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Sample records for acid bacteria yeasts

  1. Acetic acid production from food wastes using yeast and acetic acid bacteria micro-aerobic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; He, Dongwei; Niu, Dongjie; Zhao, Youcai

    2015-05-01

    In this study, yeast and acetic acid bacteria strains were adopted to enhance the ethanol-type fermentation resulting to a volatile fatty acids yield of 30.22 g/L, and improve acetic acid production to 25.88 g/L, with food wastes as substrate. In contrast, only 12.81 g/L acetic acid can be obtained in the absence of strains. The parameters such as pH, oxidation reduction potential and volatile fatty acids were tested and the microbial diversity of different strains and activity of hydrolytic ferment were investigated to reveal the mechanism. The optimum pH and oxidation reduction potential for the acetic acid production were determined to be at 3.0-3.5 and -500 mV, respectively. Yeast can convert organic matters into ethanol, which is used by acetic acid bacteria to convert the organic wastes into acetic acid. The acetic acid thus obtained from food wastes micro-aerobic fermentation liquid could be extracted by distillation to get high-pure acetic acid.

  2. [Volatile oil of Anethum Graveolens L. as an inhibitor of yeast and lactic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Shcherbanovsky, L R; Kapelev, I G

    1975-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of 25 volatile oils from aerial parts and seeds of dill (Anethum graveolens L.) of different geographical origin towards yeast Saccharomyces vini and lactic acid bacteria Lactobacterium buchneri was measured by serial dilutions. Volatile oils from mature seeds and green parts of the plants harvested at late vegetation phases showed the highest activity. The geographical origin of plants influenced insignificantly the antimicrobial activity of volatile oil.

  3. Interaction between lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in sour-dough using a rheofermentometer.

    PubMed

    Gobbetti, M; Corsetti, A; Rossi, J

    1995-11-01

    Rheofermentometer assays were used to characterize the leavening of sour-doughs produced using species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts, alone or in combination. Saccharomyces cerevisiae 141 produced the most CO2 and ethanol whereas S. exiguus M14 and Lactobacillus brevis subsp. lindneri CB1 contributed poorly to leavening and gave sour-doughs without porosity. In comparison with that seen in sour-dough produced with yeast alone, yeast fermentation with heterofermentative LAB present was faster whereas that with homofermentative LAB (L. plantarum DC400, L. farciminis CF3) present was slower and produced more CO2. Combining L. brevis subsp. lindneri CB1 with S. cerevisiae 141 decreased bacterial cell numbers and souring activity. However, addition of fructose to the sour-dough overcame these problems as well as activating S. cerevisiae 141.

  4. Lactic acid bacteria and yeasts involved in the fermentation ofamabere amaruranu, a Kenyan fermented milk

    PubMed Central

    Nyambane, Bitutu; Thari, William M; Wangoh, John; Njage, Patrick M K

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous fermented milk products contain microbiota composed of technologically important species and strains which are gradually getting lost with new technologies. We investigated the microbial diversity inamabere amaruranu, a traditionally fermented milk product from Kenya. Sixteen samples of the product from different containers were obtained. One hundred and twenty isolates of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and 67 strains of yeasts were identified using API 50 CH and API 20 C AUX identification kits, respectively. The average pH of all the traditional fermented samples was 4.00 ± 0.93. Lactobacilli, yeasts, and molds as well asEnterobacteriaceae counts from the plastic containers were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those from gourd.Enterobacteriaceae were below 1.00 ± 1.11 log10 cfu/mL in products from the gourds and 2.17 ± 1.92 log10 cfu/mL from the plastic containers. The LAB species were identified asStreptococcus thermophilus (25%),Lactobacillus plantarum (20%), andLeuconostoc mesenteroides (20%). The predominant yeasts wereSaccharomyces cerevisiae (25%),Trichosporum mucoides (15%),Candida famata (10%), andCandida albicans (10%). The type of vessel used for fermentation had no significant influence on the type of isolated and identified species. The diverse mixture of LAB and yeasts microflora forms a potential consortium for further product innovation inamabere amaruranu and other fermented milk products. PMID:25493187

  5. House microbiotas as sources of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in traditional Italian sourdoughs.

    PubMed

    Minervini, Fabio; Lattanzi, Anna; De Angelis, Maria; Celano, Giuseppe; Gobbetti, Marco

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed at understanding the extent of contamination by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts from the house microbiotas during sourdough back-slopping. Besides sourdoughs, wall, air, storage box, dough mixer and flour of four bakeries were analyzed. Based on plate counts, LAB and yeasts dominated the house microbiota. Based on high throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes, flour harbored the highest number of Firmicutes, but only few of them adapted to storage box, dough mixer and sourdough. Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis showed the highest abundance in dough mixer and sourdoughs. Lactobacillus plantarum persisted only in storage box, dough mixer and sourdough of two bakeries. Weissella cibaria also showed higher adaptability in sourdough than in bakery equipment, suggesting that flour is the main origin of this species. Based on 18S rRNA data, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the dominant yeast in house and sourdough microbiotas, excepted one bakery dominated by Kazachstania exigua. The results of this study suggest that the dominant species of sourdough LAB and yeasts dominated also the house microbiota.

  6. Molecular identification and physiological characterization of yeasts, lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria isolated from heap and box cocoa bean fermentations in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Visintin, Simonetta; Alessandria, Valentina; Valente, Antonio; Dolci, Paola; Cocolin, Luca

    2016-01-04

    Yeast, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB) populations, isolated from cocoa bean heap and box fermentations in West Africa, have been investigated. The fermentation dynamicswere determined by viable counts, and 106 yeasts, 105 LAB and 82 AAB isolateswere identified by means of rep-PCR grouping and sequencing of the rRNA genes. During the box fermentations, the most abundant species were Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida ethanolica, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Acetobacter pasteurianus and Acetobacter syzygii, while S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia manshurica, C. ethanolica, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Lb. fermentum, Lb. plantarum, A. pasteurianus and Acetobacter lovaniensis were identified in the heap fermentations. Furthermore, the most abundant species were molecularly characterized by analyzing the rep-PCR profiles. Strains grouped according to the type of fermentations and their progression during the transformation process were also highlighted. The yeast, LAB and AAB isolates were physiologically characterized to determine their ability to grow at different temperatures, as well as at different pH, and ethanol concentrations, tolerance to osmotic stress, and lactic acid and acetic acid inhibition. Temperatures of 45 °C, a pH of 2.5 to 3.5, 12% (v/v) ethanol and high concentrations of lactic and acetic acid have a significant influence on the growth of yeasts, LAB and AAB. Finally, the yeastswere screened for enzymatic activity, and the S. cerevisiae, H. guilliermondii, H. uvarumand C. ethanolica species were shown to possess several enzymes that may impact the quality of the final product.

  7. Role of specific components from commercial inactive dry yeast winemaking preparations on the growth of wine lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Andújar-Ortiz, Inmaculada; Pozo-Bayón, Maria Angeles; García-Ruiz, Almudena; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria

    2010-07-28

    The role of specific components from inactive dry yeast preparations widely used in winemaking on the growth of three representative wine lactic acid bacteria (Oenococcus oeni, Lactobacillus hilgardii and Pediococcus pentosaceus) has been studied. A pressure liquid extraction technique using solvents of different polarity was employed to obtain extracts with different chemical composition from the inactive dry yeast preparations. Each of the extracts was assayed against the three lactic acid bacteria. Important differences in the effect of the extracts on the growth of the bacteria were observed, which depended on the solvent employed during the extraction, on the type of commercial preparations and on the lactic acid bacteria species. The extracts that exhibited the most different activity were chemically characterized in amino acids, free monosaccharides, monosaccharides from polysaccharides, fatty acids and volatile compounds. In general, specific amino acids and monosaccharides were related to a stimulating effect whereas fatty acid composition and likely some volatile compounds seemed to show an inhibitory effect on the growth of the lactic acid bacteria. These results may provide novel and useful information in trying to obtain better and more specific formulations of winemaking inactive dry yeast preparations.

  8. Biodiversity of yeasts, lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in the fermentation of "Shanxi aged vinegar", a traditional Chinese vinegar.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia Jia; Ma, Ying Kun; Zhang, Fen Fen; Chen, Fu Sheng

    2012-05-01

    Shanxi aged vinegar is a famous traditional Chinese vinegar made from several kinds of cereal by spontaneous solid-state fermentation techniques. In order to get a comprehensive understanding of culturable microorganism's diversity present in its fermentation, the indigenous microorganisms including 47 yeast isolates, 28 lactic acid bacteria isolates and 58 acetic acid bacteria isolates were recovered in different fermenting time and characterized based on a combination of phenotypic and genotypic approaches including inter-delta/PCR, PCR-RFLP, ERIC/PCR analysis, as well as 16S rRNA and 26S rRNA partial gene sequencing. In the alcoholic fermentation, the dominant yeast species Saccharomyces (S.) cerevisiae (96%) exhibited low phenotypic and genotypic diversity among the isolates, while Lactobacillus (Lb.) fermentum together with Lb. plantarum, Lb. buchneri, Lb. casei, Pediococcus (P.) acidilactici, P. pentosaceus and Weissella confusa were predominated in the bacterial population at the same stage. Acetobacter (A.) pasteurianus showing great variety both in genotypic and phenotypic tests was the dominant species (76%) in the acetic acid fermentation stage, while the other acetic acid bacteria species including A. senegalensis, A. indonesiensis, A. malorum and A. orientalis, as well as Gluconobacter (G.) oxydans were detected at initial point of alcoholic and acetic acid fermentation stage respectively.

  9. Simultaneous and successive inoculations of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria on the fermentation of an unsulfited Tannat grape must

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Viviana; Beccaria, Bruno; Abreo, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between yeasts and lactic acid bacteria are strain specific, and their outcome is expected to change in simultaneous alcoholic - malolactic fermentations from the pattern observed in successive fermentations. One Oenococcus oeni strain Lalvin VP41™ was inoculated with two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains either simultaneously, three days after the yeast inoculation, or when alcoholic fermentation was close to finish. Early bacterial inoculations with each yeast strain allowed for the growth of the bacterial populations, and the length of malolactic fermentation was reduced to six days. Alcoholic fermentation by Lalvin ICV D80® yeast strain left the highest residual sugar, suggesting a negative effect of the bacterial growth and malolactic activity on its performance. In sequential inoculations the bacterial populations did not show actual growth with either yeast strain. In this strategy, both yeast strains finished the alcoholic fermentations, and malolactic fermentations took longer to finish. Lalvin ICV D80® allowed for higher viability and activity of the bacterial strain than Fermicru UY4® under the three inoculation strategies. This was beneficial for the sequential completion of both fermentations, but negatively affected the completion of alcoholic fermentation by Lalvin ICV D80® in the early bacteria additions. Conversely, Fermicru UY4®, which was rather inhibitory towards the bacteria, favored the timely completion of both fermentations simultaneously. As bacteria in early inoculations with low or no SO2 addition can be expected to multiply and interact with fermenting yeasts, not only are the yeast-bacterium strains combination and time point of the inoculation to be considered, but also the amount of bacteria inoculated. PMID:24948914

  10. Biodiversity of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in spontaneously-fermented buckwheat and teff sourdoughs.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Alice V; Arendt, Elke K; Dal Bello, Fabio

    2011-05-01

    In this study, four different laboratory scale gluten-free (GF) sourdoughs were developed from buckwheat or teff flours. The fermentations were initiated by the spontaneous biota of the flours and developed under two technological conditions (A and B). Sourdoughs were propagated by continuous back-slopping until the stability was reached. The composition of the stable biota occurring in each sourdough was assessed using both culture-dependent and -independent techniques. Overall, a broad spectrum of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts species, belonging mainly to the genera Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc, Kazachstania and Candida, were identified in the stable sourdoughs. Buckwheat and teff sourdoughs were dominated mainly by obligate or facultative heterofermentative LAB, which are commonly associated with traditional wheat or rye sourdoughs. However, the spontaneous fermentation of the GF flours resulted also in the selection of species which are not consider endemic to traditional sourdoughs, i.e. Pediococcus pentosaceus, Leuconostoc holzapfelii, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus vaginalis, Lactobacillus sakei, Lactobacillus graminis and Weissella cibaria. In general, the composition of the stable biota was strongly affected by the fermentation conditions, whilst Lactobacillus plantarum dominated in all buckwheat sourdoughs. Lactobacillus pontis is described for the first time as dominant species in teff sourdough. Among yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida glabrata dominated teff sourdoughs, whereas the solely Kazachstania barnetti was isolated in buckwheat sourdough developed under condition A. This study allowed the identification and isolation of LAB and yeasts species which are highly competitive during fermentation of buckwheat or teff flours. Representatives of these species can be selected as starters for the production of sourdough destined to GF bread production.

  11. Phytate degradation by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts during the wholemeal dough fermentation: a 31P NMR study.

    PubMed

    Reale, Anna; Mannina, Luisa; Tremonte, Patrizio; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Succi, Mariantonietta; Sorrentino, Elena; Coppola, Raffaele

    2004-10-06

    myo-Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is the main source of phosphorus in cereal grains, and therefore, in bakery products. Different microorganisms such as yeasts and lactic acid bacteria have phytase enzymes able to hydrolyze IP6 during the wholemeal breadmaking. In this paper, the phytase activity of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus curvatus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from southern Italian sourdoughs, is assayed using the (31)P NMR technique. The sourdough technology based on the use of lactic acid bacteria in the breadmaking is finally suggested.

  12. Nondairy beverage produced by controlled fermentation with potential probiotic starter cultures of lactic acid bacteria and yeast.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ana Luiza; Ramos, Cintia Lacerda; da Costa Souza, Patrícia Nirlane; Cardoso, Mauro Guilherme Barros; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2017-02-21

    This work aimed to develop a nondairy fermented beverage from a blend of cassava and rice based on Brazilian indigenous beverage cauim using probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeast. The indigenous strains Lactobacillus plantarum CCMA 0743 (from cauim) and Torulaspora delbrueckii CCMA 0235 (from tarubá), and the commercial probiotic, L. acidophilus LAC-04, were used as starter cultures in single and co-cultivations. The bacteria populations were around 8.0 log (CFU/mL) at the end of all fermentations as recommended for probiotic products. Higher residual starch contents were noted in the single LAB cultures (10.6% [w/w]) than in co-cultures (<6% [w/w]), showing that co-culture may help the digestibility. For all different assays (single and co-culture), lactic acid was the main organic acid detected (>1.6g/L) and ethanol was lower than 0.5% (w/v) consisting in a non-alcoholic beverage. The assays containing yeast showed the highest antioxidant activity (around 10% by DPPH and ABTS methods). Therefore, a nondairy fermented beverage was successfully obtained, and the co-culture of LAB and T. delbrueckii could increase the product's functional properties.

  13. Preservation of acidified cucumbers with a combination of fumaric acid and cinnamaldehyde that target lactic acid bacteria and yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The naturally occurring compound, fumaric acid, was evaluated as a potential preservative for the long-term storage of cucumbers. Fumaric acid inhibited growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in an acidified cucumber juice medium model system resembling conditions that could allow preservation of cucu...

  14. Plant-based Paste Fermented by Lactic Acid Bacteria and Yeast: Functional Analysis and Possibility of Application to Functional Foods

    PubMed Central

    Kuwaki, Shinsuke; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Tanaka, Hidehiko; Ishihara, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    A plant-based paste fermented by lactic acid bacteria and yeast (fermented paste) was made from various plant materials. The paste was made of fermented food by applying traditional food-preservation techniques, that is, fermentation and sugaring. The fermented paste contained major nutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids), 18 kinds of amino acids, and vitamins (vitamin A, B1, B2, B6, B12, E, K, niacin, biotin, pantothenic acid, and folic acid). It contained five kinds of organic acids, and a large amount of dietary fiber and plant phytochemicals. Sucrose from brown sugar, used as a material, was completely resolved into glucose and fructose. Some physiological functions of the fermented paste were examined in vitro. It was demonstrated that the paste possessed antioxidant, antihypertensive, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy and anti-tyrosinase activities in vitro. It was thought that the fermented paste would be a helpful functional food with various nutrients to help prevent lifestyle diseases. PMID:25114554

  15. Identification of yeast and acetic acid bacteria isolated from the fermentation and acetification of persimmon (Diospyros kaki).

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, C; Mateo, E; Mas, A; Torija, M J

    2012-05-01

    Persimmon (Diospyros kaki) is a seasonal fruit with important health benefits. In this study, persimmon use in wine and condiment production was investigated using molecular methods to identify the yeast and acetic acid bacteria (AAB) isolated from the alcoholic fermentation and acetification of the fruit. Alcoholic fermentation was allowed to occur either spontaneously, or by inoculation with a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strain, while acetification was always spontaneous; all these processes were performed in triplicates. Non-Saccharomyces yeast species were particularly abundant during the initial and mid-alcoholic fermentation stages, but S. cerevisiae became dominant toward the end of these processes. During spontaneous fermentation, S. cerevisiae Sc1 was the predominant strain isolated throughout, while the commercial strain of S. cerevisiae was the most common strain isolated from the inoculated fermentations. The main non-Saccharomyces strains isolated included Pichia guilliermondii, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Zygosaccharomyces florentinus and Cryptococcus sp. A distinct succession of AAB was observed during the acetification process. Acetobacter malorun was abundant during the initial and mid-stages, while Gluconacetobacter saccharivorans was the main species during the final stages of these acetifications. Four additional AAB species, Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter syzygii, Gluconacetobacter intermedius and Gluconacetobacter europaeus, were also detected. We observed 28 different AAB genotypes, though only 6 of these were present in high numbers (between 25%-60%), resulting in a high biodiversity index.

  16. Enhancement of survival of probiotic and non-probiotic lactic acid bacteria by yeasts in fermented milk under non-refrigerated conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shao-Quan; Tsao, Marlene

    2009-09-30

    The effects of yeasts on the survival of probiotic and non-probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were studied in fermented milk under non-refrigerated conditions (30 degrees C) with a view to develop ambient-stable fermented milk with live LAB. Five yeasts tested (Saccharomyces bayanus, Williopsis saturnus var. saturnus, Yarrowia lipolytica, Candida kefyr and Kluyveromyces marxianus) enhanced the survival of Lactobacillus bulgaricus (but not Streptococcus thermophilus) in a mixed yoghurt culture in yoghurt by approximately 10(2) to 10(5)-fold. Seven yeasts examined (Candida krusei, Geotrichum candidum, Pichia subpelliculosa, Kloeckera apiculata, Pichia membranifaciens, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Y. lipolytica) improved the survival of Lactobacillus rhamnosus in fermented milk by approximately10(3) to 10(6)-fold. W. saturnus var. saturnus enhanced the survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. rhamnosus (probiotic) and Lactobacillus reuteri by up to 10(6)-fold, but the same yeast failed to improve the survival of Lactobacillus johnsonii (probiotic), S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus in fermented milk. These results provide definitive evidence that yeasts possess stability-enhancing effects on LAB and that the specific effects of yeasts on LAB stability vary with yeasts as well as with LAB. However, the molecular mechanism of such interaction of yeasts with LAB remains to be found.

  17. The lactic acid bacteria and yeast microbiota of eighteen sourdoughs used for the manufacture of traditional Italian sweet leavened baked goods.

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Anna; Minervini, Fabio; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Diviccaro, Annamaria; Antonielli, Livio; Cardinali, Gianluigi; Cappelle, Stefan; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2013-05-15

    The lactic acid bacteria and yeast microbiota of eighteen sourdoughs used for the manufacture of some traditional Italian sweet leavened baked goods were studied through culture-dependent method and pyrosequencing. Flours used for back slopping and sourdoughs were also biochemically characterized. Principal component analysis was applied to explore eventual correlations between process parameters applied during back slopping, some flour nutrients, profile of microbiota, and biochemical characteristics of sourdoughs. The median values of the cell density of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts were 8.05 and 7.03 log CFU/g, respectively. As shown by culture-dependent method, Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis was identified in all the sourdoughs, except for Panaredda and Torcolo di San Costanzo. For eleven sourdoughs, all the lactic acid bacteria isolates were allotted to this species. For Buccellato di Lucca, Mbriagotto, Pandoro, and Nadalin sourdoughs, at least 80% of the isolates was allotted to this species. Other lactic acid bacteria isolated with a relatively high frequence were Lactobacillus plantarum and Leuconostoc citreum. Pyrosequencing confirmed and complemented the culture-dependent approach, detecting L. sanfranciscensis also in Panaredda and Torcolo di San Costanzo sourdoughs. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was identified in all the sourdoughs, except for Mbriagotto, Ciambella di Mosto and Pandolce Genovese. These latter sourdoughs harbored strains of Candida humilis, whereas five sourdoughs combined the presence of both yeast species. Positive correlations were found between time of back slopping and cell density and main metabolites of lactic acid bacteria. Percentage of sourdough used as inoculum was mainly correlated with the cell density of yeasts and the concentration of ethanol. This study provided a comprehensive and comparative approach to highlight the dominant microbiota of Italian sourdoughs, which could be exploited further to guarantee a highly

  18. Taxonomic structure of the yeasts and lactic acid bacteria microbiota of pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr.) and use of autochthonous starters for minimally processing.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Raffaella; Cardinali, Gainluigi; Minervini, Giovanna; Antonielli, Livio; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Ricciuti, Patrizia; Gobbetti, Marco

    2010-05-01

    Pichia guilliermondii was the only identified yeast in pineapple fruits. Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rossiae were the main identified species of lactic acid bacteria. Typing of lactic acid bacteria differentiated isolates depending on the layers. L. plantarum 1OR12 and L. rossiae 2MR10 were selected within the lactic acid bacteria isolates based on the kinetics of growth and acidification. Five technological options, including minimal processing, were considered for pineapple: heating at 72 degrees C for 15 s (HP); spontaneous fermentation without (FP) or followed by heating (FHP), and fermentation by selected autochthonous L. plantarum 1OR12 and L. rossiae 2MR10 without (SP) or preceded by heating (HSP). After 30 days of storage at 4 degrees C, HSP and SP had a number of lactic acid bacteria 1000 to 1,000,000 times higher than the other processed pineapples. The number of yeasts was the lowest in HSP and SP. The Community Level Catabolic Profiles of processed pineapples indirectly confirmed the capacity of autochthonous starters to dominate during fermentation. HSP and SP also showed the highest antioxidant activity and firmness, the better preservation of the natural colours and were preferred for odour and overall acceptability.

  19. Preservation of acidified cucumbers with a natural preservative combination of fumaric acid and allyl isothiocyanate that target lactic acid bacteria and yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Without the addition of preservative compounds cucumbers acidified with 150 mM acetic acid with pH adjusted to 3.5 typically undergo fermentation by lactic acid bacteria. Fumaric acid (20 mM) inhibited growth of Lactobacillus plantarum and the lactic acid bacteria present on fresh cucumbers, but sp...

  20. Optimal Cultivation Time for Yeast and Lactic Acid Bacteria in Fermented Milk and Effects of Fermented Soybean Meal on Rumen Degradability Using Nylon Bag Technique

    PubMed Central

    Polyorach, S.; Poungchompu, O.; Wanapat, M.; Kang, S.; Cherdthong, A.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine an optimal cultivation time for populations of yeast and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) co-cultured in fermented milk and effects of soybean meal fermented milk (SBMFM) supplementation on rumen degradability in beef cattle using nylon bag technique. The study on an optimal cultivation time for yeast and LAB growth in fermented milk was determined at 0, 4, 8, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h post-cultivation. After fermenting for 4 days, an optimal cultivation time of yeast and LAB in fermented milk was selected and used for making the SBMFM product to study nylon bag technique. Two ruminal fistulated beef cattle (410±10 kg) were used to study on the effect of SBMFM supplementation (0%, 3%, and 5% of total concentrate substrate) on rumen degradability using in situ method at incubation times of 0, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h according to a Completely randomized design. The results revealed that the highest yeast and LAB population culture in fermented milk was found at 72 h-post cultivation. From in situ study, the soluble fractions at time zero (a), potential degradability (a+b) and effective degradability of dry matter (EDDM) linearly (p<0.01) increased with the increasing supplemental levels and the highest was in the 5% SBMFM supplemented group. However, there was no effect of SBMFM supplement on insoluble degradability fractions (b) and rate of degradation (c). In conclusion, the optimal fermented time for fermented milk with yeast and LAB was at 72 h-post cultivation and supplementation of SBMFM at 5% of total concentrate substrate could improve rumen degradability of beef cattle. However, further research on effect of SBMFM on rumen ecology and production performance in meat and milk should be conducted using in vivo both digestion and feeding trials. PMID:26954119

  1. Combined moist airtight storage and feed fermentation of barley by the yeast Wickerhamomyces anomalus and a lactic acid bacteria consortium

    PubMed Central

    Borling Welin, Jenny; Lyberg, Karin; Passoth, Volkmar; Olstorpe, Matilda

    2015-01-01

    This study combined moist airtight storage of moist grain with pig feed fermentation. Starter cultures with the potential to facilitate both technologies were added to airtight stored moist crimped cereal grain, and the impact on storage microflora and the quality of feed fermentations generated from the grain was investigated. Four treatments were compared: three based on moist barley, either un-inoculated (M), inoculated with Wickerhamomyces anomalus (W), or inoculated with W. anomalus and LAB starter culture, containing Pediococcus acidilactici DSM 16243, Pediococcus pentosaceus DSM 12834 and Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 12837 (WLAB); and one treatment based on dried barley (D). After 6 weeks of storage, four feed fermentations FM, FW, FWLAB, and FD, were initiated from M, W, WLAB, and D, respectively, by mixing the grain with water to a dry matter content of 30%. Each treatment was fermented in batch initially for 7 days and then kept in a continuous mode by adding new feed daily with 50% back-slop. During the 6 week storage period, the average water activity decreased in M, W and WLAB from 0.96 to 0.85, and cereal pH decreased from approximately 6.0 at harvest to 4.5. Feed fermentation conferred a further pH decrease to 3.8–4.1. In M, W and WLAB, molds and Enterobacteriaceae were mostly below detection limit, whereas both organism groups were detected in D. In fermented feed, Enterobacteriaceae were below detection limit in almost all conditions. Molds were detected in FD, for most of the fermentation time in FM and at some sampling points in FW and FWLAB. Starter organisms, especially W. anomalus and L. plantarum comprised a considerable proportion of the yeast and LAB populations, respectively, in both stored grain and fermented feed. However, autochthonous Pichia kudriavzevii and Kazachstania exigua partially dominated the yeast populations in stored grain and fermented feed, respectively. PMID:25954295

  2. Chlorine dioxide against bacteria and yeasts from the alcoholic fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Meneghin, Silvana Perissatto; Reis, Fabricia Cristina; de Almeida, Paulo Garcia; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina

    2008-01-01

    The ethanol production in Brazil is carried out by fed-batch or continuous process with cell recycle, in such way that bacterial contaminants are also recycled and may be troublesome due to the substrate competition. Addition of sulphuric acid when inoculum cells are washed can control the bacterial growth or alternatively biocides are used. This work aimed to verify the effect of chlorine dioxide, a well-known biocide for bacterial decontamination of water and equipments, against contaminant bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides) from alcoholic fermentation, through the method of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), as well as its effect on the industrial yeast inoculum. Lower MIC was found for B. subtilis (10 ppm) and Leuconostoc mesenteroides (50 ppm) than for Lactobacillus fermentum (75 ppm) and Lactobacillus plantarum (125 ppm). Additionally, these concentrations of chlorine dioxide had similar effects on bacteria as 3 ppm of Kamoran® (recommended dosage for fermentation tanks), exception for B. subtilis, which could not be controlled at this Kamoran® dosage. The growth of industrial yeasts was affected when the concentration of chlorine dioxide was higher than 50 ppm, but the effect was slightly dependent on the type of yeast strain. Smooth yeast colonies (dispersed cells) seemed to be more sensitive than wrinkled yeast colonies (clustered cells/pseudohyphal growth), both isolated from an alcohol-producing unit during the 2006/2007 sugar cane harvest. The main advantage in the usage of chlorine dioxide that it can replace antibiotics, avoiding the selection of resistant populations of microorganisms. PMID:24031227

  3. Modelling the effect of ascorbic acid, sodium metabisulphite and sodium chloride on the kinetic responses of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in table olive storage using a specifically implemented Quasi-chemical primary model.

    PubMed

    Echevarria, R; Bautista-Gallego, J; Arroyo-López, F N; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2010-04-15

    The goal of this work was to apply the Quasi-chemical primary model (a system of four ordinary differential equations that derives from a hypothetical four-step chemical mechanism involving an antagonistic metabolite) in the study of the evolution of yeast and lactic acid bacteria populations during the storage of Manzanilla-Aloreña table olives subjected to different mixtures of ascorbic acid, sodium metabisulphite and NaCl. Firstly, the Quasi-chemical model was applied to microbial count data to estimate the growth-decay biological parameters. The model accurately described the evolution of both populations during storage, providing detailed information on the microbial behaviour. Secondly, these parameters were used as responses and analysed according to a mixture design experiment (secondary model). The contour lines of the corresponding response surfaces clearly disclosed the relationships between growth and environmental conditions, showing the stimulating and inhibitory effect of ascorbic acid and sodium metabisulphite, respectively, on both populations of microorganisms. This work opens new possibilities for the potential use of the Quasi-chemical primary model in the study of table olive fermentations.

  4. The effect of lactic acid bacteria on cocoa bean fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2015-07-16

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) are the raw material for chocolate production. Fermentation of cocoa pulp by microorganisms is crucial for developing chocolate flavor precursors. Yeasts conduct an alcoholic fermentation within the bean pulp that is essential for the production of good quality beans, giving typical chocolate characters. However, the roles of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in contributing to the quality of cocoa bean and chocolate are not fully understood. Using controlled laboratory fermentations, this study investigated the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cocoa bean fermentation. Cocoa beans were fermented under conditions where the growth of lactic acid bacteria was restricted by the use of nisin and lysozyme. The resultant microbial ecology, chemistry and chocolate quality of beans from these fermentations were compared with those of indigenous (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in control fermentations. In fermentations with the presence of nisin and lysozyme, the same species of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria grew but the growth of lactic acid bacteria was prevented or restricted. These beans underwent characteristic alcoholic fermentation where the utilization of sugars and the production of ethanol, organic acids and volatile compounds in the bean pulp and nibs were similar for beans fermented in the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid was produced during both fermentations but more so when lactic acid bacteria grew. Beans fermented in the presence or absence of lactic acid bacteria were fully fermented, had similar shell weights and gave acceptable chocolates with no differences

  5. Utilization of hexamethylenetetramine (urotropine) by bacteria and yeasts.

    PubMed

    Middelhoven, Wouter J; van Doesburg, Wim

    2007-02-01

    A slow growing bacterial population able to utilize hexamethylelenetetramine (urotropine) as sole source of carbon, nitrogen and energy was isolated from soil. From this crude enrichment culture two bacteria were isolated and identified as Brevundimonas diminuta and a Phyllobacterium sp. by sequencing of 16S ribosomal DNA. These bacteria also grew on urotropine but at a lower rate than the enrichment culture. Addition of glucose to the latter resulted in growth of some yeasts that overgrew the bacteria. Assimilation of urotropine as sole nitrogen source is very common among yeasts, 46 out of 60 species tested showed this characteristic.

  6. Influence of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria and enzymatic yeast extracts on the microbiological, biochemical and sensorial properties of Lben generic products.

    PubMed

    Mangia, Nicoletta P; Garau, Giovanni; Murgia, Marco A; Bennani, Abdelmajid; Deiana, Pietrino

    2014-05-01

    In this study we identified Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lc. lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis, Kluyveromices lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the dominant microorganisms of traditional Moroccan acid-alcoholic fermented milk named Lben. The low pH (3·8±0·3), lactose (16·8±3·4 mg/l) and lactic acid (8·16±0·6 mg/l) content indicated that a strong fermentation occurred in the traditional product which was also characterised by the substantial presence of ethanol and typical volatile carbonyl compounds (i.e., acetoin, diacetyl and acetaldehyde). Microbiological analyses of experimental Lben manufactured with selected strains (isolated from the traditional product) of Lc. lactis subsp. lactis and Lc. lactis subsp. lactis biovar. diacetylactis alone (batch A) and in combination with enzymatic extract of a K. lactis strain (batch B) indicated a good effectiveness of the starters employed (∼1010 CFU/g of lactococci after 8 h of incubation) and a significant effect of the yeast enzyme extract on lactococci viability. Despite slight changes in the physicochemical characteristics of the two Lben during the 15 d storage period, volatile compounds (i.e. ethanol, acetaldehyde, diacetyl and acetoin) were consistently higher in batch B. Moreover, sensorial analysis performed after 15 d of storage, highlighted higher odour and flavour intensity, vegetable odour and viscosity in batch B while batch A displayed higher astringency.

  7. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  8. [Quorum sensing in bacteria and yeast].

    PubMed

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; Eiros Bouza, José María

    2013-10-19

    Bacterial sets are complex dynamic systems, which interact with each other and through the interaction, bacteria coexist, collaborate, compete and share information in a coordinated manner. A way of bacterial communication is quorum sensing. Through this mechanism the bacteria can recognize its concentration in a given environment and they can decide the time at which the expression of a particular set of genes should be started for developing a specific and simultaneous response. The result of these interconnections raises properties that cannot be explained from a single isolated bacterial cell.

  9. Biopreservation by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stiles, M E

    1996-10-01

    Biopreservation refers to extended storage life and enhanced safety of foods using the natural microflora and (or) their antibacterial products. Lactic acid bacteria have a major potential for use in biopreservation because they are safe to consume and during storage they naturally dominate the microflora of many foods. In milk, brined vegetables, many cereal products and meats with added carbohydrate, the growth of lactic acid bacteria produces a new food product. In raw meats and fish that are chill stored under vacuum or in an environment with elevated carbon dioxide concentration, the lactic acid bacteria become the dominant population and preserve the meat with a "hidden' fermentation. The same applies to processed meats provided that the lactic acid bacteria survive the heat treatment or they are inoculated onto the product after heat treatment. This paper reviews the current status and potential for controlled biopreservation of foods.

  10. Regulation of glycogen metabolism in yeast and bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Wayne A.; Roach, Peter J.; Montero, Manuel; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Muñoz, Francisco José; Eydallin, Gustavo; Viale, Alejandro M.; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms have the capacity to utilize a variety of nutrients and adapt to continuously changing environmental conditions. Many microorganisms, including yeast and bacteria, accumulate carbon and energy reserves to cope with starvation conditions temporarily present in the environment. Glycogen biosynthesis is a main strategy for such metabolic storage and a variety of sensing and signaling mechanisms have evolved in evolutionarily distant species to guarantee the production of this homopolysaccharide. At the most fundamental level, the processes of glycogen synthesis and degradation in yeast and bacteria share certain broad similarities. However, the regulation of these processes is sometimes quite distinct, indicating that they have evolved separately to respond optimally to the habitat conditions of each species. This review aims to highlight the mechanisms, both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, which regulate glycogen metabolism in yeast and bacteria, focusing on selected areas where the greatest increase in knowledge has occurred during the last few years. In the yeast system, we focus particularly on the various signaling pathways that control the activity of the enzymes of glycogen storage. We also discuss our recent understanding of the important role played by the vacuole in glycogen metabolism. In the case of bacterial glycogen, especial emphasis is given to aspects related with genetic regulation of glycogen metabolism and its connection with other biological processes. PMID:20412306

  11. Functional state modelling approach validation for yeast and bacteria cultivations

    PubMed Central

    Roeva, Olympia; Pencheva, Tania

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the functional state modelling approach is validated for modelling of the cultivation of two different microorganisms: yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and bacteria (Escherichia coli). Based on the available experimental data for these fed-batch cultivation processes, three different functional states are distinguished, namely primary product synthesis state, mixed oxidative state and secondary product synthesis state. Parameter identification procedures for different local models are performed using genetic algorithms. The simulation results show high degree of adequacy of the models describing these functional states for both S. cerevisiae and E. coli cultivations. Thus, the local models are validated for the cultivation of both microorganisms. This fact is a strong structure model verification of the functional state modelling theory not only for a set of yeast cultivations, but also for bacteria cultivation. As such, the obtained results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of the functional state modelling approach. PMID:26740778

  12. Functional state modelling approach validation for yeast and bacteria cultivations.

    PubMed

    Roeva, Olympia; Pencheva, Tania

    2014-09-03

    In this paper, the functional state modelling approach is validated for modelling of the cultivation of two different microorganisms: yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and bacteria (Escherichia coli). Based on the available experimental data for these fed-batch cultivation processes, three different functional states are distinguished, namely primary product synthesis state, mixed oxidative state and secondary product synthesis state. Parameter identification procedures for different local models are performed using genetic algorithms. The simulation results show high degree of adequacy of the models describing these functional states for both S. cerevisiae and E. coli cultivations. Thus, the local models are validated for the cultivation of both microorganisms. This fact is a strong structure model verification of the functional state modelling theory not only for a set of yeast cultivations, but also for bacteria cultivation. As such, the obtained results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of the functional state modelling approach.

  13. Effects of chemical carcinogens on bacteria and yeast: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, R.L.; Gerritsen, N.; Meadows, H.

    1981-03-01

    Early studies and reviews of the effects of carcinogens on bacteria and yeast are noted, after which a brief discussion deals specifically with chemical carcinogens and their relations with mutagenesis, deficiencies in DNA repair, RNA synthesis and function, and respiration-deficient mutants. Specific chemical carcinogens are then reviewed as to their mode of action, mutagenic and carcinogenic potency, and biochemical effects, including induced biological alterations such as cytogenetic variants. Structure-function relations are discussed for some types of compounds.

  14. Bacteria and yeast microbiota in milk kefir grains from different Italian regions.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Cristiana; Osimani, Andrea; Milanović, Vesna; Aquilanti, Lucia; De Filippis, Francesca; Stellato, Giuseppina; Di Mauro, Simone; Turchetti, Benedetta; Buzzini, Pietro; Ercolini, Danilo; Clementi, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    Kefir grains are a unique symbiotic association of different microrganisms, mainly lactic acid bacteria, yeasts and occasionally acetic acid bacteria, cohabiting in a natural polysaccharide and a protein matrix. The microbial composition of kefir grains can be considered as extremely variable since it is strongly influenced by the geographical origin of the grains and by the sub-culturing method used. The aim of this study was to elucidate the bacteria and yeast species occurring in milk kefir grains collected in some Italian regions by combining the results of scanning electron microscopy analysis, viable counts on selective culture media, PCR-DGGE and pyrosequencing. The main bacterial species found was Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens while Dekkera anomala was the predominant yeast. The presence of sub-dominant species ascribed to Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactococcus lactis and Acetobacter genera was also highlighted. In addition, Lc. lactis, Enterococcus sp., Bacillus sp., Acetobacter fabarum, Acetobacter lovaniensis and Acetobacter orientalis were identified as part of the cultivable community. This work further confirms both the importance of combining culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches to study microbial diversity in food and how the combination of multiple 16S rRNA gene targets strengthens taxonomic identification using sequence-based identification approaches.

  15. Lactic acid bacteria production from whey.

    PubMed

    Mondragón-Parada, María Elena; Nájera-Martínez, Minerva; Juárez-Ramírez, Cleotilde; Galíndez-Mayer, Juvencio; Ruiz-Ordaz, Nora; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2006-09-01

    The main purpose of this work was to isolate and characterize lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains to be used for biomass production using a whey-based medium supplemented with an ammonium salt and with very low levels of yeast extract (0.25 g/L). Five strains of LAB were isolated from naturally soured milk after enrichment in whey-based medium. One bacterial isolate, designated MNM2, exhibited a remarkable capability to utilize whey lactose and give a high biomass yield on lactose. This strain was identified as Lactobacillus casei by its 16S rDNA sequence. A kinetic study of cell growth, lactose consumption, and titratable acidity production of this bacterial strain was performed in a bioreactor. The biomass yield on lactose, the percentage of lactose consumption, and the maximum increase in cell mass obtained in the bioreactor were 0.165 g of biomass/g of lactose, 100%, and 2.0 g/L, respectively, which were 1.44, 1.11, and 2.35 times higher than those found in flask cultures. The results suggest that it is possible to produce LAB biomass from a whey-based medium supplemented with minimal amounts of yeast extract.

  16. Challenges to production of antibodies in bacteria and yeast.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Jae; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2015-11-01

    Currently, antibodies play major role in treating a wide variety of human diseases (e.g., cancer, viral infection, inflammation). Those pharmaceutic antibodies have become major therapeutic reagents in the pharmaceutical drug market. In addition to full-length antibodies, the market of antibody fragments, which offer potential advantages in clinical use as well as diagnostics, is gradually growing. As the demand for antibody therapeutics increase, the development of host systems for enhanced, and less expensive, production has also become more important. All therapeutic antibodies approved to date are predominantly produced in mammalian hosts, but due to drawbacks such as high production cost and long-term cultivation, the alternative use of bacteria and yeasts has been seriously considered. Recently, there have been reports of substantial progress in genetic engineering and systems biotechnology, results in development of potential hosts that overcame the critical limitations in bacterial and yeast cells, and much enhanced productivity of functional antibodies. In this review, we highlight recent, significant progress made in the engineering of bacterial and yeast cells for enhanced production of functional antibodies.

  17. Yeast prions form infectious amyloid inclusion bodies in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prions were first identified as infectious proteins associated with fatal brain diseases in mammals. However, fungal prions behave as epigenetic regulators that can alter a range of cellular processes. These proteins propagate as self-perpetuating amyloid aggregates being an example of structural inheritance. The best-characterized examples are the Sup35 and Ure2 yeast proteins, corresponding to [PSI+] and [URE3] phenotypes, respectively. Results Here we show that both the prion domain of Sup35 (Sup35-NM) and the Ure2 protein (Ure2p) form inclusion bodies (IBs) displaying amyloid-like properties when expressed in bacteria. These intracellular aggregates template the conformational change and promote the aggregation of homologous, but not heterologous, soluble prionogenic molecules. Moreover, in the case of Sup35-NM, purified IBs are able to induce different [PSI+] phenotypes in yeast, indicating that at least a fraction of the protein embedded in these deposits adopts an infectious prion fold. Conclusions An important feature of prion inheritance is the existence of strains, which are phenotypic variants encoded by different conformations of the same polypeptide. We show here that the proportion of infected yeast cells displaying strong and weak [PSI+] phenotypes depends on the conditions under which the prionogenic aggregates are formed in E. coli, suggesting that bacterial systems might become useful tools to generate prion strain diversity. PMID:22731490

  18. Genetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorec, Monique; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Coq, Anne-Marie Crutz-Le; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    Many meat (or fish) products, obtained by the fermentation of meat originating from various animals by the flora that naturally contaminates it, are part of the human diet since millenaries. Historically, the use of bacteria as starters for the fermentation of meat, to produce dry sausages, was thus performed empirically through the endogenous micro-biota, then, by a volunteer addition of starters, often performed by back-slopping, without knowing precisely the microbial species involved. It is only since about 50 years that well defined bacterial cultures have been used as starters for the fermentation of dry sausages. Nowadays, the indigenous micro-biota of fermented meat products is well identified, and the literature is rich of reports on the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) present in many traditional fermented products from various geographical origin, obtained without the addition of commercial starters (See Talon, Leroy, & Lebert, 2007, and references therein).

  19. Differential staining of bacteria: acid fast stain.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jackie; Moyes, Rita B; Breakwell, Donald P

    2009-11-01

    Acid-fastness is an uncommon characteristic shared by the genera Mycobacterium (Section 10A) and Nocardia. Because of this feature, this stain is extremely helpful in identification of these bacteria. Although Gram positive, acid-fast bacteria do not take the crystal violet into the wall well, appearing very light purple rather than the deep purple of normal Gram-positive bacteria.

  20. Triacetic acid lactone production in industrial Saccharomyces yeast strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triacetic acid lactone (TAL) is a potential platform chemical that can be produced in yeast. To evaluate the potential for industrial yeast strains to produce TAL, the g2ps1 gene encoding 2-pyrone synthase was transformed into thirteen industrial yeast strains of varied genetic background. TAL produ...

  1. Phosphatidic Acid Synthesis in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Rock, Charles O.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane phospholipid synthesis is a vital facet of bacterial physiology. Although the spectrum of phospholipid headgroup structures produced by bacteria is large, the key precursor to all of these molecules is phosphatidic acid (PtdOH). Glycerol-3-phosphate derived from the glycolysis via glycerol-phosphate synthase is the universal source for the glycerol backbone of PtdOH. There are two distinct families of enzymes responsible for the acylation of the 1-position of glycerol-3-phosphate. The PlsB acyltransferase was discovered in Escherichia coli, and homologs are present in many eukaryotes. This protein family primarily uses acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) endproducts of fatty acid synthesis as acyl donors, but may also use acyl-CoA derived from exogenous fatty acids. The second protein family, PlsY, is more widely distributed in bacteria and utilizes the unique acyl donor, acyl-phosphate, which is produced from acyl-ACP by the enzyme PlsX. The acylation of the 2-position is carried out by members of the PlsC protein family. All PlsCs use acyl-ACP as the acyl donor, although the PlsCs of the γ-proteobacteria also may use acyl-CoA. Phospholipid headgroups are precursors in the biosynthesis of other membrane-associated molecules and the diacylglycerol product of these reactions is converted to PtdOH by one of two distinct families of lipid kinases. The central importance of the de novo and recycling pathways to PtdOH in cell physiology suggest these enzymes are suitable targets for the development of antibacterial therapeutics in Gram-positive pathogens. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:22981714

  2. Fatty acid composition of selected prosthecate bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carter, R N; Schmidt, J M

    1976-10-11

    The cellular fatty acid composition of 14 strains of Caulobacter speices and types, two species of Prosthecomicrobium, and two species of Asticcacaulis was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. In most of these bacteria, the major fatty acids were octadecenoic acid (C18:1), hexadecenoic acid (C16:1) and hexadecanoic acid (C16:0). Some cyclopropane and branched chain fatty acids were detected in addition to the straight chained acids. Hydroxytetradecanoic acid was an important component of P.enhydrum but significant amounts of hydroxy acids were not detected in other prosthecate bacteria examined.

  3. Lactic acid bacteria as probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ljungh, Asa; Wadström, Torkel

    2006-09-01

    A number of Lactobacillus species, Bifidobacterium sp, Saccharomyces boulardii, and some other microbes have been proposed as and are used as probiotic strains, i.e. live microorganisms as food supplement in order to benefit health. The health claims range from rather vague as regulation of bowel activity and increasing of well-being to more specific, such as exerting antagonistic effect on the gastroenteric pathogens Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter jejuni, Helicobacter pylori and rotavirus, neutralising food mutagens produced in colon, shifting the immune response towards a Th2 response, and thereby alleviating allergic reactions, and lowering serum cholesterol (Tannock, 2002). Unfortunately, most publications are case reports, uncontrolled studies in humans, or reports of animal or in vitro studies. Whether or not the probiotic strains employed shall be of human origin is a matter of debate but this is not a matter of concern, as long as the strains can be shown to survive the transport in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract and to colonise the human large intestine. This includes survival in the stressful environment of the stomach - acidic pH and bile - with induction of new genes encoding a number of stress proteins. Since the availability of antioxidants decreases rostrally in the GI tract production of antioxidants by colonic bacteria provides a beneficial effect in scavenging free radicals. LAB strains commonly produce antimicrobial substance(s) with activity against the homologous strain, but LAB strains also often produce microbicidal substances with effect against gastric and intestinal pathogens and other microbes, or compete for cell surface and mucin binding sites. This could be the mechanism behind reports that some probiotic strains inhibit or decrease translocation of bacteria from the gut to the liver. A protective effect against cancer development can be ascribed to binding of mutagens by intestinal bacteria, reduction of the enzymes beta

  4. Effects of Exogenous Yeast and Bacteria on the Microbial Population Dynamics and Outcomes of Olive Fermentations.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Jose; Bendiks, Zachary; Tyler, Charlotte; Kable, Mary E; Williams, Thomas R; Luchkovska, Yelizaveta; Chow, Elaine; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Marco, Maria L

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we examined Sicilian-style green olive fermentations upon the addition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448 and/or Pichia kudriazevii UCDFST09-427 or the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) Lactobacillus plantarum AJ11R and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides BGM3R. Olives containing S. cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448, a strain able to hydrolyze pectin, but not P. kudriazevii UCDFST 09-427, a nonpectinolytic strain, exhibited excessive tissue damage within 4 weeks. DNA sequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and comparisons to a yeast-specific ITS sequence database remarkably showed that neither S. cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448 nor P. kudriazevii UCDFST 09-427 resulted in significant changes to yeast species diversity. Instead, Candida boidinii constituted the majority (>90%) of the total yeast present, independent of whether S. cerevisiae or P. kudriazevii was added. By comparison, Lactobacillus species were enriched in olives inoculated with potential starter LAB L. plantarum AJ11R and L. pseudomesenteroides BGM3R according to community 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The bacterial diversity of those olives was significantly reduced and resembled control fermentations incubated for a longer period of time. Importantly, microbial populations were highly dynamic at the strain level, as indicated by the large variations in AJ11R and BGM3R cell numbers over time and reductions in the numbers of yeast isolates expressing polygalacturonase activity. These findings show the distinct effects of exogenous spoilage and starter microbes on indigenous communities in plant-based food fermentations that result in very different impacts on product quality. IMPORTANCE Food fermentations are subject to tremendous selective pressures resulting in the growth and persistence of a limited number of bacterial and fungal taxa. Although these foods are vulnerable to spoilage by unintended contamination of certain microorganisms, or alternatively, can be

  5. Effects of Exogenous Yeast and Bacteria on the Microbial Population Dynamics and Outcomes of Olive Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Jose; Bendiks, Zachary; Tyler, Charlotte; Kable, Mary E.; Williams, Thomas R.; Luchkovska, Yelizaveta; Chow, Elaine; Boundy-Mills, Kyria

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, we examined Sicilian-style green olive fermentations upon the addition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448 and/or Pichia kudriazevii UCDFST09-427 or the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) Lactobacillus plantarum AJ11R and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides BGM3R. Olives containing S. cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448, a strain able to hydrolyze pectin, but not P. kudriazevii UCDFST 09-427, a nonpectinolytic strain, exhibited excessive tissue damage within 4 weeks. DNA sequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and comparisons to a yeast-specific ITS sequence database remarkably showed that neither S. cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448 nor P. kudriazevii UCDFST 09-427 resulted in significant changes to yeast species diversity. Instead, Candida boidinii constituted the majority (>90%) of the total yeast present, independent of whether S. cerevisiae or P. kudriazevii was added. By comparison, Lactobacillus species were enriched in olives inoculated with potential starter LAB L. plantarum AJ11R and L. pseudomesenteroides BGM3R according to community 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The bacterial diversity of those olives was significantly reduced and resembled control fermentations incubated for a longer period of time. Importantly, microbial populations were highly dynamic at the strain level, as indicated by the large variations in AJ11R and BGM3R cell numbers over time and reductions in the numbers of yeast isolates expressing polygalacturonase activity. These findings show the distinct effects of exogenous spoilage and starter microbes on indigenous communities in plant-based food fermentations that result in very different impacts on product quality. IMPORTANCE Food fermentations are subject to tremendous selective pressures resulting in the growth and persistence of a limited number of bacterial and fungal taxa. Although these foods are vulnerable to spoilage by unintended contamination of certain microorganisms, or alternatively, can

  6. Discrimination of Pigments of Microalgae, Bacteria and Yeasts Using Lightweight Handheld Raman Spectrometers: Prospects for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehlicka, J.; Osterrothova, K.; Nedbalova, L.; Gunde-Cimerman, N.; Oren, A.

    2014-06-01

    Handheld Raman instrumentation with 532 nm lasers can be used to distinguish carotenoids of autotrophic microalgae, purple sulfur bacteria, halophilic Archaea and pigmented yeasts. Pigments are proposed as biomarkers for astrobiology of Mars.

  7. Decarboxylation of Substituted Cinnamic Acids by Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated during Malt Whisky Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Sylvie; Priest, Fergus G.

    2000-01-01

    Seven strains of Lactobacillus isolated from malt whisky fermentations and representing Lactobacillus brevis, L. crispatus, L. fermentum, L. hilgardii, L. paracasei, L. pentosus, and L. plantarum contained genes for hydroxycinnamic acid (p-coumaric acid) decarboxylase. With the exception of L. hilgardii, these bacteria decarboxylated p-coumaric acid and/or ferulic acid, with the production of 4-vinylphenol and/or 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively, although the relative activities on the two substrates varied between strains. The addition of p-coumaric acid or ferulic acid to cultures of L. pentosus in MRS broth induced hydroxycinnamic acid decarboxylase mRNA within 5 min, and the gene was also induced by the indigenous components of malt wort. In a simulated distillery fermentation, a mixed culture of L. crispatus and L. pentosus in the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae decarboxylated added p-coumaric acid more rapidly than the yeast alone but had little activity on added ferulic acid. Moreover, we were able to demonstrate the induction of hydroxycinnamic acid decarboxylase mRNA under these conditions. However, in fermentations with no additional hydroxycinnamic acid, the bacteria lowered the final concentration of 4-vinylphenol in the fermented wort compared to the level seen in a pure-yeast fermentation. It seems likely that the combined activities of bacteria and yeast decarboxylate p-coumaric acid and then reduce 4-vinylphenol to 4-ethylphenol more effectively than either microorganism alone in pure cultures. Although we have shown that lactobacilli participate in the metabolism of phenolic compounds during malt whisky fermentations, the net result is a reduction in the concentrations of 4-vinylphenol and 4-vinylguaiacol prior to distillation. PMID:11097909

  8. Yeast pro- and paraprobiotics have the capability to bind pathogenic bacteria associated with animal disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Live yeast probiotics and yeast cell wall components (paraprobiotics) may serve as an alternative to the use of antibiotics in prevention and treatment of infections caused by pathogenic bacteria. Probiotics and paraprobiotics can bind directly to pathogens, which limits binding of the pathogens to ...

  9. Effect of mannoproteins on the growth, gastrointestinal viability, and adherence to Caco-2 cells of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ganan, M; Carrascosa, A V; de Pascual-Teresa, S; Martinez-Rodriguez, A J

    2012-03-01

    Yeast cell wall (YCW) preparations and yeast mannoprotein extracts have been effective against some enteropathogenic bacteria as Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella, and they can affect the population of beneficial lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this work, we studied the effect of a mannoprotein extract on five strains of LAB. This extract was metabolised by the bacteria, enhancing their survival in simulated gastrointestinal juice, and increasing the adherence of Lactobacillus plantarum, L. salivarius, and Enterococcus faecium to Caco-2 cells. Yeast mannoproteins are promising naturally occurring compounds that could be used to enhance LAB intestinal populations and control pathogens.

  10. Effect of Simultaneous Inoculation with Yeast and Bacteria on Fermentation Kinetics and Key Wine Parameters of Cool-Climate Chardonnay

    PubMed Central

    Jussier, Delphine; Dubé Morneau, Amélie; Mira de Orduña, Ramón

    2006-01-01

    Inoculating grape musts with wine yeast and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) concurrently in order to induce simultaneous alcoholic fermentation (AF) and malolactic fermentation (MLF) can be an efficient alternative to overcome potential inhibition of LAB in wines because of high ethanol concentrations and reduced nutrient content. In this study, the simultaneous inoculation of yeast and LAB into must was compared with a traditional vinification protocol, where MLF was induced after completion of AF. For this, two suitable commercial yeast-bacterium combinations were tested in cool-climate Chardonnay must. The time courses of glucose and fructose, acetaldehyde, several organic acids, and nitrogenous compounds were measured along with the final values of other key wine parameters. Sensory evaluation was done after 12 months of storage. The current study could not confirm a negative impact of simultaneous AF/MLF on fermentation success and kinetics or on final wine parameters. While acetic acid concentrations were slightly increased in wines after simultaneous AF/MLF, the differences were of neither practical nor legal significance. No statistically significant differences were found with regard to the final values of pH or total acidity and the concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, glycerol, citric and lactic acids, and the nitrogen compounds arginine, ammonia, urea, citrulline, and ornithine. Sensory evaluation by a semiexpert panel confirmed the similarity of the wines. However, simultaneous inoculation led to considerable reductions in overall fermentation durations. Furthermore, differences of physiological and microbiological relevance were found. Specifically, we report the vinification of “super-dry” wines devoid of glucose and fructose after simultaneous inoculation of yeast and bacteria. PMID:16391046

  11. Effect of simultaneous inoculation with yeast and bacteria on fermentation kinetics and key wine parameters of cool-climate chardonnay.

    PubMed

    Jussier, Delphine; Dubé Morneau, Amélie; Mira de Orduña, Ramón

    2006-01-01

    Inoculating grape musts with wine yeast and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) concurrently in order to induce simultaneous alcoholic fermentation (AF) and malolactic fermentation (MLF) can be an efficient alternative to overcome potential inhibition of LAB in wines because of high ethanol concentrations and reduced nutrient content. In this study, the simultaneous inoculation of yeast and LAB into must was compared with a traditional vinification protocol, where MLF was induced after completion of AF. For this, two suitable commercial yeast-bacterium combinations were tested in cool-climate Chardonnay must. The time courses of glucose and fructose, acetaldehyde, several organic acids, and nitrogenous compounds were measured along with the final values of other key wine parameters. Sensory evaluation was done after 12 months of storage. The current study could not confirm a negative impact of simultaneous AF/MLF on fermentation success and kinetics or on final wine parameters. While acetic acid concentrations were slightly increased in wines after simultaneous AF/MLF, the differences were of neither practical nor legal significance. No statistically significant differences were found with regard to the final values of pH or total acidity and the concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, glycerol, citric and lactic acids, and the nitrogen compounds arginine, ammonia, urea, citrulline, and ornithine. Sensory evaluation by a semiexpert panel confirmed the similarity of the wines. However, simultaneous inoculation led to considerable reductions in overall fermentation durations. Furthermore, differences of physiological and microbiological relevance were found. Specifically, we report the vinification of "super-dry" wines devoid of glucose and fructose after simultaneous inoculation of yeast and bacteria.

  12. Acetic acid bacteria spoilage of bottled red wine -- a review.

    PubMed

    Bartowsky, Eveline J; Henschke, Paul A

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are ubiquitous organisms that are well adapted to sugar and ethanol rich environments. This family of Gram-positive bacteria are well known for their ability to produce acetic acid, the main constituent in vinegar. The oxidation of ethanol through acetaldehyde to acetic acid is well understood and characterised. AAB form part of the complex natural microbial flora of grapes and wine, however their presence is less desirable than the lactic acid bacteria and yeast. Even though AAB were described by Pasteur in the 1850s, wine associated AAB are still difficult to cultivate on artificial laboratory media and until more recently, their taxonomy has not been well characterised. Wine is at most risk of spoilage during production and the presence of these strictly aerobic bacteria in grape must and during wine maturation can be controlled by eliminating, or at least limiting oxygen, an essential growth factor. However, a new risk, spoilage of wine by AAB after packaging, has only recently been reported. As wine is not always sterile filtered prior to bottling, especially red wine, it often has a small resident bacterial population (<10(3) cfu/mL), which under conducive conditions might proliferate. Bottled red wines, sealed with natural cork closures, and stored in a vertical upright position may develop spoilage by acetic acid bacteria. This spoilage is evident as a distinct deposit of bacterial biofilm in the neck of the bottle at the interface of the wine and the headspace of air, and is accompanied with vinegar, sherry, bruised apple, nutty, and solvent like off-aromas, depending on the degree of spoilage. This review focuses on the wine associated AAB species, the aroma and flavour changes in wine due to AAB metabolism, discusses the importance of oxygen ingress into the bottle and presents a hypothesis for the mechanism of spoilage of bottled red wine.

  13. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.; Sorokin, A.; Mirkin, B.; Koonin, E.; Pavlov, A.; Pavlova, N.; Karamychev, V.; Polouchine, N.; Shakhova, V.; Grigoriev, I.; Lou, Y.; Rokhsar, D.; Lucas, S.; Huang, K.; Goodstein, D. M.; Hawkins, T.; Plengvidhya, V.; Welker, D.; Hughes, J.; Goh, Y.; Benson, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lee, J. -H.; Diaz-Muniz, I.; Dosti, B.; Smeianov, V; Wechter, W.; Barabote, R.; Lorca, G.; Altermann, E.; Barrangou, R.; Ganesan, B.; Xie, Y.; Rawsthorne, H.; Tamir, D.; Parker, C.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Hutkins, R.; O'Sullivan, D.; Steele, J.; Unlu, G.; Saier, M.; Klaenhammer, T.; Richardson, P.; Kozyavkin, S.; Weimer, B.; Mills, D.

    2006-06-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive gene loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats.

  14. The Occurrence of Beer Spoilage Lactic Acid Bacteria in Craft Beer Production.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Cristiana; Osimani, Andrea; Milanović, Vesna; Taccari, Manuela; Aquilanti, Lucia; Clementi, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Beer is one of the world's most ancient and widely consumed fermented alcoholic beverages produced with water, malted cereal grains (generally barley and wheat), hops, and yeast. Beer is considered an unfavorable substrate of growth for many microorganisms, however, there are a limited number of bacteria and yeasts, which are capable of growth and may spoil beer especially if it is not pasteurized or sterile-filtered as craft beer. The aim of this research study was to track beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inside a brewery and during the craft beer production process. To that end, indoor air and work surface samples, collected in the brewery under study, together with commercial active dry yeasts, exhausted yeasts, yeast pellet (obtained after mature beer centrifugation), and spoiled beers were analyzed through culture-dependent methods and PCR-DGGE in order to identify the contaminant LAB species and the source of contamination. Lactobacillus brevis was detected in a spoiled beer and in a commercial active dry yeast. Other LAB species and bacteria ascribed to Staphylococcus sp., Enterobaceriaceae, and Acetobacter sp. were found in the brewery. In conclusion, the PCR-DGGE technique coupled with the culture-dependent method was found to be a useful tool for identifying the beer spoilage bacteria and the source of contamination. The analyses carried out on raw materials, by-products, final products, and the brewery were useful for implementing a sanitization plan to be adopted in the production plant.

  15. [Adaptation of yeasts of the genus Debaryomyces to protocatechuic acid].

    PubMed

    Karasevich, Iu N

    1980-01-01

    Among five yeast strains belonging to the genus Debaryomyces that were unable of utilizing aromatic compounds (phenols and hydroxybenzoic acids), three strains, viz. D. kloeckeri BKM-Y-1044, D. marama BKM-Y-100 and D. marama BKM-Y-2045, were adapted to protocatechuic acid. The adapted yeasts utilized protocatechuic acid if its concentration in the medium was 0.1%, but did not utilize it, or did at a very low rate, if the concentration of protocatechuic acid was decreased to 0.05%. The mechanism of adaptation is rare mutations occurring in succession, and the process takes therefore several months. The adaptation seems to be based on reversion of inactivated genes for enzymes involved in the preparative metabolism of protocatechuic acid. Three typical yeast species of the Debaryomyces genus are proposed (D. hansenii, D. kloeckeri and D. konokotinae) which include all of the Debaryomyces species and strains available at the Institute of Microbiology of the USSR Academy of Sciences.

  16. Adaptation and tolerance of bacteria against acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Trček, Janja; Mira, Nuno Pereira; Jarboe, Laura R

    2015-08-01

    Acetic acid is a weak organic acid exerting a toxic effect to most microorganisms at concentrations as low as 0.5 wt%. This toxic effect results mostly from acetic acid dissociation inside microbial cells, causing a decrease of intracellular pH and metabolic disturbance by the anion, among other deleterious effects. These microbial inhibition mechanisms enable acetic acid to be used as a preservative, although its usefulness is limited by the emergence of highly tolerant spoilage strains. Several biotechnological processes are also inhibited by the accumulation of acetic acid in the growth medium including production of bioethanol from lignocellulosics, wine making, and microbe-based production of acetic acid itself. To design better preservation strategies based on acetic acid and to improve the robustness of industrial biotechnological processes limited by this acid's toxicity, it is essential to deepen the understanding of the underlying toxicity mechanisms. In this sense, adaptive responses that improve tolerance to acetic acid have been well studied in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strains highly tolerant to acetic acid, either isolated from natural environments or specifically engineered for this effect, represent a unique reservoir of information that could increase our understanding of acetic acid tolerance and contribute to the design of additional tolerance mechanisms. In this article, the mechanisms underlying the acetic acid tolerance exhibited by several bacterial strains are reviewed, with emphasis on the knowledge gathered in acetic acid bacteria and E. coli. A comparison of how these bacterial adaptive responses to acetic acid stress fit to those described in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also performed. A systematic comparison of the similarities and dissimilarities of the ways by which different microbial systems surpass the deleterious effects of acetic acid toxicity has not been performed so far, although such exchange

  17. [Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Bilková, Andrea; Sepova, Hana Kinová; Bilka, Frantisek; Balázová, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria comprise several genera of gram-positive bacteria that are known for the production of structurally different antimicrobial substances. Among them, bacteriocins are nowadays in the centre of scientific interest. Bacteriocins, proteinaceous antimicrobial substances, are produced ribosomally and have usually a narrow spectrum of bacterial growth inhibition. According to their structure and the target of their activity, they are divided into four classes, although there are some suggestions for a renewed classification. The most interesting and usable class are lantibiotics. They comprise the most widely commercially used and well examined bacteriocin, nisin. The non-pathogenic character of lactic acid bacteria is advantageous for using their bacteriocins in food preservation as well as in feed supplements or in veterinary medicine.

  18. Why engineering lactic acid bacteria for biobutanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Gram-positive Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are considered attractive biocatalysts for biomass to biofuels for several reasons. They have GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) status that are acceptable in food, feed, and medical applications. LAB are fermentative: selected strains are capable of f...

  19. Adhesion to the yeast cell surface as a mechanism for trapping pathogenic bacteria by Saccharomyces probiotics.

    PubMed

    Tiago, F C P; Martins, F S; Souza, E L S; Pimenta, P F P; Araujo, H R C; Castro, I M; Brandão, R L; Nicoli, Jacques R

    2012-09-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to the use of probiotics as an adjuvant for the prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal pathology. The great advantage of therapy with probiotics is that they have few side effects such as selection of resistant bacteria or disturbance of the intestinal microbiota, which occur when antibiotics are used. Adhesion of pathogenic bacteria onto the surface of probiotics instead of onto intestinal receptors could explain part of the probiotic effect. Thus, this study evaluated the adhesion of pathogenic bacteria onto the cell wall of Saccharomyces boulardii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains UFMG 905, W303 and BY4741. To understand the mechanism of adhesion of pathogens to yeast, cell-wall mutants of the parental strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 were used because of the difficulty of mutating polyploid yeast, as is the case for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces boulardii. The tests of adhesion showed that, among 11 enteropathogenic bacteria tested, only Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Typhi adhered to the surface of Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG 905 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741. The presence of mannose, and to some extent bile salts, inhibited this adhesion, which was not dependent on yeast viability. Among 44 cell-wall mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741, five lost the ability to fix the bacteria. Electron microscopy showed that the phenomenon of yeast-bacteria adhesion occurred both in vitro and in vivo (in the digestive tract of dixenic mice). In conclusion, some pathogenic bacteria were captured on the surface of Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFMG 905 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741, thus preventing their adhesion to specific receptors on the intestinal epithelium and their subsequent invasion of the host.

  20. Inactivation of bacteria and yeast using high-frequency ultrasound treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shengpu; Hemar, Yacine; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Paturel, Sara; Lewis, Gillian D

    2014-09-01

    High-frequency (850 kHz) ultrasound was used to inactivate bacteria and yeast at different growth phases under controlled temperature conditions. Three species of bacteria, Enterobacter aerogenes, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus epidermidis as well as a yeast, Aureobasidium pullulans were considered. The study shows that high-frequency ultrasound is highly efficient in inactivating the bacteria in both their exponential and stationary growth phases, and inactivation rates of more than 99% were achieved. TEM observation suggests that the mechanism of bacteria inactivation is mainly due to acoustic cavitation generated free radicals and H2O2. The rod-shaped bacterium B. subtilis was also found to be sensitive to the mechanical effects of acoustic cavitation. The study showed that the inactivation process continued even after ultrasonic processing cessed due to the presence of H2O2, generated during acoustic cavitation. Compared to bacteria, the yeast A. pullulans was found to be more resistant to high-frequency ultrasound treatment.

  1. Lactic acid bacteria: promising supplements for enhancing the biological activities of kombucha.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nguyen Khoi; Dong, Ngan Thi Ngoc; Nguyen, Huong Thuy; Le, Phu Hong

    2015-01-01

    Kombucha is sweetened black tea that is fermented by a symbiosis of bacteria and yeast embedded within a cellulose membrane. It is considered a health drink in many countries because it is a rich source of vitamins and may have other health benefits. It has previously been reported that adding lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus) strains to kombucha can enhance its biological functions, but in that study only lactic acid bacteria isolated from kefir grains were tested. There are many other natural sources of lactic acid bacteria. In this study, we examined the effects of lactic acid bacteria from various fermented Vietnamese food sources (pickled cabbage, kefir and kombucha) on kombucha's three main biological functions: glucuronic acid production, antibacterial activity and antioxidant ability. Glucuronic acid production was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, antibacterial activity was assessed by the agar-well diffusion method and antioxidant ability was evaluated by determining the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging capacity. Four strains of food-borne pathogenic bacteria were used in our antibacterial experiments: Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19111, Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028 and Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778. Our findings showed that lactic acid bacteria strains isolated from kefir are superior to those from other sources for improving glucuronic acid production and enhancing the antibacterial and antioxidant activities of kombucha. This study illustrates the potential of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus plantarum isolated from kefir as biosupplements for enhancing the bioactivities of kombucha.

  2. Nectar bacteria, but not yeast, weaken a plant–pollinator mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Vannette, Rachel L.; Gauthier, Marie-Pierre L.; Fukami, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Mutualistic interactions are often subject to exploitation by species that are not directly involved in the mutualism. Understanding which organisms act as such ‘third-party’ species and how they do so is a major challenge in the current study of mutualistic interactions. Here, we show that even species that appear ecologically similar can have contrasting effects as third-party species. We experimentally compared the effects of nectar-inhabiting bacteria and yeasts on the strength of a mutualism between a hummingbird-pollinated shrub, Mimulus aurantiacus, and its pollinators. We found that the common bacterium Gluconobacter sp., but not the common yeast Metschnikowia reukaufii, reduced pollination success, seed set and nectar consumption by pollinators, thereby weakening the plant–pollinator mutualism. We also found that the bacteria reduced nectar pH and total sugar concentration more greatly than the yeasts did and that the bacteria decreased glucose concentration and increased fructose concentration whereas the yeasts affected neither. These distinct changes to nectar chemistry may underlie the microbes' contrasting effects on the mutualism. Our results suggest that it is necessary to understand the determinants of microbial species composition in nectar and their differential modification of floral rewards to explain the mutual benefits that plants and pollinators gain from each other. PMID:23222453

  3. [Metabolic engineering of wild acid-resistant yeast for L-lactic acid production].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Zhongyang; Wang, Zhengxiang; Shi, Guiyang

    2011-07-01

    In order to obtain a yeast strain able to produce L-lactic acid under the condition of low pH and high lactate content, one wild acid-resistant yeast strain isolated from natural samples, was found to be able to grow well in YEPD medium (20 g/L glucose, 20 g/L tryptone, 10 g/L yeast extract, adjusted pH 2.5 with lactic acid) without consuming lactic acid. Based on further molecular biological tests, the strain was identified as Candida magnolia. Then, the gene ldhA, encoding a lactate dehydrogenase from Rhizopus oryzae, was cloned into a yeast shuttle vector containing G418 resistance gene. The resultant plasmid pYX212-kanMX-ldhA was introduced into C. magnolia by electroporation method. Subsequently, a recombinant L-lactic acid producing yeast C. magnolia-2 was obtained. The optimum pH of the recombinant yeast is 3.5 for lactic acid production. Moreover, the recombinant strain could grow well and produce lactic acid at pH 2.5. This recombinant yeast strain could be useful for producing L-lactic acid.

  4. Precision genome engineering in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    van Pijkeren, Jan Peter; Britton, Robert A

    2014-08-29

    Innovative new genome engineering technologies for manipulating chromosomes have appeared in the last decade. One of these technologies, recombination mediated genetic engineering (recombineering) allows for precision DNA engineering of chromosomes and plasmids in Escherichia coli. Single-stranded DNA recombineering (SSDR) allows for the generation of subtle mutations without the need for selection and without leaving behind any foreign DNA. In this review we discuss the application of SSDR technology in lactic acid bacteria, with an emphasis on key factors that were critical to move this technology from E. coli into Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactococcus lactis. We also provide a blueprint for how to proceed if one is attempting to establish SSDR technology in a lactic acid bacterium. The emergence of CRISPR-Cas technology in genome engineering and its potential application to enhancing SSDR in lactic acid bacteria is discussed. The ability to perform precision genome engineering in medically and industrially important lactic acid bacteria will allow for the genetic improvement of strains without compromising safety.

  5. Precision genome engineering in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Innovative new genome engineering technologies for manipulating chromosomes have appeared in the last decade. One of these technologies, recombination mediated genetic engineering (recombineering) allows for precision DNA engineering of chromosomes and plasmids in Escherichia coli. Single-stranded DNA recombineering (SSDR) allows for the generation of subtle mutations without the need for selection and without leaving behind any foreign DNA. In this review we discuss the application of SSDR technology in lactic acid bacteria, with an emphasis on key factors that were critical to move this technology from E. coli into Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactococcus lactis. We also provide a blueprint for how to proceed if one is attempting to establish SSDR technology in a lactic acid bacterium. The emergence of CRISPR-Cas technology in genome engineering and its potential application to enhancing SSDR in lactic acid bacteria is discussed. The ability to perform precision genome engineering in medically and industrially important lactic acid bacteria will allow for the genetic improvement of strains without compromising safety. PMID:25185700

  6. In vivo unnatural amino acid expression in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G

    2014-02-11

    The invention provides orthogonal translation systems for the production of polypeptides comprising unnatural amino acids in methyltrophic yeast such as Pichia pastoris. Methods for producing polypeptides comprising unnatural amino acids in methyltrophic yeast such as Pichia pastoris are also provided.

  7. Lactic acid bacteria in the quality improvement and depreciation of wine.

    PubMed

    Lonvaud-Funel, A

    1999-01-01

    The winemaking process includes two main steps: lactic acid bacteria are responsible for the malolactic fermentation which follows the alcoholic fermentation by yeasts. Both types of microorganisms are present on grapes and on cellar equipment. Yeasts are better adapted to growth in grape must than lactic acid bacteria, so the alcoholic fermentation starts quickly. In must, up to ten lactic acid bacteria species can be identified. They belong to the Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc and Oenococcus genera. Throughout alcoholic fermentation, a natural selection occurs and finally the dominant species is O. oeni, due to interactions between yeasts and bacteria and between bacteria themselves. After bacterial growth, when the population is over 10(6) CFU/ml, malolactic transformation is the obvious change in wine composition. However, many other substrates can be metabolized. Some like remaining sugars and citric acid are always assimilated by lactic acid bacteria, thus providing them with energy and carbon. Other substrates such as some amino acids may be used following pathways restricted to strains carrying the adequate enzymes. Some strains can also produce exopolysaccharides. All these transformations greatly influence the sensory and hygienic quality of wine. Malic acid transformation is encouraged because it induces deacidification. Diacetyl produced from citric acid is also helpful to some extent. Sensory analyses show that many other reactions change the aromas and make malolactic fermentation beneficial, but they are as yet unknown. On the contrary, an excess of acetic acid, the synthesis of glucane, biogenic amines and precursors of ethylcarbamate are undesirable. Fortunately, lactic acid bacteria normally multiply in dry wines; moreover some of these activities are not widespread. Moreover, the most striking trait of wine lactic acid bacteria is their capacity to adapt to a hostile environment. The mechanisms for this are not yet completely elucidated

  8. Progress in engineering acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used for the production of a variety of fermented foods, and are considered as probiotic due to their health-promoting effect. However, LAB encounter various environmental stresses both in industrial fermentation and application, among which acid stress is one of the most important survival challenges. Improving the acid stress resistance may contribute to the application and function of probiotic action to the host. Recently, the advent of genomics, functional genomics and high-throughput technologies have allowed for the understanding of acid tolerance mechanisms at a systems level, and many method to improve acid tolerance have been developed. This review describes the current progress in engineering acid stress resistance of LAB. Special emphasis is placed on engineering cellular microenvironment (engineering amino acid metabolism, introduction of exogenous biosynthetic capacity, and overproduction of stress response proteins) and maintaining cell membrane functionality. Moreover, strategies to improve acid tolerance and the related physiological mechanisms are also discussed.

  9. Competition between n-alkane-assimilating yeasts and bacteria during colonization of sandy soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, C; Goebel, I; Wagner, S; Vomberg, A; Klinner, U

    2000-07-01

    An n-alkane-assimilating strain of Candida tropicalis was selected in sandy soil inoculated with microorganisms from contaminated sites. Competition experiments with n-alkane utilizers from different strain collections confirmed that yeasts overgrow bacteria in sandy soil. Acidification of the soil is one of the colonization factors useful for the yeasts. It can be counteracted by addition of bentonite, a clay mineral with high ion exchange capacity, but not, however, by kaolin. Strains of different yeast species showed different levels of competitiveness. Strains of Arxula adeninivorans, Candida maltosa, and Yarrowia lipolytica overgrew strains of C. tropicalis, C. shehatae or Pichia stipitis. Two strains of C. maltosa and Y. lipolytica coexisted during several serial transfers under microcosm conditions.

  10. Screening of representative cider yeasts and bacteria for volatile phenol-production ability.

    PubMed

    Buron, Nicolas; Coton, Monika; Desmarais, Cécile; Ledauphin, Jérôme; Guichard, Hugues; Barillier, Daniel; Coton, Emmanuel

    2011-10-01

    Representative cider microorganisms (47 yeast strains and 16 bacterial strains) were studied for their ability to produce volatile phenols in a synthetic medium simulating cider conditions and supplemented with the necessary precursors. The various strains were tested for cinnamoyl esterase activity and only Lactobacillus collinoides were able to hydrolyse chlorogenic acid. Phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) activities were observed for 6 yeasts and 4 bacterial species allowing them to produce vinylphenols from hydroxycinnamic acids. On the other hand, 4 bacterial species exhibited phenolic acid reductase (PAR) activities leading to the formation of hydroxyphenylpropionic acids. Brettanomyces/Dekkera anomala and L. collinoides were able to produce 4-ethylcatechol (4-EC) and 4-ethylphenol (4-EP) from caffeic and p-coumaric acid, respectively, indicating that both species exhibit PAD and vinylphenol reductase (VPR) activities. In the experimental conditions used, the production of ethylphenols by L. collinoides was faster than the one observed for D. anomala.

  11. [Methanotrophic bacteria of acid sphagnum bogs].

    PubMed

    Dedysh, S N

    2002-01-01

    Acid sphagnum bogs cover a considerable part of the territory of Russia and are an important natural source of biogenic methane, which is formed in their anaerobic layers. A considerable portion of this methane is consumed in the aerobic part of the bog profile by acidophilic methanotrophic bacteria, which comprise the methane filter of sphagnum bogs and decrease CH4 emission to the atmosphere. For a long time, these bacteria escaped isolation, which became possible only after the elucidation of the optimal conditions of their functioning in situ: pH 4.5 to 5.5; temperature, from 15 to 20 degrees C; and low salt concentration in the solution. Reproduction of these conditions and rejection of earlier used media with a high content of biogenic elements allowed methanotrophic bacteria of two new genera and species--Methylocella palustris and Methylocapsa acidophila--to be isolated from the peat of sphagnum bogs of the northern part of European Russia and West Siberia. These bacteria are well adapted to the conditions in cold, acid, oligotrophic sphagnum bogs. They grow in a pH range of 4.2-7.5 with an optimum at 5.0-5.5, prefer moderate temperatures (15-25 degrees C) and media with a low content of mineral salts (200-500 mg/l), and are capable of active nitrogen fixation. Design of fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for the detection of Methylocella palustris and Methylocapsa acidophila and their application to the analysis of sphagnum peat samples showed that these bacteria represent dominant populations of methanotrophs with a density of 10(5)-10(6) cells/g peat. In addition to Methylocella and Methylocapsa populations, one more abundant population of methanotrophs was revealed (10(6) cells/g peat), which were phylogenetically close to the genus Methylocystis.

  12. Kefir: a symbiotic yeasts-bacteria community with alleged healthy capabilities.

    PubMed

    Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rementeria, Aitor; Elguezabal, Natalia; Garaizar, Javier

    2006-06-01

    Kefir is a fermented milk beverage. The milk fermentation is achieved by the of kefir grains, a cluster of microorganisms held together by a polysaccharide matrix named kefiran. Kefir grains are an example of symbiosis between yeast and bacteria. They have been used over years to produce kefir, a fermented beverage that is consumed all over the world, although its origin is Caucasian. A vast variety of different species of organisms forming the kefir grains, comprising yeast and bacteria, have been isolated and identified. Kefir is a probiotic food. Probiotics have shown to be beneficial to health, being presently of great interest to the food industry. Kefir has been accredited with antibacterial, antifungal and antitumoural activities among other beneficial attributes. This review includes a critical revision of the microbiological composition of kefir along with its beneficial properties to human health.

  13. Citric acid metabolism in hetero- and homofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Drinan, D F; Robin, S; Cogan, T M

    1976-01-01

    The effect of citrate on production of diacetyl and acetoin by four strains each of heterofermentative and homofermentative lactic acid bacteria capable of utilizing citrate was studied. Acetoin was quantitatively the more important compound. The heterofermentative bacteria produced no acetoin or diacetyl in the absence of citrate, and two strains produced traces of acetoin in its presence. Citrate stimulated the growth rate of the heterofermentative lactobacilli. Acidification of all heterofermentative cultures with citric acid resulted in acetoin production. Destruction of accumulated acetoin appeared to coincide with the disappearance of citrate. All homofermentative bacteria produced more acetoin and diacetyl in the presence of citrate than in its absence. Citrate utilization was begun immediately by the streptococci but was delayed until at least the middle of the exponential phase in the case of the lactobacilli. PMID:5054

  14. Inhibition of ethanol-producing yeast and bacteria by degradation products produced during pre-treatment of biomass.

    PubMed

    Klinke, H B; Thomsen, A B; Ahring, B K

    2004-11-01

    An overview of the different inhibitors formed by pre-treatment of lignocellulosic materials and their inhibition of ethanol production in yeast and bacteria is given. Different high temperature physical pre-treatment methods are available to render the carbohydrates in lignocellulose accessible for ethanol fermentation. The resulting hydrolyzsates contain substances inhibitory to fermentation-depending on both the raw material (biomass) and the pre-treatment applied. An overview of the inhibitory effect on ethanol production by yeast and bacteria is presented. Apart from furans formed by sugar degradation, phenol monomers from lignin degradation are important co-factors in hydrolysate inhibition, and inhibitory effects of these aromatic compounds on different ethanol producing microorganisms is reviewed. The furans and phenols generally inhibited growth and ethanol production rate (Q(EtOH)) but not the ethanol yields (Y(EtOH)) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Within the same phenol functional group (aldehyde, ketone, and acid) the inhibition of volumetric ethanol productivity was found to depend on the amount of methoxyl substituents and hence hydrophobicity (log P). Many pentose-utilizing strains Escherichia coli, Pichia stipititis, and Zymomonas mobilis produce ethanol in concentrated hemicellulose liquors but detoxification by overliming is needed. Thermoanaerobacter mathranii A3M3 can grow on pentoses and produce ethanol in hydrolysate without any need for detoxification.

  15. Degradation of organic acids by dairy lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, F Z; Abo-Elnaga, I G

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and twelve different strains of lactic acid bacteria, belonging to the genera Leuconostoc, Streptococcus, and Lactobacillus, were examined for the ability to degrade 10 organic acids by detecting gas production, using the conventional Durham tube method. All the strains did not break down succinate, glutarate, 2-oxo-glutarate, and mucate. Malate, citrate, pyruvate, fumarate, tartrate, and gluconate were variably attacked. Streptococcus cremoiris AM2, ML8, and SK11 required glucose to produce gas from citrate, whereas Leuconostoc citrovorum and Streptococcus faecalis did not. Streptococcus cremoris differed from the other streptococci in not producing gas from gluconate. From all lactic acid bacteria examined, only Lactobacillus plantarum formed gas from tartarate. Determination of acetoin and diacetyl proved to be a more reliable evidence for assessing the degradation of pyruvate, compared with detection of gas production. Homofermentative lactobacilli and Leuconostoc citrovorum produced acetoin and diacetyl from pyruvate, whereas beta-bacteria did not, a character that would be of taxonomic value. Streptobacteria degraded pyruvate in the presence of glucose with lactate as the major product together with a mean acetate of 4.1%, ethanol 7.9%, acetoin 1.7%, and diacetyl 2.6% yield on a molar basis after 60 days at 30 degrees C. L. brevis produced acetate and lactate. Formation of diacetyl from pyruvate by lactic acid bacteria may play an important role in flavour development in fermenting dairy products, especially in cheese, where lactic acid bacteria usually predominate, and pyruvate is probably excreted in the breaking down of lactose and in the oxidative deamination of alanine by the accompanying microflora.

  16. Experimental Study of Membrane Fouling during Crossflow Microfiltration of Yeast and Bacteria Suspensions: Towards an Analysis at the Microscopic Level.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ines Ben; Ennouri, Monia; Lafforgue, Christine; Schmitz, Philippe; Ayadi, Abdelmoneim

    2013-05-10

    Microfiltration of model cell suspensions combining macroscopic and microscopic approaches was studied in order to better understand microbial membrane fouling mechanisms. The respective impact of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and Escherichia coli bacteria on crossflow microfiltration performances was investigated using a multichannel ceramic 0.2 µm membrane. Pure yeast suspensions (5 µm ovoid cells) and mixtures of yeast and bacteria (1 to 2.5 µm rod shape cells) were considered in order to analyse the effect of interaction between these two microorganisms on fouling reversibility. The resistances varied significantly with the concentration and characteristics of the microorganisms. Membrane fouling with pure yeast suspension was mainly reversible. For yeast and bacteria mixed suspensions (6 g L-1 yeast concentration) the increase in bacteria from 0.15 to 0.30 g L-1 increased the percentage of normalized reversible resistance. At 10 g L-1 yeast concentration, the addition of bacteria tends to increase the percentage of normalized irreversible resistance. For the objective of performing local analysis of fouling, an original filtration chamber allowing direct in situ observation of the cake by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was designed, developed and validated. This device will be used in future studies to characterize cake structure at the microscopic scale.

  17. Degradation of spent craft brewer’s yeast by caprine rumen hyper ammonia-producing bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spent brewer’s yeast has long been included in ruminant diets as a protein supplement. However, modern craft beers often include more hops (Humulus lupulus L.) compounds than traditional recipes. These compounds include alpha and beta-acids, which are antimicrobial to the rumen hyper ammonia-produci...

  18. Caspase Inhibitors of the P35 Family Are More Active When Purified from Yeast than Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Ingo L.; Civciristov, Srgjan; Taylor, Nicole L.; Talbo, Gert H.; Pantaki-Eimany, Delara; Levina, Vita; Clem, Rollie J.; Perugini, Matthew A.; Kvansakul, Marc; Hawkins, Christine J.

    2012-01-01

    Many insect viruses express caspase inhibitors of the P35 superfamily, which prevent defensive host apoptosis to enable viral propagation. The prototypical P35 family member, AcP35 from Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus, has been extensively studied. Bacterially purified AcP35 has been previously shown to inhibit caspases from insect, mammalian and nematode species. This inhibition occurs via a pseudosubstrate mechanism involving caspase-mediated cleavage of a “reactive site loop” within the P35 protein, which ultimately leaves cleaved P35 covalently bound to the caspase's active site. We observed that AcP35 purifed from Saccharomyces cerevisae inhibited caspase activity more efficiently than AcP35 purified from Escherichia coli. This differential potency was more dramatic for another P35 family member, MaviP35, which inhibited human caspase 3 almost 300-fold more potently when purified from yeast than bacteria. Biophysical assays revealed that MaviP35 proteins produced in bacteria and yeast had similar primary and secondary structures. However, bacterially produced MaviP35 possessed greater thermal stability and propensity to form higher order oligomers than its counterpart purified from yeast. Caspase 3 could process yeast-purified MaviP35, but failed to detectably cleave bacterially purified MaviP35. These data suggest that bacterially produced P35 proteins adopt subtly different conformations from their yeast-expressed counterparts, which hinder caspase access to the reactive site loop to reduce the potency of caspase inhibition, and promote aggregation. These data highlight the differential caspase inhibition by recombinant P35 proteins purified from different sources, and caution that analyses of bacterially produced P35 family members (and perhaps other types of proteins) may underestimate their activity. PMID:22720082

  19. Perspectives of engineering lactic acid bacteria for biotechnological polyol production.

    PubMed

    Monedero, Vicente; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J

    2010-04-01

    Polyols are sugar alcohols largely used as sweeteners and they are claimed to have several health-promoting effects (low-caloric, low-glycemic, low-insulinemic, anticariogenic, and prebiotic). While at present chemical synthesis is the only strategy able to assure the polyol market demand, the biotechnological production of polyols has been implemented in yeasts, fungi, and bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a group of microorganisms particularly suited for polyol production as they display a fermentative metabolism associated with an important redox modulation and a limited biosynthetic capacity. In addition, LAB participate in food fermentation processes, where in situ production of polyols during fermentation may be useful in the development of novel functional foods. Here, we review the polyol production by LAB, focusing on metabolic engineering strategies aimed to redirect sugar fermentation pathways towards the synthesis of biotechnologically important sugar alcohols such as sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol. Furthermore, possible approaches are presented for engineering new fermentation routes in LAB for production of arabitol, ribitol, and erythritol.

  20. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles against bacteria, yeast, and algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorobantu, Loredana S.; Fallone, Clara; Noble, Adam J.; Veinot, Jonathan; Ma, Guibin; Goss, Greg G.; Burrell, Robert E.

    2015-04-01

    The toxicity mechanism employed by silver nanoparticles against microorganisms has captivated scientists for nearly a decade and remains a debatable issue. The question most frequently asked is whether silver nanoparticles exert specific effects on microorganisms beyond the well-documented antimicrobial activity of Ag+. Here, we study the effects of citrate- (d = 17.5 ± 9.4 nm) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (d = 38.8 ± 3.6 nm)-capped silver nanoparticles on microorganisms belonging to various genera. The antimicrobial effect of Ag+ was distinguished from that of nanosilver by monitoring microbial growth in the presence and absence of nanoparticles and by careful comparison of the responses of equimolar silver nitrate solution. The results show that when using equimolar silver solutions, silver nitrate has higher toxic potential on all microorganisms than both nanoparticles tested. Furthermore, some microorganisms are more susceptible to silver than others and the choice of capping agent is relevant in the toxicity. Atomic force microscopy disclosed that AgNO3 had a destructive effect on algae. The antimicrobial activity of nanosilver could be exploited to prevent microbial colonization of medical devices and to determine the fate of nanoparticles in the environment.

  1. A novel method for comparison of biocidal properties of nanomaterials to bacteria, yeasts and algae.

    PubMed

    Suppi, Sandra; Kasemets, Kaja; Ivask, Angela; Künnis-Beres, Kai; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Kurvet, Imbi; Aruoja, Villem; Kahru, Anne

    2015-04-09

    Toxicity testing of nanomaterials (NMs) is experimentally challenging because NMs may interfere with test environment and assay components. In this work we propose a simple and reliable method--a 'spot test' to compare biocidal potency of NMs to unicellular microorganisms such as bacteria, yeasts and algae. The assay is straightforward: cells are incubated in deionized water suspensions of NMs for up to 24h and then pipetted as a 'spot' on agarized medium. Altogether seven bacterial strains, yeast and a microalga were tested. CuO, TiO2 and two different Ag NPs, multi-wall C-nanotubes (MWCNTs), AgNO3, CuSO4, 3,5-dichlorophenol, triclosan and H2O2 were analyzed. The biocidal potency of tested substances ranged from 0.1mg/L to >1000 mg/L; whereas, the least potent NMs toward all test species were TiO2 NPs and MWCNTs and most potent Ag and CuO NPs. Based on the similar toxicity pattern of the tested chemicals on the nine unicellular organisms in deionized water we conclude that toxicity mechanism of biocidal chemicals seems to be similar, whatever the organism (bacteria, yeast, alga). Therefore, when the organisms are not 'protected' by their environment that usually includes various organic and inorganic supplements their tolerance to toxicants is chemical- rather than organism-dependent.

  2. TRFLP analysis reveals that fungi rather than bacteria are associated with premature yeast flocculation in brewing.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Mandeep; Bowman, John P; Stewart, Doug C; Sheehy, Megan; Janusz, Agnieszka; Speers, R Alex; Koutoulis, Anthony; Evans, David E

    2012-12-01

    Premature yeast flocculation (PYF) is a sporadic fermentation problem in the brewing industry that results in incomplete yeast utilization of fermentable sugars in wort. Culture-independent, PCR-based fingerprinting techniques were applied in this study to identify the associations between the occurrence of the PYF problem during brewery fermentation with barley malt-associated microbial communities (both bacteria and fungi). Striking differences in the microbial DNA fingerprint patterns for fungi between PYF positive (PYF +ve) and negative (PYF -ve) barley malts were observed using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) technique. The presence of terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) of 360-460 bp size range, for fungal HaeIII restriction enzyme-derived TRFLP profiles appeared to vary substantially between PYF +ve and PYF -ve samples. The source of the barley malt did not influence the fungal taxa implicated in PYF. TRFLP analysis indicates bacterial taxa are unlikely to be important in causing PYF. Virtual digestion of fungal sequences tentatively linked HaeIII TRFs in the 360-460 bp size range to a diverse range of yeast/yeast-like species. Findings from this study suggest that direct monitoring of barley malt samples using molecular methods could potentially be an efficient and viable alternative for monitoring PYF during brewery fermentations.

  3. Development of radiation sterilized dip slides for enumerating lactic acid bacteria and total count in foodstuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenberg, E.; Padova, R.; Kirsch, E.; Weissman, Sh.; Hirshfeld, T.; Shenfeld, A.

    APT agar (APT) used for enumeration of lactic acid bacteria and Plate Count agar (PCA) applied for total count were sterilized by gamma radiation using radiation dose of 10-15 kGy. Radiosterilized PCA and APT modified by adding catalase prior to irradiation, or APT with increased content of yeast extract performed, as well as, the heat sterilized commercial media. Growth performance was evaluated on several strains of microorganisms, as well as, by enumeration of bacteria in food products. Radiosterilization of culture media in final packaging, can be applied to produce dip slide kits containing PCA or APT.

  4. Integrated microbioreactor for culture and analysis of bacteria, algae and yeast.

    PubMed

    Au, Sam H; Shih, Steve C C; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2011-02-01

    We introduce a micro-scale bioreactor for automated culture and density analysis of microorganisms. The microbioreactor is powered by digital microfluidics (DMF) and because it is used with bacteria, algae and yeast, we call it the BAY microbioreactor. Previous miniaturized bioreactors have relied on microchannels which often require valves, mixers and complex optical systems. In contrast, the BAY microbioreactor is capable of culturing microorganisms in distinct droplets on a format compatible with conventional bench-top analyzers without the use of valves, mixers or pumps. Bacteria, algae and yeast were grown for up to 5 days with automated semi-continuous mixing and temperature control. Cell densities were determined by measuring absorbances through transparent regions of the devices, and growth profiles were shown to be comparable to those generated in conventional, macro-scale systems. Cell growth and density measurements were integrated in the microbioreactor with a fluorescent viability assay and transformation of bacteria with a fluorescent reporter gene. These results suggest that DMF may be a useful new tool in automated culture and analysis of microorganisms for a wide range of applications.

  5. Ecophysiological properties of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria and yeasts dominating in phytocenoses of Galindez Island, maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Vasileva-Tonkova, Evgenia; Romanovskaya, Victoria; Gladka, Galina; Gouliamova, Dilnora; Tomova, Iva; Stoilova-Disheva, Margarita; Tashyrev, Oleksandr

    2014-04-01

    Antarctic plants are stable specific microenvironments for microbial colonization that are still less explored. In this study, we investigated cultivable heterotrophic bacteria and yeasts dominating in plant samples collected from different terrestrial biotopes near Ukrainian Antarctic Base on Galindez Island, maritime Antarctica. Phylogenetic analysis revealed affiliation of the bacterial isolates to genera Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Brevundimonas, Sporosarcina, Dermacoccus, Microbacterium, Rothia and Frondihabitans, and the yeast isolates to genera Rhodosporidium, Cryptococcus, Leucosporidiella, Candida and Exophiala. Some ecophysiological properties of isolated strains were determined that are important in response to different stresses such as psychro- and halotolerance, UV-resistance and production of hydrolytic enzymes. The majority of isolates (88 %) was found to be psychrotolerant; all are halotolerant. Significant differences in survival subsequent to UV-C radiation were observed among the isolates, as measured by culturable counts. For the bacterial isolates, lethal doses in the range 80-600 J m⁻² were determined, and for the yeast isolates--in the range 300-1,000 J m⁻². Dermacoccus profundi U9 and Candida davisiana U6 were found as most UV resistant among the bacterial and yeast isolates, respectively. Producers of caseinase, gelatinase, β-glucosidase, and cellulase were detected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on isolation of UV resistant strain D. profundi, and Frondihabitans strain from Antarctica, and on detection of cellulase activity in Antarctic yeast strain C. davisiana. The results obtained contribute to clarifying adaptation strategies of Antarctic microbiota and its possible role in functional stability of Antarctic biocenoses. Stress tolerant strains were detected that are valuable for ecological and applied studies.

  6. Culex pipiens Development Is Greatly Influenced by Native Bacteria and Exogenous Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Nieto, Leonardo M.; D´Alessio, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Culex pipiens is the most cosmopolitan mosquito of the Pipiens Assemblage. By studying the nature of interactions between this species and microorganisms common to its breeding environment we can unravel important pitfalls encountered during development. We tested the survival rate of larval stages, pupae and adults of a Cx. pipiens colony exposed to a variety of microorganisms in laboratory conditions and assessed the transmission to offspring (F1) by those organisms that secured development up to adulthood. Three complementary experiments were designed to: 1) explore the nutritional value of yeasts and other microorganisms during Cx. pipiens development; 2) elucidate the transstadial transmission of yeast to the host offspring; and 3) to examine the relevance of all these microorganisms in female choice for oviposition-substratum. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proved to be the most nutritional diet, but despite showing the highest survival rates, vertical transmission to F1 was never confirmed. In addition, during the oviposition trials, none of the gravid females was attracted to the yeast substratum. Notably, the two native bacterial strains, Klebsiella sp. and Aeromonas sp., were the preferred oviposition media, the same two bacteria that managed to feed neonates until molting into 2nd instar larvae. Our results not only suggest that Klebsiella sp. or Aeromonas sp. serve as attractants for oviposition habitat selection, but also nurture the most fragile instar, L1, to assure molting into a more resilient stage, L2, while yeast proves to be the most supportive diet for completing development. These experiments unearthed survival traits that might be considered in the future development of strategies of Cx. pipiens control. These studies can be extended to other members of the Pipiens Assemblage. PMID:27055276

  7. Food phenolics and lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Curiel, José Antonio; Landete, José María; de las Rivas, Blanca; López de Felipe, Félix; Gómez-Cordovés, Carmen; Mancheño, José Miguel; Muñoz, Rosario

    2009-06-30

    Phenolic compounds are important constituents of food products of plant origin. These compounds are directly related to sensory characteristics of foods such as flavour, astringency, and colour. In addition, the presence of phenolic compounds on the diet is beneficial to health due to their chemopreventive activities against carcinogenesis and mutagenesis, mainly due to their antioxidant activities. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are autochthonous microbiota of raw vegetables. To get desirable properties on fermented plant-derived food products, LAB has to be adapted to the characteristics of the plant raw materials where phenolic compounds are abundant. Lactobacillus plantarum is the commercial starter most frequently used in the fermentation of food products of plant origin. However, scarce information is still available on the influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and viability of L. plantarum and other LAB species. Moreover, metabolic pathways of biosynthesis or degradation of phenolic compounds in LAB have not been completely described. Results obtained in L. plantarum showed that L. plantarum was able to degrade some food phenolic compounds giving compounds influencing food aroma as well as compounds presenting increased antioxidant activity. Recently, several L. plantarum proteins involved in the metabolism of phenolic compounds have been genetically and biochemically characterized. The aim of this review is to give a complete and updated overview of the current knowledge among LAB and food phenolics interaction, which could facilitate the possible application of selected bacteria or their enzymes in the elaboration of food products with improved characteristics.

  8. Cell dualism: presence of cells with alternative membrane potentials in growing populations of bacteria and yeasts.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Volodymyr; Rezaeinejad, Saeid; Chu, Jian

    2013-10-01

    It is considered that all growing cells, for exception of acidophilic bacteria, have negatively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁻-cells). Here we show that growing populations of microbial cells contain a small portion of cells with positively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁺-cells). These cells were detected after simultaneous application of the fluorescent probes for positive membrane potential (anionic dye DIBAC⁻) and membrane integrity (propidium iodide, PI). We found in exponentially growing cell populations of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae that the content of live Δψ⁻-cells was 93.6 ± 1.8 % for bacteria and 90.4 ± 4.0 % for yeasts and the content of live Δψ⁺-cells was 0.9 ± 0.3 % for bacteria and 2.4 ± 0.7 % for yeasts. Hypothetically, existence of Δψ⁺-cells could be due to short-term, about 1 min for bacteria and 5 min for yeasts, change of membrane potential from negative to positive value during the cell cycle. This change has been shown by the reversions of K⁺, Na⁺, and Ca²⁺ ions fluxes across the cell membrane during synchronous yeast culture. The transformation of Δψ(⁻-cells to Δψ⁺-cells can be explained by slow influx of K⁺ ions into Δψ⁻-cell to the trigger level of K⁺ concentration ("compression of potassium spring"), which is forming "alternative" Δψ⁺-cell for a short period, following with fast efflux of K⁺ ions out of Δψ⁺-cell ("release of potassium spring") returning cell to normal Δψ⁻ state. We anticipate our results to be a starting point to reveal the biological role of cell dualism in form of Δψ⁻- and Δψ⁺- cells.

  9. Yeast Acid Phosphatases and Phytases: Production, Characterization and Commercial Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Satyanarayana, T.

    The element phosphorus is critical to all life forms as it forms the basic component of nucleic acids and ATP and has a number of indispensable biochemical roles. Unlike C or N, the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus is very slow, and thus making it the growth-limiting element in most soils and aquatic systems. Phosphohydrolases (e.g. acid phosphatases and phytases) are enzymes that break the C-O-P ester bonds and provide available inorganic phosphorus from various inassimilable organic forms of phosphorus like phytates. These enzymes are of significant value in effectively combating phosphorus pollution. Although phytases and acid phosphatases are produced by various plants, animals and micro organisms, microbial sources are more promising for the production on a commercial scale. Yeasts being the simplest eukaryotes are ideal candidates for phytase and phos-phatase research due to their mostly non-pathogenic and GRAS status. They have not, however, been utilized to their full potential. This chapter focuses attention on the present state of knowledge on the production, characterization and potential commercial prospects of yeast phytases and acid phosphatases.

  10. Beneficial effects of lactic acid bacteria on human beings.

    PubMed

    Masood, Muhammad Irfan; Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Shirazi, Jafir Hussain; Khan, Ikram Ullah

    2011-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are a diverse group of bacteria that produce lactic acid as their major fermented product. Most of them are normal flora of human being and animals and produce myriad beneficial effects for human beings include, alleviation of lactose intolerance, diarrhea, peptic ulcer, stimulation of immune system, antiallergic effects, antifungal actions, preservation of food, and prevention of colon cancer. This review highlights the potential species of Lactic acid bacteria responsible for producing these effects. It has been concluded that lactic acid bacteria are highly beneficial microorganisms for human beings and are present abundantly in dairy products so their use should be promoted for good human health.

  11. [Regulating acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria--a review].

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-07-04

    As cell factories, lactic acid bacteria are widely used in food, agriculture, pharmaceutical and other industries. Acid stress is one the important survival challenges encountered by lactic acid bacteria both in fermentation process and in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, the development of systems biology and metabolic engineering brings unprecedented opportunity for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and improving the acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria. This review addresses physiological mechanisms of lactic acid bacteria during acid stress. Moreover, strategies to improve the acid stress resistance of lactic acid were proposed.

  12. Evolutionary systems biology of amino acid biosynthetic cost in yeast.

    PubMed

    Barton, Michael D; Delneri, Daniela; Oliver, Stephen G; Rattray, Magnus; Bergman, Casey M

    2010-08-17

    Every protein has a biosynthetic cost to the cell based on the synthesis of its constituent amino acids. In order to optimise growth and reproduction, natural selection is expected, where possible, to favour the use of proteins whose constituents are cheaper to produce, as reduced biosynthetic cost may confer a fitness advantage to the organism. Quantifying the cost of amino acid biosynthesis presents challenges, since energetic requirements may change across different cellular and environmental conditions. We developed a systems biology approach to estimate the cost of amino acid synthesis based on genome-scale metabolic models and investigated the effects of the cost of amino acid synthesis on Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression and protein evolution. First, we used our two new and six previously reported measures of amino acid cost in conjunction with codon usage bias, tRNA gene number and atomic composition to identify which of these factors best predict transcript and protein levels. Second, we compared amino acid cost with rates of amino acid substitution across four species in the genus Saccharomyces. Regardless of which cost measure is used, amino acid biosynthetic cost is weakly associated with transcript and protein levels. In contrast, we find that biosynthetic cost and amino acid substitution rates show a negative correlation, but for only a subset of cost measures. In the economy of the yeast cell, we find that the cost of amino acid synthesis plays a limited role in shaping transcript and protein expression levels compared to that of translational optimisation. Biosynthetic cost does, however, appear to affect rates of amino acid evolution in Saccharomyces, suggesting that expensive amino acids may only be used when they have specific structural or functional roles in protein sequences. However, as there appears to be no single currency to compute the cost of amino acid synthesis across all cellular and environmental conditions, we conclude that

  13. Stress responses in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    van de Guchte, Maarten; Serror, Pascale; Chervaux, Christian; Smokvina, Tamara; Ehrlich, Stanislav D; Maguin, Emmanuelle

    2002-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) constitute a heterogeneous group of bacteria that are traditionally used to produce fermented foods. The industrialization of food bio-transformations increased the economical importance of LAB, as they play a crucial role in the development of the organoleptique and hygienic quality of fermented products. Therefore, the reliability of starter strains in terms of quality and functional properties (important for the development of aroma and texture), but also in terms of growth performance and robustness has become essential. These strains should resist to adverse conditions encountered in industrial processes, for example during starter handling and storage (freeze-drying, freezing or spray-drying). The development of new applications such as life vaccines and probiotic foods reinforces the need for robust LAB since they may have to survive in the digestive tract, resist the intestinal flora, maybe colonize the digestive or uro-genital mucosa and express specific functions under conditions that are unfavorable to growth (for example, during stationary phase or storage). Also in nature, the ability to quickly respond to stress is essential for survival and it is now well established that LAB, like other bacteria, evolved defense mechanisms against stress that allow them to withstand harsh conditions and sudden environmental changes. While genes implicated in stress responses are numerous, in LAB the levels of characterization of their actual role and regulation differ widely between species. The functional conservation of several stress proteins (for example, HS proteins, Csp, etc) and of some of their regulators (for example, HrcA, CtsR) renders even more striking the differences that exist between LAB and the classical model micro-organisms. Among the differences observed between LAB species and B. subtilis, one of the most striking is the absence of a sigma B orthologue in L. lactis ssp. lactis as well as in at least two streptococci

  14. Towards lactic acid bacteria-based biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Mazzoli, Roberto; Bosco, Francesca; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Bayer, Edward A; Pessione, Enrica

    2014-11-15

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have long been used in industrial applications mainly as starters for food fermentation or as biocontrol agents or as probiotics. However, LAB possess several characteristics that render them among the most promising candidates for use in future biorefineries in converting plant-derived biomass-either from dedicated crops or from municipal/industrial solid wastes-into biofuels and high value-added products. Lactic acid, their main fermentation product, is an attractive building block extensively used by the chemical industry, owing to the potential for production of polylactides as biodegradable and biocompatible plastic alternative to polymers derived from petrochemicals. LA is but one of many high-value compounds which can be produced by LAB fermentation, which also include biofuels such as ethanol and butanol, biodegradable plastic polymers, exopolysaccharides, antimicrobial agents, health-promoting substances and nutraceuticals. Furthermore, several LAB strains have ascertained probiotic properties, and their biomass can be considered a high-value product. The present contribution aims to provide an extensive overview of the main industrial applications of LAB and future perspectives concerning their utilization in biorefineries. Strategies will be described in detail for developing LAB strains with broader substrate metabolic capacity for fermentation of cheaper biomass.

  15. Fatty acid accumulation in the yeast Sporidiobolus salmonicolor during batch production of gamma-decalactone.

    PubMed

    Feron, G; Dufossé, L; Mauvais, G; Bonnarme, P; Spinnler, H E

    1997-04-01

    This paper provides new information about the metabolism of various fatty acids and gamma-decalactone production by yeast. An analysis of the fatty acid composition of the yeast Sporidiobolus salmonicolor during batch production of lactone with ricinoleic acid methyl ester as a precursor showed an accumulation of the gamma-decalactone precursor inside the cells. Electron microscopy of the yeasts showed the presence of large internal inclusions leading to membrane and organelle lysis and, consequently, death of the yeast. S. salmonicolor cultivated with methyl oleate did not produce gamma-decalactone and is viable during the whole culture. Analysis of the long chain fatty acid fraction showed incorporation of methyl oleate.

  16. Independent and additive effects of glutamic acid and methionine on yeast longevity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziyun; Song, Lixia; Liu, Shao Quan; Huang, Dejian

    2013-01-01

    It is established that glucose restriction extends yeast chronological and replicative lifespan, but little is known about the influence of amino acids on yeast lifespan, although some amino acids were reported to delay aging in rodents. Here we show that amino acid composition greatly alters yeast chronological lifespan. We found that non-essential amino acids (to yeast) methionine and glutamic acid had the most significant impact on yeast chronological lifespan extension, restriction of methionine and/or increase of glutamic acid led to longevity that was not the result of low acetic acid production and acidification in aging media. Remarkably, low methionine, high glutamic acid and glucose restriction additively and independently extended yeast lifespan, which could not be further extended by buffering the medium (pH 6.0). Our preliminary findings using yeasts with gene deletion demonstrate that glutamic acid addition, methionine and glucose restriction prompt yeast longevity through distinct mechanisms. This study may help to fill a gap in yeast model for the fast developing view that nutrient balance is a critical factor to extend lifespan.

  17. Independent and Additive Effects of Glutamic Acid and Methionine on Yeast Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ziyun; Song, Lixia; Liu, Shao Quan; Huang, Dejian

    2013-01-01

    It is established that glucose restriction extends yeast chronological and replicative lifespan, but little is known about the influence of amino acids on yeast lifespan, although some amino acids were reported to delay aging in rodents. Here we show that amino acid composition greatly alters yeast chronological lifespan. We found that non-essential amino acids (to yeast) methionine and glutamic acid had the most significant impact on yeast chronological lifespan extension, restriction of methionine and/or increase of glutamic acid led to longevity that was not the result of low acetic acid production and acidification in aging media. Remarkably, low methionine, high glutamic acid and glucose restriction additively and independently extended yeast lifespan, which could not be further extended by buffering the medium (pH 6.0). Our preliminary findings using yeasts with gene deletion demonstrate that glutamic acid addition, methionine and glucose restriction prompt yeast longevity through distinct mechanisms. This study may help to fill a gap in yeast model for the fast developing view that nutrient balance is a critical factor to extend lifespan. PMID:24244480

  18. Isolation and characterisation of lactic acid bacteria from donkey milk.

    PubMed

    Soto Del Rio, Maria de Los Dolores; Andrighetto, Christian; Dalmasso, Alessandra; Lombardi, Angiolella; Civera, Tiziana; Bottero, Maria Teresa

    2016-08-01

    During the last years the interest in donkey milk has increased significantly mainly because of its compelling functional elements. Even if the composition and nutritional properties of donkey milk are known, its microbiota is less studied. This Research Communication aimed to provide a comprehensive characterisation of the lactic acid bacteria in raw donkey milk. RAPD-PCR assay combined with 16S rDNA sequencing analysis were used to describe the microbial diversity of several donkey farms in the North West part of Italy. The more frequently detected species were: Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactococcus lactis and Carnobacterium maltaromaticum. Less abundant genera were Leuconostoc, Enterococcus and Streptococcus. The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus was also isolated. The bacterial and biotype distribution notably diverged among the farms. Several of the found species, not previously detected in donkey milk, could have an important probiotic activity and biotechnological potential. This study represents an important insight to the ample diversity of the microorganisms present in the highly selective ecosystem of raw donkey milk.

  19. Gut mucosal immunostimulation by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vitiñi, E; Alvarez, S; Medina, M; Medici, M; de Budeguer, M V; Perdigón, G

    2000-12-01

    The beneficial properties of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on human health have been frequently demonstrated. The interaction of LAB with the lymphoid cells associated to the gut to activate the mucosal immune system and the mechanisms by which they can exert an adjuvant effect is still unclear, as well as if this property is common for all the LAB. We studied the influence of the oral administration of different geneous of LAB such as Lactobacillus casei, L. acidophilus, L. rhamnosus, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. plantarum, Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus. We determined if the LAB assayed were able to stimulate the specific, the non-specific immune response (inflammatory response), or both. We demonstrated that all the bacteria assayed were able to increase the number of IgA producing cells associated to the lamina propria of small intestine. This effect was dose dependent. The increase in IgA+ producing cells was not always correlated with an increase in the CD4+ T cell number, indicating that some LAB assayed only induced clonal expansion of B cells triggered to produce IgA. Most of them, induced an increase in the number of cells involved in the inflammatory immune response. CD8+ T cell were diminished or not affected, with exception of L. plantarum that induced an increase at low dose. This fact would mean that LAB are unable to induce cytotoxicity mechanisms. We demonstrated the importance in the selection of LAB to be used as gut mucosal adjuvant. The different behaviours observed among them on the gut mucosal immune response, specially those that induce inflammatory immune response, show that not all the LAB can be used as oral adjuvant and that the beneficial effect of them can not generalized to genous or specie. The immunoadjuvant capacity would be a property of the strain assayed.

  20. Influence of Artisan Bakery- or Laboratory-Propagated Sourdoughs on the Diversity of Lactic Acid Bacterium and Yeast Microbiotas

    PubMed Central

    Minervini, Fabio; Lattanzi, Anna; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Seven mature type I sourdoughs were comparatively back-slopped (80 days) at artisan bakery and laboratory levels under constant technology parameters. The cell density of presumptive lactic acid bacteria and related biochemical features were not affected by the environment of propagation. On the contrary, the number of yeasts markedly decreased from artisan bakery to laboratory propagation. During late laboratory propagation, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that the DNA band corresponding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae was no longer detectable in several sourdoughs. Twelve species of lactic acid bacteria were variously identified through a culture-dependent approach. All sourdoughs harbored a certain number of species and strains, which were dominant throughout time and, in several cases, varied depending on the environment of propagation. As shown by statistical permutation analysis, the lactic acid bacterium populations differed among sourdoughs propagated at artisan bakery and laboratory levels. Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sakei, and Weissella cibaria dominated in only some sourdoughs back-slopped at artisan bakeries, and Leuconostoc citreum seemed to be more persistent under laboratory conditions. Strains of Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis were indifferently found in some sourdoughs. Together with the other stable species and strains, other lactic acid bacteria temporarily contaminated the sourdoughs and largely differed between artisan bakery and laboratory levels. The environment of propagation has an undoubted influence on the composition of sourdough yeast and lactic acid bacterium microbiotas. PMID:22635989

  1. Molecular screening of wine lactic acid bacteria degrading hydroxycinnamic acids.

    PubMed

    de las Rivas, Blanca; Rodríguez, Héctor; Curiel, José Antonio; Landete, José María; Muñoz, Rosario

    2009-01-28

    The potential to produce volatile phenols from hydroxycinnamic acids was investigated for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Spanish grape must and wine. A PCR assay was developed for the detection of LAB that potentially produce volatile phenols. Synthetic degenerate oligonucleotides for the specific detection of the pdc gene encoding a phenolic acid decarboxylase were designed. The pdc PCR assay amplifies a 321 bp DNA fragment from phenolic acid decarboxylase. The pdc PCR method was applied to 85 strains belonging to the 6 main wine LAB species. Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, and Pediococcus pentosaceus strains produce a positive response in the pdc PCR assay, whereas Oenococcus oeni, Lactobacillus hilgardii, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains did not produce the expected PCR product. The production of vinyl and ethyl derivatives from hydroxycinnamic acids in culture media was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. A relationship was found between pdc PCR amplification and volatile phenol production, so that the LAB strains that gave a positive pdc PCR response produce volatile phenols, whereas strains that did not produce a PCR amplicon did not produce volatile phenols. The proposed method could be useful for a preliminary identification of LAB strains able to produce volatile phenols in wine.

  2. Yeast and lactic acid flora of tej, an indigenous Ethiopian honey wine: variations within and between production units.

    PubMed

    Bahiru, Bekele; Mehari, Tetemke; Ashenafi, Mogessie

    2006-05-01

    A total of 200 samples of tej, an indigenous Ethiopian honey wine, were collected from ten production units at different production times. The samples were analysed for their microbial flora. Mean counts of aerobic mesophilic bacteria and aerobic spores for the different production units were <3 log cfu/ml. Coliforms and other members of Enterobacteriaceae were below detectable levels basically due to the low pH of the samples (<4.0). Yeasts were among the dominant micro-organisms in all samples with mean counts of 6 log cfu/ml for all production units. Over 25% of the yeast isolates belonged to Saccharomyces cerevisiae followed by Kluyvermyces bulgaricus (16%), Debaromyces phaffi (14%) and K. veronae (10%). Yeast counts showed significant variation within samples of a production unit (CV>10%) and difference in counts among all samples was also significant (P<0.01). The lactic acid bacteria had counts of 6 log cfu/ml with a significant variation within samples of a production unit (CV>10%) or among all samples (P<0.01). In most production units, the heterolactics had higher counts than the homolactics. The lactic flora consisted of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Leuconostoc and Pediococcus species. The lactobacilli were, however, the most frequently encountered groups. In most of the samples, the lactic flora was dominated by two (49.5%) or three (46%) groups of lactic acid bacteria.

  3. Theoretical Prerequisites for the Possible Use of Bacteria which Split Organophosphates in Order to Increase the Yield of Nutrient Yeast and its Nitrogen and Phosphorous Content,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-28

    FOR THE POSSIBLE USE OF BACTERIA WHICH SPLIT ORGANOPHOSPHATES IN ORDER TO INCREASE THE YIELD OF NUTRIENT YEAST AND ITS NITROGEN:AND PHOSPHOROUS CONTENT...ORGANOPHOSPHATES IN ORDER TO IN- -SI CfA &I CREASE THE YIELD OF NUTRIENT YEAST AND ITS NITROGEN DTCTAB AND PHOSPHOROUS CONTENT -F unec By: D.L. Shamis English...POSSIBLE USE OF BACTERIA WHICH SPLIT ORGANOPHOSPHATES IN ORDER TO INCREASE THE YIELD OF NUTRIENT YEAST AND ITS NITROGEN AND PHOSPHOROUS CONTENT D. L. Shamis

  4. Process strategies to maximize lipid accumulations of novel yeast in acid and base treated hydrolyzates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleaginous yeasts can accumulate up to 70% of cell biomass as lipids, predominantly as triacylglycerols. Yeast lipid fatty acid profiles have been reported to be similar to that of vegetable oils and consist primarily of oleic, palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acids. This capability provides the oppo...

  5. Transport of malic acid and other dicarboxylic acids in the yeast Hansenula anomala.

    PubMed

    Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C

    1990-04-01

    DL-Malic acid-grown cells of the yeast Hansenula anomala formed a saturable transport system that mediated accumulative transport of L-malic acid with the following kinetic parameters at pH 5.0: Vmax, 0.20 nmol.s-1.mg (dry weight)-1; Km, 0.076 mM L-malate. Uptake of malic acid was accompanied by proton disappearance from the external medium with rates that followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics as a function of malic acid concentration. Fumaric acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, oxaloacetic acid, D-malic acid, and L-malic acid were competitive inhibitors of succinic acid transport, and all induced proton movements that followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, suggesting that all of these dicarboxylates used the same transport system. Maleic acid, malonic acid, oxalic acid, and L-(+)-tartaric acid, as well as other Krebs cycle acids such as citric and isocitric acids, were not accepted by the malate transport system. Km measurements as a function of pH suggested that the anionic forms of the acids were transported by an accumulative dicarboxylate proton symporter. The accumulation ratio at pH 5.0 was about 40. The malate system was inducible and was subject to glucose repression. Undissociated succinic acid entered the cells slowly by simple diffusion. The permeability of the cells by undissociated acid increased with pH, with the diffusion constant increasing 100-fold between pH 3.0 and 6.0.

  6. Treatment of heavy oil wastewater by UASB-BAFs using the combination of yeast and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiao-Ling

    2015-01-01

    A novel system integrating an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a two-stage biological aerated filter (BAF) system was investigated as advanced treatment of heavy oil wastewater with large amounts of dissolved recalcitrant organic substances and low levels of nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients. #1 BAF, inoculated with two yeast strains (Candida tropicalis and Rhodotorula dairenensis), was installed in the upper reaches of #2 BAF inoculated with activated sludge. During the 180-day study period, the chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), oil and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the wastewater were removed by 90.2%, 90.8%, 86.5% and 89.4%, respectively. Although the wastewater qualities fluctuated and the hydraulic retention time continuously decreased, the effluent quality index met the national discharge standard steadily. The UASB process greatly improved the biodegradability of the wastewater, while #1 BAF played an important role not only in degrading COD but also in removing oil and high molecular weight PAHs. This work demonstrates that the hybrid UASB-BAFs system containing yeast-bacteria consortium has the potential to be used in bioremediation of high-strength oily wastewater.

  7. Coexistence of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Potential Spoilage Microbiota in a Dairy Processing Environment.

    PubMed

    Stellato, Giuseppina; De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta; Ercolini, Danilo

    2015-11-01

    Microbial contamination in food processing plants can play a fundamental role in food quality and safety. In this study, the microbiota in a dairy plant was studied by both 16S rRNA- and 26S rRNA-based culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Environmental samples from surfaces and tools were studied along with the different types of cheese produced in the same plant. The microbiota of environmental swabs was very complex, including more than 200 operational taxonomic units with extremely variable relative abundances (0.01 to 99%) depending on the species and sample. A core microbiota shared by 70% of the samples indicated a coexistence of lactic acid bacteria with a remarkable level of Streptococcus thermophilus and possible spoilage-associated bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Psychrobacter, with a relative abundance above 50%. The most abundant yeasts were Kluyveromyces marxianus, Yamadazyma triangularis, Trichosporon faecale, and Debaryomyces hansenii. Beta-diversity analyses showed a clear separation of environmental and cheese samples based on both yeast and bacterial community structure. In addition, predicted metagenomes also indicated differential distribution of metabolic pathways between the two categories of samples. Cooccurrence and coexclusion pattern analyses indicated that the occurrence of potential spoilers was excluded by lactic acid bacteria. In addition, their persistence in the environment can be helpful to counter the development of potential spoilers that may contaminate the cheeses, with possible negative effects on their microbiological quality.

  8. Coexistence of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Potential Spoilage Microbiota in a Dairy Processing Environment

    PubMed Central

    Stellato, Giuseppina; De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    Microbial contamination in food processing plants can play a fundamental role in food quality and safety. In this study, the microbiota in a dairy plant was studied by both 16S rRNA- and 26S rRNA-based culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Environmental samples from surfaces and tools were studied along with the different types of cheese produced in the same plant. The microbiota of environmental swabs was very complex, including more than 200 operational taxonomic units with extremely variable relative abundances (0.01 to 99%) depending on the species and sample. A core microbiota shared by 70% of the samples indicated a coexistence of lactic acid bacteria with a remarkable level of Streptococcus thermophilus and possible spoilage-associated bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Psychrobacter, with a relative abundance above 50%. The most abundant yeasts were Kluyveromyces marxianus, Yamadazyma triangularis, Trichosporon faecale, and Debaryomyces hansenii. Beta-diversity analyses showed a clear separation of environmental and cheese samples based on both yeast and bacterial community structure. In addition, predicted metagenomes also indicated differential distribution of metabolic pathways between the two categories of samples. Cooccurrence and coexclusion pattern analyses indicated that the occurrence of potential spoilers was excluded by lactic acid bacteria. In addition, their persistence in the environment can be helpful to counter the development of potential spoilers that may contaminate the cheeses, with possible negative effects on their microbiological quality. PMID:26341209

  9. Importance of lactic acid bacteria in Asian fermented foods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria play important roles in various fermented foods in Asia. Besides being the main component in kimchi and other fermented foods, they are used to preserve edible food materials through fermentation of other raw-materials such as rice wine/beer, rice cakes, and fish by producing organic acids to control putrefactive microorganisms and pathogens. These bacteria also provide a selective environment favoring fermentative microorganisms and produce desirable flavors in various fermented foods. This paper discusses the role of lactic acid bacteria in various non-dairy fermented food products in Asia and their nutritional and physiological functions in the Asian diet. PMID:21995342

  10. Production of Value-added Products by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a group of facultative anaerobic, catalase negative, nonmotile and nonsporeforming–Gram positive bacteria. Most LAB utilize high energy C sources including monomer sugars to produce energy to maintain cellular structure and function. This anaerobic fermentation proce...

  11. Effect of phenolic acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by lactic acid bacteria from wine.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco M; Figueiredo, Ana R; Hogg, Tim A; Couto, José A

    2009-06-01

    The influence of phenolic (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic, gallic and protocatechuic) acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by two strains of wine lactic acid bacteria (Oenococcus oeni VF and Lactobacillus hilgardii 5) was investigated. Cultures were grown in modified MRS medium supplemented with different phenolic acids. Cellular growth was monitored and metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC-RI. Despite the strong inhibitory effect of most tested phenolic acids on the growth of O. oeni VF, the malolactic activity of this strain was not considerably affected by these compounds. While less affected in its growth, the capacity of L. hilgardii 5 to degrade malic acid was clearly diminished. Except for gallic acid, the addition of phenolic acids delayed the metabolism of glucose and citric acid in both strains tested. It was also found that the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic) increased the yield of lactic and acetic acid production from glucose by O. oeni VF and not by L. hilgardii 5. The results show that important oenological characteristics of wine lactic acid bacteria, such as the malolactic activity and the production of volatile organic acids, may be differently affected by the presence of phenolic acids, depending on the bacterial species or strain.

  12. Effects of heavy metals on the electrokinetic properties of bacteria, yeast, and clay minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Y.E.

    1987-01-01

    The electrokinetic patterns of four bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Agrobacterium radiobacter), two yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Canida albicans), and two clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite) in the presence of the chloride salts of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Zn) and of Na and Mg were determined by microelectrophoresis. The cells and clays were net negatively charged at pH values above their isoelectric point (pI) in solutions of Na, Mg, Hg, and Pb with an ionic strength (..mu..) of 3 x 10/sup -4/. However, at pH values above pH 5.0, the charge of some bacteria, S. cerevisiae, and kaolinite changed to a net positive charge (charge reversal) in the presence of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Zn. The charge of the bacteria and S. cerevisiae also reversed in solution of Ni and Cu with a ..mu.. > 3 x 10/sup -4/, whereas there was no reversal in solutions with a ..mu.. < 3 x 10/sup -4/. The clays became net positively charged when the ..mu.. of Cu was > 3 x 10/sup -4/ and that of Ni was > 1.5 x 10/sup -4/. The charge of the cells and clays also reversed in solutions containing both Mg and Ni or both Cu and Ni (except montmorillonite) but not in solutions containing both Mg and Cu (except kaolinite) (..mu.. = 3 x 10/sup -4/). The pI of the cells in the presence of some heavy metals, especially Ni and Cr, was at higher pH values than in the presence of Na and Mg.

  13. Yeasts and coliform bacteria of water accumulated in bromeliads of mangrove and sand dune ecosystems of southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hagler, A N; Rosa, C A; Morais, P B; Mendonça-Hagler, L C; Franco, G M; Araujo, F V; Soares, C A

    1993-10-01

    Yeasts and coliform bacteria were isolated from water that accumulated in the central cups and adjacent leaf axilae of two bromeliads, Neoregelia cruenta of a coastal sand dune and Quesnelia quesneliana of a mangrove ecosystem near the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The mean total coliform counts were above 10,000 per 100 mL for waters of both plants, but the mean fecal coliform counts were only 74 per 100 mL for Q. quesneliana and mostly undetected in water from N. cruenta. Of 90 fecal coliform isolates, 51 were typical of Escherichia coli in colony morphology and indol, methyl red, Volges-Proskauer, and citrate (IMViC) tests. Seven representatives of the typical E. coli cultures were identified as this species, but the identifications of nine other coliform bacteria were mostly dubious. The yeast community of N. cruenta was typical of plant surfaces with basidiomycetous yeasts anamorphs, and the black yeast Aureobasidium pullulans was prevalent. Quesnelia quesneliana had a substantial proportion of ascomycetous yeasts and their anamorphs, including a probable new biotype of Saccharomyces unisporus. Our results suggested that the microbial communities in bromeliad waters are typically autochtonous and not contaminants.

  14. Temperature Sensitivity Conferred by ligA Alleles from Psychrophilic Bacteria upon Substitution in Mesophilic Bacteria and a Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Pankowski, Jarosław A.; Puckett, Stephanie M.

    2016-01-01

    We have assembled a collection of 13 psychrophilic ligA alleles that can serve as genetic elements for engineering mesophiles to a temperature-sensitive (TS) phenotype. When these ligA alleles were substituted into Francisella novicida, they conferred a TS phenotype with restrictive temperatures between 33 and 39°C. When the F. novicida ligA hybrid strains were plated above their restrictive temperatures, eight of them generated temperature-resistant variants. For two alleles, the mutations that led to temperature resistance clustered near the 5′ end of the gene, and the mutations increased the predicted strength of the ribosome binding site at least 3-fold. Four F. novicida ligA hybrid strains generated no temperature-resistant variants at a detectable level. These results suggest that multiple mutations are needed to create temperature-resistant variants of these ligA gene products. One ligA allele was isolated from a Colwellia species that has a maximal growth temperature of 12°C, and this allele supported growth of F. novicida only as a hybrid between the psychrophilic and the F. novicida ligA genes. However, the full psychrophilic gene alone supported the growth of Salmonella enterica, imparting a restrictive temperature of 27°C. We also tested two ligA alleles from two Pseudoalteromonas strains for their ability to support the viability of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that lacked its essential gene, CDC9, encoding an ATP-dependent DNA ligase. In both cases, the psychrophilic bacterial alleles supported yeast viability and their expression generated TS phenotypes. This collection of ligA alleles should be useful in engineering bacteria, and possibly eukaryotic microbes, to predictable TS phenotypes. PMID:26773080

  15. Methods and materials for the production of L-lactic acid in yeast

    DOEpatents

    Hause, Ben; Rajgarhia, Vineet; Suominen, Pirkko

    2009-05-19

    Recombinant yeast are provided having, in one aspect, multiple exogenous LDH genes integrated into the genome, while leaving native PDC genes intact. In a second aspect, recombinant yeast are provided having an exogenous LDH gene integrated into its genome at the locus of a native PDC gene, with deletion of the native PDC gene. The recombinant yeast are useful in fermentation process for producing lactic acid.

  16. Hydrothermal decomposition of yeast cells for production of proteins and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Lamoolphak, Wiwat; Goto, Motonobu; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Suphantharika, Manop; Muangnapoh, Chirakarn; Prommuag, Chattip; Shotipruk, Artiwan

    2006-10-11

    This study examines hydrothermal decomposition of Baker's yeast cells, used as a model for spent Brewer's yeast waste, into protein and amino acids. The reaction was carried out in a closed batch reactor at various temperatures between 100 and 250 degrees C. The reaction products were separated into water-soluble and solid residue. The results demonstrated that the amount of yeast residue decreased with increasing hydrolysis temperature. After 20 min reaction in water at 250 degrees C, 78% of yeast was decomposed. The highest amount of protein produced was also obtained at this condition and was found to be 0.16 mg/mg dry yeast. The highest amount of amino acids (0.063 mg/mg dry yeast) was found at the lowest temperature tested after 15 min. The hydrolysis product obtained at 200 degrees C was tested as a nutrient source for yeast growth. The growth of yeast cells in the culture medium containing 2 w/v% of this product was comparable to that of the cells grown in the medium containing commercial yeast extract at the same concentration. These results demonstrated the feasibility of using subcritical water to potentially decompose proteinaceous waste such as spent Brewer's yeast while recovering more useful products.

  17. Field Assessment of Yeast- and Oxalic Acid-generated Carbon Dioxide for Mosquito Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    FIELD ASSESSMENT OF YEAST- AND OXALIC ACID –GENERATED CARBON DIOXIDE FOR MOSQUITO SURVEILLANCE1 JAMES F. HARWOOD, ALEC G. RICHARDSON, JENNIFER A...were evaluated in order to address this capability gap: 1) an electrolyzer that converts solid oxalic acid into CO2 gas, and 2) CO2 produced by yeast...surveillance was compared to dry ice and compressed gas in Jacksonville, FL. The electrolyzed oxalic acid only slightly increased the number of

  18. Influencing fatty acid composition of yeasts by lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Kolouchova, Irena; Sigler, Karel; Zimola, Michal; Rezanka, Tomas; Matatkova, Olga; Masak, Jan

    2016-08-01

    The growth of microorganisms is affected by cultivation conditions, concentration of carbon and nitrogen sources and the presence of trace elements. One of the new possibilities of influencing the production of cell mass or lipids is the use of lanthanides. Lanthanides are biologically non-essential elements with wide applications in technology and industry and their concentration as environmental contaminants is therefore increasing. Although non-essential, lanthanides have been proposed (and even used) to produce beneficial effects in plants but their mechanisms of action are unclear. Recently, it was suggested that they may replace essential elements or operate as potent blockers of Ca(2+) channels. We tested the effect of low concentrations of lanthanides on traditional biotechnologically useful yeast species (Kluyveromyces polysporus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Torulospora delbrueckii), and species capable of high accumulation of lipids (Rhodotorula glutinis, Trichosporon cutaneum, Candida sp., Yarrowia lipolytica). Low concentrations of lanthanum and monazite were conducive to an increase in cell mass and lipids and also higher production of palmitoleic acid, commonly used in cosmetics and medicine, and ω6-linoleic acid which is a precursor of thromboxanes, prostaglandins and leucotrienes.

  19. Yeast ecology of Kombucha fermentation.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Ai Leng; Heard, Gillian; Cox, Julian

    2004-09-01

    Kombucha is a traditional fermentation of sweetened tea, involving a symbiosis of yeast species and acetic acid bacteria. Despite reports of different yeast species being associated with the fermentation, little is known of the quantitative ecology of yeasts in Kombucha. Using oxytetracycline-supplemented malt extract agar, yeasts were isolated from four commercially available Kombucha products and identified using conventional biochemical and physiological tests. During the fermentation of each of the four products, yeasts were enumerated from both the cellulosic pellicle and liquor of the Kombucha. The number and diversity of species varied between products, but included Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Candida stellata, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. While these yeast species are known to occur in Kombucha, the enumeration of each species present throughout fermentation of each of the four Kombucha cultures demonstrated for the first time the dynamic nature of the yeast ecology. Kombucha fermentation is, in general, initiated by osmotolerant species, succeeded and ultimately dominated by acid-tolerant species.

  20. Involvement of carnitine acyltransferases in peroxisomal fatty acid metabolism by the yeast Pichia guilliermondii.

    PubMed Central

    Pagot, Y; Belin, J M

    1996-01-01

    This article provides information about peroxisomal fatty acid metabolism in the yeast Pichia guilliermondii. The existence of inducible mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase and peroxisomal carnitine octanoyl-transferase activities was demonstrated after culture of this yeast in a medium containing methyl oleate. The subcellular sites and induction patterns were studied. The inhibition of carnitine octanoyl- and palmitoyl-transferases by chlorpromazine to a large extent prevented the otherwise observed metabolism-dependent inactivation of thiolase by 2-bromofatty acids in vivo. We concluded that the metabolism of long- and medium-chain fatty acids in the peroxisome of this yeast involved carnitine intermediates. PMID:8837442

  1. Use of virginiamycin to control the growth of lactic acid bacteria during alcohol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Hynes, S H; Kjarsgaard, D M; Thomas, K C; Ingledew, W M

    1997-04-01

    The antibiotic virginiamycin was investigated for its effects on growth and lactic acid production by seven strains of lactobacilli during the alcoholic fermentation of wheat mash by yeast. The lowest concentration of virginiamycin tested (0.5 mg Lactrol kg-1 mash), was effective against most of the lactic acid bacteria under study, but Lactobacillus plantarum was not significantly inhibited at this concentration. The use of virginiamycin prevented or reduced potential yield losses of up to 11% of the produced ethanol due to the growth and metabolism of lactobacilli. However, when the same concentration of virginiamycin was added to mash not inoculated with yeast, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and L. paracasei grew after an extensive lag of 48 h and L. plantarum grew after a similar lag even in the presence of 2 mg virginiamycin kg-1 mash. Results showed a variation in sensitivity to virginiamycin between the different strains tested and also a possible reduction in effectiveness of virginiamycin over prolonged incubation in wheat mash, especially in the absence of yeast.

  2. Effects of humic acids on the growth of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, V. V.; Yakushev, A. V.; Zavgorodnyaya, Yu. A.; Byzov, B. A.; Demin, V. V.

    2010-03-01

    The influence of humic acids of different origins on the growth of bacterial cultures of different taxa isolated from the soil and the digestive tracts of earthworms ( Aporrectodea caliginosa)—habitats with contrasting conditions—was studied. More than half of the soil and intestinal isolates from the 170 tested strains grew on the humic acid of brown coal as the only carbon source. The specific growth rate of the bacteria isolated from the intestines of the earthworms was higher than that of the soil bacteria. The use of humic acids by intestinal bacteria confirms the possibility of symbiotic digestion by earthworms with the participation of bacterial symbionts. Humic acids at a concentration of 0.1 g/l stimulated the growth of the soil and intestinal bacteria strains (66 strains out of 161) on Czapek’s medium with glucose (1 g/l), probably, acting as a regulator of the cell metabolism. On the medium with the humic acid, the intestinal bacteria grew faster than the soil isolates did. The most active growth of the intestinal isolates was observed by Paenibacillus sp., Pseudomonas putida, Delftia acidovorans, Microbacterium terregens, and Aeromonas sp.; among the soil ones were the representatives of the Pseudomonas genus. A response of the bacteria to the influence of humic acids was shown at the strain level using the example of Pseudomonas representatives. The Flexom humin preparation stimulated the growth of the hydrocarbon-oxidizing Acinetobacter sp. bacteria. This effect can be used for creating a new compound with the elevated activity of bacteria that are destroyers of oil and oil products.

  3. Contribution of Fermentation Yeast to Final Amino Acid Profile in DDGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One major factor affecting DDGS quality and market values is amino acid (AA) composition. DDGS proteins come from corn and yeast. Yet, the effect of fermentation yeast on DDGS protein quantity and quality (AA profile) has not been well documented. Based on literature review, there are at least 4 met...

  4. Transport of malic acid and other dicarboxylic acids in the yeast Hansenula anomala.

    PubMed Central

    Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C

    1990-01-01

    DL-Malic acid-grown cells of the yeast Hansenula anomala formed a saturable transport system that mediated accumulative transport of L-malic acid with the following kinetic parameters at pH 5.0: Vmax, 0.20 nmol.s-1.mg (dry weight)-1; Km, 0.076 mM L-malate. Uptake of malic acid was accompanied by proton disappearance from the external medium with rates that followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics as a function of malic acid concentration. Fumaric acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, oxaloacetic acid, D-malic acid, and L-malic acid were competitive inhibitors of succinic acid transport, and all induced proton movements that followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, suggesting that all of these dicarboxylates used the same transport system. Maleic acid, malonic acid, oxalic acid, and L-(+)-tartaric acid, as well as other Krebs cycle acids such as citric and isocitric acids, were not accepted by the malate transport system. Km measurements as a function of pH suggested that the anionic forms of the acids were transported by an accumulative dicarboxylate proton symporter. The accumulation ratio at pH 5.0 was about 40. The malate system was inducible and was subject to glucose repression. Undissociated succinic acid entered the cells slowly by simple diffusion. The permeability of the cells by undissociated acid increased with pH, with the diffusion constant increasing 100-fold between pH 3.0 and 6.0. PMID:2339872

  5. Distribution of D-amino acids in vinegars and involvement of lactic acid bacteria in the production of D-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Mutaguchi, Yuta; Ohmori, Taketo; Akano, Hirofumi; Doi, Katsumi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Levels of free D-amino acids were compared in 11 vinegars produced from different sources or through different manufacturing processes. To analyze the D- and L-amino acids, the enantiomers were initially converted into diastereomers using pre-column derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde plus N-acethyl-L-cysteine or N-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-L-cysteine. This was followed by separation of the resultant fluorescent isoindol derivatives on an octadecylsilyl stationary phase using ultra-performance liquid chromatography. The analyses showed that the total D-amino acid level in lactic fermented tomato vinegar was very high. Furthermore, analysis of the amino acids in tomato juice samples collected after alcoholic, lactic and acetic fermentation during the production of lactic fermented tomato vinegar showed clearly that lactic fermentation is responsible for the D-amino acids production; marked increases in D-amino acids were seen during lactic fermentation, but not during alcoholic or acetic fermentation. This suggests lactic acid bacteria have a greater ability to produce D-amino acids than yeast or acetic acid bacteria.

  6. Biotechnological and in situ food production of polyols by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Maria Eugenia; Bleckwedel, Juliana; Raya, Raúl R; Mozzi, Fernanda

    2013-06-01

    Polyols such as mannitol, erythritol, sorbitol, and xylitol are naturally found in fruits and vegetables and are produced by certain bacteria, fungi, yeasts, and algae. These sugar alcohols are widely used in food and pharmaceutical industries and in medicine because of their interesting physicochemical properties. In the food industry, polyols are employed as natural sweeteners applicable in light and diabetic food products. In the last decade, biotechnological production of polyols by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been investigated as an alternative to their current industrial production. While heterofermentative LAB may naturally produce mannitol and erythritol under certain culture conditions, sorbitol and xylitol have been only synthesized through metabolic engineering processes. This review deals with the spontaneous formation of mannitol and erythritol in fermented foods and their biotechnological production by heterofermentative LAB and briefly presented the metabolic engineering processes applied for polyol formation.

  7. Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauri, James F.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed…

  8. Structural diversity and biological significance of lipoteichoic acid in Gram-positive bacteria: focusing on beneficial probiotic lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Yokota, Shinichi; Fukiya, Satoru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell surface molecules are at the forefront of host-bacterium interactions. Teichoic acids are observed only in Gram-positive bacteria, and they are one of the main cell surface components. Teichoic acids play important physiological roles and contribute to the bacterial interaction with their host. In particular, lipoteichoic acid (LTA) anchored to the cell membrane has attracted attention as a host immunomodulator. Chemical and biological characteristics of LTA from various bacteria have been described. However, most of the information concerns pathogenic bacteria, and information on beneficial bacteria, including probiotic lactic acid bacteria, is insufficient. LTA is structurally diverse. Strain-level structural diversity of LTA is suggested to underpin its immunomodulatory activities. Thus, the structural information on LTA in probiotics, in particular strain-associated diversity, is important for understanding its beneficial roles associated with the modulation of immune response. Continued accumulation of structural information is necessary to elucidate the detailed physiological roles and significance of LTA. In this review article, we summarize the current state of knowledge on LTA structure, in particular the structure of LTA from lactic acid bacteria. We also describe the significance of structural diversity and biological roles of LTA.

  9. Structural diversity and biological significance of lipoteichoic acid in Gram-positive bacteria: focusing on beneficial probiotic lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    SHIRAISHI, Tsukasa; YOKOTA, Shinichi; FUKIYA, Satoru; YOKOTA, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell surface molecules are at the forefront of host-bacterium interactions. Teichoic acids are observed only in Gram-positive bacteria, and they are one of the main cell surface components. Teichoic acids play important physiological roles and contribute to the bacterial interaction with their host. In particular, lipoteichoic acid (LTA) anchored to the cell membrane has attracted attention as a host immunomodulator. Chemical and biological characteristics of LTA from various bacteria have been described. However, most of the information concerns pathogenic bacteria, and information on beneficial bacteria, including probiotic lactic acid bacteria, is insufficient. LTA is structurally diverse. Strain-level structural diversity of LTA is suggested to underpin its immunomodulatory activities. Thus, the structural information on LTA in probiotics, in particular strain-associated diversity, is important for understanding its beneficial roles associated with the modulation of immune response. Continued accumulation of structural information is necessary to elucidate the detailed physiological roles and significance of LTA. In this review article, we summarize the current state of knowledge on LTA structure, in particular the structure of LTA from lactic acid bacteria. We also describe the significance of structural diversity and biological roles of LTA. PMID:27867802

  10. Bacteria, Yeast, Worms, and Flies: Exploiting simple model organisms to investigate human mitochondrial diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Shane L.; Graham, Brett H.; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Kar, Adwitiya; Falk, Marni J.

    2013-01-01

    The extensive conservation of mitochondrial structure, composition, and function across evolution offers a unique opportunity to expand our understanding of human mitochondrial biology and disease. By investigating the biology of much simpler model organisms, it is often possible to answer questions that are unreachable at the clinical level. Here, we review the relative utility of four different model organisms, namely the bacteria Escherichia coli, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, in studying the role of mitochondrial proteins relevant to human disease. E. coli are single cell, prokaryotic bacteria that have proven to be a useful model system in which to investigate mitochondrial respiratory chain protein structure and function. S. cerevisiae is a single-celled eukaryote that can grow equally well by mitochondrial-dependent respiration or by ethanol fermentation, a property that has proven to be a veritable boon for investigating mitochondrial functionality. C. elegans is a multi-cellular, microscopic worm that is organized into five major tissues and has proven to be a robust model animal for in vitro and in vivo studies of primary respiratory chain dysfunction and its potential therapies in humans. Studied for over a century, D. melanogaster is a classic metazoan model system offering an abundance of genetic tools and reagents that facilitates investigations of mitochondrial biology using both forward and reverse genetics. The respective strengths and limitations of each species relative to mitochondrial studies are explored. In addition, an overview is provided of major discoveries made in mitochondrial biology in each of these four model systems. PMID:20818735

  11. Degradation capacities of bacteria and yeasts isolated from the gut of Dendroctonus rhizophagus (Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    PubMed

    Briones-Roblero, Carlos I; Rodríguez-Díaz, Roberto; Santiago-Cruz, José A; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Rivera-Orduña, Flor N

    2017-01-01

    Bark beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) feed on the xylem and phloem of their host, which are composed of structural carbohydrates and organic compounds that are not easily degraded by the insects. Some of these compounds might be hydrolyzed by digestive enzymes produced by microbes present in the gut of these insects. In this study, we evaluated the enzymatic capacity of bacteria (Acinetobacter lwoffii, Arthrobacter sp., Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas azotoformans, and Rahnella sp.) and yeasts (Candida piceae, Candida oregonensis, Cyberlindnera americana, Zygoascus sp., and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa) isolated from the Dendroctonus rhizophagus gut to hydrolyze cellulose, xylan, pectin, starch, lipids, and esters. All isolates, with the exception of C. piceae, showed lipolytic activity. Furthermore, P. putida, P. azotoformans, C. americana, C. piceae, and R. mucilaginosa presented amylolytic activity. Esterase activity was shown by A. lwoffii, P. azotoformans, and Rahnella sp. Cellulolytic and xylanolytic activities were present only in Arthrobacter sp. and P. azotoformans. The pectinolytic activity was not recorded in any isolate. This is the first study to provide evidence on the capacity of microbes associated with the D. rhizophagus gut to hydrolyze specific substrates, which might cover part of the nutritional requirements for the development, fitness, and survival of these insects.

  12. Optimum production and characterization of an acid protease from marine yeast Metschnikowia reukaufii W6b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Peng, Ying; Wang, Xianghong; Chi, Zhenming

    2010-12-01

    The marine yeast strain W6b isolated from sediment of the South China Sea was found to produce a cell-bound acid protease. The crude acid protease produced by this marine yeast showed the highest activity at pH 3.5 and 40 °C. The optimal pH and temperature for the crude acid protease were in agreement with those for acid protease produced by the terrestrial yeasts. The optimal medium of the acid protease production was seawater containing 1.0% glucose, 1.5% casein, and 0.5% yeast extract, and the optimal cultivation conditions of the acid protease production were pH 4.0, a temperature of 25 °C and a shaking speed of 140 rmin-1. Under the optimal conditions, 72.5 UmL-1 of acid protease activity could be obtained in cell suspension within 48 h of fermentation at shake flask level. The acid protease production was induced by high-molecular-weight nitrogen sources and repressed by low-molecular-weight nitrogen sources. Skimmed-milk-clotting test showed that the crude acid protease from the cell suspension of the yeast W6b had high skimmed milk coagulability. The acid protease produced by M. reukaufii W6b may have highly potential applications in cheese, food and fermentation industries.

  13. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria and their environmental interactions. Moreover, functional genomics approaches have been used to understand the response of lactic acid bacteria to their environment. The results have been instrumental in understanding the adaptation of lactic acid bacteria in artisanal and industrial food fermentations as well as their interactions with the human host. Collectively, this has led to a detailed analysis of genes involved in colonization, persistence, interaction and signaling towards to the human host and its health. Finally, massive parallel genome re-sequencing has provided new opportunities in applied genomics, specifically in the characterization of novel non-GMO strains that have potential to be used in the food industry. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art of these functional genomics approaches and their impact in understanding, applying and designing lactic acid bacteria for food and health. PMID:25186768

  14. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health.

    PubMed

    Douillard, François P; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-08-29

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria and their environmental interactions. Moreover, functional genomics approaches have been used to understand the response of lactic acid bacteria to their environment. The results have been instrumental in understanding the adaptation of lactic acid bacteria in artisanal and industrial food fermentations as well as their interactions with the human host. Collectively, this has led to a detailed analysis of genes involved in colonization, persistence, interaction and signaling towards to the human host and its health. Finally, massive parallel genome re-sequencing has provided new opportunities in applied genomics, specifically in the characterization of novel non-GMO strains that have potential to be used in the food industry. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art of these functional genomics approaches and their impact in understanding, applying and designing lactic acid bacteria for food and health.

  15. [Fluorescein transport and antioxidant systems in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae under acid stress].

    PubMed

    Abrat, O B; Semchyshyn, H M; Miedzobrodski, J; Lushchak, V I

    2008-01-01

    The influence of acetic acid induced stress on the activity of fluorescein extrusion system and cell survival in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied. It was shown that acetic acid caused the inhibition of fluorescein efflux from the cells of both parental strain and its derivative defective in the transcriptional factor War1 which regulates the system of acetate efflux from the cell. The stress induced by 200 mM CH3COOH decreased almost 10 times the survival of strains deficient in the regulatory proteins War1 and Yap1 as compared with respective wild strains. However, pretreatment of the yeast by sublethal concentrations of hydrogen peroxide resulted in the increased resistance to acid stress. Thus it may be supposed that several systems exist which are responsible for acetate extrusion from the yeast cells. Regulatory proteins War1 and Yap1 are involved in the yeast adaptation to the stress induced by acetic acid.

  16. Production of amino acids by yogurt bacteria.

    PubMed

    Beshkova, D M; Simova, E D; Frengova, G I; Simov, Z I; Adilov, E F

    1998-01-01

    The dynamics of free amino acid production by the selected strains Streptococcus thermophilus 13a and Lactobacillus bulgaricus 2-11 were studied in pure and mixed cultivations during yogurt starter culture manufacture. L. bulgaricus 2-11 showed the highest activity for producing free amino acids with high individual concentrations over the first hour of growth (50% of the total amount). By the end of milk's full coagulation (4.5 h), 70% of the total amount of amino acids was released. S. thermophilus 13a showed poor proteolytic properties and consumed up to 70% of the free amino acids produced by L. bulgaricus 2-11 in the process of coagulation of milk with the mixed culture.

  17. Remediation of acid mine drainage with sulfate reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Hauri, J.F.; Schaider, L.A.

    2009-02-15

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed changes in dissolved metal concentrations and pH. Using synthetic acid mine drainage and combinations of inputs, students monitor their bioreactors for decreases in dissolved copper and iron concentrations.

  18. Metabolic engineering of yeast to produce fatty acid-derived biofuels: bottlenecks and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Feng, Xueyang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid-derived biofuels can be a better solution than bioethanol to replace petroleum fuel, since they have similar energy content and combustion properties as current transportation fuels. The environmentally friendly microbial fermentation process has been used to synthesize advanced biofuels from renewable feedstock. Due to their robustness as well as the high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors and phage contamination, yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica have attracted tremendous attention in recent studies regarding the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, including fatty acids, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty alkanes. However, the native yeast strains cannot produce fatty acids and fatty acid-derived biofuels in large quantities. To this end, we have summarized recent publications in this review on metabolic engineering of yeast strains to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, identified the bottlenecks that limit the productivity of biofuels, and categorized the appropriate approaches to overcome these obstacles. PMID:26106371

  19. Acid phosphatase/phosphotransferases from enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Y; Utagawa, T; Yamada, H; Asano, Y

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the enzymatic phosphorylation of nucleosides and found that Morganella morganii phoC acid phosphatase exhibits regioselective pyrophosphate (PP(i))-nucleoside phosphotransferase activity. In this study, we isolated genes encoding an acid phosphatase with regioselective phosphotransferase activity (AP/PTase) from Providencia stuartii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia blattae and Klebsiella planticola, and compared the primary structures and enzymatic characteristics of these enzymes with those of AP/PTase (PhoC acid phosphatase) from M. morganii. The enzymes were highly homologous in primary structure with M. morganii AP/PTase, and are classified as class A1 acid phosphatases. The synthesis of inosine-5'-monophosphate (5'-IMP) by E. coli overproducing each acid phosphatase was investigated. The P. stuartii enzyme, which is most closely related to the M. morganii enzyme, exhibited high 5'-IMP productivity, similar to the M. morganii enzyme. The 5'-IMP productivities of the E. aerogenes, E. blattae and K. planticola enzymes were inferior to those of the former two enzymes. This result underlines the importance of lower K(m) values for efficient nucleotide production. As these enzymes exhibited a very high degree of homology at the amino acid sequence level, it is likely that local sequence differences in the binding pocket are responsible for the differences in the nucleoside-PP(i) phosphotransferase reaction.

  20. Microbiological and biochemical profile of cv. Conservolea naturally black olives during controlled fermentation with selected strains of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Panagou, Efstathios Z; Schillinger, Ulrich; Franz, Charles M A P; Nychas, George-John E

    2008-04-01

    The effect of controlled fermentation processes on the microbial association and biochemical profile of cv. Conservolea naturally black olives processed by the traditional anaerobic method was studied. The different treatments included (a) inoculation with a commercial starter culture of Lactobacillus pentosus, (b) inoculation with a strain of Lactobacillus plantarum isolated from a fermented cassava product and (c) uninoculated spontaneous process. Microbial growth, pH, titratable acidity, organic acids and volatile compounds were monitored throughout the fermentation. The initial microbiota consisted of Gram-negative bacteria, lactic acid bacteria and yeasts. Inhibition of Gram-negative bacteria was evident in all processes. Both starter cultures were effective in establishing an accelerated fermentation process and reduced the survival period of Gram-negative bacteria by 5 days compared with the spontaneous process, minimizing thus the likelihood of spoilage. Higher acidification of the brines was observed in inoculated processes without any significant difference between the two selected starter cultures (113.5 and 117.6mM for L. plantarum and L. pentosus, respectively). L. pentosus was also determined as the major species present during the whole process of spontaneous olive fermentation. It is characteristic that lactic acid fermentation was also initiated rapidly in the spontaneous process, as the conditions of fermentation, mainly the low salt level (6%, w/v) favored the dominance of lactic acid bacteria over yeasts. Lactic, acetic and propionic were the organic acids detected by HPLC in considerable amounts, whereas citric and malic acids were also present at low levels and degraded completely during the processes. Ethanol, methanol, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate were the major volatile compounds identified by GC. Their concentrations varied among the different treatments, reflecting varying degrees of microbial activity in the brines. The results obtained

  1. Succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes using hydrolysates of spent yeast cells and corn fiber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-Quan; Li, Jian; Ma, Jiang-Feng; Jiang, Min; Wei, Ping; Liu, Zhong-Min; Ying, Han-Jie

    2011-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysate of spent yeast cells was evaluated as a nitrogen source for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes NJ113, using corn fiber hydrolysate as a carbon source. When spent yeast cell hydrolysate was used directly as a nitrogen source, a maximum succinic acid concentration of 35.5 g/l was obtained from a glucose concentration of 50 g/l, with a glucose utilization of 95.2%. Supplementation with individual vitamins showed that biotin was the most likely factor to be limiting for succinic acid production with spent yeast cell hydrolysate. After supplementing spent yeast cell hydrolysate and 90 g/l of glucose with 150 μg/l of biotin, cell growth increased 32.5%, glucose utilization increased 37.6%, and succinic acid concentration was enhanced 49.0%. As a result, when biotin-supplemented spent yeast cell hydrolysate was used with corn fiber hydrolysate, a succinic acid yield of 67.7% was obtained from 70.3 g/l of total sugar concentration, with a productivity of 0.63 g/(l h). Our results suggest that biotin-supplemented spent yeast cell hydrolysate may be an alternative nitrogen source for the efficient production of succinic acid by A. succinogenes NJ113, using renewable resources.

  2. Characterization of acetic acid bacteria in "traditional balsamic vinegar".

    PubMed

    Gullo, Maria; Caggia, Cinzia; De Vero, Luciana; Giudici, Paolo

    2006-02-01

    This study evaluated the glucose tolerance of acetic acid bacteria strains isolated from Traditional Balsamic Vinegar. The results showed that the greatest hurdle to acetic acid bacteria growth is the high sugar concentration, since the majority of the isolated strains are inhibited by 25% of glucose. Sugar tolerance is an important technological trait because Traditional Balsamic Vinegar is made with concentrated cooked must. On the contrary, ethanol concentration of the cooked and fermented must is less significant for acetic acid bacteria growth. A tentative identification of the isolated strains was done by 16S-23S-5S rDNA PCR/RFLP technique and the isolated strains were clustered: 32 strains belong to Gluconacetobacter xylinus group, two strains to Acetobacter pasteurianus group and one to Acetobacter aceti.

  3. Acid tolerance in root nodule bacteria.

    PubMed

    Glenn, A R; Reeve, W G; Tiwari, R P; Dilworth, M J

    1999-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation, especially via the legume Rhizobium symbiosis, is important for world agriculture. The productivity of legume crops and pastures is significantly affected by soil acidity; in some cases it is the prokaryotic partner that is pH sensitive. Growth of Rhizobium is adversely affected by low pH, especially in the 'acid stress zone'. Rhizobia exhibit an adaptive acid tolerance response (ATR) that is influenced by calcium concentration. Using Tn5-mutagenesis, gusA fusions and 'proteome' analysis, we have identified a range of genes that are essential for growth at low pH (such as actA, actP, exoR, actR and actS). At least three regulatory systems exist. The two-component sensor-regulator system, actSR, is essential for induction of the adaptive ATR. Two other regulatory circuits exist that are independent of ActR. One system involves the low pH-induced regulator gene, phrR, which may control other low pH-regulated genes. The other circuit, involving a regulator that is yet unidentified, controls the expression of a pH-regulated structural gene (lpiA). We have used pH-responsive gusA fusions to identify acid-inducible genes (such as lpiA), and then attempted to identify the regulators of these genes. The emerging picture is of a relatively complex set of systems that respond to external pH.

  4. MALDI-TOF MS Andromas strategy for the routine identification of bacteria, mycobacteria, yeasts, Aspergillus spp. and positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Bille, E; Dauphin, B; Leto, J; Bougnoux, M-E; Beretti, J-L; Lotz, A; Suarez, S; Meyer, J; Join-Lambert, O; Descamps, P; Grall, N; Mory, F; Dubreuil, L; Berche, P; Nassif, X; Ferroni, A

    2012-11-01

    All organisms usually isolated in our laboratory are now routinely identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) using the Andromas software. The aim of this study was to describe the use of this strategy in a routine clinical microbiology laboratory. The microorganisms identified included bacteria, mycobacteria, yeasts and Aspergillus spp. isolated on solid media or extracted directly from blood cultures. MALDI-TOF MS was performed on 2665 bacteria isolated on solid media, corresponding to all bacteria isolated during this period except Escherichia coli grown on chromogenic media. All acquisitions were performed without extraction. After a single acquisition, 93.1% of bacteria grown on solid media were correctly identified. When the first acquisition was not contributory, a second acquisition was performed either the same day or the next day. After two acquisitions, the rate of bacteria identified increased to 99.2%. The failures reported on 21 strains were due to an unknown profile attributed to new species (9) or an insufficient quality of the spectrum (12). MALDI-TOF MS has been applied to 162 positive blood cultures. The identification rate was 91.4%. All mycobacteria isolated during this period (22) were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF MS without any extraction. For 96.3% and 92.2% of yeasts and Aspergillus spp., respectively, the identification was obtained with a single acquisition. After a second acquisition, the overall identification rate was 98.8% for yeasts (160/162) and 98.4% (63/64) for Aspergillus spp. In conclusion, the MALDI-TOF MS strategy used in this work allows a rapid and efficient identification of all microorganisms isolated routinely.

  5. Heavy metals alter the electrokinetic properties of bacteria, yeasts, and clay minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Y.E.; Stotzky, G. )

    1992-05-01

    The electrokinetic patterns of four bacterial species (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Agrobacterium radiobacter), two yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans), and two clay minerals (montmorillonite and kaolinite) in the presence of the chloride salts of the heavy metals, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn, and of Na and Mg were determined by microelectrophoresis. The cells and kaolinite were net negatively charged at pH values above their isoelectric points (pI) in the presence of Na, Mg, Hg, and Pb at an ionic strength ([mu]) of 3 [times] 10[sup [minus]4]; montmorillonite has no pI and was net negatively charged at all pH values in the presence of these metals. However, the charge of some bacteria, S. cerevisiae, and kaolinite changed to a net positive charge (charge reversal) in the presence of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Zn at pH values above 5.0 and then at higher pH values, again became negative. The charge of the bacteria and S. cerevisiae also reversed in solutions of Cu and Ni with a [mu] of >3 [times] 10[sup [minus]4], whereas there was no reversal in solutions with a [mu] of <3 [times] 10[sup [minus]4]. The clays became net positively charged when the [mu] of Cu was >3 [times] 10[sup [minus]4] and that of Ni was >1.5 [times] 10[sup [minus]4]. The charge of the cells and clays also reversed in solutions containing both Mg and Ni or both Cu and Ni (except montmorillonite) but not in solutions containing both Mg and Cu (except kaolinite). The pIs of the cells in the presence of the heavy metals were at either higher or lower pH values than in the presence of Na and Mg. Exposure of the cells to the various metals at pH values from 2 to 9 for the short times (ca. 10 min) required to measured the electrophoretic mobility did not affect their viability.

  6. Dual phylogenetic staining protocol for simultaneous analysis of yeast and bacteria in artworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Pérez, Marina; Brinco, Catarina; Vieira, Ricardo; Rosado, Tânia; Mauran, Guilhem; Pereira, António; Candeias, António; Caldeira, Ana Teresa

    2017-02-01

    The detection and analysis of metabolically active microorganisms are useful to determine those directly involved in the biodeterioration of cultural heritage (CH). Fluorescence in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes targeted at rRNA (RNA-FISH) has demonstrated to be a powerful tool for signaling them. However, more efforts are required for the technique to become a vital tool for the analysis of CH's microbiological communities. Simultaneous analysis of microorganisms belonging to different kingdoms, by RNA-FISH in-suspension approach, could represent an important progress: it could open the door for the future use of the technique to analyze the microbial communities by flow cytometry, which has shown to be a potent tool in environmental microbiology. Thus, in this work, various already implemented in-suspension RNA-FISH protocols for ex situ analysis of yeast and bacteria were investigated and adapted for allowing the simultaneous detection of these types of microorganisms. A deep investigation of the factors that can affect the results was carried out, focusing particular attention on the selection of the fluorochromes used for labelling the probe set. The resultant protocol, involving the use of EUK516-6-FAM/EUB338-Cy3 probes combination, was validated using artificial consortia and gave positive preliminary results when applied in samples from a real case study: the Paleolithic archaeological site of Escoural Cave (Alentejo, Portugal). This approach represents the first dual-staining RNA-FISH in-suspension protocol developed and applied for the simultaneous investigation of CH biodeteriogenic agents belonging to different kingdoms.

  7. Acetic acid bacteria: A group of bacteria with versatile biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Saichana, Natsaran; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao; Frébort, Ivo; Frebortova, Jitka

    2015-11-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are gram-negative obligate aerobic bacteria assigned to the family Acetobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. They are members of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Swaminathania, Saccharibacter, Neoasaia, Granulibacter, Tanticharoenia, Ameyamaea, Neokomagataea, and Komagataeibacter. Many strains of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter have been known to possess high acetic acid fermentation ability as well as the acetic acid and ethanol resistance, which are considered to be useful features for industrial production of acetic acid and vinegar, the commercial product. On the other hand, Gluconobacter strains have the ability to perform oxidative fermentation of various sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar acids leading to the formation of several valuable products. Thermotolerant strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated in order to serve as the new strains of choice for industrial fermentations, in which the cooling costs for maintaining optimum growth and production temperature in the fermentation vessels could be significantly reduced. Genetic modifications by adaptation and genetic engineering were also applied to improve their properties, such as productivity and heat resistance.

  8. 16 years research on lactic acid production with yeast - ready for the market?

    PubMed

    Sauer, Michael; Porro, Danilo; Mattanovich, Diethard; Branduardi, Paola

    2010-01-01

    The use of plastic produced from non-renewable resources constitutes a major environmental problem of the modern society. Polylactide polymers (PLA) have recently gained enormous attention as one possible substitution of petroleum derived polymers. A prerequisite for high quality PLA production is the provision of optically pure lactic acid, which cannot be obtained by chemical synthesis in an economical way. Microbial fermentation is therefore the commercial option to obtain lactic acid as monomer for PLA production. However, one major economic hurdle for commercial lactic acid production as basis for PLA is the costly separation procedure, which is needed to recover and purify the product from the fermentation broth. Yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae (bakers yeast) offer themselves as production organisms because they can tolerate low pH and grow on mineral media what eases the purification of the acid. However, naturally yeasts do not produce lactic acid. By metabolic engineering, ethanol was exchanged with lactic acid as end product of fermentation. A vast amount of effort has been invested into the development of yeasts for lactic acid production since the first paper on this topic by Dequin and Barre appeared 1994. Now yeasts are very close to industrial exploitation - here we summarize the developments in this field.

  9. Soil Bacteria Take Up D-Amino Acids, Protect Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H. J.; Zhang, G.

    2011-12-01

    Recently, many groups reported D-amino acid uptake by plant roots, raising the question of whether soil D-amino acids represent a source of nitrogen or a source of toxicity. The discussion needs to be placed in the context of competition with rhizosphere bacteria. To provide this context, we followed the concentrations of D- and L-enantiomers of alanine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and leucine after they were added to soils in the laboratory. In all cases, the uptake of L-enantiomer began immediately and proceeded rapidly until exhausted. In contrast, the uptake of D-enantiomer required induction: an initial period of inactivity followed by rapid consumption comparable in rate to L-enantiomer. The induced nature of the D activity was confirmed by the addition of rifampicin, an mRNA synthesis inhibitor. Preventing the synthesis of new enzymes abolished soil flora's ability to consume D-amino acids, but not L-amino acids. These results suggest that inducible special racemase enzymes, which can convert D-amino acids back to their native L-forms, are widespread among soil microorganisms. This finding does not rule out the possibility that some plants may out-compete microorganisms and be able to access D-amino acids. It does suggest, however, that rhizosphere bacteria can shield plants from the toxic effect of D-amino acids.

  10. Effects of lactic acid bacteria contamination on lignocellulosic ethanol fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slower fermentation rates, mixed sugar compositions, and lower sugar concentrations may make lignocellulosic fermentations more susceptible to contamination by lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which is a common and costly problem to the corn-based fuel ethanol industry. To examine the effects of LAB con...

  11. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which serve as scientific paradigms. Moreover, functional and comparative metagenomic studies are taking off and provide a wealth of insight in the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in a variety of applications, ranging from starters in complex fermentations to their marketing as probiotics. In this new era of high throughput analysis, biology has become big science. Hence, there is a need to systematically store the generated information, apply this in an intelligent way, and provide modalities for constructing self-learning systems that can be used for future improvements. This review addresses these systems solutions with a state of the art overview of the present paradigms that relate to the use of lactic acid bacteria in industrial applications. Moreover, an outlook is presented of the future developments that include the transition into practice as well as the use of lactic acid bacteria in synthetic biology and other next generation applications. PMID:21995776

  12. Isolation of lactic acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Jelena; Yüksel-Dadak, Aytül; Dröge, Stefan; König, Helmut

    2017-02-20

    Direct molecular approaches provide hints that lactic acid bacteria play an important role in the degradation process of organic material to methanogenetic substrates in biogas plants. However, their diversity in biogas fermenter samples has not been analyzed in detail yet. For that reason, five different biogas fermenters, which were fed mainly with maize silage and manure from cattle or pigs, were examined for the occurrence of lactic acid-forming bacteria. A total of 197 lactic acid-forming bacterial strains were isolated, which we assigned to 21 species, belonging to the genera Bacillus, Clostridium, Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Streptococcus and Pseudoramibacter-related. A qualitative multiplex system and a real-time quantitative PCR could be developed for most isolates, realized by the selection of specific primers. Their role in biogas plants was discussed on the basis of the quantitative results and on physiological data of the isolates.

  13. Relation between chemotaxis and consumption of amino acids in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yiling; M. Pollard, Abiola; Höfler, Carolin; Poschet, Gernot; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chemotaxis enables bacteria to navigate chemical gradients in their environment, accumulating toward high concentrations of attractants and avoiding high concentrations of repellents. Although finding nutrients is likely to be an important function of bacterial chemotaxis, not all characterized attractants are nutrients. Moreover, even for potential nutrients, the exact relation between the metabolic value of chemicals and their efficiency as chemoattractants has not been systematically explored. Here we compare the chemotactic response of amino acids with their use by bacteria for two well‐established models of chemotactic behavior, E scherichia coli and B acillus subtilis. We demonstrate that in E . coli chemotaxis toward amino acids indeed strongly correlates with their utilization. However, no such correlation is observed for B . subtilis, suggesting that in this case, the amino acids are not followed because of their nutritional value but rather as environmental cues. PMID:25807888

  14. Fast identification of wine related lactic acid bacteria by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Petri, A; Pfannebecker, J; Fröhlich, J; König, H

    2013-02-01

    The microflora of must and wine consists of yeasts, acetic acid bacteria and lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The latter group plays an important role for wine quality. The malolactic fermentation carried out by LAB leads to deacidification and stabilisation of wines. Nevertheless, LAB are often associated with wine spoilage. They are mainly responsible for the formation of biogenic amines. Furthermore, some strains produce exopolysaccharide slimes, acetic acid, diacetyl and other off-flavours. In this context a better monitoring of the vinification process is crucial to improve wine quality. Moreover, a lot of biodiversity studies would also profit from a fast and reliable identification method. In this study, we propose a species-specific multiplex PCR system for a rapid and simultaneous detection of 13 LAB species, frequently occurring in must or wine: Lactobacillus brevis, Lb. buchneri, Lb. curvatus, Lb. hilgardii, Lb. plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Oenococcus oeni, Pediococcus acidilactici, P. damnosus, P. inopinatus, P. parvulus, P. pentosaceus and Weissella paramesenteroides.

  15. Lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for riboflavin production

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Kiran; De, Sachinandan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Consumers are increasingly becoming aware of their health and nutritional requirements, and in this context, vitamins produced in situ by microbes may suit their needs and expectations. B groups vitamins are essential components of cellular metabolism and among them riboflavin is one of the vital vitamins required by bacteria, plants, animals and humans. Here, we focus on the importance of microbial production of riboflavin over chemical synthesis. In addition, genetic abilities for riboflavin biosynthesis by lactic acid bacteria are discussed. Genetically modified strains by employing genetic engineering and chemical analogues have been developed to enhance riboflavin production. The present review attempts to collect the currently available information on riboflavin production by microbes in general, while placing greater emphasis on food grade lactic acid bacteria and human gut commensals. For designing riboflavin‐enriched functional foods, proper selection and exploitation of riboflavin‐producing lactic acid bacteria is essential. Moreover, eliminating the in situ vitamin fortification step will decrease the cost of food production. PMID:26686515

  16. Occurrence of yeasts, pseudomonads and enteric bacteria in the oral cavity of patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gaetti-Jardim, Elerson Júnior; Ciesielski, Francisco Isaak Nicolas; de Sousa, Fátima Regina Nunes; Nwaokorie, Francisca; Schweitzer, Christiane Marie; Avila-Campos, Mario Júlio

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of yeasts, pseudomonads and enteric bacteria in the oral cavity of patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of head and neck cancer. Fifty patients receiving RT were examined before, during and 30 days after RT. Saliva, mucosa, and biofilm samples were collected and microorganisms were detected by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The most prevalent yeasts in patients submitted to RT were Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis. Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Klebsiella, Proteus, and Pseudomonas were the most frequently cultivated bacteria. Before RT, targeted bacteria were cultivated from 22.2% of edentulous patients and 16.6% of dentate patients; 30 days after RT, these microorganisms were recovered from 77.8% edentulous and 46.8% dentate patients. By PCR, these microorganisms were detected from all edentulous patients, 78.1% of dentate patients. The presence of Gram-negative enteric roads and fungi was particularly frequent in patients presenting mucositis level III or IV. Modifications in the oral environment due to RT treatment seem to facilitate the colonization of oral cavity by members of family Enterobacteriaceae, genera Enterococcus and Candida.

  17. Occurrence of yeasts, pseudomonads and enteric bacteria in the oral cavity of patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gaetti-Jardim, Elerson; Ciesielski, Francisco Isaak Nicolas; de Sousa, Fátima Regina Nunes; Nwaokorie, Francisca; Schweitzer, Christiane Marie; Avila-Campos, Mario Júlio

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of yeasts, pseudomonads and enteric bacteria in the oral cavity of patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of head and neck cancer. Fifty patients receiving RT were examined before, during and 30 days after RT. Saliva, mucosa, and biofilm samples were collected and microorganisms were detected by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The most prevalent yeasts in patients submitted to RT were Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis. Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Klebsiella, Proteus, and Pseudomonas were the most frequently cultivated bacteria. Before RT, targeted bacteria were cultivated from 22.2% of edentulous patients and 16.6% of dentate patients; 30 days after RT, these microorganisms were recovered from 77.8% edentulous and 46.8% dentate patients. By PCR, these microorganisms were detected from all edentulous patients, 78.1% of dentate patients. The presence of Gram-negative enteric roads and fungi was particularly frequent in patients presenting mucositis level III or IV. Modifications in the oral environment due to RT treatment seem to facilitate the colonization of oral cavity by members of family Enterobacteriaceae, genera Enterococcus and Candida. PMID:24031721

  18. P2X7 from j774 murine macrophages acts as a scavenger receptor for bacteria but not yeast.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Flores, Gabriela; Hernández-Silva, Cesar; Gutiérrez-Escobedo, Guadalupe; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene; Arreola, Jorge; Pérez-Cornejo, Patricia

    2016-12-02

    We studied the effects of extracellular ATP and Ca(2+) on uptake of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli) and live yeast (Candida glabrata) by J774 macrophages to determine the role of endogenous P2X7 receptors in phagocytosis. Our findings show that phagocytosis of bio-particles coated with S. aureus or E. coli was blocked by ATP and the P2X7 receptor agonist BzATP, while yeast phagocytosis was not. A438079, an antagonist of P2X7 receptors, partially reverted the effects of ATP on bacterial phagocytosis. To determine if P2X7-mediated Ca(2+) entry into macrophages was blocking the engulfment of bacteria, we measured phagocytic activity in the absence or presence of 2 mM extracellular Ca(2+) with or without ATP. Ca(2+), in the absence of ATP, was required for engulfment of E. coli and C. glabrata but not S. aureus. Adding ATP inhibited phagocytosis of S. aureus and E. coli regardless of Ca(2+), suggesting that Ca(2+) entry was not important for inhibiting phagocytosis. On the other hand, phagocytosis of normal or hyper-adherent C. glabrata mutants had an absolute requirement for extracellular Ca(2+) due to yeast adhesion to macrophages mediated by Ca(2+)-dependent adhesion proteins. We conclude that unstimulated P2X7 from J774 cells act as scavenger receptor for the uptake of S. aureus and E. coli but not of yeast; Ca(2+) entry via P2X7 receptors play no role in phagocytosis of S. aureus and E. coli; while the effect of Ca(2+) on C. glabrata phagocytosis was mediated by the adhesins Epa1, Epa6 and Epa7.

  19. Residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential decreases unsaturated fatty acid level in sake yeast during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Kazutaka; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen, a key nutrient in alcoholic fermentation, is rapidly depleted during this process. Several pathways of oxygen utilization have been reported in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation, namely synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid, sterols and heme, and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. However, the interaction between these pathways has not been investigated. In this study, we showed that the major proportion of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids in sake fermentation mash is derived from the sake yeast rather than from rice or koji (rice fermented with Aspergillus). Additionally, during alcoholic fermentation, inhibition of the residual mitochondrial activity of sake yeast increases the levels of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids. These findings indicate that the residual activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain reduces molecular oxygen levels and decreases the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, thereby increasing the synthesis of estery flavors by sake yeast. This is the first report of a novel link between residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids by the brewery yeast during alcoholic fermentation.

  20. Yeast display evolution of a kinetically efficient 13-amino acid substrate for lipoic acid ligase

    PubMed Central

    Puthenveetil, Sujiet; Liu, Daniel S.; White, Katharine A.; Thompson, Samuel; Ting, Alice Y.

    2009-01-01

    E. coli lipoic acid ligase (LplA) catalyzes ATP-dependent covalent ligation of lipoic acid onto specific lysine sidechains of three acceptor proteins involved in oxidative metabolism. Our lab has shown that LplA and engineered mutants can ligate useful small-molecule probes such as alkyl azides (Nat. Biotechnol. 2007, 25, 1483–1487) and photocrosslinkers (Angew. Chem Int. Ed Engl. 2008, 47, 7018–7021) in place of lipoic acid, facilitating imaging and proteomic studies. Both to further our understanding of lipoic acid metabolism, and to improve LplA’s utility as a biotechnological platform, we have engineered a novel 13-amino acid peptide substrate for LplA. LplA’s natural protein substrates have a conserved β-hairpin structure, a conformation that is difficult to recapitulate in a peptide, and thus we performed in vitro evolution to engineer the LplA peptide substrate, called “LplA Acceptor Peptide” (LAP). A ~107 library of LAP variants was displayed on the surface of yeast cells, labeled by LplA with either lipoic acid or bromoalkanoic acid, and the most efficiently labeled LAP clones were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting. Four rounds of evolution followed by additional rational mutagenesis produced a “LAP2” sequence with a kcat/Km of 0.99 μM−1min−1, >70-fold better than our previous rationally-designed 22-amino acid LAP1 sequence (Nat. Biotechnol. 2007, 25, 1483–1487), and only 8-fold worse than the kcat/Km values of natural lipoate and biotin acceptor proteins. The kinetic improvement over LAP1 allowed us to rapidly label cell surface peptide-fused receptors with quantum dots. PMID:19863063

  1. A glutamic acid-producing lactic acid bacteria isolated from Malaysian fermented foods.

    PubMed

    Zareian, Mohsen; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Bakar, Fatimah Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Karim Sabo; Forghani, Bita; Ab-Kadir, Mohd Safuan B; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    l-glutamaic acid is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and an important intermediate in metabolism. In the present study, lactic acid bacteria (218) were isolated from six different fermented foods as potent sources of glutamic acid producers. The presumptive bacteria were tested for their ability to synthesize glutamic acid. Out of the 35 strains showing this capability, strain MNZ was determined as the highest glutamic-acid producer. Identification tests including 16S rRNA gene sequencing and sugar assimilation ability identified the strain MNZ as Lactobacillus plantarum. The characteristics of this microorganism related to its glutamic acid-producing ability, growth rate, glucose consumption and pH profile were studied. Results revealed that glutamic acid was formed inside the cell and excreted into the extracellular medium. Glutamic acid production was found to be growth-associated and glucose significantly enhanced glutamic acid production (1.032 mmol/L) compared to other carbon sources. A concentration of 0.7% ammonium nitrate as a nitrogen source effectively enhanced glutamic acid production. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of glutamic acid production by lactic acid bacteria. The results of this study can be further applied for developing functional foods enriched in glutamic acid and subsequently γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) as a bioactive compound.

  2. Isolation, characterisation and identification of lactic acid bacteria from bushera: a Ugandan traditional fermented beverage.

    PubMed

    Muyanja, C M B K; Narvhus, J A; Treimo, J; Langsrud, T

    2003-02-15

    One hundred and thirteen strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were selected from 351 isolates from 15 samples of traditionally fermented household bushera from Uganda and also from laboratory-prepared bushera. Isolates were phenotypically characterised by their ability to ferment 49 carbohydrates using API 50 CHL kits and additional biochemical tests. Coliforms, yeasts and LAB were enumerated in bushera. The pH, volatile organic compounds and organic acids were also determined. The LAB counts in household bushera varied between 7.1 and 9.4 log cfu ml(-1). The coliform counts varied between < 1 and 5.2 log cfu ml(-1). The pH of bushera ranged from 3.7 to 4.5. Ethanol (max, 0.27%) was the major volatile organic compound while lactic acid (max, 0.52%) was identified as the dominant organic acid in household bushera. The initial numbers of LAB and coliforms in laboratory-fermented bushera were similar; however, the LAB numbers increased faster during the first 24 h. LAB counts increased from 5.5 to 9.0 log cfu ml(-1) during the laboratory fermentation. Coliform counts increased from 5.9 to 7.8 log cfu ml(-1) at 24 h, but after 48 h, counts were less 4 log cfu ml(-1). Yeasts increased from 4.3 to 7.7 log cfu ml(-1) at 48 h, but thereafter decreased slightly. The pH declined from 7.0 to around 4.0. Lactic acid and ethanol increased from zero to 0.75% and 0.20%, respectively. Lactic acid bacteria isolated from household bushera belonged to Lactobacillus, Streptococcus and Enterococcus genera. Tentatively, Lactobacillus isolates were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, L. paracasei subsp. paracasei, L. fermentum, L. brevis and L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii. Streptococcus thermophilus strains were also identified in household bushera. LAB isolated from bushera produced in the laboratory belonged to five genera (Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, Weissella and Enterococcus. Eight isolates were able to produce acid from starch and were identified as Lactococcus

  3. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  4. Phenolic Biotransformations during Conversion of Ferulic Acid to Vanillin by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Baljinder; Kumar, Balvir

    2013-01-01

    Vanillin is widely used as food additive and as a masking agent in various pharmaceutical formulations. Ferulic acid is an important precursor of vanillin that is available in abundance in cell walls of cereals like wheat, corn, and rice. Phenolic biotransformations can occur during growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and their production can be made feasible using specialized LAB strains that have been reported to produce ferulic acid esterases. The present study aimed at screening a panel of LAB isolates for their ability to release phenolics from agrowaste materials like rice bran and their biotransformation to industrially important compounds such as ferulic acid, 4-ethyl phenol, vanillic acid, vanillin, and vanillyl alcohol. Bacterial isolates were evaluated using ferulic acid esterase, ferulic acid decarboxylase, and vanillin dehydrogenase assays. This work highlights the importance of lactic acid bacteria in phenolic biotransformations for the development of food grade flavours and additives. PMID:24066293

  5. Simple Process for the Reduction in the Nucleic Acid Content in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zee, J. A.; Simard, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A simple one-step process for the nucleic acid reduction in Rhodotorula glutinis is described. The process consists of submitting the yeast cells to a heat treatment in an acidic (pH 2) spent medium. The optimal temperature for pH 2 medium is 90 C and the final nucleic acid content in treated yeasts was 1.2%. Heat treatment at acidic pH is preferred to that at alkaline pH because it offers a better protection for amino acids and crude protein, while being more efficient in lowering the nucleic acid level. The new process is economic and rapid and could be easily used for industrial application. PMID:234157

  6. Yeast fermentation of carboxylic acids obtained from pyrolytic aqueous phases for lipid production.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jieni; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Coates, Ralph; Wu, Hongwei; Chen, Shulin

    2012-08-01

    The presence of very reactive C1-C4 molecules adversely affects the quality bio-oils produced from the pyrolysis of lignocellulosic materials. In this paper a scheme to produce lipids with Cryptococcus curvatus from the carboxylic acids in the pyrolytic aqueous phase collected in fractional condensers is proposed. The capacities of three oleaginous yeasts C. curvatus, Rhodotorula glutinis, Lipomyces starkeyi to ferment acetate, formate, hydroxylacat-aldehyde, phenol and acetol were investigated. While acetate could be a good carbon source for lipid production, formate provides additional energy and contributes to yeast growth and lipid production as auxiliary energy resource. Acetol could slightly support yeast growth, but it inhibits lipid accumulation. Hydroxyacetaldehyde and phenols showed high yeast growth and lipid accumulation inhibition. A pyrolytic aqueous phase with 20 g/L acetate was fermented with C. curvatus, after neutralization and detoxification to produce 6.9 g/L dry biomass and 2.2 g/L lipid.

  7. Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria: extending the family.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sieiro, Patricia; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Mu, Dongdong; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) constitute a heterogeneous group of microorganisms that produce lactic acid as the major product during the fermentation process. LAB are Gram-positive bacteria with great biotechnological potential in the food industry. They can produce bacteriocins, which are proteinaceous antimicrobial molecules with a diverse genetic origin, posttranslationally modified or not, that can help the producer organism to outcompete other bacterial species. In this review, we focus on the various types of bacteriocins that can be found in LAB and the organization and regulation of the gene clusters responsible for their production and biosynthesis, and consider the food applications of the prototype bacteriocins from LAB. Furthermore, we propose a revised classification of bacteriocins that can accommodate the increasing number of classes reported over the last years.

  8. Impact of yeast-bacteria coinfection on the detection of Candida sp. in an automated blood culture system.

    PubMed

    Cateau, Estelle; Cognee, Anne-Sophie; Tran, Tri Cong; Vallade, Elodie; Garcia, Magali; Belaz, Sorya; Kauffmann-Lacroix, Catherine; Rodier, Marie-Helene

    2012-04-01

    Invasive candidiasis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. It is now well known that an early diagnosis contributes to the patients' outcome. Blood cultures, which are the first-line test in case of bloodstream infection suspicion, can be carried out using fungus-selective medium (containing antibiotics) or standard microorganism medium allowing both bacterial and fungal growth. Some patients can suffer from polymicrobial sepsis involving bacteria and yeasts, so we decided to investigate in blood cultures the influence of the presence of bacteria on fungal development. Simulated blood cultures were performed using Candida albicans or C. glabrata coincubated with Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus at different concentrations. The results showed that, in a standard microorganism medium, bacterial growth could hide the fungal development. Thus, in patients at risk of invasive candidiasis, the use of a specific fungal medium could improve the diagnosis and allow an earlier efficient antifungal treatment.

  9. Discovery of synthesis and secretion of polyol esters of fatty acids by four basidiomycetous yeast species in the order Sporidiobolales.

    PubMed

    Garay, Luis A; Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Cajka, Tomas; Fiehn, Oliver; Cathcart, Erin; Fry, Russell W; Kanti, Atit; Joko Nugroho, Agustinus; Faulina, Sarah Asih; Stephanandra, Sira; German, J Bruce; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2017-03-13

    Polyol esters of fatty acids (PEFA) are amphiphilic glycolipids produced by yeast that could play a role as natural, environmentally friendly biosurfactants. We recently reported discovery of a new PEFA-secreting yeast species, Rhodotorula babjevae, a basidiomycetous yeast to display this behavior, in addition to a few other Rhodotorula yeasts reported on the 1960s. Additional yeast species within the taxonomic order Sporidiobolales were screened for secreted glycolipid production. PEFA production equal or above 1 g L(-1) were detected in 19 out of 65 strains of yeast screened, belonging to 6 out of 30 yeast species tested. Four of these species were not previously known to secrete glycolipids. These results significantly increase the number of yeast species known to secrete PEFA, holding promise for expanding knowledge of PEFA synthesis and secretion mechanisms, as well as setting the groundwork towards commercialization.

  10. Isolation of thermophilic L-lactic acid producing bacteria showing homo-fermentative manner under high aeration condition.

    PubMed

    Tongpim, Saowanit; Meidong, Ratchanu; Poudel, Pramod; Yoshino, Satoshi; Okugawa, Yuki; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Taniguchi, Masayuki; Sakai, Kenji

    2014-03-01

    By applying non-sterile open fermentation of food waste, various thermotolerant l-lactic acid-producing bacteria were isolated and identified. The predominant bacterial isolates showing higher accumulation of l-lactic acid belong to 3 groups of Bacillus coagulans, according to their 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities. B. coagulans strains M21 and M36 produced high amounts of l-lactic acid of high optical purity and lactic acid selectivity in model kitchen refuse medium and glucose-yeast extract-peptone medium. Other thermotolerant isolates resembling to Bacillus humi, B. ruris, B. subtilis, B. niacini and B. soli were also identified. These bacteria produced low amounts of l-lactic acid of more than 99% optical purity. All isolated strains showed the highest growth rate at temperatures around 55-60°C. They showed unique responses to various oxygen supply conditions. The majority of isolates produced l-lactic acid at a low overall oxygen transfer coefficient (KLa); however, acetic acid was produced instead of l-lactic acid at a high KLa. B. coagulans M21 was the only strain that produced high, consistent, and reproducible amounts of optically pure l-lactic acid (>99% optical purity) under high and low KLa conditions in a homo-fermentative manner.

  11. Ethanol Production by Selected Intestinal Microorganisms and Lactic Acid Bacteria Growing under Different Nutritional Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Elshaghabee, Fouad M. F.; Bockelmann, Wilhelm; Meske, Diana; de Vrese, Michael; Walte, Hans-Georg; Schrezenmeir, Juergen; Heller, Knut J.

    2016-01-01

    To gain some specific insight into the roles microorganisms might play in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), some intestinal and lactic acid bacteria and one yeast (Anaerostipes caccae, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bifidobacterium longum, Enterococcus fecalis, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Weissella confusa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were characterized by high performance liquid chromatography for production of ethanol when grown on different carbohydrates: hexoses (glucose and fructose), pentoses (arabinose and ribose), disaccharides (lactose and lactulose), and inulin. Highest amounts of ethanol were produced by S. cerevisiae, L. fermentum, and W. confusa on glucose and by S. cerevisiae and W. confusa on fructose. Due to mannitol-dehydrogenase expressed in L. fermentum, ethanol production on fructose was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced. Pyruvate and citrate, two potential electron acceptors for regeneration of NAD+/NADP+, drastically reduced ethanol production with acetate produced instead in L. fermentum grown on glucose and W. confusa grown on glucose and fructose, respectively. In fecal slurries prepared from feces of four overweight volunteers, ethanol was found to be produced upon addition of fructose. Addition of A. caccae, L. acidophilus, L. fermentum, as well as citrate and pyruvate, respectively, abolished ethanol production. However, addition of W. confusa resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) increased production of ethanol. These results indicate that microorganisms like W. confusa, a hetero-fermentative, mannitol-dehydrogenase negative lactic acid bacterium, may promote NAFLD through ethanol produced from sugar fermentation, while other intestinal bacteria and homo- and hetero-fermentative but mannitol-dehydrogenase positive lactic acid bacteria may not promote NAFLD. Also, our studies indicate that dietary factors interfering with gastrointestinal microbiota and microbial

  12. Genome shuffling in the ethanologenic yeast Candida krusei to improve acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wei, Pingying; Li, Zilong; He, Peng; Lin, Yuping; Jiang, Ning

    2008-02-01

    Genome shuffling was used to improve the acetic acid tolerance of an ethanologenic yeast, Candida krusei GL560. A mutant, S4-3, was isolated and selected after four rounds of genome shuffling. It was found that the mutant S4-3 had a higher viability in the YNBX (yeast nitrogen base/xylose) medium with acetic acid and grew better in the YPD (yeast extract, peptone and dextrose) medium [1% (w/v) yeast extract, 2% (w/v) peptone and 2% (w/v) glucose] with acetic acid than the parent strain GL560. The mutant S4-3 also improved its multiple stress tolerance to ethanol, H2O2, heat and freeze-thaw. Furthermore, S4-3 showed higher ethanol production than GL560 in EFM (ethanol fermentation medium) with or without acetic acid. The DNA content of S4-3 was similar to its parent strains in the genome shuffling. This suggested that gene exchange, as caused by homologous recombination, may have occurred during the process. Higher membrane integrity and intracellular catalase activity were two possible reasons for the higher acid-tolerance phenotype of S4-3. These results indicated that genome shuffling is a powerful means of rapidly improving the complex traits of non-haploid organisms, while still maintaining robust growth.

  13. Effect of applying lactic acid bacteria and propionic acid on fermentation quality and aerobic stability of oats-common vetch mixed silage on the Tibetan plateau.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Gang; Chen, Lei; Li, Junfeng; Yuan, Xianjun; Yu, Chengqun; Shimojo, Masataka; Shao, Tao

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of lactic acid bacteria and propionic acid on the fermentation quality and aerobic stability of oats-common vetch mixed silage by using a small-scale fermentation system on the Tibetan plateau. (i) An inoculant (Lactobacillus plantarum) (L) or (ii) propionic acid (P) or (iii) inoculant + propionic acid (PL) were used as additives. After fermenting for 60 days, silos were opened and the aerobic stability was tested for the following 15 days. The results showed that all silages were well preserved with low pH and NH3 -N, and high lactic acid content and V-scores. L and PL silages showed higher (P < 0.05) lactic acid and crude protein content than the control silage. P silage inhibited lactic acid production. Under aerobic conditions, L silage had similar yeast counts as the control silage (> 10(5) cfu/g fresh matter (FM)); however, it numerically reduced aerobic stability for 6 h. P and PL silages showed fewer yeasts (< 10(5) cfu/g FM) (P < 0.05) and markedly improved the aerobic stability (> 360 h). The result suggested that PL is the best additive as it could not only improved fermentation quality, but also aerobic stability of oats-common vetch mixed silage on the Tibetan plateau.

  14. Culture-independent analysis of lactic acid bacteria diversity associated with mezcal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Narváez-Zapata, J A; Rojas-Herrera, R A; Rodríguez-Luna, I C; Larralde-Corona, C P

    2010-11-01

    Mezcal is an alcoholic beverage obtained from the distillation of fermented juices of cooked Agave spp. plant stalks (agave must), and each region in Mexico with denomination of origin uses defined Agave species to prepare mezcal with unique organoleptic characteristics. During fermentation to produce mezcal in the state of Tamaulipas, not only alcohol-producing yeasts are involved, but also a lactic acid bacterial community that has not been characterized yet. In order to address this lack of knowledge on this traditional Mexican beverage, we performed a DGGE-16S rRNA analysis of the lactic acid bacterial diversity and metabolite accumulation during the fermentation of a typical agave must that is rustically produced in San Carlos County (Tamaulipas, Mexico). The analysis of metabolite production indicated a short but important malolactic fermentation stage not previously described for mezcal. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the 16S rRNA genes showed a distinctive lactic acid bacterial community composed mainly of Pediococcus parvulus, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus composti, Lactobacillus parabuchneri, and Lactobacillus plantarum. Some atypical genera such as Weissella and Bacillus were also found in the residual must. Our results suggest that the lactic acid bacteria could strongly be implicated in the organoleptic attributes of this traditional Mexican distilled beverage.

  15. Hypotonic shocks activate rat TRPV4 in Yeast in the Absence of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Loukin, Stephen H.; Su, Zhenwei; Kung, Ching

    2010-01-01

    Transient-receptor-potential channels (TRPs) underlie the sensing of chemicals, heat, and mechanical force. We expressed the rat TRPV1 and TRPV4 subtypes in yeast and monitored their activities in vivo as Ca2+ rise using transgenic aequorin. Heat and capsaicin activate TRPV1 but not TRPV4 in yeast. Hypotonic shocks activate TRPV4 but not TRPV1. Osmotic swelling is modeled to activate enzyme(s), producing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to open TRPV4 in mammalian cells. This model relegates mechanosensitivity to the enzyme and not the channel. Yeast has only a single Δ9 fatty-acid monodesaturase and cannot make PUFAs suggesting an alternative mechanism for TRPV4 activation. We discuss possible explanations of this difference. PMID:19174160

  16. Potential of lactic acid bacteria in aflatoxin risk mitigation.

    PubMed

    Ahlberg, Sara H; Joutsjoki, Vesa; Korhonen, Hannu J

    2015-08-17

    Aflatoxins (AF) are ubiquitous mycotoxins contaminating food and feed. Consumption of contaminated food and feed can cause a severe health risk to humans and animals. A novel biological method could reduce the health risks of aflatoxins through inhibiting mold growth and binding aflatoxins. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in fermented food production. LAB are known to inhibit mold growth and, to some extent, to bind aflatoxins in different matrices. Reduced mold growth and aflatoxin production may be caused by competition for nutrients between bacterial cells and fungi. Most likely, binding of aflatoxins depends on environmental conditions and is strain-specific. Killed bacteria cells possess consistently better binding abilities for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) than viable cells. Lactobacilli especially are relatively well studied and provide noticeable possibilities in binding of aflatoxin B1 and M1 in food. It seems that binding is reversible and that bound aflatoxins are released later on (Haskard et al., 2001; Peltonen et al., 2001). This literature review suggests that novel biological methods, such as lactic acid bacteria, show potential in mitigating toxic effects of aflatoxins in food and feed.

  17. Biosynthesis of myristic acid in luminescent bacteria. [Vibrio harveyi

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    In vivo pulse-label studies have demonstrated that luminescent bacteria can provide myritic acid (14:0) required for the synthesis of the luciferase substrate myristyl aldehyde. Luminescent wild type Vibrio harveyi incubated with (/sup 14/C) acetate in a nutrient-depleted medium accumulated substantial tree (/sup 14/C)fatty acid (up to 20% of the total lipid label). Radio-gas chromatography revealed that > 75% of the labeled fatty acid is 14:0. No free fatty acid was detected in wild type cells labeled prior to the development of bioluminescence in the exponential growth phase, or in a dark mutant of V. harveyi (mutant M17) that requires exogenous 14:0 for light emission. The preferential accumulation of 14:0 was not observed when wild type cells were labeled with (/sup 14/C)acetate in regular growth medium. Moreover, all V. harveyi strains exhibited similar fatty acid mass compositions regardless of the state of bioluminescence. Since earlier work has shown that a luminescence-related acyltransferase (defective in the M17 mutant) can catalyze the deacylation of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein in vitro, the present results are consistent with a model in which this enzyme diverts 14:0 to the luminescence system during fatty acid biosynthesis. Under normal conditions, the supply of 14:0 by this pathway is tightly regulated such that bioluminescence development does not significantly alter the total fatty acid composition.

  18. Industrial production of amino acids by coryneform bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Thomas

    2003-09-04

    In the 1950s Corynebacterium glutamicum was found to be a very efficient producer of L-glutamic acid. Since this time biotechnological processes with bacteria of the species Corynebacterium developed to be among the most important in terms of tonnage and economical value. L-Glutamic acid and L-lysine are bulk products nowadays. L-Valine, L-isoleucine, L-threonine, L-aspartic acid and L-alanine are among other amino acids produced by Corynebacteria. Applications range from feed to food and pharmaceutical products. The growing market for amino acids produced with Corynebacteria led to significant improvements in bioprocess and downstream technology as well as in molecular biology. During the last decade big efforts were made to increase the productivity and to decrease the production costs. This review gives an overview of the world market for amino acids produced by Corynebacteria. Significant improvements in bioprocess technology, i.e. repeated fed batch or continuous production are summarised. Bioprocess technology itself was improved furthermore by application of more sophisticated feeding and automatisation strategies. Even though several amino acids developed towards commodities in the last decade, side aspects of the production process like sterility or detection of contaminants still have increasing relevance. Finally one focus of this review is on recent developments in downstream technology.

  19. Flow Cytometric Assessment of Viability of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bunthof, Christine J.; Bloemen, Karen; Breeuwer, Pieter; Rombouts, Frank M.; Abee, Tjakko

    2001-01-01

    The viability of lactic acid bacteria is crucial for their applications as dairy starters and as probiotics. We investigated the usefulness of flow cytometry (FCM) for viability assessment of lactic acid bacteria. The esterase substrate carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA) and the dye exclusion DNA binding probes propidium iodide (PI) and TOTO-1 were tested for live/dead discrimination using a Lactococcus, a Streptococcus, three Lactobacillus, two Leuconostoc, an Enterococcus, and a Pediococcus species. Plate count experiments were performed to validate the results of the FCM assays. The results showed that cFDA was an accurate stain for live cells; in exponential-phase cultures almost all cells were labeled, while 70°C heat-killed cultures were left unstained. PI did not give clear live/dead discrimination for some of the species. TOTO-1, on the other hand, gave clear discrimination between live and dead cells. The combination of cFDA and TOTO-1 gave the best results. Well-separated subpopulations of live and dead cells could be detected with FCM. Cell sorting of the subpopulations and subsequent plating on agar medium provided direct evidence that cFDA labels the culturable subpopulation and that TOTO-1 labels the nonculturable subpopulation. Applied to cultures exposed to deconjugated bile salts or to acid, cFDA and TOTO-1 proved to be accurate indicators of culturability. Our experiments with lactic acid bacteria demonstrated that the combination of cFDA and TOTO-1 makes an excellent live/dead assay with versatile applications. PMID:11319119

  20. Low auxotrophy-complementing amino acid concentrations reduce yeast chronological life span.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Pedro; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Ludovico, Paula; Rodrigues, Fernando; Leão, Cecília

    2007-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, interventions resembling caloric restriction, either by reduction of glucose or non-essential amino acid content in the medium, prolong life span and retard aging. Here we have examined the role of auxotrophy-complementing amino acid supplementation of S. cerevisiae strains in determining yeast chronological life span and stress resistance. The results obtained from cells cultured in standard amino acid concentrations revealed a reduced final biomass yield and premature aging phenotypes. These included shorter life span and indicators of oxidative stress, together with a G2/M cell cycle arrest and the appearance of a sub-G0/G1 population pointing to the occurrence of a specific cell death programme under starvation of essential amino acids. In order to overcome this starvation, five times higher amino acid concentrations were supplied to the medium as has already been commonly used by few laboratories. Such cultures reached more than five-fold higher final biomass yield in stationary phase and the early aging phenotypes were abrogated. Furthermore, in a long-lived yeast strain lacking TOR1, there was no positive effect of amino acid supplementation on longevity. On the contrary, amino acid supply had a positive effect on chronological life span of RAS2 deleted cells. This study may provide novel insights into the role of essential nutrients and their effect on aging process and raises the warning that the positive effects of caloric restriction on life span maybe restricted to non-essential nutrients. Moreover, the severe consequences on cell physiology, life span and stress resistance induced by essential amino acid imbalances presents a note of caution for those still using standard amino acid concentrations for studies with auxotrophic yeast strains.

  1. Novel wine yeast with mutations in YAP1 that produce less acetic acid during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cordente, Antonio G; Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Pretorius, Isak S; Curtin, Christopher D

    2013-02-01

    Acetic acid, a byproduct formed during yeast alcoholic fermentation, is the main component of volatile acidity (VA). When present in high concentrations in wine, acetic acid imparts an undesirable 'vinegary' character that results in a significant reduction in quality and sales. Previously, it has been shown that saké yeast strains resistant to the antifungal cerulenin produce significantly lower levels of VA. In this study, we used a classical mutagenesis method to isolate a series of cerulenin-resistant strains, derived from a commercial diploid wine yeast. Four of the selected strains showed a consistent low-VA production phenotype after small-scale fermentation of different white and red grape musts. Specific mutations in YAP1, a gene encoding a transcription factor required for oxidative stress tolerance, were found in three of the four low-VA strains. When integrated into the genome of a haploid wine strain, the mutated YAP1 alleles partially reproduced the low-VA production phenotype of the diploid cerulenin-resistant strains, suggesting that YAP1 might play a role in (regulating) acetic acid production during fermentation. This study offers prospects for the development of low-VA wine yeast starter strains that could assist winemakers in their effort to consistently produce wine to definable quality specifications.

  2. Short communication: Conversion of lactose and whey into lactic acid by engineered yeast.

    PubMed

    Turner, Timothy L; Kim, Eunbee; Hwang, ChangHoon; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Liu, Jing-Jing; Jin, Yong-Su

    2017-01-01

    Lactose is often considered an unwanted and wasted byproduct, particularly lactose trapped in acid whey from yogurt production. But using specialized microbial fermentation, the surplus wasted acid whey could be converted into value-added chemicals. The baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is commonly used for industrial fermentation, cannot natively ferment lactose. The present study describes how an engineered S. cerevisiae yeast was constructed to produce lactic acid from purified lactose, whey, or dairy milk. Lactic acid is an excellent proof-of-concept chemical to produce from lactose, because lactic acid has many food, pharmaceutical, and industrial uses, and over 250,000 t are produced for industrial use annually. To ferment the milk sugar lactose, a cellodextrin transporter (CDT-1, which also transports lactose) and a β-glucosidase (GH1-1, which also acts as a β-galactosidase) from Neurospora crassa were expressed in a S. cerevisiae strain. A heterologous lactate dehydrogenase (encoded by ldhA) from the fungus Rhizopus oryzae was integrated into the CDT-1/GH1-1-expressing strain of S. cerevisiae. As a result, the engineered strain was able to produce lactic acid from purified lactose, whey, and store-bought milk. A lactic acid yield of 0.358g/g of lactose was achieved from whey fermentation, providing an initial proof of concept for the production of value-added chemicals from excess industrial whey using engineered yeast.

  3. Cytofluorometric detection of wine lactic acid bacteria: application of malolactic fermentation to the monitoring.

    PubMed

    Salma, Mohammad; Rousseaux, Sandrine; Sequeira-Le Grand, Anabelle; Alexandre, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report for the first time a rapid, efficient and cost-effective method for the enumeration of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in wine. Indeed, up to now, detection of LAB in wine, especially red wine, was not possible. Wines contain debris that cannot be separated from bacteria using flow cytometry (FCM). Furthermore, the dyes tested in previous reports did not allow an efficient staining of bacteria. Using FCM and a combination of BOX/PI dyes, we were able to count bacteria in wines. The study was performed in wine inoculated with Oenococcus oeni (10(6) CFU ml(-1)) stained with either FDA or BOX/PI and analyzed by FCM during the malolactic fermentation (MLF). The analysis show a strong correlation between the numbers of BOX/PI-stained cells determined by FCM and the cell numbers determined by plate counts (red wine: R (2) ≥ 0.97, white wine R (2) ≥ 0.965). On the other hand, we found that the enumeration of O. oeni labeled with FDA was only possible in white wine (R (2) ≥ 0.97). Viable yeast and LAB populations can be rapidly discriminated and quantified in simultaneous malolactic-alcoholic wine fermentations using BOX/PI and scatter parameters in a one single measurement. This rapid procedure is therefore a suitable method for monitoring O. oeni populations during winemaking, offers a detection limit of <10(4) CFU ml(-1) and can be considered a useful method for investigating the dynamics of microbial growth in wine and applied for microbiological quality control in wineries.

  4. Development of Mucosal Vaccines Based on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.; Innocentin, Silvia; Lefèvre, Francois; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Langella, Philippe

    Today, sufficient data are available to support the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), notably lactococci and lactobacilli, as delivery vehicles for the development of new mucosal vaccines. These non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria have been safely consumed by humans for centuries in fermented foods. They thus constitute an attractive alternative to the attenuated pathogens (most popular live vectors actually studied) which could recover their pathogenic potential and are thus not totally safe for use in humans. This chapter reviews the current research and advances in the use of LAB as live delivery vectors of proteins of interest for the development of new safe mucosal vaccines. The use of LAB as DNA vaccine vehicles to deliver DNA directly to antigen-presenting cells of the immune system is also discussed.

  5. Current taxonomy of phages infecting lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Jennifer; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Phages infecting lactic acid bacteria have been the focus of significant research attention over the past three decades. Through the isolation and characterization of hundreds of phage isolates, it has been possible to classify phages of the dairy starter and adjunct bacteria Lactococus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Leuconostoc spp., and Lactobacillus spp. Among these, phages of L. lactis have been most thoroughly scrutinized and serve as an excellent model system to address issues that arise when attempting taxonomic classification of phages infecting other LAB species. Here, we present an overview of the current taxonomy of phages infecting LAB genera of industrial significance, the methods employed in these taxonomic efforts and how these may be employed for the taxonomy of phages of currently underrepresented and emerging phage species. PMID:24478767

  6. Screening and characterization of novel bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zendo, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are expected to be safe antimicrobial agents. While the best studied LAB bacteriocin, nisin A, is widely utilized as a food preservative, various novel ones are required to control undesirable bacteria more effectively. To discover novel bacteriocins at the early step of the screening process, we developed a rapid screening system that evaluates bacteriocins produced by newly isolated LAB based on their antibacterial spectra and molecular masses. By means of this system, various novel bacteriocins were identified, including a nisin variant, nisin Q, a two-peptide bacteriocin, lactococcin Q, a leaderless bacteriocin, lacticin Q, and a circular bacteriocin, lactocyclicin Q. Moreover, some LAB isolates were found to produce multiple bacteriocins. They were characterized as to their structures, mechanisms of action, and biosynthetic mechanisms. Novel LAB bacteriocins and their biosynthetic mechanisms are expected for applications such as food preservation and peptide engineering.

  7. Plums (Prunus domestica L.) are a good source of yeasts producing organic acids of industrial interest from glycerol.

    PubMed

    García-Fraile, Paula; Silva, Luís R; Sánchez-Márquez, Salud; Velázquez, Encarna; Rivas, Raúl

    2013-08-15

    The production of organic acids from several yeasts isolated from mature plums on media containing glycerol as carbon source was analysed by HPLC-UV. The yeasts isolated were identified by sequencing the 5.8S internal transcribed spacer as Pichia fermentans, Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Candida oleophila. The organic acid profiles of these strains comprise acetic, citric, succinic and malic acids that qualitatively and quantitatively vary between different species as well as among strains from the same species. The production from glycerol of succinic, acetic, citric, malic and oxalic acids from C. oleophila and W. anomalus, and that of succinic, oxalic and acetic acids by P. fermentans is reported for the first time in this work, as is the production of oxalic acid from glycerol in yeasts. Our results also showed that mature fruits can be a good source of new yeasts able to metabolise glycerol, producing different organic acids with industrial and biotechnological interest.

  8. Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activity of the Beverage Obtained by Fermentation of Sweetened Lemon Balm
(Melissa officinalis L.) Tea with Symbiotic Consortium 
of Bacteria and Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Cvetković, Dragoljub D.; Markov, Siniša L.; Šaponjac, Vesna T. Tumbas; Vulić, Jelena J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Kombucha is a fermented tea beverage which is traditionally prepared by fermenting sweetened black or green tea (Camellia sinensis L.) with symbiotic consortium of bacteria and yeasts (SCOBY). In this study, lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) was used as the only nitrogen source for kombucha fermentation. During the seven-day fermentation process, pH value, titratable acidity (TA), total phenolic content, phenolic compounds, and antioxidant activity against hydroxyl (˙OH) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazil (DPPH) radicals were measured to detect the connection between the fermentation time and antioxidant and antibacterial activities of lemon balm kombucha. Antibacterial activity of finished beverages with optimum acidity (TA=4–4.5 g/L), the value which is confirmed by long-time kombucha consumers, and enhanced acidity (TA=8.12 g/L) was tested against eleven wild bacterial strains. The results showed that lemon balm could be successfully used as an alternative to C. sinensis L. for kombucha fermentation. Total phenolic content and antioxidant activity against DPPH radicals of lemon balm fermentation broth were higher than those of traditional kombucha. Rosmarinic acid is the main phenolic compound of the lemon balm-based kombucha that probably provides biological activity of the beverage. Judging from the EC50 values, kombucha beverages exhibited higher antioxidant activities compared with C. sinensis L. and M. officinalis L. infusions, which can probably be ascribed to SCOBY metabolites. Lemon balm kombucha with both optimum and enhanced acidity showed antibacterial activity, which can be primarily ascribed to acetic acid, but also to some other tea components and SCOBY metabolites. PMID:27904315

  9. Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activity of the Beverage Obtained by Fermentation of Sweetened Lemon Balm
(Melissa officinalis L.) Tea with Symbiotic Consortium 
of Bacteria and Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Velićanski, Aleksandra S; Cvetković, Dragoljub D; Markov, Siniša L; Šaponjac, Vesna T Tumbas; Vulić, Jelena J

    2014-12-01

    Kombucha is a fermented tea beverage which is traditionally prepared by fermenting sweetened black or green tea (Camellia sinensis L.) with symbiotic consortium of bacteria and yeasts (SCOBY). In this study, lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) was used as the only nitrogen source for kombucha fermentation. During the seven-day fermentation process, pH value, titratable acidity (TA), total phenolic content, phenolic compounds, and antioxidant activity against hydroxyl (˙OH) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazil (DPPH) radicals were measured to detect the connection between the fermentation time and antioxidant and antibacterial activities of lemon balm kombucha. Antibacterial activity of finished beverages with optimum acidity (TA=4-4.5 g/L), the value which is confirmed by long-time kombucha consumers, and enhanced acidity (TA=8.12 g/L) was tested against eleven wild bacterial strains. The results showed that lemon balm could be successfully used as an alternative to C. sinensis L. for kombucha fermentation. Total phenolic content and antioxidant activity against DPPH radicals of lemon balm fermentation broth were higher than those of traditional kombucha. Rosmarinic acid is the main phenolic compound of the lemon balm-based kombucha that probably provides biological activity of the beverage. Judging from the EC (50) values, kombucha beverages exhibited higher antioxidant activities compared with C. sinensis L. and M. officinalis L. infusions, which can probably be ascribed to SCOBY metabolites. Lemon balm kombucha with both optimum and enhanced acidity showed antibacterial activity, which can be primarily ascribed to acetic acid, but also to some other tea components and SCOBY metabolites.

  10. Metabolic strategies of beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria in beer.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Andreas J; Behr, Jürgen; von Kamp, Kristina; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-04

    Beer contains only limited amounts of readily fermentable carbohydrates and amino acids. Beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have to come up with metabolic strategies in order to deal with selective nutrient content, high energy demand of hop tolerance mechanisms and a low pH. The metabolism of 26 LAB strains of 6 species and varying spoilage potentialwas investigated in order to define and compare their metabolic capabilities using multivariate statistics and outline possible metabolic strategies. Metabolic capabilities of beer spoilage LAB regarding carbohydrate and amino acids did not correlate with spoilage potential, but with fermentation type (heterofermentative/homofermentative) and species. A shift to mixed acid fermentation by homofermentative (hof) Pediococcus claussenii and Lactobacillus backii was observed as a specific feature of their growth in beer. For heterofermentative (hef) LAB a mostly versatile carbohydrate metabolism could be demonstrated, supplementing the known relevance of organic acids for their growth in beer. For hef LAB a distinct amino acid metabolism, resulting in biogenic amine production, was observed, presumably contributing to energy supply and pH homeostasis.

  11. Cytokinin producing bacteria stimulate amino acid deposition by wheat roots.

    PubMed

    Kudoyarova, Guzel R; Melentiev, Alexander I; Martynenko, Elena V; Timergalina, Leila N; Arkhipova, Tatiana N; Shendel, Galina V; Kuz'mina, Ludmila Yu; Dodd, Ian C; Veselov, Stanislav Yu

    2014-10-01

    Phytohormone production is one mechanism by which rhizobacteria can stimulate plant growth, but it is not clear whether the bacteria gain from this mechanism. The hypothesis that microbial-derived cytokinin phytohormones stimulate root exudation of amino acids was tested. The rhizosphere of wheat plants was drenched with the synthetic cytokinin trans-zeatin or inoculated with Bacillus subtilis IB-22 (which produces zeatin type cytokinins) or B. subtilis IB-21 (which failed to accumulate cytokinins). Growing plants in a split root system allowed spatial separation of zeatin application or rhizobacterial inoculation to one compartment and analyses of amino acid release from roots (rhizodeposition) into the other compartment (without either microbial inoculation or treatment with exogenous hormone). Supplying B. subtilis IB-22 or zeatin to either the whole root system or half of the roots increased concentrations of amino acids in the soil solution although the magnitude of the increase was greater when whole roots were treated. There was some similarity in amino acid concentrations induced by either bacterial or zeatin treatment. Thus B. subtilis IB-22 increased amino acid rhizodeposition, likely due to its ability to produce cytokinins. Furthermore, B. subtilis strain IB-21, which failed to accumulate cytokinins in culture media, did not significantly affect amino acid concentrations in the wheat rhizosphere. The ability of rhizobacteria to produce cytokinins and thereby stimulate rhizodeposition may be important in enhancing rhizobacterial colonization of the rhizoplane.

  12. Fermentation of aqueous plant seed extracts by lactic acid bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Schafner, D.W.; Beuchat, R.L.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of lactic acid bacterial fermentation on chemical and physical changes in aqueous extracts of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), peanut (Arachis hypogea), soybean (Glycine max), and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) were studied. The bacteria investigated were Lactobacillus helveticus, L. delbrueckii, L. casei, L. bulgaricus, L. acidophilus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. Organisms were inoculated individually into all of the seed extracts; L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus were also evaluated together as inocula for fermenting the legume extracts. During fermentation, bacterial population and changes in titratable acidity, pH, viscosity, and color were measured over a 72 h period at 37 degrees C. Maximum bacterial populations, titratable acidity, pH, and viscosity varied depending upon the type of extract and bacterial strain. The maximum population of each organism was influenced by fermentable carbohydrates, which, in turn, influenced acid production and change in pH. Change in viscosity was correlated with the amount of protein and titratable acidity of products. Color was affected by pasteurization treatment and fermentation as well as the source of extract. In the extracts inoculated simultaneously with L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus, a synergistic effect resulted in increased bacterial populations, titratable acidity, and viscosity, and decreased pH in all the legume extracts when compared to the extracts fermented with either of these organisms individually. Fermented extracts offer potential as substitutes for cultured dairy products. 24 references.

  13. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  14. Occurrence and role of lactic acid bacteria in seafood products.

    PubMed

    Françoise, Leroi

    2010-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in fish flesh has long been disregarded because the high post-mortem pH, the low percentage of sugars, the high content of low molecular weight nitrogenous molecules and the low temperature of temperate waters favor the rapid growth of pH-sensitive psychrotolerant marine Gram-negative bacteria like Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Photobacterium. In seafood packed in both vacuum (VP) and modified atmosphere (MAP) packaging commonly CO(2) enriched, the growth of the Gram-negative aerobic bacteria group (predominantly pseudomonads) is effectively inhibited and the number reached by LAB during storage is higher than that achieved in air but always several log units lower than the trimethylamine oxide (TMA-O) reducing and CO(2)-resistant organisms (Shewanella putrefaciens and Photobacterium phosphoreum). Accordingly, LAB are not of much concern in seafood neither aerobically stored nor VP and MAP. However, they may acquire great relevance in lightly preserved fish products (LPFP), including those VP or MAP. Fresh fish presents a very high water activity (aw) value (0.99). However, aw is reduced to about 0.96 when salt (typically 6% WP) is added to the product. As a result, aerobic Gram-negative bacteria are inhibited, which allows the growth of other organisms more resistant to reduced aw, i.e. LAB, and then they may acquire a central role in the microbial events occurring in the product. Changes in consumers' habits have led to an increase of convenient LPFP with a relative long shelf-life (at least 3 weeks) which, on the other hand, may constitute a serious problem from a safety perspective since Listeria monocytogenes and sometimes Clostridium botulinum (mainly type E) may able to grow. In any case the LAB function in marine products is complex, depending on species, strains, interaction with other bacteria and the food matrix. They may have no particular effect or they may be responsible for spoilage and, in certain cases, they may even exert

  15. Genomic reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genome scale annotation of regulatory interactions and reconstruction of regulatory networks are the crucial problems in bacterial genomics. The Lactobacillales order of bacteria collates various microorganisms having a large economic impact, including both human and animal pathogens and strains used in the food industry. Nonetheless, no systematic genome-wide analysis of transcriptional regulation has been previously made for this taxonomic group. Results A comparative genomics approach was used for reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in 30 selected genomes of lactic acid bacteria. The inferred networks comprise regulons for 102 orthologous transcription factors (TFs), including 47 novel regulons for previously uncharacterized TFs. Numerous differences between regulatory networks of the Streptococcaceae and Lactobacillaceae groups were described on several levels. The two groups are characterized by substantially different sets of TFs encoded in their genomes. Content of the inferred regulons and structure of their cognate TF binding motifs differ for many orthologous TFs between the two groups. Multiple cases of non-orthologous displacements of TFs that control specific metabolic pathways were reported. Conclusions The reconstructed regulatory networks substantially expand the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in lactic acid bacteria. In each of 30 studied genomes the obtained regulatory network contains on average 36 TFs and 250 target genes that are mostly involved in carbohydrate metabolism, stress response, metal homeostasis and amino acids biosynthesis. The inferred networks can be used for genetic experiments, functional annotations of genes, metabolic reconstruction and evolutionary analysis. All reconstructed regulons are captured within the Streptococcaceae and Lactobacillaceae collections in the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov). PMID:23398941

  16. Ultrastructure of Candida ingens: a yeast that can assimilate volatile fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Garrison, R G; Mirikitani, F K; Henry, D P; Evans, B J; Arnold, W N

    1985-01-01

    A defined liquid medium was developed for culture of Candida ingens on either volatile fatty acids or glucose as carbon source. Buffering capacity at pH 5.4 was achieved by inclusion of 50 mM phthalic acid which is not assimilated. The yeast grew on C2-C5 acids, with lags in some cases that were dependent on the cultural history of the inoculum. The cells were notably large for Candida species, or yeasts in general, and were significantly more elongated on glucose substrate compared with butyrate. Traditional aldehyde fixatives and heavy metal staining yielded bland micrographs. However, the periodic acid-thiocarbohydrazide-silver proteinate stain of Thiéry resulted in informative, high contrast electron images for this species. The ultrastructure of the cell envelope was not greatly affected by carbon source or by growth habit except that a slime layer was more prevalent in pellicular cells compared with those grown in submerged culture. The slime layer was apparently stabilized by colloidal iron staining. The other feature of the cell envelope was a microfibrillar zone containing periodic acid reactive constituents. Subcellular organelles were typical of yeast species although there was a propensity for large vacuoles in pellicular cells. When cells were grown on fatty acids there was an increase in the number of microbodies compared with that observed on glucose. Microbodies were best demonstrated by diaminobenzidine-hydrogen peroxide staining of protoplasts, which were generated by dissolution of cell walls with snail digestive enzymes.

  17. Challenges in the expression of disulfide bonded, threonine-rich antifreeze proteins in bacteria and yeast.

    PubMed

    Tyshenko, Michael G; d'Anjou, Marc; Davies, Peter L; Daugulis, Andrew J; Walker, Virginia K

    2006-05-01

    Certain freeze-intolerant insects produce antifreeze proteins (AFPs) during overwintering including the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) and yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) AFP gene families. However, only a few of the isoforms, encoded by their multiple-copy gene families, have been characterized. When expressed in bacterial systems the insect AFPs have to be denatured and refolded in vitro, a procedure that is not uniformly successful, presumably due to the beta-helix structure and the requirement for disulfide bonds. In an attempt to overcome these difficulties, bacterial vectors and hosts that have been developed to produce soluble, folded proteins, as well as a yeast expression system (Pichia pastoris) were employed. Bacterial expression resulted in low quantities of active recombinant protein for certain isoforms. In contrast, both small and large-scale fermentation of recombinant AFP in Pichia yielded substantial protein production (100 mg/L) but functional ice binding activity of protein produced in three different transformed yeast strains (KM71, X33 or GS115) was low. Inappropriate O-linked glycosylation of the Thr-rich AFPs appeared to be partially reversed by mild chemical deglycosylation, but activity remained low. Substantial quantities, as well as activity were recovered when a fish AFP, with disulfide bonds, but without potential Thr glycosylation sites was expressed in the yeast system.

  18. Overview on mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-02-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are a group of gram-negative or gram-variable bacteria which possess an obligate aerobic property with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, meanwhile transform ethanol and sugar to corresponding aldehydes, ketones and organic acids. Since the first genus Acetobacter of AAB was established in 1898, 16 AAB genera have been recorded so far. As the main producer of a world-wide condiment, vinegar, AAB have evolved an elegant adaptive system that enables them to survive and produce a high concentration of acetic acid. Some researches and reviews focused on mechanisms of acid resistance in enteric bacteria and made the mechanisms thoroughly understood, while a few investigations did in AAB. As the related technologies with proteome, transcriptome and genome were rapidly developed and applied to AAB research, some plausible mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in some AAB strains have been published. In this review, the related mechanisms of AAB against acetic acid with acetic acid assimilation, transportation systems, cell morphology and membrane compositions, adaptation response, and fermentation conditions will be described. Finally, a framework for future research for anti-acid AAB will be provided.

  19. Phenolic acid degradation potential and growth behavior of lactic acid bacteria in sunflower substrates.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Caroline; Heinrich, Veronika; Vogel, Rudi F; Toelstede, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Sunflower flour provides a high content of protein with a well-balanced amino acid composition and is therefore regarded as an attractive source for protein. The use for human nutrition is hindered by phenolic compounds, mainly chlorogenic acid, which can lead under specific circumstances to undesirable discolorations. In this study, growth behavior and degradation ability of chlorogenic acid of four lactic acid bacteria were explored. Data suggested that significant higher fermentation performances on sunflower flour as compared to sunflower protein concentrate were reached by Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus gasseri and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. In fermentation with the latter two strains reduced amounts of chlorogenic acid were observed in sunflower flour (-11.4% and -19.8%, respectively), which were more pronounced in the protein concentrate (-50.7% and -95.6%, respectively). High tolerances against chlorogenic acid and the cleavage product quinic acid with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥20.48 mg/ml after 48 h were recorded for all strains except Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, which was more sensitive. The second cleavage compound, caffeic acid revealed a higher antimicrobial potential with MIC values of 0.64-5.12 mg/ml. In this proof of concept study, degradation versus inhibitory effect suggest the existence of basic mechanisms of interaction between phenolic acids in sunflower and lactic acid bacteria and a feasible way to reduce the chlorogenic acid content, which may help to avoid undesired color changes.

  20. Main and interaction effects of acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on growth and ethanol productivity of yeasts.

    PubMed

    Palmqvist, E; Grage, H; Meinander, N Q; Hahn-Hägerdal, B

    1999-04-05

    The influence of the factors acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on the ethanol yield (YEtOH) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, bakers' yeast, S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581, and Candida shehatae NJ 23 was investigated using a 2(3)-full factorial design with 3 centrepoints. The results indicated that acetic acid inhibited the fermentation by C. shehatae NJ 23 markedly more than by bakers' yeast, whereas no significant difference in tolerance towards the compounds was detected between the S. cerevisiae strains. Furfural (2 g L-1) and the lignin derived compound p-hydroxybenzoic acid (2 g L-1) did not affect any of the yeasts at the cell mass concentration used. The results indicated that the linear model was not adequate to describe the experimental data (the p-values of curvatures were 0.048 for NJ 23 and 0.091 for bakers' yeast). Based on the results from the 2(3)-full factorial experiment, an extended experiment was designed based on a central composite design to investigate the influence of the factors on the specific growth rate (mu), biomass yield (Yx), volumetric ethanol productivity (QEtOH), and YEtOH. Bakers' yeast was chosen in the extended experiment due to its better tolerance towards acetic acid, which makes it a more interesting organism for use in industrial fermentations of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. The inoculum size was reduced in the extended experiment to reduce any increase in inhibitor tolerance that might be due to a large cell inoculum. By dividing the experiment in blocks containing fermentations performed with the same inoculum preparation on the same day, much of the anticipated systematic variation between the experiments was separated from the experimental error. The results of the fitted model can be summarised as follows: mu was decreased by furfural (0-3 g L-1). Furfural and acetic acid (0-10 g L-1) also interacted negatively on mu. Furfural concentrations up to 2 g L-1 stimulated Yx in the absence of acetic acid whereas higher

  1. Bioactive compounds derived from the yeast metabolism of aromatic amino acids during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mas, Albert; Guillamon, Jose Manuel; Torija, Maria Jesus; Beltran, Gemma; Cerezo, Ana B; Troncoso, Ana M; Garcia-Parrilla, M Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Metabolites resulting from nitrogen metabolism in yeast are currently found in some fermented beverages such as wine and beer. Their study has recently attracted the attention of researchers. Some metabolites derived from aromatic amino acids are bioactive compounds that can behave as hormones or even mimic their role in humans and may also act as regulators in yeast. Although the metabolic pathways for their formation are well known, the physiological significance is still far from being understood. The understanding of this relevance will be a key element in managing the production of these compounds under controlled conditions, to offer fermented food with specific enrichment in these compounds or even to use the yeast as nutritional complements.

  2. Bioactive Compounds Derived from the Yeast Metabolism of Aromatic Amino Acids during Alcoholic Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Guillamon, Jose Manuel; Torija, Maria Jesus; Beltran, Gemma; Troncoso, Ana M.; Garcia-Parrilla, M. Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Metabolites resulting from nitrogen metabolism in yeast are currently found in some fermented beverages such as wine and beer. Their study has recently attracted the attention of researchers. Some metabolites derived from aromatic amino acids are bioactive compounds that can behave as hormones or even mimic their role in humans and may also act as regulators in yeast. Although the metabolic pathways for their formation are well known, the physiological significance is still far from being understood. The understanding of this relevance will be a key element in managing the production of these compounds under controlled conditions, to offer fermented food with specific enrichment in these compounds or even to use the yeast as nutritional complements. PMID:24895623

  3. Probiotic lactic acid bacteria detoxify N-nitrosodimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Adriana; Kuberski, Sławomir; Libudzisz, Zdzisława

    2014-01-01

    Humans can be exposed to N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) due to many environmental sources, as well as endogenous formation. The main nitrosamine found in food products and also synthesised in vivo by intestinal microbiota is N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). It can cause cancer of the stomach, kidney and colon. The effect of four probiotic Lactobacillus strains on NDMA was studied under different culture conditions (24 h in MRS, 168 h in modified MRS N, and 168 h in phosphate buffer). HPLC and GC-TEA methods were used for NDMA determination in supernatants. The influence of lactic acid bacteria on NDMA genotoxicity was investigated by means of the comet assay. Additionally, the effect of NDMA (2-100 µg ml⁻¹) on the growth and survival of the probiotic strains was studied. The results indicate that the bacteria decreased NDMA concentration by up to 50%, depending on the culture conditions, time of incubation, NDMA concentration, pH and bacterial strain. Lb. brevis 0945 lowered the concentration and genotoxicity of NDMA most effectively by up to 50%. This could be due to either adsorption or metabolism. The growth and survival of the bacteria was not affected by any of the tested NDMA concentrations.

  4. Genome level analysis of bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetigyata Pratap; Tiwari, Abhay; Bansal, Ankiti; Thakur, Shruti; Sharma, Garima; Gabrani, Reema

    2015-06-01

    Bacteriocins are antimicrobial peptides which are ribosomally synthesized by mainly all bacterial species. LABs (lactic acid bacteria) are a diverse group of bacteria that include around 20 genera of various species. Though LABs have a tremendous potential for production of anti-microbial peptides, this group of bacteria is still underexplored for bacteriocins. To study the diversity among bacteriocin encoding clusters and the putative bacteriocin precursors, genome mining was performed on 20 different species of LAB not reported to be bacteriocin producers. The phylogenetic tree of gyrB, rpoB, and 16S rRNA were constructed using MEGA6 software to analyze the diversity among strains. Putative bacteriocins operons identified were found to be diverse and were further characterized on the basis of physiochemical properties and the secondary structure. The presence of at least two cysteine residues in most of the observed putative bacteriocins leads to disulphide bond formation and provide stability. Our data suggests that LABs are prolific source of low molecular weight non modified peptides.

  5. Root-secreted malic acid recruits beneficial soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rudrappa, Thimmaraju; Czymmek, Kirk J; Paré, Paul W; Bais, Harsh P

    2008-11-01

    Beneficial soil bacteria confer immunity against a wide range of foliar diseases by activating plant defenses, thereby reducing a plant's susceptibility to pathogen attack. Although bacterial signals have been identified that activate these plant defenses, plant metabolites that elicit rhizobacterial responses have not been demonstrated. Here, we provide biochemical evidence that the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate L-malic acid (MA) secreted from roots of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) selectively signals and recruits the beneficial rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis FB17 in a dose-dependent manner. Root secretions of L-MA are induced by the foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst DC3000) and elevated levels of L-MA promote binding and biofilm formation of FB17 on Arabidopsis roots. The demonstration that roots selectively secrete L-MA and effectively signal beneficial rhizobacteria establishes a regulatory role of root metabolites in recruitment of beneficial microbes, as well as underscores the breadth and sophistication of plant-microbial interactions.

  6. Lactic acid bacteria evolution during winemaking: use of rpoB gene as a target for PCR-DGGE analysis.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Vincent; Claisse, Olivier; Miot-Sertier, Cécile; Lonvaud-Funel, Aline

    2006-04-01

    Evolution of the microbial population during winemaking is crucial. Winemakers are more and more attentive to microbial aspects during fermentation. During aging, microbial stabilization is preponderant to avoid development of spoilage yeast and bacteria. Therefore, it is necessary to improve methods to study the evolution of micro-organisms and for early detection of undesirable strain. The aim of this study was to develop a culture-independent method for identifying lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and to monitoring predominant species. The benefits of PCR-DGGE for the analysis of microbial changes during winemaking were clearly demonstrated. Targeting rpoB gene allowed a reliable discrimination of each species. The primers were able to avoid the interspecies heterogeneity problem caused by the use of the 16S rRNA gene. This method was applied to study the influence of different oenological practices on LAB population and their evolution during winemaking.

  7. Naturally Occurring Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Tomato Pomace Silage

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing-jing; Du, Rui-ping; Gao, Min; Sui, Yao-qiang; Xiu, Lei; Wang, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Silage making has become a significant method of forage conservation worldwide. To determine how tomato pomace (TP) may be used effectively as animal feed, it was ensilaged for 90 days and microbiology counts, fermentation characteristics and chemical composition of tomato pomace silage (TPS) were evaluated at the 30th, 60th, and 90th days, respectively. In addition, 103 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from TPS. Based on the phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, 16S rDNA sequence and carbohydrate fermentation tests, the isolates were identified as 17 species namely: Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. torquens (0.97%), Lactobacillus pontis (0.97%), Lactobacillus hilgardii (0.97%), Lactobacillus pantheris (0.97%), Lactobacillus amylovorus (1.9%), Lactobacillus panis (1.9%), Lactobacillus vaginalis (1.9%), Lactobacillus rapi (1.9%), Lactobacillus buchneri (2.9%), Lactobacillus parafarraginis (2.9%), Lactobacillus helveticus (3.9%), Lactobacillus camelliae (3.9%), Lactobacillus fermentum (5.8%), Lactobacillus manihotivorans (6.8%), Lactobacillus plantarum (10.7%), Lactobacillus harbinensis (16.5%) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (35.0%). This study has shown that TP can be well preserved for 90 days by ensilaging and that TPS is not only rich in essential nutrients, but that physiological and biochemical properties of the isolates could provide a platform for future design of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculants aimed at improving the fermentation quality of silage. PMID:25049999

  8. Manipulation of culture conditions alters lipid content and fatty acid profiles of a wide variety of known and new oleaginous yeast species.

    PubMed

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Sestric, Ryan; Ignatia, Laura; Levin, David; German, J Bruce; Gillies, Laura A; Almada, Luis A G; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2013-09-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been studied for oleochemical production for over 80 years. Only a few species have been studied intensely. To expand the diversity of oleaginous yeasts available for lipid research, we surveyed a broad diversity of yeasts with indicators of oleaginicity including known oleaginous clades, and buoyancy. Sixty-nine strains representing 17 genera and 50 species were screened for lipid production. Yeasts belonged to Ascomycota families, Basidiomycota orders, and the yeast-like algal genus Prototheca. Total intracellular lipids and fatty acid composition were determined under different incubation times and nitrogen availability. Thirteen new oleaginous yeast species were discovered, representing multiple ascomycete and basidiomycete clades. Nitrogen starvation generally increased intracellular lipid content. The fatty acid profiles varied with the growth conditions regardless of taxonomic affiliation. The dominant fatty acids were oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid. Yeasts and culture conditions that produced fatty acids appropriate for biodiesel were identified.

  9. Manipulation of culture conditions alters lipid content and fatty acid profiles of a wide variety of known and new oleaginous yeasts species

    PubMed Central

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Sestric, Ryan; Ignatia, Laura; Levin, David; German, J. Bruce; Gillies, Laura A.; Almada, Luis A.G.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2013-01-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been studied for oleochemical production for over 80 years. Only a few species have been studied intensely. To expand the diversity of oleaginous yeasts available for lipid research, we surveyed a broad diversity of yeasts with indicators of oleaginicity including known oleaginous clades, and buoyancy. Sixty-nine strains representing 17 genera and 50 species were screened for lipid production. Yeasts belonged to Ascomycota families, Basidiomycota orders, and the yeast-like algal genus Prototheca. Total intracellular lipids and fatty acid composition were determined under different incubation times and nitrogen availability. Thirteen new oleaginous yeast species were discovered, representing multiple ascomycete and basidiomycete clades. Nitrogen starvation generally increased intracellular lipid content. The fatty acid profiles varied with the growth conditions regardless of taxonomic affiliation. The dominant fatty acids were oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid. Yeasts and culture conditions that produced fatty acids appropriate for biodiesel were identified. PMID:23891835

  10. In vitro studies on the translocation of acid phosphatase into the endoplasmic reticulum of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Krebs, H O; Hoffschulte, H K; Müller, M

    1989-05-01

    We demonstrate here the in vitro translocation of yeast acid phosphatase into rough endoplasmic reticulum. The precursor of the repressible acid phosphatase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae encoded by the PHO5 gene, was synthesized in a yeast lysate programmed with in vitro transcribed PHO5 mRNA. In the presence of yeast rough microsomes up to 16% of the acid phosphatase synthesized was found to be translocated into the microsomes, as judged by proteinase resistance, and fully core-glycosylated. The translocation efficiency however, decreased to 3% if yeast rough microsomes were added after synthesis of acid phosphatase had been terminated. When a wheat-germ extract was used for in vitro synthesis, the precursor of acid phosphatase was translocated into canine pancreatic rough microsomes and thereby core-glycosylated in a signal-recognition-particle-dependent manner. Replacing canine with yeast rough microsomes in the wheat-germ translation system, however, resulted in a significant decrease in the ability to translocate and glycosylate the precursor. Translocation and glycosylation were partially restored by a high-salt extract prepared from yeast ribosomes. The results presented here suggest that yeast-specific factors are needed to translocate and glycosylate acid phosphatase efficiently in vitro.

  11. Production of Palmitoleic and Linoleic Acid in Oleaginous and Nonoleaginous Yeast Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Kolouchová, Irena; Maťátková, Olga; Sigler, Karel; Masák, Jan; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of utilizing both oleaginous yeast species accumulating large amounts of lipids (Yarrowia lipolytica, Rhodotorula glutinis, Trichosporon cutaneum, and Candida sp.) and traditional biotechnological nonoleaginous ones (Kluyveromyces polysporus, Torulaspora delbrueckii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as potential producers of dietetically important major fatty acids. The main objective was to examine the cultivation conditions that would induce a high ratio of dietary fatty acids and biomass. Though genus-dependent, the type of nitrogen source had a higher influence on biomass yield than the C/N ratio. The nitrogen source leading to the highest lipid accumulation was potassium nitrate, followed by ammonium sulfate, which is an ideal nitrogen source supporting, in both oleaginous and nonoleaginous species, sufficient biomass growth with concomitantly increased lipid accumulation. All yeast strains displayed high (70–90%) content of unsaturated fatty acids in total cell lipids. The content of dietary fatty acids of interest, namely, palmitoleic acid and linoleic acid, reached in Kluyveromyces and Trichosporon strains over 50% of total fatty acids and the highest yield, over 280 mg per g of dry cell weight of these fatty acids, was observed in Trichosporon with ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source at C/N ratio 70. PMID:27022398

  12. Nonstarter lactic acid bacteria volatilomes produced using cheese components.

    PubMed

    Sgarbi, E; Lazzi, C; Tabanelli, G; Gatti, M; Neviani, E; Gardini, F

    2013-07-01

    In long-ripened cheese, flavor formation occurs during ripening. The metabolism of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) leads to the production of different compounds that contribute to the flavor of cheese. The contribution of LAB to the formation of cheese flavor has previously been studied. However, the specific nonstarter LAB (NSLAB) metabolic reactions in ripened cheese that lead to the formation of flavor compounds remain unclear. In ripened cheese, the nutrient sources available include small peptides or amino acids, citrate, lactate, free fatty acids, and starter LAB cell lysis products. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of NSLAB to produce volatile flavor compounds by using an in vitro system that used only the nutrients available in ripened cheese as the energy source. Moreover, the potential contribution of the NSLAB volatilome on total cheese flavor is discussed. For this purpose, the production of volatile compounds on cheese-based medium (CBM) and on starter LAB lysed cell medium (LCM) by 2 Lactobacillus casei and 2 Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, previously isolated from ripened Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, was investigated. The generated volatile compounds were analyzed with head-space gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Overall, ketones, aldehydes, alcohols, and acids were the most abundant compounds produced. Differences in volatilome production were found between NSLAB grown in LCM and CBM. The catabolic metabolism of amino acids and fatty acids were required for NSLAB growth on LCM. Conversely, pyruvate metabolism was the main catabolic pathway that supported growth of NSLAB in CBM. This study can be considered a first step toward a better understanding of how microbiota involved in the long ripening of cheese may contribute to the development of cheese flavor.

  13. Relationships between the resistance of yeasts to acetic, propanoic and benzoic acids and to methyl paraben and pH.

    PubMed

    Warth, A D

    1989-07-01

    Minimum inhibitory concentrations of acetic, propanoic and benzoic acids and methyl paraben were determined at pH 3.50 for 22 isolates of 11 yeast species, differing in their resistance to preservatives. Growth in the presence of benzoic acid enhanced the resistance of yeasts to benzoic and the other weak acid preservatives, but not to methyl paraben. Resistance to acetic, propanoic and benzoic acids was strongly correlated, but was not closely related to resistance to methyl paraben. Minimum pH for growth was not related to resistance to the weak acids. The results suggest that growth in the presence of weak-acid preservatives involves a common resistance mechanism.

  14. Bioconversion of R-(+)-limonene to perillic acid by the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Maria Antonieta; Almeida, Débora S.; Siani, Antonio C.; Lucchetti, Leonardo; Lacerda, Paulo S.B.; Freitas, André; Tappin, Marcelo R.R.; Bon, Elba P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Perillyl derivatives are increasingly important due to their flavouring and antimicrobial properties as well as their potential as anticancer agents. These terpenoid species, which are present in limited amounts in plants, may be obtained via bioconversion of selected monoterpene hydrocarbons. In this study, seventeen yeast strains were screened for their ability to oxidize the exocyclic methyl group in the p-menthene moiety of limonene into perillic acid. Of the yeast tested, the highest efficiency was observed for Yarrowia lipolytica ATCC 18942. The conversion of R (+)-limonene by Y. lipolytica was evaluated by varying the pH (3 to 8) and the temperature (25 to 30 °C) in a reaction medium containing 0.5% v/v limonene and 10 g/L of stationary phase cells (dry weight). The best results, corresponding to 564 mg/L of perillic acid, were obtained in buffered medium at pH 7.1 that was incubated at 25 °C for 48 h. The stepwise addition of limonene increased the perillic acid concentration by over 50%, reaching 855 mg/L, whereas the addition of glucose or surfactant to the reaction medium did not improve the bioconversion process. The use of Y. lipolytica showed promise for ease of further downstream processing, as perillic acid was the sole oxidised product of the bioconversion reaction. Moreover, bioprocesses using safe and easy to cultivate yeast cells have been favoured in industry. PMID:24688495

  15. Recent advances in nitrogen-fixing acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Raúl O

    2008-06-30

    Nitrogen is an essential plant nutrient, widely applied as N-fertilizer to improve yield of agriculturally important crops. An interesting alternative to avoid or reduce the use of N-fertilizers could be the exploitation of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB), capable of enhancing growth and yield of many plant species, several of agronomic and ecological significance. PGPB belong to diverse genera, including Azospirillum, Azotobacter, Herbaspirillum, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, and Gluconacetobacter, among others. They are capable of promoting plant growth through different mechanisms including (in some cases), the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), the enzymatic reduction of the atmospheric dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonia, catalyzed by nitrogenase. Aerobic bacteria able to oxidize ethanol to acetic acid in neutral or acid media are candidates of belonging to the family Acetobacteraceae. At present, this family has been divided into ten genera: Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Gluconobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Saccharibacter, Swaminathania, Neoasaia, and Granulibacter. Among them, only three genera include N(2)-fixing species: Gluconacetobacter, Swaminathania and Acetobacter. The first N(2)-fixing acetic acid bacterium (AAB) was described in Brazil. It was found inside tissues of the sugarcane plant, and first named as Acetobacter diazotrophicus, but then renamed as Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus. Later, two new species within the genus Gluconacetobacter, associated to coffee plants, were described in Mexico: G. johannae and G. azotocaptans. A salt-tolerant bacterium named Swaminathania salitolerans was found associated to wild rice plants. Recently, N(2)-fixing Acetobacter peroxydans and Acetobacter nitrogenifigens, associated with rice plants and Kombucha tea, respectively, were described in India. In this paper, recent advances involving nitrogen-fixing AAB are presented. Their natural habitats, physiological and genetic aspects

  16. Epiphytic bacteria and yeasts on apple blossoms and their potential as antagonists of Erwinia amylovora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple blossoms were sampled for indigenous epiphytic populations of culturable microorganisms during different stages of bloom at two orchards in or near Wenatchee, WA, and one in Corvallis, OR. Frequencies and population sizes of bacteria on stigmas of apple were lower at Wenatchee than Corvallis, ...

  17. Indole-3-acetic acid-producing yeasts in the phyllosphere of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pei-Feng; Fang, Wei-Ta; Shin, Li-Ying; Wei, Jyuan-Yu; Fu, Shih-Feng; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are widely distributed in nature and exist in association with other microorganisms as normal inhabitants of soil, vegetation, and aqueous environments. In this study, 12 yeast strains were enriched and isolated from leaf samples of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L., which is currently threatened because of restricted habitats and use in herbal industries. According to similarities in large subunit and small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences, we identified 2 yeast species in 2 genera of the phylum Ascomycota, and 5 yeast species in 5 genera of the phylum Basidiomycota. All of the isolated yeasts produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) when cultivated in YPD broth supplemented with 0.1% L-tryptophan. Growth conditions, such as the pH and temperature of the medium, influenced yeast IAA production. Our results also suggested the existence of a tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthetic pathway. We evaluated the effects of various concentrations of exogenous IAA on yeast growth and observed that IAA produced by wild yeasts modifies auxin-inducible gene expression in Arabidopsis. Our data suggest that yeasts can promote plant growth and support ongoing prospecting of yeast strains for inclusion into biofertilizer for sustainable agriculture.

  18. Indole-3-Acetic Acid-Producing Yeasts in the Phyllosphere of the Carnivorous Plant Drosera indica L

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Li-Ying; Wei, Jyuan-Yu; Fu, Shih-Feng; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are widely distributed in nature and exist in association with other microorganisms as normal inhabitants of soil, vegetation, and aqueous environments. In this study, 12 yeast strains were enriched and isolated from leaf samples of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L., which is currently threatened because of restricted habitats and use in herbal industries. According to similarities in large subunit and small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences, we identified 2 yeast species in 2 genera of the phylum Ascomycota, and 5 yeast species in 5 genera of the phylum Basidiomycota. All of the isolated yeasts produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) when cultivated in YPD broth supplemented with 0.1% L-tryptophan. Growth conditions, such as the pH and temperature of the medium, influenced yeast IAA production. Our results also suggested the existence of a tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthetic pathway. We evaluated the effects of various concentrations of exogenous IAA on yeast growth and observed that IAA produced by wild yeasts modifies auxin-inducible gene expression in Arabidopsis. Our data suggest that yeasts can promote plant growth and support ongoing prospecting of yeast strains for inclusion into biofertilizer for sustainable agriculture. PMID:25464336

  19. Purification Techniques of Bacteriocins from Lactic Acid Bacteria and Other Gram-Positive Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Lucila; Sesma, Fernando

    The search for new antimicrobial peptides produced by lactic acid ­bacteria and other Gram-positive microorganisms has become an interesting field of research in the past decades. The fact that bacteriocins are active against numerous foodborne and human pathogens, are produced by generally regarded as safe (GRAS) microorganisms, and are readily degraded by proteolytic host systems makes them attractive candidates for biotechnological applications. However, before suggesting or choosing a new bacteriocin for future technology developments, it is necessary to elucidate its biochemical structure and its mode of action, which may be carried out once the bacteriocin is purified to homogeneity. This chapter focuses on describing the main strategies used for the purification of numerous bacteriocins.

  20. Antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Chinese yogurts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, N; Zhang, J X; Fan, M T; Wang, J; Guo, G; Wei, X Y

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of 43 strains of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from Chinese yogurts made in different geographical areas, to 11 antibiotics (ampicillin, penicillin G, roxithromycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, chlortetracycline, lincomycin, kanamycin, streptomycin, neomycin, and gentamycin). The 43 isolates (18 Lactobacillus bulgaricus and 25 Streptococcus thermophilus) were identified at species level and were typed by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. Thirty-five genotypically different strains were detected and their antimicrobial resistance to 11 antibiotics was determined using the agar dilution method. Widespread resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, chlortetracycline, tetracyclines, lincomycin, streptomycin, neomycin, and gentamycin was found among the 35 strains tested. All of the Strep. thermophilus strains tested were susceptible to penicillin G and roxithromycin, whereas 23.5 and 64.7% of Lb. bulgaricus strains, respectively, were resistant. All of the Strep. thermophilus and Lb. bulgaricus strains were found to be resistant to kanamycin. The presence of the corresponding resistance genes in the resistant isolates was investigated through PCR, with the following genes detected: tet(M) in 1 Lb. bulgaricus and 2 Strep. thermophilus isolates, ant(6) in 2 Lb. bulgaricus and 2 Strep. thermophilus isolates, and aph(3')-IIIa in 5 Lb. bulgaricus and 2 Strep. thermophilus isolates. The main threat associated with these bacteria is that they may transfer resistance genes to pathogenic bacteria, which has been a major cause of concern to human and animal health. To our knowledge, the aph(3')-IIIa and ant(6) genes were found in Lb. bulgaricus and Strep. thermophilus for the first time. Further investigations are required to analyze whether the genes identified in Lb. bulgaricus and Strep. thermophilus isolates might be horizontally transferred to other species.

  1. Interactions between Cooccurring Lactic Acid Bacteria in Honey Bee Hives.

    PubMed

    Rokop, Z P; Horton, M A; Newton, I L G

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to the honey bee gut, which is colonized by a few characteristic bacterial clades, the hive of the honey bee is home to a diverse array of microbes, including many lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this study, we used culture, combined with sequencing, to sample the LAB communities found across hive environments. Specifically, we sought to use network analysis to identify microbial hubs sharing nearly identical operational taxonomic units, evidence which may indicate cooccurrence of bacteria between environments. In the process, we identified interactions between noncore bacterial members (Fructobacillus and Lactobacillaceae) and honey bee-specific "core" members. Both Fructobacillus and Lactobacillaceae colonize brood cells, bee bread, and nectar and may serve the role of pioneering species, establishing an environment conducive to the inoculation by honey bee core bacteria. Coculture assays showed that these noncore bacterial members promote the growth of honey bee-specific bacterial species. Specifically, Fructobacillus by-products in spent medium supported the growth of the Firm-5 honey bee-specific clade in vitro. Metabolic characterization of Fructobacillus using carbohydrate utilization assays revealed that this strain is capable of utilizing the simple sugars fructose and glucose, as well as the complex plant carbohydrate lignin. We tested Fructobacillus for antibiotic sensitivity and found that this bacterium, which may be important for establishment of the microbiome, is sensitive to the commonly used antibiotic tetracycline. Our results point to the possible significance of "noncore" and environmental microbial community members in the modulation of honey bee microbiome dynamics and suggest that tetracycline use by beekeepers should be limited.

  2. Adhesion Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria on Intestinal Mucin

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Keita; Sugiyama, Makoto; Mukai, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are Gram-positive bacteria that are natural inhabitants of the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of mammals, including humans. Since Mechnikov first proposed that yogurt could prevent intestinal putrefaction and aging, the beneficial effects of LAB have been widely demonstrated. The region between the duodenum and the terminal of the ileum is the primary region colonized by LAB, particularly the Lactobacillus species, and this region is covered by a mucus layer composed mainly of mucin-type glycoproteins. The mucus layer plays a role in protecting the intestinal epithelial cells against damage, but is also considered to be critical for the adhesion of Lactobacillus in the GI tract. Consequently, the adhesion exhibited by lactobacilli on mucin has attracted attention as one of the critical factors contributing to the persistent beneficial effects of Lactobacillus in a constantly changing intestinal environment. Thus, understanding the interactions between Lactobacillus and mucin is crucial for elucidating the survival strategies of LAB in the GI tract. This review highlights the properties of the interactions between Lactobacillus and mucin, while concomitantly considering the structure of the GI tract from a histochemical perspective. PMID:27681930

  3. [Activated Sludge Bacteria Transforming Cyanopyridines and Amides of Pyridinecarboxylic Acids].

    PubMed

    Demakov, V A; Vasil'ev, D M; Maksimova, Yu G; Pavlova, Yu A; Ovechkina, G V; Maksimov, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    Species diversity of bacteria from the activated sludge of Perm biological waste treatment facilities capable of transformation of cyanopyridines and amides of pyridinecarboxylic acids was investigated. Enrichment cultures in mineral media with 3-cyanopyridine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source were used to obtain 32 clones of gram-negative heterotrophic bacteria exhibiting moderate growth on solid and liquid media with 3- and 4-cyanopyridine. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that the clones with homology of at least 99% belonged to the genera Acinetobacte, Alcaligenes, Delftia, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Xanthobacter. PCR analysis showed that 13 out of 32 isolates contained the sequences (-1070 bp) homologous to the nitrilase genes reported previously in Alcaligenes faecalis JM3 (GenBank, D13419.1). Nine clones were capable of nitrile and amide transformation in minimal salt medium. Acinetobacter sp. 11 h and Alcaligenes sp. osv transformed 3-cyanopyridine to nicotinamide, while most of the clones possessed amidase activity (0.5 to 46.3 mmol/(g h) for acetamide and 0.1 to 5.6 mmol/(g h) for nicotinamide). Nicotinamide utilization by strain A. faecalis 2 was shown to result in excretion of a secondary metabolite, which was identified as dodecyl acrylate at 91% probability.

  4. Extreme resistance to weak-acid preservatives in the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii☆

    PubMed Central

    Stratford, Malcolm; Steels, Hazel; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhard; Novodvorska, Michaela; Hayer, Kimran; Archer, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Weak-acid preservatives, such as sorbic acid and acetic acid, are used in many low pH foods to prevent spoilage by fungi. The spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii is notorious for its extreme resistance to preservatives and ability to grow in excess of legally-permitted concentrations of preservatives. Extreme resistance was confirmed in 38 strains of Z. bailii to several weak-acid preservatives. Using the brewing yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a control, tests showed that Z. bailii was ~ 3-fold more resistant to a variety of weak-acids but was not more resistant to alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ethers, ketones, or hydrophilic chelating acids. The weak acids were chemically very diverse in structure, making it improbable that the universal resistance was caused by degradation or metabolism. Examination of Z. bailii cell populations showed that extreme resistance to sorbic acid, benzoic acid and acetic acid was limited to a few cells within the population, numbers decreasing with concentration of weak acid to < 1 in 1000. Re-inoculation of resistant sub-populations into weak-acid-containing media showed that all cells now possessed extreme resistance. Resistant sub-populations grown in any weak-acid preservative also showed ~ 100% cross-resistance to other weak-acid preservatives. Tests using 14C-acetic acid showed that weak-acid accumulation was much lower in the resistant sub-populations. Acid accumulation is caused by acid dissociation in the higher pH of the cytoplasm. Tests on intracellular pH (pHi) in the resistant sub-population showed that the pH was much lower, ~ pH 5.6, than in the sensitive bulk population. The hypothesis is proposed that extreme resistance to weak-acid preservatives in Z. bailii is due to population heterogeneity, with a small proportion of cells having a lower intracellular pH. This reduces the level of accumulation of any weak acid in the cytoplasm, thus conferring resistance to all weak acids, but not to other inhibitors

  5. Extreme resistance to weak-acid preservatives in the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Stratford, Malcolm; Steels, Hazel; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhard; Novodvorska, Michaela; Hayer, Kimran; Archer, David B

    2013-08-16

    Weak-acid preservatives, such as sorbic acid and acetic acid, are used in many low pH foods to prevent spoilage by fungi. The spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii is notorious for its extreme resistance to preservatives and ability to grow in excess of legally-permitted concentrations of preservatives. Extreme resistance was confirmed in 38 strains of Z. bailii to several weak-acid preservatives. Using the brewing yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a control, tests showed that Z. bailii was ~3-fold more resistant to a variety of weak-acids but was not more resistant to alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ethers, ketones, or hydrophilic chelating acids. The weak acids were chemically very diverse in structure, making it improbable that the universal resistance was caused by degradation or metabolism. Examination of Z. bailii cell populations showed that extreme resistance to sorbic acid, benzoic acid and acetic acid was limited to a few cells within the population, numbers decreasing with concentration of weak acid to <1 in 1000. Re-inoculation of resistant sub-populations into weak-acid-containing media showed that all cells now possessed extreme resistance. Resistant sub-populations grown in any weak-acid preservative also showed ~100% cross-resistance to other weak-acid preservatives. Tests using (14)C-acetic acid showed that weak-acid accumulation was much lower in the resistant sub-populations. Acid accumulation is caused by acid dissociation in the higher pH of the cytoplasm. Tests on intracellular pH (pHi) in the resistant sub-population showed that the pH was much lower, ~ pH5.6, than in the sensitive bulk population. The hypothesis is proposed that extreme resistance to weak-acid preservatives in Z. bailii is due to population heterogeneity, with a small proportion of cells having a lower intracellular pH. This reduces the level of accumulation of any weak acid in the cytoplasm, thus conferring resistance to all weak acids, but not to other inhibitors.

  6. Enzymes in Glycolysis and the Citric Acid Cycle in the Yeast and Mycelial Forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori; Carbonell, Luis M.

    1966-01-01

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas, Venezuela), and Luis M. Carbonell. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1315–1320. 1966.—Enzymatic activities in glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, and the citric acid cycle in cell-free extracts of the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were examined comparatively. Both forms have the enzymes of these pathways. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic dehydrogenase of the mycelial form were higher than those of the yeast form. Another 15 enzymatic activities of the mycelial form were lower than those of the yeast form. The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase showed the most marked difference between the two forms, its activity in the mycelial form being about 20% of that in the yeast form. PMID:5924267

  7. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Kanetsuna, F; Carbonell, L M

    1966-11-01

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas, Venezuela), and Luis M. Carbonell. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1315-1320. 1966.-Enzymatic activities in glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, and the citric acid cycle in cell-free extracts of the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were examined comparatively. Both forms have the enzymes of these pathways. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic dehydrogenase of the mycelial form were higher than those of the yeast form. Another 15 enzymatic activities of the mycelial form were lower than those of the yeast form. The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase showed the most marked difference between the two forms, its activity in the mycelial form being about 20% of that in the yeast form.

  8. Lactic acid bacteria as adjuvants for sublingual allergy vaccines.

    PubMed

    Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Moussu, Helene; Horiot, Stéphane; Samson, Sandrine; Lombardi, Vincent; Mascarell, Laurent; van de Moer, Ariane; Bourdet-Sicard, Raphaëlle; Moingeon, Philippe

    2010-04-09

    We compared immunomodulatory properties of 11 strains of lactic acid bacteria as well as their capacity to enhance sublingual immunotherapy efficacy in a murine asthma model. Two types of bacterial strains were identified, including: (i) potent inducers of IL-12p70 and IL-10 in dendritic cells, supporting IFN-gamma and IL-10 production in CD4+ T cells such as Lactobacillus helveticus; (ii) pure Th1 inducers such as L. casei. Sublingual administration in ovalbumin-sensitized mice of L. helveticus, but not L. casei, reduced airways hyperresponsiveness, bronchial inflammation and proliferation of specific T cells in cervical lymph nodes. Thus, probiotics acting as a Th1/possibly Treg, but not Th1 adjuvant, potentiate tolerance induction via the sublingual route.

  9. Variations in prebiotic oligosaccharide fermentation by intestinal lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akihito; Nakamura, Saki; Konishi, Kenta; Nakagawa, Junichi; Tochio, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotic oligosaccharides confer health benefits on the host by modulating the gut microbiota. Intestinal lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are potential targets of prebiotics; however, the metabolism of oligosaccharides by LAB has not been fully characterized. Here, we studied the metabolism of eight oligosaccharides by 19 strains of intestinal LAB. Among the eight oligosaccharides used, 1-kestose, lactosucrose and galactooligosaccharides (GOSs) led to the greatest increases in the numbers of the strains tested. However, mono- and disaccharides accounted for more than half of the GOSs used, and several strains only metabolized the mono- and di-saccharides in GOSs. End product profiles indicated that the amounts of lactate produced were generally consistent with the bacterial growth recorded. Oligosaccharide profiling revealed the interesting metabolic manner in Lactobacillus paracasei strains, which metabolized all oligosaccharides, but left sucrose when cultured with fructooligosaccharides. The present study clearly indicated that the prebiotic potential of each oligosaccharide differs.

  10. Antiviral potential of lactic acid bacteria and their bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    Al Kassaa, I; Hober, D; Hamze, M; Chihib, N E; Drider, D

    2014-12-01

    Emerging resistance to antiviral agents is a growing public health concern worldwide as it was reported for respiratory, sexually transmitted and enteric viruses. Therefore, there is a growing demand for new, unconventional antiviral agents which may serve as an alternative to the currently used drugs. Meanwhile, published literature continues shedding the light on the potency of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and their bacteriocins as antiviral agents. Health-promoting LAB probiotics may exert their antiviral activity by (1) direct probiotic-virus interaction; (2) production of antiviral inhibitory metabolites; and/or (3) via stimulation of the immune system. The aim of this review was to highlight the antiviral activity of LAB and substances they produce with antiviral activity.

  11. Determination of peroxy radical-scavenging of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stecchini, M L; Del Torre, M; Munari, M

    2001-02-28

    Responses of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to peroxy radicals generated via thermal (40 degrees C) decomposition of the diazocompound 2,2,-azo-bis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (ABAP), were studied. In general, LAB displayed survival curves with shoulders and tails indicative of 'multihit' killing by exposure to peroxy radicals. One strain, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DIP15, producing a slope of 0.0105 in the kinetic analysis when exposed to 4 mM ABAP, exhibited a measurable antioxidant capacity. The other LAB failed to show any significant antioxidant capacity. The antioxidant capacity of strain DIP15 remained constant after cells have been heat-treated, suggesting that compounds bearing free radical scavenging capacity are rather stable.

  12. Production of fatty acid-derived oleochemicals and biofuels by synthetic yeast cell factories

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yongjin J.; Buijs, Nicolaas A.; Zhu, Zhiwei; Qin, Jiufu; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable production of oleochemicals requires establishment of cell factory platform strains. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive cell factory as new strains can be rapidly implemented into existing infrastructures such as bioethanol production plants. Here we show high-level production of free fatty acids (FFAs) in a yeast cell factory, and the production of alkanes and fatty alcohols from its descendants. The engineered strain produces up to 10.4 g l−1 of FFAs, which is the highest reported titre to date. Furthermore, through screening of specific pathway enzymes, endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and aldehyde reductases, we reconstruct efficient pathways for conversion of fatty acids to alkanes (0.8 mg l−1) and fatty alcohols (1.5 g l−1), to our knowledge the highest titres reported in S. cerevisiae. This should facilitate the construction of yeast cell factories for production of fatty acids derived products and even aldehyde-derived chemicals of high value. PMID:27222209

  13. Yeasts are essential for cocoa bean fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2014-03-17

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao) are the major raw material for chocolate production and fermentation of the beans is essential for the development of chocolate flavor precursors. In this study, a novel approach was used to determine the role of yeasts in cocoa fermentation and their contribution to chocolate quality. Cocoa bean fermentations were conducted with the addition of 200ppm Natamycin to inhibit the growth of yeasts, and the resultant microbial ecology and metabolism, bean chemistry and chocolate quality were compared with those of normal (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii and Kluyveromyces marxianus, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in the control fermentation. In fermentations with the presence of Natamycin, the same bacterial species grew but yeast growth was inhibited. Physical and chemical analyses showed that beans fermented without yeasts had increased shell content, lower production of ethanol, higher alcohols and esters throughout fermentation and lesser presence of pyrazines in the roasted product. Quality tests revealed that beans fermented without yeasts were purplish-violet in color and not fully brown, and chocolate prepared from these beans tasted more acid and lacked characteristic chocolate flavor. Beans fermented with yeast growth were fully brown in color and gave chocolate with typical characters which were clearly preferred by sensory panels. Our findings demonstrate that yeast growth and activity were essential for cocoa bean fermentation and the development of chocolate characteristics.

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of PAD1 and FDC1 show a positive relationship with ferulic acid decarboxylation ability among industrial yeasts used in alcoholic beverage production.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Nobuhiko; Masaki, Kazuo; Fujii, Tsutomu; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2014-07-01

    Among industrial yeasts used for alcoholic beverage production, most wine and weizen beer yeasts decarboxylate ferulic acid to 4-vinylguaiacol, which has a smoke-like flavor, whereas sake, shochu, top-fermenting, and bottom-fermenting yeast strains lack this ability. However, the factors underlying this difference among industrial yeasts are not clear. We previously confirmed that both PAD1 (phenylacrylic acid decarboxylase gene, YDR538W) and FDC1 (ferulic acid decarboxylase gene, YDR539W) are essential for the decarboxylation of phenylacrylic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PAD1 and FDC1 in sake, shochu, wine, weizen, top-fermenting, bottom-fermenting, and laboratory yeast strains were examined to clarify the differences in ferulic acid decarboxylation ability between these types of yeast. For PAD1, a nonsense mutation was observed in the gene sequence of standard top-fermenting yeast. Gene sequence analysis of FDC1 revealed that sake, shochu, and standard top-fermenting yeasts contained a nonsense mutation, whereas a frameshift mutation was identified in the FDC1 gene of bottom-fermenting yeast. No nonsense or frameshift mutations were detected in laboratory, wine, or weizen beer yeast strains. When FDC1 was introduced into sake and shochu yeast strains, the transformants exhibited ferulic acid decarboxylation activity. Our findings indicate that a positive relationship exists between SNPs in PAD1 and FDC1 genes and the ferulic acid decarboxylation ability of industrial yeast strains.

  15. Efficient production of L-lactic acid by Crabtree-negative yeast Candida boidinii.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Fumi; Fujii, Toshio; Nishida, Takehisa; Tada, Nobuki; Ohnishi, Toru; Kobayashi, Osamu; Komeda, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2009-09-01

    Industrial production of L-lactic acid, which in polymerized form as poly-lactic acid is widely used as a biodegradable plastic, has been attracting world-wide attention. By genetic engineering we constructed a strain of the Crabtree-negative yeast Candida boidinii that efficiently produced a large amount of L-lactic acid. The alcohol fermentation pathway of C. boidinii was altered by disruption of the PDC1 gene encoding pyruvate decarboxylase, resulting in an ethanol production that was reduced to 17% of the wild-type strain. The alcohol fermentation pathway of the PDC1 deletion strain was then successfully utilized for the synthesis of L-lactic acid by placing the bovine L-lactate dehydrogenase-encoding gene under the control of the PDC1 promoter by targeted integration. Optimizing the conditions for batch culture in a 5 l jar-fermenter resulted in an L-lactic acid production reaching 85.9 g/l within 48 h. This productivity (1.79 g/l/h) is the highest thus far reported for L-lactic acid-producing yeasts.

  16. Glycerol metabolism and bitterness producing lactic acid bacteria in cidermaking.

    PubMed

    Garai-Ibabe, G; Ibarburu, I; Berregi, I; Claisse, O; Lonvaud-Funel, A; Irastorza, A; Dueñas, M T

    2008-02-10

    Several lactic acid bacteria were isolated from bitter tasting ciders in which glycerol was partially removed. The degradation of glycerol via glycerol dehydratase pathway was found in 22 out of 67 isolates. The confirmation of glycerol degradation by this pathway was twofold: showing their glycerol dehydratase activity and detecting the presence of the corresponding gene by a PCR method. 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDL) and 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) were the metabolic end-products of glycerol utilization, and the accumulation of the acrolein precursor 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) was also detected in most of them. The strain identification by PCR-DGGE rpoB showed that Lactobacillus collinoides was the predominant species and only 2 belonged to Lactobacillus diolivorans. Environmental conditions conducting to 3-HPA accumulation in cidermaking were studied by varying the fructose concentration, pH and incubation temperature in L. collinoides 17. This strain failed to grow with glycerol as sole carbon source and the addition of fructose enhanced both growth and glycerol degradation. Regarding end-products of glycerol metabolism, 1,3-PDL was always the main end-product in all environmental conditions assayed, the only exception being the culture with 5.55 mM fructose, where equimolar amounts of 1,3-PDL and 3-HP were found. The 3-HPA was transitorily accumulated in the culture medium under almost all culture conditions, the degradation rate being notably slower at 15 degrees C. However, no disappearance of 3-HPA was found at pH 3.6, a usual value in cider making. After sugar exhaustion, L. collinoides 17 oxidated lactic acid and/or mannitol to obtain energy and these oxidations were accompanied by the removal of the toxic 3-HPA increasing the 1,3-PDL, 3-HP and acetic acid contents.

  17. Low- and high-affinity transport systems for citric acid in the yeast Candida utilis.

    PubMed Central

    Cássio, F; Leáo, C

    1991-01-01

    Citric acid-grown cells of the yeast Candida utilis induced two transport systems for citric acid, presumably a proton symport and a facilitated diffusion system for the charged and the undissociated forms of the acid, respectively. Both systems could be observed simultaneously when the transport was measured at 25 degrees C with labelled citric acid at pH 3.5 with the following kinetic parameters: for the low-affinity system, Vmax, 1.14 nmol of undissociated citric acid s-1 mg (dry weight) of cells-1, and Km, 0.59 mM undissociated acid; for the high-affinity system, Vmax, 0.38 nmol of citrate s-1 mg (dry weight) of cells-1, and Km, 0.056 mM citrate. At high pH values (above 5.0), the low-affinity system was absent or not measurable. The two transport systems exhibited different substrate specificities. Isocitric acid was a competitive inhibitor of citric acid for the high-affinity system, suggesting that these tricarboxylic acids used the same transport system, while aconitic, tricarballylic, trimesic, and hemimellitic acids were not competitive inhibitors. With respect to the low-affinity system, isocitric acid, L-lactic acid, and L-malic acid were competitive inhibitors, suggesting that all of these mono-, di-, and tricarboxylic acids used the same low-affinity transport system. The two transport systems were repressed by glucose, and as a consequence diauxic growth was observed. Both systems were inducible, and not only citric acid but also lactic acid and malic acid may induce those transport systems. The induction of both systems was not dependent on the relative concentration of the anionic form(s) and of undissociated citric acid in the culture medium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1664712

  18. Kefir-isolated bacteria and yeasts inhibit Shigella flexneri invasion and modulate pro-inflammatory response on intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bolla, P A; Abraham, A G; Pérez, P F; de Los Angeles Serradell, M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of a kefir-isolated microbial mixture containing three bacterial and two yeast strains (MM) to protect intestinal epithelial cells against Shigella flexneri invasion, as well as to analyse the effect on pro-inflammatory response elicited by this pathogen. A significant decrease in S. flexneri strain 72 invasion was observed on both HT-29 and Caco-2 cells pre-incubated with MM. Pre-incubation with the individual strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae CIDCA 8112 or Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CIDCA 8221 also reduced the internalisation of S. flexneri into HT-29 cells although in a lesser extent than MM. Interestingly, Lactobacillus plantarum CIDCA 83114 exerted a protective effect on the invasion of Caco-2 and HT-29 cells by S. flexneri. Regarding the pro-inflammatory response on HT-29 cells, S. flexneri infection induced a significant activation of the expression of interleukin 8 (IL-8), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) encoding genes (P<0.05), whereas incubation of cells with MM did not induce the expression of any of the mediators assessed. Interestingly, pre-incubation of HT-29 monolayer with MM produced an inhibition of S. flexneri-induced IL-8, CCL20 and TNF-α mRNA expression. In order to gain insight on the effect of MM (or the individual strains) on this pro-inflammatory response, a series of experiments using a HT-29-NF-κB-hrGFP reporter system were performed. Pre-incubation of HT-29-NF-κB-hrGFP cells with MM significantly dampened Shigella-induced activation. Our results showed that the contribution of yeast strain Kluyveromyces marxianus CIDCA 8154 seems to be crucial in the observed effect. In conclusion, results presented in this study demonstrate that pre-treatment with a microbial mixture containing bacteria and yeasts isolated from kefir, resulted in inhibition of S. flexneri internalisation into human intestinal epithelial cells, along with the

  19. Examination of exhaustive cloning attempts reveals that C. elegans piRNAs, transposons, and repeat sequences are efficiently cloned in yeast, but not in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sagy, Or; Shamir, Ron; Rechavi, Oded

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing requires insertion of random fragments of the sequenced organism's DNA into a unicellular host, most often Escherichia coli bacteria. This manipulation was found in the past to be analogous to naturally occurring horizontal gene transfer, and moreover has proved valuable to understanding toxicity of foreign genetic elements to E. coli. Sequencing of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome was similarly achieved via DNA transformation into E. coli. However, numerous attempts have proven a significant percentage of the genome unclonable using bacteria, although clonable via yeast. We examined the genomic segments that were not clonable in bacteria but were clonable in yeast, and observed that, in line with previous hypotheses, such sequences are more repetitive on average compared with the entire C. elegans genome. In addition, we found that these gap-sequences encode significantly more for DNA transposons. Surprisingly, we discovered that although the vast majority of the C. elegans genome is clonable in bacteria (77.5%), almost all the thousands of sequences that encode for PIWI-interacting small RNAs, or 21U-RNAs (91.6%) were only clonable in yeast. These results might help understanding why most piRNAs in C. elegans are physically clustered on particular loci on chromosome IV. In worms and in a large number of other organisms, piRNAs serve to distinguish "Self" from "Non-Self" sequences, and thus to protect the integrity of the genome against foreign genetic elements, such as transposons. We discuss the possible implications of these discoveries.

  20. Selection of lactic acid bacteria from fermented plant beverages to use as inoculants for improving the quality of the finished product.

    PubMed

    Kantachote, Duangporn; Charernjiratrakul, Wilawan

    2008-11-15

    Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) from fermented plant beverages were selected based on their antibacterial actions against potential food borne pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus PSSCMI 0004, Escherichia coli PSSCMI 0001, Salmonella typhimurium PSSCMI 0034 and Vibrio parahaemolyticus VP 4). Antibacterial activities were measured using an agar spot method. The Lactobacillus plantarum W90A strain isolated from a wild forest noni (Morinda coreia Ham) beverage was used as an inoculant. Three different inoculation procedures were conducted with the fruit of wild forest noni fermentations to establish which one was the best for controlling the numbers of yeast in the finished product. A 5% inoculum of L. plantarum W90A (LAB set), initial cell density 8.6 log cfu mL(-1), produced a better product and inhibitory properties against the test organisms, particularly E. coli PSSCMI 0001 than one with no inoculum or with a 5% inoculum from a previous natural fermented product. An LAB inoculum resulted in a reduced total bacterial count and no yeast throughout fermentation period (90 days). The lower yeast resulted in a reduction of the ethanol content to 2.9 g L(-1) compared to 12.2 g L(-1) inthe culture with no inoculum. The highest acidity (1.3-1.4%) with the same pH (3.3) was observed in both sets of inoculated fermentations, whereas the uninoculated set gave a pH value of 3.7 (1.2% acidity).

  1. In situ photoexcitation of silver-doped titania nanopowders for activity against bacteria and yeasts.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Katarzyna; Wysocka-Król, Katarzyna; Kopaczyńska, Marta; Dworniczek, Ewa; Franiczek, Roman; Wawrzyńska, Magdalena; Vargová, Melinda; Zahoran, Miroslav; Rakovský, Erik; Kuš, Peter; Plesch, Gustav; Plecenik, Andrej; Laffir, Fathima; Tofail, Syed A M; Podbielska, Halina

    2011-10-01

    Photocatalytic and in situ microbial activity of the amorphous and annealed states of Ag-doped and un-doped titania were examined. Studies on their structure, morphology, composition, and the photo-absorption characteristics of these materials were performed. These results were correlated with the photocatalytic and microbial activity against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus K324 (MRSA), methicillin susceptible S. aureus ATCC 25923 (MSSA), Escherichia coli PA 170, and yeasts Candida albicans ATCC 90028. The annealed powders containing anatase form of titania exhibited relatively higher photocatalytic activity,corresponding to activity against MRSA,when exposed to UV-A radiation. In comparison, amorphous powders exhibited low photoactivity and showed poor antibacterial performance against MRSA under UV-A exposure. Doping of amorphous titania with Ag resulted in an anti-MRSA effect without exposure to UV radiation. In the Ag-doped crystalline anatase samples, the size of Ag primary nanocrystallites increased, which led to the decrease in the surface concentration of Ag and detriment anti-MRSA activity.

  2. SYNTHESIS OF RIBONUCLEIC ACID BY X-IRRADIATED BACTERIA1

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, E. W.

    1964-01-01

    Frampton, E. W. (The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Houston). Synthesis of ribonucleic acid by X-irradiated bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 87:1369–1376. 1964.—Postirradiation synthesis of total ribonucleic acid (RNA) and of RNA components was measured after exposure of Escherichia coli B/r to X rays. Net synthesis of RNA measured by the orcinol reaction and by the incorporation of uridine-2-C14 was depressed in irradiated cells, but paralleled the period of postirradiation growth (30 to 40 min). Incorporation of uridine-2-C14, added after net synthesis of RNA had ceased, detected an apparent turnover in a portion of the RNA. Irradiated cells retained their ability to adjust RNA synthesis to growth rate. After a shift-down in growth rate, irradiated cells incorporated radioactive uridine, while the net synthesis of RNA ceased—presumptive evidence for a continued synthesis of messenger RNA. Chloramphenicol addition (100 μg/ml) did not influence the total amount of RNA synthesized. Synthesis of ribosomes and transfer RNA preceded by 0, 5, 10, and 15 min of postirradiation incubation was observed by the resolution of cell-free extracts on sucrose density gradients. Little immediate influence of irradiation could be detected on the synthesis of 50S and 30S ribosomes. A decline was observed in the synthesis of 50S ribosomes with continued postirradiation incubation; 30S ribosomes, ribosomal precursors, and 4S RNA continued to be synthesized. PMID:14188715

  3. Continuous cultivation of photosynthetic bacteria for fatty acids production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Ji-Hye; Hwang, Yuhoon; Kang, Seoktae; Kim, Mi-Sun

    2013-11-01

    In the present work, we introduced a novel approach for microbial fatty acids (FA) production. Photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides KD131, were cultivated in a continuous-flow, stirred-tank reactor (CFSTR) at various substrate (lactate) concentrations. At hydraulic retention time (HRT) 4d, cell concentration continuously increased from 0.97 g dcw/L to 2.05 g dcw/L as lactate concentration increased from 30 mM to 60mM. At 70 mM, however, cell concentration fluctuated with incomplete substrate degradation. By installing a membrane unit to CFSTR, a stable performance was observed under much higher substrate loading (lactate 100mM and HRT 1.5d). A maximum cell concentration of 16.2g dcw/L, cell productivity of 1.9 g dcw/L/d, and FA productivity of 665 mg FA/L/d were attained, and these values were comparable with those achieved using microalgae. The FA content of R. sphaeroides was around 35% of dry cell weight, mainly composed of vaccenic acid (C18:1, omega-7).

  4. Identification of lactic acid bacteria isolated from corn stovers.

    PubMed

    Pang, Huili; Zhang, Meng; Qin, Guangyong; Tan, Zhongfang; Li, Zongwei; Wang, Yanping; Cai, Yimin

    2011-10-01

    One hundred and twenty-six strains were isolated from corn stover in Henan Province, China, of which 105 isolates were considered to be lactic acid bacteria (LAB) according to Gram-positive, catalase-negative and mainly metabolic lactic acid product. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence of 21 representative strains was used to confirm the presence of the predominant groups and to determine the phylogenetic affiliation of isolates. The sequences from the various LAB isolates showed high degrees of similarity to those of the GenBank type strains between 99.4% and 100%. The prevalent LAB, predominantly Lactobacillus (85.6%), consisted of L. plantarum (33.3%), L. pentosus (28.6%) and L. brevis (23.7%). Other LAB species as Leuconostoc lactis (4.8%), Weissella cibaria (4.8%) and Enterococcus mundtii (4.8%) also presented in corn stover. The present study is the first to fully document corn stover-associated LAB involved in the silage fermentation. The identification results revealed LAB composition inhabiting corn stover and enabling the future design of appropriate inoculants aimed at improving the fermentation quality of silage.

  5. Diversity of the Lactic Acid Bacterium and Yeast Microbiota in the Switch from Firm- to Liquid-Sourdough Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Di Cagno, Raffaella; Pontonio, Erica; Buchin, Solange; De Angelis, Maria; Lattanzi, Anna; Valerio, Francesca; Calasso, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Four traditional type I sourdoughs were comparatively propagated (28 days) under firm (dough yield, 160) and liquid (dough yield, 280) conditions to mimic the alternative technology options frequently used for making baked goods. After 28 days of propagation, liquid sourdoughs had the lowest pH and total titratable acidity (TTA), the lowest concentrations of lactic and acetic acids and free amino acids, and the most stable density of presumptive lactic acid bacteria. The cell density of yeasts was the highest in liquid sourdoughs. Liquid sourdoughs showed simplified microbial diversity and harbored a low number of strains, which were persistent. Lactobacillus plantarum dominated firm sourdoughs over time. Leuconostoc lactis and Lactobacillus brevis dominated only some firm sourdoughs, and Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis persisted for some time only in some firm sourdoughs. Leuconostoc citreum persisted in all firm and liquid sourdoughs, and it was the only species detected in liquid sourdoughs at all times; it was flanked by Leuconostoc mesenteroides in some sourdoughs. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida humilis, Saccharomyces servazzii, Saccharomyces bayanus-Kazachstania sp., and Torulaspora delbrueckii were variously identified in firm and liquid sourdoughs. A total of 197 volatile components were identified through purge and trap–/solid-phase microextraction–gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PT–/SPME–GC-MS). Aldehydes, several alcohols, and some esters were at the highest levels in liquid sourdoughs. Firm sourdoughs mainly contained ethyl acetate, acetic acid, some sulfur compounds, and terpenes. The use of liquid fermentation would change the main microbial and biochemical features of traditional baked goods, which have been manufactured under firm conditions for a long time. PMID:24632249

  6. Metabolic diversity in biohydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids by lactic acid bacteria involving conjugated fatty acid production.

    PubMed

    Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Yokozeki, Kenzo; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2009-08-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum AKU 1009a effectively transforms linoleic acid to conjugated linoleic acids of cis-9,trans-11-octadecadienoic acid (18:2) and trans-9,trans-11-18:2. The transformation of various polyunsaturated fatty acids by washed cells of L. plantarum AKU 1009a was investigated. Besides linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid [cis-9,cis-12,cis-15-octadecatrienoic acid (18:3)], gamma-linolenic acid (cis-6,cis-9,cis-12-18:3), columbinic acid (trans-5,cis-9,cis-12-18:3), and stearidonic acid [cis-6,cis-9,cis-12,cis-15-octadecatetraenoic acid (18:4)] were found to be transformed. The fatty acids transformed by the strain had the common structure of a C18 fatty acid with the cis-9,cis-12 diene system. Three major fatty acids were produced from alpha-linolenic acid, which were identified as cis-9,trans-11,cis-15-18:3, trans-9,trans-11,cis-15-18:3, and trans-10,cis-15-18:2. Four major fatty acids were produced from gamma-linolenic acid, which were identified as cis-6,cis-9,trans-11-18:3, cis-6,trans-9,trans-11-18:3, cis-6,trans-10-18:2, and trans-10-octadecenoic acid. The strain transformed the cis-9,cis-12 diene system of C18 fatty acids into conjugated diene systems of cis-9,trans-11 and trans-9,trans-11. These conjugated dienes were further saturated into the trans-10 monoene system by the strain. The results provide valuable information for understanding the pathway of biohydrogenation by anaerobic bacteria and for establishing microbial processes for the practical production of conjugated fatty acids, especially those produced from alpha-linolenic acid and gamma-linolenic acid.

  7. Yeasts associated with Manteca.

    PubMed

    Suzzi, Giovanna; Schirone, Maria; Martuscelli, Maria; Gatti, Monica; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Neviani, Erasmo

    2003-04-01

    Manteca is a traditional milk product of southern Italy produced from whey deriving from Caciocavallo Podolico cheese-making. This study was undertaken to obtain more information about the microbiological properties of this product and particularly about the presence, metabolic activities, and technological significance of the different yeast species naturally occurring in Manteca. High numbers of yeasts were counted after 7 days ripening (10(4)-10(5) cfu g(-1)) and then decreased to 10(2) at the end. A total of 179 isolates were identified and studied for their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. The most frequently encountered species were Trichosporon asahii (45), Candida parapsilosis (33), Rhodotorula mucilaginosa (32), Candida inconspicua (29). Some of these yeasts showed lipolytic activity (32 strains) and proteolytic activity (29 strains), NaCl resistance up to 10% and growth up to 45 degrees C (42 strains). Biogenic amines were formed by proteolytic strains, in particular phenylethylamine, putrescine and spermidine. Spermidine was produced by all the yeasts tested in this work, but only Trichosporon produced a great quantity of this compound. Histamine was not detectable. Caseinolytic activity was common to almost all strains, corresponding to the ability to efficiently split off amino-terminal amino acids. The highest and most constant activity expressed by all species was X-prolyl-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase. The findings suggest that the presence of yeasts may play a significant role in justifying interactions with lactic acid bacteria, and consequently with their metabolic activity in the definition of the peculiar characteristics of Manteca cheese.

  8. Uracil as an index of lactic acid bacteria contamination of tomato products.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Alyssa; Pompei, Carlo; Galli, Antonietta; Cazzola, Sara

    2005-01-26

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the suitability of uracil as an hygienic quality index of tomato products. Whereas uridine was naturally present throughout tomato fruits' ripening, uracil appeared only after microbial contamination. In tomato pulp inoculated with nine different microbial strains, all five lactic acid bacteria (LAB) studied released relevant quantities of uracil (150-1040 mg/kg of dm), with a correlated partial or total decrease of uridine. Uracil production by yeasts and molds was very low or nonexistent; the starting uridine concentration (approximately 960 mg/kg of dm) remained constant or increased. Uracil thermostability was also verified. Twenty-six samples of tomato paste (30 degrees Brix) were collected from bag-in-drums produced in an industrial processing plant, some with evident swelling symptoms. All of the samples with high microbial count presented uracil. Uracil was also present in samples with microbial contamination under the detection limit and Howard mold count below legislation limits, implying the reprocessing, at least partial, of altered tomato product. The results indicate that uracil presence in tomato products is an index of LAB contamination that has occurred before heat treatment.

  9. Pristine environments harbor a new group of oligotrophic 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kamagata, Y; Fulthorpe, R R; Tamura, K; Takami, H; Forney, L J; Tiedje, J M

    1997-01-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacteria were isolated from pristine environments which had no history of 2,4-D exposure. By using 2,4-D dye indicator medium or 14C-labeled 2,4-D medium, six strains were isolated from eight enrichment cultures capable of degrading 2,4-D. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing and physiological properties revealed that one isolate from Hawaiian volcanic soil could be classified in the genus Variovorax (a member of the beta subdivision of the class Proteobacteria) and that the other five isolates from Hawaiian volcanic soils, Saskatchewan forest soil, and Chilean forest soil have 16S rDNAs with high degrees of similarity to those of the Bradyrhizobium group (a member of the alpha subdivision of the class Proteobacteria). All the isolates grow slowly on either nutrient media (0.1 x Bacto Peptone-tryptone-yeast extract-glucose [PTYG] or 0.1 x Luria broth [LB] medium) or 2,4-D medium, with mean generation times of 16 to 30 h, which are significantly slower than previously known 2,4-D degraders. Nutrient-rich media such as full-strength PTYG and LB medium did not allow their growth. PCR amplification using internal consensus sequences of tfdA (a gene encoding an enzyme for the first step of 2,4-D mineralization, found in pJP4 of Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 and some other 2,4-D-degrading bacteria) as primers and Southern hybridization with pJP4-tfdA as a probe revealed that the isolate belonging to the genus Variovorax carried the tfdA gene. This gene was transmissible to A. eutrophus JMP228 carrying a plasmid with a mutant tfdA gene. The other five isolates did not appear to carry tfdA, and 2,4-D-specific alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase activity could not be detected in cell lysates. These results indicate that 2,4-D-degrading bacteria in pristine environments are slow-growing bacteria and that most of their phylogenies and catabolic genes differ from those of 2,4-D degraders

  10. Spoilage and safety characteristics of ground beef treated with lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, A R; Brooks, J C; Thompson, L D; Palmore, W; Stephens, T P; Brashears, M M

    2009-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can decrease numbers of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella in ground beef during storage. Two dose-titration studies were conducted in ground beef to determine dose levels of LAB needed to inhibit the pathogens. A second study evaluated whether LAB masked changes typically associated with the spoilage of ground beef displayed under refrigerated (0 degrees C) or abusive (10 degrees C) temperatures packaged in both traditional overwrap (TOP) and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP; 80% O(2)-20% CO(2)). Microbial analyses were conducted to determine spoilage endpoints and pathogen reduction. In the dose-titration study, Salmonella was reduced by 3 log cycles at all doses (10(6), 10(7), and 10(8) LAB per g) after 3 days of storage and was eliminated after 5 days of storage. E. coli O157:H7 was reduced by 2 log cycles at all dosages after 3 days of storage and by 3 log cycles after 5 days of storage. In the spoilage studies, as expected, total aerobic plate counts and LAB populations in LAB-inoculated samples were higher than the controls initially, but the counts were similar near the end of the study. While total spoilage bacteria generally increased over time, very few differences existed between treatments stored at 0 degrees C and 10 degrees C in coliforms, Brochothrix thermosphacta, yeasts and molds, and Pseudomonas spp. counts for both the TOP and MAP samples. We conclude that LAB could potentially be added to ground beef in TOP and MAP as a processing intervention for E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella without masking microbial spoilage characteristics.

  11. Characteristics of the high malic acid production mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strain No. 28.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shunichi; Tabata, Ken; Oba, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Kenichi; Mitsuiki, Shinji; Kadokura, Toshimori; Nakazato, Atsumi

    2012-09-01

    We characterized a high malic acid production mechanism in sake yeast strain No. 28. No considerable differences in the activity of the enzymes that were involved in malic acid synthesis were observed between strain No. 28 and its parent strain, K1001. However, compared with strain K1001, which actively took up rhodamine 123 during staining, the cells of strain No. 28 were only lightly stained, even when cultured in high glucose concentrations. In addition, malic acid production by the respiratory-deficient strain of K1001 was 2.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type K1001 and wild-type No. 28. The findings of this study demonstrated that the high malic acid production by strain No. 28 is attributed to the suppression of mitochondrial activity.

  12. Selection of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Tunisian cereals and exploitation of the use as starters for sourdough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mamhoud, Asma; Nionelli, Luana; Bouzaine, Taroub; Hamdi, Moktar; Gobbetti, Marco; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe

    2016-05-16

    Wheat bread is the most popular staple food consumed in Tunisia and, despite the niche production of some typical breads (e.g. Tabouna, Mlawi, Mtabga), the major part is currently produced with baker's yeast at industrial or, mainly, at artisanal level, while the use of sourdough fermentation is rarely reported. Considering the growing national demand for cereal baked goods, it can be hypothesized that sourdough fermentation through the use of selected lactic acid bacteria as starters could improve the overall quality and the diversification of local products. Different cereal grains were collected from the regions of Ariana, Bizerta, Beja Nabeul, and Seliana, and the autochthonous lactic acid bacteria were isolated, identified, characterized and selected on the basis of the kinetics of acidification, the proteolytic activity, and the quotient of fermentation. Lactobacillus curvatus MA2, Pediococcus pentosaceus OA2, and Pediococcus acidilactici O1A1 were used together as mixed starter to obtain a selected sourdough. According to the backslopping procedure, a type I sourdough was made from a Tunisian flour (spontaneous sourdough). Compared to the use of the spontaneous sourdough, the one obtained with selected and mixed starters by a unique fermentation step, favored the increase of the concentrations of organic acids, phenols, and total free amino acids, the most suitable quotient of fermentation, and the most intense phytase and antioxidant activities, that increased ca. 20% compared to the control. Moreover, the selected starters improved the in vitro protein digestibility (ca. 82% when selected sourdough was used), textural and sensory features of the breads, as determined by textural profile analysis and panel test, respectively. This study aimed at exploiting the potential of selected autochthonous lactic acid bacteria and extending the use of a sourdough (type II), thanks to the set-up of a two-step fermentation protocol designed for application at the

  13. Effect of Algae and Plant Lectins on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Clinically Relevant Bacteria and Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Silva, Helton Colares; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda; Cavada, Benildo; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the abilities of plant and algae lectins to inhibit planktonic growth and biofilm formation in bacteria and yeasts. Initially, ten lectins were tested on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and C. tropicalis at concentrations of 31.25 to 250 μg/mL. The lectins from Cratylia floribunda (CFL), Vatairea macrocarpa (VML), Bauhinia bauhinioides (BBL), Bryothamnion seaforthii (BSL), and Hypnea musciformis (HML) showed activities against at least one microorganism. Biofilm formation in the presence of the lectins was also evaluated; after 24 h of incubation with the lectins, the biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the biomass (by crystal violet staining) and by enumerating the viable cells (colony-forming units). The lectins reduced the biofilm biomass and/or the number of viable cells to differing degrees depending on the microorganism tested, demonstrating the different characteristics of the lectins. These findings indicate that the lectins tested in this study may be natural alternative antimicrobial agents; however, further studies are required to better elucidate the functional use of these proteins. PMID:24982871

  14. Occurrence of yeasts, enterococci and other enteric bacteria in subgingival biofilm of HIV-positive patients with chronic gingivitis and necrotizing periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gaetti-Jardim Júnior, Elerson; Nakano, Viviane; Wahasugui, Thais C; Cabral, Fátima C; Gamba, Rosa; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of enteric bacteria and yeasts in biofilm of 80 HIV-positive patients with plaque-associated gingivitis or necrotizing periodontitis. Patients were subjected to extra, intra oral and radiographic examinations. The oral hygiene, bleeding on probing, gingival conditions, and attachment loss were evaluated. Clinical specimens were collected from gingival crevices or periodontal pockets, transferred to VMGA III, diluted and transferred to Sabouraud Dextrose agar with 100 μg/ml of chloramphenicol, peptone water, EVA broth, EMB agar, SS agar, Bile esculin agar and Brilliant green agar. Isolation of yeasts was carried out at room temperature, for 3-7 days; and for the isolation of enteric microorganisms plates were incubated at 37°C, for 24-48 h. The yeasts identification was performed according to the carbon and nitrogen assimilation, fermentation of carbohydrates and germ tube formation. Bacteria were identified according to their colonial and cellular morphologies and biochemical tests. Yeasts were identified as Candida albicans and its occurrence was more common in patients with CD4+ below 200/mm(3) and was affected by the extension of periodontal involvement (P = 0.0345). Enteric bacteria recovered from clinical specimens were identified as Enterobacter sakazakii, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia liquefaciens, Klebsiella oxytoca and Enterococcus sp. Enterobacteriaceae and enterococci were detected in 32.5% of clinical samples from patients with necrotizing periodontitis. In conclusion, non-oral pathogenic bacteria and C. albicans were more prevalent in periodontal sites of HIV-positive patients with necrotizing periodontitis and chronic gingivitis.

  15. Occurrence of yeasts, enterococci and other enteric bacteria in subgingival biofilm of HIV-positive patients with chronic gingivitis and necrotizing periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gaetti-Jardim Júnior, Elerson; Nakano, Viviane; Wahasugui, Thais C.; Cabral, Fátima C.; Gamba, Rosa; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of enteric bacteria and yeasts in biofilm of 80 HIV-positive patients with plaque-associated gingivitis or necrotizing periodontitis. Patients were subjected to extra, intra oral and radiographic examinations. The oral hygiene, bleeding on probing, gingival conditions, and attachment loss were evaluated. Clinical specimens were collected from gingival crevices or periodontal pockets, transferred to VMGA III, diluted and transferred to Sabouraud Dextrose agar with 100 μg/ml of chloramphenicol, peptone water, EVA broth, EMB agar, SS agar, Bile esculin agar and Brilliant green agar. Isolation of yeasts was carried out at room temperature, for 3-7 days; and for the isolation of enteric microorganisms plates were incubated at 37°C, for 24-48 h. The yeasts identification was performed according to the carbon and nitrogen assimilation, fermentation of carbohydrates and germ tube formation. Bacteria were identified according to their colonial and cellular morphologies and biochemical tests. Yeasts were identified as Candida albicans and its occurrence was more common in patients with CD4+ below 200/mm3 and was affected by the extension of periodontal involvement (P = 0.0345). Enteric bacteria recovered from clinical specimens were identified as Enterobacter sakazakii, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia liquefaciens, Klebsiella oxytoca and Enterococcus sp. Enterobacteriaceae and enterococci were detected in 32.5% of clinical samples from patients with necrotizing periodontitis. In conclusion, non-oral pathogenic bacteria and C. albicans were more prevalent in periodontal sites of HIV-positive patients with necrotizing periodontitis and chronic gingivitis. PMID:24031212

  16. Animal Rennets as Sources of Dairy Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cruciata, Margherita; Sannino, Ciro; Ercolini, Danilo; Scatassa, Maria L.; De Filippis, Francesca; Mancuso, Isabella; La Storia, Antonietta; Moschetti, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The microbial composition of artisan and industrial animal rennet pastes was studied by using both culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Pyrosequencing targeting the 16S rRNA gene allowed to identify 361 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to the genus/species level. Among lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Streptococcus thermophilus and some lactobacilli, mainly Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus reuteri, were the most abundant species, with differences among the samples. Twelve groups of microorganisms were targeted by viable plate counts revealing a dominance of mesophilic cocci. All rennets were able to acidify ultrahigh-temperature-processed (UHT) milk as shown by pH and total titratable acidity (TTA). Presumptive LAB isolated at the highest dilutions of acidified milks were phenotypically characterized, grouped, differentiated at the strain level by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis, and subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Only 18 strains were clearly identified at the species level, as Enterococcus casseliflavus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, and Streptococcus thermophilus, while the other strains, all belonging to the genus Enterococcus, could not be allotted into any previously described species. The phylogenetic analysis showed that these strains might represent different unknown species. All strains were evaluated for their dairy technological performances. All isolates produced diacetyl, and 10 of them produced a rapid pH drop in milk, but only 3 isolates were also autolytic. This work showed that animal rennet pastes can be sources of LAB, mainly enterococci, that might contribute to the microbial diversity associated with dairy productions. PMID:24441167

  17. Animal rennets as sources of dairy lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cruciata, Margherita; Sannino, Ciro; Ercolini, Danilo; Scatassa, Maria L; De Filippis, Francesca; Mancuso, Isabella; La Storia, Antonietta; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Settanni, Luca

    2014-04-01

    The microbial composition of artisan and industrial animal rennet pastes was studied by using both culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Pyrosequencing targeting the 16S rRNA gene allowed to identify 361 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to the genus/species level. Among lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Streptococcus thermophilus and some lactobacilli, mainly Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus reuteri, were the most abundant species, with differences among the samples. Twelve groups of microorganisms were targeted by viable plate counts revealing a dominance of mesophilic cocci. All rennets were able to acidify ultrahigh-temperature-processed (UHT) milk as shown by pH and total titratable acidity (TTA). Presumptive LAB isolated at the highest dilutions of acidified milks were phenotypically characterized, grouped, differentiated at the strain level by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis, and subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Only 18 strains were clearly identified at the species level, as Enterococcus casseliflavus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, and Streptococcus thermophilus, while the other strains, all belonging to the genus Enterococcus, could not be allotted into any previously described species. The phylogenetic analysis showed that these strains might represent different unknown species. All strains were evaluated for their dairy technological performances. All isolates produced diacetyl, and 10 of them produced a rapid pH drop in milk, but only 3 isolates were also autolytic. This work showed that animal rennet pastes can be sources of LAB, mainly enterococci, that might contribute to the microbial diversity associated with dairy productions.

  18. Acetic Acid Bacteria, Newly Emerging Symbionts of Insects▿

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, Elena; Rizzi, Aurora; Chouaia, Bessem; Ricci, Irene; Favia, Guido; Alma, Alberto; Sacchi, Luciano; Bourtzis, Kostas; Mandrioli, Mauro; Cherif, Ameur; Bandi, Claudio; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    Recent research in microbe-insect symbiosis has shown that acetic acid bacteria (AAB) establish symbiotic relationships with several insects of the orders Diptera, Hymenoptera, Hemiptera, and Homoptera, all relying on sugar-based diets, such as nectars, fruit sugars, or phloem sap. To date, the fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster and Bactrocera oleae, mosquitoes of the genera Anopheles and Aedes, the honey bee Apis mellifera, the leafhopper Scaphoideus titanus, and the mealybug Saccharicoccus sacchari have been found to be associated with the bacterial genera Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Gluconobacter, Asaia, and Saccharibacter and the novel genus Commensalibacter. AAB establish symbiotic associations with the insect midgut, a niche characterized by the availability of diet-derived carbohydrates and oxygen and by an acidic pH, selective factors that support AAB growth. AAB have been shown to actively colonize different insect tissues and organs, such as the epithelia of male and female reproductive organs, the Malpighian tubules, and the salivary glands. This complex topology of the symbiosis indicates that AAB possess the keys for passing through body barriers, allowing them to migrate to different organs of the host. Recently, AAB involvement in the regulation of innate immune system homeostasis of Drosophila has been shown, indicating a functional role in host survival. All of these lines of evidence indicate that AAB can play different roles in insect biology, not being restricted to the feeding habit of the host. The close association of AAB and their insect hosts has been confirmed by the demonstration of multiple modes of transmission between individuals and to their progeny that include vertical and horizontal transmission routes, comprising a venereal one. Taken together, the data indicate that AAB represent novel secondary symbionts of insects. PMID:20851977

  19. Lactic acid bacteria in dried vegetables and spices.

    PubMed

    Säde, Elina; Lassila, Elisa; Björkroth, Johanna

    2016-02-01

    Spices and dried vegetable seasonings are potential sources of bacterial contamination for foods. However, little is known about lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in spices and dried vegetables, even though certain LAB may cause food spoilage. In this study, we enumerated LAB in 104 spices and dried vegetables products aimed for the food manufacturing industry. The products were obtained from a spice wholesaler operating in Finland, and were sampled during a one-year period. We picked isolates (n = 343) for species identification based on numerical analysis of their ribotyping patterns and comparing them with the corresponding patterns of LAB type strains. We found LAB at levels >2 log CFU/g in 68 (65%) of the samples, with the highest counts detected from dried onion products and garlic powder with counts ranging from 4.24 to 6.64 log CFU/g. The LAB identified were predominantly Weissella spp. (61%) and Pediococcus spp. (15%) with Weissella confusa, Weissella cibaria, Weissella paramesenteroides, Pediococcus acidilactici and Pediococcus pentosaceus being the species identified. Other species identified belonged to the genera of Enterococcus spp. (8%), Leuconostoc spp. (6%) and Lactobacillus spp. (2%). Among the LAB identified, Leuconostoc citreum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides and W. confusa have been associated with food spoilage. Our findings suggest that spices and dried vegetables are potential sources of LAB contamination in the food industry.

  20. A gene network engineering platform for lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wentao; Kapuganti, Venkata S; Lu, Ting

    2016-02-29

    Recent developments in synthetic biology have positioned lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as a major class of cellular chassis for applications. To achieve the full potential of LAB, one fundamental prerequisite is the capacity for rapid engineering of complex gene networks, such as natural biosynthetic pathways and multicomponent synthetic circuits, into which cellular functions are encoded. Here, we present a synthetic biology platform for rapid construction and optimization of large-scale gene networks in LAB. The platform involves a copy-controlled shuttle for hosting target networks and two associated strategies that enable efficient genetic editing and phenotypic validation. By using a nisin biosynthesis pathway and its variants as examples, we demonstrated multiplex, continuous editing of small DNA parts, such as ribosome-binding sites, as well as efficient manipulation of large building blocks such as genes and operons. To showcase the platform, we applied it to expand the phenotypic diversity of the nisin pathway by quickly generating a library of 63 pathway variants. We further demonstrated its utility by altering the regulatory topology of the nisin pathway for constitutive bacteriocin biosynthesis. This work demonstrates the feasibility of rapid and advanced engineering of gene networks in LAB, fostering their applications in biomedicine and other areas.

  1. A PCR assay for detection of acetic acid-tolerant lactic acid bacteria in acidic food products.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shigeru; Matsumura, Atsushi; Yamada, Toshihiro

    2004-03-01

    A PCR assay for the detection of acetic acid-tolerant lactic acid bacteria in the genera of Lactobacillus and Pediococcus was developed in this study. Primers targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA gene were newly designed and used in this PCR assay. To determine the specificity of the assay, 56 different bacterial strains (of 33 genera), 2 fungi, 3 animals, and 4 plants were tested. Results were positive for most tested bacterial members of 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic groups (classified in the Lactobacillus casei and Pediococcus group), including Lactobacillus fructivorans, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus buchneri, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus paracasei. For all other bacterial strains and eukaryote tested, results were negative. Bacterial DNA for PCR was prepared with a simple procedure with the use of Chelex 100 resin from culture after growth in deMan Rogosa Sharpe broth (pH 6.0). To test this PCR assay for the monitoring of the acetic acid-tolerant lactic acid bacteria, L. fructivorans was inoculated into several acidic food as an indicator. Before the PCR, the inoculation of 10 to 50 CFU of bacteria per g of food was followed by a 28-h enrichment culture step, and the PCR assay allowed the detection of bacterial cells. Including the enrichment culture step, the entire PCR detection process can be completed within 30 h.

  2. Iso- and anteiso-fatty acids in bacteria: biosynthesis, function, and taxonomic significance.

    PubMed Central

    Kaneda, T

    1991-01-01

    Branched-chain fatty acids of the iso and anteiso series occur in many bacteria as the major acyl constituents of membrane lipids. In addition, omega-cyclohexyl and omega-cycloheptyl fatty acids are present in several bacterial species. These two types of fatty acids are synthesized by the repeated condensation of malonyl coenzyme A with one of the branched-chain and cyclic primers by the same enzyme system. The pathway of de novo branched-chain fatty acid synthesis differs only in initial steps of synthesis from that of the common straight-chain fatty acid (palmitic acid) present in most organisms. The cell membranes composed largely of iso-, anteiso-, and omega-alicyclic acids support growth of bacteria, which inhabit normal as well as extreme environments. The occurrence of these types of fatty acids as major cellular fatty acids is an important criterion used to aid identification and classification of bacteria. PMID:1886522

  3. A proteomic and transcriptomic view of amino acids catabolism in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Soulaf; Bailly, Julie; Delettre, Jérôme; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2009-10-01

    The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has to develop dynamic metabolic adaptation mechanisms to survive within the cheese habitat. The availability of amino acids (AAs) is of major importance for microbial development and/or aroma production during cheese ripening. Using 2-D protein gel electrophoresis, we analyzed the adaptation mechanisms of Y. lipolytica for AAs limitation or supplementation in a batch culture containing lactate as a carbon source. Proteome analyses allow the identification of 34 differentially expressed proteins between the culture conditions. These analyses demonstrated that prior to the AAs addition, mainly proteins involved in the oxidative stress of the yeast were induced. Following the AAs addition, yeast cells reorganize their metabolism toward AAs catabolism and also generate a higher induction of proteins related to carbon metabolism and proteins biosynthesis. Using real-time reverse transcription PCR, we re-evaluated the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in these processes. The expression levels of the genes were in accordance with the proteomic results, with the up-regulation of genes encoding a branched-chain amino transferase BAT2, a pyruvate decarboxylase PDC6 and an Hsp70 protein SSZ1 involved in protein biosynthesis. A volatile compound analysis was also performed, and increased production of dimethyldisulfide from methionine and 3-methyl-butanal from leucine was observed in media supplemented with AAs.

  4. Additive Effects of Alcohols, Their Acidic By-Products, and Temperature on the Yeast Pachysolen tannophilus.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, M de F; Lee, H; Collins-Thompson, D L

    1990-02-01

    The effects of alcohols on the growth and fermentation of the yeast Pachysolen tannophilus were investigated at both 30 and 35 degrees C. Addition of alcohols to the culture medium decreased both the growth rate and the final cell yield in a dose-dependent manner, and this decrease was more severe at 35 degrees C. The concentration for 50% growth rate inhibition decreased as the chain length of the alcohol increased. In fermentations using a high initial cell density, production of acids was always observed when the medium was supplemented with alcohols. Supplementation of the culture medium with a short-chain alcohol plus the corresponding acid was shown to exert an additive deleterious effect on fermentation, and this effect increased with temperature. Production of acids was associated with the presence of alcohol dehydrogenase activity in cell extracts.

  5. Acetic acid induces a programmed cell death process in the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Ludovico, Paula; Sansonetty, Filipe; Silva, Manuel T; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2003-03-01

    Here we show that 320-800 mM acetic acid induces in Zygosaccharomyces bailii a programmed cell death (PCD) process that is inhibited by cycloheximide, is accompanied by structural and biochemical alterations typical of apoptosis, and occurs in cells with preserved mitochondrial and plasma membrane integrity (as revealed by rhodamine 123 (Rh123) and propidium iodide (PI) staining, respectively). Mitochondrial ultrastructural changes, namely decrease of the cristae number, formation of myelinic bodies and swelling were also seen. Exposure to acetic acid above 800 mM resulted in killing by necrosis. The occurrence of an acetic acid-induced active cell death process in Z. bailii reinforces the concept of a physiological role of the PCD in the normal yeast life cycle.

  6. Performance of mass spectrometric identification of bacteria and yeasts routinely isolated in a clinical microbiology laboratory using MALDI-TOF MS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiping; Xi, Haiyan; Huang, Mei; Wang, Jie; Fan, Ming; Chen, Yong; Shao, Haifeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an emerging technology newly applied to identifying bacterial and yeast strains. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of the VITEK® MS system in the identification of bacteria and yeast strains routinely isolated from clinical samples. Methods We prospectively analyzed routine MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification in parallel with conventional phenotypic identification of bacteria and yeasts regardless of phylum or source of isolation. Discordant results were resolved with 16S rDNA or internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene sequencing. Colonies (a single deposit on a MALDI disposable target without any prior extraction step) were analyzed using the VITEK® MS system. Peptide spectra acquired by the system were compared with the VITEK® MS IVD database Version 2.0, and the identification scores were recorded. Results Of the 1,181 isolates (1,061 bacterial isolates and 120 yeast isolates) analyzed, 99.5% were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry; 95.7% identified to the species level, 3.6% identified to the genus level, and 0.3% identified within a range of species belonging to different genera. Conversely, 0.1% of isolates were misidentified and 0.4% were unidentified, partly because the species were not included in the database. Re-testing using a second deposit provided a successful identification for 0.5% of isolates unidentified with the first deposit. Our results show that the VITEK® MS system has exceptional performance in identifying bacteria and yeast by comparing acquired peptide spectra to those contained in its database. Conclusions MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is a rapid, accurate, and relatively inexpensive method for bacterial and yeast identification. Our results demonstrate that the VITEK® MS system is a fast and reliable technique, and has the potential to replace conventional phenotypic

  7. Anaerobic activities of bacteria and fungi in moderately acidic conifer and deciduous leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Reith, Frank; Drake, Harold L; Küsel, Kirsten

    2002-07-01

    Abstract The litter layer of forest soils harbors high amounts of labile organic matter, and anaerobic decomposition processes can be initiated when oxygen is consumed more rapidly than it is supplied by diffusion. In this study, two adjacent moderately acidic forest sites, a spruce and a beech-oak forest, were selected to compare the anaerobic bacterial and fungal activities and populations of conifer and deciduous leaf litter. Most probable number (MPN) estimates of general heterotrophic aerobes and anaerobes from conifer litter equaled those from deciduous leaf litter. H(2), ethanol, formate, and lactate were initially produced with similar rates in both anoxic conifer and deciduous leaf litter microcosms. These products were rapidly consumed in deciduous leaf but not in conifer litter microcosms. Supplemental ethanol and H(2) were consumed only by deciduous leaf litter and yielded additional amounts of acetate in stoichiometries indicative of ethanol- or H(2)-dependent acetogenesis. The negligible turnover of primary fermentation products in conifer litter might be due to the low numbers of acetogens and secondary fermenters present in conifer litter compared to deciduous leaf litter. Fungi capable of anaerobic growth made up only 0.01-0.1% of the total anaerobic microorganisms cultured from conifer and deciduous leaf litter, respectively. Metabolic product profiles obtained from the highest anoxic, growth-positive MPN dilutions supplemented with antibacterial agents indicated that the dominant population of fungi, apparently mainly yeast-like cells, produced H(2), ethanol, acetate, and lactate both in conifer and deciduous leaf litter. Thus, despite acidic conditions, bacteria appear to dominate in the decomposition of carbon in anoxic microsites of both conifer and deciduous leaf litter.

  8. The Fate of Acetic Acid during Glucose Co-Metabolism by the Spoilage Yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Fernando; Sousa, Maria João; Ludovico, Paula; Santos, Helena; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Leão, Cecília

    2012-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most widely represented spoilage yeast species, being able to metabolise acetic acid in the presence of glucose. To clarify whether simultaneous utilisation of the two substrates affects growth efficiency, we examined growth in single- and mixed-substrate cultures with glucose and acetic acid. Our findings indicate that the biomass yield in the first phase of growth is the result of the weighted sum of the respective biomass yields on single-substrate medium, supporting the conclusion that biomass yield on each substrate is not affected by the presence of the other at pH 3.0 and 5.0, at least for the substrate concentrations examined. In vivo 13C-NMR spectroscopy studies showed that the gluconeogenic pathway is not operational and that [2−13C]acetate is metabolised via the Krebs cycle leading to the production of glutamate labelled on C2, C3 and C4. The incorporation of [U-14C]acetate in the cellular constituents resulted mainly in the labelling of the protein and lipid pools 51.5% and 31.5%, respectively. Overall, our data establish that glucose is metabolised primarily through the glycolytic pathway, and acetic acid is used as an additional source of acetyl-CoA both for lipid synthesis and the Krebs cycle. This study provides useful clues for the design of new strategies aimed at overcoming yeast spoilage in acidic, sugar-containing food environments. Moreover, the elucidation of the molecular basis underlying the resistance phenotype of Z. bailii to acetic acid will have a potential impact on the improvement of the performance of S. cerevisiae industrial strains often exposed to acetic acid stress conditions, such as in wine and bioethanol production. PMID:23285028

  9. Production of the antimalarial drug precursor artemisinic acid in engineered yeast.

    PubMed

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Paradise, Eric M; Ouellet, Mario; Fisher, Karl J; Newman, Karyn L; Ndungu, John M; Ho, Kimberly A; Eachus, Rachel A; Ham, Timothy S; Kirby, James; Chang, Michelle C Y; Withers, Sydnor T; Shiba, Yoichiro; Sarpong, Richmond; Keasling, Jay D

    2006-04-13

    Malaria is a global health problem that threatens 300-500 million people and kills more than one million people annually. Disease control is hampered by the occurrence of multi-drug-resistant strains of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Synthetic antimalarial drugs and malarial vaccines are currently being developed, but their efficacy against malaria awaits rigorous clinical testing. Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide extracted from Artemisia annua L (family Asteraceae; commonly known as sweet wormwood), is highly effective against multi-drug-resistant Plasmodium spp., but is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria sufferers. Although total synthesis of artemisinin is difficult and costly, the semi-synthesis of artemisinin or any derivative from microbially sourced artemisinic acid, its immediate precursor, could be a cost-effective, environmentally friendly, high-quality and reliable source of artemisinin. Here we report the engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high titres (up to 100 mg l(-1)) of artemisinic acid using an engineered mevalonate pathway, amorphadiene synthase, and a novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP71AV1) from A. annua that performs a three-step oxidation of amorpha-4,11-diene to artemisinic acid. The synthesized artemisinic acid is transported out and retained on the outside of the engineered yeast, meaning that a simple and inexpensive purification process can be used to obtain the desired product. Although the engineered yeast is already capable of producing artemisinic acid at a significantly higher specific productivity than A. annua, yield optimization and industrial scale-up will be required to raise artemisinic acid production to a level high enough to reduce artemisinin combination therapies to significantly below their current prices.

  10. The fate of acetic acid during glucose co-metabolism by the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fernando; Sousa, Maria João; Ludovico, Paula; Santos, Helena; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Leão, Cecília

    2012-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most widely represented spoilage yeast species, being able to metabolise acetic acid in the presence of glucose. To clarify whether simultaneous utilisation of the two substrates affects growth efficiency, we examined growth in single- and mixed-substrate cultures with glucose and acetic acid. Our findings indicate that the biomass yield in the first phase of growth is the result of the weighted sum of the respective biomass yields on single-substrate medium, supporting the conclusion that biomass yield on each substrate is not affected by the presence of the other at pH 3.0 and 5.0, at least for the substrate concentrations examined. In vivo(13)C-NMR spectroscopy studies showed that the gluconeogenic pathway is not operational and that [2-(13)C]acetate is metabolised via the Krebs cycle leading to the production of glutamate labelled on C(2), C(3) and C(4). The incorporation of [U-(14)C]acetate in the cellular constituents resulted mainly in the labelling of the protein and lipid pools 51.5% and 31.5%, respectively. Overall, our data establish that glucose is metabolised primarily through the glycolytic pathway, and acetic acid is used as an additional source of acetyl-CoA both for lipid synthesis and the Krebs cycle. This study provides useful clues for the design of new strategies aimed at overcoming yeast spoilage in acidic, sugar-containing food environments. Moreover, the elucidation of the molecular basis underlying the resistance phenotype of Z. bailii to acetic acid will have a potential impact on the improvement of the performance of S. cerevisiae industrial strains often exposed to acetic acid stress conditions, such as in wine and bioethanol production.

  11. Genetic instability of constitutive acid phosphatase in shochu and sake yeast.

    PubMed

    Takashita, Hideharu; Kajiwara, Yasuhiro; Shimoda, Masahiko; Matsuoka, Masayoshi; Ogawa, Takahira; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2013-07-01

    Genetic instability of constitutive acid phosphatase (cAPase) activity was observed in a shochu brewer's yeast strain (Ko), which consistently produced 0.3-1% progeny without cAPase when it had been subcultured for a long period of time in barley shochu mash or in conventional complete medium. Genetic analysis showed that the cAPase-negative phenotype was associated with a single mutation in the PHO3 gene and that the Ko strain had heteroallelic PHO3/pho3 genes, while the PHO3⁻ mutants had the homoallelic pho3/pho3 defect. Some sake yeast strains that are cAPase negative, such as K6, K7 and K9, also had the same homoallelic defect, whereas another sake yeast strain K3, with heteroallelic PHO3/pho3 genes, displayed similar genetic instability of cAPase activity. In all cases, the pho3-defective genes were generated by deletion of an approximately 1.9 kb region between the PHO5-PHO3 tandem genes on chromosome II, resulting in chimeric PHO5/3 fusion genes with different fusion points. By integrating a lys2 marker, which is linked with the pho3 allele on the arm of chromosome II in the Ko strain, we demonstrated that the pho3/pho3 defect originated either from a loss of heterozygosity at the heteroallelic PHO3/pho3 locus or from a looping out of the PHO3 region. Although fermentation experiments have not yet indicated any correlation between cAPase activity and alcohol production, the PHO3⁻ mutation itself could prove to be a useful selective marker for yeast strains carrying a number of advantageous mutations for fermentation and which display phenotypic diversity and stability.

  12. Metabolic analyses elucidate non-trivial gene targets for amplifying dihydroartemisinic acid production in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ashish; Conway, Matthew F.; Johnnie, Joseph; Qureshi, Tabish M.; Lige, Bao; Derrick, Anne M.; Agbo, Eddy C.; Sriram, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology enables metabolic engineering of industrial microbes to synthesize value-added molecules. In this, a major challenge is the efficient redirection of carbon to the desired metabolic pathways. Pinpointing strategies toward this goal requires an in-depth investigation of the metabolic landscape of the organism, particularly primary metabolism, to identify precursor and cofactor availability for the target compound. The potent antimalarial therapeutic artemisinin and its precursors are promising candidate molecules for production in microbial hosts. Recent advances have demonstrated the production of artemisinin precursors in engineered yeast strains as an alternative to extraction from plants. We report the application of in silico and in vivo metabolic pathway analyses to identify metabolic engineering targets to improve the yield of the direct artemisinin precursor dihydroartemisinic acid (DHA) in yeast. First, in silico extreme pathway (ExPa) analysis identified NADPH-malic enzyme and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) as mechanisms to meet NADPH demand for DHA synthesis. Next, we compared key DHA-synthesizing ExPas to the metabolic flux distributions obtained from in vivo 13C metabolic flux analysis of a DHA-synthesizing strain. This comparison revealed that knocking out ethanol synthesis and overexpressing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the oxidative PPP (gene YNL241C) or the NADPH-malic enzyme ME2 (YKL029C) are vital steps toward overproducing DHA. Finally, we employed in silico flux balance analysis and minimization of metabolic adjustment on a yeast genome-scale model to identify gene knockouts for improving DHA yields. The best strategy involved knockout of an oxaloacetate transporter (YKL120W) and an aspartate aminotransferase (YKL106W), and was predicted to improve DHA yields by 70-fold. Collectively, our work elucidates multiple non-trivial metabolic engineering strategies for improving DHA yield in yeast. PMID:23898325

  13. Production of γ-Amino Butyric Acid in Tea Leaves wit Treatment of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yuko; Hayakawa, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Hiroshi

    Lactic acid bacteria was searched for producing termented tea that contained a lot of γ-amino butyric acid(GABA). Also examined were the growth condition, GABA production and changes in catechin contents in the tea leaves. Lactobacillus brevis L12 was found to be suitable for the production of fermented tea since it gave as much GABA as gabaron tea when tea leaves being suspended with water at 10% and incubated for 4 days at 25°C. The amount of GABA produced was more than calculated based upon the content of glutamic acid in tea leaves. It is probable to assume that glutamate derived from glutamine and theanine is converted into GABA.

  14. Ribonucleic acid synthesis in yeast. The effect of cycloheximide on the synthesis of ribonucleic acid in Saccharomyces carlsbergensis

    PubMed Central

    de Kloet, S. R.

    1966-01-01

    1. Cycloheximide causes the release of the control amino acids have over RNA synthesis in Saccharomyces carlsbergensis N.C.T.C. 74. 2. The antibiotic causes a gradual deceleration of RNA formation. After incubation for 60min. at 30° RNA synthesis usually proceeds at a rate only a few per cent of that of the untreated control. 3. In the presence of cycloheximide two types of RNA accumulate in the cell: soluble RNA and a high-molecular-weight RNA. The latter has a base composition intermediate between those of yeast DNA and yeast ribosomal RNA, and sediments in a sucrose gradient at a rate faster than that of the 23s ribosomal RNA component. 4. Yeast ribosomal RNA contains methylated bases. Judged from the incorporation of [Me-14C]methionine, the extent of methylation of ribosomal RNA is about 20% of that of the `soluble' RNA fraction. The high-molecular-weight RNA formed in the presence of cycloheximide is less methylated than normal RNA. In this case the sucrose-density-gradient sedimentation patterns of newly methylated and newly synthesized RNA do not coincide. 5. In the presence of cycloheximide, polysomal material accumulates, indicating that messenger RNA is formed. 6. The effect of the antibiotic on protein and RNA synthesis can be abolished by washing of the cells. The RNA that has accumulated during incubation of the cells with the antibiotic is not stable on removal of cycloheximide. 7. The results presented in this study are discussed in relation to the regulation of RNA formation in yeast. PMID:5964958

  15. [Role of lactic acid bacteria in the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria among healthy persons].

    PubMed

    Zigangirova, N A; Tokarskaia, E A; Narodnitskiĭ, B S; Gintsburg, A L; Tugel'ian, V A

    2006-01-01

    The wide use of antibiotics in livestock raising has contributed to the selection and accumulation of representatives of commensal microflora, as well as pathogenic bacteria, colonizing livestock and poultry. For this reason the problem of the possible transfer of antibiotic-resistance genes along the chain from bacteria, autochthonous for agricultural animals, to bacteria used for the production of foodstuffs, which are incorporated into normal microflora and may thus participate in the exchange of these genes with bacteria, enteropathogenic for humans, is a highly important task of medical microbiology. The article deals with the review of experimental data, indicative the possibility of the appearance of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria due to the transfer of antibiotic-resistance genes via alimentary chains.

  16. Who will win the race in childrens' oral cavities? Streptococcus mutans or beneficial lactic acid bacteria?

    PubMed

    Güngör, Ö E; Kırzıoğlu, Z; Dinçer, E; Kıvanç, M

    2013-09-01

    Adhesion to oral soft and hard tissue is crucial for bacterial colonisation in the mouth. The aim of this work was to select strains of oral lactic acid bacteria that could be used as probiotics for oral health. To this end, the adhesive properties of some lactic acid bacteria were investigated. Seventeen lactic acid bacteria including two Streptococcus mutans strains were isolated from the oral cavity of healthy children, while other strains were isolated from fermented meat products. The bacterial strains were applied to teeth surfaces covered with saliva or without saliva. A significant diversity in adhesion capacity to teeth surfaces among the lactic acid bacteria was observed. Lactic acid bacteria isolated from the oral cavity adhered the best to teeth surfaces covered with saliva, whereas lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermented meat samples adhered the best to tooth surface without saliva. All strains of lactic acid bacteria were able to reduce the number of S. mutans cells, in particular on saliva-coated tooth surface. Therefore, they might have potential as probiotics for the oral cavity.

  17. Plasma membrane H+ and K+ transporters are involved in the weak-acid preservative response of disparate food spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Neil; Shabala, Lana; Rooney, Henrietta; Jarman, Marcus G; Davies, Julia M

    2005-06-01

    The food spoilage yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been proposed to resist weak-acid preservative stress by different means; Z. bailii by limiting influx of preservative combined with its catabolism, S. cerevisiae by active extrusion of the preservative weak-acid anion and H(+). Measurement of H(+) extrusion by exponential-phase Z. bailii cells suggest that, in common with S. cerevisiae, this yeast uses a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase to expel H(+) when challenged by weak-acid preservative (benzoic acid). Simultaneous measurement of Z. bailii net H(+) and K(+) fluxes showed that net K(+) influx accompanies net H(+) efflux during acute benzoic acid stress. Such ionic coupling is known for S. cerevisiae in short-term preservative stress. Both yeasts significantly accumulated K(+) on long-term exposure to benzoic acid. Analysis of S. cerevisiae K(+) transporter mutants revealed that loss of the high affinity K(+) uptake system Trk1 confers sensitivity to growth in preservative. The results suggest that cation accumulation is an important factor in adaptation to weak-acid preservatives by spoilage yeasts and that Z. bailii and S. cerevisiae share hitherto unsuspected adaptive responses at the level of plasma membrane ion transport.

  18. Genetic engineering of Candida utilis yeast for efficient production of L-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Ikushima, Shigehito; Fujii, Toshio; Kobayashi, Osamu; Yoshida, Satoshi; Yoshida, Aruto

    2009-08-01

    Polylactic acid is receiving increasing attention as a renewable alternative for conventional petroleum-based plastics. In the present study, we constructed a metabolically-engineered Candida utilis strain that produces L-lactic acid with the highest efficiency yet reported in yeasts. Initially, the gene encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (CuPDC1) was identified, followed by four CuPDC1 disruption events in order to obtain a null mutant that produced little ethanol (a by-product of L-lactic acid). Two copies of the L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-LDH) gene derived from Bos taurus under the control of the CuPDC1 promoter were then integrated into the genome of the CuPdc1-null deletant. The resulting strain produced 103.3 g/l of L-lactic acid from 108.7 g/l of glucose in 33 h, representing a 95.1% conversion. The maximum production rate of L-lactic acid was 4.9 g/l/h. The optical purity of the L-lactic acid was found to be more than 99.9% e.e.

  19. Fatty Acid Desaturase Mutants of Yeast: Growth Requirements and Electron Spin Resonance Spin-Label Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Wisnieski, Bernadine J.; Kiyomoto, Richard K.

    1972-01-01

    Two respiratory-sufficient and one respiratory-deficient (nuclear petite) strains of yeast Δ9-desaturase mutants were analyzed to determine which fatty acids would serve as replacements for the naturally occurring fatty acids, 16:1 Δ9cis and 18:1 Δ9cis. The requirement can be satisfied by several fatty acids differing in double-bond position, steric configuration, chain length, and degree of unsaturation. The features common to growth-supporting fatty acids are presented and the effects of varying the carbon source and temperature are considered. In addition, we illustrate several pitfalls encountered in membrane studies which exploit lipid-requiring organisms. Since the membrane fatty acid composition of these mutants can be modified readily, electron spin resonance spectroscopy is used to compare membranes of mutant strains enriched for different fatty acids. The lipid distribution pattern of the most commonly employed electron spin resonance spin-label, 12-nitroxide stearate, was ascertained and compared to that of 18:1 Δ9cis. PMID:4333377

  20. Probiotic potential of lactic acid bacteria present in home made curd in southern India

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, Ramadass; Chandragunasekaran, Aarthi Sophia; Chellappan, Gowri; Rajaram, Krithika; Ramamoorthi, Gayathri; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: The human gut microbiota play a significant role in nutritional processes. The concept of probiotics has led to widespread consumption of food preparations containing probiotic microbes such as curd and yogurt. Curd prepared at home is consumed every day in most homes in southern India. In this study the home-made curd was evaluated for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with probiotic potential. Methods: Fifteen LAB (12 lactobacilli, 1 Lactococcus, 2 Leuconostoc) and one yeast isolated from home-made curd were evaluated for resistance to acid, pepsin, pancreatin and bile salts; antimicrobial resistance; intrinsic antimicrobial activity; adherence to Caco-2 epithelial cells; ability to block pathogen adherence to Caco-2 cells; ability to inhibit interleukin (IL)-8 secretion from HT-29 epithelial cells in response to Vibrio cholerae; and ability to induce anti-inflammatory cytokine expression in THP-1 monocyte cells. Results: Lactobacillus abundance in fermenting curd peaked sharply at 12 h. Nine of the strains survived exposure to acid (pH 3.0) for at least one hour, and all strains survived in the presence of pancreatin or bile salts for 3 h. None showed haemolytic activity. All were resistant to most antimicrobials tested, but were sensitive to imipenem. Most strains inhibited the growth of Salmonella Typhimurium while five inhibited growth of V. cholerae O139. Seven strains showed adherence to Caco-2 cells ranging from 20-104 per cent of adherence of an adherent strain of Escherichia coli, but all inhibited V. cholerae adherence to Caco-2 cells by 20-100 per cent. They inhibited interleukin-8 secretion from HT-29 cells, in response to V. cholerae, by 50-80 per cent. Two strains induced IL-10 and IL-12 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression in THP-1 cells. Interpretation & conclusions: LAB in curd had properties consistent with probiotic potential, but these were not consistent across species. LAB abundance in curd increased rapidly at 12 h

  1. High-Throughput Identification of Bacteria and Yeast by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry in Conventional Medical Microbiology Laboratories ▿

    PubMed Central

    van Veen, S. Q.; Claas, E. C. J.; Kuijper, Ed J.

    2010-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is suitable for high-throughput and rapid diagnostics at low costs and can be considered an alternative for conventional biochemical and molecular identification systems in a conventional microbiological laboratory. First, we evaluated MALDI-TOF MS using 327 clinical isolates previously cultured from patient materials and identified by conventional techniques (Vitek-II, API, and biochemical tests). Discrepancies were analyzed by molecular analysis of the 16S genes. Of 327 isolates, 95.1% were identified correctly to genus level, and 85.6% were identified to species level by MALDI-TOF MS. Second, we performed a prospective validation study, including 980 clinical isolates of bacteria and yeasts. Overall performance of MALDI-TOF MS was significantly better than conventional biochemical systems for correct species identification (92.2% and 83.1%, respectively) and produced fewer incorrect genus identifications (0.1% and 1.6%, respectively). Correct species identification by MALDI-TOF MS was observed in 97.7% of Enterobacteriaceae, 92% of nonfermentative Gram-negative bacteria, 94.3% of staphylococci, 84.8% of streptococci, 84% of a miscellaneous group (mainly Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella [HACEK]), and 85.2% of yeasts. MALDI-TOF MS had significantly better performance than conventional methods for species identification of staphylococci and genus identification of bacteria belonging to HACEK group. Misidentifications by MALDI-TOF MS were clearly associated with an absence of sufficient spectra from suitable reference strains in the MALDI-TOF MS database. We conclude that MALDI-TOF MS can be implemented easily for routine identification of bacteria (except for pneumococci and viridans streptococci) and yeasts in a medical microbiological laboratory. PMID:20053859

  2. High-throughput identification of bacteria and yeast by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry in conventional medical microbiology laboratories.

    PubMed

    van Veen, S Q; Claas, E C J; Kuijper, Ed J

    2010-03-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is suitable for high-throughput and rapid diagnostics at low costs and can be considered an alternative for conventional biochemical and molecular identification systems in a conventional microbiological laboratory. First, we evaluated MALDI-TOF MS using 327 clinical isolates previously cultured from patient materials and identified by conventional techniques (Vitek-II, API, and biochemical tests). Discrepancies were analyzed by molecular analysis of the 16S genes. Of 327 isolates, 95.1% were identified correctly to genus level, and 85.6% were identified to species level by MALDI-TOF MS. Second, we performed a prospective validation study, including 980 clinical isolates of bacteria and yeasts. Overall performance of MALDI-TOF MS was significantly better than conventional biochemical systems for correct species identification (92.2% and 83.1%, respectively) and produced fewer incorrect genus identifications (0.1% and 1.6%, respectively). Correct species identification by MALDI-TOF MS was observed in 97.7% of Enterobacteriaceae, 92% of nonfermentative Gram-negative bacteria, 94.3% of staphylococci, 84.8% of streptococci, 84% of a miscellaneous group (mainly Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella [HACEK]), and 85.2% of yeasts. MALDI-TOF MS had significantly better performance than conventional methods for species identification of staphylococci and genus identification of bacteria belonging to HACEK group. Misidentifications by MALDI-TOF MS were clearly associated with an absence of sufficient spectra from suitable reference strains in the MALDI-TOF MS database. We conclude that MALDI-TOF MS can be implemented easily for routine identification of bacteria (except for pneumococci and viridans streptococci) and yeasts in a medical microbiological laboratory.

  3. Molecular tools and protocols for engineering the acid-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii as a potential cell factory.

    PubMed

    Branduardi, Paola; Dato, Laura; Porro, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms offer a tremendous potential as cell factories, and they are indeed used by humans for centuries for biotransformations. Among them, yeasts combine the advantage of unicellular state with a eukaryotic organization, and, in the era of biorefineries, their biodiversity can offer solutions to specific process constraints. Zygosaccharomyces bailii, an ascomycetales budding yeast, is widely known for its peculiar tolerance to various stresses, among which are organic acids. Despite the possibility to apply with this yeast some of the molecular tools and protocols routinely used to manipulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adjustments and optimizations are necessary. Here, we describe in detail protocols for transformation, for target gene disruption or gene integration, and for designing episomal expression plasmids helpful for developing and further studying the yeast Z. bailii.

  4. Deoxycholic acid formation in gnotobiotic mice associated with human intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Narushima, Seiko; Itoha, Kikuji; Miyamoto, Yukiko; Park, Sang-Hee; Nagata, Keiko; Kuruma, Kazuo; Uchida, Kiyohisa

    2006-09-01

    In humans and animals, intestinal flora is indispensable for bile acid transformation. The goal of our study was to establish gnotobiotic mice with intestinal bacteria of human origin in order to examine the role of intestinal bacteria in the transformation of bile acids in vivo using the technique of gnotobiology. Eight strains of bile acid-deconjugating bacteria were isolated from ex-germ-free mice inoculated with a human fecal dilution of 10(-6), and five strains of 7alpha-dehydroxylating bacteria were isolated from the intestine of limited human flora mice inoculated only with clostridia. The results of biochemical tests and 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that seven out of eight bile acid-deconjugating strains belong to a bacteroides cluster (Bacteroides vulgatus, B. distasonis, and B. uniformis), and one strain had high similarity with Bilophila wadsworthia. All five strains that converted cholic acid to deoxycholic acid had greatest similarity with Clostridium hylemonae. A combination of 10 isolated strains converted taurocholic acid into deoxycholic acid both in vitro and in the mouse intestine. These results indicate that the predominant bacteria, mainly Bacteroides, in human feces comprise one of the main bacterial groups for the deconjugation of bile acids, and clostridia may play an important role in 7aplha-dehydroxylation of free-form primary bile acids in the intestine although these strains are not predominant. The gnotobiotic mouse with bacteria of human origin could be a useful model in studies of bile acid metabolism by human intestinal bacteria in vivo.

  5. Yeasts that utilize lactose in sweet whey

    SciTech Connect

    Gholson, J.H.; Gough, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Since processing costs are usually higher for whey than for other available food or feed nutrients, only about one-third of whey produced in the US is used by food and feed industries. As a result whey disposal costs are a problem. Further; when whey is disposed of through municipal sewerage systems, the lactose present is changed by bacteria to lactic acid which tends to act as a preservative and retards further oxidation of whey constituents. This article describes a method of utilizing lactose-fermenting yeasts to produce large quantities of yeast cells, single-cell protein. Kluveromyces fragilis was found to be the most effective yeast species and the yeast cells produced could be used as a natural food or feed additive. Results of this study determined that certain methods and yeast strains could reduce whey-related pollution and thus help reduce costs of whey disposal.

  6. Cd(II) Sorption on Montmorillonite-Humic acid-Bacteria Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Huihui; Chen, Wenli; Cai, Peng; Rong, Xingmin; Dai, Ke; Peacock, Caroline L.; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Soil components (e.g., clays, bacteria and humic substances) are known to produce mineral-organic composites in natural systems. Herein, batch sorption isotherms, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and Cd K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy were applied to investigate the binding characteristics of Cd on montmorillonite(Mont)-humic acid(HA)-bacteria composites. Additive sorption and non-additive Cd(II) sorption behaviour is observed for the binary Mont-bacteria and ternary Mont-HA-bacteria composite, respectively. Specifically, in the ternary composite, the coexistence of HA and bacteria inhibits Cd adsorption, suggesting a “blocking effect” between humic acid and bacterial cells. Large positive entropies (68.1 ~ 114.4 J/mol/K), and linear combination fitting of the EXAFS spectra for Cd adsorbed onto Mont-bacteria and Mont-HA-bacteria composites, demonstrate that Cd is mostly bound to bacterial surface functional groups by forming inner-sphere complexes. All our results together support the assertion that there is a degree of site masking in the ternary clay mineral-humic acid-bacteria composite. Because of this, in the ternary composite, Cd preferentially binds to the higher affinity components-i.e., the bacteria.

  7. Cd(II) Sorption on Montmorillonite-Humic acid-Bacteria Composites

    PubMed Central

    Du, Huihui; Chen, Wenli; Cai, Peng; Rong, Xingmin; Dai, Ke; Peacock, Caroline L.; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Soil components (e.g., clays, bacteria and humic substances) are known to produce mineral-organic composites in natural systems. Herein, batch sorption isotherms, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and Cd K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy were applied to investigate the binding characteristics of Cd on montmorillonite(Mont)-humic acid(HA)-bacteria composites. Additive sorption and non-additive Cd(II) sorption behaviour is observed for the binary Mont-bacteria and ternary Mont-HA-bacteria composite, respectively. Specifically, in the ternary composite, the coexistence of HA and bacteria inhibits Cd adsorption, suggesting a “blocking effect” between humic acid and bacterial cells. Large positive entropies (68.1 ~ 114.4 J/mol/K), and linear combination fitting of the EXAFS spectra for Cd adsorbed onto Mont-bacteria and Mont-HA-bacteria composites, demonstrate that Cd is mostly bound to bacterial surface functional groups by forming inner-sphere complexes. All our results together support the assertion that there is a degree of site masking in the ternary clay mineral-humic acid-bacteria composite. Because of this, in the ternary composite, Cd preferentially binds to the higher affinity components-i.e., the bacteria. PMID:26792640

  8. Inactivation of bacteria on surfaces by sprayed slightly acidic hypochlorous acid water: in vitro experiments

    PubMed Central

    HAKIM, Hakimullah; ALAM, Md. Shahin; SANGSRIRATANAKUL, Natthanan; NAKAJIMA, Katsuhiro; KITAZAWA, Minori; OTA, Mari; TOYOFUKU, Chiharu; YAMADA, Masashi; THAMMAKARN, Chanathip; SHOHAM, Dany; TAKEHARA, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of slightly acidic hypochlorous acid water (SAHW), in both liquid and spray form, to inactivate bacteria was evaluated as a potential candidate for biosecurity enhancement in poultry production. SAHW (containing 50 or 100 ppm chlorine, pH 6) was able to inactivate Escherichia coli and Salmonella Infantis in liquid to below detectable levels (≤2.6 log10 CFU/ml) within 5 sec of exposure. In addition, SAHW antibacterial capacity was evaluated by spraying it using a nebulizer into a box containing these bacteria, which were present on the surfaces of glass plates and rayon sheets. SAHW was able to inactivate both bacterial species on the glass plates (dry condition) and rayon sheets within 5 min spraying and 5 min contact times, with the exception of 50 ppm SAHW on the rayon sheets. Furthermore, a corrosivity test determined that SAHW does not corrode metallic objects, even at the longest exposure times (83 days). Our findings demonstrate that SAHW is a good candidate for biosecurity enhancement in the poultry industry. Spraying it on the surfaces of objects, eggshells, egg incubators and transport cages could reduce the chances of contamination and disease transmission. These results augment previous findings demonstrating the competence of SAHW as an anti-viral disinfectant. PMID:27052464

  9. Elucidation of the biosynthesis of carnosic acid and its reconstitution in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Scheler, Ulschan; Brandt, Wolfgang; Porzel, Andrea; Rothe, Kathleen; Manzano, David; Božić, Dragana; Papaefthimiou, Dimitra; Balcke, Gerd Ulrich; Henning, Anja; Lohse, Swanhild; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Kanellis, Angelos K.; Ferrer, Albert; Tissier, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Rosemary extracts containing the phenolic diterpenes carnosic acid and its derivative carnosol are approved food additives used in an increasingly wide range of products to enhance shelf-life, thanks to their high anti-oxidant activity. We describe here the elucidation of the complete biosynthetic pathway of carnosic acid and its reconstitution in yeast cells. Cytochrome P450 oxygenases (CYP76AH22-24) from Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia fruticosa already characterized as ferruginol synthases are also able to produce 11-hydroxyferruginol. Modelling-based mutagenesis of three amino acids in the related ferruginol synthase (CYP76AH1) from S. miltiorrhiza is sufficient to convert it to a 11-hydroxyferruginol synthase (HFS). The three sequential C20 oxidations for the conversion of 11-hydroxyferruginol to carnosic acid are catalysed by the related CYP76AK6-8. The availability of the genes for the biosynthesis of carnosic acid opens opportunities for the metabolic engineering of phenolic diterpenes, a class of compounds with potent anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour activities. PMID:27703160

  10. Elucidation of the biosynthesis of carnosic acid and its reconstitution in yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheler, Ulschan; Brandt, Wolfgang; Porzel, Andrea; Rothe, Kathleen; Manzano, David; Božić, Dragana; Papaefthimiou, Dimitra; Balcke, Gerd Ulrich; Henning, Anja; Lohse, Swanhild; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Kanellis, Angelos K.; Ferrer, Albert; Tissier, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Rosemary extracts containing the phenolic diterpenes carnosic acid and its derivative carnosol are approved food additives used in an increasingly wide range of products to enhance shelf-life, thanks to their high anti-oxidant activity. We describe here the elucidation of the complete biosynthetic pathway of carnosic acid and its reconstitution in yeast cells. Cytochrome P450 oxygenases (CYP76AH22-24) from Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia fruticosa already characterized as ferruginol synthases are also able to produce 11-hydroxyferruginol. Modelling-based mutagenesis of three amino acids in the related ferruginol synthase (CYP76AH1) from S. miltiorrhiza is sufficient to convert it to a 11-hydroxyferruginol synthase (HFS). The three sequential C20 oxidations for the conversion of 11-hydroxyferruginol to carnosic acid are catalysed by the related CYP76AK6-8. The availability of the genes for the biosynthesis of carnosic acid opens opportunities for the metabolic engineering of phenolic diterpenes, a class of compounds with potent anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour activities.

  11. Bacillus spp. produce antibacterial activities against lactic acid bacteria that contaminate fuel ethanol plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) frequently contaminate commercial fuel ethanol fermentations, reducing yields and decreasing profitability of biofuel production. Microorganisms from environmental sources in different geographic regions of Thailand were tested for antibacterial activity against LAB. Fou...

  12. Analysis of moisture content, acidity and contamination by yeast and molds in Apis mellifera L. honey from central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ananias, Karla Rubia; de Melo, Adriane Alexandre Machado; de Moura, Celso José

    2013-01-01

    The development of mold of environmental origin in honey affects its quality and leads to its deterioration, so yeasts and molds counts have been used as an important indicator of hygiene levels during its processing, transportation and storage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of yeasts and molds contamination and their correlation with moisture and acidity levels in Apis mellifera L. honey from central Brazil. In 20% of the samples, the yeasts and molds counts exceeded the limit established by legislation for the marketing of honey in the MERCOSUR, while 42.8% and 5.7% presented above-standard acidity and moisture levels, respectively. Although samples showed yeasts and molds counts over 1.0 × 10(2) UFC.g(-1), there was no correlation between moisture content and the number of microorganisms, since, in part of the samples with above-standard counts, the moisture level was below 20%. In some samples the acidity level was higher than that established by legislation, but only one sample presented a yeasts and molds count above the limit established by MERCOSUR, which would suggest the influence of the floral source on this parameter. In general, of the 35 samples analyzed, the quality was considered inadequate in 45.7% of cases.

  13. Analysis of moisture content, acidity and contamination by yeast and molds in Apis mellifera L. honey from central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ananias, Karla Rubia; de Melo, Adriane Alexandre Machado; de Moura, Celso José

    2013-01-01

    The development of mold of environmental origin in honey affects its quality and leads to its deterioration, so yeasts and molds counts have been used as an important indicator of hygiene levels during its processing, transportation and storage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of yeasts and molds contamination and their correlation with moisture and acidity levels in Apis mellifera L. honey from central Brazil. In 20% of the samples, the yeasts and molds counts exceeded the limit established by legislation for the marketing of honey in the MERCOSUR, while 42.8% and 5.7% presented above-standard acidity and moisture levels, respectively. Although samples showed yeasts and molds counts over 1.0 × 102 UFC.g−1, there was no correlation between moisture content and the number of microorganisms, since, in part of the samples with above-standard counts, the moisture level was below 20%. In some samples the acidity level was higher than that established by legislation, but only one sample presented a yeasts and molds count above the limit established by MERCOSUR, which would suggest the influence of the floral source on this parameter. In general, of the 35 samples analyzed, the quality was considered inadequate in 45.7% of cases. PMID:24516434

  14. Screening, selection and characterization of phytic acid degrading lactic acid bacteria from chicken intestine.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, Ponnala; Halami, Prakash M

    2009-07-31

    This study was undertaken to screen and select potent phytate degrading lactic acid bacteria and to evaluate their additional characteristic features. Forty lactic acid bacterial strains were isolated from different sources and screened for their ability to degrade myo-inositol hexaphosphate or IP(6) by cobalt chloride staining (plate assay) method, using calcium or sodium salt of phytic acid as substrate. All the forty isolates were able to degrade calcium phytate. However, only two Pediococcus pentosaceus strains (CFR R38 and CFR R35) were found to degrade sodium phytate. These strains showed phytase activity of 213 and 89 U at 50 degrees C, respectively and poor acid phosphatase activity. These strains were further evaluated for additional characteristic features. At pH 2, P. pentosaceus strains CFR R38 and CFR R35 showed 50.7 and 48.5 percentage survivability after 2 h of incubation respectively and they could also withstand 0.3% ox-bile. These cultures exhibited 54.6 and 44.8% of hydrophobicity to xylene, antibacterial activity against food borne pathogens and possessed beta-galactosidase activity. The resistance pattern to several antibiotics was also analyzed. The present study indicates that these strains, having phytate degrading ability and other characteristic features can be exploited as starter cultures in fermented foods to improve the mineral bioavailability.

  15. Characterization of the spoilage lactic acid bacteria in "sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham".

    PubMed

    Kalschne, Daneysa Lahis; Womer, Rute; Mattana, Ademir; Sarmento, Cleonice Mendes Pereira; Colla, Luciane Maria; Colla, Eliane

    2015-03-01

    The lactic acid bacteria are involved with food fermentation and in such cases with food spoilage. Considering the need to reduce the lactic acid bacteria growth in meat products, the aim of this work was to enumerated and investigated the lactic acid bacteria present on sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham stored at 4 °C and 8 °C for 45 days by phenotypic and molecular techniques. The quantification showed that the lactic acid bacteria were present from the first day with mean count of 1.98 log cfu/g for the four batches analyzed. The lactic acid bacteria grew rapidly on the samples, and plate counts around 7.59 log cfu/g and 8.25 log cfu/g were detected after 45 days of storage at 4 °C and 8 °C, respectively; storage temperatures studied showed significant influence on the microorganism in study growth. The predominant lactic acid bacteria associated with the spoilage samples at one day of storage includes Lactobacillus sp., the phenotypic overlap Leuconostoc / Weissella sp. and Enterococcus sp. At 45 days of storage at 4 and 8 °C the mainly specie was Lactobacillus curvatus , following by Lactobacillus sakei and Leuconostoc mesentereoides ; the Enterococcus sp. was not present in the samples.

  16. Characterization of the spoilage lactic acid bacteria in “sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham”

    PubMed Central

    Kalschne, Daneysa Lahis; Womer, Rute; Mattana, Ademir; Sarmento, Cleonice Mendes Pereira; Colla, Luciane Maria; Colla, Eliane

    2015-01-01

    The lactic acid bacteria are involved with food fermentation and in such cases with food spoilage. Considering the need to reduce the lactic acid bacteria growth in meat products, the aim of this work was to enumerated and investigated the lactic acid bacteria present on sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham stored at 4 °C and 8 °C for 45 days by phenotypic and molecular techniques. The quantification showed that the lactic acid bacteria were present from the first day with mean count of 1.98 log cfu/g for the four batches analyzed. The lactic acid bacteria grew rapidly on the samples, and plate counts around 7.59 log cfu/g and 8.25 log cfu/g were detected after 45 days of storage at 4 °C and 8 °C, respectively; storage temperatures studied showed significant influence on the microorganism in study growth. The predominant lactic acid bacteria associated with the spoilage samples at one day of storage includes Lactobacillus sp., the phenotypic overlap Leuconostoc / Weissella sp. and Enterococcus sp. At 45 days of storage at 4 and 8 °C the mainly specie was Lactobacillus curvatus , following by Lactobacillus sakei and Leuconostoc mesentereoides ; the Enterococcus sp. was not present in the samples. PMID:26221105

  17. Selection of lactic acid bacteria from Brazilian kefir grains for potential use as starter or probiotic cultures.

    PubMed

    Zanirati, Débora Ferreira; Abatemarco, Mário; Sandes, Sávio Henrique de Cicco; Nicoli, Jacques Robert; Nunes, Álvaro Cantini; Neumann, Elisabeth

    2015-04-01

    Brazilian kefir is a homemade fermented beverage that is obtained by incubating milk or a brown sugar solution with kefir grains that contribute their different microbiological compositions. It is highly important to isolate and characterize microorganisms from Brazilian kefir grains to obtain starter cultures for the industrial production of a standardized commercial kefir. Thus, the present study aimed to isolate lactic acid bacteria from eight kefir grains that were propagated in milk or sugar solutions from five different locations in Brazil and to select Lactobacillus isolates based on desirable in vitro probiotic properties. One hundred eight isolates from both substrates were identified by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and/or 16S rRNA gene sequencing and were determined to belong to the following 11 species from the genera: Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus (L.), and Oenococcus. Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus kefiri, and Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens were isolated only from milk grains, whereas Lactobacillus perolens, Lactobacillus parafarraginis, Lactobacillus diolivorans, and Oenococcus oeni were isolated exclusively from sugar water grains. When the microbial compositions of four kefir grains were evaluated with culture-independent analyses, L. kefiranofaciens was observed to predominant in milk grains, whereas Lactobacillus hilgardii was most abundant in sugar water kefir. Unfortunately, L. hilgardii was not isolated from any grain, although this bacteria was detected with a culture-independent methodology. Fifty-two isolated Lactobacilli were tested for gastric juice and bile salt tolerance, antagonism against pathogens, antimicrobial resistance, and surface hydrophobicity. Three Lactobacillus strains (L. kefiranofaciens 8U, L. diolivorans 1Z, and Lactobacillus casei 17U) could be classified as potential probiotics. In conclusion, several lactic acid bacteria that could be used in combination with yeasts as starter

  18. Yeasts identification in microfluidic devices using peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, André M; Cruz-Moreira, Daniela; Cerqueira, Laura; Miranda, João M; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2017-03-01

    Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) is a highly specific molecular method widely used for microbial identification. Nonetheless, and due to the detection limit of this technique, a time-consuming pre-enrichment step is typically required before identification. In here we have developed a lab-on-a-chip device to concentrate cell suspensions and speed up the identification process in yeasts. The PNA-FISH protocol was optimized to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a common yeast that is very relevant for several types of food industries. Then, several coin-sized microfluidic devices with different geometries were developed. Using Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), we modeled the hydrodynamics inside the microchannels and selected the most promising options. SU-8 structures were fabricated based on the selected designs and used to produce polydimethylsiloxane-based microchips by soft lithography. As a result, an integrated approach combining microfluidics and PNA-FISH for the rapid identification of S. cerevisiae was achieved. To improve fluid flow inside microchannels and the PNA-FISH labeling, oxygen plasma treatment was applied to the microfluidic devices and a new methodology to introduce the cell suspension and solutions into the microchannels was devised. A strong PNA-FISH signal was observed in cells trapped inside the microchannels, proving that the proposed methodology works as intended. The microfluidic designs and PNA-FISH procedure described in here should be easily adaptable for detection of other microorganisms of similar size.

  19. Genotypic identification of some lactic acid bacteria by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis and investigation of their potential usage as starter culture combinations in Beyaz cheese manufacture.

    PubMed

    Karahan, A G; Başyiğit Kiliç, G; Kart, A; Sanlidere Aloğlu, H; Oner, Z; Aydemir, S; Erkuş, O; Harsa, S

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 2 different starter culture combinations were prepared for cheesemaking. Starter culture combinations were formed from 8 strains of lactic acid bacteria. They were identified as Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis (2 strains), Lactobacillus plantarum (5 strains), and Lactobacillus paraplantarum (1 strain) by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis. The effects of these combinations on the physicochemical and microbiological properties of Beyaz cheeses were investigated. These cheeses were compared with Beyaz cheeses that were produced with a commercial starter culture containing Lc. lactis ssp. lactis and Lc. lactis ssp. cremoris as control. All cheeses were ripened in brine at 4 degrees C for 90 d. Dry matter, fat in dry matter, titratable acidity, pH, salt in dry matter, total N, water-soluble N, and ripening index were determined. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE patterns of cheeses showed that alpha(S)-casein and beta-casein degraded slightly during the ripening period. Lactic acid bacteria, total mesophilic aerobic bacteria, yeast, molds, and coliforms were also counted. All analyses were repeated twice during d 7, 30, 60, and 90. The starter culture combinations were found to be significantly different from the control group in pH, salt content, and lactobacilli, lactococci, and total mesophilic aerobic bacteria counts, whereas the cheeses were similar in fat, dry matter content, and coliform, yeast, and mold counts. The sensory analysis of cheeses indicated that textural properties of control cheeses presented somewhat lower scores than those of the test groups. The panelists preferred the tastes of treatment cheeses, whereas cheeses with starter culture combinations and control cheeses had similar scores for appearance and flavor. These results indicated that both starter culture combinations are suitable for Beyaz cheese production.

  20. Isolation of aquatic yeasts with the ability to neutralize acidic media, from an extremely acidic river near Japan's Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano.

    PubMed

    Mitsuya, Daisuke; Hayashi, Takuya; Wang, Yu; Tanaka, Mami; Okai, Masahiko; Ishida, Masami; Urano, Naoto

    2017-02-28

    The Yukawa River is an extremely acidic river whose waters on the east foot of the Kusatu-Shirane Volcano (in Gunma Prefecture, Japan) contain sulfate ions. Here we isolated many acid-tolerant yeasts from the Yukawa River, and some of them neutralized an acidic R2A medium containing casamino acid. Candida fluviatilis strain CeA16 had the strongest acid tolerance and neutralizing activity against the acidic medium. To clarify these phenomena, we performed neutralization tests with strain CeA16 using casamino acid, a mixture of amino acids, and 17 single amino acid solutions adjusted to pH 3.0, respectively. Strain CeA16 neutralized not only acidic casamino acid and the mixture of amino acids but also some of the acidic single amino acid solutions. Seven amino acids were strongly decomposed by strain CeA16 and simultaneously released ammonium ions. These results suggest strain CeA16 is a potential yeast as a new tool to neutralize acidic environments.

  1. Probiotic lactic acid bacteria – the fledgling cuckoos of the gut?

    PubMed Central

    Berstad, Arnold; Raa, Jan; Midtvedt, Tore; Valeur, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    It is tempting to look at bacteria from our human egocentric point of view and label them as either ‘good’ or ‘bad’. However, a microbial society has its own system of government – ‘microcracy’ – and its own rules of play. Lactic acid bacteria are often referred to as representatives of the good ones, and there is little doubt that those belonging to the normal intestinal flora are beneficial for human health. But we should stop thinking of lactic acid bacteria as always being ‘friendly’ – they may instead behave like fledgling cuckoos. PMID:27235098

  2. Acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar: phenotypic traits relevant for starter cultures selection.

    PubMed

    Gullo, Maria; Giudici, Paolo

    2008-06-30

    This review focuses on acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar process. Although several studies are available on acetic acid bacteria ecology, metabolism and nutritional requirements, their activity as well as their technological traits in homemade vinegars as traditional balsamic vinegar is not well known. The basic technology to oxidise cooked grape must to produce traditional balsamic vinegar is performed by the so called "seed-vinegar" that is a microbiologically undefined starter culture obtained from spontaneous acetification of previous raw material. Selected starter cultures are the main technological improvement in order to innovate traditional balsamic vinegar production but until now they are rarely applied. To develop acetic acid bacteria starter cultures, selection criteria have to take in account composition of raw material, acetic acid bacteria metabolic activities, applied technology and desired characteristics of the final product. For traditional balsamic vinegar, significative phenotypical traits of acetic acid bacteria have been highlighted. Basic traits are: ethanol preferred and efficient oxidation, fast rate of acetic acid production, tolerance to high concentration of acetic acid, no overoxidation and low pH resistance. Specific traits are tolerance to high sugar concentration and to a wide temperature range. Gluconacetobacter europaeus and Acetobacter malorum strains can be evaluated to develop selected starter cultures since they show one or more suitable characters.

  3. Protein and Amino Acid Restriction, Aging and Disease: from yeast to humans

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Hamed; Suarez, Jorge A.; Longo, Valter D.

    2014-01-01

    Many of the effects of dietary restriction (DR) on longevity and health span in model organisms have been linked to reduced protein and amino acid (AA) intake and the stimulation of specific nutrient signaling pathways. Studies in yeast have shown that addition of serine, threonine, and valine in media promotes cellular sensitization and aging by activating different but connected pathways. Protein or essential AA restriction extends both lifespan and healthspan in rodent models. In humans, protein restriction (PR) has been associated with reduced cancer, diabetes, and overall mortality. Thus, interventions aimed at lowering the intake of proteins or specific AAs can be beneficial and have the potential to be widely adopted and effective in optimizing healthspan. PMID:25153840

  4. Protein and amino acid restriction, aging and disease: from yeast to humans.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamed; Suarez, Jorge A; Longo, Valter D

    2014-11-01

    Many of the effects of dietary restriction (DR) on longevity and health span in model organisms have been linked to reduced protein and amino acid (AA) intake and the stimulation of specific nutrient signaling pathways. Studies in yeast have shown that addition of serine, threonine, and valine in media promotes cellular sensitization and aging by activating different but connected pathways. Protein or essential AA restriction extends both lifespan and healthspan in rodent models. In humans, protein restriction (PR) has been associated with reduced cancer, diabetes, and overall mortality. Thus, interventions aimed at lowering the intake of proteins or specific AAs can be beneficial and have the potential to be widely adopted and effective in optimizing healthspan.

  5. Capacity of lactic acid bacteria in immunity enhancement and cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Riaz Rajoka, Muhammad Shahid; Shi, Junling; Zhu, Jing; Shao, Dongyan; Huang, Qingsheng; Yang, Hui; Jin, Mingliang

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are associated with the human gastrointestinal tract. They are important for maintaining the balance of microflora in the human gut. An increasing number of published research reports in recent years have denoted the importance of producing interferon-gamma and IgA for treatment of disease. These agents can enhance the specific and nonspecific immune systems that are dependent on specific bacterial strains. The mechanisms of these effects were revealed in this investigation, where the cell walls of these bacteria were modulated by the cytokine pathways, while the whole bacterial cell mediated the host cell immune system and regulated the production of tumor necrosis factors and interleukins. A supplement of highly active lactic acid bacteria strains provided significant potential to enhance host's immunity, offering prevention from many diseases including some cancers. This review summarizes the current understanding of the function of lactic acid bacteria immunity enhancement and cancer prevention.

  6. Cutinase-like enzyme from the yeast Cryptococcus sp. strain S-2 hydrolyzes polylactic acid and other biodegradable plastics.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Kazuo; Kamini, Numbi Ramudu; Ikeda, Hiroko; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2005-11-01

    A purified lipase from the yeast Cryptococcus sp. strain S-2 exhibited remote homology to proteins belonging to the cutinase family rather than to lipases. This enzyme could effectively degrade the high-molecular-weight compound polylactic acid, as well as other biodegradable plastics, including polybutylene succinate, poly (epsilon-caprolactone), and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate).

  7. Hydrothermal treatment of oleaginous yeast for the recovery of free fatty acids for use in advanced biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Gonzalez, Isabel; Parashar, Archana; Bressler, David C

    2014-10-10

    Microbial oils hold great potential as a suitable feedstock for the renewable production of biofuels. Specifically, the use of oleaginous yeasts offers several advantages related to cultivation and quality of lipid products. However, one of the major bottlenecks for large-scale production of yeast oils is found in the lipid extraction process. This work investigated the hydrothermal treatment of oleaginous yeast for hydrolysis and lipid extraction resulting in fatty acids used for biofuel production. The oleaginous yeast, Cryptococcus curvatus, was grown in 5 L bioreactors and the biomass slurry with 53±4% lipid content (dry weight basis) was treated at 280 °C for 1h with an initial pressure of 500 psi in batch stainless steel reactors. The hydrolysis product was separated and each of the resulting streams was further characterized. The hexane soluble fraction contained fatty acids from the hydrolysis of yeast triacylglycerides, and was low in nitrogen and minerals and could be directly integrated as feedstock into pyrolysis processing to produce biofuels. The proposed hydrothermal treatment addresses some current technological bottlenecks associated with traditional methodologies such as dewatering, oil extraction and co-product utilization. It also enhances the feasibility of using microbial biomass for production of renewable fuels and chemicals.

  8. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria with potential protective culture characteristics from fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Nurul Huda; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah

    2015-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are also known as beneficial microorganisms abundantly found in fermented food products. In this study, lactic acid bacteria were isolated from fresh cut fruits obtained from local markets. Throughout the isolation process from 11 samples of fruits, 225 presumptive lactic acid bacteria were isolated on MRS agar medium. After catalase and oxidase tests, 149 resulted to fit the characteristics of lactic acid bacteria. Further identification using Gram staining was conducted to identify the Gram positive bacteria. After this confirmation, the fermentation characteristics of these isolates were identified. It was found that 87 (58.4%) isolates were heterofermentative, while the rest of 62 (41.6%) are homofermentative lactic acid bacteria. Later, all these isolates were investigated for the ability to inhibit growth of Staphylococcus aureus using agar spot assay method. Seven (4.7%) isolates showed strong antagonistic capacity, while 127 (85.2%) and 8 (5.4%) isolates have medium and weak antagonistic capacity, respectively. The other 7 (4.7%) isolates indicated to have no antagonistic effect on S. aureus. Results support the potential of LAB isolated in this study which showed strong antagonistic activity against S. aureus may be manipulated to become protective cultures in food products. While the homofermentative or heterofermentative LAB can be utilized in fermentation of food and non-food products depending on the by-products required during the fermentation.

  9. Putrescine production from different amino acid precursors by lactic acid bacteria from wine and cider.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Antonella; Pietroniro, Roberta; Doria, Francesca; Pessione, Enrica; Garcia-Moruno, Emilia

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the production of biogenic amines and particularly putrescine in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) related to wine and cider. We applied an analytical protocol that involves the use of PCR and TLC techniques to determine the production of putrescine from different precursors. Moreover, we also studied the ability of the Lactobacillus and Pediococcus tested to produce histamine and tyramine. The results showed that the majority of the Lactobacillus brevis analyzed harbour both AgDI and tdc genes and are tyramine and putrescine producers. Conversely, among the other LAB tested, only one Lactobacillus hilgardii and one Pediococcus pentosaceus produced putrescine. The AgDI gene was also detected in two other LAB (Lactobacillus mali and Pediococcus parvulus), but no putrescine production was observed. Finally, hdc gene and histamine production were found in strains (L. hilgardii 5211, isolated from wine, and Lactobacillus casei 18, isolated from cider) that were not putrescine producers.

  10. The biodiversity of lactic acid bacteria in Greek traditional wheat sourdoughs is reflected in both composition and metabolite formation.

    PubMed

    De Vuyst, Luc; Schrijvers, Vincent; Paramithiotis, Spiros; Hoste, Bart; Vancanneyt, Marc; Swings, Jean; Kalantzopoulos, George; Tsakalidou, Effie; Messens, Winy

    2002-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from Greek traditional wheat sourdoughs manufactured without the addition of baker's yeast. Application of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of total cell protein, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR, DNA-DNA hybridization, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis, in combination with physiological traits such as fructose fermentation and mannitol production, allowed us to classify the isolated bacteria into the species Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, and Weissella cibaria. This consortium seems to be unique for the Greek traditional wheat sourdoughs studied. Strains of the species W. cibaria have not been isolated from sourdoughs previously. No Lactobacillus pontis or Lactobacillus panis strains were found. An L. brevis-like isolate (ACA-DC 3411 t1) could not be identified properly and might be a new sourdough LAB species. In addition, fermentation capabilities associated with the LAB detected have been studied. During laboratory fermentations, all heterofermentative sourdough LAB strains produced lactic acid, acetic acid, and ethanol. Mannitol was produced from fructose that served as an additional electron acceptor. In addition to glucose, almost all of the LAB isolates fermented maltose, while fructose as the sole carbohydrate source was fermented by all sourdough LAB tested except L. sanfranciscensis. Two of the L. paralimentarius isolates tested did not ferment maltose; all strains were homofermentative. In the presence of both maltose and fructose in the medium, induction of hexokinase activity occurred in all sourdough LAB species mentioned above, explaining why no glucose accumulation was found extracellularly. No maltose phosphorylase activity was found either. These data produced a variable fermentation coefficient and a unique sourdough metabolite composition.

  11. The Biodiversity of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Greek Traditional Wheat Sourdoughs Is Reflected in Both Composition and Metabolite Formation

    PubMed Central

    De Vuyst, Luc; Schrijvers, Vincent; Paramithiotis, Spiros; Hoste, Bart; Vancanneyt, Marc; Swings, Jean; Kalantzopoulos, George; Tsakalidou, Effie; Messens, Winy

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from Greek traditional wheat sourdoughs manufactured without the addition of baker's yeast. Application of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of total cell protein, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR, DNA-DNA hybridization, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis, in combination with physiological traits such as fructose fermentation and mannitol production, allowed us to classify the isolated bacteria into the species Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, and Weissella cibaria. This consortium seems to be unique for the Greek traditional wheat sourdoughs studied. Strains of the species W. cibaria have not been isolated from sourdoughs previously. No Lactobacillus pontis or Lactobacillus panis strains were found. An L. brevis-like isolate (ACA-DC 3411 t1) could not be identified properly and might be a new sourdough LAB species. In addition, fermentation capabilities associated with the LAB detected have been studied. During laboratory fermentations, all heterofermentative sourdough LAB strains produced lactic acid, acetic acid, and ethanol. Mannitol was produced from fructose that served as an additional electron acceptor. In addition to glucose, almost all of the LAB isolates fermented maltose, while fructose as the sole carbohydrate source was fermented by all sourdough LAB tested except L. sanfranciscensis. Two of the L. paralimentarius isolates tested did not ferment maltose; all strains were homofermentative. In the presence of both maltose and fructose in the medium, induction of hexokinase activity occurred in all sourdough LAB species mentioned above, explaining why no glucose accumulation was found extracellularly. No maltose phosphorylase activity was found either. These data produced a variable fermentation coefficient and a unique sourdough metabolite composition. PMID:12450829

  12. A metabolic engineering strategy for producing conjugated linoleic acids using the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Imatoukene, Nabila; Verbeke, Jonathan; Beopoulos, Athanasios; Idrissi Taghki, Abdelghani; Thomasset, Brigitte; Sarde, Claude-Olivier; Nonus, Maurice; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2017-03-29

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) have been found to have beneficial effects on human health when used as dietary supplements. However, their availability is limited because pure, chemistry-based production is expensive, and biology-based fermentation methods can only create small quantities. In an effort to enhance microbial production of CLAs, four genetically modified strains of the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica were generated. These mutants presented various genetic modifications, including the elimination of β-oxidation (pox1-6∆), the inability to store lipids as triglycerides (dga1∆ dga2∆ are1∆ lro1∆), and the overexpression of the Y. lipolytica ∆12-desaturase gene (YlFAD2) under the control of the constitutive pTEF promoter. All strains received two copies of the pTEF-oPAI or pPOX-oPAI expression cassettes; PAI encodes linoleic acid isomerase in Propionibacterium acnes. The strains were cultured in neosynthesis or bioconversion medium in flasks or a bioreactor. The strain combining the three modifications mentioned above showed the best results: when it was grown in neosynthesis medium in a flask, CLAs represented 6.5% of total fatty acids and in bioconversion medium in a bioreactor, and CLA content reached 302 mg/L. In a previous study, a CLA degradation rate of 117 mg/L/h was observed in bioconversion medium. Here, by eliminating β-oxidation, we achieved a much lower rate of 1.8 mg/L/h.

  13. The citric acid production from raw glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica yeast and its regulation.

    PubMed

    Morgunov, Igor G; Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Lunina, Julia N

    2013-08-01

    The optimal cultivation conditions ensuring the maximal rate of citric acid (CA) biosynthesis by glycerol-grown mutant Yarrowia lipolytica NG40/UV7 were found to be as follows: growth limitation by inorganic nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, or sulfur), 28 °C, pH 5.0, dissolved oxygen concentration (pO₂) of 50 % (of air saturation), and pulsed addition of glycerol from 20 to 80 g L⁻¹ depending on the rate of medium titration. Under optimal conditions of fed-batch cultivation, in the medium with pure glycerol, strain Y. lipolytica NG40/UV7 produced 115 g L⁻¹ of CA with the mass yield coefficient of 0.64 g g⁻¹ and isocitric acid (ICA) amounted to 4.6 g L⁻¹; in the medium with raw glycerol, CA production was 112 g L⁻¹ with the mass yield coefficient of 0.90 g g⁻¹ and ICA amounted to 5.3 g L⁻¹. Based on the activities of enzymes involved in the initial stages of raw glycerol assimilation, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle, the mechanism of increased CA yield from glycerol-containing substrates in Y. lipolytica yeast was explained.

  14. Lactic acid-producing yeast cells having nonfunctional L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome C oxidoreductase cells

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Matthew [Boston, MA; Suominen, Pirkko [Maple Grove, MN; Aristidou, Aristos [Highland Ranch, CO; Hause, Benjamin Matthew [Currie, MN; Van Hoek, Pim [Camarillo, CA; Dundon, Catherine Asleson [Minneapolis, MN

    2012-03-20

    Yeast cells having an exogenous lactate dehydrogenase gene ae modified by reducing L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity in the cell. This leads to reduced consumption of lactate by the cell and can increase overall lactate yields in a fermentation process. Cells having the reduced L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity can be screened for by resistance to organic acids such as lactic or glycolic acid.

  15. Sphingolipid biosynthesis upregulation by TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling during yeast adaptive response to acetic acid stress.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Joana F; Muir, Alexander; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Thorner, Jeremy; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2016-12-01

    Acetic acid-induced inhibition of yeast growth and metabolism limits the productivity of industrial fermentation processes, especially when lignocellulosic hydrolysates are used as feedstock in industrial biotechnology. Tolerance to acetic acid of food spoilage yeasts is also a problem in the preservation of acidic foods and beverages. Thus understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation and tolerance to acetic acid stress is increasingly important in industrial biotechnology and the food industry. Prior genetic screens for Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with increased sensitivity to acetic acid identified loss-of-function mutations in the YPK1 gene, which encodes a protein kinase activated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) complex 2 (TORC2). We show in the present study by several independent criteria that TORC2-Ypk1 signaling is stimulated in response to acetic acid stress. Moreover, we demonstrate that TORC2-mediated Ypk1 phosphorylation and activation is necessary for acetic acid tolerance, and occurs independently of Hrk1, a protein kinase previously implicated in the cellular response to acetic acid. In addition, we show that TORC2-Ypk1-mediated activation of l-serine:palmitoyl-CoA acyltransferase, the enzyme complex that catalyzes the first committed step of sphingolipid biosynthesis, is required for acetic acid tolerance. Furthermore, analysis of the sphingolipid pathway using inhibitors and mutants indicates that it is production of certain complex sphingolipids that contributes to conferring acetic acid tolerance. Consistent with that conclusion, promoting sphingolipid synthesis by adding exogenous long-chain base precursor phytosphingosine to the growth medium enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Thus appropriate modulation of the TORC2-Ypk1-sphingolipid axis in industrial yeast strains may have utility in improving fermentations of acetic acid-containing feedstocks.

  16. Growth inhibition of pathogenic bacteria and some yeasts by selected essential oils and survival of L. monocytogenes and C. albicans in apple-carrot juice.

    PubMed

    Irkin, Reyhan; Korukluoglu, Mihriban

    2009-04-01

    Food safety is a fundamental concern of both consumers and the food industry. The increasing incidence of foodborne diseases increases the demand of using antimicrobials in foods. Spices and plants are rich in essential oils and show inhibition activity against microorganisms, which are composed of many compounds. In this research, effects of garlic, bay, black pepper, origanum, orange, thyme, tea tree, mint, clove, and cumin essential oils on Listeria monocytogenes AUFE 39237, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Salmonella enteritidis ATCC 13076, Proteus mirabilis AUFE 43566, Bacillus cereus AUFE 81154, Saccharomyces uvarum UUFE 16732, Kloeckera apiculata UUFE 10628, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Candida oleophila UUPP 94365, and Metschnikowia fructicola UUPP 23067 and effects of thyme oil at a concentration of 0.5% on L. monocytogenes and C. albicans in apple-carrot juice during +4 degrees C storage (first to fifth day) were investigated. Strong antibacterial and antifungal activities of some essential oils were found. Thyme, origanum, clove, and orange essential oils were the most inhibitory against bacteria and yeasts. Cumin, tea tree, and mint oils inhibited the yeasts actively. It is concluded that some essential oils could be used as potential biopreservatives capable of controlling foodborne pathogens and food spoilage yeasts.

  17. Induction of apoptosis in yeast by L-amino acid oxidase from the Malayan pit viper Calloselasma rhodostoma.

    PubMed

    Ande, Sudharsana Rao; Fussi, Heike; Knauer, Heide; Murkovic, Michael; Ghisla, Sandro; Fröhlich, Kai-Uwe; Macheroux, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Here we report for the first time that L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), a major component of snake venom, induces apoptosis in yeast. The causative agent for induction of apoptosis has been shown to be hydrogen peroxide, produced by the enzymatic activity of LAAO. However, the addition of catalase, a specific hydrogen peroxide scavenger, does not prevent cell demise completely. Intriguingly, depletion of leucine from the medium by LAAO and the interaction of LAAO with yeast cells are shown to be the major factors responsible for cell demise in the presence of catalase.

  18. Growth/no growth interfaces of table olive related yeasts for natamycin, citric acid and sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-López, F N; Bautista-Gallego, J; Romero-Gil, V; Rodríguez-Gómez, F; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2012-04-16

    The present work uses a logistic/probabilistic model to obtain the growth/no growth interfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Candida boidinii (three yeast species commonly isolated from table olives) as a function of the diverse combinations of natamycin (0-30 mg/L), citric acid (0.00-0.45%) and sodium chloride (3-6%). Mathematical models obtained individually for each yeast species showed that progressive concentrations of citric acid decreased the effect of natamycin, which was only observed below 0.15% citric acid. Sodium chloride concentrations around 5% slightly increased S. cerevisiae and C. boidinii resistance to natamycin, although concentrations above 6% of NaCl always favoured inhibition by this antimycotic. An overall growth/no growth interface, built considering data from the three yeast species, revealed that inhibition in the absence of citric acid and at 4.5% NaCl can be reached using natamycin concentrations between 12 and 30 mg/L for growth probabilities between 0.10 and 0.01, respectively. Results obtained in this survey show that is not advisable to use jointly natamycin and citric acid in table olive packaging because of the observed antagonistic effects between both preservatives, but table olives processed without citric acid could allow the application of the antifungal.

  19. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; Park, Si-Bum; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Kawada, Teruo

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism.

  20. Antibacterial and antibiofilm activities of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) against periodontopathic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengjun; Zhou, Zichao; Dong, Jiachen; Zhang, Jichun; Xia, Yiru; Shu, Rong

    2016-10-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are two major omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) with antimicrobial properties. In this study, we evaluated the potential antibacterial and antibiofilm activities of DHA and EPA against two periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum). MTT assay showed that DHA and EPA still exhibited no cytotoxicity to human oral tissue cells when the concentration came to 100 μM and 200 μM, respectively. Against P. gingivalis, DHA and EPA showed the same minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 12.5 μM, and a respective minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 12.5 μM and 25 μM. However, the MIC and MBC values of DHA or EPA against F. nucleatum were both greater than 100 μM. For early-stage bacteria, DHA or EPA displayed complete inhibition on the planktonic growth and biofilm formation of P. gingivalis from the lowest concentration of 12.5 μM. And the planktonic growth of F. nucleatum was slightly but not completely inhibited by DHA or EPA even at the concentration of 100 μM, however, the biofilm formation of F. nucleatum at 24 h was significantly restrained by 100 μM EPA. For exponential-phase bacteria, 100 μM DHA or EPA completely killed P. gingivalis and significantly decreased the viable counts of F. nucleatum. Meanwhile, the morphology of P. gingivalis was apparently damaged, and the virulence factor gene expression of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum was strongly downregulated. Besides, the viability and the thickness of mature P. gingivalis biofilm, together with the viability of mature F. nucleatum biofilm were both significantly decreased in the presence of 100 μM DHA or EPA. In conclusion, DHA and EPA possessed antibacterial activities against planktonic and biofilm forms of periodontal pathogens, which suggested that DHA and EPA might be potentially supplementary therapeutic agents for prevention

  1. Isolation and characterization of monochloroacetic acid-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Horisaki, Tadafumi; Yoshida, Eiko; Sumiya, Kaori; Takemura, Tetsuo; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Five Burkholderia strains (CL-1, CL-2, CL-3, CL-4, and CL-5) capable of degrading monochloroacetic acid (MCA) were isolated from activated sludge or soil samples gathered from several parts of Japan. All five isolates were able to grow on MCA as the sole source of carbon and energy, and argentometry and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analyses showed that these five strains consumed MCA completely and released chloride ions stoichiometrically within 25 h. The five isolates also grew on monobromoacetic acid, monoiodoacetic acid, and L-2-monochloropropionic acid as sole sources of carbon and energy. In addition, the five isolates could not grow with DCA but dehalogenate single chlorine from DCA. Because PCR analyses revealed that all five isolates have an identical group II dehalogenase gene fragment and no group I deh gene, only strain CL-1 was analyzed further. The partial amino acid sequence of the group II dehalogenase of strain CL-1, named DehCL1, showed 74.6% and 65.2% identities to corresponding regions of the two MCA dehalogenases, DehCI from Pseudomonas sp. strain CBS-3 and Hdl IVa from Burkholderia cepacia strain MBA4, respectively. The secondary-structure motifs of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily and the amino acid residues involved in substrate binding, catalysis, and hydrophobic pocket formation were conserved in the partial amino acid sequence of DehCL1.

  2. HYDROLYTIC BREAKDOWN OF LACTOFERRICIN BY LACTIC ACID BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactoferricin is a 25 amino acid antimicrobial peptide domain that is liberated by pepsin digestion of lactoferrin in bovine milk. Along with its antibacterial properties, lactoferricin has also been reported to have immunostimulatory, antiviral, and anticarcinogenic effects. There is substantial ...

  3. A Nucleic Acid Probe and Method for the Detection of Shigella and Enteroinvasive E. coli Bacteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This invention relates to nucleic acid probes and a method for the rapid detection of Shigella and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, the causative agents of bacterial dysentery, by use of a nucleic acid hybridization probe, equivalent to a plasmid DNA region encoding one of 4 specific invasion-associated, peptides of all strains of Shigella and enterinvasive E . coli , in a nucleic acid hybridization reaction with a clinical specimen containing dysentery bacteria.

  4. C- and N-catabolic utilization of tricarboxylic acid cycle-related amino acids by Scheffersomyces stipitis and other yeasts.

    PubMed

    Freese, Stefan; Vogts, Tanja; Speer, Falk; Schäfer, Bernd; Passoth, Volkmar; Klinner, Ulrich

    2011-05-01

    Scheffersomyces stipitis and the closely related yeast Candida shehatae assimilated the L-amino acids glutamate, aspartate and proline as both carbon and nitrogen sole sources. We also found this rarely investigated ability in ascomycetous species such as Candida glabrata, C. reukaufii, C. utilis, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces lactis, K. marxianus, Candida albicans, L. elongisporus, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, C. maltosa, Pichia capsulata and Yarrowia lipolytica and in basidiomycetous species such as Rhodotorula rubra and Trichosporon beigelii. Glutamate was a very efficient carbon source for Sc. stipitis, which enabled a high biomass yield/mole, although the growth rate was lower when compared to growth on glucose medium. The cells secreted waste ammonium during growth on glutamate alone. In Sc. stipitis cultures grown in glucose medium containing glutamate as the nitrogen source the biomass yield was maximal, and ethanol concentration and specific ethanol formation rate were significantly higher than in glucose medium containing ammonium as the nitrogen source. Mainly C-assimilation of glutamate but also N-assimilation in glucose-containing medium correlated with enhanced activity of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase 2 (GDH2). A Δgdh2 disruptant was unable to utilize glutamate as either a carbon or a nitrogen source; moreover, this disruptant was also unable to utilize aspartate as a carbon source. The mutation was complemented by retransformation of the GDH2 ORF into the Δgdh2 strain. The results show that Gdh2p plays a dual role in Sc. stipitis as both C- and N-catabolic enzyme, which indicates its role as an interface between the carbon and nitrogen metabolism of this yeast.

  5. Lipid dynamics in yeast under haem-induced unsaturated fatty acid and/or sterol depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Thierry; Régnacq, Matthieu; Alimardani, Parissa; Moreau-Vauzelle, Carole; Bergès, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, UFA (unsaturated fatty acids) and ergosterol syntheses are aerobic processes that require haem. We took advantage of a strain affected in haem synthesis ( hem1 Delta) to starve specifically for one or the other of these essential lipids in order to examine the consequences on the overall lipid composition. Our results demonstrate that reserve lipids (i.e. triacylglycerols and steryl esters) are depleted independently of haem availability and that their UFA and sterol content is not crucial to sustain residual growth under lipid depletion. In parallel to UFA starvation, a net accumulation of SFA (saturated fatty acids) is observed as a consequence of haem biosynthesis preclusion. Interestingly, the excess SFA are not mainly stored within triacylglycerols and steryl esters but rather within specific phospholipid species, with a marked preference for PtdIns. This results in an increase in the cellular PtdIns content. However, neutral lipid homoeostasis is perturbed under haem starvation. The contribution of two lipid particle-associated proteins (namely Tgl1p and Dga1p) to this process is described. PMID:14640980

  6. The amino acid sequence of the aspartate aminotransferase from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, V B; Maras, B; Barra, D; Doonan, S

    1991-01-01

    1. The single (cytosolic) aspartate aminotransferase was purified in high yield from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). 2. Amino-acid-sequence analysis was carried out by digestion of the protein with trypsin and with CNBr; some of the peptides produced were further subdigested with Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase or with pepsin. Peptides were sequenced by the dansyl-Edman method and/or by automated gas-phase methods. The amino acid sequence obtained was complete except for a probable gap of two residues as indicated by comparison with the structures of counterpart proteins in other species. 3. The N-terminus of the enzyme is blocked. Fast-atom-bombardment m.s. was used to identify the blocking group as an acetyl one. 4. Alignment of the sequence of the enzyme with those of vertebrate cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferases and with the enzyme from Escherichia coli showed that about 25% of residues are conserved between these distantly related forms. 5. Experimental details and confirmatory data for the results presented here are given in a Supplementary Publication (SUP 50164, 25 pages) that has been deposited at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa. Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7 BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1991) 273, 5. PMID:1859361

  7. Influence of yeast and lactic acid bacterium on the constituent profile of soy sauce during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Harada, Risa; Yuzuki, Masanobu; Ito, Kotaro; Shiga, Kazuki; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2017-02-01

    Soy sauce is a Japanese traditional seasoning composed of various constituents that are produced by various microbes during a long-term fermentation process. Due to the complexity of the process, the investigation of the constituent profile during fermentation is difficult. Metabolomics, the comprehensive study of low molecular weight compounds in biological samples, is thought to be a promising strategy for deep understanding of the constituent contribution to food flavor characteristics. Therefore, metabolomics is suitable for the analysis of soy sauce fermentation. Unfortunately, only few and unrefined studies of soy sauce fermentation using metabolomics approach have been reported. Therefore, we investigated changes in low molecular weight hydrophilic and volatile compounds of soy sauce using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based non-targeted metabolic profiling. The data were analyzed by statistical analysis to evaluate influences of yeast and lactic acid bacterium on the constituent profile. Consequently, our results suggested a novel finding that lactic acid bacterium affected the production of several constituents such as cyclotene, furfural, furfuryl alcohol and methional in the soy sauce fermentation process.

  8. Bacteriophages of lactic acid bacteria and their impact on milk fermentations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Every biotechnology process that relies on the use of bacteria to make a product or to overproduce a molecule may, at some time, struggle with the presence of virulent phages. For example, phages are the primary cause of fermentation failure in the milk transformation industry. This review focuses on the recent scientific advances in the field of lactic acid bacteria phage research. Three specific topics, namely, the sources of contamination, the detection methods and the control procedures will be discussed. PMID:21995802

  9. Hydroxycinnamic Acids Used as External Acceptors of Electrons: an Energetic Advantage for Strictly Heterofermentative Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Filannino, Pasquale; Gobbetti, Marco; De Angelis, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids by strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (19 strains) was investigated as a potential alternative energy route. Lactobacillus curvatus PE5 was the most tolerant to hydroxycinnamic acids, followed by strains of Weissella spp., Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides, for which the MIC values were the same. The highest sensitivity was found for Lactobacillus rossiae strains. During growth in MRS broth, lactic acid bacteria reduced caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids into dihydrocaffeic, phloretic, and dihydroferulic acids, respectively, or decarboxylated hydroxycinnamic acids into the corresponding vinyl derivatives and then reduced the latter compounds to ethyl compounds. Reductase activities mainly emerged, and the activities of selected strains were further investigated in chemically defined basal medium (CDM) under anaerobic conditions. The end products of carbon metabolism were quantified, as were the levels of intracellular ATP and the NAD+/NADH ratio. Electron and carbon balances and theoretical ATP/glucose yields were also estimated. When CDM was supplemented with hydroxycinnamic acids, the synthesis of ethanol decreased and the concentration of acetic acid increased. The levels of these metabolites reflected on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetate kinase activities. Overall, some biochemical traits distinguished the common metabolism of strictly heterofermentative strains: main reductase activity toward hydroxycinnamic acids, a shift from alcohol dehydrogenase to acetate kinase activities, an increase in the NAD+/NADH ratio, and the accumulation of supplementary intracellular ATP. Taken together, the above-described metabolic responses suggest that strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria mainly use hydroxycinnamic acids as external acceptors of electrons. PMID:25261518

  10. Hydroxycinnamic acids used as external acceptors of electrons: an energetic advantage for strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Filannino, Pasquale; Gobbetti, Marco; De Angelis, Maria; Di Cagno, Raffaella

    2014-12-01

    The metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids by strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (19 strains) was investigated as a potential alternative energy route. Lactobacillus curvatus PE5 was the most tolerant to hydroxycinnamic acids, followed by strains of Weissella spp., Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides, for which the MIC values were the same. The highest sensitivity was found for Lactobacillus rossiae strains. During growth in MRS broth, lactic acid bacteria reduced caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids into dihydrocaffeic, phloretic, and dihydroferulic acids, respectively, or decarboxylated hydroxycinnamic acids into the corresponding vinyl derivatives and then reduced the latter compounds to ethyl compounds. Reductase activities mainly emerged, and the activities of selected strains were further investigated in chemically defined basal medium (CDM) under anaerobic conditions. The end products of carbon metabolism were quantified, as were the levels of intracellular ATP and the NAD(+)/NADH ratio. Electron and carbon balances and theoretical ATP/glucose yields were also estimated. When CDM was supplemented with hydroxycinnamic acids, the synthesis of ethanol decreased and the concentration of acetic acid increased. The levels of these metabolites reflected on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetate kinase activities. Overall, some biochemical traits distinguished the common metabolism of strictly heterofermentative strains: main reductase activity toward hydroxycinnamic acids, a shift from alcohol dehydrogenase to acetate kinase activities, an increase in the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, and the accumulation of supplementary intracellular ATP. Taken together, the above-described metabolic responses suggest that strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria mainly use hydroxycinnamic acids as external acceptors of electrons.

  11. Isolation, characterization and evaluation of probiotic lactic acid bacteria for potential use in animal production.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, Yaneisy; Pérez-Sánchez, Tania; Boucourt, Ramón; Balcázar, José L; Nicoli, Jacques R; Moreira-Silva, João; Rodríguez, Zoraya; Fuertes, Héctor; Nuñez, Odalys; Albelo, Nereyda; Halaihel, Nabil

    2016-10-01

    In livestock production, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are the most common microorganisms used as probiotics. For such use, these bacteria must be correctly identified and characterized to ensure their safety and efficiency. In the present study, LAB were isolated from broiler excreta, where a fermentation process was used. Nine among sixteen isolates were identified by biochemical and molecular (sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene) methods as Lactobacillus crispatus (n=1), Lactobacillus pentosus (n=1), Weissella cibaria (n=1), Pediococcus pentosaceus (n=2) and Enterococcus hirae (n=4). Subsequently, these bacteria were characterized for their growth capabilities, lactic acid production, acidic pH and bile salts tolerance, cell surface hydrophobicity, antimicrobial susceptibility and antagonistic activity. Lactobacillus pentosus strain LB-31, which showed the best characteristics, was selected for further analysis. This strain was administered to broilers and showed the ability of modulating the immune response and producing beneficial effects on morpho-physiological, productive and health indicators of the animals.

  12. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from raw goat milk and effect of farming practices on the dominant species of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tormo, Hélène; Ali Haimoud Lekhal, Djamila; Roques, C

    2015-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria, in particular Lactococcus lactis, play a decisive role in the cheese making process and more particularly in lactic cheeses which are primarily produced on goat dairy farms. The objective of this study was therefore to identify the main lactic acid bacteria found in raw goats' milk from three different regions in France and evaluate if certain farming practices have an effect on the distribution of species of lactic acid bacteria in the various milk samples. Identification at genus or species level was carried out using phenotypic tests and genotypic methods including repetitive element REP-PCR, species-specific PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The distribution of the main bacterial species in the milk samples varied depending on farms and their characteristics. Out of the 146 strains identified, L. lactis was the dominant species (60% of strains), followed by Enterococcus (38%) of which Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Within the species L. lactis, L. lactis subsp lactis was detected more frequently than L. lactis subsp cremoris (74% vs. 26%). The predominance of L. lactis subsp cremoris was linked to geographical area studied. It appears that the animals' environment plays a role in the balance between the dominance of L. lactis and enterococci in raw goats' milk. The separation between the milking parlor and the goat shed (vs no separation) and only straw in the bedding (vs straw and hay) seems to promote L. lactis in the milk (vs enterococci).

  13. Production of Antilisterial Bacteriocins from Lactic Acid Bacteria in Dairy-Based Media: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Ünlü, Gülhan; Nielsen, Barbara; Ionita, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    One hundred and eight strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were screened for bacteriocin production by the modified deferred antagonism and agar well diffusion methods. When the modified deferred antagonism method was employed, 82 LAB strains showed inhibitory action against Listeria monocytogenes v7 ½a, whereas 26 LAB strains expressed no inhibition. Only 12 LAB strains exhibited inhibitory activity when the agar well diffusion method was used, 11 of which had been previously recognized as bacteriocin production positive (Bac(+)). Lactobacillus viridescens NRRL B-1951 was determined, for the first time, to produce an inhibitory compound with a proteinaceous nature. The inhibitory activity was observed in the presence of lipase, α-chymotrypsin, and trypsin, but no inhibition zone could be detected in the presence of proteinase K, indicating the proteinaceous nature of the inhibitory compound. The inhibitory compound was active against Lact. sake ATCC 15521 and Lact. plantarum NCDO 995. Bacteriocin production by the Bac(+) LAB strains was assessed in Lactobacillus MRS Broth as well as in dairy-based media such as nonfat milk, demineralized whey powder, and cheddar cheese whey supplemented with complex nutrient sources that are rich in nitrogen. Lact. sake ATCC 15521 and L. monocytogenes CWD 1002, CWD 1092, CWD 1157, CWD 1198, and v7 ½a were used as indicators. The inhibitory activities of the bacteriocins varied depending on the indicator strains and the growth media used. The LAB indicator strains were found to be more sensitive to inhibition by bacteriocins when compared to the listerial indicator strains. Among the listerial indicators, L. monocytogenes CWD 1002 and CWD 1198 were the most sensitive strains to the bacteriocins investigated in this study. Media composition had a significant influence on bacteriocin production and activity. When compared to demineralized whey powder medium and cheddar cheese whey medium supplemented with whey protein concentrate

  14. Comparative genomics of phages and prophages in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Desiere, Frank; Lucchini, Sacha; Canchaya, Carlos; Ventura, Marco; Brüssow, Harald

    2002-08-01

    Comparative phage genomics has become possible due to the availability of more than 100 complete phage genome sequences and the development of powerful bioinformatics tools. This technology, profiting from classical molecular-biology knowledge, has opened avenues of research for topics, which were difficult to address in the past. Now, it is possible to retrace part of the evolutionary history of phage modules by comparative genomics. The diagnosis of relatedness is hereby not uniquely based on sequence similarity alone, but includes topological considerations of genome organization. Detailed transcription maps have allowed in silico predictions of genome organization to be verified and refined. This comparative knowledge is providing the basis for a new taxonomic classification concept for bacteriophages infecting low G + C-content Gram-positive bacteria based on the genetic organization of the structural gene module. An Sfi21-like and an Sfi11-like genus of Siphoviridae is proposed. The gene maps of many phages show remarkable synteny in their structural genes defining a lambda super-group within Siphoviridae. A hierarchy of relatedness within the lambda super-group suggests elements of vertical evolution in Siphoviridae. Tailed phages are the result of both vertical and horizontal evolution and are thus fascinating objects for the study of molecular evolution. Prophage sequences integrated into the genomes of their bacterial host present theoretical challenges for evolutionary biologists. Prophages represent up to 10% of the genome in some LAB. In pathogenic streptococci prophages confer genes of selective value for the lysogenic cell. The lysogenic conversion genes are located between the lysin gene and the right phage attachment site. Non-attributed genes were found at the same genome position of prophages from lactic streptococci. These genes belong to the few prophage genes transcribed in the lysogen. Prophages from dairy bacteria might therefore also

  15. Inactivation of Gram-Positive Bacteria by Novel Phenolic Branched-Chain Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuetong; Wagner, Karen; Sokorai, Kimberly J B; Ngo, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Novel phenolic branched-chain fatty acids (PBC-FAs) were evaluated for their antimicrobial properties against both gram-positive ( Listeria innocua , Bacillus subtilis , Enterococcus faecium ) and gram-negative ( Escherichia coli , Salmonella Typhimurium, and Pseudomonas tolaasii ) bacteria. In addition, PBC-FA derivatives, such as PBC-FA methyl ester mixture, methyl-branched fatty acid mixtures, and trimethylsilyl-PBC-FA methyl esters, were synthesized to study the structure activity relationship. Results showed that PBC-FAs were a potent antimicrobial against gram-positive bacteria with MICs of 1.8 to 3.6 μg/ml. The compounds were less effective against gram-negative bacteria. Derivatives of PBC-FAs and an equimolar mixture of oleic acid and phenol all had MICs above 233 μg/ml against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Comparison of antimicrobial activities of the PBC-FAs with those of the derivatives suggests that the carboxylic group in the fatty acid moiety and the hydroxyl group on the phenol moiety were responsible for the antimicrobial efficacy. Growth curves of L. innocua revealed that PBC-FAs prevented bacterial growth, while MBC-FAs only delayed the onset of rapid growth of L. innocua . Our results demonstrated that the novel PBC-FAs have potential for use as antimicrobials against gram-positive bacteria.

  16. [Comparative genomics and evolutionary analysis of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Kai, Xia; Xinle, Liang; Yudong, Li

    2015-12-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) is a widespread adaptive immunity system that exists in most archaea and many bacteria against foreign DNA, such as phages, viruses and plasmids. In general, CRISPR system consists of direct repeat, leader, spacer and CRISPR-associated sequences. Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role in industrial fermentation of vinegar and bioelectrochemistry. To investigate the polymorphism and evolution pattern of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria, bioinformatic analyses were performed on 48 species from three main genera (Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter and Gluconobacter) with whole genome sequences available from the NCBI database. The results showed that the CRISPR system existed in 32 species of the 48 strains studied. Most of the CRISPR-Cas system in AAB belonged to type I CRISPR-Cas system (subtype E and C), but type II CRISPR-Cas system which contain cas9 gene was only found in the genus Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The repeat sequences of some CRISPR were highly conserved among species from different genera, and the leader sequences of some CRISPR possessed conservative motif, which was associated with regulated promoters. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of cas1 demonstrated that they were suitable for classification of species. The conservation of cas1 genes was associated with that of repeat sequences among different strains, suggesting they were subjected to similar functional constraints. Moreover, the number of spacer was positively correlated with the number of prophages and insertion sequences, indicating the acetic acid bacteria were continually invaded by new foreign DNA. The comparative analysis of CRISR loci in acetic acid bacteria provided the basis for investigating the molecular mechanism of different acetic acid tolerance and genome stability in acetic acid bacteria.

  17. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for metabolic footprinting of co-cultures of lactic and propionic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Honoré, Anders H; Thorsen, Michael; Skov, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Co-cultures of specific lactic and propionic acid bacteria have been shown to have an antagonistic effect against yeast and moulds in dairy systems. In studies of these co-cultures by bioassay-guided fractionation and analysis, numerous compounds have been reported to inhibit yeast and moulds. Although active, the compounds do not account for the full effect observed. Instead, the inhibitory action in the co-culture is believed to be a result of synergy between known exo-metabolites, depletion of nutrients, and/or compounds not yet identified. Untargeted metabolomics or metabolic footprinting could be a potent approach to elucidation of the mechanism. The purpose of this review is to discuss the two pre-requisites for such a study--the compound classes expected in the co-cultures, and on the basis of these, the most suitable analytical technique(s). Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) via electrospray ionisation (ESI) operated in both positive and negative modes is regarded as the optimum instrumental technique. The applicability of a range of liquid chromatographic techniques ranging from ion-pair (IPC) and hydrophilic interaction (HILIC) to reversed-phase chromatography (RPC) is discussed in terms of the expected metabolome. Use of both HILIC and RPC is suggested, on account of the complementarity of these modes. The most promising strategy uses a combination of the two electrospray polarities and two modes of LC. The strategy recommended in this study does not include all compound classes, and suggestions for supplementary methods are listed.

  18. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; and others

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis.

  19. Analysis of Growth Inhibition and Metabolism of Hydroxycinnamic Acids by Brewing and Spoilage Strains of Brettanomyces Yeast.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Michael; Harris, Chad

    2015-10-15

    Brettanomyces yeasts are well-known as spoilage organisms in both the wine and beer industries, but also contribute important desirable characters to certain beer styles. These properties are mediated in large part by Brettanomyces' metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) present in beverage raw materials. Here we compare growth inhibition by, and metabolism of, HCAs among commercial brewing strains and spoilage strains of B. bruxellensis and B. anomalus. These properties vary widely among the different strains tested and between the HCAs analyzed. Brewing strains showed more efficient metabolism of ferulic acid over p-coumaric acid, a trait not shared among the spoilage strains.

  20. Analysis of Growth Inhibition and Metabolism of Hydroxycinnamic Acids by Brewing and Spoilage Strains of Brettanomyces Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Michael; Harris, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Brettanomyces yeasts are well-known as spoilage organisms in both the wine and beer industries, but also contribute important desirable characters to certain beer styles. These properties are mediated in large part by Brettanomyces’ metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) present in beverage raw materials. Here we compare growth inhibition by, and metabolism of, HCAs among commercial brewing strains and spoilage strains of B. bruxellensis and B. anomalus. These properties vary widely among the different strains tested and between the HCAs analyzed. Brewing strains showed more efficient metabolism of ferulic acid over p-coumaric acid, a trait not shared among the spoilage strains. PMID:28231223

  1. The antifungal eugenol perturbs dual aromatic and branched-chain amino acid permeases in the cytoplasmic membrane of yeast.

    PubMed

    Darvishi, Emad; Omidi, Mansoor; Bushehri, Ali Akbar Shahnejat; Golshani, Ashkan; Smith, Myron L

    2013-01-01

    Eugenol is an aromatic component of clove oil that has therapeutic potential as an antifungal drug, although its mode of action and precise cellular target(s) remain ambiguous. To address this knowledge gap, a chemical-genetic profile analysis of eugenol was done using ∼4700 haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene deletion mutants to reveal 21 deletion mutants with the greatest degree of susceptibility. Cellular roles of deleted genes in the most susceptible mutants indicate that the main targets for eugenol include pathways involved in biosynthesis and transport of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids. Follow-up analyses showed inhibitory effects of eugenol on amino acid permeases in the yeast cytoplasmic membrane. Furthermore, phenotypic suppression analysis revealed that eugenol interferes with two permeases, Tat1p and Gap1p, which are both involved in dual transport of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids through the yeast cytoplasmic membrane. Perturbation of cytoplasmic permeases represents a novel antifungal target and may explain previous observations that exposure to eugenol results in leakage of cell contents. Eugenol exposure may also contribute to amino acid starvation and thus holds promise as an anticancer therapeutic drug. Finally, this study provides further evidence of the usefulness of the yeast Gene Deletion Array approach in uncovering the mode of action of natural health products.

  2. Plasmids from Food Lactic Acid Bacteria: Diversity, Similarity, and New Developments.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanhua; Hu, Tong; Qu, Xiaojun; Zhang, Lanwei; Ding, Zhongqing; Dong, Aijun

    2015-06-10

    Plasmids are widely distributed in different sources of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as self-replicating extrachromosomal genetic materials, and have received considerable attention due to their close relationship with many important functions as well as some industrially relevant characteristics of the LAB species. They are interesting with regard to the development of food-grade cloning vectors. This review summarizes new developments in the area of lactic acid bacteria plasmids and aims to provide up to date information that can be used in related future research.

  3. Acetic Acid Bacteria and the Production and Quality of Wine Vinegar

    PubMed Central

    Torija, María Jesús; García-Parrilla, María del Carmen; Troncoso, Ana María

    2014-01-01

    The production of vinegar depends on an oxidation process that is mainly performed by acetic acid bacteria. Despite the different methods of vinegar production (more or less designated as either “fast” or “traditional”), the use of pure starter cultures remains far from being a reality. Uncontrolled mixed cultures are normally used, but this review proposes the use of controlled mixed cultures. The acetic acid bacteria species determine the quality of vinegar, although the final quality is a combined result of technological process, wood contact, and aging. This discussion centers on wine vinegar and evaluates the effects of these different processes on its chemical and sensory properties. PMID:24574887

  4. Plasmids from Food Lactic Acid Bacteria: Diversity, Similarity, and New Developments

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yanhua; Hu, Tong; Qu, Xiaojun; Zhang, Lanwei; Ding, Zhongqing; Dong, Aijun

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids are widely distributed in different sources of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as self-replicating extrachromosomal genetic materials, and have received considerable attention due to their close relationship with many important functions as well as some industrially relevant characteristics of the LAB species. They are interesting with regard to the development of food-grade cloning vectors. This review summarizes new developments in the area of lactic acid bacteria plasmids and aims to provide up to date information that can be used in related future research. PMID:26068451

  5. Acetic acid bacteria and the production and quality of wine vinegar.

    PubMed

    Mas, Albert; Torija, María Jesús; García-Parrilla, María del Carmen; Troncoso, Ana María

    2014-01-01

    The production of vinegar depends on an oxidation process that is mainly performed by acetic acid bacteria. Despite the different methods of vinegar production (more or less designated as either "fast" or "traditional"), the use of pure starter cultures remains far from being a reality. Uncontrolled mixed cultures are normally used, but this review proposes the use of controlled mixed cultures. The acetic acid bacteria species determine the quality of vinegar, although the final quality is a combined result of technological process, wood contact, and aging. This discussion centers on wine vinegar and evaluates the effects of these different processes on its chemical and sensory properties.

  6. Acetic acid inhibits nutrient uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: auxotrophy confounds the use of yeast deletion libraries for strain improvement.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Bierma, Jan; Smith, Mark R; Poliner, Eric; Wolfe, Carole; Hadduck, Alex N; Zara, Severino; Jirikovic, Mallori; van Zee, Kari; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2013-08-01

    Acetic acid inhibition of yeast fermentation has a negative impact in several industrial processes. As an initial step in the construction of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with increased tolerance for acetic acid, mutations conferring resistance were identified by screening a library of deletion mutants in a multiply auxotrophic genetic background. Of the 23 identified mutations, 11 were then introduced into a prototrophic laboratory strain for further evaluation. Because none of the 11 mutations was found to increase resistance in the prototrophic strain, potential interference by the auxotrophic mutations themselves was investigated. Mutants carrying single auxotrophic mutations were constructed and found to be more sensitive to growth inhibition by acetic acid than an otherwise isogenic prototrophic strain. At a concentration of 80 mM acetic acid at pH 4.8, the initial uptake of uracil, leucine, lysine, histidine, tryptophan, phosphate, and glucose was lower in the prototrophic strain than in a non-acetic acid-treated control. These findings are consistent with two mechanisms by which nutrient uptake may be inhibited. Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were severely decreased upon acetic acid treatment, which likely slowed ATP-dependent proton symport, the major form of transport in yeast for nutrients other than glucose. In addition, the expression of genes encoding some nutrient transporters was repressed by acetic acid, including HXT1 and HXT3 that encode glucose transporters that operate by facilitated diffusion. These results illustrate how commonly used genetic markers in yeast deletion libraries complicate the effort to isolate strains with increased acetic acid resistance.

  7. Metagenomic analysis of medicinal Cannabis samples; pathogenic bacteria, toxigenic fungi, and beneficial microbes grow in culture-based yeast and mold tests.

    PubMed

    McKernan, Kevin; Spangler, Jessica; Helbert, Yvonne; Lynch, Ryan C; Devitt-Lee, Adrian; Zhang, Lei; Orphe, Wendell; Warner, Jason; Foss, Theodore; Hudalla, Christopher J; Silva, Matthew; Smith, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    Background: The presence of bacteria and fungi in medicinal or recreational Cannabis poses a potential threat to consumers if those microbes include pathogenic or toxigenic species. This study evaluated two widely used culture-based platforms for total yeast and mold (TYM) testing marketed by 3M Corporation and Biomérieux, in comparison with a quantitative PCR (qPCR) approach marketed by Medicinal Genomics Corporation. Methods: A set of 15 medicinal Cannabis samples were analyzed using 3M and Biomérieux culture-based platforms and by qPCR to quantify microbial DNA. All samples were then subjected to next-generation sequencing and metagenomics analysis to enumerate the bacteria and fungi present before and after growth on culture-based media. Results: Several pathogenic or toxigenic bacterial and fungal species were identified in proportions of >5% of classified reads on the samples, including Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Ralstonia pickettii, Salmonella enterica, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Aspergillus ostianus, Aspergillus sydowii, Penicillium citrinum and Penicillium steckii. Samples subjected to culture showed substantial shifts in the number and diversity of species present, including the failure of Aspergillus species to grow well on either platform. Substantial growth of Clostridium botulinum and other bacteria were frequently observed on one or both of the culture-based TYM platforms. The presence of plant growth promoting (beneficial) fungal species further influenced the differential growth of species in the microbiome of each sample. Conclusions: These findings have important implications for the Cannabis and food safety testing industries.

  8. Growth-inhibition of hiochi bacteria in namazake (raw sake) by bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Ishiyama, Yohei; Takata, Takeomi; Nakanishi, Toshihiro; Kaneoke, Mitsuoki; Watanabe, Ken-ichi; Yanagida, Fujitoshi; Chen, Yi-sheng; Kouya, Tomoaki; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2010-06-01

    The bacteriocins produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C101910 (C101910) and NBRC 12007 (NBRC 12007) were used to prevent the growth of sake spoiling hiochi bacteria (Lactobacillus hilgardii, Lactobacillus fructivorans, and Lactobacillus paracasei) in namazake, which is raw (unpasteurized) sake. The bacteriocin concentrations required for decreasing the viable cell concentrations of L. hilgardii and L. fructivorans below the detection limit (1.0 x 10(2) cells/ml) in 24 h from the initial concentration of 4.0-9.5 x 10(5) cells/ml in the namazake at pH 4.5 and at 4 degrees C, were 18-35 U/ml and 5.6 U/ml for the bacteriocin from C101910 and NBRC 12007, respectively. To decrease the viable cell concentration of L. paracasei from the initial concentration of 7.5 x 10(5) cells/ml to below the detection limit (1.0 x 10(2) cells/ml) in 24 h, 350 U/ml bacteriocin from C101910 and 140 U/ml bacteriocin from NBRC 12007 were required. In experiments using McIlvaine buffer (pH 4.5) with 15% ethanol instead of namazake as the medium, the viable cell concentrations of L. hilgardii and L. paracasei decreased to less than 1.0 x 10(2) cells/ml, whereas those of L. fructivorans decreased to less than 1.0 x 10(3) cells/ml, when bacteriocins were added at the concentrations that had proven effective in namazake. The membrane depolarization assay using a fluorescent probe showed that the presence of ethanol stimulated the collapse of the membrane potential induced by bacteriocins. The ethanol induced collapse of the membrane potential suggests that the application of bacteriocins at the storage stage of namazake is more beneficial than when used in other stages of the sake brewing process.

  9. Diversity of culturable yeasts in phylloplane of sugarcane in Thailand and their capability to produce indole-3-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Limtong, Savitree; Kaewwichian, Rungluk; Yongmanitchai, Wichien; Kawasaki, Hiroko

    2014-06-01

    Yeasts were isolated by the enrichment technique from the phylloplane of 94 samples of sugarcane leaf collected from seven provinces in Thailand. All sugarcane leaf samples contained yeasts and 158 yeast strains were obtained. On the basis of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit rRNA gene sequence analysis, 144 strains were identified to 24 known species in 14 genera belonging to the Ascomycota viz. Candida akabanensis, Candida dendronema, Candida mesorugosa, Candida michaelii, Candida nivariensis, Candida rugosa, Candida orthopsilosis, Candida quercitrusa, Candida tropicalis, Candida xylopsoci, Cyberlindnera fabianii, Cyberlindnera rhodanensis, Debaryomyces nepalensis, Hannaella aff. coprosmaensis, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Lachancea thermotolerans, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Metschnikowia koreensis, Meyerozyma caribbica, Millerozyma koratensis, Pichia kudriavzevii, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Wickerhamomyces edaphicus, and 12 species in six genera of the Basidiomycota viz . Cryptococcus flavescens, Cryptococcus laurentii, Cryptococcus rajasthanensis, Kwoniella heveanensis, Rhodosporidium fluviale, Rhodosporidium paludigenum, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Rhodotorula sesimbrana, Rhodotorula taiwanensis, Sporidiobolus ruineniae, Sporobolomyces carnicolor and Sporobolomyces nylandii. Seven strains were identical or similar to four undescribed species. Another seven strains represented four novels species in the genus Metschnikowia, Nakazawaea, Wickerhamomyces and Yamadazyma. The results revealed 69 % of the isolated strains were ascomycete yeasts and 31 % were basidiomycete yeast. The most prevalent species was M. caribbica with a 23 % frequency of occurrence followed by Rh. taiwanensis (11 %) and C. tropicalis (10 %). All strains were assessed for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) producing capability showing that 69 strains had the capability of producing IAA when cultivated in yeast extract peptone dextrose broth supplemented with 1

  10. Sulfuric acid hydrolysis and detoxification of red alga Pterocladiella capillacea for bioethanol fermentation with thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Hui; Chien, Wei-Chen; Chou, Han-Kai; Yang, Jungwoo; Lin, Hong-Ting Victor

    2014-09-01

    One-step sulfuric acid saccharification of the red alga Pterocladiella capillacea was optimized, and various detoxification methods (neutralization, overliming, and electrodialysis) of the acid hydrolysate were evaluated for fermentation with the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus. A proximate composition analysis indicated that P. capillacea was rich in carbohydrates. A significant galactose recovery of 81.1 ± 5% was also achieved under the conditions of a 12% (w/v) biomass load, 5% (v/v) sulfuric acid, 121°C, and hydrolysis for 30 min. Among the various detoxification methods, electrodialysis was identified as the most suitable for fermentable sugar recovery and organic acid removal (100% reduction of formic and levulinic acids), even though it failed to reduce the amount of the inhibitor 5-HMF. As a result, K. marxianus fermentation with the electrodialyzed acid hydrolysate of P. capillacea resulted in the best ethanol levels and fermentation efficiency.

  11. Local domestication of lactic acid bacteria via cassava beer fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Meadow, James F.; Liebert, Melissa A.; Cepon-Robins, Tara J.; Gildner, Theresa E.; Urlacher, Samuel S.; Bohannan, Brendan J.M.; Snodgrass, J. Josh; Sugiyama, Lawrence S.

    2014-01-01

    Cassava beer, or chicha, is typically consumed daily by the indigenous Shuar people of the Ecuadorian Amazon. This traditional beverage made from cassava tuber (Manihot esculenta) is thought to improve nutritional quality and flavor while extending shelf life in a tropical climate. Bacteria responsible for chicha fermentation could be a source of microbes for the human microbiome, but little is known regarding the microbiology of chicha. We investigated bacterial community composition of chicha batches using Illumina high-throughput sequencing. Fermented chicha samples were collected from seven Shuar households in two neighboring villages in the Morona-Santiago region of Ecuador, and the composition of the bacterial communities within each chicha sample was determined by sequencing a region of the 16S ribosomal gene. Members of the genus Lactobacillus dominated all samples. Significantly greater phylogenetic similarity was observed among chicha samples taken within a village than those from different villages. Community composition varied among chicha samples, even those separated by short geographic distances, suggesting that ecological and/or evolutionary processes, including human-mediated factors, may be responsible for creating locally distinct ferments. Our results add to evidence from other fermentation systems suggesting that traditional fermentation may be a form of domestication, providing endemic beneficial inocula for consumers, but additional research is needed to identify the mechanisms and extent of microbial dispersal. PMID:25071997

  12. Nucleotide sequence of a lysine transfer ribonucleic Acid from bakers' yeast.

    PubMed

    Madison, J T; Boguslawski, S J; Teetor, G H

    1972-05-12

    The nucleotide sequence of one of the two major lysine transfer RNA's from bakers' yeast has been determined. Its structure is compared to that of a lysine tRNA from a haploid yeast. A total of 21 nucleotides differ in the two molecules. Only the T-psi-C-G (thymidine-pseudouridine-cytidine-guanosine) loop and its supporting stem are identical.

  13. Lactic acid bacteria in dairy food: surface characterization and interactions with food matrix components.

    PubMed

    Burgain, J; Scher, J; Francius, G; Borges, F; Corgneau, M; Revol-Junelles, A M; Cailliez-Grimal, C; Gaiani, C

    2014-11-01

    This review gives an overview of the importance of interactions occurring in dairy matrices between Lactic Acid Bacteria and milk components. Dairy products are important sources of biological active compounds of particular relevance to human health. These compounds include immunoglobulins, whey proteins and peptides, polar lipids, and lactic acid bacteria including probiotics. A better understanding of interactions between bioactive components and their delivery matrix may successfully improve their transport to their target site of action. Pioneering research on probiotic lactic acid bacteria has mainly focused on their host effects. However, very little is known about their interaction with dairy ingredients. Such knowledge could contribute to designing new and more efficient dairy food, and to better understand relationships between milk constituents. The purpose of this review is first to provide an overview of the current knowledge about the biomolecules produced on bacterial surface and the composition of the dairy matter. In order to understand how bacteria interact with dairy molecules, adhesion mechanisms are subsequently reviewed with a special focus on the environmental conditions affecting bacterial adhesion. Methods dedicated to investigate the bacterial surface and to decipher interactions between bacteria and abiotic dairy components are also detailed. Finally, relevant industrial implications of these interactions are presented and discussed.

  14. Identification and Characteristics of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Sour Dough Sponges.

    PubMed

    Okada, S; Ishikawa, M; Yoshida, I; Uchimura, T; Ohara, N; Kozaki, M

    1992-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria in four samples of sour dough sponges were studied quantitatively and qualitatively. In each sponge, there were one or two species of the genus Lactobacillus: L. reuteri and L. curvatus in San Francisco sour dough sponge, L. brevis and L. hilgardii in panettone sour dough sponge produced in Italy, L. sanfrancisco from a rye sour dough sponge produced in Germany, and L. casei and L. curvatus from a rye sour dough sponge produced in Switzerland. For all isolates except the L. reuteri strains oleic acid, a component of the Tween 80 added to the medium, was essential for growth. It was of interest that lactobacilli requiring oleic acid were the predominant flora of lactic acid bacteria in the microbial environment of sour dough sponges.

  15. Heterologous surface display on lactic acid bacteria: non-GMO alternative?

    PubMed

    Zadravec, Petra; Štrukelj, Borut; Berlec, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are food-grade hosts for surface display with potential applications in food and therapy. Alternative approaches to surface display on LAB would avoid the use of recombinant DNA technology and genetically-modified organism (GMO)-related regulatory requirements. Non-covalent surface display of proteins can be achieved by fusing them to various cell-wall binding domains, of which the Lysine motif domain (LysM) is particularly well studied. Fusion proteins have been isolated from recombinant bacteria or from their growth medium and displayed on unmodified bacteria, enabling heterologous surface display. This was demonstrated on non-viable cells devoid of protein content, termed bacteria-like particles, and on various species of genus Lactobacillus. Of the latter, Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 was recently shown to be particularly amenable for LysM-mediated display. Possible regulatory implications of heterologous surface display are discussed, particularly those relevant for the European Union.

  16. Heterologous surface display on lactic acid bacteria: non-GMO alternative?

    PubMed Central

    Zadravec, Petra; Štrukelj, Borut; Berlec, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are food-grade hosts for surface display with potential applications in food and therapy. Alternative approaches to surface display on LAB would avoid the use of recombinant DNA technology and genetically-modified organism (GMO)-related regulatory requirements. Non-covalent surface display of proteins can be achieved by fusing them to various cell-wall binding domains, of which the Lysine motif domain (LysM) is particularly well studied. Fusion proteins have been isolated from recombinant bacteria or from their growth medium and displayed on unmodified bacteria, enabling heterologous surface display. This was demonstrated on non-viable cells devoid of protein content, termed bacteria-like particles, and on various species of genus Lactobacillus. Of the latter, Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 was recently shown to be particularly amenable for LysM-mediated display. Possible regulatory implications of heterologous surface display are discussed, particularly those relevant for the European Union. PMID:25880164

  17. Synthesis of green note aroma compounds by biotransformation of fatty acids using yeast cells coexpressing lipoxygenase and hydroperoxide lyase.

    PubMed

    Buchhaupt, Markus; Guder, Jan Christopher; Etschmann, Maria Magdalena Walburga; Schrader, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Green notes are substances that characterize the aroma of freshly cut grass, cucumbers, green apples, and foliage. In plants, they are synthesized by conversion of linolenic or linoleic acid via the enzymes lipoxygenase (LOX) and hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) to short-chained aldehydes. Current processes for production of natural green notes rely on plant homogenates as enzyme sources but are limited by low enzyme concentration and low specificity. In an alternative approach, soybean LOX2 and watermelon HPL were overexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. After optimization of the expression constructs, a yeast strain coexpressing LOX and HPL was applied in whole cell biotransformation experiments. Whereas addition of linolenic acid to growing cultures of this strain yielded no products, we were able to identify high green note concentrations when resting cells were used. The primary biotransformation product was 3(Z)-hexenal, a small amount of which isomerized to 2(E)-hexenal. Furthermore, both aldehydes were reduced to the corresponding green note alcohols by endogenous yeast alcohol dehydrogenase to some extent. As the cosolvent ethanol was the source of reducing equivalents for green note alcohol formation, the hexenal/hexenol ratio could be influenced by the use of alternative cosolvents. Further investigations to identify the underlying mechanism of the rather low biocatalyst stability revealed a high toxicity of linolenic acid to yeast cells. The whole cell catalyst containing LOX and HPL enzyme activity described here can be a promising approach towards a highly efficient microbial green note synthesis process.

  18. Effects of live yeast on the performance, nutrient digestibility, gastrointestinal microbiota and concentration of volatile fatty acids in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieyun; Li, Defa; Gong, Limin; Ma, Yongxi; He, Yonghui; Zhai, Hengxiao

    2006-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of live yeast supplementation on performance, nutrient digestibility, enteric microbial populations and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration of weanling pigs, receiving diets supplemented with aureomycin and elevated doses of CuSO4. In experiment 1, 90 crossbred pigs (7.20 +/- 0.44 kg, 28 d of age) were randomly allotted to one of five dietary treatments containing either 0, 4.0 x 10(6), 9.0 x 10(6), 2.6 x 10(7), or 5.1 x 10(7) cfu Saccharomyces cerevisiae per gram with six replicate pens per treatment and three pigs per pen. BWG and feed intake increased quadratically during days 1-14 and days 1-28 as live yeast levels increased (p < 0.01). Pigs fed the diet containing 2.6 x 10(7) cfu yeast per gram had the highest BWG and feed intake among the treatments. In experiment 2, 48 crossbred pigs (7.64 +/- 0.72 kg, 28 d of age) were fed diets containing live yeast at 0 or 3.2 x 10(7) cfu of S. cerevisiae per g with six replicate pens per treatment and four pigs per pen. The yeast supplementation improved BWG and feed intake during days 1-14 (p < 0.01) and days 1-28 (p < 0.05). Treatment differences were not observed in any of the bacterial populations, yeast numbers or VFA concentrations, at any of the sites of the gastrointestinal tract tested. Total tract nutrient digestibility was also not different between treatments. Overall, dietary supplementation of live yeast had a positive effect on BWG and feed intake of weanling pigs, receiving diets supplemented with aureomycin and elevated doses of CuSO4. The improvement in BWG appears to be partly related to an increase in feed intake. The mechanism of yeast improving feed intake of piglets needs to be explored.

  19. Bacteria and acid drainage from coal refuse: inhibition by sodium lauryl sulphate and sodium benzoate

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, P.R.; Apel, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Studies have shown that the application of an aqueous solution of sodium lauryl sulphate and sodium benzoate to the surface of high-sulphur coal refuse inhibits the activity of iron- and sulphur-oxidising chemo-autotrophic bacteria and reduces the amount of acid drainage from the refuse. Further studies are recommended to assess the usefulness of this method for controlling formation of acid mine drainage in the field.

  20. In vitro evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of eugenol, limonene, and citrus extract against bacteria and yeasts, representative of the spoiling microflora of fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Antonio; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2010-05-01

    This article reports on the investigation on the bioactivity of eugenol, limonene, and citrus extract against three bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, and Bacillus coagulans) and three yeasts (Saccharomyces bayanus, Pichia membranifaciens, and Rhodotorula bacarum), representing the spoilage microflora of fruit juices. The experiments were performed with laboratory media by using a microdilution method. Data were fitted using the Gompertz equation, and the kinetic parameters were used to evaluate the MIC and the dose-dependent effect (at suboptimal doses for each essential oil). Citrus extract was the most effective essential oil, and the results suggested the following susceptibility hierarchy, from the most sensitive microorganism to the most resistant one (values in parentheses represent MICs): S. bayanus (2 ppm) > R. bacarum (3 ppm) > P. membranifaciens (5 ppm) > B. coagulans (cells, 20 ppm) > L. brevis (40 ppm) > L. plantarum (>40 ppm).

  1. Optimum detection times for bacteria and yeast species with the BACTEC 9120 aerobic blood culture system: evaluation for a 5-year period in a Turkish university hospital.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, Gül; Us, Tercan; Aydinli, Aydin; Kiremitci, Abdurrahman; Kiraz, Nuri; Akgün, Yurdanur

    2003-02-01

    We tracked and documented the time of positivity of blood cultures by using the BACTEC 9120 (Becton Dickinson Diagnostic Instrument Systems) blood culture system over a 5-year study period. A 7-day protocol of the incubation period was selected, and a total of 11156 blood cultures were evaluated. The clinically significant microorganisms (32.95%) were isolated in 3676 specimens. Gram-positive and -negative bacterial isolation rates were found to be 41.07 and 44.88%, respectively. Yeasts were found in 14.03% of all pathogens. Both the false-positivity and -negativity rates were very low (0.1 and 0.3%, respectively). The mean detection times for all of the pathogens were determined to be 19.45 h. Yeasts, nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria, and Brucella melitensis strains were isolated within 5 days. By taking these data into account, we decided to establish a 5-day-incubation protocol in our laboratory instead of the 7 days that are commonly used.

  2. Prospective evaluation of the VITEK MS for the routine identification of bacteria and yeast in the clinical microbiology laboratory: assessment of accuracy of identification and turnaround time.

    PubMed

    Charnot-Katsikas, Angella; Tesic, Vera; Boonlayangoor, Sue; Bethel, Cindy; Frank, Karen M

    2014-02-01

    This study assessed the accuracy of bacterial and yeast identification using the VITEK MS, and the time to reporting of isolates before and after its implementation in routine clinical practice. Three hundred and sixty-two isolates of bacteria and yeast, consisting of a variety of clinical isolates and American Type Culture Collection strains, were tested. Results were compared with reference identifications from the VITEK 2 system and with 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The VITEK MS provided an acceptable identification to species level for 283 (78 %) isolates. Considering organisms for which genus-level identification is acceptable for routine clinical care, 315 isolates (87 %) had an acceptable identification. Six isolates (2 %) were identified incorrectly, five of which were Shigella species. Finally, the time for reporting the identifications was decreased significantly after implementation of the VITEK MS for a total mean reduction in time of 10.52 h (P<0.0001). Overall, accuracy of the VITEK MS was comparable or superior to that from the VITEK 2. The findings were also comparable to other studies examining the accuracy of the VITEK MS, although differences exist, depending on the diversity of species represented as well as on the versions of the databases used. The VITEK MS can be incorporated effectively into routine use in a clinical microbiology laboratory and future expansion of the database should provide improved accuracy for the identification of micro-organisms.

  3. Optimum Detection Times for Bacteria and Yeast Species with the BACTEC 9120 Aerobic Blood Culture System: Evaluation for a 5-Year Period in a Turkish University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Durmaz, Gül; Us, Tercan; Aydinli, Aydin; Kiremitci, Abdurrahman; Kiraz, Nuri; Akgün, Yurdanur

    2003-01-01

    We tracked and documented the time of positivity of blood cultures by using the BACTEC 9120 (Becton Dickinson Diagnostic Instrument Systems) blood culture system over a 5-year study period. A 7-day protocol of the incubation period was selected, and a total of 11,156 blood cultures were evaluated. The clinically significant microorganisms (32.95%) were isolated in 3,676 specimens. Gram-positive and -negative bacterial isolation rates were found to be 41.07 and 44.88%, respectively. Yeasts were found in 14.03% of all pathogens. Both the false-positivity and -negativity rates were very low (0.1 and 0.3%, respectively). The mean detection times for all of the pathogens were determined to be 19.45 h. Yeasts, nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria, and Brucella melitensis strains were isolated within 5 days. By taking these data into account, we decided to establish a 5-day-incubation protocol in our laboratory instead of the 7 days that are commonly used. PMID:12574291

  4. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for the identification of bacteria and yeasts in a clinical microbiological laboratory: a review.

    PubMed

    Steensels, D; Verhaegen, J; Lagrou, K

    2011-01-01

    Recently, MALDI-TOF MS devices designed for use in clinical laboratories have been commercially introduced in various large centres worldwide. All published studies conclude that MALDI-TOF MS can be implemented easily for routine identification of bacteria and yeasts in a clinical microbiological laboratory. Although all data show that MALDI-TOF MS correctly identifies the great majority of isolates processed routinely, it cannot yet identify every such isolate. Until today, MALDI-TOF MS is inappropriate for the identification of Shigella species, pneumococci and viridans streptococci. Database upgrades and sample enrichment are essential elements to refine the MALDI-TOF MS technique, allowing the method to increase its power. For the identification of a significant proportion of yeasts, an extraction method prior to analysis in the mass spectrometer is mandatory to obtain appropriate spectra. Because of the low marginal costs, and the extreme speed of MALDI-TOF MS, the technique can improve laboratory efficiency when used early in identification protocols. Lengthier, more labour-intensive, and costlier techniques can be reserved for the minority of isolates not identified with high confidence by MALDI-TOF MS. MALDI-TOF MS also has the potential to directly identify pathogens in biological fluids, such as urine samples and blood cultures. For this application however, further well-designed prospective studies are warranted. The potential for identification at the serotype or strain level, and antibiotic resistance profiling within minutes make MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry an ongoing revolution in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

  5. Aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a model system for the regulation of a eukaryotic biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Braus, G H

    1991-01-01

    This review focuses on the gene-enzyme relationships and the regulation of different levels of the aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway in a simple eukaryotic system, the unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most reactions of this branched pathway are common to all organisms which are able to synthesize tryptophan, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. The current knowledge about the two main control mechanisms of the yeast aromatic amino acid biosynthesis is reviewed. (i) At the transcriptional level, most structural genes are regulated by the transcriptional activator GCN4, the regulator of the general amino acid control network, which couples transcriptional derepression to amino acid starvation of numerous structural genes in multiple amino acid biosynthetic pathways. (ii) At the enzyme level, the carbon flow is controlled mainly by modulating the enzyme activities at the first step of the pathway and at the branch points by feedback action of the three aromatic amino acid end products. Implications of these findings for the relationship of S. cerevisiae to prokaryotic as well as to higher eukaryotic organisms and for general regulatory mechanisms occurring in a living cell such as initiation of transcription, enzyme regulation, and the regulation of a metabolic branch point are discussed. PMID:1943992

  6. Glucansucrases from lactic acid bacteria which produce water-insoluble polysaccharides from sucrose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dextrans and related glucans produced from sucrose by lactic acid bacteria have been studied for many years and are used in numerous commercial applications and products. Most of these glucans are water-soluble, except for a few notable exceptions from cariogenic Streptococcus spp. and a very small ...

  7. Drivers for the establishment and composition of the sourdough lactic acid bacteria biota.

    PubMed

    Gobbetti, Marco; Minervini, Fabio; Pontonio, Erica; Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria

    2016-12-19

    The drivers for the establishment and composition of the sourdough microbiota, with particular emphasis on lactic acid bacteria, are reviewed and discussed. More than 60 different species of lactobacilli were identified from sourdoughs, showing the main overlapping between sourdough and human intestine ecosystems. The microbial kinetics during sourdough preparation was described by several studies using various methodological approaches, including culture-dependent and -independent (e.g., high throughput sequencing), and metabolite and meta-transcriptome analyses. Although the abundant microbial diversity harbored by flours, a succession of dominating and sub-dominating populations of lactic acid bacteria suddenly occurred during sourdough propagation, leading to the progressive assembly of the bacterial community. The contribution of all the potential sources (house microbiota, flour, types of flours and additional ingredients) for contaminating lactic acid bacteria was compared with the aim to find overlapping or specific routes that affect the sourdough microbiota. Once established and mature, pros and cons regarding the stability of the sourdough lactic acid bacteria biota were also reviewed, showing contradictory results, which were mainly dependent on the species/strains. Probably, the future research efforts should be dedicated to decrease the sources/drivers of noticeable variation rather than to full standardization of the process for sourdough preparation and use.

  8. Multiple Genome Sequences of Important Beer-Spoiling Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Andreas J.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2016-01-01

    Seven strains of important beer-spoiling lactic acid bacteria were sequenced using single-molecule real-time sequencing. Complete genomes were obtained for strains of Lactobacillus paracollinoides, Lactobacillus lindneri, and Pediococcus claussenii. The analysis of these genomes emphasizes the role of plasmids as the genomic foundation of beer-spoiling ability. PMID:27795248

  9. Survival and growth of probiotic lactic acid bacteria in refrigerated pickle products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined 10 lactic acid bacteria that have been previously characterized for commercial use as probiotic cultures, mostly for dairy products, including 1 Pediococcus and 9 Lactobacilli. Our objectives were to develop a rapid procedure for determining the long-term survivability of these cultures ...

  10. Mine Waste Technology Program. In Situ Source Control Of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 3, In Situ Source Control of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S....

  11. Bacteria and Archaea in acidic environments and a key to morphological identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, E.I.

    2000-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic acidic environments are dominated by bacteria and Archaea. As many as 86 genera or species have been identified or isolated from pH <4.5 environments. This paper reviews the worldwide literature and provide tables of morphological characteristics, habitat information and a key for light microscope identification for the non-microbiologist.

  12. Isolation of alkaliphilic bacteria for production of high optically pure L-(+)-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Yokaryo, Hiroto; Tokiwa, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria that grow under alkaline conditions (pH 10) were isolated from various sources in Okinawa (Japan). These alkali-tolerant and alkaliphilic bacteria were classified as follows: Microbacterium sp. (1 strain), Enterococcus spp. (9 strains), Alkalibacterium spp. (3 strains), Exiguobacterium spp. (5 strains), Oceanobacillus spp. (3 strains) and Bacillus spp. (7 strains) by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. By fermentation, many strains were able to convert glucose into mainly L-(+)-lactic acid of high optical purity in alkaline broth. This result indicated that valuable L-(+)-lactic acid-producing bacteria could be isolated efficiently by screening under alkaline conditions. Six strains were selected and their ability to produce lactic acid at different initial pH was compared. Enterococcus casseliflavus strain 79w3 gave the highest lactic acid concentration. Lactic acid concentration and productivity were 103 g L(-1) (optical purity of 99.5% as L-isomer) and 2.2 g L(-1) h(-1), respectively when 129 g L(-1) of glucose was used by batch fermentation.

  13. Characterization and application of lactic acid bacteria for tropical silage preparation.

    PubMed

    Pholsen, Suradej; Khota, Waroon; Pang, Huili; Higgs, David; Cai, Yimin

    2016-10-01

    Strains TH 14, TH 21 and TH 64 were isolated from tropical silages, namely corn stover, sugar cane top and rice straw, respectively, prepared in Thailand. These strains were selected by low pH growth range and high lactic acid-producing ability, similar to some commercial inoculants. Based on the analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence and DNA-DNA relatedness, strain TH 14 was identified as Lactobacillus casei, and strains TH 21 and TH 64 were identified as L. plantarum. Strains TH 14, TH 21, TH 64 and two commercial inoculants, CH (L. plantarum) and SN (L. rhamnosus), were used as additives to fresh and wilted purple Guinea and sorghum silages prepared using a small-scale fermentation method. The number of epiphytic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the forages before ensilage was relatively low but the numbers of coliform and aerobic bacteria were higher. Sorghum silages at 30 days of fermentation were all well preserved with low pH (3.56) and high lactic acid production (72.86 g/kg dry matter). Purple Guinea silage inoculated with LAB exhibited reduced count levels of aerobic and coliform bacteria, lower pH, butyric acid and ammonia nitrogen and increased lactic acid concentration, compared with the control. Strain TH 14 more effectively improved lactic acid production compared with inoculants and other strains. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. Citric acid production from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers by the genetically engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain 30 and purification of citric acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Fei; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2013-11-01

    In this study, citric acid production from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers by the genetically engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain 30 was investigated. After the compositions of the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers for citric acid production were optimized, the results showed that natural components of extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers without addition of any other components were suitable for citric acid production by the yeast strain. During 10 L fermentation using the extract containing 84.3 g L(-1) total sugars, 68.3 g L(-1) citric acid was produced and the yield of citric acid was 0.91 g g(-1) within 336 h. At the end of the fermentation, 9.2 g L(-1) of residual total sugar and 2.1 g L(-1) of reducing sugar were left in the fermented medium. At the same time, citric acid in the supernatant of the culture was purified. It was found that 67.2 % of the citric acid in the supernatant of the culture was recovered and purity of citric acid in the crystal was 96 %.

  15. Clinical evaluation of the FilmArray blood culture identification panel in identification of bacteria and yeasts from positive blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Altun, Osman; Almuhayawi, Mohammed; Ullberg, Måns; Ozenci, Volkan

    2013-12-01

    The FilmArray platform (FA; BioFire, Salt Lake City, UT) is a closed diagnostic system allowing high-order multiplex PCR analysis with automated readout of results directly from positive blood cultures in 1 h. In the present study, we evaluated the clinical performance of the FilmArray blood culture identification (BCID) panel, which includes 19 bacteria, five yeasts, and three antibiotic resistance genes. In total, 206 blood culture bottles were included in the study. The FilmArray could identify microorganisms in 153/167 (91.6%) samples with monomicrobial growth. Thirteen of the 167 (7.8%) microorganisms were not covered by the FilmArray BCID panel. In 6/167 (3.6%) samples, the FilmArray detected an additional microorganism compared to blood culture. When polymicrobial growth was analyzed, the FilmArray could detect all target microorganisms in 17/24 (71%) samples. Twelve blood culture bottles that yielded a positive signal but showed no growth were also negative by FilmArray. In 3/206 (1.5%) bottles, the FilmArray results were invalid. The results of the FilmArray were reproducible, as demonstrated by the testing and retesting of five bottles in the same day and a longitudinal follow-up of five other blood cultures up to 4 weeks. The present study shows that the FilmArray is a rapid identification method with high performance in direct identification of bacteria and yeasts from positive blood culture bottles.

  16. Racemization in Reverse: Evidence that D-Amino Acid Toxicity on Earth Is Controlled by Bacteria with Racemases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaosen; Sun, Henry J.

    2014-01-01

    D-amino acids are toxic for life on Earth. Yet, they form constantly due to geochemical racemization and bacterial growth (the cell walls of which contain D-amino acids), raising the fundamental question of how they ultimately are recycled. This study provides evidence that bacteria use D-amino acids as a source of nitrogen by running enzymatic racemization in reverse. Consequently, when soils are inundated with racemic amino acids, resident bacteria consume D- as well as L-enantiomers, either simultaneously or sequentially depending on the level of their racemase activity. Bacteria thus protect life on Earth by keeping environments D-amino acid free. PMID:24647559

  17. Racemization in reverse: evidence that D-amino acid toxicity on Earth is controlled by bacteria with racemases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gaosen; Sun, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    D-amino acids are toxic for life on Earth. Yet, they form constantly due to geochemical racemization and bacterial growth (the cell walls of which contain D-amino acids), raising the fundamental question of how they ultimately are recycled. This study provides evidence that bacteria use D-amino acids as a source of nitrogen by running enzymatic racemization in reverse. Consequently, when soils are inundated with racemic amino acids, resident bacteria consume D- as well as L-enantiomers, either simultaneously or sequentially depending on the level of their racemase activity. Bacteria thus protect life on Earth by keeping environments D-amino acid free.

  18. Phytic acid degrading lactic acid bacteria in tef-injera fermentation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Maren M; Egli, Ines M; Aeberli, Isabelle; Hurrell, Richard F; Meile, Leo

    2014-11-03

    Ethiopian injera, a soft pancake, baked from fermented batter, is preferentially prepared from tef (Eragrostis tef) flour. The phytic acid (PA) content of tef is high and is only partly degraded during the fermentation step. PA chelates with iron and zinc in the human digestive tract and strongly inhibits their absorption. With the aim to formulate a starter culture that would substantially degrade PA during injera preparation, we assessed the potential of microorganisms isolated from Ethiopian household-tef fermentations to degrade PA. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were found to be among the dominating microorganisms. Seventy-six isolates from thirteen different tef fermentations were analyzed for phytase activity and thirteen different isolates of seven different species were detected to be positive in a phytase screening assay. In 20-mL model tef fermentations, out of these thirteen isolates, the use of Lactobacillus (L.) buchneri strain MF58 and Pediococcus pentosaceus strain MF35 resulted in lowest PA contents in the fermented tef of 41% and 42%, respectively of its initial content. In comparison 59% of PA remained when spontaneously fermented. Full scale tef fermentation (0.6L) and injera production using L. buchneri MF58 as culture additive decreased PA in cooked injera from 1.05 to 0.34±0.02 g/100 g, representing a degradation of 68% compared to 42% in injera from non-inoculated traditional fermentation. The visual appearance of the pancakes was similar. The final molar ratios of PA to iron of 4 and to zinc of 12 achieved with L. buchneri MF58 were decreased by ca. 50% compared to the traditional fermentation. In conclusion, selected LAB strains in tef fermentations can degrade PA, with L. buchneri MF58 displaying the highest PA degrading potential. The 68% PA degradation achieved by the application of L. buchneri MF58 would be expected to improve human zinc absorption from tef-injera, but further PA degradation is probably necessary if iron absorption has to

  19. Crystal structure of the boronic acid-based proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in complex with the yeast 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Groll, Michael; Berkers, Celia R; Ploegh, Hidde L; Ovaa, Huib

    2006-03-01

    The dipeptide boronic acid bortezomib, also termed VELCADE, is a proteasome inhibitor now in use for the treatment of multiple myeloma, and its use for the treatment of other malignancies is being explored. We determined the crystal structure of the yeast 20S proteasome in complex with bortezomib to establish the specificity and binding mode of bortezomib to the proteasome's different catalytically active sites. This structure should enable the rational design of new boronic acid derivatives with improved affinities and specificities for individual active subunits.

  20. Conversion of beet molasses and cheese whey into fatty acid methyl esters by the yeast Cryptococcus curvatus.

    PubMed

    Takakuwa, Naoya; Saito, Katsuichi

    2010-01-01

    Eighty-one yeast isolates from raw milk were surveyed for the production of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). Only one species, identified as Cryptococcus curvatus, produced FAME at a detectable level. Cr. curvatus TYC-19 produced more FAME from beet molasses and cheese whey medium than other strains of the same species. In both media, the major FAME produced were linoleic and oleic acid methyl esters. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region of ribosomal DNA indicated that TYC-19 diverged from the same species.

  1. Influence of the yeast strain on the changes of the amino acids, peptides and proteins during sparkling wine production by the traditional method.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rodríguez, A J; Carrascosa, A V; Martín-Alvarez, P J; Moreno-Arribas, V; Polo, M C

    2002-12-01

    The influence of five yeast strains on the nitrogen fractions, amino acids, peptides and proteins, during 12 months of aging of sparkling wines produced by the traditional or Champenoise method, was studied. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques were used for analysis of the amino acid and peptide fractions. Proteins plus polypeptides were determined by the colorimetric Bradford method. Four main stages were detected in the aging of wines with yeast. In the first stage, a second fermentation took place; amino acids and proteins plus polypeptides diminished, and peptides were liberated. In the second stage, there was a release of amino acids and proteins, and peptides were degraded. In the third stage, the release of proteins and peptides predominated. In the fourth stage, the amino acid concentration diminished. The yeast strain used influenced the content of free amino acids and peptides and the aging time in all the nitrogen fractions.

  2. Spatio-Temporal Variations of High and Low Nucleic Acid Content Bacteria in an Exorheic River

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lili; Ji, Yurui; Bartlam, Mark; Wang, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria with high nucleic acid (HNA) and low nucleic acid (LNA) content are commonly observed in aquatic environments. To date, limited knowledge is available on their temporal and spatial variations in freshwater environments. Here an investigation of HNA and LNA bacterial abundance and their flow cytometric characteristics was conducted in an exorheic river (Haihe River, Northern China) over a one year period covering September (autumn) 2011, December (winter) 2011, April (spring) 2012, and July (summer) 2012. The results showed that LNA and HNA bacteria contributed similarly to the total bacterial abundance on both the spatial and temporal scale. The variability of HNA on abundance, fluorescence intensity (FL1) and side scatter (SSC) were more sensitive to environmental factors than that of LNA bacteria. Meanwhile, the relative distance of SSC between HNA and LNA was more variable than that of FL1. Multivariate analysis further demonstrated that the influence of geographical distance (reflected by the salinity gradient along river to ocean) and temporal changes (as temperature variation due to seasonal succession) on the patterns of LNA and HNA were stronger than the effects of nutrient conditions. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that the distribution of LNA and HNA bacteria, including the abundance, FL1 and SSC, was controlled by different variables. The results suggested that LNA and HNA bacteria might play different ecological roles in the exorheic river. PMID:27082986

  3. Spatio-Temporal Variations of High and Low Nucleic Acid Content Bacteria in an Exorheic River.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Hao, Zhenyu; Ma, Lili; Ji, Yurui; Bartlam, Mark; Wang, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria with high nucleic acid (HNA) and low nucleic acid (LNA) content are commonly observed in aquatic environments. To date, limited knowledge is available on their temporal and spatial variations in freshwater environments. Here an investigation of HNA and LNA bacterial abundance and their flow cytometric characteristics was conducted in an exorheic river (Haihe River, Northern China) over a one year period covering September (autumn) 2011, December (winter) 2011, April (spring) 2012, and July (summer) 2012. The results showed that LNA and HNA bacteria contributed similarly to the total bacterial abundance on both the spatial and temporal scale. The variability of HNA on abundance, fluorescence intensity (FL1) and side scatter (SSC) were more sensitive to environmental factors than that of LNA bacteria. Meanwhile, the relative distance of SSC between HNA and LNA was more variable than that of FL1. Multivariate analysis further demonstrated that the influence of geographical distance (reflected by the salinity gradient along river to ocean) and temporal changes (as temperature variation due to seasonal succession) on the patterns of LNA and HNA were stronger than the effects of nutrient conditions. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that the distribution of LNA and HNA bacteria, including the abundance, FL1 and SSC, was controlled by different variables. The results suggested that LNA and HNA bacteria might play different ecological roles in the exorheic river.

  4. The importance of lactic acid bacteria for phytate degradation during cereal dough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Reale, Anna; Konietzny, Ursula; Coppola, Raffaele; Sorrentino, Elena; Greiner, Ralf

    2007-04-18

    Lactic acid fermentation of cereal flours resulted in a 100 (rye), 95-100 (wheat), and 39-47% (oat) reduction in phytate content within 24 h. The extent of phytate degradation was shown to be independent from the lactic acid bacteria strain used for fermentation. However, phytate degradation during cereal dough fermentation was positively correlated with endogenous plant phytase activity (rye, 6750 mU g(-1); wheat, 2930 mU g(-1); and oat, 23 mU g(-1)), and heat inactivation of the endogenous cereal phytases prior to lactic acid fermentation resulted in a complete loss of phytate degradation. Phytate degradation was restored after addition of a purified phytase to the liquid dough. Incubation of the cereal flours in buffered solutions resulted in a pH-dependent phytate degradation. The optimum of phytate degradation was shown to be around pH 5.5. Studies on phytase production of 50 lactic acid bacteria strains, previously isolated from sourdoughs, did not result in a significant production of intra- as well as extracellular phytase activity. Therefore, lactic acid bacteria do not participate directly in phytate degradation but provide favorable conditions for the endogenous cereal phytase activity by lowering the pH value.

  5. Mycolic acid-containing bacteria induce natural-product biosynthesis in Streptomyces species.

    PubMed

    Onaka, Hiroyasu; Mori, Yukiko; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Furumai, Tamotsu

    2011-01-01

    Natural products produced by microorganisms are important starting compounds for drug discovery. Secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, have been isolated from different Streptomyces species. The production of these metabolites depends on the culture conditions. Therefore, the development of a new culture method can facilitate the discovery of new natural products. Here, we show that mycolic acid-containing bacteria can influence the biosynthesis of cryptic natural products in Streptomyces species. The production of red pigment by Streptomyces lividans TK23 was induced by coculture with Tsukamurella pulmonis TP-B0596, which is a mycolic acid-containing bacterium. Only living cells induced this pigment production, which was not mediated by any substances. T. pulmonis could induce natural-product synthesis in other Streptomyces strains too: it altered natural-product biosynthesis in 88.4% of the Streptomyces strains isolated from soil. The other mycolic acid-containing bacteria, Rhodococcus erythropolis and Corynebacterium glutamicum, altered biosynthesis in 87.5 and 90.2% of the Streptomyces strains, respectively. The coculture broth of T. pulmonis and Streptomyces endus S-522 contained a novel antibiotic, which we named alchivemycin A. We concluded that the mycolic acid localized in the outer cell layer of the inducer bacterium influences secondary metabolism in Streptomyces, and this activity is a result of the direct interaction between the mycolic acid-containing bacteria and Streptomyces. We used these results to develop a new coculture method, called the combined-culture method, which facilitates the screening of natural products.

  6. Use of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria starters to ferment mango juice for promoting its probiotic roles.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xue-Yi; Guo, Li-Qiong; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Qiu, Ling-Yan; Gu, Feng-Wei; Lin, Jun-Fang

    2016-05-18

    Strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Lactobacillus brevis were identified from mango fruits by partial 16S rDNA gene sequence. Based on the ability of producing mannitol and diacetyl, Leuconostoc mesenteroides MPL18 and MPL39 were selected within the lactic acid bacteria isolates, and used as mixed starters to ferment mango juice (MJ). Both the autochthonous strains grew well in fermented mango juice (FMJ) and remained viable at 9.81 log cfu mL(-1) during 30 days of storage at 4°C. The content of total sugar of FMJ was lower than that of MJ, while the concentration of mannitol was higher than that of MJ, and the concentration of diacetyl was 3.29 ± 0.12 mg L(-1). Among detected organic acids including citric acid, gallic acid, lactic acid, and acetic acid, only citric acid and gallic acid were found in MJ, while all detected organic acids were found in FMJ. The concentration of lactic acid of FMJ was the highest (78.62 ± 13.66 mM) among all detected organic acids. The DPPH radical scavenging capacity of FMJ was higher than that of MJ. Total phenolic compounds were better preserved in FMJ. The acidity and sweetness had a noticeable impact on the overall acceptance of the treated sample.

  7. Effect of growth temperature on cellular fatty acids in sulphate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Könneke, Martin; Widdel, Friedrich

    2003-11-01

    The effect of growth temperature on the cellular fatty acid composition of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was studied in 12 species belonging to eight genera including psychrophiles and mesophiles. Most of these species were of marine origin. The investigated SRB with the exception of four Desulfobacter species exhibited only a minor increase in the proportion of cis-unsaturated fatty acids (by < or = 5% per 10 degrees C) when the growth temperature was decreased; psychrophiles maintained their typically high content of cis-unsaturated fatty acids (around 75% of total fatty acids) nearly constant. The four Desulfobacter species, however, increased the proportion of cis-unsaturated among total fatty acids significantly (by > or =14% per 10 degrees C; measured in late growth phase) with decreasing growth temperature. The ratio between unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in Desulfobacter species changed not only with the growth temperature, but also with the growth state in batch cultures at constant temperature. Changes of cellular fatty acids were studied in detail with D. hydrogenophilus, the most psychrotolerant (growth range 0-35 degrees C) among the mesophilic SRB examined. Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus also formed cis-9,10-methylenehexadecanoic acid (a cyclopropane fatty acid) and 10-methylhexadecanoic acid. At low growth temperature (12 degrees C), the relative amount of these fatty acids was at least threefold lower; this questions the usefulness of 10-methylhexadecanoic acid as a reliable biomarker of Desulfobacter in cold sediments.

  8. Cell-recycle continuous fermentation of Enterococcus faecalis RKY1 for economical production of lactic acid by reduction of yeast extract supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ryun-Kyung; Ryu, Hwa-Won; Oh, Hurok; Kim, Mina; Wee, Young-Jung

    2014-05-01

    Both lactic acid productivity and cell growth were linearly correlated with yeast extract supplementation in batch fermentation. During conventional continuous operation, although fresh feed was introduced into the bioreactor with a significantly low dilution rate (0.04 h(-1)), the amount of yeast extract employed was not enough to maintain the growth of microorganism. However, when the fresh feed contained 100 g/l glucose and 2 g/l yeast extract during cell-recycle continuous operation at a dilution rate of 0.04 h(-1), more than 90 g/l lactic acid was continuously produced, with the average productivity of 3.72 g/l·h. In this experiment, 82 g of yeast extract (77% of reduction yield) could be reduced for the production of 1 kg of lactic acid compared with batch fermentation of a similar volumetric productivity.

  9. Genomewide expression analysis in amino acid-producing bacteria using DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Polen, Tino; Wendisch, Volker F

    2004-01-01

    DNA microarray technology has become an important research tool for biotechnology and microbiology. It is now possible to characterize genetic diversity and gene expression in a genomewide manner. DNA microarrays have been applied extensively to study the biology of many bacteria including Escherichia coli, but only recently have they been developed for the Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum. Both bacteria are widely used for biotechnological amino acid production. In this article, in addition to the design and generation of microarrays as well as their use in hybridization experiments and subsequent data analysis, we describe recent applications of DNA microarray technology regarding amino acid production in C. glutamicum and E. coli. We also discuss the impact of functional genomics studies on fundamental as well as applied aspects of amino acid production with C. glutamicum and E. coli.

  10. Yeast genes involved in response to lactic acid and acetic acid: acidic conditions caused by the organic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures induce expression of intracellular metal metabolism genes regulated by Aft1p.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Miho; Masaki, Kazuo; Fujii, Tsutomu; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2006-09-01

    Using two types of genome-wide analysis to investigate yeast genes involved in response to lactic acid and acetic acid, we found that the acidic condition affects metal metabolism. The first type is an expression analysis using DNA microarrays to investigate 'acid shock response' as the first step to adapt to an acidic condition, and 'acid adaptation' by maintaining integrity in the acidic condition. The other is a functional screening using the nonessential genes deletion collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression analysis showed that genes involved in stress response, such as YGP1, TPS1 and HSP150, were induced under the acid shock response. Genes such as FIT2, ARN1 and ARN2, involved in metal metabolism regulated by Aft1p, were induced under the acid adaptation. AFT1 was induced under acid shock response and under acid adaptation with lactic acid. Moreover, green fluorescent protein-fused Aft1p was localized to the nucleus in cells grown in media containing lactic acid, acetic acid, or hydrochloric acid. Both analyses suggested that the acidic condition affects cell wall architecture. The depletion of cell-wall components encoded by SED1, DSE2, CTS1, EGT2, SCW11, SUN4 and YNL300W and histone acetyltransferase complex proteins encoded by YID21, EAF3, EAF5, EAF6 and YAF9 increased resistance to lactic acid. Depletion of the cell-wall mannoprotein Sed1p provided resistance to lactic acid, although the expression of SED1 was induced by exposure to lactic acid. Depletion of vacuolar membrane H+-ATPase and high-osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase proteins caused acid sensitivity. Moreover, our quantitative PCR showed that expression of PDR12 increased under acid shock response with lactic acid and decreased under acid adaptation with hydrochloric acid.

  11. [The microflora of sourdough. XVIII. The protein degrading capabilities of lactic acid bacteria in sourdough].

    PubMed

    Spicher, G; Nierle, W

    1984-05-01

    Acidification of the dough by the use of sourdough or acidifiers is necessary not only for good baking quality of rye flour but it is also very important for development of the typical sensory characteristics of rye bread. We confirmed that the lactic acid bacteria of sour dough are proteolytic. Proteolytic effects are observed in the increase of the amino acid content during fermentation. A marked increase was found in the content of leucine, alanine, valine, isoleucine, glutamic acid, glutamine, arginine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, tyrosine and serine. Lactobacillus plantarum showed a higher proteolytic activity than L. brevis ssp. lindneri or L. fructivorans.

  12. Effect of camelina oil or live yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on ruminal methane production, rumen fermentation, and milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows fed grass silage diets.

    PubMed

    Bayat, A R; Kairenius, P; Stefański, T; Leskinen, H; Comtet-Marre, S; Forano, E; Chaucheyras-Durand, F; Shingfield, K J

    2015-05-01

    The potential of dietary supplements of 2 live yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) or camelina oil to lower ruminal methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) production and the associated effects on animal performance, rumen fermentation, rumen microbial populations, nutrient metabolism, and milk fatty acid (FA) composition of cows fed grass silage-based diets were examined. Four Finnish Ayrshire cows (53±7 d in milk) fitted with rumen cannula were used in a 4×4 Latin square with four 42-d periods. Cows received a basal total mixed ration (control treatment) with a 50:50 forage-to-concentrate ratio [on a dry matter (DM) basis] containing grass silage, the same basal total mixed ration supplemented with 1 of 2 live yeasts, A or B, administered directly in the rumen at 10(10) cfu/d (treatments A and B), or supplements of 60g of camelina oil/kg of diet DM that replaced concentrate ingredients in the basal total mixed ration (treatment CO). Relative to the control, treatments A and B had no effects on DM intake, rumen fermentation, ruminal gas production, or apparent total-tract nutrient digestibility. In contrast, treatment CO lowered DM intake and ruminal CH4 and CO2 production, responses associated with numerical nonsignificant decreases in total-tract organic matter digestibility, but no alterations in rumen fermentation characteristics or changes in the total numbers of rumen bacteria, methanogens, protozoa, and fungi. Compared with the control, treatment CO decreased the yields of milk, milk fat, lactose, and protein. Relative to treatment B, treatment CO improved nitrogen utilization due to a lower crude protein intake. Treatment A had no influence on milk FA composition, whereas treatment B increased cis-9 10:1 and decreased 11-cyclohexyl 11:0 and 24:0 concentrations. Treatment CO decreased milk fat 8:0 to 16:0 and total saturated FA, and increased 18:0, 18:1, 18:2, conjugated linoleic acid, 18:3n-3, and trans FA concentrations. Decreases in ruminal CH4

  13. A polyphasic study on the taxonomic position of industrial sour dough yeasts.

    PubMed

    Mäntynen, V H; Korhola, M; Gudmundsson, H; Turakainen, H; Alfredsson, G A; Salovaara, H; Lindström, K

    1999-02-01

    The sour dough bread making process is extensively used to produce wholesome palatable rye bread. The process is traditionally done using a back-slopping procedure. Traditional sour doughs in Finland comprise of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts. The yeasts present in these doughs have been enriched in the doughs due to their metabolic activities, e.g. acid tolerance. We characterized the yeasts in five major sour bread bakeries in Finland. We found that most of the commercial sour doughs contained yeasts which were similar to Candida milleri on the basis of 18S rDNA and EF-3 PCR-RFLP patterns and metabolic activities. Some of the bakery yeasts exhibited extensive karyotype polymorphism. The minimum growth temperature was 8 degrees C for C. milleri and also for most of sour dough yeasts.

  14. Interactions among lactic acid starter and probiotic bacteria used for fermented dairy products.

    PubMed

    Vinderola, C G; Mocchiutti, P; Reinheimer, J A

    2002-04-01

    Interactions among lactic acid starter and probiotic bacteria were investigated to establish adequate combinations of strains to manufacture probiotic dairy products. For this aim, a total of 48 strains of Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacterium spp. (eight of each) were used. The detection of bacterial interactions was carried out using the well-diffusion agar assay, and the interactions found were further characterized by growth kinetics. A variety of interactions was demonstrated. Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus was found to be able to inhibit S. thermophilus strains. Among probiotic cultures, Lb. acidophilus was the sole species that was inhibited by the others (Lb. casei and Bifidobacterium). In general, probiotic bacteria proved to be more inhibitory towards lactic acid bacteria than vice versa since the latter did not exert any effect on the growth of the former, with some exceptions. The study of interactions by growth kinetics allowed the setting of four different kinds of behaviors between species of lactic acid starter and probiotic bacteria (stimulation, delay, complete inhibition of growth, and no effects among them). The possible interactions among the strains selected to manufacture a probiotic fermented dairy product should be taken into account when choosing the best combination/s to optimize their performance in the process and their survival in the products during cold storage.

  15. Mechanisms underlying the transport and intracellular metabolism of acetic acid in the presence of glucose in the yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Sousa, M J; Rodrigues, F; Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C

    1998-03-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307 displays biphasic growth in a medium containing a mixture of glucose (0.5%, w/v) and acetic acid (0.5%, w/v), pH 5.0 and 3.0. In cells harvested during the first growth phase, no activity of a mediated acetic acid transport system was found. Incubation of these cells in phosphate buffer with cycloheximide for 1 h restored activity of an acetic acid carrier which behaved as the one present in glucose-grown cells. These results indicated that the acetic acid carrier is probably present in cells from the first growth phase of the mixed medium but its activity was affected by the presence of acetic acid in the culture medium. In glucose-grown cells, after incubation in phosphate buffer with glucose and acetic acid, the activity of the acetic acid carrier decreased significantly with increased acid concentration in the incubation buffer. At acid concentrations above 16.7 mM, no significant carrier activity was detectable. Furthermore, the intracellular acid concentration increased with the extracellular one and was inversely correlated with the activity of the acetic acid carrier, suggesting the involvement of a feedback inhibition mechanism in the regulation of the carrier. During biphasic growth, the first phase corresponded to a simultaneous consumption of glucose and acetic acid, and the second to the utilization of the remaining acid. The enzyme acetyl-CoA synthetase was active in both growth phases, even in the presence of glucose. Activity of isocitrate lyase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was found only in acetic-acid-grown cells. Thus it appears that both membrane transport and acetyl-CoA synthetase and their regulation are important for Z. bailii to metabolize acetic acid in the presence of glucose. This fact correlates with the high resistance of this yeast to environments with mixtures of sugars and acetic acid such as those often present during wine fermentation.

  16. Cotransport of bacteria with hematite in porous media: Effects of ion valence and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiyan; Ge, Zhi; Wu, Dan; Tong, Meiping; Ni, Jinren

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of multiple colloids (hematite and humic acid) on the transport and deposition of bacteria (Escherichia coli) in packed porous media in both NaCl (5 mM) and CaCl2 (1 mM) solutions at pH 6. Due to the alteration of cell physicochemical properties, the presence of hematite and humic acid in cell suspensions significantly affected bacterial transport and deposition in quartz sand. Specifically, the presence of hematite (5 mg/L) decreased cell transport (increased cell deposition) in quartz sand in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions, which could be attributed to the less negative overall zeta potentials of bacteria induced by the adsorption of positively charged hematite onto cell surfaces. The presence of a low concentration (0.1 mg/L) of humic acid in bacteria and hematite mixed suspensions reduced the adsorption of hematite onto cell surfaces, leading to increased cell transport in quartz sand in NaCl solutions, whereas, in CaCl2 solutions, the presence of 0.1 mg/L humic acid increased the formation of hematite-cell aggregates and thus decreased cell transport in quartz sand. When the concentration of humic acid was increased to 1 mg/L, enhanced cell transport was observed in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions. The decreased adsorption of hematite onto cell surfaces as well as the competition of deposition sites on quartz sand with bacteria by the suspended humic acid contributed to the increased cell transport.

  17. Yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death can occur without cytochrome c release which requires metacaspase YCA1.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Bobba, Antonella; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2010-01-04

    To investigate the role of cytochrome c (cyt c) release in yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death (AA-PCD), wild type (wt) and cells lacking metacaspase (Deltayca1), cytochrome c (Deltacyc1,7) and both (Deltacyc1,7Deltayca1) were compared for AA-PCD occurrence, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production and caspase activity. AA-PCD occurs in Deltacyc1,7 and Deltacyc1,7Deltayca1 cells slower than in wt, but similar to that in Deltayca1 cells, in which no cytochrome c release occurs. Both H(2)O(2) production and caspase activation occur in these cells with early and extra-activation in Deltacyc1,7 cells. We conclude that alternative death pathways can be activated in yeast AA-PCD, one dependent on cyt c release, which requires YCA1, and the other(s) independent on it.

  18. Interaction of cationic peptides with lipoteichoic acid and gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Scott, M G; Gold, M R; Hancock, R E

    1999-12-01

    Compounds with antiendotoxin properties have been extensively studied for their potential as therapeutic agents for sepsis attributable to gram-negative bacteria. However, with the increasing incidence of gram-positive sepsis, there is interest in identifying compounds with a broad spectrum of action against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A series of synthetic alpha-helical cationic peptides related to bee melittin and silk moth cecropin have previously been shown to bind lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with high affinity, inhibit LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production in vitro and in vivo, and kill gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we analyzed whether these peptides were active against gram-positive bacteria; whether they could bind to lipoteichoic acid (LTA), the major proinflammatory structure on gram-positive bacteria; and whether they could block the ability of LTA to promote the release of cytokines by the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. We found that the cationic peptides demonstrated moderate growth-inhibitory activity toward gram-positive bacteria. In addition, the peptides bound LTA with high affinity. This correlated with the ability of the peptides to block LTA-induced production of TNF and interleukin-6 by RAW 264.7 cells but did not correlate with their ability to kill the bacteria. The peptides also effectively inhibited LTA-induced TNF production in a whole human blood assay. The peptides were also able to partly block the ability of heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus, as well as soluble products of live S. aureus, to stimulate cytokine production by macrophages. Our results indicate that these cationic peptides may be useful to prevent sepsis and inflammation caused by both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

  19. Isolation of acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    PubMed

    Cibis, Katharina Gabriela; Gneipel, Armin; König, Helmut

    2016-02-20

    In this study, acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria were isolated from thermophilic and mesophilic biogas plants (BGP) located in Germany. The fermenters were fed with maize silage and cattle or swine manure. Furthermore, pressurized laboratory fermenters digesting maize silage were sampled. Enrichment cultures for the isolation of acid-forming bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with one of the following carbon sources: Na(+)-dl-lactate, succinate, ethanol, glycerol, glucose or a mixture of amino acids. These substrates could be converted by the isolates to acetic, propionic or butyric acid. In total, 49 isolates were obtained, which belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Tenericutes or Thermotogae. According to 16S rRNA gene sequences, most isolates were related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides, Defluviitoga tunisiensis and Dendrosporobacter quercicolus. Acetic, propionic or butyric acid were produced in cultures of isolates affiliated to Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Clostridium aminovalericum, Clostridium cochlearium/Clostridium tetani, C. sporosphaeroides, D. quercicolus, Proteiniborus ethanoligenes, Selenomonas bovis and Tepidanaerobacter sp. Isolates related to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum produced acetic, butyric and lactic acid, and isolates related to D. tunisiensis formed acetic acid. Specific primer sets targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences were designed and used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The isolates were physiologically characterized and their role in BGP discussed.

  20. Production and transformation of dissolved neutral sugars and amino acids by bacteria in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, L.; Lechtenfeld, O. J.; Benner, R.; Middelboe, M.; Stedmon, C. A.

    2014-10-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean consists of a heterogeneous mixture of molecules, most of which are of unknown origin. Neutral sugars and amino acids are among the few recognizable biomolecules in DOM, and the molecular composition of these biomolecules is shaped primarily by biological production and degradation processes. This study provides insight into the bioavailability of biomolecules as well as the chemical composition of DOM produced by bacteria. The molecular compositions of combined neutral sugars and amino acids were investigated in DOM produced by bacteria and in DOM remaining after 32 days of bacterial degradation. Results from bioassay incubations with natural seawater (sampled from water masses originating from the surface waters of the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic Ocean) and artificial seawater indicate that the molecular compositions following bacterial degradation are not strongly influenced by the initial substrate or bacterial community. The molecular composition of neutral sugars released by bacteria was characterized by a high glucose content (47 mol %) and heterogeneous contributions from other neutral sugars (3-14 mol %). DOM remaining after bacterial degradation was characterized by a high galactose content (33 mol %), followed by glucose (22 mol %) and the remaining neutral sugars (7-11 mol %). The ratio of D-amino acids to L-amino acids increased during the experiments as a response to bacterial degradation, and after 32 days, the D/L ratios of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine and alanine reached around 0.79, 0.32, 0.30 and 0.51 in all treatments, respectively. The striking similarity in neutral sugar and amino acid compositions between natural (representing marine semi-labile and refractory DOM) and artificial (representing bacterially produced DOM) seawater samples, suggests that microbes transform bioavailable neutral sugars and amino acids into a common, more persistent form.

  1. Amino acid profiles of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from kefir grains and kefir starter made from them.

    PubMed

    Simova, Emilina; Simov, Zhelyasko; Beshkova, Dora; Frengova, Ginka; Dimitrov, Zhechko; Spasov, Zdravko

    2006-03-15

    The characteristics of cell growth, lactic acid production, amino acid release and consumption by single-strain cultures of lactic acid bacteria (isolated from kefir grains), and by a multiple-strain kefir starter prepared from them, were studied. The change in the levels of free amino acids was followed throughout the kefir process: single-strain kefir bacteria and the kefir starter (Lactococcus lactis C15-1%+Lactobacillus helveticus MP12-3%+(Streptococcus thermophilus T15+Lactobacillus bulgaricus HP1 = 1:1)-3%) were cultivated in pasteurized (92 degrees C for 20 min) cow's milk (3% fat content) at 28 degrees C for 5 h (the kefir starter reached pH 4.7) and subsequently grown at 20 degrees C for 16 h; storage was at 4 degrees C for 168 h. The strain L. helveticus MP12 was unrivaled with respect to free amino acid production (53.38 mg (100 g)(-1)) and cell growth (17.8 x 10(8) CFU ml(-1)); however, it manifested the lowest acidification activity. L. bulgaricus HP1 released approximately 3.7 times less amino acids, nearly 5 times lower cell growth, and produced about 1.2 times more lactic acid. S. thermophilus T15 demonstrated dramatically complex amino acid necessities for growth and metabolism. With L. lactis C15, the highest levels of growth and lactic acid synthesis were recorded (18.3 x 10(8) CFU ml(-1) and 7.8 g l(-1) lactic acid at the 21st hour), and as for free amino acid production, it approximated L. bulgaricus HP1 (17.03 mg (100 g)(-1) maximum concentration). In the L. lactis C15 culture, the amino acids were used more actively throughout the first exponential growth phase (by the 10th hour) than during the second growth phase. The unique properties of the L. helveticus MP12 strain to produce amino acids were employed to create a symbiotic bioconsortium kefir culture, which, under conditions of kefir formation, enhanced lactic acid production and shortened the time required to reach pH 4.7; intensified cell growth activity, resulting in a respective 90

  2. Rapid identification of bacteria and yeast: summary of a National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards proposed guideline.

    PubMed

    Baron, E J

    2001-07-15

    Using colony morphology on selected agars, Gram-stain morphology, and a number of 1-step biochemical or enzymatic tests, skilled microbiologists can identify the species of the majority of isolates seen routinely in a clinical laboratory. These results are often available more quickly than and are as accurate as those derived from conventional methods. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards has produced a guideline that describes tests that can be used to identify a number of aerobic gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci, a number of commonly isolated anaerobes, and 3 species of yeast. An overview of the organisms included in the guideline, the tests that identify them, and the situations in which rapid testing is appropriate is presented here.

  3. Metagenomic analysis of medicinal Cannabis samples; pathogenic bacteria, toxigenic fungi, and beneficial microbes grow in culture-based yeast and mold tests

    PubMed Central

    McKernan, Kevin; Spangler, Jessica; Helbert, Yvonne; Lynch, Ryan C.; Devitt-Lee, Adrian; Zhang, Lei; Orphe, Wendell; Warner, Jason; Foss, Theodore; Hudalla, Christopher J.; Silva, Matthew; Smith, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The presence of bacteria and fungi in medicinal or recreational Cannabis poses a potential threat to consumers if those microbes include pathogenic or toxigenic species. This study evaluated two widely used culture-based platforms for total yeast and mold (TYM) testing marketed by 3M Corporation and Biomérieux, in comparison with a quantitative PCR (qPCR) approach marketed by Medicinal Genomics Corporation. Methods: A set of 15 medicinal Cannabis samples were analyzed using 3M and Biomérieux culture-based platforms and by qPCR to quantify microbial DNA. All samples were then subjected to next-generation sequencing and metagenomics analysis to enumerate the bacteria and fungi present before and after growth on culture-based media. Results: Several pathogenic or toxigenic bacterial and fungal species were identified in proportions of >5% of classified reads on the samples, including Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Ralstonia pickettii, Salmonella enterica, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Aspergillus ostianus, Aspergillus sydowii, Penicillium citrinum and Penicillium steckii. Samples subjected to culture showed substantial shifts in the number and diversity of species present, including the failure of Aspergillus species to grow well on either platform. Substantial growth of Clostridium botulinum and other bacteria were frequently observed on one or both of the culture-based TYM platforms. The presence of plant growth promoting (beneficial) fungal species further influenced the differential growth of species in the microbiome of each sample. Conclusions: These findings have important implications for the Cannabis and food safety testing industries. PMID:27853518

  4. Occurrence of Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes in Arginine Catabolism by Wine Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S.; Pritchard, G. G.; Hardman, M. J.; Pilone, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    l-Arginine, an amino acid found in significant quantities in grape juice and wine, is known to be catabolized by some wine lactic acid bacteria. The correlation between the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and the ability to catabolize arginine was examined in this study. The activities of the three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes, arginine deiminase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and carbamate kinase, were measured in cell extracts of 35 strains of wine lactic acid bacteria. These enzymes were present in all heterofermentative lactobacilli and most leuconostocs but were absent in all the homofermentative lactobacilli and pediococci examined. There was a good correlation among arginine degradation, formation of ammonia and citrulline, and the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes. Urea was not detected during arginine degradation, suggesting that the catabolism of arginine did not proceed via the arginase-catalyzed reaction, as has been suggested in some earlier studies. Detection of ammonia with Nessler's reagent was shown to be a simple, rapid test to assess the ability of wine lactic acid bacteria to degrade arginine, although in media containing relatively high concentrations (>0.5%) of fructose, ammonia formation is inhibited. PMID:16534912

  5. Effect of organic acids on numbers of yeasts and mould fungi and aerobic stability in the silage of corn.

    PubMed

    Selwet, M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of these studies was to assess the effect of chemical conservants (FA = formic acid, PA = propionic acid, FPA+i = formic acid, propionic acid and ammonium ions) on the cell counts of yeasts and mould fungi in silage. The silage was prepared from corn (Zea mays L), cultivar Buran FAO (240). The effect of the applied conservants on silage aerobic stability was also assessed. The performed chemical analyses comprised the determination of: the content of dry matter (DM), lactic acid (LA), acetic acid (AA), ethanol, water soluble sugars (WSC), crude protein (CP) and pH. The applied preparations were found to reduce the number of yeast and mould fungi cells in all the examined silages. The growth of fungi was inhibited most strongly by the FPA+i preparation (containing a mixture of formic and propionic acids and ammonium ions). The yeast cell counts dropped (P<0.05) from 8.50 107 CFU g(-1) silage in the control (CCS = control corn silage) to 2.60 107 CFU g(-1) in silage treated with FPA+i, whereas counts of the mould fungi cells - from 15.20 104 CFU g(-1) silage in the control to 4.60 104 CFU g(-1) in silage treated with FPA+i. The applied conservants increased (P<0.05) the content of DM from 255.00 g kg(-1) in control to 266.60 g kg(-1) with PA, WSC from 27.10 g kg(-1) DM to 30.50 g kg(-1) DM with FPA+i and ethanol from 9.10 g kg(-1) DM to 11.21 g kg(-1) DM with FPA+i in the silage. The additives decreased concentrations of lactic acid, acetic acid and crude protein concentration after opening the barrels. The diversifying factors decreased the pH value in the examined silage. The experimental conservants were found to improve the aerobic stability of silages after 7 days of air exposure.

  6. Impact of gluconic fermentation of strawberry using acetic acid bacteria on amino acids and biogenic amines profile.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, J L; Sainz, F; Callejón, R M; Troncoso, A M; Torija, M J; García-Parrilla, M C

    2015-07-01

    This paper studies the amino acid profile of beverages obtained through the fermentation of strawberry purée by a surface culture using three strains belonging to different acetic acid bacteria species (one of Gluconobacter japonicus, one of Gluconobacter oxydans and one of Acetobacter malorum). An HPLC-UV method involving diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate (DEEMM) was adapted and validated. From the entire set of 21 amino acids, multiple linear regressions showed that glutamine, alanine, arginine, tryptophan, GABA and proline were significantly related to the fermentation process. Furthermore, linear discriminant analysis classified 100% of the samples correctly in accordance with the microorganism involved. G. japonicus consumed glucose most quickly and achieved the greatest decrease in amino acid concentration. None of the 8 biogenic amines were detected in the final products, which could serve as a safety guarantee for these strawberry gluconic fermentation beverages, in this regard.

  7. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production in symbiotic and non-symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria and its optimization by Taguchi design.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Dariush; Emtiazi, Giti

    2010-09-01

    Production of Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in 35 different symbiotic and non-symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria strains isolated from soil and plant roots was studied and assayed by chromatography and colorimetric methods. These bacteria included Agrobacterium, Paenibacillus, Rhizobium, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Azotobacter. The best general medium and synergism effects of isolates for IAA production were investigated. Effects of different variables containing physical parameters and key media components and optimization of condition for IAA production were performed using the Design of Experiments. Qualitek-4 (W32b) software for automatic design and analysis of the experiments, both based on Taguchi method was used. The results showed that Rhizobium strains, symbiotic, and Paenibacillus non-symbiotic bacteria yielded the highest concentrations of IAA (in the range of 5.23-0.27 and 4.90-0.19 ppm IAA/mg biomass, respectively) and IAA production was increased by synergism effect of them. Yeast Extract Mannitol medium supplemented with L-tryptophan was the best general medium for IAA production. The analysis of experimental data using Taguchi method indicated that nitrogen source is very prominent variable in affecting the yield and mannitol as carbon source, potassium nitrate (1%), and L-tryptophan (3 g/l) as nitrogen sources after 72-h incubation at 30 degrees C were the optimum conditions for production of IAA. 5.89 ppm IAA/mg biomass was produced under these optimal conditions.

  8. Yeast extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Ogrydziak, D M

    1993-01-01

    Many species of yeast secrete significant amounts of protease(s). In this article, results of numerous surveys of yeast extracellular protease production have been compiled and inconsistencies in the data and limitations of the methodology have been examined. Regulation, purification, characterization, and processing of yeast extracellular proteases are reviewed. Results obtained from the sequences of cloned genes, especially the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bar protease, the Candida albicans acid protease, and the Yarrowia lipolytica alkaline protease, have been emphasized. Biotechnological applications and the medical relevance of yeast extracellular proteases are covered. Yeast extracellular proteases have potential in beer and wine stabilization, and they probably contribute to pathogenicity of Candida spp. Yeast extracellular protease genes also provide secretion and processing signals for yeast expression systems designed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Coverage of the secretion of foreign proteases such as prochymosin, urokinase, and tissue plasminogen activator by yeast in included.

  9. Induction of multiple pleiotropic drug resistance genes in yeast engineered to produce an increased level of anti-malarial drug precursor, artemisinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Ouellet, Mario; Paradise, Eric M; Burd, Helcio; Eng, Diana; Paddon, Chris J; Newman, Jack D; Keasling, Jay D

    2008-01-01

    Background Due to the global occurrence of multi-drug-resistant malarial parasites (Plasmodium falciparum), the anti-malarial drug most effective against malaria is artemisinin, a natural product (sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide) extracted from sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua). However, artemisinin is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria patients. Artemisinin can be semi-synthesized from its precursor artemisinic acid, which can be synthesized from simple sugars using microorganisms genetically engineered with genes from A. annua. In order to develop an industrially competent yeast strain, detailed analyses of microbial physiology and development of gene expression strategies are required. Results Three plant genes coding for amorphadiene synthase, amorphadiene oxidase (AMO or CYP71AV1), and cytochrome P450 reductase, which in concert divert carbon flux from farnesyl diphosphate to artemisinic acid, were expressed from a single plasmid. The artemisinic acid production in the engineered yeast reached 250 μg mL-1 in shake-flask cultures and 1 g L-1 in bio-reactors with the use of Leu2d selection marker and appropriate medium formulation. When plasmid stability was measured, the yeast strain synthesizing amorphadiene alone maintained the plasmid in 84% of the cells, whereas the yeast strain synthesizing artemisinic acid showed poor plasmid stability. Inactivation of AMO by a point-mutation restored the high plasmid stability, indicating that the low plasmid stability is not caused by production of the AMO protein but by artemisinic acid synthesis or accumulation. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and quantitative real time-PCR consistently showed that pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) genes, belonging to the family of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter, were massively induced in the yeast strain producing artemisinic acid, relative to the yeast strain producing the hydrocarbon amorphadiene alone. Global transcriptional analysis by

  10. The aflatoxin B1 isolating potential of two lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Adel; Mirnejad, Reza; Yahaghi, Emad; Behnod, Vahid; Mirhosseini, Ali; Amani, Sajad; Sattari, Sara; Darian, Ebrahim Khodaverdi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine lactic acid bacteria's capability to enhance the process of binding and isolating aflatoxin B1 and to utilize such lactic acid bacteria as a food supplement or probiotic products for preventing absorption of aflatoxin B1 in human and animal bodies. Methods In the present research, the bacteria were isolated from five different sources. For surveying the capability of the bacteria in isolating aflatoxin B1, ELISA method was implemented, and for identifying the resultant strains through 16S rRNA sequencing method, universal primers were applied. Results Among the strains which were isolated, two strains of Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus beveris exhibited the capability of absorbing and isolating aflatoxin B1 by respectively absorbing and discharging 17.4% and 34.7% of the aforementioned toxin existing in the experiment solution. Conclusions Strains of Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus beveris were isolated from human feces and local milk samples, respectively. And both strains has the ability to isolate or bind with aflatoxin B1. PMID:23998015

  11. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Artisanal Italian goat cheese.

    PubMed

    Colombo, E; Franzetti, L; Frusca, M; Scarpellini, M

    2010-04-01

    The lactic acid bacteria community in traditional goat cheese produced in three dairies in Valsesia (Piemonte, Italy) was studied at different steps of the manufacturing process. These cheeses were produced from raw milk without starter bacteria, and no protocol was followed during the manufacturing process. Three hundred thirty-two isolates were characterized and grouped by results of both morphophysiological tests and random amplification of polymorphic DNA plus PCR analysis. Bacteria were identified by partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Lactococci were the dominant lactic acid bacteria in raw milk. Their initial numbers ranged from 5 to 7 log CFU ml(-1). Their levels increased during manufacturing and decreased during ripening. The growth trend for enterococci was comparable to that of lactococci, although enterococci counts were lower. Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Lactococcus garviae, and Enterococcus faecalis were the most frequently isolated species during goat cheese manufacturing, whereas the highest numbers of Enterococcus (E. faecium, E. durans, E. gilvus, and E. casseliflavus) were isolated with the greatest frequency from ripened cheese samples. Occasionally, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Leuconostoc lactis, and Lactobacillus paraplantarum also were isolated.

  12. Dual-coated lactic acid bacteria: an emerging innovative technology in the field of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Calatayud, Guillermo; Margolles, Abelardo

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are living micro-organisms that do not naturally have shelf life, and normally are weakly protected against the digestive action of the GI tract. A new dual coating technology has been developed in an effort to maximize survival, that is, to be able to reach the intestine alive and in sufficient numbers to confer the beneficial health effects on the host. Dual-coating of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is the result of fourth-generation coating technology for the protection of these bacteria at least 100-fold or greater than the uncoated LAB. This innovative technique involves a first pH-dependent protein layer that protects bacteria from gastric acid and bile salt, and a second polysaccharide matrix that protects bacteria from external factors, such as humidity, temperature and pressure, as well as the digestive action during the passage through the GI tract. Dual-coated probiotic formulation is applicable to different therapeutic areas, including irritable bowel syndrome, atopic dermatitis, acute diarrhea, chronic constipation, Helicobacter pylori eradication, and prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. An updated review of the efficacy of doubly coated probiotic strains for improving bacterial survival in the intestinal tract and its consequent clinical benefits in humans is here presented.

  13. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Some Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Bee Pollen: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    BELHADJ, Hani; HARZALLAH, Daoud; BOUAMRA, Dalila; KHENNOUF, Seddik; Dahamna, Saliha; GHADBANE, Mouloud

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, five hundred and sixty-seven isolates of lactic acid bacteria were recovered from raw bee pollen grains. All isolates were screened for their antagonistic activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. Neutralized supernatants of 54 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cultures from 216 active isolates inhibited the growth of indicator bacteria. They were phenotypically characterized, based on the fermentation of 39 carbohydrates. Using the simple matching coefficient and unweighted pair group algorithm with arithmetic averages (UPGMA), seven clusters with other two members were defined at the 79% similarity level. The following species were characterized: Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactococcus lactis, Pediococcus acidilactici, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and unidentified lactobacilli. Phenotypic characteristics of major and minor clusters were also identified. Partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of representative isolates from each cluster was performed, and ten strains were assigned to seven species: Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus ingluviei, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus acidipiscis and Weissella cibaria. The molecular method used failed to determine the exact taxonomic status of BH0900 and AH3133. PMID:24936378

  14. Molecular chaperones in lactic acid bacteria: physiological consequences and biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Abdullah-Al-Mahin; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2008-10-01

    Recently, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have attracted much attention because of their potential application to probiotics and industrial applications as starters for dairy products or lactic acid fermentation. Additional emphasis is also being paid to them as commensal bacteria in gastrointestinal tract. Since LAB exhibit a stress response, insight into the relationship between stress proteins such as molecular chaperones and stress tolerance or adaptation is increasing gradually along with current research examining these important bacteria. Similar to other bacteria, one of the major stress-response systems in LAB is the expression of molecular chaperones. The recently completed genome sequencing of various LAB strains, combined with the development of advanced molecular techniques, have enabled us to identify molecular chaperones and to understand their regulation systems in response to various stresses. Furthermore, recent biochemical studies provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of LAB chaperone systems. This review highlights the physiological consequences and biochemical properties of molecular chaperones (especially sHsps, Hsp70, and Hsp100) in LAB and their use in biotechnological applications.

  15. Application of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) in freshness keeping of tilapia fillets as sashimi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Rong; Liu, Qi; Chen, Shengjun; Yang, Xianqing; Li, Laihao

    2015-08-01

    Aquatic products are extremely perishable food commodities. Developing methods to keep the freshness of fish represents a major task of the fishery processing industry. Application of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) as food preservative is a novel approach. In the present study, the possibility of using lactic acid bacteria in freshness keeping of tilapia fillets as sashimi was examined. Fish fillets were dipped in Lactobacillus plantarum 1.19 (obtained from China General Microbiological Culture Collection Center) suspension as LAB-treated group. Changes in K-value, APC, sensory properties and microbial flora were analyzed. Results showed that LAB treatment slowed the increase of K-value and APC in the earlier storage, and caused a smooth decrease in sensory score. Gram-negative bacteria dominated during refrigerated storage, with Pseudomonas and Aeromonas being relatively abundant. Lactobacillus plantarum 1.19 had no obvious inhibitory effect against these Gram-negatives. However, Lactobacillus plantarum 1.19 changed the composition of Gram-positive bacteria. No Micrococcus were detected and the proportion of Staphylococcus decreased in the spoiled LAB-treated samples. The period that tilapia fillets could be used as sashimi material extended from 24 h to 48 h after LAB treatment. The potential of using LAB in sashimi processing was confirmed.

  16. Systematic identification of genes involved in metabolic acid stress resistance in yeast and their potential as cancer targets

    PubMed Central

    Shin, John J.; Aftab, Qurratulain; Austin, Pamela; McQueen, Jennifer A.; Poon, Tak; Li, Shu Chen; Young, Barry P.; Roskelley, Calvin D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hallmark of all primary and metastatic tumours is their high rate of glucose uptake and glycolysis. A consequence of the glycolytic phenotype is the accumulation of metabolic acid; hence, tumour cells experience considerable intracellular acid stress. To compensate, tumour cells upregulate acid pumps, which expel the metabolic acid into the surrounding tumour environment, resulting in alkalization of intracellular pH and acidification of the tumour microenvironment. Nevertheless, we have only a limited understanding of the consequences of altered intracellular pH on cell physiology, or of the genes and pathways that respond to metabolic acid stress. We have used yeast as a genetic model for metabolic acid stress with the rationale that the metabolic changes that occur in cancer that lead to intracellular acid stress are likely fundamental. Using a quantitative systems biology approach we identified 129 genes required for optimal growth under conditions of metabolic acid stress. We identified six highly conserved protein complexes with functions related to oxidative phosphorylation (mitochondrial respiratory chain complex III and IV), mitochondrial tRNA biosynthesis [glutamyl-tRNA(Gln) amidotransferase complex], histone methylation (Set1C–COMPASS), lysosome biogenesis (AP-3 adapter complex), and mRNA processing and P-body formation (PAN complex). We tested roles for two of these, AP-3 adapter complex and PAN deadenylase complex, in resistance to acid stress using a myeloid leukaemia-derived human cell line that we determined to be acid stress resistant. Loss of either complex inhibited growth of Hap1 cells at neutral pH and caused sensitivity to acid stress, indicating that AP-3 and PAN complexes are promising new targets in the treatment of cancer. Additionally, our data suggests that tumours may be genetically sensitized to acid stress and hence susceptible to acid stress-directed therapies, as many tumours accumulate mutations in mitochondrial

  17. A method for the identification of proteins secreted by lactic acid bacteria grown in complex media.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Borja; Chaignepain, Sthéphane; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Urdaci, María C

    2009-06-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known for their special nutritional requirements, being usually cultured in complex media to achieve optimal growth. In this paper, a protocol based on trichloroacetic acid precipitation of peptides and proteins is presented. The method has been tested on four probiotic LAB strains grown in De Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) broth, a complex medium that is often used for the culture of such bacteria. This protocol allowed the detection of 19 proteins after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 10 of them being successfully identified by tandem MS. Thereafter, the 10 were found to be secreted or surface associated by bioinformatic means. In conclusion, this work supplies a method for the identification of proteins secreted by LAB, allowing discrimination between the proteins present in the MRS and those produced by probiotic LAB.

  18. Effects of morphological changes in beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria on membrane filtration in breweries.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shizuka; Suzuki, Koji; Iijima, Kazumaru; Motoyama, Yasuo; Kuriyama, Hidetoshi; Kitagawa, Yasushi

    2007-10-01

    Membrane filter performance was investigated using beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB). As a result, beer-adapted LAB strains showed considerably increased penetration rate through filters, as compared with non-adapted strains. Further statistical analyses demonstrated the significant shifts in cell size distribution towards shorter rods, when Lactobacillus brevis and L. lindneri strains were precultured in beer. These results indicate that diminished cell size is responsible for the deteriorated filter performance and, therefore, beer-adapted lactic acid bacteria are regarded as a serious threat to the production of unpasteurized beers. In addition, the selection of test strains and preculture conditions are suggested to be important for the rigorous and standardized evaluation of membrane filter performance in the brewing industry.

  19. Biopreservation of refrigerated and vacuum-packed Dicentrarchus labrax by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    El Bassi, Leila; Hassouna, Mnasser; Shinzato, Naoya; Matsui, Toru

    2009-08-01

    Two lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were selected from 100 LAB isolated from various sea products to examine their use in Dicentrarchus labrax preservation. The isolates, tentatively named strain nr 3 and 7, were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum and L. pentosus, respectively. They showed antagonistic activity against psychrotroph, pathogenic, and coliform bacteria. The antagonistic activity of strain 3 was suggested to be by bacteriocins since activity was abolished by protease treatment, while that of strain 7 was due to the effect of pH decrease caused by the produced organic acids. Their use prevented total volatile basic nitrogen contents (TVB-N) and trimethylamine (TMA) to some extent, suggesting that inoculation could extend the period of storage.

  20. Effect of oxidoreduction potential on aroma biosynthesis by lactic acid bacteria in nonfat yogurt.

    PubMed

    Martin, F; Cachon, R; Pernin, K; De Coninck, J; Gervais, P; Guichard, E; Cayot, N

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oxidoreduction potential (Eh) on the biosynthesis of aroma compounds by lactic acid bacteria in non-fat yogurt. The study was done with yogurts fermented by Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. The Eh was modified by the application of different gaseous conditions (air, nitrogen, and nitrogen/hydrogen). Acetaldehyde, dimethyl sulfide, diacetyl, and pentane-2,3-dione, as the major endogenous odorant compounds of yogurt, were chosen as tracers for the biosynthesis of aroma compounds by lactic acid bacteria. Oxidative conditions favored the production of acetaldehyde, dimethyl sulfide, and diketones (diacetyl and pentane-2,3-dione). The Eh of the medium influences aroma production in yogurt by modifying the metabolic pathways of Lb. bulgaricus and Strep. thermophilus. The use of Eh as a control parameter during yogurt production could permit the control of aroma formation.

  1. Adaptive response to acetic acid in the highly resistant yeast species Zygosaccharomyces bailii revealed by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Joana F; Mira, Nuno P; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2012-08-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is the most tolerant yeast species to acetic acid-induced toxicity, being able to grow in the presence of concentrations of this food preservative close to the legal limits. For this reason, Z. bailii is the most important microbial contaminant of acidic food products but the mechanisms behind this intrinsic resistance to acetic acid are very poorly characterized. To gain insights into the adaptive response and tolerance to acetic acid in Z. bailii, we explored an expression proteomics approach, based on quantitative 2DE, to identify alterations occurring in the protein content in response to sudden exposure or balanced growth in the presence of an inhibitory but nonlethal concentration of this weak acid. A coordinate increase in the content of proteins involved in cellular metabolism, in particular, in carbohydrate metabolism (Mdh1p, Aco1p, Cit1p, Idh2p, and Lpd1p) and energy generation (Atp1p and Atp2p), as well as in general and oxidative stress response (Sod2p, Dak2p, Omp2p) was registered. Results reinforce the concept that glucose and acetic acid are coconsumed in Z. bailii, with acetate being channeled into the tricarboxylic acid cycle. When acetic acid is the sole carbon source, results suggest the activation of gluconeogenic and pentose phosphate pathways, based on the increased content of several proteins of these pathways after glucose exhaustion.

  2. Mutants of the pentose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus tolerant to hardwood spent sulfite liquor and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Harner, Nicole K; Bajwa, Paramjit K; Habash, Marc B; Trevors, Jack T; Austin, Glen D; Lee, Hung

    2014-01-01

    A strain development program was initiated to improve the tolerance of the pentose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus to inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Several rounds of UV mutagenesis followed by screening were used to select for mutants of P. tannophilus NRRL Y2460 with improved tolerance to hardwood spent sulfite liquor (HW SSL) and acetic acid in separate selection lines. The wild type (WT) strain grew in 50 % (v/v) HW SSL while third round HW SSL mutants (designated UHW301, UHW302 and UHW303) grew in 60 % (v/v) HW SSL, with two of these isolates (UHW302 and UHW303) being viable and growing, respectively, in 70 % (v/v) HW SSL. In defined liquid media containing acetic acid, the WT strain grew in 0.70 % (w/v) acetic acid, while third round acetic acid mutants (designated UAA301, UAA302 and UAA303) grew in 0.80 % (w/v) acetic acid, with one isolate (UAA302) growing in 0.90 % (w/v) acetic acid. Cross-tolerance of HW SSL-tolerant mutants to acetic acid and vice versa was observed with UHW303 able to grow in 0.90 % (w/v) acetic acid and UAA302 growing in 60 % (v/v) HW SSL. The UV-induced mutants retained the ability to ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol in defined media. These mutants of P. tannophilus are of considerable interest for bioconversion of the sugars in lignocellulosic hydrolysates to ethanol.

  3. Effects of worts treated with proteases on the assimilation of free amino acids and fermentation performance of lager yeast.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hongjie; Zheng, Liye; Wang, Chenxia; Zhao, Haifeng; Zhao, Mouming

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in free amino acids (FAA) composition by supplementing three commercial proteases (Neutrase, Flavorzyme and Protamex) at the beginning of wort mashing, and monitoring the effects on the assimilation pattern of FAA and fermentation performance of lager yeast (Saccharomyces pastorianus) during normal and high gravity fermentations. Proteases supplementation significantly improved the extract yield and FAA level of mashed worts. Normal gravity worts treated with Flavorzyme and Neutrase exhibited higher fermentability, ethanol production and flavor volatiles concentration compared to the control worts, while these beneficial effects were observed in high gravity worts treated with Protamex and Neutrase. The reason for the above results is proposed to be the change in the assimilation pattern of FAA in lager yeast with increased wort gravity, especially for the improved assimilation ratios of Leu, Arg, Phe, His, Asp and Val. In normal gravity fermentations, there were strong correlations between the assimilation amounts of Lys, Leu, Arg and His and fermentability, while in high gravity fermentations, these good correlations were found with only Lys and His. The present study suggested that optimizing the composition of FAA by supplementing proteases during wort mashing was beneficial to beer brewing for improving fermentation performance of lager yeast and flavor volatiles formation.

  4. Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection for studying amino acid uptake by yeast during beer fermentation.

    PubMed

    Turkia, Heidi; Sirén, Heli; Penttilä, Merja; Pitkänen, Juha-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid composition of cultivation broth is known to affect the biomass accumulation, productivity, and vitality of yeast during cultivation. A separation method based on capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection was developed for the determination of amino acid consumption by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during beer fermentation. Intraday relative standard deviations were less than 2.1% for migration times and between 2.9% and 9.9% for peak areas. Interday relative standard deviations were less than 2.5% for migration times and between 4.4% and 18.9% for peak areas. The quantification limit was even as low as 62.5 pM which equals to below attomole level detection. The method was applied to study the rate of amino acid utilization during beer fermentation.

  5. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibit biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Soichi; Akiyoshi, Yuko; O'Toole, George A; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2010-03-31

    Effects of food additives on biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria were investigated. Thirty-three potential food additives and 3 related compounds were added to the culture medium at concentrations from 0.001 to 0.1% (w/w), followed by inoculation and cultivation of five biofilm-forming bacterial strains for the evaluation of biofilm formation. Among the tested food additives, 21 showed inhibitory effects of biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and in particular, sugar fatty acid esters showed significant anti-biofilm activity. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) exerted their inhibitory effect at the concentration of 0.001% (w/w), but bacterial growth was not affected at this low concentration. Activities of the sugar fatty acid esters positively correlated with the increase of the chain length of the fatty acid residues. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibited the initial attachment of the S. aureus cells to the abiotic surface. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) also inhibited biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans and Listeria monocytogenes at 0.01% (w/w), while the inhibition of biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa required the addition of a far higher concentration (0.1% (w/w)) of the sugar fatty acid esters.

  6. Antibacterial effects of enniatins J(1) and J(3) on pathogenic and lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sebastià, Natividad; Meca, Giuseppe; Soriano, José Miguel; Mañes, Jordi

    2011-10-01

    Enniatins (ENs) are N-methylated cyclohexadepsipeptides, secondary metabolites produced by various species of the genus Fusarium. They are known to act as antifungal, antiyeast and antibacterial and to possess antiinsecticidal and phytotoxic properties. In this study we evaluated for the first time the antibiotic effect of pure fractions of EN J(1) and J(3) on several pathogenic strains and lactic acid bacteria. The ENs J(1) and J(3) were purified from the fermentation extract of Fusarium solani growth on solid medium of wheat kamut, using the technique of the low pressure liquid chromatography (LPLC) followed by a semipreparative liquid chromatography (LC). The purity and the structure of the isolated compound were confirmed by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry study-linear ion trap (ESI-MS-LIT). The use of both chromatographic techniques have permitted to produce and purify 47mg of the En J(1) and 50mg of the EN J(3) with a mean purity of 98% completely characterized with the technique of the ESI-MS-LIT. Microbial bioassay analyses were carried out by incubation in MRSA and TSA for acid lactic and pathogenic bacteria, respectively during 24h at 37°C. None of the tested strains were inhibited by a 1ng dose of EN J(1) and J(3). These compounds were only not effective against Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enteric. This study highlight ENs J(1) and J(3) could be potentially effective antibacterial agents against several pathogenic and lactic acid bacteria.

  7. Identification and Characterization of Lactic Acid Bacteria in a Commercial Probiotic Culture

    PubMed Central

    MENCONI, Anita; KALLAPURA, Gopala; LATORRE, Juan D.; MORGAN, Marion J.; PUMFORD, Neil R.; HARGIS, Billy M.; TELLEZ, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the identification and characterization (physiological properties) of two strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB 18 and 48) present in a commercial probiotic culture, FloraMax®-B11. Isolates were characterized morphologically, and identified biochemically. In addition, the MIDI System ID, the Biolog ID System, and 16S rRNA sequence analyses for identification of LAB 18 and LAB 48 strains were used to compare the identification results. Tolerance and resistance to acidic pH, high osmotic concentration of NaCl, and bile salts were tested in broth medium. In vitro assessment of antimicrobial activity against enteropathogenic bacteria and susceptibility to antibiotics were also tested. The results obtained in this study showed tolerance of LAB 18 and LAB 48 to pH 3.0, 6.5% NaCl and a high bile salt concentration (0.6%). Both strains evaluated showed in vitro antibacterial activity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, Escherichia coli (O157:H7), and Campylobacter jejuni. These are important characteristics of lactic acid bacteria that should be evaluated when selecting strains to be used as probiotics. Antimicrobial activity of these effective isolates may contribute to efficacy, possibly by direct antimicrobial activity in vivo. PMID:24936379

  8. Bacteriocin-Producing Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Traditional Fermented Food

    PubMed Central

    Kormin, Salasiah; Rusul, Gulam; Radu, Son; Ling, Foo Hooi

    2001-01-01

    Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) isolated from several traditional fermented foods such as “tempeh”, “tempoyak” and “tapai” were screened for the production of bacteriocin. One strain isolated from “tempeh” gives an inhibitory activity against several LAB. The strain was later identified as Lactobacillus plantarum BS2. Study shows that the inhibitory activity was not caused by hydrogen peroxide, organic acids or bacteriophage. The bacteriocin production was maximum after 10 hours of incubation with an activity of 200 AU/ml. The bacteriocin was found to be sensitive towards trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, β-chymotrypsin, α-amylase and lysozyme. PMID:22973159

  9. Yeast diversity of sourdoughs and associated metabolic properties and functionalities.

    PubMed

    De Vuyst, Luc; Harth, Henning; Van Kerrebroeck, Simon; Leroy, Frédéric

    2016-12-19

    Together with acidifying lactic acid bacteria, yeasts play a key role in the production process of sourdough, where they are either naturally present or added as a starter culture. Worldwide, a diversity of yeast species is encountered, with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida humilis, Kazachstania exigua, Pichia kudriavzevii, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, and Torulaspora delbrueckii among the most common ones. Sourdough-adapted yeasts are able to withstand the stress conditions encountered during their growth, including nutrient starvation as well as the effects of acidic, oxidative, thermal, and osmotic stresses. From a technological point of view, their metabolism primarily contributes to the leavening and flavour of sourdough products. Besides ethanol and carbon dioxide, yeasts can produce metabolites that specifically affect flavour, such as organic acids, diacetyl, higher alcohols from branched-chain amino acids, and esters derived thereof. Additionally, several yeast strains possess functional properties that can potentially lead to nutritional and safety advantages. These properties encompass the production of vitamins, an improvement of the bioavailability of phenolic compounds, the dephosphorylation of phytic acid, the presence of probiotic potential, and the inhibition of fungi and their mycotoxin production. Strains of diverse species are new candidate functional starter cultures, offering opportunities beyond the conventional use of baker's yeast.

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Methanesulfonic Acid-Degrading Bacteria from the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A. S.; Owens, N.; Murrell, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Two methylotrophic bacterial strains, TR3 and PSCH4, capable of growth on methanesulfonic acid as the sole carbon source were isolated from the marine environment. Methanesulfonic acid metabolism in these strains was initiated by an inducible NADH-dependent monooxygenase, which cleaved methanesulfonic acid into formaldehyde and sulfite. The presence of hydroxypyruvate reductase and the absence of ribulose monophosphate-dependent hexulose monophosphate synthase indicated the presence of the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation. Cell suspensions of bacteria grown on methanesulfonic acid completely oxidized methanesulfonic acid to carbon dioxide and sulfite with a methanesulfonic acid/oxygen stoichiometry of 1.0:2.0. Oxygen electrode-substrate studies indicated the dissimilation of formaldehyde to formate and carbon dioxide for energy generation. Carbon dioxide was not fixed by ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. It was shown that methanol is not an intermediate in methanesulfonic acid metabolism, although these strains grew on methanol and other one-carbon compounds, as well as a variety of heterotrophic carbon sources. These two novel marine facultative methylotrophs have the ability to mineralize methanesulfonic acid and may play a role in the cycling of global organic sulfur. PMID:16535055

  11. Key volatile aroma compounds of lactic acid fermented malt based beverages - impact of lactic acid bacteria strains.

    PubMed

    Nsogning Dongmo, Sorelle; Sacher, Bertram; Kollmannsberger, Hubert; Becker, Thomas

    2017-08-15

    This study aims to define the aroma composition and key aroma compounds of barley malt wort beverages produced from fermentation using six lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry-olfactometry and flame ionization detection was employed; key aroma compounds were determined by means of aroma extract dilution analysis. Fifty-six detected volatile compounds were similar among beverages. However, significant differences were observed in the concentration of individual compounds. Key aroma compounds (flavor dilution (FD) factors ≥16) were β-damascenone, furaneol, phenylacetic acid, 2-phenylethanol, 4-vinylguaiacol, sotolon, methional, vanillin, acetic acid, nor-furaneol, guaiacol and ethyl 2-methylbutanoate. Furthermore, acetaldehyde had the greatest odor activity value of up to 4266. Sensory analyses revealed large differences in the flavor profile. Beverage from L. plantarum Lp. 758 showed the highest FD factors in key aroma compounds and was correlated to fruity flavors. Therefore, we suggest that suitable LAB strain selection may improve the flavor of malt based beverages.

  12. Identification and quantification of antifungal compounds produced by lactic acid bacteria and propionibacteria.

    PubMed

    Le Lay, Céline; Coton, Emmanuel; Le Blay, Gwenaëlle; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Haertlé, Thomas; Choiset, Yvan; Van Long, Nicolas Nguyen; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Mounier, Jérôme

    2016-12-19

    Fungal growth in bakery products represents the most frequent cause of spoilage and leads to economic losses for industrials and consumers. Bacteria, such as lactic acid bacteria and propionibacteria, are commonly known to play an active role in preservation of fermented food, producing a large range of antifungal metabolites. In a previous study (Le Lay et al., 2016), an extensive screening performed both in vitro and in situ allowed for the selection of bacteria exhibiting an antifungal activity. In the present study, active supernatants against Penicillium corylophilum and Aspergillus niger were analyzed to identify and quantify the antifungal compounds associated with the observed activity. Supernatant treatments (pH neutralization, heating and addition of proteinase K) suggested that organic acids played the most important role in the antifungal activity of each tested supernatant. Different methods (HPLC, mass spectrometry, colorimetric and enzymatic assays) were then applied to analyze the supernatants and it was shown that the main antifungal compounds corresponded to lactic, acetic and propionic acids, ethanol and hydrogen peroxide, as well as other compounds present at low levels such as phenyllactic, hydroxyphenyllactic, azelaic and caproic acids. Based on these results, various combinations of the identified compounds were used to evaluate their effect on conidial germination and fungal growth of P. corylophilum and Eurotium repens. Some combinations presented the same activity than the bacterial culture supernatant thus confirming the involvement of the identified molecules in the antifungal activity. The obtained results suggested that acetic acid was mainly responsible for the antifungal activity against P. corylophilum and played an important role in E. repens inhibition.

  13. Size-Dependent Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles to Bacteria, Yeast, Algae, Crustaceans and Mammalian Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ivask, Angela; Kurvet, Imbi; Kasemets, Kaja; Blinova, Irina; Aruoja, Villem; Suppi, Sandra; Vija, Heiki; Käkinen, Aleksandr; Titma, Tiina; Heinlaan, Margit; Visnapuu, Meeri; Koller, Dagmar; Kisand, Vambola; Kahru, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The concept of nanotechnologies is based on size-dependent properties of particles in the 1–100 nm range. However, the relation between the particle size and biological effects is still unclear. The aim of the current paper was to generate and analyse a homogenous set of experimental toxicity data on Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) of similar coating (citrate) but of 5 different primary sizes (10, 20, 40, 60 and 80 nm) to different types of organisms/cells commonly used in toxicity assays: bacterial, yeast and algal cells, crustaceans and mammalian cells in vitro. When possible, the assays were conducted in ultrapure water to minimise the effect of medium components on silver speciation. The toxic effects of NPs to different organisms varied about two orders of magnitude, being the lowest (∼0.1 mg Ag/L) for crustaceans and algae and the highest (∼26 mg Ag/L) for mammalian cells. To quantify the role of Ag ions in the toxicity of Ag NPs, we normalized the EC50 values to Ag ions that dissolved from the NPs. The analysis showed that the toxicity of 20–80 nm Ag NPs could fully be explained by released Ag ions whereas 10 nm Ag NPs proved more toxic than predicted. Using E. coli Ag-biosensor, we demonstrated that 10 nm Ag NPs were more bioavailable to E. coli than silver salt (AgNO3). Thus, one may infer that 10 nm Ag NPs had more efficient cell-particle contact resulting in higher intracellular bioavailability of silver than in case of bigger NPs. Although the latter conclusion is initially based on one test organism, it may lead to an explanation for “size-dependent“ biological effects of silver NPs. This study, for the first time, investigated the size-dependent toxic effects of a well-characterized library of Ag NPs to several microbial species, protozoans, algae, crustaceans and mammalian cells in vitro. PMID:25048192

  14. Hormone fatty acid modifications: gram negative bacteria and vertebrates demonstrate common structure and function.

    PubMed

    Tizzano, Marco; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Bacteria are known to regulate diverse physiological processes through a mechanism called quorum sensing (QS). Prokaryotes communicate by extracellular signalling compounds, i.e. autoinducers (acyl homoserine lactone, AHL of Gram negative bacteria) or pheromones (post-translationally modified peptides of Gram positive bacteria), which activate genetic pathways when they reach a sufficient concentration (QS). A large number of Gram-negative quorum-sensing systems studied so far utilize N-acyl homoserine lactones as signal molecules. In vertebrates small synthetic molecules called growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) stimulate the release of growth hormone (GH) from the pituitary. GH release is stimulated by hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and ghrelin (endogenous ligand of the GHS-receptor, GHS-R). Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide, in which the serine-3 (Ser3) is n-octanoylated, and this modification is essential for ghrelin's activity. Ghrelin is the first known case of a peptide hormone modified by a fatty acid. The major active form of ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide with octanoylated Ser3; one of the more represented bacterial autoinducers is the N-Octanoyl-DL-homoserine lactone (C8-HL) molecule. The authors hypothesize that Gram-negative bacteria and vertebrates have a functional similarity in the search of food and an important structural homology of AHL and ghrelin for the highly conserved Serine-acylated motive in both molecules. Our suggestions could help one to understand the convergent origin and the biologic meaning of the Serine-acylated group in these organisms, a biologic meaning very important due to the high conservation in two kingdoms which are so different.

  15. Integration of general amino acid control and target of rapamycin (TOR) regulatory pathways in nitrogen assimilation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Staschke, Kirk A; Dey, Souvik; Zaborske, John M; Palam, Lakshmi Reddy; McClintick, Jeanette N; Pan, Tao; Edenberg, Howard J; Wek, Ronald C

    2010-05-28

    Two important nutrient-sensing and regulatory pathways, the general amino acid control (GAAC) and the target of rapamycin (TOR), participate in the control of yeast growth and metabolism during changes in nutrient availability. Amino acid starvation activates the GAAC through Gcn2p phosphorylation of translation factor eIF2 and preferential translation of GCN4, a transcription activator. TOR senses nitrogen availability and regulates transcription factors such as Gln3p. We used microarray analyses to address the integration of the GAAC and TOR pathways in directing the yeast transcriptome during amino acid starvation and rapamycin treatment. We found that GAAC is a major effector of the TOR pathway, with Gcn4p and Gln3p each inducing a similar number of genes during rapamycin treatment. Although Gcn4p activates a common core of 57 genes, the GAAC directs significant variations in the transcriptome during different stresses. In addition to inducing amino acid biosynthetic genes, Gcn4p in conjunction with Gln3p activates genes required for the assimilation of secondary nitrogen sources such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Gcn2p activation upon shifting to secondary nitrogen sources is suggested to occur by means of a dual mechanism. First, Gcn2p is induced by the release of TOR repression through a mechanism involving Sit4p protein phosphatase. Second, this eIF2 kinase is activated by select uncharged tRNAs, which were shown to accumulate during the shift to the GABA medium. This study highlights the mechanisms by which the GAAC and TOR pathways are integrated to recognize changing nitrogen availability and direct the transcriptome for optimal growth adaptation.

  16. External concentration of organic acid anions and pH: key independent variables for studying how organic acids inhibit growth of bacteria in mildly acidic foods.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, C E; Broadbent, J R

    2009-01-01

    Although the mechanisms by which organic acids inhibit growth of bacteria in mildly acidic foods are not fully understood, it is clear that intracellular accumulation of anions is a primary contributor to inhibition of bacterial growth. We hypothesize that intracellular accumulation of anions is driven by 2 factors, external anion concentration and external acidity. This hypothesis follows from basic chemistry principles that heretofore have not been fully applied to studies in the field, and it has led us to develop a novel approach for predicting internal anion concentration by controlling the external concentration of anions and pH. This approach overcomes critical flaws in contemporary experimental design that invariably target concentration of either protonated acid or total acid in the growth media thereby leaving anion concentration to vary depending on the pK(a) of the acids involved. Failure to control external concentration of anions has undoubtedly confounded results, and it has likely led to misleading conclusions regarding the antimicrobial action of organic acids. In summary, we advocate an approach for directing internal anion levels by controlling external concentration of anions and pH because it presents an additional opportunity to study the mechanisms by which organic acids inhibit bacterial growth. Knowledge gained from such studies would have important application in the control of important foodborne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes, and may also facilitate efforts to promote the survival in foods or beverages of desirable probiotic bacteria.

  17. Biotransformations of Bile Acids with Bacteria from Cayambe Slaughterhouse (Ecuador): Synthesis of Bendigoles.

    PubMed

    Costa, Stefania; Maldonado Rodriguez, Maria Elena; Rugiero, Irene; De Bastiani, Morena; Medici, Alessandro; Tamburini, Elena; Pedrini, Paola

    2016-08-01

    The biotransformations of cholic acid (1a), deoxycholic acid (1b), and hyodeoxycholic acid (1c) to bendigoles and other metabolites with bacteria isolated from the rural slaughterhouse of Cayambe (Pichincha Province, Ecuador) were reported. The more active strains were characterized, and belong to the genera Pseudomonas and Rhodococcus. Various biotransformation products were obtained depending on bacteria and substrates. Cholic acid (1a) afforded the 3-oxo and 3-oxo-4-ene derivatives 2a and 3a (45% and 45%, resp.) with P. mendocina ECS10, 3,12-dioxo-4-ene derivative 4a (60%) with Rh. erythropolis ECS25, and 9,10-secosteroid 6 (15%) with Rh. erythropolis ECS12. Bendigole F (5a) was obtained in 20% with P. fragi ECS22. Deoxycholic acid (1b) gave 3-oxo derivative 2b with P. prosekii ECS1 and Rh. erythropolis ECS25 (20% and 61%, resp.), while 3-oxo-4-ene derivative 3b was obtained with P. prosekii ECS1 and P. mendocina ECS10 (22% and 95%, resp.). Moreover, P. fragi ECS9 afforded bendigole A (8b; 80%). Finally, P. mendocina ECS10 biotransformed hyodeoxycholic acid (1c) to 3-oxo derivative 2c (50%) and Rh. erythropolis ECS12 to 6α-hydroxy-3-oxo-23,24-dinor-5β-cholan-22-oic acid (9c, 66%). Bendigole G (5c; 13%) with P. prosekii ECS1 and bendigole H (8c) with P. prosekii ECS1 and Rh. erythropolis ECS12 (20% and 16%, resp.) were obtained.

  18. [Enzymatic formation of a cis,cis-muconic acid derivative using pyrazon-degrading bacteria (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Blobel, F; Eberspächer, J; Haug, S; Lingens, F

    1976-01-01

    The cis,cis-muconic acid derivative of pyrazon, which was formerly isolated from the medium of pyrazon-degrading bacteria, was formed enzymatically by incubation of the catechol derivative of pyrazon with partially purified ortho pyrocatechase from pyrazon-degrading bacteria.

  19. Antifungal sourdough lactic acid bacteria as biopreservation tool in quinoa and rice bread.

    PubMed

    Axel, Claudia; Brosnan, Brid; Zannini, Emanuele; Furey, Ambrose; Coffey, Aidan; Arendt, Elke K

    2016-12-19

    The use of sourdough fermented with specific strains of antifungal lactic acid bacteria can reduce chemical preservatives in bakery products. The main objective of this study was to investigate the production of antifungal carboxylic acids after sourdough fermentation of quinoa and rice flour using the antifungal strains Lactobacillus reuteri R29 and Lactobacillus brevis R2Δ as bioprotective cultures and the non-antifungal L. brevis L1105 as a negative control strain. The impact of the fermentation substrate was evaluated in terms of metabolic activity, acidification pattern and quantity of antifungal carboxylic acids. These in situ produced compounds (n=20) were extracted from the sourdough using a QuEChERS method and detected by a new UHPLC-MS/MS chromatography. Furthermore, the sourdough was applied in situ using durability tests against environmental moulds to investigate the biopreservative potential to prolong the shelf life of bread. Organic acid production and TTA values were lowest in rice sourdough. The sourdough fermentation of the different flour substrates generated a complex and significantly different profile of carboxylic acids. Extracted quinoa sourdough detected the greatest number of carboxylic acids (n=11) at a much higher concentration than what was detected from rice sourdough (n=9). Comparing the lactic acid bacteria strains, L. reuteri R29 fermented sourdoughs contained generally higher concentrations of acetic and lactic acid but also the carboxylic acids. Among them, 3-phenyllactic acid and 2-hydroxyisocaproic acid were present at a significant concentration. This was correlated with the superior protein content of quinoa flour and its high protease activity. With the addition of L. reuteri R29 inoculated sourdough, the shelf life was extended by 2 days for quinoa (+100%) and rice bread (+67%) when compared to the non-acidified controls. The L. brevis R2Δ fermented sourdough bread reached a shelf life of 4 days for quinoa (+100%) and

  20. Improved screening procedure for biogenic amine production by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bover-Cid, S; Holzapfel, W H

    1999-12-01

    An improved screening plate method for the detection of amino acid decarboxylase-positive microorganisms (especially lactic acid bacteria) was developed. The suitability and detection level of the designed medium were quantitatively evaluated by confirmation of amine-forming capacity using an HPLC procedure. The potential to produce the biogenic amines (BA) tyramine, histamine, putrescine, and cadaverine, was investigated in a wide number of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) of different origin, including starter cultures, protective cultures, type strains and strains isolated from different food products. Also, several strains of Enterobacteriaceae were examined. Modifications to previously described methods included lowering glucose and sodium chloride concentrations, and increasing the buffer effect with calcium carbonate and potassium phosphate. In addition, pyridoxal-5-phosphate was included as a codecarboxylase factor for its enhancing effect on the amino acid decarboxylase activity. The screening plate method showed a good correlation with the chemical analysis and due to its simplicity it is presented as a suitable and sensitive method to investigate the capacity of biogenic amine production by LAB. Tyramine was the main amine formed by the LAB strains investigated. Enterococci, carnobacteria and some strains of lactobacilli, particularly of Lb. curvatus. Lb. brevis and Lb. buchneri, were the most intensive tyramine formers. Several strains of lactobacilli, Leuconostoc spp., Weissella spp. and pediococci did not show any potential to produce amines. Enterobacteriaceae were associated with cadaverine and putrescine formation. No significant histamine production could be detected for any of the strains tested.

  1. Selected Lactic Acid Bacteria Synthesize Antioxidant Peptides during Sourdough Fermentation of Cereal Flours

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Rossana; Pinto, Daniela; Gobbetti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    A pool of selected lactic acid bacteria was used for the sourdough fermentation of various cereal flours with the aim of synthesizing antioxidant peptides. The radical-scavenging activity of water/salt-soluble extracts (WSE) from sourdoughs was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that of chemically acidified doughs. The highest activity was found for whole wheat, spelt, rye, and kamut sourdoughs. Almost the same results were found for the inhibition of linoleic acid autoxidation. WSE were subjected to reverse-phase fast protein liquid chromatography. Thirty-seven fractions were collected and assayed in vitro. The most active fractions were resistant to further hydrolysis by digestive enzymes. Twenty-five peptides of 8 to 57 amino acid residues were identified by nano-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Almost all of the sequences shared compositional features which are typical of antioxidant peptides. All of the purified fractions showed ex vivo antioxidant activity on mouse fibroblasts artificially subjected to oxidative stress. This study demonstrates the capacity of sourdough lactic acid bacteria to release peptides with antioxidant activity through the proteolysis of native cereal proteins. PMID:22156436

  2. Improving the antioxidant properties of quinoa flour through fermentation with selected autochthonous lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Lorusso, Anna; Russo, Vito; Pinto, Daniela; Marzani, Barbara; Gobbetti, Marco

    2017-01-16

    Lactic acid bacteria strains, previously isolated from the same matrix, were used to ferment quinoa flour aiming at exploiting the antioxidant potential. As in vitro determined on DPPH and ABTS radicals, the scavenging activity of water/salt-soluble extracts (WSE) from fermented doughs was significantly (P<0.05) higher than that of non-inoculated doughs. The highest inhibition of linoleic acid autoxidation was found for the quinoa dough fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum T0A10. The corresponding WSE was subjected to Reverse Phase Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography, and 32 fractions were collected and subjected to in vitro assays. The most active fraction was resistant to further hydrolysis by digestive enzymes. Five peptides, having sizes from 5 to 9 amino acid residues, were identified by nano-Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionisation-Mass Spectra/Mass Spectra. The sequences shared compositional features which are typical of antioxidant peptides. As shown by determining cell viability and radical scavenging activity (MTT and DCFH-DA assays, respectively), the purified fraction showed antioxidant activity on human keratinocytes NCTC 2544 artificially subjected to oxidative stress. This study demonstrated the capacity of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria to release peptides with antioxidant activity through proteolysis of native quinoa proteins. Fermentation of the quinoa flour with a selected starter might be considered suitable for novel applications as functional food ingredient, dietary supplement or pharmaceutical preparations.

  3. Probiotic potential of noni juice fermented with lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Yi; Ng, Chang-Chai; Su, Hsuan; Tzeng, Wen-Sheng; Shyu, Yuan-Tay

    2009-01-01

    The present study assesses the feasibility of noni as a raw substrate for the production of probiotic noni juice by lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacilluscasei and Lactobacillus plantarum) and bifidobacteria (Bifidobacteriumlongum). Changes in pH, acidity, sugar content, cell survival and antioxidant properties during fermentation were monitored. All tested strains grew well on noni juice, reaching nearly 10⁹ colony-forming units/ml after 48 h fermentation. L.casei produced less lactic acid than B.longum and L. plantarum. After 4 weeks of cold storage at 4°C, B.longum and L. plantarum survived under low-pH conditions in fermented noni juice. In contrast, L.casei exhibited no cell viability after 3 weeks. Moreover, noni juice fermented with B.longum had a high antioxidant capacity that did not differ significantly (P <0.05) from that of lactic acid bacteria. Finally, we found that B.longum and L. plantarum are optimal probiotics for fermentation with noni juice.

  4. Comparative chemotaxonomic studies of mycolic acid-free coryneform bacteria of human origin.

    PubMed Central

    Barreau, C; Bimet, F; Kiredjian, M; Rouillon, N; Bizet, C

    1993-01-01

    Forty-two clinical isolates were classified as Corynebacterium minutissimum, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium CDC group I by the API Coryne system. The chemotaxonomic characteristics of the isolates were determined by thin-layer chromatographic analysis. Twenty-six isolates were found to have a type IV cell wall (meso-di-aminopimelic acid arabinose, galactose) but did not contain mycolic acids. These 26 isolates shared chemotaxonomic characteristics with those of mycolic acid-free reference strains (including the Corynebacterium amycolatum NCFB 2768 type strain, "Corynebacterium asperum," and coryneform CDC groups I2 and F2). The total protein profiles of the isolates determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were similar to each other and to that of the C. amycolatum type strain. The profiles of the reference strains "Corynebacterium asperum" (CIP 100836, CIP 80.54, CIP 79.37, CIP 52.13), coryneform bacteria CDC groups I2 and F2 (CDC F5771, F5890, G723, G1970), and C. amycolatum were closely related. Thus, the mycolic acid-negative strains with a chemotype IV wall may belong to a single taxon. DNA hybridization studies could confirm this hypothesis. The present study shows the importance of chemotaxonomic analysis for verifying strain identifications and completing results from biochemical tests, particularly for coryneform bacteria. Images PMID:8370733

  5. Population dynamics of acetic acid bacteria during traditional wine vinegar production.

    PubMed

    Vegas, Carlos; Mateo, Estibaliz; González, Angel; Jara, Carla; Guillamón, José Manuel; Poblet, Montse; Torija, Ma Jesús; Mas, Albert

    2010-03-31

    The population dynamics of acetic acid bacteria in traditional vinegar production was determined in two independent vinegar plants at both the species and strain level. The effect of barrels made of four different woods upon the population dynamics was also determined. Acetic acid bacteria were isolated on solid media and the species were identified by RFLP-PCR of 16S rRNA genes and confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, while strains were typed by ERIC-PCR and (GTG)(5)-rep-PCR. The most widely isolated species was Acetobacter pasteurianus, which accounted for 100% of all the isolates during most of the acetification. Gluconacetobacter europaeus only appeared at any notable level at the end of the process in oak barrels from one vinegar plant. The various A. pasteurianus strains showed a clear succession as the concentration of acetic acid increased. In both vinegar plants the relative dominance of different strains was modified as the concentrations of acetic acid increased, and strain diversity tended to reduce at the end of the process.

  6. Current status and emerging role of glutathione in food grade lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have taken centre stage in perspectives of modern fermented food industry and probiotic based therapeutics. These bacteria encounter various stress conditions during industrial processing or in the gastrointestinal environment. Such conditions are overcome by complex molecular assemblies capable of synthesizing and/or metabolizing molecules that play a specific role in stress adaptation. Thiols are important class of molecules which contribute towards stress management in cell. Glutathione, a low molecular weight thiol antioxidant distributed widely in eukaryotes and Gram negative organisms, is present sporadically in Gram positive bacteria. However, new insights on its occurrence and role in the latter group are coming to light. Some LAB and closely related Gram positive organisms are proposed to possess glutathione synthesis and/or utilization machinery. Also, supplementation of glutathione in food grade LAB is gaining attention for its role in stress protection and as a nutrient and sulfur source. Owing to the immense benefits of glutathione, its release by probiotic bacteria could also find important applications in health improvement. This review presents our current understanding about the status of glutathione and its role as an exogenously added molecule in food grade LAB and closely related organisms. PMID:22920585

  7. Impairment of cellulose- and cellobiose-degrading soil Bacteria by two acidic herbicides.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Stefanie; Drake, Harold L; Kolb, Steffen

    2012-02-01

    Herbicides have the potential to impair the metabolism of soil microorganisms. The current study addressed the toxic effect of bentazon and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid on aerobic and anaerobic Bacteria that are involved in cellulose and cellobiose degradation in an agricultural soil. Aerobic saccharide degradation was reduced at concentrations of herbicides above environmental values. Microbial processes (e.g. fermentations, ferric iron reduction) that were linked to anaerobic cellulose and cellobiose degradation were reduced in the presence of both herbicides at concentrations above and at those that occur in crop field soil. 16S rRNA gene transcript numbers of total Bacteria, and selected bacterial taxa (Clostridia [Group I], Planctomycetaceae, and two uncultivated taxa of Bacteroidetes) decreased more in anoxic than in oxic cellulose-supplemented soil microcosms in the presence of both herbicides. Collectively, the results suggested that the metabolism of anaerobic cellulose-degrading Bacteria was impaired by typical in situ herbicide concentrations, whereas in situ concentrations did not impair metabolism of aerobic cellulose- and cellobiose-degrading soil Bacteria.

  8. Involvement of yeast HSP90 isoforms in response to stress and cell death induced by acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Silva, Alexandra; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Fernandes, Angela; Carreto, Laura; Rodrigues, Fernando; Holcik, Martin; Santos, Manuel A S; Ludovico, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Acetic acid-induced apoptosis in yeast is accompanied by an impairment of the general protein synthesis machinery, yet paradoxically also by the up-regulation of the two isoforms of the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) chaperone family, Hsc82p and Hsp82p. Herein, we show that impairment of cap-dependent translation initiation induced by acetic acid is caused by the phosphorylation and inactivation of eIF2α by Gcn2p kinase. A microarray analysis of polysome-associated mRNAs engaged in translation in acetic acid challenged cells further revealed that HSP90 mRNAs are over-represented in this polysome fraction suggesting preferential translation of HSP90 upon acetic acid treatment. The relevance of HSP90 isoform translation during programmed cell death (PCD) was unveiled using genetic and pharmacological abrogation of HSP90, which suggests opposing roles for HSP90 isoforms in cell survival and death. Hsc82p appears to promote survival and its deletion leads to necrotic cell death, while Hsp82p is a pro-death molecule involved in acetic acid-induced apoptosis. Therefore, HSP90 isoforms have distinct roles in the control of cell fate during PCD and their selective translation regulates cellular response to acetic acid stress.

  9. Oil production by oleaginous yeasts using the hydrolysate from pretreatment of wheat straw with dilute sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaochen; Zheng, Yubin; Dorgan, Kathleen M; Chen, Shulin

    2011-05-01

    This paper explores the use of the hydrolysate from the dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of wheat straw for microbial oil production. The resulting hydrolysate was composed of pentoses (24.3g/L) and hexoses (4.9 g/L), along with some other degradation products, such as acetic acid, furfural, and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). Five oleaginous yeast strains, Cryptococcus curvatus, Rhodotorula glutinis, Rhodosporidium toruloides, Lipomyces starkeyi, and Yarrowia lipolytica, were evaluated by using this hydrolysate as substrates. The results showed that all of these strains could use the detoxified hydrolysate to produce lipids while except R. toruloides non-detoxified hydrolysate could also be used for the growth of all of the selective yeast strains. C. curvatus showed the highest lipid concentrations in medium on both the detoxified (4.2g/L) and non-detoxified (5.8 g/L) hydrolysates. And the inhibitory effect studies on C. curvatus indicated HMF had insignificant impacts at a concentration of up to 3g/L while furfural inhibited cell growth and lipid content by 72.0% and 62.0% at 1g/L, respectively. Our work demonstrates that lipid production is a promising alternative to utilize hemicellulosic sugars obtained during pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials.

  10. Isolation, screening and characterization of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional fermented food.

    PubMed

    El-Shafei, H A; Abd-El-Sabour, H; Ibrahim, N; Mostafa, Y A

    2000-03-01

    100 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from traditional fermented foods (yoghurt, milk cream, sour dough and milk) were screened for bacteriocin production. Twenty six strains producing a nisin-like bacteriocin were selected. Most of these isolates gave only a narrow inhibitory spectrum, although one showed a broad inhibitory spectrum against the indicator strains tested, this strain was determined as Lactococcus lactis. The influence of several parameters on the fermentative production of nisin by Lactococcus lactis was studied. Production of nisin was optimal at 30 degrees C and in the pH range 5.5-6.3. The effect of different sulphur and nitrogen sources on Lactococcus lactis growth and nisin production was studied. Magnesium sulfate and manganese sulfate were found to be the best sulphur sources while triammonium citrate was the best inorganic nitrogen source and meat extract, peptone and yeast extract were the best organic nitrogen source for nisin production.

  11. Influence of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on the Transport and Deposition Behaviors of Bacteria in Quartz Sand.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2016-03-01

    The significance of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on the transport and deposition behaviors of bacteria (Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis) in quartz sand is examined in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions at pH 5.6 by comparing both breakthrough curves and retained profiles with PFOA in solutions versus those without PFOA. All test conditions are found to be highly unfavorable for cell deposition regardless of the presence of PFOA; however, 7%-46% cell deposition is observed depending on the conditions. The cell deposition may be attributed to micro- or nanoscale roughness and/or to chemical heterogeneity of the sand surface. The results show that, under all examined conditions, PFOA in suspensions increases cell transport and decreases cell deposition in porous media regardless of cell type, presence or absence of extracellular polymeric substances, ionic strength, and ion valence. We find that the additional repulsion between bacteria and quartz sand caused by both acid-base interaction and steric repulsion as well as the competition for deposition sites on quartz sand surfaces by PFOA are responsible for the enhanced transport and decreased deposition of bacteria with PFOA in solutions.

  12. Role of sulfur-reducing bacteria in a wetland system treating acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Riefler, R Guy; Krohn, Jeremy; Stuart, Ben; Socotch, Cheryl

    2008-05-15

    This report describes a twenty month case study of a successive alkalinity producing system (SAPS) treating a strong acid mine drainage (AMD) source in Coshocton County, Ohio. Prior to the commencement of the project, a large volume of black amorphous sludge had accumulated in several of the constructed wetlands. The sludge was found to be 43% organic, with very high concentrations of sulfur, iron, aluminum, and acidity. Based on several biological, physical, and chemical analyses, the sludge was determined to be an anaerobic biofilm with a large population of sulfur-reducing bacteria and a high mineral content due to the formation of iron sulfide and aluminum precipitates. On average the system performed well, generating 26 kg CaCO3/d of alkalinity and capturing 5.0 kg/d of iron and 1.7 kg/d of aluminum. Several simple performance analysis tools were presented in this work. By comparing the pollutant influent and effluent loading, it was determined that the SAPS was performing at capacity and over the past year increased effluent concentrations were due to increased influent loadings and not system deterioration. Further, by performing a detailed cell-by-cell loading analysis of multiple chemical components, the alkalinity generated by limestone dissolution and by sulfate reduction was determined. Interestingly, 61% of the alkalinity generation in the vertical flow wetlands was due to sulfur-reducing bacteria activity, indicating that sulfur-reducing bacteria may play a more significant role in SAPS than expected.

  13. Screening of species-specific lactic acid bacteria for veal calves multi-strain probiotic adjuncts.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Barbara; Agazzi, Alessandro; Bersani, Carla; De Dea, Paola; Pecorini, Chiara; Pirani, Silvia; Rebucci, Raffaella; Savoini, Giovanni; Stella, Simone; Stenico, Alberta; Tirloni, Erica; Domeneghini, Cinzia

    2011-06-01

    The selection of promising specific species of lactic acid bacteria with potential probiotic characteristics is of particular interest in producing multi species-specific probiotic adjuncts in veal calves rearing. The aim of the present work was to select and evaluate in vitro the functional activity of lactic acid bacteria, Bifidobacterium longum and Bacillus coagulans strains isolated from veal calves in order to assess their potential use as multi species-specific probiotics for veal calves. For this purpose, bacterial strains isolated from faeces collected from 40 healthy 50-day-calves, were identified by RiboPrinter and 16s rRNA gene sequence. The most frequent strains belonged to the species B. longum, Streptococcus bovis, Lactobacillus animalis and Streptococcus macedonicus. Among these, 7 strains were chosen for testing their probiotic characteristics in vitro. Three strains, namely L. animalis SB310, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei SB137 and B. coagulans SB117 showed varying individual but promising capabilities to survive in the gastrointestinal tract, to adhere, to produce antimicrobial compounds. These three selected species-specific bacteria demonstrated in vitro, both singularly and mixed, the functional properties needed for their use as potential probiotics in veal calves.

  14. The activity of ferulic and gallic acids in biofilm prevention and control of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Borges, Anabela; Saavedra, Maria J; Simões, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The activity of two phenolic acids, gallic acid (GA) and ferulic acid (FA) at 1000 μg ml(-1), was evaluated on the prevention and control of biofilms formed by Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes. In addition, the effect of the two phenolic acids was tested on planktonic cell susceptibility, bacterial motility and adhesion. Biofilm prevention and control were tested using a microtiter plate assay and the effect of the phenolic acids was assessed on biofilm mass (crystal violet staining) and on the quantification of metabolic activity (alamar blue assay). The minimum bactericidal concentration for P. aeruginosa was 500 μg ml(-1) (for both phenolic acids), whilst for E. coli it was 2500 μg ml(-1) (FA) and 5000 μg ml(-1) (GA), for L. monocytogenes it was >5000 μg ml(-1) (for both phenolic acids), and for S. aureus it was 5000 μg ml(-1) (FA) and >5000 μg ml(-1) (GA). GA caused total inhibition of swimming (L. monocytogenes) and swarming (L. monocytogenes and E. coli) motilities. FA caused total inhibition of swimming (L. monocytogenes) and swarming (L. monocytogenes and E. coli) motilities. Colony spreading of S. aureus was completely inhibited by FA. The interference of GA and FA with bacterial adhesion was evaluated by the determination of the free energy of adhesion. Adhesion was less favorable when the bacteria were exposed to GA (P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and L. monocytogenes) and FA (P. aeruginosa and S. aureus). Both phenolics had preventive action on biofilm formation and showed a higher potential to reduce the mass of biofilms formed by the Gram-negative bacteria. GA and FA promoted reductions in biofilm activity >70% for all the biofilms tested. The two phenolic acids demonstrated the potential to inhibit bacterial motility and to prevent and control biofilms of four important human pathogenic bacteria. This study also emphasizes the potential of phytochemicals as an emergent source of biofilm

  15. Vinegar Production from Jabuticaba (Myrciaria jaboticaba) Fruit Using Immobilized Acetic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Monique Suela; Cristina de Souza, Angélica; Magalhăes-Guedes, Karina Teixeira; Ribeiro, Fernanda Severo de Rezende; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cell immobilization comprises the retention of metabolically active cells inside a polymeric matrix. In this study, the production of jabuticaba (Myrciaria jaboticaba) vinegar using immobilized Acetobacter aceti and Gluconobacter oxydans cells is proposed as a new method to prevent losses of jabuticaba fruit surplus. The pulp of jabuticaba was processed and Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCMA 0200 was used to ferment the must for jabuticaba wine production. Sugars, alcohols (ethanol and glycerol) and organic acids were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Volatile compounds were determined by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. The ethanol content of the produced jabuticaba wine was approx. 74.8 g/L (9.5% by volume) after 168 h of fermentation. Acetic acid fermentation for vinegar production was performed using a mixed culture of immobilized A. aceti CCT 0190 and G. oxydans CCMA 0350 cells. The acetic acid yield was 74.4% and productivity was 0.29 g/(L·h). The vinegar had particularly high concentrations of citric (6.67 g/L), malic (7.02 g/L) and succinic (5.60 g/L) acids. These organic acids give a suitable taste and flavour to the vinegar. Seventeen compounds (aldehydes, higher alcohols, terpene, acetate, diether, furans, acids, ketones and ethyl esters) were identified in the jabuticaba vinegar. In conclusion, vinegar was successfully produced from jabuticaba fruits using yeast and immobilized mixed cultures of A. aceti and G. oxydans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to use mixed culture of immobilized cells for the production of jabuticaba vinegar. PMID:27956867

  16. Vinegar Production from Jabuticaba (Myrciaria jaboticaba) Fruit Using Immobilized Acetic Acid Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dias, Disney Ribeiro; Silva, Monique Suela; Cristina de Souza, Angélica; Magalhăes-Guedes, Karina Teixeira; Ribeiro, Fernanda Severo de Rezende; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2016-09-01

    Cell immobilization comprises the retention of metabolically active cells inside a polymeric matrix. In this study, the production of jabuticaba (Myrciaria jaboticaba) vinegar using immobilized Acetobacter aceti and Gluconobacter oxydans cells is proposed as a new method to prevent losses of jabuticaba fruit surplus. The pulp of jabuticaba was processed and Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCMA 0200 was used to ferment the must for jabuticaba wine production. Sugars, alcohols (ethanol and glycerol) and organic acids were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Volatile compounds were determined by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. The ethanol content of the produced jabuticaba wine was approx. 74.8 g/L (9.5% by volume) after 168 h of fermentation. Acetic acid fermentation for vinegar production was performed using a mixed culture of immobilized A. aceti CCT 0190 and G. oxydans CCMA 0350 cells. The acetic acid yield was 74.4% and productivity was 0.29 g/(L·h). The vinegar had particularly high concentrations of citric (6.67 g/L), malic (7.02 g/L) and succinic (5.60 g/L) acids. These organic acids give a suitable taste and flavour to the vinegar. Seventeen compounds (aldehydes, higher alcohols, terpene, acetate, diether, furans, acids, ketones and ethyl esters) were identified in the jabuticaba vinegar. In conclusion, vinegar was successfully produced from jabuticaba fruits using yeast and immobilized mixed cultures of A. aceti and G. oxydans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to use mixed culture of immobilized cells for the production of jabuticaba vinegar.

  17. Sample to answer: a fully integrated nucleic acid identification system for bacteria monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkyu; Elsnab, John; Johnson, Michael; Gale, Bruce K.

    2010-02-01

    A fully integrated microfluidic system was developed and incorporates an EC-MWCNT (electrochemical multiwalled carbon nanotube) sensor for the detection of bacteria. Sample metering, reagent metering and delivery was implemented with microvalves and pumps embedded inside the microfluidic system. The nucleic acid extraction was performed using microchannels controlled using automated platforms and a disposable microfluidic silica cartridge. The target samples were flowed and hybridized with probe ssDNA (single strand DNA) across the MWCNT-EC sensor (built on a silicon chip), which was embedded in a microfluidic cell. The 9-pad sensor was scanned before and after hybridization to measure the quantity of RNA (Ribonucleic acid) bound to the array surface. A rapid and accurate sample-in answer-out nucleic acid system was realized with automated volume metering, microfluidic sample preparation, and integrated nano-biosensors.

  18. Bioconversion of fumaric acid to L-malic acid by the bacteria of the genus Nocardia.

    PubMed

    Hronská, Helena; Tokošová, Silvia; Pilniková, Anna; Krištofíková, Ľudmila; Rosenberg, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial strains of the genus Nocardia were used for the bioconversion of fumaric acid to L-malic acid. The ability of the bacterial strain Nocardia sp. CCM 4837/A to produce L-malic acid from fumaric acid was investigated under various conditions. The optimal temperature for the bioconversion was approximately 37 °C, and the optimal pH was around 8.0. The addition of an inductor (fumarate salt) to the fermentation medium was necessary to enhance enzyme activity. The presence of detergent Triton X-100 (0.02-0.1 %) in the reaction mixture rapidly increased the enzyme activity of fumarase. The specific fumarase activity of intact cells Nocardia sp. CCM 4837/A increased from 2.8 to 75 U/mg after optimising the experimental conditions described here. Pretreatment of the Nocardia cells with malonate was not necessary because succinate was not detected as a by-product under our experimental conditions.

  19. Development of specific fluorescent oligonucleotide probes for in situ identification of wine lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Blasco, Lucía; Ferrer, Sergi; Pardo, Isabel

    2003-08-08

    A rapid method for the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from wine has been developed. This method is based on fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), using fluorescent oligonucleotide probes, homologous to 16S rDNA of those species of LAB commonly found in wines. The protocol for the specific detection of these bacteria was established through the hybridisation of 36 reference strains. The specificity of the probes was evaluated by using pure cultures. Probes were used to identify species in different wines, making it evident that direct identification and quantification from natural samples without culturing is also possible. The results show that FISH is a promising technique for the rapid identification of LAB, allowing positive identification in a few hours (4-16 h).

  20. Behavior of Psychrotrophic Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Spoiling Cooked Meat Products

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Yoshikatsu; Ayaki, Mitsuko; Fuchu, Hidetaka; Sugiyama, Masaaki; Morita, Hidetoshi

    2003-01-01

    Three kinds of lactic acid bacteria were isolated from spoiling cooked meat products stored below 10°C. They were identified as Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, and Leuconostoc citreum. All three strains grew well in MRS broth at 10°C. In particular, L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides and L. citreum grew even at 4°C, and their doubling times were 23.6 and 51.5 h, respectively. On the other hand, although the bacteria were initially below the detection limit (<10 CFU/g) in model cooked meat products, the bacterial counts increased to 108 CFU/g at 10°C after 7 to 12 days. PMID:12788779