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Sample records for acid analysis plfa

  1. Analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) to characterize microbial communities in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Christopher T.; Scow, Kate M.

    This paper reviews published applications of lipid-based biochemical techniques for characterizing microbial communities in aquifers and other deep subsurface habitats. These techniques, such as phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, can provide information on a variety of microbial characteristics, such as biomass, physiology, taxonomic and functional identity, and overall community composition. In addition, multivariate statistical analysis of lipid data can relate spatial or temporal changes in microbial communities to environmental factors. The use of lipid-based techniques in the study of groundwater microbiology is advantageous because they do not require culturing and can provide quantitative data on entire communities. However, combined effects of physiological and phylogenetic changes on the lipid composition of a community can confound interpretation of the data, and many questions remain about the validity of various lipid techniques. Despite these caveats, lipid-based research has begun to show trends in community composition in contaminated and pristine aquifers that contribute to our understanding of groundwater microbial ecology and have potential for use in optimization of bioremediation of groundwater pollutants. Résumé Ce papier passe en revue les applications des techniques biochimiques basées sur les lipides pour caractériser les communautés microbiennes présentes dans les aquifères et dans les autres habitats souterrains profonds. Ces techniques, telles que l'analyse des acides gras phospholipidiques (PLFA), peuvent fournir des informations sur un ensemble de caractères microbiens, tels que la biomasse, la physiologie, l'identité taxonomique et fonctionnelle, et surtout la composition de la communauté. En outre, l'analyse statistique multivariée des données sur les lipides peut établir les liens entre des changements spatiaux ou temporels dans la communauté microbienne et des facteurs environnementaux. L'utilisation des

  2. Analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) to characterize microbial communities in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Christopher T.; Scow, Kate M.

    This paper reviews published applications of lipid-based biochemical techniques for characterizing microbial communities in aquifers and other deep subsurface habitats. These techniques, such as phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, can provide information on a variety of microbial characteristics, such as biomass, physiology, taxonomic and functional identity, and overall community composition. In addition, multivariate statistical analysis of lipid data can relate spatial or temporal changes in microbial communities to environmental factors. The use of lipid-based techniques in the study of groundwater microbiology is advantageous because they do not require culturing and can provide quantitative data on entire communities. However, combined effects of physiological and phylogenetic changes on the lipid composition of a community can confound interpretation of the data, and many questions remain about the validity of various lipid techniques. Despite these caveats, lipid-based research has begun to show trends in community composition in contaminated and pristine aquifers that contribute to our understanding of groundwater microbial ecology and have potential for use in optimization of bioremediation of groundwater pollutants. Résumé Ce papier passe en revue les applications des techniques biochimiques basées sur les lipides pour caractériser les communautés microbiennes présentes dans les aquifères et dans les autres habitats souterrains profonds. Ces techniques, telles que l'analyse des acides gras phospholipidiques (PLFA), peuvent fournir des informations sur un ensemble de caractères microbiens, tels que la biomasse, la physiologie, l'identité taxonomique et fonctionnelle, et surtout la composition de la communauté. En outre, l'analyse statistique multivariée des données sur les lipides peut établir les liens entre des changements spatiaux ou temporels dans la communauté microbienne et des facteurs environnementaux. L'utilisation des

  3. Molecular differentiation of subsoil biopores of different origin by PLFA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, Callum; Pausch, Johanna; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Biologically generated macropores (biopores) are a key factor for propagation of root growth, nutrient mobilisation and acquisition from the subsoil. However, biopores of different origin, i.e. root-derived, earthworm-derived or of mixed origin, are difficult to distinguish visually in the field. Therefore, the objective of this study was to test molecular differentiation by means of phospholipds fatty acids (PLFA). 24 samples of biopore content of the three aforementioned origins and 8 bulk soil samples were taken from two soil depths (45 - 75 cm; 75 - 105 cm) and extracted twice by a solution of methanol, chloroform and citrate/KOH buffer (pH 4, v:v:v = 1:2:0.8). Following separation of phospholipids, derivatisation was by hydrolysation using NaOH in MeOH and methylation by adding BF3 and heating at 80°C. After further purification and preparation, samples were measured by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Generally, the abundance of PLFA differed only slightly between the upper and lower soil depth. Gram negative bacteria (16:1w7c, 18:1w7c and Cy17:0) were the most abundant microbial group in both depths and show clear enrichment in biopores, especially in the mixed-pore type. A similiar pattern was observed for fungi (18:2w6,9), but it was less pronounced in the deeper section. Actinomycetes (10Me16:0 and 10Me18:0) in contrast, show the highest enrichment in root-derived pores. Interestingly, highest abundance of AM fungi (16:1w5c) was found not in root-derived pores, but in the mixed-pore type. Protozoa (20:4w6) occured significantly higher in the earthworm-derived biopores. The majority of the gram positive bacteria (a15:0, i15:0, i17:0 and a17:0) showed no significant preference of habitat, i.e. in this case pore type or bulk soil. This is indicative for general decomposers of old soil organic matter. Thus we showed, that PLFA analysis not only a valuable molecular proxy for the differentiation of biopore types, but also provides deep insight

  4. Utilization of low molecular weight organics by soil microorganisms: combination of 13C-labelling with PLFA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunina, Anna; Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Microbial metabolisation is the main transformation pathway of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), but detailed knowledge concerning the fate of LMWOS in soils is strongly limited. Considering that various LMWOS classes enter biochemical cycles at different steps, we hypothesise that the percentage of their LMWOS-Carbon (C) used for microbial biomass (MB) production and consequently medium-term stabilisation in soil is different. We traced the three main groups of LMWOS: amino acids, sugars and carboxylic acids, by uniformly labelled 13C-alanine, -glutamate, -glucose, -ribose, -acetate and -palmitate. Incorporation of 13C from these LMWOS into MB (fumigation-extraction method) and into phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) (Bligh-Dyer extraction, purification and GC-C-IRMS measurement) was investigated under field conditions 3 d and 10 d after LMWOS application. The activity of microbial utilization of LMWOS for cell membrane construction was estimated by replacement of PLFA-C with 13C. Decomposition of LMWOS-C comprised 20-65% of the total label, whereas incorporation of 13C into MB amounted to 20-50% of initially applied 13C on day three and was reduced to 5-30% on day 10. Incorporation of 13C-labelled LMWOS into MB followed the trend sugars > carboxylic acids > amino acids. Differences in microbial utilisation between LMWOS were observed mainly at day 10. Thus, instead of initial rapid uptake, further metabolism within microbial cells accounts for the individual fate of C from different LMWOS in soils. Incorporation of 13C from each LMWOS into each PLFA occurred, which reflects the ubiquitous ability of all functional microbial groups for LMWOS utilization. The preferential incorporation of palmitate can be attributed to its role as a direct precursor for many fatty acids (FAs) and PLFA formation. Higher incorporation of alanine and glucose compared to glutamate, ribose and acetate reflect the preferential use of glycolysis-derived substances in the FAs

  5. Assessing microbial utilization of free versus sorbed Alanine by using position-specific 13C labeling and 13C-PLFA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, Jennifer; Apostel, Carolin; Spielvogel, Sandra; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Dippold, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Microbial utilization is a key transformation process of soil organic matter (SOM). Sorption of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) to soil mineral surfaces blocks or delays microbial uptake and therefore mineralization of LMWOS to CO2, as well as all other biochemical transformations. We used position-specific labeling, a tool of isotope applications novel to soil science, combined with 13C-phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, to assess microbial utilization of sorbed and non-sorbed Alanine in soil. Alanine has various functional groups enabling different sorption mechanisms via its positive charge (e.g. to clay minerals by cation exchange), as well as via its negative charge (e.g. to iron oxides by ligand exchange). To assess changes in the transformation pathways caused by sorption, we added uniformly and position-specifically 13C and 14C labeled Alanine to the Ap of a loamy Luvisol in a short-term (10 days) incubation experiment. To allow for sorption of the tracer solution to an aliquot of this soil, microbial activity was minimized in this subsample by sterilizing the soil by γ-radiation. After shaking, the remaining solutions were filtered and the non-sorbed Alanine was removed with Millipore water and then added to non-sterilized soil. For the free Alanine treatment, solutions with Alanine of similar amount and isotopic composition were prepared, added to the soil and incubated as well. The respired CO2 was trapped in NaOH and its 14C-activity was determined at increasing times intervals. Microbial utilization of Alanine's individual C positions was evaluated in distinct microbial groups classified by 13C-PLFA analysis. Sorption to soil minerals delayed respiration to CO2 and reduced initial respiration rate by 80%. Irrespective of sorption, the highest amount was respired from the carboxylic position (C-1), whereas the amino-bound (C-2) and the methylic position (C-3) were preferentially incorporated into PLFA of microorganisms due to the

  6. Using Position-Specific 13C and 14C Labeling and 13C-PLFA Analysis to Assess Microbial Transformations of Free Versus Sorbed Alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, C.; Herschbach, J.; Bore, E. K.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Dippold, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Sorption of charged or partially charged low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) to soil mineral surfaces delays microbial uptake and therefore mineralization of LMWOS to CO2, as well as all other biochemical transformations. We used position-specific labeling, a tool of isotope applications novel to soil sciences, to compare the transformation mechanisms of sorbed and non-sorbed alanine in soil. Alanine as an amino acid links C- and N-cycles in soil and therefore is a model substance for the pool of LMWOS. To assess transformations of sorbed alanine, we added position-specific and uniformly 13C and 14C labeled alanine tracer to soil that had previously been sterilized by γ-radiation. The labeled soil was added to non-sterilized soil from the same site and incubated. Soil labeled with the same tracers without previous sorption was prepared and incubated as well. We captured the respired CO2 and determined its 14C-activity at increasing time intervals. The incorporation of 14C into microbial biomass was determined by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE), and utilization of individual C positions by distinct microbial groups was evaluated by 13C-phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA). A dual peak in the respired CO2 revealed two sorption mechanisms. To compare the fate of individual C atoms independent of their concentration and pool size in soil, we applied the divergence index (DI). The DI reveals the convergent or divergent behavior of C from individual molecule positions during microbial utilization. Alanine C-1 position was mainly oxidized to CO2, while its C-2 and C-3 were preferentially incorporated in microbial biomass and PLFA. This indicates that sorption by the COOH group does not protect this group from preferential oxidation. Microbial metabolism was determinative for the preferential oxidation of individual molecule positions. The use of position-specific labeling revealed mechanisms and kinetics of microbial utilization of sorbed and non

  7. Microbial utilization of sugars in soil assessed by position-specific labeling and compound-specific 13C-PLFA-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, Carolin; Dippold, Michaela; Glaser, Bruno; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    For the transformation of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) in soil, which is an important process in the turnover of organic matter, microbial utilization is one of the most important processes. Position-specific labeling combined with compound-specific 13C-PLFA-analysis allows a closer look on the mechanisms of LMWOS transformation in soil. We assessed short- (3 and 10 days) and long-term (half year) transformations of monosaccharides by adding position-specifically 13C labeled glucose and ribose to soil in a field experiment conducted on an agriculturally used luvisol located in north-western Bavaria. We quantified the microbial utilization of the different functional groups by 13C-analysis of microbial biomass with the chloroform-fumigation-extraction method (CFE). 13C-PLFA analysis enabled us to distinguish individual microbial groups and compare their C-utilization. Preferential degradation of glucoses C-3 and C-4 respectively C-1 position enabled differentiation between the two main hexose metabolic pathways - glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway. Microbial groups revealed different incorporation of specific C positions into their PLFA. The highest incorporation was reached by the prokaryotic gram- negative groups. The application of position-specifically labeled substances, coupled with compound-specific 13C-PLFA analysis opens a new way to investigate the microbial transformations of LMWOS in soil. Observing single C atoms and their utilization by specific microbial groups allow conclusions about the mechanisms and kinetics of microbial utilization and interaction between these groups and therefore will improve our understanding of soil carbon fluxes.

  8. PLFA profiles of drinking water biofilters with different acetate and glucose loadings.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Shi, Xu; Wei, Bo; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Shuting

    2009-08-01

    The biofilters fed with acetate or glucose and their phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles were investigated to observe the impact of organic matter concentrations on the microbial community structure in the drinking water production system. PLFA markers for bacteria were predominant in all of the biofilters and made up over half of the total PLFA content. PLFA diversity was compared and the biofilters fed with glucose had higher diversity. The Shannon-Wiener (or sometimes known as just Shannon diversity index) indices in the biofilters fed with acetate were from 0.68 to 0.97, while the indices in the biofilters fed with glucose were from 0.95 to 1.25. Principle components analysis showed that carbon sources and media depth were responsible for 68 and 17% of the total PLFA variance, respectively. The results indicated that PLFA analysis could be useful in illustrating microbial community structure in drinking water bioreactors, and microbial community structure was impacted by carbon substrates.

  9. THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT SAMPLE CONCENTRATIONS ON THE STRUCTURE OF MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES USING PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACID ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis is a powerful tool for determination of microbial community structures in soils and sediments. However, accurate determination of total microbial biomass and structure of the microbial community may be dependent on the concentration of the...

  10. [Effects of Different Altitudes on Soil Microbial PLFA and Enzyme Activity in Two Kinds of Forests].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qing-ping; He, Bing-hui; Mao, Qiao-zhi; Wu, Yao-peng; Huang, Qi; Li, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The soil microbial community is an important part in soil ecosystem, and it is sensitive to the ecological environment. Phospholipid-derived fatty acids ( PLFA ) analysis was used to examine variations in soil microbial community diversity and its influencing factors. The results showed that: there existed 48 PLFAs that were significant in the soil samples from six altitudes. The PLFAs of six altitudes with the highest contents were i16:0, 10Me17:0, 10Me18:0 TBSA. The citrus forest exhibited richer soil PLFAs distribution both in type and amount than those in masson pine. The microbial activity and functional diversity of masson pine were increased with increasing altitudes, and citrus forest gradually decreased, the PLFA content of different microbial groups in each altitude were significantly different. The richness index, Shannon-Wiener index and Pielou evenness index of masson pine in low elevation were holistically higher than those in high elevation. However, the highest richness index of citrus forest was in low altitude, the highest Shannon-Wiener index and Pielou evenness index were in high altitude. The PLFAs content of different microbial groups were closely correlated to the soil enzyme activities and environmental factors. The PLFAs of bacteria, actinomycetes, G⁻ (Gram- positive), G⁺ (Gram-negative) were positively correlated with Ure(urease) , Ive(invertase) , CAT( catalase activity) and forest type, the PLFAs of fungi was significantly correlated with Ure, Ive, CAT, the PLFAs of bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, G⁻ , G⁺ were significantly negatively or less correlated with elevation. Ure, Ive, CAT, forest type and elevation are the pivotal factors controlling the soil microbial biomass and activities.

  11. [Effects of Different Altitudes on Soil Microbial PLFA and Enzyme Activity in Two Kinds of Forests].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qing-ping; He, Bing-hui; Mao, Qiao-zhi; Wu, Yao-peng; Huang, Qi; Li, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The soil microbial community is an important part in soil ecosystem, and it is sensitive to the ecological environment. Phospholipid-derived fatty acids ( PLFA ) analysis was used to examine variations in soil microbial community diversity and its influencing factors. The results showed that: there existed 48 PLFAs that were significant in the soil samples from six altitudes. The PLFAs of six altitudes with the highest contents were i16:0, 10Me17:0, 10Me18:0 TBSA. The citrus forest exhibited richer soil PLFAs distribution both in type and amount than those in masson pine. The microbial activity and functional diversity of masson pine were increased with increasing altitudes, and citrus forest gradually decreased, the PLFA content of different microbial groups in each altitude were significantly different. The richness index, Shannon-Wiener index and Pielou evenness index of masson pine in low elevation were holistically higher than those in high elevation. However, the highest richness index of citrus forest was in low altitude, the highest Shannon-Wiener index and Pielou evenness index were in high altitude. The PLFAs content of different microbial groups were closely correlated to the soil enzyme activities and environmental factors. The PLFAs of bacteria, actinomycetes, G⁻ (Gram- positive), G⁺ (Gram-negative) were positively correlated with Ure(urease) , Ive(invertase) , CAT( catalase activity) and forest type, the PLFAs of fungi was significantly correlated with Ure, Ive, CAT, the PLFAs of bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, G⁻ , G⁺ were significantly negatively or less correlated with elevation. Ure, Ive, CAT, forest type and elevation are the pivotal factors controlling the soil microbial biomass and activities. PMID:27012007

  12. Investigation of petroleum residues and microbial PLFA in Barataria Bay sediments one year after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, S.; Zimmerman, A. R.; Mahmoudi, N.; Silliman, B. R.; Slater, G. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon spill released crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico over a period of 3 months in 2010. Barataria Bay, Louisiana was among the most heavily impacted and extensively oil-contaminated coastlines. Studies conducted in the marshes show significant ecological and geologic effects from oil residues that reached the bay. Observation of the presence of an oil sheen associated with sediment disturbance raised the question as to whether petroleum residues were also present in the sediments of Barataria Bay. In order to address this question, six sediment cores were collected from non-oiled (#1 & 2) and oiled (#3-6) portions of Barataria Bay approximately one year after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Concentrations of n-alkanes, unresolved complex material (UCM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) were determined in these upper sediments. In addition, concentrations of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were determined to assess variations in microbial community abundance. Alkane concentrations ranged from 134 to 747 ng/g with chain lengths from C12 to C35. Most cores showed an odd over even preference (carbon preference index of 1.2 to 4.3) with highest concentrations of long chain compounds between C24 and C35 (average chain length 29 to 39), consistent with a terrestrial carbon source such as plant waxes. Core #6 however, in the southwest portion of the bay, had the lowest concentrations of alkanes, and shorter n-alkane chain lengths overall. Despite this difference, the core maintains a relatively high carbon preference index and average chain length compared to that which would be expected from oil contaminated sediments. Measured PAH concentrations were highly variable ranging from undetectable to 436 ng/g. These values are several orders of magnitude lower than what is generally seen in highly contaminated sediments. Further, UCM concentrations were negligible in the cores from the oiled regions. These findings suggest only a minimal presence of

  13. Long-term impact of farm management and crops on soil microorganisms assessed by combined DGGE and PLFA analyses

    PubMed Central

    Stagnari, Fabio; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Tofalo, Rosanna; Campanelli, Gabriele; Leteo, Fabrizio; Della Vella, Umberto; Schirone, Maria; Suzzi, Giovanna; Pisante, Michele

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, long-term organic and conventional managements were compared at the experimental field of Monsampolo del Tronto (Marche region, Italy) with the aim of investigating soil chemical fertility and microbial community structure. A polyphasic approach, combining soil fertility indicators with microbiological analyses (plate counts, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [DGGE] and phospholipid fatty acid analysis [PLFA]) was applied. Organic matter, N as well as some important macro and micronutrients (K, P, Mg, Mn, Cu, and Zn) for crop growth, were more available under organic management. Bacterial counts were higher in organic management. A significant influence of management system and management x crop interaction was observed for total mesophilic bacteria, nitrogen fixing bacteria and actinobacteria. Interestingly, cultivable fungi were not detected in all analyzed samples. PLFA biomass was higher in the organic and Gram positive bacteria dominated the microbial community in both systems. Even if fungal biomass was higher in organic management, fungal PCR-DGGE fingerprinting revealed that the two systems were very similar in terms of fungal species suggesting that 10 years were not enough to establish a new dynamic equilibrium among ecosystem components. A better knowledge of soil biota and in particular of fungal community structure will be useful for the development of sustainable management strategies. PMID:25540640

  14. The stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their impact on microbial phospholipid fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Shaharoona, Baby; Crowley, David E; Khalid, Azeem; Hussain, Sabir; Arshad, Muhammad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the stability of structurally different azo dyes in soil and their impact on the microbial community composition by analyzing phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles. Sterile and non-sterile soils were amended with three azo dyes, including: Direct Red 81, Reactive Black 5 and Acid Yellow 19 at 160mgkg(-1) soil. The results showed that the azo dyes were quite stable and that large amounts of these dyes ranging from 17.3% to 87.5% were recoverable from the sterile and non-sterile soils after 14 days. The maximum amount of dye was recovered in the case of Direct Red 81. PLFA analysis showed that the azo dyes had a significant effect on microbial community structure. PLFA concentrations representing Gram-negative bacteria in dye-amended soil were substantially less as compared to the PLFA concentration of Gram-positive bacteria. Acid Yellow 19 dye had almost similar effects on the PLFA concentrations representing bacteria and fungi. In contrast, Reactive Black 5 had a greater negative effect on fungal PLFA than that on bacterial PLFA, while the opposite was observed in the case of Direct Red 81. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their effects on soil microbial community composition.

  15. The stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their impact on microbial phospholipid fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Shaharoona, Baby; Crowley, David E; Khalid, Azeem; Hussain, Sabir; Arshad, Muhammad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the stability of structurally different azo dyes in soil and their impact on the microbial community composition by analyzing phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles. Sterile and non-sterile soils were amended with three azo dyes, including: Direct Red 81, Reactive Black 5 and Acid Yellow 19 at 160mgkg(-1) soil. The results showed that the azo dyes were quite stable and that large amounts of these dyes ranging from 17.3% to 87.5% were recoverable from the sterile and non-sterile soils after 14 days. The maximum amount of dye was recovered in the case of Direct Red 81. PLFA analysis showed that the azo dyes had a significant effect on microbial community structure. PLFA concentrations representing Gram-negative bacteria in dye-amended soil were substantially less as compared to the PLFA concentration of Gram-positive bacteria. Acid Yellow 19 dye had almost similar effects on the PLFA concentrations representing bacteria and fungi. In contrast, Reactive Black 5 had a greater negative effect on fungal PLFA than that on bacterial PLFA, while the opposite was observed in the case of Direct Red 81. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their effects on soil microbial community composition. PMID:26074308

  16. Contributions of understory and/or overstory vegetations to soil microbial PLFA and nematode diversities in Eucalyptus monocultures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Wan, Songze; Zhang, Chenlu; Liu, Zhanfeng; Zhou, Lixia; Fu, Shenglei

    2014-01-01

    Ecological interactions between aboveground and belowground biodiversity have received many attentions in the recent decades. Although soil biodiversity declined with the decrease of plant diversity, many previous studies found plant species identities were more important than plant diversity in controlling soil biodiversity. This study focused on the responses of soil biodiversity to the altering of plant functional groups, namely overstory and understory vegetations, rather than plant diversity gradient. We conducted an experiment by removing overstory and/or understory vegetation to compare their effects on soil microbial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and nematode diversities in eucalyptus monocultures. Our results indicated that both overstory and understory vegetations could affect soil microbial PLFA and nematode diversities, which manifested as the decrease in Shannon-Wiener diversity index (H') and Pielou evenness index (J) and the increase in Simpson dominance index (λ) after vegetation removal. Soil microclimate change explained part of variance of soil biodiversity indices. Both overstory and understory vegetations positively correlated with soil microbial PLFA and nematode diversities. In addition, the alteration of soil biodiversity might be due to a mixing effect of bottom-up control and soil microclimate change after vegetation removal in the studied plantations. Given the studied ecosystem is common in humid subtropical and tropical region of the world, our findings might have great potential to extrapolate to large scales and could be conducive to ecosystem management and service.

  17. [A comprehensive signature biomarker analysis of the in-situ viable biomass, community composition, and nutritional status attributes of deep subsurface microbiota]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The TAN sites contains subsurface sediment contaminated with trichloroethylene (TC). A suite of microbiological analyses, including ester-linked phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, were performed to ascertain the microbial ecology associated with TCE degradation processes. The objective of the PLFA analyses were: (1) to determine the distribution of viable microbes throughout a vertical depth profile through the TCE plume, (2) determine the community composition of the viable extant microbiota and (3) relate the data derived from the PLFA analyses to other measures of the in situ microbiota as well as to the presence of TCE degradative products.

  18. Using PLFA Biomarkers and Natural Abundance Stable and Radiocarbon Isotopes to Characterize the Microbial Ecology and Metabolism of Methane Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, C. T.; Mandernack, K. W.; Slater, G. F.; Dias, R. F.

    2008-12-01

    Methane generated in the subsurface is a major source of atmospheric CH4, but its release is mitigated by CH4-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). Therefore, it is important to understand the ecology of methanotroph communities in various environments. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analyses are a particularly useful method for characterizing these communities for two reasons: (1) Many type I and II methanotrophs produce specific PLFA biomarkers that can be used to estimate their populations, and (2) because CH4 is often very depleted in 13C and sometimes 14C, natural abundance δ13CPLFA and Δ14CPLFA values can be used to trace the flow of CH4- derived carbon through microbial ecosystems. We used these tools to evaluate the role of methanotrophs in carbon flow in three different environments: (1) a soil column overlying a coal bed methane (CBM) seep in southwest CO, and pristine, oligotrophic groundwaters within (2) sedimentary and (3) granitic host rocks in Japan. In the soil column impacted by CBM seepage, concentrations of the biomarker PLFAs for type I (16:1ω8cis) and type II (18:1ω8cis) methanotrophs were as high as 13 and 18 nmoles (g dry soil)-1, respectively. Depth profiles of methanotroph PLFA concentrations varied over different sampling dates indicating dynamic populations. δ13CPLFA values of the CBM soils (-25.1 to - 66.9‰) were substantially more negative than those for the control soil (-14.5 to -32.5‰) indicating that CBM is an important carbon source for the CBM-impacted soil microbial community. Δ14CPLFA values (-351 to -936‰) indicate the importance of 14C-dead CBM as a carbon source to the microbial communities, contributing 32 to 66% of total carbon in PLFA structures isolated from shallow soils and 67 to 97% for those isolated from deeper soils. The biomarker for type II methanotrophs, comprised 3 and 18% of total PLFAs in sedimentary and granitic groundwaters, respectively. The Δ14C values determined for type II methanotroph PLFAs

  19. Strength and limits using 13C phospholipid fatty acid analysis in soil ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watzinger, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    This presentation on microbial phospholipid biomarkers, their isotope analysis and their ability to reveal soil functions summarizes experiences gained by the author for more than 10 years. The amount and composition of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) measured in environmental samples strongly depend on the methodology. To achieve comparable results the extraction, separation and methylation method must be kept constant. PLFAs patterns are sensitive to microbial community shifts even though the taxonomic resolution of PLFAs is low. The possibility to easily link lipid biomarkers with stable isotope techniques is identified as a major advantage when addressing soil functions. Measurement of PLFA isotopic ratios is sensitive and enables detecting isotopic fractionation. The difference between the carbon isotopic ratio of single PLFAs and their substrate (δ13C) can vary between -6 and +11‰. This difference derives from the fractionation during biosynthesis and from substrate inhomogeneity. Consequently, natural abundance studies are restricted to quantifying substrate uptake of the total microbial biomass. In contrast, artificial labelling enables quantifying carbon uptake into single PLFAs, but labelling success depends on homogeneous and undisturbed label application. Current developments in microbial ecology (e.g. 13C and 15N proteomics) and isotope techniques (online monitoring of CO2 isotope ratios) will likely improve soil functional interpretations in the future. 13C PLFA analysis will continue to contribute because it is affordable, sensitive and allows frequent sampling combined with the use of small amounts of 13C label.

  20. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  1. A modified weighted mixture model for the interpretation of spatial and temporal changes in the microbial communities in drinking water reservoirs using compositional phospholipid fatty acid data.

    PubMed

    Stanimirova, I; Woznica, A; Plociniczak, T; Kwasniewski, M; Karczewski, J

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to check whether a methodology based on the analysis of data that contain the entire phospholipid fatty acid, PLFA, compositions of water samples can be successfully used to interpret spatial and temporal changes in the microbial communities in water reservoirs. The proposed methodology consists of the construction of a modified weighted multivariate mixture model for the PLFA profiles of the water samples collected in a given monitoring campaign and the identification of latent PLFA components through a comparison with the known PLFA profiles of some cultivated or non-cultivated microbial communities. A 16S rDNA analysis of some of the selected water samples in the monitoring campaign was performed in order to verify the results of the PLFA analysis. The results showed that the proposed methodology can be useful for a dynamic and sensitive evaluation of changes in the microbial quality of water before and after flash flooding and can help in taking a decision regarding further risk assessment. PMID:27591599

  2. Signatures of Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Metabolic Activity in Enrichment Cultures from a Sulphur Oxidizing Acid Mine Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, G. F.; Bernier, L.; Cowie, B. R.; Warren, L. A.

    2006-12-01

    Delineating the role of microorganisms in geochemical processes of interest in natural environments requires the development of tools that provide the ability to distinguish amongst microbial activity associated with different metabolic guilds. The gap between phylogenetic characterization and phenotypic understanding remains, underscoring the need to consider alternative methods. Compound specific analysis of cellular components has the potential to differentiate between active metabolic processes supporting microbial communities and may be especially useful in extreme environments. The goal of this study was to determine whether the phospholipids fatty acid (PLFA) distribution and isotopic signatures associated with autotrophs and heterotrophs enriched from an acid mine drainage (AMD) system differed, and further whether natural consortial autotrophic isolates showed similar signatures to autotrophic pure strains of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans. Two distinct initial enrichments with tetrathionate and CO2 yielded primarily autotrophic (95%) Acidithiobaccillus spp. sulphur oxidizing communities. The remaining microbial members of theses enrichments (<5%) were morphologically distinct and heterotrophic, as subculture of the consortial isolates in a medium amended with glucose but without tetrathionate selectively resulted in their visible growth. PLFA profiles and δ13C signatures from autotrophic (1) natural enrichments, pure cultures of (2) A. ferrooxidans and (3) A. thiooxidans were similar, but collectively differed from those of the natural heterotrophic enrichment cultures. The PLFA profiles for the heterotrophic communities were made up of primarily (88-99%) C16:0 and two isomers of C18:1. In contrast, the autotrophic communities had high proportions of C16:1 (up to 18%) as well as cyclo C17 and cyclo C19 PLFA that combined comprised 18 to 58% of the observed PLFA. The δ13C signatures of the PLFA also differed strongly between the two

  3. Application of nonlinear analysis methods for identifying relationships between microbial community structure and groundwater geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Schryver, Jack C; Brandt, Craig C; Pfiffner, Susan M; Palumbo, Anthony V; Peacock, Aaron D; White, David C; McKinley, James P; Long, Philip E

    2006-02-01

    The relationship between groundwater geochemistry and microbial community structure can be complex and difficult to assess. We applied nonlinear and generalized linear data analysis methods to relate microbial biomarkers (phospholipids fatty acids, PLFA) to groundwater geochemical characteristics at the Shiprock uranium mill tailings disposal site that is primarily contaminated by uranium, sulfate, and nitrate. First, predictive models were constructed using feedforward artificial neural networks (NN) to predict PLFA classes from geochemistry. To reduce the danger of overfitting, parsimonious NN architectures were selected based on pruning of hidden nodes and elimination of redundant predictor (geochemical) variables. The resulting NN models greatly outperformed the generalized linear models. Sensitivity analysis indicated that tritium, which was indicative of riverine influences, and uranium were important in predicting the distributions of the PLFA classes. In contrast, nitrate concentration and inorganic carbon were least important, and total ionic strength was of intermediate importance. Second, nonlinear principal components (NPC) were extracted from the PLFA data using a variant of the feedforward NN. The NPC grouped the samples according to similar geochemistry. PLFA indicators of Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes were associated with the groups of wells with lower levels of contamination. The more contaminated samples contained microbial communities that were predominated by terminally branched saturates and branched monounsaturates that are indicative of metal reducers, actinomycetes, and Gram-positive bacteria. These results indicate that the microbial community at the site is coupled to the geochemistry and knowledge of the geochemistry allows prediction of the community composition.

  4. Application of Nonlinear Analysis Methods for Identifying Relationships Between Microbial Community Structure and Groundwater Geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Schryver, Jack C.; Brandt, Craig C.; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Palumbo, A V.; Peacock, Aaron D.; White, David C.; McKinley, James P.; Long, Philip E.

    2006-02-01

    The relationship between groundwater geochemistry and microbial community structure can be complex and difficult to assess. We applied nonlinear and generalized linear data analysis methods to relate microbial biomarkers (phospholipids fatty acids, PLFA) to groundwater geochemical characteristics at the Shiprock uranium mill tailings disposal site that is primarily contaminated by uranium, sulfate, and nitrate. First, predictive models were constructed using feedforward artificial neural networks (NN) to predict PLFA classes from geochemistry. To reduce the danger of overfitting, parsimonious NN architectures were selected based on pruning of hidden nodes and elimination of redundant predictor (geochemical) variables. The resulting NN models greatly outperformed the generalized linear models. Sensitivity analysis indicated that tritium, which was indicative of riverine influences, and uranium were important in predicting the distributions of the PLFA classes. In contrast, nitrate concentration and inorganic carbon were least important, and total ionic strength was of intermediate importance. Second, nonlinear principal components (NPC) were extracted from the PLFA data using a variant of the feedforward NN. The NPC grouped the samples according to similar geochemistry. PLFA indicators of Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes were associated with the groups of wells with lower levels of contamination. The more contaminated samples contained microbial communities that were predominated by terminally branched saturates and branched monounsaturates that are indicative of metal reducers, actinomycetes, and Gram-positive bacteria. These results indicate that the microbial community at the site is coupled to the geochemistry and knowledge of the geochemistry allows prediction of the community composition.

  5. A Column Experiment To Determine Black Shale Degradation And Colonization By Means of δ13C and 14C Analysis Of Phospholipid Fatty Acids And DNA Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, A.; Gleixner, G.

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the degradation of black shale organic matter by microbial communities. We inoculated two columns respectively, with the fungi Schizophyllum commune, the gram-positive bacterium Pseudomonas putida and the gram-negative bacteria Streptomyces griseus and Streptomyces chartreusis. These microorganisms are known to degrade a wide variety of organic macromolecules. Additionally, we had two sets of control columns. To one set the same nutrient solution was added as to the inoculated columns and to the other set only sterile deionised water was supplied. All columns contained 1.5 kg of freshly crushed not autoclaved black shale material with a particle size of 0.63-2 mm. The columns were incubated at 28° C and 60% humidity in the dark. The aim was to investigate, which microorganisms live on black shales and if these microorganisms are able to degrade ancient organic matter. We used compound specific stable isotope measurement techniques and compound specific 14C-dating methods. After 183 days PLFAs were extracted from the columns to investigate the microbial community, furthermore we extracted on one hand total-DNA of column material and on the other hand DNA from pure cultures isolates which grew on Kinks-agar B, Starch-casein-nitrate-agar (SCN) and on complete-yeast-medium-agar (CYM). According to the PLFA analysis bacteria dominated in the columns, whereas in pure cultures more fungi were isolated. A principal component analysis revealed differences between the columns in accordance with the inoculation, but it seems that the inoculated microorganisms were replaced by the natural population. For AMS measurements palmitic acid (C 16:0) was re-isolated from total-PLFA-extract with a preparative fraction collector (PFC). Preliminary results of the study revealed that microorganisms are able to degrade black shale material and that PLFA analysis are useful methods to be combined with analysis of stable isotope and 14C measurements to study microbial

  6. • Relationships between Soil Microbial Biomass Determined by Chloroform Fumigation-Extraction, Substrate-Induced Respiration, and Phospholipid Fatty Acid Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Peacock, A. D.; Smith, Jeff L.; Bolton, Harvey

    2002-09-01

    ABSTRACT-The soil microbial biomass (SMB) is responsible for many of the cycles and transformations of nutrients in soils. Three methods of measuring and describing this pool in soil are: (1) chloroform fumigation-extraction (CFE), (2) substrate-induced respiration (SIR), and (3) total extractable phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). This study was conducted to seek a relationship between microbial PLFA and measures of SMB. Microbial PLFA was best predicted by CFE (R2 = 0.77); 1 nmol of PLFA corresponded to a flush of 2.4 mg C released by fumigation. This conversion factor will be useful in discussions of microbial populations and diversity and allow comparisons to literature in which only CFE is used to describe the size of the microbial biomass.

  7. Analysis of Bile Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjövall, Jan; Griffiths, William J.; Setchell, Kenneth D. R.; Mano, Nariyasu; Goto, Junichi

    Bile acids constitute a large family of steroids in vertebrates, normally formed from cholesterol and carrying a carboxyl group in a side-chain of variable length. Bile alcohols, also formed from cholesterol, have similar structures as bile acids, except for the absence of a carboxyl group in the steroid skeleton. The conversion of cholesterol to bile acids and/or bile alcohols is of major importance for maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis, both from quantitative and regulatory points of view (Chiang, 2004; Kalaany and Mangelsdorf, 2006; Moore, Kato, Xie, et al., 2006; Scotti, Gilardi, Godio, et al., 2007). Appropriately conjugated bile acids and bile alcohols (also referred to as bile salts) are secreted in bile and serve vital functions in the absorption of lipids and lipid-soluble compounds (Hofmann, 2007). Reliable analytical methods are required for studies of the functions and pathophysiological importance of the variety of bile acids and bile alcohols present in living organisms. When combined with genetic and proteomic studies, analysis of these small molecules (in today's terminology: metabolomics, steroidomics, sterolomics, cholanoidomics, etc.) will lead to a deeper understanding of the integrated metabolic processes in lipid metabolism.

  8. Application of modified attapulgite in phthalate acid ester-contaminated soil: Effects on phthalate acid ester dissipation and the composition of soil microbial community.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Shi, Yi-Ying; Zhou, Hai-Feng; Ren, Xu-Qin; Ji, Huai

    2016-08-01

    The effects of modified attapulgite (MA) on the dissipations of the plasticizers di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in soil, as well as on the composition of soil microbial community, were studied. DBP, DEHP (50 mg kg(-1) in soil, respectively), and MA (1, 5, and 10 % in soil) were mixed thoroughly with soil and incubated for 60 days. DBP- and DEHP-contaminated soils without MA were used as the controls. Both of DBP and DEHP residues in bulk soils and four soil fractions were measured at five incubation times 1, 7, 15, 30, and 60 days, and their dissipation kinetic equations were analyzed. The microbial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) concentrations were also measured at the end of experiment. Our results showed that the effect of modified attapulgite on DBP dissipation was related to its dosage in soil. The DEHP dissipation was both inhibited by MA at the 5 and 10 % rates in soils. The application of MA changed the content percentages but did not change the concentration order of phthalate acid esters (PAEs) in soil particle-size fractions. The total microbial PLFA content was significantly increased by 5 and 10 % MA in the contaminated soils. Meanwhile, the gram-negative (GN)/gram-positive (GP) ratios increased when MA was applied at the dosages of 5 and 10 % in DBP and 10 % in DEHP-contaminated soils. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the change of bacteria PLFA, especially the GN bacterial PLFA, depended on the dosages of MA added into soil. The application of MA into soil has a positive effect on reducing the eco-toxicity of PAEs in soil based on the analysis of the soil microbial PLFA. PMID:27094276

  9. Structure of a microbial community in soil after prolonged addition of low levels of simulated acid rain

    PubMed

    Pennanen; Fritze; Vanhala; Kiikkila; Neuvonen; Baath

    1998-06-01

    Humus samples were collected 12 growing seasons after the start of a simulated acid rain experiment situated in the subarctic environment. The acid rain was simulated with H2SO4, a combination of H2SO4 and HNO3, and HNO3 at two levels of moderate acidic loads close to the natural anthropogenic pollution levels of southern Scandinavia. The higher levels of acid applications resulted in acidification, as defined by humus chemistry. The concentrations of base cations decreased, while the concentrations of exchangeable H+, Al, and Fe increased. Humus pH decreased from 3.83 to 3.65. Basal respiration decreased with decreasing humus pH, and total microbial biomass, measured by substrate-induced respiration and total amount of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), decreased slightly. An altered PLFA pattern indicated a change in the microbial community structure at the higher levels of acid applications. In general, branched fatty acids, typical of gram-positive bacteria, increased in the acid plots. PLFA analysis performed on the bacterial community growing on agar plates also showed that the relative amount of PLFA specific for gram-positive bacteria increased due to the acidification. The changed bacterial community was adapted to the more acidic environment in the acid-treated plots, even though bacterial growth rates, estimated by thymidine and leucine incorporation, decreased with pH. Fungal activity (measured as acetate incorporation into ergosterol) was not affected. This result indicates that bacteria were more affected than fungi by the acidification. The capacity of the bacterial community to utilize 95 different carbon sources was variable and only showed weak correlations to pH. Differences in the toxicities of H2SO4 and HNO3 for the microbial community were not found.

  10. Analysis of Organic Acids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John R.; Rauner, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are the procedures and a discussion of the results for an experiment in which students select unknown carboxylic acids, determine their melting points, and investigate their solubility behavior in water and ethanol. A table of selected carboxylic acids is included. (CW)

  11. A comparison of sole carbon source utilization patterns and phospholipid fatty acid profiles to detect changes in the root microflora of hydroponically grown crops.

    PubMed

    Khalil, S; Bååth, E; Alsanius, B; Englund, J E; Sundin, P; Gertsson, U E; Jensén, P

    2001-04-01

    Sole carbon source utilization (SCSU) patterns and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles were compared with respect to their potential to characterize root-inhabiting microbial communities of hydroponically grown crops. Sweet pepper (Capsicum annum cv. Evident), lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv. Grand Rapids), and four different cultivars of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cvs. Gitana, Armada, Aromata, and Elin) were grown in 1-L black plastic beakers placed in a cultivation chamber with artificial light. In addition to the harvest of the plants after 6 weeks, plants of one tomato cultivar, cv. Gitana, were also harvested after 4 and 8 weeks. The cultivation in this study was performed twice. Principal component analysis was used to analyze the data. Both characterization methods had the ability to discriminate between the root microflora of different plant species, cultivars, and one tomato cultivar at different ages. Differences in both SCSU patterns and PLFA profiles were larger between plant species than between cultivars, but for both methods the largest differences were between the two cultivations. Still, the differences between treatments were always due to differences in the same PLFAs in both cultivations. This was not the case for the SCSU patterns when different plant ages were studied. Furthermore, PLFA profiles showed less variation between replicates than did SCSU patterns. This larger variation observed among the SCSU data indicates that PLFA may be more useful to detect changes in the root microflora of hydroponically grown crops than the SCSU technique.

  12. Direct incorporation of fatty acids into microbial phospholipids in soils: Position-specific labeling tells the story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dippold, Michaela A.; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-02-01

    Fatty acids have been used as plant and microbial biomarkers, and knowledge about their transformation pathways in soils and sediments is crucial for interpreting fatty acid signatures, especially because the formation, recycling and decomposition processes are concurrent. We analyzed the incorporation of free fatty acids into microbial fatty acids in soil by coupling position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific 13C analysis. Position-specifically and uniformly 13C labeled palmitate were applied in an agricultural Luvisol. Pathways of fatty acids were traced by analyzing microbial utilization of 13C from individual molecule positions of palmitate and their incorporation into phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). The fate of palmitate 13C in the soil was characterized by the main pathways of microbial fatty acid metabolism: Odd positions (C-1) were preferentially oxidized to CO2 in the citric acid cycle, whereas even positions (C-2) were preferentially incorporated into microbial biomass. This pattern is a result of palmitate cleavage to acetyl-CoA and its further use in the main pathways of C metabolism. We observed a direct, intact incorporation of more than 4% of the added palmitate into the PLFA of microbial cell membranes, indicating the important role of palmitate as direct precursor for microbial fatty acids. Palmitate 13C was incorporated into PLFA as intact alkyl chain, i.e. the C backbone of palmitate was not cleaved, but palmitate was incorporated either intact or modified (e.g. desaturated, elongated or branched) according to the fatty acid demand of the microbial community. These modifications of the incorporated palmitate increased with time. Future PLFA studies must therefore consider the recycling of existing plant and microbial-derived fatty acids. This study demonstrates the intact uptake and recycling of free fatty acids such as palmitate in soils, as well as the high turnover and transformation of cellular PLFA. Knowledge about the intact

  13. Stabilization of glucose-C in microbial cell membranes (PLFA) and cell walls (amino sugars) evaluated by 13C-labelling in a field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunina, Anna; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Glaser, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Microorganisms control carbon (C) cycle and strongly contribute to formation of soil organic matter. Strong differences in the turnover of microbial groups and cellular compounds complicate the assessment of their contribution to microbial food webs and C sequestration in soil in situ. The uptake and incorporation of 13C labeled glucose by microbial groups were traced during 50 days after the labeling under field conditions. 13C was analysed: i) in the cytosolic pool by chloroform fumigation extraction, ii) in cell membranes by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), iii) in cell walls by amino sugars, and iv) remaining in bulk soil. This allowed tracing C in microbial groups as well as cellular compounds. Mean residence times (MRT) of C in PLFA and the cytosol were 47 and 150 days, respectively. Such long cytosol MRT depends on its heterogeneous composition, which includes high and low molecular weight organics. Amino sugars were mainly originated from microbial residues and thus, observation periods higher than 1 year are required for estimation of their MRT. Relative 13C incorporation (13C portion in total pool C) was the highest for PLFAs (~1.5% at day 3), whereas 13C content of the cytosol and amino sugars was one and two orders of magnitude less, respectively. Relative 13C incorporation into amino sugars of living microorganisms showed only 0.57% on day 3. Therefore, the turnover of cell membrane components is two times faster than that of cell walls, even in living microorganisms. Both PLFAs and amino sugars showed that glucose C was preferentially used by bacteria. 13C incorporation into bacterial cell walls and membranes decreased with time, but increased or remained constant for fungi, reflecting faster turnover of bacteria than fungi. Consequently, bacteria contribute more to the decomposition of low molecular weight organics, whereas fungi consume bacterial products or necromass and contribute more to long-term C stabilisation. Thus, tracing of 13C in cellular

  14. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis as part of the Yucca Mountain Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ringelberg, D.B.; White, D.C.

    1996-09-01

    In support of the Yucca Mountain subsurface microbial characterization project phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analyses for viable microbial biomass, community composition and nutritional status were performed. Results showed a positive correlation between a decrease in viable biomass and increase in depth with the lowest biomass values being obtained from the Topopah Spring geologic horizon. A plot of the ratio of non-viable (diglyceride fatty acids) to viable (PLFA) cells also showed the lowest values to derive from the Topopah Spring horizon. Estimations of microbial community composition, made from the patterns of PLFA recovered from the sediment samples, revealed similarities between samples collected within the same geologic horizons: Tiva Canyon, Pre-Pah Canyon and Topopah Spring. Results indicated the presence of mixed communities composed of gram positive, gram negative, actinomycete and obligate anaerobic bacteria. Culturable organisms, recovered from similar sediments, were representative of the same bacterial classifications although gram positive bacterial isolates typically outnumbered gram negative isolates. Within the gram negative bacterial community, corroborative indicators of physiological stress were apparent in the Topopah Spring horizon.

  15. Characterization of fulvic acid fractions of dissolved organic matter during ice-out in a hyper-eutrophic, coastal pond in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawley, Kaelin M.; McKnight, Diane M.; Miller, Penney; Cory, Rose; Fimmen, Ryan L.; Guerard, Jennifer; Dieser, Markus; Jaros, Christopher; Chin, Yu-Ping; Foreman, Christine

    2013-12-01

    Dissolved humic material (HDOM) is ubiquitous to all natural waters and its source material influences its chemical structure, reactivity, and bioavailability. While terrestrially derived HDOM reference materials distributed by the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) have been readily available to engineering and scientific communities, a microbially derived reference HDOM was not, despite the well-characterized differences in the chemistry and reactivity of HDOM derived from terrestrial versus microbial sources. To address this gap, we collected a microbial reference fulvic acid from Pony Lake (PLFA) for distribution through the IHSS. Pony Lake is a saline coastal pond on Ross Island, Antarctica, where the landscape is devoid of terrestrial plants. Sample collection occurred over a 17-day period in the summer season at Pony Lake. During this time, the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations increased nearly two-fold, and the fulvic acid fraction (collected using the XAD-8 method) accounted for 14.6% of the DOC. During the re-concentration and desalting procedures we isolated two other chemically distinct fulvic acid fractions: (1) PLFA-2, which was high in carbohydrates and (2) PLFA-CER, which was high in nitrogen. The chemical characteristics (elemental analysis, optical characterization with UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, and 13C NMR spectroscopy) of the three fulvic acid fractions helped to explain their behavior during isolation.

  16. Phospholipid fatty acid biomarkers in a freshwater periphyton community exposed to uranium: discovery by non-linear statistical learning

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) have been widely used to characterize environmental microbial communities, generating community profiles that can distinguish phylogenetic or functional groups within the community. The poor specificity of organism groups with fatty acid biomarkers in the classic PLFA-microorganism associations is a confounding factor in many of the statistical classification/clustering approaches traditionally used to interpret PLFA profiles. In this paper we demonstrate that non-linear statistical learning methods, such as a support vector machine (SVM), can more accurately find patterns related to uranyl nitrate exposure in a freshwater periphyton community than linear methods, such as partial least squares discriminant analysis. In addition, probabilistic models of exposure can be derived from the identified lipid biomarkers to demonstrate the potential model-based approach that could be used in remediation. The SVM probability model separates dose groups at accuracies of ~87.0%, ~71.4%, ~87.5%, and 100% for the four groups; Control (non-amended system), low-dose (amended at 10 µg U L-1), medium dose (amended at 100 µg U L-1), and high dose (500 µg U L-1). The SVM model achieved an overall cross-validated classification accuracy of ~87% in contrast to ~59% for the best linear classifier.

  17. A field method to store samples from temperate mountain grassland soils for analysis of phospholipid fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Schnecker, Jörg; Wild, Birgit; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Richter, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    The storage of soil samples for PLFA analysis can lead to shifts in the microbial community composition. We show here that conserving samples in RNAlater, which is already widely used to store samples for DNA and RNA analysis, proved to be as sufficient as freezing at -20 °C and preferable over storage at 4 °C for temperate mountain grassland soil. The total amount of extracted PLFAs was not changed by any storage treatment. Storage at 4 °C led to an alteration of seven out of thirty individual biomarkers, while freezing and storage in RNAlater caused changes in the amount of fungal biomarkers but had no effect on any other microbial group. We therefore suggest that RNAlater could be used to preserve soil samples for PLFA analysis when immediate extraction or freezing of samples is not possible, for example during sampling campaigns in remote areas or during transport and shipping.

  18. Australian Acid Playa Lake as a Mars Analog: Results from Sediment Lipid Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, H.; Baldridge, A. M.; Stern, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The ephemeral saline acidic lakes on the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia have been suggested as geochemical analogues to martian terrains. Both are characterized by interbedded phyllosilicates and hydrated sulfates. On Mars, these areas indicate shifting environmental conditions, from the neutral/alkaline and wet conditions that dominated during the Noachian era to the more familiar dry, acidic conditions that began in the Hesperian. The habitability of such a dynamic environment can be informed by investigation of the Yilgarn Lake system. Previous work has found phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) evidence of microbial communities in sections of sediment cores taken from Lake Gilmore. These communities include both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, Actinomycetes, and even methanotrophs. Given recurring detection of methane on the martian surface, evidence of a methane cycling community in an analogous environment is of particular interest. In this study we analyze the carbon isotope composition of bulk organic material as well as extracted lipids from the Lake Gilmore sediment cores at both a near-shore and mid-lake location. These analyses reveal very low accumulations of organic carbon, concentrated primarily in the gypsum-rich near-shore core. The near-shore sediments show a down-core decrease in abundance of organic carbon as well as depletion in the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) with depth. Bulk carbon did not exhibit the unique, highly depleted, diagnostic signature associated with methanotrophic biomass. Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of carbon in extracted methanotroph PFLAs can confirm the presence of a methane cycling metabolism at depth. Also, additional extractions have isolated lipids associated with lake-edge grasses. These analyses consider both the chain-length distribution and carbon CSIA of these lipids in order to understand the effect of terrestrial detritus on any preserved methanotroph carbon signal, given the very low

  19. Principal component analysis of phenolic acid spectra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic acids are common plant metabolites that exhibit bioactive properties and have applications in functional food and animal feed formulations. The ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectra of four closely related phenolic acid structures were evaluated by principal component analysis (PCA) to...

  20. Amino acid isotopic analysis in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new approach to stable isotopic analysis—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine). CSIA has recently been used to generate trophic position estimates among anima...

  1. Boric Acid in Kjeldahl Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    The use of boric acid in the Kjeldahl determination of nitrogen is a variant of the original method widely applied in many laboratories all over the world. Its use is recommended by control organizations such as ISO, IDF, and EPA because it yields reliable and accurate results. However, the chemical principles the method is based on are not…

  2. The use of isotopic and lipid analysis techniques linking toluene degradation to specific microorganisms: applications and limitations.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiasong; Lovanh, Nanh; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2004-05-01

    Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis combined with (13)C-labeled tracers has been used recently as an environmental forensics tool to demonstrate microbial degradation of pollutants. This study investigated the effectiveness and limitations of this approach, applied to the biodegradation of toluene by five reference strains that express different aerobic toluene degradation pathways: Pseudomonas putida mt-2, P. putida F1, Burkholderia cepacia G4, B. pickettii PKO1, and P. mendocina KR1. The five strains were grown on mineral salts base medium amended with either 10 mM natural or [(13)C-ring]-labeled toluene. PLFA analysis showed that all five strains incorporated the toluene carbon into membrane fatty acids, as demonstrated by increases in the mass of fatty acids and their mass-spectrometry fragments for cells grown on (13)C-labeled toluene. Because of its ubiquitous presence and high abundance in bacteria, C16:0 fatty acid might be a useful biomarker for tracking contaminant degradation and (13)C flow. On the other hand, the (13)C-label (which was supplied at relatively high concentrations) generally exerted an inhibitory effect on fatty acid biosynthesis. Differences in fatty acid concentrations between cells grown on natural versus (13)C-labeled toluene would affect the interpretation of lipid profiles for microbial community analysis as indicated by principal component analysis of fatty acids. Therefore, caution should be exercised in linking lipid data with microbial population shifts in biodegradation experiments with (13)C-labeled tracers.

  3. Analysis of amino acid constituents of gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Lian-Lian; Xiao, Yu-Xia; Ni, Jing-Hua; Yu, Yan

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To seek drugs that will efficaciously dissolve bilirubin, glycoprotein and black stones and that will represent improved lithotriptic agents to resolve cholesterol stones, and to study the amino acid constituents of gallstones. METHODS: According to characteristics determined by infrared spectroscopy and to the contents of bilirubin determined by semi-quantitative chemical analysis, 30 of 148 cases of gallstones were selected and divided into 5 groups. Amino acids of the 30 cases were detected by high-speed chromatography. RESULTS: The quantity of amino acids was highest in black stones (226.9 mg/g) and lowest in pure cholesterol stones (1.4 mg/g). In the 5 groups of gallstones, the quantity of amino acids followed the hierarchy of black stone > mixed bilirubin stone and glucoprotein stone > mixed cholesterol stone > pure cholesterol stone. The proportions were: 95.95:29.02 and 28.05:5.78:1. Aliphatic amino acids accounted for approximately 50% of the total amino acids in the gallstones, with glycine accounting for 15.3% of the total amount of the 17 kinds of amino acids. CONCLUSION: For mixed stones, the higher level of bilirubin, the higher content of amino acids. Acidic amino acids were relatively higher in bilirubin stones than in cholesterol stones. PMID:27053886

  4. Analysis of Chiral Carboxylic Acids in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Hein, J. E.; Aponte, J. C.; Parker, E. T.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    our efforts to develop highly sensitive LC-MS methods for the analysis of chiral carboxylic acids including hydroxy acids.

  5. Short-term monitoring of aridland lichen cover and biomass using photography and fatty acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Johnson, N.C.; Belnap, J.; Koch, G.W.

    2008-01-01

    Biological soil crust (BSC) communities (composed of lichens, bryophytes, and cyanobacteria) may be more dynamic on short-time scales than previously thought, requiring new and informative short-term monitoring techniques. We used repeat digital photography and image analysis, which revealed a change in area of a dominant BSC lichen, Collema tenax. The data generated correlated well with gross photosynthesis (r=0.57) and carotenoid content (r=0.53), two variables that would be expected to be positively related to lichen area. We also extracted fatty acids from lichen samples and identified useful phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) indicators for the Collema mycobiont (20:1, 15:0, 23:0), and the Collema photobiont (18:3??3). The 18:3??3 correlated well with chlorophyll a (r=0.66), a more traditional proxy for cyanobacterial biomass. We also compared total PLFA as a proxy for total Collema biomass with our photographically generated areal change data, and found them to be moderately correlated (r=0.44). Areal change proved to be responsive on short-time scales, while fatty acid techniques were information-rich, providing data on biomass of lichens, and both photo- and mycobionts separately, in addition to the physiological status of the mycobiont. Both techniques should be refined and tested in field situations. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Vibrational analysis of α-cyanohydroxycinnamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojica, Elmer-Rico E.; Vedad, Jayson; Desamero, Ruel Z. B.

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, a comparative Raman vibrational analysis of alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (4CHCA) and its derivative, alpha-cyano-3-hydroxycinnamic acid (3CHCA), was performed. The Raman spectra of the 4CHCA and 3CHCA in solid form were obtained and analyzed to determine differences between the two structurally similar derivatives. For comparison, the CHCA derivatives cyanocinnamic acid (CCA) and coumaric acid (CA) were also studied. The plausible vibrational assignments were made and matched with those obtained theoretically using density functional theory (DFT) based method employing a 6-31 g basis set. The computational wavenumbers obtained were in good agreement with the observed experimental results. This was the first reported Raman study of CCA, 3CHCA and 4CHCA.

  7. Effect of low temperature on highly unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    He, Su; Ding, Li-Li; Xu, Ke; Geng, Jin-Ju; Ren, Hong-Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Low temperature is a limiting factor for the microbial activity of activated sludge for sewage treatment plant in winter. Highly unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) constituents and microbial structure in activated sludge at low temperature were investigated. Over 12 gigabases of metagenomic sequence data were generated with the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. The result showed 43.11% of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) in the activated sludge participated in UFA biosynthesis, and γ-Linolenic could be converted to Arachidonic acid at low temperature. The highly UFA biosynthesis in activated sludge was n-6 highly UFA biosynthesis, rather than n-3 highly UFA biosynthesis. The microbial community structures of activated sludge were analyzed by PLFA and high-throughput sequencing (HiSeq) simultaneously. Acidovorax, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Polaromonas occupied higher percentage at 5°C, and genetic changes of highly UFA biosynthesis derived from microbial community structures change.

  8. Analysis of Peptides and Conjugates by Amino Acid Analysis.

    PubMed

    Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is a highly accurate method for characterization of the composition of synthetic peptides. Together with mass spectrometry, it gives a reliable control of peptide quality and quantity before conjugation and immunization. Peptides are hydrolyzed, preferably in gas phase, with 6 M HCl at 110 °C for 20-24 h and the resulting amino acids analyzed by ion-exchange chromatography with post-column ninhydrin derivatization. Depending on the hydrolysis conditions, tryptophan is destroyed, and cysteine also, unless derivatized, and the amides, glutamine and asparagine, are deamidated to glutamic acid and aspartic acid, respectively. Three different ways of calculating results are suggested, and taking the above limitations into account, a quantitation better than 5% can usually be obtained. PMID:26424264

  9. Applications of cellular fatty acid analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, D F

    1991-01-01

    More than ever, new technology is having an impact on the tools of clinical microbiologists. The analysis of cellular fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) has become markedly more practical with the advent of the fused-silica capillary column, computer-controlled chromatography and data analysis, simplified sample preparation, and a commercially available GLC system dedicated to microbiological applications. Experience with applications in diagnostic microbiology ranges from substantial success in work with mycobacteria, legionellae, and nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli to minimal involvement with fungi and other nonbacterial agents. GLC is a good alternative to other means for the identification of mycobacteria or legionellae because it is rapid, specific, and independent of other specialized testing, e.g., DNA hybridization. Nonfermenters show features in their cellular fatty acid content that are useful in identifying species and, in some cases, subspecies. Less frequently encountered nonfermenters, including those belonging to unclassified groups, can ideally be characterized by GLC. Information is just beginning to materialize on the usefulness of cellular fatty acids for the identification of gram-positive bacteria and anaerobes, despite the traditional role of GLC in detecting metabolic products as an aid to identification of anaerobes. When species identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci is called for, GLC may offer an alternative to biochemical testing. Methods for direct analysis of clinical material have been developed, but in practical and economic terms they are not yet ready for use in the clinical laboratory. Direct analysis holds promise for detecting markers of infection due to an uncultivable agent or in clinical specimens that presently require cultures and prolonged incubation to yield an etiologic agent. PMID:1747860

  10. Nucleic Acid Aptamers for Living Cell Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiangling; Lv, Yifan; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-01

    Cells as the building blocks of life determine the basic functions and properties of a living organism. Understanding the structure and components of a cell aids in the elucidation of its biological functions. Moreover, knowledge of the similarities and differences between diseased and healthy cells is essential to understanding pathological mechanisms, identifying diagnostic markers, and designing therapeutic molecules. However, monitoring the structures and activities of a living cell remains a challenging task in bioanalytical and life science research. To meet the requirements of this task, aptamers, as “chemical antibodies,” have become increasingly powerful tools for cellular analysis. This article reviews recent advances in the development of nucleic acid aptamers in the areas of cell membrane analysis, cell detection and isolation, real-time monitoring of cell secretion, and intracellular delivery and analysis with living cell models. Limitations of aptamers and possible solutions are also discussed.

  11. Recent advances in microchip electrophoresis for amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Ou, Gaozhi; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Xin; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2013-10-01

    With the maturation of microfluidic technologies, microchip electrophoresis has been widely employed for amino acid analysis owing to its advantages of low sample consumption, reduced analysis time, high throughput, and potential for integration and automation. In this article, we review the recent progress in amino acid analysis using microchip electrophoresis during the period from 2007 to 2012. Innovations in microchip materials, surface modification, sample introduction, microchip electrophoresis, and detection methods are documented, as well as nascent applications of amino acid analysis in single-cell analysis, microdialysis sampling, food analysis, and extraterrestrial exploration. Without doubt, more applications of microchip electrophoresis in amino acid analysis may be expected soon.

  12. Recent advances in microchip electrophoresis for amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Ou, Gaozhi; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Xin; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2013-10-01

    With the maturation of microfluidic technologies, microchip electrophoresis has been widely employed for amino acid analysis owing to its advantages of low sample consumption, reduced analysis time, high throughput, and potential for integration and automation. In this article, we review the recent progress in amino acid analysis using microchip electrophoresis during the period from 2007 to 2012. Innovations in microchip materials, surface modification, sample introduction, microchip electrophoresis, and detection methods are documented, as well as nascent applications of amino acid analysis in single-cell analysis, microdialysis sampling, food analysis, and extraterrestrial exploration. Without doubt, more applications of microchip electrophoresis in amino acid analysis may be expected soon. PMID:23436170

  13. Monitoring Subsurface Microbial Biomass, Community Composition and Physiological Status during Biological Uranium Reduction with Acetate Addition using Lipid Analysis, DNA Arrays and q-PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, A. D.; Long, P. E.; N'Guessan, L.; Williams, K. H.; Chandler, D.

    2011-12-01

    Our objectives for this effort were to investigate microbial community dynamics during each of the distinct terminal electron accepting phases that occur during long-term acetate addition for the immobilization of Uranium. Groundwater was collected from four wells (one up gradient and three down gradient) at three different depths and at four different times (pre-acetate injection, peak iron reduction, iron/sulfate reduction transition and during heavy sulfate reduction). Phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) results from ground water showed that microbial biomass was highest during Iron reduction and then lower during the transition from Iron reduction to Sulfate reduction and lowest during Sulfate reduction. Microbial community composition parameters as measured by PLFA showed distinct differences with terminal electron accepting status. Monounsaturated PLFA that have been shown to correspond with Gram-negative bacteria and Geobacteracea increased markedly with Iron reduction and then decreased with the onset of sulfate reduction. Bacterial physiological stress levels as measured by PLFA fluctuated with terminal electron acceptor status. Low bacterial stress levels coincided with pre-donor addition and Iron reduction but were much higher during Iron to Sulfate transition and during Sulfate reduction. Microarray results showed the expected progression of microbial signatures from Iron to Sulfate -reducers with changes in acetate amendment and in situ field conditions. The microarray response for Geobacter was highly correlated with qPCR for the same target gene (R2 = 0.84). Probes targeting Desulfobacter and Desulfitobacterium were the most reactive during the Iron to Sulfate transition and into Sulfate reduction, with a consistent Desulfotomaculum signature throughout the field experiment and a general decrease in Geobacter signal to noise ratios during the onset of Sulfate reducing conditions. Nitrate reducers represented by Dechloromonas and Dechlorosoma

  14. Functional analysis of abscisic acid 8'-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akira; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Kawakami, Naoto; Nambara, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in the control of seed dormancy and germination. Identification of hormone metabolism genes from a particular plant species of interest is an essential step in hormone research. The function of these gene products is validated by biochemical analysis using heterologous expression systems, such as E. coli and yeast. ABA 8'-hydroxylase is a subfamily of P450 monooxygenases and is encoded by CYP707A genes. CYP707A catalyzes the committed step in the major ABA catabolic pathway. In this chapter, we describe the methods for RNA extraction from seeds, cloning the CYP707A cDNAs, protein expression in yeast, and biochemical analysis of their gene products.

  15. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  16. Analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid in Acetobacter: molecular mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria are used for industrial vinegar production because of their remarkable ability to oxidize ethanol and high resistance to acetic acid. Although several molecular machineries responsible for acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria have been reported, the entire mechanism that confers acetic acid resistance has not been completely understood. One of the promising methods to elucidate the entire mechanism is global analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Recently, two proteins whose production was greatly enhanced by acetic acid in Acetobacter aceti were identified to be aconitase and a putative ABC-transporter, respectively; furthermore, overexpression or disruption of the genes encoding these proteins affected acetic acid resistance in A. aceti, indicating that these proteins are involved in acetic acid resistance. Overexpression of each gene increased acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter, which resulted in an improvement in the productivity of acetic acid fermentation. Taken together, the results of the proteomic analysis and those of previous studies indicate that acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria is conferred by several mechanisms. These findings also provide a clue to breed a strain having high resistance to acetic acid for vinegar fermentation.

  17. Comparison of Rapid Methods for Analysis of Bacterial Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Moss, C. Wayne; Lambert, M. A.; Merwin, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    When rapid gas-liquid chromatography methods for determination of bacterial fatty acids were compared, results showed that saponification was required for total fatty acid analysis. Transesterification with boron-trihalide reagents (BF3-CH3OH, BCl3-CH3OH) caused extensive degradation of cyclopropane acids and was less effective than saponification in releasing cellular hydroxy fatty acids. Digestion of cells with tetramethylammonium hydroxide was unsatisfactory because of extraneous gas-liquid chromatography peaks and because of lower recovery of branched-chain and hydroxy fatty acids. A simple, rapid saponification procedure which can be used for total cellular fatty acid analysis of freshly grown cells is described. PMID:4844271

  18. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF ABSCISIC ACID BIOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    MCCARTY D R

    2012-01-10

    The carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCD) catalyze synthesis of a variety of apo-carotenoid secondary metabolites in plants, animals and bacteria. In plants, the reaction catalyzed by the 11, 12, 9-cis-epoxy carotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) is the first committed and key regulated step in synthesis of the plant hormone, abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is a key regulator of plant stress responses and has critical functions in normal root and seed development. The molecular mechanisms responsible for developmental control of ABA synthesis in plant tissues are poorly understood. Five of the nine CCD genes present in the Arabidopsis genome encode NCED's involved in control of ABA synthesis in the plant. This project is focused on functional analysis of these five AtNCED genes as a key to understanding developmental regulation of ABA synthesis and dissecting the role of ABA in plant development. For this purpose, the project developed a comprehensive set of gene knockouts in the AtNCED genes that facilitate genetic dissection of ABA synthesis. These mutants were used in combination with key molecular tools to address the following specific objectives: (1) the role of ABA synthesis in root development; (2) developmental control of ABA synthesis in seeds; (3) analysis of ATNCED over-expressers; (4) preliminary crystallography of the maize VP14 protein.

  19. An analysis of issues concerning acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    GAO examines the implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain and offers a series of observations on the following issues involved in the debate: to what extent has it been scientifically demonstrated that acid rain is resulting in damage to the environment. What are the causes of acid rain and where is it most prevalent. What alternatives exist for controlling acid rain and what are their economic effects.

  20. Trophic spectra under the lens of amino acid isotopic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in compound specific isotopic ratio analysis (CSIRA) have allowed researchers to measure trophic fractionation of 15N in specific amino acids, namely glutamic acid and phenylalanine. These amino acids have proven useful in food web studies because of the wide and consistent disparity...

  1. Unique odd-chain polyenoic phospholipid fatty acids present in chytrid fungi.

    PubMed

    Akinwole, Philips O; Lefevre, Emilie; Powell, Martha J; Findlay, Robert H

    2014-09-01

    Chytrid fungi are ubiquitous components of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems yet they remain understudied. To investigate the use of phospholipid fatty acids as phenotypic characteristics in taxonomic studies and biomarkers for ecological studies, 18 chytrid fungi isolated from soil to freshwater samples were grown in defined media and their phospholipid fatty acid profile determined. Gas chromatographic/mass spectral analysis indicated the presence of fatty acids typically associated with fungi, such as 16:1(n-7), 16:0, 18:2(n-6), 18:3(n-3) 18:1(n-9), and 18:0, as well as, a number of odd-chain length fatty acids, including two polyunsaturated C-17 fatty acids. Conversion to their 3-pyridylcarbinol ester facilitated GC-MS determination of double-bond positions and these fatty acid were identified as 6,9-17:2 [17:2(n-8)] and 6,9,12-17:3 [17:3(n-5)]. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of polyunsaturated C-17 fatty acids isolated from the phospholipids of chytrid fungi. Cluster analysis of PLFA profiles showed sufficient correlation with chytrid phylogeny to warrant inclusion of lipid analysis in species descriptions and the presence of several phospholipid fatty acids of restricted phylogenetic distributions suggests their usefulness as biomarkers for ecological studies. PMID:25119485

  2. Using quantitative acid-base analysis in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, P; Freebairn, R

    2006-03-01

    The quantitative acid-base 'Strong Ion' calculator is a practical application of quantitative acid-base chemistry, as developed by Peter Stewart and Peter Constable. It quantifies the three independent factors that control acidity, calculates the concentration and charge of unmeasured ions, produces a report based on these calculations and displays a Gamblegram depicting measured ionic species. Used together with the medical history, quantitative acid-base analysis has advantages over traditional approaches.

  3. Analysis of issues concerning acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, C.A.

    1984-12-11

    Although science has largely determined that man-made emissions cause acid rain, there is uncertainty concerning the extent and timing of its anticipated effects. Thus, at the present time scientific information alone does not lead unequivocally to a conclusion on whether it is appropriate to begin control actions now or to await better understanding. Given this uncertainty, decisionmakers must weigh the risks of further, potentially avoidable environmental damage against the risks of economic impacts from acid rain control actions which may ultimately prove to be unwarranted. GAO examines the implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain and offers a series of observations on the following issues involved in the debate: To what extent has it been scientifically demonstrated that acid rain is resulting in damage to the environment. What are the causes of acid rain and where is it most prevalent. What alternatives exist for controlling acid rain and what are their economic effects. 5 figures, 20 tables.

  4. Total dietary fat and fatty acid content modifies plasma phospholipid fatty acids, desaturase activity indices, and urinary prostaglandin E in women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compared to diets high in fat, low fat diets are associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that a low fat (LF; 20% fat) and a low fat high omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid diet (LFn3; 23% fat with 3% as ALA, EPA and DHA) would enhance n-3 composition of PLFA and reduce urinary ...

  5. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm.

  6. Gas chromatographic analysis of total fatty acids in cider.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Gomis, D; Alonso, J J; Cabrales, I M; Abrodo, P A

    2001-03-01

    This paper reports the composition of total fatty acids in an apple beverage, cider. Fatty acids are present in the free or esterified form and contribute to both the flavor and foam properties of cider. Fatty acids were separated and identified as methyl esters by GC-MS, and 12 of these were subsequently determined by GC-FID. The major fatty acids found in cider were caproic, caprylic, capric, and palmitic acid, the saturated acids predominating over the unsaturated ones. The proposed method was applied to 59 ciders from three consecutive harvests (1996, 1997, and 1998), which were made by 19 cider-makers from the region of Asturias (Spain). Linear discriminant analysis of fatty acids in these samples allowed selection of palmitoleic, pentadecanoic, linoleic, myristic, and linolenic acid as the most predictive variables to differentiate ciders made from apples grown in the Asturias region (1997 harvest) and ciders made from apples grown outside this region (1996 and 1998 harvests). PMID:11312846

  7. Extraterrestrial material analysis: loss of amino acids during liquid-phase acid hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Brault, Amaury; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Searching for building blocks of life in extraterrestrial material is a way to learn more about how life could have appeared on Earth. With this aim, liquid-phase acid hydrolysis has been used, since at least 1970 , in order to extract amino acids and other organic molecules from extraterrestrial materials (e.g. meteorites, lunar fines) or Earth analogues (e.g. Atacama desert soil). This procedure involves drastic conditions such as heating samples in 6N HCl for 24 h, either under inert atmosphere/vacuum, or air. Analysis of the hydrolyzed part of the sample should give its total (free plus bound) amino acid content. The present work deals with the influence of the 6N HCl hydrolysis on amino acid degradation. Our experiments have been performed on a standard solution of 17 amino acids. After liquid-phase acid hydrolysis (6N HCl) under argon atmosphere (24 h at 100°C), the liquid phase was evaporated and the dry residue was derivatized with N-Methyl-N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. After comparison with derivatized amino acids from the standard solution, a significant reduction of the chromatographic peak areas was observed for most of the amino acids after liquid-phase acid hydrolysis. Furthermore, the same loss pattern was observed when the amino acids were exposed to cold 6N HCl for a short amount of time. The least affected amino acid, i.e. glycine, was found to be 73,93% percent less abundant compared to the non-hydrolyzed standard, while the most affected, i.e. histidine, was not found in the chromatograms after hydrolysis. Our experiments thereby indicate that liquid-phase acid hydrolysis, even under inert atmosphere, leads to a partial or total loss of all of the 17 amino acids present in the standard solution, and that a quick cold contact with 6N HCl is sufficient to lead to a loss of amino acids. Therefore, in the literature, the reported increase

  8. Effects of poultry manure on soil biochemical properties in phthalic acid esters contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Qin, Xiaojian; Ren, Xuqin; Zhou, Haifeng

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of poultry manure (PM) on soil biological properties in DBP- and DEHP-contaminated soils. An indoor incubation experiment was conducted. Soil microbial biomass C (Cmic), soil enzymatic activities, and microbial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) concentrations were measured during incubation period. The results indicated that except alkaline phosphatase activity, DBP and DEHP had negative effects on Cmic, dehydrogenase, urease, protease activities, and contents of total PLFA. However, 5 % PM treatment alleviated the negative effects of PAEs on the above biochemical parameters. In DBP-contaminated soil, 5 % PM amendment even resulted in dehydroenase activity and Cmic content increasing by 17.8 and 11.8 % on the day 15 of incubation, respectively. During the incubation periods, the total PLFA contents decreased maximumly by 17.2 and 11.6 % in DBP- and DEHP-contaminated soils without PM amendments, respectively. Compared with those in uncontaminated soil, the total PLFA contents increased slightly and the value of bacPLFA/fugalPLFA increased significantly in PAE-contaminated soils with 5 % PM amendment. Nevertheless, in both contaminated soils, the effects of 5 % PM amendment on the biochemical parameters were not observed with 10 % PM amendment. In 10 % PM-amended soils, DBP and DEHP had little effect on Cmic, soil enzymatic activities, and microbial community composition. At the end of incubation, the effects of PAEs on these parameters disappeared, irrespective of PM amendment. The application of PM ameliorated the negative effect of PAEs on soil biological environment. However, further work is needed to study the effect of PM on soil microbial gene expression in order to explain the change mechanisms of soil biological properties.

  9. XPS analysis of humic and fulvic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Desbene, P.L.; Silly, L.; Morizur, J.P.; Delamar, M.

    1986-01-01

    The composition of humic and fulvic acids is examined using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS results are compared to that of elemental analyses. XPS permits an easy detection of the different chemical forms of carbon and sulfur that exist in these complex compounds.

  10. Acid Rain Analysis by Standard Addition Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    The standard addition titration is a precise and rapid method for the determination of the acidity in rain or snow samples. The method requires use of a standard buret, a pH meter, and Gran's plot to determine the equivalence point. Experimental procedures used and typical results obtained are presented. (JN)

  11. Analysis of fatty acid content and composition in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Guido; Evers, Wendy A C; de Vree, Jeroen H; Kleinegris, Dorinde M M; Martens, Dirk E; Wijffels, René H; Lamers, Packo P

    2013-01-01

    A method to determine the content and composition of total fatty acids present in microalgae is described. Fatty acids are a major constituent of microalgal biomass. These fatty acids can be present in different acyl-lipid classes. Especially the fatty acids present in triacylglycerol (TAG) are of commercial interest, because they can be used for production of transportation fuels, bulk chemicals, nutraceuticals (ω-3 fatty acids), and food commodities. To develop commercial applications, reliable analytical methods for quantification of fatty acid content and composition are needed. Microalgae are single cells surrounded by a rigid cell wall. A fatty acid analysis method should provide sufficient cell disruption to liberate all acyl lipids and the extraction procedure used should be able to extract all acyl lipid classes. With the method presented here all fatty acids present in microalgae can be accurately and reproducibly identified and quantified using small amounts of sample (5 mg) independent of their chain length, degree of unsaturation, or the lipid class they are part of. This method does not provide information about the relative abundance of different lipid classes, but can be extended to separate lipid classes from each other. The method is based on a sequence of mechanical cell disruption, solvent based lipid extraction, transesterification of fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), and quantification and identification of FAMEs using gas chromatography (GC-FID). A TAG internal standard (tripentadecanoin) is added prior to the analytical procedure to correct for losses during extraction and incomplete transesterification. PMID:24121679

  12. Analysis of single nucleic acid molecules with protein nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Maglia, Giovanni; Heron, Andrew J.; Stoddart, David; Japrung, Deanpen; Bayley, Hagan

    2011-01-01

    We describe the methods used in our laboratory for the analysis of single nucleic acid molecules with protein nanopores. The technical section is preceded by a review of the variety of experiments that can be done with protein nanopores. The end goal of much of this work is single-molecule DNA sequencing, although sequencing is not discussed explicitly here. The technical section covers the equipment required for nucleic acid analysis, the preparation and storage of the necessary materials, and aspects of signal processing and data analysis. PMID:20627172

  13. Profiling of soil fatty acids using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Annie Xu; Chin, Sung-Tong; Patti, Antonio; Marriott, Philip J

    2013-11-22

    Profiling of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) represents a challenging goal for distinguishing the diversity of microbial communities and biomass in the complex and heterogeneous soil ecosystem. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) coupled with simultaneous flame ionisation and mass spectrometry detection was applied as a culture-independent method for PLFA profiling of microbial classification in forest soil. A number of column sets were evaluated for the GC×GC separation of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). Due to better isomeric separation and compound patterns on the 2D contour plot, an apolar-polar column combination was selected for soil microbial PLFA characterisation. A comprehensive view of PLFA composition with carbon chain length varying from 12 to 20 was observed in forest soil samples, with the commonly reported bacterial FAME of iso-/anteiso-, methyl-branched-, cyclopropyl-, and hydroxyl-substituted FA identified by their mass spectral and retention time according to authentic standards. Notably, some uncommon oxygenated FAME were found in high abundance and were further characterised by GC×GC coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry. This tentatively revealed geometric pairs of methyl 9,10-epoxyoctadecanoate isomers.

  14. Analysis of Free Amino Acid Pools in Fungal Mycelia

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, J. G.; Davies, D. M.; Haworth, C.

    1972-01-01

    Free amino acid pools derived from three different types of fungal mycelia have been analyzed by the method of Heathcote and Haworth by using thinlayer chromatography. The preliminary extraction was carried out with boiling water and interfering proteins; peptides and salts were first removed by means of an ion-retardation resin. As far as determined, the results obtained represent the first quantitative analysis of fungal amino acid pools. PMID:4622829

  15. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm. PMID:26748867

  16. Typing of Histoplasma capsulatum strains by fatty acid profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarnowski, Robert; Miyazaki, Makoto; Dobrzyn, Agnieszka; Ntambi, James M; Woods, Jon P

    2007-06-01

    The performance of fatty acid profiling for strain differentiation of Histoplasma capsulatum was assessed. Total fatty acids were isolated from the yeast-phase cells of seven stock and two previously unreported clinical strains of H. capsulatum var. capsulatum, as well as from one unreported clinical strain and one stock strain of H. capsulatum var. duboisii, and one strain of each of three other dimorphic zoopathogenic fungal species, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii. Different colony morphology and pigmentation types of the H. capsulatum strains were also included. The most frequently occurring fatty acids were oleic, palmitic, stearic and linoleic acids. There were variations in the relative percentage fatty acid contents of H. capsulatum strains that could be used for strain identification and discrimination. Differentiation between H. capsulatum strains was achieved by the comparison of detected fatty acids accompanied by principal component analysis using calculated Varimax-rotated principal component loadings. Statistical analysis yielded three major principal components that explained over 94 % of total variance in the data. All the strains of H. capsulatum var. capsulatum RFLP classes II and III were grouped into two distinct clusters: the heterogenic RFLP class I formed a large, but also well-defined group, whereas the outgroup strains of H. capsulatum var. duboisii, B. dermatitidis, P. brasiliensis and S. schenckii were shifted away. These data suggest that fatty acid profiling can be used in H. capsulatum strain classification and epidemiological studies that require strain differentiation at the intraspecies level. PMID:17510264

  17. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  18. Digital PCR analysis of circulating nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Hudecova, Irena

    2015-10-01

    Detection of plasma circulating nucleic acids (CNAs) requires the use of extremely sensitive and precise methods. The commonly used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) poses certain technical limitations in relation to the precise measurement of CNAs whereas the costs of massively parallel sequencing are still relatively high. Digital PCR (dPCR) now represents an affordable and powerful single molecule counting strategy to detect minute amounts of genetic material with performance surpassing many quantitative methods. Microfluidic (chip) and emulsion (droplet)-based technologies have already been integrated into platforms offering hundreds to millions of nanoliter- or even picoliter-scale reaction partitions. The compelling observations reported in the field of cancer research, prenatal testing, transplantation medicine and virology support translation of this technology into routine use. Extremely sensitive plasma detection of rare mutations originating from tumor or placental cells among a large background of homologous sequences facilitates unraveling of the early stages of cancer or the detection of fetal mutations. Digital measurement of quantitative changes in plasma CNAs associated with cancer or graft rejection provides valuable information on the monitoring of disease burden or the recipient's immune response and subsequent therapy treatment. Furthermore, careful quantitative assessment of the viral load offers great value for effective monitoring of antiviral therapy for immunosuppressed or transplant patients. The present review describes the inherent features of dPCR that make it exceptionally robust in precise and sensitive quantification of CNAs. Moreover, I provide an insight into the types of potential clinical applications that have been developed by researchers to date. PMID:25828047

  19. Analysis of the generating action of the acid from PAG using acid sensitive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko; Konishi, Hiroko; Moriyasu, Kengo; Morimoto, Yukihiro

    2011-04-01

    The use of acid sensitive dyes to determine the quantity of acid generated from PAG and in the analysis of acid-generating reaction is currently being studied. The method would allow an easy understanding of the PAG acid-generating reaction simply by adding an acid sensitive dye to the resist. In the conventional method, a resist containing a chromogenic substance is applied to a quartz substrate, which is then exposed. Following the exposure, the absorbance of chromogenic component near 530 nm is measured and evaluated with a spectroscope. The rate constant for acid generation (Dill's C parameter) during the exposure is determined based on the relationship between transmittance at 530 nm and the exposure dose. However, the chromogenic substance used in this method degrades over time (fading reaction) after the exposure, resulting in variations in transmittance measurements due to the effects of time between the completion of the exposure and the measurement of transmittance. We devised a prototype instrument capable of in situ measurements of absorbance at 530 nm while irradiating a 193-nm light beam. Using this instrument, we obtained rate constants for acid generation (Dill's C parameter) and examined the differing results obtained with ArF resist polymers of differing PAG concentrations and structures as well as dependence on the quantity of the chromogenic substance.

  20. Effect of environmental conditions on the fatty acid fingerprint of microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, Mikhail; Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Lipid biomarkers, especially phospholipids, are routinely used to characterize microbial community structure in environmental samples. Interpretations of these fingerprints mainly depend on rare results of pure cultures which were cultivated under standardized batch conditions. However, membrane lipids (e.g. phopholipid biomarker) build up the interface between microorganisms and their environment and consequently are prone to be adapted according to the environmental conditions. We cultivated several bacteria, isolated from soil (gram-positive and gram-negative) under various conditions e.g. C supply and temperature regimes. Effect of growth conditions on phospholipids fatty acid (PLFA) as well as neutral lipid fatty acids (NLFA) and glycolipid fatty acids (GLFA) was investigated by conventional method of extraction and derivatization, followed by assessments with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, phospholipids were measured as intact molecules by ultra high performance liquid chromatography - quadrupole - time of flight mass spectrometer (UHPLC-Q-ToF) to further assess the composition of headgroups with fatty acids residues and their response on changing environmental conditions. PLFA fingerprints revealed a strong effect of growth stage, C supply and temperature e.g. decrease of temperature increased the amount of branched and/or unsaturated fatty acids to maintain the membrane fluidity. This strongly changes the ratio of specific to unspecific fatty acids depending on environmental conditions. Therefore, amounts of specific fatty acids cannot be used to assess biomass of a functional microbial group in soil. Intracellular neutral lipids depended less on environmental conditions reflecting a more stable biomarker group but also showed less specific fatty acids then PLFA. Therefore, combination of several lipid classes is suggested as more powerful tool to assess amounts and functionality of environmental microbial communities. Further

  1. Acid rain: Some preliminary results from global data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequeira, R.

    1981-02-01

    Preliminary results of an analysis of global precipitation data from WMO (World Meteorological Organization) stations suggest that even remote maritime baseline stations, far removed from major continents, could become predisposed to acid rain if there is a deficiency of non-marine calcium relative to non-marine sulfate. The regional stations show greater complexity than the baseline stations in their precipitation chemistry. The overall results of this analysis suggest that not all non-marine sulfate and nitrate in precipitation could be present as acid.

  2. Bile acids: analysis in biological fluids and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, William J.; Sjövall, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The formation of bile acids/bile alcohols is of major importance for the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. Besides their functions in lipid absorption, bile acids/bile alcohols are regulatory molecules for a number of metabolic processes. Their effects are structure-dependent, and numerous metabolic conversions result in a complex mixture of biologically active and inactive forms. Advanced methods are required to characterize and quantify individual bile acids in these mixtures. A combination of such analyses with analyses of the proteome will be required for a better understanding of mechanisms of action and nature of endogenous ligands. Mass spectrometry is the basic detection technique for effluents from chromatographic columns. Capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization provides the highest sensitivity in metabolome analysis. Classical gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is less sensitive but offers extensive structure-dependent fragmentation increasing the specificity in analyses of isobaric isomers of unconjugated bile acids. Depending on the nature of the bile acid/bile alcohol mixture and the range of concentration of individuals, different sample preparation sequences, from simple extractions to group separations and derivatizations, are applicable. We review the methods currently available for the analysis of bile acids in biological fluids and tissues, with emphasis on the combination of liquid and gas phase chromatography with mass spectrometry. PMID:20008121

  3. Computerized image analysis for acetic acid induced intraepithelial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Ferris, Daron G.; Lieberman, Rich W.

    2008-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) exhibits certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Immature and dysphasic cervical squamous epithelium turns white after application of acetic acid during the exam. The whitening process occurs visually over several minutes and subjectively discriminates between dysphasic and normal tissue. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician analyzing the acetic acid induced lesions (acetowhite region) in a fully automatic way. This paper reports a study designed to measure multiple parameters of the acetowhitening process from two images captured with a digital colposcope. One image is captured before the acetic acid application, and the other is captured after the acetic acid application. The spatial change of the acetowhitening is extracted using color and texture information in the post acetic acid image; the temporal change is extracted from the intensity and color changes between the post acetic acid and pre acetic acid images with an automatic alignment. The imaging and data analysis system has been evaluated with a total of 99 human subjects and demonstrate its potential to screening underserved women where access to skilled colposcopists is limited.

  4. Detection of COL III in parchment by amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Dorte V P; Larsen, René

    2016-01-01

    Cultural heritage parchments made from the reticular dermis of animals have been subject to studies of deterioration and conservation by amino acid analysis. The reticular dermis contains a varying mixture of collagen I and III (COL I and III). When dealing with the results of the amino acid analyses, till now the COL III content has not been taken into account. Based on the available amino acid sequences, we present a method for determining the amount of COL III in the reticular dermis of new and historical parchments calculated from the ratio of Ile/Val. We find COL III contents between 7 and 32 % in new parchments and between 0.2 and 40 % in the historical parchments. This is consistent with results in the literature. The varying content of COL III has a significant influence on the uncertainty of the amino acid analysis. Although we have not found a simple correlation between the COL III content and the degree of deterioration, our results show that this question must be taken into consideration in future studies of the chemical and physical deterioration of parchment measured by amino acid analysis and other analytical methods.

  5. Quality Analysis of Chlorogenic Acid and Hyperoside in Crataegi fructus

    PubMed Central

    Weon, Jin Bae; Jung, Youn Sik; Ma, Choong Je

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crataegi fructus is a herbal medicine for strong stomach, sterilization, and alcohol detoxification. Chlorogenic acid and hyperoside are the major compounds in Crataegi fructus. Objective: In this study, we established novel high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-diode array detection analysis method of chlorogenic acid and hyperoside for quality control of Crataegi fructus. Materials and Methods: HPLC analysis was achieved on a reverse-phase C18 column (5 μm, 4.6 mm × 250 mm) using water and acetonitrile as mobile phase with gradient system. The method was validated for linearity, precision, and accuracy. About 31 batches of Crataegi fructus samples collected from Korea and China were analyzed by using HPLC fingerprint of developed HPLC method. Then, the contents of chlorogenic acid and hyperoside were compared for quality evaluation of Crataegi fructus. Results: The results have shown that the average contents (w/w %) of chlorogenic acid and hyperoside in Crataegi fructus collected from Korea were 0.0438% and 0.0416%, respectively, and the average contents (w/w %) of 0.0399% and 0.0325%, respectively. Conclusion: In conclusion, established HPLC analysis method was stable and could provide efficient quality evaluation for monitoring of commercial Crataegi fructus. SUMMARY Quantitative analysis method of chlorogenic acid and hyperoside in Crataegi fructus is developed by high.performance liquid chromatography.(HPLC).diode array detectionEstablished HPLC analysis method is validated with linearity, precision, and accuracyThe developed method was successfully applied for quantitative analysis of Crataegi fructus sample collected from Korea and China. Abbreviations used: HPLC: High-performance liquid chromatography, GC: Gas chromatography, MS: Mass spectrometer, LOD: Limits of detection, LOQ: Limits of quantification, RSD: Relative standard deviation, RRT: Relative retention time, RPA: Relation peak area. PMID:27076744

  6. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE TESTICULAR TOXICITY OF HALOACETIC ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic analysis of the testicular toxicity of haloacetic acids

    David J. Dix and John C. Rockett
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, R...

  7. Acid rain research: a review and analysis of methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    The acidic deposition phenomena, when implicated as a factor potentially responsible for crop and forest yield losses and destruction of aquatic life, has gained increasing attention. The widespread fear that acid rain is having or may have devastating effects has prompted international debates and legislative proposals. An analysis of research on the effects of acid rain, however, reveals serious questions concerning the applicability and validity of conclusions of much of the work and thus conclusive estimations of impacts are lacking. In order to establish cause-effect relationships between rain acidity and the response of a receptor, controlled studies are necessary to verify observations in the field since there are many natural processes that produce and consume acidity and because numerous other environmental variables affect ecosystem response. Only when the response of an entire system is understood (i.e., interactions between plant, soil, soil microbes, and groundwater) can economic impacts be assessed and tolerance thresholds established for the wet deposition of acids. 14 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  8. Determining important regulatory relations of amino acids from dynamic network analysis of plasma amino acids.

    PubMed

    Shikata, Nahoko; Maki, Yukihiro; Nakatsui, Masahiko; Mori, Masato; Noguchi, Yasushi; Yoshida, Shintaro; Takahashi, Michio; Kondo, Nobuo; Okamoto, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    The changes in the concentrations of plasma amino acids do not always follow the flow-based metabolic pathway network. We have previously shown that there is a control-based network structure among plasma amino acids besides the metabolic pathway map. Based on this network structure, in this study, we performed dynamic analysis using time-course data of the plasma samples of rats fed single essential amino acid deficient diet. Using S-system model (conceptual mathematical model represented by power-law formalism), we inferred the dynamic network structure which reproduces the actual time-courses within the error allowance of 13.17%. By performing sensitivity analysis, three of the most dominant relations in this network were selected; the control paths from leucine to valine, from methionine to threonine, and from leucine to isoleucine. This result is in good agreement with the biological knowledge regarding branched-chain amino acids, and suggests the biological importance of the effect from methionine to threonine.

  9. Evolution of amino acid metabolism inferred through cladistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunchillos, Chomin; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2003-11-28

    Because free amino acids were most probably available in primitive abiotic environments, their metabolism is likely to have provided some of the very first metabolic pathways of life. What were the first enzymatic reactions to emerge? A cladistic analysis of metabolic pathways of the 16 aliphatic amino acids and 2 portions of the Krebs cycle was performed using four criteria of homology. The analysis is not based on sequence comparisons but, rather, on coding similarities in enzyme properties. The properties used are shared specific enzymatic activity, shared enzymatic function without substrate specificity, shared coenzymes, and shared functional family. The tree shows that the earliest pathways to emerge are not portions of the Krebs cycle but metabolisms of aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine. The views of Horowitz (Horowitz, N. H. (1945) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 31, 153-157) and Cordón (Cordón, F. (1990) Tratado Evolucionista de Biologia, Aguilar, Madrid, Spain), according to which the upstream reactions in the catabolic pathways and the downstream reactions in the anabolic pathways are the earliest in evolution, are globally corroborated; however, with some exceptions. These are due to later opportunistic connections of pathways (actually already suggested by these authors). Earliest enzymatic functions are mostly catabolic; they were deaminations, transaminations, and decarboxylations. From the consensus tree we extracted four time spans for amino acid metabolism development. For some amino acids catabolism and biosynthesis occurred at the same time (Asp, Glu, Lys, Leu, Ala, Val, Ile, Pro, Arg). For others ultimate reactions that use amino acids as a substrate or as a product are distinct in time, with catabolism preceding anabolism for Asn, Gln, and Cys and anabolism preceding catabolism for Ser, Met, and Thr. Cladistic analysis of the structure of biochemical pathways makes hypotheses in biochemical evolution explicit and parsimonious.

  10. Mathematical Modeling and Sensitivity Analysis of Acid Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seog-Yeon

    Atmospheric processes influencing acid deposition are investigated by using mathematical model and sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity analysis techniques including Green's function analysis, constraint sensitivities, and lumped sensitivities are applied to temporal problems describing gas and liquid phase chemistry and to space-time problems describing pollutant transport and deposition. The sensitivity analysis techniques are used to; (1) investigate the chemical and physical processes related to acid depositions and (2) evaluate the linearity hypothesis, and source and receptor relationships. Results from analysis of the chemistry processes show that the relationship between SO(,2) concentration and the amount of sulfate produced is linear in gas phase but it may be nonlinear in liquid phase when there exists an excess amount of SO(,2) compared to H(,2)O(,2). Under the simulated conditions, the deviation of linearity between ambient sulfur present and the amount of sulfur deposited after 2 hours, is less than 10% in a convective storm situation when the liquid phase chemistry, gas phases chemistry, and cloud processes are considered simultaneously. Efficient ways of sensitivity analysis of time-space problems are also developed and used to evaluate the source and receptor relationships in an Eulerian transport, chemistry, removal model.

  11. Recent advances in amino acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Poinsot, Véréna; Carpéné, Marie-Anne; Bouajila, Jalloul; Gavard, Pierre; Feurer, Bernard; Couderc, François

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the most important articles that have been published on amino acid analysis using CE during the period from June 2009 to May 2011 and follows the format of the previous articles of Smith (Electrophoresis 1999, 20, 3078-3083), Prata et al. (Electrophoresis 2001, 22, 4129-4138) and Poinsot et al. (Electrophoresis 2003, 24, 4047-4062; Electrophoresis 2006, 27, 176-194; Electrophoresis 2008, 29, 207-223; Electrophoresis 2010, 31, 105-121). We present new developments in amino acid analysis with CE, which are reported describing the use of lasers or light emitting diodes for fluorescence detection, conductimetry electrochemiluminescence detectors, mass spectrometry applications, and lab-on-a-chip applications using CE. In addition, we describe articles concerning clinical studies and neurochemical applications of these techniques.

  12. Proximate composition, fatty acid analysis and protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score of three Mediterranean cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Zlatanos, Spiros; Laskaridis, Kostas; Feist, Christian; Sagredos, Angelos

    2006-10-01

    Proximate composition, fatty acid analysis and protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) in three commercially important cephalopods of the Mediterranean sea (cuttlefish, octopus and squid) were determined. The results of the proximate analysis showed that these species had very high protein:fat ratios similar to lean beef. Docosahexaenoic, palmitic and eicosipentaenoic acid were the most abundant fatty acids among analyzed species. The amount of n-3 fatty acids was higher than that of saturated, monounsaturated and n-6 fatty acids. Despite the fact that cephalopods contain small amounts of fat they were found quite rich in n-3 fatty acids. Finally, PDCAAS indicated that these organisms had a very good protein quality.

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of acetic acid steam reforming for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, Saioa; Ehrich, Heike; Arias, Pedro L.; Kockmann, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen generation by acetic acid steam reforming has been carried out with respect to applications in solid oxide fuel cells. The effect of operating parameters on equilibrium composition has been examined focusing especially on hydrogen and carbon monoxide production, which are the fuels in this type of fuel cell. The temperature, steam to acetic acid ratio, and to a lesser extent pressure affect significantly the equilibrium product distribution due to their influence on steam reforming, thermal decomposition and water-gas shift reaction. The study shows that steam reforming of acetic acid with a steam to acetic acid ratio of 2 to 1 is thermodynamically feasible with hydrogen, carbon monoxide and water as the main products at the equilibrium at temperatures higher than 700 °C, and achieving CO/CO2 ratios higher than 1. Thus, it can be concluded that within the operation temperature range of solid oxide fuel cells - between 700 °C and 1000 °C - the production of a gas rich in hydrogen and carbon monoxide is promoted.

  14. Fluoroalkyl chloroformates in treating amino acids for gas chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Husek, Petr; Simek, Petr; Hartvich, Petr; Zahradnícková, Helena

    2008-04-01

    Novel fluoroalkyl chloroformates with three and four carbon atoms were investigated for the immediate conversion of amino acids into hydrophobic derivatives in water-containing media. Derivatization conditions were extensively studied and optimized sample preparation protocols elaborated. More than 30 amino acids were treated with the particular reagent in isooctane by simply vortexing the reactive organic phase with a slightly basified aqueous medium containing pyridine or 3-picoline as a catalyst. Outstanding separation of nearly all components on 5% phenylmethylsilicone phase in gas chromatographic (GC) analysis with mass spectrometric (MS) or flame ionization detection (FID) required <10 min. Quantitation characteristics involving linearity in the range of 0.1-100 nmol, regression coefficients of 0.999-0.953 (histidine), MS limit of detection (LOD) reaching 0.03 pmol at proline to nearly 20 pmol at glutamic acid, plus electron impact (EI) spectra and diagnostic SIM fragment ions of the derivatives are reported. The novel method is simple, robust and rapid, enabling to treat amino acids in aqueous environment and to analyze them in <15 min. PMID:18242622

  15. Changes in ester-linked phospholipid fatty acid profiles of subsurface bacteria during starvation and desiccation in a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, T.L.; Ringelberg, D.B.; White, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Ester-linked phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles of a Pseudomonas aureofaciens strain and an Arthrobacter protophormiae strain, each isolated from a subsurface sediment, were quantified in a starvation experiment in a silica sand porous medium under moist and dry conditions. Washed cells were added to sand microcosms and maintained under saturated conditions or subjected to desiccation by slow drying over a period of 16 days. In a third treatment, cells were added to saturated microcosms along with organic nutrients and maintained under saturated conditions. The numbers of culturable cells of both bacterial strains declined to below detection level within 16 days in both the moist and dried nutrient-deprived conditions, while direct counts and total PLFAs remained relatively constant. Both strains of bacteria maintained culturability in the nutrient-amended microcosms. The dried P. aureofaciens cells showed increased ratios of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids, increased ratios of trans- to cis-monoenoic fatty acids, and increased ratios of cyclopropyl fatty acids to their monoenoic precursors. P. aureofaciens starved under moist conditions showed few changes in PLFA profiles during the 16-day incubation, whereas cells incubated in the presence of nutrients showed decreases in the ratios of both saturated fatty acids to unsaturated fatty acids and cyclopropyl fatty acids to their monoenoic precursors. The PLFA profiles of A. protophormiae changed very little in response to either nutrient deprivation or desiccation. Diglyceride fatty acids, proposedindicators of dead or lysed cells, remained relatively constant throughout the experiment. The results of this laboratory experiment can be useful for interpreting PLFA profiles of subsurface communities of microorganisms for the purpose of determining their physiological status. 43 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Extraction and analysis of trifluoroacetic Acid in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Wujcik, C E; Cahill, T M; Seiber, J N

    1998-10-01

    Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), a mildly phytotoxic compound, is a stable atmospheric breakdown product of HFC-134a, HCFC-123, and HCFC-124. An extraction and analytical method has been developed for the routine analysis of low ppt levels of TFA in aqueous samples. TFA can be quantitatively recovered from most environmental waters by an extraction procedure using a commercial anion-exchange disk. In saline samples (conductivity >620 μS), where the presence of competing anions interfered with recovery, a liquid-liquid extraction cleanup was necessary. After extraction of TFA from water, the dried disk was placed in a headspace vial containing 10% sulfuric acid in methanol and the vial sealed and then vortexed for 30 s. The sulfuric acid-methanol solution extracts trifluoroacetate anion (TFA) from the anion-exchange matrix and, when heated, quantitatively converts it to the methyl ester, which is then analyzed by automated headspace gas chromatography using electron capture or mass spectrometry detection. Several environmental samples in addition to laboratory spike solutions were successfully extracted and analyzed with this technique. Recoveries averaged 108.2% for reagent water spiked at levels from 53 to 2110 ng/L with relative standard deviations ranging from 0.3 to 8.4%. The instrument's limit of detection for TFA standard was 3.3 ng. The limit of quantitation for the extraction and analytical technique was 36 ng/L. Three water samples can be prepared for automated analysis in 20 min using this technique. PMID:21651243

  17. Influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of acidic, neutral and basic polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Chi; Zhao, Xia; Pu, Jiang-Hua; Luan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Monosaccharide composition analysis is important for structural characterization of polysaccharides. To investigate the influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides, we chose alginate, starch, chitosan and chondroitin sulfate as representative of acidic, neutral, basic and complex polysaccharides to compare the release degree of monosaccharides under different hydrolytic conditions. The hydrolysis stability of 10 monosaccharide standards was also explored. Results showed that the basic sugars were hard to release but stable, the acidic sugars (uronic acids) were easy to release but unstable, and the release and stability of neutral sugars were in between acidic and basic sugars. In addition, the hydrolysis process was applied to monosaccharide composition analysis of Hippocampus trimaculatus polysaccharide and the appropriate hydrolytic condition was accorded with that of the above four polysaccharides. Thus, different hydrolytic conditions should be used for the monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides based on their structural characteristics. PMID:27083372

  18. Structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  19. Structure and function analysis of protein–nucleic acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein–nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  20. Cloning and transcriptional analysis of Crepis alpina fatty acid desaturases affecting the biosynthesis of crepenynic acid.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jeong-Won; Kappock, T Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Crepis alpina acetylenase is a variant FAD2 desaturase that catalyses the insertion of a triple bond at the Delta12 position of linoleic acid, forming crepenynic acid in developing seeds. Seeds contain a high level of crepenynic acid but other tissues contain none. Using reverse transcriptase-coupled PCR (RT-PCR), acetylenase transcripts were identified in non-seed C. alpina tissues, which were highest in flower heads. To understand why functional expression of the acetylenase is limited to seeds, genes that affect acetylenase activity by providing substrate (FAD2) or electrons (cytochrome b5), or that compete for substrate (FAD3), were cloned. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the availability of a preferred cytochrome b5 isoform is not a limiting factor. Developing seeds co-express acetylenase and FAD2 isoform 2 (FAD2-2) at high levels. Flower heads co-express FAD2-3 and FAD3 at high levels, and FAD2-2 and acetylenase at moderate levels. FAD2-3 was not expressed in developing seed. Real-time RT-PCR absolute transcript quantitation showed 10(4)-fold higher acetylenase expression in developing seeds than in flower heads. Collectively, the results show that both the acetylenase expression level and the co-expression of other desaturases may contribute to the tissue specificity of crepenynate production. Helianthus annuus contains a Delta12 acetylenase in a polyacetylene biosynthetic pathway, so does not accumulate crepenynate. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed relatively strong acetylenase expression in young sunflowers. Acetylenase transcription is observed in both species without accumulation of the enzymatic product, crepenynate. Functional expression of acetylenase appears to be affected by competition and collaboration with other enzymes. PMID:17329262

  1. Analysis of Cell Wall Teichoic Acids in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Covas, Gonçalo; Vaz, Filipa; Henriques, Gabriela; Pinho, Mariana G; Filipe, Sérgio R

    2016-01-01

    Most bacterial cells are surrounded by a surface composed mainly of peptidoglycan (PGN), a glycopolymer responsible for ensuring the bacterial shape and a telltale molecule that betrays the presence of bacteria to the host immune system. In Staphylococcus aureus, as in most gram-positive bacteria, peptidoglycan is concealed by covalently linked molecules of wall teichoic acids (WTA)-phosphate rich molecules made of glycerol and ribitol phosphates which may be tailored by different amino acids and sugars.In order to analyze and compare the composition of WTA produced by different S. aureus strains, we describe methods to: (1) quantify the total amount of WTA present at the bacterial cell surface, through the determination of the inorganic phosphate present in phosphodiester linkages of WTA; (2) identify which sugar constituents are present in the assembled WTA molecules, by detecting the monosaccharides, released by acid hydrolysis, through an high-performance anion exchange chromatography analysis coupled with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) and (3) compare the polymerization degree of WTA found at the cell surface of different S. aureus strains, through their different migration in a polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). PMID:27311674

  2. Survival and phospholipid fatty acid profiles of surface and subsurface bacteria in natural sediment microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, T.L.; Wilch, E.; O`Connor, K.

    1997-04-01

    Although starvation survival has been characterized for many bacteria, few subsurface bacteria have been tested, and few if any have been tested in natural subsurface porous media. We hypothesized that subsurface bacteria may be uniquely adapted for long-term survival in situ. We further hypothesized that subsurface conditions (sediment type and moisture content) would influence microbial survival. We compared starvation survival capabilities of surface and subsurface strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens and a novel Arthrobacter sp. in microcosms composed of natural sediments. Bacteria were incubated for up to 64 weeks under saturated and unsaturated conditions in sterilized microcosms containing either a silty sand paleosol (buried soil) or a sandy silt nonpaleosol sediment. Direct counts, plate counts, and cell sizes were measured. Membrane phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles were quantified to determine temporal patterns of PLFA stress signatures and differences in PLFAs among strains and treatments. The Arthrobacter strains survived better than the P. fluorescens strains; however, differences in survival between surface and subsurface strains of each genus were not significant. Bacteria survived better in the paleosol than in the nonpaleosol and survived better under saturated conditions than under unsaturated conditions. Cell volumes of all strains decreased; however, sediment type and moisture did not influence rates of miniaturization. Both P.fluorescens strains showed PLFA stress signatures typical for gram-negative bacteria: increased ratios of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids, increased ratios of trans- to cis-monoenoic fatty acids, and increased ratios of cyclopropyl to monoenoic precursor fatty acids. The Arthrobacter strains showed few changes in PLFAs. Environmental conditions strongly influenced PLFA profiles. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Gas chromatographic organic acid profiling analysis of brandies and whiskeys for pattern recognition analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Y J; Kim, K R; Kim, J H

    1999-06-01

    An efficient gas chromatographic profiling and pattern recognition method is described for brandy and whiskey samples according to their organic acid contents. It involves solid-phase extraction of organic acids using Chromosorb P with subsequent conversion to stable tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives for the direct analysis by capillary column gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 12 organic acids were reproducibly identified in liquor samples (1 mL). When the GC profiles were simplified to their retention index spectra, characteristic patterns were obtained for each liquor sample as well as for each group average. Stepwise discriminant analysis provided star symbols characteristic for each liquor sample and group average. As expected, canonical discriminant analysis correctly classified 23 liquor samples studied into two groups of either brandy or whiskey.

  4. Gas chromatographic organic acid profiling analysis of brandies and whiskeys for pattern recognition analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Y J; Kim, K R; Kim, J H

    1999-06-01

    An efficient gas chromatographic profiling and pattern recognition method is described for brandy and whiskey samples according to their organic acid contents. It involves solid-phase extraction of organic acids using Chromosorb P with subsequent conversion to stable tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives for the direct analysis by capillary column gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 12 organic acids were reproducibly identified in liquor samples (1 mL). When the GC profiles were simplified to their retention index spectra, characteristic patterns were obtained for each liquor sample as well as for each group average. Stepwise discriminant analysis provided star symbols characteristic for each liquor sample and group average. As expected, canonical discriminant analysis correctly classified 23 liquor samples studied into two groups of either brandy or whiskey. PMID:10794629

  5. Phospholipid fatty acids as physiological indicators of Paracoccus denitrificans encapsulated in silica sol-gel hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Trögl, Josef; Jirková, Ivana; Kuráň, Pavel; Akhmetshina, Elmira; Brovdyová, Taťjána; Sirotkin, Alexander; Kirilina, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) content was determined in samples of Paracoccus denitrificans encapsulated in silica hydrogel films prepared from prepolymerized tetramethoxysilane (TMOS). Immediately after encapsulation the total PLFA concentration was linearly proportional to the optical density (600 nm) of the input microbial suspension (R2 = 0.99). After 7 days this relationship remained linear, but with significantly decreased slope, indicating a higher extinction of bacteria in suspensions of input concentration 108 cells/mL and higher. trans-Fatty acids, indicators of cytoplasmatic membrane disturbances, were below the detection limit. The cy/pre ratio (i.e., ratio of cyclopropylated fatty acids (cy17:0 + cy19:0) to their metabolic precursors (16:1ω7 + 18:1ω7)), an indicator of the transition of the culture to a stationary growth-phase, decreased depending on co-immobilization of nutrients in the order phosphate buffer > mineral medium > Luria Broth rich medium. The ratio, too, was logarithmically proportional to cell concentration. These results confirm the applicability of total PLFA as an indicator for the determination of living biomass and cy/pre ratio for determination of nutrient limitation of microorganisms encapsulated in sol-gel matrices. This may be of interest for monitoring of sol-gel encapsulated bacteria proposed as optical recognition elements in biosensor construction, as well as other biotechnological applications. PMID:25690547

  6. Phospholipid Fatty Acids as Physiological Indicators of Paracoccus denitrificans Encapsulated in Silica Sol-Gel Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Trögl, Josef; Jirková, Ivana; Kuráň, Pavel; Akhmetshina, Elmira; Brovdyová, Tat′jána; Sirotkin, Alexander; Kirilina, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) content was determined in samples of Paracoccus denitrificans encapsulated in silica hydrogel films prepared from prepolymerized tetramethoxysilane (TMOS). Immediately after encapsulation the total PLFA concentration was linearly proportional to the optical density (600 nm) of the input microbial suspension (R2 = 0.99). After 7 days this relationship remained linear, but with significantly decreased slope, indicating a higher extinction of bacteria in suspensions of input concentration 108 cells/mL and higher. trans-Fatty acids, indicators of cytoplasmatic membrane disturbances, were below the detection limit. The cy/pre ratio (i.e., ratio of cyclopropylated fatty acids (cy17:0 + cy19:0) to their metabolic precursors (16:1ω7 + 18:1ω7)), an indicator of the transition of the culture to a stationary growth-phase, decreased depending on co-immobilization of nutrients in the order phosphate buffer > mineral medium > Luria Broth rich medium. The ratio, too, was logarithmically proportional to cell concentration. These results confirm the applicability of total PLFA as an indicator for the determination of living biomass and cy/pre ratio for determination of nutrient limitation of microorganisms encapsulated in sol-gel matrices. This may be of interest for monitoring of sol-gel encapsulated bacteria proposed as optical recognition elements in biosensor construction, as well as other biotechnological applications. PMID:25690547

  7. Transcriptome Analysis in Haematococcus pluvialis: Astaxanthin Induction by Salicylic Acid (SA) and Jasmonic Acid (JA)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guanxun; Li, Guoqiang; Sun, Haifeng; Deng, Suzhen; Shen, Yicheng; Chen, Guoqiang; Zhang, Ruihao; Meng, Chunxiao; Zhang, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is an astaxanthin-rich microalga that can increase its astaxanthin production by salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA) induction. The genetic transcriptome details of astaxanthin biosynthesis were analyzed by exposing the algal cells to 25 mg/L of SA and JA for 1, 6 and 24 hours, plus to the control (no stress). Based on the RNA-seq analysis, 56,077 unigenes (51.7%) were identified with functions in response to the hormone stress. The top five identified subcategories were cell, cellular process, intracellular, catalytic activity and cytoplasm, which possessed 5600 (~9.99%), 5302 (~9.45%), 5242 (~9.35%), 4407 (~7.86%) and 4195 (~7.48%) unigenes, respectively. Furthermore, 59 unigenes were identified and assigned to 26 putative transcription factors (TFs), including 12 plant-specific TFs. They were likely associated with astaxanthin biosynthesis in Haematococcus upon SA and JA stress. In comparison, the up-regulation of differential expressed genes occurred much earlier, with higher transcript levels in the JA treatment (about 6 h later) than in the SA treatment (beyond 24 h). These results provide valuable information for directing metabolic engineering efforts to improve astaxanthin biosynthesis in H. pluvialis. PMID:26484871

  8. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B.; Mellors, J.W.; Jeang, K.T.; Wain-Hobson, S.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  9. Concentration variations of amino acids in mammalian fossils: effects of diagenesis and the implications for amino acid racemization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, B.; Rutter, N.W.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed amino acid analysis of bones, teeth, and antler from several mammal species have shown that concentrations of several amino acids can be related to three factors: type of material analyzed, diagenetic alteration of the material, and relative age of the fossil. Concentrations of several amino acids are significantly different in enamel compared to those of dentine or cement. This can be used to check that no contamination of one material by another has occurred, which is critical for using the data for amino acid dating, since all three materials have different racemization rates for some acids. With increased in growth of secondary minerals, generally reduced amino acid concentrations are observed. Interacid ratios and concentrations vary significantly the norms expected for the type of material with increasing degrees of alteration. These effects can be linked to abnormal racemization ratios observed in the same samples. Therefore, abnormal concentrations and/or interacid ratios can be used to detect samples in which the D/L amino acid ratios otherwise appear normal, thereby insuring better accuracy of amino acid racemization analysis. For unaltered fossils, with increasing sample age regardless the type of material, some amino acids steadily degrade, while others actually increase in concentration initially due to their generation as by-products of decay. Preliminary studies indicate that this progressive alteration can used to complement racemization data for determining relative stratigraphic sequences.

  10. Trophic Hierarchies Illuminated via Amino Acid Isotopic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Steffan, Shawn A.; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Horton, David R.; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Singleton, Merritt E.; Miliczky, Eugene; Hogg, David B.; Jones, Vincent P.

    2013-01-01

    Food web ecologists have long sought to characterize the trophic niches of animals using stable isotopic analysis. However, distilling trophic position from isotopic composition has been difficult, largely because of the variability associated with trophic discrimination factors (inter-trophic isotopic fractionation and routing). We circumvented much of this variability using compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA). We examined the 15N signatures of amino acids extracted from organisms reared in pure culture at four discrete trophic levels, across two model communities. We calculated the degree of enrichment at each trophic level and found there was a consistent trophic discrimination factor (~7.6‰). The constancy of the CSIA-derived discrimination factor permitted unprecedented accuracy in the measurement of animal trophic position. Conversely, trophic position estimates generated via bulk-15N analysis significantly underestimated trophic position, particularly among higher-order consumers. We then examined the trophic hierarchy of a free-roaming arthropod community, revealing the highest trophic position (5.07) and longest food chain ever reported using CSIA. High accuracy in trophic position estimation brings trophic function into sharper focus, providing greater resolution to the analysis of food webs. PMID:24086703

  11. Quantitative analysis of seasonal variation in the amino acids in phloem sap of Salix alba L.

    PubMed

    Leckstein, P M; Llewellyn, M

    1975-01-01

    Phloem sap of Salix alba L. was collected at monthly intervals between May and October. Amino acid analysis was carried out by ion exchange chromatography. The concentrations of individual amino acids are reported.

  12. Folic acid fortification of grain: an economic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, P S; Waitzman, N J; Scheffler, R M; Pi, R D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to compare the economic costs and benefits of fortifying grain with folic acid to prevent neural tube defects. METHODS. A cost-benefit analysis based on the US population, using the human capital approach to estimate the costs associated with preventable neural tube defects, was conducted. RESULTS. Under a range of assumptions about discount rates, baseline folate intake, the effectiveness of folate in preventing neural tube defects, the threshold dose that minimizes risk, and the cost of surveillance, fortification would likely yield a net economic benefit. The best estimate of this benefit is $94 million with low-level (140 micrograms [mcg] per 100 g grain) fortification and $252 million with high-level (350 mcg/100 g) fortification. The benefit-to-cost ratio is estimated at 4.3:1 for low-level and 6.1:1 for high-level fortification. CONCLUSIONS. By averting costly birth defects, folic acid fortification of grain in the United States may yield a substantial economic benefit. We may have underestimated net benefits because of unmeasured costs of neural tube defects and unmeasured benefits of higher folate intake. We may have overestimated net benefits if the cost of neurologic sequelae related to delayed diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency exceeds our projection. PMID:7733427

  13. Spectroscopic analysis of cinnamic acid using quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod, K. S.; Periandy, S.; Govindarajan, M.

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, FT-IR, FT-Raman, 13C NMR and 1H NMR spectra for cinnamic acid have been recorded for the vibrational and spectroscopic analysis. The observed fundamental frequencies (IR and Raman) were assigned according to their distinctiveness region. The computed frequencies and optimized parameters have been calculated by using HF and DFT (B3LYP) methods and the corresponding results are tabulated. On the basis of the comparison between computed and experimental results assignments of the fundamental vibrational modes are examined. A study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by HF and DFT methods. The alternation of the vibration pattern of the pedestal molecule related to the substitutions was analyzed. The 13C and 1H NMR spectra have been recorded and the chemical shifts have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The Mulliken charges, UV spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO analysis of have been calculated and reported. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was constructed.

  14. Spectroscopic analysis of cinnamic acid using quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Vinod, K S; Periandy, S; Govindarajan, M

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, FT-IR, FT-Raman, (13)C NMR and (1)H NMR spectra for cinnamic acid have been recorded for the vibrational and spectroscopic analysis. The observed fundamental frequencies (IR and Raman) were assigned according to their distinctiveness region. The computed frequencies and optimized parameters have been calculated by using HF and DFT (B3LYP) methods and the corresponding results are tabulated. On the basis of the comparison between computed and experimental results assignments of the fundamental vibrational modes are examined. A study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by HF and DFT methods. The alternation of the vibration pattern of the pedestal molecule related to the substitutions was analyzed. The (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra have been recorded and the chemical shifts have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The Mulliken charges, UV spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO analysis of have been calculated and reported. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was constructed.

  15. An Analysis of the Effects of Vancomycin and/or Vancomycin-Resistant Citrobacter freundii Exposure on the Microbial Community Structure in Soil.

    PubMed

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Borymski, Sławomir; Orlewska, Kamila; Wąsik, Tomasz J; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes in the environment has become a subject of growing concern. The extensive use of vancomycin and other pharmaceuticals may alter the biodiversity of soil microbial communities and select antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the impact of vancomycin and/or vancomycin-resistant Citrobacter freundii on soil microbial communities using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) approaches. The experiment had a completely randomized block design with the following treatments: control soil (C), soil with vancomycin (1 mg/kg soil-VA1), soil with vancomycin (10 mg/kg soil-VA10), soil with C. freundii (Cit), soil with vancomycin (1 mg/kg soil) and C. freundii (VA1+Cit), and soil with vancomycin (10 mg/kg soil) and C. freundii (VA10+Cit). A bacterial strain resistant to vancomycin was isolated from raw sewage collected from the municipal sewage treatment plant. The obtained results indicated that the antibiotic and/or the bacterial strain exerted a selective pressure that resulted in qualitative and quantitative changes in the population of soil microorganisms. However, a multivariate analysis showed that the genetic and structural diversity of the soil microbial community was primarily affected by the incubation time and to a lesser extent by the antibiotic and introduced bacteria. DGGE analysis clearly showed that certain species within the bacterial community were sensitive to vancomycin as was evidenced by a decrease in the values of S (richness) and H (Shannon-Wiener) indices. Moreover, a PLFA method-based analysis revealed alterations in the structure of the soil microbial community as indicated by changes in the biomass of the PLFA biomarkers specific for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi. The changes observed in the community of soil microorganisms may decrease the rate of microbial

  16. An Analysis of the Effects of Vancomycin and/or Vancomycin-Resistant Citrobacter freundii Exposure on the Microbial Community Structure in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Borymski, Sławomir; Orlewska, Kamila; Wąsik, Tomasz J.; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes in the environment has become a subject of growing concern. The extensive use of vancomycin and other pharmaceuticals may alter the biodiversity of soil microbial communities and select antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the impact of vancomycin and/or vancomycin-resistant Citrobacter freundii on soil microbial communities using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) approaches. The experiment had a completely randomized block design with the following treatments: control soil (C), soil with vancomycin (1 mg/kg soil—VA1), soil with vancomycin (10 mg/kg soil—VA10), soil with C. freundii (Cit), soil with vancomycin (1 mg/kg soil) and C. freundii (VA1+Cit), and soil with vancomycin (10 mg/kg soil) and C. freundii (VA10+Cit). A bacterial strain resistant to vancomycin was isolated from raw sewage collected from the municipal sewage treatment plant. The obtained results indicated that the antibiotic and/or the bacterial strain exerted a selective pressure that resulted in qualitative and quantitative changes in the population of soil microorganisms. However, a multivariate analysis showed that the genetic and structural diversity of the soil microbial community was primarily affected by the incubation time and to a lesser extent by the antibiotic and introduced bacteria. DGGE analysis clearly showed that certain species within the bacterial community were sensitive to vancomycin as was evidenced by a decrease in the values of S (richness) and H (Shannon-Wiener) indices. Moreover, a PLFA method-based analysis revealed alterations in the structure of the soil microbial community as indicated by changes in the biomass of the PLFA biomarkers specific for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi. The changes observed in the community of soil microorganisms may decrease the rate of microbial

  17. An Analysis of the Effects of Vancomycin and/or Vancomycin-Resistant Citrobacter freundii Exposure on the Microbial Community Structure in Soil.

    PubMed

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Borymski, Sławomir; Orlewska, Kamila; Wąsik, Tomasz J; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes in the environment has become a subject of growing concern. The extensive use of vancomycin and other pharmaceuticals may alter the biodiversity of soil microbial communities and select antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the impact of vancomycin and/or vancomycin-resistant Citrobacter freundii on soil microbial communities using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) approaches. The experiment had a completely randomized block design with the following treatments: control soil (C), soil with vancomycin (1 mg/kg soil-VA1), soil with vancomycin (10 mg/kg soil-VA10), soil with C. freundii (Cit), soil with vancomycin (1 mg/kg soil) and C. freundii (VA1+Cit), and soil with vancomycin (10 mg/kg soil) and C. freundii (VA10+Cit). A bacterial strain resistant to vancomycin was isolated from raw sewage collected from the municipal sewage treatment plant. The obtained results indicated that the antibiotic and/or the bacterial strain exerted a selective pressure that resulted in qualitative and quantitative changes in the population of soil microorganisms. However, a multivariate analysis showed that the genetic and structural diversity of the soil microbial community was primarily affected by the incubation time and to a lesser extent by the antibiotic and introduced bacteria. DGGE analysis clearly showed that certain species within the bacterial community were sensitive to vancomycin as was evidenced by a decrease in the values of S (richness) and H (Shannon-Wiener) indices. Moreover, a PLFA method-based analysis revealed alterations in the structure of the soil microbial community as indicated by changes in the biomass of the PLFA biomarkers specific for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi. The changes observed in the community of soil microorganisms may decrease the rate of microbial

  18. Adansonian Analysis and Deoxyribonucleic Acid Base Composition of Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, R. R.; Mandel, M.

    1965-01-01

    Colwell, R. R. (Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.), and M. Mandel. Adansonian analysis and deoxyribonucleic acid base composition of Serratia marcescens. J. Bacteriol. 89:454–461. 1965.—A total of 33 strains of Serratia marcescens were subjected to Adansonian analysis for which more than 200 coded features for each of the organisms were included. In addition, the base composition [expressed as moles per cent guanine + cytosine (G + C)] of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) prepared from each of the strains was determined. Except for four strains which were intermediate between Serratia and the Hafnia and Aerobacter group C of Edwards and Ewing, the S. marcescens species group proved to be extremely homogeneous, and the different strains showed high affinities for each other (mean similarity, ¯S = 77%). The G + C ratio of the DNA from the Serratia strains ranged from 56.2 to 58.4% G + C. Many species names have been listed for the genus, but only a single clustering of the strains was obtained at the species level, for which the species name S. marcescens was retained. S. kiliensis, S. indica, S. plymuthica, and S. marinorubra could not be distinguished from S. marcescens; it was concluded, therefore, that there is only a single species in the genus. The variety designation kiliensis does not appear to be valid, since no subspecies clustering of strains with negative Voges-Proskauer reactions could be detected. The characteristics of the species are listed, and a description of S. marcescens is presented. PMID:14255714

  19. Qualitative urinary organic acid analysis: 10 years of quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Peters, Verena; Bonham, James R; Hoffmann, Georg F; Scott, Camilla; Langhans, Claus-Dieter

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 10 years, a total of 90 urine samples from patients with metabolic disorders and controls were circulated to different laboratories in Europe and overseas, starting with 67 laboratories in 2005 and reaching 101 in 2014. The participants were asked to analyse the samples in their usual way and to prepare a report as if to a non-specialist pediatrician. The performance for the detection of fumarase deficiency, glutaric aciduria type I, isovaleric aciduria, methylmalonic aciduria, mevalonic aciduria, phenylketonuria and propionic aciduria was excellent (98-100 %). Over the last few years, detection has clearly improved for tyrosinaemia type I (39 % in 2008 to over 80 % in 2011/2014), maple syrup urine disease (85 % in 2005 to 98 % in 2012), hawkinsinuria (62 % in 2010 to 88 % in 2014), aminoacylase I deficiency (43 % in 2009 to 73 % in 2012) and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency (60 % in 2005 to 93 % by 2011). Normal urines were mostly considered as normal (83-100 %), but laboratories often made additional diagnostic suggestions. When the findings were unambiguous, the reports were mostly clear. However, when they were less obvious, the content and quality of reports varied greatly. Repetition of organic acid measurements on a fresh sample was rarely suggested, while more complex or invasive diagnostic strategies, including further metabolic screening or biopsy were recommended. Surprisingly very few participants suggested referral from the general paediatrician to a specialist metabolic centre to confirm a diagnosis and, if applicable, to initiate treatment despite evidence suggesting that this improves the outcome for patients with inherited metabolic disorders. The reliability of qualitative organic acid analysis has improved over the last few years. However, several aspects of reporting to non-specialists may need discussion and clinicians need to be aware of the uncertainty inherent in all forms of laboratory diagnostic

  20. Qualitative urinary organic acid analysis: 10 years of quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Peters, Verena; Bonham, James R; Hoffmann, Georg F; Scott, Camilla; Langhans, Claus-Dieter

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 10 years, a total of 90 urine samples from patients with metabolic disorders and controls were circulated to different laboratories in Europe and overseas, starting with 67 laboratories in 2005 and reaching 101 in 2014. The participants were asked to analyse the samples in their usual way and to prepare a report as if to a non-specialist pediatrician. The performance for the detection of fumarase deficiency, glutaric aciduria type I, isovaleric aciduria, methylmalonic aciduria, mevalonic aciduria, phenylketonuria and propionic aciduria was excellent (98-100 %). Over the last few years, detection has clearly improved for tyrosinaemia type I (39 % in 2008 to over 80 % in 2011/2014), maple syrup urine disease (85 % in 2005 to 98 % in 2012), hawkinsinuria (62 % in 2010 to 88 % in 2014), aminoacylase I deficiency (43 % in 2009 to 73 % in 2012) and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency (60 % in 2005 to 93 % by 2011). Normal urines were mostly considered as normal (83-100 %), but laboratories often made additional diagnostic suggestions. When the findings were unambiguous, the reports were mostly clear. However, when they were less obvious, the content and quality of reports varied greatly. Repetition of organic acid measurements on a fresh sample was rarely suggested, while more complex or invasive diagnostic strategies, including further metabolic screening or biopsy were recommended. Surprisingly very few participants suggested referral from the general paediatrician to a specialist metabolic centre to confirm a diagnosis and, if applicable, to initiate treatment despite evidence suggesting that this improves the outcome for patients with inherited metabolic disorders. The reliability of qualitative organic acid analysis has improved over the last few years. However, several aspects of reporting to non-specialists may need discussion and clinicians need to be aware of the uncertainty inherent in all forms of laboratory diagnostic

  1. Automated protein hydrolysis delivering sample to a solid acid catalyst for amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Akiko; Dohmae, Naoshi

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we developed an automatic protein hydrolysis system using strong cation-exchange resins as solid acid catalysts. Examining several kinds of inorganic solid acids and cation-exchange resins, we found that a few cation-exchange resins worked as acid catalysts for protein hydrolysis when heated in the presence of water. The most efficient resin yielded amounts of amino acids that were over 70% of those recovered after conventional hydrolysis with hydrochloric acid and resulted in amino acid compositions matching the theoretical values. The solid-acid hydrolysis was automated by packing the resin into columns, combining the columns with a high-performance liquid chromatography system, and heating them. The amino acids that constitute a protein can thereby be determined, minimizing contamination from the environment.

  2. Rat lung phospholipid fatty acid composition in prepregnant, pregnant, and lactating rats: relationship to ozone-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gunnison, A F; Finkelstein, I

    1997-01-01

    Our laboratory has demonstrated recently that pulmonary inflammation induced by acute ozone exposure is much more severe in late stage pregnant and lactating rats than in postlactating rats or age-matched virgin females. It is currently widely believed that such pulmonary damage results, at least in part, from the reaction of ozone at sites of unsaturation in phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) molecules located in the epithelial fluid layer lining the lung surfaces and/or the plasma membranes of epithelial cells underlying this fluid layer. The objective of this study was to compare the PLFA composition of lung tissue and surfactant from ozone-sensitive late stage pregnant and lactating rats with comparable tissue from relatively ozone-insensitive age-matched prepregnant (virgin female) rats to explore the possibility that changes in lung PLFA composition during pregnancy and/or lactation contribute to the enhanced sensitivity of these physiologic states to ozone. In addition, the correlation of changes in plasma PLFA composition with those in lung was investigated. There were minor differences in the composition of lung tissue and surfactant PLFAs between prepregnant rats and pregnant rats at day 17 of gestation and only slightly greater differences between prepregnant and lactating rats. Changes from the prepregnant state in the PLFA composition of lung tissue, but not surfactant, correlated with changes in the plasma only in lactating rats and not in pregnant rats. Overall, the double bond index of PLFAs in surfactant and lung tissue was decreased in pregnant and lactating rats compared with prepregnant rats. Thus, the increased sensitivity of pregnant and lactating rats to ozone-induced lung injury cannot be attributed to an increased availability of unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the arachidonic acid composition of phospholipids did not appear to explain differences between prepregnant rats and pregnant or lactating rats in their inflammatory response to

  3. Sensitive Amino Acid Composition and Chirality Analysis with the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Alison M.; Scherer, James R.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Grover, William H.; Ivester, Robin H. C.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of life on Mars requires definition of a suitable biomarker and development of sensitive yet compact instrumentation capable of performing in situ analyses. Our studies are focused on amino acid analysis because amino acids are more resistant to decomposition than other biomolecules, and because amino acid chirality is a well-defined biomarker. Amino acid composition and chirality analysis has been previously demonstrated in the lab using microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) chips. To analyze amino acids in the field, we have developed the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA), a portable analysis system that consists of a compact instrument and a novel multi-layer CE microchip.

  4. GLC analysis of Indian rapeseed-mustard to study the variability of fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, N; Agnihotri, A

    2000-12-01

    Rapeseed-mustard is one of the most economically important oilseed crops in India. Speciality oils having high amounts of a specific fatty acid are of immense importance for both nutritional and industrial purposes. Oil high in oleic acid has demand in commercial food-service applications due to a long shelf-life and cholesterol-reducing properties. Both linoleic and linolenic acids are essential fatty acids; however, less than 3% linolenic acid is preferred for oil stability. High erucic acid content is beneficial for the polymer industry, whereas low erucic acid is recommended for food purposes. Therefore, it is important to undertake systematic characterization of the available gene pool for its variable fatty acid profile to be utilized for specific purposes. In the present study the Indian rapeseed-mustard germplasm and some newly developed low-erucic-acid strains were analysed by GLC to study the fatty acid composition in these lines. The GLC analysis revealed that the rapeseed-mustard varieties being commonly grown in India are characterized by high erucic acid content (30-51%) in the oil with low levels of oleic acid (13-23%). However, from among the recently developed low-erucic-acid strains, several lines were identified with comparatively high oleic acid (60-70%), moderate to high linoleic acid (13-40%) and low linolenic acid (< 10%) contents. Work is in progress at TERI (New Delhi, India) to utilize these lines for development of strains with particular fatty acid compositions for specific purposes.

  5. Fate of microbial nitrogen, carbon, hydrolysable amino acids, monosaccharides, and fatty acids in sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veuger, Bart; van Oevelen, Dick; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2012-04-01

    The fate of microbial carbon, nitrogen, hydrolysable amino acids (HAAs), monosaccharides, and fatty acids in sediment was investigated experimentally. The microbial community of a tidal flat sediment was labeled with 13C-enriched glucose and 15N-enriched ammonium, and sediment was incubated for up to 371 days. Analysis of total concentrations and 13C- and 15N content of bulk sediment, hydrolysable amino acids (including D-alanine), monosaccharides, total fatty acids (TFAs), and phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFAs) allowed us to trace the fate of microbial biomass and -detritus and the major biochemical groups therein (proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids) over intermediate time scales (weeks-months). Moreover, the unidentified fraction of the labeled material (i.e. not analyzed as HAA, FA, or carbohydrate) provided information on the formation and fate of molecularly uncharacterizable organic matter. Loss of 13C and 15N from the sediment was slow (half live of 433 days) which may have been due to the permanently anoxic conditions in the experiment. Loss rates for the different biochemical groups were also low with the following order of loss rate constants: PLFA > TFA > HAA > monosaccharides. The unidentified 13C-pool was rapidly formed (within days) and then decreased relatively slowly, resulting in a gradual relative accumulation of this pool over time. Degradation and microbial reworking of the labeled material resulted in subtle, yet consistent, diagenetic changes within the different biochemical groups. In the HAA pool, glycine, lysine, and proline were lost relatively slowly (i.e. best preserved) while there was no accumulation of D-alanine relative to L-alanine, indicating no relative accumulation of bacterial macromolecules rich in D-alanine. In the fatty acid pool, there was very little difference between PLFAs and TFAs, indicating a very similar lability of these pools. Differences between individual fatty acids included a relatively slow loss of i15

  6. [Determination of body fluid based on analysis of nucleic acids].

    PubMed

    Korabečná, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Recent methodological approaches of molecular genetics allow isolation of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) from negligible forensic samples. Analysis of these molecules may be used not only for individual identification based on DNA profiling but also for the detection of origin of the body fluid which (alone or in mixture with other body fluids) forms the examined biological trace. Such an examination can contribute to the evaluation of procedural, technical and tactical value of the trace. Molecular genetic approaches discussed in the review offer new possibilities in comparison with traditional spectrum of chemical, immunological and spectroscopic tests especially with regard to the interpretation of mixtures of biological fluids and to the confirmatory character of the tests. Approaches based on reverse transcription of tissue specific mRNA and their subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fragmentation analysis are applicable on samples containing minimal amounts of biological material. Methods for body fluid discrimination based on examination of microRNA in samples provided so far confusing results therefore further development in this field is needed. The examination of tissue specific methylation of nucleotides in selected gene sequences seems to represent a promising enrichment of the methodological spectrum. The detection of DNA sequences of tissue related bacteria has been established and it provides satisfactory results mainly in combination with above mentioned methodological approaches. PMID:26419517

  7. Electromembrane extraction and HPLC analysis of haloacetic acids and aromatic acetic acids in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Alhooshani, Khalid; Basheer, Chanbasha; Kaur, Jagjit; Gjelstad, Astrid; Rasmussen, Knut E; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Lee, Hian Kee

    2011-10-30

    For the first time, haloacetic acids and aromatic acetic acids were extracted from wastewater samples using electromembrane extraction (EME). A thin layer of toluene immobilized on the walls of a polypropylene membrane envelope served as an artificial supported liquid membrane (SLM). The haloacetic acids (HAAs) (chloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, and trifluoroacetic acid) and aromatic acetic acids (phenylacetic acid and p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid) were extracted through the SLM and into an alkalized aqueous buffer solution. The buffer solution was located inside the membrane envelope. The electrical potential difference sustained over the membrane acted as the driving force for the transport of haloacetic acids into the membrane by electrokinetic migration. After extraction, the extracts were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection. The detection limits were between 0.072 and 40.3 ng L(-1). The calibration plot linearity was in the range of 5 and 200 μg L(-1) while the correlation coefficients for the analytes ranged from 0.9932 to 0.9967. Relative recoveries were in the range of 87-106%. The extraction efficiency was found to be comparable to that of solid-phase extraction.

  8. Nucleic acid analysis using terminal-phosphate-labeled nucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-04-22

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  9. Quantitative analysis of 17 amino acids in tobacco leaves using an amino acid analyzer and chemometric resolution.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yihang; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2015-06-01

    A method was developed for quantifying 17 amino acids in tobacco leaves by using an A300 amino acid analyzer and chemometric resolution. In the method, amino acids were eluted by the buffer solution on an ion-exchange column. After reacting with ninhydrin, the derivatives of amino acids were detected by ultraviolet detection. Most amino acids are separated by the elution program. However, five peaks of the derivatives are still overlapping. A non-negative immune algorithm was employed to extract the profiles of the derivatives from the overlapping signals, and then peak areas were adopted for quantitative analysis of the amino acids. The method was validated by the determination of amino acids in tobacco leaves. The relative standard deviations (n = 5) are all less than 2.54% and the recoveries of the spiked samples are in a range of 94.62-108.21%. The feasibility of the method was proved by analyzing the 17 amino acids in 30 tobacco leaf samples. PMID:25866370

  10. Quantitative analysis of 17 amino acids in tobacco leaves using an amino acid analyzer and chemometric resolution.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yihang; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2015-06-01

    A method was developed for quantifying 17 amino acids in tobacco leaves by using an A300 amino acid analyzer and chemometric resolution. In the method, amino acids were eluted by the buffer solution on an ion-exchange column. After reacting with ninhydrin, the derivatives of amino acids were detected by ultraviolet detection. Most amino acids are separated by the elution program. However, five peaks of the derivatives are still overlapping. A non-negative immune algorithm was employed to extract the profiles of the derivatives from the overlapping signals, and then peak areas were adopted for quantitative analysis of the amino acids. The method was validated by the determination of amino acids in tobacco leaves. The relative standard deviations (n = 5) are all less than 2.54% and the recoveries of the spiked samples are in a range of 94.62-108.21%. The feasibility of the method was proved by analyzing the 17 amino acids in 30 tobacco leaf samples.

  11. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27324649

  13. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl- N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints.

  14. Quantitative Analysis and In vitro Anti-inflammatory Effects of Gallic Acid, Ellagic Acid, and Quercetin from Radix Sanguisorbae

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Chang-Seob; Jeong, Soo-Jin; Yoo, Sae-Rom; Lee, Na-Ri; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radix Sanguisorbae has long been used to treat diarrhea, enteritis, duodenal ulcers, and internal hemorrhage. Objective: We investigated the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of Radix Sanguisorbae and performed quantitative analyses of three marker components, namely gallic acid, ellagic acid, and quercetin, using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a photodiode array detector. Materials and Methods: The three marker components were separated using a reversed-phase Gemini C18 analytical column maintained at 40°C by the gradient elution with two solvent systems. We examined the biological effects of the three marker compounds, gallic acid, ellagic acid, and quercetin, by determining their anti-inflammatory activities in the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Results: All of the marker compounds exhibited inhibitory effects on prostaglandin E2 production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages, with no cytotoxicity. Particularly, ellagic acid significantly inhibited production of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 in LPS-treated RAW 264.7 cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that ellagic acid is the most potent bioactive phytochemical component of radix Sanguisorbae in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. SUMMARY Established high-performance liquid chromatography method was applied in the quantitative analysis of gallic acid, ellagic acid, and quercetin present in an extract from radix SanguisorbaeAmong the three compounds, the ellagic acid.(7.65.mg/g) is main component in radix SanguisorbaeEllagic acid significantly inhibited production of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 in lipopolysaccharide-treated RAW 264.7 cells. Abbreviations used: HPLC: High-performance liquid chromatography, PDA: Photodiode array, TNF-α: Tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL: Interleukin, LPS: Lipopolysaccharide, PGE2: Prostaglandin E2, NSAIDs

  15. Simulating realistic predator signatures in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Diet estimation is an important field within quantitative ecology, providing critical insights into many aspects of ecology and community dynamics. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is a prominent method of diet estimation, particularly for marine mammal and bird species. Investigators using QFASA commonly use computer simulation to evaluate statistical characteristics of diet estimators for the populations they study. Similar computer simulations have been used to explore and compare the performance of different variations of the original QFASA diet estimator. In both cases, computer simulations involve bootstrap sampling prey signature data to construct pseudo-predator signatures with known properties. However, bootstrap sample sizes have been selected arbitrarily and pseudo-predator signatures therefore may not have realistic properties. I develop an algorithm to objectively establish bootstrap sample sizes that generates pseudo-predator signatures with realistic properties, thereby enhancing the utility of computer simulation for assessing QFASA estimator performance. The algorithm also appears to be computationally efficient, resulting in bootstrap sample sizes that are smaller than those commonly used. I illustrate the algorithm with an example using data from Chukchi Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their marine mammal prey. The concepts underlying the approach may have value in other areas of quantitative ecology in which bootstrap samples are post-processed prior to their use.

  16. Qualitative urinary organic acid analysis: methodological approaches and performance.

    PubMed

    Peters, V; Garbade, S F; Langhans, C D; Hoffmann, G F; Pollitt, R J; Downing, M; Bonham, J R

    2008-12-01

    A programme for proficiency testing of biochemical genetics laboratories undertaking urinary qualitative organic acid analysis and its results for 50 samples examined for factors contributing to poor performance are described. Urine samples from patients in whom inherited metabolic disorders have been confirmed as well as control urines were circulated to participants and the results from 94 laboratories were evaluated. Laboratories showed variability both in terms of their individual performance and on a disease-specific basis. In general, conditions including methylmalonic aciduria, propionic aciduria, isovaleric aciduria, mevalonic aciduria, Canavan disease and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase were readily identified. Detection was poorer for other diseases such as glutaric aciduria type II, glyceric aciduria and, in one sample, 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency. To identify the factors that allow some laboratories to perform well on a consistent basis while others perform badly, we devised a questionnaire and compared the responses with the results for performance in the scheme. A trend towards better performance could be demonstrated for those laboratories that regularly use internal quality control (QC) samples in their sample preparation (p = 0.079) and those that participate in further external quality assurance (EQA) schemes (p = 0,040). Clinicians who depend upon these diagnostic services to identify patients with these defects and the laboratories that provide them should be aware of the potential for missed diagnoses and the factors that may lead to improved performance.

  17. Analysis of amino acid and codon usage in Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Dohra, Hideo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    The ciliate Paramecium bursaria harbors the green-alga Chlorella symbionts. We reassembled the P. bursaria transcriptome to minimize falsely fused transcripts, and investigated amino acid and codon usage using the transcriptome data. Surface proteins preferentially use smaller amino acid residues like cysteine. Unusual synonymous codon and amino acid usage in highly expressed genes can reflect a balance between translational selection and other factors. A correlation of gene expression level with synonymous codon or amino acid usage is emphasized in genes down-regulated in symbiont-bearing cells compared to symbiont-free cells. Our results imply that the selection is associated with P. bursaria-Chlorella symbiosis. PMID:26341535

  18. Analysis of amino acid and codon usage in Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Dohra, Hideo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    The ciliate Paramecium bursaria harbors the green-alga Chlorella symbionts. We reassembled the P. bursaria transcriptome to minimize falsely fused transcripts, and investigated amino acid and codon usage using the transcriptome data. Surface proteins preferentially use smaller amino acid residues like cysteine. Unusual synonymous codon and amino acid usage in highly expressed genes can reflect a balance between translational selection and other factors. A correlation of gene expression level with synonymous codon or amino acid usage is emphasized in genes down-regulated in symbiont-bearing cells compared to symbiont-free cells. Our results imply that the selection is associated with P. bursaria-Chlorella symbiosis.

  19. EFFECTS OF NITRIC ACID ON CRITICALITY SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, B.

    2011-08-18

    As nitric acid molarity is increased, there are two competing phenomena affecting the reactivity of the system. First, there is interaction between each of the 10 wells in the basket-like insert. As the molarity of the nitric acid solution is increased (it moves from 100% water to 100% HNO{sub 3}), the hydrogen atom density decreases by about 80%. However, it remains a relatively efficient moderator. The moderating ratio of nitric acid is about 90% that of water. As the media between the wells is changed from 100% water to 100% nitric acid, the density of the media increases by 50%. A higher density typically leads to a better reflector. However, when the macroscopic scattering cross sections are considered, nitric acid is a much worse reflector than water. The effectiveness of nitric acid as a reflector is about 40% that of water. Since the media between the wells become a worse reflector and still remains an effective moderator, interaction between the wells increases. This phenomenon will cause reactivity to increase as nitric acid molarity increases. The seond phenomenon is due to the moderating ratio changing in the high concentration fissile-nitric acid solution in the 10 wells. Since the wells contain relatively small volumes of high concentration solutions, a small decrease in moderating power has a large effect on reactivity. This is due to the fact that neutrons are more likely to escape the high concentration fissile solution before causing another fission event. The result of this phenomenon is that as nitric acid molarity increases, reactivity decreases. Recent studies have shown that the second phenomenon is indeed the dominating force in determining reactivity changes in relation to nitric acid molarity changes. When considering the system as a whole, as nitric acid molarity increases, reactivity decreases.

  20. Dietary Intake and Plasma Metabolomic Analysis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Bipolar Subjects Reveal Dysregulation of Linoleic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Simon J.; Ringrose, Rachel N.; Harrington, Gloria J; Mancuso, Peter; Burant, Charles F; McInnis, Melvin G

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) profiles associate with risk for mood disorders. This poses the hypothesis of metabolic differences between patients and unaffected healthy controls that relate to the primary illness or are secondary to medication use or dietary intake. However, dietary manipulation or supplementation studies show equivocal results improving mental health outcomes. This study investigates dietary patterns and metabolic profiles relevant to PUFA metabolism, in bipolar I individuals compared to non-psychiatric controls. We collected seven-day diet records and performed metabolomic analysis of fasted plasma collected immediately after diet recording. Regression analyses adjusted for age, gender and energy intake found that bipolar individuals had significantly lower intake of selenium and PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (n-3), arachidonic acid (AA) (n-6) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (n-3/n-6 mix); and significantly increased intake of the saturated fats, eicosanoic and docosanoic acid. Regression analysis of metabolomic data derived from plasma samples, correcting for age, gender, BMI, psychiatric medication use and dietary PUFA intake, revealed that bipolar individuals had reduced 13S-HpODE, a major peroxidation product of the n-6, linoleic acid (LA), reduced eicosadienoic acid (EDA), an elongation product of LA; reduced prostaglandins G2, F2 alpha and E1, synthesized from n-6 PUFA; and reduced EPA. These observations remained significant or near significant after Bonferroni correction and are consistent with metabolic variances between bipolar and control individuals with regard to PUFA metabolism. These findings suggest that specific dietary interventions aimed towards correcting these metabolic disparities may impact health outcomes for individuals with bipolar disorder. PMID:24953860

  1. Stimulation of Microbially Mediated Arsenic Release in Bangladesh Aquifers by Young Carbon Indicated by Radiocarbon Analysis of Sedimentary Bacterial Lipids.

    PubMed

    Whaley-Martin, K J; Mailloux, B J; van Geen, A; Bostick, B C; Silvern, R F; Kim, C; Ahmed, K M; Choudhury, I; Slater, G F

    2016-07-19

    The sources of reduced carbon driving the microbially mediated release of arsenic to shallow groundwater in Bangladesh remain poorly understood. Using radiocarbon analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and potential carbon pools, the abundance and carbon sources of the active, sediment-associated, in situ bacterial communities inhabiting shallow aquifers (<30 m) at two sites in Araihazar, Bangladesh, were investigated. At both sites, sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) Δ(14)C signatures of -631 ± 54‰ (n = 12) were significantly depleted relative to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of +24 ± 30‰ and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of -230 ± 100‰. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures (n = 10) at Site F (-167‰ to +20‰) and Site B (-163‰ to +21‰) were highly consistent and indicated utilization of carbon sources younger than the SOC, likely from the DOC pool. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures were consistent with previously determined Δ(14)C signatures of microbial DNA sampled from groundwater at Site F indicating that the carbon source for these two components of the subsurface microbial community is consistent and is temporally stable over the two years between studies. These results demonstrate that the utilization of relatively young carbon sources by the subsurface microbial community occurs at sites with varying hydrology. Further they indicate that these young carbon sources drive the metabolism of the more abundant sediment-associated microbial communities that are presumably more capable of Fe reduction and associated release of As. This implies that an introduction of younger carbon to as of yet unaffected sediments (such as those comprising the deeper Pleistocene aquifer) could stimulate microbial communities and result in arsenic release.

  2. Stimulation of Microbially Mediated Arsenic Release in Bangladesh Aquifers by Young Carbon Indicated by Radiocarbon Analysis of Sedimentary Bacterial Lipids.

    PubMed

    Whaley-Martin, K J; Mailloux, B J; van Geen, A; Bostick, B C; Silvern, R F; Kim, C; Ahmed, K M; Choudhury, I; Slater, G F

    2016-07-19

    The sources of reduced carbon driving the microbially mediated release of arsenic to shallow groundwater in Bangladesh remain poorly understood. Using radiocarbon analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and potential carbon pools, the abundance and carbon sources of the active, sediment-associated, in situ bacterial communities inhabiting shallow aquifers (<30 m) at two sites in Araihazar, Bangladesh, were investigated. At both sites, sedimentary organic carbon (SOC) Δ(14)C signatures of -631 ± 54‰ (n = 12) were significantly depleted relative to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of +24 ± 30‰ and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of -230 ± 100‰. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures (n = 10) at Site F (-167‰ to +20‰) and Site B (-163‰ to +21‰) were highly consistent and indicated utilization of carbon sources younger than the SOC, likely from the DOC pool. Sediment-associated PLFA Δ(14)C signatures were consistent with previously determined Δ(14)C signatures of microbial DNA sampled from groundwater at Site F indicating that the carbon source for these two components of the subsurface microbial community is consistent and is temporally stable over the two years between studies. These results demonstrate that the utilization of relatively young carbon sources by the subsurface microbial community occurs at sites with varying hydrology. Further they indicate that these young carbon sources drive the metabolism of the more abundant sediment-associated microbial communities that are presumably more capable of Fe reduction and associated release of As. This implies that an introduction of younger carbon to as of yet unaffected sediments (such as those comprising the deeper Pleistocene aquifer) could stimulate microbial communities and result in arsenic release. PMID:27333443

  3. Recent advances in amino acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Prata, C; Bonnafous, P; Fraysse, N; Treilhou, M; Poinsot, V; Couderc, F

    2001-11-01

    Amino acids are studied extensively using capillary electrophoresis. In this review we will report the different researchs which have been done in the literature since 1998. We will describe the developments of, detection methods, separations of enantiomers, the new medical applications, and amino acids in food and plants.

  4. Analysis of methylphosphonic acid, ethyl methylphosphonic acid and isopropyl methylphosphonic acid at low microgram per liter levels in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Sega, G A; Tomkins, B A; Griest, W H

    1997-11-28

    A method is described for determining methylphosphonic acid, ethyl methylphosphonic acid and isopropyl methylphosphonic acid, which are hydrolysis products of the nerve agents VX (S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl O-ethyl methylphosphonothiolate) and GB (sarin, isopropylmethyl phosphonofluoridate). The analytes are extracted from 50 ml groundwater using a solid-phase extraction column packed with 500 mg of silica with a bonded quaternary amine phase, and are eluted and derivatized with methanolic trimethylphenylammonium hydroxide. Separation and quantitation are achieved using a capillary column gas chromatograph equipped with a flame photometric detector operated in its phosphorus-selective mode. Two independent statistically-unbiased procedures were employed to determine the detection limits, which ranged between 3 and 9 micrograms/l, for the three analytes. PMID:9435117

  5. Advanced Technologies in Sialic Acid and Sialoglycoconjugate Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Ken; Varki, Nissi; Sato, Chihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although the structural diversity of sialic acid (Sia) is rapidly expanding, understanding of its biological significance has lagged behind. Advanced technologies to detect and probe diverse structures of Sia are absolutely necessary not only to understand further biological significance but also to pursue medicinal and industrial applications. Here we describe analytical methods for detection of Sia that have recently been developed or improved, with a special focus on 9-O-acetylated N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5,9Ac), N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), deaminoneuraminic acid (Kdn), O-sulfated Sia (SiaS), and di-, oligo-, and polysialic acid (diSia/oligoSia/polySia) in glycoproteins and glycolipids. Much more attention has been paid to these Sia and sialoglycoconjugates during the last decade, in terms of regulation of the immune system, neural development and function, tumorigenesis, and aging.

  6. Reversed-polarity capillary zone electrophoretic analysis of usnic acid.

    PubMed

    Kreft, S; Strukelj, B

    2001-08-01

    A capillary zone electrophoretic (CZE) method for the determination of usnic acid is described for the first time. Usnic acid is an antibiotic substance from lichens. Due to its low solubility in water, a high content of methanol in CZE buffer is required. Because of the methanol in the buffer, the electroosmotic flow velocity was lower than the electrophoretic mobility of usnic acid. Accordingly, the use of reversed-polarity (with the anode on the detector side of the capillary) was necessary. The optimal buffer composition was 50 mM NaOH, 20 mM acetic acid and 5% water in methanol. The detection limit of UV detector at 290 nm for usnic acid in the injected extract was 3.5 mg/L and the relative standard deviation of the normalized peak area was 3.3% at 250 mg/L.

  7. Extraction, purification, methylation and GC-MS analysis of short-chain carboxylic acids for metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Tivendale, Nathan D; Jewett, Erin M; Hegeman, Adrian D; Cohen, Jerry D

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic metabolic flux analysis requires efficient and effective methods for extraction, purification and analysis of a plethora of naturally-occurring compounds. One area of metabolism that would be highly informative to study using metabolic flux analysis is the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which consists of short-chain carboxylic acids. Here, we describe a newly-developed method for extraction, purification, derivatization and analysis of short-chain carboxylic acids involved in the TCA cycle. The method consists of snap-freezing the plant material, followed by maceration and a 12-15h extraction at -80 °C. The extracts are then subject to reduction (to stabilize β-keto acids), purified by strong anion exchange solid phase extraction and methylated with methanolic HCl. This method could also be readily adapted to quantify many other short-chain carboxylic acids.

  8. Extraction, purification, methylation and GC-MS analysis of short-chain carboxylic acids for metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Tivendale, Nathan D; Jewett, Erin M; Hegeman, Adrian D; Cohen, Jerry D

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic metabolic flux analysis requires efficient and effective methods for extraction, purification and analysis of a plethora of naturally-occurring compounds. One area of metabolism that would be highly informative to study using metabolic flux analysis is the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which consists of short-chain carboxylic acids. Here, we describe a newly-developed method for extraction, purification, derivatization and analysis of short-chain carboxylic acids involved in the TCA cycle. The method consists of snap-freezing the plant material, followed by maceration and a 12-15h extraction at -80 °C. The extracts are then subject to reduction (to stabilize β-keto acids), purified by strong anion exchange solid phase extraction and methylated with methanolic HCl. This method could also be readily adapted to quantify many other short-chain carboxylic acids. PMID:27348709

  9. Transcriptional analysis of the effect of exogenous decanoic acid stress on Streptomyces roseosporus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Backgroud Daptomycin is an important antibiotic against infections caused by drug-resistant pathogens. Its production critically depends on the addition of decanoic acid during fermentation. Unfortunately, decanoic acid (>2.5 mM) is toxic to daptomycin producer, Streptomyces roseosporus. Results To understand the mechanism underlying decanoic tolerance or toxicity, the responses of S. roseosporus was determined by a combination of phospholipid fatty acid analysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement and RNA sequencing. Assays using fluorescent dyes indicated a sharp increase in reactive oxygen species during decanoic acid stress; fatty acid analysis revealed a marked increase in the composition of branched-chain fatty acids by approximately 10%, with a corresponding decrease in straight-chain fatty acids; functional analysis indicated decanoic acid stress has components common to other stress response, including perturbation of respiratory functions (nuo and cyd operons), oxidative stress, and heat shock. Interestingly, our transcriptomic analysis revealed that genes coding for components of proteasome and related to treholase synthesis were up-regulated in the decanoic acid –treated cells. Conclusion These findings represent an important first step in understanding mechanism of decanoic acid toxicity and provide a basis for engineering microbial tolerance. PMID:23432849

  10. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical analysis of Isonicotinic acid methyl ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoba, D.; Periandy, S.; Govindarajan, M.; Gayathri, P.

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, an organic compound Isonicotinic acid methyl ester (INAME) was structurally characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman, and NMR and UV spectroscopy. The optimized geometrical parameters and energies of all different and possible conformers of INAME are obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) by B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. There are three conformers (SI, SII-1, and SII-2) for this molecule (ground state). The most stable conformer of INAME is SI conformer. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of INAME in the ground state have been calculated by using HF and density functional method (B3LYP) 6-311++G (d,p) basis set. Detailed vibrational spectral analysis has been carried out and assignments of the observed fundamental bands have been proposed on the basis of peak positions and relative intensities. The computed vibrational frequencies were compared with the experimental frequencies, which yield good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by time independent DFT approach. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and thermodynamic properties were performed. The electric dipole moment (μ) and first hyper polarizability (β) values of the investigated molecule were computed using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. The calculated results show that the INAME molecule may have microscopic nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior with non zero values. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method.

  11. Analysis of issues concerning acid rain. Report to the Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Although science has largely determined that man made emissions cause acid rain, there is uncertainty concerning the extent and timing of its anticipated effects. Thus, at the present time scientific information alone does not lead unequivocally to a conclusion on whether it is appropriate to begin control actions now or to avail better understanding. Given this uncertainty, decisionmakers must weight the risks of further, potentially avoidable environmental damage against the risks of economic impacts from acid rain control actions which may ultimately prove to be unwarranted. The implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain are examined.

  12. Appropriate sampling for intracellular amino acid analysis in five phylogenetically different yeasts.

    PubMed

    Bolten, Christoph J; Wittmann, Christoph

    2008-11-01

    Methanol quenching and fast filtration, the two most common sampling protocols in microbial metabolome analysis, were validated for intracellular amino acid analysis in phylogenetically different yeast strains comprising Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Pichia pastoris, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. With only few exceptions for selected amino acids, all yeasts exhibited negligible metabolite leakage during quenching with 60% cold buffered methanol. Slightly higher leakage was observed with increasing methanol content in the quenching solution. Fast filtration resulted in identical levels for intracellular amino acids in all strains tested. The results clearly demonstrate the validity of both approaches for leakage-free sampling of amino acids in yeast.

  13. Facile Analysis and Sequencing of Linear and Branched Peptide Boronic Acids by MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Crumpton, Jason; Zhang, Wenyu; Santos, Webster

    2011-01-01

    Interest in peptides incorporating boronic acid moieties is increasing due to their potential as therapeutics/diagnostics for a variety of diseases such as cancer. The utility of peptide boronic acids may be expanded with access to vast libraries that can be deconvoluted rapidly and economically. Unfortunately, current detection protocols using mass spectrometry are laborious and confounded by boronic acid trimerization, which requires time consuming analysis of dehydration products. These issues are exacerbated when the peptide sequence is unknown, as with de novo sequencing, and especially when multiple boronic acid moieties are present. Thus, a rapid, reliable and simple method for peptide identification is of utmost importance. Herein, we report the identification and sequencing of linear and branched peptide boronic acids containing up to five boronic acid groups by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Protocols for preparation of pinacol boronic esters were adapted for efficient MALDI analysis of peptides. Additionally, a novel peptide boronic acid detection strategy was developed in which 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) served as both matrix and derivatizing agent in a convenient, in situ, on-plate esterification. Finally, we demonstrate that DHB-modified peptide boronic acids from a single bead can be analyzed by MALDI-MSMS analysis, validating our approach for the identification and sequencing of branched peptide boronic acid libraries. PMID:21449540

  14. Comparing models for perfluorooctanoic acid pharmacokinetics using Bayesian analysis.

    PubMed

    Wambaugh, John F; Barton, Hugh A; Setzer, R Woodrow

    2008-12-01

    Selecting the appropriate pharmacokinetic (PK) model given the available data is investigated for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), which has been widely analyzed with an empirical, one-compartment model. This research examined the results of experiments [Kemper R. A., DuPont Haskell Laboratories, USEPA Administrative Record AR-226.1499 (2003)] that administered single oral or iv doses of PFOA to adult male and female rats. PFOA concentration was observed over time; in plasma for some animals and in fecal and urinary excretion for others. There were four rats per dose group, for a total of 36 males and 36 females. Assuming that the PK parameters for each individual within a gender were drawn from the same, biologically varying population, plasma and excretion data were jointly analyzed using a hierarchical framework to separate uncertainty due to measurement error from actual biological variability. Bayesian analysis using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) provides tools to perform such an analysis as well as quantitative diagnostics to evaluate and discriminate between models. Starting from a one-compartment PK model with separate clearances to urine and feces, the model was incrementally expanded using Bayesian measures to assess if the expansion was supported by the data. PFOA excretion is sexually dimorphic in rats; male rats have bi-phasic elimination that is roughly 40 times slower than that of the females, which appear to have a single elimination phase. The male and female data were analyzed separately, keeping only the parameters describing the measurement process in common. For male rats, including excretion data initially decreased certainty in the one-compartment parameter estimates compared to an analysis using plasma data only. Allowing a third, unspecified clearance improved agreement and increased certainty when all the data was used, however a significant amount of eliminated PFOA was estimated to be missing from the excretion data. Adding an additional

  15. Use of the Signature Fatty Acid 16:1ω5 as a Tool to Determine the Distribution of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Ngosong, Christopher; Gabriel, Elke; Ruess, Liliane

    2012-01-01

    Biomass estimation of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi, widespread plant root symbionts, commonly employs lipid biomarkers, predominantly the fatty acid 16:1ω5. We briefly reviewed the application of this signature fatty acid, followed by a case study comparing biochemical markers with microscopic techniques in an arable soil following a change to AM non-host plants after 27 years of continuous host crops, that is, two successive cropping seasons with wheat followed by amaranth. After switching to the non-host amaranth, spore biomass estimated by the neutral lipid fatty acid (NLFA) 16:1ω5 decreased to almost nil, whereas microscopic spore counts decreased by about 50% only. In contrast, AM hyphal biomass assessed by the phospholipid (PLFA) 16:1ω5 was greater under amaranth than wheat. The application of PLFA 16:1ω5 as biomarker was hampered by background level derived from bacteria, and further enhanced by its incorporation from degrading spores used as microbial resource. Meanwhile, biochemical and morphological assessments showed negative correlation for spores and none for hyphal biomass. In conclusion, the NLFA 16:1ω5 appears to be a feasible indicator for AM fungi of the Glomales group in the complex field soils, whereas the use of PLFA 16:1ω5 for hyphae is unsuitable and should be restricted to controlled laboratory studies. PMID:22830034

  16. Membrane properties of Enchytraeus albidus originating from contrasting environments: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Fisker, Karina Vincents; Bouvrais, Hélène; Overgaard, Johannes; Schöttner, Konrad; Ipsen, John H; Holmstrup, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Ectothermic animals adapted to different environmental temperatures are hypothesized to have biological membranes with different chemical and physical properties such that membrane properties are optimized for their particular thermal environments. To test this hypothesis we analyzed the composition of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in seven different populations of Enchytraeus albidus originating from different thermal environments. The seven populations differ markedly in origin (polar-temperate) and are also characterized by marked difference in cold tolerance. The dominant PLFAs of E. albidus were C20:5, C20:4 and C20:2 (53-61% of total PLFA) followed by C18:0, C20:1 and C22:2 (17-20% of total PLFA). As hypothesized the PLFA composition varied significantly between populations and molar percentage of several of the PLFAs (particularly C18:2) correlated with the lower lethal temperature (LT50) of the seven populations. Unsaturation ratio (UFA/SFA) and average PLFA chain length also correlated significantly with LT50, such that cold sensitive populations had a shorter chain length and a lower UFA/SFA compared to cold tolerant populations. Reconstituted membranes of the least and most cold tolerant populations were used to compare membranes' physical properties by fluorescence anisotropy and bending rigidity. Measurements of anisotropy did not show any overall difference between populations with different cold tolerance. This could be interpreted as if E. albidus populations have achieved a similar "optimal" fluidity of the membrane with a somewhat different PLFA composition. Our study suggests that membrane lipid composition could be important for the cold tolerance of E. albidus; however, these differences are not easily differentiated in the measurements of the membranes' physical properties. Other parameters such as accumulation of glucose for cryoprotection and energy supply may also be important components of enchytraeid freeze tolerance. PMID:25663468

  17. Enhancing Phospholipid Fatty Acid Profiling of Soil Bacterial Communities via Substrate- Specific 13C-labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evershed, R. P.; Maxfield, P. J.; Bingham, E. M.; Dildar, N.; Brennand, E. L.; Hornibrook, E.

    2008-12-01

    A range of culture-independent methods, has recently emerged to study environmental microorganisms in situ[1]. One such method is phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, wherein these ubiquitous membrane lipids provide a powerful tool for the study of unculturable soil microorganisms. PLFA analyses have been used to investigate the impacts of a wide range of environmental factors on the soil microbial community. An acknowledged shortcoming of the PLFAs approach is the lack the chemotaxonoic specificity, which restricts the ability of the method to probe the activities of specific functional groups of the microbial community selectively. However, the selectivity of PLFAs analyses can be enhanced by incubating soils with 13C- labelled substrates followed by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry to reveal the specific PLFAs incorporating the 13C-label. The application of this approach will be demonstrated through our recent work on methanotrophic bacteria in soils. We applied this approach initially to mineral soils[2] and then extended chemotaxonomic assessments by using a combination of 13C-labelled PLFAs and hopanoids [3]. We have used this approach to explore the properties of high affinity methanotrophs in a range of environments, investigating the relationship between methane oxidation rates and the nature and magnitude of the methanotrophic community for the first time[4,5] More recently we extended the technique using a novel time series 13C-labelling of PLFAs[6] to estimate the rate and progression of 13C- label incorporation and turnover of methanotrophic populations. This modified approach has been used to investigate the impacts of various environmental variables, e.g. soil type, vegetation cover and land use, on the methanotrophic biomass[7.8]. The unique nature of the 13CH4 as a gaseous substate/carbon source means that can be readily introduced into soils via a specific subset of the soil microbial biomass, thereby offering many

  18. Amino acid analysis using chromatography-mass spectrometry: An inter platform comparison study.

    PubMed

    Krumpochova, P; Bruyneel, B; Molenaar, D; Koukou, A; Wuhrer, M; Niessen, W M A; Giera, M

    2015-10-10

    The analysis of amino acids has become a central task in many aspects. While amino acid analysis has traditionally mainly been carried out using either gas chromatography (GC) in combination with flame ionization detection or liquid chromatography (LC) with either post-column derivatization using ninhydrin or pre-column derivatization using o-phthalaldehyde, many of today's analysis platforms are based on chromatography in combination with mass spectrometry (MS). While derivatization is mandatory for the GC-based analysis of amino acids, several LC platforms have emerged, particularly in the dawn of targeted metabolite profiling using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) coupled to MS, allowing the analysis of underivatized amino acids. Among the numerous analytical platforms available for amino acid analysis today, we here compare three prominent approaches, being GC-MS and LC-MS after amino acid derivatization using chloroformate and HILIC-MS of underivatized amino acids. We compare and discuss practical issues as well as performance characteristics, e.g., the use of (13)C-labeled internal standards, of the different platforms and present data on their practical implementation in our laboratory. Finally, we compare the real-life applicability of all three platforms for a complex biological sample. While all three platforms are very-well suited for the analysis of complex biological samples they all show advantages and disadvantages for some analytes as discussed in detail in this manuscript. PMID:26115383

  19. Salts of phenylacetic acid and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid with Cinchona alkaloids: Crystal structures, thermal analysis and FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amombo Noa, Francoise M.; Jacobs, Ayesha

    2016-06-01

    Seven salts were formed with phenylacetic acid (PAA), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPAA) and the Cinchona alkaloids; cinchonidine (CIND), quinidine (QUID) and quinine (QUIN). For all the structures the proton was transferred from the carboxylic acid of the PAA/HPAA to the quinuclidine nitrogen of the respective Cinchona alkaloid. For six of the salts, water was included in the crystal structures with one of these also incorporating an isopropanol solvent molecule. However HPAA co-crystallised with quinine to form an anhydrous salt, (HPAA-)(QUIN+). The thermal stability of the salts were determined and differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the (HPAA-)(QUIN+) salt had the highest thermal stability compared to the other salt hydrates. The salts were also characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. (PAA-)(QUID+)·H2O and (PAA-)(QUIN+)·H2O are isostructural and Hirshfeld surface analysis was completed to compare the intermolecular interactions in these two structures.

  20. Fatty acids in serum and diet--a canonical correlation analysis among toddlers.

    PubMed

    Uusitalo, Liisa; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Salminen, Irma; Ovaskainen, Marja-Leena; Kronberg-Kippilä, Carina; Ahonen, Suvi; Niinistö, Sari; Alfthan, Georg; Simell, Olli; Ilonen, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Knip, Mikael; Virtanen, Suvi M

    2013-07-01

    Fatty acid concentrations in blood are potential biomarkers of dietary fat intake, but methodological studies among children are scarce. The large number of fatty acids and their complex interrelationships pose a special challenge in research on fatty acids. Our target was to assess the interrelationships between the total fatty acid profiles in diet and serum of young children. The study subjects were healthy control children from the birth cohort of the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Study. A 3-day food record and a frozen serum sample were available from 135 children at the age of 1 year, from 133 at 2 years, and from 92 at 3 years. The relationship between dietary and serum fatty acid profiles was analysed using canonical correlation analysis. The consumption of fatty milk correlated positively with serum fatty acids, pentadecanoic acid, palmitic acid and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) at all ages. Correlations between dietary and serum eicosapentaenoic and/or docosahexaenoic acid were observed at 2 and 3 years of age. Serum linoleic acid was positively associated with the consumption of infant formula at the age of 1 year, and with the consumption of vegetable margarine at 2 and 3 years. The results indicate a high quality of the 3-day food records kept by parents and other caretakers of the children, and suitability of non-fasting, un-fractioned serum samples for total fatty acid analyses. The correlation between intake of milk fat and serum proportion of CLA is a novel finding. PMID:22066932

  1. Validation of acid washes as critical control points in hazard analysis and critical control point systems.

    PubMed

    Dormedy, E S; Brashears, M M; Cutter, C N; Burson, D E

    2000-12-01

    A 2% lactic acid wash used in a large meat-processing facility was validated as an effective critical control point (CCP) in a hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) plan. We examined the microbial profiles of beef carcasses before the acid wash, beef carcasses immediately after the acid wash, beef carcasses 24 h after the acid wash, beef subprimal cuts from the acid-washed carcasses, and on ground beef made from acid-washed carcasses. Total mesophilic, psychrotrophic, coliforms, generic Escherichia coli, lactic acid bacteria, pseudomonads, and acid-tolerant microorganisms were enumerated on all samples. The presence of Salmonella spp. was also determined. Acid washing significantly reduced all counts except for pseudomonads that were present at very low numbers before acid washing. All other counts continued to stay significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those on pre-acid-washed carcasses throughout all processing steps. Total bacteria, coliforms, and generic E. coli enumerated on ground beef samples were more than 1 log cycle lower than those reported in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Baseline data. This study suggests that acid washes may be effective CCPs in HACCP plans and can significantly reduce the total number of microorganisms present on the carcass and during further processing. PMID:11131890

  2. Acidic deposition effects on vegetation: a review and analysis of methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    Acid rain has recently been implicated as an agent which may potentially impact (both positively and negatively) vegetative growth. Although numerous hypotheses have been published regarding long-term acid rain damage to forests and croplands, there are few research results to directly support conclusive estimations of impact. A description and analysis of the approach and techniques used by researchers examining the vegetative impacts of acid rain is presented. 26 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  3. The microbial communities and potential greenhouse gas production in boreal acid sulphate, non-acid sulphate, and reedy sulphidic soils.

    PubMed

    Šimek, Miloslav; Virtanen, Seija; Simojoki, Asko; Chroňáková, Alica; Elhottová, Dana; Krištůfek, Václav; Yli-Halla, Markku

    2014-01-01

    Acid sulphate (AS) soils along the Baltic coasts contain significant amounts of organic carbon and nitrogen in their subsoils. The abundance, composition, and activity of microbial communities throughout the AS soil profile were analysed. The data from a drained AS soil were compared with those from a drained non-AS soil and a pristine wetland soil from the same region. Moreover, the potential production of methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide from the soils was determined under laboratory conditions. Direct microscopic counting, glucose-induced respiration (GIR), whole cell hybridisation, and extended phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis confirmed the presence of abundant microbial communities in the topsoil and also in the deepest Cg2 horizon of the AS soil. The patterns of microbial counts, biomass and activity in the profile of the AS soil and partly also in the non-AS soil therefore differed from the general tendency of gradual decreases in soil profiles. High respiration in the deepest Cg2 horizon of the AS soil (5.66 μg Cg(-1)h(-1), as compared to 2.71 μg Cg(-1)h(-1) in a top Ap horizon) is unusual but reasonable given the large amount of organic carbon in this horizon. Nitrous oxide production peaked in the BCgc horizon of the AS and in the BC horizon of the non-AS soil, but the peak value was ten-fold higher in the AS soil than in the non-AS soil (82.3 vs. 8.6 ng Ng(-1)d(-1)). The data suggest that boreal AS soils on the Baltic coast contain high microbial abundance and activity. This, together with the abundant carbon and total and mineral nitrogen in the deep layers of AS soils, may result in substantial gas production. Consequently, high GHG emissions could occur, for example, when the generally high water table is lowered because of arable farming.

  4. Chemometric Approach to Fatty Acid Profiles in Soybean Cultivars by Principal Component Analysis (PCA).

    PubMed

    Shin, Eui-Cheol; Hwang, Chung Eun; Lee, Byong Won; Kim, Hyun Tae; Ko, Jong Min; Baek, In Youl; Lee, Yang-Bong; Choi, Jin Sang; Cho, Eun Ju; Seo, Weon Taek; Cho, Kye Man

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the fatty acid profiles in 18 soybean cultivars grown in Korea. A total of eleven fatty acids were identified in the sample set, which was comprised of myristic (C14:0), palmitic (C16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1, ω7), stearic (C18:0), oleic (C18:1, ω9), linoleic (C18:2, ω6), linolenic (C18:3, ω3), arachidic (C20:0), gondoic (C20:1, ω9), behenic (C22:0), and lignoceric (C24:0) acids by gas-liquid chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Based on their color, yellow-, black-, brown-, and green-colored cultivars were denoted. Correlation coefficients (r) between the nine major fatty acids identified (two trace fatty acids, myristic and palmitoleic, were not included in the study) were generated and revealed an inverse association between oleic and linoleic acids (r=-0.94, p<0.05), while stearic acid was positively correlated to arachidic acid (r=0.72, p<0.05). Principal component analysis (PCA) of the fatty acid data yielded four significant principal components (PCs; i.e., eigenvalues>1), which together account for 81.49% of the total variance in the data set; with PC1 contributing 28.16% of the total. Eigen analysis of the correlation matrix loadings of the four significant PCs revealed that PC1 was mainly contributed to by oleic, linoleic, and gondoic acids, PC2 by stearic, linolenic and arachidic acids, PC3 by behenic and lignoceric acids, and PC4 by palmitic acid. The score plots generated between PC1-PC2 and PC3-PC4 segregated soybean cultivars based on fatty acid composition. PMID:24471082

  5. Particle concentration measurement of virus samples using electrospray differential mobility analysis and quantitative amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Cole, Kenneth D; Pease, Leonard F; Tsai, De-Hao; Singh, Tania; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt A; Wang, Lili

    2009-07-24

    Virus reference materials are needed to develop and calibrate detection devices and instruments. We used electrospray differential mobility analysis (ES-DMA) and quantitative amino acid analysis (AAA) to determine the particle concentration of three small model viruses (bacteriophages MS2, PP7, and phiX174). The biological activity, purity, and aggregation of the virus samples were measured using plaque assays, denaturing gel electrophoresis, and size-exclusion chromatography. ES-DMA was developed to count the virus particles using gold nanoparticles as internal standards. ES-DMA additionally provides quantitative measurement of the size and extent of aggregation in the virus samples. Quantitative AAA was also used to determine the mass of the viral proteins in the pure virus samples. The samples were hydrolyzed and the masses of the well-recovered amino acids were used to calculate the equivalent concentration of viral particles in the samples. The concentration of the virus samples determined by ES-DMA was in good agreement with the concentration predicted by AAA for these purified samples. The advantages and limitations of ES-DMA and AAA to characterize virus reference materials are discussed.

  6. Mass spectral analysis of C3 and C4 aliphatic amino acid derivatives.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Chadha, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Diagnostic criteria are obtained for the distinction of alpha, beta, gamma, and N-methyl isomers of the C3 and C4 aliphatic amino acids, using mass spectral analysis of the derivatives of these acids. The use of deuterium labeling has helped in the understanding of certain fragmentation pathways.

  7. Analysis and properties of the decarboxylation products of oleic acid by catalytic triruthenium dodecacarbonyl

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, ruthenium-catalyzed isomerization-decarboxylation of fatty acids to give alkene mixtures was reported. When the substrate was oleic acid, the reaction yielded a mixture consisting of heptadecene isomers. In this work, we report the compositional analysis of the mixture obtained by triruthe...

  8. Analysis of Steam Heating of a Two-Layer TBP/N-Paraffin/Nitric Acid Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.; Hassan, N.M.; Rudisill, T.S.; Askew, N.M.

    1998-07-22

    This report presents an analysis of steam heating of a two-layer tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/n-paraffin-nitric acid mixture.The purpose of this study is to determine if the degree of mixing provided by the steam jet or by bubbles generated by the TBP/nitric acid reaction is sufficient to prevent a runaway reaction.

  9. Students' Understanding of Acid, Base and Salt Reactions in Qualitative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kim-Chwee Daniel; Goh, Ngoh-Khang; Chia, Lian-Sai; Treagust, David F.

    2003-01-01

    Uses a two-tier, multiple-choice diagnostic instrument to determine (n=915) grade 10 students' understanding of the acid, base, and salt reactions involved in basic qualitative analysis. Reports that many students did not understand the formation of precipitates and the complex salts, acid/salt-base reactions, and thermal decomposition involved in…

  10. GC-MS Analysis of [gamma]-Hydroxybutyric Acid Analogs: A Forensic Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henck, Colin; Nally, Luke

    2007-01-01

    An upper-division forensic chemistry experiment is described. It involves using glycolic acid and sodium glycolate as analogs of [gamma]-hydroxybutyric acid and its sodium salt. The experiment shows the use of silylation in GC-MS analysis and gives students the opportunity to work with a commonly used silylating reagent,…

  11. LCMS analysis of fingerprints, the amino acid profile of 20 donors.

    PubMed

    de Puit, Marcel; Ismail, Mahado; Xu, Xiaoma

    2014-03-01

    The analysis of amino acids present in fingerprints has been studied several times. In this paper, we report a method for the analysis of amino acids using an fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl chloride-derivatization for LC separation and MS detection. We have obtained good results with regard to the calibration curves and the limit of detection and LOQ for the target compounds. The extraction of the amino acids from the substrates used proved to be very efficient. Analysis of the derivatized amino acids enabled us to obtain full amino acid profiles for 20 donors. The intervariability is as expected rather large, with serine as the most abundant constituent, and when examining the total profile of the amino acids per donor, a characteristic pattern can be observed. Some amino acids were not detected in some donors, or fell out of the range of the calibration curve, where others showed a surprisingly high amount of material in the deposition analyses. Further investigations will have to address the intravariability of the amino acid profiles of the fingerprints from donors. By the development of the analytical method and the application to the analysis of fingerprints, we were able to gain insight in the variability of the constituents of fingerprints between the donors.

  12. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory


    MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in rodents when administered in dri...

  13. Metabolomic analysis of amino acid and energy metabolism in rats supplemented with chlorogenic acid

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Zheng; Yang, Yuhui; Zhou, Yan; Wen, Yanmei; Ding, Sheng; Liu, Gang; Wu, Xin; Deng, Zeyuan; Assaad, Houssein; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA) supplementation on serum and hepatic metabolomes in rats. Rats received daily intragastric administration of either CGA (60 mg/kg body weight) or distilled water (control) for 4 weeks. Growth performance, serum biochemical profiles, and hepatic morphology were measured. Additionally, serum and liver tissue extracts were analyzed for metabolomes by high-resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics and multivariate statistics. CGA did not affect rat growth performance, serum biochemical profiles, or hepatic morphology. However, supplementation with CGA decreased serum concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, succinate, citrate, β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, while increasing serum concentrations of glycine and hepatic concentrations of glutathione. These results suggest that CGA supplementation results in perturbation of energy and amino acid metabolism in rats. We suggest that glycine and glutathione in serum may be useful biomarkers for biological properties of CGA on nitrogen metabolism in vivo. PMID:24927697

  14. Analysis and survival of amino acids in Martian regolith analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garry, James R. C.; Loes Ten Kate, Inge; Martins, Zita; Nørnberg, Per; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

    2006-03-01

    We have investigated the native amino acid composition of two analogs of Martian soil, JSC Mars-1 and Salten Skov. A Mars simulation chamber has been built and used to expose samples of these analogs to temperature and lighting conditions similar to those found at low latitudes on the Martian surface. The effects of the simulated conditions have been examined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Exposure to energetic ultraviolet (UV) light in vacuum appears to cause a modest increase in the concentration of certain amino acids within the materials, which is interpreted as resulting from the degradation of microorganisms. The influence of low temperatures shows that the accretion of condensed water on the soils leads to the destruction of amino acids, supporting the idea that reactive chemical processes involving H2O are at work within the Martian soil. We discuss the influence of UV radiation, low temperatures, and gaseous CO2 on the intrinsic amino acid composition of Martian soil analogs and describe, with the help of a simple model, how these studies fit within the framework of life detection on Mars and the practical tasks of choosing and using Martian regolith analogs in planetary research.

  15. HPLC Analysis of [Alpha]- and [Beta]-Acids in Hops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danenhower, Travis M.; Force, Leyna J.; Petersen, Kenneth J.; Betts, Thomas A.; Baker, Gary A.

    2008-01-01

    Hops have been used for centuries to impart aroma and bitterness to beer. The cones of the female hop plant contain both essential oils, which include many of the fragrant components of hops, and a collection of compounds known as [alpha]- and [beta]-acids that are the precursors to bittering agents. In order for brewers to predict the ultimate…

  16. Comparing models for perfluorooctanoic acid pharmacokinetics using Bayesian analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selecting the appropriate pharmacokinetic (PK) model given the available data is investigated for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), which has been widely analyzed with an empirical, one-compartment model. This research examined the results of experiments [Kemper R. A., DuPont Haskel...

  17. Soil Studies: Applying Acid-Base Chemistry to Environmental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Donna M.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory activities for chemistry students focus attention on the use of acid-base chemistry to examine environmental conditions. After using standard laboratory procedures to analyze soil and rainwater samples, students use web-based resources to interpret their findings. Uses CBL probes and graphing calculators to gather and analyze data and…

  18. A microcomputer program for analysis of nucleic acid hybridization data

    PubMed Central

    Green, S.; Field, J.K.; Green, C.D.; Beynon, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The study of nucleic acid hybridization is facilitated by computer mediated fitting of theoretical models to experimental data. This paper describes a non-linear curve fitting program, using the `Patternsearch' algorithm, written in BASIC for the Apple II microcomputer. The advantages and disadvantages of using a microcomputer for local data processing are discussed. Images PMID:7071017

  19. Analysis of Organic Acids, Deacetyl Asperulosidic Acid and Polyphenolic Compounds as a Potential Tool for Characterization of Noni (Morinda citrifolia) Products.

    PubMed

    Bittová, Miroslava; Hladůkova, Dita; Roblová, Vendula; Krácmar, Stanislav; Kubán, Petr; Kubán, Vlastimil

    2015-11-01

    Organic acids, deacetyl asperulosidic acid (DAA) and polyphenolic compounds in various noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) products (4 juices, 4 dry fruit powders and 2 capsules with dry fruit powder) were analyzed. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled with a variable wavelength detector (VWD) and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ESI-TOF MS) was applied for simultaneous analysis of organic acids (malic, lactic, citric and succinic acid) and DAA. An RP-HPLC method with diode-array detector (DAD) was developed for the analysis of polyphenolic compound content (rutin, catechin, quercitrin, kaempferol, gallic acid, caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid). The developed methods can contribute to better characterization of available noni products that is required from the consumers. In our study, we discovered significant dissimilarities in the content of DAA, citric acid and several phenolic compounds in some samples.

  20. Analysis of Organic Acids, Deacetyl Asperulosidic Acid and Polyphenolic Compounds as a Potential Tool for Characterization of Noni (Morinda citrifolia) Products.

    PubMed

    Bittová, Miroslava; Hladůkova, Dita; Roblová, Vendula; Krácmar, Stanislav; Kubán, Petr; Kubán, Vlastimil

    2015-11-01

    Organic acids, deacetyl asperulosidic acid (DAA) and polyphenolic compounds in various noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) products (4 juices, 4 dry fruit powders and 2 capsules with dry fruit powder) were analyzed. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled with a variable wavelength detector (VWD) and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ESI-TOF MS) was applied for simultaneous analysis of organic acids (malic, lactic, citric and succinic acid) and DAA. An RP-HPLC method with diode-array detector (DAD) was developed for the analysis of polyphenolic compound content (rutin, catechin, quercitrin, kaempferol, gallic acid, caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid). The developed methods can contribute to better characterization of available noni products that is required from the consumers. In our study, we discovered significant dissimilarities in the content of DAA, citric acid and several phenolic compounds in some samples. PMID:26749805

  1. Titration of strong and weak acids by sequential injection analysis technique.

    PubMed

    Maskula, S; Nyman, J; Ivaska, A

    2000-05-31

    A sequential injection analysis (SIA) titration method has been developed for acid-base titrations. Strong and weak acids in different concentration ranges have been titrated with a strong base. The method is based on sequential aspiration of an acidic sample zone and only one zone of the base into a carrier stream of distilled water. On their way to the detector, the sample and the reagent zones are partially mixed due to the dispersion and thereby the base is partially neutralised by the acid. The base zone contains the indicator. An LED-spectrophotometer is used as detector. It senses the colour of the unneutralised base and the signal is recorded as a typical SIA peak. The peak area of the unreacted base was found to be proportional to the logarithm of the acid concentration. Calibration curves with good linearity were obtained for a strong acid in the concentration ranges of 10(-4)-10(-2) and 0.1-3 M. Automatic sample dilution was implemented when sulphuric acid at concentration of 6-13 M was titrated. For a weak acid, i.e. acetic acid, a linear calibration curve was obtained in the range of 3x10(-4)-8x10(-2) M. By changing the volumes of the injected sample and the reagent, different acids as well as different concentration ranges of the acids can be titrated without any other adjustments in the SIA manifold or the titration protocol. PMID:18967966

  2. Titration of strong and weak acids by sequential injection analysis technique.

    PubMed

    Maskula, S; Nyman, J; Ivaska, A

    2000-05-31

    A sequential injection analysis (SIA) titration method has been developed for acid-base titrations. Strong and weak acids in different concentration ranges have been titrated with a strong base. The method is based on sequential aspiration of an acidic sample zone and only one zone of the base into a carrier stream of distilled water. On their way to the detector, the sample and the reagent zones are partially mixed due to the dispersion and thereby the base is partially neutralised by the acid. The base zone contains the indicator. An LED-spectrophotometer is used as detector. It senses the colour of the unneutralised base and the signal is recorded as a typical SIA peak. The peak area of the unreacted base was found to be proportional to the logarithm of the acid concentration. Calibration curves with good linearity were obtained for a strong acid in the concentration ranges of 10(-4)-10(-2) and 0.1-3 M. Automatic sample dilution was implemented when sulphuric acid at concentration of 6-13 M was titrated. For a weak acid, i.e. acetic acid, a linear calibration curve was obtained in the range of 3x10(-4)-8x10(-2) M. By changing the volumes of the injected sample and the reagent, different acids as well as different concentration ranges of the acids can be titrated without any other adjustments in the SIA manifold or the titration protocol.

  3. Effect of Conjugated Linoleic Acid Feeding on the Growth Performance and Meat Fatty Acid Profiles in Broiler: Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sangbuem; Ryu, Chaehwa; Yang, Jinho; Mbiriri, David Tinotenda; Choi, Chang-Weon; Chae, Jung-Il; Kim, Young-Hoon; Shim, Kwan-Seob; Kim, Young Jun; Choi, Nag-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) feeding on growth performance and fatty acid profiles in thigh meat of broiler chicken was investigated using meta-analysis with a total of 9 studies. Overall effects were calculated by standardized mean differences between treatment (CLA fed) and control using Hedges’s adjusted g from fixed and random effect models. Meta-regression was conducted to evaluate the effect of CLA levels. Subgroups in the same study were designated according to used levels of CLA, CP levels or substituted oils in diets. The effects on final body weight, weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio were investigated as growth parameters. Total saturated and unsaturated fatty acid concentrations and C16:0, C18:0, C18:2 and C18:3 concentrations in thigh meat of broiler chicken were used as fatty acid profile parameters. The overall effect of CLA feeding on final weight was negative and it was only significant in fixed effect model (p<0.01). Significantly lower weight gain, feed intake and higher feed conversion ratio compared to control were found (p<0.05). CLA feeding on the overall increased total saturated fatty acid concentration in broilers compared to the control diet (p<0.01). Total unsaturated fatty acid concentration was significantly decreased by CLA feeding (p<0.01). As for individual fatty acid profiles, C16:0, C18:0 and C18:3 were increased and C18:2 was significantly decreased by CLA feeding (p<0.01). In conclusion, CLA was proved not to be beneficial for improving growth performance, whereas it might be supposed that CLA is effective modulating n-6/n-3 fatty acids ratio in thigh meat. However, the economical compensation of the loss from suppressed growth performance and increased saturated fatty acids with the benefit from enhanced n-6/n-3 ratio should be investigated in further studies in order to propose an appropriate use of dietary CLA in the broiler industry. PMID:25049878

  4. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis of Amino Acids for Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie; Elsila, Jamie E.; Stern J. C.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2008-01-01

    Significant portions of the early Earth's prebiotic organic inventory , including amino acids, could have been delivered to the Earth's sur face by comets and their fragments. Analysis of comets via spectrosc opic observations has identified many organic molecules, including me thane, ethane, arnmonia, cyanic acid, formaldehyde, formamide, acetal ehyde, acetonitrile, and methanol. Reactions between these identifie d molecules could allow the formation of more complex organics such a s amino acids. Isotopic analysis could reveal whether an extraterrest rial signature is present in the Stardust-exposed amines and amino ac ids. Although bulk isotopic analysis would be dominated by the EACA contaminant's terrestrial signature, compoundspecific isotope analysi s (CSIA) could determine the signature of each of the other individua l amines. Here, we report on progress made towards CSIA of the amino acids glycine and EACA in Stardustreturned samples.

  5. Molten Carbonate and Phosphoric Acid Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview and Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Remick, R.; Wheeler, D.

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the technical and cost gap analysis performed to identify pathways for reducing the costs of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stationary fuel cell power plants.

  6. 13C-DEPLETED MICROBIAL LIPIDS INDICATE SEASONAL METHANOTROPHIC ACTIVITY IN SHALLOW ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compound specific isotope analysis was combined with phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis to identify methanotrophic activity in members of the sedimentary microbial community in the Altamaha and Savannah River estuaries in Georgia. 13C-depleted PLFAs indicate methane utilizat...

  7. Trajectory analysis of acid deposition data from the new jersey pine barrens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd, William W.

    This research provides an example of the application of a simple method for evaluating regional interrelationships using air parcel trajectory analysis. An assessment of trajectories associated with storms affecting McDonald's Branch watershed (39°50'N, 74°30'W) is presented. A simple classification system is used to examine regional contributions of acid precursors. The results of the work suggest that major regional sources of acid precursor emissions dominated precipitation acidity for the Pine Barrens region from 1978 to 1981. An incremental approach to acid precipitation policy is suggested.

  8. Metagenomic Analysis of the Rhizosphere Soil Microbiome with Respect to Phytic Acid Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Unno, Yusuke; Shinano, Takuro

    2013-01-01

    While phytic acid is a major form of organic phosphate in many soils, plant utilization of phytic acid is normally limited; however, culture trials of Lotus japonicus using experimental field soil that had been managed without phosphate fertilizer for over 90 years showed significant usage of phytic acid applied to soil for growth and flowering and differences in the degree of growth, even in the same culture pot. To understand the key metabolic processes involved in soil phytic acid utilization, we analyzed rhizosphere soil microbial communities using molecular ecological approaches. Although molecular fingerprint analysis revealed changes in the rhizosphere soil microbial communities from bulk soil microbial community, no clear relationship between the microbiome composition and flowering status that might be related to phytic acid utilization of L. japonicus could be determined. However, metagenomic analysis revealed changes in the relative abundance of the classes Bacteroidetes, Betaproteobacteria, Chlorobi, Dehalococcoidetes and Methanobacteria, which include strains that potentially promote plant growth and phytic acid utilization, and some gene clusters relating to phytic acid utilization, such as alkaline phosphatase and citrate synthase, with the phytic acid utilization status of the plant. This study highlights phylogenetic and metabolic features of the microbial community of the L. japonicus rhizosphere and provides a basic understanding of how rhizosphere microbial communities affect the phytic acid status in soil. PMID:23257911

  9. Collection and analysis of organic acids in exhaust gas. Comparison of different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervas, E.; Montagne, X.; Lahaye, J.

    This paper reports the development of a specific method to identify organic acids in exhaust gases. The organic acids are collected in two impingers containing liquids (pure water or Na 2CO 3 1% aqueous solution) and four cartridges containing solids (silica, fluorisil, alumina B and alumina N). Once collected, the acids are eluted of the solids by a hot water stream. These traps performances, in terms of organic acids collection and elution efficiency, are evaluated and compared. Two sources are used to produce the gas flow containing organic acids: one generates a flow whose concentration is known and stable, the other produces organic acids among other combustion products. For eluted solutions analysis, two methods are used: isocratic ionic chromatography/conductivity detection and GC/FID. Their efficiency in separating 10 aliphatic acids are compared. Their characteristics such as detection limits, detection linearity, repeatability and possible interferences with other components found in exhaust gases are determined. The stability of the organic acids solutions is also studied. Lastly, the use of these methods is illustrated by the analysis of the gas-phase organic acids exhausted by a spark ignition and by a diesel engine.

  10. Hands-free sample preparation platform for nucleic acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Baier, T; Hansen-Hagge, T E; Gransee, R; Crombé, A; Schmahl, S; Paulus, C; Drese, K S; Keegan, H; Martin, C; O'Leary, J J; Furuberg, L; Solli, L; Grønn, P; Falang, I M; Karlgård, A; Gulliksen, A; Karlsen, F

    2009-12-01

    A Lab-On-Chip system with an instrument is presented which is capable of performing total sample preparation and automated extraction of nucleic acid from human cell samples fixed in a methanol based solution. The target application is extraction of mRNA from cervical liquid based cytology specimens for detection of transformed HPV-infections. The device accepts 3 ml of sample and performs the extraction in a disposable polymer chip of credit card size. All necessary reagents for cell lysis, washing, and elution are stored on-chip and the extraction is performed in two filter stages; one for cell pre-concentration and the other for nucleic acid capture. Tests performed using cancer cell lines and cervical liquid based cytology specimens confirm the extraction of HPV-mRNA by the system. PMID:19904407

  11. Hybrid molecular probe for nucleic acid analysis in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chaoyong James; Martinez, Karen; Lin, Hui; Tan, Weihong

    2006-08-01

    The ability to detect changes in gene expression, especially in real-time and with sensitivity sufficient enough to monitor small variations in a single-cell, will have considerable value in biomedical research and applications. Out of the many available molecular probes for intracellular monitoring of nucleic acids, molecular beacon (MB) is the most frequently used probe with the advantages of high sensitivity and selectivity. However, any processes in which the MB stem-loop structure is broken will result in a restoration of the fluorescence in MB. This brings in a few possibilities for false positive signal such as nuclease degradation, protein binding, thermodynamic fluctuation, solution composition variations (such as pH, salt concentration) and sticky-end pairing. These unwanted processes do exist inside living cells, making nucleic acid monitoring inside living cells difficult. We have designed and synthesized a hybrid molecular probe (HMP) for intracellular nucleic acid monitoring to overcome these problems. HMP has two DNA probes, one labeled with a donor and the other an acceptor. The two DNA probes are linked by a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) linker, with each DNA being complementary to adjacent areas of a target sequence. Target binding event brings the donor and acceptor in proximity, resulting in quenching of the donor fluorescence and enhancement of the acceptor emission. The newly designed HMP has high sensitivity, selectivity, and fast hybridization kinetics. The probe is easy to design and synthesize. HMP does not generate any false positive signal upon digestion by nuclease, binding by proteins, forming complexes by sticky-end pairing, or by other molecular interaction processes. HMP is capable of selectively detecting nucleic acid targets from cellular samples.

  12. Keto acid profiling analysis as ethoxime/tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc-Toan; Lee, Gwang; Paik, Man-Jeong

    2013-01-15

    Organic acids, including keto acids, are key intermediates of central pathways in cellular metabolism. In this study, a comprehensive and reliable method was developed and optimized for the simultaneous measurement of 17 keto acids in various biological samples. The keto acids were converted to solvent extractable forms by ethoximation followed by tert-butyldimethylsilylation for direct analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring mode. The proposed method was precise (0.05-8.3, % RSD) and accurate (-10.5 to 5.3, % RE) with low limit of detection (0.01-0.5ng/mL) and good linearity (r>0.995) in the range of 0.01-5.0μg/mL. This was suitable for profiling analysis of targeted keto acids in human plasma, urine and rat brain tissue.

  13. Quantitative analysis of cyclic dimer fatty acid content in the dimerization product by proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyun Joo; Kim, Minyoung; Seok, Seunghwan; Kim, Young-Wun; Kim, Do Hyun

    2015-01-01

    In this work, (1)H NMR is utilized for the quantitative analysis of a specific cyclic dimer fatty acid in a dimer acid mixture using the pseudo-standard material of mesitylene on the basis of its structural similarity. Mesitylene and cyclic dimer acid levels were determined using the signal of the proton on the cyclic ring (δ=6.8) referenced to the signal of maleic acid (δ=6.2). The content of the cyclic dimer fatty acid was successfully determined through the standard curve of mesitylene and the reported equation. Using the linearity of the mesitylene curve, the cyclic dimer fatty acid in the oil mixture was quantified. The results suggest that the proposed method can be used to quantify cyclic compounds in mixtures to optimize the dimerization process.

  14. Analysis of bacterial diversity in acidic pond water and compost after treatment of artificial acid mine drainage for metal removal.

    PubMed

    Morales, Teresita A; Dopson, Mark; Athar, Rana; Herbert, Roger B

    2005-06-01

    The microbial population of a sludge amended leaf compost material utilized for treatment of artificial acid mine drainage was studied by culture-independent molecular methods. Iron-rich and sulfurous wastewater (artificial acid mine drainage) was circulated through a column bioreactor for 16 months. After 12 months the column was inoculated with a mixed culture from an acidic pond receiving acid mine drainage from a tailings impoundment at a decommissioned site in Kristineberg, North Sweden. Hydrogen sulfide odor and the formation of black precipitates indicated that sulfate-reduction occurred in the column. 16S rDNA gene analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, cloning, and sequencing as well as fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed the presence of microorganisms closely related to sulfate-reducing bacteria and microorganisms from the genera Pseudoxanthmonas, Dechlorosoma, Desulfovibrio, Agrobacterium, Methylocapsa, Rhodococcus, Sulfobacillus, and some unidentified bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were found in the column bioreactor 2 weeks after inoculation, but not thereafter. This suggests they were in low abundance, even though sulfate remediation rates were significant. Instead, the population contained species similar to those previously found to utilize humic substances released from the compost material. PMID:15818559

  15. Analysis of acid rain patterns in northeastern China using a decision tree method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuying; Jiang, Hong; Jin, Jiaxin; Xu, Xiaohua; Zhang, Qingxin

    2012-01-01

    Acid rain is a major regional-scale environmental problem in China. To control acid rain pollution and to protect the ecological environment, it is urgent to document acid rain patterns in various regions of China. Taking Liaoning Province as the study area, the present work focused on the spatial and temporal variations of acid rains in northeastern China. It presents a means for predicting the occurrence of acid rain using geographic position, terrain characteristics, routinely monitored meteorological factors and column concentrations of atmospheric SO 2 and NO 2. The analysis applies a decision tree approach to the foregoing observation data. Results showed that: (1) acid rain occurred at 17 stations among the 81 monitoring stations in Liaoning Province, with the frequency of acid rain from 0 to 84.38%; (2) summer had the most acid rain occurrences followed by spring and autumn, and the winter had the least; (3) the total accuracy for the simulation of precipitation pH (pH ≤ 4.5, 4.5 < pH ≤ 5.6, and pH > 5.6) was 98.04% using the decision tree method known as C5. The simulation results also indicated that the distance to coastline, elevation, wind direction, wind speed, rainfall amount, atmospheric pressure, and the precursors of acid rain all have a strong influence on the occurrence of acid rains in northeastern China.

  16. Strategies for comprehensive analysis of amino acid biomarkers of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ptolemy, A S; Lee, R; Britz-McKibbin, P

    2007-07-01

    Despite the wide interest in using modified amino acids as putative biomarkers of oxidative stress, many issues remain as to their overall reliability for early detection and diagnosis of diseases. In contrast to conventional single biomarker studies, comprehensive analysis of biomarkers offers an unbiased strategy for global assessment of modified amino acid metabolism due to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This review examines recent analytical techniques amenable for analysis of modified amino acids in biological samples reported during 2003-2007. Particular attention is devoted to the need for validated methods applicable to high-throughput analysis of multiple amino acid biomarkers, as well as consideration of sample pretreatment protocols on artifact formation for improved clinical relevance.

  17. Strategies for comprehensive analysis of amino acid biomarkers of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ptolemy, A S; Lee, R; Britz-McKibbin, P

    2007-07-01

    Despite the wide interest in using modified amino acids as putative biomarkers of oxidative stress, many issues remain as to their overall reliability for early detection and diagnosis of diseases. In contrast to conventional single biomarker studies, comprehensive analysis of biomarkers offers an unbiased strategy for global assessment of modified amino acid metabolism due to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This review examines recent analytical techniques amenable for analysis of modified amino acids in biological samples reported during 2003-2007. Particular attention is devoted to the need for validated methods applicable to high-throughput analysis of multiple amino acid biomarkers, as well as consideration of sample pretreatment protocols on artifact formation for improved clinical relevance. PMID:17514495

  18. Conformational Analysis of Free and Bound Retinoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zheng; Li, Xue; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    The conformational profiles of unbound all-trans and 9-cis retinoic acid (RA) have been determined using classical and quantum mechanical calculations. Sixty-six all-trans-RA (ATRA) and forty-eight 9-cis-RA energy minimum conformers were identified via HF/6-31G* geometry optimizations in vacuo. Their relative conformational energies were estimated utilizing the M06, M06-2x and MP2 methods combined with the 6-311+G(d,p), aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets, as well as complete basis set MP2 extrapolations using the latter two basis sets. Single-point energy calculations performed with the M06-2x density functional were found to yield similar results to MP2/CBS for the low-energy retinoic acid conformations. Not unexpectedly, the conformational propensities of retinoic acid were governed by the orientation and arrangement of the torsion angles associated with the polyene tail. We also used previously reported QM/MM X-ray refinement results on four ATRA-protein crystal structures plus one newly refined 9-cis-RA complex (PDB ID 1XDK) in order to investigate the conformational preferences of bound retinoic acid. In the re-refined RA conformers the conjugated double bonds are nearly coplanar, which is consistent with the global minimum identified by the Omega/QM method rather than the corresponding crystallographically determined conformations given in the PDB. Consequently, a 91.3% average reduction of the local strain energy in the gas phase, as well as 92.1% in PCM solvent, was observed using the QM/MM refined structures versus the PDB deposited RA conformations. These results thus demonstrate that our QM/MM X-ray refinement approach can significantly enhance the quality of X-ray crystal structures refined by conventional refinement protocols, thereby providing reliable drug-target structural information for use in structure-based drug discovery applications. PMID:22844234

  19. New approaches for computer analysis of nucleic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Karlin, S; Ghandour, G; Ost, F; Tavare, S; Korn, L J

    1983-09-01

    A new high-speed computer algorithm is outlined that ascertains within and between nucleic acid and protein sequences all direct repeats, dyad symmetries, and other structural relationships. Large repeats, repeats of high frequency, dyad symmetries of specified stem length and loop distance, and their distributions are determined. Significance of homologies is assessed by a hierarchy of permutation procedures. Applications are made to papovaviruses, the human papillomavirus HPV, lambda phage, the human and mouse mitochondrial genomes, and the human and mouse immunoglobulin kappa-chain genes. PMID:6577449

  20. Synthesis, Preliminary Bioevaluation and Computational Analysis of Caffeic Acid Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiqian; Fu, Jianjun; Shan, Lei; Sun, Qingyan; Zhang, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    A series of caffeic acid amides were designed, synthesized and evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity. Most of them exhibited promising anti-inflammatory activity against nitric oxide (NO) generation in murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells. A 3D pharmacophore model was created based on the biological results for further structural optimization. Moreover, predication of the potential targets was also carried out by the PharmMapper server. These amide analogues represent a promising class of anti-inflammatory scaffold for further exploration and target identification. PMID:24857914

  1. Physiological and proteomic analysis of Lactobacillus casei in response to acid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; He, Guiqiang; Zhang, Juan

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acid tolerance response (ATR) in Lactobacillus casei by a combined physiological and proteomic analysis. To optimize the ATR induction, cells were acid adapted for 1 h at different pHs, and then acid challenged at pH 3.5. The result showed that acid adaptation improved acid tolerance, and the highest survival was observed in cells adapted at pH 4.5 for 1 h. Analysis of the physiological data showed that the acid-adapted cells exhibited higher intracellular pH (pHi), intracellular NH4 (+) content, and lower inner permeability compared with the cells without adaptation. Proteomic analysis was performed upon acid adaptation to different pHs (pH 6.5 vs. pH 4.5) using two-dimensional electrophoresis. A total of 24 proteins that exhibited at least 1.5-fold differential expression were identified. Four proteins (Pgk, LacD, Hpr, and Galm) involved in carbohydrate catabolism and five classic stress response proteins (GroEL, GrpE, Dnak, Hspl, and LCAZH_2811) were up-regulated after acid adaptation at pH 4.5 for 1 h. Validation of the proteomic data was performed by quantitative RT-PCR, and transcriptional regulation of all selected genes showed a positive correlation with the proteomic patterns of the identified proteins. Results presented in this study may be useful for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and may help in formulating new strategies to improve the industrial performance of this species during acid stress. PMID:25062817

  2. Equilibrium analysis of aggregation behavior in the solvent extraction of Cu(II) from sulfuric acid by didodecylnaphthalene sulfonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.A.; Baes, C.F. Jr.; Case, G.N.; Lumetta, G.J.; Wilson, N.M.

    1993-01-01

    By use of the principles of equilibrium analysis, the liquid-liquid cation exchange of Cu(II) from aqueous sulfuric acid at 25{degrees}C by didodecylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HDDNS) in toluene may be understood in terms of small hydrated aggregated species in the organic phase. Extraction data were measured as a function of organic-phase HDDNS molarity (1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}1}), aqueous copper(II) sulfate molarity (1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} to 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}2}), and aqueous sulfuric acid molarity (0.03 to 6.0). Graphical analysis of linear regions of the data support a model in which organic-phase aggregates of HDDNS function by cation exchange to incorporate Cu(II) ions with no apparent change in aggregation number at low loading. Supporting FTIR spectra and water-content measurements of HDDNS solutions in toluene show that the HDDNS aggregates are highly hydrated. By use of the computer program SXLSQA, a comprehensive equilibrium model was developed with inclusion of activity effects. Aqueous-phase activity coefficients and degree of aqueous bisulfate formation were estimated by use of the Pitzer treatment. Organic-phase nonideality was estimated by the Hildebrand-Scott treatment and was shown to be a negligible effect under the conditions tested. Excluding aqueous sulfuric acid molarities greater than 1, it was possible to model the data to within experimental error by assuming only the equilibrium extraction of Cu{sup 2+} ion by the aggregate (HDDNS){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 22} and the equilibrium dissociation of (HDDNS){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 22} to the monomer. The dependence of Cu(II) distribution on aqueous sulfuric acid molarity was shown to be quantitatively consistent with a cation-exchange process. In comparison with the graphical approach, the computer analysis allows comprehensive model testing over large, nonlinear data sets and eliminates the need to make limiting assumptions.

  3. Tracing carbon assimilation in endosymbiotic deep-sea hydrothermal vent Mytilid fatty acids by 13C-fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riou, V.; Bouillon, S.; Serrão Santos, R.; Dehairs, F.; Colaço, A.

    2010-09-01

    Bathymodiolus azoricus mussels thrive at Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents, where part of their energy requirements are met via an endosymbiotic association with chemolithotrophic and methanotrophic bacteria. In an effort to describe phenotypic characteristics of the two bacterial endosymbionts and to assess their ability to assimilate CO2, CH4 and multi-carbon compounds, we performed experiments in aquaria using 13C-labeled NaHCO3 (in the presence of H2S), CH4 or amino-acids and traced the incorporation of 13C into total and phospholipid fatty acids (tFA and PLFA, respectively). 14:0; 15:0; 16:0; 16:1(n - 7)c+t; 18:1(n - 13)c+t and (n - 7)c+t; 20:1(n - 7); 20:2(n - 9,15); 18:3(n - 7) and (n - 5,10,13) PLFA were labeled in the presence of H13CO3- (+H2S) and 13CH4, while the 12:0 compound became labeled only in the presence of H13CO3- (+H2S). In contrast, the 17:0; 18:0; 16:1(n - 9); 16:1(n - 8) and (n - 6); 18:1(n - 8); and 18:2(n - 7) PLFA were only labeled in the presence of 13CH4. Some of these symbiont-specific fatty acids also appeared to be labeled in mussel gill tFA when incubated with 13C-enriched amino acids, and so were mussel-specific fatty acids such as 22:2(n - 7,15). Our results provide experimental evidence for the potential of specific fatty acid markers to distinguish between the two endosymbiotic bacteria, shedding new light on C1 and multi-carbon compound metabolic pathways in B. azoricus and its symbionts.

  4. Tracing carbon assimilation in endosymbiotic deep-sea hydrothermal vent Mytilid fatty acids by 13C-fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riou, V.; Bouillon, S.; Serrão Santos, R.; Dehairs, F.; Colaço, A.

    2010-05-01

    Bathymodiolus azoricus mussels thrive at Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents, where part of their energy requirements are met via an endosymbiotic association with chemolithotrophic and methanotrophic bacteria. In an effort to describe phenotypic characteristics of the two bacterial endosymbionts and to assess their ability to assimilate CO2, CH4 and multi-carbon compounds, we performed experiments in aquaria using 13C-labeled NaHCO3 (in the presence of H2S), CH4 or amino-acids and traced the incorporation of 13C into total and phospholipid fatty acids (tFA and PLFA, respectively). 14:0, 15:0, 16:1(n-7)c+t and 18:1(n-7)c+t PLFA were labeled in the presence of H13CO3- (+H2S) and 13CH4, while the 12:0 compound became labeled only in the presence of H13CO3- (+H2S). In contrast, the 16:1(n-9), 16:1(n-8) and (n-6), 18:1(n-8)c and (n-7), 20:1(n-7) and 18:2(n-7) PLFA were only labeled in the presence of 13CH4. Some of these symbiont-specific fatty acids also appeared to be labeled in mussel gill tFA when incubated with 13C-enriched amino acids, and so were mussel-specific fatty acids such as 22:2(n-7,15). Our results provide experimental evidence for the potential of specific fatty acid markers to distinguish between the two endosymbiotic bacteria, shedding new light on C1 and multi-carbon compound metabolic pathways in B. azoricus and its symbionts.

  5. Analysis of single nucleic acid molecules in micro- and nano-fluidics.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Sarah M; Zec, Helena C; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2016-03-01

    Nucleic acid analysis has enhanced our understanding of biological processes and disease progression, elucidated the association of genetic variants and disease, and led to the design and implementation of new treatment strategies. These diverse applications require analysis of a variety of characteristics of nucleic acid molecules: size or length, detection or quantification of specific sequences, mapping of the general sequence structure, full sequence identification, analysis of epigenetic modifications, and observation of interactions between nucleic acids and other biomolecules. Strategies that can detect rare or transient species, characterize population distributions, and analyze small sample volumes enable the collection of richer data from biosamples. Platforms that integrate micro- and nano-fluidic operations with high sensitivity single molecule detection facilitate manipulation and detection of individual nucleic acid molecules. In this review, we will highlight important milestones and recent advances in single molecule nucleic acid analysis in micro- and nano-fluidic platforms. We focus on assessment modalities for single nucleic acid molecules and highlight the role of micro- and nano-structures and fluidic manipulation. We will also briefly discuss future directions and the current limitations and obstacles impeding even faster progress toward these goals.

  6. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Influence of Abscisic Acid on the Metabolism of Pigments, Ascorbic Acid and Folic Acid during Strawberry Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongdong; Li, Li; Luo, Zisheng; Mou, Wangshu; Mao, Linchun; Ying, Tiejin

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation of abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis and its influence on other important phytochemicals is critical for understanding the versatile roles that ABA plays during strawberry fruit ripening. Using RNA-seq technology, we sampled strawberry fruit in response to ABA or nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA; an ABA biosynthesis blocker) treatment during ripening and assessed the expression changes of genes involved in the metabolism of pigments, ascorbic acid (AsA) and folic acid in the receptacles. The transcriptome analysis identified a lot of genes differentially expressed in response to ABA or NDGA treatment. In particular, genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway were actively regulated by ABA, with the exception of the gene encoding cinnamate 4-hydroxylase. Chlorophyll degradation was accelerated by ABA mainly owing to the higher expression of gene encoding pheide a oxygenase. The decrease of β-carotene content was accelerated by ABA treatment and delayed by NDGA. A high negative correlation rate was found between ABA and β-carotene content, indicating the importance of the requirement for ABA synthesis during fruit ripening. In addition, evaluation on the folate biosynthetic pathway indicate that ABA might have minor function in this nutrient's biosynthesis process, however, it might be involved in its homeostasis. Surprisingly, though AsA content accumulated during fruit ripening, expressions of genes involved in its biosynthesis in the receptacles were significantly lower in ABA-treated fruits. This transcriptome analysis expands our understanding of ABA's role in phytochemical metabolism during strawberry fruit ripening and the regulatory mechanisms of ABA on these pathways were discussed. Our study provides a wealth of genetic information in the metabolism pathways and may be helpful for molecular manipulation in the future.

  7. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Influence of Abscisic Acid on the Metabolism of Pigments, Ascorbic Acid and Folic Acid during Strawberry Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zisheng; Mou, Wangshu; Mao, Linchun; Ying, Tiejin

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation of abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis and its influence on other important phytochemicals is critical for understanding the versatile roles that ABA plays during strawberry fruit ripening. Using RNA-seq technology, we sampled strawberry fruit in response to ABA or nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA; an ABA biosynthesis blocker) treatment during ripening and assessed the expression changes of genes involved in the metabolism of pigments, ascorbic acid (AsA) and folic acid in the receptacles. The transcriptome analysis identified a lot of genes differentially expressed in response to ABA or NDGA treatment. In particular, genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway were actively regulated by ABA, with the exception of the gene encoding cinnamate 4-hydroxylase. Chlorophyll degradation was accelerated by ABA mainly owing to the higher expression of gene encoding pheide a oxygenase. The decrease of β-carotene content was accelerated by ABA treatment and delayed by NDGA. A high negative correlation rate was found between ABA and β-carotene content, indicating the importance of the requirement for ABA synthesis during fruit ripening. In addition, evaluation on the folate biosynthetic pathway indicate that ABA might have minor function in this nutrient’s biosynthesis process, however, it might be involved in its homeostasis. Surprisingly, though AsA content accumulated during fruit ripening, expressions of genes involved in its biosynthesis in the receptacles were significantly lower in ABA-treated fruits. This transcriptome analysis expands our understanding of ABA’s role in phytochemical metabolism during strawberry fruit ripening and the regulatory mechanisms of ABA on these pathways were discussed. Our study provides a wealth of genetic information in the metabolism pathways and may be helpful for molecular manipulation in the future. PMID:26053069

  8. Effects of eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on serum lipids: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Melissa Y; Jacobson, Terry A

    2011-12-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid supplements containing both eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been shown to reduce triglycerides but also increase low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Whether EPA or DHA given as monotherapy has differential effects on serum lipoproteins has not been systematically evaluated. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials of monotherapy with EPA (n=10), DHA (n=17), or EPA versus DHA (n=6). Compared with placebo, DHA raised LDL 7.23 mg/dL (95% CI, 3.98–10.5) whereas EPA non-significantly reduced LDL. In direct comparison studies, DHA raised LDL 4.63 mg/dL (95% CI, 2.15–7.10) more than EPA. Both EPA and DHA reduced triglycerides, with a greater reduction by DHA in direct comparison studies. DHA also raised high-density lipoprotein (4.49 mg/dL; 95% CI, 3.50–5.48) compared with placebo, whereas EPA did not. Although EPA and DHA both reduce triglycerides, they have divergent effects on LDL and high-density lipoprotein. Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms and significance of these differences. PMID:21975919

  9. Recent trends in the analysis of amino acids in fruits and derived foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, Roberto; Mercolini, Laura; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2013-10-01

    The amino acid content of fruit and fruit-derived foods is studied intensely because of the contribution to nutritional value, aroma, taste and health-promoting effects and their possible use as markers of origin and authenticity. In this review, based on 101 references, the most recent trends in the analysis of amino acids are presented: the most important techniques, the different sample treatment procedures (including derivatisation) and the most frequent applications are described and compared. Pertinent publications were retrieved from Scopus and Web of Knowledge database searches lastly performed in February 2012 with the keywords "amino acid", "analysis", "liquid chromatography", "gas chromatography", "electrophoresis", "fruit", and "vegetables"; the time limit was set from the year 2000 onwards. Although amino acids have been analysed in foods for decades, new technical possibilities and advancements have allowed ever-increasing accuracy and targeting of the methods in order to overcome the challenges posed by the complex plant matrices and their high intrinsic variability.

  10. Analysis of amino acids in latent fingerprint residue by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Tom; Croxton, Ruth; Baron, Mark; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Jose; Gámiz-Gracia, Laura; García-Campaña, Ana M

    2012-11-01

    The analysis of the chemical composition of fingerprints is important for the development and improvement of existing fingerprint enhancement techniques. This study demonstrates the first analysis of a latent fingerprint sample, using an optimized CE-MS method. In total 12 amino acids were detected in the fingerprint sample. MS/MS fragmentation was used to provide additional identity confirmation, for which eight of the twelve detected amino acids generated confirmatory product ions. Nine amino acids were quantified and their relative abundances were consistent with previous studies with serine and glycine being the most abundant. The successful detection of amino acids from latent fingerprints demonstrates that CE-MS is a potential future technique for further study of such compounds in fingerprint samples.

  11. Study of Stationary Phase Metabolism Via Isotopomer Analysis of Amino Acids from an Isolated Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, AfshanS.; Tang, YinjieJ.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Martin, Hector Garcia; Gin, Jennifer; Benke, Peter; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-09-14

    Microbial production of many commercially important secondary metabolites occurs during stationary phase, and methods to measure metabolic flux during this growth phase would be valuable. Metabolic flux analysis is often based on isotopomer information from proteinogenic amino acids. As such, flux analysis primarily reflects the metabolism pertinent to the growth phase during which most proteins are synthesized. To investigate central metabolism and amino acids synthesis activity during stationary phase, addition of fully 13C-labeled glucose followed by induction of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression during stationary phase was used. Our results indicate that Escherichia coli was able to produce new proteins (i.e., GFP) in the stationary phase, and the amino acids in GFP were mostly from degraded proteins synthesized during the exponential growth phase. Among amino acid biosynthetic pathways, only those for serine, alanine, glutamate/glutamine, and aspartate/asparagine had significant activity during the stationary phase.

  12. Biometrics from the carbon isotope ratio analysis of amino acids in human hair.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Glen P; An, Yan; Konstantynova, Kateryna I; Rashaid, Ayat H B

    2015-01-01

    This study compares and contrasts the ability to classify individuals into different grouping factors through either bulk isotope ratio analysis or amino-acid-specific isotope ratio analysis of human hair. Using LC-IRMS, we measured the isotope ratios of 14 amino acids in hair proteins independently, and leucine/isoleucine as a co-eluting pair, to provide 15 variables for classification. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the essential amino acids and non-essential amino acids were mostly independent variables in the classification rules, thereby enabling the separation of dietary factors of isotope intake from intrinsic or phenotypic factors of isotope fractionation. Multivariate analysis revealed at least two potential sources of non-dietary factors influencing the carbon isotope ratio values of the amino acids in human hair: body mass index (BMI) and age. These results provide evidence that compound-specific isotope ratio analysis has the potential to go beyond region-of-origin or geospatial movements of individuals-obtainable through bulk isotope measurements-to the provision of physical and characteristic traits about the individuals, such as age and BMI. Further development and refinement, for example to genetic, metabolic, disease and hormonal factors could ultimately be of great assistance in forensic and clinical casework.

  13. Trophic hierarchies revealed via amino acid isotopic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the potential of isotopic methods to illuminate trophic function, accurate estimates of lifetime feeding tendencies have remained elusive. A relatively new approach—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino ...

  14. Gas chromatography/trace analysis of derivatized azelaic acid as a stability marker.

    PubMed

    Alzweiri, Muhammed; Tarawneh, Ruba; Khanfar, Mohammad A

    2013-10-01

    Azelaic acid, a naturally occurring saturated dicarboxylic acid, is found in many topical formulations for its various medical benefits or as a byproduct of the oxidative decomposition of unsaturated fatty acids. The poor volatility of azelaic acid hinders its applicability in GC analysis. Therefore, azelaic acid was derivatized by methylation and silylation procedures to enhance its volatility for GC analysis. Accordingly, dimethyl azelate (DMA) and di(trimethylsilyl) azelate were synthesized and characterized by GC-MS. Subsequently, a GC with flame ionization detection method was developed and validated to analyze trace amounts of azelaic acid in some marketed skin creams. Unlike DMA, di(trimethylsilyl) azelate was chemically unstable and degraded within few hours. Nonane was used as a stable internal standard. Variability due to derivatization and extraction was controlled by a standard addition procedure. DMA analysis was linear in a wide concentration range (100 ng/mL to 100 mg/mL). Moreover, the method was accurate (96.4-103.4%) and precise with inter- and intraday variability <2.0% and LOQ and LOD of 100 and 10 ng/mL, respectively. PMID:23893928

  15. Quantitative genetic analysis of salicylic acid perception in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dobón, Albor; Canet, Juan Vicente; Perales, Lorena; Tornero, Pablo

    2011-10-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a phytohormone required for a full resistance against some pathogens in Arabidopsis, and NPR1 (Non-Expressor of Pathogenesis Related Genes 1) is the only gene with a strong effect on resistance induced by SA which has been described. There can be additional components of SA perception that escape the traditional approach of mutagenesis. An alternative to that approach is searching in the natural variation of Arabidopsis. Different methods of analyzing the variation between ecotypes have been tried and it has been found that measuring the growth of a virulent isolate of Pseudomonas syringae after the exogenous application of SA is the most effective one. Two ecotypes, Edi-0 and Stw-0, have been crossed, and their F2 has been studied. There are two significant quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in this population, and there is one QTL in each one of the existing mapping populations Col-4 × Laer-0 and Laer-0 × No-0. They have different characteristics: while one QTL is only detectable at low concentrations of SA, the other acts after the point of crosstalk with methyl jasmonate signalling. Three of the QTLs have candidates described in SA perception as NPR1, its interactors, and a calmodulin binding protein.

  16. A Mathematical Model for the Analysis of Acid Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mei-Kao; Stewart, Douglas A.; Henderson, Donald

    1982-06-01

    This paper describes the use of a regional-scale air quality model as a diagnostic tool for analyzing problems associated with acid rain. The model, which is hybrid in nature, consists of a puff module and a grid module. The puff module computes the evolution of individual puffs, such as the horizontal and vertical standard deviations of the puff spreads and the location of the center of mass, emitted continuously from each major point source. It also determines the location at which the puff will be released to the grid module and the amount of oxidation and deposition along the trajectory. The grid module then follows the transport, diffusion, and chemical reactions of these aged puffs, as well as emissions from a variety of diffuse sources. Elaborate schemes for both dry and wet deposition have also been incorporated into the model. This model has been exercised for two real-time meteorological scenarios-a dry case and a two-day rainstorm episode in the Northern Great Plains. On the basis of model calculations, atmospheric budgets for SO2 and sulfate over the modeling region have been estimated.

  17. Determination of betulinic acid, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid from Achyranthes aspera L. using RP-UFLC-DAD analysis and evaluation of various parameters for their optimum yield.

    PubMed

    Pai, Sandeep R; Upadhya, Vinayak; Hegde, Harsha V; Joshi, Rajesh K; Kholkute, Sanjiva D

    2016-03-01

    Achyranthes aspera L. is a well known herb commonly used in traditional system of Indian medicine to treat various disorders, such as cough, dysentery, gonorrhea, piles, kidney stone, pneumonia, renal dropsy, skin eruptions, snake bite, etc. Here, we used RP-UFLC-DAD method for determining triterpenoids betulinic acid (BA), oleanolic acid (OA) and ursolic acid (UA) from A. aspera. Optimum yield of these compounds were studied and evaluated using parameters viz., method of extraction, time of extraction, age of plant and plant parts (leaves, stem and roots). Linear relationships in RP-UFLC-DAD analysis were obtained in the range 0.05-100 µg/mL with 0.035, 0.042 and 0.033 µg/mL LOD for BA, OA and UA, respectively. Of the variables tested, extraction method and parts used significantly affected content yield. Continuous shaking extraction (CSE) at ambient temperature gave better extraction efficiency than exposure to ultra sonic extraction (USE) or microwave assisted extraction (MAE) methods. The highest content of BA, OA and UA were determined individually in leaf, stem and root extracts with CSE. Collective yield of these triterpenoids were higher in leaf part exposed to 15 min USE method. To best of our knowledge, the study newly reports UA from A. aspera and the same was confirmed using ATR-FT-IR studies. This study explains the distribution pattern of these major triterpenoids and optimum extraction parameters in detail. PMID:27145633

  18. Assimilation of toluene carbon along a bacteria-protist food chain determined by 13C-enrichment of biomarker fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Mauclaire, Laurie; Pelz, Oliver; Thullner, Martin; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Zeyer, Josef

    2003-12-01

    A food chain consisting of toluene, toluene-degrading Pseudomonas sp. PS+ and a bacterivorous flagellated amoebae Vahlkampfia sp. was established in a batch culture. This culture was amended with [U-13C]toluene and served as a model system to elucidate the flux of carbon in the food chain by quantifying bacterial biovolumes and 13C enrichment of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarkers of the bacteria and the heterotrophic protists. Major PLFA detected in the batch co-culture included those derived from Pseudomonas sp. PS+ (16:1omega7c and 18:1omega7c) and Vahlkampfia sp. (20:4omega6c and 20:3omega6c). A numerical model including consumption of toluene by the bacteria and predation of the bacteria by the heterotrophic protists was adjusted to the measured toluene carbon, bacterial carbon and delta13C values of bacterial and protist biomass. Using this model, we estimated that 28+/-7% of the consumed toluene carbon was transformed into bacterial biomass, and 12+/-4% of the predated bacterial carbon was incorporated into heterotrophic protist biomass. Our study showed that the 13C enrichment of PLFA biomarkers coupled to biomass determination via biovolume calculations is a suitable method to trace carbon fluxes in protist-inclusive microbial food chains because it does not require the separation of protist cells from bacterial cells and soil particles.

  19. Study of the microbial dynamics in the root environment of closed, hydroponic cultivation systems for tomato using phospholipid fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Waechter-Kristensen, B; Khalil, S; Sundin, P; Englund, J E; Gertsson, U E; Jensen, P

    1996-12-01

    A more basic understanding of the microbial dynamics of closed, hydroponic cultivation systems is needed. We therefore initiated a study of the microbial community inhabiting the root environment, using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles, and started to examine whether changes in the microbial population structure would result from the introduction of selected isolates of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Tomato were cultured in deep-flow systems with circulating nutrient solution. Bacteria were sampled from tomato roots at three locations, longitudinally, in the gutters of a control system and in two systems inoculated with PGPR. In the beginning of the gutters the PLFA profiles were similar in all systems, whereas the profiles differed in the gutter ends (following the direction of flow). In the control system, and in a treatment inoculated with two Gram-negative and one Gram-positive PGPR strain, the relative proportion of PLFAs characteristic to Gram-positive bacteria was highest at the end of the gutter. In a treatment inoculated only with a Gram-negative PGPR strain, the relative proportion of PLFAs characteristic of Gram-negative bacteria was highest at the end of the gutter. The results indicate a complex situation with different micro-environments distributed along the root mat. It can also be concluded that PLFA profiles may be useful tools in the study of the microbiology of closed hydroponic plant cultivation systems. PMID:11541571

  20. Trend analysis of weekly acid rain data, 1978-83

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schertz, Terry L.; Hirsch, Robert M.

    1985-01-01

    There are 19 stations in the National Atmospheric Deposition Program which operated over the period 1978-83 and were subsequently incorporated into the National Trends Network in 1983. The precipitation chemistry data for these stations for this period were analyzed for trend, spatial correlation, seasonality, and relationship to precipitation volume. The intent of the analysis was to provide insights on the sources of variation in precipitation chemistry and to attempt to ascertain what statistical procedures may be most useful for ongoing analysis of the National Trends Network data. The Seasonal Kendall test was used for detection of trends in raw concentrations of dissolved constituents, pH and specific conductance, and residuals of these parameters from regression analysis. Forty-one percent of the trends detected in the raw concentrations were downtrends, 4 percent were uptrends, and 55 percent showed no trends at a = 0.2. At a more restrictive significance level of a = 0.05, 24 percent of the trends detected were downtrends, 2 percent were uptrends, and 74 percent showed no trends. The two constituents of greatest interest in terms of human generated emissions and environmental effects, sulfate and nitrate, showed only downtrends, and sulfate showed the largest decreases in concentration per year of all the ions tested.

  1. Unique Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Hive Component-Based Communities as Detected by a Hybrid of Phospholipid Fatty-Acid and Fatty-Acid Methyl Ester Analyses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities (microbiomes) are associated with almost all metazoans, including the honey bee Apis mellifera. Honey bees are social insects, maintaining complex hive systems composed of a variety of integral components including bees, comb, propolis, honey, and stored pollen. Given that the different components within hives can be physically separated and are nutritionally variable, we hypothesize that unique microbial communities may occur within the different microenvironments of honey bee colonies. To explore this hypothesis and to provide further insights into the microbiome of honey bees, we use a hybrid of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and phospholipid-derived fatty acid (PLFA) analysis to produce broad, lipid-based microbial community profiles of stored pollen, adults, pupae, honey, empty comb, and propolis for 11 honey bee hives. Averaging component lipid profiles by hive, we show that, in decreasing order, lipid markers representing fungi, Gram-negative bacteria, and Gram-positive bacteria have the highest relative abundances within honey bee colonies. Our lipid profiles reveal the presence of viable microbial communities in each of the six hive components sampled, with overall microbial community richness varying from lowest to highest in honey, comb, pupae, pollen, adults and propolis, respectively. Finally, microbial community lipid profiles were more similar when compared by component than by hive, location, or sampling year. Specifically, we found that individual hive components typically exhibited several dominant lipids and that these dominant lipids differ between components. Principal component and two-way clustering analyses both support significant grouping of lipids by hive component. Our findings indicate that in addition to the microbial communities present in individual workers, honey bee hives have resident microbial communities associated with different colony components. PMID:25849080

  2. Flux balance analysis in the production of clavulanic acid by Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Claudia; Quintero, Juan Carlos; Ochoa, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    In this work, in silico flux balance analysis is used for predicting the metabolic behavior of Streptomyces clavuligerus during clavulanic acid production. To choose the best objective function for use in the analysis, three different optimization problems are evaluated inside the flux balance analysis formulation: (i) maximization of the specific growth rate, (ii) maximization of the ATP yield, and (iii) maximization of clavulanic acid production. Maximization of ATP yield showed the best predictions for the cellular behavior. Therefore, flux balance analysis using ATP as objective function was used for analyzing different scenarios of nutrient limitations toward establishing the effect of limiting the carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and oxygen sources on the growth and clavulanic acid production rates. Obtained results showed that ammonia and phosphate limitations are the ones most strongly affecting clavulanic acid biosynthesis. Furthermore, it was possible to identify the ornithine flux from the urea cycle and the α-ketoglutarate flux from the TCA cycle as the most determinant internal fluxes for promoting clavulanic acid production.

  3. Selective removal of phosphate for analysis of organic acids in complex samples.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sandeep; Frolov, Andrej; Marcillo, Andrea; Birkemeyer, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Accurate quantitation of compounds in samples of biological origin is often hampered by matrix interferences one of which occurs in GC-MS analysis from the presence of highly abundant phosphate. Consequently, high concentrations of phosphate need to be removed before sample analysis. Within this context, we screened 17 anion exchange solid-phase extraction (SPE) materials for selective phosphate removal using different protocols to meet the challenge of simultaneous recovery of six common organic acids in aqueous samples prior to derivatization for GC-MS analysis. Up to 75% recovery was achieved for the most organic acids, only the low pKa tartaric and citric acids were badly recovered. Compared to the traditional approach of phosphate removal by precipitation, SPE had a broader compatibility with common detection methods and performed more selectively among the organic acids under investigation. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that phosphate removal strategies during the analysis of biologically relevant small molecular weight organic acids consider the respective pKa of the anticipated analytes and the detection method of choice.

  4. Analysis of free amino acids in natural waters by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    How, Zuo Tong; Busetti, Francesco; Linge, Kathryn L; Kristiana, Ina; Joll, Cynthia A; Charrois, Jeffrey W A

    2014-11-28

    This paper reports a new analytical method for the analysis of 18 amino acids in natural waters using solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) operated in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Two different preconcentration methods, solid-phase extraction and concentration under reduced pressure, were tested in development of this method. Although concentration under reduced pressure provided better recoveries and method limits of detection for amino acids in ultrapure water, SPE was a more suitable extraction method for real samples due to the lower matrix effects for this method. Even though the strong cation exchange resin used in SPE method introduced exogenous matrix interferences into the sample extracts (inorganic salt originating from the acid-base reaction during the elution step), the SPE method still incorporates a broad sample clean-up and minimised endogenous matrix effects by reducing interferences originating from real water samples. The method limits of quantification (MLQ) for the SPE LC-MS/MS method in ultrapure water ranged from 0.1 to 100 μg L(-1) as N for the different amino acids. The MLQs of the early eluting amino acids were limited by the presence of matrix interfering species, such as inorganic salts in natural water samples. The SPE LC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to the analysis of amino acids in 3 different drinking water source waters: the average total free amino acid content in these waters was found to be 19 μg L(-1) as N, while among the 18 amino acids analysed, the most abundant amino acids were found to be tyrosine, leucine and isoleucine.

  5. Effect of rice straw application on microbial community and activity in paddy soil under different water status.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fuxia; Li, Yaying; Chapman, Stephen James; Yao, Huaiying

    2016-03-01

    Rice straw application and flooding are common practices in rice production, both of which can induce changes in the microbial community. This study used soil microcosms to investigate the impact of water status (saturated and nonsaturated) and straw application (10 g kg(-1) soil) on soil microbial composition (phospholipid fatty acid analysis) and activity (MicroResp(™) method). Straw application significantly increased total PLFA amount and individual PLFA components independent of soil moisture level. The amount of soil fungal PLFA was less than Gram-negative, Gram-positive, and actinomycete PLFA, except the drained treatment with rice straw application, which had higher fungal PLFA than actinomycete PLFA at the initial incubation stage. Straw amendment and waterlogging had different effects on microbial community structure and substrate-induced pattern. PLFA profiles were primarily influenced by straw application, whereas soil water status had the greater influence on microbial respiration. Of the variation in PLFA and respiration data, straw accounted for 30.1 and 16.7 %, while soil water status explained 7.5 and 29.1 %, respectively. Our results suggest that (1) the size of microbial communities in paddy soil is more limited by carbon substrate availability rather than by the anaerobic conditions due to waterlogging and (2) that soil water status is more important as a control of fungal growth and microbial community activity. PMID:26596827

  6. Comparative proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in β-aminobutyric acid enhanced Arabidopsis thaliana tolerance to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingwu; Jiang, Xinwu; Shi, Wuliang; Chen, Juan; Pei, Zhenming; Zheng, Hailei

    2011-05-01

    Acid rain is a worldwide environmental issue that has seriously destroyed forest ecosystems. As a highly effective and broad-spectrum plant resistance-inducing agent, β-aminobutyric acid could elevate the tolerance of Arabidopsis when subjected to simulated acid rain. Using comparative proteomic strategies, we analyzed 203 significantly varied proteins of which 175 proteins were identified responding to β-aminobutyric acid in the absence and presence of simulated acid rain. They could be divided into ten groups according to their biological functions. Among them, the majority was cell rescue, development and defense-related proteins, followed by transcription, protein synthesis, folding, modification and destination-associated proteins. Our conclusion is β-aminobutyric acid can lead to a large-scale primary metabolism change and simultaneously activate antioxidant system and salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid signaling pathways. In addition, β-aminobutyric acid can reinforce physical barriers to defend simulated acid rain stress.

  7. First-order kinetics analysis of monomer composition dependent polyhydroxyalkanoic acid degradation in Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mun Hwan; Rho, Jong Kook; Lee, Ho-Joo; Song, Jae Jun; Yoon, Sung Chul; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2003-01-01

    The intracellular degradation of polyhydroxyalkanoic acid (PHA) in pseudomonads was investigated by first-order kinetics analysis using the initial rate method. One type of PHA was accumulated in five Pseudomonas spp., P. oleovorans, P. aeruginosa, P. fluorescens, P. citronellolis, and P. putida, by growing them on octanoic acid. The monomer compositions of the five PHA were not significantly different from one another: 85-90 mol % 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid (3HO), 7-12 mol % 3-hydorxycaproic acid (3HC), and 3-6 mol % 3-hydroxydecanoic acid (3HD). The first-order degradation rate constants (k(1)) for the octanoate-derived PHA (designated P(3HO)) in the five species were in a similar range between 0.060 and 0.088 h(-1). This may indicate the similar specificities of the five intracellular depolymerases. In addition, the similar k(1) among the different species may correlate with the high degree of amino acid sequence identities (over 85%) among the intracellular PHA depolymerase phaZ genes. Six other chemically different types of PHA were accumulated in P. putida from n-nonanoic acid, n-decanoic acid, 5-phenyvaleric acid, or 11-phenoxyundecanoic acid as a single or a mixed carbon source. The calculated k(1) values were characteristic to each PHA, reflecting their chemical structures. In comparison with P(3HO), an increase in the levels of the two minor monomers 3HC and 3HD as in P(21 mol % 3HC-co-56 mol % 3HO-co-23 mol % 3HD) significantly slowed the rate of intracellular degradation. From the comparison of k(1) values, it is suggested that the P. putida intracellular depolymerase is most active against P(3HO). PMID:12625741

  8. [Research progress and application prospect of near-infrared spectroscopy in analysis of food amino acid].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Lan; Xu, Ning; He, Yong

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the progress and application of near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) used to detect amino acids in the growth of crops and food processing process. With online searching databases including ISI (Web of Knowledge), CNKI (China Knowledge Network), summarize the detection of chemical value using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and chemometric methods involved in the application of NIR used to analyze amino acids in food, meanwhile summarize the data, materials and main topics in relevant original literature. Overview the methods of chemical value detection using HPLC and chemometric analysis, their applications in detecting the quality of crops, determining the content of water, amino acids and polyphenol in green tea, detecting the quality of feed and determining the content of amino acids in cheese, ham and meat products, We forecasted the application of NIR in determining the content of amino acids in food and analyzed its merits and drawbacks. The development of NIR's application in amino acids detection should be based on the HPLC detection, and the problem of model transfer mainly restricts its large-scale promotion currently. Online analysis can monitor the entire reaction and change process from raw materials to products and thus meets the needs of real-time monitoring food quality from production to sales, and it will be an important direction for future.

  9. Analysis of carbohydrates and amino acids in vegetable waste waters by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Arienzo, Michele; De Martino, Antonio; Capasso, Renato; Di Maro, Antimo; Parente, Augusto

    2003-01-01

    High-performance anion exchange chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection was used for the quantitative determination of total and free sugars in olive oil mill waste waters (OMWW). Automated amino acid ion chromatography was employed to analyse total and free amino acids in the same OMWW. Sugars were analysed in samples pre-purified by means of a three-step purification procedure involving: (i) methanol precipitation of OMWW; (ii) dialysis of the obtained solid and liquid fractions; and (iii) chromatographic purification on RP18 phase followed by Amberlite resin. The amino acids were determined directly in samples obtained from the first two steps performed for sugar analysis. The analysis carried out with the reported methodologies allowed the quantitative determination of total sugars and amino acids and the differentiation between their free and bound forms. The sugars determined were arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, rhamnose, xylose, galacturonic and glucuronic acids, and the amino acids were Asp, Glu, Thr, Ser, Pro, Gly, Ala, Val, Met, Ile, Leu, Tyr, Phe, Lys, His, Arg and Cys. Asn, Gin, and Trp were not detected. The technological, biotechnological and environmental advantages arising from this analytical methodology applied to OMWW are briefly discussed.

  10. Analysis of complexes pairing hydroperoxyl radical with peroxyformic acid.

    PubMed

    Solimannejad, Mohammad; Shirazi, Sanaz G; Scheiner, Steve

    2007-10-25

    Ab initio quantum calculations are used to analyze the binding of complexes pairing OOH with HOOCHO. Six minima are located on the potential energy surface, all of cyclic geometry. Of particular interest are the OH...O and CH...O H-bonds that arise in the complexes and the manner in which these interactions influence the internal properties of the subunits. The analysis is complicated by the presence of an intramolecular H-bond in the unperturbed HOOCHO molecule, which must be broken in order to form the pair of intermolecular H-bonds that are responsible for the binding in the most stable complex. The CH bond of HOOCHO is contracted, and its stretching frequency undergoes a blue shift, when this group participates in a H-bond. PMID:17914777

  11. Studies on Tinospora cordifolia monosugars and correlation analysis of uronic acids by spectrophotometric methods and GLC.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vineet; Nagar, Shipra

    2014-01-01

    Cold water-soluble (CWSP) and hot water soluble polysaccharides (HWSP) from Tinospora cordifolia stems were isolated and purified in 2.99% and 1.99% yield respectively. Complete hydrolysis followed by paper chromatography and GLC analysis indicated the presence of L-rhamnose, L-arabinose, D-xylose, D-mannose, D-galactose and D-glucose in molar ratio of 0.857, 1.106, 0.727, 0.526, 0.708 and 95.763 in CWSP and 0.697, 0.777, 2.048, 0.777, 0.292 and 95.408 in HWSP. The uronic acid content in the polysaccharide has been studied extensively using assorted approaches. It was quantitatively estimated by GLC analysis and spectrophotometric methods using carbazole, m-hydroxydiphenyl and 3,5-dimethylphenol as colorimetric reagents. GLC analyses indicated galacturonic acid content of 3.06% and 5.16% in CWSP and HWSP respectively. Estimation of uronic acid using 3,5-dimethylphenol corroborated the above analysis. The study resulted in composition of constituent monosugars of CWSP and HWSP and co-relation analysis of uronic acid content, leading to an unambiguous structural analysis. PMID:24274509

  12. Analysis of carbonaceous biomarkers with the Mars Organic Analyzer microchip capillary electrophoresis system: carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Stockton, Amanda M; Tjin, Caroline Chandra; Chiesl, Thomas N; Mathies, Richard A

    2011-01-01

    The oxidizing surface chemistry on Mars argues that any comprehensive search for organic compounds indicative of life requires methods to analyze higher oxidation states of carbon with very low limits of detection. To address this goal, microchip capillary electrophoresis (μCE) methods were developed for analysis of carboxylic acids with the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA). Fluorescent derivatization was achieved by activation with the water soluble 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) followed by reaction with Cascade Blue hydrazide in 30 mM borate, pH 3. A standard containing 12 carboxylic acids found in terrestrial life was successfully labeled and separated in 30 mM borate at pH 9.5, 20 °C by using the MOA CE system. Limits of detection were 5-10 nM for aliphatic monoacids, 20 nM for malic acid (diacid), and 230 nM for citric acid (triacid). Polyacid benzene derivatives containing 2, 3, 4, and 6 carboxyl groups were also analyzed. In particular, mellitic acid was successfully labeled and analyzed with a limit of detection of 300 nM (5 ppb). Analyses of carboxylic acids sampled from a lava tube cave and a hydrothermal area demonstrated the versatility and robustness of our method. This work establishes that the MOA can be used for sensitive analyses of a wide range of carboxylic acids in the search for extraterrestrial organic molecules.

  13. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis to identify sources of soil in surface water.

    PubMed

    Banowetz, Gary M; Whittaker, Gerald W; Dierksen, Karen P; Azevedo, Mark D; Kennedy, Ann C; Griffith, Stephen M; Steiner, Jeffrey J

    2006-01-01

    Efforts to improve land-use practices to prevent contamination of surface waters with soil are limited by an inability to identify the primary sources of soil present in these waters. We evaluated the utility of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles of dry reference soils for multivariate statistical classification of soils collected from surface waters adjacent to agricultural production fields and a wooded riparian zone. Trials that compared approaches to concentrate soil from surface water showed that aluminum sulfate precipitation provided comparable yields to that obtained by vacuum filtration and was more suitable for handling large numbers of samples. Fatty acid methyl ester profiles were developed from reference soils collected from contrasting land uses in different seasons to determine whether specific fatty acids would consistently serve as variables in multivariate statistical analyses to permit reliable classification of soils. We used a Bayesian method and an independent iterative process to select appropriate fatty acids and found that variable selection was strongly impacted by the season during which soil was collected. The apparent seasonal variation in the occurrence of marker fatty acids in FAME profiles from reference soils prevented preparation of a standardized set of variables. Nevertheless, accurate classification of soil in surface water was achieved utilizing fatty acid variables identified in seasonally matched reference soils. Correlation analysis of entire chromatograms and subsequent discriminant analyses utilizing a restricted number of fatty acid variables showed that FAME profiles of soils exposed to the aquatic environment still had utility for classification at least 1 wk after submersion. PMID:16391284

  14. High-Throughput Quantitative Lipidomics Analysis of Nonesterified Fatty Acids in Human Plasma.

    PubMed

    Christinat, Nicolas; Morin-Rivron, Delphine; Masoodi, Mojgan

    2016-07-01

    We present a high-throughput, nontargeted lipidomics approach using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry for quantitative analysis of nonesterified fatty acids. We applied this method to screen a wide range of fatty acids from medium-chain to very long-chain (8 to 24 carbon atoms) in human plasma samples. The method enables us to chromatographically separate branched-chain species from their straight-chain isomers as well as separate biologically important ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. We used 51 fatty acid species to demonstrate the quantitative capability of this method with quantification limits in the nanomolar range; however, this method is not limited only to these fatty acid species. High-throughput sample preparation was developed and carried out on a robotic platform that allows extraction of 96 samples simultaneously within 3 h. This high-throughput platform was used to assess the influence of different types of human plasma collection and preparation on the nonesterified fatty acid profile of healthy donors. Use of the anticoagulants EDTA and heparin has been compared with simple clotting, and only limited changes have been detected in most nonesterified fatty acid concentrations. PMID:27185515

  15. Conformational analysis of glutamic acid: a density functional approach using implicit continuum solvent model.

    PubMed

    Turan, Başak; Selçuki, Cenk

    2014-09-01

    Amino acids are constituents of proteins and enzymes which take part almost in all metabolic reactions. Glutamic acid, with an ability to form a negatively charged side chain, plays a major role in intra and intermolecular interactions of proteins, peptides, and enzymes. An exhaustive conformational analysis has been performed for all eight possible forms at B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. All possible neutral, zwitterionic, protonated, and deprotonated forms of glutamic acid structures have been investigated in solution by using polarizable continuum model mimicking water as the solvent. Nine families based on the dihedral angles have been classified for eight glutamic acid forms. The electrostatic effects included in the solvent model usually stabilize the charged forms more. However, the stability of the zwitterionic form has been underestimated due to the lack of hydrogen bonding between the solute and solvent; therefore, it is observed that compact neutral glutamic acid structures are more stable in solution than they are in vacuum. Our calculations have shown that among all eight possible forms, some are not stable in solution and are immediately converted to other more stable forms. Comparison of isoelectronic glutamic acid forms indicated that one of the structures among possible zwitterionic and anionic forms may dominate over the other possible forms. Additional investigations using explicit solvent models are necessary to determine the stability of charged forms of glutamic acid in solution as our results clearly indicate that hydrogen bonding and its type have a major role in the structure and energy of conformers.

  16. Characterization of 22 Vibrio species by gas chromatography analysis of their cellular fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Urdaci, M C; Marchand, M; Grimont, P A

    1990-05-01

    The cellular fatty acid compositions of 51 Vibrio strains belonging to 22 species as well as five Aeromonas strains were determined by using capillary gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). The major fatty acids were most often hexadecenoic, hexadecanoic and octadecenoic acids. Heptadecenoic acid was present in significant amounts in V. alginolyticus, V. natriegens, V. parahaemolyticus and "Vibrio navarrensis". Twenty fatty acids including branched and hydroxy acids were detected in the genus Vibrio. Quantitative results were treated by principal component analysis to display groups of strains. The first three components (accounting for 69% of the variance) showed the type strains of V. fischeri, V. ordalii, V. damsela, V. mediterranei, V. tubiashii, V. campbellii, V. pelagius, V. gazogenes, and V. nereis to be unclustered. V. alginolyticus (4 strains) and V. parahaemolyticus (4 strains) showed some overlap and the type strain of V. natriegens was in their neighborhood. V. harveyi (4 strains) formed a cluster and V. vulnificus was in its vicinity. V. cholerae (5 strains) overlapped with V. diazotrophicus (3 strains) and was close to the type strain of V. mimicus and V. anguillarum. V. metschnikovii (3 strains) clustered with the type strain of V. cincinnatiensis. A decision tree was devised for the identification of Vibrio species based on qualitative characteristics of fatty acid patterns. However, the following three groups, V. alginolyticus-V. parahaemolyticus-V. natriegens, V. metschnikovii-V. cincinnatiensis and V. cholerae-V. mimicus could not be split into such a decision tree.

  17. Conformational analysis of glutamic acid: a density functional approach using implicit continuum solvent model.

    PubMed

    Turan, Başak; Selçuki, Cenk

    2014-09-01

    Amino acids are constituents of proteins and enzymes which take part almost in all metabolic reactions. Glutamic acid, with an ability to form a negatively charged side chain, plays a major role in intra and intermolecular interactions of proteins, peptides, and enzymes. An exhaustive conformational analysis has been performed for all eight possible forms at B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. All possible neutral, zwitterionic, protonated, and deprotonated forms of glutamic acid structures have been investigated in solution by using polarizable continuum model mimicking water as the solvent. Nine families based on the dihedral angles have been classified for eight glutamic acid forms. The electrostatic effects included in the solvent model usually stabilize the charged forms more. However, the stability of the zwitterionic form has been underestimated due to the lack of hydrogen bonding between the solute and solvent; therefore, it is observed that compact neutral glutamic acid structures are more stable in solution than they are in vacuum. Our calculations have shown that among all eight possible forms, some are not stable in solution and are immediately converted to other more stable forms. Comparison of isoelectronic glutamic acid forms indicated that one of the structures among possible zwitterionic and anionic forms may dominate over the other possible forms. Additional investigations using explicit solvent models are necessary to determine the stability of charged forms of glutamic acid in solution as our results clearly indicate that hydrogen bonding and its type have a major role in the structure and energy of conformers. PMID:25135067

  18. Cancer risk with folic acid supplements: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wien, Tale Norbye; Pike, Eva; Wisløff, Torbjørn; Staff, Annetine; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Klemp, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore if there is an increased cancer risk associated with folic acid supplements given orally. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled studies of folic acid supplementation in humans reporting cancer incidence and/or cancer mortality. Studies on folic acid fortification of foods were not included. Data sources Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase and Centre of Reviews and Dissemination, clinical trial registries and hand-searching of key journals. Results From 4104 potential references, 19 studies contributed data to our meta-analyses, including 12 randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Meta-analysis of the 10 RCTs reporting overall cancer incidence (N=38 233) gave an RR of developing cancer in patients randomised to folic acid supplements of 1.07 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.14) compared to controls. Overall cancer incidence was not reported in the seven observational studies. Meta-analyses of six RCTs reporting prostate cancer incidence showed an RR of prostate cancer of 1.24 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.49) for the men receiving folic acid compared to controls. No significant difference in cancer incidence was shown between groups receiving folic acid and placebo/control group, for any other cancer type. Total cancer mortality was reported in six RCTs, and a meta-analysis of these did not show any significant difference in cancer mortality in folic acid supplemented groups compared to controls (RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.90 to 1.30). None of the observational studies addressed mortality. Conclusions A meta-analysis of 10 RCTs showed a borderline significant increase in frequency of overall cancer in the folic acid group compared to controls. Overall cancer incidence was not reported in the seven observational studies. Prostate cancer was the only cancer type found to be increased after folic acid supplementation (meta-analyses of six RCTs). Prospective studies of cancer development in populations where food is fortified with folic acid could indicate whether

  19. Authentication analysis of cod liver oil from beef fat using fatty acid composition and FTIR spectra.

    PubMed

    Rohman, Abdul; Man, Yaakob B Che

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to authenticate cod liver oil (CLO) from beef fat (BF) by determining the level of BF as a fat adulterant in CLO. Two instrumental techniques, namely GC-FID for fatty acid analysis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, were exploited for such authentication. The decreased level of some fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), could be used as an indicative means to detect the adulteration of CLO with BF. In addition, FTIR spectroscopy combined with partial least-squares (PLS) at frequency regions of 1200-1000 cm(-1) was successfully developed for the quantification of BF in CLO. Using the PLS model, the errors obtained in calibration and prediction samples were 0.55% and 0.82% v/v, respectively.

  20. Method for the isolation of citric acid and malic acid in Japanese apricot liqueur for carbon stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Fumikazu; Hashiguchi, Tomokazu; Hisatsune, Yuri; Oe, Takaaki; Kawao, Takafumi; Fujii, Tsutomu

    2017-02-15

    A method for detecting the undeclared addition of acidic ingredients is required to control the authenticity of Japanese apricot liqueur. We developed an analytical procedure that minimizes carbon isotope discrimination for measurement of the δ(13)C values of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur. Our results demonstrated that freeze-drying is preferable to nitrogen spray-drying, because it does not significantly affect the δ(13)C values of citric acid and results in smaller isotope discrimination for malic acid. Both 0.1% formic acid and 0.2% phosphoric acid are acceptable HPLC mobile phases for the isolation of citric and malic acid, although the δ(13)C values of malic acid exhibited relatively large variation compared with citric acid following isolation using either mobile phase. The developed procedure allows precise δ(13)C measurements of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur. PMID:27664615

  1. Method for the isolation of citric acid and malic acid in Japanese apricot liqueur for carbon stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Fumikazu; Hashiguchi, Tomokazu; Hisatsune, Yuri; Oe, Takaaki; Kawao, Takafumi; Fujii, Tsutomu

    2017-02-15

    A method for detecting the undeclared addition of acidic ingredients is required to control the authenticity of Japanese apricot liqueur. We developed an analytical procedure that minimizes carbon isotope discrimination for measurement of the δ(13)C values of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur. Our results demonstrated that freeze-drying is preferable to nitrogen spray-drying, because it does not significantly affect the δ(13)C values of citric acid and results in smaller isotope discrimination for malic acid. Both 0.1% formic acid and 0.2% phosphoric acid are acceptable HPLC mobile phases for the isolation of citric and malic acid, although the δ(13)C values of malic acid exhibited relatively large variation compared with citric acid following isolation using either mobile phase. The developed procedure allows precise δ(13)C measurements of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur.

  2. Age estimation in forensic sciences: Application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Ohtani, S; Yamamoto, T; Druid, H; Spalding, S L

    2009-11-02

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster, since the age at death, birth date and year of death, as well as gender, can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this paper we analyze teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that above-ground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) which have been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel and ten of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R2=0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 0.6 {+-} 04 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 {+-} 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  3. Age estimation in forensic sciences: application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Alkass, Kanar; Buchholz, Bruce A; Ohtani, Susumu; Yamamoto, Toshiharu; Druid, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2010-05-01

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster because the age at death, birth date, and year of death as well as gender can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization, has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this study, we analyzed teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that aboveground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ((14)C), which has been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel, and 10 of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R(2) = 0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 1.0 +/- 0.6 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 +/- 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  4. Age estimation in forensic sciences: application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Alkass, Kanar; Buchholz, Bruce A; Ohtani, Susumu; Yamamoto, Toshiharu; Druid, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2010-05-01

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster because the age at death, birth date, and year of death as well as gender can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization, has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this study, we analyzed teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that aboveground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ((14)C), which has been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel, and 10 of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R(2) = 0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 1.0 +/- 0.6 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 +/- 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification. PMID:19965905

  5. A differential fluorescent receptor for nucleic acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, Hillary N; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2014-01-24

    Differential receptors use an array of sensors to recognize analytes. Each sensor in the array can recognize not one, but several analytes with different rates, so a single analyte triggers a response of several sensors in the array. The receptor thus produces a pattern of signals that is unique for each analyte, thereby enabling identification of a specific analyte by producing a "fingerprint" pattern. We applied this approach for the analysis of DNA sequences of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains that differ by single nucleotide substitutions in the 81-bp hot-spot region that imparts rifampin resistance. The technology takes advantage of the new multicomponent, selfassembling sensor, which produces a fluorescent signal in the presence of specific DNA sequences. A differential fluorescent receptor (DFR) contained an array of three such sensors and differentiated at least eight DNA sequences. The approach requires only one molecular-beacon-like fluorescent reporter, which can be used by all three sensors. The DFR developed in this study represents a cost-efficient alternative to molecular diagnostic technologies that use fluorescent hybridization probes.

  6. Analysis of perfluorinated phosponic acids and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid in water, sludge and sediment by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Esparza, X; Moyano, E; de Boer, J; Galceran, M T; van Leeuwen, S P J

    2011-10-30

    Residues of perfluorinated phosphonic acids (PFPAs) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) were investigated in various Dutch surface waters, sludge and sediments. For this purpose, a liquid chromatographic (LC) method was optimized by testing several columns with different mobile phases. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) was chosen for the LC tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis. An ion-pair reagent was added to the injection solvent to improve peak shape. Different solvents were studied for the extraction from solid samples. For clean-up and pre-concentration, weak anion-exchange solid-phase extraction cartridges were used. Water samples were extracted using the same cartridges. The method was used for screening PFPAs in the Dutch aquatic environment. PFPAs were not observed in sediment or sludge samples. PFOPA was found at 1 ng L(-1) in one surface water sample. PFOS was found at levels between 0.07 ng g(-1) and 48 ng g(-1) (dry weight) in sediments and sewage sludge samples. PFOS concentrations in surface water ranged from 3.3 ng L(-1) to 25.4 ng L(-1).

  7. Acid-base analysis: a critique of the Stewart and bicarbonate-centered approaches.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Ira; Kraut, Jeffrey; Ornekian, Vahram; Nguyen, Minhtri K

    2008-05-01

    When approaching the analysis of disorders of acid-base balance, physical chemists, physiologists, and clinicians, tend to focus on different aspects of the relevant phenomenology. The physical chemist focuses on a quantitative understanding of proton hydration and aqueous proton transfer reactions that alter the acidity of a given solution. The physiologist focuses on molecular, cellular, and whole organ transport processes that modulate the acidity of a given body fluid compartment. The clinician emphasizes the diagnosis, clinical causes, and most appropriate treatment of acid-base disturbances. Historically, two different conceptual frameworks have evolved among clinicians and physiologists for interpreting acid-base phenomena. The traditional or bicarbonate-centered framework relies quantitatively on the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, whereas the Stewart or strong ion approach utilizes either the original Stewart equation or its simplified version derived by Constable. In this review, the concepts underlying the bicarbonate-centered and Stewart formulations are analyzed in detail, emphasizing the differences in how each approach characterizes acid-base phenomenology at the molecular level, tissue level, and in the clinical realm. A quantitative comparison of the equations that are currently used in the literature to calculate H(+) concentration ([H(+)]) is included to clear up some of the misconceptions that currently exist in this area. Our analysis demonstrates that while the principle of electroneutrality plays a central role in the strong ion formulation, electroneutrality mechanistically does not dictate a specific [H(+)], and the strong ion and bicarbonate-centered approaches are quantitatively identical even in the presence of nonbicarbonate buffers. Finally, our analysis indicates that the bicarbonate-centered approach utilizing the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation is a mechanistic formulation that reflects the underlying acid-base phenomenology.

  8. Multiplexed analysis of genes using nucleic acid-stabilized silver-nanocluster quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Enkin, Natalie; Wang, Fuan; Sharon, Etery; Albada, H Bauke; Willner, Itamar

    2014-11-25

    Luminescent nucleic acid-stabilized Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) are applied for the optical detection of DNA and for the multiplexed analysis of genes. Two different sensing modules including Ag NCs as luminescence labels are described. One sensing module involves the assembly of a three-component sensing module composed of a nucleic acid-stabilized Ag NC and a quencher-modified nucleic acid hybridized with a nucleic acid scaffold that is complementary to the target DNA. The luminescence of the Ag NCs is quenched in the sensing module nanostructure. The strand displacement of the scaffold by the target DNA separates the nucleic acid-functionalized Ag NCs, leading to the turned-on luminescence of the NCs and to the optical readout of the sensing process. By implementing two different-sized Ag NC-modified sensing modules, the parallel multiplexed analysis of two genes (the Werner Syndrome gene and the HIV, human immunodeficiency, gene), using 615 and 560 nm luminescent Ag NCs, is demonstrated. The second sensing module includes the nucleic acid functionalized Ag NCs and the quencher-modified nucleic acid hybridized with a hairpin DNA scaffold. The luminescence of the Ag NCs is quenched in the sensing module. Opening of the hairpin by the target DNA triggers the luminescence of the Ag NCs, due to the spatial separation of the Ag NCs/quencher units. The system is applied for the optical detection of the BRAC1 gene. In addition, by implementing two-sized Ag NCs, the multiplexed analysis of two genes by the hairpin sensing module approach is demonstrated.

  9. Chemometric analysis of the interactions among different parameters describing health conditions, breast cancer risk and fatty acids profile in serum of rats supplemented with conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Białek, Agnieszka; Zagrodzki, Paweł; Tokarz, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    We investigated how different doses of conjugated linoleic acids applied for various periods of time influence breast cancer risk and fatty acids profile in serum of rats treated or not with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). We also search for interactions among parameters describing health conditions and cancer risk. Animals were divided into 18 groups with different diet modifications (vegetable oil, 1.0%, 2.0% additions of CLA) and different periods of supplementation. In groups treated with DMBA mammary adenocarcinomas appeared. Due to the complexity of experiment apart from statistical analysis a chemometric tool-Partial Least Square method was applied. Analysis of pairs of correlated parameters allowed to identify some regularities concerning the relationships between fatty acid profiles and clinical features of animals. Fatty acids profile was the result of prolonged exposure to high dose of CLA and DMBA administration. These two factors underlined the differences in fatty acids profiles among clusters of animals. PMID:26926361

  10. Classification of illicit heroin by UPLC-Q-TOF analysis of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuimei; Hua, Zhendong; Bai, Yanping

    2015-12-01

    The illicit manufacture of heroin results in the formation of trace levels of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities that provide valuable information about the manufacturing process used. In this work, a new ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF) method; that features high resolution, mass accuracy and sensitivity for profiling neutral and acidic heroin manufacturing impurities was developed. After the UPLC-Q-TOF analysis, the retention times and m/z data pairs of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities were detected, and 19 peaks were found to be evidently different between heroin samples from "Golden Triangle" and "Golden Crescent". Based on the data set of these 19 impurities in 150 authentic heroin samples, classification of heroin geographic origins was successfully achieved utilizing partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). By analyzing another data set of 267 authentic heroin samples, the developed discrimiant model was validated and proved to be accurate and reliable.

  11. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water

    PubMed Central

    Church, Clinton D; Wilkin, Richard T; Alpers, Charles N; Rye, Robert O; McCleskey, R Blaine

    2007-01-01

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1) preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2) stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2–3 ‰ heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3) reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures. PMID:17956615

  12. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, C.D.; Wilkin, R.T.; Alpers, C.N.; Rye, R.O.; Blaine, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1) preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2) stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2-3 ??? heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3) reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures. ?? 2007 Church et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  13. New methods for the compound specific analysis of underivatized amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullagh, J.

    2012-04-01

    The isotopic analysis of amino acids has become an important area of application in a range of geoscientific, palaeo-ecological and biochemical disciplines including in particular palaeodietary reconstruction and environmental forensics (Dunn et al., 2011; Raghaven et al., 2010; Lynch et al., 2011; Godin and McCullagh, 2011). Commercialisation of an interface between liquid chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry in 2004 has enabled the analysis of non-volatile, soluble compounds without the need for derivatization (via GC-C-IRMS), providing exciting new analytical possibilities (Krummen et al., 2004). One of the major problems facing LC-IRMS for δ13C analysis is the development of efficient and robust methods. Chromatographic restrictions on mobile phase composition and flow rates, combined with the need for baseline resolution, are analytically challenging but imperative for accurate isotopic analysis. Since the introduction of LC-IRMS a number of research groups have been working on separation methods in particular but, although suitable for resolving the majority of amino acids, current protocols are extremely time consuming, with recently published methods taking over 4 hours per sample (Smith et al., 2009). The low sample throughput of these methods is directly affecting research efficiency. For example, we are currently trying to better understand what palaeodietary information is represented by individual amino acid δ13C values from bone collagen and hair keratin, and this work has been significantly hampered by a lack of sample throughput. Recognizing the need for larger sample sets to better understanding biogenic information represented by amino acid δ13C for palaeodietary reconstruction, high throughput approaches to amino acid LC-IRMS have been investigated and developed. This poster will present unpublished research, developing an analytical protocol which cuts analysis time for amino acids dramatically. This approach is based on mixed

  14. Regulatory impact analysis of the proposed acid-rain implementation regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-16

    This regulatory impact analysis (RIA) was developed in response to Executive Order (EO) 12291, which requires Federal Agencies to assess the costs, benefits, and impacts of all 'major' regulations. In compliance with EO 12291, this RIA assesses costs, benefits and impacts for the important provisions of Title IV. EPA divided its analysis of the Acid Rain Program into two parts. First, EPA analyzed the effects of the statute in the absence of any implementation regulations. In the second part of the analysis, EPA examined a 'regulatory' case that included both the SO2 reductions and the implementation regulations. By comparing costs under the regulatory case to those under the absent regulations case, EPA was able to isolate the incremental savings provided by the regulations. At the same time, by combining the two parts of the analysis, EPA was able to show the total costs imposed by the Acid Rain Program (the statute and the regulations) as a whole.

  15. Concurrent and supercritical fluid chromatographic analysis of Terpene Lactones and ginkolic acids in Ginko biloba.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supercritical fluid chromatography was used to resolve and determine ginkgolic acids (GAs) and terpene lactones concurrently in ginkgo plant materials and commercial dietary supplements. Analysis of GAs (C13:0, C15:0, C15:1 and C17:1) was carried out by ESI (-) mass detection. The ESI (-) spectra of...

  16. A Multicomponent UV Analysis of ["alpha"]- and ["beta"]-Acids in Hops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egts, Haley; Durben, Dan J.; Dixson, John A.; Zehfus, Micheal H.

    2012-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of ["alpha"]- and ["beta"]-acids (humulones and lupulones) in a hops sample using a multicomponent UV spectroscopic analysis of a methanolic hop extract. When compared with standard methods, this lab can be considered "greener" because it uses smaller volumes of safer solvents (methanol instead of…

  17. Analysis and Identification of Acid-Base Indicator Dyes by Thin-Layer Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Daniel D.

    2007-01-01

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is a very simple and effective technique that is used by chemists by different purposes, including the monitoring of the progress of a reaction. TLC can also be easily used for the analysis and identification of various acid-base indicator dyes.

  18. Grazing food web view from compound-specific stable isotope analysis of amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the trophic position (TP) of organisms in food webs allows ecologists to track energy flow and trophic linkages among organisms in complex networks of ecosystems. Compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of amino acids has been employed as a relatively new method with the high p...

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of Branched-Chain Amino Acid Levels in Arabidopsis Seeds[W

    PubMed Central

    Angelovici, Ruthie; Lipka, Alexander E.; Deason, Nicholas; Gonzalez-Jorge, Sabrina; Lin, Haining; Cepela, Jason; Buell, Robin; Gore, Michael A.; DellaPenna, Dean

    2013-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are three of the nine essential amino acids in human and animal diets and are important for numerous processes in development and growth. However, seed BCAA levels in major crops are insufficient to meet dietary requirements, making genetic improvement for increased and balanced seed BCAAs an important nutritional target. Addressing this issue requires a better understanding of the genetics underlying seed BCAA content and composition. Here, a genome-wide association study and haplotype analysis for seed BCAA traits in Arabidopsis thaliana revealed a strong association with a chromosomal interval containing two BRANCHED-CHAIN AMINO ACID TRANSFERASES, BCAT1 and BCAT2. Linkage analysis, reverse genetic approaches, and molecular complementation analysis demonstrated that allelic variation at BCAT2 is responsible for the natural variation of seed BCAAs in this interval. Complementation analysis of a bcat2 null mutant with two significantly different alleles from accessions Bayreuth-0 and Shahdara is consistent with BCAT2 contributing to natural variation in BCAA levels, glutamate recycling, and free amino acid homeostasis in seeds in an allele-dependent manner. The seed-specific phenotype of bcat2 null alleles, its strong transcription induction during late seed development, and its subcellular localization to the mitochondria are consistent with a unique, catabolic role for BCAT2 in BCAA metabolism in seeds. PMID:24368787

  20. ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Colburn, Heather A.; Moran, James J.; Melville, Angela M.

    2009-12-01

    This report describes method development and preliminary evaluation for analyzing castor samples for signatures of purifying ricin. Ricin purification from the source castor seeds is essentially a problem of protein purification using common biochemical methods. Indications of protein purification will likely manifest themselves as removal of the non-protein fractions of the seed. Two major, non-protein, types of biochemical constituents in the seed are the castor oil and various carbohydrates. The oil comprises roughly half the seed weight while the carbohydrate component comprises roughly half of the remaining “mash” left after oil and hull removal. Different castor oil and carbohydrate components can serve as indicators of specific toxin processing steps. Ricinoleic acid is a relatively unique fatty acid in nature and is the most abundant component of castor oil. The loss of ricinoleic acid indicates a step to remove oil from the seeds. The relative amounts of carbohydrates and carbohydrate-like compounds, including arabinose, xylose, myo-inositol fucose, rhamnose, glucosamine and mannose detected in the sample can also indicate specific processing steps. For instance, the differential loss of arabinose relative to mannose and N-acetyl glucosamine indicates enrichment for the protein fraction of the seed using protein precipitation. The methods developed in this project center on fatty acid and carbohydrate extraction from castor samples followed by derivatization to permit analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Method descriptions herein include: the source and preparation of castor materials used for method evaluation, the equipment and description of procedure required for chemical derivatization, and the instrument parameters used in the analysis. Two types of derivatization methods describe analysis of carbohydrates and one procedure for analysis of fatty acids. Two types of GC-MS analysis is included in the method development, one

  1. Gas chromatography-vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy for analysis of fatty acid methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hui; Smuts, Jonathan; Bai, Ling; Walsh, Phillip; Armstrong, Daniel W; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-03-01

    A new vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) detector for gas chromatography was recently developed and applied to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. VUV detection features full spectral acquisition in a wavelength range of 115-240nm, where virtually all chemical species absorb. VUV absorption spectra of 37 FAMEs, including saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated types were recorded. Unsaturated FAMEs show significantly different gas phase absorption profiles than saturated ones, and these classes can be easily distinguished with the VUV detector. Another advantage includes differentiating cis/trans-isomeric FAMEs (e.g. oleic acid methyl ester and linoleic acid methyl ester isomers) and the ability to use VUV data analysis software for deconvolution of co-eluting signals. As a universal detector, VUV also provides high specificity, sensitivity, and a fast data acquisition rate, making it a powerful tool for fatty acid screening when combined with gas chromatography. The fatty acid profile of several food oil samples (olive, canola, vegetable, corn, sunflower and peanut oils) were analyzed in this study to demonstrate applicability to real world samples.

  2. Development and evaluation of a microdevice for amino acid biomarker detection and analysis on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Skelley, Alison M.; Scherer, James R.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Grover, William H.; Ivester, Robin H. C.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA), a microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) instrument for sensitive amino acid biomarker analysis, has been developed and evaluated. The microdevice consists of a four-wafer sandwich combining glass CE separation channels, microfabricated pneumatic membrane valves and pumps, and a nanoliter fluidic network. The portable MOA instrument integrates high voltage CE power supplies, pneumatic controls, and fluorescence detection optics necessary for field operation. The amino acid concentration sensitivities range from micromolar to 0.1 nM, corresponding to part-per-trillion sensitivity. The MOA was first used in the lab to analyze soil extracts from the Atacama Desert, Chile, detecting amino acids ranging from 10–600 parts per billion. Field tests of the MOA in the Panoche Valley, CA, successfully detected amino acids at 70 parts per trillion to 100 parts per billion in jarosite, a sulfate-rich mineral associated with liquid water that was recently detected on Mars. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using the MOA to perform sensitive in situ amino acid biomarker analysis on soil samples representative of a Mars-like environment. PMID:15657130

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced free fatty acid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liwei; Lee, Jaslyn Jie Lin; Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Wei Ning

    2016-02-01

    The engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain △faa1△faa4 [Acot5s] was demonstrated to accumulate more free fatty acids (FFA) previously. Here, comparative proteomic analysis was performed to get a global overview of metabolic regulation in the strain. Over 500 proteins were identified, and 82 of those proteins were found to change significantly in the engineered strains. Proteins involved in glycolysis, acetate metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, TCA cycle, glyoxylate cycle, the pentose phosphate pathway, respiration, transportation, and stress response were found to be upregulated in △faa1△faa4 [Acot5s] as compared to the wild type. On the other hand, proteins involved in glycerol, ethanol, ergosterol, and cell wall synthesis were downregulated. Taken together with our metabolite analysis, our results showed that the disruption of Faa1 and Faa4 and expression of Acot5s in the engineered strain △faa1△faa4 [Acot5s] not only relieved the feedback inhibition of fatty acyl-CoAs on fatty acid synthesis, but also caused a major metabolic rearrangement. The rearrangement redirected carbon flux toward the pathways which generate the essential substrates and cofactors for fatty acid synthesis, such as acetyl-CoA, ATP, and NADPH. Therefore, our results help shed light on the mechanism for the increased production of fatty acids in the engineered strains, which is useful in providing information for future studies in biofuel production.

  4. Trace analysis of acids and bases by conductometric titration with multiparametric non-linear regression.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Lúcia H G; Gutz, Ivano G R

    2006-03-15

    A chemometric method for analysis of conductometric titration data was introduced to extend its applicability to lower concentrations and more complex acid-base systems. Auxiliary pH measurements were made during the titration to assist the calculation of the distribution of protonable species on base of known or guessed equilibrium constants. Conductivity values of each ionized or ionizable species possibly present in the sample were introduced in a general equation where the only unknown parameters were the total concentrations of (conjugated) bases and of strong electrolytes not involved in acid-base equilibria. All these concentrations were adjusted by a multiparametric nonlinear regression (NLR) method, based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. This first conductometric titration method with NLR analysis (CT-NLR) was successfully applied to simulated conductometric titration data and to synthetic samples with multiple components at concentrations as low as those found in rainwater (approximately 10 micromol L(-1)). It was possible to resolve and quantify mixtures containing a strong acid, formic acid, acetic acid, ammonium ion, bicarbonate and inert electrolyte with accuracy of 5% or better.

  5. Analysis of mycolic acid cleavage products and cellular fatty acids of Mycobacterium species by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M A; Moss, C W; Silcox, V A; Good, R C

    1986-04-01

    After growth and experimental conditions were established, the mycolic acid cleavage products, constituent fatty acids, and alcohols of representative strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. smegmatis, M. fortuitum complex, M. kansasii, M. gordonae, and M. avium complex were determined by capillary gas chromatography. Reproducible cleavage of mycolic acid methyl esters to tetracosanoic (24:0) or hexacosanoic (26:0) acid methyl esters was achieved by heating the sample in a high-temperature muffle furnace. The major constituent fatty acids in all species were hexadecanoic (16:0) and octadecenoic (18:1 omega 9-c, oleic) acids. With the exception of M. gordonae, 10-methyloctadecanoic acid was found in all species; moreover, M. gordonae was the only species tested which contained 2-methyltetradecanoic acid. M. kansasii was characterized by the presence of 2,4-dimethyltetradecanoic acid, M. avium complex by 2-eicosanol, and M. tuberculosis by 26:0 mycolic acid cleavage product. The mycolic acid cleavage product in the other five species tested was 24:0. Although a limited number of strains and species were tested, preliminary results indicate that this gas chromatographic method can be used to characterize mycobacterial cultures by their mycolic acid cleavage products and constituent fatty acid and alcohol content. PMID:3084554

  6. Compound Specific Isotope Analysis of Fatty Acids in Southern African Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billmark, K. A.; Macko, S. A.; Swap, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    This study, conducted as a part of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000), applied compound specific isotope analysis to describe aerosols at source regions and rural locations. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of individual fatty acids were determined for aerosol samples collected at four sites throughout southern Africa. Mongu, Zambia and Skukuza, South Africa were chosen for their location within intense seasonal Miombo woodland savanna and bushveld savanna biomass burning source regions, respectively. Urban aerosols were collected at Johannesburg, South Africa and rural samples were collected at Sua Pan, Botswana. Fatty acid isotopic compositions varied temporally. Urban aerosols showed significant isotopic enrichment of selected short chain fatty acids (C < 20) compared to aerosols produced during biomass combustion. Sua Pan short chain fatty acid signatures were significantly different from the other non-urban sites, which suggests that sources other than biomass combustion products, such as organic eolian material, impact the Sua Pan aerosol profile. However, a high degree of correlation between Sua Pan and Skukuza long chain fatty acid δ 13C values confirm atmospheric linkages between the two areas and that isotopic signatures of combusted fatty acids are unaltered during atmospheric transport highlighting their potential for use as a conservative tracer.

  7. Kinetic Analysis of Lauric Acid Hydroxylation by Human Cytochrome P450 4A11

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 4A11 is the only functionally active subfamily 4A P450 in humans. P450 4A11 catalyzes mainly ω-hydroxylation of fatty acids in liver and kidney; this process is not a major degradative pathway, but at least one product, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, has important signaling properties. We studied catalysis by P450 4A11 and the issue of rate-limiting steps using lauric acid ω-hydroxylation, a prototypic substrate for this enzyme. Some individual reaction steps were studied using pre-steady-state kinetic approaches. Substrate and product binding and release were much faster than overall rates of catalysis. Reduction of ferric P450 4A11 (to ferrous) was rapid and not rate-limiting. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) experiments yielded low but reproducible values (1.2–2) for 12-hydroxylation with 12-2H-substituted lauric acid. However, considerable “metabolic switching” to 11-hydroxylation was observed with [12-2H3]lauric acid. Analysis of switching results [Jones, J. P., et al. (1986) J. Am. Chem. Soc.108, 7074–7078] and the use of tritium KIE analysis with [12-3H]lauric acid [Northrop, D. B. (1987) Methods Enzymol.87, 607–625] both indicated a high intrinsic KIE (>10). Cytochrome b5 (b5) stimulated steady-state lauric acid ω-hydroxylation ∼2-fold; the apoprotein was ineffective, indicating that electron transfer is involved in the b5 enhancement. The rate of b5 reoxidation was increased in the presence of ferrous P450 mixed with O2. Collectively, the results indicate that both the transfer of an electron to the ferrous·O2 complex and C–H bond-breaking limit the rate of P450 4A11 ω-oxidation. PMID:25203493

  8. Interactive network analysis of the plasma amino acids profile in a mouse model of hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Mochida, Taiga; Maki, Yukihiro; Shiraki, Yasuko; Mori, Hiroko; Matsumoto, Shirou; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Ando, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Endo, Fumio; Okamoto, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    Amino acids are a group of metabolites that are important substrates for protein synthesis, are important as signaling molecules and play central roles as highly connected metabolic hubs, and therefore, there are many reports that describe disease-specific abnormalities in plasma amino acids profile. However, the causes of progression from a healthy control to a manifestation of the plasma amino acid changes remain obscure. Here, we extended the plasma amino acids profile to relationships that have interactive properties, and found remarkable differences in the longitudinal transition of hyperglycemia as a diabetes emergency. What is especially important is to understand pathogenesis for better treatment and early diagnosis of diabetes. In this study, we performed interactive analysis using time course data of the plasma samples of AKITA mice, which develop hyperglycemia. Primarily, we decided to analyze the interactive property of amino acids which had highly significant association with hyperglycemia, namely alanine, glycine, leucine, isoleucine and valine. Next, we inferred the interactive network structure, which reproduces the actual time course within an error allowance of 10% using an S-system model (a conceptual mathematical model for analyzing and simulating networks). The emphasis of this study was altered interactions of plasma amino acids that show stabilizing and destabilizing features in a variety of clinical settings. By performing sensitivity analysis, the most dominant relations in this network were selected; the control paths from glycine to isoleucine in healthy control and from alanine to glycine in hyperglycemia. This result is in good agreement with the biological knowledge regarding branched-chain amino acids, and suggests the biological importance of the effect from alanine to glycine.

  9. Molecular analysis of microbial community structure in the chicken ileum following organic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Nava, Gerardo M; Attene-Ramos, Matias S; Gaskins, H Rex; Richards, James D

    2009-06-12

    To compensate for possible decreases in animal production due to restrictions on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters, several non-antibiotic alternatives have been investigated. Organic acid supplementation (OAS) of feed or water has shown some promising results for affecting intestinal microbiota and reducing pathogenic bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, few studies have explored the effects of OAS on microbial communities using objective molecular-based techniques. The aim of the present study was to characterize via 16S rRNA gene-based approaches responses of the intestinal microbiota after OAS in chicks. Newborn chicks were randomly divided in four treatments: (a) control (no antibiotic, no OAS); (b) antibiotic administration (bacitracin MD); (c) organic acid blend dl-2-hydroxy-4(methylthio) butanoic acid [HMTBA]; lactic, and phosphoric acid (HLP); and (d) organic acid blend HMTBA, formic, and propionic acid (HFP). Ileal contents and mucosal scrapings from 7 chicks/treatment/day were taken at 15, 22, and 29 days of age, and genomic DNA was isolated for the molecular analysis of the intestinal microbiota. The data demonstrate that HFP blend treatment for 29 consecutive days affected ileal microbial populations as indicated by community fingerprinting analysis (16S rRNA PCR-DGGE). In parallel, total bacterial and lactobacilli populations were increased by the HFP blend treatment as demonstrated by targeted qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA. In summary, the present data demonstrate that OAS, HFP blend treatment in particular, shifts intestinal microbiota, generates more homogenous and distinct populations, and increases Lactobacillus spp. colonization of the chick ileum. PMID:19269115

  10. Uric acid levels in subjects with bipolar disorder: A comparative meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Francesco; Crocamo, Cristina; Mazza, Mario Gennaro; Clerici, Massimo; Carrà, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Previous research has hypothesised increased uric acid levels, possibly because of an amplified purinergic metabolism and a reduced adenosine activity, in subjects with bipolar disorder. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at estimating if individuals with bipolar disorder had uric acid levels higher than both healthy controls and subjects with major depression (trait marker hypothesis). It also tested if uric acid levels could differ in different phases of bipolar disorder (state marker hypothesis). Meta-analyses were carried out generating pooled standardized mean differences (SMDs), using random-effects models. Heterogeneity between studies was estimated using the I(2) index. Relevant sensitivity and meta-regression analyses were conducted. We searched main Electronic Databases, identifying twelve studies that met our inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses showed increased uric acid levels in individuals with bipolar disorder as compared with both healthy controls (SMD = 0.65, p < 0.001, I(2) = 82.9%) and those with major depression (SMD = 0.46, p < 0.001; I(2) = 68.7%). However, meta-regression analyses confirmed this association only as compared with healthy controls. Finally, though uric acid levels were higher in manic/mixed phases as compared with depressive ones (SMD = 0.34; p = 0.04, I(2) = 58.8%), a sensitivity analysis did not confirm the association. In sum, our meta-analysis shows that subjects with bipolar disorder have uric acid levels higher than healthy controls. The potential role of factors that might clarify the nature of this association deserves additional research.

  11. TRACE ANALYSIS OF FLUORESCEIN-DERIVATIZED PHENOXY ACID HERBICIDES BY MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH LASER-INDUCTED FLUORESCENCE DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection was used for the trace analysis of phenoxy acid herbicides. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) with LIF detection, which has not previously been used for pesticide analysis, overcomes the po...

  12. Liquid chromatography – high resolution mass spectrometry analysis of fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Fan, Jing; Lu, Wenyun; White, Eileen; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    We present a liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method for long-chain and very-long-chain fatty acid analysis, and its application to 13C-tracer studies of fatty acid metabolism. Fatty acids containing 14 to 36 carbon atoms are separated by C8 reversed-phase chromatography using a water-methanol gradient with tributylamine as ion pairing agent, ionized by electrospray, and analyzed by a stand-alone orbitrap mass spectrometer. The median limit of detection is 5 ng/ml with a linear dynamic range of 100-fold. Ratios of unlabeled to 13C-labeled species are quantitated precisely and accurately (average relative standard deviation 3.2% and deviation from expectation 2.3%). In samples consisting of fatty acids saponified from cultured mammalian cells, 45 species are quantified, with average intraday relative standard deviations for independent biological replicates of 11%. The method enables quantitation of molecular ion peaks for all labeled forms of each fatty acid. Different degrees of 13C-labeling from glucose and glutamine correspond to fatty acid uptake from media, de novo synthesis, and elongation. To exemplify the utility of the method, we examined isogenic cell lines with and without activated Ras oncogene expression. Ras increases the abundance and alters the labeling patterns of saturated and monounsaturated very-long-chain fatty acids, with the observed pattern consistent with Ras leading to enhanced activity of ELOVL4 or an enzyme with similar catalytic activity. This LC-MS method and associated isotope tracer techniques should be broadly applicable to investigating fatty acid metabolism. PMID:22004349

  13. Culture-independent analysis of lactic acid bacteria diversity associated with mezcal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Narváez-Zapata, J A; Rojas-Herrera, R A; Rodríguez-Luna, I C; Larralde-Corona, C P

    2010-11-01

    Mezcal is an alcoholic beverage obtained from the distillation of fermented juices of cooked Agave spp. plant stalks (agave must), and each region in Mexico with denomination of origin uses defined Agave species to prepare mezcal with unique organoleptic characteristics. During fermentation to produce mezcal in the state of Tamaulipas, not only alcohol-producing yeasts are involved, but also a lactic acid bacterial community that has not been characterized yet. In order to address this lack of knowledge on this traditional Mexican beverage, we performed a DGGE-16S rRNA analysis of the lactic acid bacterial diversity and metabolite accumulation during the fermentation of a typical agave must that is rustically produced in San Carlos County (Tamaulipas, Mexico). The analysis of metabolite production indicated a short but important malolactic fermentation stage not previously described for mezcal. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the 16S rRNA genes showed a distinctive lactic acid bacterial community composed mainly of Pediococcus parvulus, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus composti, Lactobacillus parabuchneri, and Lactobacillus plantarum. Some atypical genera such as Weissella and Bacillus were also found in the residual must. Our results suggest that the lactic acid bacteria could strongly be implicated in the organoleptic attributes of this traditional Mexican distilled beverage.

  14. Tank 12H Acidic Chemical Cleaning Sample Analysis And Material Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C. J.; Reboul, S. H.; Wiersma, B. J.; Coleman, C. J.

    2013-11-08

    A process of Bulk Oxalic Acid (BOA) chemical cleaning was performed for Tank 12H during June and July of 2013 to remove all or a portion of the approximately 4400 gallon sludge heel. Three strikes of oxalic acid (nominally 4 wt% or 2 wt%) were used at 55°C and tank volumes of 96- to 140-thousand gallons. This report details the sample analysis of a scrape sample taken prior to BOA cleaning and dip samples taken during BOA cleaning. It also documents a rudimentary material balance for the Tank 12H cleaning results.

  15. Amino acid analysis of the horny layer of the soles of patients with hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P G

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid composition of keratin from soles of patients suffering from hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma of the Unna Thost variety was investigated. Patients were divided into two groups: those without dermatophytosis and those whose hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma was complicated with a dermatophyte infection. The amino acid composition of the horny layer was compared to that of control individuals and to a previously performed analysis of mammalian hair. However, no difference was found between the groups nor was any explanation as to why Trichophyton mentagrophytes occurred significantly more often in soles of patients with hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma made apparent.

  16. Acid-suppressive medications and risk of fracture: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Dawei; Feng, Wan; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acid-suppressive medications are widely used for the management of acid-related disorders. It has been reported that acid-suppressive medication users were at increased risk of fracture, but such an association was inconsistent among observational studies. The purpose of our analysis was to assess the relationship between use of antacid drugs and fracture risk. Methods: We systematically searched electronic database and manually examined the reference lists of previous reviews for potentially eligible studies. Given the heterogeneity across studies, random effects models were used to calculate summary estimates. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were conducted to explore the potential heterogeneity. Results: 18 studies met our inclusion criteria. PPI and H2RA were associated with increased risk of hip fracture, with substantial heterogeneity (PPI: 1.216, 1.134-1.304, I2=71.3%; H2RA: 1.128, 1.022-1.245, I2=72.1%). High risk of spine fracture was observed in PPI users (1.216, 95% CI: 1.134-1.304) but not H2RA users. When considering 5 studies conducted among postmenopausal women, the RR was 1.376, (95% CI: 1.043-1.816) with modest heterogeneity (I2=57.7%). Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis found consistent association between hip fracture risk and PPI use but not H2RA use. Positive association for H2RA use lost its significance when considering case-control studies and European studies. Conclusion: Results of this updated meta-analysis provided evidence to support that acid-suppressive medications were associated with increased risk of fracture, especially hip fracture. PMID:26309543

  17. Analysis of Phosphonic Acids: Validation of Semi-Volatile Analysis by HPLC-MS/MS by EPA Method MS999

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, J; Vu, A; Koester, C

    2008-10-31

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Region 5 Chicago Regional Laboratory (CRL) developed a method titled Analysis of Diisopropyl Methylphosphonate, Ethyl Hydrogen Dimethylamidophosphate, Isopropyl Methylphosphonic Acid, Methylphosphonic Acid, and Pinacolyl Methylphosphonic Acid in Water by Multiple Reaction Monitoring Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry: EPA Version MS999. This draft standard operating procedure (SOP) was distributed to multiple EPA laboratories and to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which was tasked to serve as a reference laboratory for EPA's Environmental Reference Laboratory Network (ERLN) and to develop and validate analytical procedures. The primary objective of this study was to validate and verify the analytical procedures described in EPA Method MS999 for analysis of the listed phosphonic acids and surrogates in aqueous samples. The gathered data from this validation study will be used to: (1) demonstrate analytical method performance; (2) generate quality control acceptance criteria; and (3) revise the SOP to provide a validated method that would be available for use during a homeland security event. The data contained in this report will be compiled, by EPA CRL, with data generated by other EPA Regional laboratories so that performance metrics of EPA Method MS999 can be determined.

  18. Effect of the bile-acid sequestrant colestipol on postprandial serum bile-acid concentration: evaluation by bioluminescent enzymic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, S S; Wayne, M L; Smith, R B; Wright, C E; Andreadis, N A; Hofmann, A F

    1989-02-01

    Chronic ingestion of bile-acid sequestrants has been shown to decrease the serum cholesterol concentration and coronary events in hypercholesterolaemic patients. To develop improved sequestrants, a rapid, convenient method for testing the bile-acid binding efficacy of sequestrants is needed. Serum bile-acid concentrations could be used to detect bile-acid binding by an administered sequestrant, since the serum bile-acid concentration is determined largely by the rate of intestinal absorption in healthy individuals. To test this, serum bile-acid concentrations were measured at frequent intervals over 24 h in five otherwise healthy hypercholesterolaemic subjects during the ingestion of three standard meals, with or without the addition of 5 g colestipol granules administered 30 min before each meal. Total serum bile-acid concentration was measured with a previously reported bioluminescent enzymic assay, that uses a 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, an oxido-reductase, and a bacterial luciferase co-immobilized on to Sepharose beads. Bile acids in 1 ml of serum were isolated by solid-phase extraction chromatography with reversed-phase C18 cartridges. Colestipol lowered the postprandial elevation of serum bile acids by one half, with a subsequent decrease in the cumulative area under the curve. The data suggest that measurement of serum bile-acid concentrations by bioluminescence is a rapid, simple way to document the efficacy of bile-acid sequestrants.

  19. Genomewide expression analysis in amino acid-producing bacteria using DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Polen, Tino; Wendisch, Volker F

    2004-01-01

    DNA microarray technology has become an important research tool for biotechnology and microbiology. It is now possible to characterize genetic diversity and gene expression in a genomewide manner. DNA microarrays have been applied extensively to study the biology of many bacteria including Escherichia coli, but only recently have they been developed for the Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum. Both bacteria are widely used for biotechnological amino acid production. In this article, in addition to the design and generation of microarrays as well as their use in hybridization experiments and subsequent data analysis, we describe recent applications of DNA microarray technology regarding amino acid production in C. glutamicum and E. coli. We also discuss the impact of functional genomics studies on fundamental as well as applied aspects of amino acid production with C. glutamicum and E. coli. PMID:15304751

  20. Scalable Isolation of Mammalian Mitochondria for Nucleic Acid and Nucleoid Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ken-Wing; Bogenhagen, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of mitochondria from cultured cells and animal tissues for analysis of nucleic acids and bona fide mitochondrial nucleic acid binding proteins and enzymes is complicated by contamination with cellular nucleic acids and their adherent proteins. Protocols presented here allow for quick isolation of mitochondria from a small number of cells and for preparation of highly purified mitochondria from a larger number of cells using nuclease treatment and high salt washing of mitochondria to reduce contamination. We further describe a method for the isolation of mitochondrial DNA-protein complexes known as nucleoids from these highly purified mitochondria using a combination of glycerol gradient sedimentation followed by isopycnic centrifugation in a non-ionic iodixanol gradient.

  1. Photometric method for determination of acidity constants through integral spectra analysis.

    PubMed

    Zevatskiy, Yuriy Eduardovich; Ruzanov, Daniil Olegovich; Samoylov, Denis Vladimirovich

    2015-04-15

    An express method for determination of acidity constants of organic acids, based on the analysis of the integral transmittance vs. pH dependence is developed. The integral value is registered as a photocurrent of photometric device simultaneously with potentiometric titration. The proposed method allows to obtain pKa using only simple and low-cost instrumentation. The optical part of the experimental setup has been optimized through the exclusion of the monochromator device. Thus it only takes 10-15 min to obtain one pKa value with the absolute error of less than 0.15 pH units. Application limitations and reliability of the method have been tested for a series of organic acids of various nature.

  2. Early steps of metabolism evolution inferred by cladistic analysis of amino acid catabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Cunchillos, Chomin; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2002-02-01

    Among abiotic molecules available in primitive environments, free amino acids are good candidates as the first source of energy and molecules for early protocells. Amino acid catabolic pathways are likely to be one of the very first metabolic pathways of life. Among them, which ones were the first to emerge? A cladistic analysis of catabolic pathways of the sixteen aliphatic amino acids and two portions of the Krebs cycle is performed using four criteria of homology. The cladogram shows that the earliest pathways to emerge are not portions of the Krebs cycle but catabolisms of aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, glutamine, proline, arginine. Earliest enzymatic catabolic functions were deaminations and transaminations. Later on appeared enzymatic decarboxylations. The consensus tree allows to propose four time spans for catabolism development and corroborates the views of Cordón in 1990 about the evolution of catabolism.

  3. Photometric method for determination of acidity constants through integral spectra analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevatskiy, Yuriy Eduardovich; Ruzanov, Daniil Olegovich; Samoylov, Denis Vladimirovich

    2015-04-01

    An express method for determination of acidity constants of organic acids, based on the analysis of the integral transmittance vs. pH dependence is developed. The integral value is registered as a photocurrent of photometric device simultaneously with potentiometric titration. The proposed method allows to obtain pKa using only simple and low-cost instrumentation. The optical part of the experimental setup has been optimized through the exclusion of the monochromator device. Thus it only takes 10-15 min to obtain one pKa value with the absolute error of less than 0.15 pH units. Application limitations and reliability of the method have been tested for a series of organic acids of various nature.

  4. [Comparative genomics and evolutionary analysis of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Kai, Xia; Xinle, Liang; Yudong, Li

    2015-12-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) is a widespread adaptive immunity system that exists in most archaea and many bacteria against foreign DNA, such as phages, viruses and plasmids. In general, CRISPR system consists of direct repeat, leader, spacer and CRISPR-associated sequences. Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role in industrial fermentation of vinegar and bioelectrochemistry. To investigate the polymorphism and evolution pattern of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria, bioinformatic analyses were performed on 48 species from three main genera (Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter and Gluconobacter) with whole genome sequences available from the NCBI database. The results showed that the CRISPR system existed in 32 species of the 48 strains studied. Most of the CRISPR-Cas system in AAB belonged to type I CRISPR-Cas system (subtype E and C), but type II CRISPR-Cas system which contain cas9 gene was only found in the genus Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The repeat sequences of some CRISPR were highly conserved among species from different genera, and the leader sequences of some CRISPR possessed conservative motif, which was associated with regulated promoters. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of cas1 demonstrated that they were suitable for classification of species. The conservation of cas1 genes was associated with that of repeat sequences among different strains, suggesting they were subjected to similar functional constraints. Moreover, the number of spacer was positively correlated with the number of prophages and insertion sequences, indicating the acetic acid bacteria were continually invaded by new foreign DNA. The comparative analysis of CRISR loci in acetic acid bacteria provided the basis for investigating the molecular mechanism of different acetic acid tolerance and genome stability in acetic acid bacteria.

  5. [Comparative genomics and evolutionary analysis of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Kai, Xia; Xinle, Liang; Yudong, Li

    2015-12-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) is a widespread adaptive immunity system that exists in most archaea and many bacteria against foreign DNA, such as phages, viruses and plasmids. In general, CRISPR system consists of direct repeat, leader, spacer and CRISPR-associated sequences. Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role in industrial fermentation of vinegar and bioelectrochemistry. To investigate the polymorphism and evolution pattern of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria, bioinformatic analyses were performed on 48 species from three main genera (Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter and Gluconobacter) with whole genome sequences available from the NCBI database. The results showed that the CRISPR system existed in 32 species of the 48 strains studied. Most of the CRISPR-Cas system in AAB belonged to type I CRISPR-Cas system (subtype E and C), but type II CRISPR-Cas system which contain cas9 gene was only found in the genus Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The repeat sequences of some CRISPR were highly conserved among species from different genera, and the leader sequences of some CRISPR possessed conservative motif, which was associated with regulated promoters. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of cas1 demonstrated that they were suitable for classification of species. The conservation of cas1 genes was associated with that of repeat sequences among different strains, suggesting they were subjected to similar functional constraints. Moreover, the number of spacer was positively correlated with the number of prophages and insertion sequences, indicating the acetic acid bacteria were continually invaded by new foreign DNA. The comparative analysis of CRISR loci in acetic acid bacteria provided the basis for investigating the molecular mechanism of different acetic acid tolerance and genome stability in acetic acid bacteria. PMID:26704949

  6. Near infrared spectroscopy, cluster and multivariate analysis hyphenated to thin layer chromatography for the analysis of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Heigl, N; Huck, C W; Rainer, M; Najam-Ul-Haq, M; Bonn, G K

    2006-07-01

    A method based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was developed for the rapid and non-destructive determination and quantification of solid and dissolved amino acids. The statistical results obtained after optimisation of measurement conditions were evaluated on the basis of statistical parameters, Q-value (quality of calibrations), R(2), standard error of estimation (SEE), standard error of prediction (SEP), BIAS applying cluster and different multivariate analytical procedures. Experimental optimisation comprised the selection of the highest suitable optical thin-layer (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 mm), sample temperature (10-30 degrees C), measurement option (light fibre, 0.5 mm optical thin-layer; boiling point tube; different types of cuvettes) and sample concentration in the range between 100 and 500 ppm. Applying the optimised conditions and a 115-QS Suprasil cuvette (V = 400 microl), the established qualitative model enabled to distinguish between different dissolved amino acids with a Q-value of 0.9555. Solid amino acids were investigated in the transflectance mode, allowing to differentiate them with a Q-value of 0.9155. For the qualitative and quantitative analysis of amino acids in complex matrices NIRS was established as a detection system directly onto the plate after prior separation on cellulose based thin-layer chromatography (TLC) sheets employing n-butanol, acetic acid and distilled water at a ratio of 8:4:2 (v/v/v) as an optimised mobile phase. Due to the prior separation step, the established calibration curve was found to be more stable than the one calculated from the dissolved amino acids. The found lower limit of detection was 0.01 mg/ml. Finally, this optimised TLC-NIRS method was successfully applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of L-lysine in apple juice. NIRS is shown not only to offer a fast, non-destructive detection tool but also to provide an easy-to-use alternative to more complicated detection methods such as

  7. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E.; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  8. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Meili; Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  9. Analysis of Carbohydrate and Fatty Acid Marker Abundance in Ricin Toxin Preparations for Forensic Information

    SciTech Connect

    Colburn, Heather A.; Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Moran, James J.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Melville, Angela M.

    2010-07-15

    One challenge in the forensic analysis of ricin samples is determining the method and extent of sample preparation. Ricin purification from the source castor seeds is essentially a protein purification through removal of the non-protein fractions of the seed. Two major, non-protein constituents in the seed are the castor oil and carbohydrates. Ricinoleic acid is a relatively unique fatty acid in nature and is the most abundant component of castor oil, which comprises roughly half the seed weight. The carbohydrate component comprises roughly half of the remaining “mash” left after oil and hull removal. We used derivatization of carbohydrate and fatty acid markers followed by identification and quantification using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to assess compositional changes in ricin samples purified by different methods. The loss of ricinoleic acid indicated steps for oil removal had occurred. Changes to the carbohydrate content of the sample were also observed following protein precipitation. The differential loss of arabinose relative to mannose indicated removal of the major carbohydrate fraction of the seed and enrichment of the protein content. Taken together, these changes in fatty acid and carbohydrate abundance are indicative of the preparation method used for each sample.

  10. Capillary electrophoresis method with UV-detection for analysis of free amino acids concentrations in food.

    PubMed

    Omar, Mei Musa Ali; Elbashir, Abdalla Ahmed; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2017-01-01

    Simple and inexpensive capillary electrophoresis with UV-detection method (CE-UV) was optimized and validated for determination of six amino acids namely (alanine, asparagine, glutamine, proline, serine and valine) for Sudanese food. Amino acids in the samples were derivatized with 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-Cl) prior to CE-UV analysis. Labeling reaction conditions (100mM borate buffer at pH 8.5, labeling reaction time 60min, temperature 70°C and NBD-Cl concentration 40mM) were systematically investigated. The optimal conditions for the separation were 100mM borate buffer at pH 9.7 and detected at 475nm. The method was validated in terms of linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), precision (repeatability) (RSD%) and accuracy (recovery). Good linearity was achieved for all amino acids (r(2)>0.9981) in the concentration range of 2.5-40mg/L. The LODs in the range of 0.32-0.56mg/L were obtained. Recoveries of amino acids ranging from 85% to 108%, (n=3) were obtained. The validated method was successfully applied for the determination of amino acids for Sudanese food samples.

  11. Analysis of the interactions of sulfur-containing amino acids in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Tamayo, José C; Cordomí, Arnau; Olivella, Mireia; Mayol, Eduardo; Fourmy, Daniel; Pardo, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    The interactions of Met and Cys with other amino acid side chains have received little attention, in contrast to aromatic-aromatic, aromatic-aliphatic or/and aliphatic-aliphatic interactions. Precisely, these are the only amino acids that contain a sulfur atom, which is highly polarizable and, thus, likely to participate in strong Van der Waals interactions. Analysis of the interactions present in membrane protein crystal structures, together with the characterization of their strength in small-molecule model systems at the ab-initio level, predicts that Met-Met interactions are stronger than Met-Cys ≈ Met-Phe ≈ Cys-Phe interactions, stronger than Phe-Phe ≈ Phe-Leu interactions, stronger than the Met-Leu interaction, and stronger than Leu-Leu ≈ Cys-Leu interactions. These results show that sulfur-containing amino acids form stronger interactions than aromatic or aliphatic amino acids. Thus, these amino acids may provide additional driving forces for maintaining the 3D structure of membrane proteins and may provide functional specificity.

  12. Ultrastructural Analysis of Leishmania infantum chagasi Promastigotes Forms Treated In Vitro with Usnic Acid

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, João S. B.; de Oliveira, Erwelly B.; Martins, Monica C. B.; da Silva, Nicácio H.; Alves, Luiz C.; dos Santos, Fábio A. B.; da Silva, Luiz L. S.; Silva, Eliete C.; de Medeiros, Paloma L.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is considered by the World Health Organization as one of the infectious parasitic diseases endemic of great relevance and a global public health problem. Pentavalent antimonials used for treatment of this disease are limited and new phytochemicals emerge as an alternative to existing treatments, due to the low toxicity and cost reduction. Usnic acid is uniquely found in lichens and is especially abundant in genera such as Alectoria, Cladonia, Evernia, Lecanora, Ramalina, and Usnea. Usnic acid has been shown to exhibit antiviral, antiprotozoal, antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antileishmanial activity of usnic acid on Leishmania infantum chagasi promastigotes and the occurrence of drug-induced ultrastructural damage in the parasite. Usnic acid was effective against the promastigote forms (IC50 = 18.30 ± 2.00 µg/mL). Structural and ultrastructural aspects of parasite were analyzed. Morphological alterations were observed as blebs in cell membrane and shapes given off, increasing the number of cytoplasmic vacuoles, and cellular and mitochondrial swelling, with loss of cell polarity. We concluded that the usnic acid presented antileishmanial activity against promastigote forms of Leishmania infantum chagasi and structural and ultrastructural analysis reinforces its cytotoxicity. Further, in vitro studies are warranted to further evaluate this potential. PMID:25767824

  13. Capillary electrophoresis method with UV-detection for analysis of free amino acids concentrations in food.

    PubMed

    Omar, Mei Musa Ali; Elbashir, Abdalla Ahmed; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2017-01-01

    Simple and inexpensive capillary electrophoresis with UV-detection method (CE-UV) was optimized and validated for determination of six amino acids namely (alanine, asparagine, glutamine, proline, serine and valine) for Sudanese food. Amino acids in the samples were derivatized with 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-Cl) prior to CE-UV analysis. Labeling reaction conditions (100mM borate buffer at pH 8.5, labeling reaction time 60min, temperature 70°C and NBD-Cl concentration 40mM) were systematically investigated. The optimal conditions for the separation were 100mM borate buffer at pH 9.7 and detected at 475nm. The method was validated in terms of linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), precision (repeatability) (RSD%) and accuracy (recovery). Good linearity was achieved for all amino acids (r(2)>0.9981) in the concentration range of 2.5-40mg/L. The LODs in the range of 0.32-0.56mg/L were obtained. Recoveries of amino acids ranging from 85% to 108%, (n=3) were obtained. The validated method was successfully applied for the determination of amino acids for Sudanese food samples. PMID:27507479

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy and principal component analysis for conformational study of virus nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovbeshko, G. I.; Repnytska, O. P.; Pererva, T.; Miruta, A.; Kosenkov, D.

    2004-07-01

    Conformation analysis of mutated DNA-bacteriophages (PLys-23, P23-2, P47- the numbers have been assigned by T. Pererva) induced by MS2 virus incorporated in Ecoli AB 259 Hfr 3000 has been done. Surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy and principal component analysis has been applied for solving this problem. The nucleic acids isolated from the mutated phages had a form of double stranded DNA with different modifications. The nucleic acid from phage P47 was undergone the structural rearrangement in the most degree. The shape and position ofthe fine structure of the Phosphate asymmetrical band at 1071cm-1 as well as the stretching OH vibration at 3370-3390 cm-1 has indicated to the appearance ofadditional OH-groups. The Z-form feature has been found in the base vibration region (1694 cm-1) and the sugar region (932 cm-1). A supposition about modification of structure of DNA by Z-fragments for P47 phage has been proposed. The P23-2 and PLys-23 phages have showed the numerous minor structural changes also. On the basis of SEIRA spectra we have determined the characteristic parameters of the marker bands of nucleic acid used for construction of principal components. Contribution of different spectral parameters of nucleic acids to principal components has been estimated.

  15. Flow injection analysis of picric acid explosive using a copper electrode as electrochemical detector.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, João R C; de Araujo, William R; Salles, Maiara O; Paixão, Thiago R L C

    2013-01-30

    A simple and fast electrochemical method for quantitative analysis of picric acid explosive (nitro-explosive) based on its electrochemical reduction at copper surfaces is reported. To achieve a higher sample throughput, the electrochemical sensor was adapted in a flow injection system. Under optimal experimental conditions, the peak current response increases linearly with picric acid concentration over the range of 20-300 μmol L(-1). The repeatability of the electrode response in the flow injection analysis (FIA) configuration was evaluated as 3% (n=10), and the detection limit of the method was estimated to be 6.0 μmol L(-1) (S/N=3). The sample throughput under optimised conditions was estimated to be 550 samples h(-1). Peroxide explosives like triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) were tested as potential interfering substances for the proposed method, and no significant interference by these explosives was noticed. The proposed method has interesting analytical parameters, environmental applications, and low cost compared with other electroanalytical methods that have been reported for the quantification of picric acid. Additionally, the possibility to develop an in situ device for the detection of picric acid using a disposable sensor was evaluated.

  16. Analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of acid rain electronic data reports

    SciTech Connect

    Schott, J.

    1997-12-31

    Entergy Corporation is a Phase II utility with a fossil generation base composed primarily of natural gas and low sulfur coal. This paper presents an analysis of a large Phase II utility`s continuous emissions monitoring data reported to EPA under Title IV Acid Rain. Electric utilities currently report hourly emissions of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, fuel use, and generation through electronic data reports to EPA. This paper describes strengths and weaknesses of the data reported to EPA as determined through an analysis of 1995 data. Emissions reported by this company under acid rain for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} are very different from emissions reported to state agencies for annual emission inventory purposes in past years and will represent a significant break with historic trends. A comparison of emissions has been made of 1995 emissions reported under Electronic Data Reports to the emissions that would have been reported using emission factors and fuel data in past years. In addition, the paper examines the impacts of 40 CFR Part 75 Acid Rain requirements such as missing data substitution and monitor bias adjustments. Measurement system errors including stack flow measurement and false NO{sub x}Lb/MMBtu readings at very low loads are discussed. This paper describes the implications for public policy, compliance, emissions inventories, and business decisions of Part 75 acid rain monitoring and reporting requirements.

  17. Comparison and analysis of fatty acids, sterols, and tocopherols in eight vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Li, Changmo; Yao, Yunping; Zhao, Guozhong; Cheng, Wen; Liu, Huilin; Liu, Chunyang; Shi, Zhen; Chen, Yao; Wang, Shuo

    2011-12-14

    The similarities and differences of eight vegetable oils produced in China were investigated in terms of their fatty acid, sterol, and tocopherol compositions and subsequent data processing by hierarchical clustering analysis and principal component analysis. The lipid profiles, acquired by analytical techniques tailored to each lipid class, revealed great similarities among the fatty acid profiles of corn and sesame oil as well as few differences in their sterol profiles. It turns out that not only was there great similarity between the fatty acid profiles of corn oil and sesame oil but also there were not too many differences for the sterol profiles. Sunflower and tea-seed oil showed similar sterol compositions, while the tea-seed oil tocopherol was very similar to palm oil. The results demonstrated that the use of only one of these profiles was unreliable for indentifying oil origin and authenticity. In contrast, the use of the sterol or tocopherol profile together with the fatty acid profile more accurately discriminates these oils.

  18. Flow injection analysis of picric acid explosive using a copper electrode as electrochemical detector.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, João R C; de Araujo, William R; Salles, Maiara O; Paixão, Thiago R L C

    2013-01-30

    A simple and fast electrochemical method for quantitative analysis of picric acid explosive (nitro-explosive) based on its electrochemical reduction at copper surfaces is reported. To achieve a higher sample throughput, the electrochemical sensor was adapted in a flow injection system. Under optimal experimental conditions, the peak current response increases linearly with picric acid concentration over the range of 20-300 μmol L(-1). The repeatability of the electrode response in the flow injection analysis (FIA) configuration was evaluated as 3% (n=10), and the detection limit of the method was estimated to be 6.0 μmol L(-1) (S/N=3). The sample throughput under optimised conditions was estimated to be 550 samples h(-1). Peroxide explosives like triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) were tested as potential interfering substances for the proposed method, and no significant interference by these explosives was noticed. The proposed method has interesting analytical parameters, environmental applications, and low cost compared with other electroanalytical methods that have been reported for the quantification of picric acid. Additionally, the possibility to develop an in situ device for the detection of picric acid using a disposable sensor was evaluated. PMID:23597904

  19. Fatty acids as a tool to understand microbial diversity and their role in food webs of Mediterranean temporary ponds.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Caramujo, Maria-José

    2014-01-01

    Temporary Mediterranean ponds are complex ecosystems which support a high diversity of organisms that include heterotrophic microorganisms, algae, crustaceans, amphibians and higher plants, and have the potential to supply food and a resting place to migratory birds. The role of heterotrophs at the base of the food web in providing energy to the higher trophic levels was studied in temporary ponds in Central and Southern Portugal. The relative quantification of the hetero and autotrophic biomass at the base of the food web in each pond was derived from the polar fatty acid (PLFA) composition of seston through the application of the matrix factorization program CHEMTAX that used specific PLFA and their relative proportion as markers for e.g., classes of bacteria, algae and fungi. The species composition of the culturable microbial communities was identified through their fatty acid profiles. The biomass in the lower trophic level of some ponds presented an even proportion of auto to heterotrophic organisms whilst either bacteria or algae dominated in others. In a selected subset of ponds, the incorporation of bacterial fatty acids was observed to occur in potentially herbivorous zooplankton crustacean. Zooplankton consumed and incorporated bacterial fatty acids into their body tissues, including into their phospholipids, which indicates that energy of heterotrophic origin contributes to the aquatic food webs of temporary ponds. PMID:24786844

  20. Z-sinapinic acid: the change of the stereochemistry of cinnamic acids as rational synthesis of a new matrix for carbohydrate MALDI-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Salum, María L; Itovich, Lucia M; Erra-Balsells, Rosa

    2013-11-01

    Successful application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS started with the introduction of efficient matrices such as cinnamic acid derivatives (i.e. 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, SA; α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid). Since the empirical founding of these matrices, other commercial available cinnamic acids with different nature and location of substituents at benzene ring were attempted. Rational design and synthesis of new cinnamic acids have been recently described too. Because the presence of a rigid double bond in its molecule structure, cinnamic acids can exist as two different geometric isomers, the E-form and Z-form. Commercial available cinnamic acids currently used as matrices are the geometric isomers trans or E (E-cinnamic and trans-cinnamic acids). As a new rational design of MALDI matrices, Z-cinnamic acids were synthesized, and their properties as matrices were studied. Their performance was compared with that of the corresponding E-isomer and classical crystalline matrices (3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid; norharmane) in the analysis of neutral/sulfated carbohydrates. Herein, we demonstrate the outstanding performance for Z-SA. Sulfated oligosaccharides were detected in negative ion mode, and the dissociation of sulfate groups was almost suppressed. Additionally, to better understand the quite different performance of each geometric isomer as matrix, the physical and morphological properties as well as the photochemical stability in solid state were studied. The influence of the E/Z photoisomerization of the matrix during MALDI was evaluated. Finally, molecular modeling (density functional theory study) of the optimized geometry and stereochemistry of E-cinnamic and Z-cinnamic acids revealed some factors governing the analyte-matrix interaction.

  1. Factor analysis for isolation of the Raman spectra of aqueous sulfuric acid components

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, E.R.; Cox, R.A.; Haldna, U.L.

    1984-04-01

    The Raman spectra of 16 sulfuric acid/water mixtures over the entire mole fraction range were studied by various factor analysis techniques. Abstract factor analysis showed that three factors account for 98.69% of the variation in the data with a real error of 13%. Key-set factor analysis, was used to identify three spectral wavenumbers unique to each component. Spectral-isolation factor analysis, based on the key wavenumbers, revealed the spectra of each unknown component. Target factor analysis, based on the isolated spectra, yielded the relative amounts of the three spectral components. The concentration profiles obtained from the factor loadings, as well as the isolated spectra, were used to identify the chemical species.

  2. Sensitive Amino Acid Composition and Chirality Analysis with the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelley, A. M.; Scherer, J. R.; Aubrey, A. D.; Ivester, R. H.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Bada, J. L.; Mathies, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    Detection of life on Mars requires definition of a suitable biomarker and development of sensitive yet compact instrumentation capable of performing in situ analyses. Our studies are focused on amino acid analysis because amino acids are more resistant to decomposition than other biomolecules, and because amino acid chirality is a well-defined biomarker. Amino acid composition and chirality analysis has been previously demonstrated in the lab on microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) chips (1, 2). To analyze amino acids in situ, we have developed the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA), a portable analysis system that consists of a compact instrument and a novel multi-layer CE microchip. The heart of the MOA is the microchip that contains the CE separation channels as well as microfabricated valves and pumps (3) for sample handling. The pneumatic microfabricated valves are created by combining an etched displacement chamber, an actuated PDMS membrane layer, and a discontinuous fluidic channel structure. A microfabricated pump is created by combining three individually-addressable valves in series. These membrane valves and pumps are integrated with the glass separation channel using a novel multilayer design in which sample enters the top fluidic layer for routing and is directed to the bottom glass layers for CE separation and analysis. The microfabricated device is operated by the portable instrument which contains solenoids for controlling fluidic valves, electronics, a 15 mW 400 nm diode laser, confocal detection optics, and a fiber-optic coupled photomultiplier for fluorescence detection. Limits of detection of fluorescamine-labeled amino acids are in the nM to pM range corresponding to part-per-trillion sensitivities in soil samples (4). The portable CE instrument, in combination with the Mars Organic Detector (MOD) (5), was recently successfully field tested on soil samples rich in jarosite from Panoche Valley, CA. Jarosite has recently been detected on Mars

  3. Physicochemical characterization, fatty acid composition, and thermal analysis of Bertholletia excelsa HBK oil

    PubMed Central

    Pena Muniz, Marcos Antônio; Ferreira dos Santos, Marina Nídia; da Costa, Carlos Emmerson Ferreira; Morais, Luiz; Lamarão, Maria Louze Nobre; Ribeiro-Costa, Roseane Maria; Silva-Júnior, José Otávio Carréra

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at characterizing the oil extracted from Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K. almond, a native species from the Amazon region. Analytical methods used for oils and fats were employed through pharmacopoeia assays, AOCS (American Oil Chemists Society) standard methods as well as those recommended by ANVISA (National Health Surveillance Agency) such as acidity, peroxide value, saponification index, iodine value and refractive index, pH and relative density, and also thermoanalytical analyses (thermogravimetry, differential thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis) as well as chromatographic analysis (gas chromatography). The characterization assessments of B. excelsa oil showed results indicating that the oil contains polyunsaturated fatty acids in large proportion. The termoanalytical tests indicated that B.excelsa oil showed thermal stability up to 220 °C, These results showed that the oil extracted from B. excelsa has acceptable characteristics and is of good quality. PMID:25709225

  4. DFT computation and experimental analysis of vibrational and electronic spectra of phenoxy acetic acid herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arul Dhas, D.; Hubert Joe, I.; Roy, S. D. D.; Balachandran, S.

    2013-05-01

    An absolute vibrational analysis has been attempted on the basis of experimental FTIR and NIR-FT Raman spectra with calculated vibrational wavenumbers and intensities of phenoxy acetic acids. The equilibrium geometry, bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers have been calculated with the help of B3LYP method with Dunning correlation consistent basis set aug-cc-pVTZ. The electronic structures of molecular fragments were described in terms of natural bond orbital analysis, which shows intermolecular Osbnd H⋯O and intramolecular Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The electronic absorption spectra with different solvents have been investigated in combination with time-dependent density functional theory calculation. The pKa values of phenoxy acetic acids were compared.

  5. The Use of Atomic Force Microscopy for 3D Analysis of Nucleic Acid Hybridization on Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovin, E. V.; Presnova, G. V.; Rubtsova, M. Yu.; Egorov, A. M.; Grigorenko, V. G.; Yaminsky, I. V.

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are considered today to be one of the most efficient methods of gene diagnostics. The capability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize the three-dimensional morphology of single molecules on a surface allows one to use it as an effective tool for the 3D analysis of a microarray for the detection of nucleic acids. The high resolution of AFM offers ways to decrease the detection threshold of target DNA and increase the signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, we suggest an approach to the evaluation of the results of hybridization of gold nanoparticle-labeled nucleic acids on silicon microarrays based on an AFM analysis of the surface both in air and in liquid which takes into account of their three-dimensional structure. We suggest a quantitative measure of the hybridization results which is based on the fraction of the surface area occupied by the nanoparticles. PMID:26085952

  6. Biomolecular computation with molecular beacons for quantitative analysis of target nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hee-Woong; Lee, Seung Hwan; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Yoo, Suk-In; Park, Tai Hyun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2013-01-01

    Molecular beacons are efficient and useful tools for quantitative detection of specific target nucleic acids. Thanks to their simple protocol, molecular beacons have great potential as substrates for biomolecular computing. Here we present a molecular beacon-based biomolecular computing method for quantitative detection and analysis of target nucleic acids. Whereas the conventional quantitative assays using fluorescent dyes have been designed for single target detection or multiplexed detection, the proposed method enables us not only to detect multiple targets but also to compute their quantitative information by weighted-sum of the targets. The detection and computation are performed on a molecular level simultaneously, and the outputs are detected as fluorescence signals. Experimental results show the feasibility and effectiveness of our weighted detection and linear combination method using molecular beacons. Our method can serve as a primitive operation of molecular pattern analysis, and we demonstrate successful binary classifications of molecular patterns made of synthetic oligonucleotide DNA molecules.

  7. Physicochemical characterization, fatty acid composition, and thermal analysis of Bertholletia excelsa HBK oil.

    PubMed

    Pena Muniz, Marcos Antônio; Ferreira Dos Santos, Marina Nídia; da Costa, Carlos Emmerson Ferreira; Morais, Luiz; Lamarão, Maria Louze Nobre; Ribeiro-Costa, Roseane Maria; Silva-Júnior, José Otávio Carréra

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at characterizing the oil extracted from Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K. almond, a native species from the Amazon region. Analytical methods used for oils and fats were employed through pharmacopoeia assays, AOCS (American Oil Chemists Society) standard methods as well as those recommended by ANVISA (National Health Surveillance Agency) such as acidity, peroxide value, saponification index, iodine value and refractive index, pH and relative density, and also thermoanalytical analyses (thermogravimetry, differential thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis) as well as chromatographic analysis (gas chromatography). The characterization assessments of B. excelsa oil showed results indicating that the oil contains polyunsaturated fatty acids in large proportion. The termoanalytical tests indicated that B.excelsa oil showed thermal stability up to 220 °C, These results showed that the oil extracted from B. excelsa has acceptable characteristics and is of good quality. PMID:25709225

  8. [Occupationally induced nitric acid and sulfuric acid burns: an analysis of 2 patients from the aspect of occupational health].

    PubMed

    Orimo, H; Yamamoto, O; Kobayashi, M; Yasuda, H

    2001-03-01

    We report two patients who suffered from acid burns while working in chemical factories. Case 1: a 44-year-old man who received burn induced by nitric acid on the face and extremities. Despite his protecting facial mask, he was exposed to nitric acid on his face through a gap between the mask and skin surface. Nitric acid was also sprinkled on his scalp which was not covered by a helmet or a protecting device. In addition, he suffered from acid burn on the right scapular region, the right upper arm, and the lower extremities through the work clothes. Case 2: a 26-year-old man who suffered from sulfuric acid burn on the forearms. Both patients were accidentally exposed to acids while they filled tanks with the acids through a hose. Following the manual of the factories, they washed the exposed skin with water for more than 15 minutes after the exposure. Although they recovered without any serious sequel, there remained partial deep tissue destruction of the skin. We reviewed these two cases from the aspect of industrial medicine, and proposed the following three points for improvement in the workplace to prevent accidental acid burns. 1) re-education or enlightenment activities for the well-experienced workers to avoid negligence to the danger of strong acid. 2) recommendation to take a complete shower to avoid overlooking of unaware acid injury. 3) improvement in the protecting facial mask. In addition, clinicians who examine acid-burn patients should not pass over the presence of deep ulcers lying behind the thick crust on the injured area.

  9. Analysis of acid-generating action of PAG in an EUV resist using acid-sensitive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko; Biafore, John J.

    2013-03-01

    Researchers are currently examining various methods for determining the quantity of acid generated by a photoacid generator (PAG) and for analyzing acid-generating reactions using acid-sensitive dyes that react with acid and generate a color. Adding an acid-sensitive dye to the resist gives a clear grasp of the acid-generating action. The process involves applying a resist containing an acid-sensitive dye to a quartz substrate; exposing the substrate; and measuring and evaluating the absorbance of a chromogenic substance near 530 nm using a spectroscope. The method determines the rate constant for acid generation (Dill C parameter) during exposure based on the relationship between transmissivity at 530 nm and exposure dose. Using this method, we obtained and compared rate constants for acid generation (C parameters) as part of our study of dependence on the quantity of quencher in the EUV resist. Our results indicate a new model that accounts for the quencher concentration parameter would be useful in analyzing dependence on the quantity of quencher. This paper presents these findings, together with the results of studies of profile simulations using the quencher concentration parameter obtained in the experiments.

  10. Nutrient, fatty acid, amino acid and mineral analysis of natural prey of the Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi.

    PubMed

    Goodman-Lowe, G D; Carpenter, J R; Atkinson, S; Ako, H

    1999-06-01

    Proximate nutrients, gross energy content, mineral, amino acid and fatty acid composition were determined for teleost, cephalopod and crustacean prey of the Hawaiian monk seal. Crude protein was highest in the octopus, Octopus cyanea (80.0%), crude fat was highest in the Muraenid teleost, Gymnothorax eurostus (14.1%), whereas crude ash was highest in the lobster, Panulirus marginatus (11.6%). Gross energies ranged from 4.0 +/- 0.01 kcal g-1 in the Labrid teleost Bodianus bilulunatus to 6.0 +/- 0.12 kcal g-1 in the moray eel, Gymnothorax undulatus. Essential amino acids occurred in lower concentrations as a percentage of the total amino acids (35.8 +/- 2.6%) than non-essential amino acids (64.2 +/- 2.6%), but the ratio of individual amino acids to total amino acid concentrations were similar to those required by some monogastric terrestrial species and fingerling salmon. The fatty acid concentrations varied widely among species (range = 1.2-16.5 mg 100 mg-1); however, the teleosts had higher total fatty acids than the non-teleosts. This study indicates that, from a nutritional standpoint, some prey may be more beneficial to the Hawaiian monk seal; however, these prey are not necessarily the most abundant or available to some populations of the monk seal. PMID:10425733

  11. Threads for tear film collection and support in quantitative amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Avilov, Vitaly; Zeng, Qi; Shippy, Scott A

    2016-07-01

    The collection of tears for chemical composition analysis is complicated by both the difficulty in sampling the tear film and the relatively low microliter volumes available for analysis. The experiments in this study are focused on the demonstration of a method for determining amino acids from tear samples. Phenol red thread was used to absorptively collect tear fluid for qualitative and quantitative analyses of amino acids in basal, reflex, and emotional tears. The thread is also used as a support for sample preparation followed by elution with a buffer. The phenol red indicator on the thread turns from yellow to red with 15-s tear absorption and allows accurate volume measurement from 100 nL to over 1 μL. Derivatization of amino acids was performed directly on the thread with primary amine reactive fluorescamine for fluorescence detection. Analyte elution was performed via centrifugation with the thread in a pipet tip suspended in a centrifuge tube. Collected tear eluate was analyzed via capillary electrophoresis with LED-induced fluorescence. Glycine, glutamate, and aspartate were baseline resolved and used for method characterization. Recoveries were at 50 % for a single derivation and elution step but average recoveries near 90 % were found with two-step processing. Glutamate and aspartate are shown to be stable stored on thread for 3 days. Basal, reflex, and emotional tears were analyzed from three subjects showing distinct amino acid profiles for each tear type. The demonstration of this method may facilitate the development of routine tear compositional analysis to assess ocular health. Graphical Abstract Schematic drawing of thread-based tear collection and quantitative analysis. PMID:27225176

  12. DNA nanotechnology for nucleic acid analysis: DX motif-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M; Gerasimova, Yulia V; Khan, Mohammad S

    2011-11-25

    A light on the tiles: A sensor that fluoresces in the presence of specific nucleic acids was designed and characterized. The sensor uses a molecular beacon probe and three adaptor strands to form a five-stranded assembly, a DX-tile, with a specific analyte. This sensor is a highly selective and affordable tool for the real-time analysis of DNA and RNA.

  13. Chapter 11. Community analysis-based methods

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Wu, C.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Holden, P.A.

    2010-05-01

    Microbial communities are each a composite of populations whose presence and relative abundance in water or other environmental samples are a direct manifestation of environmental conditions, including the introduction of microbe-rich fecal material and factors promoting persistence of the microbes therein. As shown by culture-independent methods, different animal-host fecal microbial communities appear distinctive, suggesting that their community profiles can be used to differentiate fecal samples and to potentially reveal the presence of host fecal material in environmental waters. Cross-comparisons of microbial communities from different hosts also reveal relative abundances of genetic groups that can be used to distinguish sources. In increasing order of their information richness, several community analysis methods hold promise for MST applications: phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), cloning/sequencing, and PhyloChip. Specific case studies involving TRFLP and PhyloChip approaches demonstrate the ability of community-based analyses of contaminated waters to confirm a diagnosis of water quality based on host-specific marker(s). The success of community-based MST for comprehensively confirming fecal sources relies extensively upon using appropriate multivariate statistical approaches. While community-based MST is still under evaluation and development as a primary diagnostic tool, results presented herein demonstrate its promise. Coupled with its inherently comprehensive ability to capture an unprecedented amount of microbiological data that is relevant to water quality, the tools for microbial community analysis are increasingly accessible, and community-based approaches have unparalleled potential for translation into rapid, perhaps real-time, monitoring platforms.

  14. Roentgenstructural analysis of Cristalline Cobalt II with 1,10- fenatrolin and tiosemicarbazid acetic acid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kon, Aviv Yu.

    The author has reported his long years research in the area of structure and Roentgen analysis of Cristalls. The talk concerns Roentgen analysis, Its first steps in Kishinev during the finish of 40-th and the beginning of 50-th. Some concerns was given to prof. T.I. Malinovskij,a graduated from the Yassy University one of the first Assistants Proff. at the Kishinev State Pedagogical Institute and later a leading scientist in the area of cristalls research in the Soviet Moldavia. Particularly, the actual talk was dedicated to interaction of acids with cristals of 1,10 fenatrolin.

  15. Nanoflow Separation of Amino Acids for the Analysis of Cosmic Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2008-01-01

    The delivery of amino acids to the early Earth by interplanetary dust particles, comets, and carbonaceous meteorites could have been a significant source of the early Earth's prebiotic organic inventory. Amino acids are central to modern terrestrial biochemistry as major components of proteins and enzymes and were probably vital in the origin of life. A variety of amino acids have been detected in the CM carbonaceous meteorite Murchison, many of which are exceptionally rare in the terrestrial biosphere including a-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and isovaline. AIB has also been detected in a small percentage of Antarctic micrometeorite grains believed to be related to the CM meteorites We report on progress in optimizing a nanoflow liquid chromatography separation system with dual detection via laser-induced-fluorescence time of flight mass spectrometry (nLC-LIF/ToF-MS) for the analysis of o-phthaldialdehydelN-acetyl-L-cysteine (OPA/NAC) labeled amino acids in cosmic dust grains. The very low flow rates (<3 micro-L/min) of nLC over analytical LC (>0.1 ml/min) combined with <2 micron column bead sizes has the potential to produce efficient analyte ionizations andchromatograms with very sharp peaks; both increase sensitivity. The combination of the selectivity (only primary amines are derivatized), sensitivity (>4 orders of magnitude lower than traditional GC-MS techniques), and specificity (compounds identities are determined by both retention time and exact mass) makes this a compelling technique. However, the development of an analytical method to achieve separation of compounds as structurally similar as amino acid monomers and produce the sharp peaks required for maximum sensitivity is challenging.

  16. Characterizing estuarine plume discharge into the coastal ocean using fatty acid biomarkers and pigment analysis.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andrew M; Ryan, John P; Levesque, Christian; Welschmeyer, Nicholas

    2014-08-01

    The transformation of estuaries by human activities continues to alter the biogeochemical balance of the coastal ocean. The disruption of this balance can negatively impact the provision of goods and services, including fisheries, commerce and transportation, recreation and esthetic enjoyment. Here we examine a link, between the Elkhorn Slough and the coastal ocean in Monterey Bay, California (USA) using a novel application of fatty acid and pigment analysis. Fatty acid analysis of filtered water samples showed biologically distinct water types between the Elkhorn Slough plume and the receiving waters of the coastal ocean. A remarkable feature of the biological content of the plume entering the coastal ocean was the abundance of bacteria-specific fatty acids, which correlated well with concentrations of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Pigment analysis showed that plume waters contained higher concentrations of diatoms and cryptophytes, while the coastal ocean waters showed higher relative concentrations of dinoflagellates. Bacteria and cryptophytes can provide a source of labile, energy-rich organic matter that may be locally important as a source of food for pelagic and benthic communities. Surface and depth surveys of the plume show that the biogeochemical constituents of the slough waters are injected into the coastal waters and become entrained in the northward flowing, nearshore current of Monterey Bay. Transport of these materials to the northern portion of the bay can fuel a bloom incubator, which exists in this region. This study shows that fatty acid markers can reveal the biogeochemical interactions between estuaries and the coastal ocean and highlights how man-made changes have the potential to influence coastal ecological change.

  17. Genetic diversity analysis of buffalo fatty acid synthase (FASN) gene and its differential expression among bovines.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, S K; Goyal, S; Dubey, P K; Kumari, N; Mishra, S K; Mukesh, M; Kataria, R S

    2016-01-10

    Fatty Acid Synthase (FASN) gene seems to be structurally and functionally different in bovines in view of their distinctive fatty acid synthesis process. Structural variation and differential expression of FASN gene is reported in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), a bovine species close to cattle, in this study. Amino acid sequence and phylogenetic analysis of functionally important thioesterase (TE) domain of FASN revealed its conserved nature across mammals. Amino acid residues at TE domain, responsible for substrate binding and processing, were found to be invariant in all the mammalian species. A total of seven polymorphic nucleotide sites, including two in coding region of TE domain were identified across the 10 buffalo populations of riverine and swamp types. G and C alleles were found almost fixed at g18996 and g19056 loci, respectively in riverine buffaloes. Principal component analysis of three SNPs (g18433, g18996 and g19056) revealed distinct classification of riverine and swamp buffalo populations. Reverse Transcription-PCR amplification of mRNA corresponding to exon 8-10 region of buffalo FASN helped in identification of two transcript variants; one transcript of 565 nucleotides and another alternate transcript of 207 nucleotides, seems to have arisen through alternative splicing. Both the transcripts were found to be expressed in most of the vital tissues of buffalo with the highest expression in mammary gland. Semi-quantitative and real-time expression analysis across 13 different buffalo tissues revealed its highest expression in lactating mammary gland. When compared, expression of FASN was also found to be higher in liver, adipose and skeletal muscle of buffalo tissues, than cattle. However, the FASN expression was highest in adipose among the three tissues in both the species. Results indicate structural and functional distinctiveness of bovine FASN. Presence of alternate splicing in buffalo FASN also seems to be a unique phenomenon to the bovines

  18. Histogram Analysis of Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI for Quantitative Hepatic Fibrosis Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Honsoul; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Park, Young Nyun; Park, Hae-Jeong; Choi, Jin-Young

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The diagnosis and monitoring of liver fibrosis is an important clinical issue; however, this is usually achieved by invasive methods such as biopsy. We aimed to determine whether histogram analysis of hepatobiliary phase images of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide non-invasive quantitative measurement of liver fibrosis. Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional ethics committee, and a waiver of informed consent was obtained. Hepatobiliary phase images of preoperative gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI studies of 105 patients (69 males, 36 females; age 56.1±12.2) with pathologically documented liver fibrosis grades were analyzed. Fibrosis staging was F0/F1/F2/F3/F4 (METAVIR system) for 11/20/13/15/46 patients, respectively. Four regions-of-interest (ROI, each about 2 cm2) were placed on predetermined locations of representative images. The measured signal intensity of pixels in each ROI was used to calculate corrected coefficient of variation (cCV), skewness, and kurtosis. An average value of each parameter was calculated for comparison. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and linear regression. Results The cCV showed statistically significant differences among pathological fibrosis grades (P<0.001) whereas skewness and kurtosis did not. Univariable linear regression analysis suggested cCV to be a meaningful parameter in predicting the fibrosis grade (P<0.001, β = 0.40 and standard error  = 0.06). For discriminating F0-3 from F4, the area under ROC score was 0.857, standard deviation 0.036, 95% confidence interval 0.785–0.928. Conclusion Histogram analysis of hepatobiliary phase images of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI can provide non-invasive quantitative measurements of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:25460180

  19. Phenylboronic acid modified solid-phase extraction column: Preparation, characterization, and application to the analysis of amino acids in sepia capsule by removing the maltose.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengzhe; Yin, Dengyang; Han, Jie; Zhang, Liyan; Li, Xiao; He, Dandan; Du, Yan; Tang, Daoquan

    2016-09-01

    Maltose, a common auxiliary material of pharmaceutical preparation, may disturb the analysis of total amino acids in sepia capsule by aldolization. Therefore, it is necessary to remove the maltose through a convenient method. In this work, a phenylboronic acid modified solid-phase extraction column has been synthesized and used to remove the maltose. The materials were synthesized by one step "thiol-ene" reaction and the parameters of the column such as absorption capacity, recovery, and absorption specificity have been investigated. The results showed the column (0.5 cm of length × 0.5 cm of inner diameter) can absorb 4.6 mg maltose with a linear absorption and absorption specificity. Then this technique was applied in the quantification of amino acids in sepia capsule. After the optimization of the method, four kinds of amino acids, which were the most abundant, were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The amounts of the four kinds of amino acids are 1.5∼2 times more than that without the treatment of solid-phase extraction column, which almost overcomes the influence of the maltose. All the results indicate that the phenylboronic acid modified solid-phase extraction column can successfully help to accurately quantify the total amino acids in sepia capsule.

  20. Morphometric analysis of oleic acid-induced permeability pulmonary edema: correlation with gravimetric lung water.

    PubMed

    Darien, B J; Saban, M R; Hart, A P; MacWilliams, P S; Clayton, M K; Kruse-Elliott, K T

    1997-07-01

    The technique used most commonly to quantitate pulmonary edema in in vivo animal models is postmortem gravimetric analysis (wet:dry) ratio. To determine whether lung water can be quantitated morphometrically, as accurately as by the commonly used gravimetric analysis, perivascular edema (cuff) area to vessel area ratio was correlated to wet:dry ratio. Anesthetized pigs were given either oleic acid (20 mg/kg/h, intravenously) or physiologic saline. At 4 h, lungs were excised and cuff:vessel and wet:dry ratio analysis was performed. The intermediate lobe was clamped across its main stem bronchus to maintain peak inspiratory inflation, excised, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at -70 degrees C until cryostat sectioning and quantification of perivascular interstitial edema (cuff) area. Gravimetric analysis (wet:dry ratio) was performed on the remaining lung. Mean cuff:vessel and wet:dry analyzes showed that lung water increased significantly (p < .01) in the oleic-acid treated group (4.9 +/- .22 and 6.78 +/- .47, respectively), compared with the saline group (.03 +/- .02 and 2.55 +/- .27, respectively). The correlation coefficient between mean cuff:vessel and wet:dry ratios was .86 (p = .0016). This study demonstrates that cuff:vessel ratio analysis can be used to identify the distribution of edema fluid versus vessel diameter, and seems to be as effective a technique as gravimetric analysis to quantitate lung water changes in acute lung injury models. Moreover cuff:vessel ratio analysis can differentiate modest changes in pulmonary edema by direct quantitation, an important end-point not provided by wet:dry analysis. Therefore, it may be a more sensitive technique when investigating therapeutic interventions in in vivo models of acute lung injury.

  1. On combining protein sequences and nucleic acid sequences in phylogenetic analysis: the homeobox protein case.

    PubMed

    Agosti, D; Jacobs, D; DeSalle, R

    1996-01-01

    Amino acid encoding genes contain character state information that may be useful for phylogenetic analysis on at least two levels. The nucleotide sequence and the translated amino acid sequences have both been employed separately as character states for cladistic studies of various taxa, including studies of the genealogy of genes in multigene families. In essence, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences are two different ways of character coding the information in a gene. Silent positions in the nucleotide sequence (first or third positions in codons that can accrue change without changing the identity of the amino acid that the triplet codes for) may accrue change relatively rapidly and become saturated, losing the pattern of historical divergence. On the other hand, non-silent nucleotide alterations and their accompanying amino acid changes may evolve too slowly to reveal relationships among closely related taxa. In general, the dynamics of sequence change in silent and non-silent positions in protein coding genes result in homoplasy and lack of resolution, respectively. We suggest that the combination of nucleic acid and the translated amino acid coded character states into the same data matrix for phylogenetic analysis addresses some of the problems caused by the rapid change of silent nucleotide positions and overall slow rate of change of non-silent nucleotide positions and slowly changing amino acid positions. One major theoretical problem with this approach is the apparent non-independence of the two sources of characters. However, there are at least three possible outcomes when comparing protein coding nucleic acid sequences with their translated amino acids in a phylogenetic context on a codon by codon basis. First, the two character sets for a codon may be entirely congruent with respect to the information they convey about the relationships of a certain set of taxa. Second, one character set may display no information concerning a phylogenetic

  2. RP-HPLC analysis of phenolic acids of selected Central European Carex L. (Cyperaceae) species and its implication for taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Szewczyk, Katarzyna; Janyszek, Magdalena; Janyszek, Sławomir; Cieśla, Łukasz

    2011-01-01

    Eighteen species belonging to the Carex genus were checked for the presence and the amount of eight phenolic acids (p-hydroxybenzoic, vanillic, caffeic, syringic, protocatechuic, p-coumaric, sinapic, and ferulic) by means of HPLC. Both the free and bonded phenolic acids were analyzed. The majority of the analyzed acids occurred in the studied species in relatively high amounts. The highest concentrations found were caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid, for which the detected levels were negatively correlated. A very interesting feature was the occurrence of sinapic acid, a compound very rarely detected in plant tissues. Its distribution across the analyzed set of species can be hypothetically connected with the humidity of plants' habitats. Several attempted tests of aggregative cluster analysis showed no similarity to the real taxonomical structure of the genus Carex. Thus, the phenolic acids' composition cannot be considered as the major taxonomical feature for the genus Carex.

  3. Kinetic flow-injection analysis of boron using 5-fluorosalicylaldehyde and H-acid.

    PubMed

    Sarenqiqige; Kodani, Takamasa; Kajiwara, Mari; Takehara, Kô; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Boric acid reacts with 5-fluorosalicylaldehyde (F-SA) and 8-amino-1-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid (HA) to form the boric acid-fluoroazomethine H complex (F-AzB) that is now being used for the flow-injection analysis (FIA) of boric acid. At pH 6.5, the F-AzB complexation proceeded fairly fast, whereas the fluoroazomethine H (F-AzH) formation was slow. Thus, highly sensitive measurement of F-AzB was possible if the reaction time was controlled using the FIA method to decrease the background absorbance of F-AzH at the analytical wavelength. The optimum conditions for the color developing reaction were investigated for single and dual channel systems. The former system was simple, applicable to the determination of boron in reversed osmosis (RO) desalination water with a detection limit (LOD) of 4 μg B dm(-3). For the latter system, the calibration range was 0.005 to 10 mg B dm(-3) with an LOD of 1 μg B dm(-3), which can be applicable to natural water analyses of boron. These methods could analyze 15 - 20 samples in one hour. The results of the boron concentration measurement for water samples from an RO desalination plant, industrial wastewater and river water were in fairly good agreement with those obtained by other methods.

  4. Analysis of volatile components, fatty acids, and phytosterols of Abies koreana growing in Poland.

    PubMed

    Wajs-Bonikowska, Anna; Olejnika, Karol; Bonikowski, Radosław; Banaszczakb, Piotr

    2013-09-01

    Extracts and essential oils from seeds as well as essential oils from cone scales and needles with twigs of the Abies koreana population were studied. An analysis of Korean fir essential oils allowed us to determine 147 volatile compounds. The identified compounds constituted 97-99% of the seed, cone and needle oils. The main volatile in the seed and needle oils was limonene (56.6% and 23.4%, respectively), while the predominant volatile in cone oils was alpha-pinene (51.2%). Korean fir seeds provided a rich source of both essential oil (3.8-8.5%) and extract, which was isolated with a 24.5% yield and contained numerous groups of fatty acids and phytosterols (414 microg/100g extract). The most prominent fatty acids were unsaturated, among which linoleic (41.2%) and oleic (31.2%) fatty acid were the main ones while the dominant sterols were isomers of ergostadienol and beta-sitosterol. A. koreana seeds, cones and needles are a source of many volatile bioactive compounds while the seed extract, with a pleasant scent, contained not only volatiles, but also fractions rich in fatty acids and phytosterols. These facts make A. koreana essential oils and especially the seed extract potential components of cosmetics.

  5. Analysis of volatile components, fatty acids, and phytosterols of Abies koreana growing in Poland.

    PubMed

    Wajs-Bonikowska, Anna; Olejnika, Karol; Bonikowski, Radosław; Banaszczakb, Piotr

    2013-09-01

    Extracts and essential oils from seeds as well as essential oils from cone scales and needles with twigs of the Abies koreana population were studied. An analysis of Korean fir essential oils allowed us to determine 147 volatile compounds. The identified compounds constituted 97-99% of the seed, cone and needle oils. The main volatile in the seed and needle oils was limonene (56.6% and 23.4%, respectively), while the predominant volatile in cone oils was alpha-pinene (51.2%). Korean fir seeds provided a rich source of both essential oil (3.8-8.5%) and extract, which was isolated with a 24.5% yield and contained numerous groups of fatty acids and phytosterols (414 microg/100g extract). The most prominent fatty acids were unsaturated, among which linoleic (41.2%) and oleic (31.2%) fatty acid were the main ones while the dominant sterols were isomers of ergostadienol and beta-sitosterol. A. koreana seeds, cones and needles are a source of many volatile bioactive compounds while the seed extract, with a pleasant scent, contained not only volatiles, but also fractions rich in fatty acids and phytosterols. These facts make A. koreana essential oils and especially the seed extract potential components of cosmetics. PMID:24273870

  6. Water O–H Stretching Raman Signature for Strong Acid Monitoring via Multivariate Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, Amanda J.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Peterson, James M.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2013-04-16

    Spectroscopic techniques have been applied extensively for quantification and analysis of solution compositions. In addition to static measurements, these techniques have been implemented in flow systems providing real-time solution information. A distinct need exists for information regarding acid concentration as it affects extraction efficiency and selectivity of many separation processes. Despite of the seeming simplicity of the problem, no practical solution has been offered yet particularly for the large-scale schemes involving toxic streams such as highly radioactive nuclear wastes. Classic potentiometric technique is not amiable for on-line measurements in nuclear fuel reprocessing due to requirements of frequent calibration/maintenance and poor long-term stability in the aggressive chemical and radiation environments. In this work, the potential of using Raman spectroscopic measurements for on-line monitoring of strong acid concentration in the solutions relevant to the dissolved used fuel was investigated. The Raman water signature was monitored and recorded for nitric and hydrochloric acid solution systems of systematically varied chemical composition, ionic strength, and temperature. The generated Raman spectroscopic database was used to develop predictive chemometric models for the quantification of the acid concentration (H+), neodymium concentration (Nd3+), nitrate concentration (NO3-), density, and ionic strength. This approach was validated using a flow solvent extraction system.

  7. Omega-6 to Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio in Patients with ADHD: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    LaChance, Laura; McKenzie, Kwame; Taylor, Valerie H.; Vigod, Simone N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids have been shown to be deficient in individuals with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder compared to controls (Hawkey & Nigg, 2014). Clinical trials of omega-3 and omega-6 supplements as treatment for ADHD have demonstrated minimal efficacy (Bloch & Qawasmi, 2011; Gillies, Sinn, Lad, Leach, & Ross, 2011; Hawkey & Nigg, 2014; Puri & Martins, 2014; Sonuga-Barke et al., 2013). Existing trials have analyzed omega-3 and omega-6 separately although the tissue ratio of these fatty acids (n6/n3) may be more important than absolute levels of either. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between blood n6/n3 and arachidonic acid to eicosapentaenoic acid (AA/EPA), to ADHD symptoms. Method: A systematic literature review identified original articles measuring blood n6/n3 or AA/EPA ratio in children and youth with ADHD, compared to controls without ADHD. Three databases were searched. Blood n6/n3, and AA/EPA ratios were compared between individuals with ADHD and controls. Results were pooled across studies using quantitative synthesis. Results: Five articles met inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis. The pooled mean difference between patients with ADHD and controls was 1.97 (0.90–3.04) for n6/n3 (n=5 studies, I2 83%) and 8.25 (5.94–10.56) for AA/EPA (n=3 studies, I2 0%). Conclusions: Children and youth with ADHD have elevated ratios of both blood n6/n3 and AA/EPA fatty acids compared to controls. Thus an elevated n6/n3, and more specifically AA/EPA, ratio may represent the underlying disturbance in essential fatty acid levels in patients with ADHD. These findings have implications for the development of future interventions using essential fatty acids to treat ADHD, and for the use of these ratios as biomarkers for titrating and monitoring ADHD treatment with essential fatty acids. PMID:27274744

  8. Gene expression analysis of Corynebacterium glutamicum subjected to long-term lactic acid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Kinga; Satorhelyi, Peter; Lange, Christian; Wendisch, Volker F; Silakowski, Barbara; Scherer, Siegfried; Neuhaus, Klaus

    2007-08-01

    Corynebacteria form an important part of the red smear cheese microbial surface consortium. To gain a better understanding of molecular adaptation due to low pH induced by lactose fermentation, the global gene expression profile of Corynebacterium glutamicum adapted to pH 5.7 with lactic acid under continuous growth in a chemostat was characterized by DNA microarray analysis. Expression of a total of 116 genes was increased and that of 90 genes was decreased compared to pH 7.5 without lactic acid, representing 7% of the genes in the genome. The up-regulated genes encode mainly transcriptional regulators, proteins responsible for export, import, and metabolism, and several proteins of unknown function. As much as 45% of the up-regulated open reading frames code for hypothetical proteins. These results were validated using real-time reverse transcription-PCR. To characterize the functions of 38 up-regulated genes, 36 single-crossover disruption mutants were generated and analyzed for their lactic acid sensitivities. However, only a sigB knockout mutant showed a highly significant negative effect on growth at low pH, suggesting a function in organic-acid adaptation. A sigE mutant already displayed growth retardation at neutral pH but grew better at acidic pH than the sigB mutant. The lack of acid-sensitive phenotypes in 34 out of 36 disrupted genes suggests either a considerable redundancy in acid adaptation response or coincidental effects. Other up-regulated genes included genes for ion transporters and metabolic pathways, including carbohydrate and respiratory metabolism. The enhanced expression of the nrd (ribonucleotide reductase) operon and a DNA ATPase repair protein implies a cellular response to combat acid-induced DNA damage. Surprisingly, multiple iron uptake systems (totaling 15% of the genes induced >or=2-fold) were induced at low pH. This induction was shown to be coincidental and could be attributed to iron-sequestering effects in complex media at low p

  9. Differentiating Milk and Non-milk Proteins by UPLC Amino Acid Fingerprints Combined with Chemometric Data Analysis Techniques.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weiying; Lv, Xiaxia; Gao, Boyan; Shi, Haiming; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2015-04-22

    Amino acid fingerprinting combined with chemometric data analysis was used to differentiate milk and non-milk proteins in this study. Microwave-assisted hydrolysis and ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) were used to obtain the amino acid fingerprints. Both univariate and multivariate chemometrics methods were applied for differentiation. The confidence boundary of amino acid concentration, principal component analysis (PCA), and partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) of the amino acid fingerprints demonstrated that there were significant differences between milk proteins and inexpensive non-milk protein powders from other biological sources including whey, peanut, corn, soy, fish, egg yolk, beef extract, collagen, and cattle bone. The results indicate that the amino acid compositions with the chemometric techniques could be applied for the detection of potential protein adulterants in milk.

  10. Preparative separation of underivatized amino acids for compound-specific stable isotope analysis and radiocarbon dating of hydrolyzed bone collagen.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Jennifer A; McCullagh, James S O; Hedges, Robert E M

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of stable and radioactive isotopes from bone collagen provides useful information to archaeologists about the origin and age of bone artifacts. Isolation and analysis of single amino acids from the proteins can provide additional and more accurate information by removing contamination and separating a bulk isotope signal into its constituent parts. In this paper, we report a new method for the separation and isolation of underivatized amino acids from bone collagen, and their analysis by isotope ratio MS and accelerator MS. RP chromatography is used to separate the amino acids with nonpolar side chains, followed by an ion pair separation to isolate the remaining amino acids. The method produces single amino acids with little or no contamination from the separation process and allows for the measurement of accurate stable isotope ratios and pure samples for radiocarbon dating.

  11. In silico Analysis for Predicting Fatty Acids of Black Cumin Oil as Inhibitors of P-Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Babar; Jamal, Qazi Mohd. Sajid; Mir, Showkat R.; Shams, Saiba; Al-Wabel, Naser A.; Kamal, Mohammad A.

    2015-01-01

    glycoprotein as a receptor.Rat P-gp structure quality shows 88.5% residues in favored region obtained by Ramchandran plot analysis.Docking analysis revealed that Some amino acids common for all compounds like Ser221, Pro222, Ile224, Gly225, Ser228, Ala229, Lys233, Tyr302, Tyr309, Ile337, Leu338 and Thr341 in the P-gp and ligands binding patterns.Eicosadeinoic acid has highest binding affinity with P-gp as the amount of energy needed to bind with P-gp was lowest (-11.92 kcal/mol). Abbreviations used: P-gp: P-glycoprotein PMID:27013802

  12. Folic acid supplements and colorectal cancer risk: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Tingting; Du, Mulong; Du, Haina; Shu, Yongqian; Wang, Meilin; Zhu, Lingjun

    2015-07-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the effects of folic acid supplementation on colorectal cancer risk, but conflicting results were reported. We herein performed a meta-analysis based on relevant studies to reach a more definitive conclusion. The PubMed and Embase databases were searched for quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published before October 2014. Eight articles met the inclusion criteria and were subsequently analyzed. The results suggested that folic acid treatment was not associated with colorectal cancer risk in the total population (relative risk [RR] = 1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.82-1.22, P = 0.974). Moreover, no statistical effect was identified in further subgroup analyses stratified by ethnicity, gender, body mass index (BMI) and potential confounding factors. No significant heterogeneity or publication bias was observed. In conclusion, our meta-analysis demonstrated that folic acid supplementation had no effect on colorectal cancer risk. However, this finding must be validated by further large studies.

  13. [Proteomic analysis of Bacillus subtilis 168 transforming cis-propenylphosphonic acid to fosfomycin].

    PubMed

    Xie, Fuhong; Chao, Yapeng; Shi, Jiaji; Zhang, Guoqing; Yang, Jing; Qian, Shijun

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the mechanism of transformation by Bacillus subtilis strain 168 by proteomic analysis. B. subtilis strain 168 was able to stereoselectively transform cis-propenylphosphonic acid (cPPA) to fosfomycin. The maximal fosfomycin production was 816.6 microg/mL after two days cultivation, with a conversion rate of 36.05%. We separated the whole cellular proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) method, and 562 protein spots were detected in the presence of cPPA in the medium, while 527 protein spots were detected in the absence of cPPA. Of them, 98 differentially expressed protein spots were found. Among them, 52 proteins were up-regulated whereas 20 were down-regulated in the presence of cPPA in the medium, and 26 induced at the presence of cPPA. The differentially expressed proteins were analyzed by combined MS and MS/MS methods. Eighty protein spots, including 45 up-regulated proteins, 17 down-regulated proteins, and 18 induced by cPPA were identified. Based on the results of proteomic analysis, we postulated two steps of transformation: in the first step, cPPA was hydrated to 2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid; in the second step, 2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid was transformed to fosfomycin via a dehydrogenation reaction. PMID:24063234

  14. An isobolographic analysis of the antinociceptive effect of xylopic acid in combination with morphine or diclofenac

    PubMed Central

    Woode, Eric; Ameyaw, Elvis Ofori; Abotsi, Wonder Kofi Mensah; Boakye-Gyasi, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background: A common practice of managing pain globally is the combination of analgesics and this is aimed at facilitating patient compliance, simplifying prescription, and improving efficacy without increasing adverse effects. Fruit extracts of Xylopia aethiopica are used traditionally in the management of pain disorders and xylopic acid (XA) present in the fruit extract have been shown to possess analgesic properties in animals. There is the likelihood of concomitant use of XA and the commonly used analgesics in traditional settings. This study, therefore, evaluated the pharmacologic interaction between XA/morphine and xylopic/diclofenac combinations. Methods: The formalin test and acetic acid writhing test were used to study the antinociceptive activity of XA, morphine, and diclofenac. The isobolographic analysis was used to study the antinociceptive interactions between XA co-administered with morphine or diclofenac. Results: Results obtained revealed that XA (10–100 mg/kg), morphine (1–10 mg/kg), and diclofenac (1–10 mg/kg) produced dose-related antinociception with different potencies in the formalin and acetic acid writhing tests. Isobolographic analysis of XA/morphine and XA/diclofenac combinations revealed potentiation of their antinociceptive effects. The degree of potentiation calculated as interaction index showed synergism for both combinations in all the nociceptive tests. Conclusion: In conclusion, the present study demonstrated synergism for the co-administration of XA with morphine or diclofenac. PMID:26692735

  15. Classification of illicit heroin by UPLC-Q-TOF analysis of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuimei; Hua, Zhendong; Bai, Yanping

    2015-12-01

    The illicit manufacture of heroin results in the formation of trace levels of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities that provide valuable information about the manufacturing process used. In this work, a new ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF) method; that features high resolution, mass accuracy and sensitivity for profiling neutral and acidic heroin manufacturing impurities was developed. After the UPLC-Q-TOF analysis, the retention times and m/z data pairs of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities were detected, and 19 peaks were found to be evidently different between heroin samples from "Golden Triangle" and "Golden Crescent". Based on the data set of these 19 impurities in 150 authentic heroin samples, classification of heroin geographic origins was successfully achieved utilizing partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). By analyzing another data set of 267 authentic heroin samples, the developed discrimiant model was validated and proved to be accurate and reliable. PMID:26364155

  16. Amino acid sequence analysis and characterization of a ribonuclease from starfish Asterias amurensis.

    PubMed

    Motoyoshi, Naomi; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Itagaki, Tadashi; Inokuchi, Norio

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to phylogenetically characterize the location of the RNase T2 enzyme in the starfish (Asterias amurensis). We isolated an RNase T2 ribonuclease (RNase Aa) from the ovaries of starfish and determined its amino acid sequence by protein chemistry and cloning cDNA encoding RNase Aa. The isolated protein had 231 amino acid residues, a predicted molecular mass of 25,906 Da, and an optimal pH of 5.0. RNase Aa preferentially released guanylic acid from the RNA. The catalytic sites of the RNase T2 family are conserved in RNase Aa; furthermore, the distribution of the cysteine residues in RNase Aa is similar to that in other animal and plant T2 RNases. RNase Aa is cleaved at two points: 21 residues from the N-terminus and 29 residues from the C-terminus; however, both fragments may remain attached to the protein via disulfide bridges, leading to the maintenance of its conformation, as suggested by circular dichroism spectrum analysis. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that starfish RNase Aa is evolutionarily an intermediate between protozoan and oyster RNases. PMID:26920046

  17. Proteomic analysis of responses of a new probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus casei Zhang to low acid stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rina; Zhang, Wenyi; Sun, Tiansong; Wu, Junrui; Yue, Xiqing; Meng, He; Zhang, Heping

    2011-06-30

    Tolerance to acid is an important feature for probiotic bacteria during transition through the gastrointestinal tract. Proteomics analysis of a new probiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus casei Zhang, was performed upon 30-min exposure to low acid stress (pH 2.5 vs. pH 6.4) using two-dimensional electrophoresis. Out of 33 protein spots that showed changes of expression between the two pHs, 22 showed 1.5-fold higher expression at pH 2.5 than at pH 6.4, whereas five spots had expression decreased by 1.5-fold at pH 2.5. There were also six protein spots that were exclusively present on different pH maps. Further analysis showed that eight of the enhanced proteins, NagA, NagB, PGM, GlmM, LacC, TDP, GALM and PtsI, were involved in carbohydrate catabolism. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR showed that the mRNA expression levels of dnaK, nagB, galm, estC, tuf and luxS were consistent with changes in protein expression. We postulate that there might be some relationship between differentially expressed proteins and acid tolerance in L. casei Zhang. PMID:21561676

  18. FRETmatrix: a general methodology for the simulation and analysis of FRET in nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Preus, Søren; Kilså, Kristine; Miannay, Francois-Alexandre; Albinsson, Bo; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a technique commonly used to unravel the structure and conformational changes of biomolecules being vital for all living organisms. Typically, FRET is performed using dyes attached externally to nucleic acids through a linker that complicates quantitative interpretation of experiments because of dye diffusion and reorientation. Here, we report a versatile, general methodology for the simulation and analysis of FRET in nucleic acids, and demonstrate its particular power for modelling FRET between probes possessing limited diffusional and rotational freedom, such as our recently developed nucleobase analogue FRET pairs (base–base FRET). These probes are positioned inside the DNA/RNA structures as a replacement for one of the natural bases, thus, providing unique control of their position and orientation and the advantage of reporting from inside sites of interest. In demonstration studies, not requiring molecular dynamics modelling, we obtain previously inaccessible insight into the orientation and nanosecond dynamics of the bases inside double-stranded DNA, and we reconstruct high resolution 3D structures of kinked DNA. The reported methodology is accompanied by a freely available software package, FRETmatrix, for the design and analysis of FRET in nucleic acid containing systems. PMID:22977181

  19. Molecular analysis of Xenopus laevis SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic, Rich in Cysteine). A highly conserved acidic calcium-binding extracellular-matrix protein.

    PubMed Central

    Damjanovski, S; Liu, F; Ringuette, M

    1992-01-01

    SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic, Rich in Cysteine) is expressed as a 1.6 kb mRNA in Xenopus laevis. On the basis of cDNA sequence analysis, Xenopus SPARC has a core Mr of 32643, with one potential N-glycosylation site. Western analysis of SPARC isolated from Xenopus long bone indicates that the mature protein has an Mr of 43,000. At the amino acid level, Xenopus SPARC has 78-79% sequence similarity to mouse, bovine and human SPARC. The least-conserved region is found within the N-terminal glutamic acid-rich domain, with the C-terminal Ca(2+)-binding domain being the most conserved. Adult Xenopus tissues show the same pattern of tissue-specific distribution of SPARC mRNAs as adult mouse. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 5. PMID:1736898

  20. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenxia; Li, Sainan; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Jianrong; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Yuqing; Yin, Qin; Wang, Fan; Xia, Yujing; Liu, Tong; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (n-3 PUFAs) in lowering liver fat, liver enzyme (alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) levels), and blood lipids (triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL)) in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Science Citation Index (ISI Web of Science), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials on the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in patients with NAFLD from inception to May 2015. Ten studies were included in this meta-analysis. Results. 577 cases of NAFLD/NASH in ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. The results of the meta-analysis showed that benefit changes in liver fat favored PUFA treatment, and it was also beneficial for GGT, but it was not significant on ALT, AST, TC, and LDL. Conclusions. In this meta-analysis, omega-3 PUFAs improved liver fat, GGT, TG, and HDL in patients with NAFLD/NASH. Therefore, n-3 PUFAs may be a new treatment option for NAFLD. PMID:27651787

  1. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenxia; Li, Sainan; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Jianrong; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Yuqing; Yin, Qin; Wang, Fan; Xia, Yujing; Liu, Tong; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (n-3 PUFAs) in lowering liver fat, liver enzyme (alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) levels), and blood lipids (triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL)) in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Science Citation Index (ISI Web of Science), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials on the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in patients with NAFLD from inception to May 2015. Ten studies were included in this meta-analysis. Results. 577 cases of NAFLD/NASH in ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. The results of the meta-analysis showed that benefit changes in liver fat favored PUFA treatment, and it was also beneficial for GGT, but it was not significant on ALT, AST, TC, and LDL. Conclusions. In this meta-analysis, omega-3 PUFAs improved liver fat, GGT, TG, and HDL in patients with NAFLD/NASH. Therefore, n-3 PUFAs may be a new treatment option for NAFLD.

  2. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenxia; Li, Sainan; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Jianrong; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Yuqing; Yin, Qin; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Wang, Fan; Xia, Yujing; Chen, Kan; Liu, Tong; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Guo, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (n-3 PUFAs) in lowering liver fat, liver enzyme (alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) levels), and blood lipids (triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL)) in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Science Citation Index (ISI Web of Science), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials on the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in patients with NAFLD from inception to May 2015. Ten studies were included in this meta-analysis. Results. 577 cases of NAFLD/NASH in ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. The results of the meta-analysis showed that benefit changes in liver fat favored PUFA treatment, and it was also beneficial for GGT, but it was not significant on ALT, AST, TC, and LDL. Conclusions. In this meta-analysis, omega-3 PUFAs improved liver fat, GGT, TG, and HDL in patients with NAFLD/NASH. Therefore, n-3 PUFAs may be a new treatment option for NAFLD. PMID:27651787

  3. A combination of omega-3 fatty acids, folic acid and B-group vitamins is superior at lowering homocysteine than omega-3 alone: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Samantha Loren; Bowe, Steven John; Crowe, Timothy Charles

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation alone or in combination with folic acid and B-group vitamins is effective in lowering homocysteine. The Medline Ovid, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized-controlled trial studies that intervened with omega-3 supplementation (with or without folic acid) and measured changes in homocysteine concentration. Studies were pooled using a random effects model for meta-analysis. Three different models were analyzed: all trials combined, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid trials, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids with folic acid and B-group vitamin trials. Nineteen studies were included, consisting of 3267 participants completing 21 trials. Studies were heterogeneous; varying by dose, duration and participant health conditions. Across all trials, omega-3 supplementation was effective in lowering homocysteine by an average of 1.18μmol/L (95%CI: (-1.89, -0.48), P=.001). The average homocysteine-lowering effect was greater when omega-3 supplementation was combined with folic acid and B-group vitamins (-1.37μmol/L, 95%CI: (-2.38, -0.36), P<.01) compared to omega-3 supplementation alone (-1.09μmol/L 95%CI: (-2.04, -0.13), P=.03). Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation was associated with a modest reduction in homocysteine. For the purposes of reducing homocysteine, a combination of omega-3s (0.2-6g/day), folic acid (150 - 2500μg/day) and vitamins B6 and B12 may be more effective than omega-3 supplementation alone.

  4. A combination of omega-3 fatty acids, folic acid and B-group vitamins is superior at lowering homocysteine than omega-3 alone: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Samantha Loren; Bowe, Steven John; Crowe, Timothy Charles

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation alone or in combination with folic acid and B-group vitamins is effective in lowering homocysteine. The Medline Ovid, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized-controlled trial studies that intervened with omega-3 supplementation (with or without folic acid) and measured changes in homocysteine concentration. Studies were pooled using a random effects model for meta-analysis. Three different models were analyzed: all trials combined, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid trials, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids with folic acid and B-group vitamin trials. Nineteen studies were included, consisting of 3267 participants completing 21 trials. Studies were heterogeneous; varying by dose, duration and participant health conditions. Across all trials, omega-3 supplementation was effective in lowering homocysteine by an average of 1.18μmol/L (95%CI: (-1.89, -0.48), P=.001). The average homocysteine-lowering effect was greater when omega-3 supplementation was combined with folic acid and B-group vitamins (-1.37μmol/L, 95%CI: (-2.38, -0.36), P<.01) compared to omega-3 supplementation alone (-1.09μmol/L 95%CI: (-2.04, -0.13), P=.03). Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation was associated with a modest reduction in homocysteine. For the purposes of reducing homocysteine, a combination of omega-3s (0.2-6g/day), folic acid (150 - 2500μg/day) and vitamins B6 and B12 may be more effective than omega-3 supplementation alone. PMID:27188895

  5. Amino acid analysis by means of MALDI TOF mass spectrometry or MALDI TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gogichaeva, Natalia V; Alterman, Michail A

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe two different amino acid analysis protocols based on the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). First protocol describes a MALDI TOF MS-based method for a routine simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analysis of free amino acids and protein hydrolysates (Alterman et al. Anal Biochem 335: 184-191, 2004). Linear responses between the amino acid concentration and the peak intensity ratio of corresponding amino acid to internal standard were observed for all amino acids analyzed in the range of concentrations from 20 to 300 μM. Limit of quantitation varied from 0.03 μM for arginine to 3.7 μM for histidine and homocysteine. This method has one inherent limitation: the analysis of isomeric and isobaric amino acids. To solve this problem, a second protocol based on the use of MALDI TOF/TOF MS/MS for qualitative analysis of amino and organic acids was developed. This technique is capable of distinguishing isobaric and isomeric compounds (Gogichayeva et al. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 18: 279-284, 2007). Both methods do not require amino acid derivatization or chromatographic separation, and the data acquisition time is decreased to several seconds for a single sample. PMID:22125142

  6. RAPID ANALYSIS OF CYNANURIC ACID IN SWIMMING POOL WATERS BY HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY USING POROUS GRAPHITIC CARBON COLUMN

    EPA Science Inventory

    An innovative approach is presented for reducing analysis times of cyanuric acid in swimming pool waters by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The HPLC method exploits the unique selectivity of porous graphitic carbon (PGC) to fully resolve cyanuric acid from other p...

  7. The estimation of deoxyribonucleic acid in the presence of sialic acid: application to analysis of human gastric washings

    PubMed Central

    Croft, D. N.; Lubran, M.

    1965-01-01

    1. Sialic acid has been found to interfere with three colorimetric reactions used for the estimation of DNA: a modified diphenylamine reaction at 100° (Dische, 1930), the nitrophenylhydrazine method (Webb & Levy, 1955) and the diphenylamine reaction at 30° (Burton, 1956). 2. Evidence is presented that sialic acid is present in hydrolysates obtained from gastric wash-out material. 3. A mathematical method for correcting for interference from sialic acid in the diphenylamine reaction at 30° is described. 4. The diphenylamine reaction has been modified to make it suitable for the estimation of DNA in the presence of sialic acid. The modifications are to increase the concentration of diphenylamine to 2% and to perform the reaction at 6–13° for 48hr. These modifications increase the sensitivity 25% above Burton's (1956) modification of the diphenylamine reaction. 5. The precipitation, extraction and recovery of DNA from gastric wash-out material have been investigated. PMID:14342494

  8. AN HPLC METHOD WITH UVDETECTION, PH CONTROL, AND REDUCTIVE ASCORBIC ACID FOR CYANURIC ACID ANALYSIS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Every year over 250 million pounds of cyanuric acid (CA) and chlorinated isocyanurates are produced industrially. These compounds are standard ingredients in formulations for household bleaches, industrial cleansers, dishwasher compounds, general sanitizers, and chlorine stabiliz...

  9. AN HPLC METHOD WITH UV DETECTION, PH CONTROL, AND REDUCTIVE ASCORBIC ACID FOR CYANURIC ACID ANALYSIS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Every year over 250 million pounds of cyanuric acid (CA) and chloroisocyanurates are produced industrially. These compounds are standard ingredients in formulations for household bleaches, industrial cleansers, dishwasher compounds, general sanitizers, and chlorine stabilizers. ...

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory analysis of 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Soni; Tandon, Poonam; Eravuchira, Pinkie J; El-Abassy, Rasha M; Materny, Arnulf

    2013-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are being performed to investigate the geometric, vibrational, and electronic properties of the chlorogenic acid isomer 3-CQA (1R,3R,4S,5R)-3-{[(2E)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)prop-2-enoyl]oxy}-1,4,5-trihydroxycyclohexanecarboxylic acid), a major phenolic compound in coffee. DFT calculations with the 6-311G(d,p) basis set produce very good results. The electrostatic potential mapped onto an isodensity surface has been obtained. A natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) has been performed in order to study intramolecular bonding, interactions among bonds, and delocalization of unpaired electrons. HOMO-LUMO studies give insights into the interaction of the molecule with other species. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies indicate that a charge transfer occurs within the molecule.

  11. Analysis of (/sup 3/H) Kainic acid binding with rat and Frog brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zharkovskii, A.M.; Zharkovskaya, T.A.

    1985-10-01

    This paper analyzes the binding of (H 3)-KA with membrances in vitro and the effect of various neuroactive amino acids, suggested as endogenous ligands for binding sites of (H 3)-KA, on binding. Experiments were carried out on male albino rats and on winter frogs. Choice of the frog's brain was determined by the high density of high-affinity binding sites of (H 3)-KA. The concentrations of substances inhibiting binding (H 3)-KA by 50% were calculated by logit-probit analysis, and inhibition constants were also calculated. It is shown that although L-glutamate and folic acid inhibit binding of (H 3)-KA, they do not satisfy the criteria to be met by endogenous ligands, and this inhibition of binding is noncompetitive in character. This suggests that KA binding sites and glutamate receptors are not identical, although they may perhaps be subunits of a single complex.

  12. Microwave acid digestion and preconcentration neutron activation analysis of biological and diet samples for iodine.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Chatt, A

    1991-07-01

    A simple preconcentration neutron activation analysis (PNAA) method has been developed for the determination of low levels of iodine in biological and nutritional materials. The method involves dissolution of the samples by microwave digestion in the presence of acids in closed Teflon bombs and preconcentration of total iodine, after reduction to iodide with hydrazine sulfate, by coprecipitation with bismuth sulfide. The effects of different factors such as acidity, time for complete precipitation, and concentrations of bismuth, sulfide, and diverse ions on the quantitative recovery of iodide have been studied. The absolute detection limit of the PNAA method is 5 ng of iodine. Precision of measurement, expressed in terms of relative standard deviation, is about 5% at 100 ppb and 10% at 20 ppb levels of iodine. The PNAA method has been applied to several biological reference materials and total diet samples. PMID:1897721

  13. Microwave acid digestion and preconcentration neutron activation analysis of biological and diet samples for iodine.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Chatt, A

    1991-07-01

    A simple preconcentration neutron activation analysis (PNAA) method has been developed for the determination of low levels of iodine in biological and nutritional materials. The method involves dissolution of the samples by microwave digestion in the presence of acids in closed Teflon bombs and preconcentration of total iodine, after reduction to iodide with hydrazine sulfate, by coprecipitation with bismuth sulfide. The effects of different factors such as acidity, time for complete precipitation, and concentrations of bismuth, sulfide, and diverse ions on the quantitative recovery of iodide have been studied. The absolute detection limit of the PNAA method is 5 ng of iodine. Precision of measurement, expressed in terms of relative standard deviation, is about 5% at 100 ppb and 10% at 20 ppb levels of iodine. The PNAA method has been applied to several biological reference materials and total diet samples.

  14. Investigation of thermal decomposition of ascorbic acid by TG-FTIR and thermal kinetics analysis.

    PubMed

    Jingyan, Shi; Yuwen, Liu; Zhiyong, Wang; Cunxin, Wang

    2013-04-15

    The thermal behavior of dry solid ascorbic acid in nitrogen atmosphere in the temperature range of 25-800°C was investigated by TG-FTIR. During the thermal decomposition process, five evolved gaseous species, including H2O, CO2, CO, CH4 and HCOOH, were identified and monitored, in which HCOOH was detected for the first time. The results indicated that ascorbic acid began to decompose at 191°C. Its decomposition process consisted of three stages, and dehydration and decarboxylation to form furfural were the possible principal mechanism. The kinetic analysis for the first decomposition stage was also carried out by the isoconversional method and the master plots method. The results indicated that this process can be described by the model of 1st order reaction.

  15. Metabolomics Analysis and Biosynthesis of Rosmarinic Acid in Agastache rugosa Kuntze Treated with Methyl Jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Romij; Xu, Hui; Park, Woo Tae; Tuan, Pham Anh; Li, Xiaohua; Chung, Eunsook; Lee, Jai-Heon; Park, Sang Un

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) on metabolic profiles and rosmarinic acid (RA) biosynthesis in cell cultures of Agastache rugosa Kuntze. Transcript levels of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes, i.e., ArPAL, Ar4CL, and ArC4H, maximally increased 4.5-fold, 3.4-fold, and 3.5-fold, respectively, compared with the untreated controls, and the culture contained relatively high amounts of RA after exposure of cells to 50 µM MeJA. RA levels were 2.1-, 4.7-, and 3.9-fold higher after exposure to 10, 50, and 100 µM MeJA, respectively, than those in untreated controls. In addition, the transcript levels of genes attained maximum levels at different time points after the initial exposure. The transcript levels of ArC4H and Ar4CL were transiently induced by MeJA, and reached a maximum of up to 8-fold at 3 hr and 6 hr, respectively. The relationships between primary metabolites and phenolic acids in cell cultures of A. rugosa treated with MeJA were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In total, 45 metabolites, including 41 primary metabolites and 4 phenolic acids, were identified from A. rugosa. Metabolite profiles were subjected to partial least square-discriminate analysis to evaluate the effects of MeJA. The results indicate that both phenolic acids and precursors for the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway, such as aromatic amino acids and shikimate, were induced as a response to MeJA treatment. Therefore, MeJA appears to have an important impact on RA accumulation, and the increased RA accumulation in the treated cells might be due to activation of the phenylpropanoid genes ArPAL, ArC4H, and Ar4CL. PMID:23724034

  16. Analysis of Vaginal Acetic Acid in Patients Undergoing Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudry, Amjad N.; Travers, Paul J.; Yuenger, Jeffrey; Colletta, Lorraine; Evans, Phillip; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; Tummon, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A “gold standard” method for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (BV) is lacking. The clinical criteria described by the Amsel technique are subjective and difficult to quantify. Alternatively, the reading of Gram-stained vaginal smears by scoring techniques such as those that use the Nugent or Hay-Ison scoring systems is again subjective, requires expert personnel to perform the reading, and is infrequently used clinically. Recently, a new diagnostic device, the Osmetech Microbial Analyzer—Bacterial Vaginosis (OMA-BV), which determines a patient's BV status on the basis of measurement of the amount of acetic acid present in a vaginal swab specimen, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The present study uses the conducting polymer gas-sensing technology of OMA-BV to measure the concentration of acetic acid in the headspace above vaginal swab specimens from patients undergoing treatment for BV with metronidazole. In 97.8% of the cases the level of acetic acid detected fell sharply during the treatment period, crossing from above to below the diagnostic threshold of 900 ppm. The diagnosis obtained on the basis of the level of vaginal acetic acid was compared with the diagnoses obtained by use of the Amsel criteria and the Nugent scoring system both at the time of initial entry into the study and at the repeat samplings on days 7 and 14. The results obtained with OMA-BV showed overall agreements compared with the results of the Amsel and Nugent tests of 98 and 94%, respectively, for the 34 patients monitored through the treatment process. This provides further evidence that the measurement of vaginal acetic acid by headspace analysis with conducting polymer sensors is a valid alternative to present tests for the diagnosis of BV. PMID:15528711

  17. Retrospective analysis for the identification of 4-aminocarminic acid photo-degradation products in beverages.

    PubMed

    Gosetti, Fabio; Chiuminatto, Ugo; Mastroianni, Rita; Mazzucco, Eleonora; Manfredi, Marcello; Marengo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the identification of the photo-degradation products of 4-aminocarminic acid potentially present in commercial beverages. Sixteen beverages of different composition but all containing the E120 dye were previously analysed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry to identify the common degradation products of the E120 dye. Since it is plausible to find unauthorised 4-aminocarminic acid in beverages which report generic E120 dye on the label, retrospective analysis was employed here not only to search for the possible presence of 4-aminocarminic acid but also to investigate the potential formation of photo-degradation products derived from this compound. For this purpose, a statistical approach based on Student's t-test was used to compare the degraded beverages containing 4-aminocarminic acid with all the others. Five degradation products were identified and their structures were elucidated on the basis of the high-accuracy and high-resolution of mass and mass/mass spectra. The toxicity of the degradation products was evaluated through the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay. No evidence of mutagenicity was obtained for the beverages subjected or not to irradiation, whereas a toxic effect of the 4-aminocarminic acid standard solution already at 100.0 µg l(-1) was found. This leads, once again, to the conclusion that the toxicity study must be carried out on the beverages in order to take into account of all the possible masking/protection interactions among the ingredients. PMID:25562586

  18. Compound-Specific Amino Acid Isotopic Analysis of Benthic Food Webs in the Chukchi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Cooper, L. W.; Biasatti, D. M.; Grebmeier, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Chukchi Sea is known for locally high standing stocks of benthic macrofauna and strong coupling between pelagic-benthic components of the ecosystem. However, benthic food structure is not fully understood, due to varied sources of particulate organic matter (POM) and the high diversity of benthic invertebrates. We provide the first demonstration of the application of compound-specific amino acid isotope analysis to study the dietary sources and trophic structure for this Arctic marginal sea. About 20 stations in Chukchi Sea were sampled during cruises in August of 2012 and 2013. At each station, phytoplankton, POM and benthic fauna were collected, processed and analyzed using GC-C-IRMS (gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry). Among benthic fauna, dominant species included the following taxonomic groups: Ophiuroidea, Amphipoda, Polychaeta, Gastropoda, Bivalvia, and Cnidaria. The benthic fauna showed similar patterns of individual amino acid δ13C, with glycine the most enriched in 13C and leucine the most depleted in 13C. Specific amino acids including phenylalanine showed spatial variability in δ13C and δ15N values within the sampled area, indicating contributions of different dietary sources including phytoplankton, sea ice algae, benthic algae and terrestrial organic materials. δ15N values of individual amino acids such as the difference between glutamic acid and phenylalanine, i.e. Δ15Nglu-phe (δ15Nglu - δ15Nphe), were also used to identify trophic levels of benthic invertebrates relative to estimates available from bulk δ15N values. These data will ultimately be used to evaluate the spatial variability of organic carbon sources and trophic level interactions of dominant benthic species in the Chukchi Sea.

  19. [Fast analysis of common fatty acids in edible vegetable oils by ultra-performance convergence chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chunhua; Xie, Xianqing; Fan, Naili; Tu, Yuanhong; Chen, Yan; Liao, Weilin

    2015-04-01

    A fast analytical method for five common fatty acids in six edible vegetable oils was developed by ultra-performance convergence chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPC2-MS). The five fatty acids are palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid. Their contents in the corn oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, tea oil, rapeseed oil and peanut oil were compared. The chromatographic separation was performed on an ACQUITY UPC2 BEH 2-EP column (100 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.7 µm) using the mobile phases of carbon dioxide and methanol/acetonitrile (1:1, v/v) with gradient elution. The separated compounds were detected by negative electrospray ionization ESF-MS. The results showed that the reasonable linearities were achieved for all the analytes over the range of 0.5-100 mg/L with the correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.9985-0.9998. The limits of quantification (S/N ≥ 10) of the five fatty acids were 0.15-0.50 mg/L. The recoveries of the five fatty acids at three spiked levels were in the range of 89.61%-108.50% with relative standard deviations of 0.69%-3.01%. The developed method showed high performance, good resolution and fast analysis for the underivatized fatty acids. It has been successfully used to detect the five fatty acids from corn oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, tea oil rapeseed oil and peanut oil.

  20. In-line preconcentration capillary zone electrophoresis for the analysis of haloacetic acids in water.

    PubMed

    Bernad, Josep O; Damascelli, Anna; Núñez, Oscar; Galceran, Maria T

    2011-08-01

    Two in-line enrichment procedures (large volume sample stacking (LVSS) and field amplified sample injection (FASI)) have been evaluated for the CZE analysis of haloacetic acids (HAAs) in drinking water. For LVSS, separation on normal polarity using 20 mM acetic acid-ammonium acetate (pH 5.5) containing 20% ACN as BGE was required. For FASI, the optimum conditions were 25 s hydrodynamic injection (3.5 kPa) of a water plug followed by 25 s electrokinetic injection (-10 kV) of the sample, and 200 mM formic acid-ammonium formate buffer at pH 3.0 as BGE. For both FASI and LVSS methods, linear calibration curves (r(2) >0.992), limit of detection on standards prepared in Milli-Q water (49.1-200 μg/L for LVSS and 4.2-48 μg/L for FASI), and both run-to-run and day-to-day precisions (RSD values up to 15.8% for concentration) were established. Due to the higher sensitive enhancement (up to 310-fold) achieved with FASI-CZE, this method was selected for the analysis of HAAs in drinking water. However, for an optimal FASI application sample salinity was removed by SPE using Oasis WAX cartridges. With SPE-FASI-CZE, method detection limits in the range 0.05-0.8 μg/L were obtained, with recoveries, in general, higher than 90% (around 65% for monochloroacetic and monobromoacetic acids). The applicability of the SPE-FASI-CZE method was evaluated by analyzing drinking tap water from Barcelona where seven HAAs were found at concentration levels between 3 and 13 μg/L.

  1. Elucidating the structure of cyclotides by partial acid hydrolysis and LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Sze, Siu Kwan; Wang, Wei; Meng, Wei; Yuan, Randong; Guo, Tiannan; Zhu, Yi; Tam, James P

    2009-02-01

    We describe here a rapid method to determine the cyclic structure and disulfide linkages of highly stable cyclotides via a combination of flash partial acid hydrolysis, LC-MS/MS, and computational tools. Briefly, a mixture of closely related cyclotides, kalata B1 and varv A purified from Viola yedoensis was partially hydrolyzed in 2 M HCl for 5 min by microwave-assisted hydrolysis or for 30 min in an autoclave oven (121 degrees C and 15 psi). The partially hydrolyzed peptide mixture was then subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis, with the disulfide linked-peptides fragmented by collision activated dissociation (CAD). A computer program written in-house (available for download at http://proteomics.sbs.ntu.edu.sg/cyclotide_SS ) was used for interpreting LC-MS/MS spectra and assigning the disulfide bonds. Time-point analysis of single-disulfide fragments revealed that nonrandom acid catalyzed fragmentation mostly occurred at the turns which are solvent-exposed and often contain side chain functionalized amino acids such as Asx/Glx and Ser/Thr. In particular, the most susceptible bond for acid hydrolysis in kalata B1 and varv A was found to be the highly conserved N25-G26 which is also the head-to-tail ligation site of the linear precursor proteins, indicating that formation of the three disulfide bonds might precede cyclic structure closure by N25-G26 ligation. This observation is consistent with the recent report that the N25-G26 bond formation is the last step in the cyclotide biosynthetic pathway. The process demonstrated here can potentially be a high throughput method that is generally applicable to determine disulfide bonds of other relatively low-abundance cyclotides.

  2. Application of Pre-Column Labeling Liquid Chromatography for Canine Plasma-Free Amino Acid Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Kazuo; Hirao, Yoshiko; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Murahata, Yusuke; Osaki, Tomohiro; Tsuka, Takeshi; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Ito, Norihiko

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-free amino acid (PFAA) levels are a useful metric for diagnosing cancer and providing a prognosis. However, the use of analysis of PFAA levels has been limited in the veterinary medicine field. We addressed the application of liquid chromatography (LC) using a pre-column labeling technique for analysis of canine PFAA levels. This method significantly shortened the analysis time relative to conventional methods. No diurnal fluctuations were detected at 9:00 AM in most PFAA levels, and food intake increased the levels of some PFAAs, including valine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, and proline. These results indicate that LC with pre-column labeling is useful for measuring canine PFAA levels, for which time of day and interval after food intake must be taken into consideration. PMID:26771650

  3. Importance of databases of nucleic acids for bioinformatic analysis focused to genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Gutierrez, L. R.; Barrios-Hernández, C. J.; Pedraza-Ferreira, G. R.; Vera-Cala, L.; Martinez-Perez, F.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, bioinformatics has become a new field of science, indispensable in the analysis of millions of nucleic acids sequences, which are currently deposited in international databases (public or private); these databases contain information of genes, RNA, ORF, proteins, intergenic regions, including entire genomes from some species. The analysis of this information requires computer programs; which were renewed in the use of new mathematical methods, and the introduction of the use of artificial intelligence. In addition to the constant creation of supercomputing units trained to withstand the heavy workload of sequence analysis. However, it is still necessary the innovation on platforms that allow genomic analyses, faster and more effectively, with a technological understanding of all biological processes.

  4. Application of Pre-Column Labeling Liquid Chromatography for Canine Plasma-Free Amino Acid Analysis.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kazuo; Hirao, Yoshiko; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Murahata, Yusuke; Osaki, Tomohiro; Tsuka, Takeshi; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Ito, Norihiko

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-free amino acid (PFAA) levels are a useful metric for diagnosing cancer and providing a prognosis. However, the use of analysis of PFAA levels has been limited in the veterinary medicine field. We addressed the application of liquid chromatography (LC) using a pre-column labeling technique for analysis of canine PFAA levels. This method significantly shortened the analysis time relative to conventional methods. No diurnal fluctuations were detected at 9:00 AM in most PFAA levels, and food intake increased the levels of some PFAAs, including valine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, and proline. These results indicate that LC with pre-column labeling is useful for measuring canine PFAA levels, for which time of day and interval after food intake must be taken into consideration. PMID:26771650

  5. Miniaturized PCR chips for nucleic acid amplification and analysis: latest advances and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunsun; Xing, Da

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of performing fast and small-volume nucleic acid amplification and analysis on a single chip has attracted great interest. Devices based on this idea, referred to as micro total analysis, microfluidic analysis, or simply ‘Lab on a chip’ systems, have witnessed steady advances over the last several years. Here, we summarize recent research on chip substrates, surface treatments, PCR reaction volume and speed, architecture, approaches to eliminating cross-contamination and control and measurement of temperature and liquid flow. We also discuss product-detection methods, integration of functional components, biological samples used in PCR chips, potential applications and other practical issues related to implementation of lab-on-a-chip technologies. PMID:17576684

  6. [Influence of Different Straws Returning with Landfill on Soil Microbial Community Structure Under Dry and Water Farming].

    PubMed

    Lan, Mu-ling; Gao, Ming

    2015-11-01

    Based on rice, wheat, corn straw and rape, broad bean green stalk as the research object, using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) method, combining principal component analysis method to study the soil microbial quantity, distribution of flora, community structure characteristics under dry and water farming as two different cultivated land use types. The PLFA analysis results showed that: under dry farming, total PLFA quantity ranged 8.35-25.15 nmol x g(-1), showed rape > broad bean > corn > rice > wheat, rape and broad bean significantly increased total PLFA quantity by 1.18 and 1.08 times compared to the treatment without straw; PLFA quantity of bacterial flora in treatments with straws was higher than that without straw, and fungal biomass was significantly increased, so was the species richness of microbial community. Under water faming, the treatments of different straws returning with landfill have improved the PLFA quantity of total soil microbial and flora comparing with the treatment without straw, fungi significantly increased, and species richness of microbial communities value also increased significantly. Total PLFA quantity ranged 4.04-22.19 nmol x g(-1), showed rice > corn > wheat > broad bean > rape, which in rape and broad bean treatments were lower than the treatment without straw; fungal PLFA amount in 5 kinds of straw except broad bean treatment was significantly higher than that of the treatment without straw, bacteria and total PLFA quantity in broad bean processing were significantly lower than those of other treatments, actinomycetes, G+, G- had no significant difference between all treatments; rice, wheat, corn, rape could significantly increase the soil microbial species richness index and dominance index under water faming. The results of principal component analysis showed that broad bean green stalk had the greatest impact on the microbial community structure in the dry soil, rape green stalk and wheat straw had the biggest influence on

  7. Titanium Mass-Balance Analysis of Paso Robles Soils: Elemental Gains and Losses as Affected by Acid Alteration Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.

    2010-03-01

    Titanium mass-balance analysis of Paso Robles soils indicated elemental gains as supplied by sulfuric acid alteration fluids. This suggests that open-system dissolution processes have operated in the Paso Robles soils.

  8. Isobolographic analysis of the antinociceptive interaction between ursolic acid and diclofenac or tramadol in mice.

    PubMed

    Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Cortés, Alejandra; Pellicer, Francisco; Díaz-Reval, Irene; González-Trujano, María Eva

    2014-02-01

    It is considered that natural products used in folk medicine can potentiate the effect of drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological interaction between ursolic acid, a triterpene isolated from herbal medicines to treat pain, and the analgesics diclofenac or tramadol. Individual dose-response curves of the antinociceptive effect of these compounds were built to calculate the ED50, as well as the pharmacological interaction, by using isobolographic analysis. All treatments decreased significantly and in a dose-dependent manner the writhing behavior with ED50 values of 103.50 ± 19.66, 20.54 ± 6.05, and 9.60 ± 1.69 mg/kg, for ursolic acid, diclofenac, and tramadol, respectively. An isobolographic analysis allowed the characterization of the pharmacological interaction produced by a fixed ratio combination of 1 : 1 and 1 : 3 of equi-effective doses of these compounds. Theoretical antinociceptive ED50 values of ursolic acid-diclofenac were 62.12 ± 10.28 and 41.43 ± 6.69 mg/kg, respectively, not statistically different from those obtained experimentally (44.52 ± 5.25 and 44.89 ± 49.05 mg/kg, respectively), reporting an additive interaction. Theoretical antinociceptive ED50 values of ursolic acid-tramadol (56.56 ± 9.87 and 33.08 ± 5.07 mg/kg, respectively) were significantly lower than those observed experimentally (138.36 ± 49.05 and 67.34 ± 18.98 mg/kg, respectively) reporting antagonism in this interaction. Antinociceptive response obtained from isobolograms in the writhing test was corroborated by using formalin test in mice. Adverse effects such as gastric damage in the ursolic acid-diclofenac combination did not increase in an additive form similarly as with antinociception. Conversely, sedative response was significantly increased in the ursolic acid-tramadol combination. As observed in the formalin test, the antagonism on the antinociceptive response between ursolic acid

  9. Selective local lysis and sampling of live cells for nucleic acid analysis using a microfluidic probe

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Aditya; Autebert, Julien; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is inherent to biology, thus it is imperative to realize methods capable of obtaining spatially-resolved genomic and transcriptomic profiles of heterogeneous biological samples. Here, we present a new method for local lysis of live adherent cells for nucleic acid analyses. This method addresses bottlenecks in current approaches, such as dilution of analytes, one-sample-one-test, and incompatibility to adherent cells. We make use of a scanning probe technology - a microfluidic probe - and implement hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hHFC) to localize multiple biochemicals on a biological substrate in a non-contact, non-destructive manner. hHFC enables rapid recovery of nucleic acids by coupling cell lysis and lysate collection. We locally lysed ~300 cells with chemical systems adapted for DNA or RNA and obtained lysates of ~70 cells/μL for DNA analysis and ~15 cells/μL for mRNA analysis. The lysates were introduced into PCR-based workflows for genomic and transcriptomic analysis. This strategy further enabled selective local lysis of subpopulations in a co-culture of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, validated by characteristic E-cadherin gene expression in individually extracted cell types. The developed strategy can be applied to study cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions locally, with implications in understanding growth, progression and drug response of a tumor. PMID:27411740

  10. Combined Analysis of Stable Isotope, (1)H NMR, and Fatty Acid To Verify Sesame Oil Authenticity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongeun; Jin, Gyungsu; Lee, Yunhee; Chun, Hyang Sook; Ahn, Sangdoo; Kim, Byung Hee

    2015-10-14

    The aim of this study was to verify the authenticity of sesame oils using combined analysis of stable isotope ratio, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and fatty acid profiles of the oils. Analytical data were obtained from 35 samples of authentic sesame oils and 29 samples of adulterated sesame oils currently distributed in Korea. The orthogonal projection to latent structure discriminant analysis technique was used to select variables that most effectively verify the sesame oil authenticity. The variables include δ(13)C value, integration values of NMR peaks that signify the CH3 of n-3 fatty acids, CH2 between two C═C, protons from sesamin/sesamolin, and 18:1n-9, 18:3n-3, 18:2t, and 18:3t content values. The authenticity of 65 of 70 blind samples was correctly verified by applying the range of the eight variables found in the authentic sesame oil samples, suggesting that triple analysis is a useful approach to verify sesame oil authenticity.

  11. Combined Analysis of Stable Isotope, (1)H NMR, and Fatty Acid To Verify Sesame Oil Authenticity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongeun; Jin, Gyungsu; Lee, Yunhee; Chun, Hyang Sook; Ahn, Sangdoo; Kim, Byung Hee

    2015-10-14

    The aim of this study was to verify the authenticity of sesame oils using combined analysis of stable isotope ratio, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and fatty acid profiles of the oils. Analytical data were obtained from 35 samples of authentic sesame oils and 29 samples of adulterated sesame oils currently distributed in Korea. The orthogonal projection to latent structure discriminant analysis technique was used to select variables that most effectively verify the sesame oil authenticity. The variables include δ(13)C value, integration values of NMR peaks that signify the CH3 of n-3 fatty acids, CH2 between two C═C, protons from sesamin/sesamolin, and 18:1n-9, 18:3n-3, 18:2t, and 18:3t content values. The authenticity of 65 of 70 blind samples was correctly verified by applying the range of the eight variables found in the authentic sesame oil samples, suggesting that triple analysis is a useful approach to verify sesame oil authenticity. PMID:26395416

  12. Comparison of four digestion procedures not requiring perchloric acid for the trace-element analysis of plant material

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, M. J.

    1980-05-01

    Perchloric acid (HClO/sub 4/) is often used to destroy organic material contained in plant tissue during sample preparation for trace-element analysis. However, since perchloric acid is an extremely strong oxidizing agent that can cause fire and explosion when in contact with combustible materials, its use is best avoided when proper safety equipment and training is unavailable. A comparison was made of four digestion procedures that do not require perchloric acid: wet digestion with nitric and sulfuric acids; wet digestion with nitric acid alone; a repeated wet digestion with nitric acid; and direct dry ashing. Each procedure was used to digest National Bureau of Standards orchard leaves (SRM 1571). To investigate the effect of possible filter paper adsorption on the determination of trace elements, digested samples were either filtered or not filtered before analysis. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was employed to determine concentrations of As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr, and Zn in each digested sample. Recoveries of each element and the relative error of each determination for each digestion procedure were then calculated. A statistical analysis of these data indicates that the direct dry ashing procedure is best suited for multi-element analysis. Dry ashing is appropriate to recover As, Be, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Pb, and Zn. The nitric-sulfuric acids, nitric acid, and repeated nitric acid digestion procedures were deemed poor for multi-element analysis; however, each proved useful for the recovery of certain individual elements, including Cd, Pb, and Zn. Sample filtration significantly (p less than or equal to 0.05) lowered the recovery of Cr, Mn, Pb, and Zn from the digested samples. Conversely, the recovery of As, Mo, and Sr was significantly (p less than or equal to 0.05) higher in samples filtered before analysis when compared to the recovery of these elements in unfiltered samples.

  13. Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    This project had three major objectives. The first objective was to develop a fossil fuel combustion source inventory (NO/sub x/, SO/sub x/, and hydrocarbon emissions) that would be relatively easy to use and update for analyzing the impact of combustion emissions on acid deposition in the eastern United States. The second objective of the project was to use the inventory data as a basis for selection of a number of areas that, by virtue of their importance in the acid rain issue, could be further studied to assess the impact of local and intraregional combustion sources. The third objective was to conduct an analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in the areas under study, along with pertinent physical characteristics, meteorological conditions, and emission patterns of these areas, to investigate probable relationships between local and intraregional combustion sources and the deposition of acidic material. The combustion source emissions inventory has been developed for the eastern United States. It characterizes all important area sources and point sources on a county-by-county basis. Its design provides flexibility and simplicity and makes it uniquely useful in overall analysis of emission patterns in the eastern United States. Three regions with basically different emission patterns have been identified and characterized. The statistical analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in conjunction with emission patterns, wind direction, and topography has produced consistent results for each study area and has demonstrated that the wet deposition in each area reflects the characteristics of the localized area around the monitoring sites (typically 50 to 150 miles). 8 references, 28 figures, 39 tables.

  14. In vitro reconstitution and steady-state analysis of the fatty acid synthase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xingye; Liu, Tiangang; Zhu, Fayin; Khosla, Chaitan

    2011-11-15

    Microbial fatty acid derivatives are emerging as promising alternatives to fossil fuel derived transportation fuels. Among bacterial fatty acid synthases (FAS), the Escherichia coli FAS is perhaps the most well studied, but little is known about its steady-state kinetic behavior. Here we describe the reconstitution of E. coli FAS using purified protein components and report detailed kinetic analysis of this reconstituted system. When all ketosynthases are present at 1 μM, the maximum rate of free fatty acid synthesis of the FAS exceeded 100 μM/ min. The steady-state turnover frequency was not significantly inhibited at high concentrations of any substrate or cofactor. FAS activity was saturated with respect to most individual protein components when their concentrations exceeded 1 μM. The exceptions were FabI and FabZ, which increased FAS activity up to concentrations of 10 μM; FabH and FabF, which decreased FAS activity at concentrations higher than 1 μM; and holo-ACP and TesA, which gave maximum FAS activity at 30 μM concentrations. Analysis of the S36T mutant of the ACP revealed that the unusual dependence of FAS activity on holo-ACP concentration was due, at least in part, to the acyl-phosphopantetheine moiety. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis of the reaction mixture further revealed medium and long chain fatty acyl-ACP intermediates as predominant ACP species. We speculate that one or more of such intermediates are key allosteric regulators of FAS turnover. Our findings provide a new basis for assessing the scope and limitations of using E. coli as a biocatalyst for the production of diesel-like fuels.

  15. In vitro reconstitution and steady-state analysis of the fatty acid synthase from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xingye; Liu, Tiangang; Zhu, Fayin; Khosla, Chaitan

    2011-01-01

    Microbial fatty acid derivatives are emerging as promising alternatives to fossil fuel derived transportation fuels. Among bacterial fatty acid synthases (FAS), the Escherichia coli FAS is perhaps the most well studied, but little is known about its steady-state kinetic behavior. Here we describe the reconstitution of E. coli FAS using purified protein components and report detailed kinetic analysis of this reconstituted system. When all ketosynthases are present at 1 μM, the maximum rate of free fatty acid synthesis of the FAS exceeded 100 μM/ min. The steady-state turnover frequency was not significantly inhibited at high concentrations of any substrate or cofactor. FAS activity was saturated with respect to most individual protein components when their concentrations exceeded 1 μM. The exceptions were FabI and FabZ, which increased FAS activity up to concentrations of 10 μM; FabH and FabF, which decreased FAS activity at concentrations higher than 1 μM; and holo-ACP and TesA, which gave maximum FAS activity at 30 μM concentrations. Analysis of the S36T mutant of the ACP revealed that the unusual dependence of FAS activity on holo-ACP concentration was due, at least in part, to the acyl-phosphopantetheine moiety. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis of the reaction mixture further revealed medium and long chain fatty acyl-ACP intermediates as predominant ACP species. We speculate that one or more of such intermediates are key allosteric regulators of FAS turnover. Our findings provide a new basis for assessing the scope and limitations of using E. coli as a biocatalyst for the production of diesel-like fuels. PMID:22042840

  16. Analysis of total oil and fatty acids composition by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy in edible nuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandala, Chari V.; Sundaram, Jaya

    2014-10-01

    Near Infrared (NIR) Reflectance spectroscopy has established itself as an important tool in quantifying water and oil present in various food materials. It is rapid and nondestructive, easier to use, and does not require processing the samples with corrosive chemicals that would render them non-edible. Earlier, the samples had to be ground into powder form before making any measurements. With the development of new soft ware packages, NIR techniques could now be used in the analysis of intact grain and nuts. While most of the commercial instruments presently available work well with small grain size materials such as wheat and corn, the method present here is suitable for large kernel size products such as shelled or in-shell peanuts. Absorbance spectra were collected from 400 nm to 2500 nm using a NIR instrument. Average values of total oil contents (TOC) of peanut samples were determined by standard extraction methods, and fatty acids were determined using gas chromatography. Partial least square (PLS) analysis was performed on the calibration set of absorption spectra, and models were developed for prediction of total oil and fatty acids. The best model was selected based on the coefficient of determination (R2), Standard error of prediction (SEP) and residual percent deviation (RPD) values. Peanut samples analyzed showed RPD values greater than 5.0 for both absorbance and reflectance models and thus could be used for quality control and analysis. Ability to rapidly and nondestructively measure the TOC, and analyze the fatty acid composition, will be immensely useful in peanut varietal improvement as well as in the grading process of grain and nuts.

  17. Characterization and analysis of the cotton cyclopropane fatty acid synthase family and their contribution to cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu X. H.; Shanklin J.; Rawat, R.

    2011-05-01

    Cyclopropane fatty acids (CPA) have been found in certain gymnosperms, Malvales, Litchi and other Sapindales. The presence of their unique strained ring structures confers physical and chemical properties characteristic of unsaturated fatty acids with the oxidative stability displayed by saturated fatty acids making them of considerable industrial interest. While cyclopropenoid fatty acids (CPE) are well-known inhibitors of fatty acid desaturation in animals, CPE can also inhibit the stearoyl-CoA desaturase and interfere with the maturation and reproduction of some insect species suggesting that in addition to their traditional role as storage lipids, CPE can contribute to the protection of plants from herbivory. Three genes encoding cyclopropane synthase homologues GhCPS1, GhCPS2 and GhCPS3 were identified in cotton. Determination of gene transcript abundance revealed differences among the expression of GhCPS1, 2 and 3 showing high, intermediate and low levels, respectively, of transcripts in roots and stems; whereas GhCPS1 and 2 are both expressed at low levels in seeds. Analyses of fatty acid composition in different tissues indicate that the expression patterns of GhCPS1 and 2 correlate with cyclic fatty acid (CFA) distribution. Deletion of the N-terminal oxidase domain lowered GhCPS's ability to produce cyclopropane fatty acid by approximately 70%. GhCPS1 and 2, but not 3 resulted in the production of cyclopropane fatty acids upon heterologous expression in yeast, tobacco BY2 cell and Arabidopsis seed. In cotton GhCPS1 and 2 gene expression correlates with the total CFA content in roots, stems and seeds. That GhCPS1 and 2 are expressed at a similar level in seed suggests both of them can be considered potential targets for gene silencing to reduce undesirable seed CPE accumulation. Because GhCPS1 is more active in yeast than the published Sterculia CPS and shows similar activity when expressed in model plant systems, it represents a strong candidate gene for

  18. [Quantitative analysis of seven phenolic acids in eight Yinqiao Jiedu serial preparations by quantitative analysis of multi-components with single-marker].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-jun; Zhang, Li; Guo, Qing; Kou, Jun-ping; Yu, Bo-yang; Gu, Dan-hua

    2015-04-01

    The study aims to develop a unified method to determine seven phenolic acids (neochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid, 4-caffeoylquinic acid, caffeic acid, isochlorogenic acid B, isochlorogenic acid A and isochlorogenic acid C) contained in honeysuckle flower that is the monarch drug of all the eight Yinqiao Jiedu serial preparations using quantitative analysis of multi-components by single-marker (QAMS). Firstly, chlorogenic acid was used as a reference to get the average relative correction factors (RCFs) of the other phenolic acids in ratios to the reference; columns and instruments from different companies were used to validate the durability of the achieved RCFs in different levels of standard solutions; and honeysuckle flower extract was used as the reference substance to fix the positions of chromatographic peaks. Secondly, the contents of seven phenolic acids in eight different Yinqiao Jiedu serial preparations samples were calculated based on the RCFs durability. Finally, the quantitative results were compared between QAMS and the external standard (ES) method. The results have showed that the durability of the achieved RCFs is good (RSD during 0.80% - 2.56%), and there are no differences between the quantitative results of QAMS and ES (the relative average deviation < 0.93%). So it can be successfully used to the quantitative control of honeysuckle flower principally prescribed in Yinqiao Jiedu serial preparations. PMID:26223132

  19. Identifying microbial carbon sources during ethanol and toluene biodegradation in a pilot-scale experimental aquifer system using isotopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, S.; McLeod, H.; Smith, J. E.; Roy, J. W.; Slater, G. F.

    2013-12-01

    Combining ethanol with gasoline has become increasingly common in order to create more environmentally conscience transportation fuels. These blended fuels are favourable alternatives since ethanol is a non-toxic and highly labile renewable biomass-based resource which is an effective fuel oxygenate that reduces air pollution. Recent research however, has indicated that upon accidental release into groundwater systems, the preferential microbial metabolism of ethanol can cause progressively reducing conditions leading to slower biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Therefore, the presence of ethanol can result in greater persistence of BTEX compounds and longer hydrocarbon plumes in groundwater systems. Microbial biodegradation and community carbon sources coupled to aqueous geochemistry were monitored in a pilot-scale laboratory tank (80cm x 525cm x 175cm) simulating an unconfined sand aquifer. Dissolved ethanol and toluene were continuously injected into the aquifer at a controlled rate over 330 days. Carbon isotope analyses were performed on phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) samples collected from 4 different locations along the aquifer. Initial stable carbon isotope values measured over days 160-185 in the bacterial PLFA ranged from δ13C = -10 to -21‰, which is indicative of dominant ethanol incorporation by the micro-organisms based on the isotopic signature of ethanol derived from corn, a C4 plant. A negative shift to δ13C = -10 to -30‰ observed over days 185-200, suggests a change in microbial metabolisms associated with less ethanol incorporation. This generally corresponds to a decrease in ethanol concentrations from day 40 to full attenuation at approximately day 160, and the onset of toluene depletion observed on day 120 and continuing thereafter. In addition, aqueous methane concentrations first detected on day 115 continued to rise to 0.38-0.70 mmol/L at all monitoring locations, demonstrating a significant redox shift to low energy methanogenic

  20. Analysis of the citric acid cycle intermediates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kombu, Rajan S; Brunengraber, Henri; Puchowicz, Michelle A

    2011-01-01

    Researchers view analysis of the citric acid cycle (CAC) intermediates as a metabolomic approach to identifying unexpected correlations between apparently related and unrelated pathways of metabolism. Relationships of the CAC intermediates, as measured by their concentrations and relative ratios, offer useful information to understanding interrelationships between the CAC and metabolic pathways under various physiological and pathological conditions. This chapter presents a relatively simple method that is sensitive for simultaneously measuring concentrations of CAC intermediates (relative and absolute) and other related intermediates of energy metabolism using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  1. Study of the free volume fraction in polylactic acid (PLA) by thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, A.; Benrekaa, N.

    2015-10-01

    The poly (lactic acid) or polylactide (PLA) is a biodegradable polymer with high modulus, strength and thermoplastic properties. In this work, the evolution of various properties of PLA is studied, such as glass transition temperature, mechanical modules and elongation percentage with the aim of investigating the free volume fraction. To do so, two thermal techniques have been used: the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dilatometry. The results obtained by these techniques are combined to go back to the structural properties of the studied material.

  2. Solid-Phase Spectrophotometric Analysis of 1-Naphthol Using Silica Functionalized with m-Diazophenylarsonic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitseva, Nataliya; Alekseev, Sergei; Zaitsev, Vladimir; Raks, Viktoria

    2016-03-01

    The m-aminophenylarsonic acid (m-APAA) was immobilized onto the silica gel surface with covalently grafted quaternary ammonium groups via ion exchange. The diazotization of ion-bonded m-APAA resulted in a new solid-phase spectrophotometric reagent for detection of 1-naphtol in environmental water samples. The procedure of solid-phase spectrophotometric analysis is characterized by 20 μg L-1 limit of detection (LOD) of 1-naphtol, up to 2000 concentration factor, and insensitivity to the presence of natural water components as well as to 30-fold excess of phenol, resorcinol, and catechol.

  3. Acid rain and photochemical oxidants control policies in the European community: A decision analysis framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Sarah; Raymond, Karen; Watson, Stephen; Wenman, Paul

    The methodology and key findings are presented of a study to evaluate costs and benefits of alternative acid rain control strategies to be implemented at a European Community level between 1980 and 2000. The methodology adopted was decision analysis whose key advantage is an explicit consideration of uncertainty. Benefits predicted under some of the control strategies were found to be significantly greater than those predicted for the 'no control' case, particularly for lakes; urban environmental quality was only expected to improve greatly under the strategy that specifically targeted urban emissions; predictions for crops and forests were relatively uncertain due to inadequacies in the measurement and modelling of ozone.

  4. Stereoselective analysis of acid herbicides in natural waters by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Polcaro, C M; Marra, C; Desiderio, C; Fanali, S

    1999-09-01

    A capillary electrophoretic method for the stereoselective analysis of aryloxypropionic and aryloxyphenoxypropionic acidic herbicides in ground water and river water was performed. Vancomycin and gamma-cyclodextrin were added to the background electrolyte (BGE) as chiral selectors. Water sample preconcentration was accomplished by solid-phase extraction on styrene-divinylbenzene packed cartridges (2 L of ground water and 1 L of river water). The analytical method allowed for the resolution of mecoprop, fenoprop, fluazifop and haloxyfop racemic mixtures in natural water samples spiked with enantiomer concentration levels in the range 0.1-0.13 ppb for ground water and 0.4-0.54 ppb for river water.

  5. From Heteroaromatic Acids and Imines to Azaspirocycles: Stereoselective Synthesis and 3D Shape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Sarah J.; Coulthard, Graeme; Unsworth, William P.; O'Brien, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Heteroaromatic carboxylic acids have been directly coupled with imines using propylphosphonic anhydride (T3P) and NEt(iPr)2 to form azaspirocycles via intermediate N‐acyliminium ions. Spirocyclic indolenines (3H‐indoles), azaindolenines, 2H‐pyrroles and 3H‐pyrroles were all accessed using this metal‐free approach. The reactions typically proceed with high diastereoselectivity and 3D shape analysis confirms that the products formed occupy areas of chemical space that are under‐represented in existing drugs and high throughput screening libraries. PMID:26918778

  6. Capillary zone electrophoresis for separation and analysis of hydroxycitric acid and hydroxycitric acid lactone: application to herbal products of Garcinia atroviridis Griff.

    PubMed

    Muensritharam, Laksamee; Tolieng, Vasana; Chaichantipyuth, Chaiyo; Petsom, Amorn; Nhujak, Thumnoon

    2008-02-13

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was developed for quantitative determination of hydroxycitric acid and hydroxycitric acid lactone in herbal products of Garcinia atroviridis Griff. Resolution optimization was investigated by varying type, concentration and pH of buffers. Using the pH 9.2 buffer containing 30 mM Na(2)B(4)O(7), 90 mM NaH(2)PO(4) and 0.5 mM tetradecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, baseline resolution (R(s)>1.5) was found for all analytes. Advantages of the developed CZE method include simple sample preparation, fast analysis time within 5 min and high accuracy and precision. PMID:18160244

  7. A Simple Purification of Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Abscisic Acid for GC-SIM-MS Analysis by Microfiltration of Aqueous Samples through Nylon

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, James R.; Guinn, Gene

    1989-01-01

    A simple procedure was developed for the partial purification of plant tissue samples to be analyzed simultaneously for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA). The procedure relies on removal of contaminants by filtration through nylon and partitioning into dichloromethane. This procedure successfully purified both IAA and ABA from muskmelon, cotton, and broccoli tissue. Twenty individual samples can be purified and methylated in 8 h for analysis of free IAA and ABA with gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring-mass spectrometry. The use of microfiltration of aqueous samples through nylon offers new opportunities for improving the efficiency of existing sample purification procedures. PMID:16666735

  8. Molecular-beacon-based tricomponent probe for SNP analysis in folded nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Camha; Grimes, Jeffrey; Gerasimova, Yulia V; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2011-11-11

    Hybridization probes are often inefficient in the analysis of single-stranded DNA or RNA that are folded in stable secondary structures. A molecular beacon (MB) probe is a short DNA hairpin with a fluorophore and a quencher attached to opposite sides of the oligonucleotide. The probe is widely used in real-time analysis of specific DNA and RNA sequences. This study demonstrates how a conventional MB probe can be used for the analysis of nucleic acids that form very stable (T(m) > 80 °C) hairpin structures. Here we demonstrate that the MB probe is not efficient in direct analysis of secondary structure-folded analytes, whereas a MB-based tricomponent probe is suitable for these purposes. The tricomponent probe takes advantage of two oligonucleotide adaptor strands f and m. Each adaptor strand contains a fragment complementary to the analyte and a fragment complementary to a MB probe. In the presence of a specific analyte, the two adaptor strands hybridize to the analyte and the MB probe, thus forming a quadripartite complex. DNA strand f binds to the analyte with high affinity and unwinds its secondary structure. Strand m forms a stable complex only with the fully complementary analyte. The MB probe fluorescently reports the formation of the quadripartite associate. It was demonstrated that the DNA analytes folded in hairpin structures with stems containing 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, or 13 base pairs can be detected in real time with the limit of detection (LOD) lying in the nanomolar range. The stability of the stem region in the DNA analyte did not affect the LOD. Analytes containing single base substitutions in the stem or in the loop positions were discriminated from the fully complementary DNA at room temperature. The tricomponent probe promises to simplify nucleic acid analysis at ambient temperatures in such applications as in vivo RNA monitoring, detection of pathogens, and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping by DNA microarrays.

  9. Lab-on-a-chip Strategies for the Analysis of Amino Acids in Mars Analogue Extract Liquid Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Maria; Bryant, S.; Greer, F.; Fisher, A.; Willis, P.

    2010-10-01

    Amino acids, as the building blocks of proteins, are essential molecules for life on Earth. Terrestrial organisms synthesize and utilize almost exclusively L amino acids. However, amino acids can also be also synthesized by non-biological means. In order to determine the origin of an amino acid mixture it is necessary to analyze the D/L ratio. Under abiotic conditions, amino acids are made as racemic mixtures while in biological systems one chiral form prevails over the other. This characteristic of amino acids makes them the preferred biomarkers in the search for extraterrestrial life in Mars. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a popular technique that has been widely used for the analysis of amino acids. Capillary electrophoresis provides highly efficient separations with short analysis times and minimum sample consumption. In addition, CE can be miniaturized to portable devices (Lab-on-a-chip) that allow us to take the lab to the sample. These characteristics make CE an ideal technique for space exploration applications. In this regard, we have developed a lab-on-a-chip system capable of performing automated labeling, mixing, dilution, and analysis of amino acids by capillary electrophoresis and fluorescence detection. This device allows nanomolar detection of amino acids in aqueous samples. In addition, we are also testing monolithic columns packed inside microfluidic channels to perform chiral separations on amino acids by capillary electrochromatography (CEC). CEC is a hybrid technique combining the best aspects of liquid chromatography (LC) and capillary electrophoresis. These columns will later be incorporated into the automated device to perform a complete analysis of Mars analogue samples.

  10. Accurate analysis of taurine, anserine, carnosine and free amino acids in a cattle muscle biopsy sample.

    PubMed

    Imanari, Mai; Higuchi, Mikito; Shiba, Nobuya; Watanabe, Akira

    2010-06-01

    We have established an analysis method for some free amino acids (FAAs), as well as taurine (Tau), anserine (Ans) and carnosine (Car), in a fresh biopsy sample from cattle muscle. A series of model biopsy samples, corresponding to the mixtures of lean meat, fat and connective tissue, was prepared and showed high correlation coefficients between the compound concentration and the 3-methylhistidine (3-MeHis) content derived from hydrolysis of the biopsy sample (r = 0.74-0.95, P < 0.01). Interference from blood contamination could not be neglected, because the concentration of some FAAs in blood was comparable to that in muscle. However, it was possible to control the contamination of Tau, Ans, Car, glutamic acid, glutamine, asparatic acid and alanine to less than 5.0% when the blood contamination was controlled to less than 23%.These results suggest the necessity of measuring 3-MeHis as an index of lean meat and hemoglobin as an index of blood contamination when compounds in muscle biopsy samples are evaluated. We have carried out a series of these analyses using one biopsy sample and reveal differences in Tau, Ans, Car and some FAAs in beef muscle after different feeding regimes.

  11. Development of Rapid Identification and Risk Analysis of Moniliella Spp. in Acidic Processed Foods.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Motokazu; Hosoya, Kouichi; Shimizu-Imanishi, Yumi; Chibana, Hiroji; Yaguchi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The number of spoilage incidents in the food industry attributable to a species of the genus Moniliella has recently increased, but the risk of food spoilage has not yet been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to rapidly identify high-risk species and to conduct a risk analysis study of Moniliella spp. Acetic acid resistance of M. acetoabutens and ethanol resistance of M. suaveolens were higher than for other Moniliella species. All examined strains of M. acetoabutens developed a high tolerance to acetic acid by being cultured twice in liquid media containing low concentrations of acetic acid. These findings indicate that M. acetoabutens and M. suaveolens are high-risk species for food spoilage and must be discriminated from other fungi. We developed species-specific primers to identify M. acetoabutens and M. suaveolens using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify the D1/D2 domain of 28S rDNA. The PCR using the primer sets designed for M. acetoabutens (Mac_F1/R1) and M. suaveolens (Msu_F1/R1) was specific to the target species and did not detect other fungi involved in food spoilage or environmental contamination. This method is expected to be effective for the monitoring of raw materials and components of the food production process. PMID:27350425

  12. A novel method for the quantification of quinic acid in food using stable isotope dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Erk, Thomas; Bergmann, Hannah; Richling, Elke

    2009-01-01

    Organic acids play an important role in the flavor and taste of plant-derived foods. Quinic acid (QA) is one of the major acids. In the past, several methods like HPLC/UV, GC, and capillary electrophoresis were used for identification and quantification of QA. For the first time, a novel, sensitive, and selective method for the quantification of QA in food using stable isotope dilution analysis with HPLC/MS/MS has been established. Uniformly labeled 13C-QA was used as a standard to reduce sample preparations and to overcome matrix and ionization effects. The method was used to determine the QA content of red wines, instant coffees, and cloudy apple juices. QA contents of instant coffees were 64.4 and 63.6 g/kg powder. The concentrations in red wines were 24.0 and 25.1 mg/L, and 1493.3 and 1705.2 mg/L in cloudy apple juices.

  13. Development of Rapid Identification and Risk Analysis of Moniliella Spp. in Acidic Processed Foods.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Motokazu; Hosoya, Kouichi; Shimizu-Imanishi, Yumi; Chibana, Hiroji; Yaguchi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The number of spoilage incidents in the food industry attributable to a species of the genus Moniliella has recently increased, but the risk of food spoilage has not yet been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to rapidly identify high-risk species and to conduct a risk analysis study of Moniliella spp. Acetic acid resistance of M. acetoabutens and ethanol resistance of M. suaveolens were higher than for other Moniliella species. All examined strains of M. acetoabutens developed a high tolerance to acetic acid by being cultured twice in liquid media containing low concentrations of acetic acid. These findings indicate that M. acetoabutens and M. suaveolens are high-risk species for food spoilage and must be discriminated from other fungi. We developed species-specific primers to identify M. acetoabutens and M. suaveolens using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify the D1/D2 domain of 28S rDNA. The PCR using the primer sets designed for M. acetoabutens (Mac_F1/R1) and M. suaveolens (Msu_F1/R1) was specific to the target species and did not detect other fungi involved in food spoilage or environmental contamination. This method is expected to be effective for the monitoring of raw materials and components of the food production process.

  14. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of purple acid phosphatase gene from pearl oyster Pinctada martensii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q H; Jiao, Y; Du, X D; Zhao, X X; Huang, R L; Deng, Y W; Yan, F

    2015-01-01

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs), also known as type 5 acid phosphatases, are widely present in animals, plants, and fungi. In mammal, PAP was reported to participate in immune defense and bone resorption. In this study, the characteristics and potential functions of a PAP gene from pearl oyster Pinctada martensii (pm-PAP) were examined. The Pm-PAP cDNA was found to be 2777 base pairs, containing a 1581-base pair open reading fragment encoding for 526 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 60.1 kDa and theoretical isoelectric point of 5.82. One signal peptide and five conserved motifs [GDXX/GDXXY/GNH(D/E)/XXXH/(A/G)HXH] were present in the entire sequence. Tissue expression profile analysis showed that pm-PAP mRNA was constitutively expressed in all tissues studied with abundant mRNA found in mollusk defense system, including hepatopancreas, gill, and hemocytes. After lipopolysaccharide stimulation, the expression of pm-PAP mRNA in hemocytes was dramatically upregulated at 2 h and achieved the highest level at 36 h. Additionally, pm-PAP mRNA expression was significantly increased and achieved the highest level at 2 days after the surgical implantation during pearl production. These results suggest that pm-PAP is a constitutive and inducible protein that may be involved in the immune defense of pearl oyster. PMID:25729991

  15. A Δ-9 Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene in the Microalga Myrmecia incisa Reisigl: Cloning and Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen-Bin; Liu, Fan; Sun, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    The green alga Myrmecia incisa is one of the richest natural sources of arachidonic acid (ArA). To better understand the regulation of ArA biosynthesis in M. incisa, a novel gene putatively encoding the Δ9 fatty acid desaturase (FAD) was cloned and characterized for the first time. Rapid-amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was employed to yield a full length cDNA designated as MiΔ9FAD, which is 2442 bp long in sequence. Comparing cDNA open reading frame (ORF) sequence to genomic sequence indicated that there are 8 introns interrupting the coding region. The deduced MiΔ9FAD protein is composed of 432 amino acids. It is soluble and localized in the chloroplast, as evidenced by the absence of transmembrane domains as well as the presence of a 61-amino acid chloroplast transit peptide. Multiple sequence alignment of amino acids revealed two conserved histidine-rich motifs, typical for Δ9 acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases. To determine the function of MiΔ9FAD, the gene was heterologously expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain with impaired desaturase activity. Results of GC-MS analysis indicated that MiΔ9FAD was able to restore the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids, generating palmitoleic acid and oleic acid through the addition of a double bond in the Δ9 position of palmitic acid and stearic acid, respectively. PMID:27438826

  16. A Δ-9 Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene in the Microalga Myrmecia incisa Reisigl: Cloning and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen-Bin; Liu, Fan; Sun, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    The green alga Myrmecia incisa is one of the richest natural sources of arachidonic acid (ArA). To better understand the regulation of ArA biosynthesis in M. incisa, a novel gene putatively encoding the Δ9 fatty acid desaturase (FAD) was cloned and characterized for the first time. Rapid-amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was employed to yield a full length cDNA designated as MiΔ9FAD, which is 2442 bp long in sequence. Comparing cDNA open reading frame (ORF) sequence to genomic sequence indicated that there are 8 introns interrupting the coding region. The deduced MiΔ9FAD protein is composed of 432 amino acids. It is soluble and localized in the chloroplast, as evidenced by the absence of transmembrane domains as well as the presence of a 61-amino acid chloroplast transit peptide. Multiple sequence alignment of amino acids revealed two conserved histidine-rich motifs, typical for Δ9 acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases. To determine the function of MiΔ9FAD, the gene was heterologously expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain with impaired desaturase activity. Results of GC-MS analysis indicated that MiΔ9FAD was able to restore the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids, generating palmitoleic acid and oleic acid through the addition of a double bond in the Δ9 position of palmitic acid and stearic acid, respectively. PMID:27438826

  17. Distance measures and optimization spaces in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis.

    PubMed

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F; Rode, Karyn D; Budge, Suzanne M; Thiemann, Gregory W

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis has become an important method of diet estimation in ecology, especially marine ecology. Controlled feeding trials to validate the method and estimate the calibration coefficients necessary to account for differential metabolism of individual fatty acids have been conducted with several species from diverse taxa. However, research into potential refinements of the estimation method has been limited. We compared the performance of the original method of estimating diet composition with that of five variants based on different combinations of distance measures and calibration-coefficient transformations between prey and predator fatty acid signature spaces. Fatty acid signatures of pseudopredators were constructed using known diet mixtures of two prey data sets previously used to estimate the diets of polar bears Ursus maritimus and gray seals Halichoerus grypus, and their diets were then estimated using all six variants. In addition, previously published diets of Chukchi Sea polar bears were re-estimated using all six methods. Our findings reveal that the selection of an estimation method can meaningfully influence estimates of diet composition. Among the pseudopredator results, which allowed evaluation of bias and precision, differences in estimator performance were rarely large, and no one estimator was universally preferred, although estimators based on the Aitchison distance measure tended to have modestly superior properties compared to estimators based on the Kullback-Leibler distance measure. However, greater differences were observed among estimated polar bear diets, most likely due to differential estimator sensitivity to assumption violations. Our results, particularly the polar bear example, suggest that additional research into estimator performance and model diagnostics is warranted. PMID:25859330

  18. An analysis of the meteorological parameters affecting ambient concentrations of acid aerosols in Uniontown, Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenka, Michael P.

    Ambient concentrations of aerosol strong acidity (H +) that were collected in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, during the summer of 1990 were evaluated to determine the relationships between meteorology and the magnitude of the H + concentrations. An extensive database containing 17 meteorological parameters was compiled for the Uniontown - Pittsburgh region. The database included both surface and upper air meteorological parameters. Concentrations of ambient acid sulfate aerosols collected in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in the summer of 1990 were greatly affected by both local and regional meteorological conditions. Seven distinct meteorological synoptic types or regimes were identified for the summer months. A clear association was shown between episodic events of elevated ambient H + concentrations and one of the regimes, referred to here as synoptic type 5, which occurred when an anticyclone set up to the east of the mid-Atlantic states. Much of the variability (approximately 45%) in H + concentrations for the overall model was explained by the surface air temperature. Approximately 10% of the H' variability was explained by westerly winds as expressed by the U components of the morning 850 mb wind and the mean daily surface wind at Uniontown. Results showed that for days under the influence of synoptic type 5, which was associated with the highest levels of ambient H', the surface temperature explained approximately one-third of the variability in H' concentrations. The height of the mixing layer also affected the variability in H + concentrations, accounting for nearly a quarter of the variance. These results show that an analysis of the surface wind speed and direction alone will not adequately explain the variability in the concentrations of ambient acid aerosols. Analyses of the meteorological parameters affecting ambient concentrations of acid aerosols should include the mixing height, as well as the temperature, wind speed, and wind direction; both at the surface

  19. Distance measures and optimization spaces in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.; Rode, Karyn D.; Budge, Suzanne M.; Thiemann, Gregory W.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis has become an important method of diet estimation in ecology, especially marine ecology. Controlled feeding trials to validate the method and estimate the calibration coefficients necessary to account for differential metabolism of individual fatty acids have been conducted with several species from diverse taxa. However, research into potential refinements of the estimation method has been limited. We compared the performance of the original method of estimating diet composition with that of five variants based on different combinations of distance measures and calibration-coefficient transformations between prey and predator fatty acid signature spaces. Fatty acid signatures of pseudopredators were constructed using known diet mixtures of two prey data sets previously used to estimate the diets of polar bears Ursus maritimus and gray seals Halichoerus grypus, and their diets were then estimated using all six variants. In addition, previously published diets of Chukchi Sea polar bears were re-estimated using all six methods. Our findings reveal that the selection of an estimation method can meaningfully influence estimates of diet composition. Among the pseudopredator results, which allowed evaluation of bias and precision, differences in estimator performance were rarely large, and no one estimator was universally preferred, although estimators based on the Aitchison distance measure tended to have modestly superior properties compared to estimators based on the Kullback-Leibler distance measure. However, greater differences were observed among estimated polar bear diets, most likely due to differential estimator sensitivity to assumption violations. Our results, particularly the polar bear example, suggest that additional research into estimator performance and model diagnostics is warranted.

  20. A Statistical Analysis of the PPII Propensity of Amino Acid Guests in Proline-Rich Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Babin, Volodymyr; Sagui, Celeste; Roland, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    There has been considerable debate about the intrinsic PPII propensity of amino-acid residues in denatured polypeptides. Experimentally, the propensity scale is based on the behavior of guest amino-acid residues placed in the middle of polyproline hosts. We have used classical molecular dynamics simulations, with state-of-the-art force fields to carry out a comprehensive analysis of the conformational equilibria of the proline-based host oligopeptides with single guests. The tracked structural characteristics include the PPII content, the cis/trans isomerization of the prolyl bonds, the puckering of the pyrrolidine rings of the proline residues, and the secondary structural motifs. We find no evidence for an intrinsic PPII propensity in any of the guest amino acids other than proline. Instead, the PPII content as derived from experiments may be explained in terms of: 1), a local correlation between the dihedral angles of the guest amino acid and the proline residue immediately preceding it; and 2), a nonlocal correlation between the cis/trans states of the peptide bonds. In terms of the latter, we find that the presence of a guest (other than proline, tyrosine, or tryptophan) increases the trans content of most of the prolyl bonds, which results in an effective increase of the peptide PPII content. With respect to the local dihedral correlations, we find that these are well described in terms of the so-called odds-ratio statistic. Expressed in terms of free energy language, the PPII content based on the odds-ratio of the relevant residues correlate well with the experimentally measured PPII content. PMID:21320454

  1. Effects of acids used in the microabrasion technique: Microhardness and confocal microscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Núbia-Inocencya-Pavesi; Ambrosano, Gláucia-Maria-Bovi; da Silva, Wander-José; Aguiar, Flávio-Henrique-Baggio; Lovadino, José-Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the effects of the acids used in the microabrasion on enamel. Material and Methods Seventy enamel/dentine blocks (25 mm2) of bovine incisors were divided into 7 groups (n=10). Experimental groups were treated by active/passive application of 35% H3PO4 (E1/E2) or 6.6% HCl (E3/E4). Control groups were treated by microabrasion with H3PO4+pumice (C5), HCl+silica (C6), or no treatment (C7). The superficial (SMH) and cross-sectional (CSMH; depths of 10, 25, 50, and 75 µm) microhardness of enamel were analyzed. Morphology was evaluated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM). Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (Proc Mixed), Tukey, and Dunnet tests (α=5%). Results Active application (E1 and E3) resulted in higher microhardness than passive application (E2 and E4), with no difference between acids. For most groups, the CSMH decreased as the depth increased. All experimental groups and negative controls (C5 and C6) showed significantly reduced CSMH values compared to the control. A significantly higher mean CSMH result was obtained with the active application of H3PO4 (E1) compared to HCl (E3). Passive application did not result in CSMH differences between acids. CLSM revealed the conditioning pattern for each group. Conclusions Although the acids displayed an erosive action, use of microabrasive mixture led to less damage to the enamel layers. Key words:Enamel microabrasion, enamel microhardness, confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:26535098

  2. Distance measures and optimization spaces in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F; Rode, Karyn D; Budge, Suzanne M; Thiemann, Gregory W

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis has become an important method of diet estimation in ecology, especially marine ecology. Controlled feeding trials to validate the method and estimate the calibration coefficients necessary to account for differential metabolism of individual fatty acids have been conducted with several species from diverse taxa. However, research into potential refinements of the estimation method has been limited. We compared the performance of the original method of estimating diet composition with that of five variants based on different combinations of distance measures and calibration-coefficient transformations between prey and predator fatty acid signature spaces. Fatty acid signatures of pseudopredators were constructed using known diet mixtures of two prey data sets previously used to estimate the diets of polar bears Ursus maritimus and gray seals Halichoerus grypus, and their diets were then estimated using all six variants. In addition, previously published diets of Chukchi Sea polar bears were re-estimated using all six methods. Our findings reveal that the selection of an estimation method can meaningfully influence estimates of diet composition. Among the pseudopredator results, which allowed evaluation of bias and precision, differences in estimator performance were rarely large, and no one estimator was universally preferred, although estimators based on the Aitchison distance measure tended to have modestly superior properties compared to estimators based on the Kullback–Leibler distance measure. However, greater differences were observed among estimated polar bear diets, most likely due to differential estimator sensitivity to assumption violations. Our results, particularly the polar bear example, suggest that additional research into estimator performance and model diagnostics is warranted. PMID:25859330

  3. Quantitative, Time-Resolved Proteomic Analysis by Combining Bioorthogonal Noncanonical Amino Acid Tagging and Pulsed Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture*

    PubMed Central

    Bagert, John D.; Xie, Yushu J.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Qi, Yutao; Hess, Sonja; Schuman, Erin M.; Tirrell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    An approach to proteomic analysis that combines bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT) and pulsed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (pSILAC) provides accurate quantitative information about rates of cellular protein synthesis on time scales of minutes. The method is capable of quantifying 1400 proteins produced by HeLa cells during a 30 min interval, a time scale that is inaccessible to isotope labeling techniques alone. Potential artifacts in protein quantification can be reduced to insignificant levels by limiting the extent of noncanonical amino acid tagging. We find no evidence for artifacts in protein identification in experiments that combine the BONCAT and pSILAC methods. PMID:24563536

  4. Evaluation of ionic pollutants of acid fog and rain using a factor analysis and back trajectories.

    PubMed

    Adzuhata, T; Inotsume, J; Okamura, T; Kikuchi, R; Ozeki, T; Kajikawa, M; Ogawa, N

    2001-01-01

    Fog and rain water samples were collected at the same time in the Akita Hachimantai mountain range in northern Japan from June to September in 1998 and 1999. The various ion concentrations in these samples were analyzed, and the fog droplet sizes were measured for each fog event. As the fog droplet size increased, the ion concentration decreased. The slope of log-log plots of the concentration versus the droplet size differed with the kind of ion. In order to characterize the air pollutant, moreover, these data were quantitatively analyzed by an oblique rotational factor analysis. We found that three factors were extracted as the air pollutant source: (NH4)2SO4, acids (HNO3 + H2SO4) and sea-salt. Combining the factor analysis with the 72 h back-trajectory at 850 hPa level, we found that the contribution of each factor varied with the transport pattern of air masses.

  5. Evaluation of ionic pollutants of acid fog and rain using a factor analysis and back trajectories.

    PubMed

    Adzuhata, T; Inotsume, J; Okamura, T; Kikuchi, R; Ozeki, T; Kajikawa, M; Ogawa, N

    2001-01-01

    Fog and rain water samples were collected at the same time in the Akita Hachimantai mountain range in northern Japan from June to September in 1998 and 1999. The various ion concentrations in these samples were analyzed, and the fog droplet sizes were measured for each fog event. As the fog droplet size increased, the ion concentration decreased. The slope of log-log plots of the concentration versus the droplet size differed with the kind of ion. In order to characterize the air pollutant, moreover, these data were quantitatively analyzed by an oblique rotational factor analysis. We found that three factors were extracted as the air pollutant source: (NH4)2SO4, acids (HNO3 + H2SO4) and sea-salt. Combining the factor analysis with the 72 h back-trajectory at 850 hPa level, we found that the contribution of each factor varied with the transport pattern of air masses. PMID:11993680

  6. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) for alcoholism: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Teri S; Johansen, Pål-Ørjan

    2012-07-01

    Assessments of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in the treatment of alcoholism have not been based on quantitative meta-analysis. Hence, we performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in order to evaluate the clinical efficacy of LSD in the treatment of alcoholism. Two reviewers independently extracted the data, pooling the effects using odds ratios (ORs) by a generic inverse variance, random effects model. We identified six eligible trials, including 536 participants. There was evidence for a beneficial effect of LSD on alcohol misuse (OR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.36-2.84; p = 0.0003). Between-trial heterogeneity for the treatment effects was negligible (I² = 0%). Secondary outcomes, risk of bias and limitations are discussed. A single dose of LSD, in the context of various alcoholism treatment programs, is associated with a decrease in alcohol misuse.

  7. MEGA-MD: molecular evolutionary genetics analysis software with mutational diagnosis of amino acid variation.

    PubMed

    Stecher, Glen; Liu, Li; Sanderford, Maxwell; Peterson, Daniel; Tamura, Koichiro; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-05-01

    Computational diagnosis of amino acid variants in the human exome is the first step in assessing the disruptive impacts of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs) on human health and disease. The Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis software with mutational diagnosis (MEGA-MD) is a suite of tools developed to forecast the deleteriousness of nsSNVs using multiple methods and to explore nsSNVs in the context of the variability permitted in the long-term evolution of the affected position. In its graphical interface for use on desktops, it enables interactive computational diagnosis and evolutionary exploration of nsSNVs. As a web service, MEGA-MD is suitable for diagnosing variants on an exome scale. The MEGA-MD suite intends to serve the needs for conducting low- and high-throughput analysis of nsSNVs in diverse applications.

  8. Metabolomic analysis reveals decreased skeletal muscle amino acid content and altered fatty acid handling in obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Koves, Timothy R.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Houmard, Joseph A.; Friedman, Jacob E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Investigate the effects of obesity and high fat diet (HFD) exposure on fatty acid oxidation and TCA cycle intermediates and amino acids in skeletal muscle to better characterize energy metabolism. Design and Methods Plasma and skeletal muscle metabolomic profiles were measured from lean and obese males before and after a 5 day HFD in the 4h post-prandial condition. Results At both time points, plasma short-chain acylcarnitine species (SCAC) were higher in the obese subjects, while the amino acids glycine, histidine, methionine, and citrulline were lower in skeletal muscle of obese subjects. Skeletal muscle medium-chain acylcarnitines (MCAC) C6, C8, C10:2, C10:1, C10, and C12:1 increased in obese subjects, but decreased in lean subjects, from Pre- to Post-HFD. Plasma content of C10:1 was also decreased in lean, but increased in the obese subjects from Pre- to Post-HFD. CD36 increased from Pre- to Post-HFD in obese but not lean subjects. Conclusions Lower skeletal muscle amino acid content and accumulation of plasma SCAC in obese subjects could reflect increased anaplerosis for TCA cycle intermediates, while accumulation of MCAC suggests limitations in β-oxidation. These measures may be important markers of or contributors to dysregulated metabolism observed in skeletal muscle of obese humans. PMID:25864501

  9. Isolation and structural analysis of the cyclic fatty acid monomers formed from eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids during fish oil deodorization.

    PubMed

    Berdeaux, Olivier; Fournier, Véronique; Lambelet, Pierre; Dionisi, Fabiola; Sébédio, Jean Louis; Destaillats, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) present in fish oils are thermolabile molecules. Among the degradation reactions encountered, thermal cyclization occurs during refining or other heat treatments. Numerous studies have been carried out in the past to quantify and determine the structures of cyclic fatty acid monomers (CFAMs) formed from oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids in heated vegetable oils. Recently, much attention have been given to LC-PUFAs due to their potential health benefits. However, data on quantification of CFAMs formed from these fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, cis-5, cis-8, cis-11, cis-14, cis-17 20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, cis-4, cis-7, cis-10, cis-13, cis-16, cis-19 22:6), the two main LC-PUFAs in fish oils, are scarce. In the present study, structural analyses of CFAMs formed from EPA and DHA during the deodorization of fish oil are presented. Fish oil sample was deodorized at 250 degrees C for 3 h under a pressure of 1.5 mbar in a laboratory deodorizer. The CFAMs formed during heat treatment of fish oil were isolated by a combination of saponification, esterification, urea fractionations and column chromatography. Structural analyses of C20- and C22-CFAMs were achieved by gas-chromatography electronic-ionization mass-spectrometry (GC-EI-MS) of their 4,4-dimethyloxazoline (DMOX) derivatives. We identified seven out of 13 possible structures of hydrogenated CFAMs formed from EPA, and nine out of 16 possible structures of CFAM formed from DHA. Major CFAMs from both EPA and DHA were cyclohexyl isomers. All possible cyclohexyl isomers were found but only nine out of 18 of the cyclopentyl isomers were present in concentration sufficient for identification. Chemical mechanisms involved in the formation of polyunsaturated LC-PUFAs have been investigated. The results have shown that general principle involved in the cyclization of LC-PUFAs is same as that for the thermal cyclization of oleic, linoleic and alpha

  10. Toxicogenomic analysis of the hepatic effects of perfluorooctanoic acid on rare minnows (Gobiocypris rarus)

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Yanhong; Liu Yang; Wang Jianshe; Tao Yi; Dai Jiayin

    2008-02-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that has been detected in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms. To assess the effects of PFOA in fish and predict its potential mode of action, a toxicogenomic approach was applied to hepatic gene expression profile analysis in male and female rare minnows (Gobiocypris rarus) using a custom cDNA microarray containing 1773 unique genes. Rare minnows were treated with continuous flow-through exposure to PFOA at concentrations of 3, 10, and 30 mg/L for 28 days. Based on the observed histopathological changes, the livers from fish exposed to 10 mg/L PFOA were selected for further hepatic gene expression analysis. While 124 and 171 genes were significantly altered by PFOA in males and females, respectively, of which 43 genes were commonly regulated in both sexes. The affected genes are involved in multiple biological processes, including lipid metabolism and transport, hormone action, immune responses, and mitochondrial functions. PFOA exposure significantly suppressed genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and transport but induced genes associated with intracellular trafficking of cholesterol. Alterations in expression of genes associated with mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation were only observed in female rare minnows. In addition, PFOA inhibited genes responsible for thyroid hormone biosynthesis and significantly induced estrogen-responsive genes. These findings implicate PFOA in endocrine disruption. This work contributes not only to the elucidation of the potential mode of toxicity of PFOA to aquatic organisms but also to the use of toxicogenomic approaches to address issues in environmental toxicology.

  11. KINEMATIC VARIABLES AND BLOOD ACID-BASE STATUS IN THE ANALYSIS OF COLLEGIATE SWIMMERS’ ANAEROBIC CAPACITY

    PubMed Central

    Bielec, G.; Makar, P.; Laskowski, R.

    2013-01-01

    Short duration repeated maximal efforts are often used in swimming training to improve lactate tolerance, which gives swimmers the ability to maintain a high work rate for a longer period of time. The aim of the study was to examine the kinematics of swimming and its relation to the changes in blood acid-base status and potassium level. Seven collegiate swimmers, with at least 6 years of training experience, volunteered to participate in the study. The test consisted of 8 x 25 m front crawl performed with maximum effort. The rest period between repetitions was set to five seconds. Blood samples were taken from the fingertip at rest, after warm-up and in the 3rd minute after completion of the test. The swimming was recorded with a video recorder, for later analysis of time, velocity and technique (stroke index). Based on the swimming velocity results, the obtained curve can be divided into rapid decrease of velocity and relatively stable velocities. The breaking point of repetition in swimming velocity was assumed as the swimming velocity threshold and it was highly correlated with the decrease of the blood acid-base status (pH r=0.82, BE r=0.87, HCO3 - r=0.76; p<0.05 in all cases). There was no correlation between stroke index or fatigue index and blood acid-base status. Analysis of the swimming speed in the 8 x 25 m test seems to be helpful in evaluation of lactate tolerance (anaerobic capacity) in collegiate swimmers. PMID:24744491

  12. Influence of the derivatization procedure on the results of the gaschromatographic fatty acid analysis of human milk and infant formulae.

    PubMed

    Kohn, G; van der Ploeg, P; Möbius, M; Sawatzki, G

    1996-09-01

    Many different analytical procedures for fatty acid analysis of infant formulae and human milk are described. The objective was to study possible pitfalls in the use of different acid-catalyzed procedures compared to a base-catalyzed procedure based on sodium-methoxide in methanol. The influence of the different methods on the relative fatty acid composition (wt% of total fatty acids) and the total fatty acid recovery rate (expressed as % of total lipids) was studied in two experimental LCP-containing formulae and a human milk sample. MeOH/HCl-procedures were found to result in an incomplete transesterification of triglycerides, if an additional nonpolar solvent like toluene or hexane is not added and a water-free preparation is not guaranteed. In infant formulae the low transesterification of triglycerides (up to only 37%) could result in an 100%-overestimation of the relative amount of LCP, if these fatty acids primarily derive from phospholipids. This is the case in infant formulae containing egg lipids as raw materials. In formula containing fish oils and in human milk the efficacy of esterification results in incorrect absolute amounts of fatty acids, but has no remarkable effect on the relative fatty acid distribution. This is due to the fact that in these samples LCP are primarily bound to triglycerides. Furthermore, in formulae based on butterfat the derivatization procedure should be designed in such a way that losses of short-chain fatty acids due to evaporation steps can be avoided. The procedure based on sodium methoxide was found to result in a satisfactory (about 90%) conversion of formula lipids and a reliable content of all individual fatty acids. Due to a possibly high amount of free fatty acids in human milk, which are not methylated by sodium-methoxide, caution is expressed about the use of this reagent for fatty acid analysis of mothers milk. It is concluded that accurate fatty acid analysis of infant formulae and human milk requires a careful

  13. An air-pressure-free elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Wooseok; Barrett, Matthew; Brooks, Carla; Rivera, Andrew; Birdsell, Dawn N.; Wagner, David M.; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2015-12-01

    We present a new elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis. The valve functions include metering to capture a designated volume of biological sample into a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber, sealing to preserve the sample during PCR cycling, and transfer of the PCR-products and on-chip formamide post-processing for the analysis of DNA fragments by capillary gel electrophoresis. This new valve differs from prior art polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) valves in that the valve is not actuated externally by air-pressure or vacuum so that it simplifies a DNA analysis system by eliminating the need for an air-pressure or vacuum source, and off-cartridge solenoid valves, control circuit boards and software. Instead, the new valve is actuated by a thermal cycling peltier assembly integrated within the hardware instrument that tightly comes in contact with a microfluidic cartridge for thermal activation during PCR, so that it spontaneously closes the valve without an additional actuator system. The valve has bumps in the designated locations so that it has a self-alignment that does not require precise alignment of a valve actuator. Moreover, the thickness of the new valve is around 600 μm with an additional bump height of 400 μm so that it is easy to handle and very feasible to fabricate by injection molding compared to other PDMS valves whose thicknesses are around 30-100 μm. The new valve provided over 95% of metering performance in filling the fixed volume of the PCR chamber, preserved over 97% of the sample volume during PCR, and showed very comparable capillary electrophoresis peak heights to the benchtop assay tube controls with very consistent transfer volume of the PCR-product and on-chip formamide. The new valve can perform a core function for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

  14. Rapid Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Cell Wall Teichoic Acid Carbohydrates by ESI-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Eugster, Marcel R.; Loessner, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    We report the application of electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry for compositional characterization of wall teichoic acids (WTA), a major component of Gram-positive bacterial cell walls. Tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) of purified and chemically hydrolyzed monomeric WTA components provided sufficient information to identify WTA monomers and their specific carbohydrate constituents. A lithium matrix was used for ionization of uncharged WTA monomers, and successfully applied to analyze the WTA molecules of four Listeria strains differing in carbohydrate substitution on a conserved polyribitol-phosphate backbone structure. Carbohydrate residues such as N-acetylglucosamine or rhamnose linked to the WTA could directly be identified by ESI-MS/MS, circumventing the need for quantitative analysis by gas chromatography. The presence of a terminal N-acetylglucosamine residue tethered to the ribitol was confirmed using fluorescently labeled wheat-germ agglutinin. In conclusion, the mass spectrometry method described here will greatly facilitate compositional analysis and characterization of teichoic acids and similar macromolecules from diverse bacterial species, and represents a significant advance in the identification of serovar-specific carbohydrates and sugar molecules on bacteria. PMID:21738682

  15. Variability analysis of 'Persian' acid lime tree selections using agronomic and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Santos, M G; Passos, O S; Soares Filho, W S; Girardi, E A; Gesteira, A S; Ferreira, C F

    2013-01-01

    'Persian' acid lime (PAL) is the most important triploid commercial citrus crop planted in the world. Little is known about the genetic variability of the selections used in Brazil. Therefore, 25 genotypes originating from the PAL, and three control species, Citrus sunki, C. limon, and C. aurantiifolia, were assessed using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP) molecular markers and agronomic traits of the fruit. The dendrograms were designed using the mean Euclidean distance for the physicochemical attributes of the fruit (weight, length, diameter, peel color, peel thickness, number of seeds, juice yield, titratable acidity, soluble solids, and ratio) and the Jaccard distances using the data from the ISSR and IRAP molecular markers. In the physicochemical analysis, the genotypes were grouped according to species. The trait that contributed most to the diversity among accessions was the number of seeds. The 17 ISSR primers produced 69 polymorphic bands in the molecular analysis, and the seven IRAP primers generated 30 polymorphic bands. The markers detected polymorphisms within and among the PALs; two groups were formed within the PALs. PMID:24222236

  16. Detection of milk fat adulteration by linear discriminant analysis of fatty acid data.

    PubMed

    Ulberth, F

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of the fatty acid (FA) profile of milk fat (MF) by gas-liquid chromatography is widely used to detect adulteration with foreign fats. On the basis of the FA spectra of 352 genuine Austrian MF samples collected over a 4-year period, the effectiveness of concentration ranges of the major FA of MF and of certain FA ratios to identify non-MF/MF mixtures was tested. FA ratios proved useful for the detection of coconut fat in MF and admixture of vegetable oils rich in linoleic acid down to a level of 2%. This approach failed to identify non-MF/MF blends containing beef tallow, lard, olive oil, or palm oil at a level less than 10% commingling. Linear discriminant analysis applied to FA data was successful in distinguishing pure MF from adulterated MF. Computer-simulated data were used to derive the discriminant functions. Saturated and unsaturated FA with 18 C atoms were the most useful discriminating variables selected by a stepwise variable selection procedure. More than 95% of a data set composed of pure MF, and non-MF/MF blends containing 3% of either tallow, lard, olive oil, or palm oil were correctly classified. The validity of the classification rule was also tested by 206 gravimetrically prepared fat mixtures. Mixtures containing > 3% foreign fat were detected in all cases. PMID:7950432

  17. BIGNASim: a NoSQL database structure and analysis portal for nucleic acids simulation data.

    PubMed

    Hospital, Adam; Andrio, Pau; Cugnasco, Cesare; Codo, Laia; Becerra, Yolanda; Dans, Pablo D; Battistini, Federica; Torres, Jordi; Goñi, Ramón; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep Ll

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is, just behind genomics, the bioinformatics tool that generates the largest amounts of data, and that is using the largest amount of CPU time in supercomputing centres. MD trajectories are obtained after months of calculations, analysed in situ, and in practice forgotten. Several projects to generate stable trajectory databases have been developed for proteins, but no equivalence exists in the nucleic acids world. We present here a novel database system to store MD trajectories and analyses of nucleic acids. The initial data set available consists mainly of the benchmark of the new molecular dynamics force-field, parmBSC1. It contains 156 simulations, with over 120 μs of total simulation time. A deposition protocol is available to accept the submission of new trajectory data. The database is based on the combination of two NoSQL engines, Cassandra for storing trajectories and MongoDB to store analysis results and simulation metadata. The analyses available include backbone geometries, helical analysis, NMR observables and a variety of mechanical analyses. Individual trajectories and combined meta-trajectories can be downloaded from the portal. The system is accessible through http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/BIGNASim/. Supplementary Material is also available on-line at http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/BIGNASim/SuppMaterial/. PMID:26612862

  18. Vibrational spectroscopy and chemometrics for rapid, quantitative analysis of bitter acids in hops (Humulus lupulus).

    PubMed

    Killeen, Daniel P; Andersen, David H; Beatson, Ron A; Gordon, Keith C; Perry, Nigel B

    2014-12-31

    Hops, Humulus lupulus, are grown worldwide for use in the brewing industry to impart characteristic flavor and aroma to finished beer. Breeders produce many varietal crosses with the aim of improving and diversifying commercial hops varieties. The large number of crosses critical to a successful breeding program imposes high demands on the supporting chemical analytical laboratories. With the aim of reducing the analysis time associated with hops breeding, quantitative partial least-squares regression (PLS-R) models have been produced, relating reference data acquired by the industrial standard HPLC and UV methods, to vibrational spectra of the same, chemically diverse hops sample set. These models, produced from rapidly acquired infrared (IR), near-infrared (NIR), and Raman spectra, were appraised using standard statistical metrics. Results demonstrated that all three spectroscopic methods could be used for screening hops for α-acid, total bitter acids, and cohumulone concentrations in powdered hops. Models generated from Raman and IR spectra also showed potential for use in screening hops varieties for xanthohumol concentrations. NIR analysis was performed using both a standard benchtop spectrometer and a portable NIR spectrometer, with comparable results obtained by both instruments. Finally, some important vibrational features of cohumulone, colupulone, and xanthohumol were assigned using DFT calculations, which allow more insightful interpretation of PLS-R latent variable plots.

  19. BIGNASim: a NoSQL database structure and analysis portal for nucleic acids simulation data

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Andrio, Pau; Cugnasco, Cesare; Codo, Laia; Becerra, Yolanda; Dans, Pablo D.; Battistini, Federica; Torres, Jordi; Goñi, Ramón; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep Ll.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is, just behind genomics, the bioinformatics tool that generates the largest amounts of data, and that is using the largest amount of CPU time in supercomputing centres. MD trajectories are obtained after months of calculations, analysed in situ, and in practice forgotten. Several projects to generate stable trajectory databases have been developed for proteins, but no equivalence exists in the nucleic acids world. We present here a novel database system to store MD trajectories and analyses of nucleic acids. The initial data set available consists mainly of the benchmark of the new molecular dynamics force-field, parmBSC1. It contains 156 simulations, with over 120 μs of total simulation time. A deposition protocol is available to accept the submission of new trajectory data. The database is based on the combination of two NoSQL engines, Cassandra for storing trajectories and MongoDB to store analysis results and simulation metadata. The analyses available include backbone geometries, helical analysis, NMR observables and a variety of mechanical analyses. Individual trajectories and combined meta-trajectories can be downloaded from the portal. The system is accessible through http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/BIGNASim/. Supplementary Material is also available on-line at http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/BIGNASim/SuppMaterial/. PMID:26612862

  20. BIGNASim: a NoSQL database structure and analysis portal for nucleic acids simulation data.

    PubMed

    Hospital, Adam; Andrio, Pau; Cugnasco, Cesare; Codo, Laia; Becerra, Yolanda; Dans, Pablo D; Battistini, Federica; Torres, Jordi; Goñi, Ramón; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep Ll

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is, just behind genomics, the bioinformatics tool that generates the largest amounts of data, and that is using the largest amount of CPU time in supercomputing centres. MD trajectories are obtained after months of calculations, analysed in situ, and in practice forgotten. Several projects to generate stable trajectory databases have been developed for proteins, but no equivalence exists in the nucleic acids world. We present here a novel database system to store MD trajectories and analyses of nucleic acids. The initial data set available consists mainly of the benchmark of the new molecular dynamics force-field, parmBSC1. It contains 156 simulations, with over 120 μs of total simulation time. A deposition protocol is available to accept the submission of new trajectory data. The database is based on the combination of two NoSQL engines, Cassandra for storing trajectories and MongoDB to store analysis results and simulation metadata. The analyses available include backbone geometries, helical analysis, NMR observables and a variety of mechanical analyses. Individual trajectories and combined meta-trajectories can be downloaded from the portal. The system is accessible through http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/BIGNASim/. Supplementary Material is also available on-line at http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/BIGNASim/SuppMaterial/.

  1. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THREE CLASSES OF BACTERIAL NON-SPECIFIC ACID PHOSPHATASES AND ARCHAEAL PHOSPHOESTERASES: EVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVE

    PubMed Central

    U. Gandhi, Neha; B. Chandra, Sathees

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Bacterial nonspecific acid phosphohydrolases (NSAPs) or phosphatases are group of enzymes secreted as soluble periplasmic proteins or retained as membrane bound lipoproteins that are usually able to dephosphorylate a broad array of structurally unrelated organic phosphoesters (nucleotides, sugar phosphates, phytic acid etc.) to acquire inorganic phosphate (Pi) and organic byproducts. They exhibit optimal catalytic activity at acidic to neutral pH values. On the basis of amino acid sequence relatedness, phosphatase are grouped into different molecular families namely Class A, Class B and Class C acid phosphatase respectively. Results and discussion: In this article out of thirty three sequences, twenty six belonging to each of the three classes of bacterial acid phosphatase and seven belonging to archaeal phosphoesterases were analyzed using various tools of bioinformatics. Phylogenetic analysis, dot plot comparisons and motif analysis were done to identify a number of similarities and differences between three classes of bacterial acid phosphatases and archaeal phosphoesterases. In this research we have attempted to decipher evolutionary relationship between three classes of bacterial acid phosphatase and archaeal phosphoesterases using bioinformatics approach. PMID:23322973

  2. Gene cloning and functional analysis of a second delta 6-fatty acid desaturase from an arachidonic acid-producing Mortierella fungus.

    PubMed

    Sakuradani, Eiji; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2003-04-01

    We demonstrated that Mortierella alpina 1S-4 has two delta 6-desaturases, which are involved in the desaturation of linoleic acid to gamma-linolenic acid. For one of the two delta 6-desaturases, designated as delta 6I, gene cloning and its heterologous expression in a fungus, Aspergillus oryzae, has previously been reported. In addition, we indicated in this paper that there is an isozyme of the two delta 6-desaturases, designated as delta 6II, in M. alpina 1S-4. The predicted amino acid sequences of the Mortierella delta 6-desaturases were similar to those of ones from other organisms, i.e. borage and Caenorhabditis elegans, and had a cytochrome b5-like domain at the N-terminus, being different from the yeast delta 9-desaturase, which has the corresponding domain at the C-terminus. The full-length delta 6II cDNA was expressed in A. oryzae, resulting in the accumulation of gamma-linolenic acid (which was not detected in the control Aspergillus) up to 37% of the total fatty acids. The analysis of real-time quantitative PCR (RTQ-PCR) showed that the quantity of delta 6I RNA was 2.4-, 9-, and 17-fold higher than that of delta 6II RNA on 2, 3, and 4 days in M. alpina 1S-4, respectively. M. alpina 1S-4 is the first fungus to be confirmed to have two functional delta 6-desaturase genes. PMID:12784608

  3. Expansion of the Clavulanic Acid Gene Cluster: Identification and In Vivo Functional Analysis of Three New Genes Required for Biosynthesis of Clavulanic Acid by Streptomyces clavuligerus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongfeng; Khaleeli, Nusrat; Townsend, Craig A.

    2000-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is a potent inhibitor of β-lactamase enzymes and is of demonstrated value in the treatment of infections by β-lactam-resistant bacteria. Previously, it was thought that eight contiguous genes within the genome of the producing strain Streptomyces clavuligerus were sufficient for clavulanic acid biosynthesis, because they allowed production of the antibiotic in a heterologous host (K. A. Aidoo, A. S. Paradkar, D. C. Alexander, and S. E. Jensen, p. 219–236, In V. P. Gullo et al., ed., Development in industrial microbiology series, 1993). In contrast, we report the identification of three new genes, orf10 (cyp), orf11 (fd), and orf12, that are required for clavulanic acid biosynthesis as indicated by gene replacement and trans-complementation analysis in S. clavuligerus. These genes are contained within a 3.4-kb DNA fragment located directly downstream of orf9 (cad) in the clavulanic acid cluster. While the orf10 (cyp) and orf11 (fd) proteins show homologies to other known CYP-150 cytochrome P-450 and [3Fe-4S] ferredoxin enzymes and may be responsible for an oxidative reaction late in the pathway, the protein encoded by orf12 shows no significant similarity to any known protein. The results of this study extend the biosynthetic gene cluster for clavulanic acid and attest to the importance of analyzing biosynthetic genes in the context of their natural host. Potential functional roles for these proteins are proposed. PMID:10869089

  4. Analysis of sterols and fatty acids in natural and cultured Cordyceps by one-step derivatization followed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, F Q; Feng, K; Zhao, J; Li, S P

    2009-07-12

    Ten free fatty acids namely lauric acid, myristic acid, pentadecanoic acid, palmitoleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, stearic acid, docosanoic acid and lignoceric acid and four free sterols including ergosterol, cholesterol, campesterol and beta-sitosterol in natural (wild) Cordyceps sinensis, Cordyceps liangshanensis and Cordyceps gunnii, as well as cultured C. sinensis and Cordyceps militaris were first determined using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatization and GC-MS analysis. The conditions such as the amount of reagent, temperature and time for TMS derivatization of analytes were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, all calibration curves showed good linearity within the tested ranges. The intra- and inter-day variations for 14 investigated compounds were less than 3.4% and 5.2%, respectively. The results showed that palmitic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, stearic acid and ergosterol are main components in natural and cultured Cordyceps which could be discriminated by hierarchical clustering analysis based on the contents of 14 investigated compounds or the 4 fatty acids, where the contents of palmitic acid and oleic acid in natural Cordyceps are significantly higher than those in the cultured ones.

  5. Analysis of Reaction between α-Lipoic Acid and 2-Chloro-1-methylquinolinium Tetrafluoroborate Used as a Precolumn Derivatization Technique in Chromatographic Determination of α-Lipoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Magdalena; Odachowska, Angelika; Turkowicz, Monika; Karpinska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The present study offers results of analysis concerning the course of reaction between reduced α-lipoic acid (LA) and 2-chloro-1-methylquinolinium tetrafluoroborate (CMQT). In water environments, the reaction between CMQT and hydrophilic thiols proceeds very rapidly and the resultant products are stable. For the described analysis, optimum reaction conditions, such as concentration of the reducing agent, environment pH, and concentration of the reagent were carefully selected. The spectrophotometric assay was carried out measuring absorbance at λ = 348 nm (i.e., the spectral band of the obtained reaction product). Furthermore, the calibration curve of lipoic acid was registered. It was concluded that the Lambert-Beer law was observed within the range 1-10 μmol L(-1). Later, the reaction between LA and CMQT was used as precolumn derivatization in a chromatographic determination of the lipoic acid in the range 2.5-50 μmol L(-1). Practical applicability of the designed methods was evaluated by determining lipoic acid in Revitanerv pharmaceutical preparation which contains 300 mg LA in a single capsule. The error of the determination did not exceed 0.5% in relation to the declared value. PMID:26504616

  6. Analysis of Reaction between α-Lipoic Acid and 2-Chloro-1-methylquinolinium Tetrafluoroborate Used as a Precolumn Derivatization Technique in Chromatographic Determination of α-Lipoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Godlewska, Magdalena; Odachowska, Angelika; Turkowicz, Monika; Karpinska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The present study offers results of analysis concerning the course of reaction between reduced α-lipoic acid (LA) and 2-chloro-1-methylquinolinium tetrafluoroborate (CMQT). In water environments, the reaction between CMQT and hydrophilic thiols proceeds very rapidly and the resultant products are stable. For the described analysis, optimum reaction conditions, such as concentration of the reducing agent, environment pH, and concentration of the reagent were carefully selected. The spectrophotometric assay was carried out measuring absorbance at λ = 348 nm (i.e., the spectral band of the obtained reaction product). Furthermore, the calibration curve of lipoic acid was registered. It was concluded that the Lambert-Beer law was observed within the range 1–10 μmol L−1. Later, the reaction between LA and CMQT was used as precolumn derivatization in a chromatographic determination of the lipoic acid in the range 2.5–50 μmol L−1. Practical applicability of the designed methods was evaluated by determining lipoic acid in Revitanerv pharmaceutical preparation which contains 300 mg LA in a single capsule. The error of the determination did not exceed 0.5% in relation to the declared value. PMID:26504616

  7. Gene identification and functional analysis of methylcitrate synthase in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keiichi; Hattori, Takasumi; Honda, Yuki; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2013-01-01

    Methylcitrate synthase (EC 2.3.3.5; MCS) is a key enzyme of the methylcitric acid cycle localized in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells and related to propionic acid metabolism. In this study, cloning of the gene mcsA encoding MCS and heterologous expression of it in Escherichia coli were performed for functional analysis of the MCS of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L. Only one copy of mcsA (1,495 bp) exists in the A. niger WU-2223L chromosome. It encodes a 51-kDa polypeptide consisting of 465 amino acids containing mitochondrial targeting signal peptides. Purified recombinant MCS showed not only MCS activity (27.6 U/mg) but also citrate synthase (EC 2.3.3.1; CS) activity (26.8 U/mg). For functional analysis of MCS, mcsA disruptant strain DMCS-1, derived from A. niger WU-2223L, was constructed. Although A. niger WU-2223L showed growth on propionate as sole carbon source, DMCS-1 showed no growth. These results suggest that MCS is an essential enzyme in propionic acid metabolism, and that the methylcitric acid cycle operates functionally in A. niger WU-2223L. To determine whether MCS makes a contribution to citric acid production, citric acid production tests on DMCS-1 were performed. The amount of citric acid produced from glucose consumed by DMCS-1 in citric acid production medium over 12 d of cultivation was on the same level to that by WU-2223L. Thus it was found that MCS made no contribution to citric acid production from glucose in A. niger WU-2223L, although MCS showed CS activity.

  8. Gene identification and functional analysis of methylcitrate synthase in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keiichi; Hattori, Takasumi; Honda, Yuki; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2013-01-01

    Methylcitrate synthase (EC 2.3.3.5; MCS) is a key enzyme of the methylcitric acid cycle localized in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells and related to propionic acid metabolism. In this study, cloning of the gene mcsA encoding MCS and heterologous expression of it in Escherichia coli were performed for functional analysis of the MCS of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L. Only one copy of mcsA (1,495 bp) exists in the A. niger WU-2223L chromosome. It encodes a 51-kDa polypeptide consisting of 465 amino acids containing mitochondrial targeting signal peptides. Purified recombinant MCS showed not only MCS activity (27.6 U/mg) but also citrate synthase (EC 2.3.3.1; CS) activity (26.8 U/mg). For functional analysis of MCS, mcsA disruptant strain DMCS-1, derived from A. niger WU-2223L, was constructed. Although A. niger WU-2223L showed growth on propionate as sole carbon source, DMCS-1 showed no growth. These results suggest that MCS is an essential enzyme in propionic acid metabolism, and that the methylcitric acid cycle operates functionally in A. niger WU-2223L. To determine whether MCS makes a contribution to citric acid production, citric acid production tests on DMCS-1 were performed. The amount of citric acid produced from glucose consumed by DMCS-1 in citric acid production medium over 12 d of cultivation was on the same level to that by WU-2223L. Thus it was found that MCS made no contribution to citric acid production from glucose in A. niger WU-2223L, although MCS showed CS activity. PMID:23832368

  9. Lipid and fatty acid analysis of the Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus (PiGV) envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri-Bhalla, K.; Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Virus envelope was isolated from Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus, produced in early fourth-instar larvae. Both polar and neutral lipids were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. Fatty acid composition of various individual neutral and polar lipids was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. The major components of envelope neutral lipid were diacylglycerols. Palmitic acid and stearic acid were the major saturated fatty acids in both polar and neutral lipids. Whereas palmitoleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acids in neutral lipids, oleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acid in the polar lipids.

  10. Neutral loss analysis of amino acids by desorption electrospray ionization using an unmodified tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Corso, Gaetano; Paglia, Giuseppe; Garofalo, Daniela; D'Apolito, Oceania

    2007-01-01

    A new method to analyze free amino acids using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) has been implemented. The method is based on the neutral loss mode determination of underivatized amino acids using a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with an unmodified atmospheric interface. Qualitative and quantitative optimization of DESI parameters, including ESI voltage, solvent flow rate, angle of collection and incidence, gas flow and temperatures, was performed for amino acids detection. The parameters for DESI analysis were evaluated using a mixture of valine, leucine, methionine, phenylalanine and tyrosine standards. A few microliters of this mixture were deposited on a slide, dried and analyzed at a flow rate of 2 microL/min. The optimal ionization response was obtained using laboratory glass slides and an equivalent solution of water/methanol doped with 2% of formic acid. The method specificity was evaluated by comparing product ion spectra and neutral loss analysis of amino acids obtained either by DESI or by electrospray ionization flow injection analysis (ESI-FIA). To evaluate the quantitative response on amino acids analyzed by DESI, calibration curves were performed on amino acid standard solutions spiked with a fixed amount of labelled amino acids. The method was also employed to analyze free amino acids from blood spots, after a rapid solvent extraction without other sample pretreatment, from positive and negative subjects. The method enables one to analyze biological samples and to discriminate healthy subjects from patients affected by inherited metabolic diseases. The intrinsic high-throughput analysis of DESI represents an opportunity, because of its potential application in clinical chemistry, for the expanded screening of some inborn errors of metabolism.

  11. Characterizing the interaction between uranyl ion and fulvic acid using regional integration analysis (RIA) and fluorescence quenching.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bingqi; Ryan, David K

    2016-03-01

    The development of chemometric methods has substantially improved the quantitative usefulness of the fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) in the analysis of dissolved organic matter (DOM). In this study, Regional Integration Analysis (RIA) was used to quantitatively interpret EEMs and assess fluorescence quenching behavior in order to study the binding between uranyl ion and fulvic acid. Three fulvic acids including soil fulvic acid (SFA), Oyster River fulvic acid (ORFA) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) were used and investigated by the spectroscopic techniques. The EEM spectra obtained were divided into five regions according to fluorescence structural features and two distinct peaks were observed in region III and region V. Fluorescence quenching analysis was conducted for these two regions with the stability constants, ligand concentrations and residual fluorescence values calculated using the Ryan-Weber model. Results indicated a relatively strong binding ability between uranyl ion and fulvic acid samples at low pH (log K value varies from 4.11 to 4.67 at pH 3.50). Fluorophores in region III showed a higher binding ability with fewer binding sites than in region V. Stability constants followed the order, SFA > ORFA > SRFA, while ligand concentrations followed the reverse order, SRFA > ORFA > SFA. A comparison between RIA and Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC) data treatment methods was also performed and good agreement between these two methods (less than 4% difference in log K values) demonstrates the reliability of the RIA method in this study. PMID:26736183

  12. Multivariate curve resolution: a powerful tool for the analysis of conformational transitions in nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Jaumot, Joaquim; Escaja, Núria; Gargallo, Raimundo; González, Carlos; Pedroso, Enrique; Tauler, Romà

    2002-01-01

    A successful application is reported of the multivariate curve resolution alternating least-squares method (MCR-ALS) for the analysis of nucleic acid melting and salt-induced transitions. Under conditions where several structures co-exist in a conformational equilibrium, MCR-ALS analysis of the UV and circular dichroism (CD) spectra at different temperatures, ionic strength and oligonucleotide concentration allows for the resolution of concentration profiles and pure spectra of the different species. The methodology is illustrated by the case of the cyclic oligonucleotide d. The melting transition of this molecule at different oligonucleotide concentrations was studied at 0, 2 and 10 mM MgCl2 by UV and CD spectroscopy. In addition, salt titration experiments were carried out at 21.0 and 54.0°C. The MCR-ALS analysis indicates that three different conformations of this molecule co-exist in solution. In agreement with previous NMR studies, these conformations were assigned to a monomeric dumbbell-like structure, a dimeric four-stranded conformation and a disordered (random coil) structure. The MCR-ALS methodology allows for a detailed analysis of how this equilibrium is affected by temperature, salt and oligonucleotide concentration. PMID:12202780

  13. Determination of acid ionization constants for weak acids by osmometry and the instrumental analysis self-evaluation feedback approach to student preparation of solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakolesha, Nyanguila

    One focus of this work was to develop of an alternative method to conductivity for determining the acid ionization constants. Computer-controlled osmometry is one of the emerging analytical tools in industrial research and clinical laboratories. It is slowly finding its way into chemistry laboratories. The instrument's microprocessor control ensures shortened data collection time, repeatability, accuracy, and automatic calibration. The equilibrium constants of acetic acid, chloroacetic acid, bromoacetic acid, cyanoacetic acid, and iodoacetic acid have been measured using osmometry and their values compared with the existing literature values obtained, usually, from conductometric measurements. Ionization constant determined by osmometry for the moderately strong weak acids were in reasonably good agreement with literature values. The results showed that two factors, the ionic strength and the osmotic coefficient, exert opposite effects in solutions of such weak acids. Another focus of the work was analytical chemistry students solution preparation skills. The prevailing teacher-structured experiments leave little room for students' ingenuity in quantitative volumetric analysis. The purpose of this part of the study was to improve students' skills in making solutions using instrument feedback in a constructivist-learning model. After making some solutions by weighing and dissolving solutes or by serial dilution, students used the spectrophotometer and the osmometer to compare their solutions with standard solutions. Students perceived the instrument feedback as a nonthreatening approach to monitoring the development of their skill levels and liked to clarify their understanding through interacting with an instructor-observer. An assessment of the instrument feedback and the constructivist model indicated that students would assume responsibility for their own learning if given the opportunity. This study involved 167 students enrolled in Quantitative Chemical

  14. Label-free serum ribonucleic acid analysis for colorectal cancer detection by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanping; Chen, Gang; Feng, Shangyuan; Pan, Jianji; Zheng, Xiongwei; Su, Ying; Chen, Yan; Huang, Zufang; Lin, Xiaoqian; Lan, Fenghua; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haishan

    2012-06-01

    Studies with circulating ribonucleic acid (RNA) not only provide new targets for cancer detection, but also open up the possibility of noninvasive gene expression profiling for cancer. In this paper, we developed a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), platform for detection and differentiation of serum RNAs of colorectal cancer. A novel three-dimensional (3-D), Ag nanofilm formed by dry MgSO4 aggregated silver nanoparticles, Ag NP, as the SERS-active substrate was presented to effectively enhance the RNA Raman signals. SERS measurements were performed on two groups of serum RNA samples. One group from patients, n=55 with pathologically diagnosed colorectal cancer and the other group from healthy controls, n=45. Tentative assignments of the Raman bands in the normalized SERS spectra demonstrated that there are differential expressions of cancer-related RNAs between the two groups. Linear discriminate analysis, based on principal component analysis, generated features can differentiate the colorectal cancer SERS spectra from normal SERS spectra with sensitivity of 89.1 percent and specificity of 95.6 percent. This exploratory study demonstrated great potential for developing serum RNA SERS analysis into a useful clinical tool for label-free, noninvasive screening and detection of colorectal cancers.

  15. Organic matter in sediments of an acidic mining lake as assessed by lipid analysis. Part I: fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, Juergen; Koschorreck, Matthias; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acid (FA) patterns of sediments collected from the bottom of an acidic mine pit lake (AML) at different depths (surface sediment: 0 to 1cm; deep sediment: 4 to 5 cm) were studied to characterize microbial communities and the sources of sedimentary organic matter (SOM). Studies were performed on the molecular level utilizing source-specific, diagnostic FA biomarkers. The biomarker-based approach has been used widely in marine sediment studies, but has not been applied for sediments from AMLs so far. Combined FA concentrations in the surface sediment were higher compared to those in the deep sediment (497 vs. 127 μg g(-1)d.w., respectively). This was related to deposition of autochthonous biomass and higher terrestrial plants onto the surface sediment, as well as--to lesser extent--with higher bacterial activity on the sediment-water interface. The FA distribution in both sediments was characterized by a strong even-over-odd preference and was bimodal in nature: there was a cluster at nC(14)-nC(18) characteristic of chiefly autochthonous (algal and bacterial) SOM production, and another cluster at nC(22-28) related to input from higher plants. The FA distribution in the surface sediment pointed to higher terrestrial input compared to autochthonous contribution to SOM (67%:33%) as an estimate. Fingerprinting of viable bacteria was accomplished through signature FA markers including branched C(15) and C(17) surrogates, cyclopropanoic acids, 3-hydroxy (OH) acids and monounsaturated surrogates with unusual double bond localization. The abundance of Gram-negative bacteria was higher in the surface sediment as evidenced by total diagnostic 3-OH-fatty acids (37 μg g(-1) versus 25 μg g(-1)). Potential source taxa in both sediment layers included acidophilic iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria including Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. High abundances of terminally branched C(15) and C(17) surrogates in both sediments pointed to sulfate- and iron-reducing bacteria

  16. Metabolic and Transcriptional Analysis of Acid Stress in Lactococcus lactis, with a Focus on the Kinetics of Lactic Acid Pools

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Turner, David L.; Fonseca, Luís L.; Solopova, Ana; Catarino, Teresa; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Voit, Eberhard O.; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pH on the glucose metabolism of non-growing cells of L. lactis MG1363 was studied by in vivo NMR in the range 4.8 to 6.5. Immediate pH effects on glucose transporters and/or enzyme activities were distinguished from transcriptional/translational effects by using cells grown at the optimal pH of 6.5 or pre-adjusted to low pH by growth at 5.1. In cells grown at pH 5.1, glucose metabolism proceeds at a rate 35% higher than in non-adjusted cells at the same pH. Besides the upregulation of stress-related genes (such as dnaK and groEL), cells adjusted to low pH overexpressed H+-ATPase subunits as well as glycolytic genes. At sub-optimal pHs, the total intracellular pool of lactic acid reached approximately 500 mM in cells grown at optimal pH and about 700 mM in cells grown at pH 5.1. These high levels, together with good pH homeostasis (internal pH always above 6), imply intracellular accumulation of the ionized form of lactic acid (lactate anion), and the concomitant export of the equivalent protons. The average number, n, of protons exported with each lactate anion was determined directly from the kinetics of accumulation of intra- and extracellular lactic acid as monitored online by 13C-NMR. In cells non-adjusted to low pH, n varies between 2 and 1 during glucose consumption, suggesting an inhibitory effect of intracellular lactate on proton export. We confirmed that extracellular lactate did not affect the lactate: proton stoichiometry. In adjusted cells, n was lower and varied less, indicating a different mix of lactic acid exporters less affected by the high level of intracellular lactate. A qualitative model for pH effects and acid stress adaptation is proposed on the basis of these results. PMID:23844205

  17. Metabolic and transcriptional analysis of acid stress in Lactococcus lactis, with a focus on the kinetics of lactic acid pools.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Turner, David L; Fonseca, Luís L; Solopova, Ana; Catarino, Teresa; Kuipers, Oscar P; Voit, Eberhard O; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pH on the glucose metabolism of non-growing cells of L. lactis MG1363 was studied by in vivo NMR in the range 4.8 to 6.5. Immediate pH effects on glucose transporters and/or enzyme activities were distinguished from transcriptional/translational effects by using cells grown at the optimal pH of 6.5 or pre-adjusted to low pH by growth at 5.1. In cells grown at pH 5.1, glucose metabolism proceeds at a rate 35% higher than in non-adjusted cells at the same pH. Besides the upregulation of stress-related genes (such as dnaK and groEL), cells adjusted to low pH overexpressed H(+)-ATPase subunits as well as glycolytic genes. At sub-optimal pHs, the total intracellular pool of lactic acid reached approximately 500 mM in cells grown at optimal pH and about 700 mM in cells grown at pH 5.1. These high levels, together with good pH homeostasis (internal pH always above 6), imply intracellular accumulation of the ionized form of lactic acid (lactate anion), and the concomitant export of the equivalent protons. The average number, n, of protons exported with each lactate anion was determined directly from the kinetics of accumulation of intra- and extracellular lactic acid as monitored online by (13)C-NMR. In cells non-adjusted to low pH, n varies between 2 and 1 during glucose consumption, suggesting an inhibitory effect of intracellular lactate on proton export. We confirmed that extracellular lactate did not affect the lactate: proton stoichiometry. In adjusted cells, n was lower and varied less, indicating a different mix of lactic acid exporters less affected by the high level of intracellular lactate. A qualitative model for pH effects and acid stress adaptation is proposed on the basis of these results.

  18. Fatty acid analysis as a tool to infer the diet in Illinois river otters (Lontra canadensis).

    PubMed

    Satterthwaite-Phillips, Damian; Novakofski, Jan; Mateus-Pinilla, Nohra

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) have recently been used in several studies to infer the diet in a number of species. While these studies have been largely successful, most have dealt with predators that have a fairly specialized diet. In this paper, we used FA analysis as a tool to infer the diet of the nearctic river otter (Lontra canadensis). The river otter is an opportunistic predator known to subsist on a wide variety of prey including, fishes, crayfish, molluscs, reptiles and amphibians, among others. We analyzed the principle components of 60 FA from otters and 25 potential prey species in Illinois, USA. Prey species came from 4 major taxonomic divisions: fishes, crayfish, molluscs and amphibians. Within each division, most, but not all, species had significantly different profiles. Using quantitative FA signature analysis, our results suggest that, by mass, fish species are the most significant component of Illinois River otters' diet (37.7 ± 1.0%). Molluscs ranked second (32.0 ± 0.8%), followed by amphibians (27.3 ± 4.3%), and finally, crayfish (3.0 ± 0.6%). Our analysis indicates that molluscs make up a larger portion of the otter diet than previously reported. Throughout much of the Midwest there have been numerous otter reintroduction efforts, many of which appear to be successful. In regions where mollusc species are endangered, these data are essential for management agencies to better understand the potential impact of otters on these species. Our analysis further suggests that quantitative FA signature analysis can be used to infer diet even when prey species are diverse, to the extent that their FA profiles differ. Better understanding of the otter's metabolism of FA would improve inferences of diet from FA analysis.

  19. Direct tandem mass spectrometric analysis of amino acids in plasma using fluorous derivatization and monolithic solid-phase purification.

    PubMed

    Tamashima, Erina; Hayama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Imakyure, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Nohta, Hitoshi

    2015-11-10

    In this study, we developed a novel direct tandem mass spectrometric method for rapid and accurate analysis of amino acids utilizing a fluorous derivatization and purification technique. Amino acids were perfluoroalkylated with 2H,2H,3H,3H-perfluoroundecan-1-al in the presence of 2-picoline borane via reductive amination. The derivatives were purified by perfluoroalkyl-modified silica-based monolithic solid-phase extraction (monolithic F-SPE), and directly analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization without liquid chromatographic separation. The perfluoroalkyl derivatives could be sufficiently distinguished from non-fluorous compounds, i.e. the biological matrix, due to their fluorous interaction. Thus, rapid and accurate determination of amino acids was accomplished. The method was validated with human plasma samples and applied to the analysis of amino acids in the plasma of mice with maple syrup urine disease or phenylketonuria. PMID:26222276

  20. Direct tandem mass spectrometric analysis of amino acids in plasma using fluorous derivatization and monolithic solid-phase purification.

    PubMed

    Tamashima, Erina; Hayama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Imakyure, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Nohta, Hitoshi

    2015-11-10

    In this study, we developed a novel direct tandem mass spectrometric method for rapid and accurate analysis of amino acids utilizing a fluorous derivatization and purification technique. Amino acids were perfluoroalkylated with 2H,2H,3H,3H-perfluoroundecan-1-al in the presence of 2-picoline borane via reductive amination. The derivatives were purified by perfluoroalkyl-modified silica-based monolithic solid-phase extraction (monolithic F-SPE), and directly analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization without liquid chromatographic separation. The perfluoroalkyl derivatives could be sufficiently distinguished from non-fluorous compounds, i.e. the biological matrix, due to their fluorous interaction. Thus, rapid and accurate determination of amino acids was accomplished. The method was validated with human plasma samples and applied to the analysis of amino acids in the plasma of mice with maple syrup urine disease or phenylketonuria.

  1. Microbial carbon cycling in oligotrophic regional aquifers near the Tono Uranium Mine, Japan as inferred from δ 13C and Δ 14C values of in situ phospholipid fatty acids and carbon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Christopher T.; Amano, Yuki; Slater, Gregory F.; Dias, Robert F.; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Mandernack, Kevin W.

    2010-07-01

    Microorganisms are ubiquitous in deep subsurface environments, but their role in the global carbon cycle is not well-understood. The natural abundance δ 13C and Δ 14C values of microbial membrane phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) were measured and used to assess the carbon sources of bacteria in sedimentary and granitic groundwaters sampled from three boreholes in the vicinity of the Tono Uranium Mine, Gifu, Japan. Sample storage experiments were performed and drill waters analyzed to characterize potential sources of microbial contamination. The most abundant PLFA structures in all waters sampled were 16:0, 16:1ω7 c, cy17:0, and 18:1ω7 c. A PLFA biomarker for type II methanotrophs, 18:1ω8 c, comprised 3% and 18% of total PLFAs in anoxic sedimentary and granitic waters, respectively, sampled from the KNA-6 borehole. The presence of this biomarker was unexpected given that type II methanotrophs are considered obligate aerobes. However, a bacterium that grows aerobically with CH 4 as the sole energy source and which also produces 56% of its total PLFAs as 18:1ω8 c was isolated from both waters, providing additional evidence for the presence of type II methanotrophs. The Δ 14C values determined for type II methanotroph PLFAs in the sedimentary (-861‰) and granite (-867‰) waters were very similar to the Δ 14C values of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in each water (˜-850‰). This suggests that type II methanotrophs ultimately derive all their carbon from inorganic sources, whether directly from DIC and/or from CH 4 produced by the reduction of DIC. In contrast, δ 13C values of type II PLFAs in the sedimentary (-93‰) and granite (-60‰) waters indicate that these organisms use different carbon assimilation schemes in each environment despite very similar δ13C values (˜-95‰) for each water. The δ 13C PLFA values (-28‰ to -45‰) of non-methanotrophic bacteria in the KNA-6 LTL water do not clearly distinguish between heterotrophic and autotrophic

  2. Fast derivatization of fatty acids in different meat samples for gas chromatography analysis.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Ingrid Lima; Claus, Thiago; Oliveira Santos Júnior, Oscar; Almeida, Vitor Cinque; Magon, Thiago; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergilio

    2016-07-22

    In order to analyze the composition of fatty acids employing gas chromatography as the separation method, a derivatization of lipids using esterification and transesterification reactions is needed. The methodologies currently available are time consuming and use large amounts of sample and reagents. Thus, this work proposes a new procedure to carry out the derivatization of fatty acids without the need for prior extraction of lipids. The use of small amounts of sample (100mg) allows the analysis to be performed in specific parts of animals, in most cases without having them slaughtered. Another benefit is the use of small amounts of reagents (only 2mL of NaOH/Methanol and H2SO4/Methanol). The use of an experimental design procedure (Design Expert software) allows the optimization of the alkaline and acid reaction times. The procedure was validated for five minutes in both steps. The method was validated for bovine fat, beef, chicken, pork, fish and shrimp meats. The results for the merit figures of accuracy (from 101.07% to 109.18%), precision (RSDintra-day (from 0.65 to 3.93%), RSDinter-day (from 1.57 to 5.22%)), linearity (R(2)=0.9864) and robustness confirmed that the new method is satisfactory within the linear range of 2-30% of lipids in the sample. Besides the benefits of minimizing the amount of samples and reagents, the procedure enables gas chromatography sample preparation in a very short time compared with traditional procedures. PMID:27320376

  3. Topological analysis of the electronic charge density in the ethene protonation reaction catalyzed by acidic zeolite.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, M Fernanda; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2007-08-16

    In the present work, the distribution of the electronic charge density in the ethene protonation reaction by a zeolite acid site is studied within the framework of the density functional theory and the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory. The key electronic effects such as topological distribution of the charge density involved in the reaction are presented and discussed. The results are obtained at B3LYP/6-31G(**) level theory. Attention is focused on topological parameters such as electron density, its Laplacian, kinetic energy density, potential energy density, and electronic energy density at the bond critical points (BCP) in all bonds involved in the interaction zone, in the reactants, pi-complex, transition state, and alkoxy product. In addition, the topological atomic properties are determined on the selected atoms in the course of the reaction (average electron population, N(Omega), atomic net charge, q(Omega), atomic energy, E(Omega), atomic volume, v(Omega), and first moment of the atomic charge distribution, M(Omega)) and their changes are analyzed exhaustively. The topological study clearly shows that the ethene interaction with the acid site of the zeolite cluster, T5-OH, in the ethene adsorbed, is dominated by a strong O-H...pi interaction with some degree of covalence. AIM analysis based on DFT calculation for the transition state (TS) shows that the hydrogen atom from the acid site in the zeolitic fragment is connected to the carbon atom by a covalent bond with some contribution of electrostatic interaction and to the oxygen atom by closed shell interaction with some contribution of covalent character. The C-O bond formed in the alkoxy product can be defined as a weaker shared interaction. Our results show that in the transition state, the dominant interactions are partially electrostatic and partially covalent in nature, in which the covalent contribution increases as the concentration and accumulation of the charge density along the bond path between

  4. Image analysis of epicuticular damage to foliage caused by dry deposition of the air pollutant nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Pamela E; Parry, Sally D; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Heath, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    Nitric acid vapor is produced by the same photochemical processes that produce ozone. In the laboratory, concentrated nitric acid is a strong acid and a powerful oxidant. In the environment, where the concentrations are much lower, it is an innocuous source of plant nitrogen. As an air pollutant, which mode of action does dry deposition of nitric acid follow? We investigated the effects of dry deposition of nitric acid on the foliage of four tree species native to the western United States. A novel controlled environment, fumigation system enabled a four-week exposure at concentrations consistent with ambient diurnal patterns. Scanning electron microscopy and automated image analysis revealed changes in the epicuticular wax layer during fumigation. Exposure to nitric acid resulted in a reproducible suite of damage symptoms that increased with increasing dose. Each tree species tested exhibited a unique set of damage features, including cracks, lesions, and conformation changes to epicuticular crystallite structures. Dry deposition of atmospheric nitric acid caused substantial perturbation to the epicuticular surface of all four tree species investigated, consistent with the chemical oxidation of epicuticular waxes. Automated image analysis eliminated many biases that can trouble microscopy studies. Trade names and commercial enterprises or products are mentioned solely for information. No endorsements by the U.S. Department of Agriculture are implied.

  5. Study of sample preparation for quantitative analysis of amino acids in human sweat by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Povedano, M M; Calderón-Santiago, M; Priego-Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2016-01-01

    The determination of physiological levels of amino acids is important to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of several diseases and nutritional status of individuals. Amino acids are frequently determined in biofluids such as blood (serum or plasma) and urine; however, there are less common biofluids with different concentration profiles of amino acids that could be of interest. One of these biofluids is sweat that can be obtained in a non-invasive manner and is characterized by low complex composition. The analysis of amino acids in human sweat requires the development of sample preparation strategies according to the sample matrix and small collected volume. The influence of sample preparation on the quantitative analysis of amino acids in sweat by LC-MS/MS has been assessed through a comparison between two strategies: dilution of sweat and centrifugal microsolid-phase extraction (c-μSPE). In both cases, several dilution factors were assayed for in-depth knowledge of the matrix effects, and the use of c-μSPE provided the best results in terms of accuracy. The behavior of the target analytes was a function of the dilution factor, thus providing a pattern for sample preparation that depended on the amino acid to be determined. The concentration of amino acids in sweat ranges between 6.20 ng mL(-1) (for homocysteine) and 259.77 µg mL(-1) (for serine) with precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, within 1.1-21.4%.

  6. Development and validation of a robust automated analysis of plasma phospholipid fatty acids for metabolic phenotyping of large epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Laura Yun; Summerhill, Keith; Rodriguez-Canas, Carmen; Mather, Ian; Patel, Pinal; Eiden, Michael; Young, Stephen; Forouhi, Nita G; Koulman, Albert

    2013-01-01

    A fully automated, high-throughput method was developed to profile the fatty acids of phospholipids from human plasma samples for application to a large epidemiological sample set (n > 25,000). We report here on the data obtained for the quality-control materials used with the first 860 batches, and the validation process used. The method consists of two robotic systems combined with gas chromatography, performing lipid extraction, phospholipid isolation, hydrolysis and derivatization to fatty-acid methyl esters, and on-line analysis. This is the first report showing that fatty-acid profiling is an achievable strategy for metabolic phenotyping in very large epidemiological and genetic studies. PMID:23618465

  7. Development and validation of a robust automated analysis of plasma phospholipid fatty acids for metabolic phenotyping of large epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A fully automated, high-throughput method was developed to profile the fatty acids of phospholipids from human plasma samples for application to a large epidemiological sample set (n > 25,000). We report here on the data obtained for the quality-control materials used with the first 860 batches, and the validation process used. The method consists of two robotic systems combined with gas chromatography, performing lipid extraction, phospholipid isolation, hydrolysis and derivatization to fatty-acid methyl esters, and on-line analysis. This is the first report showing that fatty-acid profiling is an achievable strategy for metabolic phenotyping in very large epidemiological and genetic studies. PMID:23618465

  8. Proteomic analysis reveals dynamic regulation of fruit development and sugar and acid accumulation in apple.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjun; Li, Dongxia; Feng, Fengjuan; Zhang, Sheng; Ma, Fengwang; Cheng, Lailiang

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the fruit developmental process is critical for fruit quality improvement. Here, we report a comprehensive proteomic analysis of apple fruit development over five growth stages, from young fruit to maturity, coupled with metabolomic profiling. A tandem mass tag (TMT)-based comparative proteomics approach led to the identification and quantification of 7098 and 6247 proteins, respectively. This large-scale proteomic dataset presents a global view of the critical pathways involved in fruit development and metabolism. When linked with metabolomics data, these results provide new insights into the modulation of fruit development, the metabolism and storage of sugars and organic acids (mainly malate), and events within the energy-related pathways for respiration and glycolysis. We suggest that the key steps identified here (e.g. those involving the FK2, TST, EDR6, SPS, mtME and mtMDH switches), can be further targeted to confirm their roles in accumulation and balance of fructose, sucrose and malate. Moreover, our findings imply that the primary reason for decreases in amino acid concentrations during fruit development is related to a reduction in substrate flux via glycolysis, which is mainly regulated by fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and bisphosphoglycerate mutase.

  9. Proteomic analysis reveals dynamic regulation of fruit development and sugar and acid accumulation in apple.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjun; Li, Dongxia; Feng, Fengjuan; Zhang, Sheng; Ma, Fengwang; Cheng, Lailiang

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the fruit developmental process is critical for fruit quality improvement. Here, we report a comprehensive proteomic analysis of apple fruit development over five growth stages, from young fruit to maturity, coupled with metabolomic profiling. A tandem mass tag (TMT)-based comparative proteomics approach led to the identification and quantification of 7098 and 6247 proteins, respectively. This large-scale proteomic dataset presents a global view of the critical pathways involved in fruit development and metabolism. When linked with metabolomics data, these results provide new insights into the modulation of fruit development, the metabolism and storage of sugars and organic acids (mainly malate), and events within the energy-related pathways for respiration and glycolysis. We suggest that the key steps identified here (e.g. those involving the FK2, TST, EDR6, SPS, mtME and mtMDH switches), can be further targeted to confirm their roles in accumulation and balance of fructose, sucrose and malate. Moreover, our findings imply that the primary reason for decreases in amino acid concentrations during fruit development is related to a reduction in substrate flux via glycolysis, which is mainly regulated by fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and bisphosphoglycerate mutase. PMID:27535992

  10. An electrochemical clamp assay for direct, rapid analysis of circulating nucleic acids in serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jagotamoy; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Montermini, Laura; Rak, Janusz; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2015-07-01

    The analysis of cell-free nucleic acids (cfNAs), which are present at significant levels in the blood of cancer patients, can reveal the mutational spectrum of a tumour without the need for invasive sampling of the tissue. However, this requires differentiation between the nucleic acids that originate from healthy cells and the mutated sequences shed by tumour cells. Here we report an electrochemical clamp assay that directly detects mutated sequences in patient serum. This is the first successful detection of cfNAs without the need for enzymatic amplification, a step that normally requires extensive sample processing and is prone to interference. The new chip-based assay reads out the presence of mutations within 15 minutes using a collection of oligonucleotides that sequester closely related sequences in solution, and thus allow only the mutated sequence to bind to a chip-based sensor. We demonstrate excellent levels of sensitivity and specificity and show that the clamp assay accurately detects mutated sequences in a collection of samples taken from lung cancer and melanoma patients.

  11. Comparative proteomic analysis of proteins in response to simulated acid rain in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Wu; Fu, Bin; Niu, Li; Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2011-05-01

    A proteomic study using 2-D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF MS was performed to characterize the responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to simulated acid rain (SiAR) stress, which is a global environmental problem and has become a serious issue in China in recent years. The emphasis of the present study was to investigate the overall protein expression changes when exposed to SiAR. Out of over 1000 protein spots reproducibly resolved, 50 of them changed their abundance by at least 2-fold. Analysis of protein expression patterns revealed that a set of proteins associated with energy production, metabolism, cell rescue, cell defense and protein folding, etc., could play important roles in mediating plant response to SiAR. In addition to this, some proteins involved in stress responses and jasmonic acid pathway are also involved in plant response to SiAR. More interestingly, the expression of several ubiquitination-related proteins changed dramatically after 32-h SiAR treatment, suggesting that they may act as a molecular marker for the injury phenotype caused by SiAR. Based on our results, we proposed a schematic model to explain the mechanisms associated with the systematic response of Arabidopsis plants to SiAR.

  12. Technical approaches for efficient high-precision nucleic acid analysis using DNA microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkel, Daniel; Hamilton, Gregory; Brown, Nils; Segraves, Richard; Huey, Bing; Snijders, Anoine; Blackwood, Stephanie; Hindle, Kate; Law, Sindy; Gray, Joe W.; Jain, Ajay; Hanson, John; Nordmeyer, Robert; Albertson, Donna

    2002-06-01

    Microarray measurements offer the potential to compare the abundances of numerous nucleic acid sequences in parallel. Using linker-adapter PCR products from mapped BAC clones we have made arrays that permit scanning the human genome for single copy gains and losses of DNA sequence, which requires reliable detection of 50 percent changes. The DNA is printed at high concentration on amino-silane or chromium coated surface using a custom-built capillary pin printing system. Spots are printed on 130 micrometers centers or closer to minimize the size of the arrays. Hybridization occurs in a dextran sulfate/formamide buffer at 37 degrees C, using slow rocking to mix the reaction. The entire array is imaged in a single CCD frame using a custom built system that employs mercury arc illumination. Up to four fluorochromes can be imaged from a single array with adequate spectral separation. Typically we use DAPI to stain the DNA in the array spots to facilitate automatic image segmentation during analysis, and fluorescein, Cy3, and Cy5 or their spectral equivalents, for labeling specimen nucleic acids. Array spots are segmented and quantitative fluorescence intensities and intensity ratios are automatically calculated in < 1 minute per approximately 8000 element array using the custom software UCSF SPOT.

  13. ADANSONIAN ANALYSIS AND DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID BASE COMPOSITION OF SOME GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, R. R.; Mandel, M.

    1964-01-01

    Colwell, R. R. (Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.), and M. Mandel. Adansonian analysis and deoxyribonucleic acid base composition of some gram-negative bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 87:1412–1422. 1964.—The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) base compositions and S values for a minimum of 134 coded properties were determined for representative cultures of the genera Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas, Aeromonas, Vibrio, Aerobacter, Escherichia, Alcaligenes, and Flavobacterium. Those cultures having a high degree of similarity by the criterion of numerical taxonomy were found to have similar DNA base compositions. The relative affinities of clusters of cultures suggest taxonomic relations. Eleven species of Xanthomonas might be a single species, and V. metschnikovii was shown to be more closely related to enteric bacteria than to other vibrios which, in turn, were found to be like pseudomonads. Aeromonas was found to be intermediate in similarity to enterics and pseudomonads and divisible into at least two, but possibly three, species. F. aquatile was unlike any of the other organisms studied, and its DNA also differed greatly in composition from other representatives of the genus. PMID:14188722

  14. A novel process for recovery of fermentation-derived succinic acid: process design and economic analysis.

    PubMed

    Orjuela, Alvaro; Orjuela, Andrea; Lira, Carl T; Miller, Dennis J

    2013-07-01

    Recovery and purification of organic acids produced in fermentation constitutes a significant fraction of total production cost. In this paper, the design and economic analysis of a process to recover succinic acid (SA) via dissolution and acidification of succinate salts in ethanol, followed by reactive distillation to form succinate esters, is presented. Process simulation was performed for a range of plant capacities (13-55 million kg/yr SA) and SA fermentation titers (50-100 kg/m(3)). Economics were evaluated for a recovery system installed within an existing fermentation facility producing succinate salts at a cost of $0.66/kg SA. For a SA processing capacity of 54.9 million kg/yr and a titer of 100 kg/m(3) SA, the model predicts a capital investment of $75 million and a net processing cost of $1.85 per kg SA. Required selling price of diethyl succinate for a 30% annual return on investment is $1.57 per kg.

  15. Analysis of aristolochic acids, aristololactams and their analogues using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Ma, Chao-Mei; Wang, Xuan; Shang, Ming-Ying; Hattori, Masao; Xu, Feng; Jing, Yu; Dong, Shi-Wen; Xu, Yu-Qiong; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Cai, Shao-Qing

    2016-08-01

    More than 80 aristolochic acids (AAs) and aristololactams (ALs) have been found in plants of the Aristolochiaceae family, but relatively few have been fully studied. The present study aimed at developing and validating a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS(n)) for the analysis of these compounds. We characterized the fragmentation behaviors of 31 AAs, ALs, and their analogues via high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We summarized their fragmentation rules and used these rules to identify the constituents contained in Aristolochia contorta, Ar. debilis, Ar. manshurensis, Ar. fangchi, Ar. cinnabarina, and Ar. mollissima. The AAs and ALs showed very different MS behaviors. In MS(1) of AAs, the characteristic pseudomolecular ions were [M + NH4](+), [M + H](+), and [M + H - H2O](+). However, only [M + H](+) was found in the MS(1) of ALs, which was simpler than that of AAs. Distinct MS(n)fragmentation patterns were found for AAs and ALs, showing the same skeleton among the different substituent groups. The distribution of the 31 constituents in the 6 species of Aristolochia genus was reported for the first time. 25 Analogues of AAs and ALs were detected in this genus. A hierarchical schemes and a calculating formula of the molecular formula of these nitrophenanthrene carboxylic acids and their lactams were proposed. In conclusion, this method could be applied to identification of similar unknown constituents in other plants. PMID:27608953

  16. Trophic relationships in an estuarine environment: A quantitative fatty acid analysis signature approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnone, Larisa; Bessonart, Martin; Gadea, Juan; Salhi, María

    2015-12-01

    In order to better understand the functioning of aquatic environments, it is necessary to obtain accurate diet estimations in food webs. Their description should incorporate information about energy flow and the relative importance of trophic pathways. Fatty acids have been extensively used in qualitative studies on trophic relationships in food webs. Recently a new method to estimate quantitatively single predator diet has been developed. In this study, a model of aquatic food web through quantitative fatty acid signature analysis was generated to identify the trophic interactions among the species in the Rocha Lagoon. The biological sampling over two consecutive annual periods was comprehensive enough to identify all functional groups in the aquatic food web (except birds and mammals). Heleobia australis seemed to play a central role in this estuarine ecosystem. As both, a grazer and a prey to several other species, probably H. australis is transferring a great amount of energy to upper trophic levels. Most of the species at Rocha Lagoon have a wide range of prey items in their diet reflecting a complex food web, which is characteristic of extremely dynamic environment as estuarine ecosystems. QFASA is a model in tracing and quantitative estimate trophic pathways among species in an estuarine food web. The results obtained in the present work are a valuable contribution in the understanding of trophic relationships in Rocha Lagoon.

  17. In Silico Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Modelling Study of 2-Haloalkanoic Acid Dehalogenase Enzymes from Bacterial and Fungal Origin

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Raghunath; Konkimalla, V. B.; Ratha, Jagnyeswar

    2016-01-01

    2-Haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase enzymes have broad range of applications, starting from bioremediation to chemical synthesis of useful compounds that are widely distributed in fungi and bacteria. In the present study, a total of 81 full-length protein sequences of 2-haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase from bacteria and fungi were retrieved from NCBI database. Sequence analysis such as multiple sequence alignment (MSA), conserved motif identification, computation of amino acid composition, and phylogenetic tree construction were performed on these primary sequences. From MSA analysis, it was observed that the sequences share conserved lysine (K) and aspartate (D) residues in them. Also, phylogenetic tree indicated a subcluster comprised of both fungal and bacterial species. Due to nonavailability of experimental 3D structure for fungal 2-haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase in the PDB, molecular modelling study was performed for both fungal and bacterial sources of enzymes present in the subcluster. Further structural analysis revealed a common evolutionary topology shared between both fungal and bacterial enzymes. Studies on the buried amino acids showed highly conserved Leu and Ser in the core, despite variation in their amino acid percentage. Additionally, a surface exposed tryptophan was conserved in all of these selected models. PMID:26880911

  18. Analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts by single pump cycling-column-switching ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhongping; Ni, Chengzhu; Zhu, Zhuyi; Pan, Zaifa; Wang, Lili; Zhu, Yan

    2015-05-01

    The application of ion chromatography with the single pump cycling-column-switching technique was described for the analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts within a single run. Due to the hydrogen ions provided by an anion suppressor electrolyzing water, weak acid anions could be transformed into weak acids, existing as molecules, after passing through the suppressor. Therefore, an anion suppressor and ion-exclusion column were adopted to achieve on-line matrix elimination of weak acid anions with high concentration for the analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts. A series of standard solutions consisting of target anions of various concentrations from 0.005 to 10 mg/L were analyzed, with correlation coefficients r ≥ 0.9990. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.67 to 1.51 μg/L, based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3 and a 25 μL injection volume. Relative standard deviations for retention time, peak area, and peak height were all less than 2.01%. A spiking study was performed with satisfactory recoveries between 90.3 and 104.4% for all anions. The chromatographic system was successfully applied to the analysis of trace inorganic anions in five weak acid salts.

  19. Evaluation of a rapid method for preparation of fatty acid methyl esters for analysis by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Misir, R; Laarveld, B; Blair, R

    1985-08-30

    The major limitation to fatty acid analysis by gas-liquid chromatography is associated with preparation of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). In the present study, FAME preparations were made from plant oils (corn, olive, sunflower), sunflower oil margarine, lard and various animal tissue fats by a rapid transesterification involving tetramethylammonium hydroxide in methanol, and also by a longer conventional saponification-esterification method. Fats from animal (beef, mutton, pork) adipose tissues were extracted by a simpler modified procedure and also by the Folch method prior to the rapid and the conventional FAME preparations, respectively. FAME analysis on a gas-liquid chromatograph equipped with a Silar 10C glass capillary column indicated similar fatty acid composition of a given fat or oil, whether FAME was prepared by the rapid or the longer conventional method. The data obtained by both methods were very highly correlated for all the fats (r = 0.9895 - 0.9999). However, the rapid method showed a tendency for enhanced recoveries of lower chain fatty acids (e.g. 14:0), and also of unsaturated C18 isomers. Possibly, losses of fatty acids that occurred during the lengthy fat extraction, fatty acid esterification or ether-evaporation FAME concentration steps (conventional method) were minimised by the single transesterification step (rapid method). This rapid transesterification method appears to be an attractive alternative to FAME preparation from a wide variety of different fats for gas-liquid chromatographic analysis. PMID:4044736

  20. Beef, chicken and lamb fatty acid analysis--a simplified direct bimethylation procedure using freeze-dried material.

    PubMed

    Lee, M R F; Tweed, J K S; Kim, E J; Scollan, N D

    2012-12-01

    When fractionation of meat lipids is not required, procedures such as saponification can be used to extract total fatty acids, reducing reliance on toxic organic compounds. However, saponification of muscle fatty acids is laborious, and requires extended heating times, and a second methylation step to convert the extracted fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters prior to gas chromatography. Therefore the development of a more rapid direct methylation procedure would be of merit. The use of freeze-dried material for analysis is common and allows for greater homogenisation of the sample. The present study investigated the potential of using freeze-dried muscle samples and a direct bimethylation to analyse total fatty acids of meat (beef, chicken and lamb) in comparison with a saponification procedure followed by bimethylation. Both methods compared favourably for all major fatty acids measured. There was a minor difference in relation to the C18:1 trans 10 isomer with a greater (P<0.05) recovery with saponification. However, numerically the difference was small and likely as a result of approaching the limits of isomer identification by single column gas chromatography. Differences (P<0.001) between species were found for all fatty acids measured with no interaction effects. The described technique offers a simplified, quick and reliable alternative to saponification to analyse total fatty acids from muscle samples.

  1. Structural analysis and investigation of molecular properties of Cefpodoxime acid, a third generation antibiotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganthi, S.; Balu, P.; Sathyanarayanamoorthi, V.; Kannappan, V.; Kamil, M. G. Mohamed; Kumar, R.

    2016-03-01

    Extensive quantum mechanical studies are carried out on Cefpodoxime acid (CA), a new generation drug by Hartree-Fock (HF) and B3LYP methods to understand the structural and spectral characteristics of the molecule. The most stable geometry of the molecule was optimized and the bond parameters were reported. The spectroscopic properties of this pharmaceutically important compound were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and 1H NMR techniques. The scaled vibrational frequencies of CA in the ground state are calculated by HF and B3LYP methods with 6-311++G (d, p) basis set and compared with the observed FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The vibrational spectral analysis indicates the presence of two intra molecular hydrogen bonds in the molecule which is supported by theoretical study. 1H NMR chemical shifts (δ) were calculated for the CA molecule and compared with the experimental values. The theoretical electronic absorption spectral data in water and ethanol solvents were computed by TD-DFT method. UV-Vis absorption spectra of CA are recorded in these two solvents and compared with theoretical spectra. The spectral data and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis confirm the occurrence of intra molecular interactions in CA. The electronic distribution, in conjunction with electrophilicity index of CA was used to establish the active site and type of interaction between CA and beta lactamases. Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges is also carried out and thermodynamic properties of the title compound are calculated.

  2. Improved Proteomic Analysis Following Trichloroacetic Acid Extraction of Bacillus anthracis Spore Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Brooke LD; Wunschel, David S.; Sydor, Michael A.; Warner, Marvin G.; Wahl, Karen L.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2015-08-07

    Proteomic analysis of bacterial samples provides valuable information about cellular responses and functions under different environmental pressures. Proteomic analysis is dependent upon efficient extraction of proteins from bacterial samples without introducing bias toward extraction of particular protein classes. While no single method can recover 100% of the bacterial proteins, selected protocols can improve overall protein isolation, peptide recovery, or enrich for certain classes of proteins. The method presented here is technically simple and does not require specialized equipment such as a mechanical disrupter. Our data reveal that for particularly challenging samples, such as B. anthracis Sterne spores, trichloroacetic acid extraction improved the number of proteins identified within a sample compared to bead beating (714 vs 660, respectively). Further, TCA extraction enriched for 103 known spore specific proteins whereas bead beating resulted in 49 unique proteins. Analysis of C. botulinum samples grown to 5 days, composed of vegetative biomass and spores, showed a similar trend with improved protein yields and identification using our method compared to bead beating. Interestingly, easily lysed samples, such as B. anthracis vegetative cells, were equally as effectively processed via TCA and bead beating, but TCA extraction remains the easiest and most cost effective option. As with all assays, supplemental methods such as implementation of an alternative preparation method may provide additional insight to the protein biology of the bacteria being studied.

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopic and conformational analysis of 1,4-dihydroisonicotinic acid derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goba, Inguna; Turovska, Baiba; Belyakov, Sergey; Liepinsh, Edvards

    2014-09-01

    Structural and conformational properties of 1,4-dihydroisonicotinic acid derivatives, characterized by ester, ketone or cyano functions at positions 3 and 5 in solid and liquid states have been investigated by X-ray analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance and supported by quantum chemical calculations. The dihydropyridine ring in each of the compounds exists in flattened boat-type conformation. The observed ring distortions around the C(4) and N(1) atoms are interrelated. The substituent at N(1) has great influence on nitrogen atom pyramidality. The 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shifts and coupling constants are discussed in terms of their relationship to structural features such as character and position of the substituent in heterocycle, N-alkyl substitution and nitrogen lone pair delocalization within the conjugated system.

  4. [Gene cloning and bioinformatics analysis of new gene for chlorogenic acid biosynthesis of Lonicera hypoglauca].

    PubMed

    Yu, Shu-lin; Huang, Lu-qi; Yuan, Yuan; Qi, Lin-jie; Liu, Da-hui

    2015-03-01

    To obtain the key genes for chlorogenic acid biosynthesis of Lonicera hypoglauca, four new genes ware obtained from the our dataset of L. hypoglauca. And we also predicted the structure and function of LHPAL4, LHHCT1 , LHHCT2 and LHHCT3 proteins. The phylogenetic tree showed that LHPAL4 was closely related with LHPAL1, LHHCT1 was closely related with LHHCT3, LHHCT2 clustered into a single group. By Real-time PCR to detect the gene expressed level in different organs of L. hypoglauca, we found that the transcripted level of LHPAL4, LHHCT1 and LHHCT3 was the highest in defeat flowers, and the transcripted level of LHHCT2 was the highest in leaves. These result provided a basis to further analysis the mechanism of active ingredients in different organs, as well as the element for in vitro biosynthesis of active ingredients.

  5. Crystallization kinetics of poly-(lactic acid) with and without talc: Optical microscopy and calorimetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaa, Z.; Boutaous, M.; Rousset, F.; Fulchiron, R.; Zinet, M.; Xin, S.; Bourgin, P.

    2014-05-01

    Poly-(lactic acid) or PLA is a biodegradable polymer synthesized from renewable resources. Recently, the discovery of new polymerization routes has allowed increasing the produced volumes. As a consequence, PLA is becoming of great interest for reducing the dependence on petroleum-based plastics. Because of its interesting mechanical properties, PLA is seen as a potential substitute for some usual polymers. However, its relatively slow crystallization kinetics can be a disadvantage with regard to industrial applications. The crystallization kinetics of PLA can be enhanced by adding nucleating agents, which also influences on crystalline morphology and rheological behavior. In the present work, the isothermal quiescent crystallization kinetics of both neat PLA and PLA/talc composite (5 wt% talc) are investigated. The effects of talc on the overall crystallization kinetics and on the crystalline morphology are analyzed using both optical microscopy measurements and thermal analysis by differential scanning calorimetry.

  6. [Gene cloning and bioinformatics analysis of new gene for chlorogenic acid biosynthesis of Lonicera hypoglauca].

    PubMed

    Yu, Shu-lin; Huang, Lu-qi; Yuan, Yuan; Qi, Lin-jie; Liu, Da-hui

    2015-03-01

    To obtain the key genes for chlorogenic acid biosynthesis of Lonicera hypoglauca, four new genes ware obtained from the our dataset of L. hypoglauca. And we also predicted the structure and function of LHPAL4, LHHCT1 , LHHCT2 and LHHCT3 proteins. The phylogenetic tree showed that LHPAL4 was closely related with LHPAL1, LHHCT1 was closely related with LHHCT3, LHHCT2 clustered into a single group. By Real-time PCR to detect the gene expressed level in different organs of L. hypoglauca, we found that the transcripted level of LHPAL4, LHHCT1 and LHHCT3 was the highest in defeat flowers, and the transcripted level of LHHCT2 was the highest in leaves. These result provided a basis to further analysis the mechanism of active ingredients in different organs, as well as the element for in vitro biosynthesis of active ingredients. PMID:26087546

  7. Organic Analysis in the Miller Range 090657 CR2 Chondrite: Part 2 Amino Acid Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Cao, T.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Berger, E. L.; Messenger, S.; Clemett, S. J.; Aponte, J. C.; Elsila, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a wide variety of organic material, ranging from soluble discrete molecules to insoluble, unstructured kerogen-like components, as well as structured nano-globules of macromolecular carbon. The relationship between the soluble organic molecules, macromolecular organic material, and host minerals are poorly understood. Due to the differences in extractability of soluble and insoluble organic materials, the analysis methods for each differ and are often performed independently. The combination of soluble and insoluble analyses, when performed concurrently, can provide a wider understanding of spatial distribution, and elemental, structural and isotopic composition of organic material in primitive meteorites. Using macroscale extraction and analysis techniques in combination with in situ microscale observation, we have been studying both insoluble and soluble organic material in the primitive CR2 chondrite Miller Range (MIL) 090657. In accompanying abstracts (Cao et al. and Messenger et al.) we discuss insoluble organic material in the samples. By performing the consortium studies, we aim to improve our understanding of the relationship between the meteorite minerals and the soluble and insoluble organic phases and to delineate which species formed within the meteorite and those that formed in nebular or presolar environments. In this abstract, we present the results of amino acid analyses of MIL 090657 by ultra performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry. Amino acids are of interest because they are essential to life on Earth, and because they are present in sufficient structural, enantiomeric and isotopic diversity to allow insights into early solar system chemical processes. Furthermore, these are among the most isotopically anomalous species, yet at least some fraction are thought to have formed by aqueously-mediated processes during parent body alteration.

  8. Correlating multidimensional fetal heart rate variability analysis with acid-base balance at birth.

    PubMed

    Frasch, Martin G; Xu, Yawen; Stampalija, Tamara; Durosier, Lucien D; Herry, Christophe; Wang, Xiaogang; Casati, Daniela; Seely, Andrew Je; Alfirevic, Zarko; Gao, Xin; Ferrazzi, Enrico

    2014-12-01

    Fetal monitoring during labour currently fails to accurately detect acidemia. We developed a method to assess the multidimensional properties of fetal heart rate variability (fHRV) from trans-abdominal fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) during labour. We aimed to assess this novel bioinformatics approach for correlation between fHRV and neonatal pH or base excess (BE) at birth.We enrolled a prospective pilot cohort of uncomplicated singleton pregnancies at 38-42 weeks' gestation in Milan, Italy, and Liverpool, UK. Fetal monitoring was performed by standard cardiotocography. Simultaneously, with fECG (high sampling frequency) was recorded. To ensure clinician blinding, fECG information was not displayed. Data from the last 60 min preceding onset of second-stage labour were analyzed using clinically validated continuous individualized multiorgan variability analysis (CIMVA) software in 5 min overlapping windows. CIMVA allows simultaneous calculation of 101 fHRV measures across five fHRV signal analysis domains. We validated our mathematical prediction model internally with 80:20 cross-validation split, comparing results to cord pH and BE at birth.The cohort consisted of 60 women with neonatal pH values at birth ranging from 7.44 to 6.99 and BE from -0.3 to -18.7 mmol L(-1). Our model predicted pH from 30 fHRV measures (R(2) = 0.90, P < 0.001) and BE from 21 fHRV measures (R(2) = 0.77, P < 0.001).Novel bioinformatics approach (CIMVA) applied to fHRV derived from trans-abdominal fECG during labor correlated well with acid-base balance at birth. Further refinement and validation in larger cohorts are needed. These new measurements of fHRV might offer a new opportunity to predict fetal acid-base balance at birth. PMID:25407948

  9. Omega-3 fatty acids and risk of cognitive decline in the elderly: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Hou, Wen-Shang; Li, Min; Tang, Zhen-Yu

    2016-02-01

    Evidence has demonstrated that omega-3 fatty acids intake may be associated with age-related cognitive decline. However, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have drawn inconsistent conclusions. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the association between omega-3 fatty acids and risk of cognitive decline in the elderly. A strategic literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library (updated to December 2014) was performed. We retrieved six randomized controlled studies as eligible for our meta-analysis. Among these six studies, the duration time ranged from 3 to 40 months. The dose of omega-3 fatty acids (DHA + EPA) ranged from 400 to 1800 mg. The result of our meta-analysis expressed that omega-3 fatty acids statistically decrease the rate of cognitive decline in MMSE score (WMD = 0.15, [0.05, 0.25]; p = 0.003). In conclusion, our meta-analysis indicated that omega-3 fatty acids may help to prevent cognitive decline in the elderly.

  10. Robust analysis of underivatized free amino acids in soil by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiajia; Helmus, Rick; Cerli, Chiara; Jansen, Boris; Wang, Xiang; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2016-06-01

    Amino acids are an important and highly dynamic fraction of organic N in soils and their determination in soil without derivatization is challenging due to the difficulties in separation and detection of trace amounts of these polar analytes. In the present work, we developed an analytical method to quantify 20 free amino acids in aqueous soil extracts without derivatization. The method employed hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) technique combined with a cation exchange solid phase extraction (SPE). Four stable isotope labelled amino acids were used as internal standards to improve the method performance. Good separation of 20 underivatized amino acids was achieved within 12min. The limit of detection (LODs) and limit of quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 13-384ngg(-1) and 43-1267ngg(-1) (dry soil basis), respectively. The results showed that overall recoveries with high precision were obtained for the extracted free amino acids from ten different soils. The overall recoveries of 18 amino acids were similar for the ten soils used, which differed substantially in organic C content and in other properties as soil texture and pH. For most of the amino acids, the average recoveries from soil extracts were between 74% and 117%, with the exception of Met (31%), Pro (52%) and Arg (68%). Variability was within acceptable limits (relative standard deviations were between 4% and 13%), with the exception of Met (relative standard deviation=90%) and Arg (relative standard deviation=53%). Thus the proposed method with high throughout and high analyte specificity shows great promise for consistent analysis of free amino acids extracted from soils and offers new horizons for the analysis of amino acids in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem. PMID:27157424

  11. Automated high-throughput fatty acid analysis of umbilical cord serum and application to an epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu Hong; Salem, Norman; Wells, Ellen M; Zhou, Weiyin; Loewke, James D; Brown, James A; Lands, William E M; Goldman, Lynn R; Hibbeln, Joseph R

    2012-05-01

    Large population studies show that polyunsaturated fatty acids are important for human health, but determining relationships between the health benefits and the fatty acid content has been hampered by the unavailability of labor-effective high-throughput technologies. An automated high throughput fatty acid analysis was developed from a previous procedure based on direct transesterification including the automation of chemical procedures, data acquisition and automatic data processing. The method was validated and applied to umbilical cord serum samples in an epidemiological study. The method was linear in the range of 1-600 μg/mL serum with r² ≥ 0.99. The within-run CV was <5.4% for 23 fatty acids and a range of recoveries over three concentrations were 76-119% in a low-lipid matrix with the exception of 14:0. The fatty acid concentration as measured by the robotic method for human plasma was in good agreement with the Lepage & Roy method. The fatty acid profile in umbilical cord serum from American subjects (n = 287) showed an average of 38.0, 24.9, 32.0 and 4.6% of total fatty acids for saturates, monounsaturates, n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturates, respectively. This is the first report of a complete, validated, cost-effective, automated, high throughput fatty acid measurement method along with application to a population-based study. Automated fatty acid analysis coupled with automated data processing greatly facilitates the high throughput, 72 samples transesterified in 6 h, required for large population-based studies. PMID:22430941

  12. Robust analysis of underivatized free amino acids in soil by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiajia; Helmus, Rick; Cerli, Chiara; Jansen, Boris; Wang, Xiang; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2016-06-01

    Amino acids are an important and highly dynamic fraction of organic N in soils and their determination in soil without derivatization is challenging due to the difficulties in separation and detection of trace amounts of these polar analytes. In the present work, we developed an analytical method to quantify 20 free amino acids in aqueous soil extracts without derivatization. The method employed hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) technique combined with a cation exchange solid phase extraction (SPE). Four stable isotope labelled amino acids were used as internal standards to improve the method performance. Good separation of 20 underivatized amino acids was achieved within 12min. The limit of detection (LODs) and limit of quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 13-384ngg(-1) and 43-1267ngg(-1) (dry soil basis), respectively. The results showed that overall recoveries with high precision were obtained for the extracted free amino acids from ten different soils. The overall recoveries of 18 amino acids were similar for the ten soils used, which differed substantially in organic C content and in other properties as soil texture and pH. For most of the amino acids, the average recoveries from soil extracts were between 74% and 117%, with the exception of Met (31%), Pro (52%) and Arg (68%). Variability was within acceptable limits (relative standard deviations were between 4% and 13%), with the exception of Met (relative standard deviation=90%) and Arg (relative standard deviation=53%). Thus the proposed method with high throughout and high analyte specificity shows great promise for consistent analysis of free amino acids extracted from soils and offers new horizons for the analysis of amino acids in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem.

  13. A computer program for geochemical analysis of acid-rain and other low-ionic-strength, acidic waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnsson, P.A.; Lord, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    ARCHEM, a computer program written in FORTRAN 77, is designed primarily for use in the routine geochemical interpretation of low-ionic-strength, acidic waters. On the basis of chemical analyses of the water, and either laboratory or field determinations of pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen, the program calculates the equilibrium distribution of major inorganic aqueous species and of inorganic aluminum complexes. The concentration of the organic anion is estimated from the dissolved organic concentration. Ionic ferrous iron is calculated from the dissolved oxygen concentration. Ionic balances and comparisons of computed with measured specific conductances are performed as checks on the analytical accuracy of chemical analyses. ARCHEM may be tailored easily to fit different sampling protocols, and may be run on multiple sample analyses. (Author 's abstract)

  14. Stereoselective analysis of D and L dansyl amino acids as the mixed chelate copper(II) complexes by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Lam, S

    1984-09-01

    This paper reviews the mixed chelation approach to resolution of the optical isomers of D and L dansyl amino acids by high performance liquid chromatography. The use of eluants containing Cu(II) complexes of L-proline, L-arginine, L-histidine, and L-histidine methyl ester effected the separation of many D and L amino acids, including those with aliphatic, polar, and aromatic substituents. The mechanism of separation, which is based on the preferential ternary complex formation of the analyte amino acid and the chiral chelate with Cu(II) in the mobile phase, is discussed. The stereoselectivity depends mainly on the different steric interactions between the alkyl side chains of the amino acid analytes and the chiral ligands coordinating around Cu(II), although such parameters as pH, temperature, organic modifier, and concentration of the chiral additive also affect the chromatographic separation. Among the chiral ligands studied, L-histidine methyl ester is unique in that it possesses both achiral selectivity for the dansyl amino acids and chiral selectivity for the respective D and L enantiomers. With a mobile phase gradient of acetonitrile in a buffer containing Cu(II) L-histidine methyl ester complex, a stereoselective procedure was devised for the analysis of D and L amino acid enantiomers, achieving the separation that the current amino acid analyzer could not perform. Finally, the use of the mixed chelation approach in two biomedical studies is described. In the first application, the histidine methyl ester gradient was adapted for analyzing amino acids in cerebrospinal fluid; in the second, an L-aspartame Cu(II) complex eluant was developed for measuring the urine concentration of D and L pipecolic acid (piperidine-2-carboxylic acid), a metabolite of lysine.

  15. Analysis of porcine adipose tissue transcriptome reveals differences in de novo fatty acid synthesis in pigs with divergent muscle fatty acid composition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In pigs, adipose tissue is one of the principal organs involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. It is particularly involved in the overall fatty acid synthesis with consequences in other lipid-target organs such as muscles and the liver. With this in mind, we have used massive, parallel high-throughput sequencing technologies to characterize the porcine adipose tissue transcriptome architecture in six Iberian x Landrace crossbred pigs showing extreme phenotypes for intramuscular fatty acid composition (three per group). Results High-throughput RNA sequencing was used to generate a whole characterization of adipose tissue (backfat) transcriptome. A total of 4,130 putative unannotated protein-coding sequences were identified in the 20% of reads which mapped in intergenic regions. Furthermore, 36% of the unmapped reads were represented by interspersed repeats, SINEs being the most abundant elements. Differential expression analyses identified 396 candidate genes among divergent animals for intramuscular fatty acid composition. Sixty-two percent of these genes (247/396) presented higher expression in the group of pigs with higher content of intramuscular SFA and MUFA, while the remaining 149 showed higher expression in the group with higher content of PUFA. Pathway analysis related these genes to biological functions and canonical pathways controlling lipid and fatty acid metabolisms. In concordance with the phenotypic classification of animals, the major metabolic pathway differentially modulated between groups was de novo lipogenesis, the group with more PUFA being the one that showed lower expression of lipogenic genes. Conclusions These results will help in the identification of genetic variants at loci that affect fatty acid composition traits. The implications of these results range from the improvement of porcine meat quality traits to the application of the pig as an animal model of human metabolic diseases. PMID:24289474

  16. ANALYSIS OF PERFLUORINATED CARBOXYLIC ACIDS IN SOILS II: OPTIMIZATION OF CHROMATOGRAPHY AND EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the objective of detecting and quantitating low concentrations of perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs), including perfluorinated octanoic acid (PFOA), in soils, we compared the analytical suitability of liquid chromatography columns containing three different stationary p...

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a bacterial l-amino-acid oxidase from Rhodococcus opacus

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, Annette; Geueke, Birgit; Niefind, Karsten; Hummel, Werner; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2006-03-01

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a bacterial l-amino acid oxidase from R. opacus is described. The homodimeric protein contains one molecule of non-covalently bound FAD per monomer. Crystals with good diffraction properties were grown in two different orthorhombic space groups (P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and C222{sub 1}). l-Amino-acid oxidases (EC 1.4.3.2) catalyse the stereospecific oxidative deamination of an l-amino-acid substrate to an α-keto acid with the production of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. In this study, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a bacterial l-amino-acid oxidase from Rhodococcus opacus (RoLAAO) is described. RoLAAO is a dimeric protein consisting of two identical subunits of 489 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 54.2 kDa and a non-covalently bound FAD molecule. RoLAAO was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method in two different space groups: P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 65.7, b = 109.7, c = 134.4 Å) and C222{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 68.3, b = 88.4, c = 186.6 Å). Both crystal forms diffracted X-rays to a resolution of at least 1.6 Å.

  18. Prediction of anticancer property of bowsellic acid derivatives by quantitative structure activity relationship analysis and molecular docking study

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Raghunath; Guru, R. K.; Behera, R.; Nayak, B.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Boswellic acid consists of a series of pentacyclic triterpene molecules that are produced by the plant Boswellia serrata. The potential applications of Bowsellic acid for treatment of cancer have been focused here. Aims: To predict the property of the bowsellic acid derivatives as anticancer compounds by various computational approaches. Materials and Methods: In this work, all total 65 derivatives of bowsellic acids from the PubChem database were considered for the study. After energy minimization of the ligands various types of molecular descriptors were computed and corresponding two-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models were obtained by taking Andrews coefficient as the dependent variable. Statistical Analysis Used: Different types of comparative analysis were used for QSAR study are multiple linear regression, partial least squares, support vector machines and artificial neural network. Results: From the study geometrical descriptors shows the highest correlation coefficient, which indicates the binding factor of the compound. To evaluate the anticancer property molecular docking study of six selected ligands based on Andrews affinity were performed with nuclear factor-kappa protein kinase (Protein Data Bank ID 4G3D), which is an established therapeutic target for cancers. Along with QSAR study and docking result, it was predicted that bowsellic acid can also be treated as a potential anticancer compound. Conclusions: Along with QSAR study and docking result, it was predicted that bowsellic acid can also be treated as a potential anticancer compound. PMID:25709332

  19. Dose-dependent consumption of farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) increases plasma phospholipid n-3 fatty acids differentially

    PubMed Central

    Raatz, Susan K.; Rosenberger, Thad A.; Johnson, LuAnn K.; Wolters, William W.; Burr, Gary S; Picklo, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced omega-3 fatty acid (n-3) intake benefits cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk reduction. Increasing consumption at a population level may be better addressed by diet than through supplementation. However, limited data are available on the effect of the dose response to fish intake on plasma levels of n-3 fatty acids. To compare the effects of different doses of farmed Atlantic salmon on plasma phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) proportions and CVD risk biomarkers (glucose, insulin, HOMAIR, hsCRP, and IL-6) in healthy subjects we performed a randomized 3-period cross-over designed trial (4 wk treatment, 4-8 wk washout) to compare the effects of twice/wk consumption of farmed Atlantic salmon at doses of 90, 180, and 270 g in 19 apparently healthy men and women with a mean age of aged 40-65 years and a BMI between 25-34.9 kg/m2. All study visits were conducted at the USDA, ARS Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center. EPA and total n-3 were increased (p<0.05) by all treatments in a dose response manner, with total n-3 of 8.03 ± 0.26 and 9.21 ± 0.26 % for 180 and 270 g doses, respectively. Linoleic acid did not change in response to treatment while arachidonic acid (P<0.05) and total omega-6 fatty acids (n-6) decreased dose dependently (<0.0001). The addition of farmed Atlantic salmon to the diet twice/wk for 4 wk at portions of 180g and 270g modifies PLFA proportions of