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Sample records for acid asa aspirin

  1. High-pressure polymorphism of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin): Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, Ethan L.; Dreger, Zbigniew A.; Gupta, Yogendra M.

    2015-02-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to elucidate the high-pressure polymorphic behavior of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), an important pharmaceutical compound known as aspirin. Using a diamond anvil cell (DAC), single crystals of the two polymorphic phases of aspirin existing at ambient conditions (ASA-I and ASA-II) were compressed to 10 GPa. We found that ASA-I does not transform to ASA-II, but instead transforms to a new phase (ASA-III) above ∼2 GPa. It is demonstrated that this transformation primarily introduces structural changes in the bonding and arrangement of the acetyl groups and is reversible upon the release of pressure. In contrast, a less dense ASA-II shows no transition in the pressure range studied, though it appears to exhibit a disordered structure above 7 GPa. Our results suggest that ASA-III is the most stable polymorph of aspirin at high pressures.

  2. [Metabolic changes in arachidonic acid during aspirin desensitization].

    PubMed

    Salazar Villa, R M; Zambrano Villa, S

    1996-01-01

    Aspirin sensitivity occurs in 10% of all asthmatics patients. In this subset of asthmatics, nasal congestion and bronchospasm occurs between 30-180 minutes after ingestion of aspirin. Following a respiratory reaction to aspirin, all patients can be desensitized to aspirin by repetitively introducing small and then larger doses of aspirin until the asthmatic subject can ingest 650 mg of aspirin without adverse effect. The mechanism of aspirin sensitivity are incompletely understood. And the reasons why ASA desensitization occurs universally are unknown. In this study, known ASA sensitive and control insensitive asthmatics were challenged with ASA. Urine was collected before, during induced bronchospasm, and after ingestion of 650 mg of ASA when the adverse effect (ie., acute desensitization) had subsided. Excretion levels of cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase products in the urine were determined. PMID:8963642

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of chronic aspirin on brain arachidonic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2011-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) modulate peripheral inflammation and its resolution. Aspirin (ASA) is a unique non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which switches AA metabolism from prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and thromboxane B₂ (TXB₂) to lipoxin A₄ (LXA₄) and 15-epi-LXA₄. However, it is unknown whether chronic therapeutic doses of ASA are anti-inflammatory in the brain. We hypothesized that ASA would dampen increases in brain concentrations of AA metabolites in a rat model of neuroinflammation, produced by a 6-day intracerebroventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In rats infused with LPS (0.5 ng/h) and given ASA-free water to drink, concentrations in high-energy microwaved brain of PGE₂, TXB₂ and leukotriene B₄ (LTB₄) were elevated. In rats infused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 6 weeks of treatment with a low (10 mg/kg/day) or high (100 mg/kg/day) ASA dose in drinking water decreased brain PGE₂, but increased LTB₄, LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ concentrations. Both doses attenuated the LPS effects on PGE₂, and TXB₂. The increments in LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ caused by high-dose ASA were significantly greater in LPS-infused rats. The ability of ASA to increase anti-inflammatory LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ and reduce pro-inflammatory PGE₂ and TXB₂ suggests considering aspirin further for treating clinical neuroinflammation. PMID:20981485

  4. Ticlopidine, Alka-Seltzer, or a combination of citric acid with aspirin: effects on platelet aggregation in individuals with an insufficient response to aspirin alone.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, S; Kaplan, A; Marcoe, K; Sauvage, L R

    2000-10-01

    Aspirin (ASA) does not effectively lower platelet aggregation in all people. The platelet aggregation (PA) score is an easily used clinical method for measuring the effect in individuals of antiplatelet medications. Fifteen apparently healthy subjects (2 men and 13 women), selected for their resistance to ASA's antiaggregation effect, completed a sequential trial of ticlopidine, Alka-Seltzer, and ASA + citric acid (CTA). Ticlopidine was the strongest aggregation inhibitor and the ASA + CTA combination was more inhibitory than Alka-Seltzer. It was determined that measuring antiaggregation effects of a particular agent in an individual prior to usage would optimize treatment. The PA score methodology provides a means for testing patients prior to antiplatelet therapy for prevention and treatment of the thrombotic complications of vascular disease. PMID:11030528

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of chronic aspirin on brain arachidonic acid metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2010-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) modulate peripheral inflammation and its resolution. Aspirin (ASA) is a unique non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which switches AA metabolism from prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) to lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and 15-epi-LXA4. However it is unknown whether chronic therapeutic doses of ASA are anti-inflammatory in the brain. We hypothesized that ASA would dampen increases in brain concentrations of AA metabolites in a rat model of neuroinflammation, produced by a 6-day intracerebroventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In rats infused with LPS (0.5 ng/h) and given ASA-free water to drink, concentrations in high-energy microwaved brain of PGE2, TXB2 and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were elevated. In rats infused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 6 weeks of treatment with a low (10 mg/kg/day) or high (100 mg/kg/day) ASA dose in drinking water decreased brain PGE2, but increased LTB4, LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 concentrations. Both doses attenuated the LPS effects on PGE2, and TXB2. The increments in LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 caused by high-dose ASA were significantly greater in LPS-infused rats. The ability of ASA to increase anti-inflammatory LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 and reduce pro-inflammatory PGE2 and TXB2 suggests considering aspirin further for treating clinical neuroinflammation. PMID:20981485

  6. Does high serum uric acid level cause aspirin resistance?

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Bekir S; Ozkan, Emel; Esin, Fatma; Alihanoglu, Yusuf I; Ozkan, Hayrettin; Bilgin, Murat; Kilic, Ismail D; Ergin, Ahmet; Kaftan, Havane A; Evrengul, Harun

    2016-06-01

    In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), though aspirin inhibits platelet activation and reduces atherothrombotic complications, it does not always sufficiently inhibit platelet function, thereby causing a clinical situation known as aspirin resistance. As hyperuricemia activates platelet turnover, aspirin resistance may be specifically induced by increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels. In this study, we thus investigated the association between SUA level and aspirin resistance in patients with CAD. We analyzed 245 consecutive patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP) who in coronary angiography showed more than 50% occlusion in a major coronary artery. According to aspirin resistance, two groups were formed: the aspirin resistance group (Group 1) and the aspirin-sensitive group (Group 2). Compared with those of Group 2, patients with aspirin resistance exhibited significantly higher white blood cell counts, neutrophil counts, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios, SUA levels, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, and fasting blood glucose levels. After multivariate analysis, a high level of SUA emerged as an independent predictor of aspirin resistance. The receiver-operating characteristic analysis provided a cutoff value of 6.45 mg/dl for SUA to predict aspirin resistance with 79% sensitivity and 65% specificity. Hyperuricemia may cause aspirin resistance in patients with CAD and high SUA levels may indicate aspirin-resistant patients. Such levels should thus recommend avoiding heart attack and stroke by adjusting aspirin dosage. PMID:26656902

  7. DNA immobilization on a polypyrrole nanofiber modified electrode and its interaction with salicylic acid/aspirin.

    PubMed

    Yousef Elahi, M; Bathaie, S Z; Kazemi, S H; Mousavi, M F

    2011-04-15

    A double-stranded calf thymus DNA (dsDNA) was physisorbed onto a polypyrrole (PPy) nanofiber film that had been electrochemically deposited onto a Pt electrode. The surface morphology of the polymeric film was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrochemical characteristics of the PPy film and the DNA deposited onto the PPy modified electrode were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Then the interaction of DNA with salicylic acid (SA) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), or aspirin, was studied on the electrode surface with DPV. An increase in the DPV current was observed due to the oxidation of guanine, which decreased with the increasing concentrations of the ligands. The interactions of SA and ASA with the DNA follow the saturation isotherm behavior. The binding constants of these interactions were 1.15×10(4)M for SA and 7.46×10(5)M for ASA. The numbers of binding sites of SA and ASA on DNA were approximately 0.8 and 0.6, respectively. The linear dynamic ranges of the sensors were 0.1-2μM (r(2)=0.996) and 0.05-1mM (r(2)=0.996) with limits of detection of 8.62×10(-1) and 5.24×10(-6)μM for SA and ASA, respectively. PMID:21236237

  8. Rationale and design of a Phase II clinical trial of aspirin and simvastatin for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension: ASA-STAT

    PubMed Central

    Kawut, Steven M.; Bagiella, Emilia; Shimbo, Daichi; Lederer, David J.; Al-Naamani, Nadine; Roberts, Kari E.; Barr, R. Graham; Post, Wendy; Horn, Evelyn; Tracy, Russell; Hassoun, Paul; Girgis, Reda

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease which causes exercise limitation, heart failure, and death. Aspirin and simvastatin are highly effective and safe therapies for other cardiovascular diseases characterized by platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction, but have not been formally studied in PAH. Methods ASA-STAT is a Phase II, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 2 × 2 factorial clinical trial of aspirin and simvastatin in patients with PAH. A total of 92 subjects were to be randomized to aspirin or aspirin placebo and simvastatin or simvastatin placebo. The primary outcome is the distance walked in six minutes at six months after randomization. Secondary measures include brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, circulating biomarkers of platelet and endothelial function, functional class, quality-of-life, and time to clinical end points. The incidence of adverse events will be compared between treatment groups. Screening and Enrollment We screened a total of 712 individuals with PAH. Sixty-five subjects were enrolled when the trial was terminated for futility in reaching the primary end point for simvastatin. Conclusions This study aims to determine whether aspirin or simvastatin have beneficial biologic or clinical effects in patients with PAH. The safety and side effects of these commonly prescribed cardiovascular drugs will also be assessed. PMID:21146637

  9. Semi-micro column high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection for quantification of aspirin and salicylic acid and its application to patients' sera administered with low-dose enteric-coated aspirin.

    PubMed

    Ohwaki, Yuichi; Yamane, Tomoko; Ishimatsu, Takashi; Wada, Mitsuhiro; Nakashima, Kenichiro

    2007-03-01

    A simultaneous determination of aspirin (ASA) and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA), in human serum by a semi-micro column HPLC-UV was developed. A relatively small size of serum sample (100 microL) containing ASA and SA was cleaned up by a simple solid phase extraction. A good separation of ASA and SA could be achieved within 25 min using a semi-micro ODS column with an eluent of MeOH/0.7 mm phosphoric acid solution (pH 2.5) = 50:50 (v/v). The calibration curves for ASA and SA showed good linearity (r = 0.999) with the detection limits 114 and 38 ng/mL at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, respectively. ASA and SA in patients' sera administered with low-dose enteric-coated aspirin were determined, and the concentration ranges obtained for ASA and SA were 1.2-2.2 and 0.5-57.3 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:17221906

  10. Effects of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), ASA plus L-glutamine and L-glutamine on healing of chronic gastric ulcer in the rat.

    PubMed

    Okabe, S; Takeuchi, K; Honda, K; Takagi, K

    1976-01-01

    A chronic gastric ulcer model was produced in rats by the subserosal injection of 20% acetic acid solution (0.015 ml) in order to examine whether (1) acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) irritates the chronic gastric ulcer in active or healed or diminished stage, (2) L-glutamine, given together with ASA, inhibits the adverse effect of ASA. Oral ASA 200 mg/kg/day, given in two divided doses for 10 consecutive days, apparently delayed the healing of the gastric ulcer and irritated the healed ulcer to reulcerate. L-Glutamine, 1,500 mg/kg/day, which was given together with ASA in two divided doses, markedly protected the gastric ulcer both in active and healed stages from the deleterious activity of ASA. PMID:955326

  11. Aspirin

    MedlinePlus

    ... aches. Nonprescription aspirin is also used to prevent heart attacks in people who have had a heart attack in the past or who have angina (chest ... are experiencing or who have recently experienced a heart attack. Nonprescription aspirin is also used to prevent ischemic ...

  12. Aspirin

    MedlinePlus

    ... cough and cold medications. This monograph only includes information about the use of aspirin alone. If you are taking a combination product, read the information on the package or prescription label or ask ...

  13. Efficacy of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) in skin B16-F0 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Vad, Nikhil M; Kudugunti, Shashi K; Wang, Hezhen; Bhat, G Jayarama; Moridani, Majid Y

    2014-05-01

    Several epidemiological studies show that aspirin can act as a chemopreventive agent and decrease the incidences of various cancers including melanoma. In this work, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) as an antimelanoma agent in B16-F0 cells and skin B16-F0 melanoma tumor mouse model. Our findings indicate that the IC50 (48 h) for ASA in B16-F0 melanoma cells was 100 μM and that ASA caused a dose- and time-dependent GSH depletion and increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in B16-F0 melanoma cells. Male C57BL/6 mice were inoculated s.c. with 1 × 10(6) B16-F0 melanoma cells. ASA (80, 100, and 150 mg/kg) was initiated on day 1 or day 7, or day 9 after cell inoculation and continued daily for 13, 7, and 5 days, respectively. Animals were weighed daily and sacrificed on day 13. The tumors were excised and weighed. The animals receiving 13 days of ASA therapy at 80, 100, and 150 mg/kg demonstrated tumor growth inhibition by 1 ± 12%, 19 ± 22%, and 50 ± 29%, respectively. Animals receiving 7 days of therapy at 80, 100, and 150 mg/kg demonstrated tumor growth inhibition by 12 ± 14%, 27 ± 14%, and 40 ± 14%, respectively. No significant tumor growth inhibition was observed with 5 days of therapy. ASA at 100 and 150 mg/kg caused significant tumor growth inhibition in C57BL/6 mice when administered for 13 and 7 days, respectively. The results obtained in this study are consistent with the recent epidemiologically based report that aspirin is associated with lower melanoma risk in humans. PMID:24492939

  14. Strong and Long-Lasting Antinociceptive and Anti-inflammatory Conjugate of Naturally Occurring Oleanolic Acid and Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Bednarczyk-Cwynar, Barbara; Wachowiak, Natalia; Szulc, Michal; Kamińska, Ewa; Bogacz, Anna; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Zaprutko, Lucjusz; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L.

    2016-01-01

    The conjugate 8 was obtained as a result of condensation of 3-hydroxyiminooleanolic acid morfolide (7) and aspirin in dioxane. Analgesic effect of OAO-ASA (8) for the range of doses 0.3–300.0 mg/kg (p.o.) was performed in mice using a hot-plate test. Anti-inflammatory activity was assessed on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats for the same range of doses. The conjugate OAO-ASA (8) did not significantly change locomotor activity of mice, therefore sedative properties of the compound should be excluded. The compound 8 proved a simple, proportional, dose-dependent analgesic action and expressed strong anti-inflammatory activity showing a reversed U-shaped, dose-dependent relation with its maximum at 30.0 mg/kg. After its combined administration with morphine (MF, 5.0 mg/kg, s.c.) the lowering of antinociceptive activity was found; however, the interaction with naloxone (NL, 3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) did not affect the antinociceptive effect of OAO-ASA (8), therefore its opioid mechanism of action should be rather excluded. After combined administration with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 300.0 mg/kg, p.o.) in hot-plate test, the examined compound 8 enhanced the antinociceptive activity in significant way. It also shows that rather the whole molecule is responsible for the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of the tested compound 8, however, it cannot be excluded that the summarizing effect is produced by ASA released from the compound 8 and the rest of triterpene derivative. The occurrence of tolerance for triterpenic derivative 8 was not observed, since the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects after chronic administration of the conjugate OAO-ASA (8) was on the same level as after its single treatment. It seemed that the anti-inflammatory mechanism of action of OAO-ASA (8) is not simple, even its chronic administration lowered both blood concentration of IL-6 and mRNA IL-6 expression. However, the effects of the conjugate OAO-ASA (8) on TNF-α level and m

  15. Ascorbic Acid may Exacerbate Aspirin-Induced Increase in Intestinal Permeability.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Ivana R; Kruger, Marlena C; Hurst, Roger D; Lentle, Roger G

    2015-09-01

    Ascorbic acid in combination with aspirin has been used to prevent aspirin-induced oxidative GI damage. We aimed to determine whether ascorbic acid reduces or prevents aspirin-induced changes in intestinal permeability over a 6-hr period using saccharidic probes mannitol and lactulose. The effects of administration of 600 mg aspirin alone, 500 mg ascorbic acid alone and simultaneous dosage of both agents were compared in a cross-over study in 28 healthy female volunteers. These effects were also compared with that of a placebo. The ability of ascorbic acid to mitigate the effects of aspirin when administered either half an hour before or after dosage with aspirin was also assessed in 19 healthy female volunteers. The excretion of lactulose over the 6-hr period was augmented after consumption of either aspirin or ascorbic acid compared with that after consumption of placebo. Dosage with ascorbic acid alone augmented the excretion of lactulose more than did aspirin alone. Simultaneous dosage with both agents augmented the excretion of lactulose in an additive manner. The timing of dosage with ascorbic acid in relation to that with aspirin had no significant effect on the excretion of the two sugars. These findings indicate that ascorbic acid does not prevent aspirin-induced increase in gut permeability rather that both agents augment it to a similar extent. The additive effect on simultaneous dosage with both agents in augmenting the absorption of lactulose suggests that each influences paracellular permeability by different pathways. PMID:25641731

  16. [Asthma and aspirin].

    PubMed

    Schiappoli, Michele; Gani, Federica; Frati, Francesco; Marcucci, Francesco; Senna, Gianenrico

    2003-02-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is an important cause of asthma so that ASA induced asthma (AIA) is considered a disease. Its prevalence is of 0.3-0.6 in the general population but it raises to 21% in the asthmatic one. Middle aged female are the most affected. AIA generally begins with a non allergic rhinitis, complicated sometimes with polyps, that evolves secondarily in asthma. The disease is often so severe to need oral corticosteroids to be controlled. It persists independently to the intake of ASA. From a pathogenetic point of view the interaction of ASA with the arachidonic acid metabolism seems to be important. The inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) induces an activation of lypo-oxygenase with an increased synthesis of leukotrienes. In ASA intolerant patients there is also an activation of LTC4 synthetase, enzyme responsible for the synthesis of leukotrienes. Clinical history is very important to diagnose the disease but to confirm the diagnosis sometimes the provocation test is mandatory. Oral and bronchial challenges can be dangerous, while nasal challenge is safer even if must be better standardized. Patients must not use antiinflammatory drugs with the same mechanism of action of ASA; COX-2 inhibitors are generally well tolerated. Antileukotrienes are useful to treat asthma, in association with steroids. Desensitization can be used in very selected patients. PMID:12908375

  17. Salicylic acid: a link between aspirin, diet and the prevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Paterson, J R; Lawrence, J R

    2001-08-01

    Aspirin was introduced into clinical practice more than 100 years ago. This unique drug belongs to a family of compounds called the salicylates, the simplest of which is salicylic acid, the principal metabolite of aspirin. Salicylic acid is responsible for the anti-inflammatory action of aspirin, and may cause the reduced risk of colorectal cancer observed in those who take aspirin. Yet salicylic acid and other salicylates occur naturally in fruits and plants, while diets rich in these are believed to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. Serum salicylic acid concentrations are greater in vegetarians than non-vegetarians, and there is overlap between concentrations in vegetarians and those taking low-dose aspirin. We propose that the cancer-preventive action of aspirin is due to its principal metabolite, salicylic acid, and that dietary salicylates can have the same effect. It is also possible that natural salicylates contribute to the other recognized benefits of a healthy diet. PMID:11493722

  18. Synergistically killing activity of aspirin and histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on hepatocellular cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yanshuang; He, Huabin; Lou, Lianqing; Ye, Weiwei; Chen, Yongxin; Wang, Jinghe

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Novel combination therapy using aspirin and valproic acid (VPA). •Combination of aspirin and VPA elicits synergistic cytotoxic effects. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly reduces the drug dosage required alone. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly inhibit tumor growth. •Lower dose of aspirin in combination therapy will minimize side effects of aspirin. -- Abstract: Aspirin and valproic acid (VPA) have been extensively studied for inducing various malignancies growth inhibition respectively, despite their severe side effects. Here, we developed a novel combination by aspirin and VPA on hepatocellular cancer cells (HCCs). The viability of HCC lines were analyzed by MTT assay, apoptotic analysis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cell was performed. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of apoptosis related genes and proteins such as Survivin, Bcl-2/Bax, Cyclin D1 and p15. Moreover, orthotopic xenograft tumors were challenged in nude mice to establish murine model, and then therapeutic effect was analyzed after drug combination therapy. The viability of HCC lines’ significantly decreased after drug combination treatment, and cancer cell apoptosis in combination group increasingly induced compared with single drug use. Therapeutic effect was significantly enhanced by combination therapy in tumor volume and tumor weight decrease. From the data shown here, aspirin and VPA combination have a synergistic killing effect on hepatocellular cancers cells proliferation and apoptosis.

  19. Activation of the bile acid receptor GPBAR1 protects against gastrointestinal injury caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Sabrina; Mencarelli, Andrea; Bruno, Angela; Renga, Barbara; Distrutti, Eleonora; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Low doses of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. GPBAR1 is a bile acid receptor expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we have investigated whether GPBAR1 was required for mucosal protection in models of gastrointestinal injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs. Experimental Approch GPBAR1+/+ and GPBAR1−/− mice were given ASA (10–50 mg.kg−1) or naproxen. Gastric and intestinal mucosal damage was assessed by measuring lesion scores. Key Results Expression of GPBAR1, mRNA and protein, was detected in mouse stomach. Mice lacking GPBAR1 were more sensitive to gastric and intestinal injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs and exhibited a markedly reduced expression of cystathionine-γ-liase (CSE), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and endothelial NOS enzymes required for generation of H2S and NO, in the stomach. Treating GPBAR1+/+ mice with two GPBAR1 agonists, ciprofloxacin and betulinic acid, rescued mice from gastric injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs. The protective effect of these agents was lost in GPBAR1−/− mice. Inhibition of CSE by DL-propargylglycine completely reversed protection afforded by ciprofloxacin in wild type mice, whereas treating mice with an H2S donor restored the protective effects of ciprofloxacin in GPBAR1−/− mice. Deletion of GPBAR1 altered the morphology of the small intestine and increased sensitivity to injury caused by naproxen. Conclusion and Implications GPBAR1 is essential to maintain gastric and intestinal mucosal integrity. GPBAR1 agonists protect against gastrointestinal injury caused by ASA and NSAIDs by a COX-independent mechanism. PMID:22881598

  20. Prevention of dipyrone (metamizole) induced inhibition of aspirin antiplatelet effects.

    PubMed

    Polzin, Amin; Richter, Stefan; Schrör, Karsten; Rassaf, Tienush; Merx, Marc W; Kelm, Malte; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Zeus, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    We have recently shown that dipyrone (metamizole), a non-opioid analgesic, can nullify aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA) antiplatelet effects in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this study, we analysed the aspirin and dipyrone drug-drug interaction in order to identify strategies to prevent the dipyrone induced inhibition of asprin antiplatelet effects. Platelet function was measured by arachidonic acid-induced light-transmission aggregometry, thromboxane (TX) B2- formation by immunoassay. Dipyrone metabolite plasma levels were determined by high-performance-liquid-chromatography (HPLC). In seven healthy individuals, in vitro ASA (30 µM/ 100 µM/ 300 µM/ 1,000 µM) and dipyrone (10 µM) coincubation revealed, that the aspirin and dipyrone interaction can be overcome by increasing doses of aspirin. In 36 aspirin and dipyrone comedicated CAD patients, addition of ASA (30 µM/ 100 µM) in vitro inhibited, but did not completely overcome the dipyrone induced reduction of aspirin antiplatelet effects. Notably, the inhibition of thromboxane formation in aspirin and dipyrone comedicated CAD patients coincided with dipyrone plasma levels. In a cross-over designed study in four healthy individuals, we were able to prove that inhibition of aspirin (100 mg/ day) effects by dipyrone (750 mg/ day) was reversible. Furthermore, aspirin (100 mg/ day) medication prior to dipyrone (750 mg/ day) intake prevented the inhibition of antiplatelet effects by dipyrone in 12 healthy individuals. In conclusion, aspirin medication prior to dipyrone intake preserves antiplatelet effects, circumventing the pharmacodynamic drug-drug interaction at the level of cyclooxygenase-1. PMID:25789542

  1. Salicylic acid sans aspirin in animals and man: persistence in fasting and biosynthesis from benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Paterson, John R; Baxter, Gwendoline; Dreyer, Jacob S; Halket, John M; Flynn, Robert; Lawrence, James R

    2008-12-24

    Salicylic acid (SA), which is central to defense mechanisms in plants and the principal metabolite of aspirin, occurs naturally in man with higher levels of SA and its urinary metabolite salicyluric acid (SU) in vegetarians overlapping with levels in patients on low-dose aspirin regimens. SA is widely distributed in animal blood. Fasting for major colorectal surgery did not cause disappearance of SA from plasma, even in patients following total proctocolectomy. A (13)C(6) benzoic acid load ingested by six volunteers led, between 8 and 16 h, to a median 33.9% labeling of urinary salicyluric acid. The overall contribution of benzoic acid (and its salts) to the turnover of circulating SA thus requires further assessment. However, that SA appears to be, at least partially, an endogenous compound should lead to reassessment of its role in human (and animal) pathophysiology. PMID:19053387

  2. Salicylic Acid sans Aspirin in Animals and Man: Persistence in Fasting and Biosynthesis from Benzoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA), which is central to defense mechanisms in plants and the principal metabolite of aspirin, occurs naturally in man with higher levels of SA and its urinary metabolite salicyluric acid (SU) in vegetarians overlapping with levels in patients on low-dose aspirin regimens. SA is widely distributed in animal blood. Fasting for major colorectal surgery did not cause disappearance of SA from plasma, even in patients following total proctocolectomy. A 13C6 benzoic acid load ingested by six volunteers led, between 8 and 16 h, to a median 33.9% labeling of urinary salicyluric acid. The overall contribution of benzoic acid (and its salts) to the turnover of circulating SA thus requires further assessment. However, that SA appears to be, at least partially, an endogenous compound should lead to reassessment of its role in human (and animal) pathophysiology. PMID:19053387

  3. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P N; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5mM at 24h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential. PMID:26319435

  4. Pharmacokinetics of salicylic acid following administration of aspirin tablets and three different forms of soluble aspirin in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Gatti, G; Barzaghi, N; Attardo Parrinello, G; Vitiello, B; Perucca, E

    1989-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic profile of an innovative formulation of soluble aspirin (l-ornithine acetylsalicylate, ldB 1003) was compared with that of conventional tablets and two other soluble dosage forms (d, l-lysine acetylsalicylate and a buffered effervescent formulation of acetylsalicylic acid) after administration of single oral doses in six normal volunteers. All soluble forms showed a rapid absorption profile, peak plasma salicylic acid levels being attained after about 30 min on average and without statistically significant differences among the solutions tested. As compared to the soluble formulations, acetylsalicylic acid given as tablets resulted in slower absorption, with peak plasma salicylic acid levels being reached more than 1 h after dosing. Despite these differences in time course of plasma level profiles, the extent of absorption was similar for all formulations. Apart from the potential advantages in terms of improved gastric tolerability, the increased rate of absorption of aspirin solutions is therapeutically useful whenever a rapid onset of action is required. In this respect, the kinetic pattern of the innovative formulation compares favourably with that of other available soluble dosage forms. PMID:2517497

  5. Effects of paracetamol and propacetamol on gastric mucosal damage and gastric lipid peroxidation caused by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in rats.

    PubMed

    Galunska, B; Marazova, K; Tankova, T; Popov, A; Frangov, P; Krushkov, I; Di Massa, A

    2002-08-01

    We have studied the effect of paracetamol and its pro-drug propacetamol on gastric mucosal damage induced by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and its possible relation to changes in gastric lipid peroxidation status in rats. Paracetamol or propacetamol were administered intragastrically 1h before ASA (300 mg kg(-1)) in the following equivalent doses: 62.5, 125.0 and 250.0 mg kg(-1) or 125.0, 250.0 and 500.0 mg kg(-1), respectively. The effects of the tested agents were compared to that of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) 15, 30 and 60 mg kg(-1). Gastric ulcer formation was estimated morphometrically 4h after ASA administration. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (reduced, GSH, and oxidized, GSSG) and uric acid (UA) were determined in gastric mucosa and blood plasma and used as biochemical markers of the oxidative status. The results showed that paracetamol (250, 125, 62.5 mg kg(-1)) and propacetamol (500, 250, 125 mg kg(-1)) diminished the area of ASA-induced gastric lesions. The effect of propacetamol was more pronounced than that of paracetamol and similar to that of PGE2. Gastric MDA increased 3-fold in the ASA-group. The tested agents reduced it by a range of 30-70%. In all pretreated groups gastric glutathione and UA levels were found higher than that of control group and lower than that of ASA-group. Paracetamol and propacetamol, as well as PGE2, diminished the lipid peroxidation in plasma to a lesser extent than in gastric mucosa, but maintained elevated levels of the selective plasma antioxidant UA. These results show that the ASA-induced gastric mucosal damage is accompanied by the development of oxidative stress, evidenced by the accumulation of MDA, and concomitant initial activation of cell antioxidant defences. As paracetamol and propacetamol tend to decrease gastric lesions caused by ASA and alter gastric mucosal MDA, glutathione and UA values in a favorable manner, it could be suggested that their effects on the gastric mucosa could be related to interference with

  6. Influence of Differing Analgesic Formulations of Aspirin on Pharmacokinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kanani, Kunal; Gatoulis, Sergio C; Voelker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been used therapeutically for over 100 years. As the originator and an important marketer of aspirin-containing products, Bayer's clinical trial database contains numerous reports of the pharmacokinetics of various aspirin formulations. These include evaluations of plain tablets, effervescent tablets, granules, chewable tablets, and fast-release tablets. This publication seeks to expand upon the available pharmacokinetic information concerning aspirin formulations. In the pre-systemic circulation, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is rapidly converted into its main active metabolite, salicylic acid (SA). Therefore, both substances are measured in plasma and reported in the results. The 500 mg strength of each formulation was chosen for analysis as this is the most commonly used for analgesia. A total of 22 studies were included in the analysis. All formulations of 500 mg aspirin result in comparable plasma exposure to ASA and SA as evidenced by AUC. Tablets and dry granules provide a consistently lower Cmax compared to effervescent, granules in suspension and fast release tablets. Effervescent tablets, fast release tablets, and granules in suspension provide a consistently lower median Tmax compared to dry granules and tablets for both ASA and SA. This report reinforces the importance of formulation differences and their impact on pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:26247959

  7. Influence of Differing Analgesic Formulations of Aspirin on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kanani, Kunal; Gatoulis, Sergio C.; Voelker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been used therapeutically for over 100 years. As the originator and an important marketer of aspirin-containing products, Bayer’s clinical trial database contains numerous reports of the pharmacokinetics of various aspirin formulations. These include evaluations of plain tablets, effervescent tablets, granules, chewable tablets, and fast-release tablets. This publication seeks to expand upon the available pharmacokinetic information concerning aspirin formulations. In the pre-systemic circulation, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is rapidly converted into its main active metabolite, salicylic acid (SA). Therefore, both substances are measured in plasma and reported in the results. The 500 mg strength of each formulation was chosen for analysis as this is the most commonly used for analgesia. A total of 22 studies were included in the analysis. All formulations of 500 mg aspirin result in comparable plasma exposure to ASA and SA as evidenced by AUC. Tablets and dry granules provide a consistently lower Cmax compared to effervescent, granules in suspension and fast release tablets. Effervescent tablets, fast release tablets, and granules in suspension provide a consistently lower median Tmax compared to dry granules and tablets for both ASA and SA. This report reinforces the importance of formulation differences and their impact on pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:26247959

  8. Positional Isomers of Aspirin Are Equally Potent in Inhibiting Colon Cancer Cell Growth: Differences in Mode of Cyclooxygenase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kodela, Ravinder; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Goswami, Satindra; Gan, Zong Yuan; Rao, Praveen P. N.; Nia, Kamran V.; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the differential effects of positional isomers of acetylsalicylic acid (o-ASA, m-ASA, and p-ASA) on cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition, gastric prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cell growth inhibition, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell-cycle progression. We also evaluated the gastric toxicity exerted by ASA isomers. All ASA isomers inhibit COX enzymes, but only the o-ASA exerted an irreversible inhibitory profile. We did not observe a significant difference between ASA isomers in their ability to decrease the in vivo synthesis of PGE2 and SOD activity. Furthermore, all isomers increased the levels of gastric and TNF-α when administered orally at equimolar doses. We observed a dose-dependent cell growth inhibitory effect; the order of potency was p-ASA > m-ASA ≈ o-ASA. There was a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis, with a concomitant Go/G1 arrest. The ulcerogenic profile of the three ASA isomers showed a significant difference between o-ASA (aspirin) and its two positional isomers when administered orally at equimolar doses (1 mmol/kg); the ulcer index (UI) for o-ASA indicated extensive mucosal injury (UI = 38), whereas m-ASA and p-ASA produced a significantly decreased toxic response (UI = 12 and 8, respectively) under the same experimental conditions. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of ASA exert practically the same biologic profile in vitro and in vivo but showed different safety profiles. The mechanism of gastric ulcer formation exerted by aspirin and its two isomers warrants a more detailed and thorough investigation. PMID:23349335

  9. Aspirin overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) can be found in many prescription and over-the-counter pain relievers, including: Alka Seltzer Anacin Bayer Bufferin Ecotrin Excedrin Fiorinal Percodan St. Joseph's Note: This list may not be all-inclusive.

  10. Chemometrics-assisted Spectrofluorimetric Determination of Two Co-administered Drugs of Major Interaction, Methotrexate and Aspirin, in Human Urine Following Acid-induced Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Maher, Hadir M; Ragab, Marwa A A; El-Kimary, Eman I

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), mostly along with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the most common of which is aspirin or acetyl salicylic acid (ASA). Since NSAIDs impair MTX clearance and increase its toxicity, it was necessary to develop a simple and reliable method for the monitoring of MTX levels in urine samples, when coadministered with ASA. The method was based on the spectrofluorimetric measurement of the acid-induced hydrolysis product of MTX, 4-amino-4-deoxy-10-methylpteroic acid (AMP), along with the strongly fluorescent salicylic acid (SA), a product of acid-induced hydrolysis of aspirin and its metabolites in urine. The overlapping emission spectra were resolved using the derivative method (D method). In addition, the corresponding derivative emission spectra were convoluted using discrete Fourier functions, 8-points sin xi polynomials, (D/FF method) for better elimination of interferences. Validation of the developed methods was carried out according to the ICH guidelines. Moreover, the data obtained using derivative and convoluted derivative spectra were treated using the non-parametric Theil's method (NP), compared with the least-squares parametric regression method (LSP). The results treated with Theil's method were more accurate and precise compared with LSP since the former is less affected by the outliers. This work offers the potential of both derivative and convolution using discrete Fourier functions in addition to the effectiveness of using the NP regression analysis of data. The high sensitivity obtained by the proposed methods was promising for measuring low concentration levels of the two drugs in urine samples. These methods were efficiently used to measure the drugs in human urine samples following their co-administration. PMID:26234512

  11. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid and aspirin increase lifespan of genetically heterogeneous male mice.

    PubMed

    Strong, Randy; Miller, Richard A; Astle, Clinton M; Floyd, Robert A; Flurkey, Kevin; Hensley, Kenneth L; Javors, Martin A; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Nelson, James F; Ongini, Ennio; Nadon, Nancy L; Warner, Huber R; Harrison, David E

    2008-10-01

    The National Institute on Aging's Interventions Testing Program was established to evaluate agents that are purported to increase lifespan and delay the appearance of age-related disease in genetically heterogeneous mice. Up to five compounds are added to the study each year and each compound is tested at three test sites (The Jackson Laboratory, University of Michigan, and University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio). Mice in the first cohort were exposed to one of four agents: aspirin, nitroflurbiprofen, 4-OH-alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone, or nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA). Sample size was sufficient to detect a 10% difference in lifespan in either sex,with 80% power, using data from two of the three sites. Pooling data from all three sites, a log-rank test showed that both NDGA (p=0.0006) and aspirin (p=0.01) led to increased lifespan of male mice. Comparison of the proportion of live mice at the age of 90% mortality was used as a surrogate for measurement of maximum lifespan;neither NDGA (p=0.12) nor aspirin (p=0.16) had a significant effect in this test. Measures of blood levels of NDGA or aspirin and its salicylic acid metabolite suggest that the observed lack of effects of NDGA or aspirin on life span in females could be related to gender differences in drug disposition or metabolism. Further studies are warranted to find whether NDGA or aspirin, over a range of doses,might prove to postpone death and various age-related outcomes reproducibly in mice. PMID:18631321

  12. Aspirin may influence cellular energy status.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Pratibha; Litvinov, Dmitry; Aluganti Narasimhulu, Chandrakala; Jiang, Xueting; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2015-02-15

    In our previous findings, we have demonstrated that aspirin/acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) might induce sirtuins via aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ah receptor). Induction effects included an increase in cellular paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity and apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) gene expression. As predicted, ASA and salicylic acid (SA) treatment resulted in generation of H2O2, which is known to be an inducer of mitochondrial gene Sirt4 and other downstream target genes of Sirt1. Our current mass spectroscopic studies further confirm the metabolism of the drugs ASA and SA. Our studies show that HepG2 cells readily converted ASA to SA, which was then metabolized to 2,3-DHBA. HepG2 cells transfected with aryl hydrocarbon receptor siRNA upon treatment with SA showed the absence of a DHBA peak as measured by LC-MS/MS. MS studies for Sirt1 action also showed a peak at 180.9 m/z for the deacetylated and chlorinated product formed from N-acetyl lε-lysine. Thus an increase in Sirt4, Nrf2, Tfam, UCP1, eNOS, HO1 and STAT3 genes could profoundly affect mitochondrial function, cholesterol homeostasis, and fatty acid oxidation, suggesting that ASA could be beneficial beyond simply its ability to inhibit cyclooxygenase. PMID:25557764

  13. Aspirin may influence cellular energy status

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Pratibha; Litvinov, Dmitry; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Jiang, Xueting; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2015-01-01

    In our previous findings, we have demonstrated that aspirin/acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) might induce sirtuins via aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ah receptor). Induction effects included an increase in cellular paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity and apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) gene expression. As predicted, ASA and salicylic acid (SA) treatment resulted in generation of H2O2, which is known to be an inducer of mitochondrial gene Sirt4 and other downstream target genes of Sirt1. Our current mass spectroscopic studies further confirm the metabolism of the drugs ASA and SA. Our studies show that HepG2 cells readily converted ASA to SA, which was then metabolized to 2,3-DHBA. HepG2 cells transfected with aryl hydrocarbon receptor siRNA upon treatment with SA showed the absence of a DHBA peak as measured by LC-MS/MS. MS studies for Sirt1 action also showed a peak at 180.9 m/z for the deacetylated and chlorinated product formed from N-acetyl Lε-lysine. Thus an increase in Sirt4, Nrf2, Tfam, UCP1, eNOS, HO1 and STAT3 genes could profoundly affect mitochondrial function, cholesterol homeostasis, and fatty acid oxidation, suggesting that ASA could be beneficial beyond simply its ability to inhibit cyclooxygenase. PMID:25557764

  14. Variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of low dose aspirin in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Benedek, I H; Joshi, A S; Pieniaszek, H J; King, S Y; Kornhauser, D M

    1995-12-01

    Data describing the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of low dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA) are limited. This single-center study was designed to determine the rate and extent of oral absorption of 80-mg ASA tablets in healthy, young male subjects and to assess the intra- and inter-subject variability of ASA pharmacokinetics and platelet aggregation effects. Ten subjects each received a single, open-label, oral 80-mg ASA dose on three separate days. Each dose was separated by a 2-week washout interval. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic determinations of ASA and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA) and platelet aggregation studies were obtained at scheduled timepoints before and up to 24 hours after each dose. Peak plasma ASA levels of 1 microgram/mL were achieved within 30 minutes. Peak plasma SA levels of approximately 4 micrograms/mL were attained in 1 hour. The terminal half-lives (t1/2) of ASA and SA were 0.4 and 2.1 hours, respectively. Both ASA and SA pharmacokinetics and the platelet aggregation response to ASA exhibited considerable intra- and inter-subject variability. Inhibition of platelet aggregation was found to relate with ASA area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC). PMID:8750369

  15. Aspirin delays mesothelioma growth by inhibiting HMGB1-mediated tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H; Pellegrini, L; Napolitano, A; Giorgi, C; Jube, S; Preti, A; Jennings, C J; De Marchis, F; Flores, E G; Larson, D; Pagano, I; Tanji, M; Powers, A; Kanodia, S; Gaudino, G; Pastorino, S; Pass, H I; Pinton, P; Bianchi, M E; Carbone, M

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an inflammatory molecule that has a critical role in the initiation and progression of malignant mesothelioma (MM). Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is the most widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that reduces the incidence, metastatic potential and mortality of many inflammation-induced cancers. We hypothesized that ASA may exert anticancer properties in MM by abrogating the carcinogenic effects of HMGB1. Using HMGB1-secreting and -non-secreting human MM cell lines, we determined whether aspirin inhibited the hallmarks of HMGB1-induced MM cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrated that ASA and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA), inhibit motility, migration, invasion and anchorage-independent colony formation of MM cells via a novel HMGB1-mediated mechanism. ASA/SA, at serum concentrations comparable to those achieved in humans taking therapeutic doses of aspirin, and BoxA, a specific inhibitor of HMGB1, markedly reduced MM growth in xenograft mice and significantly improved survival of treated animals. The effects of ASA and BoxA were cyclooxygenase-2 independent and were not additive, consistent with both acting via inhibition of HMGB1 activity. Our findings provide a rationale for the well documented, yet poorly understood antitumorigenic activity of aspirin, which we show proceeds via HMGB1 inhibition. Moreover, the use of BoxA appears to allow a more efficient HMGB1 targeting while eluding the known gastrointestinal side effects of ASA. Our findings are directly relevant to MM. Given the emerging importance of HMGB1 and its tumor-promoting functions in many cancer types, and of aspirin in cancer prevention and therapy, our investigation is poised to provide broadly applicable information. PMID:26068794

  16. Aspirin delays mesothelioma growth by inhibiting HMGB1-mediated tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Pellegrini, L; Napolitano, A; Giorgi, C; Jube, S; Preti, A; Jennings, C J; De Marchis, F; Flores, E G; Larson, D; Pagano, I; Tanji, M; Powers, A; Kanodia, S; Gaudino, G; Pastorino, S; Pass, H I; Pinton, P; Bianchi, M E; Carbone, M

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an inflammatory molecule that has a critical role in the initiation and progression of malignant mesothelioma (MM). Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is the most widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that reduces the incidence, metastatic potential and mortality of many inflammation-induced cancers. We hypothesized that ASA may exert anticancer properties in MM by abrogating the carcinogenic effects of HMGB1. Using HMGB1-secreting and -non-secreting human MM cell lines, we determined whether aspirin inhibited the hallmarks of HMGB1-induced MM cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrated that ASA and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA), inhibit motility, migration, invasion and anchorage-independent colony formation of MM cells via a novel HMGB1-mediated mechanism. ASA/SA, at serum concentrations comparable to those achieved in humans taking therapeutic doses of aspirin, and BoxA, a specific inhibitor of HMGB1, markedly reduced MM growth in xenograft mice and significantly improved survival of treated animals. The effects of ASA and BoxA were cyclooxygenase-2 independent and were not additive, consistent with both acting via inhibition of HMGB1 activity. Our findings provide a rationale for the well documented, yet poorly understood antitumorigenic activity of aspirin, which we show proceeds via HMGB1 inhibition. Moreover, the use of BoxA appears to allow a more efficient HMGB1 targeting while eluding the known gastrointestinal side effects of ASA. Our findings are directly relevant to MM. Given the emerging importance of HMGB1 and its tumor-promoting functions in many cancer types, and of aspirin in cancer prevention and therapy, our investigation is poised to provide broadly applicable information. PMID:26068794

  17. Aspirin's Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Song, Fei; Venereau, Emilie; Preti, Alessandro; Park, Sang-Wook; Hamilton, Keith; Swapna, G V T; Manohar, Murli; Moreau, Magali; Agresti, Alessandra; Gorzanelli, Andrea; De Marchis, Francesco; Wang, Huang; Antonyak, Marc; Micikas, Robert J; Gentile, Daniel R; Cerione, Richard A; Schroeder, Frank C; Montelione, Gaetano T; Bianchi, Marco E; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin's bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world's longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage. PMID:26101955

  18. Epithelial MUC1 promotes cell migration, reduces apoptosis and affects levels of mucosal modulators during acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)-induced gastropathy.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Debashish; Fernandez, Harvey Robert; Patil, Pradeep Bhatu; Premaratne, Pushpa; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne; Lindén, Sara Katarina

    2015-02-01

    MUC1 is a transmembrane mucin highly expressed in the stomach. Although extensive research has uncovered many of its roles in cancer, knowledge about the functions of MUC1 in normal tissues is limited. In the present study, we showed that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; aspirin) up-regulated MUC1/Muc1 expression in the gastric mucosa of humans and wild-type (WT) mice. ASA induced mucosal injury in all mice to a similar extent; however, WT animals and those chimaeras with Muc1 on the epithelia recovered faster than Muc1-knockout (KO) mice and chimaeras carrying Muc1 on haemopoietic but not epithelial cells. MUC1 enhanced proliferation and migration of the human gastric cell line MKN-7 and increased resistance to apoptosis. The repeated treatment regime used caused a reduction in cyclo-oxygenase-1 (Cox-1) expression, though WT animals returned faster towards pre-treatment levels and had increased Cox-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels during recovery. Thus we found that epithelial Muc1 is more important for the healing process than haemopoietic Muc1 and Muc1/MUC1 facilitates wound healing by enhancing cell migration and proliferation, protecting against apoptosis and mediating expression of mucosal modulators. Thus MUC1 plays essential roles during wound healing and development of treatment modalities targeting enhanced expression of MUC1 may be beneficial to treat mucosal wounds. PMID:25387004

  19. Experiments with Aspirin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa L.; Barry, Edward

    2000-01-01

    Presents a series of experiments that can be used to demonstrate how aspirin can be synthesized and characterized, how the hydrolysis of aspirin can be used as an introduction to kinetics, and how coordination chemistry (chelation) can be introduced by preparing and characterizing the copper complexes of aspirin and salicylic acid. (Contains over…

  20. A study of aspirin and clopidogrel in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robbins, I M; Kawut, S M; Yung, D; Reilly, M P; Lloyd, W; Cunningham, G; Loscalzo, J; Kimmel, S E; Christman, B W; Barst, R J

    2006-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is characterised by in situ thrombosis and increased thromboxane (Tx) A2 synthesis; however, there are no studies of antiplatelet therapy in IPAH. The aim of the current study was to determine the biochemical effects of aspirin (ASA) and clopidogrel on platelet function and eicosanoid metabolism in patients with IPAH. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study of ASA 81 mg once daily and clopidogrel 75 mg once daily was performed. Plasma P-selectin levels and aggregometry were measured after exposure to adenosine diphosphate, arachidonic acid and collagen. Serum levels of TxB2 and urinary metabolites of TxA2 and prostaglandin I2 (Tx-M and PGI-M, respectively) were assessed. A total of 19 IPAH patients were enrolled, of whom nine were being treated with continuous intravenous epoprostenol. ASA and clopidogrel significantly reduced platelet aggregation to arachidonic acid and adenosine diphosphate, respectively. ASA significantly decreased serum TxB2, urinary Tx-M levels and the Tx-M/PGI-M ratio, whereas clopidogrel had no effect on eicosanoid levels. Neither drug significantly lowered plasma P-selectin levels. Epoprostenol use did not affect the results. In conclusion, aspirin and clopidogrel inhibited platelet aggregation, and aspirin reduced thromboxane metabolite production without affecting prostaglandin I2 metabolite synthesis. Further clinical trials of aspirin in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension should be performed. PMID:16507859

  1. Aspirin for cancer is no mere antiplatelet prototype. There is potential in its ancient roots.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, James R; Baxter, Gwendoline J; Paterson, John R

    2016-09-01

    Aspirin (ASA), increasingly accepted as predominantly a cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 inhibitor, is a prodrug for salicylic acid (SA) which has no such activity. SA is widespread in nature, vital in plants, and present in drug free serum from animals and man. Evolutionary conserved SA receptors are found in human tissues. Very low doses of ASA will, on repeat dosing, produce near maximal platelet COX-1 inhibition. Evidence for cancer prophylaxis is based on ASA doses of at least 75mg/day. Pleiotropic mechanisms underlie low dose ASA's undoubted efficacy in preventive medicine but the key barrier to its more widespread use is gastrointestinal toxicity. ASA/SA combination formulations may improve the current risk/benefit ratio of chemo-prophylactic preparations. There is well established methodology for, and should be few regulatory barriers to, their evaluation. PMID:27515206

  2. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of NO-donating aspirin in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Rao, Chinthalapally V; Joseph, Stancy; Gao, Li; Patlolla, Jagan M R; Choi, Chang-In; Kopelovich, Levy; Steele, Vernon E; Rigas, Basil

    2008-10-01

    Nitric oxide-donating aspirin (NO-ASA) represents class of promising chemopreventive NO-NSAIDs. NO-ASA combines the beneficial effects of ASA and the gut-sparing effect of the NO moiety. There is, however, limited information on its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in vivo. Herein, experiments were designed to identify the optimal dose, the effective route of administration, and targeted markers in plasma and colonic tissues of male F344 rats. Seven weeks old male F344 rats were randomized into 9 groups (16/group) and fed the control diet. At eight weeks of age, groups 2-5 were each administered one of four different doses of NO-ASA by gavage (33, 66, 132 and 264 mg/kg) and each of groups 6-9 were fed diets containing NO-ASA (35, 700, 1,400 and 2,800 ppm) for two weeks. Rats were sacrificed 2 and 10 h after completion of the two weeks of treatment with NO-ASA and plasma and colonic mucosa were collected and analyzed for NO-ASA, its metabolites, and PGE2 and TXB2 levels. Our results indicate that NO-ASA is rapidly metabolized, predominantly to salicylic acid; no intact NO-ASA was detected in plasma. Compared to diet-fed NO-ASA, gavaging generated much higher salicylic acid levels over a wide range of doses and a relatively broad time period (10 h). Regardless of its route of administration, NO-ASA lowered the levels of PGE2 in colonic tissues and plasma, as well as TxB2 in plasma in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These findings may have practical utility for the administration of NO-ASA to humans. PMID:18813794

  3. Aspirin and salicylic acid decrease c-Myc expression in cancer cells: a potential role in chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Muley, Pratik; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a significant correlation between regular aspirin use and reduced colon cancer incidence and mortality; however, the pathways by which it exerts its anti-cancer effects are still not fully explored. We hypothesized that aspirin's anti-cancer effect may occur through downregulation of c-Myc gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that aspirin and its primary metabolite, salicylic acid, decrease the c-Myc protein levels in human HCT-116 colon and in few other cancer cell lines. In total cell lysates, both drugs decreased the levels of c-Myc in a concentration-dependent fashion. Greater inhibition was observed in the nucleus than the cytoplasm, and immunofluorescence studies confirmed these observations. Pretreatment of cells with lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, partially prevented the downregulatory effect of both aspirin and salicylic acid, suggesting that 26S proteasomal pathway is involved. Both drugs failed to decrease exogenously expressed DDK-tagged c-Myc protein levels; however, under the same conditions, the endogenous c-Myc protein levels were downregulated. Northern blot analysis showed that both drugs caused a decrease in c-Myc mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent fashion. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that aspirin taken up by cells was rapidly metabolized to salicylic acid, suggesting that aspirin's inhibitory effect on c-Myc may occur through formation of salicylic acid. Our result suggests that salicylic acid regulates c-Myc level at both transcriptional and post-transcription levels. Inhibition of c-Myc may represent an important pathway by which aspirin exerts its anti-cancer effect and decrease the occurrence of cancer in epithelial tissues. PMID:26314861

  4. Aspirin suppresses cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen formation through downregulation of angiotensin type 1 receptor transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei Lu, Jingjun; Khaidakov, Magomed; Mitra, Sona; Ding, Zufeng; Raina, Sameer; Goyal, Tanu; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2012-03-15

    Aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid, ASA) is a common drug used for its analgesic and antipyretic effects. Recent studies show that ASA not only blocks cyclooxygenase, but also inhibits NADPH oxidase and resultant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a pathway that underlies pathogenesis of several ailments, including hypertension and tissue remodeling after injury. In these disease states, angiotensin II (Ang II) activates NADPH oxidase via its type 1 receptor (AT1R) and leads to fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. In this study, we examined if ASA would inhibit NADPH oxidase activation, upregulation of AT1R transcription, and subsequent collagen generation in mouse cardiac fibroblasts challenged with Ang II. Mouse heart fibroblasts were isolated and treated with Ang II with or without ASA. As expected, Ang II induced AT1R expression, and stimulated cardiac fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. The AT1R blocker losartan attenuated these effects of Ang II. Similarly to losartan, ASA, and its SA moiety suppressed Ang II-mediated AT1R transcription and fibroblast proliferation as well as expression of collagens and MMPs. ASA also suppressed the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p22{sup phox}, p47{sup phox}, p67{sup phox}, NOX2 and NOX4) and ROS generation. ASA did not affect total NF-κB p65, but inhibited its phosphorylation and activation. These observations suggest that ASA inhibits Ang II-induced NADPH oxidase expression, NF-κB activation and AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts, and fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. The critical role of NADPH oxidase activity in stimulation of AT1R transcription became apparent in experiments where ASA also inhibited AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts challenged with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Since SA had similar effect as ASA on AT1R expression, we suggest that ASA's effect is mediated by its SA moiety. -- Highlights: ► Aspirin in therapeutic concentrations decreases mouse cardiac fibroblast

  5. Glucuronidation of the aspirin metabolite salicylic acid by expressed UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Gwendolyn E; Bigler, Jeannette; Potter, John D; Lampe, Johanna W

    2006-02-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is a common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used for treatment of pain and arthritis. In the body, acetylsalicylic acid is rapidly deacetylated to form salicylic acid. Both compounds have been proposed as anti-inflammatory agents. Major metabolites of salicylic acid are its acyl and phenolic glucuronide conjugates. Formation of these conjugates, catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), decreases the amount of pharmacologically active salicylic acid present. We aimed to identify the UGTs catalyzing the glucuronidation of salicylic acid using both heterologously expressed enzymes and pooled human liver microsomes (HLMs) and to develop a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to quantify glucuronidation activity of UGTs 1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, 2B4, 2B7, 2B15, and 2B17 Supersomes. All UGTs tested, except 1A4, 2B15, and 2B17, catalyzed salicylic acid phenolic and acyl glucuronidation. Ratios of salicylic acid phenolic to acyl glucuronide formation varied more than 12-fold from 0.5 for UGT1A6 to 6.1 for UGT1A1. These results suggest that all UGTs except 1A4, 2B15, and 2B17 might be involved in the glucuronidation of salicylic acid in vivo. From comparisons of apparent Km values determined in pooled HLMs and in expressed UGTs, UGT2B7 was suggested as a likely catalyst of salicylic acid acyl glucuronidation, whereas multiple UGTs were suggested as catalysts of phenolic glucuronidation. The results of this UGT screening may help target future evaluation of the effects of UGT polymorphisms on response to aspirin in clinical and population-based studies. PMID:16258079

  6. Implications of Altered Glutathione Metabolism in Aspirin-Induced Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) induces cell cycle arrest, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells. In the present study, we have further elucidated that altered glutathione (GSH)-redox metabolism in HepG2 cells play a critical role in ASA-induced cytotoxicity. Using selected doses and time point for ASA toxicity, we have demonstrated that when GSH synthesis is inhibited in HepG2 cells by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), prior to ASA treatment, cytotoxicity of the drug is augmented. On the other hand, when GSH-depleted cells were treated with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), cytotoxicity/apoptosis caused by ASA was attenuated with a significant recovery in oxidative stress, GSH homeostasis, DNA fragmentation and some of the mitochondrial functions. NAC treatment, however, had no significant effects on the drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase activity and ATP synthesis in GSH-depleted cells. Our results have confirmed that aspirin increases apoptosis by increased reactive oxygen species production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory functions. These effects were further amplified when GSH-depleted cells were treated with ASA. We have also shown that some of the effects of aspirin might be associated with reduced GSH homeostasis, as treatment of cells with NAC attenuated the effects of BSO and aspirin. Our results strongly suggest that GSH dependent redox homeostasis in HepG2 cells is critical in preserving mitochondrial functions and preventing oxidative stress associated complications caused by aspirin treatment. PMID:22558435

  7. Aspirin overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002542.htm Aspirin overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An overdose of aspirin means you have too much aspirin in your ...

  8. Lack of Pharmacokinetic Interaction between Aspirin and Warfarin.

    PubMed

    Fiske, William D.; Connell, Jill M.; Benedek, Irma H.

    1995-06-01

    An open-label, randomized, two-phase crossover study was conducted on 36 healthy male volunteers to identify the effects of coadministration of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA) and crystalline warfarin sodium (Coumadin((R))) on the elimination and disposition kinetics of ASA, salicylic acid (SA) and R- and S-warfarin enantiomers. Twenty-four subjects were administered single doses of 325 mg of ASA alone and in combination with 10 mg of crystalline warfarin sodium with a 1-week washout between ASA doses. ASA and SA pharmacokinetic parameters were determined after each dose. Twelve subjects were administered single doses of 10 mg of crystalline warfarin sodium alone and in combination with 325 mg of ASA with a 4-week washout between warfarin doses. R- and S-warfarin enantiomer pharmacokinetic parameters were determined after each dose. Pharmacokinetic parameters were compared using analysis of variance and 90% confidence intervals. ASA and SA AUCs (the area under the plasma concentration versus time curve from time zero to time infinity) respectively were 3.28 plus minus 0.80 and 66.99 plus minus 11.73 &mgr;g h ml(minus sign1) (ASA alone), and 3.22 plus minus 0.61 and 69.48 plus minus 15.79 &mgr;g h ml(minus sign1) (ASA with warfarin). R-warfarin and S-warfarin AUCs respectively were 33.9 plus minus 9.3 and 23.9 plus minus 16.0 &mgr;g h ml(minus sign1) (warfarin alone) and 33.6 plus minus 10.2 and 22.6 plus minus 14.7 &mgr;g h ml(minus sign1) (warfarin with ASA). The only pharmacokinetic parameter which was statistically significantly different when the combination was administered was the S-warfarin elimination rate constant (p < 0.05), but the difference (9.2% increase in the presence of ASA) was small and no significant difference was found in S-warfarin clearance. It is concluded that there is no pharmacokinetic interaction when a single dose of ASA 325 mg is coadministered with a single dose of crystalline warfarin sodium 10 mg. PMID:11850685

  9. COX-2, aspirin and metabolism of arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids and their physiological and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Poorani, R; Bhatt, Anant N; Dwarakanath, B S; Das, Undurti N

    2016-08-15

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are vital for normal growth and development and physiological function of various tissues in humans. PUFAs have immunomodulatory actions in addition to their ability to modulate inflammation, vascular reactivity, neurotransmission and stem cell biology. PUFAs and their metabolites possess both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties that underlie their actions and involvement in several diseases. Aspirin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), possesses both cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitory action and enhances the production of anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 {(called as epi-lipoxin A4, aspirin-triggered lipoxins (ATLs))}. In addition, at low doses aspirin may not interfere with the production of prostacyclin (PGI2). Both lipoxin A4 and PGI2 have vasodilator, platelet anti-aggregator and anti-inflammatory actions that may underlie the beneficial actions of aspirin. Paradoxically, other NSAIDs may not have the same actions as that of aspirin on PUFA metabolism. Similar anti-inflammatory compounds are formed from eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) by the action of aspirin termed as resolvins (from EPA and DHA) and protectins and maresins from DHA. PUFAs: arachidonic acid (AA), EPA and DHA and their various products modulate not only inflammation and immune response but also possess actions on various genes, nuclear factors, cyclic AMP and GMP, G-protein coupled receptors (GPRs), hypothalamic neurotransmitters, hormones, cytokines and enzymes, and interact with nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide to regulate their formation and action and to form new compounds that have several biological actions. These pleiotropic actions of PUFAs and their metabolites may explain their ability to play a role in several physiological actions and diseases. The big challenge is to harness these actions to prevent and manage clinical conditions. PMID:26335394

  10. In Vitro Cytotoxic Effects of Celecoxib, Mefenamic Acid, Aspirin and Indometacin on Several Cells Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hashemipour, Maryam Alsadat; Mehrabizadeh Honarmand, Hoda; Falsafi, Farideh; Tahmasebi Arashlo, Mehrnaz; Rajabalian, Saied; Gandjalikhan Nassab, Sayed Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Use of cyclooxygenase inhibitors as chemotherapy agents has attracted the attention of a large number of investigators in recent years. Given the importance of cancer therapy, only a limited number of studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors on specific cell lines. Purpose This research aimed to determine the in vitro cytotoxic effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors (COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors) on KB, Saos-2, 1321N, U-87MG, SFBF-PI 39 cell lines. Materials and Method Powders of celecoxib, mefenamic acid, aspirin and indometacin were dissolved in the appropriate solvent. The viability of cell lines was carried out by MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide) assay technique. Data gathered from four separate experiments were expressed as mean±SD. Statistical significance was defined at p< 0.05 by using analysis of variance. Significant treatment mean values were subjected to post-hoc Tukey’s test. Results Celecoxib showed marked cytotoxic effects on KB, Saos-2, and 1321N cells, which was significant in comparison with the control group. Celecoxib was not effective in killing U-87MG cell line. Mefenamic acid exerted cytotoxic effects on KB, Saos-2, and 1321N cells, where the viability was approximately 75%. U-87MG cells were resistant to mefenamic acid. Indometacin had the highest rate of activity on U-87MG cells, which was significant in comparison with the control group. Aspirin did not exhibit any activity on these cell lines and was not effective in killing U-87MG, KB, Saos-2, and 1321N cells. Conclusion This research showed that celecoxib, indometacin, and mefenamic acid have the cytotoxic effects on KB, Saos-2, 1321N and U-87MG cell lines. Therefore, it appears that these drugs can be considered as anti-neoplastic agents in the experimental phase. PMID:27602398

  11. Do we need a statin-nicotinic acid-aspirin mini-polypill to treat combined hyperlipidaemia?

    PubMed

    Athyros, Vasilios G; Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Pagourelias, Efstathios D; Kakafika, Anna I; Skaperdas, Athanasios; Hatzitolios, Apostolos; Karagiannis, Asterios

    2007-10-01

    This review considers the treatment for combined hyperlipidaemia (CH) with a combination formulation of three drugs: a statin, nicotinic acid (NA) and aspirin--a mini-polypill. CH is a highly atherogenic dyslipidaemia manifested either as familial combined hyperlipidaemia or dyslipidaemia related to the metabolic syndrome or Type 2 diabetes mellitus. These types of dyslipidaemia are highly prevalent in the general population. Statin plus extended-release NA is a promising treatment option for the normalisation of these atherogenic lipid alterations, regression of atherosclerosis, as well as for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. The addition of aspirin might prove a useful adjunct that might reduce the cutaneous side effects of NA while also acting as an antiplatelet agent in high-CVD-risk patients. However, the effective dose of aspirin may need to be at least 160 mg/day. This triple combination might improve patient compliance when compared with the three drugs administered separately. PMID:17927482

  12. Replacing the acetyl linkage in aspirin with choline and magnesium moieties reduces the occurrence of gastric mucosal injury.

    PubMed

    Danesh, B J; Nelson, L M; Russell, R I; Docherty, C

    1987-02-01

    The acetyl moiety in aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid: ASA) is considered to play a major part in the pathogenesis of ASA-induced mucosal injury. At equivalent salicylate doses and pH values, the induction of acute gastric mucosal haemorrhagic erosions in rats by ASA and choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), a new non-acetylated salicylate, with and without the potentiating damaging effect of taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) were compared. Test solutions were administered by per oral intubation to five groups of fasting Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 24). Gastric mucosa were examined after 4 hours and mucosal injury assessed by a lesion-scoring system. The incidence and severity (median lesion scores with quartiles) of the lesions were 83% and 13 (7:20) respectively for ASA (128 mg kg-1) compared with 17% and 0 (0:0) for CMT (128 mg kg-1) (P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.001). TDCA increased mucosal damage to 100% and 29 (20:34) for ASA compared with 30% and 0 (0:4) for CMT (P less than 0.001) and P less than 0.001). Serum salicylate levels (median values of 1.4 for ASA and 1.5 mmol litre-1 for CMT) were not significantly different. It is concluded that replacing the acetyl moiety in ASA with choline and magnesium moieties reduces the ASA-induced mucosal injury, without affecting blood salicylate concentrations. PMID:2979212

  13. Aspirin Increases the Solubility of Cholesterol in Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, Richard; Barrett, Matthew; Zheng, Sonbo; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is often prescribed for patients with high levels of cholesterol for the secondary prevention of myocardial events, a regimen known as the Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy. We have recently shown that Aspirin partitions in lipid bilayers. However, a direct interplay between ASA and cholesterol has not been investigated. Cholesterol is known to insert itself into the membrane in a dispersed state at moderate concentrations (under ~37.5%) and decrease fluidity of membranes. We prepared model lipid membranes containing varying amounts of both ASA and cholesterol molecules. The structure of the bilayers as a function of ASA and cholesterol concentration was determined using high-resolution X-ray diffraction. At cholesterol levels of more than 40mol%, immiscible cholesterol plaques formed. Adding ASA to the membranes was found to dissolve the cholesterol plaques, leading to a fluid lipid bilayer structure. We present first direct evidence for an interaction between ASA and cholesterol on the level of the cell membrane.

  14. Newly Identified Targets of Aspirin and Its Primary Metabolite, Salicylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Klessig, Daniel F

    2016-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a plant hormone, which influences several physiological processes, and is a critical modulator of multiple levels of immunity in plants. Several high-throughput screens, which were developed to identify SA-binding proteins through which SA mediates its many physiological effects in plants, uncovered several novel targets of aspirin and its primary metabolite, SA, in humans. These include glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), two proteins associated with some of the most prevalent and devastating human diseases. In addition, natural and synthetic SA derivatives were discovered, which are much more potent than SA at inhibiting the disease-associated activities of these targets. PMID:26954428

  15. Determinants of Aspirin Metabolism in Healthy Men and Women: Effects of Dietary Inducers of UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Sandi L.; Saracino, Misty R.; Makar, Karen W.; Thomas, Sushma S.; Li, Lin; Zheng, Yingye; Levy, Lisa; Schwarz, Yvonne; Bigler, Jeannette; Potter, John D.; Lampe, Johanna W.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Interindividual variation in aspirin (ASA) metabolism is attributed to concomitant use of drugs or alcohol, urine pH, ethnicity, sex, and genetic variants in UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT). Little is known about the effects of diet. Methods We evaluated cross-sectionally whether urinary excretion of ASA and its metabolites [salicylic acid (SA), salicyluric acid (SUA) phenolic glucuronide (SUAPG), salicylic acid acyl glucuronide (SAAG) and salicylic acid phenolic glucuronide (SAPG)] differed by UGT1A6 genotype and dietary factors shown to induce UGT. Following oral treatment with 650 mg ASA, urine was collected over 8 h in 264 men and 264 women (21–45 years old). Results There were statistically significant differences in metabolites excreted between sexes and ethnicities. Men excreted more SUA; women more ASA (p = 0.03), SA, SAAG and SAPG (p ≤ 0.001 for all). Compared to Caucasians, Asians excreted more ASA, SA and SAAG, and less SUA and SUAPG (p ≤ 0.03 for all); African-Americans excreted more SAAG and SAPG and less SUA (p ≤ 0.04). There was no effect of UGT1A6 genotypes. Increased ASA and decreased SUAPG excretion was observed with increased servings of vegetables (p = 0.008), specifically crucifers (p = 0.05). Conclusion Diet may influence the pharmacokinetics of ASA, but effects may be through modulation of glycine conjugation rather than glucuronidation. PMID:21625173

  16. Aspirin metabolites are GPR35 agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used as an anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-pyretic, and cancer-preventive agent; however, the molecular mode of action is unlikely due entirely to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Here, we report the agonist activity of several aspirin metabolites at GPR35, a poorly characterized orphan G protein-coupled receptor. 2,3,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid, an aspirin catabolite, was found to be the most potent GPR35 agonist among aspirin metabolites. Salicyluric acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, was also active. These results suggest that the GPR35 agonist activity of certain aspirin metabolites may contribute to the clinical features of aspirin. PMID:22526472

  17. Aspirin Desensitization

    MedlinePlus

    ... dust mites, cats, dogs, or pollen. Others believe sensitivity to aspirin results from a problem in certain ... examination is required to diagnose patients with aspirin sensitivity. Patients with severe asthma, chronic sinusitis, nasal polyps ...

  18. The Efficacy of Probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG) and 5-ASA (Aminosalicylic Acid) in the Treatment of Experimental Radiation Proctitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Dandin, Özgür; Akin, Mehmet Levhi; Balta, Ahmet Ziya; Yücel, Ergün; Karakaş, Dursun Özgür; Demirbaş, Sezai; Özdemir, Sevim; Haholu, Apdullah

    2015-12-01

    The aims of the study are to demonstrate the effect of probiotic use on the healing of radiation proctitis (RP) and evaluate the efficiency of fecal biomarkers at follow-up of the treatment. Thirty-two male/female rats were randomly separated into four groups of eight rats. The first group (control) was not radiated. RP was created by 17.5 Gy single dose rectal irradiation. The second group (RP) was subjected to RP, but not treated. The third group (RP+ASA) was treated with 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) 250 mg/kg daily by gastric lavage for 14 days after the irradiation, and the forth group (RP+LGG) was treated with Lactobacillus GG (LGG) 25 × 100 million CFU daily. Feces samples were taken at the 7th and 14th day of the treatment for fecal biomarkers. Rectums of the rats were resected at the 14th day by laparotomy. Samples were evaluated both macroscopically and microscopically. RP was achieved both macroscopically and microscopically. Weight loss of RP group is statistically significant (p < 0.005) than other groups. The healing ratio of RP+ASA and RP+LGG groups was significantly better than the RP group (p < 0.005) both macroscopically and microscopically. But there was no significant difference between ASA and LGG groups. Biochemically, fecal calprotectin was found to be more effective than fecal myeloperoxidase and fecal lactoferrin to show the efficacy of treatment of radiation proctitis. The results of our study demonstrate that probiotic is as effective as 5-aminosalicylic in the treatment of radiation proctitis, and fecal calprotectin is a useful biomarker in determining the response to the treatment. PMID:26730065

  19. Aspirin revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, D.; Hu, X. K.; Loboda, A. V.; Mosey, N. J.; Lipson, R. H.

    2007-03-01

    Experiments are described where the experimental conditions have been optimized to detect aspirin by MALDI mass spectrometry. Although protonated aspirin was not observed by MALDI, sodium and potassium aspirin adducts could be found. Significantly better signals could be obtained by using Rb and Cs salts as cationization sources. Quantum calculations were carried out to determine the structure and energetics of the Li, K, Rb, and Cs alkali--aspirin adducts.

  20. Sensitive determination of aspirin and its metabolites in plasma by LC-UV using on-line solid-phase extraction with methylcellulose-immobilized anion-exchange restricted access media.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Eiichi; Takakuwa, Susumu; Kato, Takashi; Asakawa, Naoki

    2007-02-01

    We describe a sensitive determination of aspirin (ASA) and its three metabolites (salicylic acid [SA], 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid [2,3-DHBA], and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid [gentisic acid (GA)]) in rat plasma. Analysis was carried out by on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) using a methylcellulose-immobilized-strong anion-exchanger (MC-SAX), followed by liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with UV detection. The lower limits of quantitation for ASA and SA were 60 ng/mL in 100 microL of plasma, respectively. This method was validated with respect to intra- and inter-day precision, accuracy, and linearity up to concentrations of 20,000 ng/mL for ASA, SA, 2,3-DHBA and gentisic acid, respectively. The method was successfully applied to an analysis of the pharmacokinetics of ASA and SA in rats. PMID:16959551

  1. Electrochemical behavior of triflusal, aspirin and their metabolites at glassy carbon and boron doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2010-08-01

    The electrochemical behavior of triflusal (TRF) and aspirin (ASA), before and after hydrolysis in water and in alkaline medium using two different electrode surfaces, glassy carbon and boron doped diamond, was study by differential pulse voltammetry over a wide pH range. The hydrolysis products are 2-(hydroxyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-benzoic acid (HTB) for triflusal and salicylic acid (SA) for aspirin, which in vivo represent their main metabolites. The hydrolysis processes were also followed by spectrophotometry. The UV results showed complete hydrolysis after one hour for TRF and after two hours for ASA in alkaline solution. The glassy carbon electrode enables only indirect determination of TRF and ASA through the electrochemical detection of their hydrolysis products HTB and SA, respectively. The oxidation processes of HTB and SA are pH dependent and involve different numbers of electrons and protons. Moreover, the difference between the oxidation peak potential of SA and HTB was equal to 100 mV in the studied pH range from 1 to 8 due to the CF3 of the aromatic ring of HTB molecule. Due to its wider oxidation potential range, the boron doped diamond electrode was used to study the direct oxidation of TRF and ASA, as well as of their respective metabolites HTB and SA. PMID:20402644

  2. Apigenin inhibits platelet adhesion and thrombus formation and synergizes with aspirin in the suppression of the arachidonic acid pathway.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Núñez, L; Lozano, M L; Palomo, M; Martínez, C; Vicente, V; Castillo, J; Benavente-García, O; Diaz-Ricart, M; Escolar, G; Rivera, J

    2008-05-14

    Previous studies using washed platelets demonstrated that certain flavonoids inhibit platelet function through several mechanisms including blockade of TxA(2) receptors (TPs). We aimed to analyze the binding capacity of flavonoids to TPs in platelet rich plasma (PRP), investigated their effect in flowing blood, and evaluated the ability of apigenin to improve the efficacy of aspirin in the inhibition of platelet aggregation. The binding of flavonoids to TPs in PRP was explored using binding assays and the TP antagonist [ (3)H]SQ29548. Effects of flavonoids on platelet adhesion were assessed using arterial subendothelium with annular plate perfusion chambers, and global evaluation of apigenin on high-shear-dependent platelet function was determined by the PFA-100. To evaluate the ability of apigenin to potentiate the effect of aspirin, arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation was measured prior to and after consumption of subaggregatory doses of aspirin in the presence or absence of apigenin. Binding assays revealed that apigenin was an efficient competitor of [ (3)H]SQ29548 binding to PRP ( K i = 155.3 +/- 65.4 microM), and perfusion studies showed that apigenin, genistein, and catechin significantly diminished thrombus formation when compared to control (26.2 +/- 3.8, 33.1 +/- 5.2, and 26.2 +/- 5.2 vs 76.6 +/- 2.6%, respectively; p < 0.05). Apigenin, similarly to the TP antagonist SQ29548, significantly prolonged collagen epinephrine-induced PFA-100 closure time in comparison to the control and, when added to platelets that had been exposed in vivo to aspirin, potentiated its inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. The inhibitory effect of some flavonoids in the presence of plasma, particularly apigenin, might in part rely on TxA(2) receptor antagonism. There is a clear increase in the ex vivo antiplatelet effect of aspirin in the presence of apigenin, which encourages the idea of the combined use of aspirin and certain flavonoids in patients in which

  3. NAC Attenuates LPS-Induced Toxicity in Aspirin-Sensitized Mouse Macrophages via Suppression of Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie; Shafarin, Jasmin

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces the production of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS) under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin) is a commonly used anti-inflammatory drug. Our aim was to study the effects of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), an antioxidant precursor of GSH synthesis, on aspirin-sensitized macrophages treated with LPS. We investigated the effects of LPS alone and in conjunction with a sub-toxic concentration of ASA, on metabolic and oxidative stress, apoptosis, and mitochondrial function using J774.2 mouse macrophage cell line. Protection from LPS-induced toxicity by NAC was also studied. LPS alone markedly induced ROS production and oxidative stress in macrophage cells. When ASA was added to LPS-treated macrophages, the increase in oxidative stress was significantly higher than that with LPS alone. Similarly, alteration in glutathione-dependent redox metabolism was also observed in macrophages after treatment with LPS and ASA. The combination of LPS and ASA selectively altered the CYP 3A4, CYP 2E1 and CYP 1A1 catalytic activities. Mitochondrial respiratory complexes and ATP production were also inhibited by LPS-ASA treatment. Furthermore a higher apoptotic cell death was also observed in LPS-ASA treated macrophages. NAC pre-treatment showed protection against oxidative stress induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. These effects are presumed, at least in part, to be associated with alterations in NF-κB/Nrf-2 mediated cell signaling. These results suggest that macrophages are more sensitive to LPS when challenged with ASA and that NAC pre-treatment protects the macrophages from these deleterious effects. PMID:25075522

  4. 5-ASA Dose-Response

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Seymour; Lichtenstein, Gary R; Safdi, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Mesalamine (5-aminosalicylic acid; 5-ASA) represents the cornerstone of first-line therapy for mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis (UC). Current guidelines suggest that the combination of oral and rectal therapies provide optimal symptom resolution and effectively maintain remission in the majority of these patients. Although effective, most oral 5-ASA formulations have a high pill burden and rectal therapies are associated with low adherence. Recent research has examined patterns of compliance, as well as the efficacy of different dose levels of 5-ASA in terms of symptom resolution, the maintenance of remission, and improvements in quality of life. The ASCEND I, II, and III trials found that doses of 4.8 g/day are more effective than 2.4 g/day doses in patients with moderate disease, those with previous steroid use, and those with a history of multiple medications. The benefits of effective long-term 5-ASA therapy include the avoidance of more costly and potentially toxic drugs (such as corticosteroids and biologic therapies), as well as improvements in quality of life, reductions in the need for future colectomy, and a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer. PMID:20567558

  5. A rapid high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the simultaneous quantitation of aspirin, salicylic acid, and caffeine in effervescent tablets.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, MaryJean; Kumar, Vimal

    2003-09-01

    A rapid reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure is developed and validated for the simultaneous quantitation of aspirin, salicylic acid, and caffeine extracted from an effervescent tablet. The method uses a Hypersil C18 column (5 micro m, 15 cm x 4.6 mm) for an isocratic elution in a water-methanol-acetic acid mobile phase at a wavelength of 275 nm. The tablets' buffering effects and acid neutralizing capacity require an extraction solvent of methanol-formic acid. The range of linearity for aspirin is 0.5-1.25 mg/mL, caffeine 0.065-0.195 mg/mL, and salicylic acid 0.4-6.0% of aspirin. The overall recovery is 100.2%, 100.7%, and 99.2% for aspirin, caffeine, and salicylic acid, respectively. Under the conditions of the method, aspirin, caffeine, and salicylic acid are adequately resolved with proper peak symmetry in less than 7 min. PMID:14558930

  6. Human GAPDH Is a Target of Aspirin's Primary Metabolite Salicylic Acid and Its Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Manohar, Murli; Harraz, Maged M; Park, Sang-Wook; Schroeder, Frank C; Snyder, Solomon H; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) controls several physiological processes and is a key regulator of multiple levels of plant immunity. To decipher the mechanisms through which SA's multiple physiological effects are mediated, particularly in immunity, two high-throughput screens were developed to identify SA-binding proteins (SABPs). Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) was identified in these screens. Similar screens and subsequent analyses using SA analogs, in conjunction with either a photoaffinity labeling technique or surface plasmon resonance-based technology, established that human GAPDH (HsGAPDH) also binds SA. In addition to its central role in glycolysis, HsGAPDH participates in several pathological processes, including viral replication and neuronal cell death. The anti-Parkinson's drug deprenyl has been shown to suppress nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH, an early step in cell death and the resulting cell death induced by the DNA alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Here, we demonstrate that SA, which is the primary metabolite of aspirin (acetyl SA) and is likely responsible for many of its pharmacological effects, also suppresses nuclear translocation of HsGAPDH and cell death. Analysis of two synthetic SA derivatives and two classes of compounds from the Chinese medicinal herb Glycyrrhiza foetida (licorice), glycyrrhizin and the SA-derivatives amorfrutins, revealed that they not only appear to bind HsGAPDH more tightly than SA, but also exhibit a greater ability to suppress translocation of HsGAPDH to the nucleus and cell death. PMID:26606248

  7. Therapeutic potential of choline magnesium trisalicylate as an alternative to aspirin for patients with bleeding tendencies.

    PubMed

    Danesh, B J; Saniabadi, A R; Russell, R I; Lowe, G D

    1987-12-01

    We have compared the effects of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA, aspirin) and choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), a non-acetylated salicylate product, on platelet aggregation in human whole blood ex-vivo. Using a whole blood platelet counter, platelet aggregation was quantified by measuring the fall in the number of single platelets at peak aggregation in response to collagen, arachidonic acid (AA), as well as spontaneous aggregation. In double blind and random order, 12 healthy volunteers received, on two separate occasions 10 days apart, a single oral dose of 652 mg ASA or 655 mg CMT. Despite a comparable absorption of salicylic acid from the two drugs, ingestion of ASA resulted in a marked inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by collagen (p less than 0.005), AA (p less than 0.01) and spontaneous aggregation (p less than 0.01), whereas such effects were not observed after CMT ingestion. We suggest that CMT may have therapeutic potential as an alternative to aspirin when inhibition of platelet aggregation can induce bleeding complications. PMID:3329766

  8. ASA24-Canada-2014

    Cancer.gov

    A Canadian adaptation of the Automated Self-Administered 24-hour (ASA24-Canada-2014) Recall has been developed by the Food Directorate at Health Canada in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

  9. Derivative-ratio spectrophotometric method for the determination of ternary mixture of aspirin, paracetamol and salicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Yazbi, Fawzi A.; Hammud, Hassan H.; Assi, Sulaf A.

    2007-10-01

    A derivative spectrophotometric method was developed for the assay of a ternary mixture of aspirin (ASP), paracetamol (PAR) and salicylic acid (SAL). The method is based on the use of the first and second derivatives of the ratio spectra and measurement at zero-crossing wavelengths. The ratio spectra were obtained by dividing the absorption spectrum of the mixture by that of one of the components. The concentration of the other components are then determined from their respective calibration curves treated similarly. The described method was applied for the determination of these combinations in synthetic mixtures and dosage forms. The results obtained were accurate and precise.

  10. Comparative gastrointestinal blood loss associated with placebo, aspirin, and nabumetone as assessed by radiochromium (/sup 51/Cr)

    SciTech Connect

    Lussier, A.; Davis, A.; Lussier, Y.; Lebel, E.

    1989-03-01

    Nabumetone differs from most other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. It is presented to the gut as a nonacidic prodrug, and is metabolized to its active form after absorption. Studies in animals and humans suggest it is less irritating to the gastrointestinal mucosa. This study compared the gastrointestinal microbleeding induced by nabumetone to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), and placebo in a double blind parallel study using chromium /sup 51/Cr labelled red cells to quantitate fecal blood loss (FBL) in healthy volunteers. Thirty subjects were randomized to treatment with nabumetone (2000 mg), ASA (3.6 g) or placebo for 21 days following a 7 day placebo period. Six subjects served as untreated controls. FBL in nabumetone treated subjects was not significantly different to placebo or untreated subjects. In contrast, ASA-treated subjects exhibited significantly increased FBL than the other 3 groups (P less than .0001).

  11. Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Studies of the Slow Dynamics of Supercooled and Glassy Aspirin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Tyagi, M.; Mamontov, Eugene; Chen, Sow-hsin H

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 K down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent (Q) is independent of the wave vector transfer Q in the measured Q-range, and (ii) the structural relaxation time (Q) follows a power law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time 0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of 0 can be fitted with the mode coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by M. Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function T(Q,t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows a direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement x2 and non-Gaussian parameter 2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  12. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of the slow dynamics of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mamontov, Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-02-01

    Aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), is not only a wonderful drug, but also a good glass former. Therefore, it serves as an important molecular system to study the near-arrest and arrested phenomena. In this paper, a high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique is used to investigate the slow dynamics of supercooled liquid and glassy aspirin from 410 down to 350 K. The measured QENS spectra can be analyzed with a stretched exponential model. We find that (i) the stretched exponent β(Q) is independent of the wavevector transfer Q in the measured Q range and (ii) the structural relaxation time τ(Q) follows a power-law dependence on Q. Consequently, the Q-independent structural relaxation time τ0 can be extracted for each temperature to characterize the slow dynamics of aspirin. The temperature dependence of τ0 can be fitted with the mode-coupling power law, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and a universal equation for fragile glass forming liquids recently proposed by Tokuyama in the measured temperature range. The calculated dynamic response function χT(Q, t) using the experimentally determined self-intermediate scattering function of the hydrogen atoms of aspirin shows direct evidence of the enhanced dynamic fluctuations as the aspirin is increasingly supercooled, in agreement with the fixed-time mean squared displacement langx2rang and the non-Gaussian parameter α2 extracted from the elastic scattering.

  13. Twisted aspirin crystals.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Rohl, Andrew L; Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2013-03-01

    Banded spherulites of aspirin have been crystallized from the melt in the presence of salicylic acid either generated from aspirin decomposition or added deliberately (2.6-35.9 mol %). Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and optical polarimetry show that the spherulites are composed of helicoidal crystallites twisted along the <010> growth directions. Mueller matrix imaging reveals radial oscillations in not only linear birefringence, but also circular birefringence, whose origin is explained through slight (∼1.3°) but systematic splaying of individual lamellae in the film. Strain associated with the replacement of aspirin molecules by salicylic acid molecules in the crystal structure is computed to be large enough to work as the driving force for the twisting of crystallites. PMID:23425247

  14. [Physiopathology of aspirin intolerant asthma].

    PubMed

    Carsin, A; Bienvenu, J; Pacheco, Y; Devouassoux, G

    2012-02-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) refers to the development of bronchoconstriction in individuals with asthma following the ingestion of aspirin. AERD affects up to 20 % of adults with asthma. At present, no reliable in vitro test is available to confirm the diagnosis. The confirmation of the diagnosis of AERD therefore depends on the response to challenge testing with aspirin. The pathogenesis of AERD is linked to abnormalities in arachidonic acid metabolism. Prior to exposure to aspirin, respiratory mucosal inflammation is the result of a cell infiltration, an overproduction of leukotrienes, prostaglandins D2, 5-oxo-eicosatetraenoic acid and an underproduction of lipoxins. After aspirin ingestion, patients with AERD synthesize excessive amounts of cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin metabolites involved in bronchoconstriction. New hypotheses concerning AERD pathogenesis have been added to the initial cyclooxygenase theory. These propose that AERD may be linked to the complement system, adenosine metabolism or angiotensin converting enzyme gene and IgE receptor gene polymorphisms. PMID:22405107

  15. ASA education outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Uwe J.; Everbach, E. Carr

    2003-04-01

    A number of very successful Hands-on demo sessions for high school students have been a part of regular ASA meetings for some time. In addition, the Education Committee has organized a series of teacher workshops. These workshops are designed to give high school teachers relatively sophisticated tools to enhance their laboratory content. Workshops for teachers in the elementary grades prepare teachers to use music as a vehicle to introduce additional science concepts. Content and methods associated with both workshops will be discussed. Cyberspace outreach by the ASA was accelerated by the establishment of a Home Page Committee, and more recently by the On-Line Education committee, which is creating an educational website. The website provides a fun way for users to access information including acoustics information, history, demos, and links to the Technical Committee's webpages. The ASA has joined other AIP member societies in developing additional mechanisms, including road shows and nightly news spots.

  16. Aspirin blocks growth of breast tumor cells and tumor-initiating cells and induces reprogramming factors of mesenchymal to epithelial transition.

    PubMed

    Maity, Gargi; De, Archana; Das, Amlan; Banerjee, Snigdha; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K

    2015-07-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), also known as aspirin, a classic, nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is widely used to relieve minor aches and pains and to reduce fever. Epidemiological studies and other experimental studies suggest that ASA use reduces the risk of different cancers including breast cancer (BC) and may be used as a chemopreventive agent against BC and other cancers. These studies have raised the tempting possibility that ASA could serve as a preventive medicine for BC. However, lack of in-depth knowledge of the mechanism of action of ASA reshapes the debate of risk and benefit of using ASA in prevention of BC. Our studies, using in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft models, show a strong beneficial effect of ASA in the prevention of breast carcinogenesis. We find that ASA not only prevents breast tumor cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in nude mice xenograft model through the induction of apoptosis, but also significantly reduces the self-renewal capacity and growth of breast tumor-initiating cells (BTICs)/breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) and delays the formation of a palpable tumor. Moreover, ASA regulates other pathophysiological events in breast carcinogenesis, such as reprogramming the mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and delaying in vitro migration in BC cells. The tumor growth-inhibitory and reprogramming roles of ASA could be mediated through inhibition of TGF-β/SMAD4 signaling pathway that is associated with growth, motility, invasion, and metastasis in advanced BCs. Collectively, ASA has a therapeutic or preventive potential by attacking possible target such as TGF-β in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:25867761

  17. Effectiveness of combined salmon calcitonin and aspirin therapy for osteoporosis in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    WEI, JINSONG; WANG, JIAN; GONG, YAN; ZENG, RONG

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of combined salmon calcitonin (sCT) and aspirin [acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)] treatment in an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Following 12 weeks of treatment, therapeutic efficacy was assessed by evaluating changes in the biochemical and biophysical properties of bone (n=8 rats per group). Serological markers of bone metabolism were measured by ELISA; bone mineral densities (BMD) by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; bone biomechanics of the femur and lumbar vertebrae by three-point stress test; trabecular bone morphology of lumbar vertebrae by hematoxylin and eosin staining; messenger RNA expression levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) in bone marrow cells by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and OPG and RANKL protein expression levels in the proximal tibia were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Compared with treatment by sCT or ASA alone, combined treatment (sCT+ASA) increased BMD, improved femur bone strength, normalized trabecular network architecture and morphology, and increased mRNA and protein expression of OPG, while reducing the expression of RANKL. Collectively, these results demonstrated that combined treatment (sCT+ASA) of osteoporotic symptoms in OVX rats was more effective than treatment with sCT or ASA alone. Furthermore, these two drugs appeared to alter the expression of two distinct factors in the OPG/RANKL/RANK system, suggesting that their effects may be synergistic. Since sCT and ASA are currently approved for use in humans, the results of the present study suggest that the safety and efficacy of sCT+ASA combined therapy for postmenopausal osteoporosis should be assessed in clinical trials. PMID:25891179

  18. Aspirin: from a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Ugurlucan, Murat; Caglar, Ilker M; Caglar, Fatma N Turhan; Ziyade, Sedat; Karatepe, Oguzhan; Yildiz, Yahya; Zencirci, Ertugrul; Ugurlucan, Funda Gungor; Arslan, Ahmet H; Korkmaz, Semra; Filizcan, Ugur; Cicek, Sertac

    2012-04-01

    Aspirin is one of the oldest medicines. Due to its wide range usage in different fields of medicine, we aimed to present the history, effects and different uses of aspirin in this review. Furthermore, recent patents of novel pharmaceutical interventions in the field of acetylsalicylic acid, expanding treatment options are presented. Literature search was performed in order to reach data and present information about aspirin from a historical perspective. Since its first use as a pain killer, aspirin has found a broad range of use in general medicine, cardiovascular medicine, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology, dentistry, gastroenterology, oncology with its different effects. Aspirin, a painkilling gift of history to mankind, with a history dating back to BC and various healing effects, promises to be of greater use in different fields of medicine with the light of recent studies, inspiring more research and gaining more popularity. PMID:22257089

  19. Use of aspirin associates with longer primary patency of hemodialysis grafts.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Bradley S; Beck, Gerald J; Dember, Laura M; Vazquez, Miguel A; Greenberg, Arthur; Delmez, James A; Allon, Michael; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Hu, Bo; Greene, Tom; Radeva, Milena K; Davidson, Ingemar J; Ikizler, T Alp; Braden, Gregory L; Lawson, Jeffrey H; Cotton, James R; Kusek, John W; Feldman, Harold I

    2011-04-01

    Extended-release dipyridamole plus low-dose aspirin (ERDP/ASA) prolongs primary unassisted graft patency of newly created hemodialysis arteriovenous grafts, but the individual contributions of each component are unknown. Here, we analyzed whether use of aspirin at baseline associated with primary unassisted graft patency among participants in a randomized trial that compared ERDP/ASA and placebo in newly created grafts. We used Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for prespecified baseline comorbidities and covariates. Of all participants, 43% reported use of aspirin at baseline; of these, 82% remained on nonstudy aspirin (i.e., excluding ERDP/ASA) at 1 year. After 1 year of follow-up, the incidence of primary unassisted patency among participants using aspirin at baseline was 30% (95% CI: 24 to 35%) and among those not using aspirin was 23% (95% CI: 18 to 27%). Use of aspirin at baseline associated with a dose-dependent prolongation of primary unassisted graft patency that approached statistical significance (adjusted HR, 0.83; 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.01; P=0.06). Use of aspirin at baseline did not associate with prolongation of cumulative graft patency or participant survival. In conclusion, use of aspirin associates with a trend toward longer primary unassisted patency of newly placed hemodialysis grafts similar to that observed for ERDP/ASA. PMID:21415156

  20. Use of Aspirin Associates with Longer Primary Patency of Hemodialysis Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Gerald J.; Dember, Laura M.; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Greenberg, Arthur; Delmez, James A.; Allon, Michael; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Hu, Bo; Greene, Tom; Radeva, Milena K.; Davidson, Ingemar J.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Braden, Gregory L.; Lawson, Jeffrey H.; Cotton, James R.; Kusek, John W.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2011-01-01

    Extended-release dipyridamole plus low-dose aspirin (ERDP/ASA) prolongs primary unassisted graft patency of newly created hemodialysis arteriovenous grafts, but the individual contributions of each component are unknown. Here, we analyzed whether use of aspirin at baseline associated with primary unassisted graft patency among participants in a randomized trial that compared ERDP/ASA and placebo in newly created grafts. We used Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for prespecified baseline comorbidities and covariates. Of all participants, 43% reported use of aspirin at baseline; of these, 82% remained on nonstudy aspirin (i.e., excluding ERDP/ASA) at 1 year. After 1 year of follow-up, the incidence of primary unassisted patency among participants using aspirin at baseline was 30% (95% CI: 24 to 35%) and among those not using aspirin was 23% (95% CI: 18 to 27%). Use of aspirin at baseline associated with a dose-dependent prolongation of primary unassisted graft patency that approached statistical significance (adjusted HR, 0.83; 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.01; P = 0.06). Use of aspirin at baseline did not associate with prolongation of cumulative graft patency or participant survival. In conclusion, use of aspirin associates with a trend toward longer primary unassisted patency of newly placed hemodialysis grafts similar to that observed for ERDP/ASA. PMID:21415156

  1. Aspirin triggers previously undescribed bioactive eicosanoids by human endothelial cell-leukocyte interactions.

    PubMed

    Clària, J; Serhan, C N

    1995-10-10

    Aspirin [acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)], along with its analgesic-antipyretic uses, is now also being considered for cardiovascular protection and treatments in cancer and human immunodeficiency virus infection. Although many of ASA's pharmacological actions are related to its ability to inhibit prostaglandin and thromboxane biosynthesis, some of its beneficial therapeutic effects are not completely understood. Here, ASA triggered transcellular biosynthesis of a previously unrecognized class of eicosanoids during coincubations of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and neutrophils [polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN)]. These eicosanoids were generated with ASA but not by indomethacin, salicylate, or dexamethasone. Formation was enhanced by cytokines (interleukin 1 beta) that induced the appearance of prostaglandin G/H synthase 2 (PGHS-2) but not 15-lipoxygenase, which initiates their biosynthesis from arachidonic acid in HUVEC. Costimulation of HUVEC/PMN by either thrombin plus the chemotactic peptide fMet-Leu-Phe or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or ionophore A23187 leads to the production of these eicosanoids from endogenous sources. Four of these eicosanoids were also produced when PMN were exposed to 15R-HETE [(15R)-15-hydroxy-5,8,11-cis-13-trans-eicosatetraenoic acid] and an agonist. Physical methods showed that the class consists of four tetraene-containing products from arachidonic acid that proved to be 15R-epimers of lipoxins. Two of these compounds (III and IV) were potent inhibitors of leukotriene B4-mediated PMN adhesion to HUVEC, with compound IV [(5S,6R,15R)-5,6,15-trihydroxy-7,9,13-trans-11-cis-eicosatetraenoi c acid; 15-epilipoxin A4] active in the nanomolar range. These results demonstrate that ASA evokes a unique class of eicosanoids formed by acetylated PGHS-2 and 5-lipoxygenase interactions, which may contribute to the therapeutic impact of this drug. Moreover, they provide an example of a drug's ability to pirate endogenous biosynthetic

  2. [Pharmacokinetics after oral and intravenous administration of d,l-monolysine acetylsalicylate and an oral dose of acetylsalicylic acid in healthy volunteers].

    PubMed

    Raschka, C; Koch, H J

    2001-01-01

    We studied the ASA pharmacokinetics of single doses of 500 mg and 1000 mg of D,L-lysine-monoacetylsalicylate (Lys-ASA) administered both orally (Delgesic) and 500 mg parenterally (Aspisol) as well as 500 mg acetylsalicylate (ASA, Aspirin) in 13 healthy volunteers. Blood samples were taken before and at defined times up to 48 h after application of Lys-ASA and ASA. Analysis for ASA and its metabolite salicylic acid were performed by HPLC. All concentration versus time data were presented descriptively. As far as ASA was concerned, differences were assessed by means of ANOVA according to Friedman including post hoc Wilcoxon tests for each time point. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated based on a one-compartment model. The concentration vs. time curves after oral intake of 500 mg of ASA and Lys-ASA differed significantly (p < 0.001). Peak serum ASA concentrations (Cmax) were 6.8 mg/l for oral Lys-ASA and 2.7 mg/l for ASA per os. The corresponding tmax-values were 14.2 and 38.0 min. Absolute bioavailabilities for 500 mg doses were 75.4 and 63.4 pour cent, respectively. After intake of 100 mg and 1000 mg oral doses of Lys-ASA Cmax was 2.7 mg/l and 15.9 mg/l, tmax being 14.2 min for the 1000 mg dose. The shortest half-life was found after i.v. injection with 7.5 min. Metabolism was fast with maximum rise of salicylic acid concentration after injection of Lys-ASS. We conclude that concerning time dimension oral administration of Lys-ASA is almost equivalent to i.v. Lys-ASA and may be an alternative for i.v. administration in cases of acute heart attacks. PMID:11878089

  3. Salicylate pre-treatment attenuates intensity of bronchial and nasal symptoms precipitated by aspirin in aspirin-intolerant patients.

    PubMed

    Nizankowska, E; Dworski, R; Soja, J; Szczeklik, A

    1990-11-01

    Aspirin (ASA) and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which are cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, precipitate asthmatic attacks in ASA-intolerant patients, while sodium salicylate, hardly active on COX by itself, is well tolerated by these patients. However, salicylate moiety appears to interfere with aspirin inhibitory action on platelets and vascular COX. Such interaction, if present at the level of respiratory tract, may be of interest to pathogenesis of ASA-induced asthma. We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized cross-over study on the effect of choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT, trilisate) pre-treatment on ASA-induced adverse reactions in nine patients. Pulmonary function tests, nasal symptoms score, PNIF and serum salicylate levels were monitored following challenges with threshold doses of ASA. Trilisate administered at a dose of 3000 mg daily for 3 days, offered a moderate protection against ASA-induced symptoms; it diminished the severity and/or delayed the appearance of FEV1 fall. Maximal decreases in FEV1 as well as reaction intensity indexes were significantly lower (P less than 0.02 and P less than 0.002, respectively) after trilisate pre-treatment as compared to placebo. Trilisate also attenuated nasal symptoms in three out of five patients. Although the precise mechanism of the protective action of trilisate is unknown, our data support the possibility of interaction between salicylate and ASA on cyclo-oxygenase locus in the respiratory tract in ASA-intolerant patients. PMID:2083404

  4. A metabolomics strategy to explore urinary biomarkers and metabolic pathways for assessment of interaction between Danhong injection and low-dose aspirin during their synergistic treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianping; Guo, Jianming; Shang, Erxin; Zhu, Zhenhua; Zhu, Kevin Yue; Li, Shujiao; Zhao, Buchang; Jia, Lifu; Zhao, Jing; Tang, Zhishu; Duan, Jinao

    2016-07-15

    The drug combination of Danhong injection (DHI) and low-dose aspirin (ASA) was frequently applied for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Due to the drug interactions, a lot of potential benefits and risks might exist side by side in the course of combination therapy. However, there had been no studies of interaction between DHI and ASA. Metabolomics was a powerful tool to explore endogenous biomarkers and metabolic pathways. In present study, metabolic profiling with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF/MS) coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was performed to provide insight into understanding the interaction between DHI and low-dose ASA. Eleven potential biomarkers of three types were identified and seven metabolic pathways were constructed. The results showed that the interaction between DHI and low-dose ASA during synergistic treatment indeed affected some key endogenous biomarkers and metabolic pathways, which could not happen when DHI or low-dose ASA was used alone. The quality and quantity of endogenous metabolite were both influenced by interaction between DHI and low-dose ASA. In details, the amount of flavin mononucleotide, L-2, 4-diaminobutyric acid (DABA) and 4-aminohippuric acid were significantly increased. On the contrary, the amount of 3-methyluridine, 4, 6-dihydroxyquinoline, cortolone-3-glucuronide, and serotonin were significantly decreased. Furthermore, O-phosphotyrosine, 3-methyl-2-butenal, indoxyl sulfate and dolichyl diphosphate were disappeared in urine. As to metabolic pathways, riboflavin metabolism, pentose and glucuronate interconversions, and tryptophan metabolism were all significantly influenced. The emerging alterations of biomarkers and metabolic pathways were associated with a lot of drugs and diseases based on literature researches, which might influence the co-administration of other drugs or the treatments of relevant

  5. Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandor, Barbara; Varga, Adam; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Andras; Papp, Judit; Toth, Kalman; Szakaly, Peter

    2014-05-01

    International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low ( i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p < 0.002). Morbidity analysis demonstrated significantly higher incidence of myocardial infarction, hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the RT group (p < 0.05). The subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher incidence of infarction and stroke in the ASA resistant RT group compared to the RT patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the incidence of myocardial infarction and hypertension was significantly higher in the non-resistant RT group than in the group of PC patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). These results may suggest that the elevated rate of aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

  6. ASA24-Kids-2014 and ASA24-Kids-2012

    Cancer.gov

    >ASA24-Kids-2014 was released in February 2014 and researchers can still register new studies in this version of the ASA24® system. A mobile accessible version is in development and is expected to be open to new studies later in 2016.

  7. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its major metabolite, salicylic acid, in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: application to pharmacokinetic study of Astrix in Korean healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Kyung; Seo, Kyung Ah; Jung, Eun Ji; Kim, Ho-Sook; Yeo, Chang-Woo; Shon, Ji-Hong; Park, Kyung-Mi; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Shin, Jae-Gook

    2008-06-01

    The first liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for determination of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) and one of its major metabolites, salicylic acid (SA), in human plasma using simvastatin as an internal standard has been developed and validated. For ASA analysis, a plasma sample containing potassium fluoride was extracted using a mixture of ethyl acetate and diethyl ether in the presence of 0.5% formic acid. SA, a major metabolite of ASA, was extracted from plasma using protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The compounds were separated on a reversed-phase column with an isocratic mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and water containing 0.1% formic acid (8:2, v/v). The ion transitions recorded in multiple reaction monitoring mode were m/z 179 --> 137, 137 --> 93 and 435 --> 319 for ASA, SA and IS, respectively. The coefficient of variation of the assay precision was less than 9.3%, and the accuracy exceeded 86.5%. The lower limits of quantification for ASA and SA were 5 and 50 ng/mL, respectively. The developed assay method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of ASA and SA after single oral administration of Astrix (entero-coated pellet, 100 mg of aspirin) to 10 Korean healthy male volunteers. PMID:18254152

  8. Canadian Drug Products Containing ASA

    PubMed Central

    Parker, William A.; Shearer, Cameron A.; Kirkpatrick, Susan L.

    1977-01-01

    A list of nearly 200 Canadian ASA-containing drug products is presented. Information was supplied by the major pharmaceutical companies and data were also obtained from various Canadian reference sources. This information should aid the physician and other health-related personnel in identifying ASA-containing products and counselling the salicylate-endangered patient. PMID:21304856

  9. Increases in ambient particulate matter air pollution, acute changes in platelet function, and effect modification by aspirin and omega-3 fatty acids: A panel study.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Adan Z; Georas, Steve; Brenna, J Thomas; Hopke, Philip K; Kane, Cathleen; Chalupa, David; Frampton, Mark W; Block, Robert; Rich, David Q

    2016-01-01

    Increased particulate matter (PM) air pollutant concentrations have been associated with platelet activation. It was postulated that elevated air pollutant concentrations would be associated with increases in measures of platelet function and that responses would be blunted when taking aspirin and/or fish oil. Data from a sequential therapy trial (30 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus), with 4 clinic visits (first: no supplements, second: aspirin, third: omega-3 fatty acid supplements, fourth: aspirin and omega-3 fatty acids) per subject, were utilized. Using linear mixed models, adjusted for relative humidity, temperature, visit number, and season, changes in three platelet function measures including (1) aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP), (2) aggregation induced by collagen, and (3) thromboxane B2 production were associated with interquartile range (IQR) increases in mean concentrations of ambient PM2.5, black carbon, ultrafine particles (UFP; 10-100 nm), and accumulation mode particles (AMP; 100-500 nm) in the previous 1-96 h. IQR increases in mean UFP and AMP concentrations were associated with significant decreases in platelet response, with the largest being a -0.43 log(pg/ml) decrease in log(thromboxane B2) (95% CI = -0.8, -0.1) associated with each 582-particles/cm(3) increase in AMP, and a -1.7 ohm reduction in collagen-induced aggregation (95% CI = -3.1, -0.3) associated with each 2097-particles/cm(3) increase in UFP in the previous 72 h. This UFP effect on thromboxane B2 was significantly muted in diabetic subjects taking aspirin (-0.01 log[pg/ml]; 95% CI = -0.4, 0.3). The reason for this finding remains unknown, and needs to be investigated in future studies. PMID:27029326

  10. Aspirin-triggered metabolites of EFAs.

    PubMed

    Makriyannis, Alexandros; Nikas, Spyros P

    2011-10-28

    Aspirin triggers the biosynthesis of oxygenated metabolites from arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. In a preceding issue, Serhan et al. (2011) describe a novel aspirin-triggered DHA pathway for the biosynthesis of a potent anti-inflammatory and proresolving molecule. PMID:22035788

  11. Exhaled Eicosanoids following Bronchial Aspirin Challenge in Asthma Patients with and without Aspirin Hypersensitivity: The Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mastalerz, L.; Sanak, M.; Kumik, J.; Gawlewicz-Mroczka, A.; Celejewska-Wójcik, N.; Ćmiel, A.; Szczeklik, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Special regulatory role of eicosanoids has been postulated in aspirin-induced asthma. Objective. To investigate effects of aspirin on exhaled breath condensate (EBC) levels of eicosanoids in patients with asthma. Methods. We determined EBC eicosanoid concentrations using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS2) or both. Determinations were performed at baseline and following bronchial aspirin challenge, in two well-defined phenotypes of asthma: aspirin-sensitive and aspirin-tolerant patients. Results. Aspirin precipitated bronchial reactions in all aspirin-sensitive, but in none of aspirin-tolerant patients (ATAs). At baseline, eicosanoids profile did not differ between both asthma groups except for lipoxygenation products: 5- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-, 15-HETE) which were higher in aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) than inaspirin-tolerant subjects. Following aspirin challenge the total levels of cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs) remained unchanged in both groups. The dose of aspirin had an effect on magnitude of the response of the exhaled cys-LTs and prostanoids levels only in AIA subjects. Conclusion. The high baseline eicosanoid profiling of lipoxygenation products 5- and 15-HETE in EBC makes it possible to detect alterations in aspirin-sensitive asthma. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes, and eoxins levels in EBC after bronchial aspirin administration in stable asthma patients cannot be used as a reliable diagnostic index for aspirin hypersensitivity. PMID:22291720

  12. Low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylate) prevents increases in brain PGE2, 15-epi-lipoxin A4 and 8-isoprostane concentrations in 9 month-old HIV-1 transgenic rats, a model for HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Helene C.; Taha, Ameer Y.; Rapoport, Stanley I; Yuan, Zhi-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background Older human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transgenic rats are a model for HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). They show behavioral changes, neuroinflammation, neuronal loss, and increased brain arachidonic acid (AA) enzymes. Aspirin (acetylsalicylate, ASA) inhibits AA oxidation by cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2. Hypothesis Chronic low-dose ASA will downregulate brain AA metabolism in HIV-1 transgenic rats. Methods Nine month-old HIV-1 transgenic and wildtype rats were given 42 days of 10 mg/kg/day ASA or nothing in drinking water; eicosanoids were measured using ELISAs on microwaved brain extracts. Results Brain 15-epi-lipoxin A4 and 8-isoprostane concentrations were significantly higher in HIV-1 transgenic than wildtype rats; these differences were prevented by ASA. ASA reduced prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 concentrations in HIV-1 Tg but not wildtype rats. Thromboxane B2, 15-HETE, lipoxin A4 and resolvin D1 concentrations were unaffected by genotype or treatment. Conclusion Chronic low-dose ASA reduces AA-metabolite markers of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in a rat model for HAND. PMID:25638779

  13. Addition of aspirin to a fish oil-rich diet decreases inflammation and atherosclerosis in ApoE-null mice.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Alexander V; Yang, Zhi-Hong; Vaisman, Boris L; Thacker, Seth; Yu, Zu-Xi; Sampson, Maureen; Serhan, Charles N; Remaley, Alan T

    2016-09-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is known to alter the production of potent inflammatory lipid mediators, but whether it interacts with omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) from fish oil to affect atherosclerosis has not been determined. The goal was to investigate the impact of a fish oil-enriched diet alone and in combination with ASA on the production of lipid mediators and atherosclerosis. ApoE(-/-) female mice were fed for 13weeks one of the four following diets: omega-3 FA deficient (OD), omega-3 FA rich (OR) (1.8g omega-3 FAs/kg·diet per day), omega-3 FA rich plus ASA (ORA) (0.1g ASA/kg·diet per day) or an omega-3 FA deficient plus ASA (ODA) with supplement levels equivalent to human doses. Plasma lipids, atherosclerosis, markers of inflammation, hepatic gene expression and aortic lipid mediators were determined. Hepatic omega-3 FAs were markedly higher in OR (9.9-fold) and ORA (7-fold) groups. Mice in both OR and ORA groups had 40% less plasma cholesterol in very low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein fractions, but aortic plaque area formation was only significantly lower in the ORA group (5.5%) compared to the OD group (2.5%). Plasma PCSK9 protein levels were approximately 70% lower in the OR and ORA groups. Proinflammatory aortic lipid mediators were 50%-70% lower in the ODA group than in the OD group and more than 50% lower in the ORA group. In summary, less aortic plaque lesions and aortic proinflammatory lipid mediators were observed in mice on the fish oil diet plus ASA vs. just the fish oil diet. PMID:27394692

  14. (Nitrooxyacyloxy)methyl esters of aspirin as novel nitric oxide releasing aspirins.

    PubMed

    Lazzarato, Loretta; Donnola, Monica; Rolando, Barbara; Chegaev, Konstantin; Marini, Elisabetta; Cena, Clara; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Biondi, Stefano; Ongini, Ennio; Gasco, Alberto

    2009-08-27

    A series of (nitrooxyacyloxy)methyl esters of aspirin were synthesized and evaluated as new NO-donor aspirins. Different amounts of aspirin were released in serum from these products according to the nature of nitrooxyacyloxy moiety present. In the aromatic series, there is a rather good linear correlation between the amount of aspirin released and the potencies of the products in inhibiting platelet aggregation induced by collagen. Both the native compounds and the related nitrooxy-substituted acid metabolites were able to relax rat aorta strips precontracted with phenylephrine, in keeping with a NO-induced activation of the sGC as a mechanism that underlies the vasodilator effect. The products here described are new improved examples of NO-donor aspirins containing nitrooxy groups. They could represent an alternative to the use of aspirin in a variety of clinical applications. PMID:20560642

  15. Pharmacokinetics in Wistar Rats of 5-[(4-Carboxybutanoyl)Amino]-2-Hydroxybenzoic Acid: A Novel Synthetic Derivative of 5-Aminosalicylic Acid (5-ASA) with Possible Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Romero-Castro, Aurelio; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Mara; Correa-Basurto, José; Rosales Hernández, Martha Cecilia; Padilla Martínez, Itzia Irene; Mendieta-Wejebe, Jessica Elena

    2016-01-01

    5-[(4-carboxybutanoyl)amino]-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (C2) is a novel synthetic derivative of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), which is currently being evaluated ex vivo as an anti-inflammatory agent and has shown satisfactory results. This study aimed to obtain the pharmacokinetic profiles, tissue distribution and plasma protein binding of C2 in Wistar Rats. Additionally, an HPLC method was developed and validated to quantify C2 in rat plasma. The pharmacokinetic profiles of intragastric, intravenous and intraperitoneal administration routes at singles doses of 100, 50, and 100 mg/kg, respectively, were studied in Wistar rats. The elimination half-life of intravenously administered C2 was approximately 33 min. The maximum plasma level of C2 was reached approximately 24 min after intragastric administration, with a Cmax value of 2.5 g/mL and an AUCtot value of 157 μg min-1/mL; the oral bioavailability was approximately 13%. Following a single intragastric or oral dose (100 mg/kg), C2 was distributed and detected in all examined tissues (including the brain and colon). The results showed that C2 accumulates over time. The plasma protein binding results indicated that the unbound fraction of C2 at concentrations of 1 to 20 μg/mL ranged from 89.8% to 92.5%, meaning that this fraction of C2 is available to cross tissues. Finally, the blood-plasma partitioning (BP ratio) of C2 in rat plasma was 0.71 and 0.6 at concentrations of 5 and 10 μg/mL, respectively, which indicates that C2 is free in the plasmatic phase and not inside blood cells. The results of this study suggest that a fraction of the administered C2 dose is absorbed in the stomach, and the fraction that is not absorbed reaches the small intestine and colon. This distribution constitutes the main advantage of C2 compared with 5-ASA for the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). PMID:27454774

  16. Pharmacokinetics in Wistar Rats of 5-[(4-Carboxybutanoyl)Amino]-2-Hydroxybenzoic Acid: A Novel Synthetic Derivative of 5-Aminosalicylic Acid (5-ASA) with Possible Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Basurto, José; Rosales Hernández, Martha Cecilia; Padilla Martínez, Itzia Irene; Mendieta-Wejebe, Jessica Elena

    2016-01-01

    5-[(4-carboxybutanoyl)amino]-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (C2) is a novel synthetic derivative of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), which is currently being evaluated ex vivo as an anti-inflammatory agent and has shown satisfactory results. This study aimed to obtain the pharmacokinetic profiles, tissue distribution and plasma protein binding of C2 in Wistar Rats. Additionally, an HPLC method was developed and validated to quantify C2 in rat plasma. The pharmacokinetic profiles of intragastric, intravenous and intraperitoneal administration routes at singles doses of 100, 50, and 100 mg/kg, respectively, were studied in Wistar rats. The elimination half-life of intravenously administered C2 was approximately 33 min. The maximum plasma level of C2 was reached approximately 24 min after intragastric administration, with a Cmax value of 2.5 g/mL and an AUCtot value of 157 μg min-1/mL; the oral bioavailability was approximately 13%. Following a single intragastric or oral dose (100 mg/kg), C2 was distributed and detected in all examined tissues (including the brain and colon). The results showed that C2 accumulates over time. The plasma protein binding results indicated that the unbound fraction of C2 at concentrations of 1 to 20 μg/mL ranged from 89.8% to 92.5%, meaning that this fraction of C2 is available to cross tissues. Finally, the blood-plasma partitioning (BP ratio) of C2 in rat plasma was 0.71 and 0.6 at concentrations of 5 and 10 μg/mL, respectively, which indicates that C2 is free in the plasmatic phase and not inside blood cells. The results of this study suggest that a fraction of the administered C2 dose is absorbed in the stomach, and the fraction that is not absorbed reaches the small intestine and colon. This distribution constitutes the main advantage of C2 compared with 5-ASA for the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). PMID:27454774

  17. Aspirin and colorectal cancer: the promise of precision chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Drew, David A; Cao, Yin; Chan, Andrew T

    2016-03-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) has become one of the most commonly used drugs, given its role as an analgesic, antipyretic and agent for cardiovascular prophylaxis. Several decades of research have provided considerable evidence demonstrating its potential for the prevention of cancer, particularly colorectal cancer. Broader clinical recommendations for aspirin-based chemoprevention strategies have recently been established; however, given the known hazards of long-term aspirin use, larger-scale adoption of an aspirin chemoprevention strategy is likely to require improved identification of individuals for whom the protective benefits outweigh the harms. Such a precision medicine approach may emerge through further clarification of aspirin's mechanism of action. PMID:26868177

  18. The epigenetic effects of aspirin: the modification of histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation in the prevention of colon carcinogenesis in azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate sodium-treated CF-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yue; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Chengyue; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Li, Wenji; Huang, Mou-Tuan; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide. Chronic inflammation appears to enhance the risk of CRC. Emerging evidence has suggested that epigenetic mechanisms play an important role in CRC. Aspirin [acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)] has been shown to prevent CRC; however, the epigenetic mechanisms of its action remain unknown. This study investigated the protective role of ASA in azoxymethane (AOM)-initiated and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-promoted colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) and examined the epigenetic effects, particularly on histone 3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27ac), underlying the preventive effect of ASA. CF-1 mice were fed with AIN-93M diet with or without 0.02% ASA from 1 week prior to AOM initiation until the mice were killed 20 weeks after AOM injection. Our results showed that AOM/DSS + ASA significantly suppressed inflammatory colitis symptoms and tumor multiplicity. AOM/DSS + ASA reduced AOM/DSS-induced protein expression and the activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and globally restored H3K27ac. Furthermore, AOM/DSS + ASA inhibited AOM/DSS-induced enrichment of H3K27ac in the promoters of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) that corresponded to the dramatic suppression of the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels. Surprisingly, no significant changes in the H3K27ac abundance in the prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (Cox-2) promoters or in the Cox-2 mRNA and protein expression were observed. Collectively, our results suggest that a potential novel epigenetic mechanism underlies the chemopreventive effects of ASA, and this mechanism attenuates CAC in AOM/DSS-induced CF-1 mice via the inhibition of HDACs and the modification of H3K27ac marks that suppress iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6. PMID:27207670

  19. Aspirin in dermatology: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Bubna, Aditya Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been one of the oldest drugs in the field of medicine, with a wide range of applications. In dermatology, aspirin has shown benefit in a variety of disorders. Recently, reduction of melanoma risk with aspirin has been demonstrated. Although an analgesic to begin with, aspirin has come a long way; after cardiology, it is now found to be useful even in dermatology. PMID:26753146

  20. Relationship between high on aspirin platelet reactivity and oxidative stress in coronary artery by-pass grafted patients.

    PubMed

    Kuliczkowski, Wiktor; Golanski, Ryszard; Bijak, Michal; Boryczka, Katarzyna; Kaczmarski, Jacek; Watala, Cezary; Golanski, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the responsiveness of blood platelets to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in patients following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery with relation to oxidative and antioxidative plasma status. The study included 37 patients treated with the CABG procedure. During the first 24 h after CABG patients were given 300 mg of ASA with the following dose of 150 mg daily. The blood was collected before the procedure and 10 days after. Whole blood platelet aggregation induced with arachidonic acid, collagen and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was performed together with whole blood generation of thromboxane B2 (TxB2). Oxidative stress was measured before and 10 days after CABG with total oxidative plasma status (TOS) and total antioxidative status of the plasma (TAS). TOS/TAS index was calculated. We observed a significant increase in the TOS and TOS/TAS index and ADP-induced aggregation 10 days after CABG in comparison with its level before operation. There was a significant decrease in the arachidonic acid-induced aggregation and serum TxB2 level. Patients with ADP-induced and collagen-induced aggregation in the upper quartile had significantly higher TOS and TOS/TAS index before (ADP) and after the operation (ADP and collagen). There were 19 patients (51%) with high on aspirin platelet reactivity after CABG who had also higher TOS and TOS/TAS index and lower TAS value in comparison with aspirin responders. Despite ASA use, increased oxidative stress after CABG can overcome its antiplatelet effect and increase platelet activation through other pathways. PMID:26523914

  1. Proteome-wide prediction of targets for aspirin: new insight into the molecular mechanism of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Besides its anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic properties, aspirin is used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and various types of cancer. The multiple activities of aspirin likely involve several molecular targets and pathways rather than a single target. Therefore, systematic identification of these targets of aspirin can help us understand the underlying mechanisms of the activities. In this study, we identified 23 putative targets of aspirin in the human proteome by using binding pocket similarity detecting tool combination with molecular docking, free energy calculation and pathway analysis. These targets have diverse folds and are derived from different protein family. However, they have similar aspirin-binding pockets. The binding free energy with aspirin for newly identified targets is comparable to that for the primary targets. Pathway analysis revealed that the targets were enriched in several pathways such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, Fc epsilon RI signaling and arachidonic acid metabolism, which are strongly involved in inflammation, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Therefore, the predicted target profile of aspirin suggests a new explanation for the disease prevention ability of aspirin. Our findings provide a new insight of aspirin and its efficacy of disease prevention in a systematic and global view. PMID:26989626

  2. Proteome-wide prediction of targets for aspirin: new insight into the molecular mechanism of aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Besides its anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic properties, aspirin is used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and various types of cancer. The multiple activities of aspirin likely involve several molecular targets and pathways rather than a single target. Therefore, systematic identification of these targets of aspirin can help us understand the underlying mechanisms of the activities. In this study, we identified 23 putative targets of aspirin in the human proteome by using binding pocket similarity detecting tool combination with molecular docking, free energy calculation and pathway analysis. These targets have diverse folds and are derived from different protein family. However, they have similar aspirin-binding pockets. The binding free energy with aspirin for newly identified targets is comparable to that for the primary targets. Pathway analysis revealed that the targets were enriched in several pathways such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, Fc epsilon RI signaling and arachidonic acid metabolism, which are strongly involved in inflammation, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Therefore, the predicted target profile of aspirin suggests a new explanation for the disease prevention ability of aspirin. Our findings provide a new insight of aspirin and its efficacy of disease prevention in a systematic and global view. PMID:26989626

  3. A General Chemistry Laboratory Theme: Spectroscopic Analysis of Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Houston; O'Donnell, Stephen E.

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the introduction of spectroscopy into the general chemistry laboratory using a series of experiments based on a common substance, aspirin. In the first lab the students synthesize and recrystallize aspirin and take melting points of their product, an aspirin standard, and salicylic acid. The students perform the remaining experiments on a rotating basis where the following four labs run simultaneously: structural characterization of the synthesized aspirin by IR and NMR; analysis of synthesized aspirin and commercial products by UV vis spectroscopy; analysis of synthesized aspirin and commercial products by HPLC; and analysis of calcium in commercial buffered aspirin tablets by AAS. In each of the analysis experiments, students collect, graph, and analyze their data using a spreadsheet. We have found that this series of labs has been very beneficial to our students. From the course evaluations, students indicate that they are beginning to understand how chemistry is applied outside of the classroom.

  4. Study design of ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE): a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective strategies to maintain healthy active lifestyle in aging populations are required to address the global burden of age-related diseases. ASPREE will examine whether the potential primary prevention benefits of low dose aspirin outweigh the risks in older healthy individuals. Our primary hypothesis is that daily oral 100 mg enteric-coated aspirin will extend a composite primary endpoint termed ‘disability-free life’ including onset of dementia, total mortality, or persistent disability in at least one of the Katz Activities of Daily Living in 19,000 healthy participants aged 65 years and above (‘US minorities’) and 70 years and above (non ‘US minorities’). ASPREE is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of oral 100 mg enteric-coated acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) or matching placebo being conducted in Australian and US community settings on individuals free of dementia, disability and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Secondary endpoints are all-cause and cause specific mortality, fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events, fatal and non-fatal cancer (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer), dementia, mild cognitive impairment, depression, physical disability, and clinically significant bleeding. To 20 September 2013 14383 participants have been recruited. Recruitment and study completion is anticipated in July 2014 and December 2018 respectively. In contrast to other aspirin trials that have largely focused on cardiovascular endpoints, ASPREE has a unique composite primary endpoint to better capture the overall risk and benefit of aspirin to extend healthy independent lifespan in older adults in the US and Australia. PMID:24113028

  5. Study design of ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE): a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    Cost-effective strategies to maintain healthy active lifestyle in aging populations are required to address the global burden of age-related diseases. ASPREE will examine whether the potential primary prevention benefits of low dose aspirin outweigh the risks in older healthy individuals. Our primary hypothesis is that daily oral 100 mg enteric-coated aspirin will extend a composite primary endpoint termed 'disability-free life' including onset of dementia, total mortality, or persistent disability in at least one of the Katz Activities of Daily Living in 19,000 healthy participants aged 65 years and above ('US minorities') and 70 years and above (non-'US minorities'). ASPREE is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of oral 100mg enteric-coated acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) or matching placebo being conducted in Australian and US community settings on individuals free of dementia, disability and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Secondary endpoints are all-cause and cause specific mortality, fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events, fatal and non-fatal cancer (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer), dementia, mild cognitive impairment, depression, physical disability, and clinically significant bleeding. To 20 September 2013 14,383 participants have been recruited. Recruitment and study completion are anticipated in July 2014 and December 2018 respectively. In contrast to other aspirin trials that have largely focused on cardiovascular endpoints, ASPREE has a unique composite primary endpoint to better capture the overall risk and benefit of aspirin to extend healthy independent lifespan in older adults in the US and Australia. PMID:24113028

  6. Network reconstruction of platelet metabolism identifies metabolic signature for aspirin resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Alex; Rahmanian, Sorena; Bordbar, Aarash; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Jamshidi, Neema

    2014-01-01

    Recently there has not been a systematic, objective assessment of the metabolic capabilities of the human platelet. A manually curated, functionally tested, and validated biochemical reaction network of platelet metabolism, iAT-PLT-636, was reconstructed using 33 proteomic datasets and 354 literature references. The network contains enzymes mapping to 403 diseases and 231 FDA approved drugs, alluding to an expansive scope of biochemical transformations that may affect or be affected by disease processes in multiple organ systems. The effect of aspirin (ASA) resistance on platelet metabolism was evaluated using constraint-based modeling, which revealed a redirection of glycolytic, fatty acid, and nucleotide metabolism reaction fluxes in order to accommodate eicosanoid synthesis and reactive oxygen species stress. These results were confirmed with independent proteomic data. The construction and availability of iAT-PLT-636 should stimulate further data-driven, systems analysis of platelet metabolism towards the understanding of pathophysiological conditions including, but not strictly limited to, coagulopathies.

  7. Plasma levels of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid after oral ingestion of plain and buffered acetylsalicylic acid in relation to bleeding time and thrombocyte function.

    PubMed

    Proost, J H; Van Imhoff, G W; Wesseling, H

    1983-02-25

    Buffered acetylsalicylic acid (Alka Seltzer, B-ASA) and plain aspirin (P-ASA) tablets were compared as to their effects on bleeding time and platelet function in eight healthy male volunteers. Two doses (500 and 1000 mg) of each preparation were investigated in a cross-over design, each volunteer being his own control in each dose group (n=4). Both preparations disturbed platelet aggregation to the same extent. Bleeding time increased after both preparations, though significantly more after the buffered preparation than after plain acetylsalicylic acid, irrespective of the dosage. The 1000 mg dose prolonged bleeding time significantly more than the 500 mg dose, irrespective of the preparation. Kinetic analysis showed that B-ASA gave higher peak plasma levels of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and accordingly salicylic acid peak levels were also higher after the buffered preparation. It is concluded that B-ASA in equi-analgesic doses prolongs bleeding time more than the plain preparation. Since it is less agressive on the gastro-intestinal mucosa, its use may be advantageous in situations where acetylsalicylic acid induced loss of platelet aggregation is desired. However, the risk of prolonged bleeding--e.g. after tooth extractions--is probably higher after the buffered preparation. PMID:6844122

  8. Novel Resveratrol-Based Aspirin Prodrugs: Synthesis, Metabolism, and Anticancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingdong; Fu, Junsheng; Shurlknight, Kelly L; Soroka, Dominique N; Hu, Yuhui; Chen, Xiaoxin; Sang, Shengmin

    2015-08-27

    Regular aspirin use has been convincingly shown to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. However, long-term use of aspirin leads to gastrotoxicity. Herein, we designed and synthesized a novel class of resveratrol-based aspirin prodrugs to simultaneously release aspirin and resveratrol to attenuate the side effects caused by aspirin. Prodrug RAH exerted enhanced anticancer activities which are better than a physical mixture of aspirin and resveratrol as well as each individually. Metabolism of RAH in mice showed that the majority of RAH is decomposed to release resveratrol and aspirin or salicylic acid either in the intestine or after absorption. Mechanistic studies demonstrate RAH inhibits cell cycle arrest through downregulation of cyclins and induces apoptosis by activation of caspase-3 in cancer cells. These findings highlighted the improved anticancer properties of resveratrol-based aspirin prodrugs. RAH may represent novel and safe alternatives of aspirin for the purpose of daily use in the future. PMID:26204233

  9. Aspirin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borges, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to acetylsalicylic acid and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs constitute a major medical concern worldwide. This article presents an overview of the observations that led to the discovery of cyclooxygenase inhibitors, as a prerequisite to better understand the basic concepts supporting seminal investigations carried out in order to elucidate the clinical features, pathogenic mechanisms, diagnosis and modern management of these common conditions. There are some unmet needs in this clinical area which will have to be solved in the future, especially concerning the pathogenesis of these reactions and the availability of novel in vitro diagnostic methods sparing both patient and physician of the risks inherent to in vivo provocation tests. PMID:24925393

  10. Comparison between 3-Nitrooxyphenyl acetylsalicylate (NO-ASA) and O2-(acetylsalicyloxymethyl)-1-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (NONO-ASA) as Safe Anti-Inflammatory, Analgesic, Antipyretic, Antioxidant Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Velazquez, Carlos A.; Pruski, April; Nia, Kamran V.; Abdellatif, Khaled R.; Keefer, Larry K.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is an underlying etiological factor in carcinogenesis; nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and their chemically modified NO-releasing prodrugs (NO-NSAIDs) are promising chemopreventive agents. The aim of this study was to conduct a head-to-head comparison between two NO-ASAs possessing different NO donor groups, an organic nitrate [3-nitrooxyphenyl acetylsalicylate (NO-ASA; NCX-4016)] and an N-diazeniumdiolate [NONO-ASA, O2- (acetylsalicyloxymethyl)-1-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (NONO-ASA; CVM-01)], as antiulcerogenic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic agents. All drugs were administered orally at equimolar doses. For antiulcerogenic study, 6 h after administration, the number and size of hemorrhagic lesions in stomachs from euthanized animals were counted. Tissue samples were frozen for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde determination. For anti-inflammatory study, 1 h after drug administration, the volume of carrageenan-induced rat paw edemas was measured for 6 h. For antipyretic study, 1 h after dosing, fever was induced by intraperitoneal LPS, and body core temperatures measured for 5 h. For analgesic study, time-dependent analgesic effect of prodrugs was evaluated by carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia. Drugs were administered 30 min after carrageenan. NO-ASA and NONO-ASA were equipotent as analgesic and anti-inflammatory agents but were better than aspirin. Despite a drastic reduction of PGE2 in stomach tissue, both prodrugs were devoid of gastric side effects. Lipid peroxidation induced by aspirin was higher than that observed by prodrugs. SOD activity induced by both prodrugs was similar, but approximately 2-fold higher than that induced by aspirin. CVM-01 is as effective as NCX-4016 in anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic assays in vivo, and it showed an equivalent safety profile in the stomach. These results underscore the use of N-diazeniumdiolate moieties

  11. Aspirin and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Patrignani, Paola; Patrono, Carlo

    2016-08-30

    The place of aspirin in primary prevention remains controversial, with North American and European organizations issuing contradictory treatment guidelines. More recently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended "initiating low-dose aspirin use for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and colorectal cancer in adults aged 50 to 59 years who have a 10% or greater 10-year CVD risk, are not at increased risk for bleeding, have a life expectancy of at least 10 years, and are willing to take low-dose aspirin daily for at least 10 years." This recommendation reflects increasing evidence for a chemopreventive effect of low-dose aspirin against colorectal (and other) cancer. The intent of this paper is to review the evidence supporting a chemopreventive effect of aspirin, discuss its potential mechanism(s) of action, and provide a conceptual framework for assessing current guidelines in the light of ongoing studies. PMID:27561771

  12. A rapid method for the simultaneous determination of L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid in aspirin C effervescent tablet by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; Alothman, Zeid Abdullah; Khan, Mohammad Rizwan

    2013-05-01

    In present study, a rapid and sensitive method using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid in aspirin C effervescent tablet. The optimum chromatographic separation was carried out on a reversed phase Waters® Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column (1.7 μm particle size, 100 mm × 2.1 mm ID) with an isocratic elution profile and mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile (75:25, v/v, pH 3.5) at flow rate of 0.5 mL min-1. The influences of mobile phase composition, flow rate and pH on chromatographic resolution were investigated. The total chromatographic analysis time was as short as 2 min with excellent resolution. Detection and quantification of the target compounds were carried out with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer using negative electrospray ionization (ESI) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) modes. The performance of the method was evaluated and very low limits of detection less than 0.09 μg g-1, excellent coefficient correlation (r2 > 0.999) with liner range over a concentration range of 0.1-1.0 μg g-1 for both L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid, and good intraday and interday precisions (relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) <3%), were obtained. Comparison of system performance with traditional liquid chromatography-photo diode array detector (HPLC-PDA) was made with respect to analysis time, sensitivity, linearity and precisions. The proposed UPLC-MS/MS method was found to be reproducible and appropriate for quantitative analysis of L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid in aspirin C effervescent tablet.

  13. A spectroscopic study of phenylbutazone and aspirin bound to serum albumin in rheumatoid diseases.

    PubMed

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M; Sułkowska, A; Bojko, B; Równicka-Zubik, J; Sułkowski, W W

    2011-11-01

    Interaction of phenylbutazone (PBZ) and aspirin (ASA), two drugs recommended in rheumatoid diseases (RDs), when binding to human (HSA) and bovine (BSA) serum albumins, has been studied by quenching of fluorescence and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)HNMR) techniques. On the basis of spectrofluorescence measurements high affinity binding sites of PBZ and ASA on albumin as well as their interaction within the binding sites were described. A low affinity binding site has been studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using fluorescence spectroscopy the location of binding site in serum albumin (SA) for PBZ and ASA was found. Association constants K(a) were determined for binary (i.e. PBZ-SA and ASA-SA) and ternary complexes (i.e. PBZ-[ASA]-SA and ASA-[PBZ]-SA). PBZ and ASA change the affinity of each other to the binding site in serum albumin (SA). The presence of ASA causes the increase of association constants K(aI) of PBZ-SA complex. Similarly, PBZ influences K(aI) of ASA-SA complex. This phenomenon shows that the strength of binding and the stability of the complexes increase in the presence of the second drug. The decrease of K(aII) values suggests that the competition between PBZ and ASA in binding to serum albumin in the second class of binding sites occurs. The analysis of (1)HNMR spectral parameters i.e. changes of chemical shifts and relaxation times of the drug indicate that the presence of ASA weakens the interaction of PBZ with albumin. Similarly PBZ weakens the interaction of ASA with albumin. This conclusion points to the necessity of using a monitoring therapy owning to the possible increase of uncontrolled toxic effects. PMID:21856214

  14. A spectroscopic study of phenylbutazone and aspirin bound to serum albumin in rheumatoid diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka-Zubik, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2011-11-01

    Interaction of phenylbutazone (PBZ) and aspirin (ASA), two drugs recommended in rheumatoid diseases (RDs), when binding to human (HSA) and bovine (BSA) serum albumins, has been studied by quenching of fluorescence and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1HNMR) techniques. On the basis of spectrofluorescence measurements high affinity binding sites of PBZ and ASA on albumin as well as their interaction within the binding sites were described. A low affinity binding site has been studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using fluorescence spectroscopy the location of binding site in serum albumin (SA) for PBZ and ASA was found. Association constants Ka were determined for binary (i.e. PBZ-SA and ASA-SA) and ternary complexes (i.e. PBZ-[ASA]-SA and ASA-[PBZ]-SA). PBZ and ASA change the affinity of each other to the binding site in serum albumin (SA). The presence of ASA causes the increase of association constants KaI of PBZ-SA complex. Similarly, PBZ influences KaI of ASA-SA complex. This phenomenon shows that the strength of binding and the stability of the complexes increase in the presence of the second drug. The decrease of KaII values suggests that the competition between PBZ and ASA in binding to serum albumin in the second class of binding sites occurs. The analysis of 1HNMR spectral parameters i.e. changes of chemical shifts and relaxation times of the drug indicate that the presence of ASA weakens the interaction of PBZ with albumin. Similarly PBZ weakens the interaction of ASA with albumin. This conclusion points to the necessity of using a monitoring therapy owning to the possible increase of uncontrolled toxic effects.

  15. Synthesis of Aspirin: A General Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmsted, John A., III

    1998-10-01

    An experiment is described that is suitable for the early portion of the laboratory in a general chemistry course and integrates organic examples. It is the two-step synthesis of aspirin starting from oil of wintergreen. The mechanism for this synthesis provides examples of three major classes of chemical reactions: hydrolysis, condensation, and proton transfer. To understand the chemistry, the student must be able to recognize the common molecular framework shared by oil of wintergreen, salicylic acid, and aspirin and to identify the -OH and -CO2 sites where chemical changes occur. The experiment differs in three ways from traditional aspirin synthesis experiments for general chemistry. It is designed to be performed early rather than late; it starts from a naturally occurring material and requires two steps rather than one; and it utilizes FTIR spectroscopy to distinguish among oil of wintergreen starting material, salicylic acid intermediate, and aspirin product. The use of FTIR spectroscopy introduces students to a modern analytical technique that is currently used in research involving aspirin.

  16. Molecular targets of aspirin and cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, L; Ai, G; Spitale, R C; Bhat, G J

    2014-07-01

    Salicylates from plant sources have been used for centuries by different cultures to treat a variety of ailments such as inflammation, fever and pain. A chemical derivative of salicylic acid, aspirin, was synthesised and mass produced by the end of the 19th century and is one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Its cardioprotective properties are well established; however, recent evidence shows that it can also act as a chemopreventive agent. Its antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory actions occur through the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. The precise mechanisms leading to its anticancer effects are not clearly established, although multiple mechanisms affecting enzyme activity, transcription factors, cellular signalling and mitochondrial functions have been proposed. This review presents a brief account of the major COX-dependent and independent pathways described in connection with aspirin's anticancer effects. Aspirin's unique ability to acetylate biomolecules besides COX has not been thoroughly investigated nor have all the targets of its primary metabolite, salicylic acid been identified. Recent reports on the ability of aspirin to acetylate multiple cellular proteins warrant a comprehensive study to investigate the role of this posttranslational modification in its anticancer effects. In this review, we also raise the intriguing possibility that aspirin may interact and acetylate cellular molecules such as RNA, and metabolites such as CoA, leading to a change in their function. Research in this area will provide a greater understanding of the mechanisms of action of this drug. PMID:24874482

  17. Willow species and aspirin: different mechanism of actions.

    PubMed

    Vlachojannis, J; Magora, F; Chrubasik, S

    2011-07-01

    Many believe that willow is the natural source of aspirin. However, willow species contain only a low quantity of the prodrug salicin which is metabolized during absorption into various salicylate derivatives. If calculated as salicylic acid, the daily salicin dose is insufficient to produce analgesia. Salicylic acid concentrations following an analgesic dose of aspirin are an order of magnitude higher. Flavonoids and polyphenols contribute to the potent willow bark analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect. The multi-component active principle of willow bark provides a broader mechanism of action than aspirin and is devoid of serious adverse events. In contrast to synthetic aspirin, willow bark does not damage the gastrointestinal mucosa. An extract dose with 240 mg salicin had no major impact on blood clotting. In patients with known aspirin allergy willow bark products are contraindicated. PMID:21226125

  18. Aspirin resistance: a clinical review focused on the most common cause, noncompliance.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Kenneth A

    2011-04-01

    Aspirin is an inexpensive, readily available medication that reduces the risk of subsequent vascular disease by about 25% in patients with known occlusive vascular disease. Aspirin's beneficial effect is mediated via inhibition of arachidonic acid (AA) activation of platelets and is detected by demonstrating a decrease in platelet function and/or a decrease in prostaglandin metabolites. Patients who are assumed to be taking their aspirin, but who do not demonstrate an aspirin effect are labeled as, "aspirin resistant." This is an unfortunate designation as the vast majority of patients labeled as "aspirin resistant" are noncompliant. Noncompliance is demonstrated in multiple studies that use repeat testing for platelet inhibition in patients with an initial inadequate response to aspirin. When the test is repeated under condition where ingestion of the test aspirin is assured, the patients' platelets are inhibited. Instead of using the term "aspirin resistance," this review will use "inadequate response to aspirin." Patients with an inadequate aspirin response have an increased likelihood for subsequent vascular events. Detection and treatment of an inadequate aspirin response would be facilitated by the development of a bedside assay that uses whole blood, is technically simple, inexpensive, sensitive, specific, reproducible, and provides an answer in a few minutes. Future research in patients with an inadequate response to aspirin should focus on mechanisms to improve compliance, which should decrease their risk of future vascular events. PMID:23983843

  19. Aspirin desensitization in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew A; Stevenson, Donald D

    2013-05-01

    Although aspirin desensitization was discovered in 1922, it was not until 1979 that a therapeutic use for aspirin treatment, under the protection of desensitization, was discovered. In the last 33 years, details of aspirin treatment have been refined to the point where it is now recognized and accepted as a major therapeutic intervention in the treatment of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, with therapeutic efficacy in approximately two-thirds of patients. It is only effective in patients who have aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease and none of the other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, despite their cross-reactive inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1, can effectively take the place of aspirin. PMID:23639709

  20. LC-MS/MS for the simultaneous analysis of arachidonic acid and 32 related metabolites in human plasma: Basal plasma concentrations and aspirin-induced changes of eicosanoids.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Dhananjay D; Kim, Kwon-Bok; Oh, Kyung-Suk; Abdalla, Nagi; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Bae, Soo Kyung; Shon, Ji-Hong; Kim, Ho-Sook; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Shin, Jae Gook

    2012-12-12

    Eicosanoids play an important role in various biological responses and can be used as biomarkers for specific diseases. Therefore, we developed a highly selective, sensitive, and robust liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method to measure arachidonic acid and its 32 metabolites in human plasma. Sample preparation involved solid phase extraction, which efficiently removed sources of interference present in human plasma. Chromatographic separation was performed using a Luna C(8)-column with 0.5mM ammonium formate buffer and acetonitrile as the mobile phase under gradient conditions. Detection was performed using tandem mass spectrometry equipped with an electrospray ionization interface in negative ion mode. The matrix did not affect the reproducibility and reliability of the assay. All analytes showed good linearity over the investigated concentration range (r>0.997). The validated lower limit of quantitation for the analytes ranged from 10 to 400pg/mL. Intra- and inter-day precision (RDS%) over the concentration ranges for all eicosanoids were within 16.8%, and accuracy ranged between 88.1 and 108.2%. This assay was suitable for the determination of basal plasma levels of eicosanoids and the evaluation of effect of aspirin on eicosanoid plasma levels in healthy subjects. PMID:23217314

  1. Polysaccharide arabinogalactan from larch Larix sibirica as carrier for molecules of salicylic and acetylsalicylic acid: preparation, physicochemical and pharmacological study.

    PubMed

    Chistyachenko, Yulia S; Dushkin, Alexandr V; Polyakov, Nikolay E; Khvostov, Mikhail V; Tolstikova, Tatyana G; Tolstikov, Genrikh A; Lyakhov, Nikolay Z

    2015-05-01

    Inclusion complexes of salicylic acid (SA) and acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) with polysaccharide arabinogalactan (AG) from larch wood Larix sibirica and Larix gmelinii were synthesized using mechanochemical technology. In the present study, we have investigated physicochemical properties of the synthesized complexes in solid state and in aqueous solutions as well as their anti-aggregation and ulcerogenic activity. The evidence of the complexes formation was obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation technique. It was shown that in aqueous solution the molecules of SA and ASA are in fast exchange between the complex with AG macromolecules and solution. The stability constant of aspirin complex was calculated. It was shown that mechanochemically synthesized complexes are more stable when compared to the complex obtained by mixing solutions of the components. Complexes of ASA show two-fold increase of anti-platelet effect. It allows to reduce the dose of the antithrombotic drug and its ulcerogenic activity. These results substantiate the possibility to design new preparations on the basis of ASA with increased activity and safety. PMID:24517849

  2. Medications Containing Aspirin (Acetylsalicylate) and Aspirin-Like Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... This listing shows products containing aspirin or salicylate compounds. THIS IS NOT A COMPLETE LIST! Some medication ... and Aspirin Tablets Par Damason-P 5 Darvon Compound-65 9 Lily Disalcid Capsules and Tablets 3M ...

  3. The mechanism of aspirin reactions in the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Alan; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Sohlberg, Karl; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2001-03-01

    We report first-principles (density functional theory) calculations of possible reaction pathways for the break-up of aspirin that leads to pain relief in the human body. An aspirin molecule consists of an acetyl group attached to a salicylate. Upon entering a membrane protein known as COX, the aspirin molecule is pulled apart. The acetyl group of the aspirin molecule attaches to SER-530, a serine residue that is located near the entrance of the COX protein channel. The resulting acetyl-serine residue effectively forms a gate within the COX channel blocking certain fatty acids from reaching the protein active site where they are converted into prostaglandins, the molecules that are responsible for the sensation of pain. An important new finding is that the aspirin molecule undergoes a transformation prior to breaking up.

  4. Aspirin decreases platelet uptake on Dacron vascular grafts in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, W.C.; Connolly, R.J.; Callow, A.D.; Keough, E.M.; Ramberg-Laskaris, K.; McCullough, J.L.; O'Donnell, T.F. Jr.; Melaragno, A.; Valeri, C.R.; Weiblen, B.

    1984-07-01

    The influence of a single dose of aspirin (5.4-7.4 mg/kg) on platelet uptake on 4-mm Dacron interposition grafts was studied in a baboon model using gamma camera scanning for 111-Indium labeled platelets. In vitro assessment of platelet function after aspirin administration revealed that in the baboon, as in the human, aspirin abolished arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation, prolonged the lag time between exposure to collagen and aggregation, and decreased plasma thromboxane B2 levels. Aspirin also prolonged the template bleeding time. Scans for 111-Indium labeled platelets revealed that pretreatment with a single dose of aspirin decreased platelet uptake on 4-mm Dacron carotid interposition grafts. This decrease in platelet uptake was associated with a significant improvement in 2-hour graft patency and with a trend toward improved 2-week patency.

  5. Preparation and analysis of deuterium-labeled aspirin: application to pharmacokinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, A.K.; FitzGerald, G.A.

    1985-02-01

    Inhibition of endogenous prostacyclin and thromboxane biosynthesis by aspirin is critically dose-dependent in humans. Gastrointestinal and hepatic hydrolysis may limit systemic availability of aspirin, especially in low doses, perhaps contributing to the biochemical selectivity of aspirin. Existing analytical methods do not permit determination of systemic bioavailability when low (less than 100 mg) doses of aspirin are administered. Deuterium-labeled aspirin (2-acetoxy(3,4,5,6-/sup 2/H4)benzoic acid) was synthesized from salicylic acid by catalytic exchange and subsequent acetylation. Analysis of the compounds as benzyl esters by GC-MS followed extractive alkylation from plasma. Heptadeuterated compounds were used as internal standards. Simultaneous administration of tetradeuterated aspirin intravenously with native aspirin orally to anesthetized dogs permitted kinetic studies of both aspirin and salicylic acid. The sensitivity of the method is superior to published methods using HPLC and, thus, more applicable to studies of low dose aspirin. Pulse administration of stable isotope-labeled aspirin permits detailed and repeated studies of dose-related aspirin pharmacokinetics in humans.

  6. Aspirin and lipid mediators in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2015-09-01

    Aspirin is an unique compound because it bears two active moieties within one and the same molecule: a reactive acetyl group and the salicylate metabolite. Salicylate has some effects similar to aspirin, however only at higher concentrations, usually in the millimolar range, which are not obtained at conventional antiplatelet aspirin doses of 100-300 mg/day. Pharmacological actions of aspirin in the cardiovascular system at these doses are largely if not entirely due to target structure acetylation. Several classes of lipid mediators become affected: Best known is the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) in platelets with subsequent inhibition of thromboxane and, possibly, thrombin formation. By this action, aspirin also inhibits paracrine thromboxane functions on other lipid mediators, such as the platelet storage product sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an inflammatory mediator. Acetylation of COX-2 allows for generation of 15-(R)HETE and subsequent formation of "aspirin-triggered lipoxin" (ATL) by interaction with white cell lipoxygenases. In the cardiovascular system, aspirin also acetylates eNOS with subsequent upregulation of NO formation and enhanced expression of the antioxidans heme-oxygenase-1. This action is possibly also COX-2/ATL mediated. Many more acetylation targets have been identified in live cells by quantitative acid-cleavable activity-based protein profiling and might result in discovery of even more aspirin targets in the near future. PMID:26201059

  7. Long-term aspirin pretreatment in the prevention of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Akyazi, Ibrahim; Eraslan, Evren; Gülçubuk, Ahmet; Ekiz, Elif Ergül; Çırakli, Zeynep L; Haktanir, Damla; Bala, Deniz Aktaran; Özkurt, Mete; Matur, Erdal; Özcan, Mukaddes

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of long term pretreatment with low-, medium- and high-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) on a model of acute pancreatitis (AP) induced in rats. METHODS: Forty male Wistar rats were used. Three experimental groups, each consisting of eight animals, received low- (5 mg/kg per day), medium- (150 mg/kg per day) and high-dose (350 mg/kg per day) ASA in supplemented pellet chow for 100 d. Eight animals, serving as the AP-control group, and another eight, serving as reference value (RV) group, were fed with standard pellet chow for the same period. After pretreatment, AP was induced in the experimental animals by intraperitoneal administration of cerulein (2 × 50 μg/kg), while the RV group received saline in the same way. Twelve hours after the second injection, the animals were sacrificed. Pancreatic tissue and plasma samples were collected. One part of the collected pancreatic tissues was used for histopathological evaluation, and the remaining portion was homogenized. Cytokine levels [tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6], hemogram parameters, biochemical parameters (amylase and lipase), nuclear factor-κB, aspirin triggered lipoxins and parameters related to the antioxidant system (malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, hemeoxygenase-1, catalase and superoxide dismutase) were measured. RESULTS: Cerulein administration induced mild pancreatitis, characterized by interstitial edema (total histopathological score of 5.88 ± 0.44 vs 0.25 ± 0.16, P < 0.001). Subsequent pancreatic tissue damage resulted in an increase in amylase (2829.71 ± 772.48 vs 984.57 ± 49.22 U/L, P = 0.001) and lipase (110.14 ± 75.84 U/L vs 4.71 ± 0.78 U/L, P < 0.001) in plasma, and leucocytes (6.89 ± 0.48 vs 4.36 ± 0.23, P = 0.001) in peripheral blood. Cytokines, IL-1β (18.81 ± 2.55 pg/μg vs 6.65 ± 0.24 pg/μg, P = 0.002) and IL-6 (14.62 ± 1.98 pg/μg vs 9.09 ± 1.36 pg/μg, P = 0.04) in pancreatic tissue also increased. Aspirin pretreatment

  8. [ASA - from cardiovascular to cancer prevention].

    PubMed

    Sanin, Veronika; Pfetsch, Vanessa; Koenig, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease and cancer are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Low-dose ASA has been shown to effectively prevent about one fifth of atherothrombotic vascular complications in patients with previous myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD), or stroke 2. In secondary prevention, the benefits of antiplatelet therapy substantially exceed its risk 2. By contrast, recommendations for the use of ASA in primary prevention are still a matter of controversy. The aim of this article is to review the current evidence for the efficacy of low-dose ASA in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases as well as to discuss its potential additional chemopreventive action. PMID:26939106

  9. Eclipsing binaries in the ASAS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedoroščík, J.; Vaňko, M.; Pribulla, T.

    2014-03-01

    We present a statistical investigation of eclipsing binaries presented in the ASAS (http://www.astrouw.edu.pl/asas/?page=download) survey. Applying the Fourier analysis on the ASAS light curves, we used the relations between coefficients to infer principal properties of eclipsing binaries. The systems with eccentric orbits were found and for the same sample the minimum eccentricity was estimated. We also selected short-period detached eclipsing binaries suitable for the detection of circumbinary exoplanets. Systems with the equal minima depth were also discussed.

  10. ASA24-Australian Version (Under Development)

    Cancer.gov

    In collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), a consortium of Australian Researchers is adapting the ASA24 system to the Australian context to account for variations in food consumed, portion sizes, and nutrient composition.

  11. Aspirin sensitivity of platelet aggregation in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Albert, Stewart G; Hasnain, Bibi I; Ritter, Detlef G; Joist, J Heinrich; Mooradian, Arshag D

    2005-11-01

    Although aspirin is cardioprotective in high-risk populations, many with diabetes mellitus (DM) are unresponsive to these benefits. We questioned whether cardiovascular unresponsiveness might be demonstrated by lack of aspirin sensitivity to in vitro platelet functions especially in subjects with poorly controlled diabetes. Six women and 4 men (48+/-8 years [mean+/-S.D.]), selected for poor control (glycohemoglobin 11.9+/-2.2%) and 10 sex-age (+/-5 years) matched controls received 81 mg aspirin daily. There was a 2-week washout from aspirin and related drugs. After the aspirin dose on day-7, blood for platelet aggregation assays, and 24-h urine for 2,3 dinor thromboxane B2 (TxB2) and 2,3 dinor 6-keto (PGF1alpha) were obtained. Aspirin sensitivity was defined as inhibition (i.e., lower than expected) platelet aggregation after exposure to an agonist. Those with diabetes and controls were sensitive to aspirin inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by 1.6 mM arachidonic acid (9.5+/-3.9% versus 9.1+/-3.1%, normal range 40-100%) and by 0.83 microg/mL collagen (17.4+/-13.9% versus 13.2+/-9.3%, normal range 60-93%), respectively. Aspirin sensitivity to 2 microM ADP was present in five with diabetes and five controls. Urinary prostaglandin metabolites were suppressed below reference ranges, without differences between those with DM or controls for TxB2 (350+/-149 pg/mg versus 348+/-93 pg/mg creatinine) and PGF1alpha (255+/-104 pg/mg versus 222+/-88 pg/mg creatinine). In conclusion, in poorly controlled diabetes, there was no differential lack of aspirin sensitivity to platelet aggregation, or lack of aspirin suppression of urinary TxB2 or PGF1alpha, compared with controls on aspirin. Despite suppression of urinary prostaglandin metabolites, aspirin resistance was most apparent to ADP-mediated platelet aggregation. It is not known what level of inhibition of in vitro tests is necessary for the cardioprotective benefits of aspirin in diabetes mellitus. Thus, the lack of

  12. Improved aortocoronary bypass patency by low-dose aspirin (100 mg daily). Effects on platelet aggregation and thromboxane formation.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, R L; Schacky, C V; Weber, M; Meister, W; Kotzur, J; Reichardt, B; Theisen, K; Weber, P C

    1984-06-01

    Prevention of aortocoronary bypass occlusion by aspirin (ASA, 1 X 100 mg per day) was studied in a prospective double-blind trial of 83 patients. 60 (72%) were randomly allocated to ASA or placebo starting 24 h after operation. 90% of grafts in the ASA group and 68% in the placebo group were patent at four months. At least one anastomosis was occluded in 62% of the patients on placebo and in 27% of those on aspirin. Ventricular arrhythmias increased after surgery in more patients on placebo (12/18) than in patients on ASA (5/17). Platelet thromboxane formation on collagen tested before operation was significantly higher in patients in whom bypass occlusion developed (occlusion: 40 +/- 19, no occlusion: 25 +/- 13 ng/ml). A 100 mg dose of ASA per day effectively blocked platelet thromboxane formation and thromboxane-supported aggregation on collagen and was safe in the postoperative phase. No side effects were reported throughout the trial. The reduced toxicity with full efficacy favours a low and infrequent dosage of aspirin. PMID:6144975

  13. Aspirin failure in patients presenting with acute cerebrovascular ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Halawani, Saeed H M; Williams, David J P; Adefurin, Abiodun; Webster, John; Greaves, Michael; Ford, Isobel

    2011-08-01

    Aspirin is the most commonly used antiplatelet drug for prevention of ischaemic stroke. In order to determine the prevalence and nature of aspirin failure, we studied 51 adults admitted with suspected ischaemic stroke and already prescribed daily aspirin. Within 48 hours (h) of onset, blood and urine samples were collected to assess platelet aggregation, activation and aspirin response by a range of methods. All tests were then repeated on a second sample taken 24 h after witnessed administration of 75 mg or 150 mg aspirin. At entry to the study, incomplete response to aspirin, measured by arachidonic acid (AA)-stimulated platelet aggregation, was found in 43% of patients. Following in-hospital aspirin administration, there was a significant decrease in AA-aggregation (p=0.001) suggesting poor adherence to therapy prior to admission. However, residual aggregation (10-15%) persisted in 11 subjects - suggesting alternative causes. In incomplete responders on admission, platelet aggregation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was significantly higher compared with responders (p<0.05) but there were no significant differences in collagen aggregation, platelet fibrinogen binding or P-selectin expression, plasma von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, or the urinary metabolite, 11-dehydro-TxB2. Incomplete platelet inhibition is common around the time of acute cerebrovascular ischaemic events in patients prescribed aspirin. Up to 50% of these observations appear due to incomplete adherence to aspirin therapy. Intervention studies are required to determine the clinical relevance of measured platelet response to aspirin in terms of outcome, and the effectiveness of improved pharmacotherapy for stroke prevention. PMID:21544317

  14. [Milestones of cardivascular pharmacotherapy: salicylates and aspirin].

    PubMed

    Jerie, P

    2006-01-01

    The analgesic and antipyretic effect of the bark of willow has been known in Egypt and Greece for canturies. The modem era of salicylates starts with a letter sent 1758 by Reverend Edward Stone to The Royal Society in London. He described "an account of the success of the bark of willow in the cure of agues". His report. erroneously attributed to Edmond Stone. was published five years later. The active ingredient of willow bark. "salicine". was first isolated 1828 by Joseph Buchner, then by Henri Leroux, and also prepared from the oil of wintergreen (Gaultheria) and meadowsweet (Spirea ulmaria) by J. W. Lowig 1833. and called "Spirsäure", which was already pure acetylsalicylic acid. It was also synthetised 1853 by Ch. Gerhardt and finally 1897 in Bayer's laboratoires by Felix Hoffman, who also demonstrated its antiinflammatory efficacy. After two years of clinical trials with low doses, Bayer's management decided to start the productions and launched Aspirin as an analgetic worldwide in summer 1899. The first ASPIRIN ERA bagun. A completely new epoch started when J. N. Vane and Priscilla Piner demonstrated 1971 that the main mechanism of action of aspirin-like drugs is the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. In later studies the potency to inhibit platelet aggregation with small doses of aspirin (30-125 mg) was demonstrated. The Physicians'Health Study 1988 confirmed this effect: aspirin significantly reduced the risk of both, fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction. and is now used in primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerosis. However the idea was not new: The use of salicylates and aspirin was throughly discussed more than 50 years ago: Paul C. Gibson published 1949 a well-documented case report on efficacy of aspirin in patients with angina, and Kl. Weber and P. Klein in Prague used Gibson's mixture successfully for patients with acute myocardial infarction (1951). Recently, the efficacy and security, the interactions and side-effects of low

  15. Impact of Acetylsalicylic Acid on the Clinicopathological Characteristics and Prognosis of Patients with Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sendur, Mehmet A.N.; Aksoy, Sercan; Ozdemir, Nuriye Y.; Zengin, Nurullah; Altundag, Kadri

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The impact of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on the clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer has not yet been elucidated in detail; we therefore aimed to investigate the effects of ASA on the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients diagnosed with breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Breast cancer patients who were taking ASA at the time of breast cancer diagnosis were enrolled as ASA users (n = 84); matching patients with the same age who were not taking ASA were included as control group (n = 890). Results The median age was 56 (range 34–82) years in both groups. ASA users had a significantly lower incidence of grade II–III tumors compared to non-users (P = 0.02). The other clinicopathological characteristics and treatment histories were similar in both groups. In patients using ASA, the disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 97.3%, 89.4%, and 79.9% and in non-users it was 94.1%, 81.8%, and 70.9% in the 1rst, 3rd, and 5th year, respectively (P = 0.01). In aspirin users, the overall survival rate was 95.0%, 90.6%, and 87.6% and in non-users it was 98.1%, 91.2%, and 85.5% in the 1rst, 3rd, and 5th year, respectively (P = 0.50). Conclusion Using ASA at the time of breast cancer diagnosis was associated with significantly improved DFS in breast cancer patients. PMID:25404885

  16. Calculations of aspirin reaction mechanisms in the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Alan; Sohlberg, Karl; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    1999-11-01

    We report quantum mechanical calculations of possible reaction pathways for the breakup of aspirin that lead to pain relief in the human body. Animations of the reactions will be shown. An aspirin molecule consists of an acetyl group attached to a salicylate. Upon entering a membrane protein known as COX, the aspirin molecule is pulled apart. The acetyl group of the aspirin molecule attaches to SER-530, a serine residue that is located near the entrance of the COX protein channel. The resulting acetyl-serine residue effectively forms a gate within the COX channel blocking certain fatty acids from reaching the protein active site where the fatty acids are converted into prostaglandins, the molecules that are responsible for inflammation and the sensation of pain.

  17. High prevalence of aspirin resistance in elderly patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and hyperhomocysteinaemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaxin; Chen, Xiuying; Liu, Lin; Fan, Li; Cao, Jian; Li, Xiaoli; Hu, Guoliang; Hu, Yixin; Zhu, Bingpo; Liu, Xianfeng; Gao, Yan; Ma, Cong; Leng, Wenxiu

    2014-01-01

    Although aspirin resistance is well reported in CVD, little is known about aspirin response in elderly patients with hyperhomocysteinaemia. The aim of the present study was to explore the prevalence of aspirin resistance in elderly patients with CVD and hyperhomocysteinaemia. A total of 370 elderly patients with CVD were recruited. The study included 216 patients with hyperhomocysteinaemia and 154 patients with normohomocysteinaemia receiving daily aspirin therapy (≥ 75 mg) over 1 month. The effect of aspirin was assessed using by light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Aspirin resistance was defined as ≥ 20% arachidonic acid induced aggregation according to LTA. Aspirin resistance was defined in 48 (13.0%) of 370 patients. The prevalence of aspirin resistance was higher in hyperhomocysteinaemic patients than normohomocysteinaemic patients (16.7% vs. 7.8%, odds ratio (OR)=2.367; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.188-4.715, p=0.012). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, hyperhomocysteinaemia (OR=2.406, 95% CI=1.201-4.820, p=0.013) was a significant risk factor for aspirin resistance. A significant number of CVD patients with hyperhomocysteinemia are resistant to aspirin therapy. Hyperhomocysteinemia is a significant risk factor for aspirin resistance in elderly patients with CVD. PMID:24880196

  18. Homocysteine is a novel risk factor for suboptimal response of blood platelets to acetylsalicylic acid in coronary artery disease: a randomized multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Karolczak, Kamil; Kamysz, Wojciech; Karafova, Anna; Drzewoski, Jozef; Watala, Cezary

    2013-08-01

    The incomplete inhibition of platelet function by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), despite the patients are receiving therapeutic doses of the drug ('aspirin-resistance'), is caused by numbers of risk factors. In this study we verified the idea that plasma homocysteine (Hcy) contributes to 'aspirin-resistance' in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A cross-designed randomized controlled intervention study has been performed (126 CAD pts incl. 26 with T2DM) to determine whether increasing ASA dose from 75mg to 150mg daily may result in the increased antiplatelet effect, in the course of four-week treatment. Platelet response to collagen (coll) or arachidonic acid (AA) was monitored with whole blood aggregometry, plasma thromboxane (Tx), and Hcy levels were determined immunochemically. The ASA-mediated reductions in platelet response to coll (by 12±3%) or AA (by 10±3%) and in plasma Tx (by 20±9%; p<0.02 or less) were significantly greater for higher ASA dose and significantly correlated with plasma Hcy, which was significantly lower in "good" ASA responders compared to "poor" responders (p<0.001). Higher plasma Hcy appeared a significant risk factor for blood platelet refractoriness to low ASA dose (OR=1.11; ±95%CI: 1.02-1.20, p<0.02, adjusted to age, sex and CAD risk factors). Hcy diminished in vitro antiplatelet effect of low ASA concentration and augmented platelet aggregation (by up to 62% (p<0.005) for coll and up to 15% (p<0.005) for AA), whereas its acetyl derivative acted oppositely. Otherwise, Hcy intensified antiplatelet action of high ASA. Hyperhomocysteinaemia may be a novel risk factor for the suppressed blood platelet response to ASA, and homocysteine may act as a specific sensitizer of blood platelets to some agonists. While homocysteine per se acts as a proaggregatory agent to blood platelets, its acetylated form is able to reverse this effect. Thus, these findings reveal a possibly new

  19. An Efficient Microscale Procedure for the Synthesis of Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandita, Sangeeta; Goyal, Samta

    1998-06-01

    The synthesis of aspirin is a part of many undergraduate organic synthesis labs and is frequently used in qualitative organic analysis laboratory for the identification of salicylic acid. We have found that aspirin can be synthesized on microscale by a simple and efficient procedure that eliminates the heating step employed in literature procedures and gives a pure, ferric-negative product (no purple color with alcoholic ferric chloride solution).

  20. Standards 101; the ASA standards program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomer, Paul D.

    2002-11-01

    ASA supports the development of standards by serving as the secretariat for standards committees of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The program is organized through four ANSI technical committees (S1, S2, S3, and S12) and one administrative committee (ASACOS). S1 deals with physical acoustics, S2 deals with shock and vibration, S3 deals with physiological and psychological acoustics, and S12 deals with noise. ASACOS is the ASA Committee on Standards. The program has three primary tasks: (1) the development of National Standards (ANSI Standards), (2) the national adoption of an international standard (ANSI NAIS Standards), (3) providing the USA input to the development of International Standards (ISO and IEC Standards). At every level the main work is accomplished in Working Groups (WG) that are ''staffed'' by hundreds of volunteers--mainly ASA members from its various technical committees such as Noise, Physical Acoustics, Architectural Acoustics, Psychological and Physiological Acoustics, etc. Overall, the Standards Program involves more ASA members than does any other single function of the Society except meetings and it is the biggest outreach function of ASA affecting the health, welfare, and economic well-being of large segments of the population, the business and industrial community, and government at all levels.

  1. Dose- and time-dependent antiplatelet effects of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Perneby, Christina; Wallén, N Håkan; Rooney, Cathy; Fitzgerald, Desmond; Hjemdahl, Paul

    2006-04-01

    Aspirin is widely used, but dosages in different clinical situations and the possible importance of "aspirin resistance" are debated. We performed an open cross-over study comparing no treatment (baseline) with three aspirin dosage regimens--37.5 mg/day for 10 days, 320 mg/day for 7 days, and, finally, a single 640 mg dose (cumulative dose 960 mg)--in 15 healthy male volunteers. Platelet aggregability was assessed in whole blood (WB) and platelet rich plasma (PRP). The urinary excretions of stable thromboxane (TxM) and prostacyclin (PGI-M) metabolites, and bleeding time were also measured. Platelet COX inhibition was nearly complete already at 37.5 mg aspirin daily, as evidenced by >98% suppression of serum thromboxane B2 and almost abolished arachidonic acid (AA) induced aggregation in PRP 2-6 h after dosing. Bleeding time was similarly prolonged by all dosages of aspirin. Once daily dosing was associated with considerable recovery of AA induced platelet aggregation in WB after 24 hours, even after 960 mg aspirin. Collagen induced aggregation in WB with normal extracellular calcium levels (hirudin anticoagulated) was inhibited <40% at all dosages. TxM excretion was incompletely suppressed, and increased <24 hours after the cumulative 960 mg dose. Aspirin treatment reduced PGI-M already at the lowest dosage (by approximately 25%), but PGI-M excretion and platelet aggregability were not correlated. Antiplatelet effects of aspirin are limited in WB with normal calcium levels. Since recovery of COX-dependent platelet aggregation occurred within 24 hours, once daily dosing of aspirin might be insufficient in patients with increased platelet turnover. PMID:16601836

  2. Deciphering glycomics and neuroproteomic alterations in experimental traumatic brain injury: Comparative analysis of aspirin and clopidogrel treatment.

    PubMed

    Abou-Abbass, Hussein; Bahmad, Hisham; Abou-El-Hassan, Hadi; Zhu, Rui; Zhou, Shiyue; Dong, Xue; Hamade, Eva; Mallah, Khalil; Zebian, Abir; Ramadan, Naify; Mondello, Stefania; Fares, Jawad; Comair, Youssef; Atweh, Samir; Darwish, Hala; Zibara, Kazem; Mechref, Yehia; Kobeissy, Firas

    2016-06-01

    As populations age, the number of patients sustaining traumatic brain injury (TBI) and concomitantly receiving preinjury antiplatelet therapy such as aspirin (ASA) and clopidogrel (CLOP) is rising. These drugs have been linked with unfavorable clinical outcomes following TBI, where the exact mechanism(s) involved are still unknown. In this novel work, we aimed to identify and compare the altered proteome profile imposed by ASA and CLOP when administered alone or in combination, prior to experimental TBI. Furthermore, we assessed differential glycosylation PTM patterns following experimental controlled cortical impact model of TBI, ASA, CLOP, and ASA + CLOP. Ipsilateral cortical brain tissues were harvested 48 h postinjury and were analyzed using an advanced neuroproteomics LC-MS/MS platform to assess proteomic and glycoproteins alterations. Of interest, differential proteins pertaining to each group (22 in TBI, 41 in TBI + ASA, 44 in TBI + CLOP, and 34 in TBI + ASA + CLOP) were revealed. Advanced bioinformatics/systems biology and clustering analyses were performed to evaluate biological networks and protein interaction maps illustrating molecular pathways involved in the experimental conditions. Results have indicated that proteins involved in neuroprotective cellular pathways were upregulated in the ASA and CLOP groups when given separately. However, ASA + CLOP administration revealed enrichment in biological pathways relevant to inflammation and proinjury mechanisms. Moreover, results showed differential upregulation of glycoproteins levels in the sialylated N-glycans PTMs that can be implicated in pathological changes. Omics data obtained have provided molecular insights of the underlying mechanisms that can be translated into clinical bedside settings. PMID:27249377

  3. Analgesic and Decongestant Efficacy of the Combination of Aspirin with Pseudoephedrine in Patients With Symptoms of Upper Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, Ronald; Voelker, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the efficacy and safety of a combination therapy of 1,000 mg aspirin (ASA) and 60 mg pseudoephedrine (PSE) on the symptoms of pain (combined score for headache and sore throat) and nasal congestion in 833 patients with acute upper respiratory tract viral infection (URTI), over 4 hours after a single dose in the clinic and over 3 days with multiple doses at home. The study demonstrated that over 4 hours in the clinic the combination ASA plus PSE was superior to PSE or placebo for relief of pain symptoms measured subjectively with pain scores, and was superior to ASA or placebo for relief of nasal congestion as measured objectively with rhinomanometry and subjectively with congestion scores. After 3 days of treatment, ASA plus PSE was superior to PSE but not to placebo or ASA for global pain assessments, and ASA plus PSE was superior to ASA and placebo but not to PSE for congestion assessments. No unexpected adverse events occurred and no serious adverse events were attributed to study medicines. This study demonstrates that a combination therapy of ASA plus PSE provides safe and effective relief of both common cold pain related symptoms and nasal congestion. PMID:26097788

  4. The comparative study of acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA) and aspirin in the prevention of intestinal adenomatous polyposis in APC(Min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruiqi; Wang, Yan; Gao, Zuhua; Qu, Xianjun

    2014-02-01

    Acetyl-11-keto-beta-BA (AKBA), a component of the gum resin of Boswellia serrata, has been recognized as a promising agent for the prevention of intestinal tumorigenesis. Aspirin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has also been considered to have the activity against intestinal tumorigenesis. However, the prevention of colonic cancer is insufficient and no definitive recommendation has been made for clinic use. Herein, we compared the efficacy of AKBA with that of aspirin in an adenomatous polyposis coli intestinal neoplasia consecutive weeks. Mice were sacrificed by anesthetizing. The whole intestine was removed from each mouse. The number, size and histopathology of intestinal adenomatous polyps were examined under microscopy. The adenomatous polyps were removed for further analysis by the assays of western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. AKBA significantly prevented the formation of intestinal adenomatous polyps without toxicity to mice. Statistical analysis indicated that AKBA's activity both in the prevention of small intestinal and colonic polyps was more potently than aspirin. Histopathologic examination revealed that AKBA's effect, that is the reduction of polyp size and degree of dysplasia, was more prominent in larger sized polyps, especially those originating in colon. These effects of AKBA were associated with its role in the induction of apoptosis in carcinomas. The assays of western blotting and immunohistochemistry staining indicated that the efficacy of AKBA might arise from its activity in the modulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and NF-κB/COX-2 pathway in adenomatous polyps. Conclusion, AKBA by oral application prevented intestinal tumorigenesis more potential than aspirin. PMID:24647155

  5. Two cases of oral aspirin overdose.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Kanji; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    A 30-year-old woman and a 27-year-old man were found in a parked car after the man had telephoned his father to tell him of their suicide attempt. In spite of emergent hospitalization and intensive care, the woman died. Due to the possibility of his assisting her suicide, medicolegal autopsy and toxicological analysis were performed. On forensic autopsy, no external injuries or pathological findings were detected. The man recovered after 5 days of hospitalization. In spite of a negative toxicological screening test, the police investigation revealed that they may have taken 120 tablets (330 mg/tablet; 39,600 mg total dose) of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) orally; therefore, we analyzed the concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid and two kinds of metabolite in specimens obtained at autopsy and on emergent hospitalization using high performance liquid chromatography. Acetylsalicylic acid and/or the two metabolites were found in the woman's specimens. These substances were also present in the man's specimens. It is still unclear why the man survived in spite of what appeared to be a fatal aspirin overdose. It was very straightforward to diagnose aspirin poisoning in these cases; however, we have to be aware of poisoning by drugs which are not included in simple drug screening examinations. PMID:20569957

  6. Comparison of the effect of aspirin and choline magnesium trisalicylate on thromboxane biosynthesis in human platelets: role of the acetyl moiety.

    PubMed

    Danesh, B J; McLaren, M; Russell, R I; Lowe, G D; Forbes, C D

    1989-01-01

    Parameters of platelet thromboxane biosynthesis were measured 24 h after ingestion of equivalent salicylate doses (500 mg) of aspirin (ASA) and choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), a non-acetylated salicylate. In random order, 10 healthy volunteers received these drugs on 2 separate days, 2 weeks apart. While ASA significantly prolonged bleeding time, and decreased plasma thromboxane generation and serum thromboxane B2 levels, CMT failed to produce such effects. Thus CMT, which lacks an acetyl moiety in its structure, has no inhibitory effect on platelet thromboxane biosynthesis, and may therefore be considered safer than ASA for therapeutic use, when inhibition of platelet function can be hazardous. PMID:2744633

  7. Drug/drug interaction of common NSAIDs with antiplatelet effect of aspirin in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Aaruni; Balaramnavar, Vishal M; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Saxena, Anil K

    2013-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may interfere with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin at the level of the platelet cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) enzyme. In order to examine the interference of common NSAIDs with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin the human platelet rich plasma from voluntary donors was used for arachidonic acid-induced aggregation and determination of thromboxane synthesis. Further, docking studies were used to explain the molecular basis of the NSAID/aspirin interaction. The experimental results showed that celecoxib, dipyrone (active metabolite), ibuprofen, flufenamic acid, naproxen, nimesulide, oxaprozin, and piroxicam significantly interfere with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin, while diclofenac, ketorolac and acetaminophen do not. Docking studies suggested that NSAIDs forming hydrogen bonds with Ser530, Arg120, Tyr385 and other amino acids of the COX-1 hydrophobic channel interfere with antiplatelet activity of aspirin while non interfering NSAIDs do not form relevant hydrogen bond interactions within the aspirin binding site. In conclusion, docking analysis of NSAID interactions at the COX-1 active site appears useful to predict their interference with the anti-platelet activity of aspirin. The results, demonstrate that some NSAIDs do not interfere with the antiplatelet action of aspirin while many others do and provide a basis for understanding the observed differences among individual non-aspirin NSAIDs. PMID:24075938

  8. Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159459.html Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation Blood thinners -- not aspirin -- dramatically cut the risk of stroke, researchers say ...

  9. Graphene/Nafion composite film modified glassy carbon electrode for simultaneous determination of paracetamol, aspirin and caffeine in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Yiğit, Aydın; Yardım, Yavuz; Çelebi, Metin; Levent, Abdulkadir; Şentürk, Zühre

    2016-09-01

    A graphene-Nafion composite film was fabricated on the glassy carbon electrode (GR-NF/GCE), and used for simultaneous determination of paracetamol (PAR), aspirin (ASA) and caffeine (CAF). The electrochemical behaviors of PAR, ASA and CAF were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and square-wave adsorptive anodic stripping voltammetry. By using stripping one for simultaneous determination of PAR, ASA and CAF, their electrochemical oxidation peaks appeared at +0.64, 1.04 and 1.44V, and good linear current responses were obtained with the detection limits of 18ngmL(-1) (1.2×10(-9)M), 11.7ngmL(-1) (6.5×10(-8)M) and 7.3ngmL(-1) (3.8×10(-8)M), respectively. Finally, the proposed electrochemical sensor was successfully applied for quantifying PAR, ASA and CAF in commercial tablet formulations. PMID:27343573

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and aspirin interact synergistically to induce cell death in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Hüls, Isabel; Sigler, Michael; Palani, Chithra D; Hong, Le Thi Thu; Völker, Uwe; Kroemer, Heyo K; Beck, James F

    2008-07-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) as well as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin show promise as antineoplastic agents. The treatment with both HDIs and aspirin can result in hyperacetylation of proteins. In this study, we investigated whether HDIs and aspirin interacted in inducing anticancer activity and histone acetylation. We found that the HDIs, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and sodium butyrate, and aspirin cooperated to induce cell death in the ovarian cancer cell line, A2780. The effect was synergistic, as evidenced by CI-isobologram analysis. However, aspirin had no effect on histone acetylation, neither in the absence nor presence of HDIs. To gain insight into the mechanism underlying the synergistic action of HDIs and aspirin, we employed the deacetylated metabolite of aspirin, salicylic acid, and the cyclooxygenase-1- and -2-selective inhibitors, SC-560 and NS-398, respectively. We found that HDIs and salicylic acid interacted synergistically, albeit less efficiently than HDIs and aspirin, to induce cancer cell death, suggesting that the acetyl and the salicyl moiety contributed to the cooperative interaction of aspirin with HDIs. SC-560 and NS-398 had little effect both when applied alone or in conjunction with HDIs, indicating that the combinatorial effect of HDIs and aspirin was not the result of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that HDIs and aspirin synergize to induce cancer cell death and, thus, provides a rationale for a more in-depth exploration into the potential of combining HDIs and aspirin as a strategy for anticancer therapy. PMID:18575740

  11. Asa Grant Hilliard III: Scholar Supreme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, William H.

    2008-01-01

    This integrative review uses two of Asa Grant Hilliard's books, "SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind" and "The Maroon Within Us: Selected Essays on African American Community Socialization", to discuss aspects of his scholarly legacy in teaching, history, and psychology. His scholarship is provocative. Hilliard rejected the supremacy of the…

  12. ASA24® Respondent Website Features

    Cancer.gov

    The ASA24 Respondent Website guides the participant through the completion of either a 24-hour recall for the previous day (from midnight-to-midnight or for the past 24-hours) or for a single or multiple day food record.

  13. Asa Wright Nature Center, Like Another World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimm, Wayne

    1983-01-01

    The Asa Wright Nature Center, on the Caribbean island of Trinidad, offers a diversity of wildlife species: 108 mammals, 400 birds, 55 reptiles, 25 amphibians, and over 600 butterflies. Learning opportunities include art and photography instruction, lectures, interpretive nature walks, annual resident seminars, and a two-day trip to Tobago. (MH)

  14. Nitric Oxide-Releasing Aspirin Suppresses NF-κB Signaling in Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer Cells in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Nath, Niharika; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Rodes, Deborah B; Nazarenko, Anna; Kodela, Ravinder; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor negative (ER(-)) breast cancer is aggressive, responds poorly to current treatments and has a poor prognosis. The NF-κB signaling pathway is implicated in ER(-) tumorigenesis. Aspirin (ASA) is chemopreventive against ER(+) but not for ER(-) breast cancers. Nitric oxide-releasing aspirin (NO-ASA) is a safer ASA where ASA is linked to an NO-releasing moiety through a spacer. In vitro, we investigated anti-proliferation effects of NO-ASA (para- and meta-isomers) against ER(-) breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-23, effects on NF-κB signaling, and reactive oxygen species by standard techniques. In vivo, effects of NO-ASA were evaluated in a mouse xenograft model using MDA-MB-231 cells. p-NO-ASA inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 cells at 24 h, the respective IC50s were 13 ± 2 and 17 ± 2 μM; ASA had an IC50 of >3000 μM in both cell lines. The IC50s for m-NO-ASA in MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 were 173 ± 15 and 185 ± 12 μM, respectively, therefore, implying p-NO-ASA as a stronger inhibitor of growth p-NO-ASA reduced cell growth by inhibiting proliferation, inducing apoptosis and causing G0/G1 cell cycle block. Activation of NF-κB was inhibited by both isomers as demonstrated by decreases in NF-κB-DNA binding and luciferase activity at 24 h, However, m-NO-ASA produced transient effects at 3 h such as increased NF-κB-DNA-binding, increased levels of nuclear p50, even though both isomers inhibited IκB degradation. Increase in nuclear p50 by m-NO-ASA was associated with translocation of p50 in to the nucleus as observed by immunoflouresence at 3 h. NO-ASA induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) as evidenced by overall increases in both H2DCFDA (2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein) and DHE (dihydroethidium)-derived fluorescence. Inhibition of ROS by N-acetyl-cysteine reversed the m-NO-ASA-mediated translocation of p50 in to the nucleus. In xenografts, p-NO-ASA inhibited tumor growth by inhibiting proliferation (PCNA and tumor volume

  15. Rhinosinusitis and Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Cruz, Maria L.; Jimenez-Chobillon, M. Alejandro; Teran, Luis M.

    2012-01-01

    Rhinosinusitis is a feature of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which in the initial phase is manifested as nasal congestion, mostly affecting females at the age of around 30 years on average. Subsequently, nasal inflammation progresses to chronic eosinophilic rhinosinusitis, asthma, nasal polyposis, and intolerance to aspirin and to other NSAIDs. While it has been long established that NSAIDs cause inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), leading to excessive metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) to cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs), there is now evidence that both cytokines and staphylococcus superantigens amplify the inflammatory process exacerbating the disease. This paper gives a brief overview of the development of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in sensitive patients, and we share our experience in the diagnosis and management of CRS in AERD. PMID:22829846

  16. Acetylsalicylic acid does not alter thermo-effector responses during mild whole-body passive heat stress in young men.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stephen J; Herron, Robert L; Akers, S Zeb; Bishop, Phillip A

    2015-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), aspirin, exerts potent systemic effects that may interfere with normal thermo-effector responses. We investigated the influence of commonly ingested ASA doses on measures of skin blood flow (SkBF) and local sweat rate (SR) during whole-body, passive heat stress. Seven male participants completed counter-balanced trials to compare ASA treatments (single dose 325 mg or 4 consecutive days 81 mg (4-d 81 mg)) to control (no ASA). Laser-Doppler flowmetry provided an index of SkBF. A ventilated capsule measured local sweat rate via capacitance hygrometry. Mean body temperature ([Formula: see text]) was increased by 1 °C above baseline using a water-perfused suit. [Formula: see text] was similar at the onset of cutaneous vasodilation among trials. Cutaneous vascular conductance, expressed as a percentage change from baseline, was not different among trials. Additionally, [Formula: see text] at the onset of local SR and SR sensitivity did not differ among trials. While ASA has previously been shown to influence SkBF during heat stress, it is possible our cohort's relatively young age may have contributed to our dissimilar results. PMID:25697227

  17. Ueber den Nachweis von Exoplaneten in der ASAS-3 Datenbank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huemmerich, Stefan; Bernhard, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Under favourable circumstances, transits of known exoplanets with large amplitudes like WASP-18 b can be observed in the ASAS-3 database. An attempt to search for exoplanets using ASAS-3 data is discussed.

  18. Citing ASA24® Dietary Assessment Tool in Publications & Presentations

    Cancer.gov

    In order to show and maintain support for ASA24, documenting its use in through publications is extremely useful to the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Please cite ASA24 as follows, depending on the version used in your study.

  19. Citing ASA24® System in Publications & Presentations

    Cancer.gov

    In order to show and maintain support for ASA24, documenting its use in through publications is extremely useful to the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Please cite ASA24 as follows, depending on the version used in your study.

  20. Aspirin, acetaminophen and proton transport through phospholipid bilayers and mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, J

    1992-09-01

    Mechanisms of proton transport were investigated in planar phospholipid bilayer membranes exposed to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), acetaminophen (4-acetamidophenol), benzoic acid and three aspirin metabolites (salicylic acid, gentisic acid and salicyluric acid). The objectives were to characterize the conductances and permeabilities of these weak acids in lipid bilayer membranes and then predict their effects on mitochondrial membranes. Of the compounds tested only aspirin, benzoate and salicylate caused significant increases in membrane conductance. The conductance was due mainly to proton current at low pH and to weak acid anion current at neutral pH. Analysis of the concentration and pH dependence suggests that these weak acids act as HA-2-type proton carriers when pH approximately pK and as lipid soluble anions at neutral pH. Salicylate is much more potent than aspirin and benzoate because salicylate contains an internal hydrogen bond which delocalizes the negative charge and increases the permeability of the anion. Model calculations for mitochondria suggest that salicylate causes net H+ uptake by a cyclic process of HA influx and A- efflux. This model can explain the salicylate-induced uncoupling and swelling observed in isolated mitochondria. Since ingested aspirin breaks down rapidly to form salicylate, these results may clarify the mechanisms of aspirin toxicity in humans. The results may also help to explain why the ingestion of aspirin but not acetaminophen is associated with Reye's syndrome, a disease characterized by impaired energy metabolism and mitochondrial swelling. PMID:1334228

  1. Aspirin-triggered lipoxins (15-epi-LX) are generated by the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (A549)-neutrophil interactions and are potent inhibitors of cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Clària, J.; Lee, M. H.; Serhan, C. N.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanism by which aspirin (ASA) acts to protect against human cancer is not yet known. We recently showed that ASA triggers the formation of a new series of potent bioactive eicosanoids, 15-epi-lipoxins (15-epi-LXs or ASA-triggered LX [ATL]), during interactions between prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase-2 (PGHS-2) in endothelial cells and 5-lipoxygenase (LO) in leukocytes. Here, we investigated the transcellular biosynthesis of these eicosanoids during costimulation of the human tumor A549 cell line (alveolar type II epithelial cells) and neutrophils, and evaluated their impact on cell proliferation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A549 cells and isolated neutrophils were coincubated and mRNA expression levels of key enzymes in eicosanoid biosynthesis were measured. In addition, product formation was analysed by physical methods. The effect of LX on cell proliferation was determined by using a soluble microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay and by measuring [3H]-thymidine incorporation. RESULTS: Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta)-primed A549 cells showed selective elevation in the levels of PGHS-2 mRNA and generated 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE). ASA markedly increased 15-HETE formation by A549 cells, while treatment with an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 reduced by approximately 50%, implicating both PGHS-2- and cytochrome P450-initiated routes in 15-HETE biosynthesis in these cells. Maximal production of 15-HETE from endogenous sources occurred within 24 hr of cytokine (IL-1 beta) exposure and declined thereafter. Chiral analysis revealed that approximately 85% of ASA-triggered epithelial-derived 15-HETE carries its carbon 15 alcohol group in the R configuration. Costimulation of ASA-treated A549 cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMN) led to production of both LXA4 and LXB4, as well as 15-epi-LXA4 and 15-epi-LXB4 (9.5 +/- 0.5 ng LX/10(7) A549 cells). 15-epi-LXA4 accounted for approximately 88% of the total amount of LXA4 produced

  2. Aspirin: a history, a love story.

    PubMed

    Wick, Jeannette Y

    2012-05-01

    Most pharmacists know that aspirin's origins lie with willow bark, but they may be unaware of its role in the development of the pharmaceutical industry. Evolving from salacin (the active ingredient in many plant remedies) to salicylic acid (an analgesic in its own right) to the more effective, less toxic acetylsalicylic acid, this pain reliever cornered the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory market for more than 70 years. It helped the dye industry branch into pharmaceuticals, and is now used in multiple indications. PMID:22591976

  3. Per aspirin ad astra...

    PubMed

    Hartung, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Taking the 110th anniversary of marketing of aspirin as starting point, the almost scary toxicological profile of aspirin is contrasted with its actual use experience. The author concludes that we are lucky that, in 1899, there was no regulatory toxicology. Adding, for the purpose of this article, a fourth R to the Three Rs, i.e. Realism, three reality-checks are carried out. The first one comes to the conclusion that the tools of toxicology are hardly adequate for the challenges ahead. The second one concludes that, specifically, the implementation of the EU REACH system is not feasible with these tools, mainly with regard to throughput. The third one challenges the belief that classical alternative methods, i.e. replacing animal test-based tools one by one, is actually leading to a new toxicology - it appears to change only patches of the patchwork, but not to overcome any inherent limitations other than ethical ones. The perspective lies in the Toxicology for the 21st Century initiatives, which aim to create a new approach from the scratch, by an evidence-based toxicology and a global "Human Toxicology Programme". PMID:20105011

  4. Comparison of aspirin and indobufen in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Young; Sung, Ki-Chul; Choi, Hyo-In

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the extent and recovery of platelet inhibition after administration of indobufen and aspirin in healthy volunteers. Indobufen inhibits platelet aggregation by reversibly inhibiting the platelet cyclooxygenase enzyme, thereby suppressing thromboxane synthesis. Twenty healthy volunteers completed the study and received aspirin (200 mg/day for 2 weeks) followed by a 4-week washout period and then indobufen (200 mg twice a day for 2 weeks). The percent (%) inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) was assessed using arachidonic acid (0.5 mg/ml) and adenosine diphosphate (5 µM) at 4, 12, 24 and 48 hours after last dose of each drug. IPA assessed using arachidonic acid as the agonist was similar at 4 hours after the last dose of indobufen (81.07 ± 9.36%) and aspirin (96.99 ± 0.29%, p = 0.10), but significantly lower at 12 hours (74.04 ± 9.55% vs. 97.94 ± 0.28%, p = 0.02), 24 hours (33.39 ± 11.13% vs. 97.48 ± 0.32%, p < 0.001) and 48 hours (14.12 ± 9.74% vs. 98.22 ± 0.31%, p < 0.001) after indobufen, compared to the relative values for aspirin. IPA assessed using adenosine diphosphate as the agonist was similar in the two groups at 4, 12 and 24 hours after the last dose, but significantly lower 48 hours after the last dose of indobufen, compared to the relative value for aspirin (1.98 ± 3.57% vs. 12.61 ± 2.71%, p = 0.002). Indobufen (200 mg twice a day) caused equivalent initial inhibition of platelet aggregation to aspirin (200 mg daily), and the anti-aggregation effect diminished faster than after aspirin. PMID:26083594

  5. High prevalence of aspirin resistance in elderly patients with cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Gao, Ying-Hui; Cao, Jian; Zhang, Hua-Xin; Fan, Li; Hu, Guo-Liang; Hu, Yi-Xin; Li, Xiao-Li; Zou, Xiao; Li, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is known to be a prothrombotic state. We undertook this study to examine a hypothesis that aspirin resistance may be associated with metabolic syndrome, and to assess other potential determinants of aspirin resistance in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods A total of 469 elderly patients with CVD were recruited. One hundred and seventy-two patients with metabolic syndrome and 297 without metabolic syndrome (control group) received daily aspirin therapy (≥ 75 mg) over one month. Platelet aggregation was measured by light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Aspirin resistance was defined as ≥ 20% arachidonic acid (AA)- and ≥ 70% adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation according to LTA. Aspirin semi-responders were defined as meeting one (but not both) of these criteria. Results By LTA, 38 of 469 (8.1%) patients were aspirin resistant. The prevalence of aspirin resistance was higher in the metabolic syndrome group compared with the control group [11.6 % vs. 6.6%, odds ratio (OR) = 2.039; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.047–3.973]. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, metabolic syndrome (OR = 4.951, 95% CI: 1.440–17.019, P = 0.011) was a significant risk factor for aspirin resistance. Conclusions A significant number of patients with CVD and metabolic syndrome are resistant to aspirin therapy. This might further increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in these patients. PMID:27582771

  6. Aspirin inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F.; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin-mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT-29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT-29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin-acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  7. Antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death globally, and atherothrombosis is the underlying cause of most cardiovascular events. Several studies have shown that antiplatelet therapy, including aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), reduces the risk of cardiovascular events and death. However, it is well-known that many patients experience cardiovascular events despite treatment with aspirin, often termed "aspirin low-responsiveness". This fact has caused considerable debate: does biochemical aspirin low-responsiveness have prognostic value? Can low-responders be reliably identified? And if so, should antithrombotic treatment be changed? Is the whole discussion of antiplatelet drug response merely a result of low compliance? Compliance should be carefully optimised, before evaluating the pharmacological effect of a drug. It is well-known that cardiovascular disease is multifactorial, and, therefore, total risk reduction is not feasible. Aetiological factors to the variable platelet inhibition by aspirin seem to include genetic factors, pharmacological interactions, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and increased platelet turnover. It is a captivating thought that antiplatelet therapy may be improved by individually tailored therapy based on platelet function testing. Ongoing studies are challenging the current one-size-fits-all dosing strategy, but the preceding evaluation of platelet function assays has not been adequate. The overall objective of this thesis was to evaluate the reproducibility of and aggreement between a number of widely used platelet function tests and to explore the importance of platelet turnover for the antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with coronary artery disease. In the intervention studies (studies 1, 3, and 4), optimal compliance was confirmed by measurements of serum thromboxane, which is the most sensitive assay to confirm compliance with aspirin. In study 1, platelet function tests widely used to measure the antiplatelet effect

  8. Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug-Exacerbated Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Dennis K; Lockey, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA)-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is characterized by upper airway congestion due to eosinophilic inflammation of the nasal and sinus membranes and nasal polyposis, associated with increased leukotriene production that is further accentuated by ASA or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ingestion. It occurs in 5% to 10% of subjects with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and in 15% to 40% of those with nasal polyposis. Although AERD with CRS is usually associated with asthma, this is not always the case. The eosinophilic airway inflammation and symptoms precede clinical reactions to ASA or other NSAIDs, but ultimately affected subjects experience worsening of symptoms with ingestion of ASA/NSAIDs. The endotypic mechanism for this worsening is related to a chronic increase in leukotriene and a decrease in prostaglandin production, particularly prostaglandin E2, that is further aggravated by the inhibition of cycloxgenase I. IgE does not likely play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease although nasal and sinus staphylococcal infection increases local IgE level and may increase total IgE and specific IgE levels. Genetic studies suggest that multiple genes may be involved, but the genetic abnormalities may differ in affected subjects from different ethnicities and candidate genes have not been confirmed in multiple studies. Genome-wide association studies have not been revealing. The phenotype is recognized by the mucosal inflammation and worsening of symptoms acutely with ASA/NSAID. There is clinical improvement with ASA desensitization followed by regular ingestion of ASA or other NSAIDs. Further understanding of this unique phenotype and endotype of CRS will likely improve the understanding of other eosinophilic airway diseases. PMID:27393773

  9. Platelet inhibition by aspirin 81 and 325 mg/day in men versus women without clinically apparent cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, Rehan; Becker, Diane M; Yanek, Lisa R; Moy, Taryn F; Becker, Lewis C; Faraday, Nauder; Vaidya, Dhananjay

    2008-05-01

    Compared with men, women have greater platelet aggregation before and after low-dose aspirin. It is not known whether high-dose aspirin therapy brings residual platelet aggregation in women closer to that in men. Our objective was to compare inhibition of platelet aggregation in women and men after low- and high-dose aspirin. We enrolled healthy subjects (n=106) in a trial of 14 days of aspirin 81 mg/day followed by 14 days of 325 mg/day. Platelet function was measured at baseline and after the 2 aspirin doses. Women had greater baseline platelet activation measurements. After the 2 aspirin doses, men and women had near complete suppression of platelet aggregation to arachidonic acid in whole blood and in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), the direct cyclo-oxygenase-1 pathway affected by aspirin. For indirect pathways, women had significantly greater residual platelet activation to collagen and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) in whole blood after the 2 aspirin doses and in response to collagen and ADP in PRP after aspirin 325 mg/day only. After aspirin 325 mg/day, women continued to have greater residual platelet aggregation compared with men after aspirin 81 mg/day in response to collagen (p=0.016 in whole blood, p=0.037 in PRP), ADP (p<0.001 in whole blood, p=0.012 in PRP), and epinephrine (p=0.03 in PRP). Excretion of urinary thromboxane metabolite (urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2) decreased after aspirin to a similar extent in men and women. In conclusion, women continue to have greater residual platelet activity after high-dose aspirin compared with men treated with a lower dose of aspirin. PMID:18435972

  10. In Vivo Evaluation of 5-ASA Colon-Specific Tablets Using Experimental-Induced Colitis Rat Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Sawarkar, Sujata P; Deshpande, S G; Bajaj, A N; Nikam, V S

    2015-12-01

    Colonic drug delivery is intended not only for local treatment in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but also for systemic delivery of therapeutics. Intestinal myeloperoxidase (MPO) determination could be used to estimate the average level of inflammation in colon as well as to determine the efficacy of drugs to be used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases or study the specificity of dosage forms to be used for colonic targeting of anti-inflammatory drugs. Colonic prodrug sulfasalazine (SASP) gets metabolized to give 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), which is the active portion of SASP. However, when given orally, 5-ASA is absorbed in upper part of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and not made available in colon. In the present study, colon-targeted delivery of 5-ASA was achieved by formulating tablets with two natural polymers namely guar gum and pectin using compression coating method. Colonic specificity of 5-ASA tablets (prepared using guar gum and pectin as polymers) was evaluated in vitro using simulated fluids mimicking in vivo environment as well as in vivo method using chemically (2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid and acetic acid)-induced colitis rat model. Both colon-specific formulations of 5-ASA (guar gum and pectin) were observed to be more effective in reducing inflammation in chemically induced colitis rat models when compared to colon-specific prodrug sulfasalazine as well as conventional 5-ASA administered orally. PMID:26017284

  11. Photometric solutions of some contact ASAS binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezer, İ.; Bozkurt, Z.

    2016-04-01

    We present the first light curve solution of 6 contact binary systems which are chosen from the ASAS catalog. The photometric elements and the estimated absolute parameters of all systems are obtained with the light curve analyses. We calculated the values of degree of contact for the systems. The location of the targets on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and the mass-radius plane is compared to the other well-known contact binaries and the evolutionary status of the systems are also discussed.

  12. Neutrophils influx and proinflammatory cytokines inhibition by sodium salicylate, unlike aspirin, in Candida albicans-induced peritonitis model.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tártari; Bini, Daniel; Bovo, Fernanda; Faccioli, Lucia Helena; Monteiro, Marta Chagas

    2016-07-01

    Sodium salicylate (NaS) and aspirin (ASA) are known to have a variety of effects on microorganisms, such as fungus (C. albicans and C. neoformans), moreover, it have effects in leukocyte adhesion and migration in vitro. In this report, we investigated the effect of ASA and NaS in neutrophil migration and cytokine production in C. albicans-induced peritonitis murine model. For this, mice were treated intraperitoneally (i.p) or orally (po) with NaS or ASA; after they were stimulated i.p. with C. albicans, the cellular migration was evaluated 24 h after stimulation. NaS, in mice treated i.p., unlike ASA, was able to inhibit the neutrophil migration and proinflammatory cytokine production induced by C. albicans, such as TNF-α, IL-1, IFN-γ, IL-12, and IL-10, but did not alter the IL-4 levels in these animals. However, the po treatment with same the dose of NaS or ASA did not affect the influx of this cell for inflammatory site. These results suggest that the NaS inhibits cellular migration and proinflammatory cytokine by different anti-inflammatory mechanism compared to ASA. PMID:26762336

  13. Flow Cytometry-Assisted Basophil Activation Test as a Safe Diagnostic Tool for Aspirin/NSAID Hypersenstivity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung Shin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ASA/NSAIDs) are common causes of drug hypersensitivity. An oral provocation test is the only definitive diagnostic test. This study assessed the reliability of a flow cytometry-assisted basophil activation test (FAST) as a safe diagnostic method for ASA/NSAID-induced hypersensitivity, as its high sensitivity and specificity have been demonstrated for many other drugs. Methods Eighteen patients and 11 controls were enrolled. Using a Flow-CAST kit® (Bühlmann Laboratories AG, Schönenbuch, Switzerland), 29 analyses with aspirin, ibuprofen, and diclofenac were performed by flow cytometry to detect double-positive staining of anti-IgE and anti-CD63. The stimulation index was defined as the activated basophil percentage after drug stimulation/basally active basophil percentage. A stimulation index≥2 and an absolute activated basophil percentage≥5 were considered positive. Results Patients with hypersensitivity to ASA/NSAIDs were predominantly female, and the prevalence of atopy was higher in patients than in controls. A sensitivity of 61%, specificity of 91%, positive predictive value of 92%, and negative predictive value of 59% were achieved. Conclusions FAST is a useful additional method for diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions to ASA/NSAIDs. Further development is required to increase the sensitivity of the test. PMID:22548206

  14. 5-ASA Affects Cell Cycle Progression in Colorectal Cells by Reversibly Activating a Replication Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    LUCIANI, M. GLORIA; CAMPREGHER, CHRISTOPH; FORTUNE, JOHN M.; KUNKEL, THOMAS A.; GASCHE, CHRISTOPH

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease are at risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Epidemiologic, animal, and laboratory studies suggest that 5-amino-salicylic acid (5-ASA) protects from the development of CRC by altering cell cycle progression and by inducing apoptosis. Our previous results indicate that 5-ASA improves replication fidelity in colorectal cells, an effect that is active in reducing mutations. In this study, we hypothesized that 5-ASA restrains cell cycle progression by activating checkpoint pathways in colorectal cell lines, which would prevent tumor development and improve genomic stability. Methods CRC cells with different genetic backgrounds such as HT29, HCT116, HCT116p53−/−, HCT116+chr3, and LoVo were treated with 5-ASA for 2–96 hours. Cell cycle progression, phosphorylation, and DNA binding of cell cycle checkpoint proteins were analyzed. Results We found that 5-ASA at concentrations between 10 and 40 mmol/L affects cell cycle progression by inducing cells to accumulate in the S phase. This effect was independent of the hMLH1, hMSH2, and p53 status because it was observed to a similar extent in all cell lines under investigation. Moreover, wash-out experiments demonstrated reversibility within 48 hours. Although p53 did not have a causative role, p53 Ser15 was strongly phosphorylated. Proteins involved in the ATM-and-Rad3-related kinase (ATR)-dependent S-phase checkpoint response (Chk1 and Rad17) were also phosphorylated but not ataxia telengectasia mutated kinase. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that 5-ASA causes cells to reversibly accumulate in S phase and activate an ATR-dependent checkpoint. The activation of replication checkpoint may slow down DNA replication and improve DNA replication fidelity, which increases the maintenance of genomic stability and counteracts carcinogenesis. PMID:17241873

  15. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of aspirin with warfarin in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenlin; Huang, Xiaohui; Li, Jun; Zhang, Ping; Li, Lin; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Tingting; Pappoe, Faustina; Huang, Jihan; Tang, Haiqin

    2016-01-01

    1. Warfarin and aspirin are widely used in a wide spectrum of thromboembolic and atherothrombotic diseases. Despite the potential efficacy of warfarin-aspirin therapy, the safety and side effect of combined therapy remains unclear. 2. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between warfarin and aspirin in beagles after single and multiple doses. 3. Coadministration of aspirin had no significant effects on the area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC(0-t)) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of R- and S-warfarin after a single dose of warfarin, but significantly increase the AUC(0-t) and Cmax and dramatically decrease the clearance (CL) of R- and S-warfarin after multiple dose of warfarin. Accordingly, there was a slight increase in the AUEC(0-t) and Emax of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT) and international normalized ratio (INR) after multiple dose of warfarin. 4. Coadministration of warfarin had no markedly effects on the AUC(0-t) and Cmax of aspirin and its metabolite salicylic acid after single or multiple dose of aspirin. Meanwhile, the AUEC(0-t) and Emax of inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) were not significantly affected by warfarin. 5. Our animal study indicated that coadministration of aspirin with warfarin can cause significant pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions in beagles. However, more studies are urgently needed to assess related information of warfarin-aspirin drug interactions in healthy volunteers or patients. PMID:26548565

  16. Aspirin: Pharmacology and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Paez Espinosa, Enma V.; Murad, John P.; Khasawneh, Fadi T.

    2012-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy has been documented to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease after acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft, and in chronic atrial fibrillation patients, amongst other risk factors. Conventional management of thrombosis-based disorders includes the use of heparin, oral anticoagulants, and the preferred antiplatelet agent aspirin. Interestingly, aspirin was not intended to be used as an antiplatelet agent; rather, after being repurposed, it has become one of the most widely prescribed antithrombotic drugs. To this end, there have been several milestones in the development of antiplatelet agents in the last few decades, such as adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitors, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors. However, given some of the limitations of these therapies, aspirin continues to play a major role in the management of thrombotic and cardiovascular disorders and is expected to do so for years to come. PMID:22195279

  17. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Aspirin Therapy for the Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Idiopathic Pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Schwier, Nicholas; Tran, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a mainstay of therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pericarditis (IP). A comprehensive review consisting of pertinent clinical literature, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic considerations, has not been released in recent years. This review will facilitate the clinician’s understanding of pharmacotherapeutic considerations for using ASA/NSAIDs to treat IP. Data were compiled using clinical literature consisting of case reports, cohort data, retrospective and prospective studies, and manufacturer package inserts. ASA, ibuprofen, indometacin, and ketorolac relatively have the most evidence in the treatment of IP, provide symptomatic relief of IP, and should be tapered accordingly. ASA is the drug of choice in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure (HF), or renal disease, but should be avoided in patients with asthma and nasal polyps, who are naïve to ASA therapy. Ibuprofen is an inexpensive and relatively accessible option in patients who do not have concomitant CAD, HF, or renal disease. Indometacin is not available over-the-counter in the USA, and has a relatively higher incidence of central nervous system (CNS) adverse effects. Ketorolac is an intravenous option; however, clinicians must be mindful of the maximum dose that can be administered. While ASA/NSAIDs do not ameliorate the disease process of IP, they are part of first-line therapy (along with colchicine), for preventing recurrence of IP. ASA/NSAID choice should be dictated by comorbid conditions, tolerability, and adverse effects. Additionally, the clinician should be mindful of considerations such as tapering, high-sensitivity CRP monitoring, bleeding risk, and contraindications to ASA/NSAID therapy. PMID:27023565

  18. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Aspirin Therapy for the Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Idiopathic Pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Schwier, Nicholas; Tran, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a mainstay of therapy for the treatment of idiopathic pericarditis (IP). A comprehensive review consisting of pertinent clinical literature, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic considerations, has not been released in recent years. This review will facilitate the clinician's understanding of pharmacotherapeutic considerations for using ASA/NSAIDs to treat IP. Data were compiled using clinical literature consisting of case reports, cohort data, retrospective and prospective studies, and manufacturer package inserts. ASA, ibuprofen, indometacin, and ketorolac relatively have the most evidence in the treatment of IP, provide symptomatic relief of IP, and should be tapered accordingly. ASA is the drug of choice in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure (HF), or renal disease, but should be avoided in patients with asthma and nasal polyps, who are naïve to ASA therapy. Ibuprofen is an inexpensive and relatively accessible option in patients who do not have concomitant CAD, HF, or renal disease. Indometacin is not available over-the-counter in the USA, and has a relatively higher incidence of central nervous system (CNS) adverse effects. Ketorolac is an intravenous option; however, clinicians must be mindful of the maximum dose that can be administered. While ASA/NSAIDs do not ameliorate the disease process of IP, they are part of first-line therapy (along with colchicine), for preventing recurrence of IP. ASA/NSAID choice should be dictated by comorbid conditions, tolerability, and adverse effects. Additionally, the clinician should be mindful of considerations such as tapering, high-sensitivity CRP monitoring, bleeding risk, and contraindications to ASA/NSAID therapy. PMID:27023565

  19. Protein nitration and nitrosylation by NO-donating aspirin in colon cancer cells: Relevance to its mechanism of action

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jennie L.; Ji, Ping; Ouyang, Nengtai; Kopelovich, Levy; Rigas, Basil

    2011-06-10

    Nitric oxide-donating aspirin (NO-ASA) is a promising agent for cancer prevention. Although studied extensively, its molecular targets and mechanism of action are still unclear. S-nitrosylation of signaling proteins is emerging as an important regulatory mechanism by NO. Here, we examined whether S-nitrosylation of the NF-{kappa}B, p53, and Wnt signaling proteins by NO-ASA might explain, in part, its mechanism of action in colon cancer. NO-ASA releases significant amounts of NO detected intracellularly in HCT116 and HT-29 colon cells. Using a modified biotin switch assay we demonstrated that NO-ASA S-nitrosylates the signaling proteins p53, {beta}-catenin, and NF-{kappa}B, in colon cancer cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. NO-ASA suppresses NF-{kappa}B binding to its cognate DNA oligonucleotide, which occurs without changes in the nuclear levels of the NF-{kappa}B subunits p65 and p50 and is reversed by dithiothreitol that reduces -S-NO to -SH. In addition to S-nitrosylation, we documented both in vitro and in vivo widespread nitration of tyrosine residues of cellular proteins in response to NO-ASA. Our results suggest that the increased intracellular NO levels following treatment with NO-ASA modulate cell signaling by chemically modifying key protein members of signaling cascades. We speculate that S-nitrosylation and tyrosine nitration are responsible, at least in part, for the inhibitory growth effect of NO-ASA on cancer cell growth and that this may represent a general mechanism of action of NO-releasing agents.

  20. Comparative effects of immediate-release and extended-release aspirin on basal and bradykinin-stimulated excretion of thromboxane and prostacyclin metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gamboa, Jorge L; Devin, Jessica K; Ramirez, Claudia E; Yu, Chang; Nian, Hui; Lee, Rhonda H; Brown, Nancy J

    2016-04-01

    A goal of aspirin therapy is to inhibit thromboxane production and platelet aggregation without inhibiting endothelial production of the vasodilator and anti-thrombotic prostacyclin. This study tested the hypothesis that extended-release aspirin (NHP-554C) would have increased selectivity for inhibition of basal and simulated thromboxane formation compared to immediate-release aspirin (ASA). Thirty-six healthy subjects were randomized to NHP-554C or ASA groups. Within each group, subjects were randomized to 5-day treatment with 81 mg/d, 162.5 mg/d and placebo in a crossover design in which treatment periods were separated by 2-week washout. On the fifth day of treatment, 81 mg/d and 162.5 mg/d ASA reduced basal urinary excretion of the stable thromboxane metabolite 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 62.3% and 66.2% and basal excretion of the stable prostacyclin metabolite 2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF1α 22.8% and 26.5%, respectively, compared to placebo. NHP-554C 81 mg/d and 162.5 mg/d reduced 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 53% (P = 0.03 vs. ASA 81 mg/d) and 67.9% and 2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF1α 13.4% and 18.5%, respectively. NHP-554C 81 mg/d did not significantly reduce basal excretion of the prostacyclin metabolite. Both doses of ASA and NHP significantly reduced excretion of both thromboxane and prostacyclin metabolites following intravenous bradykinin. During NHP-554C 162.5 mg/d, but not during ASA, bradykinin significantly increased urinary 2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF1α. Nevertheless, 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 and 2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF1α responses to bradykinin were statistically similar during ASA and NHP-554C. In conclusion, at doses of 81 and 162.5 mg/d immediate- and extended-release aspirin selectively decrease basal thromboxane production. Both forms of aspirin decrease bradykinin-stimulated thromboxane and prostacyclin production, but some stimulated prostacyclin production remains during treatment with NHP-554C. PMID:27069632

  1. Aspirin-exacerbated cutaneous disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Caballero-Fonseca, Fernan; Capriles-Hulett, Arnaldo

    2013-05-01

    It has been recognized that a high proportion of chronic urticaria patients experience symptom aggravation when exposed to aspirin and NSAIDs. This clinical picture is known as Aspirin-exacerbated cutaneous disease. The pathogenesis of these exacerbations is related to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 leading to a decreased synthesis of PGE2 and an increased cysteinyl leukotriene production in the skin and subcutaneous tissues. Patient management comprises the treatment of the underlying cutaneous disease with nonsedating antihistamines and other medications, avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors, and the use of alternative NSAIDs that do not inhibit COX-1 for the relief of pain, inflammation and fever. PMID:23639712

  2. BOREAS RSS-2 Extracted Reflectance Factors Derived from ASAS Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickerson, Jaime (Editor); Dabney, P.; Kovalick, W.; Graham, D.; Bur, Michael; Irons, James R.; Tierney, M.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-2 team derived atmospherically corrected bidirectional reflectance factor means from multispectral, multiangle ASAS imagery for small homogeneous areas near several BOREAS sites. The ASAS imagery was acquired from the C-130 aircraft platform in 1994 and 1996. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  3. Aspirin and Clopidogrel Alter Core Temperature and Skin Blood Flow during Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bruning, Rebecca S.; Dahmus, Jessica D.; Kenney, W. Larry; Holowatz, Lacy A.

    2012-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy with oral aspirin or clopidogrel (PlavixR) is associated with an attenuated skin vasodilator response and a greater rate of rise in core temperature in healthy, middle-aged individuals during passive heating in a water perfused suit. Purpose The present double-blind, crossover study examined the functional consequences of 7 days of low-dose aspirin (ASA, 81 mg/day) vs. clopidogrel (CLO, 75 mg/day) treatment in 14 healthy, middle-aged (50–65 yrs) men and women during passive heating in air (40 min at 30°C, 40% rh) followed by exercise (60% V̇O2peak). Methods Oral temperature (Tor) was measured in the antechamber (23.0 ± 0.1°C) before entering a warm environmental chamber. After 40 minutes of rest subjects cycled on a recumbent cycle ergometer for up to 120 minutes. Esophageal temperature (Tes) and laser Doppler flux were measured continuously, and the latter was normalized to maximal cutaneous vascular conductance (%CVCmax). Results Prior to entry into the environmental chamber there were no differences in Tor among treatments; however, after 40 minutes of rest in the heat, Tes was significantly higher for ASA and CLO vs. placebo (37.2±0.1°C, 37.3±0.1°C, vs. 37.0±0.1°C, both P<0.001), a difference that persisted throughout exercise (P<0.001 vs. placebo). The mean body temperature thresholds for the onset of cutaneous vasodilation were shifted to the right for both ASA and CLO during exercise (P<0.05). Conclusion ASA and CLO resulted in elevated core temperatures during passive heat stress and shifted the onset of peripheral thermoeffector mechanisms toward higher body temperatures during exercise heat stress. PMID:23135368

  4. Is there an ideal way to initiate antiplatelet therapy with aspirin? A crossover study on healthy volunteers evaluating different dosing schemes with whole blood aggregometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend an early initiation of aspirin treatment in patients with acute cerebral ischemia. Comparative studies on the best starting dose for initiating aspirin therapy to achieve a rapid antiplatelet effect do not exist. This study evaluated the platelet inhibitory effect in healthy volunteers by using three different aspirin loading doses to gain a model for initiating antiplatelet treatment in acute strokes patients. Methods Using whole blood aggregometry, this study with a prospective, uncontrolled, open, crossover design examined 12 healthy volunteers treated with three different aspirin loading doses: intravenous 500 mg aspirin, oral 500 mg aspirin, and a course of 200 mg aspirin on two subsequent days followed by a five-day course of 100 mg aspirin. Aspirin low response was defined as change of impedance exceeding 0 Ω after stimulation with arachidonic acid. Results Sufficient antiplatelet effectiveness was gained within 30 seconds when intravenous 500 mg aspirin was used. The mean time until antiplatelet effect was 74 minutes for 500 mg aspirin taken orally and 662 minutes (11.2 hours) for the dose scheme with 200 mg aspirin with a high inter- and intraindividual variability in those two regimes. Platelet aggregation returned to the baseline range during the wash-out phase within 4 days. Conclusion Our study reveals that the antiplatelet effect differs significantly between the three different aspirin starting dosages with a high inter- and intraindividual variability of antiplatelet response in our healthy volunteers. To ensure an early platelet inhibitory effect in acute stroke patients, it could be advantageous to initiate the therapy with an intravenous loading dose of 500 mg aspirin. However, clinical outcome studies must still define the best way to initiate antiplatelet treatment with aspirin. PMID:21466682

  5. Codelivery of SH-aspirin and curcumin by mPEG-PLGA nanoparticles enhanced antitumor activity by inducing mitochondrial apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lin; Duan, Xingmei; Zeng, Shi; Men, Ke; Zhang, Xueyan; Yang, Li; Li, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Natural product curcumin (Cur) and H2S-releasing prodrug SH-aspirin (SH-ASA) are potential anticancer agents with diverse mechanisms, but their clinical application prospects are restricted by hydrophobicity and limited efficiency. In this work, we coencapsulated SH-ASA and Cur into methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly (lactide-coglycolide) (mPEG-PLGA) nanoparticles through a modified oil-in-water single-emulsion solvent evaporation process. The prepared SH-ASA/Cur-coloaded mPEG-PLGA nanoparticles had a mean particle size of 122.3±6.8 nm and were monodispersed (polydispersity index =0.179±0.016) in water, with high drug-loading capacity and stability. Intriguingly, by treating with SH-ASA/Cur-coloaded mPEG-PLGA nanoparticles, obvious synergistic anticancer effects on ES-2 and SKOV3 human ovarian carcinoma cells were observed in vitro, and activation of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway was indicated. Our results demonstrated that SH-ASA/Cur-coloaded mPEG-PLGA nanoparticles could have potential clinical advantages for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:26316750

  6. Choline magnesium trisalicylate in patients with aspirin-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Szczeklik, A; Nizankowska, E; Dworski, R

    1990-05-01

    Treatment of inflammatory diseases of asthmatics can be a serious problem since some patients show intolerance to aspirin and other non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs that are cyclooxygenase inhibitors. Salicylates were believed to be well tolerated, but recent reports have demonstrated that diflunisal and salicylsalicylic acid can precipitate asthma attacks in aspirin-intolerant patients. This study was designed to determine the tolerance of choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), a nonacetylated salicylate with potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity, in 23 asthmatics with aspirin hypersensitivity confirmed by oral challenge. The study consisted of three phases: 1) patients received increasing doses (50-1,500 mg) of CMT under a single-blind protocol; 2) patients received either a placebo or CMT challenge in a double-blind, randomized, cross-over design; 3) patients received CMT at daily 3,000 mg doses for 1 week. Throughout the study, pulmonary function tests, peak nasal inspiratory flow, and serum salicylate and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) levels were monitored. Results showed no airway obstruction, nasal congestion or rhinorrhea after CMT. There was no significant decrease in serum TXB2 levels, indicating the absence of cyclooxygenase inhibition with CMT. We conclude that choline magnesium trisalicylate is a safe drug for treatment of different anti-inflammatory disorders in asthmatics with aspirin hypersensitivity. PMID:2198165

  7. Platelet thromboxane (11-dehydro-Thromboxane B2) and aspirin response in patients with diabetes and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Luis R; Guyer, Kirk E; Torre, Ignacio Garcia De La; Pitts, Kelly R; Matsuura, Eiji; Ames, Paul Rj

    2014-04-15

    Aspirin (ASA) irreversibly inhibits platelet cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) leading to decreased thromboxane-mediated platelet activation. The effect of ASA ingestion on thromboxane generation was evaluated in patients with diabetes (DM) and cardiovascular disease. Thromboxane inhibition was assessed by measuring the urinary excretion of 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 (11dhTxB2), a stable metabolite of thromboxane A2. The mean baseline urinary 11dhTxB2 of DM was 69.6% higher than healthy controls (P = 0.024): female subjects (DM and controls) had 50.9% higher baseline 11dhTxB2 than males (P = 0.0004), while age or disease duration had no influence. Daily ASA ingestion inhibited urinary 11dhTxB2 in both DM (71.7%) and controls (75.1%, P < 0.0001). Using a pre-established cut-off of 1500 pg/mg of urinary 11dhTxB2, there were twice as many ASA poor responders (ASA "resistant") in DM than in controls (14.8% and 8.4%, respectively). The rate of ASA poor responders in two populations of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients was 28.6 and 28.7%, in spite of a significant (81.6%) inhibition of urinary 11dhTxB2 (P < 0.0001). Both baseline 11dhTxB2 levels and rate of poor ASA responders were significantly higher in DM and ACS compared to controls. Underlying systemic oxidative inflammation may maintain platelet function in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease irrespective of COX-1 pathway inhibition and/or increase systemic generation of thromboxane from non-platelet sources. PMID:24748925

  8. Genetic Determinants of On-Aspirin Platelet Reactivity: Focus on the Influence of PEAR1

    PubMed Central

    Würtz, Morten; Nissen, Peter H.; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Kristensen, Steen Dalby; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet aggregation during aspirin treatment displays considerable inter-individual variability. A genetic etiology likely exists, but it remains unclear to what extent genetic polymorphisms determine platelet aggregation in aspirin-treated individuals. Aim To identify platelet-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influencing platelet aggregation during aspirin treatment. Furthermore, we explored to what extent changes in cyclooxygenase-1 activity and platelet activation may explain such influence. Methods We included 985 Danish patients with stable coronary artery disease treated with aspirin 75 mg/day mono antiplatelet therapy. Patients were genotyped for 16 common SNPs in platelet-related genes using standard PCR-based methods (TaqMan). Platelet aggregation was evaluated by whole blood platelet aggregometry employing Multiplate Analyzer (agonists: arachidonic acid and collagen) and VerifyNow Aspirin. Serum thromboxane B2 was measured to confirm aspirin adherence and was used as a marker of cyclooxygenase-1 activity. Soluble P-selectin was used as marker of platelet activation. Platelet aggregation, cyclooxygenase-1 activity, and platelet activation were compared across genotypes in adjusted analyses. Results The A-allele of the rs12041331 SNP in the platelet endothelial aggregation receptor-1 (PEAR1) gene was associated with reduced platelet aggregation and increased platelet activation, but not with cyclooxygenase-1 activity. Platelet aggregation was unaffected by the other SNPs analyzed. Conclusion A common genetic variant in PEAR1 (rs12041331) reproducibly influenced platelet aggregation in aspirin-treated patients with coronary artery disease. The exact biological mechanism remains elusive, but the effect of this polymorphism may be related to changes in platelet activation. Furthermore, 14 SNPs previously suggested to influence aspirin efficacy were not associated with on-aspirin platelet aggregation. Clinical Trial Registration

  9. Immunomodulatory treatments for aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Moebus, Rachel G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aspirin triad is a subclass of chronic sinusitis characterized by nasal polyposis, nonallergic induced asthma, and aspirin sensitivity. Also known as Samter's triad or aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, aspirin triad commonly affects the adult population and is seldom found in pediatric patients. Methods: This rhinosinusitis has multiple layers of pathological process, but the ultimate predicament is caused by cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs). Results: Pharmacotherapies include oral steroid, lipoxygenase inhibitor, and cysLT receptor inhibitor drugs, which can provide some relief for these patients. Conclusion: Immunomodulation via aspirin desensitization is considered when pharmacotherapy has failed. When aspirin triad is unmanageable with medical treatment alone, endoscopic sinus surgery with polypectomy can alleviate the patient's symptoms, allowing for a better response to postoperative medical management such as topical medication as well as delivery of topical medications. PMID:22487291

  10. Effect of cotreatment of aspirin metabolites on mitomycin C-induced genotoxicity using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Niikawa, Miki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2006-01-01

    In our previous reports, aspirin, an antipyretic analgesic, suppressed the genotoxicity of mitomycin C (MMC) in a somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. In order to reveal the mechanism of the anti-genotoxicity of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressing ability of each aspirin metabolite, such as salicylic acid (SA), salicyluric acid (SUA), gentisic acid (GA), gentisuric acid (GUA), and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), in SMART in Drosophila melanogaster using the cotreatment protocol in this report. SUA, GA, GUA, and DHBA reduced the number of the three types of spot induced by MMC without decrease of survival. These aspirin metabolites decreased the genotoxicity frequency of MMC for total spots in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, each metabolite decreased the genotoxicity frequency of MMC by approximately 80% at a dose of 40 mg/bottle, respectively. It is suggested that these metabolites are the main substances of anti-genotoxicity in the aspirin metabolic pathway. PMID:16931440

  11. Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day Browse Sections The Basics Overview Benefits and Risks ... sure why this works. Can taking aspirin every day cause any side effects? Taking aspirin daily isn' ...

  12. Considerations for Using the ASA24® Dietary Assessment Tool

    Cancer.gov

    ASA24 has been used by thousands of Researchers conducting studies in multiple settings. Through our support of Researchers, NCI has gained insights into best practices for implementation, as well as common issues encountered by study Respondents.

  13. Considerations for Using the ASA24® System

    Cancer.gov

    ASA24 has been used by thousands of Researchers conducting studies in multiple settings. Through our support of Researchers, NCI has gained insights into best practices for implementation, as well as common issues encountered by study Respondents.

  14. Overview of the ASA24® Researcher Website

    Cancer.gov

    The Researcher Website allows researchers, clinicians, and teachers to register to use ASA24 for research, clinical practice, or teaching; to manage logistics of data collection; and to obtain analytic output files.

  15. ASAS 095221-4329.8 und ASAS 123034-7703.9 - zwei R-CrB-Stern-Kandidaten aus der ASAS-Datenbank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huemmerich, Stefan

    2011-04-01

    During an examination of ASAS Misc-type objects, the stars ASAS 095221-4329.8 GSC 07706-00560, 09:52:21.38 -43:29:40.5) and ASAS 123034-7703.9 (GSC 09416-00380, 12:30:34.22 -77:03:52.7) - both of which show semi-regular variability - were found to exhibit significant obscuration events in their V-band lightcurves. Both stars are likely to be red giants undergoing fading events, possibly of DY Per-type. However, spectroscopy of both stars is needed for a conclusive classification. The corresponding entries in the International Variable Star Index (VSX) have been revised accordingly; variability type was set to "RCB:".

  16. Aspirin, paracetamol, and haematemesis and melaena.

    PubMed Central

    Coggon, D; Langman, M J; Spiegelhalter, D

    1982-01-01

    Aspirin and paracetamol consumption have been compared in 346 matched pairs of patients with haematemesis and melaena, and control individuals in the general community. Both aspirin and paracetamol intake were more common in patients than in controls, but the association for aspirin was stronger and was apparent with both recent and habitual intake, whereas for paracetamol the association was not detectable for habitual intake. The results for paracetamol suggests that patients with bleeding take analgesic drugs in part because of symptoms associated with bleeding, and such intake is not necessarily causal of bleeding. Failure to control investigations to take account of this point has exaggerated the possible risks of aspirin consumption. PMID:7076011

  17. Aspirin in diabetic retinopathy. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bergerhoff, Karla; Clar, Christine; Richter, Bernd

    2002-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for eye disease that can lead to blindness. There have been both concerns that aspirin use might worsen diabetic retinopathy, as well as hopes that aspirin might be beneficial in treating it. We investigated whether there are beneficial effects of aspirin alone and in combination with other antiplatelet agents in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy, and the relative hazards for the development of high-risk proliferative retinopathy following aspirin treatment. We conducted a sensitive search for randomized controlled trials combined with index terms for identifying studies on aspirin treatment in diabetic retinopathy in the Cochrane Library (issue 4, 2001) and Medline (1966 to October, 2001). We examined randomized controlled clinical trials in diabetic patients with (non) proliferative diabetic retinopathy and aspirin treatment alone or in combination with dipyramidole versus placebo administration. Two independent reviewers judged trial eligibility, collected details of study population, interventions, and outcomes using a standard data extraction form. One reviewer assessed the quality of trial reporting. We identified six publications pertinent to our objective. Aspirin dosages ranged from 650 mg to 990 mg daily, the dose of dipyridamole, used in only one trial, was 225 mg per day. Studies lasted 8 weeks to 5 years. All trials showed that aspirin alone or in combination with dipyridamole neither lowered nor increased the risk of the development of diabetic retinopathy. The results suggest that there are no ocular contraindications to taking aspirin if required as part of a treatment for cardiovascular diseases or other medical indications. PMID:12227131

  18. Clinical pharmacology of cyclooxygenase inhibition and pharmacodynamic interaction with aspirin by floctafenine in Thai healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Maenthaisong, R; Tacconelli, S; Sritara, P; Del Boccio, P; Di Francesco, L; Sacchetta, P; Archararit, N; Aryurachai, K; Patrignani, P; Suthisisang, C

    2013-01-01

    Floctafenine, a hydroxyquinoline derivative with analgesic properties, is widely used in Thailand and many other countries. The objectives of this study were to evaluate in Thai healthy volunteers: i) the inhibition of whole blood cyclooxygenase(COX)-2 and COX-1 activity by floctafenine and its metabolite floctafenic acid in vitro and ex vivo after dosing with floctafenine; ii) the possible interference of floctafenine administration with aspirin antiplatelet effects. We performed an open-label, cross-over, 3-period study, on 11 healthy Thai volunteers, who received consecutively floctafenine(200mg/TID), low-dose aspirin(81mg/daily) or their combination for 4 days, separated by washout periods. Floctafenine and floctafenic acid resulted potent inhibitors of COX-1 and COX-2 in vitro (floctafenic acid was more potent than floctafenine) showing a slight preference for COX-1. After dosing with floctafenine alone, whole blood COX-1 and COX-2 activities were inhibited ex vivo in a time-dependent fashion which paralleled floctafenic acid plasma concentrations. Aspirin alone inhibited profoundly and persistently platelet COX-1 activity and AA-induced platelet aggregation throughout 24-h dosing interval which was affected by the co-administration of floctafenine. At 24 h after dosing with aspirin and floctafenine, the inhibition of platelet thromboxane(TX)B2 generation and aggregation were significantly(P less than 0.05) lower than that caused by aspirin alone. Therapeutic dosing with floctafenine profoundly inhibited prostanoid biosynthesis through the rapid conversion to floctafenic acid. Floctafenine interfered with the antiplatelet effect of aspirin. Our results suggest that floctafenine should be avoided in patients with cardiovascular disease under treatment with low-dose aspirin. PMID:23755755

  19. [Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases in diabetic patients: focus on gender difference and insulin resistance].

    PubMed

    Legrand, D A; Scheen, A J

    2006-10-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is widely used as antiplatelet therapy for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects appear to be different according to the studied population, with a reduction of coronary events in men and, rather, a diminution of strokes in women. Diabetes mellitus markedly increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases, with an especially elevated relative risk among women. We present a detailed analysis of the literature about the efficacy of aspirin in the primary prevention of cardiovascular complications in the diabetic population. Limited available data suggest a lower protection in the diabetic than in the non-diabetic population. A greater aspirin resistance has been suggested in diabetic patents, which might lead to the use of a higher daily dosage of aspirin in diabetic than in non diabetic patients. Whatsoever, aspirin remains the first antiplatelet agent in the diabetic population in all international guidelines of cardiovascular prevention. PMID:17209500

  20. Evaluation of nitrate-substituted pseudocholine esters of aspirin as potential nitro-aspirins.

    PubMed

    Gilmer, John F; Moriarty, Louise M; Clancy, John M

    2007-06-01

    Herein we explore some designs for nitro-aspirins, compounds potentially capable of releasing both aspirin and nitric oxide in vivo. A series of nitrate-bearing alkyl esters of aspirin were prepared based on the choline ester template preferred by human plasma butyrylcholinesterase. The degradation kinetics of the compounds were followed in human plasma solution. All compounds underwent hydrolysis rapidly (t(1/2) approximately 1min) but generating exclusively the corresponding nitro-salicylate. The one exception, an N-propyl, N-nitroxyethyl aminoethanol ester produced 9.2% aspirin in molar terms indicating that the nitro-aspirin objective is probably achievable if due cognisance can be paid to the demands of the activating enzyme. Even at this low level of aspirin release, this compound is the most successful nitro-aspirin reported to date in the key human plasma model. PMID:17376682

  1. An evaluation of different doses of soluble aspirin and aspirin tablets in postoperative dental pain.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, I S; Seymour, R A; Ward-Booth, R P; Ord, R A; Lim, K L; Hoare, R C

    1988-01-01

    1. The efficacy of three different single doses (600, 900 and 1200 mg of soluble aspirin and aspirin tablets) was determined in a randomized placebo-controlled parallel study in 140 patients (70 females) with postoperative pain after removal of impacted third molars. 2. Patients treated with soluble aspirin 600 mg, 900 mg, 1200 mg and aspirin tablet 1200 mg reported significantly less pain (P less than 0.01) throughout the investigation period than those treated with placebo. 3. Overall pain scores after treatment with aspirin tablets 600 and 900 mg did not differ significantly from those after treatment with placebo (P greater than 0.05). 4. On a comparative dose basis, soluble aspirin was significantly more potent (P less than 0.05) than aspirin tablets. PMID:3190996

  2. Baseline Oral 5-ASA Use and Efficacy and Safety of Budesonide Foam in Patients with Ulcerative Proctitis and Ulcerative Proctosigmoiditis: Analysis of 2 Phase 3 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sandborn, William J.; Rubin, David T.; Harper, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rectal budesonide foam is a second-generation corticosteroid efficacious for active mild to moderate ulcerative proctitis and ulcerative proctosigmoiditis. This subgroup analysis examined the impact of baseline oral 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) on the efficacy and safety of budesonide foam in patients with mild to moderate ulcerative proctitis or ulcerative proctosigmoiditis. Methods: Patients received budesonide foam 2 mg/25 mL twice daily for 2 weeks, then once daily for 4 weeks, or placebo, with or without continued stable dosing of baseline oral 5-ASAs, for remission induction at week 6 (primary endpoint) in 2 identically designed, randomized, double-blind, phase 3 studies. Results: Of the 267 and 279 patients randomized to treatment with budesonide foam or placebo (pooled population), 55.1% and 55.2%, respectively, reported baseline 5-ASA use. A significantly greater percentage of patients achieved remission with budesonide foam versus placebo, either with (42.2% versus 31.8%, respectively; P = 0.03) or without (40.0% versus 14.4%; P < 0.0001) baseline 5-ASA use at week 6. A significantly greater percentage of patients achieved a Modified Mayo Disease Activity Index rectal bleeding subscale score of 0 at week 6, regardless of baseline 5-ASA use (5-ASA, 50.3% versus 35.7%; P = 0.003: no 5-ASA, 45.8% versus 19.2%; P < 0.0001). The frequency of adverse events was comparable between groups, regardless of baseline 5-ASA use. Conclusions: Budesonide foam was efficacious and safe for induction of remission of mild to moderate ulcerative proctitis and ulcerative proctosigmoiditis in patients receiving oral 5-ASA at baseline and those who were not (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01008410 and NCT01008423). PMID:27416045

  3. Lipoxins and aspirin-triggered lipoxins in resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Romano, Mario; Cianci, Eleonora; Simiele, Felice; Recchiuti, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    The resolution of the inflammatory response is highly regulated by the timely biosynthesis of a number of endogenous lipid mediators. Among these, lipoxins (LX) and their 15-epimers, aspirin triggered lipoxins (ATL) derived by the lipoxygenase (LO) route of arachidonic acid metabolism. In particular, they are formed and released by cells expressing 5-, 12- and 15-LO such as leukocytes, platelets, vascular endothelium and epithelium, alone or during transcellular interactions. ATL biosynthesis requires cyclooxygenase-2 acetylation by aspirin. LX and ATL exert potent bioactions on leukocytes, vascular and epithelial cells to stop inflammation and promote resolution. They have shown to be beneficial in a broad spectrum of preclinical models of disease as well as in some clinical trials. Counter-regulatory signaling by LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 follows the activation of a G protein-coupled receptor, termed ALX/FPR2, which is emerging as a key anti-inflammatory receptor. PMID:25895638

  4. Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work ... For Proteins, Form Shapes Function This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  5. Mechanisms of aspirin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Picado, César

    2006-05-01

    In some asthma patients, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induce bronchospasm, rhinorrhea, and nasal obstruction. NSAID-induced reactions appear to be caused by the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 (Cox-1); this in turn activates the lipoxygenase pathway, which eventually increases the release of cysteinyl leukotrienes (Cys-LTs) that induces bronchospasm and nasal obstruction. With regard to the metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) in NSAID-intolerant asthmatic patients, the following changes have been observed: 1) A low production of prostaglandin E2, seemingly due to deficient Cox-2 regulation; 2) an increased expression of leukotriene-C4 synthase; and 3) a reduced production of metabolites (lipoxins) released through the transcellular metabolism of AA. NSAID-intolerant asthmatics have higher basal levels of Cys-LT than NSAID-tolerant asthmatics. Moreover, Cys-LT levels in NSAID-intolerant asthmatics increase remarkably following NSAID provocation testing. There has been no explanation to date that connects all these findings, although an anomaly in the regulation of Cox-2 is probably accountable. PMID:16579869

  6. Impact of Aspirin and Clopidogrel Interruption on Platelet Function in Patients Undergoing Major Vascular Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Le Manach, Yannick; Kahn, David; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla; Le Sache, Frederic; Smadja, David M.; Remones, Veronique; Loriot, Marie-Anne; Coriat, Pierre; Gaussem, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate functional platelet recovery after preoperative withdrawal of aspirin and clopidogrel and platelet function 5 days after treatment resumption. Methods/Results We conducted an observational study, which prospectively included consecutive patients taking aspirin, taking clopidogrel, and untreated controls (15 patients in each group). The antiplatelet drugs were withdrawn five days before surgery (baseline) and were reintroduced two days after surgery. Platelet function was evaluated by optical aggregation in the presence of collagen, arachidonic acid (aspirin) and ADP (clopidogrel) and by VASP assay (clopidogrel). Platelet-leukocyte complex (PLC) level was quantified at each time-point. At baseline, platelet function was efficiently inhibited by aspirin and had recovered fully in most patients 5 days after drug withdrawal. PLC levels five days after aspirin reintroduction were similar to baseline (+4±10%; p = 0.16), in line with an effective platelet inhibition. Chronic clopidogrel treatment was associated with variable platelet inhibition and its withdrawal led to variable functional recovery. PLC levels were significantly increased five days after clopidogrel reintroduction (+10±15%; p = 0.02), compared to baseline. Conclusions Aspirin withdrawal 5 days before high-bleeding-risk procedures was associated with functional platelet recovery, and its reintroduction two days after surgery restored antiplaletet efficacy five days later. This was not the case of clopidogrel, and further work is therefore needed to define its optimal perioperative management. PMID:25141121

  7. Adverse respiratory reactions to aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ronald A

    2004-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is an adult-onset condition that manifests as asthma, rhinosinusitis/nasal polyps, and sensitivity to aspirin and other cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1)-inhibitor nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). There is no cross-sensitivity to highly selective COX-2 inhibitors. AERD is chronic and does not improve with avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors. The diagnosis of AERD is made through provocative challenge testing. Following a positive aspirin challenge, patients can be desensitized to aspirin and NSAIDs. The desensitized state can be maintained indefinitely with continued daily administration. After desensitization, there is an approximately 48-hour refractory period to adverse effects from aspirin. The pathogenesis of AERD remains unknown, but these patients have been shown to have multiple abnormalities in arachidonic acid metabolism and in cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptors. AERD patients can take up to 650 mg of acetaminophen for analgesic or antipyretic relief. Patients can also use weak COX-1 inhibitors, such as sodium salicylate or choline magnesium trisalicylate. Treatment of AERD patients with antileukotriene medications has been helpful but not preferential when compared with non-AERD patients. An alternative treatment for many AERD patients is aspirin desensitization. This is particularly effective in reducing upper-airway mucosal congestion, nasal polyp formation, and systemic steroids. PMID:14680616

  8. Temporal Aspects of the Action of ASA404 (Vadimezan; DMXAA)

    PubMed Central

    Baguley, Bruce C; Siemann, Dietmar W

    2013-01-01

    ASA404, a flavonoid tumor-vascular disrupting agent (Tumor-VDA), is in clinical trial for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Its action differs from both that of the tubulin binding class of Tumor-VDAs and antiangiogenic agents. In mice, ASA404 induces a sequence of changes in tumor tissue, starting within one hour with increased vascular permeability, increased endothelial apoptosis and decreased blood flow. Later effects include the release of serotonin, induction of tumor necrosis factor and other cytokines and chemokines, as well as induction of nitric oxide. This cascade of events induces sustained effects on blood flow, tumor hypoxia, vascular failure, inflammatory responses and, in some tumors, complete regression. One feature of the action of ASA404 against murine tumors is its ability to potentiate the effects of radiation and a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. The flavonoid class appears to be unique because of its dual action on vascular endothelial function and innate immunity. The translation of preclinical to clinical results demands an understanding of both the mechanisms underlying the dual effects and the species differences in ASA404 activity. Clinical trials indicate that the future of ASA404 as an effective agent relies on a deep appreciation of its cellular action. PMID:20964495

  9. Interaction of acupuncture and electroacupuncture on the pharmacokinetics of aspirin and the effect of brain blood flow in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Tsang; Shaw, Lee-Hsin; Wu, Yu-Tse; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture and electroacupuncture have been used to improve the brain and motor functions of poststroke patients, and aspirin is used for the prevention of stroke recurrence. Our hypothesis is that acupuncture and electroacupuncture treatments may interact with aspirin in terms of pharmacokinetics via affecting the brain blood flow. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential interactions of acupuncture and electroacupuncture on the pharmacokinetics of aspirin. The effects of acupuncture treatments on brain blood flow were measured by the laser Doppler blood flow imager. The parallel pharmacokinetic study design included three groups: control, acupuncture, and electroacupuncture groups. Two acupoints, namely, Quchi (LI 11) and Zusanli (ST 36), were needled and stimulated electronically in anaesthetized rats. The concentrations of aspirin and its metabolite, salicylic acid were determined by microdialysis and HPLC analysis after aspirin administration (30 mg/kg, i.v.). The brain blood flow responded to electroacupuncture treatments, but the pharmacokinetic parameters of aspirin and salicylic acid in blood and brain were not significantly changed by acupuncture and electroacupuncture treatments. This study may, in part, offer some evidence to support the contention that there is no significant interaction for the combination of aspirin with acupuncture or electroacupuncture. PMID:24371465

  10. Chemopreventive effects of aspirin at a glance.

    PubMed

    Usman, Muhammad Waqas; Luo, Fuwen; Cheng, Hailing; Zhao, Jean J; Liu, Pixu

    2015-04-01

    Experimental, epidemiological, and clinical data from the last two decades have each supported the hypothesis that aspirin possesses anticancer properties, and that its use may also reduce the lifetime probability of developing or dying from a number of cancers. Aspirin's ability to act on multiple key metabolic and signaling pathways via inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme, as well as through COX-independent mechanisms, makes it particularly relevant in the fight against cancer. A growing body of evidence indicates that aspirin may not only reduce cancer risk, but also prevent metastasis and angiogenesis while slowing the rate of mutation-inducing DNA damage. These emerging benefits of aspirin are offset to some extent by the known risks of treatment, such as cardiovascular events and gastrointestinal bleeding. However, it has been shown that pre-treatment risk assessment of individual patients and the use of proton pump inhibitors or Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy concomitantly with aspirin treatment can reduce these potential risks. Thus, the significant benefits of aspirin treatment, coupled with recent data concerning its risks, may prove to tip the balance in favor of aspirin use in cancer prevention. PMID:25842298

  11. Aspirin-induced AMP-activated protein kinase activation regulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Jin Young; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} Aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation was greater in VSMC from SHR than WKY. {yields} Aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation inhibited proliferation of VSMC from SHR. {yields} Low basal AMPK phosphorylation in SHR elicits increased VSMC proliferation. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK restored decreased VSMC proliferation by aspirin in SHR. {yields} Aspirin exerts anti-proliferative effect through AMPK activation in VSMC from SHR. -- Abstract: Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), used to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, plays an important role in the regulation of cellular proliferation. However, mechanisms responsible for aspirin-induced growth inhibition are not fully understood. Here, we investigated whether aspirin may exert therapeutic effects via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from wistar kyoto rats (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Aspirin increased AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation in a time- and dose-dependent manner in VSMCs from WKY and SHR, but with greater efficacy in SHR. In SHR, a low basal phosphorylation status of AMPK resulted in increased VSMC proliferation and aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation inhibited proliferation of VSMCs. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and AMPK siRNA reduced the aspirin-mediated inhibition of VSMC proliferation, this effect was more pronounced in SHR than in WKY. In VSMCs from SHR, aspirin increased p53 and p21 expression and inhibited the expression of cell cycle associated proteins, such as p-Rb, cyclin D, and cyclin E. These results indicate that in SHR VSMCs aspirin exerts anti-proliferative effects through the induction of AMPK phosphorylation.

  12. Platelet activating factor: regulation by mast cells and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Denburg, J A; Williams, D B; Kinlough-Rathbone, R L; Cazenave, J P; Bienenstock, J

    1984-02-01

    We have investigated some aspects of the regulation of production of rat platelet activating factor (PAF)2 in vitro. Suspensions of unseparated (PLC1), mast cell-depleted (PLC2), or mast cell (MC)-enriched rat peritoneal lavage cells (PLC) were analyzed for PAF content by extraction at alkaline pH. PAF activity extracted from PLC1 varied inversely with viable cell concentration: at 1 X 10(6) cells/ml, 32 +/- 9.3 PAF units, decreasing to 11.2 +/- 9.5 units at 10 X 10(6) cells/ml, and no activity at higher concentrations. Incubation of PLC1 in Tyrode's buffer or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), but not salicylate, resulted in a time-dependent loss of PAF activity. Mean PAF activity of PLC2 was similar to that in PLC1, while no PAF activity was extractable from MC. Co-incubation with MC extracts inhibited PAF activity of PLC1 extracts in a dose-dependent fashion. Ultracentrifugation of PAF-containing samples led to a loss of all PAF activity in PLC1 extracts, suggesting the association of PAF activity with subcellular components. PAF appears to be derived from a non-MC population of rat PLC, is not extractable from rat PLC in the presence of ASA and is inhibited by MC extracts. These studies suggest that ASA regulates PAF availability unrelated to its effect on cyclooxygenase and that MC membrane products directly inhibit PAF activity from rat PLC. PMID:6711391

  13. Aspirin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guidelines . Circulation . 2011 ; 123 : 2022 – 2060 . OpenUrl FREE Full Text 4. ↵ Antithrombotic Trialists' (ATT) Collaboration , Baigent C , Blackwell ... BMJ . 2002 ; 324 : 71 – 86 . OpenUrl Abstract / FREE Full Text 6. ↵ Furie KL , Kasner SE , Adams RJ , Albers ...

  14. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug and Aspirin Use, and Mortality among Critically Ill Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Patients: an Exploratory Analysis.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Holly; Vaughn, Frances L; Mosholder, Andrew D; Maloney, Elizabeth M; Rubinson, Lewis

    2016-05-20

    We explored nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and aspirin (ASA) use and mortality in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' registry of 683 adult and 838 pediatric critically ill pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza (pH1N1) patients. Among adults, 88 (12.9%) and 101 (14.8%) reported pre-admission use of an NSAID and ASA, respectively; mortality was similar (23-24%) regardless of NSAID or ASA use. Mortality among 89 pediatric NSAID users and 749 nonusers did not differ significantly (10.1% and 8.8%, respectively). One of 16 pediatric ASA users died. Among pediatric patients, the adjusted relative risk estimate for NSAID use and 90-day mortality was higher when influenza vaccination was included in the model (risk ratio [RR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval, 0.7-3.2), although not statistically significant. Among adults, RR estimates did not change appreciably after adjusting for age, sex, health status, or vaccine status. We found no compelling evidence that NSAID or ASA use influenced mortality in severe pH1N1. PMID:26255728

  15. ASAS-SN Discovery of Two Probable Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Rivera, D. Godoy; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Kiyota, S.; Koff, R. A.; Krannich, G.; Masi, G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.

    2015-10-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered two transient sources, most likely supernovae, in the galaxies 2MASX J00011837-3321048 and ESO 296-G027.

  16. ASAS classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis: time to modify.

    PubMed

    Akkoc, Nurullah; Khan, Muhammad A

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between ankylosing spondylitis and the recently proposed entity called axial spondyloarthritis with its radiographic and non-radiographic forms that have been defined by the Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society (ASAS) criteria for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), is currently being debated. The Food and Drug Agency (FDA) had criticized the ASAS criteria and the studies which used these criteria to enroll patients in a clinical trial of certolizumab and adalimumab for the treatment of non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis. The primary aim of classification criteria is to create homogenous patient populations for basic and clinical research. But the multi-arm construct of the ASAS criteria is a potential source of heterogeneity reducing their utility. Criteria sets should be regarded as dynamic concepts open to modifications or updates as our knowledge advances. We provide evidence to conclude that it is time to modify the ASAS Criteria for axSpA, and we propose some of the steps that can be taken to start moving forward in improving the validity of these criteria. PMID:27094940

  17. Nanometer aerosol size analyzer (nASA) and data inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hee Siew

    A fast-response Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) that is capable of scanning 30 size channels between 3 and 100 nm in a total time of 3 seconds was developed. The analyzer includes a bipolar charger (Po 210), an extended-length Nano DMA, and an electrometer. This combination of components provides particle size spectra at a scan rate of 0.1 second per channel free of uncertainties caused by response-time induced smearing. In addition, because of its thermodynamically stable means of particle detection, the nASA is useful for applications requiring measurements over a broad range of sample pressures and temperatures. Indeed, experimental transfer functions determined for the extended-length Nano-DMA using the Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer technique indicate the nASA provides good size resolution at pressures as low as 200 Torr, corresponding to measurement at an altitude of 10 km. The second part of this study is devoted to the selection of an accurate data inversion algorithm. From the simulation results, it is found that MICRON provides the most stable solutions with good accuracy and reasonable convergent speed especially when aerosol distribution functions are bi-modal. All subsequent nASA measurement results are inverted using the MICRON algorithm. A second generation nASA was developed for the later series of engine exhaust measurements. Several improvements are implemented to the nASA to enhance its performance and ease of use. First, its physical size is reduced and the capability for controlling the DMA flow rates via computer software is added. The former improves the portability of the instrument and the latter allows the nASA to have an wider aerosol size ranges. Finally, the system was used in the EXperiment to Characterize Aircraft Volatile Aerosol and Trace species Emissions (EXCAVATE) workshop to investigate aerosol size distribution from a Boeing 757 engine. The results show that the aerosol size distributions from the engine are

  18. Method Development for Analysis of Aspirin Tablets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Develops a lab experiment for introductory instrumental analysis that requires interference studies and optimizing of conditions. Notes the analysis of the aspirin is by visible spectrophotometric assay. Gives experimental details and discussion. (MVL)

  19. Determinants of Reduced Antiplatelet Effect of Aspirin in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Sanne Bøjet; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Neergaard-Petersen, Søs; Würtz, Morten; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Kristensen, Steen Dalby

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspirin is a cornerstone in management of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, considerable variability in the antiplatelet effect of aspirin has been reported. Aim To investigate independent determinants of reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin in stable CAD patients. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study including 900 stable, high-risk CAD patients. Among these, 795 (88%) had prior myocardial infarction, 250 (28%) had type 2 diabetes, and 170 (19%) had both. All patients received 75 mg aspirin daily as mono antiplatelet therapy. The antiplatelet effect of aspirin was assessed by measurement of platelet aggregation employing 1) multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA, Multiplate Analyzer) in whole blood anticoagulated with citrate or hirudin using arachidonic acid (AA) or collagen as agonists, and 2) VerifyNow Aspirin Assay. Compliance was assessed by measurement of serum thromboxane B2. Results Platelet count, prior myocardial infarction, type 2 diabetes and body mass index were independent determinants of increased AA-induced MEA platelet aggregation in citrate and hirudin anticoagulated blood (p-values ≤ 0.045). Similar results were found with VerifyNow. Prior coronary artery bypass grafting, age, smoking (MEA, AA/citrate) and female gender (MEA, AA/hirudin) were also independent determinants of increased platelet aggregation (p-values ≤ 0.038). Compliance was confirmed by low serum thromboxane B2 levels in all patients (median [25%;75%]: 0.97 [0.52;1.97], range 0.02-26.44 ng/ml). Conclusion Platelet count, prior myocardial infarction, type 2 diabetes and body mass index were independent determinants of increased platelet aggregation, indicating that these characteristics may be key factors in reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin in stable CAD patients. PMID:25993271

  20. The effect of prostaglandin synthase inhibitor, aspirin on the rat intestinal membrane structure and function.

    PubMed

    Kaur, G; Kaur, J; Mittal, N; Nath Sanyal, S

    2010-01-01

    Aspirin at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight was found to decrease the activity of the rat intestinal brush border membrane (BBM) - associated enzymes such as the sucrase, lactase, maltase and alkaline phosphatase. Aspirin treatment also led to a decrease in the microviscosity in the native as well as the benzyl alcohol treated membrane which might be due to the lipid peroxidative damage in the membrane. Physical correlation of the membrane oxidative damage was evident as the Fourier Transformation Infra Red (FTIR) study of the Aspirin treated membrane, which include an increased proportion of gauche to trans conformer, shift in the methylene C-H asymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies, C = O double bond stretching, NH bending, antisymmetric (N)-CH3 bending, C-N stretching and antisymmetric CNC stretching while there was no change in the CH2 wagging and twisting as well as in NH-bending amide bond I and II. Aspirin treatment also caused an alteration in the glucose and histidine transport, as evident by a decreased Vmax value while the apparent Km remaining unchanged in the control and Aspirin-treated animals confirming that there was no change in the substrate affinity constant of the membrane transport proteins for the glucose and the basic amino acid, although the rate of transport decreased considerably. There was a decrease noted in the energy of activation of glucose and histidine transport when studied at different temperature but no change in the temperature of phase transition in the BBM with Aspirin treatment, thus implying that perhaps the thermotropic phase transition in the membrane may have relatively little effect on the transport processes. The result suggests an underlying molecular mechanism indicating the implied membrane damage by Aspirin, an important member of the non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) family which could possibly through an oxidative damage may lead to an altered molecular structure, physical state and biological

  1. How to test the effect of aspirin and clopidogrel in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy?

    PubMed

    Bagoly, Zsuzsa; Homoródi, Nóra; Kovács, Emese Gyöngyvér; Sarkady, Ferenc; Csiba, László; Édes, István; Muszbek, László

    2016-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin is frequently used for the prevention of recurrent ischemic events. Various laboratory methods are used to detect the effect of these drugs administered in monotherapy, however their value in dual therapy has not been explored. Here, we determined which methods used for testing the effect of clopidogrel or aspirin are influenced by the other antiplatelet agent. One arm of the study included 53 ischemic stroke patients being on clopidogrel monotherapy showing effective inhibition of the P2Y12 ADP receptor. Laboratory tests routinely used for the detection of aspirin resistance (arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation/secretion, AA-induced thromboxane B2 (TXB2) production in platelet-rich plasma and VerifyNow Aspirin assay) were carried out on samples obtained from these patients. The other arm of the study involved 52 patients with coronary artery disease being on aspirin monotherapy. Methods used for testing the effect of clopidogrel (ADP-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, flow cytometric analysis of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation and a newly developed P2Y12-specific platelet aggregation (ADP[PGE1] test)) were performed on samples obtained from these patients. Clopidogrel monotherapy significantly inhibited AA-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, moreover, AA-induced TXB2 production was also significantly decreased. VASP phosphorylation and AA-induced platelet aggregation showed fair correlation in patients taking clopidogrel only. Clopidogrel did not inhibit the VerifyNow Aspirin test significantly. Aspirin monotherapy influenced ADP-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, but did not have an effect on VASP phosphorylation and on the ADP[PGE1] platelet aggregation test. PMID:26083485

  2. Bleeding after tooth extraction in patients taking aspirin and clopidogrel (Plavix®) compared with healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Ghahrody, Mohsen; Yousefi-Malekshah, Seyed Hamid; Karimi-Sari, Hamidreza; Yazdanpanah, Hamid; Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Yavarahmadi, Mohammadhosein

    2016-06-01

    The risk of perioperative bleeding is high in patients who take aspirin and clopidogrel after a percutaneous coronary intervention, and whether to stop the drugs is a matter of concern for dentists. The aim of this study was to answer the specific question: should aspirin and clopidogrel bisulphate (Plavix®) be discontinued during a conventional forceps extraction? We studied 64 patients during the first year after percutaneous insertion of coronary stents who were taking aspirin (ASA) 80mg and clopidogrel (Plavix(®)) 75mg, and 50 healthy patients who were to have a conventional forceps extraction at this polyclinic in 2013-2014 and acted as controls. Clinical details (underlying diseases; number of roots; type of tooth; type of haemostasis; and bleeding immediately, 30minutes, and 48hours after intervention) were compared. We evaluated 114 patients with the mean (range) age of 56 (43-76) years, and there were no significant differences in demographic data, underlying diseases, type of tooth, number of roots, and dose of anaesthetic between the groups. There were also no significant differences in the number of bleeds immediately and 30minutes after intervention (P=0.310 and 0.205). The time that the last dose of aspirin had been taken correlated with 30-minute haemostasis (20 compared with 12hours, p=0.037). During the 48hours after the intervention, there were no uncontrolled bleeds or emergency referrals. We conclude that using aspirin and Plavix® simultaneously has no considerable effect on the risk of bleeding in patients having conventional forceps extraction of a single tooth. PMID:26975576

  3. Evaluation of antiulcer activity of indole-3-carbinol and/or omeprazole on aspirin-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Shinnawy, Nashwa A; Abd-Elmageid, Samira A; Alshailabi, Eda M A

    2014-05-01

    The present work is an attempt to elucidate the antiulcer activity of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), which is one of the anticarcinogenic phytochemicals found in the vegetables of Cruciferae family such as broccoli and cauliflower, alone or in combination with omeprazole (OMP), a proton pump inhibitor, to diminish the effects of induced acute gastric ulcer by aspirin (ASA) in male albino rats. A total of 48 adult male albino rats were used in the present study. Animals were divided into eight experimental groups (six animals each group). They were given different experimental inductions of ASA at a dose of 500 mg/kg/body weight, OMP at a dose of 20 mg/kg/body weight and I3C at a dose of 20 mg/kg/body weight either alone or in combination with each other orally for a duration of 7 days. Inner stomach features, ulcer index, pH activity, body weight, stomach weight, hematological investigations, serum total protein albumin and reduced glutathione activity were investigated in addition to the histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical stain of cyclooxygenase-2 to the stomach tissue of normal control, ulcerated and treated ulcerated rats. The results of this study revealed that oral administration of ASA to rats produced the expected characteristic mucosal lesions. OMP accelerated ulcer healing but the administration of I3C either alone or in combination with OMP to ASA-ulcerated rats produced a profound protection to the gastric mucosa from injury induced by ASA. Our results suggested that administration of antiulcer natural substances such as I3C in combination with the perused treatment such as OMP is a very important initiative in the development of new strategies in ulcer healing. PMID:22914261

  4. The effects of aspirin and dimethyl sulphoxide on the latency of lysosomes in a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Zodrow, J; Rogers, S H

    1984-05-14

    Lysosomal preparations were exposed to various concentrations of dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) and aspirin singularly and in combination. Acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase activities were measured and utilized as an indication of lysosomal membrane stability under experimental conditions in the presence and absence of these drugs. Extremely low concentrations of each drug were employed in an attempt to mimic the levels which might be feasible in vivo. There was a significant decrease of enzyme activity (increased structure-linked latency) in the presence of DMSO. Aspirin had no significant effect on the latency of the lysosomes. There was no indication of synergism between DMSO and aspirin. It was concluded that some of the therapeutic advantages attributed to DMSO in the treatment of arthritis and other musculoskeletal diseases may come from the stabilization of lysosomes in cells that contribute to the pathological condition. Aspirin did not seem to exert a therapeutic effect through this mechanism. PMID:6727549

  5. Preparation of Oil of Wintergreen from Commercial Aspirin Tablets: A Microscale Experiment Highlighting Acyl Substitutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartel, Aaron M.; Hanna, James M., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    A single-pot procedure for the preparation of methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) from commercial aspirin tablets has been developed. The synthesis proceeds via a tandem transesterification-Fischer esterification using acidic methanol and can be carried out using either conventional or microwave heating. The experiment helps demonstrate acyl…

  6. Adverse Effects of Subchronic Dose of Aspirin on Reproductive Profile of Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Archana; Ram, Heera; Purohit, Ashok; Jatwa, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is widely used for cardiovascular prophylaxis and as anti-inflammatory pharmaceutical. An investigation was carried out to evaluate the influence of subchronic dose of aspirin on reproductive profile of male rats, if any. Experimental animals were divided into three groups: control and aspirin subchronic dose of 12.5 mg/kg for 30 days and 60 days, respectively, while alterations in sperm dynamics, testicular histopathological and planimetric investigations, body and organs weights, lipid profiles, and hematology were performed as per aimed objectives. Subchronic dose of aspirin reduced sperm density, count, and mobility in cauda epididymis and testis; histopathology and developing primary spermatogonial cells (primary spermatogonia, secondary spermatogonia, and mature spermatocyte) count were also significantly decreased in rats. Hematological investigations revealed hemopoietic abnormalities in 60-day-treated animals along with dysfunctions in hepatic and renal functions. The findings of the present study revealed that administration with subchronic dose of aspirin to male rats resulted in altered reproductive profiles and serum biochemistry. PMID:27190691

  7. Differences in Esterase Activity to Aspirin and p-Nitrophenyl Acetate among Human Serum Albumin Preparations.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Akitoshi; Okada, Masaya; Inagaki, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Sachiyo; Hamaguchi, Tsuneo; Iwakawa, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) has two major ligand-binding sites, sites I and II, and also hydrolyzes some compounds at both sites. In the present study, we investigated differences in esterase activity among HSA preparations, and also the effects of warfarin, indomethacin, and naproxen on the hydrolytic activities of HSA to aspirin and p-nitrophenyl acetate. The esterase activities of HSA to aspirin or p-nitrophenyl acetate were measured from the pseudo-first-order formation rate constant (kobs) of salicylic acid or p-nitrophenol by HSA. Inter-lot variations were observed in the esterase activities of HSA to aspirin and p-nitrophenyl acetate; however, the esterase activity of HSA to aspirin did not correlate with that to p-nitrophenyl acetate. The inhibitory effects of warfarin and indomethacin on the esterase activity of HSA to aspirin were stronger than that of naproxen. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of naproxen on the esterase activity of HSA to p-nitrophenyl acetate was stronger than those of warfarin and indomethacin. These results suggest that the administration of different commercial HSA preparations and the co-administration with site I or II high-affinity binding drugs may change the pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs that are hydrolyzed by HSA. PMID:27476944

  8. Aspirin chemoprevention of gastrointestinal cancer in the next decade. A review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Helena; Hooper, Patricia; Jankowski, Janusz A

    2010-10-01

    Together, gastrointestinal (GI) cancers now account for 25% of neoplastic deaths in the West. In Poland, GI cancer rates are likely to increase further as westernization progresses. Given that conventional cancer therapies have made only modest reductions in cancer mortality, there is a great interest in chemoprevention to prevent or slow malignant transformation from premalignant lesions. The financial pressures in the immediate future require even more stringent criteria for chemopreventive agents - they must be cheap but also safe and efficacious. In this regard, several reviews have indicated that aspirin possesses many favorable qualities for chemoprevention. Furthermore, meta-analyses indicate that aspirin may decrease cancer by approximately 30%. Several large clinical trials are underway, including AspECT (Aspirin and Esomeprazole Chemoprevention Trial) that aims not only to prevent cancer but also decrease the gastric side effects by combining aspirin with potent acid-suppressing drugs. In conclusion, whether aspirin will be the world's first proven chemopreventive agent is currently unknown but the evidence looks hopeful. PMID:20980946

  9. Papillary Necrosis in Rats Caused by Aspirin and Aspirin-containing Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Nanra, Ranjit S.; Kincaid-Smith, Priscilla

    1970-01-01

    Nearly half the rats gavage-fed with aspirin and aspirin-containing mixtures developed papillary necrosis in 20 weeks. This incidence is similar to that found in rats on A.P.C. mixtures with high and low concentrations of p-chloracetanilide, an impurity of phenacetin. Aspirin alone produced necrosis in 7 out of 19 rats (36·8%) whereas phenacetin in the same dose had failed to cause any renal damage over six to nine months. If these results also apply to man they suggest that aspirin and not phenacetin may be the major factor in analgesic nephropathy in patients taking A.P.C. mixtures. An augmented clearance of aspirin appeared to afford some protection to the medulla, and it is suggested that this observation may have important clinical and epidemiological applications. Imagesp560-a PMID:5454357

  10. The Aspirin Foundation Scientific Conference: the history, the present state and the future of aspirin prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tom; Elwood, Peter; Keating, Conrad; Rothwell, Peter; Detering, Elmar; Freedman, Andrew; Langley, Ruth; Logan, Richard; Phillips, Ceri; DeCensi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Aspirin Foundation Conference covered a range of topics from clinical and medical history, epidemiology, health economics, and the current uses of aspirin in general practice and in the treatment and prevention of cancer. The use of aspirin as primary prevention in people at risk of atherosclerotic events is now well known, but its use as a preventative agent in some cancer types is still under discussion, and data on colorectal and lung cancer were presented at this meeting. The potential use of aspirin in preventing vascular disease in HIV patients was also discussed. The cost effectiveness of aspirin as a primary prevention strategy was discussed for the first time in this series of meetings. PMID:24678343

  11. Lack of effect of multiple doses of vortioxetine on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of aspirin and warfarin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Grace; Zhang, Wencan; Serenko, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multimodal activity approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. Two separate randomized, placebo-controlled trials evaluated the effects of multiple doses of vortioxetine (10 mg/day) on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of aspirin and warfarin in healthy volunteers. In the aspirin study, subjects received vortioxetine 10 mg or placebo once daily for 14 days, followed by coadministration with aspirin 150 mg once daily for 6 days, in 2 periods with a crossover design. In the warfarin study, subjects were randomized after reaching target international normalized ratio (INR) values on warfarin to receive vortioxetine 10 mg or matching placebo once daily for 14 days, with all subjects receiving a maintenance dose of warfarin (1-10 mg). Vortioxetine had no effect on the steady-state pharmacokinetic parameters of aspirin or its metabolite salicylic acid, and no statistically significant effect on the inhibition of arachidonic acid-, adenosine-5'-diphosphate-, or collagen-induced platelet aggregation at any time points. Coadministration of vortioxetine did not alter the pharmacokinetics of (R)- and (S)-warfarin enantiomers, or the mean coagulation parameters of warfarin treatment alone. Coadministration of vortioxetine doses in healthy volunteers had no effect on aspirin or warfarin pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics. Vortioxetine was well tolerated when coadministered with aspirin or warfarin. PMID:25641606

  12. 78 FR 32477 - ASA Gold and Precious Metals Limited; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... COMMISSION ASA Gold and Precious Metals Limited; Notice of Application May 22, 2013. AGENCY: Securities and... Company Act of 1940 (the ``Act''). ] SUMMARY: Summary of Application: Applicant, ASA Gold and Precious... gold and other precious minerals. To this end, ASA's management is seeking to take advantage...

  13. Assessing the Photometric Calibration of the ASAS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdnikov, L. N.; Dambis, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    We compare bona fide calibrated mean VIC magnitudes of several hundred stars found in the CCD frames taken in 2012 during our photometric observations of 109 Cepheids and RR Lyrae type stars made at the South African Astronomical Observatory to the corresponding mean VIC magnitudes measured in the course of the ASAS survey to assess the quality of ASAS photometry and derive the appropriate transformation equations. We conclude that as far as the only serious caveat due to photometric errors, which range from ˜ 0.05m for relatively bright stars to about ˜ 0.15m for ˜ 14m stars and translates into extra fractional distance error of 0.025–0.07.

  14. Multiples Among Detached Eclipsing Binaries from the ASAS Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hełminiak, K. G.; Konacki, M.; Ratajczak, M.; Jordán, A.; Espinoza, N.; Brahm, R.; Kambe, E.; Ukita, N.

    2015-07-01

    We have been conducting a spectroscopic survey of detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs) from the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) database for more than three years. Thousands of high-resolution spectra of >300 systems have been secured, and used for radial velocity measurements and spectral analysis. We have found a zoo of multiple systems in our sample, such as spectroscopic triples and quadruples, visual binaries with eclipsing components, and circumbinary low-mass companions, including sub-stellar-mass candidates.

  15. Du Pont Classifications of 2 ASAS-SN Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappee, Benjamin J.; Prieto, J. L.; Rich, J.; Madore, B.; Poetrodjojo, Henry; D'Agostino, Joshua

    2016-09-01

    We report optical spectroscopy (range 370-910 nm) of two supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN; Shappee et al. 2014, ApJ, 788, 48) using the du Pont 2.5-m telescope (+ WFCCD) at Las Campanas Observatory on Aug. 30 and Sep. 1 2016 UT. We performed a cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  16. Analysis of Kepler Observations of ASAS Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzato, Jacklyn M.; Mighell, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a study that compares the performance of period-finding algorithms when using data gathered by ground-based telescopes to their performance when using data gathered by space-based telescopes. In order to make this comparison, the periods reported by the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) Catalog for Variable Stars in the Kepler Field of View, a study that identified targets for the Kepler Mission before its launch, were compared to periods determined by this study. Only targets that were identified in the ASAS Catalog and later observed by the Kepler Mission were selected for analysis, for a total of 599 targets. The observations gathered by the Kepler Mission were analyzed using three period-finding algorithms: the Lafler-Kinman algorithm, the Analysis of Variance algorithm, and the Conditional Entropy algorithm. These three algorithms analyzed the light curves of each target, and one of the periods produced was selected to be compared to the period found by the ASAS Catalog. The analysis of the two data sets highlights issues with the performance of period finding algorithms with ground-based data, leading to crude period estimates for all targets with periods longer than 10 days. Since the Large Synoptic Scanning Telescope (LSST), due for first light in 2020, will have a similar observation schedule to that of the ASAS survey, similar issues can be expected with the analysis of LSST data for some types of long period variables, like semiregulars), that have periods longer than 10 days. Pezzato was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  17. Du Pont Classifications of 4 ASAS-SN Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrell, N.; Shappee, Benjamin J.

    2016-08-01

    We report optical spectroscopy (range 370-910 nm) of four supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN; Shappee et al. 2014, ApJ, 788, 48) using the du Pont 2.5-m telescope (+ WFCCD) at Las Campanas Observatory on July 31 and Aug. 01 2016 UT. We performed a cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  18. Identifying SRD Variables Among "Miscellaneous" ASAS Stars (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinonez, M.; Larsen, K.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) The International Variable Star Index (VSX) contains a large number of stars observed and analyzed by the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS). While ASAS is a powerful tool in terms of the sheer volume of data it collects, its automated light curve analysis is not always robust enough to reliably identify stars that are not strictly regular in their magnitude variations. As a consequence, it was suspected that potentially many variable stars of the semiregular type were instead added to the VSX under a miscellaneous (MISC) classification. A subset of these semiregular stars, known as SRD variables, has a well-defined set of parameters regarding their classification - they are of the F, G, or K spectral type, their amplitudes of light variation are between 0.1 and 4 magnitudes, and their periods of variation can span 30 to 1,100 days. Furthermore, SRD variables are giants or supergiants, and therefore typically distant with small proper motions. A search was made through stars listed as MISC in the VSX using the above parameters, as well detailed light curve analyses via the AAVSO's VStar program, in order to find ASAS SRDs that were misclassified as MISC. This study of 90 stars has yielded five new SRDs to date. In addition, some data pertaining to several stars that were not confirmed to be of the SRD type were found to contain errors, and have since been revised accordingly in VSX.

  19. Aspirin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs in RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Ping; Yang, Chao; Li, Yuan; Fan, Yong; Yang, Hong-Jun; Liu, Bin; Sang, Hong-Xun

    2016-09-01

    Aspirin is a commonly used medicine as an effective antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug. Previous studies have demonstrated its potential effects of anti-postmenopausal osteoporosis, while the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of aspirin on receptor‑activator of nuclear factor κB (NF‑κB) ligand (RANKL)‑induced osteoclasts were investigated in RAW264.7 cells in the current study. Using tartrate‑resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, it was observed that aspirin inhibited the differentiation of RANKL‑induced RAW264.7 cells. The mRNA expression of osteoclastic marker genes, including cathepsin K, TRAP, matrix metalloproteinase 9 and calcitonin receptor, were suppressed by aspirin as identified using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The immunofluorescence assay indicated that aspirin markedly inhibited NF‑κB p65 translocation to the nucleus in RANKL‑induced RAW264.7 cells. In addition, aspirin also suppressed the phosphorylation of mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs), observed by western blot analysis. Taken together, these data identified that aspirin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by suppressing the activation of NF‑κB and MAPKs in RANKL‑induced RAW264.7 cells, implying that aspirin may possess therapeutic potential for use in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27430169

  20. Aspirin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs in RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yan-Ping; Yang, Chao; Li, Yuan; Fan, Yong; Yang, Hong-Jun; Liu, Bin; Sang, Hong-Xun

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin is a commonly used medicine as an effective antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug. Previous studies have demonstrated its potential effects of anti-postmenopausal osteoporosis, while the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of aspirin on receptor-activator of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclasts were investigated in RAW264.7 cells in the current study. Using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, it was observed that aspirin inhibited the differentiation of RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells. The mRNA expression of osteoclastic marker genes, including cathepsin K, TRAP, matrix metalloproteinase 9 and calcitonin receptor, were suppressed by aspirin as identified using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The immunofluorescence assay indicated that aspirin markedly inhibited NF-κB p65 translocation to the nucleus in RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells. In addition, aspirin also suppressed the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), observed by western blot analysis. Taken together, these data identified that aspirin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs in RANKL-induced RAW264.7 cells, implying that aspirin may possess therapeutic potential for use in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27430169

  1. Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day

    MedlinePlus

    ... Previous section Overview 2 of 5 sections Take Action! Take Action: Talk with Your Doctor Take these steps to ... Benefits and Risks 3 of 5 sections Take Action: Aspirin Tips Use aspirin safely. If you and ...

  2. Beware of Bleeding Risks with Antacids Containing Aspirin

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159221.html Beware of Bleeding Risks With Antacids Containing Aspirin Alka Seltzer, Bromo Seltzer among over- ... 6, 2016 MONDAY, June 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antacids that contain aspirin may cause stomach or intestinal ...

  3. A brief review on the mechanisms of aspirin resistance.

    PubMed

    Du, Gang; Lin, Qiang; Wang, Jinhua

    2016-10-01

    Aspirin is the most widely prescribed drug for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, a large number of patients continue to experience thromboembolic events despite aspirin therapy, a phenomenon referred to as aspirin resistance or treatment failure. Aspirin resistance is often observed along with a high incidence of unstable plaque, cardiovascular events and cerebrovascular accident. Studies have shown that aspirin reduces the production of TXA2, but not totally inhibits the activation of platelets. In this review, we analyze current and past research on aspirin resistance, presenting important summaries of results regarding the potential contributive roles of single nucleotide polymorphisms, inflammation, metabolic syndrome and miRNAs. The aim of this article is to provide a brief review on aspirin resistance and platelet function, which will provide important insights into the research of aspirin resistance. PMID:27372038

  4. Aspirin inhibits glucose‑6‑phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT‑29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin‑mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT‑29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT‑29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin‑acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  5. Aspirin overutilization for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Miller, Aaron W; Rezkalla, Shereif H

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspirin is commonly used for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the US. Previous research has observed significant levels of inappropriate aspirin use for primary CVD prevention in some European populations, but the degree to which aspirin is overutilized in the US remains unknown. This study examined the association between regular aspirin use and demographic/clinical factors in a population-based sample of adults without a clinical indication for aspirin for primary prevention. Methods A cross-sectional analysis was performed using 2010–2012 data from individuals aged 30–79 years in the Marshfield Epidemiologic Study Area (WI, USA). Regular aspirin users included those who took aspirin at least every other day. Results There were 16,922 individuals who were not clinically indicated for aspirin therapy for primary CVD prevention. Of these, 19% were regular aspirin users. In the final adjusted model, participants who were older, male, lived in northern Wisconsin, had more frequent medical visits, and had greater body mass index had significantly higher odds of regular aspirin use (P<0.001 for all). Race/ethnicity, health insurance, smoking, blood pressure, and lipid levels had negligible influence on aspirin use. A sensitivity analysis found a significant interaction between age and number of medical visits, indicating progressively more aspirin use in older age groups who visited their provider frequently. Conclusion There was evidence of aspirin overutilization in this US population without CVD. Older age and more frequent provider visits were the strongest predictors of inappropriate aspirin use. Obesity was the only significant clinical factor, suggesting misalignment between perceived aspirin benefits and cardiovascular risks in this subgroup of patients. Prospective studies that examine cardiac and bleeding events associated with regular aspirin use among obese samples (without CVD) are needed to refine clinical

  6. Spectroscopic studies of the interaction of aspirin and its important metabolite, salicylate ion, with DNA, A·T and G·C rich sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathaie, S. Z.; Nikfarjam, L.; Rahmanpour, R.; Moosavi-Movahedi, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    Among different biological effects of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), its anticancer property is controversial. Since ASA hydrolyzes rapidly to salicylic acid (SA), especially in the blood, interaction of both ASA and SA (as the small molecules) with ctDNA, oligo(dA·dT) 15 and oligo(dG·dC) 15, as a possible mechanism of their action, is investigated here. The results show that the rate of ASA hydrolysis in the absence and presence of ctDNA is similar. The spectrophotometric results indicate that both ASA and SA cooperatively bind to ctDNA. The binding constants ( K) are (1.7 ± 0.7) × 10 3 M -1 and (6.7 ± 0.2) × 10 3 M -1 for ASA and SA, respectively. Both ligands quench the fluorescence emission of ethidium bromide (Et)-ctDNA complex. The Scatchard plots indicate the non-displacement based quenching (non-intercalative binding). The circular dichroism (CD) spectra of ASA- or SA-ctDsNA complexes show the minor distortion of ctDNA structure, with no characteristic peaks for intercalation of ligands. Tm of ctDNA is decreased up to 3 °C upon ASA binding. The CD results also indicate more distortions on oligo(dG·dC) 15 structure due to the binding of both ASA and SA in comparison with oligo(dA·dT) 15. All data indicate the more affinity for SA binding with DNA minor groove in comparison with ASA which has more hydrophobic character.

  7. 21 CFR 520.1409 - Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets. 520.1409... Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains 0.5 milligram of methylprednisolone and 300 milligrams of aspirin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c)...

  8. Exonic Variants Associated with Development of Aspirin Exacerbated Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, HunSoo; Park, Jong Sook; Bae, Da-Jeong; Song, Hyun-Ji; Choi, Inseon S.; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Park, Hea-Sim; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Namgoong, Suhg; Kim, Ji On; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Park, Choon-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is one phenotype of asthma, often occurring in the form of a severe and sudden attack. Due to the time-consuming nature and difficulty of oral aspirin challenge (OAC) for AERD diagnosis, non-invasive biomarkers have been sought. The aim of this study was to identify AERD-associated exonic SNPs and examine the diagnostic potential of a combination of these candidate SNPs to predict AERD. DNA from 165 AERD patients, 397 subjects with aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA), and 398 normal controls were subjected to an Exome BeadChip assay containing 240K SNPs. 1,023 models (210-1) were generated from combinations of the top 10 SNPs, selected by the p-values in association with AERD. The area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves was calculated for each model. SNP Function Portal and PolyPhen-2 were used to validate the functional significance of candidate SNPs. An exonic SNP, exm537513 in HLA-DPB1, showed the lowest p-value (p = 3.40×10−8) in its association with AERD risk. From the top 10 SNPs, a combination model of 7 SNPs (exm537513, exm83523, exm1884673, exm538564, exm2264237, exm396794, and exm791954) showed the best AUC of 0.75 (asymptotic p-value of 7.94×10−21), with 34% sensitivity and 93% specificity to discriminate AERD from ATA. Amino acid changes due to exm83523 in CHIA were predicted to be “probably damaging” to the structure and function of the protein, with a high score of ‘1’. A combination model of seven SNPs may provide a useful, non-invasive genetic marker combination for predicting AERD. PMID:25372592

  9. The cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor, etodolac, but not aspirin reduces neovascularization in a murine ischemic hind limb model.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kohei; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Tsujimoto, Shunsuke; Uozumi, Naonori; Kita, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Akio; Shimizu, Takao; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2010-02-10

    Cyclooxygenase inhibitors are often prescribed to relieve severe ischemic leg pain in critical ischemic limb patients. Prescription of high doses of aspirin and selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors is reported to increase cardiovascular events through suppression of the vasodilative prostanoid prostaglandin I(2) in endothelium. Here, we evaluated the influence of aspirin and etodolac, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on neovascularization using a murine ischemia hind limb model. C57BL/6J mice were treated with aspirin or etodolac for twenty-eight days after induction of ischemia. We exploited a concentration of the agents that suppressed cyclooxygenase activity efficiently, especially in prostaglandin I(2) production. Recovery of limb blood perfusion and capillary density in ischemic limbs was significantly suppressed by etodolac treatment when compared to the aspirin treated group and untreated group. Production of 6-keto prostaglandin F(1alpha) and prostaglandin E(2) was lower in the aspirin treated group when compared with the etodolac-treated group. Also, these concentrations were lower in both treatment groups compared with the untreated group. Immunohistochemical analysis suggested cyclooxygenase-2 was expressed in endothelium but not in inflammatory cells in ischemic tissue from the acute to chronic phase. Cyclooxygenase-1 was expressed strongly in inflammatory cells in the acute phase. Furthermore, bone marrow-derived mononuclear cell transplantation improved neovascularization, whereas aspirin and etodolac did not inhibit these effects. Production of arachidonic acid metabolites by transplanted cells was independent of the improvement of neovascularization. In conclusion, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces ischemia-induced neovascularization. PMID:19879866

  10. Impact of aspirin dose on adenosine diphosphate-mediated platelet activities. Results of an in vitro pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Thano, Estela; Rollini, Fabiana; Patel, Ronakkumar; Wilson, Ryan E; Muñiz-Lozano, Ana; Franchi, Francesco; Darlington, Andrew; Desai, Bhaloo; Guzman, Luis A; Bass, Theodore A; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2013-10-01

    Different aspirin dosing regimens have been suggested to impact outcomes when used in combination with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) P2Y12 receptor antagonists. Prior investigations have shown that not only aspirin, but also potent ADP P2Y12 receptor blockade can inhibit thromboxane A2-mediated platelet activation. The impact of aspirin dosing on ADP mediated platelet activities is unknown and represents the aim of this in vitro pilot pharmacodynamic (PD) investigation. Twenty-six patients with stable coronary artery disease on aspirin 81 mg/day and P2Y12 naïve were enrolled. PD assessments were performed at baseline, while patients were on 81 mg/day aspirin and after switching to 325 mg/day for 7 ± 2 days with and without escalating concentrations (vehicle, 1, 3, and 10 μM) of prasugrel's active metabolite (P-AM). PD assays included flow cytometric assessment of VASP to define the platelet reactivity index (PRI) and the Multiplate Analyzer (MEA) using multiple agonists [ADP, ADP + prostaglandin (PGE1), arachidonic acid (AA), and collagen]. Escalating P-AM concentrations showed incremental platelet P2Y12 inhibition measured by VASP-PRI (p<0.001). However, there were no differences according to aspirin dosing regimen at any P-AM concentration (vehicle: p=0.899; 1 μM: p=0.888; 3 μM: p=0.524; 10 μM: p=0.548). Similar findings were observed in purinergic markers assessed by MEA (ADP and ADP+PGE1). P-AM addition significantly reduced AA and collagen induced platelet aggregation (p<0.001 for all measures), irrespective of aspirin dose. In conclusion, aspirin dosing does not appear to affect PD measures of ADP-mediated platelet reactivity irrespective of the degree of P2Y12 receptor blockade. P2Y12 receptor blockade modulates platelet reactivity mediated by alternative activators. PMID:23884248

  11. The effect of simvastatin, aspirin, and their combination in reduction of atheroma plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniati, Neng Fisheri; Permatasari, Anita

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by high level of cholesterol especially low density lipoprotein (LDL) and accumulation of neutrophil and macrophage in the artery wall. Thickness of aortic wall is an early stage of atherosclerosis plaque formation. Identification of atherosclerosis plaque formation was done by measuring level of total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL, interleukin-18 (IL-18), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and measuring the thickness of aortic wall. Atherosclerosis's model induced by high fat diet and CCT (cholesterol, cholic acid, and propyltiouracil) oral administration. Rats induced cholesterol divided into positive control, simvastatin 25 mg/kg bw, aspirin 20 mg/kg bw, and combination simvastatin 25 mg/kg and aspirin 20 mg/kg bw group for 3 weeks. In the third week, therapy was given to atherosclerosis's model. Then, in the fourth and fifth week, therapy was given but induction of high cholesterol was stopped due to the massive loss of body weight. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL, MPO, and IL-18 measured by uv-vis spectrophotometry and ELISA. In the end of therapy, aorta's rats was isolated to identify the thickness of aorta wall. In the fourth week, after 1 week of treatment, only combination group showed significantly higher total cholesterol, LDL and MPO compared to positive control group. Level of triglycerides and HDL in all groups did not significantly differ compared to positive control group. After 2 weeks continuing drug treatment, the level of total cholesterol, MPO, and IL-18 were decreased in all groups, and aspirin group showed the lowest level. The level of triglycerides was decreased in simvastatin and aspirin group, and aspirin group showed the lowest. Only combination group showed the lowest level of LDL. Based on histopathology result, the thickness of aortic wall was reduced in all groups and aspirin group showed the lowest.

  12. Reduction of aspirin-induced fecal blood loss with low-dose misoprostol tablets in man

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.M.; Clark, L.; Armstrong, L.; D'Souza, J.

    1985-07-01

    Misoprostol (SC-29333), a synthetic prostaglandin E1 methyl ester analog, was given simultaneously with acetylsalicylic acid in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized prospective study of 32 healthy human male subjects. Fecal blood loss was measured for eight days using the /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cell technique. Aspirin (650 mg qid) and misoprostol (25 micrograms qid) or placebo were given during days 3, 4, and 5. There was a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in median blood loss (modified Friedman test) from 0.81 to 6.05 ml/day in the aspirin with placebo group (N = 16). Median blood loss was increased (from 0.75 to 3.75 ml/day) in the aspirin with misoprostol group (N = 16), but this was significantly less (Mann-Whitney U test, P less than 0.01) than the placebo group. Mean serum salicylate concentrations in the placebo and misoprostol groups were similar (7.8 and 6.8 micrograms/ml, respectively). There were no significant changes in laboratory values in any of the subjects studied, nor were any major side-effects encountered. This study demonstrates that oral misoprostol reduces aspirin-induced gastrointestinal bleeding even when administered simultaneously and at a dose level below its threshold for significant acid inhibition. This indicates a potential role for misoprostol in the prevention of gastric mucosal damage in selected patients.

  13. Aspirin-triggered 15-epi-lipoxin A4 regulates neutrophil-platelet aggregation and attenuates acute lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Muñoz, Guadalupe; Mallavia, Beñat; Bins, Adriaan; Headley, Mark; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that platelets are major contributors to innate immune responses in conditions such as acute lung injury (ALI). Platelets form heterotypic aggregates with neutrophils, and we hypothesized that lipoxin mediators regulate formation of neutrophil-platelet aggregates (NPA) and that NPA significantly contribute to ALI. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury was accompanied by platelet sequestration, activation, intra-alveolar accumulation, and NPA formation within both blood and alveolar compartments. Using lung intravital microscopy, we observed the dynamic formation of NPA during physiologic conditions, which sharply increased with ALI. Aspirin (ASA) treatment significantly reduced lung platelet sequestration and activation, NPA formation, and lung injury. ASA treatment increased levels of ASA-triggered lipoxin (ATL; 15-epi-lipoxin A4), and blocking the lipoxin A4 receptor (ALX) with a peptide antagonist (Boc2) or using ALX knockouts (Fpr2/3−/−) reversed this protection. LPS increased NPA formation in vitro, which was reduced by ATL, and engagement of ALX by ATL on both neutrophils and platelets was necessary to prevent aggregation. In a model of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), Boc2 also reversed ASA protection, and treatment with ATL in both LPS and TRALI models protected from ALI. We conclude that ATL regulates neutrophil-platelet aggregation and that platelet-neutrophil interactions are a therapeutic target in lung injury. PMID:25143486

  14. First photometric analyses of five contact ASAS binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygan, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present the first light curve solutions of five binary systems selected from All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) Catalog of Variable Stars. The light curves of the systems are analyzed and the light parameters are derived. The estimated absolute parameters of the components and the degree of contact values for all targets are also calculated. We compared our results to other known contact binaries by emphasizing the locations of the components on the mass-radius and the H-R diagram. The evolutionary statuses of the systems are also discussed. Results of our analyses confirm that the systems are contact binaries.

  15. Is the ASA Score in Geriatric Hip Fractures a Predictive Factor for Complications and Readmission?

    PubMed Central

    Rosiadis, M.; Balalis, K.

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are the second cause of hospitalization in geriatric patients. The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification scheme is a scoring system for the evaluation of the patients' health and comorbidities before an operative procedure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the ASA score is a predictive factor for perioperative and postoperative complications and a cause of readmission of geriatric patients with hip fractures. The study included 198 elderly patients. The mean values of hospitalization were 6.4 ± 2.1 days for the patients with ASA II, 10.4 ± 3.4 days for the patients with ASA III, and 13.5 ± 4.4 days for the patients with ASA IV. The patients with ASA II exhibited minor complications, while patients with ASA III presented cutaneous ulcer and respiratory dysfunction. Five patients with ASA IV had pulmonary embolism, two patients had myocardial infarction, and three patients died. The ASA score seems to have direct correlation with multiple factors, such as the hospitalization days, the severity of the complications, and the total hospitalization costs. The treatment of geriatrics hip fractures in patients with a high ASA score requires a multidisciplinary approach and a special assessment in order to decrease postoperative morbidity and mortality and offer optimal functionality. PMID:27293978

  16. The effect of aspirin on atherogenic diet-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Apoorva; Parmar, Hamendra S; Kumar, Anil

    2011-06-01

    Exploration of atherogenic diet-induced diabetes mellitus and the evaluation of antidiabetic potential of aspirin were carried out in this study. Male albino Wistar rats were divided into three groups of seven each (1, 2 and 3). Animals of groups 2 and 3 received CCT diet (normal rat chow supplemented with 4% cholesterol, 1% cholic acid and 0.5%, 2-thiouracil), whereas the animals of group 1 received normal feed and served as control. In addition to CCT, animals of group 3 (CCT + Asp) also received aspirin (8 gm/kg), commencing from day 8 till the end of study (day 15). In another experiment (exp. 2), aspirin-supplemented normal rat chow (Asp) was fed to the animals for 7 days and compared with the normal rat chow-fed control group. In experiment 3, an in vitro nitric oxide radical-scavenging potential of aspirin at three different doses (25, 50 and 100 μg/ml) was evaluated. In response to CCT diet, a decrease in serum insulin, α-amylase activity, hepatic glycogen, pancreatic calcium with a concomitant increase in serum glucose, lipid profile (except high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)), pancreatic nitrite and lipid peroxidation and the size of adipocytes along with macrophages infiltration were observed. Aspirin administration to CCT diet-fed animals (CCT + Asp) reverted all the studied biochemical and histological changes towards normality. In experiment 2, aspirin administration decreased the serum glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and VLDL-C with concomitantly increased HDL-C and insulin; however, it increased hepatic glycogen and pancreatic calcium concentration with a decrease in pancreatic and adipose lipid peroxidation. In vitro assay revealed the nitric oxide radical-scavenging potential of aspirin in all the studied doses. It is concluded that CCT diet-induced diabetes mellitus might be the outcome of nitric oxide radical-induced oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue, as well as diminished

  17. Aspirin metabolism and efficacy in postoperative dental pain.

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, R A; Williams, F M; Ward, A; Rawlins, M D

    1984-01-01

    Aspirin 1200 mg was compared with placebo in a randomised, double-blind, crossover study in 15 patients with postoperative pain after removal of impacted lower third molars. Over a 5 h investigation period, patients reported significantly less pain (P less than 0.01) after treatment with aspirin, than after treatment with placebo. Peak concentrations of aspirin occurred at 15 min after dosage. Significant negative correlations were observed between plasma aspirin esterase activity and both AUC aspirin (r = -0.904, P less than 0.001) and AUC analgesia (r = -0.91, P less than 0.001). Similarly, a significant correlation was observed between AUC aspirin and AUC analgesia (r = 0.96, P less than 0.001). Evidence from this study would suggest that an individual's pain relief in postoperative dental pain is determined by the rate of aspirin hydrolysis to salicylate. PMID:6378231

  18. Non-enzymatic modifications of prostaglandin H synthase 1 affect bifunctional enzyme activity - Implications for the sensitivity of blood platelets to acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Kassassir, Hassan; Siewiera, Karolina; Talar, Marcin; Stec-Martyna, Emilia; Pawlowska, Zofia; Watala, Cezary

    2016-06-25

    Due to its ability to inhibit the blood platelet PGHS-1, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, Aspirin(®)) is widely used as a preventive agent in atherothrombotic diseases. However, its beneficial effects seem to be lower in diabetic patients, suggesting that protein glycation may impair effective ASA-mediated acetylation process. On the other hand, it is proposed that ASA can prevent some of the late complications of diabetes by lowering the extent of glycation at protein free amino groups. The aim of this work was to evaluate the extents of non-enzymatic N-glycosylation (glycation) and acetylation of blood platelet PGHS-1 (COX-1) and the competition between glycation and acetylation was investigated in order to demonstrate how these two reactions may compete against platelet PGHS-1. When PGHS-1 was incubated with glycating/acetylating agents (glucose, Glu; 1,6-bisphosphofructose, 1,6-BPF; methylglyoxal, MGO, acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), the enzyme was modified in 13.4 ± 1.6, 5.3 ± 0.5, 10.7 ± 1.2 and 6.4 ± 1.1 mol/mol protein, respectively, and its activity was significantly reduced. The prior glycation/carbonylation of PGHS-1 with Glu, 1,6-BPF or MGO decreased the extent of acetylation from 6.4 ± 1.1 down to 2.5 ± 0.2, 3.6 ± 0.3 and 5.2 ± 0.2 mol/mol protein, respectively, but the enzyme still remained susceptible to the subsequent inhibition of its activity with ASA. When PGHS-1 was first acetylated with ASA and then incubated with glycating/carbonylating agents, we observed the following reductions in the enzyme modifications: from 13.4 ± 1.6 to 8.7 ± 0.6 mol/mol protein for Glu, from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 3.9 ± 0.3 mol/mol protein for 1,6-BPF and from 10.7 ± 1.2 to 7.5 ± 0.5 mol/mol protein for MGO, however subsequent glycation/carbonylation did not significantly affect PGHS-1 function. Overall, our outcomes allow to better understand the structural aspects of the chemical competition between glycation and acetylation of PGHS-1

  19. Van der Waals Interactions in Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Anthony; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    The ability of molecules to yield multiple solid forms, or polymorphs, has significance for diverse applications ranging from drug design and food chemistry to nonlinear optics and hydrogen storage. In particular, aspirin has been used and studied for over a century, but has only recently been shown to have an additional polymorphic form, known as form II. Since the two observed solid forms of aspirin are degenerate in terms of lattice energy, kinetic effects have been suggested to determine the metastability of the less abundant form II. Here, first-principles calculations provide an alternative explanation based on free-energy differences at room temperature. The explicit consideration of many-body van der Waals interactions in the free energy demonstrates that the stability of the most abundant form of aspirin is due to a subtle coupling between collective electronic fluctuations and quantized lattice vibrations. In addition, a systematic analysis of the elastic properties of the two forms of aspirin rules out mechanical instability of form II as making it metastable.

  20. Aspirin Use Associated With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a Total Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ching-Piao; Lin, Feng-Cheng; Lee, Johnny Kuang-Wu; Lee, Charles Tzu-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of aspirin use and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) risk is unclear. This study determined whether use of any individual compound is associated with ALS risk by conducting a total population-based case-control study in Taiwan. Methods A total of 729 patients with newly diagnosed ALS who had a severely disabling disease certificate between January 1, 2002, and December 1, 2008, comprised the case group. These cases were compared with 7290 sex-, age-, residence-, and insurance premium-matched controls. Drug use by each Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical code was analyzed using conditional logistic regression models. False discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted P values were reported in order to avoid inflating false positives. Results Of the 1336 compounds, only the 266 with use cases exceeding 30 in our database were included in the screening analysis. Without controlling for steroid use, the analysis failed to reveal any compound that was inversely associated with ALS risk according to FDR criteria. After controlling for steroid use, we found use of the following compounds to be associated with ALS risk: aspirin, diphenhydramine (one of the antihistamines), and mefenamic acid (one of the NSAIDs). A multivariate analysis revealed that aspirin was independently inversely associated with ALS risk after controlling for diphenhydramine, mefenamic acid, and steroid use. The inverse association between aspirin and ALS was present predominately in patients older than 55 years. Conclusions The results of this study suggested that aspirin use might reduce the risk of ALS, and the benefit might be more prominent for older people. PMID:25721071

  1. Feasibility of clinoptilolite application as a microporous carrier for pH-controlled oral delivery of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Tondar, Mahdi; Parsa, Mohammad Javad; Yousefpour, Yaser; Sharifi, Ali Mohammad; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Clinoptilolite is a natural zeolite which due to high surface area/volume ratio has found many applications in industries and medicine. Aspirin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which is currently used as an anticoagulant, antinociceptive, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory drug. It is an acidic drug which induces gastric irritation due to inhibition of cyclooxygenase I located in gastric mucosa. In the present work, adsorption and desorption of aspirin on Iranian clinoptilolite micronized particles were studied in acidic and relatively alkaline pHs. Effect of particle size of clinoptilolite was also investigated on adsorption and desorption of aspirin. Specific surfaces, particle sizes, and zeta potentials of clinoptilolite particles were also determined. Scanning electron micrograph was used to study the morphology and crystallinity of clinoptilolite particles. The results showed that adsorption and desorption of aspirin on clinoptilolite are particle size- and pH-dependent. The present work proposes clinoptilolite as an inexpensive, efficient, and non-toxic natural available microporous material for aspirin oral delivery. PMID:25551707

  2. Optimization of ascorbic acid-2-phosphate production from ascorbic acid using resting cell of Brevundimonas diminuta.

    PubMed

    Shin, Woo-Jung; Kim, Byung-Yong; Bang, Won-Gi

    2007-05-01

    With the aim to produce ascorbic acid-2-phosphate (AsA-2-P) from L-ascorbic acid (AsA, Vitamin C), nine bacteria conferring the ability to transform AsA to AsA-2-P were isolated from soil samples alongside known strains from culture collections. Most isolates were classified to the genus Brevundimonas by 16S phylogenetic analysis. Among them, Brevundimonas diminuta KACC 10306 was selected as the experimental strain because of its the highest productivity of AsA-2-P. The optimum set of conditions for the AsA-2-P production from AsA using resting cells as the source of the enzyme was also investigated. The optimum cultivation time was 16 h and the cell concentration was 120 g/l (wet weight). The optimum concentrations of AsA and pyrophosphate were 550 mM and 450 mM, respectively. The most effective buffer was 50 mM sodium formate. The optimum pH was 4.5 and temperature was 40 degrees C. Under the above conditions, 27.5 g/l of AsA-2-P was produced from AsA after 36 h of incubation, which corresponded to a 19.7% conversion efficiency based on the initial concentration of AsA. PMID:18051298

  3. Repurposing of Aspirin and Ibuprofen as Candidate Anti-Cryptococcus Drugs.

    PubMed

    Ogundeji, Adepemi O; Pohl, Carolina H; Sebolai, Olihile M

    2016-08-01

    The usage of fluconazole and amphotericin B in clinical settings is often limited by, among other things, drug resistance development and undesired side effects. Thus, there is a constant need to find new drugs to better manage fungal infections. Toward this end, the study described in this paper considered the repurposing of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and ibuprofen as alternative drugs to control the growth of cryptococcal cells. In vitro susceptibility tests, including a checkerboard assay, were performed to assess the response of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii to the above-mentioned anti-inflammatory drugs. Next, the capacity of these two drugs to induce stress as well as their mode of action in the killing of cryptococcal cells was determined. The studied fungal strains revealed a response to both aspirin and ibuprofen that was dose dependent, with ibuprofen exerting greater antimicrobial action. More importantly, the MICs of these drugs did not negatively (i) affect growth or (ii) impair the functioning of macrophages; rather, they enhanced the ability of these immune cells to phagocytose cryptococcal cells. Ibuprofen was also shown to act in synergy with fluconazole and amphotericin B. The treatment of cryptococcal cells with aspirin or ibuprofen led to stress induction via activation of the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, and cell death was eventually achieved through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated membrane damage. The presented data highlight the potential clinical application of aspirin and ibuprofen as candidate anti-Cryptococcus drugs. PMID:27246782

  4. Sustained release of aspirin and vitamin C from titanium nanotubes: An experimental and stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weihu; Deng, Conghui; Liu, Peng; Hu, Yan; Luo, Zhong; Cai, Kaiyong

    2016-07-01

    Anodization is a promising method to change the topography and wettability of titanium (Ti) implant. The formed TiO2 nanotubes (TiNTs) arrays could enhance the biological properties of Ti implants. In this study, to investigate the possibility of TiNTs arrays on a Ti implant surface as nano-reservoirs for small molecular drugs when using in orthopedic and dental prosthesis, TiNTs on a Ti implant surface were prepared. Then, aspirin and/or vitamin C were loaded into TiNTs as model drugs. Meanwhile, low molecular weight polylactic acid (PLA, Mw=3000) was synthesized and loaded alternately along with aspirin or vitamin C. The release rates of aspirin and vitamin C with/or without PLA loading were investigated by using a UV-Vis spectrometer. The results showed that when loading without PLA, drugs released quickly with presence of burst release. However, when loading with PLA, the cumulative release duration of aspirin and vitamin C was prolonged to over 240h. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation results proved that when loading with PLA, PLA molecules aggregated gradually and formed clusters or micelles in these nanotubes. Meanwhile, drug molecules were captured and distributed inside the PLA matrix, which retarding the release of drugs. Only when PLA micelles degrade gradually in body fluid, drugs could be released slowly from nanotubes. These knowledge laid ground basis for the following biological experiments. PMID:27127038

  5. Comparison of intraoperative and postoperative complications based on ASA risks in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Hüseyin Buğra; Çiçekbilek, İzzet; Tok, Adem; Alışkan, Tamer; Akduman, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to evaluate intraoperative and postoperative complications which developed according to pre-operative American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) risk criteria in patients who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). Material and methods Five hundred and sixty patients who had undergone PNL between 2002 and 2014 were included in the study. Patients operated on the ipsilateral kidney, those with solitary kidney or the cases who had previously undergone more than one access were excluded from this study. Preoperative anesthesia risks were determined according to preoperative classification developed by ASA. Postoperative complications were evaluated using Clavien Complication Grading Scale. Results The mean age of the cases was 47±14 years. The 57% (n=319) of the cases were male, 241 (43%) of them were female. The average indwell time of nephrostomy catheter was 2.88±1.00 (1–8), and length of hospital stay was 4.91±1.54 (2–17) days. When the cases were assessed according to ASA risk groups, intraoperative complications were observed in 9 (5.5%) ASA I, 27 (8.6%) ASA II, and 18 (22%) ASA III patients and and distribution of the patients was statistically significant (p<0.001). When intraoperative complications were evaluated one by one, intraoperative hypotension developed in ASA I (n=3; 1.8%), ASA II (n=20; 6.4%) and ASA III (n=11; 13.4%) risk groups and this distribution (p=0.002) of patients was statistically significant. When assessed according to Clavien Postoperative Scale, postoperative complications developed (p=0.053) in ASAI (n=24; 14.7%), ASA II (n=27, 8.6%) and ASA III (n=13; 15.9%) risk groups, and this distribution of the patients was not statistically significant. In postoperative complications, Grade 3a complications developed in ASA I (n=12; 7.4%), ASA II (n=19; 6%) and ASA III (n=8; 9.8%) risk groups and this distribution was not seen to be statistically significant (p=0.485). Conclusion A statistically

  6. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Aspirin Resistance: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiandong; Zhang, Haowen; Chen, Xiaohu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effectiveness and safety of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) for the treatment of aspirin resistance (AR). Methods A comprehensive research of seven electronic databases was performed for comparative studies evaluating CHM for AR. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the included trials using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data wasere synthesized by using RevMan 5.3 software. (PROSPERO Registration #CRD42015020182) Results 18 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving 1,460 patients were included. 15 RCTs reported significant difference in the reduction of platelet aggregation rate (PAR) induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) (P<0.05), and 11 reported significant effect of CHM plus aspirin to reduce PAR induced by arachidonic acid (AA) (P<0.05) compared with aspirin 100mg/d treatment. The pooling data of 3 RCTs showed the thromboxane B2 (TXB2) in patients with CHM plus aspirin versus aspirin were significantly reduced (Random Effect model (RE), Standard Deviation (SD) = -95.93, 95% Confidential Interval (CI)[-118.25,-73.61], P<0.00001). Subgroup analysis showed that TXB2 (Fixed Effect model (FE), SD = -89.23, 95%CI[-121.96,-56.49], P<0.00001) had significant difference in Tongxinluo capsule plus aspirin versus aspirin. 2 RCTs reported the clinical effective rate, and the meta-analysis result showed a significant difference in intervention and control group (FE, Relative Risk (RR) = 1.67, 95%CI[1.15, 2.42], P = 0.007<0.05). In 4 trials, CHM plus aspirin had better effects of reducing the reoccurrence of cerebral infarction than aspirin (FE, RR = 0.24, 95%CI [0.11, 0.49], P<0.0001). And one trial showed that CHM plus aspirin could decrease the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NHISS) score (P<0.05) and increase the Barthel Index (BI) score (P<0.05). 4 trials stated that there were no adverse effects occurred in intervention group, and analysis showed significant difference of CHM or

  7. Gastroprotective Effect of Rubia cordifolia Linn. on Aspirin Plus Pylorus-Ligated Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Deoda, R. S.; Kumar, Dinesh; Bhujbal, S. S.

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of Rubia cordifolia (Rubiaceae) against experimentally induced gastric ulcer and compare activity with its fractions by employing aspirin plus pylorus-ligated ulcer screening model in Wistar rats. Total acidity, volume of gastric acid secretion, total acid output, and pepsin activity show significant reduction, when compared with the control group. The present study confirmed that chloroform fraction showed the significant activity at lower doses compared to parent extract. The mechanism can be attributed to decrease in gastric acid secretary activity along with strengthening of mucosal defensive mechanism by prostaglandin synthesis and antioxidant potential. PMID:21423635

  8. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for aspirin recognition and controlled release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Xianwen; Geng, Zhirong; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Zhilin; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2009-04-01

    Core-shell structural magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic MIPs) with combined properties of molecular recognition and controlled release were prepared and characterized. Magnetic MIPs were synthesized by the co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) around aspirin (ASP) at the surface of double-bond-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles in chloroform. The obtained spherical magnetic MIPs with diameters of about 500 nm had obvious superparamagnetism and could be separated quickly by an external magnetic field. Binding experiments were carried out to evaluate the properties of magnetic MIPs and magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic NIPs). The results demonstrated that the magnetic MIPs had high adsorption capacity and selectivity to ASP. Moreover, release profiles and release rate of ASP from the ASP-loaded magnetic MIPs indicated that the magnetic MIPs also had potential applications in drug controlled release.

  9. Large Magellanic Cloud Cepheids in the ASAS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karczmarek, P.; Dziembowski, W. A.; Lenz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pojmański, G.

    2011-12-01

    A catalog of Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) from the ASAS project is presented. It contains data on 65 fundamental mode pulsators with periods longer than about 8 days. The period-luminosity (PL) relation in the V-band does not significantly differ from the relation determined from the OGLE-III data extended toward longer periods but shows much larger scatter. For objects with periods longer than 40 d there is an evidence for a shallower PL relation. The rates of long-term period variations significant at 3σ level are found only for seven objects. The rates for 25 objects determined with the 1σ significance are confronted with the values derived from stellar evolution models. The models from various sources yield discrepant predictions. Over the whole data range, a good agreement with measurements is found for certain models but not from the same source.

  10. Identification of Cepheid Variables in ASAS Data (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenton, V.; Larsen, K.

    2014-06-01

    (Abstract only) Through studying the characteristics of Cepheid variables, we can further understand the nature and evolution of stars, as well as the scale of the Universe (through the famous period-luminosity relationship). Classical Cepheid stars, or Type I Cepheids, are radially-pulsating supergiants. Type II Cepheids are older and have lower mass than Type I Cepheids. They are rarer and existing classifications of these stars have been shown to be erroneous at unusual high rates. Computerized automatic classification programs sift through the data of large photometric surveys to produce a list of (what the program recognizes as) Cepheid star candidates. Unfortunately, this automatic classification of light curves has demonstrated to be ambiguous. Therefore, it takes a human to further sift through the list in order to come up with a more accurate (and, as a result, a more useful) list of probable Cepheids. This study was based on a list of 3,548 Cepheid candidates in the ASAS data provided by Patrick Wils (through Doug Welch). Patrick Wils had previously examined eighty-four stars on the spreadsheet and positively identified only five of these stars as Cepheids. The methodology of the current study was to use known properties of Cepheids including available infrared photometry (2MASS), proper motion (PPMXL), and X-Ray emission (ROTSE) data (for which we received helpful guidance from Sebastian Otero) to cull the list down to the most likely Cepheids. The ASAS light curves of these candidates were investigated to determine whether the shapes were truly consistent with those of Cepheids. This poster will summarize the methodology used and give examples of how individual Cepheid candidates were evaluated. Candidates of interest are currently being crosschecked for any updated information on VSX, and the light curves more closely analyzed using VStar. Results concerning the misidentification of candidate Cepheids will be reported to VSX and summarized in JAAVSO.

  11. Antiplatelet therapy: aspirin resistance and all that jazz!

    PubMed

    Divani, Afshin A; Zantek, Nicole D; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Rao, Gundu H R

    2013-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and stroke. Aspirin used alone or in combination with other antiplatelet drugs has been shown to offer significant benefit to patients at high risk of vascular events. Resistance to the action of aspirin may decrease this benefit. Aspirin resistance has been defined by clinical and/or laboratory criteria; however, detection by laboratory methods prior to experiencing a clinical event will likely provide the greatest opportunity for intervention. Numerous laboratory methods with different cutoff points have been used to evaluate the resistance. Noncompliance with aspirin treatment has also confounded studies. A single assay is currently insufficient to establish resistance. Combinations of results to confirm compliance and platelet inhibition may identify "at-risk" individuals who truly have aspirin resistance. The most effective strategy for managing patients with aspirin resistance is unknown; however, studies are currently underway to address this issue. PMID:22751909

  12. The Role of Aspirin in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ittaman, Sunitha V.; VanWormer, Jeffrey J.; Rezkalla, Shereif H.

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin therapy is well-accepted as an agent for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and current guidelines also define a role for aspirin in primary prevention. In this review, we describe the seminal trials of aspirin use in the context of current guidelines, discuss factors that may influence the effectiveness of aspirin therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, and briefly examine patterns of use. The body of evidence supports a role for aspirin in both secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events in selected population groups, but practice patterns may be suboptimal. As a simple and inexpensive prophylactic measure for cardiovascular disease, aspirin use should be carefully considered in all at-risk adult patients, and further measures, including patient education, are necessary to ensure its proper use. PMID:24573704

  13. 5-Aminosalicylic Acid Azo-Linked to Procainamide Acts as an Anticolitic Mutual Prodrug via Additive Inhibition of Nuclear Factor kappaB.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooseong; Nam, Joon; Lee, Sunyoung; Jeong, Seongkeun; Jung, Yunjin

    2016-06-01

    To improve the anticolitic efficacy of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), a colon-specific mutual prodrug of 5-ASA was designed. 5-ASA was coupled to procainamide (PA), a local anesthetic, via an azo bond to prepare 5-(4-{[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]carbamoyl}phenylazo)salicylic acid (5-ASA-azo-PA). 5-ASA-azo-PA was cleaved to 5-ASA and PA up to about 76% at 10 h in the cecal contents while remaining stable in the small intestinal contents. Oral gavage of 5-ASA-azo-PA and sulfasalazine, a colon-specific prodrug currently used in clinic, to rats showed similar efficiency in delivery of 5-ASA to the large intestine, and PA was not detectable in the blood after 5-ASA-azo-PA administration. Oral gavage of 5-ASA-azo-PA alleviated 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced rat colitis. Moreover, combined intracolonic treatment with 5-ASA and PA elicited an additive ameliorative effect. Furthermore, combined treatment with 5-ASA and PA additively inhibited nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) activity in human colon carcinoma cells and inflamed colonic tissues. Finally, 5-ASA-azo-PA administered orally was able to reduce inflammatory mediators, NFκB target gene products, in the inflamed colon. 5-ASA-azo-PA may be a colon-specific mutual prodrug acting against colitis, and the mutual anticolitic effects occurred at least partly through the cooperative inhibition of NFκB activity. PMID:27112518

  14. [Aspirin treatment for patients with Kawasaki disease].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hiromichi

    2014-09-01

    Aspirin was first used for patients with Kawasaki disease(KD) at 1970s. Favorable outcomes of KD patients treated with aspirin were reported in 1970-80s and now it is one of the standard therapeutic agents for KD. Its anti-inflammation effects suppress vascular wall inflammation of KD at acute phase. In addition, its antiplatelet effects heal endothelial dysfunction and prevent clot formation in coronary arteries at sub-acute and convalescent phase. Long-term dosage for patients with coronary artery aneurysms(CAA) is also important, however, there are few evidences of risk-benefit assessment for its long-term use especially for middle-aged and senior adults with KD and CAA. PMID:25518411

  15. The ASAS Health Index (ASAS HI) - a new tool to assess the health status of patients with spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kiltz, U; van der Heijde, D; Boonen, A; Braun, J

    2014-01-01

    Within the variable course of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, and involvement of other organs can add to the burden of the disease. The primary complaints of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) are pain, stiffness, fatigue, and limitation in activities and social participation. Instruments currently available for the assessment of patients with SpA focus predominantly on specific aspects of health such as pain, disease activity, and physical function and measure specific concepts like physical function and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL). However, the overall picture of impairments, limitations and restrictions in activities or social participation of patients with AS is not adequately assessed in SpA-specific questionnaires. Most of the existing questionnaires are not conceptualised with regard to their underlying construct. The International classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) Core Set for AS may serve as an appropriate model and underlying construct to develop a health index, since the whole range of functioning and disability of patients with AS is captured. Based on these assumptions, ASAS developed for patients with SpA an instrument assessing health as operationalised by the ICF. The questionnaire was developed by preparing an item pool, linkage of the items to the comprehensive ICF core set for AS and test of the item pool in two cross-sectional studies. The analysis of the questionnaire and the response scale were done with Rasch analysis. Emphasis was on optimal targeting, the capacity of items to differentiate between different levels of health, and optimal coverage of items to the spectrum of ICF categories, so that the final questionnaire could represent as much of the entire range of difficulty levels as possible. The ASAS HI is a linear composite measure and includes 17 items which cover most of the ICF core set. Preliminary validity has been confirmed in a field test in 4 English

  16. 76 FR 53907 - Determination That TALWIN COMPOUND (Aspirin; Pentazocine Hydrochloride) Tablets, 325 Milligrams...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That TALWIN COMPOUND (Aspirin; Pentazocine... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that TALWIN COMPOUND (aspirin; pentazocine... ANDA that does not refer to a listed drug. TALWIN COMPOUND (aspirin; pentazocine HCl) tablets, 325...

  17. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... q What are my chances of having a heart attack? q Would I benefit from taking aspirin? q ... Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks Did you know that aspirin can be an ...

  18. Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke: Know the Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Aspirin Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke: Know the Facts Share Tweet Linkedin ... example, using aspirin to lower the risk of heart attack and clot-related strokes. In these cases, the ...

  19. Coxibs interfere with the action of aspirin by binding tightly to one monomer of cyclooxygenase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Gilad; Sidhu, Ranjinder S.; Lauver, D. Adam; Lee, Jullia Y.; Sharma, Narayan P.; Yuan, Chong; Frieler, Ryan A.; Trievel, Raymond C.; Lucchesi, Benedict R.; Smith, William L.

    2010-02-11

    Pain associated with inflammation involves prostaglandins synthesized from arachidonic acid (AA) through cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) pathways while thromboxane A{sub 2} formed by platelets from AA via cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) mediates thrombosis. COX-1 and COX-2 are both targets of nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs) including aspirin whereas COX-2 activity is preferentially blocked by COX-2 inhibitors called coxibs. COXs are homodimers composed of identical subunits, but we have shown that only one subunit is active at a time during catalysis; moreover, many nsNSAIDS bind to a single subunit of a COX dimer to inhibit the COX activity of the entire dimer. Here, we report the surprising observation that celecoxib and other coxibs bind tightly to a subunit of COX-1. Although celecoxib binding to one monomer of COX-1 does not affect the normal catalytic processing of AA by the second, partner subunit, celecoxib does interfere with the inhibition of COX-1 by aspirin in vitro. X-ray crystallographic results obtained with a celecoxib/COX-1 complex show how celecoxib can bind to one of the two available COX sites of the COX-1 dimer. Finally, we find that administration of celecoxib to dogs interferes with the ability of a low dose of aspirin to inhibit AA-induced ex vivo platelet aggregation. COX-2 inhibitors such as celecoxib are widely used for pain relief. Because coxibs exhibit cardiovascular side effects, they are often prescribed in combination with low-dose aspirin to prevent thrombosis. Our studies predict that the cardioprotective effect of low-dose aspirin on COX-1 may be blunted when taken with coxibs.

  20. Fibrin Clot Structure and Platelet Aggregation in Patients with Aspirin Treatment Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ajjan, Ramzi; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Hess, Katharina; Larsen, Sanne Bøjet; Kristensen, Steen Dalby

    2013-01-01

    Background Aspirin is a cornerstone in prevention of cardiovascular events and modulates both platelet aggregation and fibrin clot formation. Some patients experience cardiovascular events whilst on aspirin, often termed aspirin treatment failure (ATF). This study evaluated both platelet aggregation and fibrin clot structure in patients with ATF. Methods We included 177 stable coronary artery disease patients on aspirin monotherapy. Among these, 116 (66%) had ATF defined as myocardial infarction (MI) whilst on aspirin. Platelet aggregation was assessed by Multiplate® aggregometry and VerifyNow®, whereas turbidimetric assays and scanning electron microscopy were employed to study fibrin clot characteristics. Results Enhanced platelet aggregation was observed in patients with ATF compared with non-MI patients following stimulation with arachidonic acid 1.0 mM (median 161 (IQR 95; 222) vs. 97 (60; 1776) AU*min, p = 0.005) and collagen 1.0 µg/mL (293 (198; 427) vs. 220 (165; 370) AU*min, p = 0.03). Similarly, clot maximum absorbance, a measure of fibrin network density, was increased in patients with ATF (0.48 (0.41; 0.52) vs. 0.42 (0.38; 0.50), p = 0.02), and this was associated with thinner fibres (mean ± SD: 119.7±27.5 vs. 127.8±31.1 nm, p = 0.003) and prolonged lysis time (552 (498; 756) vs. 519 (468; 633) seconds; p = 0.02). Patients with ATF also had increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (1.34 (0.48; 2.94) and 0.88 (0.32; 1.77) mg/L, p = 0.01) compared with the non-MI group. Clot maximum absorbance correlated with platelet aggregation (r = 0.31–0.35, p-values<0.001) and CRP levels (r = 0.60, p<0.001). Conclusions Patients with aspirin treatment failure showed increased platelet aggregation and altered clot structure with impaired fibrinolysis compared with stable CAD patients without previous MI. These findings suggest that an increased risk of aspirin treatment failure may be identified by measuring both platelet

  1. Subunit Asa1 spans all the peripheral stalk of the mitochondrial ATP synthase of the chlorophycean alga Polytomella sp.

    PubMed

    Colina-Tenorio, Lilia; Miranda-Astudillo, Héctor; Cano-Estrada, Araceli; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; Cardol, Pierre; Remacle, Claire; González-Halphen, Diego

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial F1FO-ATP synthase of chlorophycean algae is dimeric. It contains eight orthodox subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, epsilon, OSCP, a and c) and nine atypical subunits (Asa1 to 9). These subunits build the peripheral stalk of the enzyme and stabilize its dimeric structure. The location of the 66.1kDa subunit Asa1 has been debated. On one hand, it was found in a transient subcomplex that contained membrane-bound subunits Asa1/Asa3/Asa5/Asa8/a (Atp6)/c (Atp9). On the other hand, Asa1 was proposed to form the bulky structure of the peripheral stalk that contacts the OSCP subunit in the F1 sector. Here, we overexpressed and purified the recombinant proteins Asa1 and OSCP and explored their interactions in vitro, using immunochemical techniques and affinity chromatography. Asa1 and OSCP interact strongly, and the carboxy-terminal half of OSCP seems to be instrumental for this association. In addition, the algal ATP synthase was partially dissociated at relatively high detergent concentrations, and an Asa1/Asa3/Asa5/Asa8/a/c10 subcomplex was identified. Furthermore, Far-Western analysis suggests an Asa1-Asa8 interaction. Based on these results, a model is proposed in which Asa1 spans the whole peripheral arm of the enzyme, from a region close to the matrix-exposed side of the mitochondrial inner membrane to the F1 region where OSCP is located. 3D models show elongated, helix-rich structures for chlorophycean Asa1 subunits. Asa1 subunit probably plays a scaffolding role in the peripheral stalk analogous to the one of subunit b in orthodox mitochondrial enzymes. PMID:26657474

  2. Phospho-Aspirin (MDC-22) Prevents Pancreatic Carcinogenesis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mattheolabakis, George; Papayannis, Ioannis; Yang, Jennifer; Vaeth, Brandon M; Wang, Ruixue; Bandovic, Jela; Ouyang, Nengtai; Rigas, Basil; Mackenzie, Gerardo G

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease with a dismal 5-year survival rate of <6%. The currently limited treatment options for pancreatic cancer underscore the need for novel chemopreventive and therapeutic agents. Accumulating evidence indicates that aspirin use is associated with a decreased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, the anticancer properties of aspirin are restricted by its gastrointestinal toxicity and its limited efficacy. Therefore, we developed phospho-aspirin (MDC-22), a novel derivative of aspirin, and evaluated its chemopreventive efficacy in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. Phospho-aspirin inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cell lines 8- to 12-fold more potently than aspirin; based on the 24-hour IC50 values. In a Panc-1 xenograft model, phospho-aspirin, at a dose of 100 mg/kg/d 5 times per week for 30 days, reduced tumor growth by 78% (P < 0.01 vs. vehicle control). Furthermore, phospho-aspirin prevented pancreatitis-accelerated acinar-to-ductal metaplasia in mice with activated Kras. In p48-Cre;Kras(G12D) mice, cerulein treatment (6 hourly injections two times per week for 3 weeks) led to a significant increase in ductal metaplasia, replacing the majority of the exocrine compartment. Administration of phospho-aspirin 100 mg/kg/day five times per week for 21 days (starting on the first day of cerulein injection) inhibited the acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, reducing it by 87% (P < 0.01, vs. cerulein-treated control). Phospho-aspirin appeared to be safe, with the animals showing no signs of toxicity during treatment. Mechanistically, phospho-aspirin inhibited EGFR activation in pancreatic cancer, an effect consistently observed in pancreatic cancer cells, primary acinar explants and in vivo In conclusion, our findings indicate that phospho-aspirin has strong anticancer efficacy in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer, warranting its further evaluation. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 624-34. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27138793

  3. Aspirination of α-Aminoalcohol (Sarpogrelate M1).

    PubMed

    Park, Sunhwa; Lee, Jiyun; Shin, Kye Jung; Seo, Jae Hong

    2016-01-01

    Aspirination of α-aminoalcohol (sarpogrelate M1) has been performed under various general esterification conditions. In most cases, the desired aspirinate ester was obtained at a low yield with unexpected byproducts, the formation of which was mostly derived from the chemical properties of the tertiary α-amino group. After systematic analysis of those methods, the aspirinated sarpogrelate M1 was prepared using a two-step approach combining salicylate ester formation and acetylation. PMID:27571053

  4. [Acetylsalicylic acid desensitization in the new era of percutaneous coronary intervention].

    PubMed

    Fuertes Ferre, Georgina; Ferrer Gracia, Maria Cruz; Calvo Cebollero, Isabel

    2015-09-21

    Dual antiplatelet therapy is essential in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation. Hypersensitivity to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) limits treatment options. Desensitization to ASA has classically been studied in patients with respiratory tract disease. Over the last years, many protocols have been described about ASA desensitization in patients with ischemic heart disease, including acute coronary syndrome and the need for coronary stent implantation. It is important to know the efficacy and safety of ASA desensitization in these patients. PMID:25577589

  5. Comparative plasma salicylate and urine salicylurate levels following administration of aspirin, magnesium salicylate, and choline magnesium trisalicylate.

    PubMed

    Mason, W D

    1980-11-01

    Eighteen healthy volunteers were administered single doses of commercially available solid dosage forms of aspirin, magnesium salicylate (I), and choline magnesium trisalicylate (II), equivalent to approximately 500 mg of salicylic acid, in a randomized, complete crossover design. Plasma salicylate and urine salicylurate levels were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography at frequent intervals following dosing; the resultant profiles, areas under the curve (AUC), and percentages of dose excreted as salicylurate were statistically analyzed by an analysis of variance. The plasma salicylate levels following the two dosage forms containing I and II were virtually identical when corrected for small differences in the dose. The plasma salicylic acid level following aspirin was approximately 10% lower during the 1.5--3.0-hr interval due to a portion of unhydrolyzed aspirin, but the dose-corrected AUC for the products tested did not differ significantly (p < 0.05). During the 24 hr following dosing, 66.5 +/- 12.1 68.4 +/- 7.1, and 60.9 +/- 14.1% of the salicylic acid were excreted as urine salicylurate for aspirin, I, and II, respectively, with no significant difference (p < 0.05). Based on this study, there are no significant differences in the rate and extent of absorption of salicylate following the three dosage forms tested, and the elimination kinetics of salicylic acid are not altered by these dosage forms. PMID:7452472

  6. Aspirin Promotes Oligodendroglial Differentiation Through Inhibition of Wnt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nanxin; Chen, Dong; Wu, Xiyan; Chen, Xianjun; Zhang, Xuesi; Niu, Jianqin; Shen, Hai-Ying; Xiao, Lan

    2016-07-01

    Aspirin, one of the most commonly used anti-inflammatory drugs, has been recently reported to display multiple effects in the central nervous system (CNS), including neuroprotection and upregulation of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) expression in astrocytes. Although it was most recently reported that aspirin could promote the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) after white matter lesion, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To dissect the effects of aspirin on oligodendroglial development and explore possible mechanisms, we here demonstrated the following: (i) in vitro treatment of aspirin on OPC cultures significantly increased the number of differentiated oligodendrocytes (OLs) but had no effect on the number of proliferative OPCs, indicating that aspirin can promote OPC differentiation but not proliferation; (ii) in vivo treatment of aspirin on neonatal (P3) rats for 4 days led to a nearly twofold increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), devoid of change in OPC proliferaion, in the corpus callosum (CC); (iii) finally, aspirin treatment increased the phosphorylation level of β-catenin and counteracted Wnt signaling pathway synergist QS11-induced suppression on OPC differentiation. Together, our data show that aspirin can directly target oligodendroglial lineage cells and promote their differentiation through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These findings suggest that aspirin may be a novel candidate for the treatment of demyelinating diseases. PMID:26059811

  7. Aspirin as Primary Prevention of Acute Coronary Heart Disease Events

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, Stephen P.; Hovater, Martha; Brown, Todd M.; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective Aspirin for primary prophylaxis is controversial. This study evaluated associations between prophylactic aspirin use and incident acute coronary heart disease (CHD) events. Methods and Results The Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study was accessed for aspirin use examining black and white hazards for incident CHD, for men and women, each adjusting incrementally for sampling, sociodemographics, and CHD risk factors. Stratified models examined risks across strata of the Framingham risk score, and all-cause mortality. 23,949 participants (mean 64 yo), had 503 incident events over a 3.5 year follow-up. Prophylactic aspirin use was not associated with incident acute CHD, HR 1.05 (95% CI 0.86, 1.29). Modeling had little impact on the HR (1.09 {95% CI 0.89, 1.33) nor did the addition of risk factors (HR 1.00 {95% CI 0.81, 1.23). Aspirin use was not associated with incident CHD for any Framingham risk level. Findings were similar when including all aspirin users (not just those taking aspirin prophylactically), and when examining associations with all-cause mortality. There was no excess hospitalized bleeding in the aspirin users. Conclusion Aspirin was not associated with lower risk for incident acute CHD overall, or within race, gender, or Framingham Risk Score. PMID:26413491

  8. Reversal of IL-13-induced inflammation and Ca(2+) sensitivity by resolvin and MAG-DHA in association with ASA in human bronchi.

    PubMed

    Khaddaj-Mallat, Rayan; Sirois, Chantal; Sirois, Marco; Rizcallah, Edmond; Morin, Caroline; Rousseau, Éric

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resolvin D1 (RvD1), as well as the combined treatment of docosahexaenoic acid monoglyceride (MAG-DHA) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), on the resolution of inflammation markers and Ca(2+) sensitivity in IL-13-pretreated human bronchi (HB). Tension measurements performed with 300 nM RvD1 largely abolished (50%) the over-reactivity triggered by 10 ng/ml IL-13 pretreatment and reversed hyper Ca(2+) sensitivity. Addition of 300 nM 17(S)-HpDoHE, the metabolic intermediate between DHA and RvD1, displayed similar effects. In the presence of 100 μM ASA (a COX inhibitor), the inhibitory effect of 1 μM MAG-DHA on muscarinic tone was further amplified, but not in the presence of Ibuprofen. Western blot analysis revealed that the combined treatment of MAG-DHA and ASA upregulated GPR-32 expression and downregulated cytosolic TNFα detection, hence preventing IκBα degradation and p65-NFκB phosphorylation. The Ca(2+) sensitivity of HB was also quantified on β-escin permeabilized preparations. The presence of ASA potentiated the inhibitory effects of MAG-DHA in reducing the Ca(2+) hypersensitivity triggered by IL-13 by decreasing the phosphorylation levels of the PKC-potentiated inhibitor protein-17 regulatory protein (CPI-17). In summary, MAG-DHA combined with ASA, as well as exogenously added RvD1, may represent valuable assets against critical AHR disorder. PMID:26159746

  9. A Photometric Study of ASAS J184708-3340.2: an Eclipsing Binary with Total Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrington, R. C.; Tuhey, E. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present new multi-band differential aperture photometry of the eclipsing variable star ASAS J184708-3340.2. The light curves are analyzed with the Wilson-Devinney model to determine best-fit stellar models. Our models show that ASAS J184708-3340.2 is consistent with an overcontact eclipsing binary (W Ursae Majoris) system with total eclipses.

  10. Suppressive effect of post- or pre-treatment of aspirin metabolite on mitomycin C-induced genotoxicity using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Niikawa, Miki; Shin, Seizai; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2007-01-01

    In our previous paper, we found that aspirin suppressed in a somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) of mitomycin C (MMC) in Drosophila melanogaster. In order to reveal the mechanism of bio-antimutagenicity and/or preventive effect of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressive ability of each aspirin metabolite, such as salicylic acid (SA), salicyluric acid (SUA), gentisic acid (GA), gentisuric acid (GUA) and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), in SMART in D. melanogaster using post- and pre-treatments. As for the post-treatment, SA reduced the numbers of large single and twin spots. GA reduced the small single and large single spots, and GUA reduced the single spots, large single and twin spots. The inhibition of GUA is slightly stronger than that of any other metabolites; the inhibition percentage is 49 at the dose of 5 mg/bottle. On the other hand, as for the pre-treatment, aspirin, SUA, GA and DHBA reduced the numbers of small single spots. SUA, GE and DHBA reduced the number of large single spots. Aspirin and its metabolites did not reduce the number of twin spots. The results of the present study suggest that SA, GA and GUA repair or replicate DNA-damage by MMC and SUA, GA, GUA and DHBA prevent DNA-damage by MMC. It is suggested that secondary cancer is prevented by aspirin post-treatment without losing the medicinal effectiveness (anti-tumor activity). Therefore, we consider there are effective doses and/or administration timing of aspirin and MMC to prevent secondary cancer. PMID:17275250

  11. Neuroprotection by Aspirin and Sodium Salicylate Through Blockade of NF-kappaB Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilli, Mariagrazia; Pizzi, Marina; Memo, Maurizio; Spano, Pierfranco

    1996-11-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is a commonly prescribed drug with a wide pharmacological spectrum. At concentrations compatible with amounts in plasma during chronic anti-inflammatory therapy, acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolite sodium salicylate were found to be protective against neurotoxicity elicited by the excitatory amino acid glutamate in rat primary neuronal cultures and hippocampal slices. The site of action of the drugs appeared to be downstream of glutamate receptors and to involve specific inhibition of glutamate-mediated induction of nuclear factor kappa B. These results may contribute to the emerging theme of anti-inflammatory drugs and neurodegeneration.

  12. Double-blind, placebo-controlled evaluation of 5-ASA suppositories in active distal proctitis and measurement of extent of spread using /sup 99m/Tc-labeled 5-ASA suppositories

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.N.; Haber, G.; Aquino, J.A.

    1987-12-01

    Patients with active distal proctitis received either 5-aminosalicylic (5-ASA) acid or identical placebo suppositories, 500 mg t.i.d. for 6 weeks. Activity at 3 and 6 wks was assessed using a Disease Activity Index (DAI), derived from four categories: number of daily evacuations more than usual, evacuations containing blood, sigmoidoscopy appearance, and physician's overall assessment. Each category was graded 0-3. There was thus 0-12 points scored ranging from complete remission to severe disease. A minimum score of 3 from two categories was necessary for study entry. Of 27 patients randomized, 14 received active medication and 13 placebo. Of the 14 patients, with initial mean DAI 7.1 +/- 1.8, 11 were in complete remission at 6 wks (78.6%). Whereas, there was no significant change in the placebo group, with initial mean DAI 7.1 +/- 1.8. An additional 6 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and 6 healthy volunteers were given /sup 99m/Tc-labelled 5-aminosalicylic acid suppositories. The extent of spread was limited to the rectum, and the suppositories were retained for 3 hours. There was no absorbed radioactivity. 5-ASA suppositories are safe, well-tolerated, and effective treatment for active distal proctitis.

  13. Aspirin absorption rates and platelet inhibition times with 325-mg buffered aspirin tablets (chewed or swallowed intact) and with buffered aspirin solution.

    PubMed

    Feldman, M; Cryer, B

    1999-08-15

    Large clinical trials such as the second International Study of Infarct Survival routinely gave patients with myocardial infarction a chewed aspirin, yet there are no data to show whether chewing of aspirin is better, or worse, than swallowing a whole tablet. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled study to determine whether chewing aspirin or administering it in solution accelerates its absorption and antiplatelet activity. On separate days, 12 fasting volunteers ingested 325 mg of buffered aspirin, either by chewing a tablet for 30 seconds before swallowing it with 4 ounces of water, swallowing a whole tablet with 4 ounces of water, or drinking 4 ounces of Alka Seltzer. Frequent blood samples were obtained for serum aspirin, salicylate, and thromboxane B2 (TxB2) concentrations. With all formulations of aspirin, serum TxB2 decreased 50% when the plasma aspirin concentration reached approximately 1,000 ng/ml. A 50% and 90% decrease in serum TxB2 occurred more quickly after chewing a tablet than after a tablet was swallowed whole. For example, the t 50% for serum TxB2 inhibition was 5.0 +/- 0.6 minutes with the chewed tablet versus 12.0 +/- 2.3 minutes when the tablet was swallowed (p = 0.01). A 50% decrease in serum TxB2 occurred 7.6 +/- 1.2 minutes after Alka Seltzer solution (p = 0.04 vs chewing a tablet; p = 0.13 vs swallowing a whole tablet). Chewing an aspirin tablet is the most effective way of accelerating absorption of aspirin into the blood and shortening the time required for an antiplatelet effect. PMID:10468077

  14. Enteric coating can lead to reduced antiplatelet effect of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Haastrup, Peter Fentz; Grønlykke, Thor; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2015-03-01

    Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is widely used as antithrombotic prophylaxis. Enteric-coated ASA has been developed to decrease the risk of gastrointestinal side effects. The consequences of enteric coating on pharmacokinetics and antiplatelet effect of ASA have not systematically been assessed. This MiniReview demonstrates that data from clinical trials indicate that enteric coating can reduce the antiplatelet effect of ASA compared to plain ASA. This is possibly due to decreased bioavailability of ASA caused by prolonged solvation and absorption of the enteric-coated formulations. Therefore, low-dose enteric-coated ASA might not be bioequivalent to plain ASA, entailing the risk of insufficient cardiovascular prophylaxis. PMID:25469781

  15. Association of aspirin dose and vorapaxar safety and efficacy in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (from the TRACER Trial).

    PubMed

    Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Huang, Zhen; Wallentin, Lars; Storey, Robert F; Jennings, Lisa K; Tricoci, Pierluigi; White, Harvey D; Armstrong, Paul W; Aylward, Philip E; Moliterno, David J; Van de Werf, Frans; Chen, Edmond; Leonardi, Sergio; Rorick, Tyrus; Held, Claes; Strony, John; Harrington, Robert A

    2014-03-15

    Thrombin Receptor Antagonist for Clinical Event Reduction in Acute Coronary Syndrome (TRACER) trial compared vorapaxar and placebo in 12,944 high-risk patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. We explored aspirin (ASA) use and its association with outcomes. Kaplan-Meier event rates were compared in groups defined by ASA dose (low, medium, and high). Landmark analyses with covariate adjustment were performed for 0 to 30, 31 to 180, and 181 to 365 days. Of 12,515 participants, 7,523, 1,049, and 3,943 participants were treated with low-, medium-, and high-dose ASA at baseline, respectively. Participants enrolled in North America versus elsewhere were more often treated with a high dose at baseline (66% vs 19%) and discharge (60% vs 3%). Unadjusted cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for ischemia, or urgent revascularization event rates tended to be higher with higher baseline ASA (18.45% low, 19.13% medium, and 20.27% high; p for trend = 0.15573). Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for effect of vorapaxar on cardiovascular (unadjusted p for interaction = 0.065; adjusted p for interaction = 0.140) and bleeding (unadjusted p for interaction = 0.915; adjusted p for interaction = 0.954) outcomes were similar across groups. Landmark analyses showed similar safety and efficacy outcomes with vorapaxar and placebo by ASA dose at each time point except for 0 to 30 days, when vorapaxar tended to be worse for efficacy (hazard ratio 1.13, 95% confidence interval 0.89 to 1.44, p for interaction = 0.0157). In conclusion, most TRACER participants were treated with low-dose ASA, although a high dose was common in North America. High-dose participants tended to have higher rates of ischemic and bleeding outcomes. Although formal statistical testing did not reveal heterogeneity in vorapaxar's effect across dose subgroups, consistent trends support use of low-dose ASA with other antiplatelet therapies

  16. Timing of Eclipses of Binary Stars from the ASAS Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, S. K.; Konacki, M.; Sybilski, P.

    2011-09-01

    Light was thought of as something infinite and transcendent till 1676 when Olaus Roemer carried out precise measurements of the times of eclipses of Jovian moons. Roemer's scrupulous observations led him to a qualitative conclusion that light travels at a finite speed, at the same time providing scientists with the basics of the Light-Time Effect (LTE). LTE is observed whenever the distance between the observer and any kind of periodic event changes in time. The usual cause of this distance change is the reflex motion about the system's barycenter due to the gravitational influence of one or more additional bodies. We present results of the analysis of 5032 eclipsing contact and detached binaries from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) catalogue for variations in the times of eclipses. We use an approach known from the radio pulsar timing where a template radio pulse of a pulsar is used as a reference to measure the times of arrivals of the collected pulses. Most of the variations we detect in O--Cs correspond to a linear period change, but three show evidence of more than one complete LTE-orbit. For these objects we present preliminary orbital solutions. Our results demonstrate that the timing analysis employed in radio pulsar timing can be effectively used to study large data sets from photometric surveys. This is the prelude to the analysis of data gathered by the Solaris Project which aims at the search for circumbinary planets.

  17. Aspirin Risks in Perspective: A Comparison against Marathon Running

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin has public health potential to reduce the risk of ischaemic vascular events and sporadic cancer. One objection to the wider use of aspirin for primary prevention, however, is the undesirable effects of the medicine, which include increasing risk of bleeding and haemorrhagic stroke. Marathons also carry risks of serious events such as…

  18. Predictors of thromboxane levels in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes on chronic aspirin therapy.

    PubMed

    Niccoli, Giampaolo; Giubilato, Simona; Leo, Andrea; Cosentino, Nicola; Fracassi, Francesco; Cataneo, Leonardo; Porto, Italo; Leone, Antonio Maria; Burzotta, Francesco; Trani, Carlo; Biasucci, Luigi Marzio; Narducci, Maria Lucia; Pulcinelli, Fabio Maria; Crea, Filippo

    2012-07-01

    High levels of thromboxane A2 (TxA2), a key mediator of platelet activation and aggregation, are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. We aimed at assessing the predictors of higher plasma levels of TxB2, the stable metabolite of TxA2, in consecutive patients presenting with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) on previous aspirin (ASA) treatment undergoing coronary angiography. Ninety-eight consecutive patients (age 61 ± 11, 75% males) with NSTE-ACS, on previous chronic ASA treatment, were prospectively enrolled in this study. Coronary disease extent was assessed by angiography according to the Bogaty score. In all patients, admission plasma levels of TxB2 (pg/ml) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and patients showing TxB2 levels in the fourth quartile were compared to patients showing TxB2 levels in the lower quartiles. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that platelet count (odds ratio [OR] 1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.63, p=0.04), multivessel coronary disease (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.13-3.67, p=0.03), and coronary atherosclerosis extent index (OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.45-6.79, p=0.001) were independent predictors of TxB2 level upper quartile. Of note, C-reactive protein serum levels were similar in patients with TxB2 levels in the upper quartile as compared to those in the lower quartiles (p=0.49). In conclusion, NSTE-ACS patients with severe coronary atherosclerosis may have incomplete suppression of TxA2 production despite chronic ASA therapy. This finding suggests that additional efforts should be made to lower TxA2 levels in patients with widespread coronary artery disease. PMID:22535468

  19. Geriatric Hip Fractures and Inpatient Services: Predicting Hospital Charges Using the ASA Score.

    PubMed

    Thakore, Rachel V; Lee, Young M; Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Obremskey, William T; Sethi, Manish K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine if the American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) score can be used to predict hospital charges for inpatient services. Materials and Methods. A retrospective chart review was conducted at a level I trauma center on 547 patients over the age of 60 who presented with a hip fracture and required operative fixation. Hospital charges associated with inpatient and postoperative services were organized within six categories of care. Analysis of variance and a linear regression model were performed to compare preoperative ASA scores with charges and inpatient services. Results. Inpatient and postoperative charges and services were significantly associated with patients' ASA scores. Patients with an ASA score of 4 had the highest average inpatient charges of services of $15,555, compared to $10,923 for patients with an ASA score of 2. Patients with an ASA score of 4 had an average of 45.3 hospital services compared to 24.1 for patients with a score of 2. Conclusions. A patient's ASA score is associated with total and specific hospital charges related to inpatient services. The findings of this study will allow payers to identify the major cost drivers for inpatient services based on a hip fracture patient's preoperative physical status. PMID:24876836

  20. The Best and the Brightest: Tidal Disruption Events Discovered by ASAS-SN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren-Son Holoien, Thomas; ASAS-SN

    2016-01-01

    Even today only human eyes scan the entire optical sky for the violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. The All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") is changing this by monitoring the visible sky to 17th magnitude every 2-3 days using multiple telescopes in the northern and southern hemispheres. Having been in operation for two years, ASAS-SN is discovering new transient objects daily, and while the primary goal of ASAS-SN is a complete survey of bright, nearby supernovae, ASAS-SN also discovers many other interesting nearby transients. Notably, ASAS-SN has discovered three bright tidal disruption events (TDEs), the three closest such events ever discovered at optical wavelengths, providing the opportunity to obtain detailed follow-up data at many wavelengths. ASAS-SN is discovering roughly 1 TDE for every 60 Type Ia supernovae, a rate that is significantly higher than other surveys. By virtue of their brightness, TDEs discovered by ASAS-SN can also be studied in unprecedented detail for many months, allowing deeper insight into their physics.

  1. Does aspirin-induced oxidative stress cause asthma exacerbation?

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzak, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) is a distinct clinical syndrome characterized by severe asthma exacerbations after ingestion of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The exact pathomechanism of AIA remains unknown, though ongoing research has shed some light. Recently, more and more attention has been focused on the role of aspirin in the induction of oxidative stress, especially in cancer cell systems. However, it has not excluded the similar action of aspirin in other inflammatory disorders such as asthma. Moreover, increased levels of 8-isoprostanes, reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress in expired breath condensate in steroid-naïve patients with AIA compared to AIA patients treated with steroids and healthy volunteers, has been observed. This review is an attempt to cover aspirin-induced oxidative stress action in AIA and to suggest a possible related pathomechanism. PMID:26170841

  2. Twice daily dosing of aspirin improves platelet inhibition in whole blood in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and micro- or macrovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Spectre, Galia; Arnetz, Lisa; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Brismar, Kerstin; Li, Nailin; Hjemdahl, Paul

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of low-dose aspirin in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been questioned. We tested if twice daily dosing of aspirin would be more effective in T2DM, possibly due to increased platelet turnover. A randomised cross-over study compared 75 mg aspirin OD, 75 mg BID and 320 mg OD (≥ 2 week treatment periods) in 25 patients with T2DM and micro- or macrovascular complications. Platelet responses were examined by impedance aggregometry (WBA) and the IMPACT-R aspirin test in whole blood, light transmittance aggregometry in platelet-rich plasma (LTA), and urinary 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 (TxM). Aspirin 75 mg BID decreased arachidonic acid (AA)-induced WBA compared to 75 mg OD (9.7 ± 4.5 vs. 12.6 ± 3.5 ohm; p = 0.003) or to 320 mg OD (11.5 ± 4.2 Ohms; p = 0.049). WBA responses to collagen were similarly attenuated by BID or high dosing (by 12-14%; p = 0.02 for both). The IMPACT-R showed a better response to 75 mg BID compared to 75 mg OD (p = 0.049), but not to 320 mg OD. AA-induced aggregation by LTA was <6.5% on all occasions, with no differences between aspirin dosages. TxM was reduced after 320 mg OD (p = 0.002), but not 75 mg BID (p = 0.07). Reticulated platelets were highly correlated with mean platelet volume (MPV; r2 = 0.74, p<0.0001). Both markers for platelet turnover were correlated with AA-induced WBA, but neither identified patients who benefited from BID dosing dependably. In conclusion, twice daily dosing improved laboratory responses to aspirin in high risk T2DM patients. Studies of whether BID dosing of aspirin can improve clinical outcomes in such patients are of interest. PMID:21800009

  3. A comparison of platelet function tests and thromboxane metabolites to evaluate aspirin response in healthy individuals and patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Johnsen, Helle Ladefoged; Hedegaard, Sofie Sommer; Pedersen, Susanne Bendesgaard; Mortensen, Jette; Kristensen, Steen Dalby

    2010-06-01

    Individualised antiplatelet therapy and platelet function testing have attracted considerable clinical interest, but several aspects of test performance have not been thoroughly evaluated. We investigated repeatability and concordance of light transmission aggregometry (LTA) induced with arachidonic acid (AA) 1.0 mM, PFA-100 induced with collagen/epinephrine, multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) induced with AA 0.5 or 0.75 mM and VerifyNow Aspirin. Patients with stable coronary artery disease (n=43) and healthy individuals (n=21) were included. All tests were performed in duplicate at baseline in healthy individuals and in duplicate for four days in all study participants during aspirin treatment. Serum and urinary thromboxane metabolites were measured several times to evaluate cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition by aspirin. MEA was most sensitive for aspirin as treatment induced a 12-fold difference in AA-induced platelet aggregation. Coefficients of variation for duplicate measurements at baseline (0.4-12%), during aspirin treatment (3-46%) and for day-to-day variability (3-37%) differed markedly between tests and were lowest for VerifyNow. The prevalence of aspirin low-responsiveness also differed between tests (0-9%) and the agreement was low: kappaAspirin (r=0.41, p=0.001). Overall, repeatability was moderate and the correlation between tests was low. VerifyNow Aspirin proved most reproducible, and this was the only assay showing a significant positive correlation with serum thromboxane. This study demonstrated that conclusions based on platelet function testing strongly depend on the assay used. PMID:20352155

  4. Endobronchial biopsies on aspirin and prasugrel.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kassem; Kebbe, Jad

    2015-06-01

    Patients are generally required to stop antiplatelet therapy prior to elective invasive procedures. Some patients receive dual antiplatelet therapy for recent vascular procedures such as drug-eluting coronary stenting, and early discontinuation of antiplatelet agents could lead to a significant risk of stent thrombosis. Most bronchoscopic procedures are performed on patients using Aspirin but not on those using Clopidogrel or Prasugrel. In this report, we describe a unique case of a patient with a recent placement of drug-eluting stents, who required endobronchial biopsies for evaluation of lung cancer recurrence. The procedure was performed successfully and safely with no complications. PMID:25697386

  5. Comparison of Three Aspirin Formulations in Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Nordt, Sean Patrick; Clark, Richard F; Castillo, Edward M; Guss, David A

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The treatment of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) includes the administration of aspirin. Current guidelines recommend chewing aspirin tablets to increase absorption. While this is intuitive, there are scant data supporting this recommendation. The purpose of this study is to assess which of 3 different aspirin formulations is most rapidly absorbed after ingestion. Methods A prospective, open-label, 3-way crossover volunteer study at a tertiary university medical center with human subjects 18 years or older. Fasted subjects were randomly assigned to receive aspirin 1,950 mg as (1) solid aspirin tablets swallowed whole, (2) solid aspirin tablet chewed then swallowed, or (3) a chewable aspirin formulation chewed and swallowed. Serum salicylate measurements were obtained over a period of 180 minutes. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined. Results Thirteen males and 1 female completed all 3 arms of study. Peak serum salicylate concentrations were seen at 180 minutes in all groups. Mean peaks were 10.4, 11.3, and 12.2 mg/dL in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Mean area under the time concentration was 1,153, 1,401, and 1,743 mg-min/dL in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. No measurable salicylate concentrations were seen in 6 subjects in group 1 at 60 minutes as compared to 1 subject in group 2. All subjects in group 3 had measurable levels at 45 minutes. There were no adverse effects in any of the subjects during the study period. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that the chewable aspirin formulation achieved the most rapid rate of absorption. In addition, the chewable formulation absorption was more complete than the other formulations at 180 minutes. These data suggest that in the treatment of ACS, a chewable aspirin formulation may be preferable to solid tablet aspirin, either chewed or swallowed. PMID:22224124

  6. Aspirin: History and Applications; Cross-Curricular Instructional Strategies, Ideas, and Applications for Teaching about Aspirin in the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hademenos, George

    2005-01-01

    Of the thousands of drugs and medicines available for the prevention, treatment, and control of human disease and discomfort, the most widely used is aspirin. The primary reason for aspirin's popularity is its capabilities as a pain reliever, fever reducer, and anti-inflammatory agent. This article explores the historical development of aspirin…

  7. Validation of canopy bidirectional reflectance models with asas imagery of a spruce forest in Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Schaaf, C.B.; Li, X.; Strahler, A.H.

    1994-08-12

    Advanced Solid-state Array Spectroradiometer (ASAS) directional imagery of a spruce forest are used in an initial validation of the Li-Strahler geometric-optical model and the Li-Strahler hybrid geometric-optical radiative-transfer model. Although the magnitudes of the modeled principal plane bidirectional reflectances generally correspond to the ASAS measurements. the geometric-optical model results reproduce the trends of the ASAS reflectances more closely. Both models tend to overestimate the impact of mutual shadowing at large view zenith angles. reflectances.

  8. Effects of L-glutamine on acetylsalycylic acid induced gastric lesions and acid back diffusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hung, C R; Takeuchi, K; Okabe, S; Murata, T; Takagi, K

    1976-12-01

    Effects of L-glutamine on acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)-induced gastric mucosal lesions were studied in mongrel dogs. It was confirmed that when oral ASA at 1.0 or 2.0 g per dog is given in two divided doses, there is severe and consistent dose-dependent mucosal damage in the glandular portion of the stomach in fasted dogs. However, when L-glutamine 2.0 or 4.0 g per dog in two divided doses is given concomitantly with ASA 2.0 g per dog orally, the gastric irritation is significantly inhibited. Instillation of 20 mM of ASA in 100 mM HCl solution into the Heidenhain pouch of Beagle dogs produced a significant loss of H+ from the pouch and a gain of Na+ in the lumen compared with ASA-free controls. When L-glutamine (100 mM) was given concomitantly with ASA (20 mM) into the pouch, changes of electrolyte fluxes in response to ASA alone were significantly suppressed. However, 50 mM of L-glutamine had no appreciable effect on acid back diffusion caused by ASA 20 mM. The amino acid itself had little effect on the ionic movement in the pouch. Gross bleeding from the pouch treated with ASA was never observed with the concomitant dosing of ASA and L-glutamine 50 or 100 mM. PMID:15154

  9. Comparative evaluation of gastroulcerogenic potential of nitrogen isoforms of salicyl alcohol and aspirin in rats: biochemical and histological study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Gowhar; Subhan, Fazal; Islam, Nazar Ul; Ullah, Nasir; Shahid, Muhammad; Ullah, Sami; Ullah, Ihsan; Shah, Rehmat; Khan, Ikhtiar; Sewell, Robert D E; Abbas, Ghulam

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the current study was to explore in vivo any relative gastroulcerogenic prospective propensity of newly synthesized nitrogen containing derivatives of salicyl alcohol; compound (I) [1-(2-hydroxybenzyl)piperidinium chloride], compound (II) [4-carbamoyl-1-(2-hydroxybenzyl)piperidinium chloride] and aspirin in albino rats. The experimental groups received the following oral treatments daily for 6 days: group I saline control; group II, standard (aspirin) treatment group [150 mg/kg of body weight]; group III, test (compound I) treatment group [100, 150 mg/kg]; group IV, test (compound II) treatment group [100, 150 mg/kg]. The results showed that in the case of the aspirin treated group and compound (I) [150 mg/kg], there was a significant increase in gastric volume, free acidity, total acidity, ulcer score and a decrease in gastric pH. Furthermore, histopathological examination of gastric mucosa of these treated groups revealed detectable morphological changes. Utilizing the same protocol, synthetic compound (I) [100 mg/kg] and (II) [100, 150 mg/kg] exhibited no statistically significant ulcerogenic or cytotoxic properties. A cyclooxygenase (COX) selectivity test indicated the preferential inhibition of COX-I and COX-II enzymes by compounds (I) and (II). This study therefore indicates that these synthetic compounds may possess reduced ulcerogenic potential and could be a functional substitute to aspirin. PMID:24085627

  10. Identification of Cepheid Variables in ASAS Data (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J.; Larsen, K.

    2014-06-01

    (Abstract only) Cepheid variables are well-known to be important to astronomers, as their period-luminosity relationship is used to determine the distances to galaxies. The unambiguous identification of newly discovered Cepheid variables in large photometric data sets is therefore of significance. A data set of 3,548 candidate Cepheid variable stars in the ASAS data was provided by Patrick Wils (through Doug Welch). A computer program had originally identified these candidates; however, Wils investigated a small subset of the data by hand and discovered that the vast majority of these stars were misidentified. The most common misidentification was of BY Draconis stars (rotating spotted K and M dwarfs). In a companion piece, Swenton and Larsen sought out the most likely Cepheid candidates in the data; the work discussed here is instead focused on looking at stars that had properties that were clearly different from Cepheids, more specifically properties likely to be seen in BY Dra stars. We are sorting the spreadsheet stars by characteristics in order to find as many BY Dra variables as possible (since they seem to be the most commonly misidentified stars). These characteristics include newly available infrared photometry (2MASS), proper motion (PPMXL), and X-Ray emission (ROTSE) data (for which we received helpful guidance from Sebastian Otero) as well as VSX information. The first 103 stars to be studied are those with the smallest range in magnitude (less than or equal to 0.1). An analysis of their light curves and other available data is being undertaken in order to determine whether or not they are indeed BY Dra-type variables. In doing so the goal is to be able to submit and publish the correct identifications for these stars to the International Variable Star Index (VSX) and the JAAVSO.

  11. Platelets in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Tanya M.; Boyce, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized clinically by the triad of asthma, nasal polyposis, and pathognomonic respiratory reactions after ingestion of aspirin. It is a distinct syndrome associated with eosinophilic infiltration of respiratory tissues and excessive production of cysteinyl leukotrienes. Despite the consistent clinical phenotype of the respiratory disease, the underlying pathogenesis of the disease remains unclear. In addition to their role in hemostasis, platelets have the capacity to influence the activation state and function of other immune cells during inflammation, and to facilitate granulocyte recruitment into the tissues. Platelets also possess a repertoire of potent pre-formed mediators of inflammation that are released upon activation, and are a rich source of newly-synthesized lipid mediators that alter vascular permeability and smooth muscle tone. Accordingly, the activity of platelets has been linked to diverse inflammatory diseases, including asthma. Both human and animal studies strongly suggest that platelet activity is uniquely associated with the pathophysiology of AERD. This article summarizes the evidence supporting an effector role for platelets in asthma in general and in AERD in particular, and considers the potential therapeutic implications. PMID:26051947

  12. ASASSN-16bh: A Very Bright CV Candidate Discovered By ASAS-SN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonian, G.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Godoy-Rivera, D.; Basu, U.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Brimacombe, J.

    2016-02-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source.

  13. Acceptance of the Theory of Evolution in America: Louis Agassiz vs. Asa Gray

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Elaine Claire Daughetee

    1975-01-01

    Provides some background information on the contributions of Louis Agassiz and Asa Gray to the history of American science as these two men disagreed concerning the ideas in Darwin's "The Orgin of Species." (PB)

  14. Impairment of aminopyrine clearance in aspirin-damaged canine gastric mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.A.; Henagan, J.M.; Loy, T.M.

    1983-09-01

    Using an in vivo canine chambered stomach preparation, the clearance of (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine across mucosa when intravenously infused and the back-diffusion of this substance from gastric lumen to mucosa when topically applied to gastric epithelium were evaluated in aspirin-damaged gastric epithelium. In mucosa damaged by either 20 mM or 40 mM aspirin, the recovery of (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine, when topically mixed with acid (pH . 1.1) perfusate solution, was not significantly different from nondamaged control mucosa. In addition, the degree of ''trapping'' of this substance from back-diffusion was not different in damaged mucosa from that observed in nondamaged epithelium. In contrast, when (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine was intravenously infused, its clearance was significantly impaired in aspirin-damaged mucosa when compared with control studies, as evidenced by the increased ''trapping'' of this substance in injured epithelium. These findings indicate that movement of aminopyrine from plasma to gastric lumen is impaired in damaged epithelium, making the aminopyrine clearance technique an unreliable method to accurately measure absolute gastric blood flow in this experimental setting.

  15. Probing Vitamine C, Aspirin and Paracetamol in the Gas Phase: High Resolution Rotational Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, S.; Cabezas, C.; Varela, M.; Pena, I.; Nino, A.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.; Grabow, J.-U.

    2011-06-01

    A solid sample of Vitamin C (m.p. 190°C) vaporized by laser ablation has been investigated in gas phase and characterized through their rotational spectra. Two spectroscopy techniques has been used to obtain the spectra: a new design of broadband chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy with in-phase/quadrature-phase-modulation passage-acquired-coherence technique (IMPACT) and conventional laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW). Up to now, two low-energy conformer have been observed and their rotational constants determined. Ab initio calculations at the MP2/6-311++G (d,p) level of theory predicted rotational constants which helped us to identify these conformers unequivocally. Among the molecules to benefit from the LA-MB-FTMW technique there are common important drugs never observed in the gas phase through rotational spectroscopy. We present here the results on acetyl salicylic acid and acetaminophen (m.p. 136°C), commonly known as aspirin and paracetamol respectively. We have observed two stable conformers of aspirin and two for paracetamol. The internal rotation barrier of the methyl group in aspirin has been determined for both conformers from the analysis of the A-E splittings due to the coupling of internal and overall rotation. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11,617-627 (2009)and references therein

  16. Aspirin therapy and thromboxane biosynthesis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Avalos, Ingrid; Chung, Cecilia P; Oeser, Annette; Milne, Ginger L; Borntrager, Holly; Morrow, Jason D; Raggi, Paolo; Solus, Joseph; Stein, C Michael

    2007-01-01

    Incomplete suppression of thromboxane biosynthesis during aspirin therapy is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Since systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with platelet activation and increased cardiovascular mortality, we compared thromboxane and prostacyclin biosynthesis in patients with SLE and control subjects, and measured inhibition of thromboxane excretion in aspirin-treated subjects. We measured the urinary excretion of 11-dehydro thromboxane B( 2) (TXB(2)) and 2,3-dinor 6-ketoPGF(1alpha) (PGI-M), the stable metabolites of thromboxane A(2) and prostacyclin, respectively, in 74 patients with SLE and 70 controls. In subjects who were not receiving aspirin, TXB(2) excretion was higher in patients with SLE [0.40 ng/mg creatinine (0.26-0.64), median (interquartile range)] than controls [0.31 ng/mg creatinine (0.23-0.44)] (P = 0.04), and in these patients, TXB(2) excretion correlated with disease activity (rho = 0.28, P = 0.03) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (rho = 0.48, P < 0.001). Aspirin therapy resulted in significantly lower TXB(2) excretion in controls (P = 0.01), but not in patients with SLE (P = 0.10), compared with subjects not receiving aspirin. Prostacyclin biosynthesis did not differ among patients and controls, and was not affected by aspirin (P all >0.35). Thromboxane biosynthesis is increased in SLE and is associated with disease activity. Additionally, response to aspirin may be attenuated in some patients with SLE. PMID:18042592

  17. BOREAS RSS-2 Level-1B ASAS Image Data: At-Sensor Radiance in BSQ Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Dabney, P. W.; Kovalick, W.; Graham, D.; Bur, Michael; Irons, James R.; Tierney, M.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-2 team used the ASAS instrument, mounted on the NASA C-130 aircraft, to create at-sensor radiance images of various sites as a function of spectral wavelength, view geometry (combinations of view zenith angle, view azimuth angle, solar zenith angle, and solar azimuth angle), and altitude. The level-1b ASAS images of the BOREAS study areas were collected from April to September 1994 and March to July 1996.

  18. Association analysis of formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) polymorphisms and aspirin exacerbated respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jeong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Park, Jong-Sook; Lee, Tae-Hyeong; Lee, Eun-Ju; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Uh, Soo-Taek; Chung, Il Yup; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Inseon S; Park, Byung-Lae; Shin, Hyoung-Doo; Park, Choon-Sik

    2012-04-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory diseases (AERD) are associated with the metabolism of arachidonic acid. FPR2 (formyl peptide receptor2) is a high-affinity ligand receptor for potent anti-inflammatory lipid metabolites: lipoxins. Thus, functional alterations of the FPR2 may contribute to AERD. We investigated the relationship between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FPR2 and AERD. Asthmatics were categorized into AERD <15% decreases in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)), and/or naso-ocular reactions after oral aspirin challenge (n=170) and aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA, n=268). In all, 11 SNPs were genotyped. FPR2 protein expressions on CD14-positive monocytes in peripheral blood were measured using flow cytometric analysis. We performed RT-PCR of the FPR2 mRNA expressed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Logistic regression analysis showed that the minor allele frequency of FPR2 -4209T>G (rs1769490) in intron 2 was significantly lower in the AERD group (n=170) than in the ATA group (n=268) (P=0.006, P(corr)=0.04, recessive model). The decline of FEV(1) after aspirin challenge was significantly lower in the subjects with GG homozygotes of FPR2 -4209T>G than those with the other genotypes (P=0.0002). Asthmatic homozygotes for FPR2 -4209T>G minor allele exhibited significantly higher FPR2 protein expression in CD14-positive monocytes than did those with the common allele of FPR2 -4209T>G allele (P=0.01). There was no difference in the expression of the wild form and the exon 2 deleted variant form of FPR2 gene according to the genotypes of FPR2 -4209T>G. The minor allele at FPR2 -4209T>G may have a protective role against the development of AERD, via increase of FPR2 protein expression in inflammatory cells. PMID:22377711

  19. Cilostazol, Not Aspirin, Prevents Stenosis of Bioresorbable Vascular Grafts in a Venous Model

    PubMed Central

    Tara, Shuhei; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; de Dios Ruiz Rosado, Juan; Best, Cameron A.; Shoji, Toshihiro; Mahler, Nathan; Yi, Tai; Lee, Yong-Ung; Sugiura, Tadahisa; Hibino, Narutoshi; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective— Despite successful translation of bioresorbable vascular grafts for the repair of congenital heart disease, stenosis remains the primary cause of graft failure. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of long-term treatment with the antiplatelet drugs, aspirin and cilostazol, in preventing stenosis and evaluated the effect of these drugs on the acute phase of inflammation and tissue remodeling. Approach and Results— C57BL/6 mice were fed a drug-mixed diet of aspirin, cilostazol, or normal chow during the course of follow-up. Bioresorbable vascular grafts, composed of poly(glycolic acid) mesh sealed with poly(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone), were implanted as inferior vena cava interposition conduits and followed up for 2 weeks (n=10 per group) or 24 weeks (n=15 per group). Both aspirin and cilostazol suppressed platelet activation and attachment onto the grafts. On explant at 24 weeks, well-organized neotissue had developed, and cilostazol treatment resulted in 100% graft patency followed by the aspirin (67%) and no-treatment (60%) groups (P<0.05). Wall thickness and smooth muscle cell proliferation in the neotissue of the cilostazol group were decreased when compared with that of the no-treatment group at 24 weeks. In addition, cilostazol was shown to have an anti-inflammatory effect on neotissue at 2 weeks by regulating the recruitment and activation of monocytes. Conclusions— Cilostazol prevents stenosis of bioresorbable vascular graft in a mouse inferior vena cava implantation model up to 24 weeks and is accompanied by reduction of smooth muscle cell proliferation and acute inflammation. PMID:26183618

  20. Effect of Aspirin on Spinal Cord Injury: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Kermani, Hamed Reihani; Nakhaee, Nouzar; Fatahian, Reza; Najar, Ahmad Gholamhosseinian

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin is an anti-inflammatory drug, peroxyl radical scavenger, and antioxidant agent that inhibits phospholipases, nitric oxide synthetases, and cyclooxygenase enzymes. The existing literature contains no studies on the effects of various doses of aspirin on spinal cord injury (SCI). Therefore, we sought to investigate the putative effects of aspirin on experimental SCI. The weight-drop injury model was used to produce SCI in 100 albino Wistar rats. The animals were allocated to five groups: a control group, where the rats did not undergo any surgical or medical intervention except for anesthesia; a sham-treated group, where laminectomy was performed without SCI and no further therapy was administered; and three other groups, where the rats with SCI received low-dose aspirin [20 mg/kg], high-dose aspirin [80 mg/kg], and a vehicle, respectively. Half of the rats were sacrificed 24 hours later, and their spinal cords were excised for biochemical studies. The other rats were subjected to Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale scoring once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. Aspirin decreased lipid peroxidation following SCI as the mean (± standard error) catalase level was significantly higher in the high-dose aspirin group (46.10±12.01) than in the sham-treated group (16.07±2.42) and the vehicle-treated group (15.31±3.20) (P<0.05; P<0.05, respectively). Both of the groups treated with high-dose and low-dose aspirin demonstrated a higher mean BBB score than did the control group (P<0.001) and the sham-treated group (P<0.001). Our data provide evidence in support of the potential effects of aspirin in biochemical and neurobehavioral recovery after SCI. PMID:27217606

  1. ASA grade and disease-free mortality in head and neck cancer patients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kanatas, Anastasios; Gorton, Heather; Smith, Adam B; Mannion, Christopher; Ong, Thian K; Mitchell, David

    2010-12-01

    Complex surgery with curative intent as part of the care of patients with head and neck cancer, who also have serious coexisting conditions is sometimes viewed critically as being unduly, optimistic. We have used American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA) grading by a single anaesthetist prospectively as a baseline to investigate a possible link between coexisiting conditions and disease-free survival in 114 patients with head and neck cancer patients treated by the same anaesthetist and surgical team, and found that the ASA grade is not a reliable predictor of disease-free survival. There was no significant association between ASA grade and overall mortality, but there was a significant association between ASA grade and mortality associated with metastatic disease. However, the test for trend was not significant, which suggested that deaths from metastatic disease did not increase in line with ASA grading. All patients in ASA grades II and III were alive 2 years after their initial operation and the risk of mortality after 2 years may increase by up to 10%. PMID:20004049

  2. Update on the Management of Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Kathleen M; Laidlaw, Tanya M

    2016-07-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is an adult-onset upper and lower airway disease consisting of eosinophilic nasal polyps, asthma, and respiratory reactions to cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) inhibitors. Management includes guideline-based treatment of asthma and sinus disease, avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors, and for some patients aspirin desensitization followed by high-dose aspirin therapy. Despite this, many patients have inadequately controlled symptoms and require multiple sinus surgeries. In this review, we discuss the current standard approaches to the management of AERD, and we introduce several therapeutics under development that may hold promise for the treatment of AERD. PMID:27126722

  3. Update on the Management of Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Tanya M.

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is an adult-onset upper and lower airway disease consisting of eosinophilic nasal polyps, asthma, and respiratory reactions to cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) inhibitors. Management includes guideline-based treatment of asthma and sinus disease, avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors, and for some patients aspirin desensitization followed by high-dose aspirin therapy. Despite this, many patients have inadequately controlled symptoms and require multiple sinus surgeries. In this review, we discuss the current standard approaches to the management of AERD, and we introduce several therapeutics under development that may hold promise for the treatment of AERD. PMID:27126722

  4. Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: pathophysiological insights and clinical advances

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, John W; Wilson, Jeff M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis are heterogeneous airway diseases of the lower and upper airways, respectively. Molecular and cellular studies indicate that these diseases can be categorized into unique endotypes, which have therapeutic implications. One such endotype is aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which encompasses the triad of asthma, aspirin (or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) hypersensitivity, and nasal polyposis. AERD has unique pathophysiological features that distinguish it from aspirin-tolerant asthma and other forms of chronic rhinosinusitis. This review details molecular and cellular features of AERD and highlights current and future therapies that are based on these insights. PMID:27022293

  5. Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: pathophysiological insights and clinical advances.

    PubMed

    Steinke, John W; Wilson, Jeff M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis are heterogeneous airway diseases of the lower and upper airways, respectively. Molecular and cellular studies indicate that these diseases can be categorized into unique endotypes, which have therapeutic implications. One such endotype is aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which encompasses the triad of asthma, aspirin (or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) hypersensitivity, and nasal polyposis. AERD has unique pathophysiological features that distinguish it from aspirin-tolerant asthma and other forms of chronic rhinosinusitis. This review details molecular and cellular features of AERD and highlights current and future therapies that are based on these insights. PMID:27022293

  6. Reduced mucosal side-effects of acetylsalicylic acid after conjugation with tris-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new anti-inflammatory compound.

    PubMed

    Varga, Gabriella; Lajkó, Norbert; Ugocsai, Melinda; Érces, Dániel; Horváth, Gyöngyi; Tóth, Gábor; Boros, Mihály; Ghyczy, Miklós

    2016-06-15

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) causes adverse haemorrhagic reactions in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and previous results have suggested that combination therapy with 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (Tris) could provide protection in this scenario. Based on this hypothesis, our aim was to develop a new compound from ASA and Tris precursors and to characterize the biological effects of ASA-Tris and the derivatives ASA-bis- and mono-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane (ASA-Bis, ASA-Mono, respectively) using in vivo and in vitro test systems. ASA or ASA conjugates (0.55mmol/kg, each) were administered intragastrically to Sprague-Dawley rats. Changes in the mucosal structure and in the serosal microcirculation were detected by in vivo imaging techniques, the plasma TNF-alpha, tissue xanthine oxidoreductase and myeloperoxidase activities, and liver cytochrome c changes were also determined. In two separate series, platelet aggregation and carrageenan arthritis-induced inflammatory pain were measured in control, ASA and ASA-Tris-treated groups. Severe mucosal injury and a significant decrease in serosal red blood cell velocity developed in the ASA-treated group and an ~2-fold elevation in proinflammatory mediator levels evolved. ASA-Tris did not cause bleeding, microcirculatory dysfunction, mucosal injury or an elevation in proinflammatory markers. The ASA-Mono and ASA-Bis conjugates did not cause macroscopic bleeding, but the inflammatory activation was apparent. ASA-Tris did not influence the cyclooxygenase-induced platelet aggregation significantly, but the inflammatory pain was reduced as effectively as in the case of equimolar ASA doses. ASA-Tris conjugation is an effective approach through which the GI side-effects of ASA are controlled by decreasing the cytokine-mediated progression of pro-inflammatory events. PMID:27079640

  7. Comparative effects of aspirin and enteric-coated aspirin on loss of chromium 51-labeled erythrocytes from the gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, D.C.; Schwartz, R.S.; Kutny, K.; Vallejo, G.; Horton, E.S.; Cotter, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium chromate Cr 51 was used to label red blood cells of 19 healthy male volunteers, whose stools were collected for four days before and four days during oral administration of either uncoated (N . 9) or enteric-coated (N . 10) aspirin. Each subject received 2.925 gm/day of aspirin, in three equal doses separated by eight-hour intervals, for a total of seven days. During drug use, stools were collected on days 4 through 7. Fecal blood content, estimated by measuring radioactivity in the stools, was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) during use of either type of aspirin than at baseline, but losses measured during use of the coated aspirin (mean, 1.54 ml/day) were significantly lower (P less than 0.001) than those measured during use of the uncoated aspirin (mean, 4.33 ml/day). The two types of aspirin produced equivalent serum concentrations of salicylates. We conclude that enteric-coated aspirin reduces gastrointestinal blood loss.

  8. Effect of Tamarindus indica L. on the bioavailability of aspirin in healthy human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, A; Yakasai, I A; Aguye, I A

    1996-01-01

    The influence of Tamarindus indica L. fruit extract incorporated in a traditional meal on the bioavailability of aspirin tablets 600 mg dose was studied in 6 healthy volunteers. There was a statistically significant increase in the plasma levels of aspirin and salicylic acid, respectively, when the meal containing Tamarindus indica fruit extract was administered with the aspirin tablets than when taken under fasting state or with the meal without the fruit extract. The Cmax, AUC0-6h and t1/2 for aspirin increased from 10.04 +/- 0.1 mg/ml to 28.62 +/- 0.21 mg/ml (P < 0.05); 14.03 +/- 0.11 mg/ml.h to 86.51 +/- 0.21 mg/ml.h (P < 0.085) and 1.04 +/- 0.12 h to 1.50 +/- 0.44 h (P < 0.05) respectively. There was no change in the tmax (0.50 +/- 0.17 h) but there was a decrease in the kel from 0.633 +/- 0.22 to 0.463 +/- 0.29 (P < 0.05). Similarly, the Cmax, AUC0-6h and kel for salicylic acid rose from 43.84 +/- 0.21 mg/ml to 68.19 +/- 0.71 mg/ml (P < 0.05); 171.59 +/- 0.07 mg/ml.h to 266.22 +/- 0.21 mg/ml/.h (P < 0.05) and 7.37 +/- 0.29 to 19.30 +/- 0.21 (P < 0.05), respectively. The tmax decreased from 2.0 +/- 0.18 h to 1.0 +/- 0.08 h (P < 0.05) and t1/2 from 0.25 +/- 0.21 h to 0.184 +/- 0.11 h (P < 0.05). The study has indicated that Tamarindus indica L. fruit extract significantly increased the bioavailability of aspirin. PMID:8980919

  9. The postulated mechanism of the protective effect of ginger on the aspirin induced gastric ulcer: Histological and immunohistochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Salah Khalil, Mahmoud

    2015-07-01

    There are many available drugs for treating gastric ulcer, but they have various side effects. Ginger is a folk, herbal medicine, which is used for treatment of various diseases including gastric ulcer. This study investigates the possible mechanism of the protective effect of ginger on aspirin induced gastric ulcer. Forty adult male albino rats were randomized into four groups (10 animal per each group) and orally received the followings once daily for 5 days: Group I: 3 ml of 1% carboxymethyl cellulose; Group II: ginger powder (200 mg/kg body weight) suspended in 3 mL of 1% carboxymethylcellulose; Group III: aspirin (400 mg/kg body weight) suspended in 3 ml of 1% carboxymethylcellulose in water. Group IV: ginger and 30 minutes later, received aspirin suspended in 1% carboxymethylcellulose, in similar doses as received in groups II and III. On day 6, rats were sacrificed. The animals were anesthetized and the stomach was removed for the macroscopic, histological (Haematoxylin & Eosin and Periodic Acid Shiff) and immunohistochemical investigations (Bax, inducible nitric oxide synthase and heat shock protein 70). Aspirin induced a significant increase of the macroscopic ulcer score, shed and disrupted epithelium, mucosal hemorrhage, submucosal edema and leukocyte infiltration, loss of the mucus of the mucosal surface significantly increased expression of apoptosis regulator Bax, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). Ginger ameliorated the histological changes by reducing Bax and iNOS and increasing HSP70 expressions. PMID:25652595

  10. Static platelet adhesion, flow cytometry and serum TXB2 levels for monitoring platelet inhibiting treatment with ASA and clopidogrel in coronary artery disease: a randomised cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Andreas C; Jonasson, Lena; Lindahl, Tomas L; Hedbäck, Bo; Whiss, Per A

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the use of anti-platelet agents such as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and clopidogrel in coronary heart disease, some patients continue to suffer from atherothrombosis. This has stimulated development of platelet function assays to monitor treatment effects. However, it is still not recommended to change treatment based on results from platelet function assays. This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of a static platelet adhesion assay to detect platelet inhibiting effects of ASA and clopidogrel. The adhesion assay measures several aspects of platelet adhesion simultaneously, which increases the probability of finding conditions sensitive for anti-platelet treatment. Methods With a randomised cross-over design we evaluated the anti-platelet effects of ASA combined with clopidogrel as well as monotherapy with either drug alone in 29 patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome. Also, 29 matched healthy controls were included to evaluate intra-individual variability over time. Platelet function was measured by flow cytometry, serum thromboxane B2 (TXB2)-levels and by static platelet adhesion to different protein surfaces. The results were subjected to Principal Component Analysis followed by ANOVA, t-tests and linear regression analysis. Results The majority of platelet adhesion measures were reproducible in controls over time denoting that the assay can monitor platelet activity. Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet adhesion decreased significantly upon treatment with clopidogrel compared to ASA. Flow cytometric measurements showed the same pattern (r2 = 0.49). In opposite, TXB2-levels decreased with ASA compared to clopidogrel. Serum TXB2 and ADP-induced platelet activation could both be regarded as direct measures of the pharmacodynamic effects of ASA and clopidogrel respectively. Indirect pharmacodynamic measures such as adhesion to albumin induced by various soluble activators as well as SFLLRN-induced activation measured by flow

  11. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Olson, Kenneth R.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin is the first dual acting NO and H{sub 2}S releasing hybrid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its IC{sub 50} for cell growth inhibition is in the low nano-molar range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure-activity studies show that the sum of the parts does not equal the whole. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin reduced tumor growth by 85% in mice bearing a colon cancer xenograft. -- Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH-aspirin, which is an NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing agent. NOSH-aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC{sub 50}s of 45.5 {+-} 2.5, 19.7 {+-} 3.3, and 7.7 {+-} 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH-aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure-activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH-aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH-aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH-ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH-aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation.

  12. Low-Dose Aspirin Tied to Longer Colon Cancer Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... used aspirin were 15 percent less likely to die of the disease over the next several years. ... diagnosis: They were 23 percent less likely to die of colon cancer -- and 14 percent less likely ...

  13. Aspirin use and survival after coronary bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W D; Kayser, K L; Hartz, A J; Saedi, S F

    1992-03-01

    From Jan. 1, 1968, through Dec. 31, 1981, 5618 patients in a single cardiovascular surgery practice underwent coronary bypass surgery. Detailed clinical information was obtained during hospitalization and entered into a data base. All surviving patients were surveyed for aspirin use four times: in 1984, 1985, 1986, and 1987. A subgroup of 2395 patients gave consistent answers on every returned survey. The group that answered consistently "yes" had a 5-year survival rate of 79%; those who answered consistently "no" had a 5-year survival rate of 67%. Stepwise logistic regression showed that, after adjusting for patient characteristics, the relative risk of death was 58% (confidence interval 47% to 70%) for consistent aspirin users compared with consistent non-aspirin users. This study provides evidence that regular aspirin use after bypass surgery may enhance survival. PMID:1539511

  14. [Family study of patients with aspirin intolerance and rhinosinusitis].

    PubMed

    May, A; Wagner, D; Langenbeck, U; Weber, A

    2000-09-01

    The high prevalence of aspirin intolerance in asthmatics and patients with nasal polyps as well as reports of familial clustering suggest a genetic disposition of this disease. Our study aimed at obtaining further evidence of hereditary factors in this disease. We included 33 unselected patients from 28 families with aspirin intolerance and rhinosinusitis in this study. Controls were recruited from individuals treated in our ENT clinic for diseases other than aspirin intolerance (n = 52). A questionnaire focused on family histories as well as reports on diseases of the upper respiratory tract or allergies. ASS intolerance was verified either by bronchial or nasal provocation tests. We found cases of aspirin intolerance among parents, siblings, and children of ASS intolerant probands. The children of probands had nasal polyps and rhinosinusitis more often than the children of controls. We propose that ASS intolerance with nasal polyps and asthma represents a complex phenotype, with genetic and environmental factors contributing to its manifestation. PMID:11056852

  15. Small bowel injury in low-dose aspirin users.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hiroki; Sakai, Eiji; Kato, Takayuki; Umezawa, Shotaro; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    The use of low-dose aspirin (LDA) is well known to be associated with an increased risk of serious upper gastrointestinal complications, such as peptic ulceration and bleeding. Until recently, attention was mainly focused on aspirin-induced damage of the stomach and duodenum. However, recently, there has been growing interest among gastroenterologists on the adverse effects of aspirin on the small bowel, especially as new endoscopic techniques, such as capsule endoscopy (CE) and balloon-assisted endoscopy, have become available for the evaluation of small bowel lesions. Preliminary CE studies conducted in healthy subjects have shown that short-term administration of LDA can induce mild mucosal inflammation of the small bowel. Furthermore, chronic use of LDA results in a variety of lesions in the small bowel, including multiple petechiae, loss of villi, erosions, and round, irregular, or punched-out ulcers. Some patients develop circumferential ulcers with stricture. In addition, to reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal lesions in LDA users, it is important for clinicians to confirm the differences in the gastrointestinal toxicity between different types of aspirin formulations in clinical use. Some studies suggest that enteric-coated aspirin may be more injurious to the small bowel mucosa than buffered aspirin. The ideal treatment for small bowel injury in patients taking LDA would be withdrawal of aspirin, however, LDA is used as an antiplatelet agent in the majority of patients, and its withdrawal could increase the risk of cardiovascular/cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality. Thus, novel means for the treatment of aspirin-induced enteropathy are urgently needed. PMID:25501289

  16. Cooperative antiproliferative signaling by aspirin and indole-3-carbinol targets microphthalmia-associated transcription factor gene expression and promoter activity in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Poindexter, Kevin M; Matthew, Susanne; Aronchik, Ida; Firestone, Gary L

    2016-04-01

    Antiproliferative signaling of combinations of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural indolecarbinol compound derived from cruciferous vegetables, was investigated in human melanoma cells. Melanoma cell lines with distinct mutational profiles were sensitive to different extents to the antiproliferative response of aspirin, with oncogenic BRAF-expressing G361 cells and wild-type BRAF-expressing SK-MEL-30 cells being the most responsive. I3C triggered a strong proliferative arrest of G361 melanoma cells and caused only a modest decrease in the proliferation of SK-MEL-30 cells. In both cell lines, combinations of aspirin and I3C cooperatively arrested cell proliferation and induced a G1 cell cycle arrest, and nearly ablated protein and transcript levels of the melanocyte master regulator microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoform M (MITF-M). In melanoma cells transfected with a -333/+120-bp MITF-M promoter-luciferase reporter plasmid, treatment with aspirin and I3C cooperatively disrupted MITF-M promoter activity, which accounted for the loss of MITF-M gene products. Mutational analysis revealed that the aspirin required the LEF1 binding site, whereas I3C required the BRN2 binding site to mediate their combined and individual effects on MITF-M promoter activity. Consistent with LEF1 being a downstream effector of Wnt signaling, aspirin, but not I3C, downregulated protein levels of the Wnt co-receptor LDL receptor-related protein-6 and β-catenin and upregulated the β-catenin destruction complex component Axin. Taken together, our results demonstrate that aspirin-regulated Wnt signaling and I3C-targeted signaling pathways converge at distinct DNA elements in the MITF-M promoter to cooperatively disrupt MITF-M expression and melanoma cell proliferation. PMID:27055402

  17. Aspirin inhibits surface glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, P-selectin, CD63, and CD107a receptor expression on human platelets.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Marcus E; Malinin, Alex I; Bell, Christopher R; Dzhanashvili, Alex; Horowitz, Eric D; Oshrine, Benjamin R; Atar, Dan; Serebruany, Victor L

    2003-04-01

    Platelet inhibition after aspirin therapy reduces the risk for the development of acute coronary syndromes. However, the mechanism by which aspirin affect platelets other than by prostaglandin blockade is unclear. We sought to determine the in vitro effects of aspirin on the surface expression of nine platelet receptors using whole blood flow cytometry. Blood from 24 healthy volunteers was incubated for 30 min with 1.8 and 7.2 mg/l phosphate-buffered saline-diluted acetylsalicylic acid in the presence or absence of apyrase. Platelet serotonin release, and the surface expression of platelet receptors with or without apyrase were determined using the following monoclonal antibodies: anit-CD41 [glycoprotein (GP)IIb/IIIa], CD42b (GPIb), CD62p (P-selectin), CD51/CD61 (vitronectin receptor), CD31 [platelet/endothelial cellular adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1)], CD107a [lysosomal associated membrane protein (LAMP)-1], CD107b (LAMP-2), CD63 (LIMP or LAMP-3), and CD151 (PETA-3). Samples were then immediately fixed with 2% paraformaldehyde, and run on the flow cytometer within 48 h. Aspirin does not affect serotonin release from human platelets. Dose-dependent inhibition of GPIIb/IIIa, P-selectin, CD63, and CD107a receptor expression was observed in the aspirin-treated whole-blood samples. Apyrase potentiates the effects of aspirin, and independently inhibits PECAM-1. In addition to the known effect of irreversibly inhibiting platelet cyclooxygenase-1, thereby blocking thromboxane A(2) synthesis, it appears that aspirin exhibits direct effects on selective major platelet receptors. PMID:12695747

  18. Drug Resistance and Pseudoresistance: An Unintended Consequence of Enteric Coating Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Grosser, Tilo; Fries, Susanne; Lawson, John A.; Kapoor, Shiv C.; Grant, Gregory R.; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low dose aspirin reduces the secondary incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke. Drug resistance to aspirin might result in treatment failure. Despite this concern, no clear definition of “aspirin resistance” has emerged and estimates of its incidence have varied remarkably. We aimed to determine the commonality of a mechanistically consistent, stable and specific phenotype of true pharmacological resistance to aspirin – such as might be explained by genetic causes. Methods and Results Healthy volunteers (n=400) were screened for their response to a single oral dose of 325 mg immediate release or enteric coated aspirin. Response parameters reflected the activity of aspirin's molecular target, cyclooxygenase-1. Individuals who appeared “aspirin resistant” on one occasion underwent repeat testing and if still “resistant” were exposed to low dose enteric coated aspirin (81 mg) and clopidogrel (75 mg) for one week each. Variable absorption caused a high frequency of apparent resistance to a single dose of 325 mg enteric coated aspirin (up to 49%) but not to immediate release aspirin (0%). All individuals responded to aspirin upon repeated exposure, extension of the post dosing interval or addition of aspirin to their platelets ex vivo. Conclusions Pharmacological resistance to aspirin is rare; this study failed to identify a single case of true drug resistance. Pseudoresistance, reflecting delayed and reduced drug absorption, complicates enteric coated but not immediate release aspirin administration. Clinical Trial Registration Information clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT00948987. PMID:23212718

  19. Prophylactic aspirin and risk of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, J.; Colin-Jones, D.; Langman, M.; Lawson, D.; Logan, R.; Murphy, M.; Rawlins, M.; Vessey, M.; Wainwright, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the risks of hospitalisation for bleeding peptic ulcer with the current prophylactic aspirin regimens of 300 mg daily or less. DESIGN--A case-control study with hospital and community controls. SETTING--Hospitals in Glasgow, Newcastle, Nottingham, Oxford, and Portsmouth. SUBJECTS--1121 patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer bleeding matched with hospital and community controls. RESULTS--144 (12.8%) cases had been regular users of aspirin (taken at least five days a week for at least the previous month) compared with 101 (9.0%) hospital and 77 (7.8%) community controls. Odds ratios were raised for all doses of aspirin taken, whether compared with hospital or community controls (compared with combined controls: 75 mg, 2.3 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.4); 150 mg, 3.2 (1.7 to 6.5); 300 mg, 3.9 (2.5 to 6.3)). Results were not explained by confounding influences of age, sex, prior ulcer history or dyspepsia, or concurrent non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. Risks seemed particularly high in patients who took non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs concurrently. CONCLUSION--No conventionally used prophylactic aspirin regimen seems free of the risk of peptic ulcer complications. PMID:7711618

  20. Can We Select Patients for Colorectal Cancer Prevention with Aspirin?

    PubMed

    Kraus, Sarah; Sion, Daniel; Arber, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been extensively investigated in the context of the prevention of cardiovascular disease. It has one of the strongest cumulative evidence supporting its use in colorectal cancer (CRC) chemoprevention. Epidemiological, clinical, and observational studies have demonstrated that aspirin and non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including COX-2 inhibitors, can protect against CRC and significantly reduce its incidence. Moreover, prospective randomized controlled trials of colorectal polyp recurrence and in patients with hereditary CRC syndromes have shown that aspirin can produce regression of existing colorectal adenomas and prevent the formation of new polyps. However, the lowest effective doses, treatment duration, target populations, and the effects on survival are not entirely clear. Although not common serious side effects and in particular gastrointestinal and intracerebral hemorrhage do occur, better selection of individuals who might benefit the most from aspirin use must be carefully performed in order to maximize their risk/benefit ratio. In the era of precision medicine, genetic information, blood and/or urinary biomarkers, could potentially help in tailoring chemopreventive therapeutic strategies, based on aspirin use, while limiting adverse toxic effects. The current review will cover the use of aspirin for the prevention of colorectal adenomas and CRC, potential markers for chemoprevention, and patient stratification. PMID:26369678

  1. Aspirin Delimits Platelet Life Span by Proteasomal Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Manasa K.; Dash, Ayusman; Singh, Nitesh; Dash, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin is widely used in clinical settings as an anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet drug due its inhibitory effect on cyclooxygenase activity. Although the drug has long been considered to be an effective and safe therapeutic regime against inflammatory and cardiovascular disorders, consequences of its cyclooxygenase-independent attributes on platelets, the key players in thrombogenesis, beg serious investigation. In this report we explored the effect of aspirin on platelet lifespan in murine model and its possible cytotoxicity against human platelets in vitro. Aspirin administration in mice led to significant reduction in half-life of circulating platelets, indicative of enhanced rate of platelet clearance. Aspirin-treated human platelets were found to be phagocytosed more efficiently by macrophages, associated with attenuation in platelet proteasomal activity and upregulation of conformationally active Bax, which were consistent with enhanced platelet apoptosis. Although the dosage of aspirin administered in mice was higher than the therapeutic regimen against cardiovascular events, it is comparable with the recommended anti-inflammatory prescription. Thus, above observations provide cautionary framework to critically re-evaluate prophylactic and therapeutic dosage regime of aspirin in systemic inflammatory as well as cardiovascular ailments. PMID:25126950

  2. Low-dose aspirin as treatment for central serous chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Caccavale, Antonio; Romanazzi, Filippo; Imparato, Manuela; Negri, Angelo; Morano, Anna; Ferentini, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of low-dose aspirin for the treatment of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Patients and methods: Patients with classical or multifocal CSCR were treated with aspirin 100 mg per day orally for 1 month followed by 100 mg on alternate days for 5 months. Treated patients were compared with historic controls consisting of patients with classical or multifocal CSCR previously followed up at our institution. Results: Mean visual acuity in the group treated with aspirin started to improve after the first week of therapy and continued to improve throughout the following 3 months. Visual recovery was slower in the untreated control group than in the treated group and achieved better visual acuity between the first and third month from the onset of the disease. There were no adverse events related to the administration of aspirin. Conclusion: The results indicate that treatment with low-dose aspirin may result in more rapid visual rehabilitation with fewer recurrences in patient with CSCR compared with untreated historic controls. The effectiveness of treatment with aspirin supports our hypothesis regarding the role of impaired fibrinolysis and increased platelet aggregation in the choriocapillaris in the pathogenesis of CSCR. PMID:20714368

  3. Kinetics, intermediates and acute toxicity of arsanilic acid photolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiang-Dong; Wang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Cun; Qin, Wen-Xiu; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2014-07-01

    Arsanilic acid (4-amino phenyl arsenic acid, ASA) is widely used in poultry production as feed additives, while most of ASA in the feed is excreted in the animal manure and released into the environment. However, the environmental behaviors of ASA were not well understood. In the present study, the photolysis behaviors of ASA and the toxicity of its metabolites to luminescent bacterium were studied. The results showed that ASA could be photodegraded and this process was strongly affected by solution pH, humic acid and dissolved oxygen. Upon UV irradiation for 360 min, ASA could be completely eliminated, but the reduction of total organic carbon (TOC) was not significant. In addition, NH4(+) ions and inorganic arsenic including arsenite and arsenate were identified as the predominant end-products. The conversion of ASA included both direct and indirect photolysis involving radicals, and its possible photolysis pathways were proposed on the basis of the identified intermediates. Unfortunately, higher adverse effects of the conversion products of ASA on bacteria were observed during the photolysis reaction. The results of present study might be helpful for assessing the environmental persistence and risks of ASA. PMID:24405966

  4. Assessment of Water Quality in Asa River (Nigeria) and Its Indigenous Clarias gariepinus Fish

    PubMed Central

    Kolawole, Olatunji M.; Ajayi, Kolawole T.; Olayemi, Albert B.; Okoh, Anthony I.

    2011-01-01

    Water is a valued natural resource for the existence of all living organisms. Management of the quality of this precious resource is, therefore, of special importance. In this study river water samples were collected and analysed for physicochemical and bacteriological evaluation of pollution in the Unity Road stream segment of Asa River in Ilorin, Nigeria. Juvenile samples of Clarias gariepinus fish were also collected from the experimental Asa River and from the control Asa Dam water and were analysed for comparative histological investigations and bacterial density in the liver and intestine in order to evaluate the impact of pollution on the aquatic biota. The water pH was found to range from 6.32 to 6.43 with a mean temperature range of 24.3 to 25.8 °C. Other physicochemical parameters monitored including total suspended solids, total dissolved solids, biochemical oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand values exceeded the recommended level for surface water quality. Results of bacteriological analyses including total heterotrophic count, total coliform and thermotolerant coliform counts revealed a high level of faecal pollution of the river. Histological investigations revealed no significant alterations in tissue structure, but a notable comparative distinction of higher bacterial density in the intestine and liver tissues of Clarias gariepinus from Asa River than in those collected from the control. It was inferred that the downstream Asa River is polluted and its aquatic biota is bacteriologically contaminated and unsafe for human and animal consumption. PMID:22163210

  5. Before Using Aspirin to Lower Your Risk of Heart Attack or Stroke, Here Is What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Before Using Aspirin to Lower Your Risk of Heart Attack or Stroke, What You Should Know Share Tweet ... use of aspirin will help to prevent a heart attack or stroke in your particular case. Aspirin can ...

  6. Does aspirin use make it harder to collect seizures during elective video-EEG telemetry?

    PubMed

    Godfred, Rachel M; Parikh, Mihir S; Haltiner, Alan M; Caylor, Lisa M; Sepkuty, Jehuda P; Doherty, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Aspirin has shown promise as an anticonvulsant drug in animal models. Whether aspirin alters seizure frequency in humans remains unstudied. We retrospectively looked at adults with focal onset epilepsy who took aspirin daily while undergoing elective video-EEG monitoring and compared them with similar age- and sex-matched controls to see if seizure frequencies were different between those two populations. Significantly fewer seizures were seen on day two of monitoring for patients on aspirin therapies. Higher aspirin doses were correlated with fewer seizures collected during the monitoring stay. Further prospective study is needed to determine whether aspirin affects more robust seizure control. PMID:23399946

  7. Stereocontrolled total synthesis of the potent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediator resolvin D3 and its aspirin-triggered 17R-epimer.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Jeremy W; Uddin, Jasim; Serhan, Charles N; Petasis, Nicos A

    2013-04-01

    The first total synthesis of stereochemically pure resolvin D3 and aspirin-triggered resolvin D3 is reported. These enzymatic metabolites of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have potent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving actions. The convergent synthetic strategy is based on enantiomerically pure starting materials, and it is highly stereocontrolled. PMID:23510485

  8. Comparison between urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 detection and platelet Light Transmission Aggregometry (LTA) assays for evaluating aspirin response in elderly patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tengfei; Zhang, Jingwei; Chen, Xiahuan; Feng, Xueru; Fu, Sidney W; McCaffrey, Timothy A; Liu, Meilin

    2015-10-15

    Aspirin is widely used in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of our study was to compare between two established methods of aspirin response, urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 (11dhTXB2) and platelet Light Transmission Aggregometry (LTA) assays in elderly Chinese patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and to investigate the clinical significance of both methods in predicting cardiovascular events. Urinary 11dhTxB2 assay and arachidonic acid-induced (AA, 0.5mg/ml) platelet aggregation by Light Transmission Aggregometry (LTAAA) assay were measured to evaluate aspirin responses. High-on aspirin platelet reactivity (HAPR) was defined as urinary 11dhTxB2>1500pg/mg or AA-induced platelet aggregation≥15.22%-the upper quartile of our enrolled population. The two tests showed a poor correlation for aspirin inhibition (r=0.063) and a poor agreement in classifying HAPR (kappa=0.053). With a mean follow-up time of 12months, cardiovascular events occurred more frequently in HAPR patients who were diagnosed by LTA assay as compared with no-HAPR patients (22.5% versus 10.6%, P=0.039, OR=2.45, 95% CI=1.06-5.63). However, the HAPR status, as determined by urinary 11dTXB2 measurement, did not show a significant correlation with outcomes. PMID:26095809

  9. The in vitro effect of aspirin on increased whole blood platelet aggregation in oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Norris, L A; Bonnar, J

    1994-05-01

    The effects of triphasic oral contraceptives on whole blood platelet aggregation in 36 Italian women are reported here. Aspirin's effects on platelet aggregation were also studied. 18 women took a triphasic oral contraceptive; 10 women took Trinordiol, while 8 took Trinovum for at least 90 days. The remaining 18 women took nothing and served as controls. The study was aligned with each woman's birth control pill cycle. Blood was taken daily on days 15-21 of their cycle. Either saline solution or acetylsalicylic acid was added to the blood samples and compared. All data was statistically analyzed using unpaired student's t-test. Effects of 3 aggregating agents, ADP, PAF, and EDTA, on platelet aggregation were studied. Arachidonic acid and adrenalin bitartrate were also studied in this manner. An increase in platelet aggregation was observed in women taking oral contraceptives. No difference was found between patients taking Trinordiol and those taking Trinovum. The results of this study indicate an increase in whole blood platelet sensitivity to collagen, adrenalin, and arachidonic acid when using oral contraceptives. Aspirin, at low doses, may have a role in preventing early thrombus formation in women taking oral contraceptives. PMID:8042198

  10. Synthesis, colon-targeted studies and pharmacological evaluation of an anti-ulcerative colitis drug 4-Aminosalicylic acid-β-O-glucoside.

    PubMed

    Li, Feifei; Wu, Guoli; Zheng, Huixia; Wang, Li; Zhao, Zhengbao

    2016-01-27

    A glycoside prodrug of 4-aminosalicylic acid (4-ASA) with d-glucose was synthesized for targeted drug delivery to inflammatory bowel. The in vitro assessment of 4-aminosalicylic acid-β-O-glucoside (4-ASA-Glu) as a colon-specific prodrug was studied using colitis rat with the healthy one as control. The stability studies in aqueous buffers (pH 1.2, 6.8 and 7.4) indicated that 4-ASA-Glu was stable over a period of 12 h. The incubation of 4-ASA-Glu with cecal or colonic contents of healthy rats at 37 °C released 4-ASA in 77 or 80% of the dose in 12 h, respectively. The amount of 4-ASA liberated from the incubation of 4-ASA-Glu in cecal or colonic contents of colitis rats at 37 °C was 69 or 79% in 12 h respectively, while less than 9% 4-ASA was detected from the incubation of 4-ASA-Glu with the homogenates of stomach or small intestine. The curative effect of 4-ASA-Glu was evaluated in 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) induced experimental colitis model in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. It was found that 4-ASA-Glu possess significantly ameliorate effect than sulfasalazine, oral 4- and 5-aminosalicylic acid. PMID:26717200

  11. Inhaled lysine-aspirin as a bronchoprovocation procedure in aspirin-sensitive asthma: its repeatability, absence of a late-phase reaction, and the role of histamine.

    PubMed

    Phillips, G D; Foord, R; Holgate, S T

    1989-08-01

    Inhalation of an aerosolized solution of lysine-aspirin has previously been described as a safer technique than oral challenge with aspirin for the diagnosis of aspirin-sensitive asthma. We describe a modification of this method that involves inhalation of serially doubling incremental concentrations of lysine-aspirin by a standardized technique and allows construction of concentration-response curves. In 11 subjects with asthma, mean (SEM) age 48.2 (2.9) years, the geometric mean (range) provocation concentrations of histamine and lysine-aspirin required to produce a 20% decrease in FEV1 from baseline were 0.6 (0.04 to 3.2) and 48.3 (15.5 to 219) mg/ml, respectively. No relationship was found between these values. In seven of nine subjects investigated on two consecutive occasions, bronchoconstriction with lysine-aspirin was repeatable to within a single doubling concentration difference. Bronchoconstriction provoked by lysine-aspirin was more rapid than with oral aspirin and was not followed by any late asthmatic reaction or increase in nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness. In six subjects, premedication with the selective H1 histamine-receptor antagonist, terfenadine, had no significant effect on bronchoconstriction provoked by inhaled lysine-aspirin, indicating little role for release of histamine in the response. We conclude that inhalation of lysine-aspirin may be used as a bronchoprovocation procedure for the diagnosis and investigation of aspirin-sensitive asthma. PMID:2503553

  12. The effect of aspirin nanoemulsion on TNFα and iNOS in gastric tissue in comparison with conventional aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Fatma Abd Elhalim; Hashem, Khalid S; Hussein Elkelawy, Asmaa Mohammed M

    2015-01-01

    Background No dose of aspirin is free of bleeding risk. Even at a dose as low as 75 mg/day, the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is twice as high as among nonusers. Nanoemulsions (NEs) are emulsion systems with droplet size in nanometer scale in which oil or water droplets are finely dispersed in the opposite phase with the help of a suitable surfactant to stabilize the system. Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aspirin NE in comparison to conventional aspirin. Materials and methods A total of 24 male rats were used in the study and arbitrarily assigned to four groups. Group 1 was the control group, and was given saline. Group 2 was given blank NE 1.5 mL/kg orally. Group 3 was given aspirin 30 mg/kg body weight orally. Group 4 was given aspirin NE 30 mg/kg body weight orally. Rats were killed, and gastric tissue was quickly excised after dissection of the animals. The tissues were divided into three pieces. The first one was kept in formalin 10% for pathological investigation. The second piece was kept in liquid nitrogen for molecular investigation. The third piece was homogenized in ten volumes of ice-cold phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7) using a Teflon homogenizer until a uniform suspension was obtained. The homogenate was centrifuged at 4,000 rpm for 30 minutes at 4°C to separate the supernatant from cellular debris. The supernatant was then used for the estimation of biochemical assays. Results The present study shows that aspirin has a toxic effect on the stomach as a result of inducing marked oxidative damage and the release of reactive oxygen species. This was shown by the significant increase in TNFα, iNOS, prostaglandin E2, and malondialdehyde levels, and also a significant decrease in glutathione, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. In the aspirin-treated group compared to the control group, the NE had a protective effect on the stomach and caused less injury than

  13. Studies on volatile organic compounds of Tuber borchii and T. asa-foetida.

    PubMed

    D'Auria, Maurizio; Rana, Gian Luigi; Racioppi, Rocco; Laurita, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    Ascomata of two truffle species, Tuber borchii and T. asa-foetida, both naturally growing in woodlands of the Basilicata region (southern Italy), were identified on the basis of ascospore morphology and compared under a volatile organic compound profile to determine the particular volatile organic compounds that characterize each taxon. Solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the samples showed the presence of 1-methyl-1,3-butadiene as a primary component in both truffles. T. asa-foetida showed a compound, toluene, not present in T. borchii, which creates the penetrating "solvent" smell of the truffle. PMID:22685100

  14. All Source Analysis System (ASAS): Migration from VAX to Alpha AXP computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjoholm-Sierchio, Michael J.; Friedman, Steven Z. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL's) experience migrating existing VAX applications to Digital Equipment Corporation's new Alpha AXP processor is covered. The rapid development approach used during the 10-month period required to migrate the All Source Analysis System (ASAS), 1.5 million lines of FORTRAN, C, and Ada code, is also covered. ASAS, an automated tactical intelligence system, was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the U. S. Army. Other benefits achieved as a result of the significant performance improvements provided by Alpha AXP platform are also described.

  15. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart and Circulation For Women Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes Did ... attacks. Please see the brochure Talk with Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks ...

  16. Purine pathway implicated in mechanism of resistance to aspirin therapy: pharmacometabolomics-informed pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Yerges-Armstrong, L M; Ellero-Simatos, S; Georgiades, A; Zhu, H; Lewis, J P; Horenstein, R B; Beitelshees, A L; Dane, A; Reijmers, T; Hankemeier, T; Fiehn, O; Shuldiner, A R; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2013-10-01

    Although aspirin is a well-established antiplatelet agent, the mechanisms of aspirin resistance remain poorly understood. Metabolomics allows for measurement of hundreds of small molecules in biological samples, enabling detailed mapping of pathways involved in drug response. We defined the metabolic signature of aspirin exposure in subjects from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study. Many metabolites, including known aspirin catabolites, changed on exposure to aspirin, and pathway enrichment analysis identified purine metabolism as significantly affected by drug exposure. Furthermore, purines were associated with aspirin response, and poor responders had higher postaspirin adenosine and inosine levels than did good responders (n = 76; both P < 4 × 10(-3)). Using our established "pharmacometabolomics-informed pharmacogenomics" approach, we identified genetic variants in adenosine kinase associated with aspirin response. Combining metabolomics and genomics allowed for more comprehensive interrogation of mechanisms of variation in aspirin response--an important step toward personalized treatment approaches for cardiovascular disease. PMID:23839601

  17. Expert Panel Reaffirms Daily Aspirin's Use Against Heart Disease, Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158240.html Expert Panel Reaffirms Daily Aspirin's Use Against Heart Disease, Colon Cancer Guideline applies ... of heart disease should take a low-dose aspirin each day to reduce their risk of both ...

  18. Chemoprevention of N-methylnitrosourea-induced colon carcinogenesis by ursodeoxycholic acid-5-aminosalicylic acid conjugate in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Narisawa, Tomio; Fukaura, Yoko; Takeba, Naomi; Nakai, Keiko

    2002-02-01

    Bile acids enhance colon carcinogenesis in animal models, whereas ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) suppresses it. Nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs prevent colon cancer development in animals and humans. The aim of the present study was to explore the inhibitory effect of UDCA conjugate with 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), UDCA-5-ASA conjugate (UDCA-5-ASA), against colon carcinogenesis in rats. One-hundred-and-twenty-nine 7-week-old F344 rats received an intrarectal instillation of 2 mg of N-methylnitrosourea 3 times a week for 3 weeks, and were fed a 0% (control), 0.11% or 0.02% UDCA-5-ASA-, 0.08% UDCA- or 0.03% 5-ASA-supplemented diet for the next 27 weeks. The test diets contained an equimolar amount of a test agent, 2.0 mmol/kg diet, except for the 0.02% UDCA-5-ASA diet. The tumor incidence and the mean number of tumors/rat at week 30 were significantly lower and smaller in the UDCA-5-ASA diet groups, 48% and 0.7 in both, and marginally lower in the UDCA and 5-ASA diet groups, 56% and 0.9, and 64% and 0.8, compared to the control group, 83% and 1.3. All the tumors were polypoid in shape, and most of them were differentiated adenocarcinomas restricted to the mucosa or submucosa. An analysis by HPLC for bile acids and 5-ASA in the feces and serum collected at week 30 showed that one-half of ingested UDCA-5-ASA was cleaved into UDCA and 5-ASA in the colon. Thus, the two moieties may have independently affected the promotion stage of carcinogenesis. PMID:11856477

  19. Functionalized bimodal mesoporous silicas as carriers for controlled aspirin delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Lin; Sun Jihong; Li Yuzhen

    2011-08-15

    The bimodal mesoporous silica modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was performed as the aspirin carrier. The samples' structure, drug loading and release profiles were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption and desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, TG analysis, elemental analysis and UV-spectrophotometer. For further exploring the effects of the bimodal mesopores on the drug delivery behavior, the unimodal mesoporous material MCM-41 was also modified as the aspirin carrier. Meantime, Korsmeyer-Peppas equation f{sub t}=kt{sup n} was employed to analyze the dissolution data in details. It is indicated that the bimodal mesopores are beneficial for unrestricted drug molecules diffusing and therefore lead to a higher loading and faster releasing than that of MCM-41. The results show that the aspirin delivery properties are influenced considerably by the mesoporous matrix, whereas the large pore of bimodal mesoporous silica is the key point for the improved controlled-release properties. - Graphical abstract: Loading (A) and release profiles (B) of aspirin in N-BMMs and N-MCM-41 indicated that BMMs have more drug loading capacity and faster release rate than that MCM-41. Highlights: > Bimodal mesoporous silicas (BMMs) and MCM-41 modified with amino group via post-treatment procedure. > Loading and release profiles of aspirin in modified BMMs and MCM-41. > Modified BMMs have more drug loading capacity and faster release rate than that modified MCM-41.

  20. Aspirin Prevents Colorectal Cancer by Normalizing EGFR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haitao; Zhu, Feng; Boardman, Lisa A.; Wang, Lei; Oi, Naomi; Liu, Kangdong; Li, Xiang; Fu, Yang; Limburg, Paul J.; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspirin intake reduces the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the molecular underpinnings remain elusive. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed in about 80% of CRC cases, is implicated in the etiology of CRC. Here, we investigated whether aspirin can prevent CRC by normalizing EGFR expression. Methods Immunohistochemistry staining was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections from normal colon mucosa, adenomatous polyps from FAP patients who were classified as regular aspirin users or nonusers. The interplay between cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and EGFR was studied in primary intestinal epithelial cells isolated from ApcMin mice, immortalized normal human colon epithelial cells (HCECs) as well as murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Results Immunohistochemistry staining results established that EGFR overexpression is an early event in colorectal tumorigenesis, which can be greatly attenuated by regular use of aspirin. Importantly, EGFR and COX-2 were co-overexpressed and co-localized with each other in FAP patients. Further mechanistic studies revealed that COX-2 overexpression triggers the activation of the c-Jun-dependent transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), which binds to the Egfr promoter. Binding facilitates the cellular accumulation of EGFR and lowers the threshold required for pre-neoplastic cells to undergo transformation. Conclusion Aspirin might exert its chemopreventive activity against CRC, at least partially, by normalizing EGFR expression in gastrointestinal precancerous lesions. PMID:26097892

  1. Pharmacometabolomics Reveals That Serotonin Is Implicated in Aspirin Response Variability

    PubMed Central

    Ellero-Simatos, S; Lewis, J P; Georgiades, A; Yerges-Armstrong, L M; Beitelshees, A L; Horenstein, R B; Dane, A; Harms, A C; Ramaker, R; Vreeken, R J; Perry, C G; Zhu, H; Sànchez, C L; Kuhn, C; Ortel, T L; Shuldiner, A R; Hankemeier, T; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2014-01-01

    While aspirin is generally effective for prevention of cardiovascular disease, considerable variation in drug response exists, resulting in some individuals displaying high on-treatment platelet reactivity. We used pharmacometabolomics to define pathways implicated in variation of response to treatment. We profiled serum samples from healthy subjects pre- and postaspirin (14 days, 81 mg/day) using mass spectrometry. We established a strong signature of aspirin exposure independent of response (15/34 metabolites changed). In our discovery (N = 80) and replication (N = 125) cohorts, higher serotonin levels pre- and postaspirin correlated with high, postaspirin, collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In a third cohort, platelets from subjects with the highest levels of serotonin preaspirin retained higher reactivity after incubation with aspirin than platelets from subjects with the lowest serotonin levels preaspirin (72 ± 8 vs. 61 ± 11%, P = 0.02, N = 20). Finally, ex vivo, serotonin strongly increased platelet reactivity after platelet incubation with aspirin (+20%, P = 4.9 × 10−4, N = 12). These results suggest that serotonin is implicated in aspirin response variability. PMID:25029353

  2. Pharmacometabolomics reveals that serotonin is implicated in aspirin response variability.

    PubMed

    Ellero-Simatos, S; Lewis, J P; Georgiades, A; Yerges-Armstrong, L M; Beitelshees, A L; Horenstein, R B; Dane, A; Harms, A C; Ramaker, R; Vreeken, R J; Perry, C G; Zhu, H; Sànchez, C L; Kuhn, C; Ortel, T L; Shuldiner, A R; Hankemeier, T; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2014-01-01

    While aspirin is generally effective for prevention of cardiovascular disease, considerable variation in drug response exists, resulting in some individuals displaying high on-treatment platelet reactivity. We used pharmacometabolomics to define pathways implicated in variation of response to treatment. We profiled serum samples from healthy subjects pre- and postaspirin (14 days, 81 mg/day) using mass spectrometry. We established a strong signature of aspirin exposure independent of response (15/34 metabolites changed). In our discovery (N = 80) and replication (N = 125) cohorts, higher serotonin levels pre- and postaspirin correlated with high, postaspirin, collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In a third cohort, platelets from subjects with the highest levels of serotonin preaspirin retained higher reactivity after incubation with aspirin than platelets from subjects with the lowest serotonin levels preaspirin (72 ± 8 vs. 61 ± 11%, P = 0.02, N = 20). Finally, ex vivo, serotonin strongly increased platelet reactivity after platelet incubation with aspirin (+20%, P = 4.9 × 10(-4), N = 12). These results suggest that serotonin is implicated in aspirin response variability. PMID:25029353

  3. Graphene modified glassy carbon sensor for the determination of aspirin metabolites in human biological samples.

    PubMed

    Purushotham, Meruva; Gupta, Pankaj; Goyal, Rajendra N

    2015-10-01

    A graphene modified glassy carbon (GR/GCE) sensor has been developed for the determination of aspirin metabolites 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acids (2,3- and 2,5-DHB). The modified sensor was characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. The electrochemical behavior of 2,3- and 2,5-DHB was investigated by cyclic and square wave voltammetry. The modified sensor exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of 2,3- and 2,5-DHB, leading to a remarkable enhancement in the peak current as compared to the bare sensor. The results were attributed to the enhanced surface area and high conductivity of GR. The anodic peak currents of 2,3- and 2,5-DHB were found to be linear in the concentration range of 1-150 µM and 1-200 µM with the detection limits of 47 nM and 51 nM, respectively. The sensor was capable to determine 2,5-DHB effectively without any interference from the uric acid and other metabolites present in the urine samples. The practical utility of GR/GCE has been successfully demonstrated for the determination of 2,5-DHB in the urine samples of persons undergoing treatment with aspirin. PMID:26078167

  4. Aspirin use for the prevention of cardiovascular disease: the British Women's Heart and Health Study.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, D A; Bedford, C; Taylor, M; Ebrahim, S

    2001-09-01

    Low dose aspirin is effective, safe, and economical in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. We have found that only one-third of post-menopausal women with cardiovascular disease are using aspirin and that the majority of women who are using aspirin are doing so for primary prevention. Improvements in this area of medical practice are both necessary and feasible. PMID:11593836

  5. Effervescent metoclopramide and aspirin (Migravess) versus effervescent aspirin or placebo for migraine attacks: a double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Tfelt-Hansen, P; Olesen, J

    1984-06-01

    Aspirin 650 mg and metoclopramide 10 mg in an effervescent preparation (Migravess) were compared with effervescent aspirin 650 mg (Alka-Seltzer) and placebo for common migraine attacks with a double-blind cross-over design. One hundred and eighteen patients with common migraine were entered. Eighty-five patients completed all three forms of treatment, eleven completed two, and six completed one. Medicine was taken when patients were sure they had a migraine attack and not just interval headache. After each form of treatment, they mailed a report form to the investigators. Additional medication was allowed after 2 h and was taken for 79/95 placebo treated attacks, 63/92 Migravess treated attacks, and 51/86 aspirin treated attacks (p less than 0.01). Aspirin was significantly better than placebo for pain but not quite significant for nausea. Migravess was significantly better than placebo for pain and for nausea. There was no significant difference between aspirin and Migravess with regard to analgesic effectiveness (p = 0.33) or to antinausea effect (p = 0.18). PMID:6375873

  6. Per Aa Asa Hilliard: The Great House of Black Light for Educational Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nobles, Wade W.

    2008-01-01

    This interpretive review draws on a number of Asa G. Hilliard's Kemetic (ancient Egyptian) writings to examine his conception of educational excellence in ancient Kemet and for African American education today. The review offers an interpretation of Hilliard's lifelong quest for excellence in education, which is especially revealed in his analysis…

  7. ASASSN-16bl and ASASSN-16bm: ASAS-SN Discovery of Two Probable Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Kiyota, S.; Brown, J. S.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Godoy-Rivera, D.; Basu, U.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Bock, G.; Cruz, I.; Fernandez, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered two new transient sources, most likely supernovae, in the galaxies 2MASX J11422674-3654256 and GALEXASC J115155.68-132459.3.

  8. AIR SCREENING ASSESSMENT (ASA) - COOK CO., IL/LAKE CO., IN

    EPA Science Inventory

    ASA Background and Overview - In 1995 the Chcago Legal Clinic and 11 Chicago-area community advocacy groups filed a partition under the Toxics Substances Control Act requesting that the USEPA Administrator prohibit or further regulate the emissions from eight proposed or construc...

  9. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in ESO 297-G037

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Conseil, E.; Fernandez, J. M.; Kiyota, S.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Wiethoff, W.

    2015-06-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the double 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy ESO 297-G037.

  10. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in SDSS J080519.59+225751.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Rivera, D. Godoy; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Brimacombe, J.; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Pojmanski, G.; Bock, G.; Carballo, J. G.; Cruz, I.; Kiyota, S.; Marples, P.; Masi, G.

    2015-09-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy SDSS J080519.59+225751.1.

  11. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in CGCG 063-098

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Goss, N.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Wozniak, P. R.; Falco, E.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Carballo, J. G.; Kiyota, S.; Koff, R. A.; Krannich, G.; Monard, L. A. G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Wiethoff, W.

    2015-04-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy CGCG 063-098.

  12. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in SDSS J132112.88+401556.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, J. M.; Masi, G.; Brown, J. S.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Brimacombe, J.; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Conseil, E.; Kiyota, S.; Nicolas, J.

    2015-06-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy SDSS J132112.88+401556.7.

  13. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in SDSS J152523.40+291018.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Fernandez, J. M.; Kiyota, S.; Masi, G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.

    2015-07-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy SDSS J152523.40+291018.8.

  14. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in GALEXASC J015900.57-322225.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Conseil, E.; Fernandez, J. M.; Kiyota, S.; Masi, G.; Nicolas, J.

    2015-06-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the double 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy GALEXASC J015900.57-322225.2.

  15. ATel 7548: ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in 2MFGC 08437

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Goss, N.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Brimacombe, J.; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Carballo, J. G.; Fernandez, J. M.; Kiyota, S.; Nicholls, B.; Wiethoff, W.

    2015-05-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy 2MFGC 08437. ...

  16. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in NGC 5517

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyota, S.; Brimacombe, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Conseil, E.; Masi, G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Polsgrove, D. E.; Della-Rose, D. J.; Novotny, S. J.; Wilber, A.; Zinn, J.; Wagner, R. M.; Neric, M.

    2015-06-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy NGC 5517.

  17. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in UGC 09108 NED02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, J.; Masi, G.; Catalano, P.; Fernandez, J. M.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Brimacombe, J.; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.

    2015-07-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy UGC 09108 NED02.

  18. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in ESO 069-G005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Goss, N.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Wozniak, P. R.; Falco, E.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Carballo, J. G.; Kiyota, S.; Koff, R. A.; Krannich, G.; Monard, L. A. G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Wiethoff, W.

    2015-04-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the double 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy ESO 069-G005.

  19. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in 2MASX J13080914+2749354

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Bersier, D.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Dong, Subo; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Fernandez, J. M.; Kiyota, S.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Wiethoff, W.

    2015-05-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy 2MASX J13080914+2749354.

  20. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in CGCG 448-007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Wiethoff, W.; Koff, R. A.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Godoy-Rivera, D.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Kiyota, S.; Krannich, G.; Masi, G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.

    2015-10-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy CGCG 448-007.

  1. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Possible Supernova Near 2MASXi J0909234-044327

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyota, S.; Brimacombe, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Goss, N.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Wozniak, P. R.; Falco, E.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Carballo, J. G.; Fernandez, J. M.; Koff, R. A.; Krannich, G.; Monard, L. A. G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Wiethoff, W.

    2015-04-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the double 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, possibly a supernova, near the extended source 2MASXi J0909234-044327.

  2. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in ESO 221-G012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Carballo, J. G.; Conseil, E.; Kiyota, S.; Koff, R. A.; Masi, G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Wiethoff, W.

    2015-07-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the double 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy ESO 221-G012.

  3. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Bright Supernova in IC 4303

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyota, S.; Brimacombe, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Conseil, E.; Masi, G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Polsgrove, D. E.; Della-Rose, D. J.; Novotny, S. J.

    2015-06-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the double 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new bright transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy IC 4303.

  4. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in 2MASX J15254441+5921091

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, J.; Fernandez, J. M.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Brimacombe, J.; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Kiyota, S.; Monard, L. A. G.; Nicholls, B.; Wiethoff, W.

    2015-05-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy 2MASX J15254441+5921091.

  5. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in SDSS J100807.76+191758.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Koff, R. A.; Kiyota, S.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Rivera, D. Godoy; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Krannich, G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.

    2015-10-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy SDSS J100807.76+191758.2.

  6. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in 2MASX J05014660-1343503

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Fernandez, J. M.; Kiyota, S.; Koff, R. A.; Masi, G.; Monard, L. A. G.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.

    2015-07-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the double 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy 2MASX J05014660-1343503.

  7. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in 2MASX J20030163-2154516

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Fernandez, J. M.; Masi, G.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Kiyota, S.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.

    2015-07-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy 2MASX J20030163-2154516.

  8. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in ESO 357-G005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Marples, P.; Kiyota, S.; Bock, G.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Rivera, D. Godoy; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Chen, Ping; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Pojmanski, G.; Cruz, I.; Koff, R. A.; Nicolas, J.

    2015-09-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy ESO 357-G005.

  9. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in 2MASX J15322270+4150586

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masi, G.; Nicolas, J.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Brimacombe, J.; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.

    2015-07-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy 2MASX J15322270+4150586.

  10. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in LCRS B102206.7-024353

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyota, S.; Brimacombe, J.; Nicholls, B.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Goss, N.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Wozniak, P. R.; Falco, E.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Carballo, J. G.; Koff, R. A.; Krannich, G.; Monard, L. A. G.; Nicolas, J.; Wiethoff, W.

    2015-04-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the double 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy LCRS B102206.7-024353.

  11. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Bright Supernova in Mrk 0576

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyota, S.; Brimacombe, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Conseil, E.; Fernandez, J. M.; Koff, R. A.; Masi, G.; Nicolas, J.

    2015-06-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a bright supernova, in the galaxy Mrk 0576.

  12. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Supernova in NGC 2115A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, B.; Brimacombe, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Goss, N.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Wozniak, P. R.; Falco, E.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Carballo, J. G.; Fernandez, J. M.; Kiyota, S.; Koff, R. A.; Krannich, G.; Monard, L. A. G.; Nicolas, J.; Wiethoff, W.

    2015-04-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the double 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy NGC 2115A.

  13. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Probable Bright Supernova in 2MASX J08401168-0435369

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Kiyota, S.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Danilet, A. B.; Simonian, G.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Falco, E.; Wozniak, P. R.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Fernandez, J. M.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Wiethoff, W.

    2015-05-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the double 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy 2MASX J08401168-0435369.

  14. Making a Theist out of Darwin: Asa Gray's Post-Darwinian Natural Theology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, T. Russell

    2012-01-01

    In March of 1860 the eminent Harvard Botanist and orthodox Christian Asa Gray began promoting the Origin of Species in hopes of securing a fair examination of Darwin's evolutionary theory among theistic naturalists. To this end, Gray sought to demonstrate that Darwin had not written atheistically and that his theory of evolution by natural…

  15. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Likely Galactic Nova ASASSN-16kd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Shields, J.; Shappee, G. Simonian B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Chomiuk, L.; Strader, J.; Brimacombe, J.

    2016-09-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we detect a new transient source, most likely a classical nova, near the Galactic center.

  16. ASAS-SN Discovery of A Likely, Heavily-Obscured Galactic Nova ASASSN-16ig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanek, K. Z.; Kiyota, S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Shields, J.; Shappee, G. Simonian B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Chomiuk, L.; Strader, J.; Brimacombe, J.

    2016-08-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in CTIO, Chile, we detect a new transient source, most likely a classical nova, near the Galactic center.

  17. The Scholarship of Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III: Implications for Black Principal Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillman, Linda C.

    2008-01-01

    For over 40 years the scholarship of Dr. Asa G. Hilliard has impacted the fields of educational psychology, testing and measurement, teacher education, and African and African American history. Dr. Hilliard was also concerned about school leadership, and much of his work is closely aligned with current discussions about school reform and…

  18. Dr. Asa G. Hilliard III: Trumpeter for the Academic and Cultural Excellence of African American Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemons-Smith, Shonda

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the scholarship of Asa G. Hilliard III on the theme of student academic and cultural excellence and the development of teachers. Throughout his career, Hilliard questioned the nation's commitment to ensuring the academic success of all children. The premise "Do we have the will to educate all children?" is reflected…

  19. Spectroscopic classification of Gaia, ASAS-SN and TOCP transients with the WHT+ISIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, H.; Wevers, T.; Fraser, M.; Jonker, P. G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Hodgkin, S.; Blagorodnova, N.

    2015-06-01

    We report spectroscopic confirmation and classifications for reported Gaia Photometric Science Alerts (http://gaia.ac.uk/selected-gaia-science-alerts), together with targets from the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN; Shappee et al. 2014) and the TOCP list.

  20. Functionalized bimodal mesoporous silicas as carriers for controlled aspirin delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lin; Sun, Jihong; Li, Yuzhen

    2011-08-01

    The bimodal mesoporous silica modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was performed as the aspirin carrier. The samples' structure, drug loading and release profiles were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, N 2 adsorption and desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, TG analysis, elemental analysis and UV-spectrophotometer. For further exploring the effects of the bimodal mesopores on the drug delivery behavior, the unimodal mesoporous material MCM-41 was also modified as the aspirin carrier. Meantime, Korsmeyer-Peppas equation ft= ktn was employed to analyze the dissolution data in details. It is indicated that the bimodal mesopores are beneficial for unrestricted drug molecules diffusing and therefore lead to a higher loading and faster releasing than that of MCM-41. The results show that the aspirin delivery properties are influenced considerably by the mesoporous matrix, whereas the large pore of bimodal mesoporous silica is the key point for the improved controlled-release properties.

  1. Aspirin insensitive thrombophilia: Transcript profiling of blood identifies platelet abnormalities and HLA restriction

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi, Payam; Katz, Richard; Toma, Ian; Li, Ranyang; Reiner, Jonathan; VanHouten, Kiersten; Carpio, Larry; Marshall, Lorraine; Lian, Yi; Bupp, Sujata; Fu, Sidney W.; Rickles, Frederick; Leitenberg, David; Lai, Yinglei; Weksler, Babette B.; Rebling, Frederik; Yang, Zhaoqing; McCaffrey, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin is the most widely used antiplatelet agent because it is safe, efficient, and inexpensive. However, a significant subset of patients does not exhibit a full inhibition of platelet aggregation, termed ‘aspirin resistance’ (AR). Several major studies have observed that AR patients have a 4-fold increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and other thrombotic events. Arachidonic acid-stimulated whole blood aggregation was tested in 132 adults at risk for ischemic events, and identified an inadequate response to aspirin therapy in 9 patients (6.8%). Expression profiling of blood RNA by microarray was used to generate new hypotheses about the etiology of AR. Among the differentially expressed genes, there were decreases in several known platelet transcripts, including clusterin (CLU), glycoproteins IIb/IIIa (ITGA2B/3), lipocalin (LCN2), lactoferrin (LTF), and the thrombopoetin receptor (MPL), but with increased mRNA for the T-cell Th1 chemokine CXCL10. There was a strong association of AR with expression of HLA-DRB4 and HLA-DQA1. Similar HLA changes have been linked to autoimmune disorders, particularly antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), in which autoantibodies to phospholipid/protein complexes can trigger platelet activation. Consistent with APS, AR patients exhibited a 30% reduction in platelet counts. Follow-up testing for autoimmune antibodies observed only borderline titers in AR patients. Overall, these results suggest that AR may be related to changes in platelet gene expression creating a hyperreactive platelet, despite antiplatelet therapy. Future studies will focus on determining the protein levels of these differential transcripts in platelets, and the possible involvement of HLA restriction as a contributing factor. PMID:23454623

  2. Aspirin-mediated acetylation induces structural alteration and aggregation of bovine pancreatic insulin.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Reza; Taheri, Behnaz; Alavi, Parnian; Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Asadi, Zahra; Ghahramani, Maryam; Niazi, Ali; Alavianmehr, Mohammad Mehdi; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The simple aggregation of insulin under various chemical and physical stresses is still an important challenge for both pharmaceutical production and clinical formulation. In the storage form, this protein is subjected to various chemical modifications which alter its physicochemical and aggregation properties. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) which is the most widely used medicine worldwide has been indicated to acetylate a large number of proteins both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, as insulin treated with aspirin at 37°C, a significant level of acetylation was observed by flourescamine and o-phthalaldehyde assay. Also, different spectroscopic techniques, gel electrophoresis, and microscopic assessment were applied to compare the structural variation and aggregation/fibrillation propensity among acetylated and non-acetylated insulin samples. The results of spectroscopic assessments elucidate that acetylation induces insulin unfolding which is accompanied with the exposure of protein hydrophobic patches, a transition from alpha-helix to beta-sheet and increased propensity of the protein for aggregation. The kinetic studies propose that acetylation increases aggregation rate of insulin under both thermal and chemical stresses. Also, gel electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering experiments suggest that acetylation induces insulin oligomerization. Additionally, the results of Thioflavin T fluorescence study, Congo red absorption assessment, and microscopic analysis suggest that acetylation with aspirin enhances the process of insulin fibrillation. Overall, the increased susceptibility of acetylated insulin for aggregation may reflect the fact that this type of modification has significant structural destabilizing effect which finally makes the protein more vulnerable for pathogenic aggregation/fibrillation. PMID:25994118

  3. Theoretical modeling of infrared spectra of the hydrogen and deuterium bond in aspirin crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalla, Houcine; Rekik, Najeh; Michta, Anna; Oujia, Brahim; Flakus, Henryk T.

    2010-01-01

    An extended quantum theoretical approach of the ν IR lineshape of cyclic dimers of weakly H-bonded species is proposed. We have extended a previous approach [M.E.-A. Benmalti, P. Blaise, H.T. Flakus, O. Henri-Rousseau, Chem. Phys. 320 (2006) 267] by accounting for the anharmonicity of the slow mode which is described by a "Morse" potential in order to reproduce the polarized infrared spectra of the hydrogen and deuterium bond in acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) crystals. From comparison of polarized IR spectra of isotopically neat and isotopically diluted aspirin crystals it resulted that centrosymmetric aspirin dimer was the bearer of the crystal main spectral properties. In this approach, the adiabatic approximation is performed for each separate H-bond bridge of the dimer and a strong non-adiabatic correction is introduced into the model via the resonant exchange between the fast mode excited states of the two moieties. Within the strong anharmonic coupling theory, according to which the X-H→⋯Y high-frequency mode is anharmonically coupled to the H-bond bridge, this model incorporated the Davydov coupling between the excited states of the two moieties, the quantum direct and indirect dampings and the anharmonicity for the H-bond bridge. The spectral density is obtained within the linear response theory by Fourier transform of the damped autocorrelation functions. The evaluated spectra are in fairly good agreement with the experimental ones by using a minimum number of independent parameters. The effect of deuteration has been well reproduced by reducing simply the angular frequency of the fast mode and the anharmonic coupling parameter.

  4. Ascorbic Acid Metabolism in Pea Seedlings. A Comparison of d-Glucosone, l-Sorbosone, and l-Galactono-1,4-Lactone as Ascorbate Precursors1

    PubMed Central

    Pallanca, Jane E.; Smirnoff, Nicholas

    1999-01-01

    l-Ascorbic acid (AsA) accumulates in pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings during germination, with the most rapid phase of accumulation coinciding with radicle emergence. Monodehydroascorbate reductase and dehydroascorbic acid reductase were active in the embryonic axes before AsA accumulation started, whereas AsA oxidase and AsA peroxidase activities increased in parallel with AsA. Excised embryonic axes were used to investigate the osone pathway of AsA biosynthesis, in which d-glucosone and l-sorbosone are the proposed intermediates. [U-14C]Glucosone was incorporated into AsA and inhibited the incorporation of [U-14C]glucose (Glc) into AsA. A higher d-glucosone concentration (5 mm) inhibited AsA accumulation. l-Sorbosone did not affect AsA pool size but caused a small inhibition in the incorporation of [U-14C]Glc into AsA. Oxidase and dehydrogenase activities capable of converting Glc or Glc-6-phosphate to glucosone were not detected in embryonic axis extracts. The osones are therefore unlikely to be physiological intermediates of AsA biosynthesis. l-Galactono-1,4-lactone, recently proposed as the AsA precursor (G.L. Wheeler, M.A. Jones, N. Smirnoff [1998] Nature 393: 365–369), was readily converted to AsA by pea embryonic axes. Although l-galactono-1,4-lactone did not inhibit [14C]Glc incorporation into AsA, this does not mean that it is not a precursor, because competition between endogenous and exogenous pools was minimized by its very small pool size and rapid metabolism. PMID:10364396

  5. Modest phenotypic improvements in ASA-deficient mice with only one UDP-galactose:ceramide-galactosyltransferase gene

    PubMed Central

    Franken, S; Wittke, D; Mansson, JE; D'Hooge, R; De Deyn, PP; Lüllmann-Rauch, R; Matzner, U; Gieselmann, V

    2006-01-01

    Background Arylsulfatase A (ASA)-deficient mice are a model for the lysosomal storage disorder metachromatic leukodystrophy. This lipidosis is characterised by the lysosomal accumulation of the sphingolipid sulfatide. Storage of this lipid is associated with progressive demyelination. We have mated ASA-deficient mice with mice heterozygous for a non-functional allele of UDP-galactose:ceramide-galactosyltransferase (CGT). This deficiency is known to lead to a decreased synthesis of galactosylceramide and sulfatide, which should reduce sulfatide storage and improve pathology in ASA-deficient mice. Results ASA-/- CGT+/- mice, however, showed no detectable decrease in sulfatide storage. Neuronal degeneration of cells in the spiral ganglion of the inner ear, however, was decreased. Behavioural tests showed small but clear improvements of the phenotype in ASA-/- CGT+/- mice. Conclusion Thus the reduction of galactosylceramide and sulfatide biosynthesis by genetic means overall causes modest improvements of pathology. PMID:16893448

  6. Development of a health index in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (ASAS HI): final result of a global initiative based on the ICF guided by ASAS

    PubMed Central

    Kiltz, U; van der Heijde, D; Boonen, A; Cieza, A; Stucki, G; Khan, M A; Maksymowych, W P; Marzo-Ortega, H; Reveille, J; Stebbings, S; Bostan, C; Braun, J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The burden of disease in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) can be considerable. However, no agreement has been reached among expert members of Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS) to define severity of AS. Based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), a core set of items for AS has been selected to represent the entire spectrum of possible problems in functioning. Based on this, the objective of this study was to develop a tool to quantify health in AS, the ASAS Health Index. Methods First, based on a literature search, experts’ and patients’ opinion, a large item pool covering the categories of the ICF core set was generated. In several steps this item pool was reduced based on reliability, Rasch analysis and consensus building after two cross-sectional surveys to come up with the best fitting items representing most categories of the ICF core set for AS. Results After the first survey with 1754 patients, the item pool of 251 items was reduced to 82. After selection by an expert committee, 50 items remained which were tested in a second cross-sectional survey. The results were used to reduce the number of items to a final set of 17 items. This selection showed the best reliability and fit to the Rasch model, no residual correlation, and absence of consistent differential item function and a Person Separation Index of 0.82. Conclusions In this long sequential study, 17 items which cover most of the ICF core set were identified that showed the best representation of the health status of patients with AS. The ASAS Health Index is a linear composite measure which differs from other measures in the public domain. PMID:24399232

  7. Acetylsalicylic Acid Resistance in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Prediabetes & Non-Diabetic Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Mustafa; Kiziltunc, Emrullah; Cetin, Zehra Guven; Cicekcioglu, Hulya; Sahin, Muslum; Isik, Serhat; Kurtul, Alparslan; Ornek, Ender; Ulusoy, Feridun Vasfi

    2014-01-01

    Objective : Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial role of antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) at atherosclerotic vascular disease. Antiaggregant effect of ASA is not uniform in all patients. Purpose of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence of ASA resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), pre-diabetes and non-diabetic coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: Effect of ASA was assessed using the platelet function analyzer (PFA-100) system. Resistance to ASA was defined as a normal collagen/epinephrine induced closure time after one week of ASA therapy. Patients with non-diabetic CAD, pre-diabetes and T2DM were compared. Results: ASA resistance was found in 26 (37.1%), 6 (17.6%) and 41 (26.5%) patients in the groups, respectively (p=0.154). ASA resistance was found to be significantly higher in men, smokers and insulin users, besides this it was found to be significantly lower in beta blocker (BB) users, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) users with univariate analysis. However insulin usage was found to be the single effective parameter on ASA resistance in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: There was no difference with regard to ASA resistance between groups. While ASA resistance was higher in men, smokers and insulin users, it was lower in patients using BBs and ACEIs. PMID:24948975

  8. Asthma and Rhinitis Induced by Selective Immediate Reactions to Paracetamol and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Aspirin Tolerant Subjects.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Alzate, Diana; Blanca-López, Natalia; Doña, Inmaculada; Agúndez, José A; García-Martín, Elena; Cornejo-García, José A; Perkins, James R; Blanca, Miguel; Canto, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    In subjects with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)- exacerbated respiratory disease (NERD) symptoms are triggered by acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and other strong COX-1 inhibitors, and in some cases by weak COX-1 or by selective COX-2 inhibitors. The mechanism involved is related to prostaglandin pathway inhibition and leukotriene release. Subjects who react to a single NSAID and tolerate others are considered selective responders, and often present urticaria and/or angioedema and anaphylaxis (SNIUAA). An immunological mechanism is implicated in these reactions. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that selective responders who present respiratory airway symptoms may also exist. Our objective was to determine if subjects might develop selective responses to NSAIDs/paracetamol that manifest as upper/lower airways respiratory symptoms. For this purpose, we studied patients reporting asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID that tolerated ASA. An allergological evaluation plus controlled challenge with ASA was carried out. If ASA tolerance was found, we proceeded with an oral challenge with the culprit drug. The appearance of symptoms was monitored by a clinical questionnaire and by measuring FEV1 and/or nasal airways volume changes pre and post challenge. From a total of 21 initial cases, we confirmed the appearance of nasal and/or bronchial manifestations in ten, characterized by a significant decrease in FEV1% and/or a decrease in nasal volume cavity after drug administration. All cases tolerated ASA. This shows that ASA tolerant subjects with asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID without skin/systemic manifestations exist. Whether these patients represent a new clinical phenotype to be included within the current classification of hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs requires further investigation. PMID:27489545

  9. Asthma and Rhinitis Induced by Selective Immediate Reactions to Paracetamol and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Aspirin Tolerant Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Alzate, Diana; Blanca-López, Natalia; Doña, Inmaculada; Agúndez, José A.; García-Martín, Elena; Cornejo-García, José A.; Perkins, James R.; Blanca, Miguel; Canto, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    In subjects with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)- exacerbated respiratory disease (NERD) symptoms are triggered by acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and other strong COX-1 inhibitors, and in some cases by weak COX-1 or by selective COX-2 inhibitors. The mechanism involved is related to prostaglandin pathway inhibition and leukotriene release. Subjects who react to a single NSAID and tolerate others are considered selective responders, and often present urticaria and/or angioedema and anaphylaxis (SNIUAA). An immunological mechanism is implicated in these reactions. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that selective responders who present respiratory airway symptoms may also exist. Our objective was to determine if subjects might develop selective responses to NSAIDs/paracetamol that manifest as upper/lower airways respiratory symptoms. For this purpose, we studied patients reporting asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID that tolerated ASA. An allergological evaluation plus controlled challenge with ASA was carried out. If ASA tolerance was found, we proceeded with an oral challenge with the culprit drug. The appearance of symptoms was monitored by a clinical questionnaire and by measuring FEV1 and/or nasal airways volume changes pre and post challenge. From a total of 21 initial cases, we confirmed the appearance of nasal and/or bronchial manifestations in ten, characterized by a significant decrease in FEV1% and/or a decrease in nasal volume cavity after drug administration. All cases tolerated ASA. This shows that ASA tolerant subjects with asthma and/or rhinitis induced by paracetamol or a single NSAID without skin/systemic manifestations exist. Whether these patients represent a new clinical phenotype to be included within the current classification of hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs requires further investigation. PMID:27489545

  10. Impairment of aspirin antiplatelet effects by non-opioid analgesic medication

    PubMed Central

    Polzin, Amin; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Kelm, Malte; Zeus, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin is the mainstay in prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases. Impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects are associated with enhanced incidence of cardiovascular events. Comedication with non-opioid analgesic drugs has been described to interfere with aspirin, resulting in impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects. Additionally, non-opioid analgesic medication has been shown to enhance the risk of cardiovascular events and death. Pain is very frequent and many patients rely on analgesic drugs to control pain. Therefore effective analgesic options without increased risk of cardiovascular events are desirable. This review focuses on commonly used non-opioid analgesics, interactions with aspirin medication and impact on cardiovascular risk. PMID:26225198

  11. The influence of the combined treatment with Vadimezan (ASA404) and taxol on the growth of U251 glioblastoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the most important biological characteristics of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is high vascular density. Vadimezan (ASA404, DMXAA) belongs to the class of small molecule vascular disrupting agents (VDA) that cause disruption of established tumor vessels and subsequent tumor hemorrhagic necrosis. Its selective antivascular effect is mediated by intratumoral induction of several cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α). Preclinical studies have demonstrated that ASA404 acts synergistically with taxanes. In this study, we investigated if treatment of mice bearing U251 human glioblastoma xenografts with ASA404 and taxol may be synergistic. Therapy response was evaluated by measuring changes in tumor size and metabolic activity using 18F-FDG PET (Fluorodeoxyglucose - positron emision tomography) imaging. Methods U251 cells were inoculated s.c. in the right hind limb of NMRI-Foxn1nu athymic female nude mice. Animals were randomly assigned into 4 groups (7–9 animals/group) for treatment: control, taxol, ASA404, and ASA404 plus taxol. The animals received either a single dose of taxol (10 mg/kg), ASA404 (27.5 mg/kg), or taxol (10 mg/kg) plus ASA404 (27.5 mg/kg) administered i.p.; ASA404 was administred 24 h after the treatment with taxol. 4 and 24 h after treatment with ASA404 (28 and 48 h hours after treatment with taxol) 18 F-FDG PET scans were performed. Results The treatment with taxol did not affect the tumor growth in comparison to untreated controls. The treatment of animals with single dose ASA404 alone or in combination with taxol caused a significant delay in tumor growth. The combined treatment did not decrease the growth of the xenografts significantly more than ASA404 alone, but early changes in tumor 18 F-FDG uptake preceded subsequent growth inhibition. The tumor weights, which were

  12. Endothelial dysfunction in young healthy men is associated with aspirin resistance.

    PubMed

    Doroszko, Adrian; Szahidewicz-Krupska, Ewa; Janus, Agnieszka; Jakubowski, Maciej; Turek, Aleksandra; Ilnicka, Paulina; Szuba, Andrzej; Mazur, Grzegorz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between endothelial dysfunction and aspirin response in a young healthy population (102 men aged 18-40). Initial concentrations of the NO pathway metabolites (ADMA, l-arginine, SDMA), cardiovascular risk markers, oxidative stress markers (MDA, thiol index), sICAM1, sVCAM1, PAI-1, sE-selectin, sP-selectin, VEGF, thromboxane B2, 6-keto-PGF1α and arachidonate-induced platelet aggregation (to separate aspirin resistant from sensitive group) were measured. Flow-mediated-vasodilation (FMD) was measured before and after intravenous infusion of 16.0 g of l-arginine. Measurements were repeated following aspirin administration (75 mg/24 h) for 4 days. Both groups were homogenous regarding demographic and biochemical characteristics reflecting cardiovascular risk. Aspirin resistant subjects were characterized by lower baseline FMD and higher FMD following aspirin and l-arginine treatment, as compared to aspirin sensitive control. MDA and nitrotyrosine were greater, whereas thiol index was lower in aspirin resistant men. The sICAM1, sVCAM1, PAI-1, sE-selectin, sP-selectin and VEGF levels were similar in the analyzed groups. Thromboxane in aspirin resistant subjects was greater both at baseline and following aspirin therapy. However, a significant decrease following aspirin treatment was present in both groups. Aspirin resistance in young men is associated with endothelial dysfunction, which could be due to oxidative stress resulting from lipid peroxidation. PMID:25697550

  13. In vivo prostacyclin biosynthesis and effects of different aspirin regimens in patients with essential thrombocythaemia.

    PubMed

    Cavalca, V; Rocca, B; Squellerio, I; Dragani, A; Veglia, F; Pagliaccia, F; Porro, B; Barbieri, S S; Tremoli, E; Patrono, C

    2014-07-01

    Essential thrombocythaemia (ET) is characterised by enhanced platelet generation and thrombosis. Once daily (od) aspirin incompletely inhibits platelet thromboxane (TX)A2 production in ET. A twice daily (bid) dosing is necessary to fully inhibit TXA2. Whether this dosing regimen affects in vivo prostacyclin (PGI2) biosynthesis is unknown. PGI2 biosynthesis was characterised in 50 ET patients on enteric-coated (EC) aspirin 100 mg od, by measuring its urinary metabolite, 2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGF1α (PGI-M). Moreover, in a crossover study 22 patients poorly responsive to standard aspirin based on serum TXB2 levels (≥4 ng/ml) were randomised to different seven-day aspirin regimens: EC aspirin 100 mg od, 100 mg bid, 200 mg od, or plain aspirin 100 mg od. PGI-M measured 24 hours after the last aspirin intake (EC, 100 mg od) was similar in patients and healthy subjects both on (n=10) and off (n=30) aspirin. PGI-M was unrelated to in vivo TXA2 biosynthesis, and not affected by EC aspirin 100 mg bid or 200 mg od as compared to EC 100 mg od. PGI2 biosynthesis in aspirin-treated ET patients appears unrelated to TXA2 biosynthesis, and not affected by an improved aspirin regimen, demonstrating its vascular safety for future trials. PMID:24671522

  14. Multidrug Resistance Protein-4 Influences Aspirin Toxicity in Human Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Massimi, Isabella; Ciuffetta, Ambra; Temperilli, Flavia; Ferrandino, Francesca; Zicari, Alessandra; Pulcinelli, Fabio M; Felli, Maria Pia

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of efflux transporters, in human cells, is a mechanism of resistance to drug and also to chemotherapy. We found that multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4) overexpression has a role in reducing aspirin action in patients after bypass surgery and, very recently, we found that aspirin enhances platelet MRP4 levels through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα). In the present paper, we verified whether exposure of human embryonic kidney-293 cells (Hek-293) to aspirin modifies MRP4 gene expression and its correlation with drug elimination and cell toxicity. We first investigated the effect of high-dose aspirin in Hek-293 and we showed that aspirin is able to increase cell toxicity dose-dependently. Furthermore, aspirin effects, induced at low dose, already enhance MRP4 gene expression. Based on these findings, we compared cell viability in Hek-293, after high-dose aspirin treatment, in MRP4 overexpressing cells, either after aspirin pretreatment or in MRP4 transfected cells; in both cases, a decrease of selective aspirin cell growth inhibition was observed, in comparison with the control cultures. Altogether, these data suggest that exposing cells to low nontoxic aspirin dosages can induce gene expression alterations that may lead to the efflux transporter protein overexpression, thus increasing cellular detoxification of aspirin. PMID:26491233

  15. Aspirin acetylates wild type and mutant p53 in colon cancer cells: identification of aspirin acetylated sites on recombinant p53.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-05-01

    Aspirin's ability to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in cancer cell lines is considered to be an important mechanism for its anti-cancer effects. We previously demonstrated that aspirin acetylated the tumor suppressor protein p53 at lysine 382 in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Here, we extended these observations to human colon cancer cells, HCT 116 harboring wild type p53, and HT-29 containing mutant p53. We demonstrate that aspirin induced acetylation of p53 in both cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner. Aspirin-acetylated p53 was localized to the nucleus. In both cell lines, aspirin induced p21(CIP1). Aspirin also acetylated recombinant p53 (rp53) in vitro suggesting that it occurs through a non-enzymatic chemical reaction. Mass spectrometry analysis and immunoblotting identified 10 acetylated lysines on rp53, and molecular modeling showed that all lysines targeted by aspirin are surface exposed. Five of these lysines are localized to the DNA-binding domain, four to the nuclear localization signal domain, and one to the C-terminal regulatory domain. Our results suggest that aspirin's anti-cancer effect may involve acetylation and activation of wild type and mutant p53 and induction of target gene expression. This is the first report attempting to characterize p53 acetylation sites targeted by aspirin. PMID:26596838

  16. Mechanism of action of 5-arninosalicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, S. M.; Thompson, R. P. H.

    1992-01-01

    5-Aminosalicylic Acid (5-ASA) has been used for over 50 years in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in the pro-drug form sulphasalazine (SASP). SASP is also used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. However whether the therapeutic properties of SASP are due to the intact molecule, the 5-ASA or sulphapyridine components is unknown. Several mechanisms of action have been proposed for 5-ASA and SASP including interference in the metabolism of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and leukotrienes, scavenging,of reactive oxygen species, effects on leucocyte function and production of cytokines. However, it is unlikely that the anti-inflammatory properties of SASP and 5-ASA are due to several different properties but more likely that a single property of 5-ASA explains the theraapeutic effects of 5-ASA and SASP. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the metabolism of prostaglandins and leukotrienes and can act as second messengers, and so the scavenging of ROS may be the single mechanism of action of 5-ASA that gives rise to its antiinflammatory effects in both inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:18475455

  17. Aspirin and probenecid inhibit organic anion transporter 3-mediated renal uptake of cilostazol and probenecid induces metabolism of cilostazol in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Wang, Changyuan; Liu, Qi; Meng, Qiang; Cang, Jian; Sun, Huijun; Peng, Jinyong; Ma, Xiaochi; Huo, Xiaokui; Liu, Kexin

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the transporter-mediated renal excretion mechanism for cilostazol and to characterize the mechanism of drug-drug interaction (DDI) between cilostazol and aspirin or probenecid. Concentrations of cilostazol and its metabolites OPC-13015 [6-[4-(1-cyclohexyl-1H-tetrazol-5-yl)butoxy]-2(1H)-quinolinone] and OPC-13213 [3,4-dihydro-6-[4-[1-(trans-4-hydroxycyclohexyl)-1H-tetrazol-5-yl]butoxy]-2-(1H)-quinolinone] in rat biologic or cell samples were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Coadministration with probenecid, benzylpenicillin, or aspirin decreased the cumulative urinary excretion of cilostazol and renal clearance. Concentrations of cilostazol and OPC-13213 in plasma decreased, and the concentration of OPC-13015 increased in the presence of probenecid. By contrast, rat plasma cilostazol, in combination with benzylpenicillin or aspirin, sharply increased, and concentrations of OPC-13015 and OPC-13213 did not change. In urine, OPC-13015 was below the level of detection. The cumulative urinary excretion of OPC-13213 decreased in the presence of probenecid, benzylpenicillin, or aspirin. Cilostazol was distributed in the kidney and liver, with tissue to plasma partition coefficient (Kp) values of 8.4 ml/g and 16.3 ml/g, respectively. Probenecid and aspirin reduced cilostazol distribution in the kidney. Probenecid did not affect cilostazol metabolism in the kidney but increased cilostazol metabolism in the liver, and aspirin had no effect on cilostazol metabolism. Benzylpenicillin, aspirin, and cyclo-trans-4-l-hydroxyprolyl-l-serine (JBP485) reduced cilostazol uptake in kidney slices and human organic anion transporter 3 (hOAT3)-human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells, whereas p-aminohippuric acid did not. Compared with the vector, hOAT3-HEK293 cells accumulated more cilostazol, whereas hOAT1-HEK293 cells did not. OAT3 and Oat3 play a major role in cilostazol renal excretion, whereas OAT1 and Oat1 do not. Oat3 and Cyp

  18. Aspirin-Exacerbated Diseases: Advances in Asthma with Nasal Polyposis, Urticaria, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney; Buchheit, Kathleen; Cahill, Katherine N

    2015-12-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated diseases are important examples of drug hypersensitivities and include aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), aspirin- or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced urticaria/angioedema, and aspirin- or NSAID-induced anaphylaxis. While each disease subtype may be distinguished by unique clinical features, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to these phenotypes are not fully understood. However, the inhibition of the cyclooxygenase-1 enzyme is thought to play a significant role. Additionally, eosinophils, mast cells, and their products, prostaglandins and leukotrienes, have been identified in the pathogenesis of AERD. Current diagnostic and treatment strategies for aspirin-exacerbated diseases remain limited, and continued research focusing on each of the unique hypersensitivity reactions to aspirin is essential. This will not only advance the understanding of these disease processes, but also lead to the subsequent development of novel therapeutics that patients who suffer from aspirin-induced reactions desperately need. PMID:26475526

  19. All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin")

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappee, Benjamin; Prieto, J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Holoien, T.; Jencson, J.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Szczygiel, D.; Pojmanski, G.; Brimacombe, J.; Dubberley, M.; Elphick, M.; Foale, S.; Hawkins, E.; Mullins, D.; Rosing, W.; Ross, R.; Walker, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Even in the modern era, only human eyes scan the entire optical sky for the violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. The "All Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae" (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") is changing this by surveying the extragalactic sky roughly once a week, and within a year ASAS-SN will triple in size. We began running our real-time search for variable sources in late April 2013 with our first unit, "Brutus". Brutus presently consists of two telescopes on a common mount hosted by Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network in the Faulkes Telescope North enclosure on Mount Haleakala, Hawaii. Each telescope consists of a 14-cm Nikon telephoto lens and has a 4.47 by 4.47 degree field-of-view. On a typical clear night, it can survey 5000+ square degrees. The data are reduced in real-time, and we can search for transient candidates about an hour after the data are taken using an automated difference imaging pipeline. We are now meeting, and frequently exceeding, our current depth goal of 16 mag, corresponding to the apparent brightness at maximum light of core-collapse SNe within ~30 Mpc and SNe Ia out to ~100 Mpc. Brutus will shortly expand to have four cameras instead of two, and a second unit, "Cassius", with two cameras, should commence operations in early 2014 on Cerro Tololo, Chile. With these expansions, ASAS-SN will be able to observe the entire extragalactic sky every 2-3 nights. ASAS-SN has already discovered 10+ nearby SNe, 100+ outbursts from CVs and novae, 15+ M-dwarf and other stellar flares, and AGN outbursts which have resulted in 35+ ATel and CBET telegrams and 3 publications. In particular, ASAS-SN discovered one of the most extreme M-dwarf Flares ever detected (delta 9 mag). Furthermore, after triggering on an outburst in NGC 2617 we found that the AGN had changed from a Type 1.8 into a Type 1 Seyfert. After monitoring the transient with Swift and ground-based telescopes for 70 days, we clearly determined that the X

  20. Why we should not skip aspirin in cardiovascular prevention.

    PubMed

    Schrör, K

    2016-01-01

    Since more than 20 years, aspirin is an approved and established first-line antiplatelet medication in cardiovascular prevention. This is partially due to ist unique mode of action which is not shared with any other antiplatelet agent as well by the reliability of its pharmacological efficacy: inhibition of platelet COX-1 and subsequent thromboxane formation in almost every patient. Aspirin acts synergistic with ADP-antagonists in dual antiplatelet therapy of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and is also approved for long-term secondary prevention. Patients with atrial fibrillation are an exception and benefit more from anticoagulants. After the introduction of the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), i.e. direct inhibitors of factor Xa or thrombin formation, there is a renewed discussion about the role of antiplatelet agents, specifically if additional dual antiplatelet treatment is still necessary for an optimum clinical effect or whether one component, such as aspirin might be skipped in favor of other classes of oral antiplatelet agents, such as ADP-antagonists. The available data are insufficient to recommend this because of a low number of studies and a still uncertain benefit/risk (bleeding) ratio. More research on aspirin as a chemopreventive appears also to be necessary and is going on, in particular in individuals at high-risk for vascular thrombotic diseases (diabetics, preeclampsia, venous thromboembolism). PMID:25891122

  1. Aspirin and Acetaminophen Use and the Risk of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friel, Grace; Liu, Cici S.; Kolomeyevskaya, Nonna V.; Hampras, Shalaka S.; Kruszka, Bridget; Schmitt, Kristina; Cannioto, Rikki A.; Lele, Shashikant B.; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Moysich, Kirsten B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study, we investigated whether regular use of aspirin or acetaminophen was associated with risk of cervical cancer in women treated at an American cancer hospital. Methods This case-control study included 328 patients with cervical cancer and 1,312 controls matched on age and decade enrolled. Controls were women suspected of having but not ultimately diagnosed with a neoplasm. Analgesic use was defined as regular (at least once per week for ≥6 months), frequent (≥7 tablets/week), very long term (≥11 years), or frequent, long term (≥7 tablets per week for ≥5 years). Results Compared to nonusers, frequent aspirin use was associated with decreased odds of cervical cancer (odds ratio, 0.53; 95%confidence interval, 0.29–0.97). A slightly larger association was observed with frequent, long-term use of aspirin (odds ratio, 0.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.22–0.95). Acetaminophen use was not associated with the risk of cervical cancer. Conclusions Our findings suggest that frequent and frequent, long-term use of aspirin is associated with decreased odds of cervical cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first US-based study examining these associations. Given the widespread use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen worldwide, further investigations of the possible role of analgesics in cervical cancer, using a larger sample size with better-defined dosing regimens, are warranted. PMID:25856123

  2. Aspirin use for primary prevention in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Terrosu, Pierfranco

    2016-01-01

    The net clinical benefit of aspirin in primary prevention is uncertain as the reduction in occlusive events needs to be balanced against the increase in gastro-intestinal and cerebral bleedings. The meta-analysis of ATT (Anti Thrombotic Trialists) Collaboration in 2009 showed that aspirin therapy in primary prevention was associated with 12% reduction in cardio-vascular events, due mainly to a reduction in non-fatal myocardial infarction (0.18% vs 0.23% per year, p<0.0001). However, the benefit in term of coronary events was almost balanced by the increase in major bleedings. The balance between potential benefit and harm of aspirin differs in each person and appears to be favorable in subjects at higher cardio-vascular risk. Older people have increased risk of hemorrhage as well as increased risk of heart attack and stroke. As a consequence, it is important consider both likelihoods of benefits as well as harm within the lifespan and functioning of the person. The older people who most likely benefit from aspirin in primary prevention are those at higher cardio-vascular risk, with preserved functional abilities, low comorbidity, low risk of bleeding and a prolonged life expectancy. PMID:27374042

  3. The role of aspirin in colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Singh Ranger, Gurpreet

    2016-08-01

    Considerable interest has emerged over the last decade regarding the role of aspirin in prevention of colorectal cancer. This disease is one of the commonest cancers in the Western World, therefore, the existence of a simple "everyday" agent, which could have the ability to prevent the disease, represents an invaluable opportunity clinicians may be able to exploit. Evidence from case-control and cohort studies, and recent updates of randomised controlled trials have been very encouraging-indicating benefit from long term use of aspirin at low dose. Possible mechanisms of chemoprevention include inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway, or COX-independent mechanisms, for example, the PIK3CA pathway, or therapy-induced senescence of cancer cells. The most serious side effect of prolonged aspirin treatment is haemorrhage, especially from the GI tract. This is likely to be less of a problem with chemoprevention at lower doses. One also needs to consider the impact if aspirin resistance, an increasingly recognised clinical entity. PMID:27289249

  4. Class Projects in Physical Organic Chemistry: The Hydrolysis of Aspirin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrs, Peter S.

    2004-01-01

    An exercise that provides a hands-on demonstration of the hydrolysis of aspirin is presented. The key to understanding the hydrolysis is recognizing that all six process may occur simultaneously and that the observed rate constant is the sum of the rate constants that one rate constant dominates the overall process.

  5. Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid and bleeding risks with ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement.

    PubMed

    Kamenova, Maria; Croci, Davide; Guzman, Raphael; Mariani, Luigi; Soleman, Jehuda

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement is a common procedure for the treatment of hydrocephalus following diverse neurosurgical conditions. Most of the patients present with other comorbidities and receive antiplatelet therapy, usually acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Despite its clinical relevance, the perioperative management of these patients has not been sufficiently investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the peri- and postoperative bleeding complication rates associated with ASA intake in patients undergoing VP shunt placement. METHODS Of 172 consecutive patients undergoing VP shunt placement between June 2009 and December 2015, 40 (23.3%) patients were receiving low-dose ASA treatment. The primary outcome measure was bleeding events in ASA users versus nonusers, whereas secondary outcome measures were postoperative cardiovascular events, hematological findings, morbidity, and mortality. A subgroup analysis was conducted in patients who discontinued ASA treatment for < 7 days (n = 4, ASA Group 1) and for ≥ 7 days (n = 36, ASA Group 2). RESULTS No statistically significant difference for bleeding events was observed between ASA users and nonusers (p = 0.30). Cardiovascular complications, surgical morbidity, and mortality did not differ significantly between the groups either. Moreover, there was no association between ASA discontinuation regimens (< 7 days and ≥ 7 days) and hemorrhagic events. CONCLUSIONS Given the lack of guidelines regarding perioperative management of neurosurgical patients with antiplatelet therapy, these findings elucidate one issue, showing comparable bleeding rates in ASA users and nonusers undergoing VP shunt placement. PMID:27581316

  6. Anti-MDR and antitumoral action of acetylsalicylic acid on leukaemic cells.

    PubMed

    Carrett-Dias, Michele; Votto, Ana Paula de Souza; Filgueira, Daza de Moraes Vaz Batista; Almeida, Daniela Volcan; Vallochi, Adriana Lima; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; Marins, Luis Fernando; Trindade, Gilma Santos

    2011-10-01

    ASA (acetylsalicylic acid) is an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug). ASA has gained attention as a potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for several neoplasms. The aim of this study was to analyse the possible antitumoural effects of ASA in two erythroleukaemic cell lines, with or without the MDR (multidrug resistance) phenotype. The mechanism of action of different concentrations of ASA were compared in K562 (non-MDR) and Lucena (MDR) cells by analysing cell viability, apoptosis and necrosis, intracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species) formation and bcl-2, p53 and cox-2 gene expression. ASA inhibited the cellular proliferation or induced toxicity in K562 and Lucena cell lines, irrespective of the MDR phenotype. The ASA treatment provoked death by apoptosis and necrosis in K562 cells and only by necrosis in Lucena cells. ASA also showed antioxidant activity in both cell lines. The bcl-2, p53 and cox-2 genes in both cell lines treated with ASA seem to exhibit different patterns of expression. However, normal lymphocytes treated with the same ASA concentrations were more resistant than tumoral cells. The results of this work show that both cell lines responded to treatment with ASA, demonstrating a possible antitumoral and anti-MDR role for this drug. PMID:21361874

  7. Use of acetylsalicylic acid by physicians and in the community.

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, J; Steel, K; Feagan, B G; Laupacis, A; Pederson, L L

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine physicians' attitudes toward prescribing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), physicians' own use of ASA and the prevalence of ASA use in the community following the trials of ASA for primary prevention of coronary heart disease. DESIGN: Random sample surveys of physicians and the general public by mail and telephone respectively and a mail survey of a selected panel of expert cardiologists and neurologists. SETTING: London, Ont., and surrounding Middlesex County. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 210 physicians (77% of eligible subjects), including family practitioners and most types of specialists, with an active medical licence and 666 English-speaking people (75% of eligible subjects) aged 18 years or more living in a household with active, listed telephone service. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Long-term ASA use (at least 80 mg on alternate days for 4 or more consecutive weeks) for the treatment of atherosclerosis. MAIN RESULTS: Sampled physicians and experts agreed that long-term ASA therapy was indicated in patients with unstable angina, a transient ischemic episode or recent myocardial infarction but not for primary prevention in healthy middle-aged men and women at low risk for ischemic vascular disease. Both groups were uncertain about the role of ASA in primary prevention in asymptomatic people with risk factors for atherosclerosis. Nine (16%) of the 55 male physicians aged 50 years or more took ASA routinely for primary prevention. In the community survey almost all those who used ASA routinely were 50 years or older. The proportions of men and women in this age group who used ASA routinely for any reason were 19% (95% confidence limits [CLs] 11 and 28) and 14% (95% CLs 8 and 19) respectively; the proportions of men and women who used ASA routinely and apparently for primary prevention were 8% and 1% respectively. A total of 43% (95% CLs 30 and 57) of those with apparent ischemic vascular disease took ASA routinely. Medically unsupervised long-term ASA

  8. Effect of Dipyridamole plus Aspirin on Hemodialysis Graft Patency

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Bradley S.; Beck, Gerald J.; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Greenberg, Arthur; Delmez, James A.; Allon, Michael; Dember, Laura M.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Greene, Tom; Radeva, Milena K.; Davidson, Ingemar J.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Braden, Gregory L.; Fenves, Andrew Z.; Kaufman, James S.; Cotton, James R.; Martin, Kevin J.; McNeil, James W.; Rahman, Asif; Lawson, Jeffery H.; Whiting, James F.; Hu, Bo; Meyers, Catherine M.; Kusek, John W.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Arteriovenous graft stenosis leading to thrombosis is a major cause of complications in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Procedural interventions may restore patency but are costly. Although there is no proven pharmacologic therapy, dipyridamole may be promising because of its known vascular antiproliferative activity. METHODS We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of extended-release dipyridamole, at a dose of 200 mg, and aspirin, at a dose of 25 mg, given twice daily after the placement of a new arteriovenous graft until the primary outcome, loss of primary unassisted patency (i.e., patency without thrombosis or requirement for intervention), was reached. Secondary outcomes were cumulative graft failure and death. Primary and secondary outcomes were analyzed with the use of a Cox proportional-hazards regression with adjustment for prespecified covariates. RESULTS At 13 centers in the United States, 649 patients were randomly assigned to receive dipyridamole plus aspirin (321 patients) or placebo (328 patients) over a period of 4.5 years, with 6 additional months of follow-up. The incidence of primary unassisted patency at 1 year was 23% (95% confidence interval [CI], 18 to 28) in the placebo group and 28% (95% CI, 23 to 34) in the dipyridamole–aspirin group, an absolute difference of 5 percentage points. Treatment with dipyridamole plus aspirin significantly prolonged the duration of primary unassisted patency (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.98; P = 0.03) and inhibited stenosis. The incidences of cumulative graft failure, death, the composite of graft failure or death, and serious adverse events (including bleeding) did not differ significantly between study groups. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with dipyridamole plus aspirin had a significant but modest effect in reducing the risk of stenosis and improving the duration of primary unassisted patency of newly created grafts. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00067119.) PMID

  9. L-Ascorbic acid metabolism during fruit development in an ascorbate-rich fruit crop chestnut rose (Rosa roxburghii Tratt).

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiu-Xin

    2014-09-01

    Chestnut rose (Rosa roxburghii Tratt) is a fruit crop that contains unusually high levels of l-ascorbic acid (AsA; ∼1300 mg 100g(-1) FW). To explore the mechanisms underlying AsA metabolism, we investigated the distribution and abundance of AsA during fruit development. We also analyzed gene expression patterns, enzyme activities, and content of metabolites related to AsA biosynthesis and recycling. AsA first accumulated during late fruit development and continued to accumulate during ripening, with the highest accumulation rate near fruit maturity. The redox state of AsA in fruit was also enhanced during late fruit development, while leaf and other tissues had much lower levels of AsA and the redox state of AsA was lower. In mature fruit, AsA was mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of the mesocarp. Correlation analysis suggested that the gene expression patterns, enzyme activities, and related metabolite concentrations involved in the l-galactose pathway showed relatively high correlations with the accumulation rate of AsA. The gene expression pattern and activity of dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, EC 1.8.5.1) correlated strongly with AsA concentration, possibly indicating the crucial role of DHAR in the accumulation of high levels of AsA in chestnut rose fruit. Over expression of DHAR in Arabidopsis significantly increased the reduced AsA content and redox state. This was more effective than over expression of the l-galactose pathway gene GDP-d-mannose-3,5-epimerase (EC 5.1.3.18). These findings will enhance understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating accumulation of AsA in chestnut rose. PMID:25019249

  10. Protective effects of Ankaferd blood stopper on aspirin-induced oxidative mucosal damage in a rat model of gastric injury.

    PubMed

    Hasgul, Rukiye; Uysal, Sema; Haltas, Hacer; Akyol, Sumeyye; Yuksel, Yasemin; Gurel, Ayse; Armutcu, Ferah

    2014-11-01

    The exposure of gastric mucosa to damaging factors, such as ethanol and some therapeutic drugs, produces pathological changes: inflammatory process, hemorrhagic erosions and even acute ulcers. Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) comprises a standardized mixture of five different plant extracts. The purpose of our present investigations is to explain the participation of reactive oxygen species in acute gastric mucosal damage by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and the effects of new hemostatic agent ABS. Experiments were carried out on 23 male Wistar rats. To assess gastric mucosal damage, biochemical and histopathological data were used. The colorimetric assays were used to determine the malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The level of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, the level of nitric oxide (NO) and the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. We demonstrated that the biological effects of ROS were estimated by measuring the tissue and plasma levels of MDA, the products of lipid peroxidation, as well as the activity of SOD and the scavenger of ROS produced by ASA in the experiment group. Moreover, it was found that MPO activity as well as NO and TNF-α levels also demonstrated significant improvement by ABS treatment. The pathogenesis of experimental ASA-induced mucosal damage in rat stomach includes the generation of ROS that seems to play an important role, due to the generation of lipid peroxides, accompanied by the impairment of antioxidative enzyme activity of cells. ABS appeared to attenuate the oxidative and inflammatory changes caused by ASA-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats. PMID:23114375

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ASAS chromospherically active eclipsing binaries (Parihar+ 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parihar, P.; Messina, S.; Bama, P.; Medhi, B. J.; Muneer, S.; Velu, C.; Ahmad, A.

    2009-09-01

    The medium-resolution spectroscopic survey of our 180 ASAS stars was carried out using the 2-m Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT) of Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO) equipped with the Himalaya Faint Object Spectrograph (HFOSC) spectrograph and the 2.3-m Vainu Bappu Telescope (VBT) of Vainu Bappu Observatory (VBO) equipped with the Optomechanics Research (OMR) spectrograph. High-resolution optical spectra of one particularly interesting target HD 69820 (ASAS 081700-4243.8) were obtained with two different instruments: the fibre-fed coude echelle spectrometer of the 2.3-m VBT and University College London Echelle Spectrograph (UCLES) at the 4-m Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) of Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO). (1 data file).

  12. Differential inhibition of tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation by the nicotinate aspirin prodrug (ST0702) and aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Carlos; Harmon, Shona; Inkielewicz, Iwona; Santos-Martinez, Maria Jose; Jones, Michael; Cantwell, Paula; Bazou, Despina; Ledwidge, Mark; Radomski, Marek W; Gilmer, John F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA) facilitates cancer cell invasion, angiogenesis and the formation of metastatic foci. TCIPA can be modulated by pharmacological inhibitors of MMP-2 and ADP; however, the COX inhibitor aspirin did not prevent TCIPA. In this study, we have tested the pharmacological effects of a new group of isosorbide-based aspirin prodrugs on TCIPA. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH TCIPA was induced in human platelets by mixing with human adenocarcinoma or fibrosarcoma cells under no flow and flow conditions. The release of gelatinases and P-selectin expression during TCIPA were studied by zymography and flow cytometry respectively. KEY RESULTS Tumour cells caused platelet aggregation. This aggregation resulted in the release of MMP-2 and a significant up-regulation of P-selectin on platelets, indicative of platelet activation. Pharmacological modulation of TCIPA revealed that ST0702, one of the aspirin prodrugs, down-regulated TCIPA while aspirin was ineffective. The deacetylated metabolite of ST0702, 5-nicotinate salicylate (ST0702 salicylate), down-regulated both ADP-stimulated platelet aggregation and TCIPA. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results show that ST0702 was an effective inhibitor of TCIPA in vitro. Its deacetylated metabolite may contribute to the effects of ST0702 by inhibiting ADP-mediated TCIPA. PMID:22122360

  13. BVI c photometry of classical cepheids from the ASAS-3 catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdnikov, L. N.; Kniazev, A. Yu.; Sefako, R.; Kravtsov, V. V.; Pastukhova, E. N.; Zhuiko, S. V.

    2011-09-01

    In 2008-2010, we obtained 6095 CCD frames in the BV I c photometric systemfor 49 classical Cepheids discovered in the ASAS-3 project. The observations were obtained on the 76-cm telescope of the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO, RSA) and the 40-cm telescope of the Cerro Armazones Observatory of the Catholic University of the North (OCA, Chile), with a SBIGCCD ST-10XME camera. We present tabulated observations, light curves, and revised elements for the brightness variations.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BVIc photometry of Cepheids from ASAS-3 catalog (Berdnikov+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdnikov, L. N.; Kniazev, A. Yu.; Sefako, R.; Kravtsov, V. V.; Pastukhova, E. N.; Zhujko, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    In 2008-2010, we obtained 6095 CCD frames in the BVIc photometric system for 49 classical Cepheids discovered in the ASAS-3 project. The observations were obtained on the 76-cm telescope of the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO, RSA) and the 40-cm telescope of the Cerro Armazones Observatory of the Catholic University of the North (OCA, Chile), with a SBIGCCD ST-10XME camera. We present tabulated observations, light curves, and revised elements for the brightness variations. (2 data files).

  15. The Curious Case of ASAS J174600-2321.3: an Eclipsing Symbiotic Nova in Outburst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hümmerich, S.; Otero, S.; Tisserand, P.; Bernhard, K.

    2015-06-01

    The star ASAS J174600-2321.3 was found to exhibit peculiar photometric variability (conspicuous brightening of ~4 magnitudes (V), fast luminosity declines, intrinsic pulsations). It was rejected as an RCB candidate in recent investigations on spectroscopic grounds. We have collected and present all available data from public sky surveys, photometric catalogues, and the literature. From an analysis of these data, we have identified ASAS J174600-2321.3 as a long-period eclipsing binary (Porb = 1,011.5 days). The primary star, which is probably a white dwarf, is currently in outburst and exhibits the spectral characteristics of a reddened, early F-type supergiant; the secondary star is a giant of spectral type late M. We discuss the possible origin of the observed brightening, which is related to the primary component. ASAS J174600-2321.3 is most certainly an eclipsing symbiotic binary—probably a symbiotic nova of GCVS type NC—that is currently in outburst. However, further photometric and spectroscopic data are needed to confirm this.

  16. Analysis of variability of TW Hya as observed by MOST and ASAS in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwak, Michal; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Pojmański, Grzegorz; Kuschnig, Rainer; Guenther, David B.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Weiss, Werner W.

    2011-02-01

    As a continuation of our previous studies in 2007 and 2008, new photometric observations of the T Tauri star TW Hya obtained by the MOST satellite and the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) project over 40 d in 2009 with temporal resolution of 0.2 d are presented. A wavelet analysis of the combined MOST-ASAS data provides a rich picture of coherent, intermittent, variable-period oscillations, similarly as discovered in the 2008 data. The periods (1.3-10 d) and systematic period shortening on time-scales of weeks can be interpreted within the model of magnetorotationally controlled accretion processes in the inner accretion disc around the star. Within this model and depending on the assumed visibility of plasma parcels causing the oscillations, the observed shortest oscillation period may indicate the stellar rotation period of 1.3 or 2.6 d, synchronized with the disc at 4.5 or 7.1 R⊙, respectively. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute of Aerospace Studies, and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna, and from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) (conducted by the Warsaw University Observatory, Poland) at the Las Campanas Observatory.

  17. Human brucellosis mimicking axial spondyloarthritis: a challenge for rheumatologists when applying the 2009 ASAS criteria.

    PubMed

    Ye, Cong; Shen, Gui-Fen; Li, Shou-Xin; Dong, Ling-Li; Yu, Yi-Kai; Tu, Wei; Zhu, Ying-Zi; Hu, Shao-Xian

    2016-06-01

    Although the development of the 2009 SpA classification criteria by Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) represents an important step towards a better definition of the early disease stage particularly in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), the specificity of the criteria has been criticized these days. As the commonest zoonotic infection worldwide, human brucellosis can mimic a large number of diseases, including SpA. This study was performed to determine the frequency of rheumatologic manifestations in patients with brucellosis and the chance of misdiagnosing them as having axSpA in central China. The results showed that clinical manifestations of axSpA could be observed in brucellosis. Over half of patients had back pain, and one fifth of the patients with back pain were less than 45 years old at onset and had the symptom for more than 3 months. Two young males were falsely classified as suffering from axSpA according to the ASAS criteria, and one with MRI proved sacroiliitis was once given Etanercept for treatment. Therefore, differential diagnosis including human brucellosis should always be kept in mind when applying the ASAS criteria, even in traditionally non-endemic areas. PMID:27376805

  18. Metabolism of aspirin and procaine in mice pretreated with O-4-nitrophenyl methyl(phenyl)phosphinate or O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate

    SciTech Connect

    Joly, J.M.; Brown, T.M.

    1986-07-01

    Concentrations of (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)procaine in blood of mice were increased threefold for 27 min by exposure to O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate 2 hr prior to (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)procaine injection ip, while there was no effect of O-4-nitrophenyl methyl(phenyl)phosphinate pretreatment. There was no effect of either organophosphinate on the primary hydrolysis of (acetyl-l-/sup 14/C)aspirin when assessed by the expiration of (/sup 14/C)carbon dioxide; however, O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate pretreatment produced transient increases in blood concentrations of both (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)aspirin and (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)salicylic acid following administration of (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)aspirin. Liver carboxylesterase activity in O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate pretreated mice was 11% of control activity. These results indicate the potential for drug interaction with O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate but not with O-4-nitrophenyl methyl(phenyl)phosphinate. It appears that liver carboxylesterase activity has a minor role in hydrolysis of aspirin in vivo, but may be more important in procaine metabolism.

  19. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression in the epithelium and stroma of normal colon in healthy individuals in an aspirin intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sushma S; Makar, Karen W; Li, Lin; Zheng, Yingye; Yang, Peiying; Levy, Lisa; Rudolph, Rebecca Y; Lampe, Paul D; Yan, Min; Markowitz, Sanford D; Bigler, Jeannette; Lampe, Johanna W; Potter, John D

    2015-12-01

    Regular aspirin use reduces colon adenoma and carcinoma incidence. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are involved in aspirin metabolism and clearance, and variant alleles in UGT1A6 have been shown to alter salicylic acid metabolism and risk of colon neoplasia. In a randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial of 44 healthy men and women, homozygous for UGT1A6*1 or UGT1A6*2, we explored differences between global epithelial and stromal expression, using Affymetrix U133 + 2.0 microarrays and tested effects of 60-day aspirin supplementation (325 mg/d) on epithelial and stromal gene expression and colon prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. We conducted a comprehensive study of differential gene expression between normal human colonic epithelium and stroma from healthy individuals. Although no statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed in response to aspirin or UGT1A6 genotype, we have identified the genes uniquely and reproducibly expressed in each tissue type and have analyzed the biologic processes they represent. Here we describe in detail how the data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) - accession number GSE71571 - was generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in BMC Medical Genetics with the PMID 25927723 (Thomas et al., 2015 [9]). PMID:26697360

  20. Effect of the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 on aspirin-induced asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, S. M.; Bell, G. S.; Foster, S.; Spruce, K. E.; MacMillan, R.; Williams, A. J.; Lee, T. H.; Arm, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The cysteinyl leukotrienes may play a central part in the mechanisms of aspirin-sensitive asthma. Previous work has shown that individuals with aspirin-sensitive asthma have high basal urinary LTE4 levels which increase further upon aspirin ingestion, and that sulphidopeptide leukotriene receptor antagonists attenuate aspirin-induced airflow obstruction. If the cysteinyl leukotrienes cause aspirin-induced asthmatic reactions, inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway should prevent aspirin-induced bronchospasm. This hypothesis has been tested with ZD2138, a specific non-redox 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor. METHODS--Seven subjects (four men) with aspirin-sensitive asthma with baseline FEV1 values > 67% were studied. ZD2138 (350 mg) or placebo was given on two separate occasions two weeks apart in a randomised double blind fashion. A single dose of aspirin was administered four hours after dosing and FEV1 was measured for six hours. Inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway by ZD2138 was assessed by measurements of urinary LTE4 levels and ex vivo calcium ionophore stimulated LTB4 generation in whole blood, before administration of drug or placebo and at regular time intervals after dosing and aspirin administration. RESULTS--ZD2138 protected against the aspirin-induced reduction in FEV1 with a 20.3 (4.9)% fall in FEV1 following placebo compared with 4.9 (2.9)% following ZD2138. This was associated with 72% inhibition of ex vivo LTB4 generation in whole blood at 12 hours and a 74% inhibition of the rise in urinary LTE4 excretion at six hours after aspirin ingestion. CONCLUSIONS--In aspirin-sensitive asthma the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZD2138 inhibits the fall in FEV1 induced by aspirin and this is associated with substantial inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase. PMID:8091318

  1. [Induced sputum supernatant prostaglandin E2 during oral aspirin challenge of asthmatic patients with and without aspirin hypersensitivity and healthy controls--pilot study].

    PubMed

    Ignacak, Maria; Celejewska-Wójcik, Natalia; Wójcik, Krzysztof; Sałapa, Kinga; Konduracka, Ewa; Sanak, Marek; Tyrak, Katarzyna; Sładek, Krzysztof; Musiał, Jacek; Mastalerz, Lucyna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate changes in the concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in induced sputum supernatant in 3 groups: sub- jects with NSAID-exacerbated respira- tory disease (NERD), aspirin tolerant asthma (ATA) and healthy controls (HC), before and after oral aspirin chal- lenge test. The study was conducted in the years 2014-2015 at the Clinical Department of the Pulmonology Clinic at the University Hospital in Cracow. 43 patients were enrolled in the study (NERD - n = 15, ATA - n = 15 and HC - n = 13). All of them underwent a placebo-controlled oral aspirin challenge. Sputum was induced 24 hours before the challenge and immediately after the test. Induced sputum was processed in order to obtain cystospin slides to depict inflammatory cell patterns and supernatants, in which PGE2 was measured. The concentration of PGE2 was determined using mass spectrometry coupled with gas chromatography (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry - GC/MS). After aspirin challenge, the concentration of PGE2 in induced sputum supernatant decreased in both asthmatics hypersensitive to aspirin (p = 0.01) and those who tolerated aspirin well (p = 0.17). The change in the healthy control group was not statistically significant. These results support the cyclooxygenase theory of PGE2 inhibition by aspirin. However, the mechanism of bronchoconstriction after aspirin administration alone in patients with NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease remains unclear. PMID:27197430

  2. Aspirin Increases Nitric Oxide Formation in Chronic Stable Coronary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, Scott; DeMets, David; Schneider, Ricky; Borzak, Steven; Schneider, Wendy; Serebruany, Victor; Schröder, Henning; Hennekens, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There are no published randomized data on secondary prevention in humans about whether aspirin affects nitric oxide (NO) formation. In patients with chronic stable coronary disease, we tested whether aspirin at clinically relevant doses increases NO formation. Materials and Methods In a randomized, double-blind trial, 37 patients from 2 cardiology office practices were assigned to daily doses of 81, 162.5, 325, 650, or 1300 aspirin for 12 weeks. Primary prespecified outcome measures were changes in heme oxygenase (HO-1), a downstream target of NO formation, and asymmetrical dimethyl arginine (ADMA), a competitive inhibitor of NO synthase. Results There were no significant differences for HO-1 or ADMA between any of the clinically relevant doses of aspirin tested, so all were combined. For HO-1, there was a significant increase (10.29 ± 2.44, P < .001) from baseline (15.37 ± 1.85) to week 12 (25.66 ± 1.57). The mean ratio (MR) of week 12 to baseline for HO-1 was significantly higher than 1.0 (1.67, confidence interval [CI] from 1.60 to 1.74, P < .001). For ADMA, there was a significant decrease (−0.24 ± 0.11, P < .001) from baseline (0.78 ± 0.08) to week 12 (0.54 ± 0.07). The MR of week 12 to baseline for ADMA was significantly lower than 1.0 (0.69, CI from 0.66 to 0.73, P < .001). Conclusions In patients with chronic stable coronary disease, all clinically relevant daily doses of aspirin tested, from 81 to 1300 mg, produce similar and statistically significant increases in HO-1 and decreases in ADMA. These are the first randomized data on secondary prevention patients. These data support the hypothesis that aspirin has additional beneficial effects mediated through NO formation. Further research, including direct randomized comparisons on atherosclerosis using noninvasive techniques as well as on occlusive vascular disease events, is necessary. PMID:23524841

  3. First light curve analyses of binary systems AO Aqr, CW Aqr and ASAS 012206-4924.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulaş, B.; Ulusoy, C.

    2015-11-01

    Using the data from the public database of the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) we performed the very first light curve analyses of the three eclipsing binary systems AO Aqr, CW Aqr and ASAS 012206-4924.7. The physical parameters of the systems were determined by the PHOEBE (Prša and Zwitter, 2005) software. From an analysis of the ASAS data it was concluded that AO Aqr was found to be a contact binary system while CW Aqr and ASAS 012206-4924.7 were found to be near-contact and detached binaries, respectively. Finally, the locations of the components, corresponding to the estimated physical parameters, in the HR diagram were also discussed.

  4. Slow release delivery of rioprostil by an osmotic pump inhibits the formation of acute aspirin-induced gastric lesions in dogs and accelerates the healing of chronic lesions without incidence of side effects.

    PubMed

    Katz, L B; Shriver, D A

    1989-10-01

    Rioprostil, a primary alcohol prostaglandin E1 analog, inhibits gastric acid secretion and prevents gastric lesions induced by a variety of irritants in experimental animals. Because rioprostil is relatively short-acting, it would be of significant benefit clinically if its duration of action could be extended to allow once daily dosing. This investigation demonstrates that when administered via an osmotically driven pump (Osmet, Alza Corp.), rioprostil prevents the acute effects of aspirin on the gastric mucosa of dogs, accelerates the healing of aspirin-induced gastric lesions, and heals preexisting aspirin-induced gastric lesions during chronic administration of aspiring. The potency of rioprostil against acute gastric lesion formation was greatest when delivered from a 24-hr release pump (ED50 = 0.77 micrograms/kg/24 hr) and was 37 times greater than when administered as a single oral bolus. In addition, this activity occurred at doses which had little or no gastric antisecretory activity in betazole-stimulated Heidenhain pouch dogs. When delivered from a 24-hr pump, rioprostil (100 micrograms/kg/24 hr) healed preexisting aspirin-induced gastric lesions within 8 days after removal of aspirin, or after 15 days during continued daily aspirin administration. Additional studies determined that administration of rioprostil at doses of 720, 1440, or 2160 micrograms/kg/24 hr (935-2805 times the gastroprotective ED50 in 24 hr pumps) was well tolerated, with only slight, transient increases in body temperature, softening of the stools, and mild sedation at the highest dose. Administration of rioprostil daily for 5 days at 960 micrograms/kg/24 hr from 24-hr release pumps was also well tolerated by all dogs with no evidence of any accumulation of effect of rioprostil. In summary, administration of rioprostil via an osmotic pump increases its potency and duration of action against the gastric lesion-inducing effect of aspirin, and maintains a wide ratio of safety. PMID

  5. A Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) for Rapid Measurement of High-Concentration Size Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Hee-Siew; Chen, Da-Ren; Pui, David Y. H.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a fast-response Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) that is capable of scanning 30 size channels between 3 and 100 nm in a total time of 3 seconds. The analyzer includes a bipolar charger (P0210), an extended-length Nanometer Differential Mobility Analyzer (Nano-DMA), and an electrometer (TSI 3068). This combination of components provides particle size spectra at a scan rate of 0.1 second per channel free of uncertainties caused by response-time-induced smearing. The nASA thus offers a fast response for aerosol size distribution measurements in high-concentration conditions and also eliminates the need for applying a de-smearing algorithm to resulting data. In addition, because of its thermodynamically stable means of particle detection, the nASA is useful for applications requiring measurements over a broad range of sample pressures and temperatures. Indeed, experimental transfer functions determined for the extended-length Nano-DMA using the Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) technique indicate the nASA provides good size resolution at pressures as low as 200 Torr. Also, as was demonstrated in tests to characterize the soot emissions from the J85-GE engine of a T38 aircraft, the broad dynamic concentration range of the nASA makes it particularly suitable for studies of combustion or particle formation processes. Further details of the nASA performance as well as results from calibrations, laboratory tests and field applications are presented.

  6. Effects of volumetric expansion in molecular crystals: A quantum mechanical investigation on aspirin and paracetamol most stable polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Kapil; Flurchick, Kenneth M.; Valenzano, Loredana

    2015-02-01

    This work reports a study performed at hybrid semi-empirical density functional level (B3LYP-D2*) of the physico-chemical properties of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and paracetamol (acetaminophen) in their most stable crystalline forms. It is shown how effects arising from volumetric expansions influence the properties of the materials. Structural, energetic, and vibrational properties are in good agreement with experimental values reported at temperatures far from 0 K. Results show that the proposed approach is reliable enough to reproduce effects of volumetric expansion on lattice energies and other measurable physico-chemical observables related to inter-molecular forces.

  7. A Balanced View of Efficacy and Safety of Aspirin in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Casado-Arroyo, Rubén; Lanas, Angel; Brugada, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    This review highlights practical aspects related to aspirin therapy in cardiovascular diseases, specifically, the benefits and hazards in different clinical settings. Aspirin reduces one fourth of all major cardiovascular events but also increases major gastrointestinal bleeds by about half. As with other cardiovascular prevention strategies, the absolute benefit of aspirin is linearly related to the cardiovascular risk of the patient. The risk-benefit of aspirin can vary substantially in different settings: in secondary prevention, the benefits usually outweigh the excess of major bleeding complications. In primary prevention, it is not unusual that the number of vascular events avoided equals the number of major bleeds induced by aspirin. Finally, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that aspirin may interfere with the early stages of cancer, metastasis and mortality. For all these reasons, in this article new developments in the field directed towards individualized risk assessment strategies are also discussed. PMID:26369681

  8. Statins and aspirin: do they really work in women?

    PubMed

    Desai, Hemal; Hollingsworth, Paula W; Chugh, Atul R

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease continues to be the most common cause of mortality in women in the USA. As a result, greater emphasis has been placed on preventive measures. Studies examining the role of aspirin and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) have shown important clinical differences in men versus women in the preventive realm. This has led to inconsistent recommendations by guideline committees and clinicians alike. This review presents a summary of the past and current guidelines. In addition, important clinical trials influencing current era practice are also discussed. Both strengths and limitations of these studies are described in detail, along with recommendations regarding future directions and the scope of aspirin and statin use for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25812803

  9. Accelerated Hydrolysis of Aspirin Using Alternating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinscheid, Uwe M.

    2009-08-01

    The major problem of current drug-based therapy is selectivity. As in other areas of science, a combined approach might improve the situation decisively. The idea is to use the pro-drug principle together with an alternating magnetic field as physical stimulus, which can be applied in a spatially and temporarily controlled manner. As a proof of principle, the neutral hydrolysis of aspirin in physiological phosphate buffer of pH 7.5 at 40 °C was chosen. The sensor and actuator system is a commercially available gold nanoparticle (NP) suspension which is approved for animal usage, stable in high concentrations and reproducibly available. Applying the alternating magnetic field of a conventional NMR magnet system accelerated the hydrolysis of aspirin in solution.

  10. Aspirin vs Heparin for the Prevention of Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Kanellopoulou, Theoni; Makris, Thomas; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Nomikou, Efrosyni; Tousoulis, Dimitrios

    2016-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy that remains a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Preeclampsia can be resolved by delivery, and most of the proposed preventive treatment approaches are based on processes involved in placental development in early pregnancy. Yet, none of these has been established in clinical practice. Low-dose aspirin is the most promising candidate, nevertheless; while some individual randomized controlled trials showed minimal or no statistically significant benefit, recent metanalyses showed that early initiation before 16 weeks of gestation is associated with prevention of early-onset preeclampsia and reduction in prevalence of perinatal death or morbidity of pregnant women. Heparin could be an alternative antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory median to prevent preeclampsia either alone or in combination with aspirin; however, results are conflicting concerning efficacy. PMID:27251704

  11. Trans Fat, Aspirin, and Ischemic Stroke in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Yaemsiri, Sirin; Sen, Souvik; Tinker, Lesley; Rosamond, Wayne; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; He, Ka

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between dietary fat intake and ischemic stroke among postmenopausal women. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 87,025 generally healthy postmenopausal women (age 50–79 years) enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study. Repeated and validated dietary assessments were done using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of ischemic stroke based on quintiles of the cumulative average of fat intake. Results We documented 1,049 incident cases of ischemic stroke over 663,041 person-years of follow-up. Women in the highest quintile of trans fat intake had a significantly higher incidence of ischemic stroke (HR 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08–1.79, P-trend = 0.048) compared with women in the lowest quintile, while controlling for multiple covariates. The observed association was modified by aspirin use (P-interaction=0.02). The HR was 1.66 (95% CI 1.21–2.36, P-trend<0.01) among baseline non-aspirin users (n=67,288) and 0.95 (95% CI 0.60–1.48, P-trend=0.43) among aspirin users (n=19,736). No significant associations were found between intakes of saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fat and ischemic stroke or any ischemic stroke subtypes. Interpretation In this large cohort of postmenopausal women, higher intake of trans fat was associated with incident ischemic stroke independent of major lifestyle/dietary factors. Aspirin use may attenuate the potential adverse effect of trans fat intake on ischemic stroke. PMID:22383309

  12. Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Neha M; Katial, Rohit K

    2016-08-01

    Patients with severe asthma and concomitant chronic rhinosinusitis often have severe, refractory upper and lower airway inflammation. This inflammation has been proposed to be similar throughout the upper and lower airways leading to the unified airways concept. This article reviews chronic rhinosinusitis with and without nasal polyps, and the subgroup with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, while focusing on the relationship with asthma. Additionally, diagnosis and treatment with current and newer therapies are discussed. PMID:27401622

  13. Aspirin treatment exacerbates oral infections by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cossentini, Luana Aparecida; Da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; De Almeida Araújo, Eduardo José; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2016-05-01

    Oral transmission of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, has been documented in Latin American countries. The reported cases of infection were due to the ingestion of contaminated fresh fruit, juices, or sugar cane juice. There have been few studies on the physiopathology of the disease in oral transmission cases. Gastritis is a common ailment that can be caused by poor dietary habits, intake of alcohol or other gastric irritants, bacterial infection, or by the widespread use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This study investigated in a mouse model whether gastric mucosal injury, induced by aspirin, would affect the course of disease in animals infected with T. cruzi by the oral route. The CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi, both of low infectivity, were used. To this end, groups of BALB/c mice were treated during 5 days with aspirin (100 mg kg(-1)) before oral infection with T. cruzi metacyclic forms (4 × 10(5) or 5 × 10(7) parasites/mouse). Histological analysis and determination of nitric oxide and TNF-α were performed in gastric samples obtained 5 days after infection. Parasitemia was monitored from the thirteenth day after infection. The results indicate that aspirin treatment of mice injured their gastric mucosa and facilitated invasion by both CL14 and G strains of T. cruzi. Strain CL14 caused more severe infection compared to the G strain, as larger numbers of amastigote nests were found in the stomach and parasitemia levels were higher. Our study is novel in that it shows that gastric mucosal damage caused by aspirin, a commonly used NSAID, facilitates T. cruzi infection by the oral route. PMID:26826555

  14. Aspirin Prevention of Cholesterol Gallstone Formation in Prairie Dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sum P.; Carey, Martin C.; Lamont, J. Thomas

    1981-03-01

    When prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are fed a diet containing cholesterol, a marked increase in gallbladder mucin secretion parallels the evolution of cholesterol supersaturated bile. Gelation of mucin precedes the precipitation of cholesterol liquid and solid crystals and the development of gallstones. Aspirin given to prairie dogs inhibited mucin hypersecretion and gel accumulation and prevented gallstone formation without influencing the cholesterol content of supersaturated bile. This suggests that gallbladder mucin is a nucleation matrix for cholesterol gallstones.

  15. Aspirin for Primary Cardiovascular Prevention: When Is It Worth the Risks?

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Low-dose aspirin is widely used by individuals to prevent first myocardial infarction and stroke. Although many health care professionals and patients believe that aspirin is safe and effective, the evidence is far from conclusive. As a result, current practice guidelines are inconsistent and leave practitioners with many unanswered questions. Because aspirin is available without prescription, pharmacists may often be the only health care professional positioned to advise and educate the patient. PMID:24958966

  16. Regulation of fruit ascorbic acid concentrations during ripening in high and low vitamin C tomato cultivars

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To gain insight into the regulation of fruit ascorbic acid (AsA) pool in tomatoes, a combination of metabolite analyses, non-labelled and radiolabelled substrate feeding experiments, enzyme activity measurements and gene expression studies were carried out in fruits of the ‘low-’ and ‘high-AsA’ tomato cultivars ‘Ailsa Craig’ and ‘Santorini’ respectively. Results The two cultivars exhibited different profiles of total AsA (totAsA, AsA + dehydroascorbate) and AsA accumulation during ripening, but both displayed a characteristic peak in concentrations at the breaker stage. Substrate feeding experiments demonstrated that the L-galactose pathway is the main AsA biosynthetic route in tomato fruits, but that substrates from alternative pathways can increase the AsA pool at specific developmental stages. In addition, we show that young fruits display a higher AsA biosynthetic capacity than mature ones, but this does not lead to higher AsA concentrations due to either enhanced rates of AsA breakdown (‘Ailsa Craig’) or decreased rates of AsA recycling (‘Santorini’), depending on the cultivar. In the later stages of ripening, differences in fruit totAsA-AsA concentrations of the two cultivars can be explained by differences in the rate of AsA recycling activities. Analysis of the expression of AsA metabolic genes showed that only the expression of one orthologue of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (SlGGP1), and of two monodehydroascorbate reductases (SlMDHAR1 and SlMDHAR3) correlated with the changes in fruit totAsA-AsA concentrations during fruit ripening in ‘Ailsa Craig’, and that only the expression of SlGGP1 was linked to the high AsA concentrations found in red ripe ‘Santorini’ fruits. Conclusions Results indicate that ‘Ailsa Craig’ and ‘Santorini’ use complementary mechanisms to maintain the fruit AsA pool. In the low-AsA cultivar (‘Ailsa Craig’), alternative routes of AsA biosynthesis may supplement biosynthesis via L

  17. Phytoremediation of aspirin and tetracycline by Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Gahlawat, Sonal; Gauba, Pammi

    2016-09-01

    With the increasing release of pharmaceutical drugs in the environment, research is in progress for investigating alternative methods for their remediation. Various studies have shown the phytoremediation potential of Brassica juncea for metals. The current study was aimed at evaluating the phytoremediation potential of B. juncea for two different pharmaceutical drugs i.e. aspirin and tetracycline in in-vitro conditions. The seeds of B. juncea were germinated and grown for a period of 28 and 24 days for aspirin and tetracycline, respectively. The study analyzed the remediation rate of B. juncea for the selected drugs in three different sets of varying concentration along with any phytotoxic effects exerted by the drugs on the seeds. Preliminary results showed that the average remediation rate of aspirin and tetracycline at the end of experiment was approximately 90% and 71%, respectively. As initial drug concentrations were increased in the media, the remediation rate also improved. However, at higher concentrations, the plants showed phytotoxicity as depicted by the decrease in shoot length of the germinated seeds. These preliminary results indicated that B. juncea could tolerate and remediate pharmaceutical drugs such as analgesics and antibiotics. PMID:26696522

  18. Clopidogrel responsiveness in stroke patients on a chronic aspirin regimen.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Zohara; Ching, Marilou; Sawyer, Robert N; Chichelli, Trevor; Li, Fan; Janicke, David; Radovic, Vladan; Mehta, Bijal; Farooq, Osman; Munschauer, Frederick E

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel (CPG) in patients sustaining acute ischemic stroke who were already receiving chronic outpatient aspirin therapy (81-325 mg/day). Platelet function was measured using 3 different "point-of-care" platelet function analyzers: the Thrombelastograph hemostasis system, the Accumetrics VerifyNow system, and the Chronolog 570VS impedance aggregometer. Platelet function was assessed before administration of a 300-mg CPG loading dose and again at 26 hours and 64 hours after this loading dose along with a 75-mg daily maintenance dose. All 3 instruments detected marked inhibition of platelet function at 26 hours and 64 hours after CPG administration. There were significant variations among the 3 instruments in monitoring antiplatelet responses to aspirin and CPG; however, these variations were eliminated when the platelet function results were corrected for baseline platelet variability. The percentage of patients who were poor responders to CPG after switching from aspirin depended on the measurement instrument used, but was higher at 26 hours after CPG administration than at 64 hours after CPG administration. Our findings indicate that poor response to antiplatelet agents in general, and to CPG in particular, is a function of the measuring instrument. The correction for baseline platelet variability results in similar levels of platelet inhibition measured by the 3 platelet function analyzers. Future studies are warranted to examine the association between ex vivo CPG-induced platelet inhibition and clinical outcomes in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:22209644

  19. Ascorbic acid mitigation of water stress-inhibition of root growth in association with oxidative defense in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Xu, Qian; Huang, Bingru

    2015-01-01

    Root growth inhibition by water stress may be related to oxidative damages. The objectives of this study were to determine whether exogenous application of ascorbic acid (ASA) could mitigate root growth decline due to water stress and whether ASA effects on root growth could be regulated through activating non-enzymatic or enzymatic antioxidant systems in perennial grass species. Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb. cv. “K-31”) plants were grown in nutrient solution, and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-8000 was added into the solution to induce water stress. For exogenous ASA treatment, ASA (5 mM) was added into the solution with or without PEG-8000. Plants treated with ASA under water stress showed significantly increased root growth rate, and those roots had significantly lower content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (H2O2 and O2− content) than those without ASA treatment. Malondialdehyde content in root tips treated with ASA under water stress was also significantly reduced compared with those under water stress alone. In addition, free ascorbate and total ascorbate content were significantly higher in roots treated with ASA under water stress than those without ASA treatment. The enzymatic activities for ROS scavenging-related genes were not significantly altered by ASA treatment under water stress, while transcript abundances of genes encoding superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, dehydroascorbate reductase, and monohydroascorbate reductase showed significant decreases in the root elongation zone and significant increases in the root maturation zone treated with ASA under water stress. Transcripts of genes for expansins and xyloglucan endotransglycosylases showed increased abundances in ASA-treated root maturation zone under water stress, indicating that ASA could accelerated cell wall loosening and cell expansion. The results suggested that exogenous treatment of roots with ASA enhanced root elongation under water

  20. The neuroprotective effects of aspirin following crush injury to rat sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yi; Li, Jun; Zhu, Yueliang; Tang, Hui; He, Xiaoqing; Xu, Yongqing

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been reported to be neuroprotective and produce some benefits for central nervous system diseases. However, the possibility of using aspirin as a neuroprotective agent for peripheral nerve injuries has rarely been reported thus far. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibly beneficial effects of aspirin on sciatic nerve crush injury therapy in rats. Crush injury animal model was prepared with Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were evenly divided into high-dose aspirin group, low-dose aspirin group, and vehicle group. Aspirin solution or normal saline were intraperitoneally injected once a day for 28 days after sciatic nerve crush injury. A sham-operative group was also added as normal control. The results from walking track analysis and electrophysiological assessment indicated that motor functional recovery in the aspirin groups were better than that in the vehicle group. Morphometric analysis of regenerated nerves and Fluoro-Gold retrograde tracing demonstrated that axonal regeneration in the aspirin groups was superior to that in the vehicle group. Our findings suggest that aspirin might be used as a neuroprotective agent for treating peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26770418

  1. Aspirin as a risk factor for hemorrhage in patients with head injuries.

    PubMed

    Reymond, M A; Marbet, G; Radü, E W; Gratzl, O

    1992-01-01

    The role of aspirin as a risk factor in the occurrence of intracranial bleeding following head injury was investigated. Chronic subdural hematoma appears to be a suitable model for the evaluation of risk factors in the development of hemorrhage. The most common risk factors found in our study were, apart from age, chronic alcohol abuse (28%), consumption of cumarin-derivates (21%), aspirin (13%), and heparin (5%). A patient undergoing aspirin treatment must be considered at risk of development of chronic subdural hematoma. Aspirin should not be prescribed to patients with post-traumatic headaches. PMID:1584433

  2. Effect of aspirin on DNA damage induced by MMC in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Niikawa, Miki; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2007-06-01

    In our previous paper, we found that aspirin suppressed the genotoxicity of mitomycin C (MMC) in a somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. In order to reveal the mechanism of antigenotoxicity of aspirin, we evaluated the protective effects of aspirin against the genotoxicity of MMC with the DNA repair test in Drosophila melanogaster. Three types of treatment of aspirin were performed as co-, post- and pre-treatment. Aspirin co-treatment suppressed effectively the genotoxicity of MMC in a dose-dependent manner and the sex ratio at a dose of aspirin 10mg/bottle elevated from 0.01 (without aspirin) to 0.65 at sc z(1) w(+(TE)) mei-9(a) mei-41(D5)/-C(1)DX, y f [mei-9 mei-41, Rec(-) male.Rec(+) female] consists of DNA repair-deficient (Rec(-)) males and -proficient (Rec(+)) females. The antigenotoxic effect of aspirin on [mei-41, Rec(-) male.Rec(+) female] was similar to that on [mei-9, Rec(-) male.Rec(+) female]. But post- and pre-treatment by aspirin did not affect the genotoxicity of MMC on [mei-9 mei-41, Rec(-) male.Rec(+) female]. PMID:17336029

  3. Aspirin inhibition of platelet deposition at angioplasty sites: demonstration by platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Cuningham, D.A.; Kumar, B.; Siegel, B.A.; Gilula, L.A.; Totty, W.G.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-05-01

    In-111 platelet scintigraphy was used to evaluate the effects of prior aspirin administration on the accumulation of In-111-labeled autologous platelets at sites of arterial injury resulting from iliac, femoral, or popliteal transluminal angioplasty in a nonrandomized study of 17 men. The degree of platelet localization at angioplasty sites was significantly less in nine men who had received aspirin in varying doses within the 4 days before angioplasty than in eight men who had not received aspirin for at least two weeks. The results suggest that aspirin treatment before angioplasty limits the early platelet deposition at the angioplasty site in men.

  4. Prostaglandin D2: A dominant mediator of aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Katherine N.; Bensko, Jillian C.; Boyce, Joshua A.; Laidlaw, Tanya M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspirin desensitization followed by high-dose aspirin therapy is routinely performed for patients with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). Little is known about the contributions of mediators other than cysteinyl leukotrienes to aspirin reactions and to the therapeutic benefit of high-dose aspirin therapy. Objective We investigated differences in urinary eicosanoid metabolites and blood eosinophils in subjects with AERD who tolerate and those who fail aspirin desensitization, and also in AERD subjects who were successfully treated with high-dose aspirin therapy. Methods 29 subjects with AERD were stratified into those who tolerated aspirin desensitization (Group I) and those who did not (Group II). Urine was analyzed for eicosanoid metabolites at baseline, during aspirin reactions, and on high-dose aspirin therapy. Blood was analyzed for cell differentials at baseline and on aspirin therapy. Results Basal prostaglandin D2 metabolite (PGD-M) (13.6±2.7 vs. 7.0±0.8 pmol/mg Cr; P<.05), and thromboxane metabolite (TX-M) levels (1.4±0.3 vs. 0.9±0.1 pmol/mg Cr; P<.01) were higher in Group II than in Group I. During aspirin reactions, PGD-M remained unchanged while TX-M (0.7±0.1 pmol/mg Cr; P=.07) tended to decrease in Group I. In contrast, PGD-M rose dramatically in Group II (61.3±19.9 pmol/mg Cr; P<.05), while TX-M did not change. The decrease in FEV1 inversely correlated with basal urinary levels of both LTE4 and PGD-M. Blood eosinophil and basophil levels rose while urinary PGD-M (2.2±0.8 pmol/mg Cr, P<.001) decreased on two months of high-dose aspirin therapy in Group I. Conclusion Failure to tolerate aspirin desensitization in a subset of subjects with AERD is associated with PGD2 overproduction. The increase in blood eosinophils and basophils while on high-dose aspirin therapy may reflect the functional consequences of decreased PGD2 release and the therapeutic benefit of aspirin. PMID:25218285

  5. The effects of aspirin plus cisplatin on SGC7901/CDDP cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hanzhang; Liu, Gaogao; Jiang, Biao; Guo, Jiubing; Tao, Guoquan; Yiu, Wei; Zhou, Jingsong; Li, Guoxin

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aspirin plus cisplatin (CDDP) in the chemotherapy of gastric cancer. We cultured SGC7901/CDDP cells by long-term exposure of SGC7901 cells to small doses of CDDP in vitro. The cells were treated with aspirin, CDDP or aspirin plus CDDP for 24 h and cell growth was assessed by the MTT assay, the apoptotic rate by flow cytometry, the survivin mRNA expression by RT-PCR and the survivin protein expression by western blotting. The results revealed that the cell growth in the aspirin plus CDDP group was significantly inhibited. The apoptotic rate in the aspirin plus CDDP was significantly higher compared to that in the other groups. The survivin mRNA and protein expression were also significantly reduced in the aspirin plus CDDP group. Our data suggest that the combination of aspirin and CDDP exhibited a higher degree of toxicity against SGC7901/CDDP cells compared to that of aspirin or CDDP alone. Thus, the combination of aspirin plus CDDP may reduce the expression of survivin and induce the apoptosis of SGC7901/CDDP cells. PMID:24748972

  6. ASAS J083241+2332.4: A New Extreme Low Mass Ratio Overcontact Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, K.; Malu, S.; Choi, C. S.; Vivekananda Rao, P.

    2016-03-01

    We present the R- and V-band CCD photometry and Hα line studies of an overcontact binary ASAS J083241+2332.4. The light curves exhibit totality along with a trace of the O’Connell effect. The photometric solution indicates that this system falls into the category of extreme low-mass ratio overcontact binaries with a mass ratio, q ˜ 0.06. Although a trace of the O’ Connell effect is observed, constancy of the Hα line along various phases suggest that a relatively higher magnetic activity is needed for it to show a prominent fill-in effect. The study of O-C variations reveals that the period of the binary shows a secular increase at the rate of dP/dt ˜ 0.0765 s years-1, which is superimposed by a low, but significant, sinusoidal modulation with a period of ˜8.25 years. Assuming that the sinusoidal variation is due to the presence of a third body, orbital elements have been derived. There exist three other similar systems, SX Crv, V857 Her, and E53, which have extremely low mass ratios and we conclude that ASAS J083241+2332.4 resembles SX Crv in many respects. Theoretical studies indicate that at a critical mass ratio range, qcritical = 0.07-0.09, overcontact binaries should merge and form a fast rotating star, but it has been suggested that qcritical can continue to fall up to 0.05 depending on the primary's mass and structure. Moreover, the obtained fill-out factors (50%-70%) indicate that mass loss is considerable and hydrodynamical simulations advocate that mass loss from L2 is mandatory for a successful merging process. Comprehensively, the results indicate that ASAS J083241+2332.4 is at a stage of merger. The pivotal role played by the subtle nature of the derived mass ratio in forming a rapidly rotating star has been discussed.

  7. Effects of Aspirin on Gastroduodenal Permeability in Alcoholics and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Ashkan; Keshavarzian, Ali; Kwasny, Mary J.; Shaikh, Maliha; Fogg, Louis; Lau, Cynthia; Fields, Jeremy Z.; Forsyth, Christopher B.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are noxious agents that can disrupt the integrity of the gastroduodenal mucosal and damage the epithelial barrier, and lead to increased gastroduodenal permeability. Moreover, it is not uncommon that patients are exposed to these two barrier stressors at the same time. It is thus important to know how simultaneous exposure affects the gastroduodenal barrier, and acquiring that knowledge was the goal of this study. We used a method that has been widely used for the assessment of injury to the gastroduodenal barrier induced by these noxious agents – measurement of gastroduodenal permeability as indicated by urinary excretion of ingested sucrose. We used gas chromatography to measure the amount of sucrose excreted in the urine over the 5–12 h following ingestion of a bolus of sucrose. The 148 participants in the study included 92 alcoholics and 56 healthy controls. All study subjects had a baseline permeability test. To determine whether addition of a second noxious agent, in addition to chronic alcohol, further decreases gastroduodenal barrier integrity, a subset of 118 study subjects participated in another permeability test in which they were exposed to aspirin. For this test, participants ingested 1300 mg aspirin twice, 12 hours and 1 hour before the final permeability test. The baseline permeability test showed that alcoholics have significantly higher gastroduodenal permeability than controls. Aspirin caused a significant within group absolute increase in gastroduodenal permeability in both alcoholics and controls (+7.72%, p=0.003 and +2.25%, p = 0.011, respectively) but the magnitude of these increases were not significantly different from each other. Baseline permeability did vary by gender, self-reported illegal drug use, and employment type. The extent of the permeability increase after aspirin ingestion varied with illegal drug use and recruitment site (a surrogate marker of socioeconomic status

  8. Vier suedliche chromosphaerisch aktive Sterne in der ASAS-3 Datenbank entdeckt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Klaus; Huemmerich, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Four southern chromospherically active stars are presented, which were found in the ASAS-3 database (GSC 08590-01193, GSC 08962-00532, GSC 08677-00344 and GSC 08724-01284). Candidates were selected from Table 4 of Fresneau and Osborn (2009), which identifies candidate active stars that have been found by cross-correlating entries from the Variability Sample Catalogue of the Sydney Observatory Galactic Survey (SOGS) with X-ray sources from the ROSAT All Sky Survey (for more details, see loc. cit.).

  9. Bidirectional reflectance effects derived from ASAS imagery of a pecan orchard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staenz, Karl; Gauthier, Robert P.; Teillet, Phil M.; Williams, Daniel J.

    1993-09-01

    Bidirectional reflectance factors (BRF) for a pecan orchard have been studied using Advanced Solid-State Array Spectrometer (ASAS) data acquired in the solar principal plane at altitudes of 2300 m and 5300 m above ground. In particular, the angular dependency of the BRF of different targets such as sunlit and shaded portions of the pecan tree, orchard floor, and soil (road) have been studied for viewing directions between -45 degrees and +45 degrees. The results indicate in general an increasing reflectance from the forward scattering direction to the backscattering direction. In addition, an increase in pixel size has significant effects on the surface BRFs.

  10. Dual effects of acetylsalicylic acid on ERK signaling and Mitf transcription lead to inhibition of melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Takashi; Usami, Mai; Awaji, Mizuki; Shinohara, Sumire; Sato, Kazuomi

    2016-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is widely used as an analgesic/antipyretic drug. It exhibits a wide range of biological effects, including preventative effects against heart attack and stroke, and the induction of apoptosis in various cancer cells. We previously found that ASA inhibits melanogenesis in B16 melanoma cells. However, the mechanisms of how ASA down-regulates melanin synthesis remain unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of ASA on melanogenic pathways, such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) transcription. ASA significantly inhibited melanin synthesis in a dose-dependent manner without oxidative stress and cell death. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the inhibitory effect of ASA might be due to the inhibition of Mitf gene transcription. Interestingly, ASA also induced ERK phosphorylation. Additionally, treatment with PD98059, a specific ERK phosphorylation inhibitor, abolished the anti-melanogenic effect of ASA. These results suggest that the depigmenting effect of ASA results from down-regulation of Mitf, which is induced by both the induction of ERK phosphorylation and the inhibition of Mitf transcription. PMID:26699907

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals the Metabolic Mechanism of L-Ascorbic Acid in Ziziphus jujuba Mill.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunmei; Huang, Jian; Li, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) is the most economically important member of the Rhamnaceae family and contains a high concentration of ascorbic acid (AsA). To explore the metabolic mechanism of AsA accumulation, we investigated the abundance of AsA in the fruit development stages, the leaf and flower of Z. jujuba cv Junzao, and the mature fruit of one type of wild jujube (Z. jujuba var. spinosa Hu, Yanchuan sour jujube). And the expression patterns of genes involved in AsA biosynthesis, degradation, and recycling were analyzed. The result showed that AsA biosynthesis during early fruit development (the enlargement stage) is the main reason for jujube high accumulation. The L-galactose pathway plays a predominant role in the biosynthesis of AsA during jujube fruit development, and the genes GMP1, GME1, GGP, and GaLDH involved in the determination of AsA concentration during fruit development and in different genotypes; the myo-inositol pathway along with the genes GME2 and GMP2 in the L-galactose pathway play a compensatory role in maintaining AsA accumulation during the ripening stage. These findings enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanism in regulating AsA accumulation for jujube. PMID:26913041

  12. Long-term use of ticagrelor in patients with prior heart attack: ticagrelor plus aspirin versus aspirin monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Amico, Frank; Schlesinger, Alex; Mazzoni, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Bonaca MP, Bhatt DL, Cohen M, et al. Long-term use of ticagrelor in patients with prior myocardial infarction. N Engl J Med. 2015;372:1791-1800. This Practice Pearl reviews the recent study Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Prior Heart Attack Using Ticagrelor Compared With Placebo on a Background of Aspirin-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 54 (PEGASUS-TIMI 54). It challenges the current standard of care of 12 months of dual antiplatelet followed by aspirin indefinitely. The study demonstrated that patients who received ticagrelor, either the 60 mg or 90 mg twice daily plus aspirin, showed a decreased risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The PEGASUS-TIMI 54 trial also proved that the benefit of ticagrelor was seen early and continued to accrue over time, with a median of 33 months of follow-up, meaning that the benefit persists over time. It is important to note that both doses of the ticagrelor were associated with higher incidence of bleeding, but the rates of fatal bleeding did not show any difference between the ticagrelor or placebo. PMID:26689345

  13. High On-Aspirin Platelet Reactivity and Clinical Outcome in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease: Results From ASCET (Aspirin Nonresponsiveness and Clopidogrel Endpoint Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Pettersen, Alf-Åge R.; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Abdelnoor, Michael; Arnesen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with stable coronary artery disease on single-antiplatelet therapy with aspirin are still at risk for atherothrombotic events, and high on-aspirin residual platelet reactivity (RPR) has been suggested as a risk factor. Methods and Results In this randomized trial, the association between platelet function determined by the PFA100 platelet function analyzer system (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Germany) and clinical outcome in 1001 patients, all on single-antiplatelet therapy with aspirin (160 mg/d) was studied. Patients were randomized to continue with aspirin 160 mg/d or change to clopidogrel 75 mg/d. A composite end point of death, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and unstable angina was used. At 2-year follow-up, 106 primary end points were registered. The prevalence of high RPR was 25.9%. High on-aspirin RPR did not significantly influence the primary end point in the aspirin group (13.3% versus 9.9%, P=0.31). However, in post hoc analysis, patients with von Willebrand factor levels or platelet count below median values and high on-aspirin RPR had a statistically significant higher end point rate than that of patients with low RPR (20% versus 7.5%, P=0.014, and 18.2% versus 10.8%, P=0.039, respectively). The composite end point rate in patients with high on-aspirin RPR treated with clopidogrel was not different from that of patients treated with aspirin (7.6% versus 13.3%, P=0.16). Conclusions In stable, aspirin-treated patients with coronary artery disease, high on-aspirin RPR did not relate to clinical outcome and did not identify a group responsive to clopidogrel. Post hoc subgroup analysis raised the possibility that high on-aspirin RPR might be predictive in patients with low von Willebrand factor or platelet count, but these findings will require confirmation in future studies. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT00222261. (J Am Heart Assoc. 2012;1:e000703 doi: 10.1161/JAHA.112

  14. Differential Sex Response to Aspirin in Decreasing Aneurysm Rupture in Humans and Mice.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, Nohra; Starke, Robert M; Correa, Tatiana; Jabbour, Pascal M; Zanaty, Mario; Brown, Robert D; Torner, James C; Hasan, David M

    2016-08-01

    We previously found that aspirin decreases the risk of cerebral aneurysm rupture in humans. We aim to assess whether a sex differential exists in the response of human cerebral aneurysms to aspirin and confirm these observations in a mouse model of cerebral aneurysm. A nested case-control analysis from the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms was performed to assess whether a sex differential exists in the response of human cerebral aneurysms to aspirin. A series of experiments were subsequently performed in a mouse model of cerebral aneurysms. Aneurysms were induced with hypertension and elastase injection into mice basal cisterns. We found that aspirin decreased the risk of aneurysm rupture more significantly in men than in women in the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms. In mice, aspirin and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor did not affect cerebral aneurysm formation but significantly decreased the incidence of rupture. The incidence of rupture was significantly lower in male versus female mice on aspirin. Gene expression analysis from cerebral arteries showed higher 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase levels in male mice. The rate of cerebral aneurysm rupture was similar in male mice receiving aspirin and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase inhibitor compared with females receiving aspirin and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase agonist, signaling a reversal of the sex-differential response to aspirin. Aspirin decreases aneurysm rupture in human and mice, in part through cyclooxygenase-2 pathways. Evidence from animal and human studies suggests a consistent differential effect by sex. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase activation in females reduces the incidence of rupture and eliminates the sex-differential response to aspirin. PMID:27296993

  15. Aspirin induces cell death and caspase-dependent phosphatidylserine externalization in HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, E; Dalmau, M; Barragán, M; Pueyo, G; Bartrons, R; Gil, J

    1999-01-01

    The induction of cell death by aspirin was analysed in HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. Aspirin induced two hallmarks of apoptosis: nuclear chromatin condensation and increase in phosphatidylserine externalization. However, aspirin did not induce either oligonucleosomal fragmentation of DNA, decrease in DNA content or nuclear fragmentation. The effect of aspirin on Annexin V binding was inhibited by the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD.fmk, indicating the involvement of caspases in the apoptotic action of aspirin. However, aspirin did not induce proteolysis of PARP, suggesting that aspirin does not increase nuclear caspase 3-like activity in HT-29 cells. This finding may be related with the ‘atypical’ features of aspirin-induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10496355

  16. Dissimilar effects of chronic treatment with aspirin, flubiprofen and indomethacin on renal prostaglandins

    SciTech Connect

    Quilley, C.P.; McGiff, J.C.; Quilley, J.

    1986-03-01

    Inhibition of prostaglandin (PG) excretion is not sustained during long-term aspirin administration. The authors compared the effects of 9d treatment of SHR rats with aspirin (A), 200 mg/kg/d s.c., flubiprofen (F), 2.5 mg/kg/12h s.c., and indomethacin (I), 2.5 mg/kg/12 s.c. on excretion of radioimmunoassayable PGE/sub 2/ and PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../. Conversion of 1-(/sup 14/C) arachidonic acid (AA) by renal papillae was also examined. In vehicle-treated control rats (C) PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ excretion varied from 32.2 +/- 6.2 (mean +/- SEM) to 41.6 +.- 7.3 ng/6h, 3-fold higher than that of PGE/sub 2/. Within 6h of administration all 3 drugs reduced excretion of PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 2/ to less than 20% and 35% of C rats. Although urinary concentrations of PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 2/ in A-treated rats remained depressed, a 2-fold increase in urine volume resulted in excretion rates similar to C rats. In contrast, urine volume in I- and F-treated rats was unaffected while PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 2/ excretion rates in I-treated rats were 50''% of C rats and were also lower than control in F-treated rats. Paradoxically, metabolism of AA to PGs by by renal papillae dissected on day 10, 2-4h after the last drug dose, was markedly inhibited by A (PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ by 62% and PGE/sub 2/ by 82%), but unaffected by I and F. As the effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors differ on in vivo and indices of PG production, their intended action should be verified by measuring PG levels in biological fluids.

  17. Effects of very low versus standard dose acetyl salicylic acid, dipyridamole and sulfinpyrazone on platelet function and thromboxane formation in man.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, R; Siess, W; Weber, P C

    1981-04-01

    The effects of three conventional antiplatelet regimes, dipyridamole 3 X 75 mg/day (D), sulfinpyrazone 4 X 200 mg/day (S), acetylsalicylic acid 3 X 330 mg/day combined with dipyridamole 3 X 75 mg/day (ASA + D), and very low dose acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg/day (ASA) on platelet function were studied in man following 4 days of treatment. D and S slightly increased mean minimal ADP concentration for irreversible aggregation (n.s.), S reduced aggregation and thromboxane (TXB2) formation on low dose collagen (2P less than or equal to 0.05), ASA and ASA + D increased platelet count (2P less than or equal to 0.05), increased bleeding time (n.s. for ASA, 2P less than or equal to 0.05 for ASA + D), abolished irreversible aggregation on ADP, suppressed TXB2 formation on all (2P less than or equal to 0.001) and aggregation on lower concentrations of collagen (2P less than or equal to 0.01) and abolished aggregation and TXB2 formation on arachidonic acid (2P less than or equal to 0.001). Very low dose ASA suppresses platelet aggregation and TXB2 formation on several stimuli of possible physiologic significance. In the light of a recently proposed critical balance of vascular antiaggregatory prostacyclin and platelet proaggregatory TXA2 very low dose ASA might offer advantages over conventional dosage of ASA and should be evaluated in thromboembolic disorders. PMID:7238575

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of acetylsalicylic acid after intravenous and oral administration to healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Nagelschmitz, J; Blunck, M; Kraetzschmar, J; Ludwig, M; Wensing, G; Hohlfeld, T

    2014-01-01

    Background The pharmacology of single doses of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administered intravenously (250 or 500 mg) or orally (100, 300, or 500 mg) was evaluated in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Methods Blood and urine samples were collected before and up to 24 hours after administration of ASA in 22 healthy volunteers. Pharmacokinetic parameters and measurements of platelet aggregation were determined using validated techniques. Results A comparison between administration routes showed that the geometric mean dose-corrected peak concentrations (Cmax/D) and the geometric mean dose-corrected area under the curve (AUC0–∞/D) were higher following intravenous administration of ASA 500 mg compared with oral administration (estimated ratios were 11.23 and 2.03, respectively). Complete inhibition of platelet aggregation was achieved within 5 minutes with both intravenous ASA doses, reflecting a rapid onset of inhibition that was not observed with oral dosing. At 5 minutes after administration, the mean reduction in arachidonic acid-induced thromboxane B2 synthesis ex vivo was 99.3% with ASA 250 mg intravenously and 99.7% with ASA 500 mg intravenously. In exploratory analyses, thromboxane B2 synthesis was significantly lower after intravenous versus oral ASA 500 mg (P<0.0001) at each observed time point up to the first hour after administration. Concentrations of 6-keto-prostaglandin1α at 5 and 20 minutes after dosing were also significantly lower with ASA 500 mg intravenously than with ASA 500 mg orally. Conclusion This study demonstrates that intravenous ASA provides more rapid and consistent platelet inhibition than oral ASA within the first hour after dosing. PMID:24672263

  19. Antiplatelet Effect of Sequential Administration of Cilostazol in Patients with Acetylsalycilic Acid Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Muzaffer; Demircelik, Bora; Cetin, Mustafa; Cetin, Zehra; Isık, Serhat; Cıcekcıoglu, Hulya; Ulusoy, Feridun Vasfi; Eryonucu, Beyhan

    2016-01-01

    Background Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) resistance in patients with coronary artery disease is an important medical problem that can affect treatment decision-making and outcomes. Cilostazol has been investigated to determine its effectiveness in patients with acetylsalicylic acid resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiplatelet efficacy of sequential administration of CLZ in patients with ASA resistance. Methods A total of 180 patients were enrolled in our study. Patients with stable coronary artery disease were first given orally ASA 100 for 10 days, followed by collagen/epinephrine induced closure time (CTCEPI) measurements. Those who were found to be resistant to orally 100 mg of ASA were given orally 300 mg of ASA for an additional 10 days after which we repeated CTCEPI measurements. Those patients with resistance to orally 300 mg ASA were then given CLZ at a daily dose of orally 200 mg for 10 days followed by a final CTCEPI measurement. Results The rate of resistance to 100 mg ASA was 81/180 (45%) compared to a rate of 35/81 (43.2%) with 300 mg ASA. Of the 35 patients found to be resistant to 300 mg ASA, 22 (62.9%) also failed to respond to CLZ treatment. Overall, sequential administration of 300 mg ASA and 200 mg CLZ resulted in a reduction in the number of non-responders from 45% to 12.2%. Conclusions Initiation of CLZ could be of benefit in some patients with ASA-resistance for whom an effective anti-aggregant effect is of clinical importance. PMID:27274173

  20. Variable ASAS Counterparts to Galactic Bulge Survey X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabb, Monique; Hynes, R. I.; Britt, C.; Johnson, C. C.; Jonker, P.; Torres, M.; Maccarone, T.; Steeghs, D.; Greiss, S.; Nelemans, G.; Galactic Bulge Survey Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a shallow Chandra X-ray survey of two 6x1 degree strips located 1 degree above and below the Galactic Plane. After removing duplicates, the final GBS catalogue has 1640 unique X-ray sources. The goal of the survey is to test binary evolution models and increase the number of known Low Mass X-ray Binaries, in order to investigate questions such as the distribution of black hole mass and constrain the equation of state of neutron stars. We aim to identify all variable optical counterparts to the X-ray sources and analyze their periods. This lightcurve information, along with other multi-wavelength observations, enables the classifications of these GBS sources. Many of the GBS X-ray sources coincide with stars in the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS). We report here on variable counterparts to GBS sources identified within the ASAS dataset, examine their characteristics, and discuss their likely classification. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0908789. Monique Gabb also acknowledges support from the REU Site in Physics and Astronomy (NSF Grant No. 1004822) at Louisiana State University.

  1. The Use of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Possible Carrier in Drug Delivery System for Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Alias Mohd.; Buang, Nor Aziah; Yean, Lee Sze; Ibrahim, Mohd. Lokman

    2009-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have raised great interest in a number of applications, including field emission, energy storage, molecular electronics, sensors, biochips and drug delivery systems. This is due to their remarkable mechanical properties, chemical stability and biofunctionalizability. This nanomaterial is low in weight, has high strength and a high aspect ratio (long length compared to a small diameter). This paper will present a brief overview of drugs adsorbed onto the surface of carbon nanotubes via sonication method. The surface area of carbon nanotubes was measured by methylene blue method, Carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method were purified and functionalized in a mixture of concentrated acids (H2SO4:HNO3 = 3:1) at room temperature (25° C) via sonication in water bath, yielding carboxylic acid group on the CNTs' surface. CNT was successfully loaded with 48 %(w/w) aspirin molecules by suspending CNTs in a solution of aspirin in alcohol. Analysis of loaded CNTs by Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrum (FITR) and UV-visible Spectroscopy confirmed the loading of the drug onto the CNTs. The work presented is a prelude to the direction of using carbon nanotubes as a drug delivery system to desired sites in human body.

  2. Resolvin D3 and Aspirin-Triggered Resolvin D3 Are Protective for Injured Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Colby, Jennifer K; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E; Sham, Ho Pan; Dalli, Jesmond; Colas, Romain A; Winkler, Jeremy W; Hellmann, Jason; Wong, Blenda; Cui, Ye; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Petasis, Nicos A; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N; Levy, Bruce D

    2016-07-01

    Acute lung injury is a life-threatening condition caused by disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier leading to edema, influx of inflammatory leukocytes, and impaired gas exchange. Specialized proresolving mediators biosynthesized from essential fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid, have tissue protective effects in acute inflammation. Herein, we found that the docosahexaenoic acid-derived mediator resolvin D3 (RvD3): 4S,11R,17S-trihydroxydocosa-5Z,7E,9E,13Z,15E,19Z-hexaenoic acid was present in uninjured lungs, and increased significantly 24 to 72 hours after hydrochloric acid-initiated injury. Because of its delayed enzymatic degradation, we used aspirin-triggered (AT)-RvD3: 4S,11R,17R-trihydroxydocosa-5Z,7E,9E,13Z,15E,19Z-hexaenoic acid, a 17R-epimer of RvD3, for in vivo experiments. Histopathological correlates of acid injury (alveolar wall thickening, edema, and leukocyte infiltration) were reduced in mice receiving AT-RvD3 1 hour after injury. AT-RvD3-treated mice had significantly reduced edema, as demonstrated by lower wet/dry weight ratios, increased epithelial sodium channel γ expression, and more lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1-positive vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3-positive lymphatic vessels. Evidence for counterregulation of NF-κB by RvD3 and AT-RvD3 was seen in vitro and by AT-RvD3 in vivo. Increases in lung epithelial cell proliferation and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid levels of keratinocyte growth factor were observed with AT-RvD3, which also promoted cutaneous re-epithelialization. Together, these data demonstrate protective actions of RvD3 and AT-RvD3 for injured mucosa that accelerated restoration of epithelial barrier and function. PMID:27171898

  3. Aspirin and atenolol enhance metformin activity against breast cancer by targeting both neoplastic and microenvironment cells.

    PubMed

    Talarico, Giovanna; Orecchioni, Stefania; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Reggiani, Francesca; Mancuso, Patrizia; Calleri, Angelica; Gregato, Giuliana; Labanca, Valentina; Rossi, Teresa; Noonan, Douglas M; Albini, Adriana; Bertolini, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Metformin can induce breast cancer (BC) cell apoptosis and reduce BC local and metastatic growth in preclinical models. Since Metformin is frequently used along with Aspirin or beta-blockers, we investigated the effect of Metformin, Aspirin and the beta-blocker Atenolol in several BC models. In vitro, Aspirin synergized with Metformin in inducing apoptosis of triple negative and endocrine-sensitive BC cells, and in activating AMPK in BC and in white adipose tissue (WAT) progenitors known to cooperate to BC progression. Both Aspirin and Atenolol added to the inhibitory effect of Metformin against complex I of the respiratory chain. In both immune-deficient and immune-competent preclinical models, Atenolol increased Metformin activity against angiogenesis, local and metastatic growth of HER2+ and triple negative BC. Aspirin increased the activity of Metformin only in immune-competent HER2+ BC models. Both Aspirin and Atenolol, when added to Metformin, significantly reduced the endothelial cell component of tumor vessels, whereas pericytes were reduced by the addition of Atenolol but not by the addition of Aspirin. Our data indicate that the addition of Aspirin or of Atenolol to Metformin might be beneficial for BC control, and that this activity is likely due to effects on both BC and microenvironment cells. PMID:26728433

  4. Aspirin and atenolol enhance metformin activity against breast cancer by targeting both neoplastic and microenvironment cells

    PubMed Central

    Talarico, Giovanna; Orecchioni, Stefania; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Reggiani, Francesca; Mancuso, Patrizia; Calleri, Angelica; Gregato, Giuliana; Labanca, Valentina; Rossi, Teresa; Noonan, Douglas M.; Albini, Adriana; Bertolini, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Metformin can induce breast cancer (BC) cell apoptosis and reduce BC local and metastatic growth in preclinical models. Since Metformin is frequently used along with Aspirin or beta-blockers, we investigated the effect of Metformin, Aspirin and the beta-blocker Atenolol in several BC models. In vitro, Aspirin synergized with Metformin in inducing apoptosis of triple negative and endocrine-sensitive BC cells, and in activating AMPK in BC and in white adipose tissue (WAT) progenitors known to cooperate to BC progression. Both Aspirin and Atenolol added to the inhibitory effect of Metformin against complex I of the respiratory chain. In both immune-deficient and immune-competent preclinical models, Atenolol increased Metformin activity against angiogenesis, local and metastatic growth of HER2+ and triple negative BC. Aspirin increased the activity of Metformin only in immune-competent HER2+ BC models. Both Aspirin and Atenolol, when added to Metformin, significantly reduced the endothelial cell component of tumor vessels, whereas pericytes were reduced by the addition of Atenolol but not by the addition of Aspirin. Our data indicate that the addition of Aspirin or of Atenolol to Metformin might be beneficial for BC control, and that this activity is likely due to effects on both BC and microenvironment cells. PMID:26728433

  5. Affordability Calculations on a Health Education Campaign to Promote the Use of Aspirin in Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gareth

    2008-01-01

    Aspirin has far-reaching public health potential in reducing the risk of heart attacks, ischemic strokes and possibly cancer. Balanced against this potential are undesirable effects of the drug. It seems reasonable to allow every individual over the age of 50 years to make an informed choice about whether or not to take aspirin. A health education…

  6. Aspirin-intolerant asthma: a comprehensive review of biomarkers and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, Juan R; Teran, Luis M

    2013-08-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease is a tetrad of nasal polyps, chronic hypertrophic eosinophilic sinusitis, asthma, and sensitivity to aspirin. Unawareness of this clinical condition by patients and physicians may have grave consequences because of its association with near-fatal asthma. The pathogenesis of aspirin-intolerant asthma is not related with an immunoglobin E mechanism, but with an abnormal metabolism of the lipoxygenase (LO) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways. At present, a diagnosis of aspirin sensitivity can be established only by provocative aspirin challenge, which represents a health risk for the patient. This circumstance has encouraged the search for aspirin intolerance-specific biomarkers. Major attempts have focused on mediators related with inflammation and eicosanoid regulation. The use of modern laboratory techniques including high-throughput methods has facilitated the detection of dozens of biological metabolites associated with aspirin-intolerant asthma disease. Not surprisingly, the majority of these is implicated in the LO and COX pathways. However, substantial amounts of data reveal the participation of many genes deriving from different ontologies. Biomarkers may represent a powerful, noninvasive tool in the diagnosis of aspirin sensitivity; moreover, they could provide a new way to classify asthma phenotypes. PMID:23184151

  7. Aspirin Use on Incidence and Mortality of Gastrointestinal Cancers: Current State of Epidemiological Evidence.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Kuan; Tu, Hui-Tzu; See, Lai-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been one of the most widely used medications since its first synthesis more than 100 years ago. In addition to short-term use for pain and fever relief, regular use of aspirin has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases and strokes. The issue of regular aspirin use in cancer prevention is definitely promising, which has been supported by growing evidence from a number of observational studies and post-trial follow-up data. Among all cancers, aspirin is showing to be the most effective in reducing the risk of colorectal cancer, and even at lower doses demonstrates a 30-40% effectiveness in preventing colorectal cancer. Esophagus and stomach cancers are two cancers getting increased attention from emerging evidence of meta-analyses. Given the common side effects of aspirin, such as gastrointestinal complications, whether it is ready to take aspirin regularly for general population remains controversial since more studies are needed to clarify the net balance between harm and benefit. The decision might become more complicated since recently one molecular epidemiology study showed that different genetic traits may impact the effect of aspirin on colorectal cancer. Here we summarize recent evidence from meta-analyses related to gastrointestinal cancers. We reviewed updated observational studies and post-trial follow up data from randomized controlled trials focusing on the role of aspirin in the incidence and mortality of gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:26369680

  8. Aspirin After Mini-Stroke May Help Prevent Full-Blown Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_158939.html Aspirin After Mini-Stroke May Help Prevent Full-Blown Stroke Study finds risk is reduced by as much ... HealthDay News) -- Taking aspirin immediately after a mini-stroke significantly reduces the risk of a major stroke, ...

  9. Aspirin in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: current knowledge and future research needs.

    PubMed

    Hennekens, Charles H; Dalen, James E

    2014-11-01

    In secondary prevention, among a very wide range of survivors of prior occlusive cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and those suffering acute myocardial infarction (MI) or occlusive stroke, aspirin decreases risks of MI, stroke, and CVD death. In these high risk patients, the absolute benefits are large and absolute risks are far smaller so aspirin should be more widely prescribed. In contrast, in primary prevention, aspirin reduces risks of first MI but the evidence on stroke and CVD death remain inconclusive. Based on the current totality of evidence from predominantly low risk subjects where the absolute benefits is low and side effects the same as in secondary prevention, any decision to prescribe aspirin for primary prevention should be an individual clinical judgment by the healthcare provider that weighs the absolute benefit in reducing the risk of a first MI against the absolute risk of major bleeding. If the ongoing trials of intermediate risks subjects show net benefits then general guidelines may be justified with several caveats. First, any decision to use aspirin should continue to be made by the healthcare provider. Second, therapeutic lifestyle changes and other drugs of life saving benefit such as statins should be considered with aspirin as an adjunct, not alternative. The more widespread and appropriate use of aspirin in primary prevention is particularly attractive, especially in developing countries where CVD is emerging as the leading cause of death. In addition, aspirin is generally widely available over the counter and is extremely inexpensive. PMID:25444455

  10. 75 FR 61503 - Determination That AZDONE (Hydrocodone Bitartrate and Aspirin) Tablet, 5 Milligrams/500...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Aspirin) Tablet, 5 Milligrams/500 Milligrams, Was Not Withdrawn From Sale for Reasons of Safety or... Administration (FDA) has determined that AZDONE (hydrocodone bitartrate and aspirin) Tablet, 5 milligrams (mg... allow FDA to approve abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for hydrocodone bitartrate and...

  11. Decreased sensitivity to aspirin is associated with altered polyamine metabolism in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Cameron, Gary A; Wallace, Heather M

    2016-04-01

    Aspirin is a well-known analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic drug and is recognised as a chemopreventative agent in cardiovascular disease and, more recently, in colorectal cancer. Although several studies indicate that aspirin is capable of reducing the risk of developing cancers, there is a lack of convincing evidence that aspirin can prevent prostate cancer in man. In this study, aspirin was shown to be an effective inhibitor of the growth of human prostate cancer cells. In order to investigate the link between polyamine catabolism and the effects of aspirin we used a "Tet off" system that induced the activity of spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT) in human prostate cancer cells (LNCap). Treatment with aspirin was found to decrease induced SSAT activity in these cells. A negative correlation was observed between increased polyamine catabolism via increased SSAT activity and the sensitivity to aspirin. In the presence of increased SSAT activity high amounts of N (1)-acetylspermidine and putrescine were observed. These cells were also found to grow more slowly than the non-induced cells. The results indicate that SSAT and its related polyamine metabolism may play a key role in sensitivity of cancer cells to aspirin and possibly other NSAIDs and this may have implications for the development of novel chemopreventative agents. PMID:26704566

  12. Aspirin Promotes Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell Proliferation and Differentiation after White Matter Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Zuo, Shilun; Wang, Jing; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yunxia; Zhao, Jun; Han, Junliang; Xiong, Lize; Shi, Ming; Liu, Zhirong

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral white matter lesion (WML) is one of the main causes for cognitive impairment and is often caused by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. A line of evidence has shown that aspirin has neuroprotective effects and produces some benefits in long-term outcome and survival for ischemic stroke patients. However, whether aspirin exerts a protective effect against WML is still largely unknown. Here, we showed that aspirin could promote oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) proliferation and differentiation into oligodendrocytes after WML. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion, a well-established model for WML. Four weeks later, Morris water maze test showed an impairment of learning and memory ability of rat while aspirin treatment improved behavioral performance. Low dose of aspirin (25 mg/kg) was found to elevate the number of OPCs while relatively high doses (100–200 mg/kg) increased that of oligodendrocytes, and ameliorated WML-induced the thinning of myelin, as revealed by the electron microscope. Similarly, our in vitro study also showed that relatively low and high doses of aspirin enhanced OPC proliferation and differentiation into oligodendrocytes, respectively. Furthermore, we revealed that aspirin enhanced extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) but inhibited RhoA activities. In summary, we provided the first evidence that aspirin can promote oligodendrogenesis and oligodendrocyte myelination after WML, which may involve ERK and RhoA pathways. PMID:24478700

  13. Aspirin and Zileuton and Biomarker Expression in Nasal Tissue of Current Smokers | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase II trial studies the effects of aspirin and zileuton on genes related to tobacco use in current smokers. Smokers are at increased risk for developing lung and other cancers. Aspirin and zileuton may interfere with genes related to tobacco use and may be useful in preventing lung cancer in current smokers. |

  14. Variability in the Responsiveness to Low-Dose Aspirin: Pharmacological and Disease-Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Bianca; Petrucci, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    The main pharmacological aspects of pharmacodynamics (PD) and pharmacokinetics (PK) of aspirin as antiplatelet agent were unravelled between the late sixties and the eighties, and low-dose aspirin given once daily has been shown to be a mainstay in the current treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disorders. Nevertheless, several PD and PK aspects of aspirin in selected clinical conditions have recently emerged and deserve future clinical attention. In 1994, the term “aspirin resistance” was used for the first time, but, until now, no consensus exists on definition, standardized assay, underlying mechanisms, clinical impact, and possible efficacy of alternative therapeutic interventions. At variance with an undefined aspirin-resistant status, in the last 5 years, the concept of variability in response to aspirin due to specific pathophysiological mechanisms and based on PK and/or PD of the drug has emerged. This growing evidence highlights the existence and possible clinical relevance of an interindividual variability of pharmacological aspirin response and calls for new, large studies to test new low-dose aspirin-based regimens which may ameliorate platelet acetylation, reduce variability in drug responsiveness, and improve clinical efficacy on selected populations. PMID:22288010

  15. The ADAPTABLE Trial and Aspirin Dosing in Secondary Prevention for Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Abigail; Jones, W Schuyler; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2016-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the underlying cause of death in one out of seven deaths in the USA. Aspirin therapy has been proven to decrease mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with CAD. Despite a plethora of studies showing the benefit of aspirin in secondary prevention of cardiovascular events, debate remains regarding the optimal dose due to relatively small studies that had disparate results when comparing patients taking different aspirin dosages. More recently, aspirin dosing has been thoroughly studied in the CAD population with concomitant therapy (such as P2Y12 inhibitors); however, patients in these studies were not randomized to aspirin dose. No randomized controlled trial has directly measured aspirin dosages in a population of patients with established coronary artery disease. In 2015, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) developed a network, called PCORnet, that includes patient-powered research networks (PPRN) and clinical data research networks (CDRN). The main objective of PCORnet is to conduct widely generalizable observational studies and clinical trials (including large, pragmatic clinical trials) at a low cost. The first clinical trial, called Aspirin Dosing: A Patient-centric Trial Assessing Benefits and Long-term Effectiveness (ADAPTABLE), will randomly assign 20,000 subjects with established coronary heart disease to either low dose (81 mg) or high dose (325 mg) and should be able to finally answer which dosage of aspirin is best for patients with established cardiovascular disease. PMID:27423939

  16. Syrup formulations for post-tonsillectomy analgesia: a double-blind study comparing ibuprofen, aspirin and placebo.

    PubMed

    Parker, D A; Gibbin, K P; Noyelle, R M

    1986-09-01

    Post-tonsillectomy analgesia from ibuprofen, aspirin and placebo is compared in a double-blind study. The results are reported showing ibuprofen to have greater therapeutic benefit than placebo whereas aspirin did not. Methods of providing pain relief after tonsillectomy and the relative clinical merits of ibuprofen and aspirin are discussed. PMID:3531373

  17. Ascorbic acid prevents acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice by ameliorating glutathione recovery and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Lee, Jaeyong; Nabeshima, Atsunori; Homma, Takujiro; Kang, Eun Sil; Saito, Yuka; Yamada, Sohsuke; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Miyata, Satoshi; Fujii, Junichi

    2016-08-15

    Aldehyde reductase (AKR1A) plays a role in the biosynthesis of ascorbic acid (AsA), and AKR1A-deficient mice produce about 10-15% of the AsA that is produced by wild-type mice. We found that acetaminophen (AAP) hepatotoxicity was aggravated in AKR1A-deficient mice. The pre-administration of AsA in the drinking water markedly ameliorated the AAP hepatotoxicity in the AKR1A-deficient mice. Treatment of the mice with AAP decreased both glutathione and AsA levels in the liver in the early phase after AAP administration, and an AsA deficiency delayed the recovery of the glutathione content in the healing phase. While in cysteine supply systems; a neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1, a cystine transporter xCT, enzymes for the transsulfuration pathway, and autophagy markers, were all elevated in the liver as the result of the AAP treatment, the AsA deficiency suppressed their induction. Thus, AsA appeared to exert a protective effect against AAP hepatotoxicity by ameliorating the supply of cysteine that is available for glutathione synthesis as a whole. Because some drugs produce reactive oxygen species, resulting in the consumption of glutathione during the metabolic process, the intake of sufficient amounts of AsA would be beneficial for protecting against the hepatic damage caused by such drugs. PMID:27288086

  18. Low-dose aspirin in polycythaemia vera: a pilot study. Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia (GISP).

    PubMed

    1997-05-01

    In this pilot study, aimed at exploring the feasibility of a large-scale trial of low-dose aspirin in polycythaemia vera (PV), 112 PV patients (42 females, 70 males. aged 17-80 years) were selected for not having a clear indication for, or contraindication to, aspirin treatment and randomized to receive oral aspirin (40 mg/d) or placebo. Follow-up duration was 16 +/- 6 months. Measurements of thromboxane A2 production during whole blood clotting demonstrated complete inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity in patients receiving aspirin. Aspirin administration was not associated with any bleeding complication. Within the limitations of the small sample size, this study indicates that a biochemically effective regimen of antiplatelet therapy is well tolerated in patients with polycythaemia vera and that a large-scale placebo-controlled trial is feasible. PMID:9163613

  19. Warfarin and low-dose aspirin for stroke prevention from severe intracranial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bekavac, I; Hanna, J P; Sila, C A; Furland, A J

    1999-01-01

    Management of symptomatic, intracranial, large-arterial atherosclerosis is controversial. We assessed the safety and efficacy of combining warfarin and low-dose aspirin to prevent stroke from intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis failing prior treatment with either aspirin or warfarin. Patients with severe intracranial stenosis were prescribed combination therapy, warfarin (international normalized ratio [INR] 2 to 3) and aspirin 81 mg daily. Ten men and six women treated with combination therapy had one recurrent ischemic event during 382 months of therapy. No patient suffered a myocardial infarction or sudden vascular death. No serious hemorrhagic complication occurred. The combination of warfarin and low-dose aspirin seems safe and effective in preventing recurrent stroke from symptomatic, intracranial, large-arterial occlusive disease after failure with either aspirin or warfarin monotherapy. PMID:17895135

  20. Cost-effective prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism after total joint arthroplasty: warfarin versus aspirin.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi Tabatabaee, Reza; Rasouli, Mohammad R; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-02-01

    Although recent guidelines suggest aspirin for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in low risk patients following total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), there are no cost-effectiveness studies comparing aspirin and warfarin. In a Markov cohort cost-effectiveness analysis, we found that aspirin cost less and saved more quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) than warfarin in all age groups. Cost per QALY gained by aspirin was $24,506.20 at age of 55 and $47,148.10 at the age of 85 following THA and $15,117.20 and $24,458.10 after TKA, which were greater than warfarin. In patients undergoing THA/TKA without prior VTE, aspirin is more cost-effective prophylactic agent than warfarin. Warfarin might be a better prophylaxis in TKA patients with high probability of VTE and very low probability of bleeding. PMID:25534862