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Sample records for acid amplification technologies

  1. Isothermal Amplification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongxi; Chen, Feng; Li, Qian; Wang, Lihua; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-11-25

    Isothermal amplification of nucleic acids is a simple process that rapidly and efficiently accumulates nucleic acid sequences at constant temperature. Since the early 1990s, various isothermal amplification techniques have been developed as alternatives to polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These isothermal amplification methods have been used for biosensing targets such as DNA, RNA, cells, proteins, small molecules, and ions. The applications of these techniques for in situ or intracellular bioimaging and sequencing have been amply demonstrated. Amplicons produced by isothermal amplification methods have also been utilized to construct versatile nucleic acid nanomaterials for promising applications in biomedicine, bioimaging, and biosensing. The integration of isothermal amplification into microsystems or portable devices improves nucleic acid-based on-site assays and confers high sensitivity. Single-cell and single-molecule analyses have also been implemented based on integrated microfluidic systems. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the isothermal amplification of nucleic acids encompassing work published in the past two decades. First, different isothermal amplification techniques are classified into three types based on reaction kinetics. Then, we summarize the applications of isothermal amplification in bioanalysis, diagnostics, nanotechnology, materials science, and device integration. Finally, several challenges and perspectives in the field are discussed. PMID:26551336

  2. Isothermal Amplification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongxi; Chen, Feng; Li, Qian; Wang, Lihua; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-11-25

    Isothermal amplification of nucleic acids is a simple process that rapidly and efficiently accumulates nucleic acid sequences at constant temperature. Since the early 1990s, various isothermal amplification techniques have been developed as alternatives to polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These isothermal amplification methods have been used for biosensing targets such as DNA, RNA, cells, proteins, small molecules, and ions. The applications of these techniques for in situ or intracellular bioimaging and sequencing have been amply demonstrated. Amplicons produced by isothermal amplification methods have also been utilized to construct versatile nucleic acid nanomaterials for promising applications in biomedicine, bioimaging, and biosensing. The integration of isothermal amplification into microsystems or portable devices improves nucleic acid-based on-site assays and confers high sensitivity. Single-cell and single-molecule analyses have also been implemented based on integrated microfluidic systems. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the isothermal amplification of nucleic acids encompassing work published in the past two decades. First, different isothermal amplification techniques are classified into three types based on reaction kinetics. Then, we summarize the applications of isothermal amplification in bioanalysis, diagnostics, nanotechnology, materials science, and device integration. Finally, several challenges and perspectives in the field are discussed.

  3. A collaborative study to establish the 1st WHO International Standard for human cytomegalovirus for nucleic acid amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Jacqueline F; Heath, Alan B; Minor, Philip D

    2016-07-01

    Variability in the performance of nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT)-based assays presents a significant problem in the diagnosis and management of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. Here we describe a collaborative study to evaluate the suitability of candidate reference materials to harmonize HCMV viral load measurements in a wide range of NAT assays. Candidate materials comprised lyophilized Merlin virus, liquid Merlin virus, liquid AD169 virus, and purified HCMV Merlin DNA cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome. Variability in the laboratory mean HCMV concentrations determined for virus samples across the different assays was 2 log10. Variability for the purified DNA sample was higher (>3 log10). The agreement between laboratories was markedly improved when the potencies of the liquid virus samples were expressed relative to the lyophilized virus candidate. In contrast, the agreement between laboratories for the purified DNA sample was not improved. Results indicated the suitability of the lyophilized Merlin virus preparation as the 1st WHO International Standard for HCMV for NAT. It was established in October 2010, with an assigned potency of 5 × 10(6) International Units (IU) (NIBSC code 09/162). It is intended to be used to calibrate secondary references, used in HCMV NAT assays, in IU. PMID:27179913

  4. Development of Lentivirus-Based Reference Materials for Ebola Virus Nucleic Acid Amplification Technology-Based Assays.

    PubMed

    Mattiuzzo, Giada; Ashall, James; Doris, Kathryn S; MacLellan-Gibson, Kirsty; Nicolson, Carolyn; Wilkinson, Dianna E; Harvey, Ruth; Almond, Neil; Anderson, Robert; Efstathiou, Stacey; Minor, Philip D; Page, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The 2013-present Ebola virus outbreak in Western Africa has prompted the production of many diagnostic assays, mostly based on nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAT). The calibration and performance assessment of established assays and those under evaluation requires reference materials that can be used in parallel with the clinical sample to standardise or control for every step of the procedure, from extraction to the final qualitative/quantitative result. We have developed safe and stable Ebola virus RNA reference materials by encapsidating anti sense viral RNA into HIV-1-like particles. The lentiviral particles are replication-deficient and non-infectious due to the lack of HIV-1 genes and Envelope protein. Ebola virus genes were subcloned for encapsidation into two lentiviral preparations, one containing NP-VP35-GP and the other VP40 and L RNA. Each reference material was formulated as a high-titre standard for use as a calibrator for secondary or internal standards, and a 10,000-fold lower titre preparation to serve as an in-run control. The preparations have been freeze-dried to maximise stability. These HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials were suitable for use with in-house and commercial quantitative RT-PCR assays and with digital RT-PCR. The HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials are stable at up to 37°C for two weeks, allowing the shipment of the material worldwide at ambient temperature. These results support further evaluation of the HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials as part of an International collaborative study for the establishment of the 1st International Standard for Ebola virus RNA.

  5. Development of Lentivirus-Based Reference Materials for Ebola Virus Nucleic Acid Amplification Technology-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Mattiuzzo, Giada; Ashall, James; Doris, Kathryn S.; MacLellan-Gibson, Kirsty; Nicolson, Carolyn; Wilkinson, Dianna E.; Harvey, Ruth; Almond, Neil; Anderson, Robert; Efstathiou, Stacey; Minor, Philip D.; Page, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The 2013-present Ebola virus outbreak in Western Africa has prompted the production of many diagnostic assays, mostly based on nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAT). The calibration and performance assessment of established assays and those under evaluation requires reference materials that can be used in parallel with the clinical sample to standardise or control for every step of the procedure, from extraction to the final qualitative/quantitative result. We have developed safe and stable Ebola virus RNA reference materials by encapsidating anti sense viral RNA into HIV-1-like particles. The lentiviral particles are replication-deficient and non-infectious due to the lack of HIV-1 genes and Envelope protein. Ebola virus genes were subcloned for encapsidation into two lentiviral preparations, one containing NP-VP35-GP and the other VP40 and L RNA. Each reference material was formulated as a high-titre standard for use as a calibrator for secondary or internal standards, and a 10,000-fold lower titre preparation to serve as an in-run control. The preparations have been freeze-dried to maximise stability. These HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials were suitable for use with in-house and commercial quantitative RT-PCR assays and with digital RT-PCR. The HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials are stable at up to 37°C for two weeks, allowing the shipment of the material worldwide at ambient temperature. These results support further evaluation of the HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials as part of an International collaborative study for the establishment of the 1st International Standard for Ebola virus RNA. PMID:26562415

  6. Amplification of trace amounts of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Zhang, Kun

    2008-06-17

    Methods of reducing background during amplification of small amounts of nucleic acids employ careful analysis of sources of low level contamination. Ultraviolet light can be used to reduce nucleic acid contaminants in reagents and equipment. "Primer-dimer" background can be reduced by judicious design of primers. We have shown clean signal-to-noise with as little as starting material as one single human cell (.about.6 picogram), E. coli cell (.about.5 femtogram) or Prochlorococcus cell (.about.3 femtogram).

  7. Non-instrumented nucleic acid amplification assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Domingo, Gonzalo; Gerlach, Jay; Tang, Dennis; Harvey, Darrel; Talwar, Nick; Fichtenholz, Alex; van Lew, Bill; LaBarre, Paul

    2008-02-01

    We have developed components of a diagnostic disposable platform that has the dual purpose of providing molecular diagnostics at the point of care (POC) as well as stabilizing specimens for further analysis via a centralized surveillance system. This diagnostic is targeted for use in low-resource settings by minimally trained health workers. The disposable device does not require any additional instrumentation and will be almost as rapid and simple to use as a lateral flow strip test - yet will offer the sensitivity and specificity of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). The low-cost integrated device is composed of three functional components: (1) a sample-processing subunit that generates clean and stabilized DNA from raw samples containing nucleic acids, (2) a NA amplification subunit, and (3) visual amplicon detection sub-unit. The device integrates chemical exothermic heating, temperature stabilization using phase-change materials, and isothermal nucleic acid amplification. The aim of developing this system is to provide pathogen detection with NAAT-level sensitivity in low-resource settings where there is no access to instrumentation. If a disease occurs, patients would be tested with the disposable in the field. A nucleic acid sample would be preserved within the spent disposable which could be sent to a central laboratory facility for further analysis if needed.

  8. Bioanalytical applications of isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huimin; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The most popular in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques like polymerase chain reaction (PCR) including real-time PCR are costly and require thermocycling, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Highly efficient in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques using simple, portable and low-cost instruments are crucial in disease diagnosis, mutation detection and biodefense. Toward this goal, isothermal amplification techniques that represent a group of attractive in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques for bioanalysis have been developed. Unlike PCR where polymerases are easily deactivated by thermally labile constituents in a sample, some of the isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques, such as helicase-dependent amplification and nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, enable the detection of bioanalytes with much simplified protocols and with minimal sample preparations since the entire amplification processes are performed isothermally. This review focuses on the isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry. Starting off from their amplification mechanisms and significant properties, the adoption of isothermal amplification techniques in bioanalytical chemistry and their future perspectives are discussed. Representative examples illustrating the performance and advantages of each isothermal amplification technique are discussed along with some discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of each technique.

  9. Nucleic Acid Amplification Testing in Suspected Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esernio-Jenssen, Debra; Barnes, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that site-specific cultures be obtained, when indicated, for sexually victimized children. Nucleic acid amplification testing is a highly sensitive and specific methodology for identifying sexually transmitted infections. Nucleic acid amplification tests are also less invasive than culture, and this…

  10. In vitro amplification techniques for the detection of nucleic acids: new tools for the diagnostic laboratory.

    PubMed

    Persing, D H; Landry, M L

    1989-01-01

    The acceptance of nucleic acid probes as diagnostic tools for the clinical laboratory has been hampered by a number of factors, including laborious techniques and limited sensitivity. The focus of this review is on the recent development of amplification techniques to enhance the signal generated by nucleic acid-based detection systems. Three general areas are discussed: (1) amplification of target sequences using the polymerase chain reaction or the transcript amplification system, (2) amplification of the probe sequences using Q beta replicase, and (3) amplification of probe-generated signals with compound or "Christmas tree" probes. The hope of these new technologies is to simplify yet improve on the sensitivity of nucleic acid-based tests to enable them to attain a more prominent place in the diagnostic repertoire of the clinical laboratory.

  11. Isothermal amplification detection of nucleic acids by a double-nicked beacon.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Zhou, Meiling; Pan, Mei; Zhong, Guilin; Ma, Cuiping

    2016-03-01

    Isothermal and rapid amplification detection of nucleic acids is an important technology in environmental monitoring, foodborne pathogen detection, and point-of-care clinical diagnostics. Here we have developed a novel method of isothermal signal amplification for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) detection. The ssDNA target could be used as an initiator, coupled with a double-nicked molecular beacon, to originate amplification cycles, achieving cascade signal amplification. In addition, the method showed good specificity and strong anti-jamming capability. Overall, it is a one-pot and isothermal strand displacement amplification method without the requirement of a stepwise procedure, which greatly simplifies the experimental procedure and decreases the probability of contamination of samples. With its advantages, the method would be very useful to detect nucleic acids in point-of-care or field use.

  12. Isothermal amplification detection of nucleic acids by a double-nicked beacon.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Zhou, Meiling; Pan, Mei; Zhong, Guilin; Ma, Cuiping

    2016-03-01

    Isothermal and rapid amplification detection of nucleic acids is an important technology in environmental monitoring, foodborne pathogen detection, and point-of-care clinical diagnostics. Here we have developed a novel method of isothermal signal amplification for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) detection. The ssDNA target could be used as an initiator, coupled with a double-nicked molecular beacon, to originate amplification cycles, achieving cascade signal amplification. In addition, the method showed good specificity and strong anti-jamming capability. Overall, it is a one-pot and isothermal strand displacement amplification method without the requirement of a stepwise procedure, which greatly simplifies the experimental procedure and decreases the probability of contamination of samples. With its advantages, the method would be very useful to detect nucleic acids in point-of-care or field use. PMID:26706801

  13. Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification in nanoliter volumes.

    PubMed

    Gulliksen, Anja; Solli, Lars; Karlsen, Frank; Rogne, Henrik; Hovig, Eivind; Nordstrøm, Trine; Sirevåg, Reidun

    2004-01-01

    Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) is an isothermal method specifically designed for amplification of RNA. Fluorescent molecular beacon probes enable real-time monitoring of the amplification process. Successful identification, utilizing the real-time NASBA technology, was performed on a microchip with oligonucleotides at a concentration of 1.0 and 0.1 microM, in 10- and 50-nL reaction chambers, respectively. The microchip was developed in a silicon-glass structure. An instrument providing thermal control and an optical detection system was built for amplification readout. Experimental results demonstrate distinct amplification processes. Miniaturized real-time NASBA in microchips makes high-throughput diagnostics of bacteria, viruses, and cancer markers possible, at reduced cost and without contamination.

  14. Strand Invasion Based Amplification (SIBA®): a novel isothermal DNA amplification technology demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity for a single molecule of target analyte.

    PubMed

    Hoser, Mark J; Mansukoski, Hannu K; Morrical, Scott W; Eboigbodin, Kevin E

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies offer significant advantages over polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in that they do not require thermal cycling or sophisticated laboratory equipment. However, non-target-dependent amplification has limited the sensitivity of isothermal technologies and complex probes are usually required to distinguish between non-specific and target-dependent amplification. Here, we report a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology, Strand Invasion Based Amplification (SIBA). SIBA technology is resistant to non-specific amplification, is able to detect a single molecule of target analyte, and does not require target-specific probes. The technology relies on the recombinase-dependent insertion of an invasion oligonucleotide (IO) into the double-stranded target nucleic acid. The duplex regions peripheral to the IO insertion site dissociate, thereby enabling target-specific primers to bind. A polymerase then extends the primers onto the target nucleic acid leading to exponential amplification of the target. The primers are not substrates for the recombinase and are, therefore unable to extend the target template in the absence of the IO. The inclusion of 2'-O-methyl RNA to the IO ensures that it is not extendible and that it does not take part in the extension of the target template. These characteristics ensure that the technology is resistant to non-specific amplification since primer dimers or mis-priming are unable to exponentially amplify. Consequently, SIBA is highly specific and able to distinguish closely-related species with single molecule sensitivity in the absence of complex probes or sophisticated laboratory equipment. Here, we describe this technology in detail and demonstrate its use for the detection of Salmonella.

  15. Strand Invasion Based Amplification (SIBA®): A Novel Isothermal DNA Amplification Technology Demonstrating High Specificity and Sensitivity for a Single Molecule of Target Analyte

    PubMed Central

    Hoser, Mark J.; Mansukoski, Hannu K.; Morrical, Scott W.; Eboigbodin, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies offer significant advantages over polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in that they do not require thermal cycling or sophisticated laboratory equipment. However, non-target-dependent amplification has limited the sensitivity of isothermal technologies and complex probes are usually required to distinguish between non-specific and target-dependent amplification. Here, we report a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology, Strand Invasion Based Amplification (SIBA). SIBA technology is resistant to non-specific amplification, is able to detect a single molecule of target analyte, and does not require target-specific probes. The technology relies on the recombinase-dependent insertion of an invasion oligonucleotide (IO) into the double-stranded target nucleic acid. The duplex regions peripheral to the IO insertion site dissociate, thereby enabling target-specific primers to bind. A polymerase then extends the primers onto the target nucleic acid leading to exponential amplification of the target. The primers are not substrates for the recombinase and are, therefore unable to extend the target template in the absence of the IO. The inclusion of 2′-O-methyl RNA to the IO ensures that it is not extendible and that it does not take part in the extension of the target template. These characteristics ensure that the technology is resistant to non-specific amplification since primer dimers or mis-priming are unable to exponentially amplify. Consequently, SIBA is highly specific and able to distinguish closely-related species with single molecule sensitivity in the absence of complex probes or sophisticated laboratory equipment. Here, we describe this technology in detail and demonstrate its use for the detection of Salmonella. PMID:25419812

  16. Universal probe amplification: multiplex screening technologies for genetic variations.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Hun; Park, Ki Soo; Lee, Kyungmee; Jang, Hyowon; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-01-01

    In order to achieve multiplex screening of genetic variations, multiplex amplification of target genomic DNA is necessary. Universal amplification technology meets this requirement by simultaneously amplifying a number of different regions within the target genomic DNA using a single pair of universal primers and thus eliminating the limitations associated with the use of multiple pairs of primers. We comprehensively review universal probe amplification and its use with multiplex technologies for the identification of the most representative genetic variation, i. e. single nucleotide polymorphisms. The progress and key issues relating to universal probe amplification are discussed and the representative technologies are summarized with an emphasis on their application for the identification of susceptibility to human diseases.

  17. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing a plurality of a nucleic acid array, comprising, in order, the steps of amplifying in situ nucleic acid molecules of a first randomly-patterned, immobilized nucleic acid array comprising a heterogeneous pool of nucleic acid molecules affixed to a support, transferring at least a subset of the nucleic acid molecules produced by such amplifying to a second support, and affixing the subset so transferred to the second support to form a second randomly-patterned, immobilized nucleic acid array, wherein the nucleic acid molecules of the second array occupy positions that correspond to those of the nucleic acid molecules from which they were amplified on the first array, so that the first array serves as a template to produce a plurality, is disclosed.

  18. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Church, George M.; Mitra, Robi D.

    2010-08-31

    Disclosed are improved methods of making and using immobilized arrays of nucleic acids, particularly methods for producing replicas of such arrays. Included are methods for producing high density arrays of nucleic acids and replicas of such arrays, as well as methods for preserving the resolution of arrays through rounds of replication. Also included are methods which take advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays for increased sensitivity in detection of sequences on arrays. Improved methods of sequencing nucleic acids immobilized on arrays utilizing single copies of arrays and methods taking further advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays are disclosed. The improvements lead to higher fidelity and longer read lengths of sequences immobilized on arrays. Methods are also disclosed which improve the efficiency of multiplex PCR using arrays of immobilized nucleic acids.

  19. Nucleic acid amplification using modular branched primers

    SciTech Connect

    Ulanovsky, Levy; Raja, Mugasimangalam C.

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions expand the options for making primers for use in amplifying nucleic acid segments. The invention eliminates the step of custom synthesis of primers for Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). Instead of being custom-synthesized, a primer is replaced by a combination of several oligonucleotide modules selected from a pre-synthesized library. A modular combination of just a few oligonucleotides essentially mimics the performance of a conventional, custom-made primer by matching the sequence of the priming site in the template. Each oligonucleotide module has a segment that matches one of the stretches within the priming site.

  20. New Technologies in Amplification: Applications to the Pediatric Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopun, Judy

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of technological advances in amplification for children with hearing impairments focuses on the advantages and limitations of fitting children with devices that have features such as dynamic-range compression, multiband signal processing, multimemory capability, digital feedback reduction, and frequency transposition. (Author/DB)

  1. Recombinase polymerase amplification: Emergence as a critical molecular technology for rapid, low-resource diagnostics.

    PubMed

    James, Ameh; Macdonald, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Isothermal molecular diagnostics are bridging the technology gap between traditional diagnostics and polymerase chain reaction-based methods. These new techniques enable timely and accurate testing, especially in settings where there is a lack of infrastructure to support polymerase chain reaction facilities. Despite this, there is a significant lack of uptake of these technologies in developing countries where they are highly needed. Among these novel isothermal technologies, recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) holds particular potential for use in developing countries. This rapid nucleic acid amplification approach is fast, highly sensitive and specific, and amenable to countries with a high burden of infectious diseases. Implementation of RPA technology in developing countries is critically required to assess limitations and potentials of the diagnosis of infectious disease, and may help identify impediments that prevent adoption of new molecular technologies in low resource- and low skill settings. This review focuses on approaching diagnosis of infectious disease with RPA.

  2. Recombinase polymerase amplification: Emergence as a critical molecular technology for rapid, low-resource diagnostics.

    PubMed

    James, Ameh; Macdonald, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Isothermal molecular diagnostics are bridging the technology gap between traditional diagnostics and polymerase chain reaction-based methods. These new techniques enable timely and accurate testing, especially in settings where there is a lack of infrastructure to support polymerase chain reaction facilities. Despite this, there is a significant lack of uptake of these technologies in developing countries where they are highly needed. Among these novel isothermal technologies, recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) holds particular potential for use in developing countries. This rapid nucleic acid amplification approach is fast, highly sensitive and specific, and amenable to countries with a high burden of infectious diseases. Implementation of RPA technology in developing countries is critically required to assess limitations and potentials of the diagnosis of infectious disease, and may help identify impediments that prevent adoption of new molecular technologies in low resource- and low skill settings. This review focuses on approaching diagnosis of infectious disease with RPA. PMID:26517245

  3. Fluorescence detection in Lab-on-a-chip systems using ultrafast nucleic acid amplification methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gransee, Rainer; Schneider, Tristan; Elyorgun, Deniz; Strobach, Xenia; Schunck, Tobias; Gatscha, Theresia; Höth, Julian

    2014-05-01

    Today, nucleic amplification plays a key role in modern molecular biology allowing fast and specific laboratory diagnostics testing. An ultrafast microfluidic module (allowing 30 polymeric chain reaction (PCR) cycles in 6 minutes) based on an oscillating fluid plug concept was previously developed[1]. This system allows the amplification of native genomic deoxyribonucleic acid molecules (DNA) even from whole blood samples but still lacks some functionality compared to commercial bench top systems. This work presents the actual status of the renewed and advanced system, permitting the automated optical detection of not only the fluid plug position but also fluorescence detection. The system uses light emitting diodes (LED) for illumination and a low cost CMOS web-camera for optical detection. Image data processing allows the automated process control of the overall system components. Therefore, the system enables the performance of rapid and robust nucleic acid amplifications together with the integration of real time measurement technology. This allows the amplification and simultaneous quantification of the DNA molecules. The possibility to integrate swift nucleic amplification and optical detection into complex sample-to-answer analysis platforms opens up new pathways towards fast and transportable low-cost point of care devices.

  4. Quantitative detection of Aspergillus spp. by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Perlin, David S

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and quantitative detection of Aspergillus from clinical samples may facilitate an early diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). As nucleic acid-based detection is a viable option, we demonstrate that Aspergillus burdens can be rapidly and accurately detected by a novel real-time nucleic acid assay other than qPCR by using the combination of nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and the molecular beacon (MB) technology. Here, we detail a real-time NASBA assay to determine quantitative Aspergillus burdens in lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids of rats with experimental IPA.

  5. Ligation with nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Ong, Carmichael; Tai, Warren; Sarma, Aartik; Opal, Steven M; Artenstein, Andrew W; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel method for detecting nucleic acid targets using a ligation step along with an isothermal, exponential amplification step. We use an engineered ssDNA with two variable regions on the ends, allowing us to design the probe for optimal reaction kinetics and primer binding. This two-part probe is ligated by T4 DNA Ligase only when both parts bind adjacently to the target. The assay demonstrates that the expected 72-nt RNA product appears only when the synthetic target, T4 ligase, and both probe fragments are present during the ligation step. An extraneous 38-nt RNA product also appears due to linear amplification of unligated probe (P3), but its presence does not cause a false-positive result. In addition, 40 mmol/L KCl in the final amplification mix was found to be optimal. It was also found that increasing P5 in excess of P3 helped with ligation and reduced the extraneous 38-nt RNA product. The assay was also tested with a single nucleotide polymorphism target, changing one base at the ligation site. The assay was able to yield a negative signal despite only a single-base change. Finally, using P3 and P5 with longer binding sites results in increased overall sensitivity of the reaction, showing that increasing ligation efficiency can improve the assay overall. We believe that this method can be used effectively for a number of diagnostic assays. PMID:22449695

  6. Acidic precipitation: a technical amplification of NAPAP's findings

    SciTech Connect

    Lefohn, A.S.; Krupa, S.V.

    1988-06-01

    In September 1987, NAPAP released a 4-volume, 925 page interim report that summarized the effects of acidic precipitation on crops, forests, aquatic ecosystems, visibility, and human health. Following the release of the report, APCA coordinated an international conference to provide a forum for the technical amplification of the conclusions reached in NAPAP's report. Scientists from the United States and Canada were invited to participate in the conference. The focus of the meeting was concerned only with the technical aspects of the NAPAP report. At the conference, there were important research concepts presented that may require further attention before definitive, bottom line statements can be made concerning the effects of acid precipitation on the environment. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the key technical points made at the conference and provide NAPAP with additional scientific inputs as it begins to prepare for its 1990 Final Assessment Report.

  7. Polyethersulfone improves isothermal nucleic acid amplification compared to current paper-based diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Linnes, J. C.; Rodriguez, N. M.; Liu, L.

    2016-01-01

    Devices based on rapid, paper-based, isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques have recently emerged with the potential to fill a growing need for highly sensitive point-of-care diagnostics throughout the world. As this field develops, such devices will require optimized materials that promote amplification and sample preparation. Herein, we systematically investigated isothermal nucleic acid amplification in materials currently used in rapid diagnostics (cellulose paper, glass fiber, and nitrocellulose) and two additional porous membranes with upstream sample preparation capabilities (polyethersulfone and polycarbonate). We compared amplification efficiency from four separate DNA and RNA targets (Bordetella pertussis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Influenza A H1N1) within these materials using two different isothermal amplification schemes, helicase dependent amplification (tHDA) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), and traditional PCR. We found that the current paper-based diagnostic membranes inhibited nucleic acid amplification when compared to membrane-free controls; however, polyethersulfone allowed for efficient amplification in both LAMP and tHDA reactions. Further, observing the performance of traditional PCR amplification within these membranes was not predicative of their effects on in situ LAMP and tHDA. Polyethersulfone is a new material for paper-based nucleic acid amplification, yet provides an optimal support for rapid molecular diagnostics for point-of-care applications. PMID:26906904

  8. Polyethersulfone improves isothermal nucleic acid amplification compared to current paper-based diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Linnes, J C; Rodriguez, N M; Liu, L; Klapperich, C M

    2016-04-01

    Devices based on rapid, paper-based, isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques have recently emerged with the potential to fill a growing need for highly sensitive point-of-care diagnostics throughout the world. As this field develops, such devices will require optimized materials that promote amplification and sample preparation. Herein, we systematically investigated isothermal nucleic acid amplification in materials currently used in rapid diagnostics (cellulose paper, glass fiber, and nitrocellulose) and two additional porous membranes with upstream sample preparation capabilities (polyethersulfone and polycarbonate). We compared amplification efficiency from four separate DNA and RNA targets (Bordetella pertussis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Influenza A H1N1) within these materials using two different isothermal amplification schemes, helicase dependent amplification (tHDA) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), and traditional PCR. We found that the current paper-based diagnostic membranes inhibited nucleic acid amplification when compared to membrane-free controls; however, polyethersulfone allowed for efficient amplification in both LAMP and tHDA reactions. Further, observing the performance of traditional PCR amplification within these membranes was not predicative of their effects on in situ LAMP and tHDA. Polyethersulfone is a new material for paper-based nucleic acid amplification, yet provides an optimal support for rapid molecular diagnostics for point-of-care applications. PMID:26906904

  9. Nucleic acid detection using G-quadruplex amplification methodologies.

    PubMed

    Roembke, Benjamin T; Nakayama, Shizuka; Sintim, Herman O

    2013-12-15

    In the last decade, there has been an explosion in the use of G-quadruplex labels to detect various analytes, including DNA/RNA, proteins, metals and other metabolites. In this review, we focus on strategies for the detection of nucleic acids, using G-quadruplexes as detection labels or as enzyme labels that amplify detection signals. Methods to detect other analytes are briefly mentioned. We highlight various strategies, including split G-quadruplex, hemin-G-quadruplex conjugates, molecular beacon G-quadruplex or inhibited G-quadruplex probes. The tandem use of G-quadruplex labels with various DNA-modifying enzymes, such as polymerases (used for rolling circle amplification), exonucleases and endonucleases, is also discussed. Some of the detection modalities that are discussed in this review include fluorescence, colorimetric, chemiluminescence, and electrochemical methods.

  10. Integrated Microfluidic Nucleic Acid Isolation, Isothermal Amplification, and Amplicon Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Mauk, Michael G.; Liu, Changchun; Song, Jinzhao; Bau, Haim H.

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic components and systems for rapid (<60 min), low-cost, convenient, field-deployable sequence-specific nucleic acid-based amplification tests (NAATs) are described. A microfluidic point-of-care (POC) diagnostics test to quantify HIV viral load from blood samples serves as a representative and instructive example to discuss the technical issues and capabilities of “lab on a chip” NAAT devices. A portable, miniaturized POC NAAT with performance comparable to conventional PCR (polymerase-chain reaction)-based tests in clinical laboratories can be realized with a disposable, palm-sized, plastic microfluidic chip in which: (1) nucleic acids (NAs) are extracted from relatively large (~mL) volume sample lysates using an embedded porous silica glass fiber or cellulose binding phase (“membrane”) to capture sample NAs in a flow-through, filtration mode; (2) NAs captured on the membrane are isothermally (~65 °C) amplified; (3) amplicon production is monitored by real-time fluorescence detection, such as with a smartphone CCD camera serving as a low-cost detector; and (4) paraffin-encapsulated, lyophilized reagents for temperature-activated release are pre-stored in the chip. Limits of Detection (LOD) better than 103 virons/sample can be achieved. A modified chip with conduits hosting a diffusion-mode amplification process provides a simple visual indicator to readily quantify sample NA template. In addition, a companion microfluidic device for extracting plasma from whole blood without a centrifuge, generating cell-free plasma for chip-based molecular diagnostics, is described. Extensions to a myriad of related applications including, for example, food testing, cancer screening, and insect genotyping are briefly surveyed.

  11. Integrated Microfluidic Nucleic Acid Isolation, Isothermal Amplification, and Amplicon Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Mauk, Michael G.; Liu, Changchun; Song, Jinzhao; Bau, Haim H.

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic components and systems for rapid (<60 min), low-cost, convenient, field-deployable sequence-specific nucleic acid-based amplification tests (NAATs) are described. A microfluidic point-of-care (POC) diagnostics test to quantify HIV viral load from blood samples serves as a representative and instructive example to discuss the technical issues and capabilities of “lab on a chip” NAAT devices. A portable, miniaturized POC NAAT with performance comparable to conventional PCR (polymerase-chain reaction)-based tests in clinical laboratories can be realized with a disposable, palm-sized, plastic microfluidic chip in which: (1) nucleic acids (NAs) are extracted from relatively large (~mL) volume sample lysates using an embedded porous silica glass fiber or cellulose binding phase (“membrane”) to capture sample NAs in a flow-through, filtration mode; (2) NAs captured on the membrane are isothermally (~65 °C) amplified; (3) amplicon production is monitored by real-time fluorescence detection, such as with a smartphone CCD camera serving as a low-cost detector; and (4) paraffin-encapsulated, lyophilized reagents for temperature-activated release are pre-stored in the chip. Limits of Detection (LOD) better than 103 virons/sample can be achieved. A modified chip with conduits hosting a diffusion-mode amplification process provides a simple visual indicator to readily quantify sample NA template. In addition, a companion microfluidic device for extracting plasma from whole blood without a centrifuge, generating cell-free plasma for chip-based molecular diagnostics, is described. Extensions to a myriad of related applications including, for example, food testing, cancer screening, and insect genotyping are briefly surveyed. PMID:27600235

  12. Nuclemeter: A Reaction-Diffusion Column for Quantifying Nucleic Acids Undergoing Enzymatic Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Haim; Liu, Changchun; Killawala, Chitvan; Sadik, Mohamed; Mauk, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Real-time amplification and quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences plays a major role in many medical and biotechnological applications. In the case of infectious diseases, quantification of the pathogen-load in patient specimens is critical to assessing disease progression, effectiveness of drug therapy, and emergence of drug-resistance. Typically, nucleic acid quantification requires sophisticated and expensive instruments, such as real-time PCR machines, which are not appropriate for on-site use and for low resource settings. We describe a simple, low-cost, reactiondiffusion based method for end-point quantification of target nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification. The number of target molecules is inferred from the position of the reaction-diffusion front, analogous to reading temperature in a mercury thermometer. We model the process with the Fisher Kolmogoroff Petrovskii Piscounoff (FKPP) Equation and compare theoretical predictions with experimental observations. The proposed method is suitable for nucleic acid quantification at the point of care, compatible with multiplexing and high-throughput processing, and can function instrument-free. C.L. was supported by NIH/NIAID K25AI099160; M.S. was supported by the Pennsylvania Ben Franklin Technology Development Authority; C.K. and H.B. were funded, in part, by NIH/NIAID 1R41AI104418-01A1.

  13. Sensitive detection of nucleic acids with rolling circle amplification and surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Juan; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2010-11-01

    Detection of specific DNA sequences is important to molecular biology research and clinical diagnostics. To improve the sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy (SERS), a variety of signal amplification methods has been developed, including Raman-active-dye, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology, molecular beacon, SERS-active substrates, and SERS-tag. However, the combination of rolling circle amplification (RCA) with SERS for nucleic acid detection has not been reported. Herein, we describe a new approach for nucleic acid detection by the combination of RCA reaction with SERS. Because of the binding of abundance repeated sequences of RCA products with gold nanoparticle (Au NP) and Rox-modified detection probes, SERS signal is significantly amplified and the detection limit of 10.0 pM might be achieved. The sensitivity of RCA-based SERS has increased by as much as 3 orders of magnitude as compared to PCR-based SERS and is also comparable with or even exceeds that of both RCA-based electrochemical and RCA-based fluorescent methods. This RCA-based SERS might discriminate perfect matched target DNA from 1-base mismatched DNA with high selectivity. The high sensitivity and selectivity of RCA-based SERS makes it a potential tool for early diagnosis of gene-related disease and also offers a great promise for multiplexed assays with DNA microarrays.

  14. Powerful Amplification Cascades of FRET-Based Two-Layer Nonenzymatic Nucleic Acid Circuits.

    PubMed

    Quan, Ke; Huang, Jin; Yang, Xiaohai; Yang, Yanjing; Ying, Le; Wang, He; Xie, Nuli; Ou, Min; Wang, Kemin

    2016-06-01

    Nucleic acid circuits have played important roles in biological engineering and have increasingly attracted researchers' attention. They are primarily based on nucleic acid hybridizations and strand displacement reactions between nucleic acid probes of different lengths. Signal amplification schemes that do not rely on protein enzyme show great potential in analytical applications. While the single amplification circuit often achieves linear amplification that may not meet the need for detection of target in a very small amount, it is very necessary to construct cascade circuits that allow for larger amplification of inputs. Herein, we have successfully engineered powerful amplification cascades of FRET-based two-layer nonenzymatic nucleic acid circuits, in which the outputs of catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) activate hybridization chain reactions (HCR) circuits to induce repeated hybridization, allowing real-time monitoring of self-assembly process by FRET signal. The cascades can yield 50000-fold signal amplification with the help of the well-designed and high-quality nucleic acid circuit amplifiers. Subsequently, with coupling of structure-switching aptamer, as low as 200 pM adenosine is detected in buffer, as well as in human serum. To our knowledge, we have for the first time realized real-time monitoring adaptation of HCR to CHA circuits and achieved amplified detection of nucleic acids and small molecules with relatively high sensitivity. PMID:27142084

  15. Miniaturized PCR chips for nucleic acid amplification and analysis: latest advances and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunsun; Xing, Da

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of performing fast and small-volume nucleic acid amplification and analysis on a single chip has attracted great interest. Devices based on this idea, referred to as micro total analysis, microfluidic analysis, or simply ‘Lab on a chip’ systems, have witnessed steady advances over the last several years. Here, we summarize recent research on chip substrates, surface treatments, PCR reaction volume and speed, architecture, approaches to eliminating cross-contamination and control and measurement of temperature and liquid flow. We also discuss product-detection methods, integration of functional components, biological samples used in PCR chips, potential applications and other practical issues related to implementation of lab-on-a-chip technologies. PMID:17576684

  16. Miniaturized nucleic acid amplification systems for rapid and point-of-care diagnostics: a review.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farhan; Hashsham, Syed A

    2012-07-01

    Point-of-care (POC) genetic diagnostics critically depends on miniaturization and integration of sample processing, nucleic acid amplification, and detection systems. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays have extensively applied for the diagnosis of genetic markers of disease. Microfluidic chips for microPCR with different materials and designs have been reported. Temperature cycling systems with varying thermal masses and conductivities, thermal cycling times, flow-rates, and cross-sectional areas, have also been developed to reduce the nucleic acid amplification time. Similarly, isothermal amplification techniques (e.g., loop-mediated isothermal amplification or LAMP), which are still are emerging, have a better potential as an alternative to PCR for POC diagnostics. Isothermal amplification techniques have: (i) moderate incubation temperature leading to simplified heating and low power consumption, (ii) yield high amount of amplification products, which can be detected either visually or by simple detectors, (iii) allow direct genetic amplification from bacterial cells due to the superior tolerance to substances that typically inhibit PCR, (iv) have high specificity, and sensitivity, and (v) result in rapid detection often within 10-20 min. The aim of this review is to provide a better understanding of the advantages and limitations of microPCR and microLAMP systems for rapid and POC diagnostics. PMID:22704369

  17. Microfluidic devices for nucleic acid (NA) isolation, isothermal NA amplification, and real-time detection.

    PubMed

    Mauk, Michael G; Liu, Changchun; Sadik, Mohamed; Bau, Haim H

    2015-01-01

    Molecular (nucleic acid)-based diagnostics tests have many advantages over immunoassays, particularly with regard to sensitivity and specificity. Most on-site diagnostic tests, however, are immunoassay-based because conventional nucleic acid-based tests (NATs) require extensive sample processing, trained operators, and specialized equipment. To make NATs more convenient, especially for point-of-care diagnostics and on-site testing, a simple plastic microfluidic cassette ("chip") has been developed for nucleic acid-based testing of blood, other clinical specimens, food, water, and environmental samples. The chip combines nucleic acid isolation by solid-phase extraction; isothermal enzymatic amplification such as LAMP (Loop-mediated AMPlification), NASBA (Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification), and RPA (Recombinase Polymerase Amplification); and real-time optical detection of DNA or RNA analytes. The microfluidic cassette incorporates an embedded nucleic acid binding membrane in the amplification reaction chamber. Target nucleic acids extracted from a lysate are captured on the membrane and amplified at a constant incubation temperature. The amplification product, labeled with a fluorophore reporter, is excited with a LED light source and monitored in situ in real time with a photodiode or a CCD detector (such as available in a smartphone). For blood analysis, a companion filtration device that separates plasma from whole blood to provide cell-free samples for virus and bacterial lysis and nucleic acid testing in the microfluidic chip has also been developed. For HIV virus detection in blood, the microfluidic NAT chip achieves a sensitivity and specificity that are nearly comparable to conventional benchtop protocols using spin columns and thermal cyclers.

  18. Detection of North American eastern and western equine encephalitis viruses by nucleic acid amplification assays.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Amy J; Martin, Denise A; Lanciotti, Robert S

    2003-01-01

    We have developed nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), standard reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and TaqMan nucleic acid amplification assays for the rapid detection of North American eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) and western equine encephalitis (WEE) viral RNAs from samples collected in the field and clinical samples. The sensitivities of these assays have been compared to that of virus isolation. While all three types of nucleic acid amplification assays provide rapid detection of viral RNAs comparable to the isolation of viruses in Vero cells, the TaqMan assays for North American EEE and WEE viral RNAs are the most sensitive. We have shown these assays to be specific for North American EEE and WEE viral RNAs by testing geographically and temporally distinct strains of EEE and WEE viruses along with a battery of related and unrelated arthropodborne viruses. In addition, all three types of nucleic acid amplification assays have been used to detect North American EEE and WEE viral RNAs from mosquito and vertebrate tissue samples. The sensitivity, specificity, and rapidity of nucleic acid amplification demonstrate the usefulness of NASBA, standard RT-PCR, and TaqMan assays, in both research and diagnostic settings, to detect North American EEE and WEE viral RNAs. PMID:12517876

  19. Individual donor nucleic acid amplification testing for detection of West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hun; Mathew, John; Pfahler, Wolfram; Ma, Dongling; Valinsky, Jay; Prince, Alfred M; Andrus, Linda

    2005-10-01

    We have developed an economical, high-throughput nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) for blood-borne viruses, suitable for use in the screening of plasma samples from individual blood donors. This assay system includes a semiautomated procedure, using 96-well glass fiber plates for the extraction of viral nucleic acids from plasma and "universal beacon" technology which permits the detection of all genotypes of highly variable viruses (e.g., human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus). In this detection system, two fluorescent- detection technologies were employed successfully in a single tube: molecular beacon for West Nile virus (WNV) detection using a 6-carboxyfluorescein fluorophore and TaqMan for internal control detection using a VIC fluorophore. To establish proof of concept, we focused on the development of a robust individual donor NAT for WNV. The assay showed no reactivity to 15 other viruses tested or to 420 blood donor samples from the WNV pre-epidemic season. No cross-contamination was observed on an alternating positive-/negative-well test. The sensitivity (limit of detection, 95%) of the assay for WNV is between 3.79 and 16.3 RNA copies/ml, depending on which material was used as a standard. The assay detected all positive blood donation samples identified by the Roche WNV NAT. The assay can be performed qualitatively for screening and quantitatively for confirmation.

  20. A Simple, Low-Cost Platform for Real-Time Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification.

    PubMed

    Craw, Pascal; Mackay, Ruth E; Naveenathayalan, Angel; Hudson, Chris; Branavan, Manoharanehru; Sadiq, S Tariq; Balachandran, Wamadeva

    2015-01-01

    Advances in microfluidics and the introduction of isothermal nucleic acid amplification assays have resulted in a range of solutions for nucleic acid amplification tests suited for point of care and field use. However, miniaturisation of instrumentation for such assays has not seen such rapid advances and fluorescence based assays still depend on complex, bulky and expensive optics such as fluorescence microscopes, photomultiplier tubes and sensitive lens assemblies. In this work we demonstrate a robust, low cost platform for isothermal nucleic acid amplification on a microfluidic device. Using easily obtainable materials and commercial off-the-shelf components, we show real time fluorescence detection using a low cost photodiode and operational amplifier without need for lenses. Temperature regulation on the device is achieved using a heater fabricated with standard printed circuit board fabrication methods. These facile construction methods allow fabrications at a cost compatible with widespread deployment to resource poor settings. PMID:26389913

  1. A Simple, Low-Cost Platform for Real-Time Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Craw, Pascal; Mackay, Ruth E.; Naveenathayalan, Angel; Hudson, Chris; Branavan, Manoharanehru; Sadiq, S. Tariq; Balachandran, Wamadeva

    2015-01-01

    Advances in microfluidics and the introduction of isothermal nucleic acid amplification assays have resulted in a range of solutions for nucleic acid amplification tests suited for point of care and field use. However, miniaturisation of instrumentation for such assays has not seen such rapid advances and fluorescence based assays still depend on complex, bulky and expensive optics such as fluorescence microscopes, photomultiplier tubes and sensitive lens assemblies. In this work we demonstrate a robust, low cost platform for isothermal nucleic acid amplification on a microfluidic device. Using easily obtainable materials and commercial off-the-shelf components, we show real time fluorescence detection using a low cost photodiode and operational amplifier without need for lenses. Temperature regulation on the device is achieved using a heater fabricated with standard printed circuit board fabrication methods. These facile construction methods allow fabrications at a cost compatible with widespread deployment to resource poor settings. PMID:26389913

  2. Instrument for Real-Time Digital Nucleic Acid Amplification on Custom Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Selck, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests that are coupled with a digital readout enable the absolute quantification of single molecules, even at ultralow concentrations. Digital methods are robust, versatile and compatible with many amplification chemistries including isothermal amplification, making them particularly invaluable to assays that require sensitive detection, such as the quantification of viral load in occult infections or detection of sparse amounts of DNA from forensic samples. A number of microfluidic platforms are being developed for carrying out digital amplification. However, the mechanistic investigation and optimization of digital assays has been limited by the lack of real-time kinetic information about which factors affect the digital efficiency and analytical sensitivity of a reaction. Commercially available instruments that are capable of tracking digital reactions in real-time are restricted to only a small number of device types and sample-preparation strategies. Thus, most researchers who wish to develop, study, or optimize digital assays rely on the rate of the amplification reaction when performed in a bulk experiment, which is now recognized as an unreliable predictor of digital efficiency. To expand our ability to study how digital reactions proceed in real-time and enable us to optimize both the digital efficiency and analytical sensitivity of digital assays, we built a custom large-format digital real-time amplification instrument that can accommodate a wide variety of devices, amplification chemistries and sample-handling conditions. Herein, we validate this instrument, we provide detailed schematics that will enable others to build their own custom instruments, and we include a complete custom software suite to collect and analyze the data retrieved from the instrument. We believe assay optimizations enabled by this instrument will improve the current limits of nucleic acid detection and quantification, improving our fundamental

  3. Relevance of nucleic acid amplification techniques for diagnosis of respiratory tract infections in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed Central

    Ieven, M; Goossens, H

    1997-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are increasingly receiving requests to perform nucleic acid amplification tests for the detection of a wide variety of infectious agents. In this paper, the efficiency of nucleic acid amplification techniques for the diagnosis of respiratory tract infections is reviewed. In general, these techniques should be applied only for the detection of microorganisms for which available diagnostic techniques are markedly insensitive or nonexistent or when turnaround times for existing tests (e.g., viral culture) are much longer than those expected with amplification. This is the case for rhinoviruses, coronaviruses, and hantaviruses causing a pulmonary syndrome, Bordetella pertussis, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Coxiella burnetii. For Legionella spp. and fungi, contamination originating from the environment is a limiting factor in interpretation of results, as is the difficulty in differentiating colonization and infection. Detection of these agents in urine or blood by amplification techniques remains to be evaluated. In the clinical setting, there is no need for molecular diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii. At present, amplification methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis cannot replace the classical diagnostic techniques, due to their lack of sensitivity and the absence of specific internal controls for the detection of inhibitors of the reaction. Also, the results of interlaboratory comparisons are unsatisfactory. Furthermore, isolates are needed for susceptibility studies. Additional work remains to be done on sample preparation methods, comparison between different amplification methods, and analysis of results. The techniques can be useful for the rapid identification of M. tuberculosis in particular circumstances, as well as the rapid detection of most rifampin-resistant isolates. The introduction of diagnostic amplification techniques into a clinical laboratory implies a level of proficiency for

  4. Detection of piscine nodaviruses by real-time nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA).

    PubMed

    Starkey, William G; Millar, Rose Mary; Jenkins, Mary E; Ireland, Jacqueline H; Muir, K Fiona; Richards, Randolph H

    2004-05-01

    Nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA) is an isothermal nucleic acid amplification procedure based on target-specific primers and probes, and the co-ordinated activity of 3 enzymes: AMV reverse transcriptase, RNase H, and T7 RNA polymerase. We have developed a real-time NASBA procedure for detection of piscine nodaviruses, which have emerged as major pathogens of marine fish. Viral RNA was isolated by guanidine thiocyanate lysis followed by purification on silica particles. Primers were designed to target sequences in the nodavirus capsid protein gene, yielding an amplification product of 120 nucleotides. Amplification products were detected in real-time with a molecular beacon (FAM labelled/methyl-red quenched) that recognised an internal region of the target amplicon. Amplification and detection were performed at 41 degrees C for 90 min in a Corbett Research Rotorgene. Based on the detection of cell culture-derived nodavirus, and a synthetic RNA target, the real-time NASBA procedure was approximately 100-fold more sensitive than single-tube RT-PCR. When used to test a panel of 37 clinical samples (negative, n = 18; positive, n = 19), the real-time NASBA assay correctly identified all 18 negative and 19 positive samples. In comparison, the RT-PCR procedure identified all 18 negative samples, but only 16 of the positive samples. These results suggest that real-time NASBA may represent a sensitive and specific diagnostic procedure for piscine nodaviruses.

  5. Design of a New Type of Compact Chemical Heater for Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kamal G; Guelig, Dylan; Diesburg, Steven; Buser, Joshua; Burton, Robert; LaBarre, Paul; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Weigl, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Previous chemical heater designs for isothermal nucleic acid amplification have been based on solid-liquid phase transition, but using this approach, developers have identified design challenges en route to developing a low-cost, disposable device. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a new heater configuration suitable for isothermal amplification in which one reactant of an exothermic reaction is a liquid-gas phase-change material, thereby eliminating the need for a separate phase-change compartment. This design offers potentially enhanced performance and energy density compared to other chemical and electric heaters. PMID:26430883

  6. Design of a New Type of Compact Chemical Heater for Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kamal G.; Guelig, Dylan; Diesburg, Steven; Buser, Joshua; Burton, Robert; LaBarre, Paul; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Weigl, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Previous chemical heater designs for isothermal nucleic acid amplification have been based on solid-liquid phase transition, but using this approach, developers have identified design challenges en route to developing a low-cost, disposable device. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a new heater configuration suitable for isothermal amplification in which one reactant of an exothermic reaction is a liquid-gas phase-change material, thereby eliminating the need for a separate phase-change compartment. This design offers potentially enhanced performance and energy density compared to other chemical and electric heaters. PMID:26430883

  7. Influence of sequence mismatches on the specificity of recombinase polymerase amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Daher, Rana K; Stewart, Gale; Boissinot, Maurice; Boudreau, Dominique K; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-04-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technology relies on three major proteins, recombinase proteins, single-strand binding proteins, and polymerases, to specifically amplify nucleic acid sequences in an isothermal format. The performance of RPA with respect to sequence mismatches of closely-related non-target molecules is not well documented and the influence of the number and distribution of mismatches in DNA sequences on RPA amplification reaction is not well understood. We investigated the specificity of RPA by testing closely-related species bearing naturally occurring mismatches for the tuf gene sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and/or Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for the cfb gene sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae. In addition, the impact of the number and distribution of mismatches on RPA efficiency was assessed by synthetically generating 14 types of mismatched forward primers for detecting five bacterial species of high diagnostic relevance such as Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, S. agalactiae, P. aeruginosa, and M. tuberculosis as well as Bacillus atropheus subsp. globigii for which we use the spores as internal control in diagnostic assays. A total of 87 mismatched primers were tested in this study. We observed that target specific RPA primers with mismatches (n > 1) at their 3'extrimity hampered RPA reaction. In addition, 3 mismatches covering both extremities and the center of the primer sequence negatively affected RPA yield. We demonstrated that the specificity of RPA was multifactorial. Therefore its application in clinical settings must be selected and validated a priori. We recommend that the selection of a target gene must consider the presence of closely-related non-target genes. It is advisable to choose target regions with a high number of mismatches (≥36%, relative to the size of amplicon) with respect to closely-related species and the best case scenario would be by choosing a unique target gene.

  8. NAIL: Nucleic Acid detection using Isotachophoresis and Loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Borysiak, Mark D; Kimura, Kevin W; Posner, Jonathan D

    2015-04-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests are the gold standard for many infectious disease diagnoses due to high sensitivity and specificity, rapid operation, and low limits of detection. Despite the advantages of nucleic acid amplification tests, they currently offer limited point-of-care (POC) utility due to the need for complex instruments and laborious sample preparation. We report the development of the Nucleic Acid Isotachophoresis LAMP (NAIL) diagnostic device. NAIL uses isotachophoresis (ITP) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to extract and amplify nucleic acids from complex matrices in less than one hour inside of an integrated chip. ITP is an electrokinetic separation technique that uses an electric field and two buffers to extract and purify nucleic acids in a single step. LAMP amplifies nucleic acids at constant temperature and produces large amounts of DNA that can be easily detected. A mobile phone images the amplification results to eliminate the need for laser fluorescent detection. The device requires minimal user intervention because capillary valves and heated air chambers act as passive valves and pumps for automated fluid actuation. In this paper, we describe NAIL device design and operation, and demonstrate the extraction and detection of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 cells from whole milk samples. We use the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) limit of detection (LoD) definitions that take into account the variance from both positive and negative samples to determine the diagnostic LoD. According to the CLSI definition, the NAIL device has a limit of detection (LoD) of 1000 CFU mL(-1) for E. coli cells artificially inoculated into whole milk, which is two orders of magnitude improvement to standard tube-LAMP reactions with diluted milk samples and comparable to lab-based methods. The NAIL device potentially offers significant reductions in the complexity and cost of traditional nucleic acid diagnostics for POC applications

  9. NAIL: Nucleic Acid detection using Isotachophoresis and Loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Borysiak, Mark D; Kimura, Kevin W; Posner, Jonathan D

    2015-04-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests are the gold standard for many infectious disease diagnoses due to high sensitivity and specificity, rapid operation, and low limits of detection. Despite the advantages of nucleic acid amplification tests, they currently offer limited point-of-care (POC) utility due to the need for complex instruments and laborious sample preparation. We report the development of the Nucleic Acid Isotachophoresis LAMP (NAIL) diagnostic device. NAIL uses isotachophoresis (ITP) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to extract and amplify nucleic acids from complex matrices in less than one hour inside of an integrated chip. ITP is an electrokinetic separation technique that uses an electric field and two buffers to extract and purify nucleic acids in a single step. LAMP amplifies nucleic acids at constant temperature and produces large amounts of DNA that can be easily detected. A mobile phone images the amplification results to eliminate the need for laser fluorescent detection. The device requires minimal user intervention because capillary valves and heated air chambers act as passive valves and pumps for automated fluid actuation. In this paper, we describe NAIL device design and operation, and demonstrate the extraction and detection of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 cells from whole milk samples. We use the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) limit of detection (LoD) definitions that take into account the variance from both positive and negative samples to determine the diagnostic LoD. According to the CLSI definition, the NAIL device has a limit of detection (LoD) of 1000 CFU mL(-1) for E. coli cells artificially inoculated into whole milk, which is two orders of magnitude improvement to standard tube-LAMP reactions with diluted milk samples and comparable to lab-based methods. The NAIL device potentially offers significant reductions in the complexity and cost of traditional nucleic acid diagnostics for POC applications.

  10. Detection of infectious salmon anaemia virus by real-time nucleic acid sequence based amplification.

    PubMed

    Starkey, William G; Smail, David A; Bleie, Hogne; Muir, K Fiona; Ireland, Jacqueline H; Richards, Randolph H

    2006-10-17

    We have developed a real-time nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA) procedure for detection of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV). Primers were designed to target a 124 nucleotide region of ISAV genome segment 8. Amplification products were detected in real-time with a molecular beacon (carboxyfluorescin [FAM]-labelled and methyl-red quenched) that recognised an internal region of the target amplicon. Amplification and detection were performed at 41 degrees C for 90 min in a Corbett Research Rotorgene. The real-time NASBA assay was compared to a conventional RT-PCR for ISAV detection. From a panel of 45 clinical samples, both assays detected ISAV in the same 19 samples. Based on the detection of a synthetic RNA target, the real-time NASBA procedure was approximately 100x more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR. These results suggest that real-time NASBA may represent a useful diagnostic procedure for ISAV.

  11. Sublimation of amino acids with enantiomeric excess amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Bellec, Aurelien

    The notion of chirality was first reported in 1848 by Pasteur, when he mechanically separated the two enantiomers of tartrate salts.[1] Amino acids are considered as the most important building blocks of life with sugars. On the Earth, the living systems are only composed of L- amino acids and D-sugars. Nowadays, the origin of homochirality on Earth is still unknown, and there are many theories trying to explain this phenomenon. Recently Cooks [2] and Feringa [3] reported that the sublimation of small amounts of L and D amino acid mixtures containing an excess of one of them leads to a huge enantiomeric excess (ee) enhancement of the sublimate. We reinvestigated these experiments to determine the rules leading to this enhancement. Starting from mixtures of L- and DL leucine we observed increasing and decreasing of the ee in function of the starting ratios. By the use of 13C derivatives, the origin of the sublimed enantiomers has been precised. Various parameters (L and D, or L and DL mixtures, dissolution in water before sublimation, . . . ) were studied. We also took into consideration the recently proposed hypothesis of the role played by the eutectic ee in the sublimation. [4] The application of these results to find an explanation of the enantiomeric excess in meteorites or in the Primitive Earth scenarios will be discussed. 1 Pasteur, L. Ann. Phys., 1848, 24, 442. 2 R. H. Perry, C. Wu, M. Nefliu, R. G. Cooks, Chem. Commun., 2007, 1071-1073. 3 S. P. Fletcher, R. B. C. Jagt, B. L. Feringa, Chem. Commun., 2007, 2578-2580. 4 D. G. Blackmond, M. Klussmannb Chem. Commun., 2007, 3990-3996.

  12. Nonenzymatic catalytic signal amplification for nucleic acid hybridization assays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wenhong (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Devices, methods, and kits for amplifying the signal from hybridization reactions between nucleic acid probes and their cognate targets are presented. The devices provide partially-duplexed, immobilized probe complexes, spatially separate from and separately addressable from immobilized docking strands. Cognate target acts catalytically to transfer probe from the site of probe complex immobilization to the site of immobilized docking strand, generating a detectable signal. The methods and kits of the present invention may be used to identify the presence of cognate target in a fluid sample.

  13. Guanine nanowire based amplification strategy: Enzyme-free biosensing of nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong Feng; Huang, Yan Li; Ren, Wang; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2016-04-15

    Sensitive and specific detection of nucleic acids and proteins plays a vital role in food, forensic screening, clinical and environmental monitoring. There remains a great challenge in the development of signal amplification method for biomolecules detection. Herein, we describe a novel signal amplification strategy based on the formation of guanine nanowire for quantitative detection of nucleic acids and proteins (thrombin) at room temperature. In the presence of analytes and magnesium ions, the guanine nanowire could be formed within 10 min. Compared to the widely used single G-quadruplex biocatalytic label unit, the detection limits are improved by two orders of magnitude in our assay. The proposed enzyme-free method avoids fussy chemical label-ling process, complex programming task, and sophisticated equipment, which might provide an ideal candidate for the fabrication of selective and sensitive biosensing platform.

  14. Comparison of Three Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays of Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Bestetti, Arabella; Pierotti, Chiara; Terreni, Mariarosa; Zappa, Alessandra; Vago, Luca; Lazzarin, Adriano; Cinque, Paola

    2001-01-01

    The diagnostic reliabilities of three cytomegalovirus (CMV) nucleic acid amplification assays of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were compared by using CSF samples from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with a postmortem histopathological diagnosis of CMV encephalitis (n = 15) or other central nervous system conditions (n = 16). By using a nested PCR assay, the quantitative COBAS AMPLICOR CMV MONITOR PCR, and the NucliSens CMV pp67 nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay, sensitivities were 93.3, 86.6, and 93.3%, respectively, and specificities were 93.7, 93.7, and 87.5%, respectively. The COBAS AMPLICOR assay revealed significantly higher CMV DNA levels in patients with diffuse ventriculoencephalitis than in patients with focal periventricular lesions. PMID:11230445

  15. Anchoring Transitions of Liquid Crystals for Optical Amplification of Phospholipid Oxidation Inhibition by Ascorbic Acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minmin; Jang, Chang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the antioxidant property of ascorbic acid (AH) is effective for reducing oxidative stress of phospholipids. Herein, a liquid crystals (LCs)-based method was developed for the optical amplification of resistance to phospholipid oxidation by AH. Phospholipid peroxidation initiated by free radicals was monitored from a homeotropic-to-planar anchoring transition of LCs via polarized optical microscopy. Alternatively, consistent homeotropic anchoring of LCs was observed when the oxidation caused by free radicals was blocked by AH.

  16. Construction strategy for an internal amplification control for real-time diagnostic assays using nucleic Acid sequence-based amplification: development and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lázaro, David; D'Agostino, Martin; Pla, Maria; Cook, Nigel

    2004-12-01

    An important analytical control in molecular amplification-based methods is an internal amplification control (IAC), which should be included in each reaction mixture. An IAC is a nontarget nucleic acid sequence which is coamplified simultaneously with the target sequence. With negative results for the target nucleic acid, the absence of an IAC signal indicates that amplification has failed. A general strategy for the construction of an IAC for inclusion in molecular beacon-based real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assays is presented. Construction proceeds in two phases. In the first phase, a double-stranded DNA molecule that contains nontarget sequences flanked by target sequences complementary to the NASBA primers is produced. At the 5' end of this DNA molecule is a T7 RNA polymerase binding sequence. In the second phase of construction, RNA transcripts are produced from the DNA by T7 RNA polymerase. This RNA is the IAC; it is amplified by the target NASBA primers and is detected by a molecular beacon probe complementary to the internal nontarget sequences. As a practical example, an IAC for use in an assay for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is described, its incorporation and optimization within the assay are detailed, and its application to spiked and natural clinical samples is shown to illustrate the correct interpretation of the diagnostic results.

  17. Quantitative detection of hepatitis B virus DNA by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with molecular beacon detection.

    PubMed

    Yates, S; Penning, M; Goudsmit, J; Frantzen, I; van de Weijer, B; van Strijp, D; van Gemen, B

    2001-10-01

    We have developed a hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA detection and quantification system based on amplification with nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) technology and real-time detection with molecular beacon technology. NASBA is normally applied to amplify single-stranded target RNA, producing RNA amplicons. In this work we show that with modifications like primer design, sample extraction method, and template denaturation, the NASBA technique can be made suitable for DNA target amplification resulting in RNA amplicons. A major advantage of our assay is the one-tube, isothermal nature of the method, which allows high-throughput applications for nucleic acid detection. The homogeneous real-time detection allows a closed-tube format of the assay, avoiding any postamplification handling of amplified material and therefore minimizing the risk of contamination of subsequent reactions. The assay has a detection range of 10(3) to 10(9) HBV DNA copies/ml of plasma or serum (6 logs), with good reproducibility and precision. Compared with other HBV DNA assays, our assay provides good sensitivity, a wide dynamic range, and high-throughput applicability, making it a viable alternative to those based on other amplification or detection methods.

  18. Evaluation of a real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay using molecular beacons for detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    McClernon, D R; Vavro, C; St Clair, M

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the performance characteristics of a new, real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay that incorporates molecular beacon technology for detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The quantitative results were comparable to those obtained with three leading commercially available assays. The analytical sensitivity was 37 IU/ml. The NASBA assay detected clinically relevant recombinant viruses and all group M HIV-1 subtypes.

  19. Pyrosequencing on templates generated by asymmetric nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (asymmetric-NASBA).

    PubMed

    Jia, Huning; Chen, Zhiyao; Wu, Haiping; Ye, Hui; Yan, Zhengyu; Zhou, Guohua

    2011-12-21

    Pyrosequencing is an ideal tool for verifying the sequence of amplicons. To enable pyrosequencing on amplicons from nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), asymmetric NASBA with unequal concentrations of T7 promoter primer and reverse transcription primer was proposed. By optimizing the ratio of two primers and the concentration of dNTPs and NTPs, the amount of single-stranded cDNA in the amplicons from asymmetric NASBA was found increased 12 times more than the conventional NASBA through the real-time detection of a molecular beacon specific to cDNA of interest. More than 20 bases have been successfully detected by pyrosequencing on amplicons from asymmetric NASBA using Human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) as an amplification template. The primary results indicate that the combination of NASBA with a pyrosequencing system is practical, and should open a new field in clinical diagnosis.

  20. Nuclemeter: A Reaction-Diffusion Based Method for Quantifying Nucleic Acids Undergoing Enzymatic Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Sadik, Mohamed M.; Mauk, Michael G.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Gross, Robert; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time amplification and quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences plays a major role in medical and biotechnological applications. In the case of infectious diseases, such as HIV, quantification of the pathogen-load in patient specimens is critical to assess disease progression and effectiveness of drug therapy. Typically, nucleic acid quantification requires expensive instruments, such as real-time PCR machines, which are not appropriate for on-site use and for low-resource settings. This paper describes a simple, low-cost, reaction-diffusion based method for end-point quantification of target nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification. The number of target molecules is inferred from the position of the reaction-diffusion front, analogous to reading temperature in a mercury thermometer. The method was tested for HIV viral load monitoring and performed on par with conventional benchtop methods. The proposed method is suitable for nucleic acid quantification at point of care, compatible with multiplexing and high-throughput processing, and can function instrument-free. PMID:25477046

  1. Development and comparison of a rapid isothermal nucleic acid amplification test for typing of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 on a portable fluorescence detector.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yanhong; McCarthy, Kaitlin; Kong, Huimin; Lemieux, Bertrand

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a rapid and simple molecular test, the IsoGlow HSV Typing assay, for the detection and typing of herpes simplex virus (type 1 and 2) from genital or oral lesions. Clinical samples suspended in viral transport mediums are simply diluted and then added to a helicase-dependent amplification master mix. The amplification and detection were performed on a portable fluorescence detector called the FireFly instrument. Detection of amplification products is based on end-point analysis using cycling probe technology. An internal control nucleic acid was included in the amplification master mix to monitor the presence of amplification inhibitors in the samples. Because the device has only two fluorescence detection channels, two strategies were developed and compared to detect the internal control template: internal control detected by melting curve analysis using a dual-labeled probe, versus internal control detection using end-point fluorescence release by a CPT probe at a lower temperature. Both have a total turnaround time of about 1 hour. Clinical performance relative to herpes viral culture was evaluated using 176 clinical specimens. Both formats of the IsoGlow HSV typing assay had sensitivities comparable to that of the Food and Drug Administration-cleared IsoAmp HSV (BioHelix Corp., Beverly MA) test and specificity for the two types of HSV comparable to that of ELVIS HSV (Diagnostic Hybrids, Athens, OH).

  2. Universal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification for simultaneous amplification of messengerRNAs and microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Mader, Andreas; Riehle, Ulrike; Brandstetter, Thomas; Stickeler, Elmar; Ruehe, Juergen

    2012-11-19

    A universal NASBA assay is presented for simultaneous amplification of multiple microRNA (miRNA) and messengerRNA (mRNA) sequences. First, miRNA and mRNA sequences are reverse transcribed using tailed reverse transcription primer pairs containing a gene-specific and an non-specific region. For reverse transcription of small miRNA molecules a non-specific region is incorporated into a structured stem-loop reverse transcription primer. Second, a universal NASBA primer pair that recognizes the tagged cDNA molecules enables a simultaneous, transcription-based amplification reaction (NASBA) of all different cDNA molecules in one reaction. The NASBA products (RNA copies) are detected by gene-specific DNA probes immobilized on a biochip. By using the multiplex reverse transcription combined with the universal NASBA amplification up to 14 different mRNA and miRNA sequences can be specifically amplified and detected in parallel. In comparison with standard multiplex NASBA assays this approach strongly enhances the multiplex capacity of NASBA-based amplification reactions. Furthermore simultaneous assaying of different RNA classes can be achieved that might be beneficial for studying miRNA-based regulation of gene expression or for RNA-based tumor diagnostics. PMID:23140948

  3. Quantitative titration of nucleic acids by enzymatic amplification reactions run to saturation.

    PubMed Central

    Pannetier, C; Delassus, S; Darche, S; Saucier, C; Kourilsky, P

    1993-01-01

    In vitro enzymatic amplification of nucleic acids by PCR or other techniques is a very sensitive method to detect rare DNA segments. We present here a protocol that allows the rapid, sensitive and precise quantification of DNA molecules using PCR amplification run to saturation. The DNA (or cDNA) to be assayed is co-amplified with known amounts of an internal standard DNA. We show that the latter must be almost identical to the assayed DNA, otherwise quantification at the plateau is unreliable. The read-out of the amplification involves one or two additional oligonucleotides. Using fluorescent oligonucleotides as primers in run-off reactions together with an automated DNA sequencer, we could measure the level of expression of several genes, like the murine MHC class I H-2Kd or a specific T cell receptor beta chain transcript in the course of an immunization. mRNA levels were normalized by measuring in a similar manner the number of transcripts encoding the housekeeping gene HPRT. Finally, our procedure might allow the rapid analysis of a large number of samples at the same time, as illustrated by the simultaneous analysis of the mRNAs encoding the CD4 and CD8 murine T cell markers. PMID:8441670

  4. Amplification of fluorescently labelled DNA within gram-positive and acid-fast bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vaid, A; Bishop, A H

    1999-10-01

    Representative organisms from a variety of Gram-positive genera were subjected to varying regimes in order to optimise the intracellular amplification of DNA. The bacteria were subjected to treatments with paraformaldehyde, muramidases and mild acid hydrolysis to discover which regime made each organism permeable to the amplification reagents yet allowed retention of the fluorescein-labelled amplified products within the cell. Scanning electron micrographs were used to corroborate the effectiveness of the treatments, as seen by fluorescent photomicrographs, with the damage caused to the bacterial walls. A combination of mutanolysin and lysozyme was found most effective for Bacillus cereus, whereas permeabilisation of Streptomyces coelicolor, Lactococcus lactis and Clostridium sporogenes was most effective when exposed to lysozyme only. Surprisingly, direct amplification with no pre-treatment gave the brightest fluorescence in Mycobacterium phlei. Comparing the techniques of whole cell PCR, primed in situ labelling (PRINS), and cycle PRINS showed that under the conditions used the strongest intensity of fluorescence was obtained with in situ PCR; only L. lactis and M. phlei produced signals with cycle PRINS, fluorescence was not seen for any of the organisms with PRINS.

  5. Recombinase-based isothermal amplification of nucleic acids with self-avoiding molecular recognition systems (SAMRS).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nidhi; Hoshika, Shuichi; Hutter, Daniel; Bradley, Kevin M; Benner, Steven A

    2014-10-13

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal method to amplify nucleic acid sequences without the temperature cycling that classical PCR uses. Instead of using heat to denature the DNA duplex, RPA uses recombination enzymes to swap single-stranded primers into the duplex DNA product; these are then extended using a strand-displacing polymerase to complete the cycle. Because RPA runs at low temperatures, it never forces the system to recreate base-pairs following Watson-Crick rules, and therefore it produces undesired products that impede the amplification of the desired product, complicating downstream analysis. Herein, we show that most of these undesired side products can be avoided if the primers contain components of a self-avoiding molecular recognition system (SAMRS). Given the precision that is necessary in the recombination systems for them to function biologically, it is surprising that they accept SAMRS. SAMRS-RPA is expected to be a powerful tool within the range of amplification techniques available to scientists.

  6. Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification using molecular beacons for detection of enterovirus RNA in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Landry, Marie L; Garner, Robin; Ferguson, David

    2005-07-01

    Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) using molecular beacon technology (NASBA-beacon) was compared to standard NASBA with postamplification hybridization using electrochemiluminescently labeled probes (NASBA-ECL) for detection of enteroviruses (EV) in 133 cerebrospinal fluid and 27 stool samples. NASBA-ECL and NASBA-beacon were similar in sensitivity, detecting 55 (100%) and 52 (94.5%) EV-positive samples, respectively. There were no false positives. Both NASBA assays were significantly more sensitive than culture. Real-time NASBA-beacon reagents and equipment rental were more expensive than those for NASBA-ECL; however, time to result was shortened by 1.5 h, hands-on time was reduced by 25 min, and the assay was much simpler for technologists to learn and perform.

  7. An integrated portable hand-held analyser for real-time isothermal nucleic acid amplification.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew C; Steimle, George; Ivanov, Stan; Holly, Mark; Fries, David P

    2007-08-29

    A compact hand-held heated fluorometric instrument for performing real-time isothermal nucleic acid amplification and detection is described. The optoelectronic instrument combines a Printed Circuit Board/Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (PCB/MEMS) reaction detection/chamber containing an integrated resistive heater with attached miniature LED light source and photo-detector and a disposable glass waveguide capillary to enable a mini-fluorometer. The fluorometer is fabricated and assembled in planar geometry, rolled into a tubular format and packaged with custom control electronics to form the hand-held reactor. Positive or negative results for each reaction are displayed to the user using an LED interface. Reaction data is stored in FLASH memory for retrieval via an in-built USB connection. Operating on one disposable 3 V lithium battery >12, 60 min reactions can be performed. Maximum dimensions of the system are 150 mm (h) x 48 mm (d) x 40 mm (w), the total instrument weight (with battery) is 140 g. The system produces comparable results to laboratory instrumentation when performing a real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) reaction, and also displayed comparable precision, accuracy and resolution to laboratory-based real-time nucleic acid amplification instrumentation. A good linear response (R2 = 0.948) to fluorescein gradients ranging from 0.5 to 10 microM was also obtained from the instrument indicating that it may be utilized for other fluorometric assays. This instrument enables an inexpensive, compact approach to in-field genetic screening, providing results comparable to laboratory equipment with rapid user feedback as to the status of the reaction. PMID:17719904

  8. Effect of nucleic acid binding dyes on DNA extraction, amplification, and STR typing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Alicia M; Tobe, Shanan S; Kobus, Hilton J; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-10-01

    We report on the effects of six dyes used in the detection of DNA on the process of DNA extraction, amplification, and detection of STR loci. While dyes can be used to detect the presence of DNA, their use is restricted if they adversely affect subsequent DNA typing processes. Diamond™ Nucleic Acid Dye, GelGreen™, GelRed™, RedSafe™, SYBR(®) Green I, and EvaGreen™ were evaluated in this study. The percentage of dye removed during the extraction process was determined to be: 70.3% for SYBR(®) Green I; 99.6% for RedSafe™; 99.4% for EvaGreen™; 52.7% for Diamond™ Dye; 50.6% for GelRed™, and; could not be determined for GelGreen™. It was then assumed that the amount of dye in the fluorescent quantification assay had no effect on the DNA signal. The presence of all six dyes was then reviewed for their effect on DNA extraction. The t-test showed no significant difference between the dyes and the control. These extracts were then STR profiled and all dyes and control produced full DNA profiles. STR loci in the presence of GelGreen(TM) at 1X concentration showed increased amplification products in comparison to the control samples. Full STR profiles were detected in the presence of EvaGreen™ (1X), although with reduced amplification products. RedSafe™ (1X), Diamond™ Dye (1X), and SYBR(®) Green I (1X) all exhibited varying degrees of locus drop-out with GelRed™ generating no loci at all. We provide recommendations for the best dye to visualize the presence of DNA profile as a biological stain and its subsequent amplification and detection. PMID:26202628

  9. A comparative study of three different nucleic acid amplification techniques combined with microchip electrophoresis for HPV16 E6/E7 mRNA detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quanli; Lin, Xuexia; Lin, Luyao; Yi, Linglu; Li, Haifang; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2015-10-01

    Research towards nucleic acid amplification technologies for detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6/E7 mRNA was carried out in combination with microchip electrophoresis (MCE). The approaches of nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA), one-step RT-PCR and two-step RT-PCR were successfully developed. NASBA was a simple enzymatic reaction, which directly amplified HPV16 mRNA by isothermal amplification, leaving out the complex and tedious operation. One-step RT-PCR simplified the amplification step, while two-step RT-PCR was more sensitive and less vulnerable to the interference. Furthermore, instead of gel electrophoresis, microchip electrophoresis (MCE) for RNA assay was employed to realize high-throughput and rapid analysis. Finally, the results show that PCR-based or NASBA-based mRNA tests are valuable for HPV mRNA assay, which can be potentially applied for clinical diagnosis and prognosis of cervical and other anogenital carcinoma. PMID:26332096

  10. A comparative study of three different nucleic acid amplification techniques combined with microchip electrophoresis for HPV16 E6/E7 mRNA detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quanli; Lin, Xuexia; Lin, Luyao; Yi, Linglu; Li, Haifang; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2015-10-01

    Research towards nucleic acid amplification technologies for detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6/E7 mRNA was carried out in combination with microchip electrophoresis (MCE). The approaches of nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA), one-step RT-PCR and two-step RT-PCR were successfully developed. NASBA was a simple enzymatic reaction, which directly amplified HPV16 mRNA by isothermal amplification, leaving out the complex and tedious operation. One-step RT-PCR simplified the amplification step, while two-step RT-PCR was more sensitive and less vulnerable to the interference. Furthermore, instead of gel electrophoresis, microchip electrophoresis (MCE) for RNA assay was employed to realize high-throughput and rapid analysis. Finally, the results show that PCR-based or NASBA-based mRNA tests are valuable for HPV mRNA assay, which can be potentially applied for clinical diagnosis and prognosis of cervical and other anogenital carcinoma.

  11. Genomic detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by nucleic acid amplification test in a frequent platelet donor during the pre-seroconversion period.

    PubMed

    Pondé, Robério Amorim de Almeida

    2011-11-01

    Since serological donor-screening tests for HIV were introduced in 1985, the safety of donated blood components has improved dramatically. However, these tests do not completely prevent the risk of transfusion-associated HIV infection related to the use of blood donated during the pre-seroconversion window period. Testing based on nucleic acid amplification is being implemented to screen for HIV-infected blood donated during this period, which has reduced the probability of transmitting HIV through transfusion by shortening the window period. This article describes a case of acute HIV-1 infection, detected using a nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) in a repeat blood donor who donated during the pre-seroconversion window period and whose antigen and anti-HIV antibody expression was observed after molecular marker detection. In addition, the possible route of infection is discussed based on the patient's history, and finally, the need for NAT technology for blood donor screening is emphasized.

  12. Loop mediated isothermal amplification combined with nucleic acid lateral flow strip for diagnosis of cyprinid herpes virus-3.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Hatem; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2010-02-01

    An improved loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for rapid, sensitive and specific detection of cyprinid herpes virus-3 (CyHV-3), also known as koi herpes virus (KHV), was developed. The lower detection limit of the CyHV-3-LAMP assay is 10 fg DNA which equivalent to 30 copies of CyHV-3 genome. Nucleic acid lateral flow assay was used for visual detection of the LAMP products. The LAMP- nucleic acid lateral flow assay relies on DNA hybridization technology and antigen-antibody reactions in combination with LAMP. For application of this assay, the biotinylated LAMP product was hybridized with a FITC-labelled specific probe for 5 min. The resulting DNA complex could be visualised as purple band at the strip test line within 5 min of sample exposure. The nucleic acid lateral flow analysis of the LAMP product was equivalent in sensitivity but more rapid than the conventional agarose gel electrophoresis. The combination of LAMP assay with the nucleic acid lateral flow analysis can simplify the diagnosis and screening of CyHV-3 as it is simple, requires very little training, does not require specialized equipment such as a thermal cycler, the results are read visually with no need to run a gel and has a high sensitivity and specificity.

  13. Multiplex Nucleic Acid Amplification Test for Diagnosis of Dengue Fever, Malaria, and Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Waggoner, Jesse J.; Abeynayake, Janaki; Balassiano, Ilana; Lefterova, Martina; Sahoo, Malaya K.; Liu, Yuanyuan; Vital-Brazil, Juliana Magalhães; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva; Banaei, Niaz

    2014-01-01

    Dengue, leptospirosis, and malaria are among the most common etiologies of systemic undifferentiated febrile illness (UFI) among travelers to the developing world, and these pathogens all have the potential to cause life-threatening illness in returned travelers. The current study describes the development of an internally controlled multiplex nucleic acid amplification test for the detection of dengue virus (DENV) and Leptospira and Plasmodium species, with a specific callout for Plasmodium falciparum (referred to as the UFI assay). During analytical evaluation, the UFI assay displayed a wide dynamic range and a sensitive limit of detection for each target, including all four DENV serotypes. In a clinical evaluation including 210 previously tested samples, the sensitivities of the UFI assay were 98% for DENV (58/59 samples detected) and 100% for Leptospira and malaria (65/65 and 20/20 samples, respectively). Malaria samples included all five Plasmodium species known to cause human disease. The specificity of the UFI assay was 100% when evaluated with a panel of 66 negative clinical samples. Furthermore, no amplification was observed when extracted nucleic acids from related pathogens were tested. Compared with whole-blood samples, the UFI assay remained positive for Plasmodium in 11 plasma samples from patients with malaria (parasitemia levels of 0.0037 to 3.4%). The syndrome-based design of the UFI assay, combined with the sensitivities of the component tests, represents a significant improvement over the individual diagnostic tests available for these pathogens. PMID:24671788

  14. Systematic Evaluation of Different Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays for Cytomegalovirus Detection: Feasibility of Blood Donor Screening.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T; Knabbe, C; Dreier, J

    2015-10-01

    Acute primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, which commonly occur asymptomatically among blood donors, represent a significant risk for serious morbidity in immunocompromised patients (a major group of transfusion recipients). We implemented a routine CMV pool screening procedure for plasma for the identification of CMV DNA-positive donors, and we evaluated the sensitivities and performance of different CMV DNA amplification systems. Minipools (MPs) of samples from 18,405 individual donors (54,451 donations) were screened for CMV DNA using the RealStar CMV PCR assay (Altona Diagnostic Technologies), with a minimum detection limit of 11.14 IU/ml. DNA was extracted with a high-volume protocol (4.8 ml, Chemagic Viral 5K kit; PerkinElmer) for blood donor pool screening (MP-nucleic acid testing [NAT]) and with the Nuclisens easyMAG system (0.5 ml; bioMérieux) for individual donation (ID)-NAT. In total, six CMV DNA-positive donors (0.03%) were identified by routine CMV screening, with DNA concentrations ranging from 4.35 × 10(2) to 4.30 × 10(3) IU/ml. Five donors already showed seroconversion and detectable IgA, IgM, and/or IgG antibody titers (IgA(+)/IgM(+)/IgG(-) or IgA(+)/IgM(+)/IgG(+)), and one donor showed no CMV-specific antibodies. Comparison of three commercial assays, i.e., the RealStar CMV PCR kit, the Sentosa SA CMV quantitative PCR kit (Vela Diagnostics), and the CMV R-gene PCR kit (bioMérieux), for MP-NAT and ID-NAT showed comparably good analytical sensitivities, ranging from 10.23 to 11.14 IU/ml (MP-NAT) or from 37.66 to 57.94 IU/ml (ID-NAT). The clinical relevance of transfusion-associated CMV infections requires further investigation, and the evaluated methods present powerful basic tools providing sensitive possibilities for viral testing. The application of CMV MP-NAT facilitated the identification of one donor with a window-phase donation during acute primary CMV infection.

  15. Systematic Evaluation of Different Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays for Cytomegalovirus Detection: Feasibility of Blood Donor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Knabbe, C.; Dreier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Acute primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, which commonly occur asymptomatically among blood donors, represent a significant risk for serious morbidity in immunocompromised patients (a major group of transfusion recipients). We implemented a routine CMV pool screening procedure for plasma for the identification of CMV DNA-positive donors, and we evaluated the sensitivities and performance of different CMV DNA amplification systems. Minipools (MPs) of samples from 18,405 individual donors (54,451 donations) were screened for CMV DNA using the RealStar CMV PCR assay (Altona Diagnostic Technologies), with a minimum detection limit of 11.14 IU/ml. DNA was extracted with a high-volume protocol (4.8 ml, Chemagic Viral 5K kit; PerkinElmer) for blood donor pool screening (MP-nucleic acid testing [NAT]) and with the Nuclisens easyMAG system (0.5 ml; bioMérieux) for individual donation (ID)-NAT. In total, six CMV DNA-positive donors (0.03%) were identified by routine CMV screening, with DNA concentrations ranging from 4.35 × 102 to 4.30 × 103 IU/ml. Five donors already showed seroconversion and detectable IgA, IgM, and/or IgG antibody titers (IgA+/IgM+/IgG− or IgA+/IgM+/IgG+), and one donor showed no CMV-specific antibodies. Comparison of three commercial assays, i.e., the RealStar CMV PCR kit, the Sentosa SA CMV quantitative PCR kit (Vela Diagnostics), and the CMV R-gene PCR kit (bioMérieux), for MP-NAT and ID-NAT showed comparably good analytical sensitivities, ranging from 10.23 to 11.14 IU/ml (MP-NAT) or from 37.66 to 57.94 IU/ml (ID-NAT). The clinical relevance of transfusion-associated CMV infections requires further investigation, and the evaluated methods present powerful basic tools providing sensitive possibilities for viral testing. The application of CMV MP-NAT facilitated the identification of one donor with a window-phase donation during acute primary CMV infection. PMID:26202109

  16. Social and political amplification of technological hazards. The case of the PEPCON explosion.

    PubMed

    Ibitayo, Olurominiyi O; Mushkatel, Alvin; Pijawka, K David

    2004-10-18

    Using an industrial explosion in Henderson, Nevada, as a case study, this paper examines three main issues: the efficacy of a technological hazard event in amplifying otherwise latent issues, the extent to which the hazard event can serve as a focusing event for substantive local and state policy initiatives, and the effect of fragmentation of political authority in managing technological hazards. The findings indicate that the explosion amplified several public safety issues and galvanized the public into pressing for major policy initiatives. However, notwithstanding the amplification of several otherwise latent issues, and the flurry of activities by the state and local governments, the hazard event did not seem to be an effective focusing event or trigger mechanism for substantive state and local policy initiatives. In addition, the study provides evidence of the need for a stronger nexus between political authority, land-use planning and technological hazard management. PMID:15511570

  17. Multiplex, Rapid, and Sensitive Isothermal Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence by Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Multiple Cross Displacement Amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Dongxin; Luo, Lijuan; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Liu, Kai; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    We have devised a novel isothermal amplification technology, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time multiple cross displacement amplification (ET-MCDA), which facilitated multiplex, rapid, specific and sensitive detection of nucleic-acid sequences at a constant temperature. The ET-MCDA integrated multiple cross displacement amplification strategy, restriction endonuclease cleavage and real-time fluorescence detection technique. In the ET-MCDA system, the functional cross primer E-CP1 or E-CP2 was constructed by adding a short sequence at the 5' end of CP1 or CP2, respectively, and the new E-CP1 or E-CP2 primer was labeled at the 5' end with a fluorophore and in the middle with a dark quencher. The restriction endonuclease Nb.BsrDI specifically recognized the short sequence and digested the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5' end short sequences and their complementary sequences), which released the quenching, resulting on a gain of fluorescence signal. Thus, the ET-MCDA allowed real-time detection of single or multiple targets in only a single reaction, and the positive results were observed in as short as 12 min, detecting down to 3.125 fg of genomic DNA per tube. Moreover, the analytical specificity and the practical application of the ET-MCDA were also successfully evaluated in this study. Here, we provided the details on the novel ET-MCDA technique and expounded the basic ET-MCDA amplification mechanism. PMID:27242766

  18. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of nucleic acids by template enhanced hybridization followed with rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hanxu; Yan, Feng; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2012-08-21

    An ultrasensitive protocol for electrochemical detection of DNA is designed with quantum dots (QDs) as a signal tag by combining the template enhanced hybridization process (TEHP) and rolling circle amplification (RCA). Upon the recognition of the molecular beacon (MB) to target DNA, the MB hybridizes with assistants and target DNA to form a ternary ''Y-junction''. The target DNA can be dissociated from the structure under the reaction of nicking endonuclease to initiate the next hybridization process. The template enhanced MB fragments further act as the primers of the RCA reaction to produce thousands of repeated oligonucleotide sequences, which can bind with oligonucleotide functionalized QDs. The attached signal tags can be easily read out by square-wave voltammetry after dissolving with acid. Because of the cascade signal amplification and the specific TEHP and RCA reaction, this newly designed protocol provides an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA down to the attomolar level (11 aM) with a linear range of 6 orders of magnitude (from 1 × 10(-17) to 1 × 10(-11) M) and can discriminate mismatched DNA from perfect matched target DNA with high selectivity. The high sensitivity and specificity make this method a great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases.

  19. Enzymatic amplification of DNA/RNA hybrid molecular beacon signaling in nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Jacroux, Thomas; Rieck, Daniel C; Cui, Rong; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2013-01-15

    A rapid assay operable under isothermal or nonisothermal conditions is described, where the sensitivity of a typical molecular beacon (MB) system is improved by using thermostable RNase H to enzymatically cleave an MB composed of a DNA stem and an RNA loop (R/D-MB). On hybridization of the R/D-MB to target DNA, there was a modest increase in fluorescence intensity (~5.7× above background) due to an opening of the probe and a concomitant reduction in the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency. The addition of thermostable RNase H resulted in the cleavage of the RNA loop, which eliminated energy transfer. The cleavage step also released bound target DNA, enabling it to bind to another R/D-MB probe and rendering the approach a cyclic amplification scheme. Full processing of R/D-MBs maximized the fluorescence signal to the fullest extent possible (12.9× above background), resulting in an approximately 2- to 2.8-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio observed isothermally at 50 °C following the addition of RNase H. The probe was also used to monitor real-time polymerase chain reactions by measuring enhancement of donor fluorescence on R/D-MB binding to amplified pUC19 template dilutions. Hence, the R/D-MB-RNase H scheme can be applied to a broad range of nucleic acid amplification methods.

  20. Amplification of the IMP dehydrogenase gene in Chinese hamster cells resistant to mycophenolic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Collart, F R; Huberman, E

    1987-01-01

    The regulation of IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) was analyzed in Chinese hamster V79 cell variants that exhibit different degrees of resistance to the cytotoxic effect of mycophenolic acid, a specific inhibitor of IMPDH. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with an IMPDH antiserum revealed a 14- to 27-fold increase in the amount of enzyme in the mycophenolic acid-resistant cells. The antiserum was also used to screen for a phage containing the IMPDH cDNA sequence from a lambda gt11 expression library. Northern blot (RNA blot) analyses of total cellular and poly(A)+ RNA showed that an IMPDH cDNA probe hybridized to a 2.2-kilobase transcript, the amount of which was associated with increased resistance. Southern blotting with the probe indicated an amplification of the IMPDH gene in the mycophenolic acid-resistant cells. Our findings suggest that the acquired mycophenolic acid resistance of the V79 cell variants is associated with increases in the amount and activity of IMPDH and the number of IMPDH gene copies. Images PMID:2890098

  1. Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay for detection of hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Abd el-Galil, Khaled H; el-Sokkary, M A; Kheira, S M; Salazar, Andre M; Yates, Marylynn V; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2005-11-01

    A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay in combination with a molecular beacon was developed for the real-time detection and quantification of hepatitis A virus (HAV). A 202-bp, highly conserved 5' noncoding region of HAV was targeted. The sensitivity of the real-time NASBA assay was tested with 10-fold dilutions of viral RNA, and a detection limit of 1 PFU was obtained. The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by testing with other environmental pathogens and indicator microorganisms, with only HAV positively identified. When combined with immunomagnetic separation, the NASBA assay successfully detected as few as 10 PFU from seeded lake water samples. Due to its isothermal nature, its speed, and its similar sensitivity compared to the real-time RT-PCR assay, this newly reported real-time NASBA method will have broad applications for the rapid detection of HAV in contaminated food or water.

  2. Molecular Assay for Detection of Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from Cultures and Clinical Nucleic Acid Amplification Test Specimens.

    PubMed

    Peterson, S W; Martin, I; Demczuk, W; Bharat, A; Hoang, L; Wylie, J; Allen, V; Lefebvre, B; Tyrrell, G; Horsman, G; Haldane, D; Garceau, R; Wong, T; Mulvey, M R

    2015-11-01

    We developed a real-time PCR assay to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with ciprofloxacin resistance in specimens submitted for nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT). All three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) targets produced high sensitivity and specificity values. The presence of ≥2 SNPs was sufficient to predict ciprofloxacin resistance in an organism. PMID:26292300

  3. A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification system for detection of Listeria monocytogenes hlyA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Blais, B W; Turner, G; Sooknanan, R; Malek, L T

    1997-01-01

    A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification system primarily targeting mRNA from the Listeria monocytogenes hlyA gene was developed. This system enabled the detection of low numbers (< 10 CFU/g) of L. monocytogenes cells inoculated into a variety of dairy and egg products after 48 h of enrichment in modified listeria enrichment broth. PMID:8979357

  4. Molecular Assay for Detection of Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from Cultures and Clinical Nucleic Acid Amplification Test Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, S. W.; Martin, I.; Demczuk, W.; Bharat, A.; Hoang, L.; Wylie, J.; Allen, V.; Lefebvre, B.; Tyrrell, G.; Horsman, G.; Haldane, D.; Garceau, R.; Wong, T.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a real-time PCR assay to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with ciprofloxacin resistance in specimens submitted for nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT). All three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) targets produced high sensitivity and specificity values. The presence of ≥2 SNPs was sufficient to predict ciprofloxacin resistance in an organism. PMID:26292300

  5. Immunocytochemistry versus nucleic acid amplification in fine needle aspirates and tissues of extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Madhu Mati; Budhwar, Puja; Jain, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Background: Immunocytochemistry (ICC) is an established routine diagnostic adjunct to cytology and histology for tumor diagnosis but has received little attention for diagnosis of tuberculosis. Aims: To have an objective method of direct visualization of mycobacteria or their products in clinical extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) specimens, immunocytochemical localization of M. tuberculosis antigen by staining with species specific monoclonal antibody to 38-kDa antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Materials and Methods: Immunostaining with specific monoclonal antibody to 38-kDa antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was done in fresh and archival fine needle aspirates and tissue granulomata of 302 cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and was compared with the molecular diagnostic i.e., nucleic amplification and conventional [Cytomorphology, Ziehl Neelsen (ZN) staining and culture] tests and 386 controls. Results: Diagnostic indices by Bayesian analysis for all types of archival and fresh material varied from 64 to 76% in nucleic acid amplification (NAA) and 96 to 98% in ICC. There was no significant difference in the diagnostic indices of ZN staining and/ or ICC in fresh or archival material whereas the sensitivity of NAA differed significantly in fresh versus archival material both in cytology (71.4% vs 52.1%) and histology (51.1% vs 38.8%). ICC can be easily used on archival smears and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections with almost equal sensitivity and specificity as with fresh material, in contrast to NAA which showed significant difference in test results on archival and fresh material. Conclusions: Low detection sensitivity of MTB DNA in archival material from known tuberculous cases showed the limitation of in-house NAA-based molecular diagnosis. ICC was found to be sensitive, specific and a better technique than NAA and can be used as an adjunct to conventional morphology and ZN staining for the diagnosis of EPTB in tissue

  6. Digital isothermal quantification of nucleic acids via simultaneous chemical initiation of recombinase polymerase amplification reactions on SlipChip.

    PubMed

    Shen, Feng; Davydova, Elena K; Du, Wenbin; Kreutz, Jason E; Piepenburg, Olaf; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, digital quantitative detection of nucleic acids was achieved at the single-molecule level by chemical initiation of over one thousand sequence-specific, nanoliter isothermal amplification reactions in parallel. Digital polymerase chain reaction (digital PCR), a method used for quantification of nucleic acids, counts the presence or absence of amplification of individual molecules. However, it still requires temperature cycling, which is undesirable under resource-limited conditions. This makes isothermal methods for nucleic acid amplification, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), more attractive. A microfluidic digital RPA SlipChip is described here for simultaneous initiation of over one thousand nL-scale RPA reactions by adding a chemical initiator to each reaction compartment with a simple slipping step after instrument-free pipet loading. Two designs of the SlipChip, two-step slipping and one-step slipping, were validated using digital RPA. By using the digital RPA SlipChip, false-positive results from preinitiation of the RPA amplification reaction before incubation were eliminated. End point fluorescence readout was used for "yes or no" digital quantification. The performance of digital RPA in a SlipChip was validated by amplifying and counting single molecules of the target nucleic acid, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) genomic DNA. The digital RPA on SlipChip was also tolerant to fluctuations of the incubation temperature (37-42 °C), and its performance was comparable to digital PCR on the same SlipChip design. The digital RPA SlipChip provides a simple method to quantify nucleic acids without requiring thermal cycling or kinetic measurements, with potential applications in diagnostics and environmental monitoring under resource-limited settings. The ability to initiate thousands of chemical reactions in parallel on the nanoliter scale using solvent-resistant glass devices is likely to be useful for a broader

  7. An integrated, self-contained microfluidic cassette for isolation, amplification, and detection of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dafeng; Mauk, Michael; Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Kim, Jitae; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Ongagna, Serge; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    A self-contained, integrated, disposable, sample-to-answer, polycarbonate microfluidic cassette for nucleic acid—based detection of pathogens at the point of care was designed, constructed, and tested. The cassette comprises on-chip sample lysis, nucleic acid isolation, enzymatic amplification (polymerase chain reaction and, when needed, reverse transcription), amplicon labeling, and detection. On-chip pouches and valves facilitate fluid flow control. All the liquids and dry reagents needed for the various reactions are pre-stored in the cassette. The liquid reagents are stored in flexible pouches formed on the chip surface. Dry (RT-)PCR reagents are pre-stored in the thermal cycling, reaction chamber. The process operations include sample introduction; lysis of cells and viruses; solid-phase extraction, concentration, and purification of nucleic acids from the lysate; elution of the nucleic acids into a thermal cycling chamber and mixing with pre-stored (RT-)PCR dry reagents; thermal cycling; and detection. The PCR amplicons are labeled with digoxigenin and biotin and transmitted onto a lateral flow strip, where the target analytes bind to a test line consisting of immobilized avidin-D. The immobilized nucleic acids are labeled with up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The operation of the cassette is automatically controlled by an analyzer that provides pouch and valve actuation with electrical motors and heating for the thermal cycling. The functionality of the device is demonstrated by detecting the presence of bacterial B.Cereus, viral armored RNA HIV, and HIV I virus in saliva samples. The cassette and actuator described here can be used to detect other diseases as well as the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens in the water supply and other fluids. PMID:20401537

  8. Entropy Beacon: A Hairpin-Free DNA Amplification Strategy for Efficient Detection of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yifan; Cui, Liang; Peng, Ruizi; Zhao, Zilong; Qiu, Liping; Chen, Huapei; Jin, Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Here, we propose an efficient strategy for enzyme- and hairpin-free nucleic acid detection called an entropy beacon (abbreviated as Ebeacon). Different from previously reported DNA hybridization/displacement-based strategies, Ebeacon is driven forward by increases in the entropy of the system, instead of free energy released from new base-pair formation. Ebeacon shows high sensitivity, with a detection limit of 5 pM target DNA in buffer and 50 pM in cellular homogenate. Ebeacon also benefits from the hairpin-free amplification strategy and zero-background, excellent thermostability from 20 °C to 50 °C, as well as good resistance to complex environments. In particular, based on the huge difference between the breathing rate of a single base pair and two adjacent base pairs, Ebeacon also shows high selectivity toward base mutations, such as substitution, insertion, and deletion and, therefore, is an efficient nucleic acid detection method, comparable to most reported enzyme-free strategies.

  9. Enhanced nucleic acid amplification with blood in situ by wire-guided droplet manipulation (WDM)

    PubMed Central

    Harshman, Dustin K.; Reyes, Roberto; Park, Tu San; You, David J.; Song, Jae-Young; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2013-01-01

    There are many challenges facing the use of molecular biology to provide pertinent information in a timely, cost effective manner. Wire-guided droplet manipulation (WDM) is an emerging format for conducting molecular biology with unique characteristics to address these challenges. To demonstrate the use of WDM, an apparatus was designed and assembled to automate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a reprogrammable platform. WDM minimizes thermal resistance by convective heat transfer to a constantly moving droplet in direct contact with heated silicone oil. PCR amplification of the GAPDH gene was demonstrated at a speed of 8.67 sec/cycle. Conventional PCR was shown to be inhibited by the presence of blood. WDM PCR utilizes molecular partitioning of nucleic acids and other PCR reagents from blood components, within the water-in-oil droplet, to increase PCR reaction efficiency with blood in situ. The ability to amplify nucleic acids in the presence of blood simplifies pre-treatment protocols towards true point-of-care diagnostic use. The 16s rRNA hypervariable regions V3 and V6 were amplified from Klebsiella pneumoniae genomic DNA with blood in situ. The detection limit of WDM PCR was 1 ng/µL or 105 genomes/µL with blood in situ. The application of WDM for rapid, automated detection of bacterial DNA from whole blood may have an enormous impact on the clinical diagnosis of infections in bloodstream or chronic wound/ulcer, and patient safety and morbidity. PMID:24140832

  10. Polymerase Spiral Reaction (PSR): A novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Dong, Derong; Yang, Zhan; Zou, Dayang; Chen, Zeliang; Yuan, Jing; Huang, Liuyu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method only requires one pair of primers and one enzyme, termed Polymerase Spiral Reaction (PSR) with high specificity, efficiency, and rapidity under isothermal condition. The recombinant plasmid of blaNDM-1 was imported to Escherichia coli BL21, and selected as the microbial target. PSR method employs a Bst DNA polymerase and a pair of primers designed targeting the blaNDM-1 gene sequence. The forward and reverse Tab primer sequences are reverse to each other at their 5’ end (Nr and N), whereas their 3’ end sequences are complementary to their respective target nucleic acid sequences. The PSR method was performed at a constant temperature 61 °C–65 °C, yielding a complicated spiral structure. PSR assay was monitored continuously in a real-time turbidimeter instrument or visually detected with the aid of a fluorescent dye (SYBR Greenı), and could be finished within 1 h with a high accumulation of 109 copies of the target and a fine sensitivity of 6 CFU per reaction. Clinical evaluation was also conducted using PSR, showing high specificity of this method. The PSR technique provides a convenient and cost-effective alternative for clinical screening, on-site diagnosis and primary quarantine purposes. PMID:26220251

  11. Polymerase Spiral Reaction (PSR): A novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Dong, Derong; Yang, Zhan; Zou, Dayang; Chen, Zeliang; Yuan, Jing; Huang, Liuyu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method only requires one pair of primers and one enzyme, termed Polymerase Spiral Reaction (PSR) with high specificity, efficiency, and rapidity under isothermal condition. The recombinant plasmid of blaNDM-1 was imported to Escherichia coli BL21, and selected as the microbial target. PSR method employs a Bst DNA polymerase and a pair of primers designed targeting the blaNDM-1 gene sequence. The forward and reverse Tab primer sequences are reverse to each other at their 5' end (Nr and N), whereas their 3' end sequences are complementary to their respective target nucleic acid sequences. The PSR method was performed at a constant temperature 61 °C-65 °C, yielding a complicated spiral structure. PSR assay was monitored continuously in a real-time turbidimeter instrument or visually detected with the aid of a fluorescent dye (SYBR Greenı), and could be finished within 1 h with a high accumulation of 10(9) copies of the target and a fine sensitivity of 6 CFU per reaction. Clinical evaluation was also conducted using PSR, showing high specificity of this method. The PSR technique provides a convenient and cost-effective alternative for clinical screening, on-site diagnosis and primary quarantine purposes. PMID:26220251

  12. A colorimetric biosensor for detection of attomolar microRNA with a functional nucleic acid-based amplification machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Cheng, Wei; Yan, Yurong; Zhang, Ye; Yin, Yibing; Ju, Huangxian; Ding, Shijia

    2016-01-01

    A functional nucleic acid-based amplification machine was designed for simple and label-free ultrasensitive colorimetric biosensing of microRNA (miRNA). The amplification machine was composed of a complex of trigger template and C-rich DNA modified molecular beacon (MB) and G-rich DNA (GDNA) as the probe, polymerase and nicking enzyme, and a dumbbell-shaped amplification template. The presence of target miRNA triggered MB mediated strand displacement to cyclically release nicking triggers, which led to a toehold initiated rolling circle amplification to produce large amounts of GDNAs. The formed GDNAs could stack with hemin to form G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme, a well-known horseradish peroxidase (HRP) mimic, for catalyzing a colorimetric reaction. The modified MB improved the stringent target recognition and reduced background signal. The proposed sensing strategy showed very high sensitivity and selectivity with a wide dynamic range from 10 aM to 1.0 nM, and enabled successful visual analysis of trace amount of miRNA in real sample by the naked eye. This rapid and highly efficient signal amplification strategy provided a simple and sensitive platform for miRNA detection. It would be a versatile and powerful tool for clinical molecular diagnostics.

  13. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm(2) area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10(-1) to 4 × 10(-3) copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings. PMID:27074005

  14. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm(2) area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10(-1) to 4 × 10(-3) copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings.

  15. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm2 area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10-1 to 4 × 10-3 copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings. PMID:27074005

  16. Simple, rapid and accurate molecular diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia by loop mediated amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Orietta; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Rigo, Francesca; Zanghì, Pamela; D'Agostini, Elena; Amicarelli, Giulia; Colotta, Francesco; Divona, Mariadomenica; Ciardi, Claudia; Coco, Francesco Lo; Minnucci, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic work-up of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) includes the cytogenetic demonstration of the t(15;17) translocation and/or the PML-RARA chimeric transcript by RQ-PCR or RT-PCR. This latter assays provide suitable results in 3-6 hours. We describe here two new, rapid and specific assays that detect PML-RARA transcripts, based on the RT-QLAMP (Reverse Transcription-Quenching Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification) technology in which RNA retrotranscription and cDNA amplification are carried out in a single tube with one enzyme at one temperature, in fluorescence and real time format. A single tube triplex assay detects bcr1 and bcr3 PML-RARA transcripts along with GUS housekeeping gene. A single tube duplex assay detects bcr2 and GUSB. In 73 APL cases, these assays detected in 16 minutes bcr1, bcr2 and bcr3 transcripts. All 81 non-APL samples were negative by RT-QLAMP for chimeric transcripts whereas GUSB was detectable. In 11 APL patients in which RT-PCR yielded equivocal breakpoint type results, RT-QLAMP assays unequivocally and accurately defined the breakpoint type (as confirmed by sequencing). Furthermore, RT-QLAMP could amplify two bcr2 transcripts with particularly extended PML exon 6 deletions not amplified by RQ-PCR. RT-QLAMP reproducible sensitivity is 10(-3) for bcr1 and bcr3 and 10(-)2 for bcr2 thus making this assay particularly attractive at diagnosis and leaving RQ-PCR for the molecular monitoring of minimal residual disease during the follow up. In conclusion, PML-RARA RT-QLAMP compared to RT-PCR or RQ-PCR is a valid improvement to perform rapid, simple and accurate molecular diagnosis of APL. PMID:25815362

  17. Simple, rapid and accurate molecular diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia by loop mediated amplification technology

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Orietta; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Rigo, Francesca; Zanghì, Pamela; D'Agostini, Elena; Amicarelli, Giulia; Colotta, Francesco; Divona, Mariadomenica; Ciardi, Claudia; Coco, Francesco Lo; Minnucci, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic work-up of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) includes the cytogenetic demonstration of the t(15;17) translocation and/or the PML-RARA chimeric transcript by RQ-PCR or RT-PCR. This latter assays provide suitable results in 3-6 hours. We describe here two new, rapid and specific assays that detect PML-RARA transcripts, based on the RT-QLAMP (Reverse Transcription-Quenching Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification) technology in which RNA retrotranscription and cDNA amplification are carried out in a single tube with one enzyme at one temperature, in fluorescence and real time format. A single tube triplex assay detects bcr1 and bcr3 PML-RARA transcripts along with GUS housekeeping gene. A single tube duplex assay detects bcr2 and GUSB. In 73 APL cases, these assays detected in 16 minutes bcr1, bcr2 and bcr3 transcripts. All 81 non-APL samples were negative by RT-QLAMP for chimeric transcripts whereas GUSB was detectable. In 11 APL patients in which RT-PCR yielded equivocal breakpoint type results, RT-QLAMP assays unequivocally and accurately defined the breakpoint type (as confirmed by sequencing). Furthermore, RT-QLAMP could amplify two bcr2 transcripts with particularly extended PML exon 6 deletions not amplified by RQ-PCR. RT-QLAMP reproducible sensitivity is 10−3 for bcr1 and bcr3 and 10−2 for bcr2 thus making this assay particularly attractive at diagnosis and leaving RQ-PCR for the molecular monitoring of minimal residual disease during the follow up. In conclusion, PML-RARA RT-QLAMP compared to RT-PCR or RQ-PCR is a valid improvement to perform rapid, simple and accurate molecular diagnosis of APL. PMID:25815362

  18. Early detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in BACTEC MGIT cultures using nucleic acid amplification.

    PubMed

    Lin, S Y; Hwang, S C; Yang, Y C; Wang, C F; Chen, Y H; Chen, T C; Lu, P L

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the application of nucleic acid amplification (NAA) in liquid cultures for the early detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The Cobas TaqMan MTB test, IS6110 real-time PCR, and hsp65 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis were used to detect BACTEC MGIT 960 (MGIT) cultures on days 3, 5, 7, and 14. The procedure was initially tested with a reference strain, H37Rv (ATCC 27294). Subsequently, 200 clinical specimens, including 150 Acid Fast bacillus (AFB) smear-positive and 50 AFB smear-negative samples, were examined. The Cobas TaqMan MTB test and IS6110-based PCR analysis were able to detect M. tuberculosis after 1 day when the inoculum of H37Rv was >3 x 10(-2) CFU/ml. After a 5-day incubation in the MGIT system, all three NAA assays had a positive detection regardless of the inoculum size. After a 1-day incubation of the clinical specimens in the MGIT system, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for the Cobas TaqMan MTB assay were 70.2%, 100%, 100%, and 82.3% respectively. For IS6110-based PCR analysis, these values were 63.1%, 100%, 100%, and 78.9%, and were 88.1%, 100%, 100%, and 92.1% respectively for hsp65 PCR-RFLP analysis. After a 3-day incubation, the specificity and PPV were 100% for all three NAA tests; the Cobas TaqMan MTB assay had the best sensitivity (97.6%) and NPV (98.3%). The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for conventional culture analysis were 98.8%, 100%, 100%, and 99.1%. Thus, NAA may be useful for the early detection of M. tuberculosis after 3 days in MGIT.

  19. Detection of Dengue Viral RNA Using a Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuenn-Jue L.; Lee, Eun Mi; Putvatana, Ravithat; Shurtliff, Roxanne N.; Porter, Kevin R.; Suharyono, Wuryadi; Watts, Douglas M.; King, Chwan-Chuen; Murphy, Gerald S.; Hayes, Curtis G.; Romano, Joseph W.

    2001-01-01

    Faster techniques are needed for the early diagnosis of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever during the acute viremic phase of infection. An isothermal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay was optimized to amplify viral RNA of all four dengue virus serotypes by a set of universal primers and to type the amplified products by serotype-specific capture probes. The NASBA assay involved the use of silica to extract viral nucleic acid, which was amplified without thermocycling. The amplified product was detected by a probe-hybridization method that utilized electrochemiluminescence. Using normal human plasma spiked with dengue viruses, the NASBA assay had a detection threshold of 1 to 10 PFU/ml. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were determined by testing 67 dengue virus-positive and 21 dengue virus-negative human serum or plasma samples. The “gold standard” used for comparison and evaluation was the mosquito C6/36 cell culture assay followed by an immunofluorescent assay. Viral infectivity titers in test samples were also determined by a direct plaque assay in Vero cells. The NASBA assay was able to detect dengue viral RNA in the clinical samples at plaque titers below 25 PFU/ml (the detection limit of the plaque assay). Of the 67 samples found positive by the C6/36 assay, 66 were found positive by the NASBA assay, for a sensitivity of 98.5%. The NASBA assay had a specificity of 100% based on the negative test results for the 21 normal human serum or plasma samples. These results indicate that the NASBA assay is a promising assay for the early diagnosis of dengue infections. PMID:11473994

  20. Detection of Vibrio cholerae by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Fykse, Else M; Skogan, Gunnar; Davies, William; Olsen, Jaran Strand; Blatny, Janet M

    2007-03-01

    A multitarget molecular beacon-based real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay for the specific detection of Vibrio cholerae has been developed. The genes encoding the cholera toxin (ctxA), the toxin-coregulated pilus (tcpA; colonization factor), the ctxA toxin regulator (toxR), hemolysin (hlyA), and the 60-kDa chaperonin product (groEL) were selected as target sequences for detection. The beacons for the five different genetic targets were evaluated by serial dilution of RNA from V. cholerae cells. RNase treatment of the nucleic acids eliminated all NASBA, whereas DNase treatment had no effect, showing that RNA and not DNA was amplified. The specificity of the assay was investigated by testing several isolates of V. cholerae, other Vibrio species, and Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli strains. The toxR, groEL, and hlyA beacons identified all V. cholerae isolates, whereas the ctxA and tcpA beacons identified the O1 toxigenic clinical isolates. The NASBA assay detected V. cholerae at 50 CFU/ml by using the general marker groEL and tcpA that specifically indicates toxigenic strains. A correlation between cell viability and NASBA was demonstrated for the ctxA, toxR, and hlyA targets. RNA isolated from different environmental water samples spiked with V. cholerae was specifically detected by NASBA. These results indicate that NASBA can be used in the rapid detection of V. cholerae from various environmental water samples. This method has a strong potential for detecting toxigenic strains by using the tcpA and ctxA markers. The entire assay including RNA extraction and NASBA was completed within 3 h.

  1. Multiplex, Rapid, and Sensitive Isothermal Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence by Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Multiple Cross Displacement Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Dongxin; Luo, Lijuan; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Liu, Kai; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    We have devised a novel isothermal amplification technology, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time multiple cross displacement amplification (ET-MCDA), which facilitated multiplex, rapid, specific and sensitive detection of nucleic-acid sequences at a constant temperature. The ET-MCDA integrated multiple cross displacement amplification strategy, restriction endonuclease cleavage and real-time fluorescence detection technique. In the ET-MCDA system, the functional cross primer E-CP1 or E-CP2 was constructed by adding a short sequence at the 5′ end of CP1 or CP2, respectively, and the new E-CP1 or E-CP2 primer was labeled at the 5′ end with a fluorophore and in the middle with a dark quencher. The restriction endonuclease Nb.BsrDI specifically recognized the short sequence and digested the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5′ end short sequences and their complementary sequences), which released the quenching, resulting on a gain of fluorescence signal. Thus, the ET-MCDA allowed real-time detection of single or multiple targets in only a single reaction, and the positive results were observed in as short as 12 min, detecting down to 3.125 fg of genomic DNA per tube. Moreover, the analytical specificity and the practical application of the ET-MCDA were also successfully evaluated in this study. Here, we provided the details on the novel ET-MCDA technique and expounded the basic ET-MCDA amplification mechanism. PMID:27242766

  2. Evaluation of nucleic acid sequence based amplification using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET-NASBA) in quantitative detection of Aspergillus 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Park, Chulmin; Kwon, Eun-Young; Shin, Na-Young; Choi, Su-Mi; Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Sun Hee; Lee, Dong-Gun; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2011-01-01

    We attempted to apply fluorescence resonance energy transfer technology to nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (FRET-NASBA) on the platform of the LightCycler system to detect Aspergillus species. Primers and probes for the Aspergillus 18S rRNA were newly designed to avoid overlapping with homologous sequences of human 18s rRNA. NASBA using molecular beacon (MB) showed non-specific results which have been frequently observed from controls, although it showed higher sensitivity (10(-2) amol) than the FRET. FRET-NASBA showed a sensitivity of 10(-1) amol and a high fidelity of reproducibility from controls. As FRET technology was successfully applied to the NASBA assay, it could contribute to diverse development of the NASBA assay. These results suggest that FRET-NASBA could replace previous NASBA techniques in the detection of Aspergillus.

  3. Successful Combination of Nucleic Acid Amplification Test Diagnostics and Targeted Deferred Neisseria gonorrhoeae Culture

    PubMed Central

    Wind, Carolien M.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are recommended for the diagnosis of N. gonorrhoeae infections because of their superior sensitivity. Increasing NAAT use causes a decline in crucial antimicrobial resistance (AMR) surveillance data, which rely on culture. We analyzed the suitability of the ESwab system for NAAT diagnostics and deferred targeted N. gonorrhoeae culture to allow selective and efficient culture based on NAAT results. We included patients visiting the STI Clinic Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in 2013. Patient characteristics and urogenital and rectal samples for direct N. gonorrhoeae culture, standard NAAT, and ESwab were collected. Standard NAAT and NAAT on ESwab samples were performed using the Aptima Combo 2 assay for N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis. Two deferred N. gonorrhoeae cultures were performed on NAAT-positive ESwab samples after storage at 4°C for 1 to 3 days. We included 2,452 samples from 1,893 patients. In the standard NAAT, 107 samples were N. gonorrhoeae positive and 284 were C. trachomatis positive. The sensitivities of NAAT on ESwab samples were 83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 75 to 90%) and 87% (95% CI, 82 to 90%), respectively. ESwab samples were available for 98 of the gonorrhea-positive samples. Of these, 82% were positive in direct culture and 69% and 56% were positive in the 1st and 2nd deferred cultures, respectively (median storage times, 27 and 48 h, respectively). Deferred culture was more often successful in urogenital samples or when the patient had symptoms at the sampling site. Deferred N. gonorrhoeae culture of stored ESwab samples is feasible and enables AMR surveillance. To limit the loss in NAAT sensitivity, we recommend obtaining separate samples for NAAT and deferred culture. PMID:25832300

  4. A Fully Integrated Paperfluidic Molecular Diagnostic Chip for the Extraction, Amplification, and Detection of Nucleic Acids from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Natalia M.; Wong, Winnie S.; Liu, Lena; Dewar, Rajan; Klapperich, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Paper diagnostics have successfully been employed to detect the presence of antigens or small molecules in clinical samples through immunoassays; however, the detection of many disease targets relies on the much higher sensitivity and specificity achieved via nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT). The steps involved in NAAT have recently begun to be explored in paper matrices, and our group, among others, has reported on paper-based extraction, amplification, and detection of DNA and RNA targets. Here, we integrate these paper-based NAAT steps onto a single paperfluidic chip in a modular, foldable system that allows for fully integrated fluidic handling from sample to result. We showcase the functionality of the chip by combining nucleic acid isolation, isothermal amplification, and lateral flow detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA directly from crude cervical specimens in under 1 hour for rapid, early detection of cervical cancer. The chip is made entirely of paper and adhesive sheets, making it low-cost, portable, and disposable, and offering the potential for a point-of-care molecular diagnostic platform even in remote and resource-limited settings. PMID:26785636

  5. Detection of Salmonella invA by isothermal and chimeric primer-initiated amplification of nucleic acids (ICAN) in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Emiko; Makungu, Chitwambi; Yabe, John; Sinkala, Patson; Nambota, Andrew; Isogai, Hiroshi; Fukushi, Hideto; Silungwe, Manda; Mubita, Charles; Syakalima, Michelo; Hang'ombe, Bernard Mudenda; Kozaki, Shunji; Yasuda, Jun

    2005-01-01

    The isothermal and chimeric primer-initiated amplification of nucleic acids (ICAN) is a new isothermal DNA amplification method composed of exo Bca DNA polymerase, RNaseH and DNA-RNA chimeric primers. We detected invA of Salmonella from chicken carcasses, egg yolk and cattle fecal samples. Fifty-three of 59 isolates were invA-positive in ICAN-chromatostrip detection. The result was consistent with those obtained by standard PCR. Salmonella invA was detected in 12 of 14 carcass rinses by ICAN, while in 7 of 14 rinses by standard PCR. These results indicate that ICAN is an efficient, sensitive and simple system to detect invA of Salmonella species in developing countries such as Zambia.

  6. Simple and rapid preparation of infected plant tissue extracts for PCR amplification of virus, viroid, and MLO nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Levy, L; Lee, I M; Hadidi, A

    1994-10-01

    A rapid, simple method for preparing plant tissues infected with viruses, viroids, or MLOs using a commercial product known as Gene Releaser is described. The Gene Releaser polymeric matrix method produced plant extracts suitable for PCR amplification without the use of organic solvents, ethanol precipitation, or additional nucleic acid purification techniques. Modification of maceration methods and/or extraction buffers resulted in the PCR amplification of potato spindle tuber, apple scar skin, and dapple apple viroids, as well as, genomic segments of plum pox potyvirus, grapevine virus B, grapevine leafroll-associated virus III, and elm yellows MLO. These pathogens were amplified from tissue of woody and herbaceous hosts such as peach, apricot, apple, grapevine, elm, periwinkle and potato. The application of this product for use with intractable tissue avoids lengthy and laborious extraction procedures. In our hands, about 20 samples could be prepared for PCR or RT-PCR in 1-2 h versus 1-3 days. PMID:7868647

  7. TECHNOLOGICAL OPTIONS FOR ACID RAIN CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discussed are acid rain control options available to the electric utility industry. They include coal switching, flue gas desulfurization, and such emerging lower cost technologies as Limestone Injection Multistage Burners (LIMB) and Advanced Silicate (ADVACATE), both developed ...

  8. Signal amplification architecture for electrochemical aptasensor based on network-like thiocyanuric acid/gold nanoparticle/ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengbo; Li, Lidong; Tian, Yu; Mu, Xiaojiao; Guo, Lin

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we described signal amplification architecture for electronic aptamer-based sensor (E-AB), which is applicable to a wide range of aptamers. Herein, we only take lysozyme as the representative sensing target. The amplification method was based on the network of thiocyanuric acid (TCA)/gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified with ssDNA. The binding event can be detected by a decrease in the integrated charge of the surface-bound [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) which electrostatically absorbed onto the negatively charged phosphate backbones of DNA. In the presence of target molecules, a large amount of TCA/AuNP/ssDNA network associated with [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) would be removed from the electrode surface, leading to a significant decrease of redox current. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) signals of [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) provides quantitative measures of the concentrations of lysozyme, with a linear calibration ranging from 5 pM to 1 nM and a detection limit is 0.1 pM. The detection limit of the proposed sensor is one order of magnitude and three orders of magnitude more sensitive than the detection limits in the absence of TCA (5 pM) and in the absence of TCA/AuNP/ssDNA network (0.5 nM). This amplification method is promising for broad potential application in clinic assay and various protein analysis.

  9. An efficient full-length cDNA amplification strategy based on bioinformatics technology and multiplexed PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan; Wang, Wei-Min; Wang, Huan-Ling

    2016-01-13

    A novel strategy for amplification full-length cDNA and promoter sequences has been developed using bioinformatics technology and multiplexed PCR methods in this study. The amplification of 3' ends of cDNA is performed according to the modified classic 3' RACE techniques, therein the more efficient and effective oligo(dT)-anchor primer with hairpin structure is specially designed. For the amplification of 5' ends of cDNA, two or three-round TAIL-PCR or touch-down PCR using arbitrary degenerate (AD) and sequence-specific reverse (SPR) primers is performed until the 5' sequence of multi-assembled fragment reaches the exon1 region identified by aligning this fragment to reference genome database. Then another TAIL-PCR or touch-down PCR using genomic DNA as template is conducted to obtain the remaining 5' and promoter sequences. The 5' end sites of cDNA are predicted by aligning finally assembled fragment to homologous reference genes of other species, and screening the relative locations of common characteristic cis-elements in silico on promoter. The putative 5' ends are further validated by primers corresponding to these predicted sites in cDNAs. This method is suitable for researchers to isolate limited full-length cDNA sequences due to its operability, inexpensiveness, efficiency and speediness.

  10. Label-free electrochemical nucleic acid biosensing by tandem polymerization and cleavage-mediated cascade target recycling and DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Gong, Hongwei; Wang, Yanqun; Wang, Li

    2016-03-15

    Owing to the intrinsic importance of nucleic acid as bio-targets, the achievement of its simple and sensitive detection with high confidence is very essential for biological studies and diagnostic purposes. Herein, a label-free, isothermal, and ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of target DNA was developed by using a tandem polymerization and cleavage-mediated cascade target recycling and DNAzyme releasing amplification strategy. Upon sensing of the nucleic acid analyte for the assembled hairpin-like probe DNA on the electrode, the DNA polymerase guided the target recycling and simultaneously triggered the lambda exonuclease cleavage, accompanied by the cascade recycling of the released new complementary strand and the amplified liberation of the G-rich sequence of the HRP-mimicking DNAzyme. The electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2 by the generated hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme was used for the signal readout and further amplification toward target response. Such tandem functional operation by DNA polymerase, lambda exonuclease and DNAzyme endows the developed biosensor with a high sensitivity and also a high confidence. A low detection limit of 5 fM with an excellent selectivity toward target DNA could be achieved. It also exhibits the distinct advantages of simplicity in probe design and biosensor fabrication, and label-free electrochemical detection, thus may offer a promising avenue for the applications in disease diagnosis and clinical biomedicine. PMID:26513289

  11. Label-free electrochemical nucleic acid biosensing by tandem polymerization and cleavage-mediated cascade target recycling and DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Gong, Hongwei; Wang, Yanqun; Wang, Li

    2016-03-15

    Owing to the intrinsic importance of nucleic acid as bio-targets, the achievement of its simple and sensitive detection with high confidence is very essential for biological studies and diagnostic purposes. Herein, a label-free, isothermal, and ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of target DNA was developed by using a tandem polymerization and cleavage-mediated cascade target recycling and DNAzyme releasing amplification strategy. Upon sensing of the nucleic acid analyte for the assembled hairpin-like probe DNA on the electrode, the DNA polymerase guided the target recycling and simultaneously triggered the lambda exonuclease cleavage, accompanied by the cascade recycling of the released new complementary strand and the amplified liberation of the G-rich sequence of the HRP-mimicking DNAzyme. The electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2 by the generated hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme was used for the signal readout and further amplification toward target response. Such tandem functional operation by DNA polymerase, lambda exonuclease and DNAzyme endows the developed biosensor with a high sensitivity and also a high confidence. A low detection limit of 5 fM with an excellent selectivity toward target DNA could be achieved. It also exhibits the distinct advantages of simplicity in probe design and biosensor fabrication, and label-free electrochemical detection, thus may offer a promising avenue for the applications in disease diagnosis and clinical biomedicine.

  12. Point-of-care multiplexed assays of nucleic acids using microcapillary-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Lu; Sun, Jiashu; Liu, Yulei; Ma, Xingjie; Cui, Shangjin; Ma, Liying; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-07-15

    This report demonstrates a straightforward, robust, multiplexed and point-of-care microcapillary-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification (cLAMP) for assaying nucleic acids. This assay integrates capillaries (glass or plastic) to introduce and house sample/reagents, segments of water droplets to prevent contamination, pocket warmers to provide heat, and a hand-held flashlight for a visual readout of the fluorescent signal. The cLAMP system allows the simultaneous detection of two RNA targets of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from multiple plasma samples, and achieves a high sensitivity of two copies of standard plasmid. As few nucleic acid detection methods can be wholly independent of external power supply and equipment, our cLAMP holds great promise for point-of-care applications in resource-poor settings. PMID:24937125

  13. On-Chip Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification on Flow-Based Chemiluminescence Microarray Analysis Platform for the Detection of Viruses and Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kunze, A; Dilcher, M; Abd El Wahed, A; Hufert, F; Niessner, R; Seidel, M

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an on-chip isothermal nucleic acid amplification test (iNAAT) for the multiplex amplification and detection of viral and bacterial DNA by a flow-based chemiluminescence microarray. In a principle study, on-chip recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) on defined spots of a DNA microarray was used to spatially separate the amplification reaction of DNA from two viruses (Human adenovirus 41, Phi X 174) and the bacterium Enterococcus faecalis, which are relevant for water hygiene. By establishing the developed assay on the microarray analysis platform MCR 3, the automation of isothermal multiplex-amplification (39 °C, 40 min) and subsequent detection by chemiluminescence imaging was realized. Within 48 min, the microbes could be identified by the spot position on the microarray while the generated chemiluminescence signal correlated with the amount of applied microbe DNA. The limit of detection (LOD) determined for HAdV 41, Phi X 174, and E. faecalis was 35 GU/μL, 1 GU/μL, and 5 × 10(3) GU/μL (genomic units), which is comparable to the sensitivity reported for qPCR analysis, respectively. Moreover the simultaneous amplification and detection of DNA from all three microbes was possible. The presented assay shows that complex enzymatic reactions like an isothermal amplification can be performed in an easy-to-use experimental setup. Furthermore, iNAATs can be potent candidates for multipathogen detection in clinical, food, or environmental samples in routine or field monitoring approaches.

  14. Chip-based device for parallel sorting, amplification, detection, and identification of nucleic acid subsequences

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Colston, Jr, Billy W.

    2016-08-09

    An apparatus for chip-based sorting, amplification, detection, and identification of a sample having a planar substrate. The planar substrate is divided into cells. The cells are arranged on the planar substrate in rows and columns. Electrodes are located in the cells. A micro-reactor maker produces micro-reactors containing the sample. The micro-reactor maker is positioned to deliver the micro-reactors to the planar substrate. A microprocessor is connected to the electrodes for manipulating the micro-reactors on the planar substrate. A detector is positioned to interrogate the sample contained in the micro-reactors.

  15. Validation of Internal Controls for Extraction and Amplification of Nucleic Acids from Enteric Viruses in Water Samples ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Akihiko; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Kitajima, Masaaki; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Nol, Chea; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitors that reduce viral nucleic acid extraction efficiency and interfere with cDNA synthesis and/or polymerase activity affect the molecular detection of viruses in aquatic environments. To overcome these significant problems, we developed a methodology for assessing nucleic acid yields and DNA amplification efficiencies for environmental water samples. This involved adding particles of adenovirus type 5 and murine norovirus and newly developed primer-sharing controls, which are amplified with the same primer pairs and result in the same amplicon sizes as the targets, to these samples. We found that nucleic acid loss during the extraction process, rather than reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) inhibition, more significantly attributed to underestimation of the presence of viral genomes in the environmental water samples tested in this study. Our success rate for satisfactorily amplifying viral RNAs and DNAs by RT-PCR was higher than that for obtaining adequate nucleic acid preparations. We found that inhibitory properties were greatest when we used larger sample volumes. A magnetic silica bead-based RNA extraction method effectively removed inhibitors that interfere with viral nucleic acid extraction and RT-PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the inhibitory properties of environmental water samples by using both control virus particles and primer-sharing controls. PMID:21602369

  16. Validation of internal controls for extraction and amplification of nucleic acids from enteric viruses in water samples.

    PubMed

    Hata, Akihiko; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Kitajima, Masaaki; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Nol, Chea; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2011-07-01

    Inhibitors that reduce viral nucleic acid extraction efficiency and interfere with cDNA synthesis and/or polymerase activity affect the molecular detection of viruses in aquatic environments. To overcome these significant problems, we developed a methodology for assessing nucleic acid yields and DNA amplification efficiencies for environmental water samples. This involved adding particles of adenovirus type 5 and murine norovirus and newly developed primer-sharing controls, which are amplified with the same primer pairs and result in the same amplicon sizes as the targets, to these samples. We found that nucleic acid loss during the extraction process, rather than reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) inhibition, more significantly attributed to underestimation of the presence of viral genomes in the environmental water samples tested in this study. Our success rate for satisfactorily amplifying viral RNAs and DNAs by RT-PCR was higher than that for obtaining adequate nucleic acid preparations. We found that inhibitory properties were greatest when we used larger sample volumes. A magnetic silica bead-based RNA extraction method effectively removed inhibitors that interfere with viral nucleic acid extraction and RT-PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the inhibitory properties of environmental water samples by using both control virus particles and primer-sharing controls.

  17. Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.; Prokopius, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    A review of the current phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development efforts is presented both for multimegawatt systems for electric utility applications and for multikilowatt systems for on-site integrated energy system applications. Improving fuel cell performance, reducing cost, and increasing durability are the technology drivers at this time. Electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, and fuel selection are discussed.

  18. Detection and quantification of the red tide dinoflagellate Karenia brevis by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Casper, Erica T; Paul, John H; Smith, Matthew C; Gray, Michael

    2004-08-01

    Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) is an isothermal method of RNA amplification that has been previously used in clinical diagnostic testing. A real-time NASBA assay has been developed for the detection of rbcL mRNA from the red tide dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. This assay is sensitive to one K. brevis cell and 1.0 fg of in vitro transcript, with occasional detection of lower concentrations of transcript. The assay did not detect rbcL mRNA from a wide range of nontarget organisms and environmental clones, while 10 strains (all tested) of K. brevis were detected. By the use of standard curves based on time to positivity, concentrations of K. brevis in environmental samples were predicted by NASBA and classified into different levels of blooms per the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) system. NASBA classification matched FWC classification (based on cell counts) 72% of the time. Those samples that did not match were off by only one class. NASBA is sensitive, rapid, and effective and may be used as an additional or alternative method to detect and quantify K. brevis in the marine environment. PMID:15294808

  19. A novel, sensitive and label-free loop-mediated isothermal amplification detection method for nucleic acids using luminophore dyes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sharmili; Wei, Sim Xiao; Ying, Jean Liew Zhi; Safavieh, Mohammadali; Ahmed, Minhaz Uddin

    2016-12-15

    Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) has been widely rendered for nucleic acid testing. Here, we integrate loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with ECL technique for DNA detection and quantification. The target LAMP DNA bound electrostatically with [Ru(bpy)3](+2) on the carbon electrode surface, and an ECL reaction was triggered by tripropylamine (TPrA) to yield luminescence. We illustrated this method as a new and highly sensitive strategy for the detection of sequence-specific DNA from different meat species at picogram levels. The proposed strategy renders the signal amplification capacities of TPrA and combines LAMP with inherently high sensitivity of the ECL technique, to facilitate the detection of low quantities of DNA. By leveraging this technique, target DNA of Sus scrofa (pork) meat was detected as low as 1pg/µL (3.43×10(-1)copies/µL). In addition, the proposed technique was applied for detection of Bacillus subtilis DNA samples and detection limit of 10pg/µL (2.2×10(3)copies/µL) was achieved. The advantages of being isothermal, sensitive and robust with ability for multiplex detection of bio-analytes makes this method a facile and appealing sensing modality in hand-held devices to be used at the point-of-care (POC). PMID:27393827

  20. CdTe amplification nanoplatforms capped with thioglycolic acid for electrochemical aptasensing of ultra-traces of ATP.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Farzin, Leila; Tabrizi, Mahmoud Amouzadeh; Shanehsaz, Maryam

    2016-12-01

    A "signal off" voltammetric aptasensor was developed for the sensitive and selective detection of ultra-low levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). For this purpose, a new strategy based on the principle of recognition-induced switching of aptamers from DNA/DNA duplex to DNA/target complex was designed using thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) as the signal amplifying nano-platforms. Owing to the small size, high surface-to-volume ratio and good conductivity, quantum dots were immobilized on the electrode surface for signal amplification. In this work, methylene blue (MB) adsorbed to DNA was used as a sensitive redox reporter. The intensity of voltammetric signal of MB was found to decrease linearly upon ATP addition over a concentration range of 0.1nM to 1.6μM with a correlation coefficient of 0.9924. Under optimized conditions, the aptasensor was able to selectively detect ATP with a limit of detection of 45pM at 3σ. The results also demonstrated that the QDs-based amplification strategy could be feasible for ATP assay and presented a potential universal method for other small biomolecular aptasensors. PMID:27612836

  1. Technological options for acid rain control

    SciTech Connect

    Princiotta, F.T.; Sedman, C.B.

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses technological options for acid rain control. Compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will require careful scrutiny of a number of issues before selecting control options to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. One key consideration is the effect of fuel switching or control technology upon the existing dust collector, with additional air toxics legislation looming ahead. A number of likely SO2 and NOx retrofit technologies and estimated costs are presented, along with results of retrofit case studies. New hybrid particulate controls are also being developed to meet future requirements.

  2. Ultrasensitive detection of nucleic acids by template enhanced hybridization followed by rolling circle amplification and catalytic hairpin assembly.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiling; Zhang, Qiao; Sun, Wenbo

    2015-02-11

    An ultrasensitive protocol for fluorescent detection of DNA is designed by combining the template enhanced hybridization process (TEHP) with Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA) and Catalytic Hairpin Assembly (CHA), showing a remarkable amplification efficiency.

  3. TECHNOLOGICAL OPTIONS FOR ACID RAIN CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses technological options for acid rain control. Compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will require careful scrutiny of a number of issues before selecting control options to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions...

  4. BNL Citric Acid Technology: Pilot Scale Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    FRANCIS, A J; DODGE,; J, C; GILLOW, J B; FORRESTER, K E

    1999-09-24

    The objective of this project is to remove toxic metals such as lead and cadmium from incinerator ash using the Citric Acid Process developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this process toxic metals in bottom ash from the incineration of municipal solid waste were first extracted with citric acid followed by biodegradation of the citric acid-metal extract by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens for metals recovery. The ash contained the following metals: Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Ti, and Zn. Optimization of the Citric Acid Process parameters which included citric acid molarity, contact time, the impact of mixing aggressiveness during extraction and pretreatment showed lead and cadmium removal from incinerator ash of >90%. Seeding the treated ash with P. fluorescens resulted in the removal of residual citric acid and biostabilization of any leachable lead, thus allowing it to pass EPA?s Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Biodegradation of the citric acid extract removed >99% of the lead from the extract as well as other metals such as Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ti, and Zn. Speciation of the bioprecipitated lead by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure at the National Synchrotron Light Source showed that the lead is predominantly associated with the phosphate and carboxyl functional groups in a stable form. Citric acid was completely recovered (>99%) from the extract by sulfide precipitation technique and the extraction efficiency of recovered citric acid is similar to that of the fresh citric acid. Recycling of the citric acid should result in considerable savings in the overall treatment cost. We have shown the potential application of this technology to remove and recover the metal contaminants from incinerator ash as well as from other heavy metal bearing wastes (i.e., electric arc furnace dust from steel industry) or soils. Information developed from this project is being applied to demonstrate the remediation of

  5. Nucleic Acid Amplification Based Diagnostic of Lyme (Neuro-)borreliosis – Lost in the Jungle of Methods, Targets, and Assays?

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory based diagnosis of infectious diseases usually relies on culture of the disease causing micro-organism, followed by identification and susceptibility testing. Since Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis, requires very specific culture conditions (e.g. specific liquid media, long term cul-ture) traditional bacteriology is often not done on a routine basis. Instead, confirmation of the clinical diagnosis needs ei-ther indirect techniques (like serology or measurement of cellular activity in the presence of antigens) or direct but culture independent techniques, like microscopy or nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAT), with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) being the most frequently applied NAT method in routine laboratories. NAT uses nucleic acids of the disease causing micro-organism as template for amplification, isolated from various sources of clinical specimens. Although the underlying principle, adoption of the enzymatic process running during DNA duplication prior to prokaryotic cell division, is comparatively easy, a couple of ‘pitfalls’ is associated with the technique itself as well as with interpretation of the results. At present, no commercial, CE-marked and sufficiently validated PCR assay is available. A number of homebrew assays have been published, which are different in terms of target (i.e. the gene targeted by the amplification primers), method (nested PCR, PCR followed by hybridization, real-time PCR) and validation criteria. Inhibitory compounds may lead to false negative results, if no appropriate internal control is included. Carry-over of amplicons, insufficient handling and workflow and/or insufficiently validated targets/primers may result in false positive results. Different targets may yield different analytical sensitivity, depending, among other factors, of the redundancy of a target gene in the genome. Per-formance characteristics (e.g. analytical sensitivity and

  6. Nucleic Acid Amplification Based Diagnostic of Lyme (Neuro-)borreliosis - Lost in the Jungle of Methods, Targets, and Assays?

    PubMed

    Nolte, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory based diagnosis of infectious diseases usually relies on culture of the disease causing micro-organism, followed by identification and susceptibility testing. Since Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis, requires very specific culture conditions (e.g. specific liquid media, long term cul-ture) traditional bacteriology is often not done on a routine basis. Instead, confirmation of the clinical diagnosis needs ei-ther indirect techniques (like serology or measurement of cellular activity in the presence of antigens) or direct but culture independent techniques, like microscopy or nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAT), with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) being the most frequently applied NAT method in routine laboratories. NAT uses nucleic acids of the disease causing micro-organism as template for amplification, isolated from various sources of clinical specimens. Although the underlying principle, adoption of the enzymatic process running during DNA duplication prior to prokaryotic cell division, is comparatively easy, a couple of 'pitfalls' is associated with the technique itself as well as with interpretation of the results. At present, no commercial, CE-marked and sufficiently validated PCR assay is available. A number of homebrew assays have been published, which are different in terms of target (i.e. the gene targeted by the amplification primers), method (nested PCR, PCR followed by hybridization, real-time PCR) and validation criteria. Inhibitory compounds may lead to false negative results, if no appropriate internal control is included. Carry-over of amplicons, insufficient handling and workflow and/or insufficiently validated targets/primers may result in false positive results. Different targets may yield different analytical sensitivity, depending, among other factors, of the redundancy of a target gene in the genome. Per-formance characteristics (e.g. analytical sensitivity and

  7. Microsatellite loci in the tiger shark and cross-species amplification using pyrosequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Natália J; Cruz, Vanessa P; Ashikaga, Fernando Y; Camargo, Sâmia M; Oliveira, Claudio; Piercy, Andrew N; Burgess, George H; Coelho, Rui; Santos, Miguel N; Mendonça, Fernando F; Foresti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    The tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) has a global distribution in tropical and warm temperate seas, and it is caught in numerous fisheries worldwide, mainly as bycatch. It is currently assessed as near threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. In this study, we identified nine microsatellite loci through next generation sequencing (454 pyrosequencing) using 29 samples from the western Atlantic. The genetic diversity of these loci were assessed and revealed a total of 48 alleles ranging from 3 to 7 alleles per locus (average of 5.3 alleles). Cross-species amplification was successful at most loci for other species such as Carcharhinus longimanus, C. acronotus and Alopias superciliosus. Given the potential applicability of genetic markers for biological conservation, these data may contribute to the population assessment of this and other species of sharks worldwide. PMID:27635306

  8. Microsatellite loci in the tiger shark and cross-species amplification using pyrosequencing technology

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Natália J.; Cruz, Vanessa P.; Ashikaga, Fernando Y.; Camargo, Sâmia M.; Oliveira, Claudio; Piercy, Andrew N.; Burgess, George H.; Coelho, Rui; Santos, Miguel N.; Foresti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    The tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) has a global distribution in tropical and warm temperate seas, and it is caught in numerous fisheries worldwide, mainly as bycatch. It is currently assessed as near threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. In this study, we identified nine microsatellite loci through next generation sequencing (454 pyrosequencing) using 29 samples from the western Atlantic. The genetic diversity of these loci were assessed and revealed a total of 48 alleles ranging from 3 to 7 alleles per locus (average of 5.3 alleles). Cross-species amplification was successful at most loci for other species such as Carcharhinus longimanus, C. acronotus and Alopias superciliosus. Given the potential applicability of genetic markers for biological conservation, these data may contribute to the population assessment of this and other species of sharks worldwide. PMID:27635306

  9. Microsatellite loci in the tiger shark and cross-species amplification using pyrosequencing technology

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Natália J.; Cruz, Vanessa P.; Ashikaga, Fernando Y.; Camargo, Sâmia M.; Oliveira, Claudio; Piercy, Andrew N.; Burgess, George H.; Coelho, Rui; Santos, Miguel N.; Foresti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    The tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) has a global distribution in tropical and warm temperate seas, and it is caught in numerous fisheries worldwide, mainly as bycatch. It is currently assessed as near threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. In this study, we identified nine microsatellite loci through next generation sequencing (454 pyrosequencing) using 29 samples from the western Atlantic. The genetic diversity of these loci were assessed and revealed a total of 48 alleles ranging from 3 to 7 alleles per locus (average of 5.3 alleles). Cross-species amplification was successful at most loci for other species such as Carcharhinus longimanus, C. acronotus and Alopias superciliosus. Given the potential applicability of genetic markers for biological conservation, these data may contribute to the population assessment of this and other species of sharks worldwide.

  10. Implementation of Oral and Rectal Gonococcal and Chlamydial Nucleic Acid Amplification-Based Testing as a Component of Local Health Department Activities.

    PubMed

    Nall, Jennifer; Barr, Breona; McNeil, Candice J; Bachmann, Laura H

    2016-10-01

    From January 1, 2014, to May 31, 2015, 452 individuals received extragenital nucleic acid amplification-based Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis testing through public health venues. Seventy-four individuals (16%) tested positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and/or Chlamydia trachomatis at an extragenital site and 40 (54%) would not have been effectively diagnosed and treated in the absence of extragenital testing.

  11. Nucleic acid amplification in vitro: detection of sequences with low copy numbers and application to diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Guatelli, J C; Gingeras, T R; Richman, D D

    1989-01-01

    The enzymatic amplification of specific nucleic acid sequences in vitro has revolutionized the use of nucleic acid hybridization assays for viral detection. With this method, the copy number of a pathogen-specific sequence is increased several orders of magnitude before detection is attempted. The sensitivity and specificity of detection are thus markedly improved. Mullis and Faloona devised the first method of sequence amplification in vitro, the polymerase chain reaction (K.B. Mullis and F.A. Faloona, Methods Enzymol. 155:355-350, 1987). By this method, synthetic oligonucleotide primers direct repeated, target-specific, deoxyribonucleic acid-synthetic reactions, resulting in an exponential increase in the amount of the specific target sequence. The application of sequence amplification to viral detection was initially performed with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and human T-cell lymphoma virus type I. In principle, however, this approach can be applied to the detection of any deoxyribonucleic or ribonucleic acid virus; the only requirement is that sufficient nucleotide sequence data exist to allow the synthesis of target-specific oligonucleotide primers. The use of target amplification in vitro will permit a variety of studies of viral pathogenesis which have not been feasible because of the low copy number of the viral nucleic acids in infected material. This approach is particularly applicable to the study of human retroviral infections, which are chronic and persistent and are characterized by low titers of virus in tissues. In addition, target amplification in vitro will facilitate the development of new methods of sequence detection, which will be useful for rapid viral diagnosis in the clinical laboratory. PMID:2650862

  12. On-Chip Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification on Flow-Based Chemiluminescence Microarray Analysis Platform for the Detection of Viruses and Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kunze, A; Dilcher, M; Abd El Wahed, A; Hufert, F; Niessner, R; Seidel, M

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an on-chip isothermal nucleic acid amplification test (iNAAT) for the multiplex amplification and detection of viral and bacterial DNA by a flow-based chemiluminescence microarray. In a principle study, on-chip recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) on defined spots of a DNA microarray was used to spatially separate the amplification reaction of DNA from two viruses (Human adenovirus 41, Phi X 174) and the bacterium Enterococcus faecalis, which are relevant for water hygiene. By establishing the developed assay on the microarray analysis platform MCR 3, the automation of isothermal multiplex-amplification (39 °C, 40 min) and subsequent detection by chemiluminescence imaging was realized. Within 48 min, the microbes could be identified by the spot position on the microarray while the generated chemiluminescence signal correlated with the amount of applied microbe DNA. The limit of detection (LOD) determined for HAdV 41, Phi X 174, and E. faecalis was 35 GU/μL, 1 GU/μL, and 5 × 10(3) GU/μL (genomic units), which is comparable to the sensitivity reported for qPCR analysis, respectively. Moreover the simultaneous amplification and detection of DNA from all three microbes was possible. The presented assay shows that complex enzymatic reactions like an isothermal amplification can be performed in an easy-to-use experimental setup. Furthermore, iNAATs can be potent candidates for multipathogen detection in clinical, food, or environmental samples in routine or field monitoring approaches. PMID:26624222

  13. Non-Instrumented Nucleic Acid Amplification (NINA) for Rapid Detection of Ralstonia solanacearum Race 3 Biovar 2

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Ryo; LaBarre, Paul; Singleton, Jered; Beddoe, Andy; Weigl, Bernhard H.; Alvarez, Anne M.; Jenkins, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the use of a non-instrumented device for the implementation of a loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) based assay for the select-agent bacterial-wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2. Heat energy is generated within the device by the exothermic hydration of calcium oxide, and the reaction temperature is regulated by storing latent energy at the melting temperature of a renewable lipid-based engineered phase-change material. Endpoint detection of the LAMP reaction is achieved without opening the reaction tube by observing the fluorescence of an innovative FRET-based hybridization probe with a simple custom fluorometer. Non-instrumented devices could maintain reactions near the design temperature of 63°C for at least an hour. Using this approach DNA extracted from the pathogen could be detected at fewer than ten copies within a 25 μL reaction mix, illustrating the potential of these technologies for simple, powerful agricultural diagnostics in the field. Furthermore, the assay was just as reliable when implemented in a tropical environment at 31°C as it was when implemented in an air-conditioned lab maintained at 22°C, illustrating the potential value of the technology for field conditions in the tropics and subtropics. PMID:25485176

  14. fM to aM nucleic acid amplification for molecular diagnostics in a non-stick-coated metal microfluidic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoliang; Huang, Qin; Ma, Li; Luo, Xianbo; Pang, Biao; Zhang, Zhixin; Wang, Ruliang; Zhang, Junqi; Li, Qi; Fu, Rongxin; Ye, Jiancheng

    2014-12-05

    A sensitive DNA isothermal amplification method for the detection of DNA at fM to aM concentrations for pathogen identification was developed using a non-stick-coated metal microfluidic bioreactor. A portable confocal optical detector was utilized to monitor the DNA amplification in micro- to nanoliter reaction assays in real-time, with fluorescence collection near the optical diffraction limit. The non-stick-coated metal microfluidic bioreactor, with a surface contact angle of 103°, was largely inert to bio-molecules, and DNA amplification could be performed in a minimum reaction volume of 40 nL. The isothermal nucleic acid amplification for Mycoplasma pneumoniae identification in the non-stick-coated microfluidic bioreactor could be performed at a minimum DNA template concentration of 1.3 aM, and a detection limit of three copies of genomic DNA was obtained. This microfluidic bioreactor offers a promising clinically relevant pathogen molecular diagnostic method via the amplification of targets from only a few copies of genomic DNA from a single bacterium.

  15. Microfluidic lab-on-a-foil for nucleic acid analysis based on isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA).

    PubMed

    Lutz, Sascha; Weber, Patrick; Focke, Max; Faltin, Bernd; Hoffmann, Jochen; Müller, Claas; Mark, Daniel; Roth, Günter; Munday, Peter; Armes, Niall; Piepenburg, Olaf; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2010-04-01

    For the first time we demonstrate a self-sufficient lab-on-a-foil system for the fully automated analysis of nucleic acids which is based on the recently available isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The system consists of a novel, foil-based centrifugal microfluidic cartridge including prestored liquid and dry reagents, and a commercially available centrifugal analyzer for incubation at 37 degrees C and real-time fluorescence detection. The system was characterized with an assay for the detection of the antibiotic resistance gene mecA of Staphylococcus aureus. The limit of detection was <10 copies and time-to-result was <20 min. Microfluidic unit operations comprise storage and release of liquid reagents, reconstitution of lyophilized reagents, aliquoting the sample into < or = 30 independent reaction cavities, and mixing of reagents with the DNA samples. The foil-based cartridge was produced by blow-molding and sealed with a self-adhesive tape. The demonstrated system excels existing PCR based lab-on-a-chip platforms in terms of energy efficiency and time-to-result. Applications are suggested in the field of mobile point-of-care analysis, B-detection, or in combination with continuous monitoring systems. PMID:20300675

  16. Microfluidic lab-on-a-foil for nucleic acid analysis based on isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA).

    PubMed

    Lutz, Sascha; Weber, Patrick; Focke, Max; Faltin, Bernd; Hoffmann, Jochen; Müller, Claas; Mark, Daniel; Roth, Günter; Munday, Peter; Armes, Niall; Piepenburg, Olaf; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2010-04-01

    For the first time we demonstrate a self-sufficient lab-on-a-foil system for the fully automated analysis of nucleic acids which is based on the recently available isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The system consists of a novel, foil-based centrifugal microfluidic cartridge including prestored liquid and dry reagents, and a commercially available centrifugal analyzer for incubation at 37 degrees C and real-time fluorescence detection. The system was characterized with an assay for the detection of the antibiotic resistance gene mecA of Staphylococcus aureus. The limit of detection was <10 copies and time-to-result was <20 min. Microfluidic unit operations comprise storage and release of liquid reagents, reconstitution of lyophilized reagents, aliquoting the sample into < or = 30 independent reaction cavities, and mixing of reagents with the DNA samples. The foil-based cartridge was produced by blow-molding and sealed with a self-adhesive tape. The demonstrated system excels existing PCR based lab-on-a-chip platforms in terms of energy efficiency and time-to-result. Applications are suggested in the field of mobile point-of-care analysis, B-detection, or in combination with continuous monitoring systems.

  17. Development and evaluation of a real-time nucleic acid sequence based amplification assay for rapid detection of influenza A.

    PubMed

    Moore, Catherine; Hibbitts, Sam; Owen, Neil; Corden, Sally A; Harrison, Graham; Fox, Julie; Gelder, Colin; Westmoreland, Diana

    2004-12-01

    The development and introduction of effective treatment for influenza A in the form of neuraminidase inhibitors have made the rapid diagnosis of infection important especially in high-risk populations. The aim of this study was to develop a real-time nucleic acid sequenced based amplification (NASBA) using a molecular beacon that could detect a wide range of influenza A subtypes and strains in a single reaction by targeting a conserved region of the influenza genome, and to evaluate its sensitivity and specificity against traditional laboratory techniques on a range of clinical samples usefulness during the 2003/2004 influenza season. The results demonstrated the assay to be highly sensitive and specific, detecting <0.1 TCID50 of virus stock. Three hundred eighty-nine clinical samples were tested in total from two patient groups. Overall, the real-time NASBA assay detected 64% (66/103) more influenza positive samples than cell culture and direct immunofluorescence (IF) and, therefore, was shown to be more sensitive in detecting influenza A in a wide range of respiratory samples than traditional methods. In conclusion, the real-time influenza A assay demonstrated clinical usefulness in both hospital and community populations.

  18. Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assays for rapid detection of West Nile and St. Louis encephalitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Lanciotti, R S; Kerst, A J

    2001-12-01

    The development and application of nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assays for the detection of West Nile (WN) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses are reported. Two unique detection formats were developed for the NASBA assays: a postamplification detection step with a virus-specific internal capture probe and electrochemiluminescence (NASBA-ECL assay) and a real-time assay with 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled virus-specific molecular beacon probes (NASBA-beacon assay). The sensitivities and specificities of these NASBA assays were compared to those of a newly described standard reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and TaqMan assays for SLE virus and to a previously published TaqMan assay for WN virus. The NASBA assays demonstrated exceptional sensitivities and specificities compared to those of virus isolation, the TaqMan assays, and standard RT-PCR, with the NASBA-beacon assay yielding results in less than 1 h. These assays should be of utility in the diagnostic laboratory to complement existing diagnostic testing methodologies and as a tool in conducting flavivirus surveillance in the United States.

  19. Nucleic acid-amplification testing for hepatitis B in cornea donors.

    PubMed

    Fornés, Maria Gema; Jiménez, Maria Angustias; Eisman, Marcela; Gómez Villagrán, Jose Luis; Villalba, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    Careful donor selection and implementation of tests of appropriate sensitivity and specificity are of paramount importance for minimizing the risk of transmitting infectious diseases from donors to corneal allograft recipients. Reported cases of viral transmission with corneal grafts are very unusual. Nevertheless potential virus transmission through the engraftment cannot be ruled out. According to European Guideline 2006/17/EC, screening for antibodies for Hepatitis B core antigen (anti HBc) is mandatory, and when this test is positive, some criteria must be established before using corneas. Despite the continuous progress in screening tests, donors carrying an occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) can cause transplant-transmitted hepatitis B. To date, Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) is not an obligatory assay in corneal tissue setting neither in our country nor in the rest of European countries. Herein, we report three cornea donors that were rejected with the diagnosis of OBI through the testing of sensitive NAT and the serological profile of Hepatitis B virus. The aim of this report is to emphasize the need to include NAT in new reviews of EU Tissues and Cells Directives in order to increase level of security in tissue donation as well as not to reject a high number of donors with isolated profile of anti HBc in geographical areas with high prevalence of Hepatitis B, that could be rejected without a true criterion of Hepatitis B infection. PMID:26685699

  20. Gene expression profiling of RNA extracted from FFPE tissues: NuGEN technologies' whole-transcriptome amplification system.

    PubMed

    Turner, Leah; Heath, Joe Don; Kurn, Nurith

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression profiling of RNA isolated from formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples has been historically challenging. Yet FFPE samples are sought-after because of the in-depth retrospective records typically associated with them rendering these samples a valuable resource for translational medicine studies. Extensive degradation, chemical modifications, and cross-linking have made it difficult to isolate RNA of sufficient quality required for large-scale gene expression profiling studies. NuGEN Technologies' WT-Ovation™ FFPE System linearly amplifies RNA from FFPE samples through a robust and simple whole-transcriptome approach using as little as 50 ng total RNA isolated from FFPE samples. The amplified material may be labeled with validated kits and/or protocols from NuGEN for analysis on any of the major gene expression microarray platforms, including: Affymetrix, Agilent, and Illumina gene expression arrays. Results compare well with those obtained using RNA from fresh-frozen samples. RNA quality from FFPE samples varies significantly and neither sample age nor sample size analysis via gel electrophoresis or the Agilent Bioanalyzer system accurately predict materials suitable for amplification. Therefore, NuGEN has validated a correlative qPCR-based analytical method for the RNA derived from FFPE samples which effectively predicts array results. The NuGEN approach enables fast and successful analysis of samples previously thought to be too degraded for gene expression analysis.

  1. Quantitative real-time PCR method with internal amplification control to quantify cyclopiazonic acid producing molds in foods.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alicia; Werning, María L; Rodríguez, Mar; Bermúdez, Elena; Córdoba, Juan J

    2012-12-01

    A quantitative TaqMan real-time PCR (qPCR) method that includes an internal amplification control (IAC) to quantify cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-producing molds in foods has been developed. A specific primer pair (dmaTF/dmaTR) and a TaqMan probe (dmaTp) were designed on the basis of dmaT gene which encodes the enzyme dimethylallyl tryptophan synthase involved in the biosynthesis of CPA. The IAC consisted of a 105 bp chimeric DNA fragment containing a region of the hly gene of Listeria monocytogenes. Thirty-two mold reference strains representing CPA producers and non-producers of different mold species were used in this study. All strains were tested for CPA production by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The functionality of the designed qPCR method was demonstrated by the high linear relationship of the standard curves relating to the dmaT gene copy numbers and the Ct values obtained from the different CPA producers tested. The ability of the qPCR protocol to quantify CPA-producing molds was evaluated in different artificially inoculated foods. A good linear correlation was obtained over the range 1-4 log cfu/g in the different food matrices. The detection limit in all inoculated foods ranged from 1 to 2 log cfu/g. This qPCR protocol including an IAC showed good efficiency to quantify CPA-producing molds in naturally contaminated foods avoiding false negative results. This method could be used to monitor the CPA producers in the HACCP programs to prevent the risk of CPA formation throughout the food chain. PMID:22986206

  2. Quantitative real-time PCR method with internal amplification control to quantify cyclopiazonic acid producing molds in foods.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alicia; Werning, María L; Rodríguez, Mar; Bermúdez, Elena; Córdoba, Juan J

    2012-12-01

    A quantitative TaqMan real-time PCR (qPCR) method that includes an internal amplification control (IAC) to quantify cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-producing molds in foods has been developed. A specific primer pair (dmaTF/dmaTR) and a TaqMan probe (dmaTp) were designed on the basis of dmaT gene which encodes the enzyme dimethylallyl tryptophan synthase involved in the biosynthesis of CPA. The IAC consisted of a 105 bp chimeric DNA fragment containing a region of the hly gene of Listeria monocytogenes. Thirty-two mold reference strains representing CPA producers and non-producers of different mold species were used in this study. All strains were tested for CPA production by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The functionality of the designed qPCR method was demonstrated by the high linear relationship of the standard curves relating to the dmaT gene copy numbers and the Ct values obtained from the different CPA producers tested. The ability of the qPCR protocol to quantify CPA-producing molds was evaluated in different artificially inoculated foods. A good linear correlation was obtained over the range 1-4 log cfu/g in the different food matrices. The detection limit in all inoculated foods ranged from 1 to 2 log cfu/g. This qPCR protocol including an IAC showed good efficiency to quantify CPA-producing molds in naturally contaminated foods avoiding false negative results. This method could be used to monitor the CPA producers in the HACCP programs to prevent the risk of CPA formation throughout the food chain.

  3. Evaluation of six commercial nucleic acid amplification tests for detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and other Neisseria species.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Unemo, Magnus; Limnios, Athena E; Hogan, Tiffany R; Hjelmevoll, Stig-Ove; Garland, Susanne M; Tapsall, John

    2011-10-01

    Molecular detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in extragenital samples may result in false-positive results due to cross-reaction with commensal Neisseria species or Neisseria meningitidis. This study examined 450 characterized clinical culture isolates, comprising 216 N. gonorrhoeae isolates and 234 isolates of nongonococcal Neisseria species (n = 218) and 16 isolates of other closely related bacteria, with six commercial nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). The six NAATs tested were Gen-Probe APTIMA COMBO 2 and APTIMA GC, Roche COBAS Amplicor CT/NG and COBAS 4800 CT/NG tests, BD ProbeTec GC Qx amplified DNA assay, and Abbott RealTime CT/NG test. All assays except COBAS Amplicor CT/NG test where four (1.9%) isolates were not detected showed a positive result with all N. gonorrhoeae isolates (n = 216). Among the 234 nongonococcal isolates examined, initial results from all assays displayed some false-positive results due to cross-reactions. Specifically, the COBAS Amplicor and ProbeTec tests showed the highest number of false-positive results, detecting 33 (14.1%) and 26 (11%) nongonococcal Neisseria isolates, respectively. On the first testing, APTIMA COMBO 2, APTIMA GC, Abbott RealTime, and Roche COBAS 4800 showed lower level of cross-reactions with five (2.1%), four (1.7%), two (1%), and two (1%) of the isolates showing low-level positivity, respectively. Upon retesting of these nine nongonococcal isolates using freshly cultured colonies, none were positive by the APTIMA COMBO 2, Abbott RealTime, or COBAS 4800 test. In conclusion, the COBAS Amplicor and ProbeTec tests displayed high number of false-positive results, while the remaining NAATs showed only sporadic low-level false-positive results. Supplementary testing for confirmation of N. gonorrhoeae NAATs remains recommended with all samples tested, in particular those from extragenital sites.

  4. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of nucleic acid by coupling an autonomous cascade target replication and enzyme/gold nanoparticle-based post-amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Wei, Wenji; Wang, Yanqun; Fang, Li; Wang, Li; Li, Feng

    2016-06-15

    Owing to the intrinsic importance of nucleic acid as bio-targets, the development of isothermal and ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor is very essential for biological studies and medical diagnostics. Herein, the autonomous cascade DNA replication strategy was effectively married with the enzyme/gold nanoparticle-based post-amplification strategy to promote the detection performance toward target DNA. A hairpin DNA probe (HP) is designed that consists of an overhang at 3'-end as the recognition unit for target DNA, a recognition site for nicking endonuclease, and an alkane spacer to terminate polymerization reaction. The autonomous DNA replication-scission-displacement reaction operated by the nicking endonuclease/KF polymerase induced the autocatalytic opening of HP, which was then specifically bound by the enzyme/gold nanoparticles for further dual-signal amplification toward target-related sensing events. A low detection limit of 0.065 fM with an excellent selectivity toward target DNA could be achieved. The proposed biosensor could be also easily regenerated for target detection. The developed biosensor creates an opportunity for the effective coupling of the target replication with post-amplification strategies and thus opens a promising avenue for the detection of nucleic acid with low abundance in bioanalysis and clinical biomedicine.

  5. Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification is more convenient than real-time PCR for quantification of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Petra; Wolters, Liselotte; Schoone, Gerard; Schallig, Henk; Sillekens, Peter; Hermsen, Rob; Sauerwein, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Determination of the number of malaria parasites by routine or even expert microscopy is not always sufficiently sensitive for detailed quantitative studies on the population dynamics of Plasmodium falciparum, such as intervention or vaccine trials. To circumvent this problem, two more sensitive assays, real-time quantitative nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (QT-NASBA) and real-time quantitative PCR (QT-PCR) were compared for quantification of P. falciparum parasites. QT-NASBA was adapted to molecular beacon real-time detection technology, which enables a reduction of the time of analysis and of contamination risk while retaining the specificity and sensitivity of the original assay. Both QT-NASBA and QT-PCR have a sensitivity of 20 parasites/ml of blood, but QT-PCR requires a complicated DNA extraction procedure and the use of 500 microl of venous blood to achieve this sensitivity, compared to 50 microl of finger prick blood for real-time QT-NASBA. Both techniques show a significant correlation to microscopic parasite counts, and the quantification results of the two real-time assays are significantly correlated for in vitro as well as in vivo samples. However, in comparison to real-time QT-PCR, the results of real-time QT-NASBA can be obtained 12 h earlier, with relatively easy RNA extraction and use of finger prick blood samples. The prospective development of multiplex QT-NASBA for detection of various P. falciparum developmental stages increases the value of QT-NASBA for malaria studies. Therefore, for studies requiring sensitive and accurate detection of P. falciparum parasites in large numbers of samples, the use of real-time QT-NASBA is preferred over that of real-time QT-PCR.

  6. Acid rain control II. The promise of new technology

    SciTech Connect

    Gilleland, D.S.; Swisher, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on acid rain. Topics considered at the conference included the evolving science of acid deposition, natural acidity, the renovation of acid lakes and streams, the role of advanced coal cleaning technology in the reduction of sulfur dioxide emissions, fluidized-bed combustion, desulfurization using limestone, the Kilngas project, current technology for sulfur dioxide emission control, and coal liquefaction.

  7. Flow-through Capture and in Situ Amplification Can Enable Rapid Detection of a Few Single Molecules of Nucleic Acids from Several Milliliters of Solution.

    PubMed

    Schlappi, Travis S; McCalla, Stephanie E; Schoepp, Nathan G; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-08-01

    Detecting nucleic acids (NAs) at zeptomolar concentrations (few molecules per milliliter) currently requires expensive equipment and lengthy processing times to isolate and concentrate the NAs into a volume that is amenable to amplification processes, such as PCR or LAMP. Shortening the time required to concentrate NAs and integrating this procedure with amplification on-device would be invaluable to a number of analytical fields, including environmental monitoring and clinical diagnostics. Microfluidic point-of-care (POC) devices have been designed to address these needs, but they are not able to detect NAs present in zeptomolar concentrations in short time frames because they require slow flow rates and/or they are unable to handle milliliter-scale volumes. In this paper, we theoretically and experimentally investigate a flow-through capture membrane that solves this problem by capturing NAs with high sensitivity in a short time period, followed by direct detection via amplification. Theoretical predictions guided the choice of physical parameters for a chitosan-coated nylon membrane; these predictions can also be applied generally to other capture situations with different requirements. The membrane is also compatible with in situ amplification, which, by eliminating an elution step enables high sensitivity and will facilitate integration of this method into sample-to-answer detection devices. We tested a wide range of combinations of sample volumes and concentrations of DNA molecules using a capture membrane with a 2 mm radius. We show that for nucleic acid detection, this approach can concentrate and detect as few as ∼10 molecules of DNA with flow rates as high as 1 mL/min, handling samples as large as 50 mL. In a specific example, this method reliably concentrated and detected ∼25 molecules of DNA from 50 mL of sample. PMID:27429181

  8. Technological Aspects of Chemoenzymatic Epoxidation of Fatty Acids, Fatty Acid Esters and Vegetable Oils: A Review.

    PubMed

    Milchert, Eugeniusz; Malarczyk, Kornelia; Kłos, Marlena

    2015-12-02

    The general subject of the review is analysis of the effect of technological parameters on the chemoenzymatic epoxidation processes of vegetable oils, fatty acids and alkyl esters of fatty acids. The technological parameters considered include temperature, concentration, amount of hydrogen peroxide relative to the number of unsaturated bonds, the amounts of enzyme catalysts, presence of solvent and amount of free fatty acids. Also chemical reactions accompanying the technological processes are discussed together with different technological options and significance of the products obtained.

  9. Reporter-triggered isothermal exponential amplification strategy in ultrasensitive homogeneous label-free electrochemical nucleic acid biosensing.

    PubMed

    Nie, Ji; Zhang, De-Wen; Zhang, Fang-Ting; Yuan, Fang; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Xin-Xiang

    2014-06-14

    A simple and novel reporter-triggered isothermal exponential amplification reaction (R-EXPAR) integrated with a miniaturized electrochemical device was developed, which achieved excellent improvement (five orders of magnitude) of sensitivity toward reporter, G-quadruplex. This R-EXPAR strategy has been successfully implemented to construct a homogeneous label-free electrochemical sensor for ultrasensitive DNA detection.

  10. Label-free and sensitive fluorescence detection of nucleic acid, based on combination of a graphene oxid /SYBR green I dye platform and polymerase assisted signal amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiao; Xing, Da

    2012-12-01

    A new label-free isothermal fluorescence amplification detection for nucleic acid has been developed. In this paper, we first developed a novel sensitive and specific detection platform with an unmodified hairpin probe (HP) combination of the graphene oxid (GO)/ SYBR green I dye (SG), which was relied on the selective principle of adsorption and the high quenching efficiency of GO. Then for the application of this new strategy, we used Mirco RNA-21 (Mir-21) as the target to evaluate this working principle of our design. When the target was hybridizing with the HP and inducing its conformation of change, an efficient isothermal circular strand-displacement polymerization reaction was activating to assist the first signal amplification. In this format, the formed complex conformation of DNA would interact with its high affinity dye, then detached from the surface of GO after incubating with the platform of GO/intercalating dye. This reaction would accompany with obvious fluorescence recovery, and accomplish farther signal enhancement by a mass of intercalating dye inserting into the minor groove of the long duplex replication product. By taking advantage of the multiple amplification of signal, this method exerted substantial enhancement in sensitivity and could be used for rapid and selective detection of Mir-21 with attomole range. It is expected that this cost-effective GO based sensor might hold considerable potential to apply in bioanalysis studies.

  11. Direct RNA detection without nucleic acid purification and PCR: Combining sandwich hybridization with signal amplification based on branched hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yao; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-05-15

    We have developed a convenient, robust and low-cost RNA detection system suitable for high-throughput applications. This system uses a highly specific sandwich hybridization to capture target RNA directly onto solid support, followed by on-site signal amplification via 2-dimensional, branched hybridizing chain polymerization through toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction. The assay uses SYBR Green to detect targets at concentrations as low as 1 pM, without involving nucleic acid purification or any enzymatic reaction, using ordinary oligonucleotides without modification or labeling. The system was demonstrated in the detection of malaria RNA in blood and GAPDH gene expression in cell lysate.

  12. Detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in chicken meat samples by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Churruca, E; Girbau, C; Martínez, I; Mateo, E; Alonso, R; Fernández-Astorga, A

    2007-06-10

    A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay based on molecular beacons was used for real-time detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in samples of chicken meat. A set of specific primers and beacon probe were designed to target the 16S rRNA of both species. The real-time NASBA protocol including the RNA isolation was valid for both of the cell suspensions in buffered saline and the artificially contaminated chicken meat samples. The presence of rRNA could be correlated with cellular viability, following inactivation of the bacteria by heating, in inoculated chicken meat samples but not in RNase-free cell suspensions.

  13. Quantum Feedback Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    Quantum amplification is essential for various quantum technologies such as communication and weak-signal detection. However, its practical use is still limited due to inevitable device fragility that brings about distortion in the output signal or state. This paper presents a general theory that solves this critical issue. The key idea is simple and easy to implement: just a passive feedback of the amplifier's auxiliary mode, which is usually thrown away. In fact, this scheme makes the controlled amplifier significantly robust, and furthermore it realizes the minimum-noise amplification even under realistic imperfections. Hence, the presented theory enables the quantum amplification to be implemented at a practical level. Also, a nondegenerate parametric amplifier subjected to a special detuning is proposed to show that, additionally, it has a broadband nature.

  14. NASBA: A detection and amplification system uniquely suited for RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sooknanan, R.; Malek, L.T.

    1995-06-01

    The invention of PCR (polymerase chain reaction) has revolutionized our ability to amplify and manipulate a nucleic acid sequence in vitro. The commercial rewards of this revolution have driven the development of other nuclei acid amplification and detection methodologies. This has created an alphabet soup of technologies that use different amplification methods, including NASBA (nucleic acid sequence-based amplification), LCR (ligase chain reaction), SDA (strand displacement amplification), QBR (Q-beta replicase), CPR (cycling probe reaction), and bDNA (branched DNA). Despite the differences in their processes, these amplification systems can be separated into two broad categories based on how they achieve their goal: sequence-based amplification systems, such as PCR, NASBA, and SDA, amplify a target nucleic acid sequence. Signal-based amplification systems, such as LCR, QBR, CPR and bDNA, amplify or alter a signal from a detection reaction that is target-dependent. While the various methods have relative strengths and weaknesses, only NASBA offers the unique ability to homogeneously amplify an RNA analyte in the presence of homologous genomic DNA under isothermal conditions. Since the detection of RNA sequences almost invariably measures biological activity, it is an excellent prognostic indicator of activities as diverse as virus production, gene expression, and cell viability. The isothermal nature of the reaction makes NASBA especially suitable for large-scale manual screening. These features extend NASBA`s application range from research to commercial diagnostic applications. Field test kits are presently under development for human diagnostics as well as the burgeoning fields of food and environmental diagnostic testing. These developments suggest future integration of NASBA into robotic workstations for high-throughput screening as well. 17 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Evaluation of cellular-phone technology with digital hearing-aid features: Effects of encoding and individualized amplification

    PubMed Central

    Mackersie, Carol L.; Qi, Yingyong; Boothroyd, Arthur; Conrad, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Multi-channel amplification was implemented within a cellular phone system and compared to a standard cellular-phone response. Three cellular phone speech-encoding strategies were evaluated: a narrow-band (3.5 kHz upper cut-off) enhanced variable-rate coder (EVRC), a narrow-band selectable-mode vocoder (SMV), and a wide-band SMV (7.5 kHz cut-off). Because the SMV encoding strategies are not yet available on phones, the processing was simulated using a computer. Individualized-amplification settings were created for 14 participants with hearing loss using NAL-NL1 targets. Overall gain was set at preferred listening levels for both the individualized-amplification setting and the standard cellular phone setting for each of the three encoders. Phoneme-recognition scores and subjective ratings (listening effort, overall quality) were obtained in quiet and in noise. Stimuli were played from loudspeakers in one room, picked up by a microphone connected to a (transmitting) computer, and sent over the internet to a receiving computer in an adjacent room, where the signal was amplified and delivered monaurally. Phoneme scores and subjective ratings were significantly higher for the individualized-amplification setting than for the standard setting in both quiet and noise. There were no significant differences among the cellular-phone encoding strategies for any measure. PMID:19927674

  16. Point of care nucleic acid detection of viable pathogenic bacteria with isothermal RNA amplification based paper biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxing; Xing, Da; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2014-09-01

    Food-borne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes have been recognized as a major cause of human infections worldwide, leading to substantial health problems. Food-borne pathogen identification needs to be simpler, cheaper and more reliable than the current traditional methods. Here, we have constructed a low-cost paper biosensor for the detection of viable pathogenic bacteria with the naked eye. In this study, an effective isothermal amplification method was used to amplify the hlyA mRNA gene, a specific RNA marker in Listeria monocytogenes. The amplification products were applied to the paper biosensor to perform a visual test, in which endpoint detection was performed using sandwich hybridization assays. When the RNA products migrated along the paper biosensor by capillary action, the gold nanoparticles accumulated at the designated Test line and Control line. Under optimized experimental conditions, as little as 0.5 pg/μL genomic RNA from Listeria monocytogenes could be detected. The whole assay process, including RNA extraction, amplification, and visualization, can be completed within several hours. The developed method is suitable for point-of-care applications to detect food-borne pathogens, as it can effectively overcome the false-positive results caused by amplifying nonviable Listeria monocytogenes.

  17. A Simple, Inexpensive Device for Nucleic Acid Amplification without Electricity—Toward Instrument-Free Molecular Diagnostics in Low-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    LaBarre, Paul; Hawkins, Kenneth R.; Gerlach, Jay; Wilmoth, Jared; Beddoe, Andrew; Singleton, Jered; Boyle, David; Weigl, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Background Molecular assays targeted to nucleic acid (NA) markers are becoming increasingly important to medical diagnostics. However, these are typically confined to wealthy, developed countries; or, to the national reference laboratories of developing-world countries. There are many infectious diseases that are endemic in low-resource settings (LRS) where the lack of simple, instrument-free, NA diagnostic tests is a critical barrier to timely treatment. One of the primary barriers to the practicality and availability of NA assays in LRS has been the complexity and power requirements of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) instrumentation (another is sample preparation). Methodology/Principal Findings In this article, we investigate the hypothesis that an electricity-free heater based on exothermic chemical reactions and engineered phase change materials can successfully incubate isothermal NA amplification assays. We assess the heater's equivalence to commercially available PCR instruments through the characterization of the temperature profiles produced, and a minimal method comparison. Versions of the prototype for several different isothermal techniques are presented. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that an electricity-free heater based on exothermic chemical reactions and engineered phase change materials can successfully incubate isothermal NA amplification assays, and that the results of those assays are not significantly different from ones incubated in parallel in commercially available PCR instruments. These results clearly suggest the potential of the non-instrumented nucleic acid amplification (NINA) heater for molecular diagnostics in LRS. When combined with other innovations in development that eliminate power requirements for sample preparation, cold reagent storage, and readout, the NINA heater will comprise part of a kit that should enable electricity-free NA testing for many important analytes. PMID:21573065

  18. Linear light-scattering of gold nanostars for versatile biosensing of nucleic acids and proteins using exonuclease III as biocatalyst to signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Ye, Jiayan; Dong, Ying

    2015-09-15

    Gold nanomaterials promise a wide range of potential applications in chemical and biological sensing, imaging, and catalysis. In this paper, we demonstrate a facile method for room-temperature synthesis of gold nanostars (AuNSs) with a size of ~50 nm via seeded growth. Significantly, the AuNSs are found to have high light-scattering properties, which are successfully used as labels for sensitive and selective detection of nucleic acids and proteins by using exonuclease III (Exo III) as a biocatalyst. For DNA detection, the binding of targets to the functionalized AuNS probes leads to the Exo III-stimulated cascade recycling amplification. As a result, a large amount of AuNSs are released from magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into solution, providing a greatly enhanced light-scattering signal for amplified sensing process. Moreover, a binding-induced DNA three-way junction (DNA TWJ) is introduced to thrombin detection, in which the binding of two aptamers to thrombin triggers assembly of the DNA motifs and initiates the subsequent DNA strand displacement reaction (SDR) and Exo III-assisted cascade recycling amplification. The detection limits of 89 fM and 5.6 pM are achieved for DNA and thrombin, respectively, which are comparable to or even exceed that of the reported isothermal amplification methods. It is noteworthy that based on the DNA TWJ strategy the sequences are independent on target proteins. Additionally, the employment of MNPs in the assays can not only simplify the operations but also improve the detection sensitivity. Therefore, the proposed amplified light-scattering assay with high sensitivity and selectivity, acceptable accuracy, and satisfactory versatility of analytes provides various applications in bioanalysis.

  19. [Recombinase Polymerase Amplification and its Applications in Parasite Detection].

    PubMed

    ZHENG, Wen-bin; WU, Yao-dong; MA, Jian-gang; ZHU, Xing-quan; ZHOU, Dong-hui

    2015-10-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is a recently -developed isothermal nucleic-acid-amplification technology that is based on the nucleic acid replication mechanism in T4 bacteriophage. With this technique, nucleic-acid templates can be amplified to measurable levels within 20 min at 37-42 °C. The. RPA process has high sensitivity and specificity, and is simple to operate, thus nucleic acids can be detected rapidly in non-laboratory conditions. Since its development in 2006, the RPA technique has been applied in agriculture, food safety, medicine, transgene detection, etc. In this review, we will give an overview on the research progress of RPA and its application in parasite detection.

  20. [Recombinase Polymerase Amplification and its Applications in Parasite Detection].

    PubMed

    ZHENG, Wen-bin; WU, Yao-dong; MA, Jian-gang; ZHU, Xing-quan; ZHOU, Dong-hui

    2015-10-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is a recently -developed isothermal nucleic-acid-amplification technology that is based on the nucleic acid replication mechanism in T4 bacteriophage. With this technique, nucleic-acid templates can be amplified to measurable levels within 20 min at 37-42 °C. The. RPA process has high sensitivity and specificity, and is simple to operate, thus nucleic acids can be detected rapidly in non-laboratory conditions. Since its development in 2006, the RPA technique has been applied in agriculture, food safety, medicine, transgene detection, etc. In this review, we will give an overview on the research progress of RPA and its application in parasite detection. PMID:26931046

  1. Detection of Vibrio cholerae by isothermal cross-priming amplification combined with nucleic acid detection strip analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Du, Xin-Jun; Guan, Chun; Li, Ping; Zheng, Wen-Jie; Wang, Shuo

    2015-08-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a water- and food-borne human pathogen, and V. cholerae serotypes O1 and O139 have attracted attention because of their severe pathogenesis. However, non-O1, non-O139 cholera vibrios (NCVs) were also recently recognized as having virulence properties. In this study, we developed a cross-priming amplification (CPA) method for the detection of all serotypes of V. cholerae. The specificity of the CPA method was tested using a panel of 60 different bacterial strains. All of the V. cholerae strains showed positive results, and 41 other types of bacteria gave negative results. The limit of detection of the CPA method was 79.28 fg of genomic DNA, 4.2 × 10(2) CFU/ml for bacteria in pure culture, and 5.6 CFU per 25 g of sample with pre-enrichment. This method showed a higher sensitivity than the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method did and was more convenient to perform. These results indicate that the CPA method can be used for the rapid preliminary screening of V. cholerae.

  2. Amplification-Free Detection of Circulating microRNA Biomarkers from Body Fluids Based on Fluorogenic Oligonucleotide-Templated Reaction between Engineered Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes: Application to Prostate Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Gavin A D; Shibakawa, Akifumi; Patel, Hinesh; Sita-Lumsden, Ailsa; Zivi, Andrea; Rama, Nona; Bevan, Charlotte L; Ladame, Sylvain

    2016-08-16

    Highly abundant in cells, microRNAs (or miRs) play a key role as regulators of gene expression. A proportion of them are also detectable in biofluids making them ideal noninvasive biomarkers for pathologies in which miR levels are aberrantly expressed, such as cancer. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are engineered uncharged oligonucleotide analogues capable of hybridizing to complementary nucleic acids with high affinity and high specificity. Herein, novel PNA-based fluorogenic biosensors have been designed and synthesized that target miR biomarkers for prostate cancer (PCa). The sensing strategy is based on oligonucleotide-templated reactions where the only miR of interest serves as a matrix to catalyze an otherwise highly unfavorable fluorogenic reaction. Validated in vitro using synthetic RNAs, these newly developed biosensors were then shown to detect endogenous concentrations of miR in human blood samples without the need for any amplification step and with minimal sample processing. This low-cost, quantitative, and versatile sensing technology has been technically validated using gold-standard RT-qPCR. Compared to RT-qPCR however, this enzyme-free, isothermal blood test is amenable to incorporation into low-cost portable devices and could therefore be suitable for widespread public screening. PMID:27498854

  3. A regulatory gene (ccaR) required for cephamycin and clavulanic acid production in Streptomyces clavuligerus: amplification results in overproduction of both beta-lactam compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Llarena, F J; Liras, P; Rodríguez-García, A; Martín, J F

    1997-01-01

    A regulatory gene (ccaR), located within the cephamycin gene cluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus, is linked to a gene (blp) encoding a protein similar to a beta-lactamase-inhibitory protein. Expression of ccaR is required for cephamycin and clavulanic acid biosynthesis in S. clavuligerus. The ccaR-encoded protein resembles the ActII-ORF4, RedD, AfsR, and DnrI regulatory proteins of other Streptomyces species, all of which share several motifs. Disruption of ccaR by targeted double recombination resulted in the loss of the ability to synthesize cephamycin and clavulanic acid. Complementation of the disrupted mutant with ccaR restored production of both secondary metabolites. ccaR was expressed as a monocistronic transcript at 24 and 48 h in S. clavuligerus cultures (preceding the phase of antibiotic accumulation), but no transcript hybridization signals were observed at 72 or 96 h. This expression pattern is consistent with those of regulatory proteins required for antibiotic biosynthesis. Amplification of ccaR in S. clavuligerus resulted in a two- to threefold increase in the production of cephamycin and clavulanic acid. PMID:9068654

  4. Commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Warshay, M.; Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the current commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development efforts is presented. In both the electric utility and on-site integrated energy system applications, reducing cost and increasing reliability are the technology drivers at this time. The longstanding barrier to the attainment of these goals, which manifests itself in a number of ways, has been materials. The differences in approach among the three major participants (United Technologies Corporation (UTC), Westinghouse Electric Corporation/Energy Research Corporation (ERC), and Engelhard Industries) and their unique technological features, including electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, fuel selection and system design philosophy are discussed.

  5. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 15. Liming acidic surface waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olem, H.; Thornelof, E.; Sandoy, S.; Schreiber, R.K.

    1990-09-01

    The document describes the science and technology of aquatic liming--a method for improving the water quality of acidic surface waters to restore or enhance fisheries. The report is a comprehensive compilation of years of research in North America and Europe by dozens of scientists. Several mitigation technologies--including those that have only been proposed--are critically evaluated along with the effects of liming on water chemistry and aquatic biota. Through these evaluations, the state of the science and technology of aquatic liming is identified for the reader. Whole-lake liming is now recognized as a valuable management tool for acidic surface waters and their fisheries. However, some liming technologies are considered experimental and will need further evaluation. Distinctions between technologies are included--as is the distinction between liming acidic surface waters and reducing acidifying emissions.

  6. Nucleic acid detection technologies and marker molecules in bacterial diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Ott; Glynn, Barry; Kurg, Ants

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing need for quick and reliable methods for microorganism detection and identification worldwide. Although traditional culture-based technologies are trustworthy and accurate at a relatively low cost, they are also time- and labor-consuming and are limited to culturable bacteria. Those weaknesses have created a necessity for alternative technologies that are capable for faster and more precise bacterial identification from medical, food or environmental samples. The most common current approach is to analyze the nucleic acid component of analyte solution and determine the bacterial composition according to the specific nucleic acid profiles that are present. This review aims to give an up-to-date overview of different nucleic acid target sequences and respective analytical technologies.

  7. [Advance in loop-mediated isothermal amplification technique and its applications in point-of-care testing platforms].

    PubMed

    Guan, Li; Ma, Xue-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel in vitro nucleic acid amplification method conducted under isothermal conditions with the advantages of high specificity, sensitivity, rapidity and easy detection. Since it was established in 2000, it has been widely applied in various fields of analytical science including the diagnosis of a variety of pathogens, identification of embryo sex, detection of genetically modified organisms and cancer gene identification. Additionally, significant progress has been made in the optimization of the LAMP method, such as accelerated reactions, simplified sample processing, the realization of multiplex amplification, and the enhanced specificity of reaction and detection methods. LAMP technology also shows much potential to be adopted as part of point-of-care testing platforms by the micromation, automation and integration with other technologies such as Lab-on-a-Chip and digital nucleic acid amplification. This review summarizes the latest advances in the LAMP technique and its applications in developing point-of-care testing platforms.

  8. Comparison of an rRNA‐based and DNA‐based nucleic acid amplification test for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in trachoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jon L; Schachter, Julius; Moncada, Jeanne; Habte, Dereje; Zerihun, Mulat; House, Jenafir I; Zhou, Zhaoxia; Hong, Kevin C; Maxey, Kathryn; Gaynor, Bruce D; Lietman, Thomas M

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim The World Health Organisation (WHO) hopes to achieve global elimination of trachoma, still the leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide, in part through mass antibiotic treatment. DNA‐based nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are currently used to evaluate the success of treatment programmes by measuring the prevalence of C trachomatis infection. Some believe that newer ribosomal RNA (rRNA)‐based tests may be much more sensitive since bacterial rRNA is present in amounts up to 10 000 times that of genomic DNA. Others believe that rRNA‐based tests are instead less sensitive but more specific, due to the presence of dead or subviable organisms that the test may not detect. This study compares an rRNA‐based test to a DNA‐based test for the detection of ocular C trachomatis infection in children living in trachoma‐endemic villages. Methods An rRNA‐based amplification test and DNA‐based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed on swab specimens taken from the right upper tarsal conjunctiva of 56 children aged 0–10 years living in two villages in Amhara, Ethiopia. Results The rRNA‐based test detected ocular C trachomatis infection in 35 (63%) subjects compared with 22 (39%) detected by PCR (McNemar's test, p = 0.0002). The rRNA‐based test gave positive results for all subjects that were positive by PCR, and also detected infection in 13 (23%) additional subjects. Conclusion The rRNA‐based test appears to have significantly greater sensitivity than PCR for the detection of ocular chlamydial infection in children in trachoma‐endemic villages. Using the rRNA‐based test, we may be able to detect infection that was previously missed with PCR. Past studies using DNA‐based tests to assess prevalence of infectious trachoma following antibiotic treatment may have underestimated the true prevalence of infection. PMID:17050583

  9. Advanced Technologies in Sialic Acid and Sialoglycoconjugate Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Ken; Varki, Nissi; Sato, Chihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although the structural diversity of sialic acid (Sia) is rapidly expanding, understanding of its biological significance has lagged behind. Advanced technologies to detect and probe diverse structures of Sia are absolutely necessary not only to understand further biological significance but also to pursue medicinal and industrial applications. Here we describe analytical methods for detection of Sia that have recently been developed or improved, with a special focus on 9-O-acetylated N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5,9Ac), N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), deaminoneuraminic acid (Kdn), O-sulfated Sia (SiaS), and di-, oligo-, and polysialic acid (diSia/oligoSia/polySia) in glycoproteins and glycolipids. Much more attention has been paid to these Sia and sialoglycoconjugates during the last decade, in terms of regulation of the immune system, neural development and function, tumorigenesis, and aging.

  10. A label-free fluorescent probe based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Tian, Jianniao; Ma, Yefei; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-11-01

    A number of specific nucleic acids are closely related with many serious diseases, in the current research, a platform taking advantage of exonuclease III (Exo III) to realize double recycling amplification and label-free fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) for detecting of nucleic acid had been developed. In this method, a molecular beacon (MB) with 3'-protruding termini and a single-stranded cytosine-rich (C-rich) probe were designed that coexist stably with Exo III. Once the target DNA appeared, portion of the MB could hybridize with target DNA and was digested by Exo III, which allowed the release of target DNA and a residual sequence. Subsequently, the residual sequence could trigger the Exo III to digest C-rich probe, and the DNA-AgNCs was not able to be synthesized because of the C-rich probe was destroyed; finally the fluorescent of solution was quenched. This assay enables to monitor human hemochromatosis gene (as a model) with high sensitivity, the detection limit is as low as 120 pM compared with other fluorescence DNA-AgNCs methods, this assay also exhibits superior specificity even against single base mismatch. The strategy is applied to detect human hemochromatosis gene in real human serum samples successfully. PMID:26572843

  11. A label-free fluorescent probe based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Tian, Jianniao; Ma, Yefei; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-11-01

    A number of specific nucleic acids are closely related with many serious diseases, in the current research, a platform taking advantage of exonuclease III (Exo III) to realize double recycling amplification and label-free fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) for detecting of nucleic acid had been developed. In this method, a molecular beacon (MB) with 3'-protruding termini and a single-stranded cytosine-rich (C-rich) probe were designed that coexist stably with Exo III. Once the target DNA appeared, portion of the MB could hybridize with target DNA and was digested by Exo III, which allowed the release of target DNA and a residual sequence. Subsequently, the residual sequence could trigger the Exo III to digest C-rich probe, and the DNA-AgNCs was not able to be synthesized because of the C-rich probe was destroyed; finally the fluorescent of solution was quenched. This assay enables to monitor human hemochromatosis gene (as a model) with high sensitivity, the detection limit is as low as 120 pM compared with other fluorescence DNA-AgNCs methods, this assay also exhibits superior specificity even against single base mismatch. The strategy is applied to detect human hemochromatosis gene in real human serum samples successfully.

  12. DNA extraction, preservation, and amplification.

    PubMed

    Knebelsberger, Thomas; Stöger, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of DNA barcoding as a routine practice in biodiversity research is strongly dependent on the quality of the source material, DNA extraction method, and selection of adequate primers in combination with optimized polymerase chain reaction (PCR) conditions. For the isolation of nucleic acids, silica-gel membrane methods are to be favored because they are easy to handle, applicable for high sample throughput, relatively inexpensive, and provide high DNA quality, quantity, and purity which are pre-requisites for successful PCR amplification and long-term storage of nucleic acids in biorepositories, such as DNA banks. In this section, standard protocols and workflow schemes for sample preparation, DNA isolation, DNA storage, PCR amplification, PCR product quality control, and PCR product cleanup are proposed and described in detail. A PCR troubleshooting and primer design section may help to solve problems that hinder successful amplification of the desired barcoding gene region.

  13. Technology and economic assessment of lactic acid production and uses

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, R.; Tsai, S.P.

    1996-03-01

    Lactic acid has been an intermediate-volume specialty chemical (world production {approximately}50,000 tons/yr) used in a wide range of food-processing and industrial applications. Potentially, it can become a very large-volume, commodity-chemical intermediate produced from carbohydrates for feedstocks of biodegradable polymers, oxygenated chemicals, environmentally friendly ``green`` solvents, and other intermediates. In the past, efficient and economical technologies for the recovery and purification of lactic acid from fermentation broths and its conversion to the chemical or polymer intermediates had been the key technology impediments and main process cost centers. Development and deployment of novel separations technologies, such as electrodialysis with bipolar membranes, extractive and catalytic distillations, and chemical conversion, can enable low-cost production with continuous processes in large-scale operations. The emerging technologies can use environmentally sound lactic acid processes to produce environmentally useful products, with attractive process economics. These technology advances and recent product and process commercialization strategies are reviewed and assessed.

  14. Enzymatic electrochemical detection of epidemic-causing Vibrio cholerae with a disposable oligonucleotide-modified screen-printed bisensor coupled to a dry-reagent-based nucleic acid amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Choo Yee; Ang, Geik Yong; Chan, Kok Gan; Banga Singh, Kirnpal Kaur; Chan, Yean Yean

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we developed a nucleic acid-sensing platform in which a simple, dry-reagent-based nucleic acid amplification assay is combined with a portable multiplex electrochemical genosensor. Preparation of an amplification reaction mix targeting multiple DNA regions of interest is greatly simplified because the lyophilized reagents need only be reconstituted with ultrapure water before the DNA sample is added. The presence of single or multiple target DNAs causes the corresponding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) amplicons to be generated and tagged with a fluorescein label. The fluorescein-labeled ssDNA amplicons are then analyzed using capture probe-modified screen-printed gold electrode bisensors. Enzymatic amplification of the hybridization event is achieved through the catalytic production of electroactive α-naphthol by anti-fluorescein-conjugated alkaline phosphatase. The applicability of this platform as a diagnostic tool is demonstrated with the detection of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139, which are associated with cholera epidemics and pandemics. The platform showed excellent diagnostic sensitivity and specificity (100%) when challenged with 168 spiked stool samples. The limit of detection was low (10 colony-forming units/ml) for both toxigenic V. cholerae serogroups. A heat stability assay revealed that the dry-reagent amplification reaction mix was stable at temperatures of 4-56 °C, with an estimated shelf life of seven months. The findings of this study highlight the potential of combining a dry-reagent-based nucleic acid amplification assay with an electrochemical genosensor in a more convenient, sensitive, and sequence-specific detection strategy for multiple target nucleic acids.

  15. Hybrid Chirped Pulse Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Barty, C P J

    2002-05-07

    We present a novel chirped pulse amplification method which combines optical parametric amplification and laser amplification. We have demonstrated this hybrid CPA concept with a combination of beta-barium borate and Ti:sapphire. High-efficiency, multi-terawatt compatible amplification is achieved without gain narrowing and without electro-optic modulators using a simple commercial pump laser.

  16. Full scale phosphoric acid fuel cell stack technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.; Faroque, M.

    1984-01-01

    The technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cells is summarized. The preparation, heat treatment, and characterization of carbon composites used as bipolar separator plates are described. Characterization included resistivity, porosity, and electrochemical corrosion. High density glassy carbon/graphite composites performed well in long-term fuel cell endurance tests. Platinum alloy cathode catalysts and low-loaded platinum electrodes were evaluated in 25 sq cm cells. Although the alloys displayed an initial improvement, some of this improvement diminished after a few thousand hours of testing. Low platinum loading (0.12 mg/sq cm anodes and 0.3 mg/sq cm cathodes) performed nearly as well as twice this loading. A selectively wetproofed anode backing paper was tested in a 5 by 15 inch three-cell stack. This material may provide for acid volume expansion, acid storage, and acid lateral distribution.

  17. Technological progress in sealed lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, J.; Nakashima, H.; Kasai, Y.

    A brief review is given of the history of the research and development of sealed lead/acid batteries during the 30 years since, in 1959, the Yuasa Battery Co. introduced a small-sized sealed battery as the power supply for portable television sets. In 1965, Yuasa began the full-scale mass production and sale of a small-sized sealed lead/acid battery under the NOYPER brand. In 1970, the use of a PbCa alloy grid was adopted, and there followed the successful development of a sealed battery with an oxygen-recombination facility. In 1976, Yuasa more or less established the basic technology for the valve-regulated sealed lead/acid battery — the NP battery — which is now the type in general use. Throughout the 1980s, Yuasa, has continued development in order to expand the sphere of application for the production technology of valve-regulated batteries for motorcycles, as well as for stationary duties with large capacities of 100 to 3000 A h. Recently, in order to improve the reliability and boost the output of sealed lead/acid batteries for employment in UPS power sources, Yuasa has been working intently on the design of a valve-regulated lead/acid battery with outstanding characteristics for high-rate discharge and resistance to high temperatures.

  18. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant (phase 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1979-01-01

    The status of technology for the manufacturing and testing of 1200 sq. cm cell materials, components, and stacks for on-site integrated energy systems is assessed. Topics covered include: (1) preparation of thin layers of silicon carbide; (2) definition and control schemes for volume changes in phosphoric acid fuel cells; (3) preparation of low resin content graphite phenolic resin composites; (4) chemical corrosion of graphite-phenolic resin composites in hot phosphoric acid; (5) analysis of electrical resistance of composite materials for fuel cells; and (6) fuel cell performance and testing.

  19. Technological and economic potential of poly(lactic acid) and lactic acid derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, R.; Tsai, S.P.; Bonsignore, P.; Moon, S.H.; Frank, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    Lactic acid has been an intermediate-volume specialty chemical (world production {approximately}40,000 tons/yr) used in a wide range of food processing and industrial applications. lactic acid h,as the potential of becoming a very large volume, commodity-chemical intermediate produced from renewable carbohydrates for use as feedstocks for biodegradable polymers, oxygenated chemicals, plant growth regulators, environmentally friendly ``green`` solvents, and specially chemical intermediates. In the past, efficient and economical technologies for the recovery and purification of lactic acid from crude fermentation broths and the conversion of tactic acid to the chemical or polymer intermediates had been the key technology impediments and main process cost centers. The development and deployment of novel separations technologies, such as electrodialysis (ED) with bipolar membranes, extractive distillations integrated with fermentation, and chemical conversion, can enable low-cost production with continuous processes in large-scale operations. The use of bipolar ED can virtually eliminate the salt or gypsum waste produced in the current lactic acid processes. In this paper, the recent technical advances in tactic and polylactic acid processes are discussed. The economic potential and manufacturing cost estimates of several products and process options are presented. The technical accomplishments at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the future directions of this program at ANL are discussed.

  20. [Viral safety of biologicals: evaluation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) assay and development of concentration method of HCV for sensitive detection by NAT].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Eriko; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-01

    The most important issue for the safety of biological products and blood products derived from human sources is how to prevent transmission of infectious agents. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major public health problem due to its high prevalence. HCV is mainly transmitted by exposure to blood and highly infectious during the early window period with extremely low viral loads. Therefore it is important to develop more sensitive detection methods for HCV. In the case of blood products, both serological test and nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) are required to detect HCV. Since NAT is highly sensitive, establishment of a new standard is required for validation of NAT assay. NAT guideline and establishment of the standard for HCV RNA and HCV genotype panel is introduced in this review. On the other hand, to enhance the sensitivity of virus detection by NAT, a novel viral concentration method using polyethyleneimine (PEI)-conjugated magnetic beads (PEI beads) was developed. PEI beads concentration method is applicable to a wide range of viruses including HCV. Studies using the national standard for HCV RNA, HCV genotype panel and seroconversion panel, suggest that virus concentration method using PEI-beads is useful for improvement of the sensitivity of HCV detection by NAT and applicable to donor screening for HCV.

  1. Development of Real-Time Multiplex Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification for Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Legionella spp. in Respiratory Specimens▿

    PubMed Central

    Loens, K.; Beck, T.; Ursi, D.; Overdijk, M.; Sillekens, P.; Goossens, H.; Ieven, M.

    2008-01-01

    Real-time multiplex isothermal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) was developed to detect Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Legionella spp. in respiratory specimens using the NucliSens Basic Kit (bioMérieux, Boxtel, The Netherlands). Oligonucleotide primers were derived from the M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila 16S rRNA. For real-time detection, molecular beacons were used. Specificity was established on a panel of bacterial strains. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was determined by testing dilutions of wild-type in vitro-generated RNA in water and dilutions of reference strains in lysis buffer or added to pools of respiratory specimens. Subsequently, a limited number of M. pneumoniae-, C. pneumoniae-, and L. pneumophila-positive and -negative clinical specimens were analyzed. Specific detection of the 16S rRNA of the three organisms was achieved. The analytical sensitivity of the multiplex NASBA on spiked respiratory specimens was slightly diminished compared to the results obtained with the single-target (mono) real-time assays. We conclude that the proposed real-time multiplex NASBA assay, although less sensitive than the real-time mono NASBA assay, is a promising tool for the detection of M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, and Legionella spp. in respiratory specimens, regarding handling, speed, and number of samples that can be analyzed in a single run. PMID:18032625

  2. Comparative detection of rotavirus RNA by conventional RT-PCR, TaqMan RT-PCR and real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Mo, Qiu-Hua; Wang, Hai-Bo; Tan, Hua; Wu, Bi-Mei; Feng, Zi-Li; Wang, Qi; Lin, Ji-Can; Yang, Ze

    2015-03-01

    Rotavirus is one of the major viral pathogens leading to diarrhea. Diagnosis has been conducted by either traditional cultural, serological methods or molecular biology techniques, which include RT-PCR and nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA). However, their differences regarding accuracy and sensitivity remain unknown. In this study, an in-house conventional RT-PCR assay and more importantly, an in-house real-time NASBA (RT-NASBA) were established, and compared with a commercial TaqMan RT-PCR assay. The results showed that all of these methods were able to detect and distinguish rotavirus from other diarrhea viruses with a 100% concordance rate during the course of an evaluation on 20 clinical stool samples. However, RT-NASBA was much quicker than the other two methods. More importantly, the limit of detection of RT-NASBA could reach seven copies per reaction and was one to two logs lower than that of conventional RT-PCR and TaqMan RT-PCR. These results indicate that this in-house assay was more sensitive, and thus could be used as an efficient diagnosis tool for rotavirus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct comparison among three different assays for the detection of rotavirus. These findings would provide implication for the rational selection of diagnosis tool for rotavirus.

  3. Point-Counterpoint: A Nucleic Acid Amplification Test for Streptococcus pyogenes Should Replace Antigen Detection and Culture for Detection of Bacterial Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Pritt, Bobbi S; Patel, Robin; Kirn, Thomas J; Thomson, Richard B

    2016-10-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have frequently been the standard diagnostic approach when specific infectious agents are sought in a clinic specimen. They can be applied for specific agents such as S. pyogenes, or commercial multiplex NAATs for detection of a variety of pathogens in gastrointestinal, bloodstream, and respiratory infections may be used. NAATs are both rapid and sensitive. For many years, S. pyogenes testing algorithms used a rapid and specific group A streptococcal antigen test to screen throat specimens, followed, in some clinical settings, by a throat culture for S. pyogenes to increase the sensitivity of its detection. Now S. pyogenes NAATs are being used with increasing frequency. Given their accuracy, rapidity, and ease of use, should they replace antigen detection and culture for the detection of bacterial pharyngitis? Bobbi Pritt and Robin Patel of the Mayo Clinic, where S. pyogenes NAATs have been used for well over a decade with great success, will explain the advantages of this approach, while Richard (Tom) Thomson and Tom Kirn of the NorthShore University HealthSystem will discuss their concerns about this approach to diagnosing bacterial pharyngitis.

  4. Quantitation of HIV-1 RNA viral load using nucleic acid sequence based amplification methodology and comparison with other surrogate markers for disease progression.

    PubMed

    Sitnik, R; Pinho, J R

    1998-01-01

    In this study, HIV-1 viral blood quantitation determined by Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA) was compared with other surrogate disease progression markers (antigen p24, CD4/CD8 cell counts and beta-2 microglobulin) in 540 patients followed up at São Paulo, SP, Brazil. HIV-1 RNA detection was statistically associated with the presence of antigen p24, but the viral RNA was also detected in 68% of the antigen p24 negative samples, confirming that NASBA is much more sensitive than the determination of antigen p24. Regarding other surrogate markers, no statistically significant association with the detection of viral RNA was found. The reproducibility of this viral load assay was assessed by 14 runs of the same sample, using different reagents batches. Viral load values in this sample ranged from 5.83 to 6.27 log (CV = 36%), less than the range (0.5 log) established to the determination of significant viral load changes. PMID:9698880

  5. Development of conventional and real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assays for detection of Chlamydophila pneumoniae in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Loens, K; Beck, T; Goossens, H; Ursi, D; Overdijk, M; Sillekens, P; Ieven, M

    2006-04-01

    Isothermal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) was applied to the detection of Chlamydophila pneumoniae 16S rRNA by using the NucliSens basic kit (bioMérieux, Boxtel, The Netherlands). The assay was originally developed as a conventional NASBA assay with electrochemiluminescence detection and was subsequently adapted to a real-time NASBA format by using a molecular beacon. C. pneumoniae RNA prepared from a plasmid construct was used to assess the analytical sensitivity of the assay. The sensitivity of the NASBA assay was 10 molecules of in vitro wild-type C. pneumoniae RNA and 0.1 inclusion-forming unit (IFU) of C. pneumoniae. In spiked respiratory specimens, the sensitivity of the C. pneumoniae NASBA assay varied between 0.1 and 1 IFU/100 mul sample, depending on the type of specimen. Finally, conventional and real-time NASBA were applied to respiratory specimens previously tested by PCR. A 100% concordance between the test results was obtained.

  6. Arabidopsis Triphosphate Tunnel Metalloenzyme2 Is a Negative Regulator of the Salicylic Acid-Mediated Feedback Amplification Loop for Defense Responses1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ung, Huoi; Moeder, Wolfgang; Yoshioka, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    The triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme (TTM) superfamily represents a group of enzymes that is characterized by their ability to hydrolyze a range of tripolyphosphate substrates. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) encodes three TTM genes, AtTTM1, AtTTM2, and AtTTM3. Although AtTTM3 has previously been reported to have tripolyphosphatase activity, recombinantly expressed AtTTM2 unexpectedly exhibited pyrophosphatase activity. AtTTM2 knockout mutant plants exhibit an enhanced hypersensitive response, elevated pathogen resistance against both virulent and avirulent pathogens, and elevated accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) upon infection. In addition, stronger systemic acquired resistance compared with wild-type plants was observed. These enhanced defense responses are dependent on SA, PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT4, and NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1. Despite their enhanced pathogen resistance, ttm2 plants did not display constitutively active defense responses, suggesting that AtTTM2 is not a conventional negative regulator but a negative regulator of the amplification of defense responses. The transcriptional suppression of AtTTM2 by pathogen infection or treatment with SA or the systemic acquired resistance activator benzothiadiazole further supports this notion. Such transcriptional regulation is conserved among TTM2 orthologs in the crop plants soybean (Glycine max) and canola (Brassica napus), suggesting that TTM2 is involved in immunity in a wide variety of plant species. This indicates the possible usage of TTM2 knockout mutants for agricultural applications to generate pathogen-resistant crop plants. PMID:25185123

  7. Selective adsorption and chiral amplification of amino acids in vermiculite clay-implications for the origin of biochirality.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Donald G; Fitz, Daniel; Jakschitz, T; Rode, Bernd M

    2011-01-21

    Smectite clays are hydrated layer silicates that, like micas, occur naturally in abundance. Importantly, they have readily modifiable interlayer spaces that provide excellent sites for nanochemistry. Vermiculite is one such smectite clay and in the presence of small chain-length alkyl-NH(3)Cl ions forms sensitive, 1-D ordered model clay systems with expandable nano-pore inter-layer regions. These inter-layers readily adsorb organic molecules. n-Propyl NH(3)Cl vermiculite clay gels were used to determine the adsorption of alanine, lysine and histidine by chiral HPLC. The results show that during reaction with fresh vermiculite interlayers, significant chiral enrichment of either L- and D-enantiomers occurs depending on the amino acid. Chiral enrichment of the supernatant solutions is up to about 1% per pass. In contrast, addition to clay interlayers already reacted with amino acid solutions resulted in little or no change in D/L ratio during the time of the experiment. Adsorption of small amounts of amphiphilic organic molecules in clay inter-layers is known to produce Layer-by-Layer or Langmuir-Blodgett films. Moreover atomistic simulations show that self-organization of organic species in clay interlayers is important. These non-centrosymmetric, chirally active nanofilms may cause clays to act subsequently as chiral amplifiers, concentrating organic material from dilute solution and having different adsorption energetics for D- and L-enantiomers. The additional role of clays in RNA oligomerization already postulated by Ferris and others, together with the need for the organization of amphiphilic molecules and lipids noted by Szostak and others, suggests that such chiral separation by clays in lagoonal environments at normal biological temperatures might also have played a significant role in the origin of biochirality.

  8. Detection of Aspergillus fumigatus in a rat model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Park, Steven; Warn, Peter; Shrief, Raghdaa; Harrison, Elizabeth; Perlin, David S

    2010-04-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of Aspergillus from clinical samples may facilitate the early diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). A real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) method was investigated by use of an inhalational rat model of IPA. Immunosuppressed male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to Aspergillus fumigatus spores for an hour in an aerosol chamber. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, lung tissues, and whole blood were collected from five infected rats at 1, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h postinfection and five uninfected rats at the end of the experiment. Total nucleic acid (TNA) was extracted on an easyMAG instrument. A primer-molecular beacon set targeting 28S rRNA was designed to detect Aspergillus spp. The results were compared to those of quantitative PCR (qPCR) (18S rDNA) and quantitative culture. The analytical sensitivity of the real-time NASBA assay was <1 CFU/assay. A linear range of detection was demonstrated over 5 log units of conidia (10 to 10(5) spores). Both NASBA and qPCR showed a progressive increase in lung tissue burdens, while the CFU counts were stable over time. The fungal burdens in BAL fluid were more variable and not indicative of a progressive infection. The results of both real-time assays correlated well for both sample types (r = 0.869 and P < 0.0001 for lung tissue, r = 0.887 and P < 0.0001 for BAL fluid). For all whole-blood specimens, NASBA identified Aspergillus-positive samples in the group from which samples were collected at 72 h postinfection (three of five samples) and the group from which samples were collected at 96 h postinfection (five of five samples), but no positive results were obtained by culture or PCR. Real-time NASBA is highly sensitive and useful for the detection of Aspergillus in an experimental model of IPA. PMID:20129972

  9. Detection of Aspergillus fumigatus in a rat model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Park, Steven; Warn, Peter; Shrief, Raghdaa; Harrison, Elizabeth; Perlin, David S

    2010-04-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of Aspergillus from clinical samples may facilitate the early diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). A real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) method was investigated by use of an inhalational rat model of IPA. Immunosuppressed male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to Aspergillus fumigatus spores for an hour in an aerosol chamber. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, lung tissues, and whole blood were collected from five infected rats at 1, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h postinfection and five uninfected rats at the end of the experiment. Total nucleic acid (TNA) was extracted on an easyMAG instrument. A primer-molecular beacon set targeting 28S rRNA was designed to detect Aspergillus spp. The results were compared to those of quantitative PCR (qPCR) (18S rDNA) and quantitative culture. The analytical sensitivity of the real-time NASBA assay was <1 CFU/assay. A linear range of detection was demonstrated over 5 log units of conidia (10 to 10(5) spores). Both NASBA and qPCR showed a progressive increase in lung tissue burdens, while the CFU counts were stable over time. The fungal burdens in BAL fluid were more variable and not indicative of a progressive infection. The results of both real-time assays correlated well for both sample types (r = 0.869 and P < 0.0001 for lung tissue, r = 0.887 and P < 0.0001 for BAL fluid). For all whole-blood specimens, NASBA identified Aspergillus-positive samples in the group from which samples were collected at 72 h postinfection (three of five samples) and the group from which samples were collected at 96 h postinfection (five of five samples), but no positive results were obtained by culture or PCR. Real-time NASBA is highly sensitive and useful for the detection of Aspergillus in an experimental model of IPA.

  10. Chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Elkin, Chris

    2006-05-09

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  11. Portable nucleic acid thermocyclers.

    PubMed

    Almassian, David R; Cockrell, Lisa M; Nelson, William M

    2013-11-21

    A nucleic acid thermal cycler is considered to be portable if it is under ten pounds, easily carried by one individual, and battery powered. Nucleic acid amplification includes both polymerase chain reaction (e.g. PCR, RT-PCR) and isothermal amplification (e.g. RPA, HDA, LAMP, NASBA, RCA, ICAN, SMART, SDA). There are valuable applications for portable nucleic acid thermocyclers in fields that include clinical diagnostics, biothreat detection, and veterinary testing. A system that is portable allows for the distributed detection of targets at the point of care and a reduction of the time from sample to answer. The designer of a portable nucleic acid thermocycler must carefully consider both thermal control and the detection of amplification. In addition to thermal control and detection, the designer may consider the integration of a sample preparation subsystem with the nucleic acid thermocycler. There are a variety of technologies that can achieve accurate thermal control and the detection of nucleic acid amplification. Important evaluation criteria for each technology include maturity, power requirements, cost, sensitivity, speed, and manufacturability. Ultimately the needs of a particular market will lead to user requirements that drive the decision between available technologies.

  12. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for the rapid detection of Mycoplasma genitalium.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thomas; Burke, Patricia; Smalley, Helen B; Gillies, Liz; Longhurst, Denise; Vipond, Barry; Hobbs, Glyn

    2015-09-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a sexually transmissible, pathogenic bacterium and a significant cause of nongonococcal urethritis in both men and women. Due to the difficulty of the culture of M. genitalium from clinical samples, the laboratory diagnosis of M. genitalium infection is almost exclusively carried out using nucleic acid amplification tests. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel nucleic acid amplification technology, utilising a set of 4 primers specific to 6 distinct regions of the target DNA sequence, in order to amplify target DNA in a highly specific and rapid manner. A LAMP assay was designed to the pdhD gene of M. genitalium, and the limit of detection of the assay was determined as 10 fg of M. genitalium genomic DNA, equating to ~16 copies of the M. genitalium genome, which was equally sensitive as a gold standard 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction assay. PMID:26072150

  13. Concordance study between one-step nucleic acid amplification and morphologic techniques to detect lymph node metastasis in papillary carcinoma of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    del Carmen, Sofía; Gatius, Sonia; Franch-Arcas, Guzmán; Baena, José Antonio; Gonzalez, Oscar; Zafon, Carlos; Cuevas, Dolors; Valls, Joan; Pérez, Angustias; Martinez, Mercedes; Ros, Susana; Macías, Carmen García; Iglesias, Carmela; Matías-Guiu, Xavier; de Álava, Enrique

    2016-02-01

    Tumor resection in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is often accompanied by lymph node (LN) removal of the central and lateral cervical compartments. One-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) is a polymerase chain reaction-based technique that quantifies cytokeratin 19 (CK19) messenger RNA copies. Our aim is to assess the value of OSNA in detection of LN metastases in PTC, in comparison with imprints and microscopic analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. A total of 387 LNs from 37 patients were studied. From each half LN, 2 imprints were taken and analyzed with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and CK19 immunostaining. One half of the LN was submitted to OSNA and one half to FFPE processing and H&E and CK19 staining. For concordance analysis, every single LN was considered as a case. A group of 11 cases with discordant results between OSNA and H&E/CK19 FFPE sections were subjected to additional FFPE serial sectioning and H&E and CK19 staining. We found a high degree of concordance between the assays used, with sensitivities ranging from 0.81 to 0.95, and specificities ranging from 0.87 and 0.98. OSNA allowed upstaging of patients from pN0 to pN1, in comparison with standard pathologic analysis. Identification of a metastatic LN with more than 15000 CK19 messenger RNA copies predicted the presence of a second LN with macrometastasis (<5000 copies). In summary, the study shows that OSNA application in sentinel or suspicious LN may be helpful in assessing nodal status in PTC patients.

  14. Evaluation of a viral microarray based on simultaneous extraction and amplification of viral nucleotide acid for detecting human herpesviruses and enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Duan, Chunhong; Zhang, Chunxiu; Yang, Xiaomeng; Zhao, Yan; Dong, Rui; Zhou, Jiajing; Gai, Zhongtao

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a viral microarray based assay was developed to detect the human herpesviruses and enteroviruses associated with central nervous system infections, including herpes simplex virus type 1, type 2 (HSV1 and HSV2), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), enterovirus 71 (EV71), coxsackievirus A 16 (CA16) and B 5(CB5). The DNA polymerase gene of human herpesviruses and 5'-untranslated region of enteroviruses were selected as the targets to design primers and probes. Human herpesviruses DNA and enteroviruses RNA were extracted simultaneously by using a guanidinium thiocyanate acid buffer, and were subsequently amplified through a biotinylated asymmetry multiplex RT-PCR with the specific primer of enteroviruses. In total, 90 blood samples and 49 cerebrospinal fluids samples with suspected systemic or neurological virus infections were investigated. Out of 139 samples, 66 were identified as positive. The specificities of this multiplex RT-PCR microarray assay were over 96% but the sensitivities were various from 100% for HSV1, HSV2, EV71 and CB5, 95.83% for CMV, 80% for EBV to 71.43% for CA16 in comparison with reference standards of TaqMan qPCR/qRT-PCR. The high Kappa values (>0.90) from HSV1, HSV2, CMV, EV71 and CB5 were obtained, indicating almost perfect agreement in term of the 5 viruses detection. But lower Kappa values for EBV (0.63) and CA16 (0.74) displayed a moderate to substantial agreement. This study provides an innovation of simultaneous extraction, amplification, hybridization and detection of DNA viruses and RNA viruses with simplicity and specificity, and demonstrates a potential clinical utility for a variety of viruses' detection.

  15. Establishment of the 1st World Health Organization International Standard for Plasmodium falciparum DNA for nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays

    PubMed Central

    Padley, David J; Heath, Alan B; Sutherland, Colin; Chiodini, Peter L; Baylis, Sally A

    2008-01-01

    Background In order to harmonize results for the detection and quantification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA by nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays, a World Health Organization (WHO) collaborative study was performed, evaluating a series of candidate standard preparations. Methods Fourteen laboratories from 10 different countries participated in the collaborative study. Four candidate preparations based upon blood samples parasitaemic for P. falciparum were evaluated in the study. Sample AA was lyophilized, whilst samples BB, CC and DD were liquid/frozen preparations. The candidate standards were tested by each laboratory at a range of dilutions in four independent assays, using both qualitative and quantitative NAT-based assays. The results were collated and analysed statistically. Results Twenty sets of data were returned from the participating laboratories and used to determine the mean P. falciparum DNA content for each sample. The mean log10 "equivalents"/ml were 8.51 for sample AA, 8.45 for sample BB, 8.35 for sample CC, and 5.51 for sample DD. The freeze-dried preparation AA, was examined by accelerated thermal degradation studies and found to be highly stable. Conclusion On the basis of the collaborative study, the freeze-dried material, AA (NIBSC code No. 04/176) was established as the 1st WHO International Standard for P. falciparum DNA NAT-based assays and has been assigned a potency of 109 International Units (IU) per ml. Each vial contains 5 × 108 IU, equivalent to 0.5 ml of material after reconstitution. PMID:18652656

  16. Influenza A virus drift variants reduced the detection sensitivity of a commercial multiplex nucleic acid amplification assay in the season 2014/15.

    PubMed

    Huzly, Daniela; Korn, Klaus; Bierbaum, Sibylle; Eberle, Björn; Falcone, Valeria; Knöll, Antje; Steininger, Philipp; Panning, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    The influenza season 2014/15 was dominated by drift variants of influenza A(H3N2), which resulted in a reduced vaccine effectiveness. It was not clear if the performance of commercial nucleic-acid-based amplification (NAT) assays for the detection of influenza was affected. The purpose of this study was to perform a real-life evaluation of two commercial NAT assays. During January-April 2015, we tested a total of 665 samples from patients with influenza-like illness using the Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory pathogens 21, a commercial multiplex kit, (cohorts 1 and 2, n = 563 patients) and the Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay (cohort 3, n = 102 patients), a single-use cartridge system. An in-house influenza real-time RT-PCR (cohort 1) and the RealStar Influenza RT-PCR 1.0 Kit (cohort 2 and 3) served as reference tests. Compared to the reference assay, an overall agreement of 95.9 % (cohort 1), 95 % (cohort 2), and 98 % (cohort 3) was achieved. A total of 24 false-negative results were observed using the Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory pathogens 21 kit. No false-negative results occurred using the Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay. The Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory pathogens 21 kit and the Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay had sensitivities of 90.7 % and 100 % and specificities of 100 % and 94.1 %, respectively, compared to the RealStar 1.0 kit. Upon modification of the Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory pathogens 21 kit, the sensitivity increased to 97.3 %. Influenza virus strains circulating during the 2014/15 season reduced the detection sensitivity of a commercial NAT assay, and continuous monitoring of test performance is therefore necessary. PMID:27316440

  17. Rapid real-time nucleic Acid sequence-based amplification-molecular beacon platform to detect fungal and bacterial bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Park, Steven; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Ginocchio, Christine C; Veyret, Raphaël; Laayoun, Ali; Troesch, Alain; Perlin, David S

    2009-07-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Successful patient outcomes are diminished by a failure to rapidly diagnose these infections and initiate appropriate therapy. A rapid and reliable diagnostic platform of high sensitivity is needed for the management of patients with BSIs. The combination of an RNA-dependent nucleic acid sequence-based amplification and molecular beacon (NASBA-MB) detection system in multiplex format was developed to rapidly detect medically important BSI organisms. Probes and primers representing pan-gram-negative, pan-gram-positive, pan-fungal, pan-Candida, and pan-Aspergillus organisms were established utilizing 16S and 28S rRNA targets for bacteria and fungi, respectively. Two multiplex panels were developed to rapidly discriminate bacterial or fungal infections at the subkingdom/genus level with a sensitivity of 1 to 50 genomes. A clinical study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of this platform by evaluating 570 clinical samples from a tertiary-care hospital group using blood bottle samples. The sensitivity, specificity, and Youden's index values for pan-gram-positive detection and pan-gram-negative detection were 99.7%, 100%, 0.997 and 98.6%, 95.9%, 0.945, respectively. The positive predictive values (PPV) and the negative predictive values (NPV) for these two probes were 100, 90.7, and 99.4, 99.4, respectively. Pan-fungal and pan-Candida probes showed 100% sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV, and the pan-Aspergillus probe showed 100% NPV. Robust signals were observed for all probes in the multiplex panels, with signal detection in <15 min. The multiplex real-time NASBA-MB assay provides a valuable platform for the rapid and specific diagnosis of bloodstream pathogens, and reliable pathogen identification and characterization can be obtained in under 3 h.

  18. HIV Screening via Fourth-Generation Immunoassay or Nucleic Acid Amplification Test in the United States: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Long, Elisa F.

    2011-01-01

    Background At least 10% of the 56,000 annual new HIV infections in the United States are caused by individuals with acute HIV infection (AHI). It unknown whether the health benefits and costs of routine nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) are justified, given the availability of newer fourth-generation immunoassay tests. Methods Using a dynamic HIV transmission model instantiated with U.S. epidemiologic, demographic, and behavioral data, I estimated the number of acute infections identified, HIV infections prevented, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained, and the cost-effectiveness of alternative screening strategies. I varied the target population (everyone aged 15-64, injection drug users [IDUs] and men who have sex with men [MSM], or MSM only), screening frequency (annually, or every six months), and test(s) utilized (fourth-generation immunoassay only, or immunoassay followed by pooled NAAT). Results Annual immunoassay testing of MSM reduces incidence by 9.5% and costs <$10,000 per QALY gained. Adding pooled NAAT identifies 410 AHI per year, prevents 9.6% of new cases, costs $92,000 per QALY gained, and remains <$100,000 per QALY gained in settings where undiagnosed HIV prevalence exceeds 4%. Screening IDUs and MSM annually with fourth-generation immunoassay reduces incidence by 13% with cost-effectiveness <$10,000 per QALY gained. Increasing the screening frequency to every six months reduces incidence by 11% (MSM only) or 16% (MSM and IDUs) and costs <$20,000 per QALY gained. Conclusions Pooled NAAT testing every 12 months of MSM and IDUs in the United States prevents a modest number of infections, but may be cost-effective given sufficiently high HIV prevalence levels. However, testing via fourth-generation immunoassay every six months prevents a greater number of infections, is more economically efficient, and may obviate the benefits of acute HIV screening via NAAT. PMID:22110698

  19. Technology Development for Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Powerplant, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1980-01-01

    The technology development for materials, cells, and reformers for on site integrated energy systems is described. The carbonization of 25 cu cm, 350 cu cm, and 1200 cu cm cell test hardware was accomplished and the performance of 25 cu cm fuel cells was improved. Electrochemical corrosion rates of graphite/phenolic resin composites in phosphoric acid were determined. Three cells (5 in by 15 in stacks) were operated for longer than 7000 hours. Specified endurance stacks completed a total of 4000 hours. An electrically heated reformer was tested and is to provide hydrogen for 23 cell fuel cell stack.

  20. MYCN Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimoto, Maisa; Caminada de Toledo, Silvia Regina; Monteiro Caran, Eliana Maria; de Seixas, Maria Teresa; de Martino Lee, Maria Lucia; de Campos Vieira Abib, Simone; Vianna, Sonia Maria Rossi; Schettini, Sergio Thomaz; Anderson Duffles Andrade, Joyce

    1999-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the second most common solid tumor occurring in children. Amplification of the MYCN oncogene is associated with poor prognosis. To identify neuroblastoma tumors with MYCN amplification, we studied the number of copies of MYCN in interphase cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 20 neuroblastoma patients. MYCN amplification appeared in 7 tumor specimens. Interphase and metaphase studies showed a tumor cell population with both forms of amplification, double minutes and homogeneously staining regions, in two patients. These patients showed a smaller tumor cell subpopulation with the presence of more than one homogeneously staining region, suggesting that gene amplification was undergoing karyotype evolution. PMID:10550298

  1. Development of a nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay that uses gag-based molecular beacons to distinguish between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C and C' infections in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ayele, Workenesh; Pollakis, Georgios; Abebe, Almaz; Fisseha, Bitew; Tegbaru, Belete; Tesfaye, Girma; Mengistu, Yohannes; Wolday, Dawit; van Gemen, Bob; Goudsmit, Jaap; Dorigo-Zetsma, Wendelien; de Baar, Michel P

    2004-04-01

    A gag-based molecular beacon assay utilizing real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification technology has been developed to differentiate between the two genetic subclusters of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype C (C and C') circulating in Ethiopia. Of 41 samples, 36 could be classified as C or C' by sequencing of the gag gene. All 36 isolates were correctly identified by the gag beacon test. Three isolates with genomes that were recombinant in gag were unambiguously typed as belonging to the C' subcluster. Further analysis revealed that these contained the most sequence homology with a reference subcluster C' sequence in the target region of the beacon and hence were correct for the analyzed region. For one sample, sequencing and gag molecular beacon results did not match, while another isolate could not be detected at all by the beacon assay. Overall, high levels of sensitivity and specificity were achieved for both beacons (90.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the C beacon and 100% sensitivity and 95.2% specificity for the C' beacon). The availability of a diagnostic test which can quickly and reliably discriminate between C and C' HIV-1 infections in Ethiopia is an important first step toward studying their respective biological characteristics. As the assay is specific to the Ethiopian HIV-1 subtype C epidemic, it will contribute to characterizing the circulating viruses in this population, thereby generating the information necessary for the development of a potential efficacious HIV-1 vaccine appropriate for the Ethiopian context.

  2. Quantitative detection of the M204V hepatitis B virus minor variants by amplification refractory mutation system real-time PCR combined with molecular beacon technology.

    PubMed

    Ntziora, F; Paraskevis, D; Haida, C; Magiorkinis, E; Manesis, E; Papatheodoridis, G; Manolakopoulos, S; Beloukas, A; Chryssoy, S; Magiorkinis, G; Sypsa, V; Hatzakis, A

    2009-08-01

    Mutations in the highly conserved tyrosine-methionine-aspartate-aspartate (YMDD) motif are frequently associated with resistance to antivirals and represent a major concern in the treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Conventional methods fail to detect minority populations of drug-resistant viral quasispecies if they represent less than 25% of the total sample virus population. The amplification refractory mutation system real-time PCR (ARMS RT-PCR) was combined with molecular beacon technology using the LightCycler system. The samples from HBV patients selected for assay evaluation included (i) 57 samples from treatment-naïve patients for biological discriminatory ability (cutoff) estimation, (ii) 12 samples from patients with treatment failure that were M204V positive by sequencing, and (iii) 13 samples from patients with treatment failure that were negative for mutation at codon 204 by sequencing. The discriminatory ability of the assay was 0.25% when tested with laboratory-synthesized DNA target sequences. The median mutant-to-wild-type ratio for samples from naive patients tested positive for the wild type and for mutant variants was 0.01% (5th and 95th percentiles = 0.0001 and 0.04%, respectively). A value of 0.04% was selected as the biological cutoff of the assay of clinical samples. In all samples M204V positive by sequencing (12/12), the mutant variant was detected as the predominant population (range, 82.76 to 99.43%). Interestingly, in 5 (38%) of 13 samples negative by sequencing, the M204V variant was detected at a ratio above the biological cutoff (0.05 to 28%). The assay represents an efficient technique for the early detection and quantification of M204V variants before mutant strains emerge to dominate the population.

  3. Sensitivity of individual-donation and minipool nucleic acid amplification test options in detecting window period and occult hepatitis B virus infections

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Marion; Coleman, Charl; Mitchel, Josephine; Reddy, Ravi; van Drimmelen, Harry; Ficket, Tracy; Lelie, Nico

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several comparison studies showed that the Ultrio assay (Novartis Diagnostics) used in individual-donation nucleic acid amplification testing (ID-NAT) format was as sensitive as the TaqScreen assay (Roche) on minipools of six donations (MP6), but the sensitivity of HBV DNA detection has been improved in the new Ultrio Plus version of the assay. A head-to-head comparison study was designed to compare the clinical sensitivity of the Ultrio and Ultrio Plus assay in ID, MP4, and MP8 formats using TaqScreen MP6 as a reference assay. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Plasma samples of 107 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative, HBV ID-NAT (Ultrio) positive-yield samples and 29 HBV DNA–negative, HBsAg-positive samples were used for comparison of NAT options in replicate testing of dilutions. Viral loads and relative sensitivities were determined by probit analysis against the Eurohep standard. RESULTS Ultrio Plus detected a significantly (p < 0.00001) higher proportion of replicate assays on HBV NAT yields (77%) than Ultrio ID (62%) and TaqScreen MP6 (47%), whereas Ultrio Plus MP4 and MP8 detected 53 and 41%, respectively. On HBsAg-yield samples missed by Ultrio screening, the reactivity rate increased significantly (p < 0.0001) from 23% in Ultrio to 65% in Ultrio Plus and further to 72% (p = 0.10) in the TaqScreen assay. The overall improvement factor of the analytical sensitivity offered by the target enhancer reagent in the Ultrio Plus assay was 2.5 (2.0–3.1)-fold on the Ultrio yield samples, but 43 (11–350)-fold on the HBsAg yields. In ID-NAT format the analytical sensitivity of TaqScreen relative to Ultrio Plus was 2.0 (1.0–4.2), 0.9 (0.7–1.3), and 1.6 (0.9–3.0) on the Eurohep standard, HBV NAT–, and HBsAg-yield samples respectively. CONCLUSION The clinical sensitivity of the currently available commercial NAT methods is mainly driven by the pool size. PMID:23621791

  4. Microwave amplification with nanomechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Massel, F; Heikkilä, T T; Pirkkalainen, J-M; Cho, S U; Saloniemi, H; Hakonen, P J; Sillanpää, M A

    2011-12-15

    The sensitive measurement of electrical signals is at the heart of modern technology. According to the principles of quantum mechanics, any detector or amplifier necessarily adds a certain amount of noise to the signal, equal to at least the noise added by quantum fluctuations. This quantum limit of added noise has nearly been reached in superconducting devices that take advantage of nonlinearities in Josephson junctions. Here we introduce the concept of the amplification of microwave signals using mechanical oscillation, which seems likely to enable quantum-limited operation. We drive a nanomechanical resonator with a radiation pressure force, and provide an experimental demonstration and an analytical description of how a signal input to a microwave cavity induces coherent stimulated emission and, consequently, signal amplification. This generic scheme, which is based on two linear oscillators, has the advantage of being conceptually and practically simpler than the Josephson junction devices. In our device, we achieve signal amplification of 25 decibels with the addition of 20 quanta of noise, which is consistent with the expected amount of added noise. The generality of the model allows for realization in other physical systems as well, and we anticipate that near-quantum-limited mechanical microwave amplification will soon be feasible in various applications involving integrated electrical circuits.

  5. Application of a molecular beacon based real-time isothermal amplification (MBRTIA) technology for simultaneous detection of Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mandappa, I M; Joglekar, Prasanna; Manonmani, H K

    2015-07-01

    A multiplex real-time isothermal amplification assay was developed using molecular beacons for the detection of Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus by targeting four important virulence genes. A correlation between targeting highly accessible DNA sequences and isothermal amplification based molecular beacon efficiency and sensitivity was demonstrated using phi(Φ)29 DNA polymerase at a constant isothermal temperature of 30 °C. It was very selective and consistently detected down to 10(1) copies of DNA. The specificity and sensitivity of this assay, when tested with pure culture were high, surpassing those of currently used PCR assays for the detection of these organisms. The molecular beacon based real-time isothermal amplification (MBRTIA) assay could be carried out entirely in 96 well plates or well strips, enabling a rapid and high-throughput detection of food borne pathogens.

  6. Molecular Zipper: a fluorescent probe for real-time isothermal DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jizu; Zhang, Wandi; Zhang, David Y

    2006-01-01

    Rolling-circle amplification (RCA) and ramification amplification (RAM, also known as hyperbranched RCA) are isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies that have gained a great application in in situ signal amplification, DNA and protein microarray assays, single nucleotide polymorphism detection, as well as clinical diagnosis. Real-time detection of RCA or RAM products has been a challenge because of most real-time detection systems, including Taqman and Molecular Beacon, are designed for thermal cycling-based DNA amplification technology. In the present study, we describe a novel fluorescent probe construct, termed molecular zipper, which is specially designed for quantifying target DNA by real-time monitoring RAM reactions. Our results showed that the molecular zipper has very low background fluorescence due to the strong interaction between two strands. Once it is incorporated into the RAM products its double strand region is opened by displacement, therefore, its fluorophore releases a fluorescent signal. Applying the molecular zipper in RAM assay, we were able to detect as few as 10 molecules within 90 min reaction. A linear relationship was observed between initial input of targets and threshold time (R2 = 0.985). These results indicate that molecular zipper can be applied to real-time monitoring and qualification of RAM reaction, implying an amenable method for automatic RAM-based diagnostic assays.

  7. Molecular Zipper: a fluorescent probe for real-time isothermal DNA amplification

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jizu; Zhang, Wandi; Zhang, David Y.

    2006-01-01

    Rolling-circle amplification (RCA) and ramification amplification (RAM, also known as hyperbranched RCA) are isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies that have gained a great application in in situ signal amplification, DNA and protein microarray assays, single nucleotide polymorphism detection, as well as clinical diagnosis. Real-time detection of RCA or RAM products has been a challenge because of most real-time detection systems, including Taqman and Molecular Beacon, are designed for thermal cycling-based DNA amplification technology. In the present study, we describe a novel fluorescent probe construct, termed molecular zipper, which is specially designed for quantifying target DNA by real-time monitoring RAM reactions. Our results showed that the molecular zipper has very low background fluorescence due to the strong interaction between two strands. Once it is incorporated into the RAM products its double strand region is opened by displacement, therefore, its fluorophore releases a fluorescent signal. Applying the molecular zipper in RAM assay, we were able to detect as few as 10 molecules within 90 min reaction. A linear relationship was observed between initial input of targets and threshold time (R2 = 0.985). These results indicate that molecular zipper can be applied to real-time monitoring and qualification of RAM reaction, implying an amenable method for automatic RAM-based diagnostic assays. PMID:16822854

  8. Evaluation of a field-portable DNA microarray platform and nucleic acid amplification strategies for the detection of arboviruses, arthropods, and bloodmeals.

    PubMed

    Grubaugh, Nathan D; Petz, Lawrence N; Melanson, Vanessa R; McMenamy, Scott S; Turell, Michael J; Long, Lewis S; Pisarcik, Sarah E; Kengluecha, Ampornpan; Jaichapor, Boonsong; O'Guinn, Monica L; Lee, John S

    2013-02-01

    Highly multiplexed assays, such as microarrays, can benefit arbovirus surveillance by allowing researchers to screen for hundreds of targets at once. We evaluated amplification strategies and the practicality of a portable DNA microarray platform to analyze virus-infected mosquitoes. The prototype microarray design used here targeted the non-structural protein 5, ribosomal RNA, and cytochrome b genes for the detection of flaviviruses, mosquitoes, and bloodmeals, respectively. We identified 13 of 14 flaviviruses from virus inoculated mosquitoes and cultured cells. Additionally, we differentiated between four mosquito genera and eight whole blood samples. The microarray platform was field evaluated in Thailand and successfully identified flaviviruses (Culex flavivirus, dengue-3, and Japanese encephalitis viruses), differentiated between mosquito genera (Aedes, Armigeres, Culex, and Mansonia), and detected mammalian bloodmeals (human and dog). We showed that the microarray platform and amplification strategies described here can be used to discern specific information on a wide variety of viruses and their vectors.

  9. Evaluation of a Field-Portable DNA Microarray Platform and Nucleic Acid Amplification Strategies for the Detection of Arboviruses, Arthropods, and Bloodmeals

    PubMed Central

    Grubaugh, Nathan D.; Petz, Lawrence N.; Melanson, Vanessa R.; McMenamy, Scott S.; Turell, Michael J.; Long, Lewis S.; Pisarcik, Sarah E.; Kengluecha, Ampornpan; Jaichapor, Boonsong; O'Guinn, Monica L.; Lee, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Highly multiplexed assays, such as microarrays, can benefit arbovirus surveillance by allowing researchers to screen for hundreds of targets at once. We evaluated amplification strategies and the practicality of a portable DNA microarray platform to analyze virus-infected mosquitoes. The prototype microarray design used here targeted the non-structural protein 5, ribosomal RNA, and cytochrome b genes for the detection of flaviviruses, mosquitoes, and bloodmeals, respectively. We identified 13 of 14 flaviviruses from virus inoculated mosquitoes and cultured cells. Additionally, we differentiated between four mosquito genera and eight whole blood samples. The microarray platform was field evaluated in Thailand and successfully identified flaviviruses (Culex flavivirus, dengue-3, and Japanese encephalitis viruses), differentiated between mosquito genera (Aedes, Armigeres, Culex, and Mansonia), and detected mammalian bloodmeals (human and dog). We showed that the microarray platform and amplification strategies described here can be used to discern specific information on a wide variety of viruses and their vectors. PMID:23249687

  10. Collaborative study for establishment of a European Pharmacopoei Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) for B19 virus DNA testing of plasma pools by nucleic acid amplification technique.

    PubMed

    Nübling, C M; Daas, A; Buchheit, K H

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the collaborative study was to calibrate the B19 DNA content of a candidate Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) that is intended to be used for the validation of the analytical procedure, as threshold control and/or as quantitative reference material in the Nucleic Acid Amplification Technique (NAT) test of plasma pools for detection of B19 contamination. The candidate BRP was calibrated against the 1st International Standard for B19 DNA NAT assays. According to the European Pharmacopoeia monograph Human anti-D immunoglobulin, the threshold control needs to have a titre of 10( 4) IU/ml of B19 virus DNA. The lyophilised candidate BRP was prepared from 0.5 ml aliquots of a plasma pool spiked with B19 virus. The B19 virus originated from a "B19 virus window phase" blood donation (anti-B19 negative, B19-DNA high titre positive) and was diluted in a plasma pool tested negative by both serological and NAT assays for Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 to obtain a B19-DNA concentration level in the range of 10( 6) copies/ml. The residual water content of the lyophilised candidate BRP was determined as 0.98 +/- 0.65% (mean +/- relative standard deviation). Sixteen laboratories (Official Medicine Control Laboratories, manufacturers of plasma derivatives, NAT test laboratories and NAT kit manufacturers) from nine countries participated. Participants were requested to test the candidate BRP and the International Standard (99/800) in four independent test runs on different days using their in-house qualitative and/or quantitative NAT methods. Sixteen laboratories reported results. Thirteen laboratories reported results from qualitative assays and 5 laboratories reported results from quantitative assays. Two laboratories reported results from both types of assay. For the qualitative assays a weighted combined potency of 5.64 log( 10) IU/ml with 95 per cent confidence limits of +/- 0.17 log( 10) which corresponds to 67 to 150

  11. Collaborative study for establishment of a European Pharmacopoei Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) for B19 virus DNA testing of plasma pools by nucleic acid amplification technique.

    PubMed

    Nübling, C M; Daas, A; Buchheit, K H

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the collaborative study was to calibrate the B19 DNA content of a candidate Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) that is intended to be used for the validation of the analytical procedure, as threshold control and/or as quantitative reference material in the Nucleic Acid Amplification Technique (NAT) test of plasma pools for detection of B19 contamination. The candidate BRP was calibrated against the 1st International Standard for B19 DNA NAT assays. According to the European Pharmacopoeia monograph Human anti-D immunoglobulin, the threshold control needs to have a titre of 10( 4) IU/ml of B19 virus DNA. The lyophilised candidate BRP was prepared from 0.5 ml aliquots of a plasma pool spiked with B19 virus. The B19 virus originated from a "B19 virus window phase" blood donation (anti-B19 negative, B19-DNA high titre positive) and was diluted in a plasma pool tested negative by both serological and NAT assays for Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 to obtain a B19-DNA concentration level in the range of 10( 6) copies/ml. The residual water content of the lyophilised candidate BRP was determined as 0.98 +/- 0.65% (mean +/- relative standard deviation). Sixteen laboratories (Official Medicine Control Laboratories, manufacturers of plasma derivatives, NAT test laboratories and NAT kit manufacturers) from nine countries participated. Participants were requested to test the candidate BRP and the International Standard (99/800) in four independent test runs on different days using their in-house qualitative and/or quantitative NAT methods. Sixteen laboratories reported results. Thirteen laboratories reported results from qualitative assays and 5 laboratories reported results from quantitative assays. Two laboratories reported results from both types of assay. For the qualitative assays a weighted combined potency of 5.64 log( 10) IU/ml with 95 per cent confidence limits of +/- 0.17 log( 10) which corresponds to 67 to 150

  12. Evaluation of the NucliSens Basic Kit for Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Genital Tract Specimens Using Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification of 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, J. B.; Song, X.; Chong, S.; Faught, M.; Salonga, T.; Kapala, J.

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated a new RNA amplification and detection kit, the NucliSens Basic Kit (Organon Teknika), for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in genitourinary specimens. The Basic Kit provides an open platform for RNA amplification and detection and contains isolation reagents for nucleic acid extraction, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) reagents (enzymes and buffers), and a generic ruthenium-labeled probe for electrochemiluminescent (ECL) detection of amplified product. Using freshly purified and titrated stocks of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae and in vitro-generated RNA transcripts for sensitivity determinations, the Basic Kit detected 1 inclusion-forming unit of C. trachomatis, 1 CFU of N. gonorrhoeae, and 100 RNA molecules of 16S rRNA for both bacteria. The clinical performance of the Basic Kit was evaluated by testing a total of 250 specimens for N. gonorrhoeae by culture and NASBA and a total of 96 specimens for C. trachomatis by PCR and NASBA. The Basic Kit detected 139 of 142 N. gonorrhoeae culture-positive specimens and gave a negative result for 73 of 74 culture-negative specimens, for a sensitivity and specificity of 97.9 and 98.7%, respectively. For C. trachomatis, the Basic Kit detected 24 of 24 PCR-positive specimens and gave a negative result for 71 of 72 PCR-negative specimens, for a sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 98.6%, respectively. The Basic Kit also detected specimens containing both N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis, using a multiplex NASBA assay using primers for both bacteria. The NucliSens Basic Kit offers a versatile platform for the development of sensitive RNA detection assays for sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:11283067

  13. Principles of quantitation of viral loads using nucleic acid sequence-based amplification in combination with homogeneous detection using molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Weusten, Jos J A M; Carpay, Wim M; Oosterlaken, Tom A M; van Zuijlen, Martien C A; van de Wiel, Paul A

    2002-03-15

    For quantitative NASBA-based viral load assays using homogeneous detection with molecular beacons, such as the NucliSens EasyQ HIV-1 assay, a quantitation algorithm is required. During the amplification process there is a constant growth in the concentration of amplicons to which the beacon can bind while generating a fluorescence signal. The overall fluorescence curve contains kinetic information on both amplicon formation and beacon binding, but only the former is relevant for quantitation. In the current paper, mathematical modeling of the relevant processes is used to develop an equation describing the fluorescence curve as a function of the amplification time and the relevant kinetic parameters. This equation allows reconstruction of RNA formation, which is characterized by an exponential increase in concentrations as long as the primer concentrations are not rate limiting and by linear growth over time after the primer pool is depleted. During the linear growth phase, the actual quantitation is based on assessing the amplicon formation rate from the viral RNA relative to that from a fixed amount of calibrator RNA. The quantitation procedure has been successfully applied in the NucliSens EasyQ HIV-1 assay.

  14. Post-Fragmentation Whole Genome Amplification-Based Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benardini, James; LaDuc, Myron T.; Langmore, John

    2011-01-01

    This innovation is derived from a proprietary amplification scheme that is based upon random fragmentation of the genome into a series of short, overlapping templates. The resulting shorter DNA strands (<400 bp) constitute a library of DNA fragments with defined 3 and 5 termini. Specific primers to these termini are then used to isothermally amplify this library into potentially unlimited quantities that can be used immediately for multiple downstream applications including gel eletrophoresis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR), comparative genomic hybridization microarray, SNP analysis, and sequencing. The standard reaction can be performed with minimal hands-on time, and can produce amplified DNA in as little as three hours. Post-fragmentation whole genome amplification-based technology provides a robust and accurate method of amplifying femtogram levels of starting material into microgram yields with no detectable allele bias. The amplified DNA also facilitates the preservation of samples (spacecraft samples) by amplifying scarce amounts of template DNA into microgram concentrations in just a few hours. Based on further optimization of this technology, this could be a feasible technology to use in sample preservation for potential future sample return missions. The research and technology development described here can be pivotal in dealing with backward/forward biological contamination from planetary missions. Such efforts rely heavily on an increasing understanding of the burden and diversity of microorganisms present on spacecraft surfaces throughout assembly and testing. The development and implementation of these technologies could significantly improve the comprehensiveness and resolving power of spacecraft-associated microbial population censuses, and are important to the continued evolution and advancement of planetary protection capabilities. Current molecular procedures for assaying spacecraft-associated microbial burden and diversity have

  15. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification as an emerging technology for detection of Yersinia ruckeri the causative agent of enteric red mouth disease in fish

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Mona; Soliman, Hatem; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2008-01-01

    Background Enteric Redmouth (ERM) disease also known as Yersiniosis is a contagious disease affecting salmonids, mainly rainbow trout. The causative agent is the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia ruckeri. The disease can be diagnosed by isolation and identification of the causative agent, or detection of the Pathogen using fluorescent antibody tests, ELISA and PCR assays. These diagnostic methods are laborious, time consuming and need well trained personnel. Results A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed and evaluated for detection of Y. ruckeri the etiological agent of enteric red mouth (ERM) disease in salmonids. The assay was optimised to amplify the yruI/yruR gene, which encodes Y. ruckeri quorum sensing system, in the presence of a specific primer set and Bst DNA polymerase at an isothermal temperature of 63°C for one hour. Amplification products were detected by visual inspection, agarose gel electrophoresis and by real-time monitoring of turbidity resulted by formation of LAMP amplicons. Digestion with HphI restriction enzyme demonstrated that the amplified product was unique. The specificity of the assay was verified by the absence of amplification products when tested against related bacteria. The assay had 10-fold higher sensitivity compared with conventional PCR and successfully detected Y. ruckeri not only in pure bacterial culture but also in tissue homogenates of infected fish. Conclusion The ERM-LAMP assay represents a practical alternative to the microbiological approach for rapid, sensitive and specific detection of Y. ruckeri in fish farms. The assay is carried out in one hour and needs only a heating block or water bath as laboratory furniture. The advantages of the ERM-LAMP assay make it a promising tool for molecular detection of enteric red mouth disease in fish farms. PMID:18700011

  16. Enzymatic signal amplification of molecular beacons for sensitive DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianwei Jeffery; Chu, Yizhuo; Lee, Benjamin Yi-Hung; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    2008-04-01

    Molecular beacons represent a new family of fluorescent probes for nucleic acids, and have found broad applications in recent years due to their unique advantages over traditional probes. Detection of nucleic acids using molecular beacons has been based on hybridization between target molecules and molecular beacons in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio. The stoichiometric hybridization, however, puts an intrinsic limitation on detection sensitivity, because one target molecule converts only one beacon molecule to its fluorescent form. To increase the detection sensitivity, a conventional strategy has been target amplification through polymerase chain reaction. Instead of target amplification, here we introduce a scheme of signal amplification, nicking enzyme signal amplification, to increase the detection sensitivity of molecular beacons. The mechanism of the signal amplification lies in target-dependent cleavage of molecular beacons by a DNA nicking enzyme, through which one target DNA can open many beacon molecules, giving rise to amplification of fluorescent signal. Our results indicate that one target DNA leads to cleavage of hundreds of beacon molecules, increasing detection sensitivity by nearly three orders of magnitude. We designed two versions of signal amplification. The basic version, though simple, requires that nicking enzyme recognition sequence be present in the target DNA. The extended version allows detection of target of any sequence by incorporating rolling circle amplification. Moreover, the extended version provides one additional level of signal amplification, bringing the detection limit down to tens of femtomolar, nearly five orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional hybridization assay.

  17. Molecular beacon-based junction probes for efficient detection of nucleic acids via a true target-triggered enzymatic recycling amplification.

    PubMed

    Kong, Rong-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Zhang, Liang-Liang; Huang, Yan; Lu, Dan-Qing; Tan, Weihong; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the development of a new molecular beacon-based junction sensing system with highly sensitive DNA detection and a strong capability to identify SNPs. The single linear probe typically labels the midsection of the oligonucleotide, but our next-generation junction sensing system uses a hairpin-structured MB with labels on each end of the oligonucleotide to maintain the cleaving activity of our newly designed ssDNA-cleaved endonuclease, Nt.BbvCI, rather than the typical dsDNA-cleaved endonuclease. These design improvements guarantee a true and efficient target-triggered enzymatic recycling amplification process in our sensing system. They also afford a faster and more sensitive response toward target DNA than the first-generation junction sensing system.

  18. An isothermal amplification reactor with an integrated isolation membrane for point-of-care detection of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Geva, Eran; Mauk, Michael; Qiu, Xianbo; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Curtis, Kelly; Owen, S. Michele; Bau, Haim H.

    2015-01-01

    A simple, point of care, inexpensive, disposable cassette for the detection of nucleic acids extracted from pathogens was designed, constructed, and tested. The cassette utilizes a single reaction chamber for isothermal amplification of nucleic acids. The chamber is equipped with an integrated, flow-through, Flinders Technology Associates (Whatman FTA®) membrane for the isolation, concentration, and purification of DNA and/or RNA. The nucleic acids captured by the membrane are used directly as templates for amplification without elution, thus simplifying the cassette’s flow control. The FTA membrane also serves another critical role—enabling the removal of inhibitors that dramatically reduce detection sensitivity. Thermal control is provided with a thin film heater external to the cassette. The amplification process was monitored in real time with a portable, compact fluorescent reader. The utility of the integrated, single-chamber cassette was demonstrated by detecting the presence of HIV-1 in oral fluids. The HIV RNA was reverse transcribed and subjected to loop-mediated, isothermal amplification (LAMP). A detection limit of less than 10 HIV particles was demonstrated. The cassette is particularly suitable for resource poor regions, where funds and trained personnel are in short supply. The cassette can be readily modified to detect nucleic acids associated with other pathogens borne in saliva, urine, and other body fluids as well as in water and food. PMID:21455542

  19. Electricity-free amplification and detection for molecular point-of-care diagnosis of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Jered; Osborn, Jennifer L; Lillis, Lorraine; Hawkins, Kenneth; Guelig, Dylan; Price, Will; Johns, Rachel; Ebels, Kelly; Boyle, David; Weigl, Bernhard; LaBarre, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In resource-limited settings, the lack of decentralized molecular diagnostic testing and sparse access to centralized medical facilities can present a critical barrier to timely diagnosis, treatment, and subsequent control and elimination of infectious diseases. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods, including reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), are well-suited for decentralized point-of-care molecular testing in minimal infrastructure laboratories since they significantly reduce the complexity of equipment and power requirements. Despite reduced complexity, however, there is still a need for a constant heat source to enable isothermal nucleic acid amplification. This requirement poses significant challenges for laboratories in developing countries where electricity is often unreliable or unavailable. To address this need, we previously developed a low-cost, electricity-free heater using an exothermic reaction thermally coupled with a phase change material. This heater achieved acceptable performance, but exhibited considerable variability. Furthermore, as an enabling technology, the heater was an incomplete diagnostic solution. Here we describe a more precise, affordable, and robust heater design with thermal standard deviation <0.5°C at operating temperature, a cost of approximately US$.06 per test for heater reaction materials, and an ambient temperature operating range from 16°C to 30°C. We also pair the heater with nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF)-detection for a visual readout. To further illustrate the utility of the electricity-free heater and NALF-detection platform, we demonstrate sensitive and repeatable detection of HIV-1 with a ß-actin positive internal amplification control from processed sample to result in less than 80 minutes. Together, these elements are building blocks for an electricity-free platform capable of isothermal amplification and detection of a variety of pathogens.

  20. Electricity-Free Amplification and Detection for Molecular Point-of-Care Diagnosis of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, Jered; Osborn, Jennifer L.; Lillis, Lorraine; Hawkins, Kenneth; Guelig, Dylan; Price, Will; Johns, Rachel; Ebels, Kelly; Boyle, David; Weigl, Bernhard; LaBarre, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In resource-limited settings, the lack of decentralized molecular diagnostic testing and sparse access to centralized medical facilities can present a critical barrier to timely diagnosis, treatment, and subsequent control and elimination of infectious diseases. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods, including reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), are well-suited for decentralized point-of-care molecular testing in minimal infrastructure laboratories since they significantly reduce the complexity of equipment and power requirements. Despite reduced complexity, however, there is still a need for a constant heat source to enable isothermal nucleic acid amplification. This requirement poses significant challenges for laboratories in developing countries where electricity is often unreliable or unavailable. To address this need, we previously developed a low-cost, electricity-free heater using an exothermic reaction thermally coupled with a phase change material. This heater achieved acceptable performance, but exhibited considerable variability. Furthermore, as an enabling technology, the heater was an incomplete diagnostic solution. Here we describe a more precise, affordable, and robust heater design with thermal standard deviation <0.5°C at operating temperature, a cost of approximately US$.06 per test for heater reaction materials, and an ambient temperature operating range from 16°C to 30°C. We also pair the heater with nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF)-detection for a visual readout. To further illustrate the utility of the electricity-free heater and NALF-detection platform, we demonstrate sensitive and repeatable detection of HIV-1 with a ß-actin positive internal amplification control from processed sample to result in less than 80 minutes. Together, these elements are building blocks for an electricity-free platform capable of isothermal amplification and detection of a variety of pathogens. PMID:25426953

  1. Virus testing by PCR and RT-PCR amplification in berry fruit.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, Stuart; McGavin, Wendy; Tzanetakis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Berry fruit crops are prone to infection by a wide range of viruses, with the list expanding every year, primarily because of the expansion of the crops to new geographic regions. Although some methods allow for virus detection in a nonspecific manner, the advent of cheap and effective nucleic acid sequencing technologies has allowed for the development of species-specific tests. This chapter describes methods for extraction of nucleic acids for molecular testing from a range of different berry fruit crops and lists oligonucleotide primers that have been developed for amplification of a large number of berry fruit viruses.

  2. Capture and Amplification by Tailing and Switching (CATS)

    PubMed Central

    Turchinovich, Andrey; Surowy, Harald; Serva, Andrius; Zapatka, Marc; Lichter, Peter; Burwinkel, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Massive parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies have paved the way into new areas of research including individualized medicine. However, sequencing of trace amounts of DNA or RNA still remains a major challenge, especially for degraded nucleic acids like circulating DNA. This together with high cost and time requirements impedes many important applications of MPS in medicine and fundamental science. We have established a fast, cheap and highly efficient protocol called ‘Capture and Amplification by Tailing and Switching’ (CATS) to directly generate ready-to-sequence libraries for MPS from nanogram and picogram quantities of both DNA and RNA. Furthermore, those DNA libraries are strand-specific, can be prepared within 2–3 h and do not require preliminary sample amplification steps. To exemplify the capacity of the technique, we have generated and sequenced DNA libraries from hundred-picogram amounts of circulating nucleic acids isolated from human blood plasma, one nanogram of mRNA-enriched total RNA from cultured cells and few nanograms of bisulfite-converted DNA. The approach for DNA library preparation from minimal and fragmented input described here will find broad application in diverse research areas such as translational medicine including therapy monitoring, prediction, prognosis and early detection of various human disorders and will permit high-throughput DNA sequencing from previously inaccessible material such as minute forensic and archeological samples. PMID:24922482

  3. A modified PCR protocol for consistent amplification of fatty acid desaturase (FAD) alleles in marker-assisted backcross breeding for high oleic trait in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High oleic acid, such as is found in olive oil, is desirable for the healthy cholesterol-lowering benefits. The oxidative stability of the oil with high oleic acid also gives longer “shelve life” for peanut products. These benefits drive the breeding effort toward developing high oleic peanuts worl...

  4. Commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Warshay, M.; Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    Reducing cost and increasing reliability were the technology drivers in both the electric utility and on-site integrated energy system applications. The longstanding barrier to the attainment of these goals was materials. Differences in approaches and their technological features, including electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, fuel selection, and system design philosophy were discussed.

  5. Chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning in an immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Bill W.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2010-09-28

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  6. Rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Boyle, David S; McNerney, Ruth; Teng Low, Hwee; Leader, Brandon Troy; Pérez-Osorio, Ailyn C; Meyer, Jessica C; O'Sullivan, Denise M; Brooks, David G; Piepenburg, Olaf; Forrest, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    Improved access to effective tests for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) has been designated a public health priority by the World Health Organisation. In high burden TB countries nucleic acid based TB tests have been restricted to centralised laboratories and specialised research settings. Requirements such as a constant electrical supply, air conditioning and skilled, computer literate operators prevent implementation of such tests in many settings. Isothermal DNA amplification technologies permit the use of simpler, less energy intensive detection platforms more suited to low resource settings that allow the accurate diagnosis of a disease within a short timeframe. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) is a rapid, low temperature isothermal DNA amplification reaction. We report here RPA-based detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) DNA in <20 minutes at 39 °C. Assays for two MTC specific targets were investigated, IS6110 and IS1081. When testing purified MTC genomic DNA, limits of detection of 6.25 fg (IS6110) and 20 fg (IS1081)were consistently achieved. When testing a convenience sample of pulmonary specimens from suspected TB patients, RPA demonstrated superior accuracy to indirect fluorescence microscopy. Compared to culture, sensitivities for the IS1081 RPA and microscopy were 91.4% (95%CI: 85, 97.9) and 86.1% (95%CI: 78.1, 94.1) respectively (n = 71). Specificities were 100% and 88.6% (95% CI: 80.8, 96.1) respectively. For the IS6110 RPA and microscopy sensitivities of 87.5% (95%CI: 81.7, 93.2) and 70.8% (95%CI: 62.9, 78.7) were obtained (n = 90). Specificities were 95.4 (95% CI: 92.3,98.1) and 88% (95% CI: 83.6, 92.4) respectively. The superior specificity of RPA for detecting tuberculosis was due to the reduced ability of fluorescence microscopy to distinguish Mtb complex from other acid fast bacteria. The rapid nature of the RPA assay and its low energy requirement compared to other amplification technologies suggest RPA-based TB assays

  7. Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) Technology for control of Asian citrus psyllid - You Tube

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNAi, Ribonucleic acid interference, function and application are described to bring a better understanding of how this emerging technology is providing environmentally friendly, non-transgenic, insect pest control to the citrus industry....

  8. INTERACTIVE ABANDONED MINE LANDS WORKSHOP SERIES - ACID MINE WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this interactive workshop is to present and discuss active and passive acid mine wastes cleanup technologies and to discuss the apparent disconnect between their development and their implementation. The workshop addressed five main barriers to implementing innovat...

  9. Label-free and ratiometric detection of nuclei acids based on graphene quantum dots utilizing cascade amplification by nicking endonuclease and catalytic G-quadruplex DNAzyme.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Li; Fang, Xin; Wu, Xiu-Ming; Hu, Xue-Lian; Li, Zai-Jun

    2016-07-15

    Herein, we report a ratiometric fluorescence assay based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) for the ultrasensitive DNA detection by coupling the nicking endonuclease assisted target recycling and the G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme biocatalysis for cascade signal amplifications. With o-phenylenediamine acted as the substrate of G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme, whose oxidization product (that is, 2,3-diaminophenazine, DAP) quenched the fluorescence intensity of GQDs (at 460nm) obviously, accompanied with the emergence of a new emission of DAP (at 564nm). The ratiometric signal variations at the emission wavelengths of 564 and 460nm (I564/I460) were utilized for label-free, sensitive, and selective detection of target DNA. Utilizing the nicking endonuclease assisted target recycling and the G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme biocatalysis for amplified cascade generation of DAP, the proposed bioassay exhibited high sensitivity toward target DNA with a detection limit of 30fM. The method also had additional advantages such as facile preparation and easy operation.

  10. Development of Acetic Acid Removal Technology for the UREX+Process

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Counce; Jack S. Watson

    2009-06-30

    It is imperative that acetic acid is removed from a waste stream in the UREX+process so that nitric acid can be recycled and possible interference with downstreatm steps can be avoidec. Acetic acid arises from acetohydrozamic acid (AHA), and is used to suppress plutonium in the first step of the UREX+process. Later, it is hydrolyzed into hydroxyl amine nitrate and acetic acid. Many common separation technologies were examined, and solvent extraction was determined to be the best choice under process conditions. Solvents already used in the UREX+ process were then tested to determine if they would be sufficient for the removal of acetic acid. The tributyl phosphage (TBP)-dodecane diluent, used in both UREX and NPEX, was determined to be a solvent system that gave sufficient distribution coefficients for acetic acid in addition to a high separation factor from nitric acid.

  11. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1979-01-01

    Component development has resulted in routine molding of 12 in. by 17 in. bipolar plates with 80 percent acceptance. A 5 C per hour post-cure heating cycle for these plates was found to give blister free materials. Lowering the resin in a bipolar plate content from 32 percent to 22 percent decreases the resistivity more than 50 percent. Evaluation of the corrosion resistance of Novolak and Resol resins at 185 C in phosphoric acid indicates a slow etch. aerosol modified phenolics, however, decompose rapidly. Estimates of acid loss by the use of analytical expressions known as Margule, van Laar, and Wilson equations were not satisfactory. Experimental evaluation of the P4O10 vapor concentration of 103 wt percent acid at 191 C provided a value of 2 ppm. This value is based on a single experiment.

  12. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for producing an acid inventory control member by spraying FEP onto a partially screened carbon paper backing is discussed. Theoretical analysis of the acid management indicates that the vapor composition of 103% H3PO4 is approximately 1.0 ppm P4O10. An SEM evaluation of corrosion resistance of phenolic resins and graphite/phenolic resin composites in H3PO4 at 185 C shows specific surface etching. Carbonization of graphite/phenolic bipolar plates is achieved without blistering.

  13. Remote fiber sensors and optical amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontes, M. J.; Coelho, Thiago V. N.; Carvalho, Joel P.; Santos, J. L.; Guerreiro, A.

    2013-11-01

    This work discusses remote fiber sensors enabled by optical amplification. Continuous wave numerical modeling based on the propagation of pumps and signal lasers coupled to optical fibers explores Raman amplification schemes to predict the sensor's behavior. Experimental analyses report the results to a temperature remote optical sensor with 50 km distance between the central unit and the sensor head. An electrical interrogation scheme is used due to their low cost and good time response. Different architectures in remote sensor systems are evaluated, where diffraction gratings are the sensor element. A validation of calculated results is performed by experimental analyses and, as an application, the noise generated by Raman amplification in the remote sensors systems is simulated applying such numerical modeling. The analyses of sensors systems based on diffraction gratings requires optical broadband sources to interrogate the optical sensor unit, mainly in long period gratings that shows a characteristic rejection band. Therefore, the sensor distance is limited to a few kilometers due to the attenuation in optical fibers. Additional attenuation is introduced by the sensor element. Hence, to extend the distance in the optical sensor system, the optical amplification system is needed to compensate the losses in the optical fibers. The Raman amplification technology was selected mainly due to the flexibility in the gain bandwidth. The modeling can be applied to sensor systems that monitor sites located at long distances, or in places that the access is restricted due to harsh environment conditions in such cases conventional sensors are relatively fast deteriorated.

  14. Questioning cochlear amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, Marcel; Versteegh, Corstiaen P. C.

    2015-12-01

    Thirty years ago it was hypothesized that motile processes inject mechanical energy into cochlear traveling waves. This mechanical amplification, alternatively described as negative damping, is invoked to explain both the sensitivity and the nonlinear compression of cochlear responses. There is a recent trend to present cochlear amplification as an established fact, even though the evidence is at most circumstantial and several thorny problems have remained unresolved. We analyze several of these issues, and present new basilar membrane recordings that allowed us to quantify cochlear energy flow. Specifically, we address the following questions: (1) Does auditory sensitivity require narrowband amplification? (2) Has the "RC problem" (lowpass filtering of outer hair cell receptor potential) been resolved? (3) Can OHC motility improve auditory sensitivity? (4) Is there a net power gain between neighboring locations on the basilar membrane? The analyses indicate that mechanical amplification in the cochlea is neither necessary nor useful, and that realizing it by known forms of motility would reduce sensitivity rather than enhance it. Finally, our experimental data show that the peaking of the traveling wave is realized by focusing the acoustic energy rather than amplifying it. (Abbreviations. BM: basilar membrane; CF: characteristic frequency; IHC: inner hair cell; ME: middle ear; MT; mechanotransducer; OHC: outer hair cell; SPL: sound pressure level.)

  15. On soliton amplification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibovich, S.; Randall, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper considers a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation that permits wave amplification or damping. A 'terminal similarity' solution is identified for large times in amplified systems. Numerical results are given which confirm that the terminal similarity solution is a valid local approximation for mu t sufficiently large and positive, even though the approximation is not uniformly valid in space.

  16. Application of Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Primer and PCR Clamping by LNA Oligonucleotide to Enhance the Amplification of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions in Investigating the Community Structures of Plant–Associated Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Masakazu; Kawauchi, Tomohiro; Sakai, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous extraction of host plant DNA severely limits investigations of the community structures of plant–associated fungi due to the similar homologies of sequences in primer–annealing positions between fungi and host plants. Although fungal-specific primers have been designed, plant DNA continues to be excessively amplified by PCR, resulting in the underestimation of community structures. In order to overcome this limitation, locked nucleic acid (LNA) primers and PCR clamping by LNA oligonucleotides have been applied to enhance the amplification of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. LNA primers were designed by converting DNA into LNA, which is specific to fungi, at the forward primer side. LNA oligonucleotides, the sequences of which are complementary to the host plants, were designed by overlapping a few bases with the annealing position of the reverse primer. Plant-specific DNA was then converted into LNA at the shifted position from the 3′ end of the primer–binding position. PCR using the LNA technique enhanced the amplification of fungal ITS regions, whereas those of the host plants were more likely to be amplified without the LNA technique. A denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis displayed patterns that reached an acceptable level for investigating the community structures of plant–associated fungi using the LNA technique. The sequences of the bands detected using the LNA technique were mostly affiliated with known isolates. However, some sequences showed low similarities, indicating the potential to identify novel fungi. Thus, the application of the LNA technique is considered effective for widening the scope of community analyses of plant–associated fungi. PMID:27600711

  17. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PREVENTION OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE GENERATION FROM OPEN-PIT HIGHWALLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program Activity III, Project 26, Prevention of Acid Mine Drainage Generation from Open-Pit Highwalls. The intent of this project was to obtain performance data on the ability of four technologies to prevent the gener...

  18. Multiplex isothermal solid-phase recombinase polymerase amplification for the specific and fast DNA-based detection of three bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kersting, Sebastian; Rausch, Valentina; Bier, Frank F; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We report on the development of an on-chip RPA (recombinase polymerase amplification) with simultaneous multiplex isothermal amplification and detection on a solid surface. The isothermal RPA was applied to amplify specific target sequences from the pathogens Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Salmonella enterica and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using genomic DNA. Additionally, a positive plasmid control was established as an internal control. The four targets were amplified simultaneously in a quadruplex reaction. The amplicon is labeled during on-chip RPA by reverse oligonucleotide primers coupled to a fluorophore. Both amplification and spatially resolved signal generation take place on immobilized forward primers bount to expoxy-silanized glass surfaces in a pump-driven hybridization chamber. The combination of microarray technology and sensitive isothermal nucleic acid amplification at 38 °C allows for a multiparameter analysis on a rather small area. The on-chip RPA was characterized in terms of reaction time, sensitivity and inhibitory conditions. A successful enzymatic reaction is completed in <20 min and results in detection limits of 10 colony-forming units for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica and 100 colony-forming units for Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The results show this method to be useful with respect to point-of-care testing and to enable simplified and miniaturized nucleic acid-based diagnostics. FigureThe combination of multiplex isothermal nucleic acid amplification with RPA and spatially-resolved signal generation on specific immobilized oligonucleotides.

  19. Species specific identification of spore-producing microbes using the gene sequence of small acid-soluble spore coat proteins for amplification based diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    PCR (polymerase chain reaction) primers for the detection of certain Bacillus species, such as Bacillus anthracis. The primers specifically amplify only DNA found in the target species and can distinguish closely related species. Species-specific PCR primers for Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus globigii and Clostridium perfringens are disclosed. The primers are directed to unique sequences within sasp (small acid soluble protein) genes.

  20. Energy technology and emissions control for acid rain abatement in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    After more than ten years of research, acid rain is a sufficiently serious problem in North America to warrant control action. The acid rain problem has become a threat to the Asian continent as well. Emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are already high and announces plans for increases in coal use by countries in the region imply a major increase in emissions in the future. This will inevitably lead to greater incidence of acid rain and probably significant environmental damage in some locations. The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the issues relating to acid-rain-control technology in Asia and to suggest ways to include technology options in integrated simulation models of acid rain in Asia. 14 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs. (FL)

  1. Hybrid chirped-pulse amplification.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, Igor; Ebbers, Christopher A; Barty, C P J

    2002-09-15

    Conversion efficiency in optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification is limited by spatiotemporal characteristics of the pump pulse. We have demonstrated a novel hybrid chirped-pulse amplification scheme that uses a single pump pulse and combines optical parametric amplification and laser amplification to achieve high gain, high conversion efficiency, and high prepulse contrast without utilization of electro-optic modulators. We achieved an overall conversion efficiency of 37% from the hybrid amplification system at a center wavelength of 820nm. Generation of multiterawatt pulses is possible by use of this simple method and commercial Q -switched pump lasers.

  2. Development and application of new nucleic acid-based technologies for microbial community analyses in foods.

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Nogva, Hege K; Moen, Birgitte; Nissen, Hilde; Bredholt, Sylvia; Møretrø, Trond; Naterstad, Kristine; Holck, Askild

    2002-09-15

    Several challenges still persist in the analysis of microorganisms in foods, particularly in studies of complex communities. Nucleic acid-based methods are promising tools in addressing new questions concerning microbial communities. We have developed several new methods in the field of nucleic acid-based microbial community analyses. These methods cover both sample preparation and detection approaches. The sample preparation method involves simplified DNA purification using paramagnetic beads. As an extension of this method, the same paramagnetic beads are used for both cell separation and DNA purification. This enables full automation. The separate detection of viable and dead bacteria is a major issue in nucleic acid-based diagnostics. We have applied a living/dead dye that binds covalently to DNA and inhibits the PCR from dead cells. In addition, a DNA array-based detection assay has been developed. The assay combines the specificity obtained by enzymatic labeling of DNA probes with the possibility of detecting several targets simultaneously by DNA array hybridization. In combination with 16S rDNA amplification, this is a promising tool for community analyses. Also, we have developed a novel approach for multiplex quantitative PCR. The multiplex PCR has been combined with our DNA array-based detection method. Finally, we are now in the process of adapting a system for monitoring microbial growth and death in real-time through the tagging of bacteria with green fluorescent protein (GFP) combined with fluorescence detection using a high-resolution confocal laser scanner.

  3. Light amplification using semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, R.D.

    1987-06-01

    During the summer of 1953, John von Neumann discussed his ideas concerning light amplification using semiconductors with Edward Teller. In September of that year, von Neumann sent a manuscript containing his ideas and calculations on this subject to Teller for his comments. To the best of our knowledge, von Neumann did not take time to work further on these ideas, and the manuscript remained unpublished. These previously unpublished writings of John von Neumann on the subject of light amplification in semiconductors are printed as a service to the laser community. While von Neumann's original manuscript and his letter to Teller are available to anyone who visits the Library of Congress, it is much more convenient to have this paper appear in an archival journal.

  4. Flux amplification in SSPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodestro, Lynda; Hooper, E. B.; Jayakumar, R. J.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Wood, R. D.; McLean, H. S.

    2007-11-01

    Flux amplification---the ratio of poloidal flux enclosed between the magnetic and geometric axes to that between the separatrix and the geometric axis---is a key measure of efficiency for edge-current-driven spheromaks. With the new, modular capacitor bank, permitting flexible programming of the gun current, studies of flux amplification under various drive scenarios can be performed. Analysis of recent results of pulsed operation with the new bank finds an efficiency ˜ 0.2, in selected shots, of the conversion of gun energy to confined magnetic energy during the pulses, and suggests a route toward sustained efficiency at 0.2. Results of experiments, a model calculation of field build-up, and NIMROD simulations exploring this newly suggested scenario will be presented.

  5. Gravitomagnetic amplification in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Tsagas, Christos G.

    2010-02-15

    Magnetic fields interact with gravitational waves in various ways. We consider the coupling between the Weyl and the Maxwell fields in cosmology and study the effects of the former on the latter. The approach is fully analytical and the results are gauge invariant. We show that the nature and the outcome of the gravitomagnetic interaction depends on the electric properties of the cosmic medium. When the conductivity is high, gravitational waves reduce the standard (adiabatic) decay rate of the B field, leading to its superadiabatic amplification. In poorly conductive environments, on the other hand, Weyl-curvature distortions can result into the resonant amplification of large-scale cosmological magnetic fields. Driven by the gravitational waves, these B fields oscillate with an amplitude that is found to diverge when the wavelengths of the two sources coincide. We present technical and physical aspects of the gravitomagnetic interaction and discuss its potential implications.

  6. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of materials, cell components, and reformers for on site integrated energy systems is described. Progress includes: (1) heat-treatment of 25 sq cm, 350 sq cm and 1200 sq cm cell test hardware was accomplished. Performance of fuel cells is improved by using this material; (2) electrochemical and chemical corrosion rates of heat-treated and as-molded graphite/phenolic resin composites in phosphoric acid were determined; (3) three cell, 5 in. x 15 in. stacks operated for up to 10,000 hours and 12 in. x 17 in. five cell stacks were tested for 5,000 hours; (4) a three cell 5 in. x 15 in. stack with 0.12 mg Pt/sq cm anodes and 0.25 mg Pt/sq cm cathodes was operated for 4,500 hours; and (5) an ERC proprietary high bubble pressure matrix, MAT-1, was tested for up to 10,000 hours.

  7. Acid deposition: State of science and technology. Summary report of the U. S. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, P.M.; Smith, E.

    1991-09-01

    The twenty-seven State-of-Science and State-of-Technology (SOS/T) Reports, published in 1990 as the definitive scientific and technical synthesis of information obtained during the first decade of the U.S. national Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), are summarized in the document. In most cases, these summaries were the final chapter of the complete SOS/T Report.

  8. Amplification of an MFS transporter encoding gene penT significantly stimulates penicillin production and enhances the sensitivity of Penicillium chrysogenum to phenylacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Xu, Xinxin; Liu, Gang

    2012-11-20

    Penicillin is historically important as the first discovered drug against bacterial infections in human. Although the penicillin biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanism have been well studied in Penicillium chrysogenum, the compartmentation and molecular transport of penicillin or its precursors are still poorly understood. In search of the genomic database, more than 830 open reading frames (ORFs) were found to encode transmembrane proteins of P. chrysogenum. In order to investigate their roles on penicillin production, one of them (penT) was selected and cloned. The deduced protein of penT belongs to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and contains 12 transmembrane spanning domains (TMS). During fermentation, the transcription of penT was greatly induced by penicillin precursors phenylacetic acid (PAA) and phenoxyacetic acid (POA). Knock-down of penT resulted in significant decrease of penicillin production, while over-expression of penT under the promoter of trpC enhanced the penicillin production. Introduction of an additional penT in the wild-type strain of P. chrysogenum doubled the penicillin production and enhanced the sensitivity of P. chrysogenum to the penicillin precursors PAA or POA. These results indicate that penT stimulates penicillin production probably through enhancing the translocation of penicillin precursors across fungal cellular membrane.

  9. Mass spectrometry signal amplification for ultrasensitive glycoprotein detection using gold nanoparticle as mass tag combined with boronic acid based isolation strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minbo; Zhang, Lijuan; Xu, Yawei; Yang, Pengyuan; Lu, Haojie

    2013-07-25

    We describe a novel method for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of intact glycoproteins without enzymatic pretreatment which was commonly used in proteomic research. This method is based on using gold nanoparticle (AuNP) as signal tag in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) analysis combined with boronic acid assisted isolation strategy. Briefly speaking, target glycoproteins were firstly isolated from sample solution with boronic acid functionalized magnetic microparticles, and then the surface modified gold nanoparticles were added to covalently bind to the glycoproteins. After that, these AuNP tagged glycoproteins were eluted from magnetic microparticles and applied to LDI-MS analysis. The mass signal of AuNP rather than that of glycoprotein was detected and recorded in this strategy. Through data processing of different standard glycoproteins, we have demonstrated that the signal of AuNP could be used to quantitatively represent glycoprotein. This method allows femtomolar detection of intact glycoproteins. We believe that the successful validation of this method on three different kinds of glycoproteins suggests the potential use for tracking trace amount of target glycoproteins in real biological samples in the near future.

  10. Loop mediated isothermal amplification: An innovative gene amplification technique for animal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Pravas Ranjan; Sethy, Kamadev; Mohapatra, Swagat; Panda, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    India being a developing country mainly depends on livestock sector for its economy. However, nowadays, there is emergence and reemergence of more transboundary animal diseases. The existing diagnostic techniques are not so quick and with less specificity. To reduce the economy loss, there should be a development of rapid, reliable, robust diagnostic technique, which can work with high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay is a rapid gene amplification technique that amplifies nucleic acid under an isothermal condition with a set of designed primers spanning eight distinct sequences of the target. This assay can be used as an emerging powerful, innovative gene amplification diagnostic tool against various pathogens of livestock diseases. This review is to highlight the basic concept and methodology of this assay in livestock disease. PMID:27284221

  11. Loop mediated isothermal amplification: An innovative gene amplification technique for animal diseases.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Pravas Ranjan; Sethy, Kamadev; Mohapatra, Swagat; Panda, Debasis

    2016-05-01

    India being a developing country mainly depends on livestock sector for its economy. However, nowadays, there is emergence and reemergence of more transboundary animal diseases. The existing diagnostic techniques are not so quick and with less specificity. To reduce the economy loss, there should be a development of rapid, reliable, robust diagnostic technique, which can work with high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay is a rapid gene amplification technique that amplifies nucleic acid under an isothermal condition with a set of designed primers spanning eight distinct sequences of the target. This assay can be used as an emerging powerful, innovative gene amplification diagnostic tool against various pathogens of livestock diseases. This review is to highlight the basic concept and methodology of this assay in livestock disease. PMID:27284221

  12. Performance of self-collected penile-meatal swabs compared to clinician-collected urethral swabs for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Mycoplasma genitalium by nucleic acid amplification assays.

    PubMed

    Dize, Laura; Barnes, Perry; Barnes, Mathilda; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Marsiglia, Vincent; Duncan, Della; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2016-10-01

    Men were enrolled in a study to assess the performance and acceptability of self-collected penile meatal swabs as compared to clinician-collected urethral swabs for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We expected penile-meatal swabs to perform favorably to urethral swabs for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), Trichomonas vaginalis (TV), and Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) detection by nucleic acid amplification assays (NAATs). Of 203 swab pairs tested; for CT, penile-meatal swab sensitivity was 96.8% and specificity was 98.8%. NG sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 98.9%, respectively. For TV, sensitivity was 85.0% and specificity was 96.7%. For MG sensitivity and specificity were 79.3% and 99.4%, respectively. No significant statistical differences between sample type accuracy (CT: P=0.625; NG: P=0.248; TV: P=0.344; and MG: P=0.070) existed. Most men, 90.1%, reported self-collection of penile-meatal swabs as "Very Easy" or "Easy". Self-collected penile-meatal swabs appeared acceptable for NAAT STI detection and an acceptable collection method by men. PMID:27497595

  13. Development of a quantitative real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay with an internal control using molecular beacon probes for selective and sensitive detection of human rhinovirus serotypes.

    PubMed

    Sidoti, Francesca; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Terlizzi, Maria Elena; Piasentin Alessio, Elsa; Astegiano, Sara; Gasparini, Giorgio; Cavallo, Rossana

    2012-03-01

    Evidence demonstrating that human rhinovirus (HRV) disease is not exclusively limited to the upper airways and may cause lower respiratory complications, together with the frequency of HRV infections and the increasing number of immunocompromised patients underline the need for rapid and accurate diagnosis of HRV infections. In this study, we developed the first quantitative real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay with an internal control using molecular beacon probes for selective and sensitive detection of human rhinovirus serotypes. We described a simple method to accurately quantify RNA target by computing the time to positivity (TTP) values for HRV RNA. Quantification capacity was assessed by plotting these TTP values against the starting number of target molecules. By using this simple method, we have significantly increased the diagnostic accuracy, precision, and trueness of real-time NASBA assay. Specificity of the method was verified in both in silico and experimental studies. Moreover, for assessment of clinical reactivity of the assay, NASBA has been validated on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. Our quantitative NASBA assay was found to be very specific, accurate, and precise with high repeatability and reproducibility.

  14. Electric utility acid fuel cell stack technology advancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congdon, J. V.; Goller, G. J.; Greising, G. J.; Obrien, J. J.; Randall, S. A.; Sandelli, G. J.; Breault, R. D.; Austin, G. W.; Bopse, S.; Coykendall, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The principal effort under this program was directed at the fuel cell stack technology required to accomplish the initial feasibility demonstrations of increased cell stack operating pressures and temperatures, increased cell active area, incorporation of the ribbed substrate cell configuration at the bove conditions, and the introduction of higher performance electrocatalysts. The program results were successful with the primary accomplishments being: (1) fabrication of 10 sq ft ribbed substrate, cell components including higher performing electrocatalysts; (2) assembly of a 10 sq ft, 30-cell short stack; and (3) initial test of this stack at 120 psia and 405 F. These accomplishments demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating and handling large area cells using materials and processes that are oriented to low cost manufacture. An additional accomplishment under the program was the testing of two 3.7 sq ft short stacks at 12 psia/405 F to 5400 and 4500 hours respectively. These tests demonstrate the durability of the components and the cell stack configuration to a nominal 5000 hours at the higher pressure and temperature condition planned for the next electric utility power plant.

  15. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Amy, Fabrice; Hufton, Jeffrey; Bhadra, Shubhra; Weist, Edward; Lau, Garret; Jonas, Gordon

    2015-06-30

    Air Products has developed an acid gas removal technology based on adsorption (Sour PSA) that favorably compares with incumbent AGR technologies. During this DOE-sponsored study, Air Products has been able to increase the Sour PSA technology readiness level by successfully operating a two-bed test system on coal-derived sour syngas at the NCCC, validating the lifetime and performance of the adsorbent material. Both proprietary simulation and data obtained during the testing at NCCC were used to further refine the estimate of the performance of the Sour PSA technology when expanded to a commercial scale. In-house experiments on sweet syngas combined with simulation work allowed Air Products to develop new PSA cycles that allowed for further reduction in capital expenditure. Finally our techno economic analysis of the use the Sour PSA technology for both IGCC and coal-to-methanol applications suggests significant improvement of the unit cost of electricity and methanol compared to incumbent AGR technologies.

  16. Coherent white light amplification

    DOEpatents

    Jovanovic, Igor; Barty, Christopher P.

    2004-05-25

    A system for coherent simultaneous amplification of a broad spectral range of light that includes an optical parametric amplifier and a source of a seed pulse is described. A first angular dispersive element is operatively connected to the source of a seed pulse. A first imaging telescope is operatively connected to the first angular dispersive element and operatively connected to the optical parametric amplifier. A source of a pump pulse is operatively connected to the optical parametric amplifier. A second imaging telescope is operatively connected to the optical parametric amplifier and a second angular dispersive element is operatively connected to the second imaging telescope.

  17. Camera-based ratiometric fluorescence transduction of nucleic acid hybridization with reagentless signal amplification on a paper-based platform using immobilized quantum dots as donors.

    PubMed

    Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2014-10-21

    Paper-based diagnostic assays are gaining increasing popularity for their potential application in resource-limited settings and for point-of-care screening. Achievement of high sensitivity with precision and accuracy can be challenging when using paper substrates. Herein, we implement the red-green-blue color palette of a digital camera for quantitative ratiometric transduction of nucleic acid hybridization on a paper-based platform using immobilized quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). A nonenzymatic and reagentless means of signal enhancement for QD-FRET assays on paper substrates is based on the use of dry paper substrates for data acquisition. This approach offered at least a 10-fold higher assay sensitivity and at least a 10-fold lower limit of detection (LOD) as compared to hydrated paper substrates. The surface of paper was modified with imidazole groups to assemble a transduction interface that consisted of immobilized QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates. Green-emitting QDs (gQDs) served as donors with Cy3 as an acceptor. A hybridization event that brought the Cy3 acceptor dye in close proximity to the surface of immobilized gQDs was responsible for a FRET-sensitized emission from the acceptor dye, which served as an analytical signal. A hand-held UV lamp was used as an excitation source and ratiometric analysis using an iPad camera was possible by a relative intensity analysis of the red (Cy3 photoluminescence (PL)) and green (gQD PL) color channels of the digital camera. For digital imaging using an iPad camera, the LOD of the assay in a sandwich format was 450 fmol with a dynamic range spanning 2 orders of magnitude, while an epifluorescence microscope detection platform offered a LOD of 30 fmol and a dynamic range spanning 3 orders of magnitude. The selectivity of the hybridization assay was demonstrated by detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism at a contrast ratio of 60:1. This work provides an

  18. Reading Out Single-Molecule Digital RNA and DNA Isothermal Amplification in Nanoliter Volumes with Unmodified Camera Phones.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Karymov, Mikhail A; Begolo, Stefano; Selck, David A; Zhukov, Dmitriy V; Jue, Erik; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-03-22

    Digital single-molecule technologies are expanding diagnostic capabilities, enabling the ultrasensitive quantification of targets, such as viral load in HIV and hepatitis C infections, by directly counting single molecules. Replacing fluorescent readout with a robust visual readout that can be captured by any unmodified cell phone camera will facilitate the global distribution of diagnostic tests, including in limited-resource settings where the need is greatest. This paper describes a methodology for developing a visual readout system for digital single-molecule amplification of RNA and DNA by (i) selecting colorimetric amplification-indicator dyes that are compatible with the spectral sensitivity of standard mobile phones, and (ii) identifying an optimal ratiometric image-process for a selected dye to achieve a readout that is robust to lighting conditions and camera hardware and provides unambiguous quantitative results, even for colorblind users. We also include an analysis of the limitations of this methodology, and provide a microfluidic approach that can be applied to expand dynamic range and improve reaction performance, allowing ultrasensitive, quantitative measurements at volumes as low as 5 nL. We validate this methodology using SlipChip-based digital single-molecule isothermal amplification with λDNA as a model and hepatitis C viral RNA as a clinically relevant target. The innovative combination of isothermal amplification chemistry in the presence of a judiciously chosen indicator dye and ratiometric image processing with SlipChip technology allowed the sequence-specific visual readout of single nucleic acid molecules in nanoliter volumes with an unmodified cell phone camera. When paired with devices that integrate sample preparation and nucleic acid amplification, this hardware-agnostic approach will increase the affordability and the distribution of quantitative diagnostic and environmental tests.

  19. Reading Out Single-Molecule Digital RNA and DNA Isothermal Amplification in Nanoliter Volumes with Unmodified Camera Phones.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Karymov, Mikhail A; Begolo, Stefano; Selck, David A; Zhukov, Dmitriy V; Jue, Erik; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-03-22

    Digital single-molecule technologies are expanding diagnostic capabilities, enabling the ultrasensitive quantification of targets, such as viral load in HIV and hepatitis C infections, by directly counting single molecules. Replacing fluorescent readout with a robust visual readout that can be captured by any unmodified cell phone camera will facilitate the global distribution of diagnostic tests, including in limited-resource settings where the need is greatest. This paper describes a methodology for developing a visual readout system for digital single-molecule amplification of RNA and DNA by (i) selecting colorimetric amplification-indicator dyes that are compatible with the spectral sensitivity of standard mobile phones, and (ii) identifying an optimal ratiometric image-process for a selected dye to achieve a readout that is robust to lighting conditions and camera hardware and provides unambiguous quantitative results, even for colorblind users. We also include an analysis of the limitations of this methodology, and provide a microfluidic approach that can be applied to expand dynamic range and improve reaction performance, allowing ultrasensitive, quantitative measurements at volumes as low as 5 nL. We validate this methodology using SlipChip-based digital single-molecule isothermal amplification with λDNA as a model and hepatitis C viral RNA as a clinically relevant target. The innovative combination of isothermal amplification chemistry in the presence of a judiciously chosen indicator dye and ratiometric image processing with SlipChip technology allowed the sequence-specific visual readout of single nucleic acid molecules in nanoliter volumes with an unmodified cell phone camera. When paired with devices that integrate sample preparation and nucleic acid amplification, this hardware-agnostic approach will increase the affordability and the distribution of quantitative diagnostic and environmental tests. PMID:26900709

  20. Time-Motion Analysis of Four Automated Systems for the Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Nucleic Acid Amplification Testing.

    PubMed

    Williams, James A; Eddleman, Laura; Pantone, Amy; Martinez, Regina; Young, Stephen; Van Der Pol, Barbara

    2014-08-01

    Next-generation diagnostics for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are available on semi- or fully-automated platforms. These systems require less hands-on time than older platforms and are user friendly. Four automated systems, the ABBOTT m2000 system, Becton Dickinson Viper System with XTR Technology, Gen-Probe Tigris DTS system, and Roche cobas 4800 system, were evaluated for total run time, hands-on time, and walk-away time. All of the systems evaluated in this time-motion study were able to complete a diagnostic test run within an 8-h work shift, instrument setup and operation were straightforward and uncomplicated, and walk-away time ranged from approximately 90 to 270 min in a head-to-head comparison of each system. All of the automated systems provide technical staff with increased time to perform other tasks during the run, offer easy expansion of the diagnostic test menu, and have the ability to increase specimen throughput. PMID:24196751

  1. Evidence of high-elevation amplification versus Arctic amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qixiang; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Mengben

    2016-01-01

    Elevation-dependent warming in high-elevation regions and Arctic amplification are of tremendous interest to many scientists who are engaged in studies in climate change. Here, using annual mean temperatures from 2781 global stations for the 1961-2010 period, we find that the warming for the world's high-elevation stations (>500 m above sea level) is clearly stronger than their low-elevation counterparts; and the high-elevation amplification consists of not only an altitudinal amplification but also a latitudinal amplification. The warming for the high-elevation stations is linearly proportional to the temperature lapse rates along altitudinal and latitudinal gradients, as a result of the functional shape of Stefan-Boltzmann law in both vertical and latitudinal directions. In contrast, neither altitudinal amplification nor latitudinal amplification is found within the Arctic region despite its greater warming than lower latitudes. Further analysis shows that the Arctic amplification is an integrated part of the latitudinal amplification trend for the low-elevation stations (≤500 m above sea level) across the entire low- to high-latitude Northern Hemisphere, also a result of the mathematical shape of Stefan-Boltzmann law but only in latitudinal direction. PMID:26753547

  2. Coproduction of acetic acid and electricity by application of microbial fuel cell technology to vinegar fermentation.

    PubMed

    Tanino, Takanori; Nara, Youhei; Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Ohshima, Takayuki

    2013-08-01

    The coproduction of a useful material and electricity via a novel application of microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology to oxidative fermentation was investigated. We focused on vinegar production, i.e., acetic acid fermentation, as an initial and model useful material that can be produced by oxidative fermentation in combination with MFC technology. The coproduction of acetic acid and electricity by applying MFC technology was successfully demonstrated by the simultaneous progress of acetic acid fermentation and electricity generation through a series of repeated batch fermentations. Although the production rate of acetic acid was very small, it increased with the number of repeated batch fermentations that were conducted. We obtained nearly identical (73.1%) or larger (89.9%) acetic acid yields than that typically achieved by aerated fermentation (75.8%). The open-cycle voltages measured before and after fermentation increased with the total fermentation time and reached a maximum value of 0.521 V prior to the third batch fermentation. The maximum current and power densities measured in this study (19.1 μA/cm² and 2.47 μW/cm², respectively) were obtained after the second batch fermentation.

  3. COMPOST-FREE BIOREACTOR TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE LEVIATHAN MINE, CALIFORNIA INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, an evaluation of the compost-free bioreactor treatment of acid rock drainage (ARD) from the Aspen Seep was conducted at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site located in a remote, high altitude area of Alpine Co...

  4. NRMRL EVALUATES ACTIVE AND SEMI-PASSIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR TREATING ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two-page article describing three SITE demonstration projects underway on the Leviathan mine site in California. BiPhasic lime treatment, lime treatment lagoons and compost free BioReactors are being evaluated as innovative technologies for treating acid mine drainage.

  5. Mine Waste Technology Program. In Situ Source Control Of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 3, In Situ Source Control of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S....

  6. COMPOST-FREE BIOREACTOR TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE - TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, an evaluation of the compost-free bioreactor treatment of acid rock drainage (ARD) from the Aspen Seep was conducted at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site located in a remote, high altitude area of Alpine Co...

  7. Towards the routine application of nucleic acid technology for avian disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, D; Mawditt, K; Shaw, K; Britton, P; Naylor, C

    1997-01-01

    The use of nucleic acid technology (polymerase chain reaction, probing, restriction fragment analysis and nucleotide sequencing) in the study of avian diseases has largely been confined to fundamental analysis and retrospective studies. More recently these approaches have been applied to diagnosis and what one might call real-time epidemiological studies on chickens and turkeys. At the heart of these approaches is the identification and characterisation of pathogens based on their genetic material, RNA or DNA. Among the objectives has been the detection of pathogens quickly combined with the simultaneous identification of serotype, subtype or genotype. Nucleic acid sequencing also gives a degree of characterisation unmatched by other approaches. In this paper we describe the use of nucleic acid technology for the diagnosis and epidemiology of infectious bronchitis virus, turkey rhinotracheitis virus (avian pneumovirus) and Newcastle disease virus.

  8. Simultaneous detection of human mitochondrial DNA and nuclear-inserted mitochondrial-origin sequences (NumtS) using forensic mtDNA amplification strategies and pyrosequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Bintz, Brittania J; Dixon, Groves B; Wilson, Mark R

    2014-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies enable the identification of minor mitochondrial DNA variants with higher sensitivity than Sanger methods, allowing for enhanced identification of minor variants. In this study, mixtures of human mtDNA control region amplicons were subjected to pyrosequencing to determine the detection threshold of the Roche GS Junior(®) instrument (Roche Applied Science, Indianapolis, IN). In addition to expected variants, a set of reproducible variants was consistently found in reads from one particular amplicon. A BLASTn search of the variant sequence revealed identity to a segment of a 611-bp nuclear insertion of the mitochondrial control region (NumtS) spanning the primer-binding sites of this amplicon (Nature 1995;378:489). Primers (Hum Genet 2012;131:757; Hum Biol 1996;68:847) flanking the insertion were used to confirm the presence or absence of the NumtS in buccal DNA extracts from twenty donors. These results further our understanding of human mtDNA variation and are expected to have a positive impact on the interpretation of mtDNA profiles using deep-sequencing methods in casework.

  9. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    PubMed

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach. PMID:19736969

  10. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    PubMed

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach.

  11. Nomogram including the total tumoral load in the sentinel nodes assessed by one-step nucleic acid amplification as a new factor for predicting nonsentinel lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Isabel T; Espinosa-Bravo, Martin; Rodrigo, Maxi; Amparo Viguri Diaz, Maria; Hardisson, David; Sagasta, Amaia; Dueñas, Basilio; Peg, Vicente

    2014-09-01

    Several models have been developed to predict non-sentinel nodes (NSLN) metastasis in patients with a positive sentinel node (SLN) that incorporates a standard pathology examination of the SLN. It has been reported that total tumoral load (TTL) in the SLNs assessed by one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) is a predictive factor for additional NSLN metastasis in the axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). The objective was to develop a nomogram that predicts patient´s risk of additional NSLN metastasis incorporating TTL in the SLNs assessed by OSNA. Six hundred and ninety-seven consecutive patients with positive SLN evaluation by OSNA and a completion ALND were recruited. Pathologic features of the primary tumor and SLN metastases, including TTL were collected. Multivariate logistic regression identified factors predictive of non-SLN metastasis. A nomogram was developed with these variables and validated in an external cohort. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, tumor size, number of affected SLN, Her2 overexpression, lymphovascular invasion, and TTL were each associated with the likelihood of additional NSLN metastasis (p < 0.05). The overall predictive accuracy of the nomogram, as measured by the AUC was 0.7552 (95 %CI 0.7159-0.7945). When applied to the external cohort the nomogram was accurate with an AUC = 0.678 (95 %CI 0.621-0.736). This novel nomogram that incorporates TTL assessed by OSNA performs well and may help clinicians to make decisions about ALND for individual patients. Moreover, the standardization of pathologic assessment by OSNA may help to achieve interinstitutional reproducibility among nomograms. PMID:25164972

  12. Gene promoter hypermethylation is found in sentinel lymph nodes of breast cancer patients, in samples identified as positive by one-step nucleic acid amplification of cytokeratin 19 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Martín-Sánchez, E; Pernaut-Leza, E; Mendaza, S; Cordoba, A; Vicente-Garcia, F; Monreal-Santesteban, I; Vizcaino, J Pérez; De Cerio, M J Díaz; Perez-Janices, N; Blanco-Luquin, I; Escors, D; Ulazia-Garmendia, A; Guerrero-Setas, D

    2016-07-01

    We analysed the promoter methylation status of five genes, involved in adhesion (EPB41L3, TSLC-1), apoptosis (RASSF1, RASSF2) or angiogenesis (TSP-1), in intraoperative sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy samples from patients with breast cancer, that had been processed by the one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) technique. SLN resection is performed to estimate the risk of tumour cells in the clinically negative axilla, to avoid unnecessary axillary lymph node dissection. OSNA is currently one of the eligible molecular methods for detecting tumour cells in SLNs. It is based on the quantitative evaluation of cytokeratin 19 mRNA which allows distinguishing between macrometastasis, micrometastasis and isolated tumour cells, on the basis of the quantity of tumour cells present. There have been no prior studies on the question whether or not samples processed by OSNA can be used for further molecular studies, including epigenetic abnormalities which are some of the most important molecular alterations in breast cancer. Genomic DNA was extracted from samples obtained from 50 patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer. The content of tumour cells in SLNs was evaluated by OSNA, and the promoter methylation status of the selected genes was analysed by methylation-specific PCR. All were found to be hypermethylated to a variable degree, and RASSF1 hypermethylation was significantly associated with macrometastasis, micrometastasis and isolated tumour cells (p = 0.002). We show that samples used for OSNA are suitable for molecular studies, including gene promoter methylation. These samples provide a new source of material for the identification of additional biomarkers. PMID:27097811

  13. Acid Rain Advisory Committee meeting. Held on March 20-22, 1991. Permits and technology issue papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    Index: (Permits and Technology Subcommittee Papers): Permits and Technologies Conference Call Minutes January 22, 1991; Subcommittee Meeting Minutes; January 28, 1991; Principles for Acid Rain Permits; Fact Sheet: Reduced Utilization; Topics Covered in Acid Rain Permit Regulations; and Primer on the Clean Water Act Permit Program.

  14. Structured oligonucleotides for target indexing to allow single-vessel PCR amplification and solid support microarray hybridization.

    PubMed

    Girard, Laurie D; Boissinot, Karel; Peytavi, Régis; Boissinot, Maurice; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-02-01

    The combination of molecular diagnostic technologies is increasingly used to overcome limitations on sensitivity, specificity or multiplexing capabilities, and provide efficient lab-on-chip devices. Two such techniques, PCR amplification and microarray hybridization are used serially to take advantage of the high sensitivity and specificity of the former combined with high multiplexing capacities of the latter. These methods are usually performed in different buffers and reaction chambers. However, these elaborate methods have high complexity and cost related to reagent requirements, liquid storage and the number of reaction chambers to integrate into automated devices. Furthermore, microarray hybridizations have a sequence dependent efficiency not always predictable. In this work, we have developed the concept of a structured oligonucleotide probe which is activated by cleavage from polymerase exonuclease activity. This technology is called SCISSOHR for Structured Cleavage Induced Single-Stranded Oligonucleotide Hybridization Reaction. The SCISSOHR probes enable indexing the target sequence to a tag sequence. The SCISSOHR technology also allows the combination of nucleic acid amplification and microarray hybridization in a single vessel in presence of the PCR buffer only. The SCISSOHR technology uses an amplification probe that is irreversibly modified in presence of the target, releasing a single-stranded DNA tag for microarray hybridization. Each tag is composed of a 3-nucleotide sequence-dependent segment and a unique "target sequence-independent" 14-nucleotide segment allowing for optimal hybridization with minimal cross-hybridization. We evaluated the performance of five (5) PCR buffers to support microarray hybridization, compared to a conventional hybridization buffer. Finally, as a proof of concept, we developed a multiplexed assay for the amplification, detection, and identification of three (3) DNA targets. This new technology will facilitate the design

  15. Optimization of turn-back primers in isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasumasa; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Aoki, Shintaro; Ishizu, Yuri; Kawai, Yuki; Kogo, Yasushi; Daub, Carsten O; Lezhava, Alexander; Arner, Erik; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2011-05-01

    The application of isothermal amplification technologies is rapidly expanding and currently covers different areas such as infectious disease, genetic disorder and drug dosage adjustment. Meanwhile, many of such technologies have complex reaction processes and often require a fine-tuned primer set where existing primer design tools are not sufficient. We have developed a primer selection system for one important primer, the turn-back primer (TP), which is commonly used in loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) and smart amplification process (SmartAmp). We chose 78 parameters related to the primer and target sequence, and explored their relationship to amplification speed using experimental data for 1344 primer combinations. We employed the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) method for parameter selection and estimation of their numerical coefficients. We subsequently evaluated our prediction model using additional independent experiments and compared to the LAMP primer design tool, Primer Explorer version4 (PE4). The evaluation showed that our approach yields a superior primer design in isothermal amplification and is robust against variations in the experimental setup. Our LASSO regression analysis revealed that availability of the 3'- and 5'-end of the primer are particularly important factors for efficient isothermal amplification. Our computer script is freely available at: http://gerg.gsc.riken.jp/TP_optimization/.

  16. Backward Raman amplification of broad-band pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakin, A. A.; Dodin, I. Y.; Fraiman, G. M.; Fisch, N. J.

    2016-08-01

    A reduced fluid model of Raman backscattering is proposed that describes backward Raman amplification (BRA) of pulses with duration τ0 comparable to or even smaller than the plasma period 2 π/ωp . At such a small τ0, a seed pulse can be amplified even if it has the same frequency as the pump (which is technologically advantageous), as opposed to that satisfying the Raman resonance condition. Using our theoretical model, we numerically calculate the BRA efficiency for such pulses as a function of τ0 and show that it remains reasonably high up to τ0≈2 π/ωp . We also show that using short seed pulses in BRA makes the amplification less sensitive to quasistatic inhomogeneities of the plasma density. Amplification can persist even when the density perturbations are large enough to violate the commonly known condition of resonant amplification.

  17. Ultrasensitive DNA detection by cycle isothermal amplification based on nicking endonuclease and its application to logic gates.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuemei; Ding, Tianrong; Sun, Li; Mao, Changming

    2011-12-15

    In recent years, an intense interest has grown in the DNA logic gates having high potential for computation at literally the "nano-size" level. A limitation of traditional DNA logic gates is that each target strand hybridizes with only a single copy of the probe. This 1:1 hybridization radio limits the gain of the approach and thus its sensitivity. The exponential amplification of nucleic acids has become a core technology in medical diagnostics and has been widely used for the construction of DNA sensor, DNA nanomachine and DNA sequencing. It would be of great interest to develop DNA-based logic systems with exponential amplification for the output signal. In the present study, a series of three-input DNA logic gates with the cycle isothermal amplification based on nicking endonuclease (NEase) are designed. Very low concentrations of the analytes were sufficient to initiate an autocatalytic cascade, achieving a significant improvement of the detection limit, 100-fold improvement compared to the non-autocatalytic system. This was achieved by engineering a simple and flexible biological circuit designed to initiate a cascade of events to detect and amplify a specific DNA sequence. This procedure has the potential to greatly simplify the logic operation because amplification can be performed in "one-pot".

  18. Biodiesel production using fatty acids from food industry waste using corona discharge plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Cubas, A L V; Machado, M M; Pinto, C R S C; Moecke, E H S; Dutra, A R A

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to describe an alternative and innovative methodology to transform waste, frying oil in a potential energy source, the biodiesel. The biodiesel was produced from fatty acids, using a waste product of the food industry as the raw material. The methodology to be described is the corona discharge plasma technology, which offers advantages such as acceleration of the esterification reaction, easy separation of the biodiesel and the elimination of waste generation. The best conditions were found to be an oil/methanol molar ratio of 6:1, ambient temperature (25 °C) and reaction time of 110 min and 30 mL of sample. The acid value indicates the content of free fatty acids in the biodiesel and the value obtained in this study was 0.43 mg KOH/g. Peaks corresponding to octadecadienoic acid methyl ester, octadecanoic acid methyl ester and octadecenoic acid methyl ester, from the biodiesel composition, were identified using GC-MS. A major advantage of this process is that the methyl ester can be obtained in the absence of chemical catalysts and without the formation of the co-product (glycerin).

  19. Humic acids: Structural properties and multiple functionalities for novel technological developments.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Bruna Alice Gomes; Motta, Fernanda Lopes; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade

    2016-05-01

    Humic acids (HAs) are macromolecules that comprise humic substances (HS), which are organic matter distributed in terrestrial soil, natural water, and sediment. HAs differ from the other HS fractions (fulvic acid and humins) in that they are soluble in alkaline media, partially soluble in water, and insoluble in acidic media. Due to their amphiphilic character, HAs form micelle-like structures in neutral to acidic conditions, which are useful in agriculture, pollution remediation, medicine and pharmaceuticals. HAs have undefined compositions that vary according to the origin, process of obtainment, and functional groups present in their structures, such as quinones, phenols, and carboxylic acids. Quinones are responsible for the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HAs, which are useful for wound healing and have fungicidal/bactericidal properties. Phenols and carboxylic acids deprotonate in neutral and alkaline media and are responsible for various other functions, such as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of HAs. In particular, the presence of phenolic groups in HAs provides antioxidant properties due to their free radical scavenging capacity. This paper describes the main multifunctionalities of HAs associated with their structures and properties, focusing on human health applications, and we note perspectives that may lead to novel technological developments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review to address this topic from this approach. PMID:26952503

  20. Biodiesel production using fatty acids from food industry waste using corona discharge plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Cubas, A L V; Machado, M M; Pinto, C R S C; Moecke, E H S; Dutra, A R A

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to describe an alternative and innovative methodology to transform waste, frying oil in a potential energy source, the biodiesel. The biodiesel was produced from fatty acids, using a waste product of the food industry as the raw material. The methodology to be described is the corona discharge plasma technology, which offers advantages such as acceleration of the esterification reaction, easy separation of the biodiesel and the elimination of waste generation. The best conditions were found to be an oil/methanol molar ratio of 6:1, ambient temperature (25 °C) and reaction time of 110 min and 30 mL of sample. The acid value indicates the content of free fatty acids in the biodiesel and the value obtained in this study was 0.43 mg KOH/g. Peaks corresponding to octadecadienoic acid methyl ester, octadecanoic acid methyl ester and octadecenoic acid methyl ester, from the biodiesel composition, were identified using GC-MS. A major advantage of this process is that the methyl ester can be obtained in the absence of chemical catalysts and without the formation of the co-product (glycerin). PMID:26159043

  1. Peracetic acid as an alternative disinfection technology for wet weather flows.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Elizabeth E; Ormsbee, Lindell E; Brion, Gail M

    2014-08-01

    Rain-induced wet weather flows (WWFs) consist of combined sewer overflows, sanitary sewer overflows, and stormwater, all of which introduce pathogens to surface waters when discharged. When people come into contact with the contaminated surface water, these pathogens can be transmitted resulting in severe health problems. As such, WWFs should be disinfected. Traditional disinfection technologies are typically cost-prohibitive, can yield toxic byproducts, and space for facilities is often limited, if available. More cost-effective alternative technologies, requiring less space and producing less harmful byproducts are currently being explored. Peracetic acid (PAA) was investigated as one such alternative and this research has confirmed the feasibility and applicability of using PAA as a disinfectant for WWFs. Peracetic acid doses ranging from 5 mg/L to 15 mg/L over contact times of 2 to 10 minutes were shown to be effective and directly applicable to WWF disinfection.

  2. Peracetic acid as an alternative disinfection technology for wet weather flows.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Elizabeth E; Ormsbee, Lindell E; Brion, Gail M

    2014-08-01

    Rain-induced wet weather flows (WWFs) consist of combined sewer overflows, sanitary sewer overflows, and stormwater, all of which introduce pathogens to surface waters when discharged. When people come into contact with the contaminated surface water, these pathogens can be transmitted resulting in severe health problems. As such, WWFs should be disinfected. Traditional disinfection technologies are typically cost-prohibitive, can yield toxic byproducts, and space for facilities is often limited, if available. More cost-effective alternative technologies, requiring less space and producing less harmful byproducts are currently being explored. Peracetic acid (PAA) was investigated as one such alternative and this research has confirmed the feasibility and applicability of using PAA as a disinfectant for WWFs. Peracetic acid doses ranging from 5 mg/L to 15 mg/L over contact times of 2 to 10 minutes were shown to be effective and directly applicable to WWF disinfection. PMID:25306784

  3. Potential effects of clean coal technologies on acid precipitation, greenhouse gases, and solid waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Blasing, T.J.; Miller, R.L.; McCold, L.N.

    1993-11-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) was initially funded by Congress to demonstrate more efficient, economically feasible, and environmentally acceptable coal technologies. Although the environmental focus at first was on sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) because their relationship to acid precipitation, the CCTDP may also lead to reductions in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions and in the volume of solid waste produced, compared with conventional technologies. The environmental effects of clean coal technologies (CCTs) depend upon which (if any) specific technologies eventually achieve high acceptance in the marketplace. In general, the repowering technologies and a small group of retrofit technologies show the most promise for reducing C0{sub 2} emissions and solid waste. These technologies also compare favorably with other CCTs in terms of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} reductions. The upper bound for CO{sup 2} reductions in the year 2010 is only enough to reduce global ``greenhouse`` warming potential by about 1%. However, CO{sub 2} emissions come from such variety of sources around the globe that no single technological innovation or national policy change could realistically be expected to reduce these emissions by more than a few percent. Particular CCTs can lead to either increases or decreases in the amount of solid waste produced. However, even if decreases are not achieved, much of the solid waste from clean coal technologies would be dry and therefore easier to dispose of than scrubber sludge.

  4. A general solution for opening double-stranded DNA for isothermal amplification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gangyi; Dong, Juan; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification is the core technology of molecular biology and genetic engineering. Various isothermal amplification techniques have been developed as alternatives to polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, most of these methods can only detect single stranded nucleic acid. Herein, we put forward a simple solution for opening double-stranded DNA for isothermal detection methods. The strategy employs recombination protein from E. coli (RecA) to form nucleoprotein complex with single-stranded DNA, which could scan double-stranded template for homologous sites. Then, the nucleoprotein can invade the double-stranded template to form heteroduplex in the presence of ATP, resulting in the strand exchange. The ATP regeneration system could be eliminated by using high concentration of ATP, and the 3′-OH terminal of the invasion strand can be recognized by other DNA modifying enzymes such as DNA polymerase or DNA ligase. Moreover, dATP was found to be a better cofactor for RecA, which make the system more compatible to DNA polymerase. The method described here is a general solution to open dsDNA, serving as a platform to develop more isothermal nucleic acids detection methods for real DNA samples based on it. PMID:27687498

  5. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part III: Technology scale-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Serra, L.; Dumenil, S.; Brichard, G.; Alias, M.; Jammet, B.; Vinit, L.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid technology employs new carbon/carbon composites with ordered 3D structure instead of the classic lead-acid battery current collectors. The technology is laboratory scaled up from small size grids corresponding to electrodes with a capacity of 3 Ah to current collectors suitable for assembly of lead-acid batteries covering the majority of the typical lead-acid battery applications. Two series of 150 grids each (one positive and one negative) are manufactured using low-cost lab-scale equipment. They are further subjected to pasting with active materials and the resulting battery plates are assembled in 12 V AGM-VLRA battery mono-blocks for laboratory testing and outdoor demonstration in electric scooter replacing its original VRLAB pack. The obtained results demonstrate that the technology can replace successfully the state of the art negative grids with considerable benefits. The use of the carbon honeycomb grids as positive plate current collectors is limited by the anodic corrosion of the entire structure attacking both the carbon/carbon composite part and the electroplated lead-tin alloy coating.

  6. A phaseguided passive batch microfluidic mixing chamber for isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Hakenberg, Sydney; Hügle, Matthias; Weidmann, Manfred; Hufert, Frank; Dame, Gregory; Urban, Gerald A

    2012-11-01

    With a view to developing a rapid pathogen detection system utilizing isothermal nucleic acid amplification, the necessary micro-mixing step is innovatively implemented on a chip. Passive laminar flow mixing of two 6.5 μl batches differing in viscosity is performed within a microfluidic chamber. This is achieved with a novel chip space-saving phaseguide design which allows, for the first time, the complete integration of a passive mixing structure into a target chamber. Sequential filling of batches prior to mixing is demonstrated. Simulation predicts a reduction of diffusive mixing time from hours down to one minute. A simple and low-cost fabrication method is used which combines dry film resist technology and direct wafer bonding. Finally, an isothermal nucleic acid detection assay is successfully implemented where fluorescence results are measured directly from the chip after a one minute mixing sequence. In combination with our previous work, this opens up the way towards a fully integrated pathogen detection system in a lab-on-a-chip format. PMID:22952055

  7. Humic acids enhanced removal of aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated aquifers: developing a sustainable technology.

    PubMed

    Lesage, S; Brown, S; Millar, K; Novakowski, K

    2001-09-01

    Contamination by gasoline and diesel fuels is a threat to groundwater resources. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which can represent up to 60% of volume in diesel fuels are of particular concern because many of them are carcinogenic and they are persistent, especially in oxygen-limited environment. Despite the development of alternative approaches, pump and treat continues to be the leading technology for the remediation of groundwater contaminated by gasoline and diesel fuels. The efficiency of this technology is however limited by the low solubility of the aromatic hydrocarbons. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of humic acids on the removal of aromatic hydrocarbons from petroleum products in groundwater aquifers and to evaluate the potential use of humic acids, as a cost effective additive, in groundwater and soil remediation. In order to prove the feasibility of using humic acid in the field, a pilot scale experiment was conducted in a model aquifer with a very dense monitoring network, providing controlled conditions only possible in a semi-artificial system. In addition, different sources of humic acids were compared with surfactants for their ability to bind PAHs.

  8. Recovery and STR amplification of DNA from RFLP membranes.

    PubMed

    Steadman, Shelly A; McDonald, J David; Andrews, John S; Watson, Nigel D

    2008-03-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) techniques were utilized in the forensic DNA community until the mid 1990s when less labor-intensive polymerase chain reaction short tandem repeat (PCR STR) techniques became available. During the transition from RFLP technology to PCR-based STR platforms, a method for comparing RFLP profiles to STR profiles was not developed. While the preferred approach for applying new technology to old cases would be to analyze the original biological stain, this is not always possible. For unsolved cases that previously underwent RFLP analysis, the only DNA remaining may be restriction cut and bound to nylon membranes. These studies investigate several methods for obtaining STR profiles from membrane bound DNA, including removal of bound DNA with bases, acids, detergents, various chemicals, and conventional cell extraction solutions. Direct multiplex STR amplification of template in the membrane-bound state was also explored. A partial STR profile was obtained from DNA that was recovered from an archived membrane using conventional extraction buffer components, indicating promise for recovering useful STR information from RFLP membranes that have been maintained in long-term frozen storage. PMID:18366567

  9. Whole Genome Amplification from Blood Spot Samples.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Karina Meden

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome amplification is an invaluable technique when working with DNA extracted from blood spots, as the DNA obtained from this source often is too limited for extensive genetic analysis. Two techniques that amplify the entire genome are common. Here, both are described with focus on the benefits and drawbacks of each system. However, in order to obtain the best possible WGA result the quality of input DNA extracted from the blood spot is essential, but also time consumption, flexibility in format and elution volume and price of the technology are factors influencing system choice. Here, three DNA extraction techniques are described and the above aspects are compared between the systems.

  10. Using CD-ROM technology to increase folic acid knowledge among physician assistant students.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Christine; Klein, Diane Austrin; Selbst, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of incorporating CD-ROM technology to increase the knowledge of folic acid among physician assistant students. Participants included 76 first-year physician assistant students enrolled in a Women's Health course. A pretest and posttest was used to evaluate the knowledge gain after viewing the CD-ROM over a 2-week period. Of the 76 students in the course, 73 completed the pretest and the post-test. Posttest scores were significantly better than pretest scores (t = -11.83; p < or = 0.001), with means 68.63% and 46.18%. Knowledge scores increased by 22.45% from pre-test to posttest. Student evaluation results suggested that the CD-ROM (1) provided folic acid information in a clear and effective manner, (2) adequately covered the folic acid information, (3) increased student awareness and knowledge about folic acid, and (4) may promote early commitment by students to recommend daily folic acid intake to their patients.

  11. Highly sensitive fluorescence detection of target DNA by coupling exonuclease-assisted cascade target recycling and DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Cheng, Chuanbin; Liu, Tao; Wang, Li; Gong, Hongwei; Li, Feng

    2015-01-15

    Because of the intrinsic importance of nucleic acid as bio-targets, the simple and sensitive detection of nucleic acid is very essential for biological studies and medical diagnostics. Herein, a simple, isothermal and highly sensitive fluorescence detection of target DNA was developed with the combination of exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted cascade target recycling and DNAzyme amplification. A hairpin DNA probe was designed, which contained the 3'-protruding DNA fragment as target recognition unit, the caged DNA fragment in the stem region as target analogue, and the caged 8-17 DNAzyme sequence in the loop region as signal response unit. Upon sensing of target DNA, the 3'-strand of hairpin DNA probe could be stepwise removed by Exo III, accompanied by the releasing of target DNA and autonomous generation of new target analogues for the successive hybridization and cleavage process. Simultaneously, the 8-17 DNAzyme unit could be exponentially released from this hairpin DNA probe and activated for the cyclic cleavage toward the ribonucleotide-containing molecular beacon substrate, inducing a remarkable fluorescence signal amplification for target detection. A low detection limit of 20 fM with an excellent selectivity toward target DNA could be achieved. The developed cascade amplification strategy may be further extended for the detection of a wide spectrum of analytes including protein and biological small molecules by combining DNA aptamer technology.

  12. ABRF-MARG RESEARCH STUDY: EVALUATION OF SMALL SAMPLE NUCLEIC ACID AMPLIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarrays have had a significant impact on many areas of biology. However, there are still many fertile research areas that would benefit from microarray analysis but are limited by the amount of biological material that can be obtained (e.g. samples obtained by small biopsy, f...

  13. Detection of biological molecules using chemical amplification and optical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Van Antwerp, William Peter; Mastrototaro, John Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Methods are provided for the determination of the concentration of biological levels of polyhydroxylated compounds, particularly glucose. The methods utilize an amplification system that is an analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix, where the system is implantable and biocompatible. Upon interrogation by an optical system, the amplification system produces a signal capable of detection external to the skin of the patient. Quantitation of the analyte of interest is achieved by measurement of the emitted signal. Specifically, the analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix can be a boronic acid moiety.

  14. Wet Chemical Oxidation of Organic Waste Using Nitric-Phosphoric Acid Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.A.

    1998-10-06

    Experimental progress has been made in a wide range of areas which support the continued development of the nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation process for combustible, solid organic wastes. An improved understanding of the overall process operation has been obtained, acid recovery and recycle systems have been studied, safety issues have been addressed, two potential final waste forms have been tested, preliminary mass flow diagrams have been prepared, and process flowsheets have been developed. The flowsheet developed is essentially a closed-loop system which addresses all of the internally generated waste streams. The combined activities aim to provide the basis for building and testing a 250-400 liter pilot-scale unit. Variations of the process now must be evaluated in order to address the needs of the primary customer, SRS Solid Waste Management. The customer is interested in treating job control waste contaminated with Pu-238 for shipment to WIPP. As a result, variations for feed preparation, acid recycle, and final form manufacturing must be considered to provide for simpler processing to accommodate operations in high radiation and contamination environments. The purpose of this program is to demonstrate a nitric-phosphoric acid destruction technology which can treat a heterogeneous waste by oxidizing the solid and liquid organic compounds while decontaminating noncombustible items.

  15. Chromosomal destabilization during gene amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, J C; Wahl, G M

    1990-01-01

    Acentric extrachromosomal elements, such as submicroscopic autonomously replicating circular molecules (episomes) and double minute chromosomes, are common early, and in some cases initial, intermediates of gene amplification in many drug-resistant and tumor cell lines. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the amplification process, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which such extrachromosomal elements are generated and we traced the fate of these amplification intermediates over time. The model system consists of a Chinese hamster cell line (L46) created by gene transfer in which the initial amplification product was shown previously to be an unstable extrachromosomal element containing an inverted duplication spanning more than 160 kilobases (J. C. Ruiz and G. M. Wahl, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:4302-4313, 1988). In this study, we show that these molecules were formed by a process involving chromosomal deletion. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed at multiple time points on cells with amplified sequences. These studies reveal that the extrachromosomal molecules rapidly integrate into chromosomes, often near or at telomeres, and once integrated, the amplified sequences are themselves unstable. These data provide a molecular and cytogenetic chronology for gene amplification in this model system; an early event involves deletion to generate extrachromosomal elements, and subsequent integration of these elements precipitates a cascade of chromosome instability. Images PMID:2188107

  16. Tidal amplification of seabed light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, D. G.; Brubaker, J. M.

    2010-09-01

    Because solar irradiance decreases approximately exponentially with depth in the sea, the increase in irradiance at the seabed from mid to low tide is greater than the decrease from mid to high tide. Summed over a day, this can lead to a net amplification of seabed irradiance in tidal waters compared to nontidal waters with the same mean depth and transparency. In this paper, this effect is quantified by numerical and analytical integration of the Lambert-Beer equation to derive the ratio of daily total seabed irradiance with and without a tide. Greatest amplification occurs in turbid water with large tidal range and low tide occurring at noon. The theoretical prediction is tested against observations of seabed irradiance in the coastal waters of North Wales where tidal amplification of seabed light by up to a factor of 7 is both observed and predicted. Increasing the strength of tidal currents tends to increase the turbidity of the water and hence reduce the light reaching the seabed, but this effect is made less by increasing tidal amplification, especially when low water is in the middle of the day. The ecological implications of tidal amplification are discussed. The productivity of benthic algae will be greater than that predicted by simple models which calculate seabed irradiance using the mean depth of water alone. Benthic algae are also able to live at greater depths in tidal waters than in nontidal waters with the same transparency.

  17. [Optimization of extraction technology for salidroside, tyrosol, crenulatin and gallic acid in Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma with orthogonal test].

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Wang, Xue-jing; Zhao, Yi-wu; Huang, Wen-zhe; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-09-01

    The extracting technology of salidroside, tyrosol, crenulatin and gallic acid from Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma was optimized. With extraction rate of salidroside, tyrosol, crenulatin and gallic acid as indexes, orthogonal test was used to evaluate effect of 4 factors on extracting technology, including concentration of solvent, the dosage of solvent, duration of extraction, and frequency of extraction. The results showed that, the best extracting technology was to extract in 70% alcohol with 8 times the weight of herbal medicine for 2 times, with 3 hours once. High extraction rate of salidroside, tyrosol, crenulatin and gallic acid were obtained with the present technology. The extracting technology was stable and feasible with high extraction rate of four compounds from Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma, it was suitable for industrial production.

  18. Inhibition of fungal spore adhesion by zosteric Acid as the basis for a novel, nontoxic crop protection technology.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Michele S; Callow, Maureen E; Perry, Ruth; Alberte, Randall S; Smith, Robert; Callow, James A

    2002-04-01

    ABSTRACT To explore the potential for nontoxic crop protection technologies based on the inhibition of fungal spore adhesion, we have tested the effect of synthetic zosteric acid (p-(sulfo-oxy) cinnamic acid), a naturally occurring phenolic acid in eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) plants, on spore adhesion and infection in two pathosystems: rice blast caused by Magnaporthe grisea and bean anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. We have shown that zosteric acid inhibits spore adhesion to model and host leaf surfaces and that any attached spores fail to develop appressoria, and consequently do not infect leaf cells. Low concentrations of zosteric acid that are effective in inhibiting adhesion are not toxic to either fungus or to the host. The inhibition of spore adhesion in the rice blast pathogen is fully reversible. On plants, zosteric acid reduced (rice) or delayed (bean) lesion development. These results suggest that there is potential for novel and environmentally benign crop protection technologies based on manipulating adhesion.

  19. Heralded amplification for precision measurements with spin ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Nicolas; Polzik, Eugene S.; Simon, Christoph

    2011-10-15

    We propose a simple heralded amplification scheme for small rotations of the collective spin of an ensemble of particles. Our protocol makes use of two basic primitives for quantum memories, namely, partial mapping of light onto an ensemble, and conversion of a collective spin excitation into light. The proposed scheme should be realizable with current technology, with potential applications to atomic clocks and magnetometry.

  20. Technological and safety properties of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Spanish dry-cured sausages.

    PubMed

    Landeta, G; Curiel, J A; Carrascosa, A V; Muñoz, R; de las Rivas, B

    2013-10-01

    Technological and safety-related properties were analyzed in lactic acid bacteria isolated from Spanish dry-cured sausages in order to select them as starter cultures. In relation to technological properties, all the strains showed significative nitrate reductase activity; Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei and 52% of the Enterococcus faecium strains showed lipolytic activity and only Lactobacillus sakei strains (43%) were able to form biofilms. Related to safety aspects, E. faecium strains were the most resistant to antibiotics, whereas, L. sakei strains were the most sensitive. In relation to virulence factors, in the E. faecium strains analyzed, only the presence of efaA gene was detected. The analysis of biogenic amine production showed that most E. faecium strains and L. sakei Al-142 produced tyramine. In conclusion, L. paracasei Al-128 and L. sakei Al-143 strains possess the best properties to be selected as adequate and safe meat starter cultures.

  1. Gene amplification and insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Bass, Chris; Field, Linda M

    2011-08-01

    Pesticide resistance in arthropods has been shown to evolve by two main mechanisms, the enhanced production of metabolic enzymes, which bind to and/or detoxify the pesticide, and mutation of the target protein, which makes it less sensitive to the pesticide. One route that leads to enhanced metabolism is the duplication or amplification of the structural gene(s) encoding the detoxifying enzyme, and this has now been described for the three main families (esterases, glutathione S-transferases and cytochrome P450 monooxygenases) implicated in resistance. More recently, a direct or indirect role for gene duplication or amplification has been described for target-site resistance in several arthropod species. This mini-review summarises the involvement of gene duplication/amplification in the insecticide/acaricide resistance of insect and mite pests and highlights recent developments in this area in relation to P450-mediated and target-site resistance.

  2. A universal multiplex PCR strategy for 100-plex amplification using a hydrophobically patterned microarray.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Guo, Shu-Juan; Shao, Ning; Tu, Shun; Xu, Miao; Ren, Zhao-Rui; Ling, Xing; Wang, Guo-Qing; Lin, Zhi-Xin; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2011-11-01

    Both basic research and clinical medicine have urgent demands for highly efficient strategies to simultaneously identify many different DNA sequences within a single tube. Effective and simultaneous amplification of multiple target sequences is a prerequisite for any successful multiple nucleic acid detection method. Multiplex PCR is one of the best choices for this purpose. However, due to the intrinsic interference and competition among primer pairs in the same tube, multiple rounds of highly empirical optimization procedures are usually required to establish a successful multiplex PCR reaction. To address this challenge, we report here a universal multiplex PCR strategy that is capable of over 100-plex amplification using a specially designed microarray in which hydrophilic microwells are patterned on a hydrophobic chip. On such an array, primer pairs tagged with a universal sequence are physically separated in individual hydrophilic microwells on an otherwise hydrophobic chip, enabling many unique PCR reactions to be proceeded simultaneously during the first step of the procedure. The PCR products are then isolated and further amplified from the universal sequences, producing a sufficient amount of material for analysis by conventional gel electrophoresis or DNA microarray technology. This strategy is abbreviated as "MPH&HPM" for "Multiplex PCR on a Hydrophobically and Hydrophilically Patterned Microarray". The feasibility of this method is first demonstrated by a multiplex PCR reaction for the simultaneous detection of eleven pneumonia-causing pathogens. Further, we demonstrate the power of this strategy with a highly successful 116-plex PCR reaction that required only little prior optimization. The effectiveness of the MPH&HPM strategy with clinical samples is then illustrated with the detection of deleted exons of the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) gene, the results are in excellent agreement with the clinical records. Because of its generality

  3. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect

    Kloosterman, Jeff

    2012-12-31

    Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

  4. Reliable amplification of actin genes facilitates deep-level phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Voigt, K; Wöstemeyer, J

    2000-09-01

    The gene for actin as a highly conserved and functionally essential genetic element is developing into a major tool for phylogenetic analysis within a broad organismic range. We therefore propose a set of universally applicable primers that allow reliable amplification of actin genes. For primer construction the amino acid sequences of 57 actin genes comprising fungi, animals, plants and protists were analysed, aligned and used for the definition of six well-conserved regions which are suitable as priming sites in PCR amplification experiments. Ten primers were designed for specific in vitro amplification of actin gene fragments from a wide range of microorganisms. The corresponding gene fragments provide a strong basis to isolate nearly complete actin genes for further molecular characterization and for establishing phylogenies based on actin gene trees.

  5. Chemical amplification of magnetic field effects relevant to avian magnetoreception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattnig, Daniel R.; Evans, Emrys W.; Déjean, Victoire; Dodson, Charlotte A.; Wallace, Mark I.; MacKenzie, Stuart R.; Timmel, Christiane R.; Hore, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as the Earth's can change the yields of radical pair reactions even though the energies involved are orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy, kBT, at room temperature. Proposed as the source of the light-dependent magnetic compass in migratory birds, the radical pair mechanism is thought to operate in cryptochrome flavoproteins in the retina. Here we demonstrate that the primary magnetic field effect on flavin photoreactions can be amplified chemically by slow radical termination reactions under conditions of continuous photoexcitation. The nature and origin of the amplification are revealed by studies of the intermolecular flavin-tryptophan and flavin-ascorbic acid photocycles and the closely related intramolecular flavin-tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome. Amplification factors of up to 5.6 were observed for magnetic fields weaker than 1 mT. Substantial chemical amplification could have a significant impact on the viability of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor.

  6. Method for chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning in an immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Bill W.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2015-06-02

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  7. Apparatus for chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning in an immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Bill W.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2012-05-08

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  8. Principles of Whole-Genome Amplification.

    PubMed

    Czyz, Zbigniew Tadeusz; Kirsch, Stefan; Polzer, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Modern molecular biology relies on large amounts of high-quality genomic DNA. However, in a number of clinical or biological applications this requirement cannot be met, as starting material is either limited (e.g., preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) or analysis of minimal residual cancer) or of insufficient quality (e.g., formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples or forensics). As a consequence, in order to obtain sufficient amounts of material to analyze these demanding samples by state-of-the-art modern molecular assays, genomic DNA has to be amplified. This chapter summarizes available technologies for whole-genome amplification (WGA), bridging the last 25 years from the first developments to currently applied methods. We will especially elaborate on research application, as well as inherent advantages and limitations of various WGA technologies.

  9. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, Stefan K.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei.

  10. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, S.K.

    1998-03-24

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example, the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei. 25 figs.

  11. A DNA nanomachine based on rolling circle amplification-bridged two-stage exonuclease III-assisted recycling strategy for label-free multi-amplified biosensing of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingwang; Lv, Yanqin; Cui, Hui; Gu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuqiu; Liu, Jifeng

    2015-01-26

    An autonomous DNA nanomachine based on rolling circle amplification (RCA)-bridged two-stage exonuclease III (Exo III)-induced recycling amplification (Exo III-RCA-Exo III) was developed for label-free and highly sensitive homogeneous multi-amplified detection of DNA combined with sensitive fluorescence detection technique. According to the configuration, the analysis of DNA is accomplished by recognizing the target to a unlabeled molecular beacon (UMB) that integrates target-binding and signal transducer within one multifunctional design, followed by the target-binding of UMB in duplex DNA removed stepwise by Exo III accompanied by the releasing of target DNA for the successive hybridization and cleavage process and autonomous generation of the primer that initiate RCA process with a rational designed padlock DNA. The RCA products containing thousands of repeated catalytic sequences catalytically hybridize with a hairpin reporter probe that includes a "caged" inactive G-quadruplex sequence (HGP) and were then detected by Exo III-assisted recycling amplification, liberating the active G-quadruplex and generating remarkable ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex fluorescence signals with the help of zinc(II)-protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX). The proposed strategy showed a wide dynamic range over 7 orders of magnitude with a low limit of detection of 0.51 aM. In addition, this designed protocol can discriminate mismatched DNA from perfectly matched target DNA, and holds a great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases.

  12. Dual-coated lactic acid bacteria: an emerging innovative technology in the field of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Calatayud, Guillermo; Margolles, Abelardo

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are living micro-organisms that do not naturally have shelf life, and normally are weakly protected against the digestive action of the GI tract. A new dual coating technology has been developed in an effort to maximize survival, that is, to be able to reach the intestine alive and in sufficient numbers to confer the beneficial health effects on the host. Dual-coating of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is the result of fourth-generation coating technology for the protection of these bacteria at least 100-fold or greater than the uncoated LAB. This innovative technique involves a first pH-dependent protein layer that protects bacteria from gastric acid and bile salt, and a second polysaccharide matrix that protects bacteria from external factors, such as humidity, temperature and pressure, as well as the digestive action during the passage through the GI tract. Dual-coated probiotic formulation is applicable to different therapeutic areas, including irritable bowel syndrome, atopic dermatitis, acute diarrhea, chronic constipation, Helicobacter pylori eradication, and prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. An updated review of the efficacy of doubly coated probiotic strains for improving bacterial survival in the intestinal tract and its consequent clinical benefits in humans is here presented. PMID:26780116

  13. Electricity generation from synthetic acid-mine drainage (AMD) water using fuel cell technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaoan Cheng; Brian A. Dempsey; Bruce E. Logan

    2007-12-15

    Acid-mine drainage (AMD) is difficult and costly to treat. We investigated a new approach to AMD treatment using fuel cell technologies to generate electricity while removing iron from the water. Utilizing a recently developed microbial fuel cell architecture, we developed an acid-mine drainage fuel cell (AMD-FC) capable of abiotic electricity generation. The AMD-FC operated in fed-batch mode generated a maximum power density of 290 mW/m{sup 2} at a Coulombic efficiency greater than 97%. Ferrous iron was completely removed through oxidation to insoluble Fe(III), forming a precipitate in the bottom of the anode chamber and on the anode electrode. Several factors were examined to determine their effect on operation, including pH, ferrous iron concentration, and solution chemistry. Optimum conditions were a pH of 6.3 and a ferrous iron concentration above about 0.0036 M. These results suggest that fuel cell technologies can be used not only for treating AMD through removal of metals from solution, but also for producing useful products such as electricity and recoverable metals. Advances being made in wastewater fuel cells will enable more efficient power generation and systems suitable for scale-up. 35 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Review and assessment of technologies for the separation of cesium from acidic media

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, R.J.; Brooks, K.P.; Kurath, D.E.

    1994-09-01

    A preliminary literature survey has been conducted to identify and evaluate methods for the separation of cesium from acidic waste. The most promising solvent extraction, precipitation, and ion exchange methods, along with some of the attributes for each method, are listed. The main criteria used in evaluating the separation methods were as follows: (1) good potential for cesium separation must be demonstrated (i.e., cesium decontamination factors on the order of 50 to 100). (2) Good selectivity for cesium over bulk components must be demonstrated. (3) The method must show promise for evolving into a practical and fairly simple process. (4) The process should be safe to operate. (5) The method must be robust (i.e., capable of separating cesium from various acidic waste types). (6) Secondary waste generation must be minimized. (7) The method must show resistance to radiation damage. The most promising separation methods did not necessarily satisfy all of the above criteria, thus key areas requiring further development are suggested for each method. The report discusses in detail these and other areas requiring further development, as well as alternative solvent extraction, precipitation, ion exchange, and {open_quote}other{close_quote} technologies that, based on current information, show less promise for the separation of cesium from acidic wastes because of significant process limitations. When appropriate, the report recommends areas of future development.

  15. Molecular detection of harmful algal blooms (HABs) using locked nucleic acids and bead array technology.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Mara R; Jacobson, James W; Goodwin, Kelly D; Dunbar, Sherry A; Fell, Jack W

    2010-06-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a serious public health risk in coastal waters. As the intensity and frequency of HABs continue to rise, new methods of detection are needed for reliable identification. Herein, we developed a high-throughput, multiplex, bead array technique for the detection of the dinoflagellates Karenia brevis and Karenia mikimotoi. The method combined the Luminex detection system with two novel technologies: locked nucleic acid-modified oligonucleotides (LNA) and Mirus Label IT(®) nucleic acid technology. To study the feasibility of the method, we evaluated the performance of modified and unmodified LNA probes with amplicon targets that were biotin labeled with two different strategies: direct chemical labeling (Mirus Label IT) versus enzymatic end-labeling (single biotinylated primer). The results illustrated that LNA probes hybridized to complementary single-stranded DNA with better affinity and displayed higher fluorescence intensities than unmodified oligonucleotide DNA probes. The latter effect was more pronounced when the assay was carried out at temperatures above 53°C degree. As opposed to the enzymatic 5' terminal labeling technique, the chemical-labeling method enhanced the level of fluorescence by as much as ~83%. The detection limits of the assay, which were established with LNA probes and Mirus Label IT system, ranged from 0.05 to 46 copies of rRNA. This high-throughput method, which represents the first molecular detection strategy to integrate Luminex technology with LNA probes and Mirus Label IT, can be adapted for the detection of other HABs and is well suited for the monitoring of red tides at pre-blooming and blooming conditions.

  16. Chronic centrosome amplification without tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vitre, Benjamin; Holland, Andrew J.; Kulukian, Anita; Shoshani, Ofer; Hirai, Maretoshi; Wang, Yin; Maldonado, Marcus; Cho, Thomas; Boubaker, Jihane; Swing, Deborah A.; Tessarollo, Lino; Evans, Sylvia M.; Fuchs, Elaine; Cleveland, Don W.

    2015-01-01

    Centrosomes are microtubule-organizing centers that facilitate bipolar mitotic spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. Recognizing that centrosome amplification is a common feature of aneuploid cancer cells, we tested whether supernumerary centrosomes are sufficient to drive tumor development. To do this, we constructed and analyzed mice in which centrosome amplification can be induced by a Cre-recombinase–mediated increase in expression of Polo-like kinase 4 (Plk4). Elevated Plk4 in mouse fibroblasts produced supernumerary centrosomes and enhanced the expected mitotic errors, but proliferation continued only after inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor. Increasing Plk4 levels in mice with functional p53 produced centrosome amplification in liver and skin, but this did not promote spontaneous tumor development in these tissues or enhance the growth of chemically induced skin tumors. In the absence of p53, Plk4 overexpression generated widespread centrosome amplification, but did not drive additional tumors or affect development of the fatal thymic lymphomas that arise in animals lacking p53. We conclude that, independent of p53 status, supernumerary centrosomes are not sufficient to drive tumor formation. PMID:26578792

  17. Optical chirped beam amplification and propagation

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P.

    2004-10-12

    A short pulse laser system uses dispersive optics in a chirped-beam amplification architecture to produce high peak power pulses and high peak intensities without the potential for intensity dependent damage to downstream optical components after amplification.

  18. Sequence dependence of isothermal DNA amplification via EXPAR

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jifeng; Ferguson, Tanya M.; Shinde, Deepali N.; Ramírez-Borrero, Alissa J.; Hintze, Arend; Adami, Christoph; Niemz, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal nucleic acid amplification is becoming increasingly important for molecular diagnostics. Therefore, new computational tools are needed to facilitate assay design. In the isothermal EXPonential Amplification Reaction (EXPAR), template sequences with similar thermodynamic characteristics perform very differently. To understand what causes this variability, we characterized the performance of 384 template sequences, and used this data to develop two computational methods to predict EXPAR template performance based on sequence: a position weight matrix approach with support vector machine classifier, and RELIEF attribute evaluation with Naïve Bayes classification. The methods identified well and poorly performing EXPAR templates with 67–70% sensitivity and 77–80% specificity. We combined these methods into a computational tool that can accelerate new assay design by ruling out likely poor performers. Furthermore, our data suggest that variability in template performance is linked to specific sequence motifs. Cytidine, a pyrimidine base, is over-represented in certain positions of well-performing templates. Guanosine and adenosine, both purine bases, are over-represented in similar regions of poorly performing templates, frequently as GA or AG dimers. Since polymerases have a higher affinity for purine oligonucleotides, polymerase binding to GA-rich regions of a single-stranded DNA template may promote non-specific amplification in EXPAR and other nucleic acid amplification reactions. PMID:22416064

  19. Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beam Amplification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Govind

    2015-01-01

    The Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beam Amplification (SOCLBA) project will provide a capability to amplify a laser beam that is received in a modulating retro-reflector (MRR) located in a satellite in low Earth orbit. It will also improve the pointing procedure between Earth and spacecraft terminals. The technology uses laser arrays to strengthen the reflected laser beam from the spacecraft. The results of first year's work (2014) show amplification factors of 60 times the power of the signal beam. MMRs are mirrors that reflect light beams back to the source. In space optical communications, a high-powered laser interrogator beam is directed from the ground to a satellite. Within the satellite, the beam is redirected back to ground using the MMR. In the MMR, the beam passes through modulators, which encode a data signal onto the returning beam. MMRs can be used in small spacecraft for optical communications. The SOCLBA project is significant to NASA and small spacecraft due to its application to CubeSats for optical data transmission to ground stations, as well as possible application to spacecraft for optical data transmission.

  20. Controlled Microwave Heating Accelerates Rolling Circle Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takeo; Suzuki, Takamasa; Mineki, Shigeru; Ohuchi, Shokichi

    2015-01-01

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates single-stranded DNAs or RNA, and the diverse applications of this isothermal technique range from the sensitive detection of nucleic acids to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Microwave chemistry is widely applied to increase reaction rate as well as product yield and purity. The objectives of the present research were to apply microwave heating to RCA and indicate factors that contribute to the microwave selective heating effect. The microwave reaction temperature was strictly controlled using a microwave applicator optimized for enzymatic-scale reactions. Here, we showed that microwave-assisted RCA reactions catalyzed by either of the four thermostable DNA polymerases were accelerated over 4-folds compared with conventional RCA. Furthermore, the temperatures of the individual buffer components were specifically influenced by microwave heating. We concluded that microwave heating accelerated isothermal RCA of DNA because of the differential heating mechanisms of microwaves on the temperatures of reaction components, although the overall reaction temperatures were the same.

  1. Heralded noiseless amplification of a photon polarization qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocsis, S.; Xiang, G. Y.; Ralph, T. C.; Pryde, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Photons are the best long-range carriers of quantum information, but the unavoidable absorption and scattering in a transmission channel places a serious limitation on viable communication distances. Signal amplification will therefore be an essential feature of quantum technologies, with direct applications to quantum communication, metrology and fundamental tests of quantum theory. Non-deterministic noiseless amplification of a single mode can circumvent the challenges related to amplifying a quantum signal, such as the no-cloning theorem and the minimum noise cost for deterministic quantum state amplification. However, existing devices are not suitable for amplifying the fundamental optical quantum information carrier: a qubit coherently encoded across two optical modes. Here, we construct a coherent two-mode amplifier to demonstrate the first heralded noiseless linear amplification of a qubit encoded in the polarization state of a single photon. In doing so, we increase the transmission fidelity of a realistic qubit channel by up to a factor of five. Qubit amplifiers promise to extend the range of secure quantum communication and other quantum information science and technology protocols.

  2. Hybrid chirped pulse amplification system

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2005-03-29

    A hybrid chirped pulse amplification system wherein a short-pulse oscillator generates an oscillator pulse. The oscillator pulse is stretched to produce a stretched oscillator seed pulse. A pump laser generates a pump laser pulse. The stretched oscillator seed pulse and the pump laser pulse are directed into an optical parametric amplifier producing an optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and an optical parametric amplifier output unconverted pump pulse. The optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and the optical parametric amplifier output laser pulse are directed into a laser amplifier producing a laser amplifier output pulse. The laser amplifier output pulse is compressed to produce a recompressed hybrid chirped pulse amplification pulse.

  3. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-05-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength.

  4. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength. PMID:24805968

  5. Spheromak Impedance and Current Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K; Hua, D D; Stallard, B W

    2002-01-31

    It is shown that high current amplification can be achieved only by injecting helicity on the timescale for reconnection, {tau}{sub REC}, which determines the effective impedance of the spheromak. An approximate equation for current amplification is: dI{sub TOR}{sup 2}/dt {approx} I{sup 2}/{tau}{sub REC} - I{sub TOR}{sup 2}/{tau}{sub closed} where I is the gun current, I{sub TOR} is the spheromak toroidal current and {tau}{sub CLOSED} is the ohmic decay time of the spheromak. Achieving high current amplification, I{sub TOR} >> I, requires {tau}{sub REC} <<{tau}{sub CLOSED}. For resistive reconnection, this requires reconnection in a cold zone feeding helicity into a hot zone. Here we propose an impedance model based on these ideas in a form that can be implemented in the Corsica-based helicity transport code. The most important feature of the model is the possibility that {tau}{sub REC} actually increases as the spheromak temperature increases, perhaps accounting for the ''voltage sag'' observed in some experiments, and a tendency toward a constant ratio of field to current, B {proportional_to} I, or I{sub TOR} {approx} I. Program implications are discussed.

  6. Molecular detection of harmful algal blooms (HABs) using locked nucleic acids and bead array technology

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Mara R.; Jacobson, James W.; Goodwin, Kelly D.; Dunbar, Sherry A.; Fell, Jack W.

    2010-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a serious public health risk in coastal waters. As the intensity and frequency of HABs continue to rise, new methods of detection are needed for reliable identification. Herein, we developed a high-throughput, multiplex, bead array technique for the detection of the dinoflagellates Karenia brevis and Karenia mikimotoi. The method combined the Luminex detection system with two novel technologies: locked nucleic acid–modified oligonucleotides (LNA) and Mirus Label IT® nucleic acid technology. To study the feasibility of the method, we evaluated the performance of modified and unmodified LNA probes with amplicon targets that were biotin labeled with two different strategies: direct chemical labeling (Mirus Label IT) versus enzymatic end-labeling (single biotinylated primer). The results illustrated that LNA probes hybridized to complementary single-stranded DNA with better affinity and displayed higher fluorescence intensities than unmodified oligonucleotide DNA probes. The latter effect was more pronounced when the assay was carried out at temperatures above 53°C degree. As opposed to the enzymatic 5′ terminal labeling technique, the chemical-labeling method enhanced the level of fluorescence by as much as ~83%. The detection limits of the assay, which were established with LNA probes and Mirus Label IT system, ranged from 0.05 to 46 copies of rRNA. This high-throughput method, which represents the first molecular detection strategy to integrate Luminex technology with LNA probes and Mirus Label IT, can be adapted for the detection of other HABs and is well suited for the monitoring of red tides at pre-blooming and blooming conditions. PMID:21165155

  7. Improvement of φ29 DNA polymerase amplification performance by fusion of DNA binding motifs

    PubMed Central

    de Vega, Miguel; Lázaro, José M.; Mencía, Mario; Blanco, Luis; Salas, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Bacteriophage φ29 DNA polymerase is a unique enzyme endowed with two distinctive properties, high processivity and faithful polymerization coupled to strand displacement, that have led to the development of protocols to achieve isothermal amplification of limiting amounts of both circular plasmids and genomic DNA. To enhance the amplification efficiency of φ29 DNA polymerase, we have constructed chimerical DNA polymerases by fusing DNA binding domains to the C terminus of the polymerase. The results show that the addition of Helix-hairpin-Helix [(HhH)2] domains increases DNA binding of the hybrid polymerases without hindering their replication rate. In addition, the chimerical DNA polymerases display an improved and faithful multiply primed DNA amplification proficiency on both circular plasmids and genomic DNA and are unique φ29 DNA polymerase variants with enhanced amplification performance. The reported chimerical DNA polymerases will contribute to make φ29 DNA polymerase-based amplification technologies one of the most powerful tools for genomics. PMID:20823261

  8. Improvement of φ29 DNA polymerase amplification performance by fusion of DNA binding motifs.

    PubMed

    de Vega, Miguel; Lázaro, José M; Mencía, Mario; Blanco, Luis; Salas, Margarita

    2010-09-21

    Bacteriophage ϕ29 DNA polymerase is a unique enzyme endowed with two distinctive properties, high processivity and faithful polymerization coupled to strand displacement, that have led to the development of protocols to achieve isothermal amplification of limiting amounts of both circular plasmids and genomic DNA. To enhance the amplification efficiency of ϕ29 DNA polymerase, we have constructed chimerical DNA polymerases by fusing DNA binding domains to the C terminus of the polymerase. The results show that the addition of Helix-hairpin-Helix [(HhH)(2)] domains increases DNA binding of the hybrid polymerases without hindering their replication rate. In addition, the chimerical DNA polymerases display an improved and faithful multiply primed DNA amplification proficiency on both circular plasmids and genomic DNA and are unique ϕ29 DNA polymerase variants with enhanced amplification performance. The reported chimerical DNA polymerases will contribute to make ϕ29 DNA polymerase-based amplification technologies one of the most powerful tools for genomics. PMID:20823261

  9. Rolling circle amplification detection of RNA and DNA

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T.; Pattee, Melissa S.; Attix, Cristina M.; Tucker, James D.

    2004-08-31

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) has been useful for detecting point mutations in isolated nucleic acids, but its application in cytological preparations has been problematic. By pretreating cells with a combination of restriction enzymes and exonucleases, we demonstrate RCA in solution and in situ to detect gene copy number and single base mutations. It can also detect and quantify transcribed RNA in individual cells, making it a versatile tool for cell-based assays.

  10. Capture and Direct Amplification of DNA on Chitosan Microparticles in a Single PCR-Optimal Solution.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Kunal R; Nanayakkara, Imaly A; Cao, Weidong; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; White, Ian M

    2015-11-01

    While nucleic acid amplification tests have great potential as tools for rapid diagnostics, complicated sample preparation requirements inhibit their use in near-patient diagnostics and low-resource-setting applications. Recent advancements in nucleic acid purification have leveraged pH-modulated charge switching polymers to reduce the number of steps required for sample preparation. The polycation chitosan (pKa 6.4) has been used to efficiently purify DNA by binding nucleic acids in acidic buffers and then eluting them at a pH higher than 8.0. Though it is an improvement over conventional methods, this multistep procedure has not transformed the application of nucleic acid amplification assays. Here we describe a simpler approach using magnetic chitosan microparticles that interact with DNA in a manner that has not been reported before. The microparticles capture DNA at a pH optimal for PCR (8.5) just as efficiently as at low pH. Importantly, the captured DNA is still accessible by polymerase, enabling direct amplification from the microparticles. We demonstrate quantitative PCR from DNA captured on the microparticles, thus eliminating nearly all of the sample preparation steps. We anticipate that this new streamlined method for preparing DNA for amplification will greatly expand the diagnostic applications of nucleic acid amplification tests.

  11. Nucleic acid probes in diagnostic medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberry, Phillip A.

    1991-01-01

    The need for improved diagnostic procedures is outlined and variations in probe technology are briefly reviewed. A discussion of the application of probe technology to the diagnosis of disease in animals and humans is presented. A comparison of probe versus nonprobe diagnostics and isotopic versus nonisotopic probes is made and the current state of sequence amplification is described. The current market status of nucleic acid probes is reviewed with respect to their diagnostic application in human and veterinary medicine. Representative product examples are described and information on probes being developed that offer promise as future products is discussed.

  12. Web technology in the separation of strontium and cesium from INEL-ICPP radioactive acid waste (WM-185)

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.; Brown, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    Strontium and cesium were successfully removed from radioactive acidic waste (WM-185) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), with web technology from 3M and IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc. (IBC). A technical team from Pacific Northwest Laboratory, ICPP, 3M and IBC conducted a very successful series of experiments from August 15 through 18, 1994. The ICPP, Remote Analytical Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, provided the hot cell facilities and staff to complete these milestone experiments. The actual waste experiments duplicated the initial `cold` simulated waste results and confirmed the selective removal provided by ligand-particle web technology.

  13. Signal Amplification of Bioassay Using Zinc Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Chad L.

    An emerging trend in the analytical detection sciences is the employment of nanomaterials for bioassay signal transduction to identify analytes critical to public health. These nanomaterials have been specifically investigated for applications which require identification of trace levels of cells, proteins, or other molecules that can have broad ranging impacts to human health in fields such as clinical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, food and drink control, and the prevention of bioterrorism. Oftentimes these nanoparticle-based signal transduction or amplification approaches offer distinct advantages over conventional methods such as increased sensitivity, rapidity, or stability. The biological application of nanoparticles however, does suffer from drawbacks that have limited more widespread adoption of these techniques. Some of these drawbacks are, high cost and toxicity, arduous synthesis methods, functionalization and bioconjugation challenges, and laboratory disposal and environmental hazard issues, all of which have impeded the progression of this technology in some way or another. This work aims at developing novel techniques that offer solutions to a number of these hurdles through the development of new nanoparticle-based signal transduction approaches and the description of a previously undescribed nanomaterial. Zinc-based nanomaterials offer the opportunity to overcome some of the limitations that are encountered when other nanomaterials are employed for bioassay signal transduction. On the other hand, the biological application of zinc nanomaterials has been difficult because in general their fluorescence is in the blue range and the reported quantum yields are usually too low for highly sensitive applications. The advantages of using zinc nanomaterials for biological applications, such as reduced toxicity, simple synthesis, low cost, and straightforward functionalization strategies contribute to the research interest in their application as

  14. Solid-state Raman image amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmes, Lonnie Kirkland

    Amplification of low-light-level optical images is important for extending the range of lidar systems that image and detect objects in the atmosphere and underwater. The use of range-gating to produce images of particular range bins is also important in minimizing the image degradation due to light that is scattered backward from aerosols, smoke, or water along the imaging path. For practical lidar systems that must be operated within sight of unprotected observers, eye safety is of the utmost importance. This dissertation describes a new type of eye-safe, range-gated lidar sensing element based on Solid-state Raman Image Amplification (SSRIA) in a solid- state optical crystal. SSRIA can amplify low-level images in the eye-safe infrared at 1.556 μm with gains up to 106 with the addition of only quantum- limited noise. The high gains from SSRIA can compensate for low quantum efficiency detectors and can reduce the need for detector cooling. The range-gate of SSRIA is controlled by the pulsewidth of the pump laser and can be as short as 30-100 cm, using pump pulses of 2-6.7 nsec FWHM. A rate equation theoretical model is derived to help in the design of short pulsed Raman lasers. A theoretical model for the quantum noise properties of SSRIA is presented. SSRIA results in higher SNR images throughout a broad range of incident light levels, in contrast to the increasing noise factor with reduced gain in image intensified CCD's. A theoretical framework for the optical resolution of SSRIA is presented and it is shown that SSRIA can produce higher resolution than ICCD's. SSRIA is also superior in rejecting unwanted sunlight background, further increasing image SNR. Lastly, SSRIA can be combined with optical pre-filtering to perform optical image processing functions such as high-pass filtering and automatic target detection/recognition. The application of this technology to underwater imaging, called Marine Raman Image Amplification (MARIA) is also discussed. MARIA

  15. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 11. Historical changes in surface-water acid-base chemistry in response to acidic deposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Small, M.J.; Kingston, J.C.; Bernert, J.A.; Thomas, D.R.

    1990-09-01

    The objectives of the analyses reported in the State of Science report are to: identify the lake and stream populations in the United States that have experienced chronic changes in biologically significant constituents of surface water chemistry (e.g. pH, Al) in response to acidic deposition; quantify biologically meaningful historical changes in chronic surface water chemistry associated with acidic deposition, with emphasis on ANC, pH, and Al; estimate the proportion of lakes nor acidic that were not acidic in pre-industrial times; estimate the proportional response of each of the major chemical constituents that have changed in response to acidic deposition using a subset of statistically selected Adirondack lakes for which paleolimnological reconstructions of pre-industrial surface water chemistry have been performed; evaluate and improve, where appropriate and feasible, empirical models of predicting changes in ANC; and evaluate the response of seepage lakes to acidic deposition.

  16. Simple System for Isothermal DNA Amplification Coupled to Lateral Flow Detection

    PubMed Central

    Roskos, Kristina; Hickerson, Anna I.; Lu, Hsiang-Wei; Ferguson, Tanya M.; Shinde, Deepali N.; Klaue, Yvonne; Niemz, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    Infectious disease diagnosis in point-of-care settings can be greatly improved through integrated, automated nucleic acid testing devices. We have developed an early prototype for a low-cost system which executes isothermal DNA amplification coupled to nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF) detection in a mesofluidic cartridge attached to a portable instrument. Fluid handling inside the cartridge is facilitated through one-way passive valves, flexible pouches, and electrolysis-driven pumps, which promotes a compact and inexpensive instrument design. The closed-system disposable prevents workspace amplicon contamination. The cartridge design is based on standard scalable manufacturing techniques such as injection molding. Nucleic acid amplification occurs in a two-layer pouch that enables efficient heat transfer. We have demonstrated as proof of principle the amplification and detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) genomic DNA in the cartridge, using either Loop Mediated Amplification (LAMP) or the Exponential Amplification Reaction (EXPAR), both coupled to NALF detection. We envision that a refined version of this cartridge, including upstream sample preparation coupled to amplification and detection, will enable fully-automated sample-in to answer-out infectious disease diagnosis in primary care settings of low-resource countries with high disease burden. PMID:23922706

  17. Weak value amplification considered harmful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrie, Christopher; Combes, Joshua

    2014-03-01

    We show using statistically rigorous arguments that the technique of weak value amplification does not perform better than standard statistical techniques for the tasks of parameter estimation and signal detection. We show that using all data and considering the joint distribution of all measurement outcomes yields the optimal estimator. Moreover, we show estimation using the maximum likelihood technique with weak values as small as possible produces better performance for quantum metrology. In doing so, we identify the optimal experimental arrangement to be the one which reveals the maximal eigenvalue of the square of system observables. We also show these conclusions do not change in the presence of technical noise.

  18. Chemical Amplification with Encapsulated Reagents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jian; Koemer, Steffi; Craig, Stephen; Lin, Shirley; Rudkevich, Dmitry M.; Rebek, Julius, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Autocatalysis and chemical amplification are characteristic properties of living systems, and they give rise to behaviors such as increased sensitivity, responsiveness, and self-replication. Here we report a synthetic system in which a unique form of compartmentalization leads to nonlinear, autocatalytic behavior. The compartment is a reversibly formed capsule in which a reagent is sequestered. Reaction products displace the reagent from the capsule into solution and the reaction rate is accelerated. The resulting self-regulation is sensitive to the highly selective molecular recognition properties of the capsule.

  19. Thermoacoustic amplification of photoacoustic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijnen, F. G. C.; Dongen, J. v.; Reuss, J.; Harren, F. J. M.

    1996-06-01

    The thermoacoustic effect is used to amplify the photoacoustic signal induced by trace gas absorption of CO2 laser radiation. The acoustic wave pattern in a thermoacoustic amplifier coupled to a photoacoustic cell is represented in terms of electric transmission lines. Predictions of this model have resulted in a prototype thermoacoustic-photoacoustic (TAPA) detector to get a better understanding of this combination. The photoacoustic signal strength of the TAPA cell was linear with the trace gas density in the cell. Within this study we observed for the TAPA cell a higher PA signal than generated by a normal PA cell. Design criteria for better thermoacoustic amplification of photoacoustic signal are discussed.

  20. Deterministic amplification for cat-state engineering in circuit-QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Jaewoo; Oi, Daniel; Elliott, Matthew; Ginossar, Eran; Spiller, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    We propose a novel implementation scheme of amplifying the size of Schroedinger cat states in superconducting circuits. While the amplification method in quantum optics is normally probabilistic, our scheme can be performed deterministically in circuit-QED. Using adiabatic methods and optimal control, we demonstrate that the amplification operation can be built deterministically in a system of a transmon qubit strongly coupled with a cavity. This amplification tool will in particular open the potential of continuous-variable nonclassical states toward practical quantum technologies, for example, stabilization of cat-type states and continuous-variable teleportation.

  1. Lidar measurements of atmospheric backscattering amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banakh, V. A.; Razenkov, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    Results of long-term continuous measurements of the atmospheric backscattering amplification coefficient on a 2-km-long near-ground path with the use of a two-channel micropulse lidar based on a waveguide laser are presented. It is shown that the backscattering amplification coefficient has a pronounced daily variation. In the night and in the afternoon, atmospheric backscattering amplification is maximal and the amplification coefficient can exceed 2. The amplification is low or absent in morning and evening hours at neutral temperature stratification in the near-ground layer of the atmosphere. The backscattering amplification coefficient increases with an increase in the structure constant of the air refracting index and variance of the image jitter of the illumination spot created by the probing laser beam on the wall of a 2-km-distant building.

  2. Final technical report: Commercialization of the Biofine technology for levulinic acid production from paper sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, Stephen W.

    2002-04-23

    This project involved a three-year program managed by BioMetics, Inc. (Waltham, MA) to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of Biofine thermochemical process technology for conversion of cellulose-containing wastes or renewable materials into levulinic acid, a versatile platform chemical. The program, commencing in October 1995, involved the design, procurement, construction and operation of a plant utilizing the Biofine process to convert 1 dry ton per day of paper sludge waste. The plant was successfully designed, constructed, and commissioned in 1997. It was operated for a period of one year on paper sludge from a variety of source paper mills to collect data to verify the design for a commercial scale plant. Operational results were obtained for four different feedstock varieties. Stable, continuous operation was achieved for two of the feedstocks. Continuous operation of the plant at demonstration scale provided the opportunity for process optimization, development of operational protocols, operator training and identification of suitable materials of construction for scale up to commercial operation . Separated fiber from municipal waster was also successfully processed. The project team consisted of BioMetics Inc., Great Lakes Chemical Corporation (West Lafayette, IN), and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Albany, NY).

  3. Next generation sequencing (NGS)technologies and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vuyisich, Momchilo

    2012-09-11

    NGS technology overview: (1) NGS library preparation - Nucleic acids extraction, Sample quality control, RNA conversion to cDNA, Addition of sequencing adapters, Quality control of library; (2) Sequencing - Clonal amplification of library fragments, (except PacBio), Sequencing by synthesis, Data output (reads and quality); and (3) Data analysis - Read mapping, Genome assembly, Gene expression, Operon structure, sRNA discovery, and Epigenetic analyses.

  4. Single Cell Transcriptome Amplification with MALBAC

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Longzhi; Tang, Fuchou; Xie, X. Sunney

    2015-01-01

    Recently, Multiple Annealing and Looping-Based Amplification Cycles (MALBAC) has been developed for whole genome amplification of an individual cell, relying on quasilinear instead of exponential amplification to achieve high coverage. Here we adapt MALBAC for single-cell transcriptome amplification, which gives consistently high detection efficiency, accuracy and reproducibility. With this newly developed technique, we successfully amplified and sequenced single cells from 3 germ layers from mouse embryos in the early gastrulation stage, and examined the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program among cells in the mesoderm layer on a single-cell level. PMID:25822772

  5. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification.

    PubMed

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2014-10-28

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions. PMID:25362284

  6. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj E-mail: rajc@andrew.cmu.edu

    2014-10-28

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  7. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2014-10-01

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  8. Trophic amplification of climate warming

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Richard R.; Beaugrand, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystems can alternate suddenly between contrasting persistent states due to internal processes or external drivers. It is important to understand the mechanisms by which these shifts occur, especially in exploited ecosystems. There have been several abrupt marine ecosystem shifts attributed either to fishing, recent climate change or a combination of these two drivers. We show that temperature has been an important driver of the trophodynamics of the North Sea, a heavily fished marine ecosystem, for nearly 50 years and that a recent pronounced change in temperature established a new ecosystem dynamic regime through a series of internal mechanisms. Using an end-to-end ecosystem approach that included primary producers, primary, secondary and tertiary consumers, and detritivores, we found that temperature modified the relationships among species through nonlinearities in the ecosystem involving ecological thresholds and trophic amplifications. Trophic amplification provides an alternative mechanism to positive feedback to drive an ecosystem towards a new dynamic regime, which in this case favours jellyfish in the plankton and decapods and detritivores in the benthos. Although overfishing is often held responsible for marine ecosystem degeneration, temperature can clearly bring about similar effects. Our results are relevant to ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM), seen as the way forward to manage exploited marine ecosystems. PMID:19740882

  9. Trophic amplification of climate warming.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Richard R; Beaugrand, Gregory

    2009-12-01

    Ecosystems can alternate suddenly between contrasting persistent states due to internal processes or external drivers. It is important to understand the mechanisms by which these shifts occur, especially in exploited ecosystems. There have been several abrupt marine ecosystem shifts attributed either to fishing, recent climate change or a combination of these two drivers. We show that temperature has been an important driver of the trophodynamics of the North Sea, a heavily fished marine ecosystem, for nearly 50 years and that a recent pronounced change in temperature established a new ecosystem dynamic regime through a series of internal mechanisms. Using an end-to-end ecosystem approach that included primary producers, primary, secondary and tertiary consumers, and detritivores, we found that temperature modified the relationships among species through nonlinearities in the ecosystem involving ecological thresholds and trophic amplifications. Trophic amplification provides an alternative mechanism to positive feedback to drive an ecosystem towards a new dynamic regime, which in this case favours jellyfish in the plankton and decapods and detritivores in the benthos. Although overfishing is often held responsible for marine ecosystem degeneration, temperature can clearly bring about similar effects. Our results are relevant to ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM), seen as the way forward to manage exploited marine ecosystems.

  10. Signal amplification on microarrays: techniques and advances in tyramide signal amplification (TSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Karl E.; Tyler, Mary C.; Mikulskis, Alvydas; O'Malley, Mike; Broadbent, Jeff J.; Golenko, Eva E.; Johnson, Andy L.; Lott, Steve; Khimani, Anis H.; Bobrow, Mark N.

    2001-06-01

    Increased sensitivity for differential mRNA expression analysis on microarrays is rapidly becoming a serious need as the technology matures. Current techniques using direct cyanine labeled targets are effective for expression analysis of abundant mRNA sources but have limited utility for analysis where mRNA quantities are limited. Tyramide signal amplification (TSATM) applied to microarray detection provides dramatic improvements in sensitivity, allowing the reduction of sample sizes by as much as 200-fold. The technique includes hapten labeling of two separate RNA populations, microarray hybridization and detection of each hapten with sequential signal amplification steps. The system uses fluorescein and biotin nucleotide analogs as the hapten pair. Hybridized fluorescein and biotin labeled targets are sequentially reacted with horseradish peroxidase and cyanine 3 and cyanine 5 tyramides, resulting in the numerous depositions of these fluorophors on the array. Differential gene expression analysis of LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines using one microgram of total RNA and TSA detection, indicates good correlation with results obtained starting with 100 micrograms ((mu) g) of total RNA in a conventional cyanine 3 and cyanine 5 nucleotide analog labeling and detection system (i.e., the direct method).

  11. Clostridium difficile testing algorithms using glutamate dehydrogenase antigen and C. difficile toxin enzyme immunoassays with C. difficile nucleic acid amplification testing increase diagnostic yield in a tertiary pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kaede V; McGowan, Karin L

    2012-04-01

    We evaluated the performance of the rapid C. diff Quik Chek Complete's glutamate dehydrogenase antigen (GDH) and toxin A/B (CDT) tests in two algorithmic approaches for a tertiary pediatric population: algorithm 1 entailed initial testing with GDH/CDT followed by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), and algorithm 2 entailed GDH/CDT followed by cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA) for adjudication of discrepant GDH-positive/CDT-negative results. A true positive (TP) was defined as positivity by CCNA or positivity by LAMP plus another test (GDH, CDT, or the Premier C. difficile toxin A and B enzyme immunoassay [P-EIA]). A total of 141 specimens from 141 patients yielded 27 TPs and 19% prevalence. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 56%, 100%, 100%, and 90% for P-EIA and 81%, 100%, 100%, and 96% for both algorithm 1 and algorithm 2. In summary, GDH-based algorithms detected C. difficile infections with superior sensitivity compared to P-EIA. The algorithms allowed immediate reporting of half of all TPs, but LAMP or CCNA was required to confirm the presence or absence of toxigenic C. difficile in GDH-positive/CDT-negative specimens.

  12. Chirality Amplification in Tactoids of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chenhui; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate an effective chirality amplification based on the long-range forces, extending over the scales of tens of micrometers, much larger than the single molecule (nanometer) scale. The mechanism is rooted in the long-range elastic nature of orientational order in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) that represent water solutions of achiral disc-like molecules. Minute quantities of chiral molecules such as amino acid L-alanine and limonene added to the droplets of LCLC lead to chiral amplification characterized by an increase of optical activity by a factor of 103 - 104. This effect allows one to discriminate and detect the absolute configuration of chiral molecules in an aqueous system, thus opening new possibilities in biosensing and other biological applications.

  13. Approaches towards molecular amplification for sensing.

    PubMed

    Goggins, Sean; Frost, Christopher G

    2016-06-01

    Diagnostic assays that rely on molecular interactions have come a long way; from initial reversible detection systems towards irreversible reaction indicator-based methods. More recently, the emergence of innovative molecular amplification methodologies has revolutionised sensing, allowing diagnostic assays to achieve ultra-low limits of detection. There have been a significant number of molecular amplification approaches developed over recent years to accommodate the wide variety of analytes that require sensitive detection. To celebrate this achievement, this comprehensive critical review has been compiled to give a broad overview of the many different approaches used to attain amplification in sensing with an aim to inspire the next generation of diagnostic assays looking to achieve the ultimate detection limit. This review has been created with the focus on how each conceptually unique molecular amplification methodology achieves amplification, not just its sensitivity, while highlighting any key processes. Excluded are any references that were not found to contain an obvious molecular amplifier or amplification component, or that did not use an appropriate signal readout that could be incorporated into a sensing application. Additionally, methodologies where amplification is achieved through advances in instrumentation are also excluded. Depending upon the type of approach employed, amplification strategies are divided into four categories: target, label, signal or receptor amplification. More recent, more complex protocols combine a number of approaches and are therefore categorised by which amplification component described within was considered as the biggest advancement. The advantages and disadvantages of each methodology are discussed along with any limits of detection, if stated in the original article. Any subsequent use of the methodology within sensing or any other application is also mentioned to draw attention to its practicality. The importance of

  14. The MDM2 gene amplification database.

    PubMed Central

    Momand, J; Jung, D; Wilczynski, S; Niland, J

    1998-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is inactivated in human tumors by several distinct mechanisms. The best characterized inactivation mechanisms are: (i) gene mutation; (ii) p53 protein association with viral proteins; (iii) p53 protein association with the MDM2 cellular oncoprotein. The MDM2 gene has been shown to be abnormally up-regulated in human tumors and tumor cell lines by gene amplification, increased transcript levels and enhanced translation. This communication presents a brief review of the spectrum of MDM2 abnormalities in human tumors and compares the tissue distribution of MDM2 amplification and p53 mutation frequencies. In this study, 3889 samples from tumors or xenografts from 28 tumor types were examined for MDM2 amplification from previously published sources. The overall frequency of MDM2 amplification in these human tumors was 7%. Gene amplification was observed in 19 tumor types, with the highest frequency observed in soft tissue tumors (20%), osteosarcomas (16%) and esophageal carcinomas (13%). Tumors which showed a higher incidence of MDM2 amplification than p53 mutation were soft tissue tumors, testicular germ cell cancers and neuro-blastomas. Data from studies where both MDM2 amplification and p53 mutations were analyzed within the same samples showed that mutations in these two genes do not generally occur within the same tumor. In these studies, 29 out of a total of 33 MDM2 amplification-positive tumors had wild-type p53. We hypothesize that heretofore uncharacterized carcinogens favor MDM2 amplification over p53 mutations in certain tumor types. A database listing the MDM2 gene amplifications is available on the World Wide Web at http://www. infosci.coh.org/mdm2 . Charts of MDM2 amplification frequencies and comparisons with p53 genetic alterations are also available at this Web site. PMID:9671804

  15. Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of technology focuses on instructional technology. Topics include inquiry and technology; curriculum development; reflection and curriculum evaluation; criteria for technological innovations that will increase student motivation; standards; impact of new technologies on library media centers; software; and future trends. (LRW)

  16. Multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuylsteke, Pieter; Schoeters, Emile P.

    1994-05-01

    This article presents a novel approach to the problem of detail contrast enhancement, based on multiresolution representation of the original image. The image is decomposed into a weighted sum of smooth, localized, 2D basis functions at multiple scales. Each transform coefficient represents the amount of local detail at some specific scale and at a specific position in the image. Detail contrast is enhanced by non-linear amplification of the transform coefficients. An inverse transform is then applied to the modified coefficients. This yields a uniformly contrast- enhanced image without artefacts. The MUSICA-algorithm is being applied routinely to computed radiography images of chest, skull, spine, shoulder, pelvis, extremities, and abdomen examinations, with excellent acceptance. It is useful for a wide range of applications in the medical, graphical, and industrial area.

  17. Weak value amplification via second-order correlated technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Cui; Jing-Zheng, Huang; Xiang, Liu; Gui-Hua, Zeng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new framework combining weak measurement and second-order correlated technique. The theoretical analysis shows that weak value amplification (WVA) experiment can also be implemented by a second-order correlated system. We then build two-dimensional second-order correlated function patterns for achieving higher amplification factor and discuss the signal-to-noise ratio influence. Several advantages can be obtained by our proposal. For instance, detectors with high resolution are not necessary. Moreover, detectors with low saturation intensity are available in WVA setup. Finally, type-one technical noise can be effectively suppressed. Project supported by the Union Research Centre of Advanced Spaceflight Technology (Grant No. USCAST2013-05), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61170228, 61332019, and 61471239), and the High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA122901).

  18. Phenotypic and technological diversity of lactic acid bacteria and staphylococci isolated from traditionally fermented sausages in southern Greece.

    PubMed

    Drosinos, Eleftherios H; Paramithiotis, Spiros; Kolovos, George; Tsikouras, Ioannis; Metaxopoulos, Ioannis

    2007-05-01

    The physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of spontaneously fermented sausages made by two medium-sized enterprises (MSE) located in southern Greece have been studied. A total of 300 lactic acid bacteria and 300 staphylococcal strains have been isolated and identified by their physiological characteristics. Lactobacillus plantarum strains were found to dominate the lactic acid bacteria microbiota in most of the cases with L. sakei strains prevailing in some of them and L. rhamnosus strains occasionally accompanying the dominant lactic acid bacteria microbiota. On the other hand, S. saprophyticus strains were found to dominate the staphylococcal microbiota in all spontaneously fermented sausages with of S. simulans, S. xylosus, S. gallinarum and S. cohnii cohnii strains being sporadically present. Following the identification, an evaluation of their technological properties, namely proteolytic and lipolytic capacities as well as production of biogenic amines and antimicrobial compounds, took place. None of the lactic acid bacteria and staphylococci was found to possess lipolytic activity whereas a total of 6 lactic acid bacteria and 51 staphylococci strains were found to be able to hydrolyse either the sarcoplasic, myofibrillar or both protein fractions. Furthermore, only one L. sakei strain and 185 staphylococci strains were found to possess decarboxylase activity against lysine, tyrosine, ornithine or histidine. Finally none of the staphylococcal microbiota and 3 lactic acid bacteria strains were found to be able to produce antimicrobial compounds of proteinaceous nature against Listeria monocytogenes.

  19. Controlled Microwave Heating Accelerates Rolling Circle Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takeo; Suzuki, Takamasa; Mineki, Shigeru; Ohuchi, Shokichi

    2015-01-01

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates single-stranded DNAs or RNA, and the diverse applications of this isothermal technique range from the sensitive detection of nucleic acids to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Microwave chemistry is widely applied to increase reaction rate as well as product yield and purity. The objectives of the present research were to apply microwave heating to RCA and indicate factors that contribute to the microwave selective heating effect. The microwave reaction temperature was strictly controlled using a microwave applicator optimized for enzymatic-scale reactions. Here, we showed that microwave-assisted RCA reactions catalyzed by either of the four thermostable DNA polymerases were accelerated over 4-folds compared with conventional RCA. Furthermore, the temperatures of the individual buffer components were specifically influenced by microwave heating. We concluded that microwave heating accelerated isothermal RCA of DNA because of the differential heating mechanisms of microwaves on the temperatures of reaction components, although the overall reaction temperatures were the same. PMID:26348227

  20. Profiling in situ microbial community structure with an amplification microarray.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Darrell P; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Bryant, Lexi; Golova, Julia; Wiles, Cory; Williams, Kenneth H; Peacock, Aaron D; Long, Philip E

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to unify amplification, labeling, and microarray hybridization chemistries within a single, closed microfluidic chamber (an amplification microarray) and verify technology performance on a series of groundwater samples from an in situ field experiment designed to compare U(VI) mobility under conditions of various alkalinities (as HCO(3)(-)) during stimulated microbial activity accompanying acetate amendment. Analytical limits of detection were between 2 and 200 cell equivalents of purified DNA. Amplification microarray signatures were well correlated with 16S rRNA-targeted quantitative PCR results and hybridization microarray signatures. The succession of the microbial community was evident with and consistent between the two microarray platforms. Amplification microarray analysis of acetate-treated groundwater showed elevated levels of iron-reducing bacteria (Flexibacter, Geobacter, Rhodoferax, and Shewanella) relative to the average background profile, as expected. Identical molecular signatures were evident in the transect treated with acetate plus NaHCO(3), but at much lower signal intensities and with a much more rapid decline (to nondetection). Azoarcus, Thaurea, and Methylobacterium were responsive in the acetate-only transect but not in the presence of bicarbonate. Observed differences in microbial community composition or response to bicarbonate amendment likely had an effect on measured rates of U reduction, with higher rates probable in the part of the field experiment that was amended with bicarbonate. The simplification in microarray-based work flow is a significant technological advance toward entirely closed-amplicon microarray-based tests and is generally extensible to any number of environmental monitoring applications.

  1. Profiling In Situ Microbial Community Structure with an Amplification Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Knickerbocker, Christopher; Bryant, Lexi; Golova, Julia; Wiles, Cory; Williams, Kenneth H.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Long, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to unify amplification, labeling, and microarray hybridization chemistries within a single, closed microfluidic chamber (an amplification microarray) and verify technology performance on a series of groundwater samples from an in situ field experiment designed to compare U(VI) mobility under conditions of various alkalinities (as HCO3−) during stimulated microbial activity accompanying acetate amendment. Analytical limits of detection were between 2 and 200 cell equivalents of purified DNA. Amplification microarray signatures were well correlated with 16S rRNA-targeted quantitative PCR results and hybridization microarray signatures. The succession of the microbial community was evident with and consistent between the two microarray platforms. Amplification microarray analysis of acetate-treated groundwater showed elevated levels of iron-reducing bacteria (Flexibacter, Geobacter, Rhodoferax, and Shewanella) relative to the average background profile, as expected. Identical molecular signatures were evident in the transect treated with acetate plus NaHCO3, but at much lower signal intensities and with a much more rapid decline (to nondetection). Azoarcus, Thaurea, and Methylobacterium were responsive in the acetate-only transect but not in the presence of bicarbonate. Observed differences in microbial community composition or response to bicarbonate amendment likely had an effect on measured rates of U reduction, with higher rates probable in the part of the field experiment that was amended with bicarbonate. The simplification in microarray-based work flow is a significant technological advance toward entirely closed-amplicon microarray-based tests and is generally extensible to any number of environmental monitoring applications. PMID:23160129

  2. Nitrogen dioxide reducing ascorbic acid technologies in the ventilator circuit leads to uniform NO concentration during inspiration.

    PubMed

    Pezone, Matthew J; Wakim, Matthew G; Denton, Ryan J; Gamero, Lucas G; Roscigno, Robert F; Gilbert, Richard J; Lovich, Mark A

    2016-08-31

    Conventional inhaled NO systems deliver NO by synchronized injection or continuous NO flow in the ventilator circuitry. Such methods can lead to variable concentrations during inspiration that may differ from desired dosing. NO concentrations in these systems are generally monitored through electrochemical methods that are too slow to capture this nuance and potential dosing error. A novel technology that reduces NO2 into NO via low-resistance ascorbic-acid cartridges just prior to inhalation has recently been described. The gas volume of these cartridges may enhance gas mixing and reduce dosing inconsistency throughout inhalation. The impact of the ascorbic-acid cartridge technology on NO concentration during inspiration was characterized through rapid chemiluminescence detection during volume control ventilation, pressure control ventilation, synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and continuous positive airway pressure using an in vitro lung model configured to simulate the complete uptake of NO. Two ascorbic acid cartridges in series provided uniform and consistent dosing during inspiration during all modes of ventilation. The use of one cartridge showed variable inspiratory concentration of NO at the largest tidal volumes, whereas the use of no ascorbic acid cartridge led to highly inconsistent NO inspiratory waveforms. The use of ascorbic acid cartridges also decreased breath-to-breath variation in SIMV and CPAP ventilation. The ascorbic-acid cartridges, which are designed to convert NO2 (either as substrate or resulting from NO oxidation during injection) into NO, also provide the benefit of minimizing the variation of inhaled NO concentration during inspiration. It is expected that the implementation of this method will lead to more consistent and predictable dosing.

  3. Nitrogen dioxide reducing ascorbic acid technologies in the ventilator circuit leads to uniform NO concentration during inspiration.

    PubMed

    Pezone, Matthew J; Wakim, Matthew G; Denton, Ryan J; Gamero, Lucas G; Roscigno, Robert F; Gilbert, Richard J; Lovich, Mark A

    2016-08-31

    Conventional inhaled NO systems deliver NO by synchronized injection or continuous NO flow in the ventilator circuitry. Such methods can lead to variable concentrations during inspiration that may differ from desired dosing. NO concentrations in these systems are generally monitored through electrochemical methods that are too slow to capture this nuance and potential dosing error. A novel technology that reduces NO2 into NO via low-resistance ascorbic-acid cartridges just prior to inhalation has recently been described. The gas volume of these cartridges may enhance gas mixing and reduce dosing inconsistency throughout inhalation. The impact of the ascorbic-acid cartridge technology on NO concentration during inspiration was characterized through rapid chemiluminescence detection during volume control ventilation, pressure control ventilation, synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and continuous positive airway pressure using an in vitro lung model configured to simulate the complete uptake of NO. Two ascorbic acid cartridges in series provided uniform and consistent dosing during inspiration during all modes of ventilation. The use of one cartridge showed variable inspiratory concentration of NO at the largest tidal volumes, whereas the use of no ascorbic acid cartridge led to highly inconsistent NO inspiratory waveforms. The use of ascorbic acid cartridges also decreased breath-to-breath variation in SIMV and CPAP ventilation. The ascorbic-acid cartridges, which are designed to convert NO2 (either as substrate or resulting from NO oxidation during injection) into NO, also provide the benefit of minimizing the variation of inhaled NO concentration during inspiration. It is expected that the implementation of this method will lead to more consistent and predictable dosing. PMID:27264784

  4. An integrated lateral flow assay for effective DNA amplification and detection at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Gong, Yan; Feng, Shangsheng; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-05-10

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) have been extensively explored in nucleic acid testing (NAT) for medical diagnostics, food safety analysis and environmental monitoring. However, the amount of target nucleic acid in a raw sample is usually too low to be directly detected by LFAs, necessitating the process of amplification. Even though cost-effective paper-based amplification techniques have been introduced, they have always been separately performed from LFAs, hence increasing the risk of reagent loss and cross-contaminations. To date, integrating paper-based nucleic acid amplification into colorimetric LFA in a simple, portable and cost-effective manner has not been introduced. Herein, we developed an integrated LFA with the aid of a specially designed handheld battery-powered system for effective amplification and detection of targets in resource-poor settings. Interestingly, using the integrated paper-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-LFA, we successfully performed highly sensitive and specific target detection, achieving a detection limit of as low as 3 × 10(3) copies of target DNA, which is comparable to the conventional tube-based LAMP-LFA in an unintegrated format. The device may serve in conjunction with a simple paper-based sample preparation to create a fully integrated paper-based sample-to-answer diagnostic device for point-of-care testing (POCT) in the near future. PMID:27010033

  5. Chemical amplification of magnetic field effects relevant to avian magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Kattnig, Daniel R; Evans, Emrys W; Déjean, Victoire; Dodson, Charlotte A; Wallace, Mark I; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Timmel, Christiane R; Hore, P J

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as the Earth's can change the yields of radical pair reactions even though the energies involved are orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy, kBT, at room temperature. Proposed as the source of the light-dependent magnetic compass in migratory birds, the radical pair mechanism is thought to operate in cryptochrome flavoproteins in the retina. Here we demonstrate that the primary magnetic field effect on flavin photoreactions can be amplified chemically by slow radical termination reactions under conditions of continuous photoexcitation. The nature and origin of the amplification are revealed by studies of the intermolecular flavin-tryptophan and flavin-ascorbic acid photocycles and the closely related intramolecular flavin-tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome. Amplification factors of up to 5.6 were observed for magnetic fields weaker than 1 mT. Substantial chemical amplification could have a significant impact on the viability of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor. PMID:27001735

  6. Linking Arctic amplification and local feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-11-01

    Climate simulations show that as the Earth warms, the Arctic warms more than the average global warming. However, models differ on how much more the Arctic warms, and although scientists have proposed a variety of mechanisms to explain the Arctic warming amplification, there is no consensus on the main reasons for it. To shed light on this issue, Hwang et al. investigated the relationship between Arctic amplification and poleward energy transport and local Arctic feedbacks, such as changes in cloud cover or ice loss, across a group of models. The researchers noted that differences in atmospheric energy transport did not explain the ranges of polar amplification; rather, models with more amplification showed less energy transport into high latitudes. The authors found that decreasing energy transport is due to a coupled relationship between Arctic amplification and energy transport: Arctic amplification reduces the equator-to-pole temperature gradient, which strongly decreases energy transport. They suggest that this coupled relationship should be taken into account in studies of Arctic amplification. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2011GL048546, 2011)

  7. Cochlear amplification, outer hair cells and prestin

    PubMed Central

    Dallos, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical amplification of acoustic signals is apparently a common feature of vertebrate auditory organs. In non-mammalian vertebrates amplification is produced by stereociliary processes, related to the mechanotransducer channel complex and probably to the phenomenon of fast adaptation. The extended frequency range of the mammalian cochlea has likely co-evolved with a novel hair cell type, the outer hair cell and its constituent membrane protein, prestin. Cylindrical outer hair cells are motile and their somatic length changes are voltage driven and powered by prestin. One of the central outstanding problems in mammalian cochlear neurobiology is the relation between the two amplification processes. PMID:18809494

  8. Rapid detection of Porcine circovirus 2 by recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianchang; Wang, Jinfeng; Liu, Libing; Li, Ruiwen; Yuan, Wanzhe

    2016-09-01

    Porcine circovirus-associated disease, caused primarily by Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV-2), has become endemic in many pig-producing countries and has resulted in significant economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Tests for PCV-2 infection include PCR, nested PCR, competitive PCR, and real-time PCR (rtPCR). Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) has emerged as an isothermal gene amplification technology for the molecular detection of infectious disease agents. RPA is performed at a constant temperature and therefore can be carried out in a water bath. In addition, RPA is completed in ~30 min, much faster than PCR, which usually takes >60 min. We developed a RPA-based method for the detection of PCV-2. The detection limit of RPA was 10(2) copies of PCV-2 genomic DNA. RPA showed the same sensitivity as rtPCR but was 10 times more sensitive than conventional PCR. Successful amplification of PCV-2 DNA, but not other viral templates, demonstrated high specificity of the RPA assay. This method was also validated using clinical samples. The results showed that the RPA assay had a diagnostic agreement rate of 93.7% with conventional PCR and 100% with rtPCR. These findings suggest that the RPA assay is a simple, rapid, and cost-effective method for PCV-2 detection, which could be potentially applied in clinical diagnosis and field surveillance of PCV-2 infection. PMID:27493138

  9. Gene amplification confers glyphosate resistance in Amaranthus palmeri

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Todd A.; Zhang, Wenli; Wang, Dafu; Bukun, Bekir; Chisholm, Stephen T.; Shaner, Dale L.; Nissen, Scott J.; Patzoldt, William L.; Tranel, Patrick J.; Culpepper, A. Stanley; Grey, Timothy L.; Webster, Theodore M.; Vencill, William K.; Sammons, R. Douglas; Jiang, Jiming; Preston, Christopher; Leach, Jan E.; Westra, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate became widely used in the United States and other parts of the world after the commercialization of glyphosate-resistant crops. These crops have constitutive overexpression of a glyphosate-insensitive form of the herbicide target site gene, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Increased use of glyphosate over multiple years imposes selective genetic pressure on weed populations. We investigated recently discovered glyphosate-resistant Amaranthus palmeri populations from Georgia, in comparison with normally sensitive populations. EPSPS enzyme activity from resistant and susceptible plants was equally inhibited by glyphosate, which led us to use quantitative PCR to measure relative copy numbers of the EPSPS gene. Genomes of resistant plants contained from 5-fold to more than 160-fold more copies of the EPSPS gene than did genomes of susceptible plants. Quantitative RT-PCR on cDNA revealed that EPSPS expression was positively correlated with genomic EPSPS relative copy number. Immunoblot analyses showed that increased EPSPS protein level also correlated with EPSPS genomic copy number. EPSPS gene amplification was heritable, correlated with resistance in pseudo-F2 populations, and is proposed to be the molecular basis of glyphosate resistance. FISH revealed that EPSPS genes were present on every chromosome and, therefore, gene amplification was likely not caused by unequal chromosome crossing over. This occurrence of gene amplification as an herbicide resistance mechanism in a naturally occurring weed population is particularly significant because it could threaten the sustainable use of glyphosate-resistant crop technology. PMID:20018685

  10. Rapid detection of Porcine circovirus 2 by recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianchang; Wang, Jinfeng; Liu, Libing; Li, Ruiwen; Yuan, Wanzhe

    2016-09-01

    Porcine circovirus-associated disease, caused primarily by Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV-2), has become endemic in many pig-producing countries and has resulted in significant economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Tests for PCV-2 infection include PCR, nested PCR, competitive PCR, and real-time PCR (rtPCR). Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) has emerged as an isothermal gene amplification technology for the molecular detection of infectious disease agents. RPA is performed at a constant temperature and therefore can be carried out in a water bath. In addition, RPA is completed in ~30 min, much faster than PCR, which usually takes >60 min. We developed a RPA-based method for the detection of PCV-2. The detection limit of RPA was 10(2) copies of PCV-2 genomic DNA. RPA showed the same sensitivity as rtPCR but was 10 times more sensitive than conventional PCR. Successful amplification of PCV-2 DNA, but not other viral templates, demonstrated high specificity of the RPA assay. This method was also validated using clinical samples. The results showed that the RPA assay had a diagnostic agreement rate of 93.7% with conventional PCR and 100% with rtPCR. These findings suggest that the RPA assay is a simple, rapid, and cost-effective method for PCV-2 detection, which could be potentially applied in clinical diagnosis and field surveillance of PCV-2 infection.

  11. Characterization of fatty acid-producing wastewater microbial communities using next generation sequencing technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    While wastewater represents a viable source of bacterial biodiesel production, very little is known on the composition of these microbial communities. We studied the taxonomic diversity and succession of microbial communities in bioreactors accumulating fatty acids using 454-pyro...

  12. Applications of Gene Replacement Technology to Streptomyces clavuligerus Strain Development for Clavulanic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Paradkar, A. S.; Mosher, R. H.; Anders, C.; Griffin, A.; Griffin, J.; Hughes, C.; Greaves, P.; Barton, B.; Jensen, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    Cephamycin C production was blocked in wild-type cultures of the clavulanic acid-producing organism Streptomyces clavuligerus by targeted disruption of the gene (lat) encoding lysine ɛ-aminotransferase. Specific production of clavulanic acid increased in the lat mutants derived from the wild-type strain by 2- to 2.5-fold. Similar beneficial effects on clavulanic acid production were noted in previous studies when gene disruption was used to block the production of the non-clavulanic acid clavams produced by S. clavuligerus. Therefore, mutations in lat and in cvm1, a gene involved in clavam production, were introduced into a high-titer industrial strain of S. clavuligerus to create a double mutant with defects in production of both cephamycin C and clavams. Production of both cephamycin C and non-clavulanic acid clavams was eliminated in the double mutant, and clavulanic acid titers increased about 10% relative to those of the parental strain. This represents the first report of the successful use of genetic engineering to eliminate undesirable metabolic pathways in an industrial strain used for the production of an antibiotic important in human medicine. PMID:11319114

  13. GMO detection using a bioluminescent real time reporter (BART) of loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) suitable for field use

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an increasing need for quantitative technologies suitable for molecular detection in a variety of settings for applications including food traceability and monitoring of genetically modified (GM) crops and their products through the food processing chain. Conventional molecular diagnostics utilising real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and fluorescence-based determination of amplification require temperature cycling and relatively complex optics. In contrast, isothermal amplification coupled to a bioluminescent output produced in real-time (BART) occurs at a constant temperature and only requires a simple light detection and integration device. Results Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) shows robustness to sample-derived inhibitors. Here we show the applicability of coupled LAMP and BART reactions (LAMP-BART) for determination of genetically modified (GM) maize target DNA at low levels of contamination (0.1-5.0% GM) using certified reference material, and compare this to RT-PCR. Results show that conventional DNA extraction methods developed for PCR may not be optimal for LAMP-BART quantification. Additionally, we demonstrate that LAMP is more tolerant to plant sample-derived inhibitors, and show this can be exploited to develop rapid extraction techniques suitable for simple field-based qualitative tests for GM status determination. We also assess the effect of total DNA assay load on LAMP-BART quantitation. Conclusions LAMP-BART is an effective and sensitive technique for GM detection with significant potential for quantification even at low levels of contamination and in samples derived from crops such as maize with a large genome size. The resilience of LAMP-BART to acidic polysaccharides makes it well suited to rapid sample preparation techniques and hence to both high throughput laboratory settings and to portable GM detection applications. The impact of the plant sample matrix and genome loading within a reaction must

  14. Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis by isothermal ramification amplification method: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wandi; Cohenford, Menashi; Lentrichia, Brian; Isenberg, Henry D; Simson, Elkin; Li, Hengjin; Yi, Jizu; Zhang, David Y

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of sexually transmitted disease in the United States. Effective screening for this agent can facilitate prompt treatment and prevent its sequelae. The recent introduction of liquid-based cytology has made possible the simultaneous screening of cervical intraepithelial lesions and detection of C. trachomatis in a single collection vial. In this study we determined whether cytological fluid could support DNA-based amplification for the detection of C. trachomatis. Three methods were compared, including ramification amplification (RAM), real-time PCR with molecular beacon, and Abbott's ligase chain reaction (LCx). RAM is a novel, recently introduced, isothermal DNA amplification technique that utilizes a circular probe for target detection and achieves exponential amplification through the mechanism of primer extension, strand displacement, and ramification. Our results show that RAM can detect as few as 10 C. trachomatis elementary bodies in less than 2 h, comparable to results with real-time PCR. Thirty clinical specimens collected in PreservCyt solution were tested by LCx, real-time PCR, and RAM. Among 30 specimens, 15 were positive by PCR and LCx and 14 were positive by RAM. One specimen missed by RAM had an inadequate amount of residual cellular material. Our results show that nucleic acid amplification methods can serve to detect C. trachomatis and presumably other sexually transmitted agents in cytological fluid and that the RAM assay can be an alternative to PCR and LCx because of its simplicity and isothermal amplification.

  15. Balanced amplification: a new mechanism of selective amplification of neural activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brendan K; Miller, Kenneth D

    2009-02-26

    In cerebral cortex, ongoing activity absent a stimulus can resemble stimulus-driven activity in size and structure. In particular, spontaneous activity in cat primary visual cortex (V1) has structure significantly correlated with evoked responses to oriented stimuli. This suggests that, from unstructured input, cortical circuits selectively amplify specific activity patterns. Current understanding of selective amplification involves elongation of a neural assembly's lifetime by mutual excitation among its neurons. We introduce a new mechanism for selective amplification without elongation of lifetime: "balanced amplification." Strong balanced amplification arises when feedback inhibition stabilizes strong recurrent excitation, a pattern likely to be typical of cortex. Thus, balanced amplification should ubiquitously contribute to cortical activity. Balanced amplification depends on the fact that individual neurons project only excitatory or only inhibitory synapses. This leads to a hidden feedforward connectivity between activity patterns. We show in a detailed biophysical model that this can explain the cat V1 observations.

  16. Lead-acid and lithium-ion batteries for the Chinese electric bike market and implications on future technology advancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Burke, Andrew F.; Wei, Xuezhe

    China has been experiencing a rapid increase in battery-powered personal transportation since the late 1990s due to the strong growth of the electric bike and scooter (i.e. e-bike) market. Annual sales in China reached 17 million bikes year -1 in 2006. E-bike growth has been in part due to improvements in rechargeable valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery technology, the primary battery type for e-bikes. Further improvements in technology and a transition from VRLA to lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries will impact the future market growth of this transportation mode in China and abroad. Battery performance and cost for these two types are compared to assess the feasibility of a shift from VRLA to Li-ion battery e-bikes. The requirements for batteries used in e-bikes are assessed. A widespread shift from VRLA to Li-ion batteries seems improbable in the near future for the mass market given the cost premium relative to the performance advantages of Li-ion batteries. As both battery technologies gain more real-world use in e-bike applications, both will improve. Cell variability is a key problematic area to be addressed with VRLA technology. For Li-ion technology, safety and cost are the key problem areas which are being addressed through the use of new cathode materials.

  17. A Simple Structure for Signal Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wan-Xiang; Gu, Chang-Gui; Liang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-02-01

    It has been found that a triple-node feed-forward motif has a function of signal amplification, where two input nodes receive the external weak signal and jointly modulate the response of the third output node [Liang et al., Phys. Rev. E 88 (2013) 012910]. We here show that the signal amplification can be further enhanced by adding a link between the two input nodes in the feed-forward motif. We further reveal that the coupling strength of the link regulates the enhancement of signal amplification in the modified feed-forward motif. We finally analyze the mechanism of signal amplification of such simple structure. Supported by the Program for Professor of Special Appointment (Eastern Scholar) at Shanghai Institutions of Higher Learning under Grant No. QD2015016, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11505114 and 11305078

  18. Can Anomalous Amplification be Attained without Postselection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Rincón, Julián; Liu, Wei-Tao; Viza, Gerardo I.; Howell, John C.

    2016-03-01

    We present a parameter estimation technique based on performing joint measurements of a weak interaction away from the weak-value-amplification approximation. Two detectors are used to collect full statistics of the correlations between two weakly entangled degrees of freedom. Without discarding of data, the protocol resembles the anomalous amplification of an imaginary-weak-value-like response. The amplification is induced in the difference signal of both detectors allowing robustness to different sources of technical noise, and offering in addition the advantages of balanced signals for precision metrology. All of the Fisher information about the parameter of interest is collected. A tunable phase controls the strength of the amplification response. We experimentally demonstrate the proposed technique by measuring polarization rotations in a linearly polarized laser pulse. We show that in the presence of technical noise the effective sensitivity and precision of a split detector is increased when compared to a conventional continuous-wave balanced detection technique.

  19. The spatial pattern of cochlear amplification.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jonathan A N; Nin, Fumiaki; Reichenbach, Tobias; Uthaiah, Revathy C; Hudspeth, A J

    2012-12-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss, which stems primarily from the failure of mechanosensory hair cells, changes the traveling waves that transmit acoustic signals along the cochlea. However, the connection between cochlear mechanics and the amplificatory function of hair cells remains unclear. Using an optical technique that permits the targeted inactivation of prestin, a protein of outer hair cells that generates forces on the basilar membrane, we demonstrate that these forces interact locally with cochlear traveling waves to achieve enormous mechanical amplification. By perturbing amplification in narrow segments of the basilar membrane, we further show that a cochlear traveling wave accumulates gain as it approaches its peak. Analysis of these results indicates that cochlear amplification produces negative damping that counters the viscous drag impeding traveling waves; targeted photoinactivation locally interrupts this compensation. These results reveal the locus of amplification in cochlear traveling waves and connect the characteristics of normal hearing to molecular forces.

  20. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES - Book Chapter

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter contains the following headings and subheadings: Introduction; Experimental Approach - Precautions, Template, Primers, Reaction Conditions, Enhancers, Post Amplification; Procedures - Template DNA, Basic PCR, Thermal Cycle Parameters, Enzyme Addition, Agarose Ge...

  1. The Spatial Pattern of Cochlear Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jonathan A.N.; Nin, Fumiaki; Reichenbach, Tobias; Uthaiah, Revathy C.; Hudspeth, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Sensorineural hearing loss, which stems primarily from the failure of mechanosensory hair cells, changes the traveling waves that transmit acoustic signals along the cochlea. However, the connection between cochlear mechanics and the amplificatory function of hair cells remains unclear. Using an optical technique that permits the targeted inactivation of prestin, a protein of outer hair cells that generates forces on the basilar membrane, we demonstrate that these forces interact locally with cochlear traveling waves to achieve enormous mechanical amplification. By perturbing amplification in narrow segments of the basilar membrane, we further show that a cochlear traveling wave accumulates gain as it approaches its peak. Analysis of these results indicates that cochlear amplification produces negative damping that counters the viscous drag impeding traveling waves; targeted photoinactivation locally interrupts this compensation. These results reveal the locus of amplification in cochlear traveling waves and connect the characteristics of normal hearing to molecular forces. PMID:23217746

  2. Coupled isothermal polynucleotide amplification and translation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A cell-free system for polynucleotide amplification and translation is disclosed. Also disclosed are methods for using the system and a composition which allows the various components of the system to function under a common set of reaction conditions.

  3. Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Tucker, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

  4. Rolling circle amplification of metazoan mitochondrialgenomes

    SciTech Connect

    Simison, W. Brian; Lindberg, D.R.; Boore, J.L.

    2005-07-31

    Here we report the successful use of rolling circle amplification (RCA) for the amplification of complete metazoan mt genomes to make a product that is amenable to high-throughput genome sequencing techniques. The benefits of RCA over PCR are many and with further development and refinement of RCA, the sequencing of organellar genomics will require far less time and effort than current long PCR approaches.

  5. Ultrasensitive DNA chip: gene expression profile analysis without RNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Nagino, Kunihisa; Nomura, Osamu; Takii, Yuki; Myomoto, Akira; Ichikawa, Makiko; Nakamura, Fumio; Higasa, Masashi; Akiyama, Hideo; Nobumasa, Hitoshi; Shiojima, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2006-04-01

    We have developed a new DNA chip whose substrate has a unique minute columnar array structure made of plastic. The DNA chip exhibits ultrahigh sensitivity, up to 100-fold higher than that of reference DNA chips, which makes it possible to monitor gene expression profiles even with very small amounts of RNA (0.1-0.01 microg of total RNA) without amplification. Differential expression ratios obtained with the new DNA chip were validated against those obtained with quantitative real-time PCR assays. This novel microarray technology would be a powerful tool for monitoring gene expression profiles, especially for clinical diagnosis.

  6. Onshore seismic amplifications due to bathymetric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Castellanos, A.; Carbajal-Romero, M.; Flores-Guzmán, N.; Olivera-Villaseñor, E.; Kryvko, A.

    2016-08-01

    We perform numerical calculations for onshore seismic amplifications, taking into consideration the effect of bathymetric features on the propagation of seismic movements. To this end, the boundary element method is applied. Boundary elements are employed to irradiate waves and, consequently, force densities can be obtained for each boundary element. From this assumption, Huygens’ principle is applied, and since the diffracted waves are built at the boundary from which they are radiated, this idea is equivalent to Somigliana’s representation theorem. The application of boundary conditions leads to a linear system being obtained (Fredholm integral equations). Several numerical models are analyzed, with the first one being used to verify the proposed formulation, and the others being used to estimate onshore seismic amplifications due to the presence of bathymetric features. The results obtained show that compressional waves (P-waves) generate onshore seismic amplifications that can vary from 1.2 to 5.2 times the amplitude of the incident wave. On the other hand, the shear waves (S-waves) can cause seismic amplifications of up to 4.0 times the incident wave. Furthermore, an important result is that in most cases the highest seismic amplifications from an offshore earthquake are located on the shoreline and not offshore, despite the seafloor configuration. Moreover, the influence of the incident angle of seismic waves on the seismic amplifications is highlighted.

  7. Amplification uncertainty relation for probabilistic amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, Ryo

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, quantum amplification limit refers to the property of inevitable noise addition on canonical variables when the field amplitude of an unknown state is linearly transformed through a quantum channel. Recent theoretical studies have determined amplification limits for cases of probabilistic quantum channels or general quantum operations by specifying a set of input states or a state ensemble. However, it remains open how much excess noise on canonical variables is unavoidable and whether there exists a fundamental trade-off relation between the canonical pair in a general amplification process. In this paper we present an uncertainty-product form of amplification limits for general quantum operations by assuming an input ensemble of Gaussian-distributed coherent states. It can be derived as a straightforward consequence of canonical uncertainty relations and retrieves basic properties of the traditional amplification limit. In addition, our amplification limit turns out to give a physical limitation on probabilistic reduction of an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen uncertainty. In this regard, we find a condition that probabilistic amplifiers can be regarded as local filtering operations to distill entanglement. This condition establishes a clear benchmark to verify an advantage of non-Gaussian operations beyond Gaussian operations with a feasible input set of coherent states and standard homodyne measurements.

  8. Diagnostic Technologies in Practice

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Malcolm; Kwag, Michael; Chown, Sarah A.; Doupe, Glenn; Trussler, Terry; Rekart, Michael; Gilbert, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing HIV-positive gay men through enhanced testing technologies that detect acute HIV infection (AHI) or recent HIV infection provides opportunities for individual and population health benefits. We recruited 25 men in British Columbia who received an acute (n = 13) or recent (n = 12) HIV diagnosis to engage in a longitudinal multiple-methods study over one year or longer. Our thematic analysis of baseline qualitative interviews revealed insights within men’s accounts of technologically mediated processes of HIV discovery and diagnosis. Our analysis illuminated the dialectic of new HIV technologies in practice by considering the relationship between advances in diagnostics (e.g., nucleic acid amplification tests) and the users of these medical technologies in clinical settings (e.g., clients and practitioners). Technological innovations and testing protocols have shifted experiences of learning of one’s HIV-positive status; these innovations have created new diagnostic categories that require successful interpretation and translation to be rendered meaningful, to alleviate uncertainty, and to support public health objectives. PMID:25201583

  9. Advances in nucleic acid-based detection methods.

    PubMed Central

    Wolcott, M J

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory techniques based on nucleic acid methods have increased in popularity over the last decade with clinical microbiologists and other laboratory scientists who are concerned with the diagnosis of infectious agents. This increase in popularity is a result primarily of advances made in nucleic acid amplification and detection techniques. Polymerase chain reaction, the original nucleic acid amplification technique, changed the way many people viewed and used nucleic acid techniques in clinical settings. After the potential of polymerase chain reaction became apparent, other methods of nucleic acid amplification and detection were developed. These alternative nucleic acid amplification methods may become serious contenders for application to routine laboratory analyses. This review presents some background information on nucleic acid analyses that might be used in clinical and anatomical laboratories and describes some recent advances in the amplification and detection of nucleic acids. PMID:1423216

  10. The predictive power of synthetic nucleic acid technologies in RNA biology.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Mehtab, Shabana; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: The impact of nucleic acid nanotechnology in terms of transforming motifs from biology in synthetic and translational ways is widely appreciated. But it is also emerging that the thinking and vision behind nucleic acids as construction material has broader implications, not just in nanotechnology or even synthetic biology, but can feed back into our understanding of biology itself. Physicists have treated nucleic acids as polymers and connected physical principles to biology by abstracting out the molecular interactions. In contrast, biologists delineate molecular players and pathways related to nucleic acids and how they may be networked. But in vitro nucleic acid nanotechnology has provided a valuable framework for nucleic acids by connecting its biomolecular interactions with its materials properties and thereby superarchitecture ultramanipulation that on multiple occasions has pre-empted the elucidation of how living cells themselves are exploiting these same structural concepts. This Account seeks to showcase the larger implications of certain architectural principles that have arisen from the field of structural DNA/RNA nanotechnology in biology. Here we draw connections between these principles and particular molecular phenomena within living systems that have fed in to our understanding of how the cell uses nucleic acids as construction material to achieve different functions. We illustrate this by considering a few exciting and emerging examples in biology in the context of both switchable systems and scaffolding type systems. Due to the scope of this Account, we will focus our discussion on examples of the RNA scaffold as summarized. In the context of switchable RNA architectures, the synthetic demonstration of small molecules blocking RNA translation preceded the discovery of riboswitches. In another example, it was after the description of aptazymes that the first allosteric ribozyme, glmS, was discovered. In the context of RNA architectures

  11. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Bin; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Huang, Chenghui; Liu, Franklin; Neill, Daniel; Li, Chuanyuan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and

  12. Using electromagnetic induction technology to predict volatile fatty acid, source area differences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subsurface sampling techniques have been adapted to measure manure accumulation on feedlot surface. Objectives of this study were to determine if sensor data could be used to predict differences in volatile fatty acids (VFA) and other volatiles produced on the feedlot surface three days following a...

  13. LIME TREATMENT LAGOONS TECHNOLOGY FOR TREATING ACID MINE DRAINAGE FROM TWO MINING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Runoff and drainage from active and inactive mines are someof the most environmentally damaging land uses i the US. Acid Mine drainage (AMD) from mining sites across the country requires treatment because of high metal concentrations that exceed regulatory standards for safe disc...

  14. Clean coal technology and acid rain compliance: An examination of alternative incentive proposals

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, K.A. ); South, D.W. )

    1991-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 rely primarily on the use of market incentives to stimulate least-cost compliance choices by electric utilities. Because of the potential risks associated with selecting Clean Coal Technologies (CCTs) and the public-good nature of technology commercialization, electric utilities may be reluctant to adopt CCTs as part of their compliance strategies. This paper examines the nature of the risks and perceived impediments to adopting CCTs as a compliance option. It also discusses the incentives that regulatory policy makers could adopt to mitigate these barriers to CCT adoption. (VC)

  15. Clean coal technology and acid rain compliance: An examination of alternative incentive proposals

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, K.A.; South, D.W.

    1991-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 rely primarily on the use of market incentives to stimulate least-cost compliance choices by electric utilities. Because of the potential risks associated with selecting Clean Coal Technologies (CCTs) and the public-good nature of technology commercialization, electric utilities may be reluctant to adopt CCTs as part of their compliance strategies. This paper examines the nature of the risks and perceived impediments to adopting CCTs as a compliance option. It also discusses the incentives that regulatory policy makers could adopt to mitigate these barriers to CCT adoption. (VC)

  16. Nanofluidic redox cycling amplification for the selective detection of catechol.

    PubMed

    Wolfrum, Bernhard; Zevenbergen, Marcel; Lemay, Serge

    2008-02-15

    We have developed a chip-based nanofluidic device to amplify the electrochemical signal of catechols by orders of magnitude. The amplification is based on rapid redox cycling between plane parallel electrodes inside a nanochannel. We show that it is possible to monitor the signal of only a few hundred molecules residing in the active area of the nanofluidic sensor. Furthermore, due to the nanochannel design, the sensor is immune to interference by molecules undergoing irreversible redox reactions. We demonstrate the selectivity of the device by detecting catechol in the presence of ascorbic acid, whose oxidized form is only stable for a short time. The interference of ascorbic acid is usually a challenge in the detection of catecholamines in biological samples.

  17. Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giorgis, Cyndi; Johnson, Nancy J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents annotations of 30 works of children's literature that support the topic of technology and its influences on readers' daily lives. Notes some stories tell about a time when simple tools enabled individuals to accomplish tasks, and others feature visionaries who used technology to create buildings, bridges, roads, and inventions. Considers…

  18. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  19. Non-Instrumented Incubation of a Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for the Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Proviral HIV-1 DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Lorraine; Lehman, Dara; Singhal, Mitra C.; Cantera, Jason; Singleton, Jered; Labarre, Paul; Toyama, Anthony; Piepenburg, Olaf; Parker, Mathew; Wood, Robert; Overbaugh, Julie; Boyle, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive diagnostic tests for infectious diseases often employ nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAATs). However, most NAAT assays, including many isothermal amplification methods, require power-dependent instrumentation for incubation. For use in low resource settings (LRS), diagnostics that do not require consistent electricity supply would be ideal. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal amplification technology that has been shown to typically work at temperatures ranging from 25–43°C, and does not require a stringent incubation temperature for optimal performance. Here we evaluate the ability to incubate an HIV-1 RPA assay, intended for use as an infant HIV diagnostic in LRS, at ambient temperatures or with a simple non-instrumented heat source. To determine the range of expected ambient temperatures in settings where an HIV-1 infant diagnostic would be of most use, a dataset of the seasonal range of daily temperatures in sub Saharan Africa was analyzed and revealed ambient temperatures as low as 10°C and rarely above 43°C. All 24 of 24 (100%) HIV-1 RPA reactions amplified when incubated for 20 minutes between 31°C and 43°C. The amplification from the HIV-1 RPA assay under investigation at temperatures was less consistent below 30°C. Thus, we developed a chemical heater to incubate HIV-1 RPA assays when ambient temperatures are between 10°C and 30°C. All 12/12 (100%) reactions amplified with chemical heat incubation from ambient temperatures of 15°C, 20°C, 25°C and 30°C. We also observed that incubation at 30 minutes improved assay performance at lower temperatures where detection was sporadic using 20 minutes incubation. We have demonstrated that incubation of the RPA HIV-1 assay via ambient temperatures or using chemical heaters yields similar results to using electrically powered devices. We propose that this RPA HIV-1 assay may not need dedicated equipment to be a highly sensitive tool to diagnose infant HIV-1 in

  20. Non-instrumented incubation of a recombinase polymerase amplification assay for the rapid and sensitive detection of proviral HIV-1 DNA.

    PubMed

    Lillis, Lorraine; Lehman, Dara; Singhal, Mitra C; Cantera, Jason; Singleton, Jered; Labarre, Paul; Toyama, Anthony; Piepenburg, Olaf; Parker, Mathew; Wood, Robert; Overbaugh, Julie; Boyle, David S

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive diagnostic tests for infectious diseases often employ nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAATs). However, most NAAT assays, including many isothermal amplification methods, require power-dependent instrumentation for incubation. For use in low resource settings (LRS), diagnostics that do not require consistent electricity supply would be ideal. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal amplification technology that has been shown to typically work at temperatures ranging from 25-43°C, and does not require a stringent incubation temperature for optimal performance. Here we evaluate the ability to incubate an HIV-1 RPA assay, intended for use as an infant HIV diagnostic in LRS, at ambient temperatures or with a simple non-instrumented heat source. To determine the range of expected ambient temperatures in settings where an HIV-1 infant diagnostic would be of most use, a dataset of the seasonal range of daily temperatures in sub Saharan Africa was analyzed and revealed ambient temperatures as low as 10°C and rarely above 43°C. All 24 of 24 (100%) HIV-1 RPA reactions amplified when incubated for 20 minutes between 31°C and 43°C. The amplification from the HIV-1 RPA assay under investigation at temperatures was less consistent below 30°C. Thus, we developed a chemical heater to incubate HIV-1 RPA assays when ambient temperatures are between 10°C and 30°C. All 12/12 (100%) reactions amplified with chemical heat incubation from ambient temperatures of 15°C, 20°C, 25°C and 30°C. We also observed that incubation at 30 minutes improved assay performance at lower temperatures where detection was sporadic using 20 minutes incubation. We have demonstrated that incubation of the RPA HIV-1 assay via ambient temperatures or using chemical heaters yields similar results to using electrically powered devices. We propose that this RPA HIV-1 assay may not need dedicated equipment to be a highly sensitive tool to diagnose infant HIV-1 in

  1. Non-instrumented incubation of a recombinase polymerase amplification assay for the rapid and sensitive detection of proviral HIV-1 DNA.

    PubMed

    Lillis, Lorraine; Lehman, Dara; Singhal, Mitra C; Cantera, Jason; Singleton, Jered; Labarre, Paul; Toyama, Anthony; Piepenburg, Olaf; Parker, Mathew; Wood, Robert; Overbaugh, Julie; Boyle, David S

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive diagnostic tests for infectious diseases often employ nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAATs). However, most NAAT assays, including many isothermal amplification methods, require power-dependent instrumentation for incubation. For use in low resource settings (LRS), diagnostics that do not require consistent electricity supply would be ideal. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal amplification technology that has been shown to typically work at temperatures ranging from 25-43°C, and does not require a stringent incubation temperature for optimal performance. Here we evaluate the ability to incubate an HIV-1 RPA assay, intended for use as an infant HIV diagnostic in LRS, at ambient temperatures or with a simple non-instrumented heat source. To determine the range of expected ambient temperatures in settings where an HIV-1 infant diagnostic would be of most use, a dataset of the seasonal range of daily temperatures in sub Saharan Africa was analyzed and revealed ambient temperatures as low as 10°C and rarely above 43°C. All 24 of 24 (100%) HIV-1 RPA reactions amplified when incubated for 20 minutes between 31°C and 43°C. The amplification from the HIV-1 RPA assay under investigation at temperatures was less consistent below 30°C. Thus, we developed a chemical heater to incubate HIV-1 RPA assays when ambient temperatures are between 10°C and 30°C. All 12/12 (100%) reactions amplified with chemical heat incubation from ambient temperatures of 15°C, 20°C, 25°C and 30°C. We also observed that incubation at 30 minutes improved assay performance at lower temperatures where detection was sporadic using 20 minutes incubation. We have demonstrated that incubation of the RPA HIV-1 assay via ambient temperatures or using chemical heaters yields similar results to using electrically powered devices. We propose that this RPA HIV-1 assay may not need dedicated equipment to be a highly sensitive tool to diagnose infant HIV-1 in

  2. Advances in Acid Concentration Membrane Technology for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart; Christopher J. Orme

    2006-11-01

    One of the most promising cycles for the thermochemical generation of hydrogen is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) process, where aqueous HI is thermochemically decomposed into H2 and I2 at approximately 350 degrees Celsius. Regeneration of HI is accomplished by the Bunsen reaction (reaction of SO2, water, and iodine to generate H2SO4 and HI). Furthermore, SO2 is regenerated from the decomposition of H2SO4 at 850 degrees Celsius yielding the SO2 as well as O2. Thus, the cycle actually consists of two concurrent oxidation-reduction loops. As HI is regenerated, co-produced H2SO4 must be separated so that each may be decomposed. Current flowsheets employ a large amount (~83 mol% of the entire mixture) of elemental I2 to cause the HI and the H2SO4 to separate into two phases. To aid in the isolation of HI, which is directly decomposed into hydrogen, water and iodine must be removed. Separation of iodine is facilitated by removal of water. Sulfuric acid concentration is also required to facilitate feed recycling to the sulfuric acid decomposer. Decomposition of the sulfuric acid is an equilibrium limited process that leaves a substantial portion of the acid requiring recycle. Distillation of water from sulfuric acid involves significant corrosion issues at the liquid-vapor interface. Thus, it is desirable to concentrate the acid without boiling. Recent efforts at the INL have concentrated on applying pervaporation through Nafion-117, Nafion-112, and sulfonated poly(etheretherketone) (S-PEEK) membranes for the removal of water from HI/water and HI/Iodine/water feedstreams. In pervaporation, a feed is circulated at low pressure across the upstream side of the membrane, while a vacuum is applied downstream. Selected permeants sorb into the membrane, transport through it, and are vaporized from the backside. Thus, a concentration gradient is established, which provides the driving force for transport. In this work, membrane separations have been performed at temperatures as high as

  3. Lead-acid battery performance and technology in commercial electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Weinlein, C.E.

    1982-06-01

    The lead-acid battery system is promoted for energy storage in electric vehicles for these reasons: the industry is in place, it has the lowest material costs, it is recyclable, it has demonstrated the greatest performance improvements, and it has had more field experience than other batteries. Globe Battery has demonstrated its ability to meet state-of-the-art standards set by Argonne Laboratories in a recent program. The design approach included computerized battery modelling, use of lightweight materials, extensive internal insulation, a single-point watering and venting system, and a unique electrolyte circulation system. The water venting minimizes high electrolyte specific gravities. The electrolyte circulation eliminates a condition known as electrolyte stratification. With these improvements the lead-acid battery is again proving itself to be a tough competitor.

  4. Detection of infections with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus by analyses of dried blood spots - performance characteristics of the ARCHITECT system and two commercial assays for nucleic acid amplification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nowadays, dried blood spots (DBS) are primarily used to obtain diagnostic access to risk collectives such as intravenous drug users, who are prone to infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Before DBS analyses can be used in this diagnostic context, however, a comprehensive evaluation of its performance characteristics must be conducted. To the best of our knowledge, the current study presents for the first time such essential data for the Abbott ARCHITECT system, which is currently the worldwide leading platform in this field of infection diagnostics. Methods The investigation comprised 1,762 paired serum/DBS samples and a total of 3,524 determinations with the Abbott ARCHITECT HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HCV and HIV-1-p24-antigen/anti-HIV 1/2 assays as well as with the artus HBV LC PCR and VERSANT HCV RNA qualitative (TMA) tests. Results In the context of DBS testing, a specificity of 100% was recorded for the seven serological and molecular biological assays. The analytical sensitivity of HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HCV, HIV-1-p24-antigen/anti-HIV 1/2, HBV DNA, and HCV RNA detections in DBS eluates was 98.6%, 97.1%, 97.5%, 97.8%, 100%, 93%, and 100%, respectively. Discussion/conclusions The results obtained indicate that it is today possible to reliably detect HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HCV and HIV-1-p24 antigen/anti-HIV 1/2 with state-of-the-art analytical systems such as the Abbott ARCHITECT in DBS eluates even when a comparatively high elution volume of 1,000 μl is used. They also provide evidence for the inherent analytical limits of DBS testing, which primarily concern the anti-HBc/anti-HBs system for individuals with HIV infections and nucleic acid tests with relatively low analytical sensitivity. PMID:23497102

  5. A mathematical approach to estimate the efficacy of individual-donation and minipool nucleic acid amplification test options in preventing transmission risk by window period and occult hepatitis B virus infections

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Marion; van Drimmelen, Harry; Coleman, Charl; Mitchel, Josephine; Reddy, Ravi; Lelie, Nico

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sensitivity data from a head-to-head comparison study in South Africa were used to compare the efficacy of the Ultrio Plus assay in individual-donation (ID) and minipool (MP)4 and MP8 formats with that of TaqScreen MP6 in preventing hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission risk. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS The replicate nucleic acid test (NAT) results on 106 HBV NAT (Ultrio)-yield samples and 29 HBV DNA (Ultrio)-negative, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive samples were used to determine the viral load in copies/mL against the Eurohep HBV standard by probit analysis. Random viral load distributions were established in 32 pre-HBsAg window period (WP), 15 post-HBsAg WP, and 56 occult HBV infection (OBI) donations. Regression analysis of log viral load and Poisson distribution statistics of infectious HBV particles in blood components was used to predict infectivity and efficacy of NAT options in removing HBV transmission risk. RESULTS For red blood cell transfusions (20 mL of plasma), the modeling predicted an Ultrio Plus ID-NAT efficacy of 68 and 83% in removing WP and (antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen–negative) OBI transmission risk, respectively, compared to 52 and 49% by TaqScreen MP6. For 200 mL of fresh-frozen plasma the estimated efficacy levels by these ID- and MP6-NAT options reduced to 57 and 44% for WP and to 67 and 34% for OBI donations, respectively. CONCLUSION The efficacy of the currently available commercial NAT systems in reducing HBV transmission risk is mainly driven by the pool size and the transfusion plasma volume. The modeled OBI transmission risk and NAT efficacy levels were in line with those recently reported in three lookback studies and give more insight in the incremental safety provided by HBsAg and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen testing of ID-NAT screened blood. PMID:24749834

  6. Microdroplet-based PCR amplification for large scale targeted sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tewhey, Ryan; Warner, Jason; Nakano, Masakazu; Libby, Brian; Medkova, Martina; David, Patricia; Kotsopoulos, Steve; Samuels, Michael; Hutchison, J. Brian; Larson, Jonathan W.; Topol, Eric J.; Weiner, Michael P.; Harismendy, Olivier; Olson, Jeff; Link, Darren R.; Frazer, Kelly A.

    2009-01-01

    Targeted sequencing of specific loci of the human genome is a promising approach for maximizing the efficiency of second-generation sequencing technologies for population-based studies of genetic variation. Here we describe microdroplet PCR, which performs 1.5 million separate amplifications in parallel, as an approach for enriching targeted sequences in the human genome. We initially designed primers to 435 exons of 47 genes that were selected for having a broad spectrum of sequence characteristics. Using this primer set we amplified the same six samples by both microdroplet and traditional singleplex PCR and sequenced the products using the Illumina GAII demonstrating that both methods generate similarly high quality data; 84% of the uniquely mapping reads fell within the targeted sequences, uniform coverage of ~90% of the targeted bases, greater than 99% accuracy in sequence variant calls, and high reproducibility between different samples (r2=0.9). We next scaled the microdroplet PCR to 3976 amplicons totaling 1.49 Mb of sequence, sequenced the resulting sample on both the Illumina GAII and Roche 454 platforms, and obtained data with equally high specificity and sensitivity quality. Our results demonstrate that microdroplet technology is well suited for processing DNA for massively parallel amplification of specific subsets of the human genome for targeted sequencing. PMID:19881494

  7. Advanced unrepeatered systems using novel Raman amplification schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Do-il; Pelouch, Wayne; Burtsev, Sergey; Perrier, Philippe; Fevrier, Herve

    2015-01-01

    Unrepeatered transmission systems provide a cost-effective solution to transmit high capacity channels in submarine networks to communicate between coastal population centers or in terrestrial networks to connect remote areas where service access is difficult. The main goal of unrepeatered systems has traditionally been to achieve the longest reach, however, increasing traffic demands now require unrepeatered systems to support both longer reach and higher transport capacity. As a result, transmission rate of unrepeatered systems has quickly moved from 10 Gb/s to 40 Gb/s or 100 Gb/s. This paper reviews the key basic technologies, with a specific focus on Raman amplification, required for long-reach, high-capacity unrepeatered optical transmission systems. We will discuss novel Raman amplification schemes, enhanced remote optically pumped amplifiers (ROPA), ultra-low loss / large effective area fibers, and coherent transmission with advanced modulation format and high FEC coding gain. We will also report recent experimental demonstrations that show how these technologies have been combined to achieve industry's leading capacity and reach transmission.

  8. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Chylek, Petr; Dubey, Manvendra K; Lesins, Glen; Wang, Muyin

    2009-01-01

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  9. Parametric Amplification of Scattered Atom Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Gretchen K.; Mun, Jongchul; Boyd, Micah; Streed, Erik W.; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Pritchard, David E.

    2006-01-20

    We have observed parametric generation and amplification of ultracold atom pairs. A {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate was loaded into a one-dimensional optical lattice with quasimomentum k{sub 0} and spontaneously scattered into two final states with quasimomenta k{sub 1} and k{sub 2}. Furthermore, when a seed of atoms was first created with quasimomentum k{sub 1} we observed parametric amplification of scattered atoms pairs in states k{sub 1} and k{sub 2} when the phase-matching condition was fulfilled. This process is analogous to optical parametric generation and amplification of photons and could be used to efficiently create entangled pairs of atoms. Furthermore, these results explain the dynamic instability of condensates in moving lattices observed in recent experiments.

  10. Amplification, Redundancy, and Quantum Chernoff Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Riedel, C. Jess; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2014-04-01

    Amplification was regarded, since the early days of quantum theory, as a mysterious ingredient that endows quantum microstates with macroscopic consequences, key to the "collapse of the wave packet," and a way to avoid embarrassing problems exemplified by Schrödinger's cat. Such a bridge between the quantum microworld and the classical world of our experience was postulated ad hoc in the Copenhagen interpretation. Quantum Darwinism views amplification as replication, in many copies, of the information about quantum states. We show that such amplification is a natural consequence of a broad class of models of decoherence, including the photon environment we use to obtain most of our information. This leads to objective reality via the presence of robust and widely accessible records of selected quantum states. The resulting redundancy (the number of copies deposited in the environment) follows from the quantum Chernoff information that quantifies the information transmitted by a typical elementary subsystem of the environment.

  11. Amplification, redundancy, and quantum Chernoff information.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, Michael; Riedel, C Jess; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2014-04-11

    Amplification was regarded, since the early days of quantum theory, as a mysterious ingredient that endows quantum microstates with macroscopic consequences, key to the "collapse of the wave packet," and a way to avoid embarrassing problems exemplified by Schrödinger's cat. Such a bridge between the quantum microworld and the classical world of our experience was postulated ad hoc in the Copenhagen interpretation. Quantum Darwinism views amplification as replication, in many copies, of the information about quantum states. We show that such amplification is a natural consequence of a broad class of models of decoherence, including the photon environment we use to obtain most of our information. This leads to objective reality via the presence of robust and widely accessible records of selected quantum states. The resulting redundancy (the number of copies deposited in the environment) follows from the quantum Chernoff information that quantifies the information transmitted by a typical elementary subsystem of the environment.

  12. Organo-erbium systems for optical amplification at telecommunications wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Ye, H Q; Li, Z; Peng, Y; Wang, C C; Li, T Y; Zheng, Y X; Sapelkin, A; Adamopoulos, G; Hernández, I; Wyatt, P B; Gillin, W P

    2014-04-01

    Modern telecommunications rely on the transmission and manipulation of optical signals. Optical amplification plays a vital part in this technology, as all components in a real telecommunications system produce some loss. The two main issues with present amplifiers, which rely on erbium ions in a glass matrix, are the difficulty in integration onto a single substrate and the need of high pump power densities to produce gain. Here we show a potential organic optical amplifier material that demonstrates population inversion when pumped from above using low-power visible light. This system is integrated into an organic light-emitting diode demonstrating that electrical pumping can be achieved. This opens the possibility of direct electrically driven optical amplifiers and optical circuits. Our results provide an alternative approach to producing low-cost integrated optics that is compatible with existing silicon photonics and a different route to an effective integrated optics technology.

  13. Multiplex amplification of large sets of human exons.

    PubMed

    Porreca, Gregory J; Zhang, Kun; Li, Jin Billy; Xie, Bin; Austin, Derek; Vassallo, Sara L; LeProust, Emily M; Peck, Bill J; Emig, Christopher J; Dahl, Fredrik; Gao, Yuan; Church, George M; Shendure, Jay

    2007-11-01

    A new generation of technologies is poised to reduce DNA sequencing costs by several orders of magnitude. But our ability to fully leverage the power of these technologies is crippled by the absence of suitable 'front-end' methods for isolating complex subsets of a mammalian genome at a scale that matches the throughput at which these platforms will routinely operate. We show that targeting oligonucleotides released from programmable microarrays can be used to capture and amplify approximately 10,000 human exons in a single multiplex reaction. Additionally, we show integration of this protocol with ultra-high-throughput sequencing for targeted variation discovery. Although the multiplex capture reaction is highly specific, we found that nonuniform capture is a key issue that will need to be resolved by additional optimization. We anticipate that highly multiplexed methods for targeted amplification will enable the comprehensive resequencing of human exons at a fraction of the cost of whole-genome resequencing.

  14. Bioplex technology: novel synthetic gene delivery pharmaceutical based on peptides anchored to nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Oscar E; Svahn, Mathias G; Törnquist, Elisabeth; Lundin, Karin E; Smith, C I E

    2005-01-01

    Non-viral gene delivery is an important approach in order to establish safe in vivo gene therapy in the clinic. Although viral vectors currently exhibit superior gene transfer efficacy, the safety aspect of viral gene delivery is a concern. In order to improve non-viral in vivo gene delivery we have designed a pharmaceutical platform called Bioplex (biological complex). The concept of Bioplex is to link functional entities via hybridising anchors, such as Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA), directly to naked DNA. In order to promote delivery functional entities consisting of biologically active peptides or carbohydrates, are linked to the PNA anchor. The PNA acts as genetic glue and hybridises with DNA in a sequence specific manner. By using functional entities, which elicit receptor-mediated endocytosis, improved endosomal escape and enhance nuclear entry we wish to improve the transfer of genetic material into the cell. An important aspect is that the functional entities should also have tissue-targeting properties in vivo. Examples of functional entities investigated to date are the Simian virus 40 nuclear localisation signal to improve nuclear uptake and different carbohydrate ligands in order to achieve receptor specific uptake. The delivery system is also endowed with regulatory capability, since the release of functional entities can be controlled. The aim is to create a safe, pharmaceutically defined and stable delivery system for nucleic acids with enhanced transfection properties that can be used in the clinic.

  15. Optical amplification enhancement in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza, R.; Leonetti, M.; Froufe-Perez, L. S.; Galisteo-Lopez, J. F.; Lopez, C.; Conti, C.

    2011-02-15

    Improving and controlling the efficiency of a gain medium is one of the most challenging problems of laser research. By measuring the gain length in an opal-based photonic crystal doped with laser dye, we demonstrate that optical amplification is more than twenty-fold enhanced along the {Gamma}-K symmetry directions of the face-centered-cubic photonic crystal. These results are theoretically explained by directional variations of the density of states, providing a quantitative connection between density of the states and light amplification.

  16. Parametric Amplification For Detecting Weak Optical Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Chen, Chien; Chakravarthi, Prakash

    1996-01-01

    Optical-communication receivers of proposed type implement high-sensitivity scheme of optical parametric amplification followed by direct detection for reception of extremely weak signals. Incorporates both optical parametric amplification and direct detection into optimized design enhancing effective signal-to-noise ratios during reception in photon-starved (photon-counting) regime. Eliminates need for complexity of heterodyne detection scheme and partly overcomes limitations imposed on older direct-detection schemes by noise generated in receivers and by limits on quantum efficiencies of photodetectors.

  17. Regenerative amplification and bifurcations in a burst-mode Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Mance, Jason G; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Roy, Sukesh

    2015-11-01

    An Nd:YAG-based burst-mode regenerative amplifier laser was developed that offers high extraction efficiency at high repetition rates with low seed energies. The regenerative amplification technique, combined with the burst-mode laser technology, shows promise as an efficient method for amplification of femtojoule-nanojoule pulses up to millijoule energies at repetition rates exceeding 100 kHz. Output energies at repetition rates near the inverse upper state lifetime are limited by bifurcations in the pulse energies of the burst. A model is developed and advantages and limitations are discussed.

  18. Label-Free Isothermal Amplification Assay for Specific and Highly Sensitive Colorimetric miRNA Detection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new method for the detection of miRNA in biological samples. This technology is based on the isothermal nicking enzyme amplification reaction and subsequent hybridization of the amplification product with gold nanoparticles and magnetic microparticles (barcode system) to achieve naked-eye colorimetric detection. This platform was used to detect a specific miRNA (miRNA-10b) associated with breast cancer, and attomolar sensitivity was demonstrated. The assay was validated in cell culture lysates from breast cancer cells and in serum from a mouse model of breast cancer. PMID:27713932

  19. Signal amplification in biological and electrical engineering systems: universal role of cascades.

    PubMed

    Grubelnik, Vladimir; Dugonik, Bogdan; Osebik, Davorin; Marhl, Marko

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we compare the cascade mechanisms of signal amplification in biological and electrical engineering systems, and show that they share the capacity to considerably amplify signals, and respond to signal changes both quickly and completely, which effectively preserves the form of the input signal. For biological systems, these characteristics are crucial for efficient and reliable cellular signaling. We show that this highly-efficient biological mechanism of signal amplification that has naturally evolved is mathematically fully equivalent with some man-developed amplifiers, which indicates parallels between biological evolution and successful technology development.

  20. Centrosome amplification is correlated with ploidy divergence, but not with MYCN amplification, in neuroblastoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Daisuke; Watanabe, Naoki; Kasai, Fumio; Haruta, Masayuki; Kikuchi, Akira; Kikuta, Atsushi; Kato, Koji; Nakadate, Hisaya; Tsunematsu, Yukiko; Kaneko, Yasuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Ploidy is an important biologic feature defining heterogeneous neuroblastoma. To clarify whether centrosome amplification is correlated with ploidy status or MYCN amplification, we examined centrosomes by immunostaining, and ploidy and MYCN copy numbers by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 27 neuroblastomas. There were 8 infant triploid, 9 infant diploid, and 10 childhood diploid tumors. Ploidy divergence, defined as a mixed population of cells with trisomy 1, cells with tetrasomy 1, and/or cells with pentasomy 1 in diploid tumors and that of cells with tetrasomy 1 and cells with pentasomy 1 in triploid tumors, each occupying more than 5% of cells, was found in 78% of infant diploid tumors, but not in triploid and childhood diploid tumors (P<0.0001). Childhood and infant diploid tumors had higher incidences of centrosome amplification than infant triploid tumors (P=0.0001 and 0.07, respectively). While both infant and childhood diploid tumors share a high incidence of centrosome amplification, only infant diploid tumors showed ploidy divergence, implying the presence of cytokinesis failure. These findings suggest that centrosome amplification found in cells of infant diploid tumors and that found in cells of childhood diploid tumors may be generated by different mechanisms. MYCN amplification was not correlated with centrosome amplification in sporadic neuroblastomas. PMID:19061778

  1. A dual amplification fluorescent strategy for sensitive detection of DNA methyltransferase activity based on strand displacement amplification and DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wanling; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2016-03-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) plays a critical role in many biological processes and has been regarded as a predictive cancer biomarker and a therapeutic target in cancer treatment. Sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential for early cancer diagnosis and therapeutics. Here, we developed a dual amplification fluorescent strategy for sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity based on strand displacement amplification (SDA) and DNAzyme amplification. A trifunctional double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) probe was designed including a methylation site for DNA MTase recognition, a complementary sequence of 8-17 DNAzyme for synthesizing DNAzyme, and a nicking site for nicking enzyme cleavage. Firstly, the trifunctional dsDNA probe was methylated by DNA MTase to form the methylated dsDNA. Subsequently, HpaII restriction endonuclease specifically cleaved the residue of unmethylated dsDNA. Next, under the action of polymerase and nicking enzyme, the methylared dsDNA initiated SDA, releasing numbers of 8-17 DNAzymes. Finally, the released 8-17 DNAzymes triggered DNAzyme amplification reaction to induce a significant fluorescence enhancement. This strategy could detect DNA MTase activity as low as 0.0082U/mL. Additionally, the strategy was successfully applied for evaluating the inhibitions of DNA MTase using two anticancer drugs, 5-azacytidine and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. The results indicate the proposed strategy has a potential application in early cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  2. Optimizing Technology to Reduce Mercury and Acid Gas Emissions from Electric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

    2004-07-31

    County-average hydrogen values are calculated for the part 2, 1999 Information Collection Request (ICR) coal-quality data, published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. These data are used together with estimated, county-average moisture values to calculate average net heating values for coal produced in U.S. counties. Finally, 10 draft maps of the contiguous U.S. showing the potential uncontrolled sulfur, chlorine and mercury emissions of coal by U.S. county-of-origin, as well as expected mercury emissions calculated for existing emission control technologies, are presented and discussed.

  3. Acid electrolyte fuel cell technology program. [for application to the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The development of an acid electrolyte fuel cell was investigated to provide a cost effective electrical power system for the space shuttle orbiter. Previous investigation showed the life capability of the fuel cell was improved by proper prehumidification of the reactant gases. Breadboard models were developed which incorporate reactant prehumidification and have a life duration time of 2000 hours. Fuel cell performance was found to be invariant with cell life, and reactant consumption was unchanged from start to end of life. Satisfactory start and stop procedures are demonstrated along with scale-up capabilities for the number of cells in a stack, and for cell active areas. Safety design features, which operate to isolate the affected module from the remainder of the system, to eliminate single point failure modes from affecting the entire electrical power system are included.

  4. Silylated Acid Hardened Resist [SAHR] Technology: Positive, Dry Developable Deep UV Resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackeray, James W.; Bohland, John F.; Pavelchek, , Edward K.; Orsula, George W.; McCullough, Andrew W.; Jones, Susan K.; Bobbio, Stephen M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes continuing efforts in the development of Acid Hardened Resist (AHR) systems for use in deep UV photolithography. The Silylated AHR (SAHR) process treats a highly absorbing resist, such as XP-8928, with trimethylsilyldiethylamine. The exposed, crosslinked areas show virtually no reactivity with the silylating agent, and the unexposed areas incorporate 10 to 12% by weight silicon in the film. The silicon appears to incorporate from the exterior in a constant concentration, consistent with Case II diffusion. Subsequent dry etching leads to a positive tone image. The contrast is 5, and the photospeed is ~10 mJ/cm2. Resolution of 0.5 μm line/space pairs has been demonstrated, although substantial proximity effects are encountered.

  5. Integrated Microchemical Analysis System Using DS2 Penetrator Technology for the Enantiomeric Detection of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Mathies, Richard; Hutt, Lester; Grunthaner, Paula; Grannan, Sabrina; Lin, Gisela; Blaney, Diana L.; McDonald, Gene; Becker, Luann

    1996-01-01

    Any strategy for investigating whether abiotic and/or biotic organic molecules are present on Mars and the search for biosignatures should focus on compounds which are readily synthesized under plausible prebiotic conditions, play an essential role in biochemistry as we know it and have properties such as chirality (handedness) which can be used to distinguish between abiotic vs. biotic origins (1). Amino acids are one of the few compound classes that fulfill all these requirements. They are synthesized in high yields in prebiotic simulation experiments, are one of the more abundant types of organic compounds present in carbonaceous meteorites and only the L-enantiomers are used in the proteins and enzymes in life on Earth.

  6. Assessment of technological options and economical feasibility for cyanophycin biopolymer and high-value amino acid production.

    PubMed

    Mooibroek, Hans; Oosterhuis, Nico; Giuseppin, Marco; Toonen, Marcel; Franssen, Henk; Scott, Elinor; Sanders, Johan; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2007-11-01

    Major transitions can be expected within the next few decades aiming at the reduction of pollution and global warming and at energy saving measures. For these purposes, new sustainable biorefinery concepts will be needed that will replace the traditional mineral oil-based synthesis of specialty and bulk chemicals. An important group of these chemicals are those that comprise N-functionalities. Many plant components contained in biomass rest or waste stream fractions contain these N-functionalities in proteins and free amino acids that can be used as starting materials for the synthesis of biopolymers and chemicals. This paper describes the economic and technological feasibility for cyanophycin production by fermentation of the potato waste stream Protamylassetrade mark or directly in plants and its subsequent conversion to a number of N-containing bulk chemicals.

  7. Assessment of technological options and economical feasibility for cyanophycin biopolymer and high-value amino acid production

    PubMed Central

    Oosterhuis, Nico; Giuseppin, Marco; Toonen, Marcel; Franssen, Henk; Scott, Elinor; Sanders, Johan; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Major transitions can be expected within the next few decades aiming at the reduction of pollution and global warming and at energy saving measures. For these purposes, new sustainable biorefinery concepts will be needed that will replace the traditional mineral oil-based synthesis of specialty and bulk chemicals. An important group of these chemicals are those that comprise N-functionalities. Many plant components contained in biomass rest or waste stream fractions contain these N-functionalities in proteins and free amino acids that can be used as starting materials for the synthesis of biopolymers and chemicals. This paper describes the economic and technological feasibility for cyanophycin production by fermentation of the potato waste stream Protamylasse™ or directly in plants and its subsequent conversion to a number of N-containing bulk chemicals. PMID:17876577

  8. Whole Genome Amplification of Labeled Viable Single Cells Suited for Array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kroneis, Thomas; El-Heliebi, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding details of a complex biological system makes it necessary to dismantle it down to its components. Immunostaining techniques allow identification of several distinct cell types thereby giving an inside view of intercellular heterogeneity. Often staining reveals that the most remarkable cells are the rarest. To further characterize the target cells on a molecular level, single cell techniques are necessary. Here, we describe the immunostaining, micromanipulation, and whole genome amplification of single cells for the purpose of genomic characterization. First, we exemplify the preparation of cell suspensions from cultured cells as well as the isolation of peripheral mononucleated cells from blood. The target cell population is then subjected to immunostaining. After cytocentrifugation target cells are isolated by micromanipulation and forwarded to whole genome amplification. For whole genome amplification, we use GenomePlex(®) technology allowing downstream genomic analysis such as array-comparative genomic hybridization.

  9. Method Of Signal Amplification In Multi-Chromophore Luminescence Sensors

    DOEpatents

    Levitsky, Igor A.; Krivoshlykov, Sergei G.

    2004-02-03

    A fluorescence-based method for highly sensitive and selective detection of analyte molecules is proposed. The method employs the energy transfer between two or more fluorescent chromophores in a carefully selected polymer matrix. In one preferred embodiment, signal amplification has been achieved in the fluorescent sensing of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) using two dyes, 3-aminofluoranthene (AM) and Nile Red (NR), in a hydrogen bond acidic polymer matrix. The selected polymer matrix quenches the fluorescence of both dyes and shifts dye emission and absorption spectra relative to more inert matrices. Upon DMMP sorption, the AM fluorescence shifts to the red at the same time the NR absorption shifts to the blue, resulting in better band overlap and increased energy transfer between chromophores. In another preferred embodiment, the sensitive material is incorporated into an optical fiber system enabling efficient excitation of the dye and collecting the fluorescent signal form the sensitive material on the remote end of the system. The proposed method can be applied to multichromophore luminescence sensor systems incorporating N-chromophores leading to N-fold signal amplification and improved selectivity. The method can be used in all applications where highly sensitive detection of basic gases, such as dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), Sarin, Soman and other chemical warfare agents having basic properties, is required, including environmental monitoring, chemical industry and medicine.

  10. DNA Extraction and Amplification from Contemporary Polynesian Bark-Cloth

    PubMed Central

    Moncada, Ximena; Payacán, Claudia; Arriaza, Francisco; Lobos, Sergio; Seelenfreund, Daniela; Seelenfreund, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background Paper mulberry has been used for thousands of years in Asia and Oceania for making paper and bark-cloth, respectively. Museums around the world hold valuable collections of Polynesian bark-cloth. Genetic analysis of the plant fibers from which the textiles were made may answer a number of questions of interest related to provenance, authenticity or species used in the manufacture of these textiles. Recovery of nucleic acids from paper mulberry bark-cloth has not been reported before. Methodology We describe a simple method for the extraction of PCR-amplifiable DNA from small samples of contemporary Polynesian bark-cloth (tapa) using two types of nuclear markers. We report the amplification of about 300 bp sequences of the ITS1 region and of a microsatellite marker. Conclusions Sufficient DNA was retrieved from all bark-cloth samples to permit successful PCR amplification. This method shows a means of obtaining useful genetic information from modern bark-cloth samples and opens perspectives for the analyses of small fragments derived from ethnographic materials. PMID:23437166

  11. Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  12. A peptide & peptide nucleic acid synthesis technology for transporter molecules and theranostics--the SPPS.

    PubMed

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  13. A Peptide & Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthesis Technology for Transporter Molecules and Theranostics - The SPPS

    PubMed Central

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  14. Shock wave amplification by fabric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thom, C. G.; Cronin, D. S.

    2009-04-01

    It has been shown that, when exposed to air shock waves, soft materials such as fabrics can lead to amplification of the peak pressure measured on a reflecting surface behind the fabric. This occurs for a wide range of fabric configurations, including those used in soft-ballistic protection. The goal of this study was to validate a numerical model to develop an improved understanding of this phenomenon and investigate different fabric parameters, including density, permeability and standoff, and their influence on blast amplification. The investigation of fabric parameters was carried out using numerical simulations in an explicit finite element code with coupled fluid-structure interaction. The benefit of this method was the ability to isolate individual parameters. The model predicted similar trends to existing experimental data, though the numerically predicted peak pressures were consistently higher than the experimental values. The parametric study showed that low permeability fabrics result in the highest pressure amplifications. At areal densities on the order 100 g/m2, typical of single layer fabrics, amplification also increased with areal density for low permeability materials.

  15. Quantum Amplification by Superradiant Emission of Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.; Yuan, Luqi; Scully, Marlan O.

    2013-10-01

    A laser generates light through stimulated emission of radiation and requires population inversion. Quantum interference can yield lasing without inversion. However, such phase-sensitive quantum amplification still requires some atomic population in the excited state. Here, we present a new kind of quantum amplifier based on collective superradiant emission which does not need any population in the excited state. We show that parametric resonance between the driving (e.g., infrared) field and collective superradiant oscillations of the atomic polarization can yield light amplification at high (e.g., XUV) frequencies. To achieve gain, one must suppress a time-dependent Stark shift caused by the driving field. The resulting superradiant amplifier is many orders of magnitude more efficient than the usual nonlinear multiphoton excitation and holds promise for a new kind of generator of high-frequency coherent radiation. In addition to a detailed analytical analysis, confirmed by numerical simulations, we provide a physically appealing explanation of the quantum amplification by superradiant emission of radiation (QASER) operation in terms of coupled classical oscillators. We also present an experiment that demonstrates the QASER amplification mechanism in an electronic circuit, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first experimental demonstration of the difference combination resonance.

  16. Desert Amplification in a Warming Climate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Here I analyze the observed and projected surface temperature anomalies over land between 50°S-50°N for the period 1950-2099 by large-scale ecoregion and find strongest warming consistently and persistently seen over driest ecoregions such as the Sahara desert and the Arabian Peninsula during various 30-year periods, pointing to desert amplification in a warming climate. This amplification enhances linearly with the global mean greenhouse gases(GHGs) radiative forcing and is attributable primarily to a stronger GHGs-enhanced downward longwave radiation forcing reaching the surface over drier ecoregions as a consequence of a warmer and thus moister atmosphere in response to increasing GHGs. These results indicate that desert amplification may represent a fundamental pattern of global warming associated with water vapor feedbacks over land in low- and mid- latitudes where surface warming rates depend inversely on ecosystem dryness. It is likely that desert amplification might involve two types of water vapor feedbacks that maximize respectively in the tropical upper troposphere and near the surface over deserts, with both being very dry and thus extremely sensitive to changes of water vapor. PMID:27538725

  17. Topographic amplification across a taiwanese ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rault, Claire; Meunier, Patrick; Burtin, Arnaud; Marc, Odin; Weian Chao, Vvn; Wu, Yih-Min; Hovius, Niels

    2016-04-01

    A line of 6 broadband seismometers have been deployed across a ridge in the Hualien County (Eastern Taiwan) in order to study topographic amplification. Since March 2015, the network has been continuously recording waves incoming from the Taiwanese regional seismicity. The hill is well approximated by a triangular topography of 3600m in length by 900m in height. We present a preliminary analysis performed over a dozen of earthquakes selected from the Seismic Taiwanese catalog (CWBSN). We show that most of the Uphill records exhibit a systematic amplification of seismic waves (peak to peak of particle velocity) in the relevant frequency band [0.5-2Hz]. By contrast, energy within the larger frequency band [6-20Hz] reflects local site effects induced by the soil layer. We report amplification ratios ranging from ranging from 1.2 to 3 and from 1.8 to 4 for P and S waves respectively. We show that amplification processes at the top strongly depend on the parameter α defined as the angle between the azimuth of incoming wave and the azimuth of the ridge divide.

  18. Desert Amplification in a Warming Climate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liming

    2016-08-19

    Here I analyze the observed and projected surface temperature anomalies over land between 50°S-50°N for the period 1950-2099 by large-scale ecoregion and find strongest warming consistently and persistently seen over driest ecoregions such as the Sahara desert and the Arabian Peninsula during various 30-year periods, pointing to desert amplification in a warming climate. This amplification enhances linearly with the global mean greenhouse gases(GHGs) radiative forcing and is attributable primarily to a stronger GHGs-enhanced downward longwave radiation forcing reaching the surface over drier ecoregions as a consequence of a warmer and thus moister atmosphere in response to increasing GHGs. These results indicate that desert amplification may represent a fundamental pattern of global warming associated with water vapor feedbacks over land in low- and mid- latitudes where surface warming rates depend inversely on ecosystem dryness. It is likely that desert amplification might involve two types of water vapor feedbacks that maximize respectively in the tropical upper troposphere and near the surface over deserts, with both being very dry and thus extremely sensitive to changes of water vapor.

  19. Modeling of the Princeton Raman Amplification Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Min Sup; Lindberg, Ryan; Wurtele, Jonathan; Cheng, W.; Avitzour, Y.; Ping, Y.; Suckewer, S.; Fisch, N. J.

    2004-11-01

    We numerically model the Princeton experiments on Raman amplification [1] using averaged-PIC (aPIC) [2] and 3-wave codes. Recently, there has been a series of experimental results performed in Princeton University [3]. Amplification factors up to 500 in intensity were obtained using a subpicosecond pulse propagating in a 3mm plasma. The plasma was created using a gas jet. The intensity of the amplified pulse exceeds the intensity of the pump pulse, indicating that the process of Raman amplification is in the nonlinear regime. Comparisons are made between 3-wave models, kinetic models and the experimental data. It is found that better agreement is achieved when kinetic effects are included. Discussion of the influence of a range of potentially deleterious phenomena such as density inhomogeneity, particle trapping, ionization, and pump depletion by noise amplification will be examined. References [1] V.M. Malkin, G. Shvets, and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol.82, 1999. [2] M.S. Hur, G. Penn, J.S. Wurtele, R. Lindberg, to appear in Phys. Plasmas. [3] Y. Ping, et al., Phys. Rev. E vol. 66, 2002; Phys. Rev. E vol. 67, 2003;

  20. Desert Amplification in a Warming Climate

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Here I analyze the observed and projected surface temperature anomalies over land between 50°S-50°N for the period 1950–2099 by large-scale ecoregion and find strongest warming consistently and persistently seen over driest ecoregions such as the Sahara desert and the Arabian Peninsula during various 30-year periods, pointing to desert amplification in a warming climate. This amplification enhances linearly with the global mean greenhouse gases(GHGs) radiative forcing and is attributable primarily to a stronger GHGs-enhanced downward longwave radiation forcing reaching the surface over drier ecoregions as a consequence of a warmer and thus moister atmosphere in response to increasing GHGs. These results indicate that desert amplification may represent a fundamental pattern of global warming associated with water vapor feedbacks over land in low- and mid- latitudes where surface warming rates depend inversely on ecosystem dryness. It is likely that desert amplification might involve two types of water vapor feedbacks that maximize respectively in the tropical upper troposphere and near the surface over deserts, with both being very dry and thus extremely sensitive to changes of water vapor. PMID:27538725

  1. Desert Amplification in a Warming Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liming

    2016-08-01

    Here I analyze the observed and projected surface temperature anomalies over land between 50°S-50°N for the period 1950–2099 by large-scale ecoregion and find strongest warming consistently and persistently seen over driest ecoregions such as the Sahara desert and the Arabian Peninsula during various 30-year periods, pointing to desert amplification in a warming climate. This amplification enhances linearly with the global mean greenhouse gases(GHGs) radiative forcing and is attributable primarily to a stronger GHGs-enhanced downward longwave radiation forcing reaching the surface over drier ecoregions as a consequence of a warmer and thus moister atmosphere in response to increasing GHGs. These results indicate that desert amplification may represent a fundamental pattern of global warming associated with water vapor feedbacks over land in low- and mid- latitudes where surface warming rates depend inversely on ecosystem dryness. It is likely that desert amplification might involve two types of water vapor feedbacks that maximize respectively in the tropical upper troposphere and near the surface over deserts, with both being very dry and thus extremely sensitive to changes of water vapor.

  2. The art of strain improvement of industrial lactic acid bacteria without the use of recombinant DNA technology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The food industry is constantly striving to develop new products to fulfil the ever changing demands of consumers and the strict requirements of regulatory agencies. For foods based on microbial fermentation, this pushes the boundaries of microbial performance and requires the constant development of new starter cultures with novel properties. Since the use of ingredients in the food industry is tightly regulated and under close scrutiny by consumers, the use of recombinant DNA technology to improve microbial performance is currently not an option. As a result, the focus for improving strains for microbial fermentation is on classical strain improvement methods. Here we review the use of these techniques to improve the functionality of lactic acid bacteria starter cultures for application in industrial-scale food production. Methods will be described for improving the bacteriophage resistance of specific strains, improving their texture forming ability, increasing their tolerance to stress and modulating both the amount and identity of acids produced during fermentation. In addition, approaches to eliminating undesirable properties will be described. Techniques include random mutagenesis, directed evolution and dominant selection schemes. PMID:25186244

  3. Site amplifications for generic rock sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.; Joyner, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Seismic shear-wave velocity as a function of depth for generic rock sites has been estimated from borehole data and studies of crustal velocities, and these velocities have been used to compute frequency-dependent amplifications for zero attenuation for use in simulations of strong ground motion. We define a generic rock site as one whose velocity at shallow depths equals the average of those from the rock sites sampled by the borehole data. Most of the boreholes are in populated areas; for that reason, the rock sites sampled are of particular engineering significance. We consider two generic rock sites: rock, corresponding to the bulk of the borehole data, and very hard rock, such as is found in glaciated regions in large areas of eastern North America or in portions of western North America. The amplifications on rock sites can be in excess of 3.5 at high frequencies, in contrast to the amplifications of less than 1.2 on very hard rock sites. The consideration of unattenuated amplification alone is computationally convenient, but what matters for ground-motion estimation is the combined effect of amplification and attenuation. For reasonable values of the attenuation parameter K0, the combined effect of attenuation and amplification for rock sites peaks between about 2 and 5 Hz with a maximum level of less than 1.8. The combined effect is about a factor of 1.5 at 1 Hz and is less than unity for frequencies in the range of 10 to 20 Hz (depending on K0). Using these amplifications, we find provisional values of about ???? = 70 bars and K0 = 0.035 sec for rock sites in western North America by fitting our empirically determined response spectra for an M 6.5 event to simulated values. The borehole data yield shear velocities (V??30) of 618 and 306 m/sec for "rock" and "soil" sites, respectively, when averaged over the upper 30 m. From this, we recommend that V??30 equals 620 and 310 m/sec for applications requiring the average velocity for rock and soil sites in

  4. Genetic and Technological Characterisation of Vineyard- and Winery-Associated Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nisiotou, Aspasia A.; Filippousi, Maria-Evangelia; Fragkoulis, Petros; Tassou, Chryssoula; Banilas, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Vineyard- and winery-associated lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from two major PDO regions in Greece, Peza and Nemea, were surveyed. LAB were isolated from grapes, fermenting musts, and winery tanks performing spontaneous malolactic fermentations (MLF). Higher population density and species richness were detected in Nemea than in Peza vineyards and on grapes than in fermenting musts. Pediococcus pentosaceus and Lactobacillus graminis were the most abundant LAB on grapes, while Lactobacillus plantarum dominated in fermenting musts from both regions. No particular structure of Lactobacillus plantarum populations according to the region of origin was observed, and strain distribution seems random. LAB species diversity in winery tanks differed significantly from that in vineyard samples, consisting principally of Oenococcus oeni. Different strains were analysed as per their enological characteristics and the ability to produce biogenic amines (BAs). Winery-associated species showed higher resistance to low pH, ethanol, SO2, and CuSO4 than vineyard-associated isolates. The frequency of BA-producing strains was relatively low but not negligible, considering that certain winery-associated Lactobacillus hilgardii strains were able to produce BAs. Present results show the necessity of controlling the MLF by selected starters in order to avoid BA accumulation in wine. PMID:25866789

  5. Portable pH-inspired electrochemical detection of DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Wu, Jian; Wang, Rui; Wang, Liu; Ying, Yibin

    2014-08-01

    A portable and label-free pH-mediated electrochemical method for the detection of DNA amplification is described. With protons released as readouts, DNA amplifications were detected in real-time or at the end-point.

  6. Rapid microfluidic thermal cycler for nucleic acid amplification

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Vafai, Kambiz

    2015-10-27

    A system for thermal cycling a material to be thermal cycled including a microfluidic heat exchanger; a porous medium in the microfluidic heat exchanger; a microfluidic thermal cycling chamber containing the material to be thermal cycled, the microfluidic thermal cycling chamber operatively connected to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a working fluid at first temperature; a first system for transmitting the working fluid at first temperature to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a working fluid at a second temperature, a second system for transmitting the working fluid at second temperature to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a pump for flowing the working fluid at the first temperature from the first system to the microfluidic heat exchanger and through the porous medium; and flowing the working fluid at the second temperature from the second system to the heat exchanger and through the porous medium.

  7. Centrifugal Microfluidic System for Nucleic Acid Amplification and Detection

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Baogang; Peng, Niancai; Li, Lei; Li, Zheng; Hu, Fei; Zhang, Zengming; Wang, Chaohui

    2015-01-01

    We report here the development of a rapid PCR microfluidic system comprising a double-shaft turntable and centrifugal-based disc that rapidly drives the PCR mixture between chambers set at different temperatures, and the bidirectional flow improved the space utilization of the disc. Three heating resistors and thermistors maintained uniform, specific temperatures for the denaturation, annealing, and extension steps of the PCR. Infrared imaging showed that there was little thermal interference between reaction chambers; the system enabled the cycle number and reaction time of each step to be independently adjusted. To validate the function and efficiency of the centrifugal microfluidic system, a 350-base pair target gene from the hepatitis B virus was amplified and quantitated by fluorescence detection. By optimizing the cycling parameters, the reaction time was reduced to 32 min as compared to 120 min for a commercial PCR machine. DNA samples with concentrations ranging from 10 to 106 copies/mL could be quantitatively analyzed using this system. This centrifugal-based microfluidic platform is a useful system and possesses industrialization potential that can be used for portable diagnostics. PMID:26556354

  8. Expression of biologically recombinant human acidic fibroblast growth factor in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds via oleosin fusion technology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Guan, Lili; Guo, Yongxin; Du, Linna; Wang, Fawei; Wang, Yanfang; Zhen, Lu; Wang, Qingman; Zou, Deyi; Chen, Wei; Yu, Lei; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiaokun

    2015-07-15

    The potential of oleosins to act as carriers for recombinant foreign proteins in plant cells has been established. Using the oleosin fusion technology, the protein can be targeted to oil bodies in oilseeds by fusing it to the N- or C-terminus of oleosin. In this study, aFGF was expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds via oleosin fusion technology. A plant-preferred aFGF gene was synthesized by optimizing codon usage and was fused to the C-terminus of the A. thaliana 18.5kDa oleosin gene. The fusion gene was driven by the phaseolin promoter to confer seed-specific expression of the human acidic fibroblast growth factor in A. thaliana. The T-DNA region of the recombinant plasmid pKO-aFGF was introduced into the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana by the floral dip method. The aFGF protein expression was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. The biological activity showed that oil bodies fused to aFGF stimulated NIH/3T3 cell proliferation activity.

  9. Detection and Characterization of Viral Species/Subspecies Using Isothermal Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) Assays.

    PubMed

    Glais, Laurent; Jacquot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Numerous molecular-based detection protocols include an amplification step of the targeted nucleic acids. This step is important to reach the expected sensitive detection of pathogens in diagnostic procedures. Amplifications of nucleic acid sequences are generally performed, in the presence of appropriate primers, using thermocyclers. However, the time requested to amplify molecular targets and the cost of the thermocycler machines could impair the use of these methods in routine diagnostics. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technique allows rapid (short-term incubation of sample and primers in an enzymatic mixture) and simple (isothermal) amplification of molecular targets. RPA protocol requires only basic molecular steps such as extraction procedures and agarose gel electrophoresis. Thus, RPA can be considered as an interesting alternative to standard molecular-based diagnostic tools. In this paper, the complete procedures to set up an RPA assay, applied to detection of RNA (Potato virus Y, Potyvirus) and DNA (Wheat dwarf virus, Mastrevirus) viruses, are described. The proposed procedure allows developing species- or subspecies-specific detection assay.

  10. Detection and Characterization of Viral Species/Subspecies Using Isothermal Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) Assays.

    PubMed

    Glais, Laurent; Jacquot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Numerous molecular-based detection protocols include an amplification step of the targeted nucleic acids. This step is important to reach the expected sensitive detection of pathogens in diagnostic procedures. Amplifications of nucleic acid sequences are generally performed, in the presence of appropriate primers, using thermocyclers. However, the time requested to amplify molecular targets and the cost of the thermocycler machines could impair the use of these methods in routine diagnostics. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technique allows rapid (short-term incubation of sample and primers in an enzymatic mixture) and simple (isothermal) amplification of molecular targets. RPA protocol requires only basic molecular steps such as extraction procedures and agarose gel electrophoresis. Thus, RPA can be considered as an interesting alternative to standard molecular-based diagnostic tools. In this paper, the complete procedures to set up an RPA assay, applied to detection of RNA (Potato virus Y, Potyvirus) and DNA (Wheat dwarf virus, Mastrevirus) viruses, are described. The proposed procedure allows developing species- or subspecies-specific detection assay. PMID:25981257

  11. The national protocol for paediatric amplification in Australia.

    PubMed

    King, Alison M

    2010-01-01

    This document describes the national protocol for the selection, fitting, verification, and evaluation of amplification for hearing-impaired children in Australia. It also outlines the approach to management of children who have auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder, children who have mild and unilateral hearing loss, and children who require cochlear implantation. Audiological management of all Australian citizens and permanent residents under twenty-one years of age who have a hearing loss is carried out by the national hearing service provider, Australian Hearing. It is funded by the Australian Government's Hearing Services Program to provide fully subsidised hearing aids, frequency modulated (FM) systems and ongoing audiological management. All hearing aids for children are multi-channel devices that offer wide dynamic range compression, directional microphone technology and feedback cancellation as well as access to multiple listening programs, telecoil and audio-input facilities. Hearing aid gain, frequency response and maximum power output are derived according to the NAL-NL1 prescription procedure and verified using real ear measurements. Amplification benefit is evaluated using a range of speech perception tests and functional assessment questionnaires. PMID:19919326

  12. Using electromagnetic induction technology to predict volatile fatty acid, source area differences.

    PubMed

    Woodbury, Bryan L; Eigenberg, Roger A; Varel, Vince; Lesch, Scott; Spiehs, Mindy J

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface measures have been adapted to identify manure accumulation on feedlot surfaces. Understanding where manure accumulates can be useful to develop management practices that mitigate air emissions from manure, such as odor or greenhouse gases. Objectives were to determine if electromagnetic induction could be used to predict differences in volatile fatty acids (VFA) and other volatiles produced in vitro from feedlot surface material following a simulated rain event. Twenty soil samples per pen were collected from eight pens with cattle fed two different diets using a predictive sampling approach. These samples were incubated at room temperature for 3 d to determine fermentation products formed. Fermentation products were categorized into acetate, straight-, branched-chained, and total VFAs. These data were used to develop calibration prediction models on the basis of properties measured by electromagnetic induction (EMI). Diet had no significant effect on mean volatile solids (VS) concentration of accumulated manure. However, manure from cattle fed a corn (Zea mays L.)-based diet had significantly ( P ≤ 0.1) greater mean straight-chained and total VFA generation than pens where wet distillers grain with solubles (WDGS) were fed. Alternately, pens with cattle fed a WDGS-based diet had significantly (P ≤ 0.05) greater branched-chained VFAs than pens with cattle fed a corn-based diet. Many branched-chain VFAs have a lower odor threshold than straight-chained VFAs; therefore, emissions from WDGS-based diet manure would probably have a lower odor threshold. We concluded that diets can affect the types and quantities of VFAs produced following a rain event. Understanding odorant accumulation patterns and the ability to predict generation can be used to develop precision management practices to mitigate odor emissions.

  13. Integrated sample-to-detection chip for nucleic acid test assays.

    PubMed

    Prakash, R; Pabbaraju, K; Wong, S; Tellier, R; Kaler, K V I S

    2016-06-01

    Nucleic acid based diagnostic techniques are routinely used for the detection of infectious agents. Most of these assays rely on nucleic acid extraction platforms for the extraction and purification of nucleic acids and a separate real-time PCR platform for quantitative nucleic acid amplification tests (NATs). Several microfluidic lab on chip (LOC) technologies have been developed, where mechanical and chemical methods are used for the extraction and purification of nucleic acids. Microfluidic technologies have also been effectively utilized for chip based real-time PCR assays. However, there are few examples of microfluidic systems which have successfully integrated these two key processes. In this study, we have implemented an electro-actuation based LOC micro-device that leverages multi-frequency actuation of samples and reagents droplets for chip based nucleic acid extraction and real-time, reverse transcription (RT) PCR (qRT-PCR) amplification from clinical samples. Our prototype micro-device combines chemical lysis with electric field assisted isolation of nucleic acid in a four channel parallel processing scheme. Furthermore, a four channel parallel qRT-PCR amplification and detection assay is integrated to deliver the sample-to-detection NAT chip. The NAT chip combines dielectrophoresis and electrostatic/electrowetting actuation methods with resistive micro-heaters and temperature sensors to perform chip based integrated NATs. The two chip modules have been validated using different panels of clinical samples and their performance compared with standard platforms. This study has established that our integrated NAT chip system has a sensitivity and specificity comparable to that of the standard platforms while providing up to 10 fold reduction in sample/reagent volumes.

  14. Multiplex Strand Invasion Based Amplification (mSIBA) assay for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Eboigbodin, Kevin E; Hoser, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests have become a common method for diagnosis of STIs due to their improved sensitivity over immunoassays and traditional culture-based methods. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods offer significant advantages over polymerase chain reaction (PCR) because they do not require sophisticated instruments needed for thermal cycling of PCR. We recently reported a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method, Strand Invasion-Based Amplification (SIBA), which exhibited high analytical sensitivity and specificity for amplification of DNA. However, because the reactions were detected using an intercalating dye, this method was only suitable for amplifying a single genomic target. Here, we report the development of multiplexed SIBA (mSIBA) that allows simultaneous detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and an internal control in the same reaction tube. SIBA is compatible with probes, allowing the detection of multiple DNA targets in the same reaction tube. The IC was developed to assess the quality of the isolated DNA and the integrity of the enzyme system, as well as to test oligonucleotides. The mSIBA assay retained high analytical sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CT and NG. The development of mSIBA enables rapid screening for CT and NG within point-of-care or central laboratory settings. PMID:26837460

  15. Fin width and height dependence of bipolar amplification in bulk FinFETs submitted to heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jun-Ting; Chen, Shu-Ming; Chen, Jian-Jun; Huang, Peng-Cheng

    2015-11-01

    FinFET technologies are becoming the mainstream process as technology scales down. Based on a 28-nm bulk p-FinFET device, we have investigated the fin width and height dependence of bipolar amplification for heavy-ion-irradiated FinFETs by 3D TCAD numerical simulation. Simulation results show that due to a well bipolar conduction mechanism rather than a channel (fin) conduction path, the transistors with narrower fins exhibit a diminished bipolar amplification effect, while the fin height presents a trivial effect on the bipolar amplification and charge collection. The results also indicate that the single event transient (SET) pulse width can be mitigated about 35% at least by optimizing the ratio of fin width and height, which can provide guidance for radiation-hardened applications in bulk FinFET technology. Project supported by the National Natural Science of China (Grant No. 61376109).

  16. Application of FRET Technology to the In Vivo Evaluation of Therapeutic Nucleic Acids (ANTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez-Hess, María Luisa; Alvarez-Salas, Luis Marat

    2007-02-01

    Developing applications for therapeutic nucleic acids (TNAs) (i.e. ribozymes, antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs), siRNA and aptamers) requires a reporter system designed to rapidly evaluate their in vivo effect. To this end we designed a reporter system based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) engineered to release the FRET effect produced by two green fluorescent protein (GFP) variants linked by a TNA target site. Because the FRET effect occurs instantaneously when two fluorophores are very close to each other (>100nm) stimulating emission of the acceptor fluorophore by the excitation of the donor fluorophore it has been widely use to reveal interactions between molecules. The present system (FRET2) correlates the FRET effect with the in vivo activity of distinct types of TNAs based on a model consisting of RNA from human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) previously shown accessible to TNAs. HPV-16 is the most common papillomavirus associated with cervical cancer, the leading cause of death by cancer in México. The FRET2 system was first tested in vitro and then used in bacteria in which transcription is linked to translation allowing controlled expression and rapid evaluation of the FRET2 protein. To assure accessibility of the target mRNA to TNAs, the FRET2 mRNA was probed by RNaseH assays prior FRET testing. The fluorescence features of the FRET2 system was tested with different FRET-producing GFP donor-acceptor pairs leading to selection of green (donor) and yellow (acceptor) variants of GFP as the most efficient. Modifications in aminoacid composition and linker length of the target sequence did not affect FRET efficiency. In vivo AS-ODN-mediated destruction of the chimerical FRET2 reporter mRNA resulted in the recovery of GFP fluorescent spectrum in a concentration and time dependent manner. Reported anti-HPV ribozymes were also tested with similar results. Therefore, we conclude that the FRET effect can be a useful tool in the

  17. OPTIMIZING TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE MERCURY AND ACID GAS EMISSIONS FROM ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

    2005-10-01

    Maps showing potential mercury, sulfur, chlorine, and moisture emissions for U.S. coal by county of origin were made from publicly available data (plates 1, 2, 3, and 4). Published equations that predict mercury capture by emission control technologies used at U.S. coal-fired utilities were applied to average coal quality values for 169 U.S. counties. The results were used to create five maps that show the influence of coal origin on mercury emissions from utility units with: (1) hot-side electrostatic precipitator (hESP), (2) cold-side electrostatic precipitator (cESP), (3) hot-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (hESP/FGD), (4) cold-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (cESP/FGD), and (5) spray-dry adsorption with fabric filter (SDA/FF) emission controls (plates 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9). Net (lower) coal heating values were calculated from measured coal Btu values, and estimated coal moisture and hydrogen values; the net heating values were used to derive mercury emission rates on an electric output basis (plate 10). Results indicate that selection of low-mercury coal is a good mercury control option for plants having hESP, cESP, or hESP/FGD emission controls. Chlorine content is more important for plants having cESP/FGD or SDA/FF controls; optimum mercury capture is indicated where chlorine is between 500 and 1000 ppm. Selection of low-sulfur coal should improve mercury capture where carbon in fly ash is used to reduce mercury emissions. Comparison of in-ground coal quality with the quality of commercially mined coal indicates that existing coal mining and coal washing practice results in a 25% reduction of mercury in U.S. coal before it is delivered to the power plant. Further pre-combustion mercury reductions may be possible, especially for coal from Texas, Ohio, parts of Pennsylvania and much of the western U.S.

  18. AFB (Acid-Fast Bacillus) Smear and Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mycobacteria Smear; Mycobacteria Culture; TB NAAT Formal name: Acid-Fast Bacillus Smear and Culture and Sensitivity; Mycobacteria tuberculosis Nucleic Acid Amplification Test Related tests: TB Screening Tests ; Bacterial ...

  19. Evaluation of bias associated with high-multiplex, target-specific pre-amplification

    PubMed Central

    Okino, Steven T.; Kong, Michelle; Sarras, Haya; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We developed a novel PCR-based pre-amplification (PreAmp) technology that can increase the abundance of over 350 target genes one million-fold. To assess potential bias introduced by PreAmp we utilized ERCC RNA reference standards, a model system that quantifies measurement error in RNA analysis. We assessed three types of bias: amplification bias, dynamic range bias and fold-change bias. We show that our PreAmp workflow introduces only minimal amplification and fold-change bias under stringent conditions. We do detect dynamic range bias if a target gene is highly abundant and PreAmp occurred for 16 or more PCR cycles; however, this type of bias is easily correctable. To assess PreAmp bias in a gene expression profiling experiment, we analyzed a panel of genes that are regulated during differentiation using the NTera2 stem cell model system. We find that results generated using PreAmp are similar to results obtained using standard qPCR (without the pre-amplification step). Importantly, PreAmp maintains patterns of gene expression changes across samples; the same biological insights would be derived from a PreAmp experiment as with a standard gene expression profiling experiment. We conclude that our PreAmp technology can facilitate analysis of extremely limited samples in gene expression quantification experiments. PMID:27077043

  20. Evaluation of bias associated with high-multiplex, target-specific pre-amplification.

    PubMed

    Okino, Steven T; Kong, Michelle; Sarras, Haya; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel PCR-based pre-amplification (PreAmp) technology that can increase the abundance of over 350 target genes one million-fold. To assess potential bias introduced by PreAmp we utilized ERCC RNA reference standards, a model system that quantifies measurement error in RNA analysis. We assessed three types of bias: amplification bias, dynamic range bias and fold-change bias. We show that our PreAmp workflow introduces only minimal amplification and fold-change bias under stringent conditions. We do detect dynamic range bias if a target gene is highly abundant and PreAmp occurred for 16 or more PCR cycles; however, this type of bias is easily correctable. To assess PreAmp bias in a gene expression profiling experiment, we analyzed a panel of genes that are regulated during differentiation using the NTera2 stem cell model system. We find that results generated using PreAmp are similar to results obtained using standard qPCR (without the pre-amplification step). Importantly, PreAmp maintains patterns of gene expression changes across samples; the same biological insights would be derived from a PreAmp experiment as with a standard gene expression profiling experiment. We conclude that our PreAmp technology can facilitate analysis of extremely limited samples in gene expression quantification experiments.

  1. Flux variability scanning based on enforced objective flux for identifying gene amplification targets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In order to reduce time and efforts to develop microbial strains with better capability of producing desired bioproducts, genome-scale metabolic simulations have proven useful in identifying gene knockout and amplification targets. Constraints-based flux analysis has successfully been employed for such simulation, but is limited in its ability to properly describe the complex nature of biological systems. Gene knockout simulations are relatively straightforward to implement, simply by constraining the flux values of the target reaction to zero, but the identification of reliable gene amplification targets is rather difficult. Here, we report a new algorithm which incorporates physiological data into a model to improve the model’s prediction capabilities and to capitalize on the relationships between genes and metabolic fluxes. Results We developed an algorithm, flux variability scanning based on enforced objective flux (FVSEOF) with grouping reaction (GR) constraints, in an effort to identify gene amplification targets by considering reactions that co-carry flux values based on physiological omics data via “GR constraints”. This method scans changes in the variabilities of metabolic fluxes in response to an artificially enforced objective flux of product formation. The gene amplification targets predicted using this method were validated by comparing the predicted effects with the previous experimental results obtained for the production of shikimic acid and putrescine in Escherichia coli. Moreover, new gene amplification targets for further enhancing putrescine production were validated through experiments involving the overexpression of each identified targeted gene under condition-controlled batch cultivation. Conclusions FVSEOF with GR constraints allows identification of gene amplification targets for metabolic engineering of microbial strains in order to enhance the production of desired bioproducts. The algorithm was validated through the

  2. Acceleration amplifications in nif structures subjected to earthquake base motions

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, D

    1999-11-29

    NIF technical staff have questioned the possibility of obtaining acceleration amplifications (i.e. amplification of the ground acceleration values) in a structure which are significantly higher than the acceleration amplification exhibited across the period range in the input response spectrum. This note utilizes a simple example to illustrate that the acceleration amplification resulting from the dynamic response of a structural system can indeed be significantly higher than the amplifications indicated in the response spectrum, and that the GEMINI program is computing the appropriate acceleration levels for a simple MDOF system.

  3. Amplification effects in optomechanics via weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Tao; Song, He-Shan

    2014-07-01

    We revisit the scheme of single-photon weak-coupling optomechanics using postselection, proposed by Pepper, Ghobadi, Jeffrey, Simon, and Bouwmeester [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 023601 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.023601], by analyzing the exact solution of the dynamical evolution. Positive and negative amplification effects of the displacement of the mirror's position can be generated when the Kerr phase is considered. This effect occurs when the postselected state of the photon is orthogonal to the initial state, which cannot be explained by the usual weak measurement results. The amplification effect can be further modulated by a phase shifter, and the maximal displacement state can appear within a short evolution time.

  4. Amplification of postwildfire peak flow by debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, J. W.; McGuire, L. A.; Rengers, F. K.; Smith, J. B.; Staley, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    In burned steeplands, the peak depth and discharge of postwildfire runoff can substantially increase from the addition of debris. Yet methods to estimate the increase over water flow are lacking. We quantified the potential amplification of peak stage and discharge using video observations of postwildfire runoff, compiled data on postwildfire peak flow (Qp), and a physically based model. Comparison of flood and debris flow data with similar distributions in drainage area (A) and rainfall intensity (I) showed that the median runoff coefficient (C = Qp/AI) of debris flows is 50 times greater than that of floods. The striking increase in Qp can be explained using a fully predictive model that describes the additional flow resistance caused by the emergence of coarse-grained surge fronts. The model provides estimates of the amplification of peak depth, discharge, and shear stress needed for assessing postwildfire hazards and constraining models of bedrock incision.

  5. Blending problem-based learning with Web technology positively impacts student learning outcomes in acid-base physiology.

    PubMed

    Taradi, Suncana Kukolja; Taradi, Milan; Radic, Kresimir; Pokrajac, Niksa

    2005-03-01

    World Wide Web (Web)-based learning (WBL), problem-based learning (PBL), and collaborative learning are at present the most powerful educational options in higher education. A blended (hybrid) course combines traditional face-to-face and WBL approaches in an educational environment that is nonspecific as to time and place. To provide educational services for an undergraduate second-year elective course in acid-base physiology, a rich, student-centered educational Web-environment designed to support PBL was created by using Web Course Tools courseware. The course is designed to require students to work in small collaborative groups using problem solving activities to develop topic understanding. The aim of the study was to identify the impact of the blended WBL-PBL-collaborative learning environment on student learning outcomes. Student test scores and satisfaction survey results from a blended WBL-PBL-based test group (n = 37) were compared with a control group whose instructional opportunities were from a traditional in-class PBL model (n = 84). WBL students scored significantly (t = 3.3952; P = 0.0009) better on the final acid-base physiology examination and expressed a positive attitude to the new learning environment in the satisfaction survey. Expressed in terms of a difference effect, the mean of the treated group (WBL) is at the 76th percentile of the untreated (face-to-face) group, which stands for a "medium" effect size. Thus student progress in the blended WBL-PBL collaborative environment was positively affected by the use of technology. PMID:15718381

  6. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 14. Methods for projecting future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, K.W.; Marmorek, D.; Ryan, P.F.; Heltcher, K.; Robinson, D.

    1990-09-01

    The objectives of the report are to: critically evaluate methods for projecting future effects of acidic deposition on surface water acid-base chemistry; review and evaluate techniques and procedures for analyzing projection uncertainty; review procedures for estimating regional lake and stream population attributes; review the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Direct/Delayed Response Project (DDRP) methodology for projecting the effects of acidic deposition on future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry; and present the models, uncertainty estimators, population estimators, and proposed approach selected to project the effects of acidic deposition on future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry in the NAPAP 1990 Integrated Assessment and discuss the selection rationale.

  7. Quantification of HIV-1 DNA using real-time recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Crannell, Zachary Austin; Rohrman, Brittany; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2014-06-17

    Although recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) has many advantages for the detection of pathogenic nucleic acids in point-of-care applications, RPA has not yet been implemented to quantify sample concentration using a standard curve. Here, we describe a real-time RPA assay with an internal positive control and an algorithm that analyzes real-time fluorescence data to quantify HIV-1 DNA. We show that DNA concentration and the onset of detectable amplification are correlated by an exponential standard curve. In a set of experiments in which the standard curve and algorithm were used to analyze and quantify additional DNA samples, the algorithm predicted an average concentration within 1 order of magnitude of the correct concentration for all HIV-1 DNA concentrations tested. These results suggest that quantitative RPA (qRPA) may serve as a powerful tool for quantifying nucleic acids and may be adapted for use in single-sample point-of-care diagnostic systems.

  8. Influence on Levels of Information as Presented by Different Technologies on Students' Understanding of Acid, Base, and pH Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakhleh, Mary B.; Krajcik, Joseph S.

    1994-01-01

    Involves secondary students in a study designed to allow investigation into how different levels of information presented by various technologies (chemical indicators, pH meters, and microcomputer-based laboratories-MBLs) affected students' understanding of acid, base, and pH concepts. Results showed that students using MBLs exhibited a greater…

  9. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Kamlesh D [Ken; SNL,

    2016-07-12

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  10. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Kamlesh D; SNL,

    2012-06-01

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  11. Quantum amplification effect in a horizon fluctuation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, Mohammad H.

    2010-05-15

    The appearance of a few unevenly spaced bright flashes of light on top of Hawking radiation is the sign of the amplification effect in black hole horizon fluctuations. Previous studies on this problem suffer from the lack of considering all emitted photons in the theoretical spectroscopy of these fluctuations. In this paper, we include all of the physical transition weights and present a consistent intensity formula. This modifies a black hole radiation pattern.

  12. Host range, amplification and arboviral disease emergence.

    PubMed

    Weaver, S C

    2005-01-01

    Etiologic agents of arboviral diseases are primarily zoonotic pathogens that are maintained in nature in cycles involving arthropod transmission among a variety of susceptible reservoir hosts. In the simplest form of human exposure, spillover occurs from the enzootic cycle when humans enter zoonotic foci and/or enzootic amplification increases circulation near humans. Examples include Eastern (EEEV) and Western equine encephalitis viruses (WEEV), as well as West Nile (WNV), St. Louis encephalitis (SLEV) and Yellow fever viruses. Spillover can involve direct transmission to humans by primary enzootic vectors (e.g. WNV, SLEV and WEEV) and/or bridge vectors with more catholic feeding preferences that include humans (e.g. EEEV). Some viruses, such as Rift Valley fever, Japanese encephalitis and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses (VEEV) undergo secondary amplification involving replication in livestock animals, resulting in greater levels of spillover to humans in rural settings. In the case of VEEV, secondary amplification involves equines and requires adaptive mutations in enzootic strains that allow for efficient viremia production. Two of the most important human arboviral pathogens, Yellow fever and dengue viruses (DENV), have gone one step further and adopted humans as their amplification hosts, allowing for urban disease. The ancestral forms of DENV, sylvatic viruses transmitted among nonhuman primate reservoir hosts by arboreal mosquitoes, adapted to efficiently infect the urban mosquito vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus during the past few thousand years as civilizations arose. Comparative studies of the sylvatic and urban forms of DENV may elucidate the evolution of arboviral virulence and the prospects for DENV eradication should effective vaccines be implemented.

  13. Chirped-pulse amplification with narrowband pulses.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Gibson, D J; Messerly, M J; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-15

    We demonstrate a compact hyperdispersion stretcher and compressor pair that permit chirped-pulse amplification in Nd:YAG. We generate 750 mJ, 0.2 nm FWHM, 10 Hz pulses recompressed to an 8 ps near-transform-limited duration. The dispersion-matched pulse compressor and stretcher impart a chirp of 7300 ps/nm, in a 3 m x 1 m footprint.

  14. Chirped-pulse amplification with narrowband pulses.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Gibson, D J; Messerly, M J; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-15

    We demonstrate a compact hyperdispersion stretcher and compressor pair that permit chirped-pulse amplification in Nd:YAG. We generate 750 mJ, 0.2 nm FWHM, 10 Hz pulses recompressed to an 8 ps near-transform-limited duration. The dispersion-matched pulse compressor and stretcher impart a chirp of 7300 ps/nm, in a 3 m x 1 m footprint. PMID:20634869

  15. Optically Controlled Signal Amplification for DNA Computation.

    PubMed

    Prokup, Alexander; Hemphill, James; Liu, Qingyang; Deiters, Alexander

    2015-10-16

    The hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and fuel-catalyst cycles have been applied to address the problem of signal amplification in DNA-based computation circuits. While they function efficiently, these signal amplifiers cannot be switched ON or OFF quickly and noninvasively. To overcome these limitations, a light-activated initiator strand for the HCR, which enabled fast optical OFF → ON switching, was developed. Similarly, when a light-activated version of the catalyst strand or the inhibitor strand of a fuel-catalyst cycle was applied, the cycle could be optically switched from OFF → ON or ON → OFF, respectively. To move the capabilities of these devices beyond solution-based operations, the components were embedded in agarose gels. Irradiation with customizable light patterns and at different time points demonstrated both spatial and temporal control. The addition of a translator gate enabled a spatially activated signal to travel along a predefined path, akin to a chemical wire. Overall, the addition of small light-cleavable photocaging groups to DNA signal amplification circuits enabled conditional control as well as fast photocontrol of signal amplification. PMID:25621535

  16. Thermoelectric amplification of phonons in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dompreh, K. A.; Mensah, N. G.; Mensah, S. Y.; Fosuhene, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    Amplification of acoustic in-plane phonons due to an external temperature gradient (∇T) in single-layer graphene (SLG) was studied theoretically. The threshold temperature gradient (∇ T ) 0 g and the threshold voltage (V T ) 0 g in SLG were evaluated. For T = 77 K , the calculated value for (∇ T ) 0 g = 746.8 K / cm and (V T ) 0 g = 6.6 mV . The calculation was done in the hypersound regime. Further, the dependence of the normalized amplification ( Γ / Γ 0 ) on the frequency ω q and ∇ T / T were evaluated numerically and presented graphically. The calculated threshold temperature gradient (V T ) 0 g for SLG was higher than that obtained for homogeneous semiconductors (n-InSb) (∇ T ) 0 hom ≈ 10 3 K / cm , superlattices (∇ T ) 0 S L ≈ 384 K / cm , and cylindrical quantum wire (∇ T ) 0 c q w ≈ 10 2 K / cm . This makes SLG a much better material for thermoelectric phonon amplification.

  17. Microarray-based Analysis of Microbial Community RNAs by Whole Community RNA Amplification (WCRA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin Koo; Gentry, Terry; Wu, Liyou; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-01-01

    A new approach, termed whole-community RNA amplification (WCRA), was developed to provide sufficient amounts of mRNAs from environmental samples for microarray analysis. This method employs fusion primers (six to nine random nucleotides with an attached T7 promoter) for the first-strand synthesis. The shortest primer (T7N6S) gave the best results in terms of the yield and representativeness of amplification. About 1,200- to 1,800-fold amplification was obtained with amounts of the RNA templates ranging from 10 to 100 ng, and very representative detection was obtained with 50 to 100 ng total RNA. Evaluation with a Shewanella oneidensis {Delta}fur strain revealed that the amplification method which we developed could preserve the original abundance relationships of mRNAs. In addition, to determine whether representative detection of RNAs can be achieved with mixed community samples, amplification biases were evaluated with a mixture containing equal quantities of RNAs (100 ng each) from four bacterial species, and representative amplification was also obtained. Finally, the method which we developed was applied to the active microbial populations in a denitrifying fluidized bed reactor used for denitrification of contaminated groundwater and ethanol-stimulated groundwater samples for uranium reduction. The genes expressed were consistent with the expected functions of the bioreactor and groundwater system, suggesting that this approach is useful for analyzing the functional activities of microbial communities. This is one of the first demonstrations that microarray-based technology can be used to successfully detect the activities of microbial communities from real environmental samples in a high-throughput fashion.

  18. Mefenamic acid taste-masked oral disintegrating tablets with enhanced solubility via molecular interaction produced by hot melt extrusion technology

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Sultan M.; Park, Jun-Bom; Alsulays, Bader B.; Tiwari, Roshan V.; Almutairy, Bjad; Alshetaili, Abdullah S.; Morott, Joseph; Shah, Sejal; Kulkarni, Vijay; Majumdar, Soumyajit; Martin, Scott T.; Mishra, Sanjay; Wang, Lijia; Repka, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance the solubility as well as to mask the intensely bitter taste of the poorly soluble drug, Mefenamic acid (MA). The taste masking and solubility of the drug was improved by using Eudragit® E PO in different ratios via hot melt extrusion (HME), solid dispersion technology. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies demonstrated that MA and E PO were completely miscible up to 40% drug loads. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that MA was converted to its amorphous phase in all of the formulations. Additionally, FT-IR analysis indicated hydrogen bonding between the drug and the carrier up to 25% of drug loading. SEM images indicated aggregation of MA at over 30% of drug loading. Based on the FT-IR, SEM and dissolution results for the extrudates, two optimized formulations (20% and 25% drug loads) were selected to formulate the orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs). ODTs were successfully prepared with excellent friability and rapid disintegration time in addition to having the desired taste-masking effect. All of the extruded formulations and the ODTs were found to be physically and chemically stable over a period of 6 months at 40°C/75% RH and 12 months at 25°C/60% RH, respectively. PMID:25914727

  19. A Sweet Spot for Molecular Diagnostics: Coupling Isothermal Amplification and Strand Exchange Circuits to Glucometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yan; Hughes, Randall A.; Bhadra, Sanchita; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D.; Li, Bingling

    2015-06-01

    Strand exchange nucleic acid circuitry can be used to transduce isothermal nucleic acid amplification products into signals that can be readable on an off-the-shelf glucometer. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is limited by the accumulation of non-specific products, but nucleic acid circuitry can be used to probe and distinguish specific amplicons. By combining this high temperature isothermal amplification method with a thermostable invertase, we can directly transduce Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus and Zaire Ebolavirus templates into glucose signals, with a sensitivity as low as 20-100 copies/μl, equating to atto-molar (or low zepto-mole). Virus from cell lysates and synthetic templates could be readily amplified and detected even in sputum or saliva. An OR gate that coordinately triggered on viral amplicons further guaranteed fail-safe virus detection. The method describes has potential for accelerating point-of-care applications, in that biological samples could be applied to a transducer that would then directly interface with an off-the-shelf, approved medical device.

  20. A Sweet Spot for Molecular Diagnostics: Coupling Isothermal Amplification and Strand Exchange Circuits to Glucometers

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yan; Hughes, Randall A.; Bhadra, Sanchita; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D.; Li, Bingling

    2015-01-01

    Strand exchange nucleic acid circuitry can be used to transduce isothermal nucleic acid amplification products into signals that can be readable on an off-the-shelf glucometer. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is limited by the accumulation of non-specific products, but nucleic acid circuitry can be used to probe and distinguish specific amplicons. By combining this high temperature isothermal amplification method with a thermostable invertase, we can directly transduce Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus and Zaire Ebolavirus templates into glucose signals, with a sensitivity as low as 20–100 copies/μl, equating to atto-molar (or low zepto-mole). Virus from cell lysates and synthetic templates could be readily amplified and detected even in sputum or saliva. An OR gate that coordinately triggered on viral amplicons further guaranteed fail-safe virus detection. The method describes has potential for accelerating point-of-care applications, in that biological samples could be applied to a transducer that would then directly interface with an off-the-shelf, approved medical device. PMID:26050646

  1. Effect of farming system and cheesemaking technology on the physicochemical characteristics, fatty acid profile, and sensory properties of Caciocavallo Palermitano cheese.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, A; Tornambè, G; Bellina, V; De Pasquale, C; Mazza, F; Maniaci, G; Di Grigoli, A

    2013-01-01

    Caciocavallo Palermitano is a typical stretched-curd cheese that has been produced over the centuries in Sicily according to traditional cheesemaking technology and using raw milk from autochthonous cow breeds reared at pasture. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effects of the farming system and processing technology on the characteristics of Caciocavallo Palermitano cheese, with particular regard to the fatty acid profile. The farming system was either extensive, using autochthonous cows fed a pasture-based diet, or intensive, with specialized dairy cow breeds fed mainly hay and concentrate. The cheese-processing technology was either artisanal, using traditional wooden tools and endemic lactic bacteria, or advanced, using modern steel equipment and selected lactic bacteria. Twelve Caciocavallo Palermitano cheeses, 3 from each of the 4 experimental theses (2 farming systems × 2 cheesemaking technologies), were obtained and aged for 1, 30, 60, and 120 d. Milk of origin and cheeses were analyzed for the main chemical and rheological parameters. Fatty acids were methylated in lyophilized cheese and analyzed by gas chromatography. Sensory analysis was carried out by trained panelists. The PROC GLM of SAS 9.1.2 (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NY) was used for the statistical analysis. The physical, chemical, and sensory characteristics of Caciocavallo Palermitano cheese were influenced more by the farming system than by the cheesemaking technology. Compared with cheese produced through intensive farming, cheese from extensive farming was richer in polyunsaturated, n-3, and odd- and branched-chain fatty acids, as well as in conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9,trans-11 C18:2), with accompanying improved human health benefits. The cheesemaking technology produced variation in the evolution of proteolysis during aging, due presumably to the different active microflora, which influenced the sensory profile of the resulting cheese. Indeed, cheese produced by

  2. Gene amplification system based on double rolling-circle replication as a model for oncogene-type amplification.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takaaki; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Horiuchi, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Gene amplification contributes to a variety of biological phenomena, including malignant progression and drug resistance. However, details of the molecular mechanisms remain to be determined. Here, we have developed a gene amplification system in yeast and mammalian cells that is based on double rolling-circle replication (DRCR). Cre-lox system is used to efficiently induce DRCR utilizing a recombinational process coupled with replication. This system shows distinctive features seen in amplification of oncogenes and drug-resistance genes: (i) intra- and extrachromosomal amplification, (ii) intensive chromosome rearrangement and (iii) scattered-type amplification resembling those seen in cancer cells. This system can serve as a model for amplification of oncogenes and drug-resistance genes, and improve amplification systems used for making pharmaceutical proteins in mammalian cells.

  3. PCR-sequencing is a complementary method to amplification refractory mutation system for EGFR gene mutation analysis in FFPE samples.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junchang; Wang, Chunhua; Yu, Xiaoli; Sheng, Danli; Zuo, Chen; Ren, Minpu; Wu, Yaqin; Shen, Jie; Jin, Mei; Xu, Songxiao

    2015-12-01

    Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) is the most popular technology for EGFR gene mutation analysis in China. Cutoff Ct or ΔCt values were used to differentiate low mutation abundance cases from no mutation cases. In this study, all of 359 NSCLC samples were tested by ARMS. Seventeen samples with larger Ct or ΔCt than cutoff values were retested by PCR-sequencing. TKI treatment responses were monitored on the cases with ARMS negative and PCR-sequencing positive results. One exon 18 G719X case, 67 exon 19 deletion cases, 2 exon 20 insertion cases, 1 exon 20 T790M case, 60 exon 21 L858R cases, 5 exon 21 L861Q cases and 201 wild type cases were identified by ARMS. Another 22 cases were evaluated as wild type but had later amplification fluorescent curves. Seventeen out of these 22 cases were retested by PCR-sequencing. It turns out that 3 out of 3 cases with exon 19 deletion later amplifications, 2 out of 2 cases with L858R later amplifications and 4 out of 12 cases with T790M later amplifications were identified as mutation positive. Two cases with exon 19 deletion and L858R respectively were treated by TKI and got responses. Our study indicated that PCR-sequencing might be a complementary way to confirm ARMS results with later amplifications.

  4. PCR-sequencing is a complementary method to amplification refractory mutation system for EGFR gene mutation analysis in FFPE samples.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junchang; Wang, Chunhua; Yu, Xiaoli; Sheng, Danli; Zuo, Chen; Ren, Minpu; Wu, Yaqin; Shen, Jie; Jin, Mei; Xu, Songxiao

    2015-12-01

    Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) is the most popular technology for EGFR gene mutation analysis in China. Cutoff Ct or ΔCt values were used to differentiate low mutation abundance cases from no mutation cases. In this study, all of 359 NSCLC samples were tested by ARMS. Seventeen samples with larger Ct or ΔCt than cutoff values were retested by PCR-sequencing. TKI treatment responses were monitored on the cases with ARMS negative and PCR-sequencing positive results. One exon 18 G719X case, 67 exon 19 deletion cases, 2 exon 20 insertion cases, 1 exon 20 T790M case, 60 exon 21 L858R cases, 5 exon 21 L861Q cases and 201 wild type cases were identified by ARMS. Another 22 cases were evaluated as wild type but had later amplification fluorescent curves. Seventeen out of these 22 cases were retested by PCR-sequencing. It turns out that 3 out of 3 cases with exon 19 deletion later amplifications, 2 out of 2 cases with L858R later amplifications and 4 out of 12 cases with T790M later amplifications were identified as mutation positive. Two cases with exon 19 deletion and L858R respectively were treated by TKI and got responses. Our study indicated that PCR-sequencing might be a complementary way to confirm ARMS results with later amplifications. PMID:26477713

  5. Signatures of the Self-Similar Regime of Strongly Coupled Stimulated Brillouin Scattering for Efficient Short Laser Pulse Amplification.

    PubMed

    Lancia, L; Giribono, A; Vassura, L; Chiaramello, M; Riconda, C; Weber, S; Castan, A; Chatelain, A; Frank, A; Gangolf, T; Quinn, M N; Fuchs, J; Marquès, J-R

    2016-02-19

    Plasma-based laser amplification is considered as a possible way to overcome the technological limits of present day laser systems and achieve exawatt laser pulses. Efficient amplification of a picosecond laser pulse by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) of a pump pulse in a plasma requires to reach the self-similar regime of the strongly coupled (SC) SBS. In this Letter, we report on the first observation of the signatures of the transition from linear to self-similar regimes of SC-SBS, so far only predicted by theory and simulations. With a new fully head-on collision geometry, subpicosecond pulses are amplified by a factor of 5 with energy transfers of few tens of mJ. We observe pulse shortening, frequency spectrum broadening, and down-shifting for increasing gain, signatures of SC-SBS amplification entering the self-similar regime. This is also confirmed by the power law dependence of the gain on the amplification length: doubling the interaction length increases the gain by a factor 1.4. Pump backward Raman scattering (BRS) on SC-SBS amplification has been measured for the first time, showing a strong decrease of the BRS amplitude and frequency bandwidth when SBS seed amplification occurs. PMID:26943539

  6. Ultrasensitive Visual Detection of HIV DNA Biomarkers via a Multi-amplification Nanoplatform.

    PubMed

    Long, Yuyin; Zhou, Cuisong; Wang, Congmin; Cai, Honglian; Yin, Cuiyun; Yang, Qiufang; Xiao, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Methodologies to detect disease biomarkers at ultralow concentrations can potentially improve the standard of living. A facile and label-free multi-amplification strategy is proposed for the ultrasensitive visual detection of HIV DNA biomarkers in real physiological media. This multi-amplification strategy not only exhibits a signficantly low detection limit down to 4.8 pM but also provides a label-free, cost-effective and facile technique for visualizing a few molecules of nucleic acid analyte with the naked eye. Importantly, the biosensor is capable of discriminating single-based mismatch lower than 5.0 nM in human serum samples. Moreover, the visual sensing platform exhibits excellent specificity, acceptable reusability and a long-term stability. All these advantages could be attributed to the nanofibrous sensing platform that 1) has a high surface-area-to-volume provided by electrospun nanofibrous membrane, and 2) combines glucose oxidase (GOx) biocatalysis, DNAzyme-catalyzed colorimetric reaction and catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) recycling amplification together. This multi-amplification nanoplatform promises label-free and visual single-based mismatch DNA monitoring with high sensitivity and specificity, suggesting wide applications that range from virus detection to genetic disease diagnosis. PMID:27032385

  7. Chirality amplification and detection by tactoids of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chenhui; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-10-01

    Detection of chiral molecules requires amplification of chirality to measurable levels. Typically, amplification mechanisms are considered at the microscopic scales of individual molecules and their aggregates. Here we demonstrate chirality amplification and visualization of structural handedness in water solutions of organic molecules that extends over the scale of many micrometers. The mechanism is rooted in the long-range elastic nature of orientational order in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) formed in water solutions of achiral disc-like molecules. The nematic LCLC coexists with its isotropic counterpart, forming elongated tactoids; the spatial confinement causes a structural twist even when the material is nonchiral. Minute quantities of chiral molecules such as the amino acid l-alanine and limonene transform the racemic array of left- and right-twisted tactoids into a homochiral set. The left and right chiral enantiomers are readily distinguished from each other as the induced structural handedness is visualized through a simple polarizing microscope observation. The effect is important for developing our understanding of chirality amplification mechanisms; it also might open up new possibilities in biosensing. PMID:26238525

  8. Ultrasensitive DNA detection based on two-step quantitative amplification on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mingliang; Liu, Xia; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2016-08-01

    Sensitive detection of a specific deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) sequence is important for biomedical applications. In this report, a two-step amplification strategy is developed based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to achieve ultrasensitive DNA fluorescence detection. The first level amplification is obtained from multiple binding sites on MNPs to achieve thousands of probe DNA molecules on one nanoparticle surface. The second level amplification is gained by enzymatic reaction to achieve fluorescence signal enhancement. MNPs functionalized by probe DNA (DNAp) are bound to target DNA (t-DNA) molecules with a ratio of 1:1 on a substrate with capture DNA (DNAc). After the MNPs with DNAp are released from the substrate, alkaline phosphatase (AP) is labelled to MNPs via hybridization reaction between DNAp on MNPs and detection DNAs (DNAd) with AP. The AP on MNPs catalyses non-fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP) to fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) with high intensity. Finally, fluorescence intensity of the 4-MU is detected by a conventional fluorescence spectrophotometer. With this two-step amplification strategy, the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.8 × 10-18 mol l-1 for t-DNA has been achieved.

  9. Ultrasensitive Visual Detection of HIV DNA Biomarkers via a Multi-amplification Nanoplatform.

    PubMed

    Long, Yuyin; Zhou, Cuisong; Wang, Congmin; Cai, Honglian; Yin, Cuiyun; Yang, Qiufang; Xiao, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Methodologies to detect disease biomarkers at ultralow concentrations can potentially improve the standard of living. A facile and label-free multi-amplification strategy is proposed for the ultrasensitive visual detection of HIV DNA biomarkers in real physiological media. This multi-amplification strategy not only exhibits a signficantly low detection limit down to 4.8 pM but also provides a label-free, cost-effective and facile technique for visualizing a few molecules of nucleic acid analyte with the naked eye. Importantly, the biosensor is capable of discriminating single-based mismatch lower than 5.0 nM in human serum samples. Moreover, the visual sensing platform exhibits excellent specificity, acceptable reusability and a long-term stability. All these advantages could be attributed to the nanofibrous sensing platform that 1) has a high surface-area-to-volume provided by electrospun nanofibrous membrane, and 2) combines glucose oxidase (GOx) biocatalysis, DNAzyme-catalyzed colorimetric reaction and catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) recycling amplification together. This multi-amplification nanoplatform promises label-free and visual single-based mismatch DNA monitoring with high sensitivity and specificity, suggesting wide applications that range from virus detection to genetic disease diagnosis.

  10. All Three Rows of Outer Hair Cells Are Required for Cochlear Amplification.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Michio; Suzuki, Sho; Wada, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian auditory system, the three rows of outer hair cells (OHCs) located in the cochlea are thought to increase the displacement amplitude of the organ of Corti. This cochlear amplification is thought to contribute to the high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and sharp frequency selectivity of the hearing system. Recent studies have shown that traumatic stimuli, such as noise exposure and ototoxic acid, cause functional loss of OHCs in one, two, or all three rows. However, the degree of decrease in cochlear amplification caused by such functional losses remains unclear. In the present study, a finite element model of a cross section of the gerbil cochlea was constructed. Then, to determine effects of the functional losses of OHCs on the cochlear amplification, changes in the displacement amplitude of the basilar membrane (BM) due to the functional losses of OHCs were calculated. Results showed that the displacement amplitude of the BM decreases significantly when a single row of OHCs lost its function, suggesting that all three rows of OHCs are required for cochlear amplification. PMID:26295049

  11. Ultrasensitive DNA detection based on two-step quantitative amplification on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mingliang; Liu, Xia; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2016-08-01

    Sensitive detection of a specific deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) sequence is important for biomedical applications. In this report, a two-step amplification strategy is developed based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to achieve ultrasensitive DNA fluorescence detection. The first level amplification is obtained from multiple binding sites on MNPs to achieve thousands of probe DNA molecules on one nanoparticle surface. The second level amplification is gained by enzymatic reaction to achieve fluorescence signal enhancement. MNPs functionalized by probe DNA (DNAp) are bound to target DNA (t-DNA) molecules with a ratio of 1:1 on a substrate with capture DNA (DNAc). After the MNPs with DNAp are released from the substrate, alkaline phosphatase (AP) is labelled to MNPs via hybridization reaction between DNAp on MNPs and detection DNAs (DNAd) with AP. The AP on MNPs catalyses non-fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP) to fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) with high intensity. Finally, fluorescence intensity of the 4-MU is detected by a conventional fluorescence spectrophotometer. With this two-step amplification strategy, the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.8 × 10‑18 mol l‑1 for t-DNA has been achieved.

  12. Ultrasensitive Visual Detection of HIV DNA Biomarkers via a Multi-amplification Nanoplatform

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yuyin; Zhou, Cuisong; Wang, Congmin; Cai, Honglian; Yin, Cuiyun; Yang, Qiufang; Xiao, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Methodologies to detect disease biomarkers at ultralow concentrations can potentially improve the standard of living. A facile and label-free multi-amplification strategy is proposed for the ultrasensitive visual detection of HIV DNA biomarkers in real physiological media. This multi-amplification strategy not only exhibits a signficantly low detection limit down to 4.8 pM but also provides a label-free, cost-effective and facile technique for visualizing a few molecules of nucleic acid analyte with the naked eye. Importantly, the biosensor is capable of discriminating single-based mismatch lower than 5.0 nM in human serum samples. Moreover, the visual sensing platform exhibits excellent specificity, acceptable reusability and a long-term stability. All these advantages could be attributed to the nanofibrous sensing platform that 1) has a high surface-area-to-volume provided by electrospun nanofibrous membrane, and 2) combines glucose oxidase (GOx) biocatalysis, DNAzyme-catalyzed colorimetric reaction and catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) recycling amplification together. This multi-amplification nanoplatform promises label-free and visual single-based mismatch DNA monitoring with high sensitivity and specificity, suggesting wide applications that range from virus detection to genetic disease diagnosis. PMID:27032385

  13. Ultrasensitive DNA detection based on two-step quantitative amplification on magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jin, Mingliang; Liu, Xia; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2016-08-19

    Sensitive detection of a specific deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) sequence is important for biomedical applications. In this report, a two-step amplification strategy is developed based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to achieve ultrasensitive DNA fluorescence detection. The first level amplification is obtained from multiple binding sites on MNPs to achieve thousands of probe DNA molecules on one nanoparticle surface. The second level amplification is gained by enzymatic reaction to achieve fluorescence signal enhancement. MNPs functionalized by probe DNA (DNAp) are bound to target DNA (t-DNA) molecules with a ratio of 1:1 on a substrate with capture DNA (DNAc). After the MNPs with DNAp are released from the substrate, alkaline phosphatase (AP) is labelled to MNPs via hybridization reaction between DNAp on MNPs and detection DNAs (DNAd) with AP. The AP on MNPs catalyses non-fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP) to fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) with high intensity. Finally, fluorescence intensity of the 4-MU is detected by a conventional fluorescence spectrophotometer. With this two-step amplification strategy, the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.8 × 10(-18) mol l(-1) for t-DNA has been achieved. PMID:27378514

  14. Nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Sano, Takeshi; Misasi, John; Hatch, Anson; Cantor, Charles

    2001-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to high density nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesizing nucleic acid sequences on a solid surface. Specifically, the present invention contemplates the use of stabilized nucleic acid primer sequences immobilized on solid surfaces, and circular nucleic acid sequence templates combined with the use of isothermal rolling circle amplification to thereby increase nucleic acid sequence concentrations in a sample or on an array of nucleic acid sequences.

  15. Spellbinding and crooning: sound amplification, radio, and political rhetoric in international comparative perspective, 1900-1945.

    PubMed

    Wijfjes, Huub

    2014-01-01

    This article researches in an interdisciplinary way the relationship of sound technology and political culture at the beginning of the twentieth century. It sketches the different strategies that politicians--Franklin D. Roosevelt, Adolf Hitler, Winston Churchill, and Dutch prime minister Hendrikus Colijn--found for the challenges that sound amplification and radio created for their rhetoric and presentation. Taking their different political styles into account, the article demonstrates that the interconnected technologies of sound amplification and radio forced a transition from a spellbinding style based on atmosphere and pathos in a virtual environment to "political crooning" that created artificial intimacy in despatialized simultaneity. Roosevelt and Colijn created the best examples of this political crooning, while Churchill and Hitler encountered problems in this respect. Churchill's radio successes profited from the special circumstances during the first period of World War II. Hitler's speeches were integrated into a radio regime trying to shape, with dictatorial powers, a national socialistic community of listeners. PMID:24988797

  16. Spellbinding and crooning: sound amplification, radio, and political rhetoric in international comparative perspective, 1900-1945.

    PubMed

    Wijfjes, Huub

    2014-01-01

    This article researches in an interdisciplinary way the relationship of sound technology and political culture at the beginning of the twentieth century. It sketches the different strategies that politicians--Franklin D. Roosevelt, Adolf Hitler, Winston Churchill, and Dutch prime minister Hendrikus Colijn--found for the challenges that sound amplification and radio created for their rhetoric and presentation. Taking their different political styles into account, the article demonstrates that the interconnected technologies of sound amplification and radio forced a transition from a spellbinding style based on atmosphere and pathos in a virtual environment to "political crooning" that created artificial intimacy in despatialized simultaneity. Roosevelt and Colijn created the best examples of this political crooning, while Churchill and Hitler encountered problems in this respect. Churchill's radio successes profited from the special circumstances during the first period of World War II. Hitler's speeches were integrated into a radio regime trying to shape, with dictatorial powers, a national socialistic community of listeners.

  17. On the role of temperature feedbacks for Arctic amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pithan, Felix; Mauritsen, Thorsten

    2013-04-01

    The amplification of global climate changes at the poles is a well-known feature of the climate system mentioned already by Arrhenius (1896). It has been linked to the surface-albedo feedback, changes in atmospheric and oceanic heat convergence, water vapour and cloud feedbacks and the albedo effect of black carbon on snow (Serreze and Barry, 2011). We here focus on the role of temperature feedbacks, which have received rather little attention in recent debates. The basic temperature feedback is the Planck feedback or the increase in the Earth's blackbody radiation due to a uniform temperature increase. Since the blackbody radiation scales with the fourth power of temperature, stronger warming is necessary in cold regions to balance a globally uniform radiative forcing. The second temperature feedback is caused by changes in the vertical atmospheric temperature structure: In the Tropics, deep convection leads to warming aloft being larger than at the surface, which causes a greater increase in outgoing longwave radiation compared a vertically uniform forcing and thus constitutes a negative feedback mechanism. In the Arctic, where warming is amplified at the surface, the lapse-rate feedback is positive (Wetherald and Manabe, 1975). We use CMIP5 model output and radiative Kernels to investigate the zonal distribution of temperature feedbacks. Arrhenius, S. (1896). On the influence of carbonic acid in the air upon the temperature of the ground Philos. Mag. J. Sci., 5, pp. 237-276 Serreze, M.C. and Barry, R.G. (2011) . Processes and impacts of Arctic amplification: A research synthesis, Global and Planetary Change, 77(1-2), pp. 85-96 Wetherald, R. and Manabe, S. (1975). The effects of changing the solar constant on the climate of a general circulation model. J. Atmos. Sci., 23 pp 2044-2059

  18. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Diagnostics of Dengue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abd El Wahed, Ahmed; Patel, Pranav; Faye, Oumar; Thaloengsok, Sasikanya; Heidenreich, Doris; Matangkasombut, Ponpan; Manopwisedjaroen, Khajohnpong; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Sall, Amadou A.; Hufert, Frank T.; Weidmann, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Background Over 2.5 billion people are exposed to the risk of contracting dengue fever (DF). Early diagnosis of DF helps to diminish its burden on public health. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase amplification assays (RT-PCR) are the standard method for molecular detection of the dengue virus (DENV). Real-time RT-PCR analysis is not suitable for on-site screening since mobile devices are large, expensive, and complex. In this study, two RT-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) assays were developed to detect DENV1-4. Methodology/Principal Findings Using two quantitative RNA molecular standards, the analytical sensitivity of a RT-RPA targeting the 3´non-translated region of DENV1-4 was found to range from 14 (DENV4) to 241 (DENV1-3) RNA molecules detected. The assay was specific and did not cross detect other Flaviviruses. The RT-RPA assay was tested in a mobile laboratory combining magnetic-bead based total nucleic acid extraction and a portable detection device in Kedougou (Senegal) and in Bangkok (Thailand). In Kedougou, the RT-RPA was operated at an ambient temperature of 38°C with auxiliary electricity tapped from a motor vehicle and yielded a clinical sensitivity and specificity of 98% (n=31) and 100% (n=23), respectively. While in the field trial in Bangkok, the clinical sensitivity and specificity were 72% (n=90) and 100%(n=41), respectively. Conclusions/Significance During the first 5 days of infection, the developed DENV1-4 RT-RPA assays constitute a suitable accurate and rapid assay for DENV diagnosis. Moreover, the use of a portable fluorescence-reading device broadens its application potential to the point-of-care for outbreak investigations. PMID:26075598

  19. Nucleic Acid Dipstick Test for Molecular Diagnosis of Pandemic H1N1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang-Ta; Curran, Martin D.; Ellis, Joanna S.; Parmar, Surendra; Ritchie, Allyson V.; Sharma, Pia I.; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Jalal, Hamid; Zambon, Maria; Lee, Helen H.

    2010-01-01

    A new nucleic acid amplification-based rapid test for diagnosis of pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 virus was developed. The molecular test for pandemic H1N1, SAMBA (simple amplification-based assay), is based on isothermal amplification and visual detection on a dipstick characterized by high sensitivity, high specificity, a short turnaround time, and minimal technical requirements. The amplification step is monitored with an internal control to ensure correct interpretation of test results. The clinical performance of this assay was evaluated using blinded RNA samples extracted from nasal/throat swab specimens from 262 patients exhibiting influenza-like illness. Compared with the United Kingdom National Standard Method, based on quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the new assay were 95.3% (95% confidence interval, 88.5 to 98.7%), 99.4% (95% confidence interval, 96.9 to 99.9%), 98.8% (95% confidence interval, 93.5 to 99.9%), and 97.8% (95% confidence interval, 94.4 to 99.4%), respectively. The SAMBA for pandemic H1N1 provides a new technology that could potentially facilitate timely diagnosis and management of infected individuals, thereby informing decision making with regard to patient isolation during a pandemic outbreak. PMID:20668123

  20. Improvement of Fatty Acid Profile and Studio of Rheological and Technological Characteristics in Breads Supplemented with Flaxseed, Soybean, and Wheat Bran Flours

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, Mariana B.; Judis, María A.; Romero, Ana M.; Avallone, Carmen M.; Bertola, Nora C.

    2014-01-01

    Functional breads constitute an interesting alternative as vehicle of new essential fatty acids sources. The aim of this study was to improve the fatty acids (FA) profile of bakery products, producing breads with low saturated fatty acid (SFA) content and with high polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content, through partial substitution of wheat flour by other ingredients (soy flour, flax flour, and wheat bran) and to analyze the effect of this change on the technological, rheological, and sensorial characteristics of breads. Flaxseed flour (FF), soybeans flour (SF), or wheat bran (WB) was used to replace 50, 100, and 150 g kg−1 of wheat flour (WF) in breads. FF or SF produced a decrease in monounsaturated and SFA and an increase of PUFA in these breads. Furthermore, breads replaced with FF presented considerable increase in the content of n3 FA, while, SF or WB contributed to rise of linoleic and oleic FA, respectively. The substitution percentage increase of FF, SF, or WB to formulation produced changes in the colour, rheological, textural, and technological characteristics of breads. This replacement resulted in improved lipid profile, being breads with 50 g kg−1 SF, the better acceptance, baking features, and enhanced fatty acid profile. PMID:25478592