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Sample records for acid aa protein

  1. Sex in Drosophila mauritiana: a very high level of amino acid polymorphism in a male reproductive protein gene, Acp26Aa.

    PubMed

    Tsaur, S C; Ting, C T; Wu, C I

    2001-01-01

    Many genes pertaining to male reproductive functions have been shown to evolve rapidly between species, and evidence increasingly suggest the influence of positive Darwinian selection. The accessory gland protein gene (Acp26Aa) of Drosophila is one such example. In order to understand the mechanism of selection, it is often helpful to examine the pattern of polymorphism. We report here that the level of amino acid polymorphism in the N-terminal quarter of Acp26Aa is high in Drosophila melanogaster and is unprecedented in its sibling species Drosophila mauritiana. We postulate that (1) this N-terminal segment may play a role in sperm competition, and (2) D. mauritiana may have been under much more intense sexual selection than other species. Both postulates have important ramifications and deserve to be tested rigorously.

  2. Activity of vegetative insecticidal proteins Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 of Bacillus thuringiensis against lepidopteran pests.

    PubMed

    Baranek, Jakub; Kaznowski, Adam; Konecka, Edyta; Naimov, Samir

    2015-09-01

    Vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vips) secreted by some isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis show activity against insects and are regarded as insecticides against pests. A number of B. thuringiensis strains harbouring vip3A genes were isolated from different sources and identified by using a PCR based approach. The isolates with the highest insecticidal activity were indicated in screening tests, and their vip genes were cloned and sequenced. The analysis revealed two polymorphic Vip protein forms, which were classified as Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59. After expression of the vip genes, the proteins were isolated and characterized. The activity of both toxins was estimated against economically important lepidopteran pests of woodlands (Dendrolimus pini), orchards (Cydia pomonella) and field crops (Spodoptera exigua). Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 were highly toxic and their potency surpassed those of many Cry proteins used in commercial bioinsecticides. Vip3Aa59 revealed similar larvicidal activity as Vip3Aa58 against S. exigua and C. pomonella. Despite 98% similarity of amino acid sequences of both proteins, Vip3Aa59 was significantly more active against D. pini. Additionally the effect of proteolytic activation of Vip58Aa and Vip3Aa59 on toxicity of D. pini and S. exigua was studied. Both Vip3Aa proteins did not show any activity against Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera) larvae. The results suggest that the Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 toxins might be useful for controlling populations of insect pests of crops and forests. PMID:26146224

  3. Polyacrylic acid brushes grafted from P(St-AA)/Fe3O4 composite microspheres via ARGET-ATRP in aqueous solution for protein immobilization.

    PubMed

    Xie, Liqin; Lan, Fang; Li, Wenliao; Liu, Ziyao; Ma, Shaohua; Yang, Qi; Wu, Yao; Gu, Zhongwei

    2014-11-01

    Recently, the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of acrylic monomers in many reaction systems has been successfully accomplished. However, its application in aqueous solution is still a challenging task. In this work, polyacrylic acid (PAA) brushes with tunable length were directly grafted from P(St-AA)/Fe3O4 composite microspheres in aqueous solution via an improved method, activators regenerated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET-ATRP). This reaction was carried out in environment-friendly solvent. As well, this method overcame the sensitivity of the catalyst. Due to the strong coordination interaction of carboxyl groups, PAA brushes were employed for immobilizing gold nanoparticles, which were prepared via the in situ reduction of chloroauric acid. The PAA brushes modified magnetic composite microspheres decorating with gold nanoparticles were efficient for specific immobilization and separation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) from aqueous solution under the external magnetic field.

  4. Ascorbic acid (AA) metabolism in protection against radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, R.C.; Koch, M.J.

    1986-03-05

    The possibility is considered that AA protects tissues against radiation damage by scavenging free radicals that result from radiolysis of water. A physiologic buffer (pH 6.7) was incubated with /sup 14/C-AA and 1 mM thiourea (to slow spontaneous oxidation of AA). Aliquots were assayed by HPLC and scintillation spectrometry to identify the /sup 14/C-label. Samples exposed to Cobalt-60 radiation had a half time of AA decay of < 3 minutes compared with nonirradiated samples (t/sub 1/2/ > 30 minutes) indicating that AA scavenges radiation-induced free radicals and forms the ascorbate free radical (AFR). Pairs of /sup 14/C-AFR disproportionate, with the net effect of /sup 14/C-dehydroascorbic acid formation from /sup 14/C-AA. Having established that AFR result from ionizing radiation in an aqueous solution, the possibility was evaluated that a tissue factor reduces AFR. Cortical tissue from the kidneys of male rats was minced, homogenized in buffer and centrifuged at 8000 xg. The supernatant was found to slow the rate of radiation-induced AA degradation by > 90% when incubated at 23/sup 0/C in the presence of 15 ..mu..M /sup 14/C-AA. Samples of supernatant maintained at 100/sup 0/C for 10 minutes or precipitated with 5% PCA did not prevent radiation-induced AA degradation. AA may have a specific role in scavenging free radicals generated by ionizing radiation and thereby protect body tissues.

  5. Insulin and amino acids stimulate whole body protein synthesis in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin and amino acids (AA) stimulate muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs. To determine the effects of insulin and AA on whole body protein turnover, hyperinsulinemic (0 and 100 ng/(kg[0.66]/min))-euglycemic-AA clamps were performed during euaminoacidemia or hyperaminoacidemia in fasted 7-d-...

  6. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27073325

  7. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27073325

  8. Amino acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    van Goudoever, Johannes B; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R D

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional requirements are not met, resulting in a postnatal growth restriction. However, current knowledge on adequate levels of both amino acid as well as protein intake can avoid under nutrition in the direct postnatal phase, avoid the need for subsequent catch-up growth and improve later outcome.

  9. Bardoxolone methyl (BARD) ameliorates aristolochic acid (AA)-induced acute kidney injury through Nrf2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Liu, Xinhui; Fan, Jinjin; Chen, Wenfang; Wang, Juan; Zeng, Youjia; Feng, Xiaorang; Yu, Xueqing; Yang, Xiao

    2014-04-01

    Bardoxolone methyl (BARD) is an antioxidant modulator that acts through induction of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway. This study aimed to investigate the role of BARD in protecting kidneys from aristolochic acid (AA)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Male C57BL/6 mice received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of aristolochic acid I (AAI) (5mg/kg/day) for 5 days to produce acute AA nephropathy (AAN) model. BARD (10mg/kg/day, i.p.) was applied for 7 consecutive days, starting 2 days prior to AAI administration. The mice in the AA group showed AKI as evidenced by worsening kidney function evaluated by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (SCr) levels, and severe tubulointerstitial injury marked by massive tubule necrosis in kidney tissues. BARD significantly reduced BUN and SCr levels which were elevated by AAI. Additionally, AAI-induced histopathological renal damage was ameliorated by BARD. Furthermore, the expression of Nrf2 was reduced, and its repressor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) was increased significantly, whereas heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was upregulated and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) was barely increased in the cytoplasm of tubules in kidneys after treatment with AAI. BARD significantly upregulated renal Nrf2, NQO1 and HO-1 expression and downregulated Keap1 expression compared with those in the AA group. Moreover, it was found that Nrf2 was expressed both in the cytoplasm and nuclear of glomeruli and tubules, whereas NQO1 and HO-1 were localized in the cytoplasm of tubules only. In conclusion, AA-induced acute renal injury was associated with impaired Nrf2 activation and expression of its downstream target genes in renal tissues. BARD prevented renal damage induced by AAI, and this renoprotective effect may be exerted by activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway and increasing expression of the downstream target genes.

  10. Residue-specific force field based on the protein coil library. RSFF1: modification of OPLS-AA/L.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fan; Zhou, Chen-Yang; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2014-06-26

    Traditional protein force fields use one set of parameters for most of the 20 amino acids (AAs), allowing transferability of the parameters. However, a significant shortcoming is the difficulty to fit the Ramachandran plots of all AA residues simultaneously, affecting the accuracy of the force field. In this Feature Article, we report a new strategy for protein force field parametrization. Backbone and side-chain conformational distributions of all 20 AA residues obtained from protein coil library were used as the target data. The dihedral angle (torsion) potentials and some local nonbonded (1-4/1-5/1-6) interactions in OPLS-AA/L force field were modified such that the target data can be excellently reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations of dipeptides (blocked AAs) in explicit water, resulting in a new force field with AA-specific parameters, RSFF1. An efficient free energy decomposition approach was developed to separate the corrections on ϕ and ψ from the two-dimensional Ramachandran plots. RSFF1 is shown to reproduce the experimental NMR (3)J-coupling constants of AA dipeptides better than other force fields. It has a good balance between α-helical and β-sheet secondary structures. It can successfully fold a set of α-helix proteins (Trp-cage and Homeodomain) and β-hairpins (Trpzip-2, GB1 hairpin), which cannot be consistently stabilized by other state-of-the-art force fields. Interestingly, the RSFF1 force field systematically overestimates the melting temperature (and the stability of native state) of these peptides/proteins. It has a potential application in the simulation of protein folding and protein structure refinement. PMID:24815738

  11. Residue-specific force field based on the protein coil library. RSFF1: modification of OPLS-AA/L.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fan; Zhou, Chen-Yang; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2014-06-26

    Traditional protein force fields use one set of parameters for most of the 20 amino acids (AAs), allowing transferability of the parameters. However, a significant shortcoming is the difficulty to fit the Ramachandran plots of all AA residues simultaneously, affecting the accuracy of the force field. In this Feature Article, we report a new strategy for protein force field parametrization. Backbone and side-chain conformational distributions of all 20 AA residues obtained from protein coil library were used as the target data. The dihedral angle (torsion) potentials and some local nonbonded (1-4/1-5/1-6) interactions in OPLS-AA/L force field were modified such that the target data can be excellently reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations of dipeptides (blocked AAs) in explicit water, resulting in a new force field with AA-specific parameters, RSFF1. An efficient free energy decomposition approach was developed to separate the corrections on ϕ and ψ from the two-dimensional Ramachandran plots. RSFF1 is shown to reproduce the experimental NMR (3)J-coupling constants of AA dipeptides better than other force fields. It has a good balance between α-helical and β-sheet secondary structures. It can successfully fold a set of α-helix proteins (Trp-cage and Homeodomain) and β-hairpins (Trpzip-2, GB1 hairpin), which cannot be consistently stabilized by other state-of-the-art force fields. Interestingly, the RSFF1 force field systematically overestimates the melting temperature (and the stability of native state) of these peptides/proteins. It has a potential application in the simulation of protein folding and protein structure refinement.

  12. Localization of the adenovirus E1Aa protein, a positive-acting transcriptional factor, in infected cells infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, L T; Nevins, J R

    1983-01-01

    The function of the adenovirus E1Aa protein (the product of the 13S E1A mRNA) during a productive viral infection is to activate transcription of the six early viral transcription units. To study the mechanism of action of this protein, a peptide which was 13 amino acids long and had a sequence unique to the protein product of the adenovirus 13S E1A mRNA (pE1Aa) was coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and used to raise an antibody in rabbits. The resulting antiserum was specific to this protein and did not react with the protein product of the 12S E1A mRNA, which shares considerable sequence with the E1Aa protein. This antiserum was used to probe for the E1Aa protein in situ by indirect immunofluorescence and in extracts of infected HeLa cells. We found that the protein was associated with large cellular structures both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm. The nuclear form of the protein was analyzed further and was found to purify with the nuclear matrix. Images PMID:6346057

  13. Ascorbic acid-containing whey protein film coatings for control of oxidation.

    PubMed

    Min, Seacheol; Krochta, John M

    2007-04-18

    A formulation for the whey protein isolate film or coating incorporating ascorbic acid (AA-WPI film or coating) was developed. Tensile and oxygen-barrier properties of the AA-WPI film were measured. Antioxidant effects of the AA-WPI coating on roasted peanuts were studied by comparing the values of peroxide (PO), thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), and free-radical-scavenging activity, determined with noncoated peanuts and peanuts coated with WPI with and without ascorbic acid during storage at 21% relative humidity (RH) and 23, 35, and 50 degrees C. The incorporation of AA reduced elongation of WPI films. The oxygen-barrier property of the WPI film was significantly improved by incorporation of AA. The AA-WPI coating retarded lipid oxidation in peanuts significantly at 23, 35, and 50 degrees C. The AA-WPI coated peanuts were more red than noncoated peanuts at all storage temperatures.

  14. Intrauterine, postpartum and adult relationships between arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Remko S; Luxwolda, Martine F; Janneke Dijck-Brouwer, D A; Muskiet, Frits A J

    2011-11-01

    Erythrocyte (RBC) fatty acid compositions from populations with stable dietary habits but large variations in RBC-arachidonic (AA) and RBC-docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) provided us with insight into relationships between DHA and AA. It also enabled us to estimate the maternal RBC-DHA (mRBC-DHA) status that corresponded with no decrease in mRBC-DHA during pregnancy, or in infant (i) RBC-DHA or mRBC-DHA during the first 3 months postpartum (DHA-equilibrium) while exclusively breastfeeding. At delivery, iRBC-AA is uniformly high and independent of mRBC-AA. Infants born to mothers with low RBC-DHA exhibit higher, but infants born to mothers with high RBC-DHA exhibit lower RBC-DHA than their mothers. This switch from 'biomagnification' into 'bioattenuation' occurs at 6g% mRBC-DHA. At 6g%, mRBC-DHA is stable throughout pregnancy, corresponds with postpartum infant DHA-equilibrium of 6 and 0.4g% DHA in mature milk, but results in postpartum depletion of mRBC-DHA to 5g%. Postpartum maternal DHA-equilibrium is reached at 8g% mRBC-DHA, corresponding with 1g% DHA in mature milk and 7g% iRBC-DHA at delivery that increases to 8g% during lactation. This 8g% RBC-DHA concurs with the lowest risks of cardiovascular and psychiatric diseases in adults. RBC-data from 1866 infants, males and (non-)pregnant females indicated AA vs. DHA synergism at low RBC-DHA, but antagonism at high RBC-DHA. These data, together with high intakes of AA and DHA from our Paleolithic diet, suggest that bioattenuation of DHA during pregnancy and postnatal antagonism between AA and DHA are the physiological standard for humans across the life cycle. PMID:21561751

  15. GLUE-IT and PEDEL-AA: new programmes for analyzing protein diversity in randomized libraries.

    PubMed

    Firth, Andrew E; Patrick, Wayne M

    2008-07-01

    There are many methods for introducing random mutations into nucleic acid sequences. Previously, we described a suite of programmes for estimating the completeness and diversity of randomized DNA libraries generated by a number of these protocols. Our programmes suggested some empirical guidelines for library design; however, no information was provided regarding library diversity at the protein (rather than DNA) level. We have now updated our web server, enabling analysis of translated libraries constructed by site-saturation mutagenesis and error-prone PCR (epPCR). We introduce GLUE-Including Translation (GLUE-IT), which finds the expected amino acid completeness of libraries in which up to six codons have been independently varied (according to any user-specified randomization scheme). We provide two tools for assisting with experimental design: CodonCalculator, for assessing amino acids corresponding to given randomized codons; and AA-Calculator, for finding degenerate codons that encode user-specified sets of amino acids. We also present PEDEL-AA, which calculates amino acid statistics for libraries generated by epPCR. Input includes the parent sequence, overall mutation rate, library size, indel rates and a nucleotide mutation matrix. Output includes amino acid completeness and diversity statistics, and the number and length distribution of sequences truncated by premature termination codons. The web interfaces are available at http://guinevere.otago.ac.nz/stats.html.

  16. Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Protein Cry6Aa Triggers Caenorhabditis elegans Necrosis Pathway Mediated by Aspartic Protease (ASP-1)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengjuan; Peng, Donghai; Cheng, Chunsheng; Zhou, Wei; Ju, Shouyong; Wan, Danfeng; Yu, Ziquan; Shi, Jianwei; Deng, Yaoyao; Wang, Fenshan; Ye, Xiaobo; Hu, Zhenfei; Lin, Jian; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cell death plays an important role in host-pathogen interactions. Crystal proteins (toxins) are essential components of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) biological pesticides because of their specific toxicity against insects and nematodes. However, the mode of action by which crystal toxins to induce cell death is not completely understood. Here we show that crystal toxin triggers cell death by necrosis signaling pathway using crystal toxin Cry6Aa-Caenorhabditis elegans toxin-host interaction system, which involves an increase in concentrations of cytoplasmic calcium, lysosomal lyses, uptake of propidium iodide, and burst of death fluorescence. We find that a deficiency in the necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Cry6Aa toxin. Intriguingly, the necrosis pathway is specifically triggered by Cry6Aa, not by Cry5Ba, whose amino acid sequence is different from that of Cry6Aa. Furthermore, Cry6Aa-induced necrosis pathway requires aspartic protease (ASP-1). In addition, ASP-1 protects Cry6Aa from over-degradation in C. elegans. This is the first demonstration that deficiency in necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Bt crystal protein, and that Cry6A triggers necrosis represents a newly added necrosis paradigm in the C. elegans. Understanding this model could lead to new strategies for nematode control. PMID:26795495

  17. Biotransformation of arachidonic acid (AA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) into lipoxins and lipoxenes by porcine leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.Y.K.; Spur, B.; Hirai, A.; Yoshida, S.; Tamura, Y.; Lam, B.K.

    1986-03-05

    Lipoxins and lipoxenes have been reported to be formed after incubation of 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid and 15-hydroperoxyeicosapentaenoic acid with human leukocytes and porcine leukocytes, respectively. The authors examined the ability of porcine leukocytes to metabolize (/sup 14/C)-AA and (/sup 14/C)-EPA (100 ..mu..M) to lipoxins and lipoxenes. Incubation products were separated by RP-HPLC and identified by U.V. spectrum and GC/MS. Porcine leukocytes metabolized both AA and EPA to form lipoxins and lipoxenes in addition to mono- and di-hydroxyl fatty acids. Quantitative analysis from U.V. absorbance after RP-HPLC revealed that about 0.05% of AA was converted to lipoxins A and B and 0.1% of EPA was converted to lipoxenes A and B. In addition, treatment of leukotriene A/sub 4/ and leukotriene A/sub 5/ with 15-lipoxygenase also gave rise to several isomers of lipoxin and lipoxene. Thus, lipoxins and lipoxenes would have been derived from AA and EPA after dioxygenation by 5-lipoxygenase and 15-lipoxygenase, respectively. When tested for biological activity, lipoxene A (2 ..mu..M), like lipoxin A, induced superoxide anion generation in canine neutrophils but had no effect on lysosomal enzyme release on neutrophil aggregation.

  18. Serum amyloid A and protein AA: molecular mechanisms of a transmissible amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Westermark, Gunilla T; Westermark, Per

    2009-08-20

    Systemic AA-amyloidosis is a complication of chronic inflammatory diseases and the fibril protein AA derives from the acute phase reactant serum AA. AA-amyloidosis can be induced in mice by an inflammatory challenge. The lag phase before amyloid develops can be dramatically shortened by administration of a small amount of amyloid fibrils. Systemic AA-amyloidosis is transmissible in mice and may be so in humans. Since transmission can cross species barriers it is possible that AA-amyloidosis can be induced by amyloid in food, e.g. foie gras. In mice, development of AA-amyloidosis can also be accelerated by other components with amyloid-like properties. A new possible risk factor may appear with synthetically made fibrils from short peptides, constructed for tissue repair.

  19. Renal liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) attenuates acute kidney injury in aristolochic acid nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Katsuomi; Kamijo-Ikemorif, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Yasuda, Takashi; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2011-03-01

    Injection of aristolochic acid (AA) in mice causes AA-induced nephrotoxicity, in which oxidative stress contributes to development of tubulointerstitial damage (TID). Liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is expressed in human proximal tubules and has an endogenous antioxidative function. The renoprotection of renal L-FABP was examined in a model of AA-induced nephrotoxicity. Established human L-FABP (hL-FABP) transgenic (Tg) mice and wild-type (WT) mice were treated with AA for up to 5 days. Mice were sacrificed on days 1, 3, and 5 after the start of AA injection. Although mouse L-FABP was not expressed in proximal tubules of WT mice, hL-FABP was expressed in proximal tubules of Tg mice. The expression of renal hL-FABP was significantly increased in Tg mice administered AA (Tg-AA), compared with the control (saline-treated Tg mice). In WT-AA mice, there was high urinary excretion of N(ε)-(hexanoyl)-lysine, the production of heme oxygenase-1 and receptor for advanced glycation end products increased, and TID was provoked. In contrast, renal hL-FABP in Tg-AA mice suppressed production of N(ε)-(hexanoyl)lysine, heme oxygenase-1, and receptor for advanced glycation end products. Renal dysfunction was significantly milder in Tg-AA mice than in WT-AA mice. The degree of TID was significantly attenuated in Tg-AA mice, compared with WT-AA. In conclusion, renal hL-FABP reduced the oxidative stress in AA-induced nephrotoxicity and attenuated TID.

  20. Mass Spectrometric and Spectrofluorometric Studies of the Interaction of Aristolochic Acids with Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiwei; Hu, Qin; Chan, Wan

    2015-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent carcinogen and nephrotoxin and is associated with the development of “Chinese herb nephropathy” and Balkan endemic nephropathy. Despite decades of research, the specific mechanism of the observed nephrotoxicity has remained elusive and the potential effects on proteins due to the observed toxicity of AA are not well-understood. To better understand the pharmacotoxicological features of AA, we investigated the non-covalent interactions of AA with proteins. The protein-binding properties of AA with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme were characterized using spectrofluorometric and mass spectrometric (MS) techniques. Moreover, the protein-AA complexes were clearly identified by high-resolution MS analyses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence of non-covalently bound protein-AA complexes. An analysis of the spectrofluorometric data by a modified Stern−Volmer plot model also revealed that both aristolochic acid I (AAI) and aristolochic acid II (AAII) were bound to BSA and lysozyme in 1:1 stoichiometries. A significantly stronger protein binding property was observed in AAII than in AAI as evidenced by the spectrofluorometric and MS analyses, which may explain the observed higher mutagenicity of AAII. PMID:26471474

  1. Mass Spectrometric and Spectrofluorometric Studies of the Interaction of Aristolochic Acids with Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiwei; Hu, Qin; Chan, Wan

    2015-10-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent carcinogen and nephrotoxin and is associated with the development of “Chinese herb nephropathy” and Balkan endemic nephropathy. Despite decades of research, the specific mechanism of the observed nephrotoxicity has remained elusive and the potential effects on proteins due to the observed toxicity of AA are not well-understood. To better understand the pharmacotoxicological features of AA, we investigated the non-covalent interactions of AA with proteins. The protein-binding properties of AA with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme were characterized using spectrofluorometric and mass spectrometric (MS) techniques. Moreover, the protein-AA complexes were clearly identified by high-resolution MS analyses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence of non-covalently bound protein-AA complexes. An analysis of the spectrofluorometric data by a modified Stern-Volmer plot model also revealed that both aristolochic acid I (AAI) and aristolochic acid II (AAII) were bound to BSA and lysozyme in 1:1 stoichiometries. A significantly stronger protein binding property was observed in AAII than in AAI as evidenced by the spectrofluorometric and MS analyses, which may explain the observed higher mutagenicity of AAII.

  2. Molecular cloning and promoter analysis of the specific salicylic acid biosynthetic pathway gene phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (AaPAL1) from Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Fu, Xueqing; Hao, Xiaolong; Zhang, Lida; Wang, Luyao; Qian, Hongmei; Zhao, Jingya

    2016-07-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of salicylic acid (SA). In this study, a full-length cDNA of PAL gene (named as AaPAL1) was cloned from Artemisia annua. The gene contains an open reading frame of 2,151 bps encoding 716 amino acids. Comparative and bioinformatics analysis revealed that the polypeptide protein of AaPAL1 was highly homologous to PALs from other plant species. Southern blot analysis revealed that it belonged to a gene family with three members. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of various tissues of A. annua showed that AaPAL1 transcript levels were highest in the young leaves. A 1160-bp promoter region was also isolated resulting in identification of distinct cis-regulatory elements including W-box, TGACG-motif, and TC-rich repeats. Quantitative RT-PCR indicated that AaPAL1 was upregulated by salinity, drought, wounding, and SA stresses, which were corroborated positively with the identified cis-elements within the promoter region. AaPAL1 was successfully expressed in Escherichia. coli and the enzyme activity of the purified AaPAL1 was approximately 287.2 U/mg. These results substantiated the involvement of AaPAL1 in the phenylalanine pathway. PMID:26040426

  3. Protein Restriction with Amino Acid-Balanced Diets Shrinks Circulating Pool Size of Amino Acid by Decreasing Expression of Specific Transporters in the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Wen Juan; Jiao, Ning; Li, De Fa; Yin, Jing Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction is not only beneficial to health and longevity in humans, but also protects against air pollution and minimizes feeding cost in livestock production. However, its impact on amino acid (AA) absorption and metabolism is not quite understood. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the effect of protein restriction on nitrogen balance, circulating AA pool size, and AA absorption using a pig model. In Exp.1, 72 gilts weighting 29.9 ± 1.5 kg were allocated to 1 of the 3 diets containing 14, 16, or 18% CP for a 28-d trial. Growth (n = 24), nitrogen balance (n = 6), and the expression of small intestinal AA and peptide transporters (n = 6) were evaluated. In Exp.2, 12 barrows weighting 22.7 ± 1.3 kg were surgically fitted with catheters in the portal and jejunal veins as well as the carotid artery and assigned to a diet containing 14 or 18% CP. A series of blood samples were collected before and after feeding for determining the pool size of circulating AA and AA absorption in the portal vein, respectively. Protein restriction did not sacrifice body weight gain and protein retention, since nitrogen digestibility was increased as dietary protein content reduced. However, the pool size of circulating AA except for lysine and threonine, and most AA flux through the portal vein were reduced in pigs fed the low protein diet. Meanwhile, the expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT-1) was stimulated, but the expression of the neutral and cationic AA transporter systems was depressed. These results evidenced that protein restriction with essential AA-balanced diets, decreased AA absorption and reduced circulating AA pool size. Increased expression of small intestinal peptide transporter PepT-1 could not compensate for the depressed expression of jejunal AA transporters for AA absorption. PMID:27611307

  4. Protein Restriction with Amino Acid-Balanced Diets Shrinks Circulating Pool Size of Amino Acid by Decreasing Expression of Specific Transporters in the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kai; Qin, Chun Fu; Luo, Min; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Wen Juan; Jiao, Ning; Li, De Fa; Yin, Jing Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction is not only beneficial to health and longevity in humans, but also protects against air pollution and minimizes feeding cost in livestock production. However, its impact on amino acid (AA) absorption and metabolism is not quite understood. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the effect of protein restriction on nitrogen balance, circulating AA pool size, and AA absorption using a pig model. In Exp.1, 72 gilts weighting 29.9 ± 1.5 kg were allocated to 1 of the 3 diets containing 14, 16, or 18% CP for a 28-d trial. Growth (n = 24), nitrogen balance (n = 6), and the expression of small intestinal AA and peptide transporters (n = 6) were evaluated. In Exp.2, 12 barrows weighting 22.7 ± 1.3 kg were surgically fitted with catheters in the portal and jejunal veins as well as the carotid artery and assigned to a diet containing 14 or 18% CP. A series of blood samples were collected before and after feeding for determining the pool size of circulating AA and AA absorption in the portal vein, respectively. Protein restriction did not sacrifice body weight gain and protein retention, since nitrogen digestibility was increased as dietary protein content reduced. However, the pool size of circulating AA except for lysine and threonine, and most AA flux through the portal vein were reduced in pigs fed the low protein diet. Meanwhile, the expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT-1) was stimulated, but the expression of the neutral and cationic AA transporter systems was depressed. These results evidenced that protein restriction with essential AA-balanced diets, decreased AA absorption and reduced circulating AA pool size. Increased expression of small intestinal peptide transporter PepT-1 could not compensate for the depressed expression of jejunal AA transporters for AA absorption.

  5. Protein Restriction with Amino Acid-Balanced Diets Shrinks Circulating Pool Size of Amino Acid by Decreasing Expression of Specific Transporters in the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kai; Qin, Chun Fu; Luo, Min; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Wen Juan; Jiao, Ning; Li, De Fa; Yin, Jing Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction is not only beneficial to health and longevity in humans, but also protects against air pollution and minimizes feeding cost in livestock production. However, its impact on amino acid (AA) absorption and metabolism is not quite understood. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the effect of protein restriction on nitrogen balance, circulating AA pool size, and AA absorption using a pig model. In Exp.1, 72 gilts weighting 29.9 ± 1.5 kg were allocated to 1 of the 3 diets containing 14, 16, or 18% CP for a 28-d trial. Growth (n = 24), nitrogen balance (n = 6), and the expression of small intestinal AA and peptide transporters (n = 6) were evaluated. In Exp.2, 12 barrows weighting 22.7 ± 1.3 kg were surgically fitted with catheters in the portal and jejunal veins as well as the carotid artery and assigned to a diet containing 14 or 18% CP. A series of blood samples were collected before and after feeding for determining the pool size of circulating AA and AA absorption in the portal vein, respectively. Protein restriction did not sacrifice body weight gain and protein retention, since nitrogen digestibility was increased as dietary protein content reduced. However, the pool size of circulating AA except for lysine and threonine, and most AA flux through the portal vein were reduced in pigs fed the low protein diet. Meanwhile, the expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT-1) was stimulated, but the expression of the neutral and cationic AA transporter systems was depressed. These results evidenced that protein restriction with essential AA-balanced diets, decreased AA absorption and reduced circulating AA pool size. Increased expression of small intestinal peptide transporter PepT-1 could not compensate for the depressed expression of jejunal AA transporters for AA absorption. PMID:27611307

  6. Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Aa2 toxin disrupts cell membranes by forming large protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Tharad, Sudarat; Toca-Herrera, José L.; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Krittanai, Chartchai

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cyt2Aa2 showed toxicity against Dipteran insect larvae and in vitro lysis activity on several cells. It has potential applications in the biological control of insect larvae. Although pore-forming and/or detergent-like mechanisms were proposed, the mechanism underlying cytolytic activity remains unclear. Analysis of the haemolytic activity of Cyt2Aa2 with osmotic stabilizers revealed partial toxin inhibition, suggesting a distinctive mechanism from the putative pore formation model. Membrane permeability was studied using fluorescent dye entrapped in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) at various protein/lipid molar ratios. Binding of Cyt2Aa2 monomer to the lipid membrane did not disturb membrane integrity until the critical protein/lipid molar ratio was reached, when Cyt2Aa2 complexes and cytolytic activity were detected. The complexes are large aggregates that appeared as a ladder when separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. Interaction of Cyt2Aa2 with Aedes albopictus cells was investigated by confocal microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRF). The results showed that Cyt2Aa2 binds on the cell membrane at an early stage without cell membrane disruption. Protein aggregation on the cell membrane was detected later which coincided with cell swelling. Cyt2Aa2 aggregations on supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) were visualized by AFM. The AFM topographic images revealed Cyt2Aa2 aggregates on the lipid bilayer at low protein concentration and subsequently disrupts the lipid bilayer by forming a lesion as the protein concentration increased. These results supported the mechanism whereby Cyt2Aa2 binds and aggregates on the lipid membrane leading to the formation of non-specific hole and disruption of the cell membrane. PMID:27612497

  7. Hydrophilic trans-Cyclooctenylated Noncanonical Amino Acids for Fast Intracellular Protein Labeling.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Eszter; Nikić, Ivana; Varga, Balázs R; Aramburu, Iker Valle; Kang, Jun Hee; Fackler, Oliver T; Lemke, Edward A; Kele, Péter

    2016-08-17

    Introduction of bioorthogonal functionalities (e.g., trans-cyclooctene-TCO) into a protein of interest by site-specific genetic encoding of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) creates uniquely targetable platforms for fluorescent labeling schemes in combination with tetrazine-functionalized dyes. However, fluorescent labeling of an intracellular protein is usually compromised by high background, arising from the hydrophobicity of ncAAs; this is typically compensated for by hours-long washout to remove excess ncAAs from the cellular interior. To overcome these problems, we designed, synthesized, and tested new, hydrophilic TCO-ncAAs. One derivative, DOTCO-lysine was genetically incorporated into proteins with good yield. The increased hydrophilicity shortened the excess ncAA washout time from hours to minutes, thus permitting rapid labeling and subsequent fluorescence microscopy.

  8. Amino acid repletion does not decrease muscle protein catabolism during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Raj, Dominic S C; Adeniyi, Oladipo; Dominic, Elizabeth A; Boivin, Michel A; McClelland, Sandra; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H; Morgan, Nancy; Gonzales, Lawrence; Wolfe, Robert; Ferrando, Arny

    2007-06-01

    Intradialytic protein catabolism is attributed to loss of amino acids in the dialysate. We investigated the effect of amino acid infusion during hemodialysis (HD) on muscle protein turnover and amino acid transport kinetics by using stable isotopes of phenylalanine, leucine, and lysine in eight patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Subjects were studied at baseline (pre-HD), 2 h of HD without amino acid infusion (HD-O), and 2 h of HD with amino acid infusion (HD+AA). Amino acid depletion during HD-O augmented the outward transport of amino acids from muscle into the vein. Increased delivery of amino acids to the leg during HD+AA facilitated the transport of amino acids from the artery into the intracellular compartment. Increase in muscle protein breakdown was more than the increase in synthesis during HD-O (46.7 vs. 22.3%, P < 0.001). Net balance (nmol.min(-1).100 ml (-1)) was more negative during HD-O compared with pre-HD (-33.7 +/- 1.5 vs. -6.0 +/- 2.3, P < 0.001). Despite an abundant supply of amino acids, the net balance (-16.9 +/- 1.8) did not switch from net release to net uptake. HD+AA induced a proportional increase in muscle protein synthesis and catabolism. Branched chain amino acid catabolism increased significantly from baseline during HD-O and did not decrease during HD+AA. Protein synthesis efficiency, the fraction of amino acid in the intracellular pool that is utilized for muscle protein synthesis decreased from 42.1% pre-HD to 33.7 and 32.6% during HD-O and HD+AA, respectively (P < 0.01). Thus amino acid repletion during HD increased muscle protein synthesis but did not decrease muscle protein breakdown. PMID:17264222

  9. Phosphatidic acid (PA) binds PP2AA1 to regulate PP2A activity and PIN1 polar localization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong-Bo; Chu, Yu-Jia; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) exerts broad biological functions in eukaryotes through regulating downstream effectors by its product, phosphatidic acid (PA). Protein kinases and phosphatases, such as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) and Protein Phosphatase 2C (PP2C), are PA-binding proteins that execute crucial regulatory functions in both animals and plants. PA participates in many signaling pathways by modulating the enzymatic activity and/or subcellular localization of bound proteins. In this study, we demonstrated that PLD-derived PA interacts with the scaffolding A1 subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and regulates PP2A-mediated PIN1 dephosphorylation in Arabidopsis. Genetic and pharmacological studies showed that both PA and PP2A participate in the regulation of auxin distribution. In addition, both the phosphorylation status and polar localization of PIN1 protein were affected by PLD inhibitors. Exogenous PA triggered the membrane accumulation of PP2AA1 and enhanced the PP2A activity at membrane, while PLD inhibition resulted in the reduced endosomal localization and perinuclear aggregation of PP2AA1. These results demonstrate the important role of PLD-derived PA in normal PP2A-mediated PIN dephosphorylation and reveal a novel mechanism, in which PA recruits PP2AA1 to the membrane system and regulates PP2A function on membrane-targeted proteins. As PA and PP2A are conserved among eukaryotes, other organisms might use similar mechanisms to mediate multiple biological processes.

  10. Molecular Characteristic, Protein Distribution and Potential Regulation of HSP90AA1 in the Anadromous Fish Coilia nasus

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Di-An; Duan, Jin-Rong; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Min-Ying; Xu, Dong-Po; Liu, Kai; Xu, Pao

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins play essential roles in basic cellular events. Spawning migration is a complex process, with significant structural and biochemical changes taking place in the adult gonad. To date, the molecular mechanisms underlying migration reproductive biology remain undetermined. In this regard, a full length HSP90AA1 comprising 2608 nucleotides from the anadromous fish Coilia nasus was characterized, encoding 742 amino acid (aa) residues with potential phosphorylation sites. HSP90AA1 mRNA transcripts were detected in all organs, especially in the gonad. Furthermore, the greatest transcript levels were found during the developmental phase, while the lowest levels were found during the resting phase. In addition, the strongest immunolabeling positive signal was found in the primary spermatocyte and oocyte, with lower positive staining in secondary germ cells, and a weak or absent level in the mature sperm and oocyte. Interestingly, HSP90AA1 was mainly located in the cytoplasm of germ cells. These results are important for understanding the molecular mechanism of anadromous migration reproductive biology. In combination with data from other fish species, the result of this present study may facilitate further investigations on the spawning migration mechanism. PMID:26828521

  11. Ascorbic acid and BSA protein in solution and films: interaction and surface morphological structure.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Rafael R G; de Almeida, Adriele A; Godinho, Odin G C; Gorza, Filipe D S; Pedro, Graciela C; Trescher, Tarquin F; Silva, Josmary R; de Souza, Nara C

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the study of the interactions between ascorbic acid (AA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution as well as in films (BSA/AA films) prepared by the layer-by-layer technique. Regarding to solution studies, a hyperchromism (in the range of ultraviolet) was found as a function of AA concentration, which suggested the formation of aggregates from AA and BSA. Binding constant, K, determined for aggregates from BSA and AA was found to be about 10(2) M(-1), which indicated low affinity of AA with BSA. For the BSA/AA films, it was also noted that the AA adsorption process and surface morphological structures depended on AA concentration. By changing the contact time between the AA and BSA, a hypochromism was revealed, which was associated to decrease of accessibility of solvent to tryptophan due to formation of aggregates. Furthermore, different morphological structures of aggregates were observed, which were attributed to the diffusion-limited aggregation. Since most of studies of interactions of drugs and proteins are performed in solution, the analysis of these processes by using films can be very valuable because this kind of system is able to employ several techniques of investigation in solid state.

  12. Ascorbic Acid and BSA Protein in Solution and Films: Interaction and Surface Morphological Structure

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Rafael R. G.; de Almeida, Adriele A.; Godinho, Odin G. C.; Gorza, Filipe D. S.; Pedro, Graciela C.; Trescher, Tarquin F.; Silva, Josmary R.; de Souza, Nara C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the study of the interactions between ascorbic acid (AA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution as well as in films (BSA/AA films) prepared by the layer-by-layer technique. Regarding to solution studies, a hyperchromism (in the range of ultraviolet) was found as a function of AA concentration, which suggested the formation of aggregates from AA and BSA. Binding constant, K, determined for aggregates from BSA and AA was found to be about 102 M−1, which indicated low affinity of AA with BSA. For the BSA/AA films, it was also noted that the AA adsorption process and surface morphological structures depended on AA concentration. By changing the contact time between the AA and BSA, a hypochromism was revealed, which was associated to decrease of accessibility of solvent to tryptophan due to formation of aggregates. Furthermore, different morphological structures of aggregates were observed, which were attributed to the diffusion-limited aggregation. Since most of studies of interactions of drugs and proteins are performed in solution, the analysis of these processes by using films can be very valuable because this kind of system is able to employ several techniques of investigation in solid state. PMID:23984366

  13. Ascorbic acid and BSA protein in solution and films: interaction and surface morphological structure.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Rafael R G; de Almeida, Adriele A; Godinho, Odin G C; Gorza, Filipe D S; Pedro, Graciela C; Trescher, Tarquin F; Silva, Josmary R; de Souza, Nara C

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the study of the interactions between ascorbic acid (AA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution as well as in films (BSA/AA films) prepared by the layer-by-layer technique. Regarding to solution studies, a hyperchromism (in the range of ultraviolet) was found as a function of AA concentration, which suggested the formation of aggregates from AA and BSA. Binding constant, K, determined for aggregates from BSA and AA was found to be about 10(2) M(-1), which indicated low affinity of AA with BSA. For the BSA/AA films, it was also noted that the AA adsorption process and surface morphological structures depended on AA concentration. By changing the contact time between the AA and BSA, a hypochromism was revealed, which was associated to decrease of accessibility of solvent to tryptophan due to formation of aggregates. Furthermore, different morphological structures of aggregates were observed, which were attributed to the diffusion-limited aggregation. Since most of studies of interactions of drugs and proteins are performed in solution, the analysis of these processes by using films can be very valuable because this kind of system is able to employ several techniques of investigation in solid state. PMID:23984366

  14. Performance of AA5052 alloy anode in alkaline ethylene glycol electrolyte with dicarboxylic acids additives for aluminium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, DaPeng; Zhang, DaQuan; Lee, KangYong; Gao, LiXin

    2015-11-01

    Dicarboxylic acid compounds, i.e. succinic acid (SUA), adipic acid (ADA) and sebacic acid (SEA), are used as electrolyte additives in the alkaline ethylene glycol solution for AA5052 aluminium-air batteries. It shows that the addition of dicarboxylic acids lowers the hydrogen gas evolution rate of commercial AA5052 aluminium alloy anode. AA5052 aluminium alloy has wide potential window for electrochemical activity and better discharge performance in alkaline ethylene glycol solution containing dicarboxylic acid additives. ADA has the best inhibition effect for the self-corrosion of AA5052 anode among the three dicarboxylic acid additives. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) reveals that dicarboxylic acids and aluminium ions can form coordination complexes. Quantum chemical calculations shows that ADA has a smaller energy gap (ΔE, the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied orbital and the highest occupied orbital), indicating that ADA has the strongest interaction with aluminium ions.

  15. Role of Ingested Amino Acids and Protein in the Promotion of Resistance Exercise-Induced Muscle Protein Anabolism.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Paul T; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this critical review is to comprehensively assess the evidence for the molecular, physiologic, and phenotypic skeletal muscle responses to resistance exercise (RE) combined with the nutritional intervention of protein and/or amino acid (AA) ingestion in young adults. We gathered the literature regarding the translational response in human skeletal muscle to acute exposure to RE and protein/AA supplements and the literature describing the phenotypic skeletal muscle adaptation to RE and nutritional interventions. Supplementation of protein/AAs with RE exhibited clear protein dose-dependent effects on translational regulation (protein synthesis) through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, which was most apparent through increases in p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation, compared with postexercise recovery in the fasted or carbohydrate-fed state. These acute findings were critically tested via long-term exposure to RE training (RET) and protein/AA supplementation, and it was determined that a diminishing protein/AA supplement effect occurs over a prolonged exposure stimulus after exercise training. Furthermore, we found that protein/AA supplements, combined with RET, produced a positive, albeit minor, effect on the promotion of lean mass growth (when assessed in >20 participants/treatment); a negligible effect on muscle mass; and a negligible to no additional effect on strength. A potential concern we discovered was that the majority of the exercise training studies were underpowered in their ability to discern effects of protein/AA supplementation. Regardless, even when using optimal methodology and large sample sizes, it is clear that the effect size for protein/AA supplementation is low and likely limited to a subset of individuals because the individual variability is high. With regard to nutritional intakes, total protein intake per day, rather than protein timing or quality, appears to be more of a factor on

  16. Prohibitin, an essential protein for Colorado potato beetle larval viability, is relevant to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Campuzano, Camila; Martínez-Ramírez, Amparo C; Contreras, Estefanía; Rausell, Carolina; Real, M Dolores

    2013-11-01

    Bacillus thuringienesis (Bt) Cry toxins constitute the most extensively used environmentally safe biopesticide and their mode of action relies on the interaction of the toxins with membrane proteins in the midgut of susceptible insects that mediate toxicity and insect specificity. Therefore, identification of Bt Cry toxin interacting proteins in the midgut of target insects and understanding their role in toxicity is of great interest to exploit their insecticidal action. Using ligand blot, we demonstrated that Bt Cry3Aa toxin bound to a 30kDa protein in Colorado potato beetle (CPB) larval midgut membrane, identified by sequence homology as prohibitin-1 protein. Prohibitins comprise a highly conserved family of proteins implicated in important cellular processes. We obtained the complete CPB prohibitin-1 DNA coding sequence of 828pb, in silico translated into a 276-amino acid protein. The analysis at the amino acid level showed that the protein contains a prohibitin-homology domain (Band7_prohibitin, cd03401) conserved among prohibitin proteins. A striking feature of the CPB identified prohibitin-1 is the predicted presence of cadherin elements, potential binding sites for Cry toxins described in other Bt susceptible insects. We also showed that CPB prohibitin-1 protein partitioned into both, detergent soluble and insoluble membrane fractions, as well as a prohibitin-2 homologous protein, previously reported to form functional complexes with prohibitin-1 in other organisms. Prohibitin complexes act as membrane scaffolds ensuring the recruitment of membrane proteases to facilitate substrate processing. Accordingly, sequestration of prohibitin-1 by an anti-prohibitin-1 antibody impaired the Cry3Aa toxin inhibition of the proteolytic cleavage of a fluorogenic synthetic substrate of an ADAM-like metalloprotease previously reported to proteolize this toxin. In this work, we also demonstrated that prohibitin-1 RNAi silencing in CPB larvae produced deleterious effects and

  17. Prohibitin, an essential protein for Colorado potato beetle larval viability, is relevant to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Campuzano, Camila; Martínez-Ramírez, Amparo C; Contreras, Estefanía; Rausell, Carolina; Real, M Dolores

    2013-11-01

    Bacillus thuringienesis (Bt) Cry toxins constitute the most extensively used environmentally safe biopesticide and their mode of action relies on the interaction of the toxins with membrane proteins in the midgut of susceptible insects that mediate toxicity and insect specificity. Therefore, identification of Bt Cry toxin interacting proteins in the midgut of target insects and understanding their role in toxicity is of great interest to exploit their insecticidal action. Using ligand blot, we demonstrated that Bt Cry3Aa toxin bound to a 30kDa protein in Colorado potato beetle (CPB) larval midgut membrane, identified by sequence homology as prohibitin-1 protein. Prohibitins comprise a highly conserved family of proteins implicated in important cellular processes. We obtained the complete CPB prohibitin-1 DNA coding sequence of 828pb, in silico translated into a 276-amino acid protein. The analysis at the amino acid level showed that the protein contains a prohibitin-homology domain (Band7_prohibitin, cd03401) conserved among prohibitin proteins. A striking feature of the CPB identified prohibitin-1 is the predicted presence of cadherin elements, potential binding sites for Cry toxins described in other Bt susceptible insects. We also showed that CPB prohibitin-1 protein partitioned into both, detergent soluble and insoluble membrane fractions, as well as a prohibitin-2 homologous protein, previously reported to form functional complexes with prohibitin-1 in other organisms. Prohibitin complexes act as membrane scaffolds ensuring the recruitment of membrane proteases to facilitate substrate processing. Accordingly, sequestration of prohibitin-1 by an anti-prohibitin-1 antibody impaired the Cry3Aa toxin inhibition of the proteolytic cleavage of a fluorogenic synthetic substrate of an ADAM-like metalloprotease previously reported to proteolize this toxin. In this work, we also demonstrated that prohibitin-1 RNAi silencing in CPB larvae produced deleterious effects and

  18. Quantitative determination of proteins at nanogram levels by the resonance light-scattering technique with macromolecules nanoparticles of PS-AA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leyu; Chen, Hongqi; Li, Ling; Xia, Tingting; Dong, Ling; Wang, Lun

    2004-03-01

    The polystyrene-acrylic acid (PS-AA) nanoparticles have been prepared by ultrasonic polymerization, characterized by FT-IR and TEM. It is the first report on the determination of proteins with macromolecules nanoparticles of PS-AA by resonance light-scattering (RLS). At pH 6.9, the RLS of macromolecules nanoparticles of PS-AA can be enhanced by proteins. Based on this, a novel quantitative assay of proteins at the nanogram levels has been proposed. At pH 6.9, the RLS signals of PS-AA were greatly enhanced by proteins in the region of 250-700 nm characterized by the peak at 342 nm. Under optimal conditions, the linear ranges of the calibration curves were 0.02-11.0 microgml-1, 0.04-10.0 microgml-1 and 0.03-10.0 microgml-1 for gamma-globulin (gamma-IgG), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA), respectively. The detection limits were 16.0 ngml-1, 19.0 ngml-1, and 15.0 ngml-1 for gamma-IgG, BSA and HSA, respectively. The method has been applied to the analysis of total proteins in human serum samples collected from the hospital and the results were in good agreement with those reported by the hospital, which indicates that the method presented here is not only sensitive, simple, but also reliable and suitable for practical application. PMID:15036083

  19. Effect of ileum segment and protein sources on net disappearance of crude protein and amino acids in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, M; Kluth, H; Elwert, C; Rodehutscord, M

    2008-01-01

    1. This study investigated the net disappearance of crude protein (CP) and amino acids (AA) from soybean meal and rapeseed meal in different sub-sections of the ileum of hens. A basal diet was used and in another 4 diets, maize starch contained in the basal diet was replaced with soybean meal or rapeseed meal at 140 and 280 g/kg so that changes in dietary AA concentrations resulted from the oilseed meals only. 2. A total of 250 Lohmann Brown pullets were used for this experiment at 20 weeks old and given one of the 5 diets for 7 d. The section between Meckel's diverticulum and 2 cm anterior to the ileo-caecal-colonic junction was taken after slaughtering the hens and cut into three sub-sections of equal length. Digesta were taken separately from each sub-section and then frozen. Net disappearance of AA and CP for the diets and the two protein sources was calculated based on standard equations and using a multiple linear regression approach. 3. Net disappearances of CP and all AA were significantly lower in the proximal sub-section than in the central and terminal sub-sections. Also, the net disappearance of CP and all AA from rapeseed meal was significantly lower in the proximal sub-section than in the central or terminal sub-sections. For soybean meal, only the net disappearances of arginine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and phenylalanine were significantly lower in the proximal than in the terminal sub-section. No significant differences in the net disappearance of CP and AA were detected between protein sources within the central and terminal sub-sections or between the central and terminal sub-section within each protein source. Soybean meal had a significantly higher net disappearance of CP and AA (with the exception of cystine and methionine) than rapeseed meal in the proximal sub-section but these differences were not statistically significant in the central and terminal sub-sections. 4. Amino acids disappeared from the proximal region of the ileum. This

  20. Cyt1Aa Protein of Bacillus thuringiensis Is Toxic to the Cottonwood Leaf Beetle, Chrysomela scripta, and Suppresses High Levels of Resistance to Cry3Aa

    PubMed Central

    Federici, Brian A.; Bauer, Leah S.

    1998-01-01

    The insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis is due primarily to Cry and Cyt proteins. Cry proteins are typically toxic to lepidopterous, coleopterous, or dipterous insects, whereas the known toxicity of Cyt proteins is limited to dipterans. We report here that a Cyt protein, Cyt1Aa, is also highly toxic to the cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta, with a median lethal concentration of 2.5 ng/mm2 of leaf surface for second-instar larvae. Additionally, we show that Cyt1Aa suppresses resistance to Cry3Aa greater than 5,000-fold in C. scripta, a level only partially overcome by Cry1Ba due to cross-resistance. Studies of the histopathology of C. scripta larvae treated with Cyt1Aa revealed disruption and sloughing of midgut epithelial cells, indicating that its mechanism of action against C. scripta is similar to that observed in mosquito and blackfly larvae. These novel properties suggest that Cyt proteins may have an even broader spectrum of activity against insects and, owing to their different mechanism of action in comparison to Cry proteins, might be useful in managing resistance to Cry3 and possibly other Cry toxins used in microbial insecticides and transgenic plants. PMID:9797292

  1. Post-exercise whey protein hydrolysate supplementation induces a greater increase in muscle protein synthesis than its constituent amino acid content.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Koga, Jinichiro; Kanegae, Minoru; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2013-09-28

    It is well known that ingestion of a protein source is effective in stimulating muscle protein synthesis after exercise. In addition, there are numerous reports on the impact of leucine and leucine-rich whey protein on muscle protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. However, there is only limited information on the effects of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signalling. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of WPH and amino acids on muscle protein synthesis and the initiation of translation in skeletal muscle during the post-exercise phase. Male Sprague–Dawley rats swam for 2 h to depress muscle protein synthesis. Immediately after exercise, the animals were administered either carbohydrate (CHO), CHO plus an amino acid mixture (AA) or CHO plus WPH. At 1 h after exercise, the supplements containing whey-based protein (AA and WPH) caused a significant increase in the fractional rate of protein synthesis (FSR) compared with CHO. WPH also caused a significant increase in FSR compared with AA. Post-exercise ingestion of WPH caused a significant increase in the phosphorylation of mTOR levels compared with AA or CHO. In addition, WPH caused greater phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 than AA and CHO. In contrast, there was no difference in plasma amino acid levels following supplementation with either AA or WPH. These results indicate that WPH may include active components that are superior to amino acids for stimulating muscle protein synthesis and initiating translation.

  2. Proteins and acids from petroleum.

    PubMed

    Zaki, D; el-Badrawy, S

    1978-01-01

    The wax distillate fraction (boiling range 300 up to 400 degrees C) from the crude oil "El-Alameen" was found to be a good substrate for the biosynthesis of proteins and/or amino acids by bacteria under special culture conditions. The fermentation processes were accompanied by a refining effect to the oil fraction, elevating its refraction index and lowering its melting point, giving dewaxing effect to the oil fraction. PMID:735504

  3. Protein utilization and amino acid digestibility of canola meal in response to phytase in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Kong, C; Adeola, O

    2011-07-01

    The regression method was used in a 14-d broiler chicken study to determine the true ileal digestibility of amino acid (AA) and protein utilization in canola meal (CM, 388 g of CP/kg) without or with added phytase. Experimental treatments consisted of 2 factors, phytase at 2 levels (0 or 1,500 phytase units/kg) and CM at 3 levels (125, 250, or 375 g/kg). Birds received a standard starter diet from d 1 to 8 and the assay diets from d 8 to 22 posthatch. On d 8, a total of 384 birds were allocated to 6 dietary treatments in a randomized complete block design; excreta were collected from d 12 to 14 and d 19 to 21, and ileal digesta were collected on d 22 posthatch. True ileal indispensable AA digestibility of CM were derived from the regression of AA flow (mg/kg of DM intake) at the terminal ileum against the intake of AA (mg/kg of dietary DM) of birds fed diets without or with phytase. Body weight gain (BWG), protein gain, and protein intake increased linearly (P < 0.001) with increasing CM level, regardless of phytase supplementation. Effects of phytase (P < 0.05) were observed on BWG and the protein efficiency ratio from d 8 to 15, whereas effects of phytase (P < 0.05) were observed on BWG and protein gain from d 15 to 22. There was no effect of phytase on protein intake and net protein utilization from d 8 to 22. Phytase supplementation at 1,500 phytase units/kg did not affect true ileal digestibility of any AA in CM. In conclusion, the results of this study indicated that phytase supplementation improved the protein efficiency ratio of birds fed diets containing CM as the sole protein source from d 8 to 15 posthatch but did not affect the true ileal digestibility of AA in CM as determined by the regression method.

  4. Storage stability of ascorbic acid incorporated in edible whey protein films.

    PubMed

    Janjarasskul, Theeranun; Min, Sea C; Krochta, John M

    2011-12-14

    The stability of ascorbic acid (AA) incorporated in whey protein isolate (WPI) film and the related color changes during storage were studied. No significant loss of AA content was found in any films prepared from pH 2.0 casting solution stored at 30% relative humidity (RH) and 22 °C over 84 days. Total visible color difference (ΔE*(ab)) of all films slowly increased over storage time. The ΔE*(ab) values of pH 3.5 films were significantly higher than those of pH 2.0 films. The stability of AA-WPI films was found to be mainly affected by the pH of the film-forming solution and storage temperature. Oxidative degradation of AA-WPI films followed Arrhenius behavior. Reduction of the casting solution pH to below the pK(a1) (4.04 at 25 °C) of AA effectively maintained AA-WPI storage stability by greatly reducing oxidative degradation, whereas anaerobic and nonenzymatic browning were insignificant. The half-life of pH 2.0 AA-WPI film at 30% RH and 22 °C was 520 days.

  5. Hypercortisolemia alters muscle protein anabolism following ingestion of essential amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Creson, Daniel L.; Sanford, Arthur P.; Wolf, Steven E.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Ferrando, Arny A.

    2003-01-01

    Debilitating injury is accompanied by hypercortisolemia, muscle wasting, and disruption of the normal anabolic response to food. We sought to determine whether acute hypercortisolemia alters muscle protein metabolism following ingestion of a potent anabolic stimulus: essential amino acids (EAA). A 27-h infusion (80 microg. kg(-1). h(-1)) of hydrocortisone sodium succinate mimicked cortisol (C) levels accompanying severe injury (>30 microg/dl), (C + AA; n = 6). The control group (AA) received intravenous saline (n = 6). Femoral arteriovenous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained during a primed (2.0 micromol/kg) constant infusion (0.05 micromol. kg(-1). min(-1)) of l-[ring-(2)H(5)]phenylalanine before and after ingestion of 15 g of EAA. Hypercortisolemia [36.5 +/- 2.1 (C + AA) vs. 9.0 +/- 1.0 microg/dl (AA)] increased postabsorptive arterial, venous, and muscle intracellular phenylalanine concentrations. Hypercortisolemia also increased postabsorptive and post-EAA insulin concentrations. Net protein balance was blunted (40% lower) following EAA ingestion but remained positive for a greater period of time (60 vs. 180 min) in the C + AA group. Thus, although differences in protein metabolism were evident, EAA ingestion improved muscle protein anabolism during acute hypercortisolemia and may help minimize muscle loss following debilitating injury.

  6. Arachidonic acid release from rat Leydig cells: the involvement of G protein, phospholipase A2 and regulation of cAMP production.

    PubMed

    Ronco, A M; Moraga, P F; Llanos, M N

    2002-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the release of arachidonic acid (AA) from human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated Leydig cells occurs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the amount of AA released was dependent on the hormone-receptor interaction and the concentration of LH-hCG binding sites on the cell surface. The present study was conducted to evaluate the involvement of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) and G proteins in AA release from hormonally stimulated rat Leydig cells, and the possible role of this fatty acid in cAMP production. Cells were first prelabelled with [(14)C]AA to incorporate the fatty acid into cell phospholipids, and then treated in different ways to evaluate AA release. hCG (25 mIU) increased the release of AA to 180+/-12% when compared with AA released from control cells, arbitrarily set as 100%. Mepacrine and parabromophenacyl bromide (pBpB), two PLA(2) inhibitors, decreased the hormone-stimulated AA release to 85+/-9 and 70+/-24% respectively. Conversely, melittin, a PLA(2) stimulator, increased the release of AA up to 200% over control. The inhibitory effect of mepacrine on the release of AA was evident in hCG-treated Leydig cells, but not in the melittin-treated cells. To determine if the release of AA was also mediated through a G protein, cells were first permeabilized and subsequently treated with pertussis toxin or GTPgammaS, a non-hydrolyzable analog of GTP. Results demonstrate that GTPgammaS was able to induce a similar level of the release of AA as hCG. In addition, pertussis toxin completely abolished the stimulatory effect of hCG on the release of AA, indicating that a member of the G(i) family was involved in the hCG-dependent release of AA. Cells treated with PLA(2) inhibitors did not modify cAMP production, but exogenously added AA significantly reduced cAMP production from hCG-treated Leydig cells, in a manner dependent on the concentration of AA and hCG. Results presented here suggest an involvement of

  7. Amino acids, glutamine, and protein metabolism in very low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Parimi, Prabhu S; Kadrofske, Mark M; Gruca, Lourdes L; Hanson, Richard W; Kalhan, Satish C

    2005-12-01

    Glutamine has been proposed to be conditionally essential for premature infants, and the currently used parenteral nutrient mixtures do not contain glutamine. De novo glutamine synthesis (DGln) is linked to inflow of carbon into and out of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. We hypothesized that a higher supply of parenteral amino acids by increasing the influx of amino acid carbon into the TCA cycle will enhance the rate of DGln. Very low birth weight infants were randomized to receive parenteral amino acids either 1.5 g/kg/d for 20 h followed by 3.0 g/kg/d for 5 h (AA1.5) or 3.0 g/kg/d for 20 h followed by 1.5 g/kg/d for 5 h (AA3.0). A third group of babies received amino acids 1.5 g/kg/d for 20 h followed by 3.0 g/kg/d for 20 h (AA-Ext). Glutamine and protein/nitrogen kinetics were examined using [5-(15)N]glutamine, [2H5]phenylalanine, [1-(13)C,15N]leucine, and [15N2]urea tracers. An acute increase in parenteral amino acid infusion for 5 h (AA1.5) resulted in decrease in rate of appearance (Ra) of phenylalanine and urea, but had no effect on glutamine Ra. Infusion of amino acids at 3.0 g/kg/d for 20 h resulted in increase in DGln, leucine transamination, and urea synthesis, but had no effect on Ra phenylalanine (AA-Ext). These data show an acute increase in parenteral amino acid-suppressed proteolysis, however, such an effect was not seen when amino acids were infused for 20 h and resulted in an increase in glutamine synthesis.

  8. Revealing the amino acid composition of proteins within an expanded genetic code

    PubMed Central

    Aerni, Hans R.; Shifman, Mark A.; Rogulina, Svetlana; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Rinehart, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    The genetic code can be manipulated to reassign codons for the incorporation of non-standard amino acids (NSAA). Deletion of release factor 1 in Escherichia coli enhances translation of UAG (Stop) codons, yet may also extended protein synthesis at natural UAG terminated messenger RNAs. The fidelity of protein synthesis at reassigned UAG codons and the purity of the NSAA containing proteins produced require careful examination. Proteomics would be an ideal tool for these tasks, but conventional proteomic analyses cannot readily identify the extended proteins and accurately discover multiple amino acid (AA) insertions at a single UAG. To address these challenges, we created a new proteomic workflow that enabled the detection of UAG readthrough in native proteins in E. coli strains in which UAG was reassigned to encode phosphoserine. The method also enabled quantitation of NSAA and natural AA incorporation at UAG in a recombinant reporter protein. As a proof-of-principle, we measured the fidelity and purity of the phosphoserine orthogonal translation system (OTS) and used this information to improve its performance. Our results show a surprising diversity of natural AAs at reassigned stop codons. Our method can be used to improve OTSs and to quantify amino acid purity at reassigned codons in organisms with expanded genetic codes. PMID:25378305

  9. Estimation of endogenous protein and amino acid ileal losses in weaned piglets by regression analysis using diets with graded levels of casein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many studies have investigated endogenous loss of proteins and amino acids (AAs) at the ileal level in growing pigs. However, only a few studies have researched this subject in piglets. Knowledge regarding AA ileal digestibility in piglets would be helpful during the formulation of diets for weaning piglets, rather than just using coefficients obtained in growing pigs. Therefore, in this study, we sought to estimate endogenous protein and AA ileal losses in piglets. Furthermore, apparent and true ileal digestibility (AID and TID) of protein and AAs from casein were measured. Results The average flow of protein was 20.8 g/kg of dry matter intake (DMI). Basal protein loss, as estimated by regression, was 16.9 g/kg DMI. Glutamic acid, arginine, and aspartic acid (2.2, 1.4, and 1.2 g/kg DMI, respectively) were the AAs for which greater losses were seen. The AID of protein and AAs increased as the protein level in the diet increased. A higher increment in AID was observed between diets with 80 and160 g CP/kg of feed; this finding was mainly attributable to increases in glycine and arginine (46.1% and 18%, respectively). The TID of protein was 97.8, and the TID of AAs varied from 93.9 for histidine to 100.2 for phenylalanine. Conclusions The basal endogenous protein loss in piglets was 16.9 g/kg DMI. Endogenous protein was rich in glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and arginine, which represented 32.7% of endogenous protein loss in weaning piglets. The TID of casein was high and varied from 93.0 for histidine to 100.2 for phenylalanine. PMID:24053636

  10. An experimental and theoretical study of the amino acid side chain Raman bands in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöberg, Béatrice; Foley, Sarah; Cardey, Bruno; Enescu, Mironel

    2014-07-01

    The Raman spectra of a series of tripeptides with the basic formula GlyAAGly where the central amino acid (AA) was tryptophan, tyrosine, phenylalanine, glycine, methionine, histidine, lysine and leucine were measured in H2O. The theoretical Raman spectra obtained using density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2pd) level of theory allows a precise attribution of the vibrational bands. The experimental results show that there is a blue shift in the frequencies of several bands of the amino acid side chains in tripeptides compared to free amino acids, especially in the case of AAs containing aromatic rings. On the other hand, a very good agreement was found between the Raman bands of AA residues in tripeptides and those measured on three model proteins: bovine serum albumin, β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme. The present analysis contributes to an unambiguous interpretation of the protein Raman spectra that is useful in monitoring the biological reactions involving AA side chains alteration.

  11. Supplementation with branched-chain amino acids to a low-protein diet regulates intestinal expression of amino acid and peptide transporters in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihai; Qiao, Shiyan; Ren, Man; Zeng, Xiangfang; Ma, Xi; Wu, Zhenlong; Thacker, Philip; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-11-01

    This study determined the effects of dietary branched-chain amino acids (AA) (BCAA) on growth performance, expression of jejunal AA and peptide transporters, and the colonic microflora of weanling piglets fed a low-protein (LP) diet. One hundred and eight Large White × Landrace × Duroc piglets (weaned at 28 days of age) were fed a normal protein diet (NP, 20.9 % crude protein), an LP diet (LP, 17.1 % crude protein), or an LP diet supplemented with BCAA (LP + BCAA, 17.9 % crude protein) for 14 days. Dietary protein restriction reduced piglet growth performance and small-intestinal villous height, which were restored by BCAA supplementation to the LP diet to values for the NP diet. Serum concentrations of BCAA were reduced in piglets fed the LP diet while those in piglets fed the LP + BCAA diet were similar to values for the NP group. mRNA levels for Na(+)-neutral AA exchanger-2, cationic AA transporter-1, b(0,+) AA transporter, and 4F2 heavy chain were more abundant in piglets fed the LP + BCAA diet than the LP diet. However, mRNA and protein levels for peptide transporter-1 were lower in piglets fed the LP + BCAA diet as compared to the LP diet. The colonic microflora did not differ among the three groups of pigs. In conclusion, growth performance, intestinal development, and intestinal expression of AA transporters in weanling piglets are enhanced by BCAA supplementation to LP diets. Our findings provide a new molecular basis for further understanding of BCAA as functional AA in animal nutrition.

  12. Protein biosynthesis with conformationally restricted amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Ellman, J.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1993-05-19

    The incorporation of conformationally constrained amino acids into peptides is a powerful approach for generating structurally defined peptides as conformational probes and bioactive agents. The ability to site-specifically introduce constrained amino acids into large polypeptide chains would provide a similar opportunity to probe the flexibility, conformation, folding and stability of proteins. To this end, we have examined the competence of the Escherichia coli protein biosynthetic machinery to incorporate a number of these unnatural amino acids into the 164 residue protein T4 lysozyme (T4L). Results clearly demonstrate that the protein biosynthetic machinery can accommodate a wide variety of conformationally constrained amino acids. The expansion of structural motifs that can be biosynthetically incorporated into proteins to include a large number of conformationally constrained amino acids significantly increases the power of mutagenesis methods as probes of protein structure and function and provides additional insights into the steric requirements of the translational machinery. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Distinguishing proteins from arbitrary amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Yau, Stephen S-T; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  14. Plasma Free Amino Acid Responses to Intraduodenal Whey Protein, and Relationships with Insulin, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Energy Intake in Lean Healthy Men.

    PubMed

    Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D; Hutchison, Amy T; Soenen, Stijn; Steinert, Robert E; Clifton, Peter M; Horowitz, Michael; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2016-01-04

    This study determined the effects of increasing loads of intraduodenal (ID) dairy protein on plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations, and their relationships with serum insulin, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and energy intake. Sixteen healthy men had concentrations of AAs, GLP-1 and insulin measured in response to 60-min ID infusions of hydrolysed whey protein administered, in double-blinded and randomised order, at 2.1 (P2.1), 6.3 (P6.3) or 12.5 (P12.5) kJ/min (encompassing the range of nutrient emptying from the stomach), or saline control (C). Energy intake was quantified immediately afterwards. Compared with C, the concentrations of 19/20 AAs, the exception being cysteine, were increased, and this was dependent on the protein load. The relationship between AA concentrations in the infusions and the area under the curve from 0 to 60 min (AUC0-60 min) of each AA profile was strong for essential AAs (R² range, 0.61-0.67), but more variable for non-essential (0.02-0.54) and conditional (0.006-0.64) AAs. The AUC0-60 min for each AA was correlated directly with the AUC0-60 min of insulin (R² range 0.3-0.6), GLP-1 (0.2-0.6) and energy intake (0.09-0.3) (p < 0.05, for all), with the strongest correlations being for branched-chain AAs, lysine, methionine and tyrosine. These findings indicate that ID whey protein infused at loads encompassing the normal range of gastric emptying increases plasma concentrations of 19/20 AAs in a load-dependent manner, and provide novel information on the close relationships between the essential AAs, leucine, valine, isoleucine, lysine, methionine, and the conditionally-essential AA, tyrosine, with energy intake, insulin and GLP-1.

  15. Stability of 100 homo and heterotypic coiled-coil a-a' pairs for ten amino acids (A, L, I, V, N, K, S, T, E, and R).

    PubMed

    Acharya, Asha; Rishi, Vikas; Vinson, Charles

    2006-09-26

    We present the thermal stability monitored by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at 222 nm of 100 heterodimers that contain all possible coiled-coil a-a' pairs for 10 amino acids (I, V, L, N, A, K S, T, E, and R). This includes the stability of 36 heterodimers for 6 amino acids (I, V, L, N, A, and K) previously described and 64 new heterodimers including the 4 amino acids (S, T, E, and R). We have calculated a double mutant alanine thermodynamic cycle to determine a-a' pair coupling energies to evaluate which a-a' pairs encourage specific dimerization partners. The four new homotypic a-a' pairs (T-T, S-S, R-R, E-E) are repulsive relative to A-A and have destabilizing coupling energies. Among the 90 heterotypic a-a' pairs, the stabilizing coupling energies contain lysine or arginine paired with either an aliphatic or a polar amino acid. The range in coupling energies for each amino acid reveals its potential to regulate dimerization specificity. The a-a' pairs containing isoleucine and asparagine have the greatest range in coupling energies and thus contribute dramatically to dimerization specificity, which is to encourage homodimerization. In contrast, the a-a' pairs containing charged amino acids (K, R, and E) show the least range in coupling energies and promiscuously encourage heterodimerization.

  16. Rumen Degradability and Post-ruminal Digestion of Dry Matter, Nitrogen and Amino Acids of Three Protein Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Aodong; Zhang, Bowen; Kong, Ping; Liu, Chenli; Zhao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the in situ ruminal degradability, and subsequent small intestinal digestibility (SID) of dry matter, crude protein (CP), and amino acids (AA) of cottonseed meal (CSM), sunflower seed meal (SFSM) and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) by using the modified three-step in vitro procedure. The ruminal degradability and subsequent SID of AA in rumen-undegradable protein (RUP-AA) varied among three protein supplements. The result show that the effective degradability of DM for SFSM, CSM, and DDGS was 60.8%, 56.4%, and 41.0% and their ruminal fermentable organic matter was 60.0%, 55.9%, and 39.9%, respectively. The ruminal degradable protein (RDP) content in CP for SFSM, CSM, and DDGS was 68.3%, 39.0%, and 32.9%, respectively, at the ruminal solid passage rate of 1.84%/h. The SFSM is a good source of RDP for rumen micro-organisms; however, the SID of RUP of SFSM was lower. The DDGS and CSM are good sources of RUP for lambs to digest in the small intestine to complement ruminal microbial AA of growing lambs. Individual RUP-AA from each protein source was selectively removed by the rumen micro-organisms, especially for Trp, Arg, His, and Lys (p<0.01). The SID of individual RUP-AA was different within specific RUP origin (p<0.01). Limiting amino acid was Leu for RUP of CSM and Lys for both RUP of SFSM and DDGS, respectively. Therefore, different protein supplements with specific limitations should be selected and combined carefully in growing lambs ration to optimize AA balance. PMID:25656208

  17. Tuning Surface Charge and Morphology for the Efficient Detection of Dopamine under the Interferences of Uric Acid, Ascorbic Acid, and Protein Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Hsun; Luo, Shyh-Chyang

    2015-10-01

    In this research, we aimed to evaluate the impact of the surface charges and morphologies of electrodes on electrochemically detecting dopamine (DA) in the presence of protein adsorption, uric acid (UA), and ascorbic acid (AA). Through the electropolymerization of functionalized 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophenes (EDOT) directly on Au electrodes, we successfully created PEDOT-coated electrodes with three different functional groups and nanostructures. Negatively charged carboxylic acid groups attracted DA while reducing the interferences of UA and AA due to electrostatic effect. We used charge-free tetra(ethylene glycol) and zwitterionic phosphocholine groups are used to evaluate the interference of protein adsorption on DA sensing because they both can effectively prevent the nonspecific adsorption of proteins. These two electrodes can avoid protein adsorption, yet proved ineffective for DA sensing: both tetra(ethylene glycol) and the phosphocholine groups are electroneutral and have minimal electrostatic interactions with DA. We also used three proteins of different isoelectric points - bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, and fibrinogen - to evaluate the influence of protein adsorption on DA detection. We found that for an electrode coated with carboxylic acid-functionalized PEDOT, the adsorption of positively charged lysozyme can promote the detection sensitivity of AA and UA, and that all protein adsorption lowers the sensitivity of DA. In contrast, nanostructures promote the detection sensitivity of all three molecules. All of our tested functionalized PEDOT-coated electrodes demonstrated good stability and functionality in buffers.

  18. Rumen Degradability and Small Intestinal Digestibility of the Amino Acids in Four Protein Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Jin, L.; Wen, Q. N.; Kopparapu, N. K.; Liu, J.; Liu, X. L.; Zhang, Y. G.

    2016-01-01

    The supplementation of livestock feed with animal protein is a present cause for public concern, and plant protein shortages have become increasingly prominent in China. This conflict may be resolved by fully utilizing currently available sources of plant protein. We estimated the rumen degradability and the small intestinal digestibility of the amino acids (AA) in rapeseed meal (RSM), soybean meal (SBM), sunflower seed meal (SFM) and sesame meal (SSM) using the mobile nylon bag method to determine the absorbable AA content of these protein supplements as a guide towards dietary formulations for the dairy industry. Overall, this study aimed to utilize protein supplements effectively to guide dietary formulations to increase milk yield and save plant protein resources. To this end, we studied four cows with a permanent rumen fistula and duodenal T-shape fistula in a 4×4 Latin square experimental design. The results showed that the total small intestine absorbable amino acids and small intestine absorbable essential amino acids were higher in the SBM (26.34% and 13.11% dry matter [DM], respectively) than in the SFM (13.97% and 6.89% DM, respectively). The small intestine absorbable Lys contents of the SFM, SSM, RSM and SBM were 0.86%, 0.88%, 1.43%, and 2.12% (DM basis), respectively, and the absorbable Met contents of these meals were 0.28%, 1.03%, 0.52%, and 0.47% (DM basis), respectively. Among the examined food sources, the milk protein score of the SBM (0.181) was highest followed by those of the RSM (0.136), SSM (0.108) and SFM (0.106). The absorbable amino acid contents of the protein supplements accurately reflected protein availability, which is an important indicator of the balance of feed formulation. Therefore, a database detailing the absorbable AA should be established. PMID:26732449

  19. Rumen Degradability and Small Intestinal Digestibility of the Amino Acids in Four Protein Supplements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Jin, L; Wen, Q N; Kopparapu, N K; Liu, J; Liu, X L; Zhang, Y G

    2016-02-01

    The supplementation of livestock feed with animal protein is a present cause for public concern, and plant protein shortages have become increasingly prominent in China. This conflict may be resolved by fully utilizing currently available sources of plant protein. We estimated the rumen degradability and the small intestinal digestibility of the amino acids (AA) in rapeseed meal (RSM), soybean meal (SBM), sunflower seed meal (SFM) and sesame meal (SSM) using the mobile nylon bag method to determine the absorbable AA content of these protein supplements as a guide towards dietary formulations for the dairy industry. Overall, this study aimed to utilize protein supplements effectively to guide dietary formulations to increase milk yield and save plant protein resources. To this end, we studied four cows with a permanent rumen fistula and duodenal T-shape fistula in a 4×4 Latin square experimental design. The results showed that the total small intestine absorbable amino acids and small intestine absorbable essential amino acids were higher in the SBM (26.34% and 13.11% dry matter [DM], respectively) than in the SFM (13.97% and 6.89% DM, respectively). The small intestine absorbable Lys contents of the SFM, SSM, RSM and SBM were 0.86%, 0.88%, 1.43%, and 2.12% (DM basis), respectively, and the absorbable Met contents of these meals were 0.28%, 1.03%, 0.52%, and 0.47% (DM basis), respectively. Among the examined food sources, the milk protein score of the SBM (0.181) was highest followed by those of the RSM (0.136), SSM (0.108) and SFM (0.106). The absorbable amino acid contents of the protein supplements accurately reflected protein availability, which is an important indicator of the balance of feed formulation. Therefore, a database detailing the absorbable AA should be established.

  20. A new acidic protein in porcine brain.

    PubMed

    Ishioka, N; Isobe, T; Okuyama, T; Numata, Y; Wada, H

    1980-10-21

    An extremely acidic protein has been isolated in a purified form from porcine rain extract, by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation followed by column chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50 and on Sephadex G-75. The purified protein was tentatively named as glutamic acid-rich protein because it was characterized by its remarkably high content of glutamic acid which accounted for 49% of the total amino acid composition. The protein appeared to be a single polypeptide chain with a molecular weight of 56 000-58 000, and had an isoelectric point of 4.6. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was Asp-Glu-Pro-Pro-Ser-Glu-Gly. The immunochemical analysis using rabbit antiserum prepared to the porcine protein has suggested that it is present in the brain of human, cow, cat, dog and goat as well as in various goat organs including liver, kidney, heart, small intestine and spleen.

  1. 40 CFR 174.501 - Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.501 Section 174.501 Protection... thuringiensis Vip3Aa protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa proteins in or on corn or cotton are exempt from the requirement of...

  2. 40 CFR 174.501 - Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.501 Section 174.501 Protection... thuringiensis Vip3Aa protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa proteins in or on corn or cotton are exempt from the requirement of...

  3. 40 CFR 174.501 - Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.501 Section 174.501 Protection... thuringiensis Vip3Aa protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa proteins in or on corn or cotton are exempt from the requirement of...

  4. 40 CFR 174.501 - Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.501 Section 174.501 Protection... thuringiensis Vip3Aa protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa proteins in or on corn or cotton are exempt from the requirement of...

  5. 40 CFR 174.501 - Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.501 Section 174.501 Protection... thuringiensis Vip3Aa protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa proteins in or on corn or cotton are exempt from the requirement of...

  6. Synergism and Rules of the new Combination drug Yiqijiedu Formulae (YQJD) on Ischemic Stroke based on amino acids (AAs) metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian; Chen, Chang; Chen, Jian-Xin; Wen, Li-Mei; Yang, Geng-Liang; Duan, Fei-Peng; Huang, Zhi-Ying; Li, De-Feng; Yu, Ding-Rong; Yang, Hong-Jun; Li, Shao-Jing

    2014-01-01

    The use of combination drugs is considered to be a promising strategy to control complex diseases such as ischemic stroke. The detection of metabolites has been used as a versatile tool to reveal the potential mechanism of diverse diseases. In this study, the levels of 12 endogenous AAs were simultaneously determined quantitatively in the MCAO rat brain using RRLC-QQQ method. Seven AAs were chosen as the potential biomarkers, and using PLS-DA analysis, the effects of the new combination drug YQJD, which is composed of ginsenosides, berberine, and jasminoidin, on those 7 AAs were evaluated. Four AAs, glutamic acid, homocysteine, methionine, and tryptophan, which changed significantly in the YQJD-treated groups compared to the vehicle groups (P < 0.05), were identified and designated as the AAs to use to further explore the synergism of YQJD. The result of a PCA showed that the combination of these three drugs exhibits the strongest synergistic effect compared to other combination groups and that ginsenosides might play a pivotal role, especially when combined with jasminoidin. We successfully explored the synergetic mechanism of multi-component and provided a new method for evaluating the integrated effects of combination drugs in the treatment of complex diseases. PMID:24889025

  7. Toxicity, activation process, and histopathological effect of Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3Aa16 on Tuta absoluta.

    PubMed

    Sellami, Sameh; Cherif, Maroua; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Tounsi, Slim; Jamoussi, Kaïs

    2015-02-01

    Tuta absoluta is a destructive moth of Solanaceae plants and especially tomatoes. Here, we considered the entomopathogenic activity of the Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa16 protein heterologously produced by Escherichia coli against T. absoluta. Purified Vip3Aa16 showed lower lethal concentration 50 % against third instar larvae (Toxin/tomato leaf) (335 ± 17 ng/cm(2)) compared to that of B. thuringiensis kurstaki HD1 δ-endotoxins (955 ± 4 ng/cm(2)) (P < 0.05). Action mode examination showed that Vip3Aa16 (88 kDa) was more sensitive to proteolysis activation by the chymotrypsin than the trypsin or the larvae gut soluble proteases, yielding derivative proteins essentially of about 62 and 33 kDa. The gut-soluble proteases could contain trypsin-like enzymes implicated in Vip3Aa16 activation since the proteolysis was inhibited using specific protease inhibitors. Additionally, we showed that the histopathological effect of Vip3Aa16 on T. absoluta larva midguts consisted on a microvillus damage and an epithelial cell rupture.

  8. Long-term oxandrolone treatment increases muscle protein net deposition via improving amino acid utilization in pediatric patients 6 months after burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Tuvdendorj, D.; Chinkes, DL.; Zhang, XJ.; Suman, OE.; Aarsland, A.; Ferrando, A.; Kulp, GA; Jeschke, MG.; Wolfe, RR.; Herndon, DN.

    2011-01-01

    Background We recently showed that mechanisms of protein turnover in skeletal muscle are unresponsive to amino acid (AA) infusion in severely burned pediatric patients at 6 months postinjury. In the current study, we evaluated if oxandrolone treatment affects mechanisms of protein turnover in skeletal muscle and whole-body protein breakdown in pediatric burn patients 6 months postinjury. Methods At the time of admission, patients were randomized to control or oxandrolone treatments. The treatment regimens were continued until 6 months postinjury, at which time patients (n = 26) underwent study with a stable isotope tracer infusion to measure muscle and whole-body protein turnover. Results Protein kinetics in leg muscle were expressed in nmol/min/100 ml leg volume (mean±SE). During AA infusion, rates of protein synthesis in leg muscle were increased (p < .05) in both groups (Basal vs. AA: control, 51±8 vs. 86±21; oxandrolone, 56±7 vs. 96±12). In the control group, there was also a simultaneous increase in breakdown (Basal vs. AA: 65±10 vs. 89±25), which resulted in no change in the net balance of leg muscle protein (Basal vs. AA: − 15±4 vs. − 2±10). In the oxandrolone group, protein breakdown did not change (Basal vs. AA: 80±12 vs. 77±9), leading to increased net balance (Basal vs. AA: − 24±7 vs. 19±7, p < .05). Protein breakdown at the whole-body level was not different between the groups. Conclusion Long-term oxandrolone treatment increased net deposition of leg muscle protein during AA infusion by attenuating protein breakdown, but did not affect whole-body protein breakdown. PMID:21333314

  9. Production of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against the Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3Aa16.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamadou-Charfi, Dorra; Sauer, Annette Juliane; Abdelkafi-Mesrati, Lobna; Jaoua, Samir; Stephan, Dietrich

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to establish a quantitative determination of the vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3A from the culture supernatant of Bacillus thuringiensis either by ELISA or by the conventional quantification method of the Western blot band. The Vip3A protein was produced by fermentation of the B. thuringiensis reference strain BUPM95 in 3 L. By Western blot, the Vip3Aa16 toxin was detected in the culture supernatant during the exponential growth phase of B. thuringiensis BUPM95. However, the detection of Vip3Aa16 on Western blot showed in addition to the toxin two other strips (62 and 180 kDa) recognized by the anti-Vip3Aa16 polyclonal antibodies prepared at the Centre of Biotechnology of Sfax Tunisia. For that reason and in order to develop a technique for reliable quantification of the toxin, we have considered the production of polyclonal antibodies at the Julius Kühn Institute, Germany. These antibodies were the basis for the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against the protein produced by the Vip3Aa16 recombinant strain Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). These monoclonal antibodies were tested by plate-trapped antigen (PTA) and triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TAS-ELISA). The selection of hybridoma supernatants gave us four positive clones producing monoclonal antibodies.

  10. Hepatic fatty acid biosynthesis is more responsive to protein than carbohydrate in rainbow trout during acute stimulations.

    PubMed

    Dai, Weiwei; Panserat, Stéphane; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Terrier, Frédéric; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Seiliez, Iban; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The link between dietary carbohydrate/protein and de novo lipogenesis (DNL) remains debatable in carnivorous fish. We aimed to evaluate and compare the response of hepatic lipogenic gene expression to dietary carbohydrate intake/glucose and dietary protein intake/amino acids (AAs) during acute stimulations using both in vivo and in vitro approaches. For the in vivo trial, three different diets and a controlled-feeding method were employed to supply fixed amount of dietary protein or carbohydrate in a single meal; for the in vitro trial, primary hepatocytes were stimulated with a low or high level of glucose (3 mM or 20 mM) and a low or high level of AAs (one-fold or four-fold concentrated AAs). In vitro data showed that a high level of AAs upregulated the expression of enzymes involved in DNL [fatty acid synthase (FAS) and ATP citrate lyase (ACLY)], lipid bioconversion [elongation of very long chain fatty acids like-5 (Elovl5), Elovl2, Δ6 fatty acyl desaturase (D6D) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1)], NADPH production [glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and malic enzyme (ME)], and transcriptional factor sterol regulatory element binding protein 1-like, while a high level of glucose only elevated the expression of ME. Data in trout liver also showed that high dietary protein intake induced higher lipogenic gene expression (FAS, ACLY, and Elovl2) regardless of dietary carbohydrate intake, while high carbohydrate intake markedly suppressed the expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and Elovl5. Overall, we conclude that, unlike rodents or humans, hepatic fatty acid biosynthetic gene expression in rainbow trout is more responsive to dietary protein intake/AAs than dietary carbohydrate intake/glucose during acute stimulations. This discrepancy probably represents one important physiological and metabolic difference between carnivores and omnivores. PMID:26491101

  11. Hepatic fatty acid biosynthesis is more responsive to protein than carbohydrate in rainbow trout during acute stimulations.

    PubMed

    Dai, Weiwei; Panserat, Stéphane; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Terrier, Frédéric; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Seiliez, Iban; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The link between dietary carbohydrate/protein and de novo lipogenesis (DNL) remains debatable in carnivorous fish. We aimed to evaluate and compare the response of hepatic lipogenic gene expression to dietary carbohydrate intake/glucose and dietary protein intake/amino acids (AAs) during acute stimulations using both in vivo and in vitro approaches. For the in vivo trial, three different diets and a controlled-feeding method were employed to supply fixed amount of dietary protein or carbohydrate in a single meal; for the in vitro trial, primary hepatocytes were stimulated with a low or high level of glucose (3 mM or 20 mM) and a low or high level of AAs (one-fold or four-fold concentrated AAs). In vitro data showed that a high level of AAs upregulated the expression of enzymes involved in DNL [fatty acid synthase (FAS) and ATP citrate lyase (ACLY)], lipid bioconversion [elongation of very long chain fatty acids like-5 (Elovl5), Elovl2, Δ6 fatty acyl desaturase (D6D) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1)], NADPH production [glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and malic enzyme (ME)], and transcriptional factor sterol regulatory element binding protein 1-like, while a high level of glucose only elevated the expression of ME. Data in trout liver also showed that high dietary protein intake induced higher lipogenic gene expression (FAS, ACLY, and Elovl2) regardless of dietary carbohydrate intake, while high carbohydrate intake markedly suppressed the expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and Elovl5. Overall, we conclude that, unlike rodents or humans, hepatic fatty acid biosynthetic gene expression in rainbow trout is more responsive to dietary protein intake/AAs than dietary carbohydrate intake/glucose during acute stimulations. This discrepancy probably represents one important physiological and metabolic difference between carnivores and omnivores.

  12. The expression and crystallization of Cry65Aa require two C-termini, revealing a novel evolutionary strategy of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Dong-hai; Pang, Cui-yun; Wu, Han; Huang, Qiong; Zheng, Jin-shui; Sun, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The insecticidal crystal protein (Cry) genes of Bacillus thuringiensis are a key gene resource for generating transgenic crops with pest resistance. However, many cry genes cannot be expressed or form crystals in mother cells. Here, we report a novel Cry protein gene, cry65Aa1, which exists in an operon that contains a downstream gene encoding a hypothetical protein ORF2. We demonstrated that ORF2 is required for Cry65Aa1 expression and crystallization by function as a C-terminal crystallization domain. The orf2 sequence is also required for Cry65Aa expression, because orf2 transcripts have a stabilizing effect on cry65Aa1 transcripts. Furthermore, we found that the crystallization of Cry65Aa1 required the Cry65Aa1 C-terminus in addition to ORF2 or a typical Cry protein C-terminal region. Finally, we showed that Cry65Aa1 has a selective cytotoxic effect on MDA-MB231 cancer cells. This report is the first description of a 130-kDa mass range Cry protein requiring two C-termini for crystallization. Our findings reveal a novel evolutionary strategy of Cry proteins and provide an explanation for the existence of Cry protein genes that cannot form crystals in B. thuringiensis. This study also provides a potential framework for isolating novel cry genes from “no crystal” B. thuringiensis strains. PMID:25656389

  13. BIOPOLYMERS FROM POLYLACTIC ACID AND MILK PROTEINS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is a commercially available biodegradable polymer derived from lactic acid and is used in many nonfood products as an alternative to petrochemical-derived polymers. However, its physical properties limit its use in many applications. Using dairy proteins to substitute for por...

  14. Probing protein stability with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D.; Ellman, J.A.; Zhiyuh Chang; Veenstra, D.L.; Kollman, P.A.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1992-06-26

    Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling and simulation techniques, was used to probe the effect of side chain structure on protein stability. Specific replacements at position 133 in T4 lysozyme included (1) leucine (wt), norvaline, ethylglycine, and alanine to measure the cost of stepwise removal of methyl groups from the hydrophobic core, (2) norvaline and O-methyl serine to evaluate the effects of side chain solvation, and (3) leucine, S,S-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid, and S-2-amino-3-cyclopentylpropanoic acid to measure the influence of packing density and side chain conformational entropy on protein stability. All of these factors (hydrophobicity, packing, conformational entropy, and cavity formation) significantly influence protein stability and must be considered when analyzing any structural change to proteins.

  15. Protein tyrosine phosphatases regulate arachidonic acid release, StAR induction and steroidogenesis acting on a hormone-dependent arachidonic acid-preferring acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Cano, Florencia; Poderoso, Cecilia; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Castilla, Rocío; Maloberti, Paula; Castillo, Fernanda; Neuman, Isabel; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2006-06-01

    The activation of the rate-limiting step in steroid biosynthesis, that is the transport of cholesterol into the mitochondria, is dependent on PKA-mediated events triggered by hormones like ACTH and LH. Two of such events are the protein tyrosine dephosphorylation mediated by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and the release of arachidonic acid (AA) mediated by two enzymes, ACS4 (acyl-CoA synthetase 4) and Acot2 (mitochondrial thioesterase). ACTH and LH regulate the activity of PTPs and Acot2 and promote the induction of ACS4. Here we analyzed the involvement of PTPs on the expression of ACS4. We found that two PTP inhibitors, acting through different mechanisms, are both able to abrogate the hormonal effect on ACS4 induction. PTP inhibitors also reduce the effect of cAMP on steroidogenesis and on the level of StAR protein, which facilitates the access of cholesterol into the mitochondria. Moreover, our results indicate that exogenous AA is able to overcome the inhibition produced by PTP inhibitors on StAR protein level and steroidogenesis. Then, here we describe a link between PTP activity and AA release, since ACS4 induction is under the control of PTP activity, being a key event for AA release, StAR induction and steroidogenesis.

  16. Detection of non-protein amino acids in the presence of protein amino acids. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapshak, P.; Okaji, M.

    1972-01-01

    Studies conducted with the JEOL 5AH amino acid analyzer are described. This instrument makes possible the programming of the chromatographic process. Data are presented showing the separations of seventeen non-protein amino acids in the presence of eighteen protein amino acids. It is pointed out that distinct separations could be obtained in the case of a number of chemically similar compounds, such as ornithine and lysine, N-amidino alanine and arginine, and iminodiacetic acid and S-carboxymethyl cysteine and aspartic acid.

  17. Experimental transmission of AA amyloidosis by injecting the AA amyloid protein into interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1raKO) mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Uchida, K; Chambers, J K; Tei, M; Shoji, A; Ushio, N; Nakayama, H

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of AA amyloidosis is high in humans with rheumatoid arthritis and several animal species, including cats and cattle with prolonged inflammation. AA amyloidosis can be experimentally induced in mice using severe inflammatory stimuli and a coinjection of AA amyloid; however, difficulties have been associated with transmitting AA amyloidosis to a different animal species, and this has been attributed to the "species barrier." The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1raKO) mouse, a rodent model of human rheumatoid arthritis, has been used in the transmission of AA amyloid. When IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with mouse AA amyloid together with a subcutaneous pretreatment of 2% AgNO3, all mice from both strains that were injected with crude or purified murine AA amyloid developed AA amyloidosis. However, the amyloid index, which was determined by the intensity of AA amyloid deposition, was significantly higher in IL-1raKO mice than in BALB/c mice. When IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were injected with crude or purified bovine AA amyloid together with the pretreatment, 83% (5/6 cases) and 38% (3/8 cases) of IL-1raKO mice and 17% (1/6 cases) and 0% (0/6 cases) of BALB/c mice, respectively, developed AA amyloidosis. Similarly, when IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were injected with crude or purified feline AA amyloid, 33% (2/6 cases) and 88% (7/8 cases) of IL-1raKO mice and 0% (0/6 cases) and 29% (2/6 cases) of BALB/c mice, respectively, developed AA amyloidosis. These results indicated that IL-1raKO mice are a useful animal model for investigating AA amyloidogenesis.

  18. Nucleic acids, proteins, and chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, D. A.; Profy, A. T.; Walstrum, S. A.; Needels, M. C.; Bulack, S. C.; Lo, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with experimental results related, in one case, to the chirality of nucleotides, and, in another case, to the possibility of a link between the chirality of nucleic acids, and that of peptides. It has been found that aminoacylation of the 'internal' hydroxyl group of a dinucleoside monophosphate can occur stereoselectively. However, this reaction has not yet been made a part of a working peptide synthesis scheme. The formation and cleavage of oligonucleotides is considered. In the event of the formation of a helical complex between the oligonucleotide and the polymer, 1-prime,5-prime-bonds in the oligomer are found to become more resistant towards cleavage. The conditions required for peptide bond formation are examined, taking into account the known structures of RNA and possible mechanisms for prebiotic peptide bond formation. The possibility is considered that the 2-prime,5-prime-internucleotide linkage could have played an important part in the early days of biological peptide synthesis.

  19. Role of amino acid transporters in amino acid sensing1234

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Amino acid (AA) transporters may act as sensors, as well as carriers, of tissue nutrient supplies. This review considers recent advances in our understanding of the AA-sensing functions of AA transporters in both epithelial and nonepithelial cells. These transporters mediate AA exchanges between extracellular and intracellular fluid compartments, delivering substrates to intracellular AA sensors. AA transporters on endosomal (eg, lysosomal) membranes may themselves function as intracellular AA sensors. AA transporters at the cell surface, particularly those for large neutral AAs such as leucine, interact functionally with intracellular nutrient-signaling pathways that regulate metabolism: for example, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, which promotes cell growth, and the general control non-derepressible (GCN) pathway, which is activated by AA starvation. Under some circumstances, upregulation of AA transporter expression [notably a leucine transporter, solute carrier 7A5 (SLC7A5)] is required to initiate AA-dependent activation of the mTORC1 pathway. Certain AA transporters may have dual receptor-transporter functions, operating as “transceptors” to sense extracellular (or intracellular) AA availability upstream of intracellular signaling pathways. New opportunities for nutritional therapy may include targeting of AA transporters (or mechanisms that upregulate their expression) to promote protein-anabolic signals for retention or recovery of lean tissue mass. PMID:24284439

  20. Targeted modification of storage protein content resulting in improved amino acid composition of barley grain.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Md S I; Bowra, S; Schmidt, D; Dionisio, G; Holm, P B; Vincze, E

    2016-02-01

    C-hordein in barley and ω-gliadins in wheat are members of the prolamins protein families. Prolamins are the major component of cereal storage proteins and composed of non-essential amino acids (AA) such as proline and glutamine therefore have low nutritional value. Using double stranded RNAi silencing technology directed towards C-hordein we obtained transgenic barley lines with up to 94.7% reduction in the levels of C-hordein protein relative to the parental line. The composition of the prolamin fraction of the barley parental line cv. Golden Promise was resolved using SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, the protein band were excised and the proteins identified by quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Subsequent SDS-PAGE separation and analysis of the prolamin fraction of the transgenic lines revealed a reduction in the amounts of C-hordeins and increases in the content of other hordein family members. Analysis of the AA composition of the transgenic lines showed that the level of essential amino acids increased with a concomitant reduction in proline and glutamine. Both the barley C-hordein and wheat ω-gliadin genes proved successful for RNAi-gene mediated suppression of barley C-hordein level. All transgenic lines that exhibited a reduction for C-hordein showed off-target effects: the lines exhibited increased level of B/γ-hordein while D-hordein level was reduced. Furthermore, the multicopy insertions correlated negatively with silencing.

  1. Amino Acid Availability and Age Affect the Leucine Stimulation of Protein Synthesis and eIF4F Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Jeffery; Frank, Jason W.; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V.; Davis, Teresa A.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that a physiological increase in plasma leucine for 60- and 120-min increases translation initiation factor activation in muscle of neonatal pigs. Although muscle protein synthesis is increased by leucine at 60 min, it is not maintained at 120 min, perhaps due to the decrease in plasma amino acids (AA). In the current study, 7- and 26-day-old pigs were fasted overnight and infused with leucine (0 or 400 µmol· kg−1· h−1) for 120 min to raise leucine within the postprandial range. The leucine was infused in the presence or absence of a replacement AA mixture (without leucine) to maintain baseline plasma AA levels. AA administration prevented the leucine-induced reduction in plasma AA in both age groups. At 7 days, leucine infusion alone increased eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E binding protein-1 (4E-BP1) phosphorylation, decreased inactive 4E-BP1·eIF4E complex abundance, and increased active eIF4G·eIF4E complex formation in skeletal muscle; leucine infusion with replacement AA also stimulated these, as well as S6K1, rpS6, and eIF4G phosphorylation. At 26 days, leucine infusion alone increased 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and decreased the inactive 4E-BP1·eIF4E complex only; leucine with AA also stimulated these, as well as S6K1 and rpS6 phosphorylation. Muscle protein synthesis was increased in 7-day-old (+60%) and 26-day-old (+40%) pigs infused with leucine and replacement AA, but not with leucine alone. Thus, the ability of leucine to stimulate eIF4F formation and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle is dependent on AA availability and age. PMID:17878223

  2. Effects of L- and iso-ascorbic acid on meat protein hydrolyzing activity of four commercial plant and three microbial protease preparations.

    PubMed

    Ha, Minh; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Carne, Alan

    2014-04-15

    The present study investigated the effects of both l- and iso-ascorbic acid (AA) on the activity of four plant proteases (papain, bromelain, actinidin and zingibain) and three microbial proteases (Bacterial Protease G, Fungal 31,000 and Fungal 60,000) preparations using fluorescent-labelled casein, meat myofibrillar and connective tissue extracts to explore their effects on meat structure components upon treatment with individual proteases. While l-AA in the range 0.8-3.2mM inhibited the activity of papain, bromelain and zingibain, iso-AA acted as an inhibitor of papain but as an activator of zingibain and had no significant effect on bromelain. Both AA isoforms acted as an activator of the actinidin protease and the concentration of AA isoforms appeared to affect the level of activation of the protease. The effect of the two AA isoforms on collagen and myofibrillar protein hydrolyzing activity varied depending on the concentration of the two AA isoforms. The results indicate the ability to up and down regulate the activity of the investigated proteases by using an appropriate concentration of the AA isoform.

  3. Effects of L- and iso-ascorbic acid on meat protein hydrolyzing activity of four commercial plant and three microbial protease preparations.

    PubMed

    Ha, Minh; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Carne, Alan

    2014-04-15

    The present study investigated the effects of both l- and iso-ascorbic acid (AA) on the activity of four plant proteases (papain, bromelain, actinidin and zingibain) and three microbial proteases (Bacterial Protease G, Fungal 31,000 and Fungal 60,000) preparations using fluorescent-labelled casein, meat myofibrillar and connective tissue extracts to explore their effects on meat structure components upon treatment with individual proteases. While l-AA in the range 0.8-3.2mM inhibited the activity of papain, bromelain and zingibain, iso-AA acted as an inhibitor of papain but as an activator of zingibain and had no significant effect on bromelain. Both AA isoforms acted as an activator of the actinidin protease and the concentration of AA isoforms appeared to affect the level of activation of the protease. The effect of the two AA isoforms on collagen and myofibrillar protein hydrolyzing activity varied depending on the concentration of the two AA isoforms. The results indicate the ability to up and down regulate the activity of the investigated proteases by using an appropriate concentration of the AA isoform. PMID:24295669

  4. Alimentary proteins, amino acids and cholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Blachier, François; Lancha, Antonio H; Boutry, Claire; Tomé, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Numerous data from both epidemiological and experimental origins indicate that some alimentary proteins and amino acids in supplements can modify the blood LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and total cholesterol. After an initial approval of the health claim for soy protein consumption for the prevention of coronary heart disease, more recently it has been concluded from an overall analysis of literature that isolated soy protein with isoflavones only slightly decrease LDL and total cholesterol. Other plant extracts and also some proteins from animal origin have been reported to exert a lowering effect on blood cholesterol when compared with a reference protein (often casein). The underlying mechanisms are still little understood. Individual amino acids and mixture of amino acids have also been tested (mostly in animal studies) for their effects on cholesterol parameters and on cholesterol metabolism. Methionine, lysine, cystine, leucine, aspartate and glutamate have been tested individually and in combination in different models of either normo or hypercholesterolemic animals and found to be able to modify blood cholesterol and/or LDL cholesterol and/or HDL cholesterol. It is however not known if these results are relevant to human nutrition.

  5. Apparent or Standardized Ileal Digestibility of Amino Acids of Diets Containing Different Protein Feedstuffs Fed at Two Crude Protein Levels for Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Adebiyi, A. O.; Ragland, D.; Adeola, O.; Olukosi, O. A.

    2015-01-01

    The current study determined the apparent or standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids (AID or SID of AA) in growing pigs fed diets containing three protein feedstuffs with different fiber characteristics at two dietary crude protein (CP) levels. Twenty boars (Yorkshire×Landrace) with average initial body weight of 35 (±2.6) kg were fitted with a simple T-cannula at the distal ileum. These pigs were offered six diets containing soybean meal (SBM), canola meal (CM) or corn distillers dried grains with solubles (corn-DDGS) that were either adequate (19%) or marginal (15%) in CP using a triplicated 6×2 Youden Square Design. Except for Met, Trp, Cys, and Pro, AID of AA was greater (p<0.05) in the SBM diet compared with the CM diet. Apparent ileal digestibility for Gly and Asp was greater (p<0.05) in the SBM diet compared with the corn-DDGS diet. The AID of Ile, Leu, Phe, Val, Ala, Tyr, and Asp was greater (p<0.05) in the corn-DDGS diet compared with the CM diet. Standardized ileal digestibility of AA was greater (p<0.05) in the SBM diet compared with the CM diet for all AA except Trp and Pro. The SID of Ile, Leu, Val, Ala, Tyr, and Asp was greater (p<0.05) in the corn-DDGS diet compared with the CM diet. It was concluded that protein feedstuff affects ileal AA digestibility and is closely related to dietary fiber characteristics, and a 4-percentage unit reduction in dietary CP had no effect on ileal AA digestibility in growing pigs. PMID:26194226

  6. Bile acids reduce the apoptosis-inducing effects of sodium butyrate on human colon adenoma (AA/C1) cells: implications for colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    McMillan, L; Butcher, S; Wallis, Y; Neoptolemos, J P; Lord, J M

    2000-06-24

    Butyrate is produced in the colon by fermentation of dietary fibre and induces apoptosis in colon adenoma and cancer cell lines, which may contribute to the protective effect of a high fibre diet against colorectal cancer (CRC). However, butyrate is present in the colon together with unconjugated bile acids, which are tumour promoters in the colon. We show here that bile acids deoxycholate (DCA) and chenodeoxycholate (CDCA), at levels present in the colon, gave a modest increase in cell proliferation and decreased spontaneous apoptosis in AA/C1 adenoma cells. Bile acids significantly inhibited the induction of apoptosis by butyrate in AA/C1 cells. However, the survival-inducing effects of bile acids on AA/C1 cells could be overcome by increasing the concentration of sodium butyrate. These results suggest that dysregulation of apoptosis in colonic epithelial cells by dietary factors is a key factor in the pathophysiology of CRC.

  7. Chlamydia trachomatis Scavenges Host Fatty Acids for Phospholipid Synthesis via an Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthetase*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Dodson, V. Joshua; Frank, Matthew W.; Rock, Charles O.

    2015-01-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis has a reduced genome but relies on de novo fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis to produce its membrane phospholipids. Lipidomic analyses showed that 8% of the phospholipid molecular species synthesized by C. trachomatis contained oleic acid, an abundant host fatty acid that cannot be made by the bacterium. Mass tracing experiments showed that isotopically labeled palmitic, myristic, and lauric acids added to the medium were incorporated into C. trachomatis-derived phospholipid molecular species. HeLa cells did not elongate lauric acid, but infected HeLa cell cultures elongated laurate to myristate and palmitate. The elongated fatty acids were incorporated exclusively into C. trachomatis-produced phospholipid molecular species. C. trachomatis has adjacent genes encoding the separate domains of the bifunctional acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthetase/2-acylglycerolphosphoethanolamine acyltransferase gene (aas) of Escherichia coli. The CT775 gene encodes an acyltransferase (LpaT) that selectively transfers fatty acids from acyl-ACP to the 1-position of 2-acyl-glycerophospholipids. The CT776 gene encodes an acyl-ACP synthetase (AasC) with a substrate preference for palmitic compared with oleic acid in vitro. Exogenous fatty acids were elongated and incorporated into phospholipids by Escherichia coli-expressing AasC, illustrating its function as an acyl-ACP synthetase in vivo. These data point to an AasC-dependent pathway in C. trachomatis that selectively scavenges host saturated fatty acids to be used for the de novo synthesis of its membrane constituents. PMID:26195634

  8. Chlamydia trachomatis Scavenges Host Fatty Acids for Phospholipid Synthesis via an Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiangwei; Dodson, V Joshua; Frank, Matthew W; Rock, Charles O

    2015-09-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis has a reduced genome but relies on de novo fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis to produce its membrane phospholipids. Lipidomic analyses showed that 8% of the phospholipid molecular species synthesized by C. trachomatis contained oleic acid, an abundant host fatty acid that cannot be made by the bacterium. Mass tracing experiments showed that isotopically labeled palmitic, myristic, and lauric acids added to the medium were incorporated into C. trachomatis-derived phospholipid molecular species. HeLa cells did not elongate lauric acid, but infected HeLa cell cultures elongated laurate to myristate and palmitate. The elongated fatty acids were incorporated exclusively into C. trachomatis-produced phospholipid molecular species. C. trachomatis has adjacent genes encoding the separate domains of the bifunctional acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthetase/2-acylglycerolphosphoethanolamine acyltransferase gene (aas) of Escherichia coli. The CT775 gene encodes an acyltransferase (LpaT) that selectively transfers fatty acids from acyl-ACP to the 1-position of 2-acyl-glycerophospholipids. The CT776 gene encodes an acyl-ACP synthetase (AasC) with a substrate preference for palmitic compared with oleic acid in vitro. Exogenous fatty acids were elongated and incorporated into phospholipids by Escherichia coli-expressing AasC, illustrating its function as an acyl-ACP synthetase in vivo. These data point to an AasC-dependent pathway in C. trachomatis that selectively scavenges host saturated fatty acids to be used for the de novo synthesis of its membrane constituents. PMID:26195634

  9. Prostaglandin E2 and the protein kinase A pathway mediate arachidonic acid induction of c-fos in human prostate cancer cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2000-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is the precursor for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis and increases growth of prostate cancer cells. To further elucidate the mechanisms involved in AA-induced prostate cell growth, induction of c-fos expression by AA was investigated in a human prostate cancer cell line, PC-3. c-fos mRNA was induced shortly after addition of AA, along with a remarkable increase in PGE2 production. c-fos expression and PGE2 production induced by AA was blocked by a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, flurbiprofen, suggesting that PGE2 mediated c-fos induction. Protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 abolished induction of c-fos expression by AA, and partially inhibited PGE2 production. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X had no significant effect on c-fos expression or PGE2 production. Expression of prostaglandin (EP) receptors, which mediate signal transduction from PGE2 to the cells, was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in several human prostate cell lines. EP4 and EP2, which are coupled to the PKA signalling pathway, were expressed in all cells tested. Expression of EP1, which activates the PKC pathway, was not detected. The current study showed that induction of the immediate early gene c-fos by AA is mediated by PGE2, which activates the PKA pathway via the EP2/4 receptor in the PC-3 cells.

  10. Responses in gut hormones and hunger to diets with either high protein or a mixture of protein plus free amino acids supplied under weight-loss conditions.

    PubMed

    Lobley, Gerald E; Holtrop, Grietje; Horgan, Graham W; Bremner, David M; Fyfe, Claire; Johnstone, Alexandra M

    2015-04-28

    High-protein diets are an effective means for weight loss (WL), but the mechanisms are unclear. One hypothesis relates to the release of gut hormones by either protein or amino acids (AA). The present study involved overweight and obese male volunteers (n 18, mean BMI 36·8 kg/m2) who consumed a maintenance diet for 7 d followed by fully randomised 10 d treatments with three iso-energetic WL diets, i.e. with either normal protein (NP, 15% of energy) or high protein (HP, 30%) or with a combination of protein and free AA, each 15% of energy (NPAA). Psychometric ratings of appetite were recorded hourly. On day 10, plasma samples were taken at 30 min intervals over two consecutive 5 h periods (covering post-breakfast and post-lunch) and analysed for AA, glucose and hormones (insulin, total glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, active ghrelin and total peptide YY (PYY)) plus leucine kinetics (first 5 h only). Composite hunger was 16% lower for the HP diet than for the NP diet (P<0·01) in the 5 h period after both meals. Plasma essential AA concentrations were greatest within 60 min of each meal for the NPAA diet, but remained elevated for 3-5 h after the HP diet. The three WL diets showed no difference for either fasting concentrations or the postprandial net incremental AUC (net AUCi) for insulin, ghrelin or PYY. No strong correlations were observed between composite hunger scores and net AUCi for either AA or gut peptides. Regulation of hunger may involve subtle interactions, and a range of signals may need to be integrated to produce the overall response.

  11. Transgenic plants expressing the AaIT/GNA fusion protein show increased resistance and toxicity to both chewing and sucking pests.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Min; Li, Jie; Zhu, Jin-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Shu; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Chen, Xue-Xin; Li, Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The adoption of pest-resistant transgenic plants to reduce yield losses and decrease pesticide use has been successful. To achieve the goal of controlling both chewing and sucking pests in a given transgenic plant, we generated transgenic tobacco, Arabidopsis, and rice plants expressing the fusion protein, AaIT/GNA, in which an insecticidal scorpion venom neurotoxin (Androctonus australis toxin, AaIT) is fused to snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, GNA). Compared with transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants expressing AaIT or GNA, transgenic plants expressing AaIT/GNA exhibited increased resistance and toxicity to one chewing pest, the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Transgenic tobacco and rice plants expressing AaIT/GNA showed increased resistance and toxicity to two sucking pests, the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, and the rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, respectively. Moreover, in the field, transgenic rice plants expressing AaIT/GNA exhibited a significant improvement in grain yield when infested with N. lugens. This study shows that expressing the AaIT/GNA fusion protein in transgenic plants can be a useful approach for controlling pests, particularly sucking pests which are not susceptible to the toxin in Bt crops. PMID:25641865

  12. Production and functional evaluation of a protein concentrate from giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) by acid dissolution and isoelectric precipitation.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Ruiz, Juan A; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; Elena Lugo-Sánchez, M; Gisela Carvallo-Ruiz, M; García-Sánchez, Guillermina

    2008-09-15

    A protein concentrate from giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) was produced under acidic conditions and its functional-technological capability evaluated in terms of its gel-forming ability, water holding capacity and colour attributes. Technological functionality of the concentrate was compared with that of squid muscle and a neutral concentrate. Protein-protein aggregates insoluble at high ionic strength (I=0.5M), were detected in the acidic concentrate as result of processing with no preclusion of its gel-forming ability during the sol-to-gel thermal transition. Even though washing under acidic condition promoted autolysis of the myosin heavy chain, the acidic concentrate displayed an outstanding ability to gel giving samples with a gel strength of 455 and 1160gcm at 75% and 90% compression respectively, and an AA folding test grade indicative of high gel strength, elasticity, and cohesiveness. The process proved to be a good alternative for obtaining a functional protein concentrate from giant squid muscle.

  13. Protein and Amino Acid Requirements during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Elango, Rajavel; Ball, Ronald O

    2016-07-01

    Protein forms an essential component of a healthy diet in humans to support both growth and maintenance. During pregnancy, an exceptional stage of life defined by rapid growth and development, adequate dietary protein is crucial to ensure a healthy outcome. Protein deposition in maternal and fetal tissues increases throughout pregnancy, with most occurring during the third trimester. Dietary protein intake recommendations are based on factorial estimates because the traditional method of determining protein requirements, nitrogen balance, is invasive and undesirable during pregnancy. The current Estimated Average Requirement and RDA recommendations of 0.88 and 1.1 g · kg(-1) · d(-1), respectively, are for all stages of pregnancy. The single recommendation does not take into account the changing needs during different stages of pregnancy. Recently, with the use of the minimally invasive indicator amino acid oxidation method, we defined the requirements to be, on average, 1.2 and 1.52 g · kg(-1) · d(-1) during early (∼16 wk) and late (∼36 wk) stages of pregnancy, respectively. Although the requirements are substantially higher than current recommendations, our values are ∼14-18% of total energy and fit within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range. Using swine as an animal model we showed that the requirements for several indispensable amino acids increase dramatically during late gestation compared with early gestation. Additional studies should be conducted during pregnancy to confirm the newly determined protein requirements and to determine the indispensable amino acid requirements during pregnancy in humans. PMID:27422521

  14. In-Silico Determination of Insecticidal Potential of Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac Fusion Protein Against Lepidopteran Targets Using Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aftab; Javed, Muhammad R.; Rao, Abdul Q.; Khan, Muhammad A. U.; Ahad, Ammara; Din, Salah ud; Shahid, Ahmad A.; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-01-01

    Study and research of Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) transgenic plants have opened new ways to combat insect pests. Over the decades, however, insect pests, especially the Lepidopteran, have developed tolerance against Bt delta-endotoxins. Such issues can be addressed through the development of novel toxins with greater toxicity and affinity against a broad range of insect receptors. In this computational study, functional domains of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal delta-endotoxin (Cry1Ac) insecticidal protein and vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3Aa) have been fused to develop a broad-range Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac fusion protein. Cry1Ac and Vip3Aa are non-homologous insecticidal proteins possessing receptors against different targets within the midgut of insects. The insecticidal proteins were fused to broaden the insecticidal activity. Molecular docking analysis of the fusion protein against aminopeptidase-N (APN) and cadherin receptors of five Lepidopteran insects (Agrotis ipsilon, Helicoverpa armigera, Pectinophora gossypiella, Spodoptera exigua, and Spodoptera litura) revealed that the Ser290, Ser293, Leu337, Thr340, and Arg437 residues of the fusion protein are involved in the interaction with insect receptors. The Helicoverpa armigera cadherin receptor, however, showed no interaction, which might be due to either loss or burial of interactive residues inside the fusion protein. These findings revealed that the Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac fusion protein has a strong affinity against Lepidopteran insect receptors and hence has a potential to be an efficient broad-range insecticidal protein. PMID:26697037

  15. Effect of the Concentration of Cytolytic Protein Cyt2Aa2 on the Binding Mechanism on Lipid Bilayers Studied by QCM-D and AFM.

    PubMed

    Tharad, Sudarat; Iturri, Jagoba; Moreno-Cencerrado, Alberto; Mittendorfer, Margareta; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Krittanai, Chartchai; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2015-09-29

    Bacillus thuringiensis is known by its insecticidal property. The insecticidal proteins are produced at different growth stages, including the cytolytic protein (Cyt2Aa2), which is a bioinsecticide and an antimicrobial protein. However, the binding mechanism (and the interaction) of Cyt2Aa2 on lipid bilayers is still unclear. In this work, we have used quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the interaction between Cyt2Aa2 protein and (cholesterol-)lipid bilayers. We have found that the binding mechanism is concentration dependent. While at 10 μg/mL, Cyt2Aa2 binds slowly on the lipid bilayer forming a compliance protein/lipid layer with aggregates, at higher protein concentrations (100 μg/mL), the binding is fast, and the protein/lipid layer is more rigid including holes (of about a lipid bilayer thickness) in its structure. Our study suggests that the protein/lipid bilayer binding mechanism seems to be carpet-like at low protein concentrations and pore forming-like at high protein concentrations. PMID:26354323

  16. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tan, Bie; Li, Yinghui; Duan, Yehui; Blachier, François; Hu, Chien-An A; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA) pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet)- or higher/NRC (National Research Council)-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I) and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II) were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (P<0.05) gradually with increasing age. Bama mini-pigs had generally higher (P<0.05) muscle concentrations of flavor-related AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05) than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K), and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05). There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05) the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but

  17. Selective activation of the gamma-subspecies of protein kinase C from bovine cerebellum by arachidonic acid and its lipoxygenase metabolites.

    PubMed

    Shearman, M S; Naor, Z; Sekiguchi, K; Kishimoto, A; Nishizuka, Y

    1989-01-30

    The gamma-subspecies of protein kinase C (PKC) apparently is expressed only in central nervous tissues, and at a high level in the cerebellum and hippocampus. gamma-PKC from bovine cerebellum, but not the alpha- or beta I/beta II-subspecies, is activated by micromolar concentrations of arachidonic acid (AA), in the absence of both phospholipid and diacylglycerol. A significant component of this activation is also calcium independent. Other unsaturated fatty acids are much less active in this respect. Among the AA metabolites tested, lipoxin A (5(S),6(R),15(S)-11-cis-isomer) was a potent, selective activator of the gamma-subspecies, and also, to a lesser extent, 12(S)-hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid could support activation. These results raise the possibility that AA and some of its lipoxygenase metabolites may function as messenger molecules in neurones to activate the gamma-subspecies of PKC. PMID:2492951

  18. Plasma Free Amino Acid Responses to Intraduodenal Whey Protein, and Relationships with Insulin, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Energy Intake in Lean Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D.; Hutchison, Amy T.; Soenen, Stijn; Steinert, Robert E.; Clifton, Peter M.; Horowitz, Michael; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the effects of increasing loads of intraduodenal (ID) dairy protein on plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations, and their relationships with serum insulin, plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and energy intake. Sixteen healthy men had concentrations of AAs, GLP-1 and insulin measured in response to 60-min ID infusions of hydrolysed whey protein administered, in double-blinded and randomised order, at 2.1 (P2.1), 6.3 (P6.3) or 12.5 (P12.5) kJ/min (encompassing the range of nutrient emptying from the stomach), or saline control (C). Energy intake was quantified immediately afterwards. Compared with C, the concentrations of 19/20 AAs, the exception being cysteine, were increased, and this was dependent on the protein load. The relationship between AA concentrations in the infusions and the area under the curve from 0 to 60 min (AUC0–60 min) of each AA profile was strong for essential AAs (R2 range, 0.61–0.67), but more variable for non-essential (0.02–0.54) and conditional (0.006–0.64) AAs. The AUC0–60 min for each AA was correlated directly with the AUC0–60 min of insulin (R2 range 0.3–0.6), GLP-1 (0.2–0.6) and energy intake (0.09–0.3) (p < 0.05, for all), with the strongest correlations being for branched-chain AAs, lysine, methionine and tyrosine. These findings indicate that ID whey protein infused at loads encompassing the normal range of gastric emptying increases plasma concentrations of 19/20 AAs in a load-dependent manner, and provide novel information on the close relationships between the essential AAs, leucine, valine, isoleucine, lysine, methionine, and the conditionally-essential AA, tyrosine, with energy intake, insulin and GLP-1. PMID:26742062

  19. Protein content and amino acids profile of pseudocereals.

    PubMed

    Mota, Carla; Santos, Mariana; Mauro, Raul; Samman, Norma; Matos, Ana Sofia; Torres, Duarte; Castanheira, Isabel

    2016-02-15

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa), amaranth (Amaranthus caudatus) and buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) represent the main protein source in several diets, although these pseudocereals are not currently present in the FCDB nutrient profile information. The aim of this work is to characterise the AA profile of these pseudocereals and compare them with rice. Total protein content revealed to vary from 16.3g/100g (quinoa Salta) to 13.1g/100g (buckwheat) and lower values were found in rice samples (6.7g/100g). For pseudocereals the most abundant essential AA was leucine. Quinoa-Salta evidences the highest leucine content (1013mg/100g) and the minor methionine content (199mg/100g). Buckwheat was the cereal with the highest phenylalanine content (862mg/100g). Rice (Oryza sativa) presents the lowest content for all AA. Results showed pseudocereals as the best source of AA. EuroFIR guidelines where strictly followed and proved to be a crucial tool to guarantee data interchangeability and comparability. PMID:26433287

  20. Amino Acid Recycling in Relation to Protein Turnover 1

    PubMed Central

    Davies, David D.; Humphrey, Thomas J.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of measuring amino acid recycling in Lemna minor are described. The extent to which the recycling of individual amino acids may underestimate protein turnover has been measured for a number of amino acids. The methods have been used to study the relationship between protein turnover and amino acid recycling during nitrogen starvation. It is concluded that following the removal of nitrate from the environment, protein turnover is enhanced, the partitioning of amino acids between protein synthesis and amino acid metabolism is relatively constant, but the total amount of amino acids recycling is increased. PMID:16660236

  1. Interactions between protein kinase C and arachidonic acid in the gonadotropin response to salmon and chicken gonadotropin-releasing hormone-II in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Chang, J P; Van Goor, F; Neumann, C M

    1994-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that, in goldfish, the gonadotropin (GTH) response to salmon GTH-releasing hormone (sGnRH) is partly mediated by arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism via the lipoxygenase enzyme system, whereas protein kinase C (PKC) participates in both sGnRH- and chicken (c)GnRH-II-induced GTH secretion. In this study, the interactions between AA- and PKC-dependent pathways in mediating the long-term GnRH stimulation of GTH release were further investigated using dispersed goldfish pituitary cell cultures in static incubation. Treatments with AA or the PKC activator tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) increased GTH release. The GTH responses to AA and TPA were additive. The lipoxygenase inhibitor nordihydroguairetic acid (NDGA) and the PKC inhibitor H7 selectively reduced AA- and TPA-stimulated GTH release, respectively. These findings suggest that the GTH responses to stimulation by AA- and PKC-dependent signaling pathways are independent of one another. In other experiments, the GTH response to cGnRH-II was unaffected by NDGA but was abolished by H7. In contrast, sGnRH-induced GTH release was attenuated by NDGA and H7. Furthermore, in the presence of both NDGA and H7, the GTH response to sGnRH was abolished. These data suggest that sGnRH stimulation of GTH secretion involves both AA- and PKC-dependent mechanisms; in contrast, cGnRH-II action is not dependent on AA metabolism. The pathway by which AA might be mobilized in response to a GnRH challenge was also investigated by pharmacological manipulations. The diacylglcerol (DG) lipase inhibitor, U-57908, did not decrease sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-induced GTH secretion. On the other hand, the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitors, bromophenacyl bromide (BPB), chloroquine, and quinacrine, reduced sGnRH-elicited, but not cGnRH-II-stimulated GTH release. The addition of AA reversed the inhibitory action of BPB on sGnRH-elicited GTH release. In addition, the GTH response to AA was additive to the cGnRH-II-induced, but

  2. Resistance Risk Assessment of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) to Vip3Aa20 Insecticidal Protein Expressed in Corn.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Oderlei; Bernardi, Daniel; Amado, Douglas; Sousa, Renan S; Fatoretto, Julio; Medeiros, Fernanda C L; Conville, Jared; Burd, Tony; Omoto, Celso

    2015-12-01

    Transgenic Agrisure Viptera 3 corn that expresses Cry1Ab, Vip3Aa20, and EPSPS proteins and Agrisure Viptera expressing Vip3Aa20 are used for control of Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) and Diatraea saccharalis (F.) in Brazil. To support a resistance management program, resistance risk assessment studies were conducted to characterize the dose expression of Vip3Aa20 protein and level of control against these species. The Vip3Aa20 expression in Agrisure Viptera 3 and Agrisure Viptera decreased from V6 to V10 stage of growth. However, Vip3Aa20 expression in Agrisure Viptera 3 at V6 and V10 stages was 13- and 16-fold greater than Cry1Ab, respectively. The Vip3Aa20 expression in lyophilized tissue of Agrisure Viptera 3 and Agrisure Viptera diluted 25-fold in an artificial diet caused complete larval mortality of S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis. In contrast, lyophilized tissue of Bt11 at the same dilution does not provide complete mortality of these species. Agrisure Viptera 3 and Agrisure Viptera also caused a high level of mortality against S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis. Moreover, 100% mortality was observed for S. frugiperda larvae (neonates through fifth-instar larvae) when fed in corn with the Vip trait technology. Viptera corn achieves a high level of control against S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis providing a high dose, which is an important determination to support the refuge strategy for an effective resistance management program. PMID:26470366

  3. Effect of Dietary L-ascorbic Acid (L-AA) on Production Performance, Egg Quality Traits and Fertility in Japanese Quail (Coturnix japonica) at Low Ambient Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Shit, N.; Singh, R. P.; Sastry, K. V. H.; Agarwal, R.; Singh, R.; Pandey, N. K.; Mohan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental stress boosts the levels of stress hormones and accelerates energy expenditure which subsequently imbalance the body’s homeostasis. L-ascorbic acid (L-AA) has been recognized to mitigate the negative impact of environmental stress on production performances in birds. The present investigation was carried out to elucidate the effect of different dietary levels of L-AA on production performance, egg quality traits and fertility in Japanese quail at low ambient temperature. Sixty matured females (15 wks) were equally divided into three groups (20/group) based on the different dietary levels of L-AA (0, 250 and 500 ppm) and coupled with an equal number of males (1:1) obtained from the same hatch. They were managed in uniform husbandry conditions without restriction of feed and water at 14 h photo-schedule. Except for feed efficiency, body weight change, feed consumption and hen-day egg production were recorded highest in 500 ppm L-AA supplemented groups. Among the all egg quality traits studied, only specific gravity, shell weight and thickness differed significantly (p<0.05) in the present study. Fertility was improved significantly (p<0.01) to a dose dependent manner of L-AA. The findings of the present study concluded that dietary L-AA can be a caring management practice at least in part to alleviate the adverse effect of cold induced stress on production performance in Japanese quail. PMID:25049657

  4. Dietary ascorbic acid modulates the expression profile of stress protein genes in hepatopancreas of adult Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenglong; Wang, Jia; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wenbing; Mai, Kangsen

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary ascorbic acid (AA) on transcriptional expression patterns of antioxidant proteins, heat shock proteins (HSP) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the hepatopancreas of Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino (initial average length: 84.36 ± 0.24 mm) using real-time quantitative PCR assays. L-ascorbyl-2-molyphosphate (LAMP) was added to the basal diet to formulate four experimental diets containing 0.0, 70.3, 829.8 and 4967.5 mg AA equivalent kg(-1) diets, respectively. Each diet was fed to triplicate groups of adult abalone in acrylic tanks (200 L) in a flow-through seawater system. Each tank was stocked with 15 abalone. Animals were fed once daily (17:00) to apparent satiation for 24 weeks. The results showed that the dietary AA (70.3 mg kg(-1)) could significantly up-regulate the expression levels of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), feritin (FT) and heat shock protein 26 (HSP26) in the hepatopancreas of abalone in this treatment compared to the controls. However, the expression levels of Mn-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), selenium-binding protein (SEBP), HSP70 and HSP90 were significantly down-regulated. Compared with those in the group with 70.3 mg kg(-1) dietary AA, the expression levels of CAT, GST and HSP26 were decreased in abalone fed with very high dietary AA (4967.5 mg kg(-1)). In addition, significant up-regulations of expression levels of Mn-SOD, GPX, TPx, SEBP, FT, HSP70, HSP90 and NF-κB were observed in abalone fed with apparently excessive dietary AA (829.8 and 4967.5 mg kg(-1)) as compared to those fed 70.3 mg kg(-1) dietary AA. These findings showed that dietary AA influenced the expression levels of antioxidant proteins, heat shock proteins and NF-κB in the hepatopancreas of abalone at transcriptional level. Levels of dietary AA that appeared adequate (70.3 mg kg(-1)) reduced the oxidative stress

  5. Dietary ascorbic acid modulates the expression profile of stress protein genes in hepatopancreas of adult Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenglong; Wang, Jia; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wenbing; Mai, Kangsen

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary ascorbic acid (AA) on transcriptional expression patterns of antioxidant proteins, heat shock proteins (HSP) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the hepatopancreas of Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino (initial average length: 84.36 ± 0.24 mm) using real-time quantitative PCR assays. L-ascorbyl-2-molyphosphate (LAMP) was added to the basal diet to formulate four experimental diets containing 0.0, 70.3, 829.8 and 4967.5 mg AA equivalent kg(-1) diets, respectively. Each diet was fed to triplicate groups of adult abalone in acrylic tanks (200 L) in a flow-through seawater system. Each tank was stocked with 15 abalone. Animals were fed once daily (17:00) to apparent satiation for 24 weeks. The results showed that the dietary AA (70.3 mg kg(-1)) could significantly up-regulate the expression levels of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), feritin (FT) and heat shock protein 26 (HSP26) in the hepatopancreas of abalone in this treatment compared to the controls. However, the expression levels of Mn-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), selenium-binding protein (SEBP), HSP70 and HSP90 were significantly down-regulated. Compared with those in the group with 70.3 mg kg(-1) dietary AA, the expression levels of CAT, GST and HSP26 were decreased in abalone fed with very high dietary AA (4967.5 mg kg(-1)). In addition, significant up-regulations of expression levels of Mn-SOD, GPX, TPx, SEBP, FT, HSP70, HSP90 and NF-κB were observed in abalone fed with apparently excessive dietary AA (829.8 and 4967.5 mg kg(-1)) as compared to those fed 70.3 mg kg(-1) dietary AA. These findings showed that dietary AA influenced the expression levels of antioxidant proteins, heat shock proteins and NF-κB in the hepatopancreas of abalone at transcriptional level. Levels of dietary AA that appeared adequate (70.3 mg kg(-1)) reduced the oxidative stress

  6. Protein and Amino Acid Profiles of Different Whey Protein Supplements.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Cristine C; Alvares, Thiago S; Costa, Marion P; Conte-Junior, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) supplements have received increasing attention by consumers due to the high nutritional value of the proteins and amino acids they provide. However, some WP supplements may not contain the disclosed amounts of the ingredients listed on the label, compromising the nutritional quality and the effectiveness of these supplements. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the contents of total protein (TP), α-lactalbumin (α-LA), β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), free essential amino acids (free EAA), and free branched-chain amino acids (free BCAA), amongst different WP supplements produced by U.S. and Brazilian companies. Twenty commercial brands of WP supplements were selected, ten manufactured in U.S. (WP-USA) and ten in Brazil (WP-BRA). The TP was analyzed using the Kjeldahl method, while α-LA, β-LG, free EAA, and free BCAA were analyzed using HPLC system. There were higher (p < 0.05) concentrations of TP, α-LA, β-LG, and free BCAA in WP-USA supplements, as compared to the WP-BRA supplements; however, there was no difference (p > 0.05) in the content of free EAA between WP-USA and WP-BRA. Amongst the 20 brands evaluated, four WP-USA and seven WP-BRA had lower (p < 0.05) values of TP than those specified on the label. In conclusion, the WP-USA supplements exhibited better nutritional quality, evaluated by TP, α-LA, β-LG, and free BCAA when compared to WP-BRA.

  7. A study of the swelling and model protein release behaviours of radiation-formed poly(N-vinyl 2-pyrrolidone-co-acrylic acid) hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, David; Hill, David J. T.; Rasoul, Firas; Whittaker, Andrew K.

    2011-02-01

    Hydrogels were prepared from poly(acrylic acid-co-N-vinyl pyrrolidone), poly(AA-co-VP) and mixtures of poly(AA-co-VP) and poly(ethylene oxide), PEO, by gamma radiolysis of aqueous solutions of the AA and VP monomers containing ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, EGDMA, as crosslinker and PEO. The AA/VP composition range of the poly(AA-co-VP) was XAA 0.7-0.9. The swelling behaviours of the hydrogels from the dry state were investigated in water (pH 6.5) and 50 mM 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethylsulfonic acid buffer, HEPES buffer, at pH 7.4 and 295 K. The effects of poly(AA-co-VP) composition, crosslinker mole fraction and the presence of PEO on the equilibrium swelling ratio for the gels was examined. The kinetics of the release of a model protein, horseradish peroxidase, HRP, from the hydrogels in water were also studied at 295 K.

  8. The preparation and application of N-terminal 57 amino acid protein of the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor as a candidate male contraceptive vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Cheng; Li, Ying-Chun; Yang, Hua; Long, Yan; Chen, Min-Jian; Qin, Yu-Feng; Xia, Yan-Kai; Song, Ling; Gu, Ai-Hua; Wang, Xin-Ru

    2014-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), which is expressed only on Sertoli cells and plays a key role in spermatogenesis, has been paid attention for its potential in male contraception vaccine research and development. This study introduces a method for the preparation and purification of human FSHR 57-amino acid protein (FSHR-57aa) as well as determination of its immunogenicity and antifertility effect. A recombinant pET-28a(+)-FSHR-57aa plasmid was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 Star™ (DE3) and the FSHR-57aa protein was separated and collected by cutting the gel and recovering activity by efficient refolding dialysis. The protein was identified by Western blot and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis with a band of nearly 7 kDa and a purity of 97.4%. Male monkeys were immunized with rhFSHR-57aa protein and a gradual rising of specific serum IgG antibody was found which reached a plateau on day 112 (16 weeks) after the first immunization. After mating of one male with three female monkeys, the pregnancy rate of those mated with males immunized against FSHR-57aa was significantly decreased while the serum hormone levels of testosterone and estradiol were not disturbed in the control or the FSHR-57aa groups. By evaluating pathological changes in testicular histology, we found that the blood-testis barrier remained intact, in spite of some small damage to Sertoli cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the rhFSHR-57aa protein might be a feasible male contraceptive which could affect sperm production without disturbing hormone levels. PMID:24713829

  9. Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Atshaves, B.P.; Martin, G.G.; Hostetler, H.A.; McIntosh, A.L.; Kier, A.B.; Schroeder, F.

    2010-01-01

    While low levels of unesterified long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are normal metabolic intermediates of dietary and endogenous fat, LCFAs are also potent regulators of key receptors/enzymes, and at high levels become toxic detergents within the cell. Elevated levels of LCFAs are associated with diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Consequently, mammals evolved fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) that bind/sequester these potentially toxic free fatty acids in the cytosol and present them for rapid removal in oxidative (mitochondria, peroxisomes) or storage (endoplasmic reticulum, lipid droplets) organelles. Mammals have a large (15 member) family of FABPs with multiple members occurring within a single cell type. The first described FABP, liver-FABP (L-FABP, or FABP1), is expressed in very high levels (2-5% of cytosolic protein) in liver as well as intestine and kidney. Since L-FABP facilitates uptake and metabolism of LCFAs in vitro and in cultured cells, it was expected that abnormal function or loss of L-FABP would reduce hepatic LCFA uptake/oxidation and thereby increase LCFAs available for oxidation in muscle and/or storage in adipose. This prediction was confirmed in vitro with isolated liver slices and cultured primary hepatocytes from L-FABP gene-ablated mice. Despite unaltered food consumption when fed a control diet ad libitum, the L-FABP null mice exhibited age- and sex-dependent weight gain and increased fat tissue mass. The obese phenotype was exacerbated in L-FABP null mice pair-fed a high fat diet. Taken together with other findings, these data suggest that L-FABP could have an important role in preventing age- or diet-induced obesity. PMID:20537520

  10. Activation of Exogenous Fatty Acids to Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Cannot Bypass FabI Inhibition in Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiangwei; Bruhn, David F; Frank, Matthew W; Lee, Richard E; Rock, Charles O

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria is a Gram-negative pathogen with phospholipids composed of straight chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids, and lipopolysaccharides that are not essential. The FabI inhibitor, AFN-1252, was deployed as a chemical biology tool to determine whether Neisseria can bypass the inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by incorporating exogenous fatty acids. Neisseria encodes a functional FabI that was potently inhibited by AFN-1252. AFN-1252 caused a dose-dependent inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in growing Neisseria, a delayed inhibition of growth phenotype, and minimal inhibition of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis, showing that its mode of action is through inhibiting fatty acid synthesis. Isotopic fatty acid labeling experiments showed that Neisseria encodes the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids into its phospholipids by an acyl-acyl carrier protein-dependent pathway. However, AFN-1252 remained an effective antibacterial when Neisseria were supplemented with exogenous fatty acids. These results demonstrate that extracellular fatty acids are activated by an acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasN) and validate type II fatty acid synthesis (FabI) as a therapeutic target against Neisseria.

  11. The 35-amino acid C2 protein of Cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus, Burewala, implicated in resistance breaking in cotton, retains some activities of the full-length protein.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Fazal; Iqbal, Zafar; Briddon, Rob W; Vazquez, Franck; Saeed, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    With one exception, all the begomoviruses characterized so far encode an ~134-amino acid (aa) (A)C2 protein. The exception is the "Burewala" strain of Cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV-Bu), associated with resistance breaking in cotton across Pakistan and northwestern India, that encodes a truncated 35-aa C2. The C2 protein encoded by begomoviruses performs multiple functions including suppression of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), modulating microRNA (miRNA) expression and may be a pathogenicity determinant. The study described here was designed to investigate whether the CLCuKoV-Bu 35-aa C2 retains the activities of the full-length C2 protein. The results showed the 35-aa C2 of CLCuKoV-Bu acts as a pathogenicity determinant, suppresses PTGS and upregulates miRNA expression when expressed from a Potato virus X vector in Nicotiana benthamiana. The symptoms induced by expression of full-length C2 were more severe than those induced by the 35-aa C2. The accumulation of most developmental miRNAs decreases with the full-length C2 protein and increases with the 35-aa peptide of CLCuKoV-Bu. The study also revealed that 35-aa peptide of CLCuKoV-Bu maintains suppressor of silencing activity at a level equal to that of full-length C2. The significance of the results with respect to virus fitness and resistance breaking is discussed.

  12. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  13. Apoptosis of HL-60 human leukemia cells induced by Asiatic acid through modulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 family proteins and the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuling; Lv, Tingting; Chen, Yan; Wen, Lu; Zhang, Junli; Jiang, Xudong; Liu, Fang

    2015-07-01

    The toxicities of conventional chemotherapeutic agents to normal cells restrict their dosage and clinical efficacy in acute leukemia; therefore, it is important to develop novel chemotherapeutics, including natural products, which selectively target cancer-specific pathways. The present study aimed to explore the effect of the chemopreventive agent asiatic acid (AA) on the proliferation and apoptotic rate of the leukemia cell line HL-60 and investigated the mechanisms underlying its anti-tumor activity. The effect of AA on the proliferation of HL-60 cells was evaluated using the MTT assay. Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining followed by flow cytometric analysis as well as Hoechst 33258 staining were used to analyze the apoptotic rate of the cells. Furthermore, changes of survivin, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 expressions were detected by western blot analysis. AA blocked the growth of HL-60 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50-value of AA on HL-60 cells was 46.67 ± 5.08 µmol/l for 24 h. AA induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, which was inhibited in the presence of Z-DEVD-FMK, a specific inhibitor of caspase. The anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and survivin were downregulated by AA in a dose-dependent manner. Concurrently, AA inhibited ERK and p38 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, while JNK phosphorylation was not affected. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the p38 and ERK pathways, as well as modulation of Bcl-2 family and survivin proteins were key regulators of apoptosis induced in HL-60 cells in response to AA.

  14. Cry4Ba and Cyt1Aa proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis: Interactions and toxicity mechanism against Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Elleuch, Jihen; Jaoua, Samir; Darriet, Frédéric; Chandre, Fabrice; Tounsi, Slim; Zghal, Raida Zribi

    2015-09-15

    Individual crystal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis exhibit variable levels of insecticidal activities against mosquito larvae. In all cases, they are much less active compared to the whole crystal proteins due to described complex synergistic interactions among them. In the present study we investigated the effects of Cyt1A98 (a Cyt1Aa type protein) on Cry4BLB (a Cry4Ba type toxin) insecticidal activity toward the dengue vector Aedes aegypti. The bioassay analyses demonstrated the ability of Cyt1A98 protein to enhance Cry4BLB toxin larvicidal activity even at a low proportion in the mixture (1%). In vitro interaction assays showed that Cyt1A98 provides supplementary binding sites for Cry4BLB in A. aegypti BBMVs. Moreover, it enhances the formation of Cry4BLB oligomeric structure. These results support that Cyt1A98 protein could act as a membrane-bound receptor fixing Cry4BLB δ-endotoxins and promoting its oligomerization.

  15. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2009-04-28

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  16. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2008-10-07

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  17. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  18. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2011-12-06

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  19. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2011-03-22

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  20. Herring roe protein has a high digestible indispensable amino acid score (DIAAS) using a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model.

    PubMed

    Havenaar, Robert; Maathuis, Annet; de Jong, Aard; Mancinelli, Daniele; Berger, Alvin; Bellmann, Susann

    2016-08-01

    It is hypothesized that the digestible indispensable amino acid score (DIAAS) can be determined based on dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal digestion experiments as replacement for invasive animal studies. We determined the in vitro DIAAS for immature herring eggs (roe) proteins in comparison with reference proteins. The true ileal digestibility of protein and indispensable amino acids (IAA) was measured under human conditions simulated in a gastrointestinal model (tiny-TIM). The in vitro true ileal digestibility of ovalbumin, cooked and raw chicken egg white, and casein was similar to that found in humans (r(2) = 0.96), providing a casual observation to support the validity of tiny-TIM. The digestibility of the immature herring egg proteins was 71% to 92%. The highest IAA digestibility was found for immature whole herring egg protein (55%-80%) in comparison to immature herring egg membrane and immature de-membraned herring protein (50%-70%). The DIAAS as recommended by FAO for children and adults, but measured in vitro, were 91% for immature whole herring egg protein (lysine first limiting), 71% for immature herring egg membrane protein (histidine first limiting), and 88% for immature herring egg de-membraned protein (sulfur AA first limiting). True ileal protein and amino acid digestibility can be determined in a dynamic gastrointestinal model, such as tiny-TIM, which can be used for estimating the DIAAS. Immature herring egg proteins, a previously underutilized resource, were determined to be an important and valuable source of IAA for human consumption.

  1. Herring roe protein has a high digestible indispensable amino acid score (DIAAS) using a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model.

    PubMed

    Havenaar, Robert; Maathuis, Annet; de Jong, Aard; Mancinelli, Daniele; Berger, Alvin; Bellmann, Susann

    2016-08-01

    It is hypothesized that the digestible indispensable amino acid score (DIAAS) can be determined based on dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal digestion experiments as replacement for invasive animal studies. We determined the in vitro DIAAS for immature herring eggs (roe) proteins in comparison with reference proteins. The true ileal digestibility of protein and indispensable amino acids (IAA) was measured under human conditions simulated in a gastrointestinal model (tiny-TIM). The in vitro true ileal digestibility of ovalbumin, cooked and raw chicken egg white, and casein was similar to that found in humans (r(2) = 0.96), providing a casual observation to support the validity of tiny-TIM. The digestibility of the immature herring egg proteins was 71% to 92%. The highest IAA digestibility was found for immature whole herring egg protein (55%-80%) in comparison to immature herring egg membrane and immature de-membraned herring protein (50%-70%). The DIAAS as recommended by FAO for children and adults, but measured in vitro, were 91% for immature whole herring egg protein (lysine first limiting), 71% for immature herring egg membrane protein (histidine first limiting), and 88% for immature herring egg de-membraned protein (sulfur AA first limiting). True ileal protein and amino acid digestibility can be determined in a dynamic gastrointestinal model, such as tiny-TIM, which can be used for estimating the DIAAS. Immature herring egg proteins, a previously underutilized resource, were determined to be an important and valuable source of IAA for human consumption. PMID:27440534

  2. Comparison of colorimetric assays with quantitative amino acid analysis for protein quantification of Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Omar; Maggiore, Luana; Necchi, Francesca; Koeberling, Oliver; MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan; Gerke, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Genetically induced outer membrane particles from Gram-negative bacteria, called Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA), are being investigated as vaccines. Rapid methods are required for estimating the protein content for in-process assays during production. Since GMMA are complex biological structures containing lipid and polysaccharide as well as protein, protein determinations are not necessarily straightforward. We compared protein quantification by Bradford, Lowry, and Non-Interfering assays using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as standard with quantitative amino acid (AA) analysis, the most accurate currently available method for protein quantification. The Lowry assay has the lowest inter- and intra-assay variation and gives the best linearity between protein amount and absorbance. In all three assays, the color yield (optical density per mass of protein) of GMMA was markedly different from that of BSA with a ratio of approximately 4 for the Bradford assay, and highly variable between different GMMA; and approximately 0.7 for the Lowry and Non-Interfering assays, highlighting the need for calibrating the standard used in the colorimetric assay against GMMA quantified by AA analysis. In terms of a combination of ease, reproducibility, and proportionality of protein measurement, and comparability between samples, the Lowry assay was superior to Bradford and Non-Interfering assays for GMMA quantification.

  3. Increasing dietary crude protein does not increase the essential amino acid requirements of kittens.

    PubMed

    Strieker, M J; Morris, J G; Rogers, Q R

    2006-08-01

    Essential amino acid (EAA) requirements of omnivores and herbivores (e.g. chicks, lambs, pigs and rats) are directly related to the concentration of dietary crude protein (CP). When an EAA is limiting in the diet, addition of a mixture of EAA lacking the limiting one (which increases dietary CP) results in a decrease in food intake and weight gain. This interaction has been referred to as an AA imbalance and has not been studied in depth in strict carnivores. The objectives of these experiments were to examine the effects on growing kittens (2-week periods) of the addition to diets of a mixture of AA lacking the limiting one. The control diets were at the requirement of the respective limiting EAA (or about 85% of the 1986 National Research Council requirement). In experiment 1, with the dietary EAAs at the minimally determined requirements, the concentration of the essential or dispensable amino acids was increased to determine if CP or an EAA was limiting. Results of growth rates (n = 12) and plasma AA concentrations indicated that tryptophan was limiting, but increased body weight gain also occurred when the concentration of CP was increased as dispensable amino acids without additional tryptophan. Experiment 1 was repeated in experiment 2 using a crossover design. Again, when tryptophan was limiting additional concentrations of dispensable AAs increased body weight gain. This response is the opposite of that in herbivores and omnivores. Experiment 3 consisted of 10 separate crossover trials, one for each of the 10 EAA and examined the effect of two concentrations of dietary CP (200 and 300 g CP/kg diet) on body weight gain of kittens (n = 8) offered diets limiting in each respective EAA. Body weight gain was numerically greater when diets contained 300 g CP/kg than 200 g CP/kg for eight of 10 EAAs (p < 0.05 for only isoleucine and threonine) when each amino acid was limiting. This response is the reverse of that which occurs in chicks, lambs, pigs and rats when

  4. Regulation of intestinal protein metabolism by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Julien; Goichon, Alexis; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2013-09-01

    Gut homeostasis plays a major role in health and may be regulated by quantitative and qualitative food intake. In the intestinal mucosa, an intense renewal of proteins occurs, at approximately 50% per day in humans. In some pathophysiological conditions, protein turnover is altered and may contribute to intestinal or systemic diseases. Amino acids are key effectors of gut protein turnover, both as constituents of proteins and as regulatory molecules limiting intestinal injury and maintaining intestinal functions. Many studies have focused on two amino acids: glutamine, known as the preferential substrate of rapidly dividing cells, and arginine, another conditionally essential amino acid. The effects of glutamine and arginine on protein synthesis appear to be model and condition dependent, as are the involved signaling pathways. The regulation of gut protein degradation by amino acids has been minimally documented until now. This review will examine recent data, helping to better understand how amino acids regulate intestinal protein metabolism, and will explore perspectives for future studies.

  5. Shared Binding Sites for the Bacillus thuringiensis Proteins Cry3Bb, Cry3Ca, and Cry7Aa in the African Sweet Potato Pest Cylas puncticollis (Brentidae)

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Martínez, Patricia; Vera-Velasco, Natalia Mara; Martínez-Solís, María; Ghislain, Marc; Ferré, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Bb, Cry3Ca, and Cry7Aa have been reported to be toxic against larvae of the genus Cylas, which are important pests of sweet potato worldwide and particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. However, relatively little is known about the processing and binding interactions of these coleopteran-specific Cry proteins. The aim of the present study was to determine whether Cry3Bb, Cry3Ca, and Cry7Aa proteins have shared binding sites in Cylas puncticollis to orient the pest resistance strategy by genetic transformation. Interestingly, processing of the 129-kDa Cry7Aa protoxin using commercial trypsin or chymotrypsin rendered two fragments of about 70 kDa and 65 kDa. N-terminal sequencing of the trypsin-activated Cry7Aa fragments revealed that processing occurs at Glu47 for the 70-kDa form or Ile88 for the 65-kDa form. Homologous binding assays showed specific binding of the two Cry3 proteins and the 65-kDa Cry7Aa fragment to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from C. puncticollis larvae. The 70-kDa fragment did not bind to BBMV. Heterologous-competition assays showed that Cry3Bb, Cry3Ca, and Cry7Aa (65-kDa fragment) competed for the same binding sites. Hence, our results suggest that pest resistance mediated by the alteration of a shared Cry receptor binding site might render all three Cry toxins ineffective. PMID:25261517

  6. Effects of reducing dietary protein on the expression of nutrition sensing genes (amino acid transporters) in weaned piglets*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li; He, Liu-qin; Cui, Zhi-jie; Liu, Gang; Yao, Kang; Wu, Fei; Li, Jun; Li, Tie-jun

    2015-01-01

    The effects of crude protein (CP) levels in the diet on the mRNA expression of amino acid (AA) transporters were studied in a 45-d trial. Eighteen piglets with an initial body weight (BW) of 9.57 kg were assigned to three groups (14%, 17%, and 20% CP in the diet) in a completely randomized design (six replicates per treatment). Diets were supplemented with crystalline AA to achieve equal standardized ileal digestible contents of Lys, Met plus Cys, Thr, and Trp, and were provided ad libitum. After 45 d, all piglets were slaughtered to collect small intestine samples. Compared with the values in the 14% CP group, the expressions of ASCT2, 4F2hc, and ATB0 mRNA in the jejunum were increased by 23.00%, 12.00%, 6.00% and 48.00%, 47.00%, 56.00% in the 17% and 20% CP groups, respectively. These results indicate that a 14% CP diet supplemented with crystalline AA may not transport enough AA into the body and maintain growth performance of piglets. However, a reduction of dietary 17% CP may reduce the excretion of nitrogen into the environment while supporting the development of piglets. Therefore, the 17% CP level is more suitable than 14% CP level. PMID:26055911

  7. Effects of Temperature during Moist Heat Treatment on Ruminal Degradability and Intestinal Digestibility of Protein and Amino Acids in Hempseed Cake

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, L.; Ruiz-Moreno, M.; Stern, M. D.; Martinsson, K.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate ruminal degradability and intestinal digestibility of crude protein (CP) and amino acids (AA) in hempseed cake (HC) that were moist heat treated at different temperatures. Samples of cold-pressed HC were autoclaved for 30 min at 110, 120 or 130°C, and a sample of untreated HC was used as the control. Ruminal degradability of CP was estimated, using the in situ Dacron bag technique; intestinal CP digestibility was estimated for the 16 h in situ residue using a three-step in vitro procedure. AA content was determined for the HC samples (heat treated and untreated) of the intact feed, the 16 h in situ residue and the residue after the three-step procedure. There was a linear increase in RUP (p = 0.001) and intestinal digestibility of RUP (p = 0.003) with increasing temperature during heat treatment. The 130°C treatment increased RUP from 259 to 629 g/kg CP, while intestinal digestibility increased from 176 to 730 g/kg RUP, compared to the control. Hence, the intestinal available dietary CP increased more than eight times. Increasing temperatures during heat treatment resulted in linear decreases in ruminal degradability of total AA (p = 0.006) and individual AA (p<0.05) and an increase in intestinal digestibility that could be explained both by a linear and a quadratic model for total AA and most individual AA (p<0.05). The 130°C treatment decreased ruminal degradability of total AA from 837 to 471 g/kg, while intestinal digestibility increased from 267 to 813 g/kg of rumen undegradable AA, compared with the control. There were differences between ruminal AA degradability and between intestinal AA digestibility within all individual HC treatments (p<0.001). It is concluded that moist heat treatment at 130°C did not overprotect the CP of HC and could be used to shift the site of CP and AA digestion from the rumen to the small intestine. This may increase the value of HC as a protein supplement for ruminants. PMID:25049517

  8. An equation to estimate the difference between theoretically predicted and SDS PAGE-displayed molecular weights for an acidic peptide.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yihong; Zhu, Qinfang; Huang, Delai; Zhao, Shuyi; Jan Lo, Li; Peng, Jinrong

    2015-01-01

    The molecular weight (MW) of a protein can be predicted based on its amino acids (AA) composition. However, in many cases a non-chemically modified protein shows an SDS PAGE-displayed MW larger than its predicted size. Some reports linked this fact to high content of acidic AA in the protein. However, the exact relationship between the acidic AA composition and the SDS PAGE-displayed MW is not established. Zebrafish nucleolar protein Def is composed of 753 AA and shows an SDS PAGE-displayed MW approximately 13 kDa larger than its predicted MW. The first 188 AA in Def is defined by a glutamate-rich region containing ~35.6% of acidic AA. In this report, we analyzed the relationship between the SDS PAGE-displayed MW of thirteen peptides derived from Def and the AA composition in each peptide. We found that the difference between the predicted and SDS PAGE-displayed MW showed a linear correlation with the percentage of acidic AA that fits the equation y = 276.5x - 31.33 (x represents the percentage of acidic AA, 11.4% ≤ x ≤ 51.1%; y represents the average ΔMW per AA). We demonstrated that this equation could be applied to predict the SDS PAGE-displayed MW for thirteen different natural acidic proteins. PMID:26311515

  9. Ileal digestibility of amino acids of unheated and autoclaved pea protein concentrate in broilers.

    PubMed

    Frikha, M; Valencia, D G; de Coca-Sinova, A; Lázaro, R; Mateos, G G

    2013-07-01

    The effects of autoclaving 2 varieties of micronized (fine grinding) pea protein concentrate (PPC) on the ileal digestibility (ID) of CP and amino acids (AA) were studied in broilers. There was a control diet based on fermented soybean meal (FSBM) and 4 extra diets in which the FSBM was substituted on a CP basis by PPC from 2 different pea cultivars (PPC-1 and PPC-2), either unheated or autoclaved. Chicks were fed a common diet from 1 to 17 d of age and, then, their respective experimental diets from 18 to 21 d of age. Each treatment was replicated 6 times. Autoclaving reduced trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA) but had little effect on the saponin content of the PPC. The apparent ID (AID) of CP was similar for the FSBM and the unheated PPC and lower for both than for the autoclaved PPC. Autoclaving improved (P < 0.001) the AID of CP (87.6 vs. 82.2%) and most indispensable AA (e.g., 92.1 vs. 88.8% for Lys and 83.6 vs. 76.5% for Thr) of the PPC. The improvement in CP and AA digestibility with autoclaving varied with the PPC used and was consistent with the reduction in TIA observed (9.4 to 2.8 mg/g for PPC-1 vs. 9.1 to 5.3 mg/g for PPC-2). The standardized ID (SID) of most indispensable AA was similar for the FSBM and the PPC-2 and higher for both than for the PPC-1 (P < 0.05). For Lys, the lowest SID value was observed for the FSBM and the highest for the PPC-2 either unheated or autoclaved. It is concluded that the ID of the AA of the PPC improved with heating and was in general higher for the autoclaved PPC than for the FSBM. Consequently, heat processed PPC is a good alternative to FSBM and unheated PPC in starter diets for broilers.

  10. Ileal digestibility of amino acids of unheated and autoclaved pea protein concentrate in broilers.

    PubMed

    Frikha, M; Valencia, D G; de Coca-Sinova, A; Lázaro, R; Mateos, G G

    2013-07-01

    The effects of autoclaving 2 varieties of micronized (fine grinding) pea protein concentrate (PPC) on the ileal digestibility (ID) of CP and amino acids (AA) were studied in broilers. There was a control diet based on fermented soybean meal (FSBM) and 4 extra diets in which the FSBM was substituted on a CP basis by PPC from 2 different pea cultivars (PPC-1 and PPC-2), either unheated or autoclaved. Chicks were fed a common diet from 1 to 17 d of age and, then, their respective experimental diets from 18 to 21 d of age. Each treatment was replicated 6 times. Autoclaving reduced trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA) but had little effect on the saponin content of the PPC. The apparent ID (AID) of CP was similar for the FSBM and the unheated PPC and lower for both than for the autoclaved PPC. Autoclaving improved (P < 0.001) the AID of CP (87.6 vs. 82.2%) and most indispensable AA (e.g., 92.1 vs. 88.8% for Lys and 83.6 vs. 76.5% for Thr) of the PPC. The improvement in CP and AA digestibility with autoclaving varied with the PPC used and was consistent with the reduction in TIA observed (9.4 to 2.8 mg/g for PPC-1 vs. 9.1 to 5.3 mg/g for PPC-2). The standardized ID (SID) of most indispensable AA was similar for the FSBM and the PPC-2 and higher for both than for the PPC-1 (P < 0.05). For Lys, the lowest SID value was observed for the FSBM and the highest for the PPC-2 either unheated or autoclaved. It is concluded that the ID of the AA of the PPC improved with heating and was in general higher for the autoclaved PPC than for the FSBM. Consequently, heat processed PPC is a good alternative to FSBM and unheated PPC in starter diets for broilers. PMID:23776273

  11. Age Differences of Salivary Alpha-Amylase Levels of Basal and Acute Responses to Citric Acid Stimulation Between Chinese Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ze-Min; Chen, Long-Hui; Zhang, Min; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Wei-Wen; Yang, Xiao-Rong

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear how salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) levels respond to mechanical stimuli in different age groups. In addition, the role played by the sAA gene (AMY1) copy number and protein expression (glycosylated and non-glycosylated) in sAA activity has also been rarely reported. In this study, we analyzed saliva samples collected before and after citric acid stimulation from 47 child and 47 adult Chinese subjects. We observed that adults had higher sAA activity and sAA glycosylated levels (glycosylated sAA amount/total sAA amount) in basal and stimulated saliva when compared with children, while no differences were found in total or glycosylated sAA amount between them. Interestingly, adults showed attenuated sAA activity levels increase over those of children after stimulation. Correlation analysis showed that total sAA amount, glycosylated sAA amount, and AMY1 copy number × total sAA amount were all positively correlated with sAA activity before and after stimulation in both groups. Interestingly, correlation r between sAA levels (glycosylated sAA amount and total sAA amount) and sAA activity decreased after stimulation in children, while adults showed an increase in correlation r. In addition, the correlation r between AMY1 copy number × total sAA amount and sAA activity was higher than that between AMY1 copy number, total sAA amount, and sAA activity, respectively. Taken together, our results suggest that total sAA amount, glycosylated sAA amount, and the positive interaction between AMY1 copy number and total sAA amount are crucial in influencing sAA activity before and after stimulation in children and adults. PMID:26635626

  12. Protein, amino acids and the control of food intake.

    PubMed

    Tome, Daniel

    2004-08-01

    The influence of protein and amino acid on the control of food intake and the specific control of protein and amino acid intakes remains incompletely understood. The most commonly accepted conclusions are: (1) the existence of an aversive response to diets deficient in or devoid of protein or deficient in at least one essential amino acid; (2) the existence of a mechanism that enables attainment of the minimum requirement for N and essential amino acids by increasing intake of a low-protein diet; (3) a decrease in the intake of a high-protein diet is associated with different processes, including the high satiating effect of protein. Ingested proteins are believed to generate pre- and post-absorptive signals that contribute to the control of gastric kinetics, pancreatic secretion and food intake. At the brain level, two major afferent pathways are involved in protein and amino acid monitoring: the indirect neuro-mediated (mainly vagus-mediated) pathway and the direct blood pathway. The neuro-mediated pathway transfers pre-absorptive and visceral information. This information is for the main part transferred through the vagus nerve that innervates part of the oro-sensory zone: the stomach, the duodenum and the liver. Other information is directly monitored in the blood. It is likely that the system responds precisely when protein and essential amino acid intake is inadequate, but in contrast allows a large range of adaptive capacities through amino acid degradation and substrate interconversion.

  13. Effect of allicin (diallyl disulfide-oxide) on prostaglandin endoperoxide H/sub 2/ (PGH/sub 2/) and arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeux, P.R.; Agrawal, K.C.; King, B.T.; Kadowitz, P.J.; McNamara, D.B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors report here the effects of pure allicin (the antibacterial component of GO), synthesized from diallyl disulfide and hydrogen peroxide, on human platelet aggregation, PGH/sub 2/ metabolism in microsomes of bovine lung (BL) and bovine coronary artery (BCA), homogenates of human platelet (HP), and on AA metabolism in HP. Allicin at 16 ..mu..g/ml to 160 ..mu..g/ml produced concentration-dependent inhibition of platelet aggregation to 1.6 mM AA and 2.8 ..mu..M U 46619, a stable analog of PGH/sub 2/ and a TXA/sub 2/ minic. BL (200 ..mu..g protein), BCA (10 ..mu..g protein), and HP (1500 ..mu..g protein) were incubated with 10 ..mu..M (/sup 14/C) PGH/sub 2/ +/- allicin. HP (1500 ..mu..g protein) were incubated with 20 ..mu..M (/sup 14/C) AA +/- allicin. Products were separated by TLC and quantified by radiochromatographic scan. Allicin in the concentration range of 10-/sup 6/M-10-/sup 3/M induced no change in the formation of prostacyclin by BL and BCA or of TXA/sub 2/ by BL and HP. These data suggest that the platelet antiaggregatory action of allicin is not due to inhibition of cyclooxygenase or TXA/sub 2/ synthetase in the human platelet, but may be related to interactions at the TXA/sub 2/ receptor or on cyclic nucleotide levels.

  14. Echinococcus granulosus fatty acid binding proteins subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2016-05-01

    Two fatty acid binding proteins, EgFABP1 and EgFABP2, were isolated from the parasitic platyhelminth Echinococcus granulosus. These proteins bind fatty acids and have particular relevance in flatworms since de novo fatty acids synthesis is absent. Therefore platyhelminthes depend on the capture and intracellular distribution of host's lipids and fatty acid binding proteins could participate in lipid distribution. To elucidate EgFABP's roles, we investigated their intracellular distribution in the larval stage by a proteomic approach. Our results demonstrated the presence of EgFABP1 isoforms in cytosolic, nuclear, mitochondrial and microsomal fractions, suggesting that these molecules could be involved in several cellular processes.

  15. Standardized ileal digestibility of proteins and amino acids in sesame expeller and soya bean meal in weaning piglets.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, A; Reis de Souza, T C; Mariscal-Landín, G; Escobar, K; Montaño, S; Bernal, M G

    2015-08-01

    Apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of diets containing sesame expeller (SE) and soya bean meal (SBM) was determined using 15 piglets (Genetiporc(®)), weaned at 17 ± 0.4 days with average body weight of 6.4 ± 0.7 kg (Fertilis 20 × G Performance, Genetiporc(®), PIC México, Querétaro, México). Piglets were randomly assigned to three treatments: (i) a reference diet with casein as the sole protein source; (ii) a mixed diet of casein-SE; and (iii) a mixed diet of casein-SBM. The chemical composition of SE and SBM was determined, and AID and standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of crude protein (CP) and amino acids (AAs) were determined for each protein source. SE contained greater quantities of ether extract, neutral detergent fibre, phytic acid, methionine and arginine than SBM. Lysine and proline contents and trypsin inhibitor activity were higher in SBM than in SE. The AID and SID of CP and AA (except for lysine and proline) were similar in SE and SBM. The AID of lysine and proline was higher in SBM than in SE (p < 0.05), and the SID of proline was higher in SE than in SBM (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that SE is an appropriate alternative protein source for early weaned pigs.

  16. Long-Term Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid Feeding on Lipid Composition and Brain Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Expression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elsherbiny, Marwa E.; Goruk, Susan; Monckton, Elizabeth A.; Richard, Caroline; Brun, Miranda; Emara, Marwan; Field, Catherine J.; Godbout, Roseline

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) brain accretion is essential for brain development. The impact of DHA-rich maternal diets on offspring brain fatty acid composition has previously been studied up to the weanling stage; however, there has been no follow-up at later stages. Here, we examine the impact of DHA-rich maternal and weaning diets on brain fatty acid composition at weaning and three weeks post-weaning. We report that DHA supplementation during lactation maintains high DHA levels in the brains of pups even when they are fed a DHA-deficient diet for three weeks after weaning. We show that boosting dietary DHA levels for three weeks after weaning compensates for a maternal DHA-deficient diet during lactation. Finally, our data indicate that brain fatty acid binding protein (FABP7), a marker of neural stem cells, is down-regulated in the brains of six-week pups with a high DHA:AA ratio. We propose that elevated levels of DHA in developing brain accelerate brain maturation relative to DHA-deficient brains. PMID:26506385

  17. Analysis of amino acid composition in proteins of animal tissues and foods as pre-column o-phthaldialdehyde derivatives by HPLC with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Zhenlong; Jia, Sichao; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-08-01

    Studies of protein nutrition and biochemistry require reliable methods for analysis of amino acid (AA) composition in polypeptides of animal tissues and foods. Proteins are hydrolyzed by 6M HCl (110°C for 24h), 4.2M NaOH (105°C for 20 h), or proteases. Analytical techniques that require high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) include pre-column derivatization with 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan, 9-fluorenyl methylchloroformate, phenylisothiocyanate, naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde, 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate, and o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA). OPA reacts with primary AA (except cysteine or cystine) in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol or 3-mercaptopropionic acid to form a highly fluorescent adduct. OPA also reacts with 4-amino-1-butanol and 4-aminobutane-1,3-diol produced from oxidation of proline and 4-hydroxyproline, respectively, in the presence of chloramine-T plus sodium borohydride at 60°C, or with S-carboxymethyl-cysteine formed from cysteine and iodoacetic acid at 25°C. Fluorescence of OPA derivatives is monitored at excitation and emission wavelengths of 340 and 455 nm, respectively. Detection limits are 50 fmol for AA. This technique offers the following advantages: simple procedures for preparation of samples, reagents, and mobile-phase solutions; rapid pre-column formation of OPA-AA derivatives and their efficient separation at room temperature (e.g., 20-25°C); high sensitivity of detection; easy automation on the HPLC apparatus; few interfering side reactions; a stable chromatography baseline for accurate integration of peak areas; and rapid regeneration of guard and analytical columns. Thus, the OPA method provides a useful tool to determine AA composition in proteins of animal tissues (e.g., skeletal muscle, liver, intestine, placenta, brain, and body homogenates) and foods (e.g., milk, corn grain, meat, and soybean meal).

  18. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cyt1Aa synergizes Cry11Aa toxin by functioning as a membrane-bound receptor.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Claudia; Fernandez, Luisa E; Sun, Jianguang; Folch, Jorge Luis; Gill, Sarjeet S; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2005-12-20

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis produces crystal proteins, Cry (4Aa, 4Ba, 10Aa, and 11Aa) and Cyt (1Aa and 2Ba) proteins, toxic to mosquito vectors of human diseases. Cyt1Aa overcomes insect resistance to Cry11Aa and Cry4 toxins and synergizes the toxicity of these toxins. However, the molecular mechanism of synergism remains unsolved. Here, we provide evidence that Cyt1Aa functions as a receptor of Cry11Aa. Sequential-binding analysis of Cyt1Aa and Cry11Aa revealed that Cyt1Aa binding to Aedes aegypti brush border membrane vesicles enhanced the binding of biotinylated-Cry11Aa. The Cyt1Aa- and Cry11Aa-binding epitopes were mapped by means of the yeast two-hybrid system, peptide arrays, and heterologous competition assays with synthetic peptides. Two exposed regions in Cyt1Aa, loop beta6-alphaE and part of beta7, bind Cry11Aa. On the other side, Cry11Aa binds Cyt1Aa proteins by means of domain II-loop alpha8 and beta-4, which are also involved in midgut receptor interaction. Characterization of single-point mutations in Cry11Aa and Cyt1Aa revealed key Cry11Aa (S259 and E266) and Cyt1Aa (K198, E204 and K225) residues involved in the interaction of both proteins and in synergism. Additionally, a Cyt1Aa loop beta6-alphaE mutant (K198A) with enhanced synergism to Cry11Aa was isolated. Data provided here strongly indicates that Cyt1Aa synergizes or suppresses resistance to Cry11Aa toxin by functioning as a membrane-bound receptor. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is a highly effective pathogenic bacterium because it produces a toxin and also its functional receptor, promoting toxin binding to the target membrane and causing toxicity. PMID:16339907

  19. Amino acid sequences of proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona.

    PubMed

    Alves, S F; Lefebvre, R B; Probert, W

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a partial amino acid sequences from three putative outer envelope proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona. In order to obtain internal fragments for protein sequencing, enzymatic and chemical digestion was performed. The enzyme clostripain was used to digest the proteins 32 and 45 kDa. In situ digestion of 40 kDa molecular weight protein was accomplished using cyanogen bromide. The 32 kDa protein generated two fragments, one of 21 kDa and another of 10 kDa that yielded five residues. A fragment of 24 kDa that yielded nineteen residues of amino acids was obtained from 45 kDa protein. A fragment with a molecular weight of 20 kDa, yielding a twenty amino acids sequence from the 40 kDa protein.

  20. Protein quality of supplements and meal replacements. Amino acids and calculated indicators of protein quality.

    PubMed

    Marable, N L; Hinners, M L; Hardison, N W; Kehrberg, N L

    1980-09-01

    The amino acid composition of several types of dietary supplements and meal replacements was measured and compared with label values when available and to published values for egg. Calculated indicators of protein quality, such as chemical score, protein calorie:total calorie ratio, individual essential amino acid:total essential amino acid ratio, and total essential amino acid:total amino acid ratio were also compared for products, egg, and the estimated pattern of adult requirements. Predigested liquid protein products were notably lower in protein quality than other products. All non-predigested products compared favorably with egg in terms of protein quality, but were more expensive and had no advantages over regular meals in terms of protein quality as reducing aids or protein supplements.

  1. Protein and amino acid metabolism and requirements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells of the body. Enzymes, membrane carriers, blood transport molecules, intracellular matrix, and even hair and fingernails are proteins, as are many hormones. Proteins also constitute a major portion of all membranes, and the cons...

  2. Phosphate acceptor amino acid residues in structural proteins of rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Tan, K B; McFalls, M L; Madore, P

    1974-07-01

    Partial acid hydrolysates of the [(32)P]phosphate- or [(3)H]serine-labeled proteins of purified vesicular stomatitis, rabies, Lagos bat, Mokola, or spring viremia of carp virions and of purified intracellular nucleocapsids of these viruses have been analyzed by paper electrophoresis for the presence of phosphorylated amino acids. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, with the former predominant, were present in virion and nucleocapsid preparations that contained phosphoproteins. An exception was the fish rhabdovirus, which contained only phosphoserine. When vesicular stomatitis or rabies virus proteins were phosphorylated in a cell-free system by the virion-associated protein kinase and analyzed for the presence of phosphorylated amino acid residues, phosphoserine was again found to be more abundant than phosphothreonine. After in vitro protein phosphorylation, another phospho-compound, possibly a third phosphoamino acid, was detected in the partial acid hydrolysates of these viruses. PMID:4365328

  3. Measuring protein-protein and protein-nucleic Acid interactions by biolayer interferometry.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Azmiri; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2015-01-01

    Biolayer interferometry (BLI) is a simple, optical dip-and-read system useful for measuring interactions between proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, small molecules, and/or lipids in real time. In BLI, a biomolecular bait is immobilized on a matrix at the tip of a fiber-optic sensor. The binding between the immobilized ligand and another molecule in an analyte solution produces a change in optical thickness at the tip and results in a wavelength shift proportional to binding. BLI provides direct binding affinities and rates of association and dissociation. This unit describes an efficient approach using streptavidin-based BLI to analyze DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. A quantitative set of equilibrium binding affinities (K(d)) and rates of association and dissociation (k(a)/k(d)) can be measured in minutes using nanomole quantities of sample.

  4. Aminoacylase 3 binds to and cleaves the N-terminus of the hepatitis C virus core protein

    PubMed Central

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Vahi, Ritu; Hasnain, Huma; Phillips, Martin; Ryan, Christopher M.; Atanasov, Ivo; Faull, Kym F.; Kurtz, Ira; Pushkin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Aminoacylase 3 (AA3) mediates deacetylation of N-acetyl aromatic amino acids and mercapturic acids. Deacetylation of mercapturic acids of exo- and endobiotics are likely involved in their toxicity. AA3 is predominantly expressed in kidney, and to a lesser extent in liver, brain, and blood. AA3 has been recently reported to interact with the hepatitis C virus core protein (HCVCP) in the yeast two-hybrid system. Here we demonstrate that AA3 directly binds to HCVCP (Kd~10 μM) that may by implicated in HCV pathogenesis. AA3 also revealed a weak endopeptidase activity towards the N-terminus of HCVCP. PMID:23010594

  5. Interaction of milk whey protein with common phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Yu, Dandan; Sun, Jing; Guo, Huiyuan; Ding, Qingbo; Liu, Ruihai; Ren, Fazheng

    2014-01-01

    Phenolics-rich foods such as fruit juices and coffee are often consumed with milk. In this study, the interactions of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin with the phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and coumalic acid) were examined. Fluorescence, CD, and FTIR spectroscopies were used to analyze the binding modes, binding constants, and the effects of complexation on the conformation of whey protein. The results showed that binding constants of each whey protein-phenolic acid interaction ranged from 4 × 105 to 7 × 106 M-n and the number of binding sites n ranged from 1.28 ± 0.13 to 1.54 ± 0.34. Because of these interactions, the conformation of whey protein was altered, with a significant reduction in the amount of α-helix and an increase in the amounts of β-sheet and turn structures.

  6. Use of homoarginine for measuring true ileal digestibility of amino acids in food protein.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jie; Ren, Wenkai; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Miaomiao; Xiao, Hao; Duan, Jielin; Zhao, Yurong; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao; Nyachoti, C M

    2015-09-01

    A useful application of homoarginine in animal nutrition is the determination of the true ileal digestibility (TID) of amino acids (AA) in swine complete diets and feed ingredients. The homoarginine method involves the conversion of dietary lysine to homoarginine in a guanidination reaction with methylisourea. Accurate determination of TID of AA, especially in heat-treated feed ingredients, is a key prerequisite for accurate diet formulation with respect to the provision of dietary AA. Thus, the aim of this review is to highlight the homoarginine methodology and its application in animal nutrition. Based on the data from published studies, the homoarginine method can be used to accurately determine the digestibility of lysine and the majority of other acid-stable AA in complete diets and feed ingredients fed to animals.

  7. Automated protein hydrolysis delivering sample to a solid acid catalyst for amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Akiko; Dohmae, Naoshi

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we developed an automatic protein hydrolysis system using strong cation-exchange resins as solid acid catalysts. Examining several kinds of inorganic solid acids and cation-exchange resins, we found that a few cation-exchange resins worked as acid catalysts for protein hydrolysis when heated in the presence of water. The most efficient resin yielded amounts of amino acids that were over 70% of those recovered after conventional hydrolysis with hydrochloric acid and resulted in amino acid compositions matching the theoretical values. The solid-acid hydrolysis was automated by packing the resin into columns, combining the columns with a high-performance liquid chromatography system, and heating them. The amino acids that constitute a protein can thereby be determined, minimizing contamination from the environment.

  8. Amino acid and mineral composition of protein and other components and their recovery yields from whole Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) using isoelectric solubilization/precipitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-C; Tou, J C; Jaczynski, J

    2009-03-01

    Proteins and insolubles were recovered from whole Antarctic krill via novel isoelectric solubilization/precipitation using different pH treatments. The protein recovery yield was 45% to 50% (dry basis). The recovered proteins had higher (P < 0.05) content of essential amino acids (EAAs) and non-EAAs as well as higher (P < 0.05) ratio of total EAA/total AA than whole krill. The EAAs constituted almost 50% of total AAs. The least extreme pH treatments (pHs 3 and 12) yielded highest (P < 0.05) content of EAAs. The quality of recovered proteins was high based on EAAs meeting FAO/WHO/UNU recommendations for adults and infants. The basic pH yielded proteins with the lowest (P < 0.05) amount of minerals and the highest (P < 0.05) amount of Ca, P, and Mg in the insolubles when compared to the acidic treatments. However, both basic and acidic treatments effectively removed minerals from recovered proteins without the removal of the exoskeleton before processing. Therefore, besides high-quality proteins, the insolubles may provide a mineral supplement in the animal diet.

  9. A Western Corn Rootworm Cadherin-like Protein is not Involved in the Binding and Toxicity of Cry34/35Ab1 and Cry3Aa Bacillus Thuringiensis Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The western corn rootworm (WCR) Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte is an important insect pest of corn. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins Cry3Aa (as mCry3A) and Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 have been expressed in transgenic corn and are used to control the insect in the U.S. To date, there ...

  10. Analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid in Acetobacter: molecular mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria are used for industrial vinegar production because of their remarkable ability to oxidize ethanol and high resistance to acetic acid. Although several molecular machineries responsible for acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria have been reported, the entire mechanism that confers acetic acid resistance has not been completely understood. One of the promising methods to elucidate the entire mechanism is global analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Recently, two proteins whose production was greatly enhanced by acetic acid in Acetobacter aceti were identified to be aconitase and a putative ABC-transporter, respectively; furthermore, overexpression or disruption of the genes encoding these proteins affected acetic acid resistance in A. aceti, indicating that these proteins are involved in acetic acid resistance. Overexpression of each gene increased acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter, which resulted in an improvement in the productivity of acetic acid fermentation. Taken together, the results of the proteomic analysis and those of previous studies indicate that acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria is conferred by several mechanisms. These findings also provide a clue to breed a strain having high resistance to acetic acid for vinegar fermentation.

  11. Amino acid digestibility of plant protein feed ingredients for growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Cotten, B; Ragland, D; Thomson, J E; Adeola, O

    2016-03-01

    Two experiments were designed to determine the N and AA digestibility of various protein sources (potato protein concentrate, soy protein concentrate, soy protein isolate, linseed meal, sunflower meal, cottonseed meal, canola meal, and camelina meal) fed to growing pigs. In each experiment, barrows were surgically fitted with a simple T-cannula at the distal ileum and fed 4 experimental diets and a N-free diet (NFD) on the basis of a replicated 5 × 2 crossover arrangement with 5 diets and 2 periods. For Exp. 1, 20 cannulated 25-kg barrows received potato concentrate, soy concentrate, soy isolate, and linseed meal. The apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of N for potato concentrate, soy concentrate, and soy isolate were similar and greater than that for linseed meal ( < 0.05). The AID and SID of Leu and Thr were greater in potato protein concentrate than soy concentrate ( < 0.05), and AID and SID of Thr were lower in soy isolate than potato concentrate. The AID and SID of all essential AA were similar between soy isolate and soy concentrate. Linseed meal had the lowest AID and SID of N and AA digestibility among protein sources ( < 0.05). In Exp. 2, sunflower meal, cottonseed meal, canola meal, and camelina meal were fed to 42-kg barrows to determine their AID and SID of AA. The AID and SID of N and all AA were greatest for sunflower meal ( < 0.05), and canola meal had similar AID and SID of N, Met, Thr, Leu, and Val. The AID and SID of all essential AA, except for Met and Trp, were lowest for sunflower meal ( < 0.05). Cottonseed meal had lower AID and SID for Lys, Ile, Leu, Met, Thr, and Val compared with the other protein sources ( < 0.05). In conclusion, the digestibility of N and AA varies greatly among oilseed meals. PMID:27065269

  12. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tan, Bie; Li, Yinghui; Duan, Yehui; Blachier, François; Hu, Chien-An A.; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA) pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet)- or higher/NRC (National Research Council)-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I) and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II) were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (P<0.05) gradually with increasing age. Bama mini-pigs had generally higher (P<0.05) muscle concentrations of flavor-related AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05) than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K), and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05). There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05) the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but

  13. Protein and amino acid metabolism in the human newborn.

    PubMed

    Kalhan, Satish C; Bier, Dennis M

    2008-01-01

    Birth and adaptation to extrauterine life involve major shifts in the protein and energy metabolism of the human newborn. These include a shift from a state of continuous supply of nutrients including amino acids from the mother to cyclic periodic oral intake, a change in the redox state of organs, thermogenesis, and a significant change in the mobilization and use of oxidative substrates. The development of safe, stable isotopic tracer methods has allowed the study of protein and amino acid metabolism not only in the healthy newborn but also in those born prematurely and of low birth weight. These studies have identified the unique and quantitative aspects of amino acid/protein metabolism in the neonate, thus contributing to rational nutritional care of these babies. The present review summarizes the contemporary data on some of the significant developments in essential and dispensable amino acids and their relationship to overall protein metabolism. Specifically, the recent data of kinetics of leucine, phenylalanine, glutamine, sulfur amino acid, and threonine and their relation to whole-body protein turnover are presented. Finally, the physiological rationale and the impact of nutrient (amino acids) interventions on the dynamics of protein metabolism are discussed.

  14. Fatty acid transfer between multilamellar liposomes and fatty acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Brecher, P; Saouaf, R; Sugarman, J M; Eisenberg, D; LaRosa, K

    1984-11-10

    A simple experimental system was developed for studying the movement of long-chain fatty acids between multilamellar liposomes and soluble proteins capable of binding fatty acids. Oleic acid was incorporated into multilamellar liposomes containing cholesterol and egg yolk lecithin and incubated with albumin or hepatic fatty acid-binding protein. It was found that the fatty acid transferred from the liposomes to either protein rapidly and selectively under conditions where phospholipid and cholesterol transfer did not occur. More than 50% of the fatty acid contained within liposomes could become protein bound, suggesting that the fatty acid moved readily between and across phospholipid bilayers. Transfer was reduced at low pH, and this reduction appeared to result from decreased dissociation of the protonated fatty acid from the bilayer. Liposomes made with dimyristoyl or dipalmitoyl lecithin and containing 1 mol per cent palmitic acid were used to show the effect of temperature on fatty acid transfer. Transfer to either protein did not occur at temperatures where the liposomes were in a gel state but occurred rapidly at temperatures at or above the transition temperatures of the phospholipid used. PMID:6490659

  15. Role of arachidonic acid and protein kinase C during maturation-inducing hormone-dependent meiotic resumption and ovulation in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, R.; Yoshizaki, G.; Bolamba, D.; Thomas, P.

    2003-01-01

    The roles of arachidonic acid (AA) and protein kinase C (PKC) during in vitro maturation-inducing hormone (MIH)-dependent meiotic resumption (maturation) and ovulation were studied in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus). The requirement for cyclooxygenase (COX) metabolites of AA was examined using a nonspecific COX inhibitor, indomethacin (IM), as well as two COX products, prostaglandin (PG) F2?? and PGE2, whereas the role of lipoxygenase (LOX) was investigated using a specific LOX inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA). The involvement of PKC was examined using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, as well as GF109203X (GF), a specific inhibitor of PKC and 1-(5-isoquin- olinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7), nonspecific inhibitor of protein kinases. Genomic mechanisms were examined with the transcription-inhibitor actinomycin D (ActD) and the functionality of heterologous (oocyte-granulosa) gap junctions (GJ) with a dye transfer assay. The AA (100 ??M) and PGF2?? (5 ??M) did not induce maturation, and NDGA (10 ??M) did not affect MIH-dependent maturation. However, IM (100 ??M) partially inhibited MIH-dependent maturation. Conversely, AA and both PGs induced, and IM and NDGA inhibited, MIH-dependent ovulation in matured follicles. The PMA (1 ??g/ml) did not induce maturation but caused ovulation in matured follicles, whereas PKC inhibitors (GF, 5 ??M; H7, 50??M) did not affect MIH-dependent maturation but inhibited MIH- and PMA-dependent ovulation. The PMA-dependent ovulation was inhibited by IM but not by NDGA. In addition, ActD (5 ??M) blocked MIH-dependent, but not PMA-dependent, ovulation, and PGF2?? restored MIH-dependent ovulation in ActD-blocked follicles. The AA and PGs did not induce, and GF did not inhibit, MIH-dependent heterologous GJ uncoupling. In conclusion, AA and PKC mediate MIH-dependent ovulation but not meiotic resumption or heterologous GJ uncoupling in croaker follicles, but a permissive role

  16. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-01-01

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory’s isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method. PMID:26138206

  17. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-07-03

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory's isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method.

  18. HALOACETIC ACIDS PERTURB PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION IN MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    HALOACETIC ACIDS PERTURB PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION IN MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO. MR Blanton and ES Hunter. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    Sponsor: JM Rogers.
    Haloacetic Acids (HAAs) formed during the disinfection process are present in drin...

  19. Bifunctional CYP81AA proteins catalyse identical hydroxylations but alternative regioselective phenol couplings in plant xanthone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    El-Awaad, Islam; Bocola, Marco; Beuerle, Till; Liu, Benye; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Xanthones are natural products present in plants and microorganisms. In plants, their biosynthesis starts with regioselective cyclization of 2,3′,4,6-tetrahydroxybenzophenone to either 1,3,5- or 1,3,7-trihydroxyxanthones, catalysed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. Here we isolate and express CYP81AA-coding sequences from Hypericum calycinum and H. perforatum in yeast. Microsomes catalyse two consecutive reactions, that is, 3′-hydroxylation of 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzophenone and C–O phenol coupling of the resulting 2,3′,4,6-tetrahydroxybenzophenone. Relative to the inserted 3′-hydroxyl, the orthologues Hc/HpCYP81AA1 cyclize via the para position to form 1,3,7-trihydroxyxanthone, whereas the paralogue HpCYP81AA2 directs cyclization to the ortho position, yielding the isomeric 1,3,5-trihydroxyxanthone. Homology modelling and reciprocal mutagenesis reveal the impact of S375, L378 and A483 on controlling the regioselectivity of HpCYP81AA2, which is converted into HpCYP81AA1 by sextuple mutation. However, the reciprocal mutations in HpCYP81AA1 barely affect its regiospecificity. Product docking rationalizes the alternative C–O phenol coupling reactions. Our results help understand the machinery of bifunctional CYPs. PMID:27145837

  20. Optimum ratio of histidine in the piglet ideal protein model and its effects on body metabolism. I. Basal diet formulation based on digestible amino acids according to the ideal protein model for 10 to 20 kg piglets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J H; Li, D F; Gong, L M; Zhang, Y C; Zhang, D F

    2002-04-01

    A 4 x 4 Latin square design was used to determine ileal apparent digestibility of amino acids (AAs) in corn, soybean meal, feather meal and dried whey in young pigs. The data were then to be used in formulating a basal diet for studies on AA metabolism in young pigs. Eight castrates T-cannulated at terminal ileum (average initial body weight 12.5 +/- 0.62 kg) were divided into 4 groups on the basis of body weight and transferred to individual metabolism crates. They were then fed four experimental diets containing the four feedstuffs to be tested (corn, soybean meal, feather meal and dried whey). The trial lasted 20 days, which included 4 five-day periods for ileal digesta collection. It was found that the digestibility of the AAs was similar to that reported in literature. Based on the findings a basal diet for this research was formulated according to an ideal protein model for the 10 to 20 kg piglet, on the basis of digestible AAs and containing 14.13 MJ/kg digestible energy, 18.22% crude protein, 1.04% digestible lysine and 0.23% digestible histidine.

  1. Production and functional evaluation of a protein concentrate from giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) by acid dissolution and isoelectric precipitation.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Ruiz, Juan A; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; Elena Lugo-Sánchez, M; Gisela Carvallo-Ruiz, M; García-Sánchez, Guillermina

    2008-09-15

    A protein concentrate from giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) was produced under acidic conditions and its functional-technological capability evaluated in terms of its gel-forming ability, water holding capacity and colour attributes. Technological functionality of the concentrate was compared with that of squid muscle and a neutral concentrate. Protein-protein aggregates insoluble at high ionic strength (I=0.5M), were detected in the acidic concentrate as result of processing with no preclusion of its gel-forming ability during the sol-to-gel thermal transition. Even though washing under acidic condition promoted autolysis of the myosin heavy chain, the acidic concentrate displayed an outstanding ability to gel giving samples with a gel strength of 455 and 1160gcm at 75% and 90% compression respectively, and an AA folding test grade indicative of high gel strength, elasticity, and cohesiveness. The process proved to be a good alternative for obtaining a functional protein concentrate from giant squid muscle. PMID:26049243

  2. Cry1Aa binding to the cadherin receptor does not require conserved amino acid sequences in the domain II loops

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yuki; Tanaka, Shiho; Otsuki, Manami; Hoshino, Yasushi; Morimoto, Chinatsu; Kotani, Takuya; Harashima, Yuko; Endo, Haruka; Yoshizawa, Yasutaka; Sato, Ryoichi

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing the binding mechanism of Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) Cry toxin to the cadherin receptor is indispensable to understanding the specific insecticidal activity of this toxin. To this end, we constructed 30 loop mutants by randomly inserting four serial amino acids covering all four receptor binding loops (loops α8, 1, 2 and 3) and analysed their binding affinities for Bombyx mori cadherin receptors via Biacore. High binding affinities were confirmed for all 30 mutants containing loop sequences that differed from those of wild-type. Insecticidal activities were confirmed in at least one mutant from loops 1, 2 and 3, suggesting that there is no critical amino acid sequence for the binding of the four loops to BtR175. When two mutations at different loops were integrated into one molecule, no reduction in binding affinity was observed compared with wild-type sequences. Based on these results, we discussed the binding mechanism of Cry toxin to cadherin protein. PMID:23145814

  3. Predicting protein disorder by analyzing amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu

    2008-01-01

    Background Many protein regions and some entire proteins have no definite tertiary structure, presenting instead as dynamic, disorder ensembles under different physiochemical circumstances. These proteins and regions are known as Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUP). IUP have been associated with a wide range of protein functions, along with roles in diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Results Identifying IUP is important task in structural and functional genomics. We exact useful features from sequences and develop machine learning algorithms for the above task. We compare our IUP predictor with PONDRs (mainly neural-network-based predictors), disEMBL (also based on neural networks) and Globplot (based on disorder propensity). Conclusion We find that augmenting features derived from physiochemical properties of amino acids (such as hydrophobicity, complexity etc.) and using ensemble method proved beneficial. The IUP predictor is a viable alternative software tool for identifying IUP protein regions and proteins. PMID:18831799

  4. IR-UV photochemistry of protein-nucleic acid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kozub, J.; Edwards, G.

    1995-12-31

    UV light has often been used to induce the formation of covalent bonds between DNA (or RNA) and tightly-bound protein molecules. However, the internal photoreactions of nucleic acids and proteins limit the yield and complicate the analysis of intermolecular crosslinks. In an ongoing search for improved reaction specificity or new photoreactions in these systems, we have employed UV photons from a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser and mid-IR photons from the Vanderbilt FEL. Having crosslinked several protein-nucleic acid systems with nanosecond UV laser pulses, we are currently studying the effect of various IR wavelengths on a model system (gene 32 protein and poly[dT]). We have found that irradiation with sufficiently intense FEL macropulses creates an altered form of gene 32 protein which was not observed with UV-only irradiation. The electrophoretic nobility of the product is consistent with the formation of a specific protein-protein crosslink. No evidence of the non-specific protein damage typically induced by UV light is found. The yield of the new photoproduct is apparently enhanced by exposure to FEL macropulses which are synchronized with UV laser pulses. With ideal exposure parameters, the two-color reaction effectively competes with UV-only reactions. Experiments designed to determine the reaction mechanism and to demonstrate FEL-induced reactions in other protein-nucleic acid systems are currently underway.

  5. Molecular Evolution Directs Protein Translation Using Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Cox, Vanessa E; Gaucher, Eric A

    2015-12-02

    Unnatural amino acids have in recent years established their importance in a wide range of fields, from pharmaceuticals to polymer science. Unnatural amino acids can increase the number of chemical groups within proteins and thus expand or enhance biological function. Our ability to utilize these important building blocks, however, has been limited by the inherent difficulty in incorporating these molecules into proteins. To address this challenge, researchers have examined how the canonical twenty amino acids are incorporated, regulated, and modified in nature. This review focuses on achievements and techniques used to engineer the ribosomal protein-translation machinery, including the introduction of orthogonal translation components, how directed evolution enhances the incorporation of unnatural amino acids, and the potential utility of ancient biomolecules for this process.

  6. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(II) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls. These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (α,β-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(II) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed. In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts.

  7. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    PubMed Central

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(II) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls. These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (α,β-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(II) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed. In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts. PMID:10639127

  8. Effect of pig breed and dietary protein level on selected fatty acids and stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase protein expression in longissimus muscle and subcutaneous fat.

    PubMed

    Bessa, R J B; Hughes, R A; Jeronimo, E; Moreira, O C; Prates, J A M; Doran, O

    2013-09-01

    The aims of the study were 1) to investigate effects of a low protein diet on fatty acids content and composition of the LM and subcutaneous adipose tissue in 3 genetically diverse breeds, Large White × Landrace, Alentejano, and Bizaro, and 2) to determine whether the effect of the low protein diet of fatty acid composition is associated with dietary modulation of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) protein expression. The experiments were conducted on 12 Large White × Landrace, 12 Alentejano, and 10 Bízaro female and male pigs. The average animal BW at the beginning of experiments was 40.8, 40.7, and 38.3 kg for Large White × Landrace, Alentejano, and Bízaro, respectively, and the BW of animals at slaughter was 90 kg. The diets contained 202 or 169 g/kg DM of CP (high and low protein diets, respectively) and were balanced in essential AA. The diets were fed until the animals reached 90 kg BW (approximately 73 d). It was established that Large White × Landrace pigs had a less (P = 0.001) total fatty acid content in subcutaneous adipose tissue when compared with Alentejano and Bízaro and less (P < 0.001) intramuscular fat (IMF) content when compared with Alentejano. There was a positive relationship between SCD protein expression in the LM and MUFA content (r = 0.627, P = 0.029) and SCD protein expression and total muscle fatty acids content (r = 0.725, P = 0.008) in Large White × Landrace but not in Alentejano and Bizaro breeds. It has been suggested that SCD protein expression is associated with regulation of fat deposition only in breeds with genetic predisposition to a low IMF content.

  9. Chemical approaches to detect and analyze protein sulfenic acids

    PubMed Central

    Furdui, Cristina M.; Poole, Leslie B.

    2013-01-01

    Orchestration of many processes relying on intracellular signal transduction is recognized to require the generation of hydrogen peroxide as a second messenger, yet relatively few molecular details of how this oxidant acts to regulate protein function are currently understood. This review describes emerging chemical tools and approaches that can be applied to study protein oxidation in biological systems, with a particular emphasis on a key player in protein redox regulation, cysteine sulfenic acid. While sulfenic acids (within purified proteins or simple mixtures) are detectable by physical approaches like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry, the propensity of these moieties to undergo further modification in complex biological systems has necessitated the development of chemical probes, reporter groups and analytical approaches to allow for their selective detection and quantification. Provided is an overview of techniques that are currently available for the study of sulfenic acids, and some of the biologically meaningful data that have been collected using such approaches. PMID:24105931

  10. Chemical approaches to detect and analyze protein sulfenic acids.

    PubMed

    Furdui, Cristina M; Poole, Leslie B

    2014-01-01

    Orchestration of many processes relying on intracellular signal transduction is recognized to require the generation of hydrogen peroxide as a second messenger, yet relatively few molecular details of how this oxidant acts to regulate protein function are currently understood. This review describes emerging chemical tools and approaches that can be applied to study protein oxidation in biological systems, with a particular emphasis on a key player in protein redox regulation, cysteine sulfenic acid. While sulfenic acids (within purified proteins or simple mixtures) are detectable by physical approaches like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry, the propensity of these moieties to undergo further modification in complex biological systems has necessitated the development of chemical probes, reporter groups and analytical approaches to allow for their selective detection and quantification. Provided is an overview of techniques that are currently available for the study of sulfenic acids, and some of the biologically meaningful data that have been collected using such approaches.

  11. Contribution of Fermentation Yeast to Final Amino Acid Profile in DDGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One major factor affecting DDGS quality and market values is amino acid (AA) composition. DDGS proteins come from corn and yeast. Yet, the effect of fermentation yeast on DDGS protein quantity and quality (AA profile) has not been well documented. Based on literature review, there are at least 4 met...

  12. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  13. Ruminal degradation, amino acid composition, and intestinal digestibility of the residual components of five protein supplements.

    PubMed

    Maiga, H A; Schingoethe, D J; Henson, J E

    1996-09-01

    Two ruminally cannulated Holstein cows (approximately 202 DIM) were used to determine the in situ degradability of five protein supplements: blood meal, meat and bone meal, corn gluten meal, expeller soybean meal, and solvent extracted soybean meal. Dacron bags containing 4 g of each supplement in duplicate were soaked in water and then incubated in the rumen for 0, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h for 3 d. Four extra sample bags of each supplement were incubated in the rumen for 12 h to determine the in vitro intestinal digestibility and AA analysis of the residues. Protein supplements were also analyzed for their AA content. Ruminal degradability of individual supplements varied. Solvent soybean meal was the most degradable, and blood meal was the least degradable. Specific first-limiting essential AA were isoleucine for blood meal and meat and bone meal, lysine for corn gluten meal, and methionine for the soybean meals. The RUP fraction in solvent-extracted and expeller soybean meals tended to be more intestinally digestible than did the protein in blood meal and meat and bone meal. In general, all protein supplements, except solvent-extracted soybean meal, were high in RUP and had the potential to provide good quality AA to complement microbial AA for production.

  14. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  18. Overexpression of the Artemisia Orthologue of ABA Receptor, AaPYL9, Enhances ABA Sensitivity and Improves Artemisinin Content in Artemisia annua L

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fangyuan; Lu, Xu; Lv, Zongyou; Zhang, Ling; Zhu, Mengmeng; Jiang, Weiming; Wang, Guofeng; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2013-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in plant development and environmental stress response. In this study, we cloned an ABA receptor orthologue, AaPYL9, from Artemisia annua L. AaPYL9 is expressed highly in leaf and flower. AaPYL9 protein can be localized in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Yeast two-hybrid assay shows AaPYL9 can specifically interact with AtABI1 but not with AtABI2, AtHAB1 or AtHAB2. ABA can enhance the interaction between AaPYL9 and AtABI1 while AaPYL9-89 Pro→Ser and AaPYL9-116 His→Ala point mutations abolishes the interaction. BiFC assay shows that AaPYL9 interacts with AtABI1 in nucleus in planta. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants over-expressing AaPYL9 are more sensitive to ABA in the seed germination and primary root growth than wild type. Consistent with this, ABA report genes have higher expression in AaPYL9 overexpressing plants compared to wild type after ABA treatment. Moreover, overexpression of AaPYL9 in A. annua increases not only drought tolerance, but also artemisinin content after ABA treatment, with significant enhancement of the expression of key genes in artemisinin biosynthesis. This study provides a way to develop A. annua with high-yielding artemisinin and high drought resistance. PMID:23437216

  19. Mapping protein and nucleic acid structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakov, I. V.; Zrelov, P. V.; Ivanov, V. V.; Polozov, R. V.; Sivozhelezov, V. S.; Stepanenko, V. A.; Chirgadze, Yu. N.

    2013-09-01

    Methods and algorithms to analyze surfaces of globular and fibrillar proteins, DNA, and RNA have been developed. These methods for the construction of maps of fragments of these objects in the original cylindrical projection developed herein essentially broaden the possibilities for studying the distribution of charges and surface topography of biological structures. This approach significantly supplements the qualitative characteristics of methods of visualizing biopolymer structures.

  20. FLU, an amino acid substitution model for influenza proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The amino acid substitution model is the core component of many protein analysis systems such as sequence similarity search, sequence alignment, and phylogenetic inference. Although several general amino acid substitution models have been estimated from large and diverse protein databases, they remain inappropriate for analyzing specific species, e.g., viruses. Emerging epidemics of influenza viruses raise the need for comprehensive studies of these dangerous viruses. We propose an influenza-specific amino acid substitution model to enhance the understanding of the evolution of influenza viruses. Results A maximum likelihood approach was applied to estimate an amino acid substitution model (FLU) from ~113, 000 influenza protein sequences, consisting of ~20 million residues. FLU outperforms 14 widely used models in constructing maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees for the majority of influenza protein alignments. On average, FLU gains ~42 log likelihood points with an alignment of 300 sites. Moreover, topologies of trees constructed using FLU and other models are frequently different. FLU does indeed have an impact on likelihood improvement as well as tree topologies. It was implemented in PhyML and can be downloaded from ftp://ftp.sanger.ac.uk/pub/1000genomes/lsq/FLU or included in PhyML 3.0 server at http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/phyml/. Conclusions FLU should be useful for any influenza protein analysis system which requires an accurate description of amino acid substitutions. PMID:20384985

  1. Amino acid residues in the GerAB protein important in the function and assembly of the alanine spore germination receptor of Bacillus subtilis 168.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Gareth R; Moir, Anne

    2011-05-01

    The paradigm gerA operon is required for endospore germination in response to c-alanine as the sole germinant, and the three protein products, GerAA, GerAB, and GerAC are predicted to form a receptor complex in the spore inner membrane. GerAB shows homology to the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) family of single-component transporters and is predicted to be an integral membrane protein with 10 membrane-spanning helices. Site-directed mutations were introduced into the gerAB gene at its natural location on the chromosome. Alterations to some charged or potential helix-breaking residues within membrane spans affected receptor function dramatically. In some cases, this is likely to reflect the complete loss of the GerA receptor complex, as judged by the absence of the germinant receptor protein GerAC, which suggests that the altered GerAB protein itself may be unstable or that the altered structure destabilizes the complex. Mutants that have a null phenotype for Instituto de Biotecnología de León, INBIOTEC, Parque Científico de León, Av. Real, 1, 24006 León, Spain-alanine germination but retain GerAC protein at near-normal levels are more likely to define amino acid residues of functional, rather than structural, importance. Single-amino-acid substitutions in each of the GerAB and GerAA proteins can prevent incorporation of GerAC protein into the spore; this provides strong evidence that the proteins within a specific receptor interact and that these interactions are required for receptor assembly. The lipoprotein nature of the GerAC receptor subunit is also important; an amino acid change in the prelipoprotein signal sequence in the gerAC1 mutant results in the absence of GerAC protein from the spore.

  2. Review: the liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Hugo L

    2009-12-01

    The liver bile acid-binding proteins, L-BABPs, formerly called the liver "basic" fatty acid-binding proteins, are a subfamily of the fatty acid-binding proteins, FABPs. All the members of this protein group share the same fold: a 10 stranded beta barrel in which two short helices are inserted in between the first and the second strand of antiparallel beta sheet. The barrel encloses the ligand binding cavity of the protein while the two helices are believed to be involved in ligand accessibility to the binding site. The L-BABP subfamily has been found to be present in the liver of several vertebrates: fish, amphibians, reptiles, and birds but not in mammals. The members of the FABP family present in mammals that appear to be more closely related to the L-BABPs are the liver FABPs and the ileal BABPs, both very extensively studied. Several L-BABP X-ray structures are available and chicken L-BABP has also been studied using NMR spectroscopy. The stoichiometry of ligand binding for bile acids, first determined by X-ray crystallography for the chicken liver protein, is of two cholates per protein molecule with the only exception of zebrafish L-BABP which, due to the presence of a disulfide bridge, has a stoichiometry of 1:1. The stoichiometry of ligand binding for fatty acids, determined with several different techniques, is 1:1. An unanswered question of great relevance is the identity of the protein that in mammals performs the function that in other vertebrates is carried out by the L-BABPS.

  3. A cadherin-like protein functions as a receptor for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa and Cry1Ac toxins on midgut epithelial cells of Bombyx mori larvae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hirotaka; Atsumi, Shogo; Yaoi, Katsuro; Nakanishi, Kazuko; Higurashi, Satoshi; Miura, Nami; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Sato, Ryoichi

    2003-03-13

    Aminopeptidase N (APN) and cadherin-like protein (BtR175) from Bombyx mori larvae were examined for their roles in Cry1Aa- and Cry1Ac-induced lysis of B. mori midgut epithelial cells (MECs). APNs and BtR175 were present in all areas of the midgut, were particularly abundant in the posterior region, and were found only on columnar cell microvilli and not on the lateral membrane that makes cell-cell contacts. This distribution was in accordance with the distribution of Cry1A-susceptible MECs in the midgut. The lytic activity of Cry1Aa and Cry1Ac on collagenase-dissociated MECs was linearly dependent on toxin concentration. Although pre-treatment of MECs with anti-BtR175 antibody was observed to partially inhibit the lytic activity exerted by 0.1-1 nM Cry1Aa toxin or 5 nM Cry1Ac toxin, no significant inhibition was observed when MECs were pre-treated with anti-APN antibody. These results suggest that BtR175 functions as a major receptor for Cry1A toxins in the midgut of B. mori larvae. PMID:12633848

  4. New Insight into Quinoa Seed Quality under Salinity: Changes in Proteomic and Amino Acid Profiles, Phenolic Content, and Antioxidant Activity of Protein Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Aloisi, Iris; Parrotta, Luigi; Ruiz, Karina B.; Landi, Claudia; Bini, Luca; Cai, Giampiero; Biondi, Stefania; Del Duca, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd) is an ancient Andean seed-producing crop well known for its exceptional nutritional properties and resistance to adverse environmental conditions, such as salinity and drought. Seed storage proteins, amino acid composition, and bioactive compounds play a crucial role in determining the nutritional value of quinoa. Seeds harvested from three Chilean landraces of quinoa, one belonging to the salares ecotype (R49) and two to the coastal-lowlands ecotype, VI-1 and Villarrica (VR), exposed to two levels of salinity (100 and 300 mM NaCl) were used to conduct a sequential extraction of storage proteins in order to obtain fractions enriched in albumins/globulins, 11S globulin and in prolamin-like proteins. The composition of the resulting protein fractions was analyzed by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results confirmed a high polymorphism in seed storage proteins; the two most representative genotype-specific bands of the albumin/globulin fraction were the 30- and 32-kDa bands, while the 11S globulin showed genotype-specific polymorphism for the 40- and 42-kDa bands. Spot analysis by mass spectrometry followed by in silico analyses were conducted to identify the proteins whose expression changed most significantly in response to salinity in VR. Proteins belonging to several functional categories (i.e., stress protein, metabolism, and storage) were affected by salinity. Other nutritional and functional properties, namely amino acid profiles, total polyphenol (TPC) and flavonoid (TFC) contents, and antioxidant activity (AA) of protein extracts were also analyzed. With the exception of Ala and Met in R49, all amino acids derived from protein hydrolysis were diminished in seeds from salt-treated plants, especially in landrace VI-1. By contrast, several free amino acids were unchanged or increased by salinity in R49 as compared with VR and VI-1, suggesting a greater tolerance in the salares landrace. VR had the

  5. New Insight into Quinoa Seed Quality under Salinity: Changes in Proteomic and Amino Acid Profiles, Phenolic Content, and Antioxidant Activity of Protein Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aloisi, Iris; Parrotta, Luigi; Ruiz, Karina B; Landi, Claudia; Bini, Luca; Cai, Giampiero; Biondi, Stefania; Del Duca, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd) is an ancient Andean seed-producing crop well known for its exceptional nutritional properties and resistance to adverse environmental conditions, such as salinity and drought. Seed storage proteins, amino acid composition, and bioactive compounds play a crucial role in determining the nutritional value of quinoa. Seeds harvested from three Chilean landraces of quinoa, one belonging to the salares ecotype (R49) and two to the coastal-lowlands ecotype, VI-1 and Villarrica (VR), exposed to two levels of salinity (100 and 300 mM NaCl) were used to conduct a sequential extraction of storage proteins in order to obtain fractions enriched in albumins/globulins, 11S globulin and in prolamin-like proteins. The composition of the resulting protein fractions was analyzed by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results confirmed a high polymorphism in seed storage proteins; the two most representative genotype-specific bands of the albumin/globulin fraction were the 30- and 32-kDa bands, while the 11S globulin showed genotype-specific polymorphism for the 40- and 42-kDa bands. Spot analysis by mass spectrometry followed by in silico analyses were conducted to identify the proteins whose expression changed most significantly in response to salinity in VR. Proteins belonging to several functional categories (i.e., stress protein, metabolism, and storage) were affected by salinity. Other nutritional and functional properties, namely amino acid profiles, total polyphenol (TPC) and flavonoid (TFC) contents, and antioxidant activity (AA) of protein extracts were also analyzed. With the exception of Ala and Met in R49, all amino acids derived from protein hydrolysis were diminished in seeds from salt-treated plants, especially in landrace VI-1. By contrast, several free amino acids were unchanged or increased by salinity in R49 as compared with VR and VI-1, suggesting a greater tolerance in the salares landrace. VR had the

  6. New Insight into Quinoa Seed Quality under Salinity: Changes in Proteomic and Amino Acid Profiles, Phenolic Content, and Antioxidant Activity of Protein Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aloisi, Iris; Parrotta, Luigi; Ruiz, Karina B; Landi, Claudia; Bini, Luca; Cai, Giampiero; Biondi, Stefania; Del Duca, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd) is an ancient Andean seed-producing crop well known for its exceptional nutritional properties and resistance to adverse environmental conditions, such as salinity and drought. Seed storage proteins, amino acid composition, and bioactive compounds play a crucial role in determining the nutritional value of quinoa. Seeds harvested from three Chilean landraces of quinoa, one belonging to the salares ecotype (R49) and two to the coastal-lowlands ecotype, VI-1 and Villarrica (VR), exposed to two levels of salinity (100 and 300 mM NaCl) were used to conduct a sequential extraction of storage proteins in order to obtain fractions enriched in albumins/globulins, 11S globulin and in prolamin-like proteins. The composition of the resulting protein fractions was analyzed by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results confirmed a high polymorphism in seed storage proteins; the two most representative genotype-specific bands of the albumin/globulin fraction were the 30- and 32-kDa bands, while the 11S globulin showed genotype-specific polymorphism for the 40- and 42-kDa bands. Spot analysis by mass spectrometry followed by in silico analyses were conducted to identify the proteins whose expression changed most significantly in response to salinity in VR. Proteins belonging to several functional categories (i.e., stress protein, metabolism, and storage) were affected by salinity. Other nutritional and functional properties, namely amino acid profiles, total polyphenol (TPC) and flavonoid (TFC) contents, and antioxidant activity (AA) of protein extracts were also analyzed. With the exception of Ala and Met in R49, all amino acids derived from protein hydrolysis were diminished in seeds from salt-treated plants, especially in landrace VI-1. By contrast, several free amino acids were unchanged or increased by salinity in R49 as compared with VR and VI-1, suggesting a greater tolerance in the salares landrace. VR had the

  7. [Fractional and amino acid composition of krill proteins and the potential for obtaining protein preparations].

    PubMed

    Orlova, T A; Churina, E E; Kuranova, L K

    1985-01-01

    Studies of the fractional composition of krill proteins demonstrated that the content of protein fractions changes depending on the time of krill catch. The highest amount of water-soluble proteins is contained by krill caught in December (64%), of salt-soluble by krill caught in June (12%), base-soluble by krill caught in May, September and February (34%). Krill protein contains from 50 to 60% of water- and salt-soluble fractions. Analysis of the amino acid composition of krill proteins showed that it does not differ essentially from that of adequate food proteins.

  8. Proteins, Peptides and Amino Acids: Role in Infant Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nutten, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are polymers composed of 30 or more amino acids; some of them are essential dietary components, since they are not synthetized by human metabolic processes. They are crucial for healthy growth and development and influence major functions of the body. The infant's first year is a critical time of rapid growth and development, which must be supported by a high rate of protein synthesis. Breast milk, as a single specific food source in the first months of life, is providing the total protein and essential amino acids required. Infant formulas have been designed for infants who cannot be breastfed. They should be similar to breast milk in their composition and their functional outcomes, insuring appropriate growth, optimal development, maturation of the immune system, easy digestion and healthy metabolic programming. By modifying their protein components, specific infant formulas have also been developed for specific needs. For example, partially hydrolyzed (prevention of atopic dermatitis) and extensively hydrolyzed or amino-acid-based infant formulas (reduction in allergy symptoms) have been designed for the management of cow's milk protein allergy. In conclusion, proteins provided via breast milk or infant formula are essential components of the infant's diet; therefore, the specific quality, quantity and conformation of proteins are of utmost importance for healthy growth and development. PMID:27336588

  9. Proteins, Peptides and Amino Acids: Role in Infant Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nutten, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are polymers composed of 30 or more amino acids; some of them are essential dietary components, since they are not synthetized by human metabolic processes. They are crucial for healthy growth and development and influence major functions of the body. The infant's first year is a critical time of rapid growth and development, which must be supported by a high rate of protein synthesis. Breast milk, as a single specific food source in the first months of life, is providing the total protein and essential amino acids required. Infant formulas have been designed for infants who cannot be breastfed. They should be similar to breast milk in their composition and their functional outcomes, insuring appropriate growth, optimal development, maturation of the immune system, easy digestion and healthy metabolic programming. By modifying their protein components, specific infant formulas have also been developed for specific needs. For example, partially hydrolyzed (prevention of atopic dermatitis) and extensively hydrolyzed or amino-acid-based infant formulas (reduction in allergy symptoms) have been designed for the management of cow's milk protein allergy. In conclusion, proteins provided via breast milk or infant formula are essential components of the infant's diet; therefore, the specific quality, quantity and conformation of proteins are of utmost importance for healthy growth and development.

  10. A general method of protein purification for recombinant unstructured non-acidic proteins.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco; Guillén, Gabriel; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2011-11-01

    Typical late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate in response to water deficit imposed by the environment or by plant developmental programs. Because of their physicochemical properties, they can be considered as hydrophilins and as a paradigm of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs) in plants. To study their biophysical and biochemical characteristics large quantities of highly purified protein are required. In this work, we report a fast and simple purification method for non-acidic recombinant LEA proteins that does not need the addition of tags and that preserves their in vitro protective activity. The method is based on the enrichment of the protein of interest by boiling the bacterial protein extract, followed by a differential precipitation with trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Using this procedure we have obtained highly pure recombinant LEA proteins of groups 1, 3, and 4 and one recombinant bacterial hydrophilin. This protocol will facilitate the purification of this type of IUPs, and could be particularly useful in proteomic projects/analyses.

  11. Amino acid composition, including key derivatives of eccrine sweat: potential biomarkers of certain atopic skin conditions.

    PubMed

    Mark, Harker; Harding, Clive R

    2013-04-01

    The free amino acid (AA) composition of eccrine sweat is different from other biological fluids, for reasons which are not properly understood. We undertook the detailed analysis of the AA composition of freshly isolated pure human eccrine sweat, including some of the key derivatives of AA metabolism, to better understand the key biological mechanisms governing its composition. Eccrine sweat was collected from the axillae of 12 healthy subjects immediately upon formation. Free AA analysis was performed using an automatic AA analyser after ninhydrin derivatization. Pyrrolidine-5-carboxylic acid (PCA) and urocanic acid (UCA) levels were determined using GC/MS. The free AA composition of sweat was dominated by the presence of serine accounting for just over one-fifth of the total free AA composition. Glycine was the next most abundant followed by PCA, alanine, citrulline and threonine, respectively. The data obtained indicate that the AA content of sweat bears a remarkable similarity to the AA composition of the epidermal protein profilaggrin. This protein is the key source of free AAs and their derivatives that form a major part of the natural moisturizing factor (NMF) within the stratum corneum (SC) and plays a major role in maintaining the barrier integrity of human skin. As perturbations in the production of NMF can lead to abnormal barrier function and can arise as a consequence of filaggrin genotype, we propose the quantification of AAs in sweat may serve as a non-invasive diagnostic biomarker for certain atopic skin conditions, that is, atopic dermatitis (AD).

  12. Acidic Shell Proteins of the Mediterranean Fan Mussel Pinna nobilis.

    PubMed

    Marin, Frédéric; Narayanappa, Prabakaran; Motreuil, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    In molluscs, the shell secretion process is controlled by a set of extracellular macromolecules collectively called the shell matrix. The shell matrix, which is produced by the mantle epithelial cells during mineralization, is predominantly composed of proteins, glycoproteins, acidic polysaccharides, and chitin that precisely regulate the deposition of calcium carbonate outside the mantle cells. In the present paper, we focus on the shell of Pinna nobilis, the giant Mediterranean fan mussel, usually considered as a model for studying molluscan biomineralization processes. P. nobilis exhibits indeed a nacro-prismatic shell, the outer layer of which is constituted of the so-called "regular simple calcitic prisms," according to Carter and Clark (1985). We review here the microstructural characteristics of the prisms and nacre and the biochemical properties of their associated matrices. In particular, the calcitic prisms of P. nobilis are characterized by a cortege of unusually acidic intraprismatic proteins, while the ones of the nacreous layer seem less acidic. A brief description of the molecular characterization of three acidic proteins, caspartin, calprismin and mucoperlin, is given. In particular, we show that extremely acidic intracrystalline proteins such as caspartin interact with calcium carbonate at different scales, from micrometric to crystal lattice levels.

  13. Analysis of single nucleic acid molecules with protein nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Maglia, Giovanni; Heron, Andrew J.; Stoddart, David; Japrung, Deanpen; Bayley, Hagan

    2011-01-01

    We describe the methods used in our laboratory for the analysis of single nucleic acid molecules with protein nanopores. The technical section is preceded by a review of the variety of experiments that can be done with protein nanopores. The end goal of much of this work is single-molecule DNA sequencing, although sequencing is not discussed explicitly here. The technical section covers the equipment required for nucleic acid analysis, the preparation and storage of the necessary materials, and aspects of signal processing and data analysis. PMID:20627172

  14. Comparative proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in β-aminobutyric acid enhanced Arabidopsis thaliana tolerance to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingwu; Jiang, Xinwu; Shi, Wuliang; Chen, Juan; Pei, Zhenming; Zheng, Hailei

    2011-05-01

    Acid rain is a worldwide environmental issue that has seriously destroyed forest ecosystems. As a highly effective and broad-spectrum plant resistance-inducing agent, β-aminobutyric acid could elevate the tolerance of Arabidopsis when subjected to simulated acid rain. Using comparative proteomic strategies, we analyzed 203 significantly varied proteins of which 175 proteins were identified responding to β-aminobutyric acid in the absence and presence of simulated acid rain. They could be divided into ten groups according to their biological functions. Among them, the majority was cell rescue, development and defense-related proteins, followed by transcription, protein synthesis, folding, modification and destination-associated proteins. Our conclusion is β-aminobutyric acid can lead to a large-scale primary metabolism change and simultaneously activate antioxidant system and salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid signaling pathways. In addition, β-aminobutyric acid can reinforce physical barriers to defend simulated acid rain stress.

  15. Suppression of muscle protein turnover and amino acid degradation by dietary protein deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    To define the adaptations that conserve amino acids and muscle protein when dietary protein intake is inadequate, rats (60-70 g final wt) were fed a normal or protein-deficient (PD) diet (18 or 1% lactalbumin), and their muscles were studied in vitro. After 7 days on the PD diet, both protein degradation and synthesis fell 30-40% in skeletal muscles and atria. This fall in proteolysis did not result from reduced amino acid supply to the muscle and preceded any clear decrease in plasma amino acids. Oxidation of branched-chain amino acids, glutamine and alanine synthesis, and uptake of alpha-aminoisobutyrate also fell by 30-50% in muscles and adipose tissue of PD rats. After 1 day on the PD diet, muscle protein synthesis and amino acid uptake decreased by 25-40%, and after 3 days proteolysis and leucine oxidation fell 30-45%. Upon refeeding with the normal diet, protein synthesis also rose more rapidly (+30% by 1 day) than proteolysis, which increased significantly after 3 days (+60%). These different time courses suggest distinct endocrine signals for these responses. The high rate of protein synthesis and low rate of proteolysis during the first 3 days of refeeding a normal diet to PD rats contributes to the rapid weight gain ("catch-up growth") of such animals.

  16. The interaction of amino acids, peptides, and proteins with DNA.

    PubMed

    Solovyev, Andrey Y; Tarnovskaya, Svetlana I; Chernova, Irina A; Shataeva, Larisa K; Skorik, Yury A

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids that carry charges on their side groups can bind to double stranded DNA (dsDNA) and change the strength of the double helix. Measurement of the DNA melting temperature (Tm) confirmed that acidic amino acids (Glu, Asp) weaken the H-bonds between DNA strands, whereas basic amino acids (Arg, Lys) strengthen the interaction between the strands. A rank correlation exists between the amino acid isoelectric points and the observed changes in Tm. A similar dependence of the hyperchromic effect on the isoelectric point of a protein (pepsin, insulin, cortexin, and protamine) was observed for DNA-protein complexes at room temperature. Short peptides (KE, AEDG, and KEDP) containing a mixture of acidic and basic amino acid residues also affect Tm and the stability of the double helix. A model for binding Glu and Lys to dsDNA was explored by a docking simulation. The model shows that Glu, in an untwisted shape, binds to dsDNA in its major groove and disrupts three H-bonds between the strands, thereby destabilizing the double helix. Lys, in an untwisted shape, binds to the external side of the dsDNA and forms two bonds with O atoms of neighboring phosphodiester groups, thereby strengthening the DNA helix.

  17. Commercial Phaseolus vulgaris extract (starch stopper) increases ileal endogenous amino acid and crude protein losses in the growing rat.

    PubMed

    Deglaire, A; Moughan, P J; Bos, C; Tome, D

    2006-07-12

    The effect of a commercial Phaseolus vulgaris extract (PVE, starch stopper) on ileal and fecal endogenous protein losses was studied. Growing rats were fed for 14 days a protein-free diet containing PVE at a nutritional concentration of 0% (PF1), 0.4% (PF2), or 1.1% PVE (PF3) or 1.1% autoclaved PVE (PF4). An indigestible marker (TiO(2)) was included in each diet. Ileal endogenous amino acid (AA) losses were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in PF3 (20% higher than in PF1), except for Pro, Gly, Ala, and His. Endogenous ileal N losses were 22% higher in PF3 than in PF1. Endogenous fecal AA and N losses were all significantly higher (P < 0.05) in PF3. Starch digestibility ( approximately 100%), food intake (single daily meal, d10-23), and body weight loss were not significantly different among the groups. PVE, at 1.1% of the diet, not only was ineffective in reducing starch digestibility but also led to increased ileal endogenous N losses, possibly due to the antinutritional factors (trypsin inhibitor, lectin) present in the PVE. PMID:16819935

  18. Use of industrial amino acids to allow low protein concentrations in finishing diets for growing Muscovy ducks.

    PubMed

    Baeza, E; Leclercq, B

    1998-03-01

    1. Three experiments were performed to assess the effects of decreasing protein concentration in the finishing diets for growing Muscovy ducks (8 to 12 weeks of age) by adding 4 essential amino acids (AAs, lysine, methionine, threonine and tryptophan). Experimental diets with crude protein (CP) contents from 105 to 142 g/kg, were compared with control diets providing 150 to 160 g/kg CP. In each trial, all diets were isocaloric. No significant modification in growth or carcase quality was observed when CP was greater than 124 g/kg in diets supplemented with the 4 essential AAs. 2. There was no advantages in supplying more than 4.3 g of digestible lysine per kg of diet (12.75 MJ ME/kg). When threonine was not added, breast yield decreased significantly (-4.3%), while omitting tryptophan supplementation did not influence performance. 3. Furthermore, the experiments confirmed that reducing CP had little or no effect on food conversion efficiency and fatness in Muscovy ducklings, unlike the observed situation in broiler chickens.

  19. An arachidonic acid-preferring acyl-CoA synthetase is a hormone-dependent and obligatory protein in the signal transduction pathway of steroidogenic hormones.

    PubMed

    Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Maloberti, Paula; Neuman, Isabel; Cano, Florencia; Castilla, Rocío; Castillo, Fernanda; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2005-06-01

    We have described that, in adrenal and Leydig cells, the hormonal regulation of free arachidonic acid (AA) concentration is mediated by the concerted action of two enzymes: an acyl-CoA thioesterase (MTE-I or ARTISt) and an acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS4). In this study we analyzed the potential regulation of these proteins by hormonal action in steroidogenic cells. We demonstrated that ACS4 is rapidly induced by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and cAMP in Y1 adrenocortical cells. The hormone and its second messenger increased ACS4 protein levels in a time and concentration dependent way. Maximal concentration of ACTH (10 mIU/ml) produced a significant effect after 15 min of treatment and exerted the highest increase (3-fold) after 30 min. Moreover, (35)S-methionine incorporation showed that the increase in ACS4 protein levels is due to an increase in the de novo synthesis of the protein. On the contrary MTE-I protein levels in Y1 and MA-10 cells did not change after steroidogenic stimuli. In contrast with the effect observed on protein levels, stimulation of both cell lines did not change ACS4 RNA levels during the first hour of treatment, indicating that the effect of both stimuli is exerted at the level of ACS4 protein synthesis.StAR protein induction has a key role on the activation of steroidogenesis since this protein increases the rate of the limiting step of the whole process. In agreement with the fact that the inhibition of ACS4 activity by triacsin C blocks cAMP-stimulated progesterone production by MA-10 Leydig cells, here we demonstrated that ACS4 inhibition also reduces StAR protein levels. Moreover, exogenous AA was able to overcome the effect of triacsin C on both events, StAR induction and steroidogenesis. These results were confirmed by experiments using ACS4-targeted siRNA which result in a reduction in both ACS4 and StAR protein levels. The concomitant decrease in steroid production was overcome by the addition of AA to the knocked-out cells. In summary

  20. (-)-Hydroxycitric Acid Nourishes Protein Synthesis via Altering Metabolic Directions of Amino Acids in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Ningning; Li, Longlong; Peng, Mengling; Ma, Haitian

    2016-08-01

    (-)-Hydroxycitric acid (HCA), a major active ingredient of Garcinia Cambogia extracts, had shown to suppress body weight gain and fat accumulation in animals and humans. While, the underlying mechanism of (-)-HCA has not fully understood. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the effects of long-term supplement with (-)-HCA on body weight gain and variances of amino acid content in rats. Results showed that (-)-HCA treatment reduced body weight gain and increased feed conversion ratio in rats. The content of hepatic glycogen, muscle glycogen, and serum T4 , T3 , insulin, and Leptin were increased in (-)-HCA treatment groups. Protein content in liver and muscle were significantly increased in (-)-HCA treatment groups. Amino acid profile analysis indicated that most of amino acid contents in serum and liver, especially aromatic amino acid and branched amino acid, were higher in (-)-HCA treatment groups. However, most of the amino acid contents in muscle, especially aromatic amino acid and branched amino acid, were reduced in (-)-HCA treatment groups. These results indicated that (-)-HCA treatment could reduce body weight gain through promoting energy expenditure via regulation of thyroid hormone levels. In addition, (-)-HCA treatment could promote protein synthesis by altering the metabolic directions of amino acids. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27145492

  1. The ribosome can discriminate the chirality of amino acids within its peptidyl-transferase center

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Michael T.; Avins, Joshua L.; Fleisher, Rachel C.; Liu, Bo; Effraim, Philip R.; Wang, Jiangning; Schulten, Klaus; Leyh, Thomas S.; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Cornish, Virginia W.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular translational machinery (TM) synthesizes proteins using exclusively L- or achiral aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs), despite the presence of D-amino acids in nature and their ability to be aminoacylated onto tRNAs by aa-tRNA synthetases. The ubiquity of L-amino acids in proteins has led to the hypothesis that D-amino acids are not substrates for the TM. Supporting this view, protein engineering efforts to incorporate D-amino acids into proteins using the TM have thus far been unsuccessful. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of why D-aa-tRNAs are poor substrates for the TM is lacking. To address this deficiency, we have systematically tested the translation activity of D-aa-tRNAs using a series of biochemical assays. We find that the TM can effectively, albeit slowly, accept D-aa-tRNAs into the ribosomal aa-tRNA binding (A) site, use the A-site D-aa-tRNA as a peptidyl-transfer acceptor, and translocate the resulting peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA into the ribosomal peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. During the next round of continuous translation, however, we find that ribosomes carrying a P-site peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA partition into subpopulations that are either translationally arrested or that can continue translating. Consistent with its ability to arrest translation, chemical protection experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that P site-bound peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA can trap the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center in a conformation in which peptidyl transfer is impaired. Our results reveal a novel mechanism through which D-aa-tRNAs interfere with translation, provide insight into how the TM might be engineered to use D-aa-tRNAs, and increase our understanding of the physiological role of a widely distributed enzyme that clears D-aa-tRNAs from cells. PMID:25918365

  2. The ribosome can discriminate the chirality of amino acids within its peptidyl-transferase center.

    PubMed

    Englander, Michael T; Avins, Joshua L; Fleisher, Rachel C; Liu, Bo; Effraim, Philip R; Wang, Jiangning; Schulten, Klaus; Leyh, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Cornish, Virginia W

    2015-05-12

    The cellular translational machinery (TM) synthesizes proteins using exclusively L- or achiral aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs), despite the presence of D-amino acids in nature and their ability to be aminoacylated onto tRNAs by aa-tRNA synthetases. The ubiquity of L-amino acids in proteins has led to the hypothesis that D-amino acids are not substrates for the TM. Supporting this view, protein engineering efforts to incorporate D-amino acids into proteins using the TM have thus far been unsuccessful. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of why D-aa-tRNAs are poor substrates for the TM is lacking. To address this deficiency, we have systematically tested the translation activity of D-aa-tRNAs using a series of biochemical assays. We find that the TM can effectively, albeit slowly, accept D-aa-tRNAs into the ribosomal aa-tRNA binding (A) site, use the A-site D-aa-tRNA as a peptidyl-transfer acceptor, and translocate the resulting peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA into the ribosomal peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. During the next round of continuous translation, however, we find that ribosomes carrying a P-site peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA partition into subpopulations that are either translationally arrested or that can continue translating. Consistent with its ability to arrest translation, chemical protection experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that P site-bound peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA can trap the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center in a conformation in which peptidyl transfer is impaired. Our results reveal a novel mechanism through which D-aa-tRNAs interfere with translation, provide insight into how the TM might be engineered to use D-aa-tRNAs, and increase our understanding of the physiological role of a widely distributed enzyme that clears D-aa-tRNAs from cells.

  3. Characterization and amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart.

    PubMed Central

    Offner, G D; Brecher, P; Sawlivich, W B; Costello, C E; Troxler, R F

    1988-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart was determined by automated Edman degradation of CNBr, BNPS-skatole [3'-bromo-3-methyl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulphenyl)indolenine], hydroxylamine, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, tryptic and chymotryptic peptides, and by digestion of the protein with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of the blocked N-terminal tryptic peptide from citraconylated protein was determined by collisionally induced decomposition mass spectrometry. The protein contains 132 amino acid residues, is enriched with respect to threonine and lysine, lacks cysteine, has an acetylated valine residue at the N-terminus, and has an Mr of 14768 and an isoelectric point of 5.25. This protein contains two short internal repeated sequences from residues 48-54 and from residues 114-119 located within regions of predicted beta-structure and decreasing hydrophobicity. These short repeats are contained within two longer repeated regions from residues 48-60 and residues 114-125, which display 62% sequence similarity. These regions could accommodate the charged and uncharged moieties of long-chain fatty acids and may represent fatty acid-binding domains consistent with the finding that human heart fatty acid-binding protein binds 2 mol of oleate or palmitate/mol of protein. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the peptides has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50143 (23 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3421901

  4. Minimum protein intake for the preterm neonate determined by protein and amino acid kinetics.

    PubMed

    Zello, Gordon A; Menendez, Cesar E; Rafii, Mahroukh; Clarke, Ruth; Wykes, Linda J; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B

    2003-02-01

    Lower limits of protein needs in prematurely born neonates have not been adequately studied, yet providing protein in amounts maximizing accretion without excess is a goal in these infants' nutritional care. We hypothesized that with the use of amino acid oxidation methodology, it would be possible to define minimum protein requirement. Our objective was to investigate protein kinetics during short-term changes in protein intake by measurement of nitrogen balance and amino acid flux and oxidation using [(15)N]glycine, [(13)C]phenylalanine, and [(13)C]leucine tracers. Protein kinetics were examined in 21 preterm infants (gestational age: 29 +/- 3 wk; birth weight: 1091 +/- 324 g) at five protein intakes (1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 g x kg(-1) x d(-1)) with 1 d of adaptation to the test intakes. From nitrogen balance data, a protein need of 0.74 g x kg(-1 x -1) was estimated to achieve zero balance. For all three amino acids, flux and oxidation estimates were not different across protein intakes. Whole-body protein synthesis and breakdown estimates from [(15)N]ammonia data were 14.6 +/- 3.4 and 14.4 +/- 4.1 g x kg(-1) x d(-1), respectively. Glycine flux (680 +/- 168 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1)) was greater than leucine flux (323 +/- 115 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1)), which was greater than phenylalanine flux (84.3 +/- 35.2 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1)). Leucine oxidation (36.7 +/- 15.6 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1)) was also greater than phenylalanine oxidation (6.64 +/- 4.41 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1)). Infants in our study were able to adapt to short-term changes in protein intake with little consequence to the overall whole-body protein economy, as measured by the three test amino acids.

  5. Regulatory signals for intestinal amino acid transporters and peptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, R.P.; Kwan, W.W.; Diamond, J. )

    1988-08-01

    Dietary protein ultimately regulates many processes involved in protein digestion, but it is often unclear whether proteins themselves, peptides, or amino acids (AAs) are the proximate regulatory signal. Hence the authors compared several processes involved in protein digestion in mice adapted to one of three rations, identical except for containing 54% of either casein, a partial hydrolysate of casein, or a free AA mixture simulating a complete hydrolysate of casein. The authors measured brush-border uptakes of seven AAs that variously serve as substrates for four AA transporters, and brush-border and cytosolic activities of four peptidases. The three rations yielded essentially the same AA uptake rates. Peptidase activities tended to be lower on the AA ration than on the protein ration. In other studies, all three rations yielded the same rates of brush-border peptide uptake; protein is only modestly more effective than AAs at inducing synthesis of pancreatic proteases; and, depending on the animal species, protein is either much less or much more effective than AAs at stimulating release of cholecystokinin and hence of pancreatic enzymes. Thus the regulators of each process involved in protein digestion are not necessarily that process's substrate.

  6. Stimulation of protein synthesis by phosphatidic acid in rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y J; Yau, L; Yu, L P; Elimban, V; Zahradka, P; Dhalla, N S

    1996-12-13

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) was observed to stimulate protein synthesis in adult cardiomyocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The maximal stimulation in protein synthesis (142 +/- 12% vs 100% as the control) was achieved at 10 microM PA within 60 min and was inhibited by actinomycin D (107 +/- 4% of the control) or cycloheximide (105 +/- 6% of the control). The increase in protein synthesis due to PA was attenuated or abolished by preincubation of cardiomyocytes with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein (94 +/- 9% of the control), phospholipase C inhibitors 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl N,N-diphenyl carbamate or carbon-odithioic acid O-(octahydro-4,7-methanol-1H-inden-5-yl (101 +/- 6 and 95 +/- 5% of the control, respectively), protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine or polymyxin B (109 +/- 3 and 93 +/- 3% of the control), and chelators of extracellular and intracellular free Ca2+ EGTA or BAPTA/AM (103 +/- 6 and 95 +/- 6% of the control, respectively). PA at different concentrations (0.1 to 100 microM) also caused phosphorylation of a cell surface protein of approximately 24 kDa. In addition, mitogen-activated protein kinase was stimulated by PA in a concentration-dependent manner; maximal stimulation (217 +/- 6% of the control) was seen at 10 microM PA. These data suggest that PA increases protein synthesis in adult rat cardiomyocytes and thus may play an important role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy.

  7. [Photochemistry and UV Spectroscopy of Proteins and Nucleic Acids].

    PubMed

    Wierzchowski, Kazimierz Lech

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a short history of David Shugar studies in the field of photochemistry and UV spectroscopy of proteins and nucleic acids, carried out since the late 1940s. to the beginning of the 1970s. of the 20th century, with some references to the state of related research in those days.

  8. Dynamics of body protein deposition and changes in body composition after sudden changes in amino acid intake: I. Barrows.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramírez, H R; Jeaurond, E A; de Lange, C F M

    2008-09-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the extent and dynamics of whole body protein deposition and changes in chemical and physical body composition after a period of AA intake restriction in growing barrows with medium lean tissue growth potentials. Forty Yorkshire barrows (initial BW 14.4 +/- 1.6 kg) were scale-fed at 75% of estimated voluntary daily DE intake up to 35 kg of BW and assigned to 1 of 2 diets: AA adequate (AA+; 20% above requirements; NRC, 1998) and AA deficient (AA-; 40% below requirements; restriction phase). Thereafter (re-alimentation phase), pigs from both dietary AA levels were scale-fed or fed ad libitum diets that were not limiting in AA. Body weight gain and body composition, based on serial slaughter, were monitored during the 34-d re-alimentation phase. During the restriction phase AA intake restriction reduced BW gains (556 vs. 410 g/d; P < 0.001; AA+ and AA-, respectively). At 35 kg of BW, AA intake restriction increased whole body lipid content (11.1 vs. 17.5% of empty BW; P < 0.05) and the whole body lipid to body protein ratio (0.65 vs. 1.20; P < 0.01) and reduced body protein content (17.1 vs. 14.6% of empty BW; P < 0.01) and body water content (68.2 vs. 63.9%; P < 0.05). The relationships between body protein vs. body water and body protein vs. body ash content were not altered by previous AA intake restriction or by feeding level during the re-alimentation phase (P > 0.10). Throughout the re-alimentation phase, there were no interactive effects of time, feeding level, and previous AA intake level on growth performance, body protein, and body lipid content (P > 0.10). During the re-alimentation phase, body protein deposition, derived from the linear regression analysis of body protein content vs. time, was not affected by feeding level and previous AA intake level (P > 0.10; 156 g/d for AA- vs. 157 g/d for AA+). Based on BW and body protein content, it can be concluded that no compensatory body protein deposition occurred in barrows

  9. Role of fatty acid binding protein on hepatic palmitate uptake.

    PubMed

    Burczynski, F J; Zhang, M N; Pavletic, P; Wang, G Q

    1997-12-01

    Expression of hepatic fatty acid binding protein (FABP) mRNA is regulated by growth hormone. In the absence of growth hormone, there is a 60% reduction in FABP mRNA levels (S.A. Berry, J.-B Yoon, U. List, and S. Seelig. J. Am. Coll. Nutr. 12:638-642. 1995). Previous work in our laboratory focused on the role of extracellular binding proteins in the hepatic uptake of long chain fatty acids. In the present study we were interested to determine the role of FABP in the transmembrane flux of long chain fatty acids. Using hepatocyte monolayers from control (n = 9) and hypophysectomized (n = 6) rats, we investigated the uptake of [3H]palmitate in the presence and absence of albumin. In the absence of albumin, total hepatocyte [3H]palmitate clearance rates from control (17.2 +/- 1.5 microL.mg-1 protein.s-1; mean +/- SEM; n = 9) and hypophysectomized (15.5 +/- 2.1 microL.mg-1 protein.s-1; n = 6) animals were similar (p > 0.05). In the presence of 2 microM albumin the total [3H]palmitate clearance rate from control hepatocytes (1.63 +/- 0.11 microL.mg-1 protein.s-1; n = 9) was significantly larger (40%) than from hepatocytes obtained from hypophysectomized (0.97 +/- 0.15 microL.mg-1 protein.s-1; n = 6; p < 0.01) animals. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis revealed that plasma membrane FABP levels from control and hypophysectomized animals were similar. However, there was a 49% decrease in the cytosolic FABP levels of hepatocytes isolated from hypophysectomized as compared with control animals. The decreased cytosolic FABB levels paralleled the decrease in palmitate uptake. We conclude that in the absence of extracellular binding proteins the rate-limiting step in the overall uptake of long chain fatty acids is diffusion to the cell surface. However, in the presence of albumin, the rate of palmitate uptake is determined primarily by cytosolic FABP levels.

  10. Intermolecular interaction between Cry2Aa and Cyt1Aa and its effect on larvicidal activity against Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Bideshi, Dennis K; Waldrop, Greer; Fernandez-Luna, Maria Teresa; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Wirth, Margaret C; Johnson, Jeffrey J; Park, Hyun-Woo; Federici, Brian A

    2013-08-01

    The Cyt1Aa protein of Bacillus thuringiensis susbp. israelensis elaborates demonstrable toxicity to mosquito larvae, but more importantly, it enhances the larvicidal activity of this species Cry proteins (Cry11Aa, Cry4Aa, and Cry4Ba) and delays the phenotypic expression of resistance to these that has evolved in Culex quinquefasciatus. It is also known that Cyt1Aa, which is highly lipophilic, synergizes Cry11Aa by functioning as a surrogate membrane-bound receptor for the latter protein. Little is known, however, about whether Cyt1Aa can interact similarly with other Cry proteins not primarily mosquitocidal; for example, Cry2Aa, which is active against lepidopteran larvae, but essentially inactive or has very low toxicity to mosquito larvae. Here we demonstrate by ligand binding and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays that Cyt1Aa and Cry2Aa form intermolecular complexes in vitro, and in addition show that Cyt1Aa facilitates binding of Cry2Aa throughout the midgut of C. quinquefasciatus larvae. As Cry2Aa and Cry11Aa share structural similarity in domain II, the interaction between Cyt1Aa and Cry2Aa could be a result of a similar mechanism previously proposed for Cry11Aa and Cyt1Aa. Finally, despite the observed interaction between Cry2Aa and Cyt1Aa, only a 2-fold enhancement in toxicity resulted against C. quinquefasciatus. Regardless, our results suggest that Cry2Aa could be a useful component of mosquitocidal endotoxin complements being developed for recombinant strains of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and B. sphaericus aimed at improving the efficacy of commercial products and avoiding resistance. PMID:23727800

  11. Leukocyte protease binding to nucleic acids promotes nuclear localization and cleavage of nucleic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marshall P; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron J; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein targets, whereas adding RNA to recombinant RNA binding protein substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Preincubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G. During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps, which bind NE and cathepsin G. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and neutrophil extracellular traps in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high-affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation.

  12. Proteins wriggle.

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Michael; Cahill, Sean; Cahill, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    We propose an algorithmic strategy for improving the efficiency of Monte Carlo searches for the low-energy states of proteins. Our strategy is motivated by a model of how proteins alter their shapes. In our model, when proteins fold under physiological conditions, their backbone dihedral angles change synchronously in groups of four or more to avoid steric clashes and respect the kinematic conservation laws. They wriggle; they do not thrash. We describe a simple algorithm that can be used to incorporate wriggling in Monte Carlo simulations of protein folding. We have tested this wriggling algorithm against a code in which the dihedral angles are varied independently (thrashing). Our standard of success is the average root-mean-square distance (rmsd) between the alpha-carbons of the folding protein and those of its native structure. After 100,000 Monte Carlo sweeps, the relative decrease in the mean rmsd, as one switches from thrashing to wriggling, rises from 11% for the protein 3LZM with 164 amino acids (aa) to 40% for the protein 1A1S with 313 aa and 47% for the protein 16PK with 415 aa. These results suggest that wriggling is useful and that its utility increases with the size of the protein. One may implement wriggling on a parallel computer or a computer farm. PMID:11964253

  13. Relationship between in vitro assays and standardized ileal amino acid digestibility of animal protein meals in broilers.

    PubMed

    Rochell, S J; Kuhlers, D L; Dozier, W A

    2013-01-01

    Two identical trials were conducted to determine the relationship of a novel digestive enzyme assay, Poultry Complete IDEA (PC IDEA), and the pepsin digestibility assay with standardized ileal amino acid digestibility (SIAAD) of 20 animal protein meals (APM) fed to broilers from 25 to 30 d of age. Animal protein meals included 10 meat and bone meals (MBM) consisting of bovine, porcine, or mixed bovine and porcine raw materials (BP), and 10 animal protein blends containing animal proteins from various species. Treatments consisted of 20 semi-purified diets containing 1 APM as the sole source of dietary amino acids (AA), and 1 N-free diet to determine endogenous ileal AA flow. With the exception of the N-free diet, diets were formulated to contain 20% CP. In each trial, 756 Ross × Ross 708 male broilers were housed in battery cages and randomly assigned to 21 dietary treatments on d 25 (12 birds per cage; 3 replicate cages), and ileal digesta were collected on d 30 for determination of SIAAD. Pepsin digestibility and PC IDEA were determined for APM samples from each experimental diet (3 replicates per trial; 6 total replicates). Pepsin digestibility and PC IDEA were both correlated (P < 0.001) with SIAAD for each AA. Multiple linear regression of PC IDEA and pepsin digestibility on SIAAD resulted in the following equations: % Lys SIAAD = [-9.65 + (0.38 × % PC IDEA predicted Lys digestibility) + (0.69 × % pepsin digestibility)], % Met SIAAD = [-35.95 + (0.62 × % PC IDEA predicted Met digestibility) + (0.75 × % pepsin digestibility)], % Thr SIAAD = [-77.5 + (0.39 × % PC IDEA predicted Thr digestibility) + (1.37 × % pepsin digestibility)]. Values of R(2) were 0.46, 0.47, and 0.55 for Lys, Met, and Thr, respectively. The relatively low R(2) values may have been due to the limited range in SIAAD observed for the 20 APM, and additional data on APM varying in SIAAD are needed.

  14. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of marine protein contribution in ancient diets based on nitrogen isotope ratios of individual amino acids in bone collagen: an investigation at the Kitakogane Jomon site.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuichi I; Honch, Noah V; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Yoneda, Minoru

    2010-09-01

    Nitrogen stable isotopes analysis of individual bone collagen amino acids was applied to archeological samples as a new tool for assessing the composition of ancient human diets and calibrating radiocarbon dates. We used this technique to investigate human and faunal samples from the Kitakogane shell midden in Hokkaido, Japan (5,300-6,000 cal BP). Using compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of individual amino acids, we aimed to estimate i) the quantitative contribution of marine and terrestrial protein to the human diet, and ii) the mean trophic level (TL) from which dietary protein was derived from marine ecosystems. Data were interpreted with reference to the amino acid trophic level (TL(AA)) model, which uses empirical amino acid delta(15)N from modern marine fauna to construct mathematical equations that predict the trophic position of organisms. The TL(AA) model produced realistic TL estimates for the Kitakogane marine animals. However, this model was not appropriate for the interpretation of human amino acid delta(15)N, as dietary protein is derived from both marine and terrestrial environments. Hence, we developed a series of relevant equations that considered the consumption of dietary resources from both ecosystems. Using these equations, the mean percentage of marine protein in the Kitakogane human diet was estimated to be 74%. Although this study is one of the first systematic investigations of amino acid delta(15)N in archeological bone collagen, we believe that this technique is extremely useful for TL reconstruction, palaeodietary interpretation, and the correction of marine reservoir effects for radiocarbon dating.

  16. Protein electron transfer (mechanism and reproductive toxicity): iminium, hydrogen bonding, homoconjugation, amino acid side chains (redox and charged), and cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter

    2007-03-01

    This contribution presents novel biochemical perspectives of protein electron transfer (ET) with focus on the iminium nature of the peptide link, along with relationships to reproductive toxicity. The favorable influence of hydrogen bonding on protein ET has been widely documented. Hydrogen bonding of the zwitterionic peptide enhances iminium character. A wide array of such bonding agents is available in vivo, with many reports on the peptide link itself. ET proceeds along the backbone, due in part, to homoconjugation. Redox amino acids (AAs), mainly tyrosine (Tyr), tryptophan (Typ), histidine (His), cysteine (Cys), disulfide, and methionine (Met), are involved in the competing processes for radical formation: direct hydrogen atom abstraction versus electron and proton loss. It appears that the radical or radical cation generated during the redox process is capable of interacting with n-electrons of the backbone. Beneficial effects of cationic AAs impact the conduction process. A relationship apparently exists involving cell signaling, protein conduction, and radicals or electrons. In addition, the link between protein ET and reproductive toxicity is examined. A key element is the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by protein ET. There is extensive evidence for involvement of ROS in generation of birth defects. The radical species arise in protein mainly by ET transformations by enzymes, as illustrated in the case of alcoholism.

  17. In Silico Classification of Proteins from Acidic and Neutral Cytoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yaping; Middaugh, C. Russell; Fang, Jianwen

    2012-01-01

    Protein acidostability is a common problem in biopharmaceutical and other industries. However, it remains a great challenge to engineer proteins for enhanced acidostability because our knowledge of protein acidostabilization is still very limited. In this paper, we present a comparative study of proteins from bacteria with acidic (AP) and neutral cytoplasms (NP) using an integrated statistical and machine learning approach. We construct a set of 393 non-redundant AP-NP ortholog pairs and calculate a total of 889 sequence based features for these proteins. The pairwise alignments of these ortholog pairs are used to build a residue substitution propensity matrix between APs and NPs. We use Gini importance provided by the Random Forest algorithm to rank the relative importance of these features. A scoring function using the 10 most significant features is developed and optimized using a hill climbing algorithm. The accuracy of the score function is 86.01% in predicting AP-NP ortholog pairs and is 76.65% in predicting non-ortholog AP-NP pairs, suggesting that there are significant differences between APs and NPs which can be used to predict relative acidostability of proteins. The overall trends uncovered in the study can be used as general guidelines for designing acidostable proteins. To best of our knowledge, this work represents the first systematic comparative study of the acidostable proteins and their non-acidostable orthologs. PMID:23049817

  18. Transcriptional regulation of muscle fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, J O; Neufer, P D; Farrar, R P; Veerkamp, J H; Dohm, G L

    1994-01-01

    Heart fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) is present in a wide variety of tissues but is found in the highest concentration in cardiac and red skeletal muscle. It has been proposed that the expression of H-FABP correlates directly with the fatty acid-oxidative capacity of the tissue. In the present study, the expression of H-FABP was measured in red and white skeletal muscle under two conditions in which fatty acid utilization is known to be increased: streptozotocin-induced diabetes and fasting. Protein concentration, mRNA concentration and transcription rate were measured under both conditions. The level of both protein and mRNA increased approximately 2-fold under each condition. The transcription rate was higher in red skeletal muscle than in white muscle, was increased 2-fold during fasting, but was unchanged by streptozotocin-induced diabetes. In addition to supporting the hypothesis that H-FABP is induced during conditions of increased fatty acid utilization, these findings demonstrate that the regulation of H-FABP expression may or may not be at the level of transcription depending on the stimulus. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8141774

  19. Rating AAs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Susan J.

    2001-01-01

    Why alternative investments? In a word: performance. Many higher education endowment and foundation managers are making increasing commitments to alternative investments, or AAs, in order to obtain higher returns and broader diversification for their investment portfolios than public securities instruments can usually provide. Learn how to handle…

  20. Protein and amino acid requirements in human nutrition.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    The World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization have worked to quantify the energy and nutrient needs of populations since 1949. This is the latest in a series of reports that aim to provide: updates on protein and amino acid requirements in health and disease for all age groups and pregnant and lactating mothers; recommendations on protein requirements in health and disease, including their implications for developing countries; recommendations on protein quality and labelling for worldwide use. This report provides the tools to address practical questions on the adequacy of food supplies, targets for food and nutrition policy, and labelling of protein quality. It contains specific recommendations for infant, child and adult nutrition. This report is an essential reference for those who need to determine the adequacy of population food intakes; set national food and nutrition guidelines and regulations on the protein and amino acid content of industrially processed foods; determine nutrient needs, and evaluate and ensure the adequacy of rations for vulnerable groups. The tools in this report can also be used to map and monitor global food shortages and under-nutrition through early warning systems.

  1. Fatty acid binding protein in the intestine of the chicken.

    PubMed

    Katongole, J B; March, B E

    1979-03-01

    The mucosa of the mesenteric intestine of the chicken has been found to contain a fatty acid binding protein (FABP) with a molecular weight of less than 12,400. The protein is present in the newly hatched chick before ingestion of feed and in the adult bird. When a low-fat diet is fed, the concentration of the FABP is highest in the proximal portion of the intestine and decreases posteriorly. When a high-fat diet is fed, an increase occurs in the amount of FABP in the lower section of the intestine.

  2. Trapping the dynamic acyl carrier protein in fatty acid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Chi; Haushalter, Robert W.; Lee, D. John; Markwick, Phineus R. L.; Bruegger, Joel; Caldara-Festin, Grace; Finzel, Kara; Jackson, David R.; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; O’Dowd, Bing; McCammon, J. Andrew; Opella, Stanley J.; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Burkart, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) transports the growing fatty acid chain between enzyme domains of fatty acid synthase (FAS) during biosynthesis.1 Because FAS enzymes operate upon ACP-bound acyl groups, ACP must stabilize and transport the growing lipid chain.2 The transient nature of ACP-enzyme interactions imposes a major obstacle to gaining high-resolution structural information about fatty acid biosynthesis, and a new strategy is required to properly study protein-protein interactions. In this work, we describe the application of a mechanism-based probe that allows site-selective covalent crosslinking of AcpP to FabA, the E. coli ACP and fatty acid 3-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase. We report the 1.9 Å crystal structure of the crosslinked AcpP=FabA complex as a homo-dimer, in which AcpP exhibits two different conformations likely representing snapshots of ACP in action: the 4′-phosphopantetheine (PPant) group of AcpP first binds an arginine-rich groove of FabA, followed by an AcpP helical conformational change that locks the AcpP and FabA in place. Residues at the interface of AcpP and FabA are identified and validated by solution NMR techniques, including chemical shift perturbations and RDC measurements. These not only support our interpretation of the crystal structures but also provide an animated view of ACP in action during fatty acid dehydration. Combined with molecular dynamics simulations, we show for the first time that FabA extrudes the sequestered acyl chain from the ACP binding pocket before dehydration by repositioning helix III. Extensive sequence conservation among carrier proteins suggests that the mechanistic insights gleaned from our studies will prove general for fatty acid, polyketide and non-ribosomal biosyntheses. Here the foundation is laid for defining the dynamic action of carrier protein activity in primary and secondary metabolism, providing insight into pathways that can play major roles in the treatment of cancer, obesity and infectious

  3. An amino acid depleted cell-free protein synthesis system for the incorporation of non-canonical amino acid analogs into proteins.

    PubMed

    Singh-Blom, Amrita; Hughes, Randall A; Ellington, Andrew D

    2014-05-20

    Residue-specific incorporation of non-canonical amino acids into proteins is usually performed in vivo using amino acid auxotrophic strains and replacing the natural amino acid with an unnatural amino acid analog. Herein, we present an efficient amino acid depleted cell-free protein synthesis system that can be used to study residue-specific replacement of a natural amino acid by an unnatural amino acid analog. This system combines a simple methodology and high protein expression titers with a high-efficiency analog substitution into a target protein. To demonstrate the productivity and efficacy of a cell-free synthesis system for residue-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in vitro, we use this system to show that 5-fluorotryptophan and 6-fluorotryptophan substituted streptavidin retain the ability to bind biotin despite protein-wide replacement of a natural amino acid for the amino acid analog. We envisage this amino acid depleted cell-free synthesis system being an economical and convenient format for the high-throughput screening of a myriad of amino acid analogs with a variety of protein targets for the study and functional characterization of proteins substituted with unnatural amino acids when compared to the currently employed in vivo methodologies.

  4. Amino Acid Polymorphisms in Hepatitis C Virus Core Affect Infectious Virus Production and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecule Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tasaka-Fujita, Megumi; Sugiyama, Nao; Kang, Wonseok; Masaski, Takahiro; Murayama, Asako; Yamada, Norie; Sugiyama, Ryuichi; Tsukuda, Senko; Watashi, Koichi; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Naoya; Wakita, Takaji; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Kato, Takanobu

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid (aa) polymorphisms in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b core protein have been reported to be a potent predictor for poor response to interferon (IFN)-based therapy and a risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated the effects of these polymorphisms with genotype 1b/2a chimeric viruses that contained polymorphisms of Arg/Gln at aa 70 and Leu/Met at aa 91. We found that infectious virus production was reduced in cells transfected with chimeric virus RNA that had Gln at aa 70 (aa70Q) compared with RNA with Arg at aa 70 (aa70R). Using flow cytometry analysis, we confirmed that HCV core protein accumulated in aa70Q clone transfected cells, and it caused a reduction in cell-surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules induced by IFN treatment through enhanced protein kinase R phosphorylation. We could not detect any effects due to the polymorphism at aa 91. In conclusion, the polymorphism at aa 70 was associated with efficiency of infectious virus production, and this deteriorated virus production in strains with aa70Q resulted in the intracellular accumulation of HCV proteins and attenuation of MHC class I molecule expression. These observations may explain the strain-associated resistance to IFN-based therapy and hepatocarcinogenesis of HCV. PMID:26365522

  5. Fatty acid hydroperoxide lyase is a heme protein.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Y; Matsui, K; Kajiwara, T; Hatanaka, A

    1995-02-01

    Fatty acid hydroperoxide lyase (HPO lyase) is an enzyme that cleaves hydroperoxides of polyunsaturated fatty acids to form short chain aldehydes and omega-oxoacids. Spectrophotometric analyses of HPO lyase highly purified from green bell pepper fruits indicate that it is a heme protein. The heme species was revealed to be heme b (protoheme IX) from the absorption spectrum of the pyridine hemochromogen. Although the spectrum highly resembles that of a plant cytochrome P450, allene oxide synthase from flaxseed, CO treatment of the enzyme caused no appearance of a peak at 450 nm, which is an essential diagnostic feature of a cytochrome P450. Internal amino acid sequences determined with peptide fragments obtained from the lyase showed no homology with any reported sequences.

  6. Fatty acids exacerbate tubulointerstitial injury in protein-overload proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mark E; Harris, Kevin P G; Walls, John; Furness, Peter N; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2002-10-01

    The role of the albumin-carried fatty acids in the induction of tubulointerstitial injury was studied in protein-overload proteinuria. Rats were injected with fatty acid-carrying BSA [FA(+)BSA], fatty acid-depleted BSA [FA(-)BSA], or saline. Macrophage infiltration was measured by immunohistochemical staining, apoptotic cells were detected by in situ end labeling, and proliferating cells were identified by in situ hybridization for histone mRNA. Macrophage infiltration was significantly greater in the FA(+)BSA group than in the FA(-)BSA and saline groups. The infiltrate was largely restricted to the outer cortex. Apoptosis was greater in the FA(+)BSA group than in the FA(-)BSA and saline groups. Compared with the saline group, apoptosis was significantly increased in the FA(+)BSA group but not in the FA(-)BSA group. Cortical cells proliferated significantly more in the FA(+)BSA and FA(-)BSA groups than in the saline group. FA(+)BSA is therefore a more potent inducer of macrophage infiltration and cell death than FA(-)BSA. The fatty acids carried on albumin may be the chief instigators of tubulointerstitial injury in protein-overload proteinuria. PMID:12217854

  7. Oxidative potential of ambient water-soluble PM2.5 measured by Dithiothreitol (DTT) and Ascorbic Acid (AA) assays in the southeastern United States: contrasts in sources and health associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, T.; Verma, V.; Bates, J. T.; Abrams, J.; Klein, M.; Strickland, M. J.; Sarnat, S. E.; Chang, H. H.; Mulholland, J. A.; Tolbert, P. E.; Russell, A. G.; Weber, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    The ability of certain components of particulate matter to induce oxidative stress through catalytic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo may be one mechanism accounting for observed linkages between ambient aerosols and adverse health outcomes. A variety of assays have been used to measure this so-called aerosol oxidative potential. We developed a semi-automated system to quantify oxidative potential of filter aqueous extracts utilizing the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay and have recently developed a similar semi-automated system using the ascorbic acid (AA) assay. Approximately 500 PM2.5 filter samples collected in contrasting locations in the southeastern US were analyzed using both assays. We found that water-soluble DTT activity on a per air volume basis was more spatially uniform than water-soluble AA activity. DTT activity was higher in winter than in summer/fall, whereas AA activity was higher in summer/fall compared to winter, with highest levels near highly trafficked highways. DTT activity was correlated with organic and metal species, whereas AA activity was correlated with water-soluble metals (especially water-soluble Cu, r=0.70-0.91 at most sites). Source apportionment models, Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) and a Chemical Mass Balance Method with ensemble-averaged source impact profiles (CMB-E), suggest a strong contribution from secondary processes (e.g., organic aerosol oxidation or metal mobilization by formation of an aqueous particle with secondary acids) and traffic emissions to both DTT and AA activities in urban Atlanta. Biomass burning was a large source for DTT activity, but insignificant for AA. DTT activity was well correlated with PM2.5 mass (r=0.49-0.86 across sites/seasons), while AA activity did not co-vary strongly with mass. A linear model was developed to estimate DTT and AA activities for the central Atlanta Jefferson Street site, based on the CMB-E sources that are statistically significant with positive

  8. Oxidative potential of ambient water-soluble PM2.5 in the southeastern United States: contrasts in sources and health associations between ascorbic acid (AA) and dithiothreitol (DTT) assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ting; Verma, Vishal; Bates, Josephine T.; Abrams, Joseph; Klein, Mitchel; Strickland, Matthew J.; Sarnat, Stefanie E.; Chang, Howard H.; Mulholland, James A.; Tolbert, Paige E.; Russell, Armistead G.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2016-03-01

    The ability of certain components of particulate matter to induce oxidative stress through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo may be one mechanism accounting for observed linkages between ambient aerosols and adverse health outcomes. A variety of assays have been used to measure this so-called aerosol oxidative potential. We developed a semi-automated system to quantify oxidative potential of filter aqueous extracts utilizing the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay and report here the development of a similar semi-automated system for the ascorbic acid (AA) assay. Approximately 500 PM2.5 filter samples collected in contrasting locations in the southeastern US were analyzed for a host of aerosol species, along with AA and DTT activities. We present a detailed contrast in findings from these two assays. Water-soluble AA activity was higher in summer and fall than in winter, with highest levels near heavily trafficked highways, whereas DTT activity was higher in winter compared to summer and fall and more spatially homogeneous. AA activity was nearly exclusively correlated with water-soluble Cu (r = 0.70-0.94 at most sites), whereas DTT activity was correlated with organic and metal species. Source apportionment models, positive matrix factorization (PMF) and a chemical mass balance method with ensemble-averaged source impact profiles (CMB-E), suggest a strong contribution from traffic emissions and secondary processes (e.g., organic aerosol oxidation or metals mobilization by secondary acids) to both AA and DTT activities in urban Atlanta. In contrast, biomass burning was a large source for DTT activity, but insignificant for AA. AA activity was not correlated with PM2.5 mass, while DTT activity co-varied strongly with mass (r = 0.49-0.86 across sites and seasons). Various linear models were developed to estimate AA and DTT activities for the central Atlanta Jefferson Street site, based on the CMB-E sources. The models were then used to estimate daily

  9. Identification of a calmodulin-binding site within the domain I of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Campuzano, Camila; Sánchez, Jorge; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Real, M Dolores; Rausell, Carolina; Sánchez, Jorge

    2012-09-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin is a coleopteran specific toxin highly active against Colorado Potato Beetle (CPB).We have recently shown that Cry3Aa toxin is proteolytically cleaved by CPB midgut membrane associated metalloproteases and that this cleavage is inhibited by ADAM metalloprotease inhibitors. In the present study, we investigated whether the Cry3Aa toxin is a calmodulin (CaM) binding protein, as it is the case of several different ADAM shedding substrates. In pull-down assays using agarose beads conjugated with CaM, we demonstrated that Cry3Aa toxin specifically binds to CaM in a calcium-independent manner. Furthermore, we used gel shift assays and (1)H NMR spectra to demonstrate that CaM binds to a 16-amino acid synthetic peptide corresponding to residues N256-V271 within the domain I of Cry3Aa toxin. Finally, to investigate whether CaM has any effect on Cry3Aa toxin CPB midgut membrane associated proteolysis, cleavage assays were performed in the presence of the CaM-specific inhibitor trifluoperazine. We showed that trifluoperazine significantly increased Cry3Aa toxin proteolysis and also decreased Cry3Aa larval toxicity. PMID:22836907

  10. Expression of Heat Shock Protein (Hsp90) Paralogues Is Regulated by Amino Acids in Skeletal Muscle of Atlantic Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Garcia de la serrana, Daniel; Johnston, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins 90 (Hsp90) have an essential role in sarcomere formation and differentiation in skeletal muscle and also act as molecular chaperones during protein folding impacting a wide range of physiological processes. We characterised and provided a phylogenetically consistent nomenclature for the complete repertoire of six Hsp90 paralogues present in duplicated salmonid fish genomes (Hsp90α1a, Hsp90α1b, Hsp90α2a, Hsp90α2b, Hsp90ß1a and Hsp90ß1b). The expression of paralogues in fast skeletal muscle was investigated using in vivo fasting-feeding experiments and primary myogenic cultures. Fasted juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) showed a transient 2 to 8-fold increase in the expression of all 4 Hsp90α paralogues within 24h of satiation feeding. Hsp90α1a and hsp90α1b also showed a pronounced secondary increase in expression after 10 days, concomitant with muscle differentiation and the expression of myogenin and sarcomeric proteins (mlc2, myhc). Hsp90ß1b was constitutively expressed whereas Hsp90ß1a expression was downregulated 10-fold between fasted and fed individuals. Hsp90α1a and Hsp90α1b were upregulated 10 to 15-fold concomitant with myotube formation and muscle differentiation in vitro whereas other Hsp90 paralogues showed no change in expression. In cells starved of amino acid (AA) and serum for 72h the addition of AA, but not insulin-like growth factor 1, increased phosphorylation of mTor and expression of all 4 hsp90α paralogues and associated co-chaperones including hsp30, tbcb, pdia4, pdia6, stga and fk504bp1, indicating a general activation of the protein folding response. In contrast, Hsp90ß1a expression in vitro was unresponsive to AA treatment indicating that some other as yet uncharacterised signal(s) regulate its expression in response to altered nutritional state. PMID:24040223

  11. Expression of heat shock protein (Hsp90) paralogues is regulated by amino acids in skeletal muscle of Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Garcia de la Serrana, Daniel; Johnston, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins 90 (Hsp90) have an essential role in sarcomere formation and differentiation in skeletal muscle and also act as molecular chaperones during protein folding impacting a wide range of physiological processes. We characterised and provided a phylogenetically consistent nomenclature for the complete repertoire of six Hsp90 paralogues present in duplicated salmonid fish genomes (Hsp90α1a, Hsp90α1b, Hsp90α2a, Hsp90α2b, Hsp90ß1a and Hsp90ß1b). The expression of paralogues in fast skeletal muscle was investigated using in vivo fasting-feeding experiments and primary myogenic cultures. Fasted juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) showed a transient 2 to 8-fold increase in the expression of all 4 Hsp90α paralogues within 24h of satiation feeding. Hsp90α1a and hsp90α1b also showed a pronounced secondary increase in expression after 10 days, concomitant with muscle differentiation and the expression of myogenin and sarcomeric proteins (mlc2, myhc). Hsp90ß1b was constitutively expressed whereas Hsp90ß1a expression was downregulated 10-fold between fasted and fed individuals. Hsp90α1a and Hsp90α1b were upregulated 10 to 15-fold concomitant with myotube formation and muscle differentiation in vitro whereas other Hsp90 paralogues showed no change in expression. In cells starved of amino acid (AA) and serum for 72h the addition of AA, but not insulin-like growth factor 1, increased phosphorylation of mTor and expression of all 4 hsp90α paralogues and associated co-chaperones including hsp30, tbcb, pdia4, pdia6, stga and fk504bp1, indicating a general activation of the protein folding response. In contrast, Hsp90ß1a expression in vitro was unresponsive to AA treatment indicating that some other as yet uncharacterised signal(s) regulate its expression in response to altered nutritional state. PMID:24040223

  12. The mRNA expression of amino acid transporters, aminopeptidase, and the di- and tri-peptide transporter PepT1 in the intestine and liver of post-hatch broiler chicks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amino acid transporter (AAT) proteins are responsible for the movement of amino acids (AA) in and out of cells. Aminopeptidase (APN) cleaves AAs from the N terminus of polypeptides making them available for transport, while PepT1 is a di- and tri- peptide transporter. In the intestine, these prote...

  13. Direct protein-protein interactions and substrate channeling between cellular retinoic acid binding proteins and CYP26B1.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Cara H; Peng, Chi-Chi; Lutz, Justin D; Yeung, Catherine K; Zelter, Alex; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-08-01

    Cellular retinoic acid binding proteins (CRABPs) bind all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) tightly. This study aimed to determine whether atRA is channeled directly to cytochrome P450 (CYP) CYP26B1 by CRABPs, and whether CRABPs interact directly with CYP26B1. atRA bound to CRABPs (holo-CRABP) was efficiently metabolized by CYP26B1. Isotope dilution experiments showed that delivery of atRA to CYP26B1 in solution was similar with or without CRABP. Holo-CRABPs had higher affinity for CYP26B1 than free atRA, but both apo-CRABPs inhibited the formation of 4-OH-RA by CYP26B1. Similar protein-protein interactions between soluble binding proteins and CYPs may be important for other lipophilic CYP substrates.

  14. Differential Ratios of Omega Fatty Acids (AA/EPA+DHA) Modulate Growth, Lipid Peroxidation and Expression of Tumor Regulatory MARBPs in Breast Cancer Cell Lines MCF7 and MDA-MB-231.

    PubMed

    Mansara, Prakash P; Deshpande, Rashmi A; Vaidya, Milind M; Kaul-Ghanekar, Ruchika

    2015-01-01

    Omega 3 (n3) and Omega 6 (n6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been reported to exhibit opposing roles in cancer progression. Our objective was to determine whether different ratios of n6/n3 (AA/EPA+DHA) FAs could modulate the cell viability, lipid peroxidation, total cellular fatty acid composition and expression of tumor regulatory Matrix Attachment Region binding proteins (MARBPs) in breast cancer cell lines and in non-cancerous, MCF10A cells. Low ratios of n6/n3 (1:2.5, 1:4, 1:5, 1:10) FA decreased the viability and growth of MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 significantly compared to the non-cancerous cells (MCF10A). Contrarily, higher n6/n3 FA (2.5:1, 4:1, 5:1, 10:1) decreased the survival of both the cancerous and non-cancerous cell types. Lower ratios of n6/n3 selectively induced LPO in the breast cancer cells whereas the higher ratios induced in both cancerous and non-cancerous cell types. Interestingly, compared to higher n6/n3 FA ratios, lower ratios increased the expression of tumor suppressor MARBP, SMAR1 and decreased the expression of tumor activator Cux/CDP in both breast cancer and non-cancerous, MCF10A cells. Low n6/n3 FAs significantly increased SMAR1 expression which resulted into activation of p21WAF1/CIP1 in MDA-MB-231 and MCF7, the increase being ratio dependent in MDA-MB-231. These results suggest that increased intake of n3 fatty acids in our diet could help both in the prevention as well as management of breast cancer.

  15. Differential Ratios of Omega Fatty Acids (AA/EPA+DHA) Modulate Growth, Lipid Peroxidation and Expression of Tumor Regulatory MARBPs in Breast Cancer Cell Lines MCF7 and MDA-MB-231

    PubMed Central

    Mansara, Prakash P.; Deshpande, Rashmi A.; Vaidya, Milind M.; Kaul-Ghanekar, Ruchika

    2015-01-01

    Omega 3 (n3) and Omega 6 (n6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been reported to exhibit opposing roles in cancer progression. Our objective was to determine whether different ratios of n6/n3 (AA/EPA+DHA) FAs could modulate the cell viability, lipid peroxidation, total cellular fatty acid composition and expression of tumor regulatory Matrix Attachment Region binding proteins (MARBPs) in breast cancer cell lines and in non-cancerous, MCF10A cells. Low ratios of n6/n3 (1:2.5, 1:4, 1:5, 1:10) FA decreased the viability and growth of MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 significantly compared to the non-cancerous cells (MCF10A). Contrarily, higher n6/n3 FA (2.5:1, 4:1, 5:1, 10:1) decreased the survival of both the cancerous and non-cancerous cell types. Lower ratios of n6/n3 selectively induced LPO in the breast cancer cells whereas the higher ratios induced in both cancerous and non-cancerous cell types. Interestingly, compared to higher n6/n3 FA ratios, lower ratios increased the expression of tumor suppressor MARBP, SMAR1 and decreased the expression of tumor activator Cux/CDP in both breast cancer and non-cancerous, MCF10A cells. Low n6/n3 FAs significantly increased SMAR1 expression which resulted into activation of p21WAF1/CIP1 in MDA-MB-231 and MCF7, the increase being ratio dependent in MDA-MB-231. These results suggest that increased intake of n3 fatty acids in our diet could help both in the prevention as well as management of breast cancer. PMID:26325577

  16. Phytic acid reduction in soy protein improves zinc bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.R.; Wong, M.S.; Burns, R.A.; Erdman, J.W. Jr. Mead Johnson Research Center, Evansville, IN )

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study was to confirm previous studies that have suggested that reduction of phytic acid in soy improved zinc bioavailability (BV). Two commercially-produced soybean isolates containing either a normal phytic acid level or a reduced level were formulated into diets so as to provide 6 or 9 ppm zinc. Control diets were egg white protein-based and contained 3, 6 or 9 ppm zinc from zinc carbonate. Weanling male rats were fed these diets for 21 days and food intake and weight gain monitored. Slope ratio analysis of total tibia zinc content compared to total zinc intake revealed that zinc BV from reduced phytic acid soy isolate-containing diets was indistinguishable from control egg white diets. In contrast, zinc BV from normal soy isolate diets was significantly reduced compared to reduced phytic acid and control diets. These results coupled with other results indicate that phytic acid is the inhibitory factor in soybean products that results in reduced zinc BV.

  17. Integrin-dependent homotypic adhesion of neutrophils. Arachidonic acid activates Raf-1/Mek/Erk via a 5-lipoxygenase- dependent pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Capodici, C; Pillinger, M H; Han, G; Philips, M R; Weissmann, G

    1998-01-01

    AA stimulates integrin-dependent neutrophil adhesion, a critical early step in acute inflammation. However, neither the signaling pathway(s) of AA-stimulated adhesion, nor whether AA acts directly or through the generation of active metabolites, has been elucidated. Previously, we have observed a tight association between neutrophil Erk activation and homotypic adhesion in response to chemoattractants acting through G protein-linked receptors. We now report a similar association between homotypic adhesion and Erk activation in response to AA. Erk activation was cyclooxygenase independent and required AA metabolism to 5(S)- hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HpETE) via 5-lipoxygenase, but not the further lipoxygenase-dependent metabolism of 5-HpETE to leukotrienes. AA stimulation of Erk was accompanied by Raf-1 activation and was sensitive to inhibitors of Raf-1 and Mek. Whereas activation of Erk by AA was pertussis toxin sensitive, [3H]-AA binding to neutrophils was not saturable, suggesting that an AA metabolite activates a G protein. Consistent with this hypothesis, Erk activation by 5(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE; lipoxygenase-independent metabolite of 5-HpETE) was also pertussis toxin sensitive. These data suggest that a 5-lipoxygenase metabolite of AA, e.g., 5-HETE, is released from AA-treated cells to engage a plasma membrane-associated, pertussis toxin-sensitive, G protein-linked receptor, leading to activation of Erk and adhesion via the Raf-1/Mek signal transduction pathway. PMID:9649570

  18. Characterization of a fatty acid-binding protein from rat heart.

    PubMed

    Offner, G D; Troxler, R F; Brecher, P

    1986-04-25

    A fatty acid-binding protein has been isolated from rat heart and purified by gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-75 and anion-exchange chromatography on DE52. The circular dichroic spectrum of this protein was not affected by protein concentration, suggesting that it does not aggregate into multimers. Computer analyses of the circular dichroic spectrum predicted that rat heart fatty acid-binding protein contains approximately 22% alpha-helix, 45% beta-form and 33% unordered structure. Immunological studies showed that the fatty acid-binding proteins from rat heart and rat liver are immunochemically unrelated. The amino acid composition and partial amino acid sequence of the heart protein indicated that it is structurally related to, but distinct from, other fatty acid-binding proteins from liver, intestine, and 3T3 adipocytes. Using a binding assay which measures the transfer of fatty acids between donor liposomes and protein (Brecher, P., Saouaf, R., Sugarman, J. M., Eisenberg, D., and LaRosa, K. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 13395-13401), it was shown that both rat heart and liver fatty acid-binding proteins bind 2 mol of oleic acid or palmitic acid/mol of protein. The structural and functional relationship of rat heart fatty acid-binding protein to fatty acid-binding proteins from other tissues is discussed. PMID:3957934

  19. Formation, reactivity and detection of protein sulfenic acids

    PubMed Central

    Kettenhofen, Nicholas J.; Wood, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    It has become clear in recent decades that the post-translational modification of protein cysteine residues is a crucial regulatory event in biology. Evidence supports the reversible oxidation of cysteine thiol groups as a mechanism of redox-based signal transduction while the accumulation of proteins with irreversible thiol oxidations is a hallmark of stress-induced cellular damage. The initial formation of cysteine sulfenic acid (SOH) derivatives, along with the reactive properties of this functional group, serves as a crossroads whereby the local redox environment may dictate the progression of either regulatory or pathological outcomes. Protein-SOH are established as transient intermediates in the formation of more stable cysteine oxidation products both under basal conditions and in response to several redox-active extrinsic compounds. This review details both direct and multi-step chemical routes proposed to generate protein-SOH, the spectrum of secondary reactions that may follow their initial formation and the arsenal of experimental tools available for their detection. Both the pioneering studies that have provided a framework for our current understanding of protein-SOH as well as state-of-the-art proteomic strategies designed for global assessments of this post-translational modification are highlighted. PMID:20845928

  20. Modelling and Characterization of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Hemchandra; Sarmah, Rajeev; Sharma, Ankita; Biswas, Sagarika

    2015-01-01

    Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) is an intermediate-filament (IF) protein that maintains the astrocytes of the Central Nervous System in Human. This is differentially expressed during serological studies in inflamed condition such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Therefore, it is of interest to glean molecular insight using a model of GFAP (49.88 kDa) due to its crystallographic nonavailability. The present study has been taken into consideration to construct computational protein model using Modeller 9.11. The structural relevance of the protein was verified using Gromacs 4.5 followed by validation through PROCHECK, Verify 3D, WHAT-IF, ERRAT and PROVE for reliability. The constructed three dimensional (3D) model of GFAP protein had been scrutinized to reveal the associated functions by identifying ligand binding sites and active sites. Molecular level interaction study revealed five possible surface cavities as active sites. The model finds application in further computational analysis towards drug discovery in order to minimize the effect of inflammation. PMID:26420920

  1. Retinoic acid binding protein in normal and neopolastic rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Gesell, M S; Brandes, M J; Arnold, E A; Isaacs, J T; Ueda, H; Millan, J C; Brandes, D

    1982-01-01

    Sucrose density gradient analysis of cytosol from normal and neoplastic rat prostatic tissues exhibited a peak of (3H) retinoic acid binding in the 2S region, corresponding to the cytoplasmic retinoic acid binding protein (cRABP). In the Fisher-Copenhagen F1 rat, cRABP was present in the lateral lobe, but could not be detected in the ventral nor in the dorsal prostatic lobes. Four sublines of the R-3327 rat prostatic tumor contained similar levels of this binding protein. The absence of cRABP in the normal tissue of origin of the R-3327 tumor, the rat dorsal prostate, and reappearance in the neoplastic tissues follows a pattern described in other human and animal tumors. The occurrence of cRABP in the well-differentiated as well as in the anaplastic R-3327 tumors in which markers which reflect a state of differentiation and hormonal regulation, such as androgen receptor, 5 alpha reductase, and secretory acid phosphatase are either markedly reduced or absent, points to cRABP as a marker of malignant transformation.

  2. Retinoic acid binding protein in normal and neopolastic rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Gesell, M S; Brandes, M J; Arnold, E A; Isaacs, J T; Ueda, H; Millan, J C; Brandes, D

    1982-01-01

    Sucrose density gradient analysis of cytosol from normal and neoplastic rat prostatic tissues exhibited a peak of (3H) retinoic acid binding in the 2S region, corresponding to the cytoplasmic retinoic acid binding protein (cRABP). In the Fisher-Copenhagen F1 rat, cRABP was present in the lateral lobe, but could not be detected in the ventral nor in the dorsal prostatic lobes. Four sublines of the R-3327 rat prostatic tumor contained similar levels of this binding protein. The absence of cRABP in the normal tissue of origin of the R-3327 tumor, the rat dorsal prostate, and reappearance in the neoplastic tissues follows a pattern described in other human and animal tumors. The occurrence of cRABP in the well-differentiated as well as in the anaplastic R-3327 tumors in which markers which reflect a state of differentiation and hormonal regulation, such as androgen receptor, 5 alpha reductase, and secretory acid phosphatase are either markedly reduced or absent, points to cRABP as a marker of malignant transformation. PMID:6283503

  3. Hydropathic self-organized criticality: a magic wand for protein physics.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J C

    2012-10-01

    Self-organized criticality (SOC) is a popular concept that has been the subject of more than 3000 articles in the last 25 years. The characteristic signature of SOC is the appearance of self-similarity (power-law scaling) in observable properties. A characteristic observable protein property that describes protein-water interactions is the water-accessible (hydropathic) interfacial area of compacted globular protein networks. Here we show that hydropathic power-law (size- or length-scale-dependent) exponents derived from SOC enable theory to connect standard Web-based (BLAST) short-range amino acid (aa) sequence similarities to long-range aa sequence hydropathic roughening form factors that hierarchically describe evolutionary trends in water - membrane protein interactions. Our method utilizes hydropathic aa exponents that define a non-Euclidean metric realistically rooted in the atomic coordinates of 5526 protein segments. These hydropathic aa exponents thereby encapsulate universal (but previously only implicit) non-Euclidean long-range differential geometrical features of the Protein Data Bank. These hydropathic aa exponents easily organize small mutated aa sequence differences between human and proximate species proteins. For rhodopsin, the most studied transmembrane signaling protein associated with night vision, analysis shows that this approach separates Euclidean short- and non-Euclidean long-range aa sequence properties, and shows that they correlate with 96% success for humans, monkeys, cats, mice and rabbits. Proper application of SOC using hydropathic aa exponents promises unprecedented simplifications of exponentially complex protein sequence-structure-function problems, both conceptual and practical.

  4. Foamy Virus Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions during Particle Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Martin V; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Compared with orthoretroviruses, our understanding of the molecular and cellular replication mechanism of foamy viruses (FVs), a subfamily of retroviruses, is less advanced. The FV replication cycle differs in several key aspects from orthoretroviruses, which leaves established retroviral models debatable for FVs. Here, we review the general aspect of the FV protein-nucleic acid interactions during virus morphogenesis. We provide a summary of the current knowledge of the FV genome structure and essential sequence motifs required for RNA encapsidation as well as Gag and Pol binding in combination with details about the Gag and Pol biosynthesis. This leads us to address open questions in FV RNA engagement, binding and packaging. Based on recent findings, we propose to shift the point of view from individual glycine-arginine-rich motifs having functions in RNA interactions towards envisioning the FV Gag C-terminus as a general RNA binding protein module. We encourage further investigating a potential new retroviral RNA packaging mechanism, which seems more complex in terms of the components that need to be gathered to form an infectious particle. Additional molecular insights into retroviral protein-nucleic acid interactions help us to develop safer, more specific and more efficient vectors in an era of booming genome engineering and gene therapy approaches. PMID:27589786

  5. Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin binds to a highly conserved region of aminopeptidase N in the host insect leading to its evolutionary success.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, K; Yaoi, K; Shimada, N; Kadotani, T; Sato, R

    1999-06-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal protein, Cry1Aa toxin, binds to a specific receptor in insect midguts and has insecticidal activity. Therefore, the structure of the receptor molecule is probably a key factor in determining the binding affinity of the toxin and insect susceptibility. The cDNA fragment (PX frg1) encoding the Cry1Aa toxin-binding region of an aminopeptidase N (APN) or an APN family protein from diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella midgut was cloned and sequenced. A comparison between the deduced amino acid sequence of PX frg1 and other insect APN sequences shows that Cry1Aa toxin binds to a highly conserved region of APN family protein. In this paper, we propose a model to explain the mechanism that causes B. thuringiensis evolutionary success and differing insect susceptibility to Cry1Aa toxin. PMID:10366728

  6. Amino acid profiles and digestible indispensable amino acid scores of proteins from the prioritized key foods in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Nazma; Islam, Saiful; Munmun, Sarah; Mohiduzzaman, Md; Longvah, Thingnganing

    2016-12-15

    Concentrations of standard amino acids were determined in the composite samples (representing 30 agro-ecological zones of Bangladesh) of six prioritized key dietary protein sources: Oryza sativa (rice), Triticum aestivum (wheat flour), Lens culinaris (lentils), Pangusius pangusius (pangas), Labeo rohita (rohu) and Oreochromis mossambicus (tilapia). Digestible indispensable amino acid scores (DIAAS) was calculated using published data on amino acids' digestibility to evaluate the protein quality of these foods. Indispensable amino acid (IAA) contents (mg IAA/g protein), found to be highest in pangas (430) and lowest in wheat (336), of all these analyzed foods exceeded the FAO recommended daily allowance (277mg IAA/g protein) and contributed on average 40% to total amino acid contents. Untruncated DIAAS values ranged from 51% (lysine) in wheat to 106% (histidine) in pangas and distinguished pangas, rohu, and tilapia containing 'excellent quality' protein (DIAAS>100%) with potential to complement lower quality protein of cereals, fruits, and vegetables. PMID:27451158

  7. C-Terminal Amino Acids 471-507 of Avian Hepatitis E Virus Capsid Protein Are Crucial for Binding to Avian and Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinquan; Bilic, Ivana; Marek, Ana; Glösmann, Martin; Hess, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The infection of chickens with avian Hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) can be asymptomatic or induces clinical signs characterized by increased mortality and decreased egg production in adult birds. Due to the lack of an efficient cell culture system for avian HEV, the interaction between virus and host cells is still barely understood. In this study, four truncated avian HEV capsid proteins (ORF2-1 – ORF2-4) with an identical 338aa deletion at the N-terminus and gradual deletions from 0, 42, 99 and 136aa at the C-terminus, respectively, were expressed and used to map the possible binding site within avian HEV capsid protein. Results from the binding assay showed that three truncated capsid proteins attached to avian LMH cells, but did not penetrate into cells. However, the shortest construct, ORF2-4, lost the capability of binding to cells suggesting that the presence of amino acids 471 to 507 of the capsid protein is crucial for the attachment. The construct ORF2-3 (aa339-507) was used to study the potential binding of avian HEV capsid protein to human and other avian species. It could be demonstrated that ORF2-3 was capable of binding to QT-35 cells from Japanese quail and human HepG2 cells but failed to bind to P815 cells. Additionally, chicken serum raised against ORF2-3 successfully blocked the binding to LMH cells. Treatment with heparin sodium salt or sodium chlorate significantly reduced binding of ORF2-3 to LMH cells. However, heparinase II treatment of LMH cells had no effect on binding of the ORF2-3 construct, suggesting a possible distinct attachment mechanism of avian as compared to human HEV. For the first time, interactions between avian HEV capsid protein and host cells were investigated demonstrating that aa471 to 507 of the capsid protein are needed to facilitate interaction with different kind of cells from different species. PMID:27073893

  8. Attenuated acute salivary α-amylase responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid in thin children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long Hui; Yang, Ze Min; Chen, Wei Wen; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Min; Yang, Xiao Rong; Zhao, Ling Bo

    2015-04-14

    Salivary α-amylase (sAA) is responsible for the 'pre-digestion' of starch in the oral cavity and accounts for up to 50 % of salivary protein in human saliva. An accumulating body of literature suggests that sAA is of nutritional importance; however, it is still not clear how sAA is related to individual's nutritional status. Although copy number variations (CNV) of the salivary amylase gene (AMY1) are associated with variation in sAA levels, a significant amount of sAA variation is not explained by AMY1 CNV. To measure sAA responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid, we used sAA ratio (the ratio of stimulated sAA levels to those of resting sAA) and investigated acute sAA responses to citric acid in children with normal (Normal-BMI, n 22) and low (Low-BMI, n 21) BMI. The AMY1 gene copy number was determined by quantitative PCR. We, for the first time, demonstrated attenuated acute sAA responses (decreased sAA ratio) to gustatory stimulation in Low-BMI (thinness grade 3) children compared with the Normal-BMI children, which suggest that sAA responses to gustatory stimulation may be of nutritional importance. However, child's nutritional status was not directly related to their resting or stimulated sAA levels, and it was not associated with AMY1 gene copy number. Finally, AMY1 CNV might influence, but did not eventually determine, sAA levels in children. PMID:25784372

  9. Attenuated acute salivary α-amylase responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid in thin children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long Hui; Yang, Ze Min; Chen, Wei Wen; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Min; Yang, Xiao Rong; Zhao, Ling Bo

    2015-04-14

    Salivary α-amylase (sAA) is responsible for the 'pre-digestion' of starch in the oral cavity and accounts for up to 50 % of salivary protein in human saliva. An accumulating body of literature suggests that sAA is of nutritional importance; however, it is still not clear how sAA is related to individual's nutritional status. Although copy number variations (CNV) of the salivary amylase gene (AMY1) are associated with variation in sAA levels, a significant amount of sAA variation is not explained by AMY1 CNV. To measure sAA responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid, we used sAA ratio (the ratio of stimulated sAA levels to those of resting sAA) and investigated acute sAA responses to citric acid in children with normal (Normal-BMI, n 22) and low (Low-BMI, n 21) BMI. The AMY1 gene copy number was determined by quantitative PCR. We, for the first time, demonstrated attenuated acute sAA responses (decreased sAA ratio) to gustatory stimulation in Low-BMI (thinness grade 3) children compared with the Normal-BMI children, which suggest that sAA responses to gustatory stimulation may be of nutritional importance. However, child's nutritional status was not directly related to their resting or stimulated sAA levels, and it was not associated with AMY1 gene copy number. Finally, AMY1 CNV might influence, but did not eventually determine, sAA levels in children.

  10. Photolabeling of brain membrane proteins by lysergic acid diethylamide

    SciTech Connect

    Mahon, A.C.; Hartig, P.R.

    1982-04-05

    /sup 3/H-Lysergic acid diethylamide (/sup 3/H-LSD) is irreversibly incorporated into bovine caudate membranes during ultraviolet light illumination. The incorporated radioligand apparently forms a covalent bond with a sub-population of the membrane proteins. Although the photolabeling pattern differs significantly from the Coomassie blue staining pattern on SDS gels, the photolabeling is apparently not specific for LSD binding sites associated with neurotransmitter receptors. /sup 3/H-LSD photolabeling can occur during prolonged exposure of membrane samples to room lighting and thus may introduce artifacts into receptor binding assays.

  11. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts.

  12. Structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  13. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts. PMID:26762189

  14. Non-standard amino acid incorporation into proteins using Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seok Hoon; Kwon, Yong-Chan; Jewett, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Incorporating non-standard amino acids (NSAAs) into proteins enables new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions. In recent years, improvements in cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems have opened the way to accurate and efficient incorporation of NSAAs into proteins. The driving force behind this development has been three-fold. First, a technical renaissance has enabled high-yielding (>1 g/L) and long-lasting (>10 h in batch operation) CFPS in systems derived from Escherichia coli. Second, the efficiency of orthogonal translation systems has improved. Third, the open nature of the CFPS platform has brought about an unprecedented level of control and freedom of design. Here, we review recent developments in CFPS platforms designed to precisely incorporate NSAAs. In the coming years, we anticipate that CFPS systems will impact efforts to elucidate structure/function relationships of proteins and to make biomaterials and sequence-defined biopolymers for medical and industrial applications.

  15. A single amino acid in the F2 subunit of respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein alters growth and fusogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Schickli, Jeanne H.; Tang, Roderick S.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe lower respiratory tract infection in children, especially in infants less than 1 year of age. There are currently no licensed vaccines against RSV. rA2ΔM2-2 is a promising live-attenuated vaccine candidate that is currently being evaluated in the clinic. Attenuation of rA2ΔM2-2 is achieved by a single deletion of the M2-2 gene, which disrupts the balance between viral transcription and replication. Whilst performing a manufacturing feasibility study in a serum-free adapted Vero cell line, differences in growth kinetics and cytopathic effect (CPE) were identified between two rA2ΔM2-2 vaccine candidates. Comparative sequence analysis identified four amino acid differences between the two vaccine viruses. Recombinant rA2ΔM2-2 viruses carrying each of the four amino acid differences identified a K66E mutation in the F2 fragment of the fusion (F) protein as the cause of the growth and CPE differences. Syncytium-formation experiments with RSV F protein carrying mutations at aa 66 suggested that a change in charge at this residue within the F2 fragment can have a significant impact on fusion. PMID:24092758

  16. Separation of membranes from acid-solubilized fish muscle proteins with the aid of calcium ions and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yong; Hultin, Herbert O

    2005-04-20

    Calcium chloride, and to a lesser extent MgCl2, aided in the separation of membranes by centrifugation from cod (Gadus morhua) muscle homogenates solubilized at pH 3 in the presence of citric acid or malic acid but not lactic acid. Adding citric acid and Ca2+ before solubilizing the cod muscle homogenates was needed for the effect. At 1 mM citric acid, 70-80% of the phospholipid and 25-30% of the protein were removed at 10 mM Ca2+. At 8 mM Ca2+, citric acid showed an optimal effect on phospholipid removal at 5 mM with 90% of the phospholipid and 35% of the protein removed. The treatment with citric acid and Ca2+ was also effective in separating the membrane from solubilized herring (Clupea harengus) muscle homogenate. Ca2+ and citric acid might exert their influence by disconnecting linkages between membranes and cytoskeletal proteins.

  17. RNAi induced knockdown of a cadherin-like protein (EF531715) does not affect toxicity of Cry34/35Ab1 or Cry3Aa to Diabrotica virgifera virgifera larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Tan, Sek Yee; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Wang, Haichuan; Vélez, Ana María; Hasler, James; McCaskill, David; Xu, Tao; Chen, Hong; Jurzenski, Jessica; Kelker, Matthew; Xu, Xiaoping; Narva, Kenneth; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-08-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is an important maize pest throughout most of the U.S. Corn Belt. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins including modified Cry3Aa and Cry34/35Ab1 have been expressed in transgenic maize to protect against WCR feeding damage. To date, there is limited information regarding the WCR midgut target sites for these proteins. In this study, we examined whether a cadherin-like gene from Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (DvvCad; GenBank accession # EF531715) associated with WCR larval midgut tissue is necessary for Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 toxicity. Experiments were designed to examine the sensitivity of WCR to trypsin activated Cry3Aa and Cry34/35Ab1 after oral feeding of the DvvCad dsRNA to knockdown gene expression. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed that DvvCad mRNA transcript levels were reduced in larvae treated with cadherin dsRNA. Relative cadherin expression by immunoblot analysis and nano-liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS) of WCR neonate brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) preparations exposed to DvvCad dsRNA confirmed reduced cadherin expression when compared to BBMV from untreated larvae. However, the larval mortality and growth inhibition of WCR neonates exposed to cadherin dsRNA for two days followed by feeding exposure to either Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 for four days was not significantly different to that observed in insects exposed to either Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 alone. In combination, these results suggest that cadherin is unlikely to be involved in the toxicity of Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 to WCR. PMID:27334721

  18. Molecular evolution of monotreme and marsupial whey acidic protein genes.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julie A; Lefèvre, Christophe; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    Whey acidic protein (WAP), a major whey protein present in milk of a number of mammalian species has characteristic cysteine-rich domains known as four-disulfide cores (4-DSC). Eutherian WAP, expressed in the mammary gland throughout lactation, has two 4-DSC domains, (DI-DII) whereas marsupial WAP, expressed only during mid-late lactation, contains an additional 4-DSC (DIII), and has a DIII-D1-DII configuration. We report the expression and evolution of echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and platypus (Onithorhynchus anatinus) WAP cDNAs. Predicted translation of monotreme cDNAs showed echidna WAP contains two 4-DSC domains corresponding to DIII-DII, whereas platypus WAP contains an additional domain at the C-terminus with homology to DII and has the configuration DIII-DII-DII. Both monotreme WAPs represent new WAP protein configurations. We propose models for evolution of the WAP gene in the mammalian lineage either through exon loss from an ancient ancestor or by rapid evolution via the process of exon shuffling. This evolutionary outcome may reflect differences in lactation strategy between marsupials, monotremes, and eutherians, and give insight to biological function of the gene products. WAP four-disulfide core domain 2 (WFDC2) proteins were also identified in echidna, platypus and tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) lactating mammary cells. WFDC2 proteins are secreted proteins not previously associated with lactation. Mammary gland expression of tammar WFDC2 during the course of lactation showed WFDC2 was elevated during pregnancy, reduced in early lactation and absent in mid-late lactation.

  19. Glucose supplementation stimulates peripheral branched-chain amino acid catabolism in lactating dairy cows during essential amino acid infusions.

    PubMed

    Nichols, K; Kim, J J M; Carson, M; Metcalf, J A; Cant, J P; Doelman, J

    2016-02-01

    To determine how glucose modulates protein synthesis when essential AA are in abundant supply, 5 early-lactation, rumen-fistulated Holstein dairy cows were fed a diet containing 6.95 MJ/kg of net energy for lactation and 12.4% crude protein and abomasally infused for 5 d with saline, 844 or 1,126 g/d of a complete essential AA mix, with and without the inclusion of 1,000 g/d of glucose, in a 5×5 Latin square design. Infusion of essential AA increased milk yield by 4.1 kg/d, milk protein by 256 g/d, milk fat by 95 g/d, and milk urea nitrogen by 70% compared with saline, with no differences between the level of essential AA infusion. The addition of glucose to essential AA infusate did not stimulate milk protein yield or concentration, but reduced milk urea nitrogen by 17% and decreased milk fat yield. Arterial concentrations of total essential AA increased 3- to 4-fold, mammary clearance decreased 61%, and mammary uptake of essential AA increased 65% in response to essential AA infusion. Arterial branched-chain AA concentrations declined 29% in response to glucose and mammary clearance increased 48%, but mammary AA uptake was unchanged. Essential AA infusion increased plasma 3-methylhistidine by 50% and reduced muscle branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase kinase abundance by 14%, indicating stimulation of muscle protein turnover and branched-chain AA catabolism, respectively. Glucose had no further effect on muscle branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase kinase abundance but decreased mRNA expression of branched chain aminotransferase 1. Lack of further increases in plasma 3-methylhistidine or greater stimulation of muscle branched-chain AA catabolism indicates that muscle protein degradation was unchanged with glucose but that accretion may have been stimulated. The decrease in circulating branched-chain AA concentrations and nitrogen excretion in response to glucose suggests that surplus essential AA were redirected to peripheral, extra-mammary tissues.

  20. Amino acids – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 4

    PubMed Central

    Stein, J.; Boehles, H. J.; Blumenstein, I.; Goeters, C.; Schulz, R.

    2009-01-01

    Protein catabolism should be reduced and protein synthesis promoted with parenteral nutrion (PN). Amino acid (AA) solutions should always be infused with PN. Standard AA solutions are generally used, whereas specially adapted AA solutions may be required in certain conditions such as severe disorders of AA utilisation or in inborn errors of AA metabolism. An AA intake of 0.8 g/kg/day is generally recommended for adult patients with a normal metabolism, which may be increased to 1.2–1.5 g/kg/day, or to 2.0 or 2.5 g/kg/day in exceptional cases. Sufficient non-nitrogen energy sources should be added in order to assure adequate utilisation of AA. A nitrogen calorie ratio of 1:130 to 1:170 (g N/kcal) or 1:21 to 1:27 (g AA/kcal) is recommended under normal metabolic conditions. In critically ill patients glutamine should be administered parenterally if indicated in the form of peptides, for example 0.3–0.4 g glutamine dipeptide/kg body weight/day (=0.2–0.26 g glutamine/kg body weight/day). No recommendation can be made for glutamine supplementation in PN for patients with acute pancreatitis or after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), and in newborns. The application of arginine is currently not warranted as a supplement in PN in adults. N-acetyl AA are only of limited use as alternative AA sources. There is currently no indication for use of AA solutions with an increased content of glycine, branched-chain AAs (BCAA) and ornithine-α-ketoglutarate (OKG) in all patients receiving PN. AA solutions with an increased proportion of BCAA are recommended in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy (III–IV). PMID:20049071

  1. High-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry characterization of a new isoform of human salivary acidic proline-rich proteins named Roma-Boston Ser22(Phos) → Phe variant

    PubMed Central

    Iavarone, Federica; D’Alessandro, Alfredo; Tian, Na; Cabras, Tiziana; Messana, Irene; Helmerhorst, Eva J.; Oppenheim, Frank G.; Castagnola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    During a survey of human saliva by a top-down reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry approach, two proteins eluting at 27.4 and 28.4 min, with average masses of 15 494 ± 1 and 11 142 ± 1 Da, were detected in a subject from Boston. The Δmass value (4352 Da) of the two proteins was similar to the difference in mass values between intact (150 amino acids, [a.a.]) and truncated acidic proline-rich proteins (aPRPs; 106 a.a.) suggesting an a.a. substitution in the first 106 residues resulting in a strong reduction in polarity, since under the same experimental conditions aPRPs eluted at ~22.5 min (intact) and 23.5 min (truncated forms). Manual inspection of the high-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectra of the truncated isoform showed the replacement of the phosphorylated Ser-22 in PRP-3 with a Phe residue. Inspection of the tandem mass spectra of the intact isoform confirmed the substitution, which is allowed by the code transition TCT→TTT and is in agreement with the dramatic increase in elution time. The isoform was also detected in two other subjects, one from Boston (unrelated to the previous) and one from Rome. For this reason we propose to name this variant PRP-1 (PRP-3) RB (Roma-Boston) Ser22(phos)→Phe. PMID:24771659

  2. Ribonucleic Acid Regulation in Permeabilized Cells of Escherichia coli Capable of Ribonucleic Acid and Protein Synthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Alan G.

    1974-01-01

    A cell permeabilization procedure is described that reduces viability less than 10% and does not significantly reduce the rates of ribonucleic acid and protein synthesis when appropriately supplemented. Permeabilization abolishes the normal stringent coupling of protein and ribonucleic acid synthesis. PMID:4364330

  3. SCMCRYS: predicting protein crystallization using an ensemble scoring card method with estimating propensity scores of P-collocated amino acid pairs.

    PubMed

    Charoenkwan, Phasit; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Lee, Hua-Chin; Chaijaruwanich, Jeerayut; Huang, Hui-Ling; Ho, Shinn-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Existing methods for predicting protein crystallization obtain high accuracy using various types of complemented features and complex ensemble classifiers, such as support vector machine (SVM) and Random Forest classifiers. It is desirable to develop a simple and easily interpretable prediction method with informative sequence features to provide insights into protein crystallization. This study proposes an ensemble method, SCMCRYS, to predict protein crystallization, for which each classifier is built by using a scoring card method (SCM) with estimating propensity scores of p-collocated amino acid (AA) pairs (p=0 for a dipeptide). The SCM classifier determines the crystallization of a sequence according to a weighted-sum score. The weights are the composition of the p-collocated AA pairs, and the propensity scores of these AA pairs are estimated using a statistic with optimization approach. SCMCRYS predicts the crystallization using a simple voting method from a number of SCM classifiers. The experimental results show that the single SCM classifier utilizing dipeptide composition with accuracy of 73.90% is comparable to the best previously-developed SVM-based classifier, SVM_POLY (74.6%), and our proposed SVM-based classifier utilizing the same dipeptide composition (77.55%). The SCMCRYS method with accuracy of 76.1% is comparable to the state-of-the-art ensemble methods PPCpred (76.8%) and RFCRYS (80.0%), which used the SVM and Random Forest classifiers, respectively. This study also investigates mutagenesis analysis based on SCM and the result reveals the hypothesis that the mutagenesis of surface residues Ala and Cys has large and small probabilities of enhancing protein crystallizability considering the estimated scores of crystallizability and solubility, melting point, molecular weight and conformational entropy of amino acids in a generalized condition. The propensity scores of amino acids and dipeptides for estimating the protein crystallizability can aid

  4. Acid-degradable polyurethane particles for protein-based vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bachelder, Eric M.; Beaudette, Tristan T.; Broaders, Kyle E.; Paramonov, Sergey E.; Dashe, Jesse; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Acid-degradable particles containing a model protein antigen, ovalbumin, were prepared from a polyurethane with acetal moieties embedded throughout the polymer, and characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The small molecule degradation by-product of the particles was synthesized and tested in vitro for toxicity indicating an LC50 of 12,500 μg/ml. A new liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique was developed to monitor the in vitro degradation of these particles. The degradation by-product inside RAW macrophages was at its highest level after 24 hours of culture and was efficiently exocytosed until it was no longer detectable after four days. When tested in vitro, these particles induced a substantial increase in the presentation of the immunodominant ovalbumin-derived peptide SIINFEKL in both macrophages and dendritic cells. In addition, vaccination with these particles generated a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response that was superior to both free ovalbumin and particles made from an analogous but slower-degrading acid-labile polyurethane polymer. Overall, we present a fully degradable polymer system with non-toxic by-products, which may find use in various biomedical applications including protein-based vaccines. PMID:18710254

  5. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  6. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish.

    PubMed

    Setlow, Richard B

    2002-03-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  7. 5-lipoxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein gene polymorphisms, dietary linoleic acid, and risk for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2008-10-01

    The n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid 5-lipoxygenase pathway has been shown to play a role in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer. We conducted a population-based case-control study among Latina, African-American, and White women from the San Francisco Bay area to examine the association of the 5-lipoxygenase gene (ALOX5) and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein gene (ALOX5AP) with breast cancer risk. Three ALOX5AP polymorphisms [poly(A) microsatellite, -4900 A>G (rs4076128), and -3472 A>G (rs4073259)] and three ALOX5 polymorphisms [Sp1-binding site (-GGGCGG-) variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism, -1279 G>T (rs6593482), and 760 G>A (rs2228065)] were genotyped in 802 cases and 888 controls. We did not find significant main effects of ALOX5 and ALOX5AP genotypes on breast cancer risk that were consistent across race or ethnicity; however, there was a significant interaction between the ALOX5AP -4900 A>G polymorphism and dietary linoleic acid intake (P=0.03). Among women consuming a diet high in linoleic acid (top quartile of intake, >17.4 g/d), carrying the AA genotype was associated with higher breast cancer risk (age- and race-adjusted odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.9) compared with carrying genotypes AG or GG. Among women consuming acid, ALOX5AP -4900 genotype was not associated with breast cancer risk (age- and race-adjusted odds ratio, 0.9; 95% confidence interval, 0.7-1.2). These results support a role for n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in breast carcinogenesis and suggest that epidemiologic studies on dietary fat and breast cancer should take into account genetic predisposition related to n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism.

  8. Investigation of protein-fatty acid interactions in zein films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin

    Zein, the prolamin of corn, has shown potential as industrial biopolymer for packaging and agricultural uses. Previous researchers plasticized zein with oleic acid and extruded it into sheets and films. Such products showed reasonable tensile and water barrier properties. However, those properties were affected by film structure, which is believed controlled by the interaction between zein and plasticizer. The nature of those interactions is still not well understood. Protein-fatty acid interactions in zein resin films were investigated by surface plasmon resonance and atomic force microscopy in this work. Preliminary research was conducted to establish the effect of solvent systems on the plasticization of zein by oleic acid. Although slight differences were observed, it was concluded that the use of 75% ethanol or 75% 2-propanol produced similar results. Surface plasmon resonance was employed to investigate zein static and dynamic adsorption on surfaces of hydrophilic and hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) generated by 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid or 1-octanethiol, respectively, and representing the two end groups of oleic acid. Results indicated that zein was adsorbed to both surfaces but showed higher affinity for hydrophilic groups. The corresponding thickness of zein specific binding layer on hydrophilic and hydrophobic SAMs was around 4.7 nm and 4.6 nm. Zein exhibited higher affinity for hydrophilic than for hydrophobic SAMs evidenced from the higher initial adsorption rate and ultimate surface coverage at all zein concentrations. Flushing surface with buffer would leave an apparent monolayer of zein, which is 5 times higher for hydrophilic than hydrophobic SAMs. This observation suggested that zein may use different sides of its molecule to interact with hydrophobic or hydrophilic groups. The surface topography of zein deposits on both SAMs was examined by atomic force microscopy. It was found that zein formed distinct ring-shaped structures with

  9. Site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans to enhance substrate specificity towards maltodextrin for enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G).

    PubMed

    Han, Ruizhi; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from Paenibacillus macerans was conducted to improve the specificity of CGTase towards maltodextrin, which can be used as a cheap and easily soluble glycosyl donor for the enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G) by CGTase. When using maltodextrin as glycosyl donor, four mutants K47F (lysine→ phenylalanine), K47L (lysine→ leucine), K47V (lysine→ valine) and K47W (lysine→ tryptophan) showed higher AA-2G yield as compared with that produced by the wild-type CGTase. The transformation conditions (temperature, pH and the mass ratio of L-ascorbic acid to maltodextrin) were optimized and the highest titer of AA-2G produced by the mutant K47L could reach 1.97 g/l, which was 64.2% higher than that (1.20 g/l) produced by the wild-type CGTase. The reaction kinetics analysis confirmed the enhanced maltodextrin specificity, and it was also found that compared with the wild-type CGTase, the four mutants had relatively lower cyclization activities and higher disproportionation activities, which was favorable for AA-2G synthesis. The mechanism responsible for the enhanced substrate specificity was further explored by structure modeling and it was indicated that the enhancement of maltodextrin specificity may be due to the short residue chain and the removal of hydrogen bonding interactions between the side chain of residue 47 and the sugar at -3 subsite. Here the obtained mutant CGTases, especially the K47L, has a great potential in the production of AA-2G with maltodextrin as a cheap and easily soluble substrate.

  10. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder. PMID:25639618

  11. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder.

  12. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter protein levels are down-regulated through ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation induced by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Kuribayashi, Hideaki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2013-08-15

    The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT or SLC10A2) has a crucial role in intestinal bile acid absorption. We previously reported that enterobacteria-mediated bile acid conversion was involved in the alteration of ileal ASBT expression levels. In the present study, to investigate the hypothesis that ileal ASBT protein levels are post-translationally regulated by enterobacteria-associated bile acids, alteration of ileal ASBT protein levels was analysed in mice 12 h and 24 h after anti-bacterial drug ampicillin (ABPC) treatment (100 mg/kg, single shot) that altered bile acid composition in the intestinal lumen. In ABPC-treated mice, enterobacteria-biotransformed bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) and cholic acid (CA) levels were decreased, whereas taurocholic acid (TCA) and tauro-β-muricholic acid levels were increased in the intestinal lumen. Ileal ASBT protein levels in brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMVs), but not ileal Asbt mRNA levels, were significantly increased in the ABPC-treated mice, and the extent of ubiquitination of the ileal ASBT protein was reduced in the ABPC-treated mice. Treatment of ABPC-pretreated mice with CA or TDCA, but not TCA, significantly decreased ileal ASBT protein levels and increased the extent of ubiquitination of ileal ASBT protein. Treatment of mice with the lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine, or the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, increased ileal ASBT protein levels in BBMVs. CA-mediated reduction of ASBT protein levels in the ABPC-pretreated mice was attenuated by co-treatment with chloroquine or MG132. These results suggest that ileal ASBT protein is degraded by a ubiquitin-dependent pathway in response to enterobacteria-associated bile acids. PMID:23872411

  13. Prediction of protein-protein interactions with clustered amino acids and weighted sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiaoying; You, Zhuhong; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Yong

    2015-01-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project, bioscience has entered into the era of the genome and proteome. Therefore, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) research is becoming more and more important. Life activities and the protein-protein interactions are inseparable, such as DNA synthesis, gene transcription activation, protein translation, etc. Though many methods based on biological experiments and machine learning have been proposed, they all spent a long time to learn and obtained an imprecise accuracy. How to efficiently and accurately predict PPIs is still a big challenge. To take up such a challenge, we developed a new predictor by incorporating the reduced amino acid alphabet (RAAA) information into the general form of pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and with the weighted sparse representation-based classification (WSRC). The remarkable advantages of introducing the reduced amino acid alphabet is being able to avoid the notorious dimensionality disaster or overfitting problem in statistical prediction. Additionally, experiments have proven that our method achieved good performance in both a low- and high-dimensional feature space. Among all of the experiments performed on the PPIs data of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the best one achieved 90.91% accuracy, 94.17% sensitivity, 87.22% precision and a 83.43% Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) value. In order to evaluate the prediction ability of our method, extensive experiments are performed to compare with the state-of-the-art technique, support vector machine (SVM). The achieved results show that the proposed approach is very promising for predicting PPIs, and it can be a helpful supplement for PPIs prediction. PMID:25984606

  14. Proximate composition, fatty acid analysis and protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score of three Mediterranean cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Zlatanos, Spiros; Laskaridis, Kostas; Feist, Christian; Sagredos, Angelos

    2006-10-01

    Proximate composition, fatty acid analysis and protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) in three commercially important cephalopods of the Mediterranean sea (cuttlefish, octopus and squid) were determined. The results of the proximate analysis showed that these species had very high protein:fat ratios similar to lean beef. Docosahexaenoic, palmitic and eicosipentaenoic acid were the most abundant fatty acids among analyzed species. The amount of n-3 fatty acids was higher than that of saturated, monounsaturated and n-6 fatty acids. Despite the fact that cephalopods contain small amounts of fat they were found quite rich in n-3 fatty acids. Finally, PDCAAS indicated that these organisms had a very good protein quality.

  15. Oral administration of amino acidic supplements improves protein and energy profiles in skeletal muscle of aged rats: elongation of functional performance and acceleration of mitochondrial recovery in adenosine triphosphate after exhaustive exertion.

    PubMed

    Chen Scarabelli, Carol; McCauley, Roy B; Yuan, Zhaokan; Di Rezze, Justin; Patel, David; Putt, Jeff; Raddino, Riccardo; Allebban, Zuhair; Abboud, John; Scarabelli, Gabriele M; Chilukuri, Karuna; Gardin, Julius; Saravolatz, Louis; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Scarabelli, Tiziano M

    2008-06-01

    Sarcopenia is an inevitable age-related degenerative process chiefly characterized by decreased synthesis of muscle proteins and impaired mitochondrial function, leading to progressive loss of muscle mass. Here, we sought to probe whether long-term administration of oral amino acids (AAs) can increase protein and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content in the gastrocnemius muscle of aged rats, enhancing functional performance. To this end, 6- and 24-month-old male Fisher 344 rats were divided into 3 groups: group A (6-month-old rats) and group B (24-month-old rats) were used as adult and senescent control group, respectively, while group C (24-month-old rats) was used as senescent treated group and underwent 1-month oral treatment with a mixture of mainly essential AAs. Untreated senescent animals exhibited a 30% reduction in total and fractional protein content, as well as a 50% reduction in ATP content and production, compared with adult control rats (p <0.001). Long-term supplementation with mixed AAs significantly improved protein and high-energy phosphate content, as well as the rate of mitochondrial ATP production, conforming their values to those of adult control animals (p <0.001). The improved availability of protein and high-energy substrates in the gastrocnemius muscle of treated aged rats paralleled a significant enhancement in functional performance assessed by swim test, with dramatic elongation of maximal exertion times compared with untreated senescent rats (p <0.001). In line with these findings, we observed that, after 6 hours of rest following exhaustive swimming, the recovery in mitochondrial ATP content was approximately 70% in adult control rats, approximately 60% in senescent control rats, and normalized in treated rats as compared with animals of the same age unexposed to maximal exertion (p <0.001). In conclusion, nutritional supplementation with oral AAs improved protein and energy profiles in the gastrocnemius of treated rats, enhancing

  16. Free amino acids in crocodilians fed proteins of different biological value.

    PubMed

    Herbert, J D; Coulson, R A

    1975-05-01

    Changes in plasma levels of amino acids derived from fed protein were determined by feeding crocodilians (Caiman crocodilus crocodilus and Alligator mississipiensis) 7.5 g protein/kg body weight and by monitoring the plasma free amino acids for several days. Zein and several other vegetable proteins produced no rise in plasma amino acids and were excreted intact in the feces. Casein and fish muscle were rapidly digested but produced little rise in plasma amino acids, and the increases showed no relationship to the composition of the protein fed. Gelatin feeding led to large increases in plasma amino acids that persisted for more than a week, and the resulting pattern was nearly identical to the composition of gelatin with the exception of aspartic and glutamic acids, and several animals died. Equivalent quantities of fish muscle protein were assimilated without difficulty by the crocodilians. Endogenous protein secreted into the gut apparently contributed little to the amino acid mixture absorbed.

  17. Mathematical modeling and comparison of protein size distribution in different plant, animal, fungal and microbial species reveals a negative correlation between protein size and protein number, thus providing insight into the evolution of proteomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The sizes of proteins are relevant to their biochemical structure and for their biological function. The statistical distribution of protein lengths across a diverse set of taxa can provide hints about the evolution of proteomes. Results Using the full genomic sequences of over 1,302 prokaryotic and 140 eukaryotic species two datasets containing 1.2 and 6.1 million proteins were generated and analyzed statistically. The lengthwise distribution of proteins can be roughly described with a gamma type or log-normal model, depending on the species. However the shape parameter of the gamma model has not a fixed value of 2, as previously suggested, but varies between 1.5 and 3 in different species. A gamma model with unrestricted shape parameter described best the distributions in ~48% of the species, whereas the log-normal distribution described better the observed protein sizes in 42% of the species. The gamma restricted function and the sum of exponentials distribution had a better fitting in only ~5% of the species. Eukaryotic proteins have an average size of 472 aa, whereas bacterial (320 aa) and archaeal (283 aa) proteins are significantly smaller (33-40% on average). Average protein sizes in different phylogenetic groups were: Alveolata (628 aa), Amoebozoa (533 aa), Fornicata (543 aa), Placozoa (453 aa), Eumetazoa (486 aa), Fungi (487 aa), Stramenopila (486 aa), Viridiplantae (392 aa). Amino acid composition is biased according to protein size. Protein length correlated negatively with %C, %M, %K, %F, %R, %W, %Y and positively with %D, %E, %Q, %S and %T. Prokaryotic proteins had a different protein size bias for %E, %G, %K and %M as compared to eukaryotes. Conclusions Mathematical modeling of protein length empirical distributions can be used to asses the quality of small ORFs annotation in genomic releases (detection of too many false positive small ORFs). There is a negative correlation between average protein size and total number of proteins among

  18. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and abscisic acid signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S; Testerink, C; Wang, M

    2000-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical plant hormone, responsible for regulation of abscission, diverse aspects of plant and seed development, stress responses and germination. It was found that ABA signal transduction in plants can involve the activity of type 2C-phosphatases (PP2C), calcium, potassium, pH and a transient activation of MAP kinase. The ABA signal transduction cascades have been shown to be tissue-specific, the transient activation of MAP kinase has until now only been found in barley aleurone cells. However, type 2C phosphatases are involved in the induction of most ABA responses, as shown by the PP2C-deficient abi-mutants. These phosphatases show high homology with phosphatases that regulate MAP kinase activity in yeast. In addition, the role of farnesyl transferase as a negative regulator of ABA responses also indicates towards involvement of MAP kinase in ABA signal transduction. Farnesyl transferase is known to regulate Ras proteins, Ras proteins in turn are known to regulate MAP kinase activation. Interestingly, Ras-like proteins were detected in barley aleurone cells. Further establishment of the involvement of MAP kinase in ABA signal transduction and its role therein, still awaits more study.

  19. Nucleic Acids for Ultra-Sensitive Protein Detection

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Kris P. F.; Knez, Karel; Spasic, Dragana; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    Major advancements in molecular biology and clinical diagnostics cannot be brought about strictly through the use of genomics based methods. Improved methods for protein detection and proteomic screening are an absolute necessity to complement to wealth of information offered by novel, high-throughput sequencing technologies. Only then will it be possible to advance insights into clinical processes and to characterize the importance of specific protein biomarkers for disease detection or the realization of “personalized medicine”. Currently however, large-scale proteomic information is still not as easily obtained as its genomic counterpart, mainly because traditional antibody-based technologies struggle to meet the stringent sensitivity and throughput requirements that are required whereas mass-spectrometry based methods might be burdened by significant costs involved. However, recent years have seen the development of new biodetection strategies linking nucleic acids with existing antibody technology or replacing antibodies with oligonucleotide recognition elements altogether. These advancements have unlocked many new strategies to lower detection limits and dramatically increase throughput of protein detection assays. In this review, an overview of these new strategies will be given. PMID:23337338

  20. Inhibition of the Hematopoietic Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase by Phenoxyacetic Acids.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Liu, Wallace H; Colayco, Sharon; Rascon, Justin; Vasile, Stefan; Gasior, Carlton; Critton, David A; Chan, Xochella; Dahl, Russell; Su, Ying; Sergienko, Eduard; Chung, Thomas D Y; Mustelin, Tomas; Page, Rebecca; Tautz, Lutz

    2011-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have only recently become the focus of attention in the search for novel drug targets despite the fact that they play vital roles in numerous cellular processes and are implicated in many human diseases. The hematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase (HePTP) is often found dysregulated in preleukemic myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), as well as in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Physiological substrates of HePTP include the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) ERK1/2 and p38. Specific modulators of HePTP catalytic activity will be useful for elucidating mechanisms of MAPK regulation in hematopietic cells, and may also provide treatments for hematopoietic malignancies such as AML. Here we report the discovery of phenoxyacetic acids as inhibitors of HePTP. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis and in silico docking studies reveal the molecular basis of HePTP inhibition by these compounds. We also show that these compounds are able to penetrate cell membranes and inhibit HePTP in human T lymphocytes.

  1. Induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy in human lung carcinoma A549 cells by anacardic acid.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yeong-Ae; Shin, Pyung-Gyun; Yoon, Jin-Soo; Yadunandam, Anandam Kasin; Kim, Gun-Do

    2014-03-01

    Anacardic acid (AA, 2-hydroxy-6-pentadecylbenzoic acid), a constituent of the cashew-nut shell, has a variety of beneficial effects on the treatment of cancer and tumors. However, the fact that AA induces ER stress and autophagy in cancer cell is not known. We investigated the effect of AA on ER-stress and autophagy-induced cell death in cancer cells. Because of our interest in lung cancer, we used the non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells treated with 3.0 μg/ml of AA for this research. In this research we found that AA induces intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and ER stress. AA induced the ER stress-inducing factors, especially IRE1α, and the hallmarks of UPR, Grp78/Bip and GADD153/CHOP. AA inhibited the expression of p-PERK and its downstream substrate, p-elF2α. We also demonstrated that AA induces autophagy. Up-regulation of autophagy-related genes and the appearance of autophagosome in transfected cells with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-LC3 and GFP-Beclin1 plasmids showed the induction of autophagy in AA-treated A549 cells. The morphological analysis of intracellular organelles by TEM also showed the evidence that AA induces ER stress and autophagy. For the first time, our research showed that AA induces ER stress and autophagy in cancer cells. PMID:23955513

  2. Maternal folic acid supplementation to dams on marginal protein level alters brain fatty acid levels of their adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shobha; Joshi, Sadhana; Kale, Anvita; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar; Mahadik, Sahebarao

    2006-05-01

    Studies on fetal programming of adult diseases have highlighted the importance of maternal nutrition during pregnancy. Folic acid and long-chain essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) have independent effects on fetal growth. However, folic acid effects may also involve alteration of LC-PUFA metabolism. Because marginal deficiency of LC-PUFAs during critical periods of brain growth and development is associated with risks for adult diseases, it is highly relevant to investigate how maternal supplementation of such nutrients can alter brain fatty acid levels. We examined the impact of folic acid supplementation, conventionally used in maternal intervention, on brain essential fatty acid levels and plasma corticosterone concentrations in adult offspring at 11 months of age. Pregnant female rats from 4 groups (6 in each) were fed with casein diets either with 18 g protein/100 g diet (control diet) or treatment diets that were marginal in protein (MP), such as 12 g protein/100 g diet supplemented with 8 mg folic acid (FAS/MP), 12 g protein/100 g diet without folic acid (FAD/MP), or 12 g protein/100 g diet (MP) with 2 mg folic acid. Pups were weaned to a standard laboratory diet with 18 g protein/100 g diet. All male adult offspring in the FAS/MP group showed lower docosahexaenoic acid (P<.05) as compared with control adult offspring (6.04+/-2.28 vs 10.33+/-0.86 g/100 g fatty acids) and higher n-6/n-3 ratio (P<.05). Docosahexaenoic acid levels in FAS/MP adult offspring were also lower (P<.05) when compared with the MP group. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were higher (P<.05) in male adult offspring from the FAS/MP group compared with control as well as the MP adult offspring. Results suggest that maternal folic acid supplementation at MP intake decreased brain docosahexaenoic acid levels probably involving corticosterone increase. PMID:16631439

  3. Maternal folic acid supplementation to dams on marginal protein level alters brain fatty acid levels of their adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shobha; Joshi, Sadhana; Kale, Anvita; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar; Mahadik, Sahebarao

    2006-05-01

    Studies on fetal programming of adult diseases have highlighted the importance of maternal nutrition during pregnancy. Folic acid and long-chain essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) have independent effects on fetal growth. However, folic acid effects may also involve alteration of LC-PUFA metabolism. Because marginal deficiency of LC-PUFAs during critical periods of brain growth and development is associated with risks for adult diseases, it is highly relevant to investigate how maternal supplementation of such nutrients can alter brain fatty acid levels. We examined the impact of folic acid supplementation, conventionally used in maternal intervention, on brain essential fatty acid levels and plasma corticosterone concentrations in adult offspring at 11 months of age. Pregnant female rats from 4 groups (6 in each) were fed with casein diets either with 18 g protein/100 g diet (control diet) or treatment diets that were marginal in protein (MP), such as 12 g protein/100 g diet supplemented with 8 mg folic acid (FAS/MP), 12 g protein/100 g diet without folic acid (FAD/MP), or 12 g protein/100 g diet (MP) with 2 mg folic acid. Pups were weaned to a standard laboratory diet with 18 g protein/100 g diet. All male adult offspring in the FAS/MP group showed lower docosahexaenoic acid (P<.05) as compared with control adult offspring (6.04+/-2.28 vs 10.33+/-0.86 g/100 g fatty acids) and higher n-6/n-3 ratio (P<.05). Docosahexaenoic acid levels in FAS/MP adult offspring were also lower (P<.05) when compared with the MP group. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were higher (P<.05) in male adult offspring from the FAS/MP group compared with control as well as the MP adult offspring. Results suggest that maternal folic acid supplementation at MP intake decreased brain docosahexaenoic acid levels probably involving corticosterone increase.

  4. Defining meal requirements for protein to optimize metabolic roles of amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary protein provides essential amino acids (EAAs) for the synthesis of new proteins plus an array of other metabolic functions; many of these functions are sensitive to postprandial plasma and intracellular amino acid concentrations. Recent research has focused on amino acids as metabolic signal...

  5. Defining meal requirements for protein to optimize metabolic roles of amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary protein provides essential amino acids (EAA) for the synthesis of new proteins plus an array of other metabolic functions; many of these functions are sensitive to post-prandial plasma and intracellular amino acid concentrations. Recent research has focused on amino acids as metabolic signal...

  6. Limiting amino acid for protein synthesis with mammary cells in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Park, C S; Chandler, P T; Norman, A W

    1976-05-01

    To identify the limiting amino acid in the minimal essential medium as published by Eagle (Science 130:432, 1959) for milk protein synthesis in rat mammary cells in tissue culture, two different experimental approaches were used. The first study involved the reduction of amino acids singly from the total amino acid complement of the medium for milk protein synthesis. The second study was to investigate the effect on milk protein synthesis of single amino acid addition to the basic complement of amino acids. Order of limiting amino acids was lysine (first) and possible methionine, valine, or arginine (second).

  7. Protein quality of insects as potential ingredients for dog and cat foods.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Guido; Zhang, Sheng; Oonincx, Dennis G A B; Hendriks, Wouter H

    2014-01-01

    Insects have been proposed as a high-quality, efficient and sustainable dietary protein source. The present study evaluated the protein quality of a selection of insect species. Insect substrates were housefly pupae, adult house cricket, yellow mealworm larvae, lesser mealworm larvae, Morio worm larvae, black soldier fly larvae and pupae, six spot roach, death's head cockroach and Argentinean cockroach. Reference substrates were poultry meat meal, fish meal and soyabean meal. Substrates were analysed for DM, N, crude fat, ash and amino acid (AA) contents and for in vitro digestibility of organic matter (OM) and N. The nutrient composition, AA scores as well as in vitro OM and N digestibility varied considerably between insect substrates. For the AA score, the first limiting AA for most substrates was the combined requirement for Met and Cys. The pupae of the housefly and black soldier fly were high in protein and had high AA scores but were less digestible than other insect substrates. The protein content and AA score of house crickets were high and similar to that of fish meal; however, in vitro N digestibility was higher. The cockroaches were relatively high in protein but the indispensable AA contents, AA scores and the in vitro digestibility values were relatively low. In addition to the indices of protein quality, other aspects such as efficiency of conversion of organic side streams, feasibility of mass-production, product safety and pet owner perception are important for future dog and cat food application of insects as alternative protein source.

  8. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 5 Facilitates the Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Docosahexaenoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yijun; Scanlon, Martin J; Owada, Yuji; Yamamoto, Yui; Porter, Christopher J H; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2015-12-01

    The brain has a limited ability to synthesize the essential polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from its omega-3 fatty acid precursors. Therefore, to maintain brain concentrations of this PUFA at physiological levels, plasma-derived DHA must be transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). While DHA is able to partition into the luminal membrane of brain endothelial cells, its low aqueous solubility likely limits its cytosolic transfer to the abluminal membrane, necessitating the requirement of an intracellular carrier protein to facilitate trafficking of this PUFA across the BBB. As the intracellular carrier protein fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) is expressed at the human BBB, the current study assessed the putative role of FABP5 in the brain endothelial cell uptake and BBB transport of DHA in vitro and in vivo, respectively. hFAPB5 was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli C41(DE3) cells and the binding affinity of DHA to hFABP5 assessed using isothermal titration calorimetry. The impact of FABP5 siRNA on uptake of (14)C-DHA into immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial (hCMEC/D3) cells was assessed. An in situ transcardiac perfusion method was optimized in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently used to compare the BBB influx rate (Kin) of (14)C-DHA between FABP5-deficient (FABP5(-/-)) and wild-type (FABP5(+/+)) C57BL/6 mice. DHA bound to hFABP5 with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 155 ± 8 nM (mean ± SEM). FABP5 siRNA transfection decreased hCMEC/D3 mRNA and protein expression of FABP5 by 53.2 ± 5.5% and 44.8 ± 13.7%, respectively, which was associated with a 14.1 ± 2.7% reduction in (14)C-DHA cellular uptake. By using optimized conditions for the in situ transcardiac perfusion (a 1 min preperfusion (10 mL/min) followed by perfusion of (14)C-DHA (1 min)), the Kin of (14)C-DHA was 0.04 ± 0.01 mL/g/s. Relative to FABP5(+/+) mice, the Kin of (14)C-DHA decreased 36.7 ± 12.4% in FABP5(-/-) mice

  9. Requirement for the heart-type fatty acid binding protein in cardiac fatty acid utilization.

    PubMed

    Binas, B; Danneberg, H; McWhir, J; Mullins, L; Clark, A J

    1999-05-01

    Nonenzymatic cytosolic fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are abundantly expressed in many animal tissues with high rates of fatty acid metabolism. No physiological role has been demonstrated for any FABP, although these proteins have been implicated in transport of free long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) and protection against LCFA toxicity. We report here that mice lacking heart-type FABP (H-FABP) exhibit a severe defect of peripheral (nonhepatic, non-fat) LCFA utilization. In these mice, the heart is unable to efficiently take up plasma LCFAs, which are normally its main fuel, and switches to glucose usage. Altered plasma levels of LCFAs, glucose, lactate and beta-hydroxybutyrate are consistent with depressed peripheral LCFA utilization, intensified carbohydrate usage, and increased hepatic LCFA oxidation; these changes are most pronounced under conditions favoring LCFA oxidation. H-FABP deficiency is only incompletely compensated, however, causing acute exercise intolerance and, at old age, a localized cardiac hypertrophy. These data establish a requirement for H-FABP in cardiac intracellular lipid transport and fuel selection and a major role in metabolic homeostasis. This new animal model should be particularly useful for investigating the significance of peripheral LCFA utilization for heart function, insulin sensitivity, and blood pressure.

  10. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  11. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta; Lital , Schultz; Peter G. , Zhang; Zhiwen

    2010-10-12

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  12. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  13. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2011-08-30

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  14. cDNA cloning and expression of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin binding 120 kDa aminopeptidase N from Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, K; Nakanishi, K; Kadotani, T; Imamura, M; Koizumi, N; Iwahana, H; Sato, R

    1999-01-18

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin binds to a 120 kDa putative receptor protein in the Bombyx mori midgut. Recently, this protein was purified and identified as glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored aminopeptidase N (APN). In this study, a full-length cDNA thought to encode this 120 kDa APN was isolated and sequenced. It has a 2958 bp ORF encoding 986 amino acids. In the deduced amino acid sequence, we identified GPI-anchor and zinc-metallopeptidase signals, which are the same as those of APNs of other insects that are reported to be putative Cry1 toxin receptors. The B. mori APN amino acid sequence also has a high similarity with those of the other APNs. Subsequently, the recombinant APN was expressed by Escherichia coli and its Cry1Aa toxin binding ability was analyzed. Ligand blotting showed that Cry1Aa toxin bound to the recombinant APN. PMID:9931470

  15. Interconnection between the protein solubility and amino acid and dipeptide compositions.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaohui; Li, Nana; Chen, Dinyan; Wang, Zengzhen

    2013-01-01

    Obtaining soluble proteins in sufficient concentrations helps increase the overall success rate in various experimental studies. Protein solubility is an individual trait ultimately determined by its primary protein sequence. Exploring the interconnection between the protein solubility and the compositions of protein sequence is instrumental for setting priorities on targets in large scale proteomics projects. In this paper, amino acid composition (20 dimensions) and the dipeptide composition (400 dimensions) were extracted to form the total candidate feature pool (420 dimensions), and each feature was selected into the feature vectors one by one, which were sorted by the absolute value of the correlation coefficient. Finally, we evaluated and recorded the 420 results of Support Vector Machine (SVM) as the prediction engine. According to the results of SVM, the first 208 features were chosen from the 420 dimensions, which were considered as the efficient ones. By analyzing the composition of the former 208 features, we found that the protein solubility was significantly influenced by the occurrence frequencies of the acidic amino acids, basic amino acids, non-polar hydrophobic amino acids and the two polar neutral amino acids(C, Q) in the protein sequences. Additionally, we detected that the dipeptides composed by the acidic amino acids (D, E) and basic amino acids (K, R and H), especially the dipeptide composed by the acidic amino acids (D, E), had strong interconnection with the protein solubility.

  16. On combining protein sequences and nucleic acid sequences in phylogenetic analysis: the homeobox protein case.

    PubMed

    Agosti, D; Jacobs, D; DeSalle, R

    1996-01-01

    Amino acid encoding genes contain character state information that may be useful for phylogenetic analysis on at least two levels. The nucleotide sequence and the translated amino acid sequences have both been employed separately as character states for cladistic studies of various taxa, including studies of the genealogy of genes in multigene families. In essence, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences are two different ways of character coding the information in a gene. Silent positions in the nucleotide sequence (first or third positions in codons that can accrue change without changing the identity of the amino acid that the triplet codes for) may accrue change relatively rapidly and become saturated, losing the pattern of historical divergence. On the other hand, non-silent nucleotide alterations and their accompanying amino acid changes may evolve too slowly to reveal relationships among closely related taxa. In general, the dynamics of sequence change in silent and non-silent positions in protein coding genes result in homoplasy and lack of resolution, respectively. We suggest that the combination of nucleic acid and the translated amino acid coded character states into the same data matrix for phylogenetic analysis addresses some of the problems caused by the rapid change of silent nucleotide positions and overall slow rate of change of non-silent nucleotide positions and slowly changing amino acid positions. One major theoretical problem with this approach is the apparent non-independence of the two sources of characters. However, there are at least three possible outcomes when comparing protein coding nucleic acid sequences with their translated amino acids in a phylogenetic context on a codon by codon basis. First, the two character sets for a codon may be entirely congruent with respect to the information they convey about the relationships of a certain set of taxa. Second, one character set may display no information concerning a phylogenetic

  17. Effects of ascorbic acid supplementation on male reproductive system during exposure to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havazhagan, G.; Riar, S. S.; Kain, A. K.; Bardhan, Jaya; Thomas, Pauline

    1989-09-01

    Two groups of male rats were exposed to simulated altitudes of 6060 m and 7576 m for 6 h/day for 7 days (intermittent exposure). In two additional groups of animals exposed to the same altitude, 100 mg of ascorbic acid (AA) was fed daily for 5 days prior to the exposure period and also during the exposure period. Rats that did not receive AA showed loss of body weight and weight of reproductive organs after exposure. Sex organs showed atrophy on histological examination and there was a deterioration in spermatozoal quality. There was an increase in alkaline and acid phosphatase, and decrease in protein, sialic acid and glyceryl phosphorylcholine content in various reproductive tissues after exposure. All the above changes in histology and biochemical composition could be partially prevented by AA supplementation. AA supplementation can therefore protect the male reproductive system from deleterious effects of hypoxia. The probable mechanism of action of AA is discussed.

  18. Clustering amino acid contents of protein domains: biochemical functions of proteins and implications for origin of biological macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Torshin, I Y

    2001-04-01

    Structural classes of protein domains correlate with their amino acid compositions. Several successful algorithms (that use only amino acid composition) have been elaborated for the prediction of structural class or potential biochemical significance. This work deals with dynamic classification (clustering) of the domains on the basis of their amino acid composition. Amino acid contents of domains from a non-redundant PDB set were clustered in 20-dimensional space of amino acid contents. Despite the variations of an empirical parameter and non-redundancy of the set, only one large cluster (tens-hundreds of proteins) surrounded by hundreds of small clusters (1-5 proteins), was identified. The core of the largest cluster contains at least 64% DNA (nucleotide)-interacting protein domains from various sources. About 90% of the proteins of the core are intracellular proteins. 83% of the DNA/nucleotide interacting domains in the core belong to the mixed alpha-beta folds (a+b, a/b), 14% are all-alpha (mostly helices) and all-beta (mostly beta-strands) proteins. At the same time, when core domains that belong to one organism (E.coli) are considered, over 80% of them prove to be DNA/nucleotide interacting proteins. The core is compact: amino acid contents of domains from the core lie in relatively narrow and specific ranges. The core also contains several Fe-S cluster-binding domains, amino acid contents of the core overlap with ferredoxin and CO-dehydrogenase clusters, the oldest known proteins. As Fe-S clusters are thought to be the first biocatalysts, the results are discussed in relation to contemporary experiments and models dealing with the origin of biological macromolecules. The origin of most primordial proteins is considered here to be a result of co-adsorption of nucleotides and amino acids on specific clays, followed by en-block polymerization of the adsorbed mixtures of amino acids.

  19. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-07-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  20. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A.; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  1. Abscisic acid (ABA) regulation of Arabidopsis SR protein gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Tiago M D; Carvalho, Raquel F; Richardson, Dale N; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  2. Small acid soluble proteins for rapid spore identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2006-12-01

    This one year LDRD addressed the problem of rapid characterization of bacterial spores such as those from the genus Bacillus, the group that contains pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis. In this effort we addressed the feasibility of using a proteomics based approach to spore characterization using a subset of conserved spore proteins known as the small acid soluble proteins or SASPs. We proposed developing techniques that built on our previous expertise in microseparations to rapidly characterize or identify spores. An alternative SASP extraction method was developed that was amenable to both the subsequent fluorescent labeling required for laser-induced fluorescence detection and the low ionic strength requirements for isoelectric focusing. For the microseparations, both capillary isoelectric focusing and chip gel electrophoresis were employed. A variety of methods were evaluated to improve the molecular weight resolution for the SASPs, which are in a molecular weight range that is not well resolved by the current methods. Isoelectric focusing was optimized and employed to resolve the SASPs using UV absorbance detection. Proteomic signatures of native wild type Bacillus spores and clones genetically engineered to produce altered SASP patterns were assessed by slab gel electrophoresis, capillary isoelectric focusing with absorbance detection as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  3. Coffee bean arabinogalactans: acidic polymers covalently linked to protein.

    PubMed

    Redgwell, Robert J; Curti, Delphine; Fischer, Monica; Nicolas, Pierre; Fay, Laurent B

    2002-02-11

    The arabinogalactan content of green coffee beans (Coffea arabica var. Yellow Caturra) was released by a combination of chemical extraction and enzymatic hydrolysis of the mannan-cellulose component of the wall. Several arabinogalactan fractions were isolated, purified by gel-permeation and ion-exchange chromatography and characterised by compositional and linkage analysis. The AG fractions contained between 6 and 8% glucuronic acid, and gave a positive test for the beta-glucosyl-Yariv reagent, a stain specific for arabinogalactan-proteins. The protein component accounted for between 0.5 and 2.0% of the AGPs and contained between 7 and 12% hydroxyproline. The AG moieties displayed considerable heterogeneity with regard to their degree of arabinosylation and the extent and composition of their side-chains. They possessed a MW average of 650 kDa which ranged between 150 and 2000 kDa. An investigation of the structural features of the major AG fraction, released following enzymatic hydrolysis of the mannan-cellulose polymers, allowed a partial structure of coffee arabinogalactan to be proposed.

  4. Abscisic Acid (ABA) Regulation of Arabidopsis SR Protein Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Tiago M. D.; Carvalho, Raquel F.; Richardson, Dale N.; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  5. Experimental Evolution of a Green Fluorescent Protein Composed of 19 Unique Amino Acids without Tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara-Kobayashi, Akio; Hitotsuyanagi, Mitsuhiro; Amikura, Kazuaki; Kiga, Daisuke

    2014-04-01

    At some stage of evolution, genes of organisms may have encoded proteins that were synthesized using fewer than 20 unique amino acids. Similar to evolution of the natural 19-amino-acid proteins GroEL/ES, proteins composed of 19 unique amino acids would have been able to evolve by accumulating beneficial mutations within the 19-amino-acid repertoire encoded in an ancestral genetic code. Because Trp is thought to be the last amino acid included in the canonical 20-amino-acid repertoire, this late stage of protein evolution could be mimicked by experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without tryptophan (Trp). To further understand the evolution of proteins, we tried to mimic the evolution of a 19-amino-acid protein involving the accumulation of beneficial mutations using directed evolution by random mutagenesis on the whole targeted gene sequence. We created active 19-amino-acid green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) without Trp from a poorly fluorescent 19-amino-acid mutant, S1-W57F, by using directed evolution with two rounds of mutagenesis and selection. The N105I and S205T mutations showed beneficial effects on the S1-W57F mutant. When these two mutations were combined on S1-W57F, we observed an additive effect on the fluorescence intensity. In contrast, these mutations showed no clear improvement individually or in combination on GFPS1, which is the parental GFP mutant composed of 20 amino acids. Our results provide an additional example for the experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without Trp, and would help understand the mechanisms underlying the evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins. (236 words)

  6. Impact of antinutritional factors in food proteins on the digestibility of protein and the bioavailability of amino acids and on protein quality.

    PubMed

    Sarwar Gilani, G; Wu Xiao, Chao; Cockell, Kevin A

    2012-08-01

    Dietary antinutritional factors have been reported to adversely affect the digestibility of protein, bioavailability of amino acids and protein quality of foods. Published data on these negative effects of major dietary antinutritional factors are summarized in this manuscript. Digestibility and the quality of mixed diets in developing countries are considerably lower than of those in developed regions. For example, the digestibility of protein in traditional diets from developing countries such as India, Guatemala and Brazil is considerably lower compared to that of protein in typical North American diets (54-78 versus 88-94 %). Poor digestibility of protein in the diets of developing countries, which are based on less refined cereals and grain legumes as major sources of protein, is due to the presence of less digestible protein fractions, high levels of insoluble fibre, and/or high concentrations of antinutritional factors present endogenously or formed during processing. Examples of naturally occurring antinutritional factors include glucosinolates in mustard and canola protein products, trypsin inhibitors and haemagglutinins in legumes, tannins in legumes and cereals, gossypol in cottonseed protein products, and uricogenic nucleobases in yeast protein products. Heat/alkaline treatments of protein products may yield Maillard reaction compounds, oxidized forms of sulphur amino acids, D-amino acids and lysinoalanine (LAL, an unnatural nephrotoxic amino acid derivative). Among common food and feed protein products, soyabeans are the most concentrated source of trypsin inhibitors. The presence of high levels of dietary trypsin inhibitors from soyabeans, kidney beans or other grain legumes have been reported to cause substantial reductions in protein and amino acid digestibility (up to 50 %) and protein quality (up to 100 %) in rats and/or pigs. Similarly, the presence of high levels of tannins in sorghum and other cereals, fababean and other grain legumes can cause

  7. Eicosapentaenoic acid membrane incorporation impairs ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux via a protein kinase A signaling pathway in primary human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Natalie; Tardivel, Sylviane; Benoist, Jean-François; Vedie, Benoît; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Nowak, Maxime; Allaoui, Fatima; Paul, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    A diet rich in n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is cardioprotective. Dietary PUFAs affect the cellular phospholipids composition, which may influence the function of membrane proteins. We investigated the impact of the membrane incorporation of several PUFAs on ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux, a key antiatherogenic pathway. Arachidonic acid (AA) (C20:4 n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (C22:6 n-3) decreased or increased cholesterol efflux from J774 mouse macrophages, respectively, whereas they had no effect on efflux from human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Importantly, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (C20:5 n-3) induced a dose-dependent reduction of ABCA1 functionality in both cellular models (-28% for 70μM of EPA in HMDM), without any alterations in ABCA1 expression. These results show that PUFA membrane incorporation does not have the same consequences on cholesterol efflux from mouse and human macrophages. The EPA-treated HMDM exhibited strong phospholipid composition changes, with high levels of both EPA and its elongation product docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (C22:5 n-3), which is associated with a decreased level of AA. In HMDM, EPA reduced the ATPase activity of the membrane transporter. Moreover, the activation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and the inhibition of cAMP phosphodiesterase by isobutylmethylxanthine restored ABCA1 cholesterol efflux in EPA-treated human macrophages. In conclusion, EPA membrane incorporation reduces ABCA1 functionality in mouse macrophages as well as in primary human macrophages and this effect seems to be PKA-dependent in human macrophages.

  8. Identification of Acidic pH-dependent Ligands of Pentameric C-reactive Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, David J.; Singh, Sanjay K.; Thompson, James A.; Beeler, Bradley W.; Rusiñol, Antonio E.; Pangburn, Michael K.; Potempa, Lawrence A.; Agrawal, Alok

    2010-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a phylogenetically conserved protein; in humans, it is present in the plasma and at sites of inflammation. At physiological pH, native pentameric CRP exhibits calcium-dependent binding specificity for phosphocholine. In this study, we determined the binding specificities of CRP at acidic pH, a characteristic of inflammatory sites. We investigated the binding of fluid-phase CRP to six immobilized proteins: complement factor H, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, complement C3b, IgG, amyloid β, and BSA immobilized on microtiter plates. At pH 7.0, CRP did not bind to any of these proteins, but, at pH ranging from 5.2 to 4.6, CRP bound to all six proteins. Acidic pH did not monomerize CRP but modified the pentameric structure, as determined by gel filtration, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid-binding fluorescence, and phosphocholine-binding assays. Some modifications in CRP were reversible at pH 7.0, for example, the phosphocholine-binding activity of CRP, which was reduced at acidic pH, was restored after pH neutralization. For efficient binding of acidic pH-treated CRP to immobilized proteins, it was necessary that the immobilized proteins, except factor H, were also exposed to acidic pH. Because immobilization of proteins on microtiter plates and exposure of immobilized proteins to acidic pH alter the conformation of immobilized proteins, our findings suggest that conformationally altered proteins form a CRP-ligand in acidic environment, regardless of the identity of the protein. This ligand binding specificity of CRP in its acidic pH-induced pentameric state has implications for toxic conditions involving protein misfolding in acidic environments and favors the conservation of CRP throughout evolution. PMID:20843812

  9. Proteome alterations in response to aristolochic acids in experimental animal model.

    PubMed

    Rucevic, Marijana; Rosenquist, Thomas; Breen, Lucas; Cao, Lulu; Clifton, James; Hixson, Douglas; Josic, Djuro

    2012-12-01

    Strong indications have been presented that dietary poisoning with aristolochic acids (AA) is responsible for Endemic Nephropathy (EN) and AA associated cancer of the upper urinary tract (UUTC). Our recent investigation showed drastic urinary proteome changes in AA treated mice. This study was designed to identify proteome changes associated with AA nephrotoxicity in experimental animal model. The DBA and C57BL mice, which differ in AA sensitivity, were exposed to AA for 4 days. The strategy for urinary, plasma and kidney tissue proteome study of AA exposed and control mice integrated gel-based and in-solution tryptic digestion combined with LC-ESI-MS/MS. To maximize proteome coverage, plasma fractionation scheme was developed and MS compatible sequential tissue extraction procedure was established. Proteomic analyses of urinary, plasma and kidney tissue tryptic digests resulted in identification of several cytoskeletal proteins, as well as proteins involved in kidney development and inflammatory response, that are differentially expressed in both AA exposed and control mice. These proteins are consistent with renal pathogenesis of endotoxicity and cancer. This proteomic strategy could be effectively translated for unbiased discovery of potential biomarkers for EN and associated UUTC in humans. At the same time, these results highlight the significance of AA exposure with EN. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics.

  10. Prebiotic Synthesis of Hydrophobic and Protein Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ring, David; Wolman, Yecheskel; Friedmann, Nadav; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    The formation of amino acids by the action of electric discharges on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia was studied in detail. The presence of glycine, alanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, isovaline, leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, norleucine, proline, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, allothreonine, α-hydroxy-γ-aminobutyric acid, and α,γ-diaminobutyric acid was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All of the primary α-amino acids found in the Murchison Meteorite have been synthesized by this electric discharge experiment. PMID:4501592

  11. Microwave-assisted acid and base hydrolysis of intact proteins containing disulfide bonds for protein sequence analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reiz, Bela; Li, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of proteins to generate peptide ladders combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the resultant peptides can be used for protein sequencing. In this paper, two methods of improving the microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis process are described to enable rapid sequencing of proteins containing disulfide bonds and increase sequence coverage, respectively. It was demonstrated that proteins containing disulfide bonds could be sequenced by MS analysis by first performing hydrolysis for less than 2 min, followed by 1 h of reduction to release the peptides originally linked by disulfide bonds. It was shown that a strong base could be used as a catalyst for microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis, producing complementary sequence information to that generated by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. However, using either acid or base hydrolysis, amide bond breakages in small regions of the polypeptide chains of the model proteins (e.g., cytochrome c and lysozyme) were not detected. Dynamic light scattering measurement of the proteins solubilized in an acid or base indicated that protein-protein interaction or aggregation was not the cause of the failure to hydrolyze certain amide bonds. It was speculated that there were some unknown local structures that might play a role in preventing an acid or base from reacting with the peptide bonds therein.

  12. Mapping and Serodiagnostic Application of a Dominant Epitope within the Human Herpesvirus 8 ORF 65-Encoded Protein

    PubMed Central

    Pau, Chou-Pong; Lam, Lee L.; Spira, Thomas J.; Black, Jodi B.; Stewart, John A.; Pellett, Philip E.; Respess, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    A dominant epitope within the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) ORF 65-encoded protein was mapped to an 8-amino-acid (aa) sequence (RKPPSGKK [aa 162 to 169]) by an amino acid replacement method. Using a 14-aa peptide (P4) encompassing this epitope as the antigen, we developed an enzyme immunoassay for HHV8 antibodies. The presence of P4 antibodies in a panel of 61 human serum specimens was highly correlated with biopsy-confirmed Kaposi’s sarcoma. The homologous Epstein-Barr virus peptide derived from BFBR3-encoded protein did not interfere with the assay, suggesting that P4 is specific for HHV8. PMID:9620379

  13. Effect of branched chain amino acid infusions on body protein metabolism in cirrhosis of liver.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, P D; Holdsworth, J D; Dionigi, P; Clague, M B; James, O F

    1986-01-01

    Thirty seven patients with established cirrhosis of the liver were subjected to measurement of body protein metabolism using L-(1-14C) labelled leucine as a tracer. The effects of disease severity and those of solutions containing 0%, 16%, 35%, 53%, and 100% branched chain amino acids were evaluated. Significant increases in protein synthesis were noted with solutions containing 35%, 53%, and 100% branched chain amino acids, but in patients receiving 100% branched chain amino acids without additional essential amino acid supplement the increase in synthesis was matched by a significant increase in protein breakdown. Protein balance was thus improved only in patients receiving 35% and 53% branched chain amino acids. It was concluded that the high increase in protein breakdown in patients receiving 100% branched chain amino acids was undesirable, and such a solution should not be recommended for clinical use. PMID:3539714

  14. Synthesis of alanyl nucleobase amino acids and their incorporation into proteins.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Poulami; Dedkova, Larisa M; Ellington, Andrew D; Yakovchuk, Petro; Lim, Jaebum; Anslyn, Eric V; Hecht, Sidney M

    2016-09-15

    Proteins which bind to nucleic acids and regulate their structure and functions are numerous and exceptionally important. Such proteins employ a variety of strategies for recognition of the relevant structural elements in their nucleic acid substrates, some of which have been shown to involve rather subtle interactions which might have been difficult to design from first principles. In the present study, we have explored the preparation of proteins containing unnatural amino acids having nucleobase side chains. In principle, the introduction of multiple nucleobase amino acids into the nucleic acid binding domain of a protein should enable these modified proteins to interact with their nucleic acid substrates using Watson-Crick and other base pairing interactions. We describe the synthesis of five alanyl nucleobase amino acids protected in a fashion which enabled their attachment to a suppressor tRNA, and their incorporation into each of two proteins with acceptable efficiencies. The nucleobases studied included cytosine, uracil, thymine, adenine and guanine, i.e. the major nucleobase constituents of DNA and RNA. Dihydrofolate reductase was chosen as one model protein to enable direct comparison of the facility of incorporation of the nucleobase amino acids with numerous other unnatural amino acids studied previously. The Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I was chosen as a representative DNA binding protein whose mode of action has been studied in detail. PMID:27452282

  15. Synthesis of alanyl nucleobase amino acids and their incorporation into proteins.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Poulami; Dedkova, Larisa M; Ellington, Andrew D; Yakovchuk, Petro; Lim, Jaebum; Anslyn, Eric V; Hecht, Sidney M

    2016-09-15

    Proteins which bind to nucleic acids and regulate their structure and functions are numerous and exceptionally important. Such proteins employ a variety of strategies for recognition of the relevant structural elements in their nucleic acid substrates, some of which have been shown to involve rather subtle interactions which might have been difficult to design from first principles. In the present study, we have explored the preparation of proteins containing unnatural amino acids having nucleobase side chains. In principle, the introduction of multiple nucleobase amino acids into the nucleic acid binding domain of a protein should enable these modified proteins to interact with their nucleic acid substrates using Watson-Crick and other base pairing interactions. We describe the synthesis of five alanyl nucleobase amino acids protected in a fashion which enabled their attachment to a suppressor tRNA, and their incorporation into each of two proteins with acceptable efficiencies. The nucleobases studied included cytosine, uracil, thymine, adenine and guanine, i.e. the major nucleobase constituents of DNA and RNA. Dihydrofolate reductase was chosen as one model protein to enable direct comparison of the facility of incorporation of the nucleobase amino acids with numerous other unnatural amino acids studied previously. The Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I was chosen as a representative DNA binding protein whose mode of action has been studied in detail.

  16. Amino Acid Flux from Metabolic Network Benefits Protein Translation: the Role of Resource Availability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Pan; Yang, Yi; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Protein translation is a central step in gene expression and affected by many factors such as codon usage bias, mRNA folding energy and tRNA abundance. Despite intensive previous studies, how metabolic amino acid supply correlates with protein translation efficiency remains unknown. In this work, we estimated the amino acid flux from metabolic network for each protein in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using Flux Balance Analysis. Integrated with the mRNA expression level, protein abundance and ribosome profiling data, we provided a detailed description of the role of amino acid supply in protein translation. Our results showed that amino acid supply positively correlates with translation efficiency and ribosome density. Moreover, with the rank-based regression model, we found that metabolic amino acid supply facilitates ribosome utilization. Based on the fact that the ribosome density change of well-amino-acid-supplied genes is smaller than poorly-amino-acid-supply genes under amino acid starvation, we reached the conclusion that amino acid supply may buffer ribosome density change against amino acid starvation and benefit maintaining a relatively stable translation environment. Our work provided new insights into the connection between metabolic amino acid supply and protein translation process by revealing a new regulation strategy that is dependent on resource availability. PMID:26056817

  17. Sex Steroid Modulation of Fatty Acid Utilization and Fatty Acid Binding Protein Concentration in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ockner, Robert K.; Lysenko, Nina; Manning, Joan A.; Monroe, Scott E.; Burnett, David A.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism by which sex steroids influence very low density hepatic lipoprotein triglyceride production has not been fully elucidated. In previous studies we showed that [14C]oleate utilization and incorporation into triglycerides were greater in hepatocyte suspensions from adult female rats than from males. The sex differences were not related to activities of the enzymes of triglyceride biosynthesis, whereas fatty acid binding protein (FABP) concentration in liver cytosol was greater in females. These findings suggested that sex differences in lipoprotein could reflect a sex steroid influence on the availability of fatty acids for hepatocellular triglyceride biosynthesis. In the present studies, sex steroid effects on hepatocyte [14C]oleate utilization and FABP concentration were investigated directly. Hepatocytes from immature (30-d-old) rats exhibited no sex differences in [14C]oleate utilization. With maturation, total [14C]oleate utilization and triglyceride biosynthesis increased moderately in female cells and decreased markedly in male cells; the profound sex differences in adults were maximal by age 60 d. Fatty acid oxidation was little affected. Rats were castrated at age 30 d, and received estradiol, testosterone, or no hormone until age 60 d, when hepatocyte [14C]oleate utilization was studied. Castration virtually eliminated maturational changes and blunted the sex differences in adults. Estradiol or testosterone largely reproduced the appropriate adult pattern of [14C]oleate utilization regardless of the genotypic sex of the treated animal. In immature females and males, total cytosolic FABP concentrations were similar. In 60-d-old animals, there was a striking correlation among all groups (females, males, castrates, and hormone-treated) between mean cytosolic FABP concentration on the one hand, and mean total [14C]oleate utilization (r = 0.91) and incorporation into triglycerides (r = 0.94) on the other. In 30-d-old animals rates of [14C

  18. Low-protein amino acid-supplemented diets for growing pigs: effect on expression of amino acid transporters, serum concentration, performance, and carcass composition.

    PubMed

    Morales, A; Buenabad, L; Castillo, G; Arce, N; Araiza, B A; Htoo, J K; Cervantes, M

    2015-05-01

    Pigs fed protein-bound AA appear to have a higher abundance of AA transporters for their absorption in the jejunum compared with the duodenum. However, there is limited data about the effect of dietary free AA, readily available in the duodenum, on the duodenal abundance of AA transporters and its impact on pig performance. Forty-eight pigs (24.3 kg initial BW) distributed in 4 treatments were used to evaluate the effect of the CP level and form (free vs. protein bound) in which AA are added to diets on the expression of AA transporters in the 3 small intestine segments, serum concentration of AA, and performance. Dietary treatments based on wheat and soybean meal (SBM) were 1) low-CP (14%) diet supplemented with L-Lys, L-Thr, DL-Met, L-Leu, L-Ile, L-Val, L-His, L-Trp, and L-Phe (LPAA); 2) as in the LPAA but with added L-Gly as a N source (LPAA+N); 3) intermediate CP content (16%) supplemented with L-Lys HCl, L-Thr, and DL-Met (MPAA); and 4) high-CP (22%) diet (HP) without free AA. At the end of the experiment, 8 pigs from LPAA and HP were sacrificed to collect intestinal mucosa and blood samples and to dissect the carcasses. There were no differences in ADG, ADFI, G:F, and weights of carcass components and some visceral organs between treatments. Weights of the large intestine and kidney were higher in HP pigs (P < 0.01). Expression of b(0,+) in the duodenum was higher in pigs fed the LPAA compared with the HP diet (P= 0.036) but there was no difference in the jejunum and ileum. In the ileum, y+ L expression tended to be higher in pigs fed the LPAA diet (P = 0.098). Expression of b(0,+) in LPAA pigs did not differ between the duodenum and the jejunum, but in HP pigs, the expression of all AA transporters was higher in the jejunum than in the duodenum or ileum (P < 0.05). The serum concentration of Arg, His, Ile, Leu, Phe, and Val was higher but serum Lys and Met were lower in pigs fed the HP diet (P < 0.05). These results indicate that LPAA can substitute up to 8

  19. The Inhibitory Effect of Abietic Acid on Melanoma Cancer Metastasis and Invasiveness In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Yang, Shun-Fa; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Hung, Chia-Hung; Chu, Shu-Chen; Yang, Sheng-Han; Chen, Pei-Ni

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma cell metastasis is the primary cause of patient death. Thus, various treatment strategies have been developed to prevent metastasis. Abietic acid (AA) is an organic compound commonly found in trees. This study is aimed to investigate the antimetastatic activity of AA in B16F10-xenografted C57BL/6 mice and assess the anticancer activity of AA in combination with Taxol in melanoma cells. AA effectively reduced the formation of lung metastases by approximately 92.8%. AA treatment inhibited migratory potential (p < 0.001), invasion (p < 0.001), and motility (p < 0.001) of highly metastatic B16F10 melanoma cells in vitro. Zymography revealed that AA reduced the proteinase activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Molecular analyses showed that AA reduced Akt phosphorylation and activating protein-1 DNA-binding activity by Western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), respectively. In summary, AA effectively inhibited B16F10 lung metastasis, and 50[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M AA did not affect the viability of B16F10 cells. AA improved the efficacy of Taxol and demonstrated strong anticancer activity on melanoma cells. These results suggested that AA could be used as an antimetastatic agent or as an adjuvant for anticancer therapy. PMID:26621449

  20. Effects of antinutritional factors on protein digestibility and amino acid availability in foods.

    PubMed

    Gilani, G Sarwar; Cockell, Kevin A; Sepehr, Estatira

    2005-01-01

    Digestibility of protein in traditional diets from developing countries such as India, Guatemala, and Brazil is considerably lower compared to that of protein in typical North American diets (54-78 versus 88-94%). The presence of less digestible protein fractions, high levels of insoluble fiber, and high concentrations of antinutritional factors in the diets of developing countries, which are based on less refined cereals and grain legumes as major sources of protein, are responsible for poor digestibility of protein. The effects of the presence of some of the important antinutritional factors on protein and amino digestibilities of food and feed products are reviewed in this chapter. Food and feed products may contain a number of antinutritional factors that may adversely affect protein digestibility and amino acid availability. Antinutritional factors may occur naturally, such as glucosinolates in mustard and rapeseed protein products, trypsin inhibitors and hemagglutinins in legumes, tannins in legumes and cereals, phytates in cereals and oilseeds, and gossypol in cottonseed protein products. Antinutritional factors may also be formed during heat/alkaline processing of protein products, yielding Maillard compounds, oxidized forms of sulfur amino acids, D-amino acids, and lysinoalanine (LAL, an unnatural amino acid derivative). The presence of high levels of dietary trypsin inhibitors from soybeans, kidney beans, or other grain legumes can cause substantial reductions in protein and amino acid digestibilities (up to 50%) in rats and pigs. Similarly, the presence of high levels of tannins in cereals, such as sorghum, and grain legumes, such as fababean (Vicia faba L.), can result in significantly reduced protein and amino acid digestibilities (up to 23%) in rats, poultry, and pigs. Studies involving phytase supplementation of production rations for swine or poultry have provided indirect evidence that normally encountered levels of phytates in cereals and legumes

  1. Retinal functional alterations in mice lacking intermediate filament proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Kirsten A; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Grosche, Antje; Zrenner, Eberhart; Pekny, Milos; Reichenbach, Andreas; Seeliger, Mathias W; Pannicke, Thomas; Perez, Maria-Thereza

    2015-12-01

    Vimentin (Vim) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) are important components of the intermediate filament (IF) (or nanofilament) system of astroglial cells. We conducted full-field electroretinogram (ERG) recordings and found that whereas photoreceptor responses (a-wave) were normal in uninjured GFAP(-/-)Vim(-/-) mice, b-wave amplitudes were increased. Moreover, we found that Kir (inward rectifier K(+)) channel protein expression was reduced in the retinas of GFAP(-/-)Vim(-/-) mice and that Kir-mediated current amplitudes were lower in Müller glial cells isolated from these mice. Studies have shown that the IF system, in addition, is involved in the retinal response to injury and that attenuated Müller cell reactivity and reduced photoreceptor cell loss are observed in IF-deficient mice after experimental retinal detachment. We investigated whether the lack of IF proteins would affect cell survival in a retinal ischemia-reperfusion model. We found that although cell loss was induced in both genotypes, the number of surviving cells in the inner retina was lower in IF-deficient mice. Our findings thus show that the inability to produce GFAP and Vim affects normal retinal physiology and that the effect of IF deficiency on retinal cell survival differs, depending on the underlying pathologic condition.

  2. Experimentally Testing the Hypothesis of a Limited Amino Acid Repertoire in Primitive Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanuma, S.; Nakajima, Y.; Yokobori, S.; Yamagishi, A.

    2013-11-01

    It has been argued that a fewer amino acids were used in primitive proteins and later the repertoire increased up to 20. To test this hypothesis experimentally, we restricted the amino acid usage of a reconstructed, ancestral protein to reduced sets.

  3. Labeling proteins via hole burning of their aromatic amino acids: pressure tuning spectroscopy of BPTI.

    PubMed Central

    Stübner, Markus; Hecht, Christoph; Friedrich, Josef

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate hole burning on a protein by using an intrinsic aromatic amino acid as a probe. The protein is bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), the labeled amino acid is tyrosine. Only one of the four tyrosines could be burned. As an application we present pressure tuning experiments from which the local compressibility around the burned tyrosine probe is determined. PMID:12496122

  4. Expression of the whey acidic protein in transgenic pigs impairs mammary development.

    PubMed

    Shamay, A; Pursel, V G; Wilkinson, E; Wall, R J; Hennighausen, L

    1992-05-01

    The whey acidic protein has been found in milk of mice, rats, rabbits and camels, and its gene is expressed specifically in mammary tissue at late pregnancy and throughout lactation. A characteristic of whey acidic protein is the 'four-disulfide-core' signature which is also present in proteins involved in organ development. We have generated six lines of transgenic pigs which carry a mouse whey acidic protein transgene and express it at high levels in their mammary glands. Transgenic sows from three lines could not produce sufficient quantities of milk to support normal development of healthy offspring. This phenotype appears to be similar, if not identical, to the milchlos phenotype exhibited by mice expressing whey acidic protein transgenes. Mammary tissue from post-partum milchlos sows had an immature histological appearance, which was distinct from that observed during normal development or involution. Expression of the whey acidic protein transgene was found in mammary tissue from sexually immature pigs from milchlos lines, but not in sows from lines that appeared to lactate normally. We suggest that precocious synthesis of whey acidic protein impairs mammary development and function. Impaired mammary development due to inappropriate timing of whey acidic protein expression is consistent with the notion that proteins with the 'four-disulfide-core' signature participate in tissue formation. PMID:1284481

  5. Site specific incorporation of heavy atom-containing unnatural amino acids into proteins for structure determination

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Jianming; Wang, Lei; Wu, Ning; Schultz, Peter G.

    2008-07-15

    Translation systems and other compositions including orthogonal aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases that preferentially charge an orthogonal tRNA with an iodinated or brominated amino acid are provided. Nucleic acids encoding such synthetases are also described, as are methods and kits for producing proteins including heavy atom-containing amino acids, e.g., brominated or iodinated amino acids. Methods of determining the structure of a protein, e.g., a protein into which a heavy atom has been site-specifically incorporated through use of an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase pair, are also described.

  6. Influence of dietary protein type and iron source on the absorption of amino acids and minerals.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Llamas, F; Garaulet, M; Martínez, J A; Marín, J F; Larqué, E; Zamora, S

    2001-12-01

    The apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) of amino acids and the balance of minerals (calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and iron) has been determined in rats fed four diets differing in the protein type (casein or soy protein) and iron source (ferrous sulphate or lactate) in order to study the possible interactions of these nutrients. The availability of amino acids, especially essential amino acids, was greater in the diet made with animal protein (casein). The iron source also affected the absorption of most amino acids in all the diets assayed with ferrous sulphate being greater. The balance of iron, magnesium and phosphorus was higher in the diets containing animal protein. The retention of calcium and magnesium was significantly greater when ferrous sulphate was used as iron source. These results demonstrate the important interaction between amino acids and minerals and between the minerals themselves, which must be carefully studied when selecting different types of protein or mineral sources in human or animal nutrition.

  7. Interaction of perfluoroalkyl acids with human liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Nan; Li, Juan; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Aiqian; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are highly persistent and bioaccumulative, resulting in their broad distribution in humans and the environment. The liver is an important target for PFAAs, but the mechanisms behind PFAAs interaction with hepatocyte proteins remain poorly understood. We characterized the binding of PFAAs to human liver fatty acid-binding protein (hL-FABP) and identified critical structural features in their interaction. The binding interaction of PFAAs with hL-FABP was determined by fluorescence displacement and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assay. Molecular simulation was conducted to define interactions at the binding sites. ITC measurement revealed that PFOA/PFNA displayed a moderate affinity for hL-FABP at a 1:1 molar ratio, a weak binding affinity for PFHxS and no binding for PFHxA. Moreover, the interaction was mainly mediated by electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bonding. Substitution of Asn111 with Asp caused loss of binding affinity to PFAA, indicating its crucial role for the initial PFAA binding to the outer binding site. Substitution of Arg122 with Gly caused only one molecule of PFAA to bind to hL-FABP. Molecular simulation showed that substitution of Arg122 increased the volume of the outer binding pocket, making it impossible to form intensive hydrophobic stacking and hydrogen bonds with PFOA, and highlighting its crucial role in the binding process. The binding affinity of PFAAs increased significantly with their carbon number. Arg122 and Asn111 played a pivotal role in these interactions. Our findings may help understand the distribution pattern, bioaccumulation, elimination, and toxicity of PFAAs in humans.

  8. Influence of Bleaching on Flavor of 34% Whey Protein Concentrate and Residual Benzoic Acid Concentration in Dried Whey Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  9. Amino acid sequence analysis and characterization of a ribonuclease from starfish Asterias amurensis.

    PubMed

    Motoyoshi, Naomi; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Itagaki, Tadashi; Inokuchi, Norio

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to phylogenetically characterize the location of the RNase T2 enzyme in the starfish (Asterias amurensis). We isolated an RNase T2 ribonuclease (RNase Aa) from the ovaries of starfish and determined its amino acid sequence by protein chemistry and cloning cDNA encoding RNase Aa. The isolated protein had 231 amino acid residues, a predicted molecular mass of 25,906 Da, and an optimal pH of 5.0. RNase Aa preferentially released guanylic acid from the RNA. The catalytic sites of the RNase T2 family are conserved in RNase Aa; furthermore, the distribution of the cysteine residues in RNase Aa is similar to that in other animal and plant T2 RNases. RNase Aa is cleaved at two points: 21 residues from the N-terminus and 29 residues from the C-terminus; however, both fragments may remain attached to the protein via disulfide bridges, leading to the maintenance of its conformation, as suggested by circular dichroism spectrum analysis. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that starfish RNase Aa is evolutionarily an intermediate between protozoan and oyster RNases. PMID:26920046

  10. Allied Health Chemistry Laboratory: Amino Acids, Insulin, Proteins, and Skin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, David F.

    1975-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment specifically designed for allied health students. The students construct molecular models of amino acids, extract amino acids from their skin with hot water, and chromatographically analyze the skin extract and hydrolyzed insulin. (MLH)

  11. The human ubiquitin-52 amino acid fusion protein gene shares several structural features with mammalian ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, R T; Board, P G

    1991-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones encoding ubiquitin fused to a 52 amino acid tail protein were isolated from human placental and adrenal gland cDNA libraries. The deduced human 52 amino acid tail protein is very similar to the homologous protein from other species, including the conservation of the putative metal-binding, nucleic acid-binding domain observed in these proteins. Northern blot analysis with a tail-specific probe indicated that the previously identified UbA mRNA species most likely represents comigrating transcripts of the 52 amino acid tail (UbA52) and 80 amino acid tail (UbA80) ubiquitin fusion genes. The UbA52 gene was isolated from a human genomic library and consists of five exons distributed over 3400 base pairs. One intron is in the 5' non-coding region, two interrupt the single ubiquitin coding unit, and the fourth intron is within the tail coding region. Several members of the Alu family of repetitive DNA are associated with the gene. The UbA52 promoter has several features in common with mammalian ribosomal protein genes, including its location in a CpG-rich island, initiation of transcription within a polypyrimidine tract, the lack of a consensus TATA motif, and the presence of Sp1 binding sites, observations that are consistent with the recent identification of the ubiquitin-free tail proteins as ribosomal proteins. Thus, in spite of its unusual feature of being translationally fused to ubiquitin, the 52 amino acid tail ribosomal protein is expressed from a structurally typical ribosomal protein gene. Images PMID:1850507

  12. Deduced amino acid sequence of the small hydrophobic protein of US avian pneumovirus has greater identity with that of human metapneumovirus than those of non-US avian pneumoviruses.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Abdul S; Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Huang, Zhuhui; Samal, Siba K

    2003-05-01

    We report here the nucleotide and deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of the small hydrophobic (SH) gene of the avian pneumovirus strain Colorado (APV/CO). The SH gene of APV/CO is 628 nucleotides in length from gene-start to gene-end. The longest ORF of the SH gene encoded a protein of 177 aas in length. Comparison of the deduced aa sequence of the SH protein of APV/CO with the corresponding published sequences of other members of genera metapneumovirus showed 28% identity with the newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV), but no discernable identity with the APV subgroup A or B. Collectively, this data supports the hypothesis that: (i) APV/CO is distinct from European APV subgroups and belongs to the novel subgroup APV/C (APV/US); (ii) APV/CO is more closely related to hMPV, a mammalian metapneumovirus, than to either APV subgroup A or B. The SH gene of APV/CO was cloned using a genomic walk strategy which initiated cDNA synthesis from genomic RNA that traversed the genes in the order 3'-M-F-M2-SH-G-5', thus confirming that gene-order of APV/CO conforms in the genus Metapneumovirus. We also provide the sequences of transcription-signals and the M-F, F-M2, M2-SH and SH-G intergenic regions of APV/CO.

  13. Cu(II)-catalyzed reactions in ternary [Cu(AA)(AA - H)]+ complexes (AA = Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, t-Leu, Phe).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Ohanessian, Gilles; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2009-01-01

    The unimolecular chemistry of [Cu(II)AA(AA - H)](+) complexes, composed of an intact and a deprotonated amino acid (AA) ligand, have been probed in the gas phase by tandem and multistage mass spectrometry in an electrospray ionization quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The amino acids examined include Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, t-Leu and Phe. Upon collisionally-activated dissociation (CAD), the [Cu(II)AA(AA - H)](+) complexes undergo decarboxylation with simultaneous reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I); during this process, a radical site is created at the alpha-carbon of the decarboxylated ligand (H(2)N(1) - (*)C(alpha)H - C(beta)H(2) - R; R = side chain substituent). The radical site is able to move along the backbone of the decarboxylated amino acid to form two new radicals (HN(1)(*) - C(alpha)H(2) - C(beta)H(2) - R and H(2)N(1) - C(alpha)H(2) - (*)C(beta)H - R). From the complexes of Gly and t-Leu, only C(alpha) and N(1) radicals can be formed. The whole radical ligand can be lost to form [Cu(I)AA](+) from these three isomeric radicals. Alternatively, further radical induced dissociations can take place along the backbone of the decarboxylated amino acid ligand to yield [Cu(II)AA(AA - 2H - CO(2))](+), [Cu(I)AA((*)NH(2))](+), [Cu(I)AA(HN = C(alpha)H(2))](+), or [Cu(I)AA(H(2)N - C(alpha)H = C(beta)H - R'](+) (R' = partial side chain substituent). The sodiated copper complexes, [Cu(II)(AA - H + Na)(AA - H)](+), show the same fragmentation patterns as their non-sodiated counterparts; sodium ion is retained on the intact amino acid ligand and is not involved in the CAD pathways. The amino groups of both AA units, the carbonyl group of the intact amino acid, and the deprotonated hydroxyl oxygen coordinate Cu(II) in square-planar fashion. Ab initio calculations indicate that the metal ion facilitates hydrogen atom shuttling between the N(1), C(alpha) and C(beta) atoms of the decarboxylated amino acid ligand. The dissociations of the decarboxylated radical ions unveil

  14. Amino acid rating method for evaluating protein adequacy of infant formulas.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, G; Botting, H G; Peace, R W

    1989-01-01

    Amino acid profiles and/or protein digestibility (by the rat balance method) were determined for various forms (powder, ready-to-use, liquid concentrate, etc.) of cow's milk- and soy-based infant formulas obtained from 4 manufacturers. The essential amino acid data of the formulas were compared with that of human milk for the calculation of amino acid scores (based on the single most limiting amino acid). The product of amino acid score and total protein (g/100 kcal) was then termed "amino acid rating." Amino acid scores for the milk- and soy-based formulas ranged from 59 to 90 and from 59 to 81%, respectively, due to deficiencies in sulfur amino acids and/or tryptophan. Because of significantly higher total protein contents (g/100 kcal) of soy- (2.65-3.68) and milk-based (2.20-2.95) infant formulas compared to human milk (1.5), the relative amino acid ratings (human milk = 100) for all infant formulas except 2 liquid concentrates (having values of 87%) were above 100%. Values for true digestibility of protein in milk- and soy-based formulas ranged from 87 to 97 and from 92 to 95%, respectively. When corrected for protein digestibility, the relative amino acid ratings for all the milk-based liquid concentrates were below 100% (77-98%).

  15. Optimizing Scoring Function of Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions with Both Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid (protein-DNA and protein-RNA) recognition is fundamental to the regulation of gene expression. Determination of the structures of the protein-nucleic acid recognition and insight into their interactions at molecular level are vital to understanding the regulation function. Recently, quantitative computational approach has been becoming an alternative of experimental technique for predicting the structures and interactions of biomolecular recognition. However, the progress of protein-nucleic acid structure prediction, especially protein-RNA, is far behind that of the protein-ligand and protein-protein structure predictions due to the lack of reliable and accurate scoring function for quantifying the protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this work, we developed an accurate scoring function (named as SPA-PN, SPecificity and Affinity of the Protein-Nucleic acid interactions) for protein-nucleic acid interactions by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. Specificity and affinity are two requirements of highly efficient and specific biomolecular recognition. Previous quantitative descriptions of the biomolecular interactions considered the affinity, but often ignored the specificity owing to the challenge of specificity quantification. We applied our concept of intrinsic specificity to connect the conventional specificity, which circumvents the challenge of specificity quantification. In addition to the affinity optimization, we incorporated the quantified intrinsic specificity into the optimization strategy of SPA-PN. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions validated that SPA-PN performs well on both the prediction of binding affinity and identification of native conformation. In terms of its performance, SPA-PN can be widely used to predict the protein-nucleic acid structures and quantify their interactions. PMID:24098651

  16. Biophysical and computational methods to analyze amino acid interaction networks in proteins.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Kathleen F; Gorman, Scott D; Boehr, David D

    2016-01-01

    Globular proteins are held together by interacting networks of amino acid residues. A number of different structural and computational methods have been developed to interrogate these amino acid networks. In this review, we describe some of these methods, including analyses of X-ray crystallographic data and structures, computer simulations, NMR data, and covariation among protein sequences, and indicate the critical insights that such methods provide into protein function. This information can be leveraged towards the design of new allosteric drugs, and the engineering of new protein function and protein regulation strategies. PMID:27441044

  17. Genetically programmed expression of proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-09-07

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, polynucleotides encoding the novel synthetase molecules, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine and translation systems. The invention further provides methods for producing modified proteins (e.g., lipidated proteins) through targeted modification of the phenylselenocysteine residue in a protein.

  18. Genetically programmed expression of proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-07-10

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, polynucleotides encoding the novel synthetase molecules, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine and translation systems. The invention further provides methods for producing modified proteins (e.g., lipidated proteins) through targeted modification of the phenylselenocysteine residue in a protein.

  19. Transcriptome profiling of the intoxication response of Tenebrio molitor larvae to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa protoxin.

    PubMed

    Oppert, Brenda; Dowd, Scot E; Bouffard, Pascal; Li, Lewyn; Conesa, Ana; Lorenzen, Marcé D; Toutges, Michelle; Marshall, Jeremy; Huestis, Diana L; Fabrick, Jeff; Oppert, Cris; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystal (Cry) proteins are effective against a select number of insect pests, but improvements are needed to increase efficacy and decrease time to mortality for coleopteran pests. To gain insight into the Bt intoxication process in Coleoptera, we performed RNA-Seq on cDNA generated from the guts of Tenebrio molitor larvae that consumed either a control diet or a diet containing Cry3Aa protoxin. Approximately 134,090 and 124,287 sequence reads from the control and Cry3Aa-treated groups were assembled into 1,318 and 1,140 contigs, respectively. Enrichment analyses indicated that functions associated with mitochondrial respiration, signalling, maintenance of cell structure, membrane integrity, protein recycling/synthesis, and glycosyl hydrolases were significantly increased in Cry3Aa-treated larvae, whereas functions associated with many metabolic processes were reduced, especially glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and fatty acid synthesis. Microarray analysis was used to evaluate temporal changes in gene expression after 6, 12 or 24 h of Cry3Aa exposure. Overall, microarray analysis indicated that transcripts related to allergens, chitin-binding proteins, glycosyl hydrolases, and tubulins were induced, and those related to immunity and metabolism were repressed in Cry3Aa-intoxicated larvae. The 24 h microarray data validated most of the RNA-Seq data. Of the three intoxication intervals, larvae demonstrated more differential expression of transcripts after 12 h exposure to Cry3Aa. Gene expression examined by three different methods in control vs. Cry3Aa-treated larvae at the 24 h time point indicated that transcripts encoding proteins with chitin-binding domain 3 were the most differentially expressed in Cry3Aa-intoxicated larvae. Overall, the data suggest that T. molitor larvae mount a complex response to Cry3Aa during the initial 24 h of intoxication. Data from this study represent the largest genetic sequence dataset for T. molitor

  20. Amino acid composition, molecular weight distribution and gel electrophoresis of walnut (Juglans regia L.) proteins and protein fractionations.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoying; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Guogang

    2014-01-27

    As a by-product of oil production, walnut proteins are considered as an additional source of plant protein for human food. To make full use of the protein resource, a comprehensive understanding of composition and characteristics of walnut proteins are required. Walnut proteins have been fractionated and characterized in this study. Amino acid composition, molecular weight distribution and gel electrophoresis of walnut proteins and protein fractionations were analyzed. The proteins were sequentially separated into four fractions according to their solubility. Glutelin was the main component of the protein extract. The content of glutelin, albumin, globulin and prolamin was about 72.06%, 7.54%, 15.67% and 4.73% respectively. Glutelin, albumin and globulin have a balanced content of essential amino acids, except for methionine, with respect to the FAO pattern recommended for adults. SDS-PAGE patterns of albumin, globulin and glutelin showed several polypeptides with molecular weights 14.4 to 66.2 kDa. The pattern of walnut proteins in two-dimension electrophoresis (2-DE) showed that the isoelectric point was mainly in the range of 4.8-6.8. The results of size exclusion chromatogram indicated molecular weight of the major components of walnut proteins were between 3.54 and 81.76 kDa.

  1. Amino Acid Composition, Molecular Weight Distribution and Gel Electrophoresis of Walnut (Juglans regia L.) Proteins and Protein Fractionations

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiaoying; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Guogang

    2014-01-01

    As a by-product of oil production, walnut proteins are considered as an additional source of plant protein for human food. To make full use of the protein resource, a comprehensive understanding of composition and characteristics of walnut proteins are required. Walnut proteins have been fractionated and characterized in this study. Amino acid composition, molecular weight distribution and gel electrophoresis of walnut proteins and protein fractionations were analyzed. The proteins were sequentially separated into four fractions according to their solubility. Glutelin was the main component of the protein extract. The content of glutelin, albumin, globulin and prolamin was about 72.06%, 7.54%, 15.67% and 4.73% respectively. Glutelin, albumin and globulin have a balanced content of essential amino acids, except for methionine, with respect to the FAO pattern recommended for adults. SDS-PAGE patterns of albumin, globulin and glutelin showed several polypeptides with molecular weights 14.4 to 66.2 kDa. The pattern of walnut proteins in two-dimension electrophoresis (2-DE) showed that the isoelectric point was mainly in the range of 4.8–6.8. The results of size exclusion chromatogram indicated molecular weight of the major components of walnut proteins were between 3.54 and 81.76 kDa. PMID:24473146

  2. Identification of thermophilic proteins by incorporating evolutionary and acid dissociation information into Chou's general pseudo amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guo-Liang; Liu, Yan-Ling; Wang, Hui

    2016-10-21

    Thermophilic proteins can thrive stalely at the high temperatures. Identification of thermophilic protein could be helpful to learn the function of protein. Automated prediction of thermophilic protein is an important tool for genome annotation. In this work, a powerful predictor is proposed by combining amino acid composition, evolutionary information, and acid dissociation constant. The overall prediction accuracy of 93.53% was obtained for using the algorithm of support vector machine. In order to check the performance of our method, two low-similarity independent testing datasets are used to test the proposed method. Comparisons with other methods show that the prediction results were better than other existing methods in literature. This indicates that our approach was effective to predict thermophilic proteins. PMID:27396359

  3. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury. PMID:26208104

  4. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury.

  5. Amino acid sequence of the encephalitogenic basic protein from human myelin

    PubMed Central

    Carnegie, P. R.

    1971-01-01

    Myelin from the central nervous system contains an unusual basic protein, which can induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The basic protein from human brain was digested with trypsin and other enzymes and the sequence of the 170 amino acids was determined. The localization of the encephalitogenic determinants was described. Possible roles for the protein in the structure and function of myelin are discussed. PMID:4108501

  6. Correlation between Heart-type Fatty Acid-binding Protein Gene Polymorphism and mRNA Expression with Intramuscular Fat in Baicheng-oil Chicken.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; He, Jianzhong; Yang, Wenxuan; Muhantay, Gemenggul; Chen, Ying; Xing, Jinming; Liu, Jianzhu

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to determine the polymorphism and mRNA expression pattern of the heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) gene and their association with intramuscular fat (IMF) content in the breast and leg muscles of Baicheng oil chicken (BOC). A total of 720 chickens, including 240 black Baicheng oil chicken (BBOC), 240 silky Baicheng oil chicken (SBOC), and 240 white Baicheng oil chicken (WBOC) were raised. Three genotypes of H-FABP gene second extron following AA, AB, and BB were detected by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) strategy. The G939A site created AA genotype and G956A site created BB genotype. The content of IMF in AA genotype in breast muscle of BBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0176) and the genotype in leg muscle of WBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0145). The G939A site could be taken as genetic marker for higher IMF content selecting for breast muscle of BBOC and leg muscle of WBOC. The relative mRNA expression of H-FABP was measured by real-time PCR at 30, 60, 90, and 120 d. The IMF content significantly increased with age in both muscles. The mRNA expression level of H-FABP significantly decreased with age in both muscles of the three types of chickens. Moreover, a significant negative correlation between H-FABP abundance and IMF content in the leg muscles of WBOC (p = 0.035) was observed. The mRNA expression of H-FABP negatively correlated with the IMF content in both breast and leg muscles of BOC sat slaughter time.

  7. Correlation between Heart-type Fatty Acid-binding Protein Gene Polymorphism and mRNA Expression with Intramuscular Fat in Baicheng-oil Chicken.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; He, Jianzhong; Yang, Wenxuan; Muhantay, Gemenggul; Chen, Ying; Xing, Jinming; Liu, Jianzhu

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to determine the polymorphism and mRNA expression pattern of the heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) gene and their association with intramuscular fat (IMF) content in the breast and leg muscles of Baicheng oil chicken (BOC). A total of 720 chickens, including 240 black Baicheng oil chicken (BBOC), 240 silky Baicheng oil chicken (SBOC), and 240 white Baicheng oil chicken (WBOC) were raised. Three genotypes of H-FABP gene second extron following AA, AB, and BB were detected by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) strategy. The G939A site created AA genotype and G956A site created BB genotype. The content of IMF in AA genotype in breast muscle of BBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0176) and the genotype in leg muscle of WBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0145). The G939A site could be taken as genetic marker for higher IMF content selecting for breast muscle of BBOC and leg muscle of WBOC. The relative mRNA expression of H-FABP was measured by real-time PCR at 30, 60, 90, and 120 d. The IMF content significantly increased with age in both muscles. The mRNA expression level of H-FABP significantly decreased with age in both muscles of the three types of chickens. Moreover, a significant negative correlation between H-FABP abundance and IMF content in the leg muscles of WBOC (p = 0.035) was observed. The mRNA expression of H-FABP negatively correlated with the IMF content in both breast and leg muscles of BOC sat slaughter time. PMID:26323394

  8. Correlation between Heart-type Fatty Acid-binding Protein Gene Polymorphism and mRNA Expression with Intramuscular Fat in Baicheng-oil Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; He, Jianzhong; Yang, Wenxuan; Muhantay, Gemenggul; Chen, Ying; Xing, Jinming; Liu, Jianzhu

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the polymorphism and mRNA expression pattern of the heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) gene and their association with intramuscular fat (IMF) content in the breast and leg muscles of Baicheng oil chicken (BOC). A total of 720 chickens, including 240 black Baicheng oil chicken (BBOC), 240 silky Baicheng oil chicken (SBOC), and 240 white Baicheng oil chicken (WBOC) were raised. Three genotypes of H-FABP gene second extron following AA, AB, and BB were detected by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) strategy. The G939A site created AA genotype and G956A site created BB genotype. The content of IMF in AA genotype in breast muscle of BBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0176) and the genotype in leg muscle of WBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0145). The G939A site could be taken as genetic marker for higher IMF content selecting for breast muscle of BBOC and leg muscle of WBOC. The relative mRNA expression of H-FABP was measured by real-time PCR at 30, 60, 90, and 120 d. The IMF content significantly increased with age in both muscles. The mRNA expression level of H-FABP significantly decreased with age in both muscles of the three types of chickens. Moreover, a significant negative correlation between H-FABP abundance and IMF content in the leg muscles of WBOC (p = 0.035) was observed. The mRNA expression of H-FABP negatively correlated with the IMF content in both breast and leg muscles of BOC sat slaughter time. PMID:26323394

  9. Amino acid metabolism, substrate availability and the control of protein dynamics in the human kidney.

    PubMed

    Garibotto, G; Tessari, P; Sacco, P; Deferrari, G

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling protein metabolism in the human kidney are not well understood. During adult life, kidney protein content and the size of the kidney remain fairly constant, indicating that protein synthesis and degradation within the kidney are tightly regulated. However, kidney protein turnover may change in response to stimuli such as alterations in substrate availability, hormones or growth factors, acid-base balance, renal work or renal injury with a progressive decrease in the number of nephrons. These factors have been evaluated mainly in animals, in vitro or in vivo. Amino acids, the kidneys substrates for protein synthesis, are provided by several routes. Like in other organs, amino acids can reach the kidney cells through the arterial blood flow. However, they may also come from the degradation of reabsorbed low-molecular weight proteins filtered by the glomerulus. The human kidney has high rates of protein turnover and leucine oxidation. The magnitude of the protein turnover across the human kidney suggests that the protein dynamics is partly determined by intrarenal protein catabolism. As evaluated by a steady-state leucine multiple compartment analysis, kidney protein synthesis is dependent to a similar extent on intrarenal generation of amino acids from protein breakdown and from amino acids taken up from the arterial blood. Kidney mass may therefore depend not only on the availability of free amino acids, but also on filtered proteins which are degraded within the kidney. Future studies could define the mechanisms, metabolic pathways and mediators influencing kidney protein turnover in humans, with a view to better comprehension of the mechanisms of disease. PMID:10493563

  10. [Antinociceptive effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) through long fatty acid receptor G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40)].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Kazuo; Nishinaka, Takashi; Sato, Naoya; Mankura, Mitsumasa; Koyama, Yutaka; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids, one class of essential nutrients for humans, are an important source of energy and an essential component of cell membranes. They also function as signal transduction molecules in a variety of biological phenomena. The important functional role of fatty acids in both onset and suppression of pain has become increasingly apparent in recent years. Recently, we have also demonstrated that the release of an endogenous opioid peptide, β-endorphin, plays an important role in the induction of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-induced antinociception. It is well known that fatty acids affect intracellular and intercellular signaling as well as the membrane fluidity of neurons. In addition to intracellular actions, unbound free fatty acids (FFAs) can also carry out extracellular signaling by stimulating the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Among these receptors, G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) has been reported to be activated by long-chain fatty acids such as DHA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and arachidonic acid. In the peripheral area, GPR40 is preferentially expressed in pancreatic β-cells and is known to relate to the secretion of hormone and peptides. On the other hand, even though this receptor is widely distributed in the central nervous system, reports studying the role and functions of GPR40 in the brain have not been found. In this review, we summarize the findings of our recent study about the long-chain fatty acid receptor GPR40 as a novel pain regulatory system. PMID:24584021

  11. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pratul Kumar

    2011-07-19

    The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible intermediates in the protein folding pathway. The present invention has important applications to the design of novel drugs as well as protein engineering. The present invention predicts the three-dimensional structure of a protein independent of size of the protein, overcoming a significant limitation in the prior art.

  12. Detection of D-amino acids in purified proteins synthesized in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Tetsuya; Sekine, Masae; Ogawa, Tetsuhiro; Hidaka, Makoto; Homma, Hiroshi; Masaki, Haruhiko

    2010-05-01

    It has long been believed that amino acids comprising proteins of all living organisms are only of the L-configuration, except for Gly. However, peptidyl D-amino acids were observed in hydrolysates of soluble high molecular weight fractions extracted from cells or tissues of various organisms. This strongly suggests that significant amounts of D-amino acids are naturally present in usual proteins. Thus we analyzed the D-amino acid contents of His-tag-purified beta-galactosidase and human urocortin, which were synthesized by Escherichia coli grown in controlled synthetic media. After acidic hydrolysis for various times at 110 degrees C, samples were derivatized with 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2, 1, 3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F) and separated on a reverse-phase column followed by a chiral column into D- and L-enantiomers. The contents of D-enantiomers of Ala, Leu, Phe, Val, Asp, and Glu were determined by plotting index D/(D + L) against the incubation time for hydrolysis and extrapolating the linear regression line to 0 h to eliminate the effect of racemization of amino acids during the incubation. Significant contents of D-amino acids were reproducibly detected, the D-amino acid profile being specific to an individual protein. This finding indicated the likelihood that D-amino acids are in fact present in the purified proteins. On the other hand, the D-amino acid contents of proteins were hardly influenced by the addition of D- or L-amino acids to the cultivation medium, whereas intracellular free D-amino acids sensitively varied according to the extracellular conditions. The origin of these D-amino acids detected in proteins was discussed.

  13. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  14. Refinement of Generalized Born Implicit Solvation Parameters for Nucleic Acids and Their Complexes with Proteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai; Pérez, Alberto; Bermeo, Sherry; Simmerling, Carlos

    2015-08-11

    The Generalized Born (GB) implicit solvent model has undergone significant improvements in accuracy for modeling of proteins and small molecules. However, GB still remains a less widely explored option for nucleic acid simulations, in part because fast GB models are often unable to maintain stable nucleic acid structures or they introduce structural bias in proteins, leading to difficulty in application of GB models in simulations of protein-nucleic acid complexes. Recently, GB-neck2 was developed to improve the behavior of protein simulations. In an effort to create a more accurate model for nucleic acids, a similar procedure to the development of GB-neck2 is described here for nucleic acids. The resulting parameter set significantly reduces absolute and relative energy error relative to Poisson-Boltzmann for both nucleic acids and nucleic acid-protein complexes, when compared to its predecessor GB-neck model. This improvement in solvation energy calculation translates to increased structural stability for simulations of DNA and RNA duplexes, quadruplexes, and protein-nucleic acid complexes. The GB-neck2 model also enables successful folding of small DNA and RNA hairpins to near native structures as determined from comparison with experiment. The functional form and all required parameters are provided here and also implemented in the AMBER software.

  15. Regulation of protein synthesis by amino acids in muscle of neonates.

    PubMed

    Suryawan, Agus; Davis, Teresa A

    2011-01-01

    The marked increase in skeletal muscle mass during the neonatal period is largely due to a high rate of postprandial protein synthesis that is modulated by an enhanced sensitivity to insulin and amino acids. The amino acid signaling pathway leading to the stimulation of protein synthesis has not been fully elucidated. Among the amino acids, leucine is considered to be a principal anabolic agent that regulates protein synthesis. mTORC1, which controls protein synthesis, has been implicated as a target for leucine. Until recently, there have been few studies exploring the role of amino acids in enhancing muscle protein synthesis in vivo. In this review, we discuss amino acid-induced protein synthesis in muscle in the neonate, focusing on current knowledge of the role of amino acids in the activation of mTORC1 leading to mRNA translation. The role of the amino acid transporters, SNAT2, LAT1, and PAT, in the modulation of mTORC1 activation and the role of amino acids in the activation of putative regulators of mTORC1, i.e., raptor, Rheb, MAP4K3, Vps34, and Rag GTPases, are discussed.

  16. Refsum disease diagnostic marker phytanic acid alters the physical state of membrane proteins of liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schönfeld, P; Struy, H

    1999-08-27

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid), a branched chain fatty acid accumulating in Refsum disease to high levels throughout the body, induces uncoupling of rat liver mitochondria similar to non-branched fatty acids (e.g. palmitic acid), but the contribution of the ADP/ATP carrier or the aspartate/glutamate carrier in phytanic acid-induced uncoupling is of minor importance. Possible deleterious effects of phytanic acid on membrane-linked energy coupling processes were studied by ESR spectroscopy using rat liver mitochondria and a membrane preparation labeled with the lipid-specific spin probe 5-doxylstearic acid (5-DSA) or the protein-specific spin probe MAL-TEMPO (4-maleimido-2,2,6, 6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl). The effects of phytanic acid on phospholipid molecular dynamics and on the physical state of membrane proteins were quantified by estimation of the order parameter or the ratio of the amplitudes of the weakly to strongly immobilized MAL-TEMPO binding sites (W/S ratio), respectively. It was found, that phytanic acid (1) increased the mobility of phospholipid molecules (indicated by a decrease in the order parameter) and (2) altered the conformational state and/or the segmental mobility of membrane proteins (indicated by a drastic decrease in the W/S ratio). Unsaturated fatty acids with multiple cis-double bonds (e.g. linolenic or arachidonic acid), but not non-branched FFA (ranging from chain length C10:0 to C18:0), also decrease the W/S ratio. It is hypothesized that the interaction of phytanic acid with transmembrane proteins might stimulate the proton permeability through the mitochondrial inner membrane according to a mechanism, different to a protein-supported fatty acid cycling.

  17. Crystal Structure of Okadaic Acid Binding Protein 2.1: A Sponge Protein Implicated in Cytotoxin Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Haruhiko; Makino, Marie; Kodama, Koichiro; Konoki, Keiichi; Ito, Takuhiro; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Fukuzawa, Seketsu; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tachibana, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a marine polyether cytotoxin that was first isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria okadai. OA is a potent inhibitor of protein serine/threonine phosphatases (PP) 1 and 2A, and the structural basis of phosphatase inhibition has been well investigated. However, the role and mechanism of OA retention in the marine sponge have remained elusive. We have solved the crystal structure of okadaic acid binding protein 2.1 (OABP2.1) isolated from H. okadai; it has strong affinity for OA and limited sequence homology to other proteins. The structure revealed that OABP2.1 consists of two α-helical domains, with the OA molecule deeply buried inside the protein. In addition, the global fold of OABP2.1 was unexpectedly similar to that of aequorin, a jellyfish photoprotein. The presence of structural homologues suggested that, by using similar protein scaffolds, marine invertebrates have developed diverse survival systems adapted to their living environments.

  18. Enhanced Bio-hydrogen Production from Protein Wastewater by Altering Protein Structure and Amino Acids Acidification Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Naidong; Chen, Yinguang; Chen, Aihui; Feng, Leiyu

    2014-02-01

    Enhanced bio-hydrogen production from protein wastewater by altering protein structure and amino acids acidification type via pH control was investigated. The hydrogen production reached 205.2 mL/g-protein when protein wastewater was pretreated at pH 12 and then fermented at pH 10. The mechanism studies showed that pH 12 pretreatment significantly enhanced protein bio-hydrolysis during the subsequent fermentation stage as it caused the unfolding of protein, damaged the protein hydrogen bonding networks, and destroyed the disulfide bridges, which increased the susceptibility of protein to protease. Moreover, pH 10 fermentation produced more acetic but less propionic acid during the anaerobic fermentation of amino acids, which was consistent with the theory of fermentation type affecting hydrogen production. Further analyses of the critical enzymes, genes, and microorganisms indicated that the activity and abundance of hydrogen producing bacteria in the pH 10 fermentation reactor were greater than those in the control.

  19. Arachidonic acid-induced oxidative injury to cultured spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Toborek, M; Malecki, A; Garrido, R; Mattson, M P; Hennig, B; Young, B

    1999-08-01

    Spinal cord trauma can cause a marked release of free fatty acids, in particular, arachidonic acid (AA), from cell membranes. Free fatty acids, and AA by itself, may lead to secondary damage to spinal cord neurons. To study this hypothesis, cultured spinal cord neurons were exposed to increasing concentrations of AA (0.01-10 microM). AA-induced injury to spinal cord neurons was assessed by measurements of cellular oxidative stress, intracellular calcium levels, activation of nuclear factor-KB (NF-kappaB), and cell viability. AA treatment increased intracellular calcium concentrations and decreased cell viability. Oxidative stress increased significantly in neurons exposed to 1 and 10 microM AA. In addition, AA treatment activated NF-kappaB and decreased levels of the inhibitory subunit, IKB. It is interesting that manganese superoxide dismutase protein levels and levels of intracellular total glutathione increased in neurons exposed to this fatty acid for 24 h, consistent with a compensatory response to increased oxidative stress. These results strongly support the hypothesis that free fatty acids contribute to the tissue injury observed following spinal cord trauma. PMID:10428065

  20. Differential Occurrence of Interactions and Interaction Domains in Proteins Containing Homopolymeric Amino Acid Repeats.

    PubMed

    Pelassa, Ilaria; Fiumara, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Homopolymeric amino acids repeats (AARs), which are widespread in proteomes, have often been viewed simply as spacers between protein domains, or even as "junk" sequences with no obvious function but with a potential to cause harm upon expansion as in genetic diseases associated with polyglutamine or polyalanine expansions, including Huntington disease and cleidocranial dysplasia. A growing body of evidence indicates however that at least some AARs can form organized, functional protein structures, and can regulate protein function. In particular, certain AARs can mediate protein-protein interactions, either through homotypic AAR-AAR contacts or through heterotypic contacts with other protein domains. It is still unclear however, whether AARs may have a generalized, proteome-wide role in shaping protein-protein interaction networks. Therefore, we have undertaken here a bioinformatics screening of the human proteome and interactome in search of quantitative evidence of such a role. We first identified the sets of proteins that contain repeats of any one of the 20 amino acids, as well as control sets of proteins chosen at random in the proteome. We then analyzed the connectivity between the proteins of the AAR-containing protein sets and we compared it with that observed in the corresponding control networks. We find evidence for different degrees of connectivity in the different AAR-containing protein networks. Indeed, networks of proteins containing polyglutamine, polyglutamate, polyproline, and other AARs show significantly increased levels of connectivity, whereas networks containing polyleucine and other hydrophobic repeats show lower degrees of connectivity. Furthermore, we observed that numerous protein-protein, -nucleic acid, and -lipid interaction domains are significantly enriched in specific AAR protein groups. These findings support the notion of a generalized, combinatorial role of AARs, together with conventional protein interaction domains, in shaping

  1. Effect of liver fatty acid binding protein on fatty acid movement between liposomes and rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, M; Brecher, P

    1987-01-01

    Although movement of fatty acids between bilayers can occur spontaneously, it has been postulated that intracellular movement is facilitated by a class of proteins named fatty acid binding proteins (FABP). In this study we have incorporated long chain fatty acids into multilamellar liposomes made of phosphatidylcholine, incubated them with rat liver microsomes containing an active acyl-CoA synthetase, and measured formation of acyl-CoA in the absence or presence of FABP purified from rat liver. FABP increased about 2-fold the accumulation of acyl-CoA when liposomes were the fatty acid donor. Using fatty acid incorporated into liposomes made either of egg yolk lecithin or of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, it was found that the temperature dependence of acyl-CoA accumulation in the presence of FABP correlated with both the physical state of phospholipid molecules in the liposomes and the binding of fatty acid to FABP, suggesting that fatty acid must first desorb from the liposomes before FABP can have an effect. An FABP-fatty acid complex incubated with microsomes, in the absence of liposomes, resulted in greater acyl-CoA formation than when liposomes were present, suggesting that desorption of fatty acid from the membrane is rate-limiting in the accumulation of acyl-CoA by this system. Finally, an equilibrium dialysis cell separating liposomes from microsomes on opposite sides of a Nuclepore filter was used to show that liver FABP was required for the movement and activation of fatty acid between the compartments. These studies show that liver FABP interacts with fatty acid that desorbs from phospholipid bilayers, and promotes movement to a membrane-bound enzyme, suggesting that FABP may act intracellularly by increasing net desorption of fatty acid from cell membranes. PMID:3446187

  2. Single amino acid insertions in extracellular loop 2 of Bombyx mori ABCC2 disrupt its receptor function for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac but not Cry1Aa toxins.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shiho; Miyamoto, Kazuhisa; Noda, Hiroaki; Endo, Haruka; Kikuta, Shingo; Sato, Ryoichi

    2016-04-01

    In a previous report, seven Cry1Ab-resistant strains were identified in the silkworm, Bombyx mori; these strains were shown to have a tyrosine insertion at position 234 in extracellular loop 2 of the ABC transporter C2 (BmABCC2). This insertion was confirmed to destroy the receptor function of BmABCC2 and confer the strains resistance against Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. However, these strains were susceptible to Cry1Aa. In this report, we examined the mechanisms of the loss of receptor function of the transporter by expressing mutations in Sf9 cells. After replacement of one or two of the five amino acid residues in loop 2 of the susceptible BmABCC2 gene [BmABCC2_S] with alanine, cells still showed susceptibility, retaining the receptor function. Five mutants with single amino acid insertions at position 234 in BmABCC2 were also generated, resulting in loop 2 having six amino acids, which corresponds to replacing the tyrosine insertion in the resistant BmABCC2 gene [BmABCC2_R(+(234)Y)] with another amino acid. All five mutants exhibited loss of function against Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the amino acid sequence in loop 2 is less important than the loop size (five vs. six amino acids) or loop structure for Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac activity. Several domain-swapped mutant toxins were then generated among Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac, which are composed of three domains. Swapped mutants containing domain II of Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac did not kill Sf9 cells expressing BmABCC2_R(+(234)Y), suggesting that domain II of the Cry toxin is related to the interaction with the receptor function of BmABCC2. This also suggests that different reactions against Bt-toxins in some B. mori strains, that is, Cry1Ab resistance or Cry1Aa susceptibility, are attributable to structural differences in domain II of Cry1A toxins. PMID:26928903

  3. Interaction of Lysinibacillus sphaericus Cry48Aa/Cry49Aa toxin with midgut brush-border membrane fractions from Culex quinquefasciatus larvae.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q-Y; Hu, X-M; Cai, Q-X; Yan, J-P; Yuan, Z-M

    2016-04-01

    The Cry48Aa/Cry49Aa mosquitocidal toxin from Lysinibacillus sphaericus was uniquely composed of a three-domain (Cry) toxin and binary (Bin) toxin-like protein, with high toxicity against Culex spp. However, its mode of action against the target mosquitoes is still unknown. In this study, Cry48Aa, Cry49Aa and its N- and C-terminal truncated proteins were expressed and purified, and the binding affinities of the purified proteins with midgut brush-border membrane fractions (BBMFs) from Culex quin-quefasciatus larvae were performed. The results showed that both Cry48Aa and Cry49Aa have specific and high binding affinity to BBMFs, with dissociation constants of 9.5 ± 1.8 and 25.4 ± 3.8 nM, respectively. Competition assays demonstrated that Cry49Aa C-terminal derivatives were able to bind to the BBMFs, whereas Far-Western dot blot analysis revealed that its N-terminal constructs interacted with Cry48Aa. Nevertheless, larvicidal activity was almost lost when Cry49Aa truncated proteins, either individually or in pairs, combined with Cry48Aa. It is concluded that Cry49Aa is responsible for receptor binding and interaction with Cry48Aa and plays an important role in the mechanism of action of these two-component toxins. PMID:26748768

  4. How the folding rates of two- and multistate proteins depend on the amino acid properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jitao T; Huang, Wei; Huang, Shanran R; Li, Xin

    2014-10-01

    Proteins fold by either two-state or multistate kinetic mechanism. We observe that amino acids play different roles in different mechanism. Many residues that are easy to form regular secondary structures (α helices, β sheets and turns) can promote the two-state folding reactions of small proteins. Most of hydrophilic residues can speed up the multistate folding reactions of large proteins. Folding rates of large proteins are equally responsive to the flexibility of partial amino acids. Other properties of amino acids (including volume, polarity, accessible surface, exposure degree, isoelectric point, and phase transfer energy) have contributed little to folding kinetics of the proteins. Cysteine is a special residue, it triggers two-state folding reaction and but inhibits multistate folding reaction. These findings not only provide a new insight into protein structure prediction, but also could be used to direct the point mutations that can change folding rate.

  5. Intestinal transport of sulfanilic acid in rats immunized with protein-sulfanilic acid conjugate.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, A; Kawaratani, T; Kawashima, K; Hashida, M; Sezaki, H

    1990-07-01

    Intestinal transport of sulfanilic acid was examined by means of an in vitro everted sac technique in rats immunized with a bovine gamma-globulin-sulfanilic acid conjugate. At a low concentration of sulfanilic acid, the intestinal transport of sulfanilic acid was decreased in rats immunized with bovine gamma-globulin-sulfanilic acid conjugate. This phenomenon was dose dependent and antigen specific, since there was no difference in the transport of sulfanilic acid at a high concentration and of an unrelated hapten. These results suggested that parenteral immunization impaired not only the intestinal transport of macromolecular antigens, as previously shown, but also the transport of the low molecular weight hapten, sulfanilic acid.

  6. Free fatty acids and protein kinase C activation induce GPR120 (free fatty acid receptor 4) phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Takei, Yoshinori; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-01-15

    GPR120, free fatty acid receptor 4, is a recently deorphanized G protein-coupled receptor that seems to play cardinal roles in the regulation of metabolism and in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and metabolic disorders. In the present work a GPR120-Venus fusion protein was expressed in HEK293 Flp-In T-REx cells and its function (increase in intracellular calcium) and phosphorylation were studied. It was observed that the fusion protein migrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels as a band with a mass of ≈70-75kDa, although other bands of higher apparent weight (>130kDa) were also detected. Cell stimulation with docosahexaenoic acid or α-linolenic acid induced concentration-dependent increases in intracellular calcium and GPR120 phosphorylation. Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol esters also induced a marked receptor phosphorylation but did not alter the ability of 1µM docosahexaenoic acid to increase the intracellular calcium concentration. Phorbol ester-induced GPR120 phosphorylation, but not that induced with docosahexaenoic acid, was blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors (bis-indolyl-maleimide I and Gö 6976) suggesting that conventional kinase isoforms mediate this action. The absence of effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on agonist-induced GPR120 phosphorylation indicates that this kinase does not play a major role in agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation. Docosahexaenoic acid action was associated with marked GPR120 internalization whereas that induced with phorbol esters was smaller at early times. PMID:24239485

  7. Arachidonic acid-mediated inhibition of a potassium current in the giant neurons of Aplysia

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.O.

    1990-01-01

    Biochemical and electrophysiological approaches were used to investigate the role of arachidonic acid (AA) in the modulation of an inwardly rectifying potassium current (I{sub R}) in the giant neurons of the marine snail, Aplysia californica. Using ({sup 3}H)AA as tracer, the intracellular free AA pool in Aplysia ganglia was found to be in a state of constant and rapid turnover through deacylation and reacylation of phospholipid, primarily phosphatidyl-inositol. This constant turnover was accompanied by a constant release of free AA and eicosanoids into the extracellular medium. The effects of three pharmacological agents were characterized with regard to AA metabolism in Aplysia ganglia. 4-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), an activator of protein kinase C, stimulated liberation of AA from phospholipid, and 4-bromophenacylbromide (BPB), an inhibitor of phospholipate A{sub 2}, inhibited this liberation. Indomethacin at 250 {mu}M was found to inhibit uptake of AA, likely through inhibition of acyl-CoA synthetase. These agents were also found to modulate I{sub R} in ways which were consistent with their biological effects: TPA inhibited I{sub R}, and both BPB and indomethacin stimulated I{sub R} . Modulation of I{sub R} by these substances was found not to involve cAMP metabolism. Acute application of exogenous AA did not affect I{sub R}; however, I{sub R} in giant neurons was found to be inhibited after dialysis with AA or other unsaturated fatty acids. Also, after perfusion with BSA overnight, a treatment which strips the giant neurons of AA in lipid storage, I{sub R} was found to have increased over 2-fold. This perfusion-induced increase was inhibited by the presence of AA or by pretreatment of the giant neurons with BPB. These results suggest AA, provided through constant turnover from phospholipid, mediates constitutive inhibition of I{sub R}.

  8. Nuc-PLoc: a new web-server for predicting protein subnuclear localization by fusing PseAA composition and PsePSSM.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Bin; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2007-11-01

    The life processes of an eukaryotic cell are guided by its nucleus. In addition to the genetic material, the cellular nucleus contains many proteins located at its different compartments, called subnuclear locations. Information of their localization in a nucleus is indispensable for the in-depth study of system biology because, in addition to helping determine their functions, it can provide illuminative insights of how and in what kind of microenvironments these subnuclear proteins are interacting with each other and with other molecules. Facing the deluge of protein sequences generated in the post-genomic age, we are challenged to develop an automated method for fast and effectively annotating the subnuclear locations of numerous newly found nuclear protein sequences. In view of this, a new classifier, called Nuc-PLoc, has been developed that can be used to identify nuclear proteins among the following nine subnuclear locations: (1) chromatin, (2) heterochromatin, (3) nuclear envelope, (4) nuclear matrix, (5) nuclear pore complex, (6) nuclear speckle, (7) nucleolus, (8) nucleoplasm and (9) nuclear promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) body. Nuc-PLoc is featured by an ensemble classifier formed by fusing the evolution information of a protein and its pseudo-amino acid composition. The overall jackknife cross-validation accuracy obtained by Nuc-PLoc is significantly higher than those by the existing methods on the same benchmark data set through the same testing procedure. As a user-friendly web-server, Nuc-PLoc is freely accessible to the public at http://chou.med.harvard.edu/bioinf/Nuc-PLoc.

  9. Compartmentation of hepatic fatty-acid-binding protein in liver cells and its effect on microsomal phosphatidic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bordewick, U; Heese, M; Börchers, T; Robenek, H; Spener, F

    1989-03-01

    Fatty-acid-binding proteins are known to occur in the cytosol of mammalian cells and to bind fatty acids and their CoA-esters. Application of the postembedding protein A-gold labeling method with antibody against the hepatic type fatty-acid-binding protein (hFABP) to cross-sections of liver cells and a newly developed gel-chromatographic immunofluorescence assay established qualitatively (1) that hFABP in mitochondria was confined to outer mitochondrial membranes, (2) the presence of this protein in microsomes and (3) that nuclei were also filled with hFABP. Quantitative data elaborated with a non-competitive ELISA confirmed these results. A significant difference to the distribution of cardiac FABP in heart muscle cells, where this type of protein was found in cytosol, matrix and nuclei, was observed (Börchers et al. (1989) Biochim. Biophys. Acta, in the press). hFABP-containing rat liver microsomes were incubated with long-chain acyl-CoAs in the presence of hFABP (isolated from rat liver cytosol) in a study on the acylation of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid. Both acyltransferases were stimulated by addition of hFABP to the incubation medium. The morphological, immunochemical as well as kinetic data infer a direct interaction of hFABP with microsomal membranes in liver cells.

  10. AFAL: a web service for profiling amino acids surrounding ligands in proteins.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Salinas, Mauricio; Ortega-Salazar, Samuel; Gonzales-Nilo, Fernando; Pohl, Ehmke; Holmes, David S; Quatrini, Raquel

    2014-11-01

    With advancements in crystallographic technology and the increasing wealth of information populating structural databases, there is an increasing need for prediction tools based on spatial information that will support the characterization of proteins and protein-ligand interactions. Herein, a new web service is presented termed amino acid frequency around ligand (AFAL) for determining amino acids type and frequencies surrounding ligands within proteins deposited in the Protein Data Bank and for assessing the atoms and atom-ligand distances involved in each interaction (availability: http://structuralbio.utalca.cl/AFAL/index.html ). AFAL allows the user to define a wide variety of filtering criteria (protein family, source organism, resolution, sequence redundancy and distance) in order to uncover trends and evolutionary differences in amino acid preferences that define interactions with particular ligands. Results obtained from AFAL provide valuable statistical information about amino acids that may be responsible for establishing particular ligand-protein interactions. The analysis will enable investigators to compare ligand-binding sites of different proteins and to uncover general as well as specific interaction patterns from existing data. Such patterns can be used subsequently to predict ligand binding in proteins that currently have no structural information and to refine the interpretation of existing protein models. The application of AFAL is illustrated by the analysis of proteins interacting with adenosine-5'-triphosphate.

  11. AFAL: a web service for profiling amino acids surrounding ligands in proteins.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Salinas, Mauricio; Ortega-Salazar, Samuel; Gonzales-Nilo, Fernando; Pohl, Ehmke; Holmes, David S; Quatrini, Raquel

    2014-11-01

    With advancements in crystallographic technology and the increasing wealth of information populating structural databases, there is an increasing need for prediction tools based on spatial information that will support the characterization of proteins and protein-ligand interactions. Herein, a new web service is presented termed amino acid frequency around ligand (AFAL) for determining amino acids type and frequencies surrounding ligands within proteins deposited in the Protein Data Bank and for assessing the atoms and atom-ligand distances involved in each interaction (availability: http://structuralbio.utalca.cl/AFAL/index.html ). AFAL allows the user to define a wide variety of filtering criteria (protein family, source organism, resolution, sequence redundancy and distance) in order to uncover trends and evolutionary differences in amino acid preferences that define interactions with particular ligands. Results obtained from AFAL provide valuable statistical information about amino acids that may be responsible for establishing particular ligand-protein interactions. The analysis will enable investigators to compare ligand-binding sites of different proteins and to uncover general as well as specific interaction patterns from existing data. Such patterns can be used subsequently to predict ligand binding in proteins that currently have no structural information and to refine the interpretation of existing protein models. The application of AFAL is illustrated by the analysis of proteins interacting with adenosine-5'-triphosphate. PMID:25085083

  12. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  13. Relationship between amino acid scores and protein quality indices based on rat growth.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, G; Peace, R W; Botting, H G; Brulé, D

    1989-01-01

    Protein efficiency ratio (PER), relative PER (RPER), net protein ratio (NPR) and relative NPR (RNPR) values, and amino acid scores were calculated for 20 food products (casein, casein + Met, beef salami, skim milk, tuna, chicken frankfuters, sausage, heated skim milk, peanut butter, rolled oats, soy isolate, chick peas, pea concentrate, kidney beans, wheat cereal, pinto bean, lentils, rice-wheat gluten cereal, macaroni-cheese, and beef stew). In most cases, PER, RPER, NPR or RNPR ranked the products in the same order and positive correlations among the protein quality methods were highly significant (r = 0.98-0.99). Amino acid scores (based on the first limiting amino acid, Lys-Met-Cys, Lys-Met-Cys-Trp or lys-Met-Cys-Trp-Thr) were positively correlated to the PER, RPER, NPR or RNPR data (r = 0.61-0.75). Inclusion of the correction for true digestibility of protein improved the correlations between amino acid scores and the indices based on rat growth. The correlations were especially high between Lys-Met-Cys scores (corrected for true digestibility of protein) and PER, RPER, NPR or RNPR (r = 0.86-0.91). Inclusion of the correction for true digestibility of individual amino acids did not result in further improvements of the correlations in most cases. It is concluded that adjusting amino acid scores for true digestibility of protein would be sufficient and further correction for digestibility of amino acids would be unnecessary in mixed diets. PMID:2710751

  14. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones.

  15. Core Amino Acid Residues in the Morphology-Regulating Protein, Mms6, for Intracellular Magnetite Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Narumiya, Kaori; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms produce finely tuned biomineral architectures with the aid of biomineral-associated proteins. The functional amino acid residues in these proteins have been previously identified using in vitro and in silico experimentation in different biomineralization systems. However, the investigation in living organisms is limited owing to the difficulty in establishing appropriate genetic techniques. Mms6 protein, isolated from the surface of magnetite crystals synthesized in magnetotactic bacteria, was shown to play a key role in the regulation of crystal morphology. In this study, we have demonstrated a defect in the specific region or substituted acidic amino acid residues in the Mms6 protein for observing their effect on magnetite biomineralization in vivo. Analysis of the gene deletion mutants and transformants of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 expressing partially truncated Mms6 protein revealed that deletions in the N-terminal or C-terminal regions disrupted proper protein localization to the magnetite surface, resulting in a change in the crystal morphology. Moreover, single amino acid substitutions at Asp123, Glu124, or Glu125 in the C-terminal region of Mms6 clearly indicated that these amino acid residues had a direct impact on magnetite crystal morphology. Thus, these consecutive acidic amino acid residues were found to be core residues regulating magnetite crystal morphology. PMID:27759096

  16. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones. PMID:26656109

  17. Method for nucleic acid hybridization using single-stranded DNA binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Method of nucleic acid hybridization for detecting the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence in a population of different nucleic acid sequences using a nucleic acid probe. The nucleic acid probe hybridizes with the specific nucleic acid sequence but not with other nucleic acid sequences in the population. The method includes contacting a sample (potentially including the nucleic acid sequence) with the nucleic acid probe under hybridizing conditions in the presence of a single-stranded DNA binding protein provided in an amount which stimulates renaturation of a dilute solution (i.e., one in which the t.sub.1/2 of renaturation is longer than 3 weeks) of single-stranded DNA greater than 500 fold (i.e., to a t.sub.1/2 less than 60 min, preferably less than 5 min, and most preferably about 1 min.) in the absence of nucleotide triphosphates.

  18. Role of intramitochondrial arachidonic acid and acyl-CoA synthetase 4 in angiotensin II-regulated aldosterone synthesis in NCI-H295R adrenocortical cell line.

    PubMed

    Mele, Pablo G; Duarte, Alejandra; Paz, Cristina; Capponi, Alessandro; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2012-07-01

    Although the role of arachidonic acid (AA) in angiotensin II (ANG II)- and potassium-stimulated steroid production in zona glomerulosa cells is well documented, the mechanism responsible for AA release is not fully described. In this study we evaluated the mechanism involved in the release of intramitochondrial AA and its role in the regulation of aldosterone synthesis by ANG II in glomerulosa cells. We show that ANG II and potassium induce the expression of acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) thioesterase 2 and acyl-CoA synthetase 4, two enzymes involved in intramitochondrial AA generation/export system well characterized in other steroidogenic systems. We demonstrate that mitochondrial ATP is required for AA generation/export system, steroid production, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein induction. We also demonstrate the role of protein tyrosine phosphatases regulating acyl-CoA synthetase 4 and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein induction, and hence ANG II-stimulated aldosterone synthesis.

  19. One-Pot Procedure for Recovery of Gallic Acid from Wastewater and Encapsulation within Protein Particles.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Himan; Madadlou, Ashkan; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Mousavi, Mohammad E

    2016-02-24

    A whey protein isolate solution was heat-denatured and treated with the enzyme transglutaminase, which cross-linked ≈26% of the amino groups and increased the magnitude of the ζ-potential value. The protein solution was microemulsified, and then the resulting water-in-oil microemulsion was dispersed within a gallic acid-rich model wastewater. Gallic acid extraction by the outlined microemulsion liquid membrane (MLM) from the exterior aqueous phase (wastewater) and accumulation within the internal aqueous nanodroplets induced protein cold-set gelation and resulted in the formation of gallic acid-enveloping nanoparticles. Measurements with a strain-controlled rheometer indicated a progressive increase in the MLM viscosity during gallic acid recovery corresponding to particle formation. The mean hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles made from the heat-denatured and preheated enzymatically cross-linked proteins was 137 and 122 nm, respectively. The enzymatic cross-linking of whey proteins led to a higher gallic acid recovery yield and increased the glass transition enthalpy and temperature. A similar impact on glass transition indices was observed by the gallic acid-induced nanoparticulation of proteins. Scanning electron microscopy showed the existence of numerous jammed/fused nanoparticles. It was suggested on the basis of the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy that the in situ nanoparticulation of proteins shifted the C-N stretching and C-H bending peaks to higher wavenumbers. X-ray diffraction results proposed a decreased β-sheet content for proteins because of the acid-induced particulation. The nanoparticles made from the enzymatically cross-linked protein were more stable against the in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and retained almost 19% of the entrapped gallic acid after 300 min sequential gastric and intestinal digestions. PMID:26862880

  20. One-Pot Procedure for Recovery of Gallic Acid from Wastewater and Encapsulation within Protein Particles.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Himan; Madadlou, Ashkan; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Mousavi, Mohammad E

    2016-02-24

    A whey protein isolate solution was heat-denatured and treated with the enzyme transglutaminase, which cross-linked ≈26% of the amino groups and increased the magnitude of the ζ-potential value. The protein solution was microemulsified, and then the resulting water-in-oil microemulsion was dispersed within a gallic acid-rich model wastewater. Gallic acid extraction by the outlined microemulsion liquid membrane (MLM) from the exterior aqueous phase (wastewater) and accumulation within the internal aqueous nanodroplets induced protein cold-set gelation and resulted in the formation of gallic acid-enveloping nanoparticles. Measurements with a strain-controlled rheometer indicated a progressive increase in the MLM viscosity during gallic acid recovery corresponding to particle formation. The mean hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles made from the heat-denatured and preheated enzymatically cross-linked proteins was 137 and 122 nm, respectively. The enzymatic cross-linking of whey proteins led to a higher gallic acid recovery yield and increased the glass transition enthalpy and temperature. A similar impact on glass transition indices was observed by the gallic acid-induced nanoparticulation of proteins. Scanning electron microscopy showed the existence of numerous jammed/fused nanoparticles. It was suggested on the basis of the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy that the in situ nanoparticulation of proteins shifted the C-N stretching and C-H bending peaks to higher wavenumbers. X-ray diffraction results proposed a decreased β-sheet content for proteins because of the acid-induced particulation. The nanoparticles made from the enzymatically cross-linked protein were more stable against the in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and retained almost 19% of the entrapped gallic acid after 300 min sequential gastric and intestinal digestions.

  1. Lipoteichoic acid-binding and biological properties of T protein of group A streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R H; Simpson, W A; Dale, J B; Ofek, I; Beachey, E H

    1980-08-01

    T protein was extracted with trypsin from an avirulent, M protein-deficient, type 1 group A Streptococcus and purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and anion-exchange chromatography. The latter procedure removed contaminating lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from the T protein, which consisted of a heterogeneous mixture of polypeptides resistant to digestion by trypsin and ranged in molecular size from 160,000 to 200,000 daltons. Threonine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, lysine, and valine were the most predominant amino acids. The binding of LTA to an affinity column of T protein was reversible with increasing concentrations of ethanol but not with increasing ionic strength. T protein bound less palmitic acid and LTA than did fatty acid-free bovine albumin and did not stimulate human peripheral lymphocytes. Because the surface and cell wall distribution of the T proteins and LTA appear similar, the possibility exists that T proteins and LTA may interact in situ by weakly hydrophobic bonds. Such ligand-ligand interaction may be indirectly involved in the adherence of group A streptococci to host cell membranes that is known to be mediated by LTA.

  2. Genetically programmed expression of proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-03-12

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that can incorporate the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, polynucleotides encoding the novel sythetases molecules, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine and translation systems. The invention further provides methods for producing modified proteins (e.g., lapidated proteins) through targeted modification of the phenylselenocysteine residue in a protein.

  3. Amino Acid Distribution Rules Predict Protein Fold: Protein Grammar for Beta-Strand Sandwich-Like Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kister, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We present an alternative approach to protein 3D folding prediction based on determination of rules that specify distribution of “favorable” residues, that are mainly responsible for a given fold formation, and “unfavorable” residues, that are incompatible with that fold, in polypeptide sequences. The process of determining favorable and unfavorable residues is iterative. The starting assumptions are based on the general principles of protein structure formation as well as structural features peculiar to a protein fold under investigation. The initial assumptions are tested one-by-one for a set of all known proteins with a given structure. The assumption is accepted as a “rule of amino acid distribution” for the protein fold if it holds true for all, or near all, structures. If the assumption is not accepted as a rule, it can be modified to better fit the data and then tested again in the next step of the iterative search algorithm, or rejected. We determined the set of amino acid distribution rules for a large group of beta sandwich-like proteins characterized by a specific arrangement of strands in two beta sheets. It was shown that this set of rules is highly sensitive (~90%) and very specific (~99%) for identifying sequences of proteins with specified beta sandwich fold structure. The advantage of the proposed approach is that it does not require that query proteins have a high degree of homology to proteins with known structure. So long as the query protein satisfies residue distribution rules, it can be confidently assigned to its respective protein fold. Another advantage of our approach is that it allows for a better understanding of which residues play an essential role in protein fold formation. It may, therefore, facilitate rational protein engineering design. PMID:25625198

  4. Use of anaerobic green fluorescent protein versus green fluorescent protein as reporter in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Landete, José M; Langa, Susana; Revilla, Concepción; Margolles, Abelardo; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan L

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in the production of fermented and probiotic foods. Development of molecular tools to discriminate the strains of interest from the endogenous microbiota in complex environments like food or gut is of high interest. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophores strictly requires molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which restrict the study of microorganisms in low-oxygen environments. In this work, we have developed a noninvasive cyan-green fluorescent based reporter system for real-time tracking of LAB that is functional under anoxic conditions. The evoglow-Pp1 was cloned downstream from the promoters D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase and elongation factor Tu of Lactobacillus reuteri CECT925 using pNZ8048 and downstream of the lactococcal P1 promoter using pT1NX. The classical gfp was also cloned in pT1NX. These recombinant expression vectors were electroporated into Lactococccus, Lactobacillus, and Enterococcus strains with biotechnological and/or probiotic interests to assess and compare their functionality under different conditions of oxygen and pH. The expression was analyzed by imaging and fluorometric methods as well as by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that reporter systems pNZ:TuR-aFP and pT1-aFP are two versatile molecular markers for monitoring LAB in food and fecal environments without the potential problems caused by oxygen and pH limitations, which could be exploited for in vivo studies. Production of the fluorescent protein did not disturb any important physiological properties of the parental strains, such as growth rate, reuterin, or bacteriocin production.

  5. RNA-binding protein QKI regulates Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Radomska, Katarzyna J; Halvardson, Jonatan; Reinius, Björn; Lindholm Carlström, Eva; Emilsson, Lina; Feuk, Lars; Jazin, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Linkage, association and expression studies previously pointed to the human QKI, KH domain containing, RNA-binding (QKI) as a candidate gene for schizophrenia. Functional studies of the mouse orthologue Qk focused mainly on its role in oligodendrocyte development and myelination, while its function in astroglia remained unexplored. Here, we show that QKI is highly expressed in human primary astrocytes and that its splice forms encode proteins targeting different subcellular localizations. Uncovering the role of QKI in astrocytes is of interest in light of growing evidence implicating astrocyte dysfunction in the pathogenesis of several disorders of the central nervous system. We selectively silenced QKI splice variants in human primary astrocytes and used RNA sequencing to identify differential expression and splice variant composition at the genome-wide level. We found that an mRNA expression of Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), encoding a major component of astrocyte intermediate filaments, was down-regulated after QKI7 splice variant silencing. Moreover, we identified a potential QKI-binding site within the 3' untranslated region of human GFAP. This sequence was not conserved between mice and humans, raising the possibility that GFAP is a target for QKI in humans but not rodents. Haloperidol treatment of primary astrocytes resulted in coordinated increases in QKI7 and GFAP expression. Taken together, our results provide the first link between QKI and GFAP, two genes with alterations previously observed independently in schizophrenic patients. Our findings for QKI, together with its well-known role in myelination, suggest that QKI is a hub regulator of glia function in humans.

  6. The cytochrome P450 2AA gene cluster in zebrafish (Danio rerio): Expression of CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2 and response to phenobarbital-type inducers

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Akira; Bainy, Afonso C.D.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2013-10-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2 gene family is the largest and most diverse CYP gene family in vertebrates. In zebrafish, we have identified 10 genes in a new subfamily, CYP2AA, which does not show orthology to any human or other mammalian CYP genes. Here we report evolutionary and structural relationships of the 10 CYP2AA genes and expression of the first two genes, CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2. Parsimony reconstruction of the tandem duplication pattern for the CYP2AA cluster suggests that CYP2AA1, CYP2AA2 and CYP2AA3 likely arose in the earlier duplication events and thus are most diverged in function from the other CYP2AAs. On the other hand, CYP2AA8 and CYP2AA9 are genes that arose in the latest duplication event, implying functional similarity between these two CYPs. A molecular model of CYP2AA1 showing the sequence conservation across the CYP2AA cluster reveals that the regions with the highest variability within the cluster map onto CYP2AA1 near the substrate access channels, suggesting differing substrate specificities. Zebrafish CYP2AA1 transcript was expressed predominantly in the intestine, while CYP2AA2 was most highly expressed in the kidney, suggesting differing roles in physiology. In the liver CYP2AA2 expression but not that of CYP2AA1, was increased by 1,4-bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) and, to a lesser extent, by phenobarbital (PB). In contrast, pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN) increased CYP2AA1 expression, but not CYP2AA2 in the liver. The results identify a CYP2 subfamily in zebrafish that includes genes apparently induced by PB-type chemicals and PXR agonists, the first concrete in vivo evidence for a PB-type response in fish. - Highlights: • A tandemly duplicated cluster of ten CYP2AA genes was described in zebrafish. • Parsimony and duplication analyses suggest pathways to CYP2AA diversity. • Homology models reveal amino acid positions possibly related to functional diversity. • The CYP2AA locus does not share synteny with

  7. Conservation of Shannon's redundancy for proteins. [information theory applied to amino acid sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts of information theory are applied to examine various proteins in terms of their redundancy in natural originators such as animals and plants. The Monte Carlo method is used to derive information parameters for random protein sequences. Real protein sequence parameters are compared with the standard parameters of protein sequences having a specific length. The tendency of a chain to contain some amino acids more frequently than others and the tendency of a chain to contain certain amino acid pairs more frequently than other pairs are used as randomness measures of individual protein sequences. Non-periodic proteins are generally found to have random Shannon redundancies except in cases of constraints due to short chain length and genetic codes. Redundant characteristics of highly periodic proteins are discussed. A degree of periodicity parameter is derived.

  8. Single-molecule pull-down for investigating protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Fareh, Mohamed; Loeff, Luuk; Szczepaniak, Malwina; Haagsma, Anna C; Yeom, Kyu-Hyeon; Joo, Chirlmin

    2016-08-01

    The genome and transcriptome are constantly modified by proteins in the cell. Recent advances in single-molecule techniques allow for high spatial and temporal observations of these interactions between proteins and nucleic acids. However, due to the difficulty of obtaining functional protein complexes, it remains challenging to study the interactions between macromolecular protein complexes and nucleic acids. Here, we combined single-molecule fluorescence with various protein complex pull-down techniques to determine the function and stoichiometry of ribonucleoprotein complexes. Through the use of three examples of protein complexes from eukaryotic cells (Drosha, Dicer, and TUT4 protein complexes), we provide step-by-step guidance for using novel single-molecule techniques. Our single-molecule methods provide sub-second and nanometer resolution and can be applied to other nucleoprotein complexes that are essential for cellular processes. PMID:27017911

  9. Cellular fatty acid and soluble protein composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and related organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoon, D A; Mayberry, W R; Slots, J

    1981-01-01

    The cellular fatty acid and protein content of twenty-five representative strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetecomitans isolated from juvenile and adult periodontitis patients was compared to that of 15 reference strains of oral and nonoral Actinobacillus species and Haemophilus aphrophilus. Trimethylsilyl derivatives of the fatty acid methyl esters were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. The predominant fatty acids of all 40 strains examined were 14:0, 3-OH 14:0, 16 delta, and 16:0. Actinobacillus seminis (ATCC 15768) was unlike the other strains examined because of a greater amount of 14:0 detected. The soluble protein analysis using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that A. actinomycetemcomitans, H. aphrophilus, and nonoral Actinobacillus species possessed distinct protein profiles attesting to the validity of separating these organisms into different species. Established biotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans could not be differentiated on the basis of fatty acid or protein profiles. PMID:7287893

  10. Study of Stationary Phase Metabolism Via Isotopomer Analysis of Amino Acids from an Isolated Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, AfshanS.; Tang, YinjieJ.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Martin, Hector Garcia; Gin, Jennifer; Benke, Peter; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-09-14

    Microbial production of many commercially important secondary metabolites occurs during stationary phase, and methods to measure metabolic flux during this growth phase would be valuable. Metabolic flux analysis is often based on isotopomer information from proteinogenic amino acids. As such, flux analysis primarily reflects the metabolism pertinent to the growth phase during which most proteins are synthesized. To investigate central metabolism and amino acids synthesis activity during stationary phase, addition of fully 13C-labeled glucose followed by induction of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression during stationary phase was used. Our results indicate that Escherichia coli was able to produce new proteins (i.e., GFP) in the stationary phase, and the amino acids in GFP were mostly from degraded proteins synthesized during the exponential growth phase. Among amino acid biosynthetic pathways, only those for serine, alanine, glutamate/glutamine, and aspartate/asparagine had significant activity during the stationary phase.

  11. Probing Protein Structure by Amino Acid-Specific Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Vanessa Leah; Vachet, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, amino acid-specific covalent labeling has been a valuable tool to study protein structure and protein interactions, especially for systems that are difficult to study by other means. These covalent labeling methods typically map protein structure and interactions by measuring the differential reactivity of amino acid side chains. The reactivity of amino acids in proteins generally depends on the accessibility of the side chain to the reagent, the inherent reactivity of the label and the reactivity of the amino acid side chain. Peptide mass mapping with ESI- or MALDI-MS and peptide sequencing with tandem MS are typically employed to identify modification sites to provide site-specific structural information. In this review, we describe the reagents that are most commonly used in these residue-specific modification reactions, details about the proper use of these covalent labeling reagents, and information about the specific biochemical problems that have been addressed with covalent labeling strategies. PMID:19016300

  12. Functional amino acids in nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyao

    2013-09-01

    The recent years have witnessed growing interest in biochemistry, physiology and nutrition of amino acids (AA) in growth, health and disease of humans and other animals. This results from the discoveries of AA in cell signaling involving protein kinases, G protein-coupled receptors, and gaseous molecules (i.e., NO, CO and H2S). In addition, nutritional studies have shown that dietary supplementation with several AA (e.g., arginine, glutamine, glutamate, leucine, and proline) modulates gene expression, enhances growth of the small intestine and skeletal muscle, or reduces excessive body fat. These seminal findings led to the new concept of functional AA, which are defined as those AA that participate in and regulate key metabolic pathways to improve health, survival, growth, development, lactation, and reproduction of the organisms. Functional AA hold great promise in prevention and treatment of metabolic diseases (e.g., obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disorders), intrauterine growth restriction, infertility, intestinal and neurological dysfunction, and infectious disease (including viral infections).

  13. Ascorbic acid-induced crosslinking of lens proteins: evidence supporting a Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Ortwerth, B J; Olesen, P R

    1988-08-31

    The incubation of calf lens extracts with 20 mM ascorbic acid under sterile conditions for 8 weeks caused extensive protein crosslinking, which was not observed with either 20 mM sorbitol or 20 mM glucose. While no precipitation was observed, ascorbic acid did induce the formation of high-molecular-weight protein aggregates as determined by Agarose A-5m chromatography. Proteins modified by ascorbic acid bound strongly to a boronate affinity column, however, crosslinked proteins were present mainly in the unbound fraction. These observations suggest that the cis-diol groups of ascorbic acid were present in the primary adduct, but were either lost during the crosslinking reaction or sterically hindered from binding to the column matrix. The amino acid composition of the ascorbic acid-modified proteins was identical to controls except for a 15% decrease in lysine. Amino acid analysis after borohydride reduction, however, showed a 25% decrease in lysine, a 7% decrease in arginine and an additional peak which eluted between phenylalanine and histidine. Extensive browning occurred during the ascorbic acid-modification reaction. This resulted in protein-bound chromophores with a broad absorption spectrum from 300 to 400 nm, and protein-bound fluorophores with excitation/emission maxima of 350/450 nm. A 4 week incubation of dialyzed crude lens extract with [1-14C]ascorbic acid showed increased incorporation for 2 weeks, followed by a decrease over the next 2 weeks as crosslinking was initiated. The addition of cyanoborohydride to the reaction mixture completely inhibited crosslinking and increased [1-14C]ascorbic acid incorporation to a plateau value of 180 nmol per mg protein. Amino acid analysis showed a 50% loss of lysine, and 8% decrease in arginine and the presence of a new peak which eluted slightly earlier than methionine. These data are consistent with the non-enzymatic glycation of lens proteins by either ascorbic acid or an oxidation product of ascorbic acid via

  14. Radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W. M.

    1981-12-01

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides, and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and bacterial products. All of the available data strongly suggest that the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasized.

  15. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment.

    PubMed

    Gruber, David F; Gaffney, Jean P; Mehr, Shaadi; DeSalle, Rob; Sparks, John S; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs) from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp.), two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II). We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein's fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment.

  16. Tables of critical values for examining compositional non-randomness in proteins and nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, M.; Holmquist, R.

    1975-01-01

    A binomially distributed statistic is defined to show whether or not the proportion of a particular amino acid in a protein deviates from random expectation. An analogous statistic is derived for nucleotides in nucleic acids. These new statistics are simply related to the classical chi-squared test. They explicitly account for the compositional fluctuations imposed by the finite length of proteins, and they are more accurate than previous tables.

  17. Highly efficient extraction of cellular nucleic acid associated proteins in vitro with magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Hu, Zhengyan; Qin, Hongqiang; Wei, Xiaoluan; Cheng, Kai; Liu, Fangjie; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2012-12-01

    Nucleic acid associated proteins (NAaP) play the essential roles in gene regulation and protein expression. The global analysis of cellular NAaP would give a broad insight to understand the interaction between nucleic acids and the associated proteins, such as the important proteinous regulation factors on nucleic acids. Proteomic analysis presents a novel strategy to investigate a group of proteins. However, the large scale analysis of NAaP is yet impossible due to the lack of approaches to harvest target protein groups with a high efficiency. Herein, a simple and efficient method was developed to collect cellular NAaP using magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes based on the strong interaction between carbon nanotubes and nucleic acids along with corresponding associated proteins. We found that the magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes demonstrated a nearly 100% extraction efficiency for intracellular nucleic acids from cells in vitro. Importantly, the proteins associated on nucleic acids could be highly efficiently harvested using magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes due to the binding of NAaP on nucleic acids. 1594 groups of nuclear NAaP and 2595 groups of cellular NAaP were extracted and identified from about 1,000,000 cells, and 803 groups of NAaP were analyzed with only about 10,000 cells, showing a promising performance for the proteomic analysis of NAaP from minute cellular samples. This highly efficient extraction strategy for NAaP is a simple approach to identify cellular nucleic acid associated proteome, and we believed this strategy could be further applied in systems biology to understand the gene expression and regulation.

  18. Nucleic acid-based fluorescence sensors for detecting proteins.

    PubMed

    Heyduk, Ewa; Heyduk, Tomasz

    2005-02-15

    We report here development of a rapid, homogeneous, aptamer-based fluorescence assay ("molecular beacons") for detecting proteins. The assay involves protein-induced coassociation of two aptamers recognizing two distinct epitopes of the protein. The aptamers contain short fluorophore-labeled complementary "signaling" oligonucleotides attached to the aptamer by non-DNA linker. Coassociation of the two aptamers with the protein results in bringing the two "signaling" oligonucleotides into proximity, producing a large change of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the fluorophores. We used thrombin as a model system to provide proof-of-principle evidence validating this molecular beacon design. Thrombin beacon was capable of detecting the protein with high selectivity (also in complex biological mixtures), picomolar sensitivity, and high signal-to-background ratio. This is a homogeneous assay requiring no sample manipulation. Since the design of molecular beacons described here is not limited to any specific protein, it will be possible to develop these beacons to detect a variety of target proteins of biomedical importance.

  19. Enterocyte Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs): Different Functions of Liver- and Intestinal- FABPs in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Gajda, Angela M.; Storch, Judith

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are highly abundant cytosolic proteins that are expressed in most mammalian tissues. In the intestinal enterocyte, both Liver- (LFABP; FABP1) and Intestinal-fatty acid binding proteins (IFABP; FABP2) are expressed. These proteins display high affinity binding for long chain fatty acids (FA) and other hydrophobic ligands, thus they are believed to be involved with uptake and trafficking of lipids in the intestine. In vitro studies have identified differences in ligand binding stoichiometry and specificity, and in mechanisms of FA transfer to membranes, and it has been hypothesized that LFABP and IFABP have difference functions in the enterocyte. Studies directly comparing LFABP- and IFABP-null mice have revealed markedly different phenotypes, indicating that these proteins indeed have different functions in intestinal lipid metabolism and whole body energy homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the evolving knowledge of the functions of LFABP and IFABP in the intestinal enterocyte. PMID:25458898

  20. Protein meta-functional signatures from combining sequence, structure, evolution, and amino acid property information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Horst, Jeremy A; Cheng, Gong; Nickle, David C; Samudrala, Ram

    2008-09-26

    Protein function is mediated by different amino acid residues, both their positions and types, in a protein sequence. Some amino acids are responsible for the stability or overall shape of the protein, playing an indirect role in protein function. Others play a functionally important role as part of active or binding sites of the protein. For a given protein sequence, the residues and their degree of functional importance can be thought of as a signature representing the function of the protein. We have developed a combination of knowledge- and biophysics-based function prediction approaches to elucidate the relationships between the structural and the functional roles of individual residues and positions. Such a meta-functional signature (MFS), which is a collection of continuous values representing the functional significance of each residue in a protein, may be used to study proteins of known function in greater detail and to aid in experimental characterization of proteins of unknown function. We demonstrate the superior performance of MFS in predicting protein functional sites and also present four real-world examples to apply MFS in a wide range of settings to elucidate protein sequence-structure-function relationships. Our results indicate that the MFS approach, which can combine multiple sources of information and also give biological interpretation to each component, greatly facilitates the understanding and characterization of protein function.

  1. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  2. Identification of secreted bacterial proteins by noncanonical amino acid tagging

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Alborz; Szychowski, Janek; Ngo, John T.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Graham, Robert L. J.; Hess, Sonja; Schneewind, Olaf; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.; Tirrell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes have evolved complex secretion systems to deliver virulence factors into host cells. Identification of these factors is critical for understanding the infection process. We report a powerful and versatile approach to the selective labeling and identification of secreted pathogen proteins. Selective labeling of microbial proteins is accomplished via translational incorporation of azidonorleucine (Anl), a methionine surrogate that requires a mutant form of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase for activation. Secreted pathogen proteins containing Anl can be tagged by azide-alkyne cycloaddition and enriched by affinity purification. Application of the method to analysis of the type III secretion system of the human pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica enabled efficient identification of secreted proteins, identification of distinct secretion profiles for intracellular and extracellular bacteria, and determination of the order of substrate injection into host cells. This approach should be widely useful for the identification of virulence factors in microbial pathogens and the development of potential new targets for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:24347637

  3. Protein Quantification by Derivatization-Free High-Performance Liquid Chromatography of Aromatic Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Almut

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is considered to be the gold standard for quantitative peptide and protein analysis. Here, we would like to propose a simple HPLC/UV method based on a reversed-phase separation of the aromatic amino acids tyrosine (Tyr), phenylalanine (Phe), and optionally tryptophan (Trp) without any derivatization. The hydrolysis of the proteins and peptides was performed by an accelerated microwave technique, which needs only 30 minutes. Two internal standard compounds, homotyrosine (HTyr) and 4-fluorophenylalanine (FPhe) were used for calibration. The limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be 0.05 µM (~10 µg/L) for tyrosine and phenylalanine at 215 nm. The LOD for a protein determination was calculated to be below 16 mg/L (~300 ng BSA absolute). Aromatic amino acid analysis (AAAA) offers excellent accuracy and a precision of about 5% relative standard deviation, including the hydrolysis step. The method was validated with certified reference materials (CRM) of amino acids and of a pure protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA). AAAA can be used for the quantification of aromatic amino acids, isolated peptides or proteins, complex peptide or protein samples, such as serum or milk powder, and peptides or proteins immobilized on solid supports. PMID:27559481

  4. Cold shock domain protein from Philosamia ricini prefers single-stranded nucleic acids binding.

    PubMed

    Mani, Ashutosh; Yadava, P K; Gupta, Dwijendra K

    2012-01-01

    The cold shock proteins are evolutionarily conserved nucleic acid-binding proteins. Their eukaryotic homologs are present as cold shock domain (CSD) in Y-box proteins. CSDs too share striking similarity among different organisms and show nucleic acid binding properties. The purpose of the study was to investigate the preferential binding affinity of CSD protein for nucleic acids in Philosamia ricini. We have cloned and sequenced the first cDNA coding for Y-box protein in P. ricini; the sequence has been deposited in GenBank. Comparative genomics and phylogenetic analytics further confirmed that the deduced amino acid sequence belongs to the CSD protein family. A comparative study employing molecular docking was performed with P. ricini CSD, human CSD, and bacterial cold shock protein with a range of nucleic acid entities. The results indicate that CSD per se exhibits preferential binding affinity for single-stranded RNA and DNA. Possibly, the flanking N- and C-terminal domains are additionally involved in interactions with dsDNA or in conferring extra stability to CSD for improved binding.

  5. Protein Quantification by Derivatization-Free High-Performance Liquid Chromatography of Aromatic Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Almut; Weller, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is considered to be the gold standard for quantitative peptide and protein analysis. Here, we would like to propose a simple HPLC/UV method based on a reversed-phase separation of the aromatic amino acids tyrosine (Tyr), phenylalanine (Phe), and optionally tryptophan (Trp) without any derivatization. The hydrolysis of the proteins and peptides was performed by an accelerated microwave technique, which needs only 30 minutes. Two internal standard compounds, homotyrosine (HTyr) and 4-fluorophenylalanine (FPhe) were used for calibration. The limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be 0.05 µM (~10 µg/L) for tyrosine and phenylalanine at 215 nm. The LOD for a protein determination was calculated to be below 16 mg/L (~300 ng BSA absolute). Aromatic amino acid analysis (AAAA) offers excellent accuracy and a precision of about 5% relative standard deviation, including the hydrolysis step. The method was validated with certified reference materials (CRM) of amino acids and of a pure protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA). AAAA can be used for the quantification of aromatic amino acids, isolated peptides or proteins, complex peptide or protein samples, such as serum or milk powder, and peptides or proteins immobilized on solid supports. PMID:27559481

  6. Enamel proteins mitigate mechanical and structural degradations in mature human enamel during acid attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubarsky, Gennady V.; Lemoine, Patrick; Meenan, Brian J.; Deb, Sanjukta; Mutreja, Isha; Carolan, Patrick; Petkov, Nikolay

    2014-04-01

    A hydrazine deproteination process was used to investigate the role of enamel proteins in the acid erosion of mature human dental enamel. Bright field high resolution transmission electron micrographs and x-ray diffraction analysis show no crystallographic changes after the hydrazine treatment with similar nanoscale hydroxyapatite crystallite size and orientation for sound and de-proteinated enamel. However, the presence of enamel proteins reduces the erosion depth, the loss of hardness and the loss of structural order in enamel, following exposure to citric acid. Nanoindentation creep is larger for sound enamel than for deproteinated enamel but it reduces in sound enamel after acid attack. These novel results are consistent with calcium ion-mediated visco-elasticty in enamel matrix proteins as described previously for nacre, bone and dental proteins. They are also in good agreement with a previous double layer force spectroscopy study by the authors which found that the proteins electrochemically buffer enamel against acid attack. Finally, this suggests that acid attack, and more specifically dental erosion, is influenced by ionic permeation through the enamel layer and that it is mitigated by the enamel protein matrix.

  7. Nucleic acid chaperons: a theory of an RNA-assisted protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Biro, Jan C

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteins are assumed to contain all the information necessary for unambiguous folding (Anfinsen's principle). However, ab initio structure prediction is often not successful because the amino acid sequence itself is not sufficient to guide between endless folding possibilities. It seems to be a logical to try to find the "missing" information in nucleic acids, in the redundant codon base. Results mRNA energy dot plots and protein residue contact maps were found to be rather similar. The structure of mRNA is also conserved if the protein structure is conserved, even if the sequence similarity is low. These observations led me to suppose that some similarity might exist between nucleic acid and protein folding. I found that amino acid pairs, which are co-located in the protein structure, are preferentially coded by complementary codons. This codon complementarity is not perfect; it is suboptimal where the 1st and 3rd codon residues are complementary to each other in reverse orientation, while the 2nd codon letters may be, but are not necessarily, complementary. Conclusion Partial complementary coding of co-locating amino acids in protein structures suggests that mRNA assists in protein folding and functions not only as a template but even as a chaperon during translation. This function explains the role of wobble bases and answers the mystery of why we have a redundant codon base. PMID:16137324

  8. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids - New anabolic compounds improving protein metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous animal studies demonstrated that chronic feeding of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA) that modifies muscle membrane fatty acid composition promotes protein anabolism by blunting the age-associated deterioration in insulin sensitivity. The current study assessed, as a pr...

  9. Molecular analysis of Xenopus laevis SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic, Rich in Cysteine). A highly conserved acidic calcium-binding extracellular-matrix protein.

    PubMed Central

    Damjanovski, S; Liu, F; Ringuette, M

    1992-01-01

    SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic, Rich in Cysteine) is expressed as a 1.6 kb mRNA in Xenopus laevis. On the basis of cDNA sequence analysis, Xenopus SPARC has a core Mr of 32643, with one potential N-glycosylation site. Western analysis of SPARC isolated from Xenopus long bone indicates that the mature protein has an Mr of 43,000. At the amino acid level, Xenopus SPARC has 78-79% sequence similarity to mouse, bovine and human SPARC. The least-conserved region is found within the N-terminal glutamic acid-rich domain, with the C-terminal Ca(2+)-binding domain being the most conserved. Adult Xenopus tissues show the same pattern of tissue-specific distribution of SPARC mRNAs as adult mouse. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 5. PMID:1736898

  10. Comparison of Two Serologically Distinct Ribonucleic Acid Bacteriophages II. Properties of the Nucleic Acids and Coat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Overby, L. R.; Barlow, G. H.; Doi, R. H.; Jacob, Monique; Spiegelman, S.

    1966-01-01

    Overby, L. R. (University of Illinois, Urbana), G. H. Barlow, R. H. Doi, Monique Jacob, and S. Spiegelman. Comparison of two serologically distinct ribonucleic acid bacteriophages. II. Properties of the nucleic acids and coat proteins. J. Bacteriol. 92:739–745. 1966.—The ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules and coat proteins of two RNA coliphages, MS-2 and Qβ, have been characterized. MS-2 RNA shows an S20,w of 25.8 and a molecular weight by light scattering of 106. The corresponding parameters for Qβ-RNA were 28.9 and 0.9 × 106. A difference in base composition was reflected in the adenine-uracil ratio, which was 0.95 for MS-2 and 0.75 for Qβ. The two RNA preparations are readily separated by chromatography on columns of methylated albumin. Both gave identical bouyant densities in cesium sulfate of 1.64 g/ml. The coat protein subunits were of similar molecular weights: 15,500 (Qβ) and 14,000 (MS-2). They differed, however, in that the Qβ-protein lacked tryptophan and histidine, whereas the MS-2 protein lacked only histidine. Images PMID:5922545

  11. Protein homeostasis disorders of key enzymes of amino acids metabolism: mutation-induced protein kinetic destabilization and new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Pey, Angel L

    2013-12-01

    Many inborn errors of amino acids metabolism are caused by single point mutations affecting the ability of proteins to fold properly (i.e., protein homeostasis), thus leading to enzyme loss-of-function. Mutations may affect protein homeostasis by altering intrinsic physical properties of the polypeptide (folding thermodynamics, and rates of folding/unfolding/misfolding) as well as the interaction of partially folded states with elements of the protein homeostasis network (such as molecular chaperones and proteolytic machineries). Understanding these mutational effects on protein homeostasis is required to develop new therapeutic strategies aimed to target specific features of the mutant polypeptide. Here, I review recent work in three different diseases of protein homeostasis associated to inborn errors of amino acids metabolism: phenylketonuria, inherited homocystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria type I. These three different genetic disorders involve proteins operating in different cell organelles and displaying different structural complexities. Mutations often decrease protein kinetic stability of the native state (i.e., its half-life for irreversible denaturation), which can be studied using simple kinetic models amenable to biophysical and biochemical characterization. Natural ligands and pharmacological chaperones are shown to stabilize mutant enzymes, thus supporting their therapeutic application to overcome protein kinetic destabilization. The role of molecular chaperones in protein folding and misfolding is also discussed as well as their potential pharmacological modulation as promising new therapeutic approaches. Since current available treatments for these diseases are either burdening or only successful in a fraction of patients, alternative treatments must be considered covering studies from protein structure and biophysics to studies in animal models and patients.

  12. The value of short amino acid sequence matches for prediction of protein allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Silvanovich, Andre; Nemeth, Margaret A; Song, Ping; Herman, Rod; Tagliani, Laura; Bannon, Gary A

    2006-03-01

    Typically, genetically engineered crops contain traits encoded by one or a few newly expressed proteins. The allergenicity assessment of newly expressed proteins is an important component in the safety evaluation of genetically engineered plants. One aspect of this assessment involves sequence searches that compare the amino acid sequence of the protein to all known allergens. Analyses are performed to determine the potential for immunologically based cross-reactivity where IgE directed against a known allergen could bind to the protein and elicit a clinical reaction in sensitized individuals. Bioinformatic searches are designed to detect global sequence similarity and short contiguous amino acid sequence identity. It has been suggested that potential allergen cross-reactivity may be predicted by identifying matches as short as six to eight contiguous amino acids between the protein of interest and a known allergen. A series of analyses were performed, and match probabilities were calculated for different size peptides to determine if there was a scientifically justified search window size that identified allergen sequence characteristics. Four probability modeling methods were tested: (1) a mock protein and a mock allergen database, (2) a mock protein and genuine allergen database, (3) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database, and (4) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database combined with a correction for repeating peptides. These analyses indicated that searches for short amino acid sequence matches of eight amino acids or fewer to identify proteins as potential cross-reactive allergens is a product of chance and adds little value to allergy assessments for newly expressed proteins.

  13. Reasons for the occurrence of the twenty coded protein amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.; Miller, S. L.

    1981-01-01

    Factors involved in the selection of the 20 protein L-alpha-amino acids during chemical evolution and the early stages of Darwinian evolution are discussed. The selection is considered on the basis of the availability in the primitive ocean, function in proteins, the stability of the amino acid and its peptides, stability to racemization, and stability on the transfer RNA. It is concluded that aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine, lysine, serine and possibly threonine are the best choices for acidic, basic and hydroxy amino acids. The hydrophobic amino acids are reasonable choices, except for the puzzling absences of alpha-amino-n-butyric acid, norvaline and norleucine. The choices of the sulfur and aromatic amino acids seem reasonable, but are not compelling. Asparagine and glutamine are apparently not primitive. If life were to arise on another planet, it would be expected that the catalysts would be poly-alpha-amino acids and that about 75% of the amino acids would be the same as on the earth.

  14. In vitro enantioselective displacement of propranolol from protein binding sites by acetyl salicylic acid and salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Z; Khabnadideh, S; Hemmateenejad, B; Dehghani, Z

    2007-09-01

    The influences of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and salicylic acid (SA) on the enantioselective binding of propranolol (PL) and its enantiomers to plasma proteins and human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated. The equilibrium dialysis was employed for protein binding studies. We observed statistically significant displacement of racemic-PL, (+)-(R)-PL, and (-)-(S)-PL (0.1-10 microM) from their protein binding sites by ASA (200 microg/ml) and SA (100 microg/ml). ASA and SA displaced PL stereoselectivly from its binding sites. We concluded that ASA and its metabolite SA could change R/S ratio of PL unbound fractions and they might affect pharmacokinetic properties of PL.

  15. Folic acid and protein content in maternal diet and postnatal high-fat feeding affect the tissue levels of iron, zinc, and copper in the rat.

    PubMed

    Król, Ewelina; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Chmurzynska, Agata

    2011-12-01

    Although maternal, fetal, and placental mechanisms compensate for disturbances in the fetal environment, any nutritional inadequacies present during pregnancy may affect fetal metabolism, and their consequences may appear in later life. The aim of the present study is to investigate the influence of maternal diet during gestation on Fe, Zn, and Cu levels in the livers and kidneys of adult rats. The study was carried out on the offspring (n = 48) of mothers fed either a protein-balanced or a protein-restricted diet (18% vs. 9% casein) during pregnancy, with or without folic acid supplementation (0.005- vs. 0.002-g folic acid/kg diet). At 10 weeks of age, the offspring of each maternal group were randomly assigned to groups fed either the AIN-93G diet or a high-fat diet for 6 weeks, until the end of the experiment. The levels of Fe, Zn, and Cu in the livers and kidneys were determined by the F-AAS method. It was found that postnatal exposure to the high-fat diet was associated with increased hepatic Fe levels (p < 0.001), and with decreased liver Zn and Cu contents (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively), as well as with decreased renal Cu contents (p < 0.001). Moreover, the offspring's tissue mineral levels were also affected by protein and folic acid content in the maternal diet. Both prenatal protein restriction and folic acid supplementation increased the liver Zn content (p < 0.05) and the kidney Zn content (p < 0.001; p < 0.05, respectively), while folic acid supplementation resulted in a reduction in renal Cu level (p < 0.05). Summarizing, the results of this study show that maternal dietary folic acid and protein intake during pregnancy, as well as the type of postweaning diet, affect Fe, Zn, and Cu levels in the offspring of the rat. However, the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are unclear, and warrant further investigation.

  16. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, David F.; Gaffney, Jean P.; Mehr, Shaadi; DeSalle, Rob; Sparks, John S.; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs) from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp.), two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II). We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein’s fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment. PMID:26561348

  17. Development of a Quantitative BRET Affinity Assay for Nucleic Acid-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Timothy A; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions play a crucial role in the regulation of diverse biological processes. Elucidating the roles that protein-nucleic acid complexes play in the regulation of transcription, translation, DNA replication, repair and recombination, and RNA processing continues to be a crucial aspect of understanding of cell biology and the mechanisms of disease. In addition, proteins have been demonstrated to interact with antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics in a sequence and chemistry dependent manner, influencing ASO potency and distribution in cells and in vivo. While many assays have been developed to measure protein-nucleic acid interactions, many suffer from lack of throughput and sensitivity, or challenges with protein purification and scalability. In this report we present a new BRET assay for the analysis of DNA-protein interactions which makes use of an extremely bright luciferase as a tag for the binding protein, along with a long-wavelength fluorophore conjugated to the nucleic acid. The resulting assay is high throughput, sensitive, does not require protein purification, and even allows for quantitative characterization of these interactions within the biologically relevant context of whole cells. PMID:27571227

  18. Isoelectric Point, Electric Charge, and Nomenclature of the Acid-Base Residues of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado, Andres A.; Ribeiro, Joao M.; Sillero, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The main object of this work is to present the pedagogical usefulness of the theoretical methods, developed in this laboratory, for the determination of the isoelectric point (pI) and the net electric charge of proteins together with some comments on the naming of the acid-base residues of proteins. (Contains 8 figures and 4 tables.)

  19. Acid diet (high meat protein) effects on calcium metabolism and bone health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose of review: Update recent advancements regarding the effect of high animal protein on calcium utilization and bone health. Recent findings: Increased potential renal acid load resulting from a high protein (meat) intake has been closely associated with increased urinary calcium excretion. How...

  20. Umami taste amino acids produced by hydrolyzing extracted protein from tomato seed meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzymatic hydrolysis was performed for extracting protein to prepare umami taste amino acids from defatted tomato seed meal (DTSM) which is a by-product of tomato processing. Papain was used as an enzyme for the hydrolysis of DTSM. The particle size distribution of DTSM, protein concentration and fr...

  1. Development of a Quantitative BRET Affinity Assay for Nucleic Acid-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Timothy A.; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions play a crucial role in the regulation of diverse biological processes. Elucidating the roles that protein-nucleic acid complexes play in the regulation of transcription, translation, DNA replication, repair and recombination, and RNA processing continues to be a crucial aspect of understanding of cell biology and the mechanisms of disease. In addition, proteins have been demonstrated to interact with antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics in a sequence and chemistry dependent manner, influencing ASO potency and distribution in cells and in vivo. While many assays have been developed to measure protein-nucleic acid interactions, many suffer from lack of throughput and sensitivity, or challenges with protein purification and scalability. In this report we present a new BRET assay for the analysis of DNA-protein interactions which makes use of an extremely bright luciferase as a tag for the binding protein, along with a long-wavelength fluorophore conjugated to the nucleic acid. The resulting assay is high throughput, sensitive, does not require protein purification, and even allows for quantitative characterization of these interactions within the biologically relevant context of whole cells. PMID:27571227

  2. Site-specific fatty acid-conjugation to prolong protein half-life in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Mizuta, Yukina; Takasu, Akinori; Hahn, Young S; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2013-09-10

    Therapeutic proteins are indispensable in treating numerous human diseases. However, therapeutic proteins often suffer short serum half-life. In order to extend the serum half-life, a natural albumin ligand (a fatty acid) has been conjugated to small therapeutic peptides resulting in a prolonged serum half-life via binding to patients' serum albumin in vivo. However, fatty acid-conjugation has limited applicability due to lack of site-specificity resulting in the heterogeneity of conjugated proteins and a significant loss in pharmaceutical activity. In order to address these issues, we exploited the site-specific fatty acid-conjugation to a permissive site of a protein, using copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition, by linking a fatty acid derivative to p-ethynylphenylalanine incorporated into a protein using an engineered pair of yeast tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA synthetase. As a proof-of-concept, we show that single palmitic acid conjugated to superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) in a site-specific manner enhanced a protein's albumin-binding in vitro about 20 times and the serum half-life in vivo 5 times when compared to those of the unmodified sfGFP. Furthermore, the fatty acid conjugation did not cause a significant reduction in the fluorescence of sfGFP. Therefore, these results clearly indicate that the site-specific fatty acid-conjugation is a very promising strategy to prolong protein serum half-life in vivo without compromising its folded structure and activity.

  3. Nucleic acid encoding DS-CAM proteins and products related thereto

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, Julie R.

    2005-11-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there are provided Down Syndrome-Cell Adhesion Molecule (DS-CAM) proteins. Nucleic acid sequences encoding such proteins and assays employing same are also disclosed. The invention DS-CAM proteins can be employed in a variety of ways, for example, for the production of anti-DS-CAM antibodies thereto, in therapeutic compositions and methods employing such proteins and/or antibodies. DS-CAM proteins are also useful in bioassays to identify agonists and antagonists thereto.

  4. Beta-galactosidase and selective neutrality. [amino acid composition of proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, R.

    1979-01-01

    Three hypotheses to explain the amino acid composition of proteins are inconsistent (about 10 to the minus 9th) with the experimental data for beta-galactosidase from Escherichia coli. The exceptional length of this protein, 1021 residues, permits rigorous tests of these hypotheses without complication from statistical artifacts. Either this protein is not at compositional equilibrium, which is unlikely from knowledge about other proteins, or the evolution of this protein and its coding gene have not been selectively neutral. However, the composition of approximately 60% of the molecule is consistent with either a selectively neutral or nonneutral evolutionary process.

  5. THE STRUCTURE OF THE ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION SPECTRA OF CERTAIN PROTEINS AND AMINO ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Coulter, Calvin B.; Stone, Florence M.; Kabat, Elvin A.

    1936-01-01

    1. The absorption spectra of a number of proteins in the region 2500 to 3000 A. have been found to comprise from six to nine narrow bands. In consequence of variation in the relative intensity of these bands from protein to protein, the absorption curve has a characteristic configuration for each protein. 2. These bands correspond closely in position with the narrow bands which appear in the absorption spectra of tryptophan, tyrosin, and phenylalanine. Tryptophan and tyrosin each present three bands, phenylalanine shows nine. 3. The bands in the proteins are accordingly attributed to these amino acids. In the proteins the bands are displaced from the positions which they occupy in the uncombined amino acids, in most instances, by 10 to 35 A. toward longer wavelengths. 4. The absorption spectrum of Pneumococcus Type I antibody resembles that of normal pseudoglobulin but shows characteristic differences. PMID:19872958

  6. Cell-free unnatural amino acid incorporation with alternative energy systems and linear expression templates.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Prashanta; Smith, Mark Thomas; Bundy, Bradley Charles

    2014-01-25

    Site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids (uAAs) during protein synthesis expands the proteomic code through the addition of unique residue chemistry. This field provides a unique tool to improve pharmacokinetics, cancer treatments, vaccine development, proteomics and protein engineering. The limited ability to predict the characteristics of proteins with uAA-incorporation creates a need for a low-cost system with the potential for rapid screening. Escherichia coli-based cell-free protein synthesis is a compelling platform for uAA incorporation due to the open and accessible nature of the reaction environment. However, typical cell-free systems can be expensive due to the high cost of energizing reagents. By employing alternative energy sources, we reduce the cost of uAA-incorporation in CFPS by 55%. While alternative energy systems reduce cost, the time investment to develop gene libraries can remain cumbersome. Cell-free systems allow the direct use of PCR products known as linear expression templates, thus alleviating tedious plasmid library preparations steps. We report the specific costs of CFPS with uAA incorporation, demonstrate that LETs are suitable expression templates with uAA-incorporation, and consider the substantial reduction in labor intensity using LET-based expression for CFPS uAA incorporation.

  7. An information-theoretic classification of amino acids for the assessment of interfaces in protein-protein docking.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Christophe; Stefani, Arno G; Eberhardt, Martin; Huber, Johannes B; Sticht, Heinrich

    2013-09-01

    Docking represents a versatile and powerful method to predict the geometry of protein-protein complexes. However, despite significant methodical advances, the identification of good docking solutions among a large number of false solutions still remains a difficult task. We have previously demonstrated that the formalism of mutual information (MI) from information theory can be adapted to protein docking, and we have now extended this approach to enhance its robustness and applicability. A large dataset consisting of 22,934 docking decoys derived from 203 different protein-protein complexes was used for an MI-based optimization of reduced amino acid alphabets representing the protein-protein interfaces. This optimization relied on a clustering analysis that allows one to estimate the mutual information of whole amino acid alphabets by considering all structural features simultaneously, rather than by treating them individually. This clustering approach is fast and can be applied in a similar fashion to the generation of reduced alphabets for other biological problems like fold recognition, sequence data mining, or secondary structure prediction. The reduced alphabets derived from the present work were converted into a scoring function for the evaluation of docking solutions, which is available for public use via the web service score-MI: http://score-MI.biochem.uni-erlangen.de.

  8. Isotopomer distributions in amino acids from a highly expressed protein as a proxy for those from total protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Afshan; Shaikh, Afshan S.; Tang, Yinjie; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D.

    2008-06-27

    {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis provides valuable information about bacterial physiology. Though many biological processes rely on the synergistic functions of microbial communities, study of individual organisms in a mixed culture using existing flux analysis methods is difficult. Isotopomer-based flux analysis typically relies on hydrolyzed amino acids from a homogeneous biomass. Thus metabolic flux analysis of a given organism in a mixed culture requires its separation from the mixed culture. Swift and efficient cell separation is difficult and a major hurdle for isotopomer-based flux analysis of mixed cultures. Here we demonstrate the use of a single highly-expressed protein to analyze the isotopomer distribution of amino acids from one organism. Using the model organism E. coli expressing a plasmid-borne, his-tagged Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), we show that induction of GFP does not affect E. coli growth kinetics or the isotopomer distribution in nine key metabolites. Further, the isotopomer labeling patterns of amino acids derived from purified GFP and total cell protein are indistinguishable, indicating that amino acids from a purified protein can be used to infer metabolic fluxes of targeted organisms in a mixed culture. This study provides the foundation to extend isotopomer-based flux analysis to study metabolism of individual strains in microbial communities.

  9. Isotopomer distributions in amino acids from a highly expressed protein as a proxy for those from total protein.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Afshan S; Tang, Yinjie J; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D

    2008-02-01

    13C-Based metabolic flux analysis provides valuable information about bacterial physiology. Though many biological processes rely on the synergistic functions of microbial communities, study of individual organisms in a mixed culture using existing flux analysis methods is difficult. Isotopomer-based flux analysis typically relies on hydrolyzed amino acids from a homogeneous biomass. Thus, metabolic flux analysis of a given organism in a mixed culture requires its separation from the mixed culture. Swift and efficient cell separation is difficult and a major hurdle for isotopomer-based flux analysis of mixed cultures. Here we demonstrate the use of a single highly expressed protein to analyze the isotopomer distribution of amino acids from one organism. Using the model organism Escherichia coli expressing a plasmid-borne, His-tagged green fluorescent protein (GFP), we show that induction of GFP does not affect E. coli growth kinetics or the isotopomer distribution in nine key metabolites. Further, the isotopomer labeling patterns of amino acids derived from purified GFP and total cell protein are indistinguishable, indicating that amino acids from a purified protein can be used to infer metabolic fluxes of targeted organisms in a mixed culture. This study provides the foundation to extend isotopomer-based flux analysis to study metabolism of individual strains in microbial communities.

  10. Recent advances in determining protein and amino acid requirements in humans.

    PubMed

    Elango, Rajavel; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B

    2012-08-01

    During the past 25 years a significant amount of research has been conducted to determine amino acid requirements in humans. This is primarily due to advancements in the application of stable isotopes to examine amino acid requirements. The indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) method has emerged as a robust and minimally invasive technique to identify requirements. The IAAO method is based on the concept that when one indispensable dietary amino acid (IDAA) is deficient for protein synthesis, then the excess of all other IDAA, including the indicator amino acid, will be oxidized. With increasing intakes of the limiting amino acid, IAAO will decrease, reflecting increasing incorporation into protein. Once the requirement for the limiting amino acid is met there will be no further change in the indicator oxidation. The IAAO method has been systematically applied to determine most IDAA requirements in adults. The estimates are comparable to the values obtained using the more elaborate 24h-indicator amino acid oxidation and balance (24h-IAAO/IAAB) model. Due to its non-invasive nature the IAAO method has also been used to determine requirements for amino acids in neonates, children and in disease. The IAAO model has recently been applied to determine total protein requirements in humans. The IAAO method is rapid, reliable and has been used to determine amino acid requirements in different species, across the life cycle and in disease. The recent application of IAAO to determine protein requirements in humans is novel and has significant implications for dietary protein intake recommendations globally.

  11. Section AA Pre2004 Fire, Section AA 2009, Section AA, South ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section A-A Pre-2004 Fire, Section A-A 2009, Section A-A, South Elevation - Boston & Maine Railroad, Berlin Branch Bridge #148.81, Formerly spanning Moose Brook at former Boston & Maine Railroad, Gorham, Coos County, NH

  12. Amino acid supplementation alters bone metabolism during simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Paddon-Jones, D.; Ferrando, A. A.; Wolfe, R. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    High-protein and acidogenic diets induce hypercalciuria. Foods or supplements with excess sulfur-containing amino acids increase endogenous sulfuric acid production and therefore have the potential to increase calcium excretion and alter bone metabolism. In this study, effects of an amino acid/carbohydrate supplement on bone resorption were examined during bed rest. Thirteen subjects were divided at random into two groups: a control group (Con, n = 6) and an amino acid-supplemented group (AA, n = 7) who consumed an extra 49.5 g essential amino acids and 90 g carbohydrate per day for 28 days. Urine was collected for n-telopeptide (NTX), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), calcium, and pH determinations. Bone mineral content was determined and potential renal acid load was calculated. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase was measured in serum samples collected on day 1 (immediately before bed rest) and on day 28. Potential renal acid load was higher in the AA group than in the Con group during bed rest (P < 0.05). For all subjects, during bed rest urinary NTX and DPD concentrations were greater than pre-bed rest levels (P < 0.05). Urinary NTX and DPD tended to be higher in the AA group (P = 0.073 and P = 0.056, respectively). During bed rest, urinary calcium was greater than baseline levels (P < 0.05) in the AA group but not the Con group. Total bone mineral content was lower after bed rest than before bed rest in the AA group but not the Con group (P < 0.05). During bed rest, urinary pH decreased (P < 0.05), and it was lower in the AA group than the Con group. These data suggest that bone resorption increased, without changes in bone formation, in the AA group.

  13. Structural and functional analysis of fatty acid-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Judith; McDermott, Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian FA-binding proteins (FABPs) bind long-chain FA with high affinity. The large number of FABP types is suggestive of distinct functions in specific tissues. Multiple experimental approaches have shown that individual FABPs possess both unique and overlapping functions, some of which are based on specific elements in the protein structure. Although FA binding affinities for all FABPs tend to correlate directly with FA hydrophobicity, structure-function studies indicate that subtle three-dimensional changes that occur upon ligand binding may promote specific protein-protein or protein-membrane interactions that ultimately determine the function of each FABP. The conformational changes are focused in the FABP helical/portal domain, a region that was identified by in vitro studies to be vital for the FA transport properties of the FABPs. Thus, the FABPs modulate intracellular lipid homeostasis by regulating FA transport in the nuclear and extra-nuclear compartments of the cell; in so doing, they also impact systemic energy homeostasis. PMID:19017610

  14. A Sialylated Glycan Microarray Reveals Novel Interactions of Modified Sialic Acids with Proteins and Viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Lasanajak, Yi; Tappert, Mary M.; Air, Gillian M.; Tiwari, Vinod K.; Cao, Hongzhi; Chokhawala, Harshal A.; Zheng, Haojie; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2011-01-01

    Many glycan-binding proteins in animals and pathogens recognize sialic acid or its modified forms, but their molecular recognition is poorly understood. Here we describe studies on sialic acid recognition using a novel sialylated glycan microarray containing modified sialic acids presented on different glycan backbones. Glycans terminating in β-linked galactose at the non-reducing end and with an alkylamine-containing fluorophore at the reducing end were sialylated by a one-pot three-enzyme system to generate α2–3- and α2–6-linked sialyl glycans with 16 modified sialic acids. The resulting 77 sialyl glycans were purified and quantified, characterized by mass spectrometry, covalently printed on activated slides, and interrogated with a number of key sialic acid-binding proteins and viruses. Sialic acid recognition by the sialic acid-binding lectins Sambucus nigra agglutinin and Maackia amurensis lectin-I, which are routinely used for detecting α2–6- and α2–3-linked sialic acids, are affected by sialic acid modifications, and both lectins bind glycans terminating with 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galactonononic acid (Kdn) and Kdn derivatives stronger than the derivatives of more common N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Three human parainfluenza viruses bind to glycans terminating with Neu5Ac or Neu5Gc and some of their derivatives but not to Kdn and its derivatives. Influenza A virus also does not bind glycans terminating in Kdn or Kdn derivatives. An especially novel aspect of human influenza A virus binding is its ability to equivalently recognize glycans terminated with either α2–6-linked Neu5Ac9Lt or α2–6-linked Neu5Ac. Our results demonstrate the utility of this sialylated glycan microarray to investigate the biological importance of modified sialic acids in protein-glycan interactions. PMID:21757734

  15. [Glial fibrillary acidic protein: the component of intermediate filaments in the vertebrate brain astrocytes].

    PubMed

    Sukhorukova, E G; Kruzhevskiĭ, D É; Alekseeva, O S

    2015-01-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) refers to the type III intermediate filament proteins and is the essential component of the cytoskeleton in astrocytes of all vertebrates. This review presents current data on the molecular organization of GFAP in a comparative aspect. The results of most relevant studies using immunocytochemical labeling of the protein are summarized. The data on the changes in expression of GFAP in Alexander disease caused by the primary pathology of astrocytes are presented.

  16. Advantages and limitations of the protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) as a method for evaluating protein quality in human diets.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, Gertjan

    2012-08-01

    PDCAAS is a widely used assay for evaluating protein quality. It is a chemical score, which is derived from the ratio between the first limiting amino acid in a test protein and the corresponding amino acid in a reference amino acid pattern and corrected for true faecal N digestibility. Chemical scores exceeding 100 % are truncated to 100 %. The advantages of the PDCAAS are its simplicity and direct relationship to human protein requirements. The limitations are as follows: the reference pattern is based on the minimum amino acid requirements for tissue growth and maintenance and does not necessarily reflect the optimum intake. Truncated PDCAAS of high-quality proteins do not give any information about the power of these proteins to compensate, as a supplement, for low levels of dietary essential amino acids in low-quality proteins. It is likely that faecal N digestibility does not take into account the loss from the colon of indispensable amino acids that were not absorbed in the ileum. Anti-nutritional factors, such as lectins and trypsin inhibitors, in several plant protein sources can cause heightened endogenous losses of amino acids, an issue which is particularly relevant in animal feedstuffs. The assumption that amino acid supplementation can completely restore biological efficiency of the protein source is incorrect since the kinetics of digestion and absorption between supplemented free amino acids and amino acids present in dietary proteins, are different. PMID:23107546

  17. Mosaic protein and nucleic acid vaccines against hepatitis C virus

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette T. M.; Kuiken, Carla L.; Fischer, William M.

    2013-06-11

    The invention relates to immunogenic compositions useful as HCV vaccines. Provided are HCV mosaic polypeptide and nucleic acid compositions which provide higher levels of T-cell epitope coverage while minimizing the occurrence of unnatural and rare epitopes compared to natural HCV polypeptides and consensus HCV sequences.

  18. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  19. Interplay between microbial d-amino acids and host d-amino acid oxidase modifies murine mucosal defence and gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Sasabe, Jumpei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Zhang, Ting; Mita, Masashi; Davis, Brigid M; Hamase, Kenji; Waldor, Matthew K

    2016-01-01

    L-Amino acids are the building blocks for proteins synthesized in ribosomes in all kingdoms of life, but d-amino acids (d-aa) have important non-ribosome-based functions(1). Mammals synthesize d-Ser and d-Asp, primarily in the central nervous system, where d-Ser is critical for neurotransmission(2). Bacteria synthesize a largely distinct set of d-aa, which become integral components of the cell wall and are also released as free d-aa(3,4). However, the impact of free microbial d-aa on host physiology at the host-microbial interface has not been explored. Here, we show that the mouse intestine is rich in free d-aa that are derived from the microbiota. Furthermore, the microbiota induces production of d-amino acid oxidase (DAO) by intestinal epithelial cells, including goblet cells, which secrete the enzyme into the lumen. Oxidative deamination of intestinal d-aa by DAO, which yields the antimicrobial product H2O2, protects the mucosal surface in the small intestine from the cholera pathogen. DAO also modifies the composition of the microbiota and is associated with microbial induction of intestinal sIgA. Collectively, these results identify d-aa and DAO as previously unrecognized mediators of microbe-host interplay and homeostasis on the epithelial surface of the small intestine. PMID:27670111

  20. Fluoro amino acids: a rarity in nature, yet a prospect for protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Odar, Corinna; Winkler, Margit; Wiltschi, Birgit

    2015-03-01

    Fluoro amino acids are highly valuable compounds constantly gaining relevance in diverse fields of the biosciences as well as in the pharmaceutical industry. The value of these compounds can be attributed to the properties of the extremely electronegative fluorine atom. This atom forms a highly polarized bond of extraordinary strength with carbon. The formation of the fluorine-carbon bond is challenging: its chemical synthesis demands harsh reaction conditions and to date only one class of enzyme has been found capable of introducing the fluoride ion into an organic compound. Most of these fluorinating enzymes participate in the biosynthesis of 4-fluoro-L-threonine, the only fluoro amino acid of natural origin discovered so far. Despite their scarcity in nature, fluoro amino acids are valuable tools to fluorinate proteins. The fluoro protein variants often show improved stability and folding as well as altered activity and fluorescence characteristics. This review details the biosynthesis of 4-fluoro-L-threonine with a special focus on the fluorinating enzymes. Moreover, we elaborate on the application of fluoro amino acids as building blocks for fluorinated protein variants. Insight into different techniques to incorporate fluoro amino acids into proteins is also provided. We highlight prospects and the current relevance of fluoro amino acids as a tool to engineer proteins with novel traits.

  1. Production of hydrophobic amino acids from biobased resources: wheat gluten and rubber seed proteins.

    PubMed

    Widyarani; Sari, Yessie W; Ratnaningsih, Enny; Sanders, Johan P M; Bruins, Marieke E

    2016-09-01

    Protein hydrolysis enables production of peptides and free amino acids that are suitable for usage in food and feed or can be used as precursors for bulk chemicals. Several essential amino acids for food and feed have hydrophobic side chains; this property may also be exploited for subsequent separation. Here, we present methods for selective production of hydrophobic amino acids from proteins. Selectivity can be achieved by selection of starting material, selection of hydrolysis conditions, and separation of achieved hydrolysate. Several protease combinations were applied for hydrolysis of rubber seed protein concentrate, wheat gluten, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). High degree of hydrolysis (>50 %) could be achieved. Hydrophobic selectivity was influenced by the combination of proteases and by the extent of hydrolysis. Combination of Pronase and Peptidase R showed the highest selectivity towards hydrophobic amino acids, roughly doubling the content of hydrophobic amino acids in the products compared to the original substrates. Hydrophobic selectivity of 0.6 mol-hydrophobic/mol-total free amino acids was observed after 6 h hydrolysis of wheat gluten and 24 h hydrolysis of rubber seed proteins and BSA. The results of experiments with rubber seed proteins and wheat gluten suggest that this process can be applied to agro-industrial residues.

  2. Leucine-Enriched Essential Amino Acids Augment Mixed Protein Synthesis, But Not Collagen Protein Synthesis, in Rat Skeletal Muscle after Downhill Running

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Inoue, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2016-01-01

    Mixed and collagen protein synthesis is elevated for as many as 3 days following exercise. Immediately after exercise, enhanced amino acid availability increases synthesis of mixed muscle protein, but not muscle collagen protein. However, the potential for synergic effects of amino acid ingestion with exercise on both mixed and collagen protein synthesis remains unclear. We investigated muscle collagen protein synthesis in rats following post-exercise ingestion of leucine-enriched essential amino acids. We determined fractional protein synthesis rates (FSR) at different time points following exercise. Mixed protein and collagen protein FSRs in skeletal muscle were determined by measuring protein-bound enrichments of hydroxyproline and proline, and by measuring the intracellular enrichment of proline, using injections of flooding d3-proline doses. A leucine-enriched mixture of essential amino acids (or distilled water as a control) was administrated 30 min or 1 day post-exercise. The collagen protein synthesis in the vastus lateralis was elevated for 2 days after exercise. Although amino acid administration did not increase muscle collagen protein synthesis, it did lead to augmented mixed muscle protein synthesis 1 day following exercise. Thus, contrary to the regulation of mixed muscle protein synthesis, muscle collagen protein synthesis is not affected by amino acid availability after damage-inducing exercise. PMID:27367725

  3. Leucine-Enriched Essential Amino Acids Augment Mixed Protein Synthesis, But Not Collagen Protein Synthesis, in Rat Skeletal Muscle after Downhill Running.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Inoue, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2016-01-01

    Mixed and collagen protein synthesis is elevated for as many as 3 days following exercise. Immediately after exercise, enhanced amino acid availability increases synthesis of mixed muscle protein, but not muscle collagen protein. However, the potential for synergic effects of amino acid ingestion with exercise on both mixed and collagen protein synthesis remains unclear. We investigated muscle collagen protein synthesis in rats following post-exercise ingestion of leucine-enriched essential amino acids. We determined fractional protein synthesis rates (FSR) at different time points following exercise. Mixed protein and collagen protein FSRs in skeletal muscle were determined by measuring protein-bound enrichments of hydroxyproline and proline, and by measuring the intracellular enrichment of proline, using injections of flooding d₃-proline doses. A leucine-enriched mixture of essential amino acids (or distilled water as a control) was administrated 30 min or 1 day post-exercise. The collagen protein synthesis in the vastus lateralis was elevated for 2 days after exercise. Although amino acid administration did not increase muscle collagen protein synthesis, it did lead to augmented mixed muscle protein synthesis 1 day following exercise. Thus, contrary to the regulation of mixed muscle protein synthesis, muscle collagen protein synthesis is not affected by amino acid availability after damage-inducing exercise. PMID:27367725

  4. First-pass uptake and oxidation of glucose by the splanchnic tissue in young goats fed soy protein-based milk diets with or without amino acid supplementation: glucose metabolism in goat kids after soy feeding.

    PubMed

    Schönhusen, U; Junghans, P; Flöter, A; Steinhoff-Wagner, J; Görs, S; Schneider, F; Metges, C C; Hammon, H M

    2013-04-01

    The study was designed to examine whether feeding soy protein isolate as partial replacement of casein (CN) affects glucose metabolism in young goats and whether effects may be ameliorated by supplementation of those AA known to be lower concentrated in soy than in CN. Goat kids (d 20 of age) were fed comparable milk protein diets, in which 50% of the crude protein was either CN (control, CON), soy protein isolate (SPI), or soy protein isolate supplemented with AA (SPIA) for 43 d (n=8 per group). On d 62 of age, a single bolus dose of d-[(13)C6]glucose (10mg/kg of BW) was given with the morning diet, and simultaneously, a single bolus dose of d-[6,6-(2)H2]glucose (5mg/kg of BW) was injected into a jugular vein. Blood samples were collected between -30 and +420 min relative to the tracer administration to measure the (13)C and (2)H enrichments of plasma glucose and the (13)C enrichment of blood CO2. Glucose first-pass uptake by the splanchnic tissues was calculated from the rate of appearance of differentially labeled glucose tracer in plasma. Glucose oxidation was calculated from (13)C enrichment in blood CO2. In addition, plasma concentrations of triglycerides, nonesterified fatty acids, glucose, insulin, and glucagon were measured. On d 63 of age, kids were killed and jejunal mucosa and liver samples were collected to measure lactase mRNA levels and lactase and maltase activities in the jejunum and activities of pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in the liver. Basal plasma glucose concentration tended to be higher in the CON than the SPIA group, whereas basal insulin was higher in the CON group than the SPI and SPIA groups, and glucagon was higher in the CON than the SPIA group. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations increased during the first hour after feeding, whereas plasma glucagon increased immediately after feeding and after 1h of feeding. First-pass uptake and glucose oxidation were not affected by diet. Maltase

  5. Cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Y; Nirasawa, S; Nakaya, K; Kurihara, Y

    1995-08-19

    A cDNA clone encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin (MIR), was isolated and sequenced. The encoded precursor to MIR was composed of 220 amino acid (aa) residues, including a possible signal sequence of 29 aa. Northern blot analysis showed that the mRNA encoding MIR was already expressed in fruits of Richadella dulcifica at 3 weeks after pollination and was present specifically in the pulp. PMID:7665074

  6. Determination of seleno-amino acids bound to proteins in extra virgin olive oils.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sabier; Gil, Raul; Silva, María Fernanda; Pacheco, Pablo

    2016-04-15

    An analytical method has been developed to determine seleno-amino acids in proteins extracted from extra virgin olive oils (EVOOs). Different aqueous/organic solvents were tested to isolate proteins, an acetone:n-hexane combination being the best protein precipitant. In a first dimension chromatography, extracted proteins were analysed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to identify S and Se associations as proteins marker. Two fractions of 66 kDa (A) and 443 kDa (B) were identified. These fractions were submitted to microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis (MAAH) to release seleno-amino acids. In a second dimension chromatography seleno-amino acids were determined by reversed-phase chromatography (RPC) coupled to ICP-MS. Seleno-methylselenocysteine was determined with values ranging from 1.03-2.03±0.2 μg kg(-1) and selenocysteine at a concentration of 1.47±0.1 μg kg(-1). Variations of protein and seleno-amino acid concentrations were observed between EVOO varieties, contributing to EVOO cultivar differentiation. PMID:26616967

  7. Protein and Essential Amino Acids to Protect Musculoskeletal Health during Spaceflight: Evidence of a Paradox?

    PubMed Central

    Hackney, Kyle J.; English, Kirk L.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration spaceflight results in muscle atrophy and a loss of bone mineral density. In skeletal muscle tissue, acute exercise and protein (e.g., essential amino acids) stimulate anabolic pathways (e.g., muscle protein synthesis) both independently and synergistically to maintain neutral or positive net muscle protein balance. Protein intake in space is recommended to be 12%–15% of total energy intake (≤1.4 g∙kg−1∙day−1) and spaceflight is associated with reduced energy intake (~20%), which enhances muscle catabolism. Increasing protein intake to 1.5–2.0 g∙kg−1∙day−1 may be beneficial for skeletal muscle tissue and could be accomplished with essential amino acid supplementation. However, increased consumption of sulfur-containing amino acids is associated with increased bone resorption, which creates a dilemma for musculoskeletal countermeasures, whereby optimizing skeletal muscle parameters via essential amino acid supplementation may worsen bone outcomes. To protect both muscle and bone health, future unloading studies should evaluate increased protein intake via non-sulfur containing essential amino acids or leucine in combination with exercise countermeasures and the concomitant influence of reduced energy intake. PMID:25370374

  8. Lipid binding protein response to a bile acid library: a combined NMR and statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Tomaselli, Simona; Pagano, Katiuscia; Boulton, Stephen; Zanzoni, Serena; Melacini, Giuseppe; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2015-11-01

    Primary bile acids, differing in hydroxylation pattern, are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and, once formed, can undergo extensive enzyme-catalysed glycine/taurine conjugation, giving rise to a complex mixture, the bile acid pool. Composition and concentration of the bile acid pool may be altered in diseases, posing a general question on the response of the carrier (bile acid binding protein) to the binding of ligands with different hydrophobic and steric profiles. A collection of NMR experiments (H/D exchange, HET-SOFAST, ePHOGSY NOESY/ROESY and (15) N relaxation measurements) was thus performed on apo and five different holo proteins, to monitor the binding pocket accessibility and dynamics. The ensemble of obtained data could be rationalized by a statistical approach, based on chemical shift covariance analysis, in terms of residue-specific correlations and collective protein response to ligand binding. The results indicate that the same residues are influenced by diverse chemical stresses: ligand binding always induces silencing of motions at the protein portal with a concomitant conformational rearrangement of a network of residues, located at the protein anti-portal region. This network of amino acids, which do not belong to the binding site, forms a contiguous surface, sensing the presence of the bound lipids, with a signalling role in switching protein-membrane interactions on and off.

  9. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Labudde, D; Leitner, D; Krüger, M; Oschkinat, H

    2003-01-01

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  10. Dual capacity for nutrient uptake in Tetrahymena. V. Utilization of amino acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Orias, E; Rasmussen, L

    1979-04-01

    We investigated the relative contributions of phagocytosis and plasma membrane transport to the uptake of amino acids and a protein (egg albumin) in amounts which allow Tetrahymena thermophila to grow and multiply. We used a mutant capable of indefinite growth without food vacuole formation (phagocytosis) and its wild type (phagocytosis-competent) isogenic parental strain. Our results suggest that phagocytosis is not required for free amino acid uptake, most or all of which can be attributed to carrier-mediated transport systems, apparently located on the plasma membrane. In contrast, phagocytosis is required for utilization of the protein. Proteins can supply required amino acids in amounts sufficient for growth only when food vacuoles are formed. We conclude that Tetrahymena thermophila either possesses no endocytic mechanisms at the cell surface other than food vacuole formation or, if it does, these putative mechanisms are not capable of nutritionally meaningful rates of protein uptake.

  11. Optimized orthogonal translation of unnatural amino acids enables spontaneous protein double-labelling and FRET

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Daniel J.; Wilf, Nabil M.; Lang, Kathrin; Wallace, Stephen; Mehl, Ryan A.; Chin, Jason W.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to introduce different biophysical probes into defined positions in target proteins will provide powerful approaches for interrogating protein structure, function and dynamics. However, methods for site-specifically incorporating multiple distinct unnatural amino acids are hampered by their low efficiency. Here we provide a general solution to this challenge by developing an optimized orthogonal translation system that uses amber and evolved quadruplet-decoding transfer RNAs to encode numerous pairs of distinct unnatural amino acids into a single protein expressed in Escherichia coli with a substantial increase in efficiency over previous methods. We also provide a general strategy for labelling pairs of encoded unnatural amino acids with different probes via rapid and spontaneous reactions under physiological conditions. We demonstrate the utility of our approach by genetically directing the labelling of several pairs of sites in calmodulin with fluorophores and probing protein structure and dynamics by Förster resonance energy transfer. PMID:24755590

  12. Phytanic acid, a novel activator of uncoupling protein-1 gene transcription and brown adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Agatha; Barberá, Maria José; Iglesias, Roser; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2002-01-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a phytol-derived branched-chain fatty acid present in dietary products. Phytanic acid increased uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) mRNA expression in brown adipocytes differentiated in culture. Phytanic acid induced the expression of the UCP1 gene promoter, which was enhanced by co-transfection with a retinoid X receptor (RXR) expression vector but not with other expression vectors driving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPARgamma or a form of RXR devoid of ligand-dependent sensitivity. The effect of phytanic acid on the UCP1 gene required the 5' enhancer region of the gene and the effects of phytanic acid were mediated in an additive manner by three binding sites for RXR. Moreover, phytanic acid activates brown adipocyte differentiation: long-term exposure of brown preadipocytes to phytanic acid promoted the acquisition of the brown adipocyte morphology and caused a co-ordinate induction of the mRNAs for gene markers of brown adipocyte differentiation, such as UCP1, adipocyte lipid-binding protein aP2, lipoprotein lipase, the glucose transporter GLUT4 or subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, phytanic acid is a natural product of phytol metabolism that activates brown adipocyte thermogenic function. It constitutes a potential nutritional signal linking dietary status to adaptive thermogenesis. PMID:11829740

  13. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp) residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe) as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA), which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds) occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism. PMID:25588215

  14. Identification of amino acids of the beet necrotic yellow vein virus p25 protein required for induction of the resistance response in leaves of Beta vulgaris plants.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Soutaro; Miyanishi, Masaki; Andika, Ida Bagus; Kondo, Hideki; Tamada, Tetsuo

    2008-05-01

    The RNA3-encoded p25 protein of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) is responsible for the production of rhizomania symptoms of sugar beet roots (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris). Here, it was found that the presence of the p25 protein is also associated with the resistance response in rub-inoculated leaves of sugar beet and wild beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima) plants. The resistance phenotype displayed a range of symptoms from no visible lesions to necrotic or greyish lesions at the inoculation site, and only very low levels of virus and viral RNA accumulated. The susceptible phenotype showed large, bright yellow lesions and developed high levels of virus accumulation. In roots after Polymyxa betae vector inoculation, however, no drastic differences in virus and viral RNA accumulation levels were found between plants with susceptible and resistant phenotypes, except at an early stage of infection. There was a genotype-specific interaction between BNYVV strains and two selected wild beet lines (MR1 and MR2) and sugar beet cultivars. Sequence analysis of natural BNYVV isolates and site-directed mutagenesis of the p25 protein revealed that 3 aa residues at positions 68, 70 and 179 are important in determining the resistance phenotype, and that host-genotype specificity is controlled by single amino acid changes at position 68. The mechanism of the occurrence of resistance-breaking BNYVV strains is discussed.

  15. Amino acid sequence and structural properties of protein p12, an African swine fever virus attachment protein.

    PubMed Central

    Alcamí, A; Angulo, A; López-Otín, C; Muñoz, M; Freije, J M; Carrascosa, A L; Viñuela, E

    1992-01-01

    The gene encoding the African swine fever virus protein p12, which is involved in virus attachment to the host cell, has been mapped and sequenced in the genome of the Vero-adapted virus strain BA71V. The determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence and the hybridization of oligonucleotide probes derived from this sequence to cloned restriction fragments allowed the mapping of the gene in fragment EcoRI-O, located in the central region of the viral genome. The DNA sequence of an EcoRI-XbaI fragment showed an open reading frame which is predicted to encode a polypeptide of 61 amino acids. The expression of this open reading frame in rabbit reticulocyte lysates and in Escherichia coli gave rise to a 12-kDa polypeptide that was immunoprecipitated with a monoclonal antibody specific for protein p12. The hydrophilicity profile indicated the existence of a stretch of 22 hydrophobic residues in the central part that may anchor the protein in the virus envelope. Three forms of the protein with apparent molecular masses of 17, 12, and 10 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis have been observed, depending on the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol and alkylation with 4-vinylpyridine, indicating that disulfide bonds are responsible for the multimerization of the protein. This result was in agreement with the existence of a cysteine-rich domain in the C-terminal region of the predicted amino acid sequence. The protein was synthesized at late times of infection, and no posttranslational modifications such as glycosylation, phosphorylation, or fatty acid acylation were detected. Images PMID:1583732

  16. Performance of optimized noncanonical amino acid mutagenesis systems in the absence of release factor 1.