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Sample records for acid agonist-induced functional

  1. PPARgamma agonist induced cardiac enlargement is associated with reduced fatty acid and increased glucose utilization in myocardium of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Edgley, Amanda J; Thalén, Pia G; Dahllöf, Björn; Lanne, Boel; Ljung, Bengt; Oakes, Nicholas D

    2006-05-24

    In toxicological studies, high doses of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) agonists cause cardiac enlargement. To investigate whether this could be explained by a large shift from free fatty acid to glucose utilization by the heart, Wistar rats were treated for 2-3 weeks with a potent, selective PPARgamma agonist (X334, 3 micromol/kg/d), or vehicle. X334 treatment increased body-weight gain and ventricular mass. Treatment lowered plasma triglycerides by 61%, free fatty acid levels by 72%, insulin levels by 45%, and reduced total plasma protein concentration by 7% (indicating plasma volume expansion) compared to vehicle animals. Fasting plasma glucose levels were unaltered. To assess cardiac free fatty acid and glucose utilization in vivo we used simultaneous infusions of non-beta-oxidizable free fatty acid analogue, [9,10-(3)H](R)-2-bromopalmitate and [U-(14)C]2-deoxy-d-glucose tracers, which yield indices of local free fatty acid and glucose utilization. In anesthetized, 7 h fasted animals, left ventricular glucose utilization was increased to 182% while free fatty acid utilization was reduced by 28% (P<0.05) compared to vehicle. In separate studies we attempted to prevent the X334-induced hypolipidemia. Various dietary fat supplements were unsuccessful. By contrast, restricting the time during which the treated animals had access to food (promoting endogenous lipolysis), restored plasma free fatty acid from 27% to 72% of vehicle control levels and prevented the cardiac enlargement. Body-weight gain in these treated-food restricted rats was not different from vehicle controls. In conclusion, the cardiac enlargement caused by intense PPARgamma activation in normal animals is associated with marked changes in free fatty acid/glucose utilization and the enlargement can be prevented by restoring free fatty acid availability.

  2. Agonist-induced production of 1,2-diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid in intact resistance arteries. Evidence that accumulation of diacylglycerol is not a prerequisite for contraction.

    PubMed

    Ohanian, J; Ollerenshaw, J; Collins, P; Heagerty, A

    1990-05-25

    The production of total amounts of 1,2-diacylglycerol as well as those specifically derived from inositol lipid hydrolysis was studied in intact rat resistance arteries stimulated with either noradrenaline, vasopressin, or angiotensin II at 20 s when the onset of contraction would be nearing its maximum, and at 5 min during the sustained phase of contraction. Total amounts of 1,2-diacylglycerol were not altered by any agonist at 20 s, or at 5 min. However, arachidonate-containing species of 1,2-diacylglycerol were differentially influenced being increased at 5 min by noradrenaline, and decreased at 20 s and 5 min by vasopressin. Only angiotensin II produced substantial increases in this class of 1,2-diacylglycerol at both time points. In order to investigate the fate of this second messenger total and inositol lipid derived phosphatidic acids were then measured at both 20 s and 5 min. Noradrenaline induced a rise in both total and arachidonate-containing phosphatidic acid at both times as did vasopressin. Only small increases were induced by angiotensin II at 20 s. These data demonstrate that the accumulation of 1,2-diacylglycerol generated from inositol lipid breakdown is only observed with activation by angiotensin II. Other agonists produced phosphatidic acids with time and the rate of generation of these lipids is agonist-specific. Thus phosphatidic acid may play a more prominent role during the sustained phase of contraction than previously anticipated.

  3. Selective incorporation of ( sup 15 S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid in phosphatidylinositol of human neutrophils: Agonist-induced deacylation and transformation of stored hydroxyeicosanoids

    SciTech Connect

    Brezinski, M.E.; Serhan, C.N. )

    1990-08-01

    The uptake and mobilization of (15S)-hydroxy-5,8,11-cis-13-trans-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), a major product of arachidonic acid metabolism, was examined with human neutrophils. Upon exposure to labeled 15-HETE, PMNs rapidly (15 sec to 20 min) incorporated approximately 20% of the label into phosphatidylinositol, while less than 4% was associated with other phospholipid classes and neutral lipids. This pattern was distinct from that of either labeled arachidonate or labeled(5S)-hydroxy-8,11,14-cis-6-trans-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), which within 20 min were predominantly associated with triglycerides and phosphatidylcholine. After reversed-phase HPLC, greater than 98% of the label in phosphatidylinositol, isolated from PMNs, was released with phospholipase A2. Upon exposure to either chemotactic peptide (FMLP), phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, or an ionophore (A23187), 15-HETE-labeled PMNs released 15-HETE from phosphatidylinositol and displayed an impaired ability to generate leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 20-OH-LTB4, and 20-COOH-LTB4. Deacylated (3H)15-HETE was converted to (5S,15S)-dihydroxy-6,13-trans-8,11-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid (5,15-DHETE), lipoxin A4, and lipoxin B4, each carrying 3H label. PMNs labeled with 5-HETE also released and transformed this HETE when stimulated. However, the profile of labeled products differed between PMNs with either esterified 15-HETE or 5-HETE. When activated, 5-HETE-labeled PMNs generated both 5,20-DHETE and 5,15-DHETE but not labeled lipoxins. Threshold aggregation induced by FMLP with 15-HETE-labeled PMNs was inhibited, while the threshold response was relatively unimpaired with either A23187 or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced aggregation. Results indicate that 15-HETE is esterified into phosphatidylinositol of PMNs, which can be mobilized and transformed upon exposure of the cells to a second signal.

  4. GLYX-13, a NMDA Receptor Glycine-Site Functional Partial Agonist, Induces Antidepressant-Like Effects Without Ketamine-Like Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Nicholson, Katherine L; Balster, Robert L; David Leander, J; Stanton, Patric K; Gross, Amanda L; Kroes, Roger A; Moskal, Joseph R

    2013-01-01

    Recent human clinical studies with the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonist ketamine have revealed profound and long-lasting antidepressant effects with rapid onset in several clinical trials, but antidepressant effects were preceded by dissociative side effects. Here we show that GLYX-13, a novel NMDAR glycine-site functional partial agonist, produces an antidepressant-like effect in the Porsolt, novelty induced hypophagia, and learned helplessness tests in rats without exhibiting substance abuse-related, gating, and sedative side effects of ketamine in the drug discrimination, conditioned place preference, pre-pulse inhibition and open-field tests. Like ketamine, the GLYX-13-induced antidepressant-like effects required AMPA/kainate receptor activation, as evidenced by the ability of NBQX to abolish the antidepressant-like effect. Both GLYX-13 and ketamine persistently (24 h) enhanced the induction of long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission and the magnitude of NMDAR-NR2B conductance at rat Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in vitro. Cell surface biotinylation studies showed that both GLYX-13 and ketamine led to increases in both NR2B and GluR1 protein levels, as measured by Western analysis, whereas no changes were seen in mRNA expression (microarray and qRT-PCR). GLYX-13, unlike ketamine, produced its antidepressant-like effect when injected directly into the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). These results suggest that GLYX-13 produces an antidepressant-like effect without the side effects seen with ketamine at least in part by directly modulating NR2B-containing NMDARs in the MPFC. Furthermore, the enhancement of ‘metaplasticity' by both GLYX-13 and ketamine may help explain the long-lasting antidepressant effects of these NMDAR modulators. GLYX-13 is currently in a Phase II clinical development program for treatment-resistant depression. PMID:23303054

  5. Differential β-arrestin2 requirements for constitutive and agonist-induced internalization of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Gyombolai, Pál; Boros, Eszter; Hunyady, László; Turu, Gábor

    2013-06-15

    CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) undergoes both constitutive and agonist-induced internalization, but the underlying mechanisms of these processes and the role of β-arrestins in the regulation of CB1R function are not completely understood. In this study, we followed CB1R internalization using confocal microscopy and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer measurements in HeLa and Neuro-2a cells. We found that upon activation CB1R binds β-arrestin2 (β-arr2), but not β-arrestin1. Furthermore, both the expression of dominant-negative β-arr2 (β-arr2-V54D) and siRNA-mediated knock-down of β-arr2 impaired the agonist-induced internalization of CB1R. In contrast, neither β-arr2-V54D nor β-arr2-specific siRNA had a significant effect on the constitutive internalization of CB1R. However, both constitutive and agonist-induced internalization of CB1R were impaired by siRNA-mediated depletion of clathrin heavy chain. We conclude that although clathrin is required for both constitutive and agonist-stimulated internalization of CB1R, β-arr2 binding is only required for agonist-induced internalization of the receptor suggesting that the molecular mechanisms underlying constitutive and agonist-induced internalization of CB1R are different.

  6. Agonist-induced phosphorylation and desensitization of the P2Y2 nucleotide receptor.

    PubMed

    Flores, Rosa V; Hernández-Pérez, Melvin G; Aquino, Edna; Garrad, Richard C; Weisman, Gary A; Gonzalez, Fernando A

    2005-12-01

    Purification of HA-tagged P2Y2 receptors from transfected human 1321N1 astrocytoma cells yielded a protein with a molecular size determined by SDS-PAGE to be in the range of 57-76 kDa, which is typical of membrane glycoproteins with heterogeneous complex glycosylation. The protein phosphatase inhibitor, okadaic acid, attenuated the recovery of receptor activity from the agonist-induced desensitized state, suggesting a role for P2Y2 receptor phosphorylation in desensitization. Isolation of HA-tagged P2Y2 nucleotide receptors from metabolically [32P]-labelled cells indicated a (3.8 +/- 0.2)-fold increase in the [32P]-content of the receptor after 15 min of treatment with 100 microM UTP, as compared to immunoprecipitated receptors from untreated control cells. Receptor sequestration studies indicated that approximately 40% of the surface receptors were internalized after a 15-min stimulation with 100 microM UTP. Point mutation of three potential GRK and PKC phosphorylation sites in the third intracellular loop and C-terminal tail of the P2Y2 receptor (namely, S243A, T344A, and S356A) extinguished agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation, caused a marked reduction in the efficacy of UTP to desensitize P2Y2 receptor signalling to intracellular calcium mobilization, and impaired agonist-induced receptor internalization. Activation of PKC isoforms with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate that caused heterologous receptor desensitization did not increase the level of P2Y2 receptor phosphorylation. Our results indicate a role for receptor phosphorylation by phorbol-insensitive protein kinases in agonist-induced desensitization of the P2Y2 nucleotide receptor.

  7. Cardamonin inhibits agonist-induced vascular contractility via Rho-kinase and MEK inhibition.

    PubMed

    Je, Hyun Dong; Jeong, Ji Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of cardamonin on vascular smooth muscle contractility and to determine the mechanism(s) involved. Denuded aortic rings from male rats were used and isometric contractions were recorded and combined with molecular experiments. Cardamonin significantly relaxed fluoride-, phenylephrine-, and phorbol ester-induced vascular contractions, suggesting that it has an anti-hypertensive effect on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis. Furthermore, cardamonin significantly inhibited the fluoride-induced increase in pMYPT1 level and phenylephrine-induced increase in pERK1/2 level, suggesting inhibition of Rho-kinase and MEK activity and subsequent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and ERK1/2. This study provides evidence that the relaxing effect of cardamonin on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial function involves inhibition of Rho-kinase and MEK activity.

  8. Agonist-induced platelet procoagulant activity requires shear and a Rac1-dependent signaling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Michael Keegan; Liu, Junling; Kim, Kyungho; Shen, Bo; Stojanovic-Terpo, Aleksandra; Zheng, Yi; Cho, Jaehyung

    2014-01-01

    Activated platelets facilitate blood coagulation by exposing phosphatidylserine (PS) and releasing microvesicles (MVs). However, the potent physiological agonists thrombin and collagen poorly induce PS exposure when a single agonist is used. To obtain a greater procoagulant response, thrombin is commonly used in combination with glycoprotein VI agonists. However, even under these conditions, only a percentage of platelets express procoagulant activity. To date, it remains unclear why platelets poorly expose PS even when stimulated with multiple agonists and what the signaling pathways are of soluble agonist-induced platelet procoagulant activity. Here we show that physiological levels of shear present in blood significantly enhance agonist-induced platelet PS exposure and MV release, enabling low doses of a single agonist to induce full-scale platelet procoagulant activity. PS exposed on the platelet surface was immediately released as MVs, revealing a tight coupling between the 2 processes under shear. Using platelet-specific Rac1−/− mice, we discovered that Rac1 plays a common role in mediating the low-dose agonist-induced procoagulant response independent of platelet aggregation, secretion, and the apoptosis pathway. Platelet-specific Rac1 function was not only important for coagulation in vitro but also for fibrin accumulation in vivo following laser-induced arteriolar injury. PMID:25079357

  9. The Inhibitory Effect of Shikonin on the Agonist-Induced Regulation of Vascular Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Je, Hyun Dong; Kim, Hyeong-Dong; La, Hyen-Oh

    2015-01-01

    Shikonin, a natural flavonoid found in the roots of Lithospermum erythrorhizon, has been shown to possess many biological functions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of shikonin on vascular smooth muscle contractility and to determine the mechanism involved. Denuded aortic rings from male rats were used and isometric contractions were recorded and combined with molecular experiments. Shikonin significantly relaxed fluoride-, thromboxane A2- or phorbol ester-induced vascular contraction suggesting as a possible anti-hypertensive on the agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis. Furthermore, shikonin significantly inhibited fluoride-induced increases in pMYPT1 levels and phorbol ester-induced increases in pERK1/2 levels suggesting the mechanism involving the inhibition of Rho-kinase activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and the inhibition of MEK activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study provides evidence regarding the mechanism underlying the relaxation effect of shikonin on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial function. PMID:25995821

  10. Endothelium-Independent Effect of Fisetin on the Agonist-Induced Regulation of Vascular Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Je, Hyun Dong; Sohn, Uy Dong; La, Hyen-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Fisetin, a natural flavonoid found in a variety of vegetables and fruits, has been shown to possess many biological functions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of fisetin on vascular smooth muscle contractility and to determine the mechanism involved. Denuded aortic rings from male rats were used and isometric contractions were recorded and combined with molecular experiments. Fisetin significantly relaxed fluoride-, thromboxane A2- or phorbol ester-induced vascular contraction suggesting as a possible anti-hypertensive on the agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis. Furthermore, fisetin significantly inhibited fluoride-induced increases in pMYPT1 levels and phorbol ester-induced increases in pERK1/2 levels suggesting the mechanism involving the inhibition of Rho-kinase activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and MEK activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study provides evidence regarding the mechanism underlying the relaxation effect of fisetin on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial function. PMID:26759702

  11. Studies on the adrenomedullary dependence of kappa-opioid agonist-induced diuresis in conscious rats.

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, K. R.

    1989-01-01

    1. The dependence of kappa-opioid agonist-induced diuresis, upon an intact and functional adrenal medulla in conscious rats, was investigated in order to test the hypothesis that the diuresis is mediated by a blood-borne 'diuretic factor', of adrenomedullary origin, released by kappa-opioid receptor stimulation. 2. Confirming previous observations, adrenal demedullation significantly attenuated diuretic responses to the kappa-opioid agonists U50488H, ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) and tifluadom, but did not affect basal urine output, furosemide-induced diuresis or the antidiuretic response to the mu-opioid agonist, buprenorphine. Naloxone abolished U50488H-induced diuresis, confirming an involvement of opioid receptors. 3. Transfusion studies established that blood, from intact rats treated with U50488H, induced diuresis in intact and demedullated recipient rats, whether or not the recipients had been pretreated with naloxone. However, blood from demedullated rats treated with U50448H was unable to induce diuresis when administered to intact or demedullated recipients. 4. It is concluded that kappa-opioid agonist-induced diuresis is dependent upon an intact and functional adrenal medulla and appears to be mediated by a blood-borne 'diuretic factor' of adrenomedullary origin. PMID:2558758

  12. The inhibitory effect of shikonin on the agonist-induced regulation of vascular contractility.

    PubMed

    Je, Hyun Dong; Kim, Hyeong-Dong; La, Hyen-Oh

    2015-05-01

    Shikonin, a natural flavonoid found in the roots of Lithospermum erythrorhizon, has been shown to possess many biological functions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of shikonin on vascular smooth muscle contractility and to determine the mechanism involved. Denuded aortic rings from male rats were used and isometric contractions were recorded and combined with molecular experiments. Shikonin significantly relaxed fluoride-, thromboxane A2- or phorbol ester-induced vascular contraction suggesting as a possible anti-hypertensive on the agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis. Furthermore, shikonin significantly inhibited fluoride-induced increases in pMYPT1 levels and phorbol ester-induced increases in pERK1/2 levels suggesting the mechanism involving the inhibition of Rho-kinase activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and the inhibition of MEK activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study provides evidence regarding the mechanism underlying the relaxation effect of shikonin on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial function.

  13. Endothelium-Independent Effect of Fisetin on the Agonist-Induced Regulation of Vascular Contractility.

    PubMed

    Je, Hyun Dong; Sohn, Uy Dong; La, Hyen-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Fisetin, a natural flavonoid found in a variety of vegetables and fruits, has been shown to possess many biological functions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of fisetin on vascular smooth muscle contractility and to determine the mechanism involved. Denuded aortic rings from male rats were used and isometric contractions were recorded and combined with molecular experiments. Fisetin significantly relaxed fluoride-, thromboxane A2- or phorbol ester-induced vascular contraction suggesting as a possible anti-hypertensive on the agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis. Furthermore, fisetin significantly inhibited fluoride-induced increases in pMYPT1 levels and phorbol ester-induced increases in pERK1/2 levels suggesting the mechanism involving the inhibition of Rho-kinase activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and MEK activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study provides evidence regarding the mechanism underlying the relaxation effect of fisetin on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial function.

  14. C-terminal of human histamine H1 receptors regulates their agonist-induced clathrin-mediated internalization and G-protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Hishinuma, Shigeru; Nozawa, Hiroki; Akatsu, Chizuru; Shoji, Masaru

    2016-11-01

    It has been suggested that the agonist-induced internalization of G-protein-coupled receptors from the cell surface into intracellular compartments regulates cellular responsiveness. We previously reported that Gq/11 -protein-coupled human histamine H1 receptors internalized via clathrin-dependent mechanisms upon stimulation with histamine. However, the molecular determinants of H1 receptors responsible for agonist-induced internalization remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the roles of the intracellular C-terminal of human histamine H1 receptors tagged with hemagglutinin (HA) at the N-terminal in histamine-induced internalization in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The histamine-induced internalization was evaluated by the receptor binding assay with [(3) H]mepyramine and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy with an anti-HA antibody. We found that histamine-induced internalization was inhibited under hypertonic conditions or by pitstop, a clathrin terminal domain inhibitor, but not by filipin or nystatin, disruptors of the caveolar structure and function. The histamine-induced internalization was also inhibited by truncation of a single amino acid, Ser487, located at the end of the intracellular C-terminal of H1 receptors, but not by its mutation to alanine. In contrast, the receptor-G-protein coupling, which was evaluated by histamine-induced accumulation of [(3) H]inositol phosphates, was potentiated by truncation of Ser487, but was lost by its mutation to alanine. These results suggest that the intracellular C-terminal of human H1 receptors, which only comprises 17 amino acids (Cys471-Ser487), plays crucial roles in both clathrin-dependent internalization of H1 receptors and G-protein signaling, in which truncation of Ser487 and its mutation to alanine are revealed to result in biased signaling toward activation of G-proteins and clathrin-mediated internalization, respectively.

  15. Ursodeoxycholic acid attenuates colonic epithelial secretory function

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Orlaith B; Mroz, Magdalena S; Ward, Joseph B J; Colliva, Carolina; Scharl, Michael; Pellicciari, Roberto; Gilmer, John F; Fallon, Padraic G; Hofmann, Alan F; Roda, Aldo; Murray, Frank E; Keely, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Dihydroxy bile acids, such as chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), are well known to promote colonic fluid and electrolyte secretion, thereby causing diarrhoea associated with bile acid malabsorption. However, CDCA is rapidly metabolised by colonic bacteria to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), the effects of which on epithelial transport are poorly characterised. Here, we investigated the role of UDCA in the regulation of colonic epithelial secretion. Cl− secretion was measured across voltage-clamped monolayers of T84 cells and muscle-stripped sections of mouse or human colon. Cell surface biotinylation was used to assess abundance/surface expression of transport proteins. Acute (15 min) treatment of T84 cells with bilateral UDCA attenuated Cl− secretory responses to the Ca2+ and cAMP-dependent secretagogues carbachol (CCh) and forskolin (FSK) to 14.0 ± 3.8 and 40.2 ± 7.4% of controls, respectively (n= 18, P < 0.001). Investigation of the molecular targets involved revealed that UDCA acts by inhibiting Na+/K+-ATPase activity and basolateral K+ channel currents, without altering their cell surface expression. In contrast, intraperitoneal administration of UDCA (25 mg kg−1) to mice enhanced agonist-induced colonic secretory responses, an effect we hypothesised to be due to bacterial metabolism of UDCA to lithocholic acid (LCA). Accordingly, LCA (50–200 μm) enhanced agonist-induced secretory responses in vitro and a metabolically stable UDCA analogue, 6α-methyl-UDCA, exerted anti-secretory actions in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, UDCA exerts direct anti-secretory actions on colonic epithelial cells and metabolically stable derivatives of the bile acid may offer a new approach for treating intestinal diseases associated with diarrhoea. PMID:23507881

  16. Cold Suppresses Agonist-induced Activation of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Chung, M.-K.; Wang, S.

    2011-01-01

    Cold therapy is frequently used to reduce pain and edema following acute injury or surgery such as tooth extraction. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of cold therapy are not completely understood. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and pathological pain under conditions of inflammation or injury. Although capsaicin-induced nociception, neuropeptide release, and ionic currents are suppressed by cold, it is not known if cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of recombinant TRPV1. We demonstrate that cold strongly suppressed the activation of recombinant TRPV1 by multiple agonists and capsaicin-evoked currents in trigeminal ganglia neurons under normal and phosphorylated conditions. Cold-induced suppression was partially impaired in a TRPV1 mutant that lacked heat-mediated activation and potentiation. These results suggest that cold-induced suppression of TRPV1 may share a common molecular basis with heat-induced potentiation, and that allosteric inhibition may contribute, in part, to the cold-induced suppression. We also show that combination of cold and a specific antagonist of TRPV1 can produce an additive suppression. Our results provide a mechanistic basis for cold therapy and may enhance anti-nociceptive approaches that target TRPV1 for managing pain under inflammation and tissue injury, including that from tooth extraction. PMID:21666106

  17. Cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Chung, M-K; Wang, S

    2011-09-01

    Cold therapy is frequently used to reduce pain and edema following acute injury or surgery such as tooth extraction. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of cold therapy are not completely understood. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and pathological pain under conditions of inflammation or injury. Although capsaicin-induced nociception, neuropeptide release, and ionic currents are suppressed by cold, it is not known if cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of recombinant TRPV1. We demonstrate that cold strongly suppressed the activation of recombinant TRPV1 by multiple agonists and capsaicin-evoked currents in trigeminal ganglia neurons under normal and phosphorylated conditions. Cold-induced suppression was partially impaired in a TRPV1 mutant that lacked heat-mediated activation and potentiation. These results suggest that cold-induced suppression of TRPV1 may share a common molecular basis with heat-induced potentiation, and that allosteric inhibition may contribute, in part, to the cold-induced suppression. We also show that combination of cold and a specific antagonist of TRPV1 can produce an additive suppression. Our results provide a mechanistic basis for cold therapy and may enhance anti-nociceptive approaches that target TRPV1 for managing pain under inflammation and tissue injury, including that from tooth extraction.

  18. The role of TRPP2 in agonist-induced gallbladder smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xingguo; Fu, Jie; Song, Kai; Xue, Nairui; Gong, Renhua; Sun, Dengqun; Luo, Huilai; He, Wenzhu; Pan, Xiang; Shen, Bing; Du, Juan

    2016-04-01

    TRPP2 channel protein belongs to the superfamily of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and is widely expressed in various tissues, including smooth muscle in digestive gut. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that TRPP2 can mediate Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+) stores. However, the functional role of TRPP2 in gallbladder smooth muscle contraction still remains unclear. In this study, we used Ca(2+) imaging and tension measurements to test agonist-induced intracellular Ca(2+) concentration increase and smooth muscle contraction of guinea pig gallbladder, respectively. When TRPP2 protein was knocked down in gallbladder muscle strips from guinea pig, carbachol (CCh)-evoked Ca(2+) release and extracellular Ca(2+) influx were reduced significantly, and gallbladder contractions induced by endothelin 1 and cholecystokinin were suppressed markedly as well. CCh-induced gallbladder contraction was markedly suppressed by pretreatment with U73122, which inhibits phospholipase C to terminate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3) production, and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2APB), which inhibits IP3 recepor (IP3R) to abolish IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) release. To confirm the role of Ca(2+) release in CCh-induced gallbladder contraction, we used thapsigargin (TG)-to deplete Ca(2+) stores via inhibiting sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase and eliminate the role of store-operated Ca(2+) entry on the CCh-induced gallbladder contraction. Preincubation with 2 μmol L(-1) TG significantly decreased the CCh-induced gallbladder contraction. In addition, pretreatments with U73122, 2APB or TG abolished the difference of the CCh-induced gallbladder contraction between TRPP2 knockdown and control groups. We conclude that TRPP2 mediates Ca(2+) release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores, and has an essential role in agonist-induced gallbladder muscle contraction.

  19. A single mutation of the neurokinin-2 (NK2) receptor prevents agonist-induced desensitization. Divergent conformational requirements for NK2 receptor signaling and agonist-induced desensitization in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, K; Chollet, A

    1995-11-17

    Receptor activation and agonist-induced desensitization of the human neurokinin-2 (NK2) receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes have been investigated. When neurokinin A (NKA) was applied repeatedly at 5-min intervals, the second and subsequent applications gave no responses. This desensitization was not observed with the specific agonists (Lys3, Gly8-R-gamma-lactam-Leu9)NKA(3-10) (GR64349) or (Nle10)-NKA(4-10). However, in the presence of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, stimulation with GR64349 or (Nle10)-NKA(4-10) induced receptor desensitization. In contrast, the protein kinase C inhibitor Ro-31-8220 was not able to enhance GR64349-mediated desensitization. We created a mutation (F248S) in the third cytoplasmic loop of NK2 that impairs NKA-induced desensitization. In the presence of either staurosporine or Ro-31-8220, the mutant receptor was desensitized in response to NKA application but not to GR64349. Also, truncation mutants delta 62 and delta 87, lacking serine and threonine residues in the cytoplasmic COOH-terminal tail, were functionally active and were partially resistant to desensitization. These observations indicate that 1) there are different conformational requirements for NK2 receptor signalling and agonist-induced desensitization, 2) the third intracellular loop and the cytoplasmic tail of NK2 are functional domains important for agonist-induced desensitization, and 3) some agonists at the NK2 receptor cause much more desensitization than others and suggest that this might result from phosphorylation by receptor-specific kinases and other non-identified protein kinases.

  20. Asymmetrical, agonist-induced fluctuations in local extracellular [Ca2+] in intact polarized epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Caroppo, Rosa; Gerbino, Andrea; Debellis, Lucantonio; Kifor, Olga; Soybel, David I.; Brown, Edward M.; Hofer, Aldebaran M.; Curci, Silvana

    2001-01-01

    We recently proposed that extracellular Ca2+ ions participate in a novel form of intercellular communication involving the extracellular Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaR). Here, using Ca2+-selective microelectrodes, we directly measured the profile of agonist-induced [Ca2+]ext changes in restricted domains near the basolateral or luminal membranes of polarized gastric acid-secreting cells. The Ca2+-mobilizing agonist carbachol elicited a transient, La3+-sensitive decrease in basolateral [Ca2+] (average ≈250 µM, but as large as 530 µM). Conversely, carbachol evoked an HgCl2-sensitive increase in [Ca2+] (average ≈400 µM, but as large as 520 µM) in the lumen of single gastric glands. Both responses were significantly reduced by pre-treatment with sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) pump inhibitors or with the intracellular Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. Immunofluores cence experiments demonstrated an asymmetric localization of plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase (PMCA), which appeared to be partially co-localized with CaR and the gastric H+/K+-ATPase in the apical membrane of the acid-secreting cells. Our data indicate that agonist stimulation results in local fluctuations in [Ca2+]ext that would be sufficient to modulate the activity of the CaR on neighboring cells. PMID:11707403

  1. The Inhibitory Effect of Apigenin on the Agonist-Induced Regulation of Vascular Contractility via Calcium Desensitization-Related Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Je, Hyun Dong; Kim, Hyeong-Dong; La, Hyen-Oh

    2014-01-01

    Apigenin, a natural flavonoid found in a variety of vegetables and fruits, has been shown to possess many biological functions. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of apigenin on vascular smooth muscle contractility and to determine the mechanism involved. Denuded aortic rings from male rats were used and isometric contractions were recorded and combined with molecular experiments. Apigenin significantly relaxed fluoride-, thromboxane A2 mimetic- or phorbol ester-induced vascular contraction, which suggests that apigenin could be an anti-hypertensive that reduces agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial nitric oxide synthesis. Furthermore, apigenin significantly inhibited fluoride-induced increases in pMYPT1 levels and phorbol ester-induced increases in pERK1/2 levels, which suggests the mechanism involving the inhibition of Rho-kinase and MEK activity and the subsequent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and ERK1/2. This study provides evidence regarding the mechanism underlying the relaxation effect of apigenin on agonist-induced vascular contraction regardless of endothelial function. PMID:24753814

  2. SERCA2a controls the mode of agonist-induced intracellular Ca2+ signal, transcription factor NFAT and proliferation in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Bobe, Regis; Hadri, Lahouaria; Lopez, Jose J.; Sassi, Yassine; Atassi, Fabrice; Karakikes, Ioannis; Liang, Lifan; Limon, Isabelle; Lompré, Anne-Marie; Hatem, Stephane N.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Lipskaia, Larissa

    2011-01-01

    In blood vessels, tone is maintained by agonist-induced cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations of quiescent/contractile vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). However, in synthetic/proliferative VSMCs, Gq/phosphoinositide receptor-coupled agonists trigger a steady-state increase in cytosolic Ca2+ followed by a Store Operated Calcium Entry (SOCE) which translates into activation of the proliferation-associated transcription factor NFAT. Here, we report that in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs), the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase type 2a (SERCA2a) expressed in the contractile form of the hCASMCs, controls the nature of the agonist-induced Ca2+ transient and the resulting down-stream signaling pathway. Indeed, restoring SERCA2a expression by gene transfer in synthetic hCASMCs 1) increased Ca2+ storage capacity; 2) modified agonist-induced IP3R Ca2+ release from steady-state to oscillatory mode (the frequency of agonist-induced IP3R Ca2+ signal was 11.66 ± 1.40/100 sec in SERCA2a-expressing cells (n=39) vs 1.37 ± 0.20/100 sec in control cell (n=45), p<0.01); 3) suppressed SOCE by preventing interactions between SR calcium sensor STIM1 and pore forming unit ORAI1; 4) inhibited calcium regulated transcription factor NFAT and its down-stream physiological function such as proliferation and migration. This study provides evidence for the first time that oscillatory and steady-state patterns of Ca2+ transients have different effects on calcium-dependent physiological functions in smooth muscle cells. PMID:21195084

  3. STING Agonists Induce an Innate Antiviral Immune Response against Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fang; Zhao, Xuesen; Wang, Jianghua; Liu, Fei; Xu, Chunxiao; Wei, Lai; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Block, Timothy M.; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2014-01-01

    Chronicity of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is due to the failure of a host to mount a sufficient immune response to clear the virus. The aim of this study was to identify small-molecular agonists of the pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-mediated innate immune response to control HBV infection. To achieve this goal, a coupled mouse macrophage and hepatocyte culture system mimicking the intrahepatic environment was established and used to screen small-molecular compounds that activate macrophages to produce cytokines, which in turn suppress HBV replication in a hepatocyte-derived stable cell line supporting HBV replication in a tetracycline-inducible manner. An agonist of the mouse stimulator of interferon (IFN) genes (STING), 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA), was found to induce a robust cytokine response in macrophages that efficiently suppressed HBV replication in mouse hepatocytes by reducing the amount of cytoplasmic viral nucleocapsids. Profiling of cytokines induced by DMXAA and agonists of representative Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in mouse macrophages revealed that, unlike TLR agonists that induced a predominant inflammatory cytokine/chemokine response, the STING agonist induced a cytokine response dominated by type I IFNs. Moreover, as demonstrated in an HBV hydrodynamic mouse model, intraperitoneal administration of DMXAA significantly induced the expression of IFN-stimulated genes and reduced HBV DNA replication intermediates in the livers of mice. This study thus proves the concept that activation of the STING pathway induces an antiviral cytokine response against HBV and that the development of small-molecular human STING agonists as immunotherapeutic agents for treatment of chronic hepatitis B is warranted. PMID:25512416

  4. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy.

    PubMed

    Keane, Fergus; Egan, Aoife M; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare.Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas.GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma.

  5. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  6. Agonist-induced internalization and desensitization of the apelin receptor.

    PubMed

    Pope, George R; Tilve, Sharada; McArdle, Craig A; Lolait, Stephen J; O'Carroll, Anne-Marie

    2016-12-05

    Apelin acts via the G protein-coupled apelin receptor (APJ) to mediate effects on cardiovascular and fluid homeostasis. G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) trafficking has an important role in the regulation of receptor signalling pathways and cellular functions, however in the case of APJ the mechanisms and proteins involved in apelin-induced trafficking are not well understood. We generated a stable HEK-293 cell line expressing N-terminus HA-tagged mouse (m) APJ, and used a semi-automated imaging protocol to quantitate APJ trafficking and ERK1/2 activation following stimulation with [Pyr(1)]apelin-13. The mechanisms of [Pyr(1)]apelin-13-induced internalization and desensitization were explored using dominant-negative mutant (DNM) cDNA constructs of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), β-arrestin1, EPS15 and dynamin. The di-phosphorylated ERK1/2 (ppERK1/2) response to [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 desensitized during sustained stimulation, due to upstream APJ-specific adaptive changes. Furthermore, [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 stimulation caused internalization of mAPJ via clathrin coated vesicles (CCVs) and also caused a rapid reduction in cell surface and whole cell HA-mAPJ. Our data suggest that upon continuous agonist exposure GRK2-mediated phosphorylation targets APJ to CCVs that are internalized from the cell surface in a β-arrestin1-independent, EPS15- and dynamin-dependent manner. Internalization does not appear to contribute to the desensitization of APJ-mediated ppERK1/2 activation in these cells. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Fatty acids and lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Calder, P C; Yaqoob, P; Thies, F; Wallace, F A; Miles, E A

    2002-01-01

    The immune system acts to protect the host against pathogenic invaders. However, components of the immune system can become dysregulated such that their activities are directed against host tissues, so causing damage. Lymphocytes are involved in both the beneficial and detrimental effects of the immune system. Both the level of fat and the types of fatty acid present in the diet can affect lymphocyte functions. The fatty acid composition of lymphocytes, and other immune cells, is altered according to the fatty acid composition of the diet and this alters the capacity of those cells to produce eicosanoids, such as prostaglandin E2, which are involved in immunoregulation. A high fat diet can impair lymphocyte function. Cell culture and animal feeding studies indicate that oleic, linoleic, conjugated linoleic, gamma-linolenic, dihomo-gamma-linolenic, arachidonic, alpha-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids can all influence lymphocyte proliferation, the production of cytokines by lymphocytes, and natural killer cell activity. High intakes of some of these fatty acids are necessary to induce these effects. Among these fatty acids the long chain n-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid, appear to be the most potent when included in the human diet. Although not all studies agree, it appears that fish oil, which contains eicosapentaenoic acid, down regulates the T-helper 1-type response which is associated with chronic inflammatory disease. There is evidence for beneficial effects of fish oil in such diseases; this evidence is strongest for rheumatoid arthritis. Since n-3 fatty acids also antagonise the production of inflammatory eicosanoid mediators from arachidonic acid, there is potential for benefit in asthma and related diseases. Recent evidence indicates that fish oil may be of benefit in some asthmatics but not others.

  8. Functional nucleic acid probes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2006-10-03

    The present invention provides functional nucleic acid probes, and methods of using functional nucleic acid probes, for binding a target to carry out a desired function. The probes have at least one functional nucleic acid, at least one regulating nucleic acid, and at least one attenuator. The functional nucleic acid is maintained in an inactive state by the attenuator and activated by the regulating nucleic acid only in the presence of a regulating nucleic acid target. In its activated state the functional nucleic acid can bind to its target to carry out a desired function, such as generating a signal, cleaving a nucleic acid, or catalyzing a reaction.

  9. Functional analysis of free fatty acid receptor GPR120 in human eosinophils: implications in metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yasunori; Ueki, Shigeharu; Takeda, Masahide; Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Tamaki, Mami; Moritoki, Yuki; Oyamada, Hajime; Itoga, Masamichi; Kayaba, Hiroyuki; Omokawa, Ayumi; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that eosinophils play an important role in metabolic homeostasis through Th2 cytokine production. GPR120 (FFA4) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for long-chain fatty acids that functions as a regulator of physiological energy metabolism. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether human eosinophils express GPR120 and, if present, whether it possesses a functional capacity on eosinophils. Eosinophils isolated from peripheral venous blood expressed GPR120 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Stimulation with a synthetic GPR120 agonist, GW9508, induced rapid down-regulation of cell surface expression of GPR120, suggesting ligand-dependent receptor internalization. Although GPR120 activation did not induce eosinophil chemotactic response and degranulation, we found that GW9508 inhibited eosinophil spontaneous apoptosis and Fas receptor expression. The anti-apoptotic effect was attenuated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors and was associated with inhibition of caspase-3 activity. Eosinophil response investigated using ELISpot assay indicated that stimulation with a GPR120 agonist induced IL-4 secretion. These findings demonstrate the novel functional properties of fatty acid sensor GPR120 on human eosinophils and indicate the previously unrecognized link between nutrient metabolism and the immune system.

  10. Mildly oxidized HDL decrease agonist-induced platelet aggregation and release of pro-coagulant platelet extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Tafelmeier, M; Fischer, A; Orsó, E; Konovalova, T; Böttcher, A; Liebisch, G; Matysik, S; Schmitz, G

    2017-05-01

    Stored platelet concentrates (PLCs) for therapeutic purpose, develop a platelet storage lesion (PSL), characterized by impaired platelet (PLT) viability and function, platelet extracellular vesicle (PL-EV) release and profound lipidomic changes. Whereas oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) activates PLTs and promotes atherosclerosis, effects linked to oxidized high-density lipoprotein (oxHDL) are poorly characterized. PLCs from blood donors were treated with native (nHDL) or mildly oxidized HDL (moxHDL) for 5days under blood banking conditions. Flow cytometry, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), aggregometry, immunoblot analysis and mass spectrometry were carried out to analyze PL-EV and platelet exosomes (PL-EX) release, PLT aggregation, protein expression, and PLT and plasma lipid composition. In comparison to total nHDL, moxHDL significantly decreased PL-EV release by -36% after 5days of PLT storage and partially reversed agonist-induced PLT aggregation. PL-EV release positively correlated with PLT aggregation. MoxHDL improved PLT membrane lipid homeostasis through enhanced uptake of lysophospholipids and their remodeling to corresponding phospholipid species. This also appeared for sphingomyelin (SM) and d18:0/d18:1 sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) at the expense of ceramide (Cer) and hexosylceramide (HexCer) leading to reduced Cer/S1P ratio as PLT-viability indicator. This membrane remodeling was associated with increased content of CD36 and maturation of scavenger receptor-B1 (SR-B1) protein in secreted PL-EVs. MoxHDL, more potently than nHDL, improves PLT-membrane lipid homeostasis, partially antagonizes PL-EV release and agonist-induced PLT aggregation. Altogether, this may be the result of more efficient phospho- and sphingolipid remodeling mediated by CD36 and SR-B1 in the absence of ABCA1 on PLTs. As in vitro supplement in PLCs, moxHDL has the potential to improve PLC quality and to prolong storage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. TNFR and LTbetaR agonists induce follicle-associated epithelium and M cell specific genes in rat and human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Lopez-Fraga, Marta; Rynko, Abby; Lo, David D

    2009-07-01

    M cells assist mucosal immune surveillance by transcytosis of particles to underlying lymphoid tissue, but the mechanisms of M cell differentiation are poorly understood. To develop a better defined cell culture model of M cell differentiation, we treated human (Caco-2BBe) and rat (IEC-6) intestinal epithelial cell lines with lymphotoxin beta receptor (LTbetaR) and TNF receptor (TNFR) agonists. Treated cells were studied for regulation of genes associated with M cell and follicle-associated epithelium (FAE). We found that LTbetaR and TNFR agonists induce transcription of FAE-specific genes (Ccl20 and Lamb3) in Caco2-BBe cells and IEC-6 cells as well as rodent M cell specific genes such as Sgne-1/Scg5, Cldn4, and Gp2. The cytokines have distinct but complementary effects; TNFR agonists mainly induced FAE-specific genes, while the LTbetaR agonist induced M cell specific genes. The combination of cytokines showed additive induction of the FAE-associated Ccl20, Lamb3 and a surprising induction of CD137/Tnfrsf9. On the other hand TNF agonists appeared to suppress expression of some LTbetaR-induced genes. Functionally, cytokine treatment led to the reorganization of microvilli and Claudin-4 redistribution. These studies suggest complex interactions between these cytokines in the context of either inflammation or tissue differentiation.

  12. PPARγ agonists induce adipocyte differentiation by modulating the expression of Lipin-1, which acts as a PPARγ phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jina; Lee, Yu-Jin; Kim, Jung Min; Lee, So Young; Bae, Myung-Ae; Ahn, Jin Hee; Han, Dong Cho; Kwon, Byoung-Mog

    2016-12-01

    PPARγ agonists induced obesity in animal models as a side effect. Microarray experiments reveal that PPARγ agonist upregulates the expression of lipin-1 and this upregulation is correlated with the activity of the agonists. Lipin-1 induced by PPARγ agonists decreased the levels of PPARγ and ERK1/2 phosphorylation through direct interaction with these proteins in 3T3-L1 cells. In PPARγ agonist-treated 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, the knockdown of lipin-1 expression by small interfering RNA inhibited the adipogenesis that was induced by PPARγ agonists. In contrast, PPARγ2 expression was increased, and lipid droplets were accumulated in lipin-1-overexpressing 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Rosiglitazone (RGZ), a strong PPARγ agonist, synergistically promoted PPARγ dephosphorylation and adipogenesis in lipin-1-overexpressing 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Therefore, lipin-1 has dual functions as a transcriptional cofactor and phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP) in the differentiation of preadipocyte cells induced by strong PPARγ agonists. In addition, the adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells was markedly upregulated by diacylglycerol (DAG), which was produced by lipin-1. Therefore, lipin-1 induction by PPARγ agonists might be an important factor in understanding the biological mechanism of the agonists' adverse effects, and this information may be valuable in the development of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) therapeutics with reduced adverse effects and greater tolerability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Agonist-induced internalisation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is mediated by the Gαq pathway.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Aiysha; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and an important target in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Upon stimulation with agonist, the GLP-1R signals through both Gαs and Gαq coupled pathways to stimulate insulin secretion. The agonist-induced GLP-1R internalisation has recently been shown to be important for insulin secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying GLP-1R internalisation remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the role of GLP-1R downstream signalling pathways in its internalisation. Agonist-induced human GLP-1R (hGLP-1R) internalisation and activity were examined using a number of techniques including immunoblotting, ELISA, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays to determine cAMP production, intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and ERK phosphorylation. Agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation is dependent on caveolin-1 and dynamin. Inhibition of the Gαq pathway but not the Gαs pathway affected hGLP-1R internalisation. Consistent with this, hGLP-1R mutant T149M and small-molecule agonists (compound 2 and compound B), which activate only the Gαs pathway, failed to induce internalisation of the receptor. Chemical inhibitors of the Gαq pathway, PKC and ERK phosphorylation significantly reduced agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation. These inhibitors also suppressed agonist-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation demonstrating that the phosphorylated ERK acts downstream of the Gαq pathway in the hGLP-1R internalisation. In summary, agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation is mediated by the Gαq pathway. The internalised hGLP-1R stimulates insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, indicating the importance of GLP-1 internalisation for insulin secretion.

  14. Beryllium competitively inhibits brain myo-inositol monophosphatase, but unlike lithium does not enhance agonist-induced inositol phosphate accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Faraci, W S; Zorn, S H; Bakker, A V; Jackson, E; Pratt, K

    1993-01-01

    Despite limiting side-effects, lithium is the drug of choice for the treatment of bipolar depression. Its action may be due, in part, to its ability to dampen phosphatidylinositol turnover by inhibiting myo-inositol monophosphatase. Beryllium has been identified as a potent inhibitor of partially purified myo-inositol monophosphatase isolated from rat brain (Ki = 150 nM), bovine brain (Ki = 35 nM), and from the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH (Ki = 85 nM). It is over three orders of magnitude more potent than LiCl (Ki = 0.5-1.2 mM). Kinetic analysis reveals that beryllium is a competitive inhibitor of myo-inositol monophosphatase, in contrast with lithium which is an uncompetitive inhibitor. Inhibition of exogenous [3H]inositol phosphate hydrolysis by beryllium (IC50 = 250-300 nM) was observed to the same maximal extent as that seen with lithium in permeabilized SK-N-SH cells, reflecting inhibition of cellular myo-inositol monophosphatase. However, in contrast with that observed with lithium, agonist-induced accumulation of inositol phosphate was not observed with beryllium in permeabilized and non-permeabilized SK-N-SH cells and in rat brain slices. Similar results were obtained in permeabilized SK-N-SH cells when GTP-gamma-S was used as an alternative stimulator of inositol phosphate accumulation. The disparity in the actions of beryllium and lithium suggest that either (1) selective inhibition of myo-inositol monophosphatase does not completely explain the action of lithium on the phosphatidylinositol cycle, or (2) that uncompetitive inhibition of myo-inositol monophosphatase is a necessary requirement to observe functional lithium mimetic activity. PMID:8387266

  15. Agonist-induced sensitisation of the irritant receptor ion channel TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Meents, Jannis E; Fischer, Michael J M; McNaughton, Peter A

    2016-11-15

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel is expressed in nociceptive neurons and its activation causes ongoing pain and inflammation; TRPA1 is thought to play an important role in inflammation in the airways. TRPA1 is sensitised by repeated stimulation with chemical agonists in a calcium-free environment and this sensitisation is very long lasting following agonist removal. We show that agonist-induced sensitisation is independent of the agonist's binding site and is also independent of ion channel trafficking or of other typical signalling pathways. We find that sensitisation is intrinsic to the TRPA1 protein and is accompanied by a slowly developing shift in the voltage dependence of TRPA1 towards more negative membrane potentials. Agonist-induced sensitisation may provide an explanation for sensitisation following long-term exposure to harmful irritants and pollutants, particularly in the airways. The TRPA1 ion channel is expressed in nociceptive (pain-sensitive) neurons and responds to a wide variety of chemical irritants, such as acrolein in smoke or isothiocyanates in mustard. Here we show that in the absence of extracellular calcium the current passing through TRPA1 gradually increases (sensitises) during prolonged application of agonists. Activation by an agonist is essential, because activation of TRPA1 by membrane depolarisation did not cause sensitisation. Sensitisation is independent of the site of action of the agonist, because covalent and non-covalent agonists were equally effective, and is long lasting following agonist removal. Mutating N-terminal cysteines, the target of covalent agonists, did not affect sensitisation by the non-covalent agonist carvacrol, which activates by binding to a different site. Sensitisation is unaffected by agents blocking ion channel trafficking or by block of signalling pathways involving ATP, protein kinase A or the formation of lipid rafts, and does not require ion flux through the channel

  16. Adenosine-A1 Receptor Agonist Induced Hyperalgesic Priming Type II

    PubMed Central

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Levine, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that repeated exposure of the peripheral terminal of the primary afferent nociceptor to the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-Enkephalin acetate salt) induces a model of the transition to chronic pain that we have termed Type II hyperalgesic priming. Similar to Type I hyperalgesic priming, there is a markedly prolonged response to subsequent administration of proalgesic cytokines, prototypically prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, Type II hyperalgesic priming differs from Type I in being rapidly induced, protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε dependent, not reversed by a protein translation inhibitor, occurring in female as well as in male rats, and isolectin B4-negative neuron dependent. We report that as with the repeated injection of a MOR agonist, the repeated administration of an agonist at the A1-adenosine receptor, also a Gi-protein coupled receptor, N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), also produces priming similar to DAMGO-induced Type II hyperalgesic priming. In this study we demonstrate that priming induced by repeated exposure to this A1-adenosine receptor agonist shares the same mechanisms as MOR-agonist induced priming. However, the prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by repeated administration of CPA depends on G-protein αi subunit activation, differently from DAMGO-induced Type II priming, in which it depends on the β/γ subunit. These data implicate a novel form of Gi-protein signaling pathway in the Type II hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at A1-adenosine receptor to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor. PMID:26588695

  17. nor-BNI Antagonism of Kappa Opioid Agonist-Induced Reinstatement of Ethanol-Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Harshberger, Erin; Gilson, Emily A.; Gillett, Kelli; Stone, Jasmine H.; El Amrani, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the dynorphin (DYN)/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system may be a key mediator in the behavioral effects of alcohol. The objective of the present study was to examine the ability of the KOR antagonist norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI) to attenuate relapse to ethanol seeking due to priming injections of the KOR agonist U50,488 at time points consistent with KOR selectivity. Male Wistar rats were trained to self-administer a 10% ethanol solution, and then responding was extinguished. Following extinction, rats were injected with U50,488 (0.1–10 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline and were tested for the reinstatement of ethanol seeking. Next, the ability of the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0 or 3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) and nor-BNI (0 or 20.0 mg/kg, i.p.) to block U50,488-induced reinstatement was examined. Priming injections U50,488 reinstated responding on the previously ethanol-associated lever. Pretreatment with naltrexone reduced the reinstatement of ethanol-seeking behavior. nor-BNI also attenuated KOR agonist-induced reinstatement, but to a lesser extent than naltrexone, when injected 24 hours prior to injections of U50,488, a time point that is consistent with KOR selectivity. While these results suggest that activation of KORs is a key mechanism in the regulation of ethanol-seeking behavior, U50,488-induced reinstatement may not be fully selective for KORs. PMID:27891289

  18. Effects of intracellular alkalinization on resting and agonist-induced vascular tone.

    PubMed

    Danthuluri, N R; Deth, R C

    1989-03-01

    To evaluate the influence of intracellular alkalinization on basal and agonist-induced vascular tone, we studied the effect of NH4Cl on rat aorta. NH4Cl induced a gradually developing contraction in a dose-dependent manner. Although the contractile response to 20 mM NH4Cl was associated with a latent period (LP) of 23.4 +/- 2.8 min, intracellular pH (pHi) measurements in cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells showed that NH4Cl-induced intracellular alkalinization was immediate and transient, returning to basal pHi levels in about 30-35 min. Agents that elevate Ca2+, such as A23187 and high KCl, significantly reduced the LP associated with 20 mM NH4Cl-induced contraction. NH4Cl-induced contractions were sensitive to extracellular Ca2+ removal and to the addition of forskolin (1 microM); however, NH4Cl by itself did not cause Ca2+-influx as shown by 45Ca-uptake studies. Addition of 20 mM NH4Cl to precontracted tissues resulted in a transient relaxation, which was complete in approximately 10 min, followed by a contraction above the original level of tone. NH4Cl pretreatment caused time-dependent alterations in both the rapid and slow phases of phenylephrine and angiotensin II contractions. Rapid-phase of phenylephrine and angiotensin II contractions. Rapid-phase responses were diminished at shorter NH4Cl incubation times (10 min), whereas slow-phase response was augmented after a longer incubation (20 min). Overall, the vasorelaxant and vasoconstrictor effects induced by NH4Cl suggest a complex relationship between intracellular alkalinization and arterial contractility.

  19. Peripheral endothelin B receptor agonist-induced antinociception involves endogenous opioids in mice

    PubMed Central

    Quang, Phuong N.; Schmidt, Brian L.

    2010-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) produced by various cancers is known to be responsible for inducing pain. While ET-1 binding to ETAR on peripheral nerves clearly mediates nociception, effects from binding to ETBR are less clear. The present study assessed the effects of ETBR activation and the role of endogenous opioid analgesia in carcinoma pain using an orthotopic cancer pain mouse model. mRNA expression analysis showed that ET-1 was nearly doubled while ETBR was significantly down-regulated in a human oral SCC cell line compared to normal oral keratinocytes (NOK). Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell culture treated with an ETBR agonist (10−4M, 10−5 M, and 10−6 M BQ-3020) significantly increased production of β-endorphin without any effects on leu-enkephalin or dynorphin. Cancer inoculated in the hind paw of athymic mice with SCC induced significant pain, as indicated by reduction of paw withdrawal thresholds in response to mechanical stimulation, compared to sham-injected and NOK-injected groups. Intratumor administration of 3 mg/kg BQ-3020 attenuated cancer pain by approximately 50% up to 3 hours post-injection compared to PBS-vehicle and contralateral injection, while intratumor ETBR antagonist BQ-788 treatment (100 and 300 μg/kg and 3 mg/kg) had no effects. Local naloxone methiodide (500 μg/kg) or selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist (CTOP, 500 μg/kg) injection reversed ETBR agonist-induced antinociception in cancer animals. We propose that these results demonstrate that peripheral ETBR agonism attenuates carcinoma pain by modulating β-endorphins released from the SCC to act on peripheral opioid receptors found in the cancer microenvironment. PMID:20206445

  20. Adenosine-A1 receptor agonist induced hyperalgesic priming type II.

    PubMed

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2016-03-01

    We have recently shown that repeated exposure of the peripheral terminal of the primary afferent nociceptor to the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala, N-Me-Phe, Gly-ol]-enkephalin acetate salt) induces a model of transition to chronic pain that we have termed type II hyperalgesic priming. Similar to type I hyperalgesic priming, there is a markedly prolonged response to subsequent administration of proalgesic cytokines, prototypically prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, type II hyperalgesic priming differs from type I in being rapidly induced, protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε dependent, not reversed by a protein translation inhibitor, occurring in female as well as in male rats, and isolectin B4-negative neuron dependent. We report that, as with the repeated injection of a MOR agonist, the repeated administration of an agonist at the A1-adenosine receptor, also a Gi-protein coupled receptor, N-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), also produces priming similar to DAMGO-induced type II hyperalgesic priming. In this study, we demonstrate that priming induced by repeated exposure to this A1-adenosine receptor agonist shares the same mechanisms, as MOR-agonist induced priming. However, the prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by repeated administration of CPA depends on G-protein αi subunit activation, differently from DAMGO-induced type II priming, in which it depends on the β/γ subunit. These data implicate a novel form of Gi-protein signaling pathway in the type II hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at A1-adenosine receptor to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor.

  1. Acid monolayer functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikenberry, Myles

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle functionalization is an area of intensely active research, with applications across disciplines such as biomedical science and heterogeneous catalysis. This work demonstrates the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with a quasi-monolayer of 11-sulfoundecanoic acid, 10-phosphono-1-decanesulfonic acid, and 11-aminoundecanoic acid. The carboxylic and phosphonic moieties form bonds to the iron oxide particle core, while the sulfonic acid groups face outward where they are available for catalysis. The particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), potentiometric titration, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The sulfonic acid functionalized particles were used to catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose at 80° and starch at 130°, showing a higher activity per acid site than the traditional solid acid catalyst Amberlyst-15, and comparing well against results reported in the literature for sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous silicas. In sucrose catalysis reactions, the phosphonic-sulfonic nanoparticles (PSNPs) were seen to be incompletely recovered by an external magnetic field, while the carboxylic-sulfonic nanoparticles (CSNPs) showed a trend of increasing activity over the first four recycle runs. Between the two sulfonic ligands, the phosphonates produced a more tightly packed monolayer, which corresponded to a higher sulfonic acid loading, lower agglomeration, lower recoverability through application of an external magnetic field, and higher activity per acid site for the hydrolysis of starch. Functionalizations with 11-aminoundecanoic acid resulted in some amine groups binding to the surfaces of iron oxide nanoparticles. This amine binding is commonly ignored in iron oxide

  2. Toll-like receptor agonists induce inflammation and cell death in a model of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Rydberg, Camilla; Månsson, Anne; Uddman, Rolf; Riesbeck, Kristian; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. The present study describes TLR expression and function in healthy and malignant airway epithelial cells. The squamous cell carcinoma cell line Detroit-562 was compared with the healthy bronchial epithelial cell line NL-20 and primary human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs). TLR2, TLR3 and TLR5 were present in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Consistent with this, Detroit-562 expressed TLR2, TLR3 and TLR5, whereas NL-20 expressed mainly TLR3 and HNECs expressed TLR2-5. In Detroit-562, Pam3CSK4, poly(I:C) and flagellin, ligands for TLR2, TLR3 and TLR5, respectively, induced an up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), an increase in interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion and a decrease in cell viability. Additionally, poly(I:C) affected IL-1β production and the migratory behaviour of Detroit-562. NL-20 responded with a slight increase in IL-8 secretion upon poly(I:C) stimulation. Poly(I:C) induced a small increase in IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 production in HNECs, while Pam3CSK4 increased viability. The TLR signalling was transcription-dependent, but the pathways involved differed among TLRs as well as cells. In Detroit-562, TLR2 and TLR5 activation was mediated via c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-, p38-, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)- and nuclear factor (NF)-κB-related pathways, while TLR3 was dependent on NF-κB. In NL-20, TLR3 signalled via p38, and in HNECs, NF-κB, JNK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) appeared to be involved. We found that TLR agonists induced a robust response in HNSCCs, characterized by generation of inflammation and cell death. A similar response was not seen in normal epithelial cells. Thus, the TLR system should be considered an important target in future antitumour immunotherapy. PMID:19740321

  3. Phosphorylation of histone H3 is functionally linked to retinoic acid receptor β promoter activation

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Bruno; Ozato, Keiko; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    Ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) is a multistep process culminating in the formation of a multimeric co-activator complex on regulated promoters. Several co-activator complexes harbor an acetyl transferase activity, which is required for retinoid-induced transcription of reporter genes. Using murine P19 embryonal carcinoma cells, we examined the relationship between histone post-translational modifications and activation of the endogenous RARβ2 promoter, which is under the control of a canonical retinoic acid response element and rapidly induced upon retinoid treatment. While histones H3 and H4 were constitutively acetylated at this promoter, retinoid agonists induced a rapid phosphorylation at Ser10 of histone H3. A retinoid antagonist, whose activity was independent of co-repressor binding to RAR, could oppose this agonist-induced H3 phosphorylation. Since such post-translational modifications were not observed at several other promoters, we conclude that histone H3 phosphorylation may be a molecular signature of the activated, retinoid-controlled mRARβ2 gene promoter. PMID:11897660

  4. Acid-functionalized nanoparticles for biomass hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena Duque, Leidy Eugenia

    Cellulosic ethanol is a renewable source of energy. Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex material composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Biomass pretreatment is a required step to make sugar polymers liable to hydrolysis. Mineral acids are commonly used for biomass pretreatment. Using acid catalysts that can be recovered and reused could make the process economically more attractive. The overall goal of this dissertation is the development of a recyclable nanocatalyst for the hydrolysis of biomass sugars. Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles (CoFe2O4) were synthesized to provide a magnetic core that could be separated from reaction using a magnetic field and modified to carry acid functional groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the crystal structure was that of cobalt spinel ferrite. CoFe2O4 were covered with silica which served as linker for the acid functions. Silica-coated nanoparticles were functionalized with three different acid functions: perfluoropropyl-sulfonic acid, carboxylic acid, and propyl-sulfonic acid. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were analyzed to obtain particle size distributions of the nanoparticles. Total carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur were quantified using an elemental analyzer. Fourier transform infra-red spectra confirmed the presence of sulfonic and carboxylic acid functions and ion-exchange titrations accounted for the total amount of catalytic acid sites per nanoparticle mass. These nanoparticles were evaluated for their performance to hydrolyze the beta-1,4 glycosidic bond of the cellobiose molecule. Propyl-sulfonic (PS) and perfluoropropyl-sulfonic (PFS) acid functionalized nanoparticles catalyzed the hydrolysis of cellobiose significantly better than the control. PS and PFS were also evaluated for their capacity to solubilize wheat straw hemicelluloses and performed better than the control. Although PFS nanoparticles were stronger acid catalysts, the acid functions leached out of the nanoparticle during

  5. Functional analysis of rat acidic calponin.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Yabe, Sachiko; Nakamura, Kouta; Koizumi, Youichi

    2002-05-01

    Recombinant acidic calponin, a member of the calponin family, interacted with F-actin, but not with microtubules, desmin filaments, tropomyosin, calmodulin, S100 and phosphatidylserine (PS) vesicles with significant affinity. The bindings of acidic calponin to F-actin occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and were saturated at a molar ratio of about 1 acidic calponin to 1-2 actin molecules. The apparent Kd value of acidic calponin to F-actin was calculated to be 1.6 x 10(5) M(-1). Chemical cross-linking experiments indicated that a 1:1 molar covalent complex of acidic calponin and actin monomer was produced as in the case of basic calponinactin binding. No significant morphologic change of F-actin was observed by the addition of acidic calponin. Acidic calponin had little effect on actomyosin Mg2+-ATPase activity unlike basic calponin. Basic calponin partially competed with acidic calponin for binding to F-actin. Domain mapping with V8 protease revealed that acidic calponin binding site resided within the C-terminal 16 kDa fragment of actin, where the binding of basic calponin also occurs. However, both calponins showed reversal effects on fluorescence intensity of pyrene-labeled F-actin. Fragments of acidic calponin with 30 and 22 kDa, lacking the C-terminal acidic tail, were bound to F-actin. Interestingly, both the fragments became bound to PS vesicles, but not to other components. Circular dichroism studies showed that limited digestion of acidic calponin resulted in about 30% decrease of alpha-helix and beta contents. The present results suggest that acidic calponin is functionally distinct from basic calponin and expresses a novel characteristic after removal of the acidic tail region.

  6. Select G-protein coupled receptors modulate agonist-induced signaling via a ROCK, LIMK and β-arrestin 1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Nitish; Roberts, Kristofer; Pal, Katsuri; Bentolila, Laurent A.; Fultz, Elissa; Minasyan, Ani; Cahill, Catherine; Pradhan, Amynah; Conner, David; DeFea, Kathryn; Evans, Christopher; Walwyn, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are typically present in a basal, inactive state, but when bound to agonist they activate downstream signaling cascades. In studying arrestin regulation of opioid receptors in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, we find that agonists of delta opioid receptors (δORs) activate cofilin through Rho-associated coiled-coiled containing protein kinase (ROCK), LIM domain kinase (LIMK) and β- arrestin 1 (β-arr1), to regulate actin polymerization. This controls receptor function, as assessed by agonist-induced inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in DRGs. Agonists of opioid-receptor like receptors (ORL1) similarly influence the function of this receptor through ROCK, LIMK and β-arr1. Functional evidence of this cascade was demonstrated in vivo where the behavioral effects of δOR or ORL1 agonists were enhanced in the absence of β-arr1 or prevented by inhibiting ROCK. This pathway allows δOR and ORL1 agonists to rapidly regulate receptor function. PMID:24239352

  7. Select G-protein-coupled receptors modulate agonist-induced signaling via a ROCK, LIMK, and β-arrestin 1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Nitish; Roberts, Kristofer; Pal, Katsuri; Bentolila, Laurent A; Fultz, Elissa; Minasyan, Ani; Cahill, Catherine; Pradhan, Amynah; Conner, David; DeFea, Kathryn; Evans, Christopher; Walwyn, Wendy

    2013-11-27

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are typically present in a basal, inactive state but, when bound to an agonist, activate downstream signaling cascades. In studying arrestin regulation of opioid receptors in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, we find that agonists of delta opioid receptors (δORs) activate cofilin through Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK), LIM domain kinase (LIMK), and β-arrestin 1 (β-arr1) to regulate actin polymerization. This controls receptor function, as assessed by agonist-induced inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in DRGs. Agonists of opioid-receptor-like receptors (ORL1) similarly influence the function of this receptor through ROCK, LIMK, and β-arr1. Functional evidence of this cascade was demonstrated in vivo, where the behavioral effects of δOR or ORL1 agonists were enhanced in the absence of β-arr1 or prevented by inhibiting ROCK. This pathway allows δOR and ORL1 agonists to rapidly regulate receptor function. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of 5-HT1A Receptor Stimulation on D1 Receptor Agonist-Induced Striatonigral Activity and Dyskinesia in Hemiparkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the value of 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR) agonists for dyskinesias that arise with long-term L-DOPA therapy in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Yet, how 5-HT1AR stimulation directly influences the dyskinetogenic D1 receptor (D1R)-expressing striatonigral pathway remains largely unknown. To directly examine this, one cohort of hemiparkinsonian rats received systemic injections of Vehicle + Vehicle, Vehicle + the D1R agonist SKF81297 (0.8 mg/kg), or the 5-HT1AR agonist ±8-OH-DPAT (1.0 mg/kg) + SKF81297. Rats were examined for changes in abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs), rotations, striatal preprodynorphin (PPD), and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD; 65 and 67) mRNA via RT-PCR. In the second experiment, hemiparkinsonian rats received intrastriatal pretreatments of Vehicle (aCSF), ±8-OH-DPAT (7.5 mM), or ±8-OH-DPAT + the 5-HT1AR antagonist WAY100635 (4.6 mM), followed by systemic Vehicle or SKF81297 after which AIMs, rotations, and extracellular striatal glutamate and nigral GABA efflux were measured by in vivo microdialysis. Results revealed D1R agonist-induced AIMs were reduced by systemic and intrastriatal 5-HT1AR stimulation while rotations were enhanced. Although ±8-OH-DPAT did not modify D1R agonist-induced increases in striatal PPD mRNA, the D1R/5-HT1AR agonist combination enhanced GAD65 and GAD67 mRNA. When applied locally, ±8-OH-DPAT alone diminished striatal glutamate levels while the agonist combination increased nigral GABA efflux. Thus, presynaptic 5-HT1AR stimulation may attenuate striatal glutamate levels, resulting in diminished D1R-mediated dyskinetic behaviors, but maintain or enhance striatal postsynaptic factors ultimately increasing nigral GABA levels and rotational activity. The current findings offer a novel mechanistic explanation for previous results concerning 5-HT1AR agonists for the treatment of dyskinesia. PMID:23496922

  9. GnRH-agonist induced depressive and anxiety symptoms during in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer cycles.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Miki; Azem, Foad; Aharonov, Inbar; Ben Avi, Irit; Yagil, Yaron; Schreiber, Shaul; Amit, Ami; Weizman, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether the use of a GnRH agonist inducing a hypogonadic state during IVF-ET cycles induces negative mood symptoms, we conducted a prospective randomized study in 108 women comparing two different controlled ovarian stimulation protocols. A significant phase effect was observed for depression and anxiety symptoms during IVF-ET cycles reflecting an increase in symptoms between the hypogonadal phase and the peak in gonadotropin stimulation; however, the hypogonadal phase induced by the GnRH agonist was not associated with a significant increase in any of the studied mood parameters.

  10. Involvement of phosphodiesterase 4 in beta-adrenoceptor agonist-induced amylase release in parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Keitaro; Guo, Ming-Yu; Sairenji, Nakayasu

    2009-06-01

    beta-Adrenoceptor activation increases intracellular cAMP levels and consequently induces exocytotic amylase release in parotid acinar cells. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) catalyses the hydrolysis of cAMP, which terminates the downstream signaling of this second messenger. We investigated the involvement of PDE4, a cAMP-PDE, in beta-adrenoceptor agonist-induced amylase release in mouse, rat and rabbit parotid acinar cells by using the specific PDE4 inhibitor rolipram. cAMP-PDE activity was detected in mouse, rat and rabbit parotid acinar cells. In the presence of rolipram, cAMP-PDE activity was reduced by about 31%, 38% and 33% in mouse, rat and rabbit parotid acinar cells, respectively. The increase in cAMP levels induced by the beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoproterenol was enhanced in the presence of rolipram in mouse, rat and rabbit parotid acinar cells. Isoproterenol-induced amylase release, but not constitutive amylase release, was also enhanced in the presence of rolipram in mouse, rat and rabbit parotid acinar cells. These results suggest that the rolipram-sensitive cAMP-PDE, PDE4, is involved in beta-adrenoceptor agonist-induced amylase release in parotid acinar cells.

  11. Glutamate: a truly functional amino acid.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, John T; Brosnan, Margaret E

    2013-09-01

    Glutamate is one of the most abundant of the amino acids. In addition to its role in protein structure, it plays critical roles in nutrition, metabolism and signaling. Post-translational carboxylation of glutamyl residues increases their affinity for calcium and plays a major role in hemostasis. Glutamate is of fundamental importance to amino acid metabolism, yet the great bulk of dietary glutamate is catabolyzed within the intestine. It is necessary for the synthesis of key molecules, such as glutathione and the polyglutamated folate cofactors. It plays a major role in signaling. Within the central nervous system, glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter and its product, GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter. Glutamate interaction with specific taste cells in the tongue is a major component of umami taste. The finding of glutamate receptors throughout the gastrointestinal tract has opened up a new vista in glutamate function. Glutamate is truly a functional amino acid.

  12. Integrating Retinoic Acid Signaling with Brain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Tuanlian; Wagner, Elisabeth; Drager, Ursula C.

    2009-01-01

    The vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) regulates the transcription of about a 6th of the human genome. Compelling evidence indicates a role of RA in cognitive activities, but its integration with the molecular mechanisms of higher brain functions is not known. Here we describe the properties of RA signaling in the mouse, which point to…

  13. Integrating Retinoic Acid Signaling with Brain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Tuanlian; Wagner, Elisabeth; Drager, Ursula C.

    2009-01-01

    The vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) regulates the transcription of about a 6th of the human genome. Compelling evidence indicates a role of RA in cognitive activities, but its integration with the molecular mechanisms of higher brain functions is not known. Here we describe the properties of RA signaling in the mouse, which point to…

  14. Docosahexaenoic acid: one molecule diverse functions.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michio; Hossain, Shahdat; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2017-08-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6, ω-3) is a highly polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acid. It is concentrated in neuronal brain membranes, for which reason it is also referred to as a "brain food". DHA is essential for brain development and function. It plays an important role in improving antioxidant and cognitive activities of the brain. DHA deficiency occurs during aging and dementia, impairs memory and learning, and promotes age-related neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). For about two decades, we have reported that oral administration of DHA increases spatial memory acquisition, stimulates neurogenesis, and protects against and reverses memory impairment in amyloid β peptide-infused AD rat models by decreasing amyloidogenesis and protects against age-related cognitive decline in the elderly. These results demonstrate a robust link between DHA and cognitive health. Rodents that were fed a diet low in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly those that were DHA-deficient, frequently suffered from anxiety, depression and memory impairment. Although the exact mechanisms of action of DHA in brain functions are still elusive, a host of mechanisms have been proposed. For example, DHA, which inherently has a characteristic three-dimensional structure, increases membrane fluidity, strengthens antioxidant activity and enhances the expression of several proteins that act as substrates for improving memory functions. It reduces the brain amyloid burden and inhibits in vitro fibrillation and amyloid-induced neurotoxicity in cell-culture model. In this review, we discuss how DHA acts as a molecule with diverse functions.

  15. Active components of ginger potentiate β-agonist-induced relaxation of airway smooth muscle by modulating cytoskeletal regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Carrie; Wakita, Ryo; Emala, Charles W

    2014-01-01

    β-Agonists are the first-line therapy to alleviate asthma symptoms by acutely relaxing the airway. Purified components of ginger relax airway smooth muscle (ASM), but the mechanisms are unclear. By elucidating these mechanisms, we can explore the use of phytotherapeutics in combination with traditional asthma therapies. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine if 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol potentiate β-agonist-induced ASM relaxation; and (2) define the mechanism(s) of action responsible for this potentiation. Human ASM was contracted in organ baths. Tissues were relaxed dose dependently with β-agonist, isoproterenol, in the presence of vehicle, 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol (100 μM). Primary human ASM cells were used for cellular experiments. Purified phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4D or phospholipase C β enzyme was used to assess inhibitory activity of ginger components using fluorescent assays. A G-LISA assay was used to determine the effects of ginger constituents on Ras homolog gene family member A activation. Significant potentiation of isoproterenol-induced relaxation was observed with each of the ginger constituents. 6-Shogaol showed the largest shift in isoproterenol half-maximal effective concentration. 6-Gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol significantly inhibited PDE4D, whereas 8-gingerol and 6-shogaol also inhibited phospholipase C β activity. 6-Shogaol alone inhibited Ras homolog gene family member A activation. In human ASM cells, these constituents decreased phosphorylation of 17-kD protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitory protein of type 1 protein phosphatase and 8-gingerol decreased myosin light chain phosphorylation. Isolated components of ginger potentiate β-agonist-induced relaxation in human ASM. This potentiation involves PDE4D inhibition and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins. Together with β-agonists, 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol may augment existing asthma therapy, resulting in relief of symptoms through

  16. Opiate agonist-induced re-distribution of Wntless, a mu-opioid receptor interacting protein, in rat striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Reyes, B A S; Vakharia, K; Ferraro, T N; Levenson, R; Berrettini, W H; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2012-01-01

    Wntless (WLS), a mu-opioid receptor (MOR) interacting protein, mediates Wnt protein secretion that is critical for neuronal development. We investigated whether MOR agonists induce re-distribution of WLS within rat striatal neurons. Adult male rats received either saline, morphine or [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) directly into the lateral ventricles. Following thirty minutes, brains were extracted and tissue sections were processed for immunogold silver detection of WLS. In saline-treated rats, WLS was distributed along the plasma membrane and within the cytoplasmic compartment of striatal dendrites as previously described. The ratio of cytoplasmic to total dendritic WLS labeling was 0.70±0.03 in saline-treated striatal tissue. Morphine treatment decreased this ratio to 0.48±0.03 indicating a shift of WLS from the intracellular compartment to the plasma membrane. However, following DAMGO treatment, the ratio was 0.85±0.05 indicating a greater distribution of WLS intracellularly. The difference in the re-distribution of the WLS following different agonist exposure may be related to DAMGO's well known ability to induce internalization of MOR in contrast to morphine, which is less effective in producing receptor internalization. Furthermore, these data are consistent with our hypothesis that MOR agonists promote dimerization of WLS and MOR, thereby preventing WLS from mediating Wnt secretion. In summary, our findings indicate differential agonist-induced trafficking of WLS in striatal neurons following distinct agonist exposure. Adaptations in WLS trafficking may represent a novel pharmacological target in the treatment of opiate addiction and/or pain.

  17. Imaging Functional Nucleic Acid Delivery to Skin.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Roger L; Hickerson, Robyn P; González-González, Emilio; Flores, Manuel A; Speaker, Tycho P; Rogers, Faye A; Milstone, Leonard M; Contag, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic skin diseases arise from well-defined single gene mutations, and in some cases a single point mutation. As the target cells are superficial, these diseases are ideally suited for treatment by nucleic acid-based therapies as well as monitoring through a variety of noninvasive imaging technologies. Despite the accessibility of the skin, there remain formidable barriers for functional delivery of nucleic acids to the target cells within the dermis and epidermis. These barriers include the stratum corneum and the layered structure of the skin, as well as more locally, the cellular, endosomal and nuclear membranes. A wide range of technologies for traversing these barriers has been described and moderate success has been reported for several approaches. The lessons learned from these studies include the need for combinations of approaches to facilitate nucleic acid delivery across these skin barriers and then functional delivery across the cellular and nuclear membranes for expression (e.g., reporter genes, DNA oligonucleotides or shRNA) or into the cytoplasm for regulation (e.g., siRNA, miRNA, antisense oligos). The tools for topical delivery that have been evaluated include chemical, physical and electrical methods, and the development and testing of each of these approaches has been greatly enabled by imaging tools. These techniques allow delivery and real time monitoring of reporter genes, therapeutic nucleic acids and also triplex nucleic acids for gene editing. Optical imaging is comprised of a number of modalities based on properties of light-tissue interaction (e.g., scattering, autofluorescence, and reflectance), the interaction of light with specific molecules (e.g., absorbtion, fluorescence), or enzymatic reactions that produce light (bioluminescence). Optical imaging technologies operate over a range of scales from macroscopic to microscopic and if necessary, nanoscopic, and thus can be used to assess nucleic acid delivery to organs, regions, cells

  18. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor lowers PPARγ agonist-induced body weight gain by affecting food intake, fat mass, and beige/brown fat but not fluid retention

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takahiro; Fu, Yiling; Eguchi, Akiko; Czogalla, Jan; Rose, Michael A.; Kuczkowski, Alexander; Gerasimova, Maria; Feldstein, Ariel E.; Scadeng, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists like pioglitazone (PGZ) are effective antidiabetic drugs, but they induce fluid retention and body weight (BW) gain. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) inhibitors are antidiabetic drugs that enhance renal Na+ and fluid excretion. Therefore, we examined whether the DPP IV inhibitor alogliptin (ALG) ameliorates PGZ-induced BW gain. Male Sv129 mice were treated with vehicle (repelleted diet), PGZ (220 mg/kg diet), ALG (300 mg/kg diet), or a combination of PGZ and ALG (PGZ + ALG) for 14 days. PGZ + ALG prevented the increase in BW observed with PGZ but did not attenuate the increase in body fluid content determined by bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS). BIS revealed that ALG alone had no effect on fat mass (FM) but enhanced the FM-lowering effect of PGZ; MRI analysis confirmed the latter and showed reductions in visceral and inguinal subcutaneous (sc) white adipose tissue (WAT). ALG but not PGZ decreased food intake and plasma free fatty acid concentrations. Conversely, PGZ but not ALG increased mRNA expression of thermogenesis mediator uncoupling protein 1 in epididymal WAT. Adding ALG to PGZ treatment increased the abundance of multilocular cell islets in sc WAT, and PGZ + ALG increased the expression of brown-fat-like “beige” cell marker TMEM26 in sc WAT and interscapular brown adipose tissue and increased rectal temperature vs. vehicle. In summary, DPP IV inhibition did not attenuate PPARγ agonist-induced fluid retention but prevented BW gain by reducing FM. This involved ALG inhibition of food intake and was associated with food intake-independent synergistic effects of PPARγ agonism and DPP-IV inhibition on beige/brown fat cells and thermogenesis. PMID:24347054

  19. Chronic treatment in vivo with β-adrenoceptor agonists induces dysfunction of airway β2-adrenoceptors and exacerbates lung inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rui; Degan, Simone; Theriot, Barbara S; Fischer, Bernard M; Strachan, Ryan T; Liang, Jiurong; Pierce, Richard A; Sunday, Mary E; Noble, Paul W; Kraft, Monica; Brody, Arnold R; Walker, Julia KL

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inhalation of a β-adrenoceptor agonist (β-agonist) is first-line asthma therapy, used for both prophylaxis against, and acute relief of, bronchoconstriction. However, repeated clinical use of β-agonists leads to impaired bronchoprotection and, in some cases, adverse patient outcomes. Mechanisms underlying this β2-adrenoceptor dysfunction are not well understood, due largely to the lack of a comprehensive animal model and the uncertainty as to whether or not bronchorelaxation in mice is mediated by β2-adrenoceptors. Thus, we aimed to develop a mouse model that demonstrated functional β-agonist-induced β2-adrenoceptor desensitization in the context of allergic inflammatory airway disease. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We combined chronic allergen exposure with repeated β-agonist inhalation in allergen-treated BALB/C mice and examined the contribution of β2-adrenoceptors to albuterol-induced bronchoprotection using FVB/NJ mice with genetic deletion of β2-adrenoceptors (KO). Associated inflammatory changes – cytokines (ELISA), cells in bronchoalevolar lavage and airway remodelling (histology) and β2-adrenoceptor density (radioligand binding) – were also measured. KEY RESULTS β2-Adrenoceptors mediated albuterol-induced bronchoprotection in mice. Chronic treatment with albuterol induced loss of bronchoprotection, associated with exacerbation of the inflammatory components of the asthma phenotype. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This animal model reproduced salient features of human asthma and linked loss of bronchoprotection with airway pathobiology. Accordingly, the model offers an advanced tool for understanding the mechanisms of the effects of chronic β- agonist treatment on β-adrenoceptor function in asthma. Such information may guide the clinical use of β-agonists and provide insight into development of novel β-adrenoceptor ligands for the treatment of asthma. PMID:22013997

  20. Propofol Modulates Agonist-induced Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Subtype-1 Receptor Desensitization via a Protein Kinase Cε-dependent Pathway in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wickley, Peter J.; Yuge, Ryo; Russell, Mary S.; Zhang, Hongyu; Sulak, Michael A.; Damron, Derek S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The activity of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype-1 (TRPV1) receptors, key nociceptive transducers in dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons, is enhanced by protein kinase C ε (PKCε) activation. The intravenous anesthetic propofol has been shown to activate PKCε. Our objectives were to examine whether propofol modulates TRPV1 function in dorsal root ganglion neurons via activation of PKCε. Methods Lumbar dorsal root ganglion neurons from wild-type and PKCε-null mice were isolated and cultured for 24 h. Intracellular free Ca2+ concentration was measured in neurons by using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester. The duration of pain-associated behaviors was also assessed. Phosphorylation of PKCε and TRPV1 and the cellular translocation of PKCε from cytosol to membrane compartments were assessed by immunoblot analysis. Results In wild-type neurons, repeated stimulation with capsaicin (100 nM) progressively decreased the transient rise in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration. After desensitization, exposure to propofol rescued the Ca2+ response. The resensitizing effect of propofol was absent in neurons obtained from PKCε-null mice. Moreover, the capsaicin-induced desensitization of TRPV1 was markedly attenuated in the presence of propofol in neurons from wild-type mice but not in neurons from PKCε-null mice. Propofol also prolonged the duration of agonist-induced pain associated behaviors in wild-type mice. In addition, propofol increased phosphorylation of PKCε as well as TRPV1 and stimulated translocation of PKCε from cytosolic to membrane fraction. Discussion Our results indicate that propofol modulates TRPV1 sensitivity to capsaicin and that this most likely occurs through a PKCε-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1. PMID:20808213

  1. Cholinergic and glutamatergic agonists induce gamma frequency activity in dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Christen; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Williams, D. Keith; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01

    The dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) is involved in generating two signs of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep: muscle atonia and ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves. We tested the hypothesis that single cell and/or population responses of SubCD neurons are capable of generating gamma frequency activity in response to intracellular stimulation or receptor agonist activation. Whole cell patch clamp recordings (immersion chamber) and population responses (interface chamber) were conducted on 9- to 20-day-old rat brain stem slices. All SubCD neurons (n = 103) fired at gamma frequency when subjected to depolarizing steps. Two statistically distinct populations of neurons were observed, which were distinguished by their high (>80 Hz, n = 24) versus low (35–80 Hz, n = 16) initial firing frequencies. Both cell types exhibited subthreshold oscillations in the gamma range (n = 43), which may underlie the gamma band firing properties of these neurons. The subthreshold oscillations were blocked by the sodium channel blockers tetrodotoxin (TTX, n = 21) extracellularly and N-(2,6-dimethylphenylcarbamoylmethyl)triethylammonium bromide (QX-314) intracellularly (n = 5), indicating they were sodium channel dependent. Gamma frequency subthreshold oscillations were observed in response to the nonspecific cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol (CAR, n = 11, d = 1.08) and the glutamate receptor agonists N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA, n = 12, d = 1.09) and kainic acid (KA, n = 13, d = 0.96), indicating that cholinergic and glutamatergic inputs may be involved in the activation of these subthreshold currents. Gamma band activity also was observed in population responses following application of CAR (n = 4, P < 0.05), NMDA (n = 4, P < 0.05) and KA (n = 4, P < 0.05). Voltage-sensitive, sodium channel-dependent gamma band activity appears to be a part of the intrinsic membrane properties of SubCD neurons. PMID:21543743

  2. Amino acids: metabolism, functions, and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed the discovery that amino acids (AA) are not only cell signaling molecules but are also regulators of gene expression and the protein phosphorylation cascade. Additionally, AA are key precursors for syntheses of hormones and low-molecular weight nitrogenous substances with each having enormous biological importance. Physiological concentrations of AA and their metabolites (e.g., nitric oxide, polyamines, glutathione, taurine, thyroid hormones, and serotonin) are required for the functions. However, elevated levels of AA and their products (e.g., ammonia, homocysteine, and asymmetric dimethylarginine) are pathogenic factors for neurological disorders, oxidative stress, and cardiovascular disease. Thus, an optimal balance among AA in the diet and circulation is crucial for whole body homeostasis. There is growing recognition that besides their role as building blocks of proteins and polypeptides, some AA regulate key metabolic pathways that are necessary for maintenance, growth, reproduction, and immunity. They are called functional AA, which include arginine, cysteine, glutamine, leucine, proline, and tryptophan. Dietary supplementation with one or a mixture of these AA may be beneficial for (1) ameliorating health problems at various stages of the life cycle (e.g., fetal growth restriction, neonatal morbidity and mortality, weaning-associated intestinal dysfunction and wasting syndrome, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, the metabolic syndrome, and infertility); (2) optimizing efficiency of metabolic transformations to enhance muscle growth, milk production, egg and meat quality and athletic performance, while preventing excess fat deposition and reducing adiposity. Thus, AA have important functions in both nutrition and health.

  3. CtBP1/BARS is an activator of phospholipase D1 necessary for agonist-induced macropinocytosis.

    PubMed

    Haga, Yuki; Miwa, Noriko; Jahangeer, Saleem; Okada, Taro; Nakamura, Shun-ichi

    2009-05-06

    Vesicular trafficking such as macropinocytosis is a dynamic process that requires coordinated interactions between specialized proteins and lipids. A recent report suggests the involvement of CtBP1/BARS in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced macropinocytosis. Detailed mechanisms as to how lipid remodelling is regulated during macropinocytosis are still undefined. Here, we show that CtBP1/BARS is a physiological activator of PLD1 required in agonist-induced macropinocytosis. EGF-induced macropinocytosis was specifically blocked by 1-butanol but not by 2-butanol. In addition, stimulation of cells by serum or EGF resulted in the association of CtBP1/BARS with PLD1. Finally, CtBP1/BARS activated PLD1 in a synergistic manner with other PLD activators, including ADP-ribosylation factors as demonstrated by in vitro and intact cell systems. The present results shed light on the molecular basis of how the 'fission protein' CtBP1/BARS controls vesicular trafficking events including macropinocytosis.

  4. Acid-functionalized polyolefin materials and their use in acid-promoted chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Tian, Chengcheng; Bauer, John Christopher; Dai, Sheng

    2016-06-07

    An acid-functionalized polyolefin material that can be used as an acid catalyst in a wide range of acid-promoted chemical reactions, wherein the acid-functionalized polyolefin material includes a polyolefin backbone on which acid groups are appended. Also described is a method for the preparation of the acid catalyst in which a precursor polyolefin is subjected to ionizing radiation (e.g., electron beam irradiation) of sufficient power and the irradiated precursor polyolefin reacted with at least one vinyl monomer having an acid group thereon. Further described is a method for conducting an acid-promoted chemical reaction, wherein an acid-reactive organic precursor is contacted in liquid form with a solid heterogeneous acid catalyst comprising a polyolefin backbone of at least 1 micron in one dimension and having carboxylic acid groups and either sulfonic acid or phosphoric acid groups appended thereto.

  5. Dopamine agonist-induced substance addiction: the next piece of the puzzle.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    Traditional antiparkinson treatment strategies strive to balance the antiparkinson effects of dopaminergic drugs with the avoidance of motor response complications. Dopamine agonists have an established role in delaying the emergence of motor response complications or reducing motor "off" periods. The recent recognition of a range of "behavioural addictions" that are linked to dopamine agonist use has highlighted the role of dopamine in brain reward function and addiction disorders in general. Dopamine agonists have now even been linked occasionally to new substance addictions. The challenge now for the Parkinsonologist is to also balance the net benefits of using dopamine agonists for their motor effects with avoiding the harm from behavioural compulsions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Vascular CO counterbalances the sensitizing influence of 20-HETE on agonist-induced vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Kaide, Jun-Ichi; Zhang, Fan; Wei, Yuan; Wang, WenHui; Gopal, Venkat Raj; Falck, John R; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Nasjletti, Alberto

    2004-08-01

    We examined the influence of interactions between CO and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) on vascular reactivity to phenylephrine and vasopressin. Renal interlobar arteries incubated in Krebs buffer released CO at a rate that is decreased (from 125.0+/-15.2 to 46.3+/-8.8 pmol/mg protein per hour, P<0.05) by the heme oxygenase inhibitor chromium mesoporphyrin (CrMP; 30 micromol/L). The level of 20-HETE in vessels was not affected by CrMP (74.3+/-6.1 versus 72.5+/-16.2 pmol/mg protein), but was decreased (P<0.05) by CO (1 micromol/L; 33.2+/-7.9 pmol/mg protein) or the cytochrome P450-4A inhibitor N-methylsulfonyl-12,12-dibromododec-11-enamide (DDMS; 30 micromol/L; 11.4+/-3.3 pmol/mg protein). Phenylephrine elicited development of isometric tension in vascular rings mounted on a wire-myograph (EC(50), 0.29+/-0.02 micromol/L; R(max), 3.78+/-0.19 mN/mm). The sensitivity to phenylephrine was decreased (P<0.05) by CO (1 micromol/L; EC(50), 0.60+/-0.04 micromol/L) or DDMS (EC(50), 0.71+/-0.12 micromol/L) and increased (P<0.05) by 20-HETE (10 micromol/L; EC(50), 0.08+/-0.02 micromol/L) or CrMP (EC(50), 0.11+/-0.02 micromol/L). Notably, neither CO nor CrMP changed the sensitivity to phenylephrine in vessels treated with DDMS. Refractoriness to CO and CrMP in such a setting was eliminated by inclusion of 20-HETE (1 micromol/L) in the bathing buffer. The aforementioned interventions affected the vascular reactivity to vasopressin in a similar manner. These data indicate that the reactivity of renal arteries to phenylephrine and vasopressin is reciprocally influenced by CO and 20-HETE of vascular origin and that CO desensitizes the vascular smooth muscle to constrictor agonists by interfering with the sensitizing influence of 20-HETE.

  7. Chronic ethanol increases systemic TLR3 agonist-induced neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence links systemic inflammation to neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. We previously found that systemic endotoxin, a TLR4 agonist or TNFα, increased blood TNFα that entered the brain activating microglia and persistent neuroinflammation. Further, we found that models of ethanol binge drinking sensitized blood and brain proinflammatory responses. We hypothesized that blood cytokines contribute to the magnitude of neuroinflammation and that ethanol primes proinflammatory responses. Here, we investigate the effects of chronic ethanol on neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration triggered by toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) agonist poly I:C. Methods Polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) was used to induce inflammatory responses when sensitized with D-galactosamine (D-GalN). Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with water or ethanol (5 g/kg/day, i.g., 10 days) or poly I:C (250 μg/kg, i.p.) alone or sequentially 24 hours after ethanol exposure. Cytokines, chemokines, microglial morphology, NADPH oxidase (NOX), reactive oxygen species (ROS), high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), TLR3 and cell death markers were examined using real-time PCR, ELISA, immunohistochemistry and hydroethidine histochemistry. Results Poly I:C increased blood and brain TNFα that peaked at three hours. Blood levels returned within one day, whereas brain levels remained elevated for at least three days. Escalating blood and brain proinflammatory responses were found with ethanol, poly I:C, and ethanol-poly I:C treatment. Ethanol pretreatment potentiated poly I:C-induced brain TNFα (345%), IL-1β (331%), IL-6 (255%), and MCP-1(190%). Increased levels of brain cytokines coincided with increased microglial activation, NOX gp91phox, superoxide and markers of neurodegeneration (activated caspase-3 and Fluoro-Jade B). Ethanol potentiation of poly I:C was associated with ethanol-increased expression of TLR3 and endogenous agonist HMGB1 in the brain. Minocycline and

  8. CL316,243, a β3-adrenergic receptor agonist, induces muscle hypertrophy and increased strength

    PubMed Central

    Puzzo, Daniela; Raiteri, Roberto; Castaldo, Clotilde; Capasso, Raffaele; Pagano, Ester; Tedesco, Mariateresa; Gulisano, Walter; Drozd, Lisaveta; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Palmeri, Agostino; Scotto, Pietro; Miniaci, Maria Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Studies in vitro have demonstrated that β3-adrenergic receptors (β3-ARs) regulate protein metabolism in skeletal muscle by promoting protein synthesis and inhibiting protein degradation. In this study, we evaluated whether activation of β3-ARs by the selective agonist CL316,243 modifies the functional and structural properties of skeletal muscles of healthy mice. Daily injections of CL316,243 for 15 days resulted in a significant improvement in muscle force production, assessed by grip strength and weight tests, and an increased myofiber cross-sectional area, indicative of muscle hypertrophy. In addition, atomic force microscopy revealed a significant effect of CL316,243 on the transversal stiffness of isolated muscle fibers. Interestingly, the expression level of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) downstream targets and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was also found to be enhanced in tibialis anterior and soleus muscles of CL316,243 treated mice, in accordance with previous data linking β3-ARs to mTOR and NOS signaling pathways. In conclusion, our data suggest that CL316,243 systemic administration might be a novel therapeutic strategy worthy of further investigations in conditions of muscle wasting and weakness associated with aging and muscular diseases. PMID:27874066

  9. Systems Analysis of a RIG-I Agonist Inducing Broad Spectrum Inhibition of Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Goulet, Marie-Line; Olagnier, David; Xu, Zhengyun; Paz, Suzanne; Belgnaoui, S. Mehdi; Lafferty, Erin I.; Janelle, Valérie; Arguello, Meztli; Paquet, Marilene; Ghneim, Khader; Richards, Stephanie; Smith, Andrew; Wilkinson, Peter; Cameron, Mark; Kalinke, Ulrich; Qureshi, Salman; Lamarre, Alain; Haddad, Elias K.; Sekaly, Rafick Pierre; Peri, Suraj; Balachandran, Siddharth; Lin, Rongtuan; Hiscott, John

    2013-01-01

    The RIG-I like receptor pathway is stimulated during RNA virus infection by interaction between cytosolic RIG-I and viral RNA structures that contain short hairpin dsRNA and 5′ triphosphate (5′ppp) terminal structure. In the present study, an RNA agonist of RIG-I was synthesized in vitro and shown to stimulate RIG-I-dependent antiviral responses at concentrations in the picomolar range. In human lung epithelial A549 cells, 5′pppRNA specifically stimulated multiple parameters of the innate antiviral response, including IRF3, IRF7 and STAT1 activation, and induction of inflammatory and interferon stimulated genes - hallmarks of a fully functional antiviral response. Evaluation of the magnitude and duration of gene expression by transcriptional profiling identified a robust, sustained and diversified antiviral and inflammatory response characterized by enhanced pathogen recognition and interferon (IFN) signaling. Bioinformatics analysis further identified a transcriptional signature uniquely induced by 5′pppRNA, and not by IFNα-2b, that included a constellation of IRF7 and NF-kB target genes capable of mobilizing multiple arms of the innate and adaptive immune response. Treatment of primary PBMCs or lung epithelial A549 cells with 5′pppRNA provided significant protection against a spectrum of RNA and DNA viruses. In C57Bl/6 mice, intravenous administration of 5′pppRNA protected animals from a lethal challenge with H1N1 Influenza, reduced virus titers in mouse lungs and protected animals from virus-induced pneumonia. Strikingly, the RIG-I-specific transcriptional response afforded partial protection from influenza challenge, even in the absence of type I interferon signaling. This systems approach provides transcriptional, biochemical, and in vivo analysis of the antiviral efficacy of 5′pppRNA and highlights the therapeutic potential associated with the use of RIG-I agonists as broad spectrum antiviral agents. PMID:23633948

  10. Involvement of tyrosine residues located in the carboxyl tail of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor in agonist-induced down-regulation of the receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Valiquette, M; Bonin, H; Hnatowich, M; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J; Bouvier, M

    1990-01-01

    Chronic exposure of various cell types to adrenergic agonists leads to a decrease in cell surface beta 2-adrenergic receptor (beta 2AR) number. Sequestration of the receptor away from the cell surface as well as a down-regulation of the total number of cellular receptors are believed to contribute to this agonist-mediated regulation of receptor number. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not well characterized. Recently, tyrosine residues located in the cytoplasmic tails of several membrane receptors, such as the low density lipoprotein and mannose-6-phosphate receptors, have been suggested as playing an important role in the agonist-induced internalization of these receptors. Accordingly, we assessed the potential role of two tyrosine residues in the carboxyl tail of the human beta 2AR in agonist-induced sequestration and down-regulation of the receptor. Tyr-350 and Tyr-354 of the human beta 2AR were replaced with alanine residues by site-directed mutagenesis and both wild-type and mutant beta 2AR were stably expressed in transformed Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The mutation dramatically decreased the ability of the beta 2AR to undergo isoproterenol-induced down-regulation. However, the substitution of Tyr-350 and Tyr-354 did not affect agonist-induced sequestration of the receptor. These results suggest that tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of human beta 2AR are crucial determinants involved in its down-regulation. PMID:2164220

  11. In vitro selection of functional nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. S.; Szostak, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    In vitro selection allows rare functional RNA or DNA molecules to be isolated from pools of over 10(15) different sequences. This approach has been used to identify RNA and DNA ligands for numerous small molecules, and recent three-dimensional structure solutions have revealed the basis for ligand recognition in several cases. By selecting high-affinity and -specificity nucleic acid ligands for proteins, promising new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents have been identified. Selection experiments have also been carried out to identify ribozymes that catalyze a variety of chemical transformations, including RNA cleavage, ligation, and synthesis, as well as alkylation and acyl-transfer reactions and N-glycosidic and peptide bond formation. The existence of such RNA enzymes supports the notion that ribozymes could have directed a primitive metabolism before the evolution of protein synthesis. New in vitro protein selection techniques should allow for a direct comparison of the frequency of ligand binding and catalytic structures in pools of random sequence polynucleotides versus polypeptides.

  12. In vitro selection of functional nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. S.; Szostak, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    In vitro selection allows rare functional RNA or DNA molecules to be isolated from pools of over 10(15) different sequences. This approach has been used to identify RNA and DNA ligands for numerous small molecules, and recent three-dimensional structure solutions have revealed the basis for ligand recognition in several cases. By selecting high-affinity and -specificity nucleic acid ligands for proteins, promising new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents have been identified. Selection experiments have also been carried out to identify ribozymes that catalyze a variety of chemical transformations, including RNA cleavage, ligation, and synthesis, as well as alkylation and acyl-transfer reactions and N-glycosidic and peptide bond formation. The existence of such RNA enzymes supports the notion that ribozymes could have directed a primitive metabolism before the evolution of protein synthesis. New in vitro protein selection techniques should allow for a direct comparison of the frequency of ligand binding and catalytic structures in pools of random sequence polynucleotides versus polypeptides.

  13. Nitric oxide induces airway smooth muscle cell relaxation by decreasing the frequency of agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F.; Bai, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) induces airway smooth muscle cell (SMC) relaxation, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Consequently, we investigated the effects of NO on airway SMC contraction, Ca2+ signaling, and Ca2+ sensitivity in mouse lung slices with phase-contrast and confocal microscopy. Airways that were contracted in response to the agonist 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transiently relaxed in response to the NO donor, NOC-5. This NO-induced relaxation was enhanced by zaprinast or vardenafil, two selective inhibitors of cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase-5, but blocked by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, and by Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPS, an inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). Simultaneous measurements of airway caliber and SMC [Ca2+]i revealed that airway contraction induced by 5-HT correlated with the occurrence of Ca2+ oscillations in the airway SMCs. Airway relaxation induced by NOC-5 was accompanied by a decrease in the frequency of these Ca2+ oscillations. The cGMP analogues and selective PKG activators 8Br-cGMP and 8pCPT-cGMP also induced airway relaxation and decreased the frequency of the Ca2+ oscillations. NOC-5 inhibited the increase of [Ca2+]i and contraction induced by the photolytic release of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in airway SMCs. The effect of NO on the Ca2+ sensitivity of the airway SMCs was examined in lung slices permeabilized to Ca2+ by treatment with caffeine and ryanodine. Neither NOC-5 nor 8pCPT-cGMP induced relaxation in agonist-contracted Ca2+-permeabilized airways. Consequently, we conclude that NO, acting via the cGMP–PKG pathway, induced airway SMC relaxation by predominately inhibiting the release of Ca2+ via the IP3 receptor to decrease the frequency of agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations. PMID:20176853

  14. Role of phospholipase D2 in the agonist-induced and constitutive endocytosis of G-protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Koch, Thomas; Wu, Dai-Fei; Yang, Li-Quan; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove; Höllt, Volker

    2006-04-01

    We have recently shown that the mu-opioid receptor [MOR1, also termed mu-opioid peptide (MOP) receptor] is associated with the phospholipase D2 (PLD2), a phospholipid-specific phosphodiesterase located in the plasma membrane. We further demonstrated that, in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells co-expressing MOR1 and PLD2, treatment with (D-Ala2, Me Phe4, Glyol5)enkephalin (DAMGO) led to an increase in PLD2 activity and an induction of receptor endocytosis, whereas morphine, which does not induce opioid receptor endocytosis, failed to activate PLD2. In contrast, a C-terminal splice variant of the mu-opioid receptor (MOR1D, also termed MOP(1D)) exhibited robust endocytosis in response to both DAMGO and morphine treatment. We report here that MOR1D also mediates an agonist-independent (constitutive) PLD2-activation facilitating agonist-induced and constitutive receptor endocytosis. Inhibition of PLD2 activity by over-expression of a dominant negative PLD2 (nPLD2) blocked the constitutive PLD2 activation and impaired the endocytosis of MOR1D receptors. Moreover, we provide evidence that the endocytotic trafficking of the delta-opioid receptor [DOR, also termed delta-opioid peptide (DOP) receptor] and cannabinoid receptor isoform 1 (CB1) is also mediated by a PLD2-dependent pathway. These data indicate the generally important role for PLD2 in the regulation of agonist-dependent and agonist-independent G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) endocytosis.

  15. Structural basis for constitutive activity and agonist-induced activation of the enteroendocrine fat sensor GPR119

    PubMed Central

    Engelstoft, M S; Norn, C; Hauge, M; Holliday, N D; Elster, L; Lehmann, J; Jones, R M; Frimurer, T M; Schwartz, T W

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose GPR119 is a Gαs-coupled 7TM receptor activated by endogenous lipids such as oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and by the dietary triglyceride metabolite 2-monoacylglycerol. GPR119 stimulates enteroendocrine hormone and insulin secretion. But despite massive drug discovery efforts in the field, very little is known about the basic molecular pharmacology of GPR119. Experimental Approach GPR119 receptor signalling was studied in transfected cells. Mutational mapping (30 mutations in 23 positions) was performed on residues required for ligand-independent and agonist-induced GPR119 activation (AR231453 and OEA). Novel Rosetta-based receptor modelling was applied, using a composite template approach with segments from different X-ray structures and fully flexible ligand docking. Key Results The increased signalling induced by increasing the cell surface expression of GPR119 in the absence of agonist and the inhibitory effect of two synthetic inverse agonists demonstrated that GRP119 signals with a high degree of constitutive activity through the Gαs pathway. The mutational maps for AR231453 and OEA were very similar and, surprisingly, also similar to the mutational map for residues affecting the constitutive signalling – albeit with key differences. Surprisingly, almost all residues in extracellular loop-2b were important for the constitutive activity. The molecular modelling and docking demonstrated that AR231453 binds in a ‘vertical’ pocket in between mutational hits reaching from the centre of the receptor out to extracellular loop-2b. Conclusions and Implications The high constitutive activity of GPR119 should be taken into account in future drug discovery efforts, which can now be guided by the detailed knowledge of the physiochemical properties of the extended ligand-binding pocket. PMID:25117266

  16. Relaxant effects of Schisandra chinensis and its major lignans on agonists-induced contraction in guinea pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jia-Ming; Ip, Paul Siu Po; Che, Chun-Tao; Yeung, John H K

    2011-10-15

    In this study, the herbal extracts of Schisandra chinensis were demonstrated to inhibit the contractions induced by acetylcholine (ACh) and serotonin (5-HT) in guinea pig ileum, and the 95% ethanol extract was more effective than the aqueous extract. Analysis with High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) indicated that schisandrin, schisandrol B, schisandrin A and schisandrin B were the major lignans of Schisandra chinensis, and the ethanol extract contained higher amount of these lignans than the aqueous extract. All four lignans inhibited the contractile responses to ACh, with EC(20) values ranging from 2.2±0.4μM (schisandrin A) to 13.2±4.7μM (schisandrin). The effectiveness of these compounds in relaxing the 5-HT-induced contraction was observed with a similar magnitude. Receptor binding assay indicated that Schisandra lignans did not show significant antagonistic effect on muscarinic M3 receptor. In Ca(2+)-free preparations primed with ACh or KCl, schisandrin A (50μM) attenuated the contractile responses to cumulative addition of CaCl(2) by 37%. In addition, schisandrin A also concentration-dependently inhibited ACh-induced contractions in Ca(2+)-free buffer. This study demonstrates that Schisandra chinensis exhibited relaxant effects on agonist-induced contraction in guinea pig ileum, with schisandrin, schisandrol B, schisandrin A and schisandrin B being the major active ingredients. The antispasmodic action of schisandrin A involved inhibitions on both Ca(2+) influx through L-type Ca(2+) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, rather than specific antagonism of cholinergic muscarinic receptors.

  17. Inhibitory effects of Bulnesia sarmienti aqueous extract on agonist-induced platelet activation and thrombus formation involves mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Kamruzzaman, S M; Endale, Mehari; Oh, Won Jun; Park, Seung-Chun; Kim, Kil-Soo; Hong, Joo Heon; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Yun, Bong-Sik; Rhee, Man Hee

    2010-08-09

    B. sarmienti has long been recognized in folk medicine as a medicinal plant with various medicinal uses. Traditionally, it has been appreciated for the skin-healing properties of its essence. The bark has also been employed to treat stomach and cardiovascular disorders and reported to have antitumor, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, information on its antiplatelet activity is limited. To examined the effects of B. sarmienti aqueous extract (BSAE) in platelet physiology. The anti-platelet activity of BSAE was studied using rat platelets for in vitro determination of the extract effect on agonist-induced platelet aggregation, ATP secretion, [Ca(2+)](i) mobilization and MAP kinase phosphorylation. The extract in vivo effects was also examined in arterio-venous shunt thrombus formation in rats, and tail bleeding time in mice. HPLC chromatographic analysis revealed that B. sarmienti extract contained (+)-catechin (C), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin (EC), and (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG). BSAE, significantly and dose dependently, inhibited collagen, thrombin, or ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The 50 percent inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of the extract for collagen, thrombin and ADP-induced platelet aggregation were 45.3+/-2.6, 100+/-5.6 and 110+/-4.6 microg/ml, respectively. Collagen activated ATP release and thrombin-induced intracellular Ca(2+) concentration were reduced in BSAE-treated platelets. In addition, the extract in vivo activity showed that BSAE at 100 mg/kg significantly attenuated thrombus formation in rat extracorporeal shunt model while mice tail bleeding time was not affected. Moreover, BSAE attenuated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase 2 (ERK2) phosphorylations. BSAE inhibits platelet activation, granule secretion, aggregation, and thrombus formation without affecting bleeding time, and that this effect is mediated

  18. Complex correlation between excitatory amino acid-induced increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and subsequent loss of neuronal function in individual neocortical neurons in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Witt, M R; Dekermendjian, K; Frandsen, A; Schousboe, A; Nielsen, M

    1994-01-01

    Primary cultures of cerebral cortical neurons and single-cell imaging of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) with the ratiometric dye fura-2 were used to assess excitatory amino acid (EAA)-induced neurotoxicity; the loss of neuronal function as defined by the ability of the cells to respond to K(+)-induced depolarization by a transient increase in Ca2+ influx was measured. The responsiveness of individual neurons was measured quantitatively as the [Ca2+]i values of the second KCl (2.KCl) stimulation divided by those of the first KCl (1.KCl) stimulation, giving the value of the ratio (2.KCl/1.KCl). Exposure to EAAs led to an increase in [Ca2+]i, but no simple correlation between the increase in [Ca2+]i and neuronal responsiveness could be demonstrated. Rather, below a threshold level of [Ca2+]i (ca. 1 microM), the neuronal responsiveness was largely independent of the glutamate receptor-agonist-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. However, when [Ca2+]i increased above this threshold level, the neurons almost invariably lost the ability to respond to a K(+)-induced depolarization, particularly after exposure to glutamate. Therefore, the cortical neurons were found to be exceptionally vulnerable to the glutamate-induced loss of function when compared with the effect induced by the glutamate receptor subtype-specific agonists, N-methyl-D-aspartate, quisqualate, and 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl) propionate. The findings suggest that the loss of neuronal membrane polarization precedes plasma membrane disruption and is a sensitive marker of EAA-induced neurodegeneration observed at the single-cell level. Images PMID:7527559

  19. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Alexandrina Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-23

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  20. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Alexandrina; Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-01

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  1. Involvement of nitric oxide in 5-HT(3) receptor agonist-induced fluid accumulation in jejunum and colon of anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Veeresh, B; Patil, Basanagouda M; Veeresh Babu, S V; Jeedi, Neelakanth M; Unger, Banappa S

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of nitric oxide in 5-HT(3) receptor agonist-induced fluid accumulation in jejunum and colon of anesthetized rats. Fluid movement in jejunum and colon were determined simultaneously in the same rat, by modifying the Beubler method. Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, 20 mg/kg, s.c) alone and in combination with L-arginine (L-Arg, 150 mg/kg s.c) or D-arginine (D-Arg, 150 mg/kg, s.c) were administered 30 min before administration of 1-PBG (18.5 mug/kg, i.v). Intravenous administration of 1-phenylbiguanide (1-PBG) induced a net secretion of fluid in both jejunum and colon. 1-PBG had a more prominent secretory effect in the colon, causing a three-fold increase in volume of fluid secreted/g of colon than in the jejunum. Pretreatment with (L-NNA) prevented the 1-PBG-induced fluid accumulation in both jejunum and colon. The inhibitory effect of L-NNA on 1-PBG-induced fluid accumulation was reversed by L-Arg but not by D-Arg. These results provide evidence that nitric oxide plays an important role in 5-HT(3) receptor agonist-induced fluid accumulation in jejunum and colon of anesthetized rats.

  2. Involvement of nitric oxide in 5-HT3 receptor agonist-induced fluid accumulation in jejunum and colon of anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Veeresh, B.; Patil, Basanagouda M.; Veeresh Babu, S.V.; Jeedi, Neelakanth M.; Unger, Banappa S.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of nitric oxide in 5-HT3 receptor agonist-induced fluid accumulation in jejunum and colon of anesthetized rats. Materials and Methods: Fluid movement in jejunum and colon were determined simultaneously in the same rat, by modifying the Beubler method. Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, 20 mg/kg, s.c) alone and in combination with L-arginine (L-Arg, 150 mg/kg s.c) or D-arginine (D-Arg, 150 mg/kg, s.c) were administered 30 min before administration of 1-PBG (18.5 μg/kg, i.v). Results: Intravenous administration of 1-phenylbiguanide (1-PBG) induced a net secretion of fluid in both jejunum and colon. 1-PBG had a more prominent secretory effect in the colon, causing a three-fold increase in volume of fluid secreted/g of colon than in the jejunum. Pretreatment with (L-NNA) prevented the 1-PBG-induced fluid accumulation in both jejunum and colon. The inhibitory effect of L-NNA on 1-PBG-induced fluid accumulation was reversed by L-Arg but not by D-Arg. Conclusion: These results provide evidence that nitric oxide plays an important role in 5-HT3 receptor agonist-induced fluid accumulation in jejunum and colon of anesthetized rats. PMID:20177493

  3. Free fatty acids and protein kinase C activation induce GPR120 (free fatty acid receptor 4) phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Takei, Yoshinori; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-01-15

    GPR120, free fatty acid receptor 4, is a recently deorphanized G protein-coupled receptor that seems to play cardinal roles in the regulation of metabolism and in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and metabolic disorders. In the present work a GPR120-Venus fusion protein was expressed in HEK293 Flp-In T-REx cells and its function (increase in intracellular calcium) and phosphorylation were studied. It was observed that the fusion protein migrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels as a band with a mass of ≈70-75kDa, although other bands of higher apparent weight (>130kDa) were also detected. Cell stimulation with docosahexaenoic acid or α-linolenic acid induced concentration-dependent increases in intracellular calcium and GPR120 phosphorylation. Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol esters also induced a marked receptor phosphorylation but did not alter the ability of 1µM docosahexaenoic acid to increase the intracellular calcium concentration. Phorbol ester-induced GPR120 phosphorylation, but not that induced with docosahexaenoic acid, was blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors (bis-indolyl-maleimide I and Gö 6976) suggesting that conventional kinase isoforms mediate this action. The absence of effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on agonist-induced GPR120 phosphorylation indicates that this kinase does not play a major role in agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation. Docosahexaenoic acid action was associated with marked GPR120 internalization whereas that induced with phorbol esters was smaller at early times. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Fatty acids as modulators of neutrophil recruitment, function and survival.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Hosana G; Takeo Sato, Fabio; Curi, Rui; Vinolo, Marco A R

    2016-08-15

    Neutrophils are well-known to act in the destruction of invading microorganisms. They have also been implicated in the activation of other immune cells including B- and T-lymphocytes and in the resolution of inflammation and tissue regeneration. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the circulation from where they migrate to tissues to perform their effector functions. Neutrophils are in constant contact with fatty acids that can modulate their function, activation and fate (survival or cell death) through different mechanisms. In this review, the effects of fatty acids pertaining to five classes, namely, long-chain saturated fatty acids (LCSFAs), short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and omega-3 (n-3), omega-6 (n-6) and omega-9 (n-9) unsaturated fatty acids, on neutrophils and the relevance of these effects for disease development are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Nucleic acid functionalized graphene for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2012-02-06

    There is immense demand for complex nanoarchitectures based on graphene nanostructures in the fields of biosensing or nanoelectronics. DNA molecules represent the most versatile and programmable recognition element and can provide a unique massive parallel assembly strategy with graphene nanomaterials. Here we demonstrate a facile strategy for covalent linking of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) to graphene using carbodiimide chemistry and apply it to genosensing. Since graphenes can be prepared by different methods and can contain various oxygen containing groups, we thoroughly investigated the utility of four different chemically modified graphenes for functionalization by ssDNA. The materials were characterized in detail and the different DNA functionalized graphene platforms were then employed for the detection of DNA hybridization and DNA polymorphism by using impedimetric methods. We believe that our findings are very important for the development of novel devices that can be used as alternatives to classical techniques for sensitive and fast DNA analysis. In addition, covalent functionalization of graphene with ssDNA is expected to have broad implications, from biosensing to nanoelectronics and directed, DNA programmable, self-assembly.

  6. Density functional theory study of the oligomerization of carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Di Tommaso, Devis; Watson, Ken L

    2014-11-20

    We present a density functional theory [M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p)] study of the structures and free energies of formation of oligomers of four carboxylic acids (formic acid, acetic acid, tetrolic acid, and benzoic acid) in water, chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride. Solvation effects were treated using the SMD continuum solvation model. The low-lying energy structures of molecular complexes were located by adopting an efficient search procedure to probe the potential energy surfaces of the oligomers of carboxylic acids (CA)n (n = 2-6). The free energies of the isomers of (CA)n in solution were determined as the sum of the electronic energy, vibrational-rotational-translational gas-phase contribution, and solvation free energy. The assessment of the computational protocol adopted in this study with respect to the dimerization of acetic acid, (AA)2, and formic acid, (FA)2, located new isomers of (AA)2 and (FA)2 and gave dimerization constants in good agreement with the experimental values. The calculation of the self-association of acetic acid, tetrolic acid, and benzoic acid shows the following: (i) Classic carboxylic dimers are the most stable isomer of (CA)2 in both the gas phase and solution. (ii) Trimers of carboxylic acid are stable in apolar aprotic solvents. (iii) Molecular clusters consisting of two interacting classic carboxylic dimers (CA)4,(D+D) are the most stable type of tetramers, but their formation from the self-association of classic carboxylic dimers is highly unfavorable. (iv) For acetic acid and tetrolic acid the reactions (CA)2 + 2CA → (CA)4,(D+D) and (CA)3 + CA → (CA)4,(D+D) are exoergonic, but these aggregation pathways go through unstable clusters that could hinder the formation of tetrameric species. (v) For tetrolic acid the prenucleation species that are more likely to form in solution are dimeric and trimeric structures that have encoded structural motifs resembling the α and β solid forms of tetrolic acid. (vi) Stable tetramers of

  7. Fatty Acids, Lipid Mediators, and T-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Anja J.; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Toes, René E. M.; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Research toward the mechanisms underlying obesity-linked complications has intensified during the last years. As a consequence, it has become clear that metabolism and immunity are intimately linked. Free fatty acids and other lipids acquired in excess by current feeding patterns have been proposed to mediate this link due to their immune modulatory capacity. The functional differences between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, in combination with their dietary intake are believed to modulate the outcome of immune responses. Moreover, unsaturated fatty acids can be oxidized in a tightly regulated and specific manner to generate either potent pro-inflammatory or pro-resolving lipid mediators. These oxidative derivatives of fatty acids have received detailed attention during the last years, as they have proven to have strong immune modulatory capacity, even in pM ranges. Both fatty acids and oxidized fatty acids have been studied especially in relation to macrophage and T-cells functions. In this review, we propose to focus on the effect of fatty acids and their oxidative derivatives on T-cells, as it is an active area of research during the past 5 years. The effect of fatty acids and their derivatives on activation and proliferation of T-cells, as well as the delicate balance between stimulation and lipotoxicity will be discussed. Moreover, the receptors involved in the interaction between free fatty acids and their derivatives with T-cells will be summarized. Finally, the mechanisms involved in modulation of T-cells by fatty acids will be addressed, including cellular signaling and metabolism of T-cells. The in vitro results will be placed in context of in vivo studies both in humans and mice. In this review, we summarize the latest findings on the immune modulatory function of lipids on T-cells and will point out novel directions for future research. PMID:25352844

  8. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in Gastrointestinal Function

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Gastric acid is of paramount importance for digestion and protection from pathogens but, at the same time, is a threat to the integrity of the mucosa in the upper gastrointestinal tract and may give rise to pain if inflammation or ulceration ensues. Luminal acidity in the colon is determined by lactate production and microbial transformation of carbohydrates to short chain fatty acids as well as formation of ammonia. The pH in the oesophagus, stomach and intestine is surveyed by a network of acid sensors among which acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and acid-sensitive members of transient receptor potential ion channels take a special place. In the gut, ASICs (ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3) are primarily expressed by the peripheral axons of vagal and spinal afferent neurons and are responsible for distinct proton-gated currents in these neurons. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH and through these properties contribute to a protective blood flow increase in the face of mucosal acid challenge. Importantly, experimental studies provide increasing evidence that ASICs contribute to gastric acid hypersensitivity and pain under conditions of gastritis and peptic ulceration but also participate in colonic hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli (distension) under conditions of irritation that are not necessarily associated with overt inflammation. These functional implications and their upregulation by inflammatory and non-inflammatory pathologies make ASICs potential targets to manage visceral hypersensitivity and pain associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:25582294

  9. Chemical functionalization of hyaluronic acid for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Vasi, Ana-Maria; Popa, Marcel Ionel; Butnaru, Maria; Dodi, Gianina; Verestiuc, Liliana

    2014-05-01

    Functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives were obtained by ring opening mechanism of maleic anhydride (MA). FTIR and H(1) NMR spectroscopy were used to confirm the chemical linkage of MA on the hyaluronic acid chains. Thermal analysis (TG-DTG and DSC) and GPC data for the new products revealed the formation of new functional groups, without significant changes in molecular weight and thermal stability. New gels based on hyaluronic acid modified derivatives were obtained by acrylic acid copolymerization in the presence of a redox initiation system. The resulted circular and interconnected pores of the gels were visualized by SEM. The release profiles of an ophthalmic model drug, pilocarpine from tested gels were studied in simulated media. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity and cell proliferation properties indicates the potential of the new systems to be used in contact with biological media in drug delivery applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of stearic acid on postprandial lipemia and hemostatic function.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Thomas A B; Berry, Sarah E E

    2005-12-01

    It has been suggested that fats rich in stearic acid may result in exaggerated postprandial lipemia and have adverse effects on hemostatic function. The effects of test meals containing different saturated and monounsaturated FA were compared in healthy subjects in a series of studies to investigate this hypothesis. Stearic acid, when present as cocoa butter, resulted in similar postprandial lipemia and factor VII activation compared with a meal containing high-oleic sunflower oil. Stearic acid when presented as shea butter or as randomized stearate-rich TAG resulted in decreased postprandial lipemia and decreased postprandial activation of factor VII. Stearic acid-rich test meals did not result in impaired fibrinolytic activity compared with either a low-fat meal or a meal high in oleate. The difference in responses between the different stearic acid-rich fats appears to be due to varying solid fat contents of the fats at 37 degrees C.

  11. Glucose-Sensitive Hydrogel Optical Fibers Functionalized with Phenylboronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Yetisen, Ali K; Jiang, Nan; Fallahi, Afsoon; Montelongo, Yunuen; Ruiz-Esparza, Guillermo U; Tamayol, Ali; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Mahmood, Iram; Yang, Su-A; Kim, Ki Su; Butt, Haider; Khademhosseini, Ali; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2017-02-13

    Hydrogel optical fibers are utilized for continuous glucose sensing in real time. The hydrogel fibers consist of poly(acrylamide-co-poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate) cores functionalized with phenylboronic acid. The complexation of the phenylboronic acid and cis-diol groups of glucose enables reversible changes of the hydrogel fiber diameter. The analyses of light propagation loss allow for quantitative glucose measurements within the physiological range.

  12. Esterification of fatty acid catalyzed by hydrothermally stable propylsulfonic acid-functionalized mesoporous silica SBA-15.

    PubMed

    Mar, Win Win; Somsook, Ekasith

    2013-01-01

    Propylsulfonic acid-functionalized mesoporous silica SBA-15 has been synthesized via one-step strategy at 130°C based on the co-condensation of TEOS and MPTMS in the presence of Pluronic 123 polymer and H₂O₂ in HCl aqueous solution. The synthesized solid exhibited hydrothermal stability in boiling water without significant change in textural properties. The catalytic performance of the synthesized solid was studied in the esterification of oleic acid with methanol. The experimental results revealed that the large mesopore structures of SBA-15-PrSO₃H solid synthesized at 130°C could favor a facile access of oleic acid to the acid sites, making the comparable activity to that of phenyl ethyl sulfonic acid functionalized silica and higher than that of dry amberlyst-15.

  13. New Functions and Potential Applications of Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Uneyama, Hisayuki; Kobayashi, Hisamine; Tonouchi, Naoto

    Currently, several types of amino acids are being produced and used worldwide. Nevertheless, several new functions of amino acids have been recently discovered that could result in other applications. For example, oral stimulation by glutamate triggers the cephalic phase response to prepare for food digestion. Further, the stomach and intestines have specific glutamate-recognizing systems in their epithelial mucosa. Regarding clinical applications, addition of monosodium glutamate to the medicinal diet has been shown to markedly enhance gastric secretion in a vagus-dependent manner. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are the major components of muscles, and ingestion of BCAAs has been found to be effective for decreasing muscle pain. BCAAs are expected to be a solution for the serious issue of aging. Further, ingestion of specific amino acids could be beneficial. Glycine can be ingested for good night's sleep: glycine ingestion before bedtime significantly improved subjective sleep quality. Ingestion of alanine and glutamine effectively accelerates alcohol metabolism, and ingestion of cystine and theanine effectively prevents colds. Finally, amino acids could be used in a novel clinical diagnostic method: the balance of amino acids in the blood could be an indicator of the risk of diseases such as cancer. These newly discovered functions of amino acids are expected to contribute to the resolution of various issues.

  14. Biological functions of iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Thelin, Martin A; Bartolini, Barbara; Axelsson, Jakob; Gustafsson, Renata; Tykesson, Emil; Pera, Edgar; Oldberg, Åke; Maccarana, Marco; Malmstrom, Anders

    2013-05-01

    The presence of iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate changes the properties of the polysaccharides because it generates a more flexible chain with increased binding potentials. Iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate influences multiple cellular properties, such as migration, proliferation, differentiation, angiogenesis and the regulation of cytokine/growth factor activities. Under pathological conditions such as wound healing, inflammation and cancer, iduronic acid has diverse regulatory functions. Iduronic acid is formed by two epimerases (i.e. dermatan sulfate epimerase 1 and 2) that have different tissue distribution and properties. The role of iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate is highlighted by the vast changes in connective tissue features in patients with a new type of Ehler-Danlos syndrome: adducted thumb-clubfoot syndrome. Future research aims to understand the roles of the two epimerases and their interplay with the sulfotransferases involved in chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate biosynthesis. Furthermore, a better definition of chondroitin/dermatan sulfate functions using different knockout models is needed. In this review, we focus on the two enzymes responsible for iduronic acid formation, as well as the role of iduronic acid in health and disease.

  15. Folic acid-Functionalized Nanoparticles for Enhanced Oral Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Emilie; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Kirtane, Ameya; Guru, Bharath Raja; Grill, Alex E.; Whittum-Hudson, Judith; Panyam, Jayanth

    2012-01-01

    The oral absorption of drugs that have poor bioavailability can be enhanced by encapsulation in polymeric nanoparticles. Transcellular transport of nanoparticle-encapsulated drug, possibly through transcytosis, is likely the major mechanism through which nanoparticles improve drug absorption. We hypothesized that the cellular uptake and transport of nanoparticles can be further increased by targeting the folate receptors expressed on the intestinal epithelial cells. The objective of this research was to study the effect of folic acid functionalization on transcellular transport of nanoparticle-encapsulated paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic with poor oral bioavailability. Surface-functionalized poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles loaded with paclitaxel were prepared by the interfacial activity assisted surface functionalization technique. Transport of paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles was investigated using Caco-2 cell monolayers as an in vitro model. Caco-2 cells were found to express folate receptor and the drug efflux protein, p-glycoprotein, to high levels. Encapsulation of paclitaxel in PLGA nanoparticles resulted in a 5-fold increase in apparent permeability (Papp) across Caco-2 cells. Functionalization of nanoparticles with folic acid further increased the transport (8-fold higher transport compared to free paclitaxel). Confocal microscopic studies showed that folic acid-functionalized nanoparticles were internalized by the cells and that nanoparticles did not have any gross effects on tight junction integrity. In conclusion, our studies indicate that folic acid functionalized nanoparticles have the potential to enhance the oral absorption of drugs with poor oral bioavailability. PMID:22670575

  16. Anacardic Acid, Salicylic Acid, and Oleic Acid Differentially Alter Cellular Bioenergetic Function in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Radde, Brandie N; Alizadeh-Rad, Negin; Price, Stephanie M; Schultz, David J; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2016-11-01

    Anacardic acid is a dietary and medicinal phytochemical that inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in isolated rat liver mitochondria. Since mitochondrial-targeted anticancer therapy (mitocans) may be useful in breast cancer, we examined the effect of anacardic acid on cellular bioenergetics and OXPHOS pathway proteins in breast cancer cells modeling progression to endocrine-independence: MCF-7 estrogen receptor α (ERα)+ endocrine-sensitive; LCC9 and LY2 ERα+, endocrine-resistant, and MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. At concentrations similar to cell proliferation IC50 s, anacardic acid reduced ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate (OCR), mitochondrial reserve capacity, and coupling efficiency while increasing proton leak, reflecting mitochondrial toxicity which was greater in MCF-7 compared to endocrine-resistant and TNBC cells. These results suggest tolerance in endocrine-resistant and TNBC cells to mitochondrial stress induced by anacardic acid. Since anacardic acid is an alkylated 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, the effects of salicylic acid (SA, 2-hydroxybenzoic acid moiety) and oleic acid (OA, monounsaturated alkyl moiety) were tested. SA inhibited whereas OA stimulated cell viability. In contrast to stimulation of basal OCR by anacardic acid (uncoupling effect), neither SA nor OA altered basal OCR- except OA inhibited basal and ATP-linked OCR, and increased ECAR, in MDA-MB-231 cells. Changes in OXPHOS proteins correlated with changes in OCR. Overall, neither the 2-hydroxybenzoic acid moiety nor the monounsaturated alky moiety of anacardic acid is solely responsible for the observed mitochondria-targeted anticancer activity in breast cancer cells and hence both moieties are required in the same molecule for the observed effects. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2521-2532, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Plasma membrane cholesterol level and agonist-induced internalization of δ-opioid receptors; colocalization study with intracellular membrane markers of Rab family.

    PubMed

    Brejchova, Jana; Vosahlikova, Miroslava; Roubalova, Lenka; Parenti, Marco; Mauri, Mario; Chernyavskiy, Oleksandr; Svoboda, Petr

    2016-08-01

    Decrease of cholesterol level in plasma membrane of living HEK293 cells transiently expressing FLAG-δ-OR by β-cyclodextrin (β-CDX) resulted in a slight internalization of δ-OR. Massive internalization of δ-OR induced by specific agonist DADLE was diminished in cholesterol-depleted cells. These results suggest that agonist-induced internalization of δ-OR, which has been traditionally attributed exclusively to clathrin-mediated pathway, proceeds at least partially via membrane domains. Identification of internalized pools of FLAG-δ-OR by colocalization studies with proteins of Rab family indicated the decreased presence of receptors in early endosomes (Rab5), late endosomes and lysosomes (Rab7) and fast recycling vesicles (Rab4). Slow type of recycling (Rab11) was unchanged by cholesterol depletion. As expected, agonist-induced internalization of oxytocin receptors was totally suppressed in β-CDX-treated cells. Determination of average fluorescence lifetime of TMA-DPH, the polar derivative of hydrophobic membrane probe diphenylhexatriene, in live cells by FLIM indicated a significant alteration of the overall PM structure which may be interpreted as an increased "water-accessible space" within PM area. Data obtained by studies of HEK293 cells transiently expressing FLAG-δ-OR by "antibody feeding" method were extended by analysis of the effect of cholesterol depletion on distribution of FLAG-δ-OR in sucrose density gradients prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing FLAG-δ-OR. Major part of FLAG-δ-OR was co-localized with plasma membrane marker Na,K-ATPase and β-CDX treatment resulted in shift of PM fragments containing both FLAG-δ-OR and Na,K-ATPase to higher density. Thus, the decrease in content of the major lipid constituent of PM resulted in increased density of resulting PM fragments.

  18. Nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Mo, Liuting; Li, Juan; Liu, Qiaoling; Qiu, Liping; Tan, Weihong

    2017-03-15

    In clinical diagnostics, as well as food and environmental safety practices, biosensors are powerful tools for monitoring biological or biochemical processes. Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal nanomaterials, including transition metal chalcogenides (TMCs) and transition metal oxides (TMOs), are receiving growing interest for their use in biosensing applications based on such unique properties as high surface area and fluorescence quenching abilities. Meanwhile, nucleic acid probes based on Watson-Crick base-pairing rules are also being widely applied in biosensing based on their excellent recognition capability. In particular, the emergence of functional nucleic acids in the 1980s, especially aptamers, has substantially extended the recognition capability of nucleic acids to various targets, ranging from small organic molecules and metal ions to proteins and cells. Based on π-π stacking interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids, biosensing systems can be easily assembled. Therefore, the combination of 2D transition metal nanomaterials and nucleic acids brings intriguing opportunities in bioanalysis and biomedicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets in biosensing applications. The structure and properties of 2D transition metal nanomaterials are first discussed, emphasizing the interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids. Then, the applications of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheet-based biosensors are discussed in the context of different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical and electrochemical approaches. Finally, we provide our perspectives on the current challenges and opportunities in this promising field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional characterization of Caenorhabditis elegans heteromeric amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Veljkovic, Emilija; Stasiuk, Susan; Skelly, Patrick J; Shoemaker, Charles B; Verrey, François

    2004-02-27

    Mammalian heteromeric amino acid transporters (HATs) are composed of a multi-transmembrane spanning catalytic protein covalently associated with a type II glycoprotein (e.g. 4F2hc, rBAT) through a disulfide bond. Caenorhabditis elegans has nine genes encoding close homologues of the HAT catalytic proteins. Three of these genes (designated AAT-1 to AAT-3) have a much higher degree of similarity to the mammalian homologues than the other six, including the presence of a cysteine residue at the position known to form a disulfide bridge to the glycoprotein partner in mammalian HATs. C. elegans also has two genes encoding homologues of the heteromeric amino acid transporter type II glycoprotein subunits (designated ATG-1 and ATG-2). Both ATG, and/or AAT-1, -2, -3 proteins were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and tested for amino acid transport function. This screen revealed that AAT-1 and AAT-3 facilitate amino acid transport when expressed together with ATG-2 but not with ATG-1 or the mammalian type II glycoproteins 4F2hc and rBAT. AAT-1 and AAT-3 covalently bind to both C. elegans ATG glycoproteins, but only the pairs with ATG-2 traffic to the oocyte surface. Both of these functional, surface-expressed C. elegans HATs transport most neutral amino acids and display the highest transport rate for l-Ala and l-Ser (apparent K(m) 100 microm range). Similar to their mammalian counterparts, the C. elegans HATs function as (near) obligatory amino acid exchangers. Taken together, this study demonstrates that the heteromeric structure and the amino acid exchange function of HATs have been conserved throughout the evolution of nematodes to mammals.

  20. Acid-sensing ion channels in gastrointestinal function.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Gastric acid is of paramount importance for digestion and protection from pathogens but, at the same time, is a threat to the integrity of the mucosa in the upper gastrointestinal tract and may give rise to pain if inflammation or ulceration ensues. Luminal acidity in the colon is determined by lactate production and microbial transformation of carbohydrates to short chain fatty acids as well as formation of ammonia. The pH in the oesophagus, stomach and intestine is surveyed by a network of acid sensors among which acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and acid-sensitive members of transient receptor potential ion channels take a special place. In the gut, ASICs (ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3) are primarily expressed by the peripheral axons of vagal and spinal afferent neurons and are responsible for distinct proton-gated currents in these neurons. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH and through these properties contribute to a protective blood flow increase in the face of mucosal acid challenge. Importantly, experimental studies provide increasing evidence that ASICs contribute to gastric acid hypersensitivity and pain under conditions of gastritis and peptic ulceration but also participate in colonic hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli (distension) under conditions of irritation that are not necessarily associated with overt inflammation. These functional implications and their upregulation by inflammatory and non-inflammatory pathologies make ASICs potential targets to manage visceral hypersensitivity and pain associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  1. Functional amino acids in fish nutrition, health and welfare.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Synne M; Waagbø, Rune; Espe, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Protein is the most expensive part of fish diets and supplies amino acids (AA) for energy, growth, protein synthesis and as substrates for key metabolic pathways. Functional AA is a term used to describe AA that are involved in cellular processes apart from protein synthesis. A deficiency, or imbalance, in functional AA may impair body metabolism and homeostasis. Recent years have seen an increased interest in AA to increase disease resistance, immune response, reproduction, behavior and more. This has led to a boost of commercially available functional fish feeds that aim to optimize fish performance and quality of the product. This review aim to collect recent findings of functional AA and of how they may improve fish health and welfare. It will focus on functional properties of some of the most studied AA, namely arginine, glutamine, glutamate, tryptophan, sulfur amino acids (methionine, cysteine and taurine), histidine and branched chain amino acids. Where information is not available in fish, we will point towards functions known in animals and humans, with possible translational functions to fish.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaner, Ted V.

    Silicon nanoparticles are of great interest in a great number of fields. Silicon nanoparticles show great promise particularly in the field of bioimaging. Carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles have the ability to covalently bond to biomolecules through the conjugation of the carboxylic acid to an amine functionalized biomolecule. This thesis explores the synthesis of silicon nanoparticles functionalized by both carboxylic acids and alkenes and their carboxylic acid functionality. Also discussed is the characterization of the silicon nanoparticles by the use of x-ray spectroscopy. Finally, the nature of the Si-H bond that is observed on the surface of the silicon nanoparticles will be investigated using photoassisted exciton mediated hydrosilation reactions. The silicon nanoparticles are synthesized from both carboxylic acids and alkenes. However, the lack of solubility of diacids is a significant barrier to carboxylic acid functionalization by a mixture of monoacids and diacids. A synthesis route to overcome this obstacle is to synthesize silicon nanoparticles with terminal vinyl group. This terminal vinyl group is distal to the surface of the silicon nanoparticle. The conversion of the vinyl group to a carboxylic acid is accomplished by oxidative cleavage using ozonolysis. The carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles were then successfully conjugated to amine functionalized DNA strand through an n-hydroxy succinimide ester activation step, which promotes the formation of the amide bond. Conjugation was characterized by TEM and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The PAGE results show that the silicon nanoparticle conjugates move slower through the polyacrylamide gel, resulting in a significant separation from the nonconjugated DNA. The silicon nanoparticles were then characterized by the use of x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (Xanes) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate the bonding and chemical

  3. Sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases: natural functions and applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhong

    2012-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of negatively charged monosaccharides which are commonly presented as the terminal residues in glycans of the glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface or as components of capsular polysaccharides or lipooligosaccharides of some pathogenic bacteria. Due to their important biological and pathological functions, the biosynthesis, activation, transfer, breaking down, and recycle of sialic acids are attracting increasing attention. The understanding of the sialic acid metabolism in eukaryotes and bacteria leads to the development of metabolic engineering approaches for elucidating the important functions of sialic acid in mammalian systems and for large-scale production of sialosides using engineered bacterial cells. As the key enzymes in biosynthesis of sialylated structures, sialyltransferases have been continuously identified from various sources and characterized. Protein crystal structures of seven sialyltransferases have been reported. Wild-type sialyltransferases and their mutants have been applied with or without other sialoside biosynthetic enzymes for producing complex sialic acid-containing oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. This mini-review focuses on current understanding and applications of sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases. PMID:22526796

  4. Omega-3 fatty acids and cognitive function in women

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jennifer G; Ijioma, Nkechinyere; Harris, William

    2010-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) could play an important role in maintaining cognitive function in aging individuals. The omega-3 FA docosahexaenoic acid is a major constituent of neuronal membranes and, along with the other long-chain omega-3 FAs from fish such as eicosapentaentoic acid, has been shown to have a wide variety of beneficial effects on neuronal functioning, inflammation, oxidation and cell death, as well as on the development of the characteristic pathology of Alzheimer’s disease. Omega-3 FAs may prevent vascular dementia via salutary effects on lipids, inflammation, thrombosis and vascular function. Epidemiologic studies have generally supported a protective association between fish and omega-3 FA levels and cognitive decline. Some of the small, short-term, randomized trials of docosahexaenoic acid and/or eicosapentaentoic acid supplementation have found positive effects on some aspects of cognition in older adults who were cognitively intact or had mild cognitive impairment, although little effect was found in participants with Alzheimer’s disease. Large, long-term trials in this area are needed. PMID:20088735

  5. Polyaspartic acid functionalized gold nanoparticles for tumor targeted doxorubicin delivery.

    PubMed

    Khandekar, Sameera V; Kulkarni, M G; Devarajan, Padma V

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present polyaspartic acid, a biodegradable polymer as a reducing and functionalizing agent for the synthesis of doxorubicin loaded gold nanoparticles by a green process. Gold nanoparticles were stable to electrolytes and pH. Secondary amino groups of polyaspartic acid enabled reduction of gold chloride to form gold nanoparticles of size 55 +/-10 nm, with face centered cubic crystalline structure as confirmed by UV, TEM, SAED and XRD studies. Cationic doxorubicin was readily loaded onto anionic polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles by ionic complexation. Fluorescence studies confirmed doxorubicin loading while FTIR spectra confirmed ionic complexation. Doxorubicin loading onto polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles was studied at doxorubicin/polyaspartic acid molar ratios 1:10 to 1:1. As the molar ratio tended to unity, although loading up to 60% was achieved, colloidal instability resulted and is attributed to effective covering of negative charges of polyaspartic acid. Stable doxorubicin loaded polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles of 105 +/- 15.1 nm with doxorubicin loading of 23.85% w/w and zeta potential value of -28 +/- 0.77 mV were obtained at doxorubicin/polyaspartic acid molar ratio 1:10. Higher doxorubicin release rate from the doxorubicin loaded polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles in an acid medium (i.e., pH 5.5) as compared to that in pH 7.4 and deionized water is a desirable characteristic for tumor targeted delivery. Enhanced cytotoxicity and 3 fold higher uptake of doxorubicin loaded polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles as compared to doxorubicin solution were seen in MCF-7 breast cancer cells while polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles revealed no cytotoxicity confirming safety. Prominent regression in tumor size in-vivo in fibrosarcoma tumor induced mouse model was observed upto 59 days with doxorubicin loaded polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles while doxorubicin solution treated mice showed regrowth beyond 23rd day. Moreover, a

  6. Uncoupling of Energy-Linked Functions of Corn Mitochondria by Linoleic Acid and Monomethyldecenylsuccinic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Baddeley, M. Susan; Hanson, J. B.

    1967-01-01

    Linoleic acid and monomethyldecenylsuccinic acid were tested as uncoupling agents for energy linked functions of corn mitochondria. 2,4-dinitrophenol was used as a standard for comparison. Both compounds uncoupled oxidative phosphorylation, released oligomycin-blocked respiration, and accelerated adenosine triphosphatase. Linoleic acid uncoupled calcium-activated phosphate accumulation and the increase in light scattering that accompanies the accumulation. Unlike dinitrophenol, linoleic acid at 0.1 mm had a destructive effect on membrane semipermeability. Kinetic studies indicated that dinitrophenol and linoleic acid compete with phosphate for active sites in oxidative phosphorylation. Some linoleic acid is taken up by respiring mitochondria and a major share of the uptake is incorporated into phospholipids. Calcium ion and oligomycin promote the uptake, but coenzyme A does not. It is deduced that fatty acid probably attacks the non-phosphorylated intermediate, I∼X, producing X∼acyl. Uncoupling results from breakdown of X∼acyl, but sufficient X∼acyl is maintained to serve as a source of activated fatty acid. PMID:16656708

  7. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria and their environmental interactions. Moreover, functional genomics approaches have been used to understand the response of lactic acid bacteria to their environment. The results have been instrumental in understanding the adaptation of lactic acid bacteria in artisanal and industrial food fermentations as well as their interactions with the human host. Collectively, this has led to a detailed analysis of genes involved in colonization, persistence, interaction and signaling towards to the human host and its health. Finally, massive parallel genome re-sequencing has provided new opportunities in applied genomics, specifically in the characterization of novel non-GMO strains that have potential to be used in the food industry. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art of these functional genomics approaches and their impact in understanding, applying and designing lactic acid bacteria for food and health. PMID:25186768

  8. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health.

    PubMed

    Douillard, François P; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-08-29

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria and their environmental interactions. Moreover, functional genomics approaches have been used to understand the response of lactic acid bacteria to their environment. The results have been instrumental in understanding the adaptation of lactic acid bacteria in artisanal and industrial food fermentations as well as their interactions with the human host. Collectively, this has led to a detailed analysis of genes involved in colonization, persistence, interaction and signaling towards to the human host and its health. Finally, massive parallel genome re-sequencing has provided new opportunities in applied genomics, specifically in the characterization of novel non-GMO strains that have potential to be used in the food industry. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art of these functional genomics approaches and their impact in understanding, applying and designing lactic acid bacteria for food and health.

  9. Functional nucleic acids in high throughput screening and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Srivatsan, Seergazhi G; Famulok, Michael

    2007-09-01

    In vitro selection can be used to generate functional nucleic acids such as aptamers and ribozymes that can recognize a variety of molecules with high affinity and specificity. Most often these recognition events are associated with structural alterations that can be converted into detectable signals. Several signaling aptamers and ribozymes constructed by both design and selection have been successfully utilized as sensitive detection reagents. Here we summarize the development of different types of signaling nucleic acids, and approaches that have been implemented in the screening format.

  10. Poly(amino acid) functionalized maghemite and gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, Davide; Masciocchi, Norberto; Guagliardi, Antonietta; Domínguez-Vera, José Manuel; Gálvez, Natividad

    2013-02-01

    Bimodal MRI/OI imaging probes are of great interest in nanomedicine. Although many organic polymers have been studied thoroughly for in vivo applications, reports on the use of poly(amino acid)s as coating polymers are scarce. In this paper, poly-(d-glutamic acid, d-lysine) (PGL) has been used for coating maghemite and gold nanoparticles. An advantage of this flexible and biocompatible polymer is that, once anchored to the nanoparticle surface, dangling lysine amino groups are available for the incorporation of new functionalities. As an example, Alexa Fluor derivatives have been attached to PGL-coated maghemite nanoparticles to obtain magnetic/fluorescent materials. These dual-property materials could be used as bimodal MRI/OI probes for in vivo imaging.

  11. Poly(amino acid) functionalized maghemite and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Perego, Davide; Masciocchi, Norberto; Guagliardi, Antonietta; Manuel Domínguez-Vera, José; Gálvez, Natividad

    2013-02-22

    Bimodal MRI/OI imaging probes are of great interest in nanomedicine. Although many organic polymers have been studied thoroughly for in vivo applications, reports on the use of poly(amino acid)s as coating polymers are scarce. In this paper, poly-(d-glutamic acid, d-lysine) (PGL) has been used for coating maghemite and gold nanoparticles. An advantage of this flexible and biocompatible polymer is that, once anchored to the nanoparticle surface, dangling lysine amino groups are available for the incorporation of new functionalities. As an example, Alexa Fluor derivatives have been attached to PGL-coated maghemite nanoparticles to obtain magnetic/fluorescent materials. These dual-property materials could be used as bimodal MRI/OI probes for in vivo imaging.

  12. Branched-chain amino acids and brain function.

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, John D

    2005-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) influence brain function by modifying large, neutral amino acid (LNAA) transport at the blood-brain barrier. Transport is shared by several LNAAs, notably the BCAAs and the aromatic amino acids (ArAAs), and is competitive. Consequently, when plasma BCAA concentrations rise, which can occur in response to food ingestion or BCAA administration, or with the onset of certain metabolic diseases (e.g., uncontrolled diabetes), brain BCAA concentrations rise, and ArAA concentrations decline. Such effects occur acutely and chronically. Such reductions in brain ArAA concentrations have functional consequences: biochemically, they reduce the synthesis and the release of neurotransmitters derived from ArAAs, notably serotonin (from tryptophan) and catecholamines (from tyrosine and phenylalanine). The functional effects of such neurochemical changes include altered hormonal function, blood pressure, and affective state. Although the BCAAs thus have biochemical and functional effects in the brain, few attempts have been made to characterize time-course or dose-response relations for such effects. And, no studies have attempted to identify levels of BCAA intake that might produce adverse effects on the brain. The only "model" of very high BCAA exposure is a very rare genetic disorder, maple syrup urine disease, a feature of which is substantial brain dysfunction but that probably cannot serve as a useful model for excessive BCAA intake by normal individuals. Given the known biochemical and functional effects of the BCAAs, it should be a straightforward exercise to design studies to assess dose-response relations for biochemical and functional effects and, in this context, to explore for adverse effect thresholds.

  13. Fatty Acid Signaling: The New Function of Intracellular Lipases

    PubMed Central

    Papackova, Zuzana; Cahova, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, intracellular triacylglycerols (TAG) stored in the form of cytoplasmic lipid droplets have been considered to be only passive “energy conserves”. Nevertheless, degradation of TAG gives rise to a pleiotropic spectrum of bioactive intermediates, which may function as potent co-factors of transcription factors or enzymes and contribute to the regulation of numerous cellular processes. From this point of view, the process of lipolysis not only provides energy-rich equivalents but also acquires a new regulatory function. In this review, we will concentrate on the role that fatty acids liberated from intracellular TAG stores play as signaling molecules. The first part provides an overview of the transcription factors, which are regulated by fatty acids derived from intracellular stores. The second part is devoted to the role of fatty acid signaling in different organs/tissues. The specific contribution of free fatty acids released by particular lipases, hormone-sensitive lipase, adipose triacylglycerol lipase and lysosomal lipase will also be discussed. PMID:25674855

  14. Amino acid rejection behaviour as a function of concentration.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Jason; Mandale, Stephen; Williams, Paul M

    2011-05-11

    The solute rejection versus concentration behaviour of five different amino acids has been investigated using a Nitto Denko NTR7450 nanofiltration membrane. The experimental data for amino acid rejection was also compared against a combined steric and charge rejection model. At its isoelectric point, lysine was effectively neutral and its behaviour was well described by the model incorporating a steric function only. For phenylalanine, the combined model was found to fit the data well. In contrast there was poor agreement between the model and rejection data for glutamine, glutamic acid and glycine whose rejection values at first increased with concentration. This result implied that another governing process was in operation. Dimerisation as an explanation for the observed phenomena was also investigated. Size analysis of amino acid molecules as a function of the prevailing concentration using dynamic light scattering was limited but showed no evidence of dimerisation. This data was supported by osmotic pressure measurements which demonstrated no evidence of non-linearity in the relation between osmotic pressure and concentration.

  15. Functional properties and fatty acids profile of different beans varieties.

    PubMed

    Lo Turco, Vincenzo; Potortì, Angela Giorgia; Rando, Rossana; Ravenda, Pietro; Dugo, Giacomo; Di Bella, Giuseppa

    2016-10-01

    Dried seeds of four varieties of Phaseolus vulgaris, three of Vigna unguiculata ssp. unguiculata and two of Vigna angularis grown and marketed in Italy, Mexico, India, Japan, Ghana and Ivory Coast were analysed for fatty acids content. In oils from seeds of P. vulgaris, the main fatty acids were linolenic (34.7-41.5%) and linoleic (30.7-40.3%), followed by palmitic (10.7-16.8%). The first three aforementioned fatty acids in the lipid fraction of V. unguiculata varieties were 28.4, 28.7 and 26.2%, respectively; while in V. angularis varieties, main fatty acids were linoleic (36.4-39.1%) and palmitic (26.9-33.3%), followed by linolenic (17.9-22.2%). Statistical analyses indicate that botanical species play a rule in bean fatty acids distribution, while the same was not verified for geographical origin. Furthermore, the atherogenic index (AI) and the thrombogenic index (TI) were investigated for health and nutritional information. The results showed that these wide spread legumes have functional features to human health.

  16. Microbial communities, processes and functions in acid mine drainage ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin-xing; Huang, Li-nan; Méndez-García, Celia; Kuang, Jia-liang; Hua, Zheng-shuang; Liu, Jun; Shu, Wen-sheng

    2016-04-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is generated from the oxidative dissolution of metal sulfides when water and oxygen are available largely due to human mining activities. This process can be accelerated by indigenous microorganisms. In the last several decades, culture-dependent researches have uncovered and validated the roles of AMD microorganisms in metal sulfides oxidation and acid generation processes, and culture-independent studies have largely revealed the diversity and metabolic potentials and activities of AMD communities, leading towards a full understanding of the microbial diversity, functions and interactions in AMD ecosystems. This review describes the diversity of microorganisms and their functions in AMD ecosystems, and discusses their biotechnological applications in biomining and AMD bioremediation according to their capabilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) agonist, GW405833 reduces agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zebing; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jingke; Zhao, Mengqin; Sun, Nana; Sun, Fangfang; Shen, Jianxin; Zhang, Haiying; Xia, Kunkun; Chen, Dejie; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P.; Liu, Qingrong; Xi, Zhengxiong; Fan, Xuegong; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the blockade of intracellular Ca2+ signals may protect pancreatic acinar cells against Ca2+ overload, intracellular protease activation, and necrosis. The activation of cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) prevents acinar cell pathogenesis in animal models of acute pancreatitis. However, whether CB2Rs modulate intracellular Ca2+ signals in pancreatic acinar cells is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of CB2R agonist, GW405833 (GW) in agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells using multiple experimental approaches with acute dissociated pancreatic acinar cells prepared from wild type, CB1R-knockout (KO), and CB2R-KO mice. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed that CB2R protein was expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Electrophysiological experiments showed that activation of CB2Rs by GW reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-, but not cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner; this inhibition was prevented by a selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, or was absent in CB2R-KO but not CB1R-KO mice. In addition, GW eliminated L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ oscillations, pancreatic amylase, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. Collectively, we provide novel evidence that activation of CB2Rs eliminates ACh-induced Ca2+ oscillations and L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ signaling in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, which suggests a potential cellular mechanism of CB2R-mediated protection in acute pancreatitis. PMID:27432473

  18. Cutting edge: the "death" adaptor CRADD/RAIDD targets BCL10 and suppresses agonist-induced cytokine expression in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qing; Liu, Yan; Moore, Daniel J; Elizer, Sydney K; Veach, Ruth A; Hawiger, Jacek; Ruley, H Earl

    2012-03-15

    The expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in response to TCR agonists is regulated by the caspase-recruitment domain membrane-associated guanylate kinase 1 (CARMA1) signalosome through the coordinated assembly of complexes containing the BCL10 adaptor protein. We describe a novel mechanism to negatively regulate the CARMA1 signalosome by the "death" adaptor protein caspase and receptor interacting protein adaptor with death domain (CRADD)/receptor interacting protein-associated ICH-1/CED-3 homologous protein with a death domain. We show that CRADD interacts with BCL10 through its caspase recruitment domain and suppresses interactions between BCL10 and CARMA1. TCR agonist-induced interaction between CRADD and BCL10 coincides with reduction of its complex formation with CARMA1 in wild-type, as compared with Cradd-deficient, primary cells. Finally, Cradd-deficient spleen cells, CD4(+) T cells, and mice respond to T cell agonists with strikingly higher production of proinflammatory mediators, including IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, and IL-17. These results define a novel role for CRADD as a negative regulator of the CARMA1 signalosome and suppressor of Th1- and Th17-mediated inflammatory responses.

  19. Imaging endogenous opioid peptide release with [11C]carfentanil and [3H]diprenorphine: influence of agonist-induced internalization.

    PubMed

    Quelch, Darren R; Katsouri, Loukia; Nutt, David J; Parker, Christine A; Tyacke, Robin J

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the cellular processes underpinning the changes in binding observed during positron emission tomography neurotransmitter release studies may aid translation of these methodologies to other neurotransmitter systems. We compared the sensitivities of opioid receptor radioligands, carfentanil, and diprenorphine, to amphetamine-induced endogenous opioid peptide (EOP) release and methadone administration in the rat. We also investigated whether agonist-induced internalization was involved in reductions in observed binding using subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy. After radioligand administration, significant reductions in [(11)C]carfentanil, but not [(3)H]diprenorphine, uptake were observed after methadone and amphetamine pretreatment. Subcellular fractionation and in vitro radioligand binding studies showed that amphetamine pretreatment only decreased total [(11)C]carfentanil binding. In vitro saturation binding studies conducted in buffers representative of the internalization pathway suggested that μ-receptors are significantly less able to bind the radioligands in endosomal compared with extracellular compartments. Finally, a significant increase in μ-receptor-early endosome co-localization in the hypothalamus was observed after amphetamine and methadone treatment using double-labeling confocal microscopy, with no changes in δ- or κ-receptor co-localization. These data indicate carfentanil may be superior to diprenorphine when imaging EOP release in vivo, and that alterations in the ability to bind internalized receptors may be a predictor of ligand sensitivity to endogenous neurotransmitter release.

  20. Imaging endogenous opioid peptide release with [11C]carfentanil and [3H]diprenorphine: influence of agonist-induced internalization

    PubMed Central

    Quelch, Darren R; Katsouri, Loukia; Nutt, David J; Parker, Christine A; Tyacke, Robin J

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cellular processes underpinning the changes in binding observed during positron emission tomography neurotransmitter release studies may aid translation of these methodologies to other neurotransmitter systems. We compared the sensitivities of opioid receptor radioligands, carfentanil, and diprenorphine, to amphetamine-induced endogenous opioid peptide (EOP) release and methadone administration in the rat. We also investigated whether agonist-induced internalization was involved in reductions in observed binding using subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy. After radioligand administration, significant reductions in [11C]carfentanil, but not [3H]diprenorphine, uptake were observed after methadone and amphetamine pretreatment. Subcellular fractionation and in vitro radioligand binding studies showed that amphetamine pretreatment only decreased total [11C]carfentanil binding. In vitro saturation binding studies conducted in buffers representative of the internalization pathway suggested that μ-receptors are significantly less able to bind the radioligands in endosomal compared with extracellular compartments. Finally, a significant increase in μ-receptor-early endosome co-localization in the hypothalamus was observed after amphetamine and methadone treatment using double-labeling confocal microscopy, with no changes in δ- or κ-receptor co-localization. These data indicate carfentanil may be superior to diprenorphine when imaging EOP release in vivo, and that alterations in the ability to bind internalized receptors may be a predictor of ligand sensitivity to endogenous neurotransmitter release. PMID:25005876

  1. Functional nucleic acids as in vivo metabolite and ion biosensors.

    PubMed

    Alsaafin, Alaa; McKeague, Maureen

    2017-08-15

    Characterizing the role of metabolites, metals, and proteins is required to understand normal cell function, and ultimately, elucidate the mechanism of disease. Metabolite concentration and transformation results collected from cell lysates or fixed-cells conceal important dynamic information and differences between individual cells that often have profound functional consequences. Functional nucleic acid-based biosensors are emerging tools that are capable of monitoring ions and metabolites in cell populations or whole animals. Functional nucleic acids (FNAs) are a class of biomolecules that can exhibit either ligand binding or enzymatic activity. Unlike their protein analogues or the use of instrument-based analysis, FNA-based biosensors are capable of entering cells without disruption to the cellular environment and can report on the concentration, dynamics, and spatial localization of molecules in cells. Here, we review the types of FNAs that have been used as in vivo biosensors, and how FNAs can be coupled to transduction systems and delivered inside cells. We also provide examples from the literature that demonstrate their impact in practical applications. Finally, we comment on the critical limitations that need to be addressed to enable their use for single-cell dynamic tracking of metabolites and ions in vivo. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Uric acid and skin microvascular function: the Maastricht study.

    PubMed

    Wijnands, José M A; Houben, Alfons J H M; Muris, Dennis M J; Boonen, Annelies; Schram, Miranda T; Sep, Simone J S; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Henry, Ronald M A; Dagnelie, Pieter C; van der Linden, Sjef; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Arts, Ilja C W; Stehouwer, Coen D A

    2015-08-01

    Microvascular dysfunction has been suggested as a possible underlying mechanism for the association between uric acid and various diseases, such as hypertension, renal disease and cardiomyopathies. We therefore analysed the association between serum uric acid and skin microvascular function, a model of generalized microvascular function. A cross-sectional study was performed in 610 individuals [51.8% men; mean age 58.7 ± 8.6 years; 23.6% with type 2 diabetes (by design)] from The Maastricht Study. We assessed skin capillary density (capillaries/mm) by capillaroscopy at baseline, after 4 min of arterial occlusion, and after 2 min of venous congestion. Capillary recruitment after arterial occlusion and during venous congestion was expressed as the absolute change in capillary density after recruitment and as the percentage change in capillary density from baseline. Crude linear regression analyses showed that serum uric acid [per +1 standard deviation (SD) of 74 μmol/l] was not associated with baseline capillary density [β = -0.21 (95% confidence interval, 95% CI -1.61 to 1.19) P = 0.765], while an inverse association was found between uric acid and absolute change in capillary density after arterial occlusion [β = -1.15 (95% CI -2.36 to 0.06) P = 0.062] and during venous congestion [β = -1.41 (95% CI -2.68 to -0.14) P = 0.029]. However, after adjustment for sex, age and glucose metabolism status, these associations were no longer statistically significant. In addition, we found no association between uric acid and percentage capillary recruitment after arterial occlusion [β = -1.66 (95% CI -3.97 to 0.65) P = 0.159] or during venous congestion [β = -2.02 (95% CI -4.46 to 0.42) P = 0.104] in unadjusted analyses; multivariable analyses gave similar results. These results do not support the hypothesis that generalized microvascular dysfunction (as estimated in skin microcirculation) is the underlying mechanism for

  3. Plant amino acid-derived vitamins: biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Miret, Javier A; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-04-01

    Vitamins are essential organic compounds for humans, having lost the ability to de novo synthesize them. Hence, they represent dietary requirements, which are covered by plants as the main dietary source of most vitamins (through food or livestock's feed). Most vitamins synthesized by plants present amino acids as precursors (B1, B2, B3, B5, B7, B9 and E) and are therefore linked to plant nitrogen metabolism. Amino acids play different roles in their biosynthesis and metabolism, either incorporated into the backbone of the vitamin or as amino, sulfur or one-carbon group donors. There is a high natural variation in vitamin contents in crops and its exploitation through breeding, metabolic engineering and agronomic practices can enhance their nutritional quality. While the underlying biochemical roles of vitamins as cosubstrates or cofactors are usually common for most eukaryotes, the impact of vitamins B and E in metabolism and physiology can be quite different on plants and animals. Here, we first aim at giving an overview of the biosynthesis of amino acid-derived vitamins in plants, with a particular focus on how this knowledge can be exploited to increase vitamin contents in crops. Second, we will focus on the functions of these vitamins in both plants and animals (and humans in particular), to unravel common and specific roles for vitamins in evolutionary distant organisms, in which these amino acid-derived vitamins play, however, an essential role.

  4. Structure and function of eukaryotic fatty acid synthases.

    PubMed

    Maier, Timm; Leibundgut, Marc; Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad

    2010-08-01

    In all organisms, fatty acid synthesis is achieved in variations of a common cyclic reaction pathway by stepwise, iterative elongation of precursors with two-carbon extender units. In bacteria, all individual reaction steps are carried out by monofunctional dissociated enzymes, whereas in eukaryotes the fatty acid synthases (FASs) have evolved into large multifunctional enzymes that integrate the whole process of fatty acid synthesis. During the last few years, important advances in understanding the structural and functional organization of eukaryotic FASs have been made through a combination of biochemical, electron microscopic and X-ray crystallographic approaches. They have revealed the strikingly different architectures of the two distinct types of eukaryotic FASs, the fungal and the animal enzyme system. Fungal FAS is a 2·6 MDa α₆β₆ heterododecamer with a barrel shape enclosing two large chambers, each containing three sets of active sites separated by a central wheel-like structure. It represents a highly specialized micro-compartment strictly optimized for the production of saturated fatty acids. In contrast, the animal FAS is a 540 kDa X-shaped homodimer with two lateral reaction clefts characterized by a modular domain architecture and large extent of conformational flexibility that appears to contribute to catalytic efficiency.

  5. Branched-chain amino acids alter neurobehavioral function in rats.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Anna; Wenner, Brett R; Ilkayeva, Olga; Stevens, Robert D; Maggioni, Mauro; Slotkin, Theodore A; Levin, Edward D; Newgard, Christopher B

    2013-02-15

    Recently, we have described a strong association of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and aromatic amino acids (AAA) with obesity and insulin resistance. In the current study, we have investigated the potential impact of BCAA on behavioral functions. We demonstrate that supplementation of either a high-sucrose or a high-fat diet with BCAA induces anxiety-like behavior in rats compared with control groups fed on unsupplemented diets. These behavioral changes are associated with a significant decrease in the concentration of tryptophan (Trp) in brain tissues and a consequent decrease in serotonin but no difference in indices of serotonin synaptic function. The anxiety-like behaviors and decreased levels of Trp in the brain of BCAA-fed rats were reversed by supplementation of Trp in the drinking water but not by administration of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, suggesting that the behavioral changes are independent of the serotonergic pathway of Trp metabolism. Instead, BCAA supplementation lowers the brain levels of another Trp-derived metabolite, kynurenic acid, and these levels are normalized by Trp supplementation. We conclude that supplementation of high-energy diets with BCAA causes neurobehavioral impairment. Since BCAA are elevated spontaneously in human obesity, our studies suggest a potential mechanism for explaining the strong association of obesity and mood disorders.

  6. Molecular acidity: A quantitative conceptual density functional theory description.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shubin; Schauer, Cynthia K; Pedersen, Lee G

    2009-10-28

    Accurate predictions of molecular acidity using ab initio and density functional approaches are still a daunting task. Using electronic and reactivity properties, one can quantitatively estimate pKa values of acids. In a recent paper [S. B. Liu and L. G. Pedersen, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 3648 (2009)], we employed the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) on the nucleus and the sum of valence natural atomic orbital (NAO) energies for the purpose. In this work, we reformulate these relationships on the basis of conceptual density functional theory and compare the results with those from the thermodynamic cycle method. We show that MEP and NAO properties of the dissociating proton of an acid should satisfy the same relationships with experimental pKa data. We employ 27 main groups and first to third row transition metal-water complexes as illustrative examples to numerically verify the validity of these strong linear correlations. Results also show that the accuracy of our approach and that of the conventional method through the thermodynamic cycle are statistically similar.

  7. Functional lysophosphatidic acid receptors expressed in Oryzias latipes.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yuji; Ishii, Shoichi; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichi; Katoh, Kazutaka; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2014-11-10

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is known to play biological and pathophysiological roles in many types of animals. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) is an experimental fish that can be easily maintained, propagated, and analyzed, and whose genome has been completely sequenced. However, there is limited information available regarding medaka LPA receptors. Here, using information from the medaka genome database, we examine the genomic structures, expression, and functions of six LPA receptor genes, Lpar1-Lpar6. Our analyses reveal that the genomic structures of Lpar1 and Lpar4 are different from those deduced from the database. Functional analyses using a heterologous expression system demonstrate that all medaka LPA receptors except for LPA5b respond to LPA treatment with cytoskeletal changes. These findings provide useful information on the structure and function of medaka LPA receptor genes, and identify medaka as a useful experimental model for exploration of the biological significance of LPA signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging Agonist-Induced D2/D3 Receptor Desensitization and Internalization In Vivo with PET/fMRI.

    PubMed

    Sander, Christin Y; Hooker, Jacob M; Catana, Ciprian; Rosen, Bruce R; Mandeville, Joseph B

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the dynamics of dopamine receptor desensitization and internalization, thereby proposing a new technique for non-invasive, in vivo measurements of receptor adaptations. The D2/D3 agonist quinpirole, which induces receptor internalization in vitro, was administered at graded doses in non-human primates while imaging with simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A pronounced temporal divergence between receptor occupancy and fMRI signal was observed: occupancy remained elevated while fMRI responded transiently. Analogous experiments with an antagonist (prochlorperazine) and a lower-affinity agonist (ropinirole) exhibited reduced temporal dissociation between occupancy and function, consistent with a mechanism of desensitization and internalization that depends upon drug efficacy and affinity. We postulated a model that incorporates internalization into a neurovascular-coupling relationship. This model yielded in vivo desensitization/internalization rates (0.2/min for quinpirole) consistent with published in vitro measurements. Overall, these results suggest that simultaneous PET/fMRI enables characterization of dynamic neuroreceptor adaptations in vivo, and may offer a first non-invasive method for assessing receptor desensitization and internalization.

  9. Plasma Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and the Decline of Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Lauretani, Fulvio; Semba, Richard D.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Miller, Edgar R.; Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Cherubini, Antonio; Guralnik, Jack M.; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest an association between polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and the development of chronic kidney disease. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between PUFAs and renal function in older adults. Methods We performed a cross-sectional and prospective analysis of 931 adults, ≥65 years old, enrolled in the InCHIANTI study, a population-based cohort in Tuscany, Italy. Plasma PUFAs were measured at enrollment, and creatinine clearance was estimated by the Cockcroft-Gault equation at baseline and after 3-year follow-up. Results At enrollment, participants with higher creatinine clearance had higher concentrations of HDL cholesterol, total plasma PUFAs, plasma n-3 fatty acid (FA), and plasma n-6 FA and lower triglycerides. From enrollment to the 3-year follow-up visit, creatinine clearance declined by 7.8 (12.2) mL/min (P <0.0001). Baseline total plasma PUFAs, n-3 FA, n-6 FA, and linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic acids were strong independent predictors of less steep decline in creatinine clearance from baseline to follow-up (P <0.0001, after adjusting for baseline creatinine clearance). After adjusting for baseline creatinine, baseline total plasma PUFAs, n-3 FA, and linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic acids were negatively associated with creatinine at 3-year follow-up. Participants with higher plasma PUFAs at enrollment had a lower risk of developing renal insufficiency, defined by a creatinine clearance <60 mL/min, during 3-year follow-up. Conclusion High PUFA concentrations, both n-3 FA and n-6 FA, may attenuate the age-associated decline in renal function among older community-dwelling women and men. PMID:18202159

  10. The inhibition of human platelet function by ganodermic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C N; Chen, J C; Shiao, M S; Wang, C T

    1991-01-01

    Human gel-filtered platelets aggregate at greater than 20 microM-ganodermic acid S [lanosta-7,9(11),24-triene-3 beta, 15 alpha-diacetoxy-26-oic acid] [Wang, Chen, Shiao & Wang (1989) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 986, 151-160]. This study showed that platelets at less than 20 microM-ganodermic acid S displayed both concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of function, in which the agent potency in response to inducers was ADP-fibrinogen greater than collagen greater than thrombin. The agent caused a biphasic time-dependent effect on platelet phosphoinositide metabolism. The first phase involved the decrease in the pool size of phosphoinositide by 10-20%. The second phase, in which both the resynthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and the decrease of [32P]phosphatidic acid occurred, took place after 30 min. Scanning electron microscopy also revealed a time-dependent morphological change in platelets in the presence of the agent. The cells initially became spiculate discs, then swelled to a 'potato-like' morphology at 60 min. Further studies on the time-dependent inhibition of thrombin response revealed that: (1) the percentage inhibition of cell aggregation was comparable with that occurring with an increase of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration [( Ca2+]i) or the phosphorylation of marker proteins; (2) [32P]Pi-labelled platelets showed the time-dependent inhibition of thrombin-stimulated PIP2 resynthesis as indicated by first-2-min time-course studies of phosphoinositide interconversion; (3) scanning electron microscopy revealed that the aged platelet population showed an increase in the percentage of non-responding cells on prolonged incubation. The results, taken together, enabled one to discuss a possible mechanism for the time-dependent inhibition by ganodermic acid S of platelet response to thrombin. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1649599

  11. Function and structure of heterodimeric amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C A; Lang, F; Bröer, S

    2001-10-01

    Heterodimeric amino acid transporters are comprised of two subunits, a polytopic membrane protein (light chain) and an associated type II membrane protein (heavy chain). The heavy chain rbAT (related to b(0,+) amino acid transporter) associates with the light chain b(0,+)AT (b(0,+) amino acid transporter) to form the amino acid transport system b(0,+), whereas the homologous heavy chain 4F2hc interacts with several light chains to form system L (with LAT1 and LAT2), system y(+)L (with y(+)LAT1 and y(+)LAT2), system x (with xAT), or system asc (with asc1). The association of light chains with the two heavy chains is not unambiguous. rbAT may interact with LAT2 and y(+)LAT1 and vice versa; 4F2hc may interact with b(0,+)AT when overexpressed. 4F2hc is necessary for trafficking of the light chain to the plasma membrane, whereas the light chains are thought to determine the transport characteristics of the respective heterodimer. In contrast to 4F2hc, mutations in rbAT suggest that rbAT itself takes part in the transport besides serving for the trafficking of the light chain to the cell surface. Heavy and light subunits are linked together by a disulfide bridge. The disulfide bridge, however, is not necessary for the trafficking of rbAT or 4F2 heterodimers to the membrane or for the functioning of the transporter. However, there is experimental evidence that the disulfide bridge in the 4F2hc/LAT1 heterodimer plays a role in the regulation of a cation channel. These results highlight complex interactions between the different subunits of heterodimeric amino acid transporters and suggest that despite high grades of homology, the interactions between rbAT and 4F2hc and their respective partners may be different.

  12. Comparison of receptor mechanisms and efficacy requirements for delta-agonist-induced convulsive activity and antinociception in mice.

    PubMed

    Broom, Daniel C; Nitsche, Joshua F; Pintar, John E; Rice, Kenner C; Woods, James H; Traynor, John R

    2002-11-01

    Delta-opioid receptor-selective agonists produce antinociception and convulsions in several species, including mice. This article examines two hypotheses in mice: 1) that antinociception and convulsive activity are mediated through the same type of delta-receptor and 2) that greater delta-agonist efficacy is required for antinociception than for convulsive activity. Delta-mediated antinociception was evaluated in the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction assay, which involves a low-intensity noxious stimulus; convulsive activity was indicated as a mild tonic-clonic convulsive episode followed by a period of catalepsy. In delta-opioid receptor knockout mice [DOR-1(-/-)], the nonpeptidic delta-agonists (+/-)-4-[(R*)-[(2S*,5R*)-2,5-dimethyl-4-(2-propenyl)-1- piperazinyl]-(3-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide hydrochloride (BW373U86) and (+)-4-[(R)-[(2S,5R)-2,5-dimethyl-4-(2-propenyl)-1-piperazinyl]-(3-methoxyphenyl)methyl]-N, N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80) failed to produce convulsive behavior demonstrating the absolute involvement of DOR-1 in this effect. In NIH Swiss mice expressing delta-opioid receptors, BW373U86 produced both antinociception and convulsive activity. These effects were antagonized by the putative delta(1)-receptor-selective antagonist 7-benzylidenenaltrexone and the putative delta(2)-receptor-selective antagonist naltriben. Tolerance developed to both the convulsive and antinociceptive effects of BW373U86. Tolerance to the convulsive, but not the antinociceptive, effects of BW373U86 was largely prevented when the antagonist naltrindole was given 20 min after each dose of the agonist in a 3-day treatment paradigm. The convulsive action of BW373U86 was also less sensitive than the antinociceptive action to treatment with the irreversible delta-antagonist naltrindole isothiocyanate. Collectively, these data suggest that the convulsive and antinociceptive activities of delta-agonists are mediated through the same receptor but that the

  13. Phosphonic Acid-Functionalized Polyurethane Dispersions with Improved Adhesion Properties.

    PubMed

    Breucker, Laura; Landfester, Katharina; Taden, Andreas

    2015-11-11

    A facile route to phosphorus-functionalized polyurethane dispersions (P-PUDs) with improved adhesion properties is presented. (Bis)phosphonic acid moieties serve as adhesion promoting sites that are covalently attached via an end-capping reaction to isocyanate-reactive polyurethane particles under aqueous conditions. The synthetic approach circumvents solubility issues, offers great flexibility in terms of polyurethane composition, and allows for the synthesis of semicrystalline systems with thermomechanical response due to reversible physical cross-linking. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to investigate the effect of functionalization on the semicrystallinity. The end-capping conversion was determined via inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and was surprisingly found to be almost independent of the stoichiometry of reaction, suggesting an adsorption-dominated process. Particle charge detection (PCD) experiments reveal that a dense surface coverage of phosphonic acid groups can be attained and that, at high functionalization degrees, the phosphonic adhesion moieties are partially dragged inside the colloidal P-PUD particle. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCMD) investigations conducted with hydroxyapatite (HAP) and stainless steel sensors as model surfaces show a greatly enhanced affinity of the aqueous P-PUDs and furthermore indicate polymer chain rearrangements and autonomous film formation under wet conditions. Due to their facile synthesis, significantly improved adhesion, and variable film properties, P-PUD systems such as the one described here are believed to be of great interest for multiple applications, e.g., adhesives, paints, anticorrosion, or dentistry.

  14. Impact of fatty acids on brain circulation, structure and function.

    PubMed

    Haast, Roy A M; Kiliaan, Amanda J

    2015-01-01

    The use of dietary intervention has evolved into a promising approach to prevent the onset and progression of brain diseases. The positive relationship between intake of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-LCPUFAs) and decreased onset of disease- and aging-related deterioration of brain health is increasingly endorsed across epidemiological and diet-interventional studies. Promising results are found regarding to the protection of proper brain circulation, structure and functionality in healthy and diseased humans and animal models. These include enhanced cerebral blood flow (CBF), white and gray matter integrity, and improved cognitive functioning, and are possibly mediated through increased neurovascular coupling, neuroprotection and neuronal plasticity, respectively. Contrary, studies investigating diets high in saturated fats provide opposite results, which may eventually lead to irreversible damage. Studies like these are of great importance given the high incidence of obesity caused by the increased and decreased consumption of respectively saturated fats and ω3-LCPUFAs in the Western civilization. This paper will review in vivo research conducted on the effects of ω3-LCPUFAs and saturated fatty acids on integrity (circulation, structure and function) of the young, aging and diseased brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of Novel Functional Inhibitors of Acid Sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, Stefan; Pechmann, Stefanie; Friedl, Astrid; Reichel, Martin; Mühle, Christiane; Terfloth, Lothar; Groemer, Teja W.; Spitzer, Gudrun M.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Gulbins, Erich; Tripal, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    We describe a hitherto unknown feature for 27 small drug-like molecules, namely functional inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM). These entities named FIASMAs (Functional Inhibitors of Acid SphingoMyelinAse), therefore, can be potentially used to treat diseases associated with enhanced activity of ASM, such as Alzheimer's disease, major depression, radiation- and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis and endotoxic shock syndrome. Residual activity of ASM measured in the presence of 10 µM drug concentration shows a bimodal distribution; thus the tested drugs can be classified into two groups with lower and higher inhibitory activity. All FIASMAs share distinct physicochemical properties in showing lipophilic and weakly basic properties. Hierarchical clustering of Tanimoto coefficients revealed that FIASMAs occur among drugs of various chemical scaffolds. Moreover, FIASMAs more frequently violate Lipinski's Rule-of-Five than compounds without effect on ASM. Inhibition of ASM appears to be associated with good permeability across the blood-brain barrier. In the present investigation, we developed a novel structure-property-activity relationship by using a random forest-based binary classification learner. Virtual screening revealed that only six out of 768 (0.78%) compounds of natural products functionally inhibit ASM, whereas this inhibitory activity occurs in 135 out of 2028 (6.66%) drugs licensed for medical use in humans. PMID:21909365

  16. Structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  17. Reversible lysine modification on proteins by using functionalized boronic acids.

    PubMed

    Cal, Pedro M S D; Frade, Raquel F M; Cordeiro, Carlos; Gois, Pedro M P

    2015-05-26

    Iminoboronates have been utilized to successfully install azide and alkyne bioorthogonal functions on proteins, which may then be further reacted with their bioorthogonal counterparts. These constructs were also used to add polyethylene glycol (PEG) to insulin, a modification which has been shown to be reversible in the presence of fructose. Finally, iminoboronates were used to assemble a folic acid/paclitaxel small-molecule/drug conjugate in situ with an IC50  value of 20.7 nM against NCI-H460 cancer cells and negligible cytotoxicity against the CRL-1502 noncancer cells.

  18. Intact mitochondrial Ca2+ uniport is essential for agonist-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)

    PubMed Central

    Charoensin, Suphachai; Eroglu, Emrah; Opelt, Marissa; Bischof, Helmut; Madreiter-Sokolowski, Corina T.; Kirsch, Andrijana; Depaoli, Maria R.; Frank, Saša; Schrammel, Astrid; Mayer, Bernd; Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Malli, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake regulates diverse endothelial cell functions and has also been related to nitric oxide (NO•) production. However, it is not entirely clear if the organelles support or counteract NO• biosynthesis by taking up Ca2+. The objective of this study was to verify whether or not mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake influences Ca2+-triggered NO• generation by endothelial NO• synthase (eNOS) in an immortalized endothelial cell line (EA.hy926), respective primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and eNOS-RFP (red fluorescent protein) expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We used novel genetically encoded fluorescent NO• probes, the geNOps, and Ca2+ sensors to monitor single cell NO• and Ca2+ dynamics upon cell treatment with ATP, an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-generating agonist. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was specifically manipulated by siRNA-mediated knock-down of recently identified key components of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter machinery. In endothelial cells and the eNOS-RFP expressing HEK293 cells we show that reduced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake upon the knock-down of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) protein and the essential MCU regulator (EMRE) yield considerable attenuation of the Ca2+-triggered NO• increase independently of global cytosolic Ca2+ signals. The knock-down of mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 (MICU1), a gatekeeper of the MCU, increased both mitochondrial Ca2+ sequestration and Ca2+-induced NO• signals. The positive correlation between mitochondrial Ca2+ elevation and NO• production was independent of eNOS phosphorylation at serine1177. Our findings emphasize that manipulating mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake may represent a novel strategy to control eNOS-mediated NO• production. PMID:27923677

  19. The platelet fibrinogen receptor: an immunogold-surface replica study of agonist-induced ligand binding and receptor clustering

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Platelet aggregation requires the binding of fibrinogen to its receptor, a heterodimer consisting of the plasma-membrane glycoproteins (GP) IIb and IIIa. Although the GPIIb-IIIa complex is present on the surface of unstimulated platelets, it binds fibrinogen only after platelet activation. We have used an immunogold-surface replica technique to study the distribution of GPIIb-IIIa and bound fibrinogen over broad areas of surface membranes in unstimulated, as well as thrombin-activated and ADP-activated human platelets. We found that the immunogold-labeled GPIIb-IIIa was monodispersed over the surface of unstimulated platelets, although the cell surface lacked immunoreactive fibrinogen. On thrombin-stimulated platelets, approximately 65% of the GPIIb-IIIa molecules were in clusters within the plane of the membrane. Fibrinogen, which had been released from the alpha-granules of these cells, bound to GPIIb-IIIa on the cell surface and was similarly clustered. To determine whether the receptors clustered before ligand binding, or as a consequence thereof, we studied the surface distribution of GPIIb-IIIa after stimulation with ADP, which causes activation of the fibrinogen receptor function of GPIIb-IIIa without inducing the release of fibrinogen. In the absence of added fibrinogen, the unoccupied, yet binding-competent receptors on ADP-stimulated platelets were monodispersed. The addition of fibrinogen caused the GPIIb-IIIa molecules to cluster on the cell surface. Clustering was also induced by the addition of the GPIIb-IIIa-binding domains of fibrinogen, namely the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser on the alpha-chain or the gamma-chain decapeptide gamma 402-411. These results show that receptor occupancy causes clustering of GPIIb-IIIa in activated platelets. PMID:3584243

  20. Glycine receptor α3 and α2 subunits mediate tonic and exogenous agonist-induced currents in forebrain.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Lindsay M; Lowes, Daniel C; Salling, Michael C; Carreau-Vollmer, Cyndel; Odean, Naomi N; Blednov, Yuri A; Betz, Heinrich; Harris, R Adron; Harrison, Neil L

    2017-08-22

    Neuronal inhibition can occur via synaptic mechanisms or through tonic activation of extrasynaptic receptors. In spinal cord, glycine mediates synaptic inhibition through the activation of heteromeric glycine receptors (GlyRs) composed primarily of α1 and β subunits. Inhibitory GlyRs are also found throughout the brain, where GlyR α2 and α3 subunit expression exceeds that of α1, particularly in forebrain structures, and coassembly of these α subunits with the β subunit appears to occur to a lesser extent than in spinal cord. Here, we analyzed GlyR currents in several regions of the adolescent mouse forebrain (striatum, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis). Our results show ubiquitous expression of GlyRs that mediate large-amplitude currents in response to exogenously applied glycine in these forebrain structures. Additionally, tonic inward currents were also detected, but only in the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex (PFC). These tonic currents were sensitive to both strychnine and picrotoxin, indicating that they are mediated by extrasynaptic homomeric GlyRs. Recordings from mice deficient in the GlyR α3 subunit (Glra3(-/-)) revealed a lack of tonic GlyR currents in the striatum and the PFC. In Glra2(-/Y) animals, GlyR tonic currents were preserved; however, the amplitudes of current responses to exogenous glycine were significantly reduced. We conclude that functional α2 and α3 GlyRs are present in various regions of the forebrain and that α3 GlyRs specifically participate in tonic inhibition in the striatum and PFC. Our findings suggest roles for glycine in regulating neuronal excitability in the forebrain.

  1. Inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase potentiates AT2 receptor agonist-induced natriuresis in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Sabuhi, Rifat; Asghar, Mohammad; Hussain, Tahir

    2010-10-01

    A positive association between renin-angiotensin system, especially AT1 receptor, and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular/renal diseases has been suggested. However, the role of oxidative stress, especially superoxide radicals in renal sodium handling in response to AT1 and AT2 receptors, is not known. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the role of NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX), a major superoxide radical producing enzyme, in AT1 and AT2 receptor function on natriuresis/diuresis in Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats under anesthesia were intravenously infused with NOX inhibitor apocynin (3.5 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)), the AT1 receptor antagonist candesartan (100 μg/kg; bolus), and the AT2 receptor agonist CGP-42112A (1 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) alone and in combinations. Candesartan alone significantly increased urinary flow (UF; μl/30 min) by 53 and urinary Na excretion (U(Na)V; μmol/min) by 0.4 over basal. Preinfusion of apocynin had no effect on the net increase in UF or U(Na)V in response to candesartan. On the other hand, apocynin preinfusion caused profound increases in CGP-42112A-induced UF by 72, U(Na)V by 1.14, and fractional excretion of Na by 7.8. Apocynin and CGP-42112A alone did not cause significant increase in UF or U(Na)V over the basal. CGP-42112A infusion in the presence of apocynin increased urinary nitrite/nitrates and cGMP over basal. The infusion of candesartan, apocynin, and CGP-42112A alone or in combinations had no effect on the blood pressure or the glomerular filtration rate, suggesting tubular effects on natriuresis/diuresis. The data suggest that NOX may have an antagonistic role in AT2 receptor-mediated natriuresis/diuresis possibly via neutralizing nitric oxide and thereby influence fluid-Na homeostasis.

  2. Beta(3)-adrenoceptor agonist-induced increases in lipolysis, metabolic rate, facial flushing, and reflex tachycardia in anesthetized rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hom, G J; Forrest, M J; Bach, T J; Brady, E; Candelore, M R; Cascieri, M A; Fletcher, D J; Fisher, M H; Iliff, S A; Mathvink, R; Metzger, J; Pecore, V; Saperstein, R; Shih, T; Weber, A E; Wyvratt, M; Zafian, P; MacIntyre, D E

    2001-04-01

    The effects of two beta(3)-adrenergic receptor agonists, (R)-4-[4-(3-cyclopentylpropyl)-4,5-dihydro-5-oxo-1H-tetrazol-1-yl]-N-[4-[2-[[2-hydroxy-2-(3-pyridinyl)ethyl]amino]ethyl]phenyl]benzenesulfonamide and (R)-N-[4-[2-[[2-hydroxy-2-(3-pyridinyl)- ethyl]amino]ethyl]phenyl]-1-(4-octylthiazol-2-yl)-5-indolinesulfonamide, on indices of metabolic and cardiovascular function were studied in anesthetized rhesus monkeys. Both compounds are potent and specific agonists at human and rhesus beta(3)-adrenergic receptors. Intravenous administration of either compound produced dose-dependent lipolysis, increase in metabolic rate, peripheral vasodilatation, and tachycardia with no effects on mean arterial pressure. The increase in heart rate in response to either compound was biphasic with an initial rapid component coincident with the evoked peripheral vasodilatation and a second more slowly developing phase contemporaneous with the evoked increase in metabolic rate. Because both compounds exhibited weak binding to and activation of rhesus beta(1)-adrenergic receptors in vitro, it was hypothesized that the increase in heart rate may be reflexogenic in origin and proximally mediated via release of endogenous norepinephrine acting at cardiac beta(1)-adrenergic receptors. This hypothesis was confirmed by determining that beta(3)-adrenergic receptor agonist-evoked tachycardia was attenuated in the presence of propranolol and in ganglion-blocked animals, under which conditions there was no reduction in the evoked vasodilatation, lipolysis, or increase in metabolic rate. It is not certain whether the beta(3)-adrenergic receptor-evoked vasodilatation is a direct effect of compounds at beta(3)-adrenergic receptors in the peripheral vasculature or is secondary to the release or generation of an endogenous vasodilator. Peripheral vasodilatation in response to beta(3)-adrenergic receptor agonist administration was not attenuated in animals administered mepyramine, indomethacin, or

  3. Dietary fatty acids influence sperm quality and function.

    PubMed

    Ferramosca, A; Moscatelli, N; Di Giacomo, M; Zara, V

    2017-03-23

    Recently, obesity has been linked to male infertility. In animal models the administration of a high-fat diet caused a reduction in sperm quality, by impairing gamete energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible effect of dietary fatty acids supplementation in the modulation of sperm energy metabolism and, in turn, in the improvement of sperm quality in rats fed a high-fat diet. Sexually mature male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups and fed for 4 weeks a standard diet (control group), a high-fat diet (enriched in 35% of fat and 15% sucrose), a high-fat diet supplemented with 2.5% olive oil (a source of monounsaturated fatty acids) or a high-fat diet supplemented with 2.5% krill oil (a source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids). Liver and adipose tissue weight, plasma glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations were determined. Activities of enzymes involved in sperm energetic metabolism were evaluated by spectrophotometric assays. Sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency was also assayed. The obtained results suggest that olive oil partially counteracts the negative effects of a high-fat diet on sperm quality, by increasing gamete motility, by reducing oxidative stress and slightly improving mitochondrial respiration efficiency. On the other hand, krill oil determines an increase in sperm concentration and motility, an increase in the activities of lactate dehydrogenase, Krebs cycle enzymes and respiratory chain complexes; a parallel increase in the cellular levels of ATP and a reduction in oxidative damage were also observed. These results suggest that dietary fatty acids are able to positively influence sperm quality and function.

  4. Development of phenylboronic acid-functionalized nanoparticles for emodin delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Limin; Sun, Yingjuan; Zhu, Youliang; Sun, Zhaoyan; An, Tiezhu; Li, Yuhua; Lin, Yuan; Fan, Daping; Wang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Stable and monodisperse phenylboronic acid-functionalized nanoparticles (PBA-NPs) were fabricated using 3-((acrylamido)methyl)phenylboronic acid homopolymer (PBAH) via solvent displacement technique. The effect of operating parameters, including stirring time, initial polymer concentration and the proportion of methanol on the self-assembly process were systematically investigated. The diameters of the PBA-NPs were increased as increasing the initial PBAH concentration and the proportion of methanol. Likewise, there was a linear dependence between the size of self-assembled nanoparticles and the polymer concentration. Moreover, the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation technique was used to investigate the mechanism of self-assembly behavior of PBAH, which indicated that the interior of PBA-NPs was hydrophobic and compact, and the boronic acid groups were displayed on both the outermost and interior of PBA-NPs. The resulting PBA-NPs could successfully encapsulate emodin through PBA-diol interaction and the encapsulation efficiency (EE%) and drug loading content (DLC%) of drug-loaded PBA-NPs were 78% and 2.1%, respectively. Owing to the acid-labile feature of the boronate linkage, a reduction in environmental pH from pH 7.4 to 5.0 could trigger the disassociation of the boronate ester bonds, which could accelerate the drug release from PBA-Emodin-NPs. Besides, PBA-Emodin-NPs showed a much higher cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells (cancer cells) than that to MC-3T3-E1 cells (normal cells). These results imply that PBA-NPs would be a promising scaffold for the delivery of polyphenolic drugs. PMID:25960874

  5. Functional nucleic-acid-based sensors for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sett, Arghya; Das, Suradip; Bora, Utpal

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to replace conventional chromatographic methods for environmental monitoring with cheaper and easy to use biosensors for precise detection and estimation of hazardous environmental toxicants, water or air borne pathogens as well as various other chemicals and biologics are gaining momentum. Out of the various types of biosensors classified according to their bio-recognition principle, nucleic-acid-based sensors have shown high potential in terms of cost, sensitivity, and specificity. The discovery of catalytic activities of RNA (ribozymes) and DNA (DNAzymes) which could be triggered by divalent metallic ions paved the way for their extensive use in detection of heavy metal contaminants in environment. This was followed with the invention of small oligonucleotide sequences called aptamers which can fold into specific 3D conformation under suitable conditions after binding to target molecules. Due to their high affinity, specificity, reusability, stability, and non-immunogenicity to vast array of targets like small and macromolecules from organic, inorganic, and biological origin, they can often be exploited as sensors in industrial waste management, pollution control, and environmental toxicology. Further, rational combination of the catalytic activity of DNAzymes and RNAzymes along with the sequence-specific binding ability of aptamers have given rise to the most advanced form of functional nucleic-acid-based sensors called aptazymes. Functional nucleic-acid-based sensors (FNASs) can be conjugated with fluorescent molecules, metallic nanoparticles, or quantum dots to aid in rapid detection of a variety of target molecules by target-induced structure switch (TISS) mode. Although intensive research is being carried out for further improvements of FNAs as sensors, challenges remain in integrating such bio-recognition element with advanced transduction platform to enable its use as a networked analytical system for tailor made analysis of environmental

  6. Plasma vitamins, amino acids, and renal function in postexercise hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Venta, Rafael; Cruz, Elena; Valcárcel, Gracia; Terrados, Nicolás

    2009-08-01

    Several studies have assessed the effect of the physical activity on plasma homocysteine (Hcy) concentrations, although the findings have been contradictory, and the exact mechanism by which plasma Hcy concentrations varied after an acute intense exercise remains unknown. We studied the effect of different acute aerobic intense exercises on plasma, reduced, and total Hcy (rHcy, tHcy) and cysteine (rCys, tCys) and on its metabolically related vitamins and amino acids. Parallel effects on renal function were assessed by plasma creatinine. Fifteen cyclists and 14 kayakers were examined before and 30 +/- 5 min after a specific test to exhaustion during a low-intensity training period. After a bout of specific exercise, the concentrations of aminothiols were increased regardless of the group considered. Plasma concentrations were higher than baseline values in tHcy (17.7 +/- 1.5%; P < 0.001), rHcy (10.6 +/- 1.6%; P < 0.001), tCys (9.9 +/- 1.6%; P < 0.001), and rCys (7.6 +/- 2.2%; P < 0.01). Both groups showed significant elevations of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP; P < 0.01), vitamin B12 (P < 0.001), and creatinine concentrations (P < 0.001) after acute exercises, but no changes were seen in folate. Changes in plasma aminothiols after exercise did not reach significant correlation with changes in free amino acids or baseline vitamins, but significant and positive correlations were observed with changes in plasma PLP, vitamin B12, and creatinine concentrations, when the pooled data were considered. Our results show that higher plasma concentrations of tHcy after an acute intense exercise are associated to higher concentrations of rHcy, and this effect is independent of the type of exercise, vitamin status, or amino acid metabolic stress but could be related to potential changes in the renal function.

  7. Structurally diverse peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists induce apoptosis in human uro-epithelial cells by a receptor-independent mechanism involving store-operated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Chopra, B; Georgopoulos, N T; Nicholl, A; Hinley, J; Oleksiewicz, M B; Southgate, J

    2009-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are implicated in epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation, but investigation has been confounded by potential off-target effects of some synthetic PPAR ligands. Our aim was to determine mechanisms underlying the pro-apoptotic effect of synthetic PPAR agonists in normal human bladder uro-epithelial (urothelial) cells and to reconcile this with the role of PPARs in urothelial cytodifferentiation. Normal human urothelial (NHU) cells were grown as non-immortal lines in vitro and exposed to structurally diverse agonists ciglitazone, troglitazone, rosiglitazone (PPARgamma), ragaglitazar (PPARalpha/gamma), fenofibrate (PPARalpha) and L165041 (PPARbeta/delta). NHU cells underwent apoptosis following acute exposure to ciglitazone, troglitazone or ragaglitazar, but not fenofibrate, L165041 or rosiglitazone, and this was independent of ERK or p38 MAP-kinase activation. Pro-apoptotic agonists induced sustained increases in intracellular calcium, whereas removal of extracellular calcium altered the kinetics of ciglitazone-mediated calcium release from sustained to transient. Cell death was accompanied by plasma-membrane disruption, loss of mitochondrial membrane-potential and caspase-9/caspase-3 activation. PPARgamma-mediated apoptosis was unaffected following pre-treatment with PPARgamma antagonist T0070907 and was strongly attenuated by store-operated calcium channel (SOC) inhibitors 2-APB and SKF-96365. Our results provide a mechanistic basis for the ability of some PPAR agonists to induce death in NHU cells and demonstrate that apoptosis is mediated via PPAR-independent mechanisms, involving intracellular calcium changes, activation of SOCs and induction of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

  8. Cloning of serotonin 5-HT(1) receptor subtypes from the chimpanzee, gorilla and Rhesus monkey and their agonist-induced guanosine 5'gamma(35)S triphosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Alberts, G L; Pregenzer, J F; Im, W B; Slightom, J L

    2000-02-25

    5-HT(1) receptor subtypes ((1B), (1D) and (1F)) have been implicated in migraine pathophysiology and their ligands have been examined for pharmacological actions in various experimental animal models. Considerable divergences exist, however, in their primary sequences between experimental animals and human, and additional models closer to human, such as non-human primates seem to be useful for migraine research. Earlier, we cloned the 5-HT(1D), and here 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1F) receptors from the chimpanzee, gorilla and Rhesus monkey, via polymerase chain reactions with their genomic DNAs and primers designed from the corresponding human receptors. Direct sequencing of PCR products showed that the 5-HT(1B) receptors from the chimpanzee, gorilla and monkey differ from the human receptor by 0, 1 and 7 residues, respectively while 5-HT(1F) receptors differ by 0, 3 and 10 residues, respectively. These divergent residues are mostly conservatively substituted and also largely confined to the N-terminal region and the 3rd intracellular loop, away from transmembrane segments and intracellular loops near membrane which are critical for ligand binding and G protein coupling. The chimpanzee 5-HT(1D), 5-HT(1B) and monkey 5-HT(1F) receptors, as heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, showed robust agonist-induced guanosine 5'gamma (35)S triphosphate (GTPgamma(35)S) binding through activation of G proteins containing Ggamma(i) subunits. Moreover, pronounced inhibition of basal GTPgamma(35)S binding by methiothepin (an antagonist), representing constitutively active receptors, was observed with only 5-HT(1D). Overall, ligand binding and GTPgamma(35)S binding profiles for these primate receptors are comparable to those for the human receptors and validate non-human primates as useful models for human migraine research.

  9. PPARγ agonist-induced alterations in Δ6-desaturase and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1: Role of MEK/ERK1/2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Saliani, Negar; Darabi, Masoud; Yousefi, Bahman; Baradaran, Behzad; Khaniani, Mahmoud Shekari; Darabi, Maryam; Shaaker, Maghsod; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Naji, Tahereh; Hashemi, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of MEK/ERK1/2 pathway on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARγ) agonist-induced alterations in Δ6-desaturase (Δ6D) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) in hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. METHODS: HepG2 cells cultured in RPMI-1640 were exposed to the commonly used ERK1/2 pathway inhibitor PD98059 and PPARγ agonist, pioglitazone. Total RNA was isolated and reverse transcribed from treated cells. Changes in gene expression and metabolites ratio, as activity index for Δ6D and SCD1, were then determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and gas liquid chromatography, respectively. RESULTS: The expression of both Δ6D (P = 0.03) and SCD1 (P = 0.01) increased following PD98059 treatment, with a higher impact on SCD1 (24.5% vs 62.5%). Although pioglitazone increased the mRNA level (1.47 ± 0.10 vs 0.88 ± 0.02, P = 0.006) and activity index (1.40 ± 0.07 vs 0.79 ± 0.11, P < 0.001) of Δ6D, no such changes have been observed for SCD1 activity index in pioglitazone-treated cells. SCD1 gene expression (+26.4%, P = 0.041) and activity index (+52.8%, P = 0.035) were significantly increased by MEK inhibition in the presence of pioglitazone, as compared with pioglitazone alone and control cells. However, the response of Δ6D expression and activity index to pioglitazone was unaffected by incubation with PD98059. CONCLUSION: PPARγ and ERK1/2 signaling pathway affect differentially and may have inhibitory crosstalk effects on the genes expression of ∆6D and SCD1, and subsequently on their enzymatic activities. PMID:23671727

  10. Beta2-adrenergic agonist-induced hypertrophy of the quadriceps skeletal muscle does not modulate disease severity in the rodent meniscectomy model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tonge, D P; Jones, S W; Parr, T; Bardsley, R; Doherty, M; Maciewicz, R A

    2010-04-01

    To examine whether beta2-adrenergic agonist-induced hypertrophy of the quadriceps skeletal muscle can modulate the severity of osteoarthritis (OA) in the rodent meniscectomy (MNX) model. Male Lewis rats were subcutaneously administered with 1.5 mg/kg/day clenbuterol hydrochloride (n=15) or saline vehicle (n=20) for 14 days. Following pre-treatment, five animals from each group were sacrificed to assess the immediate effects of clenbuterol. The remaining animals underwent either invasive knee surgery (clenbuterol pre-treated n=10; saline pre-treated n=10) or a sham control surgical procedure (saline pre-treated n=5). During disease initiation and progression, weight bearing was assessed by hindlimb loading. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) protein isoforms were quantified by silver stained SDS PAGE. OA severity was graded by assessment of toluidine blue stained step coronal sections of the total knee joint. Clenbuterol treatment resulted in an increase in total bodyweight, growth rate and in quadriceps skeletal muscle mass. Meniscal surgery resulted in the development of OA-like lesions, changes to weight bearing, and changes in MHC protein expression in the quadriceps. Clenbuterol-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy had no effect on either weight bearing or articular pathology following MNX surgery. Our data reveal that clenbuterol-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy is unable to mimic the beneficial clinical effects of increased musculature derived through targeted strength training in humans, in a rodent model of MNX-induced OA. In addition we observed fibre-type switching to "slow twitch" in the quadriceps muscle during the induction of OA that warrants further investigation as to its relationship to joint stability. 2010 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Thymol, a dietary monoterpene phenol abrogates mitochondrial dysfunction in β-adrenergic agonist induced myocardial infarcted rats by inhibiting oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nagoor Meeran, M F; Jagadeesh, G S; Selvaraj, P

    2016-01-25

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested to be one of the important pathological events in isoproterenol (ISO), a synthetic catecholamine and β-adrenergic agonist induced myocardial infarction (MI). In this context, we have evaluated the impact of thymol against ISO induced oxidative stress and calcium uniporter malfunction involved in the pathology of mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pre and co-treated with thymol (7.5 mg/kg body weight) daily for 7 days. Isoproterenol (100 mg/kg body weight) was subcutaneously injected into rats on 6th and 7th day to induce MI. To explore the extent of cardiac mitochondrial damage, the activities/levels of cardiac marker enzymes, mitochondrial lipid peroxidation products, antioxidants, lipids, calcium, adenosine triphosphate and multi marker enzymes were evaluated. Isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats showed a significant increase in the activities of cardiac diagnostic markers, heart mitochondrial lipid peroxidation, lipids, calcium, and a significant decrease in the activities/levels of heart mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, isocitrate, malate, α-ketoglutarate and NADH-dehydrogenases, cytochrome-C-oxidase, and adenosine triphosphate. Thymol pre and co-treatment showed near normalized effects on all the biochemical parameters studied. Transmission electron microscopic findings and mitochondrial swelling studies confirmed our biochemical findings. The in vitro study also revealed the potent free-radical scavenging activity of thymol. Thus, thymol attenuates the involvement of ISO against oxidative stress and calcium uniporter malfunction associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in rats.

  12. Statins and PPAR{alpha} agonists induce myotoxicity in differentiated rat skeletal muscle cultures but do not exhibit synergy with co-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy E. . E-mail: Timothy_Johnson@merck.com; Zhang, Xiaohua; Shi, Shu; Umbenhauer, Diane R.

    2005-11-01

    Statins and fibrates (weak PPAR{alpha} agonists) are prescribed for the treatment of lipid disorders. Both drugs cause myopathy, but with a low incidence, 0.1-0.5%. However, combined statin and fibrate therapy can enhance myopathy risk. We tested the myotoxic potential of PPAR subtype selective agonists alone and in combination with statins in a differentiated rat myotube model. A pharmacologically potent experimental PPAR{alpha} agonist, Compound A, induced myotoxicity as assessed by TUNEL staining at a minimum concentration of 1 nM, while other weaker PPAR{alpha} compounds, for example, WY-14643, Gemfibrozil and Bezafibrate increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei at micromolar concentrations. In contrast, the PPAR{gamma} agonist Rosiglitazone caused little or no cell death at up to 10 {mu}M and the PPAR{delta} ligand GW-501516 exhibited comparatively less myotoxicity than that seen with Compound A. An experimental statin (Compound B) and Atorvastatin also increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei and co-treatment with WY-14643, Gemfibrozil or Bezafibrate had less than a full additive effect on statin-induced cell killing. The mechanism of PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced cell death was different from that of statins. Unlike statins, Compound A and WY-14643 did not activate caspase 3/7. In addition, mevalonate and geranylgeraniol reversed the toxicity caused by statins, but did not prevent the cell killing induced by WY-14643. Furthermore, unlike statins, Compound A did not inhibit the isoprenylation of rab4 or rap1a. Interestingly, Compound A and Compound B had differential effects on ATP levels. Taken together, these observations support the hypothesis that in rat myotube cultures, PPAR{alpha} agonism mediates in part the toxicity response to PPAR{alpha} compounds. Furthermore, PPAR{alpha} agonists and statins cause myotoxicity through distinct and independent pathways.

  13. Reversion of muscarinic autoreceptor agonist-induced acetylcholine decrease and learning impairment by dynorphin A (1–13), an endogenous κ-opioid receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Hiramatsu, Masayuki; Murasawa, Hiroyasu; Mori, Hiromasa; Kameyama, Tsutomu

    1998-01-01

    We investigated whether carbachol, a muscarinic receptor agonist, induces learning and memory impairment, and if so, dynorphin A (1–13), an endogenous κ-opioid receptor agonist, ameliorates the impairment of learning and memory induced by carbachol, by use of a step-through type passive avoidance task.Carbachol induced a dose-related dual response. Carbachol (1.66 pmol per rat) administered directly into the hippocampus significantly shortened the step-through latency, while lower (0.166 pmol per rat) and higher (16.6 pmol per rat) doses of carbachol did not induce learning or memory impairment.Dynorphin A (1–13) (0.5 nmol per rat, i.c.v.) administered 5 min after carbachol injection significantly reversed carbachol-induced impairment of learning and memory.Perfusion with carbachol (3×10−4 M) significantly decreased acetylcholine release in the hippocampus during perfusion as determined by in vivo brain microdialysis. This decrease in acetylcholine release was suppressed by co-perfusion with a low dose of atropine (10−7 M).Dynorphin A (1–13) (0.5 nmol per rat, i.c.v.) immediately before carbachol perfusion completely blocked this decrease in extracellular acetylcholine concentration induced by carbachol.These antagonistic effects of dynorphin A (1–13) were abolished by treatment with nor-binaltorphimine (5.44 nmol per rat, i.c.v.), a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist, 5 min before dynorphin A (1–13) treatment.These results suggest that the neuropeptide dynorphin A (1–13) ameliorates the carbachol-induced impairment of learning and memory, accompanied by attenuation of the reductions in acetylcholine release which may be associated with dysfunction of presynaptic cholinergic neurones via κ-opioid receptors. PMID:9535021

  14. Docosahexaenoic acid and visual functioning in preterm infants: a review.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Carly; Doyle, Lex W; Makrides, Maria; Anderson, Peter J

    2012-12-01

    Preterm children are at risk for a number of visual impairments which can be important for a range of other more complex visuocognitive tasks reliant on visual information. Despite the relatively high incidence of visual impairments in this group there are no good predictors that would allow early identification of those at risk for adverse outcomes. Several lines of evidence suggest that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation for preterm infants may improve outcomes in this area. For example, diets deficient in the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA have been shown to reduce its concentration in the cerebral cortex and retina, which interferes with physiological processes important for cognition and visual functioning. Further, various studies with pregnant and lactating women, as well as formula-fed infants, have demonstrated a general trend that supplementation with dietary DHA is associated with better childhood outcomes on tests of visual and cognitive development over the first year of life. However, research to date has several methodological limitations, including concentrations of DHA supplementation that have been too low to emulate the in utero accretion of DHA, using single measures of visual acuity to make generalised assumptions about the entire visual system, and little attempt to match what we know about inadequate DHA and structural ramifications with how specific functions may be affected. The objective of this review is to consider the role of DHA in the context of visual processing with a specific emphasis on preterm infants and to illustrate how future research may benefit from marrying what we know about structural consequences to inadequate DHA with functional outcomes that likely have far-reaching ramifications. Factors worth considering for clinical neuropsychological evaluation are also discussed.

  15. Molecular mechanism of R-bicalutamide switching from androgen receptor antagonist to agonist induced by amino acid mutations using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongli; Han, Rui; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Zheng, Lifang

    2016-12-01

    R-bicalutamide, a first generation antiandrogen, was used to treat prostate cancer for decades. Although it is very effective at the beginning, resistance appears after 2-3 years of treatment. Mutation of androgen receptor (AR) is considered a main reason for drug resistance. It is reported that AR W741C, W741L, W741C_T877A, T877A, F876L, F876L_T877A and L701H mutations can convert R-bicalutamide from AR antagonist to agonist, but the switching mechanisms are not clear. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) calculations were performed to analyze the interaction mechanisms between R-bicalutamide and wild type/mutant ARs. The results indicate that helix H12, which lies on the top of AR LBD like a cover, plays a vital role in R-bicalutamide binding. When interacting with AR, the B-ring of R-bicalutamide pushes H12 aside, distorting the coactivator binding site (AF2) resulting in the inactivation of transcription. Several residue mutations appear to enlarge the distance between the B-ring of R-bicalutamide and H12, reducing steric clash, which is conducive to a closed H12 conformation, leading to the formation of the coactivator binding site AF2 and increased transcription. Hydrogen bond and per-residue free energy decomposition analyses are also investigated to explore the interacting mechanisms, and M895 is found to be a key residue in the antagonist mechanism. The obtained molecular mechanisms will aid rational screening and design of novel AR antagonists, even to mutant AR.

  16. Molecular mechanism of R-bicalutamide switching from androgen receptor antagonist to agonist induced by amino acid mutations using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongli; Han, Rui; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Zheng, Lifang

    2016-12-01

    R-bicalutamide, a first generation antiandrogen, was used to treat prostate cancer for decades. Although it is very effective at the beginning, resistance appears after 2-3 years of treatment. Mutation of androgen receptor (AR) is considered a main reason for drug resistance. It is reported that AR W741C, W741L, W741C_T877A, T877A, F876L, F876L_T877A and L701H mutations can convert R-bicalutamide from AR antagonist to agonist, but the switching mechanisms are not clear. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) calculations were performed to analyze the interaction mechanisms between R-bicalutamide and wild type/mutant ARs. The results indicate that helix H12, which lies on the top of AR LBD like a cover, plays a vital role in R-bicalutamide binding. When interacting with AR, the B-ring of R-bicalutamide pushes H12 aside, distorting the coactivator binding site (AF2) resulting in the inactivation of transcription. Several residue mutations appear to enlarge the distance between the B-ring of R-bicalutamide and H12, reducing steric clash, which is conducive to a closed H12 conformation, leading to the formation of the coactivator binding site AF2 and increased transcription. Hydrogen bond and per-residue free energy decomposition analyses are also investigated to explore the interacting mechanisms, and M895 is found to be a key residue in the antagonist mechanism. The obtained molecular mechanisms will aid rational screening and design of novel AR antagonists, even to mutant AR.

  17. Acid-sensing ion channels: trafficking and synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular acidification occurs in the brain with elevated neural activity, increased metabolism, and neuronal injury. This reduction in pH can have profound effects on brain function because pH regulates essentially every single biochemical reaction. Therefore, it is not surprising to see that Nature evolves a family of proteins, the acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), to sense extracellular pH reduction. ASICs are proton-gated cation channels that are mainly expressed in the nervous system. In recent years, a growing body of literature has shown that acidosis, through activating ASICs, contributes to multiple diseases, including ischemia, multiple sclerosis, and seizures. In addition, ASICs play a key role in fear and anxiety related psychiatric disorders. Several recent reviews have summarized the importance and therapeutic potential of ASICs in neurological diseases, as well as the structure-function relationship of ASICs. However, there is little focused coverage on either the basic biology of ASICs or their contribution to neural plasticity. This review will center on these topics, with an emphasis on the synaptic role of ASICs and molecular mechanisms regulating the spatial distribution and function of these ion channels. PMID:23281934

  18. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  19. Functional studies of acid transporter in cultured rat epididymal cell.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wu-Lin; Huang, Jie-Hong; Shan, Jia-Jie; Li, Sheng; Wong, Patrick Y D; Zhou, Wen-Liang

    2010-05-15

    To explore the functional role of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase in the pH regulation of epididymal fluid and its effect on sperm motility. Experimental study. Physiology laboratory in a university. Immature male Sprague-Dawley rats. The H(+)-ATPase inhibitor was applied to the primary culture of epididymal cells. The intracellular luminal fluid pH and sperm percent motility were recorded. Double immunofluorescence of H(+)-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase II in primary culture of cauda epididymal epithelial cells showed that the system was a suitable model for investigation of acid secretion by clear cells. Clear cells were pharmacologically distinct from principal cells in acid/base transportation. The intracellular pH recovery from cellular acidification was suppressed by the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1(100 nM) and the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger inhibitor amiloride (1 mM) by 85% and 54%, respectively. These results suggest that, in addition to Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, clear cells actively pump proton from cytoplasm into extracellular space through H(+)-ATPase. In addition, inhibition of H(+)-ATPase by bafilomycin A1 blocked the acidification of luminal fluid with IC(50) values of 12 nM, which supports that H(+)-ATPase acidifies the luminal fluid. We also confirm that the acid fluid regulates rat cauda sperm motility. The present work shows that clear cells, the minority cell type of epididymal cell population, play an important role in the pH regulation of epididymal fluid by H(+)-ATPase. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. AHL-priming functions via oxylipin and salicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Sebastian T.; Schikora, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative action between the host plant and associated bacteria is crucial for the establishment of an efficient interaction. In bacteria, the synchronized behavior of a population is often achieved by a density-dependent communication called quorum sensing. This behavior is based on signaling molecules, which influence bacterial gene expression. N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are such molecules in many Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, some AHLs are responsible for the beneficial effect of bacteria on plants, for example the long chain N-3-oxo-tetradecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (oxo-C14-HSL) can prime Arabidopsis and barley plants for an enhanced defense. This AHL-induced resistance phenomenon, named AHL-priming, was observed in several independent laboratories during the last two decades. Very recently, the mechanism of priming with oxo-C14-HSL was shown to depend on an oxylipin and salicylic acid (SA). SA is a key element in plant defense, it accumulates during different plant resistance responses and is the base of systemic acquired resistance. In addition, SA itself can prime plants for an enhanced resistance against pathogen attack. On the other side, oxylipins, including jasmonic acid (JA) and related metabolites, are lipid-derived signaling compounds. Especially the oxidized fatty acid derivative cis-OPDA, which is the precursor of JA, is a newly described player in plant defense. Unlike the antagonistic effect of SA and JA in plant–microbe interactions, the recently described pathway functions through a synergistic effect of oxylipins and SA, and is independent of the JA signaling cascade. Interestingly, the oxo-C14-HSL-induced oxylipin/SA signaling pathway induces stomata defense responses and cell wall strengthening thus prevents pathogen invasion. In this review, we summarize the findings on AHL-priming and the related signaling cascade. In addition, we discuss the potential of AHL-induced resistance in new strategies of plant protection. PMID

  1. Product study of oleic acid ozonolysis as function of humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesna, O.; Sax, M.; Kalberer, M.; Gaschen, A.; Ammann, M.

    The heterogeneous reaction of ozone with oleic acid (OA) aerosol particles was studied as function of humidity and reaction time in an aerosol flow reactor using an off-line gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technique. We report quantitative yields of the major C9 ozonolysis products in both gas and condensed phases and the effect of relative humidity on the product distribution. The measurements were carried out with OA aerosol particles at room temperature. The results indicate that the product yields are increasing with increasing relative humidity during the reaction. Nonanal (NN) was detected as the major gas-phase product (55.6 ± 2.3%), with 94.5 ± 2.4% of the NN yield in the gas, and 5.5 ± 2.7% in the particulate phase, whereas nonanoic, oxononanoic and azelaic acids were detected exclusively in the particulate phase. Using UV-spectrometry, we observed that peroxides make up the largest fraction of products, about half of the product aerosol mass, and their concentration decreased with increasing humidity.

  2. Synthesis of Ricinoleic Acid Estolides by the Esterification of Ricinoleic Acids Using Functional Acid Ionic Liquids as Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoshang; Sun, Shangde

    2017-07-01

    Estolides of ricinoleic acid (RA) have been used as lubricants and pigment dispersant in many industries. In this paper, functional acid ionic liquids (ILs) were firstly used as catalysts to prepare RA estolides by the esterification of RAs in solvent-free system. Different ILs were used as catalysts for the esterification. Effect of reaction variables (IL amount, reaction temperature and reaction time) on the esterification were also investigated and optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). Among all tested ILs, [BSO3HMIM]TS showed the best performance for the esterification. Arrhenius equation for the esterification was lnV0 =14.897-7558.7/T, and the activation energy (Ea) was 62.84 kJ/mol. A high degree of polymerization with an acid value of 48.0±2.5 mg KOH/g was achieved at the optimized conditions (IL load 12%, reaction temperature 140°C, and reaction time 12 h). The effect of reaction variables on the esterification decreased in the order of catalyst loading of IL > reaction temperature > reaction time.

  3. Di-heterometalation of thiol-functionalized peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tanmaya; Patra, Malay; Spiccia, Leone; Gasser, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    As a proof-of-principle, two hetero-bimetallic PNA oligomers containing a ruthenium(II) polypyridyl and a cyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl complex have been prepared by serial combination of solid-phase peptide coupling and in-solution thiol chemistry. Solid-phase N-terminus attachment of Ru(II)-polypyridyl carboxylic acid derivative, C1, onto the thiol-functionalized PNA backbone (H-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) has been performed by standard peptide coupling method. As two parallel approaches, the strong affinity of thiols for maleimide and haloacetyl group has been exploited for subsequent post-SPPS addition of cymantrene-based organometallic cores, C2 and C3. Michael-like addition and thioether ligation of thiol functionalized PNA1 (H-gly-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) and PNA2 (C1-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) to cymantrene maleimide and chloroacetyl derivatives, C2 and C3, respectively, has been performed. The synthesized ruthenium(II)-cymantrenyl PNA oligomers have been characterized by mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and IR spectroscopy. The distinct Mn-CO vibrational IR stretches, between 1,924–2,074 cm−1, have been used as markers to confirm the presence of cymantrenyl units in the PNA sequences and the purity of the HPLC-purified PNA thioethers assessed using LC-MS. PMID:23422249

  4. Reduction of brain kynurenic acid improves cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Rouba; Campbell, Brian M; Strick, Christine A; Horner, Weldon; Hoffmann, William E; Kiss, Tamas; Chapin, Douglas S; McGinnis, Dina; Abbott, Amanda L; Roberts, Brooke M; Fonseca, Kari; Guanowsky, Victor; Young, Damon A; Seymour, Patricia A; Dounay, Amy; Hajos, Mihaly; Williams, Graham V; Castner, Stacy A

    2014-08-06

    The elevation of kynurenic acid (KYNA) observed in schizophrenic patients may contribute to core symptoms arising from glutamate hypofunction, including cognitive impairments. Although increased KYNA levels reduce excitatory neurotransmission, KYNA has been proposed to act as an endogenous antagonist at the glycine site of the glutamate NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and as a negative allosteric modulator at the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Levels of KYNA are elevated in CSF and the postmortem brain of schizophrenia patients, and these elevated levels of KYNA could contribute to NMDAR hypofunction and the cognitive deficits and negative symptoms associated with this disease. However, the impact of endogenously produced KYNA on brain function and behavior is less well understood due to a paucity of pharmacological tools. To address this issue, we identified PF-04859989, a brain-penetrable inhibitor of kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II), the enzyme responsible for most brain KYNA synthesis. In rats, systemic administration of PF-04859989 dose-dependently reduced brain KYNA to as little as 28% of basal levels, and prevented amphetamine- and ketamine-induced disruption of auditory gating and improved performance in a sustained attention task. It also prevented ketamine-induced disruption of performance in a working memory task and a spatial memory task in rodents and nonhuman primates, respectively. Together, these findings support the hypotheses that endogenous KYNA impacts cognitive function and that inhibition of KAT II, and consequent lowering of endogenous brain KYNA levels, improves cognitive performance under conditions considered relevant for schizophrenia.

  5. Dissecting polysialic acid and NCAM functions in brain development.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Herbert; Mühlenhoff, Martina; Weinhold, Birgit; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita

    2007-11-01

    The unique modification of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) by polysialic acid (polySia) is tightly associated with nervous system development and plasticity. The prevailing view that this large carbohydrate polymer acts as an anti-adhesive factor seems straightforward at first sight. However, during almost 25 years of polySia research it became increasingly clear that the impact of polySia on cell surface interactions can not be explained by one unifying mechanism. Recent progress in the generation of mouse models, which partially or completely lack polySia due to ablation of one or both of the two polySia synthesizing enzymes, provides novel insights into the function of this unique post-translational modification. The present review is focused on a phenotype comparison between the newly established mouse strains which combine polySia-deficiency with normal NCAM expression and the well-characterized NCAM negative mouse model. Analysis of shared and individual phenotypes allows a clear distinction between NCAM and polySia functions and revealed that polySia plays a vital role as a specific control element of NCAM-mediated interactions.

  6. Type I and II positive allosteric modulators differentially modulate agonist-induced up-regulation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morten S; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-10-01

    Long-term treatment with nicotine or selective α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists increases the number of α7 nAChRs and this up-regulation may be involved in the mechanism underlying the sustained procognitive effect of these compounds. Here, we investigate the influence of type I and II α7 nAChR positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) on agonist-induced α7 nAChR up-regulation. We show that the type II PAMs, PNU-120596 (10 μM) or TQS (1 and 10 μM), inhibit up-regulation, as measured by protein levels, induced by the α7 nAChR agonist A-582941 (10 nM or 10 μM), in SH-EP1 cells stably expressing human α7 nAChR, whereas the type I PAMs AVL-3288 or NS1738 do not. Contrarily, neither type I nor II PAMs affect 10 μM nicotine-induced receptor up-regulation, suggesting that nicotine and A-582941 induce up-regulation through different mechanisms. We further show in vivo that 3 mg/kg PNU-120596 inhibits up-regulation of the α7 nAChR induced by 10 mg/kg A-582941, as measured by [(125)I]-bungarotoxin autoradiography, whereas 1 mg/kg AVL-3288 does not. Given that type II PAMs decrease desensitization of the receptor, whereas type I PAMs do not, these results suggest that receptor desensitization is involved in A-582941-induced up-regulation. Our results are the first to show an in vivo difference between type I and II α7 nAChR PAMs, and demonstrate an agonist-dependent effect of type II PAMs occurring on a much longer time scale than previously appreciated. Furthermore, our data suggest that nicotine and A-582941 induce up-regulation through different mechanisms, and that this confers differential sensitivity to the effects of α7 nAChR PAMs. These results may have implications for the clinical development of α7 nAChR PAMs.

  7. Short-term or long-term treatments with a phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitor result in opposing agonist-induced Ca2+ responses in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Toimil, M; Keravis, T; Orallo, F; Takeda, K; Lugnier, C

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: We previously reported that agonist-induced rises in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were inhibited after a short-term (2 min) pre-treatment with cAMP-elevating agents. The aim of this work was to study the effects of longer term (8 h) pre-treatment with dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) or rolipram, a specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4), on [Ca2+]i, cAMP levels and PDE activity and expression in HUVEC. Experimental approach: [Ca2+]i changes were measured in isolated HUVEC by Fura-2 imaging. Intracellular cAMP levels and PDE4 activity were assessed by enzyme-immunoassay and radio-enzymatic assay, respectively. PDE expression was measured by northern and western blot analysis. Key results: Long-term pre-treatment of HUVEC with rolipram or db-cAMP significantly increased ATP-, histamine- and thrombin-induced [Ca2+]i rises. Short-term pre-treatment with rolipram was associated with an increase in cAMP, whereas long-term pre-treatment was associated with a decrease in cAMP. Long-term pre-treatment with rolipram or db-cAMP induced a significant increase in PDE4 activity and the expression of 74 kDa-PDE4A and 73 kDa-PDE4B was specifically enhanced. All these effects were suppressed by cycloheximide. Conclusions and implications: Our data suggest that sustained inhibition of PDE4 by rolipram induced an increase in PDE4 activity, possibly as a compensatory mechanism to accelerate cAMP degradation and that PDE4A and PDE4B were implicated in the regulation of [Ca2+]i. Thus, isozyme-specific PDE4 inhibitors might be useful as therapeutic agents in diseases where [Ca2+]i handling is altered, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension and tolerance to β-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:18311187

  8. Melatonin receptor agonist-induced reduction of SNP-released nitric oxide and cGMP production in isolated human non-pigmented ciliary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dortch-Carnes, Juanita; Tosini, Gianluca

    2013-02-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effects of melatonin and its receptor agonists on SNP-released nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP production in aqueous humor producing cells of the ciliary body because these effects may play a role in melatonin receptor-mediated regulation of intraocular pressure (IOP). NO release protocols were carried out using human non-pigmented ciliary epithelial (hNPCE) cells treated in dye free DMEM containing l-arginine (10(-3) M). The cGMP experimental protocols were performed using dye free DMEM containing 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, 10(-4) M). The effects of varying concentrations (10(-13), 10(-11), 10(-9), 10(-7), and 10(-5) M) of melatonin, 5-MCA-NAT (putative MT(3) agonist), N-butanoyl-2-(2-methoxy-6H-isoindolo[2, 1-a]indol-11-yl)ethanamine (IIK7; selective MT(2) agonist) or S-27633-1 (selective MT(1) agonist) on sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-released NO or cGMP production were determined in separate experiments. NO and cGMP levels were measured using a colorimetric assay or enzyme immunoassay (EIA), respectively. Melatonin receptor selectivity was evaluated using luzindole (LUZ; nonselective MT(1)/MT(2) antagonist) or 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetralin (4P-PDOT; selective MT(2) antagonist). Melatonin, 5-MCA-NAT, and IIK7 all caused concentration-dependent reduction of SNP-released NO and cGMP production. The inhibitory actions of melatonin, 5-MCA-NAT and IIK7 were either completely blocked at 10(-13), 10(-11), and 10(-9) M concentrations of the agonists or partially at 10(-7) and 10(-5) M in the presence of luzindole or 4P-PDOT. Results from this study suggest that melatonin and its analogs, 5-MCA-NAT and IIK7 inhibit SNP-released NO and cGMP production via activation of MT(2) receptors in human NPCE cells. These actions may play a role in melatonin agonist-induced regulation of aqueous humor secretion and IOP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Melatonin Receptor Agonist-Induced Reduction of SNP-Released Nitric Oxide and cGMP Production in Isolated Human Non-pigmented Ciliary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dortch-Carnes, Juanita; Tosini, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effects of melatonin and its receptor agonists on SNP-released nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP production in aqueous humor producing cells of the ciliary body because these effects may play a role in melatonin receptor-mediated regulation of intraocular pressure (IOP). NO release protocols were carried out using human non-pigmented ciliary epithelial (hNPCE) cells treated in dye free DMEM containing L-arginine (10−3 M). The cGMP experimental protocols were performed using dye free DMEM containing 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, 10−4 M). The effects of varying concentrations (10−13, 10−11, 10−9, 10−7, and 10−5 M) of melatonin, 5-MCA-NAT (putative MT3 agonist), N-butanoyl-2-(2-methoxy-6H-isoindolo[2, 1-a]indol-11-yl)ethanamine (IIK7; selective MT2 agonist) or S-27633-1 (selective MT1 agonist) on sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-released NO or cGMP production were determined in separate experiments. NO and cGMP levels were measured using a colorimetric assay or enzyme immunoassay (EIA), respectively. Melatonin receptor selectivity was evaluated using luzindole (LUZ; nonselective MT1/MT2 antagonist) or 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetralin (4P-PDOT; selective MT2 antagonist). Melatonin, 5-MCA-NAT, and IIK7 all caused concentration-dependent reduction of SNP-released NO and cGMP production. The inhibitory actions of melatonin, 5-MCA-NAT and IIK7 were either completely blocked at 10−13, 10−11, and 10−9 M concentrations of the agonists or partially at 10−7 and 10−5 M in the presence of luzindole or 4P-PDOT. Results from this study suggest that melatonin and its analogues, 5-MCA-NAT and IIK7 inhibit SNP-released NO and cGMP production via activation of MT2 receptors in human NPCE cells. These actions may play a role in melatonin agonist-induced regulation of aqueous humor secretion and IOP. PMID:23201027

  10. Synthesis of functionalized fluorescent gold nanoclusters for acid phosphatase sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2015-10-01

    A novel and convenient one-pot but two-step synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters, incorporating glutathione (GSH) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) as the functionalized ligands (i.e. AuNCs@GSH/MUA), is demonstrated. Herein, the mixing of HAuCl4 and GSH in aqueous solution results in the immediate formation of non-fluorescent GSH-Au+ complexes, and then a class of ~2.6 nm GSH-coated AuNCs (AuNCs@GSH) with mild orange-yellow fluorescence after several days. Interestingly, the intense orange-red emitting ~1.7 nm AuNCs@GSH/MUA can be synthesized within seconds by introducing an alkaline aqueous solution of MUA into the GSH-Au+ complexes or AuNC@GSH solution. Subsequently, a reliable AuNC@GSH/MUA-based real-time assay of acid phosphatase (ACP) is established for the first time, inspired by the selective coordination of Fe3+ with surface ligands of AuNCs, the higher binding affinity between the pyrophosphate ion (PPi) and Fe3+, and the hydrolysis of PPi into orthophosphate by ACP. Our fluorescent chemosensor can also be applied to assay ACP in a real biological sample and, furthermore, to screen the inhibitor of ACP. This report paves a new avenue for synthesizing AuNCs based on either the bottom-up reduction or top-down etching method, establishing real-time fluorescence assays for ACP by means of PPi as the substrate, and further exploring the sensing applications of fluorescent AuNCs.A novel and convenient one-pot but two-step synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters, incorporating glutathione (GSH) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) as the functionalized ligands (i.e. AuNCs@GSH/MUA), is demonstrated. Herein, the mixing of HAuCl4 and GSH in aqueous solution results in the immediate formation of non-fluorescent GSH-Au+ complexes, and then a class of ~2.6 nm GSH-coated AuNCs (AuNCs@GSH) with mild orange-yellow fluorescence after several days. Interestingly, the intense orange-red emitting ~1.7 nm AuNCs@GSH/MUA can be synthesized within seconds by

  11. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Dominique; Speck, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium’s growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports. PMID:26684737

  12. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates.

    PubMed

    Izac, Marie; Garnier, Dominique; Speck, Denis; Lindley, Nic D

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium's growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports.

  13. Transient changes in thyroid functions tests after zoledronic acid infusion.

    PubMed

    Karga, Helen; Giagourta, Irene; Papaioannou, Garyphallia; Katsichti, Paraskevi; Pardalakis, Argyris; Kassi, Georgia; Zagoreou, Apostolia; Triantaphyllopoulou, Maria; Zerva, Cherry

    2011-01-01

    Zoledronic acid (ZA) induces an acute phase response in association with elevation of serum cytokines, which possibly alter the 3 types of iodothyronine deiodinase activity. We therefore studied the possible alteration in thyroid function tests by ZA. We investigated the acute changes in serum thyroid hormones, TSH, cortisol, white blood cells, CRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), before (0) and 1, 2 and 3 days after iv infusion of 5 mg ZA in 24 asymptomatic postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (ZA group) in comparison with a placebo group. In the majority of patients the ZA infusion was associated with acute phase response and fever within 24h after infusion which became attenuated on day three. Concurrently with increase in serum cortisol, CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α, on day 1 and 2, total serum T3 (TT3), free T3 (fT3), total T4 (TT4) and fT4 decreased with a nadir on day 2 in association with an increase in the fT4/fT3 ratio and reverse T3 (rT3) levels. All thyroid function changes returned to the baseline levels on day 3, with cytokines still at higher levels, although lower than those on day 2. Serum TSH remained essentially unchanged throughout the study. The changes in thyroid hormones were at least in part explained by the increased TNF-α, but not by IL-6. ZA induces short term changes in thyroid hormones, characteristic of nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS), in association with an increase in TNF-α and IL-6.

  14. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes via Electrophilic Substitution Reaction in Polyphosphoric Acid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-26

    1 Title of proposed research: Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes via Electrophilic Substitution Reaction in Polyphosphoric Acid Proposer: Jong...Choi, J.-Y.; Tan, L.-S.; Baek, J.-B. “Functionalization of carbon nanotubes via electrophilic substitution reaction in polyphosphoric acid” AFOSR...2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Functionalization of carbon nanotubes via electrophilic substitution reaction in polyphosphoric acid 5a. CONTRACT

  15. Design and Functional Characterization of a Novel Abscisic Acid Analog

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaoqiang; Jiang, Lun; Che, Chuanliang; Wan, Chuan; Lu, Huizhe; Xiao, Yumei; Xu, Yanjun; Chen, Zhongzhou; Qin, Zhaohai

    2017-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a crucial role in mediating plant growth and development by recruiting genetically redundant ABA receptors. To overcome its oxidation inactivation, we developed a novel ABA analog named 2′,3′-benzo-iso-ABA (iso-PhABA) and studied its function and structural characterization with A. thaliana ABA receptors. The (+)-iso-PhABA form showed much higher ABA-like activities than (+)-ABA including inhibitory effects on the seed germination of lettuce and A. thaliana, wheat embryo germination and rice seedling elongation. The PP2C (protein phosphatases 2C) activity assay showed that (+)-iso-PhABA acted as a potent and selective ABA receptor agonist, which is preferred to PYL10. In some cases, (−)-iso-PhABA showed moderate to high activity for the PYL protein inhibiting PP2C activity, suggesting different mechanisms of action of iso-PhABA and ABA. The complex crystal structure of iso-PhABA with PYL10 was determined and elucidated successfully, revealing that (+)-iso-PhABA was better coordinated in the same binding pocket compared to (+)-ABA. Moreover, the detailed interaction network of iso-PhABA/PYL10 was disclosed and involves hydrogen bonds and multiple hydrophobic interactions that provide a robust framework for the design of novel ABA receptor agonists/antagonists. PMID:28272449

  16. Structural and functional diversity in Listeria cell wall teichoic acids.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Boulos, Samy; Sumrall, Eric; Gerber, Benjamin; Julian-Rodero, Alicia; Eugster, Marcel R; Fieseler, Lars; Nyström, Laura; Ebert, Marc-Olivier; Loessner, Martin J

    2017-09-14

    Wall teichoic acids (WTAs) are the most abundant glycopolymers found on the cell wall of many Gram-positive bacteria, whose diverse surface structures play key roles in multiple biological processes. Despite recent technological advances in glycan analysis, structural elucidation of WTAs remains challenging due to their complex nature. Here, we employed a combination of UPLC-MS/MS and NMR to determine the structural complexity of WTAs from Listeria species. We unveiled more than 10 different types of WTA polymers that vary in their linkage and repeating units. Disparity in GlcNAc to ribitol connectivity, as well as variable O-acetylation and glycosylation of GlcNAc contribute to the structural diversity of WTAs. Notably, SPR analysis indicated that constitution of WTA determines the recognition by bacteriophage endolysins. Collectively, these findings provide detailed insight into Listeria cell wall-associated carbohydrates, and will guide further studies on the structure-function relationship of WTAs. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Preparation and characterization of SPION functionalized via caffeic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykal, A.; Amir, Md.; Günerb, S.; Sözeri, H.

    2015-12-01

    Caffeic acid coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION-CFA) was synthesized by reflux method. The structural, spectroscopic and magnetic properties were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) techniques. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed the presence of CA on the surface of SPION. The theoretical analyzes performed on recorded room temperature VSM spectrum confirmed the formation of superparamagnetic nature of SPION-CFA. The particle size dependent Langevin function was applied to determine the average magnetic particle dimension (Dmag) around 11.93 nm. In accordance, the average crystallite and particle sizes were obtained as 11.40 nm and ~12.00 nm from XRD and TEM measurements. The extrapolated specific saturation magnetization (σs) is 44.11 emu/g and measured magnetic moment is 1.83 μB. These parameters assign small order of magnetization for NPs with respect to bulk Fe3O4. Magnetic anisotropy was offered as uniaxial and calculated effective anisotropy constant (Keff) is 34.82×104 Erg/g. The size-dependent saturation magnetization suggests the existence of a magnetically inactive layer as 1.035 nm for SPION-CFA.

  18. Design and Functional Characterization of a Novel Abscisic Acid Analog.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaoqiang; Jiang, Lun; Che, Chuanliang; Wan, Chuan; Lu, Huizhe; Xiao, Yumei; Xu, Yanjun; Chen, Zhongzhou; Qin, Zhaohai

    2017-03-08

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a crucial role in mediating plant growth and development by recruiting genetically redundant ABA receptors. To overcome its oxidation inactivation, we developed a novel ABA analog named 2',3'-benzo-iso-ABA (iso-PhABA) and studied its function and structural characterization with A. thaliana ABA receptors. The (+)-iso-PhABA form showed much higher ABA-like activities than (+)-ABA including inhibitory effects on the seed germination of lettuce and A. thaliana, wheat embryo germination and rice seedling elongation. The PP2C (protein phosphatases 2C) activity assay showed that (+)-iso-PhABA acted as a potent and selective ABA receptor agonist, which is preferred to PYL10. In some cases, (-)-iso-PhABA showed moderate to high activity for the PYL protein inhibiting PP2C activity, suggesting different mechanisms of action of iso-PhABA and ABA. The complex crystal structure of iso-PhABA with PYL10 was determined and elucidated successfully, revealing that (+)-iso-PhABA was better coordinated in the same binding pocket compared to (+)-ABA. Moreover, the detailed interaction network of iso-PhABA/PYL10 was disclosed and involves hydrogen bonds and multiple hydrophobic interactions that provide a robust framework for the design of novel ABA receptor agonists/antagonists.

  19. Nanostructured membranes and electrodes with sulfonic acid functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Bijay P.; Schieda, M.; Shahi, Vinod K.; Nunes, Suzana P.

    Herein we report the covalent functionalization of multiwall carbon nanotubes by grafting sulfanilic acid and their dispersion into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). The nanocomposites were explored as an option for tuning the proton and electron conductivity, swelling, water and alcohol permeability aiming at nanostructured membranes and electrodes for application in alcohol or hydrogen fuel cells and other electrochemical devices. The nanocomposites were extensively characterized, by studying their physicochemical and electrochemical properties. They were processed as self-supporting films with high mechanical stability, proton conductivity of 4.47 × 10 -2 S cm -1 at 30 °C and 16.8 × 10 -2 S cm -1 at 80 °C and 100% humidity level, electron conductivity much higher than for the plain polymer. The methanol permeability could be reduced to 1/20, keeping water permeability at reasonable values. The ratio of bound water also increases with increasing content of sulfonated filler, helping in keeping water in the polymer in conditions of low external humidity level.

  20. Cloning and functional expression of the first plant fatty acid elongase specific for Delta(6)-polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Zank, T K; Zähringer, U; Lerchl, J; Heinz, E

    2000-12-01

    In order to elucidate the biosynthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in plants we searched for a cDNA encoding a Delta(6)-specific PUFA elongase from Physcomitrella patens, which is known to contain high proportions of arachidonic acid (20:4 Delta(5,8,11,14)). An EST clone from P. patens was identified by its low homology to the yeast gene ELO1, which is required for the elongation of medium-chain fatty acids. We functionally characterized this cDNA by heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in the presence of several fatty acids. Analysis of the fatty acid profile of the transgenic yeast revealed that the cDNA encodes a protein that leads to the elongation of the C(18) Delta(6)-polyunsaturated fatty acids gamma-linolenic acid (18:3 Delta(6,9,12)) and stearidonic acid (18:4 Delta(6,9,12,15)), which were recovered to 45-51% as their elongation products. In contrast, linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids were hardly elongated and we could not measure any elongation of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids (including 18:1 Delta(6)), indicating that the elongase is highly specific for the polyunsaturated nature of the fatty acid acting as substrate.

  1. Diverse Functions of Retinoic Acid in Brain Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Stephanie; Harrison-Uy, Susan; Mishra, Swati; MacPherson, Amber M.; Choe, Youngshik; Li, Dan; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Fruttiger, Marcus; Pleasure, Samuel J.

    2016-01-01

    As neural structures grow in size and increase metabolic demand, the CNS vasculature undergoes extensive growth, remodeling, and maturation. Signals from neural tissue act on endothelial cells to stimulate blood vessel ingression, vessel patterning, and acquisition of mature brain vascular traits, most notably the blood–brain barrier. Using mouse genetic and in vitro approaches, we identified retinoic acid (RA) as an important regulator of brain vascular development via non-cell-autonomous and cell-autonomous regulation of endothelial WNT signaling. Our analysis of globally RA-deficient embryos (Rdh10 mutants) points to an important, non-cell-autonomous function for RA in the development of the vasculature in the neocortex. We demonstrate that Rdh10 mutants have severe defects in cerebrovascular development and that this phenotype correlates with near absence of endothelial WNT signaling, specifically in the cerebrovasculature, and substantially elevated expression of WNT inhibitors in the neocortex. We show that RA can suppress the expression of WNT inhibitors in neocortical progenitors. Analysis of vasculature in non-neocortical brain regions suggested that RA may have a separate, cell-autonomous function in brain endothelial cells to inhibit WNT signaling. Using both gain and loss of RA signaling approaches, we show that RA signaling in brain endothelial cells can inhibit WNT-β-catenin transcriptional activity and that this is required to moderate the expression of WNT target Sox17. From this, a model emerges in which RA acts upstream of the WNT pathway via non-cell-autonomous and cell-autonomous mechanisms to ensure the formation of an adequate and stable brain vascular plexus. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Work presented here provides novel insight into important yet little understood aspects of brain vascular development, implicating for the first time a factor upstream of endothelial WNT signaling. We show that RA is permissive for cerebrovascular growth via

  2. Physiological functions and pathogenic potential of uric acid: A review.

    PubMed

    El Ridi, Rashika; Tallima, Hatem

    2017-09-01

    Uric acid is synthesized mainly in the liver, intestines and the vascular endothelium as the end product of an exogenous pool of purines, and endogenously from damaged, dying and dead cells, whereby nucleic acids, adenine and guanine, are degraded into uric acid. Mentioning uric acid generates dread because it is the established etiological agent of the severe, acute and chronic inflammatory arthritis, gout and is implicated in the initiation and progress of the metabolic syndrome. Yet, uric acid is the predominant anti-oxidant molecule in plasma and is necessary and sufficient for induction of type 2 immune responses. These properties may explain its protective potential in neurological and infectious diseases, mainly schistosomiasis. The pivotal protective potential of uric acid against blood-borne pathogens and neurological and autoimmune diseases is yet to be established.

  3. A maternal high fat diet programmes endothelial function and cardiovascular status in adult male offspring independent of body weight, which is reversed by maternal conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation.

    PubMed

    Gray, Clint; Vickers, Mark H; Segovia, Stephanie A; Zhang, Xiaohuan D; Reynolds, Clare M

    2015-01-01

    Maternal high fat intake during pregnancy and lactation can result in obesity and adverse cardio-metabolic status in offspring independent of postnatal diet. While it is clear that maternal high fat intake can cause hypertension in adult offspring, there is little evidence regarding the role of dietary interventions in terms of reversing these adverse effects. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is an omega 6 fatty acid with beneficial effects in obesity and metabolic status. However, the impact of CLA supplementation in the context of pregnancy disorders and high fat diet-induced developmental programming of offspring cardio-metabolic dysfunction has not been investigated. We have utilised a model of maternal overnutrition to examine the effects of CLA supplementation on programmed endothelial dysfunction during adulthood. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a purified control diet (CON) or purified control diet supplemented with 1% CLA (of total fat), a purified high fat (HF) diet (45%kcal from fat) and a purified HF diet supplemented with 1% CLA (of total fat) (HFCLA). All dams were fed ad libitum throughout pregnancy and lactation. Offspring were fed a standard chow diet from weaning (day 21) until the end of the study (day 150). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured at day 85 and 130 by tail cuff plethysmography. At day 150, offspring mesenteric vessels were mounted on a pressure myograph and vascular responses to agonist-induced constriction and endothelium-dependent vasodilators were investigated. SBP was increased at day 85 and 130 in HF and HFCLA adult male offspring compared to CON and CLA groups with no effect of CLA supplementation. An overall effect of a maternal HF diet was observed in adult male vessels with a reduced vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine and blunted vasodilatory response to acetylcholine (ACh). Furthermore, HF and HFCLA offspring displayed a reduction in nitric oxide pathway function and an increased compensatory EDHF

  4. A Maternal High Fat Diet Programmes Endothelial Function and Cardiovascular Status in Adult Male Offspring Independent of Body Weight, Which is Reversed by Maternal Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Clint; Vickers, Mark H.; Segovia, Stephanie A.; Zhang, Xiaohuan D.; Reynolds, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal high fat intake during pregnancy and lactation can result in obesity and adverse cardio-metabolic status in offspring independent of postnatal diet. While it is clear that maternal high fat intake can cause hypertension in adult offspring, there is little evidence regarding the role of dietary interventions in terms of reversing these adverse effects. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is an omega 6 fatty acid with beneficial effects in obesity and metabolic status. However, the impact of CLA supplementation in the context of pregnancy disorders and high fat diet-induced developmental programming of offspring cardio-metabolic dysfunction has not been investigated. We have utilised a model of maternal overnutrition to examine the effects of CLA supplementation on programmed endothelial dysfunction during adulthood. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a purified control diet (CON) or purified control diet supplemented with 1% CLA (of total fat), a purified high fat (HF) diet (45%kcal from fat) and a purified HF diet supplemented with 1% CLA (of total fat) (HFCLA). All dams were fed ad libitum throughout pregnancy and lactation. Offspring were fed a standard chow diet from weaning (day 21) until the end of the study (day 150). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured at day 85 and 130 by tail cuff plethysmography. At day 150, offspring mesenteric vessels were mounted on a pressure myograph and vascular responses to agonist-induced constriction and endothelium-dependent vasodilators were investigated. SBP was increased at day 85 and 130 in HF and HFCLA adult male offspring compared to CON and CLA groups with no effect of CLA supplementation. An overall effect of a maternal HF diet was observed in adult male vessels with a reduced vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine and blunted vasodilatory response to acetylcholine (ACh). Furthermore, HF and HFCLA offspring displayed a reduction in nitric oxide pathway function and an increased compensatory EDHF

  5. The function of oxalic acid in the human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Daniel Stewart

    2011-09-01

    Biochemical reactions in cells which involve oxalic acid are described. It is shown that this compound is required for the formation of uracil and orotic acid. The former is a component of RNA which is common to all cells in the human metabolism. On the basis of the biochemical reactions described a possible treatment to relieve the effects of calcium oxalate renal calculi whose origin is related to the metabolic concentration of oxalic acid is proposed.

  6. Effect of acid hydrolysis on starch structure and functionality: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Copeland, Les

    2015-01-01

    Acid hydrolysis is an important chemical modification that can significantly change the structural and functional properties of starch without disrupting its granular morphology. A deep understanding of the effect of acid hydrolysis on starch structure and functionality is of great importance for starch scientific research and its industrial applications. During acid hydrolysis, amorphous regions are hydrolyzed preferentially, which enhances the crystallinity and double helical content of acid hydrolyzed starch. This review discusses current understanding of the effect of acid hydrolysis on starch structure and functionality. The effects of acid hydrolysis on amylose content, chain length distribution of amylopectin molecules, molecular and crystalline organization (including lamellar structure) and granular morphology are considered. Functional properties discussed include swelling power, gelatinization, retrogradation, pasting, gel texture, and in vitro enzyme digestibility. The paper also highlights some promising applications of acid hydrolyzed starch (starch nanocrystals) in the preparation of biodegradable nanocomposites, bio-hydrogen, and slowly digestible starch-based healthy foods.

  7. C5-amino acid functionalized LNA: positively poised for antisense applications.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Dale C; Kumar, Pawan; Anderson, Brooke A; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2014-08-18

    Incorporation of positively charged C5-amino acid functionalized LNA uridines into oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ONs) results in extraordinary RNA affinity, binding specificity and stability towards 3'-exonucleases.

  8. Enhanced functional properties of tannic acid after thermal hydrolysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thermal hydrolysis processing of fresh tannic acid was carried out in a closed reactor at four different temperatures (65, 100, 150 and 200°C). Pressures reached in the system were 1.3 and 4.8 MPa at 150 and 200°C, respectively. Hydrolysis products (gallic acid and pyrogallol) were separated and qua...

  9. Biological Function of Acetic Acid-Improvement in Obesity and Glucose Tolerance by Acetic Acid in Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-07-29

    Fatty acids derived from adipose tissue are oxidized by β-oxidation to form ketone bodies as final products under the starving condition. Previously, we found that free acetic acid was formed concomitantly with the production of ketone bodies in isolated rat liver perfusion, and mitochondrial acetyl CoA hydrolase was appeared to be involved with the acetic acid production. It was revealed that acetic acid was formed as a final product of enhanced β-oxidation of fatty acids and utilized as a fuel in extrahepatic tissues under the starving condition. Under the fed condition, β-oxidation is suppressed and acetic acid production is decreased. When acetic acid was taken daily by obesity-linked type 2 diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats under the fed condition, it protected OLETF rats against obesity. Furthermore, acetic acid contributed to protect from the accumulation of lipid in the liver as well as abdominal fat in OLETF rats. Transcripts of lipogenic genes in the liver were decreased, while transcripts of myoglobin and Glut4 genes in abdominal muscles were increased in the acetic acid-administered OLETF rats. It is indicated that exogenously administered acetic acid would have effects on lipid metabolism in both the liver and the skeletal muscles, and have function that works against obesity and obesity-linked type 2 diabetes.

  10. Polylactic acid composites incorporating casein functionalized cellulose nanowhiskers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polylactic acid (PLA) is considered to be a sustainable alternative to petroleum-based polymers for many applications. Using cellulose fiber to reinforce PLA is of great interest recently due to its complete biodegradability and potential improvement of the mechanical performance. However, the dispersion of hydrophilic cellulose fibers in the hydrophobic polymer matrix is usually poor without using hazardous surfactants. The goal of this study was to develop homogenously dispersed cellulose nanowhisker (CNW) reinforced PLA composites using whole milk casein protein, which is an environmentally compatible dispersant. Results In this study, whole milk casein was chosen as a dispersant in the PLA-CNW system because of its potential to interact with the PLA matrix and cellulose. The affinity of casein to PLA was studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging. CNWs were functionalized with casein and used as reinforcements to make PLA composites. Fluorescent staining of CNWs in the PLA matrix was implemented as a novel and simple way to analyze the dispersion of the reinforcements. The dispersion of CNWs in PLA was improved when casein was present. The mechanical properties of the composites were studied experimentally. Compared to pure PLA, the PLA composites had higher Young’s modulus. Casein (CS) functionalized CNW reinforced PLA (PLA-CS-CNW) at 2 wt% filler content maintained higher strain at break compared to normal CNW reinforced PLA (PLA-CNW). The Young’s modulus of PLA-CS-CNW composites was also higher than that of PLA-CNW composites at higher filler content. However, all composites exhibited lower strain at break and tensile strength at high filler content. Conclusions The presence of whole milk casein improved the dispersion of CNWs in the PLA matrix. The improved dispersion of CNWs provided higher modulus of the PLA composites at higher reinforcement loading and maintained the strain and stress at break of the composites at relatively low

  11. Acute exposure to realistic acid fog: Effects on respiratory function and airway responsiveness in asthmatics

    SciTech Connect

    Leduc, D.; De Vuyst, P.; Yernault, J.C.

    1995-11-01

    The biological effects of acid fog composed primarily of ammonium ions and sulfate are described. Subjects with asthma were exposed for one hour to sulfuric acid aerosol. Significant changes were not observed. Other asthma subjects were exposed to acid fog containing sulfate and ammonium ions. Again, pulmonary and bronchial function were not modified after inhalation.

  12. Highly thermal-stable and functional cellulose nanocrystals and nanofibrils produced using fully recyclable organic acids

    Treesearch

    Liheng Chen; Junyong Zhu; Carlos Baez; Peter Kitin; Thomas Elder

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the production of highly thermal stable and functional cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and nanofibrils (CNF) by hydrolysis using concentrated organic acids. Due to their low water solubility, these solid organic acids can be easily recovered after hydrolysis reactions through crystallization at a lower or ambient temperature. When dicarboxylic acids were...

  13. Suppression of adipose lipolysis by long-chain fatty acid analogs.

    PubMed

    Kalderon, Bella; Azazmeh, Narmen; Azulay, Nili; Vissler, Noam; Valitsky, Michael; Bar-Tana, Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Agonist-induced lipolysis of adipose fat is robustly inhibited by insulin or by feedback inhibition by the long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) produced during lipolysis. However, the mode of action of LCFA in suppressing adipose lipolysis is not clear. β,β'-Tetramethyl hexadecanedioic acid (Mββ/ EDICA16) is a synthetic LCFA that is neither esterified into lipids nor β-oxidized, and therefore, it was exploited for suppressing agonist-induced lipolysis in analogy to natural LCFA. Mββ is shown here to suppress isoproterenol-induced lipolysis in the rat in vivo as well as in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Inhibition of isoproterenol-induced lipolysis is due to decrease in isoproterenol-induced cAMP with concomitant inhibition of the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase and perilipin by protein kinase A. Suppression of cellular cAMP levels is accounted for by inhibition of the adenylate cyclase due to suppression of Raf1 expression by Mββ-activated AMPK. Suppression of Raf1 is further complemented by induction of components of the unfolded-protein-response by Mββ. Our findings imply genuine inhibition of agonist-induced adipose lipolysis by LCFA, independent of their β-oxidation or reesterification. Mββ suppression of agonist-induced lipolysis and cellular cAMP levels independent of the insulin transduction pathway may indicate that synthetic LCFA could serve as insulin mimetics in the lipolysis context under conditions of insulin resistance.

  14. Density functional theory calculations on dipeptide gallic acid interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhan, B.; Parthasarathi, R.; Subramanian, V.; Raghava Rao, J.; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Ramasami, T.

    2003-02-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the interaction of dipeptides with gallic acid, using Becke3 parameter Lee Yang Parr (B3LYP) method employing 3-21G*, 6-31G* and 6-31+G* basis sets. The interaction energies of the dipeptide-gallic acid complexes are in the range of -5 to -18 kcal/mol depending on the mode of intermolecular complexation. Calculated molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) for the various intermolecular complexes revealed the electrostatic nature of the interaction. Qualitative estimations based on chemical hardness and chemical potential demonstrated fractional electron transfer from dipeptide to gallic acid.

  15. Np(V) reduction by humic acid: contribution of reduced sulfur functionalities to the redox behavior of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Schmeide, K; Sachs, S; Bernhard, G

    2012-03-01

    The role of sulfur-containing functional groups in humic acids for the Np(V) reduction in aqueous solution has been studied with the objective to specify individual processes contributing to the overall redox activity of humic substances. For this, humic acid model substances type M1-S containing different amounts of sulfur (1.9, 3.9, 6.9 wt.%) were applied. The sulfur functionalities in these humic acids are dominated by reduced-sulfur species, such as thiols, dialkylsulfides and/or disulfides. The Np(V) reduction behavior of these humic acids has been studied in comparison to that of the sulfur-free humic acid type M1 at pH 5.0, 7.0 and 9.0 under anaerobic conditions by means of batch experiments. For Np redox speciation in solution, solvent extraction and ultrafiltration were applied. In addition, redox potentials of the sample solutions were monitored. At pH 5.0, both rate and extent of Np(V) to Np(IV) reduction were found to increase with increasing sulfur content of the humic acids. At pH 7.0 and 9.0, sulfur functional groups had only a slight influence on the reduction behavior of humic acid toward Np(V). Thus, in addition to quinoid moieties and non-quinoid phenolic OH groups, generally acknowledged as main redox-active sites in humic substances, sulfur functional groups have been identified as further redox-active moieties of humic substances being active especially in the slightly acidic pH range as shown for Np(V). Due to the low sulfur content of up to 2 wt.% in natural humic substances, their contribution to the total reducing capacity is smaller than that of the other redox-active functional groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evolution of the genetic code by incorporation of amino acids that improved or changed protein function.

    PubMed

    Francis, Brian R

    2013-10-01

    Fifty years have passed since the genetic code was deciphered, but how the genetic code came into being has not been satisfactorily addressed. It is now widely accepted that the earliest genetic code did not encode all 20 amino acids found in the universal genetic code as some amino acids have complex biosynthetic pathways and likely were not available from the environment. Therefore, the genetic code evolved as pathways for synthesis of new amino acids became available. One hypothesis proposes that early in the evolution of the genetic code four amino acids-valine, alanine, aspartic acid, and glycine-were coded by GNC codons (N = any base) with the remaining codons being nonsense codons. The other sixteen amino acids were subsequently added to the genetic code by changing nonsense codons into sense codons for these amino acids. Improvement in protein function is presumed to be the driving force behind the evolution of the code, but how improved function was achieved by adding amino acids has not been examined. Based on an analysis of amino acid function in proteins, an evolutionary mechanism for expansion of the genetic code is described in which individual coded amino acids were replaced by new amino acids that used nonsense codons differing by one base change from the sense codons previously used. The improved or altered protein function afforded by the changes in amino acid function provided the selective advantage underlying the expansion of the genetic code. Analysis of amino acid properties and functions explains why amino acids are found in their respective positions in the genetic code.

  17. Functional changes in acid secretion produced by duodenogastric reflux.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, W E

    1980-01-01

    The effects of duodenal reflux on gastric secretion have been examined in dogs. Acid secretion during pentagastrin stimulation increased by 68% in animals with chronic diversion of duodenal contents into the stomach. This increased acid secretion did not occur when bile alone was diverted into the stomach and could be abolished by vagotomy. The hypersecretion observed with pentagastrin did not occur when histamine was the stimulus, which suggests that it was not due solely to a trophic effect on parietal cells. PMID:7429304

  18. Xenobiotic, Bile Acid, and Cholesterol Transporters: Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    Transporters influence the disposition of chemicals within the body by participating in absorption, distribution, and elimination. Transporters of the solute carrier family (SLC) comprise a variety of proteins, including organic cation transporters (OCT) 1 to 3, organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTN) 1 to 3, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1 to 7, various organic anion transporting polypeptide isoforms, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, peptide transporters (PEPT) 1 and 2, concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNT) 1 to 3, equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 to 3, and multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters (MATE) 1 and 2, which mediate the uptake (except MATEs) of organic anions and cations as well as peptides and nucleosides. Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), multidrug resistance proteins (MDR) 1 and 2, bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1 to 9, breast cancer resistance protein, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G members 5 and 8, are responsible for the unidirectional export of endogenous and exogenous substances. Other efflux transporters [ATPase copper-transporting β polypeptide (ATP7B) and ATPase class I type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1) as well as organic solute transporters (OST) α and β] also play major roles in the transport of some endogenous chemicals across biological membranes. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of these transporters (both rodent and human) with regard to tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and substrate preferences. Because uptake and efflux transporters are expressed in multiple cell types, the roles of transporters in a variety of tissues, including the liver, kidneys, intestine, brain, heart, placenta, mammary glands, immune cells, and testes are discussed. Attention is also placed upon a variety of regulatory

  19. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; ...

    2014-09-10

    In this paper, we summarize recent progress in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insightsmore » gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed.« less

  20. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; Tan, Li Huey; Lu, Yi

    2014-09-10

    In this paper, we summarize recent progress in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed.

  1. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; Tan, Li Huey

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed. PMID:25205057

  2. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E; Tan, Li Huey; Lu, Yi

    2014-12-10

    In this review, we summarize recent progress in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed.

  3. Benzylidene Acetal Protecting Group as Carboxylic Acid Surrogate: Synthesis of Functionalized Uronic Acids and Sugar Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amit; Senthilkumar, Soundararasu; Baskaran, Sundarababu

    2016-01-18

    Direct oxidation of the 4,6-O-benzylidene acetal protecting group to C-6 carboxylic acid has been developed that provides an easy access to a wide range of biologically important and synthetically challenging uronic acid and sugar amino acid derivatives in good yields. The RuCl3 -NaIO4 -mediated oxidative cleavage method eliminates protection and deprotection steps and the reaction takes place under mild conditions. The dual role of the benzylidene acetal, as a protecting group and source of carboxylic acid, was exploited in the efficient synthesis of six-carbon sialic acid analogues and disaccharides bearing uronic acids, including glycosaminoglycan analogues. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. [Correlation Between Functional Groups and Radical Scavenging Activities of Acidic Polysaccharides from Dendrobium].

    PubMed

    Liao, Ying; Yuan, Wen-yu; Zheng, Wen-ke; Luo, Ao-xue; Fan, Yi-jun

    2015-11-01

    To compare the radical scavenging activity of five different acidic polysaccharides, and to find the correlation with the functional groups. Alkali extraction method and Stepwise ethanol precipitation method were used to extract and concentrate the five Dendrobium polysaccharides, and to determine the contents of sulfuric acid and uronic acid of each kind of acidic polysaccharides, and the scavenging activity to ABTS+ radical and hydroxyl radical. Functional group structures were examined by FTIR Spectrometer. Five kinds of Dendrobium polysaccharides had different ability of scavenging ABTS+ free radical and hydroxyl free radical. Moreover, the study had shown that five kinds of antioxidant activity of acidic polysaccharides had obvious correlation withuronic acid and sulfuric acid. The antioxidant activity of each sample was positively correlated with the content of uronic acid, and negatively correlated with the content of sulfuric acid. Sulfuric acid can inhibit the antioxidant activity of acidic polysaccharide but uronic acid can enhance the free radical scavenging activity. By analyzing the structure characteristics of five acidic polysaccharides, all samples have similar structures, however, Dendrobium denneanum, Dendrobium devonianum and Dendrobium officinale which had β configuration have higher antioxidant activity than Dendrobium nobile and Dendrobium fimbriatum which had a configuration.

  5. Evolutionary and Functional Diversification of the Vitamin D Receptor-Lithocholic Acid Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guozhu; Hawkins, Mary Beth; Whitfield, G. Kerr; Reif, David M.; Kullman, Seth W.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution, molecular behavior, and physiological function of nuclear receptors are of particular interest given their diverse roles in regulating essential biological processes. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is well known for its canonical roles in calcium homeostasis and skeletal maintenance. Additionally, VDR has received an increased amount of attention due to the discovery of numerous non-calcemic functions, including the detoxification of lithocholic acid. Lithocholic acid is a toxic metabolite of chenodeoxycholic acid, a primary bile acid. The partnership between the VDR and lithocholic acid has been hypothesized to be a recent adaptation that evolved to mediate the detoxification and elimination of lithocholic acid from the gut. This partnership is speculated to be limited to higher vertebrates (birds and mammals), as lower vertebrates do not synthesize the parent compound of lithocholic acid. However, the molecular functions associated with the observed insensitivity of basal VDRs to lithocholic acid have not been explored. Here we characterize canonical nuclear receptor functions of VDRs from select species representing key nodes in vertebrate evolution and span a range of bile salt phenotypes. Competitive ligand binding assays revealed that the receptor’s affinity for lithocholic acid is highly conserved across species, suggesting that lithocholic acid affinity is an ancient and non-adaptive trait. However, transient transactivation assays revealed that lithocholic acid-mediated VDR activation might have evolved more recently, as the non-mammalian receptors did not respond to lithocholic acid unless exogenous coactivator proteins were co-expressed. Subsequent functional assays indicated that differential lithocholic acid-mediated receptor activation is potentially driven by differential protein-protein interactions between VDR and nuclear receptor coregulator proteins. We hypothesize that the vitamin D receptor-lithocholic acid partnership evolved as

  6. Evolutionary and Functional Diversification of the Vitamin D Receptor-Lithocholic Acid Partnership.

    PubMed

    Kollitz, Erin M; Zhang, Guozhu; Hawkins, Mary Beth; Whitfield, G Kerr; Reif, David M; Kullman, Seth W

    2016-01-01

    The evolution, molecular behavior, and physiological function of nuclear receptors are of particular interest given their diverse roles in regulating essential biological processes. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is well known for its canonical roles in calcium homeostasis and skeletal maintenance. Additionally, VDR has received an increased amount of attention due to the discovery of numerous non-calcemic functions, including the detoxification of lithocholic acid. Lithocholic acid is a toxic metabolite of chenodeoxycholic acid, a primary bile acid. The partnership between the VDR and lithocholic acid has been hypothesized to be a recent adaptation that evolved to mediate the detoxification and elimination of lithocholic acid from the gut. This partnership is speculated to be limited to higher vertebrates (birds and mammals), as lower vertebrates do not synthesize the parent compound of lithocholic acid. However, the molecular functions associated with the observed insensitivity of basal VDRs to lithocholic acid have not been explored. Here we characterize canonical nuclear receptor functions of VDRs from select species representing key nodes in vertebrate evolution and span a range of bile salt phenotypes. Competitive ligand binding assays revealed that the receptor's affinity for lithocholic acid is highly conserved across species, suggesting that lithocholic acid affinity is an ancient and non-adaptive trait. However, transient transactivation assays revealed that lithocholic acid-mediated VDR activation might have evolved more recently, as the non-mammalian receptors did not respond to lithocholic acid unless exogenous coactivator proteins were co-expressed. Subsequent functional assays indicated that differential lithocholic acid-mediated receptor activation is potentially driven by differential protein-protein interactions between VDR and nuclear receptor coregulator proteins. We hypothesize that the vitamin D receptor-lithocholic acid partnership evolved as a

  7. Terahertz spectroscopy and solid-state density functional theory calculations of structural isomers: Nicotinic acid, isonicotinic acid and 2-picolinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ling; Fan, Wen-Hui; Chen, Xu; Chen, Ze-You; Song, Chao

    2017-05-01

    We report, for the first time to our knowledge, the terahertz (THz) spectra of isonicotinic acid and 2-picolinic acid. The distinct THz spectral differences among these two isomers and nicotinic acid have also been observed, indicating that the THz vibrational modes are highly sensitive to the structural differences even in similar molecular crystals. Besides, solid-state density functional theory calculations reveal better qualitative agreement with the measured absorption features, which are related to the molecular vibrations of nicotinic acid and isonicotinic acid. As for 2-picolinic acid, the calculation based on the primitive cell reproduces the absorption features at 1.46, 1.82 and 2.46 THz originating from intermolecular vibrations. These results suggest that THz spectra can identify the complex intermolecular interactions even in similar molecular crystals, which shows potential applications in identifying isomers in food and pharmaceutical production.

  8. Function and evolutionary diversity of fatty acid amino acid conjugates (FACs)in Lepidopteran caterpillars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fatty acid amino acid conjugates (FACs) in regurgitant of larval Spodoptera exigua1 were initially identified as plant volatile elicitors and research has been focused on this apparent ecological disadvantage rather than on possible benefit for the caterpillar itself. Recently, we demonstrated that...

  9. Functional Analysis of Leishmania Cyclopropane Fatty Acid Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Oyola, Samuel O.; Evans, Krystal J.; Smith, Terry K.; Smith, Barbara A.; Hilley, James D.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Kaye, Paul M.; Smith, Deborah F.

    2012-01-01

    The single gene encoding cyclopropane fatty acid synthetase (CFAS) is present in Leishmania infantum, L. mexicana and L. braziliensis but absent from L. major, a causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis. In L. infantum, usually causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis, the CFAS gene is transcribed in both insect (extracellular) and host (intracellular) stages of the parasite life cycle. Tagged CFAS protein is stably detected in intracellular L. infantum but only during the early log phase of extracellular growth, when it shows partial localisation to the endoplasmic reticulum. Lipid analyses of L. infantum wild type, CFAS null and complemented parasites detect a low abundance CFAS-dependent C19Δ fatty acid, characteristic of a cyclopropanated species, in wild type and add-back cells. Sub-cellular fractionation studies locate the C19Δ fatty acid to both ER and plasma membrane-enriched fractions. This fatty acid is not detectable in wild type L. major, although expression of the L. infantum CFAS gene in L. major generates cyclopropanated fatty acids, indicating that the substrate for this modification is present in L. major, despite the absence of the modifying enzyme. Loss of the L. infantum CFAS gene does not affect extracellular parasite growth, phagocytosis or early survival in macrophages. However, while endocytosis is also unaffected in the extracellular CFAS nulls, membrane transporter activity is defective and the null parasites are more resistant to oxidative stress. Following infection in vivo, L. infantum CFAS nulls exhibit lower parasite burdens in both the liver and spleen of susceptible hosts but it has not been possible to complement this phenotype, suggesting that loss of C19Δ fatty acid may lead to irreversible changes in cell physiology that cannot be rescued by re-expression. Aberrant cyclopropanation in L. major decreases parasite virulence but does not influence parasite tissue tropism. PMID:23251490

  10. Functional domains of the fatty acid transport proteins: studies using protein chimeras.

    PubMed

    DiRusso, Concetta C; Darwis, Dina; Obermeyer, Thomas; Black, Paul N

    2008-03-01

    Fatty acid transport proteins (FATP) function in fatty acid trafficking pathways, several of which have been shown to participate in the transport of exogenous fatty acids into the cell. Members of this protein family also function as acyl CoA synthetases with specificity towards very long chain fatty acids or bile acids. These proteins have two identifying sequence motifs: The ATP/AMP motif, an approximately 100 amino acid segment required for ATP binding and common to members of the adenylate-forming super family of proteins, and the FATP/VLACS motif that consists of approximately 50 amino acid residues and is restricted to members of the FATP family. This latter motif has been implicated in fatty acid transport in the yeast FATP orthologue Fat1p. In the present studies using a yeast strain containing deletions in FAT1 (encoding Fat1p) and FAA1 (encoding the major acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) Faa1p) as an experimental platform, the phenotypic and functional properties of specific murine FATP1-FATP4 and FATP6-FATP4 protein chimeras were evaluated in order to define elements within these proteins that further distinguish the fatty acid transport and activation functions. As expected from previous work FATP1 and FATP4 were functional in the fatty acid transport pathway, while and FATP6 was not. All three isoforms were able to activate the very long chain fatty acids arachidonate (C(20:4)) and lignocerate (C(24:0)), but with distinguishing activities between saturated and highly unsaturated ligands. A 73 amino acid segment common to FATP1 and FATP4 and between the ATP/AMP and FATP/VLACS motifs was identified by studying the chimeras, which is hypothesized to contribute to the transport function.

  11. Statistical modeling of correlatively expressed functional amino acids in maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Modern maize breeding and selection for large starchy kernels may have contributed to reduced contents of essential amino acids which represents a serious nutritional problem for humans and animals. A large number (1,348) of germplasm accessions belonging to 13 populations and classified into four h...

  12. Cellular nucleic acid binding protein binds G-rich single-stranded nucleic acids and may function as a nucleic acid chaperone.

    PubMed

    Armas, Pablo; Nasif, Sofía; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2008-02-15

    Cellular nucleic acid binding protein (CNBP) is a small single-stranded nucleic acid binding protein made of seven Zn knuckles and an Arg-Gly rich box. CNBP is strikingly conserved among vertebrates and was reported to play broad-spectrum functions in eukaryotic cells biology. Neither its biological function nor its mechanisms of action were elucidated yet. The main goal of this work was to gain further insights into the CNBP biochemical and molecular features. We studied Bufo arenarum CNBP (bCNBP) binding to single-stranded nucleic acid probes representing the main reported CNBP putative targets. We report that, although bCNBP is able to bind RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes in vitro, it binds RNA as a preformed dimer whereas both monomer and dimer are able to bind to ssDNA. A systematic analysis of variant probes shows that the preferred bCNBP targets contain unpaired guanosine-rich stretches. These data expand the knowledge about CNBP binding stoichiometry and begins to dissect the main features of CNBP nucleic acid targets. Besides, we show that bCNBP presents a highly disordered predicted structure and promotes the annealing and melting of nucleic acids in vitro. These features are typical of proteins that function as nucleic acid chaperones. Based on these data, we propose that CNBP may function as a nucleic acid chaperone through binding, remodeling, and stabilizing nucleic acids secondary structures. This novel CNBP biochemical activity broadens the field of study about its biological function and may be the basis to understand the diverse ways in which CNBP controls gene expression. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Improved Mitochondrial Function with Diet-Induced Increase in Either Docosahexaenoic Acid or Arachidonic Acid in Membrane Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Khairallah, Ramzi J.; Kim, Junhwan; O'Shea, Karen M.; O'Connell, Kelly A.; Brown, Bethany H.; Galvao, Tatiana; Daneault, Caroline; Rosiers, Christine Des; Polster, Brian M.; Hoppel, Charles L.; Stanley, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria can depolarize and trigger cell death through the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). We recently showed that an increase in the long chain n3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n3) and depletion of the n6 PUFA arachidonic acid (ARA; 20:4n6) in mitochondrial membranes is associated with a greater Ca2+ load required to induce MPTP opening. Here we manipulated mitochondrial phospholipid composition by supplementing the diet with DHA, ARA or combined DHA+ARA in rats for 10 weeks. There were no effects on cardiac function, or respiration of isolated mitochondria. Analysis of mitochondrial phospholipids showed DHA supplementation increased DHA and displaced ARA in mitochondrial membranes, while supplementation with ARA or DHA+ARA increased ARA and depleted linoleic acid (18:2n6). Phospholipid analysis revealed a similar pattern, particularly in cardiolipin. Tetralinoleoyl cardiolipin was depleted by 80% with ARA or DHA+ARA supplementation, with linoleic acid side chains replaced by ARA. Both the DHA and ARA groups had delayed Ca2+-induced MPTP opening, but the DHA+ARA group was similar to the control diet. In conclusion, alterations in mitochondria membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition caused by dietary DHA or ARA was associated with a greater cumulative Ca2+ load required to induced MPTP opening. Further, high levels of tetralinoleoyl cardiolipin were not essential for normal mitochondrial function if replaced with very-long chain n3 or n6 PUFAs. PMID:22479624

  14. Using Caenorhabditis elegans to Uncover Conserved Functions of Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Watts, Jennifer L

    2016-02-02

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism to study functions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The ability to alter fatty acid composition with genetic manipulation and dietary supplementation permits the dissection of the roles of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in many biological process including reproduction, aging and neurobiology. Studies in C. elegans to date have mostly identified overlapping functions of 20-carbon omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in reproduction and in neurons, however, specific roles for either omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids are beginning to emerge. Recent findings with importance to human health include the identification of a conserved Cox-independent prostaglandin synthesis pathway, critical functions for cytochrome P450 derivatives of polyunsaturated fatty acids, the requirements for omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in sensory neurons, and the importance of fatty acid desaturation for long lifespan. Furthermore, the ability of C. elegans to interconvert omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids using the FAT-1 omega-3 desaturase has been exploited in mammalian studies and biotechnology approaches to generate mammals capable of exogenous generation of omega-3 fatty acids.

  15. Using Caenorhabditis elegans to Uncover Conserved Functions of Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism to study functions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The ability to alter fatty acid composition with genetic manipulation and dietary supplementation permits the dissection of the roles of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in many biological process including reproduction, aging and neurobiology. Studies in C. elegans to date have mostly identified overlapping functions of 20-carbon omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in reproduction and in neurons, however, specific roles for either omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids are beginning to emerge. Recent findings with importance to human health include the identification of a conserved Cox-independent prostaglandin synthesis pathway, critical functions for cytochrome P450 derivatives of polyunsaturated fatty acids, the requirements for omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in sensory neurons, and the importance of fatty acid desaturation for long lifespan. Furthermore, the ability of C. elegans to interconvert omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids using the FAT-1 omega-3 desaturase has been exploited in mammalian studies and biotechnology approaches to generate mammals capable of exogenous generation of omega-3 fatty acids. PMID:26848697

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Sulfonic Acid Functionalized Silica and Its Application for the Esterification of Ethanol and Maleic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirsam, Rajkumar; Usmani, Ghayas

    2016-04-01

    The surface of commercially available silica gel, 60-200 mesh size, was modified with sulfonic acid through surface activation, grafting of 3-Mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane, oxidation and acidification of 3-Mercaptopropylsilica. Sulfonic Acid Functionalization of Silica (SAFS) was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. Acid-base titration was used to estimate the cation exchange capacity of the SAFS. Catalytic activity of SAFS was judged for the esterification of ethanol with maleic acid. An effect of different process parameters viz. molar ratio, catalyst loading, speed of agitation and temperature were studied and optimized by Box Behnken Design (BBD) of Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Quadratic model developed by BBD-RSM reasonably satisfied an experimental and predicted values with correlation coefficient value R2 = 0.9504.

  17. Purification and functional characterization of thermostable 5-aminolevulinic acid synthases.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinglong; Zhang, Yanfei; Ma, Chunling; Ma, Hongwu; Zhao, Xueming; Chen, Tao

    2015-11-01

    As 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS), the key enzyme for 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthesis, is unstable, we have sought to find thermostable ALASs from thermophilic organisms. Three ALASs from thermophiles Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius (GT-ALAS), Laceyella sacchari (LS-ALAS) and Pseudomonas alcaliphila (PA-ALAS) were purified and characterized. All enzymes were more stable than two previously studied ALASs from Rhodopseudomonas palustris and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. There was almost no activity change after 60 h at 37 °C for the three thermostable enzymes. This contrasts with the other two enzymes which lost over 90 % activities in just 1 h. Furthermore, the specific activity of LS-ALAS (7.8 U mg(-1)) was also higher than any previously studied ALASs. Thermostable ALASs were found in thermophilic organisms and this paves the way for developing cell free processes for enzymatic production of ALA from bulk chemicals succinate and glycine.

  18. Functional characterization of lysophosphatidic acid phosphatase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Venky Sreedhar; Rao, D K Venkata; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2010-04-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) acts as a signaling molecule that regulates diverse cellular processes and it can rapidly be metabolized by phosphatase and acyltransferase. LPA phosphatase gene has not been identified and characterized in plants so far. The BLAST search revealed that the At3g03520 is similar to phospholipase family, and distantly related to bacterial phosphatases. The conserved motif, (J)4XXXNXSFD, was identified in both At3g03520 like phospholipases and acid phosphatases. In silico expression analysis of At3g03520 revealed a high expression during phosphate starvation and abiotic stresses. This gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and shown to posses LPA specific phosphatase activity. These results suggest that this gene possibly plays a role in signal transduction and storage lipid synthesis.

  19. Phenylboronic acid functionalized SBA-15 for sugar capture.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Hong; Shantz, Daniel F

    2011-12-06

    The synthesis and characterization of organic-inorganic hybrid materials that selectively capture sugars from model biomass hydrolysis mixtures are reported. 3-Aminophenylboronic acid (PBA) groups that can reversibly form cyclic esters with 1,2-diols, and 1,3-diols including sugars are attached to mesoporous SBA-15 via different synthetic protocols. In the first route, a coupling agent is used to link PBA and SBA-15, while in the second route poly(acrylic acid) brushes are first grafted from the surface of SBA-15 by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization and PBA is then immobilized. The changes in pore structure, porosity, and pore size due to the loading of organic content are measured by powder X-ray diffraction and nitrogen porosimetry. The increase in organic content after each synthesis step is monitored by thermal gravimetric analysis. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis are used to characterize the chemical compositions of the hybrid materials synthesized. D-(+)-Glucose and D-(+)-xylose, being the most commonly present sugars in biomass, are chosen to evaluate the sugar adsorption capacity of the hybrid materials. It is found that the sugar adsorption capacity is determined by the loading of boronic acid groups on the hybrid materials, and the hybrid material synthesized via route two is much better than that through route one for sugar adsorption. Mathematical modeling of the adsorption data indicates that the Langmuir model best describes the sugar adsorption behavior of the hybrid material synthesized through route one, while the Freundlich model fits the data most satisfactorily for the hybrid material prepared via route two. The adsorption kinetics, reusability, and selectivity toward some typical chemicals in cellulose acidic hydrolysis mixtures are also investigated.

  20. Functional amino acids in the development of the pig placenta.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W; Johnson, Gregory A; Herring, Cassandra; Seo, Heewon; Dai, Zhaolai; Wang, Junjun; Wu, Zhenlong; Wang, Xiaolong

    2017-09-01

    The mammalian placenta is essential for supplying nutrients (e.g., amino acids and water) and oxygen from the mother to fetus and for removing fetal metabolites (e.g., ammonia and CO2 ) from fetus to mother. Thus, placental growth and development are determinants of fetal survival, growth, and development. Indeed, low birth weight is closely associated with reduced placental growth. Providing gestating gilts or sows with dietary supplementation of arginine and glutamine, increases placental growth (including vascular growth), improves embryonic/fetal growth and survival, and reduces the large variation in birth weight among litters. These two amino acids serve as building blocks for tissue protein as well as substrates for the production of polyamines and nitric oxide, which stimulate DNA and protein synthesis and angiogenesis and vascular growth in the placenta. These recent findings not only greatly advance the field of mammalian amino acid metabolism and nutrition, but also provide practical, mechanism-based methods to enhance reproductive efficiency in swine. These results may also help improve embryonic/fetal survival and growth in other livestock species (e.g., sheep and cattle) and in humans. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Pyrabactin, an ABA agonist, induced stomatal closure and changes in signalling components of guard cells in abaxial epidermis of Pisum sativum

    PubMed Central

    Puli, Mallikarjuna Rao; Raghavendra, Agepati S.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrabactin, a synthetic agonist of abscisic acid (ABA), inhibits seed germination and hypocotyl growth and stimulates gene expression in a very similar way to ABA, implying the possible modulation of stomatal function by pyrabactin as well. The effect of pyrabactin on stomatal closure and secondary messengers was therefore studied in guard cells of Pisum sativum abaxial epidermis. Pyrabactin caused marked stomatal closure in a pattern similar to ABA. In addition, pyrabactin elevated the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and cytoplasmic pH levels in guard cells, as indicated by the respective fluorophores. However, apyrabactin, an inactive analogue of ABA, did not affect either stomatal closure or the signalling components of guard cells. The effects of pyrabactin-induced changes were reversed by pharmalogical compounds that modulate ROS, NO or cytoplasmic pH levels, quite similar to ABA effects. Fusicoccin, a fungal toxin, could reverse the stomatal closure caused by pyrabactin, as well as that caused by ABA. Experiments on stomatal closure by varying concentrations of ABA, in the presence of fixed concentration of pyrabactin, and vice versa, revealed that the actions of ABA and pyrabactin were additive. Further kinetic analysis of data revealed that the apparent KD of ABA was increased almost 4-fold in the presence of ABA, suggesting that pyrabactin and ABA were competing with each other either at the same site or close to the active site. It is proposed that pyrabactin could be used to examine the ABA-related signal-transduction components in stomatal guard cells as well as in other plant tissues. It is also suggested that pyrabactin can be used as an antitranspirant or as a priming agent for improving the drought tolerance of crop plants. PMID:22131162

  2. Encapsulation of vegetable oils as source of omega-3 fatty acids for enriched functional foods.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Ruiz, Jorge Carlos; Ortiz Vazquez, Elizabeth De La Luz; Segura Campos, Maira Rubi

    2017-05-03

    Polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (PUFAs), a functional component present in vegetable oils, are generally recognized as being beneficial to health. Omega-3 PUFAs are rich in double bonds and unsaturated in nature; this attribute makes them highly susceptible to lipid oxidation and unfit for incorporation into long shelf life foods. The microencapsulation of oils in a polymeric matrix (mainly polysaccharides) offers the possibility of controlled release of the lipophilic functional ingredient and can be useful for the supplementation of foods with PUFAs. The present paper provides a literature review of different vegetable sources of omega-3 fatty acids, the functional effects of omega-3 fatty acids, different microencapsulation methods that can possibly be used for the encapsulation of oils, the properties of vegetable oil microcapsules, the effect of encapsulation on oxidation stability and fatty acid composition of vegetable oils, and the incorporation of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in foods.

  3. 100% thiol-functionalized ethylene PMOs prepared by "thiol acid-ene" chemistry.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Dolores; van den Berg, Otto; Romero-Salguero, Francisco J; Du Prez, Filip; Van der Voort, Pascal

    2013-03-21

    A novel thiol functionalized bis-silane PMO precursor was synthesized by highly efficient thiol acid-ene chemistry between the double bonds of 1,2-(E)-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethene and thioacetic acid. After aminolysis the self-assembly process of the formed SH-precursor with Pluronic P123 under acidic conditions yields the first 100% thiol-PMO material with good structural ordering.

  4. Hydrogenation of CO2 to formic acid promoted by a diamine-functionalized ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaofu; Hu, Suqin; Song, Jinliang; Li, Wenjing; Yang, Guanying; Han, Buxing

    2009-01-01

    Amines to an end: The basic diamine-functionalized ionic liquid 1,3-di(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl)-2-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate was prepared and used in the hydrogenation of CO(2) to formic acid. One mole of the ionic liquid coordinates two moles of formic acid to promote the reaction. Both the ionic liquid and catalyst can be reused directly after their separation from the formic acid produced.

  5. Cardiac autonomic function and oesophageal acid sensitivity in patients with non-cardiac chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Tougas, G; Spaziani, R; Hollerbach, S; Djuric, V; Pang, C; Upton, A; Fallen, E; Kamath, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Acid reflux can elicit non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP), possibly through altered visceral sensory or autonomic function. The interactions between symptoms, autonomic function, and acid exposure are poorly understood.
AIM—To examine autonomic function in NCCP patients during exposure to oesophageal acid infusion.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS—Autonomic activity was assessed using power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (PSHRV), before and during oesophageal acidification (0.1 N HCl), in 28 NCCP patients (40.5 (10) years; 13 females) and in 10 matched healthy controls. Measured PSHRV indices included high frequency (HF) (0.15-0.5 Hz) and low frequency (LF) (0.06-0.15 Hz) power to assess vagal and sympathetic activity, respectively.
RESULTS—A total of 19/28 patients had angina-like symptoms elicited by acid. There were no significant manometric changes observed in either acid sensitive or insensitive patients. Acid sensitive patients had a higher baseline heart rate (82.9 (3.1) v 66.7 (3.5) beats/min; p<0.005) and lower baseline vagal activity (HF normalised area: 31.1 (1.9)% v 38.9 (2.3)%; p< 0.03) than acid insensitive patients. During acid infusion, vagal cardiac outflow increased (p<0.03) in acid sensitive but not in acid insensitive patients.
CONCLUSIONS—Patients with angina-like pain during acid infusion have decreased resting vagal activity. The symptoms elicited by perception of acid are further associated with a simultaneous increase in vagal activity in keeping with a vagally mediated pseudoaffective response.


Keywords: reflux disease; non-cardiac chest pain; acid reflux; autonomic nervous system; vagal response; sympathetic activity; heart rate variability; power spectrum analysis PMID:11600476

  6. mGlu2/3 agonist-induced hyperthermia: an in vivo assay for detection of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonism and its relation to antidepressant-like efficacy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gleason, S D; Li, X; Smith, I A; Ephlin, J D; Wang, X-S; Heinz, B A; Carter, J H; Baez, M; Yu, J; Bender, D M; Witkin, J M

    2013-08-01

    An assay to detect the on-target effects of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists in vivo would be valuable in guiding dosing regimens for the exploration of biological effects of potential therapeutic import. Multiple approaches involving blockade of mGlu2/3 receptor agoinist-driven behavioral effects in mice and rats were investigated. Most of these methods failed to provide a useful method of detection of antagonists in vivo (e.g., locomotor activity). In contrast, the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY379268 produced dose-dependent increases in body temperature of mice. The hyperthermic effects of LY379268 was abolished in mGlu2 and in mGlu2/3 receptor null mice but not in mGlu3 null mice. Hyperthermia was not produced by an mGlu8 receptor agonist. Agonist-induced hyperthermia was prevented in a dose-dependent manner by structurally-distinct mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists. The blockade was stereo-specific. Moreover, this biological readout was responsive to both orthosteric and to negative allosteric modulators of mGlu2/3 receptors. Antagonism of agonist-induced hyperthermia predicted antidepressant-like efficacy in the mouse forced swim test. As with the hyperthermic response, the antidepressant-like effects of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists were shown to be due to mGlu2 and not to mGlu3 or mGlu8 receptors through the use of receptor knock-out mice. The ability to rapidly assess on-target activity of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists enables determination of parameters for setting efficacy doses in vivo. In turn, efficacy-related data in the preclinical laboratory can help to set expectations of therapeutic potential and dosing in humans.

  7. THE EFFECT OF ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID ON PLATELET FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Geoffrey; Packham, Marian A.; Nishizawa, Edward E.; Mustard, James F.; Murphy, Edmund A.

    1968-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin) and sodium salicylate inhibit platelet aggregation induced by collagen, antigen-antibody complexes, gamma globulin-coated particles or thrombin. These compounds suppress the release of platelet constituents, such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and serotonin, induced by such stimuli. Since ASA and sodium salicylate do not inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation, it appears that their effect on the action of the other stimuli is due to a decrease in the amount of ADP released. The administration of ASA to rabbits (in doses which inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation) impaired hemostasis, prolonged platelet survival, and diminished the amount of deposit formed in an extracorporeal shunt. PMID:4176225

  8. Role of Lewis acid additives in a palladium catalyzed directed C-H functionalization reaction of benzohydroxamic acid to isoxazolone.

    PubMed

    Athira, C; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2016-12-20

    Metallic salts as well as protic additives are widely employed in transition metal catalyzed C-H bond functionalization reactions to improve the efficiency of catalytic protocols. In one such example, ZnCl2 and pivalic acid are used as additives in a palladium catalyzed synthesis of isoxazolone from a readily available benzohydroxamic acid under one pot conditions. In this article, we present some important mechanistic insights into the role of ZnCl2 and pivalic acid, gained by using density functional theory (M06) computations. Two interesting modes of action of ZnCl2 are identified in various catalytic steps involved in the formation of isoxazolone. The conventional Lewis acid coordination wherein zinc chloride (ZnCl2·(DMA)) binds to the carbonyl group is found to be more favored in the C-H activation step. However, the participation of a hetero-bimetallic Pd-Zn species is preferred in reductive elimination leading to Caryl-N bond formation. Pivalic acid helps in relay proton transfer in C-H bond activation through a cyclometallation deprotonation (CMD) process. The explicit inclusion of ZnCl2 and solvent N,N-dimethyl acetamide (DMA) stabilizes the transition state and also helps reduce the activation barrier for the C-H bond activation step. The electronic communication between the two metal species is playing a crucial role in stabilizing the Caryl-N bond formation transition state through a Pd-Zn hetero-bimetallic interaction.

  9. New insights into sulfur amino acids function in gut health and disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acids (SAAs) metabolism in the body. Aside from their role in protein synthesis, methionine and cysteine are involved in many biological functions and diseases. Methionine (MET) is an indispensable amino acid and is...

  10. Structure-function studies for the panacea, valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Terbach, Nicole; Williams, Robin S B

    2009-10-01

    The anticonvulsant properties of VPA (valproic acid), a branched short-chain fatty acid, were serendipitously discovered in 1963. Since then, therapeutic roles of VPA have increased to include bipolar disorder and migraine prophylaxis, and have more recently been proposed in cancer, Alzheimer's disease and HIV treatment. These numerous therapeutic roles elevate VPA to near 'panacea' level. Surprisingly, the mechanisms of action of VPA in the treatment of many of these disorders remain unclear, although it has been shown to alter a wide variety of signalling pathways and a small number of direct targets. To analyse the mechanism of action of VPA, a number of studies have defined the structural characteristics of VPA-related compounds giving rise to distinct therapeutic and cellular effects, including adverse effects such as teratogenicity and hepatotoxicity. These studies raise the possibility of identifying target-specific novel compounds, providing better therapeutic action or reduced side effects. This short review will describe potential therapeutic pathways targeted by VPA, and highlight studies showing structural constraints necessary for these effects.

  11. Amino acid functionalization of double-wall carbon nanotubes studied by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marcolongo, Gabriele; Ruaro, Giorgio; Gobbo, Marina; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2007-12-14

    Double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNT) have been functionalized with lysine after a strong oxidation with MnO4- in acid solution which, as suggested by the Raman spectra, attacked the external nanotube of the DWNT.

  12. Pectin functionalized with natural fatty acids as antimicrobial agent.

    PubMed

    Calce, Enrica; Mignogna, Eleonora; Bugatti, Valeria; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Vittoria, Vittoria; De Luca, Stefania

    2014-07-01

    Several pectin derivatives were prepared by chemical modifications of the polysaccharide with natural fatty acids. The obtained biodegradable pectin-based materials, pectin-linoleate, pectin-oleate and pectin-palmitate, were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against several bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Good results were obtained for pectin-oleate and pectin-linoleate, which inhibit the growth of the selected microorganisms by 50-70%. They exert the better antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. Subsequently, the pectin-oleate and the pectin-linoleate samples were coated on polyethylene films and were assessed for their capacity to capture the oxygen molecules, reducing its penetration into the polymeric support. These results confirmed a possible application of the new materials in the field of active food packaging.

  13. Structural and functional analysis of fatty acid-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Judith; McDermott, Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian FA-binding proteins (FABPs) bind long-chain FA with high affinity. The large number of FABP types is suggestive of distinct functions in specific tissues. Multiple experimental approaches have shown that individual FABPs possess both unique and overlapping functions, some of which are based on specific elements in the protein structure. Although FA binding affinities for all FABPs tend to correlate directly with FA hydrophobicity, structure-function studies indicate that subtle three-dimensional changes that occur upon ligand binding may promote specific protein-protein or protein-membrane interactions that ultimately determine the function of each FABP. The conformational changes are focused in the FABP helical/portal domain, a region that was identified by in vitro studies to be vital for the FA transport properties of the FABPs. Thus, the FABPs modulate intracellular lipid homeostasis by regulating FA transport in the nuclear and extra-nuclear compartments of the cell; in so doing, they also impact systemic energy homeostasis. PMID:19017610

  14. The function of very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Catalá, Angel

    2010-02-01

    The mammalian pineal gland is a prominent secretory organ with a high metabolic activity. Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), the main secretory product of the pineal gland, efficiently scavenges both the hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals counteracting lipid peroxidation in biological membranes. Approximately 25% of the total fatty acids present in the rat pineal lipids are represented by arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3). These very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids play important roles in the pineal gland. In addition to the production of melatonin, the mammalian pineal gland is able of convert these polyunsaturated fatty acids into bioactive lipid mediators. Lipoxygenation is the principal lipoxygenase (LOX) activity observed in the rat pineal gland. Lipoxygenation in the pineal gland is exceptional because no other brain regions express significant LOX activities under normal physiological conditions. The rat pineal gland expresses both 12- and 15-lipoxygenase (LOX) activities, producing 12- and 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12- and 15-HpETE) from arachidonic acid and 14- and 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (14- and 17-HdoHE) from docosahexaenoic acid, respectively. The rat pineal also produces hepoxilins via LOX pathways. The hepoxilins are bioactive epoxy-hydroxy products of the arachidonic acid metabolism via the 12S-lipoxygenase (12S-LOX) pathway. The two key pineal biochemical functions, lipoxygenation and melatonin synthesis, may be synergistically regulated by the status of n-3 essential fatty acids.

  15. Effects of acidic mixtures on pulmonary macrophage functions: A pilot study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Phalen, R.F.; Kikkawa, Y.; Nadziejko, C.; Kleinman, M.T.

    1992-02-01

    Fischer 344 rats were examined for effects of inhaled nitric acid and ozone on macrophage cell function, to evaluate new endpoints for future acid inhalation studies. Pulmonary macrophage respiratory burst activity, production of arachidonic acid metabolites (leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4) by macrophages, and lavage fluid elastase inhibitory capacity were found to be affected by in vivo exposure to nitric acid vapor, alone or in combination with ozone. These results have implications with respect to the development of lung infections, asthma, and emphysema.

  16. Conserved aspartic acid 233 and alanine 231 are not required for poliovirus polymerase function in replicons

    PubMed Central

    Freistadt, Marion S; Eberle, Karen E

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acid polymerases have similar structures and motifs. The function of an aspartic acid (conserved in all classes of nucleic acid polymerases) in motif A remains poorly understood in RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. We mutated this residue to alanine in a poliovirus replicon. The resulting mutant could still replicate, although at a reduced level. In addition, mutation A231C (also in motif A) yielded high levels of replication. Taken together these results show that poliovirus polymerase conserved residues D233 and A231 are not essential to poliovirus replicon function. PMID:17352827

  17. Physiological function and ecological aspects of fatty acid-amino acid conjugates in insects.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Naoko

    2016-07-01

    In tritrophic interactions, plants recognize herbivore-produced elicitors and release a blend of volatile compounds (VOCs), which work as chemical cues for parasitoids or predators to locate their hosts. From detection of elicitors to VOC emissions, plants utilize sophisticated systems that resemble the plant-microbe interaction system. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs), a class of insect elicitors, resemble compounds synthesized by microbes in nature. Recent evidence suggests that the recognition of insect elicitors by an ancestral microbe-associated defense system may be the origin of tritrophic interactions mediated by FACs. Here we discuss our findings in light of how plants have customized this defense to be effective against insect herbivores, and how some insects have successfully adapted to these defenses.

  18. Docosahexaenoic acid and cognitive function: Is the link mediated by the autonomic nervous system?

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Kathleen M.; Colombo, John; Carlson, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid is a long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid that is found in large quantity in the brain and which has repeatedly been observed to be related in positive ways to both cognitive function and cardiovascular health. The mechanisms through which docosahexaenoic acid affects cognition are not well understood, but in this article, we propose a hypothesis that integrates the positive effects of docosahexaenoic acid in the cognitive and cardiovascular realms through the autonomic nervous system. The autonomic nervous system is known to regulate vital functions such as heart rate and respiration, and has also been linked to basic cognitive components related to arousal and attention. We review the literature from this perspective, and delineate the predictions generated by the hypothesis. In addition, we provide new data showing a link between docosahexaenoic acid and fetal heart rate that is consistent with the hypothesis. PMID:18930644

  19. Target-Specific Capture of Environmentally Relevant Gaseous Aldehydes and Carboxylic Acids with Functional Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Campbell, McKenzie L; Guerra, Fernanda D; Dhulekar, Jhilmil; Alexis, Frank; Whitehead, Daniel C

    2015-10-12

    Aldehyde and carboxylic acid volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present significant environmental concern due to their prevalence in the atmosphere. We developed biodegradable functional nanoparticles comprised of poly(d,l-lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ethyleneimine) (PDLLA-PEG-PEI) block co-polymers that capture these VOCs by chemical reaction. Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) preparation involved nanoprecipitation and surface functionalization with branched PEI. The PDLLA-PEG-PEI NPs were characterized by using TGA, IR, (1) H NMR, elemental analysis, and TEM. The materials feature 1°, 2°, and 3° amines on their surface, capable of capturing aldehydes and carboxylic acids from gaseous mixtures. Aldehydes were captured by a condensation reaction forming imines, whereas carboxylic acids were captured by acid/base reaction. These materials reacted selectively with target contaminants obviating off-target binding when challenged by other VOCs with orthogonal reactivity. The NPs outperformed conventional activated carbon sorbents.

  20. Overproduction of a Functional Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Enzyme Blocks Fatty Acid Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Subrahmanyam, Satyanarayana; Cronan, John E.

    1998-01-01

    β-Ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthetase II (KAS II) is one of three Escherichia coli isozymes that catalyze the elongation of growing fatty acid chains by condensation of acyl-ACP with malonyl-ACP. Overexpression of this enzyme has been found to be extremely toxic to E. coli, much more so than overproduction of either of the other KAS isozymes, KAS I or KAS III. The immediate effect of KAS II overproduction is the cessation of phospholipid synthesis, and this inhibition is specifically due to the blockage of fatty acid synthesis. To determine the cause of this inhibition, we examined the intracellular pools of ACP, coenzyme A (CoA), and their acyl thioesters. Although no significant changes were detected in the acyl-ACP pools, the CoA pools were dramatically altered by KAS II overproduction. Malonyl-CoA increased to about 40% of the total cellular CoA pool upon KAS II overproduction from a steady-state level of around 0.5% in the absence of KAS II overproduction. This finding indicated that the conversion of malonyl-CoA to fatty acids had been blocked and could be explained if either the conversion of malonyl-CoA to malonyl-ACP and/or the elongation reactions of fatty acid synthesis had been blocked. Overproduction of malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, the enzyme catalyzing the conversion of malonyl-CoA to malonyl-ACP, partially relieved the toxicity of KAS II overproduction, consistent with a model in which high levels of KAS II blocks access of the other KAS isozymes to malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase. PMID:9721301

  1. Thermoresponsive Acidic Microgels as Functional Draw Agents for Forward Osmosis Desalination.

    PubMed

    Hartanto, Yusak; Zargar, Masoumeh; Wang, Haihui; Jin, Bo; Dai, Sheng

    2016-04-19

    Thermoresponsive microgels with carboxylic acid functionalization have been recently introduced as an attractive draw agent for forward osmosis (FO) desalination, where the microgels showed promising water flux and water recovery performance. In this study, various comonomers containing different carboxylic acid and sulfonic acid functional groups were copolymerized with N-isopropylacrylamide (NP) to yield a series of functionalized thermoresponsive microgels possessing different acidic groups and hydrophobicities. The purified microgels were examined as the draw agents for FO application, and the results show the response of water flux and water recovery was significantly affected by various acidic comonomers. The thermoresponsive microgel with itaconic acid shows the best overall performance with an initial water flux of 44.8 LMH, water recovery up to 47.2% and apparent water flux of 3.1 LMH. This study shows that the incorporation of hydrophilic dicarboxylic acid functional groups into the microgels leads to the enhancement on water adsorption and overall performance. Our work elucidates in detail on the structure-property relationship of thermoresponsive microgels in their applications as FO draw agents and would be beneficial for future design and development of high performance FO desalination.

  2. Assessment of mitochondrial function in vivo with a breath test utilizing alpha-ketoisocaproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Michaletz, P.A.; Cap, L.; Alpert, E.; Lauterburg, B.H. )

    1989-11-01

    A breath test to assess hepatic mitochondrial function in vivo was evaluated in rats. Following the i.p. administration of (1-{sup 14}C)-alpha-ketoisocaproic acid, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} exhalation reached a peak within 10 to 20 min and then declined exponentially, with a half-life of 14.3 min. Control animals exhaled 38.6% of the administered radioactivity within 1 hr. In functionally anhepatic animals, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in breath amounted to 23% of that in control animals, indicating that alpha-ketoisocaproic acid decarboxylation reflects mainly hepatic mitochondrial function in vivo. Ethanol (3 gm per kg) significantly decreased alpha-ketoisocaproic acid decarboxylation (21.8% of the dose appearing in breath in 1 hr), probably due to the ethanol-induced shift in the NAD+:NADH ratio. In contrast, an uncoupler of mitochondrial respiration, sodium salicylate (375 mg per kg), increased the decarboxylation of alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (56.3% of the dose recovered as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in 1 hr). Mitochondrial damage induced by 4-pentenoic acid decreased the decarboxylation of alpha-ketoisocaproic acid but did not affect the microsomal metabolism of antipyrine. The present data indicate that the alpha-ketoisocaproic acid breath test provides a noninvasive estimate of hepatic mitochondrial function in vivo which, when applied to man, might yield clinically useful information.

  3. Association of cognitive function and serum uric acid: Are cardiovascular diseases a mediator among women?

    PubMed

    Perna, Laura; Mons, Ute; Schöttker, Ben; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-08-01

    Several studies reported an association between concentrations of serum uric acid and cognitive function, but the evidence is contradictory. It is known that uric acid is associated with cardiovascular diseases, especially among women. Stratifying by sex and history of cardiovascular disease may clarify whether uric acid is an independent risk factor for cognitive dysfunction. A population-based study was conducted in the German State of Saarland. A subgroup of participants aged ≥70years underwent a comprehensive assessment of cognitive function. Linear regression models and restricted cubic spline functions were used to assess association of uric acid with cognitive performance in 1144 study participants. High levels of uric acid were associated with worse cognitive performance among women (-0.57; 95% CI: -1.10 to -0.04) but not among men (-0.12; 95% CI: -0.64 to 0.39). The association was much stronger among the subgroup of women with cardiovascular diseases (-1.91; 95% CI: -3.15 to -0.67) and also revealed a dose-response relationship in this subgroup. Serum uric acid showed an inverse association with cognitive function among women and the association was amplified by the presence of cardiovascular disease. These results highlight the importance of stratifying by sex and cardiovascular disease in future studies on uric acid and cognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of folic acid in nitric oxide bioavailability and vascular endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Kenney, W Larry

    2017-01-01

    Folic acid is a member of the B-vitamin family and is essential for amino acid metabolism. Adequate intake of folic acid is vital for metabolism, cellular homeostasis, and DNA synthesis. Since the initial discovery of folic acid in the 1940s, folate deficiency has been implicated in numerous disease states, primarily those associated with neural tube defects in utero and neurological degeneration later in life. However, in the past decade, epidemiological studies have identified an inverse relation between both folic acid intake and blood folate concentration and cardiovascular health. This association inspired a number of clinical studies that suggested that folic acid supplementation could reverse endothelial dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recently, in vitro and in vivo studies have begun to elucidate the mechanism(s) through which folic acid improves vascular endothelial function. These studies, which are the focus of this review, suggest that folic acid and its active metabolite 5-methyl tetrahydrofolate improve nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability by increasing endothelial NO synthase coupling and NO production as well as by directly scavenging superoxide radicals. By improving NO bioavailability, folic acid may protect or improve endothelial function, thereby preventing or reversing the progression of CVD in those with overt disease or elevated CVD risk. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Pan, Yong; Cao, Shuya; Ding, Mingyu

    2014-05-01

    Hexafluoroisopropanol phenyl group functionalized materials have great potential in the application of gas-sensitive materials for nerve agent detection, due to the formation of strong hydrogen-bonding interactions between the group and the analytes. In this paper, take full advantage of ultra-large specific surface area and plenty of carbon-carbon double bonds and hexafluoroisopropanol phenyl functionalized graphene was synthesized through in situ diazonium reaction between -C=C- and p-hexafluoroisopropanol aniline. The identity of the as-synthesis material was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis. The synthesis method is simply which retained the excellent physical properties of original graphene. In addition, the novel material can be assigned as an potential candidate for gas sensitive materials towards organophosphorus nerve agent detection.

  6. Enhancing the functionality of biobased polyester coating resins through modification with citric acid.

    PubMed

    Noordover, Bart A J; Duchateau, Robbert; van Benthem, Rolf A T M; Ming, Weihua; Koning, Cor E

    2007-12-01

    Citric acid (CA) was evaluated as a functionality-enhancing monomer in biobased polyesters suitable for coating applications. Model reactions of CA with several primary and secondary alcohols and diols, including the 1,4:3,6-dianhydrohexitols, revealed that titanium(IV) n-butoxide catalyzed esterification reactions involving these compounds proceed at relatively low temperatures, often via anhydride intermediates. Interestingly, the facile anhydride formation from CA at temperatures around CA's melting temperature ( T m = 153 degrees C) proved to be crucial in modifying sterically hindered secondary hydroxyl end groups. OH-functional polyesters were reacted with CA in the melt between 150 and 165 degrees C, yielding slightly branched carboxylic acid functional materials with strongly enhanced functionality. The acid/epoxy curing reaction of the acid-functional polymers was simulated with a monofunctional glycidyl ether. Finally, the CA-modified polyesters were applied as coatings, using conventional cross-linking agents. The formulations showed rapid curing, resulting in chemically and mechanically stable coatings. These results demonstrate that citric acid can be applied in a new way, making use of its anhydride formation to functionalize OH-functional polyesters, which is an important new step toward fully biobased coating systems.

  7. Structural basis and functions of abscisic acid receptors PYLs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing L.; Jiang, Lun; Xin, Qi; Liu, Yang; Tan, Jian X.; Chen, Zhong Z.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in many developmental processes and responses to adaptive stresses in plants. Recently, a new family of nucleocytoplasmic PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYLs) has been identified as bona fide ABA receptors. PYLs together with protein phosphatases type-2C (PP2Cs), Snf1 (Sucrose-non-fermentation 1)-related kinases subfamily 2 (SnRK2s) and downstream substrates constitute the core ABA signaling network. Generally, PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s kinases by physical interaction and direct dephosphorylation. Upon ABA binding, PYLs change their conformations and then contact and inhibit PP2Cs, thus activating SnRK2s. Here, we reviewed the recent progress in research regarding the structures of the core signaling pathways of ABA, including the (+)-ABA, (−)-ABA and ABA analogs pyrabactin as well as 6AS perception by PYLs, SnRK2s mimicking PYLs in binding PP2Cs. PYLs inhibited PP2Cs in both the presence and absence of ABA and activated SnRK2s. The present review elucidates multiple ABA signal perception and transduction by PYLs, which might shed light on how to design small chemical compounds for improving plant performance in the future. PMID:25745428

  8. Leukocyte Homing, Fate, and Function Are Controlled by Retinoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanxia; Brown, Chrysothemis; Ortiz, Carla; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2015-01-01

    Although vitamin A was recognized as an “anti-infective vitamin” over 90 years ago, the mechanism of how vitamin A regulates immunity is only beginning to be understood. Early studies which focused on the immune responses in vitamin A-deficient (VAD) animals clearly demonstrated compromised immunity and consequently increased susceptibility to infectious disease. The active form of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA), has been shown to have a profound impact on the homing and differentiation of leukocytes. Both pharmacological and genetic approaches have been applied to the understanding of how RA regulates the development and differentiation of various immune cell subsets, and how RA influences the development of immunity versus tolerance. These studies clearly show that RA profoundly impacts on cell- and humoral-mediated immunity. In this review, the early findings on the complex relationship between VAD and immunity are discussed as well as vitamin A metabolism and signaling within hematopoietic cells. Particular attention is focused on how RA impacts on T-cell lineage commitment and plasticity in various diseases. PMID:25540140

  9. Pyrene-functionalized oligonucleotides and locked nucleic acids (LNAs): tools for fundamental research, diagnostics, and nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Michael E; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2011-12-01

    Pyrene-functionalized oligonucleotides (PFOs) are increasingly explored as tools in fundamental research, diagnostics and nanotechnology. Their popularity is linked to the ability of pyrenes to function as polarity-sensitive and quenchable fluorophores, excimer-generating units, aromatic stacking moieties and nucleic acid duplex intercalators. These characteristics have enabled development of PFOs for detection of complementary DNA/RNA targets, discrimination of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and generation of π-arrays on nucleic acid scaffolds. This critical review will highlight the physical properties and applications of PFOs that are likely to provide high degree of positional control of the chromophore in nucleic acid complexes. Particular emphasis will be placed on pyrene-functionalized Locked Nucleic Acids (LNAs) since these materials display interesting properties such as fluorescence quantum yields approaching unity and recognition of mixed-sequence double stranded DNA (144 references).

  10. Cholic acid functionalized star poly(DL-lactide) for promoting cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hui-Li; Zou, Tao; Cheng, Si-Xue; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi

    2007-01-01

    Cholic acid functionalized star poly(DL-lactide) was synthesized through the ring-opening polymerization of DL-lactide initiated by cholic acid. The properties and cell behaviour of the cholic acid functionalized star poly(DL-lactide) were investigated as compared with linear poly(DL-lactide)s with different molecular weights and a star poly(DL-lactide) initiated by glycerol. In comparison to linear poly(DL-lactide)s, the cholic acid functionalized star poly(DL-lactide) had better wettability and slightly higher surface energy. The cell adhesion and proliferation on different materials were evaluated using two types of cells, 3T3 mouse fibroblasts and ECV304 human endothelial cells. Compared with the linear poly(DL-lactide)s, the cholic acid functionalized star poly(DL-lactide) showed obviously improved property for cell adhesion. The cell proliferation on the cholic acid functionalized star poly(DL-lactide) was also enhanced. The improvement in cell proliferation was not so significant as compared with the improvement in cell adhesion. This modification strategy provides an effective and simple way to promote cell attachment and growth in tissue engineering.

  11. Fusaric acid, a mycotoxin, and its influence on blood coagulation and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Girish, Kesturu S; Santhosh, Martin S; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Nayaka, Siddaiah C; Kemparaju, Kempaiah

    2013-06-01

    The current study intended to explore the effect of fusaric acid on blood coagulation including plasma coagulation and platelet aggregation. Fusaric acid exhibited biphasic effects on citrated human plasma recalcification time. At concentrations below 50 ng, fusaric acid decreased the clotting time of plasma dose-dependently from 130 ± 3s control value to 32 ± 3s; however, above 50 ng, fusaric acid increased the clotting time from 32 ± 3s and reached a maximum of 152 s at 100 ng and remained unaltered thereafter for the increased dose of fusaric acid. Fusaric acid without damaging red blood cells and platelets, inhibited agonists such as collagen, ADP, thrombin, and epinephrine-induced aggregation of both platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and washed platelets preparations of human. Interestingly, fusaric acid showed biphasic effects only in thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of washed platelets, and at lower concentration (below 900 ng) it activated platelet aggregation; however, in increased concentration (above 900 ng) it inhibited the platelet aggregation of washed platelets. In addition, fusaric acid also inhibited the agonist ADP-induced platelet aggregation of washed platelet suspension but did not show biphasic effect. Further, fusaric acid did not induce the platelets to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that clearly suggests that the induction of platelet function could be the result of the fusaric acid-mediated receptor interaction but not through the morphological shape change.

  12. High γ-aminobutyric acid production from lactic acid bacteria: Emphasis on Lactobacillus brevis as a functional dairy starter.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinglong; Shah, Nagendra P

    2017-11-22

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABA-rich foods have shown anti-hypertensive and anti-depressant activities as the major functions in humans and animals. Hence, high GABA-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) could be used as functional starters for manufacturing novel fermented dairy foods. Glutamic acid decarboxylases (GADs) from LAB are highly conserved at the species level based on the phylogenetic tree of GADs from LAB. Moreover, two functionally distinct GADs and one intact gad operon were observed in all the completely sequenced Lactobacillus brevis strains suggesting its common capability to synthesize GABA. Difficulties and strategies for the manufacture of GABA-rich fermented dairy foods have been discussed and proposed, respectively. In addition, a genetic survey on the sequenced LAB strains demonstrated the absence of cell envelope proteinases in the majority of LAB including Lb. brevis, which diminishes their cell viabilities in milk environments due to their non-proteolytic nature. Thus, several strategies have been proposed to overcome the non-proteolytic nature of Lb. brevis in order to produce GABA-rich dairy foods.

  13. Pd(II)-catalysed meta-C-H functionalizations of benzoic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Li, Shangda; Cai, Lei; Ji, Huafang; Yang, Long; Li, Gang

    2016-01-27

    Benzoic acids are highly important structural motifs in drug molecules and natural products. Selective C-H bond functionalization of benzoic acids will provide synthetically useful tools for step-economical organic synthesis. Although direct ortho-C-H functionalizations of benzoic acids or their derivatives have been intensely studied, the ability to activate meta-C-H bond of benzoic acids or their derivatives in a general manner via transition-metal catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. Although chelation-assisted meta-C-H functionalization of electron-rich arenes was reported, chelation-assisted meta-C-H activation of electron-poor arenes such as benzoic acid derivatives remains a formidable challenge. Herein, we report a general protocol for meta-C-H olefination of benzoic acid derivatives using a nitrile-based sulfonamide template. A broad range of benzoic acid derivatives are meta-selectively olefinated using molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant. The meta-C-H acetoxylation, product of which is further transformed at the meta-position, is also reported.

  14. Pd(II)-catalysed meta-C–H functionalizations of benzoic acid derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shangda; Cai, Lei; Ji, Huafang; Yang, Long; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Benzoic acids are highly important structural motifs in drug molecules and natural products. Selective C–H bond functionalization of benzoic acids will provide synthetically useful tools for step-economical organic synthesis. Although direct ortho-C–H functionalizations of benzoic acids or their derivatives have been intensely studied, the ability to activate meta-C–H bond of benzoic acids or their derivatives in a general manner via transition-metal catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. Although chelation-assisted meta-C–H functionalization of electron-rich arenes was reported, chelation-assisted meta-C–H activation of electron-poor arenes such as benzoic acid derivatives remains a formidable challenge. Herein, we report a general protocol for meta-C–H olefination of benzoic acid derivatives using a nitrile-based sulfonamide template. A broad range of benzoic acid derivatives are meta-selectively olefinated using molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant. The meta-C–H acetoxylation, product of which is further transformed at the meta-position, is also reported. PMID:26813919

  15. Organochloride pesticides impaired mitochondrial function in hepatocytes and aggravated disorders of fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Wang, Qihan; Xu, Cheng; Shao, Wentao; Zhang, Chunlan; Liu, Hui; Jiang, Zhaoyan; Gu, Aihua

    2017-01-01

    p,p’-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p, p’-DDE) and β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) were two predominant organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) metabolites in human body associated with disorders of fatty acid metabolism. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully clarified. In this study, adult male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to low dose of p, p’-DDE and β-HCH for 8 wk. OCPs accumulation in organs, hepatic fatty acid composition, tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) metabolites and other metabolite profiles were analyzed. Expression levels of genes involved in hepatic lipogenesis and β-oxidation were measured. Mitochondrial function was evaluated in HepG2 cells exposed to OCPs. High accumulation of p, p’-DDE and β-HCH was found in liver and damaged mitochondria was observed under electron microscopy. Expression of genes in fatty acid synthesis increased and that in mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation decreased in OCPs treatment groups. OCPs changed metabolite profiles in liver tissues, varied hepatic fatty acid compositions and levels of several TCA cycle metabolites. Furthermore, MitoTracker Green fluorescence, ATP levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and OCR decreased in HepG2 cells exposed to OCPs. In conclusion, chronic exposure to OCPs at doses equivalent to internal exposures in humans impaired mitochondrial function, decreased fatty acid β-oxidation and aggravated disorders of fatty acid metabolism. PMID:28397872

  16. Identification and functional characterization of uric acid transporter Urat1 (Slc22a12) in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masanobu; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Mamada, Hideaki; Shirasaka, Yoshiyuki; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2011-06-01

    Uric acid transporter URAT1 contributes significantly to reabsorption of uric acid in humans to maintain a constant serum uric acid (SUA) level. Since alteration of SUA level is associated with various diseases, it is important to clarify the mechanism of change in SUA. However, although expression of mRNA of an ortholog of URAT1 (rUrat1) in rats has been reported, functional analysis and localization have not been done. Therefore, rat rUrat1 was functionally analyzed using gene expression systems and isolated brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) prepared from rat kidney, and its localization in kidney was examined immunohistochemically. Uric acid transport by rUrat1 was chloride (Cl-) susceptible with a Km of 1773μM. It was inhibited by benzbromarone and trans-stimulated by lactate and pyrazinecarboxylic acid (PZA). Cl- gradient-susceptible uric acid transport by BBMVs showed similar characteristics to those of uric acid transport by rUrat1. Moreover, rUrat1 was localized at the apical membrane in proximal tubular epithelial cells in rat kidney. Accordingly, rUrat1 is considered to be involved in uric acid reabsorption in rats in the same manner as URAT1 in humans. Therefore, rUrat1 may be a useful model to study issues related to the role of human URAT1.

  17. The Hip Functional Retrieval after Elective Surgery May Be Enhanced by Supplemented Essential Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Baldissarro, Eleonora; Aquilani, Roberto; Boschi, Federica; Baiardi, Paola; Iadarola, Paolo; Fumagalli, Marco; Pasini, Evasio; Verri, Manuela; Dossena, Maurizia; Gambino, Arianna; Cammisuli, Sharon; Viglio, Simona

    2016-01-01

    It is not known whether postsurgery systemic inflammation and plasma amino acid abnormalities are still present during rehabilitation of individuals after elective hip arthroplasty (EHA). Sixty subjects (36 females; age 66.58 ± 8.37 years) were randomized to receive 14-day oral EAAs (8 g/day) or a placebo (maltodextrin). At admission to and discharge from the rehabilitation center, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and venous plasma amino acid concentrations were determined. Post-EHA hip function was evaluated by Harris hip score (HHS) test. Ten matched healthy subjects served as controls. At baseline, all patients had high CRP levels, considerable reduction in several amino acids, and severely reduced hip function (HHS 40.78 ± 2.70 scores). After treatment, inflammation decreased both in the EAA group and in the placebo group. Only EAA patients significantly improved their levels of glycine, alanine, tyrosine, and total amino acids. In addition, they enhanced the rate of hip function recovery (HHS) (from baseline 41.8 ± 1.15 to 76.37 ± 6.6 versus baseline 39.78 ± 4.89 to 70.0 ± 7.1 in placebo one; p = 0.006). The study documents the persistence of inflammation and plasma amino acid abnormalities in post-EHA rehabilitation phase. EAAs enhance hip function retrieval and improve plasma amino acid abnormalities. PMID:27110573

  18. Evolution of functional nucleic acids in the presence of nonheritable backbone heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Simon G; Zhang, Na; Elenko, Mark P; Lupták, Andrej; Szostak, Jack W

    2011-08-16

    Multiple lines of evidence support the hypothesis that the early evolution of life was dominated by RNA, which can both transfer information from generation to generation through replication directed by base-pairing, and carry out biochemical activities by folding into functional structures. To understand how life emerged from prebiotic chemistry we must therefore explain the steps that led to the emergence of the RNA world, and in particular, the synthesis of RNA. The generation of pools of highly pure ribonucleotides on the early Earth seems unlikely, but the presence of alternative nucleotides would support the assembly of nucleic acid polymers containing nonheritable backbone heterogeneity. We suggest that homogeneous monomers might not have been necessary if populations of heterogeneous nucleic acid molecules could evolve reproducible function. For such evolution to be possible, function would have to be maintained despite the repeated scrambling of backbone chemistry from generation to generation. We have tested this possibility in a simplified model system, by using a T7 RNA polymerase variant capable of transcribing nucleic acids that contain an approximately 11 mixture of deoxy- and ribonucleotides. We readily isolated nucleotide-binding aptamers by utilizing an in vitro selection process that shuffles the order of deoxy- and ribonucleotides in each round. We describe two such RNA/DNA mosaic nucleic acid aptamers that specifically bind ATP and GTP, respectively. We conclude that nonheritable variations in nucleic acid backbone structure may not have posed an insurmountable barrier to the emergence of functionality in early nucleic acids.

  19. Plant-based Paste Fermented by Lactic Acid Bacteria and Yeast: Functional Analysis and Possibility of Application to Functional Foods

    PubMed Central

    Kuwaki, Shinsuke; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Tanaka, Hidehiko; Ishihara, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    A plant-based paste fermented by lactic acid bacteria and yeast (fermented paste) was made from various plant materials. The paste was made of fermented food by applying traditional food-preservation techniques, that is, fermentation and sugaring. The fermented paste contained major nutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids), 18 kinds of amino acids, and vitamins (vitamin A, B1, B2, B6, B12, E, K, niacin, biotin, pantothenic acid, and folic acid). It contained five kinds of organic acids, and a large amount of dietary fiber and plant phytochemicals. Sucrose from brown sugar, used as a material, was completely resolved into glucose and fructose. Some physiological functions of the fermented paste were examined in vitro. It was demonstrated that the paste possessed antioxidant, antihypertensive, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy and anti-tyrosinase activities in vitro. It was thought that the fermented paste would be a helpful functional food with various nutrients to help prevent lifestyle diseases. PMID:25114554

  20. Prefibrillar Tau oligomers alter the nucleic acid protective function of Tau in hippocampal neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Tardivel, Meryem; Chouala, Meliza Sendid; Sultan, Audrey; Marciniak, Elodie; Humez, Sandrine; Binder, Lester; Kayed, Rakez; Lefebvre, Bruno; Bonnefoy, Eliette; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of DNA and RNA oxidative damage is observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons from Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains at early stages of pathology. We recently reported that Tau is a key nuclear player in the protection of neuronal nucleic acid integrity in vivo under physiological conditions and hyperthermia, a strong inducer of oxidative stress. In a mouse model of tauopathy (THY-Tau22), we demonstrate that hyperthermia selectively induces nucleic acid oxidative damage and nucleic acid strand breaks in the nucleus and cytoplasm of hippocampal neurons that display early Tau phosphorylation but no Tau fibrils. Nucleic acid-damaged neurons were exclusively immunoreactive for prefibrillar Tau oligomers. A similar association between prefibrillar Tau oligomers and nucleic acid oxidative damage was observed in AD brains. Pretreatment with Methylene Blue (MB), a Tau aggregation inhibitor and a redox cycler, reduced hyperthermia-induced Tau oligomerization as well as nucleic acid damage. This study clearly highlights the existence of an early and critical time frame for hyperthermia-induced Tau oligomerization, which most likely occurs through increased oxidative stress, and nucleic acid vulnerability during the progression of Tau pathology. These results suggest that at early stages of AD, Tau oligomerization triggers the loss of the nucleic acid protective function of monomeric Tau. This study highlights the existence of a short therapeutic window in which to prevent the formation of pathological forms of Tau and their harmful consequences on nucleic acid integrity during the progression of Tau pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. N-3 fatty acids and membrane microdomains: from model membranes to lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Teague, Heather

    2012-12-01

    This article summarizes the author's research on fish oil derived n-3 fatty acids, plasma membrane organization and B cell function. We first cover basic model membrane studies that investigated how docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) targeted the organization of sphingolipid-cholesterol enriched lipid microdomains. A key finding here was that DHA had a relatively poor affinity for cholesterol. This work led to a model that predicted DHA acyl chains in cells would manipulate lipid-protein microdomain organization and thereby function. We then review how the predictions of the model were tested with B cells in vitro followed by experiments using mice fed fish oil. These studies reveal a highly complex picture on how n-3 fatty acids target lipid-protein organization and B cell function. Key findings are as follows: (1) n-3 fatty acids target not just the plasma membrane but also endomembrane organization; (2) DHA, but not eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), disrupts microdomain spatial distribution (i.e. clustering), (3) DHA alters protein lateral organization and (4) changes in membrane organization are accompanied by functional effects on both innate and adaptive B cell function. Altogether, the research over the past 10 years has led to an evolution of the original model on how DHA reorganizes membrane microdomains. The work raises the intriguing possibility of testing the model at the human level to target health and disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Protection of mitochondrial and heart function by amino acids after ischemia and cardioplegia.

    PubMed

    Shug, A L; Madsen, D; Dobbie, R; Paulson, D J

    1994-01-01

    The effects of amino acids in protecting against ischemic/reperfusion injury were tested in two experimental models: the isolated perfused rat heart subjected to 21 min of zero flow ischemia (37 degrees) followed by 40 min of reperfusion and the isolated perfused rabbit heart subjected to 300 min of cardioplegic arrest (29 degrees) followed by 60 min of reperfusion. In both cases, the addition of amino acids to the perfusion medium significantly improved the recovery of cardiac contractile function. The protective effects of amino acids were associated with a preservation of mitochondrial respiratory activity. These findings suggest that amino acids by replenishing mitochondrial matrix levels of critical TCA cycle substrates, such as malate, stimulate mitochondrial respiration and thereby enhance the recovery of heart function.

  3. Dehydration of D-xylose to furfural using acid-functionalized MWCNTs catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Termvidchakorn, Chompoopitch; Itthibenchapong, Vorranutch; Songtawee, Siripit; Chamnankid, Busaya; Namuangruk, Supawadee; Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai; Khunchit, Radchadaporn; Hansupaluk, Nanthiya; Sano, Noriaki; Hinode, Hirofumi

    2017-09-01

    Acid-functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) catalysts were prepared by a wet chemical sonication with various acid solutions, i.e. H2SO4, H3PO4, HNO3, and HCl. Sulfonic groups and carboxyl groups were detected on MWCNTs with H2SO4 treatment (s-MWCNTs), while only carboxyl groups were presented from other acid treatments. The catalytic dehydration of D-xylose into furfural was evaluated using a batch reactor at 170 °C for 3 h under N2 pressure of 15 bar. The highest furfural selectivity was achieved around 57% by s-MWCNTs catalyst, suggesting a positive role of the sulfonic functionalized groups. The effect of Co species was related to their Lewis acid property resulting in the enhancement of xylose conversion with low selectivity to furfural product. Invited talk at 5th Thailand International Nanotechnology Conference (Nano Thailand-2016), 27-29 November 2016, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand.

  4. Fat-1 transgenic cattle as a model to study the function of ω-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tao; Liu, Xin F; Ding, Xiang B; Yang, Fei F; Nie, Yong W; An, Yu J; Guo, Hong

    2011-12-29

    ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been shown to play an important role in health. Enriched with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate expression of a number of genes with such broad functions as cell proliferation, growth and apoptosis and cell signaling and transduction, these effects, seem to regulate coronary artery disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, psychiatric disorders and various cancer. In this context, fat-1 transgenic cattle was designed to convert ω-6 to ω-3 fatty acids could form an ideal model to study the effect of ω-3 fatty acids on the above functions. This study focuses on the total genomic difference of gene expression between fat-1 transgenic cattle and wild-type using cDNA microarrays, several genes were found to be overexpressed or suppressed in transgenic cattle relative to wild-type, these discrepancy genes related with lipid metabolism, immunity, inflammation nervous development and fertility.

  5. Decreased sugar concentration in vegetable and fruit juices by growth of functional lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masaki; Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Nishida, Satoshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2017-03-22

    Leuconostoc carnosum #7-2, L. gelidum #4-2, and L. mesenteroides 8/11-3, which were isolated from fermented plant foods, are lactic acid bacteria. We previously reported that these bacteria are functional lactic acid bacteria whose innate immunity-stimulating activities are high based on a silkworm muscle contraction assay. The concentrations of these three lactic acid bacteria increased to more than 1 × 10(6) colony forming units (cfu)/mL in various vegetable and fruit juices when the pH values were appropriately adjusted. As the bacteria grew in the vegetable and fruit juices, the pH decreased and the concentrations of total sugars and glucose also decreased. These findings suggest that these functional lactic acid bacteria can be used to produce vegetable and fruit juices with reduced sugar levels, which is expected to be beneficial for human health.

  6. Influence of organic compound functionality on aerosol hygroscopicity: dicarboxylic acids, alkyl-substituents, sugars and amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Aleksandra; Miles, Rachael E. H.; Rovelli, Grazia; Cowling, Alexander G.; Nandy, Lucy; Dutcher, Cari S.; Reid, Jonathan P.

    2017-05-01

    Hygroscopicity data for 36 organic compounds, including amino acids, organic acids, alcohols and sugars, are determined using a comparative kinetics electrodynamic balance (CK-EDB). The CK-EDB applies an electric field to trap-charged aqueous droplets in a chamber with controlled temperature and relative humidity (RH). The dual micro dispenser set-up allows for sequential trapping of probe and sample droplets for accurate determination of droplet water activities from 0.45 to > 0.99. Here, we validate and benchmark the CK-EDB for the homologous series of straight-chain dicarboxylic acids (oxalic-pimelic) with measurements in better agreement with Universal Quasichemical Functional Group Activity Coefficients (UNIFAC) predictions than the original data used to parametrise UNIFAC. Furthermore, a series of increasingly complex organic compounds, with subtle changes to molecular structure and branching, are used to rigorously assess the accuracy of predictions by UNIFAC, which does not explicitly account for molecular structure. We show that the changes in hygroscopicity that result from increased branching and chain length are poorly represented by UNIFAC, with UNIFAC under-predicting hygroscopicity. Similarly, amino acid hygroscopicity is under-predicted by UNIFAC predictions, a consequence of the original data used in the parametrisation of the molecular subgroups. New hygroscopicity data are also reported for a selection of alcohols and sugars and they show variable levels of agreement with predictions.

  7. Dose-dependent effects of dietary gamma-linolenic acid on rat spleen lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Peterson, L D; Thies, F; Calder, P C

    1999-07-01

    Feeding rodents a diet rich in evening primrose oil (EPO), which contains 5-10 g gamma-linolenic acid (GLA)/100 g total fatty acids, has been shown to decrease lymphocyte proliferation and natural killer cell activity. However, EPO contains a very high level of linoleic acid which itself can affect lymphocyte functions and it is not clear to what extent the effects of EPO can be attributed to GLA. The current study investigated the effect of two levels of GLA in the rat diet upon immune cell functions; the level of linoleic acid was maintained below 30 g/100 g total fatty acids. Weanling rats were fed on high fat (178 g/kg) diets which contained 4.4 g or 10 g GLA/100 g total fatty acids in place of a proportion of linoleic acid. The total polyunsaturated fatty acid content and the n-6 to n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio of the diet were maintained at 35 g/100 g total fatty acids and 7, respectively. The fatty acid compositions of the serum and of spleen leukocytes were markedly influenced by that of the diet, with an increase in the proportions of GLA and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid when the diets containing GLA were fed; these diets also increased the proportion of arachidonic acid in spleen leukocytes. Spleen lymphocyte proliferation in response to concanavalin A was significantly reduced (by 60%) by feeding the diet containing the higher level of GLA, but not by the diet containing the lower level of GLA. Spleen natural killer cell activity and prostaglandin E (PGE) production by spleen leukocytes were not significantly affected by inclusion of GLA in the diet, although there was a tendency towards decreased natural killer cell activity by cells from rats fed the high GLA diet. Thus, this study shows that dietary GLA is capable of altering the fatty acid composition of cells of the immune system and of exerting some immunomodulatory effects, but that the level of GLA in the diet must exceed 4.4 g/100 g total fatty acids for these effects to become apparent.

  8. Role of fatty-acid synthesis in dendritic cell generation and function.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Adeel; Hemmert, Keith C; Ochi, Atsuo; Jamal, Mohsin; Henning, Justin R; Barilla, Rocky; Quesada, Juan P; Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Tang, Kerry; Ego-Osuala, Melvin; Rao, Raghavendra S; Greco, Stephanie; Deutsch, Michael; Narayan, Suchithra; Pachter, H Leon; Graffeo, Christopher S; Acehan, Devrim; Miller, George

    2013-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional APCs that regulate innate and adaptive immunity. The role of fatty-acid synthesis in DC development and function is uncertain. We found that blockade of fatty-acid synthesis markedly decreases dendropoiesis in the liver and in primary and secondary lymphoid organs in mice. Human DC development from PBMC precursors was also diminished by blockade of fatty-acid synthesis. This was associated with higher rates of apoptosis in precursor cells and increased expression of cleaved caspase-3 and BCL-xL and downregulation of cyclin B1. Further, blockade of fatty-acid synthesis decreased DC expression of MHC class II, ICAM-1, B7-1, and B7-2 but increased their production of selected proinflammatory cytokines including IL-12 and MCP-1. Accordingly, inhibition of fatty-acid synthesis enhanced DC capacity to activate allogeneic as well as Ag-restricted CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and induce CTL responses. Further, blockade of fatty-acid synthesis increased DC expression of Notch ligands and enhanced their ability to activate NK cell immune phenotype and IFN-γ production. Because endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress can augment the immunogenic function of APC, we postulated that this may account for the higher DC immunogenicity. We found that inhibition of fatty-acid synthesis resulted in elevated expression of numerous markers of ER stress in humans and mice and was associated with increased MAPK and Akt signaling. Further, lowering ER stress by 4-phenylbutyrate mitigated the enhanced immune stimulation associated with fatty-acid synthesis blockade. Our findings elucidate the role of fatty-acid synthesis in DC development and function and have implications to the design of DC vaccines for immunotherapy.

  9. Role of Fatty-acid Synthesis in Dendritic Cell Generation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Adeel; Hemmert, Keith C.; Ochi, Atsuo; Jamal, Mohsin; Henning, Justin R.; Barilla, Rocky; Quesada, Juan P.; Zambirinis, Constantinos P.; Tang, Kerry; Ego-Osuala, Melvin; Rao, Raghavendra S.; Greco, Stephanie; Deutsch, Michael; Narayan, Suchithra; Pachter, H. Leon; Graffeo, Christopher S.; Acehan, Devrim; Miller, George

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that regulate innate and adaptive immunity. The role of fatty-acid synthesis in DC development and function is uncertain. We found that blockade of fatty-acid synthesis markedly decreases dendropoiesis in the liver and in primary and secondary lymphoid organs in mice. Human DC development from PBMC precursors was also diminished by blockade of fatty-acid synthesis. This was associated with higher rates of apoptosis in precursor cells and increased expression of Cleaved Caspase 3 and BCL-xL, and down-regulation of Cyclin B1. Further, blockade of fatty-acid synthesis decreased DC expression of MHCII, ICAM-1, B7-1, B7-2 but increased their production of selected pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-12 and MCP-1. Accordingly, inhibition of fatty-acid synthesis enhanced DC capacityto activate allogeneic as well as antigen-restricted CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and induce CTL responses. Further, blockade of fatty-acid synthesis increased DC expression of Notch ligands and enhanced their ability to activate NK cell immune-phenotype and IFN-γ production. Since endoplasmic reticular (ER)-stress can augment the immunogenic function of APC, we postulated that this may account for the higher DC immunogenicity. We found that inhibition of fatty-acid synthesis resulted in elevated expression of numerous markers of ER stress in humans and mice and was associated with increased MAP kinase and Akt signaling. Further, lowering ER-stress by 4-phenylbutyrate mitigated the enhanced immune-stimulation associated with fatty-acid synthesis blockade. Our findings elucidate the role of fatty-acid synthesis in DC development and function and have implications to the design of DC vaccines for immunotherapy. PMID:23536633

  10. Single Amino Acid Repeats in the Proteome World: Structural, Functional, and Evolutionary Insights

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amitha Sampath; Sowpati, Divya Tej; Mishra, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) are abundant, highly diverse stretches of short DNA repeats present in all genomes. Tandem mono/tri/hexanucleotide repeats in the coding regions contribute to single amino acids repeats (SAARs) in the proteome. While SSRs in the coding region always result in amino acid repeats, a majority of SAARs arise due to a combination of various codons representing the same amino acid and not as a consequence of SSR events. Certain amino acids are abundant in repeat regions indicating a positive selection pressure behind the accumulation of SAARs. By analysing 22 proteomes including the human proteome, we explored the functional and structural relationship of amino acid repeats in an evolutionary context. Only ~15% of repeats are present in any known functional domain, while ~74% of repeats are present in the disordered regions, suggesting that SAARs add to the functionality of proteins by providing flexibility, stability and act as linker elements between domains. Comparison of SAAR containing proteins across species reveals that while shorter repeats are conserved among orthologs, proteins with longer repeats, >15 amino acids, are unique to the respective organism. Lysine repeats are well conserved among orthologs with respect to their length and number of occurrences in a protein. Other amino acids such as glutamic acid, proline, serine and alanine repeats are generally conserved among the orthologs with varying repeat lengths. These findings suggest that SAARs have accumulated in the proteome under positive selection pressure and that they provide flexibility for optimal folding of functional/structural domains of proteins. The insights gained from our observations can help in effective designing and engineering of proteins with novel features. PMID:27893794

  11. MOLECULAR MODELING AND FUNCTIONAL CONFIRMATION OF A PREDICTED FATTY ACID BINDING SITE OF MITOCHONDRIAL ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Michael W.; Stump, Decherd; Guarnieri, Frank; Berk, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular interactions are necessary for proteins to perform their functions. The identification of a putative plasma membrane fatty acid transporter as mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase indicated that that protein must have a fatty acid binding site. Molecular modeling suggests that such a site exists in the form of a 500 Å3 hydrophobic cleft on the surface of the molecule, and identifies specific amino acid residues likely to be important for binding. The modeling and comparison with the cytosolic isoform indicated that two residues (Arg 201, Ala 219) were likely to be important to the structure and function of the binding site. These residues were mutated to determine if they were essential to that function. Expression constructs with wild-type or mutated cDNAs were produced for bacteria and eukaryotic cells. Proteins expressed in E. coli were tested for oleate binding affinity, which was decreased in the mutant proteins. 3T3 fibroblasts were transfected with expression constructs for both normal and mutated forms. Plasma membrane expression was documented by indirect immunofluorescence before [3H]-oleic acid uptake kinetics were assayed. The Vmax for uptake was significantly increased by over-expression of the wild type protein, but changed little after transfection with mutated proteins, despite their presence on the plasma membrane. The hydrophobic cleft in mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase can serve as a fatty acid binding site. Specific residues are essential for normal fatty acid binding, without which fatty acid uptake is compromised. These results confirm the function of this protein as a fatty acid binding protein. PMID:21803047

  12. Oxidative effects of chronic ethanol consumption on the functions of heart and kidney: folic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, M L; Barrero, M J; Nogales, F; Murillo, M L; Carreras, O

    2012-01-01

    The principal aim of this study was to investigate the oxidative effects of chronic ethanol consumption on the functions of the heart and the kidney and the possible modification of this effect by folic acid supplementation. Moreover, in order to find whether this oxidative profile affects cardiovascular function, parameters such as heart rate and glomerular filtration rate were also assessed. Four experimental groups of rats were used: control, ethanol-exposed, control supplemented with folic acid and ethanol-exposed plus folic acid. Ethanol-exposed rats were subjected to a chronic ethanol treatment (2 months), in which the level of alcohol reaches 30% v/v. Diet and ethanol solution were provided ad libitum, and folic acid supplementation was 8 vs. 2 ppm. Energy intake, creatinine clearance and heart rate were determined. Antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid and protein peroxidation of the kidney and the heart were measured by the spectrophotometric method. Ethanol increases heart size and catalase (CAT) activity and decreases lipid peroxidation in heart without changing heart rate. However, in the kidney, ethanol decreases CAT activity, increases lipid peroxidation and decreases glomerular filtration rate. Folic acid supplementation avoids these situations; it does not, however, improve glomerular function. Chronic ethanol consumption has many effects on the antioxidant enzymatic activity of the heart and the kidney, leading to increased renal lipid peroxidation prevented by folic acid supplementation.

  13. Topoisomerase IIβ Negatively Modulates Retinoic Acid Receptor α Function: a Novel Mechanism of Retinoic Acid Resistance▿

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Suzan; Wang, Hongling; Hanna, Nessrine; Miller, Wilson H.

    2008-01-01

    Interactions between retinoic acid (RA) receptor α (RARα) and coregulators play a key role in coordinating gene transcription and myeloid differentiation. In patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the RARα gene is fused with the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) gene via the t(15;17) translocation, resulting in the expression of a PML/RARα fusion protein. Here, we report that topoisomerase II beta (TopoIIβ) associates with and negatively modulates RARα transcriptional activity and that increased levels of and association with TopoIIβ cause resistance to RA in APL cell lines. Knockdown of TopoIIβ was able to overcome resistance by permitting RA-induced differentiation and increased RA gene expression. Overexpression of TopoIIβ in clones from an RA-sensitive cell line conferred resistance by a reduction in RA-induced expression of target genes and differentiation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that TopoIIβ is bound to an RA response element and that inhibition of TopoIIβ causes hyperacetylation of histone 3 at lysine 9 and activation of transcription. Our results identify a novel mechanism of resistance in APL and provide further insight to the role of TopoIIβ in gene regulation and differentiation. PMID:18212063

  14. Hierarchical Porous Interlocked Polymeric Microcapsules: Sulfonic Acid Functionalization as Acid Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaomei; Gu, Jinyan; Tian, Lei; Zhang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    Owing to their unique structural and surface properties, mesoporous microspheres are widely applied in the catalytic field. Generally, increasing the surface area of the specific active phase of the catalyst is a good method, which can achieve a higher catalytic activity through the fabrication of the corresponding catalytic microspheres with the smaller size and hollow structure. However, one of the major challenges in the use of hollow microspheres (microcapsules) as catalysts is their chemical and structural stability. Herein, the grape-like hypercrosslinked polystyrene hierarchical porous interlocked microcapsule (HPIM-HCL-PS) is fabricated by SiO2 colloidal crystals templates, whose structure is the combination of open mouthed structure, mesoporous nanostructure and interlocked architecture. Numerous microcapsules assembling together and forming the roughly grape-like microcapsule aggregates can enhance the structural stability and recyclability of these microcapsules. After undergoing the sulfonation, the sulfonated HPIM-HCL-PS is served as recyclable acid catalyst for condensation reaction between benzaldehyde and ethylene glycol (TOF = 793 h−1), moreover, exhibits superior activity, selectivity and recyclability. PMID:28300062

  15. Hierarchical Porous Interlocked Polymeric Microcapsules: Sulfonic Acid Functionalization as Acid Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaomei; Gu, Jinyan; Tian, Lei; Zhang, Xu

    2017-03-01

    Owing to their unique structural and surface properties, mesoporous microspheres are widely applied in the catalytic field. Generally, increasing the surface area of the specific active phase of the catalyst is a good method, which can achieve a higher catalytic activity through the fabrication of the corresponding catalytic microspheres with the smaller size and hollow structure. However, one of the major challenges in the use of hollow microspheres (microcapsules) as catalysts is their chemical and structural stability. Herein, the grape-like hypercrosslinked polystyrene hierarchical porous interlocked microcapsule (HPIM-HCL-PS) is fabricated by SiO2 colloidal crystals templates, whose structure is the combination of open mouthed structure, mesoporous nanostructure and interlocked architecture. Numerous microcapsules assembling together and forming the roughly grape-like microcapsule aggregates can enhance the structural stability and recyclability of these microcapsules. After undergoing the sulfonation, the sulfonated HPIM-HCL-PS is served as recyclable acid catalyst for condensation reaction between benzaldehyde and ethylene glycol (TOF = 793 h-1), moreover, exhibits superior activity, selectivity and recyclability.

  16. Plasma levels of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid after oral ingestion of plain and buffered acetylsalicylic acid in relation to bleeding time and thrombocyte function.

    PubMed

    Proost, J H; Van Imhoff, G W; Wesseling, H

    1983-02-25

    Buffered acetylsalicylic acid (Alka Seltzer, B-ASA) and plain aspirin (P-ASA) tablets were compared as to their effects on bleeding time and platelet function in eight healthy male volunteers. Two doses (500 and 1000 mg) of each preparation were investigated in a cross-over design, each volunteer being his own control in each dose group (n=4). Both preparations disturbed platelet aggregation to the same extent. Bleeding time increased after both preparations, though significantly more after the buffered preparation than after plain acetylsalicylic acid, irrespective of the dosage. The 1000 mg dose prolonged bleeding time significantly more than the 500 mg dose, irrespective of the preparation. Kinetic analysis showed that B-ASA gave higher peak plasma levels of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and accordingly salicylic acid peak levels were also higher after the buffered preparation. It is concluded that B-ASA in equi-analgesic doses prolongs bleeding time more than the plain preparation. Since it is less agressive on the gastro-intestinal mucosa, its use may be advantageous in situations where acetylsalicylic acid induced loss of platelet aggregation is desired. However, the risk of prolonged bleeding--e.g. after tooth extractions--is probably higher after the buffered preparation.

  17. Enterocyte Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs): Different Functions of Liver- and Intestinal- FABPs in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Gajda, Angela M.; Storch, Judith

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are highly abundant cytosolic proteins that are expressed in most mammalian tissues. In the intestinal enterocyte, both Liver- (LFABP; FABP1) and Intestinal-fatty acid binding proteins (IFABP; FABP2) are expressed. These proteins display high affinity binding for long chain fatty acids (FA) and other hydrophobic ligands, thus they are believed to be involved with uptake and trafficking of lipids in the intestine. In vitro studies have identified differences in ligand binding stoichiometry and specificity, and in mechanisms of FA transfer to membranes, and it has been hypothesized that LFABP and IFABP have difference functions in the enterocyte. Studies directly comparing LFABP- and IFABP-null mice have revealed markedly different phenotypes, indicating that these proteins indeed have different functions in intestinal lipid metabolism and whole body energy homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the evolving knowledge of the functions of LFABP and IFABP in the intestinal enterocyte. PMID:25458898

  18. Label-free functional nucleic acid sensors for detecting target agents

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Yi; Xiang, Yu

    2015-01-13

    A general methodology to design label-free fluorescent functional nucleic acid sensors using a vacant site approach and an abasic site approach is described. In one example, a method for designing label-free fluorescent functional nucleic acid sensors (e.g., those that include a DNAzyme, aptamer or aptazyme) that have a tunable dynamic range through the introduction of an abasic site (e.g., dSpacer) or a vacant site into the functional nucleic acids. Also provided is a general method for designing label-free fluorescent aptamer sensors based on the regulation of malachite green (MG) fluorescence. A general method for designing label-free fluorescent catalytic and molecular beacons (CAMBs) is also provided. The methods demonstrated here can be used to design many other label-free fluorescent sensors to detect a wide range of analytes. Sensors and methods of using the disclosed sensors are also provided.

  19. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Carboxylic Acid Functional Groups with Carbodiimides

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Stutzman, John R.; Forrest, William P.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Gas-phase modification of carboxylic acid functionalities is performed via ion/ion reactions with carbodiimide reagents [N-cyclohexyl-N′-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) and [3-(3-Ethylcarbodiimide-1-yl)propyl]trimethylaminium (ECPT). Gas-phase ion/ion covalent chemistry requires the formation of a long-lived complex. In this instance, the complex is stabilized by an electrostatic interaction between the fixed charge quaternary ammonium group of the carbodiimide reagent cation and the analyte dianion. Subsequent activation results in characteristic loss of an isocyanate derivative from one side of the carbodiimide functionality, a signature for this covalent chemistry. The resulting amide bond is formed on the analyte at the site of the original carboxylic acid. Reactions involving analytes that do not contain available carboxylic acid groups (e.g., they have been converted to sodium salts) or reagents that do not have the carbodiimide functionality do not undergo a covalent reaction. This chemistry is demonstrated using PAMAM generation 0.5 dendrimer, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the model peptide DGAILDGAILD. This work demonstrates the selective gas-phase covalent modification of carboxylic acid functionalities. PMID:23208744

  20. Gas-phase reactivity of carboxylic acid functional groups with carbodiimides.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Boone M; Gilbert, Joshua D; Stutzman, John R; Forrest, William P; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase modification of carboxylic acid functionalities is performed via ion/ion reactions with carbodiimide reagents [N-cyclohexyl-N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) and [3-(3-Ethylcarbodiimide-1-yl)propyl]trimethylaminium (ECPT)]. Gas-phase ion/ion covalent chemistry requires the formation of a long-lived complex. In this instance, the complex is stabilized by an electrostatic interaction between the fixed charge quaternary ammonium group of the carbodiimide reagent cation and the analyte dianion. Subsequent activation results in characteristic loss of an isocyanate derivative from one side of the carbodiimide functionality, a signature for this covalent chemistry. The resulting amide bond is formed on the analyte at the site of the original carboxylic acid. Reactions involving analytes that do not contain available carboxylic acid groups (e.g., they have been converted to sodium salts) or reagents that do not have the carbodiimide functionality do not undergo a covalent reaction. This chemistry is demonstrated using PAMAM generation 0.5 dendrimer, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the model peptide DGAILDGAILD. This work demonstrates the selective gas-phase covalent modification of carboxylic acid functionalities.

  1. Functional contribution of CXCR2 to lung injury after aspiration of acid and gastric particulates

    PubMed Central

    Abatan, Omorodola; Fry, Christopher; Mattar, Aladdein

    2010-01-01

    The effects of individual ELR+ CXC chemokines have been documented in experimental models of acid aspiration. However, aspiration lung injury would be influenced by the combined effects of these chemokines and other factors related to their function. Therefore, the role of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 was examined in lung injury induced by aspiration of acid and acid with gastric particulates. Anesthetized mice were given intratracheal injections of saline, acid solution, or acid containing gastric particles. Within 6 h, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid neutrophils and albumin increased relative to the severity of the insult. Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR demonstrated striking increases in pulmonary expression of CXCR2 after aspiration. In CXCR2-deficient mice, neutrophil recruitment to airways was significantly reduced after aspiration of either acid or acid with particles. However, lung injury scores were unaffected in Ccr2−/− mice in the acid + particles group. Esterase-stained lung tissue demonstrated that focal aggregates of inflammatory cells contained neutrophils in the Ccr2−/− mice. These studies suggest CXCR2 and its ligands are dominant mediators of neutrophil recruitment to airways after aspiration. However, CXCR2-independent mechanisms recruit neutrophils into areas of cellular aggregation after aspiration of acidified gastric particulates. PMID:20044435

  2. Prediction of deleterious functional effects of amino acid mutations using a library of structure-based function descriptors.

    PubMed

    Herrgard, Sanna; Cammer, Stephen A; Hoffman, Brian T; Knutson, Stacy; Gallina, Marijo; Speir, Jeffrey A; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S; Baxter, Susan M

    2003-12-01

    An automated, active site-focused, computational method is described for use in predicting the effects of engineered amino acid mutations on enzyme catalytic activity. The method uses structure-based function descriptors (Fuzzy Functional Forms trade mark or FFFs trade mark ) to automatically identify enzyme functional sites in proteins. Three-dimensional sequence profiles are created from the surrounding active site structure. The computationally derived active site profile is used to analyze the effect of each amino acid change by defining three key features: proximity of the change to the active site, degree of amino acid conservation at the position in related proteins, and compatibility of the change with residues observed at that position in similar proteins. The features were analyzed using a data set of individual amino acid mutations occurring at 128 residue positions in 14 different enzymes. The results show that changes at key active site residues and at highly conserved positions are likely to have deleterious effects on the catalytic activity, and that non-conservative mutations at highly conserved residues are even more likely to be deleterious. Interestingly, the study revealed that amino acid substitutions at residues in close contact with the key active site residues are not more likely to have deleterious effects than mutations more distant from the active site. Utilization of the FFF-derived structural information yields a prediction method that is accurate in 79-83% of the test cases. The success of this method across all six EC classes suggests that it can be used generally to predict the effects of mutations and nsSNPs for enzymes. Future applications of the approach include automated, large-scale identification of deleterious nsSNPs in clinical populations and in large sets of disease-associated nsSNPs, and identification of deleterious nsSNPs in drug targets and drug metabolizing enzymes. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Hypoxia-reoxygenation and polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate adrenergic functions in cultured cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Delerive, P; Oudot, F; Ponsard, B; Talpin, S; Sergiel, J P; Cordelet, C; Athias, P; Grynberg, A

    1999-02-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of the omega 3 series are known to modulate adrenergic functions in ventricular myocytes. This study evaluated the influence of hypoxia duration and PUFA composition on the ability of cultured rat cardiomyocytes in producing alpha- and beta-adrenergic messengers (IPs and cAMP). After hypoxia (1.5, 2.5 or 3.5 h) followed by reoxygenation (1h). IP and cAMP production was induced by phenylephrine or isoproterenol stimulation, respectively. Hypoxia did not affect the basal level of messenger production in unstimulated cells, but decreased the cAMP production elicited by isoproterenol stimulation (up to 50%). The decrease in IP production after phenylephrine stimulation was observed only after long-term hypoxia duration close to irreversible cellular damages. The use of modified culture media supplemented with either arachidonic acid (AA) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) induced cardiomyocytes displaying either an arachidonic acid membrane profile (35% AA and 2% DHA in the phospholipids) or a docosahexaenoic acid membrane profile (15% AA and 20% DHA). These modifications did not alter the basal level of either messenger production in unstimulated cells nor the IP released after alpha-adrenergic stimulation. Conversely, the decrease in cAMP production was significantly more pronounced in docosahexaenoic acid-enriched cells than in arachidonic acid-enriched cells. This study suggests that hypoxia alters the beta-adrenergic messenger production, and that the alpha-system may balance the depression of the beta-system. The depression of the beta-adrenergic function induced by the incorporation of docosahexaenoic acid in membrane phospholipids may contribute to the beneficial effect of this fatty acid in the reperfused heart.

  4. Further pharmacological characterization of 5-HT2C receptor agonist-induced inhibition of 5-HT neuronal activity in the dorsal raphe nucleus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Quérée, P; Peters, S; Sharp, T

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Recent experiments using non-selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2C receptor agonists including WAY 161503 suggested that midbrain 5-HT neurones are under the inhibitory control of 5-HT2C receptors, acting via neighbouring gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurones. The present study extended this pharmacological characterization by comparing the actions of WAY 161503 with the 5-HT2C receptor agonists, Ro 60-0275 and 1-(3-chlorophenyl) piperazine (mCPP), as well as the non-selective 5-HT agonist lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and the 5-HT releasing agent 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Experimental approach: 5-HT neuronal activity was measured in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) using extracellular recordings in anaesthetized rats. The activity of DRN GABA neurones was assessed using double-label immunohistochemical measurements of Fos and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). Key results: Ro 60-0175, like WAY 161503, inhibited 5-HT neurone firing, and the 5-HT2C antagonist SB 242084 reversed this effect. mCPP also inhibited 5-HT neurone firing (∼60% neurones) in a SB 242084-reversible manner. LSD inhibited 5-HT neurone firing; however, this effect was not altered by either SB 242084 or the 5-HT2A/C receptor antagonist ritanserin but was reversed by the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY 100635. Similarly, MDMA inhibited 5-HT neurone firing in a manner reversible by WAY 100635, but not SB 242084 or ritanserin. Finally, both Ro 60-0275 and mCPP, like WAY 161503, increased Fos expression in GAD-positive DRN neurones. Conclusions and implications: These data strengthen the hypothesis that midbrain 5-HT neurones are under the inhibitory control of 5-HT2C receptors, and suggest that the 5-HT2C agonists Ro 60-0175, mCPP and WAY 161503, but not LSD or MDMA, are useful probes of the mechanism(s) involved. PMID:19845681

  5. Pd nanoparticles supported on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and electrooxidation for formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sudong; Zhang, Xiaogang; Mi, Hongyu; Ye, Xiangguo

    To improve the utilization and activity of anodic catalysts for formic acid electrooxidation, palladium (Pd) particles were loaded on the MWCNTs, which were functionalized in a mixture of 96% sulfuric acid and 4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, using sodium nitrite to produce intermediate diazonium salts from substituted anilines. The composition, particle size, and crystallinity of the Pd/f-MWCNTs catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements. The electrocatalytic properties of the Pd/f-MWCNTs catalysts for formic acid oxidation were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) in 0.5 mol L -1 H 2SO 4 solution. The results demonstrated that the catalytic activity was greatly enhanced due to the improved water-solubility and dispersion of the f-MWCNTs, which were facile to make the small particle size (3.8 nm) and uniform dispersion of Pd particles loading on the surface of the MWCNTs. In addition, the functionalized MWCNTs with benzenesulfonic group can provide benzenesulfonic anions in aqueous solution, which may combine with hydrogen cation and then promote the oxidation of formic acid reactive intermediates. So the Pd/f-MWCNTs composites showed excellent electrocatalytic activity for formic acid oxidation.

  6. Vibrational circular dichroism and IR absorption spectra of amino acids: a density functional study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhi; Santamaria, Rubén; Garzón, Ignacio L

    2010-03-18

    With density functional theory, vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and infrared absorption (IR) spectra are obtained at the B3LYP/CC-pVTZ level of theory for 20 alpha-amino acids. The contribution of different vibration modes to the IR and VCD spectra is analyzed. Overall agreement between calculated results for amino acids in gas phase with the available experimental VCD data for matrix-assisted amino acid films is found. The analysis of the calculated IR and VCD spectra indicates that the functional groups in the backbones and side chains of amino acids contribute differently to the spectra line shape. It is obtained that molecular torsions are the characteristic vibrations of the amino acids at the low-frequency regime, whereas the bending of bond angles, the out-of-plane wagging of individual atoms, and some stretching modes dominate the intermediate frequency range. Specific modes like NH(2) scissoring, CO bond stretching, and the (symmetric and asymmetric) stretching of the hydrogen atoms in the NH(2) and OH groups characterize the high-frequency regime. A general trend emerging from these calculations indicates that the rho(OH) rocking and nu(C=O) stretching modes have the highest intensity in the VCD spectra of most amino acids.

  7. The distinct C-terminal acidic domains of HMGB proteins are functionally relevant in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    de Abreu da Silva, Isabel Caetano; Carneiro, Vitor Coutinho; Vicentino, Amanda Roberta Revoredo; Aguilera, Estefania Anahi; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Thiengo, Silvana; Fernandez, Monica Ammon; Fantappié, Marcelo Rosado

    2016-04-01

    The Schistosoma mansoni High Mobility Group Box (HMGB) proteins SmHMGB1, SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 share highly conserved HMG box DNA binding domains but have significantly different C-terminal acidic tails. Here, we used three full-length and tailless forms of the S. mansoni HMGB proteins to examine the functional roles of their acidic tails. DNA binding assays revealed that the different lengths of the acidic tails among the three SmHMGB proteins significantly and distinctively influenced their DNA transactions. Spectroscopic analyses indicated that the longest acidic tail of SmHMGB3 contributes to the structural stabilisation of this protein. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we showed distinct patterns of SmHMGB1, SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 expression in different tissues of adult worms. RNA interference approaches indicated a role for SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 in the reproductive system of female worms, whereas for SmHMGB1 no clear phenotype was observed. Schistosome HMGB proteins can be phosphorylated, acetylated and methylated. Importantly, the acetylation and methylation of schistosome HMGBs were greatly enhanced upon removal of the acidic tail. These data support the notion that the C-terminal acidic tails dictate the differences in the structure, expression and function of schistosome HMGB proteins. Copyright © 2016 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biocatalyzed approach for the surface functionalization of poly(L-lactic acid) films using hydrolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pellis, Alessandro; Acero, Enrique Herrero; Weber, Hansjoerg; Obersriebnig, Michael; Breinbauer, Rolf; Srebotnik, Ewald; Guebitz, Georg M

    2015-09-01

    Poly(lactic acid) as a biodegradable thermoplastic polyester has received increasing attention. This renewable polyester has found applications in a wide range of products such as food packaging, textiles and biomedical devices. Its major drawbacks are poor toughness, slow degradation rate and lack of reactive side-chain groups. An enzymatic process for the grafting of carboxylic acids onto the surface of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) films was developed using Candida antarctica lipase B as a catalyst. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the PLLA film using Humicola insolens cutinase in order to increase the number of hydroxyl and carboxylic groups on the outer polymer chains for grafting was also assessed and showed a change of water contact angle from 74.6 to 33.1° while the roughness and waviness were an order of magnitude higher in comparison to the blank. Surface functionalization was demonstrated using two different techniques, (14) C-radiochemical analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using (14) C-butyric acid sodium salt and 4,4,4-trifluorobutyric acid as model molecules, respectively. XPS analysis showed that 4,4,4-trifluorobutyric acid was enzymatically coupled based on an increase of the fluor content from 0.19 to 0.40%. The presented (14) C-radiochemical analyses are consistent with the XPS data indicating the potential of enzymatic functionalization in different reaction conditions.

  9. Humic acids: Structural properties and multiple functionalities for novel technological developments.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Bruna Alice Gomes; Motta, Fernanda Lopes; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade

    2016-05-01

    Humic acids (HAs) are macromolecules that comprise humic substances (HS), which are organic matter distributed in terrestrial soil, natural water, and sediment. HAs differ from the other HS fractions (fulvic acid and humins) in that they are soluble in alkaline media, partially soluble in water, and insoluble in acidic media. Due to their amphiphilic character, HAs form micelle-like structures in neutral to acidic conditions, which are useful in agriculture, pollution remediation, medicine and pharmaceuticals. HAs have undefined compositions that vary according to the origin, process of obtainment, and functional groups present in their structures, such as quinones, phenols, and carboxylic acids. Quinones are responsible for the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HAs, which are useful for wound healing and have fungicidal/bactericidal properties. Phenols and carboxylic acids deprotonate in neutral and alkaline media and are responsible for various other functions, such as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of HAs. In particular, the presence of phenolic groups in HAs provides antioxidant properties due to their free radical scavenging capacity. This paper describes the main multifunctionalities of HAs associated with their structures and properties, focusing on human health applications, and we note perspectives that may lead to novel technological developments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review to address this topic from this approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Complex Prime Numerical Representation of Amino Acids for Protein Function Comparison.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duo; Wang, Jiasong; Yan, Ming; Bao, Forrest Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Computationally assessing the functional similarity between proteins is an important task of bioinformatics research. It can help molecular biologists transfer knowledge on certain proteins to others and hence reduce the amount of tedious and costly benchwork. Representation of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, plays an important role in achieving this goal. Compared with symbolic representation, representing amino acids numerically can expand our ability to analyze proteins, including comparing the functional similarity of them. Among the state-of-the-art methods, electro-ion interaction pseudopotential (EIIP) is widely adopted for the numerical representation of amino acids. However, it could suffer from degeneracy that two different amino acid sequences have the same numerical representation, due to the design of EIIP. In light of this challenge, we propose a complex prime numerical representation (CPNR) of amino acids, inspired by the similarity between a pattern among prime numbers and the number of codons of amino acids. To empirically assess the effectiveness of the proposed method, we compare CPNR against EIIP. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method CPNR always achieves better performance than EIIP. We also develop a framework to combine the advantages of CPNR and EIIP, which enables us to improve the performance and study the unique characteristics of different representations.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and liver targeting evaluation of self-assembled hyaluronic acid nanoparticles functionalized with glycyrrhetinic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodan; Gu, Xiangqin; Wang, Huimin; Sun, Yujiao; Wu, Haiyang; Mao, Shirui

    2017-01-01

    Recently, polymeric materials with multiple functions have drawn great attention as the carrier for drug delivery system design. In this study, a series of multifunctional drug delivery carriers, hyaluronic acid (HA)-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) succinate (HSG) copolymers were synthesized via hydroxyl group modification of hyaluronic acid. It was shown that the HSG nanoparticles had sub-spherical shape, and the particle size was in the range of 152.6-260.7nm depending on GA graft ratio. HSG nanoparticles presented good short term and dilution stability. MTT assay demonstrated all the copolymers presented no significant cytotoxicity. In vivo imaging analysis suggested HSG nanoparticles had superior liver targeting efficiency and the liver targeting capacity was GA graft ratio dependent. The accumulation of DiR (a lipophilic, NIR fluorescent cyanine dye)-loaded HSG-6, HSG-12, and HSG-20 nanoparticles in liver was 1.8-, 2.1-, and 2.9-fold higher than that of free DiR. The binding site of GA on HA may influence liver targeting efficiency. These results indicated that HSG copolymers based nanoparticles are potential drug carrier for improved liver targeting.

  12. Folic Acid Supplementation Improves Vascular Function in Professional Dancers With Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Anne Z.; Papanek, Paula; Szabo, Aniko; Widlansky, Michael E.; Gutterman, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine if folic acid supplementation improves vascular function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD]) in professional dancers with known endothelial dysfunction. Design Prospective cross-sectional study. Setting Academic institution in the Midwestern United States. Subjects Twenty-two professional ballet dancers volunteered for this study. Main Outcome Measures Subjects completed a 3-day food record to determine caloric and micronutrient intake. Menstrual status was determined by interview and questionnaire. Endothelial function was determined as flow-induced vasodilation measured by high-frequency ultrasound of the brachial artery. A change in brachial diameter of <5% to hyperemic flow stimulus was defined a priori as endothelial dysfunction. Subjects with abnormal FMD took 10 mg of folic acid daily for 4 weeks, and FMD testing was then repeated. Serum whole blood was measured for folic acid levels before and after supplementation. Results Sixty-four percent of dancers (n = 14) had abnormal brachial artery FMD (<5%) (mean ± standard deviation, 2.9% ± 1.5%). After 4 weeks of folic acid supplementation (10 mg/day), FMD improved in all the subjects (7.1% ± 2.3%; P < .0001). Conclusions This study reveals that vascular endothelial function improves in dancers after supplementation with folic acid (10 mg/day) for at least 4 weeks. This finding may have clinically important implications for future cardiovascular disease risk prevention. PMID:21715240

  13. Folic acid supplementation improves vascular function in professional dancers with endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Anne Z; Papanek, Paula; Szabo, Aniko; Widlansky, Michael E; Gutterman, David D

    2011-11-01

    To determine if folic acid supplementation improves vascular function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD]) in professional dancers with known endothelial dysfunction. Prospective cross-sectional study. Academic institution in the Midwestern United States. Twenty-two professional ballet dancers volunteered for this study. Subjects completed a 3-day food record to determine caloric and micronutrient intake. Menstrual status was determined by interview and questionnaire. Endothelial function was determined as flow-induced vasodilation measured by high-frequency ultrasound of the brachial artery. A change in brachial diameter of <5% to hyperemic flow stimulus was defined a priori as endothelial dysfunction. Subjects with abnormal FMD took 10 mg of folic acid daily for 4 weeks, and FMD testing was then repeated. Serum whole blood was measured for folic acid levels before and after supplementation. Sixty-four percent of dancers (n = 14) had abnormal brachial artery FMD (<5%) (mean ± standard deviation, 2.9% ± 1.5%). After 4 weeks of folic acid supplementation (10 mg/day), FMD improved in all the subjects (7.1% ± 2.3%; P < .0001). This study reveals that vascular endothelial function improves in dancers after supplementation with folic acid (10 mg/day) for at least 4 weeks. This finding may have clinically important implications for future cardiovascular disease risk prevention. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Acid fog: effects on respiratory function and symptoms in healthy and asthmatic volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Hackney, J D; Linn, W S; Avol, E L

    1989-01-01

    Acidic air pollutants generally are dissolved in water droplets. Mean droplet diameter may range from more than 10 microns in dense fog to less than 1 micron at low relative humidity. Droplet size influences the deposition of inhaled acid within the respiratory tract and thus may influence toxicity. To help assess health risks from acid pollution, we performed controlled exposures of normal and asthmatic volunteers to sulfuric acid aerosols at nominal concentrations of 0 (control), 500, 1000, and 2000 micrograms/m3. Exposures lasted 1 hr with intermittent heavy exercise. Response was assessed by lung function tests and symptom questionnaires. Under foggy conditions (mean droplet size 10 microns, temperature 50 degrees F), no marked effects on lung function were found. However, both normal and asthmatic subjects showed statistically significant dose-related increases in respiratory symptoms. In a separate study, normal subjects exposed at 70 degrees F with mean droplet size 0.9 microns showed no marked effect on function or symptoms. Asthmatics showed dose-related decrements in forced expiratory performance and increases in symptoms, most obvious at 1000 and 2000 micrograms/m3. The different results of the two studies probably reflect an influence of droplet size, but further investigation is needed to confirm this. The aggregate results suggest that only mild, if any, short-term respiratory irritant effects are likely at acid concentrations attained in ambient pollution. PMID:2707195

  15. Facile fabrication of siloxane @ poly (methylacrylic acid) core-shell microparticles with different functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zheng-Bai; Tai, Li; Zhang, Da-Ming; Jiang, Yong

    2017-02-01

    Siloxane @ poly (methylacrylic acid) core-shell microparticles with functional groups were prepared by a facile hydrolysis-condensation method in this work. Three different silane coupling agents 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS), 3-triethoxysilylpropylamine (APTES), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) were added along with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) into the polymethylacrylic acid (PMAA) microparticle ethanol dispersion to form the Si@PMAA core-shell microparticles with different functional groups. The core-shell structure and the surface special functional groups of the resulting microparticles were measured by transmission electron microscopy and FTIR. The sizes of these core-shell microparticles were about 350-400 nm. The corresponding preparation conditions and mechanism were discussed in detail. This hydrolysis-condensation method also could be used to functionalize other microparticles which contain active groups on the surface. Meanwhile, the Si@PMAA core-shell microparticles with carbon-carbon double bonds and amino groups have further been applied to prepare hydrophobic coatings.

  16. Intrahorizon differentiation of the structural-functional parameters of the humic acids from a typical chernozem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukov, S. N.; Golubkov, M. S.; Ryumin, A. G.

    2010-11-01

    It is shown that some structural-functional parameters of humic acids from the surface (0-5 cm) layer of a typical chernozem differ from those in a deeper (5-20 cm) layer. The Cha-to-Cfa ratio in the surface layer is by 1.7 times lower, and the concentration of free radicals is by almost an order of magnitude lower than that in the layer of 5-20 cm. The stimulating effect of humic acids from the surface layer on the processes of photosynthesis is sharply retarded, whereas their effect on respiration of Chlorella vulgaris is more pronounced. Humic acids from the deeper layer of chernozem have a much stronger stimulating effect on photosynthesis and a very weak stimulating effect of respiration. The concentration of free radicals in humic acids and the activity of physiological processes of photosynthesis in Chlorella vulgaris display a tight correlative relationship.

  17. Functionality of Fatty Acid Chemoreception: A Potential Factor in the Development of Obesity?

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Lisa; Haryono, Rivkeh; Keast, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Excess dietary fat consumption is recognized as a strong contributing factor in the development of overweight and obesity. Understanding why some individuals are better than others at regulating fat intake will become increasingly important and emerging associative evidence implicates attenuated fatty acid sensing in both the oral cavity and gastrointestinal (GI) tract in the development of obesity. Functional implications of impaired fatty acid chemoreception include diminished activation of the gustatory system, the cephalic response and satiety. This review will focus on knowledge from animal and human studies supporting the existence of oral fatty acid chemoreception including putative oral detection mechanisms, and how sensitivity to fatty acids is associated with fat consumption and fatty food preference. PMID:23595136

  18. Tibolone Preserves Mitochondrial Functionality and Cell Morphology in Astrocytic Cells Treated with Palmitic Acid.

    PubMed

    González-Giraldo, Yeimy; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E

    2017-06-30

    Obesity has been associated with increased chronic neuroinflammation and augmented risk of neurodegeneration. This is worsened during the normal aging process when the levels of endogenous gonadal hormones are reduced. In this study, we have assessed the protective actions of tibolone, a synthetic steroid with estrogenic actions, on T98G human astrocytic cells exposed to palmitic acid, a saturated fatty acid used to mimic obesity in vitro. Tibolone improved cell survival, and preserved mitochondrial membrane potential in palmitic acid-treated astrocytic cells. Although we did not find significant actions of tibolone on free radical production, it modulated astrocytic morphology after treatment with palmitic acid. These data suggest that tibolone protects astrocytic cells by preserving both mitochondrial functionality and morphological complexity.

  19. Dietary Fatty Acids and Temperature Modulate Mitochondrial Function and Longevity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Rand, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Fluctuations in temperature and resource availability are conditions many organisms contend with in nature. Specific dietary nutrients such as fatty acids play an essential role in reproduction, cold adaptation, and metabolism in a variety of organisms. The present study characterizes how temperature and diet interact to modulate Drosophila physiology and life span. Flies were raised on media containing specific saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fatty acids supplements at low concentrations and were placed in varied thermal environments. We found that dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids improve chill coma recovery and modulate mitochondrial function. Additionally, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid food supplements were detrimental to life span regardless of temperature, and antioxidants were able to partially rescue this effect. This study provides insight into environmental modulation of Drosophila physiology and life span. PMID:25910846

  20. Endogenous fatty acids in olfactory hairs influence pheromone binding protein structure and function in Lymantria dispar.

    PubMed

    Nardella, Jason; Terrado, Mailyn; Honson, Nicolette S; Plettner, Erika

    2015-08-01

    The gypsy moth utilizes a pheromone, (7R,8S)-2-methyl-7,8-epoxyoctadecane, for mate location. The pheromone is detected by sensory hairs (sensilla) on the antennae of adult males. Sensilla contain the dendrites of olfactory neurons bathed in lymph, which contains pheromone binding proteins (PBPs). We have extracted and identified free fatty acids from lymph of sensory hairs, and we demonstrate that these function as endogenous ligands for gypsy moth PBP1 and PBP2. Homology modeling of both PBPs, and docking of fatty acids reveal multiple binding sites: one internal, the others external. Pheromone binding assays suggest that these fatty acids increase PBP-pheromone binding affinity. We show that fatty acid binding causes an increase in α-helix content in the N-terminal domain, but not in the C-terminal peptide of both proteins. The C-terminal peptide was shown to form a α-helix in a hydrophobic, homogeneous environment, but not in the presence of fatty acid micelles. Through partition assays we show that the fatty acids prevent adsorption of the pheromone on hydrophobic surfaces and facilitate pheromone partition into an aqueous phase. We propose that lymph is an emulsion of fatty acids and PBP that influence each other and thereby control the partition equilibria of hydrophobic odorants.

  1. Functionality of maize, wheat, teff and cassava starches with stearic acid and xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    Maphalla, Thabelang Gladys; Emmambux, Mohammad Naushad

    2016-01-20

    Consumer concerns to synthetic chemicals have led to strong preference for 'clean' label starches. Lipid and hydrocolloids are food friendly chemicals. This study determines the effects of stearic acid and xanthan gum alone and in combination on the functionality of maize, wheat, teff and cassava starches. An increase in viscosity was observed for all starches with stearic acid and xanthan gum compared to the controls with cassava having the least increase. A further increase in viscosity was observed for the cereal starches with combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum. Stearic acid reduced retrogradation, resulting in soft textured pastes. Combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum reduced the formation of type IIb amylose-lipid complexes, syneresis, and hysteresis in cereal starches compared to stearic acid alone. A combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum produce higher viscosity non-gelling starches and xanthan gum addition increases physical stability to freezing and better structural recovery after shear. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The active site sulfenic acid ligand in nitrile hydratases can function as a nucleophile.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Salette; Wu, Rui; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard

    2014-01-29

    Nitrile hydratase (NHase) catalyzes the hydration of nitriles to their corresponding commercially valuable amides at ambient temperatures and physiological pH. Several reaction mechanisms have been proposed for NHase enzymes; however, the source of the nucleophile remains a mystery. Boronic acids have been shown to be potent inhibitors of numerous hydrolytic enzymes due to the open shell of boron, which allows it to expand from a trigonal planar (sp(2)) form to a tetrahedral form (sp(3)). Therefore, we examined the inhibition of the Co-type NHase from Pseudonocardia thermophila JCM 3095 (PtNHase) by boronic acids via kinetics and X-ray crystallography. Both 1-butaneboronic acid (BuBA) and phenylboronic acid (PBA) function as potent competitive inhibitors of PtNHase. X-ray crystal structures for BuBA and PBA complexed to PtNHase were solved and refined at 1.5, 1.6, and 1.2 Å resolution. The resulting PtNHase-boronic acid complexes represent a "snapshot" of reaction intermediates and implicate the cysteine-sulfenic acid ligand as the catalytic nucleophile, a heretofore unknown role for the αCys(113)-OH sulfenic acid ligand. Based on these data, a new mechanism of action for the hydration of nitriles by NHase is presented.

  3. Facile synthesis of boronic acid-functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rongna; Hu, Junjie; Cai, Zongwei; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-02-01

    A stepwise strategy was developed to synthesize boronic acid functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides. The MCNTs were synthesized by a solvothermal reaction of Fe3+ loaded on the acid-treated CNTs and modified with 1-pyrenebutanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (PASE) to bind aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) via an amide reaction. The introduction of PASE could bridge the MCNT and APBA, suppress the nonspecific adsorption and reduce the steric hindrance among the bound molecules. Due to the excellent structure of the MCNTs, the functionalization of PASE and then APBA on MCNTs was quite simple, specific and effective. The glycopeptides enrichment and separation with a magnetic field could be achieved by their reversible covalent binding with the boronic group of APBA-MCNTs. The exceptionally large specific surface area and the high density of boronic acid groups of APBA-MCNTs resulted in rapid and highly efficient enrichment of glycopeptides, even in the presence of large amounts of interfering nonglycopeptides. The functional MCNTs possessed high selectivity for enrichment of 21 glycopeptides from the digest of horseradish peroxidase demonstrated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis showing more glycopeptides detected than the usual 9 glycopeptides with commercially available APBA-agarose. The proposed system showed better specificity for glycopeptides even in the presence of non-glycopeptides with 50 times higher concentration. The boronic acid functionalized MCNTs provide a promising selective enrichment platform for precise glycoproteomic analysis.A stepwise strategy was developed to synthesize boronic acid functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides. The MCNTs were synthesized by a solvothermal reaction of Fe3+ loaded on the acid-treated CNTs and modified with 1-pyrenebutanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (PASE) to bind aminophenylboronic acid

  4. Spectroscopic studies on sidewall carboxylic acid functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deborah, M.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-03-01

    The valine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) were prepared and characterized by using XRD, UV-Vis, FT-IR, EPR, SEM, and EDX, spectroscopic techniques. The enhanced XRD peak (0 0 2) intensity was observed for valine functionalized MWCNTs compared with oxidized MWCNTs, which is likely due to sample purification by acid washing. UV-Vis study shows the formation of valine functionalized MWCNTs. FT-IR study confirms the presence of functional groups of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The ESR line shape analysis indicates that the observed EPR line shape is a Gaussian line shape. The g-values indicate that the systems are isotropic in nature. The morphology study was carried out for oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs by using SEM. The EDX spectra revealed that the high purity of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The functionalization has been chosen because, functionalization of CNTs with amino acids makes them soluble and biocompatible. Thus, they have potential applications in the field of biosensors and targeted drug delivery.

  5. Spectroscopic studies on sidewall carboxylic acid functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with valine.

    PubMed

    Deborah, M; Jawahar, A; Mathavan, T; Dhas, M Kumara; Benial, A Milton Franklin

    2015-03-15

    The valine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) were prepared and characterized by using XRD, UV-Vis, FT-IR, EPR, SEM, and EDX, spectroscopic techniques. The enhanced XRD peak (002) intensity was observed for valine functionalized MWCNTs compared with oxidized MWCNTs, which is likely due to sample purification by acid washing. UV-Vis study shows the formation of valine functionalized MWCNTs. FT-IR study confirms the presence of functional groups of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The ESR line shape analysis indicates that the observed EPR line shape is a Gaussian line shape. The g-values indicate that the systems are isotropic in nature. The morphology study was carried out for oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs by using SEM. The EDX spectra revealed that the high purity of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The functionalization has been chosen because, functionalization of CNTs with amino acids makes them soluble and biocompatible. Thus, they have potential applications in the field of biosensors and targeted drug delivery.

  6. Folic Acid: A Marker of Endothelial Function in Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Mangoni, Arduino A; Sherwood, Roy A; Asonganyi, Belinda; Ouldred, Emma L; Thomas, Stephen; Jackson, Stephen HD

    2005-01-01

    Objectives Endothelial dysfunction is a common feature of type 2 diabetes. Recent studies suggest that the B-vitamin folic acid exerts direct beneficial effects on endothelial function, beyond the well known homocysteine lowering effects. Therefore, folic acid might represent a novel “biomarker” of endothelial function. We sought to determine whether plasma levels of folic acid determine endothelial-dependent vasodilation in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Forearm arterial blood flow (FABF) was measured at baseline and during intrabrachial infusion of the endothelial-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (15 μg/min) and the endothelial-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (2 μg/min) in 26 type 2 diabetic patients (age 56.5 ± 0.9 years, means ± SEM) with no history of cardiovascular disease. Results FABF ratio (ie, the ratio between the infused and control forearm FABF) significantly increased during acetylcholine (1.10 ± 0.04 vs 1.52 ± 0.07, p < 0.001) and sodium nitroprusside (1.12 ± 0.11 vs 1.62 ± 0.06, p < 0.001) infusions. After correcting for age, gender, diabetes duration, smoking, hypertension, body mass index, microalbuminuria, glycated hemoglobin, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and homocysteine, multiple regression analysis showed that plasma folic acid concentration was the only independent determinant (p = 0.037, R2 = 0.22) of acetylcholine-mediated, but not sodium nitroprusside-mediated, vasodilatation. Conclusions Folic acid plasma concentrations determine endothelium-mediated vasodilatation in patients with type 2 diabetes. These results support the hypothesis of a direct effect of folic acid on endothelial function and the rationale for interventions aimed at increasing folic acid levels to reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:17319100

  7. Fluorometric estimation of amino acids interaction with colloidal suspension of FITC functionalized graphene oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Kashyap; Dhayal, Marshal

    2017-02-01

    A hydrosol approach developed to synthesize fluorescence quenched fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) functionalized colloidal suspension of graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONP). UV-vis spectroscopic measurements showed characteristic peak at 236 nm and 300 nm due to pi-pi* interaction in Cdbnd C and n-pi* transition in Cdbnd O bond of GONP, respectively. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra showed reduced intensity of 1429 cm-1 IR band of GONP due to the electrostatic and pi-pi interactions of FITC with GONP in FITC-GONP. ATR-FTIR spectra of different amino acid co-functionalised FITC-GONP showed an increase in the FTIR band intensity at 1429 cm-1 which was significantly reduced due to electrostatic/pi-pi interactions of FITC with GONP in the absence of the amino acids. A peak at 1084 cm-1 in ATR-FTIR spectra appears which confirms the interaction between amine group of amino acids and sbnd COO- groups at GONP surface. The FITC interaction with GONP lead to fluorescence resonance energy transfers (FRET) and resulted in a liner decrease in the FITC fluorescence with an increase of GONP concentration. An increase in the reappearance of FITC fluorescence observed while the amino acid concentration was increased in co-functionalised FITC-GONP. The quantified amount of reappeared fluorescence of FITC in amino acid co-functionalised FITC-GONP depends on the concentration, polar and non-polar nature of amino acids. The reappearance of FITC from the surface of FITC-GONP with the addition of amino acid was found to be consistent with the organic substitute, size of amino acids and their functionalities. Therefore, FRET based method using FITC-GONP colloidal suspension may have potential application in determining the binding nature of biomolecules with GONP for biomedical applications.

  8. Functionalized-graphene modified graphite electrode for the selective determination of dopamine in presence of uric acid and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Mallesha, Malledevaru; Manjunatha, Revanasiddappa; Nethravathi, C; Suresh, Gurukar Shivappa; Rajamathi, Michael; Melo, Jose Savio; Venkatesha, Thimmappa Venkatarangaiah

    2011-06-01

    Graphene is chemically synthesized by solvothermal reduction of colloidal dispersions of graphite oxide. Graphite electrode is modified with functionalized-graphene for electrochemical applications. Electrochemical characterization of functionalized-graphene modified graphite electrode (FGGE) is carried out by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The behavior of FGGE towards ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) has been investigated by CV, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and chronoamperommetry (CA). The FGGE showed excellent catalytic activity towards electrochemical oxidation of AA, DA and UA compared to that of the bare graphite electrode. The electrochemical oxidation signals of AA, DA and UA are well separated into three distinct peaks with peak potential separation of 193mv, 172mv and 264mV between AA-DA, DA-UA and AA-UA respectively in CV studies and the corresponding peak potential separations in DPV mode are 204mv, 141mv and 345mv. The FGGE is successfully used for the simultaneous detection of AA, DA and UA in their ternary mixture and DA in serum and pharmaceutical samples. The excellent electrocatalytic behavior of FGGE may lead to new applications in electrochemical analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional role of positively selected amino acid substitutions in mammalian rhodopsin evolution.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sampedro, Miguel A; Invergo, Brandon M; Ramon, Eva; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Garriga, Pere

    2016-02-11

    Visual rhodopsins are membrane proteins that function as light photoreceptors in the vertebrate retina. Specific amino acids have been positively selected in visual pigments during mammal evolution, which, as products of adaptive selection, would be at the base of important functional innovations. We have analyzed the top candidates for positive selection at the specific amino acids and the corresponding reverse changes (F13M, Q225R and A346S) in order to unravel the structural and functional consequences of these important sites in rhodopsin evolution. We have constructed, expressed and immunopurified the corresponding mutated pigments and analyzed their molecular phenotypes. We find that position 13 is very important for the folding of the receptor and also for proper protein glycosylation. Position 225 appears to be important for the function of the protein affecting the G-protein activation process, and position 346 would also regulate functionality of the receptor by enhancing G-protein activation and presumably affecting protein phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase. Our results represent a link between the evolutionary analysis, which pinpoints the specific amino acid positions in the adaptive process, and the structural and functional analysis, closer to the phenotype, making biochemical sense of specific selected genetic sequences in rhodopsin evolution.

  10. Functional role of positively selected amino acid substitutions in mammalian rhodopsin evolution

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sampedro, Miguel A.; Invergo, Brandon M.; Ramon, Eva; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Garriga, Pere

    2016-01-01

    Visual rhodopsins are membrane proteins that function as light photoreceptors in the vertebrate retina. Specific amino acids have been positively selected in visual pigments during mammal evolution, which, as products of adaptive selection, would be at the base of important functional innovations. We have analyzed the top candidates for positive selection at the specific amino acids and the corresponding reverse changes (F13M, Q225R and A346S) in order to unravel the structural and functional consequences of these important sites in rhodopsin evolution. We have constructed, expressed and immunopurified the corresponding mutated pigments and analyzed their molecular phenotypes. We find that position 13 is very important for the folding of the receptor and also for proper protein glycosylation. Position 225 appears to be important for the function of the protein affecting the G-protein activation process, and position 346 would also regulate functionality of the receptor by enhancing G-protein activation and presumably affecting protein phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase. Our results represent a link between the evolutionary analysis, which pinpoints the specific amino acid positions in the adaptive process, and the structural and functional analysis, closer to the phenotype, making biochemical sense of specific selected genetic sequences in rhodopsin evolution. PMID:26865329

  11. Functionalized azabicycloalkane amino acids by nitrone 1,3-dipolar intramolecular cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Leonardo; Arosio, Daniela; Belvisi, Laura; Bracci, Antonio; Colombo, Matteo; Invernizzi, Donatella; Scolastico, Carlo

    2005-05-13

    [reaction: see text] An efficient and operationally simple method for the synthesis of functionalized azaoxobicyclo[X.3.0]alkane amino acids has been devised. The key step is an intramolecular nitrone cycloaddition on 5-allyl- or 5-homoallylproline that was found to be completely regio- and stereoselective.

  12. New insights into sulfur amino acid function in gut health and disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acids (SAA) metabolism in the body. Aside from their role in protein synthesis, methionine and cysteine are involved in many biological functions and diseases. Methionine (MET) is an indispensable AA and is transmet...

  13. POLYCYSTEINE AND OTHER POLYAMINO ACID FUNCTIONALIZED MICROFILTRATION MEMBRANES FOR HEAVY CAPTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycysteine and other polyamino acid functionalized microfiltration membrane sorbents work exceptionally well for the removal and recovery of toxic heavy metals from aqueous streams. These are high capacity sorbents (0.3-3.7 mg/cm@) with excellent accessibility and selectivity f...

  14. Metabolomic profiling of amino acids and beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity in youth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In longitudinal studies of adults, elevated amino acid (AA) concentrations predicted future type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of the present investigation was to examine whether increased plasma AA concentrations are associated with impaired beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity ...

  15. Synthesis and characterization of highly functionalized symmetric aromatic hexa-ol intermediates from oleic acid.

    PubMed

    Song, Dong; Narine, Suresh S

    2008-09-01

    A novel highly functionalized aromatic hexa-ol was synthesized by palladium-catalyzed cyclotrimerization of an alkyne fatty acid ester followed by LAH reduction. This polyol product is a novel monomer made from a renewable lipid raw material for the production of polyurethanes, polyesters and polyamides.

  16. POLYCYSTEINE AND OTHER POLYAMINO ACID FUNCTIONALIZED MICROFILTRATION MEMBRANES FOR HEAVY CAPTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycysteine and other polyamino acid functionalized microfiltration membrane sorbents work exceptionally well for the removal and recovery of toxic heavy metals from aqueous streams. These are high capacity sorbents (0.3-3.7 mg/cm@) with excellent accessibility and selectivity f...

  17. Acidic bile salts modulate the squamous epithelial barrier function by modulating tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2011-08-01

    Experimental models for esophageal epithelium in vitro either suffer from poor differentiation or complicated culture systems. An air-liquid interface system with normal human bronchial epithelial cells can serve as a model of esophageal-like squamous epithelial cell layers. Here, we explore the influence of bile acids on barrier function and tight junction (TJ) proteins. The cells were treated with taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), or deoxycholic acid (DCA) at different pH values, or with pepsin. Barrier function was measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the diffusion of paracellular tracers (permeability). The expression of TJ proteins, including claudin-1 and claudin-4, was examined by Western blotting of 1% Nonidet P-40-soluble and -insoluble fractions. TCA and GCA dose-dependently decreased TEER and increased paracellular permeability at pH 3 after 1 h. TCA (4 mM) or GCA (4 mM) did not change TEER and permeability at pH 7.4 or pH 4. The combination of TCA and GCA at pH 3 significantly decreased TEER and increased permeability at lower concentrations (2 mM). Pepsin (4 mg/ml, pH 3) did not have any effect on barrier function. DCA significantly decreased the TEER and increased permeability at pH 6, a weakly acidic condition. TCA (4 mM) and GCA (4 mM) significantly decreased the insoluble fractions of claudin-1 and claudin-4 at pH 3. In conclusion, acidic bile salts disrupted the squamous epithelial barrier function partly by modulating the amounts of claudin-1 and claudin-4. These results provide new insights for understanding the role of TJ proteins in esophagitis.

  18. Evidence for the participation of peripheral α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors in GABAA agonists-induced nociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Hernández, Mariana; Feria-Morales, Luis Alberto; Torres-López, Jorge Elías; Cervantes-Durán, Claudia; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo; Granados-Soto, Vinicio; Rocha-González, Héctor Isaac

    2014-07-05

    The activation of GABAA receptor by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) in primary afferent fibers produces depolarization. In normal conditions this depolarization causes a reduction in the release of neurotransmitters. Therefore, this depolarization remains inhibitory. However, previous studies have suggested that in inflammatory pain, GABA shifts its signaling from inhibition to excitation by an increased GABA-induced depolarization. The contribution of peripheral α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors to the inflammatory pain is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible pronociceptive role of peripheral α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors in the formalin test. Formalin (0.5%) injection into the dorsum of the right hind paw produced flinching behavior in rats. Ipsilateral local peripheral pre-treatment (-10min) with exogenous GABA (0.003-0.03µg/paw) or common GABAA receptor agonists muscimol (0.003-0.03µg/paw), diazepam (0.017-0.056µg/paw) or phenobarbital (1-100µg/paw) significantly increased 0.5% formalin-induced nociceptive behavior. The pronociceptive effects of GABA (0.03µg/paw), muscimol (0.03µg/paw), diazepam (0.056µg/paw) and phenobarbital (100µg/paw) were prevented by either the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (0.01-0.1µg/paw) or selective α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptor inverse agonist L-655,708 (0.017-0.17µg/paw). The α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptor protein was expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and dorsal spinal cord of naïve rats. The formalin injection did not modify α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptor expression. Overall, these results suggest that peripheral α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors play a pronociceptive role in the rat formalin test.

  19. Omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function in older persons

    PubMed Central

    Lauretani, F.; Bandinelli, S.; Benedetta, B.; Cherubini, A.; Iorio, A. D.; Blè, A.; Giacomini, V.; Corsi, A. M.; Guralnik, J. M.; Ferrucci, L.

    2009-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies suggest that both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids have beneficial effects on peripheral nerve function. Rats feed a diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) showed modification of phospholipid fatty acid composition in nerve membranes and improvement of sciatic nerve conduction velocity (NCV). We tested the hypothesis that baseline plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels predict accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function. Changes between baseline and the 3-year follow-up in peripheral nerve function was assessed by standard surface ENG of the right peroneal nerve in 384 male and 443 female participants of the InCHIANTI study (age range: 24–97 years). Plasma concentrations of selected fatty acids assessed at baseline by gas chromatography. Independent of confounders, plasma omega-6 fatty acids and linoleic acid were significantly correlated with peroneal NCV at enrollment. Lower plasma PUFA, omega-6 fatty acids, linoleic acid, ratio omega-6/omega-3, arachidonic acid and docosahexanoic acid levels were significantly predicted a steeper decline in nerve function parameters over the 3-year follow-up. Low plasma omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids levels were associated with accelerated decline of peripheral nerve function with aging. PMID:17594339

  20. Development of Acid Functional Groups and Lactones During the Thermal Degradation of Wood and Wood Components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutherford, David W.; Wershaw, Robert L.; Reeves, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Black carbon (pyrogenic materials including chars) in soils has been recognized as a substantial portion of soil organic matter, and has been shown to play a vital role in nutrient cycling; however, little is known concerning the properties of this material. Previous studies have largely been concerned with the creation of high-surface-area materials for use as sorbents. These materials have been manufactured at high temperature and have often been activated. Chars occurring in the environment can be formed over a wide range of temperature. Because it is extremely difficult to isolate black carbon once it has been incorporated in soils, chars produced in the laboratory under controlled conditions can be used to investigate the range of properties possible for natural chars. This report shows that charring conditions (temperature and time) have substantial impact on the acid functional group and lactone content of chars. Low temperatures (250?C) and long charring times (greater than 72 hours) produce chars with the highest acid functional group and lactone content. The charring of cellulose appears to be responsible for the creation of the acid functional group and lactones. The significance of this study is that low-temperature chars can have acid functional group contents comparable to humic materials (as high as 8.8 milliequivalents per gram). Acid functional group and lactone content decreases as charring temperature increases. The variation in formation conditions expected under natural fire conditions will result in a wide range of sorption properties for natural chars which are an important component of soil organic matter. By controlling the temperature and duration of charring, it is possible to tailor the sorption properties of chars, which may be used as soil amendments.

  1. Effects of anticoagulant on pH, ionized calcium concentration, and agonist-induced platelet aggregation in canine platelet-rich plasma

    PubMed Central

    Callan, Mary Beth; Shofer, Frances S.; Catalfamo, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare effects of 3.8% sodium citrate and anticoagulant citrate dextrose solution National Institutes of Health formula A (ACD-A) on pH, extracellular ionized calcium (iCa) concentration, and platelet aggregation in canine platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Sample Population Samples from 12 dogs Procedures Blood samples were collected into 3.8% sodium citrate (dilution, 1:9) and ACD-A (dilution, 1:5). Platelet function, pH, and iCa concentration were evaluated in PRP Platelet agonists were ADP γ-thrombin, and convulxin; final concentrations of each were 20μM, 100nM, and 20nM, respectively. Washed platelets were used to evaluate effects of varying the pH and iCa concentration. Results Mean pH and iCa concentration were significantly greater in 3.8% sodium citrate PRP than ACD-A PRP Platelet aggregation induced by ADP and γ-thrombin was markedly diminished in ACD-A PRP compared with results for 3.8% sodium citrate PRP Anticoagulant had no effect on amplitude of convulxin-induced platelet aggregation. In washed platelet suspensions (pH, 7.4), there were no differences in amplitude of platelet aggregation induced by convulxin or γ-thrombin at various iCa concentrations. Varying the pH had no effect on amplitude of aggregation induced by convulxin or γ-thrombin, but the aggregation rate increased with increasing pH for both agonists. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Aggregation of canine platelets induced by ADP and γ-thrombin was negligible in ACD-A PRP which suggested an increase in extraplatelet hydrogen ion concentration inhibits signaling triggered by these agonists but not by convulxin. Choice of anticoagulant may influence results of in vitro evaluation of platelet function, which can lead to erroneous conclusions. PMID:19335102

  2. Effects of anticoagulant on pH, ionized calcium concentration, and agonist-induced platelet aggregation in canine platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Callan, Mary Beth; Shofer, Frances S; Catalfamo, James L

    2009-04-01

    OBJECTIVE-To compare effects of 3.8% sodium citrate and anticoagulant citrate dextrose solution National Institutes of Health formula A (ACD-A) on pH, extracellular ionized calcium (iCa) concentration, and platelet aggregation in canine platelet-rich plasma (PRP). SAMPLE POPULATION-Samples from 12 dogs. PROCEDURES-Blood samples were collected into 3.8% sodium citrate (dilution, 1:9) and ACD-A (dilution, 1:5). Platelet function, pH, and iCa concentration were evaluated in PRP. Platelet agonists were ADP, gamma-thrombin, and convulxin; final concentrations of each were 20microm, 100nM, and 20nM, respectively. Washed platelets were used to evaluate effects of varying the pH and iCa concentration. RESULTS-Mean pH and iCa concentration were significantly greater in 3.8% sodium citrate PRP than ACD-A PRP. Platelet aggregation induced by ADP and gamma-thrombin was markedly diminished in ACD-A PRP, compared with results for 3.8% sodium citrate PRP. Anticoagulant had no effect on amplitude of convulxin-induced platelet aggregation. In washed platelet suspensions (pH, 7.4), there were no differences in amplitude of platelet aggregation induced by convulxin or gamma-thrombin at various iCa concentrations. Varying the pH had no effect on amplitude of aggregation induced by convulxin or gamma-thrombin, but the aggregation rate increased with increasing pH for both agonists. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Aggregation of canine platelets induced by ADP and gamma-thrombin was negligible in ACD-A PRP, which suggested an increase in extraplatelet hydrogen ion concentration inhibits signaling triggered by these agonists but not by convulxin. Choice of anticoagulant may influence results of in vitro evaluation of platelet function, which can lead to erroneous conclusions.

  3. Oral administration of eicosapentaenoic acid or docosahexaenoic acid modifies cardiac function and ameliorates congestive heart failure in male rats.

    PubMed

    Yamanushi, Tomoko T; Kabuto, Hideaki; Hirakawa, Eiichiro; Janjua, Najma; Takayama, Fusako; Mankura, Mitsumasa

    2014-04-01

    This study assessed the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on normal cardiac function (part 1) and congestive heart failure (CHF) (part 2) through electrocardiogram analysis and determination of EPA, DHA, and arachidonic acid (AA) concentrations in rat hearts. In part 2, pathologic assessments were also performed. For part 1 of this study, 4-wk-old male rats were divided into a control group and 2 experimental groups. The rats daily were orally administered (1 g/kg body weight) saline, EPA-ethyl ester (EPA-Et; E group), or DHA-ethyl ester (DHA-Et; D group), respectively, for 28 d. ECGs revealed that QT intervals were significantly shorter for groups E and D compared with the control group (P ≤ 0.05). Relative to the control group, the concentration of EPA was higher in the E group and concentrations of EPA and DHA were higher in the D group, although AA concentrations were lower (P ≤ 0.05). In part 2, CHF was produced by subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline into 5-wk-old rats. At 3 d before monocrotaline injection, rats were administered either saline, EPA-Et, or DHA-Et as mentioned above and then killed at 21 d. The study groups were as follows: normal + saline (control), CHF + saline (H group), CHF + EPA-Et (HE group), and CHF + DHA-Et (HD group). QT intervals were significantly shorter (P ≤ 0.05) in the control and HD groups compared with the H and HE groups. Relative to the H group, concentrations of EPA were higher in the HE group and those of DHA were higher in the control and HD groups (P ≤ 0.05). There was less mononuclear cell infiltration in the myocytes of the HD group than in the H group (P = 0.06). The right ventricles in the H, HE, and HD groups showed significantly increased weights (P ≤ 0.05) compared with controls. The administration of EPA-Et or DHA-Et may affect cardiac function by modification of heart fatty acid composition, and the administration of DHA-Et may ameliorate CHF.

  4. Proximal stomach function in obesity with normal or abnormal oesophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Iovino, P; Angrisani, L; Galloro, G; Consalvo, D; Tremolaterra, F; Pascariello, A; Ciacci, C

    2006-06-01

    There is an increased prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux and symptoms in obese patients. Information about the proximal stomach in obese patients with reflux is lacking. Gastric volume and compliance are similar between obese and lean subjects. To study the proximal stomach function and perception in obese patients with normal or abnormal oesophageal acid exposure, thirty-one obese patients, with normal or abnormal oesophageal acid exposure, underwent medical evaluation of oesophageal and gastrointestinal symptoms by a questionnaire and measurement of proximal stomach function and perception by an electronic barostat and a standardized questionnaire. Nineteen obese patients had abnormal oesophageal acid exposure. The percentage of total time with pH <4 is significantly related to the presence of hiatal hernia, the oesophageal intensity-frequency symptom score and gender, i.e. higher percentage in men. The perception cumulative score was significantly different between patients with normal and abnormal oesophageal acid exposure after adjusting for covariates (gender, body mass index, age, minimal distending pressure, gastric tone and gastric compliance). Gastric tone and compliance were significantly related to the perception cumulative score. In conclusion, patients with abnormal oesophageal acid exposure have increased gastric perception. A significant relation among gastric tone, gastric compliance and upper gastrointestinal sensations was shown.

  5. Sensitive SERS glucose sensing in biological media using alkyne functionalized boronic acid on planar substrates.

    PubMed

    Kong, Kien Voon; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Gong, Tianxun; Lau, Weber Kam On; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-15

    In this work, we propose a novel glucose binding mechanism on a highly sensitive SERS substrate, in order to overcome challenges in specific glucose detection in bio-fluids. We make use of phenylboronic acid as a receptor for saccharide capture onto the substrate and the ability of the captured glucose molecule to undergo secondary binding with an alkyne-functionalized boronic acid to form a glucose-alkyne-boronic acid complex. The formation of this complex shows high selectivity for glucose, over other saccharides. In addition, the alkyne group of the alkyne-functionalized boronic acid exhibits a distinct Raman peak at 1996 cm(-1) in a biological silent region (1800-2800 cm(-1)) where most endogenous molecules, including glucose, show no Raman scattering, thus offering a high sensitivity over other SERS glucose sensing. The substrate offers long-term stability, as well as high SERS enhancement to the glucose-alkyne boronic acid complex on substrate. In addition, the reversibility of SERS signals at various incubation stages also shows reusability capabilities, whereas positive results in clinical urine samples demonstrate clinical feasibility. All these strongly suggest that this newly developed SERS-based assay offers great potential in glucose sensing.

  6. Effects of arundic acid, an astrocytic modulator, on the cerebral and respiratory functions in severe hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Isato; Takeda, Kotaro; Yokota, Shigefumi; Hasebe, Yohei; Sato, Yutaka; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw; Horiuchi, Jouji; Okada, Yasumasa

    2016-06-01

    Mild hypoxia increases ventilation, but severe hypoxia depresses it. The mechanism of hypoxic ventilatory depression, in particular, the functional role of the cerebrum, is not fully understood. Recent progress in glial physiology has provided evidence that astrocytes play active roles in information processing in various brain functions. We investigated the hypothesis that astrocytic activation is necessary to maintain the cerebral function and ventilation in hypoxia, by examining the responses of EEG and ventilation to severe hypoxia before and after administration of a modulator of astrocytic function, arundic acid, in unanesthetized mice. Ventilatory parameters were measured by whole body plethysmography. When hypoxic ventilatory depression occurred, gamma frequency band of EEG was suppressed. Arundic acid further suppressed ventilation, and the EEG power was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner. Arundic acid also suppressed hypoxia-induced c-Fos expression in the hypothalamus. We conclude that severe hypoxia suppresses the cerebral function which could reduce the stimulus to the brainstem resulting in ventilatory depression. Astrocytic activation in hypoxia may counteract both cerebral and ventilatory suppression. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Preparation of Phosphonic Acid Functionalized Graphene Oxide-modified Aluminum Powder with Enhanced Anticorrosive Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lihua; Zhao, Yan; Xing, Liying; Liu, Pinggui; Wang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Youwei; Liu, Xiaofang

    2017-07-01

    To improve the anticorrosive performance of aluminum powder, a common functional filler in polymer coatings, we report a novel method to prepare graphene oxide modified aluminum powder (GO-Al) using 3-aminoproplyphosphoic acid as ;link; agent. The GO nanosheets were firstly functionalized with 3-aminoproplyphosphoic acid (APSA) by the reaction of amine groups of APSA and the epoxy groups of GO. Subsequently, a layer of GO nanosheets uniformly and tightly covered the surface of flaky aluminum particle though the strong linking strength between -PO(OH)2 functional groups of the modified GO and aluminum. The hydrogen evolution experiment suggests that the GO attached on the aluminum powder could effectively improve the anticorrosive performance of the pigments.

  8. Lipoic Acid Gold Nanoparticles Functionalized with Organic Compounds as Bioactive Materials

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Ioana; Zarafu, Irina; Popa, Marcela; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Bleotu, Coralia; Culita, Daniela; Ghica, Corneliu; Ionita, Petre

    2017-01-01

    Water soluble gold nanoparticles protected by lipoic acid were obtained and further functionalized by standard coupling reaction with 1-naphtylamine, 4-aminoantipyrine, and 4′-aminobenzo-15-crown-5 ether. Derivatives of lipoic acid with 1-naphtylamine, 4-aminoantipyrine, and 4′-aminobenzo-15-crown-5 ether were also obtained and characterized. All these were tested for their antimicrobial activity, as well as for their influence on mammalian cell viability and cellular cycle. In all cases a decreased antimicrobial activity of the obtained bioactive nanoparticles was observed as compared with the organic compounds, proving that a possible inactivation of the bioactive groups could occur during functionalization. However, both the gold nanoparticles as well as the functionalized bioactive nanosystems proved to be biocompatible at concentrations lower than 50 µg/mL, as revealed by the cellular viability and cell cycle assay, demonstrating their potential for the development of novel antimicrobial agents. PMID:28336877

  9. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Moderate Effects of Physical Activity on Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Leckie, Regina L.; Manuck, Stephen B.; Bhattacharee, Neha; Muldoon, Matthew F.; Flory, Janine M.; Erickson, Kirk I.

    2014-01-01

    Greater amounts of physical activity (PA) and omega-3 fatty acids have both been independently associated with better cognitive performance. Because of the overlapping biological effects of omega-3 fatty acids and PA, fatty acid intake may modify the effects of PA on neurocognitive function. The present study tested this hypothesis by examining whether the ratio of serum omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid levels would moderate the association between PA and executive and memory functions in 344 participants (Mean age = 44.42 years, SD = 6.72). The Paffenbarger Physical Activity Questionnaire (PPAQ), serum fatty acid levels, and performance on a standard neuropsychological battery were acquired on all subjects. A principal component analysis reduced the number of cognitive outcomes to three factors: n-back working memory, Trail Making test, and Logical Memory. We found a significant interaction between PA and the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid serum levels on Trail Making performance and n-back performance, such that higher amounts of omega-3 levels offset the deleterious effects of lower amounts of PA. These effects remained significant in a subsample (n=299) controlling for overall dietary fat consumption. There were no significant additive or multiplicative benefits of higher amounts of both omega-3 and PA on cognitive performance. Our results demonstrate that a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids might mitigate the effect of lower levels of PA on cognitive performance. This study illuminates the importance of understanding dietary and PA factors in tandem when exploring their effects on neurocognitive health. PMID:24813150

  10. Omega-3 fatty acids moderate effects of physical activity on cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Regina L; Manuck, Stephen B; Bhattacharjee, Neha; Muldoon, Matthew F; Flory, Janine M; Erickson, Kirk I

    2014-07-01

    Greater amounts of physical activity (PA) and omega-3 fatty acids have both been independently associated with better cognitive performance. Because of the overlapping biological effects of omega-3 fatty acids and PA, fatty acid intake may modify the effects of PA on neurocognitive function. The present study tested this hypothesis by examining whether the ratio of serum omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid levels would moderate the association between PA and executive and memory functions in 344 participants (Mean age=44.42 years, SD=6.72). The Paffenbarger Physical Activity Questionnaire (PPAQ), serum fatty acid levels, and performance on a standard neuropsychological battery were acquired on all subjects. A principal component analysis reduced the number of cognitive outcomes to three factors: n-back working memory, Trail Making test, and Logical Memory. We found a significant interaction between PA and the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid serum levels on Trail Making performance and n-back performance, such that higher amounts of omega-3 levels offset the deleterious effects of lower amounts of PA. These effects remained significant in a subsample (n=299) controlling for overall dietary fat consumption. There were no significant additive or multiplicative benefits of higher amounts of both omega-3 and PA on cognitive performance. Our results demonstrate that a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids might mitigate the effect of lower levels of PA on cognitive performance. This study illuminates the importance of understanding dietary and PA factors in tandem when exploring their effects on neurocognitive health.

  11. Agonist-induced activation of histamine H3 receptor signals to extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 through PKC-, PLD-, and EGFR-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiangru; Ye, Lingyan; Liao, Yuan; Jin, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Lu, Bing; Sun, Yi; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-04-01

    The histamine H3 receptor (H3R), abundantly expressed in the central and the peripheral nervous system, has been recognized as a promising target for the treatment of various important CNS diseases including narcolepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The H3R acts via Gi/o -proteins to inhibit adenylate cyclase activity and modulate MAPK activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for H3R mediation of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) remain to be elucidated. In this study, using HEK293 cells stably expressing human H3R and mouse primary cortical neurons endogenously expressing mouse H3R, we found that the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2 was significantly blocked by both the pertussis toxin and the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Upon stimulation by H3R agonist histamine or imetit, H3R was shown to rapidly induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation via PLC/PKC-, PLDs-, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation-dependent pathways. Furthermore, it was also indicated that while the βγ-subunits play a key role in H3R-activated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, β-arrestins were not required for ERK1/2 activation. In addition, when the cultured mouse cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation conditions (OGD), imetit exhibited neuroprotective properties through the H3R. Treatment of cells with the inhibitor UO126 abolished these protective effects. This suggests a possible neuroprotective role of the H3R-mediated ERK1/2 pathway under hypoxia conditions. These observations may provide new insights into the pharmacological effects and the physiological functions modulated by the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2. Histamine H3 receptors are abundantly expressed in the brain and play important roles in various CNS physiological functions. However, the underlying mechanisms for H3R-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 remain largely unknown. Here

  12. One-step synthesis of boronic acid functionalized gold nanoclusters for photoluminescence sensing of dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huide; Liu, Chunxiu; Xia, Yunsheng

    2017-03-01

    This study is the first to report one-step synthesis of boronic acid functionalized gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) using mixed ligands of 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid (MPBA) and glutathione. Furthermore, the emission color of the products can be fancily tuned from green to near-infrared by simply changing the proportion of the two stabilizers. In basic media, dopamine (DA) molecules themselves polymerize each other and form polydopamine with large amounts of cis-diol groups, which then react with boronic acid groups on the AuNC’s surface based on the formation of boronate esters. As a result, the photoluminescence of the AuNCs is well quenched by the electron transfer effect. Accordingly, DA molecules are assayed from 0.5 to 9 μM, and the detection limit is as low as 0.1 μM. The as-prepared AuNCs exhibit high selectivity; the existing biomolecules including various amino acids, ascorbic acid, uric acid, glucose, etc, do not interfere with the assay. The proposed method is successfully applied to the assay of DA in human serum, indicating its practical potential.

  13. Critical micellar concentrations of keto derivatives of selected bile acids: thermodynamic functions of micelle formation.

    PubMed

    Posa, Mihalj; Kevresan, Slavko; Mikov, Momir; Cirin-Novta, Vera; Kuhajda, Ksenija

    2008-07-15

    The knowledge of the process of formation of molecular aggregates of bile acids in aqueous media and of the corresponding critical micellar concentrations (CMCs) is of great significance because of the biological importance of these compounds and their pharmacological applications. In view of this, the present study is concerned with the determination of CMCs of cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids and their keto derivatives at different temperatures with the aim to calculate the standard thermodynamic functions of micelle formation. Based on the molecular descriptors for tested compounds and entropy of micelle formation, the method of principal component analysis (PCA) allowed grouping of the behavior of tested molecules at 30, 50 and 70 degrees C. To one group belong cholic acid and its keto derivatives, the other group consisting of chenodeoxycholic and deoxycholic acids and their keto derivatives. For each group, the derived multiple linear regression equations of the entropy dependence on temperature contains different independent variables. A main difference between the two groups of tested bile acids is in the energy of dipole-dipole interaction, which appears to be temperature dependent, and in the case of the latter group comes into play as an independent variable already in the regression equation derived for 30 degrees C. The most remarkable changes of the descriptors with temperature were observed in the group of cholic acid and its derivatives.

  14. Discovery and Investigation of Natural Editing Function against Artificial Amino Acids in Protein Translation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fluorine being not substantially present in the chemistry of living beings is an attractive element in tailoring novel chemical, biophysical, and pharmacokinetic properties of peptides and proteins. The hallmark of ribosome-mediated artificial amino acid incorporation into peptides and proteins is a broad substrate tolerance, which is assumed to rely on the absence of evolutionary pressure for efficient editing of artificial amino acids. We used the well-characterized editing proficient isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase (IleRS) from Escherichia coli to investigate the crosstalk of aminoacylation and editing activities against fluorinated amino acids. We show that translation of trifluoroethylglycine (TfeGly) into proteins is prevented by hydrolysis of TfeGly-tRNAIle in the IleRS post-transfer editing domain. The remarkable observation is that dissociation of TfeGly-tRNAIle from IleRS is significantly slowed down. This finding is in sharp contrast to natural editing reactions by tRNA synthetases wherein fast editing rates for the noncognate substrates are essential to outcompete fast aa-tRNA dissociation rates. Using a post-transfer editing deficient mutant of IleRS (IleRSAla10), we were able to achieve ribosomal incorporation of TfeGly in vivo. Our work expands the knowledge of ribosome-mediated artificial amino acid translation with detailed analysis of natural editing function against an artificial amino acid providing an impulse for further systematic investigations and engineering of the translation and editing of unusual amino acids. PMID:28149956

  15. Acid stress mediated adaptive divergence in ion channel function during embryogenesis in Rana arvalis

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Longfei; Laurila, Anssi; Räsänen, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels and pumps are responsible for ion flux in cells, and are key mechanisms mediating cellular function. Many environmental stressors, such as salinity and acidification, are known to severely disrupt ionic balance of organisms thereby challenging fitness of natural populations. Although ion channels can have several vital functions during early life-stages (e.g. embryogenesis), it is currently not known i) how developing embryos maintain proper intracellular conditions when exposed to environmental stress and ii) to what extent environmental stress can drive intra-specific divergence in ion channels. Here we studied the moor frog, Rana arvalis, from three divergent populations to investigate the role of different ion channels and pumps for embryonic survival under acid stress (pH 4 vs 7.5) and whether populations adapted to contrasting acidities differ in the relative role of different ion channel/pumps. We found that ion channels that mediate Ca2+ influx are essential for embryonic survival under acidic pH, and, intriguingly, that populations differ in calcium channel function. Our results suggest that adaptive divergence in embryonic acid stress tolerance of amphibians may in part be mediated by Ca2+ balance. We suggest that ion flux may mediate adaptive divergence of natural populations at early life-stages in the face of environmental stress. PMID:26381453

  16. Duodenal hypersensitivity to acid in patients with functional dyspepsia-pathogenesis and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Manabu; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Manabe, Noriaki; Kamada, Tomoari; Sato, Motonori; Imamura, Hiroshi; Shiotani, Akiko; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a subcategory of the functional gastrointestinal disorders according to the Rome III classification of functional gastroduodenal disorders. FD is characterized by the presence of symptoms that are believed to be associated with gastroduodenal lesions, particularly epigastric pain or burning, postprandial fullness, or early satiation, without the evidence of organic disease likely to explain the onset of these symptoms. Generally, multiple factors are considered to be involved in the onset of dyspeptic symptoms in patients with FD. Among these factors, acid is thought to be more important because proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine 2 (H2)-receptor antagonists have been proposed to be effective therapies for a subset of patients with FD. Although manometric methods, scintigraphic methods, electrogastrography and ultrasonography have been used to evaluate enterokinesis, a practical method for evaluating duodenal hypersensitivity to acid has not been reported. Recently, we attempted to evaluate duodenal hypersensitivity to acid and gastric motility by duodenal acidification using transnasal endoscopy. Using this method, we could simultaneously evaluate both dyspeptic symptoms and gastric motility in healthy volunteers. Furthermore, we evaluated duodenal hypersensitivity to acid in healthy volunteers and in patients with FD, and we reported that duodenal acidification induced dyspeptic symptoms more significantly in patients with FD than in healthy volunteers.

  17. Functional analyses of carnivorous plant-specific amino acid residues in S-like ribonucleases.

    PubMed

    Arai, Naoki; Nishimura, Emi; Kikuchi, Yo; Ohyama, Takashi

    2015-09-11

    Unlike plants with no carnivory, carnivorous plants seem to use S-like ribonucleases (RNases) as an enzyme for carnivory. Carnivorous plant-specific conserved amino acid residues are present at four positions around the conserved active site (CAS). The roles of these conserved amino acid residues in the enzymatic function were explored in the current study by preparing five recombinant variants of DA-I, the S-like RNase of Drosera adelae. The kcat and kcat/Km values of the enzymes revealed that among the four variants with a single mutation, the serine to glycine mutation at position 111 most negatively influenced the enzymatic activity. The change in the bulkiness of the amino acid residue side-chain seemed to be the major cause of the above effect. Modeling of the three dimensional (3D) structures strongly suggested that the S to G mutation at 111 greatly altered the overall enzyme conformation. The conserved four amino acid residues are likely to function in keeping the two histidine residues, which are essential for the cleavage of RNA strands, and the CAS in the most functional enzymatic conformation.

  18. Carboxylic acid functionalized sesame straw: A sustainable cost-effective bioadsorbent with superior dye adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanfang; Liu, Yang; Xue, Lihong; Sun, Haijun; Guo, Zhi; Zhang, Yingying; Yang, Linzhang

    2017-08-01

    This study prepared a carboxylic functionalized bioadsorbent that met the "4-E" criteria: Efficient, Economical, Environmentally friendly, and Easily-produced. Sesame straw (Sesamum indicum L.) was functionalized through treatment with citric acid (SSCA) and tartaric acid (SSTA). The products were examined for adsorption capacity and mechanisms. Langmuir model gave the best fit for the isotherm data, and the maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of SSCA was 650mgg(-1) for methylene blue (MB). The excellent dye adsorption capacity of SSCA can be attributed to the introduction of ester groups during citric-acid modification and the tube-like structures (i.e., sesame straw cell wall remnants). At last, the cost of carboxylic acid functionalized bioadsorbents was evaluated, which showed that SSCA would be the most cost-effective bioadsorbent. Additionally, this study presents a thermo-decomposition methodology for contaminant-loaded bioadsorbent. Results showed that SSCA is probably one of the few bioadsorbents that can be produced and applied in industrial scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Do Uric Acid Deposits in Zooxanthellae Function as Eye-Spots?

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kobiyama, Atsushi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    The symbiosis between zooxanthellae (dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium) and corals is a fundamental basis of tropical marine ecosystems. However the physiological interactions of the hosts and symbionts are poorly understood. Recently, intracellular crystalline deposits in Symbiodinium were revealed to be uric acid functioning for nutrient storage. This is the first exploration of these enigmatic crystalline materials that had previously been misidentified as oxalic acid, providing new insights into the nutritional strategies of Symbiodinium in oligotrophic tropical waters. However, we believe these deposits also function as eye-spots on the basis of light and electron microscopic observations of motile cells of cultured Symbiodinium. The cells possessed crystalline deposit clusters in rows with each row 100–150 nm thick corresponding to 1/4 the wavelength of light and making them suitable for maximum wave interference and reflection of light. Crystalline clusters in cells observed with a light microscope strongly refracted and polarized light, and reflected or absorbed short wavelength light. The facts that purines, including uric acid, have been identified as the main constituents of light reflectors in many organisms, and that the photoreceptor protein, opsin, was detected in our Symbiodinium strain, support the idea that uric acid deposits in Symbiodinium motile cells may function as a component of an eye-spot. PMID:19609449

  20. Tuning the acid/base properties of nanocarbons by functionalization via amination.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, Rosa; Hävecker, Michael; Wrabetz, Sabine; Blume, Raoul; Lerch, Martin; McGregor, James; Parrott, Edward P J; Zeitler, J Axel; Gladden, Lynn F; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert; Su, Dang Sheng

    2010-07-21

    The surface chemical properties and the electronic properties of vapor grown carbon nanofibers (VGCNFs) have been modified by treatment of the oxidized CNFs with NH(3). The effect of treatment temperature on the types of nitrogen functionalities introduced was evaluated by synchrotron based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), while the impact of the preparation methods on the surface acid-base properties was investigated by potentiometric titration, microcalorimetry, and zeta potential measurements. The impact of the N-functionalization on the electronic properties was measured by THz-Time Domain spectroscopy. The samples functionalized via amination are characterized by the coexistence of acidic and basic O and N sites. The population of O and N species is temperature dependent. In particular, at 873 K nitrogen is stabilized in substitutional positions within the graphitic structure, as heterocyclic-like moieties. The surface presents heterogeneously distributed and energetically different basic sites. A small amount of strong basic sites gives rise to a differential heat of CO(2) adsorption of 150 kJ mol(-1). However, when functionalization is carried out at 473 K, nitrogen moieties with basic character are introduced and the maximum heat of adsorption is significantly lower, at approximately 90 kJ mol(-1). In the latter sample, energetically different basic sites coexist with acidic oxygen groups introduced during the oxidative step. Under these conditions, a bifunctional acidic and basic surface is obtained with high hydrophilic character. N-functionalization carried out at higher temperature changes the electronic properties of the CNFs as evaluated by THz-TDS. The functionalization procedure presented in this work allows high versatility and flexibility in tailoring the surface chemistry of nanocarbon material to specific needs. This work shows the potential of the N-containing nanocarbon materials obtained via amination in catalysis as well as electronic

  1. Yokukansan Increases 5-HT1A Receptors in the Prefrontal Cortex and Enhances 5-HT1A Receptor Agonist-Induced Behavioral Responses in Socially Isolated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Yamaguchi, Takuji; Nishi, Akinori; Ikarashi, Yasushi; Hattori, Tomohisa; Kase, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The traditional Japanese medicine yokukansan has an anxiolytic effect, which occurs after repeated administration. In this study, to investigate the underlying mechanisms, we examined the effects of repeated yokukansan administration on serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptor density and affinity and its expression at both mRNA and protein levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of socially isolated mice. Moreover, we examined the effects of yokukansan on a 5-HT1A receptor-mediated behavioral response. Male mice were subjected to social isolation stress for 6 weeks and simultaneously treated with yokukansan. Thereafter, the density and affinity of 5-HT1A receptors were analyzed by a receptor-binding assay. Levels of 5-HT1A receptor protein and mRNA were also measured. Furthermore, (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT; a 5-HT1A receptor agonist) was injected intraperitoneally, and rearing behavior was examined. Social isolation stress alone did not affect 5-HT1A receptor density or affinity. However, yokukansan significantly increased receptor density and decreased affinity concomitant with unchanged protein and mRNA levels. Yokukansan also enhanced the 8-OH-DPAT-induced decrease in rearing behavior. These results suggest that yokukansan increases 5-HT1A receptors in the PFC of socially isolated mice and enhances their function, which might underlie its anxiolytic effects. PMID:26681968

  2. Receptor-Selective Agonists Induce Emesis and Fos Expression in the Brain and Enteric Nervous System of the Least Shrew (Cryptotis parva)

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Andrew P.; Chebolu, Seetha; Darmani, Nissar A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on the mechanisms of emesis has implicated multiple neurotransmitters via both central (dorsal vagal complex) and peripheral (enteric neurons and enterochromaffin cells) anatomical substrates. Taking advantage of advances in receptor-specific agonists, and utilizing Fos expression as a functional activity marker, this study demonstrates a strong, but incomplete, overlap in anatomical substrates for a variety of emetogens. We used cisplatin and specific agonists to 5-HT3 serotonergic, D2/D3 dopaminergic, and NK1 tachykininergic receptors to induce vomiting in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva), and quantified the resulting Fos expression. The least shrew is a small mammal whose responses to emetic challenges are very similar to its human counterparts. In all cases, the enteric nervous system, nucleus of the solitary tract, and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus demonstrated significantly increased Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-IR). However, Fos-IR induction was notably absent from the area postrema following the dopaminergic and NK1 receptor-specific agents. Two brain nuclei not usually discussed regarding emesis, the dorsal raphe nucleus and paraventricular thalamic nucleus, also demonstrated increased emesis-related Fos-IR. Taken together, these data suggest the dorsal vagal complex is part of a common pathway for a variety of distinct emetogens, but there are central emetic substrates, both medullary and diencephalic, that can be accessed without directly stimulating the area postrema. PMID:19699757

  3. Acid Dissociation Constants of Melamine Derivatives from Density Functional Theory Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yun Hee; Hwang, Sungu; Chang, Seo Bong; Ku, Jamin; Chung, Doo Soo

    2009-10-01

    Melamine and its hydrolysis products (ammeline, ammelide, and cyanuric acid) recently attracted great attention as major food contaminants. Developing analytical tools to quantify them requires exact knowledge of their acid dissociation constants (pKa values). Herein, we calculated the pKa values of these melamine derivatives in water, using a density functional theory quantum mechanical method [B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)] in combination with the Poisson-Boltzmann continuum solvation model. The excellent agreement of the calculated values with the experimental ones shows that our method can be used to predict such properties of other food contaminants.

  4. Preparation and properties of novel double-chain nonionic surfactants with acid decomposition function.

    PubMed

    Ono, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi; Shizuma, Motohiro; Nakamura, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Novel double-chain nonionic surfactants with an acid decomposition function were prepared by acid-catalyzed condensation of chloroacetone with fatty alcohols (octyl, decyl, and dodecyl), followed by a Williamson reaction with polyethylene glycol without any expensive reagents and special equipment. These surfactants showed easy micelle formation compared to those of polyoxyethylene (n=9) dodecyl ether (C(12)EO9), and good foaming properties. The emulsion stability of these surfactants was almost the same as that of C(12)EO9. They decomposed completely after 30 min at pH 1. After 28 days they were more than 60% biodegradable and were almost the same as sodium dodecanoate.

  5. Synthesis of Functionalized Dialkyl Ketones From Carboxylic Acid Derivatives and Alkyl Halides

    PubMed Central

    Wotal, Alexander C.; Weix, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Unsymmetrical dialkyl ketones can be directly prepared by the nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling of carboxylic acid chlorides or (2-pyridyl)thioesters with alkyl iodides or benzylic chlorides. A wide variety of functional groups are tolerated by this process, including common nitrogen protecting groups and C-B bonds. Even hindered ketones flanked by tertiary and secondary centers can be formed. The mechanism is proposed to involve the reaction of a (L)Ni(alkyl)2 intermediate with the carboxylic acid derivative. PMID:22360350

  6. Highly selective and sensitive nucleic acid detection based on polysaccharide-functionalized silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-Kun; Ma, Hai-Le; Cai, Pan-Fu; Wu, Jian-Yong

    2015-01-05

    Polysaccharide-functionalized silver nanoparticles (Oc-AgNPs) with a mean diameter of 15 nm were utilized as a novel and effective fluorescence-sensing platform for nucleic acid detection. Tests on the oligonucleotide sequences associated with the human immunodeficiency virus as a model system showed that the Oc-AgNPs effectively absorbed and quenched dye-labeled single-stranded DNA through strong hydrogen bonding interactions and slight electrostatic attractive interactions. The proposed system efficiently differentiated between complementary and mismatched nucleic acid sequences with high selectivity and good reproducibility at room temperature.

  7. Highly selective and sensitive nucleic acid detection based on polysaccharide-functionalized silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing-Kun; Ma, Hai-Le; Cai, Pan-Fu; Wu, Jian-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Polysaccharide-functionalized silver nanoparticles (Oc-AgNPs) with a mean diameter of 15 nm were utilized as a novel and effective fluorescence-sensing platform for nucleic acid detection. Tests on the oligonucleotide sequences associated with the human immunodeficiency virus as a model system showed that the Oc-AgNPs effectively absorbed and quenched dye-labeled single-stranded DNA through strong hydrogen bonding interactions and slight electrostatic attractive interactions. The proposed system efficiently differentiated between complementary and mismatched nucleic acid sequences with high selectivity and good reproducibility at room temperature.

  8. Structure-function studies of nerve growth factor: functional importance of highly conserved amino acid residues.

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, C F; Hallböök, F; Ebendal, T; Persson, H

    1990-01-01

    Selected amino acid residues in chicken nerve growth factor (NGF) were replaced by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutated NGF sequences were transiently expressed in COS cells and the yield of NGF protein in conditioned medium was quantified by Western blotting. Binding of each mutant to NGF receptors on PC12 cells was evaluated in a competition assay. The biological activity was determined by measuring stimulation of neurite outgrowth from chick sympathetic ganglia. The residues homologous to the proposed receptor binding site of insulin (Ser18, Met19, Val21, Asp23) were substituted by Ala. Replacement of Ser18, Met19 and Asp23 did not affect NGF activity. Modification of Val21 notably reduced both receptor binding and biological activity, suggesting that this residue is important to retain a fully active NGF. The highly conserved Tyr51 and Arg99 were converted into Phe and Lys respectively, without changing the biological properties of the molecule. However, binding and biological activity were greatly impaired after the simultaneous replacement of both Arg99 and Arg102 by Gly. The three conserved Trp residues at positions 20, 75 and 98 were substituted by Phe. The Trp mutated proteins retained 15-60% of receptor binding and 40-80% of biological activity, indicating that the Trp residues are not essential for NGF activity. However, replacement of Trp20 significantly reduced the amount of NGF in the medium, suggesting that this residue may be important for protein stability. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2328722

  9. 86Rb+ efflux mediated by alpha4beta2*-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with high and low-sensitivity to stimulation by acetylcholine display similar agonist-induced desensitization.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael J; Meinerz, Natalie M; Brown, Robert W B; Collins, Allan C

    2010-10-15

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) assembled from alpha4 and beta2 subunits are the most densely expressed subtype in the brain. Concentration-effect curves for agonist activation of alpha4beta2*-nAChR are biphasic. This biphasic agonist sensitivity is ascribed to differences in subunit stoichiometry. The studies described here evaluated desensitization elicited by low concentrations of epibatidine, nicotine, cytisine or methylcarbachol of brain alpha4beta2-nAChR function measured with acetylcholine-stimulated (86)Rb(+) efflux from mouse thalamic synaptosomes. Each agonist elicited concentration-dependent desensitization. The agonists differed in potency. However, IC(50) values for each agonist for desensitization of (86)Rb(+) efflux both with high (EC(50) approximately 3 microM) and low (EC(50) approximately 150 microM) acetylcholine sensitivity were not significantly different. Concentrations required to elicit desensitization were higher that their respective K(D) values for receptor binding. Even though the two components of alpha4beta2*-nAChR-mediated (86)Rb(+) efflux from mouse brain differ markedly in EC(50) values for agonist activation, they are equally sensitive to desensitization by exposure to low agonist concentrations. Mice were also chronically treated with nicotine by continuous infusion of 0, 0.5 or 4.0mg/kg/h and desensitization induced by nicotine was evaluated. Consistent with previous results, chronic nicotine treatment increased the density of epibatidine binding sites. Acute exposure to nicotine also elicited concentration-dependent desensitization of both high-sensitivity and low-sensitivity acetylcholine-stimulated (86)Rb(+) efflux from cortical and thalamic synaptosomes. Although chronic nicotine treatment reduced maximal (86)Rb(+) efflux from thalamus, IC(50) values in both brain regions were unaffected by chronic nicotine treatment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. METABOLIC FUNCTION OF BRANCHED-CHAIN VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS, GROWTH FACTORS FOR RUMINOCOCCI II.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, M. J.; Bryant, M. P.; Katz, I.; Keeney, M.

    1962-01-01

    Allison, M. J. (Dairy Cattle Research Branch, USDA, Beltsville, Md.), M. P. Bryant, I. Katz, and M. Keeney. Metabolic function of branched-chain volatile fatty acids, growth factors for ruminococci. II. Biosynthesis of higher branched-chain fatty acids and aldehydes. J. Bacteriol. 83:1084–1093. 1962.—A number of strains of rumen bacteria require branched-chain volatile fatty acids for growth. A strain of Ruminococcus flavefaciens that requires either isovalerate or isobutyrate incorporates radioactive carbon from isovalerate-1-C14 and isovalerate-3-C14 into leucine and into the lipid fraction of the cells. Evidence obtained by both paper and gas chromatography indicated that most of the label in the lipid of cells grown in isovalerate-1-C14 was in a branched-chain 15-carbon fatty acid, with some in a 17-carbon acid; about 7.5% of the C14 was recovered in a branched-chain 15-carbon aldehyde. The aldehydes were in the phospholipid fraction and were presumably present as plasmalogen. A strain of R. albus was shown to require isobutyrate, 2-methyl-n-butyrate, or 2-ketoisovalerate for growth. This strain did not incorporate appreciable C14 from isovalerate-1-C14 or isovalerate-3-C14. When grown in a medium containing isobutyrate-1-C14, most of the cellular C14 was found in the lipid fraction. Analysis of the lipid demonstrated that the label was present mainly as branched-chain 14-carbon and 16-carbon fatty acids, with 11% of the C14 present in 14- and 16-carbon carbonyl compounds, presumably branched-chain aldehydes. Branched-chain 14-, 15-, and 16-carbon fatty acids are major components of the lipids of these rumen bacteria. The possibility that these acids and aldehydes, which are found in ruminant body and milk lipids, may be of microbial origin is discussed. PMID:13860622

  11. Computational Study of Acidic and Basic Functionalized Crystalline Silica Surfaces as a Model for Biomaterial Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Corno, Marta; Delle Piane, Massimo; Monti, Susanna; Moreno-Couranjou, Maryline; Choquet, Patrick; Ugliengo, Piero

    2015-06-16

    In silico modeling of acidic (CH2COOH) or basic (CH2NH2) functionalized silica surfaces has been carried out by means of a density functional approach based on a gradient-corrected functional to provide insight into the characterization of experimentally functionalized surfaces via a plasma method. Hydroxylated surfaces of crystalline cristobalite (sporting 4.8 OH/nm(2)) mimic an amorphous silica interface as unsubstituted material. To functionalize the silica surface we transformed the surface Si-OH groups into Si-CH2COOH and Si-CH2NH2 moieties to represent acidic/basic chemical character for the substitution. Structures, energetics, electronic, and vibrational properties were computed and compared as a function of the increasing loading of the functional groups (from 1 to 4 per surface unit cell). Classical molecular dynamics simulations of selected cases have been performed through a Reax-FF reactive force field to assess the mobility of the surface added chains. Both DFT and force field calculations identify the CH2NH2 moderate surface loading (1 group per unit cell) as the most stable functionalization, at variance with the case of the CH2COOH group, where higher loadings are preferred (2 groups per unit cell). The vibrational fingerprints of the surface functionalities, which are the ν(C═O) stretching and δ(NH2) bending modes for acidic/basic cases, have been characterized as a function of substitution percentage in order to guide the assignment of the experimental data. The final results highlighted the different behavior of the two types of functionalization. On the one hand, the frequency associated with the ν(C═O) mode shifts to lower wavenumbers as a function of the H-bond strength between the surface functionalities (both COOH and SiOH groups), and on the other hand, the δ(NH2) frequency shift seems to be caused by a subtle balance between the H-bond donor and acceptor abilities of the NH2 moiety. Both sets of data are in general agreement with

  12. Function modification of SR-PSOX by point mutations of basic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiwei; Yin, Lan; Chen, Chunxia; Dai, Yalei

    2011-04-15

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is a common cardiovascular disease. Transformation of macrophages to form foam cells by internalizing modified low density-lipoprotein (LDL) via scavenger receptor (SR) is a key pathogenic process in the onset of AS. It has been demonstrated that SR-PSOX functions as either a scavenger receptor for uptake of atherogenic lipoproteins and bacteria or a membrane-anchored chemokine for adhesion of macrophages and T-cells to the endothelium. Therefore, SR-PSOX plays an important role in the development of AS. In this study the key basic amino acids in the chemokine domain of SR-PSOX have been identified for its functions. A cell model to study the functions of SR-PSOX was successfully established. Based on the cell model, a series of mutants of human SR-PSOX were constructed by replacing the single basic amino acid residue in the non-conservative region of the chemokine domain (arginine 62, arginine 78, histidine 80, arginine 82, histidine 85, lysine 105, lysine 119, histidine 123) with alanine (designated as R62A, R78A, H80A, R82A, H85A, K105A, K119A and H123A, respectively). Functional studies showed that the mutants with H80A, H85A, and K105A significantly increased the activities of oxLDL uptake and bacterial phagocytosis compared with the wild-type SR-PSOX. In addition, we have also found that mutagenesis of either of those amino acids strongly reduced the adhesive activity of SR-PSOX by using a highly non-overlapping set of basic amino acid residues. Our study demonstrates that basic amino acid residues in the non-conservative region of the chemokine domain of SR-PSOX are critical for its functions. Mutation of H80, H85, and K105 is responsible for increasing SR-PSOX binding with oxLDL and bacteria. All the basic amino acids in this region are important in the cells adhesion via SR-PSOX. These findings suggest that mutagenesis of the basic amino acids in the chemokine domain of SR-PSOX may contribute to atherogenesis.

  13. Biohydrogenation of Linoleic Acid by Lactic Acid Bacteria for the Production of Functional Cultured Dairy Products: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, Gabriela Christina; De Dea Lindner, Juliano

    2016-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers have attracted significant attention due to their important physiological properties, which have been observed in humans. Many lactic acid bacteria (LAB) demonstrate the ability to produce CLA isomers (C18:2 cis-9, trans-11 and C18:2 trans-10, cis-12) from the linoleic acid (LA) present in milk or in synthetic media. CLA isomers can be synthesized in vitro by LAB using vegetable oils rich in LA. The aim of this review is to present an update on the studies that have been conducted on the production of CLA isomers from LA mainly by LAB and of the factors that influence this conversion (source and concentration of LA and fermentation conditions). In addition, this review presents the relationship between the consumption of CLA isomers and their health benefits in humans such as anti-atherosclerosis and anti-carcinogenic effects. There is considerable variation between the studies concerning the beneficial effects of CLA in animal models, which have not been reflected in human studies. This can be attributed to the differences in the doses of CLA isomers used and to the different sources of CLA. Furthermore, the regulatory and scientific information classifying the physiological properties of CLA, which serve as support for the claims of its potential as a functional ingredient, are presented. More research is needed to determine whether CLA production by LAB can be enhanced and to determine the optimal requirements for these microbial cultures. Furthermore, safety and efficacy of CLA consumption have to be investigated in the future. PMID:28231108

  14. Lipophosphoglycan from Leishmania suppresses agonist-induced interleukin 1β gene expression in human monocytes via a unique promoter sequence

    PubMed Central

    Hatzigeorgiou, Dimitrios E.; Geng, Jiayuan; Zhu, Baixin; Zhang, Yihong; Liu, Ke; Rom, William N.; Fenton, Matthew J.; Turco, Salvatore J.; Ho, John L.

    1996-01-01

    Leishmania are parasites that survive within macrophages by mechanism(s) not entirely known. Depression of cellular immunity and diminished production of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α are potential ways by which the parasite survives within macrophages. We examined the mechanism(s) by which lipophosphoglycan (LPG), a major glycolipid of Leishmania, perturbs cytokine gene expression. LPG treatment of THP-1 monocytes suppressed endotoxin induction of IL-1β steady-state mRNA by greater than 90%, while having no effect on the expression of a control gene. The addition of LPG 2 h before or 2 h after endotoxin challenge significantly suppressed steady-state IL-1β mRNA by 90% and 70%, respectively. LPG also inhibited tumor necrosis factor α and Staphylococcus induction of IL-1β gene expression. The inhibitory effect of LPG is agonist-specific because LPG did not suppress the induction of IL-1β mRNA by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. A unique DNA sequence located within the −310 to −57 nucleotide region of the IL-1β promoter was found to mediate LPG’s inhibitory activity. The requirement for the −310 to −57 promoter gene sequence for LPG’s effect is demonstrated by the abrogation of LPG’s inhibitory activity by truncation or deletion of the −310 to −57 promoter gene sequence. Furthermore, the minimal IL-1β promoter (positions −310 to +15) mediated LPG’s inhibitory activity with dose and kinetic profiles that were similar to LPG’s suppression of steady-state IL-1β mRNA. These findings delineated a promoter gene sequence that responds to LPG to act as a “gene silencer,” a function, to our knowledge, not previously described. LPG’s inhibitory activity for several mediators of inflammation and the persistence of significant inhibitory activity 2 h after endotoxin challenge suggest that LPG has therapeutic potential and may be exploited for therapy of sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and autoimmune

  15. Preoperative and postoperative cortical function of the kidney with staghorn calculi assessed by 99mtechnetium-dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, J; Itoh, H; Okada, Y; Higashi, Y; Yoshida, O; Fujita, T; Torizuka, K

    1983-09-01

    99mTechnetium dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy, consisting of the cortical image and dimercaptosuccinic acid renal uptake rate, was used to assess preoperative and postoperative renal function in 55 patients with staghorn calculi. In 14 of 20 patients who had undergone extended pyelolithotomy and in 4 of 22 who had undergone nephrolithotomy there was an increase or no change in the postoperative dimercaptosuccinic acid renal uptake in the surgically treated kidney. However, there was no increase in the postoperative dimercaptosuccinic acid renal uptake in the patients who had undergone pyelolithotomy combined with nephrotomy or partial nephrectomy. Eight per cent of the preoperative dimercaptosuccinic acid renal uptake rate in the diseased kidney seems to be the absolute level for predicting the postoperative recovery of renal function. Dimercaptosuccinic acid renal images provide evidence of morphological changes in the cortex of the kidney with stones and the dimercaptosuccinic acid uptake rate is a useful adjunct for quantitative assessments of preoperative and postoperative residual cortical function.

  16. Modification of plant lipids for human health: development of functional land-based omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Ursin, Virginia M

    2003-12-01

    We have remodeled canola seeds to accumulate the omega-3 fatty acid, stearidonic acid (SDA). In doing so, we have demonstrated the feasibility of developing a land-based source of functional omega-3 fatty acids on a large scale. Land-based omega-3 fatty acids represent a sustainable source of omega-3 fatty acids that can be produced on large acreages and delivered to consumers in a wide variety of functional foods. And unlike alpha-linolenic acid, SDA can provide eicosapentaenoic acid equivalence at moderate intakes. Widely applied, SDA-enriched foods could become a valuable tool for delivering recommended levels of omega-3 fatty acids to large portions of the population. By obviating the need for dietary changes, SDA-enriched foods may facilitate increased compliance with recommendations for daily omega-3 intakes.

  17. Diet-induced docosahexaenoic acid non-raft domains and lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Raza Shaikh, Saame

    2010-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) that generally suppresses the function of T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APCs). An emerging mechanism by which DHA modifies lymphocyte function is through changes in the organization of sphingolipid/cholesterol lipid raft membrane domains. Two contradictory models have been proposed to explain how DHA exerts its effects through changes in raft organization. The biophysical model, developed in model membranes, shows that DHA-containing phospholipids form unique non-raft membrane domains, that are organizationally distinct from lipid rafts, which serve to alter the conformation and/or lateral organization of lymphocyte proteins. In contrast, the cellular model on DHA and rafts shows that DHA suppresses lymphocyte function, in part, by directly incorporating into lipid rafts and altering protein activity. To reconcile opposing biophysical and cellular viewpoints, a major revision to existing models is presented herein. Based largely on quantitative microscopy data, it is proposed that DHA, consumed through the diet, modifies lymphocyte function, in part, through the formation of nanometer scale DHA-rich domains. These nano-scale domains disrupt the optimal raft-dependent clustering of proteins necessary for initial signaling. The data covered in this review highlights the importance of understanding how dietary n-3 PUFAs modify lymphocyte membranes, which is essential toward developing these fatty acids as therapeutic agents for treating inflammatory diseases.

  18. Surface functionalization of two-dimensional metal chalcogenides by Lewis acid-base chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Sidong; Wang, Xifan; Li, Bo; Kang, Jiahao; He, Yongmin; George, Antony; Ge, Liehui; Gong, Yongji; Dong, Pei; Jin, Zehua; Brunetto, Gustavo; Chen, Weibing; Lin, Zuan-Tao; Baines, Robert; Galvão, Douglas S.; Lou, Jun; Barrera, Enrique; Banerjee, Kaustav; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-05-01

    Precise control of the electronic surface states of two-dimensional (2D) materials could improve their versatility and widen their applicability in electronics and sensing. To this end, chemical surface functionalization has been used to adjust the electronic properties of 2D materials. So far, however, chemical functionalization has relied on lattice defects and physisorption methods that inevitably modify the topological characteristics of the atomic layers. Here we make use of the lone pair electrons found in most of 2D metal chalcogenides and report a functionalization method via a Lewis acid-base reaction that does not alter the host structure. Atomic layers of n-type InSe react with Ti4+ to form planar p-type [Ti4+n(InSe)] coordination complexes. Using this strategy, we fabricate planar p-n junctions on 2D InSe with improved rectification and photovoltaic properties, without requiring heterostructure growth procedures or device fabrication processes. We also show that this functionalization approach works with other Lewis acids (such as B3+, Al3+ and Sn4+) and can be applied to other 2D materials (for example MoS2, MoSe2). Finally, we show that it is possible to use Lewis acid-base chemistry as a bridge to connect molecules to 2D atomic layers and fabricate a proof-of-principle dye-sensitized photosensing device.

  19. Functional role of polar amino acid residues in Na+/H+ exchangers.

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, C A; Dibattista, E R; Fliegel, L

    2001-01-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchangers are a family of ubiquitous membrane proteins. In higher eukaryotes they regulate cytosolic pH by removing an intracellular H(+) in exchange for an extracellular Na(+). In yeast and Escherichia coli, Na(+)/H(+) exchangers function in the opposite direction to remove intracellular Na(+) in exchange for extracellular H(+). Na(+)/H(+) exchangers display an internal pH-sensitivity that varies with the different antiporter types. Only recently have investigations examined the amino acids involved in pH-sensitivity and in cation binding and transport. Histidine residues are good candidates for H(+)-sensing amino acids, since they can ionize within the physiological pH range. Histidine residues have been shown to be important in the function of the E. coli Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NhaA and in the yeast Na(+)/H(+) exchanger sod2. In E. coli, His(225) of NhaA may function to interact with, or regulate, the pH-sensory region of NhaA. In sod2, His(367) is also critical to transport and may be a functional analogue of His(225) of NhaA. Histidine residues are not critical for the function of the mammalian Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, although an unusual histidine-rich sequence of the C-terminal tail has some influence on activity. Other amino acids involved in cation binding and transport by Na(+)/H(+) exchangers are only beginning to be studied. Amino acids with polar side chains such as aspartate and glutamate have been implicated in transport activity of NhaA and sod2, but have not been studied in the mammalian Na(+)/H(+) exchanger. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in pH-sensitivity and cation binding and transport by Na(+)/H(+) exchangers. PMID:11415429

  20. Functional transformations of bile acid transporters induced by high-affinity macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hilal, Taslim A.; Chung, Seung Woo; Alam, Farzana; Park, Jooho; Lee, Kyung Eun; Jeon, Hyesung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, In-San; Kim, Sang Yoon; Byun, Youngro

    2014-01-01

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporters (ASBT) are the intestinal transporters that form intermediate complexes with substrates and its conformational change drives the movement of substrates across the cell membrane. However, membrane-based intestinal transporters are confined to the transport of only small molecular substrates. Here, we propose a new strategy that uses high-affinity binding macromolecular substrates to functionally transform the membrane transporters so that they behave like receptors, ultimately allowing the apical-basal transport of bound macromolecules. Bile acid based macromolecular substrates were synthesized and allowed to interact with ASBT. ASBT/macromolecular substrate complexes were rapidly internalized in vesicles, localized in early endosomes, dissociated and escaped the vesicular transport while binding of cytoplasmic ileal bile acid binding proteins cause exocytosis of macromolecules and prevented entry into lysosomes. This newly found transformation process of ASBT suggests a new transport mechanism that could aid in further utilization of ASBT to mediate oral macromolecular drug delivery. PMID:24566561

  1. Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with covalently-bound hexafluoroisopropanol groups

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Grate, Jay W.

    2010-06-01

    Fluorinated hydrogen-bond acidic groups are directly attached to the backbone of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) without the introduction of intermediate electron donating surface groups. Hexafluoroalcohol functional groups are exceptionally strong hydrogen bond acids, and are added to the nanotube surface using the aryl diazonium approach to create hydrogen-bond acidic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. These groups can promote strong hydrogen-bonding interactions with matrix materials in composites or with molecular species to be concentrated and sensed. In the latter case, this newly developed material is expected to find useful application in chemical sensors and in CNT-based preconcentrator devices for the detection of pesticides, chemical warfare agents and explosives.

  2. Complete chemical modification of amine and acid functional groups of peptides and small proteins

    PubMed Central

    Krusemark, Casey J.; Frey, Brian L.; Smith, Lloyd M.; Belshaw, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The chemical modification of protein thiols by reduction and alkylation is common in the preparation of proteomic samples for analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). Modification at other functional groups has received less attention in MS-based proteomics. Amine modification (Lys, N-termini) by reductive dimethylation or by acylation (e.g. iTRAQ labeling) has recently gained some popularity in peptide-based approaches (bottom-up MS). Modification at acidic groups (Asp, Glu, C-termini) has been explored very minimally. Here, we describe a sequential labeling strategy that enables complete modification of thiols, amines, and acids on peptides or small intact proteins. This method includes (1) the reduction and alkylation of thiols, (2) the reductive dimethylation of amines, and (3) the amidation of acids with any of several amines. This chemical modification scheme offers several options both for the incorporation of stable isotopes for relative quantification and for improving peptides or proteins as MS analytes. PMID:21604117

  3. Functional transformations of bile acid transporters induced by high-affinity macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Al-Hilal, Taslim A; Chung, Seung Woo; Alam, Farzana; Park, Jooho; Lee, Kyung Eun; Jeon, Hyesung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, In-San; Kim, Sang Yoon; Byun, Youngro

    2014-02-25

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporters (ASBT) are the intestinal transporters that form intermediate complexes with substrates and its conformational change drives the movement of substrates across the cell membrane. However, membrane-based intestinal transporters are confined to the transport of only small molecular substrates. Here, we propose a new strategy that uses high-affinity binding macromolecular substrates to functionally transform the membrane transporters so that they behave like receptors, ultimately allowing the apical-basal transport of bound macromolecules. Bile acid based macromolecular substrates were synthesized and allowed to interact with ASBT. ASBT/macromolecular substrate complexes were rapidly internalized in vesicles, localized in early endosomes, dissociated and escaped the vesicular transport while binding of cytoplasmic ileal bile acid binding proteins cause exocytosis of macromolecules and prevented entry into lysosomes. This newly found transformation process of ASBT suggests a new transport mechanism that could aid in further utilization of ASBT to mediate oral macromolecular drug delivery.

  4. Polyamino acid functionalized membranes for metal capture and nanofiltration of organics: Modeling and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hestekin, Jamie Allen

    2000-10-01

    Passive membranes have been used for separations ranging from seawater desalination via reverse osmosis to the separation of particles with microfiltration membranes. However the attachment of macromolecules, with multiple functional sites, to microfiltration membranes allows for more selective separations. For these reasons, we have designed a novel membrane system, consisting of cellulose-based microfiltration membranes functionalized with polyamino acids (2,500--15,000 MW). Because of the high carboxyl content of the polyamino acids, these membranes have been shown to be extremely useful for the separation of heavy metals from aqueous solutions. The primary objective of this research was to establish the sorption mechanisms of functionalized microfiltration membranes and use these mechanisms to predict the rate behavior of metal transport through these membranes. Both cellulose acetate and pure cellulose were used as membrane support materials. Extensive experiments (pH 3--6) were conducted (under convective flow mode) with the derivatized membranes involving the heavy metals: lead, cadmium, nickel, copper, and selected mixtures with calcium in aqueous solutions. Metal sorption results were found to be a function of derivatization (aldehydes) density of membranes and degree of attachment of the polyfunctional groups, number of functional groups per chain, membrane surface area, and the type of metals to be sorbed. We have obtained metal sorption capacities as high as 1.5 g metal/g membrane. As opposed to homogeneous solution systems, the molar sorption capacities of the functional carboxyl sites are significantly enhanced in the membrane pores because of counterion condensation resulting partly from the extremely high charge densities in the membrane pores. This phenomenon was incorporated in a kinetic model for the prediction of sorption behavior. The model studied the effect of pore size, polyamino acid attachment density, pH, and metal type. Finally, in

  5. Kinetic studies on the reaction of compound II of myeloperoxidase with ascorbic acid. Role of ascorbic acid in myeloperoxidase function.

    PubMed

    Marquez, L A; Dunford, H B; Van Wart, H

    1990-04-05

    Ascorbic acid is known to stimulate leukocyte functions. In a recent publication it was suggested that the role of ascorbic acid is to reduce compound II of myeloperoxidase back to the native enzyme (Bolscher, B. G. J. M., Zoutberg, G. R., Cuperus, R. A., and Wever, R. (1984) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 784, 189-191). In this paper we report rapid spectral scan and transient state kinetic results on the reaction of three myeloperoxidase compounds II, namely, human neutrophil myeloperoxidase, canine myeloperoxidase, and bovine spleen heme protein with ascorbate. We show by rapid scan spectra that compound II does not pass through any other intermediate when ascorbic acid reduces it back to native form. We also show that the reactions of all three compounds II involve a simple binding interaction before enzyme reduction with an apparent dissociation constant of 6.3 +/- 0.9 x 10(-4) to 2.0 +/- 0.3 x 10(-3)M and a first-order rate constant for reduction of 12.6 +/- 0.6 to 18.8 +/- 1.3 s-1. The optimum pH is 4.5, and at this pH the activation energy for the reaction is 13.2 kJ mol-1. Results of this work lend further evidence that the spleen green heme protein is very similar if not identical to leukocyte myeloperoxidase based on a comparison of spectral scans, pH-rate profiles, and kinetic parameters. We demonstrate that chloride cannot reduce compound II whereas iodide reduces compound II to native enzyme at a rate comparable to that of ascorbate. This explains why ascorbate accelerates chlorination but inhibits iodination. Formation of compound II is a dead end for the generation of hypochlorous acid; ascorbate regenerates more native enzyme to enhance the chlorination reaction namely: myeloperoxidase + peroxide----compound I followed by compound I + chloride----HOCl. On the other hand, ascorbate is a competitor with iodide for both compounds I and II and so inhibits iodination.

  6. Time-dependent density functional theory assessment of UV absorption of benzoic acid derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hao -Bo; He, Feng; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2012-11-07

    Benzoic acid (BA) derivatives of environmental relevance exhibit various photophysical and photochemical characteristics. Here, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is used to calculate photoexcitations of eight selected BAs and the results are compared with UV spectra determined experimentally. High-level gas-phase EOM-CCSD calculations and experimental aqueous-phase spectra were used as the references for the gas-phase and aqueous-phase TDDFT results, respectively. A cluster-continuum model was used in the aqueous-phase calculations. Among the 15 exchange correlation (XC) functionals assessed, five functionals, including the meta-GGA hybrid M06-2X, double hybrid B2PLYPD, and range-separated functionals CAM-B3LYP, ωB97XD, and LC- ωPBE, were found to be in excellent agreement with the EOM-CCSD gas-phase calculations. These functionals furnished excitation energies consistent with the pH dependence of the experimental spectra with a standard deviation (STDEV) of 0.20 eV. A molecular orbital analysis revealed a πσ* feature of the low-lying transitions of the BAs. Furthermore, the CAM-B3LYP functional showed the best overall performance and therefore shows promise for TDDFT calculations of processes involving photoexcitations of benzoic acid derivatives.

  7. The Pro12Ala variant of the PPARG gene is a risk factor for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma/alpha agonist-induced edema in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lars; Ekstrøm, Claus T; Tabanera Y Palacios, René; Anant, Madan; Wassermann, Karsten; Reinhardt, Rickey R

    2006-09-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs)-gamma by thiazolidinediones (pioglitazone, rosiglitazone) and dual-acting PPARalpha/gamma agonists (pargluva, ragaglitazar) is a widely used pharmacological principle to treat insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Clinically, however, fluid retention and edema are worrying side effects with these drugs. The objective of the present study was to investigate any variation in the PPARG and PPARA genes associated with the risk of fluid retention and development of peripheral edema in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with the dual-acting PPARalpha/gamma agonist ragaglitazar. Single-nucleotide polymorphism and haplotype analyses of the PPARA and PPARG genes were performed on DNA obtained from 345 type 2 diabetic patients randomized to 26-wk monotherapy with the dual-acting PPARalpha/gamma agonist ragaglitazar. At 26 wk, edema was recorded in 48 of the patients (14%) treated with ragaglitazar, and Cox regression analyses identified the common Pro12Ala variant of the PPARG gene as biologically the most important risk factor (hazard ratio 4.42, P = 0.0081) for edema. Other risk factors included female gender (hazard ratio 3.34, P = 0.0005) and weight change during treatment (hazard ratio 1.20, P = 0.0017). A population-attributable risk of approximately 50% for the Pro12Pro genotype indicates that testing for the Pro12Ala of the PPARG gene in addition to the already identified clinical risk factors may become a useful tool to further reduce the risk of PPARgamma agonist-induced fluid retention and edema in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  8. Agonist-induced changes in the phosphorylation of the myosin- binding subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase and CPI17, two regulatory factors of myosin light chain phosphatase, in smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Niiro, Naohisa; Koga, Yasuhiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2003-01-01

    The inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) enhances smooth muscle contraction at a constant [Ca2+]. There are two components, myosin-binding subunit of MLCP (MBS) and CPI17, thought to be responsible for the inhibition of MLCP by external stimuli. The phosphorylation of MBS at Thr-641 and of CPI17 at Thr-38 inhibits the MLCP activity in vitro. Here we determined the changes in the phosphorylation of MBS and CPI17 after agonist stimulation in intact as well as permeabilized smooth muscle strips using phosphorylation-site-specific antibodies as probes. The CPI17 phosphorylation transiently increased after agonist stimulation in both alpha-toxin skinned and intact fibres. The time course of the increase in CPI17 phosphorylation after stimulation correlated with the increase in myosin regulatory light chain (MLC) phosphorylation. The increase in CPI17 phosphorylation was significantly diminished by Y27632, a Rho kinase inhibitor, and GF109203x, a protein kinase C inhibitor, suggesting that both the protein kinase C and Rho kinase pathways influence the change in CPI17 phosphorylation. On the other hand, a significant level of MBS phosphorylation at Thr-641, an inhibitory site, was observed in the resting state for both skinned and intact fibres and the agonist stimulation did not significantly alter the MBS phosphorylation level at Thr-641. While the removal of the agonist markedly decreased MLC phosphorylation and induced relaxation, the phosphorylation of MBS was unchanged, while CPI17 phosphorylation markedly diminished. These results strongly suggest that the phosphorylation of CPI17 plays a more significant role in the agonist-induced increase in myosin phosphorylation and contraction of smooth muscle than MBS phosphorylation in the Ca2+-independent activation mechanism of smooth muscle contraction. PMID:12296769

  9. Folic acid enhances early functional recovery in a piglet model of pediatric head injury.

    PubMed

    Naim, Maryam Y; Friess, Stuart; Smith, Colin; Ralston, Jill; Ryall, Karen; Helfaer, Mark A; Margulies, Susan S

    2010-01-01

    For stroke and spinal cord injury, folic acid supplementation has been shown to enhance neurodevelopment and to provide neuroprotection. We hypothesized that folic acid would reduce brain injury and improve neurological outcome in a neonatal piglet model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), using 4 experimental groups of 3- to 5-day-old female piglets. Two groups were intubated, anesthetized and had moderate brain injury induced by rapid axial head rotation without impact. One group of injured (Inj) animals received folic acid (Fol; 80 μg/kg) by intraperitoneal (IP) injection 15 min following injury, and then daily for 6 days (Inj + Fol; n = 7). The second group of injured animals received an IP injection of saline (Sal) at the same time points (Inj + Sal; n = 8). Two uninjured (Uninj) control groups (Uninj + Fol, n = 8; Uninj + Sal, n = 7) were intubated, anesthetized and received folic acid (80 μg/kg) or saline by IP injection at the same time points as the injured animals following a sham procedure. Animals underwent neurobehavioral and cognitive testing on days 1 and 4 following injury to assess behavior, memory, learning and problem solving. Serum folic acid and homocysteine levels were collected prior to injury and again before euthanasia. The piglets were euthanized 6 days following injury, and their brains were perfusion fixed for histological analysis. Folic acid levels were significantly higher in both Fol groups on day 6. Homocysteine levels were not affected by treatment. On day 1 following injury, the Inj + Fol group showed significantly more exploratory interest, and better motor function, learning and problem solving compared to the Inj + Sal group. Inj + Fol animals had a significantly lower cognitive composite dysfunction score compared to all other groups on day 1. These functional improvements were not seen on day 4 following injury. Axonal injury measured by β-amyloid precursor protein staining 6 days after injury was not affected by treatment

  10. Folic Acid Enhances Early Functional Recovery in a Piglet Model of Pediatric Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Naim, Maryam Y.; Friess, Stuart; Smith, Colin; Ralston, Jill; Ryall, Karen; Helfaer, Mark A.; Margulies, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    For stroke and spinal cord injury, folic acid supplementation has been shown to enhance neurodevelopment and to provide neuroprotection. We hypothesized that folic acid would reduce brain injury and improve neurological outcome in a neonatal piglet model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), using 4 experimental groups of 3- to 5-day-old female piglets. Two groups were intubated, anesthetized and had moderate brain injury induced by rapid axial head rotation without impact. One group of injured (Inj) animals received folic acid (Fol; 80 μg/kg) by intraperitoneal (IP) injection 15 min following injury, and then daily for 6 days (Inj + Fol; n = 7). The second group of injured animals received an IP injection of saline (Sal) at the same time points (Inj + Sal; n = 8). Two uninjured (Uninj) control groups (Uninj + Fol, n = 8; Uninj + Sal, n = 7) were intubated, anesthetized and received folic acid (80 μg/kg) or saline by IP injection at the same time points as the injured animals following a sham procedure. Animals underwent neurobehavioral and cognitive testing on days 1 and 4 following injury to assess behavior, memory, learning and problem solving. Serum folic acid and homocysteine levels were collected prior to injury and again before euthanasia. The piglets were euthanized 6 days following injury, and their brains were perfusion fixed for histological analysis. Folic acid levels were significantly higher in both Fol groups on day 6. Homocysteine levels were not affected by treatment. On day 1 following injury, the Inj + Fol group showed significantly more exploratory interest, and better motor function, learning and problem solving compared to the Inj + Sal group. Inj + Fol animals had a significantly lower cognitive composite dysfunction score compared to all other groups on day 1. These functional improvements were not seen on day 4 following injury. Axonal injury measured by β-amyloid precursor protein staining 6 days after injury was not affected by treatment

  11. Effects of nanoscale confinement on the functionality of nucleic acids: implications for nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Castronovo, M; Stopar, A; Coral, L; Redhu, S K; Vidonis, M; Kumar, V; Ben, F Del; Grassi, M; Nicholson, A W

    2013-01-01

    The facile self-assembly and nanomanipulation of nucleic acids hold great promise in the design of innovative, programmable materials, with applications ranging from biosensing to cellular targeting and drug delivery. Little is known, however, of the effects of confinement on biochemical reactions within such systems, in which the level of packing and crowding is similar to that of intracellular environments. In this review article we outline novel, unexpected properties of nucleic acids that arise from nanoscale confinement, as mainly revealed by atomic force and electron microscopy, electrochemistry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and gel electrophoresis. We review selected scientific studies over the last decade that describe the novel behavior of nanoconfined nucleic acids with respect to hybridization, denaturation, conformation, stability, and enzyme accessibility. The nanoscale systems discussed include self-assembled, water-soluble, DNA or RNA nanostructures, ranging in width from a few to several tens of nm; gold nanoparticles coated with DNA monolayers; and self-assembled monolayers of DNA, from a few to several hundreds of bp in length. These studies reveal that the functionality of nucleic acid-based nanosystems is highly dependent upon the local density, molecular flexibility and network of weak interactions between adjacent molecules. These factors significantly affect steric hindrance, molecular crowding and hydration, which in turn control nucleic acid hybridization, denaturation, conformation, and enzyme accessibility. The findings discussed in this review article demonstrate that nucleic acids function in a qualitatively different manner within nanostructured systems, and suggest that these novel properties, if better understood, will enable the development of powerful molecular tools for nanomedicine.

  12. In situ chemical functionalization of gallium nitride with phosphonic acid derivatives during etching.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Stewart J; Greenough, Michelle; Arellano, Consuelo; Paskova, Tania; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2014-03-04

    In situ functionalization of polar (c plane) and nonpolar (a plane) gallium nitride (GaN) was performed by adding (3-bromopropyl) phosphonic acid or propyl phosphonic acid to a phosphoric acid etch. The target was to modulate the emission properties and oxide formation of GaN, which was explored through surface characterization with atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and water contact angle. The use of (3-bromopropyl) phosphonic acid and propyl phosphonic acid in phosphoric acid demonstrated lower amounts of gallium oxide formation and greater hydrophobicity for both sample sets, while also improving PL emission of polar GaN samples. In addition to crystal orientation, growth-related factors such as defect density in bulk GaN versus thin GaN films residing on sapphire substrates were investigated as well as their responses to in situ functionalization. Thin nonpolar GaN layers were the most sensitive to etching treatments due in part to higher defect densities (stacking faults and threading dislocations), which accounts for large surface depressions. High-quality GaN (both free-standing bulk polar and bulk nonpolar) demonstrated increased sensitivity to oxide formation. Room-temperature PL stands out as an excellent technique to identify nonradiative recombination as observed in the spectra of heteroepitaxially grown GaN samples. The chemical methods applied to tune optical and physical properties of GaN provide a quantitative framework for future novel chemical and biochemical sensor development.

  13. Quantifying Functional Group Interactions that Determine Urea Effects on Nucleic Acid Helix Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, Emily J.; Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Cha, Hyo Keun; McDevitt, Joseph L.; Merker, Wolf E.; Ritzer, Ryan; Muth, Gregory W.; Engelsgjerd, Samuel W.; Mangold, Kathryn E.; Thompson, Perry J.; Kerins, Michael J.; Record, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Urea destabilizes helical and folded conformations of nucleic acids and proteins, as well as protein-nucleic acid complexes. To understand these effects, extend previous characterizations of interactions of urea with protein functional groups, and thereby develop urea as a probe of conformational changes in protein and nucleic acid processes, we obtain chemical potential derivatives (μ23 = dμ2/dm3) quantifying interactions of urea (component 3) with nucleic acid bases, base analogs, nucleosides and nucleotide monophosphates (component 2) using osmometry and hexanol-water distribution assays. Dissection of these μ23 yields interaction potentials quantifying interactions of urea with unit surface areas of nucleic acid functional groups (heterocyclic aromatic ring, ring methyl, carbonyl and phosphate O, amino N, sugar (C,O)); urea interacts favorably with all these groups, relative to interactions with water. Interactions of urea with heterocyclic aromatic rings and attached methyl groups (as on thymine) are particularly favorable, as previously observed for urea-homocyclic aromatic ring interactions. Urea m-values determined for double helix formation by DNA dodecamers near 25°C are in the range 0.72 to 0.85 kcal mol−1 m−1 and exhibit little systematic dependence on nucleobase composition (17–42% GC). Interpretation of these results using the urea interaction potentials indicates that extensive (60–90%) stacking of nucleobases in the separated strands in the transition region is required to explain the m-value. Results for RNA and DNA dodecamers obtained at higher temperatures, and literature data, are consistent with this conclusion. This demonstrates the utility of urea as a quantitative probe of changes in surface area (ΔASA) in nucleic acid processes. PMID:23510511

  14. Conserved Acidic Amino Acid Residues in a Second RNA Recognition Motif Regulate Assembly and Function of TDP-43

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Noriko; Ayaki, Takashi; Morimura, Toshifumi; Oono, Miki; Uchida, Tsukasa; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ito, Hidefumi; Urushitani, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that pathogenic TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP)-43 fragments contain a partial RNA-recognition motif domain 2 (RRM2) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)/frontotemporal lobar degeneration. However, the molecular basis for how this domain links to the conformation and function of TDP-43 is unclear. Previous crystal analyses have documented that the RRM2-DNA complex dimerizes under acidic and high salt conditions, mediated by the intermolecular hydrogen bonds of Glu246-Ile249 and Asp247-Asp247. The aims of this study were to investigate the roles of Glu246 and Asp247 in the molecular assembly of RRM2 under physiological conditions, and to evaluate their potential use as markers for TDP-43 misfolding due to the aberrantly exposed dimer interface. Unexpectedly, gel filtration analyses showed that, regardless of DNA interaction, the RRM2 domain remained as a stable monomer in phosphate-buffered saline. Studies using substitution mutants revealed that Glu246 and, especially, Asp247 played a crucial role in preserving the functional RRM2 monomers. Substitution to glycine at Glu246 or Asp247 induced the formation of fibrillar oligomers of RRM2 accompanied by the loss of DNA-binding affinity, which also affected the conformation and the RNA splicing function of full-length TDP-43. A novel monoclonal antibody against peptides containing Asp247 was found to react with TDP-43 inclusions of ALS patients and mislocalized cytosolic TDP-43 in cultured cells, but not with nuclear wild-type TDP-43. Our findings indicate that Glu246 and Asp247 play pivotal roles in the proper conformation and function of TDP-43. In particular, Asp247 should be studied as a molecular target with an aberrant conformation related to TDP-43 proteinopathy. PMID:23300771

  15. Modification of SR-PSOX functions by multi-point mutations of basic amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiwei; Yin, Lan; Dai, Yalei

    2013-02-01

    SR-PSOX can function as a scavenger receptor, a chemokine and an adhesion molecule, and it could be an interesting player in the formation of atherosclerotic lesions. Our previous studies demonstrated that basic amino acid residues in the chemokine domain of SR-PSOX are critical for its functions. In this study the combinations of the key basic amino acids in the chemokine domain of SR-PSOX have been identified. Five combinations of basic amino acid residues that may form conformational motif for SR-PSOX functions were selected for multi-point mutants. The double mutants of K61AR62A, R76AK79A, R82AH85A, and treble mutants of R76AR78AK79A, R78AR82AH85A were successfully constructed by replacing the combinations of two or three basic amino acid residues with alanine. After successful expression of these mutants on the cells, the functional studies showed that the cells expressing R76AK79A and R82AH85A mutants significantly increased the activity of oxLDL uptake compared with that of wild-type SR-PSOX. Meanwhile, the cells expressing R76AK79A mutant also dramatically enhanced the phagocytotic activity of SR-PSOX. However, the cells expressing the construct of combination of R78A mutation in R76AK79A or R82AH85A could abolish these effects. More interestingly, the adhesive activities were remarkably down regulated in the cells expressing the multi-point mutants respectively. This study revealed that some conformational motifs of basic amino acid residues, especially R76 with K79 in SR-PSOX, may form a common functional motif for its critical functions. R78 in SR-PSOX has the potential action to stabilize the function of oxLDL uptake and bacterial phagocytosis. The results obtained may provide new insight for the development of drug target of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Fluorescence enhancement of glutaraldehyde functionalized polyaniline nanofibers in the presence of aromatic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Borah, Rajiv; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-04-01

    Polyaniline nanofibers (PNFs) synthesized by dilute polymerization method have been surface functionalized with glutaraldehyde at their N-terminals in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) at P(H)=7.4 in order to achieve improved interaction of surface functionalized polyaniline nanofibers (SF-PNFs) with aromatic amino acids-Tyrosine, Tryptophan and Phenylalanine through incorporation of aldehyde (-CHO) and hydroxyl (-OH) functionalities. HRTEM reveals nanofibers of average diameter of 35.66 nm. FESEM depicts interconnected networks of nanofibers of polyaniline (PAni). UV-visible absorption and Fluorescence spectroscopy indicate that the PNFs and SF-PNFs are in emeraldine base (EB) form. FT-IR, (1)H NMR spectroscopy suggests covalent interactions of SF-PNFs with aromatic amino acids and possible reaction mechanisms have been proposed based on these results. Remarkable enhancement in fluorescence signals of SF-PNFs in the presence of aromatic amino acids has been observed and the apparent binding constant (KA) and the number of binding sites (n) have been calculated using fluorescence enhancement equation. The KA value is found to be highest for SF-PNFs+Tyrosine and n is two for all the polymer amino acid complexes, which are in agreement with the FT-IR and (1)H NMR results. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency has been found to be highest for SF-PNFs+Tyrosine giving maximum fluorescence enhancement. The study of interaction mechanisms by means of an extremely sensitive technique like fluorescence using SF-PNFs as a substrate may provide a promising analytical tool for detection and monitoring any biochemical reactions involving these three aromatic amino acids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Acid-Functionalized Mesoporous Carbon: An Efficient Support for Ruthenium-Catalyzed γ-Valerolactone Production

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Schiavoni, Marco; Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; Fulvio, Pasquale F.; Mayes, Richard T.; Dai, Sheng; More, Karren L.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Prati, Laura

    2015-06-18

    The hydrogenation of levulinic acid has been studied using Ru supported on ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) prepared by soft-templating. P- and S-containing acid groups were introduced by postsynthetic functionalization before the addition of 1% Ru by incipient wetness impregnation. These functionalities and the reaction conditions mediate the activity and selectivity of the levulinic acid hydrogenation. The presence of Scontaining groups (Ru/OMC-S and Ru/OMC-P/S) deactivates the Ru catalysts strongly, whereas the presence of P-containing groups (Ru/OMC-P) enhances the activity compared to that of pristine Ru/OMC. Under mild conditions (70 8C and 7 bar H2) the catalyst shows high selectivity to g-valerolactone (GVL; >95%) and high stability on recycling. However, under more severe conditions (200 8C and pH2=40 bar) Ru/OMC-P is particularly able to promote GVL ring-opening and the consecutive hydrogenation to pentanoic acid.

  18. Acid-Functionalized Mesoporous Carbon: An Efficient Support for Ruthenium-Catalyzed γ-Valerolactone Production

    DOE PAGES

    Villa, Alberto; Schiavoni, Marco; Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; ...

    2015-06-18

    The hydrogenation of levulinic acid has been studied using Ru supported on ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) prepared by soft-templating. P- and S-containing acid groups were introduced by postsynthetic functionalization before the addition of 1% Ru by incipient wetness impregnation. These functionalities and the reaction conditions mediate the activity and selectivity of the levulinic acid hydrogenation. The presence of Scontaining groups (Ru/OMC-S and Ru/OMC-P/S) deactivates the Ru catalysts strongly, whereas the presence of P-containing groups (Ru/OMC-P) enhances the activity compared to that of pristine Ru/OMC. Under mild conditions (70 8C and 7 bar H2) the catalyst shows high selectivity to g-valerolactonemore » (GVL; >95%) and high stability on recycling. However, under more severe conditions (200 8C and pH2=40 bar) Ru/OMC-P is particularly able to promote GVL ring-opening and the consecutive hydrogenation to pentanoic acid.« less

  19. Phenylboronic acid functionalized gold nanoparticles for highly sensitive detection of Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jine; Gao, Jingqing; Liu, Dianjun; Han, Dongxue; Wang, Zhenxin

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we report a phenylboronic acid functionalized gold nanoparticle (GNP)-based colorimetric assay for rapid detection of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) with high sensitivity. In this approach, GNPs can bind to S. aureus by the reaction of phenylboronic acid with the cis-diol configuration in glycans on the bacterial surface, providing a colorimetric readout of the binding event. Using this strategy, we have been able to quantify S. aureus at a concentration of 50 cells per mL (three times the standard deviation divided by the slope of the working curve) in aqueous solution.Herein, we report a phenylboronic acid functionalized gold nanoparticle (GNP)-based colorimetric assay for rapid detection of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) with high sensitivity. In this approach, GNPs can bind to S. aureus by the reaction of phenylboronic acid with the cis-diol configuration in glycans on the bacterial surface, providing a colorimetric readout of the binding event. Using this strategy, we have been able to quantify S. aureus at a concentration of 50 cells per mL (three times the standard deviation divided by the slope of the working curve) in aqueous solution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experimental method and additional figures are available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11657j

  20. Conjugated linoleic acids as functional food: an insight into their health benefits

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Sailas; Spener, Friedrich

    2009-01-01

    This review evaluates the health benefits of the functional food, conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) - a heterogeneous group of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid predominantly found in milk, milk products, meat and meat products of ruminants. During the past couple of decades, hundreds of reports - principally based on in vitro, microbial, animal, and of late clinical trials on humans - have been accumulating with varying biological activities of CLA isomers. These studies highlight that CLA, apart form the classical nuclear transcription factors-mediated mechanism of action, appear to exhibit a number of inter-dependent molecular signalling pathways accounting for their reported health benefits. Such benefits relate to anti-obesitic, anti-carcinogenic, anti-atherogenic, anti-diabetagenic, immunomodulatory, apoptotic and osteosynthetic effects. On the other hand, negative effects of CLA have been reported such as fatty liver and spleen, induction of colon carcinogenesis and hyperproinsulinaemia. As far as human consumption is concerned, a definite conclusion for CLA safety has not been reached yet. Parameters such as administration of the type of CLA isomer and/or their combination with other polyunsaturated fatty acids, mode of administration (eg., as free fatty acid or its triglyceride form, liquid or solid), daily dose and duration of consumption, gender, age, or ethnic and geographical backgrounds remain to be determined. Yet, it appears from trials so far conducted that CLA are functional food having prevailing beneficial health effects for humans. PMID:19761624

  1. PPARα augments heart function and cardiac fatty acid oxidation in early experimental polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Standage, Stephen W; Bennion, Brock G; Knowles, Taft O; Ledee, Dolena R; Portman, Michael A; McGuire, John K; Liles, W Conrad; Olson, Aaron K

    2017-02-01

    Children with sepsis and multisystem organ failure have downregulated leukocyte gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα), a nuclear hormone receptor transcription factor that regulates inflammation and lipid metabolism. Mouse models of sepsis have likewise demonstrated that the absence of PPARα is associated with decreased survival and organ injury, specifically of the heart. Using a clinically relevant mouse model of early sepsis, we found that heart function increases in wild-type (WT) mice over the first 24 h of sepsis, but that mice lacking PPARα (Ppara(-/-)) cannot sustain the elevated heart function necessary to compensate for sepsis pathophysiology. Left ventricular shortening fraction, measured 24 h after initiation of sepsis by echocardiography, was higher in WT mice than in Ppara(-/-) mice. Ex vivo working heart studies demonstrated greater developed pressure, contractility, and aortic outflow in WT compared with Ppara(-/-) mice. Furthermore, cardiac fatty acid oxidation was increased in WT but not in Ppara(-/-) mice. Regulatory pathways controlling pyruvate incorporation into the citric acid cycle were inhibited by sepsis in both genotypes, but the regulatory state of enzymes controlling fatty acid oxidation appeared to be permissive in WT mice only. Mitochondrial ultrastructure was not altered in either genotype indicating that severe mitochondrial dysfunction is unlikely at this stage of sepsis. These data suggest that PPARα expression supports the hyperdynamic cardiac response early in the course of sepsis and that increased fatty acid oxidation may prevent morbidity and mortality.

  2. Amino acid-based anti-fouling functionalization of silica nanoparticles using divinyl sulfone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanqi; Cheng, Fang; Shen, Wen; Cheng, Gang; Zhao, Jing; Peng, Wei; Qu, Jingping

    2016-08-01

    Natural amino acids are zwitterionic molecules and the good biocompatibility promises them potential candidates as anti-fouling materials. Here, we developed a new method to functionalize silica nanoparticles with a natural amino acid-based anti-fouling layer. Amino acids were covalently immobilized on 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane modified silica nanoparticles using divinyl sulfone through a two-step reaction in aqueous solution at room temperature. The progress was monitored with NMR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and zeta potential measurements. A library of amino acids was screened and the nonspecific protein adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fetal bovine serum (FBS) were investigated using dynamic light scattering method. The results showed that cysteine, lysine and arginine functionalized silica nanoparticles can effectively resist protein adsorption due to the zwitterionic structure. Among them, lysine functionalized silica nanoparticles had the best anti-fouling performance, which showed hydrodynamic diameter increases of only 10% after incubated in BSA solution and 20% after incubated in FBS solution for 24h. The neat aqueous modification process can conveniently create a thin zwitterionic layer on silica particles, and it has a great potential in biomolecule immobilization and biofunctional surface preparation. Zwitterionic polymer is an outstanding class of anti-fouling material; but the difficulty in synthesis is challenging its spread utilization. In this study, we developed a new method to create an amino acid-based zwitterionic layer on APTES functionalized silica nanoparticles through a two-step reaction in aqueous solution at room temperature. The surface chemistry was monitored with NMR, XPS, TEM and zeta potential measurements. With this method, a library of amino acid conjugated-silica nanoparticles was synthesized and their anti-fouling performance was evaluated using dynamic light

  3. Characterization and functional analysis of fatty acid binding protein from the carcinogenic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini.

    PubMed

    Sripa, Jittiyawadee; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, the cDNA encoding FABP (Ov-FABP) was isolated from the adult stage of Opisthorchis viverrini and characterized. The Ov-FABP protein sequence (107 amino acids) was predicted to have a molecular mass of 12.26kDa and an isoelectric point (PI) of 6.82. This sequence had a high identity and similarity to Cs-FABP of the related opisthorchid Clonorchis sinensis. Multiple sequence alignment with FABPs from other parasitic flatworms and mammals showed a number of conserved amino acids including Phe(34), Gly(37), Glu(38), Glu(39),Val(50), Iso(62), Gly(81), Ile(84), Ser(87) and Arg(101). In addition, the structure of Ov-FABP was predicted to have eleven β-sheets and one α-helix based on the known structures for FABPs from human (hL-FABP), rat and a schistosome. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequence data revealed a close relationship of Ov-FABP with Cs-FABP and hL-FABP. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed that Ov-FABP was transcribed in the egg, metacercaria, juvenile and adult stages. The soluble form of recombinant Ov-FABP (rOv-FABP) was shown to specifically bind fatty acids, including oleic acid, palmitic acid and linoleic acid, as shown for other animals. Anti-serum against rOv-FABP (produced in mice) located the protein to parenchyma, egg, sucker musculature, testes and tegument of adult O. viverrini. Taken together, the findings suggest key functional roles for Ov-FABP in development, reproduction and/or host-parasite interactions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulatory Genes Controlling Fatty Acid Catabolism and Peroxisomal Functions in the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus nidulans†

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Michael J.; Murray, Sandra L.; Duncan, Anna; Khew, Gillian S.; Davis, Meryl A.

    2006-01-01

    The catabolism of fatty acids is important in the lifestyle of many fungi, including plant and animal pathogens. This has been investigated in Aspergillus nidulans, which can grow on acetate and fatty acids as sources of carbon, resulting in the production of acetyl coenzyme A (CoA). Acetyl-CoA is metabolized via the glyoxalate bypass, located in peroxisomes, enabling gluconeogenesis. Acetate induction of enzymes specific for acetate utilization as well as glyoxalate bypass enzymes is via the Zn2-Cys6 binuclear cluster activator FacB. However, enzymes of the glyoxalate bypass as well as fatty acid beta-oxidation and peroxisomal proteins are also inducible by fatty acids. We have isolated mutants that cannot grow on fatty acids. Two of the corresponding genes, farA and farB, encode two highly conserved families of related Zn2-Cys6 binuclear proteins present in filamentous ascomycetes, including plant pathogens. A single ortholog is found in the yeasts Candida albicans, Debaryomyces hansenii, and Yarrowia lipolytica, but not in the Ashbya, Kluyveromyces, Saccharomyces lineage. Northern blot analysis has shown that deletion of the farA gene eliminates induction of a number of genes by both short- and long-chain fatty acids, while deletion of the farB gene eliminates short-chain induction. An identical core 6-bp in vitro binding site for each protein has been identified in genes encoding glyoxalate bypass, beta-oxidation, and peroxisomal functions. This sequence is overrepresented in the 5′ region of genes predicted to be fatty acid induced in other filamentous ascomycetes, C. albicans, D. hansenii, and Y. lipolytica, but not in the corresponding genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:16682457

  5. Stratification, composition, and function of marine mammal blubber: the ecology of fatty acids in marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Strandberg, Ursula; Käkelä, Anne; Lydersen, Christian; Kovacs, Kit M; Grahl-Nielsen, Otto; Hyvärinen, Heikki; Käkelä, Reijo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This study of vertical fatty acid profiles, based on analysis of 58 fatty acids sampled at 3-mm intervals throughout the blubber column of a model marine mammal, the ringed seal (Pusa hispida), revealed three chemically distinct layers. The average depths of the outer and inner layers were quite consistent (approximately 1.5 and approximately 1 cm, respectively). Consequently, the middle layer varied greatly in thickness, from being virtually absent in the thinnest animals to 2.5 cm thick in the fattest. The relative consistencies of the thickness and composition of the layers as well as the nature of the fatty acids making up each layer support the generally assumed function of the various layers: (1) the outer layer is primarily structural and thermoregulatory, (2) the inner layer is metabolically active with a fatty acid composition that is strongly affected by recent/ongoing lipid mobilization/deposition, and (3) the middle layer is a storage site that contracts and expands with food availability/consumption. The remarkable dynamics of the middle layer along with the discrete pattern of stratification found in the vertical fatty acid profiles have important implications for methodological sampling design for studies of foraging ecology and toxicology based on analyses of blubber of marine mammals.

  6. Distinguishing Functional Amino Acid Covariation from Background Linkage Disequilibrium in HIV Protease and Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Lee, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Correlated amino acid mutation analysis has been widely used to infer functional interactions between different sites in a protein. However, this analysis can be confounded by important phylogenetic effects broadly classifiable as background linkage disequilibrium (BLD). We have systematically separated the covariation induced by selective interactions between amino acids from background LD, using synonymous (S) vs. amino acid (A) mutations. Covariation between two amino acid mutations, (A,A), can be affected by selective interactions between amino acids, whereas covariation within (A,S) pairs or (S,S) pairs cannot. Our analysis of the pol gene — including the protease and the reverse transcriptase genes — in HIV reveals that (A,A) covariation levels are enormously higher than for either (A,S) or (S,S), and thus cannot be attributed to phylogenetic effects. The magnitude of these effects suggests that a large portion of (A,A) covariation in the HIV pol gene results from selective interactions. Inspection of the most prominent (A,A) interactions in the HIV pol gene showed that they are known sites of independently identified drug resistance mutations, and physically cluster around the drug binding site. Moreover, the specific set of (A,A) interaction pairs was reproducible in different drug treatment studies, and vanished in untreated HIV samples. The (S,S) covariation curves measured a low but detectable level of background LD in HIV. PMID:17726544

  7. Polymeric prodrug-functionalized polypropylene films for sustained release of salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Magaña, Hector; Palomino, Kenia; Cornejo-Bravo, Jose M; Díaz-Gómez, Luis; Concheiro, Angel; Zavala-Lagunes, Edgar; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Bucio, Emilio

    2016-09-10

    Medical devices decorated with salicylic acid-based polymer chains (polymeric prodrug) that slowly release this anti-inflammatory and anti-biofilm drug at the implantation site were designed. A "grafting from" method was implemented to directly grow chains of a polymerizable derivative of salicylic acid (2-methacryloyloxy-benzoic acid, 2MBA) onto polypropylene (PP). PP was modified both at bulk and on the surface with poly(2MBA) by means of an oxidative pre-irradiation method ((60)Co source), in order to obtain a grafted polymer in which salicylic acid units were linked by means of labile ester bonds. The grafting percent depended on absorbed dose, reaction time, temperature and monomer concentration. The functionalized films were analyzed regarding structure (FTIR-ATR, SEM-EDX, fluorescence microscopy), temperature stability (TGA), interaction with aqueous medium (water contact angle and swelling), pH-responsive release and cytocompatibility (fibroblasts). In the obtained poly(2MBA)-grafted biomaterial, poly(2MBA) behaved as a polymeric prodrug that regulates salicylic acid release once in contact with aqueous medium, showing pH-dependent release rate.

  8. Poly-carboxylic acids functionalized chitosan nanocarriers for controlled and targeted anti-cancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Mariappan; Murugan, Maruthamuthu; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Sadasivuni, Kishor Kumar; Munusamy, Murugan A

    2016-10-01

    The present study evaluates the in-vitro cisplatin (CDDP) release from four different poly oxalates cross-linked chitosan (CS) nanocomposites. The poly oxalates were synthesized from the reaction of four different dicarboxylic acids with ethylene glycol (EG). The encapsulation of CDDP on CS cross-linked with Oxalic acid-EG, Succinic acid-EG, Citric acid-EG and tartaric acid-EG carriers were carried out by the ionic gelation technique. The poly-oxalate nanocarriers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction studies and zeta potential analysis. The stability of poly-oxalates was calculated by the density functional theory (DFT) using Gaussview 05. Excellent drug release kinetics and good biocompatibility of nanocomposites were observed for the in-vitro analysis. The unloaded poly oxalate nanocomposites perform to have a low inherent cytotoxicity, whereas the loaded nanocomposites were as active as free CDDP in the MCF-7 cancer cell line. The tumor growth inhibitions of CDDP-loaded nanocomposites are more or equal to that of free CDDP. Taken together, these two poly oxalate nanocomposites are established as promising drug carriers for the delivery of CDDP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Tannic acid functionalized graphene hydrogel for entrapping gold nanoparticles with high catalytic performance toward dye reduction.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Zhang, Nan; Lai, Jianping; Liu, Ren; Liu, Xiaoya

    2015-12-30

    In this work, a simple, cost-effective, and environmental-friendly strategy was developed to synthesize gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) decorated graphene hydrogel with the use of tannic acid. This facile route involved the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) in the presence of tannic acid to form tannic acid functionalized graphene hydrogel, followed by loading and in situ reduction of AuCl4(-) ions in the graphene hydrogel network benefiting from the abundant phenol groups of tannic acid. Tannic acid (TA), a typical plant polyphenol widely present in woods, not only reduced GO and induced the self-assembly of reduced graphene oxide into graphene hydrogel, but also served as the reducing agent and stabilizer for the synthesis and immobilization of Au NPs, avoiding extra chemical reagent and any stabilizer. The obtained Au NPs decorated graphene hydrogel (Au@TA-GH) was fully characterized and exhibited much higher catalytic activities than the unsupported and other polymer-supported Au NPs toward the reduction of methylene blue (MB). In addition, the high catalytic activity of Au@TA-GH could withhold in different pH solution conditions. Another distinct advantage of Au@TA-GH as catalysts is that it can be easily recovered and reused for five cycles.

  10. Binding of single stranded nucleic acids to cationic ligand functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nash, Jessica A; Tucker, Tasha L; Therriault, William; Yingling, Yaroslava G

    2016-11-11

    The interactions of nanoparticles (NPs) with single stranded nucleic acids (NAs) have important implications in gene delivery, and nanotechnological and biomedical applications. Here, the complexation of cationic ligand functionalized gold nanoparticles with single stranded deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) are examined using all atom molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicated that complexation depends mostly on charge of nanoparticle, and, to lesser extent, sequence and type of nucleic acid. For cationic nanoparticles, electrostatic interactions between charged ligands and the nucleic acid backbone dominate binding regardless of nanoparticle charge. Highly charged nanoparticles bind more tightly and cause compaction of the single-stranded NAs through disruption of intrastrand π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding. However, poly-purine strands (polyA-DNA, polyA-RNA) show less change in structure than poly-pyrimidine strands (polyT-DNA, polyU-RNA). Overall, the results show that control over ssNA structure may be achieved with cationic NPs with a charge of more than 30, but the extent of the structural changes depends on sequence.

  11. LITHOCHOLIC ACID FEEDING RESULTS IN DIRECT HEPATO-TOXICITY INDEPENDENT OF NEUTROPHIL FUNCTION IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Li, Feng; Xie, Yuchao; Farhood, Anwar; Fickert, Peter; Trauner, Michael; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    Lithocholic acid (LCA) supplementation in the diet results in intrahepatic cholestasis and bile infarcts. Previously we showed that an innate immune response is critical for cholestatic liver injury in the bile duct ligated mice. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the role of neutrophils in the mechanism of liver injury caused by feeding mice a diet containing LCA. C57BL/6 mice were given control or 1% LCA containing diet for 24–96h and then examined for parameters of hepatotoxicity. Plasma ALT levels were significantly increased by 48h after LCA feeding, which correlated with both neutrophil recruitment to the liver and upregulation of numerous pro-inflammatory genes. The injury was confirmed by histology. Deficiency in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression or inhibition of neutrophil function failed to protect against the injury. Bile acid levels were quantified in plasma and bile of LCA-fed mice after 48 and 96h. Only the observed biliary levels of taurochenodeoxycholic acid and potentially tauro-LCA caused direct cytotoxicity in mouse hepatocytes. These data support the conclusion that neutrophil recruitment occurs after the onset of bile acid-induced necrosis in LCA-fed animals, and is not a primary mechanism of cell death when cholestasis occurs through accumulation of hydrophobic bile acids. PMID:24742700

  12. Localization of Acid hydrolases in protoplasts: examination of the proposed lysosomal function of the mature vacuole.

    PubMed

    Butcher, H C; Wagner, G J; Siegelman, H W

    1977-06-01

    The development of techniques to isolate and purify relatively large quantities of intact vacuoles from mature tissues permits direct biochemical analysis of this ubiquitous mature plant cell organelle. Vacuoles and a fraction enriched in soluble cytoplasmic constituents were quantitatively prepared from Hippeastrum flower petal protoplasts. Vacuolar lysate and soluble cytoplasmic fractions were examined for acid hydrolase activities commonly associated with animal lysosomes, and pH optima were determined. Esterase, protease, carboxypeptidase, beta-galactosidase, alpha-glycosidase and beta-glycosidase, not found in the vacuole lysate fraction, were components of the soluble cytoplasmic fraction. Acid phosphatase, RNase and DNase were present in both fractions. Vacuolar enzyme activities were also examined as a function of flower development from bud through senescent stages. The data obtained are not consistent with the concept that the mature plant cell vacuole functions as a generalized lysosome.

  13. Conformational studies on peptides of alpha-aminoxy acids with functionalized side-chains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan; Liu, Guo-Jun; Hao, Yu; Li, Wei; Dong, Ze-Min; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Zhu, Nian-Yong

    2010-06-01

    Peptides of homochiral alpha-aminoxy acids of nonpolar side chains can form a 1.8(8)-helix. In this paper, we report the conformational studies of alpha-aminoxy peptides 1-3, which have functionalized side chains, in both nonpolar and polar solvents. (1)H NMR, XRD, and FTIR absorption studies confirm the presence of the eight-membered-ring intramolecular hydrogen bonds (the N-O turns) in nonpolar solvents as well as in methanol. CD studies of peptides 1-3 in different solvents indicate that a substantial degree of helical content is retained in methanol and acidic aqueous buffers. The introduction of functionalized side chains in alpha-aminoxy peptides provides opportunities for designing biologically active peptides.

  14. Enhanced removal of Hg(II) from acidic aqueous solution using thiol-functionalized biomass.

    PubMed

    Chai, Liyuan; Wang, Qingwei; Li, Qingzhu; Yang, Zhihui; Wang, Yunyan

    2010-01-01

    Spent grain, the low-cost and abundant biomass produced in the brewing industry, was functionalized with thiol groups to be used as an adsorbent for Hg(II) removal from acidic aqueous solution. The adsorbents were characterized by the energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Optimum pH for Hg(II) adsorption onto the thiol-functionalized spent grain (TFSG) was 2.0. The equilibrium and kinetics of the adsorption of Hg(II) onto TFSG from acidic aqueous solution were investigated. From the Langmuir isotherm model the maximum adsorption capacity of TFSG for Hg(II) was found to be 221.73 mg g(-1), which was higher than that of most various adsorbents reported in literature. Moreover, the adsorption of Hg(II) onto TFSG followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  15. Butylphenyl-functionalized Pt nanoparticles as CO-resistant electrocatalysts for formic acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-You; Ren, Jie; Kang, Xiongwu; Song, Yang; Sun, Shi-Gang; Chen, Shaowei

    2012-01-28

    Butylphenyl-functionalized Pt nanoparticles (Pt-BP) with an average core diameter of 2.93 ± 0.49 nm were synthesized by the co-reduction of butylphenyl diazonium salt and H(2)PtCl(4). Cyclic voltammetric studies of the Pt-BP nanoparticles showed a much less pronounced hysteresis between the oxidation currents of formic acid in the forward and reverse scans, as compared to that on naked Pt surfaces. Electrochemical in situ FTIR studies confirmed that no adsorbed CO, a poisoning intermediate, was generated on the Pt-BP nanoparticle surface. These results suggest that functionalization of the Pt nanoparticles by butylphenyl fragments effectively blocked the CO poisoning pathway, most probably through third-body effects, and hence led to an apparent improvement of the electrocatalytic activity in formic acid oxidation.

  16. Retinoic acids up-regulate functional eosinophil-driving receptor CCR3.

    PubMed

    Ueki, S; Nishikawa, J; Yamauchi, Y; Konno, Y; Tamaki, M; Itoga, M; Kobayashi, Y; Takeda, M; Moritoki, Y; Ito, W; Chihara, J

    2013-07-01

    Eotaxins and their receptor CCR3 have a definitive role for tissue accumulation of eosinophils both under homeostatic and pathologic conditions. However, physiological stimuli that can up-regulate CCR3 in blood-derived human eosinophils have not been recognized. As a prior gene microarray study revealed up-regulation of CCR3 in eosinophils stimulated with retinoic acids (RAs), the expression of functional CCR3 was examined. We found that 9-cis RA and all-trans RA (ATRA) significantly induced surface CCR3 expression regardless of the presence of IL-3 or IL-5. Pharmacological manipulations with receptor-specific agonists and antagonists indicated that retinoic acid receptor-α activation is critical for CCR3 up-regulation. RA-induced CCR3 was associated with its functional capacity, in terms of the calcium mobilization and chemotactic response to eotaxin-1 (CCL11). Our study suggests an important role of vitamin A derivatives in the tissue accumulation of eosinophils.

  17. Functional nucleic acid-based sensors for heavy metal ion assays.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guichi; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2014-12-21

    Heavy metal contaminants such as lead ions (Pb(2+)), mercury ions (Hg(2+)) and silver ions (Ag(+)) can cause significant harm to humans and generate enduring bioaccumulation in ecological systems. Even though a variety of methods have been developed for Pb(2+), Hg(2+) and Ag(+) assays, most of them are usually laborious and time-consuming with poor sensitivity. Due to their unique advantages of excellent catalytic properties and high affinity for heavy metal ions, functional nucleic acids such as DNAzymes and aptamers show great promise in the development of novel sensors for heavy metal ion assays. In this review, we summarize the development of functional nucleic acid-based sensors for the detection of Pb(2+), Hg(2+) and Ag(+), and especially focus on two categories including the direct assay and the amplification-based assay. We highlight the emerging trends in the development of sensitive and selective sensors for heavy metal ion assays as well.

  18. Functional selectivity and time-dependence of μ-opioid receptor desensitization at nerve terminals in the mouse ventral tegmental area

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, J D; Bailey, C P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The majority of studies examining desensitization of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) have examined those located at cell bodies. However, MORs are extensively expressed at nerve terminals throughout the mammalian nervous system. This study is designed to investigate agonist-induced MOR desensitization at nerve terminals in the mouse ventral tegmental area (VTA). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH MOR function was measured in mature mouse brain slices containing the VTA using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. Presynaptic MOR function was isolated from postsynaptic function and the functional selectivity, time-dependence and mechanisms of agonist-induced MOR desensitization were examined. KEY RESULTS MORs located at GABAergic nerve terminals in the VTA were completely resistant to rapid desensitization induced by the high-efficacy agonists DAMGO and Met-enkephalin. MORs located postsynaptically on GABAergic cell bodies readily underwent rapid desensitization in response to DAMGO. However, after prolonged (>7 h) treatment with Met-enkephalin, profound homologous MOR desensitization was observed. Morphine could induce rapid MOR desensitization at nerve terminals when PKC was activated. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Agonist-induced MOR desensitization in GABAergic neurons in the VTA is compartment-selective as well as agonist-selective. When MORs are located at cell bodies, higher-efficacy agonists induce greater levels of rapid desensitization than lower-efficacy agonists. However, the converse is true at nerve terminals where agonists that induce MOR desensitization via PKC are capable of rapid agonist-induced desensitization while higher-efficacy agonists are not. MOR desensitization induced by higher-efficacy agonists at nerve terminals only takes place after prolonged receptor activation. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http

  19. Predicting taxonomic and functional structure of microbial communities in acid mine drainage

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Jialiang; Huang, Linan; He, Zhili; Chen, Linxing; Hua, Zhengshuang; Jia, Pu; Li, Shengjin; Liu, Jun; Li, Jintian; Zhou, Jizhong; Shu, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the dynamics of community composition and functional attributes responding to environmental changes is an essential goal in community ecology but remains a major challenge, particularly in microbial ecology. Here, by targeting a model system with low species richness, we explore the spatial distribution of taxonomic and functional structure of 40 acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial communities across Southeast China profiled by 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing and a comprehensive microarray (GeoChip). Similar environmentally dependent patterns of dominant microbial lineages and key functional genes were observed regardless of the large-scale geographical isolation. Functional and phylogenetic β-diversities were significantly correlated, whereas functional metabolic potentials were strongly influenced by environmental conditions and community taxonomic structure. Using advanced modeling approaches based on artificial neural networks, we successfully predicted the taxonomic and functional dynamics with significantly higher prediction accuracies of metabolic potentials (average Bray–Curtis similarity 87.8) as compared with relative microbial abundances (similarity 66.8), implying that natural AMD microbial assemblages may be better predicted at the functional genes level rather than at taxonomic level. Furthermore, relative metabolic potentials of genes involved in many key ecological functions (for example, nitrogen and phosphate utilization, metals resistance and stress response) were extrapolated to increase under more acidic and metal-rich conditions, indicating a critical strategy of stress adaptation in these extraordinary communities. Collectively, our findings indicate that natural selection rather than geographic distance has a more crucial role in shaping the taxonomic and functional patterns of AMD microbial community that readily predicted by modeling methods and suggest that the model-based approach is essential to better understand natural

  20. Modulating NMDA Receptor Function with D-Amino Acid Oxidase Inhibitors: Understanding Functional Activity in PCP-Treated Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Sershen, Henry; Hashim, Audrey; Dunlop, David S.; Suckow, Raymond F.; Cooper, Tom B.; Javitt, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function are increasingly linked to persistent negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Accordingly, clinical studies have been targeting the modulatory site of the NMDA receptor, based on the decreased function of NMDA receptor, to see whether increasing NMDA function can potentially help treat the negative and cognitive deficits seen in the disease. Glycine and D-serine are endogenous ligands to the NMDA modulatory site, but since high doses are needed to affect brain levels, related compounds are being developed, for example glycine transport (GlyT) inhibitors to potentially elevate brain glycine or targeting enzymes, such as D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) to slow the breakdown and increase the brain level of D-serine. In the present study we further evaluated the effect of DAAO inhibitors 5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO) and sodium benzoate (NaB) in a phencyclidine (PCP) rodent mouse model to see if the inhibitors affect PCP-induced locomotor activity, alter brain D-serine level, and thereby potentially enhance D-serine responses. D-Serine dose-dependently reduced the PCP-induced locomotor activity at doses above 1000 mg/kg. Acute CBIO (30 mg/kg) did not affect PCP-induced locomotor activity, but appeared to reduce locomotor activity when given with D-serine (600 mg/kg); a dose that by itself did not have an effect. However, the effect was also present when the vehicle (Trappsol®) was tested with D-serine, suggesting that the reduction in locomotor activity was not related to DAAO inhibition, but possibly reflected enhanced bioavailability of D-serine across the blood brain barrier related to the vehicle. With this acute dose of CBIO, D-serine level in brain and plasma were not increased. Another weaker DAAO inhibitor sodium benzoate (NaB) (400 mg/kg), and NaB plus D-serine also significantly reduced PCP-induced locomotor activity, but without affecting plasma or brain D-serine level

  1. Modulating NMDA Receptor Function with D-Amino Acid Oxidase Inhibitors: Understanding Functional Activity in PCP-Treated Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Sershen, Henry; Hashim, Audrey; Dunlop, David S; Suckow, Raymond F; Cooper, Tom B; Javitt, Daniel C

    2016-02-01

    Deficits in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function are increasingly linked to persistent negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Accordingly, clinical studies have been targeting the modulatory site of the NMDA receptor, based on the decreased function of NMDA receptor, to see whether increasing NMDA function can potentially help treat the negative and cognitive deficits seen in the disease. Glycine and D-serine are endogenous ligands to the NMDA modulatory site, but since high doses are needed to affect brain levels, related compounds are being developed, for example glycine transport (GlyT) inhibitors to potentially elevate brain glycine or targeting enzymes, such as D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) to slow the breakdown and increase the brain level of D-serine. In the present study we further evaluated the effect of DAAO inhibitors 5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO) and sodium benzoate (NaB) in a phencyclidine (PCP) rodent mouse model to see if the inhibitors affect PCP-induced locomotor activity, alter brain D-serine level, and thereby potentially enhance D-serine responses. D-Serine dose-dependently reduced the PCP-induced locomotor activity at doses above 1000 mg/kg. Acute CBIO (30 mg/kg) did not affect PCP-induced locomotor activity, but appeared to reduce locomotor activity when given with D-serine (600 mg/kg); a dose that by itself did not have an effect. However, the effect was also present when the vehicle (Trappsol(®)) was tested with D-serine, suggesting that the reduction in locomotor activity was not related to DAAO inhibition, but possibly reflected enhanced bioavailability of D-serine across the blood brain barrier related to the vehicle. With this acute dose of CBIO, D-serine level in brain and plasma were not increased. Another weaker DAAO inhibitor NaB (400 mg/kg), and NaB plus D-serine also significantly reduced PCP-induced locomotor activity, but without affecting plasma or brain D-serine level, arguing against a DAAO

  2. Functional milk beverage fortified with phenolic compounds extracted from olive vegetation water, and fermented with functional lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Servili, M; Rizzello, C G; Taticchi, A; Esposto, S; Urbani, S; Mazzacane, F; Di Maio, I; Selvaggini, R; Gobbetti, M; Di Cagno, R

    2011-05-14

    Functional milk beverages (FMB100 and FMB200) fortified with phenolic compounds (100 and 200mg/l) extracted from olive vegetable water, and fermented with γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)-producing (Lactobacillus plantarum C48) and autochthonous human gastro-intestinal (Lactobacillus paracasei 15N) lactic acid bacteria were manufactured. A milk beverage (MB), without addition of phenolic compounds, was used as the control. Except for a longer latency phase of FMB200, the three beverages showed an almost similar kinetic of acidification, consumption of lactose and synthesis of lactic acid. Apart from the beverage, Lb. plantarum C48 showed a decrease of ca. Log 2.52-2.24 cfu/ml during storage. The cell density of functional Lb. paracasei 15N remained always above the value of Log 8.0 cfu/ml. During fermentation, the total concentration of free amino acids markedly increased without significant (P > 0.05) differences between beverages. The concentration of GABA increased during fermentation and further storage (63.0 ± 0.6-67.0 ± 2.1mg/l) without significant (P > 0.05) differences between beverages. After fermentation, FMB100 and FMB200 showed the same phenolic composition of the phenol extract from olive vegetable water but a different ratio between 3,4-DHPEA and 3,4-DHPEA-EDA. During storage, the concentrations of 3,4-DHPEA-EDA, p-HPEA and verbascoside of both FMB100 and FMB200 decreased. Only the concentration of 3,4-DHPEA increased. As shown by SPME-GC-MS analysis, diactetyl, acetoin and, especially, acetaldehyde were the main volatile compounds found. The concentration of phenolic compounds does not interfere with the volatile composition. Sensory analyses based on triangle and paired comparison tests showed that phenolic compounds at the concentrations of 100 or 200mg/l were suitable for addition to functional milk beverages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of protein function and its prediction from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Clark, Wyatt T; Radivojac, Predrag

    2011-07-01

    Understanding protein function is one of the keys to understanding life at the molecular level. It is also important in the context of human disease because many conditions arise as a consequence of alterations of protein function. The recent availability of relatively inexpensive sequencing technology has resulted in thousands of complete or partially sequenced genomes with millions of functionally uncharacterized proteins. Such a large volume of data, combined with the lack of high-throughput experimental assays to functionally annotate proteins, attributes to the growing importance of automated function prediction. Here, we study proteins annotated by Gene Ontology (GO) terms and estimate the accuracy of functional transfer from protein sequence only. We find that the transfer of GO terms by pairwise sequence alignments is only moderately accurate, showing a surprisingly small influence of sequence identity (SID) in a broad range (30-100%). We developed and evaluated a new predictor of protein function, functional annotator (FANN), from amino acid sequence. The predictor exploits a multioutput neural network framework which is well suited to simultaneously modeling dependencies between functional terms. Experiments provide evidence that FANN-GO (predictor of GO terms; available from http://www.informatics.indiana.edu/predrag) outperforms standard methods such as transfer by global or local SID as well as GOtcha, a method that incorporates the structure of GO.

  4. Pathways of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Utilization: Implications for Brain Function in Neuropsychiatric Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Joanne J.; Green, Pnina; Mann, J. John; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Sublette, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have profound effects on brain development and function. Abnormalities of PUFA status have been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases such as major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Pathophysiologic mechanisms could involve not only suboptimal PUFA intake, but also metabolic and genetic abnormalities, defective hepatic metabolism, and problems with diffusion and transport. This article provides an overview of physiologic factors regulating PUFA utilization, highlighting their relevance to neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:25498862

  5. Prediction of functionally important residues in globular proteins from unusual central distances of amino acids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Well-performing automated protein function recognition approaches usually comprise several complementary techniques. Beside constructing better consensus, their predictive power can be improved by either adding or refining independent modules that explore orthogonal features of proteins. In this work, we demonstrated how the exploration of global atomic distributions can be used to indicate functionally important residues. Results Using a set of carefully selected globular proteins, we parametrized continuous probability density functions describing preferred central distances of individual protein atoms. Relative preferred burials were estimated using mixture models of radial density functions dependent on the amino acid composition of a protein under consideration. The unexpectedness of extraordinary locations of atoms was evaluated in the information-theoretic manner and used directly for the identification of key amino acids. In the validation study, we tested capabilities of a tool built upon our approach, called SurpResi, by searching for binding sites interacting with ligands. The tool indicated multiple candidate sites achieving success rates comparable to several geometric methods. We also showed that the unexpectedness is a property of regions involved in protein-protein interactions, and thus can be used for the ranking of protein docking predictions. The computational approach implemented in this work is freely available via a Web interface at http://www.bioinformatics.org/surpresi. Conclusions Probabilistic analysis of atomic central distances in globular proteins is capable of capturing distinct orientational preferences of amino acids as resulting from different sizes, charges and hydrophobic characters of their side chains. When idealized spatial preferences can be inferred from the sole amino acid composition of a protein, residues located in hydrophobically unfavorable environments can be easily detected. Such residues turn out to be

  6. Protocatechuic acid protects brain mitochondrial function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Semaming, Yoswaris; Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Sa-Nguanmoo, Piangkwan; Pintana, Hiranya; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2015-10-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in diabetic animals with neurodegeneration. Protocatechuic acid (PCA), a major metabolite of anthocyanin, has been shown to exert glycemic control and oxidative stress reduction in the heart. However, its effects on oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in the brain under diabetic condition have never been investigated. We found that PCA exerted glycemic control, attenuates brain mitochondrial dysfunction, and contributes to the prevention of brain oxidative stress in diabetic rats.

  7. Antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds added to a functional emulsion containing omega-3 fatty acids and plant sterol esters.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Raquel Rainho; Inchingolo, Raffaella; Alencar, Severino Matias; Rodriguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa; Castro, Inar Alves

    2015-09-01

    The effect of eleven compounds extracted from red propolis on the oxidative stability of a functional emulsion was evaluated. Emulsions prepared with Echium oil as omega 3 (ω-3 FA) source, containing 1.63 g/100mL of α-linolenic acid (ALA), 0.73 g/100 mL of stearidonic acid (SDA) and 0.65 g/100mL of plant sterol esters (PSE) were prepared without or with phenolic compounds (vanillic acid, caffeic acid, trans-cinnamic acid, 2,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, quercetin, trans-ferulic acid, trans,trans-farnesol, rutin, gallic acid or sinapic acid). tert-Butylhydroquinone and a mixture containing ascorbic acid and FeSO4 were applied as negative and positive controls of the oxidation. Hydroperoxide, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), malondialdehyde and phytosterol oxidation products (POPs) were evaluated as oxidative markers. Based on hydroperoxide and TBARS analysis, sinapic acid and rutin (200 ppm) showed the same antioxidant activity than TBHQ, representing a potential alternative as natural antioxidant to be applied in a functional emulsion containing ω-3 FA and PSE.

  8. Retinoic Acid-Related Orphan Receptors (RORs): Regulatory Functions in Immunity, Development, Circadian Rhythm, and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Donald N.; Kang, Hong Soon; Jetten, Anton M.

    2015-01-01

    In this overview, we provide an update on recent progress made in understanding the mechanisms of action, physiological functions, and roles in disease of retinoic acid related orphan receptors (RORs). We are particularly focusing on their roles in the regulation of adaptive and innate immunity, brain function, retinal development, cancer, glucose and lipid metabolism, circadian rhythm, metabolic and inflammatory diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders. We also summarize the current status of ROR agonists and inverse agonists, including their regulation of ROR activity and their therapeutic potential for management of various diseases in which RORs have been implicated. PMID:26878025

  9. Optical control of protein function through unnatural amino acid mutagenesis and other optogenetic approaches.

    PubMed

    Baker, Austin S; Deiters, Alexander

    2014-07-18

    Biological processes are naturally regulated with high spatial and temporal resolution at the molecular, cellular, and systems level. To control and study processes with the same resolution, light-sensitive groups and domains have been employed to optically activate and deactivate protein function. Optical control is a noninvasive technique in which the amplitude, wavelength, spatial location, and timing of the light illumination can be easily controlled. This review focuses on applications of genetically encoded unnatural amino acids containing light-removable protecting groups to optically trigger protein function, while also discussing select optogenetic approaches using natural light-sensitive domains to engineer optical control of biological processes.

  10. Work Function Control of Germanium through Carborane-Carboxylic Acid Surface Passivation.

    PubMed

    Serino, Andrew C; Anderson, Mary E; Saleh, Liban M A; Dziedzic, Rafal M; Mills, Harrison; Heidenreich, Liv K; Spokoyny, Alexander M; Weiss, Paul S

    2017-10-02

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of carborane isomers with different dipole moments passivate germanium to modulate surface work function while maintaining chemical environment and surface energy. To identify head groups capable of monolayer formation on germanium surfaces, we studied thiol-, hydroxyl-, and carboxyl-terminated carboranes. These films were successfully formed with carboxylic acid head groups instead of the archetypal thiol, suggesting that the carborane cluster significantly affects headgroup reactivity. Film characterization included X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies as well as contact angle goniometry. Using these carboranes, the germanium surface work function was tailored over 0.4 eV without significant changes to wetting properties.

  11. A density-functional theory study of electrochemical adsorption of sulfuric acid anions on Pt(111).

    PubMed

    Santana, Juan A; Cabrera, Carlos R; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki

    2010-08-28

    A density-functional theory study of the electrochemical adsorption of sulfuric acid anions was conducted at the Pt(111)/electrolyte interface over a wide range of electrode potential, including the anomalous region of the hydrogen voltammogram of this electrode. We focus on the precise nature of the binding species and their bonding to the surface, identifying the adsorbed species as a function of electrode potential. In particular, the origin of anomalous or so-called "butterfly" feature in this voltammogram between +0.30 and +0.50 V vs. the reference hydrogen electrode and the nature of the adsorbed species on the Pt(111) surface in this potential range were explicated.

  12. Reactions templated by nucleic acids: more ways to translate oligonucleotide-based instructions into emerging function.

    PubMed

    Gorska, Katarzyna; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2013-07-01

    The programmability of oligonucleotide recognition offers an attractive platform to direct the assembly of reactive partners that can engage in chemical reactions. Recently, significant progress has been made in both the breadth of chemical transformations and in the functional output of the reaction. Herein we summarize these recent progresses and illustrate their applications to translate oligonucleotide instructions into functional materials and novel architectures (conductive polymers, nanopatterns, novel oligonucleotide junctions); into fluorescent or bioactive molecule using cellular RNA; to interrogate secondary structures or oligonucelic acids; or a synthetic oligomer. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Modulate TRPV4 Function through Plasma Membrane Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Caires, Rebeca; Sierra-Valdez, Francisco J; Millet, Jonathan R M; Herwig, Joshua D; Roan, Esra; Vásquez, Valeria; Cordero-Morales, Julio F

    2017-10-03

    Dietary consumption of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), present in fish oils, is known to improve the vascular response, but their molecular targets remain largely unknown. Activation of the TRPV4 channel has been implicated in endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Here, we studied the contribution of ω-3 PUFAs to TRPV4 function by precisely manipulating the fatty acid content in Caenorhabditis elegans. By genetically depriving the worms of PUFAs, we determined that the metabolism of ω-3 fatty acids is required for TRPV4 activity. Functional, lipid metabolome, and biophysical analyses demonstrated that ω-3 PUFAs enhance TRPV4 function in human endothelial cells and support the hypothesis that lipid metabolism and membrane remodeling regulate cell reactivity. We propose a model whereby the eicosanoid's epoxide group location increases membrane fluidity and influences the endothelial cell response by increasing TRPV4 channel activity. ω-3 PUFA-like molecules might be viable antihypertensive agents for targeting TRPV4 to reduce systemic blood pressure. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bacterial Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Their Biosynthetic Genes, Functions, and Practical Use

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kiyohito; Hashimoto, Mikako; Hori, Ryuji; Adachi, Takumi; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Nagamine, Tadashi; Shimizu, Satoru; Ueno, Akio; Morita, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The nutritional and pharmaceutical values of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) such as arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids have been well recognized. These LC-PUFAs are physiologically important compounds in bacteria and eukaryotes. Although little is known about the biosynthetic mechanisms and functions of LC-PUFAs in bacteria compared to those in higher organisms, a combination of genetic, bioinformatic, and molecular biological approaches to LC-PUFA-producing bacteria and some eukaryotes have revealed the notably diverse organization of the pfa genes encoding a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase complex (PUFA synthase), the LC-PUFA biosynthetic processes, and tertiary structures of the domains of this enzyme. In bacteria, LC-PUFAs appear to take part in specific functions facilitating individual membrane proteins rather than in the adjustment of the physical fluidity of the whole cell membrane. Very long chain polyunsaturated hydrocarbons (LC-HCs) such as hentriacontanonaene are considered to be closely related to LC-PUFAs in their biosynthesis and function. The possible role of LC-HCs in strictly anaerobic bacteria under aerobic and anaerobic environments and the evolutionary relationships of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria carrying pfa-like genes are also discussed. PMID:27187420

  15. Amino acid challenge and depletion techniques in human functional neuroimaging studies: an overview.

    PubMed

    Biskup, C S; Gaber, T; Helmbold, K; Bubenzer-Busch, S; Zepf, F D

    2015-04-01

    Imbalances of neurotransmitter systems, particularly serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA), are known to play an essential role in many neuropsychiatric disorders. The transient manipulation of such systems through the alteration of their amino acid precursors is a well-known research tool. Among these methods are alterations of tryptophan, the essential amino acid (AA) precursor of 5-HT, as well as manipulations of tyrosine and phenylalanine, the AA precursors of DA, which can be metabolized into norepinephrine and subsequently into epinephrine. These systems can be loaded by applying a large dose of these AAs or depleted by applying an amino acid mixture lacking the respective AAs serving as precursors. Functional neuroimaging has given insights into differential brain activation patterns and functions depending on the tasks performed, pharmacological treatments or specific disorders. Such research has shed light on the function of many brain areas as well as their interactions. The combination of AA challenge approaches with neuroimaging techniques has been subject of numerous studies. Overall, the studies conducted in this particular field of research have shown that AA challenge techniques are valid and effective research tools that allow the investigation of serotonergic and dopaminergic systems without causing serious side effects or long-term damage to the subjects. In this review, we will present an overview of the results obtained so far and discuss the implications of these findings as well as open questions that remain to be answered.

  16. Thiol-Ene Induced Diphosphonic Acid Functionalization of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, Ryan D.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Warner, Marvin G.

    2010-07-20

    Multi-functional organic molecules represent an interesting challenge for nanoparticle functionalization due to the potential for undesirable interactions between the substrate material and the variable functionalities, making it difficult to control the final orientation of the ligand. In the present study, UV-induced thiol-ene click chemistry has been utilized as a means of directed functionalization of bifunctional ligands on an iron oxide nanoparticle surface. Allyl diphosphonic acid ligand was covalently deposited on the surface of thiol-presenting iron oxide nanoparticles via the formation of a UV-induced thioether. This method of thiol-ene click chemistry offers a set of reaction conditions capable of controlling the ligand deposition and circumventing the natural affinity exhibited by the phosphonic acid moiety for the iron oxide surface. These claims are supported via a multimodal characterization platform which includes thermogravimetric analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and metal contact analysis and are consistent with a properly oriented, highly active ligand on the nanoparticle surface. These experiments suggest thiol-ene click chemistry as both a practical and generally applicable strategy for the directed deposition of multi-functional ligands on metal oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

  17. Canola oil rich in oleic acid improves diastolic heart function in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Thandapilly, Sijo Joseph; Raj, Pema; Louis, Xavier Lieben; Perera, Danielle; Yamanagedara, Prasanga; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; Netticadan, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. It directly affects heart structure and function and contributes to heart failure. Diet is a major factor involved in the development of obesity along with genetic factors. We examined the effects of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich oils on cardiac structure and function in the diet-induced rodent model of obesity (DIO). Obese prone (OP) rats were fed a high-fat diet (HF; 55% of kcal) for 12 weeks; Sprague-Dawley rats fed commercial chow served as control. Echocardiography was performed to assess the cardiac structure and function in all rats at 12 weeks. OP rats fed the HF diet showed significant impairment in diastolic function compared to control rats. The HF diet containing high oleic canola oil significantly improved diastolic function of OP rats compared to the HF diet with lard. In conclusion, canola oil rich in oleic acid, when incorporated into an HF diet, prevents the development of diastolic dysfunction in DIO rats.

  18. Functional convergence of oxylipin and abscisic acid pathways controls stomatal closure in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Tatyana; Kolla, Venkat A; Wang, Chang-Quan; Nasafi, Zainab; Hicks, Derrick R; Phadungchob, Bpantamars; Chehab, Wassim E; Brandizzi, Federica; Froehlich, John; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2014-03-01

    Membranes are primary sites of perception of environmental stimuli. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are major structural constituents of membranes that also function as modulators of a multitude of signal transduction pathways evoked by environmental stimuli. Different stresses induce production of a distinct blend of oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids, "oxylipins." We employed three Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotypes to examine the oxylipin signature in response to specific stresses and determined that wounding and drought differentially alter oxylipin profiles, particularly the allene oxide synthase branch of the oxylipin pathway, responsible for production of jasmonic acid (JA) and its precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (12-OPDA). Specifically, wounding induced both 12-OPDA and JA levels, whereas drought induced only the precursor 12-OPDA. Levels of the classical stress phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) were also mainly enhanced by drought and little by wounding. To explore the role of 12-OPDA in plant drought responses, we generated a range of transgenic lines and exploited the existing mutant plants that differ in their levels of stress-inducible 12-OPDA but display similar ABA levels. The plants producing higher 12-OPDA levels exhibited enhanced drought tolerance and reduced stomatal aperture. Furthermore, exogenously applied ABA and 12-OPDA, individually or combined, promote stomatal closure of ABA and allene oxide synthase biosynthetic mutants, albeit most effectively when combined. Using tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Brassica napus verified the potency of this combination in inducing stomatal closure in plants other than Arabidopsis. These data have identified drought as a stress signal that uncouples the conversion of 12-OPDA to JA and have revealed 12-OPDA as a drought-responsive regulator of stomatal closure functioning most effectively together with ABA.

  19. Induction of functional cytochrome P450 and its involvement in degradation of benzoic acid by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Ning, Daliang; Wang, Hui; Zhuang, Yuan

    2010-04-01

    The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the largest cytochrome P450 contingent known to date in fungi, but the study on the function of these P450s is limited. In this study, induction of functional P450 in P. chrysosporium was first shown and P450-mediate degradation of benzoic acid was demonstrated in this fungus. Carbon monoxide difference spectra indicated significant induction of P450 by benzoic acid, m-chlorobenzoic acid, p-chlorobenzoic acid and n-hexane, and showed the effect of inducer concentration and nutrient condition on the induction of P450. The high contents of P450 in the microsomal fractions facilitated the study on the function of P450. While the n-hexane-induced P450 could not interact with benzoic acid, the microsomal P450 induced by benzoic acid produced type I substrate binding spectra upon the addition of benzoic acid. The benzoic acid degradation by the microsomal P450 was NADPH-dependent at a specific rate of 194 +/- 14 min(-1), and significantly inhibited by piperonyl butoxide (a P450 inhibitor). However, inhibition of benzoic acid degradation by piperonyl butoxide was slight or not detectable in the cultures of this fungus, suggesting presumable involvement of other enzyme in benzoic acid degradation. The extracellular ligninolytic enzymes, lignin peroxidase and manganese-dependent peroxidase, were not involved in initial metabolism of benzoic acid under the test conditions.

  20. Mutagenesis of conserved amino acids of Helicobacter pylori fur reveals residues important for function.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Beth M; Gancz, Hanan; Benoit, Stéphane L; Evans, Sarah; Olsen, Cara H; Michel, Sarah L J; Maier, Robert J; Merrell, D Scott

    2010-10-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) of the medically important pathogen Helicobacter pylori is unique in that it has been shown to function as a repressor both in the presence of an Fe2+ cofactor and in its apo (non-Fe2+-bound) form. However, virtually nothing is known concerning the amino acid residues that are important for Fur functioning. Therefore, mutations in six conserved amino acid residues of H. pylori Fur were constructed and analyzed for their impact on both iron-bound and apo repression. In addition, accumulation of the mutant proteins, protein secondary structure, DNA binding ability, iron binding capacity, and the ability to form higher-order structures were also examined for each mutant protein. While none of the mutated residues completely abrogated the function of Fur, we were able to identify residues that were critical for both iron-bound and apo-Fur repression. One mutation, V64A, did not alter regulation of any target genes. However, each of the five remaining mutations showed an effect on either iron-bound or apo regulation. Of these, H96A, E110A, and E117A mutations altered iron-bound Fur regulation and were all shown to influence iron binding to different extents. Additionally, the H96A mutation was shown to alter Fur oligomerization, and the E110A mutation was shown to impact oligomerization and DNA binding. Conversely, the H134A mutant exhibited changes in apo-Fur regulation that were the result of alterations in DNA binding. Although the E90A mutant exhibited alterations in apo-Fur regulation, this mutation did not affect any of the assessed protein functions. This study is the first for H. pylori to analyze the roles of specific amino acid residues of Fur in function and continues to highlight the complexity of Fur regulation in this organism.

  1. Biochemical Principles and Functional Aspects of Pipecolic Acid Biosynthesis in Plant Immunity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Denis; Schreiber, Stefan; Zeier, Tatyana; Schuck, Stefan; Reichel-Deland, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    The nonprotein amino acid pipecolic acid (Pip) regulates plant systemic acquired resistance and basal immunity to bacterial pathogen infection. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the lysine (Lys) aminotransferase AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE RESPONSE PROTEIN1 (ALD1) mediates the pathogen-induced accumulation of Pip in inoculated and distal leaf tissue. Here, we show that ALD1 transfers the α-amino group of l-Lys to acceptor oxoacids. Combined mass spectrometric and infrared spectroscopic analyses of in vitro assays and plant extracts indicate that the final product of the ALD1-catalyzed reaction is enaminic 2,3-dehydropipecolic acid (DP), whose formation involves consecutive transamination, cyclization, and isomerization steps. Besides l-Lys, recombinant ALD1 transaminates l-methionine, l-leucine, diaminopimelate, and several other amino acids to generate oxoacids or derived products in vitro. However, detailed in planta analyses suggest that the biosynthesis of 2,3-DP from l-Lys is the major in vivo function of ALD1. Since ald1 mutant plants are able to convert exogenous 2,3-DP into Pip, their Pip deficiency relies on the inability to form the 2,3-DP intermediate. The Arabidopsis reductase ornithine cyclodeaminase/μ-crystallin, alias SYSTEMIC ACQUIRED RESISTANCE-DEFICIENT4 (SARD4), converts ALD1-generated 2,3-DP into Pip in vitro. SARD4 significantly contributes to the production of Pip in pathogen-inoculated leaves but is not the exclusive reducing enzyme involved in Pip biosynthesis. Functional SARD4 is required for proper basal immunity to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Although SARD4 knockout plants show greatly reduced accumulation of Pip in leaves distal to P. syringae inoculation, they display a considerable systemic acquired resistance response. This suggests a triggering function of locally accumulating Pip for systemic resistance induction. PMID:28330936

  2. Health effects of acid aerosols on North American children: Pulmonary function

    SciTech Connect

    Raizenne, M. |; Damokosh, A.I.; Spengler, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    We examined the health effects of exposure to acidic air pollution among children living in 24 communities in the United States and Canada. Parents of children between the ages of 8 and 12 completed a self-administered questionnaire and provided consent for their child to perform a standardized forced expiratory maneuver at school in 22 of these communities. Air quality and meteorology were measured in each community for the year preceding the pulmonary function tests. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV{sub 1.0}) measurements of 10,251 white children were examined in a two-stage regression analysis that adjusted for age, sex, height, weight, and sex-height interaction. In this study, a 52 nmol/m{sup 3} difference in annual mean particle strong acidity was associated with a 3.5% (95% CI, 2.0-4.9) decrement in adjusted FVC and a 3.1% (95% CI, 1.6-4.6) decrement in adjusted FEV{sub 1.0}. The FVC decrement was larger, although not significantly different, for children who were lifelong residents of their communities (4.1%, 95% CI, 2.5-5.8). The relative odds for low lung function (that is, measured FVC less than or equal to 85% of predicted), was 2.5 (95% CI, 1.8-3.6) across the range of particle strong acidity exposures. These data suggest that long-term exposure to ambient particle strong acidity may have a deleterious effect on lung growth, development, and function. 45 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III: effect of single amino acid substitutions and relationship with functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, V; Leone, G; Mastrangelo, S; Lane, D A; Girolami, A; de Moerloose, P; Sas, G; Abildgaard, U; Blajchman, M; Rodeghiero, F

    1994-02-01

    Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III (AT-III) was investigated by crossed immunoelectrofocusing (CIEF) on eleven molecular variants. A normal pattern was found in five variants while two different abnormal CIEF patterns were found in the other four and two variants, respectively. Point mutations causing a major pI change (exceeding 4.0) of the amino acid substituted lead to alterations in the overall microheterogeneity. The variants thus substituted share a first type of abnormal CIEF pattern with alterations throughout the pH range, regardless of the location of the mutation (reactive site and adjacent regions or heparin binding region). Minor amino acid pI changes in these regions do not alter the AT-III overall microheterogeneity, whatever the resulting functional defect. However, if the mutation is placed in the region around positions 404 or 429, then even minor changes of the amino acid pI seem able to alter the overall charge, leading to a second type of abnormal CIEF pattern with the main alteration at pH 4.8-4.6. Neuraminidase treatment leads to disappearance of microheterogeneity except for the variants with the Arg393 to Cys substitution. Addition of thrombin induces CIEF modifications specifically related to the functional defect. A normal formation of thrombin-antithrombin complexes induces a shift towards the more acid pH range, whereas in the variants substituted at the reactive site the CIEF pattern is substantially unaffected by thrombin; variants substituted at positions 382-384 show a maximal thrombin-induced increase of the isoforms at pI 4.8-4.6. Therefore mutant antithrombins with different functional abnormalities but sharing a common CIEF pattern were well distinguished.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. All-Trans-Retinoic Acid Enhances Mitochondrial Function in Models of Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Sasmita; Chapman, John D; Han, Chang Y; Hogarth, Cathryn A; Arnold, Samuel L M; Onken, Jennifer; Kent, Travis; Goodlett, David R; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-05-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is the active metabolite of vitamin A. The liver is the main storage organ of vitamin A, but activation of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in mouse liver and in human liver cell lines has also been shown. AlthoughatRA treatment improves mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in rodents, its role in modulating mitochondrial function in the liver is controversial, and little data are available regarding the human liver. The aim of this study was to determine whetheratRA regulates hepatic mitochondrial activity.atRA treatment increased the mRNA and protein expression of multiple components of mitochondrialβ-oxidation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and respiratory chain. Additionally,atRA increased mitochondrial biogenesis in human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells with and without lipid loading based on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1αand 1βand nuclear respiratory factor 1 mRNA and mitochondrial DNA quantification.atRA also increasedβ-oxidation and ATP production in HepG2 cells and in human hepatocytes. Knockdown studies of RARα, RARβ, and PPARδrevealed that the enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis andβ-oxidation byatRA requires peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta. In vivo in mice,atRA treatment increased mitochondrial biogenesis markers after an overnight fast. Inhibition ofatRA metabolism by talarozole, a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 26 specific inhibitor, increased the effects ofatRA on mitochondrial biogenesis markers in HepG2 cells and in vivo in mice. These studies show thatatRA regulates mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism and that increasingatRA concentrations in human liver via CYP26 inhibition may increase mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acidβ-oxidation and provide therapeutic benefit in diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. "Functional pain," functional outcomes, and quality of life after hyaluronic acid intra-articular injection for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Heather K; Montero, Cindy; Conrad, Bryan P; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Connelly, Jacob; Martenson, Matthew; Seay, Amanda N; Vincent, Kevin R

    2013-04-01

    To compare the effect of hyaluronic acid (HA) intra-articular knee injections on pain and functional outcomes in persons with knee osteoarthritis (OA) over 6 months, and to determine whether or not changes in functional pain are related to improvements in quality of life. A prospective cohort study. A research laboratory in an academic medical center. Patients with knee OA (N = 53) who were receiving medical care for OA. Intra-articular knee injections of HA (3 injections, each separated by 1 week) and a comparative noninjection group. Functional pain and outcomes assessments during chair rise, stair climbing, and a 6-minute walking test (by using 0-10 point numerical pain ratings during each test); gait parameters; Medical Outcomes Short Form-36 (SF-36) scores and subscores; the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Six months after HA, the completion times for the chair rise and stair climb tasks, and the distance covered during the 6-minute walk were not different between the groups. However, functional pain ratings during stair climbing decreased in the HA-treated group (P = .05). Six-month changes in gait velocity, cadence, stride length, step length, and the percentage of the gait cycle spent in single support were all higher after HA injection at month 6 (all P < .05). Significant group-by-time interactions existed for total WOMAC scores. SF-36 Vitality subscores improved by 13%, and Role Physical scores were higher in patients treated with HA injection compared with participants in the noninjection group (P < .05). Regression analyses revealed that changes in the functional pain measures did not correspond with SF-36 scores. HA is associated with lower functional pain severity, with minimal impact on functional test scores. We interpreted this finding to represent an increase in the quality of the movement and functional activity. The change in functional pain did not correspond to changes in SF-36 quality-of-life scores

  6. Efficient gene delivery vectors by tuning the surface charge density of amino acid-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Partha S; Kim, Chae-Kyu; Han, Gang; Forbes, Neil S; Rotello, Vincent M

    2008-11-25

    Gold colloids functionalized with amino acids provide a scaffold for effective DNA binding with subsequent condensation. Particles with lysine and lysine dendron functionality formed particularly compact complexes and provided highly efficient gene delivery without any observed cytotoxicity. Nanoparticles functionalized with first generation lysine dendrons (NP-LysG1) were approximately 28-fold superior to polylysine in reporter gene expression. These amino acid-based nanoparticles were responsive to intracellular glutathione levels, providing a tool for controlled release and concomitant expression of DNA.

  7. Functional polarization of tumour-associated macrophages by tumour-derived lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Colegio, Oscar R; Chu, Ngoc-Quynh; Szabo, Alison L; Chu, Thach; Rhebergen, Anne Marie; Jairam, Vikram; Cyrus, Nika; Brokowski, Carolyn E; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Phillips, Gillian M; Cline, Gary W; Phillips, Andrew J; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-09-25

    Macrophages have an important role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. To perform this function, macrophages must have the capacity to monitor the functional states of their 'client cells': namely, the parenchymal cells in the various tissues in which macrophages reside. Tumours exhibit many features of abnormally developed organs, including tissue architecture and cellular composition. Similarly to macrophages in normal tissues and organs, macrophages in tumours (tumour-associated macrophages) perform some key homeostatic functions that allow tumour maintenance and growth. However, the signals involved in communication between tumours and macrophages are poorly defined. Here we show that lactic acid produced by tumour cells, as a by-product of aerobic or anaerobic glycolysis, has a critical function in signalling, through inducing the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the M2-like polarization of tumour-associated macrophages. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this effect of lactic acid is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Finally, we show that the lactate-induced expression of arginase 1 by macrophages has an important role in tumour growth. Collectively, these findings identify a mechanism of communication between macrophages and their client cells, including tumour cells. This communication most probably evolved to promote homeostasis in normal tissues but can also be engaged in tumours to promote their growth.

  8. Surface functionalization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with alkanephosphonic acids for transparent nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiterkamp, G. J.; Hempenius, M. A.; Wormeester, H.; Vancso, G. J.

    2011-07-01

    The surface functionalization of rutile titanium dioxide nanoparticles with 1-decylphosphonic acid and diethyl undec-10-enyl phosphonate in a two-stage process, involving a change in reaction medium, is described. Similarly, 1-decylphosphonic acid and diethyl 1-decylphosphonate were employed as surface modifiers. The nanoparticles coated in two successive steps formed stable, transparent dispersions in toluene. Surface functionalization was monitored using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), which showed enhanced surface coverage after the second capping step. Incorporation of C=C-terminal surface coupling molecules in the second stage was directly proved using FTIR. Dynamic light scattering measurements showed that the dual-functionalized particles possessed a uniform size of around 13 nm. Particle dimensions were further analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Transparent nanocomposites were formed by introducing the functionalized nanoparticles into a poly(benzyl acrylate) matrix. The refractive index of poly(benzyl acrylate) composites, measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry, increased from 1.57 for the pure polymer to 1.63 for 14.0 vol.% TiO2 at λ = 586 nm. Nanocomposite films with particle weight percentages of up to 30% (9.5 vol.%) showed a high light transmittance of around 90% at wavelengths above λ = 400 nm.

  9. Hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose using functionalized Bronsted acidic ionic liquids - A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Firdaus; Patra, Tanmoy; Upadhyayula, Sreedevi

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose conversion to platform chemicals is required to meet the demands of increasing population and modernization of the world. Hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose was studied with SO3H, COOH and OH functionalized imidazole based ionic liquid using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride [BMIM]Cl as a solvent. The influence of temperature, time, acidity of ionic liquids and catalyst loading was studied on hydrolysis reaction. The maximum %TRS yield 85%, was obtained at 100°C and 90min with 0.2g of SO3H functionalized ionic liquid. UV-vis spectroscopy using 4-nitro aniline as an indicator was performed to find out the Hammett function of ionic liquid and acidity trends are as follows: SO3H>COOH>OH. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to optimize the ionic liquid and their conjugate bases at B3LYP 6-311G++ (d, p) level using Gaussian 09 program. Theoretical findings are in agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Density functional theory studies on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and electronic properties of cyanuric acid.

    PubMed

    Prabhaharan, M; Prabakaran, A R; Srinivasan, S; Gunasekaran, S

    2015-03-05

    The present work has been carried out a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and NBO analysis of cyanuric acid. The FT-IR (100-4000cm(-1)) and FT-Raman spectra (400-4000cm(-1)) of cyanuric acid were recorded. In DFT methods, Becke's three parameter exchange-functional (B3) combined with gradient-corrected correlation functional of Lee, Yang and Parr (LYP) by implementing the split-valence polarized 6-31G(d,p) and 6-31++G(d,p) basis sets have been considered for the computation of the molecular structure optimization, vibrational frequencies, thermodynamic properties and energies of the optimized structures. The density functional theory (DFT) result complements the experimental findings. The electronic properties, such as HOMO-LUMO energies and molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) are also performed. Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges is also calculated. The first order hyperpolarizability (βtotal) of this molecular system and related properties (β, μ and Δα) are calculated using DFT/B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods. The thermodynamic functions (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) from spectroscopic data by statistical methods were also obtained for the range of temperature 50-1000K. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Simultaneous Reduction and Functionalization of Graphene Oxide by 4-Hydrazinobenzenesulfonic Acid for Polymer Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Song-Jie; Xu, Xiang-Nan; Qiu, Yang; Xiao, He-Chong; Zhu, Yue-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was functionalized and reduced simultaneously by a new reductant, 4-hydrazinobenzenesulfonic acid (HBS), with a one-step and environmentally friendly process. The hydrophilic sulfonic acid group in HBS was grafted onto the surface of GO through a covalent bond. The successful preparation of HBS reduced GO (HBS-rGO) was testified by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The interlayer space of HBS-rGO was increased to 1.478 nm from 0.751 nm for GO, resulting in a subdued Van der Waals’ force between layers and less possibility to form aggregations. The aqueous dispersibility of graphene was improved to 13.49 mg/mL from 0.58 mg/mL after the functionalization. The viscosity of the epoxy resin based HBS-rGO composite could be regulated by an adjustment of the content of HBS-rGO. This study provides a new and applicable approach for the preparation of hydrophilic functionalized graphene, and makes it possible for the application of graphene in some functional polymer nanocomposites, such as specialty water-based coatings.

  12. Folic acid and polyunsaturated fatty acids improve cognitive function and prevent depression, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease--but how and why?

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2008-01-01

    Low blood folate and raised homocysteine concentrations are associated with poor cognitive function. Folic acid supplementation improves cognitive function. Folic acid enhances the plasma concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). EPA, DHA, and arachidonic acid (AA) are of benefit in dementia and Alzheimer's disease by up-regulating gene expression concerned with neurogenesis, neurotransmission and connectivity, improving endothelial nitric oxide (eNO) generation, enhancing brain acetylcholine levels, and suppressing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. EPA, DHA, and AA also form precursors to anti-inflammatory compounds such as lipoxins, resolvins, and neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) that protect neurons from the cytotoxic action of various noxious stimuli. Furthermore, various neurotrophins and statins enhance the formation of NPD1 and thus, protect neurons from oxidative stress and prevent neuronal apoptosis Folic acid improves eNO generation, enhances plasma levels of EPA/DHA and thus, could augment the formation of NPD1. These results suggest that a combination of EPA, DHA, AA and folic acid could be of significant benefit in dementia, depression, and Alzheimer's disease and improve cognitive function.

  13. Functional and safety evaluation of transgenic pork rich in omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Tang, Maoxue; Qian, Lili; Jiang, Shengwang; Zhang, Jian; Song, Pengkun; Chen, Yaoxing; Cui, Wentao; Li, Kui

    2014-08-01

    Genetically modified animals rich in omega-3 unsaturated fatty acid offer a new strategy to improve the human health, but at the same time present a challenge in terms of food safety assessment. In this study, we evaluated the function and safety of sFat-1 transgenic pork rich in omega-3 fatty acids in mice by feeding basic diet and diets that contain wild type pork and sFat-1 transgenic pork. Blood biochemistry, haematology, peripheral T cell distributions, bacterial counts, gross necropsy, histopathology and organ weights were performed in mice fed with different doses of wild type and transgenic pork. Results indicated that both low and high dose of wild type and transgenic pork had no significant effect on blood biochemistry, T cell distribution, immunoglobulins and bacterial counts in intestine and feces. However, it was noted that both low and high dose of transgenic pork improved the liver immune system in mice, which is probably due to the beneficial contribution of high level of the "good" fatty acids in transgenic pork. There is no significant effect of transgenic pork on all other organs in mice. In summary, our study clearly demonstrated that feeding transgenic pork rich in omega-3 fatty acids did not cause any harm to mice, and in fact, improved the liver immune system.

  14. Properties of acid whey as a function of pH and temperature.

    PubMed

    Chandrapala, Jayani; Duke, Mikel C; Gray, Stephen R; Zisu, Bogdan; Weeks, Mike; Palmer, Martin; Vasiljevic, Todor

    2015-07-01

    Compositional differences of acid whey (AW) in comparison with other whey types limit its processability and application of conventional membrane processing. Hence, the present study aimed to identify chemical and physical properties of AW solutions as a function of pH (3 to 10.5) at 4 different temperatures (15, 25, 40, or 90°C) to propose appropriate membrane-processing conditions for efficient use of AW streams. The concentration of minerals, mainly calcium and phosphate, and proteins in centrifuged supernatants was significantly lowered with increase in either pH or temperature. Lactic acid content decreased with pH decline and rose at higher temperatures. Calcium appeared to form complexes with phosphates and lactates mainly, which in turn may have induced molecular attractions with the proteins. An increase in pH led to more soluble protein aggregates with large particle sizes. Surface hydrophobicity of these particles increased significantly with temperature up to 40°C and decreased with further heating to 90°C. Surface charge was clearly pH dependent. High lactic acid concentrations appeared to hinder protein aggregation by hydrophobic interactions and may also indirectly influence protein denaturation. Processing conditions such as pH and temperature need to be optimized to manipulate composition, state, and surface characteristics of components of AW systems to achieve an efficient separation and concentration of lactic acid and lactose.

  15. Using Amino Acid Correlation and Community Detection Algorithms to Identify Functional Determinants in Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Bleicher, Lucas; Lemke, Ney; Garratt, Richard Charles

    2011-01-01

    Correlated mutation analysis has a long history of interesting applications, mostly in the detection of contact pairs in protein structures. Based on previous observations that, if properly assessed, amino acid correlation data can also provide insights about functional sub-classes in a protein family, we provide a complete framework devoted to this purpose. An amino acid specific correlation measure is proposed, which can be used to build networks summarizing all correlation and anti-correlation patterns in a protein family. These networks can be submitted to community structure detection algorithms, resulting in subsets of correlated amino acids which can be further assessed by specific parameters and procedures that provide insight into the relationship between different communities, the individual importance of community members and the adherence of a given amino acid sequence to a given community. By applying this framework to three protein families with contrasting characteristics (the Fe/Mn-superoxide dismutases, the peroxidase-catalase family and the C-type lysozyme/α-lactalbumin family), we show how our method and the proposed parameters and procedures are related to biological characteristics observed in these protein families, highlighting their potential use in protein characterization and gene annotation. PMID:22205928

  16. Convergent functional genomic studies of omega-3 fatty acids in stress reactivity, bipolar disorder and alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Le-Niculescu, H; Case, N J; Hulvershorn, L; Patel, S D; Bowker, D; Gupta, J; Bell, R; Edenberg, H J; Tsuang, M T; Kuczenski, R; Geyer, M A; Rodd, Z A; Niculescu, A B

    2011-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids have been proposed as an adjuvant treatment option in psychiatric disorders. Given their other health benefits and their relative lack of toxicity, teratogenicity and side effects, they may be particularly useful in children and in females of child-bearing age, especially during pregnancy and postpartum. A comprehensive mechanistic understanding of their effects is needed. Here we report translational studies demonstrating the phenotypic normalization and gene expression effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids, specifically docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in a stress-reactive knockout mouse model of bipolar disorder and co-morbid alcoholism, using a bioinformatic convergent functional genomics approach integrating animal model and human data to prioritize disease-relevant genes. Additionally, to validate at a behavioral level the novel observed effects on decreasing alcohol consumption, we also tested the effects of DHA in an independent animal model, alcohol-preferring (P) rats, a well-established animal model of alcoholism. Our studies uncover sex differences, brain region-specific effects and blood biomarkers that may underpin the effects of DHA. Of note, DHA modulates some of the same genes targeted by current psychotropic medications, as well as increases myelin-related gene expression. Myelin-related gene expression decrease is a common, if nonspecific, denominator of neuropsychiatric disorders. In conclusion, our work supports the potential utility of omega-3 fatty acids, specifically DHA, for a spectrum of psychiatric disorders such as stress disorders, bipolar disorder, alcoholism and beyond. PMID:22832392

  17. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Enhances Heat Stress-Impaired Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guizhen; Tang, Liqun; Yuan, Fangfang; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shaoheng; Liu, Zhifeng; Geng, Yan; Qiu, Xiaowen

    2013-01-01

    Objective Dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) barrier is known to have an important etiologic role in the pathophysiology of heat stroke. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), play a role in maintaining and protecting the TJ structure and function. This study is aimed at investigating whether n-3 PUFAs could alleviate heat stress-induced dysfunction of intestinal tight junction. Methods Human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were pre-incubated with EPA, DHA or arachidonic acid (AA) and then exposed to heat stress. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) permeability were measured to analyze barrier integrity. Levels of TJ proteins, including occludin, ZO-1 and claudin-2, were analyzed by Western blot and localized by immunofluorescence microscopy. Messenger RNA levels were determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). TJ morphology was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Results EPA effectively attenuated the decrease in TEER and impairment of intestinal permeability in HRP flux induced by heat exposure. EPA significantly elevated the expression of occludin and ZO-1, while DHA was less effective and AA was not at all effective. The distortion and redistribution of TJ proteins, and disruption of morphology were also effectively prevented by pretreatment with EPA. Conclusion This study indicates for the first time that EPA is more potent than DHA in protecting against heat-induced permeability dysfunction and epithelial barrier damage of tight junction. PMID:24066055

  18. Heteropoly Acid/Nitrogen Functionalized Onion-like Carbon Hybrid Catalyst for Ester Hydrolysis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Qi, Wei; Guo, Xiaoling; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-02-18

    A novel heteropoly acid (HPA)/nitrogen functionalized onion-like carbon (NOLC) hybrid catalyst was synthesized through supramolecular (electrostatic and hydrogen bond) interactions between the two components. The chemical structure and acid strength of the HPA/NOLC hybrid have been fully characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, NH3 temperature-programmed desorption and acid-base titration measurements. The proposed method for the fabrication of the HPA/NOLC hybrid catalyst is a universal strategy for different types of HPAs to meet various requirements of acidic or redox catalysis. The hydrophobic environment of NOLC effectively prevents the deactivation of HPA in an aqueous system, and the combination of uniformly dispersed HPA clusters and the synergistic effect between NOLC and HPA significantly promotes its activity in ester hydrolysis reactions, which is higher than that of bare PWA as homogeneous catalyst. The kinetics of the hydrolysis reactions indicate that the aggregation status of the catalyst particles has great influence on the apparent activity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Functional Significance May Underlie the Taxonomic Utility of Single Amino Acid Substitutions in Conserved Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Gerd K.; Wu, Qiong; Huber, Katharina T.

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that some amino acid substitutions in conserved proteins that are strongly fixed by critical functional roles would show lineage-specific distributions. As an example of an archetypal conserved eukaryotic protein we considered the active site of β-tubulin. Our analysis identified one amino acid substitution—β-tubulin F224—which was highly lineage specific. Investigation of β-tubulin for other phylogenetically restricted amino acids identified several with apparent specificity for well-defined phylogenetic groups. Intriguingly, none showed specificity for “supergroups” other than the unikonts. To understand why, we analysed the β-tubulin Neighbor-Net and demonstrated a fundamental division between core β-tubulins (plant-like) and divergent β-tubulins (animal and fungal). F224 was almost completely restricted to the core β-tubulins, while divergent β-tubulins possessed Y224. Thus, our specific example offers insight into the restrictions associated with the co-evolution of β-tubulin during the radiation of eukaryotes, underlining a fundamental dichotomy between F-type, core β-tubulins and Y-type, divergent β-tubulins. More broadly our study provides proof of principle for the taxonomic utility of critical amino acids in the active sites of conserved proteins. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00239-010-9338-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20386893

  20. Convergent functional genomic studies of ω-3 fatty acids in stress reactivity, bipolar disorder and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Le-Niculescu, H; Case, N J; Hulvershorn, L; Patel, S D; Bowker, D; Gupta, J; Bell, R; Edenberg, H J; Tsuang, M T; Kuczenski, R; Geyer, M A; Rodd, Z A; Niculescu, A B

    2011-04-26

    Omega-3 fatty acids have been proposed as an adjuvant treatment option in psychiatric disorders. Given their other health benefits and their relative lack of toxicity, teratogenicity and side effects, they may be particularly useful in children and in females of child-bearing age, especially during pregnancy and postpartum. A comprehensive mechanistic understanding of their effects is needed. Here we report translational studies demonstrating the phenotypic normalization and gene expression effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids, specifically docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in a stress-reactive knockout mouse model of bipolar disorder and co-morbid alcoholism, using a bioinformatic convergent functional genomics approach integrating animal model and human data to prioritize disease-relevant genes. Additionally, to validate at a behavioral level the novel observed effects on decreasing alcohol consumption, we also tested the effects of DHA in an independent animal model, alcohol-preferring (P) rats, a well-established animal model of alcoholism. Our studies uncover sex differences, brain region-specific effects and blood biomarkers that may underpin the effects of DHA. Of note, DHA modulates some of the same genes targeted by current psychotropic medications, as well as increases myelin-related gene expression. Myelin-related gene expression decrease is a common, if nonspecific, denominator of neuropsychiatric disorders. In conclusion, our work supports the potential utility of omega-3 fatty acids, specifically DHA, for a spectrum of psychiatric disorders such as stress disorders, bipolar disorder, alcoholism and beyond.

  1. Acid synthesis of luminescent amine-functionalized or erbium-doped silica spheres for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Enrichi, Francesco; Trave, Enrico; Bersani, Marco

    2008-03-01

    In this work we discuss and investigate the morphological and optical properties of luminescent silica spheres which can have interesting applications in bioimaging and biosensing. The spheres are synthesized following an acid route by the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylortosilicate (TEOS) and can be functionalized by incorporation of aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES) during the synthesis, inducing a significant luminescence that can be attributed to a recombination mechanism from localized organic defects related to -NH(2) groups. It is shown that the acid synthesis route produces very regular spherical particles, but their diameter vary in the range of 200-4,000 nm. The luminescence properties have been investigated and optimized by variation of the annealing temperature for the functionalized spheres, obtaining the most efficient PL emission after a thermal treatment of 1 h at 600 degrees C in air. Moreover, the possibility to introduce rare earths like erbium in the spheres was also studied and the corresponding Er(3) luminescence emission at 1.53 microm is reported in terms of intensity and lifetime, pointing out that erbium can be easily and efficiently incorporated during the acid synthesis giving high PL intensity with a good lifetime of 3.9 ms.

  2. Coexistence of multiple minor states of fatty acid binding protein and their functional relevance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Binhan; Yang, Daiwen

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are dynamic over a wide range of timescales, but determining the number of distinct dynamic processes and identifying functionally relevant dynamics are still challenging. Here we present the study on human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (hIFABP) using a novel analysis of 15N relaxation dispersion (RD) and chemical shift saturation transfer (CEST) experiments. Through combined analysis of the two types of experiments, we found that hIFABP exists in a four-state equilibrium in which three minor states interconvert directly with the major state. According to conversion rates from the major “closed” state to minor states, these minor states are irrelevant to the function of fatty acid transport. Based on chemical shifts of the minor states which could not be determined from RD data alone but were extracted from a combined analysis of RD and CEST data, we found that all the minor states are native-like. This conclusion is further supported by hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments. Direct conversions between the native state and native-like intermediate states may suggest parallel multitrack unfolding/folding pathways of hIFABP. Moreover, hydrogen-deuterium exchange data indicate the existence of another locally unfolded minor state that is relevant to the fatty acid entry process. PMID:27677899

  3. Functional analysis of gapped microbial genomes: Amino acid metabolism of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Selkov, Evgeni; Overbeek, Ross; Kogan, Yakov; Chu, Lien; Vonstein, Veronika; Holmes, David; Silver, Simon; Haselkorn, Robert; Fonstein, Michael

    2000-01-01

    A gapped genome sequence of the biomining bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strain ATCC23270 was assembled from sheared DNA fragments (3.2-times coverage) into 1,912 contigs. A total of 2,712 potential genes (ORFs) were identified in 2.6 Mbp (megabase pairs) of Thiobacillus genomic sequence. Of these genes, 2,159 could be assigned functions by using the WIT-Pro/EMP genome analysis system, most with a high degree of certainty. Nine hundred of the genes have been assigned roles in metabolic pathways, producing an overview of cellular biosynthesis, bioenergetics, and catabolism. Sequence similarities, relative gene positions on the chromosome, and metabolic reconstruction (placement of gene products in metabolic pathways) were all used to aid gene assignments and for development of a functional overview. Amino acid biosynthesis was chosen to demonstrate the analytical capabilities of this approach. Only 10 expected enzymatic activities, of the nearly 150 involved in the biosynthesis of all 20 amino acids, are currently unassigned in the Thiobacillus genome. This result compares favorably with 10 missing genes for amino acid biosynthesis in the complete Escherichia coli genome. Gapped genome analysis can therefore give a decent picture of the central metabolism of a microorganism, equivalent to that of a complete sequence, at significantly lower cost. PMID:10737802

  4. Evaluation of uric acid levels, thyroid function, and anthropometric parameters in Japanese children with Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Niegawa, Tomomi; Takitani, Kimitaka; Takaya, Ryuzo; Ishiro, Manabu; Kuroyanagi, Yuichi; Okasora, Keisuke; Minami, Yukako; Matsuda, Takuya; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Down syndrome, caused by trisomy 21, is characterized by congenital abnormalities as well as mental retardation. From the neonatal stage through adolescence, patients with Down syndrome often have several complications. Thus, it is important to attain knowledge of the prevalence of these comorbidities in children with Down syndrome. We, therefore, evaluated the biochemical data, thyroid function, and anthropometric parameters, and analyzed the association among them in Japanese children and early adolescents with Down syndrome. There was no difference in the prevalence of obesity and overweight between boys and girls. The level of uric acid was higher in boys than in girls. Moreover, the prevalence of hyperuricemia was also higher in boys than in girls (approximately 32% and 10%, respectively). The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism in children with Down syndrome was approximately 20%, with no significant sex differences. The levels of uric acid and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate were positively associated with age, while the levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone and free thyroxine had a negative association with age. Overall, children with Down syndrome, exhibit a higher incidence of hyperuricemia. Therefore, uric acid levels, as well as thyroid function, from childhood to early adulthood should be monitored in this patient cohort. PMID:28955133

  5. Evaluation of uric acid levels, thyroid function, and anthropometric parameters in Japanese children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Niegawa, Tomomi; Takitani, Kimitaka; Takaya, Ryuzo; Ishiro, Manabu; Kuroyanagi, Yuichi; Okasora, Keisuke; Minami, Yukako; Matsuda, Takuya; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2017-09-01

    Down syndrome, caused by trisomy 21, is cha