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Sample records for acid aerosol particles

  1. Oxodicarboxylic acids in atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römpp, Andreas; Winterhalter, Richard; Moortgat, Geert K.

    Fine mode aerosol was collected on quartz fiber filters at several sites across Europe. These samples were analyzed for carboxylic acids by liquid chromatography coupled to a hybrid (quadrupole and time-of-flight) mass spectrometer (LC/MS/MS-TOF). A series of oxodicarboxylic acids (C 7-C 11) was detected. Oxodicarboxylic acids are linear dicarboxylic acids with an additional carbonyl group. Previous measurements of these acids are scarce and their sources are largely unknown. Several structural isomers (different positions of the carbonyl group within the molecule) could be identified and differentiated by the combination of laboratory experiments and high mass accuracy measurements. The homologs with 9-11 carbon atoms were identified for the first time in atmospheric aerosol particles. The concentrations of oxodicarboxylic acids in ambient aerosol samples frequently exceeded those of the corresponding unsubstituted dicarboxylic acids. Oxodicarboxylic acids have been shown to be products of the reaction of dicarboxylic acids with OH radicals in chamber experiments and a reaction mechanism is proposed. Good correlation of oxodicarboxylic acid and hydroxyl radical concentrations was found at two measurement sites (Finland and Crete) of different geographic location and meteorological conditions. The ratios of individual isomers from the field samples are comparable to those of the laboratory experiments. The results of this study imply that the reaction of OH radicals and dicarboxylic acids is an important pathway for the production of oxodicarboxylic acids in the atmosphere. Oxodicarboxylic acids seem to be important intermediates in atmospheric oxidation processes of organic compounds.

  2. Fatty Acids as Surfactants on Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervahattu, H.; Juhanoja, J.; Niemi, J.

    2003-12-01

    Fatty acids (n-alcanoic acids) are common compounds in numerous anthropogenic and natural emissions. According to Rogge et al. (1993), catalyst-equipped automobiles emitted more than 600 μg km-1 of fatty acids which was over 50% of all identified organics in fine aerosol emissions. Coal burning produces fatty acids ranging from about 1700 mg kg-1 for bituminous coal to over 10000 mg kg-1 for lignite (Oros and Simoneit, 2000). Similarly, biomass burning is an important source for aerosol fatty acids. They are the major identified compound group in deciduous tree smoke, their total emission factor being measured as 1589 mg kg-1 which was 56% of all identified organic compounds (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a). Large amounts of fatty acid are also emitted from burning of conifer trees and grass (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a; Simoneit, 2002). Fatty acids have been reported to be major constituents of marine aerosols in many investigations (Barger and Garrett, 1976; Gagosian et. al, 1981; Sicre et al., 1990; Stephanou, 1992). It has been suggested that as the marine aerosol particles form, they acquire a coating of organic surfactants (Blanchard, 1964; Gill et al., 1983; Middlebrook et al., 1998; Ellison et al., 1999). Amphiphilic molecules, including lipids, can be assembled as monomolecular layers at air/water interfaces as well as transported to a solid support. Recently, we could show by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry that fatty acids are important ingredients of the outermost surface layer of the sea-salt aerosol particles (Tervahattu et al., 2002). In their TOF-SIMS studies on the surface composition of atmospheric aerosols, Peterson and Tyler (2002) found fatty acids on the surface of Montana forest fire particles. In this work we have studied by TOF-SIMS the surface chemical composition of aerosol particles emitted from field fires in the Baltic and other East European countries and transported to Finland as well as aerosol particles transported from

  3. Composition and hygroscopicity of aerosol particles at Mt. Lu in South China: Implications for acid precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijun; Chi, Jianwei; Shi, Zongbo; Wang, Xinfeng; Chen, Bin; Wang, Yan; Li, Tao; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Daizhou; Wang, Zifa; Shi, Chune; Liu, Liangke; Wang, Wenxing

    2014-09-01

    Physicochemical properties of aerosol particles were studied at Mt. Lu, an elevated site (115°59‧E, 29°35‧N, 1165 m) within the acid precipitation area. Northeast winds transport copious amounts of air pollutants and water vapor from the Yangtze River Delta into this acid precipitation area. NH4+ and SO42- are the dominant ions in PM2.5 and determine aerosol acidity. Individual particle analysis shows abundant S-rich and metals (i.e. Fe-, Zn-, Mn-, and Pb-rich) particles. Unlike aerosol particles in North China and urban areas, there are little soot and mineral particles at Mt. Lu. Lack of mineral particles contributed to the higher acidity in precipitation in the research area. Nano-sized spherical metal particles were observed to be embedded in 37% of S-rich particles. These metal particles were likely originated from heavy industries and fired-power plants. Hygroscopic experiments show that most particles start to deliquesce at 73-76% but organic coating lowers the particle deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) to 63-73%. The DRHs of these aerosol particles are clearly smaller than that of pure ammonium sulfate particles which is 80%. Since RH in ambient air was relatively high, ranging from 65% to 85% during our study period, most particles at our sampling site were in liquid phase. Our results suggest that liquid phase reactions in aerosol particles may contribute to SO2 to sulfuric acid conversion in the acid precipitation area.

  4. On the growth of nitric and sulfuric acid aerosol particles under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.

    1988-01-01

    A theory for the formation of frozen aerosol particles in the Antarctic stratosphere was developed and applied to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The theory suggests that the condensed ice particles are composed primarily of nitric acid and water, with small admixtures of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in solid solution. The proposed particle formation mechanism is in agreement with the magnitude and seasonal behavior of the optical extinction observed in the winter polar stratosphere.

  5. The Humidity Dependence of N2O5 Uptake to Citric Acid Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzinic, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Tuerler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2013-12-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. The heterogeneous loss of N2O5 to aerosol particles has remained uncertain, and reconciling lab and field data has demonstrated some gaps in our understanding of the detailed mechanism. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles in an aerosol flow reactor at ambient pressure, temperature and relative humidity. Citric acid, representing strongly oxidized polyfunctional organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols, has been chosen as a proxy due to its well established physical properties. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 15-75 % RH, within which the uptake coefficient varies between about 0.001 and about 0.02. Taking into account the well established hygroscopic properties of citric acid, we interpret uptake in terms of disproportionation of N2O5 into nitrate ion and nitronium ion and reaction of the latter with liquid water.

  6. Model for a surface film of fatty acids on rain water and aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Winfried

    Organic compounds with polar groups can form films on the water surface which lower the surface tension and may hinder the transport of water vapor and trace gases through the interface. A model is presented which describes in detail surface films formed by fatty acids. The model has been applied to measured concentrations of fatty acids on rain water and atmospheric aerosol particles. In most cases only a diluted film has been calculated which does not affect their physical and chemical properties. The exception was a clean region in the western USA, where the fatty acid concentrations are sufficiently high to form a dense film on atmospheric aerosol particles. An algorithm for the identification of the sources of fatty acids was developed. It showed leaf abrasion or biomass burning as a major source of fatty acids in the western USA.

  7. Inside versus Outside: Ion Redistribution in Nitric Acid Reacted Sea Spray Aerosol Particles as Determined by Single Particle Analysis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Guasco, T.; Ryder, O. S.; Baltrusaitis, J.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Collins, D. B.; Ruppel, M. J.; Bertram, T. H.; Prather, K. A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles were generated under real-world conditions using natural seawater and a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves or a marine aerosol reference tank (MART) that replicates those conditions. The SSA particles were exposed to nitric acid in situ in a flow tube and the well-known chloride displacement and nitrate formation reaction was observed. However, as discussed here, little is known about how this anion displacement reaction affects the distribution of cations and other chemical constituents within and phase state of individual SSA particles. Single particle analysis of individual SSA particles shows that cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) within individual particles undergo a spatial redistribution after heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid, along with a more concentrated layer of organic matter at the surface of the particle. These data suggest that specific ion and aerosol pH effects play an important role in aerosol particle structure in ways that have not been previously recognized. The ordering of organic coatings can impact trace gas uptake, and subsequently impact trace gas budgets of O3 and NOx.

  8. Optical properties of internally mixed aerosol particles composed of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Miriam A; Hasenkopf, Christa A; Beaver, Melinda R; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2009-12-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of internally mixed aerosol particles composed of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulfate using cavity ring-down aerosol extinction spectroscopy at a wavelength of 532 nm. The real refractive indices of these nonabsorbing species were retrieved from the extinction and concentration of the particles using Mie scattering theory. We obtain refractive indices for pure ammonium sulfate and pure dicarboxylic acids that are consistent with literature values, where they exist, to within experimental error. For mixed particles, however, our data deviates significantly from a volume-weighted average of the pure components. Surprisingly, the real refractive indices of internal mixtures of succinic acid and ammonium sulfate are higher than either of the pure components at the highest organic weight fractions. For binary internal mixtures of oxalic or adipic acid with ammonium sulfate, the real refractive indices of the mixtures are approximately the same as ammonium sulfate for all organic weight fractions. Various optical mixing rules for homogeneous and slightly heterogeneous systems fail to explain the experimental real refractive indices. It is likely that complex particle morphologies are responsible for the observed behavior of the mixed particles. Implications of our results for atmospheric modeling and aerosol structure are discussed. PMID:19877658

  9. Phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles containing humic acid and mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, C. L.; George, I.; Griffiths, P. T.; Braban, C. F.; Cox, R. A.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2006-03-01

    The phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of two humic acid aerosols (Aldrich sodium salt and Leonardite Standard (IHSS)) and their mixtures with ammonium sulphate have been investigated using a combination of two techniques, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA). A growth factor of 1.16 at 85% relative humidity (RH) was found for the Aldrich humic acid which can be regarded as an upper limit for growth factors of humic-like substances (HULIS) found in atmospheric aerosol and is significantly smaller than that of typical atmospheric inorganics. We find that the humic acid aerosols exhibit water uptake over all relative humidities with no apparent phase changes, suggesting that these aerosols readily form supersaturated droplets. In the mixed particles, the humic acid component decreases the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and increases the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of the ammonium sulphate component, and there is some degree of water uptake prior to ammonium sulphate deliquescence. In addition, at low RH, the FTIR spectra show that the ammonium is present in a different chemical environment in the mixed aerosols than in crystalline ammonium sulphate, perhaps existing as a complex with the humic materials. The growth factors of the mixed aerosols are intermediate between those of the single-component aerosols and can be predicted assuming that the inorganic and organic fractions take up water independently.

  10. Phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles containing humic acid and mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, C. L.; George, I.; Griffiths, P. T.; Braban, C. F.; Cox, R. A.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2005-10-01

    The phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of two humic acid aerosols (Aldrich sodium salt and Leonardite Standard (IHSS)) and their mixtures with ammonium sulphate have been investigated using a combination of two techniques, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA). A growth factor of 1.16 at 85% relative humdity (RH) was found for the Aldrich humic acid which can be regarded as an upper limit for growth factors of humic-like substances (HULIS) found in atmospheric aerosol and is significantly smaller than that of typical atmospheric inorganics. We find that the humic acid aerosols exhibit water uptake over all relative humidites with no apparent phase changes, suggesting that these aerosols readily form supersaturated droplets. In the mixed particles, the humic acid component decreases the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and increases the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of the ammonium sulphate component, and there is some degree of water uptake prior to ammonium sulphate deliquescence. In addition, at low RH, the FTIR spectra show that the ammonium is present in a different chemical environment in the mixed aerosols than in crystalline ammonium sulphate, perhaps existing as a complex with the humic materials. The growth factors of the mixed aerosols are intermediate between those of the single component aerosols and can be predicted assuming that the inorganic and organic fractions take up water independently.

  11. Critical supersaturations for aerosol particles of succinic acid and its salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenningsson, B.; Bilde, M.; Rosenørn, T.; Mønster, J.

    2003-04-01

    Dicarboxylic acids, like succinic acid, have been identified as important water soluble organic compounds in the atmosphere. Salts of carboxylic acids can be formed in the atmosphere in reactions between the acid and an inorganic salt. In this work we have studied the cloud droplet nucleating ability for succinic acid and some of its salts: disodium succinate, diammonium succinate and calcium succinate. A monodisperse aerosol was generated by atomizing a water solution of the compound of interest, drying the particles in diffusion driers and selecting a narrow size range using a differential mobility analyzer. The aerosol was then analyzed using a static thermal gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNC-100B from the University of Wyoming). A CPC was used to count the number of particles as a reference. For a fixed particle diameter, the supersaturation was scanned to find a steep increase in the fraction of particles that were activated to cloud droplets. This critical supersaturation is compared with theoretical calculations using Köhler theory. Experimental critical supersaturations for succinic acid agree with Köhler theory with a van't Hoff factor of 1, i.e. it activates as if it does not dissociate. For the sodium salt, a van't Hoff factor of 2 fits laboratory data and theoretical calculations.

  12. Effect of fatty acid coatings on ozone uptake to deliquesced KI/NaCl aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, M.; Rouvière, A.

    2009-12-01

    Phase transfer kinetics of gas phase oxidants may limit oxidative aging of aerosol particles. The aim of this work is to study the role of amphiphilic organic aerosol constituents on the kinetics of phase transfer of gaseous species to the bulk aqueous phase. The effect of (C9-C20) fatty acid surfactants on the phase transfer of ozone to deliquesced potassium iodide and sodium chloride have been investigated. Some other experiments of ozone uptake have been performed with different mixtures and proportions of fatty acids. The kinetic experiments were performed in an aerosol flow tube at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. To obtain deliquesced inorganic particles, the relative humidity was adjusted in the range of 75% to 80%. It is shown that the fatty acids in monolayer quantities may substantially inhibit the phase transfer of ozone to deliquesced particles. The results showed that especially the C15-C20 limit the mass transfer of ozone to the aqueous phase, whereby the magnitude of this effect was following the monolayer properties of the fatty acids. It was also possible to determine a resistance of such films to the transfer of ozone to the bulk phase.

  13. Kinetics and Products of Heterogeneous Oxidation of Oleic acid, Linoleic acid and Linolenic acid in Aerosol Particles by Hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nah, T.; Leone, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    A significant mass fraction of atmospheric aerosols is composed of a variety of oxidized organic compounds with varying functional groups that may affect the rate at which they chemically age. Here we study the heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with different sub-micron, alkenoic acid particles: Oleic acid (OA), Linoleic acid (LA), and Linolenic acid (LNA), in the presence of H2O2 and O2. This research explores how OH addition reactions initiate chain reactions that rapidly transform the chemical composition of an organic particle. Particles are chemically aged in a photochemical flow tube reactor where they are exposed to OH radicals (~ 1011 molecule cm-3 s) that are produced by the photolysis of H2O2 at 254 nm. The aerosols are then sized and their composition analyzed via Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization (APCI). Detailed kinetic measurements show that the reactive uptake coefficient is larger than 1, indicating the presence of secondary chemistry occurring in the condensed phase. Reactive uptake coefficient is found to scale linearly with the number of double bonds present in the molecule. In addition, the reactive uptake coefficient is found to depend sensitively upon the concentrations of O2 in the photochemical flow tube reactor, indicating that O2 plays a role in secondary chemistry. In the absence of O2 the reactive uptake coefficient increases to ~ 8, 5 and 3 for LNA, LA, and OA, respectively. The reactive uptake coefficient approaches values of 6, 4 and 2 for LNA, LA, and OA respectively when 18% of the total nitrogen flow is replaced with O2. Mechanistic pathways and products will also be presented herein.

  14. Uptake of 13N-labeled N2O5 to citric acid aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzinic, Goran; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Birrer, Mario; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Furthermore it's suspected of being a non negligible source of tropospheric Cl, even over continental areas [1,2]. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N delivered by PSI's PROTRAC facility [3] in conjunction with an aerosol flow tube reactor in order to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles. 13NO is mixed with non labeled NO and O3 in a gas reactor where N2O5 is synthesized under dry conditions to prevent hydrolysis on the reactor walls. The resulting N2O5 flow is fed into an aerosol flow tube reactor together with a humidified aerosol flow. By using movable inlets we can vary the length of the aerosol flow tube and thus the reaction time. The gas feed from the reactor is then directed into a narrow parallel plate diffusion denuder system that allows for selective separation of the gaseous species present in the gas phase. Aerosol particles are trapped on a particle filter placed at the end of the denuder system. The activity of 13N labeled species trapped on the denuder plates and in the particle filter can be monitored via scintillation counters. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 27-61.5% RH. The results obtained from our measurements have shown that the uptake coefficient increases with humidity from 1.65±0.3x10-3 (~27% RH) to 1.25±0.3x10-2 (45% RH) and 2.00±0.3x10-2 (61.5% RH). Comparison to literature data shows that this is similar to values reported for some polycarboxylic acids (like malonic acid), while being higher than some others [4]. The increase is likely related to the increasing amount of water associated

  15. Acidic species and chloride depletion in coarse aerosol particles in the US east coast.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunliang; Gao, Yuan

    2008-12-15

    To investigate the interactions of water-soluble acidic species associated with coarse mode aerosol particles (1.8-10 microm) and chlorine depletion, ten sets of size-segregated aerosol samples were collected by a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) in Newark, New Jersey on the U.S. east coast. The samples were grouped into two categories according to the air-mass back trajectories and mass ratios of sodium to magnesium and calcium: Group I was primarily impacted by marine air mass and Group II was dominated by the continental air mass. In Group I, the concentrations of coarse mode nitrate and chloride depletion showed a strong correlation (R2=0.88). Without considering other cations, nitrate was found to account for all of the chloride depletion in coarse particles for most samples. The association of coarse mode nitrate with sea-salt particles is favored when the mass ratio of sodium to calcium is approximately equal to or greater than unity. Excess sulfate accounts for a maximum of 33% of chloride depletion in the coarse particles. Regarding chloride depletion in the different particle sizes, excess nitrate and sulfate account for 89% of the chloride depletion in the particle size range of 1.8-3.2 microm in the sample from July 13-14; all of the determined dicarboxylic acids and mono-carboxylic acids cannot compensate for the rest of the chloride depletion. In Group II, high percentages of chloride depletion were not observed. With nitrate being dominant in chlorine depletion observed at this location, N-containing species from pollution emissions may have profound impact on atmospheric composition through altering chlorine chemistry in this region. PMID:18973925

  16. Reactive uptake of N2O5 by aerosol particles containing mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Badger, Claire L; Griffiths, Paul T; George, Ingrid; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Cox, R Anthony

    2006-06-01

    The kinetics of reactive uptake of N2O5 on submicron aerosol particles containing humic acid and ammonium sulfate has been investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) and aerosol composition using a laminar flow reactor coupled with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) to characterize the aerosol. For single-component humic acid aerosol the uptake coefficient, gamma, was found to increase from 2 to 9 x 10(-4) over the range 25-75% RH. These values are 1-2 orders of magnitude below those typically observed for single-component sulfate aerosols (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2003, 5, 3453-3463;(1) Atmos. Environ. 2000, 34, 2131-2159(2)). For the mixed aerosols, gamma was found to decrease with increasing humic acid mass fraction and increase with increasing RH. For aerosols containing only 6% humic acid by dry mass, a decrease in reactivity of more than a factor of 2 was observed compared with the case for single-component ammonium sulfate. The concentration of liquid water in the aerosol droplets was calculated using the aerosol inorganic model (for the ammonium sulfate component) and a new combined FTIR-DMA system (for the humic acid component). Analysis of the uptake coefficients using the water concentration data shows that the change in reactivity cannot be explained by the change in water content alone. We suggest that, due to its surfactant properties, the main effect of the humic acid is to reduce the mass accommodation coefficient for N2O5 at the aerosol particle surface. This has implications for the use of particle hygroscopicity data for predictions of the rate of N2O5 hydrolysis. PMID:16722713

  17. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3- aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Hannah M.; Draper, Danielle C.; Ayres, Benjamin R.; Ault, Andrew P.; Bondy, Amy L.; Takahama, S.; Modini, Robert; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Knote, Christoph; Laskin, Alexander; Wang, Bingbing; Fry, Juliane L.

    2015-09-25

    The inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 1 June to 15 July 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA), an ion chromatograph coupled with a wet rotating denuder and a steam-jet aerosol collector for monitoring of ambient inorganic gas and aerosol species, revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3 ) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of coarse mode mineral or sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 um) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3 and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of mineral dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. Calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3 is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral dust surface area. Modeling of NO3 and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas/aerosol phase partitioning.

  18. Hygroscopic properties of ultrafine aerosol particles in the boreal forest: diurnal variation, solubility and the influence of sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Aufmhoff, H.; Aalto, P.; Hämeri, K.; Arnold, F.; Laaksonen, A.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-10-01

    Freshly formed atmospheric aerosol particles are neither large enough to efficiently scatter incoming solar radiation nor able to act as cloud condensation nuclei. As the particles grow larger, their hygroscopicity determines the limiting size after which they are important in both of the aforementioned processes. The condensing species resulting in growth alter the hygroscopicity of the particles. We have measured hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles present in a boreal forest, along with the very hygroscopic atmospheric trace gas sulfuric acid. The focus was on days with new particle formation by nucleation. The measured hygroscopic growth factors (GF) correlated positively with gaseous phase sulfuric acid concentrations. This correlation had a strong size dependency; the smaller the particle, the more condensing sulfuric acid is bound to alter the GF due to initially smaller mass. In addition, water uptake of nucleation mode particles was monitored during new particle formation events and followed during their growth to Aitken mode sizes. As the modal diameter increased, the solubility of the particles decreased. This indicated that initially more hygroscopic particles transformed into less hygroscopic or even hydrophobic particles. A similar behavior was seen also during days with no particle formation, with GF decreasing during the evenings and increasing during early morning. This can be tentatively explained by day- and nighttime differences in the hygroscopicity of condensable vapors.

  19. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric-acid ion clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new-particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from < 2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3 (0.1 to 56 pptv), and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4] < 0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm/Δ n), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δ m/Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4] > 10. Positively

  20. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric acid clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-05-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from <2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3, and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4]<0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm / Δn), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δm / Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4]>10. Positively charged clusters grew on

  1. Aerosol-chamber study of the α-pinene/O 3 reaction: influence of particle acidity on aerosol yields and products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Böge, Olaf; Gnauk, Thomas; Herrmann, Hartmut

    α-Pinene ozonolysis was carried out in the presence of ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid seed particles in a 9 m 3 Teflon chamber at the mixing ratios of 100 ppbv for α-pinene and about 70 ppbv for ozone. The evolution of size distribution was measured by means of a differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS). The resulting secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was sampled by a denuder/quartz fiber filter combination for the determination of the total organic carbon concentration (TOC) in the particle phase, using a thermographic method and by a denuder/PTFE filter combination for the analysis of individual chemical species in the particle phase using capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS). cis-Pinic acid ( m/ z 185) and another species tentatively identified at m/ z 171 and 199 were the major particle phase species for both seed particles although the product yields were different, indicating the influence of seed particle acidity. A thermographic method for the determination of TOC showed an increase of particle phase organics by 40% for the experiments with higher acidity. CE-ESI-MS analysis showed a large increase in the concentration of compounds with Mw>300 from the experiments with sulfuric acid seed particles. These results suggest that the seed particle acidity enhances the yield of SOA and plays an important role in the formation of larger molecules in the particle phase. Our results from direct particle phase chemical analysis suggest for the first time that condensation of smaller organics takes place by polymerization or aldol condensation following the formation of aldehydes, such as pinonaldehyde from the terpene ozonolysis.

  2. Kinetics of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Cyclic Hemiacetals in Organic Aerosol Particles in Equilibrium with Nitric Acid Vapor.

    PubMed

    Ranney, April P; Ziemann, Paul J

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls, which are often major products of the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons, can undergo acid-catalyzed cyclization and dehydration in aerosol particles to form highly reactive unsaturated dihydrofurans. In this study the kinetics of dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals, the rate-limiting step in this process, was investigated in a series of environmental chamber experiments in which secondary organic aerosol (SOA) containing cyclic hemiacetals was formed from the reaction of n-pentadecane with OH radicals in dry air in the presence of HNO3. A particle beam mass spectrometer was used to monitor the formation and dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals in real time, and SOA and HNO3 were quantified in filter samples by gravimetric analysis and ion chromatography. Measured dehydration rate constants increased linearly with increasing concentration of HNO3 in the gas phase and in SOA, corresponding to catalytic rate constants of 0.27 h(-1) ppmv(-1) and 7.0 h(-1) M(-1), respectively. The measured Henry's law constant for partitioning of HNO3 into SOA was 3.7 × 10(4) M atm(-1), ∼25% of the value for dissolution into water, and the acid dissociation constant was estimated to be <8 × 10(-4), at least a factor of 10(4) less than that for HNO3 in water. The results indicate that HNO3 was only weakly dissociated in the SOA and that dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals was catalyzed by molecular HNO3 rather than by H(+). The Henry's law constant and kinetics relationships measured here can be used to improve mechanisms and models of SOA formation from the oxidation of hydrocarbons in dry air in the presence of NOx, which are conditions commonly used in laboratory studies. The fate of cyclic hemiacetals in the atmosphere, where the effects of higher relative humidity, organic/aqueous phase separation, and acid catalysis by molecular H2SO4 and/or H(+) are likely to be important, is discussed. PMID:27043733

  3. Gas-particle partitioning of organic acids during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS): measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Krechmer, J.; Day, D. A.; Isaacman, G. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Khan, M. A. H.; Holzinger, R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Thornton, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Gas-Particle partitioning measurements of organic acids were carried out during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS, June-July 2013) at the Centerville, AL Supersite in the Southeast US, a region with significant isoprene and terpene emissions. Organic acid measurements were made with a Chemical Ionization High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) and acetate (CH3COO-) as the reagent ion. We investigate both individual species and bulk organic acids and partitioning to organic and water phases in the aerosol. Measured partitioning is compared to data from three other instruments that can also quantify gas-particle partitioning with high time resolution: another HRToF-CIMS using iodide (I-) as the reagent ion to ionize acids and other highly oxidized compounds, a Semivolatile Thermal Desorption Aerosol GC/MS (SV-TAG), and a Thermal Desorption Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTRMS The partitioning measurements for three of the instruments are generally consistent, with results in the same range for most species and following similar temporal trends and diurnal cycles. The TD-PTRMS measures on average ½ the partitioning to the particle phase of the acetate CIMS. Both the measurements and the model of partitioning to the organic phase respond quickly to temperature, and the model agrees with the measured partitioning within the error of the measurement for multiple compounds, although many compounds do not match the modeled partitioning, especially at lower m/z. This discrepancy may be due to thermal decomposition of larger molecules into smaller ones when heated.

  4. Reactive uptake of N2O5 by aerosols containing dicarboxylic acids. Effect of particle phase, composition, and nitrate content.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul T; Badger, Claire L; Cox, R Anthony; Folkers, Mareike; Henk, Hartmut H; Mentel, Thomas F

    2009-04-30

    Reactive uptake coefficients for loss of N(2)O(5) to micron-size aerosols containing oxalic malonic, succinic, and glutaric acids, and mixtures with ammonium hydrogen sulfate and ammonium sulfate, are presented. The uptake measurements were made using two different systems: atmospheric pressure laminar flow tube reactor (Cambridge) and the Large Indoor Aerosol Chamber at Forschungszentrum Juelich. Generally good agreement is observed for the data recorded using the two techniques. Measured uptake coefficients lie in the range 5 x 10(-4)-3 x 10(-2), dependent on relative humidity, on particle phase, and on particle composition. Uptake to solid particles is generally slow, with observed uptake coefficients less than 1 x 10(-3), while uptake to liquid particles is around an order of magnitude more efficient. These results are rationalized using a numerical model employing explicit treatment of both transport and chemistry. Our results indicate a modest effect of the dicarboxylic acids on uptake and confirm the strong effect of particle phase, liquid water content, and particulate nitrate concentrations. PMID:19385680

  5. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 2. Gas and particle phase formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiumeng; Zhang, Xiaolu; Parker, Eric T.; Veres, Patrick R.; Roberts, James M.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Ellis, Raluca A.; Huey, L. Greg; Weber, Rodney J.

    2012-10-01

    Gas and fine particle (PM2.5) phase formic acid concentrations were measured with online instrumentation during separate one-month studies in the summer of 2010 in Los Angeles (LA), CA, and Atlanta, GA. In both urban environments, median gas phase concentrations were on the order of a few ppbv (LA 1.6 ppbv, Atlanta 2.3 ppbv) and median particle phase concentrations were approximately tens of ng/m3 (LA 49 ng/m3, Atlanta 39 ng/m3). LA formic acid gas and particle concentrations had consistent temporal patterns; both peaked in the early afternoon and generally followed the trends in photochemical secondary gases. Atlanta diurnal trends were more irregular, but the mean diurnal profile had similar afternoon peaks in both gas and particle concentrations, suggesting a photochemical source in both cities. LA formic acid particle/gas (p/g) ratios ranged between 0.01 and 12%, with a median of 1.3%. No clear evidence that LA formic acid preferentially partitioned to particle water was observed, except on three overcast periods of suppressed photochemical activity. Application of Henry's Law to predict partitioning during these periods greatly under-predicted particle phase formate concentrations based on bulk aerosol liquid water content (LWC) and pH estimated from thermodynamic models. In contrast to LA, formic acid partitioning in Atlanta appeared to be more consistently associated with elevated relative humidity (i.e., aerosol LWC), although p/g ratios were somewhat lower, ranging from 0.20 to 5.8%, with a median of 0.8%. Differences in formic acid gas absorbing phase preferences between these two cities are consistent with that of bulk water-soluble organic carbon reported in a companion paper.

  6. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 2. Gas and particle phase formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiumeng; Zhang, Xiaolu; Parker, Eric T.; Veres, Patrick R.; Roberts, James M.; Gouw, Joost A.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Ellis, Raluca A.; Huey, L. Greg; Weber, Rodney J.

    2011-11-01

    Gas and fine particle (PM2.5) phase formic acid concentrations were measured with online instrumentation during separate one-month studies in the summer of 2010 in Los Angeles (LA), CA, and Atlanta, GA. In both urban environments, median gas phase concentrations were on the order of a few ppbv (LA 1.6 ppbv, Atlanta 2.3 ppbv) and median particle phase concentrations were approximately tens of ng/m3 (LA 49 ng/m3, Atlanta 39 ng/m3). LA formic acid gas and particle concentrations had consistent temporal patterns; both peaked in the early afternoon and generally followed the trends in photochemical secondary gases. Atlanta diurnal trends were more irregular, but the mean diurnal profile had similar afternoon peaks in both gas and particle concentrations, suggesting a photochemical source in both cities. LA formic acid particle/gas (p/g) ratios ranged between 0.01 and 12%, with a median of 1.3%. No clear evidence that LA formic acid preferentially partitioned to particle water was observed, except on three overcast periods of suppressed photochemical activity. Application of Henry's Law to predict partitioning during these periods greatly under-predicted particle phase formate concentrations based on bulk aerosol liquid water content (LWC) and pH estimated from thermodynamic models. In contrast to LA, formic acid partitioning in Atlanta appeared to be more consistently associated with elevated relative humidity (i.e., aerosol LWC), although p/g ratios were somewhat lower, ranging from 0.20 to 5.8%, with a median of 0.8%. Differences in formic acid gas absorbing phase preferences between these two cities are consistent with that of bulk water-soluble organic carbon reported in a companion paper.

  7. Observations of Sub-3 nm Particles and Sulfuric acid Concentrations during Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period 2011 in Long Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Kanawade, V. P.; You, Y.; Hallar, A. G.; Mccubbin, I. B.; Chirokova, G.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Kuang, C.; Lee, Y.; McGraw, R. L.; Mikkila, J.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is an important source of aerosol particles. But the NPF processes are not well understood, in part because of our limited understanding of the formation of atmospheric sub-3 nm size aerosols and the limited number of simultaneous observations of particle size distributions and the aerosol nucleation precursors. During Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period (July-August 2011) in Long Island, New York, we deployed a particle size magnifier (Airmodus A09) running at different working fluid saturation ratios and a TSI CPC3776 to extract the information of sub-3 nm particles formation. A scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), and a number of atmospheric trace gas analyzers were used to simultaneously measure aerosol size distributions, sulfuric acid, and other possible aerosol precursors, respectively. Our observation results show that sub-3 nm particles existed during both NPF and non-NPF events, indicating the formation of sub-3nm particle didn't always lead to NPF characterized by typical banana shaped aerosol size distributions measured by SMPS. However, sub-3 nm particles were much higher during NPF events. Sub-3 nm particles were well-correlated with sulfuric acid showing the same diurnal variations and noontime peaks, especially for NPF days. These results are consistent with laboratory studies showing that formation of sub-3 nm particles is very sensitive to sulfuric acid (than amines and ammonia) [Yu et al. GRL 2012]. HYSPLIT back trajectory analysis indicates that air masses from Great Lakes, containing more SO2, VOCs and secondary organics, may contribute to growth of sub-3 nm particles and NPF.

  8. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-11-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids and quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (< 0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanic emissions.

  9. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-07-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids to quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (<0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanics.

  10. Microphysical processes affecting stratospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, P.; Toon, O. B.; Kiang, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    Physical processes which affect stratospheric aerosol particles include nucleation, condensation, evaporation, coagulation and sedimentation. Quantitative studies of these mechanisms to determine if they can account for some of the observed properties of the aerosol are carried out. It is shown that the altitude range in which nucleation of sulfuric acid-water solution droplets can take place corresponds to that region of the stratosphere where the aerosol is generally found. Since heterogeneous nucleation is the dominant nucleation mechanism, the stratospheric solution droplets are mainly formed on particles which have been mixed up from the troposphere or injected into the stratosphere by volcanoes or meteorites. Particle growth by heteromolecular condensation can account for the observed increase in mixing ratio of large particles in the stratosphere. Coagulation is important in reducing the number of particles smaller than 0.05 micron radius. Growth by condensation, applied to the mixed nature of the particles, shows that available information is consistent with ammonium sulfate being formed by liquid phase chemical reactions in the aerosol particles. The upper altitude limit of the aerosol layer is probably due to the evaporation of sulfuric acid aerosol particles, while the lower limit is due to mixing across the tropopause.

  11. Crystallization and immersion freezing ability of oxalic and succinic acid in multicomponent aqueous organic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Höhler, Kristina; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This study reports on heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of immersed oxalic and succinic acid crystals in the temperature range from 245 to 215 K, as investigated with expansion cooling experiments using suspended particles. In contrast to previous laboratory work with emulsified solution droplets where the precipitation of solid inclusions required a preceding freezing/evaporation cycle, we show that immersed solids readily form by homogeneous crystallization within aqueous solution droplets of multicomponent organic mixtures, which have noneutonic compositions with an excess of oxalic or succinic acid. Whereas succinic acid crystals did not act as heterogeneous ice nuclei, immersion freezing by oxalic acid dihydrate crystals led to a reduction of the ice saturation ratio at freezing onset by 0.066-0.072 compared to homogeneous freezing, which is by a factor of 2 higher than previously reported laboratory data. These observations emphasize the importance of oxalic acid in heterogeneous ice nucleation.

  12. Reaction of oleic acid particles with NO3 radicals: Products, mechanism, and implications for radical-initiated organic aerosol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Kenneth S; Ziemann, Paul J

    2006-03-16

    The heterogeneous reaction of liquid oleic acid aerosol particles with NO3 radicals in the presence of NO2, N2O5, and O2 was investigated in an environmental chamber using a combination of on-line and off-line mass spectrometric techniques. The results indicate that the major reaction products, which are all carboxylic acids, consist of hydroxy nitrates, carbonyl nitrates, dinitrates, hydroxydinitrates, and possibly more highly nitrated products. The key intermediate in the reaction is the nitrooxyalkylperoxy radical, which is formed by the addition of NO3 to the carbon-carbon double bond and subsequent addition of O2. The nitrooxyalkylperoxy radicals undergo self-reactions to form hydroxy nitrates and carbonyl nitrates, and may also react with NO2 to form nitrooxy peroxynitrates. The latter compounds are unstable and decompose to carbonyl nitrates and dinitrates. It is noteworthy that in this reaction nitrooxyalkoxy radicals appear not to be formed, as indicated by the absence of the expected products of decomposition or isomerization of these species. This is different from gas-phase alkene-NO3 reactions, in which a large fraction of the products are formed through these pathways. The results may indicate that, for liquid organic aerosol particles in low NOx environments, the major products of the radical-initiated oxidation (including by OH radicals) of unsaturated and saturated organic compounds will be substituted forms of the parent compound rather than smaller decomposition products. These compounds will remain in the particle and can potentially enhance particle hygroscopicity and the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei. PMID:16526637

  13. EXPOSURES TO ACIDIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient monitoring of acid aerosol in four U.S. cities and in a rural region of southern Ontario clearly show distinct periods of strong acidity. easurements made in Kingston, TN, and Stuebenville, OH, resulted in 24-hr H+ ion concentrations exceeding 100 nmole/m3 more than 10 ti...

  14. ACID AEROSOL MEASUREMENT WORKSHOP

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the discussion and results of the U.S. EPA Acid Aerosol Measurement Workshop, conducted February 1-3, 1989, in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. t was held in response to recommendations by the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) regarding ...

  15. Photochemical Aging of Organic Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizkorodov, S. A.; Bateman, A. P.; Dailo, M.; Do, T.; Mang, S. A.; Pan, X.; Underwood, J. S.; Walser, M. L.

    2007-05-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) particles are produced in the atmosphere as a result of oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Primary Organic Aerosol (POA) particles are directly emitted in the atmosphere by their sources. This research focuses on the mechanisms of direct photochemical processes taking place in model SOA and POA particles, the role of such processes in aging of organic aerosol particles, and the effect of photochemistry on particles' physicochemical properties. To address these questions, artificial SOA and POA particles are investigated with several laboratory-based approaches relying on cavity ring-down spectroscopy and mass-spectrometry. SOA particles generated by dark oxidation of d-Limonene, alpha-Pinene, and beta-Pinene by ozone are all found to absorb radiation in the tropospheric actinic window. The UV absorption photolyzes SOA constituents resulting in a release of small VOC molecules back in the gas-phase, and considerable change in SOA chemical composition. For terpenes featuring a terminal double bond, the main SOA photolysis products are invariably found to be formaldehyde and formic acid. Similar observations are obtained for products of ozonolysis of thin films of unsaturated fatty acids and self-assembled monolayers of unsaturated alkenes. For the case of fatty acids, a very detailed mechanism of ozonolysis and subsequent photolysis is proposed. The photolytic activity is primarily attributed to organic peroxides and aldehydes. These results convincingly demonstrate that photochemical processes occurring inside SOA and POA particles age the particles on time scales that are shorter than typical lifetimes of aerosol particles in the atmosphere.

  16. Application of FIGAERO (Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsol) coupled to a high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer to field and chamber organic aerosol: Implications for carboxylic acid formation and gas-particle partitioning from monoterpene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Mentel, T. F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Thornton, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present measurements of a large suite of gas and particle phase carboxylic acid containing compounds made with a Filter Inlet for Gas and AEROsol (FIGAERO) coupled to a high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. A prototype operated with acetate negative ion proton transfer chemistry was deployed on the Julich Plant Atmosphere Chamber to study a-pinene oxidation, and a modified version was deployed at the SMEAR II forest station in Hyytiälä, Finland and SOAS, in Brent Alabama. We focus here on results from JPAC and Hyytiälä, where we utilized the same ionization method most selective towards carboxylic acids. In all locations, 100's of organic acid compounds were observed in the gas and particles and many of the same composition acids detected in the gas-phase were detected in the particles upon temperature programmed thermal desorption. Particulate organics detected by FIGAERO are highly correlated with organic aerosol mass measured by an AMS, providing additional volatility and molecular level information about collected aerosol. The fraction of a given compound measured in the particle phase follows expected trends with elemental composition, but many compounds would not be well described by an absorptive partitioning model assuming unity activity coefficients. Moreover the detailed structure in the thermal desorption signals reveals a contribution from thermal decomposition of large molecular weight organics and or oligomers with implications for partitioning measurements and model validation

  17. Effects fo sulfuric acid aerosol on respiratory mechanics and mucociliary particle clearance in healthy and asthmatic adults

    SciTech Connect

    Leikauf, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of submicrometer sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) aerosol on human pulmonary physiology were investigated. Eighteen healthy and 10 asthmatic subjects inhaled H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ via nasal mask for 1 hour at concentrations of 0, 100, 300 and 1000 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ in a random sequence. The aerosol size (0.5 ..mu..m) and lower exposure level (100 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/) were selected to simulate peak ambient conditions, while the upper exposure concentration (1000 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/) is comparable to the current occupational limit for chronic exposure. Bronchial mucociliary clearance was markedly altered in all but one of the healthy subjects following one or more of the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ inhalations. The mucus was tagged by having each subject inhale either a 7.6 or 4.2 ..mu..m radiolabeled Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol. Exposure to 1000 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ produced a delay in clearance which lasted longer in the group of eight inhaling the smaller 4.2 ..mu..m Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol than in the group of ten inhaling 7.6 ..mu..m Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/. At 100 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/, the groups differed to a greater extent with clearance of the more centrally deposited larger aerosol being stimulated and that of the distally deposited smaller aerosol being transiently inhibited. Tracheal clearance remained unchanged in both groups. These findings, along with calculations of the various aerosols' deposition patterns, indicate that H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ exerted a greater effect in the distal airways than in the proximal airways. Slight changes in ventilatory mechanics were noted in the asthmatic subjects following the 1000 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ exposure, an effect not observed in the healthy subjects. However, the results obtained in the asthmatic group for tests of mucociliary clearance failed to reach significance, possible due to the large variability of such measurements in groups with respiratory disease.

  18. AEROSOL PARTICLE COLLECTOR DESIGN STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-09-27

    A computational evaluation of a particle collector design was performed to evaluate the behavior of aerosol particles in a fast flowing gas stream. The objective of the work was to improve the collection efficiency of the device while maintaining a minimum specified air throughput, nominal collector size, and minimal power requirements. The impact of a range of parameters was considered subject to constraints on gas flow rate, overall collector dimensions, and power limitations. Potential improvements were identified, some of which have already been implemented. Other more complex changes were identified and are described here for further consideration. In addition, fruitful areas for further study are proposed.

  19. Gas/Particle Partitioning of Organic Acids and Organic Aerosols in a Ponderosa Pine Forest in Colorado during BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, J. L.; Yatavelli, L.; Stark, H.; Hayes, P. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Thompson, S.; Kimmel, J. R.; Day, D. A.; Cubison, M. J.; Thornton, J. A.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study (BEACHON-RoMBAS) took place at Manitou Forest, CO, during July-Aug. 2011. Gas and particle-phase organic acids were analyzed in real time using a micro-orifice volatilization impactor chemical ionization high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MOVI-HRToF-CIMS; Yatavelli et al., AS&T 2012; Yatavelli & Thornton, AS&T 2010) with acetate as the reagent ion. During the gas sampling phase (when the MOVI was at room temperature) aerosol was collected on the MOVI impactor, and was subsequently thermally desorbed over 10 min. under nitrogen, allowing the collection of temperature-programmed thermal desorption (TPTD) mass spectra of particle-phase species. The high resolution of the instrument allows the determination of the elemental composition of most detected ions. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) is shown to be very useful to quantify the CIMS backgrounds during the different phases of operation. Two methods were used to estimate the volatility of the detected species. First, the fraction of each species in the particle phase (Fp) vs carbon number was found to approximately follow partitioning theory, both for the alkanoic acids and also for the total acid signal, after accounting for the effect of the oxidation state on vapor pressure. Fp was found to respond on timescales of ~1 h to changes in ambient temperature, indicating that diffusion limitations to evaporation are not major for the aerosol at this site. Preliminary results suggest that Fp depends more strongly on vapor pressure and temperature than on RH, suggesting preferential partitioning for the organic phase rather than the water phase. Secondly, the volatility of individual or groups of acids can be quantified based on the TPTD signal based on calibration with multiple acids of known vapor pressure at concentrations similar to ambient, analogous to the methods of

  20. EFFECT OF ACIDITY ON SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION FROM ISOPRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle-phase acidity on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from isoprene is investigated in a laboratory chamber study, in which the acidity of the inorganic seed aerosol was controlled systematically. The observed enhancement in SOA mass concentration is c...

  1. Test-Aerosol Generator For Calibrating Particle Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogan, Paul A.; Adams, Alois J.; Schwindt, Christian J.; Hodge, Timothy R.; Mallow, Tim J.; Duong, Anh A.; Bukauskas, Vyto V.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus generates clean, stable aerosol stream for use in testing and calibrating laser-based aerosol-particle counter. Size and concentration of aerosol particles controlled to ensure accurate calibration. Cheap, widely available medical nebulizers used to generate aerosols.

  2. Acid aerosols in the Pittsburgh Metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, Thomas; Zelenka, Michael P.; Lawrence, Philip M.; Houston, Robert M.; Burton, Robert

    This article presents data on ambient concentrations of selected acidic aerosols at four existing monitoring sites in the Pittsburgh PA metropolitan area. The data were collected by staff of the Allegheny County Health Department, Division of Air Quality during the summer and fall of 1993. The sampling protocol was focused on obtaining 24 h-average ammonia, ammonium, acidic sulfates, and particle strong acids data on a 2 to 3 day cycle. The data were obtained using Harvard University School of Public Health's "Short-HEADS" annular denuder sampling train. The Pittsburgh area is of interest because it is downwind of a major regional source of sulfur and nitrogen emissions from coal-burning power plants: the Ohio River Valley. The data presented here indicate that ground-level concentrations of acidic aerosols in Pittsburgh are highly correlated spatially and that many pollutants are higher on days when ground-level wind direction vectors indicate that wind is coming from the southwest rather than from the Pittsburgh source area itself. The monitoring site that is most upwind of the Pittsburgh source area - South Fayette - has particle strong acid levels about twice those of sites closer in to the Pittsburgh central business district.

  3. Carbonaceous aerosol particles from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Hallock, K.A.; Mazurek, M.A. ); Cass, G.R. . Dept. of Environmental Engineering Science)

    1992-05-01

    The problem of visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon due to fine organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere has become an area of increased environmental concern. Aerosol particles can be derived from many emission sources. In this report, we focus on identifying organic aerosols derived from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon. These aerosols are expected to be significant contributors to the total atmospheric organic aerosol content. Aerosol samples from living vegetation were collected by resuspension of surface wax and resin components liberated from the leaves of vegetation common to areas of the Grand Canyon. The samples were analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Probable identification of compounds was made by comparison of sample spectra with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass spectral references and positive identification of compounds was made when possible by comparison with authentic standards as well as NIST references. Using these references, we have been able to positively identify the presence of n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid homolog series in the surface waxes of the vegetation sampled. Several monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes were identified also as possible biogenic aerosols which may contribute to the total organic aerosol abundance leading to visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon.

  4. On the abundance and source contributions of dicarboxylic acids in size-resolved aerosol particles at continental sites in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pinxteren, D.; Neusüß, C.; Herrmann, H.

    2013-12-01

    Dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) are among the most abundant organic compounds observed in atmospheric aerosol particles and have been extensively studied at many places around the world. The importance of the various primary sources and secondary formation pathways discussed in the literature is often difficult to assess from field studies, though. In the present study, a large dataset of size-resolved DCA concentrations from several inland sites in Germany is combined with results from a recently developed approach of statistical back-trajectory analysis and additional data. Principal component analysis is then used to reveal the most important factors governing the abundance of DCAs in different particle size ranges. The two most important sources revealed are (i) photochemical formation in polluted air masses, likely occurring in the gas phase on short timescales (gasSOA), and (ii) secondary reactions in anthropogenically influenced air masses, likely occurring in the aqueous phase on longer timescales (aqSOA). While the first source strongly impacts DCA concentrations mainly in small and large particles, the second one enhances accumulation mode DCAs and is responsible for the bulk of the observed concentrations. Primary sources were found to be minor (sea salt, soil resuspension) or non-existent (biomass burning, traffic). The results can be regarded representative for typical central-european continental conditions.

  5. On the abundance and source contributions of dicarboxylic acids in size-resolved aerosol particles at continental sites in central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pinxteren, D.; Neusüß, C.; Herrmann, H.

    2014-04-01

    Dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) are among the most abundant organic compounds observed in atmospheric aerosol particles and have been extensively studied at many places around the world. The importance of the various primary sources and secondary formation pathways discussed in the literature is often difficult to assess from field studies, though. In the present study, a large data set of size-resolved DCA concentrations from several inland sites in Germany is combined with results from a recently developed approach of statistical back-trajectory analysis and additional data. Principal component analysis is then used to reveal the most important factors governing the abundance of DCAs in different particle size ranges. The two most important sources revealed are (i) photochemical formation during intense radiation days in polluted air masses, likely occurring in the gas phase on short timescales (gasSOA), and (ii) secondary reactions in anthropogenically influenced air masses, likely occurring in the aqueous phase on longer timescales (aqSOA). While the first source strongly impacts DCA concentrations mainly in small and large particles, the second one enhances accumulation mode DCAs and is responsible for the bulk of the observed concentrations. Primary sources were found to be minor (sea salt, soil resuspension) or non-existent (biomass burning, traffic). The results can be regarded as representative for typical central European continental conditions.

  6. Free amino acids in Antarctic aerosol: potential markers for the evolution and fate of marine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, E.; Zangrando, R.; Vecchiato, M.; Piazza, R.; Cairns, W. R. L.; Capodaglio, G.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the impact of marine aerosols on global climate change it is important to study their chemical composition and size distribution. Amino acids are a component of the organic nitrogen in aerosols and particles containing amino acids have been found to be efficient ice nuclei. The main aim of this study was to investigate the L- and D-free amino acid composition as possible tracers of primary biological production in Antarctic aerosols from three different areas: two continental bases, Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS) on the coast of the Ross Sea, Concordia Station at Dome C on the Antarctic Plateau, and the Southern Ocean near the Antarctic continent. Studying the size distribution of amino acids in aerosols allowed us to characterize this component of the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in marine aerosols near their source and after long-range transport. The presence of only free L-amino acids in our samples is indicative of the prevalence of phytoplanktonic material. Sampling at these three points allowed us to study the reactivity of these compounds during long-range transport. The mean total amino acid concentration detected at MZS was 11 pmol m-3, a higher percentage of amino acids were found in the fine fraction. The aerosol samples collected at Dome C had the lowest amino acid values (0.7 and 0.8 pmol m-3), and the coarse particles were found to have higher concentrations of amino acids compared to the coastal site. The amino acid composition in the aerosol collected at Dome C had also changed compared to the coastal site, suggesting that physical and chemical transformations had occurred during long range transport. During the sampling cruise on the R/V Italica on the Southern Ocean, high concentrations of amino acids were found in the total suspended particles, this we attribute to the presence of intact biological material (as microorganisms or plant material) in the sample.

  7. Influence of Aerosol Acidity on the Chemical Composition of Secondary Organic Aerosol from β-caryophyllene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M.; Surratt, J. D.; Chan, A. W.; Schlling, K.; Offenberg, J. H.; Lewandowski, M.; Edney, E.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Jaoui, M.; Edgerton, E. S.; Tanner, R. L.; Shaw, S. L.; Zheng, M.; Knipping, E. M.; Seinfeld, J.

    2011-12-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yield of β-caryophyllene photooxidation is enhanced by aerosol acidity. In the present study, the influence of aerosol acidity on the chemical composition of β-caryophyllene SOA is investigated using ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI- TOFMS). A number of first- , second- and higher-generation gas-phase products having carbonyl and carboxylic acid functional groups are detected in the particle phase. Particle-phase reaction products formed via hydration and organosulfate formation processes are also detected. Increased acidity leads to different effects on the abundance of individual products; significantly, abundances of organosulfates are correlated with aerosol acidity. The increase of certain particle-phase reaction products with increased acidity provides chemical evidence to support the acid-enhanced SOA yields. Based on the agreement between the chromatographic retention times and accurate mass measurements of chamber and field samples, three β-caryophyllene products (i.e., β-nocaryophyllon aldehyde, β-hydroxynocaryophyllon aldehyde, and β-dihydroxynocaryophyllon aldehyde) are suggested as chemical tracers for β-caryophyllene SOA. These compounds are detected in both day and night ambient samples collected in downtown Atlanta, GA and rural Yorkville, GA during the 2008 August Mini-Intensive Gas and Aerosol Study (AMIGAS).

  8. Influence of aerosol acidity on the chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol from β-caryophyllene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. N.; Surratt, J. D.; Chan, A. W. H.; Schilling, K.; Offenberg, J. H.; Lewandowski, M.; Edney, E. O.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Jaoui, M.; Edgerton, E. S.; Tanner, R. L.; Shaw, S. L.; Zheng, M.; Knipping, E. M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-02-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yield of β-caryophyllene photooxidation is enhanced by aerosol acidity. In the present study, the influence of aerosol acidity on the chemical composition of β-caryophyllene SOA is investigated using ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-TOFMS). A number of first-, second- and higher-generation gas-phase products having carbonyl and carboxylic acid functional groups are detected in the particle phase. Particle-phase reaction products formed via hydration and organosulfate formation processes are also detected. Increased acidity leads to different effects on the abundance of individual products; significantly, abundances of organosulfates are correlated with aerosol acidity. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of organosulfates and nitrated organosulfates derived from a sesquiterpene. The increase of certain particle-phase reaction products with increased acidity provides chemical evidence to support the acid-enhanced SOA yields. Based on the agreement between the chromatographic retention times and accurate mass measurements of chamber and field samples, three β-caryophyllene products (i.e., β-nocaryophyllon aldehyde, β-hydroxynocaryophyllon aldehyde, and β-dihydroxynocaryophyllon aldehyde) are suggested as chemical tracers for β-caryophyllene SOA. These compounds are detected in both day and night ambient samples collected in downtown Atlanta, GA and rural Yorkville, GA during the 2008 August Mini-Intensive Gas and Aerosol Study (AMIGAS).

  9. Influence of aerosol acidity on the chemical composition of Secondary Organic Aerosol from β-caryophyllene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. N.; Surratt, J. D.; Chan, A. W. H.; Schilling, K.; Offenberg, J. H.; Lewandowski, M.; Edney, E. O.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Jaoui, M.; Edgerton, E. S.; Tanner, R. L.; Shaw, S. L.; Zheng, M.; Knipping, E. M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-11-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yield of β-caryophyllene photooxidation is enhanced by aerosol acidity. In the present study, the influence of aerosol acidity on the chemical composition of β-caryophyllene SOA is investigated using ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-TOFMS). A number of first-, second- and higher-generation gas-phase products having carbonyl and carboxylic acid functional groups are detected in the particle phase. Particle-phase reaction products formed via hydration and organosulfate formation processes are also detected. Increase of acidity leads to different effects on the abundance of individual products; significantly, abundances of organosulfates are correlated with aerosol acidity. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of organosulfates and nitrated organosulfates derived from a sesquiterpene. The increase of certain particle-phase reaction products with increased acidity provides chemical evidence to support the acid-enhanced SOA yields. Based on the agreement between the chromatographic retention times and accurate mass measurements of chamber and field samples, three β-caryophyllene products (i.e., β-nocaryophyllon aldehyde, β-hydroxynocaryophyllon aldehyde, and β-dihydroxynocaryophyllon aldehyde) are identified as chemical tracers for β-caryophyllene SOA. These compounds are detected in both day and night ambient samples collected in downtown Atlanta, GA and rural Yorkville, GA during the 2008 August Mini-Intensive Gas and Aerosol Study (AMIGAS).

  10. FTIR Analysis of Functional Groups in Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, S. M.; McKenzie, G.; Dransfield, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are suspensions of particulate matter composed of compounds formed from chemical reactions of organic species in the atmosphere. Atmospheric particulate matter can have impacts on climate, the environment and human health. Standardized techniques to analyze the characteristics and composition of complex secondary organic aerosols are necessary to further investigate the formation of SOA and provide a better understanding of the reaction pathways of organic species in the atmosphere. While Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can provide detailed information about the elemental composition of a sample, it reveals little about the chemical moieties which make up the particles. This work probes aerosol particles deposited on Teflon filters using FTIR, based on the protocols of Russell, et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, 2009) and the spectral fitting algorithm of Takahama, et al (submitted, 2012). To validate the necessary calibration curves for the analysis of complex samples, primary aerosols of key compounds (e.g., citric acid, ammonium sulfate, sodium benzoate) were generated, and the accumulated masses of the aerosol samples were related to their IR absorption intensity. These validated calibration curves were then used to classify and quantify functional groups in SOA samples generated in chamber studies by MIT's Kroll group. The fitting algorithm currently quantifies the following functionalities: alcohols, alkanes, alkenes, amines, aromatics, carbonyls and carboxylic acids.

  11. Free amino acids in Antarctic aerosol: potential markers for the evolution and fate of marine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, E.; Zangrando, R.; Vecchiato, M.; Piazza, R.; Cairns, W. R. L.; Capodaglio, G.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the impact of marine aerosols on global climate change it is important to study their chemical composition and size distribution. Amino acids are a component of the organic nitrogen in aerosols, particles containing amino acids have been found to be efficient ice nuclei. The main aim of this study was to investigate the L- and D-free amino acid composition as possible tracers of primary biological production in Antarctic aerosols from three different areas: two continental bases, Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS) on the coast of the Ross Sea, Concordia Station at Dome C on the Antarctic Plateau, and the Southern Ocean near the Antarctic continent. Studying the size distribution of amino acids in aerosols allowed us to characterize this component of the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in marine aerosols near their source and after long-range transport. The presence of only free L-amino acids in our samples is indicative of the prevalence of phytoplanktonic material. Sampling at these three points allowed us to study the reactivity of these compounds during long-range transport. The mean total amino acid concentration detected at MZS was 11 pmol m-3, a higher percentage of amino acids were found in the fine fraction. The aerosol samples collected at Dome C had the lowest amino acid values (0.7 and 0.8 pmol m-3) and the coarse particles were found to be enriched with amino acids compared to the coastal site. The amino acid composition had also changed suggesting that physical and chemical transformations had occurred during long range transport. During the sampling cruise on the R/V talica on the Southern Ocean, high concentrations of amino acids were found in the total suspended particles, this we attribute to the presence of intact biological material in the sample.

  12. Novel Measurements of Aerosol Particle Interfaces Using Biphasic Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, A. R.; Dutcher, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are nearly ubiquitous in the atmosphere and yet there remains large uncertainties in their formation processes and ambient properties. These particles are complex microenvironments, which can contain multiple interfaces due to internal aqueous-organic phase partitioning and to the external liquid-vapor surface. These aerosol interfaces can profoundly affect the fate of condensable organic compounds emitted into the atmosphere by altering the way in which organic vapors interact with the ambient aerosol. Aerosol interfaces affect particle internal structure, species uptake, equilibrium partitioning, activation to cloud condensation or ice nuclei, and optical properties. For example, organic thin films can shield the core of the aerosol from the ambient environment, which may disrupt equilibrium partitioning and mass transfer. To improve our ability to accurately predict the fate of SOA in the atmosphere, we must improve our knowledge of aerosol interfaces and their interactions with the ambient environment. Few technologies exist to accurately probe aerosol interfaces at atmospherically-relevant conditions. In this talk, a novel method using biphasic microscale flows will be introduced for generating, trapping, and perturbing complex interfaces at atmospherically relevant conditions. These microfluidic experiments utilize high-speed imaging to monitor interfacial phenomena at the microscale and are performed with phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy on a temperature-controlled inverted microscope stage. From these experiments, interfacial thermodynamic properties such as surface tension, rheological properties such as interfacial moduli, and kinetic properties such as mass transfer coefficients can be measured or inferred. Chemical compositions of the liquid phases studied here span a range of viscosities and include electrolyte and water soluble organic acid species often observed in the atmosphere, such as mixtures

  13. New Particle Formation and Secondary Organic Aerosol in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, M.; Yue, D.; Guo, S.; Hu, W.; Huang, X.; He, L.; Wiedensohler, A.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.

    2011-12-01

    Air pollution in Beijing has been a major concern due to being a mega-city and green Olympic Games requirements. Both long term and intensive field measurements have been conducted at an Urban Air Quality Monitoring Station in the campus of Peking University since 2004. Aerosol characteristics vary seasonally depending on meteorological conditions and source emissions. Secondary compositions of SNA (sum of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium) and SOA (secondary organic aerosol) become major fraction of fine particles, which may enhance aerosol impacts on visibility and climate change. The transformation processes of new particle formation (NPF) and secondary organic aerosol have been focused on. It was found that gaseous sulfuric acid, ammonia, and organic compounds are important precursors to NPF events in Beijing and H2SO4-NH3-H2O ternary nucleation is one of the important mechanisms. The contributions of condensation and neutralization of sulfuric acid, coagulation, and organics to the growth of the new particles are estimated as 45%, 34%, and 21%, respectively. Tracer-based method to estimate biogenic and anthropogenic SOA was established by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Secondary organic tracers derived from biogenic (isoprene, α-pinene, β-caryophyllene) and anthropogenic (toluene) contributed 32% at urban site and 35% at rural site, respectively. Other source apportionment techniques were also used to estimate secondary organic aerosols, including EC tracer method, water soluble organic carbon content, chemical mass balance model, and AMS-PMF method.

  14. On the source of organic acid aerosol layers above clouds.

    PubMed

    Sorooshian, Armin; Lu, Miao-Ling; Brechtel, Fred J; Jonsson, Haflidi; Feingold, Graham; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2007-07-01

    During the July 2005 Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and the August-September 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS), the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter probed aerosols and cumulus clouds in the eastern Pacific Ocean off the coast of northern California and in southeastern Texas, respectively. An on-board particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) quantified inorganic and organic acid species with < or = 5-min time resolution. Ubiquitous organic aerosol layers above cloud with enhanced organic acid levels were observed in both locations. The data suggest that aqueous-phase reactions to produce organic acids, mainly oxalic acid, followed by droplet evaporation is a source of elevated organic acid aerosol levels above cloud. Oxalic acid is observed to be produced more efficiently relative to sulfate as the cloud liquid water content increases, corresponding to larger and less acidic droplets. As derived from large eddy simulations of stratocumulus underthe conditions of MASE, both Lagrangian trajectory analysis and diurnal cloudtop evolution provide evidence that a significant fraction of the aerosol mass concentration above cloud can be accounted for by evaporated droplet residual particles. Methanesulfonate data suggest that entrainment of free tropospheric aerosol can also be a source of organic acids above boundary layer clouds. PMID:17695910

  15. Chemical evolution of multicomponent aerosol particles during evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardini, Alessandro; Riipinen, Ilona; Pagels, Joakim; Eriksson, Axel; Worsnop, Douglas; Switieckli, Erik; Kulmala, Markku; Bilde, Merete

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have an important but not well quantified effect on climate and human health. Despite the efforts made in the last decades, the formation and evolution of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is still not fully understood. The uncertainty is partly due to the complex chemical composition of the particles which comprise inorganic and organic compounds. Many organics (like dicarboxylic acids) can be present both in the gas and in the condensed phase due to their low vapor pressure. Clearly, an understanding of this partition is crucial to address any other issue in atmospheric physics and chemistry. Moreover, many organics are water soluble, and their influence on the properties of aqueous solution droplets is still poorly characterized. The solid and sub-cooled liquid state vapor pressures of some organic compounds have been previously determined by measuring the evaporation rate of single-compound crystals [1-3] or binary aqueous droplets [4-6]. In this work, we deploy the HTDMA technique (Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer) coupled with a 3.5m laminar flow-tube and an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) for determining the chemical evolution during evaporation of ternary droplets made of one dicarboxylic acid (succinic acid, commonly found in atmospheric samples) and one inorganic compound (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) in different mixing ratios, in equilibrium with water vapor at a fixed relative humidity. In addition, we investigate the evaporation of multicomponent droplets and crystals made of three organic species (dicarboxylic acids and sugars), of which one or two are semi-volatile. 1. Bilde M. and Pandis, S.N.: Evaporation Rates and Vapor Pressures of Individual Aerosol Species Formed in the Atmospheric Oxidation of alpha- and beta-Pinene. Environmental Science and Technology, 35, 2001. 2. Bilde M., et al.: Even-Odd Alternation of Evaporation Rates and Vapor Pressures of C3-C9 Dicarboxylic Acid Aerosols

  16. Reactions and mass spectra of complex particles using Aerosol CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, John D.; Smith, Geoffrey D.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is used both on- and off-line for the analysis of complex laboratory-generated and ambient particles. One of the primary advantages of Aerosol CIMS is the low degree of ion fragmentation, making this technique well suited for investigating the reactivity of complex particles. To demonstrate the usefulness of this "soft" ionization, particles generated from meat cooking were reacted with ozone and the composition was monitored as a function of reaction time. Two distinct kinetic regimes were observed with most of the oleic acid in these particles reacting quickly but with 30% appearing to be trapped in the complex mixture. Additionally, detection limits are measured to be sufficiently low (100-200 ng/m3) to detect some of the more abundant constituents in ambient particles, including sulfate, which is measured in real-time at 1.2 [mu]g/m3. To better characterize complex aerosols from a variety of sources, a novel off-line collection method was also developed in which non-volatile and semi-volatile organics are desorbed from particles and concentrated in a cold U-tube. Desorption from the U-tube followed by analysis with Aerosol CIMS revealed significant amounts of nicotine in cigarette smoke and levoglucosan in oak and pine smoke, suggesting that this may be a useful technique for monitoring particle tracer species. Additionally, secondary organic aerosol formed from the reaction of ozone with R-limonene and volatile organics from orange peel were analyzed off-line showing large molecular weight products (m/z > 300 amu) that may indicate the formation of oligomers. Finally, mass spectra of ambient aerosol collected offline reveal a complex mixture of what appears to be highly processed organics, some of which may contain nitrogen.

  17. Acid aerosol transport episodes in Toronto, Ontario

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, G.D. . Inst. of Environmental Medicine); Waldman, J. )

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, the authors examine the pollution data collected during a 1986 field study in order to assess the nature and sources of acidic aerosols in the Toronto metropolitan area during this period. Through the examination of the continuous and filter aerosol data, isobaric back-trajectories of air masses, weather maps, and available trace element data, assessment are made of the character and possible sources of acid aerosols in this Southern Ontario city.

  18. Standard aerosols for particle velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepark, A.; Ozarski, R.; Thomson, J. A. L.

    1976-01-01

    System consists of laser-scattering counter (LSC) and photographic system. Photographic system provides absolute method of measuring aerosol size-distribution independently of their light scattering properties. LSC comprises 1-mW He/Ne laser, input optics, collecting optics, photodetector, and signal-processing electronics.

  19. Heterogeneous reaction of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide on ambient aerosol particles under dry and humid conditions: kinetics, mechanism and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q. Q.; Huang, L. B.; Liang, H.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, D.; Chen, Z. M.

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxides play important roles in the cycle of oxidants and the formation of secondary aerosols in the atmosphere. Recent field observations have suggested that the budget of peroxyacetic acid (PAA, CH3C(O)OOH) is potentially related to the aerosol phase processes, especially to secondary aerosol formation. Here, we present the first laboratory measurements of the uptake coefficient of gaseous PAA and H2O2 onto ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) as a function of relative humidity (RH) at 298 K. The results show that the PM2.5, which was collected in an urban area, can take up PAA and H2O2 at the uptake coefficient (γ) of 10-4, and both γPAA and γH2O2 increase with increasing RH. The value of γPAA at 90 % RH is 5.4 ± 1.9 times that at 3 % RH, whereas γH2O2 at 90 % RH is 2.4 ± 0.5 times that at 3 % RH, which suggests that PAA is more sensitive to the RH variation than H2O2 is. Considering the larger Henry's law constant of H2O2 than that of PAA, the smaller RH sensitivity of the H2O2 uptake coefficient suggests that the enhanced uptake of peroxide compounds on PM2.5 under humid conditions is dominated by chemical processes rather than dissolution. Considering that mineral dust is one of the main components of PM2.5 in Beijing, we also determined the uptake coefficients of gaseous PAA and H2O2 on authentic Asian Dust storm (ADS) and Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. Compared to ambient PM2.5, ADS shows a similar γ value and RH dependence in its uptake coefficient for PAA and H2O2, while ATD gives a negative dependence on RH. The present study indicates that, in addition to the mineral dust in PM2.5, other components (e.g., soluble inorganic salts) are also important to the uptake of peroxide compounds. When the heterogeneous reaction of PAA on PM2.5 is considered, its atmospheric lifetime is estimated to be 3.0 h on haze days and 7.1 h on non-haze days, values that are in good agreement with the field observations.

  20. The Life Cycle of Stratospheric Aerosol Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Jensen, Eric J.; Russell, P. B.; Bauman, Jill J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the life cycle of the background (nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosol. The authors assume the particles are formed by homogeneous nucleation near the tropical tropopause and are carried aloft into the stratosphere. The particles remain in the Tropics for most of their life, and during this period of time a size distribution is developed by a combination of coagulation, growth by heteromolecular condensation, and mixing with air parcels containing preexisting sulfate particles. The aerosol eventually migrates to higher latitudes and descends across isentropic surfaces to the lower stratosphere. The aerosol is removed from the stratosphere primarily at mid- and high latitudes through various processes, mainly by isentropic transport across the tropopause from the stratosphere into the troposphere.

  1. Submicron Aerosol Particle Losses in Metalized Bags.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecinski, Alice

    1980-07-01

    Two new types of conducting bags were tested for aerosol particle storage and sampling, a 3M Company Velostat bag and a bag constructed from 3M Type 2100 Static Shielding Film. The half-lives of unipolar, unit-charged 0.025 m, 0.050 m and 0.090 m sized aerosol particles stored in the Velostat bag and the film bag were 130, 190 and 270 min and 40, 70 and 180 min, respectively. These results depend upon the history of bag filling. The values given here apply to bags which had not previously been filled on the day of experimentation. The lifetimes exhibited by the aerosol particles stored in the Velostat bag are the longest found to data.

  2. The influence of meteoric smoke particles on stratospheric aerosol properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Graham; Brooke, James; Dhomse, Sandip; Plane, John; Feng, Wuhu; Neely, Ryan; Bardeen, Chuck; Bellouin, Nicolas; Dalvi, Mohit; Johnson, Colin; Abraham, Luke

    2016-04-01

    The ablation of metors in the thermosphere and mesosphere introduces a signficant source of particulate matter into the polar upper stratosphere. These meteoric smoke particles (MSP) initially form at nanometre sizes but in the stratosphere have grown to larger sizes (tens of nanometres) following coagulation. The presence of these smoke particles may represent a significant mechanism for the nucleation of polar stratospheric clouds and are also known to influence the properties of the stratospheric aerosol or Junge layer. In this presentation we present findings from experiments to investigate the influence of the MSP on the Junge layer, carried out with the UM-UKCA composition-climate model. The UM-UKCA model is a high-top (up to 80km) version of the general circulation model with well-resolved stratospheric dynamics, includes the aerosol microphysics module GLOMAP and has interactive sulphur chemistry suitable for the stratosphere and troposphere (Dhomse et al., 2014). We have recently added to UM-UKCA a source of meteoric smoke particles, based on prescribing the variation of the smoke particles from previous simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). In UM-UKCA, the MSP particles are transported within the GLOMAP aerosol framework, alongside interactive stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. For the experiments presented here, we have activated the interaction between the MSP and the stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. The MSP provide an important sink term for the gas phase sulphuric acid simulated in the model, with subsequent effects on the formation, growth and temporal evolution of stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol particles. By comparing simulations with and without the MSP-sulphur interactions we quantify the influence of the meteoric smoke on the properties of volcanically-quiescent Junge layer. We also investigate the extent to which the MSP may modulate the effects from SO2 injected into the stratosphere from volcanic

  3. Transported acid aerosols measured in southern Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, Gerald J.; Spengler, John D.; Koutrakis, Petros; Allen, George A.; Raizenne, Mark; Stern, Bonnie

    During the period 29 June 1986-9 August 1986, a field health study assessing the acute health effects of air pollutants on children was conducted at a summer girls' camp on the northern shore of Lake Erie in SW Ontario. Continuous air pollution measurements of SO 2, O 3, NO x, particulate sulfates, light scattering, and meteorological measurements including temperature, dew point, and wind speed and direction were made. Twelve-hour integrated samples of size fractioned particles were also obtained using dichotomous samplers and Harvard impactors equipped with an ammonia denuder for subsequent hydrogen ion determination. Particulate samples were analyzed for trace elements by X-ray fluorescence and Neutron Activation, and for organic and elemental carbon by a thermal/optical technique. The measured aerosol was periodically very acidic with observed 12-h averaged H + concentrations in the range < 10-560 nmoles m -3. The aerosol H + appeared to represent the net strong acidity after H 2SO 4 reaction with NH 3(g). Average daytime concentrations were higher than night-time for aerosol H +, sulfate, fine mass and ozone. Prolonged episodes of atmospheric acidity, sulfate, and ozone were associated with air masses arriving at the measurement site from the west and from the southwest over Lake Erie. Sulfate concentrations measured at the lakeshore camp were more than twice those measured at inland sites during extreme pollution episodes. The concentration gradient observed with onshore flow was potentially due to enhanced deposition near the lakeshore caused by discontinuities in the meteorological fields in this region.

  4. Holographic interferometry for aerosol particle characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Matthew J.; Subedi, Nava R.

    2015-01-01

    Using simulations based on Mie theory, this work shows how double-exposure digital holography can be used to measure the change in size of an expanding, or contracting, spherical particle. Here, a single particle is illuminated by a plane wave twice during its expansion: once when the particle is 27 λ in radius, and again when it is 47 λ. A hologram is formed from each illumination stage from the interference of the scattered and unscattered, i.e., incident, light. The two holograms are then superposed to form a double exposure. By applying the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory to the double-exposed hologram, a silhouette-like image of the particle is computationally reconstructed that is superposed with interference fringes. These fringes are a direct result of the change in particle size occurring between the two illumination stages. The study finds that expansion on the scale of ~ 6 λ is readily discerned from the reconstructed particle image. This work could be important for improved characterization of single and multiple aerosol particles in situ. For example, by illuminating an aerosol particle with infrared light, it may be possible to measure photothermally induced particle expansion, thus providing insight into a particle's material properties simultaneous with an image of the particle.

  5. Electronic cigarette aerosol particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Ingebrethsen, Bradley J; Cole, Stephen K; Alderman, Steven L

    2012-12-01

    The particle size distribution of aerosols produced by electronic cigarettes was measured in an undiluted state by a spectral transmission procedure and after high dilution with an electrical mobility analyzer. The undiluted e-cigarette aerosols were found to have particle diameters of average mass in the 250-450 nm range and particle number concentrations in the 10(9) particles/cm(3) range. These measurements are comparable to those observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke in prior studies and also measured in the current study with the spectral transmission method and with the electrical mobility procedure. Total particulate mass for the e-cigarettes calculated from the size distribution parameters measured by spectral transmission were in good agreement with replicate determinations of total particulate mass by gravimetric filter collection. In contrast, average particle diameters determined for e-cigarettes by the electrical mobility method are in the 50 nm range and total particulate masses calculated based on the suggested diameters are orders of magnitude smaller than those determined gravimetrically. This latter discrepancy, and the very small particle diameters observed, are believed to result from almost complete e-cigarette aerosol particle evaporation at the dilution levels and conditions of the electrical mobility analysis. A much smaller degree, ~20% by mass, of apparent particle evaporation was observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke. The spectral transmission method is validated in the current study against measurements on tobacco burning cigarette smoke, which has been well characterized in prior studies, and is supported as yielding an accurate characterization of the e-cigarette aerosol particle size distribution. PMID:23216158

  6. SCAVENGING OF AEROSOL PARTICLES BY PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne measurements have been made of aerosol particle size distributions (>0.01 micrometer) in aged air masses, in the plumes from several coal power plants and a large Kraft paper mill, and in the emissions from a volcano, before and after rain or snow showers. These measurem...

  7. Aerosol particle analysis by Raman scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, K.H.; Tang, I.N.

    1992-10-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopy is a very versatile tool for chemical characterization of micron-sized particles. Such particles are abundant in nature, and in numerous energy-related processes. In order to elucidate the formation mechanisms and understand the subsequent chemical transformation under a variety of reaction conditions, it is imperative to develop analytical measurement techniques for in situ monitoring of these suspended particles. In this report, we outline our recent work on spontaneous Raman, resonance Raman and non-linear Raman scattering as a novel technique for chemical analysis of aerosol particles as well as supersaturated solution droplets.

  8. Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, E.

    1996-05-01

    Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

  9. The hygroscopicity of indoor aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, L.

    1993-07-01

    A system to study the hygroscopic growth of particle was developed by combining a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) with a wetted wall reactor. This system is capable of mimicking the conditions in human respiratory tract, and measuring the particle size change due to the hygroscopic growth. The performance of the system was tested with three kinds of particles of known composition, NaCl, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and (NH{sub 4})HS0{sub 4} particles. The hygroscopicity of a variety of common indoor aerosol particles was studied including combustion aerosols (cigarette smoking, cooking, incenses and candles) and consumer spray products such as glass cleaner, general purpose cleaner, hair spray, furniture polish spray, disinfectant, and insect killer. Experiments indicate that most of the indoor aerosols show some hygroscopic growth and only a few materials do not. The magnitude of hygroscopic growth ranges from 20% to 300% depending on the particle size and fraction of water soluble components.

  10. Atmospheric Aerosol Nucleation: Formation of Sub-3 nm Particles and Their Subsequent Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosol nucleation is an important step in the chain reaction that lead to cloud formation but the nucleation mechanisms are poorly understand. Most of the previous aerosol nucleation studies were based on measurements of particles, typically larger than 3 nm, so it was unclear how gas phase molecules nucleate to form clusters and how they further grow to become aerosol particles. In this presentation, we will show recent results of aerosol nucleation based on direct measurements of sub-3 nm particles. We will show laboratory studies of multicomponent nucleation involving sulfuric acid, ammonia, and organic amines and atmospheric observations made in various atmospheric conditions (biogenic, marine, and less polluted continental atmosphere).

  11. Composition and formation of organic aerosol particles in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöhlker, C.; Wiedemann, K.; Sinha, B.; Shiraiwa, M.; Gunthe, S. S.; Artaxo, P.; Gilles, M. K.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Moffet, R. C.; Smith, M.; Weigand, M.; Martin, S. T.; Pöschl, U.; Andreae, M. O.

    2012-04-01

    We applied scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (STXM-NEXAFS) analysis to investigate the morphology and chemical composition of aerosol samples from a pristine tropical environment, the Amazon Basin. The samples were collected in the Amazonian rainforest during the rainy season and can be regarded as a natural background aerosol. The samples were found to be dominated by secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles in the fine and primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) in the coarse mode. Lab-generated SOA-samples from isoprene and terpene oxidation as well as pure organic compounds from spray-drying of aqueous solution were measured as reference samples. The aim of this study was to investigate the microphysical and chemical properties of a tropical background aerosol in the submicron size range and its internal mixing state. The lab-generated SOA and pure organic compounds occurred as spherical and mostly homogenous droplet-like particles, whereas the Amazonian SOA particles comprised a mixture of homogeneous droplets and droplets having internal structures due to atmospheric aging. In spite of the similar morphological appearance, the Amazon samples showed considerable differences in elemental and functional group composition. According to their NEXAFS spectra, three chemically distinct types of organic material were found and could be assigned to the following three categories: (1) particles with a pronounced carboxylic acid (COOH) peak similar to those of laboratory-generated SOA particles from terpene oxidation; (2) particles with a strong hydroxy (COH) signal similar to pure carbohydrate particles; and (3) particles with spectra resembling a mixture of the first two classes. In addition to the dominant organic component, the NEXAFS spectra revealed clearly resolved potassium (K) signals for all analyzed particles. During the rainy season and in the absence of anthropogenic influence, active biota is

  12. EFFECTS OF SULFURIC ACID AEROSOLS ON VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A continuous flow system for exposing plants to submicron aerosols of sulfuric acid has been developed and an operational model has been constructed. Exposure chambers have been designed to allow simultaneous exposures of the same plant to aerosol and control environments. All su...

  13. Quantification of aerosol chemical composition using continuous single particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, C.-H.; McGuire, M. L.; Godri, K. J.; Slowik, J. G.; Rehbein, P. J. G.; Evans, G. J.

    2011-07-01

    Mass concentrations of sulphate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) were determined from real time single particle data in the size range 0.1-3.0 μm measured by an Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) at urban and rural sites in Canada. To quantify chemical species within individual particles measured by an ATOFMS, ion peak intensity of m/z -97 for sulphate, -62 for nitrate, +18 for ammonium, +43 for OC, and +36 for EC were scaled using the number and size distribution data by an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) and a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). Hourly quantified chemical species from ATOFMS single-particle analysis were compared with collocated fine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 μm, PM2.5) chemical composition measurements by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) at a rural site, a Gas-Particle Ion Chromatograph (GPIC) at an urban site, and a Sunset Lab field OCEC analyzer at both sites. The highest correlation was found for nitrate, with correlation coefficients (Pearson r) of 0.89 (ATOFMS vs. GPIC) and 0.85 (ATOFMS vs. AMS). ATOFMS mass calibration factors, determined for the urban site, were used to calculate mass concentrations of the major PM2.5 chemical components at the rural site near the US border in southern Ontario. Mass reconstruction using the ATOFMS mass calibration factors agreed very well with the PM2.5 mass concentrations measured by a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM, r = 0.86) at the urban site and a light scattering monitor (DustTrak, r = 0.87) at the rural site. In the urban area nitrate was the largest contributor to PM2.5 mass in the winter, while organics and sulphate contributed ~64 % of the summer PM2.5 in the rural area, suggesting a strong influence of regional/trans-boundary pollution. The mass concentrations of five major species in ten size-resolved particle-types and aerosol acidity of each particle-type were determined for the rural site. On a mass basis

  14. Particle size distribution of indoor aerosol sources

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, K.B.

    1990-10-24

    As concern about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has grown in recent years, it has become necessary to determine the nature of particles produced by different indoor aerosol sources and the typical concentration that these sources tend to produce. These data are important in predicting the dose of particles to people exposed to these sources and it will also enable us to take effective mitigation procedures. Further, it will also help in designing appropriate air cleaners. A new state of the art technique, DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer) System is used to determine the particle size distributions of a number of sources. This system employs the electrical mobility characteristics of these particles and is very effective in the 0.01--1.0 {mu}m size range. A modified system that can measure particle sizes in the lower size range down to 3 nm was also used. Experimental results for various aerosol sources is presented in the ensuing chapters. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Condensation on Aerosol Particles and its Inhibition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peter Shen King

    The atmospheric aerosol is of primary importance in the formation of precipitation. Except in the neighbourhood of large sources of pollution most of the atmospheric particles are of natural origin, but human contribution is increasing at such a rate that within a comparatively short time it may equal nature's. Such an increase in the atmospheric particulate load may have significant effects on the distribution and intensity of precipitation. There is a general perception that most of the atmospheric particulate load is soluble in water or has some soluble component and soluble particles condense water more readily than insoluble. In this work a study is made of the solubility of the atmospheric aerosol at various relative humidities. The results confirm that much of the atmospheric aerosol is indeed soluble, but that the soluble proportion is highly variable. This result has significant implications for studies of air pollution in which the respirable fraction of the atmospheric aerosol is deduced from the results of long term dichotomous sampling. Results are also presented of studies in which an attempt was made to inhibit the condensation of water on man-made and adventitious particles with a view to modifying their possible climatic effects. This work has demonstrated that certain agents, notably long chain amines, do indeed have an inhibiting effect on the condensation of water on particles which have been exposed to them, but that the effect of the agents so far tested is not sufficiently great to be of immediate practical importance. It is concluded that further advances must await more precise methods of producing small supersaturations reliably and reproducibly.

  16. Spatial Variability of CCN Sized Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, A.; Väänänen, R.

    2014-12-01

    The computational limitations restrict the grid size used in GCM models, and for many cloud types they are too large when compared to the scale of the cloud formation processes. Several parameterizations for e.g. convective cloud formation exist, but information on spatial subgrid variation of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCNs) sized aerosol concentration is not known. We quantify this variation as a function of the spatial scale by using datasets from airborne aerosol measurement campaigns around the world including EUCAARI LONGREX, ATAR, INCA, INDOEX, CLAIRE, PEGASOS and several regional airborne campaigns in Finland. The typical shapes of the distributions are analyzed. When possible, we use information obtained by CCN counters. In some other cases, we use particle size distribution measured by for example SMPS to get approximated CCN concentration. Other instruments used include optical particle counters or condensational particle counters. When using the GCM models, the CCN concentration used for each the grid-box is often considered to be either flat, or as an arithmetic mean of the concentration inside the grid-box. However, the aircraft data shows that the concentration values are often lognormal distributed. This, combined with the subgrid variations in the land use and atmospheric properties, might cause that the aerosol-cloud interactions calculated by using mean values to vary significantly from the true effects both temporary and spatially. This, in turn, can cause non-linear bias into the GCMs. We calculate the CCN aerosol concentration distribution as a function of different spatial scales. The measurements allow us to study the variation of these distributions within from hundreds of meters up to hundreds of kilometers. This is used to quantify the potential error when mean values are used in GCMs.

  17. FTIR studies of low temperature sulfuric acid aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, S. E.; Tisdale, R. T.; Disselkamp, R. S.; Tolbert, M. A.; Wilson, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Sub-micrometer sized sulfuric acid H2SO4 particles were generated using a constant output atomizer source. The particles were then exposed to water vapor before being injected into a low temperature cell. Multipass transmission Fourier Transformation Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to determine the phase and composition of the aerosols as a function of time for periods of up to five hours. Binary H2SO4H2O aerosols with compositions from 35 to 95 wt % H2SO4 remained liquid for over 3 hours at room temperatures ranging from 189-240 K. These results suggest that it is very difficut to freeze SSAs via homogeneous nucleation. Attempts to form aerosols more dilute than 35 wt % H2SO4 resulted in ice formation.

  18. Organic aggregate formation in aerosols and its impact on the physicochemical properties of atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    Fatty acid salts and "humic" materials, found in abundance in atmospheric particles, are both anionic surfactants. Such materials are known to form organic aggregates or colloids in solution at very low aqueous concentrations. In a marine aerosol, micelle aggregates can form at a low fatty acid salt molality of ˜10 -3 m. In other types of atmospheric particles, such as biomass burning, biogenic, soil dust, and urban aerosols, "humic-like" materials exist in sufficient quantities to form micelle-like aggregates in solution. I show micelle formation limits the ability of surface-active organics in aerosols to reduce the surface tension of an atmospheric particle beyond about 10 dyne cm -1. A general phase diagram is presented for anionic surfactants to explain how surface-active organics can change the water uptake properties of atmospheric aerosols. Briefly such molecules can enhance and reduce water uptake by atmospheric aerosols at dry and humid conditions, respectively. This finding is consistent with a number of unexplained field and laboratory observations. Dry electron microscope images of atmospheric particles often indicate that organics may coat the surface of particles in the atmosphere. The surfactant phase diagram is used to trace the particle path back to ambient conditions in order to determine whether such coatings can exist on wet ambient aerosols. Finally, I qualitatively highlight how organic aggregate formation in aerosols may change the optical properties and chemical reactivity of atmospheric particles.

  19. The Impact of Aerosol Particle Mixing State on the Hygroscopicity of Sea Spray Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Schill, Steven R; Collins, Douglas B; Lee, Christopher; Morris, Holly S; Novak, Gordon A; Prather, Kimberly A; Quinn, Patricia K; Sultana, Camille M; Tivanski, Alexei V; Zimmermann, Kathryn; Cappa, Christopher D; Bertram, Timothy H

    2015-06-24

    Aerosol particles influence global climate by determining cloud droplet number concentrations, brightness, and lifetime. Primary aerosol particles, such as those produced from breaking waves in the ocean, display large particle-particle variability in chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state, all of which affect the ability of individual particles to accommodate water and grow into cloud droplets. Despite such diversity in molecular composition, there is a paucity of methods available to assess how particle-particle variability in chemistry translates to corresponding differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. Here, an approach has been developed that allows for characterization of the distribution of aerosol hygroscopicity within a chemically complex population of atmospheric particles. This methodology, when applied to the interpretation of nascent sea spray aerosol, provides a quantitative framework for connecting results obtained using molecular mimics generated in the laboratory with chemically complex ambient aerosol. We show that nascent sea spray aerosol, generated in situ in the Atlantic Ocean, displays a broad distribution of particle hygroscopicities, indicative of a correspondingly broad distribution of particle chemical compositions. Molecular mimics of sea spray aerosol organic material were used in the laboratory to assess the volume fractions and molecular functionality required to suppress sea spray aerosol hygroscopicity to the extent indicated by field observations. We show that proper accounting for the distribution and diversity in particle hygroscopicity and composition are important to the assessment of particle impacts on clouds and global climate. PMID:27162963

  20. FTIR studies of low temperature sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, S.E.; Tisdale, R.T.; Disselkamp, R.S.

    1995-05-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to study low temperature sulfuric acid aerosols representative of global stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). Sub-micrometer sized sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) particles were generated using a constant output atomizer source. The particles were then exposed to water vapor before being injected into a low temperature cell. Multipass transmission FTIR spectroscopy was used to determine the phase and composition of the aerosols as a function of time for periods of up to 5 hours. Binary H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O aerosols with compositions from 35 to 95 wt % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} remained liquid for over 3 hours at temperatures ranging from 189-240 K. These results suggest that it is very difficult to freeze SSAs via homogeneous nucleation. Attempts to form aerosols more dilute than 35 wt % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} resulted in ice formation. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Radial inhomogeneities in particle composition of single, levitated aerosol particles observed by Mie resonance spectroscopy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, U. K.; Steimer, S.; Lienhard, D.; Bastelberger, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent observations have indicated that organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere may exist in an amorphous semi-solid or even solid (i.e. glassy) state, e.g. [1]. The influence of highly viscous and glassy states on the timescale of aerosol particle equilibration with respect to water vapor have been investigated for some model systems of atmospheric aerosol, e.g. [2,3]. In particular, it has been shown that the kinetics of the water absorption/desorption process is controlled entirely by liquid-phase diffusion of water molecules for a highly viscous aerosol particle. A liquid phase diffusion model based on numerically solving the non-linear diffusion equation predicts strong internal gradients in water concentration when condensed phase diffusion impedes the water uptake from the gas phase [2]. Here we observe and quantify the internal concentration gradients in single, levitated, micron size aerosol particles of aqueous MBTCA (3-methyl-1,2,3-Butanetricarboxylic acid) and shikimic acid using elastic Mie resonance spectroscopy. A single, aqueous particle is levitated in an electro-dynamic balance (for details see [2]), dried for several days at room temperature, cooled to the target temperature and exposed to a rapid change in relative humidity. In addition to measuring the elastically backscattered light of a 'white light ' LED source and recording the full spectrum with a spectrograph as in [2], we use a tunable diode laser (TDL) to scan high resolution TE- and TM spectra. This combination allows observing various Mie resonance mode orders simultaneously. Since we perform the experiment at low temperatures and low humidities the changes in the Mie-spectra due to water uptake are sufficiently slow to resolve the kinetics. Experimental Mie resonance spectra are inverted to concentration profiles of water within the particle by applying the numerical diffusion model [2] in conjunction with Mie calculations of multilayered spheres [4]. Potential implications for

  2. Glass transition measurements in mixed organic and organic/inorganic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dette, Hans Peter; Qi, Mian; Schröder, David; Godt, Adelheid; Koop, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The recent proposal of a semi-solid or glassy state of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles has sparked intense research in that area. In particular, potential effects of a glassy aerosol state such as incomplete gas-to-particle partitioning of semi-volatile organics, inhibited chemical reactions and water uptake, and the potential to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei have been identified so far. Many of these studies use well-studied proxies for oxidized organics such as sugars or other polyols. There are, however, few measurements on compounds that do exist in atmospheric aerosol particles. Here, we have performed studies on the phase state of organics that actually occur in natural SOA particles arising from the oxidation of alpha-pinene emitted in boreal forests. We have investigated the two marker compounds pinonic acid and 3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA) and their mixtures. 3-MBCTA was synthesized from methyl isobutyrate and dimethyl maleate in two steps. In order to transfer these substances into a glassy state we have developed a novel aerosol spray drying technique. Dilute solutions of the relevant organics are atomized into aerosol particles which are dried subsequently by diffusion drying. The dried aerosol particles are then recollected in an impactor and studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), which provides unambiguous information on the aerosols' phase state, i.e. whether the particles are crystalline or glassy. In the latter case DSC is used to determine the glass transition temperature Tg of the investigated samples. Using the above setup we were able to determine Tg of various mixtures of organic aerosol compounds as a function of their dry mass fraction, thus allowing to infer a relation between Tg and the O:C ratio of the aerosols. Moreover, we also studied the glass transition behavior of mixed organic/inorganic aerosol particles, including the effects of liquid-liquid phase separation upon drying.

  3. Morphology and Optical Properties of Mixed Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Mehrnoush M.; Krieger, Ulrich; Rudich, Yinon; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Experiments and modeling studies have shown that deliquesced aerosols can be present not only as one-phase system containing organics, inorganic salts and water, but often as two-phase systems consisting of a predominantly organic and a predominantly inorganic aqueous phase 1,2. Recent laboratory studies conducted with model mixtures representing tropospheric aerosols1,2,3, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from smog chamber experiments4, and field measurements5 suggest that liquid- liquid phase separations (LLPS) is indeed a common phenomenon in mixed organic/ ammonium sulfate (AS) particles. During LLPS, particles may adopt different morphologies mainly core- shell and partially engulfed. A core- shell configuration will have consequences for heterogeneous chemistry and hygroscopicity and as a result will alter the optical properties of the particles since the aqueous inorganic-rich phase will be totally enclosed by a probably highly viscous organic coating with low diffusivity for reactants and water. The primary objective of this project is to establish a method for investigating the morphology of mixed inorganic and absorbing organic compounds of atmospheric relevance and study their radiative properties before, during, and after phase transitions mainly during LLPS. This will be the first study looking into the radiative effect of LLPS in detail. In this first experiment, the behavior of single droplets of carminic acid (CA)/ AS/ H2O mixture was monitored during relative humidity (RH) cycles using optical microscopy. The same mixture particle was levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and the change in its absorption properties was measured at varying RH. We also intend to determine the occurrence of LLPS in accumulation- sized particles and the change in their absorption using a cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer. If LLPS alters the absorptive properties of the suggested model aerosols significantly, absorption measurements of accumulation mode

  4. The Impact of Aerosol Particle Mixing State on the Hygroscopicity of Sea Spray Aerosol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol particles influence global climate by determining cloud droplet number concentrations, brightness, and lifetime. Primary aerosol particles, such as those produced from breaking waves in the ocean, display large particle–particle variability in chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state, all of which affect the ability of individual particles to accommodate water and grow into cloud droplets. Despite such diversity in molecular composition, there is a paucity of methods available to assess how particle–particle variability in chemistry translates to corresponding differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. Here, an approach has been developed that allows for characterization of the distribution of aerosol hygroscopicity within a chemically complex population of atmospheric particles. This methodology, when applied to the interpretation of nascent sea spray aerosol, provides a quantitative framework for connecting results obtained using molecular mimics generated in the laboratory with chemically complex ambient aerosol. We show that nascent sea spray aerosol, generated in situ in the Atlantic Ocean, displays a broad distribution of particle hygroscopicities, indicative of a correspondingly broad distribution of particle chemical compositions. Molecular mimics of sea spray aerosol organic material were used in the laboratory to assess the volume fractions and molecular functionality required to suppress sea spray aerosol hygroscopicity to the extent indicated by field observations. We show that proper accounting for the distribution and diversity in particle hygroscopicity and composition are important to the assessment of particle impacts on clouds and global climate. PMID:27162963

  5. Sources and composition of urban aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, M.; Johansson, C.; Mårtensson, M.; Struthers, H.; Ahlm, L.; Nilsson, D.

    2011-09-01

    From May 2008 to March 2009 aerosol emissions were measured using the eddy covariance method covering the size range 0.25 to 2.5 μm diameter (Dp) from a 105 m tower, in central Stockholm, Sweden. Supporting chemical aerosol data were collected at roof and street level. Results show that the inorganic fraction of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and sea salt accounts for approximately 15% of the total aerosol mass <1 μm Dp (PM1) with water soluble soil contributing 11% and water insoluble soil 47%. Carbonaceous compounds were at the most 27% of PM1 mass. It was found that heating the air from the tower to 200 °C resulted in the loss of approximately 60% of the aerosol volume at 0.25 μm Dp whereas only 40% of the aerosol volume was removed at 0.6 μm Dp. Further heating to 300 °C caused very little additional losses <0.6 μm Dp. The chemical analysis did not include carbonaceous compounds, but based on the difference between the total mass concentration and the sum of the analyzed non-carbonaceous materials, it can be assumed that the non-volatile particulate material (heated to 300 °C) consists mainly of carbonaceous compounds, including elemental carbon. Furthermore, it was found that the non-volatile particle fraction <0.6 μm Dp correlated (r2 = 0.4) with the BC concentration at roof level in the city, supporting the assumption that the non-volatile material consists of carbonaceous compounds. The average diurnal cycles of the BC emissions from road traffic (as inferred from the ratio of the incremental concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and BC measured on a densely trafficked street) and the fluxes of non-volatile material at tower level are in close agreement, suggesting a traffic source of BC. We have estimated the emission factors (EFs) for non-volatile particles <0.6 μm Dp to be 2.4±1.4 mg veh-1 km-1 based on either CO2 fluxes or traffic activity data. Light (LDV) and heavy duty vehicle (HDV) EFs were estimated using multiple linear regression and

  6. Gas-aerosol cycling of ammonia and nitric acid in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofs, Geert-Jan; Derksen, Jeroen

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric ammonia and nitric acid are present over NW Europe in large abundance. Observations made during the IMPACT measurement campaign (May 2008, Cabauw, The Netherlands) show a pronounced diurnal cycle of aerosol ammonium and nitrate on relatively dry days. Simultaneously, AERONET data show a distinct diurnal cycle in aerosol optical thickness (AOT). We used a global aerosol-climate model (ECHAM5-HAM) and a detailed aerosol-cloud column model to help analyse the observations from this period. The study shows that the diurnal cycle in AOT is partly associated with particle number concentration, with distinct peaks in the morning and evening. More important is relative humidity (RH). RH maximizes in the night and early morning, decreases during the morning and increases again in the evening. The particle wet radius, and therefore AOT, changes accordingly. In addition, the RH variability also influences chemistry associated with ammonia and nitric acid (formation of ammonium nitrate, dissolution in aerosol water), resulting in the observed diurnal cycle of aerosol ammonium and nitrate. The additional aerosol matter increases the hygroscopicity of the particles, and this leads to further swelling by water vapor condensation and a further increase of AOT. During the day, as RH decreases and the particles shrink, aerosol ammonium and nitrate are again partly expelled to the gas phase. This behaviour contributes significantly to the observed diurnal cycle in AOT, and it illustrates the complexity of using AOT as a proxy for aerosol concentrations in aerosol climate studies in the case of heavily polluted areas.

  7. Reversible and irreversible processing of biogenic olefins on acidic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.-M.

    2008-04-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that heterogeneous chemistry of oxygenated hydrocarbons, primarily carbonyls, plays a role in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA); however, evidence is emerging that direct uptake of alkenes on acidic aerosols does occur and can contribute to SOA formation. In the present study, significant uptake of monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes to acidic sulfate aerosols is found under various conditions in a reaction chamber. Proton transfer mass spectrometry is used to quantify the organic gases, while an aerosol mass spectrometer is used to quantify the organic mass uptake and obtain structural information for heterogeneous products. Aerosol mass spectra are consistent with several mechanisms including acid catalyzed olefin hydration, cationic polymerization and organic ether formation, while measurable decreases in the sulfate mass on a per particle basis suggest that the formation of organosulfate compounds is also likely. A portion of the heterogeneous reactions appears to be reversible, consistent with reversible olefin hydration reactions. A slow increase in the organic mass after a fast initial uptake is attributed to irreversible reactions, consistent with polymerization and organosulfate formation. Uptake coefficients (γ) were estimated for a fast initial uptake governed by the mass accommodation coefficient (α) and ranged from 1×10-6-2.5×10-2. Uptake coefficients for a subsequent slower reactive uptake ranged from 1×10-7-1×10-4. These processes may potentially lead to a considerable amount of SOA from the various biogenic hydrocarbons under acidic conditions, which can be highly significant for freshly nucleated aerosols, particularly given the large array of atmospheric olefins.

  8. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    PubMed

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions

  9. INDOOR CONCENTRATION MODELING OF AEROSOL STRONG ACIDITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for estimating indoor concentrations of acid aerosol was applied to data collected during the summer of 1989, in a densely populated location in New Jersey. he model, from a study of a semi-rural community in Pennsylvania, was used to estimate indoor concentrations of aer...

  10. Inhomogeneities in particle composition of single, levitated aerosol particles observed by Mie resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Ulrich; Lienhard, Daniel; Bastelberger, Sandra; Steimer, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    Recent observations have indicated that organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere may exist in an amorphous semi-solid or even solid (i.e. glassy) state, e.g. [1]. The influence of highly viscous and glassy states on the timescale of aerosol particle equilibration with respect to water vapor have been investigated for some model systems of atmospheric aerosol, e.g. [2,3]. In particular, it has been shown that the kinetics of the water absorption/desorption process is controlled entirely by liquid-phase diffusion of water molecules for a highly viscous aerosol particle. A liquid phase diffusion model based on numerically solving the non-linear diffusion equation predicts strong internal gradients in water concentration when condensed phase diffusion impedes the water uptake from the gas phase [2]. Here we observe and quantify the internal concentration gradients in single, levitated, micron size aerosol particles of aqueous shikimic acid using elastic Mie resonance spectroscopy. A single, aqueous particle is levitated in an electro-dynamic balance (for details see [2]), dried for several days at room temperature, cooled to the target temperature and exposed to a rapid change in relative humidity. In addition to measuring the elastically backscattered light of a "white light" LED source and recording the full spectrum with a spectrograph as in [2], we use a tunable diode laser (TDL) to scan high resolution TE- and TM spectra. This combination allows observing various Mie resonance mode orders simultaneously. Since we perform the experiment at low temperatures and low humidities the changes in the Mie-spectra due to water uptake are sufficiently slow to resolve the kinetics. Experimental Mie resonance spectra are inverted to concentration profiles of water within the particle by applying the numerical diffusion model [2] in conjunction with Mie calculations of multilayered spheres [4]. [1] A. Virtanen et al. (2010): An amorphous solid state of biogenic secondary

  11. Identification of characteristic mass spectrometric markers for primary biological aerosol particles and comparison with field data from submicron pristine aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freutel, F.; Schneider, J.; Zorn, S. R.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Hoffmann, T.; Martin, S. T.

    2009-04-01

    The contribution of primary biological aerosol (PBA) to the total aerosol particle concentration is estimated to range between 25 and 80%, depending on location and season. Especially in the tropical rain forest it is expected that PBA is a major source of particles in the supermicron range, and is also an important fraction of the submicron aerosol. PBA particles like plant fragments, pollen, spores, fungi, viruses etc. contain chemical compounds as proteins, sugars, amino acids, chlorophyll, and cellular material as cellulose. For this reason we have performed mass spectrometric laboratory measurements (Aerodyne C-ToF and W-ToF AMS, single particle laser ablation instrument SPLAT) on pure submicron aerosol particles containing typical PBA compounds in order to identify typical mass spectral patterns of these compounds and to explain the observed fragmentation patterns on the basis of molecular structures. These laboratory data were compared to submicron particle mass spectra obtained during AMAZE-08 (Amazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment, Brazil, February/March 2008). The results indicate that characteristic m/z ratios for carbohydrates (e.g., glucose, saccharose, levoglucosan, mannitol) can be identified, for example m/z = 60(C2H4O2+) or m/z = 61(C2H5O2+). Certain characteristic peaks for amino acids were also identified in the laboratory experiments. In the field data from AMAZE-08, these characteristic peaks for carbohydrates and amino acids were found, and their contribution to the total organic mass was estimated to about 5%. Fragment ions from peptides and small proteins were also identified in laboratory experiments. Larger proteins, however, seem to become oxidized to CO2+ to a large extend in the vaporizing process of the AMS. Thus, detection of proteins in atmospheric aerosol particles with the AMS appears to be difficult.

  12. Exposure of acid aerosol for schoolchildren in metropolitan Taipei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, I.-Fang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lin, Chun-Ji; Chen, Yi-Ju; Sung, Fung-Chang; Chen, Mei-Lien

    Metropolitan Taipei, which is located in the subtropical area, is characterized by high population and automobile densities. For convenience, most primary schools are located near major roads. This study explores the exposure of acid aerosols for schoolchildren in areas in Taipei with different traffic densities. Acid aerosols were collected by using a honeycomb denuder filter pack sampling system (HDS). Experimental results indicated that the air pollutants were significantly correlated with traffic densities. The ambient air NO 2, SO 2, HNO 3, NO 3-, SO 42-, and aerosol acidity concentrations were 31.3 ppb, 4.7 ppb, 1.3 ppb, 1.9 μg m -3, 18.5 μg m -3, and 49.5 nmol m -3 in high traffic density areas, and 6.1 ppb, 1.8 ppb, 0.9 ppb, 0.7 μg m -3, 8.8 μg m -3 and 14.7 nmol m -3 in low traffic density areas. The exposure levels of acid aerosols for schoolchildren would be higher than the measurements because the sampling height was 5 m above the ground. The SO 2 levels were low (0.13-8.03 ppb) in the metropolitan Taipei. However, the SO 42- concentrations were relatively high, and might be attributed to natural emissions of sulfur-rich geothermal sources. The seasonal variations of acid aerosol concentrations were also observed. The high levels of acidic particles in spring time may be attributed to the Asian dust storm and low height of the mixture layer. We conclude that automobile contributed not only the primary pollutants but also the secondary acid aerosols through the photochemical reaction. Schoolchildren were exposed to twice the acid aerosol concentrations in high traffic density areas compared to those in low traffic density areas. The incidence of allergic rhinitis of schoolchildren in the high traffic density areas was the highest in spring time. Accompanied by high temperature variation and high levels of air pollution in spring, the health risk of schoolchildren had been observed.

  13. Initial size distributions and hygroscopicity of indoor combustion aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Hopke, P.K.

    1993-10-01

    Cigarette smoke, incense smoke, natural gas flames, propane fuel flames, and candle flames are contributors of indoor aerosol particles. To provide a quantitative basis for the modeling of inhaled aerosol deposition pattern, the hygroscopic growth of particles from these five sources as well as the source size distributions were measured. Because the experiments were performed on the bases of particles of single size, it provided not only the averaged particle`s hygroscopic growth of each source, but also the detailed size change for particles of different sizes within the whole size spectrum. The source particle size distribution measurements found that cigarette smoke and incense smoke contained particles in the size range of 100-700 nm, while the natural gas, propane, and candle flames generated particles between 10 and 100 nm. The hygroscopic growth experiments showed that these combustion aerosol particles could grow 10% to 120%, depending on the particle sizes and origins. 18 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Identification of an organic coating on marine aerosol particles by TOF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervahattu, Heikki; Juhanoja, Jyrki; Kupiainen, Kaarle

    2002-08-01

    Marine aerosol particles play an important role in atmospheric processes. It has been suggested that as marine aerosol particles form, they acquire a coating of organic surfactants. This theory has been supported only by indirect evidence. Recently, we gave new morphological indication of such organic coating without however providing molecular speciation. Here we have studied the surface of marine aerosol particles by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), which is very suitable for surface research due to its unique combination of surface sensitivity and the detailed molecular information obtained. Spectra from the outermost surface gave high intensity for palmitic acid and lower peaks for other fatty acids. According to TOF-SIMS images, palmitic acid was distributed on small particles, similar with the marine particles. Sputtering stripped palmitic acid and revealed the inner core of the sea-salt particles. Our results show that fatty acids are important ingredients of the outermost surface layer of the studied aerosol particles.

  15. Acidic sulfate aerosols: characterization and exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, P J; Waldman, J M

    1989-01-01

    Exposures to acidic aerosol in the atmosphere are calculated from data reported in the scientific literature. The majority of date was not derived from studies necessarily designed to examine human exposures. Most of the studies were designed to investigate the characteristics of the atmosphere. However, the measurements were useful in defining two potential exposure situations: regional stagnation and transport conditions and local plume impacts. Levels of acidic aerosol in excess of 20 to 40 micrograms/m3 (as H2SO4) have been observed for time durations ranging from 1 to 12 hr. These were associated with high, but not necessarily the highest, atmospheric SO4(2)- levels. Exposures of 100 to 900 micrograms/m3/hr were calculated for the acid events that were monitored. In contrast, earlier London studies indicated that apparent acidity in excess of 100 micrograms/m3 (as H2SO4) was present in the atmosphere, and exposures less than 2000 micrograms/m3/hr were possible. Our present knowledge about the frequency, magnitude, and duration of acidic sulfate aerosol events and episodes is insufficient. Efforts must be made to gather more data, but these should be done in such a way that evaluation of human exposure is the focus of the research. In addition, further data are required on the mechanisms of formation of H2SO4 and on what factors can be used to predict acidic sulfate episodes. PMID:2651103

  16. Importance of relative humidity in the oxidative ageing of organic aerosols: case study of the ozonolysis of maleic acid aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallimore, P. J.; Achakulwisut, P.; Pope, F. D.; Davies, J. F.; Spring, D. R.; Kalberer, M.

    2011-12-01

    Many important atmospheric aerosol processes depend on the chemical composition of the aerosol, e.g. water uptake and particle cloud interactions. Atmospheric ageing processes, such as oxidation reactions, significantly and continuously change the chemical composition of aerosol particles throughout their lifetime. These ageing processes are often poorly understood. In this study we utilize an aerosol flow tube set up and an ultra-high resolution mass spectrometer to explore the effect of relative humidity (RH) in the range of <5-90% on the ozonolysis of maleic acid aerosol which is employed as model organic aerosol system. Due to the slow reaction kinetics relatively high ozone concentrations of 160-200 ppm were used to achieve an appreciable degree of oxidation of maleic acid. The effect of oxidative ageing on the hygroscopicity of maleic acid particles is also investigated using an electrodynamic balance and thermodynamic modelling. RH has a profound effect on the oxidation of maleic acid particles. Very little oxidation is observed at RH < 50% and the only observed reaction products are glyoxylic acid and formic acid. In comparison, when RH > 50% there are about 15 oxidation products identified. This increased oxidation was observed even when the particles were exposed to high humidities long after a low RH ozonolysis reaction. This result might have negative implications for the use of water as an extraction solvent for the analysis of oxidized organic aerosols. These humidity-dependent differences in the composition of the ozonolyzed aerosol demonstrate that water is both a key reactant in the oxidation scheme and a determinant of particle phase and hence diffusivity. The measured chemical composition of the processed aerosol is used to model the hygroscopic growth, which compares favourably with water uptake results from the electrodynamic balance measurements. A reaction mechanism is presented which takes into account the RH dependent observations. This

  17. Acid aerosol transport episodes in Toronto, Ontario

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, G.D.; Waldman, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    Authors used recently developed equipment to continuously monitor levels of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, NH/sub 4/HSO/sub 4/ and (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ concentrations in the ambient air outside Toronto, Ontario. These data were combined with 48-hour isobaric air mass back-trajectories ending in Toronto on each of the four days with highest acid (and sulfate) aerosol levels. The air masses with highest acid levels were found to have first passed over the SO/sub 2/ source region of the U.S. and then across the Great Lakes to Toronto. The role of ammonia as a modulator of aerosol acidity for eastern U.S. cities but not for Toronto (where the Great Lakes serve as ammonia sinks) is also discussed.

  18. Size matters in the water uptake and hygroscopic growth of atmospherically relevant multicomponent aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Laskina, Olga; Morris, Holly S; Grandquist, Joshua R; Qin, Zhen; Stone, Elizabeth A; Tivanski, Alexei V; Grassian, Vicki H

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the interactions of water with atmospheric aerosols is crucial for determining the size, physical state, reactivity, and climate impacts of this important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Here we show that water uptake and hygroscopic growth of multicomponent, atmospherically relevant particles can be size dependent when comparing 100 nm versus ca. 6 μm sized particles. It was determined that particles composed of ammonium sulfate with succinic acid and of a mixture of chlorides typical of the marine environment show size-dependent hygroscopic behavior. Microscopic analysis of the distribution of components within the aerosol particles show that the size dependence is due to differences in the mixing state, that is, whether particles are homogeneously mixed or phase separated, for different sized particles. This morphology-dependent hygroscopicity has consequences for heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry as well as aerosol interactions with electromagnetic radiation and clouds. PMID:25521409

  19. EXPOSURE MODELING OF ACID AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting an intensive characterization and human exposure monitoring program of acid species and related air pollutants in an urban environment. he EPA's Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory (AREAL) in coopera...

  20. Particle size distributions of several commonly used seeding aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswy, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    During the course of experimentation, no solid particle powder could be found which produced an aerosol with a narrow particle size distribution when fluidization was the only flow process used in producing the aerosol. The complication of adding particle size fractionation processes to the aerosol generation effort appears to be avoidable. In this regard, a simple sonic orifice is found to be effective in reducing the percentage of agglomerates in the several metal oxide powders tested. Marginally beneficial results are obtained for a 0.5/99.5 percent by weight mixture of the flow agent and metal oxide powder. However, agglomeration is observed to be enhanced when the flow agent percentage is increased to 5 percent. Liquid atomization using the Collison nebulizer as well as a version of the Laskin nozzle resulted in polydispersed aerosols with particle size distributions heavily weighted by the small particle end of the size spectrum. The aerosol particle size distributions produced by the vaporization/condensation seeder are closer to the ideal monodispersed aerosol than any of the other aerosols tested. In addition, this seeding approach affords a measure of control over particle size and particle production rate.

  1. Venus -Mesospheric hazes of ice, dust, and acid aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Keesee, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    Four distinct types of particles are suggested to be present in the upper atmosphere of Venus. The lowest and densest haze may consist of a submicron sulfuric acid aerosol which extends above the cloud tops, up to about 80 km, representing an extension of the upper cloud deck. Temperature structure measurements in the 70-120 km altitude range indicate the occasional appearance of two independent water ice layers, of which the lower may form between 80 and 100 km and is probably the detached haze layer noted in high contrast limb photography. A nucleation of this ice layer on sulfuric acid aerosols is hypothesized. Temperatures of the Venus mesopause, near 120 km altitude, are frequently cold enough to allow ice nucleation on meteoric dust or ambient ions, yielding a haze (analogous to noctilucent clouds on earth) which is expected to be tenuous to the point of optical invisibility.

  2. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice particles on glassy aerosols modifies TTL cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, T. W.; Murray, B. J.; Dobbie, S.; Al-Jumur, S. M.; Cui, Z.; Wagner, R.; Moehler, O.; Schnaiter, M.; Benz, S.; Niemand, M.; Saathoff, H.; Skrotzki, J.; Ebert, V.; Wagner, S.; Karcher, B.

    2010-12-01

    Experiments at the AIDA chamber, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, have shown that glassy aqueous citric acid aerosol can nucleate ice at temperatures relevant to the tropical tropopause layer (TTL)(1). Modelling suggests this new route to the formation of TTL cirrus can provide an explanation for the very low ice particle number density observed in cirrus clouds in this region and may lead to high in-cloud supersaturations(1). Nucleation of ice on glassy aerosol is consistent with the absence of traditional ice nuclei in sampled TTL cirrus residue(2). In addition, we will present new data from experiments performed in July 2010 at the AIDA chamber using glassy aerosols composed of other atmospherically relevant compounds (levoglucosan, raffinose) and an internal mixture of five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate (raffinose/M5AS)(3). All four systems tested nucleate ice when in a glassy state. This indicates that heterogeneous ice nucleation is a general property of glassy aerosols and that natural aerosols which are composed of similar molecules will also nucleate ice if glassy. Glassy aqueous levoglucosan and raffinose/M5AS aerosol nucleated ice at temperatures similar to those found for glassy aqueous citric acid aerosol (<202 K). Whereas raffinose, which forms a glass at much higher temperatures, nucleated ice heterogeneously at up to ~220 K. This activity at higher temperatures suggests that ice nucleation by glassy aerosol may also play a role in the formation of warmer ice clouds. (1)B. J. Murray et al., Heterogeneous nucleation of ice particles on glassy aerosols under cirrus conditions, Nature Geosci, 2010, 3, 233-237. (2)K. D. Froyd et al., Aerosols that form subvisible cirrus at the tropical tropopause, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2010, 10, 209-218. (3)B. Zobrist et al., Do atmospheric aerosols form glasses?, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2008, 8, 5221-5244.

  3. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, S.; Zubler, E. M.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-08-01

    An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented into COSMO-Model, the regional weather forecast and climate model of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO). The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed us to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snowflakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snowflakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. Thereby, the processes impact the total aerosol number and mass and additionally alter the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble Aitken and accumulation mode and generating coarse-mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases

  4. Ambient aerosols remain highly acidic despite dramatic sulfate reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, Athanasios; Weber, Rodney; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead

    2016-04-01

    The pH of fine particles has many vital environmental impacts. By affecting aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity, particle pH is linked to regional air quality and climate, and adverse effects on human health. Sulfate is often the main acid component that drives pH of fine particles (i.e., PM2.5) and is neutralized to varying degrees by gas phase ammonia. Sulfate levels have decreased by approximately 70% over the Southeastern United States in the last fifteen years, but measured ammonia levels have been fairly steady implying the aerosol may becoming more neutral. Using a chemically comprehensive data set, combined with a thermodynamic analysis, we show that PM2.5 in the Southeastern U.S. is highly acidic (pH between 0 and 2), and that pH has remained relatively unchanged throughout the past decade and a half of decreasing sulfate. Even with further sulfate reductions, pH buffering by gas-particle partitioning of ammonia is expected to continue until sulfate drops to near background levels, indicating that fine particle pH will remain near current levels into the future. These results are non-intuitive and reshape expectations of how sulfur emission reductions impact air quality in the Southeastern U.S. and possibly other regions across the globe.

  5. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    SciTech Connect

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, Ditte; Rusanen, A.; Boy, Michael; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Zelenyuk, Alla; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-11

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle- phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: 1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), 2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and 3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers.

  6. High aerosol acidity despite declining atmospheric sulfate concentrations over the past 15 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Rodney J.; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead G.; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Particle acidity affects aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity. Sulfate is often the main acid component of aerosols, and largely determines the acidity of fine particles under 2.5 μm in diameter, PM2.5. Over the past 15 years, atmospheric sulfate concentrations in the southeastern United States have decreased by 70%, whereas ammonia concentrations have been steady. Similar trends are occurring in many regions globally. Aerosol ammonium nitrate concentrations were assumed to increase to compensate for decreasing sulfate, which would result from increasing neutrality. Here we use observed gas and aerosol composition, humidity, and temperature data collected at a rural southeastern US site in June and July 2013 (ref. ), and a thermodynamic model that predicts pH and the gas-particle equilibrium concentrations of inorganic species from the observations to show that PM2.5 at the site is acidic. pH buffering by partitioning of ammonia between the gas and particle phases produced a relatively constant particle pH of 0-2 throughout the 15 years of decreasing atmospheric sulfate concentrations, and little change in particle ammonium nitrate concentrations. We conclude that the reductions in aerosol acidity widely anticipated from sulfur reductions, and expected acidity-related health and climate benefits, are unlikely to occur until atmospheric sulfate concentrations reach near pre-anthropogenic levels.

  7. Probing the bulk viscosity of particles using aerosol optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Rory; Bones, David L.; Reid, Jonathan P.

    2012-10-01

    Holographic aerosol optical tweezers can be used to trap arrays of aerosol particles allowing detailed studies of particle properties and processes at the single particle level. Recent observations have suggested that secondary organic aerosol may exist as ultra-viscous liquids or glassy states at low relative humidity, potentially a significant factor in influencing their role in the atmosphere and their activation to form cloud droplets. A decrease in relative humidity surrounding a particle leads to an increased concentration of solute in the droplet as the droplet returns to equilibrium and, thus, an increase in the bulk viscosity. We demonstrate that the timescales for condensation and evaporation processes correlate with particle viscosity, showing significant inhibition in mass transfer kinetics using ternary sucrose/sodium chloride/water droplets as a proxy to atmospheric multi-component aerosol. We go on to study the fundamental process of aerosol coagulation in aerosol particle arrays, observing the relaxation of non-spherical composite particles formed on coalescence. We demonstrate the use of bright-field imaging and elastic light scattering to make measurements of the timescale for the process of binary coalescence contrasting the rheological properties of aqueous sucrose and sodium chloride aerosol over a range of relative humidities.

  8. Uptake of Ambient Organic Gases to Acidic Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.

    2009-05-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere has been an area of significant interest due to its climatic relevance, its effects on air quality and human health. Due largely to the underestimation of SOA by regional and global models, there has been an increasing number of studies focusing on alternate pathways leading to SOA. In this regard, recent work has shown that heterogeneous and liquid phase reactions, often leading to oligomeric material, may be a route to SOA via products of biogenic and anthropogenic origin. Although oligomer formation in chamber studies has been frequently observed, the applicability of these experiments to ambient conditions, and thus the overall importance of oligomerization reactions remain unclear. In the present study, ambient air is drawn into a Teflon smog chamber and exposed to acidic sulfate aerosols which have been formed in situ via the reaction of SO3 with water vapor. The aerosol composition is measured with a High Resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), and particle size distributions are monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The use of ambient air and relatively low inorganic particle loading potentially provides clearer insight into the importance of heterogeneous reactions. Results of experiments, with a range of sulfate loadings show that there are several competing processes occurring on different timescales. A significant uptake of ambient organic gases to the particles is observed immediately followed by a slow shift towards higher m/z over a period of several hours indicating that higher molecular weight products (possibly oligomers) are being formed through a reactive process. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions can occur with ambient organic gases, even in the presence of ammonia, which may have significant implications to the ambient atmosphere where particles may be neutralized after their formation.

  9. Indoor concentration modeling of aerosol strong acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenka, M.; Waldman, J.; Suh, H.; Koutrakis, P.

    1993-01-01

    A model for estimating indoor concentrations of acid aerosol was applied to data collected during the summer of 1989, in a densely populated location in New Jersey. The model, from a study of a semi-rural community in Pennsylvania, was used to estimate indoor concentrations of aerosol strong acidity (H+) at an elderly care residence in suburban New Jersey. The purpose of the present work is to assess the applicability of the model for predicting H+ exposures in a suburban environment and to evaluate the models performance for daytime and nighttime periods. Indoor and outdoor samples were taken at an elderly care home between June 20 and July 30, 1989. The indoor and outdoor monitoring schedule collected two 12-h samples per day. Samples were taken with the Indoor Denuder Sampler (IDS). Samples were analyzed for indoor and outdoor concentrations of aerosol strong acidity (H+), ammonia (NH3), and anion determination. The model generally underestimated the indoor H+ concentration. Slight improvement was seen in the model estimate of H+ for the nighttime period (7:00 pm to 7:00 am, local time). The model applied to the site in New Jersey did not predict the indoor H+ concentrations as well as it did for the experiment from which it was developed.

  10. Reversible and irreversible processing of biogenic olefins on acidic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.-M.

    2007-08-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that heterogeneous chemistry of oxygenated hydrocarbons, primarily carbonyls, plays a role in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA); however, evidence is emerging that direct uptake of alkenes on acidic aerosols does occur and can contribute to SOA formation. In the present study, significant uptake of monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes to acidic sulfate aerosols is found under various conditions in a reaction chamber. Proton transfer mass spectrometry is used to quantify the organic gases, while an aerosol mass spectrometer is used to quantify the organic mass uptake and obtain structural information for heterogeneous products. Aerosol mass spectra are consistent with several mechanisms including acid catalyzed olefin hydration, cationic polymerization and organic ester formation, while measurable decreases in the sulfate mass on a per particle basis suggest that the formation of organosulfate compounds is also likely. A portion of the heterogeneous reactions appears to be reversible, consistent with reversible olefin hydration reactions. A slow increase in the organic mass after a fast initial uptake is attributed to irreversible reactions, consistent with polymerization and organosulfate formation. Uptake coefficients (γ) were estimated for a fast initial uptake governed by the mass accommodation coefficient (α) and ranged from 1×10-6-2.5×10-2. Uptake coefficients for a subsequent slower reactive uptake ranged from 1×10-7-1×10-4. These processes are estimated to potentially produce greater than 2.5 μg m-3 of SOA from the various biogenic hydrocarbons under atmospheric conditions, which can be highly significant given the large array of atmospheric olefins.

  11. Optimized sparse-particle aerosol representations for modeling cloud-aerosol interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, Laura; McGraw, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Sparse representations of atmospheric aerosols are needed for efficient regional- and global-scale chemical transport models. Here we introduce a new framework for representing aerosol distributions, based on the method of moments. Given a set of moment constraints, we show how linear programming can be used to identify collections of sparse particles that approximately maximize distributional entropy. The collections of sparse particles derived from this approach reproduce CCN activity of the exact model aerosol distributions with high accuracy. Additionally, the linear programming techniques described in this study can be used to bound key aerosol properties, such as the number concentration of CCN. Unlike the commonly used sparse representations, such as modal and sectional schemes, the maximum-entropy moment-based approach is not constrained to pre-determined size bins or assumed distribution shapes. This study is a first step toward a new aerosol simulation scheme that will track multivariate aerosol distributions with sufficient computational efficiency for large-scale simulations.

  12. Morphology and Optical Properties of Mixed Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Mehrnoush M.; Krieger, Ulrich; Rudich, Yinon; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Experiments and modeling studies have shown that deliquesced aerosols can exist not only as one-phase system containing organics, inorganic salts and water, but often as two-phase systems consisting of a predominantly organic and a predominantly inorganic aqueous phase (1,2). Recent laboratory studies conducted with model mixtures representing tropospheric aerosols (1,2,3), secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from smog chamber experiments (4), and field measurements (5) suggest that liquid-liquid phase separations (LLPS) is indeed a common phenomenon in mixed organic/ inorganic particles. During LLPS, particles may adopt different morphologies mainly core-shell and partially engulfed. A core-shell configuration will have consequences for heterogeneous chemistry and hygroscopicity and as a result will alter the optical properties of the particles in particular for organic phases containing absorbing molecules, e.g. brown carbon. The primary objective of this project is to establish a method for investigating the morphology of mixed inorganic and absorbing organic compounds of atmospheric relevance and study their radiative properties before, during, and after phase transitions mainly during LLPS. This will be the first study looking into the radiative effect of LLPS in detail. Our ternary model system consist of ammonium sulfate (AS)/ Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)/ and water (H2O). Carminic acid (CA) was added as a proxy for an absorbing organic compound to the system. The behavior of single droplets of above ternary mixture was monitored during relative humidity (RH) cycles using optical microscopy. The same ternary mixture particle was levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and the change in its absorption properties was measured at varying RH. In addition, Mie-code modeling is used to predict the absorption efficiency of the same ternary system and the result will be compared with the data obtained from EDB experiment. We also intend to determine the occurrence of

  13. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Intercomparison Studies of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, Paul

    2015-10-20

    Aerosols containing black carbon (and some specific types of organic particulate matter) directly absorb incoming light, heating the atmosphere. In addition, all aerosol particles backscatter solar light, leading to a net-cooling effect. Indirect effects involve hydrophilic aerosols, which serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) that affect cloud cover and cloud stability, impacting both atmospheric radiation balance and precipitation patterns. At night, all clouds produce local warming, but overall clouds exert a net-cooling effect on the Earth. The effect of aerosol radiative forcing on climate may be as large as that of the greenhouse gases, but predominantly opposite in sign and much more uncertain. The uncertainties in the representation of aerosol interactions in climate models makes it problematic to use model projections to guide energy policy. The objective of our program is to reduce the uncertainties in the aerosol radiative forcing in the two areas highlighted in the ASR Science and Program Plan. That is, (1) addressing the direct effect by correlating particle chemistry and morphology with particle optical properties (i.e. absorption, scattering, extinction), and (2) addressing the indirect effect by correlating particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity with particle size, chemistry, and morphology. In this connection we are systematically studying particle formation, oxidation, and the effects of particle coating. The work is specifically focused on carbonaceous particles where the uncertainties in the climate relevant properties are the highest. The ongoing work consists of laboratory experiments and related instrument inter-comparison studies both coordinated with field and modeling studies, with the aim of providing reliable data to represent aerosol processes in climate models. The work is performed in the aerosol laboratory at Boston College. At the center of our laboratory setup are two main sources for the production of aerosol particles: (a

  14. Asthmatic responses to airborne acid aerosols.

    PubMed Central

    Ostro, B D; Lipsett, M J; Wiener, M B; Selner, J C

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Controlled exposure studies suggest that asthmatics may be more sensitive to the respiratory effects of acidic aerosols than individuals without asthma. This study investigates whether acidic aerosols and other air pollutants are associated with respiratory symptoms in free-living asthmatics. METHODS: Daily concentrations of hydrogen ion (H+), nitric acid, fine particulates, sulfates and nitrates were obtained during an intensive air monitoring effort in Denver, Colorado, in the winter of 1987-88. A panel of 207 asthmatics recorded respiratory symptoms, frequency of medication use, and related information in daily diaries. We used a multiple regression time-series model to analyze which air pollutants, if any, were associated with health outcomes reported by study participants. RESULTS: Airborne H+ was found to be significantly associated with several indicators of asthma status, including moderate or severe cough and shortness of breath. Cough was also associated with fine particulates, and shortness of breath with sulfates. Incorporating the participants' time spent outside and exercise intensity into the daily measure of exposure strengthened the association between these pollutants and asthmatic symptoms. Nitric acid and nitrates were not significantly associated with any respiratory symptom analyzed. CONCLUSIONS: In this population of asthmatics, several outdoor air pollutants, particularly airborne acidity, were associated with daily respiratory symptoms. PMID:1851397

  15. Asthmatic responses to airborne acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ostro, B.D.; Lipsett, M.J.; Wiener, M.B.; Selner, J.C. )

    1991-06-01

    Controlled exposure studies suggest that asthmatics may be more sensitive to the respiratory effects of acidic aerosols than individuals without asthma. This study investigates whether acidic aerosols and other air pollutants are associated with respiratory symptoms in free-living asthmatics. Daily concentrations of hydrogen ion (H+), nitric acid, fine particulates, sulfates and nitrates were obtained during an intensive air monitoring effort in Denver, Colorado, in the winter of 1987-88. A panel of 207 asthmatics recorded respiratory symptoms, frequency of medication use, and related information in daily diaries. We used a multiple regression time-series model to analyze which air pollutants, if any, were associated with health outcomes reported by study participants. Airborne H+ was found to be significantly associated with several indicators of asthma status, including moderate or severe cough and shortness of breath. Cough was also associated with fine particulates, and shortness of breath with sulfates. Incorporating the participants' time spent outside and exercise intensity into the daily measure of exposure strengthened the association between these pollutants and asthmatic symptoms. Nitric acid and nitrates were not significantly associated with any respiratory symptom analyzed. In this population of asthmatics, several outdoor air pollutants, particularly airborne acidity, were associated with daily respiratory symptoms.

  16. Inkjet aerosol generator as monodisperse particle number standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Kenjiro; Sakurai, Hiromu; Ehara, Kensei

    2013-05-01

    Inkjet technology can be applied to generate highly monodisperse aerosol particles in micrometer range at a precisely controlled rate. AIST has been developing an inkjet aerosol generator (AIST-IAG), and the device will soon become the secondary measurement standard for aerosol particle number concentration in 0.35 μm to 10 μm range. The AIST-IAG can generate both solid and liquid particles consisting of water-soluble ionic compounds. We first report the characteristics of the particle sizes of the generated particles. The full width half maximum of the particle size distribution is about 2 percent, and the particle diameter of the IAG particles was calibrated as a function of the particle mass within 0.6-10 μm range using polystyrene latex sphere as reference material. Then we report the capability of the AIST-IAG as the particle number standard. The particle generation efficiency ηIAG was defined as the number of aerosol particles exiting from the AIST-IAG divided by the rate of the droplet generation, and the values of ηIAG within 0.35-10 μm is essentially 100%, and the 95% confidence interval of the values is less than 1%. The result strongly supports that the AISTIAG can be used to calibrate the counting efficiency of the optical particle counters in submicrometer to micrometer range.

  17. Identifying Metals as Marker for Waste Burning Aerosol Particles in New Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhanshu

    2012-07-01

    {Identifying Metals as Marker for Waste Burning Aerosol Particles in New Delhi } Tracing of aerosol sources is an important task helpful for making control strategy, and for climate change study. However, it is a difficult job as aerosols have several sources, involve in complex atmospheric processing, degradation and removal processes. Several approaches have been used for this task, e.g., models, which are based on the input of chemical species; stable- and radio-isotope compositions of certain species; chemical markers in which trace metals are the better options because they persist in atmosphere until the life of a particle. For example, K and Hg are used for biomass and coal burning tracings, respectively. Open waste burning has recently been believed to be a considerable source of aerosols in several mega cities in India and China. To better understand this source contribution in New Delhi aerosols, we have conducted aerosol sampling at a landfill site (Okhla), and in proximity (within 1 km distance) of this site. Aerosol filter samples were acid digested in microwave digestion system and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma -- high resolution mass spectrometry (ICP-HRMS) for getting metal signatures in particles. The metals, e.g., Sn, Sb and As those are found almost negligible in remote aerosols, are maximized in these waste burning aerosols. Sample collected in other location of New Delhi also shows the considerable presence of these metals in particles. Preliminary studies of isotopic ratios of these metals suggested that these metals, especially Sn can be used as marker for tracing the open waste burning sources of aerosols in New Delhi.

  18. On the growth of ternary system HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2} aerosol particles in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Hamill, P.; Tabazadeh, A.; Kinne, S.; Toon, O.B.

    1996-04-01

    The authors present model study results on the formation of ternary aerosols of nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and water in the stratosphere. The aerosol particles grow by means of a heteromolecular condensation process. The authors assume the particles are in equilibrium with the background water vapor.

  19. MASS SPECTROMETRY OF INDIVIDUAL AEROSOL PARTICLES. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Typically, in real-time aerosol mass spectrometry (RTAMS), individual airborne particles
    are ablated and ionized with a single focused laser pulse. This technique yields information that
    permits bulk characterization of the particle, but information about the particle's sur...

  20. Diffusion battery sampling of sulfuric acid aerosols formed in oleum spill experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I N; Wong, W T; Munkelwitz, H R

    1980-01-01

    Fuming sulfuric acid (oleum) is one of several hazardous chemicals routinely transported in bulk quantities on US waterways. In the event of a marine accident, a large amount of the cargo acid could suddenly be released into water, resulting in the formation of a dense sulfuric acid cloud. Experiments were carried out in the laboratory to study the factors controlling the extent of acid aerosol formation under conditions likely to occur in maritime spill accidents. A Sinclair-type diffusion battery was used for aerosol sizing. In this presentation, a brief discussion of an improved nonlinear iterative inversion method for the analysis of diffusion battery data is given. Experimental results obtained with monodisperse test aerosols and sulfuric acid aerosols formed during oleum spills are presented. It is shown that the diffusion battery, coupled with the inversion technique, is capable of sizing particles up to 0.8 ..mu..m in diameter.

  1. New mass measurement method of aerosol particle using vibrating probe particle controlled by radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariyama, Tatsuo; Takaya, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Takashi

    2005-11-01

    Aerosol particles with sub-micro meter size inhaled into respiratory systems cause serious damage to human body. In order to evaluate the health effects of the particles, classification methods of the particles with size and mass are needed. Several measurement methods of the particle size are established. However, conventional mass measurement methods are not enough to measure the particles with sub- pico gram. We propose a new mass measurement method of the aerosol particles based on laser trapping. In this method, an optically trapped silica particle is used as a measuring probe particle. The probe particle is trapped at a beam waist of the focused laser light and is forced to vibrate by deflecting the beam waist using AOD. The vibrating probe particle has a resonance frequency because it is governed by the spring-mass-damper system. When an aerosol particle is attached to the probe particle, the resonance frequency shifts according to the increase of the total mass. The mass of the aerosol particle can be measured from the shift of the resonance frequency. Experimentally, it is confirmed that the probe particle is governed by the spring-mass-damper system and has a resonance frequency. When a silica fine particle of 3pg in mass used as an aerosol particle is attached to the probe particle, the resonance frequency shift occurs as expected in the dynamic system and the fine particle mass can be measured based on the proposed method.

  2. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Pristine Aerosol Particles During the wet Season of Amazonia - Detection of Primary Biological Particles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J.; Zorn, S. R.; Freutel, F.; Borrmann, S.; Chen, Q.; Farmer, D. K.; Jimenez, J. L.; Flores, M.; Roldin, P.; Artaxo, P.; Martin, S. T.

    2008-12-01

    The contribution of primary biological aerosol (POA) particles to the natural organic aerosol is a subject of current research. Estimations of the POA contribution to the total aerosol particle concentration range between 25 and 80%, depending on location and season. Especially in the tropical rain forest it is expected that POA is a major source of supermicron, possibly also of submicron particles. During AMAZE (Amazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment), a field project near Manaus, Brazil, in February/March 2008, an Aerodyne ToF-AMS was equipped with a high pressure aerodynamic lens. This high pressure lens (operating pressure 14.6 torr) is designed with the objective to extend the detectable size range of the AMS into the supermicron size range where primary biological particles are expected. Size distribution measured by the AMS were compared with size distribution from an optical particle counter and indicate that the high pressure lens has a 50% cut-off at a vacuum aerodynamic diameter of about 1 μm, but still has significant transmission up to a vacuum aerodynamic diameter of about 2 μm, thus extending the detectable size range of the AMS into the coarse mode. The measuring instruments were situated in a container at ground level. The aerosol was sampled through a 40 m vertical, laminar inlet, which was heated and dried to maintain a relative humidity between 30 and 40%. The inlet was equipped with a 7 μm cut-off cyclone. Size distributions recorded with an optical particle counter parallel to the AMS show that the inlet transmitted aerosol particles up to an optically detected diameter of 10 μm. POA particles like plant fragments, pollen, spores, fungi, viruses etc. contain chemical compounds as proteins, sugars, amino acids, chlorophyll, and cellular material as cellulose. Laboratory experiments have been performed in order to identify typical mass spectral patterns of these compounds. These laboratory data were compared to size resolved particle

  3. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1986-01-01

    A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

  4. Real-time characterization of the size and chemical composition of individual particles in ambient aerosol systems in Riverside, California

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C.A.; Prather, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    Atmospheric aerosols, although ubiquitous, are highly diverse and continually fluctuating systems. A typical aerosol system may consist of particles with diameters between {approximately}0.002 {mu}m and {approximately}200 {mu}m. Even in rural or pristine areas, atmospheric particle concentration is significant, with concentrations up to 10{sup 8} particles/cm{sup 3} not being uncommon. Chemical composition of atmospheric particles vary from simple water droplets or acidic ices to soot particles and cigarette smoke. Due to changes in atmospheric conditions, processes such as nucleation, coagulation or heterogeneous chemistry may effect both physical and chemical properties of individual particles over relatively short time intervals. Recently, aerosol measurement techniques are focusing on determining the size and/or chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. This research group has recently developed aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS), a technique which allows for real-time determination of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. Single particle measurements are performed in one instrument using dual laser aerodynamic particle sizing and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry is briefly described in several other abstracts in this publication.

  5. Continuous air monitor for alpha-emitting aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, A.R.; Ortiz, C.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Rodgers, J.C.; Nelson, D.C. )

    1990-01-01

    A new alpha Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) sampler is being developed for use in detecting the presence of alpha-emitting aerosol particles. The effort involves design, fabrication and evaluation of systems for the collection of aerosol and for the processing of data to speciate and quantify the alpha emitters of interest. At the present time we have a prototype of the aerosol sampling system and we have performed wind tunnel tests to characterize the performance of the device for different particle sizes, wind speeds, flow rates and internal design parameters. The results presented herein deal with the aerosol sampling aspects of the new CAM sampler. Work on the data processing, display and alarm functions is being done in parallel with the particle sampling work and will be reported separately at a later date. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. The effect of low solublility organic acids on the hygroscopicity of sodium halide aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, L.; Méndez, E.; Sánchez, M. N.; Castaño, F.; Basterretxea, F. J.

    2014-02-01

    In order to accurately assess the influence of fatty acids on the hygroscopic and other physicochemical properties of sea salt aerosols, hexanoic, octanoic or lauric acid together with sodium halide salts (NaCl, NaBr and NaI) have been chosen to be performed in this study. The hygroscopic properties of sodium halide submicrometer particles covered with organic acids have been examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in an aerosol flow cell. Covered particles were generated by flowing atomized sodium halide particles (either dry or aqueous) through a heated oven containing the gaseous acid. The obtained results indicate that gaseous organic acids easily nucleate onto dry and aqueous sodium halide particles. On the other hand, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images indicate that lauric acid coating on NaCl particles makes them to aggregate in small clusters. The hygroscopic behaviour of covered sodium halide particles in deliquescence mode shows different features with the exchange of the halide ion: whereas the organic covering has little effect in NaBr particles, NaCl and NaI covered particles change their deliquescence relative humidities, with different trends observed for each of the acids studied. In efflorescence mode, the overall effect of the organic covering is to retard the loss of water in the particles. It has been observed that the presence of gaseous water in heterogeneously nucleated particles tends to displace the cover of hexanoic acid to energetically stabilize the system.

  7. The effect of low solubility organic acids on the hygroscopicity of sodium halide aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, L.; Méndez, E.; Sánchez, M. N.; Castaño, F.; Basterretxea, F. J.

    2014-10-01

    In order to accurately assess the influence of fatty acids on the hygroscopic and other physicochemical properties of sea salt aerosols, hexanoic, octanoic or lauric acid together with sodium halide salts (NaCl, NaBr and NaI) have been chosen to be investigated in this study. The hygroscopic properties of sodium halide sub-micrometre particles covered with organic acids have been examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in an aerosol flow cell. Covered particles were generated by flowing atomized sodium halide particles (either dry or aqueous) through a heated oven containing the gaseous acid. The obtained results indicate that gaseous organic acids easily nucleate onto dry and aqueous sodium halide particles. On the other hand, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicate that lauric acid coating on NaCl particles makes them to aggregate in small clusters. The hygroscopic behaviour of covered sodium halide particles in deliquescence mode shows different features with the exchange of the halide ion, whereas the organic surfactant has little effect in NaBr particles, NaCl and NaI covered particles experience appreciable shifts in their deliquescence relative humidities, with different trends observed for each of the acids studied. In efflorescence mode, the overall effect of the organic covering is to retard the loss of water in the particles. It has been observed that the presence of gaseous water in heterogeneously nucleated particles tends to displace the cover of hexanoic acid to energetically stabilize the system.

  8. Regional signatures in the organic composition of marine aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frossard, Amanda A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Keene, William C.; Kieber, David J.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.

    2013-05-01

    Marine aerosol particles play an important role in the earth's radiative balance, yet the sources and composition of the organic fraction remain largely unconstrained. Recent measurements have been made in order to characterize the sources, composition, and concentration of aerosol particles in the marine boundary layer. The organic composition of submicron particles derived from multiple seawater regions have been measured using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cluster analysis of FTIR organic spectra suggest different spectral signatures based on collection location, seawater composition, and ambient conditions. Measurements including non-refractory aerosol composition from a high-resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), seawater composition, and wind speed were used to interpret the cluster results, depending on the availability from each campaign. FTIR spectra of ambient particles are compared to FTIR spectra of primary marine particles generated from model ocean systems to infer the ambient particle production mechanisms and aging processes. Recent measurements used in the comparison include ambient and generated marine aerosol particles measured off the coast of California during CalNex in May and June 2010. Remote ambient marine aerosol particles were collected 100 miles off the coast of Monterey in the eastern Pacific during the EPEACE experiment in July 2011. Ambient and generated marine particles were measured in two different seawater types during WACS 2012 including colder, more productive water off the coast of the northeastern United States and warmer, oligotrophic water in the Sargasso Sea. These particles are also compared with those measured in the southeastern Pacific during VOCALS and the north Atlantic during ICEALOT.

  9. Numerical investigation of the coagulation mixing between dust and hygroscopic aerosol particles and its impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, I.-Chun; Chen, Jen-Ping; Lin, Yi-Chiu; Chung-Kuang Chou, Charles; Chen, Wei-Nai

    2015-05-01

    A statistical-numerical aerosol parameterization was incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system to study the coagulation mixing process focusing on a dust storm event that occurred over East Asia. Simulation results show that the coagulation mixing process tends to decrease aerosol mass, surface area, and number concentrations over the dust source areas. Over the downwind oceanic areas, aerosol concentrations generally increased due to enhanced sedimentation as particles became larger upon coagulation. The mixture process can reduce the overall single-scattering albedo by up to 10% as a result of enhanced core with shell absorption by dust and reduction in the number of scattering particles. The enhanced dry deposition speed also altered the vertical distribution. In addition, the ability of aerosol particles to serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) increased from around 107 m-3 to above 109 m-3 over downwind areas because a large amount of mineral dust particles became effective CCN with solute coating, except over the highly polluted areas where multiple collections of hygroscopic particles by dust in effect reduced CCN number. This CCN effect is much stronger for coagulation mixing than by the uptake of sulfuric acid gas on dust, although the nitric acid gas uptake was not investigated. The ability of dust particles to serve as ice nuclei may decrease or increase at low or high subzero temperatures, respectively, due to the switching from deposition nucleation to immersion freezing or haze freezing.

  10. Acidic sulfate aerosols: characterization and exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J.; Waldman, J.M.

    1989-02-01

    Exposures to acidic aerosol in the atmosphere are calculated from data reported in the scientific literature. The majority of date was not derived from studies necessarily designed to examine human exposures. Most of the studies were designed to investigate the characteristics of the atmosphere. However, the measurements were useful in defining two potential exposure situations: regional stagnation and transport conditions and local plume impacts. Levels of acidicaerosol in excess of 20 to 40 micrograms/m/sup 3/ (as H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) have been observed for time durations ranging from 1 to 12 hr. These were associated with high, but not necessarily the highest, atmospheric SO/sub 4/(2)- levels. Exposures of 100 to 900 micrograms/m/sup 3//hr were calculated for the acid events that were monitored. In contrast, earlier London studies indicated that apparent acidity in excess of 100 micrograms/m/sup 3/ (as H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) was present in the atmosphere, and exposures less than 2000 micrograms/m/sup 3//hr were possible. Our present knowledge about the frequency, magnitude, and duration of acidic sulfate aerosol events and episodes is insufficient. Efforts must be made to gather more data, but these should be done in such a way that evaluation of human exposure is the focus of the research. In addition, further data are required on the mechanisms of formation of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and on what factors can be used to predict acidic sulfate episodes. 96 references.

  11. Polarization resolved angular optical scattering of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, B.; Pan, Y.; Wang, C.; Videen, G.; Cao, Hui

    2014-05-01

    Real-time detection and identification of bio-aerosol particles are crucial for the protection against chemical and biological agents. The strong elastic light scattering properties of airborne particles provides a natural means for rapid, non-invasive aerosol characterization. Recent theoretical predictions suggested that variations in the polarization dependent angular scattering cross section could provide an efficient means of classifying different airborne particles. In particular, the polarization dependent scattering cross section of aggregate particles is expected to depend on the shape of the primary particles. In order to experimentally validate this prediction, we built a high throughput, sampling system, capable of measuring the polarization resolved angular scattering cross section of individual aerosol particles flowing through an interrogating volume with a single shot of laser pulse. We calibrated the system by comparing the polarization dependent scattering cross section of individual polystyrene spheres with that predicted by Mie theory. We then used the system to study different particles types: Polystyrene aggregates composed 500 nm spheres and Bacillus subtilis (BG, Anthrax simulant) spores composed of elongated 500 nm × 1000 nm cylinder-line particles. We found that the polarization resolved scattering cross section depends on the shape of the constituent elements of the aggregates. This work indicates that the polarization resolved scattering cross section could be used for rapid discrimination between different bio-aerosol particles.

  12. A portable optical particle counter system for measuring dust aerosols.

    PubMed

    Marple, V A; Rubow, K L

    1978-03-01

    A portable battery-operated optical particle counter/multichannel analyzer system has been developed for the numbers size distribution and number concentration measurement of light-absorbing irregular-shaped dust particles. An inertial impactor technique has been used to obtain calibration curves by relating the magnitude of the optical counter's signal to the particle's aerodynamic or Stokes' diameter. These calibrations have been made for aerosols of coal, potash, silica, rock (copper ore), and Arizona road dust particles. PMID:645547

  13. Ultrafine aerosol size distributions and sulfuric acid vapor pressures: Implications for new particle formation in the atmosphere. Year 2 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.

    1993-07-01

    This project has two components: (1) measurement of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor pressures in air under temperature/relative humidity conditions similar to atmospheric, and (2) measurement of ultrafine aerosol size distributions. During Year 2, more effort was put on size distribution measurements. 4 figs.

  14. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Glyoxal: Effects of Seed Aerosol on Particle Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowik, Jay; Waxman, Eleanor; Coburn, Sean; Klein, Felix; Koenig, Theodore; Krapf, Manuel; Kumar, Nivedita; Wang, Siyuan; Baltensperger, Urs; Dommen, Josef; Prévôt, Andre; Volkamer, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Conventional models of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production neglect aqueous-phase processing mechanisms, thereby excluding potentially important SOA formation pathways. These missing pathways may be an important factor in the inability of current models to fully explain SOA yields and oxidation states. Molecules identified as important precursors to SOA generated through aqueous-phase include glyoxal, which is an oxidation product of numerous organic gases. Glyoxal SOA formation experiments were conducted in the PSI smog chamber as a function of seed composition, relative humidity (RH, 60 to 85%), and the presence/absence of gaseous ammonia, affecting particle acidity. In a typical experiment, the chamber was filled with the selected seed aerosol (NaCl, (NH4)2SO4, NaNO3, or K2SO4), after which glyoxal was generated by the brief (i.e. a few minutes) exposure of acetylene to UV light. The experiment was then allowed to proceed undisturbed for several hours. Each experiment consisted of several UV exposures, followed by a dilution phase at constant RH to investigate the gas/particle partitioning behavior of the generated SOA. Gas-phase glyoxal was monitored by an LED-CE-DOAS system, while the particle composition was measured using online aerosol mass spectrometry (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS) and offline analysis of collected filter samples. SOA composition was observed to depend strongly on seed type, with increased imidazole formation evident during experiments with (NH4)2SO¬4 and K2SO4 seeds relative to those with NaCl and NaNO3. Additionally, experiments conducted in the presence of ammonia showed large enhancements in both imidazole content and total SOA yield. Analysis of mass spectral markers indicates reversible uptake of glyoxal but irreversible particle-phase production of the imidazole-containing SOA. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) using the Multilinear Engine (ME-2) was applied to the AMS mass spectral time series to quantify factors related to

  15. Characteristics of aerosolized ice forming marine biogenic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Peter A.

    Ice particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere existing as the sole constituents of glaciated cirrus clouds or coexisting with supercooled liquid droplets in mixed-phase clouds. Aerosol particles serving as heterogeneous ice nuclei for ice crystal formation impact the global radiative balance by modification of cloud radiative properties, and thus climate. Atmospheric ice formation is not a well understood process and represents great uncertainty for climate prediction. The oceans which cover the majority of the earth's surface host nearly half the total global primary productivity and contribute to the greatest aerosol production by mass. However, the effect of biological activity on particle aerosolization, particle composition, and ice nucleation is not well established. This dissertation investigates the link between marine biological activity, aerosol particle production, physical/chemical particle characteristics, and ice nucleation under controlled laboratory conditions. Dry and humidified aerosol size distributions of particles from bursting bubbles generated by plunging water jets and aeration through frits in a seawater mesocosm containing bacteria and/or phytoplankton cultures, were measured as a function of biological activity. Total particle production significantly increases primarily due to enhanced aerosolization of particles ≤100 nm in diameter attributable to the presence and growth of phytoplankton. Furthermore, hygroscopicity measurements indicate primary organic material associated with the sea salt particles, providing additional evidence for the importance of marine biological activity for ocean derived aerosol composition. Ice nucleation experiments show that these organic rich particles nucleate ice efficiently in the immersion and deposition modes, which underscores their importance in mixed-phase and cirrus cloud formation processes. In separate ice nucleation experiments employing pure cultures of Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nannochloris

  16. Retrieval of particle size distribution from aerosol optical thickness using an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jiandong; Li, Jinxuan

    2015-10-01

    Particle size distribution is essential for describing direct and indirect radiation of aerosols. Because the relationship between the aerosol size distribution and optical thickness (AOT) is an ill-posed Fredholm integral equation of the first type, the traditional techniques for determining such size distributions, such as the Phillips-Twomey regularization method, are often ambiguous. Here, we use an approach based on an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm (IPSO) to retrieve aerosol size distribution. Using AOT data measured by a CE318 sun photometer in Yinchuan, we compared the aerosol size distributions retrieved using a simple genetic algorithm, a basic particle swarm optimization algorithm and the IPSO. Aerosol size distributions for different weather conditions were analyzed, including sunny, dusty and hazy conditions. Our results show that the IPSO-based inversion method retrieved aerosol size distributions under all weather conditions, showing great potential for similar size distribution inversions.

  17. Heterogeneous oxidation of atmospheric aerosol particles by gas-phase radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2010-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles play pivotal roles in climate and air quality. Just as chemically reduced gases experience oxidation in the atmosphere, it is now apparent that solid and liquid atmospheric particulates are also subject to similar oxidative processes. The most reactive atmospheric gas-phase radicals, in particular the hydroxyl radical, readily promote such chemistry through surficial interactions. This Review looks at progress made in this field, discussing the radical-initiated heterogeneous oxidation of organic and inorganic constituents of atmospheric aerosols. We focus on the kinetics and reaction mechanisms of such processes as well as how they can affect the physico-chemical properties of particles, such as their composition, size, density and hygroscopicity. Potential impacts on the atmosphere include the release of chemically reactive gases such as halogens, aldehydes and organic acids, reactive loss of particle-borne molecular tracer and toxic species, and enhanced hygroscopic properties of aerosols that may improve their ability to form cloud droplets.

  18. New apparatus of single particle trap system for aerosol visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Hidenori; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Kitayama, Chiho; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio

    2014-08-01

    Control of transport and deposition of charged aerosol particles is important in various manufacturing processes. Aerosol visualization is an effective method to directly observe light scattering signal from laser-irradiated single aerosol particle trapped in a visualization cell. New single particle trap system triggered by light scattering pulse signal was developed in this study. The performance of the device was evaluated experimentally. Experimental setup consisted of an aerosol generator, a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), an optical particle counter (OPC) and the single particle trap system. Polystylene latex standard (PSL) particles (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 μm) were generated and classified according to the charge by the DMA. Singly charged 0.5 and 1.0 μm particles and doubly charged 2.0 μm particles were used as test particles. The single particle trap system was composed of a light scattering signal detector and a visualization cell. When the particle passed through the detector, trigger signal with a given delay time sent to the solenoid valves upstream and downstream of the visualization cell for trapping the particle in the visualization cell. The motion of particle in the visualization cell was monitored by CCD camera and the gravitational settling velocity and the electrostatic migration velocity were measured from the video image. The aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was in good agreement with Stokes diameter calculated from the electrostatic migration velocity for individual particles. It was also found that the aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was a one-to-one function of the scattered light intensity of individual particles. The applicability of this system will be discussed.

  19. LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION OF ULTRAFINE AEROSOL PARTICLES. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-line analysis of ultrafine aerosol particle in the 12 to 150 nm size range is performed by
    laser desorption/ionization. Particles are size selected with a differential mobility analyzer and then
    sent into a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer where they are ablated w...

  20. Sulfuric Acid and Soot Particle Formation in Aircraft Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Verma, S.; Ferry, G. V.; Howard, S. D.; Vay, S.; Kinne, S. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Dermott, P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Goodman, J.; Gore, Waren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A combination of CN counts, Ames wire impactor size analyses and optical particle counter data in aircraft exhaust results in a continuous particle size distribution between 0.01 micrometer and 1 micrometer particle radius sampled in the exhaust of a Boeing 757 research aircraft. The two orders of magnitude size range covered by the measurements correspond to 6-7 orders of magnitude particle concentration. CN counts and small particle wire impactor data determine a nucleation mode, composed of aircraft-emitted sulfuric acid aerosol, that contributes between 62% and 85% to the total aerosol surface area and between 31% and 34% to its volume. Soot aerosol comprises 0.5% of the surface area of the sulfuric acid aerosol. Emission indices are: EIH2SO4 = 0.05 g/kgFUEL and (0.2-0.5) g/kgFUEL (for 75 ppmm and 675 ppmm fuel-S, respectively), 2.5E4particles/kgFUEL (for 75 and 675 ppmm fuel-S). The sulfur (gas) to H2SO4 (particle) conversion efficiency is between 10% and 25%.

  1. CRITERIA POLLUTANT AND ACID AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION STUDY - CATANO, PUERTO RICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the Catano Criteria Pollutant and Acid Aerosol Characterization study was to characterize criteria pollutant and acid aerosol concentrations in the Ward of Catano and adjacent residential areas in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. on-Governmental organizations (NG...

  2. Hygroscopicity of aerosol particles and CCN activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in the urban atmosphere over Japan during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shuhei; Setoguchi, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Kaori; Nakayama, Tomoki; Ikeda, Yuka; Sawada, Yuuki; Matsumi, Yutaka; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the hygroscopicity of 150 nm particles and the number-size distributions and the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in aerosols over Nagoya, Japan, during summer. We analyzed the correlations between the number concentrations of particles in specific hygroscopic growth factor (g) ranges and the mass concentrations of chemical components. This analysis suggests the association of nearly hydrophobic particles with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol, elemental carbon and semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA), that of less hygroscopic particles with SV-OOA and nitrate and that of more hygroscopic particles with low-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and sulfate. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of organics was derived based on the g distributions and chemical composition of 150 nm particles. The κ of the organics correlated positively with the fraction of the total organic mass spectral signal at m/z 44 and the volume fraction of the LV-OOA to the organics, indicating that organics with highly oxygenated structures including carboxylic acid groups contribute to the water uptake. The number-size distributions of the nearly hydrophobic particles with g around 1.0 and 1.1 correlated with the mass concentrations of chemical components. The results show that the chemical composition of the particles with g around 1.0 was different between the Aitken mode and the accumulation mode size ranges. An analysis for a parameter Fmax of the curves fitted to the CCN efficiency spectra of the particles with g around 1.0 suggests that the coating by organics associated with SV-OOA elevated the CCN activity of these particles.

  3. Indoor exposures to fine aerosols and acid gases.

    PubMed Central

    Koutrakis, P; Brauer, M; Briggs, S L; Leaderer, B P

    1991-01-01

    Indoor exposures to aerosols and gases are associated with both indoor and outdoor air pollution sources. The identification of sources and the assessment of their relative contribution can be a complicated process due to a) the presence of numerous indoor sources, which can vary from building to building; b) the uncertainties associated with the estimation of the impact of outdoor sources on indoor air quality; c) the interactions between pollutants; and d) the importance of reactions between pollutants and indoor surfaces. It is well established that fine particles (diameter less than or equal to 2.5 microns) originating from outdoor sources such as automobiles, oil and coal combustion, incineration, and diverse industrial activities can penetrate into the indoor environment. Indoor/outdoor ratios, usually varying between 0.4 and 0.8, depend on parameters such as particle size and density, air exchange rate, and the surface-to-volume ratio of the indoor environment. Determining fine particle elemental composition makes it possible to identify the contribution of different outdoor sources. This paper focuses on the origin and the concentration of indoor aerosols and acid gases by highlighting the results from two indoor air quality studies. PMID:1821374

  4. Aircraft observations of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids in the aerosols over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Qing Fu, Ping; Boreddy, Suresh K. R.; Watanabe, Tomomi; Hatakeyama, Shiro; Takami, Akinori; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Vertical profiles of dicarboxylic acids, related organic compounds and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracer compounds in particle phase have not yet been simultaneously explored in East Asia, although there is growing evidence that aqueous-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds may be responsible for the elevated organic aerosols (OA) in the troposphere. Here, we found consistently good correlation of oxalic acid, the most abundant individual organic compounds in aerosols globally, with its precursors as well as biogenic-derived SOA compounds in Chinese tropospheric aerosols by aircraft measurements. Anthropogenically derived dicarboxylic acids (i.e., C5 and C6 diacids) at high altitudes were 4-20 times higher than those from surface measurements and even occasionally dominant over oxalic acid at altitudes higher than 2 km, which is in contrast to the predominance of oxalic acid previously reported globally including the tropospheric and surface aerosols. This indicates an enhancement of tropospheric SOA formation from anthropogenic precursors. Furthermore, oxalic acid-to-sulfate ratio maximized at altitudes of ˜ 2 km, explaining aqueous-phase SOA production that was supported by good correlations with predicted liquid water content, organic carbon and biogenic SOA tracers. These results demonstrate that elevated oxalic acid and related SOA compounds from both the anthropogenic and biogenic sources may substantially contribute to tropospheric OA burden over polluted regions of China, implying aerosol-associated climate effects and intercontinental transport.

  5. SAGE II aerosol validation - Selected altitude measurements, including particle micromeasurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Russell, Philip B.; Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Snetsinger, Kenneth G.; Ferry, Guy V.; Livingston, John M.; Rosen, James N.; Osborn, Mary T.; Kritz, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The validity of particulate extinction coefficients derived from limb path solar radiance measurements obtained during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II is tested. The SAGE II measurements are compared with correlative aerosol measurements taken during January 1985, August 1985, and July 1986 with impactors, laser spectrometers, and filter samplers on a U-2 aircraft, an upward pointing lidar on a P-3 aircraft, and balloon-borne optical particle counters. The data for July 29, 1986 are discussed in detail. The aerosol measurements taken on this day at an altitude of 20.5 km produce particulate extinction values which validate the SAGE II values for similar wavelengths.

  6. Complete chemical analysis of aerosol particles in real-time

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mo; Reilly, P.T.A.; Gieray, R.A.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Real-time mass spectrometry of individual aerosol particles using an ion trap mass spectrometer is described. The microparticles are sampled directly from the air by a particle inlet system into the vacuum chamber. An incoming particle is detected as it passes through two CW laser beams and a pulsed laser is triggered to intercept the particle for laser ablation ionization at the center of the ion trap. The produced ions are analyzed by the ion trap mass spectrometer. Ions of interest are selected and dissociated through collision with buffer gas atoms for further fragmentation analysis. Real-time chemical analyses of inorganic, organic, and bacterial aerosol articles have been demonstrated. It has been confirmed that the velocity and the size of the incoming particles highly correlate to each other. The performance of the inlet system, particle detection, and preliminary results are discussed.

  7. Chemical characterization of aerosol particles by laser Raman spectroscopy. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, K.H.

    1999-12-01

    The importance of aerosol particles in many branches of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, combustion, interfacial science, and material processing, has been steadily growing during the past decades. One of the unique properties of these particles is the very high surface-to-volume ratios, thus making them readily serve as centers for gas-phase condensation and heterogeneous reactions. These particles must be characterized by size, shape, physical state, and chemical composition. Traditionally, optical elastic scattering has been applied to obtain the physical properties of these particle (e.g., particle size, size distribution, and particle density). These physical properties are particularly important in atmospheric science as they govern the distribution and transport of atmospheric aerosols.

  8. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation on Kaolinite Particles, Particle Surrogates of HUmic-Like Substances (HULIS), and Organics-Containing Urban Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Knopf, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol particles can affect the global radiation budget through aerosol-cloud interactions by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei (IN) thereby inducing new clouds and/or modifying the radiative properties of existing clouds. This study presents heterogeneous ice nucleation data as a function of particle temperature and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) for laboratory generated kaolinite particles, leonardite and fulvic acid particles serving as surrogates for aerosols composed of HULIS, and organics-containing urban aerosols collected during the MILAGRO (Mexico City) campaign. These experiments are conducted using an improved version of a previously developed ice nucleation cell coupled to an optical microscope which allows to control particle temperatures between 200-300 K and corresponding atmospherically relevant RHice. Micrometer-sized particles are deposited onto a hydrophobic substrate and are placed in the nucleation cell. To validate the experimental approach and quality of substrates, ice nucleation experiments were performed 1. on plain sample substrates and 2. using a well studied IN: kaolinite particles. The results corroborate that kaolinite particles are efficient IN inducing ice nucleation at 102-120% RHice via deposition mode at temperatures between 200 and 245 K, in agreement with previous studies. The ice nucleation efficiency of leonardite and fulvic acid particles with median diameters of 2-3 µm is determined. Leonardite particles nucleate ice via deposition mode at 120-140% RHice for temperatures between 200 and 240 K with the minimum RHice threshold observed at 220 K. Fulvic acid particles nucleate ice via deposition mode at 135-150% RHice for temperatures between 200 and 230 K with the minimum RHice threshold determined at 216 K. The fulvic acid particles take up water at RH>95% for temperatures between 235 and 250 K. The contact angle derived from experimentally determined heterogeneous ice nucleation rate

  9. Sources markers in aerosols, oceanic particles and sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliot, A.

    2009-02-01

    This review presents some diagnostic criteria used for identifying and quantifying terrestrial organic matter inputs to the ocean. Coupled to the isotopic composition of total organic carbon, the analysis of stable biomarkers permits to trace higher plant contributions in aerosols, dusts, sedimenting particles and dissolved phase in the water column and ultimately in recent and ancient sediments and soils. Some applications are presented, based on the analysis of n-alkyl compounds by a combination of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (n-alkanes, n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids and wax esters). Another approach has been developed using the analysis of macromolecular compounds present in higher plants. Abundances of the phenolic compounds from lignin, benzene carboxylic acids obtained during cupric oxide oxidation, Curie pyrolysis are used to characterise terrestrial organic matter sources and inputs. Finally due to the importance of biomass burning in continent-ocean transfers, biomarkers are presented in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon class and for monosaccharide derivatives from the breakdown of cellulose.

  10. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, A.K.

    1984-09-07

    This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  11. Unique DNA-barcoded aerosol test particles for studying aerosol transport

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harding, Ruth N.; Hara, Christine A.; Hall, Sara B.; Vitalis, Elizabeth A.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Jones, A. Daniel; Day, James A.; Tur-Rojas, Vincent R.; Jorgensen, Trond; Herchert, Edwin; et al

    2016-03-22

    Data are presented for the first use of novel DNA-barcoded aerosol test particles that have been developed to track the fate of airborne contaminants in populated environments. Until DNATrax (DNA Tagged Reagents for Aerosol eXperiments) particles were developed, there was no way to rapidly validate air transport models with realistic particles in the respirable range of 1–10 μm in diameter. The DNATrax particles, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and tested with the assistance of the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, are the first safe and effective materials for aerosol transport studies that are identified by DNA molecules. The usemore » of unique synthetic DNA barcodes overcomes the challenges of discerning the test material from pre-existing environmental or background contaminants (either naturally occurring or previously released). The DNATrax particle properties are demonstrated to have appropriate size range (approximately 1–4.5 μm in diameter) to accurately simulate bacterial spore transport. As a result, we describe details of the first field test of the DNATrax aerosol test particles in a large indoor facility.« less

  12. Condensational growth and trace species scavenging in stratospheric sulfuric acid/water aerosol droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompson, Robert V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols play a significant role in the environment. The composition of aerosols is believed to be a liquid solution of sulfuric acid and water with numerous trace species. Of these trace species, ozone in particular was recognized as being very important in its role of shielding the environment from harmful ultraviolet radiation. Also among the trace species are HCl and ClONO2, the so called chlorine reservoir species and various oxides of nitrogen. The quantity of stratospheric aerosol and its particle size distribution determines, to a large degree, the chemistry present in the stratosphere. Aerosols experience 3 types of growth: nucleation, condensation, and coagulation. The application of condensation investigations to the specific problem of stratospheric aerosols is discussed.

  13. Selection of quasi-monodisperse super-micron aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, Michael; Pfeifer, Sascha; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Stratmann, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Size-segregated quasi monodisperse particles are essential for e.g. fundamental research concerning cloud microphysical processes. Commonly a DMA (Differential Mobility Analyzer) is used to produce quasi-monodisperse submicron particles. Thereto first, polydisperse aerosol particles are bipolarly charged by a neutralizer, and then selected according to their electrical mobility with the DMA [Knutson et al. 1975]. Selecting a certain electrical mobility with a DMA results in a particle size distribution, which contains singly charged particles as well as undesired multiply charged larger particles. Often these larger particles need to either be removed from the generated aerosol or their signals have to be corrected for in the data inversion and interpretation process. This problem becomes even more serious when considering super-micron particles. Here we will present two different techniques for generating quasi-monodisperse super-micron aerosol particles with no or only an insignificant number of larger sized particles being present. First, we use a combination of a cyclone with adjustable aerodynamic cut-off diameter and our custom-built Maxi-DMA [Raddatz et al. 2013]. The cyclone removes particles larger than the desired ones prior to mobility selection with the DMA. This results in a reduction of the number of multiply charged particles of up to 99.8%. Second, we utilize a new combination of cyclone and PCVI (Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor), which is based on purely inertial separation and avoids particle charging. The PCVI instrument was previously described by Boulter et al. (2006) and Kulkarni et al. (2011). With our two setups we are able to produce quasi-monodisperse aerosol particles in the diameter range from 0.5 to 4.4 µm without a significant number of larger undesired particles being present. Acknowledgements: This work was done within the framework of the DFG funded Ice Nucleation research UnIT (INUIT, FOR 1525) under WE 4722/1-1. References

  14. Time Resolved Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. This presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 µm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as "viable aerosols" or "fluorescent bioparticles" (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. Data from the UVAPS were averaged over 5 minute time intervals. The presence of bioparticles in the observed size range has been

  15. Chemical and physical properties of single aerosol particles using a quadrupole trap

    SciTech Connect

    Carleton, K.L.; Sonnenfroh, D.M.; Kang, S.

    1995-12-31

    The importance of aerosols in controlling the chemical balance of the stratosphere has been demonstrated through studies of the polar ozone hole and polar stratospheric clouds. Our laboratory program is designed to explore the physical and chemical properties of aerosol particles under stratospheric conditions for single particles suspended in the electrodynamic field of a quadrupole trap. The goal of this work is to provide data on important stratospheric processes, with particular attention to processes resulting from increased aircraft emissions from the current subsonic fleet or a proposed fleet of supersonic aircraft. Optical methods including Mie scattering and Raman spectroscopy are used to probe the phase and composition of individual particles. Results will be presented on the freezing behavior of sulfuric acid particles.

  16. Hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles in the Po Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenningsson, I. B.; Hansson, H.-C.; Wiedensohler, A.; Ogren, J. A.; Noone, K. J.; Hallberg, A.

    1992-11-01

    A Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (TDMA) was used to study the hygroscopic growth of individual ambient aerosol particles in the Po Valley, Italy. The measurements were made during the GCE fog experiment in November 1989. During fog, the interstitial aerosol (Dp(at ambient relative humidity)<5µm) was sampled. Two modes of particles with different hygroscopic growth were found for 0.030µmparticles in the two modes were almost equal. The mean growth factor at 85% r.h. was 1.44±0.14 for the more-hygroscopic mode and 1.1±0.07 for the less-hygroscopic mode. The growth factors and the proportion of the particles that were less hygroscopic varied considerably from day to day, but no significant size dependence was seen. Comparison of growth factors for pure salt particles and the measured growth factors indicates that both hygroscopic modes contain a major insoluble part. The effect of the external mixing of hygroscopic properties on the activation of particles to fog droplets is discussed and the fraction of particles that were activated as a function of particle size is predicted. Comparison with the measured scavenging fraction as a function of particle size shows that the hygroscopic properties of the individual particle are as important as the particle size in determining if it will be activated in a fog.

  17. Criteria pollutant and acid aerosol characterization study, Catano, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Edgerton, E.S.; Harlos, D.P.; Sune, J.M.; Akland, G.G.; Vallero, D.A.

    1995-07-01

    The primary objective of the Catano Criteria Pollutant and Acid Aerosol Characterization Study (CPAACS) was to measure criteria pollutant concentrations and acid aerosol concentrations in and around the Ward of Catano, Puerto Rico, during the summer of 1994. Continuous air sampling for criteria pollutants was performed at three fixed stations and one moobile station that was deployed to four locations. Air samples for acid aerosol analyses and particulate matter measurements were collected at three sites. Semicontinuous sulfate analysis was performed at the primary site. Continuous measurements of wind speed, wind direction, temperature, and relative humidity were also made at each site. The study was conducted from June 1 through September 30, 1994.

  18. Hygroscopic Behavior of Multicomponent Aerosols Involving NaCl and Dicarboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chao; Jing, Bo; Guo, Yu-Cong; Zhang, Yun-Hong; Ge, Mao-Fa

    2016-02-25

    Atmospheric aerosols are usually complex mixtures of inorganic and organic compounds. The hygroscopicity of mixed particles is closely related to their chemical composition and interactions between components, which is still poorly understood. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of submicron particles composed of NaCl and dicarboxylic acids including oxalic acid (OA), malonic acid (MA), and succinic acid (SA) with various mass ratios are investigated with a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) system. Both the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) method and extended aerosol inorganics model (E-AIM) are applied to predict the water uptake behaviors of sodium chloride/dicarboxylic acid mixtures. For NaCl/OA mixed particles, the measured growth factors were significantly lower than predictions from the model methods, indicating a change in particle composition caused by chloride depletion. The hygroscopic growth of NaCl/MA particles was well described by E-AIM, and that of NaCl/SA particles was dependent upon mixing ratio. Compared with model predictions, it was determined that water uptake of the NaCl/OA mixture could be enhanced and could be closer to the predictions by addition of levoglucosan or malonic acid, which retained water even at low relative humidity (RH), leading to inhibition of HCl evaporation during dehydration. These results demonstrate that the coexisting hygroscopic species have a strong influence on the phase state of particles, thus affecting chemical interactions between inorganic and organic compounds as well as the overall hygroscopicity of mixed particles. PMID:26820230

  19. Processing of aerosol particles within the Habshan pollution plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeniuk, T. A.; Bruintjes, R.; Salazar, V.; Breed, D.; Jensen, T.; Buseck, P. R.

    2015-03-01

    The Habshan industrial site in the United Arab Emirates produces a regional-scale pollution plume associated with oil and gas processing, discharging high loadings of sulfates and chlorides into the atmosphere, which interact with the ambient aerosol population. Aerosol particles and trace gas chemistry at this site were studied on two flights in the summer of 2002. Measurements were collected along vertical plume profiles to show changes associated with atmospheric processing of particle and gas components. Close to the outlet stack, particle concentrations were over 10,000 cm-3, dropping to <2000 cm-3 in more dilute plume around 1500 m above the stack. Particles collected close to the stack and within the dilute plume were individually measured for size, morphology, composition, and mixing state using transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Close to the stack, most coarse particles consisted of mineral dust and NaCl crystals from burning oil brines, while sulfate droplets dominated the fine mode. In more dilute plume, at least 1500 m above the stack, the particle spectrum was more diverse, with a significant increase in internally mixed particle types. Dilute plume samples consisted of coarse NaCl/silicate aggregates or NaCl-rich droplets, often with a sulfate component, while fine-fraction particles were of mixed cation sulfates, also internally mixed with nanospherical soot or silicates. Thus, both chloride and sulfate components of the pollution plume rapidly reacted with ambient mineral dust to form coated and aggregate particles, enhancing particle size, hygroscopicity, and reactivity of the coarse mode. The fine-fraction sulfate-bearing particles formed in the plume contribute to regional transport of sulfates, while coarse sulfate-bearing fractions locally reduced the SO2 loading through sedimentation. The chloride- and sulfate-bearing internally mixed particles formed in the plume markedly changed the

  20. Effect of particle size of bronchodilator aerosols on lung distribution and pulmonary function in patients with chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D M; Solomon, M A; Tolfree, S E; Short, M; Spiro, S G

    1987-06-01

    The particle size of bronchodilator aerosols may be important in determining the site of deposition in the lung and their therapeutic effect. The distribution of aerosols (labelled with technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentacetic acid) of two different particle sizes has been studied by gamma camera imaging. The particles had mass median aerodynamic diameters (geometric standard deviations) of 1.4 (1.4) and 5.5 (2.3) micron, and they were administered from a jet nebuliser to eight patients with chronic severe stable asthma. There was no significant difference in peripheral lung deposition with the two aerosols in any patient. The bronchodilator effect of the two aerosols was determined from cumulative dose-response studies. To avoid large doses that might mask possible differences in effect due to aerosol size, small, precisely determined incremental amounts of salbutamol (25-250 micrograms total lung dose) were used. The two doses were given via a nebuliser on separate occasions and the bronchodilator response was measured from FEV1, forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow 30 minutes after each dose. Bronchodilatation was similar with the two aerosols at each dose of salbutamol. There was therefore no difference in distribution within the lung or any difference in bronchodilator effect between an aerosol of small (1.4 micron) particle size and an aerosol of 5.5 microns in patients with severe but stable asthma. PMID:3660305

  1. Organic aerosol mixing observed by single-particle mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ellis Shipley; Saleh, Rawad; Donahue, Neil M

    2013-12-27

    We present direct measurements of mixing between separately prepared organic aerosol populations in a smog chamber using single-particle mass spectra from the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). Docosane and docosane-d46 (22 carbon linear solid alkane) did not show any signs of mixing, but squalane and squalane-d62 (30 carbon branched liquid alkane) mixed on the time scale expected from a condensational-mixing model. Docosane and docosane-d46 were driven to mix when the chamber temperature was elevated above the melting point for docosane. Docosane vapors were shown to mix into squalane-d62, but not the other way around. These results are consistent with low diffusivity in the solid phase of docosane particles. We performed mixing experiments on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) surrogate systems finding that SOA derived from toluene-d8 (a surrogate for anthropogenic SOA (aSOA)) does not mix into squalane (a surrogate for hydrophobic primary organic aerosol (POA)) but does mix into SOA derived from α-pinene (biogenic SOA (bSOA) surrogate). For the aSOA/POA, the volatility of either aerosol does not limit gas-phase diffusion, indicating that the two particle populations do not mix simply because they are immiscible. In the aSOA/bSOA system, the presence of toluene-d8-derived SOA molecules in the α-pinene-derived SOA provides evidence that the diffusion coefficient in α-pinene-derived SOA is high enough for mixing on the time scale of 1 min. The observations from all of these mixing experiments are generally invisible to bulk aerosol composition measurements but are made possible with single-particle composition data. PMID:24131283

  2. Dominant Aerosol Particle Type/Mixture Identification at Worldwide Locations Using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol absorption results in atmospheric heating for various forms of particulate matter - we address means of partitioning mineral dust, pollution (e.g., black and brown carbon), and mixtures of the two using remote sensing techniques. Remotely sensed spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) derived from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer measurements can be used to calculate the absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) at 440, 675, and 870 nm. The spectral change in AAOD with wavelength on logarithmic scales provides the absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE). Recently, a few studies have shown that the relationship between aerosol absorption (i.e., AAE or SSA) and aerosol size [i.e., Angstrom exponent (AE) or fine mode fraction (FMF) of the AOD] can estimate the dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures (i.e., dust, pollution, and dust and pollution mixtures) [Bergstrom et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010; Lee et al. 2010; Giles et al., 2011]. To evaluate these methods, approximately 20 AERONET sites were grouped into various aerosol categories (i.e., dust, mixed, urban/industrial, and biomass burning) based on aerosol types/mixtures identified in previous studies. For data collected between 1999 and 2010, the long-term data set was analyzed to determine the magnitude of spectral AAOD, perform a sensitivity study on AAE by varying the spectral AOD and SSA, and identify dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures. An assessment of the spectral AAOD showed, on average, that the mixed (dust and pollution) category had the highest absorption (AAE ~1.5) followed by biomass burning (AAE~1.3), dust (AAE~1.7), and urban/industrial (AAE~1.2) categories with AAOD (440 nm) varying between 0.03 and 0.09 among these categories. Perturbing input parameters based on the expected uncertainties for AOD (±0.01) and SSA [±0.03; for cases where AOD(440 nm)>0.4], the sensitivity study showed the perturbed AAE mean varied from the unperturbed

  3. Impact of aerosols and atmospheric particles on plant leaf proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xing; Shi, Wen Z.; Zhao, Wen J.; Luo, Na N.

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols and atmospheric particles can diffuse and absorb solar radiation, and directly affect plant photosynthesis and related protein expression. In this study, for the first time, we performed an extensive investigation of the effects of aerosols and atmospheric particles on plant leaf proteins by combining Geographic Information System and proteomic approaches. Data on particles with diameters of 0.1-1.0 μm (PM1) from different locations across the city of Beijing and the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the past 6 years (2007-2012) were collected. In order to make the study more reliable, we segregated the influence of soil pollution by measuring the heavy metal content. On the basis of AOD and PM1, two regions corresponding to strong and weak diffuse solar radiations were selected for analyzing the changes in the expression of plant proteins. Our results demonstrated that in areas with strong diffuse solar radiations, plant ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase was expressed at higher levels, but oxygen evolved in enhancer protein and light-harvesting complex II protein were expressed at lower levels. The expression of ATP synthase subunit beta and chlorophyll a-b binding protein were similar in both regions. By analyzing the changes in the expression of these leaf proteins and their functions, we conclude that aerosols and atmospheric particles stimulate plant photosynthesis facilitated by diffuse solar radiations.

  4. Modeling Gas-Particle Partitioning of SOA: Effects of Aerosol Physical State and RH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Seinfeld, J.

    2011-12-01

    Aged tropospheric aerosol particles contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. In liquid aerosol particles non-ideal mixing of all species determines whether the condensed phase undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation or whether it is stable in a single mixed phase, and whether it contains solid salts in equilibrium with their saturated solution. The extended thermodynamic model AIOMFAC is able to predict such phase states by representing the variety of organic components using functional groups within a group-contribution concept. The number and composition of different condensed phases impacts the diversity of reaction media for multiphase chemistry and the gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile species. Recent studies show that under certain conditions biogenic and other organic-rich particles can be present in a highly viscous, semisolid or amorphous solid physical state, with consequences regarding reaction kinetics and mass transfer limitations. We present results of new gas-particle partitioning computations for aerosol chamber data using a model based on AIOMFAC activity coefficients and state-of-the-art vapor pressure estimation methods. Different environmental conditions in terms of temperature, relative humidity (RH), salt content, amount of precursor VOCs, and physical state of the particles are considered. We show how modifications of absorptive and adsorptive gas-particle mass transfer affects the total aerosol mass in the calculations and how the results of these modeling approaches compare to data of aerosol chamber experiments, such as alpha-pinene oxidation SOA. For a condensed phase in a mixed liquid state containing ammonium sulfate, the model predicts liquid-liquid phase separation up to high RH in case of, on average, moderately hydrophilic organic compounds, such as first generation oxidation products of alpha-pinene. The computations also reveal that treating liquid phases as ideal

  5. Aerosol and bioaerosol particles in a dental office.

    PubMed

    Polednik, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    This study reports comprehensive aerosol and bioaerosol measurements in a dental office. The highest submicrometer particle concentrations were observed during dental grinding and they were on average 16 times higher than the indoor background. Certain metallic trace elements and total carbon concentrations were significantly elevated (>10 times) in the particles deposited in the operating room. Dental procedures also contributed to increased bacterial contamination that may pose a health risk both for dental personnel and patients. PMID:25218707

  6. Rocket-borne probes for charged mesospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, S.; Horanyi, M.; Sternovsky, Z.

    We describe a series of rocket-borne probes for detecting charged solid particles in the ionosphere. The first type of probe is a flat charge-collecting surface on the skin of the rocket. Behind this surface is a permanent magnet that shields the probe from electrons. The current that is recorded is thus from heavier charged aerosol particles. This heavy charge carrier current is converted to a charge number density. A probe launched from White Sands in November 1998 detected a narrow layer at 86 km consistent with sporadic E layer of metallic ions. Two launches were made from the Andoya Rocket Range (Norway) during the MIDAS SOLSTICE campaign in the summer of 2001. Layers of positively and negatively charged aerosol particles were detected on both flights, but inadvertent positive ion collection complicated the analysis. Subsequent payloads included a second probe that supplemented the magnetic field with a positive bias voltage to improve positive ion rejection. Three launches were made from Andoya during the MIDAS MacWAVE campaign in July 2003 with this dual-probe package. Within PMSE, the probes measured an aerosol particle distribution, clearly resolving small positive, small negative, and large negative particles. A new mass-analyzing probe is being developed in which electric fields within the nosecone deflect charged aerosol particles admitted at the nosecone tip. This probe takes advantage of the reduced density behind the shock front to increase the mean free path within the instrument so that cryopumping is not required. The new probe has three pairs of collection surfaces with opposite polarities for collecting (1) electrons and light ions, (2) particles with mass 150-103 amu, and (3) particles with mass 103 -- 2 x 104 amu.

  7. Ice Nucleation Activity of Various Agricultural Soil Dust Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Thea; Höhler, Kristina; Funk, Roger; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Nadolny, Jens; Steinke, Isabelle; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; Ullrich, Romy; Wagner, Robert; Weber, Ines; DeMott, Paul J.; Möhler, Ottmar

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) suggest that agricultural soil dust has an ice nucleation ability that is enhanced up to a factor of 10 compared to desert dust, especially at temperatures above -26 °C (Steinke et al., in preparation for submission). This enhancement might be caused by the contribution of very ice-active biological particles. In addition, soil dust aerosol particles often contain a considerably higher amount of organic matter compared to desert dust particles. To test agricultural soil dust as a source of ice nucleating particles, especially for ice formation in warm clouds, we conducted a series of laboratory measurements with different soil dust samples to extend the existing AIDA dataset. The AIDA has a volume of 84 m3 and operates under atmospherically relevant conditions over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and humidity. By controlled adiabatic expansions, the ascent of an air parcel in the troposphere can be simulated. As a supplement to the AIDA facility, we use the INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institute of Technology) continuous flow diffusion chamber based on the design by Rogers (1988) to expose the sampled aerosol particles to a continuously increasing saturation ratio by keeping the aerosol temperature constant. For our experiments, soil dust was dry dispersed into the AIDA vessel. First, fast saturation ratio scans at different temperatures were performed with INKA, sampling soil dust aerosol particles directly from the AIDA vessel. Then, we conducted the AIDA expansion experiment starting at a preset temperature. The combination of these two different methods provides a robust data set on the temperature-dependent ice activity of various agriculture soil dust aerosol particles with a special focus on relatively high temperatures. In addition, to extend the data set, we investigated the role of biological and organic matter in more

  8. Insights into secondary organic aerosol formation mechanisms from measured gas/particle partitioning of specific organic tracer compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunliang; Kreisberg, Nathan M; Worton, David R; Isaacman, Gabriel; Weber, Robin J; Liu, Shang; Day, Douglas A; Russell, Lynn M; Markovic, Milos Z; VandenBoer, Trevor C; Murphy, Jennifer G; Hering, Susanne V; Goldstein, Allen H

    2013-04-16

    In situ measurements of organic compounds in both gas and particle phases were made with a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (TAG) instrument. The gas/particle partitioning of phthalic acid, pinonaldehyde, and 6,10,14-trimethyl-2-pentadecanone is discussed in detail to explore secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation mechanisms. Measured fractions in the particle phase (f(part)) of 6,10,14-trimethyl-2-pentadecanone were similar to those expected from the absorptive gas/particle partitioning theory, suggesting that its partitioning is dominated by absorption processes. However, f(part) of phthalic acid and pinonaldehyde were substantially higher than predicted. The formation of low-volatility products from reactions of phthalic acid with ammonia is proposed as one possible mechanism to explain the high f(part) of phthalic acid. The observations of particle-phase pinonaldehyde when inorganic acids were fully neutralized indicate that inorganic acids are not required for the occurrence of reactive uptake of pinonaldehyde on particles. The observed relationship between f(part) of pinonaldehyde and relative humidity suggests that the aerosol water plays a significant role in the formation of particle-phase pinonaldehyde. Our results clearly show it is necessary to include multiple gas/particle partitioning pathways in models to predict SOA and multiple SOA tracers in source apportionment models to reconstruct SOA. PMID:23448102

  9. A dual-wavelength single particle aerosol fluorescence monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Paul H.; Stanley, Warren R.; Foot, Virginia; Baxter, Karen; Barrington, Stephen J.

    2005-10-01

    Laser diodes and light-emitting diodes capable of continuous sub-300 nm radiation emission will ultimately represent optimal excitation sources for compact and fieldable bio-aerosol monitors. However, until such devices are routinely available and whilst solid-state UV lasers remain relatively expensive, other low-cost sources of UV can offer advantages. This paper describes one such prototype that employs compact xenon discharge UV sources to excite intrinsic fluorescence from individual particles within an ambient aerosol sample. The prototype monitor samples ambient air via a laminar sheathed-flow arrangement such that particles within the sample flow column are rendered in single file as they intersect the beam from a continuous-wave 660nm diode laser. Each individual particle produces a scattered light signal from which an estimate of particle size (down to ~1 um) may be derived. This same signal also initiates the sequential firing (~10 us apart) of two xenon sources which irradiate the particle with UV pulses centred upon ~280 nm and ~370 nm wavelength, optimal for excitation of bio-fluorophores tryptophan and NADH respectively. For each excitation wavelength, fluorescence is detected across two bands embracing the peak emissions of the same bio-fluorophores. Thus, for each particle, a 2-dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrix is recorded together with an estimate of particle size. Current measurement rates are up to ~125 particles/s (limited by the xenon recharge time), corresponding to all particles for concentrations up to ~2 x 104 particles/l. Developments to increase this to ~500 particles/s are in hand. Analysis of results from aerosols of E.coli, BG spores, and a variety of non-biological materials are given.

  10. Single particle multichannel bio-aerosol fluorescence sensor.

    PubMed

    Kaye, P; Stanley, W R; Hirst, E; Foot, E V; Baxter, K L; Barrington, S J

    2005-05-16

    We describe a prototype low-cost multi-channel aerosol fluorescence sensor designed for unattended deployment in medium to large area bio-aerosol detection networks. Individual airborne particles down to ~1mum in size are detected and sized by measurement of light scattered from a continuous-wave diode laser (660nm). This scatter signal is then used to trigger the sequential firing of two xenon sources which irradiate the particle with UV pulses at ~280 nm and ~370 nm, optimal for excitation of bio-fluorophores tryptophan and NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) respectively. For each excitation wavelength, fluorescence is detected across two bands embracing the peak emissions of the same bio-fluorophores. Current measurement rates are up to ~125 particles/s, corresponding to all particles for concentrations up to 1.3 x 104 particles/l. Developments to increase this to ~500 particles/s are in hand. Device sensitivity is illustrated in preliminary data recorded from aerosols of E.coli, BG spores, and a variety of non-biological materials. PMID:19495264

  11. Single particle multichannel bio-aerosol fluorescence sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, P. H.; Stanley, W. R.; Hirst, E.; Foot, E. V.; Baxter, K. L.; Barrington, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    We describe a prototype low-cost multi-channel aerosol fluorescence sensor designed for unattended deployment in medium to large area bio-aerosol detection networks. Individual airborne particles down to ~1μm in size are detected and sized by measurement of light scattered from a continuous-wave diode laser (660nm). This scatter signal is then used to trigger the sequential firing of two xenon sources which irradiate the particle with UV pulses at ~280 nm and ~370 nm, optimal for excitation of bio-fluorophores tryptophan and NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) respectively. For each excitation wavelength, fluorescence is detected across two bands embracing the peak emissions of the same bio-fluorophores. Current measurement rates are up to ~125 particles/s, corresponding to all particles for concentrations up to 1.3 x 104 particles/l. Developments to increase this to ~500 particles/s are in hand. Device sensitivity is illustrated in preliminary data recorded from aerosols of E.coli, BG spores, and a variety of non-biological materials.

  12. Aerosol acidity characterization of large metropolitan areas: Pilot and planning for Philadelphia

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, J.M.; Koutrakis, P.; Burton, R.; Wilson, W.E.; Purdue, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    The report described the EPA's multi-year program to investigate the specific issues surrounding human exposures to aerosol activity. Philadelphia, a large metropolitan area in the heart of the northeastern seaboard afflicted with photochemical regional smog during the summertime, was chosen as the first city in the program. A pilot study of ambient concentrations was conducted in July 1991. An annular denuder system (ADS) sampler was operated for two weeks near downtown Philadelphia, with a second unit operated in central, suburban New Jersey, the same location of measurements in past years. The Philadelphia site was found to have higher concentrations of most major aerosol species, ammonia and acidic particles than in New Jersey, showing that aerosol neutralization within the urban center will not necessarily totally eliminate acidic particle exposures.

  13. Dispersion of aerosol particles in the atmosphere: Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haszpra, Tímea; Lagzi, István; Tél, Tamás

    2013-04-01

    Investigation of dispersion and deposition of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is an essential issue, because they have an effect on the biosphere and atmosphere. Moreover, aerosol particles have different transport properties and chemical and physical transformations in the atmosphere compared to gas phase air pollutants. The motion of a particle is described by a set of ordinary differential equations. The large-scale dynamics in the horizontal direction can be described by the equations of passive scalar advection, but in the vertical direction a well-defined terminal velocity should be taken into account as a term added to the vertical wind component. In the planetary boundary layer turbulent diffusion has an important role in the particle dispersion, which is taken into account by adding stochastic terms to the deterministic equations above. Wet deposition is also an essential process in the lower levels of the atmosphere, however, its precise parameterization is a challenge. For the simulations the wind field and other necessary data were taken from the ECMWF ERA-Interim database. In the case of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster (March-April 2011) radioactive aerosol particles were also released in the planetary boundary layer. Simulations (included the continuous and varying emission from the nuclear power plant) will be presented for the period of 14-23 March. Results show that wet deposition also has to be taken into consideration in the lower levels of the atmosphere. Furthermore, dynamical system characteristics are evaluated for the aerosol particle dynamics. The escape rate of particles was estimated both with and without turbulent diffusion, and in both cases when there was no wet deposition and also when wet deposition was taken into consideration.

  14. Design of Aerosol Particle Coating: Thickness, Texture and Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, B.; Pratsinis, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Core-shell particles preserve the performance (e.g. magnetic, plasmonic or opacifying) of a core material while modifying its surface with a shell that facilitates (e.g. by blocking its reactivity) their incorporation into a host liquid or polymer matrix. Here coating of titania (core) aerosol particles with thin silica shells (films or layers) is investigated at non-isothermal conditions by a trimodal aerosol dynamics model, accounting for SiO2 generation by gas phase and surface oxidation of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) vapor, coagulation and sintering. After TiO2 particles have reached their final primary particle size (e.g. upon completion of sintering during their flame synthesis), coating starts by uniformly mixing them with HMDSO vapor that is oxidized either in the gas phase or on the particles’ surface resulting in SiO2 aerosols or deposits, respectively. Sintering of SiO2 deposited onto the core TiO2 particles takes place transforming rough into smooth coating shells depending on process conditions. The core-shell characteristics (thickness, texture and efficiency) are calculated for two limiting cases of coating shells: perfectly smooth (e.g. hermetic) and fractal-like. At constant TiO2 core particle production rate, the influence of coating weight fraction, surface oxidation and core particle size on coating shell characteristics is investigated and compared to pertinent experimental data through coating diagrams. With an optimal temperature profile for complete precursor conversion, the TiO2 aerosol and SiO2-precursor (HMDSO) vapor concentrations have the strongest influence on product coating shell characteristics. PMID:23729833

  15. Characterization of aerosol particles at the forested site in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimselyte, I.; Garbaras, A.; Kvietkus, K.; Remeikis, V.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM), especially fine particles (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 1 m, PM1), has been found to play an important role in global climate change, air quality, and human health. The continuous study of aerosol parameters is therefore imperative for better understanding the environmental effects of the atmospheric particles, as well as their sources, formation and transformation processes. The particle size distribution is particularly important, since this physical parameter determines the mass and number density, lifetime and atmospheric transport, or optical scattering behavior of the particles in the atmosphere (Jaenicke, 1998). Over the years several efforts have been made to improve the knowledge about the chemical composition of atmospheric particles as a function of size (Samara and Voutsa, 2005) and to characterize the relative contribution of different components to the fine particulate matter. It is well established that organic materials constitute a highly variable fraction of the atmospheric aerosol. This fraction is predominantly found in the fine size mode in concentrations ranging from 10 to 70% of the total dry fine particle mass (Middlebrook et al., 1998). Although organic compounds are major components of the fine particles, the composition, formation mechanism of organic aerosols are not well understood. This is because particulate organic matter is part of a complex atmospheric system with hundreds of different compounds, both natural and anthropogenic, covering a wide range of chemical properties. The aim of this study was to characterize the forest PM1, and investigate effects of air mass transport on the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition, estimate and provide insights into the sources and characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols through analysis ^13C/12C isotopic ratio as a function of the aerosol particles size. The measurements were performed at the Rugšteliškis integrated

  16. Ambient particle characterization by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry in an urban area of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Li, Mei; Huang, Zhengxu; Gao, Wei; Nian, Huiqing; Fu, Zhong; Gao, Jian; Chai, Fahe; Zhou, Zhen

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the composition and possible sources of aerosol particles in Beijing urban area, a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed from April 22 to May 4, 2011. 510,341 particles out of 2,953,200 sized particles were characterized by SPAMS in combination with the ART-2a neural network algorithm. The particles were classified as rich-K (39.79%), carbonaceous species (32.7%), industry metal (19.2%), dust (5.7%), and rich-Na (1.76%). Industrial emissions related particles, rich-Fe, rich-Pb, and K-nitrate, were the major components of aerosol particles during haze periods, which were mainly from the steel plants and metal smelting processes around Beijing. Under stagnant meterological conditions, these regional emissions have a vital effect on haze formation. Organic carbon (OC) particles were attributed to biomass burning. NaK-EC was likely to come from local traffic emissions. Internally mixed organic and elemental carbon (OCEC) was found to be from possible sources of local traffic emission and biomass burning. It was found that coarse dust particles were mainly composed of four different types of dust particles, dust-Si, dust-Ca, dust-Al, and dust-Ti. It is the first time that SPAMS was used to study a dust storm in Beijing. Our results showed that SPAMS could be a powerful tool in the identification and apportionment of aerosol sources in Beijing, providing useful reference information for environmental control and management.

  17. The effect of phase partitioning of semivolatile compounds on the measured CCN activity of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romakkaniemi, S.; Jaatinen, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Nenes, A.; Raatikainen, T.

    2013-09-01

    The effect of inorganic semivolatile aerosol compounds on the CCN activity of aerosol particles was studied by using a computational model for a DMT-CCN counter, a cloud parcel model for condensation kinetics and experiments to quantify the modelled results. Concentrations of water vapour and semivolatiles as well as aerosol trajectories in the CCN column were calculated by a computational fluid dynamics model. These trajectories and vapour concentrations were then used as an input for the cloud parcel model to simulate mass transfer kinetics of water and semivolatiles between aerosol particles and the gas phase. Two different questions were studied: (1) how big fraction of semivolatiles is evaporated from particles before activation in the CCN counter? (2) How much the CCN activity can be increased due to condensation of semivolatiles prior to the maximum water supersaturation in the case of high semivolatile concentration in the gas phase? The results show that, to increase the CCN activity of aerosol particles, a very high gas phase concentration (as compared to typical ambient conditions) is needed. We used nitric acid as a test compound. A concentration of several ppb or higher is needed for measurable effect. In the case of particle evaporation, we used ammonium nitrate as a test compound and found that it partially evaporates before maximum supersaturation is reached in the CCN counter, thus causing an underestimation of CCN activity. The effect of evaporation is clearly visible in all supersaturations, leading to an underestimation of the critical dry diameter by 10 to 15 nanometres in the case of ammonium nitrate particles in different supersaturations. This result was also confirmed by measurements in supersaturations between 0.1 and 0.7%.

  18. Water and acid soluble trace metals in atmospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, S. E.; Harriss, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Continental aerosols are collected above a deciduous forest in eastern Tennessee and subjected to selective extractions to determine the water-soluble and acid-leachable concentrations of Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn. The combined contributions of these metals to the total aerosol mass is 0.5 percent, with approximately 70 percent of this attributable to Pb alone. A substantial fraction (approximately 50 percent or more) of the acid-leachable metals is soluble in distilled water. In general, this water-soluble fraction increases with decreasing particle size and with increasing frequency of atmospheric water vapor saturation during the sampling period. The pattern of relative solubilities (Zn being greater than Mn, which is approximately equal to Cd, which is greater than Pb) is found to be similar to the general order of the thermodynamic solubilities of the most probable salts of these elements in continental aerosols with mixed fossil fuel and soil sources.

  19. Aerosol particles and the formation of advection fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A study of numerical simulation of the effects of concentration, particle size, mass of nuclei, and chemical composition on the dynamics of warm fog formation, particularly the formation of advection fog, is presented. This formation is associated with the aerosol particle characteristics, and both macrophysical and microphysical processes are considered. In the macrophysical model, the evolution of wind components, water vapor content, liquid water content, and potential temperature under the influences of vertical turbulent diffusion, turbulent momentum, and turbulent energy transfers are taken into account. In the microphysical model, the supersaturation effect is incorporated with the surface tension and hygroscopic material solution. It is shown that the aerosol particles with the higher number density, larger size nuclei, the heavier nuclei mass, and the higher ratio of the Van't Hoff factor to the molecular weight favor the formation of the lower visibility advection fogs with stronger vertical energy transfer during the nucleation and condensation time period.

  20. Towards an integrated optical single aerosol particle lab.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, Marcel; Probst, Karl; Fallnich, Carsten

    2012-01-21

    We present a manipulation and characterization system for single airborne particles which is integrated onto a microscope slide. Trapped particles are manipulated by means of radiation pressure and characterized by cavity enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Optical fibers are used to deliver the trapping laser light as well as to collect the Raman scattered light, allowing for a flexible usage of the device. The system features a sample chamber which is separated from an aerosol-flooded injection chamber by means of a light guiding glass-capillary. The coupling of this device with an aerosol optical tweezers setup to selectively load its trapping sites is demonstrated. Finally, a route towards chip-integrated handling and processing of multiple particles is shown and the first results are presented. PMID:22105700

  1. Studies of Ice Nucleating Aerosol Particles in Arctic Cloud Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, David C.; DeMott, Paul J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this research is to improve the understanding of ice nucleating aerosol particles (IN) and the role they play in ice formation in Arctic clouds. IN are important for global climate issues in a variety of ways. The primary effect is their role in determining the phase (liquid or solid) of cloud particles. The microscale impact is on cloud particle size, growth rate, shape, fall speed, concentration, radiative properties, and scavenging of gases and aerosols. On a larger scale, ice formation affects the development of precipitation (rate, amount, type, and distribution), latent heat release (rate and altitude), ambient humidity, the persistence of clouds, and cloud albedo. The overall goals of our FIRE 3 research are to characterize the concentrations and variability of Arctic IN during the winter-spring transition, to compare IN measurements with ice concentrations in Arctic clouds, and to examine selected IN samples for particle morphology and chemical there are distinguishable chemical signatures. The results can be combined with other measurements of aerosols, gaseous species, and cloud characteristics in order to understand the processes that determine the phase and concentration of cloud particles.

  2. Surface Chemistry at Size-Selected Nano-Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Jeffrey

    2005-03-01

    A method has been developed to conduct surface chemistry and extract surface kinetic rates from size-selected aerosol nanoparticles. The measurements encompass broad ranges of particle size, phase, and composition. Results will be presented on the uptake of water by aerosolized soot nanoparticles of radius between 10 and 40 nm. Water uptake was monitored by tandem differential mobility analysis (T-DMA), which is capable of measuring changes in particle diameter as little as 0.2 nm. Soot particles were produced in an ethene diffusion flame and extracted into an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube reactor. The particles were subjected to various thermal and oxidative treatments, and the effects of these treatments on the ability of soot to adsorb monolayer quantities of water was determined. The results are important because soot nucleates atmospheric cloud particles. More generally, the results represent one of the first kinetic and mechanistic studies of gas-phase nanoparticle reactivity. Co-author: Henry Ajo, University of Minnesota

  3. Contributions of Acid-Catalysed Processes to Secondary Organic Aerosol Mass - A Modelling pproach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, B.; Feingold, G.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    A significant fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass is formed by chemical and/or physical processes. However, the amount of organic material found in ambient organic aerosols cannot be explained with current models. Recently, several laboratory studies have been published which suggest that also acid-catalyzed processes that occur either in particles or at their surfaces (heterogeneous) might contribute significantly to mass formation. However, to date there is no general conclusion about the efficiency of such processes due to the great diversity of species and experimental conditions. We present a compilation of literature data (thermodynamic and kinetic) of these processes. The aerosol yields of (i) additional species which are thought previously not contribute to SOA formation (e.g. isoprene, aliphatic aldehydes) and (ii) species which form apparently higher SOA masses on acidic seed aerosols are reported and compared to input data of previous SOA models. Available kinetic data clearly exclude aldol condensation as a significant process for SOA formation on a time scale of typical aerosol life times. Using aerosol size distributions and gas phase concentrations measured during NEAQS2002 as model input data, we show that (even under assumption of equilibrium conditions) these additional processes only contribute a minor fraction to the organic aerosol mass.

  4. Endotoxin in Size-Separated Metal Working Fluid Aerosol Particles.

    PubMed

    Dahlman-Höglund, Anna; Lindgren, Åsa; Mattsby-Baltzer, Inger

    2016-08-01

    Patients with airway symptoms working in metal working industries are increasing, despite efforts to improve the environmental air surrounding the machines. Our aim was to analyse the amount of endotoxin in size-separated airborne particles of metal working fluid (MWF) aerosol, by using the personal sampler Sioutas cascade impactor, to compare filter types, and to compare the concentration of airborne endotoxin to that of the corresponding MWFs. In a pilot field study, aerosols were collected in two separate machine halls on totally 10 occasions, using glass fibre and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters in parallel at each station. Airborne endotoxin was distributed over all size fractions. While a major part was found in the largest size fraction (72%, 2.5-10 µm), up to 8% of the airborne endotoxin was detected in the smallest size fraction (<0.25 µm). Comparing the efficiency of the filter types, a significantly higher median endotoxin level was found with glass fibres filters collecting the largest particle-size fraction (1.2-fold) and with PTFE filters collecting the smallest ones (5-fold). The levels of endotoxin in the size-separated airborne particle fractions correlated to those of the MWFs supporting the aerosol-generating machines. Our study indicates that a significant part of inhalable aerosols of MWFs consists of endotoxin-containing particles below the size of intact bacteria, and thus small enough to readily reach the deepest part of the lung. Combined with other chemical irritants of the MWF, exposure to MWF aerosols containing endotoxin pose a risk to respiratory health problems. PMID:27268595

  5. Online Aerosol Mass Spectrometry of Single Micrometer-Sized Particles Containing Poly(ethylene glycol)

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, M J; Patton, E; Srivastava, A; Martin, S; Fergenson, D; Steele, P; Tobias, H; Gard, E; Frank, M

    2006-10-25

    Analysis of poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG)-containing particles by online single particle aerosol mass spectrometers equipped with laser desorption ionization (LDI) is reported. We demonstrate that PEG-containing particles are useful in the development of aerosol mass spectrometers because of their ease of preparation, low cost, and inherently recognizable mass spectra. Solutions containing millimolar quantities of PEGs were nebulized and, after drying, the resultant micrometer-sized PEG containing particles were sampled. LDI (266 nm) of particles containing NaCl and PEG molecules of average molecular weight <500 generated mass spectra reminiscent of mass spectra of PEG collected by other MS schemes including the characteristic distribution of positive ions (Na{sup +} adducts) separated by the 44 Da of the ethylene oxide units separating each degree of polymerization. PEGs of average molecular weight >500 were detected from particles that also contained t the tripeptide tyrosine-tyrosine-tyrosine or 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, which were added to nebulized solutions to act as matrices to assist LDI using pulsed 266 nm and 355 nm lasers, respectively. Experiments were performed on two aerosol mass spectrometers, one reflectron and one linear, that each utilize two time-of-flight mass analyzers to detect positive and negative ions created from a single particle. PEG-containing particles are currently being employed in the optimization of our bioaerosol mass spectrometers for the application of measurements of complex biological samples, including human effluents, and we recommend that the same strategies will be of great utility to the development of any online aerosol LDI mass spectrometer platform.

  6. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols - Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1989-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystalization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  7. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols: Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1988-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystallization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  8. Comparison of the DiSCmini aerosol monitor to a handheld condensation particle counter and a scanning mobility particle sizer for submicrometer sodium chloride and metal aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jessica B.; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the robust, lightweight DiSCmini (DM) aerosol monitor for its ability to measure the concentration and mean diameter of submicrometer aerosols. Tests were conducted with monodispersed and polydispersed aerosols composed of two particle types (sodium chloride, NaCl, and spark generated metal particles, which simulate particles found in welding fume) at three different steady-state concentration ranges (Low, <103; Medium, 103–104; and High, >104 particles/cm3). Particle number concentration, lung deposited surface area (LDSA) concentration, and mean size measured with the DM were compared to those measured with reference instruments, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a handheld condensation particle counter (CPC). Particle number concentrations measured with the DM were within 21% of those measured by reference instruments for polydisperse aerosols. Poorer agreement was observed for monodispersed aerosols (±35% for most tests and +130% for 300-nm NaCl). LDSA concentrations measured by the DM were 96% to 155% of those estimated with the SMPS. The geometric mean diameters measured with the DM were within 30% of those measured with the SMPS for monodispersed aerosols and within 25% for polydispersed aerosols (except for the case when the aerosol contained a substantial number of particles larger than 300 nm). The accuracy of the DM is reasonable for particles smaller than 300 nm but caution should be exercised when particles larger than 300 nm are present. PMID:23473056

  9. Ion balances of size-resolved tropospheric aerosol samples: implications for the acidity and atmospheric processing of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Hillamo, Risto; Teinilä, Kimmo; Pakkanen, Tuomo; Allegrini, Ivo; Sparapani, Roberto

    A large set of size-resolved aerosol samples was inspected with regard to their ion balance to shed light on how the aerosol acidity changes with particle size in the lower troposphere and what implications this might have for the atmospheric processing of aerosols. Quite different behaviour between the remote and more polluted environments could be observed. At the remote sites, practically the whole accumulation mode had cation-to-anion ratios clearly below unity, indicating that these particles were quite acidic. The supermicron size range was considerably less acidic and may in some cases have been close to neutral or even alkaline. An interesting feature common to the remote sites was a clear jump in the cation-to-anion ratio when going from the accumulation to the Aitken mode. The most likely reason for this was cloud processing which, via in-cloud sulphate production, makes the smallest accumulation-mode particles more acidic than the non-activated Aitken-mode particles. A direct consequence of the less acidic nature of the Aitken mode is that it can take up semi-volatile, water-soluble gases much easier than the accumulation mode. This feature may have significant implications for atmospheric cloud condensation nuclei production in remote environments. In rural and urban locations, the cation-to-anion ratio was close to unity over most of the accumulation mode, but increased significantly when going to either larger or smaller particle sizes. The high cation-to-anion ratios in the supermicron size range were ascribed to carbonate associated with mineral dust. The ubiquitous presence of carbonate in these particles indicates that they were neutral or alkaline, making them good sites for heterogeneous reactions involving acidic trace gases. The high cation-to-anion ratios in the Aitken mode suggest that these particles contained some water-soluble anions not detected by our chemical analysis. This is worth keeping in mind when investigating the hygroscopic

  10. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR AN OFFICE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses an evaluation of the effect of percent outdoor air supplied and occupation level on the particle size distributions and mass concentrations for a typical office building. (NOTE: As attention has become focused on indoor air pollution control, it has become i...

  11. Atmospheric oxidation of isoprene and 1,3-Butadiene: influence of aerosol acidity and Relative humidity on secondary organic aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of acidic seed aerosols on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA)have been examined in a number of previous studies, several of which have observed strong linear correlations between the aerosol acidity (measured as nmol H+ per m3 air s...

  12. Ozone and secondary aerosol formation — Analysis of particle observations in the 2009 SHARP campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowin, J.; Yu, X.; Laulainen, N.; Iedema, M.; Lefer, B. L.; Anderson, D.; Pernia, D.; Flynn, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Particulate matters (PM) play important roles in the formation and transformation of ozone. Although photooxidation of volatile organic compounds with respect to ozone formation in the gas phase is well understood, many unknowns still exist in heterogeneous mechanisms that process soot, secondary aerosols (both inorganic and organic), and key radical precursors such as formaldehyde and nitrous acid. Our main objective is to answer two key science questions: 1) will reduction of fine PM reduce ozone formation? 2) What sources of PM are most culpable? Are they from local chemistry or long-range transport? The field data collected in the 2009 Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors (SHARP) by our group at the Moody Tower consist of 1) real-time photolysis rates of ozone precursors, 2) particle size distributions, 3) organic carbon and elemental carbon, and 4) an archive of single particle samples taken with the Time Resolved Aerosol Collector (TRAC) sampler. The time resolution of the TRAC sampler is 30 minutes for routine measurements, and 15 minutes during some identified “events” (usually in the mid-afternoon) of high ozone and secondary organic or sulfate particle formation. The latter events last typically about an hour. Five ozone exceedance days occurred during the 6 weeks of deployment. Strong correlation between photochemical activities and organic carbon was observed. Initial data analysis indicates that secondary organic aerosol is a major component of the carbonaceous aerosols observed in Houston. Soot, secondary sulfate, seal salt, and mineral dust particles are determined from single particle analysis using scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microcopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Compared with observations in 2000, the mass percentage of organics is higher (60 vs. 30%), and lower for sulfate (20% vs. 32%). On-going data analysis will focus on the composition, sources, and transformation of primary and

  13. Chemical characterization of submicron aerosol particles collected over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, R.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Andreae, M. O.

    2002-08-01

    Submicron aerosol particles (Dp < 1 μm) were sampled with stacked filter units on the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Hercules C-130 aircraft during February-March 1999 as a contribution to the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX). We determined the vertical and spatial distribution of the major aerosol components (NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, methyl sulfonic acid, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, oxalate, organic carbon, and black carbon) over the Indian Ocean to examine the role of pollution aerosols on indirect and direct radiative forcing. High pollution levels were observed over the entire northern Indian Ocean down to the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) located between the equator and 10°S. In the northern part of the Indian Ocean (5°-15°N, 66°-73°E), high concentrations of carbonaceous aerosol and pollution-derived inorganic species were found in a layer extending from the sea surface to about 3.5 km asl. In this layer, the average mass concentration of all aerosol species detected by our technique ranged between 7 and 34 μg m-3, comparable to pollution levels observed in industrialized regions. In the Southern Hemisphere (1°-9°S, 66°-73°E), the aerosol concentrations rapidly declined to remote background levels of about 2 μg m-3. The concentrations of non-sea-salt sulfate (the main light scattering component) ranged from maximum values of 12.7 μg m-3 in the Northern Hemisphere to 0.2 μg m-3 in the Southern Hemisphere. Carbonaceous aerosol contributes between 40% and 60% to the fine aerosol mass of all determined components. An unusually high fraction of black carbon (up to 16% in the polluted areas) is responsible for its high light absorption coefficient.

  14. Volatility of Organic Aerosol: Evaporation of Ammonium Sulfate/Succinic Acid Aqueous Solution Droplets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Condensation and evaporation modify the properties and effects of atmospheric aerosol particles. We studied the evaporation of aqueous succinic acid and succinic acid/ammonium sulfate droplets to obtain insights on the effect of ammonium sulfate on the gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric organic acids. Droplet evaporation in a laminar flow tube was measured in a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer setup. A wide range of droplet compositions was investigated, and for some of the experiments the composition was tracked using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. The measured evaporation was compared to model predictions where the ammonium sulfate was assumed not to directly affect succinic acid evaporation. The model captured the evaporation rates for droplets with large organic content but overestimated the droplet size change when the molar concentration of succinic acid was similar to or lower than that of ammonium sulfate, suggesting that ammonium sulfate enhances the partitioning of dicarboxylic acids to aqueous particles more than currently expected from simple mixture thermodynamics. If extrapolated to the real atmosphere, these results imply enhanced partitioning of secondary organic compounds to particulate phase in environments dominated by inorganic aerosol. PMID:24107221

  15. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids: Implications for atmospheric processing of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Cao, Fang; Lee, Meehye

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) were measured for 23 individual organic species including 9 dicarboxylic acids, 7 oxocarboxylic acids, 1 tricarboxylic acid, 2 α-dicarbonyls, and 4 fatty acids in the aerosols from Gosan background site in East Asia. δ13C values of particle phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal are significantly larger than those previously reported for isoprene and other precursors. The values are consistently less negative in oxalic acid (C2, average -14.1‰), glyoxylic acid (-13.8‰), pyruvic acid (-19.4‰), glyoxal (-13.5‰), and methylglyoxal (-18.6‰) compared to other organic species (e.g., palmitic acid, -26.3‰), which can be explained by the kinetic isotope effects during atmospheric oxidation of pre-aged precursors (e.g., isoprene) and the subsequent gas-particle partitioning after the evaporation of clouds or wet aerosols. The δ13C values of C2 is positively correlated with C2 to organic carbon ratio, indicating that photochemical production of C2 is more pronounced than its degradation during long-range atmospheric transport. The isotopic results also suggest that aqueous phase oxidation of glyoxal and methylglyoxal is a major formation process of oxalic acid via the intermediates such as glyoxylic acid and pyruvic acid. This study provides evidence that organic aerosols are intensively photochemically aged in the western North Pacific rim.

  16. Study on Dicarboxylic Acids in Aerosol Samples with Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Heidi; Sirén, Heli

    2014-01-01

    The research was performed to study the simultaneous detection of a homologous series of α, ω-dicarboxylic acids (C2–C10), oxalic, malonic, succinic, glutaric, adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic, and sebacic acids, with capillary electrophoresis using indirect UV detection. Good separation efficiency in 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid as background electrolyte modified with myristyl trimethyl ammonium bromide was obtained. The dicarboxylic acids were ionised and separated within five minutes. For the study, authentic samples were collected onto dry cellulose membrane filters of a cascade impactor (12 stages) from outdoor spring aerosols in an urban area. Hot water and ultrasonication extraction methods were used to isolate the acids from membrane filters. Due to the low concentrations of acids in the aerosols, the extracts were concentrated with solid-phase extraction (SPE) before determination. The enrichment of the carboxylic acids was between 86 and 134% with sample pretreatment followed by 100-time increase by preparation of the sample to 50 μL. Inaccuracy was optimised for all the sample processing steps. The aerosols contained dicarboxylic acids C2–C10. Then, mostly they contained C2, C5, and C10. Only one sample contained succinic acid. In the study, the concentrations of the acids in aerosols were lower than 10 ng/m3. PMID:24729915

  17. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of optically levitated aerosol: a technique to quantitatively map the viscosity of suspended aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, C; Hosny, N A; Tong, H; Seville, P C; Gallimore, P J; Davidson, N M; Athanasiadis, A; Botchway, S W; Ward, A D; Kalberer, M; Kuimova, M K; Pope, F D

    2016-08-21

    We describe a technique to measure the viscosity of stably levitated single micron-sized aerosol particles. Particle levitation allows the aerosol phase to be probed in the absence of potentially artefact-causing surfaces. To achieve this feat, we combined two laser based techniques: optical trapping for aerosol particle levitation, using a counter-propagating laser beam configuration, and fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of molecular rotors for the measurement of viscosity within the particle. Unlike other techniques used to measure aerosol particle viscosity, this allows for the non-destructive probing of viscosity of aerosol particles without interference from surfaces. The well-described viscosity of sucrose aerosol, under a range of relative humidity conditions, is used to validate the technique. Furthermore we investigate a pharmaceutically-relevant mixture of sodium chloride and salbutamol sulphate under humidities representative of in vivo drug inhalation. Finally, we provide a methodology for incorporating molecular rotors into already levitated particles, thereby making the FLIM/optical trapping technique applicable to real world aerosol systems, such as atmospheric aerosols and those generated by pharmaceutical inhalers. PMID:27430158

  18. The influence of temperature and aerosol acidity on biogenic secondary organic aerosol tracers: Observations at a rural site in the central Pearl River Delta region, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiang; Wang, Xin-Ming; Zheng, Mei

    2011-02-01

    At a rural site in the central Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in south China, fine particle (PM 2.5) samples were collected during fall-winter 2007 to measure biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers, including isoprene SOA tracers (3-methyl-2,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene, 2-methylglyceric acid, 2-methylthreitol and 2-methylerythritol), α-pinene SOA tracers ( cis-pinonic acid, pinic acid, 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid, 3-hydroxyglutaric acid and 3-hydroxy-4,4-dimethylglutaric acid) and a sesquiterpene SOA tracer (β-caryophyllinic acid). The isoprene-, α-pinene- and sesquiterpene-SOA tracers averaged 30.8 ± 15.9, 6.61 ± 4.39, and 0.54 ± 0.56 ng m -3, respectively; and 2-methyltetrols (sum of 2-methylthreitol and 2-methylerythritol, 27.6 ± 15.1 ng m -3) and cis-pinonic acid (3.60 ± 3.76 ng m -3) were the dominant isoprene- and α-pinene-SOA tracers, respectively. 2-Methyltetrols exhibited significantly positive correlations ( p < 0.05) with ambient temperature, probably resulting from the enhanced isoprene emission strength and tracer formation rate under higher temperature. The significantly positive correlation ( p < 0.05) between 2-methyltetrols and the estimated aerosol acidity with a slope of 59.4 ± 13.4 ng m -3 per μmol [H +] m -3 reflected the enhancement of isoprene SOA formation by aerosol acidity, and acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reaction was probably the major formation pathway for 2-methyltetrols in the PRD region. 2-Methylglyceric acid showed poor correlations with both temperature and aerosol acidity. The α-pinene SOA tracers showed poor correlations with temperature, probably due to the counteraction between temperature effects on the precursor emission/tracer formation and gas/particle partitioning. Among the α-pinene SOA tracers, only cis-pinonic acid and pinic acid exhibited significant correlations with aerosol acidity with slopes of -11.7 ± 3.7 and -2.2 ± 0.8 ng m -3 per μmol [H +] m -3, respectively. The negative

  19. Code System to Calculate Particle Penetration Through Aerosol Transport Lines.

    1999-07-14

    Version 00 Distribution is restricted to US Government Agencies and Their Contractors Only. DEPOSITION1.03 is an interactive software program which was developed for the design and analysis of aerosol transport lines. Models are presented for calculating aerosol particle penetration through straight tubes of arbitrary orientation, inlets, and elbows. An expression to calculate effective depositional velocities of particles on tube walls is derived. The concept of maximum penetration is introduced, which is the maximum possible penetrationmore » through a sampling line connecting any two points in a three-dimensional space. A procedure to predict optimum tube diameter for an existing transport line is developed. Note that there is a discrepancy in this package which includes the DEPOSITION 1.03 executable and the DEPOSITION 2.0 report. RSICC was unable to obtain other executables or reports.« less

  20. The vertical distribution of Martian aerosol particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.

    2014-12-01

    Using approximately 410 limb-viewing observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM), we retrieve the vertical distribution of Martian dust and water ice aerosol particle sizes. We find that dust particles have an effective radius of 1.0 µm over much of the atmospheric column below 40 km throughout the Martian year. This includes the detached tropical dust layers detected in previous studies. Little to no variation with height is seen in dust particle size. Water ice clouds within the aphelion cloud belt exhibit a strong sorting of particle size with height, however, and the effective radii range from >3 µm below 20 km to near 1.0 µm at 40 km altitude. Conversely, water ice clouds in the seasonal polar hoods show a near-uniform particle size with an effective radius of approximately 1.5 µm throughout the atmospheric column.

  1. Characterization of aerosol particles at the forested site in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimselyte, I.; Garbaras, A.; Kvietkus, K.; Remeikis, V.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM), especially fine particles (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 1 m, PM1), has been found to play an important role in global climate change, air quality, and human health. The continuous study of aerosol parameters is therefore imperative for better understanding the environmental effects of the atmospheric particles, as well as their sources, formation and transformation processes. The particle size distribution is particularly important, since this physical parameter determines the mass and number density, lifetime and atmospheric transport, or optical scattering behavior of the particles in the atmosphere (Jaenicke, 1998). Over the years several efforts have been made to improve the knowledge about the chemical composition of atmospheric particles as a function of size (Samara and Voutsa, 2005) and to characterize the relative contribution of different components to the fine particulate matter. It is well established that organic materials constitute a highly variable fraction of the atmospheric aerosol. This fraction is predominantly found in the fine size mode in concentrations ranging from 10 to 70% of the total dry fine particle mass (Middlebrook et al., 1998). Although organic compounds are major components of the fine particles, the composition, formation mechanism of organic aerosols are not well understood. This is because particulate organic matter is part of a complex atmospheric system with hundreds of different compounds, both natural and anthropogenic, covering a wide range of chemical properties. The aim of this study was to characterize the forest PM1, and investigate effects of air mass transport on the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition, estimate and provide insights into the sources and characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols through analysis ^13C/12C isotopic ratio as a function of the aerosol particles size. The measurements were performed at the Rugšteliškis integrated

  2. Tracking Water Diffusion Fronts in a Highly Viscous Aerosol Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastelberger, Sandra; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Field measurements indicate that atmospheric secondary aerosol particles can be present in a highly viscous, glassy state [1]. In contrast to liquid state particles, the gas phase equilibration is kinetically limited and governed by condensed phase diffusion. In recent water diffusion experiments on highly viscous single aerosol particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) we observed a characteristic shift behavior of the Mie whispering gallery modes (WGM) indicative of the changing radial structure of the particle, thus providing us with an experimental method to track the diffusion process inside the particle. When a highly viscous, homogeneous particle is exposed to an abrupt increase in relative humidity, the rapid gas phase diffusion and strong concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the condensed phase lead to extremely steep water concentration gradients inside the particle, reminiscent of diffusion fronts. The resulting quasi step-like concentration profile motivates the introduction of a simple core-shell model describing the morphology of the non-equilibrium particle during humidification. The subsequent particle growth and reduction of the shell refractive index can be observed as red and blueshift behavior of the WGM, respectively. The shift pattern can be attributed to a core-shell radius ratio and particle radius derived from model calculations [2]. If supplemented with growth information obtained from the WGM redshift and thermodynamic equilibrium data, we can infer a comprehensive picture of the time evolution of the diffusion fronts in the framework of our core-shell model. The measured time dependent concentration profile is then compared with simulations solving the non-linear diffusion equation [3] [1] Virtanen, A., et al., Nature, 467, 824-827, 2010 [2] Kaiser, T., Schweiger, G., Computers in Physics, Vol. 7, No. 6, 682-686, Nov/Dec 1993 [3] Zobrist, B., Soonsin, V., Luo, B.P., Peter, T. et al., Phys. Chem. Chem

  3. An amorphous solid state of biogenic secondary organic aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Annele; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Koop, Thomas; Kannosto, Jonna; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Leskinen, Jani; Mäkelä, Jyrki M; Holopainen, Jarmo K; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Laaksonen, Ari

    2010-10-14

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are formed in the atmosphere from condensable oxidation products of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). On a global scale, biogenic VOCs account for about 90% of VOC emissions and of SOA formation (90 billion kilograms of carbon per year). SOA particles can scatter radiation and act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei, and thereby influence the Earth's radiation balance and climate. They consist of a myriad of different compounds with varying physicochemical properties, and little information is available on the phase state of SOA particles. Gas-particle partitioning models usually assume that SOA particles are liquid, but here we present experimental evidence that they can be solid under ambient conditions. We investigated biogenic SOA particles formed from oxidation products of VOCs in plant chamber experiments and in boreal forests within a few hours after atmospheric nucleation events. On the basis of observed particle bouncing in an aerosol impactor and of electron microscopy we conclude that biogenic SOA particles can adopt an amorphous solid-most probably glassy-state. This amorphous solid state should provoke a rethinking of SOA processes because it may influence the partitioning of semi-volatile compounds, reduce the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions, affect the particles' ability to accommodate water and act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei, and change the atmospheric lifetime of the particles. Thus, the results of this study challenge traditional views of the kinetics and thermodynamics of SOA formation and transformation in the atmosphere and their implications for air quality and climate. PMID:20944744

  4. Particle size influences aerosol deposition in guinea pigs during bronchoconstriction

    SciTech Connect

    Praud, J.P.; Macquin-Mavier, I.; Wirquin, V.; Meignan, M.; Harf, A.

    1986-03-01

    The role of two factors determining the deposition of aerosols in the respiratory tract was investigated: the particle size and the nature of the airflow in the airways. An aerosol of Tc99 m-DTPA was generated, with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of either 3 ..mu..m (Bird nebulizer) or 0.5 ..mu..m (Jouan nebulizer). The vehicle was either saline (S) or histamine (H) at a concentration which was previously shown to induce a 50% decrease of specific airway conductance. Spontaneously breathing guinea pigs were exposed during 2 minutes to the aerosol, then killed and the radioactivity in the pharynx, the trachea, the large bronchi and the remaining parenchyma was measured. Results are evaluated as the percentage of total radioactivity in the respiratory tract (mean +/- SEM). Analysis of variance showed that there was a significant difference in the pattern of deposition for large particles (3 ..mu..m) during bronchoconstriction: the more proximal deposition can be ascribed to inertial impaction. Particle size should be clearly defined during histamine challenge in experimental animals.

  5. Hydrolysis of organonitrate functional groups in aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shang; Shilling, John E.; Song, Chen; Hiranuma, Naruki; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Russell, Lynn M.

    2012-10-19

    Organonitrate (ON) groups are important substituents in secondary organic aerosols. Model simulations and laboratory studies indicate a large fraction of ON groups in aerosol particles, but much lower quantities are observed in the atmosphere. Hydrolysis of ON groups in aerosol particles has been proposed recently. To test this hypothesis, we simulated formation of ON molecules in a reaction chamber under a wide range of relative humidity (0% to 90%). The mass fraction of ON groups (5% to 20% for high-NOx experiments) consistently decreased with increasing relative humidity, which was best explained by hydrolysis of ON groups at a rate of 4 day-1 (lifetime of 6 hours) for reactions under relative humidity greater than 20%. In addition, we found that secondary nitrogen-containing molecules absorb light, with greater absorption under dry and high-NOx conditions. This work provides the first evidence for particle-phase hydrolysis of ON groups, a process that could substantially reduce ON group concentration in the atmosphere.

  6. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids: implications for atmospheric processing of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Kawamura, K.; Cao, F.; Lee, M.

    2015-12-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) were measured for 23 individual organic species including 9 dicarboxylic acids, 7 oxocarboxylic acids, 1 tricarboxylic acid, 2 α-dicarbonyls and 4 fatty acids in the aerosols from Gosan background site in East Asia. δ13C of particle-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal are significantly higher than those previously reported for isoprene and other precursors, associated with isotope fractionation during atmospheric oxidation. 13C is consistently more enriched for oxalic acid (C2), glyoxylic acid, pyruvic acid, glyoxal and methylglyoxal compared to other organic compounds identified, which can be explained by the kinetic isotope effects during aqueous-phase processing and the subsequent gas-particle partitioning after clouds or wet aerosols evaporation δ13C of C2 is positively correlated with C2 and organic carbon ratio, indicating that a photochemical production of C2 is more pronounced than its degradation process during long-range transport. The 13C results also suggest that aqueous-phase oxidation of glyoxal and methylglyoxal is major formation process of oxalic acid production via the major intermediates glyoxylic acid and pyruvic acid. This study provides evidence that organic aerosols are intensively photo-chemically aged in this region.

  7. The rate of equilibration of viscous aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, Simon; Topping, David O.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    The proximity of atmospheric aerosol particles to equilibrium with their surrounding condensable vapours can substantially impact their transformations, fate and impacts and is the subject of vibrant research activity. In this study we first compare equilibration timescales estimated by three different models for diffusion through aerosol particles to assess any sensitivity to choice of model framework. Equilibration times for diffusion coefficients with varying dependencies on composition are compared for the first time. We show that even under large changes in the saturation ratio of a semi-volatile component (es) of 1-90 % predicted equilibration timescales are in agreement, including when diffusion coefficients vary with composition. For condensing water and a diffusion coefficient dependent on composition, a plasticising effect is observed, leading to a decreased estimated equilibration time with increasing final es. Above 60 % final es maximum equilibration times of around 1 s are estimated for comparatively large particles (10 µm) containing a relatively low diffusivity component (1 × 10-25 m2 s-1 in pure form). This, as well as other results here, questions whether particle-phase diffusion through water-soluble particles can limit hygroscopic growth in the ambient atmosphere. In the second part of this study, we explore sensitivities associated with the use of particle radius measurements to infer diffusion coefficient dependencies on composition using a diffusion model. Given quantified similarities between models used in this study, our results confirm considerations that must be taken into account when designing such experiments. Although quantitative agreement of equilibration timescales between models is found, further work is necessary to determine their suitability for assessing atmospheric impacts, such as their inclusion in polydisperse aerosol simulations.

  8. Modeling Rayleigh Scattering of Aerosol Particles.

    PubMed

    Harczuk, Ignat; Vahtras, Olav; Ågren, Hans

    2016-05-12

    Rayleigh scattering of naturally polarized light was studied for systems with atmospheric relevance representing growing water clusters with adsorbed cis-pinonic acid. The scattering intensity was computed from the static and dynamical polarizabilities of the clusters obtained by a recently derived methodology for classical polarizabilities, in which Applequist equations for interacting polarizable dipoles are used together with point-dipoles and polarizabilities obtained by quantum chemistry and decomposed into the atomic domain by the so-called LoProp transformation generalized for frequency dependence. The Applequist interaction was found to yield scattering intensities 20% larger for a cluster consisting of 1000 water molecules, as compared to the method where all of the polarizabilities of molecules are added without interactions. It was confirmed that scattering intensity depends quadratically on the number of water molecules in the cluster, and that it also increases quadratically with increase in the mass constituent of the foreign substance. The adsorption of the cis-pinonic acid increases the contribution to the scattering intensity stemming from the anisotropic polarizability, as compared to the isotropic contribution. The ramifications of the method in predicting Rayleigh scattering and the earth's albedo with respect to man-made and natural gas emission are briefly discussed. PMID:27097131

  9. Insitu measurements of laser-induced-fluorescence spectra of single atmospheric organic carbon aerosol particles for their partial classification. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnick, R. G.; Pan, Y.; Hill, S.; Rosen, J. M.; Chang, R. K.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosols are ubiquitous in the earth’s atmosphere. Within the last two decades, the importance of organic carbon aerosols (OCAs) has been widely recognized. OCAs have both natural and anthropogenic sources and have effects ranging from atmospheric radiative forcing to human health. Improved methods for measuring and classifying OCAs are needed for better understanding their sources, transformation, and fate. In this talk we focus on the use of a relatively new technique for characterization of single OCA particles in atmospheric aerosol: ultraviolet laser-induced-fluorescence (UV-LIF). UV-LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosols measured at multiple sites with different regional climate (Adelphi, MD, New Haven, CT, and Las Cruces, NM) are reported. A hierarchical clustering method was used to cluster (approximately 90%) of the single-particle UV-LIF spectra into 8-10 groups (clusters). Some of these clusters have spectra that are similar to spectra of some important classes of atmospheric aerosol, such as humic/fulvic acids and humic-like substances, bacteria, cellulose, marine aerosol, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The most highly populated clusters, and some of the less populated ones, appear at all sites. On average, spectra characteristic of humic/fulvic acids and humic-like-substances (HULIS) comprise 28-43% of fluorescent particles at all three sites; whereas cellulose-like spectra contribute only 1-3%.

  10. Graphical techniques for interpreting the composition of individual aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hui; Rahn, Kenneth A.; Zhuang, Guoshun

    A graphical technique that uses X- Y and ternary plots is presented for interpreting elemental data for individual aerosol particles. By revealing the multiple functional relationships between the elements, it offers more insight into the groups of particles and the transitions between them than traditional techniques such as factor analysis and cluster analysis alone are able to. For a sample of dust storm aerosol from Beijing in March 2002, X-Y plots revealed areas, lines, and "dots" that represented clays, smooth transitions to asymptotes of pure single-component minerals, and pure minor minerals or special particles, respectively. Ternary plots further revealed ratios of elements and potential minerals. Careful use of cluster analysis revealed subgroups of particles that were not separated by clear borders. The dust storm had three major components, clay/quartz (Al 2O 3, SiO 2, etc.), basic calcium (CaO, CaCO 3), and salts (sulfate, phosphate, chloride). Some sulfates, including CaSO 4 and (NH 4) xH 2-xSO 4, were mixed with the quartz and clay. A five-step sequence that combines graphics, basic statistics, cluster analysis, and SEM photography seems to extract the maximum information from suites of single particles.

  11. Pulmonary function and clearance after prolonged sulfuric acid aerosol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, P.J. ); Gerrity, T.R.; DeWitt, P.; Folinsbee, L.J. )

    1991-03-15

    The authors studied pulmonary function and clearance responses after a 4 H exposure to 75-100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} sulfuric acid aerosol (SAA). Healthy subjects, who exercised for 30 min/H at ventilation of about 25 L/min, were exposed once to clean air and once to SAA. Oral hygiene and acidic juice gargle were used to minimize oral ammonia. Lung function tests, including spirometry, plethysmography, and partial flow-volume (PEFV) curves were performed before and after exposure. Clearance of 99m-Technetium labeled iron oxide was assessed after each exposure. The first moment of fractional tracheobronchial retention (M1TBR), after correcting for 24 H retention and normalizing to time zero, was used as an index of clearance. There were no significant changes in lung volumes, airways resistance, or maximum expiratory flows after SAA exposure. Flow at 40% of total lung capacity on PEFV curves decreased 17% (NS) after SAA exposure. Tracheobronchial clearance was accelerated after a single exposure to SAA; M1TBR decreased from 73 {plus minus} 5 min (air) to 69 {plus minus} 5 min (SAA). These results suggest that acute prolonged exposure to low levels of SAA has minimal effects on lung mechanics in healthy subjects but does produce a modest acceleration of particle clearance.

  12. A biogenic source of oxalic acid in marine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, M.; Rinaldi, M.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C.; Sciare, J.; Burrows, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Oxalic acid has been often observed in marine aerosol, nevertheless, given the ubiquitous character and the high concentrations found in polluted environments, its origin has often been attributed to continental sources. In this work, we present the results of oxalic acid analyses, on aerosol samples collected at Mace Head (Ireland, 53°20’N, 9°54’W) and Amsterdam Island (Indian Ocean, 37°48’S, 77°34’E), supporting the existence of a biogenic source of oxalic acid over the oceans. Measurements cover the year 2006, at the Northern Hemisphere site, and the period 2003-2007, at the Southern Hemisphere one. Aerosol oxalic acid was detected in clean marine air masses in concentrations ranging from 2.7 to 39 ng m-3, at Mace Head, and from 0.31 to 17 ng m-3, at Amsterdam Island. In both hemispheres, oxalic acid concentration showed a clear seasonal trend, with maxima in spring-summer and minima in the fall-winter period, in analogy with other marine biogenic aerosol components (e.g., MSA and amines). Oxalic acid was distributed along the whole aerosol size spectrum, with the major contribution given by the 1.0-2.0 µm size range, and by the lower accumulation mode (0.25-0.5 µm). Given the observed size distributions, marine aerosol oxalic acid can be assumed as the result of the combination of different formation processes, among which in-cloud oxidation of gaseous precursors [1] and photochemical degradation of biogenic unsaturated fatty acids [2] are likely the most important. Among aerosol oxalic acid precursors, glyoxal is the most likely candidate in the marine boundary layer, as a source of glyoxal over the oceans has recently been discovered by satellite observations [3] and confirmed by in situ measurements [4]. In support of this hypothesis, SCIAMACHY satellite retrieved glyoxal column concentrations, over the two sampling sites, resulted characterized by a clear seasonal trend, resembling the aerosol oxalic acid one. [1] Warneck, Atmospheric

  13. Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) During AMAZE-08

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2008-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the AMazonian Aerosol CharacteriZation Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. The presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 μm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as 'viable aerosols' or 'fluorescent bioparticles' (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. First data analyses show a pronounced peak of FBAP at diameters around 2-3 μm. In this size range the biogenic particle fraction was

  14. A numerical determination of the evolution of cloud drop spectra due to condensation on natural aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, I. Y.; Haenel, G.; Pruppacher, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    The time variation in size of aerosol particles growing by condensation is studied numerically by means of an air parcel model which allows entrainment of air and aerosol particles. Particles of four types of aerosols typically occurring in atmospheric air masses were considered. The present model circumvents any assumption about the size distribution and chemical composition of the aerosol particles by basing the aerosol particle growth on actually observed size distributions and on observed amounts of water taken up under equilibrium by a deposit of the aerosol particles. Characteristic differences in the drop size distribution, liquid water content and supersaturation were found for the clouds which evolved from the four aerosol types considered.

  15. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols I: uranium concentration in aerosols as a function of time and particle size.

    PubMed

    Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Cheng, Yung Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L; Traub, Richard J

    2009-03-01

    During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing DU were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time, particularly within the first minute after a shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s after perforation, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% after 30 min. The initial and maximum uranium concentrations were lower in the Bradley vehicle than those observed in the Abrams tank, and the concentration levels decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in a cyclone sampler, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h after perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages ranged from 38 to 72% for the Abrams tank with conventional armor. In most cases, it varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Neither the Abrams tank with DU armor nor the Bradley vehicle results were specifically correlated with particle size and can best be represented by their average uranium mass concentrations of 65

  16. Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols I: Uranium Concentration in Aerosols as a Function of Time and Particle Size

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Traub, Richard J.

    2009-03-01

    During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing depleted uranium were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time particularly within the first minute after the shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% 30 min after perforation. In the Bradley vehicle, the initial (and maximum) uranium concentration was lower than those observed in the Abrams tank and decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in the cyclone samplers, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h post perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages from the Abrams tank tests ranged from 38% to 72% and, in most cases, varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Results with the Bradley vehicle ranged from 18% to 29% and were not specifically correlated with particle size.

  17. Individual aerosol particles in and below clouds along a Mt. Fuji slope: Modification of sea-salt-containing particles by in-cloud processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, S.; Hirose, Y.; Miura, K.; Okochi, H.

    2014-02-01

    Sizes and compositions of atmospheric aerosol particles can be altered by in-cloud processing by absorption/adsorption of gaseous and particulate materials and drying of aerosol particles that were formerly activated as cloud condensation nuclei. To elucidate differences of aerosol particles before and after in-cloud processing, aerosols were observed along a slope of Mt. Fuji, Japan (3776 m a.s.l.) during the summer in 2011 and 2012 using a portable laser particle counter (LPC) and an aerosol sampler. Aerosol samples for analyses of elemental compositions were obtained using a cascade impactor at top-of-cloud, in-cloud, and below-cloud altitudes. To investigate composition changes via in-cloud processing, individual particles (0.5-2 μm diameter) of samples from five cases (days) collected at different altitudes under similar backward air mass trajectory conditions were analyzed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. For most cases (four cases), most particles at all altitudes mainly comprised sea salts: mainly Na with some S and/or Cl. Of those, in two cases, sea-salt-containing particles with Cl were found in below-cloud samples, although sea-salt-containing particles in top-of-cloud samples did not contain Cl. This result suggests that Cl in the sea salt was displaced by other cloud components. In the other two cases, sea-salt-containing particles on samples at all altitudes were without Cl. However, molar ratios of S to Na (S/Na) of the sea-salt-containing particles of top-of-cloud samples were higher than those of below-cloud samples, suggesting that sulfuric acid or sulfate was added to sea-salt-containing particles after complete displacement of Cl by absorption of SO2 or coagulation with sulfate. The additional volume of sulfuric acid in clouds for the two cases was estimated using the observed S/Na values of sea-salt-containing particles. The estimation revealed that size changes by in

  18. LC-MS analysis of aerosol particles from the oxidation of α-pinene by ozone and OH-radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterhalter, R.; van Dingenen, R.; Larsen, B. R.; Jensen, N. R.; Hjorth, J.

    2003-01-01

    The time resolved chemical composition of aerosol particles, formed by the oxidation of alpha-pinene has been investigated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS) using negative and positive ionisation methods (ESI(-) and APCI(+)). The experiments were performed at the EUPHORE facility in Valencia (Spain) under various experimental conditions, including dark ozone reactions, photosmog experiments with low NOx mixing ratios and reaction with OH radicals in the absence of NOx (H2O2-photolysis). Particles were sampled on PTFE f ilters at different stages of the reaction and extracted with methanol. The predominant products from alpha-pinene in the particulate phase are cis-pinic acid, cis-pinonic acid and hydroxy-pinonic acid isomers. Another major compound with molecular weight 172 was detected, possibly a hydroxy-carboxylic acid. These major compounds account for 50% to 80% of the identified aerosol products, depending on the time of sampling and type of experiment. In addition, more than 20 different products have been detected and structures have been tentatively assigned based on their molecular weight and responses to the different ionisation modes. The different experiments performed showed that the aerosol formation is mainly caused by the ozonolysis reaction. The highest aerosol yields were observed in the dark ozone experiments, for which also the highest ratios of mass of identified products to the formed aerosol mass were found (30% to 50%, assuming a density of 1 g cm-3).

  19. Microscopic Characterization of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particle Aging in the Outflow from Mexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Moffet, R. C.; Henn, T. R.; Tivanski, A. V.; Hopkins, R. J.; Desyaterik, Y.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Tyliszczak, T.; Fast, J.; Barnard, J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Cliff, S.S.; Perry, K. D.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.

    2009-09-16

    This study was part of the Megacities Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) field campaign conducted in Mexico City Metropolitan Area during spring 2006. The physical and chemical transformations of particles aged in the outflow from Mexico City were investigated for the transport event of 22 March 2006. A detailed chemical analysis of individual particles was performed using a combination of complementary microscopy and micro-spectroscopy techniques. The applied techniques included scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) coupled with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (CCSEM/EDX). As the aerosol plume evolves from the city center, the organic mass per particle increases and the fraction of carbon-carbon double bonds (associated with elemental carbon) decreases. Organic functional groups enhanced with particle age include: carboxylic acids, alkyl groups, and oxygen bonded alkyl groups. At the city center (T0) the most prevalent aerosol type contained inorganic species (composed of sulfur, nitrogen, oxygen, and potassium) coated with organic material. At the T1 and T2 sites, located northeast of T0 (~;;29 km and ~;;65 km, respectively), the fraction of homogenously mixed organic particles increased in both size and number. These observations illustrate the evolution of the physical mixing state and organic bonding in individual particles in a photochemically active environment.

  20. Composition of Stratospheric Aerosol Particles collected during the SOLVE campaign 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Katharina; Nathalie, Benker; Martin, Ebert; Ralf, Weigel; Wilson James, C.; Stephan, Borrmann; Stephan, Weinbruch

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric Aerosol particles were collected during the SAGE III Ozone loss and validation Experiment (SOLVE) in January-March 2000 in Kiruna/ Sweden onboard the scientific ER-2 aircraft with the Multi-Sample Aerosol Collection System. The particles are deposited on Cu transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. Particles of six samples from different flights (including one PSC sample) were analyzed by TEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray detection (EDX) regarding their size, chemical composition and morphology. Most particles are sulfates (formed from droplets of sulfuric acid) which are not resistant to the electron beam. In addition, refractory particles in the size range of 100-500 nm are found. They are either embedded in the sulfates or occur as single particles. The refractory particles are mainly carbonaceous showing only C and O as major peaks in their X-ray spectra. Some particles contain minor amounts of Si and Fe. Both, the O/C (median from 0.10-0.40), as well as Si/C (median from 0.05-0.32) ratios are increasing with time, from the middle of January to the end of February. The largest Fe/C ratio (median: 0.37) is found in a sample of the end of January. Based on the nanostructure and the absence of potassium as a tracer, biomass burning can be excluded as a source. Soot from diesel engines as well as from aircrafts show a nanostructure which is not found in the refractory particles. Due to the fact that large volcanic eruptions, which introduced material directly into the stratosphere, were missing since the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in 1991, they are a very unlikely source of the refractory particles. The most likely source of the refractory particles is thus extraterrestrial material.

  1. Susceptibility of Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) to pyrethrin aerosol: effects of aerosol particle size, concentration, and exposure conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of laboratory studies were conducted to assess effect of droplet size on efficacy of pyrethrin aerosol against adults of Tribolium confusum Jacqueline DuVal, the confused flour beetle. A vertical flow aerosol exposure chamber that generated a standardized particle size diameter was used for...

  2. Atmospheric Condensational Properties of Ultrafine Chain and Fractal Aerosol Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlow, William H.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose for the research sponsored by this grant was to lay the foundations for qualitative understanding and quantitative description of the equilibrium vapor pressure of water vapor over the irregularly shaped, carbonaceous particles that are present in the atmosphere. This work apparently was the first systematic treatment of the subject. Research was conducted in two complementary components: 1. Calculations were performed of the equilibrium vapor pressure of water over particles comprised of aggregates of spheres in the 50-200 nm radius range. The purposes of this work were two-fold. First, since no systematic treatment of this subject had previously been conducted, its availability would be directly useful for quantitative treatment for a limited range of atmospheric aerosols. Second, it would provide qualitative indications of the effects of highly irregular particle shape on equilibrium vapor pressure of aggregates comprised of smaller spheres.

  3. Rocket-borne probes for charged ionospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, B.; Sternovsky, Z.; Robertson, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2003-10-01

    A series of rocket-borne probes is described for detecting charged solid particles in the ionosphere. The probes are flat charge-collecting surfaces on the skin of the rocket that have behind them a permanent magnet that magnetically insulates the probe from electrons. Several probes have also had a small positive bias of several volts to reduce collection of light molecular ions. The current that is recorded is thus from heavier charged particles and this is converted to a charge number density. Several summer launches into the polar mesosphere have found charged aerosol layers at the altitudes of noctilucent clouds and polar summer mesospheric radar echoes. A new probe is being developed in which electric deflection is used to determine the mass of the particles. This probe takes advantage of the reduced density behind the shock front to increase the mean free path within the instrument, so that cryopumping is not required.

  4. A New Electrospray Aerosol Generator with High Particle Transmission Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Huijing; Patel, Anand C.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Chen, Da-Ren

    2012-01-01

    A new single-capillary electrospray (ES) aerosol generator has been developed for monodisperse particle production with maximal transmission efficiency. The new generator consists of both a spray chamber in a point-to-orifice-plate configuration and a charge reduction chamber that can hold up to 4 Nuclespot ionizers (Model P-2042, NRD Inc.). The 2 chambers are partitioned by an orifice plate. To optimize the particle transmission efficiency of the prototype, a systematic study was performed on the generator by varying the system setup and operation. Two key dimensions of the generator setup, the orifice diameter and the distance from the capillary tip to the orifice plate, were varied. Fluorescence analysis was applied to characterize the loss of ES-generated particles at different locations of the prototype. It was found that particle loss in the generator could be reduced by either increasing the orifice diameter or decreasing the distance between the capillary tip and the orifice plate. Increasing either the total radioactivity of the ionizers or the flowrate of the particle carrier gas also further decreased the particle loss in the system. The maximum particle transmission efficiency of 88.0% was obtained with the spray chamber fully opened to the charge reduction chamber, the capillary tip at the same level as the orifice plate, and 4 bipolar ionizers installed. PMID:22829715

  5. Method and apparatus for aerosol particle absorption spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Campillo, Anthony J.; Lin, Horn-Bond

    1983-11-15

    A method and apparatus for determining the absorption spectra, and other properties, of aerosol particles. A heating beam source provides a beam of electromagnetic energy which is scanned through the region of the spectrum which is of interest. Particles exposed to the heating beam which have absorption bands within the band width of the heating beam absorb energy from the beam. The particles are also illuminated by light of a wave length such that the light is scattered by the particles. The absorption spectra of the particles can thus be determined from an analysis of the scattered light since the absorption of energy by the particles will affect the way the light is scattered. Preferably the heating beam is modulated to simplify the analysis of the scattered light. In one embodiment the heating beam is intensity modulated so that the scattered light will also be intensity modulated when the particles absorb energy. In another embodiment the heating beam passes through an interferometer and the scattered light reflects the Fourier Transform of the absorption spectra.

  6. A New Electrospray Aerosol Generator with High Particle Transmission Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huijing; Patel, Anand C; Holtzman, Michael J; Chen, Da-Ren

    2011-01-01

    A new single-capillary electrospray (ES) aerosol generator has been developed for monodisperse particle production with maximal transmission efficiency. The new generator consists of both a spray chamber in a point-to-orifice-plate configuration and a charge reduction chamber that can hold up to 4 Nuclespot ionizers (Model P-2042, NRD Inc.). The 2 chambers are partitioned by an orifice plate. To optimize the particle transmission efficiency of the prototype, a systematic study was performed on the generator by varying the system setup and operation. Two key dimensions of the generator setup, the orifice diameter and the distance from the capillary tip to the orifice plate, were varied. Fluorescence analysis was applied to characterize the loss of ES-generated particles at different locations of the prototype. It was found that particle loss in the generator could be reduced by either increasing the orifice diameter or decreasing the distance between the capillary tip and the orifice plate. Increasing either the total radioactivity of the ionizers or the flowrate of the particle carrier gas also further decreased the particle loss in the system. The maximum particle transmission efficiency of 88.0% was obtained with the spray chamber fully opened to the charge reduction chamber, the capillary tip at the same level as the orifice plate, and 4 bipolar ionizers installed. PMID:22829715

  7. Effect of Organic Coatings, Humidity and Aerosol Acidity on Multiphase Chemistry of Isoprene Epoxydiols.

    PubMed

    Riva, Matthieu; Bell, David M; Hansen, Anne-Maria Kaldal; Drozd, Greg T; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Imre, Dan; Surratt, Jason D; Glasius, Marianne; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2016-06-01

    Multiphase chemistry of isomeric isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) has been shown to be the dominant source of isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Recent studies have reported particles composed of ammonium bisulfate (ABS) mixed with model organics exhibit slower rates of IEPOX uptake. In the present study, we investigate the effect of atmospherically relevant organic coatings of α-pinene (AP) SOA on the reactive uptake of trans-β-IEPOX onto ABS particles under different conditions and coating thicknesses. Single particle mass spectrometry was used to characterize in real-time particle size, shape, density, and quantitative composition before and after reaction with IEPOX. We find that IEPOX uptake by pure sulfate particles is a volume-controlled process, which results in particles with uniform concentration of IEPOX-derived SOA across a wide range of sizes. Aerosol acidity was shown to enhance IEPOX-derived SOA formation, consistent with recent studies. The presence of water has a weaker impact on IEPOX-derived SOA yield, but significantly enhanced formation of 2-methyltetrols, consistent with offline filter analysis. In contrast, IEPOX uptake by ABS particles coated with AP-derived SOA is lower compared to that of pure ABS particles, strongly dependent on particle composition, and therefore on particle size. PMID:27176464

  8. Generation and characterization of large-particle aerosols using a center flow tangential aerosol generator with a nonhuman-primate, head-only aerosol chamber

    PubMed Central

    Bohannon, J. Kyle; Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Wada, Jiro; Bollinger, Laura; Jahrling, Peter B.; Johnson, Reed F.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol droplets or particles produced from infected respiratory secretions have the potential to infect another host through inhalation. These respiratory particles can be polydisperse and range from 0.05–500 μm in diameter. Animal models of infection are generally established to facilitate the potential licensure of candidate prophylactics and/or therapeutics. Consequently, aerosol-based animal infection models are needed to properly study and counter airborne infections. Ideally, experimental aerosol exposure should reliably result in animal disease that faithfully reproduces the modelled human disease. Few studies have been performed to explore the relationship between exposure particle size and induced disease course for infectious aerosol particles. The center flow tangential aerosol generator (CenTAG™) produces large-particle aerosols capable of safely delivering a variety of infectious aerosols to nonhuman primates within a Class III Biological Safety Cabinet (BSC) for establishment or refinement of nonhuman primate infectious disease models. Here we report the adaptation of this technology to the Animal Biosafety Level 4 (ABSL-4) environment for the future study of high-consequence viral pathogens and the characterization of CenTAG™-created sham (no animal, no virus) aerosols using a variety of viral growth media and media supplements. PMID:25970823

  9. Generation and characterization of large-particle aerosols using a center flow tangential aerosol generator with a non-human-primate, head-only aerosol chamber.

    PubMed

    Bohannon, J Kyle; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; Kuhn, Jens H; Wada, Jiro; Bollinger, Laura; Jahrling, Peter B; Johnson, Reed F

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol droplets or particles produced from infected respiratory secretions have the potential to infect another host through inhalation. These respiratory particles can be polydisperse and range from 0.05 to 500 µm in diameter. Animal models of infection are generally established to facilitate the potential licensure of candidate prophylactics and/or therapeutics. Consequently, aerosol-based animal infection models are needed to properly study and counter airborne infections. Ideally, experimental aerosol exposure should reliably result in animal disease that faithfully reproduces the modeled human disease. Few studies have been performed to explore the relationship between exposure particle size and induced disease course for infectious aerosol particles. The center flow tangential aerosol generator (CenTAG™) produces large-particle aerosols capable of safely delivering a variety of infectious aerosols to non-human primates (NHPs) within a Class III Biological Safety Cabinet (BSC) for establishment or refinement of NHP infectious disease models. Here, we report the adaptation of this technology to the Animal Biosafety Level 4 (ABSL-4) environment for the future study of high-consequence viral pathogens and the characterization of CenTAG™-created sham (no animal, no virus) aerosols using a variety of viral growth media and media supplements. PMID:25970823

  10. Longitudinal distributions of dicarboxylic acids, ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids in the marine aerosols from the central Pacific including equatorial upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoque, Mir Md. Mozammal; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2016-03-01

    Remote marine aerosol samples (total suspended particles) were collected during a cruise in the central Pacific from Japan to Mexico (1°59'N-35°N and 171°54'E-90°58'W). The aerosol samples were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11), ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids as well as organic and elemental carbon, water-soluble organic carbon, and total nitrogen (WSTN). During the study, diacids were the most abundant compound class followed by fatty acids, ω-oxoacids, and α-dicarbonyls. Molecular compositions of diacids showed a predominance of oxalic (C2) acid followed by malonic (C3) and succinic (C4) acids. Oxalic acid comprises 74% of total diacids. This result suggests that photochemical production of oxalic acid is significant over the central Pacific. Spatial distributions of diacids, ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids together with total carbon and WSTN showed higher abundances in the eastern equatorial Pacific where the upwelling of high-nutrient waters followed by high biological productivity is common, indicating that their in situ production is important in the warmer central Pacific through photochemical oxidation from their gaseous and particulate precursors. This study demonstrates that there is a strong linkage in biogeochemical cycles of carbon in the sea-air interface via ocean upwelling, phytoplankton productivity, sea-to-air emissions of organic matter, and formation of secondary organic aerosols in the eastern equatorial Pacific.

  11. Gas uptake and chemical aging of semisolid organic aerosol particles

    PubMed Central

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Ammann, Markus; Koop, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Organic substances can adopt an amorphous solid or semisolid state, influencing the rate of heterogeneous reactions and multiphase processes in atmospheric aerosols. Here we demonstrate how molecular diffusion in the condensed phase affects the gas uptake and chemical transformation of semisolid organic particles. Flow tube experiments show that the ozone uptake and oxidative aging of amorphous protein is kinetically limited by bulk diffusion. The reactive gas uptake exhibits a pronounced increase with relative humidity, which can be explained by a decrease of viscosity and increase of diffusivity due to hygroscopic water uptake transforming the amorphous organic matrix from a glassy to a semisolid state (moisture-induced phase transition). The reaction rate depends on the condensed phase diffusion coefficients of both the oxidant and the organic reactant molecules, which can be described by a kinetic multilayer flux model but not by the traditional resistor model approach of multiphase chemistry. The chemical lifetime of reactive compounds in atmospheric particles can increase from seconds to days as the rate of diffusion in semisolid phases can decrease by multiple orders of magnitude in response to low temperature or low relative humidity. The findings demonstrate that the occurrence and properties of amorphous semisolid phases challenge traditional views and require advanced formalisms for the description of organic particle formation and transformation in atmospheric models of aerosol effects on air quality, public health, and climate. PMID:21690350

  12. Impacts of Sulfate Seed Acidity and Water Content on Isoprene Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jenny P S; Lee, Alex K Y; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-11-17

    The effects of particle-phase water and the acidity of pre-existing sulfate seed particles on the formation of isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated. SOA was generated from the photo-oxidation of isoprene in a flow tube reactor at 70% relative humidity (RH) and room temperature in the presence of three different sulfate seeds (effloresced and deliquesced ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate) under low NOx conditions. High OH exposure conditions lead to little isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) SOA being generated. The primary result is that particle-phase water had the largest effect on the amount of SOA formed, with 60% more SOA formation occurring with deliquesced ammonium sulfate seeds as compared to that on effloresced ones. The additional organic material was highly oxidized. Although the amount of SOA formed did not exhibit a dependence on the range of seed particle acidity examined, perhaps because of the low amount of IEPOX SOA, the levels of high-molecular-weight material increased with acidity. While the uptake of organics was partially reversible under drying, the results nevertheless indicate that particle-phase water enhanced the amount of organic aerosol material formed and that the RH cycling of sulfate particles may mediate the extent of isoprene SOA formation in the atmosphere. PMID:26460477

  13. Nature and evolution of ultrafine aerosol particles in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V. V.

    2006-12-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical studies of a poorly understood phenomenon, an intense emission of ultrafine (nanometer) aerosols (ENA), are reviewed. In the English-language literature, this phenomenon is commonly referred to as a nucleation burst. ENA events have been observed on all the continents and throughout the depth of the troposphere, with the number of corresponding publications growing steadily. Intense and long-lasting ENA events have been studied more or less comprehensively and in full detail for Northern Europe, with 60 to 70% of observations taken in a forest area in the presence of snow cover and 10 to 20% in coastal marine areas. Most often, ENA events occur during spring and fall, with 95% of cases in the daytime and under sunny calm conditions, typical of anticyclones. In ENA events, the concentration of nanoparticles initially grows rapidly to values of 103-105 cm-3. One or two hours later, the so-called nuclei fraction with diameters D = 3-15 nm is produced. The appearance of the Aitken fraction D = 20-80 nm and the enlargement of aerosol particles inside the accumulation fraction D = 80-200 nm may occur during the following 4-6 h. Thus, the cycle of formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles in the size range from a few to hundreds of nanometers is reproduced over 6-8 h. A specific synoptic feature of ENA events over land is that they occur when the polar air is transported to measuring sites and the temperature difference between day and light is large. During ENA periods, the formation rate of condensation nuclei with a diameter of 100 nm increases 10-to 100-fold. Important factors of ENA genesis are the “aerosol” and “electric” states of the atmosphere. More intense ENA events occur at low concentrations of background aerosols in the presence of atmospheric ions of medium mobility with D = 2-3 nm. The international experiments ACE 1 and 2, BIOFOR 1, 2, and 3, ESUP 2000, QUEST, etc., have not yet provided any

  14. Method for determining aerosol particle size device for determining aerosol particle size

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Vincent J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for determining the mass median diameter D of particles contained in a fluid is provided wherein the data of the mass of a pre-exposed and then a post-exposed filter is mathematically combined with data concerning the pressure differential across the same filter before and then after exposure to a particle-laden stream. A device for measuring particle size is also provided wherein the device utilizes the above-method for mathematically combining the easily quantifiable data.

  15. Viscosity controls humidity dependence of N2O5 uptake to citric acid aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržinić, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Berkemeier, T.; Türler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneous loss of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) to aerosol particles has a significant impact on the night-time nitrogen oxide cycle and therefore the oxidative capacity in the troposphere. Using a 13N short-lived radioactive tracer method, we studied the uptake kinetics of N2O5 on citric acid aerosol particles as a function of relative humidity (RH). The results show that citric acid exhibits lower reactivity than similar dicarboxylic and polycarboxylic acids, with uptake coefficients between ∼ 3 × 10-4-∼ 3 × 10-3 depending on humidity (17-70 % RH). At RH above 50 %, the magnitude and the humidity dependence can be best explained by the viscosity of citric acid as compared to aqueous solutions of simpler organic and inorganic solutes and the variation of viscosity with RH and, hence, diffusivity in the organic matrix. Since the diffusion rates of N2O5 in highly concentrated citric acid solutions are not well established, we present four different parameterizations of N2O5 diffusivity based on the available literature data or estimates for viscosity and diffusivity of H2O. Above 50 % RH, uptake is consistent with the reacto-diffusive kinetic regime whereas below 50 % RH, the uptake coefficient is higher than expected from hydrolysis of N2O5 within the bulk of the particles, and the uptake kinetics is most likely limited by loss on the surface only. This study demonstrates the impact of viscosity in highly oxidized and highly functionalized secondary organic aerosol material on the heterogeneous chemistry of N2O5 and may explain some of the unexpectedly low loss rates to aerosol derived from field studies.

  16. Enhanced high-temperature ice nucleation ability of crystallized aerosol particles after preactivation at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin

    2014-07-01

    In cloud chamber experiments with crystallized aqueous ammonium sulfate, oxalic acid, and succinic acid solution droplets, we have studied a preactivation mechanism that markedly enhances the particles' heterogeneous ice nucleation ability. First cloud expansion experiments were performed at a high temperature (267-244 K) where the crystallized particles did not promote any heterogeneous ice nucleation. Ice nucleation at this temperature, however, could be triggered by temporarily cooling the crystallized particles to a lower temperature. This is because upon crystallization, residuals of the aqueous solution are trapped within the crystals. These captured liquids can freeze when cooled below their respective homogeneous or heterogeneous freezing temperature, leading to the formation of ice pockets in the crystalline particles. When warmed again to the higher temperature, ice formation by the preactivated particles occurred via depositional and deliquescence-induced ice growth, with ice active fractions ranging from 1 to 4% and from 4 to 20%, respectively. Preactivation disappeared above the eutectic temperature, which for the organic acids are close to the melting point of ice. This mechanism could therefore contribute to the very small fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles that are still ice active well above 263 K.

  17. Experimental Determination of Chemical Diffusion within Secondary Organic Aerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, Evan H.; Imre, D.; Beranek, Josef; Wilson, Jacqueline; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2013-02-28

    Formation, properties, transformations, and temporal evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) particles strongly depend on particle phase. Recent experimental evidence from a number of groups indicates that SOA is in a semi-solid phase, the viscosity of which remained unknown. We find that when SOA is made in the presence of vapors of volatile hydrophobic molecules the SOA particles absorb and trap them. Here, we illustrate that it is possible to measure the evaporation rate of these molecules that is determined by their diffusion in SOA, which is then used to calculate a reasonably accurate value for the SOA viscosity. We use pyrene as a tracer molecule and a-pinene SOA as an illustrative case. It takes ~24 hours for half the pyrene to evaporate to yield a viscosity of 10^8 Pa s for a-pinene. This viscosity is consistent with measurements of particle bounce and evaporation rates. We show that viscosity of 10^8 Pa s implies coalescence times of minutes, consistent with the findings that SOA particles are spherical. Similar measurements on aged SOA particles doped with pyrene yield a viscosity of 10^9 Pa s, indicating that hardening occurs with time, which is consistent with observed decrease in water uptake and evaporation rate with aging.

  18. Interactions of Gas-Phase Nitric/Nitrous Acids and Primary Organic Aerosol in the Atmosphere of Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Whitlow, S. I.; Lefer, B. L.; Flynn, J.; Rappenglück, B.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of aerosol and gas-phase pollutants were measured on the roof of an 18-story building during the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project (TRAMP) from August 15 through September 28, 2006. Aerosol measurements included size-resolved, non-refractory mass concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, chloride, and organic aerosol in submicron particles using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS). Particulate water-soluble organic carbon (PWSOC) was quantified using a mist chamber/total organic carbon analysis system. Concentration data for gas-phase pollutants included those for nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), and hydrochloric acid (HCl) collected using a mist chamber/ion chromatographic technique, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) collected using a chemiluminescent method, and carbon monoxide (CO) collected using an infrared gas correlation wheel instrument. Coincident increases in nitrate and organic aerosol mass concentrations were observed on many occasions throughout the measurement campaign, most frequently during the morning rush hour. Based on the lack of organic aerosol processing (defined by the ratio of m/z = 44/57 in the Q-AMS spectra), strong correlation with NOx and CO, and a lack of significant increase in PWSOC concentration, the spikes in organic aerosol were likely associated with primary organic aerosol (POA). During these events, gas-phase HNO3 concentration decreases were observed simultaneously with increases in gas-phase HONO concentrations. These data likely indicate uptake of HNO3 and subsequent heterogeneous conversion to HONO involving POA. Preliminary calculations show that HNO3 partitioning could account for the majority of the observed HONO and aerosol nitrate concentrations during these events. Q-AMS chloride and HCl data also indicate uptake of chloride by particles during these events. This phenomenon was also observed during the night, but these nocturnal events were less

  19. EVALUATION OF ACOUSTIC FORCES ON A PARTICLE IN AEROSOL MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-09-27

    The acoustic force exerted on a solid particle was evaluated to develop a fundamental understanding of the critical physical parameters or constraints affecting particle motion and capture in a collecting device. The application of an acoustic force to the collection of a range of submicron-to-micron particles in a highly turbulent airflow stream laden with solid particles was evaluated in the presence of other assisting and competing forces. This scoping estimate was based on the primary acoustic force acting directly on particles in a dilute aerosol system, neglecting secondary interparticle effects such as agglomeration of the sub-micron particles. A simplified analysis assuming a stable acoustic equilibrium with an infinite sound speed in the solid shows that for a solid-laden air flow in the presence of a standing wave, particles will move toward the nearest node. The results also show that the turbulent drag force on a 1-{micro}m particle resulting from eddy motion is dominant when compared with the electrostatic force or the ultrasonic acoustic force. At least 180 dB acoustic pressure level at 1 MHz is required for the acoustic force to be comparable to the electrostatic or turbulent drag forces in a high-speed air stream. It is noted that particle size and pressure amplitude are dominant parameters for the acoustic force. When acoustic pressure level becomes very large, the acoustic energy will heat up the surrounding air medium, which may cause air to expand. With an acoustic power of about 600 watts applied to a 2000-lpm air flow, the air temperature can increase by as much as 15 C at the exit of the collector.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A PORTABLE DEVICE TO COLLECT SULFURIC ACID AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative, interference-free method for collecting sulfuric acid aerosol on a filter was developed and field tested. Since previous research found that severe losses of sulfuric aicd were caused by ammonia, ambient particulate material, and other interferents, a method was n...

  1. Composition and sources of organic tracers in aerosol particles of industrial central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Basant; Patel, Khageshwar S.; Jaiswal, Nitin K.; Sharma, Saroj; Ambade, Balram; Wang, Wentao; Simonich, Staci L. Massey; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    2013-02-01

    Organic aerosols are important atmospheric components, and their formation and sources represent important aspects of urban air quality and health effects. Asia, including India, is the largest global source of aerosol particles due to regional natural advection (e.g. desert and soil dust) and anthropogenic activities (e.g. emissions from traffic, industry and burning of coal, biomass and agricultural waste) that generate vast amounts of particulate matter (PM) significantly contributing to climate change. This article reports on the distributions, concentrations, and sources of organic compounds (i.e., alkanes, carboxylic acids, carbonyl compounds, alcohols, plasticizers, PAHs, biomarkers) of PM in the ambient atmosphere of an extensively industrialized area of central India (Raipur, Chhattisgarh, a coal mega-burning region). The dominant components are emissions from fossil fuel utilization, burning of biomass and plastics, and fugitive sources. Speciation and variations of potential new tracer compounds identified are also described.

  2. Observations of Sub-3 nm Particles and Sulfuric acid Concentrations during the Summer in Long Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Y.; Yu, H.; Weech, D.; Haller, G.; Mccubbin, I. B.; Chirokova, G.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Kuang, C.; McGraw, R. L.; Kanawade, V. P.; Lee, S.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is an important source of aerosol particles. But the NPF processes are not well understood, in part because of our limited understanding of the formation of atmospheric sub-3 nm size aerosols and because of the limited number of simultaneous observations of particle size distributions and the aerosol nucleation precursors. During the 2011 (July - August) Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period in Long Island, New York, we have measured aerosol number concentrations down to 1 nm with a particle size magnifier (a new technique developed by Airmodus to detect sub-3nm particles), aerosol size distributions larger than 3 nm with a scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), and concentrations of sulfuric acid (a key aerosol precursor) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), along with a number of atmospheric trace gases and micron and sub-micron size particles. There were several different types of airmasses in our observation site during the summer, including long-range transported polluted or less polluted continental airmasses and relatively clean marine airmasses, mixed with local biogenic emissions. Our observation results show a very similar diurnal trend of sulfuric acid and total aerosol concentrations down to 1 nm during the daytime, consistent with our recent laboratory studies of sulfuric acid-ammonia-amine-water multicomponent nucleation that the formation of atmospheric sub-3 nm particles is largely due to sulfuric acid. However, the rise of sub-3 nm particle concentrations didn't always lead to NPF events characterized by typical banana shaped aerosol size distributions measured by SMPS. Additionally, there were also unexpected rises of sub-3 nm particles during the nighttime, with no sulfuric acid and when there were no NPF events. These results provide unique observation data needed to understand the atmospheric NPF processes in this observation site.

  3. Exploring Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry with Advanced High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Particle Imaging Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizkorodov, S.

    2014-12-01

    Physical and chemical complexity of atmospheric aerosols presents significant challenges both to experimentalists working on aerosol characterization and to modelers trying to parameterize critical aerosol properties. Multi-modal approaches that combine state-of-the-art experimental, theoretical, and modeling methods are becoming increasingly important in aerosol research. This presentation will discuss recent applications of unique high-resolution mass spectrometry and particle imaging tools developed at two Department of Energy's user facilities, the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) and Advanced Light Source (ALS), to studies of molecular composition, photochemical aging, and properties of laboratory-generated and field aerosols. Specifically, this presentation will attempt to address the following questions: (a) how do NO2, SO2, and NH3 affect molecular level composition of anthropogenic aerosols?; (b) what factors determine viscosity/surface tension of organic aerosol particles?; (c) how does photolysis affect molecular composition and optical properties of organic aerosols?

  4. Estimating the contribution of organic acids to northern hemispheric continental organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatavelli, Reddy L. N.; Mohr, Claudia; Stark, Harald; Day, Douglas A.; Thompson, Samantha L.; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Palm, Brett B.; Vogel, Alexander L.; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Heikkinen, Liine; ńijälä, Mikko; Ng, Nga L.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Ehn, Mikael; Junninen, Heikki; Cubison, Michael J.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2015-07-01

    Using chemical ionization mass spectrometry to detect particle-phase acids and aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements from Colorado, USA, and two studies in Hyytiälä, Finland, we quantify the fraction of organic aerosol (OA) mass that is composed of molecules with acid functional groups (facid). Molecules containing one or more carboxylic acid functionality contributed approximately 29% (45-51%) of the OA mass in Colorado (Finland). Organic acid mass concentration correlates well with AMS m/z 44 (primarily CO2+), a commonly used marker for highly oxidized aerosol. Using the average empirical relationship between AMS m/z 44 and organic acids in these three studies, together with m/z 44 data from 29 continental northern hemispheric (NH) AMS data sets, we estimate that molecules containing carboxylic acid functionality constitute on average 28% (range 10-50%) of NH continental OA mass with typically higher values at rural/remote sites and during summer and lower values at urban sites and during winter.

  5. Characterization of Individual Aerosol Particles Associated with Clouds (CRYSTAL-FACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of our research was to obtain data on the chemical and physical properties of individual aerosol particles from near the bottoms and tops of the deep convective systems that lead to the generation of tropical cirrus clouds and to provide insights into the particles that serve as CCN or IN. We used analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM), including energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and field-emission electron microscopy (FESEM) to compare the compositions, concentrations, size distributions, shapes, surface coatings, and degrees of aggregation of individual particles from cloud bases and the anvils near the tropopause. Aggregates of sea salt and mineral dust, ammonium sulfate, and soot particles are abundant in in-cloud samples. Cirrus samples contain many H2SO4 droplets, but acidic sulfate particles are rare at the cloud bases. H2SO4 probably formed at higher altitudes through oxidation of SO2 in cloud droplets. The relatively high extent of ammoniation in the upper troposphere in-cloud samples appears to have resulted from vertical transport by strong convection. The morphology of H2SO4 droplets indicates that they had been at least yartiy ammoniated at the time of collection. They are internally mixed with organic materials, metal sulfates, and solid particles of various compositions. Ammoniation and internal mixing of result in freezing at higher temperature than in pure H2SO4 aerosols. K- and S-bearing organic particles and Si-Al-rich particles are common throughout. Sea salt and mineral dust were incorporated into the convective systems from the cloud bases and worked as ice nuclei while being vertically transported. The nonsulfate particles originated from the lower troposphere and were transported to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere.

  6. Dynamics of Aerosol Particles in Stationary, Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Lance R.; Meng, Hui

    2004-01-01

    A detailed study of the dynamics of sub-Kolmogorov-size aerosol particles in stationary isotropic turbulence has been performed. The study combined direct numerical simulations (DNS; directed by Prof. Collins) and high-resolution experimental measurements (directed by Prof. Meng) under conditions of nearly perfect geometric and parametric overlap. The goal was to measure the accumulation of particles in low-vorticity regions of the flow that arises from the effect commonly referred to as preferential concentration. The grant technically was initiated on June 13, 2000; however, funding was not available until July 11, 2000. The grant was originally awarded to Penn State University (numerical simulations) and SUNY-Buffalo (experiments); however, Prof. Collins effort was moved to Cornell University on January 2002 when he joined that university. He completed the study there. A list of the specific tasks that were completed under this study is presented.

  7. Method for determining aerosol particle size, device for determining aerosol particle size

    DOEpatents

    Novick, V.J.

    1998-10-06

    A method for determining the mass median diameter D of particles contained in a fluid is provided wherein the data of the mass of a pre-exposed and then a post-exposed filter is mathematically combined with data concerning the pressure differential across the same filter before and then after exposure to a particle-laden stream. A device for measuring particle size is also provided wherein the device utilizes the above-method for mathematically combining the easily quantifiable data. 2 figs.

  8. Enhanced light absorption and scattering by carbon soot aerosol internally mixed with sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Khalizov, Alexei F; Xue, Huaxin; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jun; Zhang, Renyi

    2009-02-12

    Light absorption by carbon soot increases when the particles are internally mixed with nonabsorbing materials, leading to increased radiative forcing, but the magnitude of this enhancement is a subject of great uncertainty. We have performed laboratory experiments of the optical properties of fresh and internally mixed carbon soot aerosols with a known particle size, morphology, and the mixing state. Flame-generated soot aerosol is size-selected with a double-differential mobility analyzer (DMA) setup to eliminate multiply charged particle modes and then exposed to gaseous sulfuric acid (10(9)-10(10) molecule cm(-3)) and water vapor (5-80% relative humidity, RH). Light extinction and scattering by fresh and internally mixed soot aerosol are measured at 532 nm wavelength using a cavity ring-down spectrometer and an integrating nephelometer, respectively, and the absorption is derived as the difference between extinction and scattering. The optical properties of fresh soot are independent of RH, whereas soot internally mixed with sulfuric acid exhibits significant enhancement in light absorption and scattering, increasing with the mass fraction of sulfuric acid coating and relative humidity. For soot particles with an initial mobility diameter of 320 nm and a 40% H(2)SO(4) mass coating fraction, absorption and scattering are increased by 1.4- and 13-fold at 80% RH, respectively. Also, the single scattering albedo of soot aerosol increases from 0.1 to 0.5 after coating and humidification. Additional measurements with soot particles that are first coated with sulfuric acid and then heated to remove the coating show that both scattering and absorption are enhanced by irreversible restructuring of soot aggregates to more compact globules. Depending on the initial size and density of soot aggregates, restructuring acts to increase or decrease the absorption cross-section, but the combination of restructuring and encapsulation always results in an increased absorption for

  9. Real-time chemical analysis of aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    An important aspect of environmental atmospheric monitoring requires the characterization of airborne microparticles and aerosols. Unfortunately, traditional sample collection and handling techniques are prone to contamination and interference effects that can render an analysis invalid. These problems can be avoided by using real-time atmospheric sampling techniques followed by immediate mass spectrometric analysis. The former is achieved in these experiments via a two state differential pumping scheme that is attached directly to a commercially available quadruple ion trap mass spectrometer. Particles produced by an external particle generator enter the apparatus and immediately pass through two cw laser/fiberoptic based detectors positioned two centimeters apart. Timing electronics measure the time between detection events, estimate the particles arrival in the center of the ion trap and control the firing of a YAG laser. Ions produced when the UV laser light ablates the particle`s surface are stored by the ion trap for mass analysis. Ion trap mass spectrometers have several advantages over conventional time-of-flight instruments. First, they are capable of MS/MS analysis by the collisional dissociation of a stored species, This permits complete chemical characterization of airborne samples. Second, ion traps are small and lend themselves to portable, field oriented applications.

  10. Real-Time Detection Method And System For Identifying Individual Aerosol Particles

    DOEpatents

    Gard, Eric Evan; Fergenson, David Philip

    2005-10-25

    A method and system of identifying individual aerosol particles in real time. Sample aerosol particles are compared against and identified with substantially matching known particle types by producing positive and negative test spectra of an individual aerosol particle using a bipolar single particle mass spectrometer. Each test spectrum is compared to spectra of the same respective polarity in a database of predetermined positive and negative spectra for known particle types and a set of substantially matching spectra is obtained. Finally the identity of the individual aerosol particle is determined from the set of substantially matching spectra by determining a best matching one of the known particle types having both a substantially matching positive spectrum and a substantially matching negative spectrum associated with the best matching known particle type.

  11. Field Observations of the Processing of Organic Aerosol Particles and Trace Gases by Fogs and Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, J. L.; Herckes, P.

    2003-12-01

    carbon removed more efficiently than elemental carbon. Efforts to characterize organic matter in clouds and fogs reveal that the most abundant species are typically low molecular weight carboxylic acids and aldehydes. These species have been observed collectively to account for roughly 20-30 percent of the total organic carbon in some fogs and clouds. Dicarboxylic acids, frequently used as model compounds for organic CCN, typically account for only about 1 percent of the organic carbon, with oxalic acid the most important contributor. Measurements by GC/MS, HPLC, and H-NMR reveal that many other organic compounds are present, including aerosol source markers and compound families frequently detected in aerosol particles including n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These latter compounds were detected in both dissolved and undissolved forms in droplets, with dissolved concentrations often higher than their solubilities in pure aqueous solutions, suggesting a possible role of surface organic films. Although more than 100 organic species have been quantified in many samples, the majority of the organic carbon mass remains unspeciated. Given the importance of high molecular weight material, future efforts will focus in part on further characterization of these compounds, including possible contributions from humic like substances.

  12. Aerosol particle properties in a South American megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulke, Ana; Torres-Brizuela, Marcela; Raga, Graciela; Baumgardner, Darrel; Cancelada, Marcela

    2015-04-01

    The subtropical city of Buenos Aires is located on the western shore of Río de la Plata, on the southeastern coast of Argentina. It is the second largest metropolitan area in South America, with a population density of around 14 thousand people per km2. When all 24 counties of the Great Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area are included it is the third-largest conurbation in Latin America, with a population of around fifteen million inhabitants. The generalized worldwide trend to concentrate human activities in urban regions that continue to expand in area, threatens the local and regional environment. Air pollution in the Buenos Aires airshed is due to local sources (mainly the mobile sources, followed by the electric power plants and some industries) and to distant sources (like biomass burning, dust, marine aerosols and occasionally volcanic ash) whose products arrive in the city area due to the regional transport patterns. Previous research suggests that ambient aerosol particle concentrations should be considered an air quality problem. A field campaign was conducted in Buenos Aires in 2011 in order to characterize some aerosol particles properties measured for the first time in the city. Measurements began in mid- April and continued until December. The field observations were done in a collaborative effort between the Universities of Mexico (UNAM) and Buenos Aires (UBA). A suite of instruments was installed on the roof of an UBA laboratory and classroom buildings (34.54° S, 58.44° W) at an altitude of approximately 30 m above sea level. The measurements included the number concentration of condensation nuclei (CN) larger than approximately 50 nm, the mass concentration of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPAH), the scattering (Bscat) and absorption (Babs) coefficients at 550 nm and the vertical profiles of backscattered light from aerosols at a wavelength of 910 nm using a ceilometer. In addition, a weather station recorded the meteorological

  13. Review: engineering particles using the aerosol-through-plasma method

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Jonathan; Luhrs, Claudia C; Richard, Monique

    2009-01-01

    For decades, plasma processing of materials on the nanoscale has been an underlying enabling technology for many 'planar' technologies, particularly virtually every aspect of modern electronics from integrated-circuit fabrication with nanoscale elements to the newest generation of photovoltaics. However, it is only recent developments that suggest that plasma processing can be used to make 'particulate' structures of value in fields, including catalysis, drug delivery, imaging, higher energy density batteries, and other forms of energy storage. In this paper, the development of the science and technology of one class of plasma production of particulates, namely, aerosol-through-plasma (A-T-P), is reviewed. Various plasma systems, particularly RF and microwave, have been used to create nanoparticles of metals and ceramics, as well as supported metal catalysts. Gradually, the complexity of the nanoparticles, and concomitantly their potential value, has increased. First, unique two-layer particles were generated. These were postprocessed to create unique three-layer nanoscale particles. Also, the technique has been successfully employed to make other high-value materials, including carbon nanotubes, unsupported graphene, and spherical boron nitride. Some interesting plasma science has also emerged from efforts to characterize and map aerosol-containing plasmas. For example, it is clear that even a very low concentration of particles dramatically changes plasma characteristics. Some have also argued that the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium approach is inappropriate to these systems. Instead, it has been suggested that charged- and neutral-species models must be independently developed and allowed to 'interact' only in generation terms.

  14. Isoprene Epoxydiols as Precursors to Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation: Acid-Catalyzed Reactive Uptake Studies with Authentic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Zhang, Zhenfa; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Zhang, Haofei; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Knipping, Eladio M.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), formed from the photooxidation of isoprene under low-NOx conditions, have recently been proposed as precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) on the basis of mass spectrometric evidence. In the present study, IEPOX isomers were synthesized in high purity (> 99%) to investigate their potential to form SOA via reactive uptake in a series of controlled dark chamber studies followed by reaction product analyses. IEPOX-derived SOA was substantially observed only in the presence of acidic aerosols, with conservative lower-bound yields of 4.7–6.4% for β-IEPOX and 3.4–5.5% for δ-IEPOX, providing direct evidence for IEPOX isomers as precursors to isoprene SOA. These chamber studies demonstrate that IEPOX uptake explains the formation of known isoprene SOA tracers found in ambient aerosols, including 2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, dimers, and IEPOX-derived organosulfates. Additionally, we show reactive uptake on the acidified sulfate aerosols supports a previously unreported acid-catalyzed intramolecular rearrangement of IEPOX to cis- and trans-3-methyltetrahydrofuran-3,4-diols (3-MeTHF-3,4-diols) in the particle phase. Analysis of these novel tracer compounds by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) suggests that they contribute to a unique factor resolved from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of AMS organic aerosol spectra collected from low-NOx, isoprene-dominated regions influenced by the presence of acidic aerosols. PMID:22103348

  15. New aerosol particles formation in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela, Angel; Andrade, Maria de Fatima; Ynoue, Rita

    2016-04-01

    The Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA), in the southeast region of Brazil, is considered a megalopolis comprised of Sao Paulo city and more 38 municipalities. The air pollutant emissions in the SPMA are related to the burning of the fuels: etanol, gasohol (gasoline with 25% ethanol) and diesel. According to CETESB (2013), the road vehicles contributed up to about 97, 87, and 80% of CO, VOCs and NOx emissions in 2012, respectively, being most of NOx associated to diesel combustion and most of CO and VOCs from gasohol and ethanol combustion. Studies conducted on ambient air pollution in the SPMA have shown that black carbon (BC) explains 21% of mass concentration of PM2.5 compared with 40% of organic carbon (OC), 20% of sulfates, and 12% of soil dust (Andrade et al., 2012). Most of the observed ambient PM2.5 mass concentration usually originates from precursors gases such as sulphur dioxide (SO2), ammonia (NH3), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and VOCs as well as through the physico-chemical processes such as the oxidation of low volatile hydrocarbons transferring to the condensed phase (McMurry et al., 2004). The Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry model (WRF-Chem; Grell et al. 2005), configured with three nested grid cells: 75, 15, and 3 km, is used as photochemical modeling to describe the physico-chemical processes leading to evolution of particles number and mass size distribution from a vehicular emission model developed by the IAG-USP laboratory of Atmospheric Processes and based on statistical information of vehicular activity. The spatial and temporal distributions of emissions in the finest grid cell are based on road density products compiled by the OpenStreetMap project and measurements performed inside tunnels in the SPMA, respectively. WRF-Chem simulation with coupled primary aerosol (dust and sea-salt) and biogenic emission modules and aerosol radiative effects turned on is conducted as the baseline simulation (Case_0) to evaluate the model

  16. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Ardon-Dryer, K.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    The interplay between aerosol particles and water droplets in the atmosphere, especially in clouds, influences both aerosol and cloud properties. The major uncertainty in our understanding of climate arises in the indirect effect of aerosol and their ability to impact cloud formation and consequently alter the global radiative balance. The collision between a water droplet and aerosol particles that results in coalescence is termed 'collection' or 'coagulation'. Coagulation can lead to aerosol removal from the atmosphere or induce ice nucleation via contact freezing at temperatures below 0 C. Theoretical studies have shown that for aerosol particles smaller than 0.1 micrometers, Brownian motion is important, and for particles with diameters larger than 1 micrometer, inertial force dominates. There is a collection efficiency minimum for particles between 0.1-2 micrometers, called the 'Greenfield Gap'. Experimental efforts, however, have been limited to very large drizzle and rain drops until recently, and constrained parameters necessary to describe particle collection efficiency by cloud droplets have not been available. One reason is that laboratory setups that allow for coagulation to be observed on a single-particle basis have been lacking. Collection efficiency is also an important parameter for studying and assessing contact ice nucleation. Contact ice nucleation is currently the least understood ice nucleation mechanism and can be potentially important for mixed-phase cloud formation. The significance of experimentally assessing collection efficiency is therefore two-fold: to first understand the frequency of contacts and to then understand the fraction that lead to ice nucleation. We have constructed the MIT-Contact Freezing Chamber (MIT-CFC) to study collection efficiency of submicron aerosol particles by cloud droplets and contact freezing. A stream of 30-micron cloud droplets fall freely into the chamber and collide with aerosol particles. The outflow

  17. Single-particle Analyses of Compositions, Morphology, and Viscosity of Aerosol Particles Collected During GoAmazon2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, K.; Gong, Z.; Bateman, A. P.; Martin, S. T.; Cirino, G. G.; Artaxo, P.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Single-particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles collected during the GoAmazon2014 campaign. These TEM results indicate aerosol types and mixing states, both of which are important for evaluating particle optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei activity. The samples were collected at the T3 site, which is located in the Amazon forest with influences from the urban pollution plume from Manaus. Samples were also collected from the T0 site, which is in the middle of the jungle with minimal to no influences of anthropogenic sources. The aerosol particles mainly originated from 1) anthropogenic pollution (e.g., nanosphere soot, sulfate), 2) biogenic emissions (e.g., primary biogenic particles, organic aerosols), and 3) long-range transport (e.g., sea salts). We found that the biogenic organic aerosol particles contain homogeneously distributed potassium. Particle viscosity is important for evaluating gas-particle interactions and atmospheric chemistry for the particles. Viscosity can be estimated from the rebounding behavior at controlled relative humidities, i.e., highly viscous particles display less rebound on a plate than low-viscosity particles. We collected 1) aerosol particles from a plate (non-rebounded), 2) those that had rebounded from the plate and were then captured onto an adjacent sampling plate, and 3) particles from ambient air using a separate impactor sampler. Preliminary results show that more than 90% of non-rebounded particles consisted of nanosphere soot with or without coatings. The coatings mostly consisted of organic matter. Although rebounded particles also contain nanosphere soot (number fraction 64-69%), they were mostly internally mixed with sulfate, organic matter, or their mixtures. TEM tilted images suggested that the rebounded particles were less deformed on the substrate, whereas the non-rebounded particles were more deformed, which could

  18. Aldol Condensation Products and Polyacetals in Organic Films Formed from Reactions of Propanal in Sulfuric Acid at Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere (UT/LS) Aerosol Acidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, J. V. H.; Perez-Montano, S.; Li, E. S. W.; Nelson, T. E.; Ha, K. T.; Leong, L.; Iraci, L. T.; Van Wyngarden, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) consist mostly of concentrated sulfuric acid (40-80 wt. %) which is highly reflective towards UV and visible radiation. However, airborne measurements have shown that these particles may also contain a significant amount of organic material. Experiments combining organics (propanal, glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal) with sulfuric acid at concentrations typical of UT/LS aerosols produced highly colored surface films (and solutions) that have the potential to impact chemical, optical and/or cloud-forming properties of aerosols. In order to assess the potential for such films to impact aerosol chemistry or climate properties, experiments were performed to identify the chemical processes responsible for film formation. Surface films were analyzed via Attenuated Total Reflectance-FTIR and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopies and are shown to consist primarily of aldol condensation products and cyclic and linear polyacetals, the latter of which are likely responsible for separation from the aqueous phase.

  19. Controlled exposures of volunteers to respirable carbon and sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.R.; Avol, E.L.; Edwards, S.A.; Shamoo, D.A.; Ruchuan Peng; Linn, W.S.; Hackney, J.D. )

    1992-06-01

    Respirable carbon or fly ash particles are suspected to increase the respiratory toxicity of coexisting acidic air pollutants, by concentrating acid on their surfaces and so delivering it efficiently to the lower respiratory tract. To investigate this issue, the authors exposed 15 healthy and 15 asthmatic volunteers in a controlled-environment chamber to four test atmospheres: (1) clean air; (2) 0.5-{mu}m H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol at {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from water solution; (3) 0.5-{mu}m carbon aerosol at {approx}250 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from highly pure carbon black with specific surface area comparable to ambient pollution particles; and (4) carbon as in (3) plus {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of ultrafine H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol generated from fuming sulfuric acid. Electron microscopy showed that nearly all acid in (4) became attached to carbon particle surfaces, and that most particles remained in the sub-{mu}m size range. Exposures were performed double-blind, 1 week apart. They lasted 1 hr each, with alternate 10-min periods of heavy exercise (ventilation {approx}50 L/min) and rest. Subjects gargled citrus juice before exposure to suppress airway ammonia. Lung function and symptoms were measured pre-exposure, after initial exercise, and at end-exposure. Bronchial reactivity to methacholine was measured after exposure. Statistical analyses tested for effects of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or carbon, separate or interactive, on health measures.

  20. Viscous organic aerosol particles in the upper troposphere: diffusivity-controlled water uptake and ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, D. M.; Huisman, A. J.; Krieger, U. K.; Rudich, Y.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Bones, D. L.; Reid, J. P.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Steimer, S. S.; Koop, T.; Peter, T.

    2015-09-01

    New measurements of water diffusion in aerosol particles produced from secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material and from a number of organic/inorganic model mixtures (3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA), levoglucosan, levoglucosan/NH4HSO4, raffinose) indicate that water diffusion coefficients are determined by several properties of the aerosol substance and cannot be inferred from the glass transition temperature or bouncing properties. Our results suggest that water diffusion in SOA particles is faster than often assumed and imposes no significant kinetic limitation on water uptake and release at temperatures above 220 K. The fast diffusion of water suggests that heterogeneous ice nucleation on a glassy core is very unlikely in these systems. At temperatures below 220 K, model simulations of SOA droplets suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation may occur in the immersion mode on glassy cores which remain embedded in a liquid shell when experiencing fast updraft velocities. The particles absorb significant quantities of water during these updrafts which plasticize their outer layers such that these layers equilibrate readily with the gas phase humidity before the homogeneous ice nucleation threshold is reached. Glass formation is thus unlikely to restrict homogeneous ice nucleation. Only under most extreme conditions near the very high tropical tropopause may the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient be reduced as a consequence of slow condensed-phase water diffusion. Since the differences between the behavior limited or non limited by diffusion are small even at the very high tropical tropopause, condensed-phase water diffusivity is unlikely to have significant consequences on the direct climatic effects of SOA particles under tropospheric conditions.

  1. Origin of nitrocatechols and alkylated-nitrocatechols in atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Nicolas; Sylvestre, Alexandre; Ravier, Sylvain; Detournay, Anais; Bruns, Emily; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Slowik, Jay; El Haddad, Imad; Prevot, Andre

    2013-04-01

    Biomass burning constitutes one of the major sources of aerosol particles in most of the environments during winter. If a lot of information is available in the literature on the primary fraction of biomass burning aerosol particles, almost nothing is known regarding the formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) from the chemical mixture emitted by this source. Recently methylated nitrocatechol have been identified in atmospheric particles collected in winter. These compounds are strongly associated with biomass burning tracers such as levoglucosan and are suspected to be of secondary origin since they can be formed through the oxidation of cresol significantly emitted by biomass burning. However, nitrocatechols are particularly difficult to analyze using classical techniques like HPLC-MS or GC-MS. In the present study, we adopt a new analytical approach. Direct analysis in real time (DART), introduced by Cody et al. (2005), allows direct analysis of gases, liquids, solids and materials on surfaces. Thus, for particles collected onto filters, the sample preparation step is simplified as much as possible, avoiding losses and reducing to the minimum the analytical procedure time. Two analytic modes can be used. In positive mode, [MH]+ ions are formed by proton transfer reaction ; whereas in negative ionization mode, [MH]-, M- and [MO2]- ions are formed. DART source enables soft ionization and produces simple mass spectra suitable for analysis of complex matrices, like organic aerosol, in only a few seconds. For this study, the DART source was coupled to a Q-ToF mass spectrometer (Synapt G2 HDMS, Waters), with a mass resolution up to 40 000. The analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples, collected in Marseille during winter 2011 (APICE project), with the DART/Q-ToF approach highlighted the abundance of nitrocatechols and alkylated nitrocatechols. Their temporal trends were also very similar to those of levoglucosan or dihydroabietic acid well known tracers of biomass

  2. Chemical composition and sources of coastal marine aerosol particles during the 2008 VOCALS-REx campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y. -N.; Springston, S.; Jayne, J.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Senum, G.; Kleinman, L.; Daum, P. H.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of aerosol particles (Dp ≤ 1.5 μm) was measured over the southeast Pacific Ocean during the VAMOS (Variability of the American Monsoon Systems) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-Rex) between 16 October and 15 November 2008 using the US Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft. The objective of these flights was to gain an understanding of the sources and evolution of these aerosols, and of how they interact with the marine stratus cloud layer that prevails in this region of the globe. Our measurements showed that the marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol mass was dominated by non-sea-salt SO42−, followed by Na+, Cl, Org (total organics), NH4+, and NO3, in decreasing order of importance; CH3SO3 (MSA), Ca2+, and K+ rarely exceeded their limits of detection. Aerosols were strongly acidic with a NH4+ to SO42− equivalents ratio typically < 0.3. Sea-salt aerosol (SSA) particles, represented by NaCl, exhibited Cl deficits caused by both HNO3 and H2SO4, but for the most part were externally mixed with particles, mainly SO42−. SSA contributed only a small fraction of the total accumulation mode particle number concentration. It was inferred that all aerosol species (except SSA) were of predominantly continental origin because of their strong land-to-sea concentration gradient. Comparison of relative changes in median values suggests that (1) an oceanic source of NH3 is present between 72° W and 76° W, (2) additional organic aerosols from biomass burns or biogenic precursors were emitted from coastal regions south of 31° S, with possible cloud processing, and (3) free tropospheric (FT) contributions to MBL gas and aerosol

  3. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges. PMID:24297908

  4. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H.; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-01-01

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges. PMID:24297908

  5. Use of analytical electron microscopy for the individual particle analysis of the Arctic haze aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    To explore the usefulness of the analytical electron microscope for the analysis and source apportionment of individual aerosol particles, aerosol samples amenable to individual particle analysis were collected from a remote region. These samples were from the Arctic haze aerosol, and were collected on board a research aircraft during the Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program in spring 1983. Before elemental analysis by analytical electron microscopy (AEM) could be performed, an extensive relative sensitivity factor study was undertaken to calibrate the microscope/detector system for quanitative x-ray microanalysis. Subsequently determined elemental data, along with morphological information, were used to group the particles into classes with similar characteristics. Forty-seven classes of particles were found in the Arctic samples, the most populous classes containing H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ droplets, carbonaceous particles, lithophilic particles, CaSO/sub 4/ or NaCl. Several classes containing anthropogenic particles were also identified.

  6. Beyond single particle mass spectrometry: multidimensional characterisation of individual aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.

    2009-09-10

    The behavior of small aerosol particles depends on a number of their physical and chemical properties, many of which are strongly coupled. The size, internal composition, density, shape, morphology, hygroscopicity, index of refraction, activity as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei, and other attributes of individual particles - all play a role in determining particle properties and their impacts. The traditional particle characterization approaches rely on separate parallel measurements that average over an ensemble of particles of different sizes and/or compositions and later attempt to draw correlations between them. As a result such studies overlook critical differences between particles and bulk and miss the fact that individual particles often exhibit major differences. Here we review the recently developed methods to simultaneously measure in-situ and in real time several of the attributes for individual particles using single particle mass spectrometer, SPLAT or its second generation SPLAT II. We also discuss novel approaches developed for classification, visualization and mining of large datasets produced by the multidimensional single particle characterization.

  7. Hygroscopicity of internally mixed multi-component aerosol particles of atmospheric relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qifan; Jing, Bo; Peng, Chao; Tong, Shengrui; Wang, Weigang; Ge, Maofa

    2016-01-01

    The hygroscopic properties of two water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) relevant to urban haze pollution (phthalic acid and levoglucosan) and their internally mixtures with inorganic salts (ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate) are investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) system. The multi-component particles uptake water gradually in the range 5-90% relative humidity (RH). The experimental results are compared with the thermodynamic model predictions. For most mixtures, Extended Aerosol Inorganic Model (E-AIM) predictions agree well with the measured growth factors. The hygroscopic growth of mixed particles can be well described by the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) relation as long as the mixed particles are completely liquid. ZSR calculations underestimate the water uptake of mixed particles at moderate RH due to the partial dissolution of ammonium sulfate in the organic and ammonium nitrate solution in this RH region. The phase of ammonium nitrate in the initial dry particles changes dramatically with the composition of mixtures. The presence of organics in the mixed particles can inhibit the crystallization of ammonium nitrate during the drying process and results in water uptake at low RH (RH < 60%). These results demonstrate that certain representative WSOCs can substantially influence the hygroscopicity of inorganic salts and overall water uptake of particles.

  8. Aldol Condensation of Volatile Carbonyl Compounds in Acidic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noziere, B.; Esteve, W.

    2003-12-01

    Reactions of volatile organic compounds in acidic aerosols have been shown recently to be potentially important for organic aerosol formation and growth. Aldol condensation, the acid-catalyzed polymerization of carbonyl compounds, is a likely candidate to enhance the flux of organic matter from the gas phase to the condensed phase in the atmosphere. Until now these reactions have only been characterized for conditions relevant to synthesis (high acidities and liquid phase systems) and remote from atmospheric ones. In this work, the uptake of gas-phase acetone and 2,4\\-pentanedione by sulfuric acid solutions has been measured at room temperature using a Rotated Wetted Wall Reactor coupled to a Mass Spectrometer. The aldol condensation rate constants for 2,4\\-pentanedione measured so far for sulfuric acid solutions between 96 and 70 % wt. display a variation with acidity in agreement with what predicted in the organic chemical literature. The values of these constants, however, are much lower than expected for this compound, and comparable to the ones of acetone. Experiments are underway to complete this study to lower acidities and understand the discrepancies with the predicted reactivity.

  9. Detection and characterization of biological and other organic-carbon aerosol particles in atmosphere using fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a brief review on the detection and characterization of biological and other organic-carbon (OC) aerosol particles in atmosphere using laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) signatures. It focuses on single individual particles or aggregates in the micron and super-micron size range when they are successively drawn through the interrogation volume of a point detection system. Related technologies for these systems that have been developed in last two decades are also discussed. These results should provide a complementary view for studying atmospheric aerosol particles, particularly bioaerosol and OC aerosol particles from other analytical technologies.

  10. Sulfuric acid aerosols in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGouldrick, Kevin; Toon, Owen B.; Grinspoon, David H.

    2011-08-01

    Clouds and hazes composed of sulfuric acid are observed to exist or postulated to have once existed on each of the terrestrial planets with atmospheres in our solar system. Venus today maintains a global cover of clouds composed of a sulfuric acid/water solution that extends in altitude from roughly 50 km to roughly 80 km. Terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) form on stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols, and both PSCs and stratospheric aerosols play a critical role in the formation of the ozone hole. Stratospheric aerosols can modify the climate when they are enhanced following volcanic eruptions, and are a current focus for geoengineering studies. Rain is made more acidic by sulfuric acid originating from sulfur dioxide generated by industry on Earth. Analysis of the sulfur content of Martian rocks has led to the hypothesis that an early Martian atmosphere, rich in SO 2 and H 2O, could support a sulfur-infused hydrological cycle. Here we consider the plausibility of frozen sulfuric acid in the upper clouds of Venus, which could lead to lightning generation, with implications for observations by the European Space Agency's Venus Express and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Venus Climate Orbiter (also known as Akatsuki). We also present simulations of a sulfur-rich early Martian atmosphere. We find that about 40 cm/yr of precipitation having a pH of about 2.0 could fall in an early Martian atmosphere, assuming a surface temperature of 273 K, and SO 2 generation rates consistent with the formation of Tharsis. This modeled acid rain is a powerful sink for SO 2, quickly removing it and preventing it from having a significant greenhouse effect.

  11. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E. (Editor); Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120 deg, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20% +/- 15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, alpha, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for lambda = 0.87 microns). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with alpha. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distribution before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate

  12. COS in the stratosphere. [sulfuric acid aerosol precursor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inn, E. C. Y.; Vedder, J. F.; Tyson, B. J.; Ohara, D.

    1979-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) has been detected in the stratosphere, and mixing ratio measurements are reported for altitudes of 15.2 to 31.2 km. A large volume, cryogenic sampling system mounted on board a U-2 aircraft has been used for lower stratosphere measurements and a balloon platform for measurement at 31.2 km. These observations and measurements strongly support the concept that stratospheric COS is an important precursor in the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols.

  13. From Clusters to Atmospheric Aerosol Particles: Nucleation in the CLOUD Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltensperger, Urs

    2015-03-01

    Globally, a significant source of cloud condensation nuclei for cloud formation is thought to originate from new particle formation (aerosol nucleation). Despite extensive research, many questions remain about the dominant nucleation mechanisms. Specifically, a quantitative understanding of the dependence of the nucleation rate on the concentration of the nucleating substances such as gaseous sulfuric acid, ammonia, water vapor and others has not been reached. This is of relevance for climate as the atmospheric concentrations of sulfuric acid, ammonia and other nucleating agents are strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions. By providing extremely well controlled and essentially contaminant free conditions in the CLOUD chamber, we were able to show that indeed sulfuric acid is an important component for such new particle formation, however, for the typical temperatures encountered in the planetary boundary layer the concentrations of sulfuric acid are not high enough to explain the atmospheric observations. Moreover, the effect of ammonia, amines and oxidized organic molecules on the nucleation rate of sulfuric acid has been investigated in CLOUD so far. Recent developments in instrument technology such as the Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer have allowed us to investigate the chemical composition of charged as well as neutral clusters during such nucleation experiments. The CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) collaboration consists of 20 institutions from Europe and the United States and is funded by national funding institutions as well as the EU training network CLOUD-TRAIN (http://www.cloud-train.eu/).

  14. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  15. Real-time detection method and system for identifying individual aerosol particles

    DOEpatents

    Gard, Eric E.; Coffee, Keith R.; Frank, Matthias; Tobias, Herbert J.; Fergenson, David P.; Madden, Norm; Riot, Vincent J.; Steele, Paul T.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2007-08-21

    An improved method and system of identifying individual aerosol particles in real time. Sample aerosol particles are collimated, tracked, and screened to determine which ones qualify for mass spectrometric analysis based on predetermined qualification or selection criteria. Screening techniques include one or more of determining particle size, shape, symmetry, and fluorescence. Only qualifying particles passing all screening criteria are subject to desorption/ionization and single particle mass spectrometry to produce corresponding test spectra, which is used to determine the identities of each of the qualifying aerosol particles by comparing the test spectra against predetermined spectra for known particle types. In this manner, activation cycling of a particle ablation laser of a single particle mass spectrometer is reduced.

  16. Sizing of individual aerosol particles using TAOS (Two-dimensional Angular Optical Scattering) pattern total intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zallie, J. T.; Aptowicz, K. B.; Martin, S.; Pan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The morphology of single aerosol particles has been explored previously using the TAOS (Two-dimensional Angular Optical Scattering) technique, which captures angularly resolved scattering patterns. Particle size is known to strongly influence the light scattering properties of aerosols and therefore is a critical parameter to discern from the TAOS patterns. In this work, T-matrix simulation of light scattering from spherical and spheroidal particles is used to explore the possibility of sizing particles from the total light scattering signal detected using the TAOS technique. Scattering patterns were calculated for particles that span various particle sizes, spheroidal shapes, complex refractive indices and particles orientations representative of atmospheric aerosol distributions. A power law relationship between particle size and total scattering intensity was found that could crudely size particles but with significant error.

  17. Identifying organic aerosol sources by comparing functional group composition in chamber and atmospheric particles

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Lynn M.; Bahadur, Ranjit; Ziemann, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of submicron particles by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in 14 campaigns in North America, Asia, South America, and Europe were used to identify characteristic organic functional group compositions of fuel combustion, terrestrial vegetation, and ocean bubble bursting sources, each of which often accounts for more than a third of organic mass (OM), and some of which is secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from gas-phase precursors. The majority of the OM consists of alkane, carboxylic acid, hydroxyl, and carbonyl groups. The organic functional groups formed from combustion and vegetation emissions are similar to the secondary products identified in chamber studies. The near absence of carbonyl groups in the observed SOA associated with combustion is consistent with alkane rather than aromatic precursors, and the absence of organonitrate groups can be explained by their hydrolysis in humid ambient conditions. The remote forest observations have ratios of carboxylic acid, organic hydroxyl, and nonacid carbonyl groups similar to those observed for isoprene and monoterpene chamber studies, but in biogenic aerosols transported downwind of urban areas the formation of esters replaces the acid and hydroxyl groups and leaves only nonacid carbonyl groups. The carbonyl groups in SOA associated with vegetation emissions provides striking evidence for the mechanism of esterification as the pathway for possible oligomerization reactions in the atmosphere. Forest fires include biogenic emissions that produce SOA with organic components similar to isoprene and monoterpene chamber studies, also resulting in nonacid carbonyl groups in SOA. PMID:21317360

  18. Secondary organic aerosol-forming reactions of glyoxal with amino acids.

    PubMed

    De Haan, David O; Corrigan, Ashley L; Smith, Kyle W; Stroik, Daniel R; Turley, Jacob J; Lee, Frances E; Tolbert, Margaret A; Jimenez, Jose L; Cordova, Kyle E; Ferrell, Grant R

    2009-04-15

    Glyoxal, the simplest and most abundant alpha-dicarbonyl compound in the atmosphere, is scavenged by clouds and aerosol, where it reacts with nucleophiles to form low-volatility products. Here we examine the reactions of glyoxal with five amino acids common in clouds. When glyoxal and glycine, serine, aspartic acid or ornithine are present at concentrations as low as 30/microM in evaporating aqueous droplets or bulk solutions, 1,3-disubstituted imidazoles are formed in irreversible second-order reactions detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In contrast, glyoxal reacts with arginine preferentially at side chain amino groups, forming nonaromatic five-membered rings. All reactions were accompanied by browning. The uptake of 45 ppb glyoxal by solid-phase glycine aerosol at 50% RH was also studied and found to cause particle growth and the production of imidazole measured by scanning mobility particle sizing and AMS, respectively, with a glyoxal uptake coefficient alpha = 0.0004. Comparison of reaction kinetics in bulk and in drying droplets shows that conversion of glyoxal dihydrate to monohydrate accelerates the reaction by over 3 orders of magnitude, allowing these reactions to occur at atmospheric conditions. PMID:19475956

  19. METHODS OF CALCULATINAG LUNG DELIVERY AND DEPOSITION OF AEROSOL PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Lung deposition of aerosol is measured by a variety of methods. Total lung deposition can be measured by monitoring inhaled and exhaled aerosols in situ by laser photometry or by collecting the aerosols on filters. The measurements can be performed accurately for stable monod...

  20. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-25

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate Ca(NO3)2 when nitrogen oxide and nitric acid (HNO3) species react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here, we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory generated particles composed of water soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e. NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) investigated using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates releasing gaseous HNO3 during dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase due to its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that in turn may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling, which may further affect concentrations of gas- and aerosol-phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  1. Hygroscopicity of water-soluble organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols: amino acids and biomass burning derived organic species.

    PubMed

    Chan, Man Nin; Choi, Man Yee; Ng, Nga Lee; Chan, Chak K

    2005-03-15

    Amino acids and organic species derived from biomass burning can potentially affect the hygroscopicity and cloud condensation activities of aerosols. The hygroscopicity of seven amino acids (glycine, alanine, serine, glutamine, threonine, arginine, and asparagine) and three organic species most commonly detected in biomass burning aerosols (levoglucosan, mannosan, and galactosan) were measured using an electrodynamic balance. Crystallization was observed in the glycine, alanine, serine, glutamine, and threonine particles upon evaporation of water, while no phase transition was observed in the arginine and asparagine particles even at 5% relative humidity (RH). Water activity data from these aqueous amino acid particles, except arginine and asparagine, was used to revise the interaction parameters in UNIQUAC functional group activity coefficients to give predictions to within 15% of the measurements. Levoglucosan, mannosan, and galactosan particles did not crystallize nor did they deliquesce. They existed as highly concentrated liquid droplets at low RH, suggesting that biomass burning aerosols retain water at low RH. In addition, these particles follow a very similar pattern in hygroscopic growth. A generalized growth law (Gf = (1 - RH/100)-0.095) is proposed for levoglucosan, mannosan, and galactosan particles. PMID:15819209

  2. Reactive uptake of HOCl to laboratory generated sea salt particles and nascent sea-spray aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, N. R.; Ryder, O. S.; Bertram, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Field observations suggest that the reactive uptake of HOCl on marine aerosol particles is an important source of chlorine radicals, particularly under low NOx conditions. However to date, laboratory measurements disagree on the magnitude of the reactive uptake coefficient for HOCl by a factor of 5 (γ(HOCl) ranges between 0.0004 and 0.0018), and there are no measurements of γ(HOCl) on nascent sea-spray aerosol. Here, we present measurements of the reactive uptake of HOCl to laboratory generated sodium chloride and sea-spray aerosol particles generated in a novel Marine Aerosol Reference Tank (MART), coupled to an entrained aerosol flow reactor and Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). Measurements of γ(HOCl) retrieved here are compared against those in the literature, and the role of organic coatings on nascent sea-spray aerosol is explored.

  3. Hydrolysis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} on submicron sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, M.; Stewart, D.J.; Baker, J.; Cox, R.A.

    2000-05-04

    The kinetics of reactive uptake of gaseous N{sub 2}O{sub 5} on submicron sulfuric acid aerosol particles has been investigated using a laminar flow reactor coupled with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) to characterize the aerosol. The particles were generated by homogeneous nucleation of SO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O mixtures. In the H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration range 26.3--64.5 wt {degree} the uptake coefficient was {gamma} = 0.033 {+-} 0.004, independent of acid strength. For an acid strength of 45 wt % {gamma} was found to decrease with increasing temperature over the range 263--298 K. From this, temperature dependence values of {minus}115 {+-} 30 kJ/mol and {minus}25.5 {+-} 8.4 J/K mol were determined for the changes in enthalpy and entropy of the uptake process, respectively. The results are consistent with a previous model of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} hydrolysis involving both a direct and an acid catalyzed mechanism, with uptake under the experimental conditions limited by mass accommodation.

  4. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Carbonyls and Alcohols With Sulfuric Acid: Implications for Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Levitt, N.; Zhang, R.

    2006-12-01

    Recent environmental chamber studies have suggested that acid-catalyzed particle-phase reactions of organic carbonyls lead to multifold increases in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass and acid-catalyzed reactions between alcohols and aldehydes in the condensed phase lead to the formation of hemiacetals and acetals, also enhancing secondary organic aerosol growth. The kinetics and mechanism of the heterogeneous chemistry of carbonyls and alcohols with sulfuric acid, however, remain largely uncertain. In this talk, we present measurements of heterogeneous uptake of several carbonyls and alcohols on liquid H2SO4 in a wide range of acid concentrations and temperatures. The results indicate that uptake of larger carbonyls is explained by aldol condensation. For small dicarbonyls, heterogeneous reactions are shown to decrease with acidity and involve negligible formation of sulfate esters. Hydration and polymerization likely explain the measured uptake of such small dicarbonyls on H2SO4 and the measurements do not support an acid- catalyzed uptake. Atmospheric implications from our findings will be discussed.

  5. Ice nucleating particles at a coastal marine boundary layer site: correlations with aerosol type and meteorological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. H.; Si, M.; Li, J.; Chou, C.; Dickie, R.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Pöhlker, C.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Ladino, L. A.; Jones, K.; Leaitch, W. R.; Schiller, C. L.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Huffman, J. A.; Bertram, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    Information on what aerosol particle types are the major sources of ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the atmosphere is needed for climate predictions. To determine which aerosol particles are the major sources of immersion-mode INPs at a coastal site in Western Canada, we investigated correlations between INP number concentrations and both concentrations of different atmospheric particles and meteorological conditions. We show that INP number concentrations are strongly correlated with the number concentrations of fluorescent bioparticles between -15 and -25 °C, and that the size distribution of INPs is most consistent with the size distribution of fluorescent bioparticles. We conclude that biological particles were likely the major source of ice nuclei at freezing temperatures between -15 and -25 °C at this site for the time period studied. At -30 °C, INP number concentrations are also well correlated with number concentrations of the total aerosol particles ≥ 0.5 μm, suggesting that non-biological particles may have an important contribution to the population of INPs active at this temperature. As we found that black carbon particles were unlikely to be a major source of ice nuclei during this study, these non-biological INPs may include mineral dust. Furthermore, correlations involving chemical tracers of marine aerosols and marine biological activity, sodium and methanesulfonic acid, indicate that the majority of INPs measured at the coastal site likely originated from terrestrial rather than marine sources. Finally, six existing empirical parameterizations of ice nucleation were tested to determine if they accurately predict the measured INP number concentrations. We found that none of the parameterizations selected are capable of predicting INP number concentrations with high accuracy over the entire temperature range investigated. This finding illustrates that additional measurements are needed to improve parameterizations of INPs and their

  6. Studies of aerosol at a coastal site using two aerosol mass spectrometry instruments and identification of biogenic particle types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Harrison, R. M.; Furutani, H.; Prather, K. A.; Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.

    2005-10-01

    During August 2004 an Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TSI ATOFMS Model 3800-100) and an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) were deployed at Mace Head during the NAMBLEX campaign. Single particle data (size, positive and negative mass spectra) from the ATOFMS were imported into ART 2a, a neural network algorithm, which assigns individual particles to clusters on the basis of their mass spectral similarities. Results are very consistent with previous time consuming manual classifications (Dall'Osto et al., 2004). Three broad classes were found: sea-salt, dust and carbon-containing particles, with a number of sub-classes within each. The Aerodyne (AMS) instrument was also used during NAMBLEX, providing online, real time measurements of the mass of non-refractory components of aerosol particles as function of their size. The ATOFMS detected a type of particle not identified in our earlier analysis, with a strong signal at m/z 24, likely due to magnesium. This type of particle was detected during the same periods as pure unreacted sea salt particles and is thought to be biogenic, originating from the sea surface. AMS data are consistent with this interpretation, showing an additional organic peak in the corresponding size range at times when the Mg-rich particles are detected. The work shows the ATOFMS and AMS to be largely complementary, and to provide a powerful instrumental combination in studies of atmospheric chemistry.

  7. Stratospheric Sulfuric Acid and Black Carbon Aerosol Measured During POLARIS and its Role in Ozone Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Pueschel, R. F.; Drdla, K.; Verma, S.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol can affect the environment in three ways. Sulfuric acid aerosol have been shown to act as sites for the reduction of reactive nitrogen and chlorine and as condensation sites to form Polar Stratospheric Clouds, under very cold conditions, which facilitate ozone depletion. Recently, modeling studies have suggested a link between BCA (Black Carbon Aerosol) and ozone chemistry. These studies suggest that HNO3, NO2, and O3 may be reduced heterogeneously on BCA particles. The ozone reaction converts ozone to oxygen molecules, while HNO3 and NO2 react to form NOx. Finally, a buildup of BCA could reduce the single-scatter albedo of aerosol below a value of 0.98, a critical value that has been postulated to change the effect of stratospheric aerosol from cooling to warming. Correlations between measured BCA amounts and aircraft usage have been reported. Attempts to link BCA to ozone chemistry and other stratospheric processes have been hindered by questions concerning the amount of BCA that exists in the stratosphere, the magnitude of reaction probabilities, and the scarcity of BCA measurements. The Ames Wire Impactors (AWI) participated in POLARIS as part of the complement of experiments on the NASA ER-2. One of our main objectives was to determine the amount of aerosol surface area, particularly BCA, available for reaction with stratospheric constituents and assess if possible, the importance of these reactions. The AWI collects aerosol and BCA particles on thin Palladium wires that are exposed to the ambient air in a controlled manner. The samples are returned to the laboratory for subsequent analysis. The product of the AWI analysis is the size, surface area, and volume distributions, morphology and elemental composition of aerosol and BCA. This paper presents results from our experiments during POLARIS and puts these measurements in the context of POLARIS and other missions in which we have participated. It describes modifications to the AWI data

  8. Vertical distribution of non-volatile species of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol observed by balloon-borne optical particle counter above Ny-Aalesund, Norway in the winter of 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, K.; Hayashi, M.; Shibata, T.; Neuber, R.; Ruhe, W.

    2015-12-01

    The polar lower stratosphere is the sink area of stratospheric global circulation. The composition, concentration and size distribution of aerosol in the polar stratosphere are considered to be strongly influenced by the transportations from mid-latitude to polar region and exchange of stratosphere to troposphere. In order to study the aerosol composition and size distribution in the Arctic stratosphere and the relationship between their aerosol microphysical properties and transport process, we carried out balloon-borne measurement of aerosol volatility above Ny-Aalesund, Norway in the winter of 2015. In our observation, two optical particle counters and a thermo denuder were suspended by one rubber balloon. A particle counter measured the heated aerosol size distribution (after heating at the temperature of 300 degree by the thermo denuder) and the other measured the ambient aerosol size distribution during the observation. The observation was carried out on 15 January, 2015. Balloon arrived at the height of 30km and detailed information of aerosol size distributions in upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for both heated aerosol and ambient aerosol were obtained. As a Result, the number ratio of non-volatile particles to ambient aerosol particles in lower stratosphere (11-15km) showed different feature in particle size range of fine mode (0.3particles to ambient aerosol particles were 1-3% in fine mode range and 7-20% in coarse mode range. They suggested that fine particles are composed dominantly of volatile species (probably sulfuric acid), and coarse particles are composed of non-volatile species such as minerals, sea-salts. In our presentation, we show the obtained aerosol size distribution and discuss the aerosol compositions and their transport process.

  9. Systemic absorption of selenious acid and elemental selenium aerosols in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Medinsky, M.A.; Cuddihy, R.G.; McClellan, R.O.

    1981-11-01

    Absorption of Se from the nasal passages, lung, gastrointestinal tract, and skin was studied in Fischer-344 rats. Radiolabeled selenious acid and elemental Se particles were administered by inhalation, nasal instillation, and iv injection. Selenious acid was always absorbed into the general circulation more rapidly and to a greater extent than elemental Se. By 4 hr after inhalation of selenious acid and elemental Se aerosols, 94% of the selenious acid and 57% of the elemental Se deposited in lungs was absorbed into blood. Of the selenious acid instilled into nasal passages, 18% was absorbed into blood; 16% of the elemental Se was absorbed. Gastrointestinal absorption was 87% for selenious acid and 50% for elemental Se. Selenious acid solutions were also painted onto the pelts of rats. From 10 to 30% of the selenious acid was absorbed through the skin. Following inhalation or injection of either Se compound, most of the Se was excreted in the urine. Significantly more Se appeared in feces of animals receiving elemental Se by gavage than animals receiving selenious acid. Results indicate that if people were to absorb inhaled Se from the upper respiratory tract in a manner similar to that of rats, one-third more selenious acid would be absorbed into the general circulation than elemental Se. All Se deposited in the lungs would be absorbed into blood. However, selenious acid would be absorbed more rapidly than elemental Se.

  10. Size distributions of nano/micron dicarboxylic acids and inorganic ions in suburban PM episode and non-episodic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Li-Ying; Kuo, Su-Ching; Chen, Chien-Lung; Tsai, Ying I.

    The distribution of nano/micron dicarboxylic acids and inorganic ions in size-segregated suburban aerosol of southern Taiwan was studied for a PM episode and a non-episodic pollution period, revealing for the first time the distribution of these nanoscale particles in suburban aerosols. Inorganic species, especially nitrate, were present in higher concentrations during the PM episode. A combination of gas-to-nuclei conversion of nitrate particles and accumulation of secondary photochemical products originating from traffic-related emissions was likely a crucial cause of the PM episode. Sulfate, ammonium, and oxalic acid were the dominant anion, cation, and dicarboxylic acid, respectively, accounting for a minimum of 49% of the total anion, cation or dicarboxylic acid mass. Peak concentrations of these species occurred at 0.54 μm in the droplet mode during both non-episodic and PM episode periods, indicating an association with cloud-processed particles. On average, sulfate concentration was 16-17 times that of oxalic acid. Oxalic acid was nevertheless the most abundant dicarboxylic acid during both periods, followed by succinic, malonic, maleic, malic and tartaric acid. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of oxalic acid was 0.77 μm with a bi-modal presence at 0.54 μm and 18 nm during non-episodic pollution and an MMAD of 0.67 μm with mono-modal presence at 0.54 μm in PM episode aerosol. The concomitant formation of malonic acid and oxalic acid was attributed to in-cloud processes. During the PM episode in the 5-100 nm nanoscale range, an oxalic acid/sulfate mass ratio of 40.2-82.3% suggested a stronger formation potential for oxalic acid than for sulfate in the nuclei mode. For total cations (TC), total inorganic anions (TIA) and total dicarboxylic acids (TDA), major contributing particles were in the droplet mode, with least in the nuclei mode. The ratio of TDA to TIA in the nuclei mode increased greatly from 8.40% during the non-episodic pollution

  11. Electron mean free path from angle-dependent photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmann, Maximilian; Miguel-Sánchez, Javier; West, Adam H. C.; Yoder, Bruce L.; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-06-14

    We propose angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles as an alternative way to determine the electron mean free path of low energy electrons in solid and liquid materials. The mean free path is obtained from fits of simulated photoemission images to experimental ones over a broad range of different aerosol particle sizes. The principal advantage of the aerosol approach is twofold. First, aerosol photoemission studies can be performed for many different materials, including liquids. Second, the size-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectrons can be exploited in addition to size-dependent changes in their kinetic energy. These finite size effects depend in different ways on the mean free path and thus provide more information on the mean free path than corresponding liquid jet, thin film, or bulk data. The present contribution is a proof of principle employing a simple model for the photoemission of electrons and preliminary experimental data for potassium chloride aerosol particles.

  12. Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, John C.; McFarland, Andrew R.; Oritz, Carlos A.; Marlow, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles. A continuous air monitoring sampler is described for use in detecting the presence of alpha-emitting aerosol particles. An inlet fractionating screen has been demonstrated to remove about 95% of freshly formed radon progeny from the aerosol sample, and approximately 33% of partially aged progeny. Addition of an electrical condenser and a modified dichotomous virtual impactor are expected to produce considerable improvement in these numbers, the goal being to enrich the transuranic (TRU) fraction of the aerosols. This offers the possibility of improving the signal-to-noise ratio for the detected alpha-particle energy spectrum in the region of interest for detecting TRU materials associated with aerosols, thereby enhancing the performance of background-compensation algorithms for improving the quality of alarm signals intended to warn personnel of potentially harmful quantities of TRU materials in the ambient air.

  13. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Oo, K.; Brown, M. D.; Dhaniyala, S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    An experimental setup has been constructed to measure the collection efficiency of submicron aerosol particles by cloud droplets. The collection efficiency study is a prelude to studying contact nucleation, which is a potentially important ice nucleation mode that is not well-understood. This laboratory setup is a step closer to experimentally assessing the importance of contact nucleation. Water droplets with 20 micron diameter and submicron aerosol particles are brought into contact in an injector situated inside a chilled glass flow tube. The water droplets that collect aerosol particles are allowed to pass through a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), which accepts large droplets and rejects aerosol particles that have not coagulated with the water droplets. The collected droplets are sent into the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument which performs in situ chemical analysis of a single particle. The number of aerosol particles collected by the single water droplet is quantified by calibrating the PALMS with known concentrations of aerosol particles. The water droplets contain a known amount of ammonium sulfate for identification purpose in the mass spectrometry. Preliminary results from the experiment will be discussed and compared with previous theoretical and experimental studies.

  14. Enhancement in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Presence of Preexisting Organic Particle.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianhuai; Gordon, Catherine A; Chan, Arthur W H

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric models of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) typically assume organic species form a well-mixed phase. As a result, partitioning of semivolatile oxidation products into the particle phase to form SOA is thought to be enhanced by preexisting organic particles. In this work, the physicochemical properties that govern such enhancement in SOA yield were examined. SOA yields from α-pinene ozonolysis were measured in the presence of a variety of organic seeds which were chosen based on polarity and phase state at room temperature. Yield enhancement was only observed with seeds of medium polarities (tetraethylene glycol and citric acid). Solid hexadecanol seed was observed to enhance SOA yields only in chamber experiments with longer mixing time scales, suggesting that the mixing process for SOA and hexadecanol may be kinetically limited at shorter time scales. Our observations indicate that, in addition to kinetic limitations, intermolecular interactions also play a significant role in determining SOA yields. Here we propose for the first time to use the Hansen solubility framework to determine aerosol miscibility and predict SOA yield enhancement. These results highlight that current models may overestimate SOA formation, and parametrization of intermolecular forces is needed for accurate predictions of SOA formation. PMID:26963686

  15. Ultraviolet broadband light scattering for optically-trapped submicron-sized aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    David, Grégory; Esat, Kıvanç; Ritsch, Irina; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-02-21

    We describe a broadband light scattering setup for the characterization of size and refractive index of single submicron-to-micron sized aerosol particles. Individual particles are isolated in air by a quadruple Bessel beam optical trap or a counter-propagating optical tweezer. The use of very broadband radiation in the wavelength range from 320 to 700 nm covering the ultraviolet region allows to size submicron particles. We show that a broad wavelength range is required to determine the particle radius and the refractive index with an uncertainty of several nanometers and ∼ 0.01, respectively. The smallest particle radius that can be accurately determined lies around 300 nm. Wavelength-dependent refractive index data over a broad range are obtained, including the ultraviolet region where corresponding data are rare. Four different applications are discussed: (1) the sizing of submicron polystyrene latex spheres, (2) the evaporation of binary glycerol water droplets, (3) hydration/dehydration cycling of aqueous potassium carbonate droplets, and (4) photochemical reactions of oleic acid droplets. PMID:26863396

  16. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF FILTER-COLLECTED AEROSOL PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has become an effective technique for determining the elemental content of aerosol samples. For quantitative analysis, the aerosol particles must be collected as uniform deposits on the surface of Teflon membrane filters. An energy dispersive XRF spectrom...

  17. Evaluation of cell sorting aerosols and containment by an optical airborne particle counter.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mike; Waring, Michael T

    2015-08-01

    Understanding aerosols produced by cell sorting is critical to biosafety risk assessment and validation of containment efficiency. In this study an Optical Airborne Particle Counter was used to analyze aerosols produced by the BD FACSAria and to assess the effectiveness of its aerosol containment. The suitability of using this device to validate containment was directly compared to the Glo-Germ method put forth by the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) as a standard for testing. It was found that high concentrations of aerosols ranging from 0.3 µm to 10 µm can be detected in failure mode, with most less than 5 µm. In most cases, while numerous aerosols smaller than 5 µm were detected by the Optical Airborne Particle Counter, no Glo-Germ particles were detected, indicating that small aerosols are under-evaluated by the Glo-Germ method. The results demonstrate that the Optical Airborne Particle Counter offers a rapid, economic, and quantitative analysis of cell sorter aerosols and represents an improved method over Glo-Germ for the task of routine validation and monitoring of aerosol containment for cell sorting. PMID:26012776

  18. TIME-OF-FLIGHT AEROSOL BEAM SPECTROMETER FOR PARTICLE SIZE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A time-of-flight aerosol beam spectrometer (TOFABS) is described. The instrument has been designed and constructed to perform in situ real time measurements of the aerodynamic size of individual aerosol particles in the range 0.3 to 10 micrometers diameter. The measurement method...

  19. Terpenylic acid and nine-carbon multifunctional compounds formed during the aging of β-pinene ozonolysis secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kei; Jia, Tianyu; Tanabe, Kiyoshi; Morino, Yu; Kajii, Yoshizumi; Imamura, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Recent field and laboratory studies suggest that forest aerosol particles contain more highly functionalized organic molecules than pinonic acid, a traditional molecular maker of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles. To investigate the reaction mechanisms during the aging of biogenic SOAs, the gases and particles formed from the ozonolysis of β- and α-pinene were exposed to OH radicals in a laboratory chamber. The particle samples were collected before and after OH exposure for analysis by liquid chromatography-negative electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Pinic acid and terpenylic acid were abundant products in both β- and α-pinene ozonolysis SOA particles. Terpenylic acid and products with m/z 201.08 present in β-pinene SOA particles increased upon exposing SOA to OH radicals, whereas 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid present in α-pinene SOA particles increased upon exposing SOA to OH radicals. The products with m/z 201.08 were suggested to be C9H14O5 compounds. Similar C9H14O5 compounds and terpenylic acid were also detected in SOA particles formed from the photooxidation of nopinone, a major first-generation product of β-pinene ozonolysis. The OH-initiated oxidation of nopinone will contribute to the formation of terpenylic acid and C9H14O5 compounds during the aging of β-pinene SOA. A formation mechanism for terpenylic acid via gas-phase diaterpenylic acid formation followed by self-dehydration in the condensed phase was suggested.

  20. Nuclear microprobe analysis and source apportionment of individual atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Rabello, Marta L. C.; Watt, Frank; Grime, Geoff; Swietlicki, Erik

    1993-04-01

    In atmospheric aerosol research, one key issue is to determine the sources of the airborne particles. Bulk PIXE analysis coupled with receptor modeling provides a useful, but limited view of the aerosol sources influencing one particular site or sample. The scanning nuclear microprobe (SNM) technique is a microanalytical technique that gives unique information on individual aerosol particles. In the SNM analyses a 1.0 μm size 2.4 MeV proton beam from the Oxford SNM was used. The trace elements with Z > 11 were measured by the particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method with detection limits in the 1-10 ppm range. Carbon, nitrogen and oxygen are measured simultaneously using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Atmospheric aerosol particles were collected at the Brazilian Antarctic Station and at biomass burning sites in the Amazon basin tropical rain forest in Brazil. In the Antarctic samples, the sea-salt aerosol particles were clearly predominating, with NaCl and CaSO 4 as major compounds with several trace elements as Al, Si, P, K, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr, and Pb. Factor analysis of the elemental data showed the presence of four components: 1) soil dust particles; 2) NaCl particles; 3) CaSO 4 with Sr; and 4) Br and Mg. Strontium, observed at 20-100 ppm levels, was always present in the CaSO 4 particles. The hierarchical cluster procedure gave results similar to the ones obtained through factor analysis. For the tropical rain forest biomass burning aerosol emissions, biogenic particles with a high organic content dominate the particle population, while K, P, Ca, Mg, Zn, and Si are the dominant elements. Zinc at 10-200 ppm is present in biogenic particles rich in P and K. The quantitative aspects and excellent detection limits make SNM analysis of individual aerosol particles a very powerful analytical tool.

  1. A Micro Aerosol Sensor for the Measurement of Airborne Ultrafine Particles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Wenming

    2016-01-01

    Particle number concentration and particle size are the two key parameters used to characterize exposure to airborne nanoparticles or ultrafine particles that have attracted the most attention. This paper proposes a simple micro aerosol sensor for detecting the number concentration and particle size of ultrafine particles with diameters from 50 to 253 nm based on electrical diffusion charging. The sensor is composed of a micro channel and a couple of planar electrodes printed on two circuit boards assembled in parallel, which thus integrate charging, precipitating and measurement elements into one chip, the overall size of which is 98 × 38 × 25 mm3. The experiment results demonstrate that the sensor is useful for measuring monodisperse aerosol particles with number concentrations from 300 to 2.5 × 104 /cm3 and particle sizes from 50 to 253 nm. The aerosol sensor has a simple structure and small size, which is favorable for use in handheld devices. PMID:26999156

  2. A Micro Aerosol Sensor for the Measurement of Airborne Ultrafine Particles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Wenming

    2016-01-01

    Particle number concentration and particle size are the two key parameters used to characterize exposure to airborne nanoparticles or ultrafine particles that have attracted the most attention. This paper proposes a simple micro aerosol sensor for detecting the number concentration and particle size of ultrafine particles with diameters from 50 to 253 nm based on electrical diffusion charging. The sensor is composed of a micro channel and a couple of planar electrodes printed on two circuit boards assembled in parallel, which thus integrate charging, precipitating and measurement elements into one chip, the overall size of which is 98 × 38 × 25 mm³. The experiment results demonstrate that the sensor is useful for measuring monodisperse aerosol particles with number concentrations from 300 to 2.5 × 10⁴ /cm³ and particle sizes from 50 to 253 nm. The aerosol sensor has a simple structure and small size, which is favorable for use in handheld devices. PMID:26999156

  3. Estimating Marine Aerosol Particle Volume and Number from Maritime Aerosol Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Smirnov, A.; Hsu, N. C.; Munchak, L. A.; Holben, B. N.

    2012-01-01

    As well as spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol composition and concentration (number, volume, or mass) are of interest for a variety of applications. However, remote sensing of these quantities is more difficult than for AOD, as it is more sensitive to assumptions relating to aerosol composition. This study uses spectral AOD measured on Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) cruises, with the additional constraint of a microphysical model for unpolluted maritime aerosol based on analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) inversions, to estimate these quantities over open ocean. When the MAN data are subset to those likely to be comprised of maritime aerosol, number and volume concentrations obtained are physically reasonable. Attempts to estimate surface concentration from columnar abundance, however, are shown to be limited by uncertainties in vertical distribution. Columnar AOD at 550 nm and aerosol number for unpolluted maritime cases are also compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, for both the present Collection 5.1 and forthcoming Collection 6. MODIS provides a best-fitting retrieval solution, as well as the average for several different solutions, with different aerosol microphysical models. The average solution MODIS dataset agrees more closely with MAN than the best solution dataset. Terra tends to retrieve lower aerosol number than MAN, and Aqua higher, linked with differences in the aerosol models commonly chosen. Collection 6 AOD is likely to agree more closely with MAN over open ocean than Collection 5.1. In situations where spectral AOD is measured accurately, and aerosol microphysical properties are reasonably well-constrained, estimates of aerosol number and volume using MAN or similar data would provide for a greater variety of potential comparisons with aerosol properties derived from satellite or chemistry transport model data.

  4. Carbon in southeastern U.S. aerosol particles: Empirical estimates of secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Charles L.; Hidy, George M.; Tanenbaum, Shelley; Edgerton, Eric; Hartsell, Benjamin; Jansen, John

    Fine particles in the southeastern United States are rich in carbon: Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network measurements from 2001 through 2004 indicate that fine particles less than 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter (PM 2.5) at two inland urban sites, Atlanta, GA and Birmingham, AL, contain 9 and 11% black carbon (BC) by mass, respectively, on average. For neighboring rural or urban Gulf Coast sites, the range is 4-7% BC. Organic carbon (OC) ranges from 25 to 27% in the inland cities, and 19-24% at the rural or Gulf Coast locations. Evidence in the literature suggests that a substantial fraction of the OC found in the Southeast is produced by atmospheric chemical reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Estimation of the fraction of OC from primary and secondary sources is difficult from first principles, because the chemistry is complex and incompletely understood, and the emission sources are both anthropogenic and natural. As an alternative, measurement-based models can be used to estimate empirically the primary and secondary source contributions. Three complementary empirical models are described and applied using the SEARCH database. The methods include (a) a multiple regression model employing markers for primary and secondary carbon using gas and particle data, (b) a carbon mass balance using carbon and CO data, along with certain assumptions about the OC/CO ratios in primary emissions for different urban and rural conditions, and (c) exploitation of isotopic measurements of carbon along with the BC and OC data. Secondary organic carbon (SOC) represents ˜20-60% of mean OC, depending upon location and season. The results are sensitive to estimates of emissions of primary OC and BC.

  5. Measurement of acidic aerosol species in eastern Europe: implications for air pollution epidemiology.

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, M; Dumyahn, T S; Spengler, J D; Gutschmidt, K; Heinrich, J; Wichmann, H E

    1995-01-01

    A large number of studies have indicated associations between particulate air pollution and adverse health outcomes. Wintertime air pollution in particular has been associated with increased mortality. Identification of causal constituents of inhalable particulate matter has been elusive, although one candidate has been the acidity of the aerosol. Here we report measurements of acidic aerosol species made for approximately 1.5 years in Erfurt, Germany, and Sokolov, Czech Republic. In both locations, the burning of high-sulfur coal is the primary source of ambient air pollution. Twenty-four-hour average measurements were made for PM10, [particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter (da) < or = 10 microns], as well as fine particle (da < 2.5 microns) H+ and SO4(2-) for the entire study. Additionally, separate day and night measurements of fine particle H+, SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+ and the gases, SO2, HNO3, HONO, and NH3 were collected with an annular denuder/filter pack system over a 7-month (late winter-summer) period with additional measurements during pollution episodes the following winter. At both sites, 24-hr SO2 (mean concentrations of 52 micrograms/m3, with peak levels of > 585 micrograms/m3) and PM10 (mean concentration 60 micrograms m3) concentrations were quite high. However, aerosol SO4(2-) concentrations (mean concentration of approximately 10 micrograms/m3) were not as great as expected given the high SO2 concentrations, and acidity was very low (mean concentration of < 1 microgram/m3, with peak levels of only 7 micrograms/m3). Low acidity is likely to be the result of NH3 neutralization and slow conversion of SO2 to SO4(2-).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7656878

  6. Sources and composition of submicron organic mass in marine aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Frossard, Amanda A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott M.; Bates, Timothy S.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    2014-11-27

    Recent studies have proposed a variety of interpretations of the sources and composition of atmospheric marine aerosol particles (aMA) based on a range of physical and chemical measurements collected during open-ocean research cruises. To investigate the processes that affect marine organic particles, this study uses the characteristic functional group composition (from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy) of aMAP from five ocean regions to show that: (i) The organic functional group composition of aMAP that can be identified as atmospheric primary marine (ocean-derived) aerosol (aPMA) is 65±12% hydroxyl, 21±9% alkane, 6±6% amine, and 7±8% carboxylic acid functional groups. Contributions from photochemical reactions add carboxylic acid groups (15%-25%), shipping effluent in seawater and ship emissions add additional alkane groups (up to 70%), and coastal emissions mix in alkane and carboxylic acid groups from coastal pollution sources. (ii) The organic composition of aPMA is nearly identical to model generated primary marine aerosol particles (gPMA) from bubbled seawater (55% hydroxyl, 32% alkane, and 13% amine functional groups), indicating that its overall functional group composition is the direct consequence of the organic constituents of the seawater source. (iii) While the seawater organic functional group composition was nearly invariant across all three ocean regions studied, the gPMA alkane group fraction increased with chlorophyll-a concentrations (r = 0.79). gPMA from productive seawater had a larger fraction of alkane functional groups (35%) compared to gPMA from non-productive seawater (16%), likely due to the presence of surfactants in productive seawater that stabilize the bubble film and lead to preferential drainage of the more soluble (lower alkane group fraction) organic components. gPMA has a hydroxyl group absorption peak location characteristic of monosaccharides and disaccharides, where the seawater OM hydroxyl group peak

  7. Sources and composition of submicron organic mass in marine aerosol particles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frossard, Amanda A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott M.; Bates, Timothy S.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    2014-11-27

    Recent studies have proposed a variety of interpretations of the sources and composition of atmospheric marine aerosol particles (aMA) based on a range of physical and chemical measurements collected during open-ocean research cruises. To investigate the processes that affect marine organic particles, this study uses the characteristic functional group composition (from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy) of aMAP from five ocean regions to show that: (i) The organic functional group composition of aMAP that can be identified as atmospheric primary marine (ocean-derived) aerosol (aPMA) is 65±12% hydroxyl, 21±9% alkane, 6±6% amine, and 7±8% carboxylic acid functional groups. Contributions from photochemicalmore » reactions add carboxylic acid groups (15%-25%), shipping effluent in seawater and ship emissions add additional alkane groups (up to 70%), and coastal emissions mix in alkane and carboxylic acid groups from coastal pollution sources. (ii) The organic composition of aPMA is nearly identical to model generated primary marine aerosol particles (gPMA) from bubbled seawater (55% hydroxyl, 32% alkane, and 13% amine functional groups), indicating that its overall functional group composition is the direct consequence of the organic constituents of the seawater source. (iii) While the seawater organic functional group composition was nearly invariant across all three ocean regions studied, the gPMA alkane group fraction increased with chlorophyll-a concentrations (r = 0.79). gPMA from productive seawater had a larger fraction of alkane functional groups (35%) compared to gPMA from non-productive seawater (16%), likely due to the presence of surfactants in productive seawater that stabilize the bubble film and lead to preferential drainage of the more soluble (lower alkane group fraction) organic components. gPMA has a hydroxyl group absorption peak location characteristic of monosaccharides and disaccharides, where the seawater OM hydroxyl group

  8. Sources and composition of submicron organic mass in marine aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frossard, Amanda A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott M.; Bates, Timothy S.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    2014-11-01

    The sources and composition of atmospheric marine aerosol particles (aMA) have been investigated with a range of physical and chemical measurements from open-ocean research cruises. This study uses the characteristic functional group composition (from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) of aMA from five ocean regions to show the following: (i) The organic functional group composition of aMA that can be identified as mainly atmospheric primary marine (ocean derived) aerosol particles (aPMA) is 65 ± 12% hydroxyl, 21 ± 9% alkane, 6 ± 6% amine, and 7 ± 8% carboxylic acid functional groups. Contributions from photochemical reactions add carboxylic acid groups (15%-25%), shipping effluent in seawater and ship emissions add additional alkane groups (up to 70%), and coastal or continental emissions mix in alkane and carboxylic acid groups. (ii) The organic composition of aPMA is nearly identical to model-generated primary marine aerosol particles from bubbled seawater (gPMA, which has 55 ± 14% hydroxyl, 32 ± 14% alkane, and 13 ± 3% amine functional groups), indicating that its overall functional group composition is the direct consequence of the organic constituents of the seawater source. (iii) While the seawater organic functional group composition was nearly invariant across all three ocean regions studied and the ratio of organic carbon to sodium (OC/Na+) in the gPMA remained nearly constant over a broad range of chlorophyll a concentrations, the gPMA alkane group fraction appeared to increase with chlorophyll a concentrations (r = 0.66). gPMA from productive seawater had a larger fraction of alkane functional groups (42 ± 9%) compared to gPMA from nonproductive seawater (22 ± 10%), perhaps due to the presence of surfactants in productive seawater that stabilize the bubble film and lead to preferential drainage of the more soluble (lower alkane group fraction) organic components. gPMA has a hydroxyl group absorption peak location characteristic of

  9. Role of Acid Mobilization in Iron Solubility of Smaller Mineral Dust Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.

    2011-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for phytoplankton. The majority of iron is transported from arid regions to the open ocean, but is mainly in an insoluble form. Since most aquatic organisms can take up iron only in the dissolved form, the amount of soluble iron is of key importance. Atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols by anthropogenic pollutants may transform insoluble iron into soluble forms. Compared to dust, combustion aerosols often contain iron with higher solubility. This paper discusses the factors that affect the iron solubility in mineral aerosols on a global scale using an aerosol chemistry transport model. Bioavailable iron is derived from atmospheric processing of relatively insoluble iron from desert sources and from direct emissions of soluble iron from combustion sources such as biomass and fossil fuels burning. The iron solubility from onboard cruise measurements over the Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans in 2001 is used to evaluate the model performance in simulating soluble iron. Sensitivity simulations from dust sources with no atmospheric processing by acidic species systematically underestimate the soluble iron concentration in fine particles. Improvement of the agreement between the model results and observations is achieved by the use of a faster iron dissolution rate in fine particles associated with anthropogenic pollutants (e.g., sulphate). Accurate simulation of the abundance of soluble iron in fine aerosols has important implications with regards to ocean fertilization because of the longer residence time of smaller particles, which supply nutrients to more remote ocean biomes. The model reveals a larger deposition of soluble iron for the fine mode than that for the coarse mode in northern oceans due to acid mobilization. The ratio of deposition rate of soluble iron in the fine mode to the total aerosols in the South Atlantic Ocean (40-60%) is less than that in northern oceans (70-100%). These results suggest that Patagonian dust

  10. Effects of precursor concentration and acidic sulfate in aqueous glyoxal-OH radical oxidation and implications for secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Perri, Mark J; Seitzinger, Sybil P; Turpin, Barbara J

    2009-11-01

    Previous experiments demonstrated that aqueous OH radical oxidation of glyoxal yields low-volatility compounds. When this chemistry takes place in clouds and fogs, followed by droplet evaporation (or if it occurs in aerosol water), the products are expected to remain partially in the particle phase, forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Acidic sulfate exists ubiquitously in atmospheric water and has been shown to enhance SOA formation through aerosol phase reactions. In this work, we investigate how starting concentrations of glyoxal (30-3000 microM) and the presence of acidic sulfate (0-840 microM) affect product formation in the aqueous reaction between glyoxal and OH radical. The oxalic acid yield decreased with increasing precursor concentrations, and the presence of sulfuric acid did not alter oxalic acid concentrations significantly. A dilute aqueous chemistry model successfully reproduced oxalic acid concentrations, when the experiment was performed at cloud-relevant concentrations (glyoxal <300 microM), but predictions deviated from measurements at increasing concentrations. Results elucidate similarities and differences in aqueous glyoxal chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. They validate for the first time the accuracy of model predictions at cloud-relevant concentrations. These results suggest that cloud processing of glyoxal could be an important source of SOA. PMID:19924930

  11. Viscous organic aerosol particles in the upper troposphere: diffusivity-controlled water uptake and ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, D. M.; Huisman, A. J.; Krieger, U. K.; Rudich, Y.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Bones, D. L.; Reid, J. P.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Steimer, S. S.; Koop, T.; Peter, T.

    2015-12-01

    New measurements of water diffusion in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material produced by oxidation of α-pinene and in a number of organic/inorganic model mixtures (3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA), levoglucosan, levoglucosan/NH4HSO4, raffinose) are presented. These indicate that water diffusion coefficients are determined by several properties of the aerosol substance and cannot be inferred from the glass transition temperature or bouncing properties. Our results suggest that water diffusion in SOA particles is faster than often assumed and imposes no significant kinetic limitation on water uptake and release at temperatures above 220 K. The fast diffusion of water suggests that heterogeneous ice nucleation on a glassy core is very unlikely in these systems. At temperatures below 220 K, model simulations of SOA particles suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation may occur in the immersion mode on glassy cores which remain embedded in a liquid shell when experiencing fast updraft velocities. The particles absorb significant quantities of water during these updrafts which plasticize their outer layers such that these layers equilibrate readily with the gas phase humidity before the homogeneous ice nucleation threshold is reached. Glass formation is thus unlikely to restrict homogeneous ice nucleation. Only under most extreme conditions near the very high tropical tropopause may the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient be reduced as a consequence of slow condensed-phase water diffusion. Since the differences between the behavior limited or non limited by diffusion are small even at the very high tropical tropopause, condensed-phase water diffusivity is unlikely to have significant consequences on the direct climatic effects of SOA particles under tropospheric conditions.

  12. Organic peroxides gas-particle partitioning and rapid heterogeneous decomposition on secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Chen, Z. M.; Huang, L. B.; Huang, D.

    2015-10-01

    Organic peroxides, important species in the atmosphere, will promote secondary organic aerosols (SOA) aging, affect HOx radicals cycling, and cause adverse health effects. However, the formation, gas-particle partitioning, and evolution of organic peroxides are extremely complicated and still unclear. In this study, we investigate in the laboratory the production and gas-particle partitioning of peroxides from the ozonolysis of α-pinene, which is one of the major biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere and is an important precursor for SOA at a global scale. We have determined the molar yields of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), peroxyformic acid (PFA), peroxyacetic acid (PAA) and total peroxides (TPO, including unknown peroxides) and the fraction of peroxides in SOA. Comparing the gas-phase and particle-phase peroxides, we find that gas-particle partitioning coefficients of PFA and PAA are 104 times higher than theoretical prediction, indicating that organic peroxides play a more important role in the SOA formation than expected previously. Here, we give the partitioning coefficients of TPO as (2-3) × 10-4 m3μg-1. Even so, more than 80 % of the peroxides formed in the reaction remain in the gas phase. Water does not affect the total amount of peroxides in either the gas or particle phase, but can change the distribution of gaseous peroxides. About 18 % gaseous peroxides undergo rapid heterogeneous decomposition on SOA particles in the presence of water vapor, resulting in the additional production of H2O2. This process can partially interpret the unexpected high H2O2 yield under wet conditions. Transformation of organic peroxides to H2O2 also saves OH in the atmosphere, helping to improve the understanding of OH cycling.

  13. Organic peroxides' gas-particle partitioning and rapid heterogeneous decomposition on secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming; Huang, Liubin; Huang, Dao

    2016-02-01

    Organic peroxides, important species in the atmosphere, promote secondary organic aerosol (SOA) aging, affect HOx radicals cycling, and cause adverse health effects. However, the formation, gas-particle partitioning, and evolution of organic peroxides are complicated and still unclear. In this study, we investigated in the laboratory the production and gas-particle partitioning of peroxides from the ozonolysis of α-pinene, which is one of the major biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere and an important precursor for SOA at a global scale. We have determined the molar yields of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydromethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), peroxyformic acid (PFA), peroxyacetic acid (PAA), and total peroxides (TPOs, including unknown peroxides) and the fraction of peroxides in α-pinene/O3 SOA. Comparing the gas-phase peroxides with the particle-phase peroxides, we find that gas-particle partitioning coefficients of PFA and PAA are 104 times higher than the values from the theoretical prediction, indicating that organic peroxides play a more important role in SOA formation than previously expected. Here, the partitioning coefficients of TPO were determined to be as high as (2-3) × 10-4 m3 µg-1. Even so, more than 80 % of the peroxides formed in the reaction remain in the gas phase. Water changes the distribution of gaseous peroxides, while it does not affect the total amount of peroxides in either the gas or the particle phase. Approx. 18 % of gaseous peroxides undergo rapid heterogeneous decomposition on SOA particles in the presence of water vapor, resulting in the additional production of H2O2. This process can partially explain the unexpectedly high H2O2 yields under wet conditions. Transformation of organic peroxides to H2O2 also preserves OH in the atmosphere, helping to improve the understanding of OH cycling.

  14. Mixing state of ambient aerosols in Nanjing city by single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglei; An, Junlin; Shen, Lijuan; Zhu, Bin; Xia, Li; Duan, Qing; Zou, Jianan

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the mixing state and size-resolved aerosol in Nanjing, measurements were carried out for the period 14th January-1st February 2013 by using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SPAMS). A total of 10,864,766 particles were sized with vacuum aerodynamic diameter (dva) in the range of 0.2-2.0 μm. Of which, 1,989,725 particles were successfully ionized. Aerosol particles employed for analyzing SPAMS data utilized 96% of the hit particles to identify 5 main particle groups. The particle classes include: K-rich particles (K-CN, K-Nitrate, K-Sulfate and K-Secondary), sodium particles, ammonium particles, carbon-rich particles (OC, EC and OCEC) and heavy-metal particles (Fe-Secondary, Pb-Nitrate, Cu-Mn-Secondary and V-Secondary). EC was the largest contributor with a fraction of 21.78%, followed by K-Secondary (17.87%), K-Nitrate (12.68%) and K-CN (11.25%). High particle level and high RH (relative humidity) are two important factors decreasing visibility in Nanjing. Different particle classes have distinct extinction effects. It anti-correlated well with visibility for the K-secondary, sodium, ammonium, EC, Fe-Secondary and K-Nitrate particles. The proportion of EC particles at 0.65-1.4 μm was up to 25% on haze days and was below 10% on clean days.

  15. Mixing state of ambient aerosols in Nanjing city by single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglei; An, Junlin; Shen, Lijuan; Zhu, Bin; Xia, Li; Duan, Qing; Zou, Jianan

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the mixing state and size-resolved aerosol in Nanjing, measurements were carried out for the period 14th January-1st February 2013 by using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SPAMS). A total of 10,864,766 particles were sized with vacuum aerodynamic diameter (dva) in the range of 0.2-2.0 μm. Of which, 1,989,725 particles were successfully ionized. Aerosol particles employed for analyzing SPAMS data utilized 96% of the hit particles to identify 5 main particle groups. The particle classes include: K-rich particles (K-CN, K-Nitrate, K-Sulfate and K-Secondary), sodium particles, ammonium particles, carbon-rich particles (OC, EC and OCEC) and heavy-metal particles (Fe-Secondary, Pb-Nitrate, Cu-Mn-Secondary and V-Secondary). EC was the largest contributor with a fraction of 21.78%, followed by K-Secondary (17.87%), K-Nitrate (12.68%) and K-CN (11.25%). High particle level and high RH (relative humidity) are two important factors decreasing visibility in Nanjing. Different particle classes have distinct extinction effects. It anti-correlated well with visibility for the K-secondary, sodium, ammonium, EC, Fe-Secondary and K-Nitrate particles. The proportion of EC particles at 0.65-1.4 μm was up to 25% on haze days and was below 10% on clean days.

  16. Measurement of internal and external mixtures of test aerosols with a new Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonaschütz, Anna; Hitzenberger, Regina

    2015-04-01

    The mixing state of atmospheric aerosol particles is a very important property affecting processes such as CCN activation and scattering and absorption of light by the particles, but is challenging to determine. A new Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (LAAPTOF, AeroMegt GmbH) was tested with regards to its capability of measuring internal and external mixture of aerosols using laboratory generated particles. To create the external mixture, solutions of three different salts in deionized water, and a suspension of carbon black (Cabot Corporation) in a mixture of isopropanol and water were nebulized and individually dried, before being passed into a small mixing chamber. To create the internal mixture, equal parts of each solution/suspension were mixed, fed into a single nebulizer, nebulized and dried. The LAAPTOF sampled from the mixing chamber and recorded mass spectra of individual particles. The analysis shows a heterogeneous ensemble of single particle spectra for the external mixture, and a homogeneous ensemble of spectra for the internal mixture. The ability of a fuzzy clustering algorithm to resolve the difference between the two mixing states was also tested.

  17. Acid-catalyzed reactions of hexanal on sulfuric acid particles: Identification of reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Rebecca M.; Elrod, Matthew J.; Kincaid, Kristi; Beaver, Melinda R.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    While it is well established that organics compose a large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol mass, the mechanisms through which organics are incorporated into atmospheric aerosols are not well understood. Acid-catalyzed reactions of compounds with carbonyl groups have recently been suggested as important pathways for transfer of volatile organics into acidic aerosols. In the present study, we use the aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to probe the uptake of gas-phase hexanal into ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols. While both deliquesced and dry non-acidic ammonium sulfate aerosols showed no organic uptake, the acidic aerosols took up substantial amounts of organic material when exposed to hexanal vapor. Further, we used 1H-NMR, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and GC-MS to identify the products of the acid-catalyzed reaction of hexanal in acidic aerosols. Both aldol condensation and hemiacetal products were identified, with the dominant reaction products dependent upon the initial acid concentration of the aerosol. The aldol condensation product was formed only at initial concentrations of 75-96 wt% sulfuric acid in water. The hemiacetal was produced at all sulfuric acid concentrations studied, 30-96 wt% sulfuric acid in water. Aerosols up to 88.4 wt% organic/11.1 wt% H 2SO 4/0.5 wt% water were produced via these two dimerization reaction pathways. The UV-VIS spectrum of the isolated aldol condensation product, 2-butyl 2-octenal, extends into the visible region, suggesting these reactions may impact aerosol optical properties as well as aerosol composition. In contrast to previous suggestions, no polymerization of hexanal or its products was observed at any sulfuric acid concentration studied, from 30 to 96 wt% in water.

  18. Reactive uptake of Isoprene-derived epoxydiols to submicron aerosol particles: implications for IEPOX lifetime and SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, J. A.; Gaston, C.; Riedel, T.; Zhang, Z.; Gold, A.; Surratt, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The reactive uptake of isoprene-derived epoxydiols (IEPOX) is thought to be a significant source of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, the IEPOX reaction probability (γIEPOX) and its dependence upon particle composition remain poorly constrained. We report measurements of γIEPOX for trans-b-IEPOX, the predominant IEPOX isomer, on submicron particles as a function of composition, acidity, and relative humidity (RH). Particle acidity had the strongest effect. γIEPOX is more than 500 times larger on ammonium bisulfate (γ ~ 0.05) than on ammonium sulfate (γ ≤ 1 x 10-4). We could accurately predict γIEPOX using an acid-catalyzed, epoxide ring-opening mechanism and a high Henry's law coefficient (1.6 x 108 M/atm). Suppression of γIEPOX was observed in particles containing both ammonium bisulfate and polyethylene glycol (PEG-300), likely due to diffusion and solubility limitations within a PEG-300 coating, suggesting that IEPOX uptake could be self-limiting. Using the measured uptake kinetics, the predicted atmospheric lifetime of IEPOX is a few hours in the presence of highly acidic particles (pH < 0), but is greater than a day on less acidic particles (pH > 3). We connect these net reactive uptake measurements to chamber studies of the SOA yield from IEPOX multiphase chemistry and discuss the implications of these findings for modeling the anthropogenic influence upon SOA formation from isoprene.

  19. The chemical composition of fine ambient aerosol particles in the Beijing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Gnauk, Thomas; Müller, Konrad; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2010-05-01

    The strong economical growth in China during the last few decades led to heavy air pollution caused by significantly increased particle emissions. The aerosol particles affect not only the regional air quality and visibility, but can also influence cloud formation processes and the radiative balance of the atmosphere by their optical and microphysical properties. The ability to act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) is related to microphysical properties like the hygroscopic growth or the cloud droplet activation. The chemical composition of CCN plays an important role on these properties and varies strongly with the particle size and the time of day. Hygroscopic or surface active substances can increase the hygroscopicity and lower the surface tension of the particle liquid phase, respectively. The presence of such compounds may result in faster cloud droplet activation by faster water uptake. The DFG project HaChi (Haze in China) aimed at studying physical and chemical parameters of urban aerosol particles in the Beijing area in order to associate the chemical composition of aerosol particles with their ability to act as CCN. To this end, two measurement campaigns were performed at the Wuqing National Ordinary Meteorological Observing Station, which is a background site near Beijing. The winter campaign was realized in March 2009 and the summer campaign took place from mid July 2009 to mid August 2009. Fine particles with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than or equal 1 μm were continuously sampled for 24h over the two campaigns using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). The present contribution presents and discusses the results of the chemical characterization of the DIGITEL filters samples. The filters were analyzed for the mass concentration, inorganic ions and carbon sum parameters like elemental (EC), organic (OC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). The WSOC fraction was further characterized for hygroscopic substances like low molecular

  20. Particle size distribution of the stratospheric aerosol from SCIAMACHY limb measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Alexei; Malinina, Elizaveta; Rozanov, Vladimir; Hommel, Rene; Burrows, John

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosols are of a great scientific interest because of their crucial role in the Earth's radiative budget as well as their contribution to chemical processes resulting in ozone depletion. While the permanent aerosol background in the stratosphere is determined by the tropical injection of SO2, COS and sulphate particles from the troposphere, major perturbations of the stratospheric aerosol layer result form an uplift of SO2 after strong volcanic eruptions. Satellite measurements in the visible spectral range represent one of the most important sources of information about the vertical distribution of the stratospheric aerosol on the global scale. This study employs measurements of the scattered solar light performed in the limb viewing geometry from the space borne spectrometer SCIAMACHY, which operated onboard the ENVISAT satellite, from August 2002 to April 2012. A retrieval approach to obtain parameters of the stratospheric aerosol particle size distribution will be reported along with the sensitivity studies and first results.

  1. Formation and growth of indoor air aerosol particles as a result of D-limonene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartiainen, E.; Kulmala, M.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Taipale, R.; Rinne, J.; Vehkamäki, H.

    Oxidation of D-limonene, which is a common monoterpene, can lead to new aerosol particle formation in indoor environments. Thus, products containing D-limonene, such as citrus fruits, air refresheners, household cleaning agents, and waxes, can act as indoor air aerosol particle sources. We released D-limonene into the room air by peeling oranges and measured the concentration of aerosol particles of three different size ranges. In addition, we measured the concentration of D-limonene, the oxidant, and the concentration of ozone, the oxidizing gas. Based on the measurements we calculated the growth rate of the small aerosol particles, which were 3-10 nm in diameter, to be about 6300nmh-1, and the losses of the aerosol particles that were due to the coagulation and condensation processes. From these, we further approximated the concentration of the condensable vapour and its source rate and then calculated the formation rate of the small aerosol particles. For the final result, we calculated the nucleation rate and the maximum number of molecules in a critical cluster. The nucleation rate was in the order of 105cm-3s-1 and the number of molecules in a critical-sized cluster became 1.2. The results were in agreement with the activation theory.

  2. Comparison between CARIBIC Aerosol Samples Analysed by Accelerator-Based Methods and Optical Particle Counter Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, B. G.; Friberg, J.; Andersson, S. M.; Weigelt, A.; Hermann, M.; Assmann, D.; Voigtländer, J.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; van Velthoven, P. J. F.; Zahn, A.

    2014-08-01

    Inter-comparison of results from two kinds of aerosol systems in the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on a Instrument Container) passenger aircraft based observatory, operating during intercontinental flights at 9-12 km altitude, is presented. Aerosol from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS), the extra-tropical upper troposphere (UT) and the tropical mid troposphere (MT) were investigated. Aerosol particle volume concentration measured with an optical particle counter (OPC) is compared with analytical results of the sum of masses of all major and several minor constituents from aerosol samples collected with an impactor. Analyses were undertaken with the following accelerator-based methods: particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and particle elastic scattering analysis (PESA). Data from 48 flights during 1 year are used, leading to a total of 106 individual comparisons. The ratios of the particle volume from the OPC and the total mass from the analyses were in 84% within a relatively narrow interval. Data points outside this interval are connected with inlet-related effects in clouds, large variability in aerosol composition, particle size distribution effects and some cases of non-ideal sampling. Overall, the comparison of these two CARIBIC measurements based on vastly different methods show good agreement, implying that the chemical and size information can be combined in studies of the MT/UT/LMS aerosol.

  3. Comparison between CARIBIC aerosol samples analysed by accelerator-based methods and optical particle counter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, B. G.; Friberg, J.; Andersson, S. M.; Weigelt, A.; Hermann, M.; Assmann, D.; Voigtländer, J.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; van Velthoven, P. J. F.; Zahn, A.

    2014-04-01

    Inter-comparison of results from two kinds of aerosol systems in the CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) passenger aircraft based observatory, operating during intercontinental flights at 9-12 km altitude, is presented. Aerosol from the lowermost stratosphere (LMS), the extra-tropical upper troposphere (UT) and the tropical mid troposphere (MT) were investigated. Aerosol particle volume concentration measured with an optical particle counter (OPC) is compared with analytical results of the sum of masses of all major and several minor constituents from aerosol samples collected with an impactor. Analyses were undertaken with accelerator-based methods particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and particle elastic scattering analysis (PESA). Data from 48 flights during one year are used, leading to a total of 106 individual comparisons. The ratios of the particle volume from the OPC and the total mass from the analyses were in 84% within a relatively narrow interval. Data points outside this interval are connected with inlet-related effects in clouds, large variability in aerosol composition, particle size distribution effects and some cases of non-ideal sampling. Overall, the comparison of these two CARIBIC measurements based on vastly different methods show good agreement, implying that the chemical and size information can be combined in studies of the MT/UT/LMS aerosol.

  4. Microspectroscopic Analysis of Anthropogenic- and Biogenic-Influenced Aerosol Particles during the SOAS Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Bondy, A. L.; Nhliziyo, M. V.; Bertman, S. B.; Pratt, K.; Shepson, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    During the summer, the southeastern United States experiences a cooling haze due to the interaction of anthropogenic and biogenic aerosol sources. An objective of the summer 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) was to improve our understanding of how trace gases and aerosols are contributing to this relative cooling through light scattering and absorption. To improve understanding of biogenic-anthropogenic interactions through secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation on primary aerosol cores requires detailed physicochemical characterization of the particles after uptake and processing. Our measurements focus on single particle analysis of aerosols in the accumulation mode (300-1000 nm) collected using a multi orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI) at the Centreville, Alabama SEARCH site. Particles were characterized using an array of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, including: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and Raman microspectroscopy. These analyses provide detailed information on particle size, morphology, elemental composition, and functional groups. This information is combined with mapping capabilities to explore individual particle spatial patterns and how that impacts structural characteristics. The improved understanding will be used to explore how sources and processing (such as SOA coating of soot) change particle structure (i.e. core shell) and how the altered optical properties impact air quality/climate effects on a regional scale.

  5. Aerosolization, Chemical Characterization, Hygroscopicity and Ice Formation of Marine Biogenic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The oceans cover the majority of the earth's surface, host nearly half the total global primary productivity and are a major source of atmospheric aerosol particles. However, effects of biological activity on sea spray generation and composition, and subsequent cloud formation are not well understood. Our goal is to elucidate these effects which will be particularly important over nutrient rich seas, where microorganisms can reach concentrations of 10^9 per mL and along with transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) can become aerosolized. Here we report the results of mesocosm experiments in which bubbles were generated by two methods, either recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits, in natural or artificial seawater containing bacteria and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus. Over time we followed the size distribution of aerosolized particles as well as their hygroscopicity, heterogeneous ice nucleation potential, and individual physical-chemical characteristics. Numbers of cells and the mass of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), TEP (which includes polysaccharide-containing microgels and nanogels >0.4 μm in diameter) were determined in the bulk water, the surface microlayer, and aerosolized material. Aerosolized particles were also impacted onto substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, elemental analysis using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), and determination of carbon bonding with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Regardless of bubble generation method, the overall concentration of aerosol particles, TEP, POC and DOC increased as concentrations of bacterial and phytoplankton cells increased, stabilized, and subsequently declined. Particles <100 nm generated by means of jets

  6. Observations of aerosol light scattering, absorption, and particle morphology changes as a function of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Lewis, K.; Paredes-Miranda, G.; Winter, S.; Day, D.; Chakrabarty, R.; Moosmuller, H.; Jimenez, J. L.; Ulbrich, I.; Huffman, A.; Onasch, T.; Trimborn, A.; Kreidenweis, S.; Carrico, C.; Wold, C.; Lincoln, E.; Freeborn, P.; Hao, W.; McMeeking, G.

    2006-12-01

    A very interesting case of smoke aerosol with very low single scattering albedo, yet very large hygroscopic growth for scattering is presented. Several samples of chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum), a common and often dominant species in California chaparral, were recently burned at the USFS Fire Science Laboratory in Missoula Montana, and aerosol optics and chemistry were observed, along with humidity-dependent light scattering, absorption, and particle morphology. Photoacoustic measurements of light absorption by two instruments at 870 nm, one on the dry channel, one on the humidified channel, showed strong reduction of aerosol light absorption with RH above 65 percent, and yet a strong increase in light scattering was observed both at 870 nm and 550 nm with nephelometers. Multispectral measurements of aerosol light absorption indicated an Angstrom coefficient for absorption near unity for the aerosols from chamise combustion. It is argued that the hygroscopic growth of scattering is due to uptake of water by the sulfur bearing aerosol. Furthermore, the reduction of aerosol light absorption is argued to be due to the collapse of chain aggregate aerosol as the RH increases wherein the interior of aerosol does no longer contribute to absorption. Implications for biomass burning in general are that humidity processing of aerosols from this source and others like it tends to substantially increase its single scattering albedo, probably in a non-reversible manner. The chemical pathway to hygroscopicity will be addressed.

  7. The effect of aerosol vertical profiles on satellite-estimated surface particle sulfate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Zifeng; Wang, Jun; Ferrare, Richard A.; Newsom, Rob K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2011-02-15

    The aerosol vertical distribution is an important factor in determining the relationship between satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-level fine particle pollution concentrations. We evaluate how aerosol profiles measured by ground-based lidar and simulated by models can help improve the association between AOD retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and fine particle sulfate (SO4) concentrations using matched data at two lidar sites. At the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site, both lidar and model aerosol profiles marginally improve the association between SO4 concentrations and MISR fractional AODs, as the correlation coefficient between cross-validation (CV) and observed SO4 concentrations changes from 0.87 for the no-scaling model to 0.88 for models scaled with aerosol vertical profiles. At the GSFC site, a large amount of urban aerosols resides in the well-mixed boundary layer so the column fractional AODs are already excellent indicators of ground-level particle pollution. In contrast, at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site with relatively low aerosol loadings, scaling substantially improves model performance. The correlation coefficient between CV and observed SO4 concentrations is increased from 0.58 for the no-scaling model to 0.76 in the GEOS-Chem scaling model, and the model bias is reduced from 17% to 9%. In summary, despite the inaccuracy due to the coarse horizontal resolution and the challenges of simulating turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, GEOS-Chem simulated aerosol profiles can still improve methods for estimating surface aerosol (SO4) mass from satellite-based AODs, particularly in rural areas where aerosols in the free troposphere and any long-range transport of aerosols can significantly contribute to the column AOD.

  8. Transmission electron microscopy study of aerosol particles from the brown hazes in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijun; Shao, Longyi

    2009-05-01

    Airborne aerosol collections were performed in urban areas of Beijing that were affected by regional brown haze episodes over northern China from 31 May to 12 June 2007. Morphologies, elemental compositions, and mixing states of 810 individual aerosol particles of different sizes were obtained by transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The phases of some particles were verified using selected-area electron diffraction. Aerosol particle types less than 10 μm in diameter include mineral, complex secondary (Ca-S, K-, and S-rich), organic, soot, fly ash, and metal (Fe-rich and Zn-bearing). Most soot, fly ash, and organic particles are less than 2 μm in diameter. Approximately 84% of the analyzed mineral particles have diameters between 2 and 10 μm, while 81% of the analyzed complex secondary and metal particles are much smaller, from 0.1 to 2 μm. Trajectory analysis with fire maps show that southerly air masses arriving at Beijing have been transported through many agricultural biomass burning sites and heavy industrial areas. Spherical fly ash and Fe-rich particles were from industrial emissions, and abundant K-rich and organic particles likely originated from field burning of crop residues. Abundant Zn-bearing particles are associated with industrial activities and local waste incinerators. On the basis of the detailed analysis of 443 analyzed aerosol particles, about 70% of these particles are internally mixed with two or more aerosol components from different sources. Most mineral particles are covered with visible coatings that contain N, O, Ca (or Mg), minor S, and Cl. K- and S-rich particles tend to be coagulated with fly ash, soot, metal, and fine-grained mineral particles. Organic materials internally mixed with K- and S-rich particles can be their inclusions and coatings.

  9. Single-particle measurements of phase partitioning between primary and secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ellis Shipley; Donahue, Neil M; Ahern, Adam T; Ye, Qing; Lipsky, Eric

    2016-07-18

    Organic aerosols provide a measure of complexity in the urban atmosphere. This is because the aerosols start as an external mixture, with many populations from varied local sources, that all interact with each other, with background aerosols, and with condensing vapors from secondary organic aerosol formation. The externally mixed particle populations start to evolve immediately after emission because the organic molecules constituting the particles also form thermodynamic mixtures - solutions - in which a large fraction of the constituents are semi-volatile. The external mixtures are thus well out of thermodynamic equilibrium, with very different activities for many constituents, and yet also have the capacity to relax toward equilibrium via gas-phase exchange of semi-volatile vapors. Here we describe experiments employing quantitative single-particle mass spectrometry designed to explore the extent to which various primary organic aerosol particle populations can interact with each other or with secondary organic aerosols representative of background aerosol populations. These methods allow us to determine when these populations will and when they will not mix with each other, and then to constrain the timescales for that mixing. PMID:27092377

  10. A study of the performance of different acidic aerosol samplers and the characteristics of acidic aerosols in Hsinchu Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.J.; Perng, S.B.; Chiou, S.F.; Lin, T.Y.

    1999-07-01

    An annular denuder system (ADS), a honeycomb denuder system (HDS) and a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) were used to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics of acidic aerosols in Hsinchu Taiwan. The performances of different denuder samplers were also compared. The concentrations (in {mu}g/m{sup 3}) of major ionic species: H{sup +}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} are found to average 0.019{+-}0.01 (std. dev.) (range: 0.00--0.02), 7.60{+-}5.08 (range: 1.37--16.54), 7.67{+-}5.50 (range: 1.18--21.58) and 5.27{+-}2.90 (range: 1.14--9.42), as measured by the ADS, respectively. Aerosol acidity is not severe compared to urban cities in other countries, due to neutralization of aerosol acidity by ammonia in Hsinchu. The results indicate that the size distributions of H{sup +} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} are in the single mode while those of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} are found to be mainly bimodal. The ions such as SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and H{sup +} are dominant in the fine mode, while ions such as Cl{sup {minus}}, Na{sup +} and K{sup +} are found to be in both fine and coarse modes. Comparing two different denuder samplers, the average concentration of HNO{sub 3} measured by the HDS is found to be 40% higher than that of the ADS while the average concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and Cl{sup {minus}} measured by the ADS are higher than those of the HDS by 12% and 14%, respectively. The concentrations of other species are found to be similar in both denuder samplers.

  11. Atmospheric oxidation of isoprene and 1,3-butadiene: influence of aerosol acidity and relative humidity on secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, M.; Jaoui, M.; Offenberg, J. H.; Krug, J. D.; Kleindienst, T. E.

    2015-04-01

    The effects of acidic seed aerosols on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have been examined in a number of previous studies, several of which have observed strong linear correlations between the aerosol acidity (measured as nmol H+ m-3 air sample volume) and the percent change in secondary organic carbon (SOC). The measurements have used several precursor compounds representative of different classes of biogenic hydrocarbons including isoprene, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes. To date, isoprene has displayed the most pronounced increase in SOC, although few measurements have been conducted with anthropogenic hydrocarbons. In the present study, we examine several aspects of the effect of aerosol acidity on the secondary organic carbon formation from the photooxidation of 1,3-butadiene, and extend the previous analysis of isoprene. The photooxidation products measured in the absence and presence of acidic sulfate aerosols were generated either through photochemical oxidation of SO2 or by nebulizing mixtures of ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid into a 14.5 m3 smog chamber system. The results showed that, like isoprene and β-caryophyllene, 1,3-butadiene SOC yields linearly correlate with increasing acidic sulfate aerosol. The observed acid sensitivity of 0.11% SOC increase per nmol m-3 increase in H+ was approximately a factor of 3 less than that measured for isoprene. The results also showed that the aerosol yield decreased with increasing humidity for both isoprene and 1,3-butadiene, although to different degrees. Increasing the absolute humidity from 2 to 12 g m-3 reduced the 1,3-butadiene yield by 45% and the isoprene yield by 85%.

  12. Metal and Silicate Particles Including Nanoparticles Are Present in Electronic Cigarette Cartomizer Fluid and Aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Monique; Villarreal, Amanda; Bozhilov, Krassimir; Lin, Sabrina; Talbot, Prue

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic cigarettes (EC) deliver aerosol by heating fluid containing nicotine. Cartomizer EC combine the fluid chamber and heating element in a single unit. Because EC do not burn tobacco, they may be safer than conventional cigarettes. Their use is rapidly increasing worldwide with little prior testing of their aerosol. Objectives We tested the hypothesis that EC aerosol contains metals derived from various components in EC. Methods Cartomizer contents and aerosols were analyzed using light and electron microscopy, cytotoxicity testing, x-ray microanalysis, particle counting, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Results The filament, a nickel-chromium wire, was coupled to a thicker copper wire coated with silver. The silver coating was sometimes missing. Four tin solder joints attached the wires to each other and coupled the copper/silver wire to the air tube and mouthpiece. All cartomizers had evidence of use before packaging (burn spots on the fibers and electrophoretic movement of fluid in the fibers). Fibers in two cartomizers had green deposits that contained copper. Centrifugation of the fibers produced large pellets containing tin. Tin particles and tin whiskers were identified in cartridge fluid and outer fibers. Cartomizer fluid with tin particles was cytotoxic in assays using human pulmonary fibroblasts. The aerosol contained particles >1 µm comprised of tin, silver, iron, nickel, aluminum, and silicate and nanoparticles (<100 nm) of tin, chromium and nickel. The concentrations of nine of eleven elements in EC aerosol were higher than or equal to the corresponding concentrations in conventional cigarette smoke. Many of the elements identified in EC aerosol are known to cause respiratory distress and disease. Conclusions The presence of metal and silicate particles in cartomizer aerosol demonstrates the need for improved quality control in EC design and manufacture and studies on how EC aerosol impacts the health of

  13. Size Resolved Measurements of Springtime Aerosol Particles over the Northern South China Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Samuel A.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Cliff, Stephen S.; Zhao, Yongjing; Lin, Neng-Huei; Tsay, Si-Chee; Chu, Yu-Chi; Westphal, Douglas L.

    2012-01-01

    Large sources of aerosol particles and their precursors are ubiquitous in East Asia. Such sources are known to impact the South China Sea (henceforth SCS), a sometimes heavily polluted region that has been suggested as particularly vulnerable to climate change. To help elucidate springtime aerosol transport into the SCS, an intensive study was performed on the remote Dongsha (aka Pratas) Islands Atoll in spring 2010. As part of this deployment, a Davis Rotating-drum Uniform size-cut Monitor (DRUM) cascade impactor was deployed to collect size-resolved aerosol samples at the surface that were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence for concentrations of selected elements. HYSPLIT backtrajectories indicated that the transport of aerosol observed at the surface at Dongsha was occurring primarily from regions generally to the north and east. This observation was consistent with the apparent persistence of pollution and dust aerosol, along with sea salt, in the ground-based dataset. In contrast to the sea-level observations, modeled aerosol transport suggested that the westerly flow aloft (w700 hPa) transported smoke-laden air toward the site from regions from the south and west. Measured aerosol optical depth at the site was highest during time periods of modeled heavy smoke loadings aloft. These periods did not coincide with elevated aerosol concentrations at the surface, although the model suggested sporadic mixing of this free-tropospheric aerosol to the surface over the SCS. A biomass burning signature was not clearly identified in the surface aerosol composition data, consistent with this aerosol type remaining primarily aloft and not mixing strongly to the surface during the study. Significant vertical wind shear in the region also supports the idea that different source regions lead to varying aerosol impacts in different vertical layers, and suggests the potential for considerable vertical inhomogeneity in the SCS aerosol environment.

  14. Contrasting the Evaporation and Condensation of Water from Glassy and Amorphous Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, J. P.; Bones, D. L.; Power, R.; Lienhard, D.; Krieger, U. K.

    2012-04-01

    The partitioning of water between the condensed and gas phases in atmospheric aerosol is usually assumed to occur instantaneously and to be regulated by solution thermodynamics. However, the persistence of high viscosity, glassy and amorphous aerosol to low relative humidity without crystallisation occurring is now widely recognised, suggesting that the timescale for water transport to or from the particle during condensation or evaporation may be significant. A kinetic limitation on water transport could have important implications for understanding hygroscopic growth measurements made on ambient particles, the ability of particles to act as ice nuclei or cloud condensation nuclei, the kinetics of chemical aging/heterogeneous chemistry, and the rate or condensation/evaporation of semi-volatile organic components. In this study we will report on measurements of the timescale of water transport to and from glassy aerosol and ultra-high viscosity solution droplets using aerosol optical tweezers to investigate the time-response of single particles to changes in relative humidity. As a benchmark system, mixed component aerosol particles containing sucrose and sodium chloride have been used; varying the mole fractions of the two solutes allows a wide range of solution viscosities to be studied. We will show that coarse particles can take many thousands of seconds to equilibrate in size and that the timescale correlates with the estimated bulk viscosity of the particle. We will also confirm that significant inhomogeneities in particle composition can be established during evaporation or condensation. Using the experimental data to benchmark a model for equilibration time, predictions can be made of the timescale for the equilibration of accumulation mode particles during water condensation or evaporation and these predictions will be described and their significance explored. Finally, the coalescence dynamics of highly viscous aerosol particles will be reported

  15. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols II: particle size distributions as a function of time.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L; Guilmette, Raymond A; Parkhurst, Mary Ann

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, which generated and characterized aerosols containing DU from perforation of armored vehicles with large-caliber DU penetrators, incorporated a sampling protocol to evaluate particle size distributions. Aerosol particle size distribution is an important parameter that influences aerosol transport and deposition processes as well as the dosimetry of the inhaled particles. These aerosols were collected on cascade impactor substrates using a pre-established time sequence following the firing event to analyze the uranium concentration and particle size of the aerosols as a function of time. The impactor substrates were analyzed using proportional counting, and the derived uranium content of each served as input to the evaluation of particle size distributions. Activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMADs) of the particle size distributions were evaluated using unimodal and bimodal models. The particle size data from the impactor measurements were quite variable. Most size distributions measured in the test based on activity had bimodal size distributions with a small particle size mode in the range of between 0.2 and 1.2 microm and a large size mode between 2 and 15 microm. In general, the evolution of particle size over time showed an overall decrease of average particle size from AMADs of 5 to 10 microm shortly after perforation to around 1 microm at the end of the 2-h sampling period. The AMADs generally decreased over time because of settling. Additionally, the median diameter of the larger size mode decreased with time. These results were used to estimate the dosimetry of inhaled DU particles. PMID:19204485

  16. Bimodal Distribution of Sulfuric Acid Aerosols in the Atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Zhang, X.; Crisp, D.; Bardeen, C. G.; Yung, Y. L.

    2013-10-01

    Observations by the SPICAV/SOIR instruments aboard Venus Express have revealed that the upper haze of Venus, between 70 and 90 km, is variable on the order of days and that it is populated by two particle modes. In this work, we posit that the observed phenomena are caused by the transient mixing of the clouds and the haze, as well as another source of sulfuric acid aerosols in the upper haze that nucleate on meteoric dust. We test this hypothesis by simulating a column of the Venus atmosphere from 40 to 100 km above the surface using a model based upon the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres and consider the effects of meteoric dust and polysulfur acting as condensation nuclei in the upper haze and upper cloud, respectively, as well as transient winds at the cloud tops caused by subsolar convection. Our aerosol number density results are consistent with Pioneer Venus data from Knollenberg and Hunten (1980), while our gas distribution results match the Magellan radio occultation data as analyzed by Kolodner and Steffes (1998) below 55 km. The size distribution of cloud particles shows two distinct modes in the upper clouds region and three distinct modes in the middle and lower clouds regions, qualitatively matching the observations of Pioneer Venus. The UH size distribution shows one distinct mode that is likely an upwelled cloud particle population with which an in situ meteoric dust condensation particle population has coagulated. The results of the transient wind simulations yield a variability timescale that is consistent with Venus Express observations, as well as a clear bimodal size distribution in the UH.

  17. Spatial and temporal patterns in sulfate aerosol acidity and neutralization within a metropolitan area

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, J.M.; Lloy, P.J. ); Thurston, G.D.; Lippmann, M. )

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric acidity are relatively new and not routine. The influences and variability due to local phenomena have not been investigated heretofore. As part of a U.S. EPA-sponsored air pollution-health effects study in metropolitan Toronto (population 2.3 million), aerosol acidity was monitored at three sites. This study is discussed in the book. The primary objective was to document human exposures to acidic aerosol during the study period. Because of its chemical reactivity, it was not known whether substantial variations in acidic aerosol concentrations would be found within the subregion (area 60 km{sup 2}). A network of three acidic aerosol monitoring sites was used. Hence, this study design offered the first opportunity to compare spatial and temporal patterns of acidic aerosol levels within a large, receptor region.

  18. Heterogeneous atmospheric reactions - Sulfuric acid aerosols as tropospheric sinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, A. C.; Golden, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The reaction probabilities of various atmospheric species incident on a bulk sulfuric acid surface are measured in order to determine the role of sulfuric acid aerosols as pollutant sinks. Reaction products and unreacted starting materials leaving a Knudsen cell flow reactor after collision at 300 K with a H2SO4 surface or a soot surface were detected by mass spectrometry. Significant collision reaction probabilities are observed on a H2SO4 surface for H2O2, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, N2O5, H2O and NH3, and on soot for NH3. Estimates of the contribution of heterogeneous reactions to pollutant removal under atmospheric conditions indicate that while aerosol removal in the stratosphere is insignificant (loss rate constants approximately 10 to the -10th/sec), heterogeneous reactions may be the dominant loss process for several tropospheric species (loss rate constant approximately 10 to the -5th/sec, comparable to photolysis rate constants).

  19. Low-temperature Bessel beam trap for single submicrometer aerosol particle studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jessica W.; Chasovskikh, Egor; Stapfer, David; Isenor, Merrill; Signorell, Ruth

    2014-09-01

    We report on a new instrument for single aerosol particle studies at low temperatures that combines an optical trap consisting of two counter-propagating Bessel beams (CPBBs) and temperature control down to 223 K (−50 °C). The apparatus is capable of capturing and stably trapping individual submicrometer- to micrometer-sized aerosol particles for up to several hours. First results from studies of hexadecane, dodecane, and water aerosols reveal that we can trap and freeze supercooled droplets ranging in size from ∼450 nm to 5500 nm (radius). We have conducted homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing experiments, freezing-melting cycles, and evaporation studies. To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of the freezing process for levitated single submicrometer-sized droplets in air using optical trapping techniques. These results show that a temperature-controlled CPBB trap is an attractive new method for studying phase transitions of individual submicrometer aerosol particles.

  20. Single Particle Fluorescence & Mass Spectrometry for the Detection of Biological Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Coffee, K; Riot, V; Woods, B; Steele, P; Gard, E E

    2005-04-25

    Biological Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) is an emerging technique for the detection of biological aerosols, which is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The current system uses several orthogonal analytical methods to improve system selectivity, sensitivity and speed in order to maximize its utility as a biological aerosol detection system with extremely low probability of false alarm and high probability of detection. Our approach is to pre-select particles of interest by size and fluorescence prior to mass spectral analysis. The ability to distinguish biological aerosols from background and to discriminate bacterial spores, vegetative cells, viruses and toxins from one another will be shown. Data from particle standards of known chemical composition will be discussed. Analysis of ambient particles will also be presented.

  1. Low-temperature Bessel beam trap for single submicrometer aerosol particle studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jessica W.; Isenor, Merrill; Chasovskikh, Egor; Stapfer, David; Signorell, Ruth

    2014-09-01

    We report on a new instrument for single aerosol particle studies at low temperatures that combines an optical trap consisting of two counter-propagating Bessel beams (CPBBs) and temperature control down to 223 K (-50 °C). The apparatus is capable of capturing and stably trapping individual submicrometer- to micrometer-sized aerosol particles for up to several hours. First results from studies of hexadecane, dodecane, and water aerosols reveal that we can trap and freeze supercooled droplets ranging in size from ˜450 nm to 5500 nm (radius). We have conducted homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing experiments, freezing-melting cycles, and evaporation studies. To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of the freezing process for levitated single submicrometer-sized droplets in air using optical trapping techniques. These results show that a temperature-controlled CPBB trap is an attractive new method for studying phase transitions of individual submicrometer aerosol particles.

  2. Light absorption by secondary organic aerosol from α-pinene: Effects of oxidants, seed aerosol acidity, and relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chen; Gyawali, Madhu; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shilling, John E.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    2013-10-25

    It is well known that light absorption from dust and black carbon aerosols has a warming effect on climate while light scattering from sulfate, nitrate, and sea salt aerosols has a cooling effect. However, there are large uncertainties associated with light absorption and scattering by different types of organic aerosols, especially in the near-UV and UV spectral regions. In this paper, we present the results from a systematic laboratory study focused on measuring light absorption by secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated from dark α-pinene + O3 and α-pinene + NOx + O3 systems in the presence of neutral and acidic sulfate seed aerosols. Light absorption was monitored using photoacoustic spectrometers at four different wavelengths: 355, 405, 532, and 870 nm. Significant light absorption at 355 and 405 nm was observed for the SOA formed from α-pinene + O3 + NO3 system only in the presence of highly acidic sulfate seed aerosols under dry conditions. In contrast, no absorption was observed when the relative humidity was elevated to greater than 27% or in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols. Organic nitrates in the SOA formed in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols were found to be nonabsorbing, while the light-absorbing compounds are speculated to be aldol condensation oligomers with nitroxy organosulfate groups that are formed in highly acidic sulfate aerosols. Finally and overall, these results suggest that dark α-pinene + O3 and α-pinene + NOx + O3 systems do not form light-absorbing SOA under typical atmospheric conditions.

  3. Light absorption by secondary organic aerosol from α-pinene: Effects of oxidants, seed aerosol acidity, and relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chen; Gyawali, Madhu; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shilling, John E.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    2013-10-01

    is well known that light absorption from dust and black carbon aerosols has a warming effect on climate while light scattering from sulfate, nitrate, and sea salt aerosols has a cooling effect. However, there are large uncertainties associated with light absorption and scattering by different types of organic aerosols, especially in the near-UV and UV spectral regions. In this paper, we present the results from a systematic laboratory study focused on measuring light absorption by secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated from dark α-pinene + O3 and α-pinene + NOx + O3 systems in the presence of neutral and acidic sulfate seed aerosols. Light absorption was monitored using photoacoustic spectrometers at four different wavelengths: 355, 405, 532, and 870 nm. Significant light absorption at 355 and 405 nm was observed for the SOA formed from α-pinene + O3 + NO3 system only in the presence of highly acidic sulfate seed aerosols under dry conditions. In contrast, no absorption was observed when the relative humidity was elevated to greater than 27% or in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols. Organic nitrates in the SOA formed in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols were found to be nonabsorbing, while the light-absorbing compounds are speculated to be aldol condensation oligomers with nitroxy organosulfate groups that are formed in highly acidic sulfate aerosols. Overall, these results suggest that dark α-pinene + O3 and α-pinene + NOx + O3 systems do not form light-absorbing SOA under typical atmospheric conditions.

  4. Particle Characterization and Ice Nucleation Efficiency of Field-Collected Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Gilles, M. K.; Laskin, A.; Moffet, R.; Nizkorodov, S.; Roedel, T.; Sterckx, L.; Tivanski, A.; Knopf, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation by heterogeneous nucleation is one of the least understood processes resulting in cirrus and mixed-phase clouds which affect the global radiation budget, the hydrological cycle, and water vapor distribution. In particular, how organic aerosol affect ice nucleation is not well understood. Here we report on heterogeneous ice nucleation from particles collected during the CalNex campaign at the Caltech campus site, Pasadena, on May 19, 2010 at 6am-12pm (A2) and 12pm-6pm (A3) and May 23 at 6am-12pm (B2) and 6pm-12am (B4). The ice nucleation onsets and water uptake were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). The ice nucleation efficiency was related to the particle chemical composition. Single particle characterization was provided by using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The STXM/NEXAFS analysis indicates that the morning sample (A2) constitutes organic particles and organic particles with soot and inorganic inclusions. The afternoon sample (A3) is dominated by organic particles with a potentially higher degree of oxidation associated with soot. The B2 sample shows a higher number fraction of magnesium-containing particle indicative of a marine source and ~93% of the particles contained sulfur besides oxygen and carbon as derived from CCSEM/EDX analysis. The B4 sample lacks the strong marine influence and shows higher organic content. Above 230 K, we observed water uptake followed by condensation freezing at mean RH of 93-100% and 89-95% for A2 and A3, respectively. This indicates that the aged A3 particles are efficient ice nuclei (IN) for condensation freezing. Below 230 K A2 and A3 induced deposition ice nucleation between 125-155% RHice (at mean values of 134-150% RHice). The B2 and B4

  5. Bimodal distribution of sulfuric acid aerosols in the upper haze of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Zhang, Xi; Crisp, David; Bardeen, Charles G.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2014-03-01

    Observations by the SPICAV/SOIR instruments aboard Venus Express have revealed that the upper haze (UH) of Venus, between 70 and 90 km, is variable on the order of days and that it is populated by two particle modes. We use a one-dimensional microphysics and vertical transport model based on the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres to evaluate whether interaction of upwelled cloud particles and sulfuric acid particles nucleated in situ on meteoric dust are able to generate the two observed modes, and whether their observed variability are due in part to the action of vertical transient winds at the cloud tops. Nucleation of photochemically produced sulfuric acid onto polysulfur condensation nuclei generates mode 1 cloud droplets, which then diffuse upwards into the UH. Droplets generated in the UH from nucleation of sulfuric acid onto meteoric dust coagulate with the upwelled cloud particles and therefore cannot reproduce the observed bimodal size distribution. By comparison, the mass transport enabled by transient winds at the cloud tops, possibly caused by sustained subsolar cloud top convection, are able to generate a bimodal size distribution in a time scale consistent with Venus Express observations. Below the altitude where the cloud particles are generated, sedimentation and vigorous convection causes the formation of large mode 2 and mode 3 particles in the middle and lower clouds. Evaporation of the particles below the clouds causes a local sulfuric acid vapor maximum that results in upwelling of sulfuric acid back into the clouds. In the case where the polysulfur condensation nuclei are small and their production rate is high, coagulation of small droplets onto larger droplets in the middle cloud may set up an oscillation in the size modes of the particles such that precipitation of sulfuric acid “rain” may be possible immediately below the clouds once every few Earth months. Reduction of the polysulfur condensation nuclei production

  6. Modeling of microphysics and optics of aerosol particles in the marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloshin, Gennady

    2013-05-01

    We present a microphysical model for the surface layer marine and coastal atmospheric aerosols that is based on long-term observations of size distributions for 0.01-100 μm particles. The fundamental feature of the model is a parameterization of amplitudes and widths for aerosol modes of the aerosol size distribution function (ASDF) as functions of fetch and wind speed. The shape of ASDF and its dependence on meteorological parameters, height above sea level (H), fetch (X), wind speed (U) and relative humidity (RH), are investigated. At present, the model covers the ranges H = 0 - 25 m, U = 3 - 18 km s-1, X ≤ 120 km and RH = 40 - 98%. The latest version of the Marine Aerosol Extinction Profiles model (MaexPro) is described and applied for the computation and analysis of the spectral profiles of aerosol extinction coefficients α(λ) in the wavelength band λ = 0.2-12 μm. MaexPro is based on the aforementioned aerosol model assuming spherically shaped aerosol particles and the well-known Mie theory. The spectral profiles of α(λ) calculated by MaexPro are in good agreement with observational data and the numerical results. Moreover, MaexPro was found to be an accurate and reliable tool for investigating the optical properties of atmospheric aerosols.

  7. Middle East measurements of concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles for coastal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendersky, Sergey; Kopeika, Norman S.; Blaunstein, Natan S.

    2005-10-01

    Recently, an extension of the Navy Aerosol Model (NAM) was proposed based on analysis of an extensive series of measurements at the Irish Atlantic Coast and at the French Mediterranean Coast. We confirm the relevance of that work for the distant eastern Meditteranean and extend several coefficients of that coastal model, proposed by Piazzola et al. for the Meditteranean Coast (a form of the Navy Aerosol Model), to midland Middle East coastal environments. This analysis is based on data collected at three different Middle East coastal areas: the Negev Desert (Eilat) Red Sea Coast, the Sea of Galilee (Tiberias) Coast, and the Mediterranean (Haifa) Coast. Aerosol size distributions are compared with those obtained through measurements carried out over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean Coasts, and Mediterranean, and Baltic Seas Coasts. An analysis of these different results allows better understanding of the similarities and differences between different coastal lake, sea, and open ocean zones. It is shown that in the coastal regions in Israel, compared to open ocean and other sea zones, larger differences in aerosol particle concentration are observed. The aerosol particle concentrations and their dependences on wind speed for these coastal zones are analyzed and discussed. We propose to classify the aerosol distribution models to either: 1. a coastal model with marine aerosol domination; 2. a coastal model with continental aerosol domination (referred to as midland coast in this work); or 3. a coastal model with balanced marine and continental conditions.

  8. Prospects of real-time single-particle biological aerosol analysis: A comparison between laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddows, D. C. S.; Telle, H. H.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper we discuss the prospects of real-time, in situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy applied for the identification and classification of bio-aerosols (including species of potential bio-hazard) within common urban aerosol mixtures. In particular, we address the issues associated with the picking out of bio-aerosols against common background aerosol particles, comparing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements with data from a mobile single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (ATOFMS). The data from the latter provide statistical data over an extended period of time, highlighting the variation of the background composition. While single-particle bio-aerosols are detectable in principle, potential problems with small (˜ 1 μm size) bio-aerosols have been identified; constituents of the air mass other than background aerosols, e.g. gaseous CO 2 in conjunction with common background aerosols, may prevent unique recognition of the bio-particles. We discuss whether it is likely that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy on its own can provide reliable, real-time identification of bio-aerosol in an urban environment, and it is suggested that more than one technique should be or would have to be used. A case for using a combination of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and Raman (and/or) laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy is made.

  9. Hygroscopic growth of urban aerosol particles during the 2009 Mirage-Shanghai Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xingnan; Tang, Chen; Yin, Zi; Chen, Jianmin; Ma, Zhen; Kong, Lingdong; Yang, Xin; Gao, Wei; Geng, Fuhai

    2013-01-01

    The hygroscopic properties of submicrometer urban aerosol particles were studied during the 2009 Mirage-Shanghai Campaign. The urban aerosols were composed of more-hygroscopic and nearly-hydrophobic particles, together with a trace of less-hygroscopic particles. The mean hygroscopicity parameter κ of the more-hygroscopic mode varied in the range of 0.27-0.39 depending on particle size. The relative abundance of the more-hygroscopic particles at any size was ca. 70%, slightly increasing with particle size. The number fraction of the nearly-hydrophobic particles fluctuated between 0.1 and 0.4 daily, in accordance with traffic emissions and atmospheric diffusion. The results from relative humidity dependence on hygroscopic growth and chemical analysis of fine particles indicated that particulate nitrate formation through the homogenous gas-phase reaction was suppressed under ammonia-deficient atmosphere in summer whereas the equilibrium was broken by more available NH3 during adverse meteorological conditions.

  10. Direct observation of aerosol particles in aged agricultural biomass burning plumes impacting urban atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. Y.; Shao, L. Y.

    2010-04-01

    Emissions from agricultural biomass burning (ABB) in northern China have a significant impact on the regional and the global climate. According to the Giovanni's Aerosol optical depth (AOD) map, the monthly average AOD at 550 nm in northern China in 2007 shows a maximum value of 0.7 in June, suggesting that episodes of severe aerosol pollution occurred in this region. Aerosol particles were collected in urban Beijing during regional brown hazes from 12 to 30 June, 2007. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry characterized the morphology, composition, and mixing state of aerosol particles. Potassium salts (K2SO4 and KNO3), ammonium sulfate, soot, and organic particles predominated in fine particles (diameter <1 μm) collected from 12 to 20 June, 2007. In contrast, from 21 to 30 June, 2007, ammonium sulfate, soot, and organic particles were dominant. Potassium-dominant particles as a tracer of biomass burning, together with wildfire maps, show that intensive regional ABB in northern China from 10 to 20 June, 2007 contributed significantly to the regional haze. After long-range transport, ABB particles exhibited marked changes in their morphology, elemental composition, and mixing state. Heterogeneous reactions completely converted KCl particles from ABB into K2SO4 and KNO3. Soot particles were generally mixed with potassium salts, ammonium salts, and organic particles. In addition, the abundant aged organic particles and soluble salts emitted by ABB become more hygroscopic and increase their size during long-range transport, becoming in effect additional cloud condensation nuclei. The high AOD (average value at 2.2) during 12 to 20 June, 2007, in Beijing is partly explained by the hygroscopic growth of aged fine aerosol particles and by the strong absorption of internally mixed soot particles, both coming from regional ABB emissions.

  11. EFFECTS OF ENDOGENOUS AMMONIA ON NEUTRALIZATION OF INHALED SULFURIC ACID AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nine male beagle dogs were exposed by inhalation to 0, 6 and 10.5 mg/cu.m sulfuric acid aerosols with normal ammonia, increased blood ammonia, and increased inhaled ammonia to determine whether the addition of ammonia affected the toxicity of sulfuric acid aerosols. Exhaled conce...

  12. FIELD METHOD COMPARISON FOR THE CHARACTERIZATION OF ACID AEROSOLS AND GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents findings from two intercomparison studies of acid aerosol measurement systems, which were conducted in Uniontown and State College, PA, during the summers of 1990 and 1991, respectively. s part of these studies, acid aerosol and gas concentrations (NH3, HNO3, ...

  13. Heterogeneous reactions of TiO2 aerosol particles with N2O5 and ClONO2 and their implications for stratospheric particle injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Mingjin; Keeble, James; Telford, Paul; Pope, Francis; Rkiouak, Laylla; Abraham, Luke; Braesicke, Peter; Pyle, John; Mcgregor, James; Watson, Matt; Cox, Tony; Kalberer, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Injection of aerosol particles (or their precursors) into the stratosphere to scatter solar radiation back into space has been suggested as a solar radiation management scheme for climate engineering. Several minerals, including TiO2, have been as possible candidate particles (instead of sulfuric acid) to be injected into the stratosphere, due to their high refractive indices. However, their heterogeneous reactivity towards important reactive trace gases in the stratosphere has seldom been investigated, impeding us from a reliable assessment of their impact on stratospheric O3. In this work, the heterogeneous reactions of airborne TiO2 particles with N2O5 and ClONO2 have been studied at room temperature and at different RH, using an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube. The uptake coefficient of N2O5, γ(N2O5), increased from ~1.8E-3 at 5% RH to 4.5E-3 at ~60% RH for TiO2, significantly smaller than that for sulfuric acid particles in the stratosphere. The uptake of ClONO2 onto TiO2 aerosols particles have been found to be quite inefficient, with γ(ClONO2) not larger than 1E-3. Therefore, compared to stratospheric sulfuric acid particles, TiO2 particles show similar reactivity towards ClONO2 and much less reactivity towards N2O5. The UKCA chemistry-climate model has been used to assess the impact of TiO2 particles on stratospheric chemistry. A few scenarios have been constructed for TiO2 particle injection to have the same radiative effect as the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. We find that the impact of TiO2 injection on stratospheric N2O5 is much smaller than the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The heterogeneous reaction of ClONO2 with TiO2 particles is being included in the model, and a comprehensive assessment of the effect of TiO2 injection on stratospheric chemistry will be presented.

  14. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Yinon; Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven; Haspel, Carynelisa

    2014-05-01

    In cold high altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, ice partciles that are exposed to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. In this talk we will describe experiements that simulate the atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols. We find that aerosols with high organic content can form highly porous particles (HPA) with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogenous aerosol following ice subliation. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure follwoing ice sublimation. We find that the highly porous aerosol scatter solar light less efficiently than non-porous aerosol particles. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  15. Individual particle analysis of aerosols collected under haze and non-haze conditions at a high-elevation mountain site in the North China plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. J.; Zhang, D. Z.; Shao, L. Y.; Zhou, S. Z.; Wang, W. X.

    2011-11-01

    The North China plain is a region with megacities and huge populations. Aerosols over the highly polluted area have a significant impact on the regional and global climate. In order to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosol particles in elevated layers there, observations were carried out at the summit of Mt. Tai (1534 m a.s.l.) from 19 to 28 April, 2010, when the air masses were advected from the east (phase-I: 19-21 April), from the south (phase-II: 22-25 April), and from the northwest (phase-III: 26-28 April). Individual aerosol particles were identified with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), new particle formation (NPF) and growth events were monitored by a wide-range particle spectrometer, and ion concentrations in PM2.5 were analyzed. During phase-I and phase-II, haze layers caused by anthropogenic pollution were observed, and a high percentage of particles were sulfur-rich (47-49%). In phase-III, the haze disappeared due to the intrusion of cold air from the northwest, and mineral dust particles from deserts were dominant (43%). NPF followed by particle growth during daytime was more pronounced on hazy than on clear days. Particle growth during daytime resulted in an increase of particle geometric mean diameter from 10-22 nm in the morning to 56-96 nm in the evening. TEM analysis suggests that sulfuric acid and secondary organic compounds should be important factors for particle nucleation and growth. However, the presence of fine anthropogenic particles (e.g., soot, metal, and fly ash) embedded within S-rich particles indicates that they could weaken NPF and enhance particle growth through condensation and coagulation. Abundant mineral particles in phase-III likely suppressed the NPF processes because they supplied sufficient area on which acidic gases or acids condensed.

  16. Enhanced High-Temperature Ice Nucleation Ability of Crystallized Aerosol Particles after Pre-Activation at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Moehler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.

    2014-12-01

    The term pre-activation in heterogeneous ice nucleation describes the observation that the ice nucleation ability of solid ice nuclei may improve after they have already been involved in ice crystal formation or have been exposed to a temperature lower than 235 K. This can be explained by the retention of small ice embryos in cavities or crevices at the particle surface or by the capillary condensation and freezing of supercooled water, respectively. In recent cloud chamber experiments with crystallized aqueous ammonium sulfate, oxalic acid, and succinic acid solution droplets, we have unraveled a further pre-activation mechanism under ice subsaturated conditions which does not require the preceding growth of ice on the seed aerosol particles (Wagner, R. et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, doi: 10.1002/2014JD021741). First cloud expansion experiments were performed at a high temperature (267 - 244 K) where the crystallized particles did not promote any heterogeneous ice nucleation. Ice nucleation at this temperature, however, could be triggered by temporarily cooling the crystallized particles to a lower temperature. This is because upon crystallization, residuals of the aqueous solution are trapped within the crystals. These captured liquids can freeze when cooled below their respective homogeneous or heterogeneous freezing temperature, leading to the formation of ice pockets in the crystalline particles. When warmed again to the higher temperature, ice formation by the pre-activated particles occurred via depositional and deliquescence-induced ice growth, with ice active fractions ranging from 1 to 4% and 4 to 20%, respectively. Pre-activation disappeared above the eutectic temperature, which for the organic acids are close to the melting point of ice. This mechanism could therefore contribute to the very small fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles that are still ice active well above 263 K.

  17. Fluorescence properties of biochemicals in dry NaCl composite aerosol particles and in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putkiranta, M.; Manninen, A.; Rostedt, A.; Saarela, J.; Sorvajärvi, T.; Marjamäki, M.; Hernberg, R.; Keskinen, J.

    2010-06-01

    Several fluorophores, such as tryptophan, NADH, NADPH, and riboflavin are found in airborne micro-organisms. In this work, the fluorescence properties of these biochemicals were studied both in dry NaCl composite aerosol particles and in saline solutions by means of laser-induced fluorescence. Fluorescence spectra were measured from individual, airborne aerosol particles and from solutions in cuvette. The excitation wavelength was varied in steps from 210 nm to 419 nm and the fluorescence was detected within a wavelength band of 310-670 nm. For each sample, the measured fluorescence emission spectra were combined into fluorescence maps. The fluorescence maximum of riboflavin in a dry NaCl composite particle is 20 nm red-shifted compared with the solution, whereas the maxima are blue-shifted by about 25 nm for tryptophan and 15 nm for NADH and NADPH. The molecular fluorescence cross sections have significant differences between the aerosol particles and the solutions, except for tryptophan. For NADH and NADPH the cross sections are over 20 times larger in the aerosol particles than in the solutions probably as a result of partial quenching of fluorescence in solution caused by the collision or stacking with the adenine moiety. The fluorescence cross section of riboflavin is almost 60 times larger in the solution than in the dry NaCl composite aerosol. This is probably caused by the different microenvironment around the fluorophore molecule and by the concentration quenching in the particles where the fluorescing molecules are relatively close to each other.

  18. [Hygroscopic Properties of Aerosol Particles in North Suburb of Nanjing in Spring].

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zhang, Ze-feng; Li, Yan-weil; Qin, Xin; Miao, Qing; Shen, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol particles have significant effects on spectral distribution, CCN activation, climate forcing, human health and so on. A Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) was utilized to analyze the hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles in the northern suburb of Nanjing during 16 April to 21 May, 2014. At relative humidity (RH) of 90%, for particles with dry diameters 30-230 nm, the probability distribution of GF (GF-PDF) shows a distinct bimodal pattern, with a dominant more-hygroscopic group and a smaller less-hygroscopic group. A contrast analysis between day and night suggests that, aerosol particles during day time have a stronger hygroscopicity and a higher number fraction of more-hygroscopic group than that at night overall. Aerosol particles during night have a higher degree of externally mixed state. Backward trajectory analysis using HYSPLIT mode reveals that, the sampling site is mainly affected by three air masses. For aitken nuclei, northwest continental air masses experience a longer aging process and have a stronger hygroscopicity. For condensation nuclei, east air masses have a stronger hygroscopicity and have a higher number fraction of more-hygroscopic group. Aerosol particles in local air masses have a high number fraction of more-hygroscopic group in the whole diameter range. PMID:26387289

  19. Formation characteristics of aerosol particles from pulverized coal pyrolysis in high-temperature environments

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Hsin Chen; Shan-Wen Du; Hsi-Hsien Yang; Jheng-Syun Wu

    2008-05-15

    The formation characteristics of aerosol particles from pulverized coal pyrolysis in high temperatures are studied experimentally. By conducting a drop-tube furnace, fuel pyrolysis processes in industrial furnaces are simulated in which three different reaction temperatures of 1000, 1200, and 1400{sup o}C are considered. Experimental observations indicate that when the reaction temperature is 1000{sup o}C, submicron particles are produced, whereas the particle size is dominated by nanoscale for the temperature of 1400{sup o}C. Thermogravimetric analysis of the aerosol particles stemming from the pyrolysis temperature of 1000{sup o}C reveals that the thermal behavior of the aerosol is characterized by a three-stage reaction with increasing heating temperature: (1) a volatile-reaction stage, (2) a weak-reaction stage, and (3) a soot-reaction stage. However, with the pyrolysis temperature of 1400{sup o}C, the volatile- and weak-reaction stages almost merge together and evolve into a chemical-frozen stage. The submicron particles (i.e., 1000{sup o}C) are mainly composed of volatiles, tar, and soot, with the main component of the nanoscale particles (i.e., 1400{sup o}C) being soot. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contained in the aerosols are also analyzed. It is found that the PAH content in generated aerosols decreases dramatically as the pyrolysis temperature increases. 31 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Characterization of a Quadrotor Unmanned Aircraft System for Aerosol-Particle-Concentration Measurements.

    PubMed

    Brady, James M; Stokes, M Dale; Bonnardel, Jim; Bertram, Timothy H

    2016-02-01

    High-spatial-resolution, near-surface vertical profiling of atmospheric chemical composition is currently limited by the availability of experimental platforms that can sample in constrained environments. As a result, measurements of near-surface gradients in trace gas and aerosol particle concentrations have been limited to studies conducted from fixed location towers or tethered balloons. Here, we explore the utility of a quadrotor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) as a sampling platform to measure vertical and horizontal concentration gradients of trace gases and aerosol particles at high spatial resolution (1 m) within the mixed layer (0-100 m). A 3D Robotics Iris+ autonomous quadrotor UAS was outfitted with a sensor package consisting of a two-channel aerosol optical particle counter and a CO2 sensor. The UAS demonstrated high precision in both vertical (±0.5 m) and horizontal positions (±1 m), highlighting the potential utility of quadrotor UAS drones for aerosol- and trace-gas measurements within complex terrain, such as the urban environment, forest canopies, and above difficult-to-access areas such as breaking surf. Vertical profiles of aerosol particle number concentrations, acquired from flights conducted along the California coastline, were used to constrain sea-spray aerosol-emission rates from coastal wave breaking. PMID:26730457

  1. Investigation of Aerosol Surface Area Estimation from Number and Mass Concentration Measurements: Particle Density Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Evans, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    For nanoparticles with nonspherical morphologies, e.g., open agglomerates or fibrous particles, it is expected that the actual density of agglomerates may be significantly different from the bulk material density. It is further expected that using the material density may upset the relationship between surface area and mass when a method for estimating aerosol surface area from number and mass concentrations (referred to as “Maynard’s estimation method”) is used. Therefore, it is necessary to quantitatively investigate how much the Maynard’s estimation method depends on particle morphology and density. In this study, aerosol surface area estimated from number and mass concentration measurements was evaluated and compared with values from two reference methods: a method proposed by Lall and Friedlander for agglomerates and a mobility based method for compact nonspherical particles using well-defined polydisperse aerosols with known particle densities. Polydisperse silver aerosol particles were generated by an aerosol generation facility. Generated aerosols had a range of morphologies, count median diameters (CMD) between 25 and 50 nm, and geometric standard deviations (GSD) between 1.5 and 1.8. The surface area estimates from number and mass concentration measurements correlated well with the two reference values when gravimetric mass was used. The aerosol surface area estimates from the Maynard’s estimation method were comparable to the reference method for all particle morphologies within the surface area ratios of 3.31 and 0.19 for assumed GSDs 1.5 and 1.8, respectively, when the bulk material density of silver was used. The difference between the Maynard’s estimation method and surface area measured by the reference method for fractal-like agglomerates decreased from 79% to 23% when the measured effective particle density was used, while the difference for nearly spherical particles decreased from 30% to 24%. The results indicate that the use of

  2. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. W.; Ardon-Dryer, K.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The interplay between aerosol particles and water droplets in the atmosphere, especially in clouds, influences both aerosol and cloud properties. The major uncertainty in our understanding of climate arises in the indirect effect of aerosol and their ability to impact cloud formation and consequently alter the global radiative balance. The collision between a water droplet and aerosol particles that results in coalescence is termed "collection" or "coagulation". Coagulation can lead to aerosol removal from the atmosphere or induce ice nucleation via contact freezing. There is a theoretical collection efficiency minimum of particles with diameter between 0.1-2 µm, called the "Greenfield Gap". Experimental effort, however, was limited to drizzle and rain drops until recently, and has not constrained parameters that describe particle collection efficiency by cloud droplets. Collection efficiency is also an important parameter for assessing contact freezing, the least known ice nucleation mechanism today. Experimentally assessing collection efficiency can prove the existence of the "Greenfield Gap" and lay the foundation for studying contact freezing. We recently constructed the MIT-Contact Freezing Chamber (MIT-CFC) to study coagulation experimentally. A stream of 40 µm cloud droplets fall freely into the chamber and collide with aerosol particles with known size and concentration. The outflow goes through a series of dryers before entering the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument for chemical composition analysis. PALMS is a true single-particle instrument and gives information on the size and the chemical composition of each particle. Coagulated particles from the MIT-CFC have mass spectral signatures of both the aerosol particles and the droplet residuals, while the droplet residual contains no signature of the aerosol particles. To our knowledge, this is the first time coagulation has been seen on a single-particle basis. We will

  3. IN-SITU AERODYNAMIC SIZING OF AEROSOL PARTICLES WITH THE SPART ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single particle aerodynamic relaxation time (SPART) analyzer has been developed to measure the aerodynamic size distribution of aerosol particulates in the range 0.1 to 10.0 micrometer in diameter. The analyzer sizes and counts individual suspended particles and droplets from s...

  4. HUMIDITY EFFECTS ON THE MASS SPECTRA OF SINGLE AEROSOL PARTICLES. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-line laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry has developed into a widely used method for chemical characterization of individual aerosol particles. In the present study, the spectra of laboratory-generated particles were obtained as a function of relative humidity to elu...

  5. Discrimination and classification of bio-aerosol particles using optical spectroscopy and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eversole, Jay D.

    2011-03-01

    For more than a decade now, there has been significant emphasis for development of sensors of agent aerosols, especially for biological warfare (BW) agents. During this period, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and other labs have explored the application of optical and spectroscopic methods relevant to biological composition discrimination to aerosol particle characterization. I will first briefly attempt to establish the connection between sensor performance metrics which are statistically determined, and aerosol particle measurements through the use of computational models, and also describe the challenge of ambient background characterization that would be needed to establish more reliable and deterministic sensor performance predictions. Greater attention will then be devoted to a discussion of basic particle properties and their measurement. The NRL effort has adopted an approach based on direct measurements on individual particles, principally of elastic scatter and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), rather than populations of particles. The development of a LIF instrument using two sequential excitation wavelengths to detect fluorescence in discrete spectral bands will be described. Using this instrument, spectral characteristics of particles from a variety of biological materials including BW agent surrogates, as well as other ``calibration'' particles and some known ambient air constituents will be discussed in terms of the dependence of optical signatures on aerosol particle composition, size and incident laser fluence. Comparison of scattering and emission measurements from particles composed of widely different taxa, as well as from similar species under different growth conditions highlight the difficulties of establishing ground truth for complex biological material compositions. One aspect that is anticipated to provide greater insight to this type of particle classification capability is the development of a fundamental computational model of

  6. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, R; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Parsons, Michael S; Rogers, Donna M; Norton, Olin P; Nagel, Brian A; Alderman, Steven L; Waggoner, Charles A

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30 x 30 x 29 cm(3) nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 12 standard m(3)/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150 degrees C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7 standard m(3)/min, high mass concentrations (approximately 25 mg/m(3)) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160 nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions. PMID

  7. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, R.; Hogancamp, Kristina U.; Parsons, Michael S.; Rogers, Donna M.; Norton, Olin P.; Nagel, Brian A.; Alderman, Steven L.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30×30×29cm3 nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5to12standardm3/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150°C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7standardm3/min, high mass concentrations (˜25mg/m3) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions.

  8. Complex chemical composition of colored surface films formed from reactions of propanal in sulfuric acid at upper troposphere/lower stratosphere aerosol acidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wyngarden, A. L.; Pérez-Montaño, S.; Bui, J. V. H.; Li, E. S. W.; Nelson, T. E.; Ha, K. T.; Leong, L.; Iraci, L. T.

    2014-11-01

    Particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) consist mostly of concentrated sulfuric acid (40-80 wt %) in water. However, airborne measurements have shown that these particles also contain a significant fraction of organic compounds of unknown chemical composition. Acid-catalyzed reactions of carbonyl species are believed to be responsible for significant transfer of gas phase organic species into tropospheric aerosols and are potentially more important at the high acidities characteristic of UT/LS particles. In this study, experiments combining sulfuric acid (H2SO4) with propanal and with mixtures of propanal with glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal at acidities typical of UT/LS aerosols produced highly colored surface films (and solutions) that may have implications for aerosol properties. In order to identify the chemical processes responsible for the formation of the surface films, Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared and 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopies were used to analyze the chemical composition of the films. Films formed from propanal were a complex mixture of aldol condensation products, acetals and propanal itself. The major aldol condensation products were the dimer (2-methyl-2-pentenal) and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, which was formed by cyclization of the linear aldol condensation trimer. Additionally, the strong visible absorption of the films indicates that higher order aldol condensation products must also be present as minor species. The major acetal species were 2,4,6-triethyl-1,3,5-trioxane and longer-chain linear polyacetals which are likely to separate from the aqueous phase. Films formed on mixtures of propanal with glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal also showed evidence for products of cross-reactions. Since cross-reactions would be more likely than self-reactions under atmospheric conditions, similar reactions of aldehydes like propanal with common aerosol organic species like glyoxal and methylglyoxal

  9. Complex chemical composition of colored surface films formed from reactions of propanal in sulfuric acid at upper troposphere/lower stratosphere aerosol acidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wyngarden, A. L.; Pérez-Montaño, S.; Bui, J. V. H.; Li, E. S. W.; Nelson, T. E.; Ha, K. T.; Leong, L.; Iraci, L. T.

    2015-04-01

    Particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) consist mostly of concentrated sulfuric acid (40-80 wt%) in water. However, airborne measurements have shown that these particles also contain a significant fraction of organic compounds of unknown chemical composition. Acid-catalyzed reactions of carbonyl species are believed to be responsible for significant transfer of gas phase organic species into tropospheric aerosols and are potentially more important at the high acidities characteristic of UT/LS particles. In this study, experiments combining sulfuric acid (H2SO4) with propanal and with mixtures of propanal with glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal at acidities typical of UT/LS aerosols produced highly colored surface films (and solutions) that may have implications for aerosol properties. In order to identify the chemical processes responsible for the formation of the surface films, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies were used to analyze the chemical composition of the films. Films formed from propanal were a complex mixture of aldol condensation products, acetals and propanal itself. The major aldol condensation products were the dimer (2-methyl-2-pentenal) and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene that was formed by cyclization of the linear aldol condensation trimer. Additionally, the strong visible absorption of the films indicates that higher-order aldol condensation products must also be present as minor species. The major acetal species were 2,4,6-triethyl-1,3,5-trioxane and longer-chain linear polyacetals which are likely to separate from the aqueous phase. Films formed on mixtures of propanal with glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal also showed evidence of products of cross-reactions. Since cross-reactions would be more likely than self-reactions under atmospheric conditions, similar reactions of aldehydes like propanal with common aerosol organic species like glyoxal and

  10. Complex chemical composition of colored surface films formed from reactions of propanal in sulfuric acid at upper troposphere/lower stratosphere aerosol acidities

    PubMed Central

    Van Wyngarden, A. L.; Pérez-Montaño, S.; Bui, J. V. H.; Li, E. S. W.; Nelson, T. E.; Ha, K. T.; Leong, L.; Iraci, L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) consist mostly of concentrated sulfuric acid (40–80 wt %) in water. However, airborne measurements have shown that these particles also contain a significant fraction of organic compounds of unknown chemical composition. Acid-catalyzed reactions of carbonyl species are believed to be responsible for significant transfer of gas phase organic species into tropospheric aerosols and are potentially more important at the high acidities characteristic of UT/LS particles. In this study, experiments combining sulfuric acid (H2SO4) with propanal and with mixtures of propanal with glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal at acidities typical of UT/LS aerosols produced highly colored surface films (and solutions) that may have implications for aerosol properties. In order to identify the chemical processes responsible for the formation of the surface films, attenuated total reflectance–Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies were used to analyze the chemical composition of the films. Films formed from propanal were a complex mixture of aldol condensation products, acetals and propanal itself. The major aldol condensation products were the dimer (2-methyl-2-pentenal) and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene that was formed by cyclization of the linear aldol condensation trimer. Additionally, the strong visible absorption of the films indicates that higher-order aldol condensation products must also be present as minor species. The major acetal species were 2,4,6-triethyl-1,3,5-trioxane and longer-chain linear polyacetals which are likely to separate from the aqueous phase. Films formed on mixtures of propanal with glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal also showed evidence of products of cross-reactions. Since cross-reactions would be more likely than self-reactions under atmospheric conditions, similar reactions of aldehydes like propanal with common aerosol organic species like glyoxal and

  11. [Size distributions of aerosol particles and the impact on visibility in winter of Nanjing].

    PubMed

    Shang, Qian; Li, Zi-Hua; Yang, Jun; Pu, Mei-Juan

    2011-09-01

    High resolution instruments were used to investigate the relationship between aerosol size distribution characteristics and meteorological factors, and its possible influence on visibility in urban Nanjing from November to December 2009. Results show that the size distribution of aerosol number concentration showed a bimodal shape with the main peak value concentrating at particle sizes of 0.04-0.1 microm. Mass concentration distribution presented a bimodal shape with the two peak values concentrating at particle sizes of 0.5-0.7 microm and 2.7 microm, and the surface area concentration distribution presented two peaks from 0.1 to 0.5 microm and from 0.5 to 0.9 microm. It is found that the diurnal and interdiurnal variations of particle concentrations are obvious. Human activities and variation of atmospheric stability had great effect on daily variation of particle concentrations, while meteorological conditions such as precipitation, wind, relative humidity and so on had strong influence on interdiurnal variation. The aerosol size distribution was significantly affected by relative humidity. When RH was lower than 54%, number concentration of aerosol particles less than 1 microm in diameter increased gradually as RH increased, and concentration of particles with diameter larger than 1 microm almost had no change. When RH was higher than 54%, number concentration of aerosol particles ranging from 0.01 to 0.2 microm and from 2.7 to 10 microm decreased with the increase of RH, in contrast, concentration of aerosol particles between 0.5 and 1.5 microm in diameter increased. In addition, the particle number size distributions were different in rainy, foggy, sunny and haze weather conditions. Compared to sunny day, concentration of particles with different sizes all decreased in rainy day. In foggy weather, The number concentration of aerosol particles ranging from 0.01 to 0.3 microm and from 2.7 to 10 microm decreased, and aerosol particles between 0.3 and 2.7 microm

  12. The generation of diesel exhaust particle aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric particles

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Daniel J; Hickey, Anthony J

    2008-01-01

    The influence of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the lungs and heart is currently a topic of great interest in inhalation toxicology. Epidemiological data and animal studies have implicated airborne particulate matter and DEP in increased morbidity and mortality due to a number of cardiopulmonary diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and lung cancer. The pathogeneses of these diseases are being studied using animal models and cell culture techniques. Real-time exposures to freshly combusted diesel fuel are complex and require significant infrastructure including engine operations, dilution air, and monitoring and control of gases. A method of generating DEP aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric DEP would be a desirable and useful alternative. Metered dose inhaler technology was adopted to generate aerosols from suspensions of DEP in the propellant hydrofluoroalkane 134a. Inertial impaction data indicated that the particle size distributions of the generated aerosols were trimodal, with count median aerodynamic diameters less than 100 nm. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited particles showed tightly aggregated particles, as would be expected from an evaporative process. Chemical analysis indicated that there were no major changes in the mass proportion of 2 specific aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[k]fluoranthene) in the particles resulting from the aerosolization process. PMID:19337412

  13. LOAC (Light Optical Particle Counter): a new small aerosol counter with particle characterization capabilities for surface and airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenael; Jégou, Fabrice; Jeannot, Matthieu; Jourdain, Line; Dulac, François; Mallet, Marc; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Thaury, Claire; Tonnelier, Thierry; Verdier, Nicolas; Charpentier, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    The determination of the size distribution of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols with conventional optical counters is difficult when different natures of particles are present (droplets, soot, mineral dust, secondary organic or mineral particles...). Also, a light and cheap aerosol counter that can be used at ground, onboard drones or launched under all kinds of atmospheric balloons can be very useful during specific events as volcanic plumes, desert dust transport or local pollution episodes. These goals can be achieved thanks to a new generation of aerosol counter, called LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter). The instrument was developed in the frame of a cooperation between French scientific laboratories (CNRS), the Environnement-SA and MeteoModem companies and the French Space Agency (CNES). LOAC is a small optical particle counter/sizer of ~250 grams, having a low electrical power consumption. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles. The first one, at 12°, is used to determine the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of 0.3-100 micrometerers. At such an angle close to forward scattering, the signal is much more intense and the measurements are the least sensitive to the particle nature. The second angle is at 60°, where the scattered light is strongly dependent on the particle refractive index and thus on the nature of the aerosols. The ratio of the measurements at the two angles is used to discriminate between the different types of particles dominating the nature of the aerosol particles in the different size classes. The sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, soil dust and soot. Since 2011, we have operated LOAC in various environments (Arctic, Mediterranean, urban and peri-urban…) under different kinds of balloons including zero pressure stratospheric, tethered, drifting tropospheric, and meteorological sounding balloons. For the last case, the total weight of the gondola

  14. A rocket-borne mass analyzer for charged aerosol particles in the mesosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Knappmiller, Scott; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Friedrich, Martin

    2008-10-15

    An electrostatic mass spectrometer for nanometer-sized charged aerosol particles in the mesosphere has been developed and tested. The analyzer is mounted on the forward end of a rocket and has a slit opening for admitting a continuous sample of air that is exhausted through ports at the sides. Within the instrument housing are two sets of four collection plates that are biased with positive and negative voltages for the collection of negative and positive aerosol particles, respectively. Each collection plate spans about an order of magnitude in mass which corresponds to a factor of 2 in radius. The number density of the charge is calculated from the current collected by the plates. The mean free path for molecular collisions in the mesosphere is comparable to the size of the instrument opening; thus, the analyzer performance is modeled by a Monte Carlo computer code that finds the aerosol particles trajectories within the instrument including both the electrostatic force and the forces from collisions of the aerosol particles with air molecules. Mass sensitivity curves obtained using the computer models are near to those obtained in the laboratory using an ion source. The first two flights of the instrument returned data showing the charge number densities of both positive and negative aerosol particles in four mass ranges.

  15. Stratospheric aerosol particle size information in Odin-OSIRIS limb scatter spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, L. A.; Bourassa, A. E.; Degenstein, D. A.

    2014-02-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS) onboard the Odin satellite has now taken over a decade of limb scatter measurements that have been used to retrieve the version 5 stratospheric aerosol extinction product. This product is retrieved using a representative particle size distribution to calculate scattering cross sections and scattering phase functions for the forward model calculations. In this work the information content of OSIRIS measurements with respect to stratospheric aerosol is systematically examined for the purpose of retrieving particle size information along with the extinction coefficient. The benefit of using measurements at different wavelengths and scattering angles in the retrieval is studied, and it is found that incorporation of the 1530 nm radiance measurement is key for a robust retrieval of particle size information. It is also found that using OSIRIS measurements at the different solar geometries available on the Odin orbit simultaneously provides little additional benefit. Based on these results, an improved aerosol retrieval algorithm is developed that couples the retrieval of aerosol extinction and mode radius of a log-normal particle size distribution. Comparison of these results with coincident measurements from SAGE III shows agreement in retrieved extinction to within approximately 10% over the bulk of the aerosol layer, which is comparable to version 5. The retrieved particle size, when converted to Ångström coefficient, shows good qualitative agreement with SAGE II measurements made at somewhat shorter wavelengths.

  16. In situ measurements of heterogeneous reactions on ambient aerosol particles: Impacts on atmospheric chemistry and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, Timothy

    2015-02-11

    Aerosol particles play a critical role in the Earth’s energy budget through the absorption and scattering of radiation, and/or through their ability to form clouds and alter cloud lifetime. Heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions alter the climate-relevant properties of aerosol particles and catalyze reaction pathways that are energetically unfavorable in the gas phase. The chemical composition of aerosol particles dictates the kinetics of heterogeneous and multi-phase reactions. At present, the vast majority of the molecular level information on these processes has been determined in laboratory investigations on model aerosol systems. The work described here provides a comprehensive investigation into the reactivity of complex, ambient aerosol particles is proposed to determine: 1) how representative laboratory investigations of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes conducted on model, simple systems are of the real atmosphere, and 2) the impact of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes on ambient particle optical properties and their ability to nucleate clouds. This work has focused on the uptake kinetics for ammonia (NH3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5). The results of these investigations will be used to directly improve the representation of heterogeneous and multi-phase processes in global climate models, by identifying the key mechanistic drivers that control the variability in the observed kinetics.

  17. Chemometric analysis of multi-sensor hyperspectral images of coarse mode aerosol particles for the image-based investigation on aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, Johannes; Kamilli, Katharina A.; Eitenberger, Elisabeth; Friedbacher, Gernot; Lendl, Bernhard; Held, Andreas; Lohninger, Hans

    2015-04-01

    Multi-sensor hyperspectral imaging is a novel technique, which allows the determination of composition, chemical structure and pure components of laterally resolved samples by chemometric analysis of different hyperspectral datasets. These hyperspectral datasets are obtained by different imaging methods, analysing the same sample spot and superimposing the hyperspectral data to create a single multi-sensor dataset. Within this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) images were obtained from size-segregated aerosol particles, sampled above Western Australian salt lakes. The particles were collected on aluminum foils inside a 2350 L Teflon chamber using a Sioutas impactor, sampling aerosol particles of sizes between 250 nm and 10 µm. The complex composition of the coarse-mode particles can be linked to primary emissions of inorganic species as well as to oxidized volatile organic carbon (VOC) emissions. The oxidation products of VOC emissions are supposed to form an ultra-fine nucleation mode, which was observed during several field campaigns between 2006 and 2013. The aluminum foils were analysed using chemical imaging and electron microscopy. A Horiba LabRam 800HR Raman microscope was used for vibrational mapping of an area of about 100 µm x 100 µm of the foils at a resolution of about 1 µm. The same area was analysed using a Quanta FEI 200 electron microscope (about 250 nm resolution). In addition to the high-resolution image, the elemental composition could be investigated using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The obtained hyperspectral images were combined into a multi-sensor dataset using the software package Imagelab (Epina Software Labs, www.imagelab.at). After pre-processing of the images, the multi-sensor hyperspectral dataset was analysed using several chemometric methods such as principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and other multivariate methods. Vertex

  18. New Particle Formation and Growth from Methanesulfonic Acid, Amines, Water, and Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Particles in the atmosphere can influence visibility, negatively impact human health, and affect climate. The largest uncertainty in determining global radiative forcing is attributed to atmospheric aerosols. While new particle formation in many locations is correlated with sulfuric acid in air, neither the gas-phase binary nucleation of H2SO4-H2O nor the gas-phase ternary nucleation of H2SO4-NH3-H2O alone can fully explain observations. An additional potential particle source, based on previous studies in this laboratory, is methanesulfonic acid (MSA) with amines and water vapor. However, organics are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) being a major component of particles. Organics could be involved in the initial stages of particle formation by enhancing or inhibiting nucleation from sulfuric acid or MSA, in addition to contributing to their growth to form SOA. Experiments to measure the effects of a series of organics of varying structure on particle formation and growth from MSA, amines, and water were performed in a custom-built small volume aerosol flow tube reactor. Analytical instruments and techniques include a scanning mobility particle sizer to measure particle size distributions, sampling onto a weak cation exchange resin with analysis by ion chromatography to measure amine concentrations, and filter collection and analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to measure MSA concentrations. Organics were measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The impact of these organics on the initial particle formation as well as growth will be reported. The outcome is an improved understanding of fundamental chemistry of nucleation and growth to ultimately be incorporated into climate models to better predict how particles affect the global climate budget.

  19. Molecular composition of organic aerosols formed in the α-pinene/O3 reaction: Implications for new particle formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Thorsten; Bandur, Rolf; Marggraf, Ulrich; Linscheid, Michael

    1998-10-01

    The molecular composition of particle phase ozonolysis products of α-pinene is investigated to comprehend the aerosol formation process following the VOC oxidation, focusing on an understanding of new particle formation. Two analytical approaches are applied to identify low-volatile oxidation products in the particle phase; off-line investigations using preconcentration on Tenax TA© followed by solvent extraction and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry as well as an on-line technique, in which the organic aerosols are introduced directly into the ion source of a mass spectrometer (atmospheric pressure chemical ionization / mass spectrometry (APCI/MS)). Both techniques showed the formation of difunctional carboxylic acids, compounds whose physico-chemical properties will govern most of their mass into the particle phase. Furthermore, stable binary diacid adducts could be identified by MSn-experiments. These observations might give insight into the process of new particle formation by heteromolecular homogeneous nucleation, indicating that the initial cluster formation cannot be described by macroscopic properties of single oxidation products. Instead, strong intermolecular forces between different diacids might play a key role in the formation of initial nuclei and their subsequent growth.

  20. TEM Study of Aerosol Particles in Brown Haze Episodes over Northern China in Spring 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Shao, L.; Buseck, P. R.

    2008-12-01

    Airborne aerosol collections were performed in eight brown haze episodes from 31 May to 21 June 2007 in Beijing, China. Morphologies, compositions, and mixing states of individual aerosol particles having different sizes were obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Aerosol particle types less than 2 μ m in diameter include mineral dust, fly ash, soot, organic material, and K-rich, S-rich, and metal particles (Fe- and Zn-rich). Mineral dust particles dominate in the range of 2 to 10 μ m. In addition to finding contributions from vehicle emissions and soil dust in Beijing, TEM results from the study provide new insights into sources such as agricultural biomass burning, industrial activities, and waste incineration. These sources can contribute not only great amounts of K-rich and metal particles but also reactive gases such as NH3, NOx, SO2, and VOCs to the haze. More than 80% of the analyzed aerosol particles are internally mixed. K- and S-rich particles tend to be coagulated with fly ash, soot, metal, and fine-grained mineral dust particles. Organic materials can act as inclusions in the K- and S-rich particles and their coatings. Over 90% of the analyzed internally mixed mineral particles are covered with Ca-, Mg-, or Na-rich coatings, and only 8% are associated with K- or S-rich coatings. The compositions of Ca-, Mg-, and Na-rich coatings suggest that they are possibly nitrates mixed with minor sulfates and chlorides. Calcium sulfate particles with diameters from 10 to 500 nm were also detected within Ca(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 coatings. These results indicate that mineral dust particles in the brown haze episodes participated in heterogeneous reactions in the atmosphere with one or more of SO2, NO2, HCl, and HNO3. The development of coatings altered some mineral dust particles from hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

  1. Simulating the Evolution of Soot Mixing State with a Particle-Resolved Aerosol Model

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Nicole; West, Matt; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.

    2009-05-05

    The mixing state of soot particles in the atmosphere is of crucial importance for assessing their climatic impact, since it governs their chemical reactivity, cloud condensation nuclei activity and radiative properties. To improve the mixing state representation in models, we present a new approach, the stochastic particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC, which explicitly resolves the composition of individual particles in a given population of different types of aerosol particles. This approach accurately tracks the evolution of the mixing state of particles due to emission, dilution, condensation and coagulation. To make this direct stochastic particle-based method practical, we implemented a new multiscale stochastic coagulation method. With this method we achieved optimal efficiency for applications when the coagulation kernel is highly non-uniform, as is the case for many realistic applications. PartMC-MOSAIC was applied to an idealized urban plume case representative of a large urban area to simulate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types due to coagulation and condensation. For this urban plume scenario we quantified the individual processes that contribute to the aging of the aerosol distribution, illustrating the capabilities of our modeling approach. The results showed for the first time the multidimensional structure of particle composition, which is usually lost in internally-mixed sectional or modal aerosol models.

  2. Light scattering from aerosol particles in the El Paso del Norte region / the effect of humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina Calderon, Richard

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in climate forcing, through scattering and absorption of the incoming solar radiation. The extinction of light by the presence of atmospheric aerosols was studied using two first-principle models, and corresponding computer codes. In the first model the extinction of light from irregularly shaped aerosol particles was analyzed. In the second model it was assumed that the irregularly shaped aerosol particles were covered by a film of water, and the hygroscopicity and the extinction of light by the aerosols was analyzed. These models were then applied to the Paso del Norte region and their light extinction results compared with a local extinctiometer. The inter-comparison of the models extinction results and the extinctiometer values were well correlated. It was observed that for high humidity days the model that used an aerosol particle covered with a water film correlated better with the experimental extinctiometer measurements. While these two models were validated in the Paso del Norte region, they are also applicable to any other region, under humid or dry atmospheric conditions.

  3. DEPOSITION OF SULFATE ACID AEROSOLS IN THE DEVELOPING HUMAN LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computations of aerosol deposition as affected by (i) aerosol hygroscopicity, (ii) human age, and (iii) respiratory intensity are accomplished using a validated mathematical model. he interactive effects are very complicated but systematic. ew general observations can be made; ra...

  4. Retrievals of Aerosol and Cloud Particle Microphysics Using Polarization and Depolarization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The recent availability of theoretical techniques for computing single and multiple scattering of light by realistic polydispersions of spherical and nonspherical particles and the strong dependence of the Stokes scattering matrix on particle size, shape, and refractive index make polarization and depolarization measurements a powerful particle characterization tool. In this presentation I will describe recent applications of photopolarimetric and lidar depolarization measurements to remote sensing characterization of tropospheric aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), and contrails. The talk will include (1) a short theoretical overview of the effects of particle microphysics on particle single-scattering characteristics; (2) the use of multi-angle multi-spectral photopolarimetry to retrieve the optical thickness, size distribution, refractive index, and number concentration of tropospheric aerosols over the ocean surface; and (3) the application of the T-matrix method to constraining the PSC and contrail particle microphysics using multi-spectral measurements of lidar backscatter and depolarization.

  5. Biogenic Potassium Salt Particles as Seeds for Secondary Organic Aerosol in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöhlker, Christopher; Wiedemann, Kenia T.; Sinha, Bärbel; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Gunthe, Sachin S.; Smith, Mackenzie; Su, Hang; Artaxo, Paulo; Chen, Qi; Cheng, Yafang; Elbert, Wolfgang; Gilles, Mary K.; Kilcoyne, Arthur L. D.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Weigand, Markus; Martin, Scot T.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2012-08-01

    The fine particles serving as cloud condensation nuclei in pristine Amazonian rainforest air consist mostly of secondary organic aerosol. Their origin is enigmatic, however, because new particle formation in the atmosphere is not observed. Here, we show that the growth of organic aerosol particles can be initiated by potassium-salt-rich particles emitted by biota in the rainforest. These particles act as seeds for the condensation of low- or semi-volatile organic compounds from the atmospheric gas phase or multiphase oxidation of isoprene and terpenes. Our findings suggest that the primary emission of biogenic salt particles directly influences the number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei and affects the microphysics of cloud formation and precipitation over the rainforest.

  6. Mixing state of particles with secondary species by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer in an atmospheric pollution event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lingling; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was used to characterize size distribution, chemical composition, and mixing state of particles in an atmospheric pollution event during 20 Oct. - 5 Nov., 2015 in Xiamen, Southeast China. A total of 533,012 particle mass spectra were obtained and clustered into six groups, comprising of industry metal (4.5%), dust particles (2.6%), carbonaceous species (70.7%), K-Rich particles (20.7%), seasalt (0.6%) and other particles (0.9%). Carbonaceous species were further divided into EC (70.6%), OC (28.5%), and mixed ECOC (0.9%). There were 61.7%, 58.3%, 4.0%, and 14.6% of particles internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and C2H3O, respectively, indicating that these particles had undergone significant aging processing. Sulfate was preferentially mixed with carbonaceous particles, while nitrate tended to mix with metal-containing and dust particles. Compared to clear days, the fractions of EC-, metal- and dust particles remarkably increased, while the fraction of OC-containing particles decreased in pollution days. The mixing state of particles, excepted for OC-containing particles with secondary species was much stronger in pollution days than that in clear days, which revealed the significant influence of secondary particles in atmospheric pollution. The different activity of OC-containing particles might be related to their much smaller aerodynamic diameter. These results could improve our understanding of aerosol characteristics and could be helpful to further investigate the atmospheric process of particles.

  7. Water uptake of internally mixed ammonium sulfate and dicarboxylic acid particles probed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, Lorena; Méndez, Estíbaliz; Sánchez, María N.; Castaño, Fernando; Basterretxea, Francisco J.

    2013-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are usually mixtures of inorganic and organic compounds in variable proportions, and the relative amount of organic fraction can influence the hygroscopic properties of the particles. Infrared spectra of submicrometer internally mixed dry particles of ammonium sulfate (AS) with various dicarboxylic acids (oxalic, malonic, maleic, glutaric and pimelic) have been measured in an aerosol flow tube at several solute mass ratios. The spectra show a notable broadening in the bandwidth of sulfate ion ν3 vibrational band near 1115 cm-1 with respect to pure AS. We attribute these perturbations, that are biggest at AS/organic acid mass ratio near unity, to intermolecular interactions between inorganic ions and organic acid molecules in the internally mixed solids. The water uptake behavior of internally mixed particles has been measured by recording the infrared integrated absorbance of liquid water as a function of relative humidity (RH). The amount of water present in the particles prior to deliquescence correlates partially with the water solubilities of the dicarboxylic acids, and also with the relative magnitudes of intermolecular interactions in the internally mixed dry solids. Phase change of ammonium sulfate in the internally mixed particles with RH has been spectrally monitored, and it is shown that water uptaken before full deliquescence produces structural changes in the particles that are revealed by their vibrational spectra.

  8. Wintertime measurements of aerosol acidity and trace elements in Wuhan, a city in central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldman, J. M.; Lioy, P. J.; Zelenka, M.; Jing, L.; Lin, Y. N.; He, Q. C.; Qian, Z. M.; Chapman, R.; Wilson, W. E.

    A 2-week intensive ambient aerosol study was conducted in December 1988 in Wuhan (Hubei Province), a city of nearly 2 million located on the Yangtze River in central China (P.R.C.). This is an industrial region where soft coal burning is widespread, and emission controls for vehicles and industrial facilities are minimal. The sampling site was located in one of the civic centers where residential and commercial density is highest. An Andersen dichotomous sampler was operated with Teflon membrane filters to collect fine ( dp < 2.5 μmad) and coarse (2.5 ⩽ dp < 10 μmad) particles for total mass and element determinations. An annular denuder system (ADS) was used to collect fine fraction aerosols for analyses of ionic species including strong acidity (H +). The study was conducted between 18 and 30 December, which was rainless, consistently cool (3-10°C) and overcast, but without fog or acute stagnation. Fine particulate mass (PM, as μ m -3) averaged 139 (range 54-207); coarse PM averaged 86 (range 29-179). Trace element concentrations were also high. Crustal elements (Si, Al, Ca and Fe) were found primarily in the coarse fraction, while elements associated with combustion (S, K, Cl, Zn and Se) were enriched in the fine fraction. The concentrations of arsenic and selenium were evidence of a large source of coal burning, while vanadium levels (associated with fuel oil use) were not especially enriched. Despite the seemingly high PM loadings, ionic concentrations were not especially high. The average composition of soluble fine aerosol species (in neq m -3) were SO 42-: 520 (range 180-980), NO 3-: 225 (range 50-470), Cl -: 215 (range 20-640), and NH 4+: 760 (range 280-1660). A deficit in accountable FP components (total mass compared to the total of ionic plus element masses) as well as the black appearance of collected materials indicate an abundance of carbonaceous aerosol, as high as 100 μ m -3. (total mass compared to the total of ionic plus element masses) as

  9. Spontaneous Aerosol Ejection: Origin of Inorganic Particles in Biomass Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Andrew R; Gantt, Rachel; Joseph, Kristeen E; Maduskar, Saurabh; Paulsen, Alex D; Krumm, Christoph; Zhu, Cheng; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2016-06-01

    At high thermal flux and temperatures of approximately 500 °C, lignocellulosic biomass transforms to a reactive liquid intermediate before evaporating to condensable bio-oil for downstream upgrading to renewable fuels and chemicals. However, the existence of a fraction of nonvolatile compounds in condensed bio-oil diminishes the product quality and, in the case of inorganic materials, catalyzes undesirable aging reactions within bio-oil. In this study, ablative pyrolysis of crystalline cellulose was evaluated, with and without doped calcium, for the generation of inorganic-transporting aerosols by reactive boiling ejection from liquid intermediate cellulose. Aerosols were characterized by laser diffraction light scattering, inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, and high-speed photography. Pyrolysis product fractionation revealed that approximately 3 % of the initial feed (both organic and inorganic) was transported to the gas phase as aerosols. Large bubble-to-aerosol size ratios and visualization of significant late-time ejections in the pyrolyzing cellulose suggest the formation of film bubbles in addition to the previously discovered jet formation mechanism. PMID:27125341

  10. Light scattering and absorption properties of aerosol particles in the urban environment of Granada, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyamani, H.; Olmo, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    Surface measurements of optical and physical aerosol properties were made at an urban site, Granada (Spain) (37.18°N, 3.58°W, 680 m a.s.l), during winter 2005-2006. Measurements included the aerosol scattering, σsca, and backscattering coefficients, σbsca, at three wavelengths (450, 550 and 700 nm) measured at low relative humidity (RH<50%) by an integrating nephelometer, the absorption coefficient at 670 nm, σabs, measured with a multi-angle absorption photometer, and aerosol size distribution in the 0.5-20 μm aerodynamic diameter range registered by an aerodynamic aerosol sizer (APS-3321, TSI). The hourly average of σsca (550 nm) ranged from 2 to 424 M m -1 with an average value of 84±62 M m -1 (±S.D.). The Angstrom exponent presented an average value of 1.8±0.3, suggesting a large fraction of fine particles at the site, an observation confirmed by aerosol size distribution measurements. The hourly average of σabs (670 nm) ranged from 1.7 to 120.5 M m -1 with an average value of 28±20 M m -1. The results indicate that the aerosol absorption coefficient in Granada was relatively large. The largest σsca value was associated with air masses that passed over heavily polluted European areas and local stagnation conditions. High absorbing aerosol level was obtained during dust transport from North Africa probably due to the presence of hematite. Based on the measured scattering and absorption coefficients, a very low average value of the single scattering albedo of 0.66±0.11 at 670 nm was calculated, suggesting that urban aerosols in this region contain a large fraction of absorbing material. A clear diurnal pattern was observed in scattering and absorption coefficients and particle concentrations with two local maxima occurring in early morning and late evening. This behavior can be explained in terms of local conditions that control the particle sources associated with traffic and upward mixing of the aerosol during the daytime development of a

  11. Hydrochloric acid aerosol formation by the interaction of hydrogen chloride with humid air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhein, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions in which hydrochloric acid aerosol is predicted by the interaction of hydrogen chloride gas with the water vapor in humid air are analyzed. The liquid gas phase equilibrium for the HCL-H2O system is expressed in terms of relative humidity and hydrogen chloride concentration as parts per million, units commonly used in pollution studies. Presented are the concentration (wt %) of HC1 in the aerosol and the concentration of aerosol (ppm) predicted.

  12. MAPPIX: A software package for off-line micro-pixe single particle aerosol analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccato, D.

    2009-06-01

    In the framework of a multiannual experiment performed at Baia Terra Nova, Antarctica, size-segregated aerosol samples were collected by using a 12-stage SDI impactor (Hillamo design). Approximately 2800 particles, belonging to the first four supermicrometric SDI stages - 8.39, 4.08, 2.68, 1.66 μm dynamic aerosol diameter cuts - were analyzed at the INFN-LNL micro-PIXE facility, a three lens Oxford Microprobe (OM) product, installed in the early nineties. Four regions on each of the 12 sub-samples were measured; 60 aerosol particles were detected on average in each of the analyzed regions. The off-line single aerosol particle (SAP) analysis of such big amount of data required software that is able to rapidly handle the acquired data, with a simple and fast area selection procedure; the subsequent automated PIXE spectra analysis with a specialized code was also needed. The MAPPIX 2.0 software was designed to make easier and faster the user jobs during the SAP analysis. The package is composed of two separate routines: the first one is devoted to data format conversion (OM-LMF file format to MAPPIX format), while the second one is devoted to micro-PIXE maps graphical presentation and aerosol particle selection procedure. The MAPPIX data format and software features will be discussed; a short report of the speed performances will be presented.

  13. Aerosol and Cloud-Nucleating Particle Observations during an Atmospheric River Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, P. J.; McCluskey, C. S.; Petters, M.; Suski, K. J.; Levin, E. J.; Hill, T. C. J.; Atwood, S. A.; Schill, G. P.; Rocci, K.; Boose, Y.; Martin, A.; Cornwell, G.; Al-Mashat, H.; Moore, K.; Prather, K. A.; Rothfuss, N.; Taylor, H.; Leung, L. R.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Hubbe, J. M.; Rosenfeld, D.; Spackman, J. R.; Fairall, C. W.; Creamean, J.; White, A. B.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The multi-agency CalWater 2015 project occurred over North Central CA and the Eastern Pacific during January to March 2015 (Spackman et al., this session). The goals of the campaign were to document the structure of atmospheric rivers (ARs) that deliver much of the water vapor associated with major winter storms along the U.S. West Coast and to investigate the modulating effect of aerosols on precipitation. Aerosol sources that may influence orographic cloud properties for air lifted over the mountains in California in winter include pollution, biomass burning, soil dusts and marine aerosols, but their roles will also be influenced by transport, vertical stratification, and scavenging processes. We present results from a comprehensive study of aerosol distributions, compositions, and cloud nucleating properties during an intense winter storm during February 2015, including data from an NSF-supported measurement site at Bodega Bay, from the DOE-ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment that included sampling on the NOAA RV Ron Brown offshore and the G-1 aircraft over ocean and land, and with context provided by other NOAA aircraft and remote sensing facilities. With a special focus on the coastal site, we discuss changes in aerosol distributions, aerosol hygroscopicity, and number concentrations of fluorescent particles, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and ice nucleating particles (INPs) during the AR event. We compare with periods preceding and following the event. For example, total aerosol number and surface area concentrations at below 0.5 μm diameter decreased from typical values of a few thousand cm-3 and 100 μm2 cm-3, respectively, to a few hundred cm-3 and 10 μm2cm-3 at Bodega Bay during the AR event. CCN concentrations were similarly lower, but hygroscopicity parameter (kappa) increased from typical values of 0.2 to values > 0.5 during the AR.INP and fluorescent particle number concentrations were generally lower during the AR event than at any other

  14. Thermal desorption single particle mass spectrometry of ambient aerosol in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Jinghao; Wang, Xinning; Li, Jingyan; Xu, Tingting; Chen, Hong; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jianmin

    2015-12-01

    Submicron aerosol volatility, chemical composition, and mixing state were simultaneously measured using a thermodenuder (TD) in-line with a single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) during Nov.12 to Dec. 11 of 2014 in Shanghai. By heating up to 250 °C, the signals of refractory species such as elemental carbon, metallic compounds, and mineral dust in aerosols were enhanced in the mass spectra. At 250 °C, the main particle types present in the size range of 0.2-1.0 μm were biomass burning (37% by number) and elemental carbon (20%). From 1.0 to 2.0 μm, biomass burning (30%), dust (19%) and metal-rich (18%) were the primary particle types. CN- signal remained in the mass spectra of the heated biomass burning particles suggests the existence of some extremely low-volatility nitrogen-containing organics. Laboratory experiments were conducted by burning rice straws, the main source material of biomass burning particles in Southern China, to confirm the less volatile composition contributed by biomass burning. Strong CN- with relative area >0.21 was observed in most of the laboratory-made biomass burning particles when heated above 200 °C and was selected as a new marker to identify the biomass burning particles in the field. The TD-SPAMS measured the size-resolved chemical composition of the individual particle residues at different temperatures and offered more information on the aging processes of primary particles and their sources.

  15. Role of sulphuric acid, ammonia and galactic cosmic rays in atmospheric aerosol nucleation.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, Jasper; Curtius, Joachim; Almeida, João; Dunne, Eimear; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Gagné, Stéphanie; Ickes, Luisa; Kürten, Andreas; Kupc, Agnieszka; Metzger, Axel; Riccobono, Francesco; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Wimmer, Daniela; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; David, André; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew; Ehn, Mikael; Flagan, Richard C; Haider, Stefan; Hansel, Armin; Hauser, Daniel; Jud, Werner; Junninen, Heikki; Kreissl, Fabian; Kvashin, Alexander; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Lima, Jorge; Lovejoy, Edward R; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Mikkilä, Jyri; Minginette, Pierre; Mogo, Sandra; Nieminen, Tuomo; Onnela, Antti; Pereira, Paulo; Petäjä, Tuukka; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Vanhanen, Joonas; Viisanen, Yrjo; Vrtala, Aron; Wagner, Paul E; Walther, Hansueli; Weingartner, Ernest; Wex, Heike; Winkler, Paul M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku

    2011-08-25

    Atmospheric aerosols exert an important influence on climate through their effects on stratiform cloud albedo and lifetime and the invigoration of convective storms. Model calculations suggest that almost half of the global cloud condensation nuclei in the atmospheric boundary layer may originate from the nucleation of aerosols from trace condensable vapours, although the sensitivity of the number of cloud condensation nuclei to changes of nucleation rate may be small. Despite extensive research, fundamental questions remain about the nucleation rate of sulphuric acid particles and the mechanisms responsible, including the roles of galactic cosmic rays and other chemical species such as ammonia. Here we present the first results from the CLOUD experiment at CERN. We find that atmospherically relevant ammonia mixing ratios of 100 parts per trillion by volume, or less, increase the nucleation rate of sulphuric acid particles more than 100-1,000-fold. Time-resolved molecular measurements reveal that nucleation proceeds by a base-stabilization mechanism involving the stepwise accretion of ammonia molecules. Ions increase the nucleation rate by an additional factor of between two and more than ten at ground-level galactic-cosmic-ray intensities, provided that the nucleation rate lies below the limiting ion-pair production rate. We find that ion-induced binary nucleation of H(2)SO(4)-H(2)O can occur in the mid-troposphere but is negligible in the boundary layer. However, even with the large enhancements in rate due to ammonia and ions, atmospheric concentrations of ammonia and sulphuric acid are insufficient to account for observed boundary-layer nucleation. PMID:21866156

  16. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Crippa, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGuire, M. L.; Jeong, C.-H.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Evans, G. J.; Wenger, J. C.

    2013-04-01

    Single particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been estimated using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC), organic aerosol (OA), ammonium, nitrate, sulphate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), a thermal/optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC). ATOFMS-derived mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67-0.78), and ten discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. Potassium content was used to identify particles associated with biomass combustion. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorization, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulphate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA) is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA/EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA) was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidized OA (OOA) was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the heterogeneity of primary and

  17. Fractional iron solubility of aerosol particles enhanced by biomass burning and ship emission in Shanghai, East China.

    PubMed

    Fu, H B; Shang, G F; Lin, J; Hu, Y J; Hu, Q Q; Guo, L; Zhang, Y C; Chen, J M

    2014-05-15

    In terms of understanding Fe mobilization from aerosol particles in East China, the PM2.5 particles were collected in spring at Shanghai. Combined with the backtrajectory analysis, the PM2.5/PM10 and Ca/Al ratios, a serious dust-storm episode (DSE) during the sampling was identified. The single-particle analysis showed that the major iron-bearing class is the aluminosilicate dust during DSE, while the Fe-bearing aerosols are dominated by coal fly ash, followed by a minority of iron oxides during the non-dust storm days (NDS). Chemical analyses of samples showed that the fractional Fe solubility (%FeS) is much higher during NDS than that during DSE, and a strong inverse relationship of R(2)=0.967 between %FeS and total atmospheric iron loading were found, suggested that total Fe (FeT) is not controlling soluble Fe (FeS) during the sampling. Furthermore, no relationship between FeS and any of acidic species was established, suggesting that acidic process on aerosol surfaces are not involved in the trend of iron solubility. It was thus proposed that the source-dependent composition of aerosol particles is a primary determinant for %FeS. Specially, the Al/Fe ratio is poorly correlated (R(2)=0.113) with %FeS, while the apparent relationship between %FeS and the calculated KBB(+)/Fe ratio (R(2)=0.888) and the V/Fe ratio (R(2)=0.736) were observed, reflecting that %FeS could be controlled by both biomass burning and oil ash from ship emission, rather than mineral particles and coal fly ash, although the latter two are the main contributors to the atmospheric Fe loading during the sampling. Such information can be useful improving our understanding on iron solubility on East China, which may further correlate with iron bioavailability to the ocean, as well as human health effects associated with exposure to fine Fe-rich particles in densely populated metropolis in China. PMID:24607631

  18. Studies of acid aerosols in six cities and in a new multi-city investigation: design issues

    SciTech Connect

    Speizer, F.E.

    1989-02-01

    Techniques for measuring acid aerosols in the ambient environment have been developed only recently. As part of the on-going Harvard Study on the Health Effects of Sulfur Dioxide and Respirable Particulates, we have developed monitoring equipment for acidic particles that can be used in multiple field settings. Preliminary data suggest that these strong acid aerosol measurements may correlate with respiratory symptoms more closely than similar measurements of particulate matter less than 15 microns in size. These results have led to the beginning of a U.S.-Canadian cooperative study to assess the chronic effects of acid aerosols on the health of North American children. Communities are being selected on the basis of anticipated levels of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in ambient air along with predicted levels of ozone and nitrates. Each community will undergo a 1-year period of every other day, 24-hr monitoring with newly developed monitoring equipment that will allow for quantification of H+ ion concentrations, as well as for specific measures of ozone and acid fractions. At the end of the 1-year period, while measurements are still being made, approximately 600 children aged 7 to 11 in each of up to 24 communities will be assessed with standardized questionnaires completed by parents, and pulmonary function will be measured in the children while in school. By estimating chronic exposure from the year-long measurement of acid aerosols and consideration of specific criteria for selecting communities to study, we hope to minimize potential confounding to allow us to assess the chronic impact of strong acid in the atmosphere on the respiratory health of these children.

  19. Exposure assessment of oxidant gases and acidic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    Clearly the presence of high ozone and acidic species in North America is primarily dependent upon photochemical air pollution. Evidence shows, however, that high acid exposures may occur in specific types of areas of high sulfur fuel use during the winter. At the present time, our concerns about exposure to local populations and regional populations should be directed primarily toward the outdoor activity patterns of individuals in the summer, and how those activity patterns relate to the location, duration, and concentrations of ozone and acid aerosol in photochemical air pollution episodes. Lioy Dyba and Mage et al have examined the activity patterns of children in summer camps. Because they spend more time outside than the normal population, these children form an important group of exercising individuals subject to photochemical pollution exposures. The dose of ozone inhaled by the children in the two camps was within 50% and 25% of the dose inhaled by adults in controlled clinical situations that produced clinically significant decrements in pulmonary function and increased the symptoms after 6.6 hr exposure in a given day. The chamber studies have used only ozone, whereas in the environment this effect may be enhanced by the presence of a complex mixture. The work of Lioy et al in Mendham, New Jersey found that hydrogen ion seemed to play a role in the inability of the children to return immediately to their normal peak expiratory flow rate after exposure. The camp health study conducted in Dunsville, Ontario suggested that children participating in a summer camp where moderate levels of ozone (100 ppb) but high levels of acid (46 micrograms/m3) occurred during an episode had a similar response. Thus, for children or exercising adults who are outdoors for at least one hour or more during a given day, the presence and persistence of oxidants in the environment are of particular concern. 63 references.

  20. Aerosol number size distributions over a coastal semi urban location: Seasonal changes and ultrafine particle bursts.

    PubMed

    Babu, S Suresh; Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar; Moorthy, K Krishna

    2016-09-01

    Number-size distribution is one of the important microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols that influence aerosol life cycle, aerosol-radiation interaction as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. Making use of one-yearlong measurements of aerosol particle number-size distributions (PNSD) over a broad size spectrum (~15-15,000nm) from a tropical coastal semi-urban location-Trivandrum (Thiruvananthapuram), the size characteristics, their seasonality and response to mesoscale and synoptic scale meteorology are examined. While the accumulation mode contributed mostly to the annual mean concentration, ultrafine particles (having diameter <100nm) contributed as much as 45% to the total concentration, and thus constitute a strong reservoir, that would add to the larger particles through size transformation. The size distributions were, in general, bimodal with well-defined modes in the accumulation and coarse regimes, with mode diameters lying in the range 141 to 167nm and 1150 to 1760nm respectively, in different seasons. Despite the contribution of the coarse sized particles to the total number concentration being meager, they contributed significantly to the surface area and volume, especially during transport of marine air mass highlighting the role of synoptic air mass changes. Significant diurnal variation occurred in the number concentrations, geometric mean diameters, which is mostly attributed to the dynamics of the local coastal atmospheric boundary layer and the effect of mesoscale land/sea breeze circulation. Bursts of ultrafine particles (UFP) occurred quite frequently, apparently during periods of land-sea breeze transitions, caused by the strong mixing of precursor-rich urban air mass with the cleaner marine air mass; the resulting turbulence along with boundary layer dynamics aiding the nucleation. These ex-situ particles were observed at the surface due to the transport associated with boundary layer dynamics. The particle growth rates from

  1. Use of Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy to Characterize Organic Acids and Aerosols Emitted in Biomass Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bililign, Solomon; Fiddler, Marc; Singh, Sujeeta

    2012-02-01

    One poorly understood, but significant class of volatile organic compounds (VOC) present in biomass burning is gas-phase organic acids and inorganic acids. These acids are extremely difficult to measure because of their adsorptive nature. Particulates and aerosols are also produced during biomass burning and impact the radiation budget of the Earth and, hence, impact global climate. Use cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRD) to measure absorption cross sections for OH overtone induced photochemistry in some organic acids (acetic acid and peracetic acid) will be presented and planed measurements of optical properties of aerosols composed of mixtures of different absorbing and non-absorbing species using CRD will be discussed.

  2. Characterization of Aerosol Particles around an Open Pit Coal Mine in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Ebert, Doerthe; Ebert, Martin; Weinbruch, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    PM10 around open pit coal mines in Germany frequently exceeds the 24 hours limit value of 50 ?g/m3. To comply with current EU regulations appropriate mitigation strategies have to be developed. For this goal accurate source apportionment is an indispensable prerequisite. In this study characterization of the dust immission was performed by electronmicroscopic individual particle analysis. Particles were collected close to the open pit mine from January 2007 until February 2008 with a two stage cascade impactor (aerodynamic particle diameter: 0.4 - 1 μm and 1 - 10 μm). The size, shape, and chemical composition of more than 30,000 particles were determined by automated scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). The most abundant particle groups encountered are secondary aerosol particles, soot, silicates, silicate/coal mixtures, coal, sulfates, carbonates, Fe-rich particles and (aged) sea salt. The relative abundance of the different particle groups is highly variable as function of the specific meteorological conditions. It can be distinguished between at least three different scenarios, which were found to cause exceeding of the daily PM10 limit value. a) high concentrations of silicates and silicate/coal mixtures which can be assigned to mining activities, b) high concentrations of secondary aerosol particles and soot (urban background), occurring during inversion periods with stagnant air masses, and c) high concentrations of (aged) sea salt indicating direct transport of air masses from the North Sea. PM2.5 and PM1 are always dominated by urban background aerosol (secondary aerosol particles and soot). Following these results, significant reduction potentials for PM10 only exist for the contribution of the open pit mine (silicates, silicate/coal mixed particles) and for urban background aerosols (secondary aerosol particles and soot). As the contribution of the open pit mine is mainly apparent in the PM10-2.5 fraction

  3. Penetration of Combustion Aerosol Particles Through Filters of NIOSH-Certified Filtering Facepiece Respirators (FFRs).

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuang; Kim, Jinyong; Yermakov, Michael; Elmashae, Yousef; He, Xinjian; Reponen, Tiina; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2015-01-01

    Filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) are commonly worn by first responders, first receivers, and other exposed groups to protect against exposure to airborne particles, including those originated by combustion. Most of these FFRs are NIOSH-certified (e.g., N95-type) based on the performance testing of their filters against charge-equilibrated aerosol challenges, e.g., NaCl. However, it has not been examined if the filtration data obtained with the NaCl-challenged FFR filters adequately represent the protection against real aerosol hazards such as combustion particles. A filter sample of N95 FFR mounted on a specially designed holder was challenged with NaCl particles and three combustion aerosols generated in a test chamber by burning wood, paper, and plastic. The concentrations upstream (Cup) and downstream (Cdown) of the filter were measured with a TSI P-Trak condensation particle counter and a Grimm Nanocheck particle spectrometer. Penetration was determined as (Cdown/Cup) ×100%. Four test conditions were chosen to represent inhalation flows of 15, 30, 55, and 85 L/min. Results showed that the penetration values of combustion particles were significantly higher than those of the "model" NaCl particles (p < 0.05), raising a concern about applicability of the N95 filters performance obtained with the NaCl aerosol challenge to protection against combustion particles. Aerosol type, inhalation flow rate and particle size were significant (p < 0.05) factors affecting the performance of the N95 FFR filter. In contrast to N95 filters, the penetration of combustion particles through R95 and P95 FFR filters (were tested in addition to N95) were not significantly higher than that obtained with NaCl particles. The findings were attributed to several effects, including the degradation of an N95 filter due to hydrophobic organic components generated into the air by combustion. Their interaction with fibers is anticipated to be similar to those involving "oily" particles

  4. Single particle characterization, source apportionment, and aging effects of ambient aerosols in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Laura Grace

    Composed of a mixture of chemical species and phases and existing in a variety of shapes and sizes, atmospheric aerosols are complex and can have serious influence on human health, the environment, and climate. In order to better understand the impact of aerosols on local to global scales, detailed measurements on the physical and chemical properties of ambient particles are essential. In addition, knowing the origin or the source of the aerosols is important for policymakers to implement targeted regulations and effective control strategies to reduce air pollution in their region. One of the most ground breaking techniques in aerosol instrumentation is single particle mass spectrometry (SPMS), which can provide online chemical composition and size information on the individual particle level. The primary focus of this work is to further improve the ability of one specific SPMS technique, aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS), for the use of identifying the specific origin of ambient aerosols, which is known as source apportionment. The ATOFMS source apportionment method utilizes a library of distinct source mass spectral signatures to match the chemical information of the single ambient particles. The unique signatures are obtained in controlled source characterization studies, such as with the exhaust emissions of heavy duty diesel vehicles (HDDV) operating on a dynamometer. The apportionment of ambient aerosols is complicated by the chemical and physical processes an individual particle can undergo as it spends time in the atmosphere, which is referred to as "aging" of the aerosol. Therefore, the performance of the source signature library technique was investigated on the ambient dataset of the highly aged environment of Riverside, California. Additionally, two specific subsets of the Riverside dataset (ultrafine particles and particles containing trace metals), which are known to cause adverse health effects, were probed in greater detail. Finally

  5. Acidic reaction products of mono- and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic acids were measured from PM2.5 aerosols at SMEAR II station (Station For Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations) in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The measured organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene and β-caryophyllene. Due to lack of authentic standards caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesized at the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, University of Helsinki. The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during summer concomitant with the precursor mono- and sesquiterpenes. Of the acids β-caryophyllinic acid had highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The β-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected on the basis of emission calculations of precursor compounds and yields in oxidation experiments in smog chambers implicating that β-caryophyllene emissions or β-caryophyllinic acid yields are underestimated. Concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursor were clearly lower in summer than in winter indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during cold winter season. The β-caryophyllinic and caric acids were correlated with the accumulation mode particle number concentrations.

  6. Individual Aerosol Particles from Biomass Burning in Southern Africa. 1; Compositions and Size Distributions of Carbonaceous Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posfai, Mihaly; Simonics, Renata; Li, Jia; Hobbs, Peter V.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2003-01-01

    Individual aerosol particles in smoke plumes from biomass fires and in regional hazes in southern Africa were studied using analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which allowed detailed characterization of carbonaceous particle types in smoke and determination of changes in particle properties and concentrations during smoke aging. Based on composition, morphology, and microstructure, three distinct types of carbonaceous particles were present in the smoke: organic particles with inorganic (K-salt) inclusions, tar ball particles, and soot. The relative number concentrations of organic particles were largest in young smoke, whereas tar balls were dominant in a slightly aged (1 hour) smoke from a smoldering fire. Flaming fires emitted relatively more soot particles than smoldering fires, but soot was a minor constituent of all studied plumes. Further aging caused the accumulation of sulfate on organic and soot particles, as indicated by the large number of internally mixed organic/sulfate and soot/sulfate particles in the regional haze. Externally mixed ammonium sulfate particles dominated in the boundary layer hazes, whereas organic/sulfate particles were the most abundant type in the upper hazes. Apparently, elevated haze layers were more strongly affected by biomass smoke than those within the boundary layer. Based on size distributions and the observed patterns of internal mixing, we hypothesize that organic and soot particles are the cloud-nucleating constituents of biomass smoke aerosols. Sea-salt particles dominated in the samples taken in stratus clouds over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of Namibia, whereas a distinct haze layer above the clouds consisted of aged biomass smoke particles.

  7. Determination of the strong acidity of atmospheric fine-particles (<2. 5 mum) using annular denuder technology. Standard method, enhanced method

    SciTech Connect

    Purdue, L.J.

    1992-11-01

    The report is a standardized methodology description for the determination of strong acidity of fine particles (less than 2.5 micrometers) in ambient air using annular denuder technology. The methodology description includes two parts: Part A - Standard Method and Part B - Enhanced Method. The Standard Method utilizes a denuder for removing ammonia and a filter assembly for determination of atmospheric strong acidity fine particle aerosols in ambient air, but does not account for potential interferences from nitric acid, ammonium nitrate aerosol or other ammonium salts which might bias the acidity measurement. The Enhanced Method adds an additional denuder upstream of the filter assembly to selectively remove acid gases (nitric acid vapors, nitrous acid and sulfur dioxide) from the gas stream prior to filtration. In addition, backup nylon and citric acid impregnated filters are used to correct for biases due to the dissociation of ammonium nitrate aerosol.

  8. A Computational Study of Acid Catalyzed Aerosol Reactions of Atmospherically Relevant Epoxides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epoxides are important intermediates of atmospheric isoprene oxidation. Their subsequent reactions in the particle phase lead to the production of organic compounds detected in ambient aerosols. We apply density functional theory to determine the important kinetic factors that ...

  9. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single-particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Crippa, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGuire, M. L.; Jeong, C.-H.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Evans, G. J.; Wenger, J. C.

    2013-09-01

    Single-particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single-particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been determined using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC), organic aerosol (OA), ammonium, nitrate, sulfate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), a thermal-optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC). ATOFMS-derived estimated mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67-0.78), and 10 discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorisation, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulfate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA) is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA / EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA) was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidised OA (OOA) was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the range of primary and secondary organic aerosol mixing states in Paris. Examination of the temporal

  10. Bromide content of sea-salt aerosol particles collected over the Indian Ocean during INDOEX 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, R.; von Glasow, R.; Sander, R.; Andreae, M. O.; Crutzen, P. J.

    2002-10-01

    Bromide can be depleted from sea-salt aerosol particles in the marine boundary layer (MBL) and converted to reactive gas-phase species like Br, BrO, and HOBr, which affect ozone chemistry. Air pollution can enhance the bromine release from sea-salt aerosols and thus inject additional bromine into the MBL. During the winter monsoon the northern Indian Ocean is strongly affected by air pollution from the Indian subcontinent and Asia. As part of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), aerosol particles were sampled with stacked filter units (SFU) on the NCAR Hercules C-130 aircraft during February-March 1999. We determined the vertical and latitudinal distribution of the major inorganic aerosol components (NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-) and the Br- content of the coarse aerosol to examine the role of the bromine release on the gas-phase chemistry in the marine boundary layer over the tropical Indian Ocean. The aerosol mass and composition varied significantly with air mass origin and sampling location. In the northern part of the Indian Ocean (5°-15°N, 66°-73°E), high concentrations of pollution-derived inorganic species were found in the marine boundary layer extending from the sea surface to about 1.2 km above sea level. In this layer, the average mass concentration of all aerosol species detected by our technique was comparable to pollution levels observed in industrialized regions. In the Southern Hemisphere (1°-9°S, 66°- 73°E), the aerosol concentrations rapidly declined to remote background levels. A chloride loss from the coarse aerosol particles was observed in parallel to the latitudinal gradient of the non sea salt SO42- burden. In most of the samples, Br- was depleted from the sea-salt aerosols. However, we found an enrichment in bromide in aerosols affected by air masses originating over strong pollution sources in India (Bombay, Calcutta). In these cases the additional pollution-derived Br from organo-halogen additives in petrol

  11. Characterizing the impact of urban emissions on regional aerosol particles: airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freney, E. J.; Sellegri, K.; Canonaco, F.; Colomb, A.; Borbon, A.; Michoud, V.; Doussin, J.-F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Amarouche, N.; Pichon, J.-M.; Bourianne, T.; Gomes, L.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Beekmann, M.; Schwarzenböeck, A.

    2014-02-01

    The MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation) experiment took place in July 2009. The aim of this campaign was to study the aging and reactions of aerosol and gas-phase emissions in the city of Paris. Three ground-based measurement sites and several mobile platforms including instrument equipped vehicles and the ATR-42 aircraft were involved. We present here the variations in particle- and gas-phase species over the city of Paris, using a combination of high-time resolution measurements aboard the ATR-42 aircraft. Particle chemical composition was measured using a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS), giving detailed information on the non-refractory submicron aerosol species. The mass concentration of black carbon (BC), measured by a particle absorption soot photometer (PSAP), was used as a marker to identify the urban pollution plume boundaries. Aerosol mass concentrations and composition were affected by air-mass history, with air masses that spent longest time over land having highest fractions of organic aerosol and higher total mass concentrations. The Paris plume is mainly composed of organic aerosol (OA), BC, and nitrate aerosol, as well as high concentrations of anthropogenic gas-phase species such as toluene, benzene, and NOx. Using BC and CO as tracers for air-mass dilution, we observe the ratio of ΔOA / ΔBC and ΔOA / ΔCO increase with increasing photochemical age (-log(NOx / NOy)). Plotting the equivalent ratios of different organic aerosol species (LV-OOA, SV-OOA, and HOA) illustrate that the increase in OA is a result of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Within Paris the changes in the ΔOA / ΔCO are similar to those observed during other studies in London, Mexico City, and in New England, USA. Using the measured SOA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) species together with organic aerosol formation

  12. Characterizing the impact of urban emissions on regional aerosol particles; airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freney, E. J.; Sellegri, K.; Canonaco, F.; Colomb, A.; Borbon, A.; Michoud, V.; Doussin, J.-F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Amarouch, N.; Pichon, J.-M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Beekmann, M.; Schwarzenböeck, A.

    2013-09-01

    The MEGAPOLI experiment took place in July 2009. The aim of this campaign was to study the aging and reactions of aerosol and gas-phase emissions in the city of Paris. Three ground-based measurement sites and several mobile platforms including instrument equipped vehicles and the ATR-42 aircraft were involved. We present here the variations in particle- and gas-phase species over the city of Paris using a combination of high-time resolution measurements aboard the ATR-42 aircraft. Particle chemical composition was measured using a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS) giving detailed information of the non-refractory submicron aerosol species. The mass concentration of BC, measured by a particle absorption soot photometer (PSAP), was used as a marker to identify the urban pollution plume boundaries. Aerosol mass concentrations and composition were affected by air-mass history, with air masses that spent longest time over land having highest fractions of organic aerosol and higher total mass concentrations. The Paris plume is mainly composed of organic aerosol (OA), black carbon and nitrate aerosol, as well as high concentrations of anthropogenic gas-phase species such as toluene, benzene, and NOx. Using BC and CO as tracers for air-mass dilution, we observe the ratio of ΔOA / ΔBC and ΔOA / ΔCO increase with increasing photochemical age (-log(NOx / NOy). Plotting the equivalent ratios for the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) resolved species (LV-OOA, SV-OOA, and HOA) illustrate that the increase in OA is a result of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Within Paris the changes in the ΔOA / ΔCO are similar to those observed during other studies in Mexico city, Mexico and in New England, USA. Using the measured VOCs species together with recent organic aerosol formation yields we predicted ~ 50% of the measured organics. These airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment show that urban emissions contribute to the formation of OA

  13. Organic functional groups in aerosol particles from burning and non-burning forest emissions at a high-elevation mountain site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahama, S.; Schwartz, R. E.; Russell, L. M.; MacDonald, A. M.; Sharma, S.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2011-07-01

    Ambient particles collected on teflon filters at the Peak of Whistler Mountain, British Columbia (2182 m a.s.l.) during spring and summer 2009 were measured by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for organic functional groups (OFG). The project mean and standard deviation of organic aerosol mass concentrations (OM) for all samples was 3.2±3.3 (μg m-3). Measurements of aerosol mass fragments, size, and number concentrations were used to separate fossil-fuel combustion and burning and non-burning forest sources of the measured organic aerosol. The OM was composed of the same anthropogenic and non-burning forest components observed at Whistler mid-valley in the spring of 2008; during the 2009 campaign, biomass burning aerosol was additionally observed from fire episodes occurring between June and September. On average, organic hydroxyl, alkane, carboxylic acid, ketone, and primary amine groups represented 31 %±11 %, 34 %±9 %, 23 %±6 %, 6 %±7 %, and 6 %±3 % of OM, respectively. Ketones in aerosols were associated with burning and non-burning forest origins, and represented up to 27 % of the OM. The organic aerosol fraction resided almost entirely in the submicron fraction without significant diurnal variations. OM/OC mass ratios ranged mostly between 2.0 and 2.2 and O/C atomic ratios between 0.57 and 0.76, indicating that the organic aerosol reaching the site was highly aged and possibly formed through secondary formation processes.

  14. Polarization properties of aerosol particles over western Japan: classification, seasonal variation, and implications for air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaole; Uno, Itsushi; Hara, Yukari; Osada, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Shigekazu; Wang, Zhe; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Wang, Zifa

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based observation of the polarization properties of aerosol particles using a polarization optical particle counter (POPC) was made from 27 October 2013, to 31 December 2015, at a suburban site in the Kyushu area of Japan. We found that the depolarization ratio (DR, the fraction of s-polarized signal in the total backward light scattering signal) of aerosol particles showed prominent seasonal variability, with peaks in spring (0.21-0.23) and winter (0.19-0.23), and a minimum value (0.09-0.14) in summer. The aerosol compositions in both fine mode (aerodynamic diameter of particle, Dp < 2.5 µm) and coarse mode (2.5 µm < Dp < 10 µm), and the size-dependent polarization characteristics were analyzed for long-range transport dust particles, sea salt, and anthropogenic pollution-dominant aerosols. The DR value increased with increasing particle size, and DR = 0.1 was a reliable threshold value to identify the sphericity of supermicron (Dp > 1 µm) particles. Occurrence of substandard air quality days in Kyushu was closely related with mixed type (coexistence of anthropogenic pollutants and dust particles in the atmosphere), especially in winter and spring, indicating that dust events in the Asian continent played a key role in the cross-boundary transport of continental pollution. Backward trajectory analysis demonstrated that air masses originating from the western Pacific contained large amounts of spherical particles due to the influence of sea salt, especially in summer; however, for air masses from the Asian continent, the dependence of number fraction of spherical particles on air relative humidity was insignificant, indicating the predominance of less-hygroscopic substances (e.g., mineral dust), although the mass concentrations of anthropogenic pollutants were elevated.

  15. Carboxylic acids, sulfates, and organosulfates in processed continental organic aerosol over the southeast Pacific Ocean during VOCALS-REx 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, L. N.; Russell, L. M.; Covert, D. S.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.

    2010-07-01

    Submicron particles were collected on board the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) in the southeast Pacific marine boundary layer in October and November 2008. The aerosol in this region was characterized by low numbers of particles (150-700 cm-3) that were dominated by sulfate ions at concentrations of 0.9 ± 0.7 μg m-3 and organic mass at 0.6 ± 0.4 μg m-3, with no measurable nitrate and low ammonium ion concentrations. Measurements of submicron organic aerosol functional groups and trace elements show that continental outflow of anthropogenic emissions is the dominant source of organic mass (OM) to the southeast Pacific with an additional, smaller contribution of organic mass from primary marine sources. This continental source is supported by a correlation between OM and radon. Saturated aliphatic C-CH (alkane) composed 41 ± 27% of OM. Carboxylic acid COOH (32 ± 23% of OM) was observed in single particles internally mixed with ketonic carbonyl, carbonate, and potassium. Organosulfate COSO3 (4 ± 8% of OM) was observed only during the periods of highest organic and sulfate concentrations and lowest ammonium concentrations, consistent with a sulfuric acid epoxide hydrolysis for proposed surrogate compounds (e.g., isoprene oxidation products) or reactive glyoxal uptake mechanisms from laboratory studies. This correlation suggests that in high-sulfate, low-ammonium conditions, the formation of organosulfate compounds in the atmosphere contributes a significant fraction of aerosol OM (up to 13% in continental air masses). Organic hydroxyl C-OH composed 20 ± 12% of OM and up to 50% of remote marine OM and was inversely correlated with radon indicating a marine source. A two-factor solution of positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis resulted in one factor dominated by organic hydroxyl (>70% by mass) and one factor dominated by saturated aliphatic C-CH (alkane) and carboxylic acid

  16. Hygroscopic Measurements of Aerosol Particles in Colorado during t