Science.gov

Sample records for acid analysis revealed

  1. Trophic hierarchies revealed via amino acid isotopic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the potential of isotopic methods to illuminate trophic function, accurate estimates of lifetime feeding tendencies have remained elusive. A relatively new approach—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino ...

  2. Dietary Intake and Plasma Metabolomic Analysis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Bipolar Subjects Reveal Dysregulation of Linoleic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Simon J.; Ringrose, Rachel N.; Harrington, Gloria J; Mancuso, Peter; Burant, Charles F; McInnis, Melvin G

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) profiles associate with risk for mood disorders. This poses the hypothesis of metabolic differences between patients and unaffected healthy controls that relate to the primary illness or are secondary to medication use or dietary intake. However, dietary manipulation or supplementation studies show equivocal results improving mental health outcomes. This study investigates dietary patterns and metabolic profiles relevant to PUFA metabolism, in bipolar I individuals compared to non-psychiatric controls. We collected seven-day diet records and performed metabolomic analysis of fasted plasma collected immediately after diet recording. Regression analyses adjusted for age, gender and energy intake found that bipolar individuals had significantly lower intake of selenium and PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (n-3), arachidonic acid (AA) (n-6) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (n-3/n-6 mix); and significantly increased intake of the saturated fats, eicosanoic and docosanoic acid. Regression analysis of metabolomic data derived from plasma samples, correcting for age, gender, BMI, psychiatric medication use and dietary PUFA intake, revealed that bipolar individuals had reduced 13S-HpODE, a major peroxidation product of the n-6, linoleic acid (LA), reduced eicosadienoic acid (EDA), an elongation product of LA; reduced prostaglandins G2, F2 alpha and E1, synthesized from n-6 PUFA; and reduced EPA. These observations remained significant or near significant after Bonferroni correction and are consistent with metabolic variances between bipolar and control individuals with regard to PUFA metabolism. These findings suggest that specific dietary interventions aimed towards correcting these metabolic disparities may impact health outcomes for individuals with bipolar disorder. PMID:24953860

  3. Analysis of putative nonulosonic acid biosynthesis pathways in Archaea reveals a complex evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Kandiba, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-08-01

    Sialic acids and the other nonulosonic acid sugars, legionaminic acid and pseudaminic acid, are nine carbon-containing sugars that can be detected as components of the glycans decorating proteins and other molecules in Eukarya and Bacteria. Yet, despite the prevalence of N-glycosylation in Archaea and the variety of sugars recruited for the archaeal version of this post-translational modification, only a single report of a nonulosonic acid sugar in an archaeal N-linked glycan has appeared. Hence, to obtain a clearer picture of nonulosonic acid sugar biosynthesis capability in Archaea, 122 sequenced genomes were scanned for the presence of genes involved in the biogenesis of these sugars. The results reveal that while Archaea and Bacteria share a common route of sialic acid biosynthesis, numerous archaeal nonulosonic acid sugar biosynthesis pathway components were acquired from elsewhere via various routes. Still, the limited number of Archaea encoding components involved in the synthesis of nonulosonic acid sugars implies that such saccharides are not major components of glycans in this domain.

  4. Evolution and functional implications of the tricarboxylic acid cycle as revealed by phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, João Henrique Frota; Esteves-Ferreira, Alberto A; Quinhones, Carla G S; Pereira-Lima, Italo A; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R; Araújo, Wagner L

    2014-10-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, a crucial component of respiratory metabolism, is composed of a set of eight enzymes present in the mitochondrial matrix. However, most of the TCA cycle enzymes are encoded in the nucleus in higher eukaryotes. In addition, evidence has accumulated demonstrating that nuclear genes were acquired from the mitochondrial genome during the course of evolution. For this reason, we here analyzed the evolutionary history of all TCA cycle enzymes in attempt to better understand the origin of these nuclear-encoded proteins. Our results indicate that prior to endosymbiotic events the TCA cycle seemed to operate only as isolated steps in both the host (eubacterial cell) and mitochondria (alphaproteobacteria). The origin of isoforms present in different cell compartments might be associated either with gene-transfer events which did not result in proper targeting of the protein to mitochondrion or with duplication events. Further in silico analyses allow us to suggest new insights into the possible roles of TCA cycle enzymes in different tissues. Finally, we performed coexpression analysis using mitochondrial TCA cycle genes revealing close connections among these genes most likely related to the higher efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation in this specialized organelle. Moreover, these analyses allowed us to identify further candidate genes which might be used for metabolic engineering purposes given the importance of the TCA cycle during development and/or stress situations.

  5. Evolution and Functional Implications of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle as Revealed by Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, João Henrique Frota; Esteves-Ferreira, Alberto A.; Quinhones, Carla G.S.; Pereira-Lima, Italo A.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Araújo, Wagner L.

    2014-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, a crucial component of respiratory metabolism, is composed of a set of eight enzymes present in the mitochondrial matrix. However, most of the TCA cycle enzymes are encoded in the nucleus in higher eukaryotes. In addition, evidence has accumulated demonstrating that nuclear genes were acquired from the mitochondrial genome during the course of evolution. For this reason, we here analyzed the evolutionary history of all TCA cycle enzymes in attempt to better understand the origin of these nuclear-encoded proteins. Our results indicate that prior to endosymbiotic events the TCA cycle seemed to operate only as isolated steps in both the host (eubacterial cell) and mitochondria (alphaproteobacteria). The origin of isoforms present in different cell compartments might be associated either with gene-transfer events which did not result in proper targeting of the protein to mitochondrion or with duplication events. Further in silico analyses allow us to suggest new insights into the possible roles of TCA cycle enzymes in different tissues. Finally, we performed coexpression analysis using mitochondrial TCA cycle genes revealing close connections among these genes most likely related to the higher efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation in this specialized organelle. Moreover, these analyses allowed us to identify further candidate genes which might be used for metabolic engineering purposes given the importance of the TCA cycle during development and/or stress situations. PMID:25274566

  6. Proteomic analysis reveals dynamic regulation of fruit development and sugar and acid accumulation in apple.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjun; Li, Dongxia; Feng, Fengjuan; Zhang, Sheng; Ma, Fengwang; Cheng, Lailiang

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the fruit developmental process is critical for fruit quality improvement. Here, we report a comprehensive proteomic analysis of apple fruit development over five growth stages, from young fruit to maturity, coupled with metabolomic profiling. A tandem mass tag (TMT)-based comparative proteomics approach led to the identification and quantification of 7098 and 6247 proteins, respectively. This large-scale proteomic dataset presents a global view of the critical pathways involved in fruit development and metabolism. When linked with metabolomics data, these results provide new insights into the modulation of fruit development, the metabolism and storage of sugars and organic acids (mainly malate), and events within the energy-related pathways for respiration and glycolysis. We suggest that the key steps identified here (e.g. those involving the FK2, TST, EDR6, SPS, mtME and mtMDH switches), can be further targeted to confirm their roles in accumulation and balance of fructose, sucrose and malate. Moreover, our findings imply that the primary reason for decreases in amino acid concentrations during fruit development is related to a reduction in substrate flux via glycolysis, which is mainly regulated by fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and bisphosphoglycerate mutase.

  7. Proteomic analysis reveals dynamic regulation of fruit development and sugar and acid accumulation in apple.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjun; Li, Dongxia; Feng, Fengjuan; Zhang, Sheng; Ma, Fengwang; Cheng, Lailiang

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the fruit developmental process is critical for fruit quality improvement. Here, we report a comprehensive proteomic analysis of apple fruit development over five growth stages, from young fruit to maturity, coupled with metabolomic profiling. A tandem mass tag (TMT)-based comparative proteomics approach led to the identification and quantification of 7098 and 6247 proteins, respectively. This large-scale proteomic dataset presents a global view of the critical pathways involved in fruit development and metabolism. When linked with metabolomics data, these results provide new insights into the modulation of fruit development, the metabolism and storage of sugars and organic acids (mainly malate), and events within the energy-related pathways for respiration and glycolysis. We suggest that the key steps identified here (e.g. those involving the FK2, TST, EDR6, SPS, mtME and mtMDH switches), can be further targeted to confirm their roles in accumulation and balance of fructose, sucrose and malate. Moreover, our findings imply that the primary reason for decreases in amino acid concentrations during fruit development is related to a reduction in substrate flux via glycolysis, which is mainly regulated by fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and bisphosphoglycerate mutase. PMID:27535992

  8. Metabolomic analysis reveals decreased skeletal muscle amino acid content and altered fatty acid handling in obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Koves, Timothy R.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Houmard, Joseph A.; Friedman, Jacob E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Investigate the effects of obesity and high fat diet (HFD) exposure on fatty acid oxidation and TCA cycle intermediates and amino acids in skeletal muscle to better characterize energy metabolism. Design and Methods Plasma and skeletal muscle metabolomic profiles were measured from lean and obese males before and after a 5 day HFD in the 4h post-prandial condition. Results At both time points, plasma short-chain acylcarnitine species (SCAC) were higher in the obese subjects, while the amino acids glycine, histidine, methionine, and citrulline were lower in skeletal muscle of obese subjects. Skeletal muscle medium-chain acylcarnitines (MCAC) C6, C8, C10:2, C10:1, C10, and C12:1 increased in obese subjects, but decreased in lean subjects, from Pre- to Post-HFD. Plasma content of C10:1 was also decreased in lean, but increased in the obese subjects from Pre- to Post-HFD. CD36 increased from Pre- to Post-HFD in obese but not lean subjects. Conclusions Lower skeletal muscle amino acid content and accumulation of plasma SCAC in obese subjects could reflect increased anaplerosis for TCA cycle intermediates, while accumulation of MCAC suggests limitations in β-oxidation. These measures may be important markers of or contributors to dysregulated metabolism observed in skeletal muscle of obese humans. PMID:25864501

  9. Direct analysis reveals an absence of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid in cancer procoagulant from human tissues.

    PubMed

    Kaplinska, Katarzyna; Mielicki, Wojciech P

    2009-07-01

    Additional carboxylation of glutamic acid by vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylase is a common posttranslational modification of many proteins, including some of blood clotting factors. Vitamin K-antagonists, such as warfarin, are often included in the therapy of malignant disease, decreasing the blood coagulation potential. Cancer procoagulant, a direct blood coagulation factor X activator from malignant tissue, is considered as a vitamin K-dependent protein, so it could serve as one of possible targets for the therapy with warfarin. However, there is still no experimental data demonstrating directly the presence of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) in a cancer procoagulant molecule. The presence of Gla in cancer procoagulant isolated from human amnion-chorion membranes and from human malignant melanoma WM 115 cell line was analyzed directly, using specific anti-Gla monoclonal antibodies. There was no detectable amount of Gla in cancer procoagulant isolated from fetal or malignant tissue. Cancer procoagulant from human tissues does not contain Gla-rich domain. The finding indicates that cancer procoagulant is rather a poor target for warfarin therapy of malignant disease.

  10. Analysis of Known Bacterial Protein Vaccine Antigens Reveals Biased Physical Properties and Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Mayers, Carl; Rowe, Sonya; Miller, Julie; Lingard, Bryan; Hayward, Sarah; Titball, Richard W.

    2003-01-01

    Many vaccines have been developed from live attenuated forms of bacterial pathogens or from killed bacterial cells. However, an increased awareness of the potential for transient side-effects following vaccination has prompted an increased emphasis on the use of sub-unit vaccines, rather than those based on whole bacterial cells. The identification of vaccine sub-units is often a lengthy process and bioinformatics approaches have recently been used to identify candidate protein vaccine antigens. Such methods ultimately offer the promise of a more rapid advance towards preclinical studies with vaccines. We have compared the properties of known bacterial vaccine antigens against randomly selected proteins and identified differences in the make-up of these two groups. A computer algorithm that exploits these differences allows the identification of potential vaccine antigen candidates from pathogenic bacteria on the basis of their amino acid composition, a property inherently associated with sub-cellular location. PMID:18629010

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals the Metabolic Mechanism of L-Ascorbic Acid in Ziziphus jujuba Mill.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunmei; Huang, Jian; Li, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) is the most economically important member of the Rhamnaceae family and contains a high concentration of ascorbic acid (AsA). To explore the metabolic mechanism of AsA accumulation, we investigated the abundance of AsA in the fruit development stages, the leaf and flower of Z. jujuba cv Junzao, and the mature fruit of one type of wild jujube (Z. jujuba var. spinosa Hu, Yanchuan sour jujube). And the expression patterns of genes involved in AsA biosynthesis, degradation, and recycling were analyzed. The result showed that AsA biosynthesis during early fruit development (the enlargement stage) is the main reason for jujube high accumulation. The L-galactose pathway plays a predominant role in the biosynthesis of AsA during jujube fruit development, and the genes GMP1, GME1, GGP, and GaLDH involved in the determination of AsA concentration during fruit development and in different genotypes; the myo-inositol pathway along with the genes GME2 and GMP2 in the L-galactose pathway play a compensatory role in maintaining AsA accumulation during the ripening stage. These findings enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanism in regulating AsA accumulation for jujube. PMID:26913041

  12. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Influence of Abscisic Acid on the Metabolism of Pigments, Ascorbic Acid and Folic Acid during Strawberry Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongdong; Li, Li; Luo, Zisheng; Mou, Wangshu; Mao, Linchun; Ying, Tiejin

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation of abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis and its influence on other important phytochemicals is critical for understanding the versatile roles that ABA plays during strawberry fruit ripening. Using RNA-seq technology, we sampled strawberry fruit in response to ABA or nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA; an ABA biosynthesis blocker) treatment during ripening and assessed the expression changes of genes involved in the metabolism of pigments, ascorbic acid (AsA) and folic acid in the receptacles. The transcriptome analysis identified a lot of genes differentially expressed in response to ABA or NDGA treatment. In particular, genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway were actively regulated by ABA, with the exception of the gene encoding cinnamate 4-hydroxylase. Chlorophyll degradation was accelerated by ABA mainly owing to the higher expression of gene encoding pheide a oxygenase. The decrease of β-carotene content was accelerated by ABA treatment and delayed by NDGA. A high negative correlation rate was found between ABA and β-carotene content, indicating the importance of the requirement for ABA synthesis during fruit ripening. In addition, evaluation on the folate biosynthetic pathway indicate that ABA might have minor function in this nutrient's biosynthesis process, however, it might be involved in its homeostasis. Surprisingly, though AsA content accumulated during fruit ripening, expressions of genes involved in its biosynthesis in the receptacles were significantly lower in ABA-treated fruits. This transcriptome analysis expands our understanding of ABA's role in phytochemical metabolism during strawberry fruit ripening and the regulatory mechanisms of ABA on these pathways were discussed. Our study provides a wealth of genetic information in the metabolism pathways and may be helpful for molecular manipulation in the future.

  13. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Influence of Abscisic Acid on the Metabolism of Pigments, Ascorbic Acid and Folic Acid during Strawberry Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zisheng; Mou, Wangshu; Mao, Linchun; Ying, Tiejin

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation of abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis and its influence on other important phytochemicals is critical for understanding the versatile roles that ABA plays during strawberry fruit ripening. Using RNA-seq technology, we sampled strawberry fruit in response to ABA or nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA; an ABA biosynthesis blocker) treatment during ripening and assessed the expression changes of genes involved in the metabolism of pigments, ascorbic acid (AsA) and folic acid in the receptacles. The transcriptome analysis identified a lot of genes differentially expressed in response to ABA or NDGA treatment. In particular, genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway were actively regulated by ABA, with the exception of the gene encoding cinnamate 4-hydroxylase. Chlorophyll degradation was accelerated by ABA mainly owing to the higher expression of gene encoding pheide a oxygenase. The decrease of β-carotene content was accelerated by ABA treatment and delayed by NDGA. A high negative correlation rate was found between ABA and β-carotene content, indicating the importance of the requirement for ABA synthesis during fruit ripening. In addition, evaluation on the folate biosynthetic pathway indicate that ABA might have minor function in this nutrient’s biosynthesis process, however, it might be involved in its homeostasis. Surprisingly, though AsA content accumulated during fruit ripening, expressions of genes involved in its biosynthesis in the receptacles were significantly lower in ABA-treated fruits. This transcriptome analysis expands our understanding of ABA’s role in phytochemical metabolism during strawberry fruit ripening and the regulatory mechanisms of ABA on these pathways were discussed. Our study provides a wealth of genetic information in the metabolism pathways and may be helpful for molecular manipulation in the future. PMID:26053069

  14. Comparative Proteomic Analysis Reveals the Effects of Exogenous Calcium against Acid Rain Stress in Liquidambar formosana Hance Leaves.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen-Jun; Wu, Qian; Liu, Xiang; Shen, Zhi-Jun; Chen, Juan; Liu, Ting-Wu; Chen, Juan; Zhu, Chun-Quan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Chen, Lin; Wei, Jia; Qiu, Xiao-Yun; Shen, Guo-Xin; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Acid rain (AR) impacts forest health by leaching calcium (Ca) away from soils and plants. Ca is an essential element and participates in various plant physiological responses. In the present study, the protective role of exogenous Ca in alleviating AR stress in Liquidambar formosana Hance at the physiological and proteomic levels was examined. Our results showed that low Ca condition resulted in the chlorophyll content and photosynthesis decreasing significantly in L. formosana leaves; however, these effects could be reversed by high Ca supplementation. Further proteomic analyses successfully identified 81 differentially expressed proteins in AR-treated L. formosana under different Ca levels. In particular, some of the proteins are involved in primary metabolism, photosynthesis, energy production, antioxidant defense, transcription, and translation. Moreover, quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) results indicated that low Ca significantly increased the expression level of the investigated Ca-related genes, which can be reversed by high Ca supplementation under AR stress. Further, Western blotting analysis revealed that exogenous Ca supply reduced AR damage by elevating the expression of proteins involved in the Calvin cycle, reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging system. These findings allowed us to better understand how woody plants respond to AR stress at various Ca levels and the protective role of exogenous Ca against AR stress in forest tree species. PMID:26616104

  15. Comparative Proteomic Analysis Reveals the Effects of Exogenous Calcium against Acid Rain Stress in Liquidambar formosana Hance Leaves.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen-Jun; Wu, Qian; Liu, Xiang; Shen, Zhi-Jun; Chen, Juan; Liu, Ting-Wu; Chen, Juan; Zhu, Chun-Quan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Chen, Lin; Wei, Jia; Qiu, Xiao-Yun; Shen, Guo-Xin; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Acid rain (AR) impacts forest health by leaching calcium (Ca) away from soils and plants. Ca is an essential element and participates in various plant physiological responses. In the present study, the protective role of exogenous Ca in alleviating AR stress in Liquidambar formosana Hance at the physiological and proteomic levels was examined. Our results showed that low Ca condition resulted in the chlorophyll content and photosynthesis decreasing significantly in L. formosana leaves; however, these effects could be reversed by high Ca supplementation. Further proteomic analyses successfully identified 81 differentially expressed proteins in AR-treated L. formosana under different Ca levels. In particular, some of the proteins are involved in primary metabolism, photosynthesis, energy production, antioxidant defense, transcription, and translation. Moreover, quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) results indicated that low Ca significantly increased the expression level of the investigated Ca-related genes, which can be reversed by high Ca supplementation under AR stress. Further, Western blotting analysis revealed that exogenous Ca supply reduced AR damage by elevating the expression of proteins involved in the Calvin cycle, reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging system. These findings allowed us to better understand how woody plants respond to AR stress at various Ca levels and the protective role of exogenous Ca against AR stress in forest tree species.

  16. Differential proteomic analysis of lymphocytes treated with mycophenolic acid reveals caspase 3-induced cleavage of rho GDP dissociation inhibitor 2.

    PubMed

    Heller, Tanja; Asif, Abdul R; Petrova, Darinka Todorova; Doncheva, Yuliana; Wieland, E; Oellerich, Michael; Shipkova, Maria; Armstrong, Victor William

    2009-04-01

    The antiproliferative immunosuppressive drug mycophenolic acid (MPA) is an uncompetitive inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in de novo synthesis of purine nucleotides. The latter are not only required for synthesis of DNA and RNA but also are essential for the regulation of numerous cellular signaling pathways modulated by guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins). We undertook an analysis of the influence of MPA on protein expression in a T-lymphoblast cell line (CCRF-CEM), which displays concentration-dependent inhibition of proliferation by MPA to obtain insight into the influence of MPA on the cellular proteome. Cells were stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin and incubated in the presence or absence of MPA. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and densitometric imaging revealed 11 differentially expressed protein spots (P < 0.05) on MPA treatment, 6 with increased and 5 with decreased abundance. After in-gel tryptic digestion, proteins were identified by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Proteins displaying increased abundance after MPA treatment included splicing factor arginine/serine-rich 2, prostaglandin E synthase 3, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A, and deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase. Endoplasmin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, acidic leucine-rich nuclear phosphoprotein 32 family member A, and cofilin 1 showed decreased abundance after MPA treatment. Three separate spots (1 decreased and 2 increased abundance) were identified as Rho guanosine diphosphate dissociation inhibitor 2 (Rho GDI 2) proteins. Western blotting with a monoclonal antibody directed against the Rho GDI 2 site cleaved by caspase 3 demonstrated 1 spot with increased abundance to be the caspase 3-cleaved product of Rho GDI 2 lacking the first 19 amino acids. Rho GDI 2 plays a central regulatory role in the activation of Rho guanosine triphosphatases that function as molecular switches in cell signaling

  17. Comparative proteomic analysis of all-trans-retinoic acid treatment reveals systematic posttranscriptional control mechanisms in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michael N; Ozpolat, Bulent; Abdi, Fadi; Gu, Sheng; Legler, Allison; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G; Tirado-Gomez, Maribel; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Chen, Xian

    2004-09-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) induces growth inhibition, differentiation, and apoptosis in cancer cells, including acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In APL, expression of promyelocytic leukemia protein retinoic acid receptor-alpha (PML-RARalpha) fusion protein, owing to the t(15; 17) reciprocal translocation, leads to a block in the promyelocytic stage of differentiation. Here, we studied molecular mechanisms involved in ATRA-induced growth inhibition and myeloid cell differentiation in APL. By employing comprehensive high-throughput proteomic methods of 2-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and amino acid-coded mass tagging coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry, we systematically identified a total of 59 differentially expressed proteins that were consistently modulated in response to ATRA treatment. The data revealed significant down-regulation of eukaryotic initiation and elongation factors, initiation factor 2 (IF2), eukaryotic initiation factor 4AI (eIF4AI), eIF4G, eIF5, eIF6, eukaryotic elongation factor 1A-1 (eEF1A-1), EF-1-delta, eEF1gamma, 14-3-3epsilon, and 14-3-3zeta/delta (P <.05). The translational inhibitor DAP5/p97/NAT1 (death-associated protein 5) and PML isoform-1 were found to be up-regulated (P <.05). Additionally, the down-regulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) C1/C2, UP2, K, and F; small nuclear RNPs (snRNPs) D3 and E; nucleoprotein tumor potentiating region (TPR); and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were found (P <.05); these were found to function in pre-mRNA processing, splicing, and export events. Importantly, these proteomic findings were validated by Western blot analysis. Our data in comparison with previous cDNA microarray studies and our reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) experiments demonstrate that broad networks of posttranscriptional suppressive pathways are activated during ATRA-induced growth inhibition processes in APL. PMID:15142884

  18. A Causal Network Analysis of the Fatty Acid Metabolome in African-Americans Reveals a Critical Role for Palmitoleate and Margarate

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Akram; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fatty acids are important sources of energy and possible predictors and etiologic factors in many common complex pathologies such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and certain forms of cancers. While fatty acids are thought to covary with each other, their underlying causal networks have not been fully elucidated. This study reports the identification and analysis of a statistical causal network among 15 mostly long-chain fatty acids. In an African-American population sample and using the Genome granularity-Directed Acyclic Graph (GDAG) algorithm, we determined directions or causal relationships in the fatty acid metabolome. A directed causal network was constructed that revealed 29 significant edges among the 15 nodes (p < 0.001). We report that two fatty acid metabolites, palmitoleate and margarate, which originate from dietary intake, together influence every other fatty acid in the network. On the other hand, despite its high connectivity, dihomo-linoleate did not appear to play an important role over the whole fatty acid network. These findings collectively suggest possible strategic entry points for new treatments or preventive modalities against diseases affected by fatty acid metabolites such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. Further studies examining the embedded substructure of the fatty acid metabolite networks in independent population samples would be timely and warranted as we move toward novel postgenomic diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:27501297

  19. A Causal Network Analysis of the Fatty Acid Metabolome in African-Americans Reveals a Critical Role for Palmitoleate and Margarate.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Azam; Yazdani, Akram; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Fatty acids are important sources of energy and possible predictors and etiologic factors in many common complex pathologies such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and certain forms of cancers. While fatty acids are thought to covary with each other, their underlying causal networks have not been fully elucidated. This study reports the identification and analysis of a statistical causal network among 15 mostly long-chain fatty acids. In an African-American population sample and using the Genome granularity-Directed Acyclic Graph (GDAG) algorithm, we determined directions or causal relationships in the fatty acid metabolome. A directed causal network was constructed that revealed 29 significant edges among the 15 nodes (p < 0.001). We report that two fatty acid metabolites, palmitoleate and margarate, which originate from dietary intake, together influence every other fatty acid in the network. On the other hand, despite its high connectivity, dihomo-linoleate did not appear to play an important role over the whole fatty acid network. These findings collectively suggest possible strategic entry points for new treatments or preventive modalities against diseases affected by fatty acid metabolites such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. Further studies examining the embedded substructure of the fatty acid metabolite networks in independent population samples would be timely and warranted as we move toward novel postgenomic diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:27501297

  20. New insights into the diets of harbor seals in the Salish Sea revealed by quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.; Lance, Monique M.; Elliott, Elizabeth W.; Jeffries, Steven J.; Acevedo-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Kennish, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) are an abundant predator along the west coast of North America, and there is considerable interest in their diet composition, especially in regard to predation on valued fish stocks. Available information on harbor seal diets, primarily derived from scat analysis, suggests that adult salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii), and gadids predominate. Because diet assessments based on scat analysis may be biased, we investigated diet composition through quantitative analysis of fatty acid signatures. Blubber samples from 49 harbor seals captured in western North America from haul-outs within the area of the San Juan Islands and southern Strait of Georgia in the Salish Sea were analyzed for fatty acid composition, along with 269 fish and squid specimens representing 27 potential prey classes. Diet estimates varied spatially, demographically, and among individual harbor seals. Findings confirmed the prevalence of previously identified prey species in harbor seal diets, but other species also contributed significantly. In particular, Black (Sebastes melanops) and Yellowtail (S. flavidus) Rockfish were estimated to compose up to 50% of some individual seal diets. Specialization and high predation rates on Black and Yellowtail Rockfish by a subset of harbor seals may play a role in the population dynamics of these regional rockfish stocks that is greater than previously realized.

  1. Analysis of olfactory sensitivity in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) reveals their ability to detect lactic acid, pyruvic acid and four B vitamins.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Joaquín; Olivares, Jesús; Ponce, Daniela; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Salmonid fishes like the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss have a highly developed olfactory sense that allows them to perceive some odorants at very low concentrations, such as certain amino acids and bile salts. Previous behavioral and electrophysiological studies in salmonids have shown strong responses to human skin odor. Because this stimulus represents a complex and heterogeneous mixture of components, we sought to determine which odorants contribute to the sensitive detection of human skin odor by salmonids. In vivo electroolfactogram recordings in O. mykiss revealed lactic acid, pyruvic acid and two B vitamins, thiamine and riboflavin, as novel, potent odorants which triggered responses at nanomolar concentrations. Two more B vitamins, nicotinic and pantothenic acid, were detected at micromolar concentrations. These compounds share important roles in cellular energy metabolism, supporting an original role in food search and feeding behavior of this species and most likely other fishes. The olfactory detection of B vitamins by salmonids represents a new paradigm in chemosensation, warranting further investigation in other teleosts. PMID:25864178

  2. A phylogenetic analysis of the boreal lichen Mycoblastus sanguinarius (Mycoblastaceae, lichenized Ascomycota) reveals cryptic clades correlated with fatty acid profiles

    PubMed Central

    Spribille, Toby; Klug, Barbara; Mayrhofer, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Lichens are a prominent feature of northern conifer forests and a large number of species are thought to be circumboreal. Whether or not circumboreal lichen species really constitute monophyletic groups has seldom been tested. We investigated molecular phylogenetic patterns in the mycobiont of Mycoblastus sanguinarius, a well known epiphytic lichen species of the boreal forest, based on material collected from across the high latitude northern hemisphere. A three-locus dataset of internal transcribed spacer rDNA, translation elongation factor 1-α and replication licensing factor Mcm7 DNA sequences revealed that material treated until now as belonging to M. sanguinarius does indeed form a monophyletic group within the genus and is distinct from a strongly supported Mycoblastus affinis. The M. sanguinarius complex appears closely related to the rare Mycoblastus glabrescens, which is currently known only from the Pacific Northwest and was rediscovered during the present study. However, within M. sanguinarius s.lat. in the northern hemisphere, two deeply divergent and morphologically coherent species can be recovered, one of which matches the southern hemisphere species Mycoblastus sanguinarioides and turns out to be widespread in North America and Asia, and one of which corresponds to M. sanguinarius s.str. Both M. sanguinarius and M. sanguinarioides exhibit additional low-level genetic differentiation into geographically structured clades, the most prominent of which are distributed in East Asia/eastern North America and western North America/Europe, respectively. Individuals from these lowest-level clades are morphologically indistinguishable but chemical analyses by thin layer chromatography revealed that each clade possesses its own fatty acid profile, suggesting that chemical differentiation precedes morphological differentiation and may be a precursor to speciation. PMID:21443957

  3. Analysis of porcine adipose tissue transcriptome reveals differences in de novo fatty acid synthesis in pigs with divergent muscle fatty acid composition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In pigs, adipose tissue is one of the principal organs involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. It is particularly involved in the overall fatty acid synthesis with consequences in other lipid-target organs such as muscles and the liver. With this in mind, we have used massive, parallel high-throughput sequencing technologies to characterize the porcine adipose tissue transcriptome architecture in six Iberian x Landrace crossbred pigs showing extreme phenotypes for intramuscular fatty acid composition (three per group). Results High-throughput RNA sequencing was used to generate a whole characterization of adipose tissue (backfat) transcriptome. A total of 4,130 putative unannotated protein-coding sequences were identified in the 20% of reads which mapped in intergenic regions. Furthermore, 36% of the unmapped reads were represented by interspersed repeats, SINEs being the most abundant elements. Differential expression analyses identified 396 candidate genes among divergent animals for intramuscular fatty acid composition. Sixty-two percent of these genes (247/396) presented higher expression in the group of pigs with higher content of intramuscular SFA and MUFA, while the remaining 149 showed higher expression in the group with higher content of PUFA. Pathway analysis related these genes to biological functions and canonical pathways controlling lipid and fatty acid metabolisms. In concordance with the phenotypic classification of animals, the major metabolic pathway differentially modulated between groups was de novo lipogenesis, the group with more PUFA being the one that showed lower expression of lipogenic genes. Conclusions These results will help in the identification of genetic variants at loci that affect fatty acid composition traits. The implications of these results range from the improvement of porcine meat quality traits to the application of the pig as an animal model of human metabolic diseases. PMID:24289474

  4. High resolution integrative analysis reveals widespread genetic and epigenetic changes after chronic in-vitro acid and bile exposure in Barrett's epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Manisha; Kessel, Rachel; Bhagat, Tushar; Nischal, Sangeeta; Yu, Yiting; Verma, Amit; Das, Kiron M

    2013-12-01

    Barrett's epithelium (BE) is a premalignant condition resulting from chronic gastroesophageal reflux that may progress to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Early intervention holds promise in preventing BE progression. However, identification of high-risk BE patients remains challenging due to inadequate biomarkers for early diagnosis. We investigated the effect of prolonged chronic acid and bile exposure on transcriptome, methylome, and mutatome of cells in an in-vitro BE carcinogenesis (BEC) model. Twenty weeks acid and bile exposed cells from the BEC model (BEC20w) were compared with their naïve predecessors HiSeq Illumina based RNA sequencing was performed on RNA from both the cells for gene expression and mutational analysis. HELP Tagging Assay was performed for DNA methylation analysis. Ingenuity pathway, Gene Ontology, and KEGG PATHWAY analyses were then performed on datasets. Widespread aberrant genetic and epigenetic changes were observed in the BEC20w cells. Combinatorial analyses revealed 433 from a total of 863 downregulated genes had accompanying hypermethylation of promoters. Simultaneously, 690 genes from a total of 1,492 were upregulated with accompanying promoter hypomethylation. In addition, 763 mutations were identified on 637 genes. Ingenuity pathway analysis, Gene Ontology, and KEGG PATHWAY analyses associated the genetic and epigenetic changes in BEC20w cells with cellular and biological functions. Integration of high resolution comparative analyses of naïve BAR-T and BEC20w cells revealed striking genetic and epigenetic changes induced by chronic acid and bile exposure that may disrupt normal cellular functions and promote carcinogenesis. This novel study reveals several potential targets for future biomarkers and therapeutic development.

  5. Analysis of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Degradation in Agrobacterium fabrum Reveals a Coenzyme A-Dependent, Beta-Oxidative Deacetylation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Campillo, Tony; Renoud, Sébastien; Kerzaon, Isabelle; Vial, Ludovic; Baude, Jessica; Gaillard, Vincent; Bellvert, Floriant; Chamignon, Cécile; Comte, Gilles; Lavire, Céline; Hommais, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Agrobacterium fabrum (genomospecies G8 of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens species complex) is known to have species-specific genes involved in ferulic acid degradation. Here, we characterized, by genetic and analytical means, intermediates of degradation as feruloyl coenzyme A (feruloyl-CoA), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-hydroxypropionyl–CoA, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionyl–CoA, vanillic acid, and protocatechuic acid. The genes atu1416, atu1417, and atu1420 have been experimentally shown to be necessary for the degradation of ferulic acid. Moreover, the genes atu1415 and atu1421 have been experimentally demonstrated to be essential for this degradation and are proposed to encode a phenylhydroxypropionyl-CoA dehydrogenase and a 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionic acid (HMPKP)–CoA β-keto-thiolase, respectively. We thus demonstrated that the A. fabrum hydroxycinnamic degradation pathway is an original coenzyme A-dependent β-oxidative deacetylation that could also transform p-coumaric and caffeic acids. Finally, we showed that this pathway enables the metabolism of toxic compounds from plants and their use for growth, likely providing the species an ecological advantage in hydroxycinnamic-rich environments, such as plant roots or decaying plant materials. PMID:24657856

  6. Proteomic analysis reveals upregulation of RKIP in S-180 implanted BALB/C mouse after treatment with ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Seyeon; Ahn, Eun Sook; Lee, Sukchan; Jung, Manyong; Park, Jin Hee; Yi, Sang Yeop; Yeom, Chang-Hwan

    2009-04-15

    Tumor cells have an invasive and metastatic phenotype that is the main cause of death for cancer patients. Tumor establishment and penetration consists of a series of complex processes involving multiple changes in gene expression. In this study, intraperitoneal administration of a high concentration of ascorbic acid inhibited tumor establishment and increased survival of BALB/C mice implanted with S-180 sarcoma cancer cells. To identify proteins involved in the ascorbic acid-mediated inhibition of tumor progression, changes in the liver proteome associated with ascorbic acid treatment of BALB/C mice implanted with S-180 were investigated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Eleven protein spots were identified whose expression was different between control and ascorbic acid treatment groups. In particular, Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) and annexin A5 expression were quantitatively up-regulated. The increase in RKIP protein level was detected in the tumor tissue and accompanied by an increase in mRNA level. Our results suggest a possibility that these proteins are related to the ascorbic acid-mediated suppression of tumor formation.

  7. Raman Spectroscopic Analysis Reveals Abnormal Fatty Acid Composition in Tumor Micro- and Macroenvironments in Human Breast and Rat Mammary Cancer

    PubMed Central

    You, Sixian; Tu, Haohua; Zhao, Youbo; Liu, Yuan; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids play essential roles in the growth and metastasis of cancer cells. To facilitate their avid growth and proliferation, cancer cells not only alter the fatty acid synthesis and metabolism intracellularly and extracellularly, but also in the macroenvironment via direct or indirect pathways. We report here, using Raman micro-spectroscopy, that an increase in the production of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) was identified in both cancerous and normal appearing breast tissue obtained from breast cancer patients and tumor-bearing rats. By minimizing confounding effects from mixed chemicals and optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio of Raman spectra, we observed a large-scale transition from monounsaturated fatty acids to PUFAs in the tumor while only a small subset of fatty acids transitioned to PUFAs in the tumor micro- and macroenvironment. These data have important implications for further clarifying the macroenvironmental effect of cancer progression and provide new potential approaches for characterizing the tumor micro- and macroenvironment of breast cancer in both pre-clinical animal studies and clinical applications. PMID:27596041

  8. Raman Spectroscopic Analysis Reveals Abnormal Fatty Acid Composition in Tumor Micro- and Macroenvironments in Human Breast and Rat Mammary Cancer.

    PubMed

    You, Sixian; Tu, Haohua; Zhao, Youbo; Liu, Yuan; Chaney, Eric J; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids play essential roles in the growth and metastasis of cancer cells. To facilitate their avid growth and proliferation, cancer cells not only alter the fatty acid synthesis and metabolism intracellularly and extracellularly, but also in the macroenvironment via direct or indirect pathways. We report here, using Raman micro-spectroscopy, that an increase in the production of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) was identified in both cancerous and normal appearing breast tissue obtained from breast cancer patients and tumor-bearing rats. By minimizing confounding effects from mixed chemicals and optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio of Raman spectra, we observed a large-scale transition from monounsaturated fatty acids to PUFAs in the tumor while only a small subset of fatty acids transitioned to PUFAs in the tumor micro- and macroenvironment. These data have important implications for further clarifying the macroenvironmental effect of cancer progression and provide new potential approaches for characterizing the tumor micro- and macroenvironment of breast cancer in both pre-clinical animal studies and clinical applications. PMID:27596041

  9. Transcriptomic analysis of Shiga-toxigenic bacteriophage carriage reveals a profound regulatory effect on acid resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Veses-Garcia, Marta; Liu, Xuan; Rigden, Daniel J; Kenny, John G; McCarthy, Alan J; Allison, Heather E

    2015-12-01

    Shiga-toxigenic bacteriophages are converting lambdoid phages that impart the ability to produce Shiga toxin to their hosts. Little is known about the function of most of the genes carried by these phages or the impact that lysogeny has on the Escherichia coli host. Here we use next-generation sequencing to compare the transcriptomes of E. coli strains infected with an Stx phage, before and after triggering of the bacterial SOS response that initiates the lytic cycle of the phage. We were able to discriminate between bacteriophage genes expressed in the lysogenic and lytic cycles, and we describe transcriptional changes that occur in the bacterial host as a consequence of Stx phage carriage. Having identified upregulation of the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) operon, confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we used phenotypic assays to establish the ability of the Stx prophage to confer a greater acid resistance phenotype on the E. coli host. Known phage regulators were overexpressed in E. coli, and the acid resistance of the recombinant strains was tested. The phage-encoded transcriptional regulator CII was identified as the controller of the acid response in the lysogen. Infection of an E. coli O157 strain, from which integrated Stx prophages were previously removed, showed increased acid resistance following infection with a nontoxigenic phage, ϕ24B. In addition to demonstrating this link between Stx phage carriage and E. coli acid resistance, with its implications for survival postingestion, the data set provides a number of other potential insights into the impact of lambdoid phage carriage on the biology of E. coli. PMID:26386055

  10. Transcriptomic analysis of Shiga-toxigenic bacteriophage carriage reveals a profound regulatory effect on acid resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Veses-Garcia, Marta; Liu, Xuan; Rigden, Daniel J; Kenny, John G; McCarthy, Alan J; Allison, Heather E

    2015-12-01

    Shiga-toxigenic bacteriophages are converting lambdoid phages that impart the ability to produce Shiga toxin to their hosts. Little is known about the function of most of the genes carried by these phages or the impact that lysogeny has on the Escherichia coli host. Here we use next-generation sequencing to compare the transcriptomes of E. coli strains infected with an Stx phage, before and after triggering of the bacterial SOS response that initiates the lytic cycle of the phage. We were able to discriminate between bacteriophage genes expressed in the lysogenic and lytic cycles, and we describe transcriptional changes that occur in the bacterial host as a consequence of Stx phage carriage. Having identified upregulation of the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) operon, confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we used phenotypic assays to establish the ability of the Stx prophage to confer a greater acid resistance phenotype on the E. coli host. Known phage regulators were overexpressed in E. coli, and the acid resistance of the recombinant strains was tested. The phage-encoded transcriptional regulator CII was identified as the controller of the acid response in the lysogen. Infection of an E. coli O157 strain, from which integrated Stx prophages were previously removed, showed increased acid resistance following infection with a nontoxigenic phage, ϕ24B. In addition to demonstrating this link between Stx phage carriage and E. coli acid resistance, with its implications for survival postingestion, the data set provides a number of other potential insights into the impact of lambdoid phage carriage on the biology of E. coli.

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis of Shiga-Toxigenic Bacteriophage Carriage Reveals a Profound Regulatory Effect on Acid Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Veses-Garcia, Marta; Liu, Xuan; Rigden, Daniel J.; Kenny, John G.; McCarthy, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Shiga-toxigenic bacteriophages are converting lambdoid phages that impart the ability to produce Shiga toxin to their hosts. Little is known about the function of most of the genes carried by these phages or the impact that lysogeny has on the Escherichia coli host. Here we use next-generation sequencing to compare the transcriptomes of E. coli strains infected with an Stx phage, before and after triggering of the bacterial SOS response that initiates the lytic cycle of the phage. We were able to discriminate between bacteriophage genes expressed in the lysogenic and lytic cycles, and we describe transcriptional changes that occur in the bacterial host as a consequence of Stx phage carriage. Having identified upregulation of the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) operon, confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we used phenotypic assays to establish the ability of the Stx prophage to confer a greater acid resistance phenotype on the E. coli host. Known phage regulators were overexpressed in E. coli, and the acid resistance of the recombinant strains was tested. The phage-encoded transcriptional regulator CII was identified as the controller of the acid response in the lysogen. Infection of an E. coli O157 strain, from which integrated Stx prophages were previously removed, showed increased acid resistance following infection with a nontoxigenic phage, ϕ24B. In addition to demonstrating this link between Stx phage carriage and E. coli acid resistance, with its implications for survival postingestion, the data set provides a number of other potential insights into the impact of lambdoid phage carriage on the biology of E. coli. PMID:26386055

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and K-12 cultures exposed to inorganic and organic acids in stationary phase reveals acidulant- and strain-specific acid tolerance responses.

    PubMed

    King, Thea; Lucchini, Sacha; Hinton, Jay C D; Gobius, Kari

    2010-10-01

    The food-borne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 is commonly exposed to organic acid in processed and preserved foods, allowing adaptation and the development of tolerance to pH levels otherwise lethal. Since little is known about the molecular basis of adaptation of E. coli to organic acids, we studied K-12 MG1655 and O157:H7 Sakai during exposure to acetic, lactic, and hydrochloric acid at pH 5.5. This is the first analysis of the pH-dependent transcriptomic response of stationary-phase E. coli. Thirty-four genes and three intergenic regions were upregulated by both strains during exposure to all acids. This universal acid response included genes involved in oxidative, envelope, and cold stress resistance and iron and manganese uptake, as well as 10 genes of unknown function. Acidulant- and strain-specific responses were also revealed. The acidulant-specific response reflects differences in the modes of microbial inactivation, even between weak organic acids. The two strains exhibited similar responses to lactic and hydrochloric acid, while the response to acetic acid was distinct. Acidulant-dependent differences between the strains involved induction of genes involved in the heat shock response, osmoregulation, inorganic ion and nucleotide transport and metabolism, translation, and energy production. E. coli O157:H7-specific acid-inducible genes were identified, suggesting that the enterohemorrhagic E. coli strain possesses additional molecular mechanisms contributing to acid resistance that are absent in K-12. While E. coli K-12 was most resistant to lactic and hydrochloric acid, O157:H7 may have a greater ability to survive in more complex acidic environments, such as those encountered in the host and during food processing.

  13. Metabolome analysis reveals the effect of carbon catabolite control on the poly(γ-glutamic acid) biosynthesis of Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 9945.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, Hitoshi; Meissner, Lena; Palmen, Thomas; Bamba, Takeshi; Büchs, Jochen; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2016-04-01

    Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (PGA) is a polymer composed of L- and/or D-glutamic acids that is produced by Bacillus sp. Because the polymer has various features as water soluble, edible, non-toxic and so on, it has attracted attention as a candidate for many applications such as foods, cosmetics and so on. However, although it is well known that the intracellular metabolism of Bacillus sp. is mainly regulated by catabolite control, the effect of the catabolite control on the PGA producing Bacillus sp. is largely unknown. This study is the first report of metabolome analysis on the PGA producing Bacillus sp. that reveals the effect of carbon catabolite control on the metabolism of PGA producing Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 9945. Results showed that the cells cultivated in glycerol-containing medium showed higher PGA production than the cells in glucose-containing medium. Furthermore, metabolome analysis revealed that the activators of CcpA and CodY, global regulatory proteins of the intracellular metabolism, accumulated in the cells cultivated in glycerol-containing and glucose-containing medium, respectively, with CodY apparently inhibiting PGA production. Moreover, the cells seemed to produce glutamate from citrate and ammonium using glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase. Pulsed addition of di-ammonium hydrogen citrate, as suggested by the metabolome result, was able to achieve the highest value so far for PGA production in B. licheniformis. PMID:26419706

  14. Metabolome analysis reveals the effect of carbon catabolite control on the poly(γ-glutamic acid) biosynthesis of Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 9945.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, Hitoshi; Meissner, Lena; Palmen, Thomas; Bamba, Takeshi; Büchs, Jochen; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2016-04-01

    Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (PGA) is a polymer composed of L- and/or D-glutamic acids that is produced by Bacillus sp. Because the polymer has various features as water soluble, edible, non-toxic and so on, it has attracted attention as a candidate for many applications such as foods, cosmetics and so on. However, although it is well known that the intracellular metabolism of Bacillus sp. is mainly regulated by catabolite control, the effect of the catabolite control on the PGA producing Bacillus sp. is largely unknown. This study is the first report of metabolome analysis on the PGA producing Bacillus sp. that reveals the effect of carbon catabolite control on the metabolism of PGA producing Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 9945. Results showed that the cells cultivated in glycerol-containing medium showed higher PGA production than the cells in glucose-containing medium. Furthermore, metabolome analysis revealed that the activators of CcpA and CodY, global regulatory proteins of the intracellular metabolism, accumulated in the cells cultivated in glycerol-containing and glucose-containing medium, respectively, with CodY apparently inhibiting PGA production. Moreover, the cells seemed to produce glutamate from citrate and ammonium using glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase. Pulsed addition of di-ammonium hydrogen citrate, as suggested by the metabolome result, was able to achieve the highest value so far for PGA production in B. licheniformis.

  15. A Comprehensive Mutational Analysis of the Arabidopsis Resistance Protein RPW8.2 Reveals Key Amino Acids for Defense Activation and Protein Targeting[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenming; Zhang, Yi; Wen, Yingqiang; Berkey, Robert; Ma, Xianfeng; Pan, Zhiyong; Bendigeri, Dipti; King, Harlan; Zhang, Qiong; Xiao, Shunyuan

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana RESISTANCE TO POWDERY MILDEW8.2 (RPW8.2) protein is specifically targeted to the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM) encasing the haustorium, or fungal feeding structure, where RPW8.2 activates broad-spectrum resistance against powdery mildew pathogens. How RPW8.2 activates defenses at a precise subcellular locale is not known. Here, we report a comprehensive mutational analysis in which more than 100 RPW8.2 mutants were functionally evaluated for their defense and trafficking properties. We show that three amino acid residues (i.e., threonine-64, valine-68, and aspartic acid-116) are critical for RPW8.2-mediated cell death and resistance to powdery mildew (Golovinomyces cichoracearum UCSC1). Also, we reveal that two arginine (R)– or lysine (K)–enriched short motifs (i.e., R/K-R/K-x-R/K) make up the likely core EHM-targeting signals, which, together with the N-terminal transmembrane domain, define a minimal sequence of 60 amino acids that is necessary and sufficient for EHM localization. In addition, some RPW8.2 mutants localize to the nucleus and/or to a potentially novel membrane that wraps around plastids or plastid-derived stromules. Results from this study not only reveal critical amino acid elements in RPW8.2 that enable haustorium-targeted trafficking and defense, but also provide evidence for the existence of a specific, EHM-oriented membrane trafficking pathway in leaf epidermal cells invaded by powdery mildew. PMID:24151293

  16. Microarray analysis of the moss Physcomitrella patens reveals evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulation of salt stress and abscisic acid signalling.

    PubMed

    Richardt, Sandra; Timmerhaus, Gerrit; Lang, Daniel; Qudeimat, Enas; Corrêa, Luiz G G; Reski, Ralf; Rensing, Stefan A; Frank, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory networks of salt stress and abscisic acid (ABA) responses have previously been analyzed in seed plants. Here, we report microarray expression profiles of 439 genes encoding transcription-associated proteins (TAPs) in response to salt stress and ABA in the salt-tolerant moss Physcomitrella patens. Fourteen and 56 TAP genes were differentially expressed within 60 min of NaCl and ABA treatment, respectively, indicating that these responses are regulated at the transcriptional level. Overlapping expression profiles, as well as the up-regulation of ABA biosynthesis genes, suggest that ABA mediates the salt stress responses in P. patens. Comparison to public gene expression data of Arabidopsis thaliana and phylogenetic analyses suggest that the role of DREB-like, Dof, and bHLH TAPs in salt stress responses have been conserved during embryophyte evolution, and that the function of ABI3-like, bZIP, HAP3, and CO-like TAPs in seed development and flowering emerged from pre-existing ABA and light signalling pathways.

  17. Chemical Genetic Analysis and Functional Characterization of Staphylococcal Wall Teichoic Acid 2-Epimerases Reveals Unconventional Antibiotic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Paul A.; Müller, Anna; Wolff, Kerstin A.; Fischmann, Thierry; Wang, Hao; Reed, Patricia; Hou, Yan; Li, Wenjin; Müller, Christa E.; Xiao, Jianying; Murgolo, Nicholas; Sher, Xinwei; Mayhood, Todd; Sheth, Payal R.; Mirza, Asra; Labroli, Marc; Xiao, Li; McCoy, Mark; Gill, Charles J.; Pinho, Mariana G.; Schneider, Tanja; Roemer, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a chemical biology strategy performed in Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to identify MnaA, a 2-epimerase that we demonstrate interconverts UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-ManNAc to modulate substrate levels of TarO and TarA wall teichoic acid (WTA) biosynthesis enzymes. Genetic inactivation of mnaA results in complete loss of WTA and dramatic in vitro β-lactam hypersensitivity in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and S. epidermidis (MRSE). Likewise, the β-lactam antibiotic imipenem exhibits restored bactericidal activity against mnaA mutants in vitro and concomitant efficacy against 2-epimerase defective strains in a mouse thigh model of MRSA and MRSE infection. Interestingly, whereas MnaA serves as the sole 2-epimerase required for WTA biosynthesis in S. epidermidis, MnaA and Cap5P provide compensatory WTA functional roles in S. aureus. We also demonstrate that MnaA and other enzymes of WTA biosynthesis are required for biofilm formation in MRSA and MRSE. We further determine the 1.9Å crystal structure of S. aureus MnaA and identify critical residues for enzymatic dimerization, stability, and substrate binding. Finally, the natural product antibiotic tunicamycin is shown to physically bind MnaA and Cap5P and inhibit 2-epimerase activity, demonstrating that it inhibits a previously unanticipated step in WTA biosynthesis. In summary, MnaA serves as a new Staphylococcal antibiotic target with cognate inhibitors predicted to possess dual therapeutic benefit: as combination agents to restore β-lactam efficacy against MRSA and MRSE and as non-bioactive prophylactic agents to prevent Staphylococcal biofilm formation. PMID:27144276

  18. Chemical Genetic Analysis and Functional Characterization of Staphylococcal Wall Teichoic Acid 2-Epimerases Reveals Unconventional Antibiotic Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Mann, Paul A; Müller, Anna; Wolff, Kerstin A; Fischmann, Thierry; Wang, Hao; Reed, Patricia; Hou, Yan; Li, Wenjin; Müller, Christa E; Xiao, Jianying; Murgolo, Nicholas; Sher, Xinwei; Mayhood, Todd; Sheth, Payal R; Mirza, Asra; Labroli, Marc; Xiao, Li; McCoy, Mark; Gill, Charles J; Pinho, Mariana G; Schneider, Tanja; Roemer, Terry

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe a chemical biology strategy performed in Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to identify MnaA, a 2-epimerase that we demonstrate interconverts UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-ManNAc to modulate substrate levels of TarO and TarA wall teichoic acid (WTA) biosynthesis enzymes. Genetic inactivation of mnaA results in complete loss of WTA and dramatic in vitro β-lactam hypersensitivity in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and S. epidermidis (MRSE). Likewise, the β-lactam antibiotic imipenem exhibits restored bactericidal activity against mnaA mutants in vitro and concomitant efficacy against 2-epimerase defective strains in a mouse thigh model of MRSA and MRSE infection. Interestingly, whereas MnaA serves as the sole 2-epimerase required for WTA biosynthesis in S. epidermidis, MnaA and Cap5P provide compensatory WTA functional roles in S. aureus. We also demonstrate that MnaA and other enzymes of WTA biosynthesis are required for biofilm formation in MRSA and MRSE. We further determine the 1.9Å crystal structure of S. aureus MnaA and identify critical residues for enzymatic dimerization, stability, and substrate binding. Finally, the natural product antibiotic tunicamycin is shown to physically bind MnaA and Cap5P and inhibit 2-epimerase activity, demonstrating that it inhibits a previously unanticipated step in WTA biosynthesis. In summary, MnaA serves as a new Staphylococcal antibiotic target with cognate inhibitors predicted to possess dual therapeutic benefit: as combination agents to restore β-lactam efficacy against MRSA and MRSE and as non-bioactive prophylactic agents to prevent Staphylococcal biofilm formation. PMID:27144276

  19. Proteomic Analysis Reveals PGAM1 Altering cis-9, trans-11 Conjugated Linoleic Acid Synthesis in Bovine Mammary Gland.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Lee, S B; Hwang, J H; Lim, J N; Jung, U S; Kim, M J; Kang, H S; Choi, S H; Lee, J S; Roh, S G; Lee, H G

    2015-05-01

    cis-9, trans-11 Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is one of the most extensively studied CLA isomers due to its multiple isomer-specific effects. However, the molecular mechanisms of cis-9,trans-11 CLA synthesis in ruminant mammary gland are still not clearly understood. This process may be mediated, to a certain extent, by trans-11 C18:1 regulated by stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1) and/or its syntrophic proteins. This study aimed to investigate the effects of TVA on SCD1-mediated cis-9,trans-11 CLA synthesis in MAC-T cells and its potential molecular mechanism. Results showed that trans-11 C18:1 was continually taken up and converted into cis-9,trans-11 CLA in MAC-T cells during the 4-h incubation of 50 μM trans-11 C18:1. SCD1 protein expression increased more than twofold at 2 h (P < 0.01) and 2.5 h (P < 0.05) before decreasing to less than half of the normal level at 4 h (P < 0.05). One up-regulated (RAS guanyl releasing protein 4 isoform 1 [RASGRP4]) and six down-regulated proteins (glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase 1 [GNPDA1], triosephosphate isomerase [TPI1], phosphoglycerate mutase 1 [PGAM1], heat shock protein beta-1 [HSPB1], annexin A3 [ANXA3], thiopurine S-methyltransferase [TPMT]) were found in MAC-T cells treated with trans-11 C18:1. Of these seven identified proteins, the presence of GNPDA1 and PGAM1 was verified in several models. More trans-11 C18:1 was taken up after PGAM1 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA). In conclusion, our data suggested that PGAM1 may have a negative relationship with SCD1 and seemed to be involved in cis-9, trans-11 CLA synthesis by facilitating the absorption of trans-11 C18:1 in the bovine mammary gland.

  20. DNA microarray analysis reveals a role for lysophosphatidic acid in the regulation of anti-inflammatory genes in MC3T3-E1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Tan, Ruimin; Genetos, Damian C.; Verma, Seema; Yellowley, Clare E.; Karin, Norm J.

    2007-11-01

    DNA microarray analysis revealed that treatment of bone cells with a lipid growth factor led to extensive changes in gene expression. Particular relevance to fracture healing and inflammation was revealed.

  1. Mutational analysis reveals that all tailoring region genes are required for production of polyketide antibiotic mupirocin by pseudomonas fluorescens: pseudomonic acid B biosynthesis precedes pseudomonic acid A.

    PubMed

    Hothersall, Joanne; Wu, Ji'en; Rahman, Ayesha S; Shields, Jennifer A; Haddock, James; Johnson, Nicola; Cooper, Sian M; Stephens, Elton R; Cox, Russell J; Crosby, John; Willis, Christine L; Simpson, Thomas J; Thomas, Christopher M

    2007-05-25

    The Pseudomonas fluorescens mupirocin biosynthetic cluster encodes six proteins involved in polyketide biosynthesis and 26 single polypeptides proposed to perform largely tailoring functions. In-frame deletions in the tailoring open reading frames demonstrated that all are required for mupirocin production. A bidirectional promoter region was identified between mupF, which runs counter to other open reading frames and its immediate neighbor macpC, implying the 74-kb cluster consists of two transcriptional units. mupD/E and mupJ/K must be cotranscribed as pairs for normal function implying co-assembly during translation. MupJ and K belong to a widely distributed enzyme pair implicated, with MupH, in methyl addition. Deletion of mupF, a putative ketoreductase, produced a mupirocin analogue with a C-7 ketone. Deletion of mupC, a putative dienoyl CoA reductase, generated an analogue whose structure indicated that MupC is also implicated in control of the oxidation state around the tetrahydropyran ring of monic acid. Double mutants with DeltamupC and DeltamupO, DeltamupU, DeltamupV, or DeltamacpE produced pseudomonic acid B but not pseudomonic acid A, as do the mupO, U, V, and macpE mutants, indicating that MupC must work after MupO, U, and V.

  2. Integrated Systems Biology Analysis of Transcriptomes Reveals Candidate Genes for Acidity Control in Developing Fruits of Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dingquan; Zhao, Yihong; Cao, Minghao; Qiao, Liang; Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids, such as citrate and malate, are important contributors for the sensory traits of fleshy fruits. Although their biosynthesis has been illustrated, regulatory mechanisms of acid accumulation remain to be dissected. To provide transcriptional architecture and identify candidate genes for citrate accumulation in fruits, we have selected for transcriptome analysis four varieties of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) with varying fruit acidity, Succari (acidless), Bingtang (low acid), and Newhall and Xinhui (normal acid). Fruits of these varieties at 45 days post anthesis (DPA), which corresponds to Stage I (cell division), had similar acidity, but they displayed differential acid accumulation at 142 DPA (Stage II, cell expansion). Transcriptomes of fruits at 45 and 142 DPA were profiled using RNA sequencing and analyzed with three different algorithms (Pearson correlation, gene coexpression network and surrogate variable analysis). Our network analysis shows that the acid-correlated genes belong to three distinct network modules. Several of these candidate fruit acidity genes encode regulatory proteins involved in transport (such as AHA10), degradation (such as APD2) and transcription (such as AIL6) and act as hubs in the citrate accumulation gene networks. Taken together, our integrated systems biology analysis has provided new insights into the fruit citrate accumulation gene network and led to the identification of candidate genes likely associated with the fruit acidity control. PMID:27092171

  3. Integrated Systems Biology Analysis of Transcriptomes Reveals Candidate Genes for Acidity Control in Developing Fruits of Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck).

    PubMed

    Huang, Dingquan; Zhao, Yihong; Cao, Minghao; Qiao, Liang; Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids, such as citrate and malate, are important contributors for the sensory traits of fleshy fruits. Although their biosynthesis has been illustrated, regulatory mechanisms of acid accumulation remain to be dissected. To provide transcriptional architecture and identify candidate genes for citrate accumulation in fruits, we have selected for transcriptome analysis four varieties of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) with varying fruit acidity, Succari (acidless), Bingtang (low acid), and Newhall and Xinhui (normal acid). Fruits of these varieties at 45 days post anthesis (DPA), which corresponds to Stage I (cell division), had similar acidity, but they displayed differential acid accumulation at 142 DPA (Stage II, cell expansion). Transcriptomes of fruits at 45 and 142 DPA were profiled using RNA sequencing and analyzed with three different algorithms (Pearson correlation, gene coexpression network and surrogate variable analysis). Our network analysis shows that the acid-correlated genes belong to three distinct network modules. Several of these candidate fruit acidity genes encode regulatory proteins involved in transport (such as AHA10), degradation (such as APD2) and transcription (such as AIL6) and act as hubs in the citrate accumulation gene networks. Taken together, our integrated systems biology analysis has provided new insights into the fruit citrate accumulation gene network and led to the identification of candidate genes likely associated with the fruit acidity control.

  4. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals different molecular mechanisms of Bacillus coagulans 2-6 response to sodium lactate and calcium lactate during lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiayang; Wang, Xiuwen; Wang, Landong; Zhu, Beibei; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yao, Qingshou; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Lactate production is enhanced by adding calcium carbonate or sodium hydroxide during fermentation. However, Bacillus coagulans 2-6 can produce more than 180 g/L L-lactic acid when calcium lactate is accumulated, but less than 120 g/L L-lactic acid when sodium lactate is formed. The molecular mechanisms by which B. coagulans responds to calcium lactate and sodium lactate remain unclear. In this study, comparative transcriptomic methods based on high-throughput RNA sequencing were applied to study gene expression changes in B. coagulans 2-6 cultured in non-stress, sodium lactate stress and calcium lactate stress conditions. Gene expression profiling identified 712 and 1213 significantly regulated genes in response to calcium lactate stress and sodium lactate stress, respectively. Gene ontology assignments of the differentially expressed genes were performed. KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that 'ATP-binding cassette transporters' were significantly affected by calcium lactate stress, and 'amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism' was significantly affected by sodium lactate stress. It was also found that lactate fermentation was less affected by calcium lactate stress than by sodium lactate stress. Sodium lactate stress had negative effect on the expression of 'glycolysis/gluconeogenesis' genes but positive effect on the expression of 'citrate cycle (TCA cycle)' genes. However, calcium lactate stress had positive influence on the expression of 'glycolysis/gluconeogenesis' genes and had minor influence on 'citrate cycle (TCA cycle)' genes. Thus, our findings offer new insights into the responses of B. coagulans to different lactate stresses. Notably, our RNA-seq dataset constitute a robust database for investigating the functions of genes induced by lactate stress in the future and identify potential targets for genetic engineering to further improve L-lactic acid production by B. coagulans.

  5. Microarray analysis reveals the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B signaling by aristolochic acid in normal human kidney (HK-2) cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-yin; Chiang, Su-yin; Wu, Hsiu-ching; Kao, Shung-te; Hsiang, Chien-yun; Ho, Tin-yun; Lin, Jaung-geng

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To study the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of aristolochic acid (AA), a major active component of plants from the Aristolochiaceae family using microarray analysis. Methods: Human kidney (HK-2) cells were treated with AA (0, 10, 30, and 90 μmol/L) for 24 h, and the cell viability was measured by a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Complementary DNA microarrays were used to investigate the gene expression pattern of HK-2 cells exposed to AA in triplicate. A quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay was used to verify the microarray data for selected nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-regulated genes. Furthermore, the subcellular localization of NF-κB p65 was visualized by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy in HK-2 cells. The NF-κB activity was examined by a luciferase reporter assay in HK-2/NF-κB transgenic cells. Results: AA exhibited a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect in HK-2 cells and induced alterations in the gene expression profiles related to the DNA damage response, DNA repair, macromolecule metabolic process, carbohydrate metabolic process, DNA metabolic process, apoptosis, cell cycle, and transcription. In addition, 9 biological pathways associated with immunomodulatory functions were down-regulated in AA-treated HK-2 cells. A network analysis revealed that NF-κB played a central role in the network topology. Among NF-κB-regulated genes, 8 differentially expressed genes were verified by qRT-PCR. The inhibition of NF-κB activity by AA was further confirmed by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and by NF-κB luciferase reporter assay. Conclusion: Our data revealed that AA could suppress NF-κB activity in normal human cells, perhaps partially accounting for the reported anti-inflammatory effects of some plants from the genus Aristolochia. PMID:20139906

  6. Pseudomonas lini Strain ZBG1 Revealed Carboxylic Acid Utilization and Copper Resistance Features Required for Adaptation to Vineyard Soil Environment: A Draft Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Chong, Teik-Min; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Kher, Heng Leong; Grandclément, Catherine; Faure, Denis; Yin, Wai-Fong; Dessaux, Yves; Hong, Kar-Wai

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas lini strain ZBG1 was isolated from the soil of vineyard in Zellenberg, France and the draft genome was reported in this study. Bioinformatics analyses of the genome revealed presence of genes encoding tartaric and malic acid utilization as well as copper resistance that correspond to the adaptation this strain in vineyard soil environment. PMID:27512520

  7. Transcriptional analysis of porcine intestinal mucosa infected with Salmonella Typhimurium revealed a massive inflammatory response and disruption of bile acid absorption in ileum.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Juber Herrera; Collado-Romero, Melania; Zaldívar-López, Sara; Arce, Cristina; Bautista, Rocío; Carvajal, Ana; Cirera, Susanna; Claros, M Gonzalo; Garrido, Juan J

    2016-01-07

    Infected pork meat is an important source of non-typhoidal human salmonellosis. Understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in disease pathogenesis is important for the development of therapeutic and preventive strategies. Thus, hereby we study the transcriptional profiles along the porcine intestine during infection with Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as post-transcriptional gene modulation by microRNAs (miRNA). Sixteen piglets were orally challenged with S. Typhimurium. Samples from jejunum, ileum and colon, collected 1, 2 and 6 days post infection (dpi) were hybridized to mRNA and miRNA expression microarrays and analyzed. Jejunum showed a reduced transcriptional response indicating mild inflammation only at 2 dpi. In ileum inflammatory genes were overexpressed (e.g., IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL1RAP, TNFα), indicating a strong immune response at all times of infection. Infection also down-regulated genes of the FXR pathway (e.g., NR1H4, FABP6, APOA1, SLC10A2), indicating disruption of the bile acid absorption in ileum. This result was confirmed by decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in serum of infected pigs. Ileal inflammatory gene expression changes peaked at 2 dpi and tended to resolve at 6 dpi. Furthermore, miRNA analysis of ileum at 2 dpi revealed 62 miRNAs potentially regulating target genes involved in this inflammatory process (e.g., miR-374 and miR-451). In colon, genes involved in epithelial adherence, proliferation and cellular reorganization were down-regulated at 2 and 6 dpi. In summary, here we show the transcriptional changes occurring at the intestine at different time points of the infection, which are mainly related to inflammation and disruption of the bile acid metabolism.

  8. Microarray analysis reveals higher gestational folic Acid alters expression of genes in the cerebellum of mice offspring-a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Barua, Subit; Kuizon, Salomon; Chadman, Kathryn K; Brown, W Ted; Junaid, Mohammed A

    2015-01-01

    Folate is a water-soluble vitamin that is critical for nucleotide synthesis and can modulate methylation of DNA by altering one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies have shown that folate status during pregnancy is associated with various congenital defects including the risk of aberrant neural tube closure. Maternal exposure to a methyl supplemented diet also can alter DNA methylation and gene expression, which may influence the phenotype of offspring. We investigated if higher gestational folic acid (FA) in the diet dysregulates the expression of genes in the cerebellum of offspring in C57BL/6 J mice. One week before gestation and throughout the pregnancy, groups of dams were supplemented with FA either at 2 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg of diet. Microarray analysis was used to investigate the genome wide gene expression profile in the cerebellum from day old pups. Our results revealed that exposure to the higher dose FA diet during gestation dysregulated expression of several genes in the cerebellum of both male and female pups. Several transcription factors, imprinted genes, neuro-developmental genes and genes associated with autism spectrum disorder exhibited altered expression levels. These findings suggest that higher gestational FA potentially dysregulates gene expression in the offspring brain and such changes may adversely alter fetal programming and overall brain development. PMID:25629700

  9. Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) interleukin-2: sequence analysis reveals high nucleotide and amino acid identity with interleukin-2 of cattle and other ruminants.

    PubMed

    Sreekumar, E; Premraj, A; Saravanakumar, M; Rasool, T J

    2002-08-01

    A 4400-bp genomic sequence and a 332-bp truncated cDNA sequence of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene of Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and cloned. The coding sequence of the buffalo IL-2 gene was assembled from the 5' end of the genomic clone and the truncated cDNA clone. This sequence had 98.5% nucleotide identity and 98% amino acid identity with cattle IL-2. Three amino acid substitutions were observed at positions 63, 124 and 135. Comparison of the predicted protein structure of buffalo IL-2 with that of human and cattle IL-2 did not reveal significant differences. The putative amino acids responsible for IL-2 receptor binding were conserved in buffalo, cattle and human IL-2. The amino acid sequence of buffalo IL-2 also showed very high identity with that of other ruminants, indicating functional cross-reactivity.

  10. Fatty acids and small organic compounds bind to mineralo-organic nanoparticles derived from human body fluids as revealed by metabolomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Martel, Jan; Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Hung, Cheng-Yu; Wong, Tsui-Yin; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Shiao, Ming-Shi; Young, John D

    2016-03-14

    Nanoparticles entering the human body instantly become coated with a "protein corona" that influences the effects and distribution of the particles in vivo. Yet, whether nanoparticles may bind to other organic compounds remains unclear. Here we use an untargeted metabolomic approach based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography and quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify the organic compounds that bind to mineral nanoparticles formed in human body fluids (serum, plasma, saliva, and urine). A wide range of organic compounds is identified, including fatty acids, glycerophospholipids, amino acids, sugars, and amides. Our results reveal that, in addition to the proteins identified previously, nanoparticles harbor an "organic corona" containing several fatty acids which may affect particle-cell interactions in vivo. This study provides a platform to study the organic corona of biological and synthetic nanoparticles found in the human body.

  11. Fatty acids and small organic compounds bind to mineralo-organic nanoparticles derived from human body fluids as revealed by metabolomic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Jan; Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Hung, Cheng-Yu; Wong, Tsui-Yin; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Shiao, Ming-Shi; Young, John D.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles entering the human body instantly become coated with a ``protein corona'' that influences the effects and distribution of the particles in vivo. Yet, whether nanoparticles may bind to other organic compounds remains unclear. Here we use an untargeted metabolomic approach based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography and quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify the organic compounds that bind to mineral nanoparticles formed in human body fluids (serum, plasma, saliva, and urine). A wide range of organic compounds is identified, including fatty acids, glycerophospholipids, amino acids, sugars, and amides. Our results reveal that, in addition to the proteins identified previously, nanoparticles harbor an ``organic corona'' containing several fatty acids which may affect particle-cell interactions in vivo. This study provides a platform to study the organic corona of biological and synthetic nanoparticles found in the human body.Nanoparticles entering the human body instantly become coated with a ``protein corona'' that influences the effects and distribution of the particles in vivo. Yet, whether nanoparticles may bind to other organic compounds remains unclear. Here we use an untargeted metabolomic approach based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography and quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify the organic compounds that bind to mineral nanoparticles formed in human body fluids (serum, plasma, saliva, and urine). A wide range of organic compounds is identified, including fatty acids, glycerophospholipids, amino acids, sugars, and amides. Our results reveal that, in addition to the proteins identified previously, nanoparticles harbor an ``organic corona'' containing several fatty acids which may affect particle-cell interactions in vivo. This study provides a platform to study the organic corona of biological and synthetic nanoparticles found in the human body. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See

  12. Metabolomics analysis reveals elevation of 3-indoxyl sulfate in plasma and brain during chemically-induced acute kidney injury in mice: Investigation of nicotinic acid receptor agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zgoda-Pols, Joanna R.; Chowdhury, Swapan; Wirth, Mark; Milburn, Michael V.; Alexander, Danny C.; Alton, Kevin B.

    2011-08-15

    An investigative renal toxicity study using metabolomics was conducted with a potent nicotinic acid receptor (NAR) agonist, SCH 900424. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques were used to identify small molecule biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI) that could aid in a better mechanistic understanding of SCH 900424-induced AKI in mice. The metabolomics study revealed 3-indoxyl sulfate (3IS) as a more sensitive marker of SCH 900424-induced renal toxicity than creatinine or urea. An LC-MS assay for quantitative determination of 3IS in mouse matrices was also developed. Following treatment with SCH 900424, 3IS levels were markedly increased in murine plasma and brain, thereby potentially contributing to renal- and central nervous system (CNS)-related rapid onset of toxicities. Furthermore, significant decrease in urinary excretion of 3IS in those animals due to compromised renal function may be associated with the elevation of 3IS in plasma and brain. These data suggest that 3IS has a potential to be a marker of renal and CNS toxicities during chemically-induced AKI in mice. In addition, based on the metabolomic analysis other statistically significant plasma markers including p-cresol-sulfate and tryptophan catabolites (kynurenate, kynurenine, 3-indole-lactate) might be of toxicological importance but have not been studied in detail. This comprehensive approach that includes untargeted metabolomic and targeted bioanalytical sample analyses could be used to investigate toxicity of other compounds that pose preclinical or clinical development challenges in a pharmaceutical discovery and development. - Research Highlights: > Nicotinic acid receptor agonist, SCH 900424, caused acute kidney injury in mice. > MS-based metabolomics was conducted to identify potential small molecule markers of renal toxicity. > 3-indoxyl-sulfate was found to be as a more sensitive marker of renal toxicity than creatinine

  13. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  14. Transcriptome Profiling and Functional Analysis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Reveals a General Conserved Response to Acidic Conditions (pH 5.5) and a Complex Acid-Mediated Signaling Involved in Agrobacterium-Plant Interactions▿

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ze-Chun; Liu, Pu; Saenkham, Panatda; Kerr, Kathleen; Nester, Eugene W.

    2008-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens transferred DNA (T-DNA) transfer requires that the virulence genes (vir regulon) on the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid be induced by plant phenolic signals in an acidic environment. Using transcriptome analysis, we found that these acidic conditions elicit two distinct responses: (i) a general and conserved response through which Agrobacterium modulates gene expression patterns to adapt to environmental acidification and (ii) a highly specialized acid-mediated signaling response involved in Agrobacterium-plant interactions. Overall, 78 genes were induced and 74 genes were repressed significantly under acidic conditions (pH 5.5) compared to neutral conditions (pH 7.0). Microarray analysis not only confirmed previously identified acid-inducible genes but also uncovered many new acid-induced genes which may be directly involved in Agrobacterium-plant interactions. These genes include virE0, virE1, virH1, and virH2. Further, the chvG-chvI two-component system, previously shown to be critical for virulence, was also induced under acid conditions. Interestingly, acidic conditions induced a type VI secretion system and a putative nonheme catalase. We provide evidence suggesting that acid-induced gene expression was independent of the VirA-VirG two-component system. Our results, together with previous data, support the hypothesis that there is three-step sequential activation of the vir regulon. This process involves a cascade regulation and hierarchical signaling pathway featuring initial direct activation of the VirA-VirG system by the acid-activated ChvG-ChvI system. Our data strengthen the notion that Agrobacterium has evolved a mechanism to perceive and subvert the acidic conditions of the rhizosphere to an important signal that initiates and directs the early virulence program, culminating in T-DNA transfer. PMID:17993523

  15. Metabolomics analysis reveals the association between lipid abnormalities and oxidative stress, inflammation, fibrosis, and Nrf2 dysfunction in aristolochic acid-induced nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying-Yong; Wang, Hui-Ling; Cheng, Xian-Long; Wei, Feng; Bai, Xu; Lin, Rui-Chao; Vaziri, Nosratola D.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative medicines are commonly used for the disease prevention and treatment worldwide. Aristolochic acid (AAI) nephropathy (AAN) is a common and rapidly progressive interstitial nephropathy caused by ingestion of Aristolochia herbal medications. Available data on pathophysiology and molecular mechanisms of AAN are limited and were explored here. SD rats were randomized to AAN and control groups. AAN group was treated with AAI by oral gavage for 12 weeks and observed for additional 12 weeks. Kidneys were processed for histological evaluation, Western blotting, and metabolomics analyses using UPLC-QTOF/HDMS. The concentrations of two phosphatidylcholines, two diglycerides and two acyl-carnitines were significantly altered in AAI treated rats at week 4 when renal function and histology were unchanged. Data obtained on weeks 8 to 24 revealed progressive tubulointerstitial fibrosis, inflammation, renal dysfunction, activation of NF-κB, TGF-β, and oxidative pathways, impaired Nrf2 system, and profound changes in lipid metabolites including numerous PC, lysoPC, PE, lysoPE, ceramides and triglycerides. In conclusion, exposure to AAI results in dynamic changes in kidney tissue fatty acid, phospholipid, and glycerolipid metabolisms prior to and after the onset of detectable changes in renal function or histology. These findings point to participation of altered tissue lipid metabolism in the pathogenesis of AAN. PMID:26251179

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Plasma from California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus) Reveals Apolipoprotein E as a Candidate Biomarker of Chronic Domoic Acid Toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Neely, Benjamin A; Ferrante, Jason A; Chaves, J Mauro; Soper, Jennifer L; Almeida, Jonas S; Arthur, John M; Gulland, Frances M D; Janech, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) is caused by exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid and has been linked to massive stranding events and mortality. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs in addition to the presence of domoic acid in body fluids. Chronic DAT further is characterized by reoccurring seizures progressing to status epilepticus. Diagnosis of chronic DAT is often slow and problematic, and minimally invasive tests for DAT have been the focus of numerous recent biomarker studies. The goal of this study was to retrospectively profile plasma proteins in a population of sea lions with chronic DAT and those without DAT using two dimensional gel electrophoresis to discover whether individual, multiple, or combinations of protein and clinical data could be utilized to identify sea lions with DAT. Using a training set of 32 sea lion sera, 20 proteins and their isoforms were identified that were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.05). Interestingly, 11 apolipoprotein E (ApoE) charge forms were decreased in DAT samples, indicating that ApoE charge form distributions may be important in the progression of DAT. In order to develop a classifier of chronic DAT, an independent blinded test set of 20 sea lions, seven with chronic DAT, was used to validate models utilizing ApoE charge forms and eosinophil counts. The resulting support vector machine had high sensitivity (85.7% with 92.3% negative predictive value) and high specificity (92.3% with 85.7% positive predictive value). These results suggest that ApoE and eosinophil counts along with machine learning can perform as a robust and accurate tool to diagnose chronic DAT. Although this analysis is specifically focused on blood biomarkers and routine clinical data, the results demonstrate promise for future studies combining additional variables in multidimensional space to create robust classifiers. PMID:25919366

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Plasma from California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus) Reveals Apolipoprotein E as a Candidate Biomarker of Chronic Domoic Acid Toxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Benjamin A.; Ferrante, Jason A.; Chaves, J. Mauro; Soper, Jennifer L.; Almeida, Jonas S.; Arthur, John M.; Gulland, Frances M. D.; Janech, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) is caused by exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid and has been linked to massive stranding events and mortality. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs in addition to the presence of domoic acid in body fluids. Chronic DAT further is characterized by reoccurring seizures progressing to status epilepticus. Diagnosis of chronic DAT is often slow and problematic, and minimally invasive tests for DAT have been the focus of numerous recent biomarker studies. The goal of this study was to retrospectively profile plasma proteins in a population of sea lions with chronic DAT and those without DAT using two dimensional gel electrophoresis to discover whether individual, multiple, or combinations of protein and clinical data could be utilized to identify sea lions with DAT. Using a training set of 32 sea lion sera, 20 proteins and their isoforms were identified that were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.05). Interestingly, 11 apolipoprotein E (ApoE) charge forms were decreased in DAT samples, indicating that ApoE charge form distributions may be important in the progression of DAT. In order to develop a classifier of chronic DAT, an independent blinded test set of 20 sea lions, seven with chronic DAT, was used to validate models utilizing ApoE charge forms and eosinophil counts. The resulting support vector machine had high sensitivity (85.7% with 92.3% negative predictive value) and high specificity (92.3% with 85.7% positive predictive value). These results suggest that ApoE and eosinophil counts along with machine learning can perform as a robust and accurate tool to diagnose chronic DAT. Although this analysis is specifically focused on blood biomarkers and routine clinical data, the results demonstrate promise for future studies combining additional variables in multidimensional space to create robust classifiers. PMID:25919366

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Plasma from California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus) Reveals Apolipoprotein E as a Candidate Biomarker of Chronic Domoic Acid Toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Neely, Benjamin A; Ferrante, Jason A; Chaves, J Mauro; Soper, Jennifer L; Almeida, Jonas S; Arthur, John M; Gulland, Frances M D; Janech, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) is caused by exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid and has been linked to massive stranding events and mortality. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs in addition to the presence of domoic acid in body fluids. Chronic DAT further is characterized by reoccurring seizures progressing to status epilepticus. Diagnosis of chronic DAT is often slow and problematic, and minimally invasive tests for DAT have been the focus of numerous recent biomarker studies. The goal of this study was to retrospectively profile plasma proteins in a population of sea lions with chronic DAT and those without DAT using two dimensional gel electrophoresis to discover whether individual, multiple, or combinations of protein and clinical data could be utilized to identify sea lions with DAT. Using a training set of 32 sea lion sera, 20 proteins and their isoforms were identified that were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.05). Interestingly, 11 apolipoprotein E (ApoE) charge forms were decreased in DAT samples, indicating that ApoE charge form distributions may be important in the progression of DAT. In order to develop a classifier of chronic DAT, an independent blinded test set of 20 sea lions, seven with chronic DAT, was used to validate models utilizing ApoE charge forms and eosinophil counts. The resulting support vector machine had high sensitivity (85.7% with 92.3% negative predictive value) and high specificity (92.3% with 85.7% positive predictive value). These results suggest that ApoE and eosinophil counts along with machine learning can perform as a robust and accurate tool to diagnose chronic DAT. Although this analysis is specifically focused on blood biomarkers and routine clinical data, the results demonstrate promise for future studies combining additional variables in multidimensional space to create robust classifiers.

  19. Real-time analysis of endogenous protoporphyrin IX fluorescence from δ-aminolevulinic acid and its derivatives reveals distinct time- and dose-dependent characteristics in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesslich, Tobias; Helander, Linda; Illig, Romana; Oberdanner, Christian; Wagner, Andrej; Lettner, Herbert; Jakab, Martin; Plaetzer, Kristjan

    2014-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photodiagnosis based on the intracellular production of the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) by administration of its metabolic precursor δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) achieved their breakthrough upon the clinical approval of MAL (ALA methyl ester) and HAL (ALA hexyl ester). For newly developed ALA derivatives or application in new tumor types, in vitro determination of PPIX formation involves multiparametric experiments covering variable pro-drug concentrations, medium composition, time points of analysis, and cell type(s). This study uses a fluorescence microplate reader with a built-in temperature and atmosphere control to investigate the high-resolution long-term kinetics (72 h) of cellular PPIX fueled by administration of either ALA, MAL, or HAL for each 10 different concentrations. For simultaneous proliferation correction, A431 cells were stably transfected with green fluorescent protein. The results indicate that the peak PPIX level is a function of both, incubation concentration and period: maximal PPIX is generated with 1 to 2-mM ALA/MAL or 0.125-mM HAL; also, the PPIX peak shifts to longer incubation periods with increasing pro-drug concentrations. The results underline the need for detailed temporal analysis of PPIX formation to optimize ALA (derivative)-based PDT or photodiagnosis and highlight the value of environment-controlled microplate readers for automated in vitro analysis.

  20. Kinetic analysis of bifidobacterial metabolism reveals a minor role for succinic acid in the regeneration of NAD+ through its growth-associated production.

    PubMed

    Van der Meulen, Roel; Adriany, Tom; Verbrugghe, Kristof; De Vuyst, Luc

    2006-08-01

    Several strains belonging to the genus Bifidobacterium were tested to determine their abilities to produce succinic acid. Bifidobacterium longum strain BB536 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strain Bb 12 were kinetically analyzed in detail using in vitro fermentations to obtain more insight into the metabolism and production of succinic acid by bifidobacteria. Changes in end product formation in strains of Bifidobacterium could be related to the specific rate of sugar consumption. When the specific sugar consumption rate increased, relatively more lactic acid and less acetic acid, formic acid, and ethanol were produced, and vice versa. All Bifidobacterium strains tested produced small amounts of succinic acid; the concentrations were not more than a few millimolar. Succinic acid production was found to be associated with growth and stopped when the energy source was depleted. The production of succinic acid contributed to regeneration of a small part of the NAD+, in addition to the regeneration through the production of lactic acid and ethanol.

  1. Global transcription analysis of Krebs tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants reveals an alternating pattern of gene expression and effects on hypoxic and oxidative genes.

    PubMed

    McCammon, Mark T; Epstein, Charles B; Przybyla-Zawislak, Beata; McAlister-Henn, Lee; Butow, Ronald A

    2003-03-01

    To understand the many roles of the Krebs tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in cell function, we used DNA microarrays to examine gene expression in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. mRNA was analyzed from yeast strains harboring defects in each of 15 genes that encode subunits of the eight TCA cycle enzymes. The expression of >400 genes changed at least threefold in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. Many genes displayed a common response to TCA cycle dysfunction indicative of a shift away from oxidative metabolism. Another set of genes displayed a pairwise, alternating pattern of expression in response to contiguous TCA cycle enzyme defects: expression was elevated in aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase mutants, diminished in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA ligase mutants, elevated again in succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase mutants, and diminished again in malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase mutants. This pattern correlated with previously defined TCA cycle growth-enhancing mutations and suggested a novel metabolic signaling pathway monitoring TCA cycle function. Expression of hypoxic/anaerobic genes was elevated in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase mutants, whereas expression of oxidative genes was diminished, consistent with a heme signaling defect caused by inadequate levels of the heme precursor, succinyl-CoA. These studies have revealed extensive responses to changes in TCA cycle function and have uncovered new and unexpected metabolic networks that are wired into the TCA cycle.

  2. Transcriptome Analysis of H2O2-Treated Wheat Seedlings Reveals a H2O2-Responsive Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene Participating in Powdery Mildew Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lichuan; Zhao, Guangyao; Zhu, Mingzhu; Chu, Jinfang; Sun, Xiaohong; Wei, Bo; Zhang, Xiangqi; Jia, Jizeng; Mao, Long

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plays important roles in plant biotic and abiotic stress responses. However, the effect of H2O2 stress on the bread wheat transcriptome is still lacking. To investigate the cellular and metabolic responses triggered by H2O2, we performed an mRNA tag analysis of wheat seedlings under 10 mM H2O2 treatment for 6 hour in one powdery mildew (PM) resistant (PmA) and two susceptible (Cha and Han) lines. In total, 6,156, 6,875 and 3,276 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed in PmA, Han and Cha respectively. Among them, 260 genes exhibited consistent expression patterns in all three wheat lines and may represent a subset of basal H2O2 responsive genes that were associated with cell defense, signal transduction, photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, redox homeostasis, and transport. Among genes specific to PmA, ‘transport’ activity was significantly enriched in Gene Ontology analysis. MapMan classification showed that, while both up- and down- regulations were observed for auxin, abscisic acid, and brassinolides signaling genes, the jasmonic acid and ethylene signaling pathway genes were all up-regulated, suggesting H2O2-enhanced JA/Et functions in PmA. To further study whether any of these genes were involved in wheat PM response, 19 H2O2-responsive putative defense related genes were assayed in wheat seedlings infected with Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt). Eight of these genes were found to be co-regulated by H2O2 and Bgt, among which a fatty acid desaturase gene TaFAD was then confirmed by virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) to be required for the PM resistance. Together, our data presents the first global picture of the wheat transcriptome under H2O2 stress and uncovers potential links between H2O2 and Bgt responses, hence providing important candidate genes for the PM resistance in wheat. PMID:22174904

  3. Transcriptome analysis reveals unique C4-like photosynthesis and oil body formation in an arachidonic acid-rich microalga Myrmecia incisa Reisigl H4301

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arachidonic acid (ArA) is important for human health because it is one of the major components of mammalian brain membrane phospholipids. The interest in ArA inspired the search for a new sustainable source, and the green microalga Myrmecia incisa Reisigl H4301 has been found a potential ArA-producer due to a high content of intracellular ArA. To gain more molecular information about metabolism pathways, including the biosynthesis of ArA in the non-model microalga, a transcriptomic analysis was performed. Results The 454 pyrosequencing generated 371,740 high-quality reads, which were assembled into 51,908 unique sequences consisting of 22,749 contigs and 29,159 singletons. A total of 11,873 unique sequences were annotated through BLAST analysis, and 3,733 were assigned to Gene Ontology (GO) categories. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis uncovered a C4-like photosynthesis pathway in M. incisa. The biosynthesis pathways of lipid particularly those of ArA and triacylglycerol (TAG) were analyzed in detail, and TAG was proposed to be accumulated in oil bodies in the cytosol with the help of caleosin or oil globule-associated proteins. In addition, the carotenoid biosynthesis pathways are discussed. Conclusion This transcriptomic analysis of M. incisa enabled a global understanding of mechanisms involved in photosynthesis, de novo biosynthesis of ArA, metabolism of carotenoids, and accumulation of TAG in M. incisa. These findings provided a molecular basis for the research and possibly economic exploitation of this ArA-rich microalga. PMID:23759028

  4. Proteomic analysis reveals differences in tolerance to acid rain in two broad-leaf tree species, Liquidambar formosana and Schima superba.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Hu, Wen-Jun; Wang, Chao; Liu, Ting-Wu; Chalifour, Annie; Chen, Juan; Shen, Zhi-Jun; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Wen-Hua; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2014-01-01

    Acid rain (AR) is a serious environmental issue inducing harmful impacts on plant growth and development. It has been reported that Liquidambar formosana, considered as an AR-sensitive tree species, was largely injured by AR, compared with Schima superba, an AR-tolerant tree species. To clarify the different responses of these two species to AR, a comparative proteomic analysis was conducted in this study. More than 1000 protein spots were reproducibly detected on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels. Among them, 74 protein spots from L. formosana gels and 34 protein spots from S. superba gels showed significant changes in their abundances under AR stress. In both L. formosana and S. superba, the majority proteins with more than 2 fold changes were involved in photosynthesis and energy production, followed by material metabolism, stress and defense, transcription, post-translational and modification, and signal transduction. In contrast with L. formosana, no hormone response-related protein was found in S. superba. Moreover, the changes of proteins involved in photosynthesis, starch synthesis, and translation were distinctly different between L. formosana and S. superba. Protein expression analysis of three proteins (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase) by Western blot was well correlated with the results of proteomics. In conclusion, our study provides new insights into AR stress responses in woody plants and clarifies the differences in strategies to cope with AR between L. formosana and S. superba.

  5. Proteomic analysis reveals differences in tolerance to acid rain in two broad-leaf tree species, Liquidambar formosana and Schima superba.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Hu, Wen-Jun; Wang, Chao; Liu, Ting-Wu; Chalifour, Annie; Chen, Juan; Shen, Zhi-Jun; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Wen-Hua; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2014-01-01

    Acid rain (AR) is a serious environmental issue inducing harmful impacts on plant growth and development. It has been reported that Liquidambar formosana, considered as an AR-sensitive tree species, was largely injured by AR, compared with Schima superba, an AR-tolerant tree species. To clarify the different responses of these two species to AR, a comparative proteomic analysis was conducted in this study. More than 1000 protein spots were reproducibly detected on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels. Among them, 74 protein spots from L. formosana gels and 34 protein spots from S. superba gels showed significant changes in their abundances under AR stress. In both L. formosana and S. superba, the majority proteins with more than 2 fold changes were involved in photosynthesis and energy production, followed by material metabolism, stress and defense, transcription, post-translational and modification, and signal transduction. In contrast with L. formosana, no hormone response-related protein was found in S. superba. Moreover, the changes of proteins involved in photosynthesis, starch synthesis, and translation were distinctly different between L. formosana and S. superba. Protein expression analysis of three proteins (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase) by Western blot was well correlated with the results of proteomics. In conclusion, our study provides new insights into AR stress responses in woody plants and clarifies the differences in strategies to cope with AR between L. formosana and S. superba. PMID:25025692

  6. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Differences in Tolerance to Acid Rain in Two Broad-Leaf Tree Species, Liquidambar formosana and Schima superba

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Liu, Ting-Wu; Chalifour, Annie; Chen, Juan; Shen, Zhi-Jun; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Wen-Hua; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2014-01-01

    Acid rain (AR) is a serious environmental issue inducing harmful impacts on plant growth and development. It has been reported that Liquidambar formosana, considered as an AR-sensitive tree species, was largely injured by AR, compared with Schima superba, an AR-tolerant tree species. To clarify the different responses of these two species to AR, a comparative proteomic analysis was conducted in this study. More than 1000 protein spots were reproducibly detected on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels. Among them, 74 protein spots from L. formosana gels and 34 protein spots from S. superba gels showed significant changes in their abundances under AR stress. In both L. formosana and S. superba, the majority proteins with more than 2 fold changes were involved in photosynthesis and energy production, followed by material metabolism, stress and defense, transcription, post-translational and modification, and signal transduction. In contrast with L. formosana, no hormone response-related protein was found in S. superba. Moreover, the changes of proteins involved in photosynthesis, starch synthesis, and translation were distinctly different between L. formosana and S. superba. Protein expression analysis of three proteins (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase) by Western blot was well correlated with the results of proteomics. In conclusion, our study provides new insights into AR stress responses in woody plants and clarifies the differences in strategies to cope with AR between L. formosana and S. superba. PMID:25025692

  7. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Mechanism Underlying the Production of a High Quantity of Chlorogenic Acid in Young Leaves of Lonicera macranthoides Hand.-Mazz.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zexiong; Tang, Ning; You, Yuming; Lan, Jianbin; Liu, Yiqing; Li, Zhengguo

    2015-01-01

    Lonicera macranthoides Hand.-Mazz (L. macranthoides) is a medicinal herb that is widely distributed in southern China. The biosynthetic and metabolic pathways for a core secondary metabolite in L. macranthoides, chlorogenic acid (CGA), have been elucidated in many species. However, the mechanisms of CGA biosynthesis and the related gene regulatory network in L. macranthoides are still not well understood. In this study, CGA content was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and CGA levels differed significantly among three tissues; specifically, the CGA content in young leaves (YL) was greater than that in young stems (YS), which was greater than that in mature flowers (MF). Transcriptome analysis of L. macranthoides yielded a total of 53,533,014 clean reads (average length 90 bp) and 76,453 unigenes (average length 703 bp). A total of 3,767 unigenes were involved in biosynthesis pathways of secondary metabolites. Of these unigenes, 80 were possibly related to CGA biosynthesis. Furthermore, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened in different tissues including YL, MF and YS. In these tissues, 24 DEGs were found to be associated with CGA biosynthesis, including six phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) genes, six 4-coumarate coenzyme A ligase (4CL) genes, four cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase (C4H) genes, seven hydroxycinnamoyl transferase/hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate transferase HCT/HQT genes and one coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) gene.These results further the understanding of CGA biosynthesis and the related regulatory network in L. macranthoides.

  8. SILAC-based proteomic analysis reveals that salidroside antagonizes cobalt chloride-induced hypoxic effects by restoring the tricarboxylic acid cycle in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhong-Wei; Chen, Xi; Jin, Xiao-Han; Meng, Xiang-Yan; Zhou, Xin; Fan, Feng-Xu; Mao, Shi-Yun; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Shan, Na-Na; Li, Yu-Ming; Xu, Rui-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic status alters the energy metabolism and induces cell injury in cardiomyocytes, and it further triggers the occurrence and development of cardiovascular diseases. Our previous studies have shown that salidroside (SAL) exhibits anti-hypoxic activity. However, the mechanisms remain obscure. In the present study, we successfully screened 92 different expression proteins in CoCl2-induced hypoxic conditions, 106 different expression proteins in the SAL-mediated anti-hypoxic group were compared with the hypoxic group using quantitative proteomics strategy, respectively. We confirmed that SAL showed a positive protective function involving the acetyl-CoA metabolic, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle using bioinformatics analysis. We also demonstrated that SAL plays a critical role in restoring the TCA cycle and in protecting cardiomyocytes from oxidative injury via up-regulation expressions of PDHE1-B, ACO2, SUCLG1, SUCLG2 and down-regulation of MDH2. SAL also inhibited H9c2 cell apoptosis by inhibiting the activation of pro-apoptotic molecules caspase 3 and caspase 9 as well as activation of the anti-apoptotic molecular Bcl-2. Additionally, SAL also improved mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intercellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) accumulation and inhibited the excessive consumption of ATP in H9c2 cells. PMID:26435418

  9. SILAC-based proteomic analysis reveals that salidroside antagonizes cobalt chloride-induced hypoxic effects by restoring the tricarboxylic acid cycle in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhong-Wei; Chen, Xi; Jin, Xiao-Han; Meng, Xiang-Yan; Zhou, Xin; Fan, Feng-Xu; Mao, Shi-Yun; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Shan, Na-Na; Li, Yu-Ming; Xu, Rui-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic status alters the energy metabolism and induces cell injury in cardiomyocytes, and it further triggers the occurrence and development of cardiovascular diseases. Our previous studies have shown that salidroside (SAL) exhibits anti-hypoxic activity. However, the mechanisms remain obscure. In the present study, we successfully screened 92 different expression proteins in CoCl2-induced hypoxic conditions, 106 different expression proteins in the SAL-mediated anti-hypoxic group were compared with the hypoxic group using quantitative proteomics strategy, respectively. We confirmed that SAL showed a positive protective function involving the acetyl-CoA metabolic, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle using bioinformatics analysis. We also demonstrated that SAL plays a critical role in restoring the TCA cycle and in protecting cardiomyocytes from oxidative injury via up-regulation expressions of PDHE1-B, ACO2, SUCLG1, SUCLG2 and down-regulation of MDH2. SAL also inhibited H9c2 cell apoptosis by inhibiting the activation of pro-apoptotic molecules caspase 3 and caspase 9 as well as activation of the anti-apoptotic molecular Bcl-2. Additionally, SAL also improved mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intercellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) accumulation and inhibited the excessive consumption of ATP in H9c2 cells.

  10. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Mechanism Underlying the Production of a High Quantity of Chlorogenic Acid in Young Leaves of Lonicera macranthoides Hand.-Mazz

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zexiong; Tang, Ning; You, Yuming; Lan, Jianbin; Liu, Yiqing; Li, Zhengguo

    2015-01-01

    Lonicera macranthoides Hand.-Mazz (L. macranthoides) is a medicinal herb that is widely distributed in southern China. The biosynthetic and metabolic pathways for a core secondary metabolite in L. macranthoides, chlorogenic acid (CGA), have been elucidated in many species. However, the mechanisms of CGA biosynthesis and the related gene regulatory network in L. macranthoides are still not well understood. In this study, CGA content was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and CGA levels differed significantly among three tissues; specifically, the CGA content in young leaves (YL) was greater than that in young stems (YS), which was greater than that in mature flowers (MF). Transcriptome analysis of L. macranthoides yielded a total of 53,533,014 clean reads (average length 90 bp) and 76,453 unigenes (average length 703 bp). A total of 3,767 unigenes were involved in biosynthesis pathways of secondary metabolites. Of these unigenes, 80 were possibly related to CGA biosynthesis. Furthermore, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened in different tissues including YL, MF and YS. In these tissues, 24 DEGs were found to be associated with CGA biosynthesis, including six phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) genes, six 4-coumarate coenzyme A ligase (4CL) genes, four cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase (C4H) genes, seven hydroxycinnamoyl transferase/hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate transferase HCT/HQT genes and one coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) gene.These results further the understanding of CGA biosynthesis and the related regulatory network in L. macranthoides. PMID:26381882

  11. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Mechanism Underlying the Production of a High Quantity of Chlorogenic Acid in Young Leaves of Lonicera macranthoides Hand.-Mazz.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zexiong; Tang, Ning; You, Yuming; Lan, Jianbin; Liu, Yiqing; Li, Zhengguo

    2015-01-01

    Lonicera macranthoides Hand.-Mazz (L. macranthoides) is a medicinal herb that is widely distributed in southern China. The biosynthetic and metabolic pathways for a core secondary metabolite in L. macranthoides, chlorogenic acid (CGA), have been elucidated in many species. However, the mechanisms of CGA biosynthesis and the related gene regulatory network in L. macranthoides are still not well understood. In this study, CGA content was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and CGA levels differed significantly among three tissues; specifically, the CGA content in young leaves (YL) was greater than that in young stems (YS), which was greater than that in mature flowers (MF). Transcriptome analysis of L. macranthoides yielded a total of 53,533,014 clean reads (average length 90 bp) and 76,453 unigenes (average length 703 bp). A total of 3,767 unigenes were involved in biosynthesis pathways of secondary metabolites. Of these unigenes, 80 were possibly related to CGA biosynthesis. Furthermore, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened in different tissues including YL, MF and YS. In these tissues, 24 DEGs were found to be associated with CGA biosynthesis, including six phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) genes, six 4-coumarate coenzyme A ligase (4CL) genes, four cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase (C4H) genes, seven hydroxycinnamoyl transferase/hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate transferase HCT/HQT genes and one coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) gene.These results further the understanding of CGA biosynthesis and the related regulatory network in L. macranthoides. PMID:26381882

  12. Analysis of Bile Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjövall, Jan; Griffiths, William J.; Setchell, Kenneth D. R.; Mano, Nariyasu; Goto, Junichi

    Bile acids constitute a large family of steroids in vertebrates, normally formed from cholesterol and carrying a carboxyl group in a side-chain of variable length. Bile alcohols, also formed from cholesterol, have similar structures as bile acids, except for the absence of a carboxyl group in the steroid skeleton. The conversion of cholesterol to bile acids and/or bile alcohols is of major importance for maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis, both from quantitative and regulatory points of view (Chiang, 2004; Kalaany and Mangelsdorf, 2006; Moore, Kato, Xie, et al., 2006; Scotti, Gilardi, Godio, et al., 2007). Appropriately conjugated bile acids and bile alcohols (also referred to as bile salts) are secreted in bile and serve vital functions in the absorption of lipids and lipid-soluble compounds (Hofmann, 2007). Reliable analytical methods are required for studies of the functions and pathophysiological importance of the variety of bile acids and bile alcohols present in living organisms. When combined with genetic and proteomic studies, analysis of these small molecules (in today's terminology: metabolomics, steroidomics, sterolomics, cholanoidomics, etc.) will lead to a deeper understanding of the integrated metabolic processes in lipid metabolism.

  13. Genetic analysis of two OsLpa1-like genes in Arabidopsis reveals that only one is required for wild-type seed phytic acid levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytic acid (inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate or InsP6) is the primary storage form of phosphorus in plant seeds. The rice OsLpa1 encodes a novel protein required for wild-type levels of seed InsP6 and was identified from a low phytic acid (lpa) mutant exhibiting a 45-50% reduction in seed InsP...

  14. Highly expressed amino acid biosynthesis genes revealed by global gene expression analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis during growth in whole egg are not essential for this growth.

    PubMed

    Jakočiūnė, Džiuginta; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Jelsbak, Lotte; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the most common cause of egg borne salmonellosis in many parts of the world. This study analyzed gene expression of this bacterium during growth in whole egg, and whether highly expressed genes were essential for the growth. High quality RNA was extracted from S. Enteritidis using a modified RNA-extraction protocol. Global gene expression during growth in whole egg was compared to growth in LB-medium using DNA array method. Twenty-six genes were significantly upregulated during growth in egg; these belonged to amino acid biosynthesis, di/oligopeptide transport system, biotin synthesis, ferrous iron transport system, and type III secretion system. Significant downregulation of 15 genes related to formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) and trehalose metabolism was observed. The results suggested that S. Enteritidis is starved for amino-acids, biotin and iron when growing in egg. However, site specific mutation of amino acid biosynthesis genes asnA (17.3 fold upregulated), asnB (18.6 fold upregulated), asnA/asnB and, serA (12.0 fold upregulated) and gdhA (3.7 fold upregulated), did not result in growth attenuation, suggesting that biosynthesis using the enzymes encoded from these genes may represent the first choice for S. Enteritidis when growing in egg, but when absent, the bacterium could use alternative ways to obtain the amino acids. PMID:26945769

  15. Highly expressed amino acid biosynthesis genes revealed by global gene expression analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis during growth in whole egg are not essential for this growth.

    PubMed

    Jakočiūnė, Džiuginta; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Jelsbak, Lotte; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the most common cause of egg borne salmonellosis in many parts of the world. This study analyzed gene expression of this bacterium during growth in whole egg, and whether highly expressed genes were essential for the growth. High quality RNA was extracted from S. Enteritidis using a modified RNA-extraction protocol. Global gene expression during growth in whole egg was compared to growth in LB-medium using DNA array method. Twenty-six genes were significantly upregulated during growth in egg; these belonged to amino acid biosynthesis, di/oligopeptide transport system, biotin synthesis, ferrous iron transport system, and type III secretion system. Significant downregulation of 15 genes related to formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) and trehalose metabolism was observed. The results suggested that S. Enteritidis is starved for amino-acids, biotin and iron when growing in egg. However, site specific mutation of amino acid biosynthesis genes asnA (17.3 fold upregulated), asnB (18.6 fold upregulated), asnA/asnB and, serA (12.0 fold upregulated) and gdhA (3.7 fold upregulated), did not result in growth attenuation, suggesting that biosynthesis using the enzymes encoded from these genes may represent the first choice for S. Enteritidis when growing in egg, but when absent, the bacterium could use alternative ways to obtain the amino acids.

  16. Transcriptional analysis reveals a high impact of conjugated linoleic acid on stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1 mRNA expression in mice gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Parra, Pilar; Serra, Francisca; Palou, Andreu

    2012-10-01

    We examined the potential implication of skeletal muscle in the fat-lowering effect observed in mice treated with moderate doses of CLA. In experiment 1, mice fed with a standard-fat diet were orally treated with sunflower oil (control) and 3 or 10 mg CLA mixture/day for 37 days. In experiment 2, mice were fed with a high-fat diet for 65 days. For the first 30 days, they received the same doses as in experiment 1 and, from that time onwards, animals received double doses. Gene expression of key proteins involved in fatty acid transport, oxidation, regulation of lipid and carbohydrate utilization, composition of muscle fiber, and thermogenesis were determined and, in most of them, no major impact of CLA was seen. Therefore, enhancement of fatty acid oxidation in muscle did not seem to contribute to the antiobesity effect of CLA as seen in other studies with higher CLA doses. However, a strong induction of classically associated lipogenic genes such as Fasn (up to twofold) and, particularly, Scd1 (up to ninefold) was found. This activation could contribute to a protective role in muscle cells, since expression of ER stress markers was decreased and inversely correlated with the induction of Scd1.

  17. Proteome analysis of fatty liver in feed-deprived dairy cows reveals interaction of fuel sensing, calcium, fatty acid, and glycogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, Björn; Albrecht, Dirk; Kuhla, Siegfried; Metges, Cornelia C

    2009-04-10

    The liver of dairy cows is involved in signaling the current hepatic metabolic state to the brain via metabolites and nerval afferents to control and adjust feed intake. Feed deprivation may result in mobilization of body reserves favoring hepatic steatosis. While the overall metabolic changes are well characterized, specific regulatory mechanisms are not readily understood. To identify molecular events associated with metabolic adaptation and the control of energy homeostasis, liver specimens from six ad libitum-fed and six feed-deprived cows were analyzed for selected metabolites, for the activation of AMP kinase, and for regulatory/regulated proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS. Feed deprivation increased total liver fat and the calcium content, as well as augmented AMPK phosphorylation, while it decreased the contents of protein, glucose, glycogen, and cholesterol when expressed as a percentage of dry matter. Among 34 differentially expressed proteins identified, we found downregulation of proteins associated with fatty acid oxidation, glycolysis, electron transfer, protein degradation, and antigen processing, as well as cytoskeletal rearrangement. Proteins upregulated after feed deprivation included enzymes of the urea cycle, fatty acid or cholesterol transport proteins, an inhibitor of glycolysis, and previously unknown changes in calcium signaling network. Direct correlation was found between expression of glycolytic enzymes and glucose/glycogen content, whereas inverse correlation exists between expression of beta-oxidative enzymes and total liver fat content. In conclusion, the regulatory response of identified proteins may help to explain development and consequences of hepatic lipidosis but also offers novel candidates potentially involved in signaling for maintaining energy homeostasis.

  18. Microarray and genetic analysis reveals that csa-miR159b plays a critical role in abscisic acid-mediated heat tolerance in grafted cucumber plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Wang, Yu; Wang, Ze; Guo, Xie; Wang, Feng; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Zhou, Jie; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jing-Quan; Zhou, Yan-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Root-shoot communication plays a vital role in plant growth, development and adaptation to environmental stimuli. Grafting-induced stress tolerance is associated with the induction of plentiful stress-related genes and proteins; the mechanism involved, however, remains obscure. Here, we show that the enhanced tolerance against heat stress in cucumber plants with luffa as rootstock was accompanied with an increased accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA), down-regulation of a subset of microRNAs (miRNAs) but up-regulation of their target genes and CsHSP70 accumulation in the shoots. Significantly, luffa rootstock and foliar application of ABA both down-regulated csa-miR159b and up-regulated its target mRNAs CsGAMYB1 and CsMYB29-like and CsHSP70 accumulation in cucumber, while ectopic expression of csa-miR159b led to decreased heat tolerance, AtMYB33 transcript and AtHSP70 accumulation in Arabidopsis plants. Taken together, our results suggest that root-originated signals such as ABA could alter miRNAs in the shoots, which have a major role in the post-transcriptional regulation of the stress-responsive genes. PMID:27037862

  19. Structure-function analysis of npr1 alleles in Arabidopsis reveals a role for its paralogs in the perception of salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Canet, Juan Vicente; Dobón, Albor; Roig, Alejandra; Tornero, Pablo

    2010-11-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is necessary for plant defence against some pathogens, whereas NPR1 is necessary for SA perception. Plant defence can be induced to an extreme by several applications of benzothiadiazole (BTH), an analogue of SA. Thus, plants that do not perceive BTH grow unaffected, whereas wild-type plants grow stunted. This feature allows us to screen for mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana that show insensitivity to BTH in a high-throughput fashion. Most of the mutants are npr1 alleles, with similar phenotypes in plant weight and pathogen growth. The mutations are clustered in the carboxyl-terminal part of the protein, and no obvious null alleles were recovered. These facts have prompted a search for knockouts in the NPR1 gene. Two of these KO alleles identified are null and have an intermediate phenotype. All the evidence presented lead us to propose a redundancy in SA perception, with the paralogs of NPR1 taking part in this signalling. We show that the mutations recovered in the screening genetically interact with the paralogs preventing their function in SA signalling.

  20. Mutational Analysis of Deinococcus radiodurans Bacteriophytochrome Reveals Key Amino Acids Necessary for the Photochromicity and Proton Exchange Cycle of Phytochromes*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jeremiah R.; Zhang, Junrui; von Stetten, David; Günther, Mina; Murgida, Daniel H.; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Walker, Joseph M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Hildebrandt, Peter; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of phytochromes (Phy) to act as photointerconvertible light switches in plants and microorganisms depends on key interactions between the bilin chromophore and the apoprotein that promote bilin attachment and photointerconversion between the spectrally distinct red light-absorbing Pr conformer and far red light-absorbing Pfr conformer. Using structurally guided site-directed mutagenesis combined with several spectroscopic methods, we examined the roles of conserved amino acids within the bilin-binding domain of Deinococcus radiodurans bacteriophytochrome with respect to chromophore ligation and Pr/Pfr photoconversion. Incorporation of biliverdin IXα (BV), its structure in the Pr state, and its ability to photoisomerize to the first photocycle intermediate are insensitive to most single mutations, implying that these properties are robust with respect to small structural/electrostatic alterations in the binding pocket. In contrast, photoconversion to Pfr is highly sensitive to the chromophore environment. Many of the variants form spectrally bleached Meta-type intermediates in red light that do not relax to Pfr. Particularly important are Asp-207 and His-260, which are invariant within the Phy superfamily and participate in a unique hydrogen bond matrix involving the A, B, and C pyrrole ring nitrogens of BV and their associated pyrrole water. Resonance Raman spectroscopy demonstrates that substitutions of these residues disrupt the Pr to Pfr protonation cycle of BV with the chromophore locked in a deprotonated Meta-Rc-like photoconversion intermediate after red light irradiation. Collectively, the data show that a number of contacts contribute to the unique photochromicity of Phy-type photoreceptors. These include residues that fix the bilin in the pocket, coordinate the pyrrole water, and possibly promote the proton exchange cycle during photoconversion. PMID:18192276

  1. Molecular Dynamic Simulations Reveal the Structural Determinants of Fatty Acid Binding to Oxy-Myoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Chintapalli, Sree V.; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Patel, Reema; Shah, Natasha; Patterson, Randen L.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Anishkin, Andriy; Adams, Sean H.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which fatty acids are sequestered and transported in muscle have not been fully elucidated. A potential key player in this process is the protein myoglobin (Mb). Indeed, there is a catalogue of empirical evidence supporting direct interaction of globins with fatty acid metabolites; however, the binding pocket and regulation of the interaction remains to be established. In this study, we employed a computational strategy to elucidate the structural determinants of fatty acids (palmitic & oleic acid) binding to Mb. Sequence analysis and docking simulations with a horse (Equus caballus) structural Mb reference reveals a fatty acid-binding site in the hydrophobic cleft near the heme region in Mb. Both palmitic acid and oleic acid attain a “U” shaped structure similar to their conformation in pockets of other fatty acid-binding proteins. Specifically, we found that the carboxyl head group of palmitic acid coordinates with the amino group of Lys45, whereas the carboxyl group of oleic acid coordinates with both the amino groups of Lys45 and Lys63. The alkyl tails of both fatty acids are supported by surrounding hydrophobic residues Leu29, Leu32, Phe33, Phe43, Phe46, Val67, Val68 and Ile107. In the saturated palmitic acid, the hydrophobic tail moves freely and occasionally penetrates deeper inside the hydrophobic cleft, making additional contacts with Val28, Leu69, Leu72 and Ile111. Our simulations reveal a dynamic and stable binding pocket in which the oxygen molecule and heme group in Mb are required for additional hydrophobic interactions. Taken together, these findings support a mechanism in which Mb acts as a muscle transporter for fatty acid when it is in the oxygenated state and releases fatty acid when Mb converts to deoxygenated state. PMID:26030763

  2. Analysis of Organic Acids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John R.; Rauner, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are the procedures and a discussion of the results for an experiment in which students select unknown carboxylic acids, determine their melting points, and investigate their solubility behavior in water and ethanol. A table of selected carboxylic acids is included. (CW)

  3. Integrative Analysis Reveals Regulatory Programs in Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Kang, Kai; Cheng, Chao; Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; Taylor, Hugh S

    2015-09-01

    Endometriosis is a common gynecological disease found in approximately 10% of reproductive-age women. Gene expression analysis has been performed to explore alterations in gene expression associated with endometriosis; however, the underlying transcription factors (TFs) governing such expression changes have not been investigated in a systematic way. In this study, we propose a method to integrate gene expression with TF binding data and protein-protein interactions to construct an integrated regulatory network (IRN) for endometriosis. The IRN has shown that the most regulated gene in endometriosis is RUNX1, which is targeted by 14 of 26 TFs also involved in endometriosis. Using 2 published cohorts, GSE7305 (Hover, n = 20) and GSE7307 (Roth, n = 36) from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, we identified a network of TFs, which bind to target genes that are differentially expressed in endometriosis. Enrichment analysis based on the hypergeometric distribution allowed us to predict the TFs involved in endometriosis (n = 40). This included known TFs such as androgen receptor (AR) and critical factors in the pathology of endometriosis, estrogen receptor α, and estrogen receptor β. We also identified several new ones from which we selected FOXA2 and TFAP2C, and their regulation was confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Further, our analysis revealed that the function of AR and p53 in endometriosis is regulated by posttranscriptional changes and not by differential gene expression. Our integrative analysis provides new insights into the regulatory programs involved in endometriosis.

  4. Analysis of Cytokinin Mutants and Regulation of Cytokinin Metabolic Genes Reveals Important Regulatory Roles of Cytokinins in Drought, Salt and Abscisic Acid Responses, and Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Rie; Watanabe, Yasuko; Fujita, Yasunari; Le, Dung Tien; Kojima, Mikiko; Werner, Tomás; Vankova, Radomira; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Schmülling, Thomas; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2011-01-01

    Cytokinins (CKs) regulate plant growth and development via a complex network of CK signaling. Here, we perform functional analyses with CK-deficient plants to provide direct evidence that CKs negatively regulate salt and drought stress signaling. All CK-deficient plants with reduced levels of various CKs exhibited a strong stress-tolerant phenotype that was associated with increased cell membrane integrity and abscisic acid (ABA) hypersensitivity rather than stomatal density and ABA-mediated stomatal closure. Expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana ISOPENTENYL-TRANSFERASE genes involved in the biosynthesis of bioactive CKs and the majority of the Arabidopsis CYTOKININ OXIDASES/DEHYDROGENASES genes was repressed by stress and ABA treatments, leading to a decrease in biologically active CK contents. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism for survival under abiotic stress conditions via the homeostatic regulation of steady state CK levels. Additionally, under normal conditions, although CK deficiency increased the sensitivity of plants to exogenous ABA, it caused a downregulation of key ABA biosynthetic genes, leading to a significant reduction in endogenous ABA levels in CK-deficient plants relative to the wild type. Taken together, this study provides direct evidence that mutual regulation mechanisms exist between the CK and ABA metabolism and signals underlying different processes regulating plant adaptation to stressors as well as plant growth and development. PMID:21719693

  5. Effects of a blend of essential oil compounds and benzoic acid on performance of broiler chickens as revealed by a meta-analysis of 4 growth trials in various locations.

    PubMed

    Weber, G M; Michalczuk, M; Huyghebaert, G; Juin, H; Kwakernaak, C; Gracia, M I

    2012-11-01

    A series of growth trials with broiler chicks was conducted in various geographical locations to evaluate the efficacy of a novel eubiotic feed additive (EFA) at various dietary inclusion levels on performance of growing chicks. The EFA product consisted of a blend of essential oil compounds (thymol, eugenol, piperine) with benzoic acid, all belonging to the group of flavoring substances. Although variable in responses, the overall results indicated that 300 mg/kg of this EFA represented an optimum supplementation dose for generation of beneficial performance effects in broilers. A meta-analysis with all data from the 300 mg/kg EFA-supplemented treatments in comparison with the non-supplemented controls revealed that the eubiotic product significantly improved BW on d 21 (+2.0%; P = 0.0021) and on d 42 (+1.4%; P = 0.0151). Furthermore, the birds on the EFA 300 mg/kg treatment expressed a higher average daily gain in the starter phase (d 1-21; +2.1%; P = 0.0023) and over the entire experimental period (d 1-42; +1.5%; P = 0.0154). Feed conversion ratio was more favorable with dietary EFA supplementation (-0.6%; P = 0.0414), when compared with the control birds. Mortality was considered normal and was not affected by the dietary treatment (control = 3.09%; EFA 300 mg/kg = 3.26%). In conclusion, 300 mg/kg of this new eubiotic product demonstrated to effectively improve performance of broiler chicks under various husbandry conditions. PMID:23091138

  6. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the tobacco PR-1a- and the truncated CaMV 35S promoter reveals differences in salicylic acid-dependent TGA factor binding and histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Butterbrodt, Thomas; Thurow, Corinna; Gatz, Christiane

    2006-07-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a plant signalling molecule needed for the induction of defence responses upon attack by a variety of pathogens. Truncation of the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) 35S promoter down to 90 bp has identified activation sequence-1 (as-1) as an autonomous SA-responsive cis element. The as-1-like elements are found in a number of SA-inducible promoters like e.g. the tobacco PR-1a promoter. They are recognized by basic/leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors of the TGA family. In tobacco leaves, TGA2.2 is the most abundant TGA factor. TGA2.2 is required for the expression of as-1-containing promoters. Here we unravel clear differences between the "truncated" CaMV 35S and the PR-1a promoter with respect to in vivo TGA binding and histone acetylation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed SA-inducible recruitment of tobacco TGA2.2 as well as SA-inducible histone acetylation at the PR-1a promoter. In contrast, no influence of SA on TGA2.2 binding and histone acetylation was detectable at the "truncated" CaMV 35S promoter. The finding of SA-independent TGA factor binding in the absence of additional flanking regulatory sequences suggests that transcriptional activation is not necessarily mediated by inducible DNA binding of TGA factors. Plants with severely reduced TGA2.2 protein levels also showed SA-induced histone acetylation at the PR-1a promoter indicating that regulatory events independent from TGA2.2 function are initiated at the PR-1a promoter.

  7. Elastoviscous Transitions of Articular Cartilage Reveal a Mechanism of Synergy between Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Bonnevie, Edward D.; Galesso, Devis; Secchieri, Cynthia; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    When lubricated by synovial fluid, articular cartilage provides some of the lowest friction coefficients found in nature. While it is known that macromolecular constituents of synovial fluid provide it with its lubricating ability, it is not fully understood how two of the main molecules, lubricin and hyaluronic acid, lubricate and interact with one another. Here, we develop a novel framework for cartilage lubrication based on the elastoviscous transition to show that lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate by distinct mechanisms. Such analysis revealed nonspecific interactions between these molecules in which lubricin acts to concentrate hyaluronic acid near the tissue surface and promotes a transition to a low friction regime consistent with the theory of viscous boundary lubrication. Understanding the mechanics of synovial fluid not only provides insight into the progression of diseases such as arthritis, but also may be applicable to the development of new biomimetic lubricants. PMID:26599797

  8. Elastoviscous Transitions of Articular Cartilage Reveal a Mechanism of Synergy between Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Bonnevie, Edward D; Galesso, Devis; Secchieri, Cynthia; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2015-01-01

    When lubricated by synovial fluid, articular cartilage provides some of the lowest friction coefficients found in nature. While it is known that macromolecular constituents of synovial fluid provide it with its lubricating ability, it is not fully understood how two of the main molecules, lubricin and hyaluronic acid, lubricate and interact with one another. Here, we develop a novel framework for cartilage lubrication based on the elastoviscous transition to show that lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate by distinct mechanisms. Such analysis revealed nonspecific interactions between these molecules in which lubricin acts to concentrate hyaluronic acid near the tissue surface and promotes a transition to a low friction regime consistent with the theory of viscous boundary lubrication. Understanding the mechanics of synovial fluid not only provides insight into the progression of diseases such as arthritis, but also may be applicable to the development of new biomimetic lubricants.

  9. Analysis of a pair of END+ and END- viruses derived from the same bovine viral diarrhea virus stock reveals the amino acid determinants in Npro responsible for inhibition of type I interferon production.

    PubMed

    Kozasa, Takashi; Abe, Yuri; Mitsuhashi, Kazuya; Tamura, Tomokazu; Aoki, Hiroshi; Ishimaru, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Shigeyuki; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2015-05-01

    The Exaltation of Newcastle disease virus (END) phenomenon is induced by the inhibition of type I interferon in pestivirus-infected cells in vitro, via proteasomal degradation of cellular interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 with the property of the viral autoprotease protein N(pro). Reportedly, the amino acid residues in the zinc-binding TRASH motif of N(pro) determine the difference in characteristics between END-phenomenon-positive (END(+)) and END-phenomenon-negative (END(-)) classical swine fever viruses (CSFVs). However, the basic mechanism underlying this function in bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has not been elucidated from the genomic differences between END(+) and END(-) viruses using reverse genetics till date. In the present study, comparison of complete genome sequences of a pair of END(+) and END(-) viruses isolated from the same virus stock revealed that there were only four amino acid substitutions (D136G, I2623V, D3148G and D3502Y) between two viruses. Based on these differences, viruses with and without mutations at these positions were generated using reverse genetics. The END assay, measurements of induced type I interferon and IRF-3 detection in cells infected with these viruses revealed that the aspartic acid at position 136 in the zinc-binding TRASH motif of N(pro) was required to inhibit the production of type I interferon via the degradation of cellular IRF-3, consistently with CSFV.

  10. Metabolomic Analyses of Leishmania Reveal Multiple Species Differences and Large Differences in Amino Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijie; Zhang, Tong; Watson, David G.; Silva, Ana Marta; Coombs, Graham H.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses of Leishmania species have revealed relatively minor heterogeneity amongst recognised housekeeping genes and yet the species cause distinct infections and pathogenesis in their mammalian hosts. To gain greater information on the biochemical variation between species, and insights into possible metabolic mechanisms underpinning visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, we have undertaken in this study a comparative analysis of the metabolomes of promastigotes of L. donovani, L. major and L. mexicana. The analysis revealed 64 metabolites with confirmed identity differing 3-fold or more between the cell extracts of species, with 161 putatively identified metabolites differing similarly. Analysis of the media from cultures revealed an at least 3-fold difference in use or excretion of 43 metabolites of confirmed identity and 87 putatively identified metabolites that differed to a similar extent. Strikingly large differences were detected in their extent of amino acid use and metabolism, especially for tryptophan, aspartate, arginine and proline. Major pathways of tryptophan and arginine catabolism were shown to be to indole-3-lactate and arginic acid, respectively, which were excreted. The data presented provide clear evidence on the value of global metabolomic analyses in detecting species-specific metabolic features, thus application of this technology should be a major contributor to gaining greater understanding of how pathogens are adapted to infecting their hosts. PMID:26368322

  11. Metabolomic Analyses of Leishmania Reveal Multiple Species Differences and Large Differences in Amino Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Westrop, Gareth D; Williams, Roderick A M; Wang, Lijie; Zhang, Tong; Watson, David G; Silva, Ana Marta; Coombs, Graham H

    2015-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses of Leishmania species have revealed relatively minor heterogeneity amongst recognised housekeeping genes and yet the species cause distinct infections and pathogenesis in their mammalian hosts. To gain greater information on the biochemical variation between species, and insights into possible metabolic mechanisms underpinning visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, we have undertaken in this study a comparative analysis of the metabolomes of promastigotes of L. donovani, L. major and L. mexicana. The analysis revealed 64 metabolites with confirmed identity differing 3-fold or more between the cell extracts of species, with 161 putatively identified metabolites differing similarly. Analysis of the media from cultures revealed an at least 3-fold difference in use or excretion of 43 metabolites of confirmed identity and 87 putatively identified metabolites that differed to a similar extent. Strikingly large differences were detected in their extent of amino acid use and metabolism, especially for tryptophan, aspartate, arginine and proline. Major pathways of tryptophan and arginine catabolism were shown to be to indole-3-lactate and arginic acid, respectively, which were excreted. The data presented provide clear evidence on the value of global metabolomic analyses in detecting species-specific metabolic features, thus application of this technology should be a major contributor to gaining greater understanding of how pathogens are adapted to infecting their hosts.

  12. Fatty acid profiling reveals seasonal and spatial shifts in zooplankton diet in a temperate estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, A. M. M.; Azeiteiro, U. M.; Pardal, M. A.; De Troch, M.

    2012-08-01

    Fatty acids composition of copepod and cladoceran species and their possible food sources was investigated in the Mondego estuary (southern Europe) in order to explain the seasonal variation of the small copepods Acartia clausi, Acartia tonsa, Copidodiaptomus numidicus, Temora longicornis and the freshwater cladoceran Daphnia longispina. A total of 12 zooplankton species (7 marine, 2 estuarine and 3 freshwater species) were studied. A multivariate analysis revealed a clear seasonal distribution of zooplankton species in terms of fatty acids composition and abundance, with winter and spring zooplankton species showing maximal concentrations and diversity of total fatty acids. These findings underline the role of lipids as storage during the colder seasons in a highly variable environment like an estuary. Estuarine and freshwater species showed a more diverse array of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids rather than marine species, except for Centropages typicus. Fatty acids markers of trophic position indicated the presence of two trophic levels: copepod species were primarily omnivorous, whereas cladocerans showed to be herbivorous. Our results suggest that feeding patterns of plankton change spatially and temporally, reflecting the shifts in dominance between diatoms and flagellates as well as between dinoflagellates/diatoms and small animals.

  13. Characterisation of Drosophila CMP-sialic acid synthetase activity reveals unusual enzymatic properties

    PubMed Central

    Mertsalov, Ilya B.; Novikov, Boris N.; Scott, Hilary; Dangott, Lawrence; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2016-01-01

    CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS) is a key enzyme of the sialylation pathway. CSAS produces the activated sugar donor, CMP-sialic acid, which serves as a substrate for sialyltransferases to modify glycan termini with sialic acid. Unlike other animal CMP-Sia synthetases that normally localize in the nucleus, Drosophila melanogaster CSAS (DmCSAS) localizes in the cell secretory compartment, predominantly in the Golgi, which suggests that this enzyme has properties distinct from those of its vertebrate counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant DmCSAS and characterised its activity in vitro. Our experiments revealed several unique features of this enzyme. DmCSAS displays specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate, shows preference for lower pH and can function with a broad range of metal cofactors. When tested at a pH corresponding to the Golgi compartment, the enzyme showed significant activity with several metal cations, including Zn2+, Fe2+, Co2+ and Mn2+, while the activity with Mg2+ was found to be low. Protein sequence analysis and site-specific mutagenesis identified an aspartic acid residue that is necessary for enzymatic activity and predicted to be involved in coordinating a metal cofactor. DmCSAS enzymatic activity was found to be essential in vivo for rescuing the phenotype of DmCSAS mutants. Finally, our experiments revealed a steep dependence of the enzymatic activity on temperature. Taken together, our results indicate that DmCSAS underwent evolutionary adaptation to pH and ionic environment different from that of counterpart synthetases in vertebrates. Our data also suggest that environmental temperatures can regulate Drosophila sialylation, thus modulating neural transmission. PMID:27114558

  14. Quantitative three-dimensional analysis of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microsphere using hard X-ray nano-tomography revealed correlation between structural parameters and drug burst release.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaozhou; Li, Na; Wang, Dajiang; Luo, Yuyan; Wu, Ziyu; Guo, Zhefei; Jin, Qixing; Liu, Zhuying; Huang, Yafei; Zhang, Yongming; Wu, Chuanbin

    2015-08-10

    The objective of this study was to investigate the use of transmission hard X-ray nano-computed-tomography (nano-CT) for characterization of the pore structure and drug distribution in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres encapsulating bovine serum albumin and to study the correlation between drug distribution and burst release. The PLGA microspheres were fabricated using a double-emulsion method. The results of pore structure analysis accessed with nano-CT were compared with those acquired by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Surface pore interconnectivity and surface protein interconnectivity were obtained using combined nano-CT and pixel analysis. The correlation between surface protein interconnectivity with the initial burst release across various tested formulations was also analyzed. The size, shape, and distribution of the pores and protein could be clearly observed in the whole microsphere using nano-CT, whereas only the sectional information was observed using SEM or CLSM. Interconnected pores and surface connected pores could be clearly distinguished in nano-CT, which enables the quantitative analysis of surface pore interconnectivity and surface protein interconnectivity. The surface protein interconnectivity in different formulations correlated well with the burst release at 5-10h. Nano-CT provided a nondestructive, high-resolution, and three-dimensional analysis method to characterize the porous microsphere.

  15. Quantitative interactome analysis reveals a chemoresistant edgotype

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Juan D.; Schweppe, Devin K.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Zheng, Chunxiang; Taipale, Alex; Zhang, Yiyi; Takara, Kohji; Bruce, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a common mode of therapy failure for many cancers. Tumours develop resistance to chemotherapeutics through a variety of mechanisms, with proteins serving pivotal roles. Changes in protein conformations and interactions affect the cellular response to environmental conditions contributing to the development of new phenotypes. The ability to understand how protein interaction networks adapt to yield new function or alter phenotype is limited by the inability to determine structural and protein interaction changes on a proteomic scale. Here, chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry were employed to quantify changes in protein structures and interactions in multidrug-resistant human carcinoma cells. Quantitative analysis of the largest crosslinking-derived, protein interaction network comprising 1,391 crosslinked peptides allows for ‘edgotype' analysis in a cell model of chemoresistance. We detect consistent changes to protein interactions and structures, including those involving cytokeratins, topoisomerase-2-alpha, and post-translationally modified histones, which correlate with a chemoresistant phenotype. PMID:26235782

  16. [Acute fatty liver in pregnancy: revealing fetal fatty acid oxidation disorders].

    PubMed

    Lamireau, D; Feghali, H; Redonnet-Vernhet, I; Mesli, S; Carles, D; Brissaud, O

    2012-03-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) and hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome are serious maternal illnesses occurring in the third trimester of pregnancy with significant perinatal and maternal mortality. AFLP may result from mitochondrial defects in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids, in particular a deficiency of the long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) in the fetus. Clinical findings in AFLP vary and its diagnosis is complicated by a significant overlap in clinical and biochemical features with HELLP syndrome. We report the case of 2 siblings who died, the first one in the neonatal period of asphyxia with multivisceral presentation and the second one from sudden death at 7 months. Autopsy of the latter infant revealed hepatic steatosis associated with cardiomyopathy, which led to suspicion of a fatty acid oxidation deficiency. Mutation analysis demonstrated that both children were homozygous for the common mutation c.1528G>C and the parents were heterozygous for this same mutation. This case demonstrates the importance of screening mothers with acute fatty liver disease of pregnancy and their children at birth for a metabolic disease. This article proposes several metabolic tests for mother and child suspected of having beta-oxidation of a fatty acid disorder.

  17. Antiparasitic evaluation of betulinic acid derivatives reveals effective and selective anti-Trypanosoma cruzi inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Meira, Cássio Santana; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Lanfredi-Rangel, Adriana; Guimarães, Elisalva Teixeira; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2016-07-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid with several biological properties already described, including antiparasitic activity. Here, the anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of betulinic acid and its semi-synthetic amide derivatives (BA1-BA8) was investigated. The anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity and selectivity were enhanced in semi-synthetic derivatives, specially on derivatives BA5, BA6 and BA8. To understand the mechanism of action underlying betulinic acid anti-T. cruzi activity, we investigated ultrastructural changes by electron microscopy. Ultrastructural studies showed that trypomastigotes incubated with BA5 had membrane blebling, flagella retraction, atypical cytoplasmic vacuoles and Golgi cisternae dilatation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that parasite death is mainly caused by necrosis. Treatment with derivatives BA5, BA6 or BA8 reduced the invasion process, as well as intracellular parasite development in host cells, with a potency and selectivity similar to that observed in benznidazole-treated cells. More importantly, the combination of BA5 and benznidazole revealed synergistic effects on trypomastigote and amastigote forms of T. cruzi. In conclusion, we demonstrated that BA5 compound is an effective and selective anti-T. cruzi agent.

  18. Antiparasitic evaluation of betulinic acid derivatives reveals effective and selective anti-Trypanosoma cruzi inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Meira, Cássio Santana; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Lanfredi-Rangel, Adriana; Guimarães, Elisalva Teixeira; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2016-07-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid with several biological properties already described, including antiparasitic activity. Here, the anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of betulinic acid and its semi-synthetic amide derivatives (BA1-BA8) was investigated. The anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity and selectivity were enhanced in semi-synthetic derivatives, specially on derivatives BA5, BA6 and BA8. To understand the mechanism of action underlying betulinic acid anti-T. cruzi activity, we investigated ultrastructural changes by electron microscopy. Ultrastructural studies showed that trypomastigotes incubated with BA5 had membrane blebling, flagella retraction, atypical cytoplasmic vacuoles and Golgi cisternae dilatation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that parasite death is mainly caused by necrosis. Treatment with derivatives BA5, BA6 or BA8 reduced the invasion process, as well as intracellular parasite development in host cells, with a potency and selectivity similar to that observed in benznidazole-treated cells. More importantly, the combination of BA5 and benznidazole revealed synergistic effects on trypomastigote and amastigote forms of T. cruzi. In conclusion, we demonstrated that BA5 compound is an effective and selective anti-T. cruzi agent. PMID:27080160

  19. Phylogenomic analysis of 16S rRNA:(guanine-N2) methyltransferases suggests new family members and reveals highly conserved motifs and a domain structure similar to other nucleic acid amino-methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Bujnicki, J M

    2000-11-01

    The sequences of known Escherichia coli 16S rRNA:m2G1207 methyltransferase (MTase) RsmC and hypothetical 16S rRNA:m2G966 MTase encoded by the ygjo open reading frame were used to carry out a database search of other putative m2G-generating enzymes in finished and unfinished genomic sequences. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of 21 close homologs of RsmC and YgjO revealed the presence of the third paralogous lineage in E. coli and other gamma-Proteobacteria, which might correspond to the subfamily of MTases specific for G1516 in 16S rRNA. In addition, the comparative sequence analysis supported by sequence/structure threading suggests that rRNA:m2G MTases are very closely related to RNA and DNA:m6A MTases and that these two enzyme families share common architecture of the active site and presumably a similar mechanism of methyl group transfer onto the exocyclic amino group of their target bases. PMID:11053259

  20. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Jasmonic Acid-Associated Metabolism Related to Cotton Fiber Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liman; Zhu, Youmin; Hu, Wenjing; Zhang, Xueying; Cai, Caiping; Guo, Wangzhen

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mutants and gene expression patterns provides a powerful approach for investigating genes involved in key stages of plant fiber development. In this study, lintless-fuzzless XinWX and linted-fuzzless XinFLM with a single genetic locus difference for lint were used to identify differentially expressed genes. Scanning electron microscopy showed fiber initiation in XinFLM at 0 days post anthesis (DPA). Fiber transcriptional profiling of the lines at three initiation developmental stages (-1, 0, 1 DPA) was performed using an oligonucleotide microarray. Loop comparisons of the differentially expressed genes within and between the lines was carried out, and functional classification and enrichment analysis showed that gene expression patterns during fiber initiation were heavily associated with hormone metabolism, transcription factor regulation, lipid transport, and asparagine biosynthetic processes, as previously reported. Further, four members of the allene-oxide cyclase (AOC) family that function in jasmonate biosynthesis were parallel up-regulation in fiber initiation, especially at -1 DPA, compared to other tissues and organs in linted-fuzzed TM-1. Real time-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis in different fiber mutant lines revealed that AOCs were up-regulated higher at -1 DPA in lintless-fuzzless than that in linted-fuzzless and linted-fuzzed materials, and transcription of the AOCs was increased under jasmonic acid (JA) treatment. Expression analysis of JA biosynthesis-associated genes between XinWX and XinFLM showed that they were up-regulated during fiber initiation in the fuzzless-lintless mutant. Taken together, jasmonic acid-associated metabolism was related to cotton fiber initiation. Parallel up-regulation of AOCs expression may be important for normal fiber initiation development, while overproduction of AOCs might disrupt normal fiber development. PMID:26079621

  1. The Fatty Acid Profile Analysis of Cyperus laxus Used for Phytoremediation of Soils from Aged Oil Spill-Impacted Sites Revealed That This Is a C18:3 Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Montes Horcasitas, María del Carmen; Rodríguez Vázquez, Refugio; Esparza García, Fernando José; Pérez Vargas, Josefina; Ariza Castolo, Armando; Ferrera-Cerrato, Ronald; Gómez Guzmán, Octavio

    2015-01-01

    The effect of recalcitrant hydrocarbons on the fatty acid profile from leaf, basal corm, and roots of Cyperus laxus plants cultivated in greenhouse phytoremediation systems of soils from aged oil spill-impacted sites containing from 16 to 340 g/Kg total hydrocarbons (THC) was assessed to investigate if this is a C18:3 species and if the hydrocarbon removal during the phytoremediation process has a relationship with the fatty acid profile of this plant. The fatty acid profile was specific to each vegetative organ and was strongly affected by the hydrocarbons level in the impacted sites. Leaf extracts of plants from uncontaminated soil produced palmitic acid (C16), octadecanoic acid (C18:0), unsaturated oleic acids (C18:1-C18:3), and unsaturated eichosanoic (C20:2-C20:3) acids with a noticeable absence of the unsaturated hexadecatrienoic acid (C16:3); this finding demonstrates, for the first time, that C. laxus is a C18:3 plant. In plants from the phytoremediation systems, the total fatty acid contents in the leaf and the corm were negatively affected by the hydrocarbons presence; however, the effect was positive in root. Interestingly, under contaminated conditions, unusual fatty acids such as odd numbered carbons (C15, C17, C21, and C23) and uncommon unsaturated chains (C20:3n6 and C20:4) were produced together with a remarkable quantity of C22:2 and C24:0 chains in the corm and the leaf. These results demonstrate that weathered hydrocarbons may drastically affect the lipidic composition of C. laxus at the fatty acid level, suggesting that this species adjusts the cover lipid composition in its vegetative organs, mainly in roots, in response to the weathered hydrocarbon presence and uptake during the phytoremediation process. PMID:26473488

  2. The Fatty Acid Profile Analysis of Cyperus laxus Used for Phytoremediation of Soils from Aged Oil Spill-Impacted Sites Revealed That This Is a C18:3 Plant Species.

    PubMed

    Rivera Casado, Noemí Araceli; Montes Horcasitas, María del Carmen; Rodríguez Vázquez, Refugio; Esparza García, Fernando José; Pérez Vargas, Josefina; Ariza Castolo, Armando; Ferrera-Cerrato, Ronald; Gómez Guzmán, Octavio; Calva Calva, Graciano

    2015-01-01

    The effect of recalcitrant hydrocarbons on the fatty acid profile from leaf, basal corm, and roots of Cyperus laxus plants cultivated in greenhouse phytoremediation systems of soils from aged oil spill-impacted sites containing from 16 to 340 g/Kg total hydrocarbons (THC) was assessed to investigate if this is a C18:3 species and if the hydrocarbon removal during the phytoremediation process has a relationship with the fatty acid profile of this plant. The fatty acid profile was specific to each vegetative organ and was strongly affected by the hydrocarbons level in the impacted sites. Leaf extracts of plants from uncontaminated soil produced palmitic acid (C16), octadecanoic acid (C18:0), unsaturated oleic acids (C18:1-C18:3), and unsaturated eichosanoic (C20:2-C20:3) acids with a noticeable absence of the unsaturated hexadecatrienoic acid (C16:3); this finding demonstrates, for the first time, that C. laxus is a C18:3 plant. In plants from the phytoremediation systems, the total fatty acid contents in the leaf and the corm were negatively affected by the hydrocarbons presence; however, the effect was positive in root. Interestingly, under contaminated conditions, unusual fatty acids such as odd numbered carbons (C15, C17, C21, and C23) and uncommon unsaturated chains (C20:3n6 and C20:4) were produced together with a remarkable quantity of C22:2 and C24:0 chains in the corm and the leaf. These results demonstrate that weathered hydrocarbons may drastically affect the lipidic composition of C. laxus at the fatty acid level, suggesting that this species adjusts the cover lipid composition in its vegetative organs, mainly in roots, in response to the weathered hydrocarbon presence and uptake during the phytoremediation process.

  3. The Fatty Acid Profile Analysis of Cyperus laxus Used for Phytoremediation of Soils from Aged Oil Spill-Impacted Sites Revealed That This Is a C18:3 Plant Species.

    PubMed

    Rivera Casado, Noemí Araceli; Montes Horcasitas, María del Carmen; Rodríguez Vázquez, Refugio; Esparza García, Fernando José; Pérez Vargas, Josefina; Ariza Castolo, Armando; Ferrera-Cerrato, Ronald; Gómez Guzmán, Octavio; Calva Calva, Graciano

    2015-01-01

    The effect of recalcitrant hydrocarbons on the fatty acid profile from leaf, basal corm, and roots of Cyperus laxus plants cultivated in greenhouse phytoremediation systems of soils from aged oil spill-impacted sites containing from 16 to 340 g/Kg total hydrocarbons (THC) was assessed to investigate if this is a C18:3 species and if the hydrocarbon removal during the phytoremediation process has a relationship with the fatty acid profile of this plant. The fatty acid profile was specific to each vegetative organ and was strongly affected by the hydrocarbons level in the impacted sites. Leaf extracts of plants from uncontaminated soil produced palmitic acid (C16), octadecanoic acid (C18:0), unsaturated oleic acids (C18:1-C18:3), and unsaturated eichosanoic (C20:2-C20:3) acids with a noticeable absence of the unsaturated hexadecatrienoic acid (C16:3); this finding demonstrates, for the first time, that C. laxus is a C18:3 plant. In plants from the phytoremediation systems, the total fatty acid contents in the leaf and the corm were negatively affected by the hydrocarbons presence; however, the effect was positive in root. Interestingly, under contaminated conditions, unusual fatty acids such as odd numbered carbons (C15, C17, C21, and C23) and uncommon unsaturated chains (C20:3n6 and C20:4) were produced together with a remarkable quantity of C22:2 and C24:0 chains in the corm and the leaf. These results demonstrate that weathered hydrocarbons may drastically affect the lipidic composition of C. laxus at the fatty acid level, suggesting that this species adjusts the cover lipid composition in its vegetative organs, mainly in roots, in response to the weathered hydrocarbon presence and uptake during the phytoremediation process. PMID:26473488

  4. Polyploid genome of Camelina sativa revealed by isolation of fatty acid synthesis genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Camelina sativa, an oilseed crop in the Brassicaceae family, has inspired renewed interest due to its potential for biofuels applications. Little is understood of the nature of the C. sativa genome, however. A study was undertaken to characterize two genes in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway, fatty acid desaturase (FAD) 2 and fatty acid elongase (FAE) 1, which revealed unexpected complexity in the C. sativa genome. Results In C. sativa, Southern analysis indicates the presence of three copies of both FAD2 and FAE1 as well as LFY, a known single copy gene in other species. All three copies of both CsFAD2 and CsFAE1 are expressed in developing seeds, and sequence alignments show that previously described conserved sites are present, suggesting that all three copies of both genes could be functional. The regions downstream of CsFAD2 and upstream of CsFAE1 demonstrate co-linearity with the Arabidopsis genome. In addition, three expressed haplotypes were observed for six predicted single-copy genes in 454 sequencing analysis and results from flow cytometry indicate that the DNA content of C. sativa is approximately three-fold that of diploid Camelina relatives. Phylogenetic analyses further support a history of duplication and indicate that C. sativa and C. microcarpa might share a parental genome. Conclusions There is compelling evidence for triplication of the C. sativa genome, including a larger chromosome number and three-fold larger measured genome size than other Camelina relatives, three isolated copies of FAD2, FAE1, and the KCS17-FAE1 intergenic region, and three expressed haplotypes observed for six predicted single-copy genes. Based on these results, we propose that C. sativa be considered an allohexaploid. The characterization of fatty acid synthesis pathway genes will allow for the future manipulation of oil composition of this emerging biofuel crop; however, targeted manipulations of oil composition and general development of C. sativa should

  5. Widespread occurrence of the tfd-II genes in soil bacteria revealed by nucleotide sequence analysis of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid degradative plasmids pDB1 and p712.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Uk; Kim, Min-Sun; Lim, Jong-Sung; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2013-05-01

    Variovorax sp. strain DB1 and Pseudomonas pickettii strain 712 are 2,4-dicholorophenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacteria, which were isolated from agricultural soils in Republic of Korea and USA, respectively. Each strain harbors a 2,4-D degradative plasmid and is able to utilize 2,4-D as the sole source of carbon for its growth. The 2,4-D degradative plasmid pDB1 of strain DB1 consisted of a 65,269-bp circular molecule with a G+C content of 66.23% and had 68 ORFs. The 2,4-D degradative plasmid p712 of strain 712 was composed of a 62,798-bp circular molecule with a 62.11% G+C content and had 62 ORFs. The plasmids pDB1 and p712 share significantly homologous 2,4-D degradative genes with high similarity to the tfdR, tfdB-II, tfdC-II, tfdD-II, tfdE-II, tfdF-II, tfdK and tfdA genes of plasmid pJP4 of Alcaligenes eutrophus isolated from Australia. In a phylogenetic analysis with trfA, traL, and trbA genes, pDB1 belonged to IncP-1β with pJP4, while p712 belonged to IncP-1ε with pKJK5 and pEMT3. The results indicated that, in spite of the differences in their backbone regions, the 2,4-D catabolic genes of the two plasmids were closely related and also related to the well-known 2,4-D degradative plasmid pJP4 even though all were isolated from different geographic regions. Other similarities in the genetic organization and the presence of IS1071 suggested that these catabolic genes may be on a transposable element, leading to widespread occurrence in soil bacteria.

  6. Genome wide analysis of Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis development reveals dynamic expression using network enrichment analysis.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Valérie S; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Development involves precise timing of gene expression and coordinated pathways for organogenesis and morphogenesis. Functional and sub-network enrichment analysis provides an integrated approach for identifying networks underlying development. The objectives of this study were to characterize early gene regulatory networks over Silurana tropicalis development from NF stage 2 to 46 using a custom Agilent 4×44K microarray. There were >8000 unique gene probes that were differentially expressed between Nieuwkoop-Faber (NF) stage 2 and stage 16, and >2000 gene probes differentially expressed between NF 34 and 46. Gene ontology revealed that genes involved in nucleosome assembly, cell division, pattern specification, neurotransmission, and general metabolism were increasingly regulated throughout development, consistent with active development. Sub-network enrichment analysis revealed that processes such as membrane hyperpolarisation, retinoic acid, cholesterol, and dopamine metabolic gene networks were activated/inhibited over time. This study identifies RNA transcripts that are potentially maternally inherited in an anuran species, provides evidence that the expression of genes involved in retinoic acid receptor signaling may increase prior to those involved in thyroid receptor signaling, and characterizes novel gene expression networks preceding organogenesis which increases understanding of the spatiotemporal embryonic development in frogs.

  7. Metabolic Regulation of Trisporic Acid on Blakeslea trispora Revealed by a GC-MS-Based Metabolomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Li, Hao; Yuan, Qipeng

    2012-01-01

    The zygomycete Blakeslea trispora is used commercially as natural source of â-carotene. Trisporic acid (TA) is secreted from the mycelium of B. trispora during mating between heterothallic strains and is considered as a mediator of the regulation of mating processes and an enhancer of carotene biosynthesis. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate analysis were employed to investigate TA-associated intracellular biochemical changes in B. trispora. By principal component analysis, the differential metabolites discriminating the control groups from the TA-treated groups were found, which were also confirmed by the subsequent hierarchical cluster analysis. The results indicate that TA is a global regulator and its main effects at the metabolic level are reflected on the content changes in several fatty acids, carbohydrates, and amino acids. The carbon metabolism and fatty acids synthesis are sensitive to TA addition. Glycerol, glutamine, and ã-aminobutyrate might play important roles in the regulation of TA. Complemented by two-dimensional electrophoresis, the results indicate that the actions of TA at the metabolic level involve multiple metabolic processes, such as glycolysis and the bypass of the classical tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results reveal that the metabolomics strategy is a powerful tool to gain insight into the mechanism of a microorganism’s cellular response to signal inducers at the metabolic level. PMID:23049952

  8. Quantitative flux analysis reveals folate-dependent NADPH production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jing; Ye, Jiangbin; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Shlomi, Tomer; Thompson, Craig B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2014-06-01

    ATP is the dominant energy source in animals for mechanical and electrical work (for example, muscle contraction or neuronal firing). For chemical work, there is an equally important role for NADPH, which powers redox defence and reductive biosynthesis. The most direct route to produce NADPH from glucose is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, with malic enzyme sometimes also important. Although the relative contribution of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to ATP production has been extensively analysed, similar analysis of NADPH metabolism has been lacking. Here we demonstrate the ability to directly track, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, the passage of deuterium from labelled substrates into NADPH, and combine this approach with carbon labelling and mathematical modelling to measure NADPH fluxes. In proliferating cells, the largest contributor to cytosolic NADPH is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Surprisingly, a nearly comparable contribution comes from serine-driven one-carbon metabolism, in which oxidation of methylene tetrahydrofolate to 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate is coupled to reduction of NADP+ to NADPH. Moreover, tracing of mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism revealed complete oxidation of 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate to make NADPH. As folate metabolism has not previously been considered an NADPH producer, confirmation of its functional significance was undertaken through knockdown of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) genes. Depletion of either the cytosolic or mitochondrial MTHFD isozyme resulted in decreased cellular NADPH/NADP+ and reduced/oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH/GSSG) and increased cell sensitivity to oxidative stress. Thus, although the importance of folate metabolism for proliferating cells has been long recognized and attributed to its function of producing one-carbon units for nucleic acid synthesis, another crucial function of this pathway is generating reducing power.

  9. Principal component analysis of phenolic acid spectra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic acids are common plant metabolites that exhibit bioactive properties and have applications in functional food and animal feed formulations. The ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectra of four closely related phenolic acid structures were evaluated by principal component analysis (PCA) to...

  10. Amino acid isotopic analysis in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new approach to stable isotopic analysis—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine). CSIA has recently been used to generate trophic position estimates among anima...

  11. Boric Acid in Kjeldahl Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    The use of boric acid in the Kjeldahl determination of nitrogen is a variant of the original method widely applied in many laboratories all over the world. Its use is recommended by control organizations such as ISO, IDF, and EPA because it yields reliable and accurate results. However, the chemical principles the method is based on are not…

  12. The crystal structure of the adenylation enzyme VinN reveals a unique β-amino acid recognition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-11-01

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp(230) residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes. PMID:25246523

  13. The Crystal Structure of the Adenylation Enzyme VinN Reveals a Unique β-Amino Acid Recognition Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp230 residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes. PMID:25246523

  14. Analysis of amino acid constituents of gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Lian-Lian; Xiao, Yu-Xia; Ni, Jing-Hua; Yu, Yan

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To seek drugs that will efficaciously dissolve bilirubin, glycoprotein and black stones and that will represent improved lithotriptic agents to resolve cholesterol stones, and to study the amino acid constituents of gallstones. METHODS: According to characteristics determined by infrared spectroscopy and to the contents of bilirubin determined by semi-quantitative chemical analysis, 30 of 148 cases of gallstones were selected and divided into 5 groups. Amino acids of the 30 cases were detected by high-speed chromatography. RESULTS: The quantity of amino acids was highest in black stones (226.9 mg/g) and lowest in pure cholesterol stones (1.4 mg/g). In the 5 groups of gallstones, the quantity of amino acids followed the hierarchy of black stone > mixed bilirubin stone and glucoprotein stone > mixed cholesterol stone > pure cholesterol stone. The proportions were: 95.95:29.02 and 28.05:5.78:1. Aliphatic amino acids accounted for approximately 50% of the total amino acids in the gallstones, with glycine accounting for 15.3% of the total amount of the 17 kinds of amino acids. CONCLUSION: For mixed stones, the higher level of bilirubin, the higher content of amino acids. Acidic amino acids were relatively higher in bilirubin stones than in cholesterol stones. PMID:27053886

  15. Ecological roles of dominant and rare prokaryotes in acid mine drainage revealed by metagenomics and metatranscriptomics

    DOE PAGES

    Hua, Zheng-Shuang; Han, Yu-Jiao; Chen, Lin-Xing; Liu, Jun; Hu, Min; Li, Sheng-Jin; Kuang, Jia-Liang; Chain, Patrick SG; Huang, Li-Nan; Shu, Wen-Sheng

    2014-11-07

    Here we report that high-throughput sequencing is expanding our knowledge of microbial diversity in the environment. Still, understanding the metabolic potentials and ecological roles of rare and uncultured microbes in natural communities remains a major challenge. To this end, we applied a ‘divide and conquer’ strategy that partitioned a massive metagenomic data set (>100 Gbp) into subsets based on K-mer frequency in sequence assembly to a low-diversity acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial community and, by integrating with an additional metatranscriptomic assembly, successfully obtained 11 draft genomes most of which represent yet uncultured and/or rare taxa (relative abundance <1%). We reportmore » the first genome of a naturally occurring Ferrovum population (relative abundance >90%) and its metabolic potentials and gene expression profile, providing initial molecular insights into the ecological role of these lesser known, but potentially important, microorganisms in the AMD environment. Gene transcriptional analysis of the active taxa revealed major metabolic capabilities executed in situ, including carbon- and nitrogen-related metabolisms associated with syntrophic interactions, iron and sulfur oxidation, which are key in energy conservation and AMD generation, and the mechanisms of adaptation and response to the environmental stresses (heavy metals, low pH and oxidative stress). Remarkably, nitrogen fixation and sulfur oxidation were performed by the rare taxa, indicating their critical roles in the overall functioning and assembly of the AMD community. Finally, our study demonstrates the potential of the ‘divide and conquer’ strategy in high-throughput sequencing data assembly for genome reconstruction and functional partitioning analysis of both dominant and rare species in natural microbial assemblages.« less

  16. Ecological roles of dominant and rare prokaryotes in acid mine drainage revealed by metagenomics and metatranscriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Zheng-Shuang; Han, Yu-Jiao; Chen, Lin-Xing; Liu, Jun; Hu, Min; Li, Sheng-Jin; Kuang, Jia-Liang; Chain, Patrick SG; Huang, Li-Nan; Shu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing is expanding our knowledge of microbial diversity in the environment. Still, understanding the metabolic potentials and ecological roles of rare and uncultured microbes in natural communities remains a major challenge. To this end, we applied a ‘divide and conquer' strategy that partitioned a massive metagenomic data set (>100 Gbp) into subsets based on K-mer frequency in sequence assembly to a low-diversity acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial community and, by integrating with an additional metatranscriptomic assembly, successfully obtained 11 draft genomes most of which represent yet uncultured and/or rare taxa (relative abundance <1%). We report the first genome of a naturally occurring Ferrovum population (relative abundance >90%) and its metabolic potentials and gene expression profile, providing initial molecular insights into the ecological role of these lesser known, but potentially important, microorganisms in the AMD environment. Gene transcriptional analysis of the active taxa revealed major metabolic capabilities executed in situ, including carbon- and nitrogen-related metabolisms associated with syntrophic interactions, iron and sulfur oxidation, which are key in energy conservation and AMD generation, and the mechanisms of adaptation and response to the environmental stresses (heavy metals, low pH and oxidative stress). Remarkably, nitrogen fixation and sulfur oxidation were performed by the rare taxa, indicating their critical roles in the overall functioning and assembly of the AMD community. Our study demonstrates the potential of the ‘divide and conquer' strategy in high-throughput sequencing data assembly for genome reconstruction and functional partitioning analysis of both dominant and rare species in natural microbial assemblages. PMID:25361395

  17. Ecological roles of dominant and rare prokaryotes in acid mine drainage revealed by metagenomics and metatranscriptomics

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Zheng-Shuang; Han, Yu-Jiao; Chen, Lin-Xing; Liu, Jun; Hu, Min; Li, Sheng-Jin; Kuang, Jia-Liang; Chain, Patrick SG; Huang, Li-Nan; Shu, Wen-Sheng

    2014-11-07

    Here we report that high-throughput sequencing is expanding our knowledge of microbial diversity in the environment. Still, understanding the metabolic potentials and ecological roles of rare and uncultured microbes in natural communities remains a major challenge. To this end, we applied a ‘divide and conquer’ strategy that partitioned a massive metagenomic data set (>100 Gbp) into subsets based on K-mer frequency in sequence assembly to a low-diversity acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial community and, by integrating with an additional metatranscriptomic assembly, successfully obtained 11 draft genomes most of which represent yet uncultured and/or rare taxa (relative abundance <1%). We report the first genome of a naturally occurring Ferrovum population (relative abundance >90%) and its metabolic potentials and gene expression profile, providing initial molecular insights into the ecological role of these lesser known, but potentially important, microorganisms in the AMD environment. Gene transcriptional analysis of the active taxa revealed major metabolic capabilities executed in situ, including carbon- and nitrogen-related metabolisms associated with syntrophic interactions, iron and sulfur oxidation, which are key in energy conservation and AMD generation, and the mechanisms of adaptation and response to the environmental stresses (heavy metals, low pH and oxidative stress). Remarkably, nitrogen fixation and sulfur oxidation were performed by the rare taxa, indicating their critical roles in the overall functioning and assembly of the AMD community. Finally, our study demonstrates the potential of the ‘divide and conquer’ strategy in high-throughput sequencing data assembly for genome reconstruction and functional partitioning analysis of both dominant and rare species in natural microbial assemblages.

  18. Analysis of Chiral Carboxylic Acids in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Hein, J. E.; Aponte, J. C.; Parker, E. T.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    our efforts to develop highly sensitive LC-MS methods for the analysis of chiral carboxylic acids including hydroxy acids.

  19. Invoking Thomas Kuhn: What Citation Analysis Reveals about Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loving, Cathleen C.; Cobern, William W.

    This paper analyzes how Thomas Kuhn's writings are used by others, especially science education researchers. Previous research in citation analysis is used to frame questions related to who cites Kuhn, in what manner and why. Research questions first focus on the variety of disciplines invoking Kuhn and to what extent Structure of Scientific Revolutions (SSR) is cited. The Web of Science database provides material from 1982 for this analysis. The science education literature is analyzed using back issues from 1985 of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and Science Education. An article analysis reveals trends in terms of what Kuhnian ideas are most frequently invoked. Results indicate a wide array of disciplines from beekeeping to law cite Kuhn - especially generic citations to SSR. The science education journal analysis reveals pervasive use of the term paradigm, although use is quite varied. The two areas of research in science education most impacted by Kuhn appear to be conceptual change theory and constructivist epistemologies. Additional uses of Kuhn are discussed. The degree to which Kuhn is invoked in ways supporting the theoretical framework of citation analysis, whether his work is misappropriated, and the impact of Kuhn are discussed.

  20. Untangling the Effect of Fatty Acid Addition at Species Level Revealed Different Transcriptional Responses of the Biogas Microbial Community Members.

    PubMed

    Treu, Laura; Campanaro, Stefano; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Zhu, Xinyu; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, RNA-sequencing was used to elucidate the change of anaerobic digestion metatranscriptome after long chain fatty acids (oleate) exposure. To explore the general transcriptional behavior of the microbiome, the analysis was first performed on shotgun reads without considering a reference metagenome. As a second step, RNA reads were aligned on the genes encoded by the microbial community, revealing the expression of more than 51 000 different transcripts. The present study is the first research which was able to dissect the transcriptional behavior at a single species level by considering the 106 microbial genomes previously identified. The exploration of the metabolic pathways confirmed the importance of Syntrophomonas species in fatty acids degradation, and also highlighted the presence of protective mechanisms toward the long chain fatty acid effects in bacteria belonging to Clostridiales, Rykenellaceae, and in species of the genera Halothermothrix and Anaerobaculum. Additionally, an interesting transcriptional activation of the chemotaxis genes was evidenced in seven species belonging to Clostridia, Halothermothrix, and Tepidanaerobacter. Surprisingly, methanogens revealed a very versatile behavior different from each other, even among similar species of the Methanoculleus genus, while a strong increase of the expression level in Methanosarcina sp. was evidenced after oleate addition.

  1. Lipidomic profiling reveals protective function of fatty acid oxidation in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity[S

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaolei; Yao, Dan; Gosnell, Blake A.; Chen, Chi

    2012-01-01

    During cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity, lipid accumulation occurs prior to necrotic cell death in the liver. However, the exact influences of cocaine on the homeostasis of lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In this study, the progression of subacute hepatotoxicity, including centrilobular necrosis in the liver and elevation of transaminase activity in serum, was observed in a three-day cocaine treatment, accompanying the disruption of triacylglycerol (TAG) turnover. Serum TAG level increased on day 1 of cocaine treatment but remained unchanged afterwards. In contrast, hepatic TAG level was elevated continuously during three days of cocaine treatment and was better correlated with the development of hepatotoxicity. Lipidomic analyses of serum and liver samples revealed time-dependent separation of the control and cocaine-treated mice in multivariate models, which was due to the accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines together with the disturbances of many bioactive phospholipid species in the cocaine-treated mice. An in vitro function assay confirmed the progressive inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation after the cocaine treatment. Cotreatment of fenofibrate significantly increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)-targeted genes and the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation activity in the cocaine-treated mice, resulting in the inhibition of cocaine-induced acylcarnitine accumulation and other hepatotoxic effects. Overall, the results from this lipidomics-guided study revealed that the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation plays an important role in cocaine-induced liver injury. PMID:22904346

  2. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A; López-Climent, María F; Casaretto, José A; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  3. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A.; López-Climent, María F.; Casaretto, José A.; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  4. Phylogenetic analysis reveals the surprising diversity of an oxygenase class.

    PubMed

    Capyk, Jenna K; Eltis, Lindsay D

    2012-03-01

    As metalloenzymes capable of transforming a broad range of substrates with high stereo- and regio-specificity, the multicomponent Rieske oxygenases (ROs) have been studied in bacterial systems for applications in bioremediation and industrial biocatalysis. These studies include genetic and biochemical investigations, determination of enzyme structure, phylogenetic analysis, and enzyme classification. Although RO terminal oxygenase components (RO-Os) share a conserved domain structure, their sequences are highly divergent and present significant challenges for identification and classification. Herein, we present the first global phylogenetic analysis of a broad range of RO-Os from diverse taxonomic groups. We employed objective, structure-based criteria to significantly reduce the inclusion of erroneously aligned sequences in the analysis. Our findings reveal that RO biochemical studies to date have been largely concentrated in an unexpectedly narrow portion of the RO-O sequence landscape. Additionally, our analysis demonstrates the existence two distinct groups of RO-O sequences. Finally, the sequence diversity recognized in this study necessitates a new RO-O classification scheme. We therefore propose a P450-like naming system. Our results reveal a diversity of sequence and potential catalytic functionality that has been wholly unappreciated in the RO literature. This study also demonstrates that many commonly used bioinformatic tools may not be sufficient to analyze the vast amount of data available in current databases. These findings facilitate the expanded exploration of RO catalytic capabilities in both biological and technological contexts and increase the potential for practical exploitation of their activities.

  5. A transcriptomic study reveals differentially expressed genes and pathways respond to simulated acid rain in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Wu; Niu, Li; Fu, Bin; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Acid rain, as a worldwide environmental issue, can cause serious damage to plants. In this study, we provided the first case study on the systematic responses of arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.) to simulated acid rain (SiAR) by transcriptome approach. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the expression of a set of genes related to primary metabolisms, including nitrogen, sulfur, amino acid, photosynthesis, and reactive oxygen species metabolism, were altered under SiAR. In addition, transport and signal transduction related pathways, especially calcium-related signaling pathways, were found to play important roles in the response of arabidopsis to SiAR stress. Further, we compared our data set with previously published data sets on arabidopsis transcriptome subjected to various stresses, including wound, salt, light, heavy metal, karrikin, temperature, osmosis, etc. The results showed that many genes were overlapped in several stresses, suggesting that plant response to SiAR is a complex process, which may require the participation of multiple defense-signaling pathways. The results of this study will help us gain further insights into the response mechanisms of plants to acid rain stress.

  6. A transcriptomic study reveals differentially expressed genes and pathways respond to simulated acid rain in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Wu; Niu, Li; Fu, Bin; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Acid rain, as a worldwide environmental issue, can cause serious damage to plants. In this study, we provided the first case study on the systematic responses of arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.) to simulated acid rain (SiAR) by transcriptome approach. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the expression of a set of genes related to primary metabolisms, including nitrogen, sulfur, amino acid, photosynthesis, and reactive oxygen species metabolism, were altered under SiAR. In addition, transport and signal transduction related pathways, especially calcium-related signaling pathways, were found to play important roles in the response of arabidopsis to SiAR stress. Further, we compared our data set with previously published data sets on arabidopsis transcriptome subjected to various stresses, including wound, salt, light, heavy metal, karrikin, temperature, osmosis, etc. The results showed that many genes were overlapped in several stresses, suggesting that plant response to SiAR is a complex process, which may require the participation of multiple defense-signaling pathways. The results of this study will help us gain further insights into the response mechanisms of plants to acid rain stress. PMID:23379338

  7. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the genome-wide GadEWX transcriptional regulatory network and RpoS involvement in E. coli K-12 MG1655 under acidic stress. Integrative data analysis reveals that GadEWX regulons consist of 45 genes in 31 transcription units and 28 of these genes were associated with RpoS-binding sites. We demonstrate that GadEWX directly and coherently regulate several proton-generating/consuming enzymes with pairs of negative-feedback loops for pH homeostasis. In addition, GadEWX regulate genes with assorted functions, including molecular chaperones, acid resistance, stress response and other regulatory activities. These results show how GadEWX simultaneously coordinate many cellular processes to produce the overall response of E. coli to acid stress. PMID:26258987

  8. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J.; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the genome-wide GadEWX transcriptional regulatory network and RpoS involvement in E. coli K-12 MG1655 under acidic stress. Integrative data analysis reveals that GadEWX regulons consist of 45 genes in 31 transcription units and 28 of these genes were associated with RpoS-binding sites. We demonstrate that GadEWX directly and coherently regulate several proton-generating/consuming enzymes with pairs of negative-feedback loops for pH homeostasis. In addition, GadEWX regulate genes with assorted functions, including molecular chaperones, acid resistance, stress response and other regulatory activities. These results show how GadEWX simultaneously coordinate many cellular processes to produce the overall response of E. coli to acid stress. PMID:26258987

  9. Vibrational analysis of α-cyanohydroxycinnamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojica, Elmer-Rico E.; Vedad, Jayson; Desamero, Ruel Z. B.

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, a comparative Raman vibrational analysis of alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (4CHCA) and its derivative, alpha-cyano-3-hydroxycinnamic acid (3CHCA), was performed. The Raman spectra of the 4CHCA and 3CHCA in solid form were obtained and analyzed to determine differences between the two structurally similar derivatives. For comparison, the CHCA derivatives cyanocinnamic acid (CCA) and coumaric acid (CA) were also studied. The plausible vibrational assignments were made and matched with those obtained theoretically using density functional theory (DFT) based method employing a 6-31 g basis set. The computational wavenumbers obtained were in good agreement with the observed experimental results. This was the first reported Raman study of CCA, 3CHCA and 4CHCA.

  10. Systematic toxicological analysis revealing a rare case of captan ingestion.

    PubMed

    Gottzein, Anne K; Musshoff, Frank; Madea, Burkhard

    2013-07-01

    This article presents a case of suicide by intoxication with various pharmaceuticals, particularly anticonvulsants, combined with the fungicide captan. A cause of death could not be ascertained at autopsy. However, systematic toxicological analysis (STA) including a screening via solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for (semi) volatile organic compounds revealed results suggesting a possible cause of death. The effects of captan on the human organism, its metabolism, and distribution will be discussed. Macroscopically, the cause of death was unascertained. STA revealed clonazepam, citalopram, and its metabolites, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, lacosamide, clonazepam, captan, and its metabolite tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI). For the first time, it was detected in human viscera. A quantification of THPI was performed to obtain distribution in the organs. The significance of a complete STA must be emphasized. The presence of THPI would have been missed without previous detection of captan. Consequently, this fatality would not have been investigated satisfactorily.

  11. Lipidomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii reveals unusual polar lipids†

    PubMed Central

    Welti, Ruth; Mui, Ernie; Sparks, Alexis; Wernimont, Sarah; Isaac, Giorgis; Kirisits, Michael; Roth, Mary; Roberts, Craig W.; Botté, Cyrille; Maréchal, Eric; McLeod, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the polar lipids of Toxoplasma gondii by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry provides a detailed picture of the lipid molecular species of this parasitic protozoan. Most notably, T. gondii contains a relatively high level, estimated to about 2% of the total polar lipid, of ceramide phosphoethanolamine. The ceramide phosphoethanolamine has a fatty amide profile with only 16- and 18-carbon species. Compared with the host fibroblasts in which it was grown, T. gondii also has higher levels of phosphatidylcholine, but lower levels of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylserine. Analysis at the molecular species level indicated that T. gondii has greater amounts of shorter-chain fatty acid in its polar lipid molecular species than the host fibroblasts. Shorter-chain fatty acids with a combined total of 30 or fewer acyl carbons make up 21% of Toxoplasma’s, but only 3% of the host’s, diacyl phosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, diacyl phosphatidylcholine with two saturated acyl chains with 12, 14, or 16 carbons make up over 11% of parasite phosphatidylcholine, but less than 3% of the host phosphatidylcholine molecular species. The distinctive T. gondii tachyzoite lipid profile may be particularly suited to the function of parasitic membranes and the interaction of the parasite with the host cell and the host’s immune system. Combined with T. gondii genomic data, these lipidomic data will assist in elucidation of metabolic pathways for lipid biosynthesis in this important human pathogen. PMID:17988103

  12. Analyses of Arabidopsis ecotypes reveal metabolic diversity to convert D-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Gördes, Dirk; Koch, Grit; Thurow, Kerstin; Kolukisaoglu, Uner

    2013-01-01

    For a long time D-enantiomers of proteinogenic L-amino acids were assumed to be physiologically irrelevant for plants. But there is growing evidence that D-amino acids (D-AAs) also fulfil important physiological functions in these organisms. However, the knowledge about the metabolic fate of D-AAs in plants is still scarce and more information about it is needed. To close this gap we established an optimized protocol for the processing and analysis of D- and L-AAs from large numbers of Arabidopsis lines. This included the application of 18 different D-AAs to seedlings, the extraction of free amino acids from the samples and the determination of 16 L-AAs and their corresponding D-enantiomers. To validate our approach we searched for genetic accessions with aberrant amino acid metabolism. Therefore we applied D-AAs on 17 ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana and analysed their free amino acid contents. These analyses confirmed the suitability of the system for the analysis of large sets of plant samples with enhanced velocity and improved accuracy. Furthermore, the resulting data led to the definition of standard amino acid profiles in response to D-AAs of Arabidopsis seedlings. Within these analyses the ecotype Landsberg erecta was found with aberrant metabolic patterns like drastically reduced capabilities to convert different D-AAs to D-alanine and D-glutamate. The presented experimental setup and results of this study offer starting points to dissect the metabolic pathway of D-AAs in plants.

  13. Transcriptome Profiling of Tomato Fruit Development Reveals Transcription Factors Associated with Ascorbic Acid, Carotenoid and Flavonoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jie; Hu, Tixu; Yang, Congmei; Li, Hanxia; Yang, Mingze; Ijaz, Raina; Ye, Zhibiao; Zhang, Yuyang

    2015-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) serves as a research model for fruit development; however, while it is an important dietary source of antioxidant nutrients, the transcriptional regulation of genes that determine nutrient levels remains poorly understood. Here, the transcriptomes of fruit at seven developmental stages (7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42 and 49 days after flowering) from two tomato cultivars (Ailsa Craig and HG6-61) were evaluated using the Illumina sequencing platform. A total of 26,397 genes, which were expressed in at least one developmental stage, were detected in the two cultivars, and the expression patterns of those genes could be divided into 20 groups using a K-mean cluster analysis. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis indicated that genes involved in RNA regulation, secondary metabolism, hormone metabolism and cell wall metabolism were the most highly differentially expressed genes during fruit development and ripening. A co-expression analysis revealed several transcription factors whose expression patterns correlated with those of genes associated with ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid biosynthesis. This transcriptional correlation was confirmed by agroinfiltration mediated transient expression, which showed that most of the enzymatic genes in the ascorbic acid biosynthesis were regulated by the overexpression of each of the three transcription factors that were tested. The metabolic dynamics of ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid were investigated during fruit development and ripening, and some selected transcription factors showed transcriptional correlation with the accumulation of ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid. This transcriptome study provides insight into the regulatory mechanism of fruit development and presents candidate transcription factors involved in secondary metabolism. PMID:26133783

  14. Transcriptome Profiling of Tomato Fruit Development Reveals Transcription Factors Associated with Ascorbic Acid, Carotenoid and Flavonoid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jie; Hu, Tixu; Yang, Congmei; Li, Hanxia; Yang, Mingze; Ijaz, Raina; Ye, Zhibiao; Zhang, Yuyang

    2015-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) serves as a research model for fruit development; however, while it is an important dietary source of antioxidant nutrients, the transcriptional regulation of genes that determine nutrient levels remains poorly understood. Here, the transcriptomes of fruit at seven developmental stages (7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42 and 49 days after flowering) from two tomato cultivars (Ailsa Craig and HG6-61) were evaluated using the Illumina sequencing platform. A total of 26,397 genes, which were expressed in at least one developmental stage, were detected in the two cultivars, and the expression patterns of those genes could be divided into 20 groups using a K-mean cluster analysis. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis indicated that genes involved in RNA regulation, secondary metabolism, hormone metabolism and cell wall metabolism were the most highly differentially expressed genes during fruit development and ripening. A co-expression analysis revealed several transcription factors whose expression patterns correlated with those of genes associated with ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid biosynthesis. This transcriptional correlation was confirmed by agroinfiltration mediated transient expression, which showed that most of the enzymatic genes in the ascorbic acid biosynthesis were regulated by the overexpression of each of the three transcription factors that were tested. The metabolic dynamics of ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid were investigated during fruit development and ripening, and some selected transcription factors showed transcriptional correlation with the accumulation of ascorbic acid, carotenoid and flavonoid. This transcriptome study provides insight into the regulatory mechanism of fruit development and presents candidate transcription factors involved in secondary metabolism.

  15. Mathematical Analysis of Biomolecular Network Reveals Connections Between Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyu

    2012-02-01

    Connections between cancer and metabolic diseases may consist in the complex network of interactions among a common set of biomolecules. By applying singularity and bifurcation analysis, the phenotypes constrained by the AKT signaling pathway are identified and mapped onto the parameter space, which include cancer and certain metabolic diseases. By considering physiologic properties (sensitivity, robustness and adaptivity) the AKT pathway must possess in order to efficiently sense growth factors and nutrients, the region of normal responses is located. The analysis illuminates the parameter space and reveals system-level mechanisms in regulating biological functions (cell growth, survival, proliferation and metabolism) and how their deregulation may lead to the development of diseases. The analytical expressions summarize the synergistic interactions among many molecules, which provides valuable insights into therapeutic interventions.

  16. Acid rain research: a review and analysis of methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    The acidic deposition phenomena, when implicated as a factor potentially responsible for crop and forest yield losses and destruction of aquatic life, has gained increasing attention. The widespread fear that acid rain is having or may have devastating effects has prompted international debates and legislative proposals. An analysis of research on the effects of acid rain, however, reveals serious questions concerning the applicability and validity of conclusions of much of the work and thus conclusive estimations of impacts are lacking. In order to establish cause-effect relationships between rain acidity and the response of a receptor, controlled studies are necessary to verify observations in the field since there are many natural processes that produce and consume acidity and because numerous other environmental variables affect ecosystem response. Only when the response of an entire system is understood (i.e., interactions between plant, soil, soil microbes, and groundwater) can economic impacts be assessed and tolerance thresholds established for the wet deposition of acids. 14 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  17. High-resolution electron density profiles reveal influence of fatty acids on bilayer structure.

    PubMed Central

    Katsaras, J; Stinson, R H

    1990-01-01

    Small-angle x-ray diffraction studies were performed on gel phase-oriented bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC containing 40 mol% of either palmitic acid (PA) or palmitic acid brominated at the 2-position (BPA). Oriented samples were prepared using a method developed by us, which is as simple as powder sample preparations while offering all the advantages of oriented samples made by traditional methods. Phases were determined using swelling experiments with structure factors plotted in reciprocal space, creating a relatively smooth curve as the amount of water between the bilayers was changed. Continuous Fourier transforms were also calculated to further test the consistency of the phase assignments. The diffraction data were used to calculate absolute electron density profiles for different bilayers to a resolution of 5-6 A. Analysis indicates the following: (a) The electron density profiles for the three preparations are virtually identical in the hydrocarbon chain region. (b) There is a decrease in the electron density of the glycerol backbone-headgroup region and d-space in DPPC-PA compared to DPPC. (c) The bromine of fatty-acid brominated at the 2-position is in the vicinity of the glycerol backbone. (d) The bilayer thickness of DPPC containing either brominated or unbrominated fatty acid remains relatively constant with increased levels of hydration, unlike DPPC bilayers. PMID:2306509

  18. DNA Methylation Profiling at Single-Base Resolution Reveals Gestational Folic Acid Supplementation Influences the Epigenome of Mouse Offspring Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Subit; Kuizon, Salomon; Brown, W. Ted; Junaid, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly more evident that lifestyle, environmental factors, and maternal nutrition during gestation can influence the epigenome of the developing fetus and thus modulate the physiological outcome. Variations in the intake of maternal nutrients affecting one-carbon metabolism may influence brain development and exert long-term effects on the health of the progeny. In this study, we investigated whether supplementation with high maternal folic acid during gestation alters DNA methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of mouse offspring. We used reduced representation bisulfite sequencing to analyze the DNA methylation profile at the single-base resolution level. The genome-wide DNA methylation analysis revealed that supplementation with higher maternal folic acid resulted in distinct methylation patterns (P < 0.05) of CpG and non-CpG sites in the cerebellum of offspring. Such variations of methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of offspring were highly sex-specific, including several genes of the neuronal pathways. These findings demonstrate that alterations in the level of maternal folic acid during gestation can influence methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of offspring. Such changes in the offspring epigenome may alter neurodevelopment and influence the functional outcome of neurologic and psychiatric diseases. PMID:27199632

  19. DNA Methylation Profiling at Single-Base Resolution Reveals Gestational Folic Acid Supplementation Influences the Epigenome of Mouse Offspring Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Barua, Subit; Kuizon, Salomon; Brown, W Ted; Junaid, Mohammed A

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly more evident that lifestyle, environmental factors, and maternal nutrition during gestation can influence the epigenome of the developing fetus and thus modulate the physiological outcome. Variations in the intake of maternal nutrients affecting one-carbon metabolism may influence brain development and exert long-term effects on the health of the progeny. In this study, we investigated whether supplementation with high maternal folic acid during gestation alters DNA methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of mouse offspring. We used reduced representation bisulfite sequencing to analyze the DNA methylation profile at the single-base resolution level. The genome-wide DNA methylation analysis revealed that supplementation with higher maternal folic acid resulted in distinct methylation patterns (P < 0.05) of CpG and non-CpG sites in the cerebellum of offspring. Such variations of methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of offspring were highly sex-specific, including several genes of the neuronal pathways. These findings demonstrate that alterations in the level of maternal folic acid during gestation can influence methylation and gene expression in the cerebellum of offspring. Such changes in the offspring epigenome may alter neurodevelopment and influence the functional outcome of neurologic and psychiatric diseases. PMID:27199632

  20. Cation–Anion Interactions within the Nucleic Acid Ion Atmosphere Revealed by Ion Counting

    PubMed Central

    Gebala, Magdalena; Giambasu, George M.; Lipfert, Jan; Bisaria, Namita; Bonilla, Steve; Li, Guangchao; York, Darrin M.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The ion atmosphere is a critical structural, dynamic, and energetic component of nucleic acids that profoundly affects their interactions with proteins and ligands. Experimental methods that “count” the number of ions thermodynamically associated with the ion atmosphere allow dissection of energetic properties of the ion atmosphere, and thus provide direct comparison to theoretical results. Previous experiments have focused primarily on the cations that are attracted to nucleic acid polyanions, but have also showed that anions are excluded from the ion atmosphere. Herein, we have systematically explored the properties of anion exclusion, testing the zeroth-order model that anions of different identity are equally excluded due to electrostatic repulsion. Using a series of monovalent salts, we find, surprisingly, that the extent of anion exclusion and cation inclusion significantly depends on salt identity. The differences are prominent at higher concentrations and mirror trends in mean activity coefficients of the electrolyte solutions. Salts with lower activity coefficients exhibit greater accumulation of both cations and anions within the ion atmosphere, strongly suggesting that cation–anion correlation effects are present in the ion atmosphere and need to be accounted for to understand electrostatic interactions of nucleic acids. To test whether the effects of cation–anion correlations extend to nucleic acid kinetics and thermodynamics, we followed the folding of P4–P6, a domain of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme, via single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer in solutions with different salts. Solutions of identical concentration but lower activity gave slower and less favorable folding. Our results reveal hitherto unknown properties of the ion atmosphere and suggest possible roles of oriented ion pairs or anion-bridged cations in the ion atmosphere for electrolyte solutions of salts with reduced activity. Consideration of these new

  1. Cation-Anion Interactions within the Nucleic Acid Ion Atmosphere Revealed by Ion Counting.

    PubMed

    Gebala, Magdalena; Giambaşu, George M; Lipfert, Jan; Bisaria, Namita; Bonilla, Steve; Li, Guangchao; York, Darrin M; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-11-25

    The ion atmosphere is a critical structural, dynamic, and energetic component of nucleic acids that profoundly affects their interactions with proteins and ligands. Experimental methods that "count" the number of ions thermodynamically associated with the ion atmosphere allow dissection of energetic properties of the ion atmosphere, and thus provide direct comparison to theoretical results. Previous experiments have focused primarily on the cations that are attracted to nucleic acid polyanions, but have also showed that anions are excluded from the ion atmosphere. Herein, we have systematically explored the properties of anion exclusion, testing the zeroth-order model that anions of different identity are equally excluded due to electrostatic repulsion. Using a series of monovalent salts, we find, surprisingly, that the extent of anion exclusion and cation inclusion significantly depends on salt identity. The differences are prominent at higher concentrations and mirror trends in mean activity coefficients of the electrolyte solutions. Salts with lower activity coefficients exhibit greater accumulation of both cations and anions within the ion atmosphere, strongly suggesting that cation-anion correlation effects are present in the ion atmosphere and need to be accounted for to understand electrostatic interactions of nucleic acids. To test whether the effects of cation-anion correlations extend to nucleic acid kinetics and thermodynamics, we followed the folding of P4-P6, a domain of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme, via single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer in solutions with different salts. Solutions of identical concentration but lower activity gave slower and less favorable folding. Our results reveal hitherto unknown properties of the ion atmosphere and suggest possible roles of oriented ion pairs or anion-bridged cations in the ion atmosphere for electrolyte solutions of salts with reduced activity. Consideration of these new results leads to

  2. Comparative metabolic profiling reveals the key role of amino acids metabolism in the rapamycin overproduction by Streptomyces hygroscopicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baohua; Liu, Jiao; Liu, Huanhuan; Huang, Di; Wen, Jianping

    2015-06-01

    Rapamycin is an important natural macrolide antibiotic with antifungal, immunosuppressive and anticancer activity produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus. In this study, a mutant strain obtained by ultraviolet mutagenesis displayed higher rapamycin production capacity compared to the wild-type S. hygroscopicus ATCC 29253. To gain insights into the mechanism of rapamycin overproduction, comparative metabolic profiling between the wild-type and mutant strain was performed. A total of 86 metabolites were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pattern recognition methods, including principal component analysis, partial least squares and partial least squares discriminant analysis, were employed to determine the key biomarkers. The results showed that 22 potential biomarkers were closely associated with the increase of rapamycin production and the tremendous metabolic difference was observed between the two strains. Furthermore, metabolic pathway analysis revealed that amino acids metabolism played an important role in the synthesis of rapamycin, especially lysine, valine, tryptophan, isoleucine, glutamate, arginine and ornithine. The inadequate supply of amino acids, or namely "nitrogen starvation" occurred in the mutant strain. Subsequently, the exogenous addition of amino acids into the fermentation medium of the mutant strain confirmed the above conclusion, and rapamycin production of the mutant strain increased to 426.7 mg/L after adding lysine, approximately 5.8-fold of that in the wild-type strain. Finally, the results of real-time PCR and enzyme activity assays demonstrated that dihydrodipicolinate synthase involved with lysine metabolism played vital role in the biosynthesis of rapamycin. These findings will provide a theoretical basis for further improving production of rapamycin.

  3. Comparative genomic analysis reveals bilateral breast cancers are genetically independent.

    PubMed

    Song, Fangfang; Li, Xiangchun; Song, Fengju; Zhao, Yanrui; Li, Haixin; Zheng, Hong; Gao, Zhibo; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Kexin

    2015-10-13

    Bilateral breast cancer (BBC) poses a major challenge for oncologists because of the cryptic relationship between the two lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine the origin of the contralateral breast cancer (either dependent or independent of the index tumor). Here, we used ultra-deep whole-exome sequencing and array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to study four paired samples of BBCs with different tumor subtypes and time intervals between the developments of each tumor. We used two paired primary breast tumors and corresponding metastatic liver lesions as the control. We tested the origin independent nature of BBC in three ways: mutational concordance, mutational signature clustering, and clonality analysis using copy number profiles. We found that the paired BBC samples had near-zero concordant mutation rates, which were much lower than those of the paired primary/metastasis samples. The results of a mutational signature analysis also suggested that BBCs are independent of one another. A clonality analysis using aCGH data further revealed that paired BBC samples was clonally independent, in contrast to clonal related origin found for paired primary/metastasis samples. Our preliminary findings show that BBCs in Han Chinese women are origin independent and thus should be treated separately. PMID:26378809

  4. Microsporidian genome analysis reveals evolutionary strategies for obligate intracellular growth.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Christina A; Desjardins, Christopher A; Bakowski, Malina A; Goldberg, Jonathan; Ma, Amy T; Becnel, James J; Didier, Elizabeth S; Fan, Lin; Heiman, David I; Levin, Joshua Z; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Troemel, Emily R

    2012-12-01

    Microsporidia comprise a large phylum of obligate intracellular eukaryotes that are fungal-related parasites responsible for widespread disease, and here we address questions about microsporidia biology and evolution. We sequenced three microsporidian genomes from two species, Nematocida parisii and Nematocida sp1, which are natural pathogens of Caenorhabditis nematodes and provide model systems for studying microsporidian pathogenesis. We performed deep sequencing of transcripts from a time course of N. parisii infection. Examination of pathogen gene expression revealed compact transcripts and a dramatic takeover of host cells by Nematocida. We also performed phylogenomic analyses of Nematocida and other microsporidian genomes to refine microsporidian phylogeny and identify evolutionary events of gene loss, acquisition, and modification. In particular, we found that all microsporidia lost the tumor-suppressor gene retinoblastoma, which we speculate could accelerate the parasite cell cycle and increase the mutation rate. We also found that microsporidia acquired transporters that could import nucleosides to fuel rapid growth. In addition, microsporidian hexokinases gained secretion signal sequences, and in a functional assay these were sufficient to export proteins out of the cell; thus hexokinase may be targeted into the host cell to reprogram it toward biosynthesis. Similar molecular changes appear during formation of cancer cells and may be evolutionary strategies adopted independently by microsporidia to proliferate rapidly within host cells. Finally, analysis of genome polymorphisms revealed evidence for a sexual cycle that may provide genetic diversity to alleviate problems caused by clonal growth. Together these events may explain the emergence and success of these diverse intracellular parasites.

  5. Extensive exometabolome analysis reveals extended overflow metabolism in various microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Overflow metabolism is well known for yeast, bacteria and mammalian cells. It typically occurs under glucose excess conditions and is characterized by excretions of by-products such as ethanol, acetate or lactate. This phenomenon, also denoted the short-term Crabtree effect, has been extensively studied over the past few decades, however, its basic regulatory mechanism and functional role in metabolism is still unknown. Here we present a comprehensive quantitative and time-dependent analysis of the exometabolome of Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Bacillus licheniformis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae during well-controlled bioreactor cultivations. Most surprisingly, in all cases a great diversity of central metabolic intermediates and amino acids is found in the culture medium with extracellular concentrations varying in the micromolar range. Different hypotheses for these observations are formulated and experimentally tested. As a result, the intermediates in the culture medium during batch growth must originate from passive or active transportation due to a new phenomenon termed “extended” overflow metabolism. Moreover, we provide broad evidence that this could be a common feature of all microorganism species when cultivated under conditions of carbon excess and non-inhibited carbon uptake. In turn, this finding has consequences for metabolite balancing and, particularly, for intracellular metabolite quantification and 13C-metabolic flux analysis. PMID:22963408

  6. Graph analysis of cortical networks reveals complex anatomical communication substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora-López, Gorka; Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    Sensory information entering the nervous system follows independent paths of processing such that specific features are individually detected. However, sensory perception, awareness, and cognition emerge from the combination of information. Here we have analyzed the corticocortical network of the cat, looking for the anatomical substrate which permits the simultaneous segregation and integration of information in the brain. We find that cortical communications are mainly governed by three topological factors of the underlying network: (i) a large density of connections, (ii) segregation of cortical areas into clusters, and (iii) the presence of highly connected hubs aiding the multisensory processing and integration. Statistical analysis of the shortest paths reveals that, while information is highly accessible to all cortical areas, the complexity of cortical information processing may arise from the rich and intricate alternative paths in which areas can influence each other.

  7. Freshwater foraminiferans revealed by analysis of environmental DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Holzmann, Maria; Habura, Andrea; Giles, Hannah; Bowser, Samuel S; Pawlowski, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Sediment-dwelling protists are among the most abundant meiobenthic organisms, ubiquitous in all types of aquatic ecosystems. Yet, because their isolation and identification are difficult, their diversity remains largely unknown. In the present work, we applied molecular methods to examine the diversity of freshwater Foraminifera, a group of granuloreticulosan protists largely neglected until now. By using specific PCR primers, we detected the presence of Foraminifera in all sediment samples examined. Phylogenetic analysis of amplified SSU rDNA sequences revealed two distinct groups of freshwater foraminiferans. All obtained sequences branched within monothalamous (single-chambered), marine Foraminifera, suggesting a repeated colonization of freshwater environments. The results of our study challenge the traditional view of Foraminifera as essentially marine organisms, and provide a conceptual framework for charting the molecular diversity of freshwater granuloreticulosan protists.

  8. Stable nitrogen isotopic composition of amino acids reveals food web structure in stream ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Naoto F; Kato, Yoshikazu; Togashi, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Mayumi; Yoshimizu, Chikage; Okuda, Noboru; Tayasu, Ichiro

    2014-07-01

    The stable N isotopic composition of individual amino acids (SIAA) has recently been used to estimate trophic positions (TPs) of animals in several simple food chain systems. However, it is unknown whether the SIAA is applicable to more complex food web analysis. In this study we measured the SIAA of stream macroinvertebrates, fishes, and their potential food sources (periphyton and leaf litter of terrestrial C3 plants) collected from upper and lower sites in two streams having contrasting riparian landscapes. The stable N isotope ratios of glutamic acid and phenylalanine confirmed that for primary producers (periphyton and C3 litter) the TP was 1, and for primary consumers (e.g., mayfly and caddisfly larvae) it was 2. We built a two-source mixing model to estimate the relative contributions of aquatic and terrestrial sources to secondary and higher consumers (e.g., stonefly larva and fishes) prior to the TP calculation. The estimated TPs (2.3-3.5) roughly corresponded to their omnivorous and carnivorous feeding habits, respectively. We found that the SIAA method offers substantial advantages over traditional bulk method for food web analysis because it defines the food web structure based on the metabolic pathway of amino groups, and can be used to estimate food web structure under conditions where the bulk method cannot be used. Our result provides evidence that the SIAA method is applicable to the analysis of complex food webs, where heterogeneous resources are mixed. PMID:24719209

  9. GLC analysis of Indian rapeseed-mustard to study the variability of fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, N; Agnihotri, A

    2000-12-01

    Rapeseed-mustard is one of the most economically important oilseed crops in India. Speciality oils having high amounts of a specific fatty acid are of immense importance for both nutritional and industrial purposes. Oil high in oleic acid has demand in commercial food-service applications due to a long shelf-life and cholesterol-reducing properties. Both linoleic and linolenic acids are essential fatty acids; however, less than 3% linolenic acid is preferred for oil stability. High erucic acid content is beneficial for the polymer industry, whereas low erucic acid is recommended for food purposes. Therefore, it is important to undertake systematic characterization of the available gene pool for its variable fatty acid profile to be utilized for specific purposes. In the present study the Indian rapeseed-mustard germplasm and some newly developed low-erucic-acid strains were analysed by GLC to study the fatty acid composition in these lines. The GLC analysis revealed that the rapeseed-mustard varieties being commonly grown in India are characterized by high erucic acid content (30-51%) in the oil with low levels of oleic acid (13-23%). However, from among the recently developed low-erucic-acid strains, several lines were identified with comparatively high oleic acid (60-70%), moderate to high linoleic acid (13-40%) and low linolenic acid (< 10%) contents. Work is in progress at TERI (New Delhi, India) to utilize these lines for development of strains with particular fatty acid compositions for specific purposes.

  10. Structure of shikimate kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals the binding of shikimic acid.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José Henrique; de Oliveira, Jaim Simões; Canduri, Fernanda; Dias, Marcio Viniciusbertacine; Palma, Mário Sérgio; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2004-12-01

    Tuberculosis made a resurgence in the mid-1980s and now kills approximately 3 million people a year. The re-emergence of tuberculosis as a public health threat, the high susceptibility of HIV-infected persons and the proliferation of multi-drug-resistant strains have created a need to develop new drugs. Shikimate kinase and other enzymes in the shikimate pathway are attractive targets for development of non-toxic antimicrobial agents, herbicides and anti-parasitic drugs, because the pathway is essential in these species whereas it is absent from mammals. The crystal structure of shikimate kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtSK) complexed with MgADP and shikimic acid (shikimate) has been determined at 2.3 A resolution, clearly revealing the amino-acid residues involved in shikimate binding. This is the first three-dimensional structure of shikimate kinase complexed with shikimate. In MtSK, the Glu61 residue that is strictly conserved in shikimate kinases forms a hydrogen bond and salt bridge with Arg58 and assists in positioning the guanidinium group of Arg58 for shikimate binding. The carboxyl group of shikimate interacts with Arg58, Gly81 and Arg136 and the hydroxyl groups interact with Asp34 and Gly80. The crystal structure of MtSK-MgADP-shikimate will provide crucial information for the elucidation of the mechanism of the shikimate kinase-catalyzed reaction and for the development of a new generation of drugs against tuberculosis.

  11. Comparative analysis reveals the underlying mechanism of vertebrate seasonal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Keisuke; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Animals utilize photoperiodic changes as a calendar to regulate seasonal reproduction. Birds have highly sophisticated photoperiodic mechanisms and functional genomics analysis in quail uncovered the signal transduction pathway regulating avian seasonal reproduction. Birds detect light with deep brain photoreceptors. Long day (LD) stimulus induces secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the pars tuberalis (PT) of the pituitary gland. PT-derived TSH locally activates thyroid hormone (TH) in the hypothalamus, which induces gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and hence gonadotropin secretion. However, during winter, low temperatures increase serum TH for adaptive thermogenesis, which accelerates germ cell apoptosis by activating the genes involved in metamorphosis. Therefore, TH has a dual role in the regulation of seasonal reproduction. Studies using TSH receptor knockout mice confirmed the involvement of PT-derived TSH in mammalian seasonal reproduction. In addition, studies in mice revealed that the tissue-specific glycosylation of TSH diversifies its function in the circulation to avoid crosstalk. In contrast to birds and mammals, one of the molecular machineries necessary for the seasonal reproduction of fish are localized in the saccus vasculosus from the photoreceptor to the neuroendocrine output. Thus, comparative analysis is a powerful tool to uncover the universality and diversity of fundamental properties in various organisms.

  12. Analysis of Peptides and Conjugates by Amino Acid Analysis.

    PubMed

    Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is a highly accurate method for characterization of the composition of synthetic peptides. Together with mass spectrometry, it gives a reliable control of peptide quality and quantity before conjugation and immunization. Peptides are hydrolyzed, preferably in gas phase, with 6 M HCl at 110 °C for 20-24 h and the resulting amino acids analyzed by ion-exchange chromatography with post-column ninhydrin derivatization. Depending on the hydrolysis conditions, tryptophan is destroyed, and cysteine also, unless derivatized, and the amides, glutamine and asparagine, are deamidated to glutamic acid and aspartic acid, respectively. Three different ways of calculating results are suggested, and taking the above limitations into account, a quantitation better than 5% can usually be obtained. PMID:26424264

  13. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Overlapping Functions of Clustered Protocadherins*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Meng-Hsuan; Lin, Chengyi; Meng, Shuxia; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2010-01-01

    The three tandem-arrayed protocadherin (Pcdh) gene clusters, namely Pcdh-α, Pcdh-β, and Pcdh-γ, play important roles in the development of the vertebrate central nervous system. To gain insight into the molecular action of PCDHs, we performed a systematic proteomics analysis of PCDH-γ-associated protein complexes. We identified a list of 154 non-redundant proteins in the PCDH-γ complexes. This list includes nearly 30 members of clustered Pcdh-α, -β, and -γ families as core components of the complexes and additionally over 120 putative PCDH-associated proteins. We validated a selected subset of PCDH-γ-associated proteins using specific antibodies. Analysis of the identities of PCDH-associated proteins showed that the majority of them overlap with the proteomic profile of postsynaptic density preparations. Further analysis of membrane protein complexes revealed that several validated PCDH-γ-associated proteins exhibit reduced levels in Pcdh-γ-deficient brain tissues. Therefore, PCDH-γs are required for the integrity of the complexes. However, the size of the overall complexes and the abundance of many other proteins remained unchanged, raising a possibility that PCDH-αs and PCDH-βs might compensate for PCDH-γ function in complex formation. As a test of this idea, RNA interference knockdown of both PCDH-αs and PCDH-γs showed that PCDHs have redundant functions in regulating neuronal survival in the chicken spinal cord. Taken together, our data provide evidence that clustered PCDHs coexist in large protein complexes and have overlapping functions during vertebrate neural development. PMID:19843561

  14. Transcriptional analysis of the effect of exogenous decanoic acid stress on Streptomyces roseosporus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Backgroud Daptomycin is an important antibiotic against infections caused by drug-resistant pathogens. Its production critically depends on the addition of decanoic acid during fermentation. Unfortunately, decanoic acid (>2.5 mM) is toxic to daptomycin producer, Streptomyces roseosporus. Results To understand the mechanism underlying decanoic tolerance or toxicity, the responses of S. roseosporus was determined by a combination of phospholipid fatty acid analysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement and RNA sequencing. Assays using fluorescent dyes indicated a sharp increase in reactive oxygen species during decanoic acid stress; fatty acid analysis revealed a marked increase in the composition of branched-chain fatty acids by approximately 10%, with a corresponding decrease in straight-chain fatty acids; functional analysis indicated decanoic acid stress has components common to other stress response, including perturbation of respiratory functions (nuo and cyd operons), oxidative stress, and heat shock. Interestingly, our transcriptomic analysis revealed that genes coding for components of proteasome and related to treholase synthesis were up-regulated in the decanoic acid –treated cells. Conclusion These findings represent an important first step in understanding mechanism of decanoic acid toxicity and provide a basis for engineering microbial tolerance. PMID:23432849

  15. Applications of cellular fatty acid analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, D F

    1991-01-01

    More than ever, new technology is having an impact on the tools of clinical microbiologists. The analysis of cellular fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) has become markedly more practical with the advent of the fused-silica capillary column, computer-controlled chromatography and data analysis, simplified sample preparation, and a commercially available GLC system dedicated to microbiological applications. Experience with applications in diagnostic microbiology ranges from substantial success in work with mycobacteria, legionellae, and nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli to minimal involvement with fungi and other nonbacterial agents. GLC is a good alternative to other means for the identification of mycobacteria or legionellae because it is rapid, specific, and independent of other specialized testing, e.g., DNA hybridization. Nonfermenters show features in their cellular fatty acid content that are useful in identifying species and, in some cases, subspecies. Less frequently encountered nonfermenters, including those belonging to unclassified groups, can ideally be characterized by GLC. Information is just beginning to materialize on the usefulness of cellular fatty acids for the identification of gram-positive bacteria and anaerobes, despite the traditional role of GLC in detecting metabolic products as an aid to identification of anaerobes. When species identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci is called for, GLC may offer an alternative to biochemical testing. Methods for direct analysis of clinical material have been developed, but in practical and economic terms they are not yet ready for use in the clinical laboratory. Direct analysis holds promise for detecting markers of infection due to an uncultivable agent or in clinical specimens that presently require cultures and prolonged incubation to yield an etiologic agent. PMID:1747860

  16. Nucleic Acid Aptamers for Living Cell Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiangling; Lv, Yifan; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-01

    Cells as the building blocks of life determine the basic functions and properties of a living organism. Understanding the structure and components of a cell aids in the elucidation of its biological functions. Moreover, knowledge of the similarities and differences between diseased and healthy cells is essential to understanding pathological mechanisms, identifying diagnostic markers, and designing therapeutic molecules. However, monitoring the structures and activities of a living cell remains a challenging task in bioanalytical and life science research. To meet the requirements of this task, aptamers, as “chemical antibodies,” have become increasingly powerful tools for cellular analysis. This article reviews recent advances in the development of nucleic acid aptamers in the areas of cell membrane analysis, cell detection and isolation, real-time monitoring of cell secretion, and intracellular delivery and analysis with living cell models. Limitations of aptamers and possible solutions are also discussed.

  17. Acidic Properties and Structure-Activity Correlations of Solid Acid Catalysts Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Li, Shenhui; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2016-04-19

    Solid acid materials with tunable structural and acidic properties are promising heterogeneous catalysts for manipulating and/or emulating the activity and selectivity of industrially important catalytic reactions. On the other hand, the performances of acid-catalyzed reactions are mostly dictated by the acidic features, namely, type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount, strength, and local environment of acid sites. The latter is relevant to their location (intra- vs extracrystalline), and possible confinement and Brønsted-Lewis acid synergy effects that may strongly affect the host-guest interactions, reaction mechanism, and shape selectivity of the catalytic system. This account aims to highlight some important applications of state-of-the-art solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for exploring the structural and acidic properties of solid acid catalysts as well as their catalytic performances and relevant reaction pathway invoked. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations may be exploited in conjunction with experimental SSNMR studies to verify the structure-activity correlations of the catalytic system at a microscopic scale. We describe in this Account the developments and applications of advanced ex situ and/or in situ SSNMR techniques, such as two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum magic-angle spinning (DQ MAS) homonuclear correlation spectroscopy for structural investigation of solid acids as well as study of their acidic properties. Moreover, the energies and electronic structures of the catalysts and detailed catalytic reaction processes, including the identification of reaction species, elucidation of reaction mechanism, and verification of structure-activity correlations, made available by DFT theoretical calculations were also discussed. Relevant discussions will focus primarily on results obtained from our laboratories in the past decade, including (i) quantitative and qualitative acidity characterization utilizing assorted probe molecules

  18. Phosphoproteomic Analysis Reveals Regulatory Mechanisms at the Kidney Filtration Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Rinschen, Markus M.; Wu, Xiongwu; König, Tim; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hagmann, Henning; Pahmeyer, Caroline; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Kohli, Priyanka; Schnell, Nicole; Schermer, Bernhard; Dryer, Stuart; Brooks, Bernard R.; Beltrao, Pedro; Krueger, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Diseases of the kidney filtration barrier are a leading cause of ESRD. Most disorders affect the podocytes, polarized cells with a limited capacity for self-renewal that require tightly controlled signaling to maintain their integrity, viability, and function. Here, we provide an atlas of in vivo phosphorylated, glomerulus-expressed proteins, including podocyte-specific gene products, identified in an unbiased tandem mass spectrometry–based approach. We discovered 2449 phosphorylated proteins corresponding to 4079 identified high-confidence phosphorylated residues and performed a systematic bioinformatics analysis of this dataset. We discovered 146 phosphorylation sites on proteins abundantly expressed in podocytes. The prohibitin homology domain of the slit diaphragm protein podocin contained one such site, threonine 234 (T234), located within a phosphorylation motif that is mutated in human genetic forms of proteinuria. The T234 site resides at the interface of podocin dimers. Free energy calculation through molecular dynamic simulations revealed a role for T234 in regulating podocin dimerization. We show that phosphorylation critically regulates formation of high molecular weight complexes and that this may represent a general principle for the assembly of proteins containing prohibitin homology domains. PMID:24511133

  19. Sequential analysis of the numerical Stroop effect reveals response suppression.

    PubMed

    Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Gevers, Wim; Notebaert, Wim

    2011-09-01

    Automatic processing of irrelevant stimulus dimensions has been demonstrated in a variety of tasks. Previous studies have shown that conflict between relevant and irrelevant dimensions can be reduced when a feature of the irrelevant dimension is repeated. The specific level at which the automatic process is suppressed (e.g., perceptual repetition, response repetition), however, is less understood. In the current experiment we used the numerical Stroop paradigm, in which the processing of irrelevant numerical values of 2 digits interferes with the processing of their physical size, to pinpoint the precise level of the suppression. Using a sequential analysis, we dissociated perceptual repetition from response repetition of the relevant and irrelevant dimension. Our analyses of reaction times, error rates, and diffusion modeling revealed that the congruity effect is significantly reduced or even absent when the response sequence of the irrelevant dimension, rather than the numerical value or the physical size, is repeated. These results suggest that automatic activation of the irrelevant dimension is suppressed at the response level. The current results shed light on the level of interaction between numerical magnitude and physical size as well as the effect of variability of responses and stimuli on automatic processing.

  20. Metabonomics Reveals Drastic Changes in Anti-Inflammatory/Pro-Resolving Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids-Derived Lipid Mediators in Leprosy Disease

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Julio J.; Antunes, Luis Caetano M.; de Macedo, Cristiana S.; Mattos, Katherine A.; Han, Jun; Pan, Jingxi; Candéa, André L. P.; Henriques, Maria das Graças M. O.; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Borchers, Christoph H.; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Finlay, B. Brett; Pessolani, Maria Cristina V.

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts over the last decades, our understanding of leprosy pathogenesis remains limited. The complex interplay between pathogens and hosts has profound effects on host metabolism. To explore the metabolic perturbations associated with leprosy, we analyzed the serum metabolome of leprosy patients. Samples collected from lepromatous and tuberculoid patients before and immediately after the conclusion of multidrug therapy (MDT) were subjected to high-throughput metabolic profiling. Our results show marked metabolic alterations during leprosy that subside at the conclusion of MDT. Pathways showing the highest modulation were related to polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolism, with emphasis on anti-inflammatory, pro-resolving omega-3 fatty acids. These results were confirmed by eicosanoid measurements through enzyme-linked immunoassays. Corroborating the repertoire of metabolites altered in sera, metabonomic analysis of skin specimens revealed alterations in the levels of lipids derived from lipase activity, including PUFAs, suggesting a high lipid turnover in highly-infected lesions. Our data suggest that omega-6 and omega-3, PUFA-derived, pro-resolving lipid mediators contribute to reduced tissue damage irrespectively of pathogen burden during leprosy disease. Our results demonstrate the utility of a comprehensive metabonomic approach for identifying potential contributors to disease pathology that may facilitate the development of more targeted treatments for leprosy and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:23967366

  1. Recent advances in microchip electrophoresis for amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Ou, Gaozhi; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Xin; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2013-10-01

    With the maturation of microfluidic technologies, microchip electrophoresis has been widely employed for amino acid analysis owing to its advantages of low sample consumption, reduced analysis time, high throughput, and potential for integration and automation. In this article, we review the recent progress in amino acid analysis using microchip electrophoresis during the period from 2007 to 2012. Innovations in microchip materials, surface modification, sample introduction, microchip electrophoresis, and detection methods are documented, as well as nascent applications of amino acid analysis in single-cell analysis, microdialysis sampling, food analysis, and extraterrestrial exploration. Without doubt, more applications of microchip electrophoresis in amino acid analysis may be expected soon.

  2. Recent advances in microchip electrophoresis for amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Ou, Gaozhi; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Xin; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2013-10-01

    With the maturation of microfluidic technologies, microchip electrophoresis has been widely employed for amino acid analysis owing to its advantages of low sample consumption, reduced analysis time, high throughput, and potential for integration and automation. In this article, we review the recent progress in amino acid analysis using microchip electrophoresis during the period from 2007 to 2012. Innovations in microchip materials, surface modification, sample introduction, microchip electrophoresis, and detection methods are documented, as well as nascent applications of amino acid analysis in single-cell analysis, microdialysis sampling, food analysis, and extraterrestrial exploration. Without doubt, more applications of microchip electrophoresis in amino acid analysis may be expected soon. PMID:23436170

  3. Functional analysis of abscisic acid 8'-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akira; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Kawakami, Naoto; Nambara, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in the control of seed dormancy and germination. Identification of hormone metabolism genes from a particular plant species of interest is an essential step in hormone research. The function of these gene products is validated by biochemical analysis using heterologous expression systems, such as E. coli and yeast. ABA 8'-hydroxylase is a subfamily of P450 monooxygenases and is encoded by CYP707A genes. CYP707A catalyzes the committed step in the major ABA catabolic pathway. In this chapter, we describe the methods for RNA extraction from seeds, cloning the CYP707A cDNAs, protein expression in yeast, and biochemical analysis of their gene products.

  4. Carbon and nitrogen isotopes from top predator amino acids reveal rapidly shifting ocean biochemistry in the outer California Current.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cooley, Rocio I; Koch, Paul L; Fiedler, Paul C; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    Climatic variation alters biochemical and ecological processes, but it is difficult both to quantify the magnitude of such changes, and to differentiate long-term shifts from inter-annual variability. Here, we simultaneously quantify decade-scale isotopic variability at the lowest and highest trophic positions in the offshore California Current System (CCS) by measuring δ15N and δ13C values of amino acids in a top predator, the sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus). Using a time series of skin tissue samples as a biological archive, isotopic records from individual amino acids (AAs) can reveal the proximate factors driving a temporal decline we observed in bulk isotope values (a decline of ≥1 ‰) by decoupling changes in primary producer isotope values from those linked to the trophic position of this toothed whale. A continuous decline in baseline (i.e., primary producer) δ15N and δ13C values was observed from 1993 to 2005 (a decrease of ∼4‰ for δ15N source-AAs and 3‰ for δ13C essential-AAs), while the trophic position of whales was variable over time and it did not exhibit directional trends. The baseline δ15N and δ13C shifts suggest rapid ongoing changes in the carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical cycling in the offshore CCS, potentially occurring at faster rates than long-term shifts observed elsewhere in the Pacific. While the mechanisms forcing these biogeochemical shifts remain to be determined, our data suggest possible links to natural climate variability, and also corresponding shifts in surface nutrient availability. Our study demonstrates that isotopic analysis of individual amino acids from a top marine mammal predator can be a powerful new approach to reconstructing temporal variation in both biochemical cycling and trophic structure. PMID:25329915

  5. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes from Top Predator Amino Acids Reveal Rapidly Shifting Ocean Biochemistry in the Outer California Current

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Cooley, Rocio I.; Koch, Paul L.; Fiedler, Paul C.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Climatic variation alters biochemical and ecological processes, but it is difficult both to quantify the magnitude of such changes, and to differentiate long-term shifts from inter-annual variability. Here, we simultaneously quantify decade-scale isotopic variability at the lowest and highest trophic positions in the offshore California Current System (CCS) by measuring δ15N and δ13C values of amino acids in a top predator, the sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus). Using a time series of skin tissue samples as a biological archive, isotopic records from individual amino acids (AAs) can reveal the proximate factors driving a temporal decline we observed in bulk isotope values (a decline of ≥1 ‰) by decoupling changes in primary producer isotope values from those linked to the trophic position of this toothed whale. A continuous decline in baseline (i.e., primary producer) δ15N and δ13C values was observed from 1993 to 2005 (a decrease of ∼4‰ for δ15N source-AAs and 3‰ for δ13C essential-AAs), while the trophic position of whales was variable over time and it did not exhibit directional trends. The baseline δ15N and δ13C shifts suggest rapid ongoing changes in the carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical cycling in the offshore CCS, potentially occurring at faster rates than long-term shifts observed elsewhere in the Pacific. While the mechanisms forcing these biogeochemical shifts remain to be determined, our data suggest possible links to natural climate variability, and also corresponding shifts in surface nutrient availability. Our study demonstrates that isotopic analysis of individual amino acids from a top marine mammal predator can be a powerful new approach to reconstructing temporal variation in both biochemical cycling and trophic structure. PMID:25329915

  6. Urinary Metabolomics Reveals Alterations of Aromatic Amino Acid Metabolism of Alzheimer's Disease in the Transgenic CRND8 Mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhi; Liu, Liangfeng; Li, Yongle; Dong, Jiyang; Li, Min; Huang, Jiandong; Lin, Shuhai; Cai, Zongwei

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, with amyloid plaques accumulation as the key feature involved in its pathology. To date, however, the biochemical changes in AD have not been clearly characterized. Here, we present that urinary metabolomics based on high resolution mass spectrometry was employed for delineation of metabolic alterations in transgenic CRND8 mice. In this noninvasive approach, urinary metabolome reveals the biochemical changes in early onset of this AD mouse model. In virtue of comprehensive metabolite profiling and multivariate statistical analysis, a total of 73 differential metabolites of urine sample sets was identified in 12-week and 18-week transgenic mice compared to wild-type littermates, covering perturbations of aromatic amino acid metabolism, the Krebs cycle and one-carbon metabolism. Of particular interest is that divergent tryptophan metabolism, such as upregulation of serotonin pathway while downregulation of kynurenine pathway, was observed. Meanwhile, the accumulation of both N-acetylvanilalanine and 3-methoxytyrosine indicated aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency. And the microbial metabolites derived from aromatic amino acid metabolism and drug-like phase II metabolic response via the glycine conjugation reactions were also highlighted, indicating that genetic modification in mouse brain not only alters genotype but also perturbs the gut microbiome. Together, our study demonstrated that the integrative approach employing mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and a transgenic mouse model for AD may provide new evidence for distinct metabolic signatures. The perturbations of metabolic pathways may have far-reaching implications for early diagnosis and intervention in AD. PMID:26825095

  7. UPLC-MS-based urine metabolomics reveals indole-3-lactic acid and phenyllactic acid as conserved biomarkers for alcohol-induced liver disease in the Ppara-null mouse model.

    PubMed

    Manna, Soumen K; Patterson, Andrew D; Yang, Qian; Krausz, Kristopher W; Idle, Jeffrey R; Fornace, Albert J; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2011-09-01

    Since the development and prognosis of alcohol-induced liver disease (ALD) vary significantly with genetic background, identification of a genetic background-independent noninvasive ALD biomarker would significantly improve screening and diagnosis. This study explored the effect of genetic background on the ALD-associated urinary metabolome using the Ppara-null mouse model on two different backgrounds, C57BL/6 (B6) and 129/SvJ (129S), along with their wild-type counterparts. Reversed-phase gradient UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS analysis revealed that urinary excretion of a number of metabolites, such as ethylsulfate, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid sulfate, adipic acid, pimelic acid, xanthurenic acid, and taurine, were background-dependent. Elevation of ethyl-β-d-glucuronide and N-acetylglycine was found to be a common signature of the metabolomic response to alcohol exposure in wild-type as well as in Ppara-null mice of both strains. However, increased excretion of indole-3-lactic acid and phenyllactic acid was found to be a conserved feature exclusively associated with the alcohol-treated Ppara-null mouse on both backgrounds that develop liver pathologies similar to the early stages of human ALD. These markers reflected the biochemical events associated with early stages of ALD pathogenesis. The results suggest that indole-3-lactic acid and phenyllactic acid are potential candidates for conserved and pathology-specific high-throughput noninvasive biomarkers for early stages of ALD.

  8. Amino acid coevolution reveals three-dimensional structure and functional domains of insect odorant receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Thomas A.; Morinaga, Satoshi; Ihara, Sayoko; Touhara, Kazushige; Marks, Debora S.; Benton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Insect Odorant Receptors (ORs) comprise an enormous protein family that translates environmental chemical signals into neuronal electrical activity. These heptahelical receptors are proposed to function as ligand-gated ion channels and/or to act metabotropically as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Resolving their signalling mechanism has been hampered by the lack of tertiary structural information and primary sequence similarity to other proteins. We use amino acid evolutionary covariation across these ORs to define restraints on structural proximity of residue pairs, which permit de novo generation of three-dimensional models. The validity of our analysis is supported by the location of functionally important residues in highly constrained regions of the protein. Importantly, insect OR models exhibit a distinct transmembrane domain packing arrangement to that of canonical GPCRs, establishing the structural unrelatedness of these receptor families. The evolutionary couplings and models predict odour binding and ion conduction domains, and provide a template for rationale structure-activity dissection. PMID:25584517

  9. Isotope Analysis Reveals Foraging Area Dichotomy for Atlantic Leatherback Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Elena; Das, Krishna; Girondot, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background The leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) has undergone a dramatic decline over the last 25 years, and this is believed to be primarily the result of mortality associated with fisheries bycatch followed by egg and nesting female harvest. Atlantic leatherback turtles undertake long migrations across ocean basins from subtropical and tropical nesting beaches to productive frontal areas. Migration between two nesting seasons can last 2 or 3 years, a time period termed the remigration interval (RI). Recent satellite transmitter data revealed that Atlantic leatherbacks follow two major dispersion patterns after nesting season, through the North Gulf Stream area or more eastward across the North Equatorial Current. However, information on the whole RI is lacking, precluding the accurate identification of feeding areas where conservation measures may need to be applied. Methodology/Principal Findings Using stable isotopes as dietary tracers we determined the characteristics of feeding grounds of leatherback females nesting in French Guiana. During migration, 3-year RI females differed from 2-year RI females in their isotope values, implying differences in their choice of feeding habitats (offshore vs. more coastal) and foraging latitude (North Atlantic vs. West African coasts, respectively). Egg-yolk and blood isotope values are correlated in nesting females, indicating that egg analysis is a useful tool for assessing isotope values in these turtles, including adults when not available. Conclusions/Significance Our results complement previous data on turtle movements during the first year following the nesting season, integrating the diet consumed during the year before nesting. We suggest that the French Guiana leatherback population segregates into two distinct isotopic groupings, and highlight the urgent need to determine the feeding habitats of the turtle in the Atlantic in order to protect this species from incidental take by commercial fisheries. Our

  10. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  11. Two New Alleles of the abscisic aldehyde oxidase 3 Gene Reveal Its Role in Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis in Seeds1

    PubMed Central

    González-Guzmán, Miguel; Abia, David; Salinas, Julio; Serrano, Ramón; Rodríguez, Pedro L.

    2004-01-01

    The abscisic aldehyde oxidase 3 (AAO3) gene product of Arabidopsis catalyzes the final step in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis. An aao3-1 mutant in a Landsberg erecta genetic background exhibited a wilty phenotype in rosette leaves, whereas seed dormancy was not affected (Seo et al., 2000a). Therefore, it was speculated that a different aldehyde oxidase would be the major contributor to ABA biosynthesis in seeds (Seo et al., 2000a). Through a screening based on germination under high-salt concentration, we isolated two mutants in a Columbia genetic background, initially named sre2-1 and sre2-2 (for salt resistant). Complementation tests with different ABA-deficient mutants indicated that sre2-1 and sre2-2 mutants were allelic to aao3-1, and therefore they were renamed as aao3-2 and aao3-3, respectively. Indeed, molecular characterization of the aao3-2 mutant revealed a T-DNA insertional mutation that abolished the transcription of AAO3 gene, while sequence analysis of AAO3 in aao3-3 mutant revealed a deletion of three nucleotides and several missense mutations. Physiological characterization of aao3-2 and aao3-3 mutants revealed a wilty phenotype and osmotolerance in germination assays. In contrast to aao3-1, both aao3-2 and aao3-3 mutants showed a reduced dormancy. Accordingly, ABA levels were reduced in dry seeds and rosette leaves of both aao3-2 and aao3-3. Taken together, these results indicate that AAO3 gene product plays a major role in seed ABA biosynthesis. PMID:15122034

  12. Metabolite analysis of Mycobacterium species under aerobic and hypoxic conditions reveals common metabolic traits.

    PubMed

    Drapal, Margit; Wheeler, Paul R; Fraser, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    A metabolite profiling approach has been implemented to elucidate metabolic adaptation at set culture conditions in five Mycobacterium species (two fast- and three slow-growing) with the potential to act as model organisms for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Analysis has been performed over designated growth phases and under representative environments (nutrient and oxygen depletion) experienced by Mtb during infection. The procedure was useful in determining a range of metabolites (60-120 compounds) covering nucleotides, amino acids, organic acids, saccharides, fatty acids, glycerols, -esters, -phosphates and isoprenoids. Among these classes of compounds, key biomarker metabolites, which can act as indicators of pathway/process activity, were identified. In numerous cases, common metabolite traits were observed for all five species across the experimental conditions (e.g. uracil indicating DNA repair). Amino acid content, especially glutamic acid, highlighted the different properties between the fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria studied (e.g. nitrogen assimilation). The greatest similarities in metabolite composition between fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria were apparent under hypoxic conditions. A comparison to previously reported transcriptomic data revealed a strong correlation between changes in transcription and metabolite content. Collectively, these data validate the changes in the transcription at the metabolite level, suggesting transcription exists as one of the predominant modes of cellular regulation in Mycobacterium. Sectors with restricted correlation between metabolites and transcription (e.g. hypoxic cultivation) warrant further study to elucidate and exploit post-transcriptional modes of regulation. The strong correlation between the laboratory conditions used and data derived from in vivo conditions, indicate that the approach applied is a valuable addition to our understanding of cell regulation in these Mycobacterium species.

  13. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of Thermobifida fusca reveals metabolic pathways of cellulose utilization.

    PubMed

    Adav, Sunil S; Ng, Chee Sheng; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2011-09-01

    Thermobifida fusca is an aerobic, thermophilic, cellulose degrading bacterium identified in heated organic materials. This study applied iTRAQ quantitative proteomic analysis to the cellular and membrane proteomes of T. fusca grown in presence and absence of cellulose to elucidate the cellular processes induced by cellulose nutrient. Using an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach, 783 cytosolic and 181 membrane proteins expressed during cellulose hydrolysis were quantified with ≤1% false discovery rate. The comparative iTRAQ quantification revealed considerable induction in the expression levels and up-regulation of specific proteins in cellulosic medium than non-cellulosic medium. The regulated proteins in cellulosic medium were grouped under central carbohydrate metabolism such as glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathways, citric acid cycle, starch, sugars, pyruvate, propanoate and butanoate metabolism; energy metabolism that includes oxidative phosphorylation, nitrogen, methane and sulfur metabolism; fatty acid metabolism, amino acid metabolic pathways, purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and main cellular genetic information processing functions like replication, transcription, translation, and cell wall synthesis; and environmental information processing (membrane transport and signal transduction). The results demonstrated cellulose induced several metabolic pathways during cellulose utilization.

  14. Analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid in Acetobacter: molecular mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria are used for industrial vinegar production because of their remarkable ability to oxidize ethanol and high resistance to acetic acid. Although several molecular machineries responsible for acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria have been reported, the entire mechanism that confers acetic acid resistance has not been completely understood. One of the promising methods to elucidate the entire mechanism is global analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Recently, two proteins whose production was greatly enhanced by acetic acid in Acetobacter aceti were identified to be aconitase and a putative ABC-transporter, respectively; furthermore, overexpression or disruption of the genes encoding these proteins affected acetic acid resistance in A. aceti, indicating that these proteins are involved in acetic acid resistance. Overexpression of each gene increased acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter, which resulted in an improvement in the productivity of acetic acid fermentation. Taken together, the results of the proteomic analysis and those of previous studies indicate that acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria is conferred by several mechanisms. These findings also provide a clue to breed a strain having high resistance to acetic acid for vinegar fermentation.

  15. Comparison of Rapid Methods for Analysis of Bacterial Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Moss, C. Wayne; Lambert, M. A.; Merwin, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    When rapid gas-liquid chromatography methods for determination of bacterial fatty acids were compared, results showed that saponification was required for total fatty acid analysis. Transesterification with boron-trihalide reagents (BF3-CH3OH, BCl3-CH3OH) caused extensive degradation of cyclopropane acids and was less effective than saponification in releasing cellular hydroxy fatty acids. Digestion of cells with tetramethylammonium hydroxide was unsatisfactory because of extraneous gas-liquid chromatography peaks and because of lower recovery of branched-chain and hydroxy fatty acids. A simple, rapid saponification procedure which can be used for total cellular fatty acid analysis of freshly grown cells is described. PMID:4844271

  16. Phylogenomic Analysis of Oenococcus oeni Reveals Specific Domestication of Strains to Cider and Wines

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Sills, Hugo; El Khoury, Mariette; Favier, Marion; Romano, Andrea; Biasioli, Franco; Spano, Giuseppe; Sherman, David J.; Bouchez, Olivier; Coton, Emmanuel; Coton, Monika; Okada, Sanae; Tanaka, Naoto; Dols-Lafargue, Marguerite; Lucas, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is a lactic acid bacteria species encountered particularly in wine, where it achieves the malolactic fermentation. Molecular typing methods have previously revealed that the species is made of several genetic groups of strains, some being specific to certain types of wines, ciders or regions. Here, we describe 36 recently released O. oeni genomes and the phylogenomic analysis of these 36 plus 14 previously reported genomes. We also report three genome sequences of the sister species Oenococcus kitaharae that were used for phylogenomic reconstructions. Phylogenomic and population structure analyses performed revealed that the 50 O. oeni genomes delineate two major groups of 12 and 37 strains, respectively, named A and B, plus a putative group C, consisting of a single strain. A study on the orthologs and single nucleotide polymorphism contents of the genetic groups revealed that the domestication of some strains to products such as cider, wine, or champagne, is reflected at the genetic level. While group A strains proved to be predominant in wine and to form subgroups adapted to specific types of wine such as champagne, group B strains were found in wine and cider. The strain from putative group C was isolated from cider and genetically closer to group B strains. The results suggest that ancestral O. oeni strains were adapted to low-ethanol containing environments such as overripe fruits, and that they were domesticated to cider and wine, with group A strains being naturally selected in a process of further domestication to specific wines such as champagne. PMID:25977455

  17. Phylogenomic Analysis of Oenococcus oeni Reveals Specific Domestication of Strains to Cider and Wines.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Sills, Hugo; El Khoury, Mariette; Favier, Marion; Romano, Andrea; Biasioli, Franco; Spano, Giuseppe; Sherman, David J; Bouchez, Olivier; Coton, Emmanuel; Coton, Monika; Okada, Sanae; Tanaka, Naoto; Dols-Lafargue, Marguerite; Lucas, Patrick M

    2015-06-01

    Oenococcus oeni is a lactic acid bacteria species encountered particularly in wine, where it achieves the malolactic fermentation. Molecular typing methods have previously revealed that the species is made of several genetic groups of strains, some being specific to certain types of wines, ciders or regions. Here, we describe 36 recently released O. oeni genomes and the phylogenomic analysis of these 36 plus 14 previously reported genomes. We also report three genome sequences of the sister species Oenococcus kitaharae that were used for phylogenomic reconstructions. Phylogenomic and population structure analyses performed revealed that the 50 O. oeni genomes delineate two major groups of 12 and 37 strains, respectively, named A and B, plus a putative group C, consisting of a single strain. A study on the orthologs and single nucleotide polymorphism contents of the genetic groups revealed that the domestication of some strains to products such as cider, wine, or champagne, is reflected at the genetic level. While group A strains proved to be predominant in wine and to form subgroups adapted to specific types of wine such as champagne, group B strains were found in wine and cider. The strain from putative group C was isolated from cider and genetically closer to group B strains. The results suggest that ancestral O. oeni strains were adapted to low-ethanol containing environments such as overripe fruits, and that they were domesticated to cider and wine, with group A strains being naturally selected in a process of further domestication to specific wines such as champagne. PMID:25977455

  18. A Sialylated Glycan Microarray Reveals Novel Interactions of Modified Sialic Acids with Proteins and Viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Lasanajak, Yi; Tappert, Mary M.; Air, Gillian M.; Tiwari, Vinod K.; Cao, Hongzhi; Chokhawala, Harshal A.; Zheng, Haojie; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2011-01-01

    Many glycan-binding proteins in animals and pathogens recognize sialic acid or its modified forms, but their molecular recognition is poorly understood. Here we describe studies on sialic acid recognition using a novel sialylated glycan microarray containing modified sialic acids presented on different glycan backbones. Glycans terminating in β-linked galactose at the non-reducing end and with an alkylamine-containing fluorophore at the reducing end were sialylated by a one-pot three-enzyme system to generate α2–3- and α2–6-linked sialyl glycans with 16 modified sialic acids. The resulting 77 sialyl glycans were purified and quantified, characterized by mass spectrometry, covalently printed on activated slides, and interrogated with a number of key sialic acid-binding proteins and viruses. Sialic acid recognition by the sialic acid-binding lectins Sambucus nigra agglutinin and Maackia amurensis lectin-I, which are routinely used for detecting α2–6- and α2–3-linked sialic acids, are affected by sialic acid modifications, and both lectins bind glycans terminating with 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galactonononic acid (Kdn) and Kdn derivatives stronger than the derivatives of more common N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Three human parainfluenza viruses bind to glycans terminating with Neu5Ac or Neu5Gc and some of their derivatives but not to Kdn and its derivatives. Influenza A virus also does not bind glycans terminating in Kdn or Kdn derivatives. An especially novel aspect of human influenza A virus binding is its ability to equivalently recognize glycans terminated with either α2–6-linked Neu5Ac9Lt or α2–6-linked Neu5Ac. Our results demonstrate the utility of this sialylated glycan microarray to investigate the biological importance of modified sialic acids in protein-glycan interactions. PMID:21757734

  19. Genome mining and genetic analysis of cypemycin biosynthesis reveal an unusual class of posttranslationally modified peptides.

    PubMed

    Claesen, Jan; Bibb, Mervyn

    2010-09-14

    Posttranslational modification of amino acids confers a range of structural features and activities on ribosomally synthesized peptides, many of which have potent antimicrobial or other biological activities. Cypemycin is an extensively modified linear peptide produced by Streptomyces sp. OH-4156 with potent in vitro activity against mouse leukemia cells. Cypemycin does not contain lanthionine bridges but exhibits some of the structural features of lantibiotics, notably dehydrated threonines (dehydrobutyrines) and a C-terminal S-[(Z)-2-aminovinyl]-D-cysteine. Consequently it was classified as a member of the lantibiotic family of posttranslationally modified peptides. Cypemycin also possesses two L-allo-isoleucine residues and an N-terminal N,N-dimethylalanine, both unique amino acid modifications. We identified and heterologously expressed the cypemycin biosynthetic gene cluster and performed a mutational analysis of each individual gene. We show that even the previously described modifications are carried out by unusual enzymes or via a modification pathway unrelated to lantibiotic biosynthesis. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the widespread occurrence of cypemycin-like gene clusters within the bacterial kingdom and in the Archaea. Cypemycin is the founding member of an unusual class of posttranslationally modified ribosomally synthesized peptides, the linaridins.

  20. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals the Flooding-Tolerance Mechanism in Mutant and Abscisic Acid-Treated Soybean.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaojian; Nishimura, Minoru; Hajika, Makita; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-06-01

    Flooding negatively affects the growth of soybean, and several flooding-specific stress responses have been identified; however, the mechanisms underlying flooding tolerance in soybean remain unclear. To explore the initial flooding tolerance mechanisms in soybean, flooding-tolerant mutant and abscisic acid (ABA)-treated plants were analyzed. In the mutant and ABA-treated soybeans, 146 proteins were commonly changed at the initial flooding stress. Among the identified proteins, protein synthesis-related proteins, including nascent polypeptide-associated complex and chaperonin 20, and RNA regulation-related proteins were increased in abundance both at protein and mRNA expression. However, these proteins identified at the initial flooding stress were not significantly changed during survival stages under continuous flooding. Cluster analysis indicated that glycolysis- and cell wall-related proteins, such as enolase and polygalacturonase inhibiting protein, were increased in abundance during survival stages. Furthermore, lignification of root tissue was improved even under flooding stress. Taken together, these results suggest that protein synthesis- and RNA regulation-related proteins play a key role in triggering tolerance to the initial flooding stress in soybean. Furthermore, the integrity of cell wall and balance of glycolysis might be important factors for promoting tolerance of soybean root to flooding stress during survival stages.

  1. Chemometric Approach to Fatty Acid Profiles in Soybean Cultivars by Principal Component Analysis (PCA).

    PubMed

    Shin, Eui-Cheol; Hwang, Chung Eun; Lee, Byong Won; Kim, Hyun Tae; Ko, Jong Min; Baek, In Youl; Lee, Yang-Bong; Choi, Jin Sang; Cho, Eun Ju; Seo, Weon Taek; Cho, Kye Man

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the fatty acid profiles in 18 soybean cultivars grown in Korea. A total of eleven fatty acids were identified in the sample set, which was comprised of myristic (C14:0), palmitic (C16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1, ω7), stearic (C18:0), oleic (C18:1, ω9), linoleic (C18:2, ω6), linolenic (C18:3, ω3), arachidic (C20:0), gondoic (C20:1, ω9), behenic (C22:0), and lignoceric (C24:0) acids by gas-liquid chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Based on their color, yellow-, black-, brown-, and green-colored cultivars were denoted. Correlation coefficients (r) between the nine major fatty acids identified (two trace fatty acids, myristic and palmitoleic, were not included in the study) were generated and revealed an inverse association between oleic and linoleic acids (r=-0.94, p<0.05), while stearic acid was positively correlated to arachidic acid (r=0.72, p<0.05). Principal component analysis (PCA) of the fatty acid data yielded four significant principal components (PCs; i.e., eigenvalues>1), which together account for 81.49% of the total variance in the data set; with PC1 contributing 28.16% of the total. Eigen analysis of the correlation matrix loadings of the four significant PCs revealed that PC1 was mainly contributed to by oleic, linoleic, and gondoic acids, PC2 by stearic, linolenic and arachidic acids, PC3 by behenic and lignoceric acids, and PC4 by palmitic acid. The score plots generated between PC1-PC2 and PC3-PC4 segregated soybean cultivars based on fatty acid composition. PMID:24471082

  2. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF ABSCISIC ACID BIOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    MCCARTY D R

    2012-01-10

    The carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCD) catalyze synthesis of a variety of apo-carotenoid secondary metabolites in plants, animals and bacteria. In plants, the reaction catalyzed by the 11, 12, 9-cis-epoxy carotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) is the first committed and key regulated step in synthesis of the plant hormone, abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is a key regulator of plant stress responses and has critical functions in normal root and seed development. The molecular mechanisms responsible for developmental control of ABA synthesis in plant tissues are poorly understood. Five of the nine CCD genes present in the Arabidopsis genome encode NCED's involved in control of ABA synthesis in the plant. This project is focused on functional analysis of these five AtNCED genes as a key to understanding developmental regulation of ABA synthesis and dissecting the role of ABA in plant development. For this purpose, the project developed a comprehensive set of gene knockouts in the AtNCED genes that facilitate genetic dissection of ABA synthesis. These mutants were used in combination with key molecular tools to address the following specific objectives: (1) the role of ABA synthesis in root development; (2) developmental control of ABA synthesis in seeds; (3) analysis of ATNCED over-expressers; (4) preliminary crystallography of the maize VP14 protein.

  3. An analysis of issues concerning acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    GAO examines the implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain and offers a series of observations on the following issues involved in the debate: to what extent has it been scientifically demonstrated that acid rain is resulting in damage to the environment. What are the causes of acid rain and where is it most prevalent. What alternatives exist for controlling acid rain and what are their economic effects.

  4. Lipidomic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii reveals critical changes in lipid composition in response to acetic acid stress.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Lina; Santos, Aline Xs; Riezman, Howard; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555) cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L(-1), while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L(-1) acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS) showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP)2C 2.2×) and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP)2C 2.7×), when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to generate large

  5. Metagenomic Analysis of the Rhizosphere Soil Microbiome with Respect to Phytic Acid Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Unno, Yusuke; Shinano, Takuro

    2013-01-01

    While phytic acid is a major form of organic phosphate in many soils, plant utilization of phytic acid is normally limited; however, culture trials of Lotus japonicus using experimental field soil that had been managed without phosphate fertilizer for over 90 years showed significant usage of phytic acid applied to soil for growth and flowering and differences in the degree of growth, even in the same culture pot. To understand the key metabolic processes involved in soil phytic acid utilization, we analyzed rhizosphere soil microbial communities using molecular ecological approaches. Although molecular fingerprint analysis revealed changes in the rhizosphere soil microbial communities from bulk soil microbial community, no clear relationship between the microbiome composition and flowering status that might be related to phytic acid utilization of L. japonicus could be determined. However, metagenomic analysis revealed changes in the relative abundance of the classes Bacteroidetes, Betaproteobacteria, Chlorobi, Dehalococcoidetes and Methanobacteria, which include strains that potentially promote plant growth and phytic acid utilization, and some gene clusters relating to phytic acid utilization, such as alkaline phosphatase and citrate synthase, with the phytic acid utilization status of the plant. This study highlights phylogenetic and metabolic features of the microbial community of the L. japonicus rhizosphere and provides a basic understanding of how rhizosphere microbial communities affect the phytic acid status in soil. PMID:23257911

  6. Novel and Unexpected Microbial Diversity in Acid Mine Drainage in Svalbard (78° N), Revealed by Culture-Independent Approaches

    PubMed Central

    García-Moyano, Antonio; Austnes, Andreas Erling; Lanzén, Anders; González-Toril, Elena; Aguilera, Ángeles; Øvreås, Lise

    2015-01-01

    Svalbard, situated in the high Arctic, is an important past and present coal mining area. Dozens of abandoned waste rock piles can be found in the proximity of Longyearbyen. This environment offers a unique opportunity for studying the biological control over the weathering of sulphide rocks at low temperatures. Although the extension and impact of acid mine drainage (AMD) in this area is known, the native microbial communities involved in this process are still scarcely studied and uncharacterized. Several abandoned mining areas were explored in the search for active AMD and a culture-independent approach was applied with samples from two different runoffs for the identification and quantification of the native microbial communities. The results obtained revealed two distinct microbial communities. One of the runoffs was more extreme with regards to pH and higher concentration of soluble iron and heavy metals. These conditions favored the development of algal-dominated microbial mats. Typical AMD microorganisms related to known iron-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria) dominated the bacterial community although some unexpected populations related to Chloroflexi were also significant. No microbial mats were found in the second area. The geochemistry here showed less extreme drainage, most likely in direct contact with the ore under the waste pile. Large deposits of secondary minerals were found and the presence of iron stalks was revealed by microscopy analysis. Although typical AMD microorganisms were also detected here, the microbial community was dominated by other populations, some of them new to this type of system (Saccharibacteria, Gallionellaceae). These were absent or lowered in numbers the farther from the spring source and they could represent native populations involved in the oxidation of sulphide rocks within the waste rock pile. This environment appears thus as a highly interesting field of potential

  7. Novel and Unexpected Microbial Diversity in Acid Mine Drainage in Svalbard (78° N), Revealed by Culture-Independent Approaches

    PubMed Central

    García-Moyano, Antonio; Austnes, Andreas Erling; Lanzén, Anders; González-Toril, Elena; Aguilera, Ángeles; Øvreås, Lise

    2015-01-01

    Svalbard, situated in the high Arctic, is an important past and present coal mining area. Dozens of abandoned waste rock piles can be found in the proximity of Longyearbyen. This environment offers a unique opportunity for studying the biological control over the weathering of sulphide rocks at low temperatures. Although the extension and impact of acid mine drainage (AMD) in this area is known, the native microbial communities involved in this process are still scarcely studied and uncharacterized. Several abandoned mining areas were explored in the search for active AMD and a culture-independent approach was applied with samples from two different runoffs for the identification and quantification of the native microbial communities. The results obtained revealed two distinct microbial communities. One of the runoffs was more extreme with regards to pH and higher concentration of soluble iron and heavy metals. These conditions favored the development of algal-dominated microbial mats. Typical AMD microorganisms related to known iron-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria) dominated the bacterial community although some unexpected populations related to Chloroflexi were also significant. No microbial mats were found in the second area. The geochemistry here showed less extreme drainage, most likely in direct contact with the ore under the waste pile. Large deposits of secondary minerals were found and the presence of iron stalks was revealed by microscopy analysis. Although typical AMD microorganisms were also detected here, the microbial community was dominated by other populations, some of them new to this type of system (Saccharibacteria, Gallionellaceae). These were absent or lowered in numbers the farther from the spring source and they could represent native populations involved in the oxidation of sulphide rocks within the waste rock pile. This environment appears thus as a highly interesting field of potential

  8. Novel and Unexpected Microbial Diversity in Acid Mine Drainage in Svalbard (78° N), Revealed by Culture-Independent Approaches.

    PubMed

    García-Moyano, Antonio; Austnes, Andreas Erling; Lanzén, Anders; González-Toril, Elena; Aguilera, Ángeles; Øvreås, Lise

    2015-10-13

    Svalbard, situated in the high Arctic, is an important past and present coal mining area. Dozens of abandoned waste rock piles can be found in the proximity of Longyearbyen. This environment offers a unique opportunity for studying the biological control over the weathering of sulphide rocks at low temperatures. Although the extension and impact of acid mine drainage (AMD) in this area is known, the native microbial communities involved in this process are still scarcely studied and uncharacterized. Several abandoned mining areas were explored in the search for active AMD and a culture-independent approach was applied with samples from two different runoffs for the identification and quantification of the native microbial communities. The results obtained revealed two distinct microbial communities. One of the runoffs was more extreme with regards to pH and higher concentration of soluble iron and heavy metals. These conditions favored the development of algal-dominated microbial mats. Typical AMD microorganisms related to known iron-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria) dominated the bacterial community although some unexpected populations related to Chloroflexi were also significant. No microbial mats were found in the second area. The geochemistry here showed less extreme drainage, most likely in direct contact with the ore under the waste pile. Large deposits of secondary minerals were found and the presence of iron stalks was revealed by microscopy analysis. Although typical AMD microorganisms were also detected here, the microbial community was dominated by other populations, some of them new to this type of system (Saccharibacteria, Gallionellaceae). These were absent or lowered in numbers the farther from the spring source and they could represent native populations involved in the oxidation of sulphide rocks within the waste rock pile. This environment appears thus as a highly interesting field of potential

  9. RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals MAPKKK Family Members Related to Drought Tolerance in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wen; Yang, Fengling; He, Hang; Zhao, Jiuran

    2015-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is an evolutionarily conserved signal transduction pathway that is involved in plant development and stress responses. As the first component of this phosphorelay cascade, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) act as adaptors linking upstream signaling steps to the core MAPK cascade to promote the appropriate cellular responses; however, the functions of MAPKKKs in maize are unclear. Here, we identified 71 MAPKKK genes, of which 14 were novel, based on a computational analysis of the maize (Zea mays L.) genome. Using an RNA-seq analysis in the leaf, stem and root of maize under well-watered and drought-stress conditions, we identified 5,866 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including 8 MAPKKK genes responsive to drought stress. Many of the DEGs were enriched in processes such as drought stress, abiotic stimulus, oxidation-reduction, and metabolic processes. The other way round, DEGs involved in processes such as oxidation, photosynthesis, and starch, proline, ethylene, and salicylic acid metabolism were clearly co-expressed with the MAPKKK genes. Furthermore, a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis was performed to assess the relative expression levels of MAPKKKs. Correlation analysis revealed that there was a significant correlation between expression levels of two MAPKKKs and relative biomass responsive to drought in 8 inbred lines. Our results indicate that MAPKKKs may have important regulatory functions in drought tolerance in maize. PMID:26599013

  10. Pretreatment and integrated analysis of spectral data reveal seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Ito, Kengo; Sakata, Kenji; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Extracting useful information from high dimensionality and large data sets is a major challenge for data-driven approaches. The present study was aimed at developing novel integrated analytical strategies for comprehensively characterizing seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity. The chemical compositions of 107 seaweed and 2 seagrass samples were analyzed using multiple techniques, including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid- and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), CHNS/O total elemental analysis, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IR-MS). The spectral data were preprocessed using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) and NMF combined with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) methods in order to separate individual component information from the overlapping and/or broad spectral peaks. Integrated analysis of the preprocessed chemical data demonstrated distinct discrimination of differential seaweed species. Further network analysis revealed a close correlation between the heavy metal elements and characteristic components of brown algae, such as cellulose, alginic acid, and sulfated mucopolysaccharides, providing a componential basis for its metal-sorbing potential. These results suggest that this integrated analytical strategy is useful for extracting and identifying the chemical characteristics of diverse seaweeds based on large chemical data sets, particularly complicated overlapping spectral data.

  11. Pretreatment and integrated analysis of spectral data reveal seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Ito, Kengo; Sakata, Kenji; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Extracting useful information from high dimensionality and large data sets is a major challenge for data-driven approaches. The present study was aimed at developing novel integrated analytical strategies for comprehensively characterizing seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity. The chemical compositions of 107 seaweed and 2 seagrass samples were analyzed using multiple techniques, including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid- and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), CHNS/O total elemental analysis, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IR-MS). The spectral data were preprocessed using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) and NMF combined with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) methods in order to separate individual component information from the overlapping and/or broad spectral peaks. Integrated analysis of the preprocessed chemical data demonstrated distinct discrimination of differential seaweed species. Further network analysis revealed a close correlation between the heavy metal elements and characteristic components of brown algae, such as cellulose, alginic acid, and sulfated mucopolysaccharides, providing a componential basis for its metal-sorbing potential. These results suggest that this integrated analytical strategy is useful for extracting and identifying the chemical characteristics of diverse seaweeds based on large chemical data sets, particularly complicated overlapping spectral data. PMID:25647718

  12. Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Metabolic Profiles in Brain and Liver of Mouse Revealed by a High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nanyang; Wei, Si; Li, Meiying; Yang, Jingping; Li, Kan; Jin, Ling; Xie, Yuwei; Giesy, John P.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Hongxia

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a perfluoroalkyl acid, can result in hepatotoxicity and neurobehavioral effects in animals. The metabolome, which serves as a connection among transcriptome, proteome and toxic effects, provides pathway-based insights into effects of PFOA. Since understanding of changes in the metabolic profile during hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity were still incomplete, a high-throughput targeted metabolomics approach (278 metabolites) was used to investigate effects of exposure to PFOA for 28 d on brain and liver of male Balb/c mice. Results of multivariate statistical analysis indicated that PFOA caused alterations in metabolic pathways in exposed individuals. Pathway analysis suggested that PFOA affected metabolism of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates and energetics. Ten and 18 metabolites were identified as potential unique biomarkers of exposure to PFOA in brain and liver, respectively. In brain, PFOA affected concentrations of neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and glutamate in brain, which provides novel insights into mechanisms of PFOA-induced neurobehavioral effects. In liver, profiles of lipids revealed involvement of β-oxidation and biosynthesis of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in PFOA-induced hepatotoxicity, while alterations in metabolism of arachidonic acid suggesting potential of PFOA to cause inflammation response in liver. These results provide insight into the mechanism and biomarkers for PFOA-induced effects. PMID:27032815

  13. Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Metabolic Profiles in Brain and Liver of Mouse Revealed by a High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Nanyang; Wei, Si; Li, Meiying; Yang, Jingping; Li, Kan; Jin, Ling; Xie, Yuwei; Giesy, John P.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Hongxia

    2016-04-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a perfluoroalkyl acid, can result in hepatotoxicity and neurobehavioral effects in animals. The metabolome, which serves as a connection among transcriptome, proteome and toxic effects, provides pathway-based insights into effects of PFOA. Since understanding of changes in the metabolic profile during hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity were still incomplete, a high-throughput targeted metabolomics approach (278 metabolites) was used to investigate effects of exposure to PFOA for 28 d on brain and liver of male Balb/c mice. Results of multivariate statistical analysis indicated that PFOA caused alterations in metabolic pathways in exposed individuals. Pathway analysis suggested that PFOA affected metabolism of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates and energetics. Ten and 18 metabolites were identified as potential unique biomarkers of exposure to PFOA in brain and liver, respectively. In brain, PFOA affected concentrations of neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and glutamate in brain, which provides novel insights into mechanisms of PFOA-induced neurobehavioral effects. In liver, profiles of lipids revealed involvement of β-oxidation and biosynthesis of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in PFOA-induced hepatotoxicity, while alterations in metabolism of arachidonic acid suggesting potential of PFOA to cause inflammation response in liver. These results provide insight into the mechanism and biomarkers for PFOA-induced effects.

  14. Exploratory Metabolomics Profiling in the Kainic Acid Rat Model Reveals Depletion of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 during Epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Heischmann, Svenja; Quinn, Kevin; Cruickshank-Quinn, Charmion; Liang, Li-Ping; Reisdorph, Rick; Reisdorph, Nichole; Patel, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no reliable markers are available to evaluate the epileptogenic potential of a brain injury. The electroencephalogram is the standard method of diagnosis of epilepsy; however, it is not used to predict the risk of developing epilepsy. Biomarkers that indicate an individual’s risk to develop epilepsy, especially those measurable in the periphery are urgently needed. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most common form of acquired epilepsy, is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures following brain injury and a seizure-free “latent” period. Elucidation of mechanisms at play during epilepsy development (epileptogenesis) in animal models of TLE could enable the identification of predictive biomarkers. Our pilot study using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolomics analysis revealed changes (p-value ≤ 0.05, ≥1.5-fold change) in lipid, purine, and sterol metabolism in rat plasma and hippocampus during epileptogenesis and chronic epilepsy in the kainic acid model of TLE. Notably, disease development was associated with dysregulation of vitamin D3 metabolism at all stages and plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 depletion in the acute and latent phase of injury-induced epileptogenesis. These data suggest that plasma VD3 metabolites reflect the severity of an epileptogenic insult and that a panel of plasma VD3 metabolites may be able to serve as a marker of epileptogenesis. PMID:27526857

  15. Exploratory Metabolomics Profiling in the Kainic Acid Rat Model Reveals Depletion of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 during Epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heischmann, Svenja; Quinn, Kevin; Cruickshank-Quinn, Charmion; Liang, Li-Ping; Reisdorph, Rick; Reisdorph, Nichole; Patel, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no reliable markers are available to evaluate the epileptogenic potential of a brain injury. The electroencephalogram is the standard method of diagnosis of epilepsy; however, it is not used to predict the risk of developing epilepsy. Biomarkers that indicate an individual's risk to develop epilepsy, especially those measurable in the periphery are urgently needed. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most common form of acquired epilepsy, is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures following brain injury and a seizure-free "latent" period. Elucidation of mechanisms at play during epilepsy development (epileptogenesis) in animal models of TLE could enable the identification of predictive biomarkers. Our pilot study using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolomics analysis revealed changes (p-value ≤ 0.05, ≥1.5-fold change) in lipid, purine, and sterol metabolism in rat plasma and hippocampus during epileptogenesis and chronic epilepsy in the kainic acid model of TLE. Notably, disease development was associated with dysregulation of vitamin D3 metabolism at all stages and plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 depletion in the acute and latent phase of injury-induced epileptogenesis. These data suggest that plasma VD3 metabolites reflect the severity of an epileptogenic insult and that a panel of plasma VD3 metabolites may be able to serve as a marker of epileptogenesis. PMID:27526857

  16. Molecular dynamic simulations reveal the structural determinants of fatty acid binding to oxy-myoglobin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanism(s) by which fatty acids are sequestered and transported in muscle have not been fully elucidated. A potential key player in this process is the protein myoglobin (Mb). Indeed, there is a catalogue of empirical evidence supporting direct interaction of globins with fatty acid metabolite...

  17. Trophic spectra under the lens of amino acid isotopic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in compound specific isotopic ratio analysis (CSIRA) have allowed researchers to measure trophic fractionation of 15N in specific amino acids, namely glutamic acid and phenylalanine. These amino acids have proven useful in food web studies because of the wide and consistent disparity...

  18. Revealing Nucleic Acid Mutations Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Probes.

    PubMed

    Junager, Nina P L; Kongsted, Jacob; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid mutations are of tremendous importance in modern clinical work, biotechnology and in fundamental studies of nucleic acids. Therefore, rapid, cost-effective and reliable detection of mutations is an object of extensive research. Today, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes are among the most often used tools for the detection of nucleic acids and in particular, for the detection of mutations. However, multiple parameters must be taken into account in order to create efficient FRET probes that are sensitive to nucleic acid mutations. In this review; we focus on the design principles for such probes and available computational methods that allow for their rational design. Applications of advanced, rationally designed FRET probes range from new insights into cellular heterogeneity to gaining new knowledge of nucleic acid structures directly in living cells. PMID:27472344

  19. Revealing Nucleic Acid Mutations Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Junager, Nina P. L.; Kongsted, Jacob; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid mutations are of tremendous importance in modern clinical work, biotechnology and in fundamental studies of nucleic acids. Therefore, rapid, cost-effective and reliable detection of mutations is an object of extensive research. Today, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes are among the most often used tools for the detection of nucleic acids and in particular, for the detection of mutations. However, multiple parameters must be taken into account in order to create efficient FRET probes that are sensitive to nucleic acid mutations. In this review; we focus on the design principles for such probes and available computational methods that allow for their rational design. Applications of advanced, rationally designed FRET probes range from new insights into cellular heterogeneity to gaining new knowledge of nucleic acid structures directly in living cells. PMID:27472344

  20. Revealing Nucleic Acid Mutations Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Probes.

    PubMed

    Junager, Nina P L; Kongsted, Jacob; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid mutations are of tremendous importance in modern clinical work, biotechnology and in fundamental studies of nucleic acids. Therefore, rapid, cost-effective and reliable detection of mutations is an object of extensive research. Today, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes are among the most often used tools for the detection of nucleic acids and in particular, for the detection of mutations. However, multiple parameters must be taken into account in order to create efficient FRET probes that are sensitive to nucleic acid mutations. In this review; we focus on the design principles for such probes and available computational methods that allow for their rational design. Applications of advanced, rationally designed FRET probes range from new insights into cellular heterogeneity to gaining new knowledge of nucleic acid structures directly in living cells.

  1. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis of Amino Acids for Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie; Elsila, Jamie E.; Stern J. C.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2008-01-01

    Significant portions of the early Earth's prebiotic organic inventory , including amino acids, could have been delivered to the Earth's sur face by comets and their fragments. Analysis of comets via spectrosc opic observations has identified many organic molecules, including me thane, ethane, arnmonia, cyanic acid, formaldehyde, formamide, acetal ehyde, acetonitrile, and methanol. Reactions between these identifie d molecules could allow the formation of more complex organics such a s amino acids. Isotopic analysis could reveal whether an extraterrest rial signature is present in the Stardust-exposed amines and amino ac ids. Although bulk isotopic analysis would be dominated by the EACA contaminant's terrestrial signature, compoundspecific isotope analysi s (CSIA) could determine the signature of each of the other individua l amines. Here, we report on progress made towards CSIA of the amino acids glycine and EACA in Stardustreturned samples.

  2. [Metabolomics analysis revealing multiple compounds changed in rhubarb after processing].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Zhang, Xiao-Zhe; Hu, Chang-Jiang; Jia, Tian-Zhu; Xiao, Hong-Bin

    2014-05-01

    Untargeted metabolomics analysis of rhubarb and stewed rhubarb samples shows that the determined samples clearly clustered in to two groups, indicating that the processing procedures caused changes in the composition and/or content of components in rhubarb. Ten components were identified by UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS and references, which intensity declined in rhubarb after processing. Targeted metabolomics analysis of rhubarb and stewed rhubarb samples indicated that aloe-emodin, rhein, emodin and physcion were detected with lower intensity in stewed rhubarb samples than in rhubarb samples. Metabolomics analysis of rhubarb and stewed rhubarb indicated the various components of rhubarb changed after processing.

  3. Competitive market analysis can reveal your core costs.

    PubMed

    1999-07-01

    Peeling away layers of structure and exposing core costs allows provider groups to stay nimble in the marketplace. That's the value of a market performance analysis developed by a national consultant.

  4. Using quantitative acid-base analysis in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, P; Freebairn, R

    2006-03-01

    The quantitative acid-base 'Strong Ion' calculator is a practical application of quantitative acid-base chemistry, as developed by Peter Stewart and Peter Constable. It quantifies the three independent factors that control acidity, calculates the concentration and charge of unmeasured ions, produces a report based on these calculations and displays a Gamblegram depicting measured ionic species. Used together with the medical history, quantitative acid-base analysis has advantages over traditional approaches.

  5. Molecular annotation of ketol-acid reductoisomerases from Streptomyces reveals a novel amino acid biosynthesis interlock mediated by enzyme promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Verdel-Aranda, Karina; López-Cortina, Susana T; Hodgson, David A; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase superfamily oxidize and reduce a wide range of substrates, making their functional annotation challenging. Ketol-acid reductoisomerase (KARI), encoded by the ilvC gene in branched-chain amino acids biosynthesis, is a promiscuous reductase enzyme within this superfamily. Here, we obtain steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters for 10 IlvC homologues from the genera Streptomyces and Corynebacterium, upon eight selected chemically diverse substrates, including some not normally recognized by enzymes of this superfamily. This biochemical data suggested a Streptomyces biosynthetic interlock between proline and the branched-chain amino acids, mediated by enzyme substrate promiscuity, which was confirmed via mutagenesis and complementation analyses of the proC, ilvC1 and ilvC2 genes in Streptomyces coelicolor. Moreover, both ilvC orthologues and paralogues were analysed, such that the relationship between gene duplication and functional diversification could be explored. The KARI paralogues present in S. coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans, despite their conserved high sequence identity (97%), were shown to be more promiscuous, suggesting a recent functional diversification. In contrast, the KARI paralogue from Streptomyces viridifaciens showed selectivity towards the synthesis of valine precursors, explaining its recruitment within the biosynthetic gene cluster of valanimycin. These results allowed us to assess substrate promiscuity indices as a tool to annotate new molecular functions with metabolic implications. PMID:25296650

  6. Analysis of issues concerning acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, C.A.

    1984-12-11

    Although science has largely determined that man-made emissions cause acid rain, there is uncertainty concerning the extent and timing of its anticipated effects. Thus, at the present time scientific information alone does not lead unequivocally to a conclusion on whether it is appropriate to begin control actions now or to await better understanding. Given this uncertainty, decisionmakers must weigh the risks of further, potentially avoidable environmental damage against the risks of economic impacts from acid rain control actions which may ultimately prove to be unwarranted. GAO examines the implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain and offers a series of observations on the following issues involved in the debate: To what extent has it been scientifically demonstrated that acid rain is resulting in damage to the environment. What are the causes of acid rain and where is it most prevalent. What alternatives exist for controlling acid rain and what are their economic effects. 5 figures, 20 tables.

  7. Trophic Hierarchies Illuminated via Amino Acid Isotopic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Steffan, Shawn A.; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Horton, David R.; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Singleton, Merritt E.; Miliczky, Eugene; Hogg, David B.; Jones, Vincent P.

    2013-01-01

    Food web ecologists have long sought to characterize the trophic niches of animals using stable isotopic analysis. However, distilling trophic position from isotopic composition has been difficult, largely because of the variability associated with trophic discrimination factors (inter-trophic isotopic fractionation and routing). We circumvented much of this variability using compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA). We examined the 15N signatures of amino acids extracted from organisms reared in pure culture at four discrete trophic levels, across two model communities. We calculated the degree of enrichment at each trophic level and found there was a consistent trophic discrimination factor (~7.6‰). The constancy of the CSIA-derived discrimination factor permitted unprecedented accuracy in the measurement of animal trophic position. Conversely, trophic position estimates generated via bulk-15N analysis significantly underestimated trophic position, particularly among higher-order consumers. We then examined the trophic hierarchy of a free-roaming arthropod community, revealing the highest trophic position (5.07) and longest food chain ever reported using CSIA. High accuracy in trophic position estimation brings trophic function into sharper focus, providing greater resolution to the analysis of food webs. PMID:24086703

  8. Metatranscriptome analysis reveals host-microbiome interactions in traps of carnivorous Genlisea species

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hieu X.; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Pecinka, Ales; Schubert, Ingo; Vu, Giang T. H.

    2015-01-01

    In the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea a unique lobster pot trapping mechanism supplements nutrition in nutrient-poor habitats. A wide spectrum of microbes frequently occurs in Genlisea's leaf-derived traps without clear relevance for Genlisea carnivory. We sequenced the metatranscriptomes of subterrestrial traps vs. the aerial chlorophyll-containing leaves of G. nigrocaulis and of G. hispidula. Ribosomal RNA assignment revealed soil-borne microbial diversity in Genlisea traps, with 92 genera of 19 phyla present in more than one sample. Microbes from 16 of these phyla including proteobacteria, green algae, amoebozoa, fungi, ciliates and metazoans, contributed additionally short-lived mRNA to the metatranscriptome. Furthermore, transcripts of 438 members of hydrolases (e.g., proteases, phosphatases, lipases), mainly resembling those of metazoans, ciliates and green algae, were found. Compared to aerial leaves, Genlisea traps displayed a transcriptional up-regulation of endogenous NADH oxidases generating reactive oxygen species as well as of acid phosphatases for prey digestion. A leaf-vs.-trap transcriptome comparison reflects that carnivory provides inorganic P- and different forms of N-compounds (ammonium, nitrate, amino acid, oligopeptides) and implies the need to protect trap cells against oxidative stress. The analysis elucidates a complex food web inside the Genlisea traps, and suggests ecological relationships between this plant genus and its entrapped microbiome. PMID:26236284

  9. Metatranscriptome analysis reveals host-microbiome interactions in traps of carnivorous Genlisea species.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hieu X; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Pecinka, Ales; Schubert, Ingo; Vu, Giang T H

    2015-01-01

    In the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea a unique lobster pot trapping mechanism supplements nutrition in nutrient-poor habitats. A wide spectrum of microbes frequently occurs in Genlisea's leaf-derived traps without clear relevance for Genlisea carnivory. We sequenced the metatranscriptomes of subterrestrial traps vs. the aerial chlorophyll-containing leaves of G. nigrocaulis and of G. hispidula. Ribosomal RNA assignment revealed soil-borne microbial diversity in Genlisea traps, with 92 genera of 19 phyla present in more than one sample. Microbes from 16 of these phyla including proteobacteria, green algae, amoebozoa, fungi, ciliates and metazoans, contributed additionally short-lived mRNA to the metatranscriptome. Furthermore, transcripts of 438 members of hydrolases (e.g., proteases, phosphatases, lipases), mainly resembling those of metazoans, ciliates and green algae, were found. Compared to aerial leaves, Genlisea traps displayed a transcriptional up-regulation of endogenous NADH oxidases generating reactive oxygen species as well as of acid phosphatases for prey digestion. A leaf-vs.-trap transcriptome comparison reflects that carnivory provides inorganic P- and different forms of N-compounds (ammonium, nitrate, amino acid, oligopeptides) and implies the need to protect trap cells against oxidative stress. The analysis elucidates a complex food web inside the Genlisea traps, and suggests ecological relationships between this plant genus and its entrapped microbiome.

  10. Genetic analysis of paramyxovirus isolates from pacific salmon reveals two independently co-circulating lineages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, W.N.; Falk, K.; Winton, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Viruses with the morphological and biochemical characteristics of the family Paramyxoviridae (paramyxoviruses) have been isolated from adult salmon returning to rivers along the Pacific coast of North America since 1982. These Pacific salmon paramyxoviruses (PSPV), which have mainly been isolated from Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, grow slowly in established fish cell lines and have not been associated with disease. Genetic analysis of a 505-base-pair region of the polymerase gene from 47 PsPV isolates produced 17 nucleotide sequence types that could be grouped into two major sublineages, designated A and B. The two independently co-circulating sublineages differed by 12.1-13.9% at the nucleotide level but by only 1.2% at the amino acid level. Isolates of PSPV from adult Pacific salmon returning to rivers from Alaska to California over a 25-year period showed little evidence of geographic or temporal grouping. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that these paramyxoviruses of Pacific salmon were most closely related to the Atlantic salmon paramyxovirus (ASPV) from Norway, having a maximum nucleotide diversity of 26.1 % and an amino acid diversity of 19.0%. When compared with homologous sequences of other paramyxoviruses, PSPV and ASPV were sufficiently distinct to suggest that they are not clearly members of any of the established genera in the family Paramyxoviridae. in the course of this study, a polymerase chain reaction assay was developed that can be used for confirmatory identification of PSPV. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  11. Metatranscriptome analysis reveals host-microbiome interactions in traps of carnivorous Genlisea species.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hieu X; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Pecinka, Ales; Schubert, Ingo; Vu, Giang T H

    2015-01-01

    In the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea a unique lobster pot trapping mechanism supplements nutrition in nutrient-poor habitats. A wide spectrum of microbes frequently occurs in Genlisea's leaf-derived traps without clear relevance for Genlisea carnivory. We sequenced the metatranscriptomes of subterrestrial traps vs. the aerial chlorophyll-containing leaves of G. nigrocaulis and of G. hispidula. Ribosomal RNA assignment revealed soil-borne microbial diversity in Genlisea traps, with 92 genera of 19 phyla present in more than one sample. Microbes from 16 of these phyla including proteobacteria, green algae, amoebozoa, fungi, ciliates and metazoans, contributed additionally short-lived mRNA to the metatranscriptome. Furthermore, transcripts of 438 members of hydrolases (e.g., proteases, phosphatases, lipases), mainly resembling those of metazoans, ciliates and green algae, were found. Compared to aerial leaves, Genlisea traps displayed a transcriptional up-regulation of endogenous NADH oxidases generating reactive oxygen species as well as of acid phosphatases for prey digestion. A leaf-vs.-trap transcriptome comparison reflects that carnivory provides inorganic P- and different forms of N-compounds (ammonium, nitrate, amino acid, oligopeptides) and implies the need to protect trap cells against oxidative stress. The analysis elucidates a complex food web inside the Genlisea traps, and suggests ecological relationships between this plant genus and its entrapped microbiome. PMID:26236284

  12. Phosphoproteomic analysis of differentiating Leishmania parasites reveals a unique stage-specific phosphorylation motif.

    PubMed

    Tsigankov, Polina; Gherardini, Pier Federico; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Späth, Gerald F; Zilberstein, Dan

    2013-07-01

    Protists of the genus Leishmania are obligatory intracellular parasites that cause a wide range of cutaneous, mucocutaneous, and visceral diseases in humans. They cycle between phagolysosomes of mammalian macrophages and the sand fly midgut, proliferating as intracellular amastigotes and extracellular promastigotes, respectively. Exposure to a lysosomal environment, i.e. acidic pH and body temperature, signals promastigotes to differentiate into amastigotes. Time course analyses indicated that Leishmania differentiation is a highly regulated and coordinated process. However, the role of posttranslational events such as protein phosphorylation in this process is still unknown. Herein, we analyzed and compared the phosphoproteomes of L. donovani amastigotes and promastigotes using an axenic host-free system that simulates parasite differentiation. Shotgun phosphopeptide analysis revealed 1614 phosphorylation residues (p-sites) corresponding to 627 proteins. The analysis indicated that the majority of the p-sites are stage-specific. Serine phosphorylation in a previously identified trypanosomatid-specific "SF" motif was significantly enriched in amastigotes. We identified a few phosophotyrosines (pY), mostly in proteins known to participate in signal transduction pathways. The analysis indicated that Leishmania contains proteins with multiple p-sites that are phosphorylated at distinct stages of the life cycle. For over half of the phosphorylation events, changes in phosphoprotein abundance did not positively correlate with changes in protein abundance, suggesting functional regulation. This study compares, for the first time, the phosphoproteins of L. donovani axenic promastigotes and amastigotes and provides the largest data set of the Leishmania phosphoproteome to date.

  13. Subfield profitability analysis reveals an economic case for cropland diversification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, E.; McNunn, G. S.; Schulte, L. A.; Bonner, I. J.; Muth, D. J.; Babcock, B. A.; Sharma, B.; Heaton, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Public agencies and private enterprises increasingly desire to achieve ecosystem service outcomes in agricultural systems, but are limited by perceived conflicts between economic and ecosystem service goals and a lack of tools enabling effective operational management. Here we use Iowa—an agriculturally homogeneous state representative of the Maize Belt—to demonstrate an economic rationale for cropland diversification at the subfield scale. We used a novel computational framework that integrates disparate but publicly available data to map ˜3.3 million unique potential management polygons (9.3 Mha) and reveal subfield opportunities to increase overall field profitability. We analyzed subfield profitability for maize/soybean fields during 2010-2013—four of the most profitable years in recent history—and projected results for 2015. While cropland operating at a loss of US 250 ha-1 or more was negligible between 2010 and 2013 at 18 000-190 000 ha (<2% of row-crop land), the extent of highly unprofitable land increased to 2.5 Mha, or 27% of row-crop land, in the 2015 projection. Aggregation of these areas to the township level revealed ‘hotspots’ for potential management change in Western, Central, and Northeast Iowa. In these least profitable areas, incorporating conservation management that breaks even (e.g., planting low-input perennials), into low-yielding portions of fields could increase overall cropland profitability by 80%. This approach is applicable to the broader region and differs substantially from the status quo of ‘top-down’ land management for conservation by harnessing private interest to align profitability with the production of ecosystem services.

  14. Freud's analysis of Ferenczi as revealed by their correspondence.

    PubMed

    Dupont, J

    1994-04-01

    The relationship between Freud and Ferenczi was a very intimate one. Nevertheless--or consequently--when Ferenczi decided to undergo his own analysis, he couldn't imagine anyone other then Freud as his analyst. This remained true in spite of Freud's clearly expressed reluctance to analyse Ferenczi. The analysis stimulated very intense and passionate transference feelings in Ferenczi. In response, Freud desperately tried to cool down the situation, apparently by trying to keep things on an intellectual level. This analysis, carried out in three brief sections, was interrupted the first time by the beginning of World War I, the second time because the time planned for the analysis was over, and the final time because Freud obviously felt that it could not go further and considered it 'finished', even if not 'terminated'. It left unresolved a great part of the father-son relationship in both the transference and in the countertransference (Nemes, 1988). According to Ferenczi, Freud failed to analyse his negative transference. I would add the supposition that Freud also ignored his negative countertransference. This analytic experience certainly added to the complexity of their subsequent relationship, in spite of the warm feelings between them and the permanence of their friendship. Indications of that complexity can be found in the writings of both men.

  15. Structural Analysis of an Evolved Transketolase Reveals Divergent Binding Modes

    PubMed Central

    Affaticati, Pierre E.; Dai, Shao-Bo; Payongsri, Panwajee; Hailes, Helen C.; Tittmann, Kai; Dalby, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    The S385Y/D469T/R520Q variant of E. coli transketolase was evolved previously with three successive smart libraries, each guided by different structural, bioinformatical or computational methods. Substrate-walking progressively shifted the target acceptor substrate from phosphorylated aldehydes, towards a non-phosphorylated polar aldehyde, a non-polar aliphatic aldehyde, and finally a non-polar aromatic aldehyde. Kinetic evaluations on three benzaldehyde derivatives, suggested that their active-site binding was differentially sensitive to the S385Y mutation. Docking into mutants generated in silico from the wild-type crystal structure was not wholly satisfactory, as errors accumulated with successive mutations, and hampered further smart-library designs. Here we report the crystal structure of the S385Y/D469T/R520Q variant, and molecular docking of three substrates. This now supports our original hypothesis that directed-evolution had generated an evolutionary intermediate with divergent binding modes for the three aromatic aldehydes tested. The new active site contained two binding pockets supporting π-π stacking interactions, sterically separated by the D469T mutation. While 3-formylbenzoic acid (3-FBA) preferred one pocket, and 4-FBA the other, the less well-accepted substrate 3-hydroxybenzaldehyde (3-HBA) was caught in limbo with equal preference for the two pockets. This work highlights the value of obtaining crystal structures of evolved enzyme variants, for continued and reliable use of smart library strategies. PMID:27767080

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of the oleaginous microalga Neochloris oleoabundans reveals metabolic insights into triacylglyceride accumulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The lack of sequenced genomes for oleaginous microalgae limits our understanding of the mechanisms these organisms utilize to become enriched in triglycerides. Here we report the de novo transcriptome assembly and quantitative gene expression analysis of the oleaginous microalga Neochloris oleoabundans, with a focus on the complex interaction of pathways associated with the production of the triacylglycerol (TAG) biofuel precursor. Results After growth under nitrogen replete and nitrogen limiting conditions, we quantified the cellular content of major biomolecules including total lipids, triacylglycerides, starch, protein, and chlorophyll. Transcribed genes were sequenced, the transcriptome was assembled de novo, and the expression of major functional categories, relevant pathways, and important genes was quantified through the mapping of reads to the transcriptome. Over 87 million, 77 base pair high quality reads were produced on the Illumina HiSeq sequencing platform. Metabolite measurements supported by genes and pathway expression results indicated that under the nitrogen-limiting condition, carbon is partitioned toward triglyceride production, which increased fivefold over the nitrogen-replete control. In addition to the observed overexpression of the fatty acid synthesis pathway, TAG production during nitrogen limitation was bolstered by repression of the β-oxidation pathway, up-regulation of genes encoding for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex which funnels acetyl-CoA to lipid biosynthesis, activation of the pentose phosphate pathway to supply reducing equivalents to inorganic nitrogen assimilation and fatty acid biosynthesis, and the up-regulation of lipases—presumably to reconstruct cell membranes in order to supply additional fatty acids for TAG biosynthesis. Conclusions Our quantitative transcriptome study reveals a broad overview of how nitrogen stress results in excess TAG production in N. oleoabundans, and provides a variety of genetic

  17. An evolutionary analysis of flightin reveals a conserved motif unique and widespread in Pancrustacea.

    PubMed

    Soto-Adames, Felipe N; Alvarez-Ortiz, Pedro; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2014-01-01

    Flightin is a thick filament protein that in Drosophila melanogaster is uniquely expressed in the asynchronous, indirect flight muscles (IFM). Flightin is required for the structure and function of the IFM and is indispensable for flight in Drosophila. Given the importance of flight acquisition in the evolutionary history of insects, here we study the phylogeny and distribution of flightin. Flightin was identified in 69 species of hexapods in classes Collembola (springtails), Protura, Diplura, and insect orders Thysanura (silverfish), Dictyoptera (roaches), Orthoptera (grasshoppers), Pthiraptera (lice), Hemiptera (true bugs), Coleoptera (beetles), Neuroptera (green lacewing), Hymenoptera (bees, ants, and wasps), Lepidoptera (moths), and Diptera (flies and mosquitoes). Flightin was also found in 14 species of crustaceans in orders Anostraca (water flea), Cladocera (brine shrimp), Isopoda (pill bugs), Amphipoda (scuds, sideswimmers), and Decapoda (lobsters, crabs, and shrimps). Flightin was not identified in representatives of chelicerates, myriapods, or any species outside Pancrustacea (Tetraconata, sensu Dohle). Alignment of amino acid sequences revealed a conserved region of 52 amino acids, referred herein as WYR, that is bound by strictly conserved tryptophan (W) and arginine (R) and an intervening sequence with a high content of tyrosines (Y). This motif has no homologs in GenBank or PROSITE and is unique to flightin and paraflightin, a putative flightin paralog identified in decapods. A third motif of unclear affinities to pancrustacean WYR was observed in chelicerates. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of the conserved motif suggests that paraflightin originated before the divergence of amphipods, isopods, and decapods. We conclude that flightin originated de novo in the ancestor of Pancrustacea > 500 MYA, well before the divergence of insects (~400 MYA) and the origin of flight (~325 MYA), and that its IFM-specific function in Drosophila is a more

  18. An evolutionary analysis of flightin reveals a conserved motif unique and widespread in Pancrustacea.

    PubMed

    Soto-Adames, Felipe N; Alvarez-Ortiz, Pedro; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2014-01-01

    Flightin is a thick filament protein that in Drosophila melanogaster is uniquely expressed in the asynchronous, indirect flight muscles (IFM). Flightin is required for the structure and function of the IFM and is indispensable for flight in Drosophila. Given the importance of flight acquisition in the evolutionary history of insects, here we study the phylogeny and distribution of flightin. Flightin was identified in 69 species of hexapods in classes Collembola (springtails), Protura, Diplura, and insect orders Thysanura (silverfish), Dictyoptera (roaches), Orthoptera (grasshoppers), Pthiraptera (lice), Hemiptera (true bugs), Coleoptera (beetles), Neuroptera (green lacewing), Hymenoptera (bees, ants, and wasps), Lepidoptera (moths), and Diptera (flies and mosquitoes). Flightin was also found in 14 species of crustaceans in orders Anostraca (water flea), Cladocera (brine shrimp), Isopoda (pill bugs), Amphipoda (scuds, sideswimmers), and Decapoda (lobsters, crabs, and shrimps). Flightin was not identified in representatives of chelicerates, myriapods, or any species outside Pancrustacea (Tetraconata, sensu Dohle). Alignment of amino acid sequences revealed a conserved region of 52 amino acids, referred herein as WYR, that is bound by strictly conserved tryptophan (W) and arginine (R) and an intervening sequence with a high content of tyrosines (Y). This motif has no homologs in GenBank or PROSITE and is unique to flightin and paraflightin, a putative flightin paralog identified in decapods. A third motif of unclear affinities to pancrustacean WYR was observed in chelicerates. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of the conserved motif suggests that paraflightin originated before the divergence of amphipods, isopods, and decapods. We conclude that flightin originated de novo in the ancestor of Pancrustacea > 500 MYA, well before the divergence of insects (~400 MYA) and the origin of flight (~325 MYA), and that its IFM-specific function in Drosophila is a more

  19. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm.

  20. Proteomics-Based Metabolic Modeling Reveals That Fatty Acid Oxidation (FAO) Controls Endothelial Cell (EC) Permeability*

    PubMed Central

    Patella, Francesca; Schug, Zachary T.; Persi, Erez; Neilson, Lisa J.; Erami, Zahra; Avanzato, Daniele; Maione, Federica; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R.; Mackay, Gillian; Zheng, Liang; Reid, Steven; Frezza, Christian; Giraudo, Enrico; Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Anderson, Kurt; Ruppin, Eytan; Gottlieb, Eyal; Zanivan, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) play a key role to maintain the functionality of blood vessels. Altered EC permeability causes severe impairment in vessel stability and is a hallmark of pathologies such as cancer and thrombosis. Integrating label-free quantitative proteomics data into genome-wide metabolic modeling, we built up a model that predicts the metabolic fluxes in ECs when cultured on a tridimensional matrix and organize into a vascular-like network. We discovered how fatty acid oxidation increases when ECs are assembled into a fully formed network that can be disrupted by inhibiting CPT1A, the fatty acid oxidation rate-limiting enzyme. Acute CPT1A inhibition reduces cellular ATP levels and oxygen consumption, which are restored by replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Remarkably, global phosphoproteomic changes measured upon acute CPT1A inhibition pinpointed altered calcium signaling. Indeed, CPT1A inhibition increases intracellular calcium oscillations. Finally, inhibiting CPT1A induces hyperpermeability in vitro and leakage of blood vessel in vivo, which were restored blocking calcium influx or replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fatty acid oxidation emerges as central regulator of endothelial functions and blood vessel stability and druggable pathway to control pathological vascular permeability. PMID:25573745

  1. Penicillium simile sp. nov. revealed by morphological and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Davolos, Domenico; Pietrangeli, Biancamaria; Persiani, Anna Maria; Maggi, Oriana

    2012-02-01

    The morphology of three phenetically identical Penicillium isolates, collected from the bioaerosol in a restoration laboratory in Italy, displayed macro- and microscopic characteristics that were similar though not completely ascribable to Penicillium raistrickii. For this reason, a phylogenetic approach based on DNA sequencing analysis was performed to establish both the taxonomic status and the evolutionary relationships of these three peculiar isolates in relation to previously described species of the genus Penicillium. We used four nuclear loci (both rRNA and protein coding genes) that have previously proved useful for the molecular investigation of taxa belonging to the genus Penicillium at various evolutionary levels. The internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2), domains D1 and D2 of the 28S rDNA, a region of the tubulin beta chain gene (benA) and part of the calmodulin gene (cmd) were amplified by PCR and sequenced. Analysis of the rRNA genes and of the benA and cmd sequence data indicates the presence of three isogenic isolates belonging to a genetically distinct species of the genus Penicillium, here described and named Penicillium simile sp. nov. (ATCC MYA-4591(T)  = CBS 129191(T)). This novel species is phylogenetically different from P. raistrickii and other related species of the genus Penicillium (e.g. Penicillium scabrosum), from which it can be distinguished on the basis of morphological trait analysis.

  2. Penicillium simile sp. nov. revealed by morphological and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Davolos, Domenico; Pietrangeli, Biancamaria; Persiani, Anna Maria; Maggi, Oriana

    2012-02-01

    The morphology of three phenetically identical Penicillium isolates, collected from the bioaerosol in a restoration laboratory in Italy, displayed macro- and microscopic characteristics that were similar though not completely ascribable to Penicillium raistrickii. For this reason, a phylogenetic approach based on DNA sequencing analysis was performed to establish both the taxonomic status and the evolutionary relationships of these three peculiar isolates in relation to previously described species of the genus Penicillium. We used four nuclear loci (both rRNA and protein coding genes) that have previously proved useful for the molecular investigation of taxa belonging to the genus Penicillium at various evolutionary levels. The internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2), domains D1 and D2 of the 28S rDNA, a region of the tubulin beta chain gene (benA) and part of the calmodulin gene (cmd) were amplified by PCR and sequenced. Analysis of the rRNA genes and of the benA and cmd sequence data indicates the presence of three isogenic isolates belonging to a genetically distinct species of the genus Penicillium, here described and named Penicillium simile sp. nov. (ATCC MYA-4591(T)  = CBS 129191(T)). This novel species is phylogenetically different from P. raistrickii and other related species of the genus Penicillium (e.g. Penicillium scabrosum), from which it can be distinguished on the basis of morphological trait analysis. PMID:21460135

  3. Integrative network analysis reveals molecular mechanisms of blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Huan, Tianxiao; Meng, Qingying; Saleh, Mohamed A; Norlander, Allison E; Joehanes, Roby; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Brian H; Zhang, Bin; Johnson, Andrew D; Ying, Saixia; Courchesne, Paul; Raghavachari, Nalini; Wang, Richard; Liu, Poching; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Vasan, Ramachandran; Munson, Peter J; Madhur, Meena S; Harrison, David G; Yang, Xia; Levy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous loci associated with blood pressure (BP). The molecular mechanisms underlying BP regulation, however, remain unclear. We investigated BP-associated molecular mechanisms by integrating BP GWAS with whole blood mRNA expression profiles in 3,679 individuals, using network approaches. BP transcriptomic signatures at the single-gene and the coexpression network module levels were identified. Four coexpression modules were identified as potentially causal based on genetic inference because expression-related SNPs for their corresponding genes demonstrated enrichment for BP GWAS signals. Genes from the four modules were further projected onto predefined molecular interaction networks, revealing key drivers. Gene subnetworks entailing molecular interactions between key drivers and BP-related genes were uncovered. As proof-of-concept, we validated SH2B3, one of the top key drivers, using Sh2b3(-/-) mice. We found that a significant number of genes predicted to be regulated by SH2B3 in gene networks are perturbed in Sh2b3(-/-) mice, which demonstrate an exaggerated pressor response to angiotensin II infusion. Our findings may help to identify novel targets for the prevention or treatment of hypertension.

  4. Integrative network analysis reveals molecular mechanisms of blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Huan, Tianxiao; Meng, Qingying; Saleh, Mohamed A; Norlander, Allison E; Joehanes, Roby; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Brian H; Zhang, Bin; Johnson, Andrew D; Ying, Saixia; Courchesne, Paul; Raghavachari, Nalini; Wang, Richard; Liu, Poching; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Vasan, Ramachandran; Munson, Peter J; Madhur, Meena S; Harrison, David G; Yang, Xia; Levy, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous loci associated with blood pressure (BP). The molecular mechanisms underlying BP regulation, however, remain unclear. We investigated BP-associated molecular mechanisms by integrating BP GWAS with whole blood mRNA expression profiles in 3,679 individuals, using network approaches. BP transcriptomic signatures at the single-gene and the coexpression network module levels were identified. Four coexpression modules were identified as potentially causal based on genetic inference because expression-related SNPs for their corresponding genes demonstrated enrichment for BP GWAS signals. Genes from the four modules were further projected onto predefined molecular interaction networks, revealing key drivers. Gene subnetworks entailing molecular interactions between key drivers and BP-related genes were uncovered. As proof-of-concept, we validated SH2B3, one of the top key drivers, using Sh2b3−/− mice. We found that a significant number of genes predicted to be regulated by SH2B3 in gene networks are perturbed in Sh2b3−/− mice, which demonstrate an exaggerated pressor response to angiotensin II infusion. Our findings may help to identify novel targets for the prevention or treatment of hypertension.

  5. Tremor patches in Cascadia revealed by seismic array analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Vidale, John E.; Sweet, Justin R.; Creager, Kenneth C.; Wech, Aaron G.

    2009-09-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events in Cascadia have recently been observed, illuminating the general area that radiates seismic energy in the form of non-volcanic tremor (NVT). However, the picture of the ETS zone remains fuzzy because of difficulties in tremor detection and location. To observe the intimate details of tremor, we deployed a dense 84-element small-aperture seismic array on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, above the tremor migration path. It recorded the main ETS event in May 2008, as well as a weaker tremor episode two months earlier. Using a beamforming technique, we are able to capture and track tremor activity with an unprecedented resolution from southern Puget Sound to the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The array technique reveals up to four times more duration of tremor compared to the conventional envelope cross-correlation method. Our findings suggest that NVT is not uniformly distributed on the subduction interface, and unveils several distinct patches that release much of the tremor moment. The patches appear to be devoid of ordinary earthquakes, and may indicate the heterogeneity in fault strength that affects the modes of stress release within the ETS zone.

  6. Multiple etiologies for Alzheimer disease are revealed by segregation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.S.; Connor-Lacke, L.; Cupplies, L.A.; Growdon, J.H.; Farrer, L.A.; Duijn, C.M. van

    1994-11-01

    We have evaluated several transmission models for Alzheimer disease (AD), using the logistic regressive approach in 401 nuclear families of consecutively ascertained and rigorously diagnosed probands. Models postulating no major gene effect, random environmental transmission, recessive inheritance, and sporadic occurrence were rejected under varied assumptions regarding the associations among sex, age, and major gene susceptibility. Transmission of the disorder was not fully explained by a single Mendelian model for all families. Stratification of families as early- and late-onset by using the median of family mean onset ages showed that, regardless of the model studied, two groups of families fit better than a single group. AD in early-onset families is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with full penetrance in both sexes and has a gene frequency of 1.5%. Dominant inheritance also gave the best fit of the data in late-onset families, but this hypothesis was rejected, suggesting the presence of heterogeneity within this subset. Our study also revealed that genetically nonsusceptible males and females develop AD, indicating the presence of phenocopies within early-onset and late-onset groups. Moreover, our results suggest that the higher risk to females is not solely due to their increased longevity. 50 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Hylocereus polyrhizus Reveals Metabolic Pathway Changes

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Qingzhu; Zhou, Qianjun; Gan, Susheng; Wu, Jingyu; Chen, Canbin; Li, Jiaqiang; Ye, Yaoxiong; Zhao, Jietang; Hu, Guibing; Qin, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Red dragon fruit or red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is the only edible fruit that contains betalains. The color of betalains ranges from red and violet to yellow in plants. Betalains may also serve as an important component of health-promoting and disease-preventing functional food. Currently, the biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for betalain production remain to be fully deciphered. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analyses were used to reveal the molecular mechanism of betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus fruits at white and red pulp stages, respectively. A total of 1946 proteins were identified as the differentially expressed between the two samples, and 936 of them were significantly highly expressed at the red pulp stage of H. polyrhizus. RNA-seq and iTRAQ analyses showed that some transcripts and proteins were positively correlated; they belonged to “phenylpropanoid biosynthesis”, “tyrosine metabolism”, “flavonoid biosynthesis”, “ascorbate and aldarate metabolism”, “betalains biosynthesis” and “anthocyanin biosynthesis”. In betalains biosynthesis pathway, several proteins/enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase, CYP76AD3 and 4,5-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (DOPA) dioxygenase extradiol-like protein were identified. The present study provides a new insight into the molecular mechanism of the betalain biosynthesis at the posttranscriptional level. PMID:27690004

  8. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Novel RASSF2 Interaction Partners

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Thibaut; Wilkey, Daniel W.; Merchant, Michael L.; Clark, Jennifer A.; Donninger, Howard

    2016-01-01

    RASSF2 is a tumor suppressor that shares homology with other Ras-association domain (RASSF) family members. It is a powerful pro-apoptotic K-Ras effector that is frequently inactivated in many human tumors. The exact mechanism by which RASSF2 functions is not clearly defined, but it likely acts as a scaffolding protein, modulating the activity of other pro-apoptotic effectors, thereby regulating and integrating tumor suppressor pathways. However, only a limited number of RASSF2 interacting partners have been identified to date. We used a proteomics based approach to identify additional RASSF2 interactions, and thereby gain a better insight into the mechanism of action of RASSF2. We identified several proteins, including C1QBP, Vimentin, Protein phosphatase 1G and Ribonuclease inhibitor that function in diverse biological processes, including protein post-translational modifications, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cell migration and redox homeostasis, which have not previously been reported to interact with RASSF2. We independently validated two of these novel interactions, C1QBP and Vimentin and found that the interaction with C1QBP was enhanced by K-Ras whereas, interestingly, the Vimentin interaction was reduced by K-Ras. Additionally, RASSF2/K-Ras regulated the acetylation of Vimentin. Our data thus reveal novel mechanisms by which RASSF2 may exert its functions, several of which may be Ras-regulated. PMID:26999212

  9. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Previously Uncharacterized Virulence Factors in Vibrio proteolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Ann; Kinch, Lisa N.; de Souza Santos, Marcela; Grishin, Nick V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the genus Vibrio include many pathogens of humans and marine animals that share genetic information via horizontal gene transfer. Hence, the Vibrio pan-genome carries the potential to establish new pathogenic strains by sharing virulence determinants, many of which have yet to be characterized. Here, we investigated the virulence properties of Vibrio proteolyticus, a Gram-negative marine bacterium previously identified as part of the Vibrio consortium isolated from diseased corals. We found that V. proteolyticus causes actin cytoskeleton rearrangements followed by cell lysis in HeLa cells in a contact-independent manner. In search of the responsible virulence factor involved, we determined the V. proteolyticus secretome. This proteomics approach revealed various putative virulence factors, including active type VI secretion systems and effectors with virulence toxin domains; however, these type VI secretion systems were not responsible for the observed cytotoxic effects. Further examination of the V. proteolyticus secretome led us to hypothesize and subsequently demonstrate that a secreted hemolysin, belonging to a previously uncharacterized clan of the leukocidin superfamily, was the toxin responsible for the V. proteolyticus-mediated cytotoxicity in both HeLa cells and macrophages. Clearly, there remains an armory of yet-to-be-discovered virulence factors in the Vibrio pan-genome that will undoubtedly provide a wealth of knowledge on how a pathogen can manipulate host cells. PMID:27460800

  10. Gas chromatographic analysis of total fatty acids in cider.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Gomis, D; Alonso, J J; Cabrales, I M; Abrodo, P A

    2001-03-01

    This paper reports the composition of total fatty acids in an apple beverage, cider. Fatty acids are present in the free or esterified form and contribute to both the flavor and foam properties of cider. Fatty acids were separated and identified as methyl esters by GC-MS, and 12 of these were subsequently determined by GC-FID. The major fatty acids found in cider were caproic, caprylic, capric, and palmitic acid, the saturated acids predominating over the unsaturated ones. The proposed method was applied to 59 ciders from three consecutive harvests (1996, 1997, and 1998), which were made by 19 cider-makers from the region of Asturias (Spain). Linear discriminant analysis of fatty acids in these samples allowed selection of palmitoleic, pentadecanoic, linoleic, myristic, and linolenic acid as the most predictive variables to differentiate ciders made from apples grown in the Asturias region (1997 harvest) and ciders made from apples grown outside this region (1996 and 1998 harvests). PMID:11312846

  11. Salts of phenylacetic acid and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid with Cinchona alkaloids: Crystal structures, thermal analysis and FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amombo Noa, Francoise M.; Jacobs, Ayesha

    2016-06-01

    Seven salts were formed with phenylacetic acid (PAA), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPAA) and the Cinchona alkaloids; cinchonidine (CIND), quinidine (QUID) and quinine (QUIN). For all the structures the proton was transferred from the carboxylic acid of the PAA/HPAA to the quinuclidine nitrogen of the respective Cinchona alkaloid. For six of the salts, water was included in the crystal structures with one of these also incorporating an isopropanol solvent molecule. However HPAA co-crystallised with quinine to form an anhydrous salt, (HPAA-)(QUIN+). The thermal stability of the salts were determined and differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the (HPAA-)(QUIN+) salt had the highest thermal stability compared to the other salt hydrates. The salts were also characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. (PAA-)(QUID+)·H2O and (PAA-)(QUIN+)·H2O are isostructural and Hirshfeld surface analysis was completed to compare the intermolecular interactions in these two structures.

  12. Molecular analysis of Baylisascaris columnaris revealed mitochondrial and nuclear polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Baylisascaris species are intestinal nematodes of skunks, raccoons, badgers, and bears belonging to the genus Ascarididae. Oral uptake of embryonated Baylisascaris sp. eggs by a wide variety of mammals and birds can lead to visceral, ocular and neurological larva migrans. B. procyonis, the raccoon roundworm, is known to cause severe illness in intermediate hosts and in humans, whereas the skunk roundworm B. columnaris is probably less pathogenic. Skunks and raccoons are kept as pets in Europe, sometimes together with cats and dogs, living in close contact with humans. B. procyonis and B. columnaris are difficult to differentiate based on morphological criteria and molecular and phylogenetic information concerning B. columnaris is missing. This is the first study on the genetic characterisation of B. columnaris, based on mitochondrial and nuclear molecular markers. Methods B. columnaris worms were isolated from pet skunks, and used for molecular analysis. PCR primers targeted at mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 and 2 (CO1 and CO2), ribosomal ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and ribosomal 28S genes were used. DNA sequences from B. columnaris, B. procyonis and B. transfuga from bears were analysed by cluster analysis. Results Four different multi-locus genotypes were found in B. columnaris, based on 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and two insertions / deletions in CO1, CO2, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and 28S. Conclusions The genetic characteristics of B. columnaris show close resemblance to those of B. procyonis, but in contrast to B. procyonis, show several polymorphisms in both mitochondrial and nuclear markers. These polymorphisms could be used as a tool to differentiate B. columnaris from B. procyonis in molecular diagnostic assays, and to identify B. columnaris by PCR, in addition to or replacing morphometric analysis. This might lead to more insight into the zoonotic relevance of B. columnaris in humans. PMID:23627901

  13. Clostridium clariflavum: Key Cellulosome Players Are Revealed by Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Artzi, Lior; Morag, Ely; Barak, Yoav; Lamed, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium clariflavum is an anaerobic, cellulosome-forming thermophile, containing in its genome genes for a large number of cellulosomal enzyme and a complex scaffoldin system. Previously, we described the major cohesin-dockerin interactions of the cellulosome components, and on this basis a model of diverse cellulosome assemblies was derived. In this work, we cultivated C. clariflavum on cellobiose-, microcrystalline cellulose-, and switchgrass-containing media and isolated cell-free cellulosome complexes from each culture. Gel filtration separation of the cellulosome samples revealed two major fractions, which were analyzed by label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in order to identify the key players of the cellulosome assemblies therein. From the 13 scaffoldins present in the C. clariflavum genome, 11 were identified, and a variety of enzymes from different glycoside hydrolase and carbohydrate esterase families were identified, including the glycoside hydrolase families GH48, GH9, GH5, GH30, GH11, and GH10. The expression level of the cellulosomal proteins varied as a function of the carbon source used for cultivation of the bacterium. In addition, the catalytic activity of each cellulosome was examined on different cellulosic substrates, xylan and switchgrass. The cellulosome isolated from the microcrystalline cellulose-containing medium was the most active of all the cellulosomes that were tested. The results suggest that the expression of the cellulosome proteins is regulated by the type of substrate in the growth medium. Moreover, both cell-free and cell-bound cellulosome complexes were produced which together may degrade the substrate in a synergistic manner. These observations are compatible with our previously published model of cellulosome assemblies in this bacterium. PMID:25991683

  14. Analysis of Chlamydomonas thiamin metabolism in vivo reveals riboswitch plasticity.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Michael; Nguyen, Ginnie T D T; Scaife, Mark A; Smith, Alison G; Fitzpatrick, Teresa B

    2013-09-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1) is an essential micronutrient needed as a cofactor for many central metabolic enzymes. Animals must have thiamin in their diet, whereas bacteria, fungi, and plants can biosynthesize it de novo from the condensation of a thiazole and a pyrimidine moiety. Although the routes to biosynthesize these two heterocycles are not conserved in different organisms, in all cases exogenous thiamin represses expression of one or more of the biosynthetic pathway genes. One important mechanism for this control is via thiamin-pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitches, regions of the mRNA to which TPP can bind directly, thus facilitating fine-tuning to maintain homeostasis. However, there is little information on how modulation of riboswitches affects thiamin metabolism in vivo. Here we use the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which regulates both thiazole and pyrimidine biosynthesis with riboswitches in the THI4 (Thiamin 4) and THIC (Thiamin C) genes, respectively, to investigate this question. Our study reveals that regulation of thiamin metabolism is not the simple dogma of negative feedback control. Specifically, balancing the provision of both of the heterocycles of TPP appears to be an important requirement. Furthermore, we show that the Chlamydomonas THIC riboswitch is controlled by hydroxymethylpyrimidine pyrophosphate, as well as TPP, but with an identical alternative splicing mechanism. Similarly, the THI4 gene is responsive to thiazole. The study not only provides insight into the plasticity of the TPP riboswitches but also shows that their maintenance is likely to be a consequence of evolutionary need as a function of the organisms' environment and the particular pathway used.

  15. Network analysis reveals potential markers for pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Anurag; Suman, Shikha; Ranjan, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy with a poor outcome. Molecular mechanisms of pediatric ACC oncogenesis and advancement are not well understood. Accurate and timely diagnosis of the disease requires identification of new markers for pediatric ACC. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified from the gene expression profile of pediatric ACC and obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. Gene Ontology functional and pathway enrichment analysis was implemented to recognize the functions of DEGs. A protein–protein interaction (PPI) and gene–gene functional interaction (GGI) network of DEGs was constructed. Hub gene detection and enrichment analysis of functional modules were performed. Furthermore, a gene regulatory network incorporating DEGs–microRNAs–transcription factors was constructed and analyzed. A total of 431 DEGs including 228 upregulated and 203 downregulated DEGs were screened. These genes were largely involved in cell cycle, steroid biosynthesis, and p53 signaling pathways. Upregulated genes, CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B, were identified as the common hubs of PPI and GGI networks. All the four common hub genes were also part of modules of the PPI network. Moreover, all the four genes were also present in the largest module of GGI network. A gene regulatory network consisting of 82 microRNAs and 100 transcription factors was also constructed. CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B may serve as potential biomarker of pediatric ACC and as potential targets for therapeutic approach, although experimental studies are required to authenticate our findings. PMID:27555782

  16. Leukemia surfaceome analysis reveals new disease-associated features.

    PubMed

    Mirkowska, Paulina; Hofmann, Andreas; Sedek, Lukasz; Slamova, Lucie; Mejstrikova, Ester; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Schmitz, Maike; Cario, Gunnar; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; van der Velden, Vincent H J; Bornhauser, Beat C; Wollscheid, Bernd; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre

    2013-06-20

    A better description of the leukemia cell surface proteome (surfaceome) is a prerequisite for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Insights into the complexity of the surfaceome have been limited by the lack of suitable methodologies. We combined a leukemia xenograft model with the discovery-driven chemoproteomic Cell Surface Capture technology to explore the B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) surfaceome; 713 cell surface proteins, including 181 CD proteins, were detected through combined analysis of 19 BCP-ALL cases. Diagnostic immunophenotypes were recapitulated in each case, and subtype specific markers were detected. To identify new leukemia-associated markers, we filtered the surfaceome data set against gene expression information from sorted, normal hematopoietic cells. Nine candidate markers (CD18, CD63, CD31, CD97, CD102, CD157, CD217, CD305, and CD317) were validated by flow cytometry in patient samples at diagnosis and during chemotherapy. CD97, CD157, CD63, and CD305 accounted for the most informative differences between normal and malignant cells. The ALL surfaceome constitutes a valuable resource to assist the functional exploration of surface markers in normal and malignant lymphopoiesis. This unbiased approach will also contribute to the development of strategies that rely on complex information for multidimensional flow cytometry data analysis to improve its diagnostic applications. PMID:23649467

  17. Proteogenomic analysis reveals exosomes are more oncogenic than ectosomes.

    PubMed

    Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Gangoda, Lahiru; Liem, Michael; Fonseka, Pamali; Atukorala, Ishara; Ozcitti, Cemil; Mechler, Adam; Adda, Christopher G; Ang, Ching-Seng; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2015-06-20

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) include the exosomes (30-100 nm) that are produced through the endocytic pathway via the multivesicular bodies and the ectosomes (100-1000 nm) that are released through the budding of the plasma membrane. Despite the differences in the mode of biogenesis and size, reliable markers that can distinguish between exosomes and ectosomes are non-existent. Moreover, the precise functional differences between exosomes and ectosomes remains poorly characterised. Here, using label-free quantitative proteomics, we highlight proteins that could be exploited as markers to discriminate between exosomes and ectosomes. For the first time, a global proteogenomics analysis unveiled the secretion of mutant proteins that are implicated in cancer progression through tumor-derived EVs. Follow up integrated bioinformatics analysis highlighted the enrichment of oncogenic cargo in exosomes and ectosomes. Interestingly, exosomes induced significant cell proliferation and migration in recipient cells compared to ectosomes confirming the oncogenic nature of exosomes. These findings ascertain that cancer cells facilitate oncogenesis by the secretion of mutant and oncoproteins into the tumor microenvironment via exosomes and ectosomes. The integrative proteogenomics approach utilized in this study has the potential to identify disease biomarker candidates which can be later assayed in liquid biopsies obtained from cancer patients.

  18. Proteogenomic analysis reveals exosomes are more oncogenic than ectosomes

    PubMed Central

    Liem, Michael; Fonseka, Pamali; Atukorala, Ishara; Ozcitti, Cemil; Mechler, Adam; Adda, Christopher G.; Ang, Ching-Seng; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) include the exosomes (30-100 nm) that are produced through the endocytic pathway via the multivesicular bodies and the ectosomes (100-1000 nm) that are released through the budding of the plasma membrane. Despite the differences in the mode of biogenesis and size, reliable markers that can distinguish between exosomes and ectosomes are non-existent. Moreover, the precise functional differences between exosomes and ectosomes remains poorly characterised. Here, using label-free quantitative proteomics, we highlight proteins that could be exploited as markers to discriminate between exosomes and ectosomes. For the first time, a global proteogenomics analysis unveiled the secretion of mutant proteins that are implicated in cancer progression through tumor-derived EVs. Follow up integrated bioinformatics analysis highlighted the enrichment of oncogenic cargo in exosomes and ectosomes. Interestingly, exosomes induced significant cell proliferation and migration in recipient cells compared to ectosomes confirming the oncogenic nature of exosomes. These findings ascertain that cancer cells facilitate oncogenesis by the secretion of mutant and oncoproteins into the tumor microenvironment via exosomes and ectosomes. The integrative proteogenomics approach utilized in this study has the potential to identify disease biomarker candidates which can be later assayed in liquid biopsies obtained from cancer patients. PMID:25944692

  19. Modes of embayed beach dynamics: analysis reveals emergent timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, K. T.; Murray, A.; Limber, P. W.; Ells, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    Embayed beaches, or beaches positioned between rocky headlands, exhibit morphologic changes over many length and time scales. Beach sediment is transported as a result of the day-to-day wave forcing, causing patterns of erosion and accretion. We use the Rocky Coastline Evolution Model (RCEM) to investigate how patterns of shoreline change depend on wave climate (the distribution of wave-approach angles) and beach characteristics. Measuring changes in beach width through time allows us to track the evolution of the shape of the beach and the movement of sand within it. By using Principle Component Analysis (PCA), these changes can be categorized into modes, where the first few modes explain the majority of the variation in the time series. We analyze these modes and how they vary as a function of wave climate and headland/bay aspect ratio. In the purposefully simple RCEM, sediment transport is wave-driven and affected by wave shadowing behind the headlands. The rock elements in our model experiments (including the headlands) are fixed and unerodable so that this analysis can focus purely on sand dynamics between the headlands, without a sand contribution from the headlands or cliffs behind the beach. The wave climate is characterized by dictating the percentage of offshore waves arriving from the left and the percentage of waves arriving from high angles (very oblique to the coastline orientation). A high-angle dominated wave climate tends to amplify coastline perturbations, whereas a lower-angle wave climate is diffusive. By changing the headland/bay aspect ratio and wave climate, we can perform PCA analysis of generalized embayed beaches with differing anatomy and wave climate forcings. Previous work using PCA analysis of embayed beaches focused on specific locations and shorter timescales (<30 years; Short and Trembanis, 2004). By using the RCEM, we can more broadly characterize beach dynamics over longer timescales. The first two PCA modes, which explain a

  20. Genome-based metabolic mapping and 13C flux analysis reveal systematic properties of an oleaginous microalga Chlorella protothecoides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-02-01

    Integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and (13)C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass and corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary (13)C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. The result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Taken together, the metabolic network modeling assisted by experimental metabolomics and (13)C

  1. Genome-Based Metabolic Mapping and 13C Flux Analysis Reveal Systematic Properties of an Oleaginous Microalga Chlorella protothecoides

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2014-12-15

    We report that integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and 13C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass andmore » corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. We found that the result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Lastly, taken together, the metabolic network modeling assisted

  2. Extraterrestrial material analysis: loss of amino acids during liquid-phase acid hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Brault, Amaury; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Searching for building blocks of life in extraterrestrial material is a way to learn more about how life could have appeared on Earth. With this aim, liquid-phase acid hydrolysis has been used, since at least 1970 , in order to extract amino acids and other organic molecules from extraterrestrial materials (e.g. meteorites, lunar fines) or Earth analogues (e.g. Atacama desert soil). This procedure involves drastic conditions such as heating samples in 6N HCl for 24 h, either under inert atmosphere/vacuum, or air. Analysis of the hydrolyzed part of the sample should give its total (free plus bound) amino acid content. The present work deals with the influence of the 6N HCl hydrolysis on amino acid degradation. Our experiments have been performed on a standard solution of 17 amino acids. After liquid-phase acid hydrolysis (6N HCl) under argon atmosphere (24 h at 100°C), the liquid phase was evaporated and the dry residue was derivatized with N-Methyl-N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. After comparison with derivatized amino acids from the standard solution, a significant reduction of the chromatographic peak areas was observed for most of the amino acids after liquid-phase acid hydrolysis. Furthermore, the same loss pattern was observed when the amino acids were exposed to cold 6N HCl for a short amount of time. The least affected amino acid, i.e. glycine, was found to be 73,93% percent less abundant compared to the non-hydrolyzed standard, while the most affected, i.e. histidine, was not found in the chromatograms after hydrolysis. Our experiments thereby indicate that liquid-phase acid hydrolysis, even under inert atmosphere, leads to a partial or total loss of all of the 17 amino acids present in the standard solution, and that a quick cold contact with 6N HCl is sufficient to lead to a loss of amino acids. Therefore, in the literature, the reported increase

  3. C-1s NEXAFS spectroscopy reveals chemical fractionation of humic acid by cation-induced coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Christl,I.; Kretzschmar, R.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of cation-induced coagulation on the chemical composition of dissolved and coagulated fractions of humic acid was investigated in batch coagulation experiments for additions of aluminum at pH 4 and 5, iron at pH 4, and calcium and lead at pH 6. The partitioning of organic carbon and metals was determined by analyzing total organic carbon and total metal contents of the dissolved phase. Both the dissolved and the coagulated humic acid fractions were characterized using synchrotron scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and C-1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Intensities of {pi}* transitions of carboxyl carbon and {sigma}* transitions of alkyl, O-alkyl, and carboxyl carbon decreased with increasing metal concentration for the dissolved humic acid fractions. This decrease was accompanied by an increase of the respective intensities in the coagulated fraction as shown for lead. Intensities of aromatic and phenolic carbon were affected to a larger extent only by aluminum and iron additions. The changes observed in the C-1s NEXAFS spectra coincided with an increasing removal of organic carbon from the dissolved phase with increasing total metal concentrations. We conclude that humic acid was chemically fractionated by cation-induced coagulation, which preferentially removed functional groups involved in metal-cation binding from solution.

  4. Mutational Studies on Resurrected Ancestral Proteins Reveal Conservation of Site-Specific Amino Acid Preferences throughout Evolutionary History

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Valeria A.; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Local protein interactions (“molecular context” effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  5. Mutational studies on resurrected ancestral proteins reveal conservation of site-specific amino acid preferences throughout evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Risso, Valeria A; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A; Gaucher, Eric A; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2015-02-01

    Local protein interactions ("molecular context" effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations.

  6. Mutational studies on resurrected ancestral proteins reveal conservation of site-specific amino acid preferences throughout evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Risso, Valeria A; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A; Gaucher, Eric A; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2015-02-01

    Local protein interactions ("molecular context" effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  7. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals vertebrate phylotypic period during organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Naoki; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    One of the central issues in evolutionary developmental biology is how we can formulate the relationships between evolutionary and developmental processes. Two major models have been proposed: the 'funnel-like' model, in which the earliest embryo shows the most conserved morphological pattern, followed by diversifying later stages, and the 'hourglass' model, in which constraints are imposed to conserve organogenesis stages, which is called the phylotypic period. Here we perform a quantitative comparative transcriptome analysis of several model vertebrate embryos and show that the pharyngula stage is most conserved, whereas earlier and later stages are rather divergent. These results allow us to predict approximate developmental timetables between different species, and indicate that pharyngula embryos have the most conserved gene expression profiles, which may be the source of the basic body plan of vertebrates. PMID:21427719

  8. Time-Frequency Analysis Reveals Pairwise Interactions in Insect Swarms.

    PubMed

    Puckett, James G; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2015-06-26

    The macroscopic emergent behavior of social animal groups is a classic example of dynamical self-organization, and is thought to arise from the local interactions between individuals. Determining these interactions from empirical data sets of real animal groups, however, is challenging. Using multicamera imaging and tracking, we studied the motion of individual flying midges in laboratory mating swarms. By performing a time-frequency analysis of the midge trajectories, we show that the midge behavior can be segmented into two distinct modes: one that is independent and composed of low-frequency maneuvers, and one that consists of higher-frequency nearly harmonic oscillations conducted in synchrony with another midge. We characterize these pairwise interactions, and make a hypothesis as to their biological function. PMID:26197145

  9. Genome analysis of the platypus reveals unique signatures of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Wesley C.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A.; Birney, Ewan; Ponting, Chris P.; Grützner, Frank; Belov, Katherine; Miller, Webb; Clarke, Laura; Chinwalla, Asif T.; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Heger, Andreas; Locke, Devin P.; Miethke, Pat; Waters, Paul D.; Veyrunes, Frédéric; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Bob; Graves, Tina; Wallis, John; Puente, Xose S.; López-Otín, Carlos; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R.; Eichler, Evan E.; Chen, Lin; Cheng, Ze; Deakin, Janine E.; Alsop, Amber; Thompson, Katherine; Kirby, Patrick; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Wakefield, Matthew J.; Olender, Tsviya; Lancet, Doron; Huttley, Gavin A.; Smit, Arian F. A.; Pask, Andrew; Temple-Smith, Peter; Batzer, Mark A.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Harris, Robert S.; Whittington, Camilla M.; Wong, Emily S. W.; Gemmell, Neil J.; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Vargas Jentzsch, Iris M.; Merkel, Angelika; Schmitz, Juergen; Zemann, Anja; Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Brosius, Juergen; Murchison, Elizabeth P.; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Smith, Carly; Hannon, Gregory J.; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; McMillan, Daniel; Attenborough, Rosalind; Rens, Willem; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm; Lefèvre, Christophe M.; Sharp, Julie A.; Nicholas, Kevin R.; Ray, David A.; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Pringle, Thomas H.; Taylor, James; Jones, Russell C.; Nixon, Brett; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Niwa, Hitoshi; Sekita, Yoko; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Stark, Alexander; Kheradpour, Pouya; Kellis, Manolis; Flicek, Paul; Chen, Yuan; Webber, Caleb; Hardison, Ross; Nelson, Joanne; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Minx, Pat; Feng, Yucheng; Kremitzki, Colin; Mitreva, Makedonka; Glasscock, Jarret; Wylie, Todd; Wohldmann, Patricia; Thiru, Prathapan; Nhan, Michael N.; Pohl, Craig S.; Smith, Scott M.; Hou, Shunfeng; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    We present a draft genome sequence of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. This monotreme exhibits a fascinating combination of reptilian and mammalian characters. For example, platypuses have a coat of fur adapted to an aquatic lifestyle; platypus females lactate, yet lay eggs; and males are equipped with venom similar to that of reptiles. Analysis of the first monotreme genome aligned these features with genetic innovations. We find that reptile and platypus venom proteins have been co-opted independently from the same gene families; milk protein genes are conserved despite platypuses laying eggs; and immune gene family expansions are directly related to platypus biology. Expansions of protein, non-protein-coding RNA and microRNA families, as well as repeat elements, are identified. Sequencing of this genome now provides a valuable resource for deep mammalian comparative analyses, as well as for monotreme biology and conservation. PMID:18464734

  10. Time-Frequency Analysis Reveals Pairwise Interactions in Insect Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2015-06-01

    The macroscopic emergent behavior of social animal groups is a classic example of dynamical self-organization, and is thought to arise from the local interactions between individuals. Determining these interactions from empirical data sets of real animal groups, however, is challenging. Using multicamera imaging and tracking, we studied the motion of individual flying midges in laboratory mating swarms. By performing a time-frequency analysis of the midge trajectories, we show that the midge behavior can be segmented into two distinct modes: one that is independent and composed of low-frequency maneuvers, and one that consists of higher-frequency nearly harmonic oscillations conducted in synchrony with another midge. We characterize these pairwise interactions, and make a hypothesis as to their biological function.

  11. Image analysis of weaverbird nests reveals signature weave textures.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ida E; Backes, André; Walsh, Patrick T; Morgan, Kate V; Meddle, Simone L; Healy, Susan D

    2015-06-01

    In nature, many animals build structures that can be readily measured at the scale of their gross morphology (e.g. length, volume and weight). Capturing individuality as can be done with the structures designed and built by human architects or artists, however, is more challenging. Here, we tested whether computer-aided image texture classification approaches can be used to describe textural variation in the nests of weaverbirds (Ploceus species) in order to attribute nests to the individual weaverbird that built them. We found that a computer-aided texture analysis approach does allow the assignment of a signature to weaverbirds' nests. We suggest that this approach will be a useful tool with which to examine individual variation across a range of animal constructions, not just for nests.

  12. Six Tissue Transcriptomics Reveals Specific Immune Suppression in Spleen by Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsson, Britt G.; Peris, Eduard; Nookaew, Intawat; Grahnemo, Louise; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid; Jansson, John-Olov; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are suggested to modulate immune function, but the effects of dietary fatty acids composition on gene expression patterns in immune organs have not been fully characterized. In the current study we investigated how dietary fatty acids composition affects the total transcriptome profile, and especially, immune related genes in two immune organs, spleen (SPL) and bone marrow cells (BMC). Four tissues with metabolic function, skeletal muscle (SKM), white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT), and liver (LIV), were investigated as a comparison. Following 8 weeks on low fat diet (LFD), high fat diet (HFD) rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD-S), or HFD rich in PUFA (HFD-P), tissue transcriptomics were analyzed by microarray and metabolic health assessed by fasting blood glucose level, HOMA-IR index, oral glucose tolerance test as well as quantification of crown-like structures in WAT. HFD-P corrected the metabolic phenotype induced by HFD-S. Interestingly, SKM and BMC were relatively inert to the diets, whereas the two adipose tissues (WAT and BAT) were mainly affected by HFD per se (both HFD-S and HFD-P). In particular, WAT gene expression was driven closer to that of the immune organs SPL and BMC by HFDs. The LIV exhibited different responses to both of the HFDs. Surprisingly, the spleen showed a major response to HFD-P (82 genes differed from LFD, mostly immune genes), while it was not affected at all by HFD-S (0 genes differed from LFD). In conclusion, the quantity and composition of dietary fatty acids affected the transcriptome in distinct manners in different organs. Remarkably, dietary PUFA, but not saturated fat, prompted a specific regulation of immune related genes in the spleen, opening the possibility that PUFA can regulate immune function by influencing gene expression in this organ. PMID:27166587

  13. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs.

  14. A combined physiological and proteomic approach to reveal lactic-acid-induced alterations in Lactobacillus casei Zhang and its mutant with enhanced lactic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Wei; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei has traditionally been recognized as a probiotic and frequently used as an adjunct culture in fermented dairy products, where acid stress is an environmental condition commonly encountered. In the present study, we carried out a comparative physiological and proteomic study to investigate lactic-acid-induced alterations in Lactobacillus casei Zhang (WT) and its acid-resistant mutant. Analysis of the physiological data showed that the mutant exhibited 33.8% higher glucose phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system activity and lower glycolytic pH compared with the WT under acidic conditions. In addition, significant differences were detected in both cells during acid stress between intracellular physiological state, including intracellular pH, H(+)-ATPase activity, and intracellular ATP pool. Comparison of the proteomic data based on 2D-DIGE and i-TRAQ indicated that acid stress invoked a global change in both strains. The mutant protected the cells against acid damage by regulating the expression of key proteins involved in cellular metabolism, DNA replication, RNA synthesis, translation, and some chaperones. Proteome results were validated by Lactobacillus casei displaying higher intracellular aspartate and arginine levels, and the survival at pH 3.3 was improved 1.36- and 2.10-fold by the addition of 50-mM aspartate and arginine, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that aspartate may be involved in acid tolerance in Lactobacillus casei. Results presented here may help us understand acid resistance mechanisms and help formulate new strategies to enhance the industrial applications of this species. PMID:22159611

  15. Expression Profiling during Arabidopsis/Downy Mildew Interaction Reveals a Highly-Expressed Effector That Attenuates Responses to Salicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Shuta; Caillaud, Marie-Cécile; Furzer, Oliver J.; Ishaque, Naveed; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Fabro, Georgina; Shirasu, Ken; Jones, Jonathan D. G.

    2014-01-01

    Plants have evolved strong innate immunity mechanisms, but successful pathogens evade or suppress plant immunity via effectors delivered into the plant cell. Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) causes downy mildew on Arabidopsis thaliana, and a genome sequence is available for isolate Emoy2. Here, we exploit the availability of genome sequences for Hpa and Arabidopsis to measure gene-expression changes in both Hpa and Arabidopsis simultaneously during infection. Using a high-throughput cDNA tag sequencing method, we reveal expression patterns of Hpa predicted effectors and Arabidopsis genes in compatible and incompatible interactions, and promoter elements associated with Hpa genes expressed during infection. By resequencing Hpa isolate Waco9, we found it evades Arabidopsis resistance gene RPP1 through deletion of the cognate recognized effector ATR1. Arabidopsis salicylic acid (SA)-responsive genes including PR1 were activated not only at early time points in the incompatible interaction but also at late time points in the compatible interaction. By histochemical analysis, we found that Hpa suppresses SA-inducible PR1 expression, specifically in the haustoriated cells into which host-translocated effectors are delivered, but not in non-haustoriated adjacent cells. Finally, we found a highly-expressed Hpa effector candidate that suppresses responsiveness to SA. As this approach can be easily applied to host-pathogen interactions for which both host and pathogen genome sequences are available, this work opens the door towards transcriptome studies in infection biology that should help unravel pathogen infection strategies and the mechanisms by which host defense responses are overcome. PMID:25329884

  16. Mixed-culture transcriptome analysis reveals the molecular basis of mixed-culture growth in Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Sieuwerts, Sander; Molenaar, Douwe; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; Beerthuyzen, Marke; Stevens, Marc J A; Janssen, Patrick W M; Ingham, Colin J; de Bok, Frank A M; de Vos, Willem M; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E T

    2010-12-01

    Many food fermentations are performed using mixed cultures of lactic acid bacteria. Interactions between strains are of key importance for the performance of these fermentations. Yogurt fermentation by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus (basonym, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus) is one of the best-described mixed-culture fermentations. These species are believed to stimulate each other's growth by the exchange of metabolites such as folic acid and carbon dioxide. Recently, postgenomic studies revealed that an upregulation of biosynthesis pathways for nucleotides and sulfur-containing amino acids is part of the global physiological response to mixed-culture growth in S. thermophilus, but an in-depth molecular analysis of mixed-culture growth of both strains remains to be established. We report here the application of mixed-culture transcriptome profiling and a systematic analysis of the effect of interaction-related compounds on growth, which allowed us to unravel the molecular responses associated with batch mixed-culture growth in milk of S. thermophilus CNRZ1066 and L. bulgaricus ATCC BAA-365. The results indicate that interactions between these bacteria are primarily related to purine, amino acid, and long-chain fatty acid metabolism. The results support a model in which formic acid, folic acid, and fatty acids are provided by S. thermophilus. Proteolysis by L. bulgaricus supplies both strains with amino acids but is insufficient to meet the biosynthetic demands for sulfur and branched-chain amino acids, as becomes clear from the upregulation of genes associated with these amino acids in mixed culture. Moreover, genes involved in iron uptake in S. thermophilus are affected by mixed-culture growth, and genes coding for exopolysaccharide production were upregulated in both organisms in mixed culture compared to monocultures. The confirmation of previously identified responses in S. thermophilus using a different strain combination

  17. Visual gene-network analysis reveals the cancer gene co-expression in human endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancers (ECs) are the most common form of gynecologic malignancy. Recent studies have reported that ECs reveal distinct markers for molecular pathogenesis, which in turn is linked to the various histological types of ECs. To understand further the molecular events contributing to ECs and endometrial tumorigenesis in general, a more precise identification of cancer-associated molecules and signaling networks would be useful for the detection and monitoring of malignancy, improving clinical cancer therapy, and personalization of treatments. Results ECs-specific gene co-expression networks were constructed by differential expression analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). Important pathways and putative cancer hub genes contribution to tumorigenesis of ECs were identified. An elastic-net regularized classification model was built using the cancer hub gene signatures to predict the phenotypic characteristics of ECs. The 19 cancer hub gene signatures had high predictive power to distinguish among three key principal features of ECs: grade, type, and stage. Intriguingly, these hub gene networks seem to contribute to ECs progression and malignancy via cell-cycle regulation, antigen processing and the citric acid (TCA) cycle. Conclusions The results of this study provide a powerful biomarker discovery platform to better understand the progression of ECs and to uncover potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of ECs. This information might lead to improved monitoring of ECs and resulting improvement of treatment of ECs, the 4th most common of cancer in women. PMID:24758163

  18. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Mechanisms for Stress Response in Hypoliths from Extreme Hyperarid Deserts.

    PubMed

    Le, Phuong Thi; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Guerrero, Leandro D; Vikram, Surendra; Van de Peer, Yves; Cowan, Don A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding microbial adaptation to environmental stressors is crucial for interpreting broader ecological patterns. In the most extreme hot and cold deserts, cryptic niche communities are thought to play key roles in ecosystem processes and represent excellent model systems for investigating microbial responses to environmental stressors. However, relatively little is known about the genetic diversity underlying such functional processes in climatically extreme desert systems. This study presents the first comparative metagenome analysis of cyanobacteria-dominated hypolithic communities in hot (Namib Desert, Namibia) and cold (Miers Valley, Antarctica) hyperarid deserts. The most abundant phyla in both hypolith metagenomes were Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes with Cyanobacteria dominating in Antarctic hypoliths. However, no significant differences between the two metagenomes were identified. The Antarctic hypolithic metagenome displayed a high number of sequences assigned to sigma factors, replication, recombination and repair, translation, ribosomal structure, and biogenesis. In contrast, the Namib Desert metagenome showed a high abundance of sequences assigned to carbohydrate transport and metabolism. Metagenome data analysis also revealed significant divergence in the genetic determinants of amino acid and nucleotide metabolism between these two metagenomes and those of soil from other polar deserts, hot deserts, and non-desert soils. Our results suggest extensive niche differentiation in hypolithic microbial communities from these two extreme environments and a high genetic capacity for survival under environmental extremes. PMID:27503299

  19. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B. H.

    2016-05-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions.

  20. Proteogenomic analysis reveals unanticipated adaptations of colorectal tumor cells to deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Halvey, Patrick J.; Wang, Xiaojing; Wang, Jing; Bhat, Ajaz A.; Dhawan, Punita; Li, Ming; Zhang, Bing; Liebler, Daniel C.; Slebos, Robbert J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A growing body of genomic data on human cancers poses the critical question of how genomic variations translate to cancer phenotypes. We employed standardized shotgun proteomics and targeted protein quantitation platforms to analyze a panel of 10 colon cancer cell lines differing by mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. In addition, we performed transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to enable detection of protein sequence variants from the proteomic data. Biological replicate cultures yielded highly consistent proteomic inventories with a cumulative total of 6,513 protein groups with a protein FDR of 3.17% across all cell lines. Networks of co-expressed proteins with differential expression based on MMR status revealed impact on protein folding, turnover and transport, on cellular metabolism and on DNA and RNA synthesis and repair. Analysis of variant amino acid sequences suggested higher stability of proteins affected by naturally occurring germline polymorphisms than of proteins affected by somatic protein sequence changes. The data provide evidence for multi-system adaptation to MMR deficiency with a stress response that targets misfolded proteins for degradation through the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome pathway. Enrichment analysis suggested epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in RKO cells, as evidenced by increased mobility and invasion properties compared to SW480. The observed proteomic profiles demonstrate previously unknown consequences of altered DNA repair and provide an expanded basis for mechanistic interpretation of MMR phenotypes. PMID:24247723

  1. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B H

    2016-01-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions.

  2. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B. H.

    2016-01-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions. PMID:27193869

  3. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B H

    2016-01-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions. PMID:27193869

  4. Proteomic analysis of mice fed methionine and choline deficient diet reveals marker proteins associated with steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Jin; Kang, Jeong Han; Iqbal, Waqas; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the progression of simple steatosis to steatohepatitis are yet to be elucidated. To identify the proteins involved in the development of liver tissue inflammation, we performed comparative proteomic analysis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet (MCD) developed hepatic steatosis characterized by increased free fatty acid (FFA) and triglyceride levels as well as alpha-SMA. Two-dimensional proteomic analysis revealed that the change from the normal diet to the MCD diet affected the expressions of 50 proteins. The most-pronounced changes were observed in the expression of proteins involved in Met metabolism and oxidative stress, most of which were significantly downregulated in NASH model animals. Peroxiredoxin (Prx) is the most interesting among the modulated proteins identified in this study. In particular, cross-regulated Prx1 and Prx6 are likely to participate in cellular defense against the development of hepatitis. Thus, these Prx isoforms may be a useful new marker for early stage steatohepatitis. Moreover, curcumin treatment results in alleviation of the severity of hepatic inflammation in steatohepatitis. Notably, curcumin administration in MCD-fed mice dramatically reduced CYP2E1 as well as Prx1 expression, while upregulating Prx6 expression. These findings suggest that curcumin may have a protective role against MCD fed-induced oxidative stress.

  5. Differential network analysis reveals dysfunctional regulatory networks in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mu-Shui; Liu, Bing-Ya; Dai, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Wei-Xin; Li, Yi-Xue; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric Carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in the world. A large number of differentially expressed genes have been identified as being associated with gastric cancer progression, however, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanisms. To address this problem, we developed a differential networking approach that is characterized by including a nascent methodology, differential coexpression analysis (DCEA), and two novel quantitative methods for differential regulation analysis. We first applied DCEA to a gene expression dataset of gastric normal mucosa, adenoma and carcinoma samples to identify gene interconnection changes during cancer progression, based on which we inferred normal, adenoma, and carcinoma-specific gene regulation networks by using linear regression model. It was observed that cancer genes and drug targets were enriched in each network. To investigate the dynamic changes of gene regulation during carcinogenesis, we then designed two quantitative methods to prioritize differentially regulated genes (DRGs) and gene pairs or links (DRLs) between adjacent stages. It was found that known cancer genes and drug targets are significantly higher ranked. The top 4% normal vs. adenoma DRGs (36 genes) and top 6% adenoma vs. carcinoma DRGs (56 genes) proved to be worthy of further investigation to explore their association with gastric cancer. Out of the 16 DRGs involved in two top-10 DRG lists of normal vs. adenoma and adenoma vs. carcinoma comparisons, 15 have been reported to be gastric cancer or cancer related. Based on our inferred differential networking information and known signaling pathways, we generated testable hypotheses on the roles of GATA6, ESRRG and their signaling pathways in gastric carcinogenesis. Compared with established approaches which build genome-scale GRNs, or sub-networks around differentially expressed genes, the present one proved to be better at enriching cancer genes and drug targets, and prioritizing

  6. Hereditary hemochromatosis: HFE mutation analysis in Greeks reveals genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, G; Politou, M; Terpos, E; Fourlemadis, S; Sakellaropoulos, N; Loukopoulos, D

    2000-04-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is common among Caucasians; reported disease frequencies vary from 0.3 to 0.8%. Identification of a candidate HFE gene in 1996 was soon followed by the description of two ancestral mutations, i.e., c.845G-->A (C282Y) and c.187C-->G (H63D). To these was recently added the mutation S65C, which may represent a simple polymorphism. The incidence of HH in Greece is unknown but clinical cases are rare. Also unknown is the carrier frequency of the two mutant alleles. A first estimate of the latter is given in the present report. It is based on data from the genetic analysis of 10 unrelated patients of Greek origin who were referred to our center for genotyping and 158 unselected male blood donors. The allele frequencies for the C282Y and H63D mutations were 0.003 and 0.145, respectively. The C282Y allele was detected in 50% of HH patients. This is considerably lower than the frequencies reported for HH patients in the U.S.A. (82%) and France (91 %) and closer to that reported in Italy (64%). Five patients did not carry any known HFE mutation; three may represent cases of juvenile hemochromatosis, given their early onset with iron overload, hypogonadism, and heart disease. We suggest that genetic heterogeneity is more prominent in Southern Europe. It is also possible that the penetrance of the responsible genes is different across the Mediterranean.

  7. Layered Social Network Analysis Reveals Complex Relationships in Kindergarteners.

    PubMed

    Golemiec, Mireille; Schneider, Jonathan; Boyce, W Thomas; Bush, Nicole R; Adler, Nancy; Levine, Joel D

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between individuals forms building blocks for social structure. Here, we examine the structure of behavioral interactions among kindergarten classroom with a hierarchy-neutral approach to examine all possible underlying patterns in the formation of layered networks of "reciprocal" interactions. To understand how these layers are coordinated, we used a layered motif approach. Our dual layered motif analysis can therefore be thought of as the dynamics of smaller groups that tile to create the group structure, or alternatively they provide information on what the average child would do in a given local social environment. When we examine the regulated motifs in layered networks, we find that transitivity is at least partially involved in the formation of these layered network structures. We also found complex combinations of the expected reciprocal interactions. The mechanisms used to understand social networks of kindergarten children here are also applicable on a more general scale to any group of individuals where interactions and identities can be readily observed and scored. PMID:26973572

  8. Layered Social Network Analysis Reveals Complex Relationships in Kindergarteners

    PubMed Central

    Golemiec, Mireille; Schneider, Jonathan; Boyce, W. Thomas; Bush, Nicole R.; Adler, Nancy; Levine, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between individuals forms building blocks for social structure. Here, we examine the structure of behavioral interactions among kindergarten classroom with a hierarchy-neutral approach to examine all possible underlying patterns in the formation of layered networks of “reciprocal” interactions. To understand how these layers are coordinated, we used a layered motif approach. Our dual layered motif analysis can therefore be thought of as the dynamics of smaller groups that tile to create the group structure, or alternatively they provide information on what the average child would do in a given local social environment. When we examine the regulated motifs in layered networks, we find that transitivity is at least partially involved in the formation of these layered network structures. We also found complex combinations of the expected reciprocal interactions. The mechanisms used to understand social networks of kindergarten children here are also applicable on a more general scale to any group of individuals where interactions and identities can be readily observed and scored. PMID:26973572

  9. Connectivity Analysis Reveals a Cortical Network for Eye Gaze Perception

    PubMed Central

    Passamonti, Luca; Rowe, James; Engell, Andrew D.; Calder, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Haxby et al. (Haxby JV, Hoffman EA, Gobbini MI. 2000. The distributed human neural system for face perception. Trends Cogn Sci. 4:223–233.) proposed that eye gaze processing results from an interaction between a “core” face-specific system involved in visual analysis and an “extended” system involved in spatial attention, more generally. However, the full gaze perception network has remained poorly specified. In the context of a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we used psychophysiological interactions (PPIs) to identify brain regions that showed differential connectivity (correlation) with core face perception structures (posterior superior temporal sulcus [pSTS] and fusiform gyrus [FG]) when viewing gaze shifts relative to control eye movements (opening/closing the eyes). The PPIs identified altered connectivity between the pSTS and MT/V5, intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, superior temporal gyrus (STG), supramarginal gyrus, and middle frontal gyrus (MFG). The FG showed altered connectivity with the same areas of the STG and MFG, demonstrating the contribution of both dorsal and ventral core face areas to gaze perception. We propose that this network provides an interactive system that alerts us to seen changes in other agents’ gaze direction, makes us aware of their altered focus of spatial attention, and prepares a corresponding shift in our own attention. PMID:20016001

  10. Connectivity analysis reveals a cortical network for eye gaze perception.

    PubMed

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Passamonti, Luca; Rowe, James; Engell, Andrew D; Calder, Andrew J

    2010-08-01

    Haxby et al. (Haxby JV, Hoffman EA, Gobbini MI. 2000. The distributed human neural system for face perception. Trends Cogn Sci. 4:223-233.) proposed that eye gaze processing results from an interaction between a "core" face-specific system involved in visual analysis and an "extended" system involved in spatial attention, more generally. However, the full gaze perception network has remained poorly specified. In the context of a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we used psychophysiological interactions (PPIs) to identify brain regions that showed differential connectivity (correlation) with core face perception structures (posterior superior temporal sulcus [pSTS] and fusiform gyrus [FG]) when viewing gaze shifts relative to control eye movements (opening/closing the eyes). The PPIs identified altered connectivity between the pSTS and MT/V5, intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, superior temporal gyrus (STG), supramarginal gyrus, and middle frontal gyrus (MFG). The FG showed altered connectivity with the same areas of the STG and MFG, demonstrating the contribution of both dorsal and ventral core face areas to gaze perception. We propose that this network provides an interactive system that alerts us to seen changes in other agents' gaze direction, makes us aware of their altered focus of spatial attention, and prepares a corresponding shift in our own attention.

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis of Autistic Brain Reveals Convergent Molecular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Voineagu, Irina; Wang, Xinchen; Johnston, Patrick; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Tian, Yuan; Horvath, Steve; Mill, Jonathan; Cantor, Rita; Blencowe, Benjamin J.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common, highly heritable neuro-developmental condition characterized by marked genetic heterogeneity1–3. Thus, a fundamental question is whether autism represents an etiologically heterogeneous disorder in which the myriad genetic or environmental risk factors perturb common underlying molecular pathways in the brain4. Here, we demonstrate consistent differences in transcriptome organization between autistic and normal brain by gene co-expression network analysis. Remarkably, regional patterns of gene expression that typically distinguish frontal and temporal cortex are significantly attenuated in the ASD brain, suggesting abnormalities in cortical patterning. We further identify discrete modules of co-expressed genes associated with autism: a neuronal module enriched for known autism susceptibility genes, including the neuronal specific splicing factor A2BP1/FOX1, and a module enriched for immune genes and glial markers. Using high-throughput RNA-sequencing we demonstrate dysregulated splicing of A2BP1-dependent alternative exons in ASD brain. Moreover, using a published autism GWAS dataset, we show that the neuronal module is enriched for genetically associated variants, providing independent support for the causal involvement of these genes in autism. In contrast, the immune-glial module showed no enrichment for autism GWAS signals, indicating a non-genetic etiology for this process. Collectively, our results provide strong evidence for convergent molecular abnormalities in ASD, and implicate transcriptional and splicing dysregulation as underlying mechanisms of neuronal dysfunction in this disorder. PMID:21614001

  12. Bioimage analysis of Shigella infection reveals targeting of colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ellen T; Campbell-Valois, Francois-Xavier; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sachse, Martin; Moya-Nilges, Maryse; Nothelfer, Katharina; Marteyn, Benoit; Shorte, Spencer L; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2015-06-23

    Few studies within the pathogenic field have used advanced imaging and analytical tools to quantitatively measure pathogenicity in vivo. In this work, we present a novel approach for the investigation of host-pathogen processes based on medium-throughput 3D fluorescence imaging. The guinea pig model for Shigella flexneri invasion of the colonic mucosa was used to monitor the infectious process over time with GFP-expressing S. flexneri. A precise quantitative imaging protocol was devised to follow individual S. flexneri in a large tissue volume. An extensive dataset of confocal images was obtained and processed to extract specific quantitative information regarding the progression of S. flexneri infection in an unbiased and exhaustive manner. Specific parameters included the analysis of S. flexneri positions relative to the epithelial surface, S. flexneri density within the tissue, and volume of tissue destruction. In particular, at early time points, there was a clear association of S. flexneri with crypts, key morphological features of the colonic mucosa. Numerical simulations based on random bacterial entry confirmed the bias of experimentally measured S. flexneri for early crypt targeting. The application of a correlative light and electron microscopy technique adapted for thick tissue samples further confirmed the location of S. flexneri within colonocytes at the mouth of crypts. This quantitative imaging approach is a novel means to examine host-pathogen systems in a tailored and robust manner, inclusive of the infectious agent. PMID:26056271

  13. Bioimage analysis of Shigella infection reveals targeting of colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ellen T; Campbell-Valois, Francois-Xavier; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sachse, Martin; Moya-Nilges, Maryse; Nothelfer, Katharina; Marteyn, Benoit; Shorte, Spencer L; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2015-06-23

    Few studies within the pathogenic field have used advanced imaging and analytical tools to quantitatively measure pathogenicity in vivo. In this work, we present a novel approach for the investigation of host-pathogen processes based on medium-throughput 3D fluorescence imaging. The guinea pig model for Shigella flexneri invasion of the colonic mucosa was used to monitor the infectious process over time with GFP-expressing S. flexneri. A precise quantitative imaging protocol was devised to follow individual S. flexneri in a large tissue volume. An extensive dataset of confocal images was obtained and processed to extract specific quantitative information regarding the progression of S. flexneri infection in an unbiased and exhaustive manner. Specific parameters included the analysis of S. flexneri positions relative to the epithelial surface, S. flexneri density within the tissue, and volume of tissue destruction. In particular, at early time points, there was a clear association of S. flexneri with crypts, key morphological features of the colonic mucosa. Numerical simulations based on random bacterial entry confirmed the bias of experimentally measured S. flexneri for early crypt targeting. The application of a correlative light and electron microscopy technique adapted for thick tissue samples further confirmed the location of S. flexneri within colonocytes at the mouth of crypts. This quantitative imaging approach is a novel means to examine host-pathogen systems in a tailored and robust manner, inclusive of the infectious agent.

  14. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27324649

  16. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl- N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints.

  17. Sulphur Kβ emission spectra reveal protonation states of aqueous sulfuric acid

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, Johannes; Sahle, Christoph J.; Ruotsalainen, Kari O.; Müller, Harald; Kavčič, Matjaž; Žitnik, Matjaž; Bučar, Klemen; Petric, Marko; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report an X-ray emission study of bulk aqueous sulfuric acid. Throughout the range of molarities from 1 M to 18 M the sulfur Kβ emission spectra from H2SO4 (aq) depend on the molar fractions and related deprotonation of H2SO4. We compare the experimental results with results from emission spectrum calculations based on atomic structures of single molecules and structures from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the S Kβ emission spectrum is a sensitive probe of the protonation state of the acid molecules. Using non-negative matrix factorization we are able to extract the fractions of different protonation states in the spectra, and the results are in good agreement with the simulation for the higher part of the concentration range. PMID:26888159

  18. Sulphur Kβ emission spectra reveal protonation states of aqueous sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Johannes; Sahle, Christoph J; Ruotsalainen, Kari O; Müller, Harald; Kavčič, Matjaž; Žitnik, Matjaž; Bučar, Klemen; Petric, Marko; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2016-02-18

    In this paper we report an X-ray emission study of bulk aqueous sulfuric acid. Throughout the range of molarities from 1 M to 18 M the sulfur Kβ emission spectra from H2SO4 (aq) depend on the molar fractions and related deprotonation of H2SO4. We compare the experimental results with results from emission spectrum calculations based on atomic structures of single molecules and structures from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the S Kβ emission spectrum is a sensitive probe of the protonation state of the acid molecules. Using non-negative matrix factorization we are able to extract the fractions of different protonation states in the spectra, and the results are in good agreement with the simulation for the higher part of the concentration range.

  19. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, Kevin J.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Likens, Gene E.; Buso, Donald C.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Bailey, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in an entire fifth-order stream network. These samples were analyzed for an exhaustive suite of chemical constituents. The fine grain and broad extent of this study design allowed us to quantify spatial patterns over a range of scales by using empirical semivariograms that explicitly incorporated network topology. Here, we show that spatial structure, as determined by the characteristic shape of the semivariograms, differed both among chemical constituents and by spatial relationship (flow-connected, flow-unconnected, or Euclidean). Spatial structure was apparent at either a single scale or at multiple nested scales, suggesting separate processes operating simultaneously within the stream network and surrounding terrestrial landscape. Expected patterns of spatial dependence for flow-connected relationships (e.g., increasing homogeneity with downstream distance) occurred for some chemical constituents (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and aluminum) but not for others (e.g., nitrate, sodium). By comparing semivariograms for the different chemical constituents and spatial relationships, we were able to separate effects on streamwater chemistry of (i) fine-scale versus broad-scale processes and (ii) in-stream processes versus landscape controls. These findings provide insight on the hierarchical scaling of local, longitudinal, and landscape processes that drive biogeochemical patterns in stream networks.

  20. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Kevin J; Torgersen, Christian E; Likens, Gene E; Buso, Donald C; Lowe, Winsor H; Bailey, Scott W

    2014-05-13

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in an entire fifth-order stream network. These samples were analyzed for an exhaustive suite of chemical constituents. The fine grain and broad extent of this study design allowed us to quantify spatial patterns over a range of scales by using empirical semivariograms that explicitly incorporated network topology. Here, we show that spatial structure, as determined by the characteristic shape of the semivariograms, differed both among chemical constituents and by spatial relationship (flow-connected, flow-unconnected, or Euclidean). Spatial structure was apparent at either a single scale or at multiple nested scales, suggesting separate processes operating simultaneously within the stream network and surrounding terrestrial landscape. Expected patterns of spatial dependence for flow-connected relationships (e.g., increasing homogeneity with downstream distance) occurred for some chemical constituents (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and aluminum) but not for others (e.g., nitrate, sodium). By comparing semivariograms for the different chemical constituents and spatial relationships, we were able to separate effects on streamwater chemistry of (i) fine-scale versus broad-scale processes and (ii) in-stream processes versus landscape controls. These findings provide insight on the hierarchical scaling of local, longitudinal, and landscape processes that drive biogeochemical patterns in stream networks.

  1. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Kevin J.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Likens, Gene E.; Buso, Donald C.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Bailey, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in an entire fifth-order stream network. These samples were analyzed for an exhaustive suite of chemical constituents. The fine grain and broad extent of this study design allowed us to quantify spatial patterns over a range of scales by using empirical semivariograms that explicitly incorporated network topology. Here, we show that spatial structure, as determined by the characteristic shape of the semivariograms, differed both among chemical constituents and by spatial relationship (flow-connected, flow-unconnected, or Euclidean). Spatial structure was apparent at either a single scale or at multiple nested scales, suggesting separate processes operating simultaneously within the stream network and surrounding terrestrial landscape. Expected patterns of spatial dependence for flow-connected relationships (e.g., increasing homogeneity with downstream distance) occurred for some chemical constituents (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and aluminum) but not for others (e.g., nitrate, sodium). By comparing semivariograms for the different chemical constituents and spatial relationships, we were able to separate effects on streamwater chemistry of (i) fine-scale versus broad-scale processes and (ii) in-stream processes versus landscape controls. These findings provide insight on the hierarchical scaling of local, longitudinal, and landscape processes that drive biogeochemical patterns in stream networks. PMID:24753575

  2. The diversity of algal phospholipase D homologs revealed by biocomputational analysis.

    PubMed

    Beligni, María Verónica; Bagnato, Carolina; Prados, María Belén; Bondino, Hernán; Laxalt, Ana María; Munnik, Teun; Ten Have, Arjen

    2015-10-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) participates in the formation of phosphatidic acid, a precursor in glycerolipid biosynthesis and a second messenger. PLDs are part of a superfamily of proteins that hydrolyze phosphodiesters and share a catalytic motif, HxKxxxxD, and hence a mechanism of action. Although HKD-PLDs have been thoroughly characterized in plants, animals and bacteria, very little is known about these enzymes in algae. To fill this gap in knowledge, we performed a biocomputational analysis by means of HMMER iterative profiling, using most eukaryotic algae genomes available. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that algae exhibit very few eukaryotic-type PLDs but possess, instead, many bacteria-like PLDs. Among algae eukaryotic-type PLDs, we identified C2-PLDs and PXPH-like PLDs. In addition, the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense features several proteins phylogenetically related to oomycete PLDs. Our phylogenetic analysis also showed that algae bacteria-like PLDs (proteins with putative PLD activity) fall into five clades, three of which are novel lineages in eukaryotes, composed almost entirely of algae. Specifically, Clade II is almost exclusive to diatoms, whereas Clade I and IV are mainly represented by proteins from prasinophytes. The other two clades are composed of mitochondrial PLDs (Clade V or Mito-PLDs), previously found in mammals, and a subfamily of potentially secreted proteins (Clade III or SP-PLDs), which includes a homolog formerly characterized in rice. In addition, our phylogenetic analysis shows that algae have non-PLD members within the bacteria-like HKD superfamily with putative cardiolipin synthase and phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylglycerophosphate synthase activities. Altogether, our results show that eukaryotic algae possess a moderate number of PLDs that belong to very diverse phylogenetic groups.

  3. The diversity of algal phospholipase D homologs revealed by biocomputational analysis.

    PubMed

    Beligni, María Verónica; Bagnato, Carolina; Prados, María Belén; Bondino, Hernán; Laxalt, Ana María; Munnik, Teun; Ten Have, Arjen

    2015-10-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) participates in the formation of phosphatidic acid, a precursor in glycerolipid biosynthesis and a second messenger. PLDs are part of a superfamily of proteins that hydrolyze phosphodiesters and share a catalytic motif, HxKxxxxD, and hence a mechanism of action. Although HKD-PLDs have been thoroughly characterized in plants, animals and bacteria, very little is known about these enzymes in algae. To fill this gap in knowledge, we performed a biocomputational analysis by means of HMMER iterative profiling, using most eukaryotic algae genomes available. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that algae exhibit very few eukaryotic-type PLDs but possess, instead, many bacteria-like PLDs. Among algae eukaryotic-type PLDs, we identified C2-PLDs and PXPH-like PLDs. In addition, the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense features several proteins phylogenetically related to oomycete PLDs. Our phylogenetic analysis also showed that algae bacteria-like PLDs (proteins with putative PLD activity) fall into five clades, three of which are novel lineages in eukaryotes, composed almost entirely of algae. Specifically, Clade II is almost exclusive to diatoms, whereas Clade I and IV are mainly represented by proteins from prasinophytes. The other two clades are composed of mitochondrial PLDs (Clade V or Mito-PLDs), previously found in mammals, and a subfamily of potentially secreted proteins (Clade III or SP-PLDs), which includes a homolog formerly characterized in rice. In addition, our phylogenetic analysis shows that algae have non-PLD members within the bacteria-like HKD superfamily with putative cardiolipin synthase and phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylglycerophosphate synthase activities. Altogether, our results show that eukaryotic algae possess a moderate number of PLDs that belong to very diverse phylogenetic groups. PMID:26986890

  4. Structure of Human Acid Sphingomyelinase Reveals the Role of the Saposin Domain in Activating Substrate Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zi-Jian; Huang, Jingjing; Poda, Gennady; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G

    2016-07-31

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal phosphodiesterase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide and phosphocholine. While other lysosomal sphingolipid hydrolases require a saposin activator protein for full activity, the ASM polypeptide incorporates a built-in N-terminal saposin domain and does not require an external activator protein. Here, we report the crystal structure of human ASM and describe the organization of the three main regions of the enzyme: the N-terminal saposin domain, the proline-rich connector, and the catalytic domain. The saposin domain is tightly associated along an edge of the large, bowl-shaped catalytic domain and adopts an open form that exposes a hydrophobic concave surface approximately 30Å from the catalytic center. The calculated electrostatic potential of the enzyme is electropositive at the acidic pH of the lysosome, consistent with the strict requirement for the presence of acidic lipids in target membranes. Docking studies indicate that sphingomyelin binds with the ceramide-phosphate group positioned at the binuclear zinc center and molecular dynamic simulations indicate that the intrinsic flexibility of the saposin domain is important for monomer-dimer exchange and for membrane interactions. Overall, ASM uses a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions to cause local disruptions of target bilayers in order to bring the lipid headgroup to the catalytic center in a membrane-bound reaction. PMID:27349982

  5. Structure of Human Acid Sphingomyelinase Reveals the Role of the Saposin Domain in Activating Substrate Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zi-Jian; Huang, Jingjing; Poda, Gennady; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G

    2016-07-31

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal phosphodiesterase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide and phosphocholine. While other lysosomal sphingolipid hydrolases require a saposin activator protein for full activity, the ASM polypeptide incorporates a built-in N-terminal saposin domain and does not require an external activator protein. Here, we report the crystal structure of human ASM and describe the organization of the three main regions of the enzyme: the N-terminal saposin domain, the proline-rich connector, and the catalytic domain. The saposin domain is tightly associated along an edge of the large, bowl-shaped catalytic domain and adopts an open form that exposes a hydrophobic concave surface approximately 30Å from the catalytic center. The calculated electrostatic potential of the enzyme is electropositive at the acidic pH of the lysosome, consistent with the strict requirement for the presence of acidic lipids in target membranes. Docking studies indicate that sphingomyelin binds with the ceramide-phosphate group positioned at the binuclear zinc center and molecular dynamic simulations indicate that the intrinsic flexibility of the saposin domain is important for monomer-dimer exchange and for membrane interactions. Overall, ASM uses a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions to cause local disruptions of target bilayers in order to bring the lipid headgroup to the catalytic center in a membrane-bound reaction.

  6. THPP target assignment reveals EchA6 as an essential fatty acid shuttle in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jonathan A G; Abrahams, Katherine A; Alemparte, Carlos; Ghidelli-Disse, Sonja; Rullas, Joaquín; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Singh, Albel; Gurcha, Sudagar S; Nataraj, Vijayashankar; Bethell, Stephen; Remuiñán, Modesto J; Encinas, Lourdes; Jervis, Peter J; Cammack, Nicholas C; Bhatt, Apoorva; Kruse, Ulrich; Bantscheff, Marcus; Fütterer, Klaus; Barros, David; Ballell, Lluis; Drewes, Gerard; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic screens for bactericidal compounds against drug-resistant tuberculosis are beginning to yield novel inhibitors. However, reliable target identification remains challenging. Here, we show that tetrahydropyrazo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-3-carboxamide (THPP) selectively pulls down EchA6 in a stereospecific manner, instead of the previously assigned target Mycobacterium tuberculosis MmpL3. While homologous to mammalian enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratases, EchA6 is non-catalytic yet essential and binds long-chain acyl-CoAs. THPP inhibitors compete with CoA-binding, suppress mycolic acid synthesis, and are bactericidal in a mouse model of chronic tuberculosis infection. A point mutation, W133A, abrogated THPP-binding and increased both the in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration and the in vivo effective dose 99 in mice. Surprisingly, EchA6 interacts with selected enzymes of fatty acid synthase II (FAS-II) in bacterial two-hybrid assays, suggesting essentiality may be linked to feeding long-chain fatty acids to FAS-II. Finally, our data show that spontaneous resistance-conferring mutations can potentially obscure the actual target or alternative targets of small molecule inhibitors. PMID:27571973

  7. Revealing the amino acid composition of proteins within an expanded genetic code

    PubMed Central

    Aerni, Hans R.; Shifman, Mark A.; Rogulina, Svetlana; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Rinehart, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    The genetic code can be manipulated to reassign codons for the incorporation of non-standard amino acids (NSAA). Deletion of release factor 1 in Escherichia coli enhances translation of UAG (Stop) codons, yet may also extended protein synthesis at natural UAG terminated messenger RNAs. The fidelity of protein synthesis at reassigned UAG codons and the purity of the NSAA containing proteins produced require careful examination. Proteomics would be an ideal tool for these tasks, but conventional proteomic analyses cannot readily identify the extended proteins and accurately discover multiple amino acid (AA) insertions at a single UAG. To address these challenges, we created a new proteomic workflow that enabled the detection of UAG readthrough in native proteins in E. coli strains in which UAG was reassigned to encode phosphoserine. The method also enabled quantitation of NSAA and natural AA incorporation at UAG in a recombinant reporter protein. As a proof-of-principle, we measured the fidelity and purity of the phosphoserine orthogonal translation system (OTS) and used this information to improve its performance. Our results show a surprising diversity of natural AAs at reassigned stop codons. Our method can be used to improve OTSs and to quantify amino acid purity at reassigned codons in organisms with expanded genetic codes. PMID:25378305

  8. Compound-gene interaction mapping reveals distinct roles for Staphylococcus aureus teichoic acids

    PubMed Central

    Santa Maria, John P.; Sadaka, Ama; Moussa, Samir H.; Brown, Stephanie; Zhang, Yanjia J.; Rubin, Eric J.; Gilmore, Michael S.; Walker, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus contains two distinct teichoic acid (TA) polymers, lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and wall teichoic acid (WTA), which are proposed to play redundant roles in regulating cell division. To gain insight into the underlying biology of S. aureus TAs, we used a small molecule inhibitor to screen a highly saturated transposon library for cellular factors that become essential when WTA is depleted. We constructed an interaction network connecting WTAs with genes involved in LTA synthesis, peptidoglycan synthesis, surface protein display, and D-alanine cell envelope modifications. Although LTAs and WTAs are synthetically lethal, we report that they do not have the same synthetic interactions with other cell envelope genes. For example, D-alanylation, a tailoring modification of both WTAs and LTAs, becomes essential when the former, but not the latter, are removed. Therefore, D-alanine–tailored LTAs are required for survival when WTAs are absent. Examination of terminal phenotoypes led to the unexpected discovery that cells lacking both LTAs and WTAs lose their ability to form Z rings and can no longer divide. We have concluded that the presence of either LTAs or WTAs on the cell surface is required for initiation of S. aureus cell division, but these polymers act as part of distinct cellular networks. PMID:25104751

  9. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides

    PubMed Central

    Gagne, Steve J.; Stout, Jake M.; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M.; Page, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2–C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity. PMID:22802619

  10. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Steve J; Stout, Jake M; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-07-31

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2-C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity.

  11. Metatranscriptomic Analysis of Groundwater Reveals an Active Anammox Bacterial Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Thomas, B. C.; Banfield, J. F.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.; Beller, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is a major natural resource, yet little is known about the contribution of microbial anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity to subsurface nitrogen cycling. During anammox, energy is generated as ammonium is oxidized under anaerobic conditions to dinitrogen gas, using nitrite as the final electron acceptor. This process is a global sink for fixed nitrogen. Only a narrow range of monophyletic bacteria within the Planctomycetes carries out anammox, and the full extent of their metabolism, and subsequent impact on nitrogen cycling and microbial community structure, is still unknown. Here, we employ a metatranscriptomic analysis on enriched mRNA to identify the abundance and activity of a population of anammox bacteria within an aquifer at Rifle, CO. Planktonic biomass was collected over a two-month period after injection of up to 1.5 mM nitrate. Illumina-generated sequences were mapped to a phylogenetically binned Rifle metagenome database. We identified transcripts for genes with high protein sequence identities (81-98%) to those of anammox strain KSU-1 and to two of the five anammox bacteria genera, Brocadia and Kuenenia, suggesting an active, if not diverse, anammox population. Many of the most abundant anammox transcripts mapped to a single scaffold, indicative of a single dominant anammox species. Transcripts of the genes necessary for the anammox pathway were present, including an ammonium transporter (amtB), nitrite/formate transporter, nitrite reductase (nirK), and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzoB). The form of nitrite reductase encoded by anammox is species-dependent, and we only identified nirK, with no evidence of anammox nirS. In addition to the anammox pathway we saw evidence of the anammox bacterial dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium pathway (narH, putative nrfA, and nrfB), which provides an alternate means of generating substrates for anammox from nitrate, rather than relying on an external pool. Transcripts for hydroxylamine

  12. The acidic pH-induced structural changes in Pin1 as revealed by spectral methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Xi, Lei; Zhu, Guo-Fei; Han, Yong-Guang; Luo, Yue; Wang, Mei; Du, Lin-Fang

    2012-12-01

    Pin1 is closely associated with the pathogenesis of cancers and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously, we have shown the characteristics of the thermal denaturation of Pin1. Herein, the acid-induced denaturation of Pin1 was determined by means of fluorescence emission, synchronous fluorescence, far-UV CD, ANS fluorescence and RLS spectroscopies. The fluorescence emission spectra and the synchronous fluorescence spectra suggested the partially reversible unfolding (approximately from pH 7.0 to 4.0) and refolding (approximately from pH 4.0 to 1.0) of the structures around the chromophores in Pin1, apparently with an intermediate state at about pH 4.0-4.5. The far-UV CD spectra indicated that acidic pH (below pH 4.0) induced the structural transition from α-helix and random coils to β-sheet in Pin1. The ANS fluorescence and the RLS spectra further suggested the exposure of the hydrophobic side-chains of Pin1 and the aggregation of it especially below pH 2.3, and the aggregation possibly resulted in the formation of extra intermolecular β-sheet. The present work primarily shows that acidic pH can induce kinds of irreversible structural changes in Pin1, such as the exposure of the hydrophobic side-chains, the transition from α-helix to β-sheet and the aggregation of Pin1, and also explains why Pin1 loses most of its activity below pH 5.0. The results emphasize the important role of decreased pH in the pathogenesis of some Pin1-related diseases, and support the therapeutic approach for them by targeting acidosis and modifying the intracellular pH gradients.

  13. Insight toward epithelial Na+ channel mechanism revealed by the acid-sensing ion channel 1 structure.

    PubMed

    Stockand, James D; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Booth, Rachell E; Silverthorn, Dee U

    2008-09-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG) protein family includes a diverse group of ion channels, including nonvoltage-gated Na(+) channels of epithelia and neurons, and the acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1). In mammalian epithelia, ENaC helps regulate Na(+) and associated water transport, making it a critical determinant of systemic blood pressure and pulmonary mucosal fluidity. In the nervous system, ENaC/DEG proteins are related to sensory transduction. While the importance and physiological function of these ion channels are established, less is known about their structure. One hallmark of the ENaC/DEG channel family is that each channel subunit has only two transmembrane domains connected by an exceedingly large extracellular loop. This subunit structure was recently confirmed when Jasti and colleagues determined the crystal structure of chicken ASIC1, a neuronal acid-sensing ENaC/DEG channel. By mapping ENaC to the structural coordinates of cASIC1, as we do here, we hope to provide insight toward ENaC structure. ENaC, like ASIC1, appears to be a trimeric channel containing 1alpha, 1beta, and 1gamma subunit. Heterotrimeric ENaC and monomeric ENaC subunits within the trimer possibly contain many of the major secondary, tertiary, and quaternary features identified in cASIC1 with a few subtle but critical differences. These differences are expected to have profound effects on channel behavior. In particular, they may contribute to ENaC insensitivity to acid and to its constitutive activity in the absence of time- and ligand-dependent inactivation. Experiments resulting from this comparison of cASIC1 and ENaC may help clarify unresolved issues related to ENaC architecture, and may help identify secondary structures and residues critical to ENaC function.

  14. XPS analysis of humic and fulvic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Desbene, P.L.; Silly, L.; Morizur, J.P.; Delamar, M.

    1986-01-01

    The composition of humic and fulvic acids is examined using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS results are compared to that of elemental analyses. XPS permits an easy detection of the different chemical forms of carbon and sulfur that exist in these complex compounds.

  15. Acid Rain Analysis by Standard Addition Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    The standard addition titration is a precise and rapid method for the determination of the acidity in rain or snow samples. The method requires use of a standard buret, a pH meter, and Gran's plot to determine the equivalence point. Experimental procedures used and typical results obtained are presented. (JN)

  16. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals Specific Novel Tetrapeptide and Potential Anti-Inflammatory Metabolites in Pathogenic Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim-Chung; Tam, Emily W T; Lo, Ka-Ching; Tsang, Alan K L; Lau, Candy C Y; To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Jasper F W; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-01-01

    Infections related to Aspergillus species have emerged to become an important focus in infectious diseases, as a result of the increasing use of immunosuppressive agents and high fatality associated with invasive aspergillosis. However, laboratory diagnosis of Aspergillus infections remains difficult. In this study, by comparing the metabolomic profiles of the culture supernatants of 30 strains of six pathogenic Aspergillus species (A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. terreus, A. nomius and A. tamarii) and 31 strains of 10 non-Aspergillus fungi, eight compounds present in all strains of the six Aspergillus species but not in any strain of the non-Aspergillus fungi were observed. One of the eight compounds, Leu-Glu-Leu-Glu, is a novel tetrapeptide and represents the first linear tetrapeptide observed in Aspergillus species, which we propose to be named aspergitide. Two other closely related Aspergillus-specific compounds, hydroxy-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid and (sulfooxy)benzoic acid, may possess anti-inflammatory properties, as 2-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid possesses a structure similar to those of aspirin [2-(acetoxy)benzoic acid] and salicylic acid (2-hydroxybenzoic acid). Further studies to examine the potentials of these Aspergillus-specific compounds for laboratory diagnosis of aspergillosis are warranted and further experiments will reveal whether Leu-Glu-Leu-Glu, hydroxy-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid and (sulfooxy)benzoic acid are virulent factors of the pathogenic Aspergillus species. PMID:26090713

  17. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals Specific Novel Tetrapeptide and Potential Anti-Inflammatory Metabolites in Pathogenic Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim-Chung; Tam, Emily W T; Lo, Ka-Ching; Tsang, Alan K L; Lau, Candy C Y; To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Jasper F W; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-06-17

    Infections related to Aspergillus species have emerged to become an important focus in infectious diseases, as a result of the increasing use of immunosuppressive agents and high fatality associated with invasive aspergillosis. However, laboratory diagnosis of Aspergillus infections remains difficult. In this study, by comparing the metabolomic profiles of the culture supernatants of 30 strains of six pathogenic Aspergillus species (A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. terreus, A. nomius and A. tamarii) and 31 strains of 10 non-Aspergillus fungi, eight compounds present in all strains of the six Aspergillus species but not in any strain of the non-Aspergillus fungi were observed. One of the eight compounds, Leu-Glu-Leu-Glu, is a novel tetrapeptide and represents the first linear tetrapeptide observed in Aspergillus species, which we propose to be named aspergitide. Two other closely related Aspergillus-specific compounds, hydroxy-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid and (sulfooxy)benzoic acid, may possess anti-inflammatory properties, as 2-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid possesses a structure similar to those of aspirin [2-(acetoxy)benzoic acid] and salicylic acid (2-hydroxybenzoic acid). Further studies to examine the potentials of these Aspergillus-specific compounds for laboratory diagnosis of aspergillosis are warranted and further experiments will reveal whether Leu-Glu-Leu-Glu, hydroxy-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid and (sulfooxy)benzoic acid are virulent factors of the pathogenic Aspergillus species.

  18. Image Restoration and Analysis of Influenza Virions Binding to Membrane Receptors Reveal Adhesion-Strengthening Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donald W.; Hsu, Hung-Lun; Bacon, Kaitlyn B.; Daniel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    With the development of single-particle tracking (SPT) microscopy and host membrane mimics called supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), stochastic virus-membrane binding interactions can be studied in depth while maintaining control over host receptor type and concentration. However, several experimental design challenges and quantitative image analysis limitations prevent the widespread use of this approach. One main challenge of SPT studies is the low signal-to-noise ratio of SPT videos, which is sometimes inevitable due to small particle sizes, low quantum yield of fluorescent dyes, and photobleaching. These situations could render current particle tracking software to yield biased binding kinetic data caused by intermittent tracking error. Hence, we developed an effective image restoration algorithm for SPT applications called STAWASP that reveals particles with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.2 while preserving particle features. We tested our improvements to the SPT binding assay experiment and imaging procedures by monitoring X31 influenza virus binding to α2,3 sialic acid glycolipids. Our interests lie in how slight changes to the peripheral oligosaccharide structures can affect the binding rate and residence times of viruses. We were able to detect viruses binding weakly to a glycolipid called GM3, which was undetected via assays such as surface plasmon resonance. The binding rate was around 28 folds higher when the virus bound to a different glycolipid called GD1a, which has a sialic acid group extending further away from the bilayer surface than GM3. The improved imaging allowed us to obtain binding residence time distributions that reflect an adhesion-strengthening mechanism via multivalent bonds. We empirically fitted these distributions using a time-dependent unbinding rate parameter, koff, which diverges from standard treatment of koff as a constant. We further explain how to convert these models to fit ensemble-averaged binding data obtained by assays such

  19. Chemical genetics reveals negative regulation of abscisic acid signaling by a plant immune response pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Hauser, Felix; Ha, Tracy; Xue, Shaowu; Böhmer, Maik; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Munemasa, Shintaro; Hubbard, Katharine; Peine, Nora; Lee, Byeong-Ha; Lee, Stephen; Robert, Nadia; Parker, Jane E; Schroeder, Julian I

    2011-06-01

    Coordinated regulation of protection mechanisms against environmental abiotic stress and pathogen attack is essential for plant adaptation and survival. Initial abiotic stress can interfere with disease-resistance signaling [1-6]. Conversely, initial plant immune signaling may interrupt subsequent abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction [7, 8]. However, the processes involved in this crosstalk between these signaling networks have not been determined. By screening a 9600-compound chemical library, we identified a small molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that rapidly downregulates ABA-dependent gene expression and also inhibits ABA-induced stomatal closure. Transcriptome analyses show that DFPM also stimulates expression of plant defense-related genes. Major early regulators of pathogen-resistance responses, including EDS1, PAD4, RAR1, and SGT1b, are required for DFPM-and notably also for Pseudomonas-interference with ABA signal transduction, whereas salicylic acid, EDS16, and NPR1 are not necessary. Although DFPM does not interfere with early ABA perception by PYR/RCAR receptors or ABA activation of SnRK2 kinases, it disrupts cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling and downstream anion channel activation in a PAD4-dependent manner. Our findings provide evidence that activation of EDS1/PAD4-dependent plant immune responses rapidly disrupts ABA signal transduction and that this occurs at the level of Ca(2+) signaling, illuminating how the initial biotic stress pathway interferes with ABA signaling.

  20. Differential RNA-seq, Multi-Network Analysis and Metabolic Regulation Analysis of Kluyveromyces marxianus Reveals a Compartmentalised Response to Xylose.

    PubMed

    Schabort, Du Toit W P; Letebele, Precious K; Steyn, Laurinda; Kilian, Stephanus G; du Preez, James C

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the transcriptomic response of a new strain of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, in glucose and xylose media using RNA-seq. The data were explored in a number of innovative ways using a variety of networks types, pathway maps, enrichment statistics, reporter metabolites and a flux simulation model, revealing different aspects of the genome-scale response in an integrative systems biology manner. The importance of the subcellular localisation in the transcriptomic response is emphasised here, revealing new insights. As was previously reported by others using a rich medium, we show that peroxisomal fatty acid catabolism was dramatically up-regulated in a defined xylose mineral medium without fatty acids, along with mechanisms to activate fatty acids and transfer products of β-oxidation to the mitochondria. Notably, we observed a strong up-regulation of the 2-methylcitrate pathway, supporting capacity for odd-chain fatty acid catabolism. Next we asked which pathways would respond to the additional requirement for NADPH for xylose utilisation, and rationalised the unexpected results using simulations with Flux Balance Analysis. On a fundamental level, we investigated the contribution of the hierarchical and metabolic regulation levels to the regulation of metabolic fluxes. Metabolic regulation analysis suggested that genetic level regulation plays a major role in regulating metabolic fluxes in adaptation to xylose, even for the high capacity reactions, which is unexpected. In addition, isozyme switching may play an important role in re-routing of metabolic fluxes in subcellular compartments in K. marxianus. PMID:27315089

  1. Differential RNA-seq, Multi-Network Analysis and Metabolic Regulation Analysis of Kluyveromyces marxianus Reveals a Compartmentalised Response to Xylose

    PubMed Central

    Schabort, Du Toit W. P.; Letebele, Precious K.; Steyn, Laurinda; Kilian, Stephanus G.; du Preez, James C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the transcriptomic response of a new strain of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, in glucose and xylose media using RNA-seq. The data were explored in a number of innovative ways using a variety of networks types, pathway maps, enrichment statistics, reporter metabolites and a flux simulation model, revealing different aspects of the genome-scale response in an integrative systems biology manner. The importance of the subcellular localisation in the transcriptomic response is emphasised here, revealing new insights. As was previously reported by others using a rich medium, we show that peroxisomal fatty acid catabolism was dramatically up-regulated in a defined xylose mineral medium without fatty acids, along with mechanisms to activate fatty acids and transfer products of β-oxidation to the mitochondria. Notably, we observed a strong up-regulation of the 2-methylcitrate pathway, supporting capacity for odd-chain fatty acid catabolism. Next we asked which pathways would respond to the additional requirement for NADPH for xylose utilisation, and rationalised the unexpected results using simulations with Flux Balance Analysis. On a fundamental level, we investigated the contribution of the hierarchical and metabolic regulation levels to the regulation of metabolic fluxes. Metabolic regulation analysis suggested that genetic level regulation plays a major role in regulating metabolic fluxes in adaptation to xylose, even for the high capacity reactions, which is unexpected. In addition, isozyme switching may play an important role in re-routing of metabolic fluxes in subcellular compartments in K. marxianus. PMID:27315089

  2. Field-Based Stable Isotope Probing Reveals the Identities of Benzoic Acid-Metabolizing Microorganisms and Their In Situ Growth in Agricultural Soil▿

    PubMed Central

    Pumphrey, Graham M.; Madsen, Eugene L.

    2008-01-01

    We used a combination of stable isotope probing (SIP), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based respiration, isolation/cultivation, and quantitative PCR procedures to discover the identity and in situ growth of soil microorganisms that metabolize benzoic acid. We added [13C]benzoic acid or [12C]benzoic acid (100 μg) once, four times, or five times at 2-day intervals to agricultural field plots. After monitoring 13CO2 evolution from the benzoic acid-dosed soil, field soils were harvested and used for nucleic acid extraction and for cultivation of benzoate-degrading bacteria. Exposure of soil to benzoate increased the number of culturable benzoate degraders compared to unamended soil, and exposure to benzoate shifted the dominant culturable benzoate degraders from Pseudomonas species to Burkholderia species. Isopycnic separation of heavy [13C]DNA from the unlabeled fraction allowed terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses to confirm that distinct 16S rRNA genes were localized in the heavy fraction. Phylogenetic analysis of sequenced 16S rRNA genes revealed a predominance (15 of 58 clones) of Burkholderia species in the heavy fraction. Burkholderia sp. strain EBA09 shared 99.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity with a group of clones representing the dominant RFLP pattern, and the T-RFLP fragment for strain EBA09 and a clone from that cluster matched the fragment enriched in the [13C]DNA fraction. Growth of the population represented by EBA09 during the field-dosing experiment was demonstrated by using most-probable-number-PCR and primers targeting EBA09 and the closely related species Burkholderia hospita. Thus, the target population identified by SIP not only actively metabolized benzoic acid but reproduced in the field upon the addition of the substrate. PMID:18469130

  3. Field-based stable isotope probing reveals the identities of benzoic acid-metabolizing microorganisms and their in situ growth in agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Pumphrey, Graham M; Madsen, Eugene L

    2008-07-01

    We used a combination of stable isotope probing (SIP), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based respiration, isolation/cultivation, and quantitative PCR procedures to discover the identity and in situ growth of soil microorganisms that metabolize benzoic acid. We added [(13)C]benzoic acid or [(12)C]benzoic acid (100 microg) once, four times, or five times at 2-day intervals to agricultural field plots. After monitoring (13)CO(2) evolution from the benzoic acid-dosed soil, field soils were harvested and used for nucleic acid extraction and for cultivation of benzoate-degrading bacteria. Exposure of soil to benzoate increased the number of culturable benzoate degraders compared to unamended soil, and exposure to benzoate shifted the dominant culturable benzoate degraders from Pseudomonas species to Burkholderia species. Isopycnic separation of heavy [(13)C]DNA from the unlabeled fraction allowed terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses to confirm that distinct 16S rRNA genes were localized in the heavy fraction. Phylogenetic analysis of sequenced 16S rRNA genes revealed a predominance (15 of 58 clones) of Burkholderia species in the heavy fraction. Burkholderia sp. strain EBA09 shared 99.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity with a group of clones representing the dominant RFLP pattern, and the T-RFLP fragment for strain EBA09 and a clone from that cluster matched the fragment enriched in the [(13)C]DNA fraction. Growth of the population represented by EBA09 during the field-dosing experiment was demonstrated by using most-probable-number-PCR and primers targeting EBA09 and the closely related species Burkholderia hospita. Thus, the target population identified by SIP not only actively metabolized benzoic acid but reproduced in the field upon the addition of the substrate.

  4. In situ proteo-metabolomics reveals metabolite secretion by the acid mine drainage bio-indicator, Euglena mutabilis

    PubMed Central

    Halter, David; Goulhen-Chollet, Florence; Gallien, Sébastien; Casiot, Corinne; Hamelin, Jérôme; Gilard, Françoise; Heintz, Dimitri; Schaeffer, Christine; Carapito, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Bertin, Philippe N

    2012-01-01

    Euglena mutabilis is a photosynthetic protist found in acidic aquatic environments such as peat bogs, volcanic lakes and acid mine drainages (AMDs). Through its photosynthetic metabolism, this protist is supposed to have an important role in primary production in such oligotrophic ecosystems. Nevertheless, the exact contribution of E. mutabilis in organic matter synthesis remains unclear and no evidence of metabolite secretion by this protist has been established so far. Here we combined in situ proteo-metabolomic approaches to determine the nature of the metabolites accumulated by this protist or potentially secreted into an AMD. Our results revealed that the secreted metabolites are represented by a large number of amino acids, polyamine compounds, urea and some sugars but no fatty acids, suggesting a selective organic matter contribution in this ecosystem. Such a production may have a crucial impact on the bacterial community present on the study site, as it has been suggested previously that prokaryotes transport and recycle in situ most of the metabolites secreted by E. mutabilis. Consequently, this protist may have an indirect but important role in AMD ecosystems but also in other ecological niches often described as nitrogen-limited. PMID:22237547

  5. Down-regulation of the Caffeic acid O-methyltransferase Gene in Switchgrass Reveals a Novel Monolignol Analog

    SciTech Connect

    Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Standaert, Robert F; Engle, Nancy L; Martin, Madhavi Z; Sangha, Amandeep K; Parks, Jerry M; Smith, Jeremy C; Samuel, Reichel; Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, A J; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Fu, Chunxiang; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Davison, Brian H; Dixon, Richard A; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Down-regulation of the caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene in the lignin biosynthetic pathway of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) resulted in cell walls of transgenic plants releasing more constituent sugars after pretreatment by dilute acid and treatment with glycosyl hydrolases from an added enzyme preparation and from Clostridium thermocellum. Fermentation of both wild-type and transgenic switchgrass after milder hot water pretreatment with no water washing showed that only the transgenic switchgrass inhibited C. thermocellum. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics were undertaken on cell wall aqueous extracts to determine the nature of the microbial inhibitors, confirming the increased concentration of a number of phenolic acids and aldehydes that are known inhibitors of fermentation. Metabolomic analyses of the transgenic biomass additionally revealed the presence of a novel monolignol-like metabolite, identified as trans-3, 4-dimethoxy-5-hydroxycinnamyl alcohol (iso-sinapyl alcohol) in both non-pretreated, as well as hot water pretreated samples. Although there was no indication that iso-sinapyl alcohol was integrated into the cell wall, diversion of substrates from sinapyl alcohol to free iso-sinapyl alcohol, its glucoside, and associated upstream lignin pathway changes, including increased phenolic aldehydes and acids, are associated with more facile cell wall deconstruction, and to the observed inhibitory effect on microbial growth.

  6. Co-expression network analysis reveals transcription factors associated to cell wall biosynthesis in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Savio Siqueira; Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Poelking, Viviane Guzzo de Carli; Leite, Debora Chaves Coelho; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Barbosa, Marcio Henrique Pereira; Carneiro, Monalisa Sampaio; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2016-05-01

    Sugarcane is a hybrid of Saccharum officinarum and Saccharum spontaneum, with minor contributions from other species in Saccharum and other genera. Understanding the molecular basis of cell wall metabolism in sugarcane may allow for rational changes in fiber quality and content when designing new energy crops. This work describes a comparative expression profiling of sugarcane ancestral genotypes: S. officinarum, S. spontaneum and S. robustum and a commercial hybrid: RB867515, linking gene expression to phenotypes to identify genes for sugarcane improvement. Oligoarray experiments of leaves, immature and intermediate internodes, detected 12,621 sense and 995 antisense transcripts. Amino acid metabolism was particularly evident among pathways showing natural antisense transcripts expression. For all tissues sampled, expression analysis revealed 831, 674 and 648 differentially expressed genes in S. officinarum, S. robustum and S. spontaneum, respectively, using RB867515 as reference. Expression of sugar transporters might explain sucrose differences among genotypes, but an unexpected differential expression of histones were also identified between high and low Brix° genotypes. Lignin biosynthetic genes and bioenergetics-related genes were up-regulated in the high lignin genotype, suggesting that these genes are important for S. spontaneum to allocate carbon to lignin, while S. officinarum allocates it to sucrose storage. Co-expression network analysis identified 18 transcription factors possibly related to cell wall biosynthesis while in silico analysis detected cis-elements involved in cell wall biosynthesis in their promoters. Our results provide information to elucidate regulatory networks underlying traits of interest that will allow the improvement of sugarcane for biofuel and chemicals production. PMID:26820137

  7. Co-expression network analysis reveals transcription factors associated to cell wall biosynthesis in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Savio Siqueira; Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Poelking, Viviane Guzzo de Carli; Leite, Debora Chaves Coelho; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Barbosa, Marcio Henrique Pereira; Carneiro, Monalisa Sampaio; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2016-05-01

    Sugarcane is a hybrid of Saccharum officinarum and Saccharum spontaneum, with minor contributions from other species in Saccharum and other genera. Understanding the molecular basis of cell wall metabolism in sugarcane may allow for rational changes in fiber quality and content when designing new energy crops. This work describes a comparative expression profiling of sugarcane ancestral genotypes: S. officinarum, S. spontaneum and S. robustum and a commercial hybrid: RB867515, linking gene expression to phenotypes to identify genes for sugarcane improvement. Oligoarray experiments of leaves, immature and intermediate internodes, detected 12,621 sense and 995 antisense transcripts. Amino acid metabolism was particularly evident among pathways showing natural antisense transcripts expression. For all tissues sampled, expression analysis revealed 831, 674 and 648 differentially expressed genes in S. officinarum, S. robustum and S. spontaneum, respectively, using RB867515 as reference. Expression of sugar transporters might explain sucrose differences among genotypes, but an unexpected differential expression of histones were also identified between high and low Brix° genotypes. Lignin biosynthetic genes and bioenergetics-related genes were up-regulated in the high lignin genotype, suggesting that these genes are important for S. spontaneum to allocate carbon to lignin, while S. officinarum allocates it to sucrose storage. Co-expression network analysis identified 18 transcription factors possibly related to cell wall biosynthesis while in silico analysis detected cis-elements involved in cell wall biosynthesis in their promoters. Our results provide information to elucidate regulatory networks underlying traits of interest that will allow the improvement of sugarcane for biofuel and chemicals production.

  8. Structure of Vibrio cholerae ToxT reveals a mechanism for fatty acid regulation of virulence genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, Michael J.; Skorupski, Karen; Pellegrini, Maria; Chiorazzo, Michael G.; Taylor, Ronald K.; Kull, F. Jon

    2010-03-04

    Cholera is an acute intestinal infection caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. In order for V. cholerae to cause disease, it must produce two virulence factors, the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT), whose expression is controlled by a transcriptional cascade culminating with the expression of the AraC-family regulator, ToxT. We have solved the 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of ToxT, which reveals folds in the N- and C-terminal domains that share a number of features in common with AraC, MarA, and Rob as well as the unexpected presence of a buried 16-carbon fatty acid, cis-palmitoleate. The finding that cis-palmitoleic acid reduces TCP and CT expression in V. cholerae and prevents ToxT from binding to DNA in vitro provides a direct link between the host environment of V. cholerae and regulation of virulence gene expression.

  9. Analysis of SSH library of rice variety Aganni reveals candidate gall midge resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Divya, Dhanasekar; Singh, Y Tunginba; Nair, Suresh; Bentur, J S

    2016-03-01

    The Asian rice gall midge, Orseolia oryzae, is a serious insect pest causing extensive yield loss. Interaction between the gall midge and rice genotypes is known to be on a gene-for-gene basis. Here, we report molecular basis of HR- (hypersensitive reaction-negative) type of resistance in Aganni (an indica rice variety possessing gall midge resistance gene Gm8) through the construction and analysis of a suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH) cDNA library. In all, 2,800 positive clones were sequenced and analyzed. The high-quality ESTs were assembled into 448 non-redundant gene sequences. Homology search with the NCBI databases, using BlastX and BlastN, revealed that 73% of the clones showed homology to genes with known function and majority of ESTs belonged to the gene ontology category 'biological process'. Validation of 27 putative candidate gall midge resistance genes through real-time PCR, following gall midge infestation, in contrasting parents and their derived pre-NILs (near isogenic lines) revealed induction of specific genes related to defense and metabolism. Interestingly, four genes, belonging to families of leucine-rich repeat (LRR), heat shock protein (HSP), pathogenesis related protein (PR), and NAC domain-containing protein, implicated in conferring HR+ type of resistance, were found to be up-regulated in Aganni. Two of the reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI)-scavenging-enzyme-coding genes Cytosolic Ascorbate Peroxidase1, 2 (OsAPx1 and OsAPx2) were found up-regulated in Aganni in incompatible interaction possibly suppressing HR. We suggest that Aganni has a deviant form of inducible, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated resistance but without HR. PMID:26801786

  10. Analysis of SSH library of rice variety Aganni reveals candidate gall midge resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Divya, Dhanasekar; Singh, Y Tunginba; Nair, Suresh; Bentur, J S

    2016-03-01

    The Asian rice gall midge, Orseolia oryzae, is a serious insect pest causing extensive yield loss. Interaction between the gall midge and rice genotypes is known to be on a gene-for-gene basis. Here, we report molecular basis of HR- (hypersensitive reaction-negative) type of resistance in Aganni (an indica rice variety possessing gall midge resistance gene Gm8) through the construction and analysis of a suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH) cDNA library. In all, 2,800 positive clones were sequenced and analyzed. The high-quality ESTs were assembled into 448 non-redundant gene sequences. Homology search with the NCBI databases, using BlastX and BlastN, revealed that 73% of the clones showed homology to genes with known function and majority of ESTs belonged to the gene ontology category 'biological process'. Validation of 27 putative candidate gall midge resistance genes through real-time PCR, following gall midge infestation, in contrasting parents and their derived pre-NILs (near isogenic lines) revealed induction of specific genes related to defense and metabolism. Interestingly, four genes, belonging to families of leucine-rich repeat (LRR), heat shock protein (HSP), pathogenesis related protein (PR), and NAC domain-containing protein, implicated in conferring HR+ type of resistance, were found to be up-regulated in Aganni. Two of the reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI)-scavenging-enzyme-coding genes Cytosolic Ascorbate Peroxidase1, 2 (OsAPx1 and OsAPx2) were found up-regulated in Aganni in incompatible interaction possibly suppressing HR. We suggest that Aganni has a deviant form of inducible, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated resistance but without HR.

  11. Genomic analysis reveals the molecular basis for capsule loss in the group B Streptococcus population.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Roberto; Campisi, Edmondo; De Chiara, Matteo; Tettelin, Hervé; Rinaudo, Daniela; Toniolo, Chiara; Metruccio, Matteo; Guidotti, Silvia; Sørensen, Uffe B Skov; Kilian, Mogens; Ramirez, Mario; Janulczyk, Robert; Donati, Claudio; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl transferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity.

  12. Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Analysis of Whole Saliva Reveals a Distinct Phosphorylation Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Matthew D.; Chen, Xiaobing; McGowan, Thomas; Bandhakavi, Sricharan; Cheng, Bin; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Griffin, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    In-depth knowledge of bodily fluid phosphoproteomes, such as whole saliva, is limited. To better understand the whole saliva phosphoproteome, we generated a large-scale catalog of phosphorylated proteins. To circumvent the wide dynamic range of phosphoprotein abundance in whole saliva, we combined dynamic range compression using hexapeptide beads, strong cation exchange HPLC peptide fractionation, and immobilized metal affinity chromatography prior to mass spectrometry. In total, 217 unique phosphopeptides sites were identified representing 85 distinct phosphoproteins at 2.3% global FDR. From these peptides, 129 distinct phosphorylation sites were identified of which 57 were previously known, but only 11 of which had been previously identified in whole saliva. Cellular localization analysis revealed salivary phosphoproteins had a distribution similar to all known salivary proteins, but with less relative representation in “extracellular” and “plasma membrane” categories compared to salivary glycoproteins. Sequence alignment showed that phosphorylation occurred at acidic-directed kinase, proline-directed, and basophilic motifs. This differs from plasma phosphoproteins, which predominantly occur at Golgi casein kinase recognized sequences. Collectively, these results suggest diverse functions for salivary phosphoproteins and multiple kinases involved in their processing and secretion. In all, this study should lay groundwork for future elucidation of the functions of salivary protein phosphorylation. PMID:21299198

  13. Comparative genome analysis reveals the molecular basis of nicotine degradation and survival capacities of Arthrobacter

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuxiang; Tang, Hongzhi; Su, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Arthrobacter is one of the most prevalent genera of nicotine-degrading bacteria; however, studies of nicotine degradation in Arthrobacter species remain at the plasmid level (plasmid pAO1). Here, we report the bioinformatic analysis of a nicotine-degrading Arthrobacter aurescens M2012083, and show that the moeB and mogA genes that are essential for nicotine degradation in Arthrobacter are absent from plasmid pAO1. Homologues of all the nicotine degradation-related genes of plasmid pAO1 were found to be located on a 68,622-bp DNA segment (nic segment-1) in the M2012083 genome, showing 98.1% nucleotide acid sequence identity to the 69,252-bp nic segment of plasmid pAO1. However, the rest sequence of plasmid pAO1 other than the nic segment shows no significant similarity to the genome sequence of strain M2012083. Taken together, our data suggest that the nicotine degradation-related genes of strain M2012083 are located on the chromosome or a plasmid other than pAO1. Based on the genomic sequence comparison of strain M2012083 and six other Arthrobacter strains, we have identified 17 σ70 transcription factors reported to be involved in stress responses and 109 genes involved in environmental adaptability of strain M2012083. These results reveal the molecular basis of nicotine degradation and survival capacities of Arthrobacter species. PMID:25721465

  14. Genomic Analysis Reveals the Molecular Basis for Capsule Loss in the Group B Streptococcus Population

    PubMed Central

    Rosini, Roberto; Campisi, Edmondo; De Chiara, Matteo; Tettelin, Hervé; Rinaudo, Daniela; Toniolo, Chiara; Metruccio, Matteo; Guidotti, Silvia; Sørensen, Uffe B. Skov; Kilian, Mogens; Ramirez, Mario; Janulczyk, Robert; Donati, Claudio; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl trasferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity. PMID:25946017

  15. Global Phospholipidomics Analysis Reveals Selective Pulmonary Peroxidation Profiles Upon Inhalation of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Kapralova, Valentina I.; Sparvero, Louis J.; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Samhan-Arias, Alejandro K.; Swedin, Linda; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Fadeel, Bengt; Shvedova, Anna A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly believed that nanomaterials cause non-specific oxidative damage. Our mass spectrometry-based oxidative lipidomics analysis of all major phospholipid classes revealed highly selective patterns of pulmonary peroxidation after inhalation exposure of mice to single-walled carbon nanotubes. No oxidized molecular species were found in two most abundant phospholipid classes – phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Peroxidation products were identified in three relatively minor classes of anionic phospholipids, cardiolipin, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol whereby oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acid residues also showed unusual substrate specificity. This non-random peroxidation coincided with the accumulation of apoptotic cells in the lung. A similar selective phospholipid peroxidation profile was detected upon incubation of a mixture of total lung lipids with H2O2/cytochrome c known to catalyze cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation in apoptotic cells. The characterized specific phospholipid peroxidation signaling pathways indicate new approaches to the development of mitochondria targeted regulators of cardiolipin peroxidation to protect against deleterious effects of pro-apoptotic effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the lung. PMID:21800898

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of Lactobacillus plantarum ZJ316 reveals its genetic adaptation and potential probiotic profiles* #

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Li, Xuan; Gu, Qing; Lou, Xiu-yu; Zhang, Xiao-mei; Song, Da-feng; Zhang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In previous studies, Lactobacillus plantarum ZJ316 showed probiotic properties, such as antimicrobial activity against various pathogens and the capacity to significantly improve pig growth and pork quality. The purpose of this study was to reveal the genes potentially related to its genetic adaptation and probiotic profiles based on comparative genomic analysis. Methods: The genome sequence of L. plantarum ZJ316 was compared with those of eight L. plantarum strains deposited in GenBank. BLASTN, Mauve, and MUMmer programs were used for genome alignment and comparison. CRISPRFinder was applied for searching the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Results: We identified genes that encode proteins related to genetic adaptation and probiotic profiles, including carbohydrate transport and metabolism, proteolytic enzyme systems and amino acid biosynthesis, CRISPR adaptive immunity, stress responses, bile salt resistance, ability to adhere to the host intestinal wall, exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis, and bacteriocin biosynthesis. Conclusions: Comparative characterization of the L. plantarum ZJ316 genome provided the genetic basis for further elucidating the functional mechanisms of its probiotic properties. ZJ316 could be considered a potential probiotic candidate. PMID:27487802

  17. Differential proteomic analysis of STAT6 knockout mice reveals new regulatory function in liver lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Iff, Joël; Wang, Wei; Sajic, Tatjana; Oudry, Nathalie; Gueneau, Estelle; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Varesio, Emmanuel; Szanto, Ildiko

    2009-10-01

    Increased inflammatory signaling is a key feature of metabolic disorders. In this context, the role of increased pro-inflammatory signals has been extensively studied. By contrast, no efforts have been dedicated to study the contrasting scenario: the attenuation of anti-inflammatory signals and their role in metabolic homeostasis. IL-4 and IL-13 are anti-inflammatory cytokines signaling through the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 6 (STAT6). Our study was aimed at evaluating the lack of STAT6 signaling on liver homeostasis. To this end we analyzed the liver proteome of wild type and STAT6 knock-out mice using 2D nanoscale LC-MS/MS with iTRAQ labeling technique. The coordinated changes in proteins identified by this quantitative proteome analysis indicated disturbed lipid homeostasis and a state of hepatocellular stress. Most significantly, the expression of the liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1) was increased in the knock-out mice. In line with the elevated FABP1 expression we found latent liver lipid accumulation in the STAT6-deficient mice which was further aggravated when mice were challenged by a high fat diet. In conclusion, our study revealed a so far uncharacterized role for STAT6 in regulating liver lipid homeostasis and demonstrates the importance of anti-inflammatory signaling in the defense against the development of liver steatosis.

  18. Unique Features of Ethnic Mongolian Gut Microbiome revealed by metagenomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjun; Zhang, Jiachao; Wu, Chunyan; Cai, Shunfeng; Huang, Weiqiang; Chen, Jing; XI, Xiaoxia; Liang, Zebin; Hou, Qiangchuan; Zhou, Bing; Qin, Nan; Zhang, Heping

    2016-01-01

    The human gut microbiota varies considerably among world populations due to a variety of factors including genetic background, diet, cultural habits and socioeconomic status. Here we characterized 110 healthy Mongolian adults gut microbiota by shotgun metagenomic sequencing and compared the intestinal microbiome among Mongolians, the Hans and European cohorts. The results showed that the taxonomic profile of intestinal microbiome among cohorts revealed the Actinobaceria and Bifidobacterium were the key microbes contributing to the differences among Mongolians, the Hans and Europeans at the phylum level and genus level, respectively. Metagenomic species analysis indicated that Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Coprococcus comeswere enrich in Mongolian people which might contribute to gut health through anti-inflammatory properties and butyrate production, respectively. On the other hand, the enriched genus Collinsella, biomarker in symptomatic atherosclerosis patients, might be associated with the high morbidity of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases in Mongolian adults. At the functional level, a unique microbial metabolic pathway profile was present in Mongolian’s gut which mainly distributed in amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, glycan biosynthesis and metabolism. We can attribute the specific signatures of Mongolian gut microbiome to their unique genotype, dietary habits and living environment. PMID:27708392

  19. Genomic analysis reveals the molecular basis for capsule loss in the group B Streptococcus population.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Roberto; Campisi, Edmondo; De Chiara, Matteo; Tettelin, Hervé; Rinaudo, Daniela; Toniolo, Chiara; Metruccio, Matteo; Guidotti, Silvia; Sørensen, Uffe B Skov; Kilian, Mogens; Ramirez, Mario; Janulczyk, Robert; Donati, Claudio; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl transferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity. PMID:25946017

  20. Acetic acid bacteria genomes reveal functional traits for adaptation to life in insect guts.

    PubMed

    Chouaia, Bessem; Gaiarsa, Stefano; Crotti, Elena; Comandatore, Francesco; Degli Esposti, Mauro; Ricci, Irene; Alma, Alberto; Favia, Guido; Bandi, Claudio; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2014-04-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) live in sugar rich environments, including food matrices, plant tissues, and the gut of sugar-feeding insects. By comparing the newly sequenced genomes of Asaia platycodi and Saccharibacter sp., symbionts of Anopheles stephensi and Apis mellifera, respectively, with those of 14 other AAB, we provide a genomic view of the evolutionary pattern of this bacterial group and clues on traits that explain the success of AAB as insect symbionts. A specific pre-adaptive trait, cytochrome bo3 ubiquinol oxidase, appears ancestral in AAB and shows a phylogeny that is congruent with that of the genomes. The functional properties of this terminal oxidase might have allowed AAB to adapt to the diverse oxygen levels of arthropod guts.

  1. Acetic Acid Bacteria Genomes Reveal Functional Traits for Adaptation to Life in Insect Guts

    PubMed Central

    Chouaia, Bessem; Gaiarsa, Stefano; Crotti, Elena; Comandatore, Francesco; Degli Esposti, Mauro; Ricci, Irene; Alma, Alberto; Favia, Guido; Bandi, Claudio; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) live in sugar rich environments, including food matrices, plant tissues, and the gut of sugar-feeding insects. By comparing the newly sequenced genomes of Asaia platycodi and Saccharibacter sp., symbionts of Anopheles stephensi and Apis mellifera, respectively, with those of 14 other AAB, we provide a genomic view of the evolutionary pattern of this bacterial group and clues on traits that explain the success of AAB as insect symbionts. A specific pre-adaptive trait, cytochrome bo3 ubiquinol oxidase, appears ancestral in AAB and shows a phylogeny that is congruent with that of the genomes. The functional properties of this terminal oxidase might have allowed AAB to adapt to the diverse oxygen levels of arthropod guts. PMID:24682158

  2. Stable isotope tracer reveals that viviparous snakes transport amino acids to offspring during gestation.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, James U; Beaupre, Steven J

    2012-03-01

    Viviparity and placentation have evolved from oviparity over 100 times in squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes). The independent origins of placentation have resulted in a variety of placental morphologies in different taxa, ranging from simple apposition of fetal and maternal tissues to endotheliochorial implantation that is homoplasious with mammalian placentation. Because the eggs of oviparous squamates transport gases and water from the environment and calcium from the eggshell, the placentae of viviparous squamates are thought to have initially evolved to accomplish these functions from within the maternal oviduct. Species with complex placentae have also been shown to rely substantially, or even primarily, on placental transport of organic nutrients for embryonic nutrition. However, it is unclear whether species with only simple placentae are also capable of transporting organic nutrients to offspring. Among viviparous squamates, all of the snakes that have been studied thus far have been shown to have simple placentae. However, most studies of snake placentation are limited to a single lineage, the North American Natricinae. We tested the abilities of four species of viviparous snakes - Agkistrodon contortrix (Viperidae), Boa constrictor (Boidae), Nerodia sipedon (Colubridae: Natricinae) and Thamnophis sirtalis (Colubridae: Natricinae) - to transport diet-derived amino acids to offspring during gestation. We fed [(15)N]leucine to pregnant snakes, and compared offspring (15)N content with that of unlabeled controls. Labeled females allocated significantly more (15)N to offspring than did controls, but (15)N allocation did not differ among species. Our results indicate that viviparous snakes are capable of transporting diet-derived amino acids to their offspring during gestation, possibly via placentation.

  3. Proteomic-based stable isotope probing reveals taxonomically Distinct Patterns in Amino Acid Assimilation by Coastal Marine Bacterioplankton

    DOE PAGES

    Bryson, Samuel; Li, Zhou; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Robert L. Hettich; Mayali, Xavier; Pan, Chongle; Mueller, Ryan S.

    2016-04-26

    Heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton are a critical component of the carbon cycle, processing nearly a quarter of annual global primary production, yet defining how substrate utilization preferences and resource partitioning structure these microbial communities remains a challenge. In this study, we utilized proteomics-based stable isotope probing (proteomic SIP) to characterize the assimilation of amino acids by coastal marine bacterioplankton populations. We incubated microcosms of seawater collected from Newport, OR and Monterey Bay, CA with 1 M 13C-amino acids for 15 and 32 hours. Subsequent analysis of 13C incorporation into protein biomass quantified the frequency and extent of isotope enrichment for identifiedmore » proteins. Using these metrics we tested whether amino acid assimilation patterns were different for specific bacterioplankton populations. Proteins associated with Rhodobacterales and Alteromonadales tended to have a significantly high number of tandem mass spectra from 13C-enriched peptides, while Flavobacteriales and SAR11 proteins generally had significantly low numbers of 13C-enriched spectra. Rhodobacterales proteins associated with amino acid transport and metabolism had an increased frequency of 13C-enriched spectra at time-point 2, while Alteromonadales ribosomal proteins were 13C- enriched across time-points. Overall, proteomic SIP facilitated quantitative comparisons of dissolved free amino acids assimilation by specific taxa, both between sympatric populations and between protein functional groups within discrete populations, allowing an unprecedented examination of population-level metabolic responses to resource acquisition in complex microbial communities.« less

  4. Analysis of fatty acid content and composition in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Guido; Evers, Wendy A C; de Vree, Jeroen H; Kleinegris, Dorinde M M; Martens, Dirk E; Wijffels, René H; Lamers, Packo P

    2013-01-01

    A method to determine the content and composition of total fatty acids present in microalgae is described. Fatty acids are a major constituent of microalgal biomass. These fatty acids can be present in different acyl-lipid classes. Especially the fatty acids present in triacylglycerol (TAG) are of commercial interest, because they can be used for production of transportation fuels, bulk chemicals, nutraceuticals (ω-3 fatty acids), and food commodities. To develop commercial applications, reliable analytical methods for quantification of fatty acid content and composition are needed. Microalgae are single cells surrounded by a rigid cell wall. A fatty acid analysis method should provide sufficient cell disruption to liberate all acyl lipids and the extraction procedure used should be able to extract all acyl lipid classes. With the method presented here all fatty acids present in microalgae can be accurately and reproducibly identified and quantified using small amounts of sample (5 mg) independent of their chain length, degree of unsaturation, or the lipid class they are part of. This method does not provide information about the relative abundance of different lipid classes, but can be extended to separate lipid classes from each other. The method is based on a sequence of mechanical cell disruption, solvent based lipid extraction, transesterification of fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), and quantification and identification of FAMEs using gas chromatography (GC-FID). A TAG internal standard (tripentadecanoin) is added prior to the analytical procedure to correct for losses during extraction and incomplete transesterification. PMID:24121679

  5. Characterization of VuMATE1 Expression in Response to Iron Nutrition and Aluminum Stress Reveals Adaptation of Rice Bean (Vigna umbellata) to Acid Soils through Cis Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meiya; Xu, Jiameng; Lou, Heqiang; Fan, Wei; Yang, Jianli; Zheng, Shaojian

    2016-01-01

    Rice bean (Vigna umbellata) VuMATE1 appears to be constitutively expressed at vascular system but root apex, and Al stress extends its expression to root apex. Whether VuMATE1 participates in both Al tolerance and Fe nutrition, and how VuMATE1 expression is regulated is of great interest. In this study, the role of VuMATE1 in Fe nutrition was characterized through in planta complementation assays. The transcriptional regulation of VuMATE1 was investigated through promoter analysis and promoter-GUS reporter assays. The results showed that the expression of VuMATE1 was regulated by Al stress but not Fe status. Complementation of frd3-1 with VuMATE1 under VuMATE1 promoter could not restore phenotype, but restored with 35SCaMV promoter. Immunostaining of VuMATE1 revealed abnormal localization of VuMATE1 in vasculature. In planta GUS reporter assay identified Al-responsive cis-acting elements resided between -1228 and -574 bp. Promoter analysis revealed several cis-acting elements, but transcription is not simply regulated by one of these elements. We demonstrated that cis regulation of VuMATE1 expression is involved in Al tolerance mechanism, while not involved in Fe nutrition. These results reveal the evolution of VuMATE1 expression for better adaptation of rice bean to acid soils where Al stress imposed but Fe deficiency pressure released. PMID:27148333

  6. A lysophosphatidic acid analogue is revealed as a potent inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine synthesis, inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gueguen, Geneviéve; Granci, Virginie; Rogalle, Pierre; Briand-Mésange, Fabienne; Wilson, Michéle; Klaébé, Alain; Tercé, François; Chap, Hugues; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Simon, Marie-Françoise; Gaits, Frédérique

    2002-01-01

    A previous study demonstrated that cross-desensitization experiments performed with the lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) analogues (R)- and (S)-N-palmitoyl-norleucinol 1-phosphate (PNPAs) inhibited LPA-induced platelet aggregation without any stereospecificity. Here we report opposite biological effects of the two enantiomers on mitogenesis of IMR-90 fibroblasts in relation to their respective metabolism. (R)PNPA was proliferative, while (S)PNPA induced apoptosis by specifically inhibiting phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis at the last step of the CDP-choline pathway controlled by cholinephosphotransferase. This effect was not direct but required dephosphorylation of PNPAs by ecto-lipid phosphate phosphatase before cellular uptake of the generated N-palmitoyl-norleucinols (PNOHs). Inhibition of cholinephosphotransferase by the derivative (S)PNOH was confirmed by an in vitro assay. (S)PNPA proapoptotic effects led us to clarify the mechanism linking cholinephosphotransferase inhibition to apoptosis. Three proapoptotic responses were observed: the activation of caspase-3, the production of ceramides from newly synthesized pools (as demonstrated by the inhibitor Fumonisin B1) and finally the activation of stress-activated protein kinase, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases 1/2, as a result of ceramide increase. Thus our data demonstrate that synthetic analogues of LPA might display stereospecific effects leading to apoptosis independently of classical LPA-activated pathways. PMID:12197836

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Global Proteome and Lysine Acetylome Reveal the Differential Impacts of VPA and SAHA on HL60 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xin; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Lei; Wang, Fengsong; Qi, Wulin; Yan, Jiawei; Liu, Ning; Sun, Zimin; Liu, Huilan; Peng, Xiaojun; Hao, Yingchan; Zheng, Nan; Wu, Quan

    2016-01-29

    Valproic acid (VPA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) are both HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Previous studies indicated that both inhibitors show therapeutic effects on acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), while the differential impacts of the two different HDACi on AML treatment still remains elusive. In this study, using 3-plex SILAC based quantitative proteomics technique, anti-acetyllysine antibody based affinity enrichment, high resolution LC-MS/MS and intensive bioinformatic analysis, the quantitative proteome and acetylome in SAHA and VPA treated AML HL60 cells were extensively studied. In total, 5,775 proteins and 1,124 lysine acetylation sites were successfully obtained in response to VAP and SAHA treatment. It is found that VPA and SAHA treatment differently induced proteome and acetylome profiling in AML HL60 cells. This study revealed the differential impacts of VPA and SAHA on proteome/acetylome in AML cells, deepening our understanding of HDAC inhibitor mediated AML therapeutics.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Global Proteome and Lysine Acetylome Reveal the Differential Impacts of VPA and SAHA on HL60 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xin; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Lei; Wang, Fengsong; Qi, Wulin; Yan, Jiawei; Liu, Ning; Sun, Zimin; Liu, Huilan; Peng, Xiaojun; Hao, Yingchan; Zheng, Nan; Wu, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) are both HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Previous studies indicated that both inhibitors show therapeutic effects on acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), while the differential impacts of the two different HDACi on AML treatment still remains elusive. In this study, using 3-plex SILAC based quantitative proteomics technique, anti-acetyllysine antibody based affinity enrichment, high resolution LC-MS/MS and intensive bioinformatic analysis, the quantitative proteome and acetylome in SAHA and VPA treated AML HL60 cells were extensively studied. In total, 5,775 proteins and 1,124 lysine acetylation sites were successfully obtained in response to VAP and SAHA treatment. It is found that VPA and SAHA treatment differently induced proteome and acetylome profiling in AML HL60 cells. This study revealed the differential impacts of VPA and SAHA on proteome/acetylome in AML cells, deepening our understanding of HDAC inhibitor mediated AML therapeutics. PMID:26822725

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Global Proteome and Lysine Acetylome Reveal the Differential Impacts of VPA and SAHA on HL60 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xin; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Lei; Wang, Fengsong; Qi, Wulin; Yan, Jiawei; Liu, Ning; Sun, Zimin; Liu, Huilan; Peng, Xiaojun; Hao, Yingchan; Zheng, Nan; Wu, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) are both HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Previous studies indicated that both inhibitors show therapeutic effects on acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), while the differential impacts of the two different HDACi on AML treatment still remains elusive. In this study, using 3-plex SILAC based quantitative proteomics technique, anti-acetyllysine antibody based affinity enrichment, high resolution LC-MS/MS and intensive bioinformatic analysis, the quantitative proteome and acetylome in SAHA and VPA treated AML HL60 cells were extensively studied. In total, 5,775 proteins and 1,124 lysine acetylation sites were successfully obtained in response to VAP and SAHA treatment. It is found that VPA and SAHA treatment differently induced proteome and acetylome profiling in AML HL60 cells. This study revealed the differential impacts of VPA and SAHA on proteome/acetylome in AML cells, deepening our understanding of HDAC inhibitor mediated AML therapeutics. PMID:26822725

  10. Proteomic analysis of Ketogulonicigenium vulgare under glutathione reveals high demand for thiamin transport and antioxidant protection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qian; Zhang, Weiwen; Zhang, Lu; Qiao, Bin; Pan, Chensong; Yi, Hong; Wang, Lili; Yuan, Ying-jin

    2012-01-01

    Ketogulonicigenium vulgare, though grows poorly when mono-cultured, has been widely used in the industrial production of the precursor of vitamin C with the coculture of Bacillus megaterium. Various efforts have been made to clarify the synergic pattern of this artificial microbial community and to improve the growth and production ability of K. vulgare, but there is still no sound explanation. In previous research, we found that the addition of reduced glutathione into K. vulgare monoculture could significantly improve its growth and productivity. By performing SEM and TEM, we observed that after adding GSH into K. vulgare monoculture, cells became about 4-6 folds elongated, and formed intracytoplasmic membranes (ICM). To explore the molecular mechanism and provide insights into the investigation of the synergic pattern of the co-culture system, we conducted a comparative iTRAQ-2-D-LC-MS/MS-based proteomic analysis of K. vulgare grown under reduced glutathione. Principal component analysis of proteomic data showed that after the addition of glutathione, proteins for thiamin/thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) transport, glutathione transport and the maintenance of membrane integrity, together with several membrane-bound dehydrogenases had significant up-regulation. Besides, several proteins participating in the pentose phosphate pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle were also up-regulated. Additionally, proteins combating intracellular reactive oxygen species were also up-regulated, which similarly occurred in K. vulgare when the co-cultured B. megaterium cells lysed from our former research results. This study reveals the demand for transmembrane transport of substrates, especially thiamin, and the demand for antioxidant protection of K. vulgare.

  11. Proteomic analysis of chromoplasts from six crop species reveals insights into chromoplast function and development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Qiang; Yang, Yong; Fei, Zhangjun; Yuan, Hui; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Mazourek, Michael; Kochian, Leon V; Wang, Xiaowu; Li, Li

    2013-02-01

    Chromoplasts are unique plastids that accumulate massive amounts of carotenoids. To gain a general and comparative characterization of chromoplast proteins, this study performed proteomic analysis of chromoplasts from six carotenoid-rich crops: watermelon, tomato, carrot, orange cauliflower, red papaya, and red bell pepper. Stromal and membrane proteins of chromoplasts were separated by 1D gel electrophoresis and analysed using nLC-MS/MS. A total of 953-2262 proteins from chromoplasts of different crop species were identified. Approximately 60% of the identified proteins were predicted to be plastid localized. Functional classification using MapMan bins revealed large numbers of proteins involved in protein metabolism, transport, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, and redox in chromoplasts from all six species. Seventeen core carotenoid metabolic enzymes were identified. Phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, ζ-carotene desaturase, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase, and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 were found in almost all crops, suggesting relative abundance of them among the carotenoid pathway enzymes. Chromoplasts from different crops contained abundant amounts of ATP synthase and adenine nucleotide translocator, which indicates an important role of ATP production and transport in chromoplast development. Distinctive abundant proteins were observed in chromoplast from different crops, including capsanthin/capsorubin synthase and fibrillins in pepper, superoxide dismutase in watermelon, carrot, and cauliflower, and glutathione-S-transferease in papaya. The comparative analysis of chromoplast proteins among six crop species offers new insights into the general metabolism and function of chromoplasts as well as the uniqueness of chromoplasts in specific crop species. This work provides reference datasets for future experimental study of chromoplast biogenesis, development, and regulation in plants.

  12. Proteomic analysis of chromoplasts from six crop species reveals insights into chromoplast function and development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Qiang; Yang, Yong; Li, Li

    2013-01-01

    Chromoplasts are unique plastids that accumulate massive amounts of carotenoids. To gain a general and comparative characterization of chromoplast proteins, this study performed proteomic analysis of chromoplasts from six carotenoid-rich crops: watermelon, tomato, carrot, orange cauliflower, red papaya, and red bell pepper. Stromal and membrane proteins of chromoplasts were separated by 1D gel electrophoresis and analysed using nLC-MS/MS. A total of 953–2262 proteins from chromoplasts of different crop species were identified. Approximately 60% of the identified proteins were predicted to be plastid localized. Functional classification using MapMan bins revealed large numbers of proteins involved in protein metabolism, transport, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, and redox in chromoplasts from all six species. Seventeen core carotenoid metabolic enzymes were identified. Phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, ζ-carotene desaturase, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase, and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 were found in almost all crops, suggesting relative abundance of them among the carotenoid pathway enzymes. Chromoplasts from different crops contained abundant amounts of ATP synthase and adenine nucleotide translocator, which indicates an important role of ATP production and transport in chromoplast development. Distinctive abundant proteins were observed in chromoplast from different crops, including capsanthin/capsorubin synthase and fibrillins in pepper, superoxide dismutase in watermelon, carrot, and cauliflower, and glutathione-S-transferease in papaya. The comparative analysis of chromoplast proteins among six crop species offers new insights into the general metabolism and function of chromoplasts as well as the uniqueness of chromoplasts in specific crop species. This work provides reference datasets for future experimental study of chromoplast biogenesis, development, and regulation in plants. PMID:23314817

  13. Proteomic analysis of chromoplasts from six crop species reveals insights into chromoplast function and development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Qiang; Yang, Yong; Fei, Zhangjun; Yuan, Hui; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Mazourek, Michael; Kochian, Leon V; Wang, Xiaowu; Li, Li

    2013-02-01

    Chromoplasts are unique plastids that accumulate massive amounts of carotenoids. To gain a general and comparative characterization of chromoplast proteins, this study performed proteomic analysis of chromoplasts from six carotenoid-rich crops: watermelon, tomato, carrot, orange cauliflower, red papaya, and red bell pepper. Stromal and membrane proteins of chromoplasts were separated by 1D gel electrophoresis and analysed using nLC-MS/MS. A total of 953-2262 proteins from chromoplasts of different crop species were identified. Approximately 60% of the identified proteins were predicted to be plastid localized. Functional classification using MapMan bins revealed large numbers of proteins involved in protein metabolism, transport, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, and redox in chromoplasts from all six species. Seventeen core carotenoid metabolic enzymes were identified. Phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, ζ-carotene desaturase, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase, and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 were found in almost all crops, suggesting relative abundance of them among the carotenoid pathway enzymes. Chromoplasts from different crops contained abundant amounts of ATP synthase and adenine nucleotide translocator, which indicates an important role of ATP production and transport in chromoplast development. Distinctive abundant proteins were observed in chromoplast from different crops, including capsanthin/capsorubin synthase and fibrillins in pepper, superoxide dismutase in watermelon, carrot, and cauliflower, and glutathione-S-transferease in papaya. The comparative analysis of chromoplast proteins among six crop species offers new insights into the general metabolism and function of chromoplasts as well as the uniqueness of chromoplasts in specific crop species. This work provides reference datasets for future experimental study of chromoplast biogenesis, development, and regulation in plants. PMID:23314817

  14. Exploration of Sulfur Assimilation of Aspergillus fumigatus Reveals Biosynthesis of Sulfur-Containing Amino Acids as a Virulence Determinant

    PubMed Central

    Dümig, Michaela; O'Keeffe, Gráinne; Binder, Jasmin; Doyle, Sean; Beilhack, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections are of major relevance due to the increased numbers of immunocompromised patients, frequently delayed diagnosis, and limited therapeutics. To date, the growth and nutritional requirements of fungi during infection, which are relevant for invasion of the host, are poorly understood. This is particularly true for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, as so far, sources of (macro)elements that are exploited during infection have been identified to only a limited extent. Here, we have investigated sulfur (S) utilization by the human-pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus during invasive growth. Our data reveal that inorganic S compounds or taurine is unlikely to serve as an S source during invasive pulmonary aspergillosis since a sulfate transporter mutant strain and a sulfite reductase mutant strain are fully virulent. In contrast, the S-containing amino acid cysteine is limiting for fungal growth, as proven by the reduced virulence of a cysteine auxotroph. Moreover, phenotypic characterization of this strain further revealed the robustness of the subordinate glutathione redox system. Interestingly, we demonstrate that methionine synthase is essential for A. fumigatus virulence, defining the biosynthetic route of this proteinogenic amino acid as a potential antifungal target. In conclusion, we provide novel insights into the nutritional requirements of A. fumigatus during pathogenesis, a prerequisite to understanding and fighting infection. PMID:26787716

  15. Biometrics from the carbon isotope ratio analysis of amino acids in human hair.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Glen P; An, Yan; Konstantynova, Kateryna I; Rashaid, Ayat H B

    2015-01-01

    This study compares and contrasts the ability to classify individuals into different grouping factors through either bulk isotope ratio analysis or amino-acid-specific isotope ratio analysis of human hair. Using LC-IRMS, we measured the isotope ratios of 14 amino acids in hair proteins independently, and leucine/isoleucine as a co-eluting pair, to provide 15 variables for classification. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the essential amino acids and non-essential amino acids were mostly independent variables in the classification rules, thereby enabling the separation of dietary factors of isotope intake from intrinsic or phenotypic factors of isotope fractionation. Multivariate analysis revealed at least two potential sources of non-dietary factors influencing the carbon isotope ratio values of the amino acids in human hair: body mass index (BMI) and age. These results provide evidence that compound-specific isotope ratio analysis has the potential to go beyond region-of-origin or geospatial movements of individuals-obtainable through bulk isotope measurements-to the provision of physical and characteristic traits about the individuals, such as age and BMI. Further development and refinement, for example to genetic, metabolic, disease and hormonal factors could ultimately be of great assistance in forensic and clinical casework.

  16. Intramolecular allosteric communication in dopamine D2 receptor revealed by evolutionary amino acid covariation

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Yun-Min; Wilkins, Angela D.; Rodriguez, Gustavo J.; Wensel, Theodore G.; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The structural basis of allosteric signaling in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is important in guiding design of therapeutics and understanding phenotypic consequences of genetic variation. The Evolutionary Trace (ET) algorithm previously proved effective in redesigning receptors to mimic the ligand specificities of functionally distinct homologs. We now expand ET to consider mutual information, with validation in GPCR structure and dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) function. The new algorithm, called ET-MIp, identifies evolutionarily relevant patterns of amino acid covariations. The improved predictions of structural proximity and D2R mutagenesis demonstrate that ET-MIp predicts functional interactions between residue pairs, particularly potency and efficacy of activation by dopamine. Remarkably, although most of the residue pairs chosen for mutagenesis are neither in the binding pocket nor in contact with each other, many exhibited functional interactions, implying at-a-distance coupling. The functional interaction between the coupled pairs correlated best with the evolutionary coupling potential derived from dopamine receptor sequences rather than with broader sets of GPCR sequences. These data suggest that the allosteric communication responsible for dopamine responses is resolved by ET-MIp and best discerned within a short evolutionary distance. Most double mutants restored dopamine response to wild-type levels, also suggesting that tight regulation of the response to dopamine drove the coevolution and intramolecular communications between coupled residues. Our approach provides a general tool to identify evolutionary covariation patterns in small sets of close sequence homologs and to translate them into functional linkages between residues. PMID:26979958

  17. A High-Throughput Fatty Acid Profiling Screen Reveals Novel Variations in Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Related Algae

    PubMed Central

    Pflaster, Erin L.; Schwabe, Michael J.; Becker, Joyanne; Wilkinson, Melissa S.; Parmer, Ashley; Clemente, Thomas E.; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) by gas chromatography (GC) is a common technique for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of acyl lipids. Methods for FAME preparation are typically time-consuming and labor-intensive and require multiple transfers of reagents and products between reaction tubes and autosampler vials. In order to increase throughput and lower the time and materials costs required for FAME preparation prior to GC analysis, we have developed a method in which 10-to-20-mg samples of microbial biomass are transferred to standard GC autosampler vials, transesterified using an emulsion of methanolic trimethylsulfonium hydroxide and hexane, and analyzed directly by GC without further sample handling. This method gives results that are essentially identical to those obtained by the more labor- and material-intensive FAME preparation methods, such as transmethylation with methanolic HCl. We applied this method to the screening of laboratory and environmental isolates of the green alga Chlamydomonas for variations in fatty acid composition. This screening method facilitated two novel discoveries. First, we identified a common laboratory strain of C. reinhardtii, CC-620, completely lacking all ω-3 fatty acids normally found in this organism and showed that this strain contains an inactivating mutation in the CrFAD7 gene, encoding the sole ω-3 desaturase activity in this organism. Second, we showed that some species of Chlamydomonas make Δ6-unsaturated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) rather than the Δ5 species normally made by the previously characterized laboratory strains of Chlamydomonas, suggesting that there is species-specific variation in the regiospecificity and substrate selectivity of front-end desaturases in this algal genus. PMID:25239975

  18. Genetic identification of ACC-RESISTANT2 reveals involvement of LYSINE HISTIDINE TRANSPORTER1 in the uptake of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kihye; Lee, Sumin; Song, Won-Yong; Lee, Rin-A; Lee, Inhye; Ha, Kyungsun; Koo, Ja-Choon; Park, Soon-Ki; Nam, Hong-Gil; Lee, Youngsook; Soh, Moon-Soo

    2015-03-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) is a biosynthetic precursor of ethylene, a gaseous plant hormone which controls a myriad of aspects of development and stress adaptation in higher plants. Here, we identified a mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana, designated as ACC-resistant2 (are2), displaying a dose-dependent resistance to exogenously applied ACC. Physiological analyses revealed that mutation of are2 impaired various aspects of exogenous ACC-induced ethylene responses, while not affecting sensitivity to other plant hormones during seedling development. Interestingly, the are2 mutant was normally sensitive to gaseous ethylene, compared with the wild type. Double mutant analysis showed that the ethylene-overproducing mutations, eto1 or eto3, and the constitutive ethylene signaling mutation, ctr1 were epistatic to the are2 mutation. These results suggest that the are2 mutant is not defective in ethylene biosynthesis or ethylene signaling per se. Map-based cloning of ARE2 demonstrated that LYSINE HISTIDINE TRANSPORTER1 (LHT1), encoding an amino acid transporter, is the gene responsible. An uptake experiment with radiolabeled ACC indicated that mutations of LHT1 reduced, albeit not completely, uptake of ACC. Further, we performed an amino acid competition assay and found that two amino acids, alanine and glycine, known as substrates of LHT1, could suppress the ACC-induced triple response in a LHT1-dependent way. Taken together, these results provide the first molecular genetic evidence supporting that a class of amino acid transporters including LHT1 takes part in transport of ACC, thereby influencing exogenous ACC-induced ethylene responses in A. thaliana. PMID:25520403

  19. Analysis of single nucleic acid molecules with protein nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Maglia, Giovanni; Heron, Andrew J.; Stoddart, David; Japrung, Deanpen; Bayley, Hagan

    2011-01-01

    We describe the methods used in our laboratory for the analysis of single nucleic acid molecules with protein nanopores. The technical section is preceded by a review of the variety of experiments that can be done with protein nanopores. The end goal of much of this work is single-molecule DNA sequencing, although sequencing is not discussed explicitly here. The technical section covers the equipment required for nucleic acid analysis, the preparation and storage of the necessary materials, and aspects of signal processing and data analysis. PMID:20627172

  20. Function of Several Critical Amino Acids in Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Revealed by Its Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Ciszak, E.; Patel, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1), an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer, catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate and reductive acetylation of lipoyl moieties of the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The roles of beta W135, alpha P188, alpha M181, alpha H15 and alpha R349 of E1 determined by kinetic analysis were reassessed by analyzing the three-dimensional structure of human E1. The residues identified above are found to play a structural role rather than being directly involved in catalysis: beta W135 is the center residue in the hydrophobic interaction between beta and beta' subunits; alpha P188 and alpha M181 are critical for the conformation of the TPP-binding motif and interaction between alpha and beta subunits; alpha H15, is necessary for the organization of the N-terminus of alpha and alpha'; subunits and alpha R349 supports the interaction of the C-terminus of the alpha subunits with the beta subunits. Analysis of several critical E1 residues confirms the importance of residues distant from the active site for subunit interactions and enzyme function.

  1. High-throughput sequence analysis reveals structural diversity and improved potency among RNA inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Ditzler, Mark A.; Lange, Margaret J.; Bose, Debojit; Bottoms, Christopher A.; Virkler, Katherine F.; Sawyer, Andrew W.; Whatley, Angela S.; Spollen, William; Givan, Scott A.; Burke, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    Systematic evolution of ligands through exponential enrichment (SELEX) is a well-established method for generating nucleic acid populations that are enriched for specified functions. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) enhances the power of comparative sequence analysis to reveal details of how RNAs within these populations recognize their targets. We used HTS analysis to evaluate RNA populations selected to bind type I human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (RT). The populations are enriched in RNAs of independent lineages that converge on shared motifs and in clusters of RNAs with nearly identical sequences that share common ancestry. Both of these features informed inferences of the secondary structures of enriched RNAs, their minimal structural requirements and their stabilities in RT-aptamer complexes. Monitoring population dynamics in response to increasing selection pressure revealed RNA inhibitors of RT that are more potent than the previously identified pseudoknots. Improved potency was observed for inhibition of both purified RT in enzymatic assays and viral replication in cell-based assays. Structural and functional details of converged motifs that are obscured by simple consensus descriptions are also revealed by the HTS analysis. The approach presented here can readily be generalized for the efficient and systematic post-SELEX development of aptamers for down-stream applications. PMID:23241386

  2. Proteomic Dissection of Endosperm Starch Granule Associated Proteins Reveals a Network Coordinating Starch Biosynthesis and Amino Acid Metabolism and Glycolysis in Rice Endosperms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huatao; Wang, Tai

    2016-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis and starch granule packaging in cereal endosperms involve a coordinated action of starch biosynthesis enzymes and coordination with other metabolisms. Because directly binding to starch granules, starch granule-associated proteins (SGAPs) are essential to understand the underlying mechanisms, however the information on SGAPs remains largely unknown. Here, we dissected developmentally changed SGAPs from developing rice endosperms from 10 to 20 days after flowering (DAF). Starch granule packaging was not completed at 10 DAF, and was finished in the central endosperm at 15 DAF and in the whole endosperm at 20 DAF. Proteomic analysis with two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed 115 developmentally changed SGAPs, representing 37 unique proteins. 65% of the unique proteins had isoforms. 39% of the identified SGAPs were involved in starch biosynthesis with main functions in polyglucan elongation and granule structure trimming. Almost all proteins involved in starch biosynthesis, amino acid biosynthesis, glycolysis, protein folding, and PPDK pathways increased abundance as the endosperm developed, and were predicted in an interaction network. The network represents an important mechanism to orchestrate carbon partitioning among starch biosynthesis, amino acid biosynthesis and glycolysis for efficient starch and protein storage. These results provide novel insights into mechanisms of starch biosynthesis and its coordination with amino acid metabolisms and glycolysis in cereal endosperms.

  3. Down-regulation of the caffeic acid O-methyltransferase gene in switchgrass reveals a novel monolignol analog

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Down-regulation of the caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase EC 2.1.1.68 (COMT) gene in the lignin biosynthetic pathway of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) resulted in cell walls of transgenic plants releasing more constituent sugars after pretreatment by dilute acid and treatment with glycosyl hydrolases from an added enzyme preparation and from Clostridium thermocellum. Fermentation of both wild-type and transgenic switchgrass after milder hot water pretreatment with no water washing showed that only the transgenic switchgrass inhibited C. thermocellum. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GCMS)-based metabolomics were undertaken on cell wall aqueous extracts to determine the nature of the microbial inhibitors. Results GCMS confirmed the increased concentration of a number of phenolic acids and aldehydes that are known inhibitors of microbial fermentation. Metabolomic analyses of the transgenic biomass additionally revealed the presence of a novel monolignol-like metabolite, identified as trans-3, 4-dimethoxy-5-hydroxycinnamyl alcohol (iso-sinapyl alcohol) in both non-pretreated, as well as hot water pretreated samples. iso-Sinapyl alcohol and its glucoside were subsequently generated by organic synthesis and the identity of natural and synthetic materials were confirmed by mass spectrometric and NMR analyses. The additional novel presence of iso-sinapic acid, iso-sinapyl aldehyde, and iso-syringin suggest the increased activity of a para-methyltransferase, concomitant with the reduced COMT activity, a strict meta-methyltransferase. Quantum chemical calculations were used to predict the most likely homodimeric lignans generated from dehydration reactions, but these products were not evident in plant samples. Conclusions Down-regulation of COMT activity in switchgrass resulted in the accumulation of previously undetected metabolites resembling sinapyl alcohol and its related metabolites, but that are derived from para-methylation of 5-hydroxyconiferyl

  4. Analysis of Free Amino Acid Pools in Fungal Mycelia

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, J. G.; Davies, D. M.; Haworth, C.

    1972-01-01

    Free amino acid pools derived from three different types of fungal mycelia have been analyzed by the method of Heathcote and Haworth by using thinlayer chromatography. The preliminary extraction was carried out with boiling water and interfering proteins; peptides and salts were first removed by means of an ion-retardation resin. As far as determined, the results obtained represent the first quantitative analysis of fungal amino acid pools. PMID:4622829

  5. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm. PMID:26748867

  6. Typing of Histoplasma capsulatum strains by fatty acid profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarnowski, Robert; Miyazaki, Makoto; Dobrzyn, Agnieszka; Ntambi, James M; Woods, Jon P

    2007-06-01

    The performance of fatty acid profiling for strain differentiation of Histoplasma capsulatum was assessed. Total fatty acids were isolated from the yeast-phase cells of seven stock and two previously unreported clinical strains of H. capsulatum var. capsulatum, as well as from one unreported clinical strain and one stock strain of H. capsulatum var. duboisii, and one strain of each of three other dimorphic zoopathogenic fungal species, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii. Different colony morphology and pigmentation types of the H. capsulatum strains were also included. The most frequently occurring fatty acids were oleic, palmitic, stearic and linoleic acids. There were variations in the relative percentage fatty acid contents of H. capsulatum strains that could be used for strain identification and discrimination. Differentiation between H. capsulatum strains was achieved by the comparison of detected fatty acids accompanied by principal component analysis using calculated Varimax-rotated principal component loadings. Statistical analysis yielded three major principal components that explained over 94 % of total variance in the data. All the strains of H. capsulatum var. capsulatum RFLP classes II and III were grouped into two distinct clusters: the heterogenic RFLP class I formed a large, but also well-defined group, whereas the outgroup strains of H. capsulatum var. duboisii, B. dermatitidis, P. brasiliensis and S. schenckii were shifted away. These data suggest that fatty acid profiling can be used in H. capsulatum strain classification and epidemiological studies that require strain differentiation at the intraspecies level. PMID:17510264

  7. In vivo imaging of farnesoid X receptor activity reveals the ileum as the primary bile acid signaling tissue.

    PubMed

    Houten, Sander M; Volle, David H; Cummins, Carolyn L; Mangelsdorf, David J; Auwerx, Johan

    2007-06-01

    We generated and characterized a firefly luciferase reporter mouse for the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR). This FXR reporter mouse has basal luciferase expression in the terminal ileum, an organ with well-characterized FXRalpha signaling. In vivo luciferase activity reflected the diurnal activity pattern of the mouse, and is regulated by both natural (bile acids, chenodeoxycholic acid) and synthetic (GW4064) FXRalpha ligands. Moreover, in vivo and in vitro analysis showed luciferase activity after GW4064 administration in the liver, kidney, and adrenal gland, indicating that FXRalpha signaling is functional in these tissues. Hepatic luciferase activity was robustly induced in cholestatic mice, showing that FXRalpha signaling pathways are activated in this disease. In conclusion, we have developed an FXR reporter mouse that is useful to monitor FXRalpha signaling in vivo in health and disease. The use of this animal could facilitate the development of new therapeutic compounds that target FXRalpha in a tissue-specific manner.

  8. Metabolomics analysis reveals the compositional differences of shade grown tea (Camellia sinensis L.).

    PubMed

    Ku, Kang Mo; Choi, Jung Nam; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Jeong Kee; Yoo, Lang Gook; Lee, Sang Jun; Hong, Young-Shick; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2010-01-13

    The different cultivation methods affect tea quality by altering the basic metabolite profiles. In this study, the metabolome changes were investigated in green tea and shade cultured green tea (tencha) by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) coupled with a multivariate data set. The principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminate analysis (OPLS-DA) of green tea clearly showed higher levels of galloylquinic acid, epigallocatechin, epicatechin, succinic acid, and fructose, together with lower levels of gallocatechin, strictinin, apigenin glucosyl arabinoside, quercetin p-coumaroylglucosyl-rhamnosylgalactoside, kaempferol p-coumaroylglucosylrhamnosylgalactoside, malic acid, and pyroglutamic acid than tencha. The effects of some seasonal variations were also observed in the primary metabolite concentrations such as amino acids and organic acids. In addition, green tea showed stronger antioxidant activity than tencha in both April and July. The antioxidant activity of green tea samples were significantly correlated with their total phenol and total flavonoid contents. This present study delineates the possibility to get high umami and less astringent green teas in shade culture. It highlights the metabolomic approaches to find out the effect of cultivation methods on chemical composition in plants and the relationship with antioxidant activity.

  9. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  10. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Lipids and Gene Expression Reveals Differences in Fatty Acid Metabolism between Follicular Compartments in Porcine Ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Uzbekova, Svetlana; Elis, Sebastien; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Desmarchais, Alice; Maillard, Virginie; Labas, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, oocytes develop inside the ovarian follicles; this process is strongly supported by the surrounding follicular environment consisting of cumulus, granulosa and theca cells, and follicular fluid. In the antral follicle, the final stages of oogenesis require large amounts of energy that is produced by follicular cells from substrates including glucose, amino acids and fatty acids (FAs). Since lipid metabolism plays an important role in acquiring oocyte developmental competence, the aim of this study was to investigate site-specificity of lipid metabolism in ovaries by comparing lipid profiles and expression of FA metabolism-related genes in different ovarian compartments. Using MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging, images of porcine ovary sections were reconstructed from lipid ion signals for the first time. Cluster analysis of ion spectra revealed differences in spatial distribution of lipid species among ovarian compartments, notably between the follicles and interstitial tissue. Inside the follicles analysis differentiated follicular fluid, granulosa, theca and the oocyte-cumulus complex. Moreover, by transcript quantification using real time PCR, we showed that expression of five key genes in FA metabolism significantly varied between somatic follicular cells (theca, granulosa and cumulus) and the oocyte. In conclusion, lipid metabolism differs between ovarian and follicular compartments. PMID:25756245

  11. Digital PCR analysis of circulating nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Hudecova, Irena

    2015-10-01

    Detection of plasma circulating nucleic acids (CNAs) requires the use of extremely sensitive and precise methods. The commonly used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) poses certain technical limitations in relation to the precise measurement of CNAs whereas the costs of massively parallel sequencing are still relatively high. Digital PCR (dPCR) now represents an affordable and powerful single molecule counting strategy to detect minute amounts of genetic material with performance surpassing many quantitative methods. Microfluidic (chip) and emulsion (droplet)-based technologies have already been integrated into platforms offering hundreds to millions of nanoliter- or even picoliter-scale reaction partitions. The compelling observations reported in the field of cancer research, prenatal testing, transplantation medicine and virology support translation of this technology into routine use. Extremely sensitive plasma detection of rare mutations originating from tumor or placental cells among a large background of homologous sequences facilitates unraveling of the early stages of cancer or the detection of fetal mutations. Digital measurement of quantitative changes in plasma CNAs associated with cancer or graft rejection provides valuable information on the monitoring of disease burden or the recipient's immune response and subsequent therapy treatment. Furthermore, careful quantitative assessment of the viral load offers great value for effective monitoring of antiviral therapy for immunosuppressed or transplant patients. The present review describes the inherent features of dPCR that make it exceptionally robust in precise and sensitive quantification of CNAs. Moreover, I provide an insight into the types of potential clinical applications that have been developed by researchers to date. PMID:25828047

  12. Analysis of the generating action of the acid from PAG using acid sensitive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko; Konishi, Hiroko; Moriyasu, Kengo; Morimoto, Yukihiro

    2011-04-01

    The use of acid sensitive dyes to determine the quantity of acid generated from PAG and in the analysis of acid-generating reaction is currently being studied. The method would allow an easy understanding of the PAG acid-generating reaction simply by adding an acid sensitive dye to the resist. In the conventional method, a resist containing a chromogenic substance is applied to a quartz substrate, which is then exposed. Following the exposure, the absorbance of chromogenic component near 530 nm is measured and evaluated with a spectroscope. The rate constant for acid generation (Dill's C parameter) during the exposure is determined based on the relationship between transmittance at 530 nm and the exposure dose. However, the chromogenic substance used in this method degrades over time (fading reaction) after the exposure, resulting in variations in transmittance measurements due to the effects of time between the completion of the exposure and the measurement of transmittance. We devised a prototype instrument capable of in situ measurements of absorbance at 530 nm while irradiating a 193-nm light beam. Using this instrument, we obtained rate constants for acid generation (Dill's C parameter) and examined the differing results obtained with ArF resist polymers of differing PAG concentrations and structures as well as dependence on the quantity of the chromogenic substance.

  13. Molecular Determinants of Juvenile Hormone Action as Revealed by 3D QSAR Analysis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Beňo, Milan; Farkaš, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background Postembryonic development, including metamorphosis, of many animals is under control of hormones. In Drosophila and other insects these developmental transitions are regulated by the coordinate action of two principal hormones, the steroid ecdysone and the sesquiterpenoid juvenile hormone (JH). While the mode of ecdysone action is relatively well understood, the molecular mode of JH action remains elusive. Methodology/Principal Findings To gain more insights into the molecular mechanism of JH action, we have tested the biological activity of 86 structurally diverse JH agonists in Drosophila melanogaster. The results were evaluated using 3D QSAR analyses involving CoMFA and CoMSIA procedures. Using this approach we have generated both computer-aided and species-specific pharmacophore fingerprints of JH and its agonists, which revealed that the most active compounds must possess an electronegative atom (oxygen or nitrogen) at both ends of the molecule. When either of these electronegative atoms are replaced by carbon or the distance between them is shorter than 11.5 Å or longer than 13.5 Å, their biological activity is dramatically decreased. The presence of an electron-deficient moiety in the middle of the JH agonist is also essential for high activity. Conclusions/Significance The information from 3D QSAR provides guidelines and mechanistic scope for identification of steric and electrostatic properties as well as donor and acceptor hydrogen-bonding that are important features of the ligand-binding cavity of a JH target protein. In order to refine the pharmacophore analysis and evaluate the outcomes of the CoMFA and CoMSIA study we used pseudoreceptor modeling software PrGen to generate a putative binding site surrogate that is composed of eight amino acid residues corresponding to the defined molecular interactions. PMID:19547707

  14. Carbon sources in the Beaufort Sea revealed by molecular lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolosa, I.; Fiorini, S.; Gasser, B.; Martín, J.; Miquel, J. C.

    2012-10-01

    Molecular lipid biomarkers (hydrocarbons, alcohols, sterols and fatty acids) and compound specific isotope analysis of suspended particulate organic matter (SPM) and surface sediments of the Mackenzie Shelf and slope (Southeast Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean), were studied in summer 2009. The concentrations of the molecular lipid markers, characteristic of known organic matter sources, were grouped and used as proxies to evaluate the relative importance of fresh algal, detrital algal, fossil, C3 terrestrial plants, bacterial and zooplankton material in the sedimentary organic matter (OM). Fossil and detrital algal contributions were the major fractions of the freshwater SPM from the Mackenzie River with ~34% each of the total molecular biomarkers. Fresh algal, C3 terrestrial, bacterial and zooplanktonic components represented much lower percentages, 17, 10, 4 and < 1%, respectively. In marine SPM from the Mackenzie slope, the major contributions were fresh and detrital algal components (> 80%) with a minor contribution of fossil and C3 terrestrial biomarkers. Characterization of the sediments revealed a major sink of refractory algal material mixed with some fresh algal material, fossil hydrocarbons and a small input of C3 terrestrial sources. In particular, the sediments from the shelf and at the mouth of the Amundsen Gulf presented the highest contribution of detrital algal material (60-75%) whereas those from the slope contained the highest proportion of fossil (40%) and C3 terrestrial plant material (10%). Overall, considering that the detrital algal material is marine derived, autochthonous sources contributed more than allochthonous sources to the OM lipid pool. Using the ratio of an allochthonous biomarker (normalized to total organic carbon, TOC) found in the sediments to those measured at the river mouth water, we estimated that the fraction of terrestrial material preserved in the sediments accounted for 30-40% of the total carbon in the inner shelf sediments

  15. A novel mechanism of gall midge resistance in the rice variety Kavya revealed by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Nidhi; Chiruvuri Naga, Neeraja; Raman Meenakshi, Sundaram; Nair, Suresh; Bentur, Jagadish S

    2012-06-01

    The Asian rice gall midge [Orseolia oryzae (Wood-Mason)] is an important rice pest causing an annual average yield loss of about US $80 million in India. Rice varieties possess several discrete resistance (R) genes conferring resistance against the pest in two distinct ways, i.e., with (HR+ type) or without (HR- type) the expression of hypersensitive reaction (HR). The aim of the present work is to understand the molecular basis of compatible and incompatible (HR- type) rice gall midge interactions between the rice variety Kavya and the two gall midge biotypes: the virulent GMB4M and the avirulent GMB1 using transcriptional microarray gene expression analysis. A large number of differentially expressed genes (602genes in incompatible interaction and 1,330 genes in compatible interaction with at least twofold changes, p value <0.05) was obtained from the microarray analysis that could be grouped into six clusters based on their induction during both or either of the interactions. MapMan software was used for functional characterization of these genes into 13 categories (BINs). Real-time polymerase chain reaction validation of 26 genes selected through the analysis revealed four genes viz. NADPH oxidase, AtrbohF, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase, and von Willebrand factor type A domain containing protein coding genes to be significantly upregulated during the incompatible interaction. But most of the signature genes related to HR+ type resistance like salicylic acid pathway-related genes and disease resistance protein coding genes were downregulated. On the other hand, during the compatible interaction, genes related to primary metabolism and nutrient transport were upregulated and genes for defense and signaling were downregulated. We propose a hypothesis that HR- type of resistance in the rice variety Kavya against gall midge could be due to the constitutive expression of an R gene and a case of extreme resistance which is devoid of cell death. Compatible interaction

  16. Integrated metabolomic and proteomic analysis reveals systemic responses of Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 to aniline stress.

    PubMed

    Mujahid, Md; Prasuna, M Lakshmi; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch Venkata

    2015-02-01

    Aromatic amines are widely distributed in the environment and are major environmental pollutants. Although degradation of aromatic amines is well studied in bacteria, physiological adaptations and stress response to these toxic compounds is not yet fully understood. In the present study, systemic responses of Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 to aniline stress were deciphered using metabolite and iTRAQ-labeled protein profiling. Strain JA2 tolerated high concentrations of aniline (30 mM) with trace amounts of aniline being transformed to acetanilide. GC-MS metabolite profiling revealed aniline stress phenotype wherein amino acid, carbohydrate, fatty acid, nitrogen metabolisms, and TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) were modulated. Strain JA2 responded to aniline by remodeling the proteome, and cellular functions, such as signaling, transcription, translation, stress tolerance, transport and carbohydrate metabolism, were highly modulated. Key adaptive responses, such as transcription/translational changes, molecular chaperones to control protein folding, and efflux pumps implicated in solvent extrusion, were induced in response to aniline stress. Proteo-metabolomics indicated extensive rewiring of metabolism to aniline. TCA cycle and amino acid catabolism were down-regulated while gluconeogenesis and pentose phosphate pathways were up-regulated, leading to the synthesis of extracellular polymeric substances. Furthermore, increased saturated fatty acid ratios in membranes due to aniline stress suggest membrane adaptation. The present study thus indicates that strain JA2 employs multilayered responses: stress response, toxic compound tolerance, energy conservation, and metabolic rearrangements to aniline.

  17. Integrated metabolomic and proteomic analysis reveals systemic responses of Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 to aniline stress.

    PubMed

    Mujahid, Md; Prasuna, M Lakshmi; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch Venkata

    2015-02-01

    Aromatic amines are widely distributed in the environment and are major environmental pollutants. Although degradation of aromatic amines is well studied in bacteria, physiological adaptations and stress response to these toxic compounds is not yet fully understood. In the present study, systemic responses of Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 to aniline stress were deciphered using metabolite and iTRAQ-labeled protein profiling. Strain JA2 tolerated high concentrations of aniline (30 mM) with trace amounts of aniline being transformed to acetanilide. GC-MS metabolite profiling revealed aniline stress phenotype wherein amino acid, carbohydrate, fatty acid, nitrogen metabolisms, and TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) were modulated. Strain JA2 responded to aniline by remodeling the proteome, and cellular functions, such as signaling, transcription, translation, stress tolerance, transport and carbohydrate metabolism, were highly modulated. Key adaptive responses, such as transcription/translational changes, molecular chaperones to control protein folding, and efflux pumps implicated in solvent extrusion, were induced in response to aniline stress. Proteo-metabolomics indicated extensive rewiring of metabolism to aniline. TCA cycle and amino acid catabolism were down-regulated while gluconeogenesis and pentose phosphate pathways were up-regulated, leading to the synthesis of extracellular polymeric substances. Furthermore, increased saturated fatty acid ratios in membranes due to aniline stress suggest membrane adaptation. The present study thus indicates that strain JA2 employs multilayered responses: stress response, toxic compound tolerance, energy conservation, and metabolic rearrangements to aniline. PMID:25388363

  18. Acid rain: Some preliminary results from global data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequeira, R.

    1981-02-01

    Preliminary results of an analysis of global precipitation data from WMO (World Meteorological Organization) stations suggest that even remote maritime baseline stations, far removed from major continents, could become predisposed to acid rain if there is a deficiency of non-marine calcium relative to non-marine sulfate. The regional stations show greater complexity than the baseline stations in their precipitation chemistry. The overall results of this analysis suggest that not all non-marine sulfate and nitrate in precipitation could be present as acid.

  19. Design and exploration of novel boronic acid inhibitors reveals important interactions with a clavulanic acid-resistant sulfhydryl-variable (SHV) β-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Marisa L; Rodkey, Elizabeth A; Taracila, Magdalena A; Drawz, Sarah M; Bethel, Christopher R; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M; Smith, Kerri M; Xu, Yan; Dwulit-Smith, Jeffrey R; Romagnoli, Chiara; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; van den Akker, Focco; Bonomo, Robert A

    2013-02-14

    Inhibitor resistant (IR) class A β-lactamases pose a significant threat to many current antibiotic combinations. The K234R substitution in the SHV β-lactamase, from Klebsiella pneumoniae , results in resistance to ampicillin/clavulanate. After site-saturation mutagenesis of Lys-234 in SHV, microbiological and biochemical characterization of the resulting β-lactamases revealed that only -Arg conferred resistance to ampicillin/clavulanate. X-ray crystallography revealed two conformations of Arg-234 and Ser-130 in SHV K234R. The movement of Ser-130 is the principal cause of the observed clavulanate resistance. A panel of boronic acid inhibitors was designed and tested against SHV-1 and SHV K234R. A chiral ampicillin analogue was discovered to have a 2.4 ± 0.2 nM K(i) for SHV K234R; the chiral ampicillin analogue formed a more complex hydrogen-bonding network in SHV K234R vs SHV-1. Consideration of the spatial position of Ser-130 and Lys-234 and this hydrogen-bonding network will be important in the design of novel antibiotics targeting IR β-lactamases.

  20. Design and Exploration of Novel Boronic Acid Inhibitors Reveals Important Interactions with a Clavulanic Acid-Resistant Sulfhydryl-Variable (SHV) β-Lactamase

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Marisa L.; Rodkey, Elizabeth A.; Taracila, Magdalena A.; Drawz, Sarah M.; Bethel, Christopher R.; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M.; Smith, Kerri M.; Xu, Yan; Dwulit-Smith, Jeffrey R.; Romagnoli, Chiara; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; van den Akker, Focco; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitor resistant (IR) class A β-lactamases pose a significant threat to many current antibiotic combinations. The K234R substitution in the SHV β-lactamase, from Klebsiella pneumoniae, results in resistance to ampicillin/clavulanate. After site-saturation mutagenesis of Lys-234 in SHV, microbiological and biochemical characterization of the resulting β-lactamases revealed that only –Arg conferred resistance to ampicillin/clavulanate. X-ray crystallography revealed two conformations of Arg-234 and Ser-130 in SHV K234R. The movement of Ser-130 is the principal cause of the observed clavulanate resistance. A panel of boronic acid inhibitors was designed and tested against SHV-1 and SHV K234R. A chiral ampicillin analogue was discovered to have a 2.4 ± 0.2 nM Ki for SHV K234R; the chiral ampicillin analogue formed a more complex hydrogen-bonding network in SHV K234R vs SHV-1. Consideration of the spatial position of Ser-130 and Lys-234 and this hydrogen-bonding network will be important in the design of novel antibiotics targeting IR β-lactamases. PMID:23252553

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopy reveals accompanying occurrence of ammonium with fulvic acid-like organic matter in a fluvio-lacustrine aquifer of Jianhan Plain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuangbing; Wang, Yanxin; Ma, Teng; Wang, Yanyan; Zhao, Long

    2016-05-01

    This study is the first to investigate the simultaneous presence of NH4 (+) and fluorescent organic matter components (FOCs) from a fluvio-lacustrine aquifer in Central Jianghan Plain. Sediment, groundwater, and surface water samples were collected for the sediment organic matter extraction, 3D fluorescence spectroscopy characterization, and/or hydrochemical analysis. NH4 (+) and dissolved organic carbon was ubiquitous in the groundwater. The fluorescence spectroscopy revealed good relationships between NH4 (+) and fulvic acid-like components (FALCs) in the groundwater and sediment-extracted organic matter (SEOM) solutions. NH4 (+) also exhibited significant positive correlation with protein-like component (PLC) (p < 0.001), with the stronger in the SEOM solutions than that in groundwater. Comparisons of spectroscopic indices [e.g., humification index (HIX), biological index (BIX), spectra slope (S275-295), and specific UV absorbance (SUVA254)] between the groundwater and SEOM solutions revealed more labile properties of SEOM. This result indicates that the decreasing NH4 (+)-FOCs correlations of groundwater relative to sediments may be attributed to microbial degradation. Factor analysis identifies important factors that cause NH4 (+) occurrence in the groundwater. The accompanying increase of FALC (C1) and NH4-N with the mole concentration of the normalized HCO3 (-)/(Ca(2+)+Mg(2+)) and [H(+)] suggests that couple effects of various biodegradations simultaneously occur in the aquifer, promoting the occurrence of NH4-DOMs.

  2. Activation of acid-sensing ion channels by localized proton transient reveals their role in proton signaling.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Zheng; Liu, Di-Shi; Liu, Lu; She, Liang; Wu, Long-Jun; Xu, Tian-Le

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular transients of pH alterations likely mediate signal transduction in the nervous system. Neuronal acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) act as sensors for extracellular protons, but the mechanism underlying ASIC activation remains largely unknown. Here, we show that, following activation of a light-activated proton pump, Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch), proton transients induced ASIC currents in both neurons and HEK293T cells co-expressing ASIC1a channels. Using chimera proteins that bridge Arch and ASIC1a by a glycine/serine linker, we found that successful coupling occurred within 15 nm distance. Furthermore, two-cell sniffer patch recording revealed that regulated release of protons through either Arch or voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 activated neighbouring cells expressing ASIC1a channels. Finally, computational modelling predicted the peak proton concentration at the intercellular interface to be at pH 6.7, which is acidic enough to activate ASICs in vivo. Our results highlight the pathophysiological role of proton signalling in the nervous system. PMID:26370138

  3. Newly identified essential amino acid residues affecting Δ8-sphingolipid desaturase activity revealed by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Fen; Song, Li-Ying; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Yin, Wei-Bo; Chen, Yu-Hong; Wang, Richard R-C; Hu, Zan-Min

    2011-12-01

    In order to identify amino acid residues crucial for the enzymatic activity of Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturases, a sequence comparison was performed among Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturases and Δ(6)-fatty acid desaturases from various plants. In addition to the known conserved cytb(5) (cytochrome b(5)) HPGG motif and three conserved histidine boxes, they share additional 15 completely conserved residues. A series of site-directed mutants were generated using our previously isolated Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturase gene from Brassica rapa to evaluate the importance of these residues to the enzyme function. The mutants were functionally characterized by heterologous expression in yeast, allowing the identification of the products of the enzymes. The results revealed that residues H63, N203, D208, D210, and G368 were obligatorily required for the enzymatic activity, and substitution of the residues F59, W190, W345, L369 and Q372 markedly decreased the enzyme activity. Among them, replacement of the residues W190, L369 and Q372 also has significant influence on the ratio of the two enzyme products. Information obtained in this work provides the molecular basis for the Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturase activity and aids in our understanding of the structure-function relationships of the membrane-bound desaturases.

  4. Activation of acid-sensing ion channels by localized proton transient reveals their role in proton signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei-Zheng; Liu, Di-Shi; Liu, Lu; She, Liang; Wu, Long-Jun; Xu, Tian-Le

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular transients of pH alterations likely mediate signal transduction in the nervous system. Neuronal acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) act as sensors for extracellular protons, but the mechanism underlying ASIC activation remains largely unknown. Here, we show that, following activation of a light-activated proton pump, Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch), proton transients induced ASIC currents in both neurons and HEK293T cells co-expressing ASIC1a channels. Using chimera proteins that bridge Arch and ASIC1a by a glycine/serine linker, we found that successful coupling occurred within 15 nm distance. Furthermore, two-cell sniffer patch recording revealed that regulated release of protons through either Arch or voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 activated neighbouring cells expressing ASIC1a channels. Finally, computational modelling predicted the peak proton concentration at the intercellular interface to be at pH 6.7, which is acidic enough to activate ASICs in vivo. Our results highlight the pathophysiological role of proton signalling in the nervous system. PMID:26370138

  5. Activation of acid-sensing ion channels by localized proton transient reveals their role in proton signaling.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Zheng; Liu, Di-Shi; Liu, Lu; She, Liang; Wu, Long-Jun; Xu, Tian-Le

    2015-09-15

    Extracellular transients of pH alterations likely mediate signal transduction in the nervous system. Neuronal acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) act as sensors for extracellular protons, but the mechanism underlying ASIC activation remains largely unknown. Here, we show that, following activation of a light-activated proton pump, Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch), proton transients induced ASIC currents in both neurons and HEK293T cells co-expressing ASIC1a channels. Using chimera proteins that bridge Arch and ASIC1a by a glycine/serine linker, we found that successful coupling occurred within 15 nm distance. Furthermore, two-cell sniffer patch recording revealed that regulated release of protons through either Arch or voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 activated neighbouring cells expressing ASIC1a channels. Finally, computational modelling predicted the peak proton concentration at the intercellular interface to be at pH 6.7, which is acidic enough to activate ASICs in vivo. Our results highlight the pathophysiological role of proton signalling in the nervous system.

  6. Genetic dissection of the polyoxin building block-carbamoylpolyoxamic acid biosynthesis revealing the “pathway redundancy” in metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyoxin, a peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic, consists of three building blocks including a nucleoside skeleton, polyoximic acid (POIA), and carbamoylpolyoxamic acid (CPOAA), however, little is known about the “pathway redundancy” of the metabolic networks directing the CPOAA biosynthesis in the cell factories of the polyoxin producer. Results Here we report the genetic characterization of CPOAA biosynthesis with revealing a “pathway redundancy” in metabolic networks. Independent mutation of the four genes (polL-N and polP) directly resulted in the accumulation of polyoxin I, suggesting their positive roles for CPOAA biosynthesis. Moreover, the individual mutant of polN and polP also partially retains polyoxin production, suggesting the existence of the alternative homologs substituting their functional roles. Conclusions It is unveiled that argA and argB in L-arginine biosynthetic pathway contributed to the “pathway redundancy”, more interestingly, argB in S. cacaoi is indispensible for both polyoxin production and L-arginine biosynthesis. These data should provide an example for the research on the “pathway redundancy” in metabolic networks, and lay a solid foundation for targeted enhancement of polyoxin production with synthetic biology strategies. PMID:24314013

  7. Disruption of OPR7 and OPR8 reveals the versatile functions of jasmonic acid in maize development and defense.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuanxin; Christensen, Shawn; Isakeit, Tom; Engelberth, Jürgen; Meeley, Robert; Hayward, Allison; Emery, R J Neil; Kolomiets, Michael V

    2012-04-01

    Here, multiple functions of jasmonic acid (JA) in maize (Zea mays) are revealed by comprehensive analyses of JA-deficient mutants of the two oxo-phytodienoate reductase genes, OPR7 and OPR8. Single mutants produce wild-type levels of JA in most tissues, but the double mutant opr7 opr8 has dramatically reduced JA in all organs tested. opr7 opr8 displayed strong developmental defects, including formation of a feminized tassel, initiation of female reproductive buds at each node, and extreme elongation of ear shanks; these defects were rescued by exogenous JA. These data provide evidence that JA is required for male sex determination and suppression of female reproductive organ biogenesis. Moreover, opr7 opr8 exhibited delayed leaf senescence accompanied by reduced ethylene and abscisic acid levels and lack of anthocyanin pigmentation of brace roots. Remarkably, opr7 opr8 is nonviable in nonsterile soil and under field conditions due to extreme susceptibility to a root-rotting oomycete (Pythium spp), demonstrating that these genes are necessary for maize survival in nature. Supporting the importance of JA in insect defense, opr7 opr8 is susceptible to beet armyworm. Overall, this study provides strong genetic evidence for the global roles of JA in maize development and immunity to pathogens and insects. PMID:22523204

  8. Salts of hexamethylenetetramine with organic acids: Enhanced anomeric interactions with a lowering of molecular symmetry revealed by crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar, Sosale; Mukherjee, Somnath

    2015-02-01

    The hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) framework displays interesting stereoelectronic interactions of the anomeric type. In the highly symmetrical parent system, the nitrogen centres act as both donors and acceptors. Protonation lowers symmetry and also leads to an enhancement of the anomeric interaction around the protonated centre. X-ray diffraction crystal structures of four derivatives of HMT - with succinic, (DL)-malic, phthalic and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids - reveal significant trends. (The first three form well-defined salts, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid forming a co-crystalline compound.) Each molecular structure is essentially characterised by a major anomeric interaction involving the protonated centre as acceptor. In two cases (succinic and 4-hydroxybenzoic), secondary protonation leads to a weaker anomeric interaction site that apparently competes with the dominant one. Bond length changes indicate that the anomeric interaction decreases as malic > phthalic > succinic > 4-hydroxybenzoic, which correlates with the degree of proton transfer to the nitrogen centre. Along with other bond length and angle changes, the results offer insight into the applicability of the antiperiplanar lone pair hypothesis (ALPH) in a rigid system.

  9. Low-coverage exome sequencing screen in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors reveals evidence of exposure to carcinogenic aristolochic acid

    PubMed Central

    Castells, Xavier; Karanović, Sandra; Ardin, Maude; Tomić, Karla; Xylinas, Evanguelos; Durand, Geoffroy; Villar, Stephanie; Forey, Nathalie; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Voegele, Catherine; Karlović, Krešimir; Mišić, Maja; Dittrich, Damir; Dolgalev, Igor; McKay, James; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Sidorenko, Viktoria S.; Fernandes, Andrea; Heguy, Adriana; Dickman, Kathleen G.; Olivier, Magali; Grollman, Arthur P.; Jelaković, Bojan; Zavadil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Background Dietary exposure to cytotoxic and carcinogenic aristolochic acid (AA) causes severe nephropathy typically associated with urological cancers. Monitoring of AA exposure uses biomarkers such as aristolactam-DNA adducts, detected by mass spectrometry in the kidney cortex, or the somatic A>T transversion pattern characteristic of exposure to AA, as revealed by previous DNA sequencing studies using fresh frozen tumors. Methods Here we report a low-coverage whole-exome sequencing method (LC-WES) optimized for multi-sample detection of the AA mutational signature, and demonstrate its utility in 17 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded urothelial tumors obtained from 15 patients with endemic nephropathy, an environmental form of aristolochic acid nephropathy. Results LC-WES identified the AA signature, alongside signatures of age and APOBEC enzyme activity, in 15 samples sequenced at the average per-base coverage of ~10x. Analysis at 3–9x coverage revealed the signature in 91% of the positive samples. The exome-wide distribution of the predominant A>T transversions exhibited a stochastic pattern whereas 83 cancer driver genes were enriched for recurrent non-synonymous A>T mutations. In two patients, pairs of tumors from different parts of the urinary tract, including the bladder, harbored overlapping mutation patterns, suggesting tumor dissemination via cell seeding. Conclusion LC-WES analysis of archived tumor tissues is a reliable method applicable to investigations of both the exposure to AA and its biologic effects in human carcinomas. Impact By detecting cancers associated with AA exposure in high-risk populations, LC-WES can support future molecular epidemiology studies and provide evidence-base for relevant preventive measures. PMID:26383547

  10. Targeted Lipidomics Studies Reveal that Linolenic Acid Promotes Cotton Fiber Elongation by Activating Phosphatidylinositol and Phosphatidylinositol Monophosphate Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gao-Jun; Xiao, Guang-Hui; Liu, Ning-Jing; Liu, Dan; Chen, Pei-Shuang; Qin, Yong-Mei; Zhu, Yu-Xian

    2015-06-01

    The membrane lipids from fast-elongating wild-type cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fibers at 10 days post-anthesis, wild-type ovules with fiber cells removed, and ovules from the fuzzless-lintless mutant harvested at the same age, were extracted, separated, and quantified. Fiber cells contained significantly higher amounts of phosphatidylinositol (PI) than both ovule samples with PI 34:3 being the most predominant species. The genes encoding fatty acid desaturases (Δ(15)GhFAD), PI synthase (PIS) and PI kinase (PIK) were expressed in a fiber-preferential manner. Further analysis of phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) indicated that elongating fibers contained four- to five-fold higher amounts of PIP 34:3 than the ovules. Exogenously applied linolenic acid (C18:3), soybean L-α-PI, and PIPs containing PIP 34:3 promoted significant fiber growth, whereas a liver PI lacking the C18:3 moiety, linoleic acid, and PIP 36:2 were completely ineffective. The growth inhibitory effects of carbenoxolone, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and wortmannin were reverted by C18:3, PI, or PIP, respectively, suggesting that PIP signaling is essential for fiber cell growth. Furthermore, cotton plants expressing virus-induced gene-silencing constructs that specifically suppressed GhΔ(15)FAD, GhPIS, or GhPIK expression, resulted in significantly short-fibered phenotypes. Our data provide the basis for in-depth studies on the roles of PI and PIP in mediating cotton fiber growth.

  11. Polarized FTIR spectroscopy in conjunction with in situ H/D exchange reveals the orientation of protein internal carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Garczarek, Florian; Gerwert, Klaus

    2006-01-11

    Polarized Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy has been combined with in situ H/D exchange measurements to investigate the orientation of single protonated carboxylic acids within bacteriorhodopsin (bR), exclusively based on the protein ground state. The combination of these two techniques enables the determination of the C=O dipole moment direction of D115 and D96 relative to the membrane plane to 68 +/- 11 and 45 +/- 4 degrees , respectively. By discussing these results in the context of X-ray structure analysis, we are able to determine which of the two oxygen atoms of the respective carboxylic acids binds the proton. In the case of D115, it is the oxygen which is located close to T90. On the basis of this finding, we show a possible interaction path between D115 and D85, which has been proposed to be responsible for the inhibition of the proton pump efficiency to prevent over-acidification of the external medium known as the back-pressure effect. Because the orientation of carboxylic acids can be determined even when the group does not undergo any protonation changes during the photocycle, as shown in the case of D115, the method can be applied to any orientable protein and is not merely restricted to bR.

  12. Bile acids: analysis in biological fluids and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, William J.; Sjövall, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The formation of bile acids/bile alcohols is of major importance for the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. Besides their functions in lipid absorption, bile acids/bile alcohols are regulatory molecules for a number of metabolic processes. Their effects are structure-dependent, and numerous metabolic conversions result in a complex mixture of biologically active and inactive forms. Advanced methods are required to characterize and quantify individual bile acids in these mixtures. A combination of such analyses with analyses of the proteome will be required for a better understanding of mechanisms of action and nature of endogenous ligands. Mass spectrometry is the basic detection technique for effluents from chromatographic columns. Capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization provides the highest sensitivity in metabolome analysis. Classical gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is less sensitive but offers extensive structure-dependent fragmentation increasing the specificity in analyses of isobaric isomers of unconjugated bile acids. Depending on the nature of the bile acid/bile alcohol mixture and the range of concentration of individuals, different sample preparation sequences, from simple extractions to group separations and derivatizations, are applicable. We review the methods currently available for the analysis of bile acids in biological fluids and tissues, with emphasis on the combination of liquid and gas phase chromatography with mass spectrometry. PMID:20008121

  13. Genome wide transcriptome analysis reveals ABA mediated response in Arabidopsis during gold (AuCl−4) treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Devesh; Krishnamurthy, Sneha; Sahi, Shivendra V.

    2014-01-01

    The unique physico-chemical properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) find manifold applications in diagnostics, medicine and catalysis. Chemical synthesis produces reactive AuNPs and generates hazardous by-products. Alternatively, plants can be utilized to produce AuNPs in an eco-friendly manner. To better control the biosynthesis of AuNPs, we need to first understand the detailed molecular response induced by AuCl−4 In this study, we carried out global transcriptome analysis in root tissue of Arabidopsis grown for 12- h in presence of gold solution (HAuCl4) using the novel unbiased Affymetrix exon array. Transcriptomics analysis revealed differential regulation of a total of 704 genes and 4900 exons. Of these, 492 and 212 genes were up- and downregulated, respectively. The validation of the expressed key genes, such as glutathione-S-transferases, auxin responsive genes, cytochrome P450 82C2, methyl transferases, transducin (G protein beta subunit), ERF transcription factor, ABC, and MATE transporters, was carried out through quantitative RT-PCR. These key genes demonstrated specific induction under AuCl4− treatment relative to other heavy metals, suggesting a unique plant-gold interaction. GO enrichment analysis reveals the upregulation of processes like oxidative stress, glutathione binding, metal binding, transport, and plant hormonal responses. Changes predicted in biochemical pathways indicated major modulation in glutathione mediated detoxification, flavones and derivatives, and plant hormone biosynthesis. Motif search analysis identified a highly significant enriched motif, ACGT, which is an abscisic acid responsive core element (ABRE), suggesting the possibility of ABA- mediated signaling. Identification of abscisic acid response element (ABRE) points to the operation of a predominant signaling mechanism in response to AuCl−4 exposure. Overall, this study presents a useful picture of plant-gold interaction with an identification of candidate genes

  14. Genome wide transcriptome analysis reveals ABA mediated response in Arabidopsis during gold (AuCl(-) 4) treatment.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Devesh; Krishnamurthy, Sneha; Sahi, Shivendra V

    2014-01-01

    The unique physico-chemical properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) find manifold applications in diagnostics, medicine and catalysis. Chemical synthesis produces reactive AuNPs and generates hazardous by-products. Alternatively, plants can be utilized to produce AuNPs in an eco-friendly manner. To better control the biosynthesis of AuNPs, we need to first understand the detailed molecular response induced by AuCl(-) 4 In this study, we carried out global transcriptome analysis in root tissue of Arabidopsis grown for 12- h in presence of gold solution (HAuCl4) using the novel unbiased Affymetrix exon array. Transcriptomics analysis revealed differential regulation of a total of 704 genes and 4900 exons. Of these, 492 and 212 genes were up- and downregulated, respectively. The validation of the expressed key genes, such as glutathione-S-transferases, auxin responsive genes, cytochrome P450 82C2, methyl transferases, transducin (G protein beta subunit), ERF transcription factor, ABC, and MATE transporters, was carried out through quantitative RT-PCR. These key genes demonstrated specific induction under AuCl4(-) treatment relative to other heavy metals, suggesting a unique plant-gold interaction. GO enrichment analysis reveals the upregulation of processes like oxidative stress, glutathione binding, metal binding, transport, and plant hormonal responses. Changes predicted in biochemical pathways indicated major modulation in glutathione mediated detoxification, flavones and derivatives, and plant hormone biosynthesis. Motif search analysis identified a highly significant enriched motif, ACGT, which is an abscisic acid responsive core element (ABRE), suggesting the possibility of ABA- mediated signaling. Identification of abscisic acid response element (ABRE) points to the operation of a predominant signaling mechanism in response to AuCl(-) 4 exposure. Overall, this study presents a useful picture of plant-gold interaction with an identification of candidate genes

  15. Computerized image analysis for acetic acid induced intraepithelial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Ferris, Daron G.; Lieberman, Rich W.

    2008-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) exhibits certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Immature and dysphasic cervical squamous epithelium turns white after application of acetic acid during the exam. The whitening process occurs visually over several minutes and subjectively discriminates between dysphasic and normal tissue. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician analyzing the acetic acid induced lesions (acetowhite region) in a fully automatic way. This paper reports a study designed to measure multiple parameters of the acetowhitening process from two images captured with a digital colposcope. One image is captured before the acetic acid application, and the other is captured after the acetic acid application. The spatial change of the acetowhitening is extracted using color and texture information in the post acetic acid image; the temporal change is extracted from the intensity and color changes between the post acetic acid and pre acetic acid images with an automatic alignment. The imaging and data analysis system has been evaluated with a total of 99 human subjects and demonstrate its potential to screening underserved women where access to skilled colposcopists is limited.

  16. Revealing biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion in sludge digesters: detection of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria within full-scale digesters.

    PubMed

    Huber, B; Drewes, J E; Lin, K C; König, R; Müller, E

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion (BSA) is a costly problem affecting both sewerage infrastructure and sludge handling facilities such as digesters. The aim of this study was to verify BSA in full-scale digesters by identifying the microorganisms involved in the concrete corrosion process, that is, sulfate-reducing (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). To investigate the SRB and SOB communities, digester sludge and biofilm samples were collected. SRB diversity within digester sludge was studied by applying polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) targeting the dsrB-gene (dissimilatory sulfite reductase beta subunit). To reveal SOB diversity, cultivation dependent and independent techniques were applied. The SRB diversity studies revealed different uncultured SRB, confirming SRB activity and H2S production. Comparable DGGE profiles were obtained from the different sludges, demonstrating the presence of similar SRB species. By cultivation, three pure SOB strains from the digester headspace were obtained including Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Thiomonas intermedia and Thiomonas perometabolis. These organisms were also detected with PCR-DGGE in addition to two new SOB: Thiobacillus thioparus and Paracoccus solventivorans. The SRB and SOB responsible for BSA were identified within five different digesters, demonstrating that BSA is a problem occurring not only in sewer systems but also in sludge digesters. In addition, the presence of different SOB species was successfully associated with the progression of microbial corrosion. PMID:25353947

  17. Revealing biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion in sludge digesters: detection of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria within full-scale digesters.

    PubMed

    Huber, B; Drewes, J E; Lin, K C; König, R; Müller, E

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion (BSA) is a costly problem affecting both sewerage infrastructure and sludge handling facilities such as digesters. The aim of this study was to verify BSA in full-scale digesters by identifying the microorganisms involved in the concrete corrosion process, that is, sulfate-reducing (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). To investigate the SRB and SOB communities, digester sludge and biofilm samples were collected. SRB diversity within digester sludge was studied by applying polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) targeting the dsrB-gene (dissimilatory sulfite reductase beta subunit). To reveal SOB diversity, cultivation dependent and independent techniques were applied. The SRB diversity studies revealed different uncultured SRB, confirming SRB activity and H2S production. Comparable DGGE profiles were obtained from the different sludges, demonstrating the presence of similar SRB species. By cultivation, three pure SOB strains from the digester headspace were obtained including Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Thiomonas intermedia and Thiomonas perometabolis. These organisms were also detected with PCR-DGGE in addition to two new SOB: Thiobacillus thioparus and Paracoccus solventivorans. The SRB and SOB responsible for BSA were identified within five different digesters, demonstrating that BSA is a problem occurring not only in sewer systems but also in sludge digesters. In addition, the presence of different SOB species was successfully associated with the progression of microbial corrosion.

  18. Detection of COL III in parchment by amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Dorte V P; Larsen, René

    2016-01-01

    Cultural heritage parchments made from the reticular dermis of animals have been subject to studies of deterioration and conservation by amino acid analysis. The reticular dermis contains a varying mixture of collagen I and III (COL I and III). When dealing with the results of the amino acid analyses, till now the COL III content has not been taken into account. Based on the available amino acid sequences, we present a method for determining the amount of COL III in the reticular dermis of new and historical parchments calculated from the ratio of Ile/Val. We find COL III contents between 7 and 32 % in new parchments and between 0.2 and 40 % in the historical parchments. This is consistent with results in the literature. The varying content of COL III has a significant influence on the uncertainty of the amino acid analysis. Although we have not found a simple correlation between the COL III content and the degree of deterioration, our results show that this question must be taken into consideration in future studies of the chemical and physical deterioration of parchment measured by amino acid analysis and other analytical methods.

  19. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Regulation of Gene Expression for Lipid Catabolism in Young Broilers by Butyrate Glycerides

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Fugui; Yu, Hai; Lepp, Dion; Shi, Xuejiang; Yang, Xiaojian; Hu, Jielun; Leeson, Steve; Yang, Chengbo; Nie, Shaoping; Hou, Yongqing; Gong, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    indicated that dietary BG intervention induced 79 and 205 characterized DEGs in the jejunum and liver, respectively. In addition, 255 and 165 TSEGs were detected in the liver and jejunum of BG-fed group, while 162 and 211 TSEGs genes were observed in the liver and jejunum of BD-fed birds, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis with both IPA and DAVID-BR further revealed a significant enrichment of DEGs and TSEGs in the biological processes for reducing the synthesis, storage, transportation and secretion of lipids in the jejunum, while those in the liver were for enhancing the oxidation of ingested lipids and fatty acids. In particular, transcriptional regulators of THRSP and EGR-1 as well as several DEGs involved in the PPAR-α signaling pathway were significantly induced by dietary BG intervention for lipid catabolism. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that BG reduces body fat deposition via regulation of gene expression, which is involved in the biological events relating to the reduction of synthesis, storage, transportation and secretion, and improvement of oxidation of lipids and fatty acids. PMID:27508934

  20. Revealing the metabonomic variation of rosemary extracts using 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chaoni; Dai, Hui; Liu, Hongbing; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2008-11-12

    The molecular compositions of rosemary ( Rosmarinus officinalis L.) extracts and their dependence on extraction solvents, seasons, and drying processes were systematically characterized using NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis. The results showed that the rosemary metabonome was dominated by 33 metabolites including sugars, amino acids, organic acids, polyphenolic acids, and diterpenes, among which quinate, cis-4-glucosyloxycinnamic acid, and 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylmethanol were found in rosemary for the first time. Compared with water extracts, the 50% aqueous methanol extracts contained higher levels of sucrose, succinate, fumarate, malonate, shikimate, and phenolic acids, but lower levels of fructose, glucose, citrate, and quinate. Chloroform/methanol was an excellent solvent for selective extraction of diterpenes. From February to August, the levels of rosmarinate and quinate increased, whereas the sucrose level decreased. The sun-dried samples contained higher concentrations of rosmarinate, sucrose, and some amino acids but lower concentrations of glucose, fructose, malate, succinate, lactate, and quinate than freeze-dried ones. These findings will fill the gap in the understanding of rosemary composition and its variations.

  1. Quality Analysis of Chlorogenic Acid and Hyperoside in Crataegi fructus

    PubMed Central

    Weon, Jin Bae; Jung, Youn Sik; Ma, Choong Je

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crataegi fructus is a herbal medicine for strong stomach, sterilization, and alcohol detoxification. Chlorogenic acid and hyperoside are the major compounds in Crataegi fructus. Objective: In this study, we established novel high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-diode array detection analysis method of chlorogenic acid and hyperoside for quality control of Crataegi fructus. Materials and Methods: HPLC analysis was achieved on a reverse-phase C18 column (5 μm, 4.6 mm × 250 mm) using water and acetonitrile as mobile phase with gradient system. The method was validated for linearity, precision, and accuracy. About 31 batches of Crataegi fructus samples collected from Korea and China were analyzed by using HPLC fingerprint of developed HPLC method. Then, the contents of chlorogenic acid and hyperoside were compared for quality evaluation of Crataegi fructus. Results: The results have shown that the average contents (w/w %) of chlorogenic acid and hyperoside in Crataegi fructus collected from Korea were 0.0438% and 0.0416%, respectively, and the average contents (w/w %) of 0.0399% and 0.0325%, respectively. Conclusion: In conclusion, established HPLC analysis method was stable and could provide efficient quality evaluation for monitoring of commercial Crataegi fructus. SUMMARY Quantitative analysis method of chlorogenic acid and hyperoside in Crataegi fructus is developed by high.performance liquid chromatography.(HPLC).diode array detectionEstablished HPLC analysis method is validated with linearity, precision, and accuracyThe developed method was successfully applied for quantitative analysis of Crataegi fructus sample collected from Korea and China. Abbreviations used: HPLC: High-performance liquid chromatography, GC: Gas chromatography, MS: Mass spectrometer, LOD: Limits of detection, LOQ: Limits of quantification, RSD: Relative standard deviation, RRT: Relative retention time, RPA: Relation peak area. PMID:27076744

  2. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE TESTICULAR TOXICITY OF HALOACETIC ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic analysis of the testicular toxicity of haloacetic acids

    David J. Dix and John C. Rockett
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, R...

  3. Transcriptome Analysis Revealed the Embryo-Induced Gene Expression Patterns in the Endometrium from Meishan and Yorkshire Pigs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiangnan; Liu, Ruize; Su, Lijie; Xiao, Qian; Yu, Mei

    2015-09-18

    The expression patterns in Meishan- and Yorkshire-derived endometrium during early (gestational day 15) and mid-gestation (gestational days 26 and 50) were investigated, respectively. Totally, 689 and 1649 annotated genes were identified to be differentially expressed in Meishan and Yorkshire endometrium during the three gestational stages, respectively. Hierarchical clustering analysis identified that, of the annotated differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 73 DEGs were unique to Meishan endometrium, 536 DEGs were unique to Yorkshire endometrium, and 228 DEGs were common in Meishan and Yorkshire endometriums. Subsequently, DEGs in each of the three types of expression patterns were grouped into four distinct categories according to the similarities in their temporal expression patterns. The expression patterns identified from the microarray analysis were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. The functional enrichment analysis revealed that the common DEGs were enriched in pathways of steroid metabolic process and regulation of retinoic acid receptor signaling. These unique DEGs in Meishan endometrium were involved in cell cycle and adherens junction. The DEGs unique to Yorkshire endometrium were associated with regulation of Rho protein signal transduction, maternal placenta development and cell proliferation. This study revealed the different gene expression patterns or pathways related to the endometrium remodeling in Meishan and Yorkshire pigs, respectively. These unique DEGs in either Meishan or Yorkshire endometriums may contribute to the divergence of the endometrium environment in the two pig breeds.

  4. Transcriptome Analysis Revealed the Embryo-Induced Gene Expression Patterns in the Endometrium from Meishan and Yorkshire Pigs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiangnan; Liu, Ruize; Su, Lijie; Xiao, Qian; Yu, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The expression patterns in Meishan- and Yorkshire-derived endometrium during early (gestational day 15) and mid-gestation (gestational days 26 and 50) were investigated, respectively. Totally, 689 and 1649 annotated genes were identified to be differentially expressed in Meishan and Yorkshire endometrium during the three gestational stages, respectively. Hierarchical clustering analysis identified that, of the annotated differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 73 DEGs were unique to Meishan endometrium, 536 DEGs were unique to Yorkshire endometrium, and 228 DEGs were common in Meishan and Yorkshire endometriums. Subsequently, DEGs in each of the three types of expression patterns were grouped into four distinct categories according to the similarities in their temporal expression patterns. The expression patterns identified from the microarray analysis were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. The functional enrichment analysis revealed that the common DEGs were enriched in pathways of steroid metabolic process and regulation of retinoic acid receptor signaling. These unique DEGs in Meishan endometrium were involved in cell cycle and adherens junction. The DEGs unique to Yorkshire endometrium were associated with regulation of Rho protein signal transduction, maternal placenta development and cell proliferation. This study revealed the different gene expression patterns or pathways related to the endometrium remodeling in Meishan and Yorkshire pigs, respectively. These unique DEGs in either Meishan or Yorkshire endometriums may contribute to the divergence of the endometrium environment in the two pig breeds. PMID:26393584

  5. The manipulation of auxin in the abscission zone cells of Arabidopsis flowers reveals that indoleacetic acid signaling is a prerequisite for organ shedding.

    PubMed

    Basu, Manojit M; González-Carranza, Zinnia H; Azam-Ali, Sayed; Tang, Shouya; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Roberts, Jeremy A

    2013-05-01

    A number of novel strategies were employed to examine the role of indoleacetic acid (IAA) in regulating floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Analysis of auxin influx facilitator expression in β-glucuronidase reporter plants revealed that AUXIN RESISTANT1, LIKE AUX1, and LAX3 were specifically up-regulated at the site of floral organ shedding. Flowers from mutants where individual family members were down-regulated exhibited a reduction in the force necessary to bring about petal separation; however, the effect was not additive in double or quadruple mutants. Using the promoter of a polygalacturonase (At2g41850), active primarily in cells undergoing separation, to drive expression of the bacterial genes iaaL and iaaM, we have shown that it is possible to manipulate auxin activity specifically within the floral organ abscission zone (AZ). Analysis of petal breakstrength reveals that if IAA AZ levels are reduced, shedding takes place prematurely, while if they are enhanced, organ loss is delayed. The At2g41850 promoter was also used to transactivate the gain-of-function AXR3-1 gene in order to disrupt auxin signaling specifically within the floral organ AZ cells. Flowers from transactivated lines failed to shed their sepals, petals, and anthers during pod expansion and maturity, and these organs frequently remained attached to the plant even after silique desiccation and dehiscence had taken place. These observations support a key role for IAA in the regulation of abscission in planta and reveal, to our knowledge for the first time, a requirement for a functional IAA signaling pathway in AZ cells for organ shedding to take place.

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of Branched-Chain Amino Acid Levels in Arabidopsis Seeds[W

    PubMed Central

    Angelovici, Ruthie; Lipka, Alexander E.; Deason, Nicholas; Gonzalez-Jorge, Sabrina; Lin, Haining; Cepela, Jason; Buell, Robin; Gore, Michael A.; DellaPenna, Dean

    2013-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are three of the nine essential amino acids in human and animal diets and are important for numerous processes in development and growth. However, seed BCAA levels in major crops are insufficient to meet dietary requirements, making genetic improvement for increased and balanced seed BCAAs an important nutritional target. Addressing this issue requires a better understanding of the genetics underlying seed BCAA content and composition. Here, a genome-wide association study and haplotype analysis for seed BCAA traits in Arabidopsis thaliana revealed a strong association with a chromosomal interval containing two BRANCHED-CHAIN AMINO ACID TRANSFERASES, BCAT1 and BCAT2. Linkage analysis, reverse genetic approaches, and molecular complementation analysis demonstrated that allelic variation at BCAT2 is responsible for the natural variation of seed BCAAs in this interval. Complementation analysis of a bcat2 null mutant with two significantly different alleles from accessions Bayreuth-0 and Shahdara is consistent with BCAT2 contributing to natural variation in BCAA levels, glutamate recycling, and free amino acid homeostasis in seeds in an allele-dependent manner. The seed-specific phenotype of bcat2 null alleles, its strong transcription induction during late seed development, and its subcellular localization to the mitochondria are consistent with a unique, catabolic role for BCAT2 in BCAA metabolism in seeds. PMID:24368787

  7. Microarray analysis reveals overlapping and specific transcriptional responses to different plant hormones in rice.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rohini; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Jain, Mukesh

    2012-08-01

    Hormones exert pleiotropic effects on plant growth and development throughout the life cycle. Many of these effects are mediated at molecular level via altering gene expression. In this study, we investigated the exogenous effect of plant hormones, including auxin, cytokinin, abscisic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, on the transcription of rice genes at whole genome level using microarray. Our analysis identified a total of 4171 genes involved in several biological processes, whose expression was altered significantly in the presence of different hormones. Further, 28% of these genes exhibited overlapping transcriptional responses in the presence of any two hormones, indicating crosstalk among plant hormones. In addition, we identified genes showing only a particular hormone-specific response, which can be used as hormone-specific markers. The results of this study will facilitate further studies in hormone biology in rice.

  8. OTU Deubiquitinases Reveal Mechanisms of Linkage Specificity and Enable Ubiquitin Chain Restriction Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mevissen, Tycho E.T.; Hospenthal, Manuela K.; Geurink, Paul P.; Elliott, Paul R.; Akutsu, Masato; Arnaudo, Nadia; Ekkebus, Reggy; Kulathu, Yogesh; Wauer, Tobias; El Oualid, Farid; Freund, Stefan M.V.; Ovaa, Huib; Komander, David

    2013-01-01

    Summary Sixteen ovarian tumor (OTU) family deubiquitinases (DUBs) exist in humans, and most members regulate cell-signaling cascades. Several OTU DUBs were reported to be ubiquitin (Ub) chain linkage specific, but comprehensive analyses are missing, and the underlying mechanisms of linkage specificity are unclear. Using Ub chains of all eight linkage types, we reveal that most human OTU enzymes are linkage specific, preferring one, two, or a defined subset of linkage types, including unstudied atypical Ub chains. Biochemical analysis and five crystal structures of OTU DUBs with or without Ub substrates reveal four mechanisms of linkage specificity. Additional Ub-binding domains, the ubiquitinated sequence in the substrate, and defined S1’ and S2 Ub-binding sites on the OTU domain enable OTU DUBs to distinguish linkage types. We introduce Ub chain restriction analysis, in which OTU DUBs are used as restriction enzymes to reveal linkage type and the relative abundance of Ub chains on substrates. PMID:23827681

  9. Systematic Analysis of Compositional Order of Proteins Reveals New Characteristics of Biological Functions and a Universal Correlate of Macroevolution

    PubMed Central

    Persi, Erez; Horn, David

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel analysis of compositional order (CO) based on the occurrence of Frequent amino-acid Triplets (FTs) that appear much more than random in protein sequences. The method captures all types of proteomic compositional order including single amino-acid runs, tandem repeats, periodic structure of motifs and otherwise low complexity amino-acid regions. We introduce new order measures, distinguishing between ‘regularity’, ‘periodicity’ and ‘vocabulary’, to quantify these phenomena and to facilitate the identification of evolutionary effects. Detailed analysis of representative species across the tree-of-life demonstrates that CO proteins exhibit numerous functional enrichments, including a wide repertoire of particular patterns of dependencies on regularity and periodicity. Comparison between human and mouse proteomes further reveals the interplay of CO with evolutionary trends, such as faster substitution rate in mouse leading to decrease of periodicity, while innovation along the human lineage leads to larger regularity. Large-scale analysis of 94 proteomes leads to systematic ordering of all major taxonomic groups according to FT-vocabulary size. This is measured by the count of Different Frequent Triplets (DFT) in proteomes. The latter provides a clear hierarchical delineation of vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, fungi and prokaryotes, with thermophiles showing the lowest level of FT-vocabulary. Among eukaryotes, this ordering correlates with phylogenetic proximity. Interestingly, in all kingdoms CO accumulation in the proteome has universal characteristics. We suggest that CO is a genomic-information correlate of both macroevolution and various protein functions. The results indicate a mechanism of genomic ‘innovation’ at the peptide level, involved in protein elongation, shaped in a universal manner by mutational and selective forces. PMID:24278003

  10. Using team cognitive work analysis to reveal healthcare team interactions in a birthing unit

    PubMed Central

    Ashoori, Maryam; Burns, Catherine M.; d'Entremont, Barbara; Momtahan, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive work analysis (CWA) as an analytical approach for examining complex sociotechnical systems has shown success in modelling the work of single operators. The CWA approach incorporates social and team interactions, but a more explicit analysis of team aspects can reveal more information for systems design. In this paper, Team CWA is explored to understand teamwork within a birthing unit at a hospital. Team CWA models are derived from theories and models of teamworkand leverage the existing CWA approaches to analyse team interactions. Team CWA is explained and contrasted with prior approaches to CWA. Team CWA does not replace CWA, but supplements traditional CWA to more easily reveal team information. As a result, Team CWA may be a useful approach to enhance CWA in complex environments where effective teamwork is required. Practitioner Summary: This paper looks at ways of analysing cognitive work in healthcare teams. Team Cognitive Work Analysis, when used to supplement traditional Cognitive Work Analysis, revealed more team information than traditional Cognitive Work Analysis. Team Cognitive Work Analysis should be considered when studying teams PMID:24837514

  11. Combined Transcriptomics and Chemical-Genetics Reveal Molecular Mode of Action of Valproic acid, an Anticancer Molecule using Budding Yeast Model

    PubMed Central

    Golla, Upendarrao; Joseph, Deepthi; Tomar, Raghuvir Singh

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VA) is a pharmacologically important histone deacetylase inhibitor that recently garnered attention as an anticancer agent. Since the molecular mechanisms behind the multiple effects of VA are unclear, this study was aimed to unravel the comprehensive cellular processes affected by VA and its molecular targets in vivo using budding yeast as a model organism. Interestingly, genome-wide transcriptome analysis of cells treated with VA showed differential regulation of 30% of the genome. Functional enrichment analysis of VA transcriptome evidenced alteration of various cellular processes including cell cycle, cell wall biogenesis, DNA repair, ion homeostasis, metabolism, stress response, transport and ribosomal biogenesis, etc. Moreover, our genetic screening analysis revealed VA molecular targets belonging to oxidative and osmotic stress, DNA repair, cell wall integrity, and iron homeostasis. Further, our results demonstrated the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) Hog1 (p38) and Slt2 (p44/42) upon VA treatment. Our results also exhibited that VA acts through alteration of mitochondrial, ER architecture and functions. Especially, VA effects were neutralized in cells lacking lipid particles. Altogether, our results deciphered the novel molecular insights and mechanistic links to strengthen our knowledge on diverse cellular effects of VA along with its probable therapeutic targets and detoxification approaches. PMID:27734932

  12. Genetic diversity analysis of buffalo fatty acid synthase (FASN) gene and its differential expression among bovines.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, S K; Goyal, S; Dubey, P K; Kumari, N; Mishra, S K; Mukesh, M; Kataria, R S

    2016-01-10

    Fatty Acid Synthase (FASN) gene seems to be structurally and functionally different in bovines in view of their distinctive fatty acid synthesis process. Structural variation and differential expression of FASN gene is reported in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), a bovine species close to cattle, in this study. Amino acid sequence and phylogenetic analysis of functionally important thioesterase (TE) domain of FASN revealed its conserved nature across mammals. Amino acid residues at TE domain, responsible for substrate binding and processing, were found to be invariant in all the mammalian species. A total of seven polymorphic nucleotide sites, including two in coding region of TE domain were identified across the 10 buffalo populations of riverine and swamp types. G and C alleles were found almost fixed at g18996 and g19056 loci, respectively in riverine buffaloes. Principal component analysis of three SNPs (g18433, g18996 and g19056) revealed distinct classification of riverine and swamp buffalo populations. Reverse Transcription-PCR amplification of mRNA corresponding to exon 8-10 region of buffalo FASN helped in identification of two transcript variants; one transcript of 565 nucleotides and another alternate transcript of 207 nucleotides, seems to have arisen through alternative splicing. Both the transcripts were found to be expressed in most of the vital tissues of buffalo with the highest expression in mammary gland. Semi-quantitative and real-time expression analysis across 13 different buffalo tissues revealed its highest expression in lactating mammary gland. When compared, expression of FASN was also found to be higher in liver, adipose and skeletal muscle of buffalo tissues, than cattle. However, the FASN expression was highest in adipose among the three tissues in both the species. Results indicate structural and functional distinctiveness of bovine FASN. Presence of alternate splicing in buffalo FASN also seems to be a unique phenomenon to the bovines

  13. Site-directed mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB reveals amino acid residues important for mercury methylation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven D; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M; Elias, Dwayne A; Hurt, Richard A; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Wall, Judy D

    2015-05-01

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative "cap helix" region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. This study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.

  14. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. This study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin. PMID:25724962

  15. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-02-27

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential formore » mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. Ultimately, this study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.« less

  16. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-02-27

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. Ultimately, this study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.

  17. Comparative Proteomics Analysis Reveals L-Arginine Activates Ethanol Degradation Pathways in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Guokai; Lestari, Retno; Long, Baisheng; Fan, Qiwen; Wang, Zhichang; Guo, Xiaozhen; Yu, Jie; Hu, Jun; Yang, Xingya; Chen, Changqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Xiuzhi; Purnomoadi, Agung; Achmadi, Joelal; Yan, Xianghua

    2016-01-01

    L-Arginine (Arg) is a versatile amino acid that plays crucial roles in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. In this study, to investigate the alteration induced by Arg supplementation in proteome scale, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) based proteomic approach was employed to comparatively characterize the differentially expressed proteins between Arg deprivation (Ctrl) and Arg supplementation (+Arg) treated human liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. A total of 21 proteins were identified as differentially expressed proteins and these 21 proteins were all up-regulated by Arg supplementation. Six amino acid metabolism-related proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, showed differential expressions. Intriguingly, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) based pathway analysis suggested that the three ethanol degradation pathways were significantly altered between Ctrl and +Arg. Western blotting and enzymatic activity assays validated that the key enzymes ADH1C, ALDH1A1, and ALDH2, which are mainly involved in ethanol degradation pathways, were highly differentially expressed, and activated between Ctrl and +Arg in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, 10 mM Arg significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity induced by 100 mM ethanol treatment (P < 0.0001). This study is the first time to reveal that Arg activates ethanol degradation pathways in HepG2 cells. PMID:26983598

  18. Determining important regulatory relations of amino acids from dynamic network analysis of plasma amino acids.

    PubMed

    Shikata, Nahoko; Maki, Yukihiro; Nakatsui, Masahiko; Mori, Masato; Noguchi, Yasushi; Yoshida, Shintaro; Takahashi, Michio; Kondo, Nobuo; Okamoto, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    The changes in the concentrations of plasma amino acids do not always follow the flow-based metabolic pathway network. We have previously shown that there is a control-based network structure among plasma amino acids besides the metabolic pathway map. Based on this network structure, in this study, we performed dynamic analysis using time-course data of the plasma samples of rats fed single essential amino acid deficient diet. Using S-system model (conceptual mathematical model represented by power-law formalism), we inferred the dynamic network structure which reproduces the actual time-courses within the error allowance of 13.17%. By performing sensitivity analysis, three of the most dominant relations in this network were selected; the control paths from leucine to valine, from methionine to threonine, and from leucine to isoleucine. This result is in good agreement with the biological knowledge regarding branched-chain amino acids, and suggests the biological importance of the effect from methionine to threonine.

  19. Molecular Cloning and Functional Characterization of Xenopus tropicalis Frog Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Reveal Its Functional Evolution for Heat, Acid, and Capsaicin Sensitivities in Terrestrial Vertebrates*

    PubMed Central

    Ohkita, Masashi; Saito, Shigeru; Imagawa, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Kenji; Tominaga, Makoto; Ohta, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The functional difference of thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in the evolutionary context has attracted attention, but thus far little information is available on the TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) function of amphibians, which diverged earliest from terrestrial vertebrate lineages. In this study we cloned Xenopus tropicalis frog TRPV1 (xtTRPV1), and functional characterization was performed using HeLa cells heterologously expressing xtTRPV1 (xtTRPV1-HeLa) and dorsal root ganglion neurons isolated from X. tropicalis (xtDRG neurons) by measuring changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). The channel activity was also observed in xtTRPV1-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Furthermore, we tested capsaicin- and heat-induced nocifensive behaviors of the frog X. tropicalis in vivo. At the amino acid level, xtTRPV1 displays ∼60% sequence identity to other terrestrial vertebrate TRPV1 orthologues. Capsaicin induced [Ca2+]i increases in xtTRPV1-HeLa and xtDRG neurons and evoked nocifensive behavior in X. tropicalis. However, its sensitivity was extremely low compared with mammalian orthologues. Low extracellular pH and heat activated xtTRPV1-HeLa and xtDRG neurons. Heat also evoked nocifensive behavior. In oocytes expressing xtTRPV1, inward currents were elicited by heat and low extracellular pH. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that two amino acids (tyrosine 523 and alanine 561) were responsible for the low sensitivity to capsaicin. Taken together, our results indicate that xtTRPV1 functions as a polymodal receptor similar to its mammalian orthologues. The present study demonstrates that TRPV1 functions as a heat- and acid-sensitive channel in the ancestor of terrestrial vertebrates. Because it is possible to examine vanilloid and heat sensitivities in vitro and in vivo, X. tropicalis could be the ideal experimental lower vertebrate animal for the study of TRPV1 function. PMID:22130664

  20. Factor analysis for isolation of the Raman spectra of aqueous sulfuric acid components

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, E.R.; Cox, R.A.; Haldna, U.L.

    1984-04-01

    The Raman spectra of 16 sulfuric acid/water mixtures over the entire mole fraction range were studied by various factor analysis techniques. Abstract factor analysis showed that three factors account for 98.69% of the variation in the data with a real error of 13%. Key-set factor analysis, was used to identify three spectral wavenumbers unique to each component. Spectral-isolation factor analysis, based on the key wavenumbers, revealed the spectra of each unknown component. Target factor analysis, based on the isolated spectra, yielded the relative amounts of the three spectral components. The concentration profiles obtained from the factor loadings, as well as the isolated spectra, were used to identify the chemical species.

  1. In Vivo Screening Using Transgenic Zebrafish Embryos Reveals New Effects of HDAC Inhibitors Trichostatin A and Valproic Acid on Organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Bonneton, François; Tohme, Marie; Bernard, Laure; Chen, Xiao Yong; Laudet, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on reproduction are well known, whereas their developmental effects are much less characterized. However, exposure to endocrine disruptors during organogenesis may lead to deleterious and permanent problems later in life. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) transgenic lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in specific organs and tissues are powerful tools to uncover developmental defects elicited by EDCs. Here, we used seven transgenic lines to visualize in vivo whether a series of EDCs and other pharmaceutical compounds can alter organogenesis in zebrafish. We used transgenic lines expressing GFP in pancreas, liver, blood vessels, inner ear, nervous system, pharyngeal tooth and pectoral fins. This screen revealed that four of the tested chemicals have detectable effects on different organs, which shows that the range of effects elicited by EDCs is wider than anticipated. The endocrine disruptor tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), as well as the three drugs diclofenac, trichostatin A (TSA) and valproic acid (VPA) induced abnormalities in the embryonic vascular system of zebrafish. Moreover, TSA and VPA induced specific alterations during the development of pancreas, an observation that was confirmed by in situ hybridization with specific markers. Developmental delays were also induced by TSA and VPA in the liver and in pharyngeal teeth, resulting in smaller organ size. Our results show that EDCs can induce a large range of developmental alterations during embryogenesis of zebrafish and establish GFP transgenic lines as powerful tools to screen for EDCs effects in vivo.

  2. In Vivo Screening Using Transgenic Zebrafish Embryos Reveals New Effects of HDAC Inhibitors Trichostatin A and Valproic Acid on Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Bonneton, François; Tohme, Marie; Bernard, Laure; Chen, Xiao Yong; Laudet, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on reproduction are well known, whereas their developmental effects are much less characterized. However, exposure to endocrine disruptors during organogenesis may lead to deleterious and permanent problems later in life. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) transgenic lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in specific organs and tissues are powerful tools to uncover developmental defects elicited by EDCs. Here, we used seven transgenic lines to visualize in vivo whether a series of EDCs and other pharmaceutical compounds can alter organogenesis in zebrafish. We used transgenic lines expressing GFP in pancreas, liver, blood vessels, inner ear, nervous system, pharyngeal tooth and pectoral fins. This screen revealed that four of the tested chemicals have detectable effects on different organs, which shows that the range of effects elicited by EDCs is wider than anticipated. The endocrine disruptor tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), as well as the three drugs diclofenac, trichostatin A (TSA) and valproic acid (VPA) induced abnormalities in the embryonic vascular system of zebrafish. Moreover, TSA and VPA induced specific alterations during the development of pancreas, an observation that was confirmed by in situ hybridization with specific markers. Developmental delays were also induced by TSA and VPA in the liver and in pharyngeal teeth, resulting in smaller organ size. Our results show that EDCs can induce a large range of developmental alterations during embryogenesis of zebrafish and establish GFP transgenic lines as powerful tools to screen for EDCs effects in vivo. PMID:26900852

  3. In Vivo Screening Using Transgenic Zebrafish Embryos Reveals New Effects of HDAC Inhibitors Trichostatin A and Valproic Acid on Organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Bonneton, François; Tohme, Marie; Bernard, Laure; Chen, Xiao Yong; Laudet, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on reproduction are well known, whereas their developmental effects are much less characterized. However, exposure to endocrine disruptors during organogenesis may lead to deleterious and permanent problems later in life. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) transgenic lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in specific organs and tissues are powerful tools to uncover developmental defects elicited by EDCs. Here, we used seven transgenic lines to visualize in vivo whether a series of EDCs and other pharmaceutical compounds can alter organogenesis in zebrafish. We used transgenic lines expressing GFP in pancreas, liver, blood vessels, inner ear, nervous system, pharyngeal tooth and pectoral fins. This screen revealed that four of the tested chemicals have detectable effects on different organs, which shows that the range of effects elicited by EDCs is wider than anticipated. The endocrine disruptor tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), as well as the three drugs diclofenac, trichostatin A (TSA) and valproic acid (VPA) induced abnormalities in the embryonic vascular system of zebrafish. Moreover, TSA and VPA induced specific alterations during the development of pancreas, an observation that was confirmed by in situ hybridization with specific markers. Developmental delays were also induced by TSA and VPA in the liver and in pharyngeal teeth, resulting in smaller organ size. Our results show that EDCs can induce a large range of developmental alterations during embryogenesis of zebrafish and establish GFP transgenic lines as powerful tools to screen for EDCs effects in vivo. PMID:26900852

  4. Phospho-selective mechanisms of arrestin conformations and functions revealed by unnatural amino acid incorporation and 19F-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Yu, Xiao; Liu, Chuan; Qu, Chang-Xiu; Gong, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Da; Li, Fa-Hui; Wang, Hong-Mei; He, Dong-Fang; Yi, Fan; Song, Chen; Tian, Chang-Lin; Xiao, Kun-Hong; Wang, Jiang-Yun; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Specific arrestin conformations are coupled to distinct downstream effectors, which underlie the functions of many G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, using unnatural amino acid incorporation and fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance (19F-NMR) spectroscopy, we demonstrate that distinct receptor phospho-barcodes are translated to specific β-arrestin-1 conformations and direct selective signalling. With its phosphate-binding concave surface, β-arrestin-1 ‘reads' the message in the receptor phospho-C-tails and distinct phospho-interaction patterns are revealed by 19F-NMR. Whereas all functional phosphopeptides interact with a common phosphate binding site and induce the movements of finger and middle loops, different phospho-interaction patterns induce distinct structural states of β-arrestin-1 that are coupled to distinct arrestin functions. Only clathrin recognizes and stabilizes GRK2-specific β-arrestin-1 conformations. The identified receptor-phospho-selective mechanism for arrestin conformation and the spacing of the multiple phosphate-binding sites in the arrestin enable arrestin to recognize plethora phosphorylation states of numerous GPCRs, contributing to the functional diversity of receptors. PMID:26347956

  5. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity.

  6. Metabolomics analysis reveals 6‐benzylaminopurine as a stimulator for improving lipid and DHA accumulation of Aurantiochytriumsp.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin‐Jun; Sun, Jie; Zheng, Jian‐Yong; Sun, Ya‐Qi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND Phytohormones are chemical messengers that have a positive effect on biodiesel production of microalgae at low concentrations. However, the effect of phytohormone 6‐benzylaminopurine on lipid and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) production in marine DHA‐producer Aurantiochytrium has never been reported. In this study, a GC‐MS‐based metabolomics method combined with a multivariate analysis is applied to reveal the metabolic mechanism of 6‐benzylaminopurine enhancing production of lipid and DHA in Aurantiochytrium sp.YLH70. RESULTS In total, 71 metabolites were identified by GC‐MS. The PCA model revealed that 76.9% of metabolite variation was related to 6‐benzylaminopurine treatment, and overall metabolomics profiles between the 6‐benzylaminopurine and control groups were clearly discriminated. Forty‐six metabolites identified by the PLS‐DA model were responsible for responding to 6‐benzylaminopurine. Metabolic analysis showed that 6‐benzylaminopurine could accelerate the rate of utilization of glucose in Aurantiochytrium sp. YLH70, and the metabolic flux from glycolysis, TCA cycle and mevalonate pathway to fatty acids biosynthesis was promoted. Moreover, the anti‐stress mechanism in Aurantiochytrium sp.YLH70 might be induced by 6‐benzylaminopurine. CONCLUSION Metabolomics is a suitable tool to discover the metabolic mechanism for improving lipid and DHA accumulation in a microorganism. 6‐benzylaminopurine has the potential to stimulate lipid and DHA production of Aurantiochytrium sp.YLH70 for industrial purposes. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:27065509

  7. Evolution of amino acid metabolism inferred through cladistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunchillos, Chomin; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2003-11-28

    Because free amino acids were most probably available in primitive abiotic environments, their metabolism is likely to have provided some of the very first metabolic pathways of life. What were the first enzymatic reactions to emerge? A cladistic analysis of metabolic pathways of the 16 aliphatic amino acids and 2 portions of the Krebs cycle was performed using four criteria of homology. The analysis is not based on sequence comparisons but, rather, on coding similarities in enzyme properties. The properties used are shared specific enzymatic activity, shared enzymatic function without substrate specificity, shared coenzymes, and shared functional family. The tree shows that the earliest pathways to emerge are not portions of the Krebs cycle but metabolisms of aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine. The views of Horowitz (Horowitz, N. H. (1945) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 31, 153-157) and Cordón (Cordón, F. (1990) Tratado Evolucionista de Biologia, Aguilar, Madrid, Spain), according to which the upstream reactions in the catabolic pathways and the downstream reactions in the anabolic pathways are the earliest in evolution, are globally corroborated; however, with some exceptions. These are due to later opportunistic connections of pathways (actually already suggested by these authors). Earliest enzymatic functions are mostly catabolic; they were deaminations, transaminations, and decarboxylations. From the consensus tree we extracted four time spans for amino acid metabolism development. For some amino acids catabolism and biosynthesis occurred at the same time (Asp, Glu, Lys, Leu, Ala, Val, Ile, Pro, Arg). For others ultimate reactions that use amino acids as a substrate or as a product are distinct in time, with catabolism preceding anabolism for Asn, Gln, and Cys and anabolism preceding catabolism for Ser, Met, and Thr. Cladistic analysis of the structure of biochemical pathways makes hypotheses in biochemical evolution explicit and parsimonious.

  8. Stable isotope studies reveal pathways for the incorporation of non-essential amino acids in Acyrthosiphon pisum (pea aphids).

    PubMed

    Haribal, Meena; Jander, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Plant roots incorporate inorganic nitrogen into the amino acids glutamine, glutamic acid, asparagine and aspartic acid, which together serve as the primary metabolites of nitrogen transport to other tissues. Given the preponderance of these four amino acids, phloem sap is a nutritionally unbalanced diet for phloem-feeding insects. Therefore, aphids and other phloem feeders typically rely on microbial symbionts for the synthesis of essential amino acids. To investigate the metabolism of the four main transport amino acids by the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum), and its Buchnera aphidicola endosymbionts, aphids were fed defined diets with stable isotope-labeled glutamine, glutamic acid, asparagine or aspartic acid (U-(13)C, U-(15)N; U-(15)N; α-(15)N; or γ-(15)N). The metabolic fate of the dietary (15)N and (13)C was traced using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Nitrogen was the major contributor to the observed amino acid isotopomers with one additional unit mass (M+1). However, there was differential incorporation, with the amine nitrogen of asparagine being incorporated into other amino acids more efficiently than the amide nitrogen. Higher isotopomers (M+2, M+3 and M+4) indicated the incorporation of varying numbers of (13)C atoms into essential amino acids. GC-MS assays also showed that, even with an excess of dietary labeled glutamine, glutamic acid, asparagine or aspartic acid, the overall content of these amino acids in aphid bodies was mostly the product of catabolism of dietary amino acids and subsequent re-synthesis within the aphids. Thus, these predominant dietary amino acids are not passed directly to Buchnera endosymbionts for synthesis of essential amino acids, but are rather are produced de novo, most likely by endogenous aphid enzymes.

  9. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals that AICAR Affects Glycerolipid, Ceramide and Nucleotide Synthesis Pathways in INS-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    ElAzzouny, Mahmoud A; Evans, Charles R; Burant, Charles F; Kennedy, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    AMPK regulates many metabolic pathways including fatty acid and glucose metabolism, both of which are closely associated with insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. Insulin secretion is regulated by metabolic coupling factors such as ATP/ADP ratio and other metabolites generated by the metabolism of nutrients such as glucose, fatty acid and amino acids. However, the connection between AMPK activation and insulin secretion in β-cells has not yet been fully elucidated at a metabolic level. To study the effect of AMPK activation on glucose stimulated insulin secretion, we applied the pharmacological activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) to an INS-1 (832/13) β-cell line. We measured the change in 66 metabolites in the presence or absence of AICAR using different stable isotopic labeled nutrients to probe selected pathways. AMPK activation by AICAR increased basal insulin secretion and reduced the glucose stimulation index. Although ATP/ADP ratios were not strongly affected by AICAR, several other metabolites and pathways important for insulin secretion were affected by AICAR treatment including long-chain CoAs, malonyl-CoA, 3-hydroxy-3 methylglutaryl CoA, diacylglycerol, and farnesyl pyrophosphate. Tracer studies using 13C-glucose revealed lower glucose flux in the purine and pyrimidine pathway and in the glycerolipid synthesis pathway. Untargeted metabolomics revealed reduction in ceramides caused by AICAR that may explain the beneficial role of AMPK in protecting β-cells from lipotoxicity. Taken together, the results provide an overall picture of the metabolic changes associated with AICAR treatment and how it modulates insulin secretion and β-cell survival.

  10. Comparative genome analysis of the oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans reveals its potential applications in lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qi; Chen, Yue; Jin, Danfeng; Lin, Hui; Wang, Qun; Zhao, Yu-Hua

    2016-11-01

    In this work, Trichosporon fermentans CICC 1368, which has been shown to accumulate cellular lipids efficiently using industry-agricultural wastes, was subjected to preliminary genome analysis, yielding a genome size of 31.3 million bases and 12,702 predicted protein-coding genes. Our analysis also showed a high degree of gene duplications and unique genes compared with those observed in other oleaginous yeasts, with 3-4-fold more genes related to fatty acid elongation and degradation compared with those in Rhodosporidium toruloides NP11 and Yarrowia lipolytica CLIB122. Phylogenetic analysis with other oleaginous microbes suggested that the lipogenic capacity of T. fermentans was obtained during evolution after the divergence of genera. Thus, our study provided the first draft genome and comparative analysis of T. fermentans, laying the foundation for its genetic improvement to facilitate cost-effective lipid production. PMID:27664738

  11. Comparative genome analysis of the oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans reveals its potential applications in lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qi; Chen, Yue; Jin, Danfeng; Lin, Hui; Wang, Qun; Zhao, Yu-Hua

    2016-11-01

    In this work, Trichosporon fermentans CICC 1368, which has been shown to accumulate cellular lipids efficiently using industry-agricultural wastes, was subjected to preliminary genome analysis, yielding a genome size of 31.3 million bases and 12,702 predicted protein-coding genes. Our analysis also showed a high degree of gene duplications and unique genes compared with those observed in other oleaginous yeasts, with 3-4-fold more genes related to fatty acid elongation and degradation compared with those in Rhodosporidium toruloides NP11 and Yarrowia lipolytica CLIB122. Phylogenetic analysis with other oleaginous microbes suggested that the lipogenic capacity of T. fermentans was obtained during evolution after the divergence of genera. Thus, our study provided the first draft genome and comparative analysis of T. fermentans, laying the foundation for its genetic improvement to facilitate cost-effective lipid production.

  12. Mathematical Modeling and Sensitivity Analysis of Acid Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seog-Yeon

    Atmospheric processes influencing acid deposition are investigated by using mathematical model and sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity analysis techniques including Green's function analysis, constraint sensitivities, and lumped sensitivities are applied to temporal problems describing gas and liquid phase chemistry and to space-time problems describing pollutant transport and deposition. The sensitivity analysis techniques are used to; (1) investigate the chemical and physical processes related to acid depositions and (2) evaluate the linearity hypothesis, and source and receptor relationships. Results from analysis of the chemistry processes show that the relationship between SO(,2) concentration and the amount of sulfate produced is linear in gas phase but it may be nonlinear in liquid phase when there exists an excess amount of SO(,2) compared to H(,2)O(,2). Under the simulated conditions, the deviation of linearity between ambient sulfur present and the amount of sulfur deposited after 2 hours, is less than 10% in a convective storm situation when the liquid phase chemistry, gas phases chemistry, and cloud processes are considered simultaneously. Efficient ways of sensitivity analysis of time-space problems are also developed and used to evaluate the source and receptor relationships in an Eulerian transport, chemistry, removal model.

  13. Recent advances in amino acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Poinsot, Véréna; Carpéné, Marie-Anne; Bouajila, Jalloul; Gavard, Pierre; Feurer, Bernard; Couderc, François

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the most important articles that have been published on amino acid analysis using CE during the period from June 2009 to May 2011 and follows the format of the previous articles of Smith (Electrophoresis 1999, 20, 3078-3083), Prata et al. (Electrophoresis 2001, 22, 4129-4138) and Poinsot et al. (Electrophoresis 2003, 24, 4047-4062; Electrophoresis 2006, 27, 176-194; Electrophoresis 2008, 29, 207-223; Electrophoresis 2010, 31, 105-121). We present new developments in amino acid analysis with CE, which are reported describing the use of lasers or light emitting diodes for fluorescence detection, conductimetry electrochemiluminescence detectors, mass spectrometry applications, and lab-on-a-chip applications using CE. In addition, we describe articles concerning clinical studies and neurochemical applications of these techniques.

  14. Z-sinapinic acid: the change of the stereochemistry of cinnamic acids as rational synthesis of a new matrix for carbohydrate MALDI-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Salum, María L; Itovich, Lucia M; Erra-Balsells, Rosa

    2013-11-01

    Successful application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS started with the introduction of efficient matrices such as cinnamic acid derivatives (i.e. 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, SA; α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid). Since the empirical founding of these matrices, other commercial available cinnamic acids with different nature and location of substituents at benzene ring were attempted. Rational design and synthesis of new cinnamic acids have been recently described too. Because the presence of a rigid double bond in its molecule structure, cinnamic acids can exist as two different geometric isomers, the E-form and Z-form. Commercial available cinnamic acids currently used as matrices are the geometric isomers trans or E (E-cinnamic and trans-cinnamic acids). As a new rational design of MALDI matrices, Z-cinnamic acids were synthesized, and their properties as matrices were studied. Their performance was compared with that of the corresponding E-isomer and classical crystalline matrices (3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid; norharmane) in the analysis of neutral/sulfated carbohydrates. Herein, we demonstrate the outstanding performance for Z-SA. Sulfated oligosaccharides were detected in negative ion mode, and the dissociation of sulfate groups was almost suppressed. Additionally, to better understand the quite different performance of each geometric isomer as matrix, the physical and morphological properties as well as the photochemical stability in solid state were studied. The influence of the E/Z photoisomerization of the matrix during MALDI was evaluated. Finally, molecular modeling (density functional theory study) of the optimized geometry and stereochemistry of E-cinnamic and Z-cinnamic acids revealed some factors governing the analyte-matrix interaction.

  15. An isobolographic analysis of the antinociceptive effect of xylopic acid in combination with morphine or diclofenac

    PubMed Central

    Woode, Eric; Ameyaw, Elvis Ofori; Abotsi, Wonder Kofi Mensah; Boakye-Gyasi, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background: A common practice of managing pain globally is the combination of analgesics and this is aimed at facilitating patient compliance, simplifying prescription, and improving efficacy without increasing adverse effects. Fruit extracts of Xylopia aethiopica are used traditionally in the management of pain disorders and xylopic acid (XA) present in the fruit extract have been shown to possess analgesic properties in animals. There is the likelihood of concomitant use of XA and the commonly used analgesics in traditional settings. This study, therefore, evaluated the pharmacologic interaction between XA/morphine and xylopic/diclofenac combinations. Methods: The formalin test and acetic acid writhing test were used to study the antinociceptive activity of XA, morphine, and diclofenac. The isobolographic analysis was used to study the antinociceptive interactions between XA co-administered with morphine or diclofenac. Results: Results obtained revealed that XA (10–100 mg/kg), morphine (1–10 mg/kg), and diclofenac (1–10 mg/kg) produced dose-related antinociception with different potencies in the formalin and acetic acid writhing tests. Isobolographic analysis of XA/morphine and XA/diclofenac combinations revealed potentiation of their antinociceptive effects. The degree of potentiation calculated as interaction index showed synergism for both combinations in all the nociceptive tests. Conclusion: In conclusion, the present study demonstrated synergism for the co-administration of XA with morphine or diclofenac. PMID:26692735

  16. Quantitative proteomics using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture reveals protein and pathway regulation in porcine circovirus type 2 infected PK-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huiying; Ye, Yu; Luo, Yongwen; Tong, Tiezhu; Yan, Guangrong; Liao, Ming

    2012-02-01

    The infection of host cells by porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) leads to extensive modulation of the gene expression levels of target cells. To uncover the pathogenesis and virus-host interactions of PCV2, a quantitative proteomic study using the stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), coupled with mass spectrometry, was performed on PCV2-infected PK-15 cells. The SILAC-based approach identified 1341 proteins, 163 of which showed significant change in level at 72 h after infection (79 up-regulated and 84 down-regulated). The modulated proteins included a number of proteins involved in substrate transport, cytoskeletal changes, and the stress response. Changes in the expression levels of selected proteins were verified by Western blot analysis. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was used to reveal protein and interactive pathway regulation in response to PCV2 infection. Functional network and pathway analyses could provide insights into the complexity and dynamics of virus-host cell interactions and may accelerate our understanding of the mechanisms of PCV2 infection.

  17. Proteomic analysis of an unculturable bacterial endosymbiont (Blochmannia) reveals high abundance of chaperonins and biosynthetic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongliang; Thompson, J. Will; Dubois, Laura G.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Wernegreen, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Many insect groups have coevolved with bacterial endosymbionts that live within specialized host cells. As a salient example, ants in the tribe Camponotini rely on Blochmannia, an intracellular bacterial mutualist that synthesizes amino acids and recycles nitrogen for the host. We performed a shotgun, label-free, LC/MS/MS quantitative proteomic analysis to investigate the proteome of Blochmannia associated with Camponotus chromaiodes. We identified more than 330 Blochmannia proteins, or 54% coverage of the predicted proteome, as well as 244 Camponotus proteins. Using the average intensity of the top 3 “best flier” peptides along with spiking of a surrogate standard at a known concentration, we estimated the concentration (fmol/μg) of those proteins with confident identification. The estimated dynamic range of Blochmannia protein abundance spanned three orders of magnitude and covered diverse functional categories, with particularly high representation of metabolism, information transfer, and chaperones. GroEL, the most abundant protein, totaled 6% of Blochmannia protein abundance. Biosynthesis of essential amino acids, fatty acids, and nucleotides, and sulfate assimilation had disproportionately high coverage in the proteome, further supporting a nutritional role of the symbiosis. This first quantitative proteomic analysis of an ant endosymbiont illustrates a promising approach to study the functional basis of intimate symbioses. PMID:23205679

  18. Comparative genomics in acid mine drainage biofilm communities reveals metabolic and structural differentiation of co-occurring archaea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metal sulfide mineral dissolution during bioleaching and acid mine drainage (AMD) formation creates an environment that is inhospitable to most life. Despite dominance by a small number of bacteria, AMD microbial biofilm communities contain a notable variety of coexisting and closely related Euryarchaea, most of which have defied cultivation efforts. For this reason, we used metagenomics to analyze variation in gene content that may contribute to niche differentiation among co-occurring AMD archaea. Our analyses targeted members of the Thermoplasmatales and related archaea. These results greatly expand genomic information available for this archaeal order. Results We reconstructed near-complete genomes for uncultivated, relatively low abundance organisms A-, E-, and Gplasma, members of Thermoplasmatales order, and for a novel organism, Iplasma. Genomic analyses of these organisms, as well as Ferroplasma type I and II, reveal that all are facultative aerobic heterotrophs with the ability to use many of the same carbon substrates, including methanol. Most of the genomes share genes for toxic metal resistance and surface-layer production. Only Aplasma and Eplasma have a full suite of flagellar genes whereas all but the Ferroplasma spp. have genes for pili production. Cryogenic-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and tomography (cryo-ET) strengthen these metagenomics-based ultrastructural predictions. Notably, only Aplasma, Gplasma and the Ferroplasma spp. have predicted iron oxidation genes and Eplasma and Iplasma lack most genes for cobalamin, valine, (iso)leucine and histidine synthesis. Conclusion The Thermoplasmatales AMD archaea share a large number of metabolic capabilities. All of the uncultivated organisms studied here (A-, E-, G-, and Iplasma) are metabolically very similar to characterized Ferroplasma spp., differentiating themselves mainly in their genetic capabilities for biosynthesis, motility, and possibly iron oxidation. These results indicate that

  19. Reticulate evolutionary history and extensive introgression in mosquito species revealed by phylogenetic network analysis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Dingqiao; Yu, Yun; Hahn, Matthew W; Nakhleh, Luay

    2016-06-01

    The role of hybridization and subsequent introgression has been demonstrated in an increasing number of species. Recently, Fontaine et al. (Science, 347, 2015, 1258524) conducted a phylogenomic analysis of six members of the Anopheles gambiae species complex. Their analysis revealed a reticulate evolutionary history and pointed to extensive introgression on all four autosomal arms. The study further highlighted the complex evolutionary signals that the co-occurrence of incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) and introgression can give rise to in phylogenomic analyses. While tree-based methodologies were used in the study, phylogenetic networks provide a more natural model to capture reticulate evolutionary histories. In this work, we reanalyse the Anopheles data using a recently devised framework that combines the multispecies coalescent with phylogenetic networks. This framework allows us to capture ILS and introgression simultaneously, and forms the basis for statistical methods for inferring reticulate evolutionary histories. The new analysis reveals a phylogenetic network with multiple hybridization events, some of which differ from those reported in the original study. To elucidate the extent and patterns of introgression across the genome, we devise a new method that quantifies the use of reticulation branches in the phylogenetic network by each genomic region. Applying the method to the mosquito data set reveals the evolutionary history of all the chromosomes. This study highlights the utility of 'network thinking' and the new insights it can uncover, in particular in phylogenomic analyses of large data sets with extensive gene tree incongruence. PMID:26808290

  20. Proximate composition, fatty acid analysis and protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score of three Mediterranean cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Zlatanos, Spiros; Laskaridis, Kostas; Feist, Christian; Sagredos, Angelos

    2006-10-01

    Proximate composition, fatty acid analysis and protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) in three commercially important cephalopods of the Mediterranean sea (cuttlefish, octopus and squid) were determined. The results of the proximate analysis showed that these species had very high protein:fat ratios similar to lean beef. Docosahexaenoic, palmitic and eicosipentaenoic acid were the most abundant fatty acids among analyzed species. The amount of n-3 fatty acids was higher than that of saturated, monounsaturated and n-6 fatty acids. Despite the fact that cephalopods contain small amounts of fat they were found quite rich in n-3 fatty acids. Finally, PDCAAS indicated that these organisms had a very good protein quality.

  1. Comparison and analysis of fatty acids, sterols, and tocopherols in eight vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Li, Changmo; Yao, Yunping; Zhao, Guozhong; Cheng, Wen; Liu, Huilin; Liu, Chunyang; Shi, Zhen; Chen, Yao; Wang, Shuo

    2011-12-14

    The similarities and differences of eight vegetable oils produced in China were investigated in terms of their fatty acid, sterol, and tocopherol compositions and subsequent data processing by hierarchical clustering analysis and principal component analysis. The lipid profiles, acquired by analytical techniques tailored to each lipid class, revealed great similarities among the fatty acid profiles of corn and sesame oil as well as few differences in their sterol profiles. It turns out that not only was there great similarity between the fatty acid profiles of corn oil and sesame oil but also there were not too many differences for the sterol profiles. Sunflower and tea-seed oil showed similar sterol compositions, while the tea-seed oil tocopherol was very similar to palm oil. The results demonstrated that the use of only one of these profiles was unreliable for indentifying oil origin and authenticity. In contrast, the use of the sterol or tocopherol profile together with the fatty acid profile more accurately discriminates these oils.

  2. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Possible Influences of ABA on Secondary Metabolism of Pigments, Flavonoids and Antioxidants in Tomato Fruit during Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Wangshu; Li, Dongdong; Luo, Zisheng; Mao, Linchun; Ying, Tiejin

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has been proven to be involved in the regulation of climacteric fruit ripening, but a comprehensive investigation of its influence on ripening related processes is still lacking. By applying the next generation sequencing technology, we conducted a comparative analysis of the effects of exogenous ABA and NDGA (Nordihydroguaiaretic acid, an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis) on tomato fruit ripening. The high throughput sequencing results showed that out of the 25728 genes expressed across all three samples, 10388 were identified as significantly differently expressed genes. Exogenous ABA was found to enhance the transcription of genes involved in pigments metabolism, including carotenoids biosynthesis and chlorophyll degradation, whereas NDGA treatment inhibited these processes. The results also revealed the crucial role of ABA in flavonoids synthesis and regulation of antioxidant system. Intriguingly, we also found that an inhibition of endogenous ABA significantly enhanced the transcriptional abundance of genes involved in photosynthesis. Our results highlighted the significance of ABA in regulating tomato ripening, which provided insight into the regulatory mechanism of fruit maturation and senescence process. PMID:26053166

  3. Metabolomic analysis of bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 mutations in human pulmonary endothelium reveals widespread metabolic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Fessel, Joshua P; Hamid, Rizwan; Wittmann, Bryan M; Robinson, Linda J; Blackwell, Tom; Tada, Yuji; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Hemnes, Anna R; West, James D

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive and fatal disease of the lung vasculature for which the molecular etiologies are unclear. Specific metabolic alterations have been identified in animal models and in PAH patients, though existing data focus mainly on abnormalities of glucose homeostasis. We hypothesized that analysis of the entire metabolome in PAH would reveal multiple other metabolic changes relevant to disease pathogenesis and possible treatment. Layered transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (hPMVEC) expressing two different disease-causing mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) confirmed previously described increases in aerobic glycolysis but also uncovered significant upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway, increases in nucleotide salvage and polyamine biosynthesis pathways, decreases in carnitine and fatty acid oxidation pathways, and major impairment of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and failure of anaplerosis. As a proof of principle, we focused on the TCA cycle, predicting that isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) activity would be altered in PAH, and then demonstrating increased IDH activity not only in cultured hPMVEC expressing mutant BMPR2 but also in the serum of PAH patients. These results suggest that widespread metabolic changes are an important part of PAH pathogenesis, and that simultaneous identification and targeting of the multiple involved pathways may be a more fruitful therapeutic approach than targeting of any one individual pathway.

  4. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Possible Influences of ABA on Secondary Metabolism of Pigments, Flavonoids and Antioxidants in Tomato Fruit during Ripening.

    PubMed

    Mou, Wangshu; Li, Dongdong; Luo, Zisheng; Mao, Linchun; Ying, Tiejin

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has been proven to be involved in the regulation of climacteric fruit ripening, but a comprehensive investigation of its influence on ripening related processes is still lacking. By applying the next generation sequencing technology, we conducted a comparative analysis of the effects of exogenous ABA and NDGA (Nordihydroguaiaretic acid, an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis) on tomato fruit ripening. The high throughput sequencing results showed that out of the 25728 genes expressed across all three samples, 10388 were identified as significantly differently expressed genes. Exogenous ABA was found to enhance the transcription of genes involved in pigments metabolism, including carotenoids biosynthesis and chlorophyll degradation, whereas NDGA treatment inhibited these processes. The results also revealed the crucial role of ABA in flavonoids synthesis and regulation of antioxidant system. Intriguingly, we also found that an inhibition of endogenous ABA significantly enhanced the transcriptional abundance of genes involved in photosynthesis. Our results highlighted the significance of ABA in regulating tomato ripening, which provided insight into the regulatory mechanism of fruit maturation and senescence process.

  5. In silico Analysis for Predicting Fatty Acids of Black Cumin Oil as Inhibitors of P-Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Babar; Jamal, Qazi Mohd. Sajid; Mir, Showkat R.; Shams, Saiba; Al-Wabel, Naser A.; Kamal, Mohammad A.

    2015-01-01

    glycoprotein as a receptor.Rat P-gp structure quality shows 88.5% residues in favored region obtained by Ramchandran plot analysis.Docking analysis revealed that Some amino acids common for all compounds like Ser221, Pro222, Ile224, Gly225, Ser228, Ala229, Lys233, Tyr302, Tyr309, Ile337, Leu338 and Thr341 in the P-gp and ligands binding patterns.Eicosadeinoic acid has highest binding affinity with P-gp as the amount of energy needed to bind with P-gp was lowest (-11.92 kcal/mol). Abbreviations used: P-gp: P-glycoprotein PMID:27013802

  6. A Δ-9 Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene in the Microalga Myrmecia incisa Reisigl: Cloning and Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen-Bin; Liu, Fan; Sun, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    The green alga Myrmecia incisa is one of the richest natural sources of arachidonic acid (ArA). To better understand the regulation of ArA biosynthesis in M. incisa, a novel gene putatively encoding the Δ9 fatty acid desaturase (FAD) was cloned and characterized for the first time. Rapid-amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was employed to yield a full length cDNA designated as MiΔ9FAD, which is 2442 bp long in sequence. Comparing cDNA open reading frame (ORF) sequence to genomic sequence indicated that there are 8 introns interrupting the coding region. The deduced MiΔ9FAD protein is composed of 432 amino acids. It is soluble and localized in the chloroplast, as evidenced by the absence of transmembrane domains as well as the presence of a 61-amino acid chloroplast transit peptide. Multiple sequence alignment of amino acids revealed two conserved histidine-rich motifs, typical for Δ9 acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases. To determine the function of MiΔ9FAD, the gene was heterologously expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain with impaired desaturase activity. Results of GC-MS analysis indicated that MiΔ9FAD was able to restore the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids, generating palmitoleic acid and oleic acid through the addition of a double bond in the Δ9 position of palmitic acid and stearic acid, respectively. PMID:27438826

  7. A Δ-9 Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene in the Microalga Myrmecia incisa Reisigl: Cloning and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen-Bin; Liu, Fan; Sun, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    The green alga Myrmecia incisa is one of the richest natural sources of arachidonic acid (ArA). To better understand the regulation of ArA biosynthesis in M. incisa, a novel gene putatively encoding the Δ9 fatty acid desaturase (FAD) was cloned and characterized for the first time. Rapid-amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was employed to yield a full length cDNA designated as MiΔ9FAD, which is 2442 bp long in sequence. Comparing cDNA open reading frame (ORF) sequence to genomic sequence indicated that there are 8 introns interrupting the coding region. The deduced MiΔ9FAD protein is composed of 432 amino acids. It is soluble and localized in the chloroplast, as evidenced by the absence of transmembrane domains as well as the presence of a 61-amino acid chloroplast transit peptide. Multiple sequence alignment of amino acids revealed two conserved histidine-rich motifs, typical for Δ9 acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases. To determine the function of MiΔ9FAD, the gene was heterologously expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain with impaired desaturase activity. Results of GC-MS analysis indicated that MiΔ9FAD was able to restore the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids, generating palmitoleic acid and oleic acid through the addition of a double bond in the Δ9 position of palmitic acid and stearic acid, respectively. PMID:27438826

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of acetic acid steam reforming for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, Saioa; Ehrich, Heike; Arias, Pedro L.; Kockmann, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen generation by acetic acid steam reforming has been carried out with respect to applications in solid oxide fuel cells. The effect of operating parameters on equilibrium composition has been examined focusing especially on hydrogen and carbon monoxide production, which are the fuels in this type of fuel cell. The temperature, steam to acetic acid ratio, and to a lesser extent pressure affect significantly the equilibrium product distribution due to their influence on steam reforming, thermal decomposition and water-gas shift reaction. The study shows that steam reforming of acetic acid with a steam to acetic acid ratio of 2 to 1 is thermodynamically feasible with hydrogen, carbon monoxide and water as the main products at the equilibrium at temperatures higher than 700 °C, and achieving CO/CO2 ratios higher than 1. Thus, it can be concluded that within the operation temperature range of solid oxide fuel cells - between 700 °C and 1000 °C - the production of a gas rich in hydrogen and carbon monoxide is promoted.

  9. Fluoroalkyl chloroformates in treating amino acids for gas chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Husek, Petr; Simek, Petr; Hartvich, Petr; Zahradnícková, Helena

    2008-04-01

    Novel fluoroalkyl chloroformates with three and four carbon atoms were investigated for the immediate conversion of amino acids into hydrophobic derivatives in water-containing media. Derivatization conditions were extensively studied and optimized sample preparation protocols elaborated. More than 30 amino acids were treated with the particular reagent in isooctane by simply vortexing the reactive organic phase with a slightly basified aqueous medium containing pyridine or 3-picoline as a catalyst. Outstanding separation of nearly all components on 5% phenylmethylsilicone phase in gas chromatographic (GC) analysis with mass spectrometric (MS) or flame ionization detection (FID) required <10 min. Quantitation characteristics involving linearity in the range of 0.1-100 nmol, regression coefficients of 0.999-0.953 (histidine), MS limit of detection (LOD) reaching 0.03 pmol at proline to nearly 20 pmol at glutamic acid, plus electron impact (EI) spectra and diagnostic SIM fragment ions of the derivatives are reported. The novel method is simple, robust and rapid, enabling to treat amino acids in aqueous environment and to analyze them in <15 min. PMID:18242622

  10. Extreme diversity of scorpion venom peptides and proteins revealed by transcriptomic analysis: implication for proteome evolution of scorpion venom arsenal.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yibao; He, Yawen; Zhao, Ruiming; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2012-02-16

    Venom is an important genetic development crucial to the survival of scorpions for over 400 million years. We studied the evolution of the scorpion venom arsenal by means of comparative transcriptome analysis of venom glands and phylogenetic analysis of shared types of venom peptides and proteins between buthids and euscorpiids. Fifteen types of venom peptides and proteins were sequenced during the venom gland transcriptome analyses of two Buthidae species (Lychas mucronatus and Isometrus maculatus) and one Euscorpiidae species (Scorpiops margerisonae). Great diversity has been observed in translated amino acid sequences of these transcripts for venom peptides and proteins. Seven types of venom peptides and proteins were shared between buthids and euscorpiids. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed that at least five of the seven common types of venom peptides and proteins were likely recruited into the scorpion venom proteome before the lineage split between Buthidae and Euscorpiidae with their corresponding genes undergoing individual or multiple gene duplication events. These are α-KTxs, βKSPNs (β-KTxs and scorpines), anionic peptides, La1-like peptides, and SPSVs (serine proteases from scorpion venom). Multiple types of venom peptides and proteins were demonstrated to be continuously recruited into the venom proteome during the evolution process of individual scorpion lineages. Our results provide an insight into the recruitment pattern of the scorpion venom arsenal for the first time.

  11. Transcriptome, carbohydrate, and phytohormone analysis of Petunia hybrida reveals a complex disturbance of plant functional integrity under mild chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Bauerfeind, Martin Andreas; Winkelmann, Traud; Franken, Philipp; Druege, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Cultivation of chilling-tolerant ornamental crops at lower temperature could reduce the energy demands of heated greenhouses. To provide a better understanding of how sub-optimal temperatures (12°C vs. 16°C) affect growth of the sensitive Petunia hybrida cultivar 'SweetSunshine Williams', the transcriptome, carbohydrate metabolism, and phytohormone homeostasis were monitored in aerial plant parts over 4 weeks by use of a microarray, enzymatic assays and GC-MS/MS. The data revealed three consecutive phases of chilling response. The first days were marked by a strong accumulation of sugars, particularly in source leaves, preferential up-regulation of genes in the same tissue and down-regulation of several genes in the shoot apex, especially those involved in the abiotic stress response. The midterm phase featured a partial normalization of carbohydrate levels and gene expression. After 3 weeks of chilling exposure, a new stabilized balance was established. Reduced hexose levels in the shoot apex, reduced ratios of sugar levels between the apex and source leaves and a higher apical sucrose/hexose ratio, associated with decreased activity and expression of cell wall invertase, indicate that prolonged chilling induced sugar accumulation in source leaves at the expense of reduced sugar transport to and reduced sucrose utilization in the shoot. This was associated with reduced levels of indole-3-acetic acid and abscisic acid in the apex and high numbers of differentially, particularly up-regulated genes, especially in the source leaves, including those regulating histones, ethylene action, transcription factors, and a jasmonate-ZIM-domain protein. Transcripts of one Jumonji C domain containing protein and one expansin accumulated in source leaves throughout the chilling period. The results reveal a dynamic and complex disturbance of plant function in response to mild chilling, opening new perspectives for the comparative analysis of differently tolerant cultivars. PMID

  12. Multistate proteomics analysis reveals novel strategies used by a hibernator to precondition the heart and conserve ATP for winter heterothermy.

    PubMed

    Grabek, Katharine R; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Epperson, L Elaine; Hindle, Allyson; Hunter, Lawrence E; Martin, Sandra L

    2011-11-21

    The hibernator's heart functions continuously and avoids damage across the wide temperature range of winter heterothermy. To define the molecular basis of this phenotype, we quantified proteomic changes in the 13-lined ground squirrel heart among eight distinct physiological states encompassing the hibernator's year. Unsupervised clustering revealed a prominent seasonal separation between the summer homeotherms and winter heterotherms, whereas within-season state separation was limited. Further, animals torpid in the fall were intermediate to summer and winter, consistent with the transitional nature of this phase. A seasonal analysis revealed that the relative abundances of protein spots were mainly winter-increased. The winter-elevated proteins were involved in fatty acid catabolism and protein folding, whereas the winter-depleted proteins included those that degrade branched-chain amino acids. To identify further state-dependent changes, protein spots were re-evaluated with respect to specific physiological state, confirming the predominance of seasonal differences. Additionally, chaperone and heat shock proteins increased in winter, including HSPA4, HSPB6, and HSP90AB1, which have known roles in protecting against ischemia-reperfusion injury and apoptosis. The most significant and greatest fold change observed was a disappearance of phospho-cofilin 2 at low body temperature, likely a strategy to preserve ATP. The robust summer-to-winter seasonal proteomic shift implies that a winter-protected state is orchestrated before prolonged torpor ensues. Additionally, the general preservation of the proteome during winter hibernation and an increase of stress response proteins, together with dephosphorylation of cofilin 2, highlight the importance of ATP-conserving mechanisms for winter cardioprotection. PMID:21914784

  13. Transcriptome, carbohydrate, and phytohormone analysis of Petunia hybrida reveals a complex disturbance of plant functional integrity under mild chilling stress

    PubMed Central

    Bauerfeind, Martin Andreas; Winkelmann, Traud; Franken, Philipp; Druege, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Cultivation of chilling-tolerant ornamental crops at lower temperature could reduce the energy demands of heated greenhouses. To provide a better understanding of how sub-optimal temperatures (12°C vs. 16°C) affect growth of the sensitive Petunia hybrida cultivar ‘SweetSunshine Williams’, the transcriptome, carbohydrate metabolism, and phytohormone homeostasis were monitored in aerial plant parts over 4 weeks by use of a microarray, enzymatic assays and GC-MS/MS. The data revealed three consecutive phases of chilling response. The first days were marked by a strong accumulation of sugars, particularly in source leaves, preferential up-regulation of genes in the same tissue and down-regulation of several genes in the shoot apex, especially those involved in the abiotic stress response. The midterm phase featured a partial normalization of carbohydrate levels and gene expression. After 3 weeks of chilling exposure, a new stabilized balance was established. Reduced hexose levels in the shoot apex, reduced ratios of sugar levels between the apex and source leaves and a higher apical sucrose/hexose ratio, associated with decreased activity and expression of cell wall invertase, indicate that prolonged chilling induced sugar accumulation in source leaves at the expense of reduced sugar transport to and reduced sucrose utilization in the shoot. This was associated with reduced levels of indole-3-acetic acid and abscisic acid in the apex and high numbers of differentially, particularly up-regulated genes, especially in the source leaves, including those regulating histones, ethylene action, transcription factors, and a jasmonate-ZIM-domain protein. Transcripts of one Jumonji C domain containing protein and one expansin accumulated in source leaves throughout the chilling period. The results reveal a dynamic and complex disturbance of plant function in response to mild chilling, opening new perspectives for the comparative analysis of differently tolerant cultivars

  14. Extraction and analysis of trifluoroacetic Acid in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Wujcik, C E; Cahill, T M; Seiber, J N

    1998-10-01

    Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), a mildly phytotoxic compound, is a stable atmospheric breakdown product of HFC-134a, HCFC-123, and HCFC-124. An extraction and analytical method has been developed for the routine analysis of low ppt levels of TFA in aqueous samples. TFA can be quantitatively recovered from most environmental waters by an extraction procedure using a commercial anion-exchange disk. In saline samples (conductivity >620 μS), where the presence of competing anions interfered with recovery, a liquid-liquid extraction cleanup was necessary. After extraction of TFA from water, the dried disk was placed in a headspace vial containing 10% sulfuric acid in methanol and the vial sealed and then vortexed for 30 s. The sulfuric acid-methanol solution extracts trifluoroacetate anion (TFA) from the anion-exchange matrix and, when heated, quantitatively converts it to the methyl ester, which is then analyzed by automated headspace gas chromatography using electron capture or mass spectrometry detection. Several environmental samples in addition to laboratory spike solutions were successfully extracted and analyzed with this technique. Recoveries averaged 108.2% for reagent water spiked at levels from 53 to 2110 ng/L with relative standard deviations ranging from 0.3 to 8.4%. The instrument's limit of detection for TFA standard was 3.3 ng. The limit of quantitation for the extraction and analytical technique was 36 ng/L. Three water samples can be prepared for automated analysis in 20 min using this technique. PMID:21651243

  15. PhyloChip microarray analysis reveals altered gastrointestinal microbial communities in a rat model of colonic hypersensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.A.; Holmes, S.; Alekseyenko, A.V.; Shenoy, M.; DeSantis, T.; Wu, C.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Winston, J.; Sonnenburg, J.; Pasricha, P.J.; Spormann, A.

    2010-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, episodic gastrointestinal disorder that is prevalent in a significant fraction of western human populations; and changes in the microbiota of the large bowel have been implicated in the pathology of the disease. Using a novel comprehensive, high-density DNA microarray (PhyloChip) we performed a phylogenetic analysis of the microbial community of the large bowel in a rat model in which intracolonic acetic acid in neonates was used to induce long lasting colonic hypersensitivity and decreased stool water content and frequency, representing the equivalent of human constipation-predominant IBS. Our results revealed a significantly increased compositional difference in the microbial communities in rats with neonatal irritation as compared with controls. Even more striking was the dramatic change in the ratio of Firmicutes relative to Bacteroidetes, where neonatally irritated rats were enriched more with Bacteroidetes and also contained a different composition of species within this phylum. Our study also revealed differences at the level of bacterial families and species. The PhyloChip is a useful and convenient method to study enteric microflora. Further, this rat model system may be a useful experimental platform to study the causes and consequences of changes in microbial community composition associated with IBS.

  16. Proteomics Analysis with a Nano Random Forest Approach Reveals Novel Functional Interactions Regulated by SMC Complexes on Mitotic Chromosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shinya; Montaño-Gutierrez, Luis F.; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Ogawa, Hiromi; Toramoto, Iyo; Sato, Nobuko; Morrison, Ciaran G.; Takeda, Shunichi; Hudson, Damien F.; Earnshaw, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Packaging of DNA into condensed chromosomes during mitosis is essential for the faithful segregation of the genome into daughter nuclei. Although the structure and composition of mitotic chromosomes have been studied for over 30 years, these aspects are yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we used stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture to compare the proteomes of mitotic chromosomes isolated from cell lines harboring conditional knockouts of members of the condensin (SMC2, CAP-H, CAP-D3), cohesin (Scc1/Rad21), and SMC5/6 (SMC5) complexes. Our analysis revealed that these complexes associate with chromosomes independently of each other, with the SMC5/6 complex showing no significant dependence on any other chromosomal proteins during mitosis. To identify subtle relationships between chromosomal proteins, we employed a nano Random Forest (nanoRF) approach to detect protein complexes and the relationships between them. Our nanoRF results suggested that as few as 113 of 5058 detected chromosomal proteins are functionally linked to chromosome structure and segregation. Furthermore, nanoRF data revealed 23 proteins that were not previously suspected to have functional interactions with complexes playing important roles in mitosis. Subsequent small-interfering-RNA-based validation and localization tracking by green fluorescent protein-tagging highlighted novel candidates that might play significant roles in mitotic progression. PMID:27231315

  17. Transcriptome profiling and physiological studies reveal a major role for aromatic amino acids in mercury stress tolerance in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-An; Chi, Wen-Chang; Trinh, Ngoc Nam; Huang, Li-Yao; Chen, Ying-Chih; Cheng, Kai-Teng; Huang, Tsai-Lien; Lin, Chung-Yi; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a serious environmental pollution threat to the planet. The accumulation of Hg in plants disrupts many cellular-level functions and inhibits growth and development, but the mechanism is not fully understood. To gain more insight into the cellular response to Hg, we performed a large-scale analysis of the rice transcriptome during Hg stress. Genes induced with short-term exposure represented functional categories of cell-wall formation, chemical detoxification, secondary metabolism, signal transduction and abiotic stress response. Moreover, Hg stress upregulated several genes involved in aromatic amino acids (Phe and Trp) and increased the level of free Phe and Trp content. Exogenous application of Phe and Trp to rice roots enhanced tolerance to Hg and effectively reduced Hg-induced production of reactive oxygen species. Hg induced calcium accumulation and activated mitogen-activated protein kinase. Further characterization of the Hg-responsive genes we identified may be helpful for better understanding the mechanisms of Hg in plants. PMID:24840062

  18. Transcriptome Profiling and Physiological Studies Reveal a Major Role for Aromatic Amino Acids in Mercury Stress Tolerance in Rice Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Ngoc Nam; Huang, Li-Yao; Chen, Ying-Chih; Cheng, Kai-Teng; Huang, Tsai-Lien; Lin, Chung-Yi; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a serious environmental pollution threat to the planet. The accumulation of Hg in plants disrupts many cellular-level functions and inhibits growth and development, but the mechanism is not fully understood. To gain more insight into the cellular response to Hg, we performed a large-scale analysis of the rice transcriptome during Hg stress. Genes induced with short-term exposure represented functional categories of cell-wall formation, chemical detoxification, secondary metabolism, signal transduction and abiotic stress response. Moreover, Hg stress upregulated several genes involved in aromatic amino acids (Phe and Trp) and increased the level of free Phe and Trp content. Exogenous application of Phe and Trp to rice roots enhanced tolerance to Hg and effectively reduced Hg-induced production of reactive oxygen species. Hg induced calcium accumulation and activated mitogen-activated protein kinase. Further characterization of the Hg-responsive genes we identified may be helpful for better understanding the mechanisms of Hg in plants. PMID:24840062

  19. Dynamic transcriptome analysis reveals AP2/ERF transcription factors responsible for cold stress in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Du, Chunfang; Hu, Kaining; Xian, Shuanshi; Liu, Chunqing; Fan, Jianchun; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2016-06-01

    The APETALA2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF) transcription factor (TF) superfamily plays an important regulatory role in signal transduction of the plant responses to various stresses including low temperature. Significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of cold resistance in Brassica napus, an important oilseed crop. However, comprehensive studies on the induction and activity of these TFs under low temperature have been lacking. In this study, 132 AP2/ERF genes were identified by transcriptome sequencing of rapeseed leaves exposed to 0, 2, 6, 12, and 24 h of low (4 °C) temperature stress. The genes were classified into 4 subfamilies (AP2, DREB, ERF, and RAV) and 13 subgroups, among which the DREB subfamily and ERF subfamily contained 114 genes, no genes were assigned to soloist or DREB A3 subgroups. One hundred and eighteen genes were located on chromosomes A1 to C9. GO functional analysis and promoter sequence analysis revealed that these genes are involved in many molecular pathways that may enhance cold resistance in plants, such as the low-temperature responsiveness, methyl jasmonate, abscisic acid, and ethylene-responsiveness pathways. Their expression patterns revealed dynamic control at different times following initiation of cold stress; the RAV and DREB subfamilies were expressed at the early stage of cold stress, whereas the AP2 subfamily was expressed later. Quantitative PCR analyses of 13 cold-induced AP2/ERF TFs confirmed the accuracy of above results. This study is the first dynamic analysis of the AP2/ERF TFs responsible for cold stress in rapeseed. These findings will serve as a reference for future functional research on transcription in rapeseed. PMID:26728151

  20. Quantitative proteomic analysis of amniocytes reveals potentially dysregulated molecular networks in Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Down syndrome (DS), caused by an extra copy of chromosome 21, affects 1 in 750 live births and is characterized by cognitive impairment and a constellation of congenital defects. Currently, little is known about the molecular pathogenesis and no direct genotype-phenotype relationship has yet been confirmed. Since DS amniocytes are expected to have a distinct biological behaviour compared to normal amniocytes, we hypothesize that relative quantification of proteins produced from trisomy and euploid (chromosomally normal) amniocytes will reveal dysregulated molecular pathways. Results Chromosomally normal- and Trisomy 21-amniocytes were quantitatively analyzed by using Stable Isotope Labeling of Amino acids in Cell culture and tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 4919 unique proteins were identified from the supernatant and cell lysate proteome. More specifically, 4548 unique proteins were identified from the lysate, and 91% of these proteins were quantified based on MS/MS spectra ratios of peptides containing isotope-labeled amino acids. A total of 904 proteins showed significant differential expression and were involved in 25 molecular pathways, each containing a minimum of 16 proteins. Sixty of these proteins consistently showed aberrant expression from trisomy 21 affected amniocytes, indicating their potential role in DS pathogenesis. Nine proteins were analyzed with a multiplex selected reaction monitoring assay in an independent set of Trisomy 21-amniocyte samples and two of them (SOD1 and NES) showed a consistent differential expression. Conclusions The most extensive proteome of amniocytes and amniotic fluid has been generated and differentially expressed proteins from amniocytes with Trisomy 21 revealed molecular pathways that seem to be most significantly affected by the presence of an extra copy of chromosome 21. PMID:23394617

  1. An iTRAQ proteomic study reveals an association between diet-induced enhanced fatty acid metabolism and the development of glucose intolerance in prediabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jennifer H; Lee, Oscar K; Fu, Yun-Ju; Shih, Hung-Ta; Tseng, Chien-Yu; Chung, Cheng-Chih; Han, Chia-Li; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-03-01

    High-fat diet (HFD)-induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance increases the chances of developing type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. To study the mechanism(s) by which a HFD impairs glucose tolerance, we used a quantitative proteomic platform that integrated pI-based OFFGEL fractionation and iTRAQ labeling to profile the temporal changes in adipose membrane protein expression in mice fed a HFD for up to 8 months. Within 2 months of starting the diet, the mice adipose and liver tissues accumulated fat droplets, which contributed to subsequent insulin resistance and glucose intolerance within 6 months. The membrane proteomic delineation of such phenotypic expression resulted in quantification of 1713 proteins with 266, 343, and 125 differentially expressed proteins in 2-, 6-, and 8-month HFD-fed versus control mice, respectively. Pathway analysis of these differentially expressed proteins revealed the interplay between upregulation of fatty acid metabolism and downregulation of glucose metabolism. Substantial upregulation of adipose and liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase (Cpt) 1, the rate-limiting enzyme in the transport of long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria, occurred by 2 months. The increase in hepatic Cpt 1a expression was associated with a progressive decrease in glucose uptake as evidenced by downregulation of the liver glucose transporter protein (Glut) 2. Loss of glycogen storage was found in those hepatocytes full of fat droplets. Intriguingly, skeletal muscle Cpt 1b expression was unaltered by the HFD, whereas skeletal muscle Glut 4 and tyrosine phosphoryated insulin receptor substrate 1 (p-IRS1) were substantially upregulated at the same time as abnormal glucose metabolism developed in adipose and liver tissues. This study defines some of the molecular mechanisms as well as the relationship among adipose tissue, liver and skeletal muscle during development of HFD-induced glucose intolerance in vivo and identifies Cpt 1 as a

  2. Influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of acidic, neutral and basic polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Chi; Zhao, Xia; Pu, Jiang-Hua; Luan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Monosaccharide composition analysis is important for structural characterization of polysaccharides. To investigate the influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides, we chose alginate, starch, chitosan and chondroitin sulfate as representative of acidic, neutral, basic and complex polysaccharides to compare the release degree of monosaccharides under different hydrolytic conditions. The hydrolysis stability of 10 monosaccharide standards was also explored. Results showed that the basic sugars were hard to release but stable, the acidic sugars (uronic acids) were easy to release but unstable, and the release and stability of neutral sugars were in between acidic and basic sugars. In addition, the hydrolysis process