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Sample records for acid anchoring groups

  1. Boronic acid as an efficient anchor group for surface modification of solid polyvinyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Nishiyabu, Ryuhei; Shimizu, Ai

    2016-07-28

    We report the use of boronic acid as an anchor group for surface modification of solid polyvinyl alcohol (PVA); the surfaces of PVA microparticles, films, and nanofibers were chemically modified with boronic acid-appended fluorescent dyes through boronate esterification using a simple soaking technique in a short time under ambient conditions. PMID:27311634

  2. Pyrimidine-2-carboxylic Acid as an Electron-Accepting and Anchoring Group for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhifang; Li, Xin; Ågren, Hans; Hua, Jianli; Tian, He

    2015-12-01

    We report a new dye (INPA) adopting pyrimidine-2-carboxylic acid as an electron-accepting and anchoring group to be used in dye-sensitized solar cells. IR spectral analysis indicates that the anchoring group may form two coordination bonds with TiO2 and so facilitate the interaction between the anchoring group and TiO2. The INPA-based cell exhibits an overall conversion efficiency of 5.45%, which is considerably higher than that obtained with cyanoacrylic acid commonly used as the electron acceptor. PMID:26581583

  3. Comparative Study on Single-Molecule Junctions of Alkane- and Benzene-Based Molecules with Carboxylic Acid/Aldehyde as the Anchoring Groups.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Peng, Lin-Lu; Hong, Ze-Wen; Mao, Jin-Chuan; Zheng, Ju-Fang; Shao, Yong; Niu, Zhen-Jiang; Zhou, Xiao-Shun

    2016-12-01

    We have measured the alkane and benzene-based molecules with aldehyde and carboxylic acid as anchoring groups by using the electrochemical jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (ECSTM-BJ) approach. The results show that molecule with benzene backbone has better peak shape and intensity than those with alkane backbone. Typically, high junction formation probability for same anchoring group (aldehyde and carboxylic acid) with benzene backbone is found, which contributes to the stronger attractive interaction between Cu and molecules with benzene backbone. The present work shows the import role of backbone in junction, which can guide the design molecule to form effective junction for studying molecular electronics. PMID:27566686

  4. Bottlebrush Polymer Synthesis by Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization: The Significance of the Anchor Group.

    PubMed

    Radzinski, Scott C; Foster, Jeffrey C; Chapleski, Robert C; Troya, Diego; Matson, John B

    2016-06-01

    Control over bottlebrush polymer synthesis by ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of macromonomers (MMs) is highly dependent on the competition between the kinetics of the polymerization and the lifetime of the catalyst. We evaluated the effect of anchor group chemistry-the configuration of atoms linking the polymer to a polymerizable norbornene-on the kinetics of ROMP of polystyrene and poly(lactic acid) MMs initiated by (H2IMes)(pyr)2(Cl)2Ru═CHPh (Grubbs third generation catalyst). We observed a variance in the rate of propagation of >4-fold between similar MMs with different anchor groups. This phenomenon was conserved across all MMs tested, regardless of solvent, molecular weight (MW), or repeat unit identity. The observed >4-fold difference in propagation rate had a dramatic effect on the maximum obtainable backbone degree of polymerization, with slower propagating MMs reducing the maximum bottlebrush MW by an order of magnitude (from ∼10(6) to ∼10(5) Da). A chelation mechanism was initially proposed to explain the observed anchor group effect, but experimental and computational studies indicated that the rate differences likely resulted from a combination of varying steric demands and electronic structure among the different anchor groups. The addition of trifluoroacetic acid to the ROMP reaction substantially increased the propagation rate for all anchor groups tested, likely due to scavenging of the pyridine ligands. Based on these data, rational selection of the anchor group is critical to achieve high MM conversion and to prepare pure, high MW bottlebrush polymers by ROMP grafting-through. PMID:27219866

  5. Unravelling the effect of anchoring groups on the ground and excited state properties of pyrene using computational and spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, Arunkumar; Panneerselvam, Murugesan; Sundaravel, Karuppasamy; Pavithra, Nagaraj; Srinivasan, Venkatesan; Anandan, Sambandam; Jaccob, Madhavan

    2016-05-21

    Anchoring groups play an important role in dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs). In order to acquire a suitable anchoring group for DSCs, a deeper understanding of the effect of anchoring groups on the ground and excited state properties of the dye is significant. In this context, various anchoring group connected pyrene derivatives are successfully synthesized and well characterized by using (1)H, (13)C-NMR, FT-IR and EI-MS spectrometry. The anchoring groups employed are carboxylic acid, malonic acid, acrylic acid, malononitrile, cyanoacrylic acid, rhodanine and rhodanine-3-acetic acid. The optimized geometries, HOMO-LUMO energy gap, light harvesting efficiency (LHE) and electronic absorption spectra of these dyes are studied by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results show that pyrene connected with anchoring groups with weak electron pulling strength (PC, PAC and PMC) has a larger HOMO-LUMO energy gap, whereas that connected with anchoring groups with strong electron pulling strength (PCC, PMN, PR and PRA) has a reduced HOMO-LUMO energy gap. These molecules with a reduced energy gap are primarily preferred for DSC applications. Moreover, P, PC, PAC and PMC molecules undergo π→π* transition, whereas PCC, PMN, PR and PRA molecules show significant charge transfer along with π→π* transition. UV-visible absorption spectral studies on these dyes reveal that connecting various anchoring groups with different electron pulling abilities enables the pyrene chromophore to absorb in the longer wavelength region. Notably, an efficient bathochromic shift is observed for PCC, PMN, PR and PRA molecules in both electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral measurements, which suggests that the excitation is delocalized throughout the entire π-system of the molecules. Both theoretical and spectral studies reveal that dyes with an ICT character (PCC, PMN, PR and PRA) are suitable for dye sensitized solar cell applications. PMID:27121202

  6. Reliable anchoring groups for single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M. Teresa; Leary, Edmund; Evangeli, Charalambos; Arroyo, Carlos; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraïit, Nicolás

    2012-02-01

    In the field of molecular electronics, thiols have been extensively used as the most common anchoring groups to bind molecules to gold electrodes. However, other anchoring groups as amines can provide interesting advantages. Recently, C-60 has been also proposed as a possible very efficient binding group. In this talk, I will present our studies on molecular junctions formed by thiol-, amine-, and C-60-terminated molecules. We use a STM (scanning tunneling microscope) break-junction technique to create and characterized single-molecule junctions both in ambient and liquid environment. We compare thiols and amines on the alkane family and an oligo(phenylene ethynylene). Our study of the molecular-junction stretching length allows us to conclude that thiols affect atomic rearrangement at the electrodes significantly more than amines. Using C-60-terminated molecules, we have recently introduced a new technique for controllably wiring one molecule at a time. We first get STM images to located isolated molecules on a gold substrate, which are then specifically targeted and contacted using a STM gold tip. This technique offers a significant improvement over other techniques, as it guaranties that one and only one molecule is contacted at a time between the electrodes.

  7. Group II Intron-Anchored Gene Deletion in Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Kaizhi; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium plays an important role in commercial and medical use, for which targeted gene deletion is difficult. We proposed an intron-anchored gene deletion approach for Clostridium, which combines the advantage of the group II intron “ClosTron” system and homologous recombination. In this approach, an intron carrying a fragment homologous to upstream or downstream of the target site was first inserted into the genome by retrotransposition, followed by homologous recombination, resulting in gene deletion. A functional unknown operon CAC1493–1494 located in the chromosome, and an operon ctfAB located in the megaplasmid of C. acetobutylicum DSM1731 were successfully deleted by using this approach, without leaving antibiotic marker in the genome. We therefore propose this approach can be used for targeted gene deletion in Clostridium. This approach might also be applicable for gene deletion in other bacterial species if group II intron retrotransposition system is established. PMID:21304965

  8. Red electroluminescence of ruthenium sensitizer functionalized by sulfonate anchoring groups.

    PubMed

    Shahroosvand, Hashem; Abbasi, Parisa; Mohajerani, Ezeddin; Janghouri, Mohammad

    2014-06-28

    We have synthesized five novel Ru(ii) phenanthroline complexes with an additional aryl sulfonate ligating substituent at the 5-position [Ru(L)(bpy)2](BF4)2 (1), [Ru(L)(bpy)(SCN)2] (2), [Ru(L)3](BF4)2 (3), [Ru(L)2(bpy)](BF4)2 (4) and [Ru(L)(BPhen)(SCN)2] (5) (where L = 6-one-[1,10]phenanthroline-5-ylamino)-3-hydroxynaphthalene 1-sulfonic, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, BPhen = 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline), as both photosensitizers for oxide semiconductor solar cells (DSSCs) and light emitting diodes (LEDs). The absorption and emission maxima of these complexes red shifted upon extending the conjugation of the phenanthroline ligand. Ru phenanthroline complexes exhibit broad metal to ligand charge transfer-centered electroluminescence (EL) with a maximum near 580 nm. Our results indicated that a particular structure (2) can be considered as both DSSC and OLED devices. The efficiency of the LED performance can be tuned by using a range of ligands. Device (2) has a luminance of 550 cd m(-2) and maximum efficiency of 0.9 cd A(-1) at 18 V, which are the highest values among the five devices. The turn-on voltage of this device is approximately 5 V. The role of auxiliary ligands in the photophysical properties of Ru complexes was investigated by DFT calculation. We have also studied photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized nanocrystalline semiconductor solar cells based on Ru phenanthroline complexes and an iodine redox electrolyte. A solar energy to electricity conversion efficiency (η) of 0.67% was obtained for Ru complex (2) under standard AM 1.5 irradiation with a short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) of 2.46 mA cm(-2), an open-circuit photovoltage (Voc) of 0.6 V, and a fill factor (ff) of 40%, which are all among the highest values for ruthenium sulfonated anchoring groups reported so far. Monochromatic incident photon to current conversion efficiency was 23% at 475 nm. Photovoltaic studies clearly indicated dyes with two SCN substituents yielded a higher Jsc for the

  9. Equating without an Anchor for Nonequivalent Groups of Examinees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    2015-01-01

    An equating procedure for a testing program with evolving distribution of examinee profiles is developed. No anchor is available because the original scoring scheme was based on expert judgment of the item difficulties. Pairs of examinees from two administrations are formed by matching on coarsened propensity scores derived from a set of…

  10. Incorporating single molecules into electrical circuits. The role of the chemical anchoring group.

    PubMed

    Leary, Edmund; La Rosa, Andrea; González, M Teresa; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraït, Nicolás; Martín, Nazario

    2015-02-21

    Constructing electronic circuits containing singly wired molecules is at the frontier of electrical device miniaturisation. When a molecule is wired between a pair of electrodes, the two points of contact are determined by the chemical anchoring groups, located at the ends of the molecule. At this point, when a bias is applied, electrons are channelled from a metallic environment through an extremely narrow constriction, essentially a single atom, into the molecule. The fact that this is such an abrupt change in the electron pathway makes the nature of the chemical anchoring groups critically important regarding the propagation of electrons from the electrode across the molecule. A delicate interplay of phenomena can occur when a molecule binds to the electrodes, which can produce profound differences in conductance properties depending on the anchoring group. This makes answering the question "what is the best anchoring group for single molecule studies" far from straight forward. In this review, we firstly take a look at techniques developed to 'wire-up' single molecules, as understanding their limitations is key when assessing a molecular wire's performance. We then analyse the various chemical anchoring groups, and discuss their merits and disadvantages. Finally we discuss some theoretical concepts of molecular junctions to understand how transport is affected by the nature of the chemical anchor group. PMID:25522058

  11. Different orientations of large rigid organic chromophores at the rutile TiO2 surface controlled by different binding geometries of specific anchor groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, L.; Szarko, J.; Socaciu-Siebert, L. D.; Neubauer, A.; Ernstorfer, R.; Willig, F.

    2007-03-01

    Polarization and angle-resolved two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy was employed to determine the adsorption geometry of di-tert-butyl-perylene when anchored via two different acid groups on rutile TiO2(110) . With the carboxylic acid group as anchor and a rigid bridge group the binding geometry of the chromophore was found with the long molecular axis perpendicular to the surface. In contrast, with the phosphonic acid as anchor group the long axis of perylene showed a tilt angle of around 66° with respect to the surface normal and an alignment in the direction perpendicular to [001]. Our experimental results agree with adsorption geometries recently predicted from DFT calculations by Persson’s group.

  12. Anchoring the gas-phase acidity scale: From formic acid to methanethiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyet, Nicole; Villano, Stephanie M.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2009-06-01

    We have measured the gas-phase acidities of nine compounds: formic acid, acetic acid, 1,3-propanedithiol, 2-methyl-2-propanethiol, 3-methyl-1-butanethiol, 2-propanethiol, 1-propanethiol, ethanethiol, and methanethiol, with acidities ranging from 338.6 to 351.1 kcal mol-1 using proton transfer kinetics and the resulting equilibrium constants. These acids were anchored to the well-known acidity of hydrogen sulfide; the measured acidities are in good agreement with previous experimental values, but error bars are significantly reduced. The gas-phase acidity of 3-methyl-1-butanethiol was determined to be 347.1 (5) kcal mol-1; there were no previous measurements of this value. Entropies of deprotonation were calculated and enthalpies of deprotonation were determined.

  13. ANTS-anchored Zn-Al-CO3-LDH particles as fluorescent probe for sensing of folic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengfei; Liu, Dan; Liu, Yanhuan; Li, Lei

    2016-09-01

    A novel fluorescent nanosensor for detecting folic acid (FA) in aqueous media has been developed based on 8-aminonaphthalene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (ANTS) anchored to the surface of Zn-Al-CO3-layered double hydroxides (LDH) particles. The nanosensor showed high fluorescence intensity and good photostability due to a strong coordination interaction between surface Zn2+ ions of Zn-Al-CO3-LDH and N atoms of ANTS, which were verified by result of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). ANTS-anchored on the surface of Zn-Al-CO3-LDH restricted the intra-molecular rotation leading to ANTS-anchored J-type aggregation emission enhancement. ANTS-anchored Zn-Al-CO3-LDH particles exhibited highly sensitive and selective response to FA over other common metal ions and saccharides present in biological fluids. The proposed mechanism was that oxygen atoms of -SO3 groups in ANTS-anchored on the surface of Zn-Al-CO3-LDH were easily collided by FA molecules to form potential hydrogen bonds between ANTS-anchored and FA molecules, which could effectively quench the ANTS-anchored fluorescence. Under the simulated physiological conditions (pH of 7.4), the fluorescence quenching was fitted to Stern-Volmer equation with a linear response in the concentration range of 1 μM to 200 μM with a limit of detection of 0.1 μM. The results indicate that ANTS-anchored Zn-Al-CO3-LDH particles can afford a very sensitive system for the sensing FA in aqueous solution.

  14. Using Anchoring Vignettes to Assess Group Differences in General Self-Rated Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grol-Prokopczyk, Hanna; Freese, Jeremy; Hauser, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses a potentially serious problem with the widely used self-rated health (SRH) survey item: that different groups have systematically different ways of using the item's response categories. Analyses based on unadjusted SRH may thus yield misleading results. The authors evaluate anchoring vignettes as a possible solution to this…

  15. Electrical properties and mechanical stability of anchoring groups for single-molecule electronics

    PubMed Central

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Tarkuç, Simge; Galán, Elena; Perrin, Mickael L; Eelkema, Rienk; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report on an experimental investigation of transport through single molecules, trapped between two gold nano-electrodes fabricated with the mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ) technique. The four molecules studied share the same core structure, namely oligo(phenylene ethynylene) (OPE3), while having different aurophilic anchoring groups: thiol (SAc), methyl sulfide (SMe), pyridyl (Py) and amine (NH2). The focus of this paper is on the combined characterization of the electrical and mechanical properties determined by the anchoring groups. From conductance histograms we find that thiol anchored molecules provide the highest conductance; a single-level model fit to current–voltage characteristics suggests that SAc groups exhibit a higher electronic coupling to the electrodes, together with better level alignment than the other three groups. An analysis of the mechanical stability, recording the lifetime in a self-breaking method, shows that Py and SAc yield the most stable junctions while SMe form short-lived junctions. Density functional theory combined with non-equlibrium Green’s function calculations help in elucidating the experimental findings. PMID:26425407

  16. Electrical properties and mechanical stability of anchoring groups for single-molecule electronics.

    PubMed

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Tarkuç, Simge; Galán, Elena; Perrin, Mickael L; Eelkema, Rienk; Grozema, Ferdinand C; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2015-01-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of transport through single molecules, trapped between two gold nano-electrodes fabricated with the mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ) technique. The four molecules studied share the same core structure, namely oligo(phenylene ethynylene) (OPE3), while having different aurophilic anchoring groups: thiol (SAc), methyl sulfide (SMe), pyridyl (Py) and amine (NH2). The focus of this paper is on the combined characterization of the electrical and mechanical properties determined by the anchoring groups. From conductance histograms we find that thiol anchored molecules provide the highest conductance; a single-level model fit to current-voltage characteristics suggests that SAc groups exhibit a higher electronic coupling to the electrodes, together with better level alignment than the other three groups. An analysis of the mechanical stability, recording the lifetime in a self-breaking method, shows that Py and SAc yield the most stable junctions while SMe form short-lived junctions. Density functional theory combined with non-equlibrium Green's function calculations help in elucidating the experimental findings. PMID:26425407

  17. Synthesis and characterization of ruthenium and rhenium dyes with phosphonate anchoring groups.

    PubMed

    Braumüller, Markus; Schulz, Martin; Staniszewska, Magdalena; Sorsche, Dieter; Wunderlin, Markus; Popp, Jürgen; Guthmuller, Julien; Dietzek, Benjamin; Rau, Sven

    2016-05-31

    , a series of rhenium(i) tricarbonyl chloride complexes with bpy-R2 derivatives (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, R represents the substitution at the 4- and 4'-positions), and their corresponding trishomoleptic as well as heteroleptic ruthenium(ii) complexes and have been synthesized and characterized. Their applicability as immobilizable metal-organic chromophores in solar and photosynthesis cells is enabled by R, since it includes phosphonic ester groups as precursors for potent phosphonate anchoring groups. Conjugated linkers (phenylene and triazole moieties) serve as distance control between bpy and the anchor. Photophysical and electrochemical studies reveal pronounced effects of the aryl substitution. These effects were further investigated using resonance Raman experiments and supported by theoretical calculations. After hydrolysis the triazole containing was successfully immobilized on NiO, suggesting that its application in photovoltaic cells is feasible. The solid state structures of , , and are reported in this paper, enabling the determination of the distances and intermolecular interactions. PMID:27172842

  18. Tuning the electron transport of molecular junctions by chemically functionalizing anchoring groups: First-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Caciuc, Vasile; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Blügel, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    In this first-principles study, we present density-functional calculations of the electronic structures and electron transport properties of organic molecular junctions with several anchoring groups containing atoms with different electronegativities, i.e., benzenediboronate (BDB), benzenedicarboxylate (BDC), and dinitrobenzene (DNB) molecular junctions sandwiched between two Cu(110) electrodes. The electronic-structure calculations exhibit a significant difference in the density of states not only at the anchoring groups but also at the aromatic rings of the molecular junctions, suggesting that the electron transport is specific for each system. Our transport calculations show that the BDB and DNB molecular junctions have finite electron transmissions at the zero-bias limit while the BDC molecular junction has a negligible electron transmission. Moreover, for the BDB and DNB systems, the electron transmission channels around the Fermi energy reveal fingerprint features, which provide specific functionalities for the molecular junctions. Therefore, our theoretical results demonstrate the possibility to precisely tune the electron transport properties of molecular junctions by engineering the anchoring groups at the single-atom level.

  19. Suppression of single-molecule conductance fluctuations using extended anchor groups on graphene and carbon-nanotube electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péterfalvi, Csaba G.; Lambert, Colin J.

    2012-08-01

    Devices formed from single molecules attached to noble-metal electrodes exhibit large conductance fluctuations, which inhibit their development as reproducible functional units. We demonstrate that single molecules with planar anchor groups attached to carbon-based electrodes are more resilient to atomic-scale variation in the contacts and exhibit significantly lower conductance fluctuations. We examine the conductance of a 2,6-dibenzylamino core-substituted naphthalenediimide chromophore attached to carbon electrodes by either phenanthrene anchors or more extended anchor groups, which include oligophenylene ethynylene spacers. We demonstrate that for the more spatially extended anchor groups conductance fluctuations are significantly reduced. The current-voltage characteristic arising from long-range tunneling is found to be strongly nonlinear with pronounced conductance suppression below a threshold voltage of approximately 2.5 V.

  20. Cyanohydrin as an Anchoring Group for Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Enterovirus 71 3C Protease.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yangyang; Zhao, Xiangshuai; Cui, Zhengjie; Wang, Man; Wang, Yaxin; Li, Linfeng; Sun, Qi; Yang, Xi; Zeng, Debin; Liu, Ying; Sun, Yuna; Lou, Zhiyong; Shang, Luqing; Yin, Zheng

    2015-12-10

    Cyanohydrin derivatives as enterovirus 71 (EV71) 3C protease (3C(pro)) inhibitors have been synthesized and assayed for their biochemical and antiviral activities. Compared with the reported inhibitors, cyanohydrins (1S,2S,2'S,5S)-16 and (1R,2S,2'S,5S)-16 exhibited significantly improved activity and attractive selectivity profiles against other proteases, which were a result of the specific interactions between the cyanohydrin moiety and the catalytic site of 3C(pro). Cyanohydrin as an anchoring group with high selectivity and excellent inhibitory activity represents a useful choice for cysteine protease inhibitors. PMID:26571192

  1. Impact of Anchoring Groups on Ballistic Transport: Single Molecule vs Monolayer Junctions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tuning the transport properties of molecular junctions by chemically modifying the molecular structure is one of the key challenges for advancing the field of molecular electronics. In the present contribution, we investigate current–voltage characteristics of differently linked metal–molecule–metal systems that comprise either a single molecule or a molecular assembly. This is achieved by employing density functional theory in conjunction with a Green’s function approach. We show that the conductance of a molecular system with a specific anchoring group is fundamentally different depending on whether a single molecule or a continuous monolayer forms the junction. This is a consequence of collective electrostatic effects that arise from dipolar elements contained in the monolayer and from interfacial charge rearrangements. As a consequence of these collective effects, the “ideal” choice for an anchoring group is clearly different for monolayer and single molecule devices. A particularly striking effect is observed for pyridine-docked systems. These are subject to Fermi-level pinning at high molecular packing densities, causing an abrupt increase of the junction current already at small voltages. PMID:26401191

  2. Sialic Acid within the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Targets the Cellular Prion Protein to Synapses.

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; McHale-Owen, Harriet; Williams, Alun

    2016-08-12

    Although the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is concentrated at synapses, the factors that target PrP(C) to synapses are not understood. Here we demonstrate that exogenous PrP(C) was rapidly targeted to synapses in recipient neurons derived from Prnp knock-out((0/0)) mice. The targeting of PrP(C) to synapses was dependent upon both neuronal cholesterol concentrations and the lipid and glycan composition of its glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Thus, the removal of either an acyl chain or sialic acid from the GPI anchor reduced the targeting of PrP(C) to synapses. Isolated GPIs (derived from PrP(C)) were also targeted to synapses, as was IgG conjugated to these GPIs. The removal of sialic acid from GPIs prevented the targeting of either the isolated GPIs or the IgG-GPI conjugate to synapses. Competition studies showed that pretreatment with sialylated GPIs prevented the targeting of PrP(C) to synapses. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the sialylated GPI anchor attached to PrP(C) acts as a synapse homing signal. PMID:27325697

  3. C-Au Covalently Bonded Molecular Junctions Using Nonprotected Alkynyl Anchoring Groups.

    PubMed

    Olavarria-Contreras, Ignacio José; Perrin, Mickael L; Chen, Zhi; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2016-07-13

    We report on an approach to realize carbon-gold (C-Au) bonded molecular junctions without the need for an additive to deprotect the alkynyl carbon as endstanding anchor group. Using the mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ) technique, we determine the most probable conductance value of a family of alkynyl terminated oligophenylenes (OPA(n)) connected to gold electrodes through such an akynyl moiety in ambient conditions. The molecules bind to the gold leads through an sp-hybridized carbon atom at each side. Comparing our results with other families of molecules that present organometallic C-Au bonds, we conclude that the conductance of molecules contacted via an sp-hybridized carbon atom is lower than the ones using sp(3) hybridization due to strong differences in the coupling of the conducting orbitals with the gold leads. PMID:27266477

  4. Anomalous length dependence of conductance of aromatic nanoribbons with amine anchoring groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilić, Ante; Sanvito, Stefano

    2012-09-01

    Two sets of aromatic nanoribbons, based around a common hexagonal scaffolding, with single and dual terminal amine groups have been considered as potential molecular wires in a junction formed by gold leads. Charge transport through the two-terminal device has been modeled using density functional theory (with and without self-interaction correction) and the nonequilibrium Green's function method. The effects of wire length, multiple terminal contacts, and pathways across the junction have been investigated. For nanoribbons with the oligopyrene motif and conventional single amine terminal groups, an increase in the wire length causes an exponential drop in the conductance. In contrast, for the nanoribbons with the oligoperylene motif and dual amine anchoring groups the predicted conductance rises with the wire length over the whole range of investigated lengths. Only when the effects of self-interaction correction are taken into account, the conductance of the oligoperylene ribbons exhibits saturation for longer members of the series. The oligoperylene nanoribbons, with dual amine groups at both terminals, show the potential to fully harness the highly conjugated system of π molecular orbitals across the junction.

  5. Sensitive methods for estimating the anchoring strength of nematic liquid crystals on Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers of fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, Valentina S. U.; Nannelli, Francesca; Komitov, Lachezar

    2001-06-01

    The anchoring of the nematic liquid crystal N-(p-methoxybenzylidene)-p-butylaniline (MBBA) on Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers of fatty acids (COOHC{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}) was studied as a function of the length of the fatty acid alkyl chain n (n=15,17,19,21). The monolayers were deposited onto glass plates coated with indium tin oxide, which were used to assemble sandwich cells of various thicknesses that were filled with MBBA in the nematic phase. The mechanism of relaxation from the flow-induced quasiplanar to the surface-induced homeotropic alignment was studied for the four aligning monolayers. It was found that the speed of the relaxation decreases linearly with increasing length of the alkyl chain n, which suggests that the Langmuir-Blodgett film plays a role in the phenomenon. This fact was confirmed by a sensitive estimation of the anchoring strength of MBBA on the fatty acid monolayers after anchoring breaking, which takes place at the transition between two electric-field-induced turbulent states, denoted as DSM1 and DSM2 (where DSM indicates dynamic scattering mode). It was found that the threshold electric field for the anchoring breaking, which can be considered as a measure of the anchoring strength, also decreases linearly as n increases. Both methods thus possess a high sensitivity in resolving small differences in anchoring strength. In cells coated with mixed Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers of two fatty acids (n=15 and n=17) a maximum of the relaxation speed was observed when the two acids were present in equal amounts. This observation suggests an efficient method for controlling the anchoring strength in homeotropic cells by changing the ratio between the components of the surfactant film.

  6. Sensitive methods for estimating the anchoring strength of nematic liquid crystals on Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers of fatty acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Valentina S.; Nannelli, Francesca; Komitov, Lachezar

    2001-06-01

    The anchoring of the nematic liquid crystal N-(p-methoxybenzylidene)-p-butylaniline (MBBA) on Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers of fatty acids (COOHCnH2n+1) was studied as a function of the length of the fatty acid alkyl chain n (n=15,17,19,21). The monolayers were deposited onto glass plates coated with indium tin oxide, which were used to assemble sandwich cells of various thicknesses that were filled with MBBA in the nematic phase. The mechanism of relaxation from the flow-induced quasiplanar to the surface-induced homeotropic alignment was studied for the four aligning monolayers. It was found that the speed of the relaxation decreases linearly with increasing length of the alkyl chain n, which suggests that the Langmuir-Blodgett film plays a role in the phenomenon. This fact was confirmed by a sensitive estimation of the anchoring strength of MBBA on the fatty acid monolayers after anchoring breaking, which takes place at the transition between two electric-field-induced turbulent states, denoted as DSM1 and DSM2 (where DSM indicates dynamic scattering mode). It was found that the threshold electric field for the anchoring breaking, which can be considered as a measure of the anchoring strength, also decreases linearly as n increases. Both methods thus possess a high sensitivity in resolving small differences in anchoring strength. In cells coated with mixed Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers of two fatty acids (n=15 and n=17) a maximum of the relaxation speed was observed when the two acids were present in equal amounts. This observation suggests an efficient method for controlling the anchoring strength in homeotropic cells by changing the ratio between the components of the surfactant film.

  7. "Spider"-shaped porphyrins with conjugated pyridyl anchoring groups as efficient sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Stangel, Christina; Bagaki, Anthi; Angaridis, Panagiotis A; Charalambidis, Georgios; Sharma, Ganesh D; Coutsolelos, Athanasios G

    2014-11-17

    Two novel "spider-shaped" porphyrins, meso-tetraaryl-substituted 1PV-Por and zinc-metalated 1PV-Zn-Por, bearing four oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (oPPV) pyridyl groups with long dodecyloxy chains on the phenyl groups, have been synthesized. The presence of four pyridyl groups in both porphyrins, which allow them to act as anchoring groups upon coordination to various Lewis acid sites, the conjugated oPPV bridges, which offer the possibility of electronic communication between the porphyrin core and the pyridyl groups, and the dodecyloxy groups, which offer the advantage of high solubility in a variety of organic solvents of different polarities and could prevent porphyrin aggregation, renders porphyrins 1PV-Por and 1PV-Zn-Por very promising sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Photophysical measurements, together with electrochemistry experiments and density functional theory calculations, suggest that both porphyrins have frontier molecular orbital energy levels that favor electron injection and dye regeneration in DSSCs. Solar cells sensitized by 1PV-Por and 1PV-Zn-Por were fabricated, and it was found that they show power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 3.28 and 5.12%, respectively. Photovoltaic measurements (J-V curves) together with incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency spectra of the two cells reveal that the higher PCE value of the DSSC based on 1PV-Zn-Por is ascribed to higher short-circuit current (Jsc), open-circuit voltage (Voc), and dye loading values. Emission spectra and electrochemistry experiments suggest a greater driving force for injection of the photogenerated electrons into the TiO2 conduction band for 1PV-Zn-Por rather than its free-base analogue. Furthermore, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements prove that the utilization of 1PV-Zn-Por as a sensitizer offers a high charge recombination resistance and, therefore, leads to a longer electron lifetime. PMID:25365138

  8. A study of planar anchor groups for graphene-based single-molecule electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Steven; Visontai, David; Lambert, Colin J.; Bryce, Martin R.; Frampton, Harry; Chappell, David

    2014-02-07

    To identify families of stable planar anchor groups for use in single molecule electronics, we report detailed results for the binding energies of two families of anthracene and pyrene derivatives adsorbed onto graphene. We find that all the selected derivatives functionalized with either electron donating or electron accepting substituents bind more strongly to graphene than the parent non-functionalized anthracene or pyrene. The binding energy is sensitive to the detailed atomic alignment of substituent groups over the graphene substrate leading to larger than expected binding energies for –OH and –CN derivatives. Furthermore, the ordering of the binding energies within the anthracene and pyrene series does not simply follow the electron affinities of the substituents. Energy barriers to rotation or displacement on the graphene surface are much lower than binding energies for adsorption and therefore at room temperature, although the molecules are bound to the graphene, they are almost free to move along the graphene surface. Binding energies can be increased by incorporating electrically inert side chains and are sensitive to the conformation of such chains.

  9. What Makes Hydroxamate a Promising Anchoring Group in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells? Insights from Theoretical Investigation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Rego, Luis G C; Bai, Fu-Quan; Wang, Jian; Jia, Ran; Xie, Li-Ming; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2014-11-20

    We report, from a theoretical point of view, the first comparative study between the highly water-stable hydroxamate and the widely used carboxylate, in addition to the robust phosphate anchors. Theoretical calculations reveal that hydroxamate would be better for photoabsorption. A quantum dynamics description of the interfacial electron transfer (IET), including the underlying nuclear motion effect, is presented. We find that both hydroxamate and carboxylate would have efficient IET character; for phosphate the injection time is significantly longer (several hundred femtoseconds). We also verified that the symmetry of the geometry of the anchoring group plays important roles in the electronic charge delocalization. We conclude that hydroxamate can be a promising anchoring group, as compared to carboxylate and phosphate, due to its better photoabsorption and comparable IET time scale as well as the experimental advantage of water stability. We expect the implications of these findings to be relevant for the design of more efficient anchoring groups for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) application. PMID:26276483

  10. Sialic Acid on the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Regulates PrP-mediated Cell Signaling and Prion Formation.

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    The prion diseases occur following the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into disease-related isoforms (PrP(Sc)). In this study, the role of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor attached to PrP(C) in prion formation was examined using a cell painting technique. PrP(Sc) formation in two prion-infected neuronal cell lines (ScGT1 and ScN2a cells) and in scrapie-infected primary cortical neurons was increased following the introduction of PrP(C). In contrast, PrP(C) containing a GPI anchor from which the sialic acid had been removed (desialylated PrP(C)) was not converted to PrP(Sc). Furthermore, the presence of desialylated PrP(C) inhibited the production of PrP(Sc) within prion-infected cortical neurons and ScGT1 and ScN2a cells. The membrane rafts surrounding desialylated PrP(C) contained greater amounts of sialylated gangliosides and cholesterol than membrane rafts surrounding PrP(C). Desialylated PrP(C) was less sensitive to cholesterol depletion than PrP(C) and was not released from cells by treatment with glimepiride. The presence of desialylated PrP(C) in neurons caused the dissociation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 from PrP-containing membrane rafts and reduced the activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2. These findings show that the sialic acid moiety of the GPI attached to PrP(C) modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrP(Sc) formation. These results suggest that pharmacological modification of GPI glycosylation might constitute a novel therapeutic approach to prion diseases. PMID:26553874

  11. Role of the Group B Antigen of Streptococcus agalactiae: A Peptidoglycan-Anchored Polysaccharide Involved in Cell Wall Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Courtin, Pascal; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Péchoux, Christine; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Mistou, Michel-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS) is a leading cause of infections in neonates and an emerging pathogen in adults. The Lancefield Group B carbohydrate (GBC) is a peptidoglycan-anchored antigen that defines this species as a Group B Streptococcus. Despite earlier immunological and biochemical characterizations, the function of this abundant glycopolymer has never been addressed experimentally. Here, we inactivated the gene gbcO encoding a putative UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate:lipid phosphate transferase thought to catalyze the first step of GBC synthesis. Indeed, the gbcO mutant was unable to synthesize the GBC polymer, and displayed an important growth defect in vitro. Electron microscopy study of the GBC-depleted strain of S. agalactiae revealed a series of growth-related abnormalities: random placement of septa, defective cell division and separation processes, and aberrant cell morphology. Furthermore, vancomycin labeling and peptidoglycan structure analysis demonstrated that, in the absence of GBC, cells failed to initiate normal PG synthesis and cannot complete polymerization of the murein sacculus. Finally, the subcellular localization of the PG hydrolase PcsB, which has a critical role in cell division of streptococci, was altered in the gbcO mutant. Collectively, these findings show that GBC is an essential component of the cell wall of S. agalactiae whose function is reminiscent of that of conventional wall teichoic acids found in Staphylococcus aureus or Bacillus subtilis. Furthermore, our findings raise the possibility that GBC-like molecules play a major role in the growth of most if not all beta –hemolytic streptococci. PMID:22719253

  12. Positional isomerism makes a difference: phosphonic acid anchoring ligands with thienyl spacers in copper(i)-based dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Klein, Y Maximilian; Willgert, Markus; Prescimone, Alessandro; Constable, Edwin C; Housecroft, Catherine E

    2016-03-21

    With the aim of improving the photoconversion efficiencies of heteroleptic [Cu(Lanchor)(Lancillary)](+) dyes in n-type dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), the previously favoured anchor ((6,6'-dimethyl-[2,2'-bipyridine]-4,4'-diyl)bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(phosphonic acid) (1) has been replaced by analogues 2 and 3 containing 2-thienyl spacers between the 2,2'-bipyridine metal-binding domain and the phosphonic acid anchoring groups. The synthesis and characterization of 2 and 3 (2-thienyl spacer with phosphonic acid in the 5- and 4-positions, respectively) are reported. A stepwise, on-surface method was used to assemble [Cu(Lanchor)(Lancillary)](+) dyes onto FTO/TiO2 electrodes with Lanchor = 1, 2 or 3, and Lancillary = 6,6'-bis(trifluoromethyl)-2,2'-bipyridine (4), 6-trifluoromethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (5), 6,6'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (6), and 6-methyl-2,2'-bipyridine (7). Changing the solvent in the dye-bath from CH2Cl2 to acetone had only a small effect on the photoconversion efficiencies of [Cu(1)(4)](+), [Cu(1)(5)](+) and [Cu(1)(6)](+); the optimal dye in this series was [Cu(1)(5)](+). Comparable DSC performances were achieved by using either anchor 1 or 2, but there is improved electron injection if the phosphonic acid group is in the 4- rather than 5-position of the thienyl ring (i.e. anchor 3 is superior to 2). Similar open-circuit voltages (VOC) are achieved on going from 1 to 3 with a given Lancillary; although there is typically a gain in short-circuit current denisty (JSC) on going from 1 or 3 to 2, there is an ≈50-60 mV drop in VOC on introducing 2 as the anchor. The best photoconversion efficiencies are obtained for the dye [Cu(3)(5)](+) (η = 2.40% relative to an N719 reference of 5.76%). The conclusions reached from plots of current-density (J) against potential (V), and external quantum efficiency spectra are supported by electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements. PMID:26856366

  13. First principles investigations on the electronic structure of anchor groups on ZnO nanowires and surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, A.; Lorke, M.; Rosa, A. L.; Frauenheim, Th.; Schoenhalz, A. L.; Dalpian, G. M.; Rocha, A. R.

    2014-05-28

    We report on density functional theory investigations of the electronic properties of monofunctional ligands adsorbed on ZnO-(1010) surfaces and ZnO nanowires using semi-local and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. We consider three anchor groups, namely thiol, amino, and carboxyl groups. Our results indicate that neither the carboxyl nor the amino group modify the transport and conductivity properties of ZnO. In contrast, the modification of the ZnO surface and nanostructure with thiol leads to insertion of molecular states in the band gap, thus suggesting that functionalization with this moiety may customize the optical properties of ZnO nanomaterials.

  14. Can aliphatic anchoring groups be utilised with dyes for p-type dye sensitized solar cells?

    PubMed

    Hao, Yan; Wood, Christopher J; Clark, Charlotte A; Calladine, James A; Horvath, Raphael; Hanson-Heine, Magnus W D; Sun, Xue-Zhong; Clark, Ian P; Towrie, Michael; George, Michael W; Yang, Xichuan; Sun, Licheng; Gibson, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    A series of novel laterally anchoring tetrahydroquinoline derivatives have been synthesized and investigated for their use in NiO-based p-type dye-sensitized solar cells. The kinetics of charge injection and recombination at the NiO-dye interface for these dyes have been thoroughly investigated using picosecond transient absorption and time-resolved infrared measurements. It was revealed that despite the anchoring unit being electronically decoupled from the dye structure, charge injection occurred on a sub picosecond timescale. However, rapid recombination was also observed due to the close proximity of the electron acceptor on the dyes to the NiO surface, ultimately limiting the performance of the p-DSCs. PMID:27055102

  15. Surface Functionalization of Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for MRI Applications – Effect of Anchoring Group and Ligand Exchange Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Smolensky, Eric D.; Park, Hee-Yun E.; Berquó, Thelma S.; Pierre, Valérie C.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles synthesized from thermal decomposition of iron salts must be rendered hydrophilic for their application as MRI contrast agents. This process requires refunctionalizing the surface of the nanoparticles with a hydrophilic organic coating such as polyethylene glycol. Two parameters were found to influence the magnetic behavior and relaxivity of the resulting hydrophilic iron oxide nanoparticles: the functionality of the anchoring group and the protocol followed for the functionalization. Nanoparticles coated with PEGs via a catecholate-type anchoring moiety maintain the saturation magnetization and relaxivity of the hydrophobic magnetite precursor. Other anchoring functionalities, such as phosphonate, carboxylate, and dopamine decrease the magnetization and relaxivity of the contrast agent. The protocol for functionalizing the nanoparticles also influences the magnetic behavior of the material. Nanoparticles refunctionalized according to a direct biphasic protocol exhibit higher relaxivity than those refunctionalized according to a two-step procedure which first involves stripping the nanoparticles. This research presents the first systematic study of both the binding moiety and the functionalization protocol on the relaxivity and magnetization of water-soluble coated iron oxide nanoparticles used as MRI contrast agents. PMID:21861279

  16. Highly Stable Nanocontainer of APTES-Anchored Layered Titanate Nanosheet for Reliable Protection/Recovery of Nucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, In Young; Park, Dae-Hwan; Choy, Jin-Ho; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2016-01-01

    A universal technology for the encapsulative protection of unstable anionic species by highly stable layered metal oxide has been developed via the surface modification of a metal oxide nanosheet. The surface anchoring of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) on exfoliated titanate nanosheet yields a novel cationic metal oxide nanosheet, which can be universally used for the hybridization with various biological and inorganic anions. The encapsulation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the cationic APTES-anchored titanate lattice makes possible the reliable long-term protection of DNA against enzymatic, chemical, and UV−vis light corrosions. The encapsulated DNA can be easily released from the titanate lattice via sonication, underscoring the functionality of the cationic APTES-anchored titanate nanosheet as a stable nanocontainer for DNA. The APTES-anchored titanate nanosheet can be also used as an efficient CO2 adsorbent and a versatile host material for various inorganic anions like polyoxometalates, leading to the synthesis of novel intercalative nanohybrids with unexplored properties and useful functionalities. PMID:26906340

  17. Highly Stable Nanocontainer of APTES-Anchored Layered Titanate Nanosheet for Reliable Protection/Recovery of Nucleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, In Young; Park, Dae-Hwan; Choy, Jin-Ho; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2016-01-01

    A universal technology for the encapsulative protection of unstable anionic species by highly stable layered metal oxide has been developed via the surface modification of a metal oxide nanosheet. The surface anchoring of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) on exfoliated titanate nanosheet yields a novel cationic metal oxide nanosheet, which can be universally used for the hybridization with various biological and inorganic anions. The encapsulation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the cationic APTES-anchored titanate lattice makes possible the reliable long-term protection of DNA against enzymatic, chemical, and UV-vis light corrosions. The encapsulated DNA can be easily released from the titanate lattice via sonication, underscoring the functionality of the cationic APTES-anchored titanate nanosheet as a stable nanocontainer for DNA. The APTES-anchored titanate nanosheet can be also used as an efficient CO2 adsorbent and a versatile host material for various inorganic anions like polyoxometalates, leading to the synthesis of novel intercalative nanohybrids with unexplored properties and useful functionalities. PMID:26906340

  18. Highly Stable Nanocontainer of APTES-Anchored Layered Titanate Nanosheet for Reliable Protection/Recovery of Nucleic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, In Young; Park, Dae-Hwan; Choy, Jin-Ho; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2016-02-01

    A universal technology for the encapsulative protection of unstable anionic species by highly stable layered metal oxide has been developed via the surface modification of a metal oxide nanosheet. The surface anchoring of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) on exfoliated titanate nanosheet yields a novel cationic metal oxide nanosheet, which can be universally used for the hybridization with various biological and inorganic anions. The encapsulation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the cationic APTES-anchored titanate lattice makes possible the reliable long-term protection of DNA against enzymatic, chemical, and UV-vis light corrosions. The encapsulated DNA can be easily released from the titanate lattice via sonication, underscoring the functionality of the cationic APTES-anchored titanate nanosheet as a stable nanocontainer for DNA. The APTES-anchored titanate nanosheet can be also used as an efficient CO2 adsorbent and a versatile host material for various inorganic anions like polyoxometalates, leading to the synthesis of novel intercalative nanohybrids with unexplored properties and useful functionalities.

  19. 2-Chlorotrityl chloride resin. Studies on anchoring of Fmoc-amino acids and peptide cleavage.

    PubMed

    Barlos, K; Chatzi, O; Gatos, D; Stavropoulos, G

    1991-06-01

    The esterification of 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin with Fmoc-amino acids in the presence of DIEA is studied under various conditions. High esterification yields are obtained using 0.6 equiv. Fmoc-amino acid/mmol resin in DCM or DCE, in 25 min, at room temperature. The reaction proceeds without by product formation even in the case of Fmoc-Asn and Fmoc-Gln. The quantitative and easy cleavage of amino acids and peptides from 2-chlorotrityl resin, by using AcOH/TFE/DCM mixtures, is accomplished within 15-60 min at room temperature, while t-butyl type protecting groups remain unaffected. Under these exceptionally mild conditions 2-chlorotrityl cations generated during the cleavage of amino acids and peptides from resin do not attack the nucleophilic side chains of Trp, Met, and Tyr. PMID:1917309

  20. Anchoring linkage groups of the Rosa genetic map to physical chromosomes with tyramide-FISH and EST-SNP markers.

    PubMed

    Kirov, Ilya; Van Laere, Katrijn; De Riek, Jan; De Keyser, Ellen; Van Roy, Nadine; Khrustaleva, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    In order to anchor Rosa linkage groups to physical chromosomes, a combination of the Tyramide-FISH technology and the modern molecular marker system based on High Resolution Melting (HRM) is an efficient approach. Although, Tyramide-FISH is a very promising technique for the visualization of short DNA probes, it is very challenging for plant species with small chromosomes such as Rosa. In this study, we successfully applied the Tyramide-FISH technique for Rosa and compared different detection systems. An indirect detection system exploiting biotinylated tyramides was shown to be the most suitable technique for reliable signal detection. Three gene fragments with a size of 1100 pb-1700 bp (Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase, Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Synthase and Orcinol O-Methyl Transferase) have been physically mapped on chromosomes 7, 4 and 1, respectively, of Rosa wichurana. The signal frequency was between 25% and 40%. HRM markers of these 3 gene fragments were used to include the gene fragments on the existing genetic linkage map of Rosa wichurana. As a result, three linkage groups could be anchored to their physical chromosomes. The information was used to check for synteny between the Rosa chromosomes and Fragaria. PMID:24755945

  1. Anchoring Linkage Groups of the Rosa Genetic Map to Physical Chromosomes with Tyramide-FISH and EST-SNP Markers

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, Ilya; Van Laere, Katrijn; De Riek, Jan; De Keyser, Ellen; Van Roy, Nadine; Khrustaleva, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    In order to anchor Rosa linkage groups to physical chromosomes, a combination of the Tyramide-FISH technology and the modern molecular marker system based on High Resolution Melting (HRM) is an efficient approach. Although, Tyramide-FISH is a very promising technique for the visualization of short DNA probes, it is very challenging for plant species with small chromosomes such as Rosa. In this study, we successfully applied the Tyramide-FISH technique for Rosa and compared different detection systems. An indirect detection system exploiting biotinylated tyramides was shown to be the most suitable technique for reliable signal detection. Three gene fragments with a size of 1100 pb–1700 bp (Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase, Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Synthase and Orcinol O-Methyl Transferase) have been physically mapped on chromosomes 7, 4 and 1, respectively, of Rosa wichurana. The signal frequency was between 25% and 40%. HRM markers of these 3 gene fragments were used to include the gene fragments on the existing genetic linkage map of Rosa wichurana. As a result, three linkage groups could be anchored to their physical chromosomes. The information was used to check for synteny between the Rosa chromosomes and Fragaria. PMID:24755945

  2. Visible light-harvesting photoanodes for solar energy conversion: A comparison of anchoring groups to titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Lauren A.

    integration of efficient visible-light absorption, ultrafast forward electron transfer, and stable charge separation is quite complicated. The work presented here is devoted to the design, synthesis, spectroscopy, and computational study of dye-sensitized photoanodes. In particular, we explore the relative stability and performance of different anchoring groups for the surface attachment of light-harvesting molecular dyes to titanium dioxide. Here we present the first systematic study that directly compares carboxylate, phosphonate, acetylacetonate, and hydroxamate anchors using the same molecular chromophore framework. We discuss a number of novel methods for the incorporation of anchoring group functionalities on each chromophore framework. We also assess the relative water stability of each of the anchoring groups on titanium dioxide as well as the relative efficiency of electron transfer from photoexcited molecular chromophores through each anchoring group into the conduction band of titanium dioxide. We hope that the work presented here will contribute to the rational design of better photoanodes for light-driven water splitting.

  3. Can nitro groups really anchor onto TiO2? Case study of dye-to-TiO2 adsorption using azo dyes with NO2 substituents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Cole, Jacqueline M

    2016-07-28

    The nitro group has recently been suggested as a new type of anchor for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and has shown promising optoelectronic properties. Considering the excellent electron withdrawing ability of the nitro group and wider materials selection brought about by this substituent, it is helpful to evaluate the interfacial structures and photophysics of more organic dyes where NO2 poses as the dye-to-TiO2 anchor. A computational study on a family of azo dyes bearing a nitro group is presented, where the effect of certain side groups on their optical properties is examined. Both isolated dye molecules and dye/TiO2 nanocomposites are studied via density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory, with complementary experimental UV/vis absorption spectroscopy and photovoltaic device testing. Results demonstrate that these nitro-containing dyes prefer a monodentate anchoring mode on a TiO2 cluster. These nitro dyes reveal weak, but non-negligible, adsorption onto TiO2; yet, very low photovoltaic performance once incorporated into a DSSC device. This poor delivery of nitro groups as DSSC anchors is ostensibly inconsistent with previous findings; but is rationalized via the "auxiliary anchor" concept. PMID:27356762

  4. The surface structure matters: thermal stability of phthalic acid anchored to atomically-defined cobalt oxide films.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Schwarz, Matthias; Werner, Kristin; Mohr, Susanne; Amende, Max; Libuda, Jörg

    2016-04-21

    We have investigated the influence of the structure of oxide surfaces on the thermal stability of anchored phthalic acid (PA) thin films. Specifically, we have performed temperature programmed infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (TP-IRAS) of PA films deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) in ultra-high vacuum (UVH) onto three well-ordered surfaces: Co3O4(111), CoO(111) and CoO(100), all grown on Ir(100). Restructuring and desorption of PA were monitored in situ by TP-IRAS. Upon annealing of PA multilayers, co-adsorbed phthalic anhydride (PAA) desorbs at 200 K and a structural transition to a flat-lying adsorption geometry occurs at 250 K, before the PA multilayer desorbs at 300 K. At temperatures up to 400 K co-adsorbed mono-carboxylates partially desorb and partially convert to bis-carboxylates. Pronounced structure dependencies are observed regarding the thermal stability of the anchored bis-carboxylate monolayers. From Co3O4(111) the anchored PA desorbs over a wide range of temperatures centered at around 540 K. Weaker binding is observed for CoO(111) with desorption temperatures centered around 490 K. The strongest binding occurs on CoO(100), where the anchored PA films are found to be perfectly stable up to 510 K, before desorption starts and centers at around 580 K. The differences in binding strength are rationalized based on the density and the accessibility of the surface Co(2+) ions. The findings show that the atomic structure of the oxide surface plays an important role in the stability of organic hybrid interfaces. PMID:27030374

  5. Anchoring the Deficit of the Anchor Deficit: Dyslexia or Attention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willburger, Edith; Landerl, Karin

    2010-01-01

    In the anchoring deficit hypothesis of dyslexia ("Trends Cogn. Sci.", 2007; 11: 458-465), it is proposed that perceptual problems arise from the lack of forming a perceptual anchor for repeatedly presented stimuli. A study designed to explicitly test the specificity of the anchoring deficit for dyslexia is presented. Four groups, representing all…

  6. Importance of the Anchor Group Position (Para versus Meta) in Tetraphenylmethane Tripods: Synthesis and Self-Assembly Features.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Marcin; Valášek, Michal; Homberg, Jan; Edelmann, Kevin; Gerhard, Lukas; Wulfhekel, Wulf; Fuhr, Olaf; Wächter, Tobias; Zharnikov, Michael; Kolivoška, Viliam; Pospíšil, Lubomír; Mészáros, Gábor; Hromadová, Magdaléna; Mayor, Marcel

    2016-09-01

    The efficient synthesis of tripodal platforms based on tetraphenylmethane with three acetyl-protected thiol groups in either meta or para positions relative to the central sp(3) carbon for deposition on Au (111) surfaces is reported. These platforms are intended to provide a vertical arrangement of the substituent in position 4 of the perpendicular phenyl ring and an electronic coupling to the gold substrate. The self-assembly features of both derivatives are analyzed on Au (111) surfaces by low-temperature ultra-high-vacuum STM, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and reductive voltammetric desorption studies. These experiments indicated that the meta derivative forms a well-ordered monolayer, with most of the anchoring groups bound to the surface, whereas the para derivative forms a multilayer film with physically adsorbed adlayers on the chemisorbed para monolayer. Single-molecule conductance values for both tripodal platforms are obtained through an STM break junction experiment. PMID:27505302

  7. First-principles investigation on the electronic efficiency and binding energy of the contacts formed by graphene and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon anchoring groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2015-04-01

    The electronic efficiency and binding energy of contacts formed between graphene electrodes and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) anchoring groups have been investigated by the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that PAH molecules always bind in the interior and at the edge of graphene in the AB stacking manner, and that the binding energy increases following the increase of the number of carbon and hydrogen atoms constituting the PAH molecule. When we move to analyzing the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions with a six-carbon alkyne chain as the central molecule, the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contacts is found to depend on the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the corresponding PAH anchoring group, rather than its size. To be specific, the smaller is the HOMO-LUMO gap of the PAH anchoring group, the higher is the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contact. Although the HOMO-LUMO gap of a PAH molecule depends on its specific configuration, PAH molecules with similar atomic structures show a decreasing trend for their HOMO-LUMO gap as the number of fused benzene rings increases. Therefore, graphene-conjugated molecule-graphene junctions with high-binding and high-conducting graphene-PAH contacts can be realized by choosing appropriate PAH anchor groups with a large area and a small HOMO-LUMO gap.

  8. First-principles investigation on the electronic efficiency and binding energy of the contacts formed by graphene and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon anchoring groups

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Hao; Hou, Shimin; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-04-28

    The electronic efficiency and binding energy of contacts formed between graphene electrodes and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) anchoring groups have been investigated by the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that PAH molecules always bind in the interior and at the edge of graphene in the AB stacking manner, and that the binding energy increases following the increase of the number of carbon and hydrogen atoms constituting the PAH molecule. When we move to analyzing the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions with a six-carbon alkyne chain as the central molecule, the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contacts is found to depend on the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the corresponding PAH anchoring group, rather than its size. To be specific, the smaller is the HOMO-LUMO gap of the PAH anchoring group, the higher is the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contact. Although the HOMO-LUMO gap of a PAH molecule depends on its specific configuration, PAH molecules with similar atomic structures show a decreasing trend for their HOMO-LUMO gap as the number of fused benzene rings increases. Therefore, graphene-conjugated molecule-graphene junctions with high-binding and high-conducting graphene-PAH contacts can be realized by choosing appropriate PAH anchor groups with a large area and a small HOMO-LUMO gap.

  9. PbsP, a cell wall-anchored protein that binds plasminogen to promote hematogenous dissemination of group B Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Buscetta, Marco; Firon, Arnaud; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Biondo, Carmelo; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Midiri, Angelina; Romeo, Letizia; Galbo, Roberta; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Kaminski, Pierre-Alexandre; Gominet, Myriam; Teti, Giuseppe; Speziale, Pietro; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus or GBS) is a leading cause of invasive infections in neonates whose virulence is dependent on its ability to interact with cells and host components. We here characterized a surface protein with a critical function in GBS pathophysiology. This adhesin, designated PbsP, possesses two Streptococcal Surface Repeat domains, a methionine and lysine-rich region, and a LPXTG cell wall-anchoring motif. PbsP mediates plasminogen (Plg) binding both in vitro and in vivo and we showed that cell surface-bound Plg can be activated into plasmin by tissue plasminogen activator to increase the bacterial extracellular proteolytic activity. Absence of PbsP results in a decreased bacterial transmigration across brain endothelial cells and impaired virulence in a murine model of infection. PbsP is conserved among the main GBS lineages and is a major plasminogen adhesin in non-CC17 GBS strains. Importantly, immunization of mice with recombinant PbsP confers protective immunity. Our results indicate that GBS have evolved different strategies to recruit Plg which indicates that the ability to acquire cell surface proteolytic activity is essential for the invasiveness of this bacterium. PMID:26888569

  10. Design of stable polyether-magnetite complexes in aqueous media: effects of the anchor group, molecular weight, and chain density.

    PubMed

    Miles, William C; Huffstetler, Philip P; Goff, Jonathan D; Chen, Alfred Y; Riffle, J S; Davis, Richey M

    2011-05-01

    The colloidal stability of polymer-stabilized nanoparticles is critical for therapeutic use. However, phosphates in physiological media can induce polymer desorption and consequently flocculation. Colloidal characteristics of PEO-magnetite nanoparticles with different anchors for attaching PEO to magnetite were examined in PBS. The effects of the number of anchors, PEO molecular weight, and chain density were examined. It was observed that ammonium phosphonates anchored PEO to magnetite effectively in phosphate-containing solutions because of interactions between the phosphonates and magnetite. Additionally, a method to estimate the magnetite surface coverage was developed and was found to be critical to the prediction of colloidal stability. This is key to understanding how functionalized surfaces interact with their environment. PMID:21476527

  11. Magnetically separable nanoferrite-anchored glutathione: Aqueous homocoupling of arylboronic acids under microwave irradiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A highly active, stable and magnetically separable glutathione based organocatalyst provided good to excellent yields to symmetric biaryls in the homocoupling of arylboronic acids under microwave irradiation. Symmetrical biaryl motifs are present in a wide range of natural p...

  12. Uptake and Intracellular Transport of Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor: Evidence for Free and Cytoskeleton-anchored Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Citores, Lucía; Wesche, Jørgen; Kolpakova, Elona; Olsnes, Sjur

    1999-01-01

    Endocytic uptake and intracellular transport of acidic FGF was studied in cells transfected with FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4). Acidification of the cytosol to block endocytic uptake from coated pits did not inhibit endocytosis of the growth factor in COS cells transfected with FGFR4, indicating that it is to a large extent taken up by an alternative endocytic pathway. Fractionation of the cells demonstrated that part of the growth factor receptor was present in a low-density, caveolin-containing fraction, but we were unable to demonstrate binding to caveolin in immunoprecipitation studies. Upon treatment of the cells with acidic FGF, the activated receptor, together with the growth factor, moved to a juxtanuclear compartment, which was identified as the recycling endosome compartment. When the cells were lysed with Triton X-100, 3-([3-chloramidopropyl]dimethylammonio)-2-hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate, or 2-octyl glucoside, almost all surface-exposed and endocytosed FGFR4 was solubilized, but only a minor fraction of the total FGFR4 in the cells was found in the soluble fraction. The data indicate that the major part of FGFR4 is anchored to detergent-insoluble structures, presumably cytoskeletal elements associated with the recycling endosome compartment. PMID:10564275

  13. Ru-bis(pyridine)pyrazolate (bpp)-Based Water-Oxidation Catalysts Anchored on TiO2: The Importance of the Nature and Position of the Anchoring Group.

    PubMed

    Francàs, Laia; Richmond, Craig; Garrido-Barros, Pablo; Planas, Nora; Roeser, Stephan; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Escriche, Lluís; Sala, Xavier; Llobet, Antoni

    2016-04-01

    Three distinct functionalisation strategies have been applied to the in,in-[{Ru(II)(trpy)}2(μ-bpp)(H2O)2](3+) (trpy=2,2':6',2''-terpyridine, bpp=bis(pyridine)pyrazolate) water-oxidation catalyst framework to form new derivatives that can adsorb onto titania substrates. Modifications included the addition of sulfonate, carboxylate, and phosphonate anchoring groups to the terpyridine and bis(pyridyl)pyrazolate ligands. The complexes were characterised in solution by using 1D NMR, 2D NMR, and UV/Vis spectroscopic analysis and electrochemical techniques. The complexes were then anchored on TiO2-coated fluorinated tin oxide (FTO) films, and the reactivity of these new materials as water-oxidation catalysts was tested electrochemically through controlled-potential electrolysis (CPE) with oxygen evolution detected by headspace analysis with a Clark electrode. The results obtained highlight the importance of the catalyst orientation with respect to the titania surface in regard to its capacity to catalytically oxidize water to dioxygen. PMID:26919725

  14. Synthesis and Single-Molecule Conductance Study of Redox-Active Ruthenium Complexes with Pyridyl and Dihydrobenzo[b]thiophene Anchoring Groups.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Hiroaki; Baghernejad, Masoud; Al-Owaedi, Oday A; Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Nagashima, Takumi; Ferrer, Jaime; Wandlowski, Thomas; García-Suárez, Víctor M; Broekmann, Peter; Lambert, Colin J; Haga, Masa-Aki

    2016-08-26

    The ancillary ligands 4'-(4-pyridyl)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine and 4'-(2,3-dihydrobenzo[b]thiophene)-2,2'-6',2"-terpyridine were used to synthesize two series of mono- and dinuclear ruthenium complexes differing in their lengths and anchoring groups. The electrochemical and single-molecular conductance properties of these two series of ruthenium complexes were studied experimentally by means of cyclic voltammetry and the scanning tunneling microscopy-break junction technique (STM-BJ) and theoretically by means of density functional theory (DFT). Cyclic voltammetry data showed clear redox peaks corresponding to both the metal- and ligand-related redox reactions. Single-molecular conductance demonstrated an exponential decay of the molecular conductance with the increase in molecular length for both the series of ruthenium complexes, with decay constants of βPY =2.07±0.1 nm(-1) and βBT =2.16±0.1 nm(-1) , respectively. The contact resistance of complexes with 2,3-dihydrobenzo[b]thiophene (BT) anchoring groups is found to be smaller than the contact resistance of ruthenium complexes with pyridine (PY) anchors. DFT calculations support the experimental results and provided additional information on the electronic structure and charge transport properties in those metal|ruthenium complex|metal junctions. PMID:27472889

  15. Simple suture and anchor in rabbit hips

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Filho, Fernando Cal; Guarniero, Roberto; de Godoy Júnior, Rui Maciel; Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Matos, Marcos Almeida; Garcia, Lucas Cortizo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Using biomechanical studies, this research aims to compare hip capsulorrhaphy in rabbits, carried out with two different techniques: capsulorrhaphy with simple sutures and with anchors. Method Thirteen New Zealand Albino (Oryctolaguscuniculus) male rabbits, twenty-six hip joints, were used. First, a pilot project was performed with three rabbits (six hip joints). This experiment consisted of ten rabbits divided into two groups: group 1 underwent capsulorrhaphy on both right and left hips with simple suture using polyglycolic acid absorbable thread, and group 2 underwent capsulorrhaphy with titanium anchors. After a four-week postoperative period, the animals were euthanized and the hip joints were frozen. On the same day of the biomechanical studies, after the hip joints were previously unfrozen, the following parameters were evaluated: rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy. Results There was no relevant statistical difference in rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy between the simple suture and anchor groups. Conclusion Through biomechanical analyses, using parameters of rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy, it has been shown that capsulorrhaphy with simple suture and with anchors has similar results in rabbit hip joints. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study. PMID:24453618

  16. Self-assembling of Zn porphyrins on a (110) face of rutile TiO2-The anchoring role of carboxyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajac, Lukasz; Olszowski, Piotr; Godlewski, Szymon; Bodek, Lukasz; Such, Bartosz; Jöhr, Res; Pawlak, Remy; Hinaut, Antoine; Glatzel, Thilo; Meyer, Ernst; Szymonski, Marek

    2016-08-01

    The ordering of zinc containing porphyrin molecules on surface of rutile TiO2(110)-(1×1) has been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. It is demonstrated that a carboxylic group (COOH) has a profound impact on the immobilization of the molecules. At coverages below 0.1 monolayer only molecules equipped with the group COOH could be anchored to the surface and imaged with STM. At higher coverage both species, with and without the carboxyl substituent, assemble into ordered structures, forming complete monolayers. It is found, however, that the rhomboid unit cells of these structures exhibit differences in size.

  17. Behavior of Surface-Anchored Poly(acrylic acid) Brushes with Grafting Density Gradients on Solid Substrates: 1. Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,T.; Gong, P.; Szleifer, I.; Vicek, P.; Subr, V.; Genzer, J.

    2007-01-01

    We describe experiments pertaining to the formation of surface-anchored poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) brushes with a gradual variation of the PAA grafting densities on flat surfaces and provide detailed analysis of their properties. The PAA brush gradients are generated by first covering the substrate with a molecular gradient of the polymerization initiator, followed by the 'grafting from' polymerization of tert-butyl acrylate (tBA) from these substrate-bound initiator centers, and finally converting the PtBA into PAA. We use spectroscopic ellipsometry to measure the wet thickness of the grafted PAA chains in aqueous solutions at three different pH values (4, 5.8, and 10) and a series of ionic strengths (IS). Our measurements reveal that at low grafting densities, s, the wet thickness of the PAA brush (H) remains relatively constant, the polymers are in the mushroom regime. Beyond a certain value of s, the macromolecules enter the brush regime, where H increases with increasing s. For a given s, H exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the IS. At large IS, the H is small because the charges along PAA are completely screened by the excess of the external salt. As IS decreases, the PAA enters the so-called salt brush (SB) regime, where H increases. At a certain value of IS, H reaches a maximum and then decreases again. The latter is a typical brush behavior in so-called osmotic brush (OB) regime. We provide detailed discussion of the behavior of the grafted PAA chains in the SB and OB regimes.

  18. Anchoring of both PKA-RIIα and 14-3-3θ regulates retinoic acid induced 16 mediated phosphorylation of heat shock protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hai-Lin; Zhu, Shi-Ying; Zhao, Lan-Juan; Ren, Hao; Zhao, Ping; Qi, Zhong-Tian; Wang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study reported that retinoic acid induced 16 (RAI16) could enhance tumorigenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the cellular functions of RAI16 are still unclear. In this study, by immunoprecipitation and tandem (MS/MS) mass spectrometry analysis, we identified that RAI16 interacted with the type II regulatory subunit of PKA (PKA-RIIα), acting as a novel protein kinase A anchoring protein (AKAP). In addition, RAI16 also interacted with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and 14-3-3θ. Further studies indicated that RAI16 mediated PKA phosphorylation of HSP70 at serine 486, resulting in anti-apoptosis events. RAI16 was also phosphorylated by the anchored PKA at serine 325, which promoted the recruitment of 14-3-3θ, which, in turn, inhibited RAI16 mediated PKA phosphorylation of HSP70. These findings offer mechanism insight into RAI16 mediated anti-apoptosis signaling in HCC. PMID:25900241

  19. A Methylated Phosphate Group and Four Amide-linked Acyl Chains in Leptospira interrogans Lipid A. The Membrane Anchor of an Unusual Lipopolysaccharide that Activates TLR2*

    PubMed Central

    Que-Gewirth, Nanette L. S.; Ribeiro, Anthony A.; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Cotter, Robert J.; Bulach, Dieter M.; Adler, Ben; Girons, Isabelle Saint; Werts, Catherine; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2008-01-01

    Leptospira interrogans differs from other spirochetes in that it contains homologs of all the Escherichia coli lpx genes required for the biosynthesis of the lipid A anchor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS from L. interrogans cells is unusual in that it activates TLR2 rather than TLR4. The structure of L. interrogans lipid A has now been determined by a combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy, and biochemical studies. Lipid A was released from LPS of L. interrogans serovar Pomona by 100 °C hydrolysis at pH 4.5 in the presence of SDS. Following purification by anion exchange and thin layer chromatography, the major component was shown to have a molecular weight of 1727. Mild hydrolysis with dilute NaOH reduced this to 1338, consistent with the presence of four N-linked and two O-linked acyl chains. The lipid A molecules of both the virulent and nonvirulent forms of L. interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae (strain Verdun) were identical to those of L. interrogans Pomona by the above criteria. Given the selectivity of L. interrogans LpxA for 3-hydroxylaurate, we propose that L. interrogans lipid A is acylated with R-3-hydroxylaurate at positions 3 and 3′ and with R-3-hydroxypalmitate at positions 2 and 2′. The hydroxyacyl chain composition was validated by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry of fatty acid methyl esters. Intact hexa-acylated lipid A of L. interrogans Pomona was also analyzed by NMR, confirming the presence a β-1′,6-linked disaccharide of 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucopyranose units. Two secondary unsaturated acyl chains are attached to the distal residue. The 1-position of the disaccharide is derivatized with an axial phosphate moiety, but the 4′-OH is unsubstituted. 1H and 31P NMR analyses revealed that the 1-phosphate group is methylated. Purified L. interrogans lipid A is inactive against human THP-1 cells but does stimulate tumor necrosis factor production by

  20. Two groups challenge US acid rain efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    In its report, Acid Rain Invades Our National Parks, the National Parks and Conservation Association (NPCA) says acid rain is being detected at all 27 national park monitoring sites. In 1980, 87 national parks expressed concern in a NPCA survey over acid rain. Repolled in 1986, more than half of the respondents reported that no research on acid rain was under way. The NPCA report concludes that the alarm that was sounded in 1980 fell largely on deaf ears, and calls for the structural and scientific reorganization of the National Park Service. The National Audubon Society shares NPCA's dissatisfaction with federal efforts to tackle the problem of acid rain and has taken testing into its own hands. Through its Citizens Acid Rain Monitoring Network, Audubon volunteers have collected readings of acidity at 64 monitoring stations in 31 states since July.

  1. Synthesis and Anchoring of Antineoplastic Ferrocene and Phthalocyanine Derivatives on Water-Soluble Polymeric Drug Carriers Derived from Lysine and Aspartic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Maree, M. David; Neuse, Eberhard W.; Erasmus, Elizabeth; Swarts, Jannie C.

    2008-01-01

    The general synthetic strategy towards water-soluble biodegradable drug carriers and the properties that they must have are discussed. The syntheses of water-soluble biodegradable copolymers of lysine and aspartic acid as potential drug-delivering devices, having amine-functionalised side chains are then described. Covalent anchoring of carboxylic acid derivatives of the antineoplastic ferrocene and photodynamically active phthalocyanine moieties to the amine-containing drug carrier copolymers under mild coupling conditions has been achieved utilising the coupling reagent O-benzotriazolyl-N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate to promote formation of the biodegradable amide bond. Even though the parent antineoplastic ferrocene and phthalocyanine derivatives are themselves insoluble in water at pH < 7, the new carrier-drug conjugates that were obtained are well water-soluble. PMID:18288243

  2. Ultrasonic/Sonic Anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    The ultrasonic/sonic anchor (U/S anchor) is an anchoring device that drills a hole for itself in rock, concrete, or other similar material. The U/S anchor is a recent addition to a series of related devices, the first of which were reported in "Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors"

  3. Anchoring the Gas-Phase Acidity Scale from Hydrogen Sulfide to Pyrrole. Experimental Bond Dissociation Energies of Nitromethane, Ethanethiol, and Cyclopentadiene.

    PubMed

    Ervin, Kent M; Nickel, Alex A; Lanorio, Jerry G; Ghale, Surja B

    2015-07-16

    A meta-analysis of experimental information from a variety of sources is combined with statistical thermodynamics calculations to refine the gas-phase acidity scale from hydrogen sulfide to pyrrole. The absolute acidities of hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, and pyrrole are evaluated from literature R-H bond energies and radical electron affinities to anchor the scale. Relative acidities from proton-transfer equilibrium experiments are used in a local thermochemical network optimized by least-squares analysis to obtain absolute acidities of 14 additional acids in the region. Thermal enthalpy and entropy corrections are applied using molecular parameters from density functional theory, with explicit calculation of hindered rotor energy levels for torsional modes. The analysis reduces the uncertainties of the absolute acidities of the 14 acids to within ±1.2 to ±3.3 kJ/mol, expressed as estimates of the 95% confidence level. The experimental gas-phase acidities are compared with calculations, with generally good agreement. For nitromethane, ethanethiol, and cyclopentadiene, the refined acidities can be combined with electron affinities of the corresponding radicals from photoelectron spectroscopy to obtain improved values of the C-H or S-H bond dissociation energies, yielding D298(H-CH2NO2) = 423.5 ± 2.2 kJ mol(-1), D298(C2H5S-H) = 364.7 ± 2.2 kJ mol(-1), and D298(C5H5-H) = 347.4 ± 2.2 kJ mol(-1). These values represent the best-available experimental bond dissociation energies for these species. PMID:25549109

  4. A Comparison of Three IRT Approaches to Examinee Ability Change Modeling in a Single-Group Anchor Test Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paek, Insu; Park, Hyun-Jeong; Cai, Li; Chi, Eunlim

    2014-01-01

    Typically a longitudinal growth modeling based on item response theory (IRT) requires repeated measures data from a single group with the same test design. If operational or item exposure problems are present, the same test may not be employed to collect data for longitudinal analyses and tests at multiple time points are constructed with unique…

  5. Simple Formation of C60 and C60-Ferrocene Conjugated Monolayers Anchored onto Silicon Oxide with Five Carboxylic Acids and Their Transistor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Y Itoh; B Kim; R Gearba; N Tremblay; R Pindak; Y Matsuo; E Nakamura; C Nuckolls

    2011-12-31

    C{sub 60} and C{sub 60}-ferrocene conjugated molecule bearing five carboxylic acids successfully anchor onto a silicon oxide surface as a monolayer through a simple method of simply dipping an amino-terminated surface into the solution of the C{sub 60} derivatives. The monolayer structure was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray reflectivity, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and IR spectroscopy to reveal that the molecules are standing presenting its C{sub 60} spherical face at the surface. The electronic effect of the C{sub 60} monolayer and the ferrocene-functionalized C{sub 60} monolayer in OFET devices was investigated. When an n-type OFET was fabricated on the ferrocene functionalized monolayer, we see an enhancement in the mobility. When a p-type OFET was made the ferrocene-functionalized C{sub 60} monolayer showed a lowering of the carrier mobility.

  6. A unique surface membrane anchored purine-salvage enzyme is conserved among a group of primitive eukaryotic human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Debrabant, A; Bastien, P; Dwyer, D M

    2001-04-01

    Previously, we isolated and characterized the gene encoding the 3'-Nucleotidase/Nuclease (Ld3'NT/NU) from the human pathogen, Leishmania donovani. This unique cell surface enzyme has been shown to be involved in the salvage of host-derived purines, which are essential for the survival of this important protozoan parasite. In this report, we assessed whether the 3'-Nucleotidase/Nuclease was conserved amongst other pathogenic Leishmania and related trypanosomatid parasites. Results of pulsed field gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting showed that a Ld3'NT/NU gene homolog was present in each of the visceral and cutaneous Leishmania species tested (i.e. isolates of L. donovani, L. infantum, L. tropica, L. major and L. mexicana, respectively). Further, results of colorimetric assays using 3'-adenosine monophosphate as substrate demonstrated that each of these organisms also expressed significant levels of 3'-nucleotidase enzyme activity. In addition, we showed that a Ld3'NT/NU gene homolog was expressed in each of these Leishmania species as a > 40 kDa 3'-nucleotidase enzyme activity. A Ld3'NT/NU gene homolog was also identified in two Crithidia species (C. fasciculata and C. luciliae) and Leptomonas seymouri but was only marginally detectable in Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Phytomonas serpens. Cumulatively, results of this study showed that an Ld3'NT/NU homolog was conserved amongst pathogenic Leishmania sp. which suggests that this enzyme must play an critical role in purine salvage for all members of this group of human pathogens. PMID:11451370

  7. Novel vitamin D receptor ligands having a carboxyl group as an anchor to arginine 274 in the ligand-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Fujishima, Toshie; Tsuji, Genichiro; Tanaka, Chika; Harayama, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Vitamin D3 is metabolized into the hormonally active form, 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1), via 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (2) which is the most abundant circulating metabolite. Introduction of the 1alpha-hydroxyl group into 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (2) to produce 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1) increases the VDR binding affinity by approximately 1000-fold. The X-ray crystal structure of human VDR in complex with 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1) shows that, together with Ser-237, the 1alpha-hydroxyl group of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1) makes hydrogen bonds with Arg-274, single mutation of which results in impaired ligand recognition. In 2002, lithocholic acid, which possesses a carboxyl group at position C24, was demonstrated to be a weak VDR ligand. We speculated that the carboxylic acid of lithocholic acid could be recognized by Arg-274 in the ligand-binding domain of VDR. In view of the significance of Arg-274 to direct the 1alpha-hydroxyl group, as well as the results with lithocholic acid and its derivatives, we designed the C2 modified analogues of 25-hydroxylvitamin D3 (2) having a carboxyl group, instead of the 1-hydroxyl group, for better electrostatic interaction to the guanidinium side-chain of arginine. PMID:20435140

  8. Comparing Amino Acid Abundances and Distributions Across Carbonaceous Chondrite Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Meteorites are grouped according to bulk properties such as chemical composition and mineralogy. These parameters can vary significantly among the different carbonaceous chondrite groups (CI, CM, CO, CR, CH, CB, CV and CK). We have determined the amino acid abundances of more than 30 primary amino acids in meteorites from each of the eight groups, revealing several interesting trends. There are noticeable differences in the structural diversity and overall abundances of amino acids between meteorites from the different chondrite groups. Because meteorites may have been an important source of amino acids to the prebiotic Earth and these organic compounds are essential for life as we know it, the observed variations of these molecules may have been important for the origins of life.

  9. Display of alpha-amylase on the surface of Lactobacillus casei cells by use of the PgsA anchor protein, and production of lactic acid from starch.

    PubMed

    Narita, Junya; Okano, Kenji; Kitao, Tomoe; Ishida, Saori; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Sung, Moon-Hee; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2006-01-01

    We developed a new cell surface engineering system based on the PgsA anchor protein from Bacillus subtilis. In this system, the N terminus of the target protein was fused to the PgsA protein and the resulting fusion protein was expressed on the cell surface. Using this new system, we constructed a novel starch-degrading strain of Lactobacillus casei by genetically displaying alpha-amylase from the Streptococcus bovis strain 148 with a FLAG peptide tag (AmyAF). Localization of the PgsA-AmyA-FLAG fusion protein on the cell surface was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometric analysis. The lactic acid bacteria which displayed AmyAF showed significantly elevated hydrolytic activity toward soluble starch. By fermentation using AmyAF-displaying L. casei cells, 50 g/liter of soluble starch was reduced to 13.7 g/liter, and 21.8 g/liter of lactic acid was produced within about 24 h. The yield in terms of grams of lactic acid produced per gram of carbohydrate utilized was 0.60 g per g of carbohydrate consumed at 24 h. Since AmyA was immobilized on the cells, cells were recovered after fermentation and used repeatedly. During repeated utilization of cells, the lactic acid yield was improved to 0.81 g per g of carbohydrate consumed at 72 h. These results indicate that efficient simultaneous saccharification and fermentation from soluble starch to lactic acid were carried out by recombinant L. casei cells with cell surface display of AmyA. PMID:16391053

  10. Display of α-Amylase on the Surface of Lactobacillus casei Cells by Use of the PgsA Anchor Protein, and Production of Lactic Acid from Starch

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Junya; Okano, Kenji; Kitao, Tomoe; Ishida, Saori; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Sung, Moon-Hee; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2006-01-01

    We developed a new cell surface engineering system based on the PgsA anchor protein from Bacillus subtilis. In this system, the N terminus of the target protein was fused to the PgsA protein and the resulting fusion protein was expressed on the cell surface. Using this new system, we constructed a novel starch-degrading strain of Lactobacillus casei by genetically displaying α-amylase from the Streptococcus bovis strain 148 with a FLAG peptide tag (AmyAF). Localization of the PgsA-AmyA-FLAG fusion protein on the cell surface was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometric analysis. The lactic acid bacteria which displayed AmyAF showed significantly elevated hydrolytic activity toward soluble starch. By fermentation using AmyAF-displaying L. casei cells, 50 g/liter of soluble starch was reduced to 13.7 g/liter, and 21.8 g/liter of lactic acid was produced within about 24 h. The yield in terms of grams of lactic acid produced per gram of carbohydrate utilized was 0.60 g per g of carbohydrate consumed at 24 h. Since AmyA was immobilized on the cells, cells were recovered after fermentation and used repeatedly. During repeated utilization of cells, the lactic acid yield was improved to 0.81 g per g of carbohydrate consumed at 72 h. These results indicate that efficient simultaneous saccharification and fermentation from soluble starch to lactic acid were carried out by recombinant L. casei cells with cell surface display of AmyA. PMID:16391053

  11. Benzylidene Acetal Protecting Group as Carboxylic Acid Surrogate: Synthesis of Functionalized Uronic Acids and Sugar Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amit; Senthilkumar, Soundararasu; Baskaran, Sundarababu

    2016-01-18

    Direct oxidation of the 4,6-O-benzylidene acetal protecting group to C-6 carboxylic acid has been developed that provides an easy access to a wide range of biologically important and synthetically challenging uronic acid and sugar amino acid derivatives in good yields. The RuCl3 -NaIO4 -mediated oxidative cleavage method eliminates protection and deprotection steps and the reaction takes place under mild conditions. The dual role of the benzylidene acetal, as a protecting group and source of carboxylic acid, was exploited in the efficient synthesis of six-carbon sialic acid analogues and disaccharides bearing uronic acids, including glycosaminoglycan analogues. PMID:26572799

  12. Choosing among Tucker or Chained Linear Equating in Two Testing Situations: Rater Comparability Scoring and Randomly Equivalent Groups with an Anchor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puhan, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Tucker and chained linear equatings were evaluated in two testing scenarios. In Scenario 1, referred to as rater comparability scoring and equating, the anchor-to-total correlation is often very high for the new form but moderate for the reference form. This may adversely affect the results of Tucker equating, especially if the new and reference…

  13. Poly(acrylic acid)-block-poly(vinyl alcohol) anchored maghemite nanoparticles designed for multi-stimuli triggered drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ji; Detrembleur, Christophe; Debuigne, Antoine; de Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire; Mornet, Stéphane; Vander Elst, Luce; Laurent, Sophie; Labrugère, Christine; Duguet, Etienne; Jérôme, Christine

    2013-11-01

    Original core/corona nanoparticles composed of a maghemite core and a stimuli-responsive polymer coating made of poly(acrylic acid)-block-poly(vinyl alcohol) macromolecules were fabricated for drug delivery system (DDS) application. This kind of DDS aims to combine the advantage of stimuli-responsive polymer coating, in order to regulate the drug release behaviours under different conditions and furthermore, improve the biocompatibility and in vivo circulation half-time of the maghemite nanoparticles. Drug loading capacity was evaluated with methylene blue (MB), a cationic model drug. The triggered release of MB was studied under various stimuli such as pH, ionic strength and temperature. Local heating generated under alternating magnetic field (AMF) application was studied, and remotely AMF-triggered release was also confirmed, while a mild heating-up of the release medium was observed. Furthermore, their potential application as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents was explored via relaxivity measurements and acquisition of T2-weighted images. Preliminary studies on the cytotoxicity against mouse fibroblast-like L929 cell line and also their cellular uptake within human melanoma MEL-5 cell line were carried out. In conclusion, this kind of stimuli-responsive nanoparticles appears to be promising carriers for delivering drugs to some tumour sites or into cellular compartments with an acidic environment.Original core/corona nanoparticles composed of a maghemite core and a stimuli-responsive polymer coating made of poly(acrylic acid)-block-poly(vinyl alcohol) macromolecules were fabricated for drug delivery system (DDS) application. This kind of DDS aims to combine the advantage of stimuli-responsive polymer coating, in order to regulate the drug release behaviours under different conditions and furthermore, improve the biocompatibility and in vivo circulation half-time of the maghemite nanoparticles. Drug loading capacity was evaluated with methylene

  14. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A preformed... the platinum group intended to be incorporated into a dental appliance, such as a denture, to...

  15. Domain-confined catalytic soot combustion over Co3O4 anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst prepared by mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiale; Yu, Yifu; Dai, Fangfang; Meng, Ming; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Hu, Tiandou

    2013-12-21

    Herein, we introduce a specially designed domain-confined macroporous catalyst, namely, the Co3O4 nanocrystals anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst, which was synthesized by using the mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting method. This catalyst exhibits much better performance for catalytic soot combustion than the conventional TiO2 powder supported one in gravitational contact mode (GMC). PMID:24177172

  16. Phosphotungstic acid anchored to amino-functionalized core-shell magnetic mesoporous silica microspheres: a magnetically recoverable nanocomposite with enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Chi, Yue; Yuan, Qing; Li, Nan; Yan, Wenfu; Li, Xiaotian

    2013-01-15

    H(3)PW(12)O(40) was successfully anchored to the surface of amino-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2)@meso-SiO(2) microspheres by means of chemical bonding to aminosilane groups, aiming to remove unwanted organic compounds from aqueous media. The resultant multifunctional microspheres were thoroughly characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, and N(2) adsorption-desorption. The as-prepared microspheres possess unique properties including high magnetization (46.8 emu g(-1)), large BET surface area (135 m(2) g(-1)), and highly open mesopores (~5.0 nm), and H(3)PW(12)O(40) loading is calculated to be ~16.8%; and as a result, the as-prepared microspheres exhibit enhanced performance in degrading dyes under UV irradiation compared with pure H(3)PW(12)O(40). Additionally, the photocatalyst can be easily recycled using an external magnetic field without losing the photocatalytic activity. PMID:23083769

  17. Trimesic acid dimethyl sulfoxide solvate: space group revision

    PubMed Central

    Bernès, Sylvain; Hernández, Guadalupe; Portillo, Roberto; Gutiérrez, René

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the title solvate, C9H6O6·C2H6OS, was determined 30 years ago [Herbstein, Kapon & Wasserman (1978 ▶). Acta Cryst. B34, 1613–1617], with data collected at room temperature, and refined in the space group P21. The present redetermination, based on high-resolution diffraction data, shows that the actual space group is more likely to be P21/m. The crystal structure contains layers of trimesic acid molecules lying on mirror planes. A mirror plane also passes through the S and O atoms of the solvent molecule. The molecules in each layer are inter­connected through strong O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a two-dimensional supra­molecular network within each layer. The donor groups are the hydroxyls of the trimesic acid mol­ecules, while the acceptors are the carbonyl or the sulfoxide O atoms. PMID:21202984

  18. Water-Stable, Hydroxamate Anchors for Functionalization of TiO2 Surfaces with Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, W.R.; Milot, R.L.; Song, H.; Snoeberger III, R.C.; Batista, Victor S.; Schmuttenmaer, C.A.; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2010-01-01

    A novel class of derivatized hydroxamic acid linkages for robust sensitization of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) under various aqueous conditions is described. The stability of linkages bound to metal oxides under various conditions is important in developing photocatalytic cells which incorporate transition metal complexes for solar energy conversion. In order to compare the standard carboxylate anchor to hydroxamates, two organic dyes differing only in anchoring groups were synthesized and attached to TiO{sub 2} NPs. At acidic, basic, and close to neutral pH, hydroxamic acid linkages resist detachment compared to the labile carboxylic acids. THz spectroscopy was used to compare ultrafast interfacial electron transfer (IET) into the conduction band of TiO{sub 2} for both linkages and found similar IET characteristics. Observable electron injection and stronger binding suggest that hydroxamates are a suitable class of anchors for designing water stable molecules for functionalizing TiO{sub 2}.

  19. Anchors for Education Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alok, Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Education reforms, considering their significance, deserve better methods than mere "trial and error." This article conceptualizes a network of six anchors for education reforms: education policy, education system, curriculum, pedagogy, assessment, and teacher education. It establishes the futility to reform anchors in isolation and anticipates…

  20. Photocatalytic degradation of acid blue 74 in water using Ag-Ag2O-Zno nanostuctures anchored on graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umukoro, Eseoghene H.; Peleyeju, Moses G.; Ngila, Jane C.; Arotiba, Omotayo A.

    2016-01-01

    Water pollution due to industrial effluents from industries which utilize dyes in the manufacturing of their products has serious implications on aquatic lives and the general environment. Thus, there is need for the removal of dyes from wastewater before being discharged into the environment. In this study, a nanocomposite consisting of silver, silver oxide (Ag2O), zinc oxide (ZnO) and graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized, characterized and photocatalytically applied in the degradation (and possibly mineralization) of organic pollutants in water treatment process. The Ag-Ag2O-ZnO nanostructure was synthesized by a co-precipitation method and calcined at 400 °C. It was functionalized using 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane and further anchored on carboxylated graphene oxide via the formation of an amide bond to give the Ag-Ag2O-ZnO/GO nanocomposite. The prepared nanocomposite was characterized by UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and Raman spectroscopy. The applicability of Ag-Ag2O-ZnO/GO nanocomposite as a photocatalyst was investigated in the photocatalytic degradation of acid blue 74 dye under visible light irradiation in synthetic wastewater containing the dye. The results indicated that Ag-Ag2O-ZnO/GO nanocomposite has a higher photocatalytic activity (90% removal) compared to Ag-Ag2O-ZnO (85% removal) and ZnO (75% removal) respectively and thus lends itself to application in water treatment, where the removal of organics is very important.

  1. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 1. Minor structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the strong-acid characteristics (pKa 3.0 or less) of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was conducted. Quantitative determinations were made for amino acid and sulfur-containing acid structures, oxalate half-ester structures, malonic acid structures, keto acid structures, and aromatic carboxyl-group structures. These determinations were made by using a variety of spectrometric (13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and ultraviolet spectrometry) and titrimetric characterizations on fulvic acid or fulvic acid samples that were chemically derivatized to indicate certain functional groups. Only keto acid and aromatic carboxyl-group structures contributed significantly to the strong-acid characteristics of the fulvic acid; these structures accounted for 43% of the strong-acid acidity. The remaining 57% of the strong acids are aliphatic carboxyl groups in unusual and/or complex configurations for which limited model compound data are available.

  2. The Effects of Anchor Groups on (1) TiO2-Catalyzed Photooxidation and (2) Linker-Assisted Assembly on TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ian Mark

    Quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) are a popular target for research due to their potential for highly efficient, easily tuned absorption. Typically, light is absorbed by quantum dots attached to a semiconductor substrate, such as TiO2, via bifunctional linker molecules. This research aims to create a patterned monolayer of linker molecules on a TiO2 film, which would in turn allow the attachment of a patterned layer of quantum dots. One method for the creation of a patterned monolayer is the functionalization of a TiO2 film with a linker molecule, followed by illumination with a laser at 355 nm. This initiates a TiO 2-catalyzed oxidation reaction, causing loss of surface coverage. A second linker molecule can then be adsorbed onto the TiO2 surface in the illuminated area. Towards that end, the behaviors of carboxylic and phosphonic acids adsorbed on TiO2 have been studied. TiO2 films were functionalized by immersion in solutions a single adsorbate and surface coverage was determined by IR spectroscopy. It is shown that phosphonic acids attain higher surface coverage than carboxylic acids, and will displace them from TiO2 when in a polar solvent. Alkyl chain lengths, which can influence stabilities of monolayers, are shown not to have an effect on this relationship. Equilibrium binding data for the adsorption of n-hexadecanoic acid to TiO2 from a THF solution are presented. It is shown that solvent polarity can affect monolayer stability; carboxylates and phosphonates undergo more desorption into polar solvents than nonpolar. Through illumination, it was possible to remove nearly all adsorbed linkers from TiO2. However, the illuminated areas were found not to be receptive to attachment by a second adsorbate. A possible reason for this behavior is presented. I also report on the synthesis and characterization of a straight-chain, thiol-terminated phosphonic acid. Initial experiments involving monolayer formation and quantum dot attachment are presented

  3. Nanocellulose/nanobentonite composite anchored with multi-carboxyl functional groups as an adsorbent for the effective removal of Cobalt(II) from nuclear industry wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Anirudhan, T S; Deepa, J R; Christa, J

    2016-04-01

    A novel adsorbent, poly(itaconic acid/methacrylic acid)-grafted-nanocellulose/nanobentonite composite [P(IA/MAA)-g-NC/NB] with multi carboxyl functional groups for the effective removal of Cobalt(II) [Co(II)] from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent was characterized using FTIR, XRD, SEM-EDS, AFM and potentiometric titrations before and after adsorption of Co(II) ions. FTIR spectra revealed that Co(II) adsorption on to the polymer may be due to the involvement of COOH groups. The surface morphological changes were observed by the SEM images. The pH was optimized as 6.0. An adsorbent dose of 2.0g/L found to be sufficient for the complete removal of Co(II) from 100mg/L at room temperature. Pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models were tested to describe kinetic data and adsorption of Co(II) follows pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium attained at 120min. Isotherm studies were conducted and data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich and Sips isotherm models and best fit was Sips model. Thermodynamic study confirmed endothermic and physical nature of adsorption of the Co(II) onto the adsorbent. Desorption experiments were done with 0.1MHCl proved that without significant loss in performance adsorbent could be reused for six cycles. The practical efficacy and effectiveness of the adsorbent were tested using nuclear industrial wastewater. A double stage batch adsorption system was designed from the adsorption isotherm data of Co(II) by constructing operating lines. PMID:26844393

  4. Anchor Trial Launch

    Cancer.gov

    NCI has launched a multicenter phase III clinical trial called the ANCHOR Study -- Anal Cancer HSIL (High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion) Outcomes Research Study -- to determine if treatment of HSIL in HIV-infected individuals can prevent anal canc

  5. Weighing Anchor in the "Ragged Times"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Tonya B.

    2012-01-01

    In today's middle school classroom, grouping is an essential learning tool that enhances students' ability to collaborate with others and deepen their own thinking. Implementing group work effectively, though, can be a challenge, especially since groups tend to end their work at "ragged" or staggered times. Creating "anchor activities"--respectful…

  6. Gas phase acidity measurement of local acidic groups in multifunctional species: controlling the binding sites in hydroxycinnamic acids.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Andres; Baer, Tomas; Chana, Antonio; González, Javier; Dávalos, Juan Z

    2013-07-01

    The applicability of the extended kinetic method (EKM) to determine the gas phase acidities (GA) of different deprotonable groups within the same molecule was tested by measuring the acidities of cinnamic, coumaric, and caffeic acids. These molecules differ not only in the number of acidic groups but in their nature, intramolecular distances, and calculated GAs. In order to determine independently the GA of groups within the same molecule using the EKM, it is necessary to selectively prepare pure forms of the hydrogen-bound heterodimer. In this work, the selectivity was achieved by the use of solvents of different vapor pressure (water and acetonitrile), as well as by variation of the drying temperature in the ESI source, which affected the production of heterodimers with different solvation energies and gas-phase dissociation energies. A particularly surprising finding is that the calculated solvation enthalpies of water and the aprotic acetonitrile are essentially identical, and that the different gas-phase products generated are apparently the result of their different vapor pressures, which affects the drying mechanism. This approach for the selective preparation of heterodimers, which is based on the energetics, appears to be quite general and should prove useful for other studies that require the selective production of heterodimers in ESI sources. The experimental results were supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations of both gas-phase and solvated species. The experimental thermochemical parameters (deprotonation ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS) are in good agreement with the calculated values for the monofunctional cinnamic acid, as well as the multifunctional coumaric and caffeic acids. The measured GA for cinnamic acid is 334.5 ± 2.0 kcal/mol. The measured acidities for the COOH and OH groups of coumaric and caffeic acids are 332.7 ± 2.0, 318.7 ± 2.1, 332.2 ± 2.0, and 317.3 ± 2.2 kcal/mol, respectively. PMID:23799241

  7. ABO blood group glycans modulate sialic acid recognition on erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Miriam; Hurtado-Ziola, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    ABH(O) blood group polymorphisms are based on well-known intraspecies variations in structures of neutral blood cell surface glycans in humans and other primates. Whereas natural antibodies against these glycans can act as barriers to blood transfusion and transplantation, the normal functions of this long-standing evolutionary polymorphism remain largely unknown. Although microbial interactions have been suggested as a selective force, direct binding of lethal pathogens to ABH antigens has not been reported. We show in this study that ABH antigens found on human erythrocytes modulate the specific interactions of 3 sialic acid-recognizing proteins (human Siglec-2, 1918SC influenza hemagglutinin, and Sambucus nigra agglutinin) with sialylated glycans on the same cell surface. Using specific glycosidases that convert A and B glycans to the underlying H(O) structure, we show ABH antigens stabilize sialylated glycan clusters on erythrocyte membranes uniquely for each blood type, generating differential interactions of the 3 sialic acid-binding proteins with erythrocytes from each blood type. We further show that by stabilizing such structures ABH antigens can also modulate sialic acid-mediated interaction of pathogens such as Plasmodium falciparum malarial parasite. Thus, ABH antigens can noncovalently alter the presentation of other cell surface glycans to cognate-binding proteins, without themselves being a direct ligand. PMID:19704115

  8. Software Note: Using BILOG for Fixed-Anchor Item Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMars, Christine E.; Jurich, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The nonequivalent groups anchor test (NEAT) design is often used to scale item parameters from two different test forms. A subset of items, called the anchor items or common items, are administered as part of both test forms. These items are used to adjust the item calibrations for any differences in the ability distributions of the groups taking…

  9. A human immunoglobulin G receptor exists in both polypeptide-anchored and phosphatidylinositol-glycan-anchored forms.

    PubMed Central

    Scallon, B J; Scigliano, E; Freedman, V H; Miedel, M C; Pan, Y C; Unkeless, J C; Kochan, J P

    1989-01-01

    Several cDNA clones encoding the human immunoglobulin G receptor CD16 were isolated from human lung or peripheral blood leukocyte cDNA libraries. Nucleotide sequence comparisons revealed that the cDNAs could be divided into two groups. cDNA clones in one group encode a protein that terminates 4 amino acids after the putative transmembrane domain. Clones in the second group encode a protein with an extra 21 amino acids that could comprise a cytoplasmic domain. Direct peptide sequencing was used to determine the N terminus of the mature CD16 receptor protein and supported the existence of the two forms of the receptor. Treatment of neutrophils with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C resulted in the release of a large percentage of the CD16 molecules from the cell surface. In contrast, treatment of natural killer cells with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C did not release any CD16 from the cell surface. These data demonstrate that both polypeptide-anchored and phosphatidylinositol-glycan-anchored forms of the CD16 molecule exist and that they are differentially expressed on neutrophils and natural killer cells. Images PMID:2525780

  10. Blind-Anchor-Nut-Installation Fixture (BANIF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Norman F., Jr.; Linker, James F.

    1994-01-01

    Blind-anchor-nut-installation fixture, BANIF, developed for replacing or installing anchor nuts in blind holes or other inaccessible places. Attachment of anchor nut to BANIF enables placement of anchor nut on blind side of component.

  11. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 2. Major structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Polycarboxylic acid structures that account for the strong-acid characteristics (pKa1 near 2.0) were examined for fulvic acid from the Suwannee River. Studies of model compounds demonstrated that pKa values near 2.0 occur only if the ??-ether or ??-ester groups were in cyclic structures with two to three additional electronegative functional groups (carboxyl, ester, ketone, aromatic groups) at adjacent positions on the ring. Ester linkage removal by alkaline hydrolysis and destruction of ether linkages through cleavage and reduction with hydriodic acid confirmed that the strong carboxyl acidity in fulvic acid was associated with polycarboxylic ??-ether and ??-ester structures. Studies of hypothetical structural models of fulvic acid indicated possible relation of these polycarboxylic structures with the amphiphilic and metal-binding properties of fulvic acid.

  12. Characterization and diagenesis of strong-acid carboxyl groups in humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Brown, G.K.; Reddy, M.M.

    2003-01-01

    A small fraction of carboxylic acid functional groups in humic substances are exceptionally acidic with pKa values as low as 0.5. A review of acid-group theory eliminated most models and explanations for these exceptionally acidic carboxyl groups. These acidic carboxyl groups in Suwannee River fulvic acid were enriched by a 2-stage fractionation process and the fractions were characterized by elemental, molecular-weight, and titrimetric analyses, and by infrared and 13C- and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. An average structural model of the most acidic fraction derived from the characterization data indicated a high density of carboxyl groups clustered on oxygen-heterocycle alicyclic rings. Intramolecular H-bonding between adjacent carboxyl groups in these ring structures enhanced stabilization of the carboxylate anion which results in low pKa1 values. The standard, tetrahydrofuran tetracarboxylic acid, was shown to have similar acidity characteristics to the highly acidic fulvic acid fraction. The end products of 3 known diagenetic pathways for the formation of humic substances were shown to result in carboxyl groups clustered on oxygen-heterocycle alicyclic rings.

  13. Towards zirconium phosphonate-based microarrays for probing DNA-protein interactions: critical influence of the location of the probe anchoring groups.

    PubMed

    Monot, Julien; Petit, Marc; Lane, Sarah M; Guisle, Isabelle; Léger, Jean; Tellier, Charles; Talham, Daniel R; Bujoli, Bruno

    2008-05-14

    Terminal phosphate groups on double-stranded DNA probes bind strongly to glass substrates coated with a zirconium phosphonate monolayer, and probes immobilized in this way as microarrays can be used to detect protein targets. The sensitivity of the microarray was shown to be enhanced by the use of a polyguanine segment ((G)n , n > or = 5) as a spacer between the phosphate linker and the protein interaction domain. More importantly, the presence of phosphate linkers on both ends of the dsDNA probes leads to significant enhancement of target capture. The relevant characteristics of the different probes when bound to the surface were determined, by the original use of a combination of surface characterization techniques (XPS, AFM, and Sarfus). In this context, the location of the phosphate linkers in the duplex probes was found to result in different probe surface coverage and presentation on the surface, which affect subsequent interactions with the target protein. PMID:18407629

  14. Bellow seal and anchor

    DOEpatents

    Mansure, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    An annular seal is made of a collapsible bellows. The bellows can function as an anchor or a seal and is easily set into position using relative component movement. The bellows folds can be slanted and their outer sealing edges can have different profiles to meet expected conditions. The bellows is expanded for insertion to reduce its outer dimension and sets by compaction as a result of relative movement. The bellows can be straight or tapered and is settable with a minimal axial force.

  15. Analysis of Glenoid Inter-anchor Distance with an All-Suture Anchor System

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Jonathan; Robinson, Sean; Dutton, Pascual; Dickinson, Ephraim; Rodriguez, John Paul; Camisa, William; Leasure, Jeremi M.; Montgomery, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Arthroscopic shoulder stabilization using suture anchors are commonly used techniques. More recently developed all-suture systems employ smaller diameter anchors, which increase repair contact area and allow greater placement density on narrow surfaces such as the glenoid. Our goal is investigate the strength characteristics of various inter-anchor distances in a human glenoid model. Methods: Twelve fresh-frozen human cadaveric glenoids were potted after the labrum was excised. The glenoids were then implanted with 1.4 mm all-suture anchors (Juggerknot, Biomet, Warsaw, IN) at varying inter-anchor distances. Anchors were implanted adjacent to one another or at 2 mm, 3 mm, or 5 mm distances using a template with pre-drilled holes. The glenoids were then underwent single cycle pullout testing using a test frame (Instron 8521, Instron Inc., Norwood, MA). A 5 N preload was applied to the construct and the actuator was driven away from the shoulder at a rate of 12.5mm/s as seen in Figure 1. Force and displacement were collected from the test frame actuator at a rate of 500 Hz. The primary outcomes were failure strength and stiffness. Stiffness was calculated from the initial linear region of the force displacement curve. Failure strength was defined as the first local maximum inflection point in the force displacement curve. Results: During load to fail testing, all but three of the specimens had both anchors pull out of the glenoid. The other mode of failure included one or both of the sutures failing. Stiffness was 13.52 ± 3.8, 17.97 ± 5.02, 17.59 ± 4.65 and 18.95 ± 4.67 N/mm for the adjacent, 2 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm treatment groups as shown Table 1. The adjacent group had a significantly lower stiffness compared to the other treatment groups. Failure strength was 48.68 ± 20.64, 76.16 ± 23.78, 73.19 ± 35.83 and 87.04 ± 34.67 N for the adjacent, 2 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm treatment groups as shown in Table 1. The adjacent group had a significantly lower

  16. Lightness, brightness, and anchoring.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Barton L; Whitbread, Michael; de Silva, Chamila

    2014-01-01

    The majority of work in lightness perception has evaluated the perception of lightness using flat, matte, two-dimensional surfaces. In such contexts, the amount of light reaching the eye contains a conflated mixture of the illuminant and surface lightness. A fundamental puzzle of lightness perception is understanding how it is possible to experience achromatic surfaces as specific achromatic shades in the face of this ambiguity. It has been argued that the perception of lightness in such contexts implies that the visual system imposes an "anchoring rule" whereby a specific relative luminance (the highest) serves as a fixed point in the mapping of image luminance onto the lightness scale ("white"). We conducted a series of experiments to explicitly test this assertion in contexts where this mapping seemed most unlikely-namely, low-contrast images viewed in dim illumination. Our results provide evidence that the computational ambiguity in mapping luminance onto lightness is reflected in perceptual experience. The perception of the highest luminance in a two-dimensional Mondrian display varied monotonically with its brightness, ranging from midgray to white. Similar scaling occurred for the lowest luminance and, by implication, all other luminance values. We conclude that the conflation between brightness and lightness in two-dimensional Mondrian displays is reflected in perception and find no support for the claim that any specific relative luminance value acts as a fixed anchor point in this mapping function. PMID:25104828

  17. [Dactylogyrids (Monogenea: Dactylogyridea) with an unusual number of anchors, their origin and phylogenetic significance. Reference data].

    PubMed

    Gerasev, P I

    2002-01-01

    It is considered that in Anacanthorinae, Markewitschiana and Pseudacolpenteron pavlovskii (Dactylogyridae s. s.) the anchors are absent originally. In the other dactylogyrids (s. l.) without anchors (Pseudacolpenteron ignotus; Acolpenteron; Anonchohaptor-Icelanchohaptor; Kritskyia-Telethecium-Pavanelliela) these structures are lost. In related genera Rhinoxenus and Nanotrema the dorsal pair of anchors is transformed into the "spikes"; in Heteronchocleidinae there is one anchor; in Trinigyrus and Schilbetrematoides are two anchors; and in Urogyrus three anchors are reduced. But in Rhinonaster, Cacatyocotyle, Callceostomella, Neocalseostoma elongatum and Pseudodactylogyridae the presence of one pair of ventral "peduncular" or "haptoral" anchors appear to be the original state. For Anacanthorinae and Dactylogyridae s. s. the presence of 18-16 hooks, original lacking of anchors, appearance of one pair of them, evolutionary development and subsequent reduction of these structures are characteristic. In the dactylogyrids (s. l.) having two pairs of anchors and 14 hooks, one pair of the anchors is present originally, then usually the second dorsal pair grows up, and finally, the reduction of a part of anchors or all the anchors is possible. In the 16-hooked dactylogyrids (s. l.) having two pairs of anchors (Tetraonchinea, Amphibdellainea, Neodactylodiscinea) the original lacking or reduction of the anchors is not reported. The author considers, that it is unwarranted to unite all dactylogyrids (s. l.) without anchors into the superorder Ananchorea Malmberg, 1990 or to postulate the original presence of the two pairs of ventral anchors in this group. It is also impossible to unit all dactylogyrids (s. l.) having 0-4 anchors and 18-14 hooks into Dactylogyridae sensu Boeger et Kritsky, 1993. PMID:12070963

  18. CDC group IIc: phenotypic characteristics, fatty acid composition, and isoprenoid quinone content.

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, D G; Moss, C W; Daneshvar, M I; Wallace-Shewmaker, P L

    1996-01-01

    Twenty strains of glucose-utilizing, small gram-negative slightly pleomorphic rods that grew well aerobically and that were isolated from clinical specimens formed a phenotypically similar group that was designated CDC group IIc. The phenotypic characteristics of CDC group IIc were most similar to those of CDC groups IIe and IIh, the major differences being that CDC group IIc produced acid from sucrose, hydrolyzed esculin, and usually reduced nitrate. The CDC group IIc strains were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography for their cellular fatty acid compositions, and all contained relatively large amounts of isobranched hydroxy and nonhydroxy acids. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis of the quinone extract showed menaquinone-6 as the major component. Both the cellular fatty acid and isoprenoid quinone compositions were consistent with the profiles of CDC groups IIe and IIh. Thirty percent of the isolates were from human blood. PMID:8862612

  19. Enhanced phagocytosis of group A streptococci M type 6 by oleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Speert, D.P.; Quie, P.G.; Wannamaker, L.W.

    1981-04-01

    M protein, located on the surface fimbriae of group A streptococci, is antiphagocytic by unknown means. It is known that oleic acid kills group A streptococci and distorts the fimbriae. The effect of oleic acid on phagocytosis of group A streptococci was examined. Phagocytosis of a strain possessing M protein (M+) and its M- variant was assessed by uptake of radiolabeled bacteria and by chemiluminescence. The M- but not the M+ streptococci were well phagocytized and induced chemiluminescence. Oleic acid-killed and heat-killed streptococci (both M+ and M-) were readily phagocytized and induced sustained chemiluminescence. M+ streptococci killed by ultraviolet irradiation were inefficiently phagocytized and did not induce chemiluminescence. Oleic acid-killed M+ streptococci absorbed type-specific antibody. An extract of M protein reduced the bactericidal capacity of oleic acid. It is proposed that oleic acid may bind to and alter the M protein of group A streptococci and thereby enhance phagocytosis.

  20. Development of acid functional groups during the thermal degradation of wood and wood components

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study provides data on acid functional groups in charcoals and how the acid functional group content varies with the formation conditions. Chars were created from purified cellulose, purified lignin, pine wood, and pine bark. The charring temperatures and charring duration were controlled in a ...

  1. Granular Simulation of NEO Anchoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazhar, Hammad

    2011-01-01

    NASA is interested in designing a spacecraft capable of visiting a Near Earth Object (NEO), performing experiments, and then returning safely. Certain periods of this mission will require the spacecraft to remain stationary relative to the NEO. Such situations require an anchoring mechanism that is compact, easy to deploy and upon mission completion, easily removed. The design philosophy used in the project relies on the simulation capability of a multibody dynamics physics engine. On Earth it is difficult to create low gravity conditions and testing in low gravity environments, whether artificial or in space is costly and therefore not feasible. Through simulation, gravity can be controlled with great accuracy, making it ideally suited to analyze the problem at hand. Using Chrono::Engine [1], a simulation package capable of utilizing massively parallel GPU hardware, several validation experiments will be performed. Once there is sufficient confidence, modeling of the NEO regolith interaction will begin after which the anchor tests will be performed and analyzed. The outcome of this task is a study with an analysis of several different anchor designs, along with a recommendation on which anchor is better suited to the task of anchoring. With the anchors tested against a range of parameters relating to soil, environment and anchor penetration angles/velocities on a NEO.

  2. Ultrafast interfacial electron transfer from the excited state of anchored molecules into a semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, L.; Ernstorfer, R.; Willig, F.

    Ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer (HET) from the excited singlet state of the large organic chromophore perylene into the inorganic semiconductor rutile TiO 2 was investigated with femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PPE). The strength of the electronic interaction between the chromophore and the semiconductor was varied by inserting different anchor/bridge groups that functioned either as electronic wire or electronic tunnelling barrier. Both anchor groups, i.e. carboxylic and phosphonic acid, formed strong chemical bonds at the TiO 2 surface. The perylene chromophore with the different anchor/bridge groups was adsorbed from solution in a dedicated ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) chamber. The adsorption geometry of the chromophore perylene was determined from angle and polarization dependent two-photon photoemission (2PPE) signals and was found to be very different for the two different anchor/bridge groups. The measured adsorption geometries are compatible with recent DFT (density functional theory) calculations by P. Persson and co-workers [M. Nilsing, S. Lunell, P. Persson, L. Ojamäe, Phosphonic acid adsorption at the TiO 2 anatase (1 0 1) surface investigated by periodic hybrid HF-DFT computations, Surf. Sci. 582 (2005) 49-60]. Two different processes contributed to the TR-2PPE transients, firstly electron transfer from the chromophore to the electronic acceptor states on the surface and secondly escape of the electrons from the surface into the bulk of the semiconductor. The latter escape process was measured separately by making the interfacial electron injection process instantaneous when the chromophore catechol was employed in place of the perylene compounds. The thus measured electron escape behavior was governed by the same time constants that have recently been predicted by Prezhdo and coworkers from time dependent DFT calculations [W.R. Duncan, W.M. Stier, O.V. Prezhdo, Ab initio nonadiabatic molecular dynamics of the ultrafast

  3. Bone cement improves suture anchor fixation.

    PubMed

    Giori, Nicholas J; Sohn, David H; Mirza, Faisal M; Lindsey, Derek P; Lee, Arthur T

    2006-10-01

    Suture anchor fixation failure can occur if the anchor pulls out of bone. We hypothesized that suture anchor fixation can be augmented with polymethylmethacrylate cement, and that polymethylmethacrylate can be used to improve fixation in a stripped anchor hole. Six matched cadaveric proximal humeri were used. On one side, suture anchors were placed and loaded to failure using a ramped cyclic loading protocol. The stripped anchor holes then were injected with approximately 1 cc polymethylmethacrylate, and anchors were replaced and tested again. In the contralateral humerus, polymethylmethacrylate was injected into anchor holes before anchor placement and testing. In unstripped anchors, polymethylmethacrylate increased the number of cycles to failure by 34% and failure load by 71% compared with anchors not augmented with polymethylmethacrylate. Polymethylmethacrylate haugmentation of stripped anchors increased the cycles to failure by 31% and failure load by 111% compared with unstripped uncemented anchors. No difference was found in cycles to failure or failure load between cemented stripped anchors and cemented unstripped anchors. Polymethylmethacrylate can be used to augment fixation, reducing the risk of anchor pull-out failure, regardless whether the suture anchor hole is stripped or unstripped. PMID:16702922

  4. Electroactive self-doped poly(amic acid) with oligoaniline and sulfonic acid groups: synthesis and electrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Chi, Maoqiang; Wang, Shutao; Liang, Yuan; Chao, Danming; Wang, Ce

    2014-06-01

    A novel poly(amic acid) with pendant aniline tetramer and sulfonic acid groups (ESPAA) was synthesized by ternary polymerization and characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectra, ((1))H NMR and gel permeation chromatography. The polymer showed good thermal stability and excellent solubility in the common organic solvents. The electrochemical properties were investigated carefully on a CHI 660A Electrochemical Workstation. The polymer displayed good electroactivity in acid, neutral and even in alkaline solutions (pH=1-10) due to the self-doping effect between aniline tetramer and sulfonic/carboxylic acid groups. It also exhibited satisfactory electrochromic performance with high contrast value, acceptable coloration efficiency and fast switching time in the range of pH=1-9. PMID:24703661

  5. Effect of secondary anchor amino acid substitutions on the immunogenic properties of an HLA-A*0201-restricted T cell epitope derived from the Trypanosoma cruzi KMP-11 protein.

    PubMed

    Lasso, Paola; Cárdenas, Constanza; Guzmán, Fanny; Rosas, Fernando; Thomas, María Carmen; López, Manuel Carlos; González, John Mario; Cuéllar, Adriana; Campanera, Josep Maria; Luque, F Javier; Puerta, Concepción Judith

    2016-04-01

    The TcTLE peptide (TLEEFSAKL) is a CD8(+) T cell HLA-A*0201-restricted epitope derived from the Trypanosoma cruzi KMP-11 protein that is efficiently processed, presented and recognized by CD8(+) T cells from chagasic patients. Since the immunogenic properties of wild-type epitopes may be enhanced by suitable substitutions in secondary anchor residues, we have studied the effect of introducing specific mutations at position 3, 6 and 7 of the TcTLE peptide. Mutations (E3L, S6V and A7F) were chosen on the basis of in silico predictions and in vitro assays were performed to determine the TcTLE-modified peptide binding capacity to the HLA-A*0201 molecule. In addition, the functional activity of peptide-specific CD8(+) T cells in HLA-A2(+) chagasic patients was also interrogated. In contrast to bioinformatics predictions, the TcTLE-modified peptide was found to have lower binding affinity and stability than the original peptide. Nevertheless, CD8(+) T cells from chronic chagasic patients recognized the TcTLE-modified peptide producing TNF-α and INF-γ and expressing CD107a/b, though in less extension than the response triggered by the original peptide. Overall, although the amino acids at positions 3, 6 and 7 of TcTLE are critical for the peptide affinity, they have a limited effect on the immunogenic properties of the TcTLE epitope. PMID:26854383

  6. Bi-anchoring organic sensitizers of type D-(π-A)2 comprising thiophene-2-acetonitrile as π-spacer and malonic acid as electron acceptor for dye sensitized solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Gachumale Saritha; Ramkumar, Sekar; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Anandan, Sambandam

    2015-06-01

    Two new bi-anchoring organic sensitizers of type D-(π-A)2 comprising the identical π-spacer (thiophene-2-acetonitrile) and electron acceptor (malonic acid) but different aryl amine as electron donors (diphenylamine and carbazole) were synthesized, characterized and fabricated metal free dye-sensitized solar cell devices. The intra molecular charge transfer property and electrochemical property of these dyes were investigated by molecular absorption, emission, cyclic voltammetric experiments and in addition, quantum chemical calculation studies were performed to provide sufficient driving force for the electron injection into the conduction band of TiO2 which leads to efficient charge collection. Among the fabricated devices, carbazole based device exhibits high current conversion efficiency (η = 4.7%) with a short circuit current density (JSC) 15.3 mA/cm2, an open circuit photo voltage (VOC) of 0.59 V and a fill factor of 0.44 under AM 1.5 illumination (85 mW/cm2) compared to diphenylamine based device.

  7. Bi-anchoring organic sensitizers of type D-(π-A)₂ comprising thiophene-2-acetonitrile as π-spacer and malonic acid as electron acceptor for dye sensitized solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Gachumale Saritha; Ramkumar, Sekar; Asiri, Abdullah M; Anandan, Sambandam

    2015-06-15

    Two new bi-anchoring organic sensitizers of type D-(π-A)2 comprising the identical π-spacer (thiophene-2-acetonitrile) and electron acceptor (malonic acid) but different aryl amine as electron donors (diphenylamine and carbazole) were synthesized, characterized and fabricated metal free dye-sensitized solar cell devices. The intra molecular charge transfer property and electrochemical property of these dyes were investigated by molecular absorption, emission, cyclic voltammetric experiments and in addition, quantum chemical calculation studies were performed to provide sufficient driving force for the electron injection into the conduction band of TiO2 which leads to efficient charge collection. Among the fabricated devices, carbazole based device exhibits high current conversion efficiency (η=4.7%) with a short circuit current density (JSC) 15.3 mA/cm(2), an open circuit photo voltage (VOC) of 0.59 V and a fill factor of 0.44 under AM 1.5 illumination (85 mW/cm(2)) compared to diphenylamine based device. PMID:25801442

  8. Functionalization of poly-SNS-anchored carboxylic acid with Lys and PAMAM: surface modifications for biomolecule immobilization/stabilization and bio-sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Sema; Emre, Fatma Bilge; Ekiz, Fulya; Oğuzkaya, Funda; Timur, Suna; Tanyeli, Cihangir; Toppare, Levent

    2012-09-21

    Poly(2-(2,5-di(thiophen-2-yl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl) (SNS) acetic acid) was electrochemically deposited on graphite electrodes and functionalized with lysine (Lys) amino acid and poly(amidoamine) derivatives (PAMAM G2 and PAMAM G4) to investigate their matrix properties for biosensor applications. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized onto the modified surface as the model enzyme. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to report the surface properties of the matrices in each step of the biosensor construction. The biosensors were characterized in terms of their operational and storage stabilities and the kinetic parameters (K(app)(m) and I(max)). Three new glucose biosensors revealed good stability, featuring low detection limits (19.0 μM, 3.47 μM and 2.93 μM for lysine-, PAMAM G2- and PAMAM G4-functionalized electrodes, respectively) and prolonged the shelf lives (4, 5, and 6 weeks for Lys-, PAMAM G2- and PAMAM G4-modified electrodes, respectively). The proposed biosensors were tested for glucose detection on real human blood serum samples. PMID:22832474

  9. Career Anchors and the Effects of Downsizing: Implications for Generations and Cultures at Work. A Preliminary Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Verena; Bonner, Dede

    2003-01-01

    The relationships among career anchors, age, culture, gender, employment experience, and the impact of career planning on downsizing were examined with data from 423 management students (49% had been downsized). Lifestyle was the most valued anchor across age groups, stability/security the least; compared with Schein's earlier anchors research,…

  10. Coracoclavicular stabilization using a suture anchor technique.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Darren J; Barron, O Alton; Catalano, Louis; Donahue, Joseph P; Zambetti, George

    2008-06-01

    Multiple fixation options exist for coracoclavicular stabilization, but many are technically demanding and require hardware removal. In the study reported here, we reviewed a specific fixation technique that includes suture anchors moored in the base of the coracoid process. We retrospectively reviewed 24 consecutive cases of patients who underwent coracoclavicular stabilization with a suture anchor for a type III or type V acromioclavicular (AC) joint separation or a group II, type II or type V distal clavicle fracture. Eighteen of the 22 patients had full strength and painless range of motion (ROM) in the affected extremity by 3 months and at final follow-up (minimum, 24 months; mean, 39 months). Two patients were lost to follow-up. Four patients had early complications likely secondary to documented noncompliance. Two of these 4 patients underwent reoperation with a similar procedure and remained asymptomatic at a minimum follow-up of 15 months. One patient underwent osteophyte and knot excision 7 months after surgery and remained asymptomatic at 30 months. Our results suggest that coracoclavicular stabilization using a suture anchor technique is a safe and reliable method of treating acromioclavicular joint separations and certain distal clavicle fractures in the compliant patient. PMID:18716693

  11. Glucosamine-Anchored Graphene Oxide Nanosheets: Fabrication, Ultraviolet Irradiation, and Electrochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Veerapandian, Murugan; Lévaray, Nicolas; Lee, Min-Ho; Giasson, Suzanne; Zhu, X X

    2015-07-15

    A biofunctionalized graphene oxide (GO) nanosheet with improved physicochemical properties is useful for electrocatalysis and sensor development. Herein, a new class of functionalized GO with a chemically anchored biomolecule glucosamine is developed. Structural and chemical analyses confirm the glucosamine anchoring. Ultraviolet irradiation transforms the surface chemistry of GO. Glucosamine-anchored GO nanosheets exhibit improved cyclic voltammetric and amperometric sensing activity toward the model redox probe, ruthenium(II) and N-acetylneuraminic acid, respectively. The biomolecular anchoring and ultraviolet irradiation helped to tune and enhance the properties of GO, which may find multiple applications in optimizing sensor platforms. PMID:26120929

  12. Effect of Amino Acids on Steady-State Growth of a Group A Hemolytic Streptococcus1

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Helen C.; Karush, Fred; Rudd, Joanne H.

    1965-01-01

    Davies, Helen C. (University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia), Fred Karush, and Joanne H. Rudd. Effect of amino acids on steady-state growth of a group A hemolytic streptococcus. J. Bacteriol. 89:421–427. 1965.—A study has been made of amino acid utilization by a strain of type 4, group A streptococcus growing under steady-state conditions in a continuous-culture device and supplied with a completely synthetic medium. At a fixed growth rate, corresponding to a generation of time of 84 min, and with the pH maintained constant at 7.4, the bacterial turbidity was made dependent on the concentration of one of the amino acids of the defined medium. Under these conditions, the extracellular concentration of the limiting amino acid is fixed by the preset growth rate. The steady-state concentration of each of 14 essential l-amino acids was measured by means of C14-labeled amino acids in such limited cultures. At approximately equal turbidities, these concentrations ranged from 1.6 × 10−6m for methionine to 4.3 × 10−4m for glutamic acid. The rates of utilization of the amino acids ranged from 26 mμmoles per mg (dry weight) of bacteria per hr for histidine to 310 mμmoles per mg (dry weight) of bacteria per hr for glutamic acid. The percentage of the limiting amino acid used varied from 95% for threonine and methionine to 43% for gluamic acid. The rate of utilization of the limiting amino acid at unit concentration (tmoles per gram per hour per m) differed by a factor of 27 between extremes. These observations reflect the variation in the capacity of this streptococcal cell to take up and use different amino acids. PMID:14255710

  13. Anchoring International sets new water depth record

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, H.J.

    1983-07-01

    Santa Barbara Channel has a history steeped in firsts in techniques for the production of offshore oil. Landscaped drilling and production islands, production piers, and directional drilling from land rigs to production under the channel, to name a few. The latest such project was handled by Anchoring International, Inc., a pipe line anchoring company headquartered in Houston, Texas. Contracted by Healy Tibbets Construction Company, prime contractor, Anchoring was commissioned to handle a new deep water record breaking anchoring job. The job was to anchor J-tube extensions in 820 feet of water--the deepest pipe line anchoring job ever undertaken. In most shallow water pipe line anchoring jobs, anchors and anchor installation unit placement over the pipe line is handled from a crane topside with visual assist from divers. However, due to the extreme depth of this project, the installation unit with anchors had to be modified for submersible operator-assisted placement capability. Anchoring International handled the anchor design and installation equipment, and submersible operator assistance was furnished by Oceaneering, International. WASP and JIM atmospheric diving systems were used. All ocean bottom activities were monitored topside with the JERED video-equipped remote controlled vehicle. Since the weight of the anchor sets and power installation unit are minimum, the entire operation was conducted from a small boat sufficient to carry dive equipment and the anchor installation unit power supply. A small pedestal crane was used to lower and retrieve the anchor installation unit.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of acid-base bifunctional materials through protection of amino groups

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yanqiu; Liu, Heng; Yu, Xiaofang; Guan, Jingqi; Kan, Qiubin

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acid-base bifunctional material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized through protection of amino groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} catalyst containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties. -- Abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, transmission electron micrographs (TEM), back titration, {sup 13}C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and {sup 29}Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR were employed to characterize the synthesized materials. The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation reaction between acetone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. Compared with monofunctional catalysts of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15 and SBA-15-NH{sub 2}, the bifunctional sample of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity for the aldol condensation.

  15. Growth of group IV mycobacteria on medium containing various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, H; Tomioka, H; Yoneyama, T

    1984-01-01

    Seventy-one strains of 15 species of rapidly growing mycobacteria were studied for their susceptibilities to fatty acids with 2 to 20 carbons by the agar dilution method at pH 7.0. Most mycobacteria other than potential pathogens (Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonei) were resistant to saturated fatty acids, except for lauric acid (C12:0) (MIC, 6.25 to 25 micrograms/ml) and capric acid (C10:0) (MIC, 50 to 100 micrograms#ml). M. fortuitum and M. chelonei were substantially insusceptible to these fatty acids. Unsaturated fatty acids with 16 to 20 carbons, except for C20:5, were highly toxic to group IV mycobacteria other than M. fortuitum, M. chelonei, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Mycobacterium phlei, these being highly resistant to all the unsaturated acids, except for C16:1, C18:3, and C20:5. Introduction of double bonds to C16 to C20 fatty acids caused a marked increase in their activities that depended on the increase in the number of double bonds, at least up to three or four. M. fortuitum and M. chelonei were more resistant to the unsaturated fatty acids (particularly to C20:3 and C20:4) than the other group IV mycobacteria. PMID:6486760

  16. Adsorption of amino acids and glucose by sediments of Resurrection Bay, Alaska, USA: Functional group effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrichs, Susan M.; Sugai, Susan F.

    1993-02-01

    The adsorption of amino acids and glucose was investigated in sediments from Resurrection Bay, Alaska. Adsorption of the basic amino acid lysine was greater than adsorption of glutamic acid, alanine, leucine, or glucose. Formaldehyde and heat treatments were used to separate adsorption from biological uptake, but can alter adsorption significantly; formaldehyde treatment, followed by a seawater rinse, was the most satisfactory. Much of the rapid amino acid adsorption by these sediments was due to the formation of ionic bonds, since adsorbed amino acids could be extracted using concentrated solutions of amino acid, cesium chloride, sodium citrate, ammonium chloride, or sodium acetate. However, most amino acid adsorption was not reversible by ion exchange solutions, indicating that additional processes or chemical reactions occur which result in irreversible binding to sediment. Consistent with literature reports of the negative surface charge of marine particulate matter, lysine (with a net positive charge) was adsorbed to the greatest extent and had the largest cation-exchangeable adsorption. However, negatively charged amino acid functional groups also influenced adsorption. Chemical modification of sediments with reagents reactive with aldehydes decreased lysine adsorption. This suggests that reactive functional groups of sediment organic matter contribute to adsorption, consistent with a melanoidintype reaction. An estimate of the rate of amino acid adsorption indicates that adsorption could produce a significant amount of the total refractory sediment organic nitrogen.

  17. Dihydrolipoic acid activates oligomycin-sensitive thiol groups and increases ATP synthesis in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, G; Mainka, L; Krüger, E

    1991-08-01

    Investigations with dihydrolipoic acid in rat heart mitochondria and mitoplasts reveal an activation of ATP-synthase up to 45%, whereas ATPase activities decrease by 36%. In parallel with an increase in ATP synthesis oligomycin-sensitive mitochondrial -SH groups are activated at 2-4 nmol dihydrolipoic acid/mg protein. ATPase activation by the uncouplers carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone and oleate is diminished by dihydrolipoic acid, and ATP synthesis depressed by oleate is partially restored. No such efficiency of dihydrolipoic acid is seen with palmitate-induced ATPase activation or decrease of ATP synthesis. This indicates different interference of oleate and palmitate with mitochondria. In addition to its known coenzymatic properties dihydrolipoic acid may act as a substitute for coenzyme A, thereby diminishing the uncoupling efficiency of oleate. Furthermore, dihydrolipoic acid is a very potent antioxidant, shifting the -SH-S-S- equilibrium in mitochondria to the reduced state and improving the energetic state of cells. PMID:1832845

  18. Solving nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement: examples from group II intron studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marcia, Marco Humphris-Narayanan, Elisabeth; Keating, Kevin S.; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-11-01

    Strategies for phasing nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement, using both experimental and de novo designed models, are discussed. Structured RNA molecules are key players in ensuring cellular viability. It is now emerging that, like proteins, the functions of many nucleic acids are dictated by their tertiary folds. At the same time, the number of known crystal structures of nucleic acids is also increasing rapidly. In this context, molecular replacement will become an increasingly useful technique for phasing nucleic acid crystallographic data in the near future. Here, strategies to select, create and refine molecular-replacement search models for nucleic acids are discussed. Using examples taken primarily from research on group II introns, it is shown that nucleic acids are amenable to different and potentially more flexible and sophisticated molecular-replacement searches than proteins. These observations specifically aim to encourage future crystallographic studies on the newly discovered repertoire of noncoding transcripts.

  19. Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with covalently-bound hexafluoroisopropanol groups

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Grate, Jay W.

    2010-06-01

    Fluorinated hydrogen-bond acidic groups are directly attached to the backbone of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) without the introduction of intermediate electron donating surface groups. Hexafluoroalcohol functional groups are exceptionally strong hydrogen bond acids, and are added to the nanotube surface using the aryl diazonium approach to create hydrogen-bond acidic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. These groups can promote strong hydrogen-bonding interactions with matrix materials in composites or with molecular species to be concentrated and sensed. In the latter case, this newly developed material is expected to find useful application in chemical sensors and in CNT-based preconcentrator devices for the detection of pesticides, chemical warfare agents and explosives.

  20. Alanylated lipoteichoic acid primer in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acid is a major lipid-anchored polymer in Gram-positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis. This polymer typically consists of repeating phosphate-containing units and therefore has a predominant negative charge. The repeating units are attached to a glycolipid anchor which has a diacylglycerol (DAG) moiety attached to a dihexopyranose head group. D-alanylation is known as the major modification of type I and type IV lipoteichoic acids, which partially neutralizes the polymer and plays important roles in bacterial survival and resistance to the host immune system. The biosynthesis pathways of the glycolipid anchor and lipoteichoic acid have been fully characterized. However, the exact mechanism of D-alanyl transfer from the cytosol to cell surface lipoteichoic acid remains unclear. Here I report the use of mass spectrometry in the identification of possible intermediate species in the biosynthesis and D-alanylation of lipoteichoic acid: the glycolipid anchor, nascent lipoteichoic acid primer with one phosphoglycerol unit, as well as mono- and di-alanylated forms of the lipoteichoic acid primer. Monitoring these species as well as the recently reported D-alanyl-phosphatidyl glycerol should aid in shedding light on the mechanism of the D-alanylation pathway of lipoteichoic acid. PMID:27134729

  1. Bone Anchored Hearing Aid

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in improving the hearing of people with conduction or mixed hearing loss. The Technology The (BAHA) is a bone conduction hearing device that includes a titanium fixture permanently implanted into the mastoid bone of the skull and an external percutaneous sound processor. The sound processor is attached to the fixture by means of a skin penetrating abutment. Because the device bypasses the middle ear and directly stimulates the cochlea, it has been recommended for individuals with conduction hearing loss or discharging middle ear infection. The titanium implant is expected to last a lifetime while the external sound processor is expected to last 5 years. The total initial device cost is approximately $5,300 and the external sound processor costs approximately $3,500. Review of BAHA by the Medical Advisory Secretariat The Medical Advisory Secretariat’s review is a descriptive synthesis of findings from 36 research articles published between January 1990 and May 2002. Summary of Findings No randomized controlled studies were found. The evidence was derived from level 4 case series with relative small sample sizes (ranging from 30-188). The majority of the studies have follow-up periods of eight years or longer. All except one study were based on monaural BAHA implant on the side with the best bone conduction threshold. Safety Level 4 evidence showed that BAHA has been be implanted safely in adults and children with success rates of 90% or higher in most studies. No mortality or life threatening morbidity has been reported. Revision rates for tissue reduction or resiting were generally under 10% for adults but have been reported to be as high as 25% in pediatric studies. Adverse skin reaction around the skin penetration site was the most common complication reported. Most of these

  2. Evaluation of functional groups on amino acids in cyclic tetrapeptides in histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Bhuiyan, Mohammed P I; Islam, Md Nurul; Nsiama, Tienabe Kipassa; Oishi, Naoto; Kato, Tamaki; Nishino, Norikazu; Ito, Akihiro; Yoshida, Minoru

    2012-06-01

    The naturally occurring cyclic tetrapeptide, chlamydocin, originally isolated from fungus Diheterospora chlamydosphoria, consists of α-aminoisobutyric acid, L-phenylalanine, D-proline and an unusual amino acid (S)-2-amino-8-((S)-oxiran-2-yl)-8-oxooctanoic acid (Aoe) and inhibits the histone deacetylases (HDACs), a class of regulatory enzymes. The epoxyketone moiety of Aoe is the key functional group for inhibition. The cyclic tetrapeptide scaffold is supposed to play important role for effective binding to the surface of enzymes. In place of the epoxyketone group, hydroxamic acid and sulfhydryl group have been applied to design inhibitor ligands to zinc atom in catalytic site of HDACs. In the research for more potent HDAC inhibitors, we replaced the epoxyketone moiety of Aoe with different functional groups and synthesized a series of chlamydocin analogs as HDAC inhibitors. Among the functional groups, methoxymethylketone moiety showed as potent inhibition as the hydroxamic acid. On the contrary, we confirmed that borate, trifruoromethylketone, and 2-aminoanilide are almost inactive in HDAC inhibition. PMID:21638021

  3. Microgravity Drill and Anchor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew A.; King, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    This work is a method to drill into a rock surface regardless of the gravitational field or orientation. The required weight-on-bit (WOB) is supplied by a self-contained anchoring mechanism. The system includes a rotary percussive coring drill, forming a complete sampling instrument usable by robot or human. This method of in situ sample acquisition using micro - spine anchoring technology enables several NASA mission concepts not currently possible with existing technology, including sampling from consolidated rock on asteroids, providing a bolt network for astronauts visiting a near-Earth asteroid, and sampling from the ceilings or vertical walls of lava tubes and cliff faces on Mars. One of the most fundamental parameters of drilling is the WOB; essentially, the load applied to the bit that allows it to cut, creating a reaction force normal to the surface. In every drilling application, there is a minimum WOB that must be maintained for the system to function properly. In microgravity (asteroids and comets), even a small WOB could not be supported conventionally by the weight of the robot or astronaut. An anchoring mechanism would be needed to resist the reactions, or the robot or astronaut would push themselves off the surface and into space. The ability of the system to anchor itself to a surface creates potential applications that reach beyond use in low gravity. The use of these anchoring mechanisms as end effectors on climbing robots has the potential of vastly expanding the scope of what is considered accessible terrain. Further, because the drill is supported by its own anchor rather than by a robotic arm, the workspace is not constrained by the reach of such an arm. Yet, if the drill is on a robotic arm, it has the benefit of not reflecting the forces of drilling back to the arm s joints. Combining the drill with the anchoring feet will create a highly mobile, highly stable, and highly reliable system. The drilling system s anchor uses hundreds of

  4. Permanent ground anchors: Nicholson design criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. J.; Uranowski, D. D.; Wycliffe-Jones, P. T.

    1982-09-01

    The methods used by Nicholson Construction Company in the design of permanent ground anchors specifically as related to retaining walls are discussed. Basic soil parameters, design concepts, drilling and grouting methods for ground anchors are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on anchors founded in soil rather than rock formations. Also, soil properties necessary for the proper design of anchored retaining walls are detailed. The second chapter of the report is devoted to a general discussion of retaining wall and anchor design. In addition, a design example of an anchored retaining wall is presented in a step by step manner.

  5. Synthesis and Monolayer Behaviors of Novel Hybrid Corynomycolic Acids Containing Semifluoroalkyl Groups.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Tokuzo; Tamaki, Kazuki; Oida, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, novel hybrid-type corynomycolic acids [hybrid-OH and hybrid-COOH, with semifluoroalkyl groups (Rf-(CH2)n-: Rf = C4F9, n = 6 and Rf = C6F13, n = 3) located on the carbon atoms attached to the hydroxyl and carboxylic acid groups (C-OH and C-COOH), respectively] were successfully synthesized. The behaviors and formation of hybrid corynomycolic acid monolayers at the air-water interface were investigated by surface tension and surface pressure-area (π-A) measurements to clarify the effects of the Rf chain length, position of the semifluoroalkyl group, and surfactant molecule stereochemistry. Compared to dialkyl corynomycolic acid, both the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the surface tension at the CMC (γCMC) of hybrid corynomycolic acids were reduced by the presence of the Rf group. With respect to the surface tension versus log concentration (γ vs. log C) isotherms, all syn-isomers of the hybrid-OH and hybrid-COOH acids showed two break points, while the anti-isomers showed only one break point. These different isotherms can be explained in terms of the steric repulsion between the two hydrophilic groups (OH and COO(-)), which depend on the stereochemistry of the surfactant. No effect of the location of the semifluoroalkyl group was observed. With respect to the formation of a monolayer film, four parameters-the lift-off area (AL), zero-pressure molecular area (A0), maximum of the Gibbs elastic modulus [EG (max)], and monolayer collapse pressure (πc)-were measured. Both AL and A0 of all hybrid corynomycolic acids were larger than the corresponding dialkyl acids due to the bulky and rigid Rf groups. Interestingly, syn- and anti-hybrids had almost identical isotherms on compression, although the values of πc of anti-hybrids were higher than those of syn-isomers. In addition, the values of EG (max) of hybrid-COOHs were slightly larger than those of the corresponding hybrid-OHs. Using the nascent soap method (agent-in-oil method), we found that

  6. Selective protection and relative importance of the carboxylic acid groups of zaragozic acid A for squalene synthase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Biftu, T; Acton, J J; Berger, G D; Bergstrom, J D; Dufresne, C; Kurtz, M M; Marquis, R W; Parsons, W H; Rew, D R; Wilson, K E

    1994-02-01

    Chemistry that allows selective modification of the carboxylic acid groups of the squalene synthase inhibitor zaragozic acid A (1) was developed and applied to the synthesis of compounds modified at the 3-,4-,5-,3,4-,3,5-, and 4,5-positions. A key step in this procedure is the selective debenzylation by transfer hydrogenolysis in the presence of other olefinic groups. These compounds were tested in the rat squalene synthase assay and in vivo mouse model. Modification at C3 retains significant enzyme potency and enhances oral activity, indicating that C3 is not essential for squalene synthase activity. Modification at C4 and C5 results in significant loss in enzyme activity. In contrast, substitution at C3 or C4 enhances in vivo activity. Furthermore, disubstitution at the C3 and C4 positions results in additive in vivo potency. PMID:8308869

  7. Potentiation of acid-sensing ion channel activity by peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiong; Wu, Jing; Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan-Kun; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate activates peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and contributes to inflammatory pain. However, it is still not clear the mechanisms are involved in group I mGluR-mediated peripheral sensitization. Herein, we report that group I mGluRs signaling sensitizes acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and contributes to acidosis-evoked pain. DHPG, a selective group I mGluR agonist, can potentiate the functional activity of ASICs, which mediated the proton-induced events. DHPG concentration-dependently increased proton-gated currents in DRG neurons. It shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 47.3±7.0% increase of the maximal current response to proton. Group I mGluRs, especially mGluR5, mediated the potentiation of DHPG via an intracellular cascade. DHPG potentiation of proton-gated currents disappeared after inhibition of intracellular Gq/11 proteins, PLCβ, PKC or PICK1 signaling. Moreover, DHPG enhanced proton-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and increased the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripherally administration of DHPG dose-dependently exacerbated nociceptive responses to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Potentiation of ASIC activity by group I mGluR signaling in rat DRG neurons revealed a novel peripheral mechanism underlying group I mGluRs involvement in hyperalgesia. PMID:26946972

  8. Sustained load performance of adhesive anchor systems in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Todd Marshall

    Stemming from a tragic failure of an adhesive anchor system, this research project investigated the sustained load performance of adhesive anchors in concrete under different installation and in-service conditions. The literature review investigated the current state of art of adhesive anchors. Extensive discussion was devoted to the behavior of adhesive anchors in concrete as well as the many factors that can affect their short-term and sustained load strength. Existing standards and specifications for the testing, design, construction, and inspection of adhesive anchors were covered. Based on the results of the literature review and the experience of the research group, a triage was conducted on many parameters identified as possibly affecting the sustained load performance of adhesive anchors and the highest priority parameters were investigated in this project. A stress versus time-to-failure approach was used to evaluate sensitivity of three ICC-ES AC 308 approved adhesive anchor systems. Of the various parameters investigated, only elevated in-service temperature and manufacturer's cure time was shown to exhibit adverse effects on sustained loads more than that predicted by short-term tests of fully cured adhesive over a reasonable structure lifetime of 75 years. In a related study, various tests were conducted on the adhesive alone (time-temperature superposition, time-stress superposition, and dogbone tensile tests). The results of that study were used to investigate the existence of a correlation with long-term anchor pullout testing in concrete. No consistent correlations were detected for the adhesives in the study. Tests were also conducted on the effect of early-age concrete on adhesive anchor bond strength. On the basis of confined test bond-strength alone, adhesive A (vinyl ester) did not show any significant increase after 14 days (102% of 28 day strength at 14 days), and adhesive B and C (epoxies) did not show any significant increase after 7 days

  9. Characterization of the C-terminal ER membrane anchor of PTP1B

    SciTech Connect

    Anderie, Ines Schulz, Irene; Schmid, Andreas

    2007-09-10

    The tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is an important regulator of cell function. In living cells PTP1B activity is restricted to the vicinity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by post-translational C-terminal attachment of PTP1B to the ER membrane network. In our study we investigated the membrane anchor of PTP1B by use of EGFP fusion proteins. We demonstrate that the membrane anchor of PTP1B cannot be narrowed down to a unique amino acid sequence with a defined start and stop point but rather is moveable within several amino acids. Removal of up to seven amino acids from the C-terminus, as well as exchange of single amino acids in the putative transmembrane sequence did not influence subcellular localization of PTP1B. With the method of bimolecular fluorescence complementation we could demonstrate dimerization of PTP1B in vivo. Homodimerization was, in contrast to other tail-anchored proteins, not dependent on the membrane anchor. Our data demonstrate that the C-terminal membrane anchor of PTP1B is formed by a combination of a single stretch transmembrane domain (TMD) followed by a tail. TMD and tail length are variable and there are no sequence-specific features. Our data for PTP1B are consistent with a concept that explains the ER membrane anchor of tail-anchored proteins as a physicochemical structure.

  10. Proton transport pathways in an acid-base complex consisting of a phosphonic acid group and a 1,2,3-triazolyl group.

    PubMed

    Yue, Baohua; Yan, Liuming; Han, Shuaiyuan; Xie, Liqing

    2013-07-01

    The proton transport pathways in an acid-base complex consisting of a phosphonic acid group and a 1,2,3-triazolyl group were studied using density functional theory (DFT) calculations in terms of stable configurations and transition states of the molecular or ionic dimers and trimers and verified by proof-of-concept experiments including experimental measurements of overall conductivity and (1)H NMR and FTIR spectroscopy of the methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and 1,2,3-triazole (Tri) complex as well as overall proton conductivity of polymeric blend of poly(vinylphosphonic acid) (PVPA) and poly(4-vinyl-1H-1,2,3-triazole) (PVTri). From the DFT calculations of dimers and trimers composed of ethylphosphonic acid (EPA), Tri, and their deprotonated counterparts, it was concluded that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds of the transition states corresponding to proton transport are much shorter than those of stable configurations, but the O-H and N-H bonds are much longer than those of stable configurations. The tautomerization activation energy decreases from 0.927-1.176 eV in Tri-Tri dimers to 0.336-0.444 eV in the EPA-Tri dimers. From the proof-of-concept experiments, about a 50 fold increase in overall conductivity was observed in the MPA-Tri complex consisting of 10% (molar ratio) MPA compared to pure Tri, and the calculated activation energy is consistent with the experimental activation energy evaluated from temperature dependence of proton conductivity of pure Tri and the MPA-Tri complex. In addition, the fast proton exchange between MPA and Tri, consistent with the DFT calculations, was verified by (1)H NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. Finally, a polymeric blend of PVPA and PVTri was prepared, and its proton conductivity at about 2.1 mS·cm(-1) in anhydrous state at 100 °C was observed to be significantly higher than that of PVPA or of poly(VPA-co-1-vinyl-1,2,4-triazole). The proton conductivity of the polymeric PVPA and PVTri blend in humidity state is in the same range as

  11. Fatty acid composition of breast milk from three racial groups from Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kneebone, G M; Kneebone, R; Gibson, R A

    1985-04-01

    The fatty acid composition of samples of breast milk obtained from 51 mothers (26 Malay, 15 Chinese, 10 Indian) residing in Penang, Malaysia was determined by gas chromatography. Despite living in close physical proximity the mothers from the three racial groups showed distinct cultural differences in dietary intake. These differences were reflected in differences in the fatty acid composition of breast milk samples. The milk of Chinese mothers was generally less saturated (41%) than that of Malay and Indian mothers (52 and 50% respectively). The milk of Chinese mothers was also richer in linoleic acid (17%) than that of Malay and Indian mothers (9% and 11% respectively). Overall the level of individual fatty acids fell within the range of values reported for Western mothers on well nourished diets and pointed to breast milk of high standard despite large variations in the diet of Malaysian mothers. PMID:3984928

  12. Quantifying Functional Group Interactions that Determine Urea Effects on Nucleic Acid Helix Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, Emily J.; Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Cha, Hyo Keun; McDevitt, Joseph L.; Merker, Wolf E.; Ritzer, Ryan; Muth, Gregory W.; Engelsgjerd, Samuel W.; Mangold, Kathryn E.; Thompson, Perry J.; Kerins, Michael J.; Record, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Urea destabilizes helical and folded conformations of nucleic acids and proteins, as well as protein-nucleic acid complexes. To understand these effects, extend previous characterizations of interactions of urea with protein functional groups, and thereby develop urea as a probe of conformational changes in protein and nucleic acid processes, we obtain chemical potential derivatives (μ23 = dμ2/dm3) quantifying interactions of urea (component 3) with nucleic acid bases, base analogs, nucleosides and nucleotide monophosphates (component 2) using osmometry and hexanol-water distribution assays. Dissection of these μ23 yields interaction potentials quantifying interactions of urea with unit surface areas of nucleic acid functional groups (heterocyclic aromatic ring, ring methyl, carbonyl and phosphate O, amino N, sugar (C,O)); urea interacts favorably with all these groups, relative to interactions with water. Interactions of urea with heterocyclic aromatic rings and attached methyl groups (as on thymine) are particularly favorable, as previously observed for urea-homocyclic aromatic ring interactions. Urea m-values determined for double helix formation by DNA dodecamers near 25°C are in the range 0.72 to 0.85 kcal mol−1 m−1 and exhibit little systematic dependence on nucleobase composition (17–42% GC). Interpretation of these results using the urea interaction potentials indicates that extensive (60–90%) stacking of nucleobases in the separated strands in the transition region is required to explain the m-value. Results for RNA and DNA dodecamers obtained at higher temperatures, and literature data, are consistent with this conclusion. This demonstrates the utility of urea as a quantitative probe of changes in surface area (ΔASA) in nucleic acid processes. PMID:23510511

  13. The geochemical model of neutral and acidic thermal water in the Tatun Volcano Group, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Y.; Kuo, C.; Liu, C.

    2013-12-01

    The geochemical model can provide a quantitative method for water-rock interaction and understand the processes of neutralization of initially acidic water. The Tatun Volcano Group (TVG) is one of the Quaternary volcanoes of northern Taiwan. In the Southern Sulfur River of the TVG, it has neutral and acidic thermal water that can provide good materials for modeling the flow path of acidic and neutral thermal water. This study collects 7 thermal springs and identifies into two types, which are neutral and acidic thermal water. The host rock of neutral thermal water has fresh andesitic rock and is weak fumaroles, and the field observations of acidic thermal waters have been alternated andesitic rock and strong degassing fumaroles. The Geochemist's Workbench software (GWB) can model the processes of neutralization of initially acidic water. Furthermore, this study will collect the meteoric water, thermal springs, and country rock along the Southern Sulfur River and use the GWB software to model the processes of neutralization of initially acidic water in the Southern Sulfur River in the future.

  14. Structure-Dependent Anchoring of Organic Molecules to Atomically Defined Oxide Surfaces: Phthalic Acid on Co3 O4 (111), CoO(100), and CoO(111).

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Schwarz, Matthias; Werner, Kristin; Mohr, Susanne; Amende, Max; Libuda, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    We have performed a model study to explore the influence of surface structure on the anchoring of organic molecules on oxide materials. Specifically, we have investigated the adsorption of phthalic acid (PA) on three different, well-ordered, and atomically defined cobalt oxide surfaces, namely 1) Co3 O4 (111), 2) CoO(111), and 3) CoO(100) on Ir(100). PA was deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The formation of the PA films and interfacial reactions were monitored in situ during growth by isothermal time-resolved IR reflection absorption spectroscopy (TR-IRAS) under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. We observed a pronounced structure dependence on the three surfaces with three distinctively different binding geometries and characteristic differences depending on the temperature and coverage. 1) PA initially binds to Co3 O4 (111) through the formation of a chelating bis-carboxylate with the molecular plane oriented perpendicularly to the surface. Similar species were observed both at low temperature (130 K) and at room temperature (300 K). With increasing exposure, chelating mono-carboxylates became more abundant and partially replaced the bis-carboxylate. 2) PA binds to CoO(100) in the form of a bridging bis-carboxylate for low coverage. Upon prolonged deposition of PA at low temperature, the bis-carboxylates were converted into mono-carboxylate species. In contrast, the bis-carboxylate layer was very stable at 300 K. 3) For CoO(111) we observed a temperature-dependent change in the adsorption mechanism. Although PA binds as a mono-carboxylate in a bridging bidentate fashion at low temperature (130 K), a strongly distorted bis-carboxylate was formed at 300 K, possibly as a result of temperature-dependent restructuring of the surface. The results show that the adsorption geometry of PA depends on the atomic structure of the oxide surface. The structure dependence can be rationalized by the different arrangements of cobalt ions at the

  15. Development of Acid Functional Groups and Lactones During the Thermal Degradation of Wood and Wood Components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutherford, David W.; Wershaw, Robert L.; Reeves, James B., III

    2008-01-01

    Black carbon (pyrogenic materials including chars) in soils has been recognized as a substantial portion of soil organic matter, and has been shown to play a vital role in nutrient cycling; however, little is known concerning the properties of this material. Previous studies have largely been concerned with the creation of high-surface-area materials for use as sorbents. These materials have been manufactured at high temperature and have often been activated. Chars occurring in the environment can be formed over a wide range of temperature. Because it is extremely difficult to isolate black carbon once it has been incorporated in soils, chars produced in the laboratory under controlled conditions can be used to investigate the range of properties possible for natural chars. This report shows that charring conditions (temperature and time) have substantial impact on the acid functional group and lactone content of chars. Low temperatures (250?C) and long charring times (greater than 72 hours) produce chars with the highest acid functional group and lactone content. The charring of cellulose appears to be responsible for the creation of the acid functional group and lactones. The significance of this study is that low-temperature chars can have acid functional group contents comparable to humic materials (as high as 8.8 milliequivalents per gram). Acid functional group and lactone content decreases as charring temperature increases. The variation in formation conditions expected under natural fire conditions will result in a wide range of sorption properties for natural chars which are an important component of soil organic matter. By controlling the temperature and duration of charring, it is possible to tailor the sorption properties of chars, which may be used as soil amendments.

  16. Association of elevated levels of cellular lipoteichoic acids of group B streptococci with human neonatal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Nealon, T J; Mattingly, S J

    1983-01-01

    Cell-associated lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) from late-exponential-phase cultures (serotypes Ia, Ib, Ic, II, and III) of group B streptococci isolated from infected and asymptomatically colonized infants were quantitated and characterized by growing the organisms in a chemically defined medium containing [3H]glycerol and [14C]acetate. Cell pellets were extracted with 45% aqueous phenol and chloroform-methanol and subjected to DEAE-Sephacel anion-exchange chromatography. Elution profiles resolved three major peaks, I, II, and III, with glycerol and phosphate present in a 1:1 molar ratio in each peak, and results obtained by Ouchterlony immunodiffusion analysis confirmed the presence of poly(glycerol phosphate). Saponification indicated that [14C]acetate was incorporated into fatty acids of peaks I and II only, suggesting that these were cell-associated LTAs. Peak II was of small molecular weight (less than 10,000) and probably represented another species of LTA. Peaks I and II were further demonstrated to be LTA by their ability to sensitize human type O erythrocytes. Peak III lacked fatty acids and was shown to probably be deacylated LTA. Quantitation of cell-associated teichoic acid material produced by the group B streptococcal strains indicated that the clinical isolates from infants with early- or late-onset disease possessed significantly higher levels than did the asymptomatic (clinical isolates from infants without symptoms of disease) group B streptococcal strains. Images PMID:6341233

  17. Cell wall anchor structure of BcpA pili in Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Budzik, Jonathan M; Oh, So-Young; Schneewind, Olaf

    2008-12-26

    Assembly of pili in Gram-positive bacteria and their attachment to the cell wall envelope are mediated by sortases. In Bacillus cereus and its close relative Bacillus anthracis, the major pilin protein BcpA is cleaved between the threonine and the glycine of its C-terminal LPXTG motif sorting signal by the pilin-specific sortase D. The resulting acyl enzyme intermediate is relieved by the nucleophilic attack of the side-chain amino group of lysine within the YPKN motif of another BcpA subunit. Cell wall anchoring of assembled BcpA pili requires sortase A, which also cleaves the LPXTG sorting signal of BcpA between its threonine and glycine residues. We show here that sortases A and D require only the C-terminal sorting signal of BcpA for substrate cleavage. Unlike sortase D, which accepts the YPKN motif as a nucleophile, sortase A forms an amide bond between the BcpA C-terminal carboxyl group of threonine and the side-chain amino group of diaminopimelic acid within the cell wall peptidoglycan of bacilli. These results represent the first demonstration of a cell wall anchor structure for pili, which are deposited by sortase A into the envelope of many different microbes. PMID:18940793

  18. Anchoring in Numeric Judgments of Visual Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Langeborg, Linda; Eriksson, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates effects of anchoring in age estimation and estimation of quantities, two tasks which to different extents are based on visual stimuli. The results are compared to anchoring in answers to classic general knowledge questions that rely on semantic knowledge. Cognitive load was manipulated to explore possible differences between domains. Effects of source credibility, manipulated by differing instructions regarding the selection of anchor values (no information regarding anchor selection, information that the anchors are randomly generated or information that the anchors are answers from an expert) on anchoring were also investigated. Effects of anchoring were large for all types of judgments but were not affected by cognitive load or by source credibility in either one of the researched domains. A main effect of cognitive load on quantity estimations and main effects of source credibility in the two visually based domains indicate that the manipulations were efficient. Implications for theoretical explanations of anchoring are discussed. In particular, because anchoring did not interact with cognitive load, the results imply that the process behind anchoring in visual tasks is predominantly automatic and unconscious. PMID:26941684

  19. Anchoring in Numeric Judgments of Visual Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Langeborg, Linda; Eriksson, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates effects of anchoring in age estimation and estimation of quantities, two tasks which to different extents are based on visual stimuli. The results are compared to anchoring in answers to classic general knowledge questions that rely on semantic knowledge. Cognitive load was manipulated to explore possible differences between domains. Effects of source credibility, manipulated by differing instructions regarding the selection of anchor values (no information regarding anchor selection, information that the anchors are randomly generated or information that the anchors are answers from an expert) on anchoring were also investigated. Effects of anchoring were large for all types of judgments but were not affected by cognitive load or by source credibility in either one of the researched domains. A main effect of cognitive load on quantity estimations and main effects of source credibility in the two visually based domains indicate that the manipulations were efficient. Implications for theoretical explanations of anchoring are discussed. In particular, because anchoring did not interact with cognitive load, the results imply that the process behind anchoring in visual tasks is predominantly automatic and unconscious. PMID:26941684

  20. Anchor for Fiberglas Guy Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Solution to problem of anchoring fiberglas guy rods to install nut with threads on outer circumference, followed by aluminum sleeve. Sleeve has opening oval at upper and round at bottom end. End of rod is split so fiberglas wedge can be inserted to form V-shaped end. Spread end of rod fits into tapered hole in sleeve and threaded aluminum coupling is put over rod and sleeve.

  1. Independent control of polar and azimuthal anchoring.

    PubMed

    Anquetil-Deck, C; Cleaver, D J; Bramble, J P; Atherton, T J

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulation, experiment, and continuum theory are used to examine the anchoring exhibited by a nematic liquid crystal at a patterned substrate comprising a periodic array of rectangles that, respectively, promote vertical and planar alignment. It is shown that the easy axis and effective anchoring energy promoted by such surfaces can be readily controlled by adjusting the design of the pattern. The calculations reveal rich behavior: for strong anchoring, as exhibited by the simulated system, for rectangle ratios ≥2 the nematic aligns in the direction of the long edge of the rectangles, the azimuthal anchoring coefficient changing with pattern shape. In weak anchoring scenarios, however, including our experimental systems, preferential anchoring is degenerate between the two rectangle diagonals. Bistability between diagonally aligned and edge-aligned arrangement is predicted for intermediate combinations of anchoring coefficient and system length scale. PMID:23944468

  2. Main Group Lewis Acid-Mediated Transformations of Transition-Metal Hydride Complexes.

    PubMed

    Maity, Ayan; Teets, Thomas S

    2016-08-10

    This Review highlights stoichiometric reactions and elementary steps of catalytic reactions involving cooperative participation of transition-metal hydrides and main group Lewis acids. Included are reactions where the transition-metal hydride acts as a reactant as well as transformations that form the metal hydride as a product. This Review is divided by reaction type, illustrating the diverse roles that Lewis acids can play in mediating transformations involving transition-metal hydrides as either reactants or products. We begin with a discussion of reactions where metal hydrides form direct adducts with Lewis acids, elaborating the structure and dynamics of the products of these reactions. The bulk of this Review focuses on reactions where the transition metal and Lewis acid act in cooperation, and includes sections on carbonyl reduction, H2 activation, and hydride elimination reactions, all of which can be promoted by Lewis acids. Also included is a section on Lewis acid-base secondary coordination sphere interactions, which can influence the reactivity of hydrides. Work from the past 50 years is included, but the majority of this Review focuses on research from the past decade, with the intent of showcasing the rapid emergence of this field and the potential for further development into the future. PMID:27164024

  3. The Ponto bone-anchored hearing system.

    PubMed

    Westerkull, Patrik

    2011-01-01

    Based on a foundation of a well-documented Brånemark implant experience and the most advanced sound processing technology from Oticon, Oticon Medical introduced in 2009 a new bone-anchored hearing system, the Ponto system. Although the principle of percutaneous direct bone conduction is established, new technology aiming at improving speech perception and sound comfort in noisy environments is introduced with the new Ponto system. This has been possible by using the sound-processing platform from the most advanced conventional hearing aids from Oticon. Furthermore, specific steps have been taken aiming at improving the implant as well as the skin-penetrating abutment. The Ponto sound processor coupling has been developed to withstand long-term wear and tear. With the Ponto system, a new alternative is offered to the various groups of both new and existing users of bone-anchored hearing systems. In clinical studies of the Ponto Pro sound processor, the objective testing verified the high performance of the adaptive directionality system. The subjective questionnaires on speech perception and device handling also verified that the Ponto system offers efficient hearing rehabilitation as well as other user benefits. The Ponto system also includes possibilities to fit the sound processor 2 weeks after surgery. Referred clinical studies with the Ponto system have, however, not yet been published in the literature (autumn 2010).Clinical results have this far been presented at scientific conferences. PMID:21389702

  4. Electrostatically anchored branched brush layers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Dedinaite, Andra; Rutland, Mark; Thormann, Esben; Visnevskij, Ceslav; Makuska, Ricardas; Claesson, Per M

    2012-11-01

    A novel type of block copolymer has been synthesized. It consists of a linear cationic block and an uncharged bottle-brush block. The nonionic bottle-brush block contains 45 units long poly(ethylene oxide) side chains. This polymer was synthesized with the intention of creating branched brush layers firmly physisorbed to negatively charged surfaces via the cationic block, mimicking the architecture (but not the chemistry) of bottle-brush molecules suggested to be present on the cartilage surface, and contributing to the efficient lubrication of synovial joints. The adsorption properties of the diblock copolymer as well as of the two blocks separately were studied on silica surfaces using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and optical reflectometry. The adsorption kinetics data highlight that the diblock copolymers initially adsorb preferentially parallel to the surface with both the cationic block and the uncharged bottle-brush block in contact with the surface. However, as the adsorption proceeds, a structural change occurs within the layer, and the PEO bottle-brush block extends toward solution, forming a surface-anchored branched brush layer. As the adsorption plateau is reached, the diblock copolymer layer is 46-48 nm thick, and the water content in the layer is above 90 wt %. The combination of strong electrostatic anchoring and highly hydrated branched brush structures provide strong steric repulsion, low friction forces, and high load bearing capacity. The strong electrostatic anchoring also provides high stability of preadsorbed layers under different ionic strength conditions. PMID:23046176

  5. Theoretical predictions and experimental observations of genomic mapping by anchoring random clones

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, A.V. )

    1993-02-01

    Genome mapping by anchoring random clones has recently been the subject of intensive theoretical study. In this paper, differences between published predictions of properties of anchored groups of clones ( contigs') are analyzed and simplifications of the mathematical formulae describing these properties are presented. The theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results from the physical mapping of the genome of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Information about the number of genome sections with no anchored clone on them ( oceans') and the number of undetected overlaps between the contigs at a given stage of the experiment is required for the decision to change from the random strategy to that of a directed closure of gaps. We demonstrate that the expected number of oceans can be approximated by the number of groups of clones anchored by a single probe ( singletons'), as can the expected number of undetected overlaps between contigs by the number of contigs containing more than one anchor. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Boronic Acid Group: A Cumbersome False Negative Case in the Process of Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Katsamakas, Sotirios; Papadopoulos, Anastasios G; Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present, an exhaustive docking analysis considering the case of autotaxin (ATX). HA155, a small molecule inhibitor of ATX, is co-crystallized. In order to further extract conclusions on the nature of the bond formed between the ligands and the amino acid residues of the active site, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were undertaken. However, docking does not provide reproducible results when screening boronic acid derivatives and their binding orientations to protein drug targets. Based on natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations, the formed bond between Ser/Thr residues is characterized more accurately as a polar covalent bond instead of a simple nonpolar covalent one. The presented results are acceptable and could be used in screening as an active negative filter for boron compounds. The hydroxyl groups of amino acids are bonded with the inhibitor's boron atom, converting its hybridization to sp³. PMID:27617984

  7. Group A Streptococci Bind to Mucin and Human Pharyngeal Cells through Sialic Acid-Containing Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Patricia A.; Pancholi, Vijaykumar; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2001-01-01

    The first step in the colonization of group A streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes) is adherence to pharyngeal epithelial cells. Prior to adherence to their target tissue, the first barrier that the streptococci encounter is the mucous layer of the respiratory tract. The present study was undertaken to characterize the interaction between mucin, the major glycoprotein component of mucus, and streptococci. We report here that S. pyogenes is able to bind to bovine submaxillary mucin in solid-phase microtiter plate assays. Western blots probed with 125I-labeled mucin and a panel of monoclonal antibodies revealed that the streptococcal M protein is one of two cell wall-associated proteins responsible for this binding. The binding was further localized to the N-terminal portion of the M molecule. Further analysis revealed that the M protein binds to the sialic acid moieties on mucin, and this interaction seems to be based on M-protein conformation rather than specific amino acid sequences. We found that sialic acid also plays a critical role in the adherence of an M6 streptococcal strain to the Detroit 562 human pharyngeal cell line and have identified α2-6-linked sialic acid as an important sialylated linkage for M-protein recognition. Western blot analysis of extracted pharyngeal cell membrane proteins identified three potential sialic acid-containing receptors for the M protein. The results are the first to show that sialic acid not only is involved in the binding of the streptococci to mucin but also plays an important role in adherence of group A streptococci to the pharyngeal cell surface. PMID:11705914

  8. H-binding groups in lignite vs. soil humic acids: NICA-Donnan and spectroscopic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Drosos, M.; Jerzykiewicz, M.; Deligiannakis, Y.

    2009-04-15

    A comparative study has been carried out for two sets of humic acids isolated from lignites and soils. H-binding data were analyzed using the NICA-Donnan model, for three Greek lignite humic acids (HA) plus IHSS Leonardite reference HA, and five Greek soil HAs plus a commercial peat HA. {sup 13}C-CP-MAS NMR and H-binding data provide quantitative estimates for functional groups, showing that lignite HAs of diverse origin have strikingly homogeneous properties, while the H-binding structural units of soil HAs are characterized by a large degree of variability. Consistent differences between soil HA vs. lignite HA are revealed at the level of functional groups' concentrations. In the pH range 4 to 10, soil HA showed a charge variation < 3 (equiv kg{sup -1}) while lignite HAs showed a higher charge variation > 3.5 (equiv kg{sup -1}).

  9. Measuring the concentration of carboxylic acid groups in torrefied spruce wood.

    PubMed

    Khazraie Shoulaifar, Tooran; Demartini, Nikolai; Ivaska, Ari; Fardim, Pedro; Hupa, Mikko

    2012-11-01

    Torrefaction is moderate thermal treatment (∼200-300°C) to improve the energy density, handling and storage properties of biomass fuels. In biomass, carboxylic sites are partially responsible for its hygroscopic. These sites are degraded to varying extents during torrefaction. In this paper, we apply methylene blue sorption and potentiometric titration to measure the concentration of carboxylic acid groups in spruce wood torrefied for 30min at temperatures between 180 and 300°C. The results from both methods were applicable and the values agreed well. A decrease in the equilibrium moisture content at different humidity was also measured for the torrefied wood samples, which is in good agreement with the decrease in carboxylic acid sites. Thus both methods offer a means of directly measuring the decomposition of carboxylic groups in biomass during torrefaction as a valuable parameter in evaluating the extent of torrefaction which provides new information to the chemical changes occurring during torrefaction. PMID:22940339

  10. H-binding groups in lignite vs. soil humic acids: NICA-Donnan and spectroscopic parameters.

    PubMed

    Drosos, Marios; Jerzykiewicz, Maria; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2009-04-01

    A comparative study has been carried out for two sets of humic acids isolated from lignites and soils. H-binding data were analyzed using the NICA-Donnan model, for three Greek lignite humic acids (HA) plus IHSS Leonardite reference HA, and five Greek soil HAs plus a commercial peat HA. (13)C-CP-MAS NMR and H-binding data provide quantitative estimates for functional groups, showing that lignite HAs of diverse origin have strikingly homogeneous properties, while the H-binding structural units of soil HAs are characterized by a large degree of variability. Consistent differences between soil HA vs. lignite HA are revealed at the level of functional groups' concentrations. In the pH range 4 to 10, soil HA showed a charge variation <3 [equiv kg(-1)] while lignite HAs showed a higher charge variation >3.5 [equiv kg(-1)]. PMID:19144349

  11. Removal of transition metals from dilute aqueous solution by carboxylic acid group containing absorbent polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new carboxylic acid group containing resin with cation exchange capacity, 12.67 meq/g has been used to remove Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ ions from dilute aqueous solution. The resin has Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ removal capacity, 216 mg/g, 154 mg/g and 180 mg/g, respectively. The selectivity of the resin to ...

  12. Does Linking Mixed-Format Tests Using a Multiple-Choice Anchor Produce Comparable Results for Male and Female Subgroups? Research Report. ETS RR-11-44

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sooyeon; Walker, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the use of subpopulation invariance indices to evaluate the appropriateness of using a multiple-choice (MC) item anchor in mixed-format tests, which include both MC and constructed-response (CR) items. Linking functions were derived in the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design using an MC-only anchor set for 4…

  13. Cooperative Effects in Aligned and Opposed Multicomponent Charge Gradients Containing Strongly Acidic, Weakly Acidic, and Basic Functional Groups.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Kayesh M; Giri, Dipak; Wynne, Kenneth J; Higgins, Daniel A; Collinson, Maryanne M

    2016-04-26

    Bifunctionalized surface charge gradients in which the individual component gradients either align with or oppose each other have been prepared. The multicomponent gradients contain strongly acidic, weakly acidic, and basic functionalities that cooperatively interact to define surface wettability, nanoparticle binding, and surface charge. The two-step process for gradient formation begins by modifying a siloxane coated silicon wafer in a spatially dependent fashion first with an aminoalkoxysilane and then with a mercapto-functionalized alkoxysilane. Immersion in hydrogen peroxide leads to oxidation of the surface immobilized sulfhydryl groups and subsequent protonation of the surface immobilized amines. Very different surface chemistries were obtained from gradients that either align with or oppose each other. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the degree of amine group protonation depends on the local concentration of sulfonate groups, which form ion pairs with the resulting ammonium ions. Contact angle measurements show that these ion pairs greatly enhance the wettability of the gradient surface. Finally, studies of colloidal gold binding show that the presence of both amine and thiol moieties enhance colloid binding, which is also influenced by surface charge. Cooperativity is also revealed in the distribution of charges on uniform samples used as models of the gradient surfaces, as evaluated via zeta potential measurements. Most significantly, the net surface charge and how it changes with distance and solution pH strongly depend on whether the gradients in amine and thiol align or oppose each other. The aligned multicomponent gradients show the most interesting behavior in that there appears to be a point at pH ∼ 6.5 where surface charge remains constant with distance. Setting the pH above or below this transition point leads to changes in the direction of charge variation along the length of the substrate. PMID:27073019

  14. Structure and energy level alignment at the dye-electrode interface in p-type DSSCs: new hints on the role of anchoring modes from ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-García, Ana B; Pavone, Michele

    2015-05-14

    p-type dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) represent the complementary photocathodes to the well-studied n-type DSSCs (Grätzel cells), but their low performances have hindered the development of convenient tandem solar cells based on cost-effective n- and p-type DSSCs. Because of their low efficiencies, experimental investigations highlighted the role of hole-electron transport processes at the dye-electrode interface. However, the effects of the dye anchoring groups on interfacial electronic features are still unclear. We report here a first principles study of a benchmark p-type DSSC model, namely the widely used Coumarin-based dye C343 adsorbed on the p-NiO surface. Together with the original carboxylic acid, we test the alternative phosphonic acid as the anchoring group. We investigate binding energies, structural features and electronic energy level alignments: our results highlight that these properties are highly sensitive to the binding modes. In particular, both the chemical nature of the anchoring group and the binding mode strongly affect the thermodynamic driving force for the dye-electrode hole injection process. From analysis of the electronic densities, we find that favorable driving forces are correlated with small values of the interfacial electrostatic dipole that is formed upon dye adsorption. From our results, we derive new hints for improving open circuit potential and the hole injection process in p-type DSSCs based on NiO electrodes. PMID:25892559

  15. Lactic acid bacteria producing B-group vitamins: a great potential for functional cereals products.

    PubMed

    Capozzi, Vittorio; Russo, Pasquale; Dueñas, María Teresa; López, Paloma; Spano, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    Wheat contains various essential nutrients including the B group of vitamins. However, B group vitamins, normally present in cereals-derived products, are easily removed or destroyed during milling, food processing or cooking. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used as starter cultures for the fermentation of a large variety of foods and can improve the safety, shelf life, nutritional value, flavor and overall quality of the fermented products. In this regard, the identification and application of strains delivering health-promoting compounds is a fascinating field. Besides their key role in food fermentations, several LAB found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals are commercially used as probiotics and possess generally recognized as safe status. LAB are usually auxotrophic for several vitamins although certain strains of LAB have the capability to synthesize water-soluble vitamins such as those included in the B group. In recent years, a number of biotechnological processes have been explored to perform a more economical and sustainable vitamin production than that obtained via chemical synthesis. This review article will briefly report the current knowledge on lactic acid bacteria synthesis of vitamins B2, B11 and B12 and the potential strategies to increase B-group vitamin content in cereals-based products, where vitamins-producing LAB have been leading to the elaboration of novel fermented functional foods. In addition, the use of genetic strategies to increase vitamin production or to create novel vitamin-producing strains will be also discussed. PMID:23093174

  16. Dynamics of electron injection from the excited state of anchored molecules into semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, L.; Ernstorfer, R.; Willig, F.

    A complete picture of different interfacial electron transfer dynamics has been obtained from transient absorption and two-photon photoemission data when inserting different anchor/bridge groups between the excited organic donor and the electrode surface.

  17. A lunar/Martian anchor emplacement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, Dustin; Holt, Andrew; Jantz, Erik; Kaufman, Teresa; Martin, James; Weber, Reed

    On the Moon or Mars, it is necessary to have an anchor, or a stable, fixed point able to support the forces necessary to rescue a stuck vehicle, act as a stake for a tent in a Martian gale, act as a fulcrum in the erection of general construction poles, or support tent-like regolith shields. The anchor emplacement system must be highly autonomous. It must supply the energy and stability for anchor deployment. The goal of the anchor emplacement system project is to design and build a prototype anchor and to design a conceptual anchor emplacement system. Various anchors were tested in a 1.3 cubic meter test bed containing decomposed granite. A simulated lunar soil was created by adjusting the moisture and compaction characteristics of the soil. We conducted tests on emplacement torque, amount of force the anchor could withstand before failure, anchor pull out force at various angles, and soil disturbances caused by placing the anchor. A single helix auger anchor performed best in this test bed based on energy to emplace, and the ultimate holding capacity. The anchor was optimized for ultimate holding capacity, minimum emplacement torque, and minimum soil disturbance in sandy soils yielding the following dimensions: helix diameter (4.45 cm), pitch (1.27 cm), blade thickness (0.15 cm), total length (35.56 cm), shaft diameter (0.78 cm), and a weight of 212.62 g. The experimental results showed that smaller diameter, single-helix augers held more force than larger diameter augers for a given depth. The emplacement system consists of a flywheel and a motor for power, sealed in a protective box supported by four legs. The flywheel system was chosen over a gear system based on its increased reliability in the lunar environment.

  18. A lunar/Martian anchor emplacement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, Dustin; Holt, Andrew; Jantz, Erik; Kaufman, Teresa; Martin, James; Weber, Reed

    1993-01-01

    On the Moon or Mars, it is necessary to have an anchor, or a stable, fixed point able to support the forces necessary to rescue a stuck vehicle, act as a stake for a tent in a Martian gale, act as a fulcrum in the erection of general construction poles, or support tent-like regolith shields. The anchor emplacement system must be highly autonomous. It must supply the energy and stability for anchor deployment. The goal of the anchor emplacement system project is to design and build a prototype anchor and to design a conceptual anchor emplacement system. Various anchors were tested in a 1.3 cubic meter test bed containing decomposed granite. A simulated lunar soil was created by adjusting the moisture and compaction characteristics of the soil. We conducted tests on emplacement torque, amount of force the anchor could withstand before failure, anchor pull out force at various angles, and soil disturbances caused by placing the anchor. A single helix auger anchor performed best in this test bed based on energy to emplace, and the ultimate holding capacity. The anchor was optimized for ultimate holding capacity, minimum emplacement torque, and minimum soil disturbance in sandy soils yielding the following dimensions: helix diameter (4.45 cm), pitch (1.27 cm), blade thickness (0.15 cm), total length (35.56 cm), shaft diameter (0.78 cm), and a weight of 212.62 g. The experimental results showed that smaller diameter, single-helix augers held more force than larger diameter augers for a given depth. The emplacement system consists of a flywheel and a motor for power, sealed in a protective box supported by four legs. The flywheel system was chosen over a gear system based on its increased reliability in the lunar environment.

  19. Inhibition of nitrobenzene adsorption by water cluster formation at acidic oxygen functional groups on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuichi; Machida, Motoi; Tatsumoto, Hideki

    2008-06-15

    The inhibition effect of nitrobenzene adsorption by water clusters formed at the acidic groups on activated carbon was examined in aqueous and n-hexane solution. The activated carbon was oxidized with nitric acid to introduce CO complexes and then outgassed in helium flow at 1273 K to remove them completely without changing the structural properties of the carbon as a reference adsorbent. The amounts of acidic functional groups were determined by applying Boehm titration. A relative humidity of 95% was used to adsorb water onto the carbon surface. Strong adsorption of water onto the oxidized carbon can be observed by thermogravimetric analysis. The adsorption kinetic rate was estimated to be controlled by diffusion from the kinetic analysis. Significant decline in both capacity and kinetic rate for nitrobenzene adsorption onto the oxidized carbon was also observed in n-hexane solution by preadsorption of water to the carbon surface, whereas it was not detected for the outgassed carbons. These results might reveal that water molecules forming clusters at the CO complexes inhibited the entrance of nitrobenzene into the interparticles of the carbon. PMID:18440013

  20. Glycosylphosphatidylinositols: More than just an anchor?

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is increasing interest in the role of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors that attach some proteins to cell membranes. Far from being biologically inert, GPIs influence the targeting, intracellular trafficking and function of the attached protein. Our recent paper demonstrated the role of sialic acid on the GPI of the cellular prion protein (PrPC). The “prion diseases” arise following the conversion of PrPC to a disease-associated isoform called PrPSc or “prion”. Our paper showed that desialylated PrPC inhibited PrPSc formation. Aggregated PrPSc creates a signaling platform in the cell membrane incorporating and activating cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), an enzyme that regulates PrPC trafficking and hence PrPSc formation. The presence of desialylated PrPC caused the dissociation of cPLA2 from PrP-containing platforms, reduced the activation of cPLA2 and inhibited PrPSc production. We concluded that sialic acid contained within the GPI attached to PrPC modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrPSc formation. PMID:27195066

  1. Glycosylphosphatidylinositols: More than just an anchor?

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the role of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors that attach some proteins to cell membranes. Far from being biologically inert, GPIs influence the targeting, intracellular trafficking and function of the attached protein. Our recent paper demonstrated the role of sialic acid on the GPI of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)). The "prion diseases" arise following the conversion of PrP(C) to a disease-associated isoform called PrP(Sc) or "prion". Our paper showed that desialylated PrP(C) inhibited PrP(Sc) formation. Aggregated PrP(Sc) creates a signaling platform in the cell membrane incorporating and activating cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), an enzyme that regulates PrP(C) trafficking and hence PrP(Sc) formation. The presence of desialylated PrP(C) caused the dissociation of cPLA2 from PrP-containing platforms, reduced the activation of cPLA2 and inhibited PrP(Sc) production. We concluded that sialic acid contained within the GPI attached to PrP(C) modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrP(Sc) formation. PMID:27195066

  2. Anchored Instruction and Anchored Assessment: An Ecological Approach to Measuring Situated Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael F.; Kulikowich, Jonna M.

    Anchored instruction and anchored assessment are described and illustrated through a mathematics problem from the Jasper problem solving series developed at Vanderbilt University in Nashville (Tennessee). Anchored instruction is instruction situated in a context complex enough to provide meaning and reasons for why information is useful. Problems…

  3. Palladium(II)-Catalyzed Tandem Synthesis of Acenes Using Carboxylic Acids as Traceless Directing Groups.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kiho; Vasu, Dhananjayan; Im, Honggu; Hong, Sungwoo

    2016-07-18

    A straightforward synthetic strategy for generating useful anthracene derivatives was developed involving palladium(II)-catalyzed tandem transformation with carboxylic acids as traceless directing groups. Carboxyl-directed C-H alkenylation, carboxyl-directed secondary C-H activation and rollover, intramolecular C-C bond formation, and decarboxylative aromatization are proposed as the key steps in the tandem reaction pathway. This novel synthetic route utilizes a broad range of substrates and provides a convenient synthetic tool that allows access to acenes. PMID:27244536

  4. Synthesis and physicochemical properties of polysiloxane functionalized with aminoacetic acid groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakiza, N. V.; Neudachina, L. K.

    2016-07-01

    Polysiloxane functionalized with aminoacetic acid groups was synthesized using sol-gel technology. Elemental analysis and FTIR spectroscopy were used to determine the composition of the polysiloxane show that it is a mesoporous material with a developed surface (109.4 m2/g). It was found that the selective properties of carboxymethylated polysiloxane towards transition metal ions simultaneously present in an ammonium acetate solution change in the order Zn < Cu > Ni > Co > Pb > Cd. It was shown that the sorption of copper(II) ions by carboxymethylated aminopropylpolysiloxane with particle sizes of 50-71 μm reaches its maximum level within 2 h; the rate-limiting step of the process is the chemical reaction between the ions and the polysiloxane functional groups; and the pseudo-second-order model is the best way of describing sorption.

  5. THz and mid-IR spectroscopy of interstellar ice analogs: methyl and carboxylic acid groups.

    PubMed

    Ioppolo, S; McGuire, B A; Allodi, M A; Blake, G A

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental problem in astrochemistry concerns the synthesis and survival of complex organic molecules (COMs) throughout the process of star and planet formation. While it is generally accepted that most complex molecules and prebiotic species form in the solid phase on icy grain particles, a complete understanding of the formation pathways is still largely lacking. To take full advantage of the enormous number of available THz observations (e.g., Herschel Space Observatory, SOFIA, and ALMA), laboratory analogs must be studied systematically. Here, we present the THz (0.3-7.5 THz; 10-250 cm(-1)) and mid-IR (400-4000 cm(-1)) spectra of astrophysically-relevant species that share the same functional groups, including formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH), and acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and acetone ((CH3)2CO), compared to more abundant interstellar molecules such as water (H2O), methanol (CH3OH), and carbon monoxide (CO). A suite of pure and mixed binary ices are discussed. The effects on the spectra due to the composition and the structure of the ice at different temperatures are shown. Our results demonstrate that THz spectra are sensitive to reversible and irreversible transformations within the ice caused by thermal processing, suggesting that THz spectra can be used to study the composition, structure, and thermal history of interstellar ices. Moreover, the THz spectrum of an individual species depends on the functional group(s) within that molecule. Thus, future THz studies of different functional groups will help in characterizing the chemistry and physics of the interstellar medium (ISM). PMID:25302394

  6. Anchors of Religious Commitment in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layton, Emily; Dollahite, David C.; Hardy, Sam A.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores adolescent religious commitment using qualitative data from a religiously diverse (Jewish, Christian, Muslim) sample of 80 adolescents. A new construct, "anchors of religious commitment," grounded in interview data, is proposed to describe what adolescents commit to as a part of their religious identity. Seven anchors of…

  7. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  8. 77 FR 65496 - Commercial Acquisition; Anchor Tenancy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... limited conditions, to issue Anchor Tenancy contracts. Anchor Tenancy means ``an arrangement in which the... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: A. Background NASA published a proposed rule in the Federal Register at 76 FR 30301... simplified; it is now discussed only in paragraph (a). The final rule identifies what is meant by an...

  9. 33 CFR 401.15 - Stern anchors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stern anchors. 401.15 Section 401.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.15 Stern anchors. (a)...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  13. Ammonia capture in porous organic polymers densely functionalized with Brønsted acid groups.

    PubMed

    Van Humbeck, Jeffrey F; McDonald, Thomas M; Jing, Xiaofei; Wiers, Brian M; Zhu, Guangshan; Long, Jeffrey R

    2014-02-12

    The elimination of specific environmental and industrial contaminants, which are hazardous at only part per million to part per billion concentrations, poses a significant technological challenge. Adsorptive materials designed for such processes must be engendered with an exceptionally high enthalpy of adsorption for the analyte of interest. Rather than relying on a single strong interaction, the use of multiple chemical interactions is an emerging strategy for achieving this requisite physical parameter. Herein, we describe an efficient, catalytic synthesis of diamondoid porous organic polymers densely functionalized with carboxylic acids. Physical parameters such as pore size distribution, application of these materials to low-pressure ammonia adsorption, and comparison with analogous materials featuring functional groups of varying acidity are presented. In particular, BPP-5, which features a multiply interpenetrated structure dominated by <6 Å pores, is shown to exhibit an uptake of 17.7 mmol/g at 1 bar, the highest capacity yet demonstrated for a readily recyclable material. A complementary framework, BPP-7, features slightly larger pore sizes, and the resulting improvement in uptake kinetics allows for efficient adsorption at low pressure (3.15 mmol/g at 480 ppm). Overall, the data strongly suggest that the spatial arrangement of acidic sites allows for cooperative behavior, which leads to enhanced NH3 adsorption. PMID:24456083

  14. The difluoromethylene (CF2) group in aliphatic chains: Synthesis and conformational preference of palmitic acids and nonadecane containing CF2 groups.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Callejo, Ricardo; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; O'Hagan, David

    2014-01-01

    The syntheses of palmitic acids and a nonadecane are reported with CF2 groups located 1,3 or 1,4 to each other along the aliphatic chain. Specifically 8,8,10,10- and 8,8,11,11-tetrafluorohexadecanoic acids (6b and 6c) are prepared as well as the singly modified analogue 8,8-difluorohexadecanoic acid (6a). Also 8,8,11,11-tetrafluorononadecane (27) is prepared as a pure hydrocarbon containing a 1,4-di-CF2 motif. The modified palmitic acids are characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine melting points and phase behaviour relative to palmitic acid (62.5 °C). It emerges that 6c, with the CF2 groups placed 1,4- to each other, has a significantly higher melting point (89.9 °C) when compared to the other analogues and palmitic acid itself. It is a crystalline compound and the structure reveals an extended anti-zig-zag chain. Similarly 8,8,11,11-tetrafluorononadecane (27) adopts an extended anti-zig-zag structure. This is rationalized by dipolar relaxation between the two CF2 groups placed 1,4 to each other in the extended anti-zig-zag chain and suggests a design modification for long chain aliphatics which can introduce conformational stability. PMID:24454560

  15. The difluoromethylene (CF2) group in aliphatic chains: Synthesis and conformational preference of palmitic acids and nonadecane containing CF2 groups

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Callejo, Ricardo; Slawin, Alexandra M Z

    2014-01-01

    Summary The syntheses of palmitic acids and a nonadecane are reported with CF2 groups located 1,3 or 1,4 to each other along the aliphatic chain. Specifically 8,8,10,10- and 8,8,11,11-tetrafluorohexadecanoic acids (6b and 6c) are prepared as well as the singly modified analogue 8,8-difluorohexadecanoic acid (6a). Also 8,8,11,11-tetrafluorononadecane (27) is prepared as a pure hydrocarbon containing a 1,4-di-CF2 motif. The modified palmitic acids are characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine melting points and phase behaviour relative to palmitic acid (62.5 °C). It emerges that 6c, with the CF2 groups placed 1,4- to each other, has a significantly higher melting point (89.9 °C) when compared to the other analogues and palmitic acid itself. It is a crystalline compound and the structure reveals an extended anti-zig-zag chain. Similarly 8,8,11,11-tetrafluorononadecane (27) adopts an extended anti-zig-zag structure. This is rationalized by dipolar relaxation between the two CF2 groups placed 1,4 to each other in the extended anti-zig-zag chain and suggests a design modification for long chain aliphatics which can introduce conformational stability. PMID:24454560

  16. Intrinsic acidity of aluminum, chromium (III) and iron (III) μ 3-hydroxo functional groups from ab initio electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, James R.; Dixon, David A.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2000-05-01

    Density functional calculations are performed on M 3(OH) 7(H 2O) 62+ and M 3O(OH) 6(H 2O) 6+ clusters for MAl, Cr(III), and Fe(III), allowing determination of the relative acidities of the μ 3-hydroxo and aquo functional groups. Contrary to previous predictions and rationalizations, Fe 3OH and Al 3OH groups have nearly the same intrinsic acidity, while Cr 3OH groups are significantly more acidic. The gas-phase acidity of the Fe 3OH site is in good agreement with the value predicted by the molecular mechanics model previously used to estimate the relative acidities of surface sites on iron oxides. [ J. R. Rustad et al. (1996)Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 60, 1563]. Acidities of aquo functional groups were also computed for Al and Cr. The AlOH 2 site is more acidic than the Al 3OH site, whereas the Cr 3OH site is more acidic than the CrOH 2 site. These findings predict that the surface charging behavior of chromium oxides/oxyhydroxides should be distinguishable from their Fe, Al counterparts. The calculations also provide insight into why the lepidocrocite/boehmite polymorph is not observed for CrOOH.

  17. Functional groups of sialic acids involved in binding to siglecs (sialoadhesins) deduced from interactions with synthetic analogues.

    PubMed

    Kelm, S; Brossmer, R; Isecke, R; Gross, H J; Strenge, K; Schauer, R

    1998-08-01

    The siglecs, formerly called sialoadhesins, are a family of I-type lectins binding to sialic acids on the cell surface. Five members of this family have been identified: sialoadhesin, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), Schwann cell myelin protein (SMP), CD22 and CD33. We have investigated the relevance of substituents at position C-9 and in the N-acetyl group of N-acetylneuraminic acid, using a series of synthetic sialic-acid analogues either on resialylated human erythrocytes or as free alpha-glycosides in hapten inhibition. All five siglecs require the hydroxy group at C-9 for binding, suggesting hydrogen bonding of this substituent with the binding site. Remarkable differences were found among the proteins in their specificity for modifications of the N-acetyl group. Whereas sialoadhesin, MAG and SMP do not tolerate a hydroxy group as in N-glycolylneuraminic acid, they bind to halogenated acetyl residues. In the case of MAG, N-fluoroacetylneuraminic acid is bound about 17-fold better than N-acetylneuraminic acid. In contrast, human and murine CD22 both show good affinity for N-glycolylneuraminic acid, but only human CD22 bound the halogenated compounds. In conclusion, our data indicate that interactions of the hydroxy group at position 9 and the N-acyl substituent contribute significantly to the binding strength. PMID:9738906

  18. An exploratory study on the career anchors of educators in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, H H; Quek, B C

    2001-09-01

    In this exploratory study, the authors adopted an empirical approach to determine the various primary career anchors possessed by Singapore educators, the impact of the degree of congruency between teaching and the career anchors on intrinsic and extrinsic satisfaction, and turnover intentions. A number of hypotheses were supported and provided the 1st step in understanding this group of important individuals who nuture the future generation of human capital for the workplace. PMID:11804006

  19. Tunable photochemical properties of a covalently anchored and spatially confined organic polymer in a layered compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Oaki, Yuya; Imai, Hiroaki

    2016-05-01

    A covalently anchored and spatially confined organic polymer was formed in a layered compound with a surface-modified layer. The resultant anchored and confined polymer showed tunable photochemical properties with the incorporation of a variety of guest molecules originating from the specific incorporation states. The layer surface of an inorganic layered compound was modified by an organic molecule with vinyl groups. The precursor layered composite accommodated N-vinylcarbazole (VCz), a vinyl monomer, in the hydrophobic interlayer space. The introduction of VCz induced the simultaneous exfoliation of the layered structures and copolymerization with vinyl groups on the layer surface. The covalently anchored and spatially confined poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVCz) with tunable photochemical properties was formed in a layered structure. The present study shows the versatile potential of polymers with anchored and confined states in surface-functionalized layered composites.A covalently anchored and spatially confined organic polymer was formed in a layered compound with a surface-modified layer. The resultant anchored and confined polymer showed tunable photochemical properties with the incorporation of a variety of guest molecules originating from the specific incorporation states. The layer surface of an inorganic layered compound was modified by an organic molecule with vinyl groups. The precursor layered composite accommodated N-vinylcarbazole (VCz), a vinyl monomer, in the hydrophobic interlayer space. The introduction of VCz induced the simultaneous exfoliation of the layered structures and copolymerization with vinyl groups on the layer surface. The covalently anchored and spatially confined poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVCz) with tunable photochemical properties was formed in a layered structure. The present study shows the versatile potential of polymers with anchored and confined states in surface-functionalized layered composites. Electronic supplementary

  20. Role of hydroxyl group in the inhibitive action of benzoic acid toward corrosion of aluminum in nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, P.N.S.; Singh, A.K.; Wadhwani, R.

    1999-10-01

    Corrosion inhibition action of benzoic acid, p-hydroxy benzoic acid, 2-4-dihydroxy benzoic acid, and 3-4-5-trihydroxy benzoic acid toward aluminum alloy 3003 (UNS A93003) in 20% (wt%) nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) using different concentrations of these compounds at 30 C, 40 C, and 50 C has been studied thoroughly. 3-4-5-trihydroxy benzoic acid (inhibition efficiency (IE): 30% and 72%) was the most effective inhibitor followed by 2-4-dihydroxy benzoic acid (IE: 22% to 62%) p-hydroxy benzoic acid (IE: 11% to 52%), and benzoic acid (IE: 2.5% to 15%). IE increased with concentration and its maximum value was observed at 0.5% concentration of all inhibitors used. The percentage of IE of the inhibitors decreased with an increase in temperature from 30 C to 50 C. Values of heat adsorption and activation energy were calculated from weight loss data, which came out in the range for the reaction occurring at the surface. The behavior of inhibitors studied deviated from the Langmuir isotherm. The IE of higher hydroxy species was improved when more hydroxy centers were added. Anodic and cathodic polarization curves were shifted toward lower current density regions in the presence of inhibitors. This revealed that they were mixed inhibitors.

  1. A simple colorimetric chemosensor bearing a carboxylic acid group with high selectivity for CN-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gyeong Jin; Choi, Ye Won; Lee, Dongkuk; Kim, Cheal

    2014-11-01

    A new simple ‘naked eye' chemosensor 1 (sodium (E)-2-((2-(3-hydroxy-2-naphthoyl)hydrazono)methyl)benzoate) has been synthesized for detection of CN- in a mixture of DMF/H2O (9:1). The sensor 1 comprises of a naphthoic hydrazide as efficient hydrogen bonding donor group and a benzoic acid as the moiety with the water solubility. The receptor 1 showed high selectivity toward cyanide ions in a 1:1 stoichiometric manner, which induces a fast color change from colorless to yellow for CN- over other anions. Therefore, receptor 1 could be useful for cyanide detection in aqueous environment, displaying a high distinguishable selectivity from hydrogen bonded anions and being clearly visible to the naked eye.

  2. Nanoscale Distribution of Sulfonic Acid Groups Determines Structure and Binding of Water in Nafion Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiao; Bonn, Mischa; Parekh, Sapun H; Domke, Katrin F

    2016-03-14

    The connection between the nanoscale structure of two chemically equivalent, yet morphologically distinct Nafion fuel-cell membranes and their macroscopic chemical properties is demonstrated. Quantification of the chemical interactions between water and Nafion reveals that extruded membranes have smaller water channels with a reduced sulfonic acid head group density compared to dispersion-cast membranes. As a result, a disproportionally large amount of non-bulk water molecules exists in extruded membranes, which also exhibit larger proton conductivity and larger water mobility compared to cast membranes. The differences in the physicochemical properties of the membranes, that is, the chemical constitution of the water channels and the local water structure, and the accompanying differences in macroscopic water and proton transport suggest that the chemistry of nanoscale channels is an important, yet largely overlooked parameter that influences the functionality of fuel-cell membranes. PMID:26895211

  3. Conjugal transfer and characterization of bacteriocin plasmids in group N (lactic acid) streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Neve, H; Geis, A; Teuber, M

    1984-01-01

    Thirteen bacteriocin-producing strains of group N (lactic acid) streptococci were screened for their potential to transfer this property by conjugation to Streptococcus lactis subsp. diacetylactis Bu2-60. Bacteriocin production in three strains was plasmid encoded as shown by conjugal transfer and by analysis of cured, bacteriocin-negative derivatives of the donor strains and the transconjugants. With Streptococcus cremoris strains 9B4 and 4G6 and S. lactis subsp. diacetylactis 6F7 as donors, bacteriocin-producing transconjugants were isolated with frequencies ranging from ca. 2 X 10(-2) to 2 X 10(-1) per recipient cell. Bacteriocin-producing transconjugants had acquired a 39.6-megadalton plasmid from the donor strains 9B4 and 4G6, and a 75-megadalton plasmid from the donor strain 6F7. As shown by restriction endonuclease analysis, the plasmids from strains 9B4 and 4G6 were almost identical. The plasmid from strain 6F7 yielded some additional fragments not present in the two other plasmids. In hybridization experiments any of the three plasmids strongly hybridized with each other and with some other bacteriocin but nontransmissible plasmids from other S. cremoris strains. Homology was also detected to a variety of cryptic plasmids in lactic acid streptococci. Images PMID:6321437

  4. Leaching platinum-group metals in a sulfuric acid/chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, M. H. H.

    2003-04-01

    A leaching process was established based on the ability of platinum-group metals to form stable chloro-complexes in acidic chloride solutions. Industrial catalyst losses were examined for the recovery of platinum, palladium, and rhodium by leaching with a mixture of sulfuric acid and sodium chloride to avoid using aqua regia or autoclave conditions. Extraction of platinum and rhodium in 60% H2SO4 at 135°C steadily increased with increasing NaCl concentrations reaching 95% and 85%, respectively, at 0.1 M NaCl after two hours. By comparison, palladium was dissolved more quickly but also reached 85% under the same conditions. Extraction of each metal increased with temperatures up to 125°C but plateaued at higher temperatures. Similar behavior was observed with increasing H2SO4 concentrations up to 60%. More than 99% extraction of each metal was obtained after ten hours using 0.1 M NaCl and 60% H2SO4 at 125°C.

  5. Copoly(arlene ether)s containing pendant sulfonic acid groups as proton exchange membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik; Robertson, Gilles; Guiver, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A copoly(arylene ether) (PAE) with high fluorine content and a copoly(arylene ether nitrile) (PAEN) with high nitrile content, each containing pendant phenyl sulfonic acids were synthesized. The P AE and PAEN were prepared from decafluorobiphenyl (DFBP) and difluorobenzonitrile (DFBN) respectively, by polycondensation with 2-phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) by conventional aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. The sulfonic acid groups were introduced by mild post-sulfonation exclusively on the para-position of the pendant phenyl ring in PHQ. The membrane properties of the resulting sulfonated copolymers sP AE and sP AEN were compared for fuel cell applications. The copolymers sPAE and sPAEN, each having a degree of sulfonation (DS) of 1.0 had high ion exchange capacities (IEC{sub v}(wet) (volume-based, wet state)) of 1.77 and 2.55 meq./cm{sup 3}, high proton conductivities of 135.4 and 140.1 mS/cm at 80 C, and acceptable volume-based water uptake of 44.5-51.9 vol% at 80 C, respectively, compared to Nafion. The data points of these copolymer membranes are located in the area of outstanding properties in the trade-off plot of alternative hydrocarbon polyelectrolyte membranes (PEM) for the relationship between proton conductivity versus water uptake (weight based or volume based). Furthermore, the relative selectivity derived from proton conductivity and methanol permeability is higher than that of Nafion.

  6. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  7. Auger anchors produce major cost savings

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, B.C.

    1981-10-01

    To meet specific-gravity standards, a 42-in.-diam, 0.598-in.-wall-thickness pipeline being installed in a glacial area full of potholes, peat swamps, and low-lying sections required 425 lb/ft of anchor hold-down. In spots where the underlying soil had an acceptable shear strength, the crew installed auger anchors (costing only $8/ft of pipeline) instead of the concrete set-on weights (at $80/ft) required in areas where the auger anchors would not hold; the savings amounted to about $380,000/mile of line laid.

  8. Anchoring Revisited: The Role of the Comparative Question

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Ina; Bohner, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    When people estimate a numeric value after judging whether it is larger or smaller than a high or low anchor value (comparative question), estimates are biased in the direction of the anchor. One explanation for this anchoring effect is that people selectively access knowledge consistent with the anchor value as part of a positive test strategy. Two studies (total N = 184) supported the alternative explanation that people access knowledge consistent with their own answer to the comparative question. Specifically, anchoring effects emerged when the answer to the comparative question was unexpected (lower than the low anchor or higher than the high anchor). For expected answers (lower than the high anchor or higher than the low anchor), however, anchoring effects were attenuated or reversed. The anchor value itself was almost never reported as an absolute estimate. PMID:24454953

  9. An aldehyde group-based P-acid probe for selective fluorescence turn-on sensing of cysteine and homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunlei; Wang, Xiu; Shen, Lei; Deng, Wenping; Liu, Haiyun; Ge, Shenguang; Yan, Mei; Song, Xianrang

    2016-06-15

    A highly sensitive and selective turn on fluorescent probe P-acid-aldehyde (P-CHO) is developed for the determination of cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy). The probe is designed and synthesized by incorporating the specific functional group aldehyde group for thiols into a stable π-conjugated material 4,4'-(2,5-dimethoxy-1,4-phenylene) bis(ethyne-2,1-diyl) dibenzoic acid (P-acid). The probe fluorescence is quenched through donor photoinduced electron transfer (d-PET) between the fluorophore (P-acid) and the recognition group (aldehyde group). In the presence of thiols, Cys and Hcy can selectively react with aldehyde group of the probe because the inhibition of d-PET between fluorophore and recognition group. Therefore, a turn-on fluorescent sensor was established for the fluorescence recovery. Under the optimized conditions, the fluorescence response of probe is directly proportional to the concentration of Cys in the range of 4-95 NM L(-1), with a detection limit 3.0 nM. In addition, the sensing system exhibits good selectively toward Cys and Hcy in the presence of other amino acids. It has been successfully applied for bioimaging of Cys and Hcy in living cells with low cell toxicity. PMID:26802748

  10. Behavior of soil anchors under dynamic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Picornell, M.; Olague, B.

    1997-07-01

    Helical anchors placed in a cohesionless soil in a laboratory setting were tested under static and dynamic loads. The dynamic tests were performed after subjecting the anchors to a seating load. The dynamic load had an intensity that changed in sinusoidal fashion and was superimposed to the static seating loads. Although, the anchors have a static pull-out capacity, when the dynamic loads are applied the anchor experiences additional deformations for each load cycle. The deformations per cycle are initially high but then decrease to a nearly constant rate. Eventually, the constant rate increases suddenly accelerating until failure. This failure can take place even at small fractions of the static pull-out capacity. The rate of deformation per load cycle is found to increase for larger seating loads and for larger dynamic pulsating loads. The results of this study shows that the designer can only adjust loads to decrease the deformation rate to suit the design life of the structure.

  11. A combination of omega-3 fatty acids, folic acid and B-group vitamins is superior at lowering homocysteine than omega-3 alone: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Samantha Loren; Bowe, Steven John; Crowe, Timothy Charles

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation alone or in combination with folic acid and B-group vitamins is effective in lowering homocysteine. The Medline Ovid, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized-controlled trial studies that intervened with omega-3 supplementation (with or without folic acid) and measured changes in homocysteine concentration. Studies were pooled using a random effects model for meta-analysis. Three different models were analyzed: all trials combined, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid trials, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids with folic acid and B-group vitamin trials. Nineteen studies were included, consisting of 3267 participants completing 21 trials. Studies were heterogeneous; varying by dose, duration and participant health conditions. Across all trials, omega-3 supplementation was effective in lowering homocysteine by an average of 1.18μmol/L (95%CI: (-1.89, -0.48), P=.001). The average homocysteine-lowering effect was greater when omega-3 supplementation was combined with folic acid and B-group vitamins (-1.37μmol/L, 95%CI: (-2.38, -0.36), P<.01) compared to omega-3 supplementation alone (-1.09μmol/L 95%CI: (-2.04, -0.13), P=.03). Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation was associated with a modest reduction in homocysteine. For the purposes of reducing homocysteine, a combination of omega-3s (0.2-6g/day), folic acid (150 - 2500μg/day) and vitamins B6 and B12 may be more effective than omega-3 supplementation alone. PMID:27188895

  12. Load transfer mechanisms in anchored geosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hryciw, Roman D.

    1990-12-01

    Success of an anchored geosynthetic system (AGS) depends on the satisfactory transfer of load between: the surface-deployed geosynthetic and anchors (typically ribbed reinforcing rods) driven into the slope; the geosynthetic and soil; and the anchors and soil. A study was performed to evaluate the load transfer mechanisms at these interfaces in an AGS. A mathematical model was developed for predicting the pullout resistance of plane ribbed inclusions. The model considered the contribution of both frictional and passive resistance components of pullout resistance. Optical observation of sand around the ribs was made to determine the behavior of soil around the moving ribs during pullout. A theoretical study disclosed that the optimum anchor orientation for stabilization of infinite slopes depends on several factors including slope angle and in-situ stresses. It typically ranges from 20 to 30 degree from the normal to the slope with the anchor driven upslope. An experimental study confirmed that the soil-geosynthetic interface friction angle may be correctly predicted from the residual or critical state friction angle of the sand. Equations were developed for load transfer at curved soil-fabric interfaces. An experimental study verified that the increases in soil stress with distance from the anchor may be predicted by the developed equations.

  13. An accessory protein required for anchoring and assembly of amyloid fibres in B. subtilis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2011-06-01

    Cells within Bacillus subtilis biofilms are held in place by an extracellular matrix that contains cell-anchored amyloid fibres, composed of the amyloidogenic protein TasA. As biofilms age they disassemble because the cells release the amyloid fibres. This release appears to be the consequence of incorporation of D-tyrosine, D-leucine, D-tryptophan and D-methionine into the cell wall. Here, we characterize the in vivo roles of an accessory protein TapA (TasA anchoring/assembly protein; previously YqxM) that serves both to anchor the fibres to the cell wall and to assemble TasA into fibres. TapA is found in discrete foci in the cell envelope and these foci disappear when cells are treated with a mixture of D-amino acids. Purified cell wall sacculi retain a functional form of this anchoring protein such that purified fibres can be anchored to the sacculi in vitro. In addition, we show that TapA is essential for the proper assembly of the fibres. Its absence results in a dramatic reduction in TasA levels and what little TasA is left produces only thin fibres that are not anchored to the cell. PMID:21477127

  14. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  15. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  16. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  17. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  18. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  19. The Use of Comics-Based Cases in Anchored Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneller, Matthew F.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to understand how comics fulfill the role of anchor in an anchored instruction learning environment. Anchored instruction addresses the inert knowledge problem through the use of realistic multimedia stories, or "anchors," that embed a problem and the necessary data to solve it within the narrative. In the…

  20. Aspirin's Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Song, Fei; Venereau, Emilie; Preti, Alessandro; Park, Sang-Wook; Hamilton, Keith; Swapna, G V T; Manohar, Murli; Moreau, Magali; Agresti, Alessandra; Gorzanelli, Andrea; De Marchis, Francesco; Wang, Huang; Antonyak, Marc; Micikas, Robert J; Gentile, Daniel R; Cerione, Richard A; Schroeder, Frank C; Montelione, Gaetano T; Bianchi, Marco E; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin's bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world's longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage. PMID:26101955

  1. Copoly(arylene ether)s containing pendant sulfonic acid groups as proton exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Dae Sik, Kim; Yu Seung, Kim; Gilles, Robertson; Guiver, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    A copoly(arylene ether) (PAE) with high fluorine content and a copoly(arylene ether nitrile) (PAEN) with high nitrile content, each containing pendant phenyl sulfonic acids were synthesized. The PAE and P AEN were prepared from decafluorobiphenyl (DFBP) and difluorobenzonitrile (DFBN) respectively, by polycondensation with 2phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) by conventional aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. sulfonic acid groups were introduced by mild post-sulfonation exclusively on the para-position of the pendant phenyl ring in PHQ. The membrane properties of the resulting sulfonated copolymers sPAE and sPAEN were compared for fuel cell applications. The copolymers sPAE and sPAEN, each having a degree of sulfonation (OS) of 1.0 had high ion exchange capacities (IEC{sub v})(wet) (volume-based, wet state) of 1.77 and 2.55 meq./cm3, high proton conductivities of 135.4 and 140.1 mS/cm at 80 C, and acceptable volume-based water uptake of 44.5 -51.9 vol% at 80 C, respectively, compared to Nafion. The data points of these copolymer membranes are located in the upper left-hand corner in the trade-off plot of alternative hydrocarbon polyelectrolyte membranes (PEM) for the relationship between proton conductivity versus water uptake (weight based or volume based), i.e., high proton conductivity and low water uptake. Furthermore, the relative selectivity derived from proton conductivity and methanol permeability is higher than that of Nafion.

  2. Molecular Structures, Acid-Base Properties, and Formation of Group 6 Transition Metal Hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shenggang; Guenther, Courtney L.; Kelley, Matthew S.; Dixon, David A.

    2011-04-28

    Density functional theory (DFT) and coupled cluster theory (CCSD(T)) were used to study the group 6 metal (M = Cr, Mo, W) hydroxides: MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3), M2O6-m(OH)2m (m = 1-5), M3O9-m(OH)2m (m = 1, 2), and M4O11(OH)2. The calculations were done up to the complete basis set (CBS) limit for the CCSD(T) method. Molecular structures of many low-energy conformers/isomers were located. Brønsted acidities in the gas phase and pKa values in aqueous solution were predicted for MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3) and MnO3n-1(OH)2 (n = 2-4). In addition, Brønsted basicities and Lewis acidities (fluoride affinities) were predicted for MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3) as well as the metal oxide clusters MnO3n (n = 1-3). The metal hydroxides were predicted to be strong Brønsted acids and weak to modest Brønsted bases and Lewis acids. The pKa values can have values as negative as -31. Potential energy surfaces for the hydrolysis of the MnO3n (n = 1-4) clusters were calculated. Heats of formation of the metal hydroxides were predicted from the calculated reaction energies, and the agreement with the limited available experimental data is good. The first hydrolysis step leading to the formation of MnO3n-1(OH)2 was predicted to be exothermic, with the exothermicity becoming less negative as n increases and essentially converged at n = 3. Reaction rate constants for the hydrogen transfer steps were calculated using transition state theory and RRKM theory. Further hydrolysis of MnO3n-1(OH)2 tends to be endothermic especially for M = Cr. Fifty-five DFT exchange-correlation functionals were benchmarked for the calculations of the reaction energies, complexation energies, and reaction barriers by comparing to our CCSD(T) results. Overall, the DFT results for the potential energy surfaces are semiquantitatively correct, but no single functional works for all processes and all three metals. Among the functionals benchmarked, the wB97, wB97X, B1B95, B97-1, mPW1LYP, and X3LYP functionals have the best

  3. Number of free hydroxyl groups on bile acid phospholipids determines the fluidity and hydration of model membranes.

    PubMed

    Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Bajaj, Avinash

    2013-10-10

    Interactions of synthetic phospholipids with model membranes determines the drug release capabilities of phospholipid vesicles at diseased sites. We performed 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH)-based fluorescence anisotropy, Laurdan-based membrane hydration, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies to cognize the interactions of three bile acid phospholipids, lithocholic acid-phosphocholine (LCA-PC), deoxycholic acid-phosphocholine (DCA-PC), and cholic acid-phosphocholine (CA-PC) with model membranes. These studies revealed that bile acid phospholipids increases membrane fluidity in DCA-PC > CA-PC > LCA-PC order, indicating that induction of membrane fluidity is contingent on the number and positioning of free hydroxyl groups on bile acids. Similarly, DCA-PC causes maximum membrane perturbations due to the presence of a free hydroxyl group, whereas LCA-PC induces gel phase in membranes due to hydrophobic bile acid acyl chain interactions. These DCA-PC-induced membrane perturbations induce a drastic decrease in phase transition temperature (Tm) as determined by calorimetric studies, whereas doping of LCA-PC causes phase transition broadening without change in Tm. Doping of CA-PC induces membrane perturbations and membrane hydration like DCA-PC but sharpening of phase transition at higher doping suggests self-association of CA-PC molecules. Therefore these differential mode of interactions between bile acid phospholipids and model membranes would help in the future for their use in drug delivery. PMID:24079709

  4. Anchors as Semantic Primes in Value Construction: An EEG Study of the Anchoring Effect

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qiang; Qiu, Wenwei

    2015-01-01

    Previous research regarding anchoring effects has demonstrated that human judgments are often assimilated to irrelevant information. Studies have demonstrated that anchors influence the economic valuation of various products and experiences; however, the cognitive explanations of this effect remain controversial, and its neural mechanisms have rarely been explored. In the current study, we conducted an electroencephalography (EEG) experiment to investigate the anchoring effect on willingness to accept (WTA) for an aversive hedonic experience and the role of anchors in this judgment heuristic. The behavioral results demonstrated that random numbers affect participants’ WTA for listening to pieces of noise. The participants asked for higher pay after comparing their WTA with higher numbers. The EEG results indicated that anchors also influenced the neural underpinnings of the valuation process. Specifically, when a higher anchor number was drawn, larger P2 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited, reflecting the anticipation of more intensive pain from the subsequent noise. Moreover, higher anchors induced a stronger theta band power increase compared with lower anchors when subjects listened to the noises, indicating that the participants felt more unpleasant during the actual experience of the noise. The levels of unpleasantness during both anticipation and experience were consistent with the semantic information implied by the anchors. Therefore, these data suggest that a semantic priming process underlies the anchoring effect in WTA. This study provides proof for the robustness of the anchoring effect and neural evidence of the semantic priming model. Our findings indicate that activated contextual information, even seemingly irrelevant, can be embedded in the construction of economic value in the brain. PMID:26439926

  5. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  6. Light and heavy dansyl reporter groups in food chemistry: amino acid assay in beverages.

    PubMed

    Mazzotti, Fabio; Benabdelkamel, Hicham; Di Donna, Leonardo; Athanassopoulos, Constantinos M; Napoli, Anna; Sindona, Giovanni

    2012-07-01

    5-Dimethylamino-1-sulfonyl naphthalene (DNS, commonly referred as dansyl) is a functionality, bearing well-established properties in directing the fragmentation, by mass spectrometry (MS), of the corresponding ionized sulfonylated derivatives. This property is shared also by its labeled analogs. The use of d(0)/d(6) DNS derivatives is now exploited in the application of the well-established isotope dilution mass spectrometric approach in the assay of complex mixtures. A new method for the quantitation of amino acids (AAs) in beverages is therefore presented, which relies on liquid chromatographic separation of their N-dansylated derivatives followed by comparative electrospray tandem MS/MS of the d(0)/d(6) isobaric mixtures. Labeled and unlabeled DNS derivatives of the selected AAs are readily available by microwave-assisted synthetic protocols. The novelty of the method is represented by the use of heavy and light DNS-isotopologue providing suitable reporter groups. Multiple-reaction monitoring has been applied in the assay of AAs in wine, pineapple juice and bergamot juice with good-to-excellent results as proved by both relative standard deviation, lower than 15%, and by the accuracy values in the range 90-110%. PMID:22791261

  7. B-group vitamin production by lactic acid bacteria--current knowledge and potential applications.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, J G; Laiño, J E; del Valle, M Juarez; Vannini, V; van Sinderen, D; Taranto, M P; de Valdez, G Font; de Giori, G Savoy; Sesma, F

    2011-12-01

    Although most vitamins are present in a variety of foods, human vitamin deficiencies still occur in many countries, mainly because of malnutrition not only as a result of insufficient food intake but also because of unbalanced diets. Even though most lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are auxotrophic for several vitamins, it is now known that certain strains have the capability to synthesize water-soluble vitamins such as those included in the B-group (folates, riboflavin and vitamin B(12) amongst others). This review article will show the current knowledge of vitamin biosynthesis by LAB and show how the proper selection of starter cultures and probiotic strains could be useful in preventing clinical and subclinical vitamin deficiencies. Here, several examples will be presented where vitamin-producing LAB led to the elaboration of novel fermented foods with increased and bioavailable vitamins. In addition, the use of genetic engineering strategies to increase vitamin production or to create novel vitamin-producing strains will also be discussed. This review will show that the use of vitamin-producing LAB could be a cost-effective alternative to current vitamin fortification programmes and be useful in the elaboration of novel vitamin-enriched products. PMID:21933312

  8. Removal of textile dyes and metallic ions using polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups.

    PubMed

    Caldera Villalobos, M; Peláez Cid, A A; Herrera González, Ana M

    2016-07-15

    This work reports the removal of textile dyes and metallic ions by means of adsorption and coagulation-flocculation using two polyelectrolytes and two macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups. The adsorption of textile dyes was studied in aqueous solutions containing cationic dyes and in wastewater containing a vat dye. Also, removal of vat and naphthol dyes was studied using the process of coagulation-flocculation. The results show these materials possess elevated adsorption capacity, and they accomplished removal rates above 97% in aqueous solutions. The removal of the vat dye improved the quality of the wastewater notably, and an uncolored effluent was obtained at the end of the treatment. The treatment using adsorption decreased the values for coloration, conductivity, suspended solids, and pH. The removal of vat and naphthol dyes by means of coagulation-flocculation was studied as well, and removal rates of 90% were obtained. The polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes also proved effective in the adsorption of metallic ions in wastewater. The treatment using adsorption accomplished high removal rates of metallic ions, and it showed greater selectivity towards Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Pb(2+). A decrease in the content of solids as well as the values for COD and conductivity was observed in the wastewater as well. The analyses of FT-IR indicated that cationic dyes and metallic ions were chemisorbed by means of ionic exchange. PMID:27082258

  9. Community Genomic and Proteomic Analyses of Chemoautotrophic Iron-Oxidizing "Leptospirillum rubarum" (Group II) and "Leptospirillum ferrodiazotrophum" (Group III) Bacteria in Acid Mine Drainage Biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Goltsman, Daniela; Denef, Vincent; Singer, Steven; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Lefsrud, Mark G; Mueller, Ryan; Dick, Gregory J.; Sun, Christine; Wheeler, Korin; Zelma, Adam; Baker, Brett J.; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Shah, Manesh B; Thelen, Michael P.; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed near-complete population (composite) genomic sequences for coexisting acidophilic iron-oxidizing Leptospirillum group II and III bacteria (phylum Nitrospirae) and an extrachromosomal plasmid from a Richmond Mine, Iron Mountain, CA, acid mine drainage biofilm. Community proteomic analysis of the genomically characterized sample and two other biofilms identified 64.6% and 44.9% of the predicted proteins of Leptospirillum groups II and III, respectively, and 20% of the predicted plasmid proteins. The bacteria share 92% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity and >60% of their genes, including integrated plasmid-like regions. The extrachromosomal plasmid carries conjugation genes with detectable sequence similarity to genes in the integrated conjugative plasmid, but only those on the extrachromosomal element were identified by proteomics. Both bacterial groups have genes for community-essential functions, including carbon fixation and biosynthesis of vitamins, fatty acids, and biopolymers (including cellulose); proteomic analyses reveal these activities. Both Leptospirillum types have multiple pathways for osmotic protection. Although both are motile, signal transduction and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins are more abundant in Leptospirillum group III, consistent with its distribution in gradients within biofilms. Interestingly, Leptospirillum group II uses a methyl-dependent and Leptospirillum group III a methyl-independent response pathway. Although only Leptospirillum group III can fix nitrogen, these proteins were not identified by proteomics. The abundances of core proteins are similar in all communities, but the abundance levels of unique and shared proteins of unknown function vary. Some proteins unique to one organism were highly expressed and may be key to the functional and ecological differentiation of Leptospirillum groups II and III.

  10. Multi-Molar Absorption of CO2 by the Activation of Carboxylate Groups in Amino Acid Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Feng; Huang, Kuan; Zhou, Yan; Tian, Zi-Qi; Zhu, Xiang; Tao, Duan-Jian; Jiang, De-En; Dai, Sheng

    2016-06-13

    A new strategy for multi-molar absorption of CO2 is reported based on activating a carboxylate group in amino acid ionic liquids. It was illustrated that introducing an electron-withdrawing site to amino acid anions could reduce the negative inductive effect of the amino group while simultaneously activating the carboxylate group to interact with CO2 very efficiently. An extremely high absorption capacity of CO2 (up to 1.69 mol mol(-1) ) in aminopolycarboxylate-based amino acid ionic liquids was thus achieved. The evidence of spectroscopic investigations and quantum-chemical calculations confirmed the interactions between two kinds of sites in the anion and CO2 that resulted in superior CO2 capacities. PMID:27136274

  11. Studies of the prevalence and significance of radiolabeled bile acid malabsorption in a group of patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, L.R.; Hogan, R.B.; Morawski, S.G.; Santa Ana, C.A.; Bern, M.J.; Norgaard, R.P.; Bo-Linn, G.W.; Fordtran, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    We studied radiolabeled fecal bile acid excretion in 11 normal subjects and 17 patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea for three major purposes: to establish normal values for this test in the presence of increased stool volumes (induced in normal subjects by ingestion of poorly absorbable solutions); to test for bile acid malabsorption in the patients and to correlate this with an independent test of ileal function, the Schilling test; and to compare the results of the bile acid excretion test with the subsequent effect of a bile acid binding agent (cholestyramine) on stool weight. In normal subjects fecal excretion of the radiolabel was increased with increasing stool volumes. As a group, patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea excreted radiolabeled bile acid more rapidly than normal subjects with induced diarrhea (t1/2 56 +/- 8 vs. 236 +/- 60 h, respectively, p less than 0.005). There was a statistically significant positive correlation between t1/2 of radiolabeled bile acid and Schilling test results in these patients. Although 14 of 17 patients absorbed labeled taurocholic acid less well than any of the normal subjects with comparable volumes of induced diarrhea, cholestyramine had no statistically significant effect on stool weight in the patient group, and in none of the patients was stool weight reduced to within the normal range. In summary, most patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea have bile acid malabsorption (as measured by fecal excretion of labeled bile acid), but they do not respond to cholestyramine therapy with a significant reduction in stool weight. Although the significance of these findings was not clearly established, the most likely interpretation is that bile acid malabsorption is a manifestation of an underlying intestinal motility or absorptive defect rather than the primary cause of diarrhea.

  12. Suture anchor versus screw fixation for greater tuberosity fractures of the humerus--a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Hong, Chih-Kai; Jou, I-Ming; Lin, Chii-Jeng; Su, Fong-Chin; Su, Wei-Ren

    2012-03-01

    Suture anchors and screws are commonly used for fixation of humeral greater tuberosity (GT) fractures in either arthroscopic or open surgeries, but no biomechanical studies have been performed to compare the strength of fixation constructs using these two implants. This cadaveric study aimed to compare the biomechanical strength of three different fixation constructs in the management of GT fractures: Double-Row Suture Anchor Fixation (DR); Suture-Bridge Technique using suture anchors and knotless suture anchors (SB); and Two-Screw Fixation (TS). The experimental procedure was designed to assess fracture displacement after cyclic loading, failure load, and failure mode of the fixation construct. Significant differences were found among the SB (321 N), DR (263 N), and TS (187 N) groups (SB > DR > TS, p < 0.05) in the mean force of cyclic loading to create 3 mm displacement. Regarding the mean force of cyclic loading to create 5 mm displacement and ultimate failure load, no significant difference was found between the DR (370 N, 480 N) and SB (399 N, 493 N) groups, but both groups achieved superior results compared with the TS group (249 N, 340 N) (p < 0.05). The results suggested that the suture anchor constructs would be stronger than the fixation construct using screws for the humeral GT fracture. PMID:21858857

  13. Grouping newly isolated docosahexaenoic acid-producing thraustochytrids based on their polyunsaturated fatty acid profiles and comparative analysis of 18S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianzhong; Aki, Tsunehiro; Yokochi, Toshihiro; Nakahara, Toro; Honda, Daiske; Kawamoto, Seiji; Shigeta, Seiko; Ono, Kazuhisa; Suzuki, Osamu

    2003-01-01

    Seven strains of marine microbes producing a significant amount of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6, n-3) were screened from seawater collected in coastal areas of Japan and Fiji. They accumulate their respective intermediate fatty acids in addition to DHA. There are 5 kinds of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) profiles which can be described as (1) DHA/docosapentaenoic acid (DPA; C22:5, n-6), (2) DHA/DPA/eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; C20:5, n-3), (3) DHA/EPA, (4) DHA/DPA/EPA/arachidonic acid (AA; C20:4, n-6), and (5) DHA/DPA/EPA/AA/docosatetraenoic acid (C22:4, n-6). These isolates are proved to be new thraustochytrids by their specific insertion sequences in the 18S rRNA genes. The phylogenetic tree constructed by molecular analysis of 18S rRNA genes from the isolates and typical thraustochytrids shows that strains with the same PUFA profile form each monophyletic cluster. These results suggest that the C20-22 PUFA profile may be applicable as an effective characteristic for grouping thraustochytrids. PMID:14730428

  14. Monitoring ground anchor using non-destructive ground anchor integrity test (NDT-GRANIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbany, Z.; Handayani, G.

    2015-09-01

    Monitoring at ground anchor commonly uses a pull out test method, therefor we developing a non-destructive ground anchor integrity testing (NDT-GRANIT). NDT-GRANIT using the principle of seismic waves that have been modified into form of sweep signal, the signal will be demodulated, filtered, and Fourier transformation (inverse discrete Fourier transform) so the data can be interpreted reflected wave from the ground anchor. The method was applied to determine whether the ground anchor still gripped in the subsurface by looking the attenuation of the wave generated sources. From the result we can see that ground anchor does not grip. To validate the results of the comparison method of measurement used pile integrity test.

  15. Monitoring ground anchor using non-destructive ground anchor integrity test (NDT-GRANIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Robbany, Z. Handayani, G.

    2015-09-30

    Monitoring at ground anchor commonly uses a pull out test method, therefor we developing a non-destructive ground anchor integrity testing (NDT-GRANIT). NDT-GRANIT using the principle of seismic waves that have been modified into form of sweep signal, the signal will be demodulated, filtered, and Fourier transformation (inverse discrete Fourier transform) so the data can be interpreted reflected wave from the ground anchor. The method was applied to determine whether the ground anchor still gripped in the subsurface by looking the attenuation of the wave generated sources. From the result we can see that ground anchor does not grip. To validate the results of the comparison method of measurement used pile integrity test.

  16. Community genomic and proteomic analysis of chemoautotrophic, iron-oxidizing "Leptospirillum rubarum" (Group II) and Leptospirillum ferrodiazotrophum (Group III) in acid mine drainage biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Goltsman, Daniela; Denef, Vincent; Singer, Steven; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Lefsrud, Mark G; Mueller, Ryan; Dick, Gregory J.; Sun, Christine; Wheeler, Korin; Zelma, Adam; Baker, Brett J.; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Shah, Manesh B; Thelen, Michael P.; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed near-complete population (composite) genomic sequences for coexisting acidophilic iron-oxidizing Leptospirillum Groups II and III bacteria (phylum Nitrospirae) and an extrachromosomal plasmid from a Richmond Mine, CA acid mine drainage (AMD) biofilm. Community proteomic analysis of the genomically characterized sample and two other biofilms identified 64.6% and 44.9% of the predicted proteins of Leptospirillum Groups II and III, respectively and 20% of the predicted plasmid proteins. The bacteria share 92% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity and > 60% of their genes, including integrated plasmid-like regions. The extrachromosomal plasmid encodes conjugation genes with detectable sequence similarity to genes in the integrated conjugative plasmid, but only those on the extrachromosomal element were identified by proteomics. Both bacteria have genes for community-essential functions, including carbon fixation, biosynthesis of vitamins, fatty acids and biopolymers (including cellulose); proteomic analyses reveal these activities. Both Leptospirillum types have multiple pathways for osmotic protection. Although both are motile, signal transduction and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins are more abundant in Leptospirillum Group III, consistent with its distribution in gradients within biofilms. Interestingly, Leptospirillum Group II uses a methyl-dependent and Leptospirillum Group III a methyl-independent response pathway. Although only Leptospirillum Group III can fix nitrogen, these proteins were not identified by proteomics. Abundances of core proteins are similar in all communities, but abundance levels of unique and shared proteins of unknown function vary. Some proteins unique to one organism were highly expressed and may be key to the functional and ecological differentiation of Leptospirillum Groups II and III.

  17. Characterization of acid functional groups of carbon dots by nonlinear regression data fitting of potentiometric titration curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Larissa A.; de Castro, Arthur H.; de Mendonça, Fernanda G.; de Mesquita, João P.

    2016-05-01

    The oxygenated functional groups present on the surface of carbon dots with an average size of 2.7 ± 0.5 nm were characterized by a variety of techniques. In particular, we discussed the fit data of potentiometric titration curves using a nonlinear regression method based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The results obtained by statistical treatment of the titration curve data showed that the best fit was obtained considering the presence of five Brønsted-Lowry acids on the surface of the carbon dots with constant ionization characteristics of carboxylic acids, cyclic ester, phenolic and pyrone-like groups. The total number of oxygenated acid groups obtained was 5 mmol g-1, with approximately 65% (∼2.9 mmol g-1) originating from groups with pKa < 6. The methodology showed good reproducibility and stability with standard deviations below 5%. The nature of the groups was independent of small variations in experimental conditions, i.e. the mass of carbon dots titrated and initial concentration of HCl solution. Finally, we believe that the methodology used here, together with other characterization techniques, is a simple, fast and powerful tool to characterize the complex acid-base properties of these so interesting and intriguing nanoparticles.

  18. A novel role of Rab11 in trafficking GPI-anchored trans-sialidase to the plasma membrane of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Niyogi, Sayantanee; Docampo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is a unicellular parasite that possesses a contractile vacuole complex (CVC). This organelle is usually present in free-living protists and is mainly involved in osmoregulation. However, in some organisms, like for example Dictyostelium discoideum, other roles include calcium homeostasis and transference of proteins to the plasma membrane. T. cruzi plasma membrane is very rich in glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchored proteins (GPI-AP) and a very important group of GPI-AP is that of the trans-sialidases. These enzymes catalyze the transfer of sialic acid from host glycoconjugates to mucins present in the surface of the parasite and are important for host cell invasion among other functions. We recently reported that a pathway dependent on the Rab GTPase Rab11 is involved in the traffic of trans-sialidases to the plasma membrane through the CVC of the infective stages of the parasite and that preventing this traffic results in considerable reduction in the ability of T. cruzi to infect host cells. We also found that traffic of other GPI-anchored proteins is also through the CVC but uses a Rab11-independent pathway. These represent unconventional pathways of GPI-anchored protein traffic to the plasma membrane. PMID:25862161

  19. Test Equating under the NEAT Design: A Necessary Condition for Anchor Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko

    2010-01-01

    Mroch, Suh, Kane, & Ripkey (2009); Suh, Mroch, Kane, & Ripkey (2009); and Kane, Mroch, Suh, & Ripkey (2009) provided elucidating discussions on critical properties of linear equating methods under the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design. In this popular equating design, two test forms are administered to different groups of…

  20. Fully Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting α-2,9-Oligosialic Acid Based Conjugate Vaccines against Group C Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    α-2,9-Polysialic acid is an important capsular polysaccharide expressed by serotype C Neisseria meningitidis. Its protein conjugates are current vaccines against group C meningitis. To address some concerns about traditional protein conjugate vaccines, a new type of fully synthetic vaccines composed of oligosialic acids and glycolipids was explored. In this regard, α-2,9-linked di-, tri-, tetra-, and pentasialic acids were prepared and conjugated with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA). Immunological studies of the conjugates in C57BL/6J mouse revealed that they alone elicited robust immune responses comparable to that induced by corresponding protein conjugates plus adjuvant, suggesting the self-adjuvanting properties of MPLA conjugates. The elicited antibodies were mainly IgG2b and IgG2c, suggesting T cell dependent immunities. The antisera had strong and specific binding to α-2,9-oligosialic acids and to group C meningococcal polysaccharide and cell, indicating the ability of antibodies to selectively target the bacteria. The antisera also mediated strong bactericidal activities. Structure–activity relationship analysis of the MPLA conjugates also revealed that the immunogenicity of oligosialic acids decreased with elongated sugar chain, but all tested MPLA conjugates elicited robust immune responses. It is concluded that tri- and tetrasialic acid–MPLA conjugates are worthy of further investigation as the first fully synthetic and self-adjuvanting vaccines against group C meningitis. PMID:27163051

  1. Photosensitizer anchored gold nanorods for targeted combinational photothermal and photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Tham, Huijun Phoebe; Chen, Hongzhong; Tan, Yu Hui; Qu, Qiuyu; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Zhao, Lingzhi; Venkatraman, Subbu S; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-07-01

    Silylated zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) was anchored onto silica-coated gold nanorods (AuNR) with retained local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). Independent LSPR and singlet oxygen production of anchored ZnPc enhance the photothermal and photodynamic efficacy of the obtained AuNR-Si-ZnPc under NIR light excitation. AuNR-Si-ZnPc was further grafted with hyaluronic acid (HA). Since HA has selective targeting capability to CD44 antigens, the final hybrid could target cancer cells directly for synergistic photothermal and photodynamic therapy. PMID:27346609

  2. Phase II study of zoledronic acid combined with docetaxel for non-small-cell lung cancer: West Japan Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Haruyasu; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Seto, Takashi; Sugio, Kenji; Okamoto, Isamu; Sawa, Toshiyuki; Hirashima, Tomonori; Takeda, Koji; Atagi, Shinji; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this open-label, multicenter, randomized phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of zoledronic acid in combination with docetaxel in previously treated patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and bone metastases. In this study, patients randomly received docetaxel (60 mg/m2) with (group DZ) or without (group D) zoledronic acid every 21 days. There were 50 patients in each group, and the primary endpoint was progression-free survival. In an efficacy analysis of 94 patients (DZ, 48; D, 46), the median progression-free survival was 2.7 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5–3.5 months) for the DZ group and 2.6 months (95% CI, 1.5–3.4 months) for the D group (stratified log-rank test, P = 0.89). The median overall survival was 10.4 months (95% CI, 7.0–15.8 months) for the DZ group and 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.1–12.5 months) for the D group (stratified log-rank test, P = 0.62). There were no clinically relevant differences in the frequencies of grade 3 or 4 adverse events between the two groups. No treatment-related deaths occurred in the DZ group. Zoledronic acid combined with docetaxel was well tolerated but did not meet the primary endpoint of demonstrating a longer progression-free survival in advanced NSCLC patients with bone metastases compared with docetaxel alone. This trial was registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN000001098). PMID:24837137

  3. Thiomers: Influence of molecular mass and thiol group content of poly(acrylic acid) on efflux pump inhibition.

    PubMed

    Grabovac, Vjera; Laffleur, Flavia; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2015-09-30

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of molecular mass and thiol group content of poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine conjugates on the permeation of sulforhodamine 101 and penicillin G. acting as substrates for multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 efflux pump. Poly(acrylic acids) of 2 kDa, 100 kDa, 250 kDa, 450 kDa and 3000 kDa were conjugated with cysteine. The thiol group content of all these polymers was in the range from 343.3 ± 48.4 μmol/g to 450.3 ± 76.1 μmol/g. Transport studies were performed on rat small intestine mounted in Ussing-type chambers. Since 250 kDa poly(acrylic acid) showed the highest permeation enhancing effect, additionally thiolated 250 kDa polyacrylates displaying 157.2 μmol/g, 223.0 ± 18.1 and 355.9 μmol/g thiol groups were synthesized in order to investigate the influence of thiol group content on the permeation enhancement. The permeation of sulforhodamine was 3.93- and 3.85-fold improved using 250 kDa poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine conjugate exhibiting 355.9 ± 39.5 μmol/g and 223.0 ± 18.1 μmol/g thiol groups. Using the same conjugates the permeation of penicillin G was 1.70- and 1.59-fold improved, respectively. The study demonstrates that thiolated poly(acrylic acid) inhibits Mrp2 mediated transport and that the extent of inhibition depends on the molecular mass and degree of thiolation of the polymer. PMID:26238816

  4. Influence of group composition of sulfonic acids on properties of sulfonate additives

    SciTech Connect

    Katrenko, T.I.; Bessonova, R.N.; Kuznetsova, M.G.; Potolovskii, L.A.

    1983-05-01

    Three types of sulfonic acids are formed in sulfonation of petroleum oils-- oil-soluble, oil-insoluble, and water-soluble. This study investigates the influence of the different acids on neutral calcium sulfonates. Samples are recovered from As-14 oil. Oil-insoluble synthesis failed. Water-soluble acid did synthesize with a mix of oil- and water-soluble sulfonates. Neutral calcium sulfonates synthesized from oil-soluble had good properties, from oil-insoluble, bad properties. Oil-insoluble sulfonate also has an inverse effect on cleanup, and it interferes with carbonation. These findings will help with improvements in the sulfonate additive manufacturing process.

  5. NMR contour maps as a new parameter of carboxyl's OH groups in amino acids recognition: A reason of tRNA-amino acid conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monajjemi, Majid; Wayne, Robert; Boggs, James E.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we have applied a statistical method by computing statistical nucleus-independent chemical shifts (SNICS) in point of probes motions within a spatial shielding and de-shielding spaces around the OH groups of some amino acids. NMR contour maps as a new parameter have been created for amino-acyl-tRNA conjugation, by using a computational method to identify this model theoretically, it is critical to understand the reasons for tRNA-amino acid conjugation. DFT, NMR, 3D Gaussian distribution and Monte Carlo methods have been applied for Methionine, Serine, Histidine, Glycine and Glutamine to investigate the structural stability in the active parts of the amino acid-tRNA linkage by chemical shielding effects.

  6. Pristine environments harbor a new group of oligotrophic 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kamagata, Y; Fulthorpe, R R; Tamura, K; Takami, H; Forney, L J; Tiedje, J M

    1997-01-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacteria were isolated from pristine environments which had no history of 2,4-D exposure. By using 2,4-D dye indicator medium or 14C-labeled 2,4-D medium, six strains were isolated from eight enrichment cultures capable of degrading 2,4-D. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing and physiological properties revealed that one isolate from Hawaiian volcanic soil could be classified in the genus Variovorax (a member of the beta subdivision of the class Proteobacteria) and that the other five isolates from Hawaiian volcanic soils, Saskatchewan forest soil, and Chilean forest soil have 16S rDNAs with high degrees of similarity to those of the Bradyrhizobium group (a member of the alpha subdivision of the class Proteobacteria). All the isolates grow slowly on either nutrient media (0.1 x Bacto Peptone-tryptone-yeast extract-glucose [PTYG] or 0.1 x Luria broth [LB] medium) or 2,4-D medium, with mean generation times of 16 to 30 h, which are significantly slower than previously known 2,4-D degraders. Nutrient-rich media such as full-strength PTYG and LB medium did not allow their growth. PCR amplification using internal consensus sequences of tfdA (a gene encoding an enzyme for the first step of 2,4-D mineralization, found in pJP4 of Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 and some other 2,4-D-degrading bacteria) as primers and Southern hybridization with pJP4-tfdA as a probe revealed that the isolate belonging to the genus Variovorax carried the tfdA gene. This gene was transmissible to A. eutrophus JMP228 carrying a plasmid with a mutant tfdA gene. The other five isolates did not appear to carry tfdA, and 2,4-D-specific alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase activity could not be detected in cell lysates. These results indicate that 2,4-D-degrading bacteria in pristine environments are slow-growing bacteria and that most of their phylogenies and catabolic genes differ from those of 2,4-D degraders

  7. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Oi Yoon Michelle; Tan, Wooi Boon; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae) fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker) and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes) from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530) were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams’s Kmult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the outer root

  8. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Khang, Tsung Fei; Soo, Oi Yoon Michelle; Tan, Wooi Boon; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae) fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker) and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes) from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530) were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams's K mult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the outer root

  9. 5'to 3' nucleic acid synthesis using 3'-photoremovable protecting group

    DOEpatents

    Pirrung, Michael C.; Shuey, Steven W.; Bradley, Jean-Claude

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates, in general, to a method of synthesizing a nucleic acid, and, in particular, to a method of effecting 5' to 3' nucleic acid synthesis. The method can be used to prepare arrays of oligomers bound to a support via their 5' end. The invention also relates to a method of effecting mutation analysis using such arrays. The invention further relates to compounds and compositions suitable for use in such methods.

  10. 5[prime] to 3[prime] nucleic acid synthesis using 3[prime]-photoremovable protecting group

    DOEpatents

    Pirrung, M.C.; Shuey, S.W.; Bradley, J.C.

    1999-06-01

    The present invention relates, in general, to a method of synthesizing a nucleic acid, and, in particular, to a method of effecting 5[prime] to 3[prime] nucleic acid synthesis. The method can be used to prepare arrays of oligomers bound to a support via their 5[prime] end. The invention also relates to a method of effecting mutation analysis using such arrays. The invention further relates to compounds and compositions suitable for use in such methods.

  11. Acetic acid bacteria: A group of bacteria with versatile biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Saichana, Natsaran; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao; Frébort, Ivo; Frebortova, Jitka

    2015-11-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are gram-negative obligate aerobic bacteria assigned to the family Acetobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. They are members of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Swaminathania, Saccharibacter, Neoasaia, Granulibacter, Tanticharoenia, Ameyamaea, Neokomagataea, and Komagataeibacter. Many strains of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter have been known to possess high acetic acid fermentation ability as well as the acetic acid and ethanol resistance, which are considered to be useful features for industrial production of acetic acid and vinegar, the commercial product. On the other hand, Gluconobacter strains have the ability to perform oxidative fermentation of various sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar acids leading to the formation of several valuable products. Thermotolerant strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated in order to serve as the new strains of choice for industrial fermentations, in which the cooling costs for maintaining optimum growth and production temperature in the fermentation vessels could be significantly reduced. Genetic modifications by adaptation and genetic engineering were also applied to improve their properties, such as productivity and heat resistance. PMID:25485864

  12. The Effect of Methyl, Hydroxyl, and Ketone Functional Groups on the Heterogeneous Oxidation of Succinic Acid Aerosol by OH Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M.; Zhang, H.; Wilson, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous oxidation of atmospheric organic aerosols can influence their effects on climate, human health, and visibility. During oxidation, functionalization occurs when an oxygenated functional group is added to a molecule, leaving the carbon skeleton intact. Fragmentation involves carbon-carbon bond cleavage and produces two products with smaller carbon numbers than the parent compound. To gain better insights into how the molecular structure of more oxygenated organic compounds affects heterogeneous reactivity, succinic acid aerosols are photo-oxidized in an aerosol flow tube reactor, and the reaction products are analyzed using Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry for online chemical analysis. The effect of various functional groups (CH3, OH, C=O) along the carbon backbone on the heterogeneous reaction mechanisms are also investigated using model compounds. For this series of compounds, the formation of more oxygenated products through functionalization can be explained by well-known condensation-phase reactions such as Russell and Bennett and Summers. The number of fragmentation products is found to increase with the presence of OH and CH3 groups. This can be attributed to the increased number of tertiary carbons, enhancing the fragmentation after multiple oxidation steps. Smaller dicaids (oxalic acid and malonic acid) can be formed through the fragmentation processes in the heterogeneous oxidation of succinic acid. The effect of molecular structure on reaction kinetics, volatilization, and the relative importance of functionalization and fragmentation pathways will be discussed.

  13. Effect the conditions of the acid-thermal modification of clinoptilolite have on the catalytic properties of palladium-copper complexes anchored on it in the reaction of carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitskaya, T. L.; Kiose, T. A.; Ennan, A. A.; Golubchik, K. O.; Oleksenko, L. P.; Gerasiova, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of the physicochemical and structural-adsorption properties of natural and acid-thermal modified clinoptilolite, and of Pd(II)-Cu(II) catalysts based on them, on the duration of acid-thermal modification is investigated. The samples under study are described via XRD and thermal gravimetric (DTG and DTA) analysis, IR, DR UV-Vis, EPR spectroscopy, and water vapor adsorption. Values of both the specific surface area ( S sp) and pH of aqueous suspensions are determined. The resulting catalysts are tested in the reaction of low-temperature carbon monoxide oxidation with air oxygen. A conclusion is drawn about the nature of surface bimetallic Pd(II)-Cu(II) complexes. The greatest catalytic activity is shown by complexes based on clinoptilolite and modified with 3 M HNO3 for 0.5 and 1 h.

  14. Finding Chemical Anchors in the Kitchen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haim, Liliana

    2005-01-01

    ''The Chemistry Kitchen'', a unit composed of five activities with kitchen elements for elementary students ages 9-11, introduces the children to the skills and chemical working ideas to be used later as anchors for chemical concepts. These activities include kitchen elements, determining the relative mass and so on.

  15. International Lunar Network (ILN) Anchor Nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the United States' contribution to the International Lunar Network (ILN) project, the Anchor Nodes project. The ILN is an initiative of 9 national space agencies to establish a set of robotic geophysical monitoring stations on the surface of the Moon. The project is aimed at furthering the understanding of the lunar composition, and interior structure.

  16. Expectations of Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Rick; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Behaviorally anchored rating scales (BARS) are no better or worse than other methods when assessed on a quantitative basis but have greater potential when assessed on use and qualitative criteria. Suggestions are offered for extending BARS research to process questions and domains other than performance appraisal. (Author)

  17. 50 CFR 622.432 - Anchoring restriction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anchoring restriction. 622.432 Section 622.432 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Reef...

  18. 50 CFR 622.432 - Anchoring restriction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anchoring restriction. 622.432 Section 622.432 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Reef...

  19. 24 CFR 3285.401 - Anchoring instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.401... wind by use of anchor assembly type installations or by connecting the home to an alternative... must require the home to be secured against the wind, as described in this section. The...

  20. 24 CFR 3285.401 - Anchoring instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.401... wind by use of anchor assembly type installations or by connecting the home to an alternative... must require the home to be secured against the wind, as described in this section. The...

  1. Anchoring the Panic Disorder Severity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keough, Meghan E.; Porter, Eliora; Kredlow, M. Alexandra; Worthington, John J.; Hoge, Elizabeth A.; Pollack, Mark H.; Shear, M. Katherine; Simon, Naomi M.

    2012-01-01

    The Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) is a clinician-administered measure of panic disorder symptom severity widely used in clinical research. This investigation sought to provide clinically meaningful anchor points for the PDSS both in terms of clinical severity as measured by the Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) and to extend…

  2. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed. PMID:27166952

  3. 63. ANCHOR WINDLASS ROOM AFT LOOKING FORWARD ON CENTERLINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. ANCHOR WINDLASS ROOM - AFT LOOKING FORWARD ON CENTERLINE SHOWING LINE REELS, MAIN ANCHOR CHAIN, CHAIN STOPPERS, CAPSTAN AND CONTROLS. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  4. 9. CABLE ANCHORAGE DETAIL, NORTHWEST ABUTMENT (NOTE MOSSCOVERED CONCRETE ANCHOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CABLE ANCHORAGE DETAIL, NORTHWEST ABUTMENT (NOTE MOSS-COVERED CONCRETE ANCHOR LEFT OF ANCHOR BOLTS) - Nisqually Suspension Bridge, Spanning Nisqually River on Service Road, Longmire, Pierce County, WA

  5. 345. Caltrans, Photographer September 20, 1935 "WEST ANCHOR ARM"; DETAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    345. Caltrans, Photographer September 20, 1935 "WEST ANCHOR ARM"; DETAIL VIEW OF CANTILEVER TRUSS WEST ANCHOR ARM UNDER CONSTRUCTION. 7-1023 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed. PMID:27166952

  7. SNP discovery and chromosome anchoring provide the first physically-anchored hexaploid oat map and reveal synteny with model species.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Rebekah E; Tinker, Nicholas A; Lazo, Gerard R; Chao, Shiaoman; Jellen, Eric N; Carson, Martin L; Rines, Howard W; Obert, Donald E; Lutz, Joseph D; Shackelford, Irene; Korol, Abraham B; Wight, Charlene P; Gardner, Kyle M; Hattori, Jiro; Beattie, Aaron D; Bjørnstad, Åsmund; Bonman, J Michael; Jannink, Jean-Luc; Sorrells, Mark E; Brown-Guedira, Gina L; Mitchell Fetch, Jennifer W; Harrison, Stephen A; Howarth, Catherine J; Ibrahim, Amir; Kolb, Frederic L; McMullen, Michael S; Murphy, J Paul; Ohm, Herbert W; Rossnagel, Brian G; Yan, Weikai; Miclaus, Kelci J; Hiller, Jordan; Maughan, Peter J; Redman Hulse, Rachel R; Anderson, Joseph M; Islamovic, Emir; Jackson, Eric W

    2013-01-01

    A physically anchored consensus map is foundational to modern genomics research; however, construction of such a map in oat (Avena sativa L., 2n = 6x = 42) has been hindered by the size and complexity of the genome, the scarcity of robust molecular markers, and the lack of aneuploid stocks. Resources developed in this study include a modified SNP discovery method for complex genomes, a diverse set of oat SNP markers, and a novel chromosome-deficient SNP anchoring strategy. These resources were applied to build the first complete, physically-anchored consensus map of hexaploid oat. Approximately 11,000 high-confidence in silico SNPs were discovered based on nine million inter-varietal sequence reads of genomic and cDNA origin. GoldenGate genotyping of 3,072 SNP assays yielded 1,311 robust markers, of which 985 were mapped in 390 recombinant-inbred lines from six bi-parental mapping populations ranging in size from 49 to 97 progeny. The consensus map included 985 SNPs and 68 previously-published markers, resolving 21 linkage groups with a total map distance of 1,838.8 cM. Consensus linkage groups were assigned to 21 chromosomes using SNP deletion analysis of chromosome-deficient monosomic hybrid stocks. Alignments with sequenced genomes of rice and Brachypodium provide evidence for extensive conservation of genomic regions, and renewed encouragement for orthology-based genomic discovery in this important hexaploid species. These results also provide a framework for high-resolution genetic analysis in oat, and a model for marker development and map construction in other species with complex genomes and limited resources. PMID:23533580

  8. Grouping of amino acids and recognition of protein structurally conserved regions by reduced alphabets of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Wei

    2007-06-01

    Sequence alignment is a common method for finding protein structurally conserved/similar regions. However, sequence alignment is often not accurate if sequence identities between to-be-aligned sequences are less than 30%. This is because that for these sequences, different residues may play similar structural roles and they are incorrectly aligned during the sequence alignment using substitution matrix consisting of 20 types of residues. Based on the similarity of physicochemical features, residues can be clustered into a few groups. Using such simplified alphabets, the complexity of protein sequences is reduced and at the same time the key information encoded in the sequences remains. As a result, the accuracy of sequence alignment might be improved if the residues are properly clustered. Here, by using a database of aligned protein structures (DAPS), a new clustering method based on the substitution scores is proposed for the grouping of residues, and substitution matrices of residues at different levels of simplification are constructed. The validity of the reduced alphabets is confirmed by relative entropy analysis. The reduced alphabets are applied to recognition of protein structurally conserved/similar regions by sequence alignment. The results indicate that the accuracy or efficiency of sequence alignment can be improved with the optimal reduced alphabet with N around 9. PMID:17609897

  9. Leaving group activation by aromatic stacking: an alternative to general acid catalysis.

    PubMed

    Versées, Wim; Loverix, Stefan; Vandemeulebroucke, An; Geerlings, Paul; Steyaert, Jan

    2004-04-16

    General acid catalysis is a powerful and widely used strategy in enzymatic nucleophilic displacement reactions. For example, hydrolysis/phosphorolysis of the N-glycosidic bond in nucleosides and nucleotides commonly involves the protonation of the leaving nucleobase concomitant with nucleophilic attack. However, in the nucleoside hydrolase of the parasite Trypanosoma vivax, crystallographic and mutagenesis studies failed to identify a general acid. This enzyme binds the purine base of the substrate between the aromatic side-chains of Trp83 and Trp260. Here, we show via quantum chemical calculations that face-to-face stacking can raise the pKa of a heterocyclic aromatic compound by several units. Site-directed mutagenesis combined with substrate engineering demonstrates that Trp260 catalyzes the cleavage of the glycosidic bond by promoting the protonation of the purine base at N-7, hence functioning as an alternative to general acid catalysis. PMID:15050818

  10. One-pot assembly of metal/organic-acid sites on amine-functionalized ligands of MOFs for photocatalytic hydrogen peroxide splitting.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lei; Li, Zhaowen; Hu, Qiong; Xu, Zehai; Guo, Xinwen; Zhang, Guoliang

    2016-06-01

    A one-pot organic-acid-directed post-synthetic modification allows molecular iron/citric acid complexes to be anchored into amine-functionalized MOFs by a simple and rapid liquid spraying method. Amidation between organic acid and -NH2 groups of ligands can lead to more small nanoparticles (NPs) that are well-dispersed into MOFs and exhibit high activity for photocatalytic H2O2 splitting. PMID:27166081

  11. Hydrogen-bond acidity of OH groups in various molecular environments (phenols, alcohols, steroid derivatives, and amino acids structures): experimental measurements and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Graton, Jérôme; Besseau, François; Brossard, Anne-Marie; Charpentier, Eloïse; Deroche, Arnaud; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2013-12-12

    The hydrogen-bond (H-bond) donating strengths of a series of 36 hydroxylic H-bond donors (HBDs) with N-methylpyrrolidinone have been measured in CCl4 solution by FTIR spectrometry. These data allow the definition of a H-bond acidity scale named pKAHY covering almost three pK units, corresponding to 16 kJ mol(-1). These results are supplemented by equilibrium constants determined in CH2Cl2 for one-third of the data set to study compounds showing a poor solubility in CCl4. A systematic comparison of these experimental results with theoretical data computed in the gas phase using DFT (density functional theory) calculations has also been carried out. Quantum electrostatic parameters appear to accurately describe the H-bond acidity of the hydroxyl group, whereas partial atomic charges according to the Merz-Singh-Kollman and CHelpG schemes are not suitable for this purpose. A substantial decrease of the H-bond acidity of the OH group is pointed out when the hydroxyl moiety is involved in intramolecular H-bond interactions. In such situations, the interactions are further characterized through AIM and NBO analyses, which respectively allow localizing the corresponding bond critical point and the quantification of a significant charge transfer from the available lone pair to the σ*OH antibonding orbital. Eventually, the H-bond ability of the hydroxyl groups of steroid derivatives and of lateral chains of amino acids are evaluated on the basis of experimental and/or theoretical data. PMID:24274054

  12. AnchorDock: Blind and Flexible Anchor-Driven Peptide Docking.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shimon, Avraham; Niv, Masha Y

    2015-05-01

    The huge conformational space stemming from the inherent flexibility of peptides is among the main obstacles to successful and efficient computational modeling of protein-peptide interactions. Current peptide docking methods typically overcome this challenge using prior knowledge from the structure of the complex. Here we introduce AnchorDock, a peptide docking approach, which automatically targets the docking search to the most relevant parts of the conformational space. This is done by precomputing the free peptide's structure and by computationally identifying anchoring spots on the protein surface. Next, a free peptide conformation undergoes anchor-driven simulated annealing molecular dynamics simulations around the predicted anchoring spots. In the challenging task of a completely blind docking test, AnchorDock produced exceptionally good results (backbone root-mean-square deviation ≤ 2.2Å, rank ≤15) for 10 of 13 unbound cases tested. The impressive performance of AnchorDock supports a molecular recognition pathway that is driven via pre-existing local structural elements. PMID:25914054

  13. Career Paths, Images and Anchors: A Study with Brazilian Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilimnik, Zelia Miranda; de Oliveira, Luiz Claudio Vieira; Sant'anna, Anderson De Souza; Barros, Delba Teixeira Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses career anchors changes associated to images and professionals trajectories. Its main question: Do anchors careers change through time? We conducted twelve interviews involving professionals from the Administration Area, applying Schein's Career Anchors Inventory (1993). We did the same two years later. In both of them, the…

  14. Students' Anchoring Predisposition: An Illustration from Spring Training Baseball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrweis, Lawrence C.

    2014-01-01

    The anchoring tendency results when decision makers anchor on initial values and then make final assessments that are adjusted insufficiently away from the initial values. The professional literature recognizes that auditors often risk falling into the judgment trap of anchoring and adjusting (Ranzilla et al., 2011). Students may also be unaware…

  15. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzell, Marta C.; Raju, Muralikrishna; Watson, Valerie J.; Stack, Andrew G.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-11-03

    We report that the amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10–5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g–1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in the LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g–1) had a negative rise potential (₋31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to ₋6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. In conclusion, these results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.

  16. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hatzell, Marta C.; Raju, Muralikrishna; Watson, Valerie J.; Stack, Andrew G.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-11-03

    We report that the amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10–5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g–1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in themore » LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g–1) had a negative rise potential (₋31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to ₋6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. In conclusion, these results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.« less

  17. Synthesis, characterization, guest inclusion, and photophysical studies of gold nanoparticles stabilized with carboxylic acid groups of organic cavitands.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Barnali; Kamatham, Nareshbabu; Samanta, Shampa R; Jagadesan, Pradeepkumar; He, Jibao; Ramamurthy, V

    2013-10-15

    Water-soluble gold nanoparticles (AuNP) stabilized with cavitands having carboxylic acid groups have been synthesized and characterized by a variety of techniques. Apparently, the COOH groups similar to thiol are able to prevent aggregation of AuNP. These AuNP were stable either as solids or in aqueous solution. Most importantly, these cavitand functionalized AuNP were able to include organic guest molecules in their cavities in aqueous solution. Just like free cavitands (e.g., octa acid), cavitand functionalized AuNP includes guests such as 4,4'-dimethylbenzil and coumarin-1 through capsule formation. The exact structure of the capsular assembly is not known at this stage. Upon excitation there is communication between the excited guest present in the capsule and gold atoms and this results in quenching of phosphorescence from 4,4'-dimethylbenzil and fluorescence from coumarin-1. PMID:24059841

  18. Metal-organic coordination architectures of azole heterocycle ligands bearing acetic acid groups: Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Bowen; Zhao Jiongpeng; Yang Qian; Hu Tongliang; Du Wenping; Bu Xianhe

    2009-10-15

    Four new coordination complexes with azole heterocycle ligands bearing acetic acid groups, [Co(L{sup 1}){sub 2}]{sub n} (1), [CuL{sup 1}N{sub 3}]{sub n} (2), [Cu(L{sup 2}){sub 2}.0.5C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH.H{sub 2}O]{sub n} (3) and [Co(L{sup 2}){sub 2}]{sub n} (4) (here, HL{sup 1}=1H-imidazole-1-yl-acetic acid, HL{sup 2}=1H-benzimidazole-1-yl-acetic acid) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Single-crystal structure analysis shows that 3 and 4 are 2D complexes with 4{sup 4}-sql topologies, while another 2D complex 1 has a (4{sup 3}){sub 2}(4{sup 6})-kgd topology. And 2 is a 3D complex composed dinuclear mu{sub 1,1}-bridging azido Cu{sup II} entities with distorted rutile topology. The magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have been studied. - Graphical Abstract: The synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the new coordination complexes with azole heterocycle ligands bearing acetic acid groups are reported.

  19. Sulphydryl groups and iodo-(/sup 3/H)acetic acid labeling in proteolipids from Torpedo electroplax

    SciTech Connect

    Criado, M.; Aguilar, J.S.; De Robertis, E.

    1983-05-01

    Several fractions of proteolipids from Torpedo electroplax were separated by DEAE-cellulose chromatography in organic solvents, and the sulphydryl groups were determined by a spectrophotometric method. On the same fractions the covalent labeling with iodo-(/sup 3/H)acetic acid to sulphydryl groups was studied. In total proteolipids there were 30.3 nmol/mg protein of sulphydryl groups of which 20.6 nmoles were in the form of disulfide bonds and 10.9 nmol as free--SH groups. The highest content of sulphydryl groups (36.7 nmol/mg protein) was found in fraction II; while fraction I, that binds the cholinergic ligands, has a lower content (23.7 nmol/mg protein). The 42 Kdaltons polypeptide, which is the major band in Fraction II, has the strongest labeling with iodo-(/sup 3/H)acetic acid, while the 39 Kdaltons cholinergic polypeptide shows a lower labeling. The importance of proteolipids as channel-forming macromolecules is discussed in connection with the possible significance of the 42 Kdaltons polypeptide.

  20. Apatite-forming ability of vinylphosphonic acid-based copolymer in simulated body fluid: effects of phosphate group content.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Ryo; Shirosaki, Yuki; Miyazaki, Toshiki

    2016-10-01

    Phosphate groups on materials surfaces are known to contribute to apatite formation upon exposure of the materials in simulated body fluid and improved affinity of the materials for osteoblast-like cells. Typically, polymers containing phosphate groups are organic matrices consisting of apatite-polymer composites prepared by biomimetic process using simulated body fluid. Ca(2+) incorporation into the polymer accelerates apatite formation in simulated body fluid owing because of increase in the supersaturation degree, with respect to apatite in simulated body fluid, owing to Ca(2+) release from the polymer. However, the effects of phosphate content on the Ca(2+) release and apatite-forming abilities of copolymers in simulated body fluid are rather elusive. In this study, a phosphate-containing copolymer prepared from vinylphosphonic acid, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate was examined. The release of Ca(2+) in Tris-NaCl buffer and simulated body fluid increased as the additive amount of vinylphosphonic acid increased. However, apatite formation was suppressed as the phosphate groups content increased despite the enhanced release of Ca(2+) from the polymer. This phenomenon was reflected by changes in the surface zeta potential. Thus, it was concluded that the apatite-forming ability of vinylphosphonic acid-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-triethylene glycol dimethacrylate copolymer treated with CaCl2 solution was governed by surface state rather than Ca(2+) release in simulated body fluid. PMID:27585911

  1. Trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions by a sol–gel synthesized silica adsorbent functionalized with sulphonic acid groups

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Sergio Efrain; Carbajal-Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe; Manriquez-Gonzalez, Ricardo; De la Cruz-Hernandez, Wencel; Gomez-Salazar, Sergio

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Corpuscular sulphonic acid-functionalized silica holds improved uptake of chromium. • Mesopores on adsorbent facilitate (CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}Cr{sup +} ion uptake on sulphonate sites. • Formation of chromium acetate sulphonate complex proposed from XPS results. • Fixed bed chromium uptake results suggest potential industrial use. - Abstract: A high capacity hybrid silica adsorbent was synthesized via sol–gel processing with sulphonic acid groups as trivalent chromium complex ions chelators from aqueous solutions. The synthesis included co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) with 3-(mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPS), and oxidation of thiol to sulphonic acid groups. Chromium uptake kinetic, batch and fixed-bed experiments were performed to assess the removal of this metal from aqueous solutions. {sup 13}C, {sup 29}Si CPMAS NMR, FTIR, XPS were used to characterize the adsorbent structure and the nature of chromium complexes on the adsorbent surface. Chromium maximum uptake was obtained at pH 3 (72.8 mg/g). Elemental analysis results showed ligand density of 1.48 mmol sulphonic groups/g. About 407 mL of Cr(III) solution (311 mg/L) were treated to breakthrough point reaching ≤0.06 mg/L at the effluent. These results comply with USEPA regulation for chromium concentration in drinking water (≤0.1 mg/L). The adsorbent shows potential to be used in chromium separations to the industrial level.

  2. Multinomial logistic regression model to assess the levels in trans, trans-muconic acid and inferential-risk age group among benzene-exposed group.

    PubMed

    Mala, A; Ravichandran, B; Raghavan, S; Rajmohan, H R

    2010-08-01

    There are only a few studies performed on multinomial logistic regression on the benzene-exposed occupational group. A study was carried out to assess the relationship between the benzene concentration and trans-trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA), biomarkers in urine samples from petrol filling workers. A total of 117 workers involved in this occupation were selected for this current study. Generally, logistic regression analysis (LR) is a common statistical technique that could be used to predict the likelihood of categorical or binary or dichotomous outcome variables. The multinomial logistic regression equations were used to predict the relationship between benzene concentration and t,t-MA. The results showed a significant correlation between benzene and t,t-MA among the petrol fillers. Prediction equations were estimated by adopting the physical characteristic viz., age, experience in years and job categories of petrol filling station workers. Interestingly, there was no significant difference observed among experience in years. Petrol fillers and cashiers having a higher occupational risk were in the age group of ≤24 and between 25 and 34 years. Among the petrol fillers, the t,t-MA levels with exceeding ACGIH TWA-TLV level was showing to be more significant. This study demonstrated that multinomial logistic regression is an effective model for profiling the greatest risk of the benzene-exposed group caused by different explanatory variables. PMID:21120078

  3. Multinomial logistic regression model to assess the levels in trans, trans-muconic acid and inferential-risk age group among benzene-exposed group

    PubMed Central

    Mala, A.; Ravichandran, B.; Raghavan, S.; Rajmohan, H. R.

    2010-01-01

    There are only a few studies performed on multinomial logistic regression on the benzene-exposed occupational group. A study was carried out to assess the relationship between the benzene concentration and trans-trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA), biomarkers in urine samples from petrol filling workers. A total of 117 workers involved in this occupation were selected for this current study. Generally, logistic regression analysis (LR) is a common statistical technique that could be used to predict the likelihood of categorical or binary or dichotomous outcome variables. The multinomial logistic regression equations were used to predict the relationship between benzene concentration and t,t-MA. The results showed a significant correlation between benzene and t,t-MA among the petrol fillers. Prediction equations were estimated by adopting the physical characteristic viz., age, experience in years and job categories of petrol filling station workers. Interestingly, there was no significant difference observed among experience in years. Petrol fillers and cashiers having a higher occupational risk were in the age group of ≤24 and between 25 and 34 years. Among the petrol fillers, the t,t-MA levels with exceeding ACGIH TWA-TLV level was showing to be more significant. This study demonstrated that multinomial logistic regression is an effective model for profiling the greatest risk of the benzene-exposed group caused by different explanatory variables. PMID:21120078

  4. Substrate-anchored and degradation-sensitive anti-inflammatory coatings for implant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Duo; Chen, Xingyu; Chen, Tianchan; Ding, Chunmei; Wu, Wei; Li, Jianshu

    2015-06-01

    Implant materials need to be highly biocompatible to avoid inflammation in clinical practice. Although biodegradable polymeric implants can eliminate the need for a second surgical intervention to remove the implant materials, they may produce acidic degradation products in vivo and cause non-bacterial inflammation. Here we show the strategy of “substrate-anchored and degradation-sensitive coatings” for biodegradable implants. Using poly(lactic acid)/hydroxyapatite as an implant material model, we constructed a layer-by-layer coating using pH-sensitive star polymers and dendrimers loaded with an anti-inflammatory drug, which was immobilised through a hydroxyapatite-anchored layer. The multifunctional coating can effectively suppress the local inflammation caused by the degradation of implant materials for at least 8 weeks in vivo. Moreover, the substrate-anchored coating is able to modulate the degradation of the substrate in a more homogeneous manner. The “substrate-anchored and degradation-sensitive coating” strategy therefore exhibits potential for the design of various self-anti-inflammatory biodegradable implant materials.

  5. Substrate-anchored and degradation-sensitive anti-inflammatory coatings for implant materials

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Duo; Chen, Xingyu; Chen, Tianchan; Ding, Chunmei; Wu, Wei; Li, Jianshu

    2015-01-01

    Implant materials need to be highly biocompatible to avoid inflammation in clinical practice. Although biodegradable polymeric implants can eliminate the need for a second surgical intervention to remove the implant materials, they may produce acidic degradation products in vivo and cause non-bacterial inflammation. Here we show the strategy of “substrate-anchored and degradation-sensitive coatings” for biodegradable implants. Using poly(lactic acid)/hydroxyapatite as an implant material model, we constructed a layer-by-layer coating using pH-sensitive star polymers and dendrimers loaded with an anti-inflammatory drug, which was immobilised through a hydroxyapatite-anchored layer. The multifunctional coating can effectively suppress the local inflammation caused by the degradation of implant materials for at least 8 weeks in vivo. Moreover, the substrate-anchored coating is able to modulate the degradation of the substrate in a more homogeneous manner. The “substrate-anchored and degradation-sensitive coating” strategy therefore exhibits potential for the design of various self-anti-inflammatory biodegradable implant materials. PMID:26077243

  6. Does the tail wag the dog? How the structure of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor affects prion formation.

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing interest in the role of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor attached to the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)). Since GPI anchors can alter protein targeting, trafficking and cell signaling, our recent study examined how the structure of the GPI anchor affected prion formation. PrP(C) containing a GPI anchor from which the sialic acid had been removed (desialylated PrP(C)) was not converted to PrP(Sc) in prion-infected neuronal cell lines and in scrapie-infected primary cortical neurons. In uninfected neurons desialylated PrP(C) was associated with greater concentrations of gangliosides and cholesterol than PrP(C). In addition, the targeting of desialylated PrP(C) to lipid rafts showed greater resistance to cholesterol depletion than PrP(C). The presence of desialylated PrP(C) caused the dissociation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) from PrP-containing lipid rafts, reduced the activation of cPLA2 and inhibited PrP(Sc) production. We conclude that the sialic acid moiety of the GPI attached to PrP(C) modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrP(Sc) formation. PMID:26901126

  7. Interference Screw vs. Suture Anchor Fixation for Open Subpectoral Biceps Tenodesis: Does it Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Millett, Peter J; Sanders, Brett; Gobezie, Reuben; Braun, Sepp; Warner, Jon JP

    2008-01-01

    Background Bioabsorbable interference screw fixation has superior biomechanical properties compared to suture anchor fixation for biceps tenodesis. However, it is unknown whether fixation technique influences clinical results. Hypothesis We hypothesize that subpectoral interference screw fixation offers relevant clinical advantages over suture anchor fixation for biceps tenodesis. Study Design Case Series. Methods We performed a retrospective review of a consecutive series of 88 patients receiving open subpectoral biceps tenodesis with either interference screw fixation (34 patients) or suture anchor fixation (54 patients). Average follow up was 13 months. Outcomes included Visual Analogue Pain Scale (0–10), ASES score, modified Constant score, pain at the tenodesis site, failure of fixation, cosmesis, deformity (popeye) and complications. Results There were no failures of fixation in this study. All patients showed significant improvement between their preoperative and postoperative status with regard to pain, ASES score, and abbreviated modified Constant scores. When comparing IF screw versus anchor outcomes, there was no statistical significance difference for VAS (p = 0.4), ASES score (p = 0.2), and modified Constant score (P = 0.09). One patient (3%) treated with IF screw complained of persistent bicipital groove tenderness, versus four patients (7%) in the SA group (nonsignificant). Conclusion Subpectoral biceps tenodesis reliably relieves pain and improves function. There was no statistically significant difference in the outcomes studied between the two fixation techniques. Residual pain at the site of tenodesis may be an issue when suture anchors are used in the subpectoral location. PMID:18793424

  8. Maleimide-functionalized lipids that anchor polypeptides to lipid bilayers and membranes.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J T; Prestwich, G D

    2000-01-01

    Two maleimide-containing diacylglycerol derivatives were synthesized to permit the anchoring of short peptides and longer polypeptides to phospholipid bilayers and membranes. The maleimide was introduced at the site normally occupied by a phospholipid headgroup. The first lipid, the dipalmitoyl ester of 1-maleimido-2,3-propanediol, was developed as a membrane anchor for extracellular domains of transmembrane proteins. The second anchoring lipid, in which the 3-position contained a 6-aminohexanoate, was designed for convenient modification with amine-reactive reporter groups. Specifically, the NBD fluorophore, 7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole-aminohexanoic-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester, was attached to give an fluorescent anchoring reagent. Next, these reagents were applied to the anchoring of a C-terminally cysteamine-modified 8 kDa polypeptide that comprises the extracellular N-terminal domain of the human thrombin receptor, a transmembrane protease-activated receptor (PAR-1). Gel filtration and fluorescence analysis showed that the fluorescent lipopolypeptide spontaneously inserted into preformed phospholipid vesicles, but it did not insert into whole cell membranes. In contrast, the dipalmitoyl derivative could only be reconstituted into artificial membranes by mixing the lipopolypeptide and phospholipid before vesicle formation. These results suggest that biophysical interactions governing the lipopolypeptide insertion into artificial and cellular membranes may differ. The thiol-reactive lipidating reagents should be valuable materials for studying the structure and function of peptides and polypeptides at phospholipid bilayer surfaces. PMID:11087332

  9. Investigating Repeater Effects on Chained Equipercentile Equating with Common Anchor Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sooyeon; Walker, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of repeat takers of a licensure test on the equating functions in the context of a nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design. Examinees who had taken a new, to-be-equated form of the test were divided into three subgroups according to their previous testing experience: (a) repeaters who previously took…

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of novel dental monomer with branched carboxyl acid group

    PubMed Central

    Song, Linyong; Ye, Qiang; Ge, Xueping; Misra, Anil; Laurence, Jennifer S.; Berrie, Cynthia L.; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the water miscibility and increase the mechanical properties of dentin adhesives, a new glycerol-based monomer with vinyl and carboxylic acid, 4-((1,3-bis(-methacryloyloxy)propan-2-yl)oxy)-2-methylene-4-oxobutanoic acid (BMPMOB), was synthesized and characterized. Dentin adhesive formulations containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]propane (BisGMA), and BMPMOB were characterized with regard to real-time photopolymerization behavior, water sorption, dynamic mechanical analysis, and microscale three-dimensional internal morphologies and compared with HEMA/BisGMA controls. The experimental adhesive copolymers showed higher glass transition temperature and rubbery moduli, as well as improved water miscibility compared to the controls. The enhanced properties of the adhesive copolymers indicated that BMPMOB is a promising comonomer for dental restorative materials. PMID:24596134

  11. Hyaluronic acid nanogels with enzyme-sensitive cross-linking group for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenchen; Wang, Xin; Yao, Xikuang; Zhang, Yajun; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2015-05-10

    A methacrylation strategy was employed to functionalize hyaluronic acid and prepare hyaluronic acid (HA) nanogels. Dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analyzer and electron microscopy were utilized to characterize the nanogels and their enzyme-degradability in vitro. It was found that these nanogels had a spherical morphology with the diameter of about 70nm, and negative surface potential. When doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded into the nanogels, the diameter decreased to approximately 50nm with a drug loading content of 16% and encapsulation efficiency of 62%. Cellular uptake examinations showed that HA nanogels could be preferentially internalized by two-dimensional (2D) cells and three-dimensional (3D) multicellular spheroids (MCs) which both overexpress CD44 receptor. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging, biodistribution and penetration examinations in tumor tissue indicated that the HA nanogels could efficiently accumulate and penetrate the tumor matrix. In vivo antitumor evaluation found that DOX-loaded HA nanogels exhibited a significantly superior antitumor effect. PMID:25665867

  12. Mussel-Inspired Anchoring of Polymer Loops That Provide Superior Surface Lubrication and Antifouling Properties.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taegon; Banquy, Xavier; Heo, Jinhwa; Lim, Chanoong; Lynd, Nathaniel A; Lundberg, Pontus; Oh, Dongyeop X; Lee, Han-Koo; Hong, Yong-Ki; Hwang, Dong Soo; Waite, John Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Hawker, Craig J

    2016-01-26

    We describe robustly anchored triblock copolymers that adopt loop conformations on surfaces and endow them with unprecedented lubricating and antifouling properties. The triblocks have two end blocks with catechol-anchoring groups and a looping poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) midblock. The loops mediate strong steric repulsion between two mica surfaces. When sheared at constant speeds of ∼2.5 μm/s, the surfaces exhibit an extremely low friction coefficient of ∼0.002-0.004 without any signs of damage up to pressures of ∼2-3 MPa that are close to most biological bearing systems. Moreover, the polymer loops enhance inhibition of cell adhesion and proliferation compared to polymers in the random coil or brush conformations. These results demonstrate that strongly anchored polymer loops are effective for high lubrication and low cell adhesion and represent a promising candidate for the development of specialized high-performance biomedical coatings. PMID:26695175

  13. Chemical rescue, multiple ionizable groups, and general acid-base catalysis in the HDV genomic ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Anne T; Wadkins, Timothy S; Been, Michael D

    2006-07-01

    In the ribozyme from the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) genomic strand RNA, a cytosine side chain is proposed to facilitate proton transfer in the transition state of the reaction and, thus, act as a general acid-base catalyst. Mutation of this active-site cytosine (C75) reduced RNA cleavage rates by as much as one million-fold, but addition of exogenous cytosine and certain nucleobase or imidazole analogs can partially rescue activity in these mutants. However, pH-rate profiles for the rescued reactions were bell shaped, and only one leg of the pH-rate curve could be attributed to ionization of the exogenous nucleobase or buffer. When a second potential ionizable nucleobase (C41) was removed, one leg of the bell-shaped curve was eliminated in the chemical-rescue reaction. With this construct, the apparent pK(a) determined from the pH-rate profile correlated with the solution pK(a) of the buffer, and the contribution of the buffer to the rate enhancement could be directly evaluated in a free-energy or Brønsted plot. The free-energy relationship between the acid dissociation constant of the buffer and the rate constant for cleavage (Brønsted value, beta, = approximately 0.5) was consistent with a mechanism in which the buffer acted as a general acid-base catalyst. These data support the hypothesis that cytosine 75, in the intact ribozyme, acts as a general acid-base catalyst. PMID:16690998

  14. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Barton F.; Gao, Feng; Korber, Bette T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.; Kothe, Denise; Li, Ying Ying; Decker, Julie; Liao, Hua-Xin

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  15. Saxitoxins and okadaic acid group: accumulation and distribution in invertebrate marine vectors from Southern Chile.

    PubMed

    García, Carlos; Pérez, Francisco; Contreras, Cristóbal; Figueroa, Diego; Barriga, Andrés; López-Rivera, Américo; Araneda, Oscar F; Contreras, Héctor R

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algae blooms (HABs) are the main source of marine toxins in the aquatic environment surrounding the austral fjords in Chile. Huichas Island (Aysén) has an history of HABs spanning more than 30 years, but there is limited investigation of the bioaccumulation of marine toxins in the bivalves and gastropods from the Region of Aysén. In this study, bivalves (Mytilus chilenses, Choromytilus chorus, Aulacomya ater, Gari solida, Tagelus dombeii and Venus antiqua) and carnivorous gastropods (Argobuccinum ranelliformes and Concholepas concholepas) were collected from 28 sites. Researchers analysed the accumulation of STX-group toxins using a LC with a derivatisation post column (LC-PCOX), while lipophilic toxins (OA-group, azapiracids, pectenotoxins and yessotoxins) were analysed using LC-MS/MS with electrospray ionisation (+/-) in visceral (hepatopancreas) and non-visceral tissues (mantle, adductor muscle, gills and foot). Levels of STX-group and OA-group toxins varied among individuals from the same site. Among all tissue samples, the highest concentrations of STX-group toxins were noted in the hepatopancreas in V. antiqua (95 ± 0.1 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1)), T. dombeii (148 ± 1.4 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1)) and G. solida (3232 ± 5.2 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1); p < 0.05); in the adductor muscle in M. chilensis (2495 ± 6.4 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1); p < 0.05) and in the foot in C. concholepas (81 ± 0.7 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1)) and T. dombeii (114 ± 1.2 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1)). The highest variability of toxins was detected in G. solida, where high levels of carbamate derivatives were identified (GTXs, neoSTX and STX). In addition to the detected hydrophilic toxins, OA-group toxins were detected (OA and DTX-1) with an average ratio of ≈1:1. The highest levels of OA-group toxins were in the foot of C. concholepas, with levels of 400.3 ± 3.6 μg OA eq kg(-1) (p < 0.05) and with a toxic profile composed of 90% OA. A wide range of OA-group toxins was detected in M. chilensis with a

  16. Effect of the Methylation and N-H Acidic Group on the Physicochemical Properties of Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana S M C; Rocha, Marisa A A; Almeida, Hugo F D; Neves, Catarina M S S; Lopes-da-Silva, José A; Freire, Mara G; Coutinho, João A P; Santos, Luís M N B F

    2015-07-16

    This work presents and highlights the differentiation of the physicochemical properties of the [C1Him][NTf2], [C2Him][NTf2], [(1)C1(2)C1Him][NTf2], and [(1)C4(2)C1(3)C1im][NTf2] that is related with the strong bulk interaction potential, which highlights the differentiation on the physicochemical arising from the presence of the acidic group (N-H) as well as the methylation in position 2, C(2), of the imidazolium ring. Densities, viscosities, refractive indices, and surface tensions in a wide range of temperatures, as well as isobaric heat capacities at 298.15 K, for this IL series are presented and discussed. It was found that the volumetric properties are barely affected by the geometric and structural isomerization, following a quite regular trend. A linear correlation between the glass transition temperature, Tg, and the alkyl chain size was found; however, ILs with the acidic N-H group present a significant higher Tg than the [(1)CN-1(3)C1im][NTf2] and [(1)CN(3)CNim][NTf2] series. It was found that the most viscous ILs, ([(1)C1Him][NTf2], [(1)C2Him][NTf2], and [(1)C1(2)C1Him][NTf2]) have an acidic N-H group in the imidazolium ring in agreement with the observed increase of energy barrier of flow. The methylation in position 2, C(2), as well as the N-H acidic group in the imidazolium ring contribute to a significant variation in the cation-anion interactions and their dynamics, which is reflected in their charge distribution and polarizability leading to a significant differentiation of the refractive indices, surface tension, and heat capacities. The observed differentiation of the physicochemical properties of the [(1)C1Him][NTf2], [(1)C2Him][NTf2], [(1)C1(2)C1Him][NTf2], and [(1)C4(2)C1(3)C1im][NTf2] are an indication of the stronger bulk interaction potential, which highlights the effect that arises from the presence of the acidic group (N-H) as well as the methylation in position 2 of the imidazolium ring. PMID:26082427

  17. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  18. Geodesic defect anchoring on nematic shells.

    PubMed

    Mirantsev, Leonid V; Sonnet, André M; Virga, Epifanio G

    2012-08-01

    Nematic shells are colloidal particles coated with nematic liquid crystal molecules, which may freely glide and rotate on the colloid's surface while keeping their long axis on the local tangent plane. Molecular dynamics simulations on a nanoscopic spherical shell indicate that under appropriate adhesion conditions for the molecules on the equator, the equilibrium nematic texture exhibits at each pole a pair of +1/2 defects so close to one another to be treated as one +1 defect. Spirals connect the polar defects, though the continuum limit of the interaction potential would not feature any elastic anisotropy. A molecular averaging justifies an anchoring defect energy that feels the geodesics emanating from the defect. All our observations are explained by such a geodesic anchoring, which vanishes on flat manifolds. PMID:23005713

  19. Partial credit model and pivot anchoring.

    PubMed

    Bode, R K

    2001-01-01

    This article contains information on the Rasch measurement partial credit model: what it is, how it differs from other Rasch models, when to use it, and how to use it. The calibration of instruments with increasingly complex items is described, starting with dichotomous items and moving on to polychotomous items using a single rating scale, and mixed polychotomous items using multiple rating scales, and instruments in which each item has its own rating scale. It also introduces a procedure for aligning rating scale categories to be used when more than one rating scale is used in a single instrument. Pivot anchoring is defined and an illustration of its use with the mental health scale of the SF-36 that contains positive and negative worded items is provided. It finally describes the effect of pivot anchoring on step calibrations, the item hierarchy, and person measures. PMID:12000858

  20. International Lunar Network (ILN) Anchor Nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews what we know about the interior and surface of the moon and the need to establish a robotic set of geophysical monitoring stations on the surface of the Moon for the purpose of providing significant scientific value to the exploration of the Moon. The ILN Anchor Nodes will provide the backbone of the network in a way that accomplishes new science and allows other nodes to be flexible contributors to the network.

  1. Anchoring in a novel bimanual coordination pattern.

    PubMed

    Maslovat, Dana; Lam, Melanie Y; Brunke, Kirstin M; Chua, Romeo; Franks, Ian M

    2009-02-01

    Anchoring in cyclical movements has been defined as regions of reduced spatial or temporal variability [Beek, P. J. (1989). Juggling dynamics. PhD thesis. Amsterdam: Free University Press] that are typically found at movement reversal points. For in-phase and anti-phase movements, synchronizing reversal points with a metronome pulse has resulted in decreased anchor point variability and increased pattern stability [Byblow, W. D., Carson, R. G., & Goodman, D. (1994). Expressions of asymmetries and anchoring in bimanual coordination. Human Movement Science, 13, 3-28; Fink, P. W., Foo, P., Jirsa, V. K., & Kelso, J. A. S. (2000). Local and global stabilization of coordination by sensory information. Experimental Brain Research, 134, 9-20]. The present experiment examined anchoring during acquisition, retention, and transfer of a 90 degrees phase-offset continuous bimanual coordination pattern (whereby the right limb lags the left limb by one quarter cycle), involving horizontal flexion about the elbow. Three metronome synchronization strategies were imposed: participants either synchronized maximal flexion of the right arm (i.e., single metronome), both flexion and extension of the right arm (i.e., double metronome within-limb), or flexion of each arm (i.e., double metronome between-limb) to an auditory metronome. In contrast to simpler in-phase and anti-phase movements, synchronization of additional reversal points to the metronome did not reduce reversal point variability or increase pattern stability. Furthermore, practicing under different metronome synchronization strategies did not appear to have a significant effect on the rate of acquisition of the pattern. PMID:18842313

  2. Test Score Equating Using a Mini-Version Anchor and a Midi Anchor: A Case Study Using SAT[R] Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jinghua; Sinharay, Sandip; Holland, Paul W.; Curley, Edward; Feigenbaum, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    This study explores an anchor that is different from the traditional miniature anchor in test score equating. In contrast to a traditional "mini" anchor that has the same spread of item difficulties as the tests to be equated, the studied anchor, referred to as a "midi" anchor (Sinharay & Holland), has a smaller spread of item difficulties than…

  3. Dithiocarbamate anchoring in molecular wire junctions: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenyu; Kosov, Daniel S

    2006-05-25

    Recent experimental realization [J. Am. Chem. Soc., 127 (2005) 7328] of various dithiocarbamate self-assembly on gold surface opens the possibility for use of dithiocarbamate linkers to anchor molecular wires to gold electrodes. In this paper, we explore this hypothesis computationally. We computed the electron transport properties of 4,4'-bipyridine (BP), 4,4'-bipyridinium-1,1'-bis(carbodithioate) (BPBC), 4-(4'-pyridyl)-peridium-1-carbodithioate (BPC) molecule junctions based on the density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions. We demonstrated that the stronger molecule-electrode coupling associated with the conjugated dithiocarbamate linker broadens transmission resonances near the Fermi energy. The broadening effect along with the extension of the pi conjugation from the molecule to the gold electrodes lead to enhanced electrical conductance for BPBC molecule. The conductance enhancement factor is as large as 25 at applied voltage bias 1.0 V. Rectification behavior is predicted for BPC molecular wire junction, which has the asymmetric anchoring groups. PMID:16706444

  4. Electropermanent magnetic anchoring for surgery and endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Tugwell, Josef; Brennan, Philip; O'Shea, Conor; O'Donoghue, Kilian; Power, Timothy; O'Shea, Michael; Griffiths, James; Cahill, Ronan; Cantillon-Murphy, Padraig

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnets for anchoring of instrumentation in minimally invasive surgery and endoscopy has become of increased interest in recent years. Permanent magnets have significant advantages over electromagnets for these applications; larger anchoring and retraction force for comparable size and volume without the need for any external power supply. However, permanent magnets represent a potential hazard in the operating field where inadvertent attraction to surgical instrumentation is often undesirable. The current work proposes an interesting hybrid approach which marries the high forces of permanent magnets with the control of electromagnetic technology including the ability to turn the magnet OFF when necessary. This is achieved through the use of an electropermanent magnet, which is designed for surgical retraction across the abdominal and gastric walls. Our electropermanent magnet, which is hand-held and does not require continuous power, is designed with a center lumen which may be used for trocar or needle insertion. The device in this application has been demonstrated successfully in the porcine model where coupling between an intraluminal ring magnet and our electropermanent magnet facilitated guided insertion of an 18 Fr Tuohy needle for guidewire placement. Subsequent investigations have demonstrated the ability to control the coupling distance of the system alleviating shortcomings with current methods of magnetic coupling due to variation in transabdominal wall thicknesses. With further refinement, the magnet may find application in the anchoring of endoscopic and surgical instrumentation for minimally invasive interventions in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25361499

  5. Short read DNA fragment anchoring algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wendi; Zhang, Peiheng; Liu, Xinchun

    2009-01-01

    Background The emerging next-generation sequencing method based on PCR technology boosts genome sequencing speed considerably, the expense is also get decreased. It has been utilized to address a broad range of bioinformatics problems. Limited by reliable output sequence length of next-generation sequencing technologies, we are confined to study gene fragments with 30~50 bps in general and it is relatively shorter than traditional gene fragment length. Anchoring gene fragments in long reference sequence is an essential and prerequisite step for further assembly and analysis works. Due to the sheer number of fragments produced by next-generation sequencing technologies and the huge size of reference sequences, anchoring would rapidly becoming a computational bottleneck. Results and discussion We compared algorithm efficiency on BLAT, SOAP and EMBF. The efficiency is defined as the count of total output results divided by time consumed to retrieve them. The data show that our algorithm EMBF have 3~4 times efficiency advantage over SOAP, and at least 150 times over BLAT. Moreover, when the reference sequence size is increased, the efficiency of SOAP will get degraded as far as 30%, while EMBF have preferable increasing tendency. Conclusion In conclusion, we deem that EMBF is more suitable for short fragment anchoring problem where result completeness and accuracy is predominant and the reference sequences are relatively large. PMID:19208116

  6. The conformational properties of α,β-dehydroamino acids with a C-terminal ester group.

    PubMed

    Siodłak, Dawid; Grondys, Justyna; Broda, Małgorzata A

    2011-10-01

    α,β-Dehydroamino acid esters occur in nature. To investigate their conformational properties, a systematic theoretical analysis was performed on the model molecules Ac-ΔXaa-OMe [ΔXaa = ΔAla, (E)-ΔAbu, (Z)-ΔAbu, ΔVal] at the B3LYP/6-311+ + G(d,p) level in the gas phase as well as in chloroform and water solutions with the self-consistent reaction field-polarisable continuum model method. The Fourier transform IR spectra in CCl(4) and CHCl(3) have been analysed as well as the analogous solid state conformations drawn from The Cambridge Structural Database. The ΔAla residue has a considerable tendency to adopt planar conformations C5 (ϕ, ψ ≈ - 180°, 180°) and β2 (ϕ, ψ ≈ - 180°, 0°), regardless of the environment. The ΔVal residue prefers the conformation β2 (ϕ, ψ ≈ - 120°, 0°) in a low polar environment, but the conformations α (ϕ, ψ ≈ - 55°, 35°) and β (ϕ, ψ ≈ - 55°, 145°) when the polarity increases. The ΔAbu residues reveal intermediate properties, but their conformational dispositions depend on configuration of the side chain of residue: (E)-ΔAbu is similar to ΔAla, whereas (Z)-ΔAbu to ΔVal. Results indicate that the low-energy conformation β2 is the characteristic feature of dehydroamino acid esters. The studied molecules constitute conformational patterns for dehydroamino acid esters with various side chain substituents in either or both Z and E positions. PMID:21805538

  7. Purified group X secretory phospholipase A(2) induced prominent release of arachidonic acid from human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hanasaki, K; Ono, T; Saiga, A; Morioka, Y; Ikeda, M; Kawamoto, K; Higashino, K; Nakano, K; Yamada, K; Ishizaki, J; Arita, H

    1999-11-26

    Group X secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)-X) possesses several structural features characteristic of both group IB and IIA sPLA(2)s (sPLA(2)-IB and -IIA) and is postulated to be involved in inflammatory responses owing to its restricted expression in the spleen and thymus. Here, we report the purification of human recombinant COOH-terminal His-tagged sPLA(2)-X, the preparation of its antibody, and the purification of native sPLA(2)-X. The affinity-purified sPLA(2)-X protein migrated as various molecular species of 13-18 kDa on SDS-polyacrylamide gels, and N-glycosidase F treatment caused shifts to the 13- and 14-kDa bands. NH(2)-terminal amino acid sequencing analysis revealed that the 13-kDa form is a putative mature sPLA(2)-X and the 14-kDa protein possesses a propeptide of 11 amino acid residues attached at the NH(2) termini of the mature protein. Separation with reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography revealed that N-linked carbohydrates are not required for the enzymatic activity and pro-sPLA(2)-X has a relatively weak potency compared with the mature protein. The mature sPLA(2)-X induced the release of arachidonic acid from phosphatidylcholine more efficiently than other human sPLA(2) groups (IB, IIA, IID, and V) and elicited a prompt and marked release of arachidonic acid from human monocytic THP-1 cells compared with sPLA(2)-IB and -IIA with concomitant production of prostaglandin E(2). A prominent release of arachidonic acid was also observed in sPLA(2)-X-treated human U937 and HL60 cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of human lung preparations revealed its expression in alveolar epithelial cells. These results indicate that human sPLA(2)-X is a unique N-glycosylated sPLA(2) that releases arachidonic acid from human myeloid leukemia cells more efficiently than sPLA(2)-IB and -IIA. PMID:10567392

  8. Immobilization of DNA via oligonucleotides containing an aldehyde or carboxylic acid group at the 5' terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Kremsky, J N; Wooters, J L; Dougherty, J P; Meyers, R E; Collins, M; Brown, E L

    1987-01-01

    A general method for the immobilization of DNA through its 5'-end has been developed. A synthetic oligonucleotide, modified at its 5'-end with an aldehyde or carboxylic acid, was attached to latex microspheres containing hydrazide residues. Using T4 polynucleotide ligase and an oligonucleotide splint, a single stranded 98mer was efficiently joined to the immobilized synthetic fragment. After impregnation of the latex microspheres with the fluorescent dye, Nile Red and attachment of an aldehyde 16mer, 5 X 10(5) bead-DNA conjugates could be detected with a conventional fluorimeter. Images PMID:3562241

  9. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  10. Human platelets respond differentially to lysophosphatidic acids having a highly unsaturated fatty acyl group and alkyl ether-linked lysophosphatidic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Tokumura, Akira; Sinomiya, Junya; Kishimoto, Seishi; Tanaka, Tamotsu; Kogure, Kentaro; Sugiura, Takayuki; Satouchi, Kiyoshi; Waku, Keizo; Fukuzawa, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a physiological agonist that is produced by lysophospholipase D, phospholipase A(1) and phospholipase A(2) in the blood of animals. It exerts diverse biological actions on a broad range of animal cells. Specific receptors for this important agonist have been characterized. In this investigation, for the first time we prepared LPAs having a highly unsaturated fatty acyl group, such as the eicosapentaenoyl or docosahexaenoyl residue, and their acetylated derivatives. Human platelets aggregated more potently in response to the highly unsaturated acyl-LPAs than to LPAs with a C(18) fatty acyl group, such as an oleoyl group, while alkyl ether-linked LPAs (alkyl-LPA) had much stronger aggregating activity. Two positional isomers of LPAs with an arachidonoyl, eicosapentaenoyl or docosahexaenoyl group had equipotent aggregatory activity as well as the positional isomers of their acetylated analogues, indicating that putative LPA receptors could not distinguish the difference between the positional isomers. We found that platelet preparations from two individuals showed no aggregatory response to alkyl-LPAs, although they contained mRNAs for known LPA receptors in the following order of expression level: endothelial differentiation gene (Edg)-4>Edg-7>Edg-2. We also obtained evidence that 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid (ONO-RS-082), a phospholipase A(2) inhibitor, potentiated alkyl-LPA-induced platelet aggregation, but inhibited highly unsaturated acyl-LPA-induced platelet aggregation. These results indicated that human platelets express acyl-LPA-selective and alkyl-LPA-selective receptors on their plasma membrane. PMID:11982483

  11. Trapeziectomy and tendon suspension with or without a mitek anchor fixation in the thumb basal joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Nordback, S; Erba, P; Wehrli, L; Raffoul, W; Egloff, D V

    2012-09-01

    Partial trapeziectomy with suspension ligamentoplasty is a commonly performed treatment of thumb osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, the post-operative recovery remains long and critical reason for which different modifications of the surgical technique have been proposed. To compare two suspension ligamentoplasty techniques, one with a mitek anchor and another without, a retrospective study of 55 consecutive operated patients was performed. A detailed clinical analysis of pain, function and a radiologic assessment of the trapeziometacarpal space were performed. Mitek anchor fixation was associated with a shorter convalescence period. However, in spite of an improved radiological maintenance of the scaphometacarpal space, mitek anchor fixation was associated with an impaired postoperative function and residual pain when compared with the conventional suspension ligamentoplasty procedure. Patient's satisfaction was comparable in both groups. In our series stabilization of the suspension ligamentoplasty procedure by the insertion of a mitek anchor did not bring the hoped benefits to the patients with a trapeziometacarpal arthritis. PMID:22415426

  12. Identification of csrR/csrS, a genetic locus that regulates hyaluronic acid capsule synthesis in group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Levin, J C; Wessels, M R

    1998-10-01

    The hyaluronic acid capsule of group A Streptococcus (GAS) is an important virulence factor, but little is known about mechanisms that regulate capsule expression. Transposon Tn916 mutagenesis of the poorly encapsulated M-type 3 GAS strain DLS003 produced a transconjugant that exhibited a mucoid colony morphology, reflecting increased hyaluronic acid capsule production. Analysis of chromosomal DNA sequence immediately downstream of the transposon insertion identified two open reading frames, designated csrR and csrS, which exhibited sequence similarity to bacterial two-component regulatory systems. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutation within csrR, which encodes the putative response component. Replacement of the native csrR gene in the DLS003 chromosome with the mutant allele resulted in a sixfold increase in capsule production and a corresponding increase in transcription of the has operon, which contains the essential genes for hyaluronic acid synthesis. Increased capsule production by the csrR mutant strain was associated with enhanced resistance to complement-mediated opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and with a 500-fold increase in virulence in mice. These results establish CsrR as a negative regulator of hyaluronic acid capsule synthesis and suggest that it is part of a two-component regulatory system that influences capsule expression and virulence. PMID:9786197

  13. Group 11 complexes with amino acid derivatives: Synthesis and antitumoral studies.

    PubMed

    Ortego, Lourdes; Meireles, Margarida; Kasper, Cornelia; Laguna, Antonio; Villacampa, M Dolores; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2016-03-01

    Gold(I), gold(III), silver(I) and copper(I) complexes with modified amino acid esters and phosphine ligands have been prepared in order to test their cytotoxic activity. Two different phosphine fragments, PPh3 and PPh2py (py=pyridine), have been used. The amino acid esters have been modified by introducing an aromatic amine as pyridine that coordinates metal fragments through the nitrogen atom, giving complexes of the type [M(L)(PR3)](+) or [AuCl3(L)] (L=l-valine-N-(4-pyridylcarbonyl) methyl ester (L1), l-alanine-N-(4-pyridylcarbonyl) methyl ester (L2), l-phenylalanine-N-(4-pyridylcarbonyl) methyl-ester) (L3); M=Au(I), Ag(I), Cu(I), PR3=PPh3, PPh2py). The in vitro cytotoxic activity of metal complexes was tested against four tumor human cell lines and one tumor mouse cell line. A metabolic activity test (3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, MTT) was used and IC50 values were compared with those obtained for cisplatin. Several complexes displayed significant cytotoxic activities. In order to determine whether antiproliferation and cell death are associated with apoptosis, NIH-3T3 cells were exposed to five selected complexes (Annexin V+ FITC, PI) and analyzed by flow cytometry. These experiments showed that the mechanism by which the complexes inhibit cell proliferation inducing cell death in NIH-3T3 cells is mainly apoptotic. PMID:26780577

  14. Enhanced Sensitivity for Hydrogen Peroxide Detection: Polydiacetylene Vesicles with Phenylboronic Acid Head Group.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chen; Tang, Jie; Lu, Shengguo; Han, Yuwang; Huang, He

    2016-01-01

    It was recently reported that, besides UV irradiated polymerization, polymerization of diacetylene compounds could also been initiated by radicals generated from enzyme catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) decomposition. A new optical sensing method for H2O2 was proposed based on this phenomenon. However, the sensitivity of this method is relatively lower than existed ones. In the present work, phenylboronic acid (PBA) functionalized 10, 12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PDA-PBA) was synthesized and its vesicles were formed successfully as colorimetric sensor for H2O2 detection. It was found that color change during the polymerization of vesicles composed of the PBA modified monomer is much stronger than that of the non-modified one. The response of PDA-PBA vesicles to H2O2 is 16 times more sensitive than that of the PDA. The absorption of PDA-PBA at 650 nm is linearly related to the concentration of H2O2 and a detection limit of ~5 μM could be achieved. PMID:26511954

  15. Robotic Ankle for Omnidirectional Rock Anchors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew; Thatte, Nitish

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the vertical and inverted rock walls of lava caves and cliff faces on Mars and other planetary bodies would require a method of gripping their rocky surfaces to allow mobility without gravitational assistance. In order to successfully navigate this terrain and drill for samples, the grippers must be able to produce anchoring forces in excess of 100 N. Additionally, the grippers must be able to support the inertial forces of a moving robot, as well gravitational forces for demonstrations on Earth. One possible solution would be to use microspine arrays to anchor to rock surfaces and provide the necessary load-bearing abilities for robotic exploration of asteroids. Microspine arrays comprise dozens of small steel hooks supported on individual suspensions. When these arrays are dragged along a rock surface, the steel hooks engage with asperities and holes on the surface. The suspensions allow for individual hooks to engage with asperities while the remaining hooks continue to drag along the surface. This ensures that the maximum possible number of hooks engage with the surface, thereby increasing the load-bearing abilities of the gripper. Using the microspine array grippers described above as the end-effectors of a robot would allow it to traverse terrain previously unreachable by traditional wheeled robots. Furthermore, microspine-gripping robots that can perch on cliffs or rocky walls could enable a new class of persistent surveillance devices for military applications. In order to interface these microspine grippers with a legged robot, an ankle is needed that can robotically actuate the gripper, as well as allow it to conform to the large-scale irregularities in the rock. The anchor serves three main purposes: deploy and release the anchor, conform to roughness or misalignment with the surface, and cancel out any moments about the anchor that could cause unintentional detachment. The ankle design contains a

  16. Surface plasmon Raman scattering studies of liquid crystal anchoring on liquid-crystal-based self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Critchley, Kevin; Cheadle, Edward M; Zhang, Hao-Li; Baldwin, Kurt J; Liu, Quanying; Cheng, Yaling; Fukushima, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Takashi; Batchelder, David N; Bushby, Richard J; Evans, Stephen D

    2009-11-26

    We studied the anchoring of 6CB on a series of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with a functional group that mimics that of the nematic liquid crystal (LC). The SAMs were first characterized by wetting, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and surface potential measurements. We found that, in two of these SAMs, the end group dipoles were oriented close to the normal of the surface and that these promoted homeotropic anchoring. In the case of the other SAM, the dipole was oriented parallel to the surface, and planar anchoring was obtained. Raman scattering by adsorbates on thin metal films is enhanced by the electromagnetic fields of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Despite the inherent polarization of SPPs, there have been few reports in which SPP Raman scattering has been used to study molecular orientation. We have developed optical instrumentation to provide efficient excitation and collection of SPP Raman scattered light using attenuated total reflection geometry. The Kretschmann prism coupling configuration was used to excite SPPs on thin (500 A) gold films with adsorbed SAMs of alkanethiols in contact with thin films (50 microm) of the nematic liquid crystal 4'-hexylbiphenyl-4-carbonitrile (6CB, Merck). The anchoring and orientational wetting of the LC 6CB at the interface with omega-functionalized SAMs was studied using this arrangement. In agreement with the results of previous studies, a high-energy surface (-COOH) was found to promote planar anchoring, whereas a low-energy surface (-CF(3)) was found to induce homeotropic anchoring. PMID:19921953

  17. Synthesis, physical properties and cytotoxicity of stilbene-triazine derivatives containing amino acid groups as fluorescent whitening agents.

    PubMed

    Wan, Maosheng; Zhou, Shaoli; Jiao, Peifu; Cao, Chengbo; Guo, Jing

    2013-09-01

    A series of novel stilbene-triazine derivatives containing amino acid groups were synthesized and screened to evaluate their cytotoxicity. The UV absorptions of the derivatives were in the range of 240-450 nm. The absorption peaks of the cis-isomers and trans-isomers were in 281-291 nm and 353-361 nm, respectively. Their fluorescence emission peaks of the derivatives were located in the range of 400-650 nm. The whiteness data indicated that all the stilbene-triazine-amino acid derivatives showed excellent whitening effect on cotton fiber compared to untreated cotton. The preliminary cytotoxicity of these derivatives on a mouse fibroblast cell line (L-929 cells) was also investigated. The results showed that the compounds (7a-h) were nontoxic to L-929 cells as fluorescent whitening agents. PMID:23748838

  18. The Parmotrema acid test: a look at species delineation in the P. perforatum group 40 y later.

    PubMed

    Lendemer, James C; Allen, Jessica L; Noell, Nastassja

    2015-01-01

    Parmotrema perforatum and its relatives form a morphologically distinctive group of species, most of which are common and endemic to eastern North America. Species delimitation in this ecologically important group was the subject of extensive inquiry before the advent of molecular systematics and computationally intensive niche modeling. As part of a large-scale lichen biodiversity inventory of the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain, we used ITS sequence data to examine the utility of characters (morphological, chemical, reproductive, ecological) in circumscribing four species in this group (P. hypoleucinum, P. hypotropum, P. perforatum, P. subrigidum). We found that P. hypoleucinum and P. subrigidum as currently circumscribed are monophyletic and the latter comprises two chemotypes differing in the presence or absence of norstictic acid in addition to alectoronic acid. The sequences of P. hypotropum and P. perforatum, which are chemically identical species and differ only in reproductive mode, were intermixed in a single, well-supported clade. The two chemotypes of P. subrigidum are partially allopatric and their sequences are >99% identical. Nonetheless, niche modeling suggests they occupy significantly different ecological niches. These results provide a new perspective on much-debated questions on species circumscription in lichens and suggest new avenues for genetic, ecological and systematic research. PMID:26354803

  19. Key Role for the 12-Hydroxy Group in the Negative Ion Fragmentation of Unconjugated C24 Bile Acids.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ke; Su, Mingming; Xie, Guoxiang; Ferslew, Brian C; Brouwer, Kim L R; Rajani, Cynthia; Liu, Changxiao; Jia, Wei

    2016-07-19

    Host-gut microbial interactions contribute to human health and disease states and an important manifestation resulting from this cometabolism is a vast diversity of bile acids (BAs). There is increasing interest in using BAs as biomarkers to assess the health status of individuals and, therefore, an increased need for their accurate separation and identification. In this study, the negative ion fragmentation behaviors of C24 BAs were investigated by UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS. The step-by-step fragmentation analysis revealed a distinct fragmentation mechanism for the unconjugated BAs containing a 12-hydroxyl group. The unconjugated BAs lacking 12-hydroxylation fragmented via dehydration and dehydrogenation. In contrast, the 12-hydroxylated ones, such as deoxycholic acid (DCA) and cholic acid (CA), employed dissociation routes including dehydration, loss of carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide, and dehydrogenation. All fragmentations of the 12-hydroxylated unconjugated BAs, characterized by means of stable isotope labeled standards, were associated with the rotation of the carboxylate side chain and the subsequent rearrangements accompanied by proton transfer between 12-hydroxyl and 24-carboxyl groups. Compared to DCA, CA underwent further cleavages of the steroid skeleton. Accordingly, the effects of stereochemistry on the fragmentation pattern of CA were investigated using its stereoisomers. Based on the knowledge gained from the fragmentation analysis, a novel BA, 3β,7β,12α-trihydroxy-5β-cholanic acid, was identified in the postprandial urine samples of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The analyses used in this study may contribute to a better understanding of the chemical diversity of BAs and the molecular basis of human liver diseases that involve BA synthesis, transport, and metabolism. PMID:27322813

  20. Characterization of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor signal sequence of human Cryptic with a hydrophilic extension

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kazuhide; Nagaoka, Tadahiro; Strizzi, Luigi; Mancino, Mario; Gonzales, Monica; Bianco, Caterina; Salomon, David S.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Epidermal Growth Factor-Cripto-1/FRL-1/Cryptic (EGF-CFC) proteins, including human Cripto-1 (hCFC2/hCR-1) and human Cryptic (hCFC1), are membrane-associated Nodal co-receptors, which have critical roles in vertebrate development. Most of the EGF-CFC proteins have been experimentally proven or predicted to be glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins. However, unlike other EGF-CFC proteins, hCFC1 does not exhibit a typical GPI-signal sequence, containing a 32-amino acid hydrophilic extension in its COOH-terminal end. Here we experimentally demonstrate that the COOH-terminal sequence of hCFC1 functions as a GPI-anchoring signal. Moreover, addition of a hydrophilic epitope tag of 55-amino acids (V5-His) after the GPI signal of hCR-1 interfered with generation of a GPI-anchored form of hCR-1. In contrast, addition of the same epitope tag to the end of GPI signal of hCFC1 did not affect the GPI-attachment of hCFC1. The COOH-terminal signal of hCFC1 could produce two different forms of the protein; a GPI-anchored form and an unprocessed form which was more prone to be secreted into the conditioned medium. The hydrophilic extension of hCFC1 negatively regulates the activity of hCFC1 as a Nodal co-receptor. These results demonstrate the presence of endogenous GPI-signal sequence with a hydrophilic extension, which can generate both GPI-anchored and soluble forms of the protein. PMID:18930707

  1. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to Abiotrophia/Granulicatella. Results As lactobacilli are known for notorious resistance to probe penetration, probe-specific assay protocols were experimentally developed to provide maximum cell wall permeability, probe accessibility, hybridization stringency, and fluorescence intensity. The new assays were then applied in a pilot study to three biofilm samples harvested from variably demineralized bovine enamel discs that had been carried in situ for 10 days by different volunteers. Best probe penetration and fluorescent labeling of reference strains were obtained after combined lysozyme and achromopeptidase treatment followed by exposure to lipase. Hybridization stringency had to be established strictly for each probe. Thereafter all probes showed the expected specificity with reference strains and labeled the anticipated morphotypes in dental plaques. Applied to in situ grown biofilms the set of probes detected only Lactobacillus fermentum and bacteria of the Lactobacillus casei group. The most cariogenic biofilm contained two orders of magnitude higher L. fermentum cell numbers than the other biofilms. Abiotrophia/Granulicatella and streptococci from the mitis group were found in all samples at high levels, whereas Streptococcus mutans was detected in only one sample in very low numbers. Conclusions Application of these new group- and species-specific FISH probes to oral biofilm-forming lactic acid bacteria will allow a clearer understanding of the supragingival biome, its spatial architecture and of structure-function relationships implicated during plaque homeostasis and caries development. The probes should prove of value far beyond the field of oral microbiology, as many of

  2. Differential response of archaeal groups to land use change in an acidic red soil.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ju-Pei; Cao, Peng; Hu, Hang-Wei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2013-09-01

    Land use management, one of the most important aspects of anthropogenic disturbance to terrestrial ecosystems, has exerted overriding impacts on soil biogeochemical cycling and inhabitant microorganisms. However, the knowledge concerning response of different archaeal groups to long-term land use changes is still limited in terrestrial environments. Here we used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) approaches to investigate the response of archaeal communities to four different land use practices, i.e. cropland, pine forest, restoration land and degradation land. qPCR analyses showed that expression of the archaeal amoA gene responds more sensitively to changes of land use. In particular, we observed, occurring at significantly lower numbers of archaeal amoA genes in degradation land samples, while the abundance of total archaea and Group 1.1c based on 16S rRNA gene copy numbers remained constant among the different treatments examined. Soil nitrate content is significantly correlated with archaeal amoA gene abundance, but not their bacterial counterparts. The percentage of archaea among total prokaryote communities increases with increasing depth, but has no significant relationship with total carbon, total nitrogen or pH. Soil pH was significantly correlated with total bacterial abundance. Based on results from PCR-DGGE, three land use practices (i.e. cropland, pine forest, restoration land) showed distinct dominant bands, which were mostly affiliated with Group 1.1a. Degradation land, however, was dominated by sequences belonging to Group 1.1c. Results from this study suggest that community structure of ammonia oxidizing archaea were significantly impacted by land use practices. PMID:23774250

  3. Methyl groups of thymine bases are important for nucleic acid recognition by DtxR.

    PubMed

    Chen, C S; White, A; Love, J; Murphy, J R; Ringe, D

    2000-08-29

    The expression of diphtheria toxin is controlled by the diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR). Under conditions of high iron concentration, DtxR binds the tox operator to inhibit transcription. To study how DNA binding specificity is achieved by this repressor, we solved the crystal structure of the nickel(II) activated DtxR(C102D) mutant complexed with a 43mer DNA duplex containing the DtxR consensus binding sequence. Structural analysis of this complex and comparison with a previously determined DtxR(C102D)-Ni(II)-tox operator ternary complex revealed unusual van der Waals interactions between Ser37/Pro39 of the repressor helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif and the methyl groups of specific thymine bases in the consensus binding sequence. Gel mobility shift assays utilizing deoxyuridine modified duplex DNA probes proved the importance of these interactions: the four methyl groups shown to interact with Ser37/Pro39 in the crystal structure contribute a total of 3.4 kcal/mol to binding energy. Thus, in addition to making base-specific hydrogen-bonding interactions to the DNA through its Gln43 residue, DtxR also recognizes methyl groups at certain positions in the DNA sequence with its Ser37 and Pro39 side chains, to achieve binding specificity toward its cognate operator sequences. PMID:10956029

  4. Histologic and morphologic evaluation of explanted bone anchors from bone-anchored hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Mlynski, Robert; Goldberg, Eva; Ebmeyer, Joerg; Scheich, Matthias; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Schwager, Konrad; Hagen, Rudolf; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa

    2009-05-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aids are a standard option in rehabilitation of patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss, and also CROS fitting. However, the skin-penetrating bone anchor repeatedly gives reason for discussion about the risk of infection of surrounding tissues as a major cause of malfunction. In the present study, explanted bone anchors with surrounding bone and soft tissue were examined and compared with the morphology of lost implants. The anchors originated from five patients. Two needed explantation due to deafness with the need of cochlea implantation. A third patient underwent explantation due to meningeal irritation by the bone anchor. Another patient lost the implant due to mechanical stress shortly after implantation. The last implant was lost in a child without apparent reason. All implants were clinically free of infection and had been stable for a median implantation period of 12 months. During the explantation procedure, the fixtures were recovered together with the attached soft tissue and bone. The specimens were examined by light microscopy or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sectioning for light microscopy was performed with a diamond-coated saw microtome. Histopathologic examination of the surrounding skin and subcutaneous soft tissue showed slight inflammation in one case only. The bone was regularly vital, presenting no signs of inflammation. The threads of the fixtures were filled with bone, with particularly strong attachment to the flank of traction. The SEM investigation exposed the ultrastructural interaction of bone with the implant surface. Filiform- and podocyte-like processes of osteocytes attach to the implant; lost implants did not reflect these features. Implant integration involves both osseointegration as well as soft tissue integration. Titanium oxide as the active implant surface promotes this integration even in unstable implants. The morphologic analysis exposed structural areas of the implant with weak bone

  5. Mass spectrometric identification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored peptides.

    PubMed

    Masuishi, Yusuke; Nomura, Ayako; Okayama, Akiko; Kimura, Yayoi; Arakawa, Noriaki; Hirano, Hisashi

    2013-10-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring is a post-translational modification widely observed among eukaryotic membrane proteins. GPI anchors are attached to proteins via the carboxy-terminus in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane, where GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) perform important functions as coreceptors and enzymes. Precursors of GPI-APs (Pre-GPI-APs) contain a C-terminal hydrophobic sequence that is involved in cleavage of the signal sequence from the protein and addition of the GPI anchor by the transamidase complex. In order to confirm that a given protein contains a GPI anchor, it is essential to identify the C-terminal peptide containing the GPI-anchor modification site (ω-site). Previously, efficient identification of GPI-anchored C-terminal peptides by mass spectrometry has been difficult, in part because of complex structure of the GPI-anchor moiety. We developed a method to experimentally identify GPI-APs and their ω-sites. In this method, a part of GPI-anchor moieties are removed from GPI-anchored peptides using phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF), and peptide sequence is then determined by mass spectrometry. Using this method, we successfully identified 10 GPI-APs and 12 ω-sites in the cultured ovarian adenocarcinoma cells, demonstrating that this method is useful for identifying efficiently GPI-APs. PMID:24001144

  6. Comparative electrochemical degradation of salicylic and aminosalicylic acids: Influence of functional groups on decay kinetics and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Florenza, Xavier; Garcia-Segura, Sergi; Centellas, Francesc; Brillas, Enric

    2016-07-01

    Solutions of 100 mL with 1.20 mM of salicylic acid (SA), 4-aminosalicylic acid (4-ASA) or 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) have been comparatively degraded by anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). Trials were carried out with a stirred tank reactor with a BDD anode and an air-diffusion cathode for continuous H2O2 production. A marked influence of the functional groups of the drugs was observed in their decay kinetics, increasing in the order SA < 5-ASA < 4-ASA in AO-H2O2 and 5-ASA < SA < 4-ASA in EF and PEF, due to the different attack of OH generated at the BDD surface and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction, respectively. This effect was clearly observed when varying the current density between 16.7 and 100 mA cm(-2). The relative mineralization power of the processes always followed the sequence: AO-H2O2 < EF < PEF. The three drugs underwent analogous mineralization abatement up to 88% by AO-H2O2 at 100 mA cm(-2). The mineralization rate in EF and PEF grew in the order: 4-ASA < 5-ASA < SA. The most powerful process was PEF, attaining >98% mineralization for all the drugs at 100 mA cm(-2). Oxalic and oxamic acids were detected as final short-linear aliphatic carboxylic acids by ion-exclusion HPLC, allowing the fast photolysis of their Fe(III) complexes by UVA light to justify the high power of PEF. PMID:27045634

  7. Protecting-Group-Free Total Synthesis of (-)-Lycopodine via Phosphoric Acid Promoted Alkyne Aza-Prins Cyclization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Donghui; Zhong, Zhuliang; Liu, Zaimin; Zhang, Mingjie; Xu, Shiyan; Xu, Dengyu; Song, Dengpeng; Xie, Xingang; She, Xuegong

    2016-09-01

    A protecting-group-free route for the total synthesis of (-)-lycopodine was demonstrated in only 8 steps from Wade's fawcettimine enone (12 steps from commercial availiable (R)-(+)-pulegone). The key core of this alkaloid was constructed through a phosphoric acid promoted and highly stereocontrolled alkyne aza-Prins cyclization reaction, synchronously establishing the bridged B-ring and the C13 quaternary stereocenter. Importantly, the synthesis further features a new efficient approach for the preparation of other lycopodine-type alkaloids. PMID:27529730

  8. Incorporation of Acid-Labile Masking Groups for the Traceless Synthesis of C-Terminal Peptide α-Ketoacids.

    PubMed

    Thuaud, Frédéric; Rohrbacher, Florian; Zwicky, André; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2016-08-01

    An optimized protocol for the masking of α-ketoacids with acid-labile cyclic acetal protecting groups is reported. Unlike prior approaches, these new conditions allow the synthesis of protected α-ketoacids bearing aromatic, hindered alkyl, and protected polar side chains. Attachment to a Wang-type linker and solid support provides a resin that delivers fully unprotected C-terminal peptide α-ketoacids upon resin cleavage. These peptides are the key starting materials for chemical protein synthesis using the α-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligation. PMID:27439001

  9. Sortases and the Art of Anchoring Proteins to the Envelopes of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Marraffini, Luciano A.; DeDent, Andrea C.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2006-01-01

    The cell wall envelopes of gram-positive bacteria represent a surface organelle that not only functions as a cytoskeletal element but also promotes interactions between bacteria and their environment. Cell wall peptidoglycan is covalently and noncovalently decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. The sum of these molecular decorations provides bacterial envelopes with species- and strain-specific properties that are ultimately responsible for bacterial virulence, interactions with host immune systems, and the development of disease symptoms or successful outcomes of infections. Surface proteins typically carry two topogenic sequences, i.e., N-terminal signal peptides and C-terminal sorting signals. Sortases catalyze a transpeptidation reaction by first cleaving a surface protein substrate at the cell wall sorting signal. The resulting acyl enzyme intermediates between sortases and their substrates are then resolved by the nucleophilic attack of amino groups, typically provided by the cell wall cross bridges of peptidoglycan precursors. The surface protein linked to peptidoglycan is then incorporated into the envelope and displayed on the microbial surface. This review focuses on the mechanisms of surface protein anchoring to the cell wall envelope by sortases and the role that these enzymes play in bacterial physiology and pathogenesis. PMID:16524923

  10. Efficiency of Polyoxometalate-Based Mesoporous Hybrids as Covalently Anchored Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bentaleb, Faiza; Makrygenni, Ourania; Brouri, Dalil; Coelho Diogo, Cristina; Mehdi, Ahmad; Proust, Anna; Launay, Franck; Villanneau, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Polyoxometalate (POM) hybrids have been covalently immobilized through the formation of amide bonds on several types of mesoporous silica. This work allows the comparison of three POM-based mesoporous systems, obtained with three different silica supports in which either the organic functions of the support (amine vs carboxylic acid) and/or the structure of the support itself (SBA-15 vs mesocellular foams (MCF)) were varied. The resulting POM-based mesoporous systems have been studied in particular by high resolution transmission electronic microscopy (HR-TEM) in order to characterize the nanostructuration of the POMs inside the pores/cells of the different materials. We thus have shown that the best distribution and loading in POMs have been reached with SBA-15 functionalized with aminopropyl groups. In this case, the formation of amide bonds in the materials has led to the nonaggregation of the POMs inside the channels of the SBA-15. The catalytic activity of the anchored systems has been evaluated through the epoxidation of cyclooctene and cyclohexene with H2O2 in acetonitrile. The reactivity of the different grafted POMs hybrids has been compared to that in solution (homogeneous conditions). Parallels can be drawn between the distribution of the POMs and the activity of the supported systems. Furthermore, recycling tests together with catalyst filtration experiments during the reaction allowed us to preclude the hypothesis of a significant leaching of the supported catalyst. PMID:26161980

  11. Acidity of the amidoxime functional group in aqueous solution. A combined experimental and computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Mehio, Nada; Lashely, Mark A.; Nugent, Joseph W.; Tucker, Lyndsay; Correia, Bruna; Do-Thanh, Chi-Linh; Dai, Sheng; Hancock, Robert D.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-01-26

    Poly(acrylamidoxime) adsorbents are often invoked in discussions of mining uranium from seawater. It has been demonstrated repeatedly in the literature that the success of these materials is due to the amidoxime functional group. While the amidoxime-uranyl chelation mode has been established, a number of essential binding constants remain unclear. This is largely due to the wide range of conflicting pKa values that have been reported for the amidoxime functional group in the literature. To resolve this existing controversy we investigated the pKa values of the amidoxime functional group using a combination of experimental and computational methods. Experimentally, we used spectroscopic titrations to measure the pKa values of representative amidoximes, acetamidoxime and benzamidoxime. Computationally, we report on the performance of several protocols for predicting the pKa values of aqueous oxoacids. Calculations carried out at the MP2 or M06-2X levels of theory combined with solvent effects calculated using the SMD model provide the best overall performance with a mean absolute error of 0.33 pKa units and 0.35 pKa units, respectively, and a root mean square deviation of 0.46 pKa units and 0.45 pKa units, respectively. Finally, we employ our two best methods to predict the pKa values of promising, uncharacterized amidoxime ligands. Hence, our study provides a convenient means for screening suitable amidoxime monomers for future generations of poly(acrylamidoxime) adsorbents used to mine uranium from seawater.

  12. Acidity of the amidoxime functional group in aqueous solution. A combined experimental and computational study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mehio, Nada; Lashely, Mark A.; Nugent, Joseph W.; Tucker, Lyndsay; Correia, Bruna; Do-Thanh, Chi-Linh; Dai, Sheng; Hancock, Robert D.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-01-26

    Poly(acrylamidoxime) adsorbents are often invoked in discussions of mining uranium from seawater. It has been demonstrated repeatedly in the literature that the success of these materials is due to the amidoxime functional group. While the amidoxime-uranyl chelation mode has been established, a number of essential binding constants remain unclear. This is largely due to the wide range of conflicting pKa values that have been reported for the amidoxime functional group in the literature. To resolve this existing controversy we investigated the pKa values of the amidoxime functional group using a combination of experimental and computational methods. Experimentally, we used spectroscopicmore » titrations to measure the pKa values of representative amidoximes, acetamidoxime and benzamidoxime. Computationally, we report on the performance of several protocols for predicting the pKa values of aqueous oxoacids. Calculations carried out at the MP2 or M06-2X levels of theory combined with solvent effects calculated using the SMD model provide the best overall performance with a mean absolute error of 0.33 pKa units and 0.35 pKa units, respectively, and a root mean square deviation of 0.46 pKa units and 0.45 pKa units, respectively. Finally, we employ our two best methods to predict the pKa values of promising, uncharacterized amidoxime ligands. Hence, our study provides a convenient means for screening suitable amidoxime monomers for future generations of poly(acrylamidoxime) adsorbents used to mine uranium from seawater.« less

  13. Analytical methods to determine phosphonic and amino acid group-containing pesticides.

    PubMed

    Stalikas, C D; Konidari, C N

    2001-01-12

    A comprehensive view on the possibilities of the most recently developed chromatographic methods and emerging techniques in the analysis of pesticides glyphosate, glufosinate, bialaphos and their metabolites is presented. The state-of-the-art of the individual pre-treatment steps (extraction, pre-concentration, clean-up, separation, quantification) of the employed analytical methods for this group of chemicals is reviewed. The advantages and drawbacks of the described analytical methods are discussed and the present status and future trends are outlined. PMID:11217016

  14. Delivery of a secreted soluble protein to the vacuole via a membrane anchor

    SciTech Connect

    Barrieu, F.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1999-08-01

    To further understand how membrane proteins are sorted in the secretory system, the authors devised a strategy that involves the expression of a membrane-anchored yeast invertase in transgenic plants. The construct consisted of a signal peptide followed by the coding region of yeast invertase and the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of calnexin. The substitution of a lysine near the C terminus of calnexin with a glutamic acid residue ensured progression through the secretory system rather than retention in or return to the endoplasmic reticulum. In the transformed plants, invertase activity and a 70-kD cross-reacting protein were found in the vacuoles. This yeast invertase had plant-specific complex glycans, indicating that transport to the vacuole was mediated by the Golgi apparatus. The microsomal fraction contained a membrane-anchored 90-kD cross-reacting polypeptide, but was devoid of invertase activity. Their results indicate that this membrane-anchored protein proceeds in the secretory system beyond the point where soluble proteins are sorted for secretion, and is detached from its membrane anchor either just before or just after delivery to the vacuole.

  15. Angiotensin-converting enzyme is a GPI-anchored protein releasing factor crucial for fertilization.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Gen; Tojo, Hiromasa; Nakatani, Yuka; Komazawa, Nobuyasu; Murata, Chie; Yamagata, Kazuo; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh; Okabe, Masaru; Taguchi, Ryo; Takeda, Junji

    2005-02-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key regulator of blood pressure. It is known to cleave small peptides, such as angiotensin I and bradykinin and changes their biological activities, leading to upregulation of blood pressure. Here we describe a new activity for ACE: a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein releasing activity (GPIase activity). Unlike its peptidase activity, GPIase activity is weakly inhibited by the tightly binding ACE inhibitor and not inactivated by substitutions of core amino acid residues for the peptidase activity, suggesting that the active site elements for GPIase differ from those for peptidase activity. ACE shed various GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface, and the process was accelerated by the lipid raft disruptor filipin. The released products carried portions of the GPI anchor, indicating cleavage within the GPI moiety. Further analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry predicted the cleavage site at the mannose-mannose linkage. GPI-anchored proteins such as TESP5 and PH-20 were released from the sperm membrane of wild-type mice but not in Ace knockout sperm in vivo. Moreover, peptidase-inactivated E414D mutant ACE and also PI-PLC rescued the egg-binding deficiency of Ace knockout sperms, implying that ACE plays a crucial role in fertilization through this activity. PMID:15665832

  16. Understanding and valuing environmental issues: the effects of availability and anchoring on judgment.

    PubMed

    van der Pligt, J; van Schie, E C; Hoevenagel, R

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses the effects of availability and anchoring-and-adjustment on people's beliefs and values concerning environmental issues. The first three studies focus on lay people's perceptions of the causes of large scale environmental risks, the second series of three studies deals with how people value environmental goods and how much they are prepared to pay to mitigate environmental risks. In studies 1-3 we investigate the effects of availability and anchoring-and-adjustment on estimating the contribution of various factors to large scale environmental risks. Highly complex risks such as acid rain and global warming tend to be associated with multiple causes, and our results show that estimating the role of these causes is clearly affected by availability and anchoring-and-adjustment. Both have sizeable effects and persist over time. Moreover, corrective procedures only seem to have a limited effect. Availability and anchoring-and-adjustment not only play a role in judging the possible causes of risks; they also play a role in research attempting to assess the public's willingness to pay (WTP) to protect our environment. The outcomes of WTP surveys are often used as a tool to help policy decision making. In the second part of this article we present three studies on this issue. Results provide further evidence of the impact of the two heuristics on the outcomes of WTP research. Implications for research and practice are briefly discussed. PMID:9857823

  17. Heterometal nanoparticles from Ru-based molecular clusters covalently anchored onto functionalized carbon nanotubes and nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Vidick, Deborah; Ke, Xiaoxing; Devillers, Michel; Poleunis, Claude; Delcorte, Arnaud; Moggi, Pietro; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2015-01-01

    Summary Heterometal clusters containing Ru and Au, Co and/or Pt are anchored onto carbon nanotubes and nanofibers functionalized with chelating phosphine groups. The cluster anchoring yield is related to the amount of phosphine groups available on the nanocarbon surface. The ligands of the anchored molecular species are then removed by gentle thermal treatment in order to form nanoparticles. In the case of Au-containing clusters, removal of gold atoms from the clusters and agglomeration leads to a bimodal distribution of nanoparticles at the nanocarbon surface. In the case of Ru–Pt species, anchoring occurs without reorganization through a ligand exchange mechanism. After thermal treatment, ultrasmall (1–3 nm) bimetal Ru–Pt nanoparticles are formed on the surface of the nanocarbons. Characterization by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) confirms their bimetal nature on the nanoscale. The obtained bimetal nanoparticles supported on nanocarbon were tested as catalysts in ammonia synthesis and are shown to be active at low temperature and atmospheric pressure with very low Ru loading. PMID:26199832

  18. Highly Fluorescent Group 13 Metal Complexes with Cyclic, Aromatic Hydroxamic Acid Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Michael; Moore, Evan G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-11

    The neutral complexes of two ligands based on the 1-oxo-2-hydroxy-isoquinoline (1,2-HOIQO) motif with group 13 metals (Al, Ga, In) show bright blue-violet luminescence in organic solvents. The corresponding transition can be attributed to ligand-centered singlet emission, characterized by a small Stokes shifts of only a few nm combined with lifetimes in the range between 1-3 ns. The fluorescence efficiency is high, with quantum yields of up to 37% in benzene solution. The crystal structure of one of the indium(III) complexes (trigonal space group R-3, a = b = 13.0384(15) {angstrom}, c = 32.870(8) {angstrom}, ? = {beta} = 90{sup o}, {gamma} = 120{sup o}, V = 4839.3(14) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 6) shows a six-coordinate geometry around the indium center which is close to trigonal-prismatic, with a twist angle between the two trigonal faces of 20.7{sup o}. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations (Al and Ga: B3LYP/6-31G(d)); In: B3LYP/LANL2DZ of the fac and mer isomers with one of the two ligands indicate that there is no clear preference for either one of the isomeric forms of the metal complexes. In addition, the metal centers do not have a significant influence on the electronic structure, and as a consequence, on the predominant intraligand optical transitions.

  19. Acidity of the amidoxime functional group in aqueous solution: a combined experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Mehio, Nada; Lashely, Mark A; Nugent, Joseph W; Tucker, Lyndsay; Correia, Bruna; Do-Thanh, Chi-Linh; Dai, Sheng; Hancock, Robert D; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S

    2015-02-26

    Poly(acrylamidoxime) adsorbents are often invoked in discussions of mining uranium from seawater. While the amidoxime-uranyl chelation mode has been established, a number of essential binding constants remain unclear. This is largely due to the wide range of conflicting pK(a) values that have been reported for the amidoxime functional group. To resolve this existing controversy we investigated the pK(a) values of the amidoxime functional group using a combination of experimental and computational methods. Experimentally, we used spectroscopic titrations to measure the pK(a) values of representative amidoximes, acetamidoxime, and benzamidoxime. Computationally, we report on the performance of several protocols for predicting the pK(a) values of aqueous oxoacids. Calculations carried out at the MP2 or M06-2X levels of theory combined with solvent effects calculated using the SMD model provide the best overall performance, with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.46 pK(a) units and 0.45 pK(a) units, respectively. Finally, we employ our two best methods to predict the pK(a) values of promising, uncharacterized amidoxime ligands, which provides a convenient means for screening suitable amidoxime monomers for future generations of poly(acrylamidoxime) adsorbents. PMID:25621618

  20. Anchoring of FRET Sensors—A Requirement for Spatiotemporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Elena V.; Figueroa, Ricardo A.; Gatsinzi, Tom; Hallberg, Einar; Iverfeldt, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    FRET biosensors have become a routine tool for investigating mechanisms and components of cell signaling. Strategies for improving them for particular applications are continuously sought. One important aspect to consider when designing FRET probes is the dynamic distribution and propagation of signals within living cells. We have addressed this issue by directly comparing an anchored (taFS) to a non-anchored (naFS) cleavable FRET sensor. We chose a microtubule-associated protein tau as an anchor, as microtubules are abundant throughout the cytosol of cells. We show that tau-anchored FRET sensors are concentrated at the cytoskeleton and enriched in the neurite-like processes of cells, providing high intensity of the total signal. In addition, anchoring limits the diffusion of the sensor, enabling spatiotemporally resolved monitoring of subcellular variations in enzyme activity. Thus, anchoring is an important aspect to consider when designing FRET sensors for deeper understanding of cell signaling. PMID:27196902

  1. Anchoring of FRET Sensors-A Requirement for Spatiotemporal Resolution.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Elena V; Figueroa, Ricardo A; Gatsinzi, Tom; Hallberg, Einar; Iverfeldt, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    FRET biosensors have become a routine tool for investigating mechanisms and components of cell signaling. Strategies for improving them for particular applications are continuously sought. One important aspect to consider when designing FRET probes is the dynamic distribution and propagation of signals within living cells. We have addressed this issue by directly comparing an anchored (taFS) to a non-anchored (naFS) cleavable FRET sensor. We chose a microtubule-associated protein tau as an anchor, as microtubules are abundant throughout the cytosol of cells. We show that tau-anchored FRET sensors are concentrated at the cytoskeleton and enriched in the neurite-like processes of cells, providing high intensity of the total signal. In addition, anchoring limits the diffusion of the sensor, enabling spatiotemporally resolved monitoring of subcellular variations in enzyme activity. Thus, anchoring is an important aspect to consider when designing FRET sensors for deeper understanding of cell signaling. PMID:27196902

  2. Anchor Toolkit - a secure mobile agent system

    SciTech Connect

    Mudumbai, Srilekha S.; Johnston, William; Essiari, Abdelilah

    1999-05-19

    Mobile agent technology facilitates intelligent operation insoftware systems with less human interaction. Major challenge todeployment of mobile agents include secure transmission of agents andpreventing unauthorized access to resources between interacting systems,as either hosts, or agents, or both can act maliciously. The Anchortoolkit, designed by LBNL, handles the transmission and secure managementof mobile agents in a heterogeneous distributed computing environment. Itprovides users with the option of incorporating their security managers.This paper concentrates on the architecture, features, access control anddeployment of Anchor toolkit. Application of this toolkit in a securedistributed CVS environment is discussed as a case study.

  3. BAHA: Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid

    PubMed Central

    Hagr, Abdulrahman

    2007-01-01

    Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA) has proven performance and advantages for patients with aural atresia or chronic ear drainage who cannot wear air-conduction hearing aids. The BAHA has both cosmetic and acoustic advantages over most conventional hearing aids and hence is becoming increasingly popular. Moreover, BAHA improves the quality of life and has also significantly reduces ear discharge. This extensive review of the literature pertaining to BAHA discus the history, the indications, the advantages, the prediction of the outcome and the complications of this device as well as comparing it to the conventional hearing aids. PMID:21475438

  4. Synthesis and characterisation of a degradable poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer with biotinylated end groups.

    PubMed

    Salem, A K; Cannizzaro, S M; Davies, M C; Tendler, S J; Roberts, C J; Williams, P M; Shakesheff, K M

    2001-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol)-biotin (PLA-PEG-biotin) is a degradable polymer with protein resistant properties that can undergo rapid surface engineering in aqueous media to create biomimetic surfaces. Surface engineering of this polymer is dependent on biomolecular interactions between the biotin end group and the protein avidin. Given the vigorous conditions of synthesis, it is essential that the manufacture of the polymer does not alter the biotin structure or its molecular recognition. Equally, it is important that the incorporation of biotin does not adversely affect the physicochemical properties of the polymer. (1)H NMR provides evidence of biotin attachment and structural integrity. (1)H NMR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis shows there is no significant effect on bulk properties induced by the biotin end group. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescent spectroscopy studies using the 2-(4'-hydroxyazobenzene) benzoic acid (HABA)/avidin complex show that the biotin moieties binding capabilities are not impaired by the synthesis. PMID:11749223

  5. Prediction of intramuscular fat content and major fatty acid groups of lamb M. longissimus lumborum using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Stephanie M; Ponnampalam, Eric N; Schmidt, Heinar; Wynn, Peter; Hopkins, David L

    2015-12-01

    A hand held Raman spectroscopic device was used to predict intramuscular fat (IMF) levels and the major fatty acid (FA) groups of fresh intact ovine M. longissimus lumborum (LL). IMF levels were determined using the Soxhlet method, while FA analysis was conducted using a rapid (KOH in water, methanol and sulphuric acid in water) extraction procedure. IMF levels and FA values were regressed against Raman spectra using partial least squares regression and against each other using linear regression. The results indicate that there is potential to predict PUFA (R(2)=0.93) and MUFA (R(2)=0.54) as well as SFA values that had been adjusted for IMF content (R(2)=0.54). However, this potential was significantly reduced when correlations between predicted and observed values were determined by cross validation (R(2)cv=0.21-0.00). Overall, the prediction of major FA groups using Raman spectra was more precise (relative reductions in error of 0.3-40.8%) compared to the null models. PMID:26188359

  6. Evaluation of a 7-Methoxycoumarin-3-carboxylic Acid Ester Derivative as a Fluorescent, Cell-Cleavable, Phosphonate Protecting Group.

    PubMed

    Wiemer, Andrew J; Shippy, Rebekah R; Kilcollins, Ashley M; Li, Jin; Hsiao, Chia-Hung Christine; Barney, Rocky J; Geng, M Lei; Wiemer, David F

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cleavable protecting groups often enhance cellular delivery of species that are charged at physiological pH. Although several phosphonate protecting groups have achieved clinical success, it remains difficult to use these prodrugs in live cells to clarify biological mechanisms. Here, we present a strategy that uses a 7-methoxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid ester as a fluorescent protecting group. This strategy was applied to synthesis of an (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate (HMBPP) analogue to assess cellular uptake and human Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation. The fluorescent ester displayed low cellular toxicity (IC50 >100 μm) and strong T cell activation (EC50 =0.018 μm) relative to the unprotected anion (EC50 =23 μm). The coumarin-derived analogue allowed no-wash analysis of biological deprotection, which revealed rapid internalization of the prodrug. These results demonstrate that fluorescent groups can be applied both as functional drug delivery tools and useful biological probes of drug uptake. PMID:26503489

  7. Beam and pump currents for a MARS anchor

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, P.D.; Devoto, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    The MARS anchor has been modeled and analyzed with a numerical bounce-average Fokker-Planck treatment. The interactions between the various ion classes (passing, spanning and trapped) are treated in detail. Consistent solutions have been obtained for the complete asymmetric anchor. For baseline MARS parameters, 5.7 MW per end must be delivered by the anchor neutral beams, and 6.5 A per end must be pumped to maintain the sloshing ion axial density profiles.

  8. Ion transport proteins anchor and regulate the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Denker, Sheryl P; Barber, Diane L

    2002-04-01

    Structurally diverse ion transport proteins anchor the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane by binding directly to linker proteins of the ankyrin and protein 4.1 families. Cytoskeletal anchoring regulates cell shape and restricts the activity of ion transport proteins to specialised membrane domains. New directions are being forged by recent findings that localised anchoring by ion transport proteins regulates the ordered assembly of actin filaments and the actin-dependent processes of cell adhesion and motility. PMID:11891121

  9. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J.; Matsuda, Nicole A.; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16–41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5–6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface. PMID:27011815

  10. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J; Matsuda, Nicole A; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16-41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5-6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface. PMID:27011815

  11. Decoding Cytoskeleton-Anchored and Non-Anchored Receptors from Single-Cell Adhesion Force Data.

    PubMed

    Sariisik, Ediz; Popov, Cvetan; Müller, Jochen P; Docheva, Denitsa; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Benoit, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Complementary to parameters established for cell-adhesion force curve analysis, we evaluated the slope before a force step together with the distance from the surface at which the step occurs and visualized the result in a two-dimensional density plot. This new tool allows detachment steps of long membrane tethers to be distinguished from shorter jumplike force steps, which are typical for cytoskeleton-anchored bonds. A prostate cancer cell line (PC3) immobilized on an atomic-force-microscopy sensor interacted with three different substrates: collagen-I (Col-I), bovine serum albumin, and a monolayer of bone marrow-derived stem cells (SCP1). To address PC3 cells' predominant Col-I binding molecules, an antibody-blocking β1-integrin was used. Untreated PC3 cells on Col-I or SCP1 cells, which express Col-I, predominantly showed jumps in their force curves, while PC3 cells on bovine-serum-albumin- and antibody-treated PC3 cells showed long membrane tethers. The probability density plots thus revealed that β1-integrin-specific interactions are predominately anchored to the cytoskeleton, while the nonspecific interactions are mainly membrane-anchored. Experiments with latrunculin-A-treated PC3 cells corroborated these observations. The plots thus reveal details of the anchoring of bonds to the cell and provide a better understanding of receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:26445433

  12. Nonrotating, self-centering anchor assembly for anchoring a bolt in a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Bevan, John E.; King, Grant W.

    1998-01-01

    An expandable anchor assembly is provided for anchoring the threaded end portion of an elongated roof bolt in a borehole. The anchoring assembly includes a hollow outer sleeve in the form of a plurality of symmetrically arranged, longitudinal segmented wall portions with exterior gripping teeth and an inner expander sleeve in the form of a corresponding plurality of longitudinal wall portions symmetrically arranged about a central axis to define an inner threaded cylindrical section. The inner sleeve is captured within and moveable axially relative to the outer sleeve. As the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt is inserted into the inner threaded cylindrical section of the inner sleeve from the trailing end to the leading end thereof, the inner sleeve expands over and clamps around the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt. Thereafter, partial withdrawal of the elongated bolt from the borehole causes the inner sleeve to axially move relative to the outer sleeve from the leading end toward the trailing end of the outer sleeve in a wedging action to cause the outer sleeve to radially expand and force engagement of the gripping teeth against the sidewall of the borehole to thereby secure the expandable anchor assembly and therewith the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt within the borehole.

  13. Nonrotating, self-centering anchor assembly for anchoring a bolt in a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Bevan, J.E.; King, G.W.

    1998-12-08

    An expandable anchor assembly is provided for anchoring the threaded end portion of an elongated roof bolt in a borehole. The anchoring assembly includes a hollow outer sleeve in the form of a plurality of symmetrically arranged, longitudinal segmented wall portions with exterior gripping teeth and an inner expander sleeve in the form of a corresponding plurality of longitudinal wall portions symmetrically arranged about a central axis to define an inner threaded cylindrical section. The inner sleeve is captured within and moveable axially relative to the outer sleeve. As the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt is inserted into the inner threaded cylindrical section of the inner sleeve from the trailing end to the leading end thereof, the inner sleeve expands over and clamps around the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt. Thereafter, partial withdrawal of the elongated bolt from the borehole causes the inner sleeve to axially move relative to the outer sleeve from the leading end toward the trailing end of the outer sleeve in a wedging action to cause the outer sleeve to radially expand and force engagement of the gripping teeth against the sidewall of the borehole to thereby secure the expandable anchor assembly and therewith the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt within the borehole. 8 figs.

  14. Members of a unique histidine acid phosphatase family are conserved amongst a group of primitive eukaryotic human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shakarian, Alison M; Joshi, Manju B; Yamage, Mat; Ellis, Stephanie L; Debrabant, Alain; Dwyer, Dennis M

    2003-03-01

    Recently, we identified and characterized the genes encoding several distinct members of the histidine-acid phosphatase enzyme family from Leishmania donovani, a primitive protozoan pathogen of humans. These included genes encoding the heavily phosphorylated/glycosylated, tartrate-sensitive, secretory acid phosphatases (Ld SAcP-1 and Ld SAcP-2) and the unique, tartrate-resistant, externally-oriented, surface membrane-bound acid phosphatase (Ld MAcP) of this parasite. It had been previously suggested that these enzymes may play essential roles in the growth, development and survival of this organism. In this report, to further examine this hypothesis, we assessed whether members of the L. donovani histidine-acid phosphatase enzyme family were conserved amongst other pathogenic Leishmania and related trypanosomatid parasites. Such phylogenetic conservation would clearly indicate an evolutionary selection for this family of enzymes and strongly suggest and support an important functional role for acid phosphatases to the survival of these parasites. Results of pulsed field gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting showed that homologs of both the Ld SAcPs and Ld MAcP were present in each of the visceral and cutaneous Leishmania species examined (i.e. isolates of L. donovani, L. infantum, L. tropica, L. major and L. mexicana, respectively). Further, results of enzyme assays showed that all of these organisms expressed both tartrate-sensitive and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activities. In addition, homologs of both the Ld SAcPs and Ld MAcP genes and their corresponding enzyme activities were also identified in two Crithidia species (C. fasciculata and C. luciliae) and in Leptomonas seymouri. In contrast, Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Phytomonas serpens had only very-low levels of such enzyme activities. Cumulatively, results of this study showed that homologs of the Ld SAcPs and Ld MAcP are conserved amongst all pathogenic Leishmania sps. suggesting

  15. Group X Secreted Phospholipase A2 Releases ω3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, Suppresses Colitis, and Promotes Sperm Fertility.

    PubMed

    Murase, Remi; Sato, Hiroyasu; Yamamoto, Kei; Ushida, Ayako; Nishito, Yasumasa; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Murakami, Makoto

    2016-03-25

    Within the secreted phospholipase A2(sPLA2) family, group X sPLA2(sPLA2-X) has the highest capacity to hydrolyze cellular membranes and has long been thought to promote inflammation by releasing arachidonic acid, a precursor of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids. Unexpectedly, we found that transgenic mice globally overexpressing human sPLA2-X (PLA2G10-Tg) displayed striking immunosuppressive and lean phenotypes with lymphopenia and increased M2-like macrophages, accompanied by marked elevation of free ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and their metabolites. Studies usingPla2g10-deficient mice revealed that endogenous sPLA2-X, which is highly expressed in the colon epithelium and spermatozoa, mobilized ω3 PUFAs or their metabolites to protect against dextran sulfate-induced colitis and to promote fertilization, respectively. In colitis, sPLA2-X deficiency increased colorectal expression of Th17 cytokines, and ω3 PUFAs attenuated their production by lamina propria cells partly through the fatty acid receptor GPR120. In comparison, cytosolic phospholipase A2(cPLA2α) protects from colitis by mobilizing ω6 arachidonic acid metabolites, including prostaglandin E2 Thus, our results underscore a previously unrecognized role of sPLA2-X as an ω3 PUFA mobilizerin vivo, segregated mobilization of ω3 and ω6 PUFA metabolites by sPLA2-X and cPLA2α, respectively, in protection against colitis, and the novel role of a particular sPLA2-X-driven PUFA in fertilization. PMID:26828067

  16. The nature of peptide interactions with acid end-group PLGAs and facile aqueous-based microencapsulation of therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Andreas M.; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H.; Mazzara, J. Maxwell; Tong, Ling; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Olsen, Karl F.; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    An important poorly understood phenomenon in controlled-release depots involves the strong interaction between common cationic peptides and low Mw free acid end-group poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids) (PLGAs) used to achieve continuous peptide release kinetics. The kinetics of peptide sorption to PLGA was examined by incubating peptide solutions of 0.2-4 mM octreotide or leuprolide acetate salts in 0.1 M HEPES buffer, pH 7.4, with polymer particles or films at 4-37 °C for 24 h. The extent of absorption/loading of peptides in PLGA particles/films was assayed by two-phase extraction and amino acid analysis. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser scanning confocal imaging techniques were used to examine peptide penetration in the polymer phase. The release of sorbed peptide from leuprolide-PLGA particles was evaluated both in vitro (PBST + 0.02% sodium azide, 37 °C) and in vivo (male Sprague-Dawley rats). We found that when the PLGA-COOH chains are sufficiently mobilized, therapeutic peptides not only bind at the surface, a common belief to date, but can also internalized and distributed throughout the polymer phase at physiological temperature forming a salt with low-molecular weight PLGA-COOH. Importantly, absorption of leuprolide into low MW PLGA-COOH particles yielded ~17 wt% leuprolide loading in the polymer (i.e., ~70% of PLGA-COOH acids occupied), and the absorbed peptide was released from the polymer for > 2 weeks in a controlled fashion in vitro and as indicated by sustained testosterone suppression in male Sprague-Dawley rats. This new approach, which bypasses the traditional encapsulation method and associated production cost, opens up the potential for facile production of low-cost controlled-release injectable depots for leuprolide and related peptides. PMID:24021356

  17. Transosseous Acetabular Labral Repair as an Alternative to Anchors

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Carro, Luis; Cabello, Andres Gonzalez; Rakha, Mohamed Ibrahim; Patnaik, Sarthak; Centeno, Elias; Miranda, Victor; Fernández, Ana Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Labral tears are the most common pathology in patients undergoing hip arthroscopy and the most common cause of mechanical hip symptoms. Labral repair techniques have been described in the literature using suture anchors placed as close as possible to the acetabular rim without penetrating the articular surface. Optimal surgical technique for labral repair is very important, and an inappropriate entry point and guide angulation may lead to intra-articular penetration of the anchor, chondral damage, anchor loosening, or inadequate fixation. A shallow dysplastic hip, the drilling trajectory, the narrow width of the acetabular rim, or some specific anatomic variations may generate difficulty during anchor placement. Suture anchors themselves have been associated with several significant complications, including rim fracture, osteolysis, enlargement of drill holes, and infection. The treatment of labral lesions with transosseous suture is an alternative to anchor use, eliminating the need for anchors and avoiding anchor-associated complications. This technique offers versatility to surgeons and is more cost-effective for patients and health services. We aim to describe the indications and technique for transosseous labral repair without anchors. PMID:26697295

  18. New Retrievable Coil Anchors: Preliminary In Vivo Experiences in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Konya, A. Wright, K.C.

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To design and test retrievable coil anchors to improve the safety and efficacy of coil embolization. Methods. Fifty-two 0.038-inch homemade retrievable stainless steel coils were equipped with one of four different pre-shaped nitinol anchors and tested in 38 pigs. All coils with the anchor were completely retrieved and redeployed 3-18 times (median 7 times) prior to release. Types 1 and 2 anchored coils were acutely deployed in the external iliac arteries (n = 10 each), and chronically tested (1 week) in the common carotid arteries (n = 6 each). Larger type 1 (n = 4), type 3 (n = 6), and type 4 (n = 4) anchored coils were acutely deployed in the abdominal aorta. The largest type 1 anchors (n = 6) were acutely tested in the inferior vena cava. Results. All anchored coils were successfully retrieved and repositioned several times. All but two coils formed a compact plug and there was no coil migration except with two mechanically defective type 3 anchors. Conclusion. The use of retrievable anchors allowed the coils to be retrieved and repositioned, prevented coil migration, and enabled compact coil configuration.

  19. Trace metal occurrences in acid-insoluble residues of the Ordovician Galena Group, southeastern Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Lively, R.S.; Mossler, J.H.; Morey, G.B. ); Hauck, S.A. . Natural Resources Research Inst.)

    1993-03-01

    Regional geochemical, studies on insoluble residues from Paleozoic carbonate rocks have become an integral part of the search for new Upper Mississippi Valley-type mineral deposits in the northern Midcontinent. The authors have extended these studies to southeastern Minnesota, an area well to the north of known lead-zinc deposits of commercial size and grade. In this region, a thin sequence of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician strata unconformably overlies a complex Precambrian basement. More than 500 samples of limestone and dolomite from 40 drill holes and outcrops were analyzed for 29 related trace elements. Preliminary interpretations are based on the analysis of 380 samples of the Ordovician Galena Group from 37 localities. Results indicate that anomalous concentrations of Pb, Cu, zn, As, Cd, and Ni are confined to the southern half of the Galena subgroup area and extend less than 30 miles north of the Iowa border. The anomalous areas, as well as saddles between the, have a distinct northwest trend, coincident with structural features previously recognized in the Precambrian basement. The spatial relationships of the anomalies and the lack of direct correlation imply deposition from fluids moving north out of the main lead-zinc district along structural pathways. The lack of significant anomalies in the northern part of the subcrop area implies northwest weakening of the forces driving the metal-bearing fluids, as well as a decrease over distance in the absolute metal content of the migrating fluids.

  20. Enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen production by introducing the carboxylic acid group into cobaloxime catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junfei; Li, Chao; Zhou, Qianxiong; Wang, Weibo; Hou, Yuanjun; Zhang, Baowen; Wang, Xuesong

    2015-10-28

    A series of cobaloxime complexes, [Co(iii)(dmgH)2(py-m-X)Cl] (dmgH = dimethylglyoxime, py-m-X = meta-substituted pyridine, X = COOH (2), COOCH3 (3), CH2CH2COOH (6), and CH2CH2COOCH3 (7)), and [Co(iii)(dmgH)2(py-p-X)Cl], (py-p-X = para-substituted pyridine, X = COOH (4) and COOCH3 (5)), were synthesized and their photocatalytic H2 production activities were compared in an artificial photosynthesis system containing a xanthene dye Eosin Y as the photosensitizer (PS) and triethanolamine (TEOA) as the sacrificial reductant (SR) in CH3CN/H2O (1 : 1, pH = 7.5). Irrespective of substitution by an electron-donating or electron withdrawing group, the photocatalytic H2 production activities of 2-7 are all higher than that of [Co(iii)(dmgH)2(py)Cl] (1). Importantly, meta-substitution is more efficient than para-substitution, and COOH is more efficient than COOCH3, in enhancing the photocatalytic activities. 6 showed the highest activity among the examined complexes. The -CH2CH2- chain linking COOH and pyridine might play a role in the promising performance of 6, which makes the proton relay via interaction between COOH and dmgH possible. This work may open new avenues for developing more efficient cobaloxime-based H2 evolution catalysts (HERs). PMID:26394744

  1. The Isothiocyanato Moiety. An Ideal Protecting Group for Stereoselective Sialic Acid Glycoside Synthesis and Subsequent Diversification**

    PubMed Central

    Mandhapati, Appi Reddy; Rajender, Salla; Shaw, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of a crystalline, peracetyl adamantanyl thiosialoside donor protected by an isothiocyanate group is described. On activation at -78 C in the presence of typical carbohydrate acceptors this donor gives high yields of the corresponding sialosides with exquisite α-selectivity. The high selectivity extends to the 4-O-benzyl-protected 3-OH acceptors that are typically less reactive and selective than galactose 3,4-diols. Treatment of the α-sialosides with tris(trimethylsilyl)silane or allyltris(trimethylsilyl)silane sialosides replaces the C5-N5 bond by a C-H or a C-C bond. Reaction of the isothiocyanate-protected sialosides with thioacids achieves conversion into amides. Reaction of the isothiocyanate with an amine gives a thiourea, which can be converted to a guanidine. The very high α-selectivities observed with the new donor and the rich chemistry of the isothiocyante function considerably extend the scope for optimization at the sialoside 5-position. PMID:25446629

  2. Use of Continuous Exponential Families to Link Forms via Anchor Tests. Research Report. ETS RR-11-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberman, Shelby J.; Yan, Duanli

    2011-01-01

    Continuous exponential families are applied to linking test forms via an internal anchor. This application combines work on continuous exponential families for single-group designs and work on continuous exponential families for equivalent-group designs. Results are compared to those for kernel and equipercentile equating in the case of chained…

  3. Atomically mixed Fe-group nanoalloys: catalyst design for the selective electrooxidation of ethylene glycol to oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sadakiyo, Masaaki; Ooi, Mei Lee; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Kato, Kenichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji; Yamauchi, Miho

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate electric power generation via the electrooxidation of ethylene glycol (EG) on a series of Fe-group nanoalloy (NA) catalysts in alkaline media. A series of Fe-group binary NA catalysts supported on carbon (FeCo/C, FeNi/C, and CoNi/C) and monometallic analogues (Fe/C, Co/C, and Ni/C) were synthesized. Catalytic activities and product distributions on the prepared Fe-group NA catalysts in the EG electrooxidation were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry, and compared with those of the previously reported FeCoNi/C, which clarified the contributory factors of the metal components for the EG electrooxidation activity, C2 product selectivity, and catalyst durability. The Co-containing catalysts, such as Co/C, FeCo/C, and FeCoNi/C, exhibit relatively high catalytic activities for EG electrooxidation, whereas the catalytic performances of Ni-containing catalysts are relatively low. However, we found that the inclusion of Ni is a requisite for the prevention of rapid degradation due to surface modification of the catalyst. Notably, FeCoNi/C shows the highest selectivity for oxalic acid production without CO2 generation at 0.4 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), resulting from the synergetic contribution of all of the component elements. Finally, we performed power generation using the direct EG alkaline fuel cell in the presence of the Fe-group catalysts. The power density obtained on each catalyst directly reflected the catalytic performances elucidated in the electrochemical experiments for the corresponding catalyst. The catalytic roles and alloying effects disclosed herein provide information on the design of highly efficient electrocatalysts containing Fe-group metals. PMID:25848911

  4. Intrinsic acidity of aluminum, chromium(III) and iron(III) {mu}{sub 3}-hydroxo functional groups from ab initio electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, J.R.; Dixon, D.A.; Felmy, A.R.

    2000-05-01

    Density functional calculations are performed on M{sub 3}(OH){sub 7}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup 2+} and M{sub 3}O(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup +} clusters for M {double_bond} Al, Cr(III), and Fe(III), allowing determination of the relative acidities of the {mu}{sub 3}-hydroxo and aquo functional groups. Contrary to previous predictions and rationalizations, {double_bond}Fe{sub 3}OH and {double_bond}Al{sub 3}OH groups have nearly the same intrinsic acidity, while {double_bond}Cr{sub 3}OH groups are significantly more acidic. The gas-phase acidity of the Fe{sub 3}OH site is in good agreement with the value predicted by the molecular mechanics model previously used to estimate the relative acidities of surface sites on iron oxides. Acidities of aquo functional groups were also computed for Al and Cr. The {double_bond}AlOH{sub 2} site is more acidic than the {double_bond}Al{sub 3}OH site, whereas the {double_bond}Cr{sub 3}OH site is more acidic than the {double_bond}CrOH{sub 2} site. These findings predict that the surface charging behavior of chromium oxides/oxyhydroxides should be distinguishable from their Fe, Al counterparts. The calculations also provide insight into why the lepidocrocite/boehmite polymorph is not observed for CrOOH.

  5. The relation between gastric acid secretion and body habitus, blood groups, smoking, and the subsequent development of dyspepsia and duodenal ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Novis, B. H.; Marks, I. N.; Bank, S.; Sloan, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-six students free of gastrointestinal disease were studied to establish normal acid secretion values for healthy male and female students by the augmented histamine test and to re-examine the relationship between gastric acid secretion and ABO blood groups, body weight, fat-free body mass, height, degree of ectomorphy and mesomorphy, the number of cigarettes smoked per day, and serum cholesterol. A prospective study was then carried out on gastric acid secretion and the subsequent development after 10 years of duodenal ulcers or dyspepsia. Young, healthy medical students have a fairly high mean basal and maximal acid output. There was very little difference in the mean acid outputs of the various ABO blood groups. A significant correlation was shown between acid output and body weight and fat-free body mass, but not with the other measurements of body build. Basal acid output was also related to the number of cigarettes smoked per day. Three students who subsequently developed duodenal ulcers all had a preexistent high level of acid secretion. The acid output was, however, similar in the groups who developed significant or minor dyspepsia or who remained asymptomatic. PMID:4696532

  6. Breaking the dogma of the metal-coordinating carboxylate group in integrin ligands: introducing hydroxamic acids to the MIDAS to tune potency and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, Dominik; Laufer, Burkhardt; Marinelli, Luciana; Limongelli, Vittorio; Novellino, Ettore; Zahn, Grit; Stragies, Roland; Kessler, Horst

    2009-01-01

    A suitable substitute: All integrin receptors bind their ligands, which contain an aspartate residue, in the metal-ion- dependent adhesion site (MIDAS). So far all attempts to replace the carboxyl group of aspartate with other, pharmacologically favorable isosteric groups have failed. Now it has been shown that a hydroxamic acid group can replace the carboxyl group; the resulting ligand retains its high binding activity. The picture shows one such ligand in the binding site of alphavbeta3. PMID:19343753

  7. Importance of anchor genomes for any plant genome project

    PubMed Central

    Messing, Joachim; Llaca, Victor

    1998-01-01

    Progress in agricultural and environmental technologies is hampered by a slower rate of gene discovery in plants than animals. The vast pool of genes in plants, however, will be an important resource for insertion of genes, via biotechnological procedures, into an array of plants, generating unique germ plasms not achievable by conventional breeding. It just became clear that genomes of grasses have evolved in a manner analogous to Lego blocks. Large chromosome segments have been reshuffled and stuffer pieces added between genes. Although some genomes have become very large, the genome with the fewest stuffer pieces, the rice genome, is the Rosetta Stone of all the bigger grass genomes. This means that sequencing the rice genome as anchor genome of the grasses will provide instantaneous access to the same genes in the same relative physical position in other grasses (e.g., corn and wheat), without the need to sequence each of these genomes independently. (i) The sequencing of the entire genome of rice as anchor genome for the grasses will accelerate plant gene discovery in many important crops (e.g., corn, wheat, and rice) by several orders of magnitudes and reduce research and development costs for government and industry at a faster pace. (ii) Costs for sequencing entire genomes have come down significantly. Because of its size, rice is only 12% of the human or the corn genome, and technology improvements by the human genome project are completely transferable, translating in another 50% reduction of the costs. (iii) The physical mapping of the rice genome by a group of Japanese researchers provides a jump start for sequencing the genome and forming an international consortium. Otherwise, other countries would do it alone and own proprietary positions. PMID:9482827

  8. The CovS/CovR acid response regulator is required for intracellular survival of group B Streptococcus in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cumley, Nicola J; Smith, Leanne M; Anthony, Mark; May, Robin C

    2012-05-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal meningitis and septicemia. The ability of this organism to survive inside phagocytic cells is poorly understood but thought to be an important step for the establishment of disease in the host. Here, we demonstrate that GBS shows prolonged survival within J774 macrophages and that the capacity to survive is not significantly changed across a diverse range of strains representing different serotypes, multilocus sequence types (MLST), and sites of clinical isolation. Using staining for the lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP) and by pharmacological inhibition of phagosome acidification, we demonstrate that streptococci reside in a phagosome and that acidification of the phagosome is required for GBS to survive intracellularly. Moreover, we show that the GBS two-component system CovS/CovR, which is the major acid response regulator in this organism, is required for survival inside the phagosome. PMID:22331428

  9. The CovS/CovR Acid Response Regulator Is Required for Intracellular Survival of Group B Streptococcus in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cumley, Nicola J.; Smith, Leanne M.; Anthony, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal meningitis and septicemia. The ability of this organism to survive inside phagocytic cells is poorly understood but thought to be an important step for the establishment of disease in the host. Here, we demonstrate that GBS shows prolonged survival within J774 macrophages and that the capacity to survive is not significantly changed across a diverse range of strains representing different serotypes, multilocus sequence types (MLST), and sites of clinical isolation. Using staining for the lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP) and by pharmacological inhibition of phagosome acidification, we demonstrate that streptococci reside in a phagosome and that acidification of the phagosome is required for GBS to survive intracellularly. Moreover, we show that the GBS two-component system CovS/CovR, which is the major acid response regulator in this organism, is required for survival inside the phagosome. PMID:22331428

  10. Infrared and Raman spectra of N-acetyl- L-amino acid methylamides with aromatic side groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hiroatsu; Hasegawa, Kodo; Miyazawa, Tatsuo

    Infrared and Raman spectra of N-acetyl- L-phenylalanine methylamide, N-acetyl- L-tyrosine methylamide and N-acetyl- L-tryptophan methylamide, as model compounds of aromatic amino acid residues in proteins, were measured in the solid state and in methanol solutions. Vibrational assignments of the spectra were made by utilizing the deuteration effect and by comparison with the spectra of related compounds which include toluene, p-cresol and 3-methylindole. The amide I, III and IV bands were strong in Raman scattering, but other characteristic amide bands were ill-defined. In the Raman spectra of methanol solutions, only the bands due to the aromatic side group vibrations were markedly observed, but those due to the peptide backbone vibrations were very weak, suggesting the coexistence of various molecular conformations in solution.

  11. Block and random copolymers bearing cholic acid and oligo(ethylene glycol) pendant groups: aggregation, thermosensitivity, and drug loading.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu; Jia, Yong-Guang; Shi, Changying; Luo, Juntao; Zhu, X X

    2014-05-12

    A series of block and random copolymers consisting of oligo(ethylene glycol) and cholic acid pendant groups were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization of their norbornene derivatives. These block and random copolymers were designed to have similar molecular weights and comonomer ratios; both types of copolymers showed thermosensitivity in aqueous solutions with similar cloud points. The copolymers self-assembled into micelles in water as shown by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The hydrodynamic diameter of the micelles formed by the block copolymer is much larger and exhibited a broad and gradual shrinkage from 20 to 54 °C below its cloud point, while the micelles formed by the random copolymers are smaller in size but exhibited some swelling in the same temperature range. Based on in vitro drug release studies, 78% and 24% paclitaxel (PTX) were released in 24 h from micelles self-assembled by the block and random copolymers, respectively. PTX-loaded micelles formed by the block and random copolymers exhibited apparent antitumor efficacy toward the ovarian cancer cells with a particularly low half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 27.4 and 40.2 ng/mL, respectively. Cholic acid-based micelles show promise as a versatile and potent platform for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:24725005

  12. Block and Random Copolymers Bearing Cholic Acid and Oligo(ethylene glycol) Pendant Groups: Aggregation, Thermosensitivity, and Drug Loading

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of block and random copolymers consisting of oligo(ethylene glycol) and cholic acid pendant groups were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization of their norbornene derivatives. These block and random copolymers were designed to have similar molecular weights and comonomer ratios; both types of copolymers showed thermosensitivity in aqueous solutions with similar cloud points. The copolymers self-assembled into micelles in water as shown by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The hydrodynamic diameter of the micelles formed by the block copolymer is much larger and exhibited a broad and gradual shrinkage from 20 to 54 °C below its cloud point, while the micelles formed by the random copolymers are smaller in size but exhibited some swelling in the same temperature range. Based on in vitro drug release studies, 78% and 24% paclitaxel (PTX) were released in 24 h from micelles self-assembled by the block and random copolymers, respectively. PTX-loaded micelles formed by the block and random copolymers exhibited apparent antitumor efficacy toward the ovarian cancer cells with a particularly low half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 27.4 and 40.2 ng/mL, respectively. Cholic acid-based micelles show promise as a versatile and potent platform for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:24725005

  13. Functionalisation of mesoporous silica gel with 2-[(phosphonomethyl)-amino]acetic acid functional groups. Characterisation and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldarola, Dario; Mitev, Dimitar P.; Marlin, Lucile; Nesterenko, Ekaterina P.; Paull, Brett; Onida, Barbara; Bruzzoniti, Maria Concetta; Carlo, Rosa Maria De; Sarzanini, Corrado; Nesterenko, Pavel N.

    2014-01-01

    A new complexing adsorbent was prepared by chemical modification of mesoporous silica Kieselgel 60 (dp = 37-63 μm, average pore size 6 nm, specific surface area 425 m2 g-1) with 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and 2-[(phosphonomethyl)amino]acetic acid (PMA), commonly known as glyphosate. The prepared adsorbent was fully characterised using elemental analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), acid-base potentiometric titration, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K (BET), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The concentration of bonded PMA groups calculated from the nitrogen content was 0.38 mmol per gram. The adsorption of transition metal ions on PMA functionalised silica (HEPMAS) was studied from aqueous solutions having different pH and the following selectivity was established, Zn(II) < Co(II) < Cd(II) < Mn(II) < Ni(II) < Cu(II). The calculated values of distribution coefficients D for the adsorption of ecotoxic metal ions on HEPMAS are 5.0 × 104, 4.9 × 105 and 2.6 × 104 for Zn(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II), respectively.

  14. Characterization and grouping of aquatic fulvic acids isolated from clear-water rivers and lakes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Kumiko; Mori, Hisayo; Asakawa, Daichi; Yanagi, Yukiko; Kodama, Hiroki; Nagao, Seiya; Yonebayashi, Koyo; Fujitake, Nobuhide

    2010-07-01

    Characteristics of aquatic fulvic acids (FAs) from 10 clear waters in Japan (around the temperate zone) were revealed by several analytical techniques-high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC), elemental analysis, liquid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy, isotopic analyses (delta(13)C and delta(15)N), and compared with those of International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) standard samples including FAs from brown waters (Suwannee, Pony, and Nordic FAs). Generally clear-water FAs were different from brown-water FAs in chemical properties. Weight-average molecular weights (Mw) of the clear-water FAs were similar to each other, whereas their elemental compositions and carbon species distribution were different. The clear-water FAs all exhibited a high proportion of alkyl carbons, which may be attributed to microbial activity. delta(13)C and delta(15)N values of the FAs indicated that there would be a huge gap between origin and chemical structure of clear-water FA. Results of the chemical structural analyses described above were not always linked to those of the isotopic analyses (delta(13)C and delta(15)N). Multivariate statistical analysis, i.e. cluster and principal component analysis was applied to reveal differences or similarities in a more objective manner. The FAs were always classified into two clear-water groups and one brown-water group. Aryl-C and O-Alkyl-C contents were important for the grouping. We speculate that the grouping might depend on the differences of aquatic microbial activity caused by the differences of residence time of water. PMID:20569962

  15. Design of new anchored p-dopants for high power efficiency OLEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Koech, Phillip K; Sapochak, Linda S; Rainbolt, James E; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James S; Wang, Liang; Padmaperuma, Asanga B; Gaspar, Daniel J

    2009-08-27

    Conductivity doping of charge transporting layers is increasingly becoming attractive for improving power efficiency in OLEDs. However, the number of organic molecular p-dopants is limited for instance the electron acceptor 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8,-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) is the most utilized p-dopant. F4-TCNQ can dope most hole transporting materials (HTL), but it is very volatility, and has a low sticking coefficient thus difficult to deposit. Here we present the design of anchored molecular dopants based on the TCNQ core. We first review how the reduction potential of TCNQ core is affected by substitution with alkyl groups of different electronic properties. Electron donating groups have negative effect on the reduction potential of the acceptor. However, attaching electron withdrawing groups such as halogens counteracts the effect of electron donating groups. Using gas phase theoretical calculations we determined that trifluorinated TCNQ can be anchored through a σ-coupled alkyl chain to an inert molecular anchor without sacrificing the electron affinity.

  16. 30 CFR 56.9311 - Anchoring stationary sizing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anchoring stationary sizing devices. 56.9311 Section 56.9311 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Dumping Sites § 56.9311 Anchoring stationary sizing devices. Grizzlies and other stationary sizing...

  17. Memory for Dialogue: Recalling an Anchor through Talk and Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Pam

    This paper reports on a project involving student recall of the dialogue in a movie and retention of the "anchor," which in this case refers to a videotape recording of "To Kill a Mockingbird." The project looked at how students retained knowledge over a few days and what kind of activities resulted from expertise with an anchor. The goal of…

  18. Anchored Instruction in Preservice Educational Technology Classes: A Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Jeffrey W.

    This study examined the effectiveness of the anchored instruction (i.e., using a theme or anchor around which various learning activities take place) approach in preparing preservice teachers to integrate technology. Participants were 48 students enrolled in the three sections of a preservice educational technology class during the summer of 1997.…

  19. 30 CFR 56.9311 - Anchoring stationary sizing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Anchoring stationary sizing devices. 56.9311 Section 56.9311 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Dumping Sites § 56.9311 Anchoring stationary sizing devices. Grizzlies and other stationary sizing...

  20. Using Anchored Instruction to Evaluate Mathematical Growth and Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Terri L.; Batarelo, Ivana

    2005-01-01

    Anchored instruction is designed to present problems in a meaningful context to allow for investigations into real life environments. The Jasper Project was created to allow students to investigate mathematical dilemmas using anchored instruction techniques. This study uses case study methods to examine the perceptions that preservice teachers…

  1. Bearing area: a new indication for suture anchor pullout strength?

    PubMed

    Yakacki, Christopher Michael; Griffis, Jack; Poukalova, Mariya; Gall, Ken

    2009-08-01

    Studies performed to quantify the pullout strength of suture anchors have not adequately defined the basic device parameters that control monotonic pullout. The bearing area of a suture anchor can be used to understand and predict anchor pullout strength in a soft-bone model. First, conical-shaped test samples were varied in size and shape and tested for pullout in 5, 8, and 10 pcf sawbone models. Next, bearing area and pullout strength relationships developed from the test samples were validated against nine commercially available suture anchors, including the Mitek QuickAnchor and SpiraLok, Opus Magnum(2), ArthroCare ParaSorb, and Arthrex BioCorkscrew. The samples showed a direct correlation between bearing area and pullout strength. Increased insertion depth was a secondary condition that also increased pullout strength. The pullout strength for the suture anchors followed the predicted trends of conical devices based on their individual bearing areas. For the 5 and 8 pcf models, only two and three devices, respectively, fell outside the predicted pullout strength range by more than a standard deviation. The use of a synthetic sawbone model was validated against the pullout strength of an Arthrex Corkscrew in five fresh-frozen cadaver humeral heads. The bearing area of a suture anchor can be used to predict the pullout strength independent of design in a soft-bone model. This work helps provide a foundation to understand the principles that affect the pullout strength of suture anchors. PMID:19226593

  2. Understanding Rasch Measurement: Partial Credit Model and Pivot Anchoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bode, Rita K.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Rasch measurement partial credit model, what it is, how it differs from other Rasch models, and when and how to use it. Also describes the calibration of instruments with increasingly complex items. Explains pivot anchoring and illustrates its use and describes the effect of pivot anchoring on step calibrations, item hierarchy, and…

  3. 107. View showing open caisson Pier 4 with anchor bolts ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    107. View showing open caisson Pier 4 with anchor bolts placed ready for last pour of concrete. Also pile driver driving falsework piles for south anchor arm. Located at end of the old ferry landing slip at Crockett side of straits. - Carquinez Bridge, Spanning Carquinez Strait at Interstate 80, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  4. Metal-free protodeboronation of electron-rich arene boronic acids and its application to ortho-functionalization of electron-rich arenes using a boronic acid as a blocking group.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Su-Jin; Lee, Chun-Young; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Cheon, Cheol-Hong

    2014-08-15

    The metal-free thermal protodeboronation of various electron-rich arene boronic acids was studied. Several reaction parameters controlling this protodeboronation, such as solvent, temperature, and a proton source, have been investigated. On the basis of these studies, suitable reaction conditions for protodeboronation of several types of electron-rich arene boronic acids were provided. On the basis of this protodeboronation, a new protocol for the synthesis of ortho-functionalized electron-rich arenes from these boronic acids was developed using the boronic acid moiety as a blocking group in the electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction, followed by the removal of the boronic acid moiety via thermal protodeboronation. Mechanistic studies suggested that this protodeboronation might proceed via the complex formation of a boronic acid with a proton source, followed by the carbon-boron bond fission through σ-bond metathesis, to afford the corresponding arene compound and boric acid. PMID:25052375

  5. Electrically insulated MLI and thermal anchor

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, Koji; Furukawa, Masato; Murakami, Haruyuki; Kizu, Kaname; Tsuchiya, Katsuhiko; Koidea, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Hatakenaka, Ryuta; Miyakita, Takeshi

    2014-01-29

    The thermal shield of JT-60SA is kept at 80 K and will use the multilayer insulation (MLI) to reduce radiation heat load to the superconducting coils at 4.4 K from the cryostat at 300 K. Due to plasma pulse operation, the MLI is affected by eddy current in toroidal direction. The MLI is designed to suppress the current by electrically insulating every 20 degree in the toroidal direction by covering the MLI with polyimide films. In this paper, two kinds of designs for the MLI system are proposed, focusing on a way to overlap the layers. A boil-off calorimeter method and temperature measurement has been performed to determine the thermal performance of the MLI system. The design of the electrical insulated thermal anchor between the toroidal field (TF) coil and the thermal shield is also explained.

  6. Dependence of planar alignment layer upon enhancement of azimuthal anchoring energy by reactive mesogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngsik; Lee, You-Jin; Baek, Ji-Ho; Yu, Chang-Jae; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Reactive mesogens (RMs) can enhance the azimuthal anchoring energy of planar alignment layers used in liquid crystal (LC) devices; herein, we studied the interactions between the RMs and the planar alignment material that determine whether this enhancement can occur. Two alignment-layer materials were studied: polyamic acid (PA) and polyimide (PI). The addition of RMs to the PI-type alignment layer was effective in enhancing the azimuthal anchoring energy, whereas the addition of RMs to the PA-type alignment layer had little effect. Surface analysis revealed that the RMs adhered well to the PI-type alignment surface only; in the resulting cell, the presence of the RMs enhanced both the rise and decay times in fringe field switching (FFS)-mode operation.

  7. Durability Enhancement of Intermetallics Electrocatalysts via N-anchor Effect for Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; An, Li; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Nanlin; Xia, Dingguo; Huang, Weifeng; Chu, Wangsheng; Wu, Ziyu

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient durability and catalytic activity of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalyst are key issues that have to be solved for the practical application of low temperature fuel cell. This paper introduces a new catalyst design strategy using N-anchor to promote the corrosion resistance of electrocatalyst. The as-synthesized N-Pt3Fe1/C shows a high electrocatalytic activity and a superior durability towards ORR. The kinetic current density of N-Pt3Fe1/C as normalized by ECSA is still as high as 0.145 mA cm−2 and only 7% loss after 20000 potential cycles from 0.6 to 1.2 V (vs. NHE) in O2-bubbling perchloric acid solution, whereas Pt3Fe1/C shows 49% loss under the same tests. The N-anchor approach offers novel opportunities for the development of ORR catalyst with excellent electrochemical properties. PMID:24240982

  8. Anchoring submersible ultrasonic receivers in river channels with stable substrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bettoli, Phillip William; Scholten, G.D.; Hubbs, D.

    2010-01-01

    We developed an anchoring system for submersible ultrasonic receivers (SURs) that we placed on the bottom of the riverine reaches of three main-stem reservoirs in the upper Tennessee River. Each anchor consisted of a steel tube (8.9 x 35.6 cm) welded vertically to a round plate of steel (5.1 x 40.6 cm). All seven SURs and their 57-kg anchors were successfully deployed and retrieved three times over 547 d by a dive team employing surface air-breathing equipment and a davit-equipped boat. All of the anchors and their SURs remained stationary over two consecutive winters on the hard-bottom, thalweg sites where they were deployed. The SUR and its anchor at the most downriver site experienced flows that exceeded 2,100 m(3)/s and mean water column velocities of about 0.9 m/s.

  9. A single amino acid substitution in the group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor abolishes TLF-1 binding.

    PubMed

    DeJesus, E; Kieft, R; Albright, B; Stephens, N A; Hajduk, S L

    2013-01-01

    Critical to human innate immunity against African trypanosomes is a minor subclass of human high-density lipoproteins, termed Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1). This primate-specific molecule binds to a haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) on the surface of susceptible trypanosomes, initiating a lytic pathway. Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), escaping TLF-1 killing due to reduced uptake. Previously, we found that group 1 T. b. gambiense HpHbR (TbgHpHbR) mRNA levels were greatly reduced and the gene contained substitutions within the open reading frame. Here we show that a single, highly conserved amino acid in the TbgHpHbR ablates high affinity TLF-1 binding and subsequent endocytosis, thus evading TLF-1 killing. In addition, we show that over-expression of TbgHpHbR failed to rescue TLF-1 susceptibility. These findings suggest that the single substitution present in the TbgHpHbR directly contributes to the reduced uptake and resistance to TLF-1 seen in these important human pathogens. PMID:23637606

  10. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in the Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Haptoglobin-Hemoglobin Receptor Abolishes TLF-1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus, E.; Kieft, R.; Albright, B.; Stephens, N. A.; Hajduk, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Critical to human innate immunity against African trypanosomes is a minor subclass of human high-density lipoproteins, termed Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1). This primate-specific molecule binds to a haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) on the surface of susceptible trypanosomes, initiating a lytic pathway. Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), escaping TLF-1 killing due to reduced uptake. Previously, we found that group 1 T. b. gambiense HpHbR (TbgHpHbR) mRNA levels were greatly reduced and the gene contained substitutions within the open reading frame. Here we show that a single, highly conserved amino acid in the TbgHpHbR ablates high affinity TLF-1 binding and subsequent endocytosis, thus evading TLF-1 killing. In addition, we show that over-expression of TbgHpHbR failed to rescue TLF-1 susceptibility. These findings suggest that the single substitution present in the TbgHpHbR directly contributes to the reduced uptake and resistance to TLF-1 seen in these important human pathogens. PMID:23637606

  11. The effects of anion exchange functional-group variations on the sorption of Pu(IV) from nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.

    1995-12-01

    A macroporous, polyvinylpyridine anion exchange resin has been used for more than five years at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility to recover plutonium from nitrate media. This strong-base anion exchanger, Reillex{trademark} HPQ, offers higher capacity, faster kinetics, and significantly higher resistance to chemical and radiation damage than conventional polystyrene-based resins. In this study, we measured the sorption of Pu(IV) on Reillex{trademark} HPQ and on three macroporous, strong-base anion exchange resins that differ from Reillex{trademark} HPQ only in the alkyl group used to quaternize the pyridinium. nitrogen. These four resins, prepared by Reilly Industries, Inc., are copolymers of 1-alkyl-4-vinylpyridine, where the alkyl groups are methyl, butyl, hexyl, and octyl. We compare the trends in Pu(IV) sorption on these four resins to those obtained in our previous study of four polystyrene anion exchange resins having trimethyl, triethyl, tripropyl, and tributyl ammonium functionality. The Pu(IV) sorption was measured from 1 M to 9 M nitric acid in both studies.

  12. Probing the Influence of Protecting Groups on the Anomeric Equilibrium in Sialic Acid Glycosides with the Persistent Radical Effect

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A method for the investigation of the influence of protecting groups on the anomeric equilibrium in the sialic acid glycosides has been developed on the basis of the equilibration of O-sialyl hydroxylamines by reversible homolytic scission of the glycosidic bond following the dictates of the Fischer–Ingold persistent radical effect. It is found that a trans-fused 4O,5N-oxazolidinone group stabilizes the equatorial glycoside, i.e., reduces the anomeric effect, when compared to the 4O,5N-diacetyl protected systems. This effect is discussed in terms of the powerful electron-withdrawing nature of the oxazolidinone system, which in turn is a function of its strong dipole moment in the mean plane of the pyranose ring system. The new equilibration method displays a small solvent effect and is most pronounced in less polar media consistent with the anomeric effect in general. The unusual (for anomeric radicals) poor kinetic selectivity of anomeric sialyl radicals is discussed in terms of the planar π-type structure of these radicals and of competing 1,3-diaxial interactions in the diastereomeric transition states for trapping on the α- and β-faces of the radical. PMID:24606062

  13. A self-crosslinking thermosetting monomer with both epoxy and anhydride groups derived from Tung oil fatty acids: Synthesis and properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A self-crosslinking compound with epoxy groups and anhydride groups (GEMA) has been successfully synthesized from Tung oil fatty acid by reacting with maleic anhydride via the Diels-Alder reaction. GEMA has very good storage stability and can be cured with trace amounts of tertiary amine. This advan...

  14. Structure of a CGI-58 motif provides the molecular basis of lipid droplet anchoring.

    PubMed

    Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Nagy, Harald Manuel; Arthanari, Haribabu; Pillip, Christoph Jens; Lindermuth, Hanna; Luna, Rafael Eulogio; Wagner, Gerhard; Zechner, Rudolf; Zangger, Klaus; Oberer, Monika

    2015-10-30

    Triacylglycerols (TGs) stored in lipid droplets (LDs) are hydrolyzed in a highly regulated metabolic process called lipolysis to free fatty acids that serve as energy substrates for β-oxidation, precursors for membrane lipids and signaling molecules. Comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) stimulates the enzymatic activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of TGs to diacylglycerols and free fatty acids. In adipose tissue, protein-protein interactions between CGI-58 and the LD coating protein perilipin 1 restrain the ability of CGI-58 to activate ATGL under basal conditions. Phosphorylation of perilipin 1 disrupts these interactions and mobilizes CGI-58 for the activation of ATGL. We have previously demonstrated that the removal of a peptide at the N terminus (residues 10-31) of CGI-58 abrogates CGI-58 localization to LDs and CGI-58-mediated activation of ATGL. Here, we show that this tryptophan-rich N-terminal peptide serves as an independent LD anchor, with its three tryptophans serving as focal points of the left (harboring Trp(21) and Trp(25)) and right (harboring Trp(29)) anchor arms. The solution state NMR structure of a peptide comprising the LD anchor bound to dodecylphosphocholine micelles as LD mimic reveals that the left arm forms a concise hydrophobic core comprising tryptophans Trp(21) and Trp(25) and two adjacent leucines. Trp(29) serves as the core of a functionally independent anchor arm. Consequently, simultaneous tryptophan alanine permutations in both arms abolish localization and activity of CGI-58 as opposed to tryptophan substitutions that occur in only one arm. PMID:26350461

  15. Structure of a CGI-58 Motif Provides the Molecular Basis of Lipid Droplet Anchoring*

    PubMed Central

    Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Nagy, Harald Manuel; Arthanari, Haribabu; Pillip, Christoph Jens; Lindermuth, Hanna; Luna, Rafael Eulogio; Wagner, Gerhard; Zechner, Rudolf; Zangger, Klaus; Oberer, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (TGs) stored in lipid droplets (LDs) are hydrolyzed in a highly regulated metabolic process called lipolysis to free fatty acids that serve as energy substrates for β-oxidation, precursors for membrane lipids and signaling molecules. Comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) stimulates the enzymatic activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of TGs to diacylglycerols and free fatty acids. In adipose tissue, protein-protein interactions between CGI-58 and the LD coating protein perilipin 1 restrain the ability of CGI-58 to activate ATGL under basal conditions. Phosphorylation of perilipin 1 disrupts these interactions and mobilizes CGI-58 for the activation of ATGL. We have previously demonstrated that the removal of a peptide at the N terminus (residues 10–31) of CGI-58 abrogates CGI-58 localization to LDs and CGI-58-mediated activation of ATGL. Here, we show that this tryptophan-rich N-terminal peptide serves as an independent LD anchor, with its three tryptophans serving as focal points of the left (harboring Trp21 and Trp25) and right (harboring Trp29) anchor arms. The solution state NMR structure of a peptide comprising the LD anchor bound to dodecylphosphocholine micelles as LD mimic reveals that the left arm forms a concise hydrophobic core comprising tryptophans Trp21 and Trp25 and two adjacent leucines. Trp29 serves as the core of a functionally independent anchor arm. Consequently, simultaneous tryptophan alanine permutations in both arms abolish localization and activity of CGI-58 as opposed to tryptophan substitutions that occur in only one arm. PMID:26350461

  16. The role of hydroxyl group acidity on the activity of silica-supported secondary amines for the self-condensation of n-butanal.

    PubMed

    Shylesh, Sankaranarayanapillai; Hanna, David; Gomes, Joseph; Canlas, Christian G; Head-Gordon, Martin; Bell, Alexis T

    2015-02-01

    The catalytic activity of secondary amines supported on mesoporous silica for the self-condensation of n-butanal to 2-ethylhexenal can be altered significantly by controlling the Brønsted acidity of M--OH species present on the surface of the support. In this study, M--OH (M=Sn, Zr, Ti, and Al) groups were doped onto the surface of SBA-15, a mesoporous silica, prior to grafting secondary propyl amine groups on to the support surface. The catalytic activity was found to depend critically on the synthesis procedure, the nature and amount of metal species introduced and the spatial separation between the acidic sites and amine groups. DFT analysis of the reaction pathway indicates that, for weak Brønsted acid groups, such as Si--OH, the rate-limiting step is C--C bond formation, whereas for stronger Brønsted acid groups, such as Ti and Al, hydrolysis of iminium species produced upon C--C bond formation is the rate-limiting step. Theoretical analysis shows further that the apparent activation energy decreases with increasing Brønsted acidity of the M--OH groups, consistent with experimental observation. PMID:25314616

  17. Theoretical study of chlordecone and surface groups interaction in an activated carbon model under acidic and neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Carballo, Juan José; Melchor-Rodríguez, Kenia; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises Javier

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) are widely used in the purification of drinking water without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanisms of the persistent organic pollutants. Chlordecone (CLD, Kepone) is an organochlorinated synthetic compound that has been used mainly as agricultural insecticide. CLD has been identified and listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. The selection of the best suited AC for this type of contaminants is mainly an empirical and costly process. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on CLD adsorption is done in order to help understanding the process. This may provide a first selection criteria for the preparation of AC with suitable surface properties. A model of AC consisting of a seven membered ring graphene sheet (coronene) with a functional group on the edge was used to evaluate the influence of the SGs over the adsorption. Multiple Minima Hypersurface methodology (MMH) coupled with PM7 semiempirical Hamiltonian was employed in order to study the interactions of the chlordecone with SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) at acidic and neutral pH and different hydration conditions. Selected structures were re-optimized using CAM-B3LYP to achieve a well-defined electron density to characterize the interactions by the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules approach. The deprotonated form of surface carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of AC models show the strongest interactions, suggesting a chemical adsorption. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance CLD adsorption onto AC at neutral pH conditions. PMID:26945637

  18. Further studies on the glycerol teichoic acid of walls of Staphylococcus lactis I3. Location of the phosphodiester groups and their susceptibility to hydrolysis with alkali

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, A. R.; Baddiley, J.; Heckels, J. E.; Heptinstall, S.

    1971-01-01

    1. The teichoic acid from walls of Staphylococcus lactis I3 is readily degraded in dilute alkali. 2. Degradation proceeds by selective hydrolysis of that phosphodiester group attached to an alcoholic hydroxyl group of the N-acetylglucosamine and gives a repeating unit in high yield. 3. Further studies on a different repeating unit isolated by partial acid hydrolysis have shown that the glycerol diphosphate is attached to the 4-hydroxyl group of the N-acetylglucosamine and not to the 3-hydroxyl group as was proposed earlier. 4. The susceptibility towards hydrolysis by alkali of other structural types of teichoic acid has been examined and found to vary markedly according to their structure. PMID:5158917

  19. Triple labrum tears repaired with the JuggerKnot™ soft anchor: Technique and results

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vivek; Pietrzak, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The 2-year outcomes of patients undergoing repair of triple labrum tears using an all-suture anchor device were assessed. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients (17 male, one female; mean age 36.4 years, range: 14.2-62.3 years) with triple labrum tears underwent arthroscopic repair using the 1.4 mm JuggerKnot Soft Anchor (mean number of anchors 11.5, range: 9-19 anchors). Five patients had prior surgeries performed on their operative shoulder. Patients were followed for a mean of 2.0 years (range: 1.6-3.0 years). Constant–Murley shoulder score (CS) and Flexilevel scale of shoulder function (FLEX-SF) scores were measured, with preoperative and final postoperative mean scores compared with a paired Student's t-test (P < 0.05). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was also performed at final postoperative. Results: Overall total CS and FLEX-SF scores increased from 52.9 ± 20.4 to 84.3 ± 10.7 (P < 0.0001) and from 29.3 ± 4.7 to 42.0 ± 7.3 (P < 0.0001), respectively. When divided into two groups by whether or not glenohumeral arthrosis was present at the time of surgery (n = 9 each group), significant improvements in CS and FLEX-SF were obtained for both groups (P < 0.0015). There were no intraoperative complications. All patients, including contact athletes, returned to their preinjury level of sports activity and were satisfied. MRI evaluation revealed no instances of subchondral cyst formation or tunnel expansion. Anchor tracts appeared to heal with fibrous tissue, complete bony healing, or combined fibro-osseous healing. Conclusion: Our results are encouraging, demonstrating a consistent healing of the anchor tunnels through arthroscopic treatment of complex labrum lesions with a completely suture-based implant. It further demonstrates a meaningful improvement in patient outcomes, a predictable return to activity, and a high rate of patient satisfaction. Level of Evidence: Level IV case series. PMID:26288537

  20. Aspirin’s Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Song, Fei; Venereau, Emilie; Preti, Alessandro; Park, Sang-Wook; Hamilton, Keith; Swapna, G V T; Manohar, Murli; Moreau, Magali; Agresti, Alessandra; Gorzanelli, Andrea; De Marchis, Francesco; Wang, Huang; Antonyak, Marc; Micikas, Robert J; Gentile, Daniel R; Cerione, Richard A; Schroeder, Frank C; Montelione, Gaetano T; Bianchi, Marco E; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin’s bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world’s longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage. PMID:26101955

  1. The effect of functional groups on the SO2 adsorption on carbon surface I: A new insight into noncovalent interaction between SO2 molecule and acidic oxygen-containing groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Sun, Fei; Qu, Zhibin; Gao, Jihui; Wu, Shaohua

    2016-04-01

    For the aim to give a new insight into the interactions between SO2 molecule and carbon surface and the effect of acidic oxygen-containing groups, density functional theory and noncovalent interaction analysis in terms of reduced density gradient were employed to investigate both the intensity and type of the interactions. The results indicate that the physisorption of SO2 molecule mainly occurs on the basal plane of pure carbon surface due to van der Waals interactions, however, when acidic oxygen-containing groups were decorated on the carbon surface, they would facilitate SO2 adsorption as a result of hydrogen bonding and dipole-dipole interactions. What's more, these groups could not affect the chemisorption of SO2 remarkably, no matter they are near the adsorption sites or not. In addition, calculation results show that the interactions between SO2 and acidic oxygen-containing groups are in physisorption nature, which challenges a long-held the viewpoint of irreversible chemisorption. Acidic oxygen-containing groups could boost the effective surface area of carbon by enhancing the physisorption on edge positions.

  2. Peptide Anchor for Folate-Targeted Liposomal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Mangialavori, Irene C; Loureiro, Ana; Azoia, Nuno G; Sárria, Marisa P; Nogueira, Patrícia; Freitas, Jaime; Härmark, Johan; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Rollett, Alexandra; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Guebitz, Georg; Hebert, Hans; Moreira, Alexandra; Carmo, Alexandre M; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C; Gomes, Andreia C; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-09-14

    Specific folate receptors are abundantly overexpressed in chronically activated macrophages and in most cancer cells. Directed folate receptor targeting using liposomes is usually achieved using folate linked to a phospholipid or cholesterol anchor. This link is formed using a large spacer like polyethylene glycol. Here, we report an innovative strategy for targeted liposome delivery that uses a hydrophobic fragment of surfactant protein D linked to folate. Our proposed spacer is a small 4 amino acid residue linker. The peptide conjugate inserts deeply into the lipid bilayer without affecting liposomal integrity, with high stability and specificity. To compare the drug delivery potential of both liposomal targeting systems, we encapsulated the nuclear dye Hoechst 34580. The eventual increase in blue fluorescence would only be detectable upon liposome disruption, leading to specific binding of this dye to DNA. Our delivery system was proven to be more efficient (2-fold) in Caco-2 cells than classic systems where the folate moiety is linked to liposomes by polyethylene glycol. PMID:26241560

  3. Gold nanoparticles assembled with dithiocarbamate-anchored molecular wires

    PubMed Central

    Reeler, Nini E. A.; Lerstrup, Knud A.; Somerville, Walter; Speder, Jozsef; Petersen, Søren V.; Laursen, Bo W.; Arenz, Matthias; Qiu, Xiaohui; Vosch, Tom; Nørgaard, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    A protocol for the bottom-up self-assembly of nanogaps is developed through molecular linking of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Two π-conjugated oligo(phenylene ethynylene) molecules (OPE) with dithiocarbamate anchoring groups are used as ligands for the AuNPs. OPE-4S with a dithiocarbamate in each end of the molecule and a reference molecule OPE-2S with only a single dithiocarbamate end group. The linking mechanism of OPE-4S is investigated by using a combination of TEM, UV-Vis absorption and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as well as studying the effect of varying the OPE-4S to AuNP concentration ratio. UV-Vis absorption confirms the formation of AuNP aggregates by the appearance of an extended plasmon band (EPB) for which the red shift and intensity depend on the OPE-4S:AuNP ratio. SERS confirms the presence of OPE-4S and shows a gradual increase of the signal intensity with increasing OPE-4S:AuNP ratios up to a ratio of about 4000, after which the SERS intensity does not increase significantly. For OPE-2S, no linking is observed below full coverage of the AuNPs indicating that the observed aggregate formation at high OPE-2S:AuNP ratios, above full AuNP coverage, is most likely of a physical nature (van der Waals forces or π-π interactions). PMID:26471461

  4. Gold nanoparticles assembled with dithiocarbamate-anchored molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Reeler, Nini E A; Lerstrup, Knud A; Somerville, Walter; Speder, Jozsef; Petersen, Søren V; Laursen, Bo W; Arenz, Matthias; Qiu, Xiaohui; Vosch, Tom; Nørgaard, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    A protocol for the bottom-up self-assembly of nanogaps is developed through molecular linking of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Two π-conjugated oligo(phenylene ethynylene) molecules (OPE) with dithiocarbamate anchoring groups are used as ligands for the AuNPs. OPE-4S with a dithiocarbamate in each end of the molecule and a reference molecule OPE-2S with only a single dithiocarbamate end group. The linking mechanism of OPE-4S is investigated by using a combination of TEM, UV-Vis absorption and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as well as studying the effect of varying the OPE-4S to AuNP concentration ratio. UV-Vis absorption confirms the formation of AuNP aggregates by the appearance of an extended plasmon band (EPB) for which the red shift and intensity depend on the OPE-4S:AuNP ratio. SERS confirms the presence of OPE-4S and shows a gradual increase of the signal intensity with increasing OPE-4S:AuNP ratios up to a ratio of about 4000, after which the SERS intensity does not increase significantly. For OPE-2S, no linking is observed below full coverage of the AuNPs indicating that the observed aggregate formation at high OPE-2S:AuNP ratios, above full AuNP coverage, is most likely of a physical nature (van der Waals forces or π-π interactions). PMID:26471461

  5. Correlation between surface free energy and anchoring energy of 6CHBT on polyimide surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borycki, Jerzy; Okulska-Bozek, Malgorzata; Kedzierski, Jerzy; Kojdecki, Marek A.

    2002-06-01

    Polyimides were prepared in the classical two-step method via poly(amic acids). Poly(amic acids) were obtained from 3,3',4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (BPDA), 4,4'- (hexafluoroisopropylidene)diphthalic anhydride (6FDA), pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA), 3,3',4,4'- diphenylsulfonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (DSDA), 4,4'- oxydiphthalic anhydride (ODPA) and amines 4,4'-oxydianiline (ODA), 1,3-phenylenediamine (MPD), 1,4-phenylenediamine (PPD), 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane (MDA), 4,4'- ethylenedianiline (DAB), 2,4,6-trimethyl-1,3- phenylenediamine (TMPD), 4-methyl-1,3-phenylenediamine (MMPD) and 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (DAD) in dimethylformamide. The indium tin oxide (ITO)-glass plates were spin-coated with the poly(amic acids) solutions and dried. A thermal imidization process was then carried out at 250 degree(s)C for 4 h. In this study the anchoring energies of 6CHBT molecules were evaluated on rubbing aligning layers of PI films. The polar anchoring energy coefficient was determined by wedge cell method. The surface free energy and its components of polyimide layers were determined by measuring the contact angles of water, ethylene glycol, formamide and diiodomethane drops on the rubbing polymer surfaces. The Lifshitz-van der Waals and acidic-basic components of surface free energies were found from van Oss equation.

  6. Wave propagation in damage assessment of ground anchors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zima, B.; Rucka, M.

    2015-07-01

    The inspection possibilities of ground anchors are limited to destructive test such as pull-out test. Guided wave propagation gives an opportunity to develop an inspection system dedicated to determine the condition of inspected element without violation of their integrity. In this paper the experimental study on wave propagation in laboratory models of ground anchors are presented. Experiments were conducted for different bonding lengths and different frequencies of excitation. Waves were generated by a piezoelectric actuator and the laser vibrometry technique was used to register velocity signals. For all tested anchors it was possible to identify the boundary between steel and concrete based on the registered reflections in wave propagation signals.

  7. Dungeons, Gratings, and Black Rooms: A Defense of Double-Anchoring Theory and a Reply to Howe et al. (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressan, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Replies to comments mad by Howe et al. on the current author's original article. The double-anchoring theory of lightness (P. Bressan, 2006b) assumes that any given region belongs to a set of frameworks, created by Gestalt grouping principles, and receives a provisional lightness within each of them; the region's final lightness is a weighted…

  8. Comparative Analysis of the Cytotoxic Effects of Okadaic Acid-Group Toxins on Human Intestinal Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ferron, Pierre-Jean; Hogeveen, Kevin; Fessard, Valérie; Le Hégarat, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    The phycotoxin, okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxin 1 and 2 (DTX-1 and -2) are protein phosphatase PP2A and PP1 inhibitors involved in diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP). Data on the toxicity of the OA-group toxins show some differences with respect to the in vivo acute toxicity between the toxin members. In order to investigate whether OA and congeners DTX-1 and -2 may induce different mechanisms of action during acute toxicity on the human intestine, we compared their toxicological effects in two in vitro intestinal cell models: the colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, Caco-2, and the intestinal muco-secreting cell line, HT29-MTX. Using a high content analysis approach, we evaluated various cytotoxicity parameters, including apoptosis (caspase-3 activation), DNA damage (phosphorylation of histone H2AX), inflammation (translocation of NF-κB) and cell proliferation (Ki-67 production). Investigation of the kinetics of the cellular responses demonstrated that the three toxins induced a pro-inflammatory response followed by cell cycle disruption in both cell lines, leading to apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that the three toxins induce similar effects, as no major differences in the cytotoxic responses could be detected. However DTX-1 induced cytotoxic effects at five-fold lower concentrations than for OA and DTX-2. PMID:25196936

  9. Activation of Plant Innate Immunity by Extracellular High Mobility Group Box 3 and Its Inhibition by Salicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Manohar, Murli; Manosalva, Patricia; Tian, Miaoying; Moreau, Magali; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) signal the presence of tissue damage to induce immune responses in plants and animals. Here, we report that High Mobility Group Box 3 (HMGB3) is a novel plant DAMP. Extracellular HMGB3, through receptor-like kinases BAK1 and BKK1, induced hallmark innate immune responses, including i) MAPK activation, ii) defense-related gene expression, iii) callose deposition, and iv) enhanced resistance to Botrytis cinerea. Infection by necrotrophic B. cinerea released HMGB3 into the extracellular space (apoplast). Silencing HMGBs enhanced susceptibility to B. cinerea, while HMGB3 injection into apoplast restored resistance. Like its human counterpart, HMGB3 binds salicylic acid (SA), which results in inhibition of its DAMP activity. An SA-binding site mutant of HMGB3 retained its DAMP activity, which was no longer inhibited by SA, consistent with its reduced SA-binding activity. These results provide cross-kingdom evidence that HMGB proteins function as DAMPs and that SA is their conserved inhibitor. PMID:27007252

  10. Group B Streptococcus Engages an Inhibitory Siglec through Sialic Acid Mimicry to Blunt Innate Immune and Inflammatory Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yung-Chi; Olson, Joshua; Beasley, Federico C.; Tung, Christine; Zhang, Jiquan; Crocker, Paul R.; Varki, Ajit; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a common agent of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in newborns. The GBS surface capsule contains sialic acids (Sia) that engage Sia-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) on leukocytes. Here we use mice lacking Siglec-E, an inhibitory Siglec of myelomonocytic cells, to study the significance of GBS Siglec engagement during in vivo infection. We found GBS bound to Siglec-E in a Sia-specific fashion to blunt NF-κB and MAPK activation. As a consequence, Siglec-E-deficient macrophages had enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, phagocytosis and bactericidal activity against the pathogen. Following pulmonary or low-dose intravenous GBS challenge, Siglec-E KO mice produced more pro-inflammatory cytokines and exhibited reduced GBS invasion of the central nervous system. In contrast, upon high dose lethal challenges, cytokine storm in Siglec-E KO mice was associated with accelerated mortality. We conclude that GBS Sia mimicry influences host innate immune and inflammatory responses in vivo through engagement of an inhibitory Siglec, with the ultimate outcome of the host response varying depending upon the site, stage and magnitude of infection. PMID:24391502

  11. Specific excitonic interactions in the aggregates of hyaluronic acid and cyanine dyes with different lengths of methine group.

    PubMed

    Tobata, H; Sagawa, T

    2016-03-01

    The absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectra of three types of cyanine dyes with different lengths of methine group (3,3'-diethylthiadicarbocyanine iodide, DTDC; 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide, DTC; and 3,3'-diethylthiacyanine iodide, DTTHC) in an aqueous solution were compared with and without hyaluronic acid (HA), which has a helical structure. DTDC forms chiral H- and J-aggregates, whereas DTC and DTTHC are unable to form any aggregates. DTDC also forms H- and J-aggregates in the presence of sodium polyacrylate (PA) with a random-coil structure; however, the PA-DTDC aggregates exhibit no chirality. These results suggest that the chirality of HA-DTDC aggregates is induced by the helical structure of HA. In 2.4 vol% and 10 vol% methanol, HA-DTDC aggregates displayed different patterns of temperature dependence, whereas no aggregation was observed in 30 vol% methanol. The solubility of DTDC in a mixed solvent of water and methanol is generally improved by the addition of methanol, which prevents the aggregation of DTDC. PMID:26815728

  12. Lipoarabinomannans: characterization of the multiacylated forms of the phosphatidyl-myo-inositol anchor by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Nigou, J; Gilleron, M; Puzo, G

    1999-01-01

    Lipoarabinomannans, which exhibit a large spectrum of immunological activities, emerge as the major antigens of mycobacterial envelopes. The lipoarabinomannan structure is based on a phosphatidyl-myo-inositol anchor whose integrity has been shown to be crucial for lipoarabinomannan biological activity and particularly for presentation to CD4/CD8 double-negative alphabetaT cells by CD1 molecules. In this report, an analytical approach was developed for high-resolution 31P-NMR analysis of native, i.e. multiacylated, lipoarabinomannans. The one-dimensional 31P spectrum of cellular lipoarabinomannans, from Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, exhibited four 31P resonances typifying four types of lipoarabinomannans. Two-dimensional 1H-31P heteronuclear multiple-quantum-correlation/homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn analysis of the native molecules showed that these four types of lipoarabinomannan differed in the number and localization of fatty acids (from 1 to 4) esterifying the anchor. Besides the three acylation sites previously described, i.e. positions 1 and 2 of glycerol and 6 of the mannosyl unit linked to the C-2 of myo-inositol, we demonstrate the existence of a fourth acylation position at the C-3 of myo-inositol. We report here the first structural study of native multiacylated lipoarabinomannans, establishing the structure of the intact phosphatidyl-myo-inositol anchor. Our findings would help gain more understanding of the molecular basis of lipoarabinomannan discrimination in the binding process to CD1 molecules. PMID:9895288

  13. Cleavage by signal peptide peptidase is required for the degradation of selected tail-anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boname, Jessica M.; Bloor, Stuart; Wandel, Michal P.; Nathan, James A.; Antrobus, Robin; Dingwell, Kevin S.; Thurston, Teresa L.; Smith, Duncan L.; Smith, James C.; Randow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The regulated turnover of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–resident membrane proteins requires their extraction from the membrane lipid bilayer and subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation. Cleavage within the transmembrane domain provides an attractive mechanism to facilitate protein dislocation but has never been shown for endogenous substrates. To determine whether intramembrane proteolysis, specifically cleavage by the intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl protease signal peptide peptidase (SPP), is involved in this pathway, we generated an SPP-specific somatic cell knockout. In a stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture–based proteomics screen, we identified HO-1 (heme oxygenase-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to biliverdin, as a novel SPP substrate. Intramembrane cleavage by catalytically active SPP provided the primary proteolytic step required for the extraction and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of HO-1, an ER-resident tail-anchored protein. SPP-mediated proteolysis was not limited to HO-1 but was required for the dislocation and degradation of additional tail-anchored ER-resident proteins. Our study identifies tail-anchored proteins as novel SPP substrates and a specific requirement for SPP-mediated intramembrane cleavage in protein turnover. PMID:24958774

  14. High-resolution structure of TBP with TAF1 reveals anchoring patterns in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Anandapadamanaban, Madhanagopal; Andresen, Cecilia; Helander, Sara; Ohyama, Yoshifumi; Siponen, Marina I.; Lundström, Patrik; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Moche, Martin; Sunnerhagen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The general transcription factor TFIID provides a regulatory platform for transcription initiation. Here we present the crystal structure (1.97 Å) and NMR analysis of yeast TAF1 N-terminal domains TAND1 and TAND2 when bound to yeast TBP, together with mutational data. The yTAF1-TAND1, which in itself acts as a transcriptional activator, binds into the DNA-binding TBP concave surface by presenting similar anchor residues to TBP as E. coli Mot1 but from a distinct structural scaffold. Furthermore, we show how yTAF1-TAND2 employs an aromatic and acidic anchoring pattern to bind a conserved yTBP surface groove traversing the basic helix region, and we find highly similar TBP-binding motifs also presented by the structurally distinct TFIIA, Mot1 and Brf1 proteins. Our identification of these anchoring patterns, which can be easily disrupted or enhanced, provides compelling insight into the competitive multiprotein TBP interplay critical to transcriptional regulation. PMID:23851461

  15. Novel cancer vaccines prepared by anchoring cytokines to tumor cells avoiding gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizard, Philippe; Gross, David-Alexandre; Chenal, Alexandre; Beaumelle, Bruno; Kosmatopoulos, Konstadinos; Gillet, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    Cytokines have a strong potential for triggering anticancer immunity if released in the tumor microenvironment. Successful vaccines have been engineered using tumor cells genetically modified to secrete the cytokines. Unfortunately, this approach remains difficult and hazardous to perform in the clinic. We describe a new way of combining cytokines with tumor cells to prepare anticancer vaccines. This consists in anchoring recombinant cytokines to the membrane of killed tumor cells. Attachment is mediated by a fragment of diphtheria toxin (T) genetically connected to the cytokine. It is triggered by an acid pH pulse. The method was applied to IL-2, a potent anti-tumor cytokine. IL-2 anchored to the surface of tumor cells by the T anchor retained its IL-2 activity and remained exposed several days. Interestingly, vaccination of mice with these modified tumor cells induced a protective anti-tumor immunity mediated by tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This procedure presents several advantages as compared to the conventional approaches based on the transfection of tumor cells with cytokine genes. It does not require the culture of tumor cells from the patients and eliminates the safety problems connected with viral vectors while allowing the control of the amount of cytokines delivered with the vaccine.

  16. Preparation of water-soluble hyperbranched polyester nanoparticles with sulfonic acid functional groups and their micelles behavior, anticoagulant effect and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Han, Qiaorong; Chen, Xiaohan; Niu, Yanlian; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Bingxiang; Mao, Chun; Chen, Libin; Shen, Jian

    2013-07-01

    Biocompatibility of nanoparticles has been attracting great interest in the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Herein, the aliphatic water-soluble hyperbranched polyester nanoparticles with sulfonic acid functional groups (HBPE-SO3 NPs) were synthesized and characterized. They are amphiphilic polymeric nanoparticles with hydrophobic hyperbranched polyester (HBPE) core and hydrophilic sulfonic acid terminal groups. Based on our observations, we believe there are two forms of HBPE-SO3 NPs in water under different conditions: unimolecular micelles and large multimolecular micelles. The biocompatibility and anticoagulant effect of the HBPE-SO3 NPs were investigated using coagulation tests, hemolysis assay, morphological changes of red blood cells (RBCs), complement and platelet activation detection, and cytotoxicity (MTT). The results confirmed that the sulfonic acid terminal groups can substantially enhance the anticoagulant property of HBPE, and the HBPE-SO3 NPs have the potential to be used in nanomedicine due to their good bioproperties. PMID:23718279

  17. Dicarboxylic acid anhydride condensation with compounds containing active methylene groups. 4: Some 4-nitrophthalic anhydride condensation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oskaja, V.; Rotberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    By 4-nitrophthalic anhydride condensation with acetoacetate in acetic anhydride and triethylamine solution with subsequent breakdown of the intermediate condensation product, 5-nitroindanedione-1,3 was obtained. A 4-nitrophthalic anhydride with acetic anhydride, according to reaction conditions, may yield two products: in the presence of potassium acetate and at high temperatures 4-(or 5-)-nitro-2-acetylbenzoic acid is formed: in the presence of triethylamine and at room temperature 5-( or 6-)-nitrophthalic acetic acid is isolated. A 4-nitrophthalic anhydride and malonic acid in pyridine solution according to temperature yield either 5-( or 6-)-nitrophthalic acetic acid or 4-(or 5-)-nitro-2-acetylbenzoic acid.

  18. Ideals as Anchors for Relationship Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Margaret; Trinitapoli, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Research on young-adult sexuality in sub-Saharan Africa typically conceptualizes sex as an individual-level risk behavior. We introduce a new approach that connects the conditions surrounding the initiation of sex with subsequent relationship well-being, examines relationships as sequences of interdependent events, and indexes relationship experiences to individually held ideals. New card-sort data from southern Malawi capture young women’s relationship experiences and their ideals in a sequential framework. Using optimal matching, we measure the distance between ideal and experienced relationship sequences to (1) assess the associations between ideological congruence and perceived relationship well-being, (2) compare this ideal-based approach to other experience-based alternatives, and (3) identify individual- and couple-level correlates of congruence between ideals and experiences in the romantic realm. We show that congruence between ideals and experiences conveys relationship well-being along four dimensions: expressions of love and support, robust communication habits, perceived biological safety, and perceived relationship stability. We further show that congruence is patterned by socioeconomic status and supported by shared ideals within romantic dyads. We argue that conceiving of ideals as anchors for how sexual experiences are manifest advances current understandings of romantic relationships, and we suggest that this approach has applications for other domains of life. PMID:27110031

  19. Photoinduced anchoring on a chalcogenide surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheremet, N.; Kurioz, Yu.; Klebanov, M.; Lyubin, V.; Slyusarenko, K.; Reznikov, Yu.

    2012-05-01

    We present basic characteristics and a model of photoinduced anchoring of liquid crystals (LCs) on a chalcogenide surface. It was found that characteristics of the alignment strongly depend on the LC material for the same chalcogenide glass. The photoalignment is partially reversible and can be controlled by changing the light polarization direction. We propose a model in which the existence of dichroic units on the chalcogenide surface and competition between two mechanisms of the photoalignment is suggested. The first mechanism is related to the light-induced anisotropy on the chalcogenide surface and results in an easy orientation axes of a LC parallel to the polarization of the incident light. The second mechanism is attributed to an energy transfer from the dichroic units after the light absorption to the LC molecules adsorbed on the chalcogenide surface. The transferred energy causes polarization-sensitive desorption of the LC molecules from the chalcogenide surface and the light-induced easy orientation axis of a LC perpendicular to the incident light polarization. The competition between these mechanisms leads to the observed change of the direction of the easy axis with the exposure.

  20. Anchored boundary conditions for locally isostatic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theran, Louis; Nixon, Anthony; Ross, Elissa; Sadjadi, Mahdi; Servatius, Brigitte; Thorpe, M. F.

    2015-11-01

    Finite pieces of locally isostatic networks have a large number of floppy modes because of missing constraints at the surface. Here we show that by imposing suitable boundary conditions at the surface the network can be rendered effectively isostatic. We refer to these as anchored boundary conditions. An important example is formed by a two-dimensional network of corner sharing triangles, which is the focus of this paper. Another way of rendering such networks isostatic is by adding an external wire along which all unpinned vertices can slide (sliding boundary conditions). This approach also allows for the incorporation of boundaries associated with internal holes and complex sample geometries, which are illustrated with examples. The recent synthesis of bilayers of vitreous silica has provided impetus for this work. Experimental results from the imaging of finite pieces at the atomic level need such boundary conditions, if the observed structure is to be computer refined so that the interior atoms have the perception of being in an infinite isostatic environment.

  1. Material Testing for Robotic Omnidirectional Anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witkoe, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    To successfully explore near-Earth Asteroids the question of mobility emerges as the key issue for any robotic mission. When small bodies have extremely low escape velocities, traditional methods, such as wheels, would send the robot hurtling off of the asteroid's surface. To solve this problem, JPL has developed an omni-directional anchoring mechanism for use in microgravity that utilizes microspine technology. These microspines are placed in circular arrays with 16 independent carriages biasing the surface of the rock. The asperities in the surface allow the gripper to hold nearly 150N in all directions. While the gripper has been proven successful on consolidated rocks, it had yet to be tested on a variety of other surfaces that are suspected to separate the large boulders on an asteroid. Since asteroid surfaces vary widely, from friable rocks to lose ponds of regolith, the gripper was tested in a large variety of materials such as, bonded pumice, sand, gravel, and loose rocks. The forces are applied tangent, at 45 degrees, and normal to the surface of the material. The immediate results from this experiment will give insight into the gripper's effectiveness across the wide spectrum of materials found on asteroids.

  2. Pyrene-terminated phenylenethynylene rigid linkers anchored to metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Taratula, Olena; Rochford, Jonathan; Piotrowiak, Piotr; Galoppini, Elena; Carlisle, Rachael A; Meyer, Gerald J

    2006-08-17

    Phenylenethynylene (PE) rigid linkers (para and meta) were used to anchor pyrene to the surface of TiO2 (anatase) and ZrO2 nanoparticle thin films through the two COOH groups of an isophthalic acid (Ipa) unit. Four chromophore-linker models were studied in solution and bound. Two are novel meta-pyrene-PE linker systems: dimethyl 5-(3-(1-pyrenylethynyl)phenylethynyl)-isophthalate, carrying one pyrene, and dimethyl 5-(bis-3,5-(1-pyrenylethynyl)phenylethynyl)-isophthalate, carrying two. These were compared with para rigid-rods dimethyl 5-(1-pyrenylethynyl)isophthalate and dimethyl 5-(4-(1-pyrenylethynyl)phenylethynyl)-isophthalate, each carrying one pyrene but varying in length. The length of the PE linkers and the para or meta substitution influence the photophysical properties of the compounds. The extinction coefficient increased, and the long wavelength absorbance of the pyrene chromophore was shifted to the red with increasing conjugation. Compared to unsubstituted pyrene, the pyrene-linker systems were characterized by short fluorescence lifetimes (tau approximately 2 ns in tetrahydrofuran solutions), but quantum yields were close to unity. ZINDO/S CI calculations attribute this effect to a switching in the order of the two lowest-lying singlet states of pyrene. High surface coverages, approximately 10(-8) mol/cm2, and carboxylate binding modes on nanostructured TiO2 films were obtained in all cases. The appearance of a pyrene excimer emission on ZrO2, an insulator, indicates that the pyrene-linker system is closely packed (Py-Py < 4 A) on the surface. The fluorescence emission on TiO2 was completely quenched, consistent with quantitative and rapid electron injection into the semiconductor indicating that the pyrene excimer acts as a sensitizer. Photoelectrochemical studies in regenerative solar cells with I3-/I- as the redox mediator indicated near-quantitative conversion of absorbed photons into an electrical current. PMID:16898719

  3. Formation and properties of surface-anchored polymer assemblies with tunable physico-chemical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao

    We describe two new methodologies leading to the formation of novel surface-anchored polymer assemblies on solid substrates. While the main goal is to understand the fundamentals pertaining to the preparation and properties of the surface-bound polymer assemblies (including neutral and chargeable polymers), several examples also are mentioned throughout the Thesis that point out to practical applications of such structures. The first method is based on generating assemblies comprising anchored polymers with a gradual variation of grafting densities on solid substrates. These structures are prepared by first covering the substrate with a molecular gradient of the polymerization initiator, followed by polymerization from these substrate-bound initiator centers ("grafting from"). We apply this technique to prepare grafting density gradients of poly(acryl amide) (PAAm) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) on silica-covered substrates. We show that using the grafting density gradient geometry, the characteristics of surface-anchored polymers in both the low grafting density ("mushroom") regime as well as the high grafting density ("brush") regime can be accessed conveniently on a single sample. We use a battery of experimental methods, including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Near-edge absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), contact angle, ellipsometry, to study the characteristics of the surface-bound polymer layers. We also probe the scaling laws of neutral polymer as a function of grafting density, and for weak polyelectrolyte, in addition to the grafting density, we study the affect of solution ionic strength and pH values. In the second novel method, which we coined as "mechanically assisted polymer assembly" (MAPA), we form surface anchored polymers by "grafting from" polymerization initiators deposited on elastic surfaces that have been previously extended uniaxially by a certain length increment, Deltax. Upon releasing the strain in the

  4. Knotless anchors with sutures external to the anchor body may be at risk for suture cutting through osteopenic bone

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Y.; Woodmass, J. M.; Nelson, A. A.; Boorman, R. S.; Thornton, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the mechanical performance, under low-load cyclic loading, of two different knotless suture anchor designs: sutures completely internal to the anchor body (SpeedScrew) and sutures external to the anchor body and adjacent to bone (MultiFIX P). Methods Using standard suture loops pulled in-line with the rotator cuff (approximately 60°), anchors were tested in cadaveric bone and foam blocks representing normal to osteopenic bone. Mechanical testing included preloading to 10 N and cyclic loading for 500 cycles from 10 N to 60 N at 60 mm/min. The parameters evaluated were initial displacement, cyclic displacement and number of cycles and load at 3 mm displacement relative to preload. Video recording throughout testing documented the predominant source of suture displacement and the distance of ‘suture cutting through bone’. Results In cadaveric bone and foam blocks, MultiFIX P anchors had significantly greater initial displacement, and lower number of cycles and lower load at 3 mm displacement than SpeedScrew anchors. Video analysis revealed ‘suture cutting through bone’ as the predominant source of suture displacement in cadaveric bone (qualitative) and greater ‘suture cutting through bone’ comparing MultiFIX P with SpeedScrew anchors in foam blocks (quantitative). The greater suture displacement in MultiFIX P anchors was predominantly from suture cutting through bone, which was enhanced in an osteopenic bone model. Conclusions Anchors with sutures external to the anchor body are at risk for suture cutting through bone since the suture eyelet is at the distal tip of the implant and the suture directly abrades against the bone edge during cyclic loading. Suture cutting through bone may be a significant source of fixation failure, particularly in osteopenic bone. Cite this article: Y. Ono, J. M. Woodmass, A. A. Nelson, R. S. Boorman, G. M. Thornton, I. K. Y. Lo. Knotless anchors with sutures external to the anchor body may be

  5. Detail on west elevation of anchor above door; camera facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail on west elevation of anchor above door; camera facing east. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Smithery, California Avenue, west side at California Avenue & Eighth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  6. 19. WEST ANCHOR SPAN OF THROUGH TRUSS AND PIERS NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. WEST ANCHOR SPAN OF THROUGH TRUSS AND PIERS NO. 2 AND 3, FROM WEST RIVERBANK. VIEW TO NORTH. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  7. 20. DETAIL OF WEST ANCHOR SPAN, CANTILEVER ARMS AND WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL OF WEST ANCHOR SPAN, CANTILEVER ARMS AND WEST HALF OF SUSPENDED SPAN OF THROUGH TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  8. Visual implant elastomer and anchor tag retention in largemouth bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, K.J.; Janney, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    We double-marked largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides with Floy FD-68B anchor tags and visible implant elastomer (VIE) marks before stocking to compare retention of the two marks for age-0 (178 mm total length [TL]) and age-1 (273 mm TL) largemouth bass. In a short-term (31-d) evaluation, retention rate of anchor tags was over 94% for each age-class and retention of VIE marks was 98% in both age-classes. In a longer-term comparison of fish stocked into the Ohio River, retention was substantially higher for VIE marks (92.9%) than for anchor tags (42.9%) after 403 d (ages combined). Although anchor tags had high retention in two sizes of largemouth bass during the short-term experiment, they should not be used in situations where accurate identification of marked fish is required for periods longer than 123 d. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  9. 21. DETAIL OF WEST (AMERICAN) CANTILEVER AND ANCHOR ARMS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAIL OF WEST (AMERICAN) CANTILEVER AND ANCHOR ARMS OF MAIN SPAN, SHOWING PIER M. VIEW TO NORTH. - Blue Water Bridge, Spanning St. Clair River at I-69, I-94, & Canadian Route 402, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  10. 22. DETAIL OF EAST (CANADIAN) CANTILEVER AND ANCHOR ARMS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DETAIL OF EAST (CANADIAN) CANTILEVER AND ANCHOR ARMS OF MAIN SPAN, SHOWING PIER C. VIEW TO NORTH. - Blue Water Bridge, Spanning St. Clair River at I-69, I-94, & Canadian Route 402, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  11. 34. View of pier 3, showing supporting main anchor arm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. View of pier 3, showing supporting main anchor arm and cantilever arm spans, as seen from shore near pier 4, looking north - Williamstown-Marietta Bridge, Spanning Ohio River between Williamstown & Marietta, Williamstown, Wood County, WV

  12. 22. View showing main anchor arm, as viewed from main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. View showing main anchor arm, as viewed from main cantilever arm looking south. Note upper chord eyebar arrangement. - Williamstown-Marietta Bridge, Spanning Ohio River between Williamstown & Marietta, Williamstown, Wood County, WV

  13. 43. DETAIL OF PINNED UPPER CHORD CONNECTION BETWEEN ANCHOR ARM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. DETAIL OF PINNED UPPER CHORD CONNECTION BETWEEN ANCHOR ARM AND SUSPENDED (PANEL 67). VIEW TO NORTH. - Blue Water Bridge, Spanning St. Clair River at I-69, I-94, & Canadian Route 402, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  14. ANCHOR SETTING PLAN FOR TYPICAL APPROACH SPANS AND ELEVATION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ANCHOR SETTING PLAN FOR TYPICAL APPROACH SPANS AND ELEVATION OF BENT CAPS FOR APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE, SHEET 5509-M1 - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  15. ANCHOR SETTING PLAN FOR PIERS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ANCHOR SETTING PLAN FOR PIERS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 AND 6, APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE, SHEET 5505 TO 8-M1 - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  16. ANCHOR SETTING PLAN, WITH DETAILS, FOR STEEL BENTS AT APPROACH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ANCHOR SETTING PLAN, WITH DETAILS, FOR STEEL BENTS AT APPROACH SPANS FOR APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE, SHEET 5509-M2 - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  17. Theory of anchoring on a two-dimensionally grooved surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Jun-Ichi; Gwag, Jin Seog; Yoneya, Makoto; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    We investigate analytically the anchoring of a nematic liquid crystal on a two-dimensionally grooved surface of arbitrary shape, induced by the elastic distortions of a liquid crystal adjacent to the surface. Our theoretical framework applied to a surface with square grooves reveals that such a surface can exhibit bistable anchoring, while a direct extension of a well-known theory of Berreman [Phys. Rev. Lett. 28, 1683 (1972)] results in no azimuthal anchoring in the so-called one-constant case ( K1=K2=K3 , with K1 , K2 , and K3 being the splay, twist, and bend elastic constants, respectively). We show under the assumption of K1=K2=K that the direction of the bistable easy axes and the anchoring strength crucially depend on the ratios K3/K and K24/K , where K24 is the saddle-splay surface elastic constant. To demonstrate the applicability of our theory to general cases and to elucidate the effect of surface shape and the elastic constants on the properties of surface anchoring, we also consider several specific cases of interest; one-dimensional grooves of arbitrary shape, rhombic grooves, and surfaces possessing 2N -fold symmetry, including hexagonal grooves, and show the following: (i) The rescaled anchoring energy f(ϕ)/f(π/2) of one-dimensional grooves, with ϕ being the angle between the director n and the groove direction, is independent of the groove shape. (ii) Whether two diagonal axes of rhombic grooves can become easy axes depends sensitively on K3/K , K24/K and the angle α between the grooves. The angle α yielding the maximum anchoring strength for given groove pitch and amplitude depends again on K3/K and K24/K ; in some cases α=0 (one-dimensional grooves), and in other cases α≠0 , gives the maximum anchoring strength. Square grooves (α=π/2) do not necessarily exhibit the largest anchoring strength. (iii) A surface possessing 2N -fold symmetry can yield N -stable azimuthal anchoring. However, when K1=K2=K3 and N≥3 , azimuthal anchoring is

  18. Collagenous microstructure of the glenoid labrum and biceps anchor

    PubMed Central

    Hill, A M; Hoerning, E J; Brook, K; Smith, C D; Moss, J; Ryder, T; Wallace, A L; Bull, A M J

    2008-01-01

    The glenoid labrum is a significant passive stabilizer of the shoulder joint. However, its microstructural form remains largely unappreciated, particularly in the context of its variety of functions. The focus of labral microscopy has often been histology and, as such, there is very little appreciation of collagen composition and arrangement of the labrum, and hence the micromechanics of the structure. On transmission electron microscopy, significant differences in diameter, area and perimeter were noted in the two gross histological groups of collagen fibril visualized; this suggests a heterogeneous collagenous composition with potentially distinct mechanical function. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated three distinct zones of interest: a superficial mesh, a dense circumferential braided core potentially able to accommodate hoop stresses, and a loosely packed peri-core zone. Confocal microscopy revealed an articular surface fine fibrillar mesh potentially able to reduce surface friction, bundles of circumferential encapsulated fibres in the bulk of the tissue, and bone anchoring fibres at the osseous interface. Varying microstructure throughout the depth of the labrum suggests a role in accommodating different types of loading. An understanding of the labral microstructure can lead to development of hypotheses based upon an appreciation of this component of material property. This may aid an educated approach to surgical timing and repair. PMID:18429974

  19. Clinical Usefulness of Oral Supplementation with Alpha-Lipoic Acid, Curcumin Phytosome, and B-Group Vitamins in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Undergoing Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pajardi, Giorgio; Bortot, Paola; Ponti, Veronica; Novelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the clinical usefulness of oral supplementation with a combination product containing alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins in 180 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. Patients in Group A (n = 60) served as controls and did not receive any treatment either before or after surgery. Patients in Group B (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months both before and after surgery (totaling 6 months of supplementation). Patients in Group C (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months before surgery only. Patients in Group B showed significantly lower nocturnal symptoms scores compared with Group A subjects at both 40 days and 3 months after surgery (both P values <0.05). Moreover, patients in Group B had a significantly lower number of positive Phalen's tests at 3 months compared with the other study groups (P < 0.05). We conclude that oral supplementation with alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins twice a day both before and after surgery is safe and effective in CTS patients scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. PMID:24563654

  20. Clinical usefulness of oral supplementation with alpha-lipoic Acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome undergoing surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Pajardi, Giorgio; Bortot, Paola; Ponti, Veronica; Novelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the clinical usefulness of oral supplementation with a combination product containing alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins in 180 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. Patients in Group A (n = 60) served as controls and did not receive any treatment either before or after surgery. Patients in Group B (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months both before and after surgery (totaling 6 months of supplementation). Patients in Group C (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months before surgery only. Patients in Group B showed significantly lower nocturnal symptoms scores compared with Group A subjects at both 40 days and 3 months after surgery (both P values <0.05). Moreover, patients in Group B had a significantly lower number of positive Phalen's tests at 3 months compared with the other study groups (P < 0.05). We conclude that oral supplementation with alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins twice a day both before and after surgery is safe and effective in CTS patients scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. PMID:24563654

  1. Genome mapping by random anchoring: A discrete theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M. Q.; Marr, T. G.

    1993-11-01

    As a part of the international human genome project, large-scale genomic maps of human and other model organisms are being generated. More recently, mapping using various anchoring (as opposed to the traditional "fingerprinting") strategies have been proposed based largely on mathematical models. In all of the theoretical work dealing with anchoring, an anchor has been idealized as a point on a continuous, infinite-length genome. In general, it is not desirable to make these assumptions, since in practice they may be violated under a variety of actual biological situations. Here we analyze a discrete model that can be used to predict the expected progress made when mapping by random anchoring. By virtue of keeping all three length scales (genome length, clone length, and probe length) finite, our results for the random anchoring strategy are derived in full generality, which contain previous results as special cases and hence can have broad application for planning mapping experiments or assessing the accuracy of the continuum models. Finally, we pose a challenging nonrandom anchoring model corresponding to a more efficient mapping scheme.

  2. Filamentous structures in skeletal muscle: anchors for the subsarcolemmal space.

    PubMed

    Khairani, Astrid Feinisa; Tajika, Yuki; Takahashi, Maiko; Ueno, Hitoshi; Murakami, Tohru; Soenggono, Arifin; Yorifuji, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    In skeletal muscle fibers, intermediate filaments and actin filaments provide structural support to the myofibrils and the sarcolemma. For many years, it was poorly understood from ultrastructural observations that how these filamentous structures were kept anchored. The present study was conducted to determine the architecture of filamentous anchoring structures in the subsarcolemmal space and the intermyofibrils. The diaphragms (Dp) of adult wild type and mdx mice (mdx is a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy) were subjected to tension applied perpendicular to the long axis of the muscle fibers, with or without treatment with 1% Triton X-100 or 0.03% saponin. These experiments were conducted to confirm the presence and integrity of the filamentous anchoring structures. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that these structures provide firm transverse connections between the sarcolemma and peripheral myofibrils. Most of the filamentous structures appeared to be inserted into subsarcolemmal densities, forming anchoring connections between the sarcolemma and peripheral myofibrils. In some cases, actin filaments were found to run longitudinally in the subsarcolemmal space to connect to the sarcolemma or in some cases to connect to the intermyofibrils as elongated thin filaments. These filamentous anchoring structures were less common in the mdx Dp. Our data suggest that the transverse and longitudinal filamentous structures form an anchoring system in the subsarcolemmal space and the intermyofibrils. PMID:24519712

  3. Epoxy-coated rock anchors for upper Occoquan Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Bruen, M.P.; Pansic, N.; Schwartz, M.I.

    1995-12-31

    High-capacity, epoxy-coated anchors were installed at Upper Occoquan Dam to increase the stability of the 70-foot-high concrete gravity dam and powerhouse under revised Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) conditions. The post-tensioned anchorage system consisted of 56 multi-strand rock anchors with design loads of 700 to 1855 kips, averaging 1500 kips per tendon. A double corrosion protection system was specified to provide protection throughout the entire anchor length. During anchor stressing and testing, significant creep movement under constant loads equivalent to 133% of the design load was experienced and exceeded the requisite Post-Tensioning Institute (PTI) criteria. In addition to the creep phenomena, seating losses during transfer of the load to the end anchorage are at least 2 to 3 times greater than that which has been experienced with bare-wire strand tendons. On the basis of anchor test results, modifications were made to the anchor testing protocol, acceptance criteria, and the approach used for assessment of the long-term performance of the anchorage system.

  4. Free versus anchored numerical estimation: A unified approach.

    PubMed

    Opfer, John E; Thompson, Clarissa A; Kim, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Children's number-line estimation has produced a lively debate about representational change, supported by apparently incompatible data regarding descriptive adequacy of logarithmic (Opfer, Siegler, & Young, 2011) and cyclic power models (Slusser, Santiago, & Barth, 2013). To test whether methodological differences might explain discrepant findings, we created a fully crossed 2×2 design and assigned 96 children to one of four cells. In the design, we crossed anchoring (free, anchored) and sampling (over-, even-), which were candidate factors to explain discrepant findings. In three conditions (free/over-sampling, free/even-sampling, and anchored/over-sampling), the majority of children provided estimates better fit by the logarithmic than cyclic power function. In the last condition (anchored/even-sampling), the reverse was found. Results suggest that logarithmically-compressed numerical estimates do not depend on sampling, that the fit of cyclic power functions to children's estimates is likely an effect of anchors, and that a mixed log/linear model provides a useful model for both free and anchored numerical estimation. PMID:26774104

  5. Evaluation of mitral valve replacement anchoring in a phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Moore, John; Lang, Pencilla; Bainbridge, Dan; Campbell, Gordon; Jones, Doug L.; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Conventional mitral valve replacement requires a median sternotomy and cardio-pulmonary bypass with aortic crossclamping and is associated with significant mortality and morbidity which could be reduced by performing the procedure off-pump. Replacing the mitral valve in the closed, off-pump, beating heart requires extensive development and validation of surgical and imaging techniques. Image guidance systems and surgical access for off-pump mitral valve replacement have been previously developed, allowing the prosthetic valve to be safely introduced into the left atrium and inserted into the mitral annulus. The major remaining challenge is to design a method of securely anchoring the prosthetic valve inside the beating heart. The development of anchoring techniques has been hampered by the expense and difficulty in conducting large animal studies. In this paper, we demonstrate how prosthetic valve anchoring may be evaluated in a dynamic phantom. The phantom provides a consistent testing environment where pressure measurements and Doppler ultrasound can be used to monitor and assess the valve anchoring procedures, detecting pararvalvular leak when valve anchoring is inadequate. Minimally invasive anchoring techniques may be directly compared to the current gold standard of valves sutured under direct vision, providing a useful tool for the validation of new surgical instruments.

  6. The Dynamics of Scaling: A Memory-Based Anchor Model of Category Rating and Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrov, Alexander A.; Anderson, John R.

    2005-01-01

    A memory-based scaling model--ANCHOR--is proposed and tested. The perceived magnitude of the target stimulus is compared with a set of anchors in memory. Anchor selection is probabilistic and sensitive to similarity, base-level strength, and recency. The winning anchor provides a reference point near the target and thereby converts the global…

  7. 46 CFR 130.240 - Anchors and chains for OSVs of 100 or more gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Miscellaneous Equipment and...— (1) One anchor of the tabular weight and one-half the tabulated length of anchor chain listed in the applicable standard; or (2) Two anchors of one-half the tabular weight with the total length of anchor...

  8. 46 CFR 130.240 - Anchors and chains for OSVs of 100 or more gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Miscellaneous Equipment and...— (1) One anchor of the tabular weight and one-half the tabulated length of anchor chain listed in the applicable standard; or (2) Two anchors of one-half the tabular weight with the total length of anchor...

  9. 46 CFR 130.240 - Anchors and chains for OSVs of 100 or more gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Miscellaneous Equipment and...— (1) One anchor of the tabular weight and one-half the tabulated length of anchor chain listed in the applicable standard; or (2) Two anchors of one-half the tabular weight with the total length of anchor...

  10. 46 CFR 130.240 - Anchors and chains for OSVs of 100 or more gross tons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Miscellaneous Equipment and...— (1) One anchor of the tabular weight and one-half the tabulated length of anchor chain listed in the applicable standard; or (2) Two anchors of one-half the tabular weight with the total length of anchor...

  11. Ligand anchored poly(propyleneimine) dendrimers for brain targeting: Comparative in vitro and in vivo assessment.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hemant K; Gajbhiye, Virendra; Kesharwani, Prashant; Jain, Narendra K

    2016-11-15

    The present investigation was aimed at developing various ligands-anchored dendrimers and comparing their brain targeting potential at one platform. Sialic acid (S), glucosamine (G) and concanavalin A (C) anchored poly(propyleneimine) (PPI) dendritic nanoconjugates were developed and evaluated for delivery of anti-cancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX) to the brain. MTT assay on U373MG human astrocytoma cells indicated IC50 values of 0.40, 0.65, 0.95, 2.00 and 3.50μM for PTX loaded SPPI, GPPI, CPPI, PPI formulations, and free PTX, respectively. The invivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies in rats showed significantly higher accumulation of PTX in brain as compared to free PTX. The order of targeting potential of various ligands under investigation was found as sialic acid>glucosamine>concanavalin A. Thus, it can be concluded that sialic acid, glucosamine and Con A can be used as potential ligands to append PPI dendrimers for enhanced delivery of anticancer drugs to the brain for higher therapeutic outcome. PMID:27501037

  12. Adsorption-induced anchoring transitions at nematic-liquid-crystal-crystal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieranski, P.; Jérôme, B.

    1989-07-01

    Discontinuous (first-order) anchoring transitions are shown to occur as a function of water adsorption at the nematic-liquid-crystal(E9)-gypsum and E9-mica interfaces. The transitions involve growth of domains with an anchoring a' making a finite angle with the direction a of the parent anchoring. The growth proceeds by motion of walls separating the domains with the new anchoring a' from the matrix with the parental anchoring a. A Landau-type expression for the interfacial energy is proposed and used to classify the anchoring transitions and to explain the behavior of the domains during the first-order anchoring transitions.

  13. Self-assembly and cytotoxicity study of waterwheel-like dinuclear metal complexes: the first metal complexes appended with multiple free hydroxamic acid groups.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Hua; Liu, Wei-Sheng; Wang, Ya-Wen; Li, Yang; Zheng, Li-Fang; Wang, Da-Qi

    2007-02-01

    Two waterwheel-like dinuclear complexes [M(2)(PHA)(4)(H(2)O)(2)] (M = Cu(II) (1), Zn(II) (2); HPHA = phthal-hydroxamic acid) appended with four free hydroxamic acid groups, namely, free hydroxamic acid metal complexes (FHAMCs) have been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of complex 1 was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, which adopts the paddlewheel motif with four bidentate carboxylate ligands joining two Cu(II) ions. The relative cytotoxicities of compounds 1 and 2 against SMMC-7721 and HO-8910 cell lines are similar and more predominant than HPHA (IC(50): Cu(II)>Zn(II)>HPHA). The synergic effect of the bound water molecules, multiple free hydroxamic acid groups and dimetal active sites with bridging carboxylate may have significant impacts on their pharmacological activity. As the prototype for a new class of hydroxamic acid derivatives, the self-assembly of FHAMCs presents a promising new strategy in designing multiple hydroxamic acids with remarkable bioactivities. PMID:17125839

  14. Metal and metalloid indicator electrodes for the non-aqueous potentiometric titration of weak acids: comparative evaluation of group III, IV and V main-group elements.

    PubMed

    Greenhow, E J; Al-Mudarris, B F

    Indicator electrodes constructed from aluminium, gallium, indium, thallium, carbon, silicon, germanium, tin, lead, arsenic, antimony and bismuth have been evaluated for the potentiometric titration of solutions of benzoic acid in dimethylformamide and 4-methyl-2-pentanone. The aluminium, gallium, silicon and arsenic electrodes have also been evaluated for the determination of 3,5-xylenol in the same two solvents. Aluminium, gallium, indium, silicon, germanium, antimony and bismuth electrodes are superior to, or compare favourably with, a glass electrode for the determination of benzoic acid, when the criterion of efficiency is the sharpness of the end-point inflexion. In non-aqueous titrations of 3,5-xylenol, aluminium and gallium electrodes are similar in efficiency to the glass electrode for determinations in dimethylformamide solution, while the gallium electrode is superior to the glass electrode when 4-methyl-2-pentanone is the solvent. Possible relationships between the properties of the electrode element and the end-point sharpness when it is used as an indicator electrode are briefly considered. PMID:18961658

  15. The Synthesis of a Dipeptide from its Component Amino Acids: Protecting Groups in the Elementary Organic Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Paul E.; Campbell, Andrew

    1982-01-01

    A simple, three-step procedure for synthesizing a dipeptide from its component amino acids is described. The dipeptide synthesized uses inexpensive amino acids having hydrocarbon side-chains and can be observed in E/Z forms by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Each step in the synthesis produces white crystalline products using standard…

  16. Copolymeric hexyl acrylate-methacrylic acid microspheres - surface vs. bulk reactive carboxyl groups. Coulometric and colorimetric determination and analytical applications for heterogeneous microtitration.

    PubMed

    Stelmach, Emilia; Maksymiuk, Krzysztof; Michalska, Agata

    2016-10-01

    Copolymeric acrylate microspheres were prepared from hexyl acrylate using different amounts of methacrylic acid, resulting in a series of microspheres of gradually changing properties. The distribution of carboxyl groups - between surface and bulk of microspheres was evaluated. Bulk reactive carboxyl groups were determined using reverse coulometric titration with H(+) ions, following hydroxide ions have been generated and allowed to react with microspheres in the first step. It was found that the number of reactive carboxyl groups available in copolymeric microspheres is lower compared to number of methacrylic acid units used for polymerization process. Moreover, there is correlation between the number of groups introduced and found to be reactive in microspheres. On the other hand, the number of surface reactive groups was proportional to the number of groups introduced in course of polymerization. Thus, the surface reactive groups can be used as reagent, in novel heterogeneous microtitration procedure, in which a constant number of microspheres of different carboxyl groups contents is introduced to the sample to react with the analyte. The applicability of novel proposed method was tested on the example of Ni(2+) determination. PMID:27474305

  17. Selective and programmed cleavage of GPI-anchored proteins from the surface membrane by phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Müller, Alexandra; Klöppel, Christine; Smith-Valentine, Megan; Van Houten, Judith; Simon, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Many surface proteins of eukaryotic cells are tethered to the membrane by a GPI-anchor which is enzymatically cleavable. Here, we investigate cleavage and release of different GPI-proteins by phospholipase C from the outer membrane of the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. Our data indicate that different GPI-proteins are not equally cleaved as proteins of the surface antigen family are preferentially released in vitro compared to several smaller GPI-proteins. Likewise, the analysis of culture medium indicates exclusive in vivo release of surface antigens by two phospholipase C isoforms (PLC2 and PLC6). This suggests that phospholipase C shows affinity for select groups of GPI-anchored proteins. Our data also reveal an up-regulation of PLC isoforms in GPI-anchored protein cleavage during antigenic switching. As a consequence, silencing of these PLCs leads to a drastic decrease of antigen concentration in the medium. These results suggest a higher order of GPI-regulation by phospholipase C as cleavage occurs programmed and specific for single GPI-proteins instead of an unspecific shedding of the entire surface membrane GPI-content. PMID:22024023

  18. RhVI1 is a membrane-anchored vacuolar invertase highly expressed in Rosa hybrida L. petals.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Collu, Gabriella; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Esposito, Francesca; Piano, Dario

    2016-05-01

    Invertases are a widespread group of enzymes that catalyse the conversion of sucrose into fructose and glucose. Plants invertases and their substrates are essential factors that play an active role in primary metabolism and in cellular differentiation and by these activities they sustain development and growth. Being naturally present in multiple isoforms, invertases are known to be highly differentiated and tissue specific in such a way that every isoform is characteristic of a specific part of the plant. In this work, we report the identification of the invertase RhVI1 that was found to be highly expressed in rose petals. A characterization of this protein revealed that RhVI1 is a glycosylated membrane-anchored protein associated with the cytosolic side of the vacuolar membrane which occurs in vivo in a monomeric form. Purification yields have shown that the levels of expression decreased during the passage of petals from buds to mature and pre-senescent flowers. Moreover, the activity assay indicates RhVI1 to be an acidic vacuolar invertase. The physiological implications of these findings are discussed, suggesting a possible role of this protein during anthesis. PMID:27083698

  19. RhVI1 is a membrane-anchored vacuolar invertase highly expressed in Rosa hybrida L. petals

    PubMed Central

    Farci, Domenica; Collu, Gabriella; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Esposito, Francesca; Piano, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Invertases are a widespread group of enzymes that catalyse the conversion of sucrose into fructose and glucose. Plants invertases and their substrates are essential factors that play an active role in primary metabolism and in cellular differentiation and by these activities they sustain development and growth. Being naturally present in multiple isoforms, invertases are known to be highly differentiated and tissue specific in such a way that every isoform is characteristic of a specific part of the plant. In this work, we report the identification of the invertase RhVI1 that was found to be highly expressed in rose petals. A characterization of this protein revealed that RhVI1 is a glycosylated membrane-anchored protein associated with the cytosolic side of the vacuolar membrane which occurs in vivo in a monomeric form. Purification yields have shown that the levels of expression decreased during the passage of petals from buds to mature and pre-senescent flowers. Moreover, the activity assay indicates RhVI1 to be an acidic vacuolar invertase. The physiological implications of these findings are discussed, suggesting a possible role of this protein during anthesis. PMID:27083698

  20. Efficient Light-Driven Oxidation of Alcohols Using an Organic Chromophore-Catalyst Assembly Anchored to TiO2.

    PubMed

    Pho, Toan V; Sheridan, Matthew V; Morseth, Zachary A; Sherman, Benjamin D; Meyer, Thomas J; Papanikolas, John M; Schanze, Kirk S; Reynolds, John R

    2016-04-13

    The ligand 5-PO3H2-2,2':5',2″-terthiophene-5-trpy, T3 (trpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), was prepared and studied in aqueous solutions along with its metal complex assembly [Ru(T3)(bpy)(OH2)](2+) (T3-Ru-OH2, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine). T3 contains a phosphonic acid group for anchoring to a TiO2 photoanode under aqueous conditions, a terthiophene fragment for light absorption and electron injection into TiO2, and a terminal trpy ligand for the construction of assemblies comprising a molecular oxidation catalyst. At a TiO2 photoanode, T3 displays efficient injection at pH 4.35 as evidenced by the high photocurrents (∼350 uA/cm(2)) arising from hydroquinone oxidation. Addition of [Ru(bpy)(OTf)][OTf]2 (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, OTf(-) = triflate) to T3 at the free trpy ligand forms the molecular assembly, T3-Ru-OH2, with the oxidative catalyst fragment: [Ru(trpy)(bpy)(OH2)](2+). The new assembly, T3-Ru-OH2, was used to perform efficient light-driven oxidation of phenol (230 μA/cm(2)) and benzyl alcohol (25 μA/cm(2)) in a dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cell. PMID:27032068

  1. Expanding the clinical and molecular characteristics of PIGT-CDG, a disorder of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors.

    PubMed

    Lam, Christina; Golas, Gretchen A; Davids, Mariska; Huizing, Marjan; Kane, Megan S; Krasnewich, Donna M; Malicdan, May Christine V; Adams, David R; Markello, Thomas C; Zein, Wadih M; Gropman, Andrea L; Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A; Maric, Irina; Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Baker, Eva H; Ferreira, Carlos R; Danylchuk, Noelle R; Kahler, Stephen; Garnica, Adolfo D; Bradley Schaefer, G; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Gahl, William A; Wolfe, Lynne A

    2015-01-01

    PIGT-CDG, an autosomal recessive syndromic intellectual disability disorder of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors, was recently described in two independent kindreds [Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia-Seizures Syndrome 3 (OMIM, #615398)]. PIGT encodes phosphatidylinositol-glycan biosynthesis class T, a subunit of the heteropentameric transamidase complex that facilitates the transfer of GPI to proteins. GPI facilitates attachment (anchoring) of proteins to cell membranes. We describe, at ages 7 and 6 years, two children of non-consanguineous parents; they had hypotonia, severe global developmental delay, and intractable seizures along with endocrine, ophthalmologic, skeletal, hearing, and cardiac anomalies. Exome sequencing revealed that both siblings had compound heterozygous variants in PIGT (NM_015937.5), i.e., c.918dupC, a novel duplication leading to a frameshift, and c.1342C > T encoding a previously described missense variant. Flow cytometry studies showed decreased surface expression of GPI-anchored proteins on granulocytes, consistent with findings in previous cases. These siblings further delineate the clinical spectrum of PIGT-CDG, reemphasize the neuro-ophthalmologic presentation, clarify the endocrine features, and add hypermobility, low CSF albumin quotient, and hearing loss to the phenotypic spectrum. Our results emphasize that GPI anchor-related congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) should be considered in subjects with early onset severe seizure disorders and dysmorphic facial features, even in the presence of a normal carbohydrate-deficient transferrin pattern and N-glycan profiling. Currently available screening for CDGs will not reliably detect this family of disorders, and our case reaffirms that the use of flow cytometry and genetic testing is essential for diagnosis in this group of disorders. PMID:25943031

  2. Temperature-induced alteration of inositolphosphorylceramides in the putative glycosylated lipid precursors of Tetrahymena mimbres glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hung, C Y; Ko, Y G; Thompson, G A

    1995-01-01

    Tetrahymena species contain relatively prominent glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins as well as their putative precursor phosphatidylinositol (PI) glycans. We have characterized the lipid components of the two principal T. mimbres PI glycans. Following their purification by preparative TLC, the PI glycans were hydrolysed in methanolic HCl or NaOH, and resulting lipids were analysed by chromatography and mass spectrometry. The two PI glycans contained nearly identical lipid moieties having long-chain bases with N-linked fatty acids. The predominant long-chain base, 3-O-methylsphinganine, was first assumed to be O-methylated as an artifact of hydrolysis, but subsequently, on the basis of control experiments, it was shown to be naturally occurring. PI glycans from cells grown at 28 degrees C contained primarily palmitic acid (79%) and some stearic acid (11%), whereas the principal PI glycan from 38 degrees C-grown T. mimbres contained 65% stearic acid. In 15 degrees C-grown cells stearic acid accounted for only 2% of ceramide-bound fatty acids and was almost totally replaced by palmitic acid (95%). The distributions of fatty acids bound to T. mimbres GPI-anchored proteins [Ko, Hung and Thompson (1995) Biochem. J. 307, 115-121] were similar but not identical to those of the PI glycans described here. Temperature-induced specification of the lipid components of mature T. mimbres GPI-anchored proteins appears to be established both at the level of PI-glycan synthesis and the level of PI-glycan utilization for protein attachment. PMID:7717964

  3. Influence of Trifluoroethanol on Membrane Interfacial Anchoring Interactions of Transmembrane α-Helical Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Özdirekcan, Suat; Nyholm, Thomas K. M.; Raja, Mobeen; Rijkers, Dirk T. S.; Liskamp, Rob M. J.; Killian, J. Antoinette

    2008-01-01

    Interfacial anchoring interactions between aromatic amino acid residues and the lipid-water interface are believed to be important determinants for membrane protein structure and function. Thus, it is possible that molecules that partition into the lipid-water interface can influence membrane protein activity simply by interfering with these anchoring interactions. Here we tested this hypothesis by investigating the effects of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) on the interaction of a Trp-flanked synthetic transmembrane peptide (acetyl-GW2(LA)8LW2A-NH2) with model membranes of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. Two striking observations were made. First, using 2H nuclear magnetic resonance on acyl chain deuterated lipids, we found that addition of 4 or 8 vol % of TFE completely abolishes the ability of the peptide to order and stretch the lipid acyl chains in these relatively thin bilayers. Second, we observed that addition of 8 vol % TFE reduces the tilt angle of the peptide from 5.3° to 2.5°, as measured by 2H NMR on Ala-d4 labeled peptides. The “straightening” of the peptide was accompanied by an increased exposure of Trp to the aqueous phase, as shown by Trp-fluorescence quenching experiments using acrylamide. The observation of a reduced tilt angle was surprising because we also found that TFE partioning results in a significant thinning of the membrane, which would increase the extent of hydrophobic mismatch. In contrast to the Trp-flanked peptide, no effect of TFE was observed on the interaction of a Lys-flanked analog (acetyl-GK2(LA)8LK2A-NH2) with the lipid bilayer. These results emphasize the importance of interfacial anchoring interactions for membrane organization and provide new insights into how molecules such as TFE that can act as anesthetics may affect the behavior of membrane proteins that are enriched in aromatic amino acids at the lipid-water interface. PMID:17905843

  4. Surface display of heterologous proteins in Bacillus thuringiensis using a peptidoglycan hydrolase anchor

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiaohu; Jiang, Mengtian; Yu, Ziniu; Cai, Hao; Li, Lin

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have revealed that the lysin motif (LysM) domains of bacterial cell wall-degrading enzymes are able to bind to peptidoglycan moieties of the cell wall. This suggests an approach for a cell surface display system in Gram-positive bacteria using a LysM-containing protein as the anchoring motif. In this study, we developed a new surface display system in B. thuringiensis using a LysM-containing peptidoglycan hydrolase, endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Mbg), as the anchor protein. Results Homology searching in the B. thuringiensis YBT-1520 genome revealed a putative peptidoglycan hydrolase gene. The encoded protein, Mbg, exhibited substantial cell-wall binding capacity. The deduced amino acid sequence of Mbg was structurally distinguished as an N-terminal domain with two tandemly aligned LysMs and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A GFP-fusion protein was expressed and used to verify the surface localization by Western blot, flow cytometry, protease accessibility, SDS sensitivity, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy assays. Low-level constitutive expression of Mbg was elevated by introducing a sporulation-independent promoter of cry3Aa. Truncated Mbg domains with separate N-terminus (Mbgn), C-terminus (Mbgc), LysM1, or LysM2 were further compared for their cell-wall displaying efficiencies. The Mbgn moiety contributed to cell-wall anchoring, while LysM1 was the active domain. Two tandemly repeated Mbgns exhibited the highest display activity, while the activity of three repeated Mbgns was decreased. A heterologous bacterial multicopper oxidase (WlacD) was successfully displayed onto the surface of B. thuringiensis target cells using the optimum (Mbgn)2 anchor, without radically altering its catalytic activity. Conclusion Mbg can be a functional anchor protein to target different heterologous proteins onto the surface of B. thuringiensis cells. Since the LysM domain appears to be universal in Gram-positive bacteria, the strategy

  5. Complexes of adamantane-based group 13 Lewis acids and superacids: Bonding analysis and thermodynamics of hydrogen splitting.

    PubMed

    El-Hamdi, Majid; Solà, Miquel; Poater, Jordi; Timoshkin, Alexey Y

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structure and chemical bonding in donor-acceptor complexes formed by group 13 element adamantane and perfluorinated adamantane derivatives EC9 R'15 (E = B, Al; R' = H, F) with Lewis bases XR3 and XC9 H15 (X = N, P; R= H, CH3 ) have been studied using energy decomposition analysis at the BP86/TZ2P level of theory. Larger stability of complexes with perfluorinated adamantane derivatives is mainly due to better electrostatic and orbital interactions. Deformation energies of the fragments and Pauli repulsion are of less importance, with exception for the boron-phosphorus complexes. The MO analysis reveals that LUMO energies of EC9 R'15 significantly decrease upon fluorination (by 4.7 and 3.6 eV for E = B and Al, respectively) which results in an increase of orbital interaction energies by 27-38 (B) and 15-26 (Al) kcal mol(-1) . HOMO energies of XR3 increase in order PH3  < NH3  < PMe3  < PC9 H15  < NMe3  < NC9 H15 . For the studied complexes, there is a linear correlation between the dissociation energy of the complex and the energy difference between HOMO of the donor and LUMO of the acceptor. The fluorination of the Lewis acid significantly reduces standard enthalpies of the heterolytic hydrogen splitting H2  + D + A = [HD](+)  + [HA](-) . Analysis of several types of the [HD](+) ···[HA](-) ion pair formation in the gas phase reveals that structures with additional H···F interactions are energetically favorable. Taking into account the ion pair formation, hydrogen splitting is predicted to be highly exothermic in case of the perfluorinated derivatives both in the gas phase and in solution. Thus, fluorinated adamantane-based Lewis superacids are attractive synthetic targets for the construction of the donor-acceptor cryptands. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26931238

  6. Laparoendoscopic single-site simple nephrectomy using a magnetic anchoring system in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Hyo; Lee, Hye Won; Lee, Seo Yeon; Han, Deok Hyun; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic anchoring devices may reduce the number of port sites needed in laparoscopic surgery. In this study, we prospectively assessed the feasibility of using a magnetic anchoring and guidance system (MAGS) in laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery performed by novices. Materials and Methods A total of 10 LESS simple nephrectomies were performed with or without MAGS in a nonsurvival porcine model by 6 operators with no previous LESS surgery experience. After installation of the homemade single port, an intra-abdominal magnet was fixed to the renal parenchyma with suturing and stabilized by an external magnet placed on the flank so that the position of the kidney could be easily changed by moving the external handheld magnet. The length of the procedure and any intraoperative complications were evaluated. Results Operative time (mean±standard deviation) was shorter in the group using the magnetic anchoring device (M-LESS-N) than in the group with conventional LESS nephrectomy (C-LESS-N) (63±20.8 minutes vs. 82±40.7 minutes, respectively). Although all nephrectomies were completed uneventfully in the M-LESS-N group, renal vein injury occurred during dissection of the renal hilum in two cases of C-LESS-N and was resolved by simultaneous transection of the renal artery and vein with an Endo-GIA stapler. Conclusions LESS-N using MAGS is a feasible technique for surgeons with no LESS surgery experience. Taking into account the 2 cases of renal vein injury in the C-LESS-N group, the application of MAGS may be beneficial for overcoming the learning curve of LESS surgery. PMID:27195320

  7. Effect of excess dietary iron as ferrous sulfate and excess dietary ascorbic acid on liver zinc, copper and sulfhydryl groups and the ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.H.; Adkins, J.S.; Harrison, B.

    1986-03-05

    Female guinea pigs of the NIH 13/N strain, weighing between 475 and 512 g, were fed diets supplemented with 50 to 2500 mg of iron per kg of diet as ferrous sulfate and 0.2 to 8.0 g of ascorbic acid per kg of diet. A significant effect was observed on tissue copper and zinc, ovary weight and liver protein sulfhydryl groups. The mean ovary weight for guinea pigs fed 2500 mg of iron was significantly less than that of animals fed 50 mg of iron, 0.045 +/- 0.012 g and 0.061 +/- 0.009 g, respectively. Liver zinc content of animals fed 2500 mg of iron and 200 mg of ascorbic acid per kg of diet was significantly less than that of animals fed 50 mg of iron and 200 mg of ascorbic acid, 16.3 +/- 3.3 ..mu..g and 19.6 +/- 1.6 ..mu..g, respectively. There was no difference in liver copper due to dietary iron, but when dietary ascorbic acid was increased to 8 g per kg of diet, there was a significant decrease (from 22.8 +/- 8.1 ..mu..g to 10.5 +/- 4.8 ..mu..g) in liver copper. Excess dietary ascorbic acid decreased ovarian zinc significantly when increased to 8 g per kg of diet, 2929 +/- 919 ..mu..g vs 1661 +/- 471 ..mu..g, respectively, when compared to the control group.

  8. Targeting the membrane-anchored serine protease testisin with a novel engineered anthrax toxin prodrug to kill tumor cells and reduce tumor burden

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Erik W.; Buzza, Marguerite S.; Driesbaugh, Kathryn H.; Liu, Shihui; Fortenberry, Yolanda M.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Antalis, Toni M.

    2015-01-01

    The membrane-anchored serine proteases are a unique group of trypsin-like serine proteases that are tethered to the cell surface via transmembrane domains or glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchors. Overexpressed in tumors, with pro-tumorigenic properties, they are attractive targets for protease-activated prodrug-like anti-tumor therapies. Here, we sought to engineer anthrax toxin protective antigen (PrAg), which is proteolytically activated on the cell surface by the proprotein convertase furin to instead be activated by tumor cell-expressed membrane-anchored serine proteases to function as a tumoricidal agent. PrAg's native activation sequence was mutated to a sequence derived from protein C inhibitor (PCI) that can be cleaved by membrane-anchored serine proteases, to generate the mutant protein PrAg-PCIS. PrAg-PCIS was resistant to furin cleavage in vitro, yet cytotoxic to multiple human tumor cell lines when combined with FP59, a chimeric anthrax toxin lethal factor-Pseudomonas exotoxin fusion protein. Molecular analyses showed that PrAg-PCIS can be cleaved in vitro by several serine proteases including the membrane-anchored serine protease testisin, and mediates increased killing of testisin-expressing tumor cells. Treatment with PrAg-PCIS also potently attenuated the growth of testisin-expressing xenograft tumors in mice. The data indicates PrAg can be engineered to target tumor cell-expressed membrane-anchored serine proteases to function as a potent tumoricidal agent. PMID:26392335

  9. Behavior of Giant Vesicles with Anchored DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nikolov, Vesselin; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Dimova, Rumiana

    2007-01-01

    We study changes in curvature and elastic properties of lipid membranes induced by anchoring of long hydrophilic polymers at low polymer surface concentrations (corresponding to the mushroom regime). The effect of anchored polymers on the membrane spontaneous curvature is characterized by monitoring the changes in the fluctuation spectra and the morphology of giant unilamellar vesicles. The polymers used in our study are fluorescently labeled and biotinylated λ-phage DNA molecules which bind to biotinylated giant unilamellar vesicles via a biotin-avidin-biotin linkage. By varying the amount of biotinylated lipid in the membrane, we control the surface concentration of anchors. At low anchor concentrations, the spontaneous curvature of the membrane increases linearly with the DNA concentration. The linear increase is consistent with theoretical predictions for polymer surface concentrations in the mushroom regime. At higher anchor concentrations, which should still belong to the mushroom regime, the vesicles undergo budding transitions. In this latter regime, the bud size is used to estimate the polymer-induced membrane curvature. PMID:17384074

  10. Contribution of cytochrome P450 and UDT-glucuronosyltransferase to the metabolism of drugs containing carboxylic acid groups: risk assessment of acylglucuronides using human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Norimasa; Tagashira, Mizuka; Tsurui, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Shizuo

    2014-08-01

    1. In order to evaluate the inhibition activity of 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT) and (-)-borneol (borneol) against cytochrome P450 (CYP) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), the substrates of these metabolic enzymes were incubated with ABT and borneol in human hepatocytes. We found that 3 mM ABT and 300 μM borneol were the most suitable experimental levels to specifically inhibit CYP and UGT. 2. Montelukast, mefenamic acid, flufenamic acid, diclofenac, tienilic acid, gemfibrozil, ibufenac and repaglinide were markedly metabolized in human hepatocytes, and the metabolism of gemfibrozil, mefenamic acid and flufenamic acid was inhibited by borneol. With regard to repaglinide, montelukast, diclofenac and tienilic acid, metabolism was inhibited by ABT. Ibufenac was partly inhibited by both inhibitors. Zomepirac, tolmetin, ibuprofen, indomethacin and levofloxacin were moderately metabolized by human hepatocytes, and the metabolism of zomepirac, ibuprofen and indomethacin was equally inhibited by both ABT and borneol. The metabolism of tolmetin was strongly inhibited by ABT, and was also inhibited weakly by borneol. Residual drugs, telmisartan, valsartan, furosemide, naproxen and probenecid were scarcely metabolized. 3. Although we attempted to predict the toxicological risks of drugs containing carboxylic groups from the combination chemical stability and CLint via UGT, the results indicated that this combination was not sufficient and that clinical daily dose is important. PMID:24575896

  11. Major surface antigen, P30, of Toxoplasma gondii is anchored by a glycolipid

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, S.D.; Boothroyd, J.C.

    1989-04-05

    P30, the major surface antigen of the parasitic protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, can be specifically labeled with (/sup 3/H)palmitic acid and with myo-(2-/sup 3/H)inositol. The fatty acid label can be released by treatment of P30 with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Such treatment exposes an immunological cross-reacting determinant first described on Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoprotein. PI-PLC cleavage of intact parasites metabolically labeled with (/sup 35/S)methionine results in the release of intact P30 polypeptide in a form which migrates faster in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results argue that P30 is anchored by a glycolipid. Results from thin layer chromatography analysis of purified (/sup 3/H) palmitate-labeled P30 treated with PI-PLC, together with susceptibility to mild alkali hydrolysis and to cleavage with phospholipase A2, suggest that the glycolipid anchor of T. gondii P30 includes a 1,2-diacylglycerol moiety.

  12. Raft-based interactions of gangliosides with a GPI-anchored receptor.

    PubMed

    Komura, Naoko; Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Ando, Hiromune; Konishi, Miku; Koikeda, Machi; Imamura, Akihiro; Chadda, Rahul; Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Tsuboi, Hisae; Sheng, Ren; Cho, Wonhwa; Furukawa, Koichi; Furukawa, Keiko; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Ishida, Hideharu; Kusumi, Akihiro; Kiso, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Gangliosides, glycosphingolipids containing one or more sialic acid(s) in the glyco-chain, are involved in various important physiological and pathological processes in the plasma membrane. However, their exact functions are poorly understood, primarily because of the scarcity of suitable fluorescent ganglioside analogs. Here, we developed methods for systematically synthesizing analogs that behave like their native counterparts in regard to partitioning into raft-related membrane domains or preparations. Single-fluorescent-molecule imaging in the live-cell plasma membrane revealed the clear but transient colocalization and codiffusion of fluorescent ganglioside analogs with a fluorescently labeled glycosylphosphatidylinisotol (GPI)-anchored protein, human CD59, with lifetimes of 12 ms for CD59 monomers, 40 ms for CD59's transient homodimer rafts in quiescent cells, and 48 ms for engaged-CD59-cluster rafts, in cholesterol- and GPI-anchoring-dependent manners. The ganglioside molecules were always mobile in quiescent cells. These results show that gangliosides continually and dynamically exchange between raft domains and the bulk domain, indicating that raft domains are dynamic entities. PMID:27043189

  13. The Benzyl Ester Group of Amino Acid Monomers Enhances Substrate Affinity and Broadens the Substrate Specificity of the Enzyme Catalyst in Chemoenzymatic Copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Ageitos, Jose Manuel; Yazawa, Kenjiro; Tateishi, Ayaka; Tsuchiya, Kousuke; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-11

    The chemoenzymatic polymerization of amino acid monomers by proteases involves a two-step reaction: the formation of a covalent acyl-intermediate complex between the protease and the carboxyl ester group of the monomer and the subsequent deacylation of the complex by aminolysis to form a peptide bond. Although the initiation with the ester group of the monomer is an important step, the influence of the ester group on the polymerization has not been studied in detail. Herein, we studied the effect of the ester groups (methyl, ethyl, benzyl, and tert-butyl esters) of alanine and glycine on the synthesis of peptides using papain as the catalyst. Alanine and glycine were selected as monomers because of their substantially different affinities toward papain. The efficiency of the polymerization of alanine and glycine benzyl esters was much greater than that of the other esters. The benzyl ester group therefore allowed papain to equally polymerize alanine and glycine, even though the affinity of alanine toward papain is substantially higher. The characterization of the copolymers of alanine and glycine in terms of the secondary structure and thermal properties revealed that the thermal stability of the peptides depends on the amino acid composition and resultant secondary structure. The current results indicate that the nature of the ester group drastically affects the polymerization efficiency and broadens the substrate specificity of the protease. PMID:26620763

  14. Multivalent anchored and crosslinked hyperbranched polyglycerol monolayers as antifouling coating for titanium oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Krysiak, Stefanie; Achazi, Katharina; Becherer, Tobias; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Paulus, Florian; Liebe, Hendrik; Grunwald, Ingo; Dernedde, Jens; Hartwig, Andreas; Hugel, Thorsten; Haag, Rainer

    2014-10-01

    A set of new catecholic monolayer coatings was developed to improve the antifouling performance of TiO2 surfaces. To solve the problem of the weak charge-transfer interaction between a single catechol anchor and TiO2, multiple catechol groups were combined with hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG) which is a distinct dendritic scaffold that exposes its multivalent anchor groups on the surface. Thus, multivalent catecholic hPGs can be easily prepared for surface modification. The immobilization of the compounds was monitored by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Surface properties of the coatings were analyzed by water contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The antifouling ability and stability were investigated by protein adsorption and cell adhesion. By increasing the number of catechol groups on the hPG scaffold, the stability and surface coverage could be significantly enhanced. Moreover, the inner-layer crosslinking of the coatings by grafting and initiating vinyl groups clearly improved their long-term stability. As a result, hPG with a catecholic functional degree of 10% (hPG-Cat10) and hPG with both catecholic and vinylic functional degree of 5% (hPG-Cat5-V5) were identified as the best catecholic hPGs to prepare bioinert and stable monolayer coatings on TiO2. PMID:25189471

  15. Synthesis, structural characterization and antimicrobial activities of diorganotin(IV) complexes with azo-imino carboxylic acid ligand: Crystal structure and topological study of a doubly phenoxide-bridged dimeric dimethyltin(IV) complex appended with free carboxylic acid groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Manojit; Roy, Subhadip; Devi, N. Manglembi; Singh, Ch. Brajakishor; Singh, Keisham Surjit

    2016-09-01

    Diorganotin(IV) complexes appended with free carboxylic acids were synthesized by reacting diorganotin(IV) dichlorides [R2SnCl2; R = Me (1), Bu (2) and Ph (3)] with an azo-imino carboxylic acid ligand i.e. 2-{4-hydroxy-3-[(2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl]phenylazo}benzoic acid in presence of triethylamine. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and multinuclear NMR (1H, 13C and 119Sn) spectroscopy. The structure of 1 in solid state has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Crystal structure of 1 reveals that the compound crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/c and is a dimeric dimethyltin(IV) complex appended with free carboxylic acid groups. In the structure of 1, the Sn(IV) atoms are hexacoordinated and have a distorted octahedral coordination geometry in which two phenoxy oxygen atoms and the azomethine nitrogen atom of the ligand coordinate to each tin atom. One of the phenoxy oxygen atom bridges the two tin centers resulting in a planar Sn2O2 core. Topological analysis is used for the description of molecular packing in 1. Tin NMR spectroscopy study indicates that the complexes have five coordinate geometry around tin atom in solution state. Since the complexes have free carboxylic acids, these compounds could be further used as potential metallo-ligands for the synthesis of other complexes. The synthesized diorganotin(IV) complexes were also screened for their antimicrobial activities and compound 2 showed effective antimicrobial activities.

  16. The "loop with anchor" technique to repair mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Susumu; Osako, Motohiko; Kimura, Tamizo; Mashiko, Yuji; Yamanaka, Nozomu; Nakamura, Shingo; Maehara, Tadaaki

    2012-01-01

    The current surgical technique of using an artificial chord (composed of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene [ePTFE] sutures) to repair mitral prolapse is technically difficult to perform. Slippery knot tying and the difficulty of changing the chordae length after the hydrostatic test are frustrating problems. The loop technique solves the problem of slippery knot tying but not the problem of changing the chordae length. Our "loop with anchor" technique consists of the following elements: construction of an anchor at the papillary muscle; determining the loop length; tying the loop to the anchor; suturing the loop to the mitral valve; the hydrostatic test; and re-suturing or changing the loop, if needed. Adjustments can be made for the entire procedure or for a portion of the procedure. PMID:22156285

  17. An androgenic gland membrane-anchored gene associated with the crustacean insulin-like androgenic gland hormone.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Ohad; Manor, Rivka; Weil, Simy; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Bakhrat, Anna; Abdu, Uri; Sagi, Amir

    2013-06-01

    Crustacean male sexual differentiation is governed by the androgenic gland (AG) and specifically by the secreted insulin-like AG hormone (IAG), thus far identified in several decapod species including the Australian red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (termed Cq-IAG). While a few insulin-like AG genes have been identified in crustaceans, other AG-specific genes have not been documented until now. In the present study, we describe the recent identification of a non-IAG AG-specific transcript obtained from the C. quadricarinatus AG cDNA library. This transcript, termed C. quadricarinatus membrane-anchored AG-specific factor (Cq-MAG), was fully sequenced and found to encode a putative product of 189 amino acids including a signal anchoring peptide. Expression of a recombinant GFP fusion protein lacking the signal anchor encoding sequence dramatically affected recombinant protein localization pattern. While the expression of the deleterious fusion protein was observed throughout most of the cell, the native GFP::Cq-MAG fusion protein was observed mainly surrounding the periphery of the nucleus, demonstrating an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-like localization pattern. Moreover, co-expression of the wild-type Cq-MAG (fused to GFP) and the Cq-IAG hormone revealed that these peptides indeed co-localize. This study is the first to report a protein specifically associated with the insulin-like AG hormone in addition to the finding of another AG-specific transcript in crustaceans. Previous knowledge suggests that insulin/insulin-like factor secretion involves tissue-specific transcripts and membrane-anchored proteins. In this regard, Cq-MAG's tissue specificity, anchoring properties and intracellular co-localization with Cq-IAG suggest that it may play a role in the processing and secretion of this insulin-like AG hormone. PMID:23470660

  18. Jena Reference Air Set (JRAS): a multi-point scale anchor for isotope measurements of CO2 in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendeberg, M.; Richter, J. M.; Rothe, M.; Brand, W. A.

    2013-03-01

    The need for a unifying scale anchor for isotopes of CO2 in air was brought to light at the 11th WMO/IAEA Meeting of Experts on Carbon Dioxide in Tokyo 2001. During discussions about persistent discrepancies in isotope measurements between the worlds leading laboratories, it was concluded that a unifying scale anchor for Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite (VPDB) of CO2 in air was desperately needed. Ten years later, at the 2011 Meeting of Experts on Carbon Dioxide in Wellington, it was recommended that the Jena Reference Air Set (JRAS) become the official scale anchor for isotope measurements of CO2 in air (Brailsford, 2012). The source of CO2 used for JRAS is two calcites. After releasing CO2 by reaction with phosphoric acid, the gases are mixed into CO2-free air. This procedure ensures both isotopic stability and longevity of the CO2. That the reference CO2 is generated from calcites and supplied as an air mixture is unique to JRAS. This is made to ensure that any measurement bias arising from the extraction procedure is eliminated. As every laboratory has its own procedure for extracting the CO2, this is of paramount importance if the local scales are to be unified with a common anchor. For a period of four years, JRAS has been evaluated through the IMECC1 program, which made it possible to distribute sets of JRAS gases to 13 laboratories worldwide. A summary of data from the six laboratories that have reported the full set of results is given here along with a description of the production and maintenance of the JRAS scale anchors. 1 IMECC refers to the EU project "Infrastructure for Measurements of the European Carbon Cycle" (http://imecc.ipsl.jussieu.fr/).

  19. Probing the Huntingtin 1-17 Membrane Anchor on a Phospholipid Bilayer by Using All-Atom Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Sébastien; Binette, Vincent; Salnikov, Evgeniy S.; Bechinger, Burkhard; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-01-01

    Mislocalization and aggregation of the huntingtin protein are related to Huntington’s disease. Its first exon—more specifically the first 17 amino acids (Htt17)—is crucial for the physiological and pathological functions of huntingtin. It regulates huntingtin’s activity through posttranslational modifications and serves as an anchor to membrane-containing organelles of the cell. Recently, structure and orientation of the Htt17 membrane anchor were determined using a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach. This prompted us to refine this model by investigating the dynamics and thermodynamics of this membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer using all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics and Hamiltonian replica exchange. Our simulations are combined with various experimental measurements to generate a high-resolution atomistic model for the huntingtin Htt17 membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer. More precisely, we observe that the single α-helix structure is more stable in the phospholipid membrane than the NMR model obtained in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles. The resulting Htt17 monomer has its hydrophobic plane oriented parallel to the bilayer surface. Our results further unveil the key residues interacting with the membrane in terms of hydrogen bonds, salt-bridges, and nonpolar contributions. We also observe that Htt17 equilibrates at a well-defined insertion depth and that it perturbs the physical properties—order parameter, thickness, and area per lipid—of the bilayer in a manner that could favor its dimerization. Overall, our observations reinforce and refine the NMR measurements on the Htt17 membrane anchor segment of huntingtin that is of fundamental importance to its biological functions. PMID:25762330

  20. Surface chemical functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube with anchored phenol structures: Physical and chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jong Hyun; Shanmugharaj, A. M.; Noh, Woo Hyun; Choi, Won Seok; Ryu, Sung Hun

    2007-02-01

    Surface functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotube was carried out by introducing ylides groups containing anchored phenol structures. The functionalized nanotube is characterized using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy and zeta potential measurements. Elemental and FT-IR analysis reveal the successful functionalization of azomethine ylides. Raman spectroscopic studies corroborates that the surface functionalization does not affect the basic crystal domain size of the nanotubes. Functionalized carbon nanotubes exhibit higher zeta potential values showing its higher dispersant ability in water and acetone solvent in comparison to pure carbon nanotube.

  1. Anchoring strength of o-, m-, and p-methyl red-dye-doped nematics on rubbed and unrubbed polyimide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statman, David; Wozniak, Kaitlin; Potuzko, Marci

    2011-10-01

    It is demonstrated that the photoinduced gliding of the easy axis for nematics doped with various azo dyes on rubbed polyimide involves the formation of a second easy axis on the polyimide surface. While some azo dyes, such as disperse orange 3, do not exhibit large surface induced nonlinear effects, other dyes, such as methyl red, do. The amount of reorientation of the easy axis on rubbed polyimide is determined by the relative anchoring strengths of the easy axis formed from adsorbed dye and that formed from rubbing. One question of interest is what is the source of the anchoring strength? In this paper, we discuss the formation of easy axes via the photo-induced adsorption of azo dye. We will compare the anchoring strengths between dyed nematic liquid crystals and the easy axes formed by photoinduced adsorption of three isomers of the methyl red azo dye, ortho, meta, and para, as well as disperse orange 3. We will also discuss the impact of the carboxyl group position in the dye molecule on the anchoring strength.

  2. TRIM5α requires Ube2W to anchor Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains and restrict reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Adam J; Christensen, Devin E; Nelson, Chad; Tan, Choon Ping; Schaller, Torsten; Lehner, Paul J; Sundquist, Wesley I; Towers, Greg J

    2015-08-01

    TRIM5α is an antiviral, cytoplasmic, E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase that assembles on incoming retroviral capsids and induces their premature dissociation. It inhibits reverse transcription of the viral genome and can also synthesize unanchored polyubiquitin (polyUb) chains to stimulate innate immune responses. Here, we show that TRIM5α employs the E2 Ub-conjugating enzyme Ube2W to anchor the Lys63-linked polyUb chains in a process of TRIM5α auto-ubiquitination. Chain anchoring is initiated, in cells and in vitro, through Ube2W-catalyzed monoubiquitination of TRIM5α. This modification serves as a substrate for the elongation of anchored Lys63-linked polyUb chains, catalyzed by the heterodimeric E2 enzyme Ube2N/Ube2V2. Ube2W targets multiple TRIM5α internal lysines with Ub especially lysines 45 and 50, rather than modifying the N-terminal amino group, which is instead αN-acetylated in cells. E2 depletion or Ub mutation inhibits TRIM5α ubiquitination in cells and restores restricted viral reverse transcription, but not infection. Our data indicate that the stepwise formation of anchored Lys63-linked polyUb is a critical early step in the TRIM5α restriction mechanism and identify the E2 Ub-conjugating cofactors involved. PMID:26101372

  3. TRIM5α requires Ube2W to anchor Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains and restrict reverse transcription

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Adam J; Christensen, Devin E; Nelson, Chad; Tan, Choon Ping; Schaller, Torsten; Lehner, Paul J; Sundquist, Wesley I; Towers, Greg J

    2015-01-01

    TRIM5α is an antiviral, cytoplasmic, E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase that assembles on incoming retroviral capsids and induces their premature dissociation. It inhibits reverse transcription of the viral genome and can also synthesize unanchored polyubiquitin (polyUb) chains to stimulate innate immune responses. Here, we show that TRIM5α employs the E2 Ub-conjugating enzyme Ube2W to anchor the Lys63-linked polyUb chains in a process of TRIM5α auto-ubiquitination. Chain anchoring is initiated, in cells and in vitro, through Ube2W-catalyzed monoubiquitination of TRIM5α. This modification serves as a substrate for the elongation of anchored Lys63-linked polyUb chains, catalyzed by the heterodimeric E2 enzyme Ube2N/Ube2V2. Ube2W targets multiple TRIM5α internal lysines with Ub especially lysines 45 and 50, rather than modifying the N-terminal amino group, which is instead αN-acetylated in cells. E2 depletion or Ub mutation inhibits TRIM5α ubiquitination in cells and restores restricted viral reverse transcription, but not infection. Our data indicate that the stepwise formation of anchored Lys63-linked polyUb is a critical early step in the TRIM5α restriction mechanism and identify the E2 Ub-conjugating cofactors involved. PMID:26101372

  4. Modeling and Simulation of Anchoring Processess for Small Body Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Mazahar, Hammad; Negrut, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes recent work done in modeling and simulation of anchoring processes in granular media, with applications to anchoring on a Near Earth Object (NEO), where the forces due to interactions with the regolith are much stronger than the local surface gravity field. This effort is part of a larger systems engineering capability developed at JPL to answer key questions, validate requirements, conduct key system and mission trades,and evaluate performance and risk related to NEO operations for any proposed human or robotic missions to a NEO.

  5. 17. VIEW OF ANCHOR BRIDGE NUMBER 310 LOOKING EAST ALONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF ANCHOR BRIDGE NUMBER 310 LOOKING EAST ALONG THE MAIN LINE TRACK LOCATED TO THE NORTH OF THE COS COB POWER PLANT. ANCHOR BRIDGES LOCATED AT TWO MILE INTERVALS WITHSTAND CATENARY TENSION AND PROVIDE A PLATFORM FOR MOUNTING OIL FILLED CIRCUIT BREAKERS, LIGHTNING ARRESTORS AND OTHER ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. THE ROOF OF THE LOAD DISPATCHER'S TOWER CAN BE SEEN DIRECTLY BEHIND THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE BRIDGE. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  6. Analysis of carbon functional groups in mobile humic acid and recalcitrant calcium humate extracted from eight US soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a common tool to study the structure of soil humic fractions; however, knowledge regarding carbon structural relationships in humic fractions is limited. In this study, mobile humic acid (MHA) and recalcitrant calcium humate (CaHA) fr...

  7. Comparison of the influence of polyaspartic acid and polylysine functional groups on the adsorption at the Cr2O3-Aqueous polymer solution interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostolska, Iwona; Wiśniewska, Małgorzata

    2014-08-01

    Polyamino acids are a group of synthesized polymers obtained by polymerization of a given kind of amino acid monomer. Because of high biodegradability of this class of polymers, they can be used as flocculation or stabilization agents in the environmental aspects. Therefore determination of their influence on the stability of the aqueous suspension of metal oxides is important. An influence of different functional groups of polyamino acids, their molecular weight and concentration on the adsorption at the chromium (III) oxide (Cr2O3)-aqueous solution interface was determined. Experiments were carried out for four values of solution pH varying from 3 to 10 (3, 4, 7.6 and 10, respectively). Two polymers were used: anionic polyaspartic acid (ASP) of 6800 and 27,000 as well as polylysine (LYS) of 4900 and 33,000 molecular weights. Changes of surface charge density of colloidal Cr2O3 in the presence and in the absence of macromolecular substances were determined using potentiometric titration. In these studies the influence of the concentration and molecular weight of the ionic polymers on the pHpzc value was determined. Additionally, due to the lack of appropriate literature data, potentiometric titration of the selected polymers was performed to determine pKa values.

  8. A comparative evaluation of skeletal, dental, and soft tissue changes with skeletal anchored and conventional facemask protraction therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Tulika; Rai, Priyank; Singh, Navneet; Kalra, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To cephalometrically evaluate and compare the skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft tissue changes after maxillary protraction with skeletally anchored and conventional facemask. Methods: The data for the study were collected from the pre- and post-treatment records of patients of maxillary retrusion treated with skeletally anchored and conventional facemask therapy. Twenty subjects were included in the study and were categorized into two groups, namely skeletal anchored maxillary protraction (SAMP) group with the mean age of 10.10 ± 1.1 years and conventional facemask maxillary protraction (CFMP) group with the mean age of 9.90 ± 1.1 years. Pre and post-treatment lateral cephalograms were assessed. Results: The data were analyzed by Mann–Whitney test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The mean duration of treatment in SAMP group and CFMP group was 5.8 months and 10 months, respectively. The mean forward displacement of the maxilla (vertical point A) was 3.40 ± 1.07 mm in SAMP group and 2.80 ± 0.79 mm in CFMP group. The mandible showed downward and backward rotation in both the groups with more rotation in CFMP group. A significant increase in maxillary incisor inclination was seen in CFMP group as compared to SAMP group. A significant decrease was found in mandibular incisor inclination in both the treatment groups. The soft tissue changes corresponded to underlying skeletal tissue. Conclusions: SAMP is proven to be a better treatment modality as compared to CFMP for achieving true skeletal changes and minimal dental changes in cases with developing skeletal Class III with maxillary retrusion. PMID:27556021

  9. Phosphorylation of Lipin 1 and Charge on the Phosphatidic Acid Head Group Control Its Phosphatidic Acid Phosphatase Activity and Membrane Association*

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, James M.; Mullins, Garrett R.; Brindley, David N.; Harris, Thurl E.

    2013-01-01

    The lipin gene family encodes a class of Mg2+-dependent phosphatidic acid phosphatases involved in the de novo synthesis of phospholipids and triglycerides. Unlike other enzymes in the Kennedy pathway, lipins are not integral membrane proteins, and they need to translocate from the cytosol to intracellular membranes to participate in glycerolipid synthesis. The movement of lipin 1 within the cell is closely associated with its phosphorylation status. Although cellular analyses have demonstrated that highly phosphorylated lipin 1 is enriched in the cytosol and dephosphorylated lipin 1 is found on membranes, the effects of phosphorylation on lipin 1 activity and binding to membranes has not been recapitulated in vitro. Herein we describe a new biochemical assay for lipin 1 using mixtures of phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylethanolamine that reflects its physiological activity and membrane interaction. This depends on our observation that lipin 1 binding to PA in membranes is highly responsive to the electrostatic charge of PA. The studies presented here demonstrate that phosphorylation regulates the ability of the polybasic domain of lipin 1 to recognize di-anionic PA and identify mTOR as a crucial upstream signaling component regulating lipin 1 phosphorylation. These results demonstrate how phosphorylation of lipin 1 together with pH and membrane phospholipid composition play important roles in the membrane association of lipin 1 and thus the regulation of its enzymatic activity. PMID:23426360

  10. The wall teichoic acids of Lactobacillus plantarum N.I.R.D. C106. Location of the phosphodiester groups and separation of the chains

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, A. R.; Coapes, Hilary E.

    1971-01-01

    1. The identities of the component glycerol glucosides of the wall teichoic acids of Lactobacillus plantarum N.I.R.D. C106 have been confirmed by methylation analysis. These glucosides are α-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→1)-l-glycerol, α-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→1)-l-glycerol and α-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→3)-α-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→1)-l-glycerol. 2. These units are connected by phosphodiester groups attached to the 3(l)-hydroxyl group of glycerol and the 6-hydroxyl group of the non-reducing terminal glucose residues in the adjacent unit. 3. Concanavalin A forms a precipitate with the teichoic acid and the material so precipitated contains only the α-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-d-glucopyranosyl -(1→1)-l-glycerol component. This unit is therefore present in a homogeneous polymer so that the teichoic acid is a mixture of this and of other possibly homogeneous chains containing the other two components. PMID:4332541

  11. Impact of primary amine group from aminophospholipids and amino acids on marine phospholipids stability: non-enzymatic browning and lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Lu, F S H; Nielsen, N S; Baron, C P; Diehl, B W K; Jacobsen, C

    2013-11-15

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the oxidative stability and non-enzymatic browning reactions of marine PL in the presence or in the absence of primary amine group from aminophospholipids and amino acids. Marine phospholipids liposomal dispersions were prepared from two authentic standards (phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine) and two purified PL from marine sources with and without addition of amino acids (leucine, methionine and lysine). Samples were incubated at 60°C for 0, 2, 4 and 6days. Non-enzymatic browning reactions were investigated through measurement of (i) Strecker derived volatiles, (ii) yellowness index (YI), (iii) hydrophobic and (iv) hydrophilic pyrroles content. The oxidative stability of the samples was assessed through measurement of secondary lipid derived volatile oxidation products. The result showed that the presence of PE and amino acids caused the formation of pyrroles, generated Strecker derived volatiles, decreased the YI development and lowered lipid oxidation. The lower degree of lipid oxidation in liposomal dispersions containing amino acids might be attributed to antioxidative properties of pyrroles or amino acids. PMID:23790862

  12. Current status of frameless anchored IUD for immediate intracesarean insertion.

    PubMed

    Wildemeersch, Dirk; Goldstuck, Norman D; Hasskamp, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Immediate postpartum intrauterine device (IUD) insertion deserves great attention as it can provide immediate, timely and convenient contraception plus the added benefit of preventing repeat unintended pregnancies. Although women post vaginal delivery can benefit from immediate post-placenta contraception, women undergoing Cesarean section clearly need contraception, as an inter-delivery interval shorter than 18 months places them at a high risk for uterine rupture. The main drawback of currently available framed IUD devices for immediate postpartum insertion of an IUD is their high expulsion and displacement rates when inserted immediately postpartum after both vaginal and Cesarean delivery. Current research suggests that a brief window of opportunity exists of 10 minutes for insertion of conventional IUDs after which time expulsion rates both immediately and over time are greatly enhanced. This paper summarizes the current research conducted to overcome the expulsion problems associated with conventional T-shaped devices as well as through the use of an anchored frameless device. In the 1970s and 1980s, attempts were made to solve the expulsion problem by modifying existing devices, such as adding absorbable sutures (Delta-T) or additional appendages. These attempts proved to be clinically unsuccessful as the catgut suture added to the transverse arms did not provide sufficient resistance to prevent downward displacement and expulsion. An anchoring technique to suspend a copper IUD to the fundus of the uterus was developed in Belgium in the 1980s and has been the subject of extensive ongoing clinical research since 1985. Recently the frameless copper releasing anchor IUD, GyneFix, has been tested for postplacental insertion. Initially, the anchor was modified by the inclusion of a biodegradable cone which was added below the anchoring knot. Clinical studies confirmed the adequacy of this approach suggesting that it was technically possible to anchor an IUD

  13. Cu₂O Nanoparticles Anchored on Amine-Functionalized Graphite Nanosheet: A Potential Reusable Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Amrita; Bhowmik, Koushik; Mukherjee, Arnab; De, Goutam

    2015-05-12

    Synthesis of Cu2O-amine-functionalized graphite nanosheet (AFGNS) composite has been accomplished at room temperature. In the first step, AFGNS is synthesized by wet chemical functionalization where the -NH2 groups formed on nanosheet surface help to anchor the Cu(2+) ions homogeneously through coordinate bonds. Reduction of Cu(2+) (3.4 × 10(-2) mmol) in the presence of NaBH4 (1.8 mmol) can be restricted to Cu(1+) on AFGNS surface at room temperature. This leads to the formation of uniform Cu2O nanoparticles (NP) on AFGNS. The role played by the -NH2 groups in anchoring Cu(2+) ions and followed by stabilizing the Cu2O NP on AFGNS was understood by controlled reactions in the absence of -NH2 groups and without any graphitic support, respectively. The prepared Cu2O-AFGNS composite shows excellent catalytic activity toward degradation of an azo dye, methyl orange, which is an environmental pollutant. The dye degradation proceeds with high rate constant value, and the composite shows high stability and excellent reuse capability. PMID:25902017

  14. Effects of Detergents on the Redistribution of Gangliosides and GPI-anchored Proteins in Brain Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Heffer-Lauc, Marija; Viljetiæ, Barbara; Vajn, Katarina; Schnaar, Ronald L.; Lauc, Gordan

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Gangliosides and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins contain lipid tails that tether them to the outer side of the cell membrane. This mode of association with the cell membrane enables them to take part in the organization of lipid rafts, but it also permits gangliosides and GPI-anchored proteins to be actively released from one cell and inserted into the membrane of another cell. Recently, we reported that under conditions of lipid raft isolation, Triton X-100 causes significant redistribution of both gangliosides and GPI-anchored proteins. Aiming to find a less disruptive detergent, we evaluated the effects of CHAPS, Saponin, deoxycholic acid, Trappsol, Tween 20, Triton X-100, Brij 96V, Brij 98, and SDS on brain tissue sections. At room temperature, all detergents (1% concentration) extracted significant amounts of both gangliosides and Thy-1. At 4C, the extraction was weaker, but Triton X-100, CHAPS, and deoxycholic acid caused significant redistribution of GD1a and Thy-1 from gray matter into the white matter. Both redistribution and extraction were significantly augmented when sections were incubated with detergents in the presence of primary antibodies. Of the nine tested detergents, none is the ideal choice. However, Brij 96V appears to be able to sufficiently reveal myelin epitopes while causing the least amount of artifacts. This manuscript contains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc.org. Please visit this article online to view these materials. PMID:17409378

  15. Age and Sex Effects in Anchoring Vignette Studies: Methodological and Empirical Contributions*

    PubMed Central

    Grol-Prokopczyk, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Anchoring vignettes are an increasingly popular tool for identifying and correcting for group differences in use of subjective ordered response categories. However, existing techniques to maximize response consistency (use of the same standards for self-ratings as for vignette-ratings), which center on matching vignette characters’ demographic characteristics to respondents’ own characteristics, appear at times to be ineffective or to pose interpretive difficulties. Specifically, respondents often appear to neglect instructions to treat vignette characters as age peers. Furthermore, when vignette characters’ sex is matched to respondents’ sex, interpretation of sex differences in rating style is rendered problematic. This study applies two experimental manipulations to a national American sample (n=1,765) to clarify best practices for enhancing response consistency. First, an analysis of two methods of highlighting vignette characters’ age suggests that both yield better response consistency than previous, less prominent means. Second, a comparison of ratings of same- and opposite-sex vignette characters suggests that, with avoidable exceptions, the sex of the respondent rather than of the vignette character drives observed sex differences in rating style. Implications for interpretation and design of anchoring vignette studies are discussed. In addition, this study clarifies the importance of two additional measurement assumptions, cross-respondent vignette equivalence and cross-character vignette equivalence. It also presents empirical findings of significant sex, educational, and racial/ethnic differences in styles of rating health, and racial/ethnic differences in styles of rating political efficacy. These findings underscore the incomparability of unadjusted subjective self-ratings across demographic groups, and thus support the potential utility of the anchoring vignette method. PMID:25621079

  16. Fatty acids binding to human serum albumin: Changes of reactivity and glycation level of Cysteine-34 free thiol group with methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Pavićević, Ivan D; Jovanović, Vesna B; Takić, Marija M; Penezić, Ana Z; Aćimović, Jelena M; Mandić, Ljuba M

    2014-10-17

    Fatty acids (FAs) binding to human serum albumin (HSA) could lead to the changes of Cys-34 thiol group accessibility and reactivity, i.e. its scavenger capacity and antioxidant property. The influence of saturated, mono and poly unsaturated, and fish oil FAs binding to HSA on the carbonylation level and the reactivity of HSA-SH and HSA modified with methylglyoxal (MG-HSA-SH) was investigated. Changes of thiol group reactivity were followed by determination of pseudo first order rate constant (k') for thiols reaction with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid). HSA changes were monitored using native PAG electrophoresis and fluorescence spectroscopy. For FA/HSA molar ratios screening, qTLC and GC were used. FAs increase thiol group carbonylation levels from 8% to 20%. The k' values obtained for FAs-free HSA-SH and FAs-free MG-HSA-SH are almost equal (7.5×10(-3) and 7.7×10(-3)s(-1), resp.). Binding of all FAs amplify the reactivity (k' values from 14.6×10(-3) to 26.0×10(-3)s(-1)) of HSA-SH group for 2-3.5times in the order: palmitic, docosahexaenoic, fish oil extract, stearic, oleic, myristic and eicosapentaenoic acid, due to HSA conformational changes. FAs-bound MG-HSA-SH samples follow that pattern, but their k' values (from 9.8×10(-3) to 14.3×10(-3)s(-1)) were lower compared to unmodified HSA due to additional conformation changes of HSA molecules during carbonylation. Carbonylation level and reactivity of Cys34 thiol group of unmodified and carbonylated HSA depend on type of FAs bound to HSA, which implies the possibility for modulation of -SH reactivity (scavenger capacity and antioxidant property) by FAs as a supplement. PMID:25451573

  17. Inactivation of the cysteine protease SpeB affects hyaluronic acid capsule expression in group A streptococci.

    PubMed

    Woischnik, M; Buttaro, B A; Podbielski, A

    2000-04-01

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes expresses several virulence factors that are required for the pathogens survival within the host and the concomitant development of disease. To examine the influence of one virulence factor, the extracellular cysteine protease SpeB, on the expression of other virulence factors, the speB structural gene of a serotype M3 and M49 strain was inactivated. Morphologic examination, quantification of extracellular hyaluronic acid capsule, and Northern blot analysis of the isogenic speB -mutants revealed a strain-dependent decrease of hyaluronic acid capsule production and an increase in superoxide dismutase transcription. The transcription of streptolysin O (slo), di- and oligo-peptide permease (dpp, opp), hyaluronidase (hyl), streptokinase (ska) and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A (speA) was unaffected. PMID:10764613

  18. A natural protecting group strategy to carry an amino acid starter unit in the biosynthesis of macrolactam polyketide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2011-11-16

    Macrolactam antibiotics are an important class of macrocyclic polyketides that contain a unique nitrogen-containing starter unit. In the present study, a set of starter biosynthetic enzymes in the macrolactam antibiotic vicenistatin was characterized. We found that the protection-deprotection strategy of the aminoacyl-ACP intermediate was critical in this system. On the basis of bioinformatics, the described pathway is also proposed as a common method for carrying amino acids in the biosynthesis of other macrolactam antibiotics. PMID:22010945

  19. Cluster-like molybdenum phosphide anchored on reduced graphene oxide for efficient hydrogen evolution over a broad pH range.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haijing; Jiao, Yanqing; Wu, Aiping; Tian, Chungui; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wang, Lei; Ren, Zhiyu; Fu, Honggang

    2016-07-21

    Cluster-like molybdenum phosphide particles were anchored on reduced graphene oxide (MoP/rGO) with high uniformity by using phosphomolybdic acid as a molybdenum precursor based on a robust assembly-immobilization method. Benefiting from the small size, and even distribution of the MoP particles, the MoP/rGO hybrid exhibits superior electrocatalytic activity towards the hydrogen evolution reaction both in acidic and alkaline media. PMID:27380736

  20. Regeneration of spent three-way catalysts with nano-structured platinum group metals by gas and acid treatments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Chai; Nahm, Seung Won; Wang, Geun Shim; Seo, Seong Gyu; Lee, Jae Wook

    2008-10-01

    The influence of physicochemical treatments on the catalytic activity of the spent nano-structured three way catalysts (TWCs) was examined to evaluate the possibility of using spent TWCs for removing VOCs. Thermal gases and acid aqueous solutions were used to regenerate the spent nano-structured TWCs. The characterization of the spent catalyst and its modified forms was carried out by using XRD, TEM, ICP, and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The catalytic activity tests revealed that the spent nano-structured TWCs have a great potential for removing toxic compounds. The activities of catalysts were also found to be highly dependent on the treatment conditions. The acid aqueous treatments were very useful for improving the catalytic activity because they removed various contaminants such as fuel additives, lubricant oil additives, and metallic compounds. However, the thermal gas treated TWCs were less active than the parent TWCs. Furthermore, the activities of the catalysts treated with acids were closely connected with the remaining Pt/Al ratios. PMID:19198464

  1. Removal of acid-labile protecting groups on carbohydrates using water-tolerant and recoverable vanadyl triflate catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming-Chung; Chen, Yeng-Nan; Wu, Huan-Ting; Lin, Chang-Ching; Chen, Chien-Tien; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Acetal, trityl, and TBDMS protecting groups on saccharides were subjected to alcoholysis using a catalytic amount of vanadyl triflate in an MeOH-CH2Cl2 solvent system. The configuration at the anomeric positions of saccharides was retained, and no glycosidic bond cleavage and oxidation of sulfides were observed. The presented method was easily implemented, compatible with diverse functional groups, and regioselective in some cases. PMID:17194117

  2. Characterization of Group V Dubnium Homologs on DGA Extraction Chromatography Resin from Nitric and Hydrofluoric Acid Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Despotopulos, J D; Sudowe, R

    2012-02-21

    somewhere between Nb and Pa. Much more recent studies have examined the properties of Db from HNO{sub 3}/HF matrices, and suggest Db forms complexes similar to those of Pa. Very little experimental work into the behavior of element 114 has been performed. Thermochromatography experiments of three atoms of element 114 indicate that the element 114 is at least as volatile as Hg, At, and element 112. Lead was shown to deposit on gold at temperatures about 1000 C higher than the atoms of element 114. Results indicate a substantially increased stability of element 114. No liquid phase studies of element 114 or its homologs (Pb, Sn, Ge) or pseudo-homologs (Hg, Cd) have been performed. Theoretical predictions indicate that element 114 is should have a much more stable +2 oxidation state and neutral state than Pb, which would result in element 114 being less reactive and less metallic than Pb. The relativistic effects on the 7p{sub 1/2} electrons are predicted to cause a diagonal relationship to be introduced into the periodic table. Therefore, 114{sup 2+} is expected to behave as if it were somewhere between Hg{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Pb{sup 2+}. In this work two commercially available extraction chromatography resins are evaluated, one for the separation of Db homologs and pseudo?homologs from each other as well as from potential interfering elements such as Group IV Rf homologs and actinides, and the other for separation of element 114 homologs. One resin, Eichrom's DGA resin, contains a N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide extractant, which separates analytes based on both size and charge characteristics of the solvated metal species, coated on an inert support. The DGA resin was examined for Db chemical systems, and shows a high degree of selectivity for tri-, tetra-, and hexavalent metal ions in multiple acid matrices with fast kinetics. The other resin, Eichrom's Pb resin, contains a di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 extractant with isodecanol solvent, which separates

  3. The Effect of Anchor Test Construction on Scale Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antal, Judit; Melican, Gerald; Proctor, Thomas; Wiley, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Presented at the Annual Meeting of National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME) in 2010. The focus of the research is to investigate the effect of applying the Sinharay & Holland (2007) midi-test idea for building anchor tests to an on-going testing program with a series of versions of the test and comparing these results to the more…

  4. Detecting Anchoring-and-Adjusting in Survey Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Proper survey design is essential to obtain reliable, replicable data from research subjects. One threat to inferences drawn from surveys is anchoring-and-adjusting. Tversky and Kahnemann (1974) observed that participants' responses to questions depended systematically on irrelevant information they received prior to answering. It is important for…

  5. Culturally-Anchored Values and University Education Experience Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitsis, Ann; Foley, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine whether business students' gender, age and culturally-anchored values affect their perceptions of their university course experience. Design/methodology/approach: Culturally diverse business students (n 1/4 548) studying at an Australian university were surveyed using previously established scales.…

  6. 20. DETAIL, ANCHOR BLOCK AND BUTTRESS AT SOUTH END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL, ANCHOR BLOCK AND BUTTRESS AT SOUTH END OF DAM, SHOWING PROMINENT GROOVE WHERE THE NEXT ARCH COULD HAVE BEEN JOINED TO THE NORTH-SOUTH TRENDING DAM. - Rock Creek Dam, East end of Rock Creek Road, Auburn, Placer County, CA

  7. 48 CFR 1812.7000 - Anchor tenancy contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anchor tenancy contracts. 1812.7000 Section 1812.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION OF COMMERCIAL ITEMS Commercial Space Hardware...

  8. 48 CFR 1812.7000 - Anchor tenancy contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anchor tenancy contracts. 1812.7000 Section 1812.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION OF COMMERCIAL ITEMS Commercial Space Hardware...

  9. Effective Leadership for Supervisors: Behaviorally Anchored Supervision System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukic, Stevan J.; Fister, Susan

    The paper describes the Behaviorally Anchored Supervision System (BASS), an approach to supervision in special education based on the definition of effective instruction developed by the Council for Exceptional Children in 1986. A comprehensive model for excellence in special education is based upon the following four elements: values,…

  10. Early active mobilization following UCL repair With Mitek bone anchor.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Timothy P; Stevenson, Susan; Taghizadeh, Reika; Addison, Patrick; Milner, Richard H

    2013-09-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries of the thumb are common. Surgical repair is accepted as the treatment of choice for complete rupture of the ligament. Biomechanical studies have suggested that Mitek bone anchor repairs are potentially safe and strong enough to allow early controlled active mobilization. To date, there have been no studies to compare early active mobilization following Mitek bone anchor repair to standard postoperative rehabilitation involving thumb spica immobilization for the first 4 to 6 weeks. We performed a small pilot randomized control trial to assess the outcome of this new rehabilitation technique to that of standard immobilization following UCL repair with Mitek bone anchor. Our results show that on average early active mobilization leads to an earlier return to full hand function (6 vs. 8 wk) and an earlier return to work (7 vs. 11 wk). There is no difference in the final range of motion achieved. We suggest that Mitek bone anchor repairs for UCL ruptures are robust enough to allow early active mobilization and that a larger trial is warranted to assess whether early active mobilization is superior to standard rehabilitation. PMID:23970193

  11. Isolating Suture Slippage During Cadaveric Testing of Knotless Anchors.

    PubMed

    Klinge, Stephen A; Vopat, Bryan G; Paller, David; Avery, Anthony L; Koruprolu, Sarath; Fadale, Paul D

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated a testing method designed to isolate and analyze the effectiveness of different suture-retention mechanisms in knotless suture anchors used for rotator cuff repairs. Six knotless PushLock implants (Arthrex) with a suture-retention mechanism dependent on a press-fit of suture between the anchor's outer diameter and surrounding bone were compared with 6 ReelX STT devices (Stryker) reliant on an intrinsic suture-locking mechanism. Suture slippage beyond minimal clinical failure thresholds, as well as ultimate failure load, were determined with a novel testing fixture that isolated suture slippage. Suture slippage was isolated from anchor-bone disengagement. Each PushLock exhibited suture slippage of more than 3 mm, and each ReelX exhibited slippage of less than 3 mm. The PushLock implants also exhibited significantly (P < .05) more interval and maximum slippage; 5 of these 6 implants failed via complete suture slippage before dynamic testing could be completed. All ReelX devices survived dynamic testing and ultimately failed via suture breakage. This novel axial load biomechanical testing technique isolated suture slippage in 2 uniquely designed knotless anchors. The press-fit PushLock implant was prone to slippage failure, whereas the ReelX device with its internal suture-locking mechanism exhibited minimal slippage. PMID:26161766

  12. Self Mountable and Extractable Ultrasonic/Sonic Anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Self drilling anchors and related methods and apparatus. In one embodiment an apparatus comprises a drill bit, a hammer mechanism for hammering the drill bit in a first direction and in a second direction, and a selection mechanism for controlling whether, at a given point in time, the drill bit is hammered in the first or second direction.

  13. When Does Scale Anchoring Work? A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip; Haberman, Shelby J.; Lee, Yi-Hsuan

    2011-01-01

    Providing information to test takers and test score users about the abilities of test takers at different score levels has been a persistent problem in educational and psychological measurement. Scale anchoring, a technique which describes what students at different points on a score scale know and can do, is a tool to provide such information.…

  14. 33 CFR 401.14 - Anchor marking buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anchor marking buoys. 401.14 Section 401.14 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.14...

  15. The Effect of Anchor Test Construction on Scale Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antal, Judit; Proctor, Thomas P.; Melican, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    In common-item equating the anchor block is generally built to represent a miniature form of the total test in terms of content and statistical specifications. The statistical properties frequently reflect equal mean and spread of item difficulty. Sinharay and Holland (2007) suggested that the requirement for equal spread of difficulty may be too…

  16. Ten Anchor Points for Teaching Principles of Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkovick, Chuck

    2004-01-01

    Effective marketing instructors commonly share a love for their students, an affinity for the subject matter, and a devotion to continuous quality improvement. The purpose of this article is to highlight 10 anchor points for teaching Principles of Marketing, which are designed to better engage students in the learning process. These anchor…

  17. 24 CFR 3285.402 - Ground anchor installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285... anchoring. Manufactured homes must also be stabilized against wind in the longitudinal direction in all Wind Zones. Manufactured homes located in Wind Zones II and III must have longitudinal ground...

  18. 24 CFR 3285.402 - Ground anchor installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285... anchoring. Manufactured homes must also be stabilized against wind in the longitudinal direction in all Wind Zones. Manufactured homes located in Wind Zones II and III must have longitudinal ground...

  19. Aerothermal Anchoring of CBAERO Using High Fidelity CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, David J.

    2007-01-01

    The Configuration Based Aerodynamics (CBAERO) software package is used to predict the convective and radiative heating environments for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). A limited number of high fidelity CFD solutions are used to "anchor" the engineering level estimates obtained using CBAERO.

  20. 30 CFR 57.9311 - Anchoring stationary sizing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Anchoring stationary sizing devices. 57.9311 Section 57.9311 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...