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Sample records for acid bacterium streptococcus

  1. Proteome analysis of the hyaluronic acid-producing bacterium, Streptococcus zooepidemicus

    PubMed Central

    Marcellin, Esteban; Gruber, Christian W; Archer, Colin; Craik, David J; Nielsen, Lars K

    2009-01-01

    Background Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) is a commensal of horses and an opportunistic pathogen in many animals and humans. Some strains produce copious amounts of hyaluronic acid, making S. zooepidemicus an important industrial microorganism for the production of this valuable biopolymer used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry. Encapsulation by hyaluronic acid is considered an important virulence factor in other streptococci, though the importance in S. zooepidemicus remains poorly understood. Proteomics may provide a better understanding of virulence factors in S. zooepidemicus, facilitate the design of better diagnostics and treatments, and guide engineering of superior production strains. Results Using hyaluronidase to remove the capsule and by optimising cellular lysis, a reference map for S. zooepidemicus was completed. This protocol significantly increased protein recovery, allowing for visualisation of 682 spots and the identification of 86 proteins using mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF); of which 16 were membrane proteins. Conclusion The data presented constitute the first reference map for S. zooepidemicus and provide new information on the identity and characteristics of the more abundantly expressed proteins. PMID:19327162

  2. Growth and gas formation by Lactobacillus wasatchensis, a novel obligatory heterofermentative nonstarter lactic acid bacterium, in Cheddar-style cheese made using a Streptococcus thermophilus starter.

    PubMed

    Ortakci, Fatih; Broadbent, Jeffery R; Oberg, Craig J; McMahon, Donald J

    2015-11-01

    A novel slow-growing, obligatory heterofermentative, nonstarter lactic acid bacterium (NSLAB), Lactobacillus wasatchensis WDC04, was studied for growth and gas production in Cheddar-style cheese made using Streptococcus thermophilus as the starter culture. Cheesemaking trials were conducted using S. thermophilus alone or in combination with Lb. wasatchensis deliberately added to cheese milk at a level of ~10(4) cfu/mL. Resulting cheeses were ripened at 6 or 12°C. At d 1, starter streptococcal numbers were similar in both cheeses (~10(9) cfu/g) and fast-growing NSLAB lactobacilli counts were below detectable levels (<10(2) cfu/g). As expected, Lactobacillus wasatchensis counts were 3×10(5) cfu/g in cheeses inoculated with this bacterium and below enumeration limits in the control cheese. Starter streptococci decreased over time at both storage temperatures but declined more rapidly at 12°C, especially in cheese also containing Lb. wasatchensis. Populations of fast-growing NSLAB and the slow-growing Lb. wasatchensis reached 5×10(7) and 2×10(8) cfu/g, respectively, after 16 wk of storage at 12°C. Growth of NSLAB coincided with a reduction in galactose concentration in the cheese from 0.6 to 0.1%. Levels of galactose at 6°C had similar decrease. Gas formation and textural defects were only observed in cheese with added Lb. wasatchensis ripened at 12°C. Use of S. thermophilus as starter culture resulted in galactose accumulation that Lb. wasatchensis can use to produce CO2, which contributes to late gas blowing in Cheddar-style cheeses, especially when the cheese is ripened at elevated temperature.

  3. Growth and gas formation by Lactobacillus wasatchensis, a novel obligatory heterofermentative nonstarter lactic acid bacterium, in Cheddar-style cheese made using a Streptococcus thermophilus starter.

    PubMed

    Ortakci, Fatih; Broadbent, Jeffery R; Oberg, Craig J; McMahon, Donald J

    2015-11-01

    A novel slow-growing, obligatory heterofermentative, nonstarter lactic acid bacterium (NSLAB), Lactobacillus wasatchensis WDC04, was studied for growth and gas production in Cheddar-style cheese made using Streptococcus thermophilus as the starter culture. Cheesemaking trials were conducted using S. thermophilus alone or in combination with Lb. wasatchensis deliberately added to cheese milk at a level of ~10(4) cfu/mL. Resulting cheeses were ripened at 6 or 12°C. At d 1, starter streptococcal numbers were similar in both cheeses (~10(9) cfu/g) and fast-growing NSLAB lactobacilli counts were below detectable levels (<10(2) cfu/g). As expected, Lactobacillus wasatchensis counts were 3×10(5) cfu/g in cheeses inoculated with this bacterium and below enumeration limits in the control cheese. Starter streptococci decreased over time at both storage temperatures but declined more rapidly at 12°C, especially in cheese also containing Lb. wasatchensis. Populations of fast-growing NSLAB and the slow-growing Lb. wasatchensis reached 5×10(7) and 2×10(8) cfu/g, respectively, after 16 wk of storage at 12°C. Growth of NSLAB coincided with a reduction in galactose concentration in the cheese from 0.6 to 0.1%. Levels of galactose at 6°C had similar decrease. Gas formation and textural defects were only observed in cheese with added Lb. wasatchensis ripened at 12°C. Use of S. thermophilus as starter culture resulted in galactose accumulation that Lb. wasatchensis can use to produce CO2, which contributes to late gas blowing in Cheddar-style cheeses, especially when the cheese is ripened at elevated temperature. PMID:26364109

  4. Specialized adaptation of a lactic acid bacterium to the milk environment: the comparative genomics of Streptococcus thermophilus LMD-9

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus thermophilus represents the only species among the streptococci that has “Generally Regarded As Safe” status and that plays an economically important role in the fermentation of yogurt and cheeses. We conducted comparative genome analysis of S. thermophilus LMD-9 to identify unique gene features as well as features that contribute to its adaptation to the dairy environment. In addition, we investigated the transcriptome response of LMD-9 during growth in milk in the presence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, a companion culture in yogurt fermentation, and during lytic bacteriophage infection. Results The S. thermophilus LMD-9 genome is comprised of a 1.8 Mbp circular chromosome (39.1% GC; 1,834 predicted open reading frames) and two small cryptic plasmids. Genome comparison with the previously sequenced LMG 18311 and CNRZ1066 strains revealed 114 kb of LMD-9 specific chromosomal region, including genes that encode for histidine biosynthetic pathway, a cell surface proteinase, various host defense mechanisms and a phage remnant. Interestingly, also unique to LMD-9 are genes encoding for a putative mucus-binding protein, a peptide transporter, and exopolysaccharide biosynthetic proteins that have close orthologs in human intestinal microorganisms. LMD-9 harbors a large number of pseudogenes (13% of ORFeome), indicating that like LMG 18311 and CNRZ1066, LMD-9 has also undergone major reductive evolution, with the loss of carbohydrate metabolic genes and virulence genes found in their streptococcal counterparts. Functional genome distribution analysis of ORFeomes among streptococci showed that all three S. thermophilus strains formed a distinct functional cluster, further establishing their specialized adaptation to the nutrient-rich milk niche. An upregulation of CRISPR1 expression in LMD-9 during lytic bacteriophage DT1 infection suggests its protective role against phage invasion. When co-cultured with L. bulgaricus, LMD-9

  5. Streptococcus danieliae sp. nov., a novel bacterium isolated from the caecum of a mouse.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Thomas; Charrier, Cédric; Haller, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    We report the characterization of one novel bacterium, strain ERD01G(T), isolated from the cecum of a TNF(deltaARE) mouse. The strain was found to belong to the genus Streptococcus based on phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences. The bacterial species with standing name in nomenclature that was most closely related to our isolate was Streptococcus alactolyticus (97 %). The two bacteria were characterized by a DNA-DNA hybridization similarity value of 35 %, demonstrating that they belong to different species. The new isolate was negative for acetoin production, esculin hydrolysis, urease, α-galactosidase and β-glucosidase, was able to produce acid from starch and trehalose, grew as beta-hemolytic coccobacilli on blood agar, did not grow at >40 °C, did not survive heat treatment at 60 °C for 20 min and showed negative agglutination in Lancefield tests. On the basis of these characteristics, strain ERD01G(T) differed from the most closely related species S. alactolyticus, Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus sanguinis. Thus, based on genotypic and phenotypic evidence, we propose that the isolate belongs to a novel bacterial taxon within the genus Streptococcus, for which the name Streptococcus danieliae is proposed. The type strain is ERD01G(T) (= DSM 22233(T) = CCUG 57647(T)).

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus salivarius HSISS4, a Human Commensal Bacterium Highly Prevalent in the Digestive Tract.

    PubMed

    Mignolet, Johann; Fontaine, Laetitia; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Hols, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The human commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius plays a major role in the equilibrium of microbial communities of the digestive tract. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a Streptococcus salivarius strain isolated from the small intestine, namely, HSISS4. Its circular chromosome comprises 1,903 coding sequences and 2,100,988 nucleotides. PMID:26847886

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus salivarius HSISS4, a Human Commensal Bacterium Highly Prevalent in the Digestive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Laetitia; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    The human commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius plays a major role in the equilibrium of microbial communities of the digestive tract. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a Streptococcus salivarius strain isolated from the small intestine, namely, HSISS4. Its circular chromosome comprises 1,903 coding sequences and 2,100,988 nucleotides. PMID:26847886

  8. Acid tolerance mechanisms utilized by Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Robert; Cvitkovitch, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1924 by J Clarke, Streptococcus mutans has been the focus of rigorous research efforts due to its involvement in caries initiation and progression. Its ability to ferment a range of dietary carbohydrates can rapidly drop the external environmental pH, thereby making dental plaque inhabitable to many competing species and can ultimately lead to tooth decay. Acid production by this oral pathogen would prove suicidal if not for its remarkable ability to withstand the acid onslaught by utilizing a wide variety of highly evolved acid-tolerance mechanisms. The elucidation of these mechanisms will be discussed, serving as the focus of this review. PMID:20210551

  9. Structural analysis of the lipoteichoic acids isolated from bovine mastitis Streptococcus uberis 233, Streptococcus dysgalactiae 2023 and Streptococcus agalactiae 0250.

    PubMed

    Czabańska, Anna; Neiwert, Olga; Lindner, Buko; Leigh, James; Holst, Otto; Duda, Katarzyna A

    2012-11-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an amphiphilic polycondensate located in the cell envelope of Gram-positive bacteria. In this study, LTAs were isolated from the three bovine mastitis species Streptococcus uberis 233, Streptococcus dysgalactiae 2023, and Streptococcus agalactiae 0250. Structural investigations of these LTAs were performed applying 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance experiments as well as chemical analyses and mass spectrometry. Compositional analysis revealed the presence of glycerol (Gro), Glc, alanine (Ala), and 16:0, 16:1, 18:0, 18:1. The LTAs of the three Streptococcus strains possessed the same structure, that is, a lipid anchor comprised of α-Glcp-(1→2)-α-Glcp-(1→3)-1,2-diacyl-sn-Gro and the hydrophilic backbone consisting of poly(sn-Gro-1-phosphate) randomly substituted at O-2 of Gro by d-Ala.

  10. Structural analysis of the lipoteichoic acids isolated from bovine mastitis Streptococcus uberis 233, Streptococcus dysgalactiae 2023 and Streptococcus agalactiae 0250.

    PubMed

    Czabańska, Anna; Neiwert, Olga; Lindner, Buko; Leigh, James; Holst, Otto; Duda, Katarzyna A

    2012-11-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an amphiphilic polycondensate located in the cell envelope of Gram-positive bacteria. In this study, LTAs were isolated from the three bovine mastitis species Streptococcus uberis 233, Streptococcus dysgalactiae 2023, and Streptococcus agalactiae 0250. Structural investigations of these LTAs were performed applying 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance experiments as well as chemical analyses and mass spectrometry. Compositional analysis revealed the presence of glycerol (Gro), Glc, alanine (Ala), and 16:0, 16:1, 18:0, 18:1. The LTAs of the three Streptococcus strains possessed the same structure, that is, a lipid anchor comprised of α-Glcp-(1→2)-α-Glcp-(1→3)-1,2-diacyl-sn-Gro and the hydrophilic backbone consisting of poly(sn-Gro-1-phosphate) randomly substituted at O-2 of Gro by d-Ala. PMID:23036931

  11. Genomic insights into high exopolysaccharide-producing dairy starter bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus ASCC 1275

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qinglong; Tun, Hein Min; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching; Shah, Nagendra P.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus ASCC 1275 (ST 1275), a typical dairy starter bacterium, yields the highest known amount (~1,000 mg/L) of exopolysaccharide (EPS) in milk among the species of S. thermophilus. The addition of this starter in milk fermentation exhibited texture modifying properties for fermented dairy foods such as yogurt and cheese in the presence of EPS as its important metabolite. In this genomic study, a novel eps gene cluster for EPS assembly of repeating unit has been reported. It contains two-pair epsC-epsD genes which are assigned to determine the chain length of EPS. This also suggests this organism produces two types of EPSs – capsular and ropy EPS, as observed in our previous studies. Additionally, ST 1275 appears to exhibit effective proteolysis system and sophisticated stress response systems to stressful conditions, and has the highest number of four separate CRISPR/Cas loci. These features may be conducive to milk adaptation of this starter and against undesirable bacteriophage infections which leads to failure of milk fermentation. Insights into the genome of ST 1275 suggest that this strain may be a model high EPS-producing dairy starter. PMID:24827399

  12. Galactose and Lactose Genes from the Galactose-Positive Bacterium Streptococcus salivarius and the Phylogenetically Related Galactose-Negative Bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus: Organization, Sequence, Transcription, and Activity of the gal Gene Products

    PubMed Central

    Vaillancourt, Katy; Moineau, Sylvain; Frenette, Michel; Lessard, Christian; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a lactose- and galactose-positive bacterium that is phylogenetically closely related to Streptococcus thermophilus, a bacterium that metabolizes lactose but not galactose. In this paper, we report a comparative characterization of the S. salivarius and S. thermophilus gal-lac gene clusters. The clusters have the same organization with the order galR (codes for a transcriptional regulator and is transcribed in the opposite direction), galK (galactokinase), galT (galactose-1-P uridylyltransferase), galE (UDP-glucose 4-epimerase), galM (galactose mutarotase), lacS (lactose transporter), and lacZ (β-galactosidase). An analysis of the nucleotide sequence as well as Northern blotting and primer extension experiments revealed the presence of four promoters located upstream from galR, the gal operon, galM, and the lac operon of S. salivarius. Putative promoters with virtually identical nucleotide sequences were found at the same positions in the S. thermophilus gal-lac gene cluster. An additional putative internal promoter at the 3′ end of galT was found in S. thermophilus but not in S. salivarius. The results clearly indicated that the gal-lac gene cluster was efficiently transcribed in both species. The Shine-Dalgarno sequences of galT and galE were identical in both species, whereas the ribosome binding site of S. thermophilus galK differed from that of S. salivarius by two nucleotides, suggesting that the S. thermophilus galK gene might be poorly translated. This was confirmed by measurements of enzyme activities. PMID:11790749

  13. Fatal septicemia caused by the zoonotic bacterium Streptococcus iniae during an outbreak in Caribbean reef fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An outbreak of Streptococcus iniae occurred in the early months of 2008 among wild reef fish in the waters of the Federation of St.Kitts and Nevis, lasting almost 2 months. Moribund and dead fish were collected for gross, histological, bacteriological, and molecular analysis. Necropsy findings inclu...

  14. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stéphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  15. Comparative analysis of the localization of lipoteichoic acid in Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, S J; Johnston, B P

    1987-01-01

    The cellular locations of deacylated lipoteichoic acid (dLTA) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) were examined in late-exponential-phase cells of a serotype III strain of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococci [GBS]) isolated from an infant with late-onset meningitis and compared with a fresh clinical isolate of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci [GAS]). LTA and dLTA were found to be associated with the protoplast membranes of both organisms, with only dLTA found in mutanolysin cell wall digests. Both organisms released dLTA during growth, but only the GAS released substantial levels of LTA into the culture medium. However, penicillin treatment (5 micrograms/ml for 60 min) of GBS resulted in the recovery of LTA in cell wall digests as well as in the culture medium. These results suggest that under normal growth conditions, the hydrophobic region (glycolipid) of LTA remains associated with the cytoplasmic membrane of GBS and unavailable for hydrophobic interactions at the cell surface with epithelial cells. In contrast, release of LTA into the environment by the GAS allows the fatty acid moieties to interact with hydrophobic domains on the surface of epithelial cells. These results may help explain the marked differences in the specificity of binding between these two major streptococcal pathogens for human fetal and adult epithelial cells. PMID:3308704

  16. Association of a novel high molecular weight, serine-rich protein (SrpA) with fibril-mediated adhesion of the oral biofilm bacterium Streptococcus cristatus

    PubMed Central

    Handley, P. S.; Correia, F. F.; Russell, K.; Rosan, B.; DiRienzo, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The surface of the oral plaque bacterium Streptococcus cristatus is decorated with a lateral tuft of fibrils. The fibrillar tuft functions in the adhesion of S. cristatus to heterologous bacterial species in the plaque biofilm. The tuft typically consists of a densely packed fringe of shorter fibrils 238 ± 19 nm long with longer, less abundant fibrils 403 ± 66 nm long projecting through the fringe of short fibrils. The two types of fibrils in the tufts of S. cristatus have been refractory to biochemical separation, complicating their characterization. A hexadecane partition assay was used to enrich for subpopulations of S. cristatus CR311 (type strain NCTC 12479) having distinct fibrillar morphotypes. Negative staining in the TEM revealed that cells of a hydrophobic subpopulation of S. cristatus (CR311var1) carried only the long fibrils (395 ± 32 nm). A hydrophilic subpopulation of S. cristatus (CR311var3) consisted of mixed morphotypes having no fibrils or remnant short fibrils (223 ± 49 nm). No long fibrils were observed on any cells in the CR311var3 subpopulation. The CR311var3 morphotype, unlike the wild-type strain and CR311var1, was not able to form corncobs with either Corynebacterium matruchotii or Fusobacterium nucleatum. Variant CR311var3 did not express the novel gene srpA, which encodes a high molecular weight (321,882 Da) serine-rich protein, SrpA. The SrpA protein contains two extensive repeat motifs of 17 and 71 amino acids and a gram-positive cell wall anchor consensus sequence (LPNTG). The unusual properties of SrpA most closely resemble those of Fap1, the fimbrial-associated adhesin protein of Streptococcus parasanguis. The association of long fibrils, high surface hydrophobicity, ability to form corncob formations, and expression of the srpA gene suggest that SrpA is a long fibril protein in S. cristatus. PMID:15836513

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Unsaturated Fatty Acid Auxotrophs of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans▿

    PubMed Central

    Altabe, Silvia; Lopez, Paloma; de Mendoza, Diego

    2007-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis is essential for the maintenance of membrane structure and function in many groups of anaerobic bacteria. Like Escherichia coli, the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae produces straight-chain saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids. In E. coli UFA synthesis requires the action of two gene products, the essential isomerase/dehydratase encoded by fabA and an elongation condensing enzyme encoded by fabB. S. pneumoniae lacks both genes and instead employs a single enzyme with only an isomerase function encoded by the fabM gene. In this paper we report the construction and characterization of an S. pneumoniae 708 fabM mutant. This mutant failed to grow in complex medium, and the defect was overcome by addition of UFAs to the growth medium. S. pneumoniae fabM mutants did not produce detectable levels of monounsaturated fatty acids as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and thin-layer chromatography analysis of the radiolabeled phospholipids. We also demonstrate that a fabM null mutant of the cariogenic organism Streptococcus mutants is a UFA auxotroph, indicating that FabM is the only enzyme involved in the control of membrane fluidity in streptococci. Finally we report that the fabN gene of Enterococcus faecalis, coding for a dehydratase/isomerase, complements the growth of S. pneumoniae fabM mutants. Taken together, these results suggest that FabM is a potential target for chemotherapeutic agents against streptococci and that S. pneumoniae UFA auxotrophs could help identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in UFA biosynthesis. PMID:17827283

  18. Transformation of Streptococcus sanguis Challis by plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid from Streptococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, D J; Hassell, F P

    1976-01-01

    Plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from Streptococcus faecalis, strain DS5, was transferred to the Challis strain of Streptococcus sanguis by transformation. Two antibiotic resistance markers carried by the beta plasmid from strain DS5, erythromycin and lincomycin, were transferred to S. sanguis at a maximum frequency of 1.8 x 10-5/colony-forming unit. Approximately 70% of the covalently closed circular DNA isolated from transformant cultures by dye buoyant density gradients was shown to be hybridizable to beta plasmid DNA. Two major differences were observed between the beta plasmid from S. faecalis and the plasmid isolated from transformed S. sanguis: (i) the beta plasmid from strain DS5 sedimented in velocity gradients at 43S, whereas the covalently closed circular DNA from transformed Challis sedimented at 41S, suggesting a 1.5-Mdal deletion from the beta plasmid occurred; (ii) although the 43S beta plasmid remained in the supercoiled configuration for several weeks after isolation, the 41S plasmid was rapidly converted to a linear double-stranded molecule. Attempts to transform S. sanguis with the alpha plasmid from S. faecalis, strain DS5, were unsuccessful. PMID:824275

  19. Fatal septicemia caused by the zoonotic bacterium Streptococcus iniae during an outbreak in Caribbean reef fish.

    PubMed

    Keirstead, N D; Brake, J W; Griffin, M J; Halliday-Simmonds, I; Thrall, M A; Soto, E

    2014-09-01

    An outbreak of Streptococcus iniae occurred in the early months of 2008 among wild reef fish in the waters of the Federation of St Kitts and Nevis, lasting almost 2 months. Moribund and dead fish were collected for gross, histological, bacteriological, and molecular analysis. Necropsy findings included diffuse fibrinous pericarditis, pale friable livers, and serosal petechiation. Cytological and histological analysis revealed granulocytic and granulomatous inflammation with abundant coccoid bacterial organisms forming long chains. Necrosis, inflammation, and vasculitis were most severe in the pericardium, meninges, liver, kidneys, and gills. Bacterial isolates revealed β-hemolytic, Gram-positive coccoid bacteria identified as S. iniae by amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Results from biochemical and antimicrobial susceptibility analysis, together with repetitive element palindromic polymerase chain reaction fingerprinting, suggest that a single strain was responsible for the outbreak. The inciting cause for this S. iniae-associated cluster of mortalities is unknown.

  20. Natural genetic transformation in the rumen bacterium Streptococcus bovis JB1.

    PubMed

    Mercer, D K; Melville, C M; Scott, K P; Flint, H J

    1999-10-15

    Natural transformation of Streptococcus bovis JB1 was demonstrated after development of competence in normal culture medium. Transformation efficiencies were not significantly increased when heat-inactivated horse serum was added to the medium before growth. This is the first time that a resident rumen bacterial species has been shown to be naturally transformable. Transformation allowed the acquisition of plasmids or integration of sequences into the chromosome. No transformation was observed in the presence of undiluted autoclaved or filter-sterilised ovine rumen fluid or filter-sterilised ovine saliva, suggesting that transformation in the ruminant digestive tract is a rare event, although transformation was observed in the presence of 1% and 0.5% filter-sterilised rumen fluid. The use of natural transformation of S. bovis should facilitate further molecular biological studies on this species.

  1. Atomic force microscopy study of the structure function relationships of the biofilm-forming bacterium Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Kreth, Jens; Zhu, Lin; Qi, Fengxia; Pelling, Andrew E.; Shi, Wenyuan; Gimzewski, James K.

    2006-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has garnered much interest in recent years for its ability to probe the structure, function and cellular nanomechanics inherent to specific biological cells. In particular, we have used AFM to probe the important structure-function relationships of the bacterium Streptococcus mutans. S. mutans is the primary aetiological agent in human dental caries (tooth decay), and is of medical importance due to the virulence properties of these cells in biofilm initiation and formation, leading to increased tolerance to antibiotics. We have used AFM to characterize the unique surface structures of distinct mutants of S. mutans. These mutations are located in specific genes that encode surface proteins, thus using AFM we have resolved characteristic surface features for mutant strains compared to the wild type. Ultimately, our characterization of surface morphology has shown distinct differences in the local properties displayed by various S. mutans strains on the nanoscale, which is imperative for understanding the collective properties of these cells in biofilm formation.

  2. Transport and phosphorylation of disaccharides by the ruminal bacterium Streptococcus bovis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.A.; Russell, J.B.

    1987-10-01

    Toluene-treated cells of Streptococcus bovis JB1 phosphorylated cellobiose, glucose, maltose, and sucrose by the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system. Glucose phosphorylation was constitutive, while all three disaccharide systems were inducible. Competition experiments, indicated that separate phosphotransferases systems existed for glucose, maltose, and sucrose. (/sup 14/C)maltose transport was inhibited by excess glucose and to a lesser extent by sucrose. (/sup 14/C)glucose and (/sup 14/C)sucrose transports were not inhibited by an excess of maltose. Since (/sup 14/C)maltose phosphorylation in triethanolamine buffer was increased 160-fold as the concentration of P/sub i/ was increased from 0 to 100 mM, a maltose phosphorylase was present, and this activity was inducible. Maltose was also hydrolyzed by an inducible maltase. Glucose 1-phosphate arising from the maltose phosphorylase was metabolized by a constitutive phosphoglucomutase that was specific for ..cap alpha..-glucose 1-phosphate. Only sucrose-grown cells possessed sucrose hydrolase activity, and this activity was much lower than the sucrose phosphotransferase system and sucrose-phosphate hydrolase activities.

  3. Inhibitory efficacy of cyclo(L-leucyl-L-prolyl) from mangrove rhizosphere bacterium-Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (MMS-50) toward cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Gowrishankar, Shanmugaraj; Poornima, Balan; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2014-05-01

    Since Streptococcus mutans is the principal etiologic agent causing dental caries, by encompassing an array of unique virulence traits, emerging treatment strategies that specifically target the virulence of this pathogen may be promising as alternative approaches compared to conventional antibiotic therapy. In this perspective, we investigated chloroform extract of cell-free culture supernatant from mangrove rhizosphere bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (MMS-50) in terms of anticariogenic properties of S. mutans, without suppressing its viability. Crude chloroform extract of MMS-50 was subjected to column and high performance liquid chromatographic techniques to obtain the active fraction (AF), and MMS-50 AF was used for all further assays. GC-MS and FT-IR were carried out to identify the major components present in MMS-50 AF. Comparative gene expression analysis of some biofilm-forming and virulence genes (vicR, comDE, gtfC, and gbpB) was done by real-time PCR. Cyclo(L-leucyl-L-prolyl) was found to be the chief compound in MMS-50 AF responsible for bioactivity. The minimum and maximum inhibitory concentrations of MMS-50 AF against S. mutans were found to be 100 and 250 μg/mL, respectively. Anti-virulence assays performed using below-sub-MIC levels of MMS-50 AF (30 μg/mL) resulted in significant reduction in adherence (68%), acid production, acid tolerance, glucan synthesis (32%), biofilm formation (53.5%) and cell surface hydrophobicity, all devoid of affecting its viability. The micrographs of CLSM and SEM further confirmed the antibiofilm and anti-virulence efficacies of MMS-50 AF. Expression data showed significant reduction in expression of all studied virulence genes. Thus, the current study unveils the anticariogenic potential of cyclo(L-leucyl-L-prolyl) from B. amyloliquefaciens, as well as its suitability as a novel and alternative anticariogenic agent against dental caries.

  4. Inhibitory efficacy of cyclo(L-leucyl-L-prolyl) from mangrove rhizosphere bacterium-Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (MMS-50) toward cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Gowrishankar, Shanmugaraj; Poornima, Balan; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2014-05-01

    Since Streptococcus mutans is the principal etiologic agent causing dental caries, by encompassing an array of unique virulence traits, emerging treatment strategies that specifically target the virulence of this pathogen may be promising as alternative approaches compared to conventional antibiotic therapy. In this perspective, we investigated chloroform extract of cell-free culture supernatant from mangrove rhizosphere bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (MMS-50) in terms of anticariogenic properties of S. mutans, without suppressing its viability. Crude chloroform extract of MMS-50 was subjected to column and high performance liquid chromatographic techniques to obtain the active fraction (AF), and MMS-50 AF was used for all further assays. GC-MS and FT-IR were carried out to identify the major components present in MMS-50 AF. Comparative gene expression analysis of some biofilm-forming and virulence genes (vicR, comDE, gtfC, and gbpB) was done by real-time PCR. Cyclo(L-leucyl-L-prolyl) was found to be the chief compound in MMS-50 AF responsible for bioactivity. The minimum and maximum inhibitory concentrations of MMS-50 AF against S. mutans were found to be 100 and 250 μg/mL, respectively. Anti-virulence assays performed using below-sub-MIC levels of MMS-50 AF (30 μg/mL) resulted in significant reduction in adherence (68%), acid production, acid tolerance, glucan synthesis (32%), biofilm formation (53.5%) and cell surface hydrophobicity, all devoid of affecting its viability. The micrographs of CLSM and SEM further confirmed the antibiofilm and anti-virulence efficacies of MMS-50 AF. Expression data showed significant reduction in expression of all studied virulence genes. Thus, the current study unveils the anticariogenic potential of cyclo(L-leucyl-L-prolyl) from B. amyloliquefaciens, as well as its suitability as a novel and alternative anticariogenic agent against dental caries. PMID:24698790

  5. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antimicrobial Characteristics of Streptococcus halichoeri Isolates from Humans, Proposal To Rename Streptococcus halichoeri as Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri, and Description of Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis subsp. nov., a Bacterium Associated with Human Clinical Infections.

    PubMed

    Shewmaker, P L; Whitney, A M; Humrighouse, B W

    2016-03-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and antimicrobial characteristics of six phenotypically distinct human clinical isolates that most closely resembled the type strain of Streptococcus halichoeri isolated from a seal are presented. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN genes; comparative whole-genome analysis; conventional biochemical and Rapid ID 32 Strep identification methods; and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed on the human isolates, the type strain of S. halichoeri, and type strains of closely related species. The six human clinical isolates were biochemically indistinguishable from each other and showed 100% 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN gene sequence similarity. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis revealed 98.6% similarity to S. halichoeri CCUG 48324(T), 97.9% similarity to S. canis ATCC 43496(T), and 97.8% similarity to S. ictaluri ATCC BAA-1300(T). A 3,530-bp fragment of the rpoB gene was 98.8% similar to the S. halichoeri type strain, 84.6% to the S. canis type strain, and 83.8% to the S. ictaluri type strain. The S. halichoeri type strain and the human clinical isolates were susceptible to the antimicrobials tested based on CLSI guidelines for Streptococcus species viridans group with the exception of tetracycline and erythromycin. The human isolates were phenotypically distinct from the type strain isolated from a seal; comparative whole-genome sequence analysis confirmed that the human isolates were S. halichoeri. On the basis of these results, a novel subspecies, Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis, is proposed for the human isolates and Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri is proposed for the gray seal isolates. The type strain of the novel subspecies is SS1844(T) = CCUG 67100(T) = LMG 28801(T).

  6. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antimicrobial Characteristics of Streptococcus halichoeri Isolates from Humans, Proposal To Rename Streptococcus halichoeri as Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri, and Description of Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis subsp. nov., a Bacterium Associated with Human Clinical Infections

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, A. M.; Humrighouse, B. W.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and antimicrobial characteristics of six phenotypically distinct human clinical isolates that most closely resembled the type strain of Streptococcus halichoeri isolated from a seal are presented. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN genes; comparative whole-genome analysis; conventional biochemical and Rapid ID 32 Strep identification methods; and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed on the human isolates, the type strain of S. halichoeri, and type strains of closely related species. The six human clinical isolates were biochemically indistinguishable from each other and showed 100% 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN gene sequence similarity. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis revealed 98.6% similarity to S. halichoeri CCUG 48324T, 97.9% similarity to S. canis ATCC 43496T, and 97.8% similarity to S. ictaluri ATCC BAA-1300T. A 3,530-bp fragment of the rpoB gene was 98.8% similar to the S. halichoeri type strain, 84.6% to the S. canis type strain, and 83.8% to the S. ictaluri type strain. The S. halichoeri type strain and the human clinical isolates were susceptible to the antimicrobials tested based on CLSI guidelines for Streptococcus species viridans group with the exception of tetracycline and erythromycin. The human isolates were phenotypically distinct from the type strain isolated from a seal; comparative whole-genome sequence analysis confirmed that the human isolates were S. halichoeri. On the basis of these results, a novel subspecies, Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis, is proposed for the human isolates and Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri is proposed for the gray seal isolates. The type strain of the novel subspecies is SS1844T = CCUG 67100T = LMG 28801T. PMID:26763962

  7. Functional regions of Candida albicans hyphal cell wall protein Als3 that determine interaction with the oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, Caroline V.; Nobbs, Angela H.; Barbour, Michele E.; Lamont, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans colonizes the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. Adherence to host cells, extracellular matrix and salivary glycoproteins that coat oral surfaces, including prostheses, is an important prerequisite for colonization. In addition, interactions of C. albicans with commensal oral streptococci are suggested to promote retention and persistence of fungal cells in mixed-species communities. The hyphal filament specific cell wall protein Als3, a member of the Als protein family, is a major determinant in C. albicans adherence. Here, we utilized site-specific in-frame deletions within Als3 expressed on the surface of heterologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae to determine regions involved in interactions of Als3 with Streptococcus gordonii. N-terminal region amino acid residue deletions Δ166–225, Δ218–285, Δ270–305 and Δ277–286 were each effective in inhibiting binding of Strep. gordonii to Als3. In addition, these deletions differentially affected biofilm formation, hydrophobicity, and adherence to silicone and human tissue proteins. Deletion of the central repeat domain (Δ434–830) did not significantly affect interaction of Als3 with Strep. gordonii SspB protein, but affected other adherence properties and biofilm formation. Deletion of the amyloid-forming region (Δ325–331) did not affect interaction of Als3 with Strep. gordonii SspB adhesin, suggesting this interaction was amyloid-independent. These findings highlighted the essential function of the N-terminal domain of Als3 in mediating the interaction of C. albicans with S. gordonii, and suggested that amyloid formation is not essential for the inter-kingdom interaction. PMID:25332379

  8. Effects of mushroom and chicory extracts on the shape, physiology and proteome of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dental caries is an infectious disease which results from the acidic demineralisation of the tooth enamel and dentine as a consequence of the dental plaque (a microbial biofilm) accumulation. Research showed that several foods contain some components with antibacterial and antiplaque activity. Previous studies indicated antimicrobial and antiplaque activities in a low-molecular-mass (LMM) fraction of extracts from either an edible mushroom (Lentinus edodes) or from Italian red chicory (Cichorium intybus). Methods We have evaluated the antimicrobial mode of action of these fractions on Streptococcus mutans, the etiological agent of human dental caries. The effects on shape, macromolecular syntheses and cell proteome were analysed. Results The best antimicrobial activity has been displayed by the LMM mushroom extract with a bacteriostatic effect. At the MIC of both extracts DNA synthesis was the main macromolecular synthesis inhibited, RNA synthesis was less inhibited than that of DNA and protein synthesis was inhibited only by roughly 50%. The partial inhibition of protein synthesis is compatible with the observed significant increase in cell mass. The increase in these parameters is linked to the morphological alteration with transition from cocci of the untreated control to elongated cells. Interestingly, these modifications were also observed at sub-MIC concentrations. Finally, membrane and cytosol proteome analysis was conducted under LMM mushroom extract treatment in comparison with untreated S. mutans cells. Significant changes were observed for 31 membrane proteins and 20 of the cytosol fractions. The possible role of the changed proteins is discussed. Conclusions This report has shown an antibiotic-like mode of action of mushroom and chicory extracts as demonstrated by induced morphogenetic effects and inhibition of specific macromolecular synthesis. This feature as well as the safe use of this extract as result of its natural origin render the

  9. Functional regions of Candida albicans hyphal cell wall protein Als3 that determine interaction with the oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Caroline V; Nobbs, Angela H; Barbour, Michele E; Lamont, Richard J; Jenkinson, Howard F

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans colonizes the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. Adherence to host cells, extracellular matrix and salivary glycoproteins that coat oral surfaces, including prostheses, is an important prerequisite for colonization. In addition, interactions of C. albicans with commensal oral streptococci are suggested to promote retention and persistence of fungal cells in mixed-species communities. The hyphal filament specific cell wall protein Als3, a member of the Als protein family, is a major determinant in C. albicans adherence. Here, we utilized site-specific in-frame deletions within Als3 expressed on the surface of heterologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae to determine regions involved in interactions of Als3 with Streptococcus gordonii. N-terminal region amino acid residue deletions Δ166-225, Δ218-285, Δ270-305 and Δ277-286 were each effective in inhibiting binding of Strep. gordonii to Als3. In addition, these deletions differentially affected biofilm formation, hydrophobicity, and adherence to silicone and human tissue proteins. Deletion of the central repeat domain (Δ434-830) did not significantly affect interaction of Als3 with Strep. gordonii SspB protein, but affected other adherence properties and biofilm formation. Deletion of the amyloid-forming region (Δ325-331) did not affect interaction of Als3 with Strep. gordonii SspB adhesin, suggesting this interaction was amyloid-independent. These findings highlighted the essential function of the N-terminal domain of Als3 in mediating the interaction of C. albicans with S. gordonii, and suggested that amyloid formation is not essential for the inter-kingdom interaction.

  10. Nitrogenous compounds stimulate glucose-derived acid production by oral Streptococcus and Actinomyces.

    PubMed

    Norimatsu, Yuka; Kawashima, Junko; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Both Streptococcus and Actinomyces can produce acids from dietary sugars and are frequently found in caries lesions. In the oral cavity, nitrogenous compounds, such as peptides and amino acids, are provided continuously by saliva and crevicular gingival fluid. Given that these bacteria can also utilize nitrogen compounds for their growth, it was hypothesized that nitrogenous compounds may influence their acid production; however, no previous studies have examined this topic. Therefore, the present study aimed to assess the effects of nitrogenous compounds (tryptone and glutamate) on glucose-derived acid production by Streptococcus and Actinomyces. Acid production was evaluated using a pH-stat method under anaerobic conditions, whereas the amounts of metabolic end-products were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography. Tryptone enhanced glucose-derived acid production by up to 2.68-fold, whereas glutamate enhanced Streptococcus species only. However, neither tryptone nor glutamate altered the end-product profiles, indicating that the nitrogenous compounds stimulate the whole metabolic pathways involving in acid production from glucose, but are not actively metabolized, nor do they alter metabolic pathways. These results suggest that nitrogenous compounds in the oral cavity promote acid production by Streptococcus and Actinomyces in vivo.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Gary; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Chertkov, Olga; Land, Miriam L

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer-ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi-cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome squence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brelan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer- ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this spo- rogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attrac- tive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi- cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome se- quence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Bruce, D.; Goodwin, L.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Han, C.; Detter, C.; Pitluck, S.; Land, Miriam L.; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed. PMID:22675583

  14. Effect of alginic acid decomposing bacterium on the growth of Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae).

    PubMed

    Wang, You; Tang, Xue-Xi; Yang, Zhen; Yu, Zhi-Ming

    2006-01-01

    We collected the diseased blades of Laminaria japonica from Yantai Sea Farm from October to December 2002, and the alginic acid decomposing bacterium on the diseased blade was isolated and purified, and was identified as Alteromonas espejiana. This bacterium was applied as the causative pathogen to infect the blades of L. japonica under laboratory conditions. The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of the bacterium on the growth of L. japonica, and to find the possibly effective mechanism. Results showed that: (1) The blades of L. japonica exhibited symptoms of lesion, bleaching and deterioration when infected by the bacterium, and their growth and photosynthesis were dramatically suppressed. At the same time, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation enhanced obviously, and the relative membrane permeability increased significantly. The contents of malonaldehyde (MDA) and free fatty acid in the microsomol membrane greatly elevated, but the phospholipid content decreased. Result suggested an obvious peroxidation and deesterrification in the blades of L. japonica when infected by the bacterium. (2) The simultaneous assay on the antioxidant enzyme activities demonstrated that superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) increased greatly when infected by the bacterium, but glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) did not exhibit active responses to the bacterium throughout the experiment. (3) The histomorphological observations gave a distinctive evidence of the severity of the lesions as well as the relative abundance in the bacterial population on the blades after infection. The bacterium firstly invaded into the endodermis of L. japonica and gathered around there, and then resulted in the membrane damage, cells corruption and ultimately, the death of L. japonica.

  15. PlsX deletion impacts fatty acid synthesis and acid adaptation in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Cross, Benjamin; Garcia, Ariana; Faustoferri, Roberta; Quivey, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans, one of the primary causative agents of dental caries in humans, ferments dietary sugars in the mouth to produce organic acids. These acids lower local pH values, resulting in demineralization of the tooth enamel, leading to caries. To survive acidic environments, Strep. mutans employs several adaptive mechanisms, including a shift from saturated to unsaturated fatty acids in membrane phospholipids. PlsX is an acyl-ACP : phosphate transacylase that links the fatty acid synthase II (FASII) pathway to the phospholipid synthesis pathway, and is therefore central to the movement of unsaturated fatty acids into the membrane. Recently, we discovered that plsX is not essential in Strep. mutans. A plsX deletion mutant was not a fatty acid or phospholipid auxotroph. Gas chromatography of fatty acid methyl esters indicated that membrane fatty acid chain length in the plsX deletion strain differed from those detected in the parent strain, UA159. The deletion strain displayed a fatty acid shift similar to WT, but had a higher percentage of unsaturated fatty acids at low pH. The deletion strain survived significantly longer than the parent strain when cultures were subjected to an acid challenge of pH 2.5.The ΔplsX strain also exhibited elevated F-ATPase activity at pH 5.2, compared with the parent. These results indicate that the loss of plsX affects both the fatty acid synthesis pathway and the acid-adaptive response of Strep. mutans. PMID:26850107

  16. Investigating Acid Production by Streptococcus mutans with a Surface-Displayed pH-Sensitive Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lihong; Hu, Wei; He, Xuesong; Lux, Renate; McLean, Jeff; Shi, Wenyuan

    2013-01-01

    Acidogenicity and aciduricity are the main virulence factors of the cavity-causing bacterium Streptococcus mutans. Monitoring at the individual cell level the temporal and spatial distribution of acid produced by this important oral pathogen is central for our understanding of these key virulence factors especially when S. mutans resides in multi-species microbial communities. In this study, we explored the application of pH-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (pHluorins) to investigate these important features. Ecliptic pHluorin was functionally displayed on the cell surface of S. mutans as a fusion protein with SpaP. The resulting strain (O87) was used to monitor temporal and spatial pH changes in the microenvironment of S. mutans cells under both planktonic and biofilm conditions. Using strain O87, we revealed a rapid pH drop in the microenviroment of S. mutans microcolonies prior to the decrease in the macro-environment pH following sucrose fermentation. Meanwhile, a non-uniform pH distribution was observed within S. mutans biofilms, reflecting differences in microbial metabolic activity. Furthermore, strain O87 was successfully used to monitor the S. mutans acid production profiles within dual- and multispecies oral biofilms. Based on these findings, the ecliptic pHluorin allows us to investigate in vivo and in situ acid production and distribution by the cariogenic species S. mutans. PMID:23468929

  17. Fluoride-sensitivity of growth and acid production of oral Actinomyces: comparison with oral Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Junko; Nakajo, Kazuko; Washio, Jumpei; Mayanagi, Gen; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2013-12-01

    Actinomyces are predominant oral bacteria; however, their cariogenic potential in terms of acid production and fluoride sensitivity has not been elucidated in detail and compared with that of other caries-associated oral bacteria, such as Streptococcus. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate and compare the acid production and growth of Actinomyces and Streptococcus in the presence of bicarbonate and fluoride to mimic conditions in the oral cavity. Acid production from glucose was measured by pH-stat at pH 5.5 and 7.0 under anaerobic conditions. Growth rate was assessed by optical density in anaerobic culture. Although Actinomyces produced acid at a lower rate than did Streptococcus, their acid production was more tolerant of fluoride (IDacid production 50 = 110-170 ppm at pH 7.0 and 10-13 ppm at pH 5.5) than that of Streptococcus (IDacid production 50 = 36-53 ppm at pH 7.0 and 6.3-6.5 ppm at pH 5.5). Bicarbonate increased acid production by Actinomyces with prominent succinate production and enhanced their fluoride tolerance (IDacid production 50 = 220-320 ppm at pH 7.0 and 33-52 ppm at pH 5.5). Bicarbonate had no effect on these variables in Streptococcus. In addition, although the growth rate of Actinomyces was lower than that of Streptococcus, Actinomyces growth was more tolerant of fluoride (IDgrowth 50 = 130-160 ppm) than was that of Streptococcus (IDgrowth 50 = 27-36 ppm). These results indicate that oral Actinomyces are more tolerant of fluoride than oral Streptococcus, and bicarbonate enhances the fluoride tolerance of oral Actinomyces. Because of the limited number of species tested here, further study is needed to generalize these findings to the genus level.

  18. Use of the dynamic gastro-intestinal model TIM to explore the survival of the yogurt bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus and the metabolic activities induced in the simulated human gut.

    PubMed

    Uriot, Ophélie; Galia, Wessam; Awussi, Ahoefa Ablavi; Perrin, Clarisse; Denis, Sylvain; Chalancon, Sandrine; Lorson, Emilie; Poirson, Chantal; Junjua, Maira; Le Roux, Yves; Alric, Monique; Dary, Annie; Blanquet-Diot, Stéphanie; Roussel, Yvonne

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus, a lactic acid bacterium used to produce yogurts and cheeses is more and more considered for its potential probiotic properties. This implies that additional information should be obtained regarding its survival and metabolic activity in the human Gastro-Intestinal Tract (GIT). In this study, we screened 30 S. thermophilus strains for urease, small heat shock protein, and amino-acid decarboxylase functions which may play a role in survival in the upper part of the GIT. The survival kinetics of 4 strains was investigated using the TIM, a physiologically relevant in vitro dynamic gastric and small intestinal model. The three strains LMD9, PB18O and EBLST20 showed significantly higher survival than CNRZ21 in all digestive compartments of the TIM, which may be related to the presence of urease and heat shock protein functions. When LMD9 bacterial cells were delivered in a fermented milk formula, a significant improvement of survival in the TIM was observed compared to non-fermented milk. With the RIVET (Recombinase In Vivo Expression Technology) method applied to the LMD9 strain, a promoter located upstream of hisS, responsible for the histidyl-transfer RNA synthesis, was found to be specifically activated in the artificial stomach. The data generated on S. thermophilus survival and its adaptation capacities to the digestive tract are essential to establish a list of biomarkers useful for the selection of probiotic strains. PMID:26611166

  19. Use of the dynamic gastro-intestinal model TIM to explore the survival of the yogurt bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus and the metabolic activities induced in the simulated human gut.

    PubMed

    Uriot, Ophélie; Galia, Wessam; Awussi, Ahoefa Ablavi; Perrin, Clarisse; Denis, Sylvain; Chalancon, Sandrine; Lorson, Emilie; Poirson, Chantal; Junjua, Maira; Le Roux, Yves; Alric, Monique; Dary, Annie; Blanquet-Diot, Stéphanie; Roussel, Yvonne

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus, a lactic acid bacterium used to produce yogurts and cheeses is more and more considered for its potential probiotic properties. This implies that additional information should be obtained regarding its survival and metabolic activity in the human Gastro-Intestinal Tract (GIT). In this study, we screened 30 S. thermophilus strains for urease, small heat shock protein, and amino-acid decarboxylase functions which may play a role in survival in the upper part of the GIT. The survival kinetics of 4 strains was investigated using the TIM, a physiologically relevant in vitro dynamic gastric and small intestinal model. The three strains LMD9, PB18O and EBLST20 showed significantly higher survival than CNRZ21 in all digestive compartments of the TIM, which may be related to the presence of urease and heat shock protein functions. When LMD9 bacterial cells were delivered in a fermented milk formula, a significant improvement of survival in the TIM was observed compared to non-fermented milk. With the RIVET (Recombinase In Vivo Expression Technology) method applied to the LMD9 strain, a promoter located upstream of hisS, responsible for the histidyl-transfer RNA synthesis, was found to be specifically activated in the artificial stomach. The data generated on S. thermophilus survival and its adaptation capacities to the digestive tract are essential to establish a list of biomarkers useful for the selection of probiotic strains.

  20. Divalent cations enhance fluoride binding to Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis cells and subsequently inhibit bacterial acid production.

    PubMed

    Domon-Tawaraya, H; Nakajo, K; Washio, J; Ashizawa, T; Ichino, T; Sugawara, H; Fukumoto, S; Takahashi, N

    2013-01-01

    One preventive effect of topical fluoride application is derived from the fact that fluoride can inhibit bacterial acid production. Furthermore, divalent cations such as Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) increase the binding of fluoride to bacterial cells. These findings suggest that exposure of oral bacteria to fluoride in the presence of divalent cations increases fluoride binding to bacterial cells and subsequently enhances fluoride-induced inhibition of bacterial acid production. This study investigated the effects of fluoride exposure (0-20,000 ppm F) in the presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) prior to glucose challenge on pH fall ability by bacterial sugar fermentation, as well as fluoride binding to bacterial cells by exposure to fluoride, and fluoride release from bacterial cells during bacterial sugar fermentation, using caries-related bacteria, Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis. The pH fall by both streptococci was inhibited by exposure to over 250 ppm F in the presence of Ca(2+) (p < 0.01), whereas in the presence of Mg(2+), the pH fall by S. mutans and S. sanguinis was inhibited after exposure to over 250 and 950 ppm F, respectively (p < 0.05). The amounts of fluoride binding to and released from streptococcal cells increased with the concentration of fluoride the cells were exposed to in the presence of Mg(2+), but were high enough even after 250 ppm F exposure in the presence of Ca(2+). The enhanced inhibition of acid production in the presence of divalent cations is probably due to the improved efficiency of fluoride binding to bacterial cells being improved via these divalent cations.

  1. Effect of tannic acid on the transcriptome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tannins are plant-produced organic compounds that are found in soils, are able to sequester iron, and have antimicrobial properties. We studied the effect of tannic acid on the molecular physiology of the soil-inhabiting biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluoresce...

  2. An efficient process for production and purification of hyaluronic acid from Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus.

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, Vidhya; Jain, Dharmendra

    2008-03-01

    Growth of Streptococcus zooepidemicus in a 10 l bioreactor with 50 g sucrose/l and 10 g casein hydrolysate/l gave 5-6 g hyaluronic acid/l after 24-28 h. Purification of hyaluronic acid gave a recovery of 65% with the final material having an Mr of approximately 4 x 10(6) Da with less than 0.1% protein.

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Streptococcus salivarius, a Commensal Bacterium of the Oral Cavity and Digestive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Kaci, Ghalia; Goudercourt, Denise; Dennin, Véronique; Pot, Bruno; Doré, Joël; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Renault, Pierre; Blottière, Hervé M.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is one of the first colonizers of the human oral cavity and gut after birth and therefore may contribute to the establishment of immune homeostasis and regulation of host inflammatory responses. The anti-inflammatory potential of S. salivarius was first evaluated in vitro on human intestinal epithelial cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We show that live S. salivarius strains inhibited in vitro the activation of the NF-κB pathway on intestinal epithelial cells. We also demonstrate that the live S. salivarius JIM8772 strain significantly inhibited inflammation in severe and moderate colitis mouse models. These in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory properties were not found with heat-killed S. salivarius, suggesting a protective response exclusively with metabolically active bacteria. PMID:24271166

  4. Anti-inflammatory properties of Streptococcus salivarius, a commensal bacterium of the oral cavity and digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Kaci, Ghalia; Goudercourt, Denise; Dennin, Véronique; Pot, Bruno; Doré, Joël; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Renault, Pierre; Blottière, Hervé M; Daniel, Catherine; Delorme, Christine

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is one of the first colonizers of the human oral cavity and gut after birth and therefore may contribute to the establishment of immune homeostasis and regulation of host inflammatory responses. The anti-inflammatory potential of S. salivarius was first evaluated in vitro on human intestinal epithelial cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We show that live S. salivarius strains inhibited in vitro the activation of the NF-κB pathway on intestinal epithelial cells. We also demonstrate that the live S. salivarius JIM8772 strain significantly inhibited inflammation in severe and moderate colitis mouse models. These in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory properties were not found with heat-killed S. salivarius, suggesting a protective response exclusively with metabolically active bacteria. PMID:24271166

  5. Effect of tannic acid on the transcriptome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chee Kent; Penesyan, Anahit; Hassan, Karl A; Loper, Joyce E; Paulsen, Ian T

    2013-05-01

    Tannins are a diverse group of plant-produced, polyphenolic compounds with metal-chelating and antimicrobial properties that are prevalent in many soils. Using transcriptomics, we determined that tannic acid, a form of hydrolysable tannin, broadly affects the expression of genes involved in iron and zinc homeostases, sulfur metabolism, biofilm formation, motility, and secondary metabolite biosynthesis in the soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

  6. Effect of Tannic Acid on the Transcriptome of the Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chee Kent; Penesyan, Anahit; Hassan, Karl A.

    2013-01-01

    Tannins are a diverse group of plant-produced, polyphenolic compounds with metal-chelating and antimicrobial properties that are prevalent in many soils. Using transcriptomics, we determined that tannic acid, a form of hydrolysable tannin, broadly affects the expression of genes involved in iron and zinc homeostases, sulfur metabolism, biofilm formation, motility, and secondary metabolite biosynthesis in the soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5. PMID:23435890

  7. Citrulline Protects Streptococcus pyogenes from Acid Stress Using the Arginine Deiminase Pathway and the F1Fo-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Cusumano, Zachary T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A common stress encountered by both pathogenic and environmental bacteria is exposure to a low-pH environment, which can inhibit cell growth and lead to cell death. One major defense mechanism against this stress is the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway, which catabolizes arginine to generate two ammonia molecules and one molecule of ATP. While this pathway typically relies on the utilization of arginine, citrulline has also been shown to enter into the pathway and contribute to protection against acid stress. In the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes, the utilization of citrulline has been demonstrated to contribute to pathogenesis in a murine model of soft tissue infection, although the mechanism underlying its role in infection is unknown. To gain insight into this question, we analyzed a panel of mutants defective in different steps in the ADI pathway to dissect how arginine and citrulline protect S. pyogenes in a low-pH environment. While protection provided by arginine utilization occurred through the buffering of the extracellular environment, citrulline catabolism protection was pH independent, requiring the generation of ATP via the ADI pathway and a functional F1Fo-ATP synthase. This work demonstrates that arginine and citrulline catabolism protect against acid stress through distinct mechanisms and have unique contributions to virulence during an infection. IMPORTANCE An important aspect of bacterial pathogenesis is the utilization of host-derived nutrients during an infection for growth and virulence. Previously published work from our lab identified a unique role for citrulline catabolism in Streptococcus pyogenes during a soft tissue infection. The present article probes the role of citrulline utilization during this infection and its contribution to protection against acid stress. This work reveals a unique and concerted action between the catabolism of citrulline and the F1Fo-ATPase that function together to provide protection for

  8. Effects of xylitol on the acid production activity from sorbitol by Streptococcus mutans and human dental plaque.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, N; Topitsoglou, V; Frostell, G

    1983-01-01

    -A method for the determination of acid production from 20-25 mg (wet weight) of Streptococcus mutans and 12-33 mg (wet weight) of human dental plaque is described. After endogenous acid production had been followed, either sorbitol or xylitol or a mixture of sorbitol and xylitol (2:1) was added. After about ten minutes glucose, sucrose or Palatinose were added for a vitality test. Addition of xylitol to the bacterial suspension caused inhibition of acid production from sorbitol by Streptococcus mutans grown on sorbitol or a mixture of sorbitol and glucose. It was also observed that it had a similar effect on acid production from sorbitol in suspensions of dental plaque with few exceptions. On the other hand, Streptococcus mutans cells grown on glucose, sucrose and xylitol media, produced no or insignificant amounts of acid from sorbitol. Streptococcus mutans cells grown on media containing glucose, sucrose, sorbitol and a mixture of sorbitol and glucose generally formed a large amount of acid from glucose and sucrose after the addition of sorbitol and xylitol. However, Streptococcus mutans cells grown on a medium containing xylitol and the mixture of sorbitol and xylitol formed less acid from glucose. The acid production activity from sorbitol in suspensions of dental plaque after the xylitol addition was somewhat lower than the acid production from sorbitol alone (p less than 0.02).

  9. An Oleaginous Bacterium That Intrinsically Accumulates Long-Chain Free Fatty Acids in its Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Taiki; Kanno, Manabu; Morita, Naoki; Hori, Tomoyuki; Narihiro, Takashi; Mitani, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Medium- and long-chain fatty acids are present in organisms in esterified forms that serve as cell membrane constituents and storage compounds. A large number of organisms are known to accumulate lipophilic materials as a source of energy and carbon. We found a bacterium, designated GK12, that intrinsically accumulates free fatty acids (FFAs) as intracellular droplets without exhibiting cytotoxicity. GK12 is an obligatory anaerobic, mesophilic lactic acid bacterium that was isolated from a methanogenic reactor. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that GK12 is affiliated with the family Erysipelotrichaceae in the phylum Firmicutes but is distantly related to type species in this family (less than 92% similarity in 16S rRNA gene sequence). Saturated fatty acids with carbon chain lengths of 14, 16, 18, and 20 were produced from glucose under stress conditions, including higher-than-optimum temperatures and the presence of organic solvents that affect cell membrane integrity. FFAs were produced at levels corresponding to up to 25% (wt/wt) of the dry cell mass. Our data suggest that FFA accumulation is a result of an imbalance between excess membrane fatty acid biosynthesis due to homeoviscous adaptation and limited β-oxidation activity due to anaerobic growth involving lactic acid fermentation. FFA droplets were not further utilized as an energy and carbon source, even under conditions of starvation. A naturally occurring bacterium that accumulates significant amounts of long-chain FFAs with noncytotoxicity would provide useful strategies for microbial biodiesel production. PMID:24296497

  10. In vitro and in vivo antibiofilm potential of 2,4-Di-tert-butylphenol from seaweed surface associated bacterium Bacillus subtilis against group A streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Viszwapriya, Dharmaprakash; Prithika, Udayakumar; Deebika, Sundaresan; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2016-10-01

    Biofilm formation of Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is recognized as an important virulent determinant. The present study reports the antibiofilm potential of seaweed (Gracilaria gracilis) surface associated Bacillus subtilis against GAS. Purification revealed 2,4-Di-tert-butyl-phenol (DTBP) as the active principle. DTBP exhibited a dose dependent antibiofilm activity against GAS (SF370 & six different clinical M serotypes). Microscopic analysis revealed changes in cell surface architecture and reduced thickness upon DTBP treatment. Results of extracellular polymeric substance quantification, microbial adhesion to hydrocarbon assay and fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis suggested that DTBP probably interferes with the initial adhesion stage of biofilm formation cascade. Reduction in hyaluronic acid synthesis goes in unison with blood survival assay wherein, increased susceptibility to phagocytosis was observed. In vivo studies using Caenorhabditis elegans manifested the reduction in adherence and virulence, which prompts further investigation of the potential of DTBP for the treatment of GAS infections. PMID:27524650

  11. A partial proteome reference map of the wine lactic acid bacterium Oenococcus oeni ATCC BAA-1163.

    PubMed

    Mohedano, María de la Luz; Russo, Pasquale; de Los Ríos, Vivian; Capozzi, Vittorio; Fernández de Palencia, Pilar; Spano, Giuseppe; López, Paloma

    2014-02-26

    Oenococcus oeni is the main lactic acid bacterium that carries out the malolactic fermentation in virtually all red wines and in some white and sparkling wines. Oenococcus oeni possesses an array of metabolic activities that can modify the taste and aromatic properties of wine. There is, therefore, industrial interest in the proteins involved in these metabolic pathways and related transport systems of this bacterium. In this work, we report the characterization of the O. oeni ATCC BAA-1163 proteome. Total and membrane protein preparations from O. oeni were standardized and analysed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we identified 224 different spots corresponding to 152 unique proteins, which have been classified by their putative function and subjected to bioinformatics analysis.

  12. Mechanism of biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Pseudomonas sp. strain E-3, a psychrotrophic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Fukunaga, N.; Sasaki, S. )

    1989-08-01

    Biosynthesis of palmitic, palmitoleic, and cis-vaccenic acids in Pseudomonas sp. strain E-3 was investigated with in vitro and in vivo systems. (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid was aerobically converted to palmitoleate and cis-vaccenate, and the radioactivities on their carboxyl carbons were 100 and 43%, respectively, of the total radioactivity in the fatty acids. Palmitoyl coenzyme A desaturase activity was found in the membrane fraction. (1-{sup 14}C)stearic acid was converted to octadecenoate and C16 fatty acids. The octadecenoate contained oleate and cis-vaccenate, but only oleate was produced in the presence of cerulenin. (1-{sup 14}C)lauric acid was aerobically converted to palmitate, palmitoleate, and cis-vaccenate. Under anaerobic conditions, palmitate (62%), palmitoleate (4%), and cis-vaccenate (34%) were produced from (1-{sup 14}C)acetic acid, while they amounted to 48, 39, and 14%, respectively, under aerobic conditions. In these incorporation experiments, 3 to 19% of the added radioactivity was detected in released {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, indicating that part of the added fatty acids were oxidatively decomposed. Partially purified fatty acid synthetase produced saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with chain lengths of C10 to C18. These results indicated that both aerobic and anaerobic mechanisms for the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid are operating in this bacterium.

  13. Teichoic acids from chemostat-grown cultures of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed Central

    Wicken, A J; Evans, J D; Campbell, L K; Knox, K W

    1982-01-01

    We examined the effect of growth conditions in chemostat culture on the quantity and composition of the cell wall teichoic acids of Streptococcus mutans BHT and Lactobacillus plantarum NCIB 7220 and the membrane lipoteichoic acid from S. mutans Ingbritt. With the cell wall teichoic acids, which are covalently linked to peptidoglycan, the amount of teichoic acid is independent of the growth conditions employed. However, the extent of glucosyl substitution of the polymer from L. plantarum was dependent on growth conditions. S. mutans Ingbritt lipoteichoic acid, on the other hand, was little affected by growth conditions in terms of composition or serological activity, but the amount produced was markedly affected by changes in growth conditions. PMID:7141685

  14. Laboratory growth and maintenance of Streptococcus pyogenes (the Group A Streptococcus, GAS).

    PubMed

    Gera, Kanika; McIver, Kevin S

    2013-10-02

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that strictly infects humans. It is the causative agent of a broad spectrum of diseases accounting for millions of infections and at least 517,000 deaths each year worldwide. It is a nutritionally fastidious organism that ferments sugars to produce lactic acid and has strict requirements for growth. To aid in the study of this organism, this unit describes the growth and maintenance of S. pyogenes.

  15. Laboratory Growth and Maintenance of Streptococcus pyogenes (The Group A Streptococcus, GAS)

    PubMed Central

    Gera, Kanika; McIver, Kevin S.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that strictly infects humans. It is the causative agent of a broad spectrum of diseases accounting for millions of infections and at least 517, 000 deaths each year worldwide (Carapetis et al., 2005). It is a nutritionally fastidious organism that ferments sugars to produce lactic acid and has strict requirements for growth. To aid in the study of this organism, this unit describes the growth and maintenance of S. pyogenes. PMID:24510893

  16. Identification of bisphosphatidic acid and its plasmalogen analogues in the phospholipids of a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    McAllister, D J; De Siervo, A J

    1975-07-01

    A relatively nonpolar unidentified phospholipid (phospholipid X) , isolated from the gram-negative marine bacterium MB 45, was characterized both chromatographically and by chemical analysis. Phospholipid X was shown to be an acidic phospholipid without vicinal hydroxyl, free-amino, or amide groups. The presence of O-alkenyl groups was indicated by a positive reaction for plasmalogen. Mild alkaline methanolysis of phospholipid X yielded only glycerophosphoryglycerol as the derivative. Acetolysis produced only diacyl-glycerol monoacetate. Clevage of O-alkenyl chains by methanolic hydrochloride resulted in the formation of three lyso derivatives. It was estimated that 18.2% of phospholipid X was plasmalogen. From these data, together with chromatographic comparisons with standards, infrared spectra, a molecular weight estimation, and the determination of the glycerol-phosphate-acyl ester ratio, it was concluded that phospholipid X was bisphosphatidic acid mixed with its plasmalogen analogues. PMID:1141198

  17. Who will win the race in childrens' oral cavities? Streptococcus mutans or beneficial lactic acid bacteria?

    PubMed

    Güngör, Ö E; Kırzıoğlu, Z; Dinçer, E; Kıvanç, M

    2013-09-01

    Adhesion to oral soft and hard tissue is crucial for bacterial colonisation in the mouth. The aim of this work was to select strains of oral lactic acid bacteria that could be used as probiotics for oral health. To this end, the adhesive properties of some lactic acid bacteria were investigated. Seventeen lactic acid bacteria including two Streptococcus mutans strains were isolated from the oral cavity of healthy children, while other strains were isolated from fermented meat products. The bacterial strains were applied to teeth surfaces covered with saliva or without saliva. A significant diversity in adhesion capacity to teeth surfaces among the lactic acid bacteria was observed. Lactic acid bacteria isolated from the oral cavity adhered the best to teeth surfaces covered with saliva, whereas lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermented meat samples adhered the best to tooth surface without saliva. All strains of lactic acid bacteria were able to reduce the number of S. mutans cells, in particular on saliva-coated tooth surface. Therefore, they might have potential as probiotics for the oral cavity.

  18. Eubacterium rangiferina, a novel usnic acid-resistant bacterium from the reindeer rumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundset, Monica A.; Kohn, Alexandra; Mathiesen, Svein D.; Præsteng, Kirsti E.

    2008-08-01

    Reindeer are able to eat and utilize lichens as an important source of energy and nutrients. In the current study, the activities of antibiotic secondary metabolites including usnic, antranoric, fumarprotocetraric, and lobaric acid commonly found in lichens were tested against a collection of 26 anaerobic rumen bacterial isolates from reindeer ( Rangifer tarandus tarandus) using the agar diffusion method. The isolates were identified based on their 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene sequences. Usnic acid had a potent antimicrobial effect against 25 of the isolates, belonging to Clostridiales, Enterococci, and Streptococci. Isolates of Clostridia and Streptococci were also susceptible to atranoric and lobaric acid. However, one isolate (R3_91_1) was found to be resistant to usnic, antranoric, fumarprotocetraric, and lobaric acid. R3_91_1 was also seen invading and adhering to lichen particles when grown in a liquid anaerobic culture as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. This was a Gram-negative, nonmotile rod (0.2-0.7 × 2.0-3.5 μm) with a deoxyribonucleic acid G + C content of 47.0 mol% and main cellular fatty acids including 15:0 anteiso-dimethyl acetal (DMA), 16:0 iso-fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), 13:0 iso-3OH FAME, and 17:0 anteiso-FAME, not matching any of the presently known profiles in the MIDI database. Combined, the phenotypic and genotypic traits including the 16S rRNA gene sequence show that R3_91_1 is a novel species inside the order Clostridiales within the family Lachnospiraceae, for which we propose the name Eubacterium rangiferina. This is the first record of a rumen bacterium able to tolerate and grow in the presence of usnic acid, indicating that the rumen microorganisms in these animals have adapted mechanisms to deal with lichen secondary metabolites, well known for their antimicrobial and toxic effects.

  19. Effect of penicillin on fatty acid synthesis and excretion in Streptococcus mutans BHT

    SciTech Connect

    Brissette, J.L.; Pieringer, R.A.

    1985-03-01

    Treatment of exponentially growing cultures of Streptococcus mutans BHT with growth-inhibitory concentrations (0.2 microgram/ml) of benzylpenicillin stimulates the incorporation of (2-/sup 14/C) acetate into lipids excreted by the cells by as much as 69-fold, but does not change the amount of /sup 14/C incorporated into intracellular lipids. At this concentration of penicillin cellular lysis does not occur. The radioactive label is incorporated exclusively into the fatty acid moieties of the glycerolipids. During a 4-hr incubation in the presence of penicillin, the extracellular fatty acid ester concentration increases 1.5 fold, even though there is no growth or cellular lysis. An indication of the relative rate of fatty acid synthesis was most readily obtained by placing S. mutans BHT in a buffer containing /sup 14/C-acetate. Under these nongrowing conditions free fatty acids are the only lipids labeled, a factor which simplifies the assay. The addition of glycerol to the buffer causes all of the nonesterified fatty acids to be incorporated into glycerolipid. The cells excrete much of the lipid whether glycerol is present or not. Addition of penicillin to the nongrowth supporting buffer system does not stimulate the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-acetate into fatty acids.

  20. Lipoteichoic acid-binding and biological properties of T protein of group A streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R H; Simpson, W A; Dale, J B; Ofek, I; Beachey, E H

    1980-08-01

    T protein was extracted with trypsin from an avirulent, M protein-deficient, type 1 group A Streptococcus and purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and anion-exchange chromatography. The latter procedure removed contaminating lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from the T protein, which consisted of a heterogeneous mixture of polypeptides resistant to digestion by trypsin and ranged in molecular size from 160,000 to 200,000 daltons. Threonine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, lysine, and valine were the most predominant amino acids. The binding of LTA to an affinity column of T protein was reversible with increasing concentrations of ethanol but not with increasing ionic strength. T protein bound less palmitic acid and LTA than did fatty acid-free bovine albumin and did not stimulate human peripheral lymphocytes. Because the surface and cell wall distribution of the T proteins and LTA appear similar, the possibility exists that T proteins and LTA may interact in situ by weakly hydrophobic bonds. Such ligand-ligand interaction may be indirectly involved in the adherence of group A streptococci to host cell membranes that is known to be mediated by LTA.

  1. Inhibition of fructan-fermenting equine fecal bacteria and Streptococcus bovis by hops (Humulus lupulus L.) ß-acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The goals were to determine if the '-acid from hops (Humulus lupulus L.) could be used to control fructan fermentation by equine hindgut microorganisms, and to verify the antimicrobial mode of action on the Streptococcus bovis, which has been implicated in fructan fermentation, hindgut acidos...

  2. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E.; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  3. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Meili; Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  4. Induction of nitric oxide production by polyosides from the cell walls of Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175, a gram-positive bacterium, in the rat aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, V; Kleschyov, A L; Klein, J P; Beretz, A

    1997-01-01

    The cardiovascular dysfunctions associated with septic shock induced by gram-negative or gram-positive bacteria (gram-positive or gram-negative septic shock) are comparable. In gram-negative septic shock, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces nitric oxide (NO) synthase, which contributes to the vascular hypotension and hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors. The role of NO in gram-positive septic shock and the nature of the bacterial wall components responsible for the vascular effects of gram-positive bacteria are not well known. This study investigated the vascular effects of cell wall serotype polyosides, rhamnose glucose polymers (RGPs), from Streptococcus mutans, in comparison with lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Staphylococcus aureus, on the induction of NO synthase activity in the rat aorta. We show that 10 microg of both RGPs and LTA per ml induced hyporeactivity to noradrenaline, L-arginine-induced relaxation, increases of 2.2- and 7.8-fold, respectively, of cyclic GMP production, and increases of 7- and 12-fold in nitrite release. All of these effects appeared after several hours of incubation and were inhibited by N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NO synthase. Electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping experiments demonstrated directly that RGPs and LTA induced NO overproduction (four- to eightfold, respectively) in rat aortic rings; this production was inhibited by L-NAME and prevented by dexamethasone. These results demonstrate directly the induction of NO production in vascular tissue by LTA and show that another, chemically different component of gram-positive bacteria can also have these properties. This result suggests that different components of the gram-positive bacterial wall could be implicated in the genesis of cardiovascular dysfunctions observed in gram-positive septic shock. PMID:9169734

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1, a Lactic Acid Bacterium Isolated from French Handcrafted Fermented Milk

    PubMed Central

    Meneghel, Julie; Irlinger, Françoise; Loux, Valentin; Vidal, Marie; Passot, Stéphanie; Béal, Catherine; Layec, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is a lactic acid bacterium widely used for the production of yogurt and cheeses. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. bulgaricus CFL1 to improve our knowledge on its stress-induced damages following production and end-use processes. PMID:26941141

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1, a Lactic Acid Bacterium Isolated from French Handcrafted Fermented Milk.

    PubMed

    Meneghel, Julie; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Irlinger, Françoise; Loux, Valentin; Vidal, Marie; Passot, Stéphanie; Béal, Catherine; Layec, Séverine; Fonseca, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is a lactic acid bacterium widely used for the production of yogurt and cheeses. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. bulgaricus CFL1 to improve our knowledge on its stress-induced damages following production and end-use processes. PMID:26941141

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1, a Lactic Acid Bacterium Isolated from French Handcrafted Fermented Milk.

    PubMed

    Meneghel, Julie; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Irlinger, Françoise; Loux, Valentin; Vidal, Marie; Passot, Stéphanie; Béal, Catherine; Layec, Séverine; Fonseca, Fernanda

    2016-03-03

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is a lactic acid bacterium widely used for the production of yogurt and cheeses. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. bulgaricus CFL1 to improve our knowledge on its stress-induced damages following production and end-use processes.

  8. Quantitative analysis of growth and volatile fatty acid production by the anaerobic ruminal bacterium Megasphaera elsdenii T81

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Megaspheara elsdenii T81 grew on either DL-lactate or D-glucose at similar rates (0.85 per h), but displayed major differences in the fermentation of these substrates. Lactate was fermented at up to 210-mM concentration to yield acetic, propionic, butyric, and valeric acids. The bacterium was able t...

  9. SO-LAAO, a novel L-amino acid oxidase that enables Streptococcus oligofermentans to outcompete Streptococcus mutans by generating H2O2 from peptone.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huichun; Chen, Wei; Shi, Wenyuan; Qi, Fengxia; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2008-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that Streptococcus oligofermentans suppressed the growth of Streptococcus mutans, the primary cariogenic pathogen, by producing hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) through lactate oxidase activity. In this study, we found that the lox mutant of S. oligofermentans regained the inhibition while growing on peptone-rich plates. Further studies demonstrated that the H(2)O(2) produced on peptone by S. oligofermentans was mainly derived from seven L-amino acids, i.e., L-aspartic acid, L-tryptophan, L-lysine, L-isoleucine, L-arginine, L-asparagine, and L-glutamine, indicating the possible existence of L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) that can produce H(2)O(2) from L-amino acids. Through searching the S. oligofermentans genome for open reading frames with a conserved flavin adenine dinucleotide binding motif that exists in the known LAAOs, including those of snake venom, fungi, and bacteria, a putative LAAO gene, assigned as aao(So), was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, SO-LAAO, showed a molecular mass of 43 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and catalyzed H(2)O(2) formation from the seven L-amino acids determined above, thus confirming its LAAO activity. The SO-LAAO identified in S. oligofermentans differed evidently from the known LAAOs in both substrate profile and sequence, suggesting that it could represent a novel LAAO. An aao(So) mutant of S. oligofermentans did lose H(2)O(2) formation from the seven L-amino acids, further verifying its function as an LAAO. Furthermore, the inhibition by S. oligofermentans of S. mutans in a peptone-rich mixed-species biofilm was greatly reduced for the aao(So) mutant, indicating the gene's importance in interspecies competition. PMID:18469105

  10. Complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1, a lactic acid bacterium that utilizes xylose and produces high levels of L-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroaki; Shiwa, Yuh; Oshima, Kenshiro; Machii, Miki; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Hattori, Masahira; Sonomoto, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2012-04-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1 (= JCM7638). It is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, produces nisin Z, ferments xylose, and produces predominantly L-lactic acid at high xylose concentrations. From ortholog analysis with other five L. lactis strains, IO-1 was identified as L. lactis subsp. lactis.

  11. Proteomic analysis of responses of a new probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus casei Zhang to low acid stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rina; Zhang, Wenyi; Sun, Tiansong; Wu, Junrui; Yue, Xiqing; Meng, He; Zhang, Heping

    2011-06-30

    Tolerance to acid is an important feature for probiotic bacteria during transition through the gastrointestinal tract. Proteomics analysis of a new probiotic bacterium, Lactobacillus casei Zhang, was performed upon 30-min exposure to low acid stress (pH 2.5 vs. pH 6.4) using two-dimensional electrophoresis. Out of 33 protein spots that showed changes of expression between the two pHs, 22 showed 1.5-fold higher expression at pH 2.5 than at pH 6.4, whereas five spots had expression decreased by 1.5-fold at pH 2.5. There were also six protein spots that were exclusively present on different pH maps. Further analysis showed that eight of the enhanced proteins, NagA, NagB, PGM, GlmM, LacC, TDP, GALM and PtsI, were involved in carbohydrate catabolism. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR showed that the mRNA expression levels of dnaK, nagB, galm, estC, tuf and luxS were consistent with changes in protein expression. We postulate that there might be some relationship between differentially expressed proteins and acid tolerance in L. casei Zhang. PMID:21561676

  12. Cheese whey: A cost-effective alternative for hyaluronic acid production by Streptococcus zooepidemicus.

    PubMed

    Amado, Isabel R; Vázquez, José A; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Teixeira, José A

    2016-05-01

    This study focuses on the optimisation of cheese whey formulated media for the production of hyaluronic acid (HA) by Streptococcus zooepidemicus. Culture media containing whey (W; 2.1g/L) or whey hydrolysate (WH; 2.4 g/L) gave the highest HA productions. Both W and WH produced high yields on protein consumed, suggesting cheese whey is a good nitrogen source for S. zooepidemicus production of HA. Polysaccharide concentrations of 4.0 g/L and 3.2g/L were produced in W and WH in a further scale-up to 5L bioreactors, confirming the suitability of the low-cost nitrogen source. Cheese whey culture media provided high molecular weight (>3000 kDa) HA products. This study revealed replacing the commercial peptone by the low-cost alternative could reduce HA production costs by up to a 70% compared to synthetic media.

  13. Fractionation of Dipeptidase Activities of Streptococcus lactis and Dipeptidase Specificity of Some Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sørhaug, Terje; Solberg, Peter

    1973-01-01

    Proteins in sonic extracts of Streptococcus lactis were separated by starch-gel electrophoresis at high voltage. Each slab was sliced longitudinally, and half was stained for peptidases in a mixture containing a peptide, L-amino acid oxidase (snake venom), peroxidase, and o-dianisdine; the other half was stained in amido black for protein. In addition to sonic treatment, trypsin also released enzyme from acetone-treated cells. Glycyl-L-phenylalanine, L-phenylalanyl-glycine, L-alanyl-L-phenylalanine, and L-phenylalanyl-L-alanine served as substrates in characterizing the enzymes. Five different fractions of various specificities appeared in the gels. Broad-range substrate specificities were found for sonic extracts of S. lactis, S. cremoris, S. durans, and Lactobacillus acidophilus. Images PMID:4633426

  14. Cheese whey: A cost-effective alternative for hyaluronic acid production by Streptococcus zooepidemicus.

    PubMed

    Amado, Isabel R; Vázquez, José A; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Teixeira, José A

    2016-05-01

    This study focuses on the optimisation of cheese whey formulated media for the production of hyaluronic acid (HA) by Streptococcus zooepidemicus. Culture media containing whey (W; 2.1g/L) or whey hydrolysate (WH; 2.4 g/L) gave the highest HA productions. Both W and WH produced high yields on protein consumed, suggesting cheese whey is a good nitrogen source for S. zooepidemicus production of HA. Polysaccharide concentrations of 4.0 g/L and 3.2g/L were produced in W and WH in a further scale-up to 5L bioreactors, confirming the suitability of the low-cost nitrogen source. Cheese whey culture media provided high molecular weight (>3000 kDa) HA products. This study revealed replacing the commercial peptone by the low-cost alternative could reduce HA production costs by up to a 70% compared to synthetic media. PMID:26769504

  15. Production of Hyaluronic Acid by Streptococcus zooepidemicus on Protein Substrates Obtained from Scyliorhinus canicula Discards

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, José A.; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Piñeiro, Carmen; Teixeira, José A.; Pérez-Martín, Ricardo I.; Amado, Isabel R.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the production of hyaluronic acid (H) by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in complex media formulated with peptones obtained from Scyliorhinus canicula viscera by-products. Initially, in batch cultures, the greatest productions were achieved using commercial media (3.03 g/L) followed by peptones from alcalase hydrolyzed viscera (2.32 g/L) and peptones from non-hydrolyzed viscera (2.26 g/L). An increase of between 12% and 15% was found in subsequent fed-batch cultures performed on waste peptones. Such organic nitrogen sources were shown to be an excellent low-cost substrate for microbial H, saving more than 50% of the nutrient costs. PMID:26512678

  16. Precursor-product relationship of intracellular and extracellular lipoteichoic acids of Streptococcus faecium.

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, R E; Shockman, G D

    1979-01-01

    Exponential biosynthesis and excretion of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) during the exponential phase of growth, and continued synthesis and excretion during valine starvation of Streptococcus faecium (S. faecalis ATCC 9790), were shown. During exponential growth, extracellular LTA (LTAx) accounted for approximately 13% of the total LTA in cultures, whereas during valine starvation, this percentage increased to approximately 60% within 4 h. LTAx was present in a low-molecular-weight, apparently deacylated form, whereas intracellular (LTAi) was present primarily in an apparently high-molecular-weight, acylated and micellar form. Experiments utilizing chases of either fully equilibrated or short pulses of [14C]- or [3H]glycerol were used to demonstrate that LTAx was derived directly from LTAi. PMID:106043

  17. Identification of amino acid residues in Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferases influencing the structure of the glucan product.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, A; Nakano, Y J; Mukasa, H; Kuramitsu, H K

    1994-08-01

    The glucosyltransferases (GTFs) of mutans streptococci are important virulence factors in the sucrose-dependent colonization of tooth surfaces by these organisms. To investigate the structure-function relationship of the GTFs, an approach was initiated to identify amino acid residues of the GTFs which affect the incorporation of glucose residues into the glucan polymer. Conserved amino acid residues were identified in the GTF-S and GTF-I enzymes of the mutans streptococci and were selected for site-directed mutagenesis in the corresponding enzymes from Streptococcus mutans GS5. Conversion of six amino acid residues of the GTF-I enzyme to those present at the corresponding positions in GTF-S, either singly or in multiple combinations, resulted in enzymes synthesizing increased levels of soluble glucans. The enzyme containing six alterations synthesized 73% water-soluble glucan in the absence of acceptor dextran T10, while parental enzyme GTF-I synthesized no such glucan product. Conversely, when residue 589 of the GTF-S enzyme was converted from Thr to either Asp or Glu, the resulting enzyme synthesized primarily water-insoluble glucan in the absence of the acceptor. Therefore, this approach has identified several amino acid positions which influence the nature of the glucan product synthesized by GTFs.

  18. Genomic analysis of dairy starter culture Streptococcus thermophilus MTCC 5461.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Jashbhai B; Nathani, Neelam M; Patel, Amrutlal K; Senan, Suja; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2013-04-01

    The lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus is widely used as a starter culture for the production of dairy products. Whole-genome sequencing is expected to utilize the genetic basis behind the metabolic functioning of lactic acid bacterium (LAB), for development of their use in biotechnological and probiotic applications. We sequenced the whole genome of Streptococcus thermophilus MTCC 5461, the strain isolated from a curd source, by 454 GS-FLX titanium and Ion Torrent PGM. We performed comparative genome analysis using the local BLAST and RDP for 16S rDNA comparison and by the RAST server for functional comparison against the published genome sequence of Streptococcus thermophilus CNRZ 1066. The whole genome size of S. thermophilus MTCC 5461 is of 1.73Mb size with a GC content of 39.3%. Streptococcal virulence-related genes are either inactivated or absent in the strain. The genome possesses coding sequences for features important for a probiotic organism such as adhesion, acid tolerance, bacteriocin production, and lactose utilization, which was found to be conserved among the strains MTCC 5461 and CNRZ 1066. Biochemical analysis revealed the utilization of 17 sugars by the bacterium, where the presence of genes encoding enzymes involved in metabolism for 16 of these 17 sugars were confirmed in the genome. This study supports the facts that the strain MTCC 5461 is nonpathogenic and harbors essential features that can be exploited for its probiotic potential.

  19. A complex of equine lysozyme and oleic acid with bactericidal activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Emily A; Wilhelm, Kristina R; Schleucher, Jürgen; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A; Hakansson, Anders P

    2013-01-01

    HAMLET and ELOA are complexes consisting of oleic acid and two homologous, yet functionally different, proteins with cytotoxic activities against mammalian cells, with HAMLET showing higher tumor cells specificity, possibly due to the difference in propensity for oleic acid binding, as HAMLET binds 5-8 oleic acid molecules per protein molecule and ELOA binds 11-48 oleic acids. HAMLET has been shown to possess bactericidal activity against a number of bacterial species, particularly those with a respiratory tropism, with Streptococcus pneumoniae displaying the greatest degree of sensitivity. We show here that ELOA also displays bactericidal activity against pneumococci, which at lower concentrations shows mechanistic similarities to HAMLET's bactericidal activity. ELOA binds to S. pneumoniae and causes perturbations of the plasma membrane, including depolarization and subsequent rupture, and activates an influx of calcium into the cells. Selective inhibition of calcium channels and sodium/calcium exchange activity significantly diminished ELOA's bactericidal activity, similar to what we have observed with HAMLET. Finally, ELOA-induced death was also accompanied by DNA fragmentation into high molecular weight fragments - an apoptosis-like morphological phenotype that is seen during HAMLET-induced death. Thus, in contrast to different mechanisms of eukaryote cell death induced by ELOA and HAMLET, these complexes are characterized by rather similar activities towards bacteria. Although the majority of these events could be mimicked using oleic acid alone, the concentrations of oleic acid required were significantly higher than those present in the ELOA complex, and for some assays, the results were not identical between oleic acid alone and the ELOA complex. This indicates that the lipid, as a common denominator in both complexes, is an important component for the complexes' bactericidal activities, while the proteins are required both to solubilize and/or present the

  20. Lactobacillus formosensis sp. nov., a lactic acid bacterium isolated from fermented soybean meal.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-huan; Chen, Yi-sheng; Lee, Tzu-tai; Chang, Yu-chung; Yu, Bi

    2015-01-01

    A Gram-reaction-positive, catalase-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped lactic acid bacterium, designated strain S215(T), was isolated from fermented soybean meal. The organism produced d-lactic acid from glucose without gas formation. 16S rRNA gene sequencing results showed that strain S215(T) had 98.74-99.60 % sequence similarity to the type strains of three species of the genus Lactobacillus (Lactobacillus farciminis BCRC 14043(T), Lactobacillus futsaii BCRC 80278(T) and Lactobacillus crustorum JCM 15951(T)). A comparison of two housekeeping genes, rpoA and pheS, revealed that strain S215(T) was well separated from the reference strains of species of the genus Lactobacillus. DNA-DNA hybridization results indicated that strain S215(T) had DNA related to the three type strains of species of the genus Lactobacillus (33-66 % relatedness). The DNA G+C content of strain S215(T) was 36.2 mol%. The cell walls contained peptidoglycan of the d-meso-diaminopimelic acid type and the major fatty acids were C18 : 1ω9c, C16 : 0 and C19 : 0 cyclo ω10c/C19 : 1ω6c. Phenotypic and genotypic features demonstrated that the isolate represents a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus formosensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S215(T) ( = NBRC 109509(T) = BCRC 80582(T)).

  1. Withania somnifera attenuates acid production, acid tolerance and extra-cellular polysaccharide formation of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Santosh; Song, Kwang-Yeob; Jeon, Jae-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) is a plant of the Solanaceae family. It has been widely used as a remedy for a variety of ailments in India and Nepal. The plant has also been used as a controlling agent for dental diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the activity of the methanol extract of W. somnifera against the physiological ability of cariogenic biofilms and to identify the components of the extract. To determine the activity of the extract, assays for sucrose-dependent bacterial adherence, glycolytic acid production, acid tolerance, and extracellular polysaccharide formation were performed using Streptococcus mutans biofilms. The viability change of S. mutans biofilms cells was also determined. A phytochemical analysis of the extract was performed using TLC and LC/MS/MS. The extract showed inhibitory effects on sucrose-dependent bacterial adherence (≥ 100 μg/ml), glycolytic acid production (≥ 300 μg/ml), acid tolerance (≥ 300 μg/ml), and extracellular polysaccharide formation (≥ 300 μg/ml) of S. mutans biofilms. However, the extract did not alter the viability of S. mutans biofilms cells in all concentrations tested. Based on the phytochemical analysis, the activity of the extract may be related to the presence of alkaloids, anthrones, coumarines, anthraquinones, terpenoids, flavonoids, and steroid lactones (withanolide A, withaferin A, withanolide B, withanoside IV, and 12-deoxy withastramonolide). These data indicate that W. somnifera may be a potential agent for restraining the physiological ability of cariogenic biofilms.

  2. Light-driven amino acid uptake in Streptococcus cremoris or Clostridium acetobutylicum membrane vesicles fused with liposomes containing bacterial reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Crielaard, W.; Driessen, A.J.; Molenaar, D.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; Konings, W.N.

    1988-04-01

    Reaction centers of the phototrophic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris were introduced as proton motive force-generating systems in membrane vesicles of two anaerobic bacteria. Liposomes containing reaction center-light-harvesting complex I pigment protein complexes were fused with membrane vesicles of Streptococcus cremoris or Clostridium acetobutylicum by freeze-thawing and sonication. Illumination of these fused membranes resulted in the generation of a proton motive force of approximately -110 mV. The magnitude of the proton motive force in these membranes could be varied by changing the light intensity. As a result of this proton motive force, amino acid transport into the fused membranes could be observed. The initial rate of leucine transport by membrane vesicles of S. cremoris increased exponentially with the proton motive force. An H+/leucine stoichiometry of 0.8 was determined from the steady-state level of leucine accumulation and the proton motive force, and this stoichiometry was found to be independent of the magnitude of the proton motive force. These results indicate that the introduction of bacterial reaction centers in membrane vesicles by the fusion procedure yields very attractive model systems for the study of proton motive force-consuming processes in membrane vesicles of (strict) anaerobic bacteria.

  3. Fermentation products of solvent tolerant marine bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and its biotechnological applications in salicylic acid bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Wahidullah, Solimabi; Naik, Deepak N; Devi, Prabha

    2013-01-01

    As part of a proactive approach to environmental protection, emerging issues with potential impact on the environment is the subject of ongoing investigation. One emerging area of environmental research concerns pharmaceuticals like salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of various analgesics including aspirin. It is a common component of sewage effluent and also an intermediate in the degradation pathway of various aromatic compounds which are introduced in the marine environment as pollutants. In this study, biotransformation products of salicylic acid by seaweed, Bryopsis plumosa, associated marine bacterium, Moraxella spp. MB1, have been investigated. Phenol, conjugates of phenol and hydroxy cinnamic acid derivatives (coumaroyl, caffeoyl, feruloyl and trihydroxy cinnamyl) with salicylic acid (3-8) were identified as the bioconversion products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These results show that the microorganism do not degrade phenolic acid but catalyses oxygen dependent transformations without ring cleavage. The degradation of salicylic acid is known to proceed either via gentisic acid pathway or catechol pathway but this is the first report of biotransformation of salicylic acid into cinnamates, without ring cleavage. Besides cinnamic acid derivatives (9-12), metabolites produced by the bacterium include antimicrobial indole (13) and β-carbolines, norharman (14), harman (15) and methyl derivative (16), which are beneficial to the host and the environment. PMID:24391802

  4. Fermentation products of solvent tolerant marine bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and its biotechnological applications in salicylic acid bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Wahidullah, Solimabi; Naik, Deepak N; Devi, Prabha

    2013-01-01

    As part of a proactive approach to environmental protection, emerging issues with potential impact on the environment is the subject of ongoing investigation. One emerging area of environmental research concerns pharmaceuticals like salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of various analgesics including aspirin. It is a common component of sewage effluent and also an intermediate in the degradation pathway of various aromatic compounds which are introduced in the marine environment as pollutants. In this study, biotransformation products of salicylic acid by seaweed, Bryopsis plumosa, associated marine bacterium, Moraxella spp. MB1, have been investigated. Phenol, conjugates of phenol and hydroxy cinnamic acid derivatives (coumaroyl, caffeoyl, feruloyl and trihydroxy cinnamyl) with salicylic acid (3-8) were identified as the bioconversion products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These results show that the microorganism do not degrade phenolic acid but catalyses oxygen dependent transformations without ring cleavage. The degradation of salicylic acid is known to proceed either via gentisic acid pathway or catechol pathway but this is the first report of biotransformation of salicylic acid into cinnamates, without ring cleavage. Besides cinnamic acid derivatives (9-12), metabolites produced by the bacterium include antimicrobial indole (13) and β-carbolines, norharman (14), harman (15) and methyl derivative (16), which are beneficial to the host and the environment.

  5. Fermentation Products of Solvent Tolerant Marine Bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and Its Biotechnological Applications in Salicylic Acid Bioconversion

    PubMed Central

    Wahidullah, Solimabi; Naik, Deepak N.; Devi, Prabha

    2013-01-01

    As part of a proactive approach to environmental protection, emerging issues with potential impact on the environment is the subject of ongoing investigation. One emerging area of environmental research concerns pharmaceuticals like salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of various analgesics including aspirin. It is a common component of sewage effluent and also an intermediate in the degradation pathway of various aromatic compounds which are introduced in the marine environment as pollutants. In this study, biotransformation products of salicylic acid by seaweed, Bryopsis plumosa, associated marine bacterium, Moraxella spp. MB1, have been investigated. Phenol, conjugates of phenol and hydroxy cinnamic acid derivatives (coumaroyl, caffeoyl, feruloyl and trihydroxy cinnamyl) with salicylic acid (3–8) were identified as the bioconversion products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These results show that the microorganism do not degrade phenolic acid but catalyses oxygen dependent transformations without ring cleavage. The degradation of salicylic acid is known to proceed either via gentisic acid pathway or catechol pathway but this is the first report of biotransformation of salicylic acid into cinnamates, without ring cleavage. Besides cinnamic acid derivatives (9–12), metabolites produced by the bacterium include antimicrobial indole (13) and β-carbolines, norharman (14), harman (15) and methyl derivative (16), which are beneficial to the host and the environment. PMID:24391802

  6. Effect of Psidium cattleianum leaf extract on Streptococcus mutans viability, protein expression and acid production.

    PubMed

    Brighenti, F L; Luppens, S B I; Delbem, A C B; Deng, D M; Hoogenkamp, M A; Gaetti-Jardim, E; Dekker, H L; Crielaard, W; ten Cate, J M

    2008-01-01

    Plants naturally produce secondary metabolites that can be used as antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Psidium cattleianum leaf extract on Streptococcus mutans. The extract (100%) was obtained by decoction of 100 g of leaves in 600 ml of deionized water. To assess killing, S. mutans biofilms were treated with water (negative control) or various extract dilutions [100, 50, 25% (v/v) in water] for 5 or 60 min. To evaluate the effect on protein expression, biofilms were exposed to water or 1.6% (v/v) extract for 120 min, proteins were extracted and submitted to 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Differentially expressed proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. The effect of 1.6% (v/v) extract on acid production was determined by pH measurements and compared to a water control. Viability was similar after 5 min of treatment with the 100% extract or 60 min with the 50% extract (about 0.03% survival). There were no differences in viability between the biofilms exposed to the 25 or 50% extract after 60 min of treatment (about 0.02% survival). Treatment with the 1.6% extract significantly changed protein expression. The abundance of 24 spots was decreased compared to water (p < 0.05). The extract significantly inhibited acid production (p < 0.05). It is concluded that P. cattleianum leaf extract kills S. mutans grown in biofilms when applied at high concentrations. At low concentrations it inhibits S. mutans acid production and reduces the expression of proteins involved in general metabolism, glycolysis and lactic acid production.

  7. Recovery of Acid Production in Streptococcus mutans Biofilms after Short-Term Fluoride Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dang, Minh-Huy; Jung, Ji-Eun; Lee, Dae-Woo; Song, Kwang-Yeob; Jeon, Jae-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Fluoride is commonly used as an ingredient of topical oral hygiene measures. Despite the anti-acidogenic activities of fluoride against cariogenic biofilms, the recovery of the biofilms from fluoride damage is unclear. Herein, we investigated the recovery of acid production in Streptococcus mutans biofilms after short-term or during periodic 1-min fluoride treatments. For this study, 46-hour-old S. mutans biofilms were treated with fluoride (0-2,000 ppm F-) for 1-8 min and then incubated in saliva for 0-100 min. The 74-hour-old biofilms were also periodically treated with the fluoride concentration during biofilm formation (1 min/treatment). Changes in acidogenicity and viability were determined via pH drop and colony-forming unit assays, respectively. In this study, acid production after a 1-min fluoride treatment was recovered as saliva incubation time increased, which followed a linear pattern of concentration dependence (R = 0.99, R2 = 0.98). The recovery pattern was in a biphasic pattern, with an initial rapid rate followed by a second slow recovery. Furthermore, recovery from fluoride damage was retarded in a concentration-dependent manner as treatment time increased. In periodic 1-min fluoride treatments, acid production in the biofilms was not diminished during the non-fluoride treatment period; however, it was reduced in a concentration-dependent manner during the fluoride treatment period. The viability of the biofilm cells did not change, even at high fluoride concentrations. Collectively, our results suggest that brief fluoride treatment does not sustain anti-acidogenic activity against S. mutans in biofilms since the damage is recoverable with time. PMID:27355469

  8. Difference in the xylitol sensitivity of acid production among Streptococcus mutans strains and the biochemical mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miyasawa-Hori, H; Aizawa, S; Takahashi, N

    2006-08-01

    Xylitol inhibits the glycolysis and growth of Streptococcus mutans, but to different degrees among strains. Thus, we studied the biochemical mechanism through which the inhibition varies, using S. mutans strains ATCC 31989, NCTN 10449, and NCIB 11723, which are highly sensitive, moderately sensitive, and resistant to xylitol, respectively, under strictly anaerobic conditions such as those found in deep layers of dental plaque. Xylitol (30 mM) decreased the rate of acid production from glucose (10 mM) in ATCC 31989, NCTC 10449, and NCIB 11723 by 86, 26, and 0%, respectively. The activities of the xylitol : phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) relative to those of glucose : PEP-PTS were 120, 16, and 3%, respectively. In ATCC 31989 and NCTC 10449, intracellular accumulation of xylitol 5-phosphate and decreases of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and glucose 6-phosphate were observed. Furthermore, in the presence of xylitol (30 mM), glucose : PEP-PTS activities decreased by 34, 17, and 0%, respectively. These findings indicated that the higher the xylitol : PEP-PTS activity was and the more effectively xylitol decreased glucose : PEP-PTS activity, the more sensitive the strain was to xylitol. These results suggest that the following inhibitory mechanisms are active in the xylitol-sensitive mutans streptococci: direct inhibition of glycolytic enzymes by xylitol 5-phosphate derived from xylitol : PEP-PTS and, possibly, indirect inhibition through competition for the phosphoryl donor, HPr-P, between glucose and xylitol : PEP-PTSs.

  9. Mutation of aspartic acid residues in the fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975.

    PubMed Central

    Song, D D; Jacques, N A

    1999-01-01

    The site-directed mutated fructosyltransferases (Ftfs) of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, D312E, D312S, D312N and D312K were all active at 37 degrees C, indicating that Asp-312 present in the 'sucrose box' was not the nucleophilic Asp residue responsible for the formation of a covalent fructosyl-enzyme intermediate required for enzyme activity. Analysis of the kinetic constants of the purified mutated forms of the enzyme showed that Asp-312 was most likely an essential amino acid involved in determining acceptor recognition and/or stabilizing a beta-turn in the protein. In contrast, when the Asp-397 of the Ftf present in the conserved triplet RDP motif of all 60 bacterial and plant family-32 glycosylhydrolases was mutated to a Ser residue, both sucrose hydrolysis and polymerization ceased. Tryptophan emission spectra confirmed that this mutation did not alter protein structure. Comparison of published data from other site-directed mutated enzymes implicated the Asp residue in the RDP motif as the one that may form a transient covalent fructosyl intermediate during the catalysis of sucrose by the Ftf of S. salivarius. PMID:10548559

  10. Production of gamma-aminobutyric acid by Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus Y2 under submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, S-Y; Lü, F-X; Lu, Z-X; Bie, X-M; Jiao, Y; Sun, L-J; Yu, B

    2008-04-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has several well-known physiological functions and has been applied to the production of many drugs and functional foods. The technology of GABA production via submerged fermentation by Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus Y2 was investigated in this paper. It indicated that the GABA production was related to the biochemical characteristics of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) of S. salivarius subsp. thermophilus Y2. After 24 h of fermentation at 37 degrees C, which is the suitable culture conditions for GAD-production, then the culture condition were adjusted to the optimal temperature (40 degrees C) and pH (4.5) for the GAD reaction activity in biotransformation of cells and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (0.02 mmol/l) were added to the broth at the 48 h, the GABA production was increased up to 1.76-fold, reaching 7984.75 +/- 293.33 mg/l. The strain shows great potential use as a starter for GABA-containing yoghurt, cheese and other functional fermented food productions. PMID:17514494

  11. Efficacy of two barrier teat dips containing chlorous acid germicides against experimental challenge with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Boddie, R L; Nickerson, S C; Kemp, G K

    1994-10-01

    Two postmilking teat dips were tested for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae using experimental challenge procedures recommended by the National Mastitis Council. Both dips contained chlorous acid as the primary germicidal agent and lactic acid or mandelic acid as the chlorous acid activator. The dip activated with mandelic acid significantly reduced new IMI by Staph. aureus and Strep. agalactiae. The IMI rate was reduced 68.7% for Staph. aureus and 56.4% for Strep. agalactiae. The dip activated with lactic acid significantly reduced new Staph. aureus IMI by 69.3% but did not significantly reduce new Strep. agalactiae IMI (35.2% reduction) through the full 11-wk study period. Teat skin condition did not change from pretrial status after using either teat dip during the study. PMID:7836608

  12. Methanol and ethanol oxidase respiratory chains of the methylotrophic acetic acid bacterium, Acetobacter methanolicus.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, K; Takahashi, K; Takahashi, M; Ameyama, M; Adachi, O

    1992-06-01

    Acetobacter methanolicus is a unique acetic acid bacterium which has a methanol oxidase respiratory chain, as seen in methylotrophs, in addition to its ethanol oxidase respiratory chain. In this study, the relationship between methanol and ethanol oxidase respiratory chains was investigated. The organism is able to grow by oxidizing several carbon sources, including methanol, glycerol, and glucose. Cells grown on methanol exhibited a high methanol-oxidizing activity and contained large amounts of methanol dehydrogenase and soluble cytochromes c. Cells grown on glycerol showed higher oxygen uptake rate and dehydrogenase activity with ethanol but little methanol-oxidizing activity. Furthermore, two different terminal oxidases, cytochrome c and ubiquinol oxidases, have been shown to be involved in the respiratory chain; cytochrome c oxidase predominates in cells grown on methanol while ubiquinol oxidase predominates in cells grown on glycerol. Both terminal oxidases could be solubilized from the membranes and separated from each other. The cytochrome c oxidase and the ubiquinol oxidase have been shown to be a cytochrome co and a cytochrome bo, respectively. Methanol-oxidizing activity was diminished by several treatments that disrupt the integrity of the cells. The activity of the intact cells was inhibited with NaCl and/or EDTA, which disturbed the interaction between methanol dehydrogenase and cytochrome c. Ethanol-oxidizing activity in the membranes was inhibited with 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, which inhibited ubiquinol oxidase but not cytochrome c oxidase. Alcohol dehydrogenase has been purified from the membranes of glycerol-grown cells and shown to reduce ubiquinone-10 as well as a short side-chain homologue in detergent solution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Recycling of carbon dioxide and acetate as lactic acid by the hydrogen-producing bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana.

    PubMed

    d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Dipasquale, Laura; Fontana, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    The heterotrophic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana produces hydrogen by fermentation of sugars. Under capnophilic (carbon dioxide requiring) conditions, the process is preferentially associated with the production of lactic acid, which, as shown herein, is synthesized by reductive carboxylation of acetyl coenzyme A. The enzymatic coupling is dependent on the carbon dioxide stimulated activity of heterotetrameric pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Under the same culture conditions, T. neapolitana also operates the unfavorable synthesis of lactic acid from an exogenous acetate supply. This process, which requires carbon dioxide (or carbonate) and an unknown electron donor, allows for the conversion of carbon dioxide into added-value chemicals without biomass deconstruction.

  14. Genetic manipulation of Streptococcus pyogenes (the Group A Streptococcus, GAS).

    PubMed

    Le Breton, Yoann; McIver, Kevin S

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (the Group A Streptococcus, GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterium responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild superficial infections (pharyngitis, impetigo) to severe, often life-threatening invasive diseases (necrotizing fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome) in humans. This unit describes molecular techniques for the genetic manipulation of S. pyogenes with detailed protocols for transformation, gene disruption, allelic exchange, transposon mutagenesis, and genetic complementation. PMID:24510894

  15. Response of Fatty Acid Synthesis Genes to the Binding of Human Salivary Amylase by Streptococcus gordonii

    PubMed Central

    Nikitkova, Anna E.; Haase, Elaine M.; Vickerman, M. Margaret; Gill, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, an important primary colonizer of dental plaque biofilm, specifically binds to salivary amylase via the surface-associated amylase-binding protein A (AbpA). We hypothesized that a function of amylase binding to S. gordonii may be to modulate the expression of chromosomal genes, which could influence bacterial survival and persistence in the oral cavity. Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis was performed to detect genes in S. gordonii strain CH1 that were differentially expressed in response to the binding of purified human salivary amylase versus exposure to purified heat-denatured amylase. Selected genes found to be differentially expressed were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Five genes from the fatty acid synthesis (FAS) cluster were highly (10- to 35-fold) upregulated in S. gordonii CH1 cells treated with native amylase relative to those treated with denatured amylase. An abpA-deficient strain of S. gordonii exposed to amylase failed to show a response in FAS gene expression similar to that observed in the parental strain. Predicted phenotypic effects of amylase binding to S. gordonii strain CH1 (associated with increased expression of FAS genes, leading to changes in fatty acid synthesis) were noted; these included increased bacterial growth, survival at low pH, and resistance to triclosan. These changes were not observed in the amylase-exposed abpA-deficient strain, suggesting a role for AbpA in the amylase-induced phenotype. These results provide evidence that the binding of salivary amylase elicits a differential gene response in S. gordonii, resulting in a phenotypic adjustment that is potentially advantageous for bacterial survival in the oral environment. PMID:22247133

  16. An Evaluation of a Teat Dip with Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonic Acid in Preventing Bovine Mammary Gland Infection from Experimental Exposure to Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, D. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Brooks, B. W.

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of a teat dip with dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (1.94%) for the prevention of intramammary infections was determined in cows experimentally challenged with Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus. The infection rates with Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus were 62.5% and 75% in undipped quarters, 12.5% and 21.5% in dipped quarters with a reduction rate of 80% and 71% respectively. The significance of some findings in relation to mastitis control are discussed. PMID:17422110

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptococcus thermophilus C106, a Dairy Isolate from an Artisanal Cheese Produced in the Countryside of Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, L. Mariela; Eibrink, Beerd-Jan; Backus, Lennart; Bongers, Roger S.; Vriesendorp, Bastienne; Siezen, Roland J.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Meijer, Wilco C.

    2015-01-01

    The lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus is widely used for the fermentation of dairy products. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of S. thermophilus C106 isolated from an artisanal cheese produced in the countryside of Ireland. PMID:26607891

  18. Whole-Genome Sequence of Streptococcus macedonicus Strain 33MO, Isolated from Curd of Morlacco Cheese in the Veneto Region (Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Vendramin, Veronica; Treu, Laura; Bovo, Barbara; Campanaro, Stefano; Giacomini, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    A genetic characterization of Streptococcus macedonicus is important to better understand the characteristics of this lactic acid bacterium, frequently detected in fermented food bacteria communities. This report presents the draft genome sequence description of strain 33MO, the first publicly available genome sequence of an Italian S. macedonicus isolate. PMID:25103758

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptococcus thermophilus C106, a Dairy Isolate from an Artisanal Cheese Produced in the Countryside of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Wels, Michiel; Serrano, L Mariela; Eibrink, Beerd-Jan; Backus, Lennart; Bongers, Roger S; Vriesendorp, Bastienne; Siezen, Roland J; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; Meijer, Wilco C

    2015-01-01

    The lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus is widely used for the fermentation of dairy products. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of S. thermophilus C106 isolated from an artisanal cheese produced in the countryside of Ireland. PMID:26607891

  20. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: Relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grown at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). Y{sub ATP} (grams of cells per mole at ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 14}C)benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation.

  1. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grow at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). YATP (grams of cells per mole of ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up [14C]acetate and [14C]benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation. PMID:2036013

  2. Desulfurella amilsii sp. nov., a novel acidotolerant sulfur-respiring bacterium isolated from acidic river sediments.

    PubMed

    Florentino, Anna P; Brienza, Claudio; Stams, Alfons J M; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

    2016-03-01

    A novel acidotolerant and moderately thermophilic sulfur-reducing bacterium was isolated from sediments of the Tinto River (Spain), an extremely acidic environment. Strain TR1T stained Gram-negative, and was obligately anaerobic, non-spore-forming and motile. Cells were short rods (1.5-2 × 0.5-0.7 μm), appearing singly or in pairs. Strain TR1T was catalase-negative and slightly oxidase-positive. Urease activity and indole formation were absent, but gelatin hydrolysis was present. Growth was observed at 20-52 °C with an optimum close to 50 °C, and a pH range of 3-7 with optimum between pH 6 and 6.5. Yeast extract was essential for growth, but extra vitamins were not required. In the presence of sulfur, strain TR1T grew with acetate, formate, lactate, pyruvate, stearate, arginine and H2/CO2. All substrates were completely oxidized and H2S and CO2 were the only metabolic products detected. Besides elemental sulfur, thiosulfate was used as an electron acceptor. The isolate also grew by disproportionation of elemental sulfur. The predominant cellular fatty acids were saturated components: C16 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0 and C18 : 0. The only quinone component detected was menaquinone MK-7(H2). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34 mol%. The isolate is affiliated to the genus Desulfurella of the class Deltaproteobacteria, sharing 97 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the four species described in the genus Desulfurella. Considering the distinct physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strain TR1T represents a novel species within the genus Desulfurella, for which the name Desulfurella amilsii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TR1T ( = DSM 29984T = JCM 30680T). PMID:26704766

  3. Identification and Characterization of a New 7-Aminocephalosporanic Acid Deacetylase from Thermophilic Bacterium Alicyclobacillus tengchongensis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun-Mei; Yu, Ting-Ting; Han, Nan-Yu; Yu, Jia-Lin; Li, Jun-Jun; Yang, Yun-Juan; Tang, Xiang-Hua; Xu, Bo; Zhou, Jun-Pei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deacetylation of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) at position C-3 provides valuable starting material for producing semisynthetic β-lactam antibiotics. However, few enzymes have been characterized in this process before now. Comparative analysis of the genome of the thermophilic bacterium Alicyclobacillus tengchongensis revealed a hypothetical protein (EstD1) with typical esterase features. The EstD1 protein was functionally cloned, expressed, and purified from Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). It indeed displayed esterase activity, with optimal activity at around 65°C and pH 8.5, with a preference for esters with short-chain acyl esters (C2 to C4). Sequence alignment revealed that EstD1 is an SGNH hydrolase with the putative catalytic triad Ser15, Asp191, and His194, which belongs to carbohydrate esterase family 12. EstD1 can hydrolyze acetate at the C-3 position of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) to form deacetyl-7-ACA, which is an important starting material for producing semisynthetic β-lactam antibiotics. EstD1 retained more than 50% of its initial activity when incubated at pH values ranging from 4 to 11 at 65°C for 1 h. To the best of our knowledge, this enzyme is a new SGNH hydrolase identified from thermophiles that is able to hydrolyze 7-ACA. IMPORTANCE Deacetyl cephalosporins are highly valuable building blocks for the industrial production of various kinds of semisynthetic β-lactam antibiotics. These compounds are derived mainly from 7-ACA, which is obtained by chemical or enzymatic processes from cephalosporin C. Enzymatic transformation of 7-ACA is the main method because of the adverse effects chemical deacylation brought to the environment. SGNH hydrolases are widely distributed in plants. However, the tools for identifying and characterizing SGNH hydrolases from bacteria, especially from thermophiles, are rather limited. Here, our work demonstrates that EstD1 belongs to the SGNH family and can hydrolyze acetate at the C-3 position of

  4. Influence of Artisan Bakery- or Laboratory-Propagated Sourdoughs on the Diversity of Lactic Acid Bacterium and Yeast Microbiotas

    PubMed Central

    Minervini, Fabio; Lattanzi, Anna; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Seven mature type I sourdoughs were comparatively back-slopped (80 days) at artisan bakery and laboratory levels under constant technology parameters. The cell density of presumptive lactic acid bacteria and related biochemical features were not affected by the environment of propagation. On the contrary, the number of yeasts markedly decreased from artisan bakery to laboratory propagation. During late laboratory propagation, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that the DNA band corresponding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae was no longer detectable in several sourdoughs. Twelve species of lactic acid bacteria were variously identified through a culture-dependent approach. All sourdoughs harbored a certain number of species and strains, which were dominant throughout time and, in several cases, varied depending on the environment of propagation. As shown by statistical permutation analysis, the lactic acid bacterium populations differed among sourdoughs propagated at artisan bakery and laboratory levels. Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sakei, and Weissella cibaria dominated in only some sourdoughs back-slopped at artisan bakeries, and Leuconostoc citreum seemed to be more persistent under laboratory conditions. Strains of Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis were indifferently found in some sourdoughs. Together with the other stable species and strains, other lactic acid bacteria temporarily contaminated the sourdoughs and largely differed between artisan bakery and laboratory levels. The environment of propagation has an undoubted influence on the composition of sourdough yeast and lactic acid bacterium microbiotas. PMID:22635989

  5. Amino Acid and Peptide Utilization Profiles of the Fluoroacetate-Degrading Bacterium Synergistetes Strain MFA1 Under Varying Conditions.

    PubMed

    Leong, Lex E X; Denman, Stuart E; Hugenholtz, Philip; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2016-02-01

    Synergistetes strain MFA1 is an asaccharolytic ruminal bacterium isolated based on its ability to degrade fluoroacetate, a plant toxin. The amino acid and peptide requirements of the bacterium were investigated under different culturing conditions. The growth of strain MFA1 and its fluoroacetate degradation rate were enhanced by peptide-rich protein hydrolysates (tryptone and yeast extract) compared to casamino acid, an amino acid-rich protein hydrolysate. Complete utilization and preference for arginine, asparagine, glutamate, glycine, and histidine as free amino acids from yeast extract were observed, while the utilization of serine, threonine, and lysine in free form and peptide-bound glutamate was stimulated during growth on fluoroacetate. A predominant peptide in yeast extract preferentially utilized by strain MFA1 was partially characterized by high-liquid performance chromatography-mass spectrometry as a hepta-glutamate oligopeptide. Similar utilization profiles of amino acids were observed between the co-culture of strain MFA1 with Methanobrevibacter smithii without fluoroacetate and pure strain MFA1 culture with fluoroacetate. This suggests that growth of strain MFA1 could be enhanced by a reduction of hydrogen partial pressure as a result of hydrogen removal by a methanogen or reduction of fluoroacetate.

  6. Flavonoid Glycosides Inhibit Sortase A and Sortase A-Mediated Aggregation of Streptococcus mutans, an Oral Bacterium Responsible for Human Dental Caries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Woo-Young; Kim, Chang-Kwon; Ahn, Chan-Hong; Kim, Heegyu; Shin, Jongheon; Oh, Ki-Bong

    2016-09-28

    Three flavonoids were isolated from dried flowers of Sophora japonica using repetitive column chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The flavonoids were identified as rutin (1), quercetin-3'-O-methyl-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), and quercetin (3) on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and comparison of values reported in the literature. These compounds inhibited the action of sortase A (SrtA) from Streptococcus mutans, a primary etiologic agent of human dental caries. The onset and magnitude of inhibition of saliva-induced aggregation of S. mutans treated with compound 1 was comparable to that of untreated S. mutans with a deletion of the srtA gene. PMID:27291675

  7. Flavonoid Glycosides Inhibit Sortase A and Sortase A-Mediated Aggregation of Streptococcus mutans, an Oral Bacterium Responsible for Human Dental Caries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Woo-Young; Kim, Chang-Kwon; Ahn, Chan-Hong; Kim, Heegyu; Shin, Jongheon; Oh, Ki-Bong

    2016-09-28

    Three flavonoids were isolated from dried flowers of Sophora japonica using repetitive column chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The flavonoids were identified as rutin (1), quercetin-3'-O-methyl-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), and quercetin (3) on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and comparison of values reported in the literature. These compounds inhibited the action of sortase A (SrtA) from Streptococcus mutans, a primary etiologic agent of human dental caries. The onset and magnitude of inhibition of saliva-induced aggregation of S. mutans treated with compound 1 was comparable to that of untreated S. mutans with a deletion of the srtA gene.

  8. Transport of. cap alpha. -aminoisobutyric acid by Streptococcus pyogenes and its derived L-form

    SciTech Connect

    Reizer, J.; Panos, C.

    1982-01-01

    We studied the uptake of ..cap alpha..-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) in Streptococcus pyogenes and its physiologically isotonic L-form. S. pyogenes cells starved for glucose or treated with carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenyl hydrazone accumulated limited amounts of AIB. A high apparent K/sub m/ value characterized the glucose-independent transport of AIB. The rate and extent of AIB accumulation significantly increased in the presence of glucose. Two saturable transport components with distinct apparent K/sub m/values characterized glycolysis-coupled transport of AIB. A biphasic Lineweaver-Burk plot was also obtained for L-alanine transport by glycolyzing S. pyogenes cells. AIB seems to share a common transport system(s) with glycine, L- and D-anine, L-serine, and L-valine. This was shown by the competitive exchange efflux of accumulated AIB. About 30% of the AIB uptake was not inhibited by a saturating amount of L-valine, indicating the existence of more than one system for AIB transport, p-Chloromercuribenzoate markedly inhibited the accumulation of AIB by both glycolyzing and glucose-starved cells. In contrast, carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenyl hydrazone affected only metabolism-dependent uptake of AIB, which was also sensitive to dinitrophenol, N-ethylmaleimide, iodoacetate, fluoride (NaF), arsenate, and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. These results are interpreted according to the chemiosmotic theory of Mitchell, whereby a proton motive force constitutes the driving force for AIB accumulation. AIB was not accumulated by the L-form. However, a temporary accumulation of AIB by a counterflow mechanism and a saturable system with a low apparent affinity were demonstrated for AIB transport by this organism. We suggest that a deficiency in the coupling of energy to AIB transport is responsible for the apparent lack of active AIB accumulation by the L-form.

  9. Enterococcus faecium QU 50: a novel thermophilic lactic acid bacterium for high-yield l-lactic acid production from xylose.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ali; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Zendo, Takeshi; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Production of optically pure lactic acid from lignocellulosic material for commercial purposes is hampered by several difficulties, including heterofermentation of pentose sugars and high energy consumption by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Here, we report a novel lactic acid bacterium, strain QU 50, that has the potential to produce optically pure l-lactic acid (≥99.2%) in a homofermentative manner from xylose under thermophilic conditions. Strain QU 50 was isolated from Egyptian fertile soil and identified as Enterococcus faecium QU 50 by analyzing its sugar fermentation pattern and 16S rRNA gene sequence. Enterococcus faecium QU 50 fermented xylose efficiently to produce lactic acid over wide pH (6.0-10.0) and temperature ranges (30-52°C), with a pH of 6.5 and temperature of 50°C being optimal. To our knowledge, this is the first report of homofermentative lactic acid production from xylose by a thermophilic lactic acid bacterium.

  10. Efficacy of teat dips containing a hypochlorous acid germicide against experimental challenge with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Boddie, R L; Nickerson, S C

    1996-09-01

    Two teat dip formulations containing sodium dichloroisocyanurate, which released hypochlorous acid (2800 ppm) as the active ingredient, were tested for efficacy against new Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae IMI using an experimental challenge model. Product 1 reduced the number of new Staph. aureus IMI by 73.6% and reduced the number of new Strep. agalactiae IMI by 65.1%. Product 2 reduced the number of new Staph. aureus IMI by 69.0% and reduced the number of new Strep. agalactiae IMI by 63.5%. No adverse effects on teat skin condition were observed over the course of the studies. PMID:8899537

  11. Value-added lipid production from brown seaweed biomass by two-stage fermentation using acetic acid bacterium and thraustochytrid.

    PubMed

    Arafiles, Kim Hazel V; Iwasaka, Hiroaki; Eramoto, Yuri; Okamura, Yoshiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Aki, Tsunehiro

    2014-11-01

    Thraustochytrid production of polyunsaturated fatty acids and xanthophylls have been generally sourced from crop-derived substrates, making the exploration of alternative feedstocks attractive since they promise increased sustainability and lower production costs. In this study, a distinct two-stage fermentation system was conceptualized for the first time, using the brown seaweed sugar mannitol as substrate for the intermediary biocatalyst Gluconobacter oxydans, an acetic acid bacterium, along with the marine thraustochytrid Aurantiochytrium sp. to produce the value-added lipids and xanthophylls. Jar fermenter culture resulted in seaweed mannitol conversion to fructose with an efficiency of 83 % by G. oxydans and, after bacteriostasis with sea salts, production of astaxanthin and docosahexaenoic acid by Aurantiochytrium sp. KH105. Astaxanthin productivity was high at 3.60 mg/L/day. This new system, therefore, widens possibilities of obtaining more varieties of industrially valuable products including foods, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and biofuel precursor lipids from seaweed fermentation upon the use of suitable thraustochytrid strains.

  12. Deregulated balance of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids following infection by the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Claude; Segura, Mariela; Dominguez-Punaro, Maria C; Wojewodka, Gabriella; De Sanctis, Juan B; Radzioch, Danuta; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2014-05-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important swine pathogen and an emergent zoonotic pathogen. Excessive inflammation caused by S. suis is responsible for early high mortality in septic shock-like syndrome cases. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may contribute to regulating inflammatory processes. This study shows that mouse infection by S. suis is accompanied by an increase of arachidonic acid, a proinflammatory omega-6 (ω-6) PUFA, and by a decrease of docosahexaenoic acid, an anti-inflammatory ω-3 PUFA. Macrophages infected with S. suis showed activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and cyclooxygenase-2 upregulation. Fenretinide, a synthetic vitamin A analog, reduced in vitro expression of inflammatory mediators. Pretreatment of mice with fenretinide significantly improved their survival by reducing systemic proinflammatory cytokines during the acute phase of an S. suis infection. These findings indicate a beneficial effect of fenretinide in diminishing the expression of inflammation and improving survival during an acute infection by a virulent S. suis strain.

  13. Identification and characterization of two bile acid coenzyme A transferases from Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Hylemon, Phillip B.

    2012-01-01

    The human bile acid pool composition is composed of both primary bile acids (cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid) and secondary bile acids (deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid). Secondary bile acids are formed by the 7α-dehydroxylation of primary bile acids carried out by intestinal anaerobic bacteria. We have previously described a multistep biochemical pathway in Clostridium scindens that is responsible for bile acid 7α-dehydroxylation. We have identified a large (12 kb) bile acid inducible (bai) operon in this bacterium that encodes eight genes involved in bile acid 7α-dehydroxylation. However, the function of the baiF gene product in this operon has not been elucidated. In the current study, we cloned and expressed the baiF gene in E. coli and discovered it has bile acid CoA transferase activity. In addition, we discovered a second bai operon encoding three genes. The baiK gene in this operon was expressed in E. coli and found to encode a second bile acid CoA transferase. Both bile acid CoA transferases were determined to be members of the type III family by amino acid sequence comparisons. Both bile acid CoA transferases had broad substrate specificity, except the baiK gene product, which failed to use lithocholyl-CoA as a CoA donor. Primary bile acids are ligated to CoA via an ATP-dependent mechanism during the initial steps of 7α-dehydroxylation. The bile acid CoA transferases conserve the thioester bond energy, saving the cell ATP molecules during bile acid 7α-dehydroxylation. ATP-dependent CoA ligation is likely quickly supplanted by ATP-independent CoA transfer. PMID:22021638

  14. Molecular characterization of CcpA and involvement of this protein in transcriptional regulation of lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate formate-lyase in the ruminal bacterium Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Narito; Yoshii, Takahiro; Hino, Tsuneo

    2004-09-01

    A ccpA gene that encodes global catabolite control protein A (CcpA) in Streptococcus bovis was identified and characterized, and the involvement of CcpA in transcriptional control of a gene (ldh) encoding lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and a gene (pfl) encoding pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL) was examined. The ccpA gene was shown to be transcribed as a monocistronic operon. A catabolite-responsive element (cre) was found in the promoter region of ccpA, suggesting that ccpA transcription in S. bovis is autogenously regulated. CcpA required HPr that was phosphorylated at the serine residue at position 46 (HPr-[Ser-P]) for binding to the cre site, but glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, and NADP had no effect on binding. Diauxic growth was observed when S. bovis was grown in a medium containing glucose and lactose, but it disappeared when ccpA was disrupted, which indicates that CcpA is involved in catabolite repression in S. bovis. The level of ccpA mRNA was higher when cells were grown on glucose than when they were grown on lactose, which was in line with the level of ldh mRNA. When cells were grown on glucose, the ldh mRNA level was lower but the pfl mRNA level was higher in a ccpA-disrupted mutant than in the parent strain, which suggests that ldh transcription is enhanced and pfl transcription is suppressed by CcpA. The ccpA-disrupted mutant produced less lactate and more formate than the parent, probably because the mutant had reduced LDH activity and elevated PFL activity. In the upper region of both ldh and pfl, a cre-like sequence was found, suggesting that the complex consisting of CcpA and HPr-[Ser-P] binds to the possible cre sites. Thus, CcpA appears to be involved in the global regulation of sugar utilization in S. bovis. PMID:15345406

  15. N5-(1-carboxyethyl)-ornithine, a new amino acid from the intracellular pool of Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J; Curtis, M A; Miller, S P

    1986-01-01

    Intracellular concentrations of amino acids were determined in cells of Streptococcus lactis 133 during growth in complex, spent, and chemically defined media. Glutamic and aspartic acids represented the major constituents of the amino acid pool. However, organisms grown in spent medium or in defined medium supplemented with ornithine also contained unusually high levels of two additional amino acids. One of these amino acids was ornithine. The second compound exhibited properties of a neutral amino acid by coelution with valine from the amino acid analyzer. The compound did not, however, comigrate with valine or any other standard amino acid by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. The unknown amino acid was purified by paper and thin-layer chromatography, and its molecular structure was determined by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This new amino acid was shown to be N5-(1-carboxyethyl)-ornithine. The 14C-labeled compound was formed by cells of S. lactis 133 during growth in spent medium or defined medium containing [14C]ornithine. Formation of the derivative by resting cells required ornithine and the presence of a metabolizable sugar. N5-(1-Carboxyethyl)-ornithine was synthesized chemically from both poly-S-ornithine and (2S)-N2-carbobenzyloxy-ornithine as a 1:1 mixture of two diastereomers. The physical and chemical properties of the amino acid purified from S. lactis 133 were identical to those of one of the synthetic diastereomers. The bis-N-trifluoroacetyl-di-n-butyl esters of the natural and synthetic compounds generated identical gas chromatography-mass spectrometry spectra. A mechanism is suggested for the in vivo synthesis of N5-(1-carboxyethyl)-ornithine, and the possible functions of this new amino acid are discussed. Images PMID:3090017

  16. Influence of clavulanic acid on the activity of amoxicillin against an experimental Streptococcus pneumoniae-Staphylococcus aureus mixed respiratory infection.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G M; Boon, R J; Beale, A S

    1990-01-01

    An experimental respiratory infection caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae was established in weanling rats by intrabronchial instillation. Treatment of this infection with amoxicillin rapidly eliminated the pneumococci from the lung tissue. A beta-lactamase-producing strain of Staphylococcus aureus, when inoculated in a similar manner, did not persist adequately in the lungs long enough to permit a reasonable assessment of the therapy, but staphylococcal survival was extended in the lungs of rats infected 24 h previously with S. pneumoniae. Amoxicillin therapy was relatively ineffective against the pneumococci in this polymicrobial infection and had no effect on the growth of S. aureus. In contrast, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid eliminated the pneumococci from the lung tissue and brought about a reduction in the numbers of staphylococci. The data illustrate the utility of this model for the study of polymicrobial lung infections and demonstrate the role of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid in the treatment of polymicrobial infections involving beta-lactamase-producing bacteria. PMID:2327767

  17. New Real-Time PCR Assay Using Locked Nucleic Acid Probes To Assess Prevalence of ParC Mutations in Fluoroquinolone-Susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from France

    PubMed Central

    Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Methlouthi, Imen; Pina, Patrick; Collignon, Anne; Allouch, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay with locked nucleic acid probes was developed to screen mutations at codons 79 and 83 of the Streptococcus pneumoniae parC gene. Only silent mutations were detected among 236 French invasive fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains. This test could be useful for some high-risk patients or in national surveys. PMID:16569894

  18. Analysis of Small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans under Acid Stress-A New Insight for Caries Research.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shanshan; Tao, Ye; Yu, Lixia; Zhuang, Peilin; Zhi, Qinghui; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Huancai

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is the major clinical pathogen responsible for dental caries. Its acid tolerance has been identified as a significant virulence factor for its survival and cariogenicity in acidic conditions. Small RNAs (sRNAs) are recognized as key regulators of virulence and stress adaptation. Here, we constructed three libraries of sRNAs with small size exposed to acidic conditions for the first time, followed by verification using qRT-PCR. The levels of two sRNAs and target genes predicted to be bioinformatically related to acid tolerance were further evaluated under different acid stress conditions (pH 7.5, 6.5, 5.5, and 4.5) at three time points (0.5, 1, and 2 h). Meanwhile, bacterial growth characteristics and vitality were assessed. We obtained 1879 sRNAs with read counts of at least 100. One hundred and ten sRNAs were perfectly mapped to reported msRNAs in S. mutans. Ten out of 18 sRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. The survival of bacteria declined as the acid was increased from pH 7.5 to 4.5 at each time point. The bacteria can proliferate under each pH except pH 4.5 with time. The levels of sRNAs gradually decreased from pH 7.5 to 5.5, and slightly increased in pH 4.5; however, the expression levels of target mRNAs were up-regulated in acidic conditions than in pH 7.5. These results indicate that some sRNAs are specially induced at acid stress conditions, involving acid adaptation, and provide a new insight into exploring the complex acid tolerance for S. mutans. PMID:27649155

  19. Analysis of Small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans under Acid Stress—A New Insight for Caries Research

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shanshan; Tao, Ye; Yu, Lixia; Zhuang, Peilin; Zhi, Qinghui; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Huancai

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is the major clinical pathogen responsible for dental caries. Its acid tolerance has been identified as a significant virulence factor for its survival and cariogenicity in acidic conditions. Small RNAs (sRNAs) are recognized as key regulators of virulence and stress adaptation. Here, we constructed three libraries of sRNAs with small size exposed to acidic conditions for the first time, followed by verification using qRT-PCR. The levels of two sRNAs and target genes predicted to be bioinformatically related to acid tolerance were further evaluated under different acid stress conditions (pH 7.5, 6.5, 5.5, and 4.5) at three time points (0.5, 1, and 2 h). Meanwhile, bacterial growth characteristics and vitality were assessed. We obtained 1879 sRNAs with read counts of at least 100. One hundred and ten sRNAs were perfectly mapped to reported msRNAs in S. mutans. Ten out of 18 sRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. The survival of bacteria declined as the acid was increased from pH 7.5 to 4.5 at each time point. The bacteria can proliferate under each pH except pH 4.5 with time. The levels of sRNAs gradually decreased from pH 7.5 to 5.5, and slightly increased in pH 4.5; however, the expression levels of target mRNAs were up-regulated in acidic conditions than in pH 7.5. These results indicate that some sRNAs are specially induced at acid stress conditions, involving acid adaptation, and provide a new insight into exploring the complex acid tolerance for S. mutans. PMID:27649155

  20. Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae are economically important Gram positive bacterial pathogens of cultured and wild fish with a worldwide distribution. Both bacteria are potential zoonotic pathogens and have been associated most often with infections in immunocompromised people. Streptococcus in...

  1. Identification of an Arachidonic Acid-Producing Bacterium and Description of Kineococcus arachidonicus sp. nov.

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.

    2001-05-15

    The identification of bacterial with the ability to produce polyunsaturated fatty acids as been limited almost exclusively to gram-negative, psychrophilic, marine microorganisms. Here we describe a new gram-type-positive bactgerium, strain SRS30216T, that produces the polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid, and is neither psychrophilic nor a marine isolate.

  2. Characterization of the sat Operon in Streptococcus mutans: Evidence for a Role of Ffh in Acid Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Bas H. A.; van der Kraan, Marieke; Crowley, Paula J.; Hamilton, Ian R.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Bleiweis, Arnold S.

    2001-01-01

    An essential protein translocation pathway in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis involves the signal recognition particle (SRP), of which the 54-kDa homolog (Ffh) is an essential component. In a previous study, we found that a transposon insertion in the ylxM-ffh intergenic region of the designated secretion and acid tolerance (sat) operon of Streptococcus mutans resulted in an acid-sensitive phenotype. In the present study, we further characterized this genomic region in S. mutans after construction of bonafide sat operon mutants and confirmed the role of the SRP pathway in acid resistance. Northern blot and primer extension analyses identified an acid-inducible promoter upstream of ylxM that was responsible for upregulating the coordinate expression of all five genes of the sat operon when cells were grown at acid pH. Two constitutive promoters, one immediately upstream of satD and one just 3′ to the acid-inducible promoter, were also identified. Except for Ffh, the functions of the sat operon gene products are unknown. SatC, SatD, and SatE have no homology to proteins with known functions, although YlxM may function as a transcriptional regulator linked to genes encoding SRP pathway proteins. Nonpolar mutations created in each of the five genes of the sat locus resulted in viable mutants. Most striking, however, was the finding that a mutation in ffh did not result in loss of cell viability, as is the case in all other microbial species in which this pathway has been described. This mutant also lacked immunologically detectable Ffh and was severely affected in resistance to acid. Complementation of the mutation resulted in restoration of acid tolerance and reappearance of cytoplasmic Ffh. These data provide evidence that the SRP pathway plays an important role in acid tolerance in S. mutans. PMID:11274114

  3. The CovS/CovR Acid Response Regulator Is Required for Intracellular Survival of Group B Streptococcus in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cumley, Nicola J.; Smith, Leanne M.; Anthony, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal meningitis and septicemia. The ability of this organism to survive inside phagocytic cells is poorly understood but thought to be an important step for the establishment of disease in the host. Here, we demonstrate that GBS shows prolonged survival within J774 macrophages and that the capacity to survive is not significantly changed across a diverse range of strains representing different serotypes, multilocus sequence types (MLST), and sites of clinical isolation. Using staining for the lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP) and by pharmacological inhibition of phagosome acidification, we demonstrate that streptococci reside in a phagosome and that acidification of the phagosome is required for GBS to survive intracellularly. Moreover, we show that the GBS two-component system CovS/CovR, which is the major acid response regulator in this organism, is required for survival inside the phagosome. PMID:22331428

  4. Influence of immobilization parameters on growth and lactic acid production by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus co-immobilized in calcium alginate gel beads.

    PubMed

    Garbayo, I; Vílchez, C; Vega, J M; Nava-Saucedo, J E; Barbotin, J N

    2004-12-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus were co-immobilized in different systems with varying calcium (0.1-1.5 M) and alginate (1-2%, w/v) concentrations. Highest lactic acid production was 35 g l(-1) when both bacteria were in high viscosity beads (1%, w/v alginate) hardened in 0.1 M CaCl2 . The gel bead composition affected size and distribution of entrapped lactic acid bacteria.

  5. Fermentation of alfalfa wet-fractionation liquids to volatile fatty acids by Streptococcus bovis and Megasphaera elsdenii.

    PubMed

    Weimer, P J; Digman, M F

    2013-08-01

    "Green juice", obtained by squeezing fresh alfalfa leaves inoculated with lactic acid bacteria, was fermented at room temperature for 7-21 d to obtain 12-47 g lactic acid L(-1). Inoculation of green juice with Streptococcus bovis and incubation at 39°C reduced fermentation time to 8-12h. The resulting "brown juice" from either fermentation had a pH of ∼4.5 and a protein precipitate. Upon adjustment to pH 5.2-6.8 and inoculation with Megasphaera elsdenii, brown juice was fermented within 48 h to up to 18 g of mixed volatile fatty acids (VFA) L(-1). Single-stage fermentation of green juice by both species in coculture typically resulted in overgrowth of S. bovis and acid inhibition of M. elsdenii, inhibiting VFA production. Because the juice fermentations are conducted without sterilization or supplemental nutrients, they can potentially contribute to an integrated process featuring protein recovery and fermentation of fractionated solids to VFA and other products.

  6. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Mohedano, Maria L; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27610104

  7. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Mohedano, Maria L.; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M.; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27610104

  8. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Mohedano, Maria L.; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M.; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation.

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae Senses a Human-like Sialic Acid Profile via the Response Regulator CiaR.

    PubMed

    Hentrich, Karina; Löfling, Jonas; Pathak, Anuj; Nizet, Victor; Varki, Ajit; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta

    2016-09-14

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human-adapted pathogen that encounters terminally sialylated glycoconjugates and free sialic acid (Sia) in the airways. Upon scavenging by the bacterial sialidase NanA, Sias serve as carbon sources for the bacteria. Unlike most animals in which cytidine-monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH) converts Sia N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) into N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), humans have an inactive CMAH, causing an absence of Neu5Gc and excess Neu5Ac. We find that pneumococcal challenge in Cmah(-/-) mice leads to heightened bacterial loads, virulence, and NanA expression. In vitro, NanA is upregulated in response to Neu5Ac compared with Neu5Gc, a process controlled by the two-component response regulator CiaR and requiring Sia uptake by the transporter SatABC. Additionally, compared with Neu5Gc, Neu5Ac increases pneumococcal resistance to antimicrobial reactive oxygen species in a CiaR-dependent manner. Thus, S. pneumoniae senses and responds to Neu5Ac, leading to CiaR activation and increased virulence and potentially explaining the greater susceptibility in humans. PMID:27593514

  10. A novel algicide: evidence of the effect of a fatty acid compound from the marine bacterium, Vibrio sp. BS02 on the harmful dinoflagellate, Alexandrium tamarense.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Zhang, Huajun; Fu, Lijun; An, Xinli; Zhang, Bangzhou; Li, Yi; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Yi, Lin; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-01-01

    Alexandrium tamarense is a notorious bloom-forming dinoflagellate, which adversely impacts water quality and human health. In this study we present a new algicide against A. tamarense, which was isolated from the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. BS02. MALDI-TOF-MS, NMR and algicidal activity analysis reveal that this compound corresponds to palmitoleic acid, which shows algicidal activity against A. tamarense with an EC50 of 40 μg/mL. The effects of palmitoleic acid on the growth of other algal species were also studied. The results indicate that palmitoleic acid has potential for selective control of the Harmful algal blooms (HABs). Over extended periods of contact, transmission electron microscopy shows severe ultrastructural damage to the algae at 40 μg/mL concentrations of palmitoleic acid. All of these results indicate potential for controlling HABs by using the special algicidal bacterium and its active agent. PMID:24626054

  11. A novel algicide: evidence of the effect of a fatty acid compound from the marine bacterium, Vibrio sp. BS02 on the harmful dinoflagellate, Alexandrium tamarense.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Zhang, Huajun; Fu, Lijun; An, Xinli; Zhang, Bangzhou; Li, Yi; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Yi, Lin; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-01-01

    Alexandrium tamarense is a notorious bloom-forming dinoflagellate, which adversely impacts water quality and human health. In this study we present a new algicide against A. tamarense, which was isolated from the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. BS02. MALDI-TOF-MS, NMR and algicidal activity analysis reveal that this compound corresponds to palmitoleic acid, which shows algicidal activity against A. tamarense with an EC50 of 40 μg/mL. The effects of palmitoleic acid on the growth of other algal species were also studied. The results indicate that palmitoleic acid has potential for selective control of the Harmful algal blooms (HABs). Over extended periods of contact, transmission electron microscopy shows severe ultrastructural damage to the algae at 40 μg/mL concentrations of palmitoleic acid. All of these results indicate potential for controlling HABs by using the special algicidal bacterium and its active agent.

  12. A Novel Algicide: Evidence of the Effect of a Fatty Acid Compound from the Marine Bacterium, Vibrio sp. BS02 on the Harmful Dinoflagellate, Alexandrium tamarense

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lijun; An, Xinli; Zhang, Bangzhou; Li, Yi; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Yi, Lin; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-01-01

    Alexandrium tamarense is a notorious bloom-forming dinoflagellate, which adversely impacts water quality and human health. In this study we present a new algicide against A. tamarense, which was isolated from the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. BS02. MALDI-TOF-MS, NMR and algicidal activity analysis reveal that this compound corresponds to palmitoleic acid, which shows algicidal activity against A. tamarense with an EC50 of 40 μg/mL. The effects of palmitoleic acid on the growth of other algal species were also studied. The results indicate that palmitoleic acid has potential for selective control of the Harmful algal blooms (HABs). Over extended periods of contact, transmission electron microscopy shows severe ultrastructural damage to the algae at 40 μg/mL concentrations of palmitoleic acid. All of these results indicate potential for controlling HABs by using the special algicidal bacterium and its active agent. PMID:24626054

  13. Tryptophan, thiamine and indole-3-acetic acid exchange between Chlorella sorokiniana and the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Oskar A; Gomez-Anduro, Gracia; Bashan, Yoav; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2016-06-01

    During synthetic mutualistic interactions between the microalga Chlorella sorokiniana and the plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Azospirillum brasilense, mutual exchange of resources involved in producing and releasing the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) by the bacterium, using tryptophan and thiamine released by the microalga, were measured. Although increased activities of tryptophan synthase in C. sorokiniana and indole pyruvate decarboxylase (IPDC) in A. brasilense were observed, we could not detect tryptophan or IAA in the culture medium when both organisms were co-immobilized. This indicates that no extra tryptophan or IAA is produced, apart from the quantities required to sustain the interaction. Over-expression of the ipdC gene occurs at different incubation times: after 48 h, when A. brasilense was immobilized alone and grown in exudates of C. sorokiniana and at 96 h, when A. brasilense was co-immobilized with the microalga. When A. brasilense was cultured in exudates of C. sorokiniana, increased expression of the ipdC gene, corresponding increase in activity of IPDC encoded by the ipdC gene, and increase in IAA production were measured during the first 48 h of incubation. IAA production and release by A. brasilense was found only when tryptophan and thiamine were present in a synthetic growth medium (SGM). The absence of thiamine in SGM yielded no detectable IAA. In summary, this study demonstrates that C. sorokiniana can exude sufficient tryptophan and thiamine to allow IAA production by a PGPB during their interaction. Thiamine is essential for IAA production by A. brasilense and these three metabolites are part of a communication between the two microorganisms.

  14. EndoS from Streptococcus pyogenes is hydrolyzed by the cysteine proteinase SpeB and requires glutamic acid 235 and tryptophans for IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity

    PubMed Central

    Allhorn, Maria; Olsén, Arne; Collin, Mattias

    2008-01-01

    Background The endoglycosidase EndoS and the cysteine proteinase SpeB from the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes are functionally related in that they both hydrolyze IgG leading to impairment of opsonizing antibodies and thus enhance bacterial survival in human blood. In this study, we further investigated the relationship between EndoS and SpeB by examining their in vitro temporal production and stability and activity of EndoS. Furthermore, theoretical structure modeling of EndoS combined with site-directed mutagenesis and chemical blocking of amino acids was used to identify amino acids required for the IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity of EndoS. Results We could show that during growth in vitro S. pyogenes secretes the IgG glycan-hydrolyzing endoglycosidase EndoS prior to the cysteine proteinase SpeB. Upon maturation SpeB hydrolyzes EndoS that then loses its IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity. Sequence analysis and structural homology modeling of EndoS provided a basis for further analysis of the prerequisites for IgG glycan-hydrolysis. Site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification of amino acids revealed that glutamic acid 235 is an essential catalytic residue, and that tryptophan residues, but not the abundant lysine or the single cysteine residues, are important for EndoS activity. Conclusion We present novel information about the amino acid requirements for IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity of the immunomodulating enzyme EndoS. Furthermore, we show that the cysteine proteinase SpeB processes/degrades EndoS and thus emphasize the importance of the SpeB as a degrading/processing enzyme of proteins from the bacterium itself. PMID:18182097

  15. Crystal structure of Streptococcus pneumoniae acyl carrier protein synthase: an essential enzyme in bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Briggs, Steven L.; McAllister, Kelly A.; Fischl, Anthony S.; Zhao, Genshi

    2000-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) catalyzes the formation of holo-ACP, which mediates the essential transfer of acyl fatty acid intermediates during the biosynthesis of fatty acids and lipids in the cell. Thus, AcpS plays an important role in bacterial fatty acid and lipid biosynthesis, making it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. We have determined, for the first time, the crystal structure of the Streptococcus pneumoniae AcpS and AcpS complexed with 3′5′-ADP, a product of AcpS, at 2.0 and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively. The crystal structure reveals an α/β fold and shows that AcpS assembles as a tightly packed functional trimer, with a non-crystallographic pseudo-symmetric 3-fold axis, which contains three active sites at the interface between protomers. Only two active sites are occupied by the ligand molecules. Although there is virtually no sequence similarity between the S.pneumoniae AcpS and the Bacillus subtilis Sfp transferase, a striking structural similarity between both enzymes was observed. These data provide a starting point for structure-based drug design efforts towards the identification of AcpS inhibitors with potent antibacterial activity. PMID:11032795

  16. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Oguchi, Riyo; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2) of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N) or Arg365 to Asn (R365N) substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins. PMID:27101147

  17. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Oguchi, Riyo; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2) of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N) or Arg365 to Asn (R365N) substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins. PMID:27101147

  18. Complete genome sequence of Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, an efficient L-(+)-lactic acid-producing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yanase, Hiroaki; Hirose, Yuu; Satomi, Shohei; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Watanabe, Satoru; Zendo, Takeshi; Chibazakura, Taku; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, a non-dairy bacterial strain of ovine faecal origin, can ferment both cellobiose and xylose to produce l-lactic acid. The use of this strain is highly desirable for economical l-lactate production from renewable biomass substrates. Genome sequence determination is necessary for the genetic improvement of this strain. We report the complete genome sequence of strain QU 25, primarily determined using Pacific Biosciences sequencing technology. The E. mundtii QU 25 genome comprises a 3 022 186-bp single circular chromosome (GC content, 38.6%) and five circular plasmids: pQY182, pQY082, pQY039, pQY024, and pQY003. In all, 2900 protein-coding sequences, 63 tRNA genes, and 6 rRNA operons were predicted in the QU 25 chromosome. Plasmid pQY024 harbours genes for mundticin production. We found that strain QU 25 produces a bacteriocin, suggesting that mundticin-encoded genes on plasmid pQY024 were functional. For lactic acid fermentation, two gene clusters were identified-one involved in the initial metabolism of xylose and uptake of pentose and the second containing genes for the pentose phosphate pathway and uptake of related sugars. This is the first complete genome sequence of an E. mundtii strain. The data provide insights into lactate production in this bacterium and its evolution among enterococci.

  19. Transcription of the Streptococcus pyogenes hyaluronic acid capsule biosynthesis operon is regulated by previously unknown upstream elements.

    PubMed

    Falaleeva, Marina; Zurek, Oliwia W; Watkins, Robert L; Reed, Robert W; Ali, Hadeel; Sumby, Paul; Voyich, Jovanka M; Korotkova, Natalia

    2014-12-01

    The important human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) produces a hyaluronic acid (HA) capsule that plays critical roles in immune evasion. Previous studies showed that the hasABC operon encoding the capsule biosynthesis enzymes is under the control of a single promoter, P1, which is negatively regulated by the two-component regulatory system CovR/S. In this work, we characterize the sequence upstream of P1 and identify a novel regulatory region controlling transcription of the capsule biosynthesis operon in the M1 serotype strain MGAS2221. This region consists of a promoter, P2, which initiates transcription of a novel small RNA, HasS, an intrinsic transcriptional terminator that inefficiently terminates HasS, permitting read-through transcription of hasABC, and a putative promoter which lies upstream of P2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and transcriptional reporter data identified CovR as a negative regulator of P2. We found that the P1 and P2 promoters are completely repressed by CovR, and capsule expression is regulated by the putative promoter upstream of P2. Deletion of hasS or of the terminator eliminates CovR-binding sequences, relieving repression and increasing read-through, hasA transcription, and capsule production. Sequence analysis of 44 GAS genomes revealed a high level of polymorphism in the HasS sequence region. Most of the HasS variations were located in the terminator sequences, suggesting that this region is under strong selective pressure. We discovered that the terminator deletion mutant is highly resistant to neutrophil-mediated killing and is significantly more virulent in a mouse model of GAS invasive disease than the wild-type strain. Together, these results are consistent with the naturally occurring mutations in this region modulating GAS virulence.

  20. Transcription of the Streptococcus pyogenes Hyaluronic Acid Capsule Biosynthesis Operon Is Regulated by Previously Unknown Upstream Elements

    PubMed Central

    Falaleeva, Marina; Zurek, Oliwia W.; Watkins, Robert L.; Reed, Robert W.; Ali, Hadeel; Sumby, Paul; Voyich, Jovanka M.

    2014-01-01

    The important human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) produces a hyaluronic acid (HA) capsule that plays critical roles in immune evasion. Previous studies showed that the hasABC operon encoding the capsule biosynthesis enzymes is under the control of a single promoter, P1, which is negatively regulated by the two-component regulatory system CovR/S. In this work, we characterize the sequence upstream of P1 and identify a novel regulatory region controlling transcription of the capsule biosynthesis operon in the M1 serotype strain MGAS2221. This region consists of a promoter, P2, which initiates transcription of a novel small RNA, HasS, an intrinsic transcriptional terminator that inefficiently terminates HasS, permitting read-through transcription of hasABC, and a putative promoter which lies upstream of P2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and transcriptional reporter data identified CovR as a negative regulator of P2. We found that the P1 and P2 promoters are completely repressed by CovR, and capsule expression is regulated by the putative promoter upstream of P2. Deletion of hasS or of the terminator eliminates CovR-binding sequences, relieving repression and increasing read-through, hasA transcription, and capsule production. Sequence analysis of 44 GAS genomes revealed a high level of polymorphism in the HasS sequence region. Most of the HasS variations were located in the terminator sequences, suggesting that this region is under strong selective pressure. We discovered that the terminator deletion mutant is highly resistant to neutrophil-mediated killing and is significantly more virulent in a mouse model of GAS invasive disease than the wild-type strain. Together, these results are consistent with the naturally occurring mutations in this region modulating GAS virulence. PMID:25287924

  1. Simultaneous saccharification and high titer lactic acid fermentation of corn stover using a newly isolated lactic acid bacterium Pediococcus acidilactici DQ2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Qiao, Qingan; Chu, Deqiang; Gu, Hanqi; Dao, Thai Ha; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2013-05-01

    A lactic acid bacterium with high tolerance of temperature and lignocellulose derived inhibitor was isolated and characterized as Pediococcus acidilactici DQ2. The strain used in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) for high titer lactic acid production at the high solids loading of corn stover. Corn stover was pretreated using the dry sulphuric acid pretreatment, followed by a biological detoxification to remove the inhibitors produced in the pretreatment. The bioreactor with a novel helical impeller was used to the SSF operation of the pretreated and biodetoxified corn stover. The results show that a typical SSF operation at 48 °C, pH 5.5, and near 30% (w/w) solids loading in both 5 and 50 L bioreactors was demonstrated. The lactic acid titer, yield, and productivity reached 101.9 g/L, 77.2%, and 1.06 g/L/h, respectively. The result provided a practical process option for cellulosic lactic acid production using virgin agriculture lignocellulose residues.

  2. Catabolism of N-acetylneuraminic acid, a fitness function of the food-borne lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus sakei, involves two newly characterized proteins.

    PubMed

    Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Chaillou, Stéphane; Zagorec, Monique; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    2013-03-01

    In silico analysis of the genome sequence of the meat-borne lactic acid bacterium (LAB) Lactobacillus sakei 23K has revealed a repertoire of potential functions related to the adaptation of this bacterium to the meat environment. Among these functions, the ability to use N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (NANA) as a carbon source could provide a competitive advantage for growth on meat in which this amino sugar is present. In this work, we proposed to analyze the functionality of a gene cluster encompassing nanTEAR and nanK (nanTEAR-nanK). We established that this cluster encoded a pathway allowing transport and early steps of the catabolism of NANA in this genome. We also demonstrated that this cluster was absent from the genome of other L. sakei strains that were shown to be unable to grow on NANA. Moreover, L. sakei 23K nanA, nanT, nanK, and nanE genes were able to complement Escherichia coli mutants. Construction of different mutants in L. sakei 23K ΔnanR, ΔnanT, and ΔnanK and the double mutant L. sakei 23K Δ(nanA-nanE) made it possible to show that all were impaired for growth on NANA. In addition, two genes located downstream from nanK, lsa1644 and lsa1645, are involved in the catabolism of sialic acid in L. sakei 23K, as a L. sakei 23K Δlsa1645 mutant was no longer able to grow on NANA. All these results demonstrate that the gene cluster nanTEAR-nanK-lsa1644-lsa1645 is indeed involved in the use of NANA as an energy source by L. sakei.

  3. [Screening and identification of indoleacetic acid producing endophytic bacterium in Panax ginseng].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun; Tian, Lei; Chen, Chang-qing; Zhang, Guan-jun; Li, Tong; Chen, Jing-xiu; Wang, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria which was producing indoleacetic acid was screened from Panax ginseng by using the Salkowski method. The active strain was also tested for its ability of nitrogen fixation by using the Ashby agar plates, the PKV plates and quantitative analysis of Mo-Sb-Ascrobiology acid colorimetry was used to measure its ability of phosphate solubilization, for its ability of potassium solubilization the silicate medium and flame spectrophotometry was used, for its ability of producing siderophores the method detecting CAS was used, for its ability of producing ACC deaminase the Alpha ketone butyric acid method was applied. And the effect on promoting growth of seed by active strain was tested. The results showed that the indoleacetic acid producing strain of JJ5-2 was obtained from 118 endophytes, which the content of indoleacetic acid was 10.2 mg x L(-1). The JJ5-2 strain also had characteristics of phosphate and potassium solubilization, nitrogen fixation, producing siderophores traits, and the promoting germination of ginseng seeds. The JJ5-2 strain was identified as Bacillus thuringiensis by analyzing morphology, physiological and biochemical properties and 16S rRNA gene sequences. PMID:26080547

  4. Gluconacetobacter kakiaceti sp. nov., an acetic acid bacterium isolated from a traditional Japanese fruit vinegar.

    PubMed

    Iino, Takao; Suzuki, Rei; Tanaka, Naoto; Kosako, Yoshimasa; Ohkuma, Moriya; Komagata, Kazuo; Uchimura, Tai

    2012-07-01

    Two novel acetic acid bacteria, strains G5-1(T) and I5-1, were isolated from traditional kaki vinegar (produced from fruits of kaki, Diospyros kaki Thunb.), collected in Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strains G5-1(T) and I5-1 formed a distinct subline in the genus Gluconacetobacter and were closely related to Gluconacetobacter swingsii DST GL01(T) (99.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The isolates showed 96-100% DNA-DNA relatedness with each other, but <53% DNA-DNA relatedness with closely related members of the genus Gluconacetobacter. The isolates could be distinguished from closely related members of the genus Gluconacetobacter by not producing 2- and 5-ketogluconic acids from glucose, producing cellulose, growing without acetic acid and with 30% (w/v) d-glucose, and producing acid from sugars and alcohols. Furthermore, the genomic DNA G+C contents of strains G5-1(T) and I5-1 were a little higher than those of their closest phylogenetic neighbours. On the basis of the phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic position, strains G5-1(T) and I5-1 are assigned to a novel species, for which the name Gluconacetobacter kakiaceti sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is G5-1(T) (=JCM 25156(T)=NRIC 0798(T)=LMG 26206(T)).

  5. Gluconic acid production and phosphate solubilization by the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Hilda; Gonzalez, Tania; Goire, Isabel; Bashan, Yoav

    2004-11-01

    In vitro gluconic acid formation and phosphate solubilization from sparingly soluble phosphorus sources by two strains of the plant growth-promoting bacteria A. brasilense (Cd and 8-I) and one strain of A. lipoferum JA4 were studied. Strains of A. brasilense were capable of producing gluconic acid when grown in sparingly soluble calcium phosphate medium when their usual fructose carbon source is amended with glucose. At the same time, there is a reduction in pH of the medium and release of soluble phosphate. To a greater extent, gluconic acid production and pH reduction were observed for A. lipoferum JA4. For the three strains, clearing halos were detected on solid medium plates with calcium phosphate. This is the first report of in vitro gluconic acid production and direct phosphate solubilization by A. brasilense and the first report of P solubilization by A. lipoferum. This adds to the very broad spectrum of plant growth-promoting abilities of this genus.

  6. Gluconacetobacter maltaceti sp. nov., a novel vinegar producing acetic acid bacterium.

    PubMed

    Slapšak, Nina; Cleenwerck, Ilse; De Vos, Paul; Trček, Janja

    2013-02-01

    Comparison of HaeIII- and HpaII-restriction profiles of PCR-amplified 16S-23S rDNA ITS regions of Gluconacetobacter sp. LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 with restriction profiles of reference strains of acetic acid bacteria described by Trček and Teuber [34] revealed the same but unique restriction profiles for LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109. Further analyses of nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequences, nearly complete 16S-23S rDNA ITS sequences, as well as concatenated partial sequences of the housekeeping genes dnaK, groEL and rpoB, allocated both strains to a single phylogenetic cluster well separated from the other species of the genus Gluconacetobacter. DNA-DNA hybridizations confirmed their novel species identity by 73% DNA-DNA relatedness between both strains, and values below the species level (<70%) between SKU 1109 and the type strains of the closest phylogenetic neighbors. The classification of strains LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 into a single novel species was confirmed also by AFLP and (GTG)(5)-PCR DNA fingerprinting data, as well as by phenotypic data. Strains LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 can be differentiated from their closely related Gluconacetobacter species, Gluconacetobacter entanii and Gluconacetobacter hansenii, by their ability to form 2-keto-d-gluconic acid from d-glucose, their ability to use d-mannitol, d-gluconate and glycerol as carbon source and form acid from d-fructose, and their ability to grow without acetic acid. The major fatty acid of LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 is C(18:1ω7c) (60.2-64.8%). The DNA G+C content of LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 is 62.5 and 63.3mol% respectively. The name Gluconacetobacter maltaceti sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LMG 1529(T) (=NBRC 14815(T)=NCIMB 8752(T)).

  7. Clostridium aciditolerans sp. nov., an acid-tolerant spore-forming anaerobic bacterium from constructed wetland sediment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Jin; Romanek, Christopher S; Wiegel, Juergen

    2007-02-01

    An obligately anaerobic, spore-forming, moderately acid-tolerant bacterium, strain JW/YJL-B3T, was isolated from a sediment sample from a constructed wetland system receiving acid sulfate water. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate belonged to the Firmicutes branch with Clostridium drakei SL1T (96.2 % gene sequence similarity) as its closest relative. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 30.8 mol% (HPLC). Cells were straight to curved rods, 0.5-1.0 microm in diameter and 3.0-9.0 microm in length. The temperature range for growth was 20-45 degrees C, with an optimum around 35 degrees C. Growth was not detected below 18 degrees C or above 47 degrees C. The pH range for growth was broad, pH(25 degrees C) 3.8-8.9, with an optimum at 7.0-7.5. However at pH 4.5, the strain grew at 52 % of the optimal growth rate. The salinity range was 0-1.5 % NaCl (w/v). Strain JW/YJL-B3T utilized beef extract, Casamino acids, peptone, tryptone, arabinose, cellobiose, fructose, galactose, glucose, lactose, maltose, mannose, raffinose, ribose, sucrose, xylose, pyruvate, glutamate and inulin as a carbon and energy source. There were no indications of growth under aerobic or autotrophic conditions. The isolate produced acetate, butyrate and ethanol as fermentation end products from glucose. Based on these characteristics and other physiological properties, the isolate is placed into the novel taxon, Clostridium aciditolerans sp. nov., with strain JW/YJL-B3T (=DSM 17425T=ATCC BAA-1220T) as the type strain.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae PR06

    PubMed Central

    MZ, Irma Syakina; Teh, L. K.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) is a Gram-positive bacterium that was first recognized as a causative agent of bovine mastitis. S. agalactiae has subsequently emerged as a significant cause of human diseases. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of S. agalactiae PR06, which was isolated from a septicemic patient in a local hospital in Malaysia. PMID:23766409

  9. The Sialic Acid Binding Protein, Hsa, in Streptococcus gordonii DL1 also Mediates Intergeneric Coaggregation with Veillonella Species

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Liu, Jinman; Li, Xiaoli; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Qi, Fengxia

    2015-01-01

    Dental biofilm development involves initial colonization of the tooth’s surface by pioneer colonizers, followed by cell-cell coaggregation between the pioneer and later colonizers. Streptococcus gordonii is one of the pioneer colonizers. In addition to its role in oral biofilm development, S. gordonii also is a pathogen in infective endocarditis in susceptible humans. A surface adhesin, Hsa, has been shown to play a critical role in colonization of S. gordonii on the heart tissue; however, its role in oral biofilm development has not been reported. In this study we demonstrate that Hsa is essential for coaggregation between S. gordonii and Veillonella sp., which are bridging species connecting the pioneer colonizers to the late colonizers. Interestingly, the same domains shown to be required for Hsa binding to sialic acid on the human cell surface are also required for coaggregation with Veillonella sp. However, sialic acid appeared not to be required for this intergeneric coaggregation. This result suggests that although the same domains of Hsa are involved in binding to eukaryotic as well as Veillonella cells, the binding mechanism is different. The gene expression pattern of hsa was also studied and shown not to be induced by coaggregation with Veillonella sp. PMID:26606595

  10. The Sialic Acid Binding Protein, Hsa, in Streptococcus gordonii DL1 also Mediates Intergeneric Coaggregation with Veillonella Species.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Liu, Jinman; Li, Xiaoli; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Qi, Fengxia

    2015-01-01

    Dental biofilm development involves initial colonization of the tooth's surface by pioneer colonizers, followed by cell-cell coaggregation between the pioneer and later colonizers. Streptococcus gordonii is one of the pioneer colonizers. In addition to its role in oral biofilm development, S. gordonii also is a pathogen in infective endocarditis in susceptible humans. A surface adhesin, Hsa, has been shown to play a critical role in colonization of S. gordonii on the heart tissue; however, its role in oral biofilm development has not been reported. In this study we demonstrate that Hsa is essential for coaggregation between S. gordonii and Veillonella sp., which are bridging species connecting the pioneer colonizers to the late colonizers. Interestingly, the same domains shown to be required for Hsa binding to sialic acid on the human cell surface are also required for coaggregation with Veillonella sp. However, sialic acid appeared not to be required for this intergeneric coaggregation. This result suggests that although the same domains of Hsa are involved in binding to eukaryotic as well as Veillonella cells, the binding mechanism is different. The gene expression pattern of hsa was also studied and shown not to be induced by coaggregation with Veillonella sp. PMID:26606595

  11. Bombella intestini gen. nov., sp. nov., an acetic acid bacterium isolated from bumble bee crop.

    PubMed

    Li, Leilei; Praet, Jessy; Borremans, Wim; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Meeus, Ivan; Smagghe, Guy; De Vuyst, Luc; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In the frame of a bumble bee gut microbiota study, acetic acid bacteria (AAB) were isolated using a combination of direct isolation methods and enrichment procedures. MALDI-TOF MS profiling of the isolates and a comparison of these profiles with profiles of established AAB species identified most isolates as Asaia astilbis or as 'Commensalibacter intestini', except for two isolates (R-52486 and LMG 28161(T)) that showed an identical profile. A nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain LMG 28161(T) was determined and showed the highest pairwise similarity to Saccharibacter floricola S-877(T) (96.5%), which corresponded with genus level divergence in the family Acetobacteraceae. Isolate LMG 28161(T) was subjected to whole-genome shotgun sequencing; a 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence as well as partial sequences of the housekeeping genes dnaK, groEL and rpoB were extracted for phylogenetic analyses. The obtained data confirmed that this isolate is best classified into a new genus in the family Acetobacteraceae. The DNA G+C content of strain LMG 28161(T) was 54.9 mol%. The fatty acid compositions of isolates R-52486 and LMG 28161(T) were similar to those of established AAB species [with C18:1ω7c (43.1%) as the major component], but the amounts of fatty acids such as C19:0 cyclo ω8c, C14:0 and C14:0 2-OH enabled to differentiate them. The major ubiquinone was Q-10. Both isolates could also be differentiated from the known genera of AAB by means of biochemical characteristics, such as their inability to oxidize ethanol to acetic acid, negligible acid production from melibiose, and notable acid production from d-fructose, sucrose and d-mannitol. In addition, they produced 2-keto-d-gluconate, but not 5-keto-d-gluconate from d-glucose. Therefore, the name Bombella intestini gen nov., sp. nov. is proposed for this new taxon, with LMG 28161(T) ( =DSM 28636(T) =R-52487(T)) as the type strain of the type species.

  12. Bombella intestini gen. nov., sp. nov., an acetic acid bacterium isolated from bumble bee crop.

    PubMed

    Li, Leilei; Praet, Jessy; Borremans, Wim; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Meeus, Ivan; Smagghe, Guy; De Vuyst, Luc; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In the frame of a bumble bee gut microbiota study, acetic acid bacteria (AAB) were isolated using a combination of direct isolation methods and enrichment procedures. MALDI-TOF MS profiling of the isolates and a comparison of these profiles with profiles of established AAB species identified most isolates as Asaia astilbis or as 'Commensalibacter intestini', except for two isolates (R-52486 and LMG 28161(T)) that showed an identical profile. A nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain LMG 28161(T) was determined and showed the highest pairwise similarity to Saccharibacter floricola S-877(T) (96.5%), which corresponded with genus level divergence in the family Acetobacteraceae. Isolate LMG 28161(T) was subjected to whole-genome shotgun sequencing; a 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence as well as partial sequences of the housekeeping genes dnaK, groEL and rpoB were extracted for phylogenetic analyses. The obtained data confirmed that this isolate is best classified into a new genus in the family Acetobacteraceae. The DNA G+C content of strain LMG 28161(T) was 54.9 mol%. The fatty acid compositions of isolates R-52486 and LMG 28161(T) were similar to those of established AAB species [with C18:1ω7c (43.1%) as the major component], but the amounts of fatty acids such as C19:0 cyclo ω8c, C14:0 and C14:0 2-OH enabled to differentiate them. The major ubiquinone was Q-10. Both isolates could also be differentiated from the known genera of AAB by means of biochemical characteristics, such as their inability to oxidize ethanol to acetic acid, negligible acid production from melibiose, and notable acid production from d-fructose, sucrose and d-mannitol. In addition, they produced 2-keto-d-gluconate, but not 5-keto-d-gluconate from d-glucose. Therefore, the name Bombella intestini gen nov., sp. nov. is proposed for this new taxon, with LMG 28161(T) ( =DSM 28636(T) =R-52487(T)) as the type strain of the type species. PMID:25336723

  13. Diversity of Heteropolysaccharide-Producing Lactic Acid Bacterium Strains and Their Biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Mozzi, Fernanda; Vaningelgem, Frederik; Hébert, Elvira María; Van der Meulen, Roel; Foulquié Moreno, María Remedios; Font de Valdez, Graciela; De Vuyst, Luc

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-one lactic acid bacterial strains from different species were evaluated for exopolysaccharide (EPS) production in milk. Thermophilic strains produced more EPS than mesophilic ones, but EPS yields were generally low. Ropiness or capsular polysaccharide formation was strain dependent. Six strains produced high-molecular-mass EPS. Polymers were classified into nine groups on the basis of their monomer composition. EPS from Enterococcus strains were isolated and characterized. PMID:16751563

  14. Reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions by the facultative Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum

    SciTech Connect

    David E. Cummings; Scott Fendorf; Rajesh K. Sani; Brent M. Peyton; Timothy S. Magnuson

    2007-01-01

    The potential for biological reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions was evaluated with the acidophilic, facultatively metal-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum strain JF-5 to explore the role of acidophilic microorganisms in the Cr cycle in low-pH environments. An anaerobic suspension of washed A. cryptum cells rapidly reduced 50 M Cr(VI) at pH 3.2; biological reduction was detected from pH 1.7-4.7. The reduction product, confirmed by XANES analysis, was entirely Cr(III) that was associated predominantly with the cell biomass (70-80%) with the residual residing in the aqueous phase. Reduction of Cr(VI) showed a pH optimum similar to that for growth and was inhibited by 5 mM HgCl2, suggesting that the reaction was enzyme-mediated. Introduction of O2 into the reaction medium slowed the reduction rate only slightly, whereas soluble Fe(III) (as ferric sulfate) increased the rate dramatically, presumably by the shuttling of electrons from bioreduced Fe(II) to Cr(VI) in a coupled biotic-abiotic cycle. Starved cells could not reduce Cr(VI) when provided as sole electron acceptor, indicating that Cr(VI) reduction is not an energy-conserving process in A. cryptum. We speculate, rather, that Cr(VI) reduction is used here as a detoxification mechanism.

  15. Lactococcus piscium: a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium with bioprotective or spoilage activity in food-a review.

    PubMed

    Saraoui, T; Leroi, F; Björkroth, J; Pilet, M F

    2016-10-01

    The genus Lactococcus comprises 12 species, some known for decades and others more recently described. Lactococcus piscium, isolated in 1990 from rainbow trout, is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium, probably disregarded because most of the strains are unable to grow at 30°C. During the last 10 years, this species has been isolated from a large variety of food: meat, seafood and vegetables, mostly packed under vacuum (VP) or modified atmosphere (MAP) and stored at chilled temperature. Recently, culture-independent techniques used for characterization of microbial ecosystems have highlighted the importance of Lc. piscium in food. Its role in food spoilage varies according to the strain and the food matrix. However, most studies have indicated that Lc. piscium spoils meat, whereas it does not degrade the sensory properties of seafood. Lactococcus piscium strains have a large antimicrobial spectrum, including Gram-positive and negative bacteria. In various seafoods, some strains have a protective effect against spoilage and can extend the sensory shelf-life of the products. They can also inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, by a cell-to-cell contact-dependent. This article reviews the physiological and genomic characteristics of Lc. piscium and discusses its spoilage or protective activities in food.

  16. Lactococcus piscium: a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium with bioprotective or spoilage activity in food-a review.

    PubMed

    Saraoui, T; Leroi, F; Björkroth, J; Pilet, M F

    2016-10-01

    The genus Lactococcus comprises 12 species, some known for decades and others more recently described. Lactococcus piscium, isolated in 1990 from rainbow trout, is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium, probably disregarded because most of the strains are unable to grow at 30°C. During the last 10 years, this species has been isolated from a large variety of food: meat, seafood and vegetables, mostly packed under vacuum (VP) or modified atmosphere (MAP) and stored at chilled temperature. Recently, culture-independent techniques used for characterization of microbial ecosystems have highlighted the importance of Lc. piscium in food. Its role in food spoilage varies according to the strain and the food matrix. However, most studies have indicated that Lc. piscium spoils meat, whereas it does not degrade the sensory properties of seafood. Lactococcus piscium strains have a large antimicrobial spectrum, including Gram-positive and negative bacteria. In various seafoods, some strains have a protective effect against spoilage and can extend the sensory shelf-life of the products. They can also inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, by a cell-to-cell contact-dependent. This article reviews the physiological and genomic characteristics of Lc. piscium and discusses its spoilage or protective activities in food. PMID:27172050

  17. Identification of Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus salivarius in clinical laboratories.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L; Ferraro, M J; Holden, J; Kunz, L J

    1984-01-01

    Streptococci identified as Streptococcus bovis, S. bovis variant, and Streptococcus salivarius were examined with respect to physiological and serological characteristics and cellular fatty acid content. Similarities in physiological reactions and problems encountered in serological analysis were noted, suggesting that an expanded battery of physiological tests is needed to definitively identify these streptococci. Cellular fatty acid analysis provided an accurate method for distinguishing S. salivarius from S. bovis and S. bovis variant. PMID:6490816

  18. Lactococcus fujiensis sp. nov., a lactic acid bacterium isolated from vegetable matter.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yimin; Yang, Jinsong; Pang, Huili; Kitahara, Maki

    2011-07-01

    Three strains of lactic acid bacteria, designated NJ 317(T), NJ 414 and NJ 415, were isolated from the outer leaves of Chinese cabbages (Brassica rapa L. var. glabra Regel) and characterized taxonomically. The strains were gram-reaction-positive, catalase-negative, facultatively anaerobic cocci that did not produce gas from glucose and formed L-lactic acid. The major fatty acids were C(18 : 1)ω9c, C(16 : 0), C(14 : 0) and summed feature 10. Morphological, physiological and phylogenetic data indicated that the strains belonged to the genus Lactococcus. These strains shared similar phenotypic characteristics and exhibited DNA relatedness values >96.6 % to each other, indicating that they represent a single species. The DNA G+C contents of the three strains were 42.1-42.5 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequences of the novel strains were determined and aligned with those of other species of the genus Lactococcus. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis the three strains grouped with other members of the genus Lactococcus. Lactococcus lactis and Lactococcus garvieae were the most closely related species, sharing a sequence similarity value of 94.4 % with the three strains. Ribotyping patterns, however, revealed that these strains were well-separated from reference strains of species of the genus Lactococcus and DNA-DNA hybridization studies indicated that the novel strains had low levels (<20.2 %) of DNA relatedness with reference strains of L. lactis, L. garvieae and other type strains of previously described species, showing that they represent a different species. Based on this evidence, strains NJ 317(T), NJ 414 and NJ 415 represent a novel species of the genus Lactococcus, for which the name Lactococcus fujiensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NJ 317(T) ( = JCM16395(T)  = CGMCC 1.10453(T)).

  19. Lactic acid bacterium and yeast microbiotas of sixteen French traditional sourdoughs.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, Emilie; Lattanzi, Anna; Dousset, Xavier; Minervini, Fabio; De Angelis, Maria; Lacaze, Guylaine; Onno, Bernard; Gobbetti, Marco

    2015-12-23

    Sixteen sourdoughs (FS1-FS16) used for the manufacture of traditional French breads were characterized by strongly acid conditions (median value of pH 3.5). The concentration of free amino acids (FAA) was highly variable, due to different proteolytic activity of flour used for back slopping and of dominant microorganisms. Median value of cell density of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was 9.2 log CFU/g. The ratio between LAB and yeasts ranged from 10,000:1 to 10:1. According to the culture-dependent method and 16S metagenetics, Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis was the dominant species in French sourdoughs. FS5 and FS15, propagated according to protocols including one back slopping step at 14 °C, were the only exceptions. High positive correlations were found between L. sanfranciscensis, temperature of back slopping and FAA. The results of this study highlighted the broad adaptability of L. sanfranciscensis to very acid sourdough. Besides species frequently encountered (e.g., Lactobacillus parabrevis/Lactobacillus hammesii, Lactobacillus plantarum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides), first Lactobacillus xiangfangensis (FS5) and Lactobacillus diolivorans (FS15) were found in sourdough. As determined by RAPD-PCR analyses, the sourdough samples showed a different number of strains, ranging from 5 (FS9, FS11 and FS15) to 12 (FS1 and FS13), meaning a highly variable bacterial diversity. Cluster analysis showed that different sourdoughs, especially when propagated in the same bakery, may harbor similar strains. Except for L. plantarum (FS5) and Ln. mesenteroides (FS3), all the dominant species were detected by both 16S metagenetics and culture-dependent method. Yeast diversity was lower than LAB. Except for FS4 (solely dominated by Kazachstania servazzii), yeast microbiota of French sourdoughs was dominated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strains isolated in this study could be a useful base for developing new basic researches on physiology, metabolism, and intraspecific diversity of L

  20. Streptococcus agalactiae infection in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Brandon J; Hancock, Bryan M; Del Cid, Natasha; Bermudez, Andres; Traver, David; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is an encapsulated, Gram-positive bacterium that is a leading cause of neonatal pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis, and an emerging aquaculture pathogen. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a genetically tractable model vertebrate that has been used to analyze the pathogenesis of both aquatic and human bacterial pathogens. We have developed a larval zebrafish model of GBS infection to study bacterial and host factors that contribute to disease progression. GBS infection resulted in dose dependent larval death, and GBS serotype III, ST-17 strain was observed as the most virulent. Virulence was dependent on the presence of the GBS capsule, surface anchored lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and toxin production, as infection with GBS mutants lacking these factors resulted in little to no mortality. Additionally, interleukin-1β (il1b) and CXCL-8 (cxcl8a) were significantly induced following GBS infection compared to controls. We also visualized GBS outside the brain vasculature, suggesting GBS penetration into the brain during the course of infection. Our data demonstrate that zebrafish larvae are a valuable model organism to study GBS pathogenesis. PMID:25617657

  1. Asaia siamensis sp. nov., an acetic acid bacterium in the alpha-proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Katsura, K; Kawasaki, H; Potacharoen, W; Saono, S; Seki, T; Yamada, Y; Uchimura, T; Komagata, K

    2001-03-01

    Five bacterial strains were isolated from tropical flowers collected in Thailand and Indonesia by the enrichment culture approach for acetic acid bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates were located within the cluster of the genus Asaia. The isolates constituted a group separate from Asaia bogorensis on the basis of DNA relatedness values. Their DNA G+C contents were 58.6-59.7 mol%, with a range of 1.1 mol%, which were slightly lower than that of A. bogorensis (59.3-61.0 mol%), the type species of the genus Asaia. The isolates had morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics similar to A. bogorensis strains, but the isolates did not produce acid from dulcitol. On the basis of the results obtained, the name Asaia siamensis sp. nov. is proposed for these isolates. Strain S60-1T, isolated from a flower of crown flower (dok rak, Calotropis gigantea) collected in Bangkok, Thailand, was designated the type strain ( = NRIC 0323T = JCM 10715T = IFO 16457T).

  2. Biochemical and phylogenetic analyses of a cold-active {beta}-galactosidase from the lactic acid bacterium Carnobacterium piscicola BA

    SciTech Connect

    Coombs, J.M.; Brenchley, J.E.

    1999-12-01

    The authors are investigating glycosyl hydrolases from new psychrophilic isolates to examine the adaptations of enzymes to low temperatures. A {beta}-galactosidase from isolate BA, which they have classified as a strain of the lactic acid bacterium Carnobacterium piscicola, was capable of hydrolyzing the chromogen 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl {beta}-D-galactopyranoside (X-Gal) at 4 C and possessed higher activity in crude cell lysates at 25 than at 37 C. Sequence analysis of a cloned DNA fragment encoding this activity revealed a gene cluster containing three glycosyl hydrolases with homology to an {alpha}-galactosidase and two {beta}-galactosidases. The larger of the two {beta}-galactosidase genes, bgaB, encoded the 76.9-kDa cold-active enzyme. This gene was homologous to family 42 glycosyl hydrolases, a group which contains several thermophilic enzymes but none from lactic acid bacteria. The bgaB gene from isolate BA was subcloned in Escherichia coli, and its enzyme, BgaB, was purified. The purified enzyme was highly unstable and required 10% glycerol to maintain activity. Its optimal temperature for activity was 30 C, and it was inactivated at 40 C in 10 min. The K{sub m} of freshly purified enzyme at 30 C was 1.7 mM, and the V{sub max} was 450 {micro}mol {sm{underscore}bullet} min{sup {minus}1}{sm{underscore}bullet}mg{sup {minus}1} with o-nitrophenyl {beta}-D-galactopyranoside. This cold-active enzyme is interesting because it is homologous to a thermophilic enzyme from Bacillus stearothermophilus, and comparisons could provide information about structural features important for activity at low temperatures.

  3. Microbacter margulisiae gen. nov., sp. nov., a propionigenic bacterium isolated from sediments of an acid rock drainage pond.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Sanz, Jose Luis; Stams, Alfons J M

    2014-12-01

    A novel anaerobic propionigenic bacterium, strain ADRI(T), was isolated from sediment of an acid rock drainage environment (Tinto River, Spain). Cells were small (0.4-0.6×1-1.7 µm), non-motile and non-spore-forming rods. Cells possessed a Gram-negative cell-wall structure and were vancomycin-resistant. Strain ADRI(T) utilized yeast extract and various sugars as substrates and formed propionate, lactate and acetate as major fermentation products. The optimum growth temperature was 30 °C and the optimum pH for growth was pH 6.5, but strain ADRI(T) was able to grow at a pH as low as 3.0. Oxidase, indole formation, and urease and catalase activities were negative. Aesculin and gelatin were hydrolysed. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain ADRI(T) were anteiso-C15 : 0 (30.3 %), iso-C15 : 0 (29.2 %) and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH (14.9 %). Major menaquinones were MK-8 (52 %) and MK-9 (48 %). The genomic DNA G+C content was 39.9 mol%. Phylogenetically, strain ADRI(T) was affiliated to the family Porphyromonadaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes. The most closely related cultured species were Paludibacter propionicigenes with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 87.5 % and several species of the genus Dysgonomonas (similarities of 83.5-85.4 % to the type strains). Based on the distinctive ecological, phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics of strain ADRI(T), a novel genus and species, Microbacter margulisiae gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is ADRI(T) ( = JCM 19374(T) = DSM 27471(T)).

  4. Genome sequence of a food spoilage lactic acid bacterium, Leuconostoc gasicomitatum LMG 18811T, in association with specific spoilage reactions.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Per; Paulin, Lars; Säde, Elina; Salovuori, Noora; Alatalo, Edward R; Björkroth, K Johanna; Auvinen, Petri

    2011-07-01

    Leuconostoc gasicomitatum is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium causing spoilage of cold-stored, modified-atmosphere-packaged (MAP), nutrient-rich foods. Its role has been verified by challenge tests in gas and slime formation, development of pungent acidic and buttery off odors, and greening of beef. MAP meats have especially been prone to L. gasicomitatum spoilage. In addition, spoilage of vacuum-packaged vegetable sausages and marinated herring has been reported. The genomic sequencing project of L. gasicomitatum LMG 18811T was prompted by a need to understand the growth and spoilage potentials of L. gasicomitatum, to study its phylogeny, and to be able to knock out and overexpress the genes. Comparative genomic analysis was done within L. gasicomitatum LMG 18811T and the three fully assembled Leuconostoc genomes (those of Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Leuconostoc citreum, and Leuconostoc kimchii) available. The genome of L. gasicomitatum LMG 18811T is plasmid-free and contains a 1,954,080-bp circular chromosome with an average GC content of 36.7%. It includes genes for the phosphoketolase pathway and alternative pathways for pyruvate utilization. As interesting features associated with the growth and spoilage potential, LMG 18811T possesses utilization strategies for ribose, external nucleotides, nucleosides, and nucleobases and it has a functional electron transport chain requiring only externally supplied heme for respiration. In respect of the documented specific spoilage reactions, the pathways/genes associated with a buttery off odor, meat greening, and slime formation were recognized. Unexpectedly, genes associated with platelet binding and collagen adhesion were detected, but their functionality and role in food spoilage and processing environment contamination need further study.

  5. Production of L-lactic Acid from Biomass Wastes Using Scallop Crude Enzymes and Novel Lactic Acid Bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Mitsunori; Nakamura, Kanami; Nakasaki, Kiyohiko

    In the present study, biomass waste raw materials including paper mill sludge, bamboo, sea lettuce, and shochu residue (from a distiller) and crude enzymes derived from inedible and discarded scallop parts were used to produce L-lactic acid for the raw material of biodegradable plastic poly-lactic acid. The activities of cellulase and amylase in the crude enzymes were 22 and 170units/L, respectively, and L-lactic acid was produced from every of the above mentioned biomass wastes, by the method of liquid-state simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) . The L-lactic acid concentrations produced from sea lettuce and shochu residue, which contain high concentration of starch were 3.6 and 9.3g/L, respectively, and corresponded to greater than 25% of the conversion of glucans contained in these biomass wastes. Furthermore, using the solid state SSF method, concentrations as high as 13g/L of L-lactic acid were obtained from sea lettuce and 26g/L were obtained from shochu residue.

  6. Desulfosporosinus acididurans sp. nov.: an acidophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from acidic sediments.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Stams, Alfons J M; Hedrich, Sabrina; Ňancucheo, Ivan; Johnson, D Barrie

    2015-01-01

    Three strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria (M1(T), D, and E) were isolated from acidic sediments (White river and Tinto river) and characterized phylogenetically and physiologically. All three strains were obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, spore-forming straight rods, stained Gram-negative and displayed variable motility during active growth. The pH range for growth was 3.8-7.0, with an optimum at pH 5.5. The temperature range for growth was 15-40 °C, with an optimum at 30 °C. Strains M1(T), D, and E used a wide range of electron donors and acceptors, with certain variability within the different strains. The nominated type strain (M1(T)) used ferric iron, nitrate, sulfate, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate (but not arsenate, sulfite, or fumarate) as electron acceptors, and organic acids (formate, lactate, butyrate, fumarate, malate, and pyruvate), alcohols (glycerol, methanol, and ethanol), yeast extract, and sugars (xylose, glucose, and fructose) as electron donors. It also fermented some substrates such as pyruvate and formate. Strain M1(T) tolerated up to 50 mM ferrous iron and 10 mM aluminum, but was inhibited by 1 mM copper. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic, and genetic characteristics, strains M1(T), D, and E represent a novel species within the genus Desulfosporosinus, for which the name Desulfosporosinus acididurans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is M1(T) (=DSM 27692(T) = JCM 19471(T)). Strain M1(T) was the first acidophilic SRB isolated, and it is the third described species of acidophilic SRB besides Desulfosporosinus acidiphilus and Thermodesulfobium narugense.

  7. An engineered bacterium auxotrophic for an unnatural amino acid: a novel biological containment system.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Biological containment is a genetic technique that programs dangerous organisms to grow only in the laboratory and to die in the natural environment. Auxotrophy for a substance not found in the natural environment is an ideal biological containment. Here, we constructed an Escherichia coli strain that cannot survive in the absence of the unnatural amino acid 3-iodo-L-tyrosine. This synthetic auxotrophy was achieved by conditional production of the antidote protein against the highly toxic enzyme colicin E3. An amber stop codon was inserted in the antidote gene. The translation of the antidote mRNA was controlled by a translational switch using amber-specific 3-iodo-L-tyrosine incorporation. The antidote is synthesized only when 3-iodo-L-tyrosine is present in the culture medium. The viability of this strain rapidly decreased with less than a 1 h half-life after removal of 3-iodo-L-tyrosine, suggesting that the decay of the antidote causes the host killing by activated colicin E3 in the absence of this unnatural amino acid. The contained strain grew 1.5 times more slowly than the parent strains. The escaper frequency was estimated to be 1.4 mutations (95% highest posterior density 1.1-1.8) per 10(5) cell divisions. This containment system can be constructed by only plasmid introduction without genome editing, suggesting that this system may be applicable to other microbes carrying toxin-antidote systems similar to that of colicin E3. PMID:26401457

  8. An engineered bacterium auxotrophic for an unnatural amino acid: a novel biological containment system

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biological containment is a genetic technique that programs dangerous organisms to grow only in the laboratory and to die in the natural environment. Auxotrophy for a substance not found in the natural environment is an ideal biological containment. Here, we constructed an Escherichia coli strain that cannot survive in the absence of the unnatural amino acid 3-iodo-L-tyrosine. This synthetic auxotrophy was achieved by conditional production of the antidote protein against the highly toxic enzyme colicin E3. An amber stop codon was inserted in the antidote gene. The translation of the antidote mRNA was controlled by a translational switch using amber-specific 3-iodo-L-tyrosine incorporation. The antidote is synthesized only when 3-iodo-L-tyrosine is present in the culture medium. The viability of this strain rapidly decreased with less than a 1 h half-life after removal of 3-iodo-L-tyrosine, suggesting that the decay of the antidote causes the host killing by activated colicin E3 in the absence of this unnatural amino acid. The contained strain grew 1.5 times more slowly than the parent strains. The escaper frequency was estimated to be 1.4 mutations (95% highest posterior density 1.1–1.8) per 105 cell divisions. This containment system can be constructed by only plasmid introduction without genome editing, suggesting that this system may be applicable to other microbes carrying toxin-antidote systems similar to that of colicin E3. PMID:26401457

  9. Hyaluronic acid depolymerization by ascorbate-redox effects on solid state cultivation of Streptococcus zooepidemicus in cashew apple fruit bagasse.

    PubMed

    de Macedo, André Casimiro; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade

    2012-05-01

    The cashew fruit (Anacardium occidentale L.) has been used as a promising agricultural resource for the production of low-molecular weight (M(W)) hyaluronic acid (HA) (10(4)-10(5) Da). The cashew juice is a rich source of vitamin C containing, 1.2-2.0 g L(-1). This work explores the effects of the initial concentration of the ascorbate on the solid fermentation of the juice-moisturized bagasse from the cashew apple fruit. The results show that the M(W) reduction of HA is proportional to the initial ascorbate concentration. The presence of ascorbate did not influence the Streptococcus zooepidemicus metabolism. However, the HA productivity was increased from 0.18 to 0.28 mg g(-1) h(-1) when the ascorbate concentration ranged from 1.7 to 10 mg mL(-1). These findings contribute to the controlled production of HA in a low M(W) range, which is important in cell signalization, angiogenesis and nanoparticles production.

  10. Molecular modeling and simulation of FabG, an enzyme involved in the fatty acid pathway of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Shafreen, Rajamohmed Beema; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2013-09-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (SP) is the major cause of pharyngitis accompanied by strep throat infections in humans. 3-keto acyl reductase (FabG), an important enzyme involved in the elongation cycle of the fatty acid pathway of S. pyogenes, is essential for synthesis of the cell-membrane, virulence factors and quorum sensing-related mechanisms. Targeting SPFabG may provide an important aid for the development of drugs against S. pyogenes. However, the absence of a crystal structure for FabG of S. pyogenes limits the development of structure-based drug designs. Hence, in the present study, a homology model of FabG was generated using the X-ray crystallographic structure of Aquifex aeolicus (PDB ID: 2PNF). The modeled structure was refined using energy minimization. Furthermore, active sites were predicted, and a large dataset of compounds was screened against SPFabG. The ligands were docked using the LigandFit module that is available from Discovery Studio version 2.5. From this list, 13 best hit ligands were chosen based on the docking score and binding energy. All of the 13 ligands were screened for Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion and Toxicity (ADMET) properties. From this, the two best descriptors, along with one descriptor that lay outside the ADMET plot, were selected for molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. In vitro testing of the ligands using biological assays further substantiated the efficacy of the ligands that were screened based on the in silico methods.

  11. Microbial production of low molecular weight hyaluronic acid by adding hydrogen peroxide and ascorbate in batch culture of Streptococcus zooepidemicus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Zhu, Yang; Wang, Miao; Sun, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Microbial production of low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HA) by the addition of hydrogen peroxide and ascorbate during the batch culture of Streptococcus zooepidemicus was investigated. Hydrogen peroxide (1.0 mmol/g HA) and ascorbate (0.5 mmol/g HA) were added at 8h and 12h to degrade HA. With the redox depolymerization of HA, the HA molecular weight decreased from 1,300 kDa for the control to 80 kDa, and the average broth viscosity during 8-16 h decreased from 360 mPa s for the control to 290 mPa s. The average oxygen mass transfer coefficient K(L)a increased from 10h(-1) for the control to 35 h(-1) and the average dissolved oxygen level increased from 1% of air saturation in the control to 10%. HA production increased from 5.0 g/L for the control to 6.5 g/L, and contributed to the increased redox potential and energy charge. This novel process not only significantly enhanced production of low molecular weight HA, but also improved purification efficiency due to a decreased broth viscosity. Low molecular weight HA finds applications in biomedical and healthcare fields.

  12. Optimization and effect of dairy industrial waste as media components in the production of hyaluronic acid by Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Naresh; Balakrishnan, Rengesh; Sivaprakasam, Senthilkumar

    2016-08-17

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) production using a dairy industrial waste is a more cost-efficient strategy than using an expensive synthetic medium. In this study, we investigated the production of HA using Streptococcus thermophilus under shake flask conditions using dairy industrial waste as nutritional supplements, namely whey permeate (WP) and whey protein hydrolysate (WPH). Preliminary screening using Plackett-Burman design exhibited WP, WPH, initial pH, and inoculum size as significant factors influencing HA titer. Response surface methodology design of four factors was formulated at three levels for enhanced production of HA. Shake flask HA fermentation by S. thermophilus was performed under global optimized process conditions and the optimal HA titer (342.93 mg L(-1)) corroborates with Box-Behnken design prediction. The molecular weight of HA was elucidated as 9.22-9.46 kDa. The ultralow-molecular weight HA reported in this study has a potential role in drug and gene delivery applications. PMID:26681350

  13. Biosynthesis of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid by Streptococcus zooepidemicus using oxygen vector and optimum impeller tip speed.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zee-Wei; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Mohamad, Rosfarizan

    2012-09-01

    The potential use of n-dodecane and n-hexadecane as oxygen vectors for enhancing hyaluronic acid (HA) biosynthesis by Streptococcus zooepidemicus ATCC 39920 was investigated using a 2-L stirred-tank bioreactor equipped with helical ribbon or Rushton turbine impellers. The volumetric fraction of the oxygen vector influenced the gas-liquid volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)a) positively. Batch HA fermentation with 1% (v/v) n-dodecane or 0.5% (v/v) n-hexadecane addition was carried out at different impeller tip speeds. Even though cell growth was lower in the fermentation with oxygen vector addition, the HA productivity and molecular weight were higher when compared to the fermentation without oxygen vector at low impeller tip speed. The highest HA concentration (4.25 gHA/l) and molecular weight (1.54 × 10(7) Da) were obtained when 0.5% (v/v) n-hexadecane and 0.785 m/s impeller tip speed of helical ribbon were used.

  14. Biosynthesis of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid by Streptococcus zooepidemicus using oxygen vector and optimum impeller tip speed.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zee-Wei; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Mohamad, Rosfarizan

    2012-09-01

    The potential use of n-dodecane and n-hexadecane as oxygen vectors for enhancing hyaluronic acid (HA) biosynthesis by Streptococcus zooepidemicus ATCC 39920 was investigated using a 2-L stirred-tank bioreactor equipped with helical ribbon or Rushton turbine impellers. The volumetric fraction of the oxygen vector influenced the gas-liquid volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)a) positively. Batch HA fermentation with 1% (v/v) n-dodecane or 0.5% (v/v) n-hexadecane addition was carried out at different impeller tip speeds. Even though cell growth was lower in the fermentation with oxygen vector addition, the HA productivity and molecular weight were higher when compared to the fermentation without oxygen vector at low impeller tip speed. The highest HA concentration (4.25 gHA/l) and molecular weight (1.54 × 10(7) Da) were obtained when 0.5% (v/v) n-hexadecane and 0.785 m/s impeller tip speed of helical ribbon were used. PMID:22608992

  15. Lactobacillus vini sp. nov., a wine lactic acid bacterium homofermentative for pentoses.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Ana María; Chenoll, Empar; Macián, M Carmen; Ferrer, Sergi; Pardo, Isabel; Aznar, Rosa

    2006-03-01

    Six strains with more than 99.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, identical internal spacer region profiles and restriction analysis of the amplified 16S rRNA gene patterns were isolated from fermenting grape musts during independent studies carried out in France and Spain many years apart. Strains are Gram-positive, motile, facultatively anaerobic rods that do not exhibit catalase activity and have the ability to utilize pentose sugars (ribose and/or l-arabinose), although they are homofermentative bacteria. Strains ferment pentoses exclusively yielding lactic acid as the end product. A broad set of molecular techniques has been applied to characterize these strains and the results show a high degree of genotypical congruence, sharing identical profiles with 16S rRNA-based techniques. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed these strains within the genus Lactobacillus, closely related to Lactobacillus mali, Lactobacillus nagelii and Lactobacillus satsumensis (with approximately 95 % sequence similarity). DNA-DNA hybridization experiments confirmed the independent status at the species level of these fermenting grape-musts strains. Phenotypically they can be distinguished from the closest relatives by several traits such as growth temperatures and fermentation of carbohydrates. The name Lactobacillus vini sp. nov. is proposed, with strain Mont 4T (= DSM 20605T = CECT 5924T) as the type strain.

  16. Enterococcus bulliens sp. nov., a novel lactic acid bacterium isolated from camel milk.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Zaina; Spitaels, Freek; Cnockaert, Margo; Praet, Jessy; El Farricha, Omar; Swings, Jean; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Four lactic acid bacteria isolates obtained from fresh dromedary camel milk produced in Dakhla, a city in southern Morocco, were characterised in order to determine their taxonomic position. The four isolates had highly similar MALDI-TOF MS and RAPD fingerprints and identical 16S rRNA gene sequences. Comparative sequence analysis revealed that the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the four isolates was most similar to that of Enterococcus sulfureus ATCC 49903(T) and Enterococcus italicus DSM 15952(T) (99.33 and 98.59% similarity, respectively). However, sequence analysis of the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase (pheS), RNA polymerase (rpoA) and ATP synthase (atpA) genes revealed that the taxon represented by strain LMG 28766(T) was well separated from E. sulfureus LMG 13084(T) and E. italicus LMG 22039(T), which was further confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization values that were clearly below the species demarcation threshold. The novel taxon was easily differentiated from its nearest neighbour species through sequence analysis of protein encoding genes, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and multiple biochemical tests, but had a similar percentage G+C content of about 39%. We therefore propose to formally classify these isolates as Enterococcus bulliens sp. nov., with LMG 28766(T) (=CCMM B1177(T)) as the type strain.

  17. Asaia krungthepensis sp. nov., an acetic acid bacterium in the alpha-Proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yukphan, Pattaraporn; Potacharoen, Wanchern; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Yamada, Yuzo

    2004-03-01

    Three bacterial strains were isolated from flowers collected in Bangkok, Thailand, by an enrichment-culture approach for acetic acid bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates were located in the lineage of the genus Asaia but constituted a cluster separate from the type strains of Asaia bogorensis and Asaia siamensis. The DNA base composition of the isolates was 60.2-60.5 mol% G+C, with a range of 0.3 mol%. The isolates constituted a taxon separate from Asaia bogorensis and Asaia siamensis on the basis of DNA-DNA relatedness. The isolates had morphological, physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic characteristics similar to those of the type strains of Asaia bogorensis and Asaia siamensis, but the isolates grew on maltose. The major ubiquinone was Q(10). On the basis of the results obtained, the name Asaia krungthepensis sp. nov. is proposed for the isolates. The type strain is isolate AA08(T) (=BCC 12978(T)=TISTR 1524(T)=NBRC 100057(T)=NRIC 0535(T)), which had a DNA G+C content of 60.3 mol% and was isolated from a heliconia flower ('paksaasawan' in Thai; Heliconia sp.) collected in Bangkok, Thailand.

  18. Deficiency of PdxR in Streptococcus mutans affects vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Liao, S; Bitoun, J P; Nguyen, A H; Bozner, D; Yao, X; Wen, Z T

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a key etiological agent of the human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in tenacious biofilms. The SMU864 locus, designated pdxR, is predicted to encode a member of the novel MocR/GabR family proteins, which are featured with a winged helix DNA-binding N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain highly homologous to the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent aspartate aminotransferases. A pdxR-deficient mutant, TW296, was constructed using allelic exchange. PdxR deficiency in S. mutans had little effect on cell morphology and growth when grown in brain heart infusion. However, when compared with its parent strain, UA159, the PdxR-deficient mutant displayed major defects in acid tolerance response and formed significantly fewer biofilms (P < 0.01). When analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, PdxR deficiency was found to drastically reduce expression of an apparent operon encoding a pyridoxal kinase (SMU865) and a pyridoxal permease (SMU866) of the salvage pathway of vitamin B6 biosynthesis. In addition, PdxR deficiency also altered the expression of genes for ClpL protease, glucosyltransferase B and adhesin SpaP, which are known to play important roles in stress tolerance and biofilm formation. Consistently, PdxR-deficiency affected the growth of the deficient mutant when grown in defined medium with and without vitamin B6 . Further studies revealed that although S. mutans is known to require vitamin B6 to grow in defined medium, B6 vitamers, especially pyridoxal, were strongly inhibitory at millimolar concentrations, against S. mutans growth and biofilm formation. Our results suggest that PdxR in S. mutans plays an important role in regulation of vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation. PMID:25421565

  19. Deficiency of PdxR in Streptococcus mutans affects vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Liao, S; Bitoun, J P; Nguyen, A H; Bozner, D; Yao, X; Wen, Z T

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a key etiological agent of the human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in tenacious biofilms. The SMU864 locus, designated pdxR, is predicted to encode a member of the novel MocR/GabR family proteins, which are featured with a winged helix DNA-binding N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain highly homologous to the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent aspartate aminotransferases. A pdxR-deficient mutant, TW296, was constructed using allelic exchange. PdxR deficiency in S. mutans had little effect on cell morphology and growth when grown in brain heart infusion. However, when compared with its parent strain, UA159, the PdxR-deficient mutant displayed major defects in acid tolerance response and formed significantly fewer biofilms (P < 0.01). When analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, PdxR deficiency was found to drastically reduce expression of an apparent operon encoding a pyridoxal kinase (SMU865) and a pyridoxal permease (SMU866) of the salvage pathway of vitamin B6 biosynthesis. In addition, PdxR deficiency also altered the expression of genes for ClpL protease, glucosyltransferase B and adhesin SpaP, which are known to play important roles in stress tolerance and biofilm formation. Consistently, PdxR-deficiency affected the growth of the deficient mutant when grown in defined medium with and without vitamin B6 . Further studies revealed that although S. mutans is known to require vitamin B6 to grow in defined medium, B6 vitamers, especially pyridoxal, were strongly inhibitory at millimolar concentrations, against S. mutans growth and biofilm formation. Our results suggest that PdxR in S. mutans plays an important role in regulation of vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation.

  20. Soil acidity determines the effectiveness of an organic amendment and a native bacterium for increasing soil stabilisation in semiarid mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, L; Caravaca, F; Azcón, R; Roldán, A

    2009-01-01

    Unstable mine tailings are vulnerable to water and air erosion, so it is important to promote their surface stabilisation in order to avoid the spread of heavy metals. In a greenhouse experiment, we assessed the effect of the addition of Aspergillus niger-treated sugar beet waste and inoculation with a native bacterium, Bacillus cereus, on the stabilisation of soil aggregates of two acidic, semiarid mine tailings, with different acidity degree, during watering and drying periods. Organic amendment raised the pH of both the moderately and highly acidic tailings, whereas the bacterial inoculation increased this parameter in the former. Only the amendment addition increased soil water-soluble carbon in both tailings compared with their controls, under either watering or drying conditions. Both the amendment and B. cereus enhanced water-soluble carbohydrates. Both treatments increased dehydrogenase activity and aggregate stability, particularly in the moderately acidic tailing under drying conditions. After soil drying, aggregate stability was increased by the amendment (about 66% higher than the control soil) and by the bacterium (about 45% higher than the control soil) in the moderately acidic tailing. The effectiveness of these treatments as structure-stabilisation methods for degraded, semiarid mine ecosystems appears to be restricted to tailings of moderate acidity. PMID:18954889

  1. Soil acidity determines the effectiveness of an organic amendment and a native bacterium for increasing soil stabilisation in semiarid mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, L; Caravaca, F; Azcón, R; Roldán, A

    2009-01-01

    Unstable mine tailings are vulnerable to water and air erosion, so it is important to promote their surface stabilisation in order to avoid the spread of heavy metals. In a greenhouse experiment, we assessed the effect of the addition of Aspergillus niger-treated sugar beet waste and inoculation with a native bacterium, Bacillus cereus, on the stabilisation of soil aggregates of two acidic, semiarid mine tailings, with different acidity degree, during watering and drying periods. Organic amendment raised the pH of both the moderately and highly acidic tailings, whereas the bacterial inoculation increased this parameter in the former. Only the amendment addition increased soil water-soluble carbon in both tailings compared with their controls, under either watering or drying conditions. Both the amendment and B. cereus enhanced water-soluble carbohydrates. Both treatments increased dehydrogenase activity and aggregate stability, particularly in the moderately acidic tailing under drying conditions. After soil drying, aggregate stability was increased by the amendment (about 66% higher than the control soil) and by the bacterium (about 45% higher than the control soil) in the moderately acidic tailing. The effectiveness of these treatments as structure-stabilisation methods for degraded, semiarid mine ecosystems appears to be restricted to tailings of moderate acidity.

  2. Isolation, characterization, and amino acid sequences of auracyanins, blue copper proteins from the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McManus, J. D.; Brune, D. C.; Han, J.; Sanders-Loehr, J.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Tollin, G.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Three small blue copper proteins designated auracyanin A, auracyanin B-1, and auracyanin B-2 have been isolated from the thermophilic green gliding photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. All three auracyanins are peripheral membrane proteins. Auracyanin A was described previously (Trost, J. T., McManus, J. D., Freeman, J. C., Ramakrishna, B. L., and Blankenship, R. E. (1988) Biochemistry 27, 7858-7863) and is not glycosylated. The two B forms are glycoproteins and have almost identical properties to each other, but are distinct from the A form. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis apparent monomer molecular masses are 14 (A), 18 (B-2), and 22 (B-1) kDa. The amino acid sequences of the B forms are presented. All three proteins have similar absorbance, circular dichroism, and resonance Raman spectra, but the electron spin resonance signals are quite different. Laser flash photolysis kinetic analysis of the reactions of the three forms of auracyanin with lumiflavin and flavin mononucleotide semiquinones indicates that the site of electron transfer is negatively charged and has an accessibility similar to that found in other blue copper proteins. Copper analysis indicates that all three proteins contain 1 mol of copper per mol of protein. All three auracyanins exhibit a midpoint redox potential of +240 mV. Light-induced absorbance changes and electron spin resonance signals suggest that auracyanin A may play a role in photosynthetic electron transfer. Kinetic data indicate that all three proteins can donate electrons to cytochrome c-554, the electron donor to the photosynthetic reaction center.

  3. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analysis of Meat-Spoilage-Associated Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus piscium MKFS47.

    PubMed

    Andreevskaya, Margarita; Johansson, Per; Laine, Pia; Smolander, Olli-Pekka; Sonck, Matti; Rahkila, Riitta; Jääskeläinen, Elina; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Björkroth, Johanna

    2015-06-01

    Lactococcus piscium is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium and is known to be one of the predominant species within spoilage microbial communities in cold-stored packaged foods, particularly in meat products. Its presence in such products has been associated with the formation of buttery and sour off-odors. Nevertheless, the spoilage potential of L. piscium varies dramatically depending on the strain and growth conditions. Additional knowledge about the genome is required to explain such variation, understand its phylogeny, and study gene functions. Here, we present the complete and annotated genomic sequence of L. piscium MKFS47, combined with a time course analysis of the glucose catabolism-based transcriptome. In addition, a comparative analysis of gene contents was done for L. piscium MKFS47 and 29 other lactococci, revealing three distinct clades within the genus. The genome of L. piscium MKFS47 consists of one chromosome, carrying 2,289 genes, and two plasmids. A wide range of carbohydrates was predicted to be fermented, and growth on glycerol was observed. Both carbohydrate and glycerol catabolic pathways were significantly upregulated in the course of time as a result of glucose exhaustion. At the same time, differential expression of the pyruvate utilization pathways, implicated in the formation of spoilage substances, switched the metabolism toward a heterofermentative mode. In agreement with data from previous inoculation studies, L. piscium MKFS47 was identified as an efficient producer of buttery-odor compounds under aerobic conditions. Finally, genes and pathways that may contribute to increased survival in meat environments were considered. PMID:25819958

  4. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analysis of Meat-Spoilage-Associated Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus piscium MKFS47.

    PubMed

    Andreevskaya, Margarita; Johansson, Per; Laine, Pia; Smolander, Olli-Pekka; Sonck, Matti; Rahkila, Riitta; Jääskeläinen, Elina; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Björkroth, Johanna

    2015-06-01

    Lactococcus piscium is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium and is known to be one of the predominant species within spoilage microbial communities in cold-stored packaged foods, particularly in meat products. Its presence in such products has been associated with the formation of buttery and sour off-odors. Nevertheless, the spoilage potential of L. piscium varies dramatically depending on the strain and growth conditions. Additional knowledge about the genome is required to explain such variation, understand its phylogeny, and study gene functions. Here, we present the complete and annotated genomic sequence of L. piscium MKFS47, combined with a time course analysis of the glucose catabolism-based transcriptome. In addition, a comparative analysis of gene contents was done for L. piscium MKFS47 and 29 other lactococci, revealing three distinct clades within the genus. The genome of L. piscium MKFS47 consists of one chromosome, carrying 2,289 genes, and two plasmids. A wide range of carbohydrates was predicted to be fermented, and growth on glycerol was observed. Both carbohydrate and glycerol catabolic pathways were significantly upregulated in the course of time as a result of glucose exhaustion. At the same time, differential expression of the pyruvate utilization pathways, implicated in the formation of spoilage substances, switched the metabolism toward a heterofermentative mode. In agreement with data from previous inoculation studies, L. piscium MKFS47 was identified as an efficient producer of buttery-odor compounds under aerobic conditions. Finally, genes and pathways that may contribute to increased survival in meat environments were considered.

  5. Description of Paralactobacillus selangorensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a new lactic acid bacterium isolated from chili bo, a Malaysian food ingredient.

    PubMed

    Leisner, J J; Vancanneyt, M; Goris, J; Christensen, H; Rusul, G

    2000-01-01

    Paralactobacillus selangorensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is described. This organism, isolated from a Malaysian food ingredient called chili bo, is an obligatory homofermentative, rod-shaped lactic acid bacterium. The G+C content is 46.1-46.2+/-0.3 mol%. Earlier 16S rRNA studies showed that this organism constitutes a new taxon distantly related to the Lactobacillus casei-Pediococcus group. A phenotypic description that distinguishes Paralactobacillus selangorensis from other genera of lactic acid bacteria is presented. The type strain of Paralactobacillus selangorensis is LMG 17710T.

  6. The inhibitory effect of a fermented papaya preparation on growth, hydrophobicity, and acid production of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, and Lactobacillus acidophilus: its implications in oral health improvement of diabetics.

    PubMed

    Somanah, Jhoti; Bourdon, Emmanuel; Bahorun, Theeshan; Aruoma, Okezie I

    2013-11-01

    Fermented papaya preparation (FPP) is a "natural health product." The high incidence of dental caries, gingivitis, periodontitis, and oral microbial infection cases among patients with diabetes mellitus continues to prevail. The potential role of FPP against common oral microbiota (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, and Lactobacillus acidophilus) isolated from the human oral cavity was investigated using in vitro simulation models of dental plaque and caries. FPP showed an inhibitory effect against the growth (at 0.05 mg/mL: S. mutans: -6.9%; S. mitis: -4.47%, P < 0.05), acid production (at 0.05 mg/mL: S. mutans: +6.38%; L. acidophilus: +2.25%), and hydrophobicity (at 50 mg/mL: S. mutans: 1.01%, P < 0.01; S. mitis: 7.66%, P < 0.05) of tested microbiota. The results of this study suggest that low doses of FPP may be a suitable complement to good oral hygiene practice for the effective prevention of dental caries, plaque, and gingivitis. The functional application of FPP as a constituent of a balanced diet and active lifestyle can make a positive contribution to the oral health status and well-being of patients with diabetes.

  7. Teichoic acid-containing muropeptides from Streptococcus pneumoniae as substrates for the pneumococcal autolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Bustos, J F; Tomasz, A

    1987-01-01

    Pneumococcal cell walls in which the normal phosphorylcholine component of the wall teichoic acids is replaced with phosphorylethanolamine cannot absorb the homologous autolytic enzyme and are completely resistant to autolytic degradation (S. Giudicelli and A. Tomasz, J. Bacteriol. 158:1188-1190, 1984). We have now isolated and characterized soluble teichoic acid-containing muropeptides from such cell walls and tested them as substrates for the pneumococcal autolytic enzyme. Both choline- and ethanolamine-containing muropeptides were hydrolyzed to the same extent by the enzyme. Furthermore, free choline concentrations that totally inhibited the digestion of pneumococcal cell walls in vivo and in vitro were without effect when the soluble substrates were used. PMID:2879828

  8. Kaurenoic Acid from Aralia continentalis Inhibits Biofilm Formation of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung-Il; Kim, Beom-Su; Keum, Ki-Suk; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kang, Sun-Young; Park, Bok-Im; Lee, Young-Rae; You, Yong-Ouk

    2013-01-01

    We isolated a single chemical compound from A. continentalis and identified it to be kaurenoic acid (KA) and investigated the influence of anticariogenic properties. Inhibitory effects of KA on cariogenic properties such as growth, acid production, biofilm formation, and the adherence of S. mutans were evaluated. Furthermore, real-time PCR analysis was performed to evaluate the influence of KA on the genetic expression of virulence factors. KA significantly inhibited the growth and acid production of S. mutans at 2–4 μg/mL and 4 μg/mL of KA, respectively. Furthermore, the adherence onto S-HAs was inhibited at 3-4 μg/mL of KA and biofilm formation was significantly inhibited when treated with 3 μg/mL KA and completely inhibited at 4 μg/mL. Also, the inhibitory effect of KA on biofilm formation was confirmed by SEM. In confocal laser scanning microscopy, bacterial viability gradually decreased by KA in a dose dependent manner. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expressions of gtfB, gtfC, gbpB, spaP, brpA, relA, and vicR were significantly decreased in S. mutans when it was treated with KA. These results suggest that KA from A. continentalis may be a useful agent for inhibiting the cariogenic properties of S. mutans. PMID:23662113

  9. Non-infectivity of Cattle Streptococcus agalactiae in Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus and Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus agalactiae is classified as a Lancefield’s group B Streptococcus (GBS). It is the causative bacterium of streptococcosis that is responsible for severe economic losses in wild and cultured fish, worldwide. Streptococcus agalactiae also causes bovine mastitis. Only limited comparativ...

  10. [Isolation, identification and oxidizing characterization of an iron-sulfur oxidizing bacterium LY01 from acid mine drainage].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-jiao; Yang, Xin-ping; Wang, Shi-mei; Liang, Yin

    2013-05-01

    An acidophilic iron-sulfur oxidizing bacterium LY01 was isolated from acid mine drainage of coal in Guizhou Province, China. Strain LY01 was identified as Acidithiobacillusferrooxidans by morphological and physiological characteristics, and phylogenetic analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. Strain LY01 was able to grow using ferrous ion (Fe2+), elemental sulfur (S0) and pyrite as sole energy source, respectively, but significant differences in oxidation efficiency and bacterial growth were observed when different energy source was used. When strain LY01 was cultured in 9K medium with 44.2 g x L(-1) FeSO4.7H2O as the substrate, the oxidation efficiency of Fe2+ was 100% in 30 h and the cell number of strain LY01 reached to 4.2 x 10(7) cell x mL(-1). When LY01 was cultured in 9K medium with 10 g x L(-1) S0 as the substrate, 6.7% S0 oxidation efficiency, 2001 mg x L(-1) SO4(2-) concentration and 8.9 x 10(7) cell x mL(-1) cell number were observed in 21 d respectively. When LY01 was cultured with 30 g x L(-1) pyrite as the substrate, the oxidation efficiency of pyrite, SO4(2-) concentration and cell number reached 10%, 4443 mg x L(-1) and 3.4 x 10(8) cell x mL(-1) respectively in 20 d. The effects of different heavy metals (Ni2+, Pb2+) on oxidation activity of strain LY01 cultured with pyrite were investigated. Results showed that the oxidation activity of strain LY01 was inhibited to a certain extent with the addition of Ni2+ at 10-100 mg x L(-1) to the medium, but the addition of 10-100 mg x L(-1) Pb2+ had no effect on LY01 activity.

  11. NeuA sialic acid O-acetylesterase activity modulates O-acetylation of capsular polysaccharides in Group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda L.; Cao, Hongzhi; Patel, Silpa K.; Diaz, Sandra; Ryan, Wesley; Carlin, Aaron F.; Thon, Vireak; Lewis, Warren G.; Varki, Ajit; Chen, Xi; Nizet, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a common cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. A major GBS virulence determinant is its sialic acid (Sia)-capped capsular polysaccharide (CPS). Recently, we discovered the presence and genetic basis of capsular Sia O-acetylation in GBS. We now characterize a GBS Sia O-acetylesterase that modulates the degree of GBS surface O-acetylation. The GBS Sia O-acetylesterase operates cooperatively with the GBS CMP-Sia synthetase, both part of a single polypeptide encoded by the neuA gene. NeuA de-O-acetylation of free 9-O-acetyl-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5,9Ac2) was enhanced by CTP and Mg2+, the substrate and co-factor respectively of the N-terminal GBS CMP-Sia synthetase domain. In contrast, the homologous bi-functional NeuA esterase from E. coli K1 did not display cofactor dependence. Further analyses showed that in vitro, GBS NeuA can operate via two alternate enzymatic pathways: de-O-acetylation of Neu5,9Ac2, followed by CMP-activation of Neu5Ac; or, activation of Neu5,9Ac2, then de-O-acetylation of CMP-Neu5,9Ac2. Consistent with in vitro esterase assays, genetic deletion of GBS neuA led to accumulation of intracellular O-acetylated Sias, and over-expression of GBS NeuA reduced O-acetylation of Sias on the bacterial surface. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved asparagine residue 301 abolished esterase activity, but preserved CMP-Sia synthetase activity, as evidenced by hyper-O-acetylation of CPS Sias on GBS expressing only the N301A NeuA allele. These studies demonstrate a novel mechanism regulating the extent of capsular Sia O-acetylation in intact bacteria, and provide a genetic strategy for manipulating GBS O-acetylation, in order to explore the role of this modification in GBS pathogenesis and immunogenicity. PMID:17646166

  12. [Effect of agitation on hyaluronic acid produced by Streptococcus zooepidemicus by using computational fluid dynamics].

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaohua; Duan, Xujie; Tan, Wensong; Zhang, Xu

    2009-11-01

    Agitation plays an important role in the hyaluronic acid (HA) fermentation process. However, views about the effect of agitation on HA production remain controversial. We investigated the effect of agitation on cell growth and HA synthesis during HA fermentation process by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technology. The results showed that the biomass and HA yield changed a little with the increase of impeller speed, but the HA molecular weight firstly increased and then decreased. The results of phase agitation control strategy demonstrated that the influence of agitation on the HA molecular weight mainly exhibited at the stage of HA synthesis. Moreover, the CFD simulation results indicated that when impeller speed increased, the mixing time reduced while the shear rate increased significantly. The removal of anchor could moderate the contradiction between the mixing time and shear rate, and finally the HA molecular weight increased by 23.9%. The results of this work could provide guidelines for optimizing the HA fermentation, as well as the bioreactor design and scaling up. PMID:20222466

  13. Potent inhibitory effects of D-tagatose on the acid production and water-insoluble glucan synthesis of Streptococcus mutans GS5 in the presence of sucrose.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Daijo; Ogawa, Takaaki; Miyake, Minoru; Hasui, Yoshinori; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Izumori, Ken; Tokuda, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    We examined and compared the inhibitory effects of D-tagatose on the growth, acid production, and water-insoluble glucan synthesis of GS5, a bacterial strain of Streptococcus mutans, with those of xylitol, D-psicose, L-psicose and L-tagatose. GS5 was cultured for 12h in a medium containing 10% (w/v) of xylitol, D-psicose, L-psicose, D-tagatose or L-tagatose, and the inhibitory effect of GS5 growth was assessed. Each sugar showed different inhibitory effects on GS5. Both D-tagatose and xylitol significantly inhibited the acid production and water-insoluble glucan synthesis of GS5 in the presence of 1% (w/v) sucrose. However, the inhibitory effect of acid production by D-tagatose was significantly stronger than that of xylitol in presence of sucrose.

  14. Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., a lipolytic, anaerobic, alkalitolerant, thermophilic bacterium utilizing short- and long-chain fatty acids in syntrophic coculture with a methanogenic archaeum

    SciTech Connect

    Svetlitshnyi, V.; Wiegel, J.; Rainey, F.

    1996-10-01

    Three strains of an anaerobic thermophilic organoheterotrophic lipolytic alkalitolerant bacterium, Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain JW/VS-264{sup T}; DSM 11003) were isolated from alkaline hot springs of Lake Bogoria (Kenya). The cells were nonmotile, non-spore forming, straight or slightly curved rods. At 60{degrees}C, the pH range for growth determined at 25{degrees}C [pH{sup 25{degrees}C}] was 7.15 to 9.5, with an optimum between 8.1 and 8.9 (pH{sup 60{degrees}C} of 7.6 and 8.1). At a pH{sup 25{degrees}C} of 8.5 temperature range for growth was from 52 to 70{degrees}C, with an optimum between 60 and 66{degrees}C. The shortest doubling time was around 1 h. In pure culture the bacterium grew in a mineral base medium supplemented with yeast extract, tryptone, Casamino Acids, betaine, and crotonate as carbon sources, producing acetate as a major product and constitutively a lipase. During growth in the presence of olive oil, free long-chain fatty acids were accumulated in the medium but the pure culture syntrophic coculture (Methanobacterium strain JW/VS-M29) the lipolytic bacteria grew on triacylglycerols and linear saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with 4 to 18 carbon atoms, but glycerol was not utilized. Fatty acids with even numbers of carbon atoms were degraded to acetate and methane, while from odd-numbered fatty acids 1 mol of propionate per mol of fatty acid was additionally formed. 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified Syntrophospora and Syntrophomonas spp. as closest phylogenetic neighbors.

  15. A naturally occurring single amino acid replacement in multiple gene regulator of group A Streptococcus significantly increases virulence.

    PubMed

    Sanson, Misu; O'Neill, Brian E; Kachroo, Priyanka; Anderson, Jeff R; Flores, Anthony R; Valson, Chandni; Cantu, Concepcion C; Makthal, Nishanth; Karmonik, Christof; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Musser, James M; Olsen, Randall J

    2015-02-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common source of genetic variation within a species; however, few investigations demonstrate how naturally occurring SNPs may increase strain virulence. We recently used group A Streptococcus as a model pathogen to study bacteria strain genotype-patient disease phenotype relationships. Whole-genome sequencing of approximately 800 serotype M59 group A Streptococcus strains, recovered during an outbreak of severe invasive infections across North America, identified a disproportionate number of SNPs in the gene encoding multiple gene regulator of group A Streptococcus (mga). Herein, we report results of studies designed to test the hypothesis that the most commonly occurring SNP, encoding a replacement of arginine for histidine at codon 201 of Mga (H201R), significantly increases virulence. Whole transcriptome analysis revealed that the H201R replacement significantly increased expression of mga and 54 other genes, including many proven virulence factors. Compared to the wild-type strain, a H201R isogenic mutant strain caused significantly larger skin lesions in mice. Serial quantitative bacterial culture and noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging also demonstrated that the isogenic H201R strain was significantly more virulent in a nonhuman primate model of joint infection. These findings show that the H201R replacement in Mga increases the virulence of M59 group A Streptococcus and provide new insight to how a naturally occurring SNP in bacteria contributes to human disease phenotypes.

  16. A naturally occurring single amino acid replacement in multiple gene regulator of group A Streptococcus significantly increases virulence.

    PubMed

    Sanson, Misu; O'Neill, Brian E; Kachroo, Priyanka; Anderson, Jeff R; Flores, Anthony R; Valson, Chandni; Cantu, Concepcion C; Makthal, Nishanth; Karmonik, Christof; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Musser, James M; Olsen, Randall J

    2015-02-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common source of genetic variation within a species; however, few investigations demonstrate how naturally occurring SNPs may increase strain virulence. We recently used group A Streptococcus as a model pathogen to study bacteria strain genotype-patient disease phenotype relationships. Whole-genome sequencing of approximately 800 serotype M59 group A Streptococcus strains, recovered during an outbreak of severe invasive infections across North America, identified a disproportionate number of SNPs in the gene encoding multiple gene regulator of group A Streptococcus (mga). Herein, we report results of studies designed to test the hypothesis that the most commonly occurring SNP, encoding a replacement of arginine for histidine at codon 201 of Mga (H201R), significantly increases virulence. Whole transcriptome analysis revealed that the H201R replacement significantly increased expression of mga and 54 other genes, including many proven virulence factors. Compared to the wild-type strain, a H201R isogenic mutant strain caused significantly larger skin lesions in mice. Serial quantitative bacterial culture and noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging also demonstrated that the isogenic H201R strain was significantly more virulent in a nonhuman primate model of joint infection. These findings show that the H201R replacement in Mga increases the virulence of M59 group A Streptococcus and provide new insight to how a naturally occurring SNP in bacteria contributes to human disease phenotypes. PMID:25476528

  17. Streptococcus cuniculi sp. nov., isolated from the respiratory tract of wild rabbits.

    PubMed

    Vela, A I; Sánchez Del Rey, V; Zamora, L; Casamayor, A; Domínguez, L; Fernández-Garayzábal, J F

    2014-07-01

    Biochemical and molecular genetic studies were performed on four unknown Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative, coccus-shaped organisms isolated from tonsils (n = 3) and nasal samples (n = 1) of four wild rabbits. The micro-organism was identified as a streptococcal species based on its cellular morphological and biochemical tests. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing confirmed its identification as a member of the genus Streptococcus, but the organism did not correspond to any recognized species of this genus. The closest phylogenetic relative of the unknown cocci from wild rabbits was Streptococcus acidominimus NCIMB 702025(T) (97.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). rpoB and sodA sequence analysis of the novel isolate showed interspecies divergence of 16.2% and 20.3%, respectively, from the type strain of its closest 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic relative, S. acidominimus. The novel bacterial isolate could be distinguished from the type strain of S. acidominimus by several biochemical characteristics, such as the production of esterase C4, acid phosphatase and naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase and acidification of different sugars. Based on both phenotypic and phylogenetic findings, it is proposed that the unknown bacterium be classified as a novel species of the genus Streptococcus, Streptococcus cuniculi sp. nov. The type strain is NED12-00049-6B(T) ( = CECT 8498(T) = CCUG 65085(T)).

  18. ATP-driven calcium transport in membrane vesicles of Streptococcus sanguis. [Streptococcus sanguis; Streptococcus faecalis; Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Houng, H.; Lynn, A.R.; Rosen, B.P.

    1986-11-01

    Calcium transport was investigated in membrane vesicles prepared from the oral bacterium Streptococcus sanguis. Procedures were devised for the preparation of membrane vesicles capable of accumulation /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake was ATP dependent and did not require a proton motive force. Calcium transport in these vesicles was compared with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ accumulation in membrane vesicles from Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The data support the existence of an ATP-driven calcium pump in S. sanguis similar to that in S. faecalis. This pump, which catalyzes uptake into membrane vesicles, would be responsible for extrusion of calcium from intact cells.

  19. Mechanism of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin antibiotics in Streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) group antibiotics in the dairy bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) is documented but the mechanism of resistance has not been elucidated. MIC values for erythromycin (Erm), azithromycin (Azm), tylosin (Tyl), spiramycin (Spm), pristinamyci...

  20. Inhibitory effect of sorbitol on sugar metabolism of Streptococcus mutans in vitro and on acid production in dental plaque in vivo.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Abbe, S; Abbe, K; Takahashi, N; Tamazawa, Y; Yamada, T

    2001-04-01

    This study was conducted to find out whether sorbitol inhibits the sugar metabolism of Streptococcus mutans in vitro and the acid production in dental plaque in vivo. S. mutans NCIB 11723 was anaerobically grown in sorbitol-containing medium. The rate of acid production from sugars was estimated with a pH stat. The rate of acid production from glucose or sucrose was not changed at various concentrations of oxygen. By the addition of sorbitol to sugar, however, the acid production was decreased with increasing levels of oxygen. Intracellular NADH/NAD+ ratio and (dihydroxyacetone-phosphate+glyceraldehyde-phosphate)/3-phosphoglycerate ratio were high whenever the acid production was inhibited by sorbitol. Sorbitol also inhibited the acid production in dental plaque in vivo. These results suggest that the increased NADH/NAD+ ratio during sorbitol metabolism through the inactivation of pyruvate formate-lyase by oxygen inhibited glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase and then the acid production of S. mutans and the one in dental plaque.

  1. Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase from the thermophilic bacterium Rhodothermus marinus JCM9785: characteristics and role in trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline catabolism.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Ishikura, Masaru; Koyanagi, Takashi; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Suye, Shin-ichiro

    2015-05-01

    A gene from the thermophilic Gram-negative bacterium Rhodothermus marinus JCM9785, encoding a dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase homologue, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product was purified and characterized. The expressed enzyme was a highly thermostable dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase that retained more than 80% of its activity after incubation for 10 min at up to 70 °C. When enzyme-catalyzed dehydrogenation of several D-amino acids was carried out using 2,6-dichloroindophenol as the electron acceptor, D-phenylalanine was the most preferable substrate among the D-amino acids tested. Immediately upstream of the dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase gene (dadh) was a gene encoding a 4-hydroxyproline 2-epimerase homologue (hypE). That gene was successfully expressed in E. coli, and the gene product exhibited strong 4-hydroxyproline 2-epimerase activity. Reverse transcription PCR and quantitative real-time PCR showed that the six genes containing the dadh and hypE genes were arranged in an operon and were required for catabolism of trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline in R. marinus. This is the first description of a dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase (Dye-DADH) with broad substrate specificity involved in trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline catabolism. PMID:25472442

  2. Ascorbic acid-dependent gene expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae and the activator function of the transcriptional regulator UlaR2

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have explored the impact of ascorbic acid on the transcriptome of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39. The expression of several genes and operons, including the ula operon (which has been previously shown to be involved in ascorbic acid utilization), the AdcR regulon (which has been previously shown to be involved in zinc transport and virulence) and a PTS operon (which we denote here as ula2 operon) were altered in the presence of ascorbic acid. The ula2 operon consists of five genes, including the transcriptional activator ulaR2. Our β-galactosidase assay data and transcriptome comparison of the ulaR2 mutant with the wild-type demonstrated that the transcriptional activator UlaR2 in the presence of ascorbic acid activates the expression of the ula2 operon. We further predict a 16-bp regulatory site (5′-ATATTGTGCTCAAATA-3′) for UlaR2 in the Pula2. Furthermore, we have explored the effect of ascorbic acid on the expression of the AdcR regulon. Our ICP-MS analysis showed that addition of ascorbic acid to the medium causes zinc starvation in the cell which leads to the activation of the AdcR regulon. PMID:25717320

  3. Ascorbic acid-dependent gene expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae and the activator function of the transcriptional regulator UlaR2.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have explored the impact of ascorbic acid on the transcriptome of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39. The expression of several genes and operons, including the ula operon (which has been previously shown to be involved in ascorbic acid utilization), the AdcR regulon (which has been previously shown to be involved in zinc transport and virulence) and a PTS operon (which we denote here as ula2 operon) were altered in the presence of ascorbic acid. The ula2 operon consists of five genes, including the transcriptional activator ulaR2. Our β-galactosidase assay data and transcriptome comparison of the ulaR2 mutant with the wild-type demonstrated that the transcriptional activator UlaR2 in the presence of ascorbic acid activates the expression of the ula2 operon. We further predict a 16-bp regulatory site (5'-ATATTGTGCTCAAATA-3') for UlaR2 in the Pula2. Furthermore, we have explored the effect of ascorbic acid on the expression of the AdcR regulon. Our ICP-MS analysis showed that addition of ascorbic acid to the medium causes zinc starvation in the cell which leads to the activation of the AdcR regulon.

  4. A consolidated analysis of the physiologic and molecular responses induced under acid stress in the legume-symbiont model-soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Draghi, W. O.; Del Papa, M. F.; Hellweg, C.; Watt, S. A.; Watt, T. F.; Barsch, A.; Lozano, M. J.; Lagares, A.; Salas, M. E.; López, J. L.; Albicoro, F. J.; Nilsson, J. F.; Torres Tejerizo, G. A.; Luna, M. F.; Pistorio, M.; Boiardi, J. L.; Pühler, A.; Weidner, S.; Niehaus, K.; Lagares, A.

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses in general and extracellular acidity in particular disturb and limit nitrogen-fixing symbioses between rhizobia and their host legumes. Except for valuable molecular-biological studies on different rhizobia, no consolidated models have been formulated to describe the central physiologic changes that occur in acid-stressed bacteria. We present here an integrated analysis entailing the main cultural, metabolic, and molecular responses of the model bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti growing under controlled acid stress in a chemostat. A stepwise extracellular acidification of the culture medium had indicated that S. meliloti stopped growing at ca. pH 6.0–6.1. Under such stress the rhizobia increased the O2 consumption per cell by more than 5-fold. This phenotype, together with an increase in the transcripts for several membrane cytochromes, entails a higher aerobic-respiration rate in the acid-stressed rhizobia. Multivariate analysis of global metabolome data served to unequivocally correlate specific-metabolite profiles with the extracellular pH, showing that at low pH the pentose-phosphate pathway exhibited increases in several transcripts, enzymes, and metabolites. Further analyses should be focused on the time course of the observed changes, its associated intracellular signaling, and on the comparison with the changes that operate during the sub lethal acid-adaptive response (ATR) in rhizobia. PMID:27404346

  5. A consolidated analysis of the physiologic and molecular responses induced under acid stress in the legume-symbiont model-soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Draghi, W O; Del Papa, M F; Hellweg, C; Watt, S A; Watt, T F; Barsch, A; Lozano, M J; Lagares, A; Salas, M E; López, J L; Albicoro, F J; Nilsson, J F; Torres Tejerizo, G A; Luna, M F; Pistorio, M; Boiardi, J L; Pühler, A; Weidner, S; Niehaus, K; Lagares, A

    2016-07-11

    Abiotic stresses in general and extracellular acidity in particular disturb and limit nitrogen-fixing symbioses between rhizobia and their host legumes. Except for valuable molecular-biological studies on different rhizobia, no consolidated models have been formulated to describe the central physiologic changes that occur in acid-stressed bacteria. We present here an integrated analysis entailing the main cultural, metabolic, and molecular responses of the model bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti growing under controlled acid stress in a chemostat. A stepwise extracellular acidification of the culture medium had indicated that S. meliloti stopped growing at ca. pH 6.0-6.1. Under such stress the rhizobia increased the O2 consumption per cell by more than 5-fold. This phenotype, together with an increase in the transcripts for several membrane cytochromes, entails a higher aerobic-respiration rate in the acid-stressed rhizobia. Multivariate analysis of global metabolome data served to unequivocally correlate specific-metabolite profiles with the extracellular pH, showing that at low pH the pentose-phosphate pathway exhibited increases in several transcripts, enzymes, and metabolites. Further analyses should be focused on the time course of the observed changes, its associated intracellular signaling, and on the comparison with the changes that operate during the sub lethal acid-adaptive response (ATR) in rhizobia.

  6. A consolidated analysis of the physiologic and molecular responses induced under acid stress in the legume-symbiont model-soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Draghi, W O; Del Papa, M F; Hellweg, C; Watt, S A; Watt, T F; Barsch, A; Lozano, M J; Lagares, A; Salas, M E; López, J L; Albicoro, F J; Nilsson, J F; Torres Tejerizo, G A; Luna, M F; Pistorio, M; Boiardi, J L; Pühler, A; Weidner, S; Niehaus, K; Lagares, A

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses in general and extracellular acidity in particular disturb and limit nitrogen-fixing symbioses between rhizobia and their host legumes. Except for valuable molecular-biological studies on different rhizobia, no consolidated models have been formulated to describe the central physiologic changes that occur in acid-stressed bacteria. We present here an integrated analysis entailing the main cultural, metabolic, and molecular responses of the model bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti growing under controlled acid stress in a chemostat. A stepwise extracellular acidification of the culture medium had indicated that S. meliloti stopped growing at ca. pH 6.0-6.1. Under such stress the rhizobia increased the O2 consumption per cell by more than 5-fold. This phenotype, together with an increase in the transcripts for several membrane cytochromes, entails a higher aerobic-respiration rate in the acid-stressed rhizobia. Multivariate analysis of global metabolome data served to unequivocally correlate specific-metabolite profiles with the extracellular pH, showing that at low pH the pentose-phosphate pathway exhibited increases in several transcripts, enzymes, and metabolites. Further analyses should be focused on the time course of the observed changes, its associated intracellular signaling, and on the comparison with the changes that operate during the sub lethal acid-adaptive response (ATR) in rhizobia. PMID:27404346

  7. Identification of linoleic acid, a main component of the n-hexane fraction from Dryopteris crassirhizoma, as an anti-Streptococcus mutans biofilm agent.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji-Eun; Pandit, Santosh; Jeon, Jae-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Dryopteris crassirhizoma is a semi-evergreen plant. Previous studies have shown the potential of this plant as an agent for the control of cariogenic biofilms. In this study, the main antibacterial components of the plant were identified by correlating gas chromatography-mass spectrometry data with the antibacterial activity of chloroform and n-hexane fractions and then evaluating the activity of the most potent antibacterial component against Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms. The most potent antibacterial component was linoleic acid, a main component of the n-hexane fraction. Linoleic acid reduced viability in a dose dependent manner and reduced biofilm accumulation during initial and mature biofilm formation. Furthermore, when the biofilms were briefly treated with linoleic acid (10 min/treatment, a total of six times), the dry weight of the biofilms was significantly diminished. In addition, the anti-biofilm activity of the n-hexane fraction was similar to that of linoleic acid. These results suggest that the n-hexane fraction of D. crassirhizoma and linoleic acid may be useful for controlling cariogenic biofilms.

  8. Three Streptococcus pneumoniae sialidases: three different products.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guogang; Kiefel, Milton J; Wilson, Jennifer C; Andrew, Peter W; Oggioni, Marco R; Taylor, Garry L

    2011-02-16

    Streptococcus penumoniae is a major human pathogen responsible for respiratory tract infections, septicemia, and meningitis and continues to produce numerous cases of disease with relatively high mortalities. S. pneumoniae encodes up to three sialidases, NanA, NanB, and NanC, that have been implicated in pathogenesis and are potential drug targets. NanA has been shown to be a promiscuous sialidase, hydrolyzing the removal of Neu5Ac from a variety of glycoconjugates with retention of configuration at the anomeric center, as we confirm by NMR. NanB is an intramolecular trans-sialidase producing 2,7-anhydro-Neu5Ac selectively from α2,3-sialosides. Here, we show that the first product of NanC is 2-deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac2en) that can be slowly hydrated by the enzyme to Neu5Ac. We propose that the three pneumococcal sialidases share a common catalytic mechanism up to the final product formation step, and speculate on the roles of the enzymes in the lifecycle of the bacterium.

  9. Syntrophus aciditrophicus sp. nov., a new anaerobic bacterium that degrades fatty acids and benzoate in syntrophic association with hydrogen-using microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, B. E.; Bhupathiraju, V. K.; Tanner, R. S.; Woese, C. R.; McInerney, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Strain SBT is a new, strictly anaerobic, gram-negative, nonmotile, non-sporeforming, rod-shaped bacterium that degrades benzoate and certain fatty acids in syntrophic association with hydrogen/formate-using microorganisms. Strain SBT produced approximately 3 mol of acetate and 0.6 mol of methane per mol of benzoate in coculture with Methanospirillum hungatei strain JF1. Saturated fatty acids, some unsaturated fatty acids, and methyl esters of butyrate and hexanoate also supported growth of strain SBT in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. Strain SBT grew in pure culture with crotonate, producing acetate, butyrate, caproate, and hydrogen. The molar growth yield was 17 +/- 1 g cell dry mass per mol of crotonate. Strain SBT did not grow with fumarate, iron(III), polysulfide, or oxyanions of sulfur or nitrogen as electron acceptors with benzoate as the electron donor. The DNA base composition of strain SBT was 43.1 mol% G+C. Analysis of the 16 S rRNA gene sequence placed strain SBT in the delta-subdivision of the Proteobacteria, with sulfate-reducing bacteria. Strain SBT was most closely related to members of the genus Syntrophus. The clear phenotypic and genotypic differences between strain SBT and the two described species in the genus Syntrophus justify the formation of a new species, Syntrophus aciditrophicus.

  10. Acetobacter senegalensis sp. nov., a thermotolerant acetic acid bacterium isolated in Senegal (sub-Saharan Africa) from mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.).

    PubMed

    Ndoye, Bassirou; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Engelbeen, Katrien; Dubois-Dauphin, Robin; Guiro, Amadou Tidiane; Van Trappen, Stefanie; Willems, Anne; Thonart, Phillipe

    2007-07-01

    A thermotolerant acetic acid bacterium, designated strain CWBI-B418(T), isolated in Senegal from mango fruit (Mangifera indica), was characterized in detail by means of genotypic and phenotypic methods. The novel strain was strictly aerobic and exhibited optimal growth on YGM medium at 35 degrees C. Cells were Gram-negative, motile and coccoid. The strain was assigned to the genus Acetobacter on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments with its phylogenetically closest relatives showed that strain CWBI-B418(T) represented a novel Acetobacter genospecies. The DNA G+C content of strain CWBI-B418(T) was 56.0 mol%. Phenotypic characteristics enabling the differentiation of strain CWBI-B418(T) from phylogenetically related Acetobacter species were: production of 2-keto-D-gluconic acid from D-glucose, but not 5-keto-D-gluconic acid, production of catalase but not oxidase, growth on yeast extract with 30 % d-glucose, growth with ammonium as sole nitrogen source with ethanol as carbon source, utilization of glycerol and ethanol but not maltose or methanol as carbon sources, and growth in the presence of 10 % ethanol. Based on the genotypic and phenotypic data presented, strain CWBI-B418(T) clearly represents a novel Acetobacter species, for which the name Acetobacter senegalensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CWBI-B418(T) (=LMG 23690(T)=DSM 18889(T)).

  11. Fructose metabolism of the purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum: effect of carbon dioxide on growth, and production of bacteriochlorophyll and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Christiane; Grammel, Hartmut

    2012-04-01

    During fermentative metabolism, carbon dioxide fixation plays a key role in many bacteria regarding growth and production of organic acids. The present contribution, dealing with the facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, reveals not only the strong influence of ambient carbon dioxide on the fermentative break-down of fructose but also a high impact on aerobic growth with fructose as sole carbon source. Both growth rates and biomass yield increased with increasing carbon dioxide supply in chemoheterotrophic aerobic cultures. Furthermore, intracellular metabolite concentration measurements showed almost negligible concentrations of the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates succinate, fumarate and malate under aerobic growth, in contrast to several metabolites of the glycolysis. In addition, we present a dual phase fed-batch process, where an aerobic growth phase is followed by an anaerobic production phase. The biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll and the secretion of organic acids were both affected by the carbon dioxide supply, the pH value and by the cell density at the time of switching from aerobic to anaerobic conditions. The formation of pigmented photosynthetic membranes and the amount of bacteriochlorophyll were inversely correlated to the secretion of succinate. Accounting the high biotechnological potential of R. rubrum, optimization of carbon dioxide supply is important because of the favored application of fructose-containing fermentable feedstock solutions in bio-industrial processes.

  12. Effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the uptake and respiration of amino acids by a facultatively psychrophilic marine bacterium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, K. L.; Morita, R. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Studies of pressure and temperature effects on glutamic acid transport and utilization indicated that hydrostatic pressure and low temperature inhibit glutamate transport more than glutamate respiration. The effects of pressure on transport were reduced at temperatures near the optimum. Similar results were obtained for glycine, phenylalanine, and proline. Pressure effects on the transport systems of all four amino acids were reversible to some degree. Both proline and glutamic acid were able to protect their transport proteins against pressure damage. The data presented indicate that the uptake of amino acids by cells under pressure is inhibited, which is the cause of their inability to grow under pressure.

  13. Evidence that the Essential Response Regulator YycF in Streptococcus pneumoniae Modulates Expression of Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Genes and Alters Membrane Composition†

    PubMed Central

    Mohedano, M. Luz; Overweg, Karin; de la Fuente, Alicia; Reuter, Mark; Altabe, Silvia; Mulholland, Francis; de Mendoza, Diego; López, Paloma; Wells, Jerry M.

    2005-01-01

    The YycFG two-component system, originally identified in Bacillus subtilis, is highly conserved among gram-positive bacteria with low G+C contents. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential for cell growth, but the signal to which it responds and the gene members of the regulon remain unclear. In order to investigate the role of YycFG in S. pneumoniae, we increased the expression of yycF by using a maltose-inducible vector and analyzed the genome-wide effects on transcription and protein expression during the course of yycF expression. The induction of yycF expression increased histidine kinase yycG transcript levels, suggesting an autoregulation of the yycFG operon. Evidence from both proteomic and microarray transcriptome studies as well as analyses of membrane fatty acid composition indicated that YycFG is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis pathways and in determining fatty acid chain lengths in membrane lipids. In agreement with recent transcriptome data on pneumococcal cells depleted of YycFG, we also identified several other potential members of the YycFG regulon that are required for virulence and cell wall biosynthesis and metabolism. PMID:15774879

  14. Enhanced secretion of glucosyltransferase by changes in potassium ion concentrations is accompanied by an altered pattern of membrane fatty acids in Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed Central

    Markevics, L J; Jacques, N A

    1985-01-01

    Growth of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975 in a Na+-based medium containing 1 to 50 mM K+ enhanced extracellular glucosyltransferase production by 3.7-fold over the level of enzyme found in a K+-based medium containing 184 mM K+. Enzyme synthesis and secretion were further enhanced in a nonlinear manner with respect to the concentration of K+ in the medium when cells were cultured from an inoculum grown in the presence of 1 mM K+. This concentration of K+ was the minimum required to maintain a near-maximum growth rate for S. salivarius in medium where K+ was limited. A maximum sevenfold stimulation of glucosyltransferase production occurred at 18 mM K+ under these conditions. Analysis of the total membrane lipids showed that the composition of octadecanoic acid increased with decreasing K+ concentration essentially at the expense of the octadecenoic acid moiety. Extracellular glucosyltransferase production was found to be directly related to the ratio of these two fatty acids. Similar confirmatory results over a greater range of enzyme production were obtained with nonproliferating cell suspensions. PMID:3156125

  15. Abnormal physiological properties and altered cell wall composition in Streptococcus pneumoniae grown in the presence of clavulanic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Severin, A; Severina, E; Tomasz, A

    1997-01-01

    Subinhibitory concentrations of clavulanate caused premature induction of stationary-phase autolysis, sensitization to lysozyme, and reductions in the MICs of deoxycholate and penicillin for Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the range of clavulanate concentrations producing these effects, this beta-lactam compound was selectively bound to PBP 3. Cell walls isolated from pneumococci grown in the presence of clavulanate showed increased sensitivity to the hydrolytic action of purified pneumococcal autolysin in vitro. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the peptidoglycan isolated from the clavulanate-grown cells showed major qualitative and quantitative changes in stem peptide composition, the most striking feature of which was the accumulation of peptide species carrying intact D-alanyl-D-alanine residues at the carboxy termini. The altered biological and biochemical properties of the clavulanate-grown pneumococci appear to be the consequences of suppressed D,D-carboxypeptidase activity. PMID:9055983

  16. Genome Sequence of the Oral Probiotic Streptococcus salivarius JF

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a nonpathogenic Gram-positive bacterium and the predominant colonizer of the oral microbiota. It finds a wide application in the prevention of upper respiratory tract infections, also reducing the frequency of other main pathogens. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of the oral probiotic S. salivarius JF. PMID:27660775

  17. Genome Sequence of the Oral Probiotic Streptococcus salivarius JF.

    PubMed

    Jia, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a nonpathogenic Gram-positive bacterium and the predominant colonizer of the oral microbiota. It finds a wide application in the prevention of upper respiratory tract infections, also reducing the frequency of other main pathogens. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of the oral probiotic S. salivarius JF. PMID:27660775

  18. Streptococcus parasanguinis: new pathogen associated with asymptomatic mastitis in sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Garayzábal, J. F.; Fernández, E.; Las Heras, A.; Pascual, C.; Collins, M. D.; Domínguez, L.

    1998-01-01

    We describe two unusual cases in sheep of subclinical mastitis caused by Streptococcus parasanguinis. This bacterium has been associated with the development of experimental endocarditis; its presence at relatively high concentrations in apparently healthy sheep milk may pose a health risk in persons with predisposing heart lesions. PMID:9866743

  19. Amoeba Host Model for Evaluation of Streptococcus suis Virulence ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bonifait, Laetitia; Charette, Steve J.; Filion, Geneviève; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Grenier, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus suis is a major swine pathogen worldwide that causes meningitis, septicemia, and endocarditis. In this study, we demonstrate that the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can be a relevant alternative system to study the virulence of S. suis. PMID:21742906

  20. Desulfotomaculum geothermicum sp. nov., a thermophilic, fatty acid-degrading, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated with H2 from geothermal ground water.

    PubMed

    Daumas, S; Cord-Ruwisch, R; Garcia, J L

    1988-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, fatty acids-degrading, sporulating sulfate-reducing bacterium was isolated from geothermal ground water. The organism stained Gram-negative and formed gas vacuoles during sporulation. Lactate, ethanol, fructose and saturated fatty acids up to C18 served as electron donors and carbon sources with sulfate as external electron acceptor. Benzoate was not used. Stoichiometric measurements revealed a complete oxidation of part of butyrate although growth with acetate as only electron donor was not observed. The rest of butyrate was oxidized to acetate. The strain grew chemolithoautotrophically with hydrogen plus sulfate as energy source and carbon dioxide as carbon source without requirement of additional organic carbon like acetate. The strain contained a c-type cytochrome and presumably a sulfite reductase P582. Optimum temperature, pH and NaCl concentration for growth were 54 degrees C, pH 7.3-7.5 and 25 to 35 g NaCl/l. The G + C content of DNA was 50.4 mol %. Strain BSD is proposed as a new species of the spore-forming sulfate-reducing genus Desulfotomaculum, D. geothermicum.

  1. Lysinibacillus endophyticus sp. nov., an indole-3-acetic acid producing endophytic bacterium isolated from corn root (Zea mays cv. Xinken-5).

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiang; Guan, Xuejiao; Liu, Chongxi; Xiang, Wensheng; Yu, Zhenhua; Liu, Xiaobing; Wang, Guanghua

    2016-10-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain C9(T), was isolated from surface sterilised corn roots (Zea mays cv. Xinken-5) and found to be able to produce indole-3-acetic acid. A polyphasic taxonomic study was carried out to determine the status of strain C9(T). The major cellular fatty acids were found to contain iso-C15:0, anteiso-C15:0 and anteiso-C17:0, and the only menaquinone was identified as MK-7. The polar lipid profile was found to contain diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified phospholipids and an unidentified lipid. The cell wall peptidoglycan was found to be of the A4α L-Lys-D-Asp type and the whole cell sugar was found to be glucose. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain C9(T) belongs to the genus Lysinibacillus and is closely related to Lysinibacillus chungkukjangi NBRC 108948(T) (98.1 % similarity) and Lysinibacillus sinduriensis DSM 27595(T) (98.0 %). However, the low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness and some differential phenotypic characteristics allowed the strain to be distinguished from its close relatives. Therefore, it is concluded that strain C9(T) represents a novel species of the genus Lysinibacillus, for which the name Lysinibacillus endophyticus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is C9(T) (=DSM 100506(T) = CGMCC 1.15291(T)).

  2. Favourable effects of eicosapentaenoic acid on the late step of the cell division in a piezophilic bacterium, Shewanella violacea DSS12, at high-hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Jun; Sato, Takako; Nakasone, Kaoru; Kato, Chiaki; Mihara, Hisaaki; Esaki, Nobuyoshi; Kurihara, Tatsuo

    2011-08-01

    Shewanella violacea DSS12, a deep-sea bacterium, produces eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) as a component of membrane phospholipids. Although various isolates from the deep sea, such as Photobacterium profundum SS9, Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H and various Shewanella strains, produce EPA- or docosahexaenoic acid-containing phospholipids, the physiological role of these polyunsaturated fatty acids remains unclear. In this article, we illustrate the physiological importance of EPA for high-pressure adaptation in strain DSS12 with the help of an EPA-deficient mutant (DSS12(pfaA)). DSS12(pfaA) showed significant growth retardation at 30 MPa, but not at 0.1 MPa. We also found that DSS12(pfaA) grown at 30 MPa forms filamentous cells. When an EPA-containing phospholipid (sn-1-oleoly-sn-2-eicosapentaenoyl phosphatidylethanolamine) was supplemented, the growth retardation and the morphological defect of DSS12(pfaA) were suppressed, indicating that the externally added EPA-containing phospholipid compensated for the loss of endogenous EPA. In contrast, the addition of an oleic acid-containing phospholipid (sn-1,2-dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine) did not affect the growth and the morphology of the cells. Immunofluorescent microscopic analysis with anti-FtsZ antibody revealed a number of Z-rings and separated nucleoids in DSS12(pfaA) grown at 30 MPa. These results demonstrate the physiological importance of EPA for the later step of Z-ring formation of S. violacea DSS12 under high-pressure conditions. PMID:21518217

  3. An in vitro study on the effect of free amino acids alone or in combination with nisin on biofilms as well as on planktonic bacteria of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Zhang, Luodan; Ling, Junqi; Jian, Yutao; Huang, Lijia; Deng, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Free D-amino acids (D-AAs) are one of the most striking features of the peptidoglycan composition in bacteria and play a key role in regulating and disassembling bacterial biofilms. Previous studies have indicated that the antimicrobial peptide nisin can inhibit the growth of the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans. The present study investigated the effect of free amino acids either alone or in combination with nisin on biofilm and on planktonic S. mutans bacteria. The results of the MIC and MBC analyses showed that D-cysteine (Cys), D- or L-aspartic acid (Asp), and D- or L-glutamic acid (Glu) significantly improve the antibacterial activity of nisin against S. mutans and that the mixture of D-Cys, D-Asp, and D-Glu (3D-AAs) and the mixture of L-Cys, L-Asp, and L-Glu (3L-AAs) at a concentration of 40 mM can prevent S. mutans growth. Crystal violet staining showed that the D- or L-enantiomers of Cys, Asp, and Glu at a concentration of 40 mM can inhibit the formation of S. mutans biofilms, and their mixture generated a stronger inhibition than the components alone. Furthermore, the mixture of the three D-AAs or L-AAs may improve the antibacterial activity of nisin against S. mutans biofilms. This study underscores the potential of free amino acids for the enhancement of the antibacterial activity of nisin and the inhibition of the cariogenic bacteria S. mutans and biofilms.

  4. An in vitro study on the effect of free amino acids alone or in combination with nisin on biofilms as well as on planktonic bacteria of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Zhang, Luodan; Ling, Junqi; Jian, Yutao; Huang, Lijia; Deng, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Free D-amino acids (D-AAs) are one of the most striking features of the peptidoglycan composition in bacteria and play a key role in regulating and disassembling bacterial biofilms. Previous studies have indicated that the antimicrobial peptide nisin can inhibit the growth of the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans. The present study investigated the effect of free amino acids either alone or in combination with nisin on biofilm and on planktonic S. mutans bacteria. The results of the MIC and MBC analyses showed that D-cysteine (Cys), D- or L-aspartic acid (Asp), and D- or L-glutamic acid (Glu) significantly improve the antibacterial activity of nisin against S. mutans and that the mixture of D-Cys, D-Asp, and D-Glu (3D-AAs) and the mixture of L-Cys, L-Asp, and L-Glu (3L-AAs) at a concentration of 40 mM can prevent S. mutans growth. Crystal violet staining showed that the D- or L-enantiomers of Cys, Asp, and Glu at a concentration of 40 mM can inhibit the formation of S. mutans biofilms, and their mixture generated a stronger inhibition than the components alone. Furthermore, the mixture of the three D-AAs or L-AAs may improve the antibacterial activity of nisin against S. mutans biofilms. This study underscores the potential of free amino acids for the enhancement of the antibacterial activity of nisin and the inhibition of the cariogenic bacteria S. mutans and biofilms. PMID:24936873

  5. Fatty acids in bacterium Dietzia sp. grown on simple and complex hydrocarbons determined as FAME by GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Hvidsten, Ina; Mjøs, Svein Are; Bødtker, Gunhild; Barth, Tanja

    2015-09-01

    The influence of growth substrates on the fatty acids produced by Dietzia sp. A14101 has been studied to investigate how qualitative and semi-quantitative information on fatty acids correlates with the ability of this strain to access and utilize a wide range of water-immiscible HC-substrates by modifying the FA content and thus also the properties of the cellular membrane. After incubation on different substrates and media, the profiles of fatty acids (FA) were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The equivalent chain length (ECL) index calibration system was employed to identify FA. The effect of each substrate on the cell surface charge and on the hydrophobicity of the cellular membrane was also investigated. The results indicate that the variation of the content of saturated fatty acids (SAT-FA) versus mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) was found to be the most pronounced while branched FA exhibited much less variation in spite of different substrate regimes. The regulation of the ratio of SAT-FA and MUFA seems to be coupled with the regulation of the charge and hydrophobicity of the outer cellular surface. The exposure to a water immiscible substrate led to the development of the negative cellular surface charge, production of carotenoid-type pigments and increased hydrophobicity of the cellular surface. The specific aspects of the adaptation mechanism could have implications for bioremediation and/or (M)EOR applications.

  6. Utilization of CO2 fixating bacterium Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z for simultaneous biogas upgrading and biosuccinic acid production.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur B; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-10-21

    Biogas is an attractive renewable energy carrier. However, it contains CO2 which limits its use for certain applications. Here we report a novel approach for removing CO2 from biogas and capturing it as a biochemical through a biological process. This approach entails converting CO2 into biosuccinic acid using the bacterial strain Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z, and simultaneously producing high-purity CH4 (> 95%). Results showed that when pressure during fermentation was increased from 101.325 to 140 kPa, higher CO2 solubility was achieved, thereby positively affecting final succinic acid yield and titer, CO2 consumption rate, and CH4 purity. When using biogas as the only CO2 source at 140 kPa, the CO2 consumption rate corresponded to 2.59 L CO2 L(-1) d(-1) with a final succinic acid titer of 14.4 g L(-1). Under this pressure condition, the highest succinic acid yield and biogas quality reached corresponded to 0.635 g g(-1) and 95.4% (v v(-1)) CH4 content, respectively, after 24 h fermentation. This work represents the first successful attempt to develop a system capable of upgrading biogas to vehicle fuel/gas grid quality and simultaneously produce biosuccinic acid, a valuable building block with large market potential in the near term.

  7. Dairy Streptococcus thermophilus improves cell viability of Lactobacillus brevis NPS-QW-145 and its γ-aminobutyric acid biosynthesis ability in milk

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qinglong; Law, Yee-Song; Shah, Nagendra P.

    2015-01-01

    Most high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producers are Lactobacillus brevis of plant origin, which may be not able to ferment milk well due to its poor proteolytic nature as evidenced by the absence of genes encoding extracellular proteinases in its genome. In the present study, two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes, gadA and gadB, were found in high GABA-producing L. brevis NPS-QW-145. Co-culturing of this organism with conventional dairy starters was carried out to manufacture GABA-rich fermented milk. It was observed that all the selected strains of Streptococcus thermophilus, but not Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, improved the viability of L. brevis NPS-QW-145 in milk. Only certain strains of S. thermophilus improved the gadA mRNA level in L. brevis NPS-QW-145, thus enhanced GABA biosynthesis by the latter. These results suggest that certain S. thermophilus strains are highly recommended to co-culture with high GABA producer for manufacturing GABA-rich fermented milk. PMID:26245488

  8. Dairy Streptococcus thermophilus improves cell viability of Lactobacillus brevis NPS-QW-145 and its γ-aminobutyric acid biosynthesis ability in milk.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinglong; Law, Yee-Song; Shah, Nagendra P

    2015-08-06

    Most high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producers are Lactobacillus brevis of plant origin, which may be not able to ferment milk well due to its poor proteolytic nature as evidenced by the absence of genes encoding extracellular proteinases in its genome. In the present study, two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes, gadA and gadB, were found in high GABA-producing L. brevis NPS-QW-145. Co-culturing of this organism with conventional dairy starters was carried out to manufacture GABA-rich fermented milk. It was observed that all the selected strains of Streptococcus thermophilus, but not Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, improved the viability of L. brevis NPS-QW-145 in milk. Only certain strains of S. thermophilus improved the gadA mRNA level in L. brevis NPS-QW-145, thus enhanced GABA biosynthesis by the latter. These results suggest that certain S. thermophilus strains are highly recommended to co-culture with high GABA producer for manufacturing GABA-rich fermented milk.

  9. Germicidal activity of a chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip and a sodium chlorite teat dip during experimental challenge with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Boddie, R L; Nickerson, S C; Adkinson, R W

    1998-08-01

    Three postmilking teat dips were tested for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae in two separate studies using experimental challenge procedures that were recommended by the National Mastitis Council. The first study evaluated a barrier teat dip product containing chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide as the germicidal agent, and the second study evaluated a sodium chlorite product with a barrier component as well as a sodium chlorite product without a barrier component. The chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip reduced new intramammary infections (IMI) caused by Staph. aureus by 91.5% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 71.7%. The barrier dip containing sodium chlorite reduced new IMI caused by Staph. aureus and Strep. agalactiae by 41.0 and 0%, respectively. The nonbarrier dip containing sodium chlorite reduced new IMI caused by Staph. aureus by 65.6% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 39.1%. Teat skin and teat end conditions were evaluated before and after the second study; no deleterious effects among dipped quarters compared with control quarters were noted for the two sodium chlorite products. PMID:9749396

  10. Fermentation of alfalfa wet-fractionation liquids to volatile fatty acids by Streptococcus bovis and Megasphaera elsdenii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A “green juice”, obtained by squeezing freshly harvested alfalfa leaves amended with a commercial lactic acid bacterial inoculant, was readily fermented by 7- to 21-d incubation at room temperature to obtain lactic acid at concentrations of 12-46 g l-1, along with additional acetic and succinic acid...

  11. Diversity of the Lactic Acid Bacterium and Yeast Microbiota in the Switch from Firm- to Liquid-Sourdough Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Di Cagno, Raffaella; Pontonio, Erica; Buchin, Solange; De Angelis, Maria; Lattanzi, Anna; Valerio, Francesca; Calasso, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Four traditional type I sourdoughs were comparatively propagated (28 days) under firm (dough yield, 160) and liquid (dough yield, 280) conditions to mimic the alternative technology options frequently used for making baked goods. After 28 days of propagation, liquid sourdoughs had the lowest pH and total titratable acidity (TTA), the lowest concentrations of lactic and acetic acids and free amino acids, and the most stable density of presumptive lactic acid bacteria. The cell density of yeasts was the highest in liquid sourdoughs. Liquid sourdoughs showed simplified microbial diversity and harbored a low number of strains, which were persistent. Lactobacillus plantarum dominated firm sourdoughs over time. Leuconostoc lactis and Lactobacillus brevis dominated only some firm sourdoughs, and Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis persisted for some time only in some firm sourdoughs. Leuconostoc citreum persisted in all firm and liquid sourdoughs, and it was the only species detected in liquid sourdoughs at all times; it was flanked by Leuconostoc mesenteroides in some sourdoughs. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida humilis, Saccharomyces servazzii, Saccharomyces bayanus-Kazachstania sp., and Torulaspora delbrueckii were variously identified in firm and liquid sourdoughs. A total of 197 volatile components were identified through purge and trap–/solid-phase microextraction–gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PT–/SPME–GC-MS). Aldehydes, several alcohols, and some esters were at the highest levels in liquid sourdoughs. Firm sourdoughs mainly contained ethyl acetate, acetic acid, some sulfur compounds, and terpenes. The use of liquid fermentation would change the main microbial and biochemical features of traditional baked goods, which have been manufactured under firm conditions for a long time. PMID:24632249

  12. Eicosapentaenoic acid plays a beneficial role in membrane organization and cell division of a cold-adapted bacterium, Shewanella livingstonensis Ac10.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Jun; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Nagayasu, Makiko; Tani, Yasushi; Mihara, Hisaaki; Hosokawa, Masashi; Baba, Takeshi; Sato, Satoshi B; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Shewanella livingstonensis Ac10, a psychrotrophic gram-negative bacterium isolated from Antarctic seawater, produces eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) as a component of phospholipids at low temperatures. EPA constitutes about 5% of the total fatty acids of cells grown at 4 degrees C. We found that five genes, termed orf2, orf5, orf6, orf7, and orf8, are specifically required for the synthesis of EPA by targeted disruption of the respective genes. The mutants lacking EPA showed significant growth retardation at 4 degrees C but not at 18 degrees C. Supplementation of a synthetic phosphatidylethanolamine that contained EPA at the sn-2 position complemented the growth defect. The EPA-less mutant became filamentous, and multiple nucleoids were observed in a single cell at 4 degrees C, indicating that the mutant has a defect in cell division. Electron microscopy of the cells by high-pressure freezing and freeze-substitution revealed abnormal intracellular membranes in the EPA-less mutant at 4 degrees C. We also found that the amounts of several membrane proteins were affected by the depletion of EPA. While polyunsaturated fatty acids are often considered to increase the fluidity of the hydrophobic membrane core, diffusion of a small hydrophobic molecule, pyrene, in the cell membranes and large unilamellar vesicles prepared from the lipid extracts was very similar between the EPA-less mutant and the parental strain. These results suggest that EPA in S. livingstonensis Ac10 is not required for bulk bilayer fluidity but plays a beneficial role in membrane organization and cell division at low temperatures, possibly through specific interaction between EPA and proteins involved in these cellular processes. PMID:19011019

  13. The Antisense RNA Approach: a New Application for In Vivo Investigation of the Stress Response of Oenococcus oeni, a Wine-Associated Lactic Acid Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Darsonval, Maud; Msadek, Tarek; Alexandre, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is a wine-associated lactic acid bacterium mostly responsible for malolactic fermentation in wine. In wine, O. oeni grows in an environment hostile to bacterial growth (low pH, low temperature, and ethanol) that induces stress response mechanisms. To survive, O. oeni is known to set up transitional stress response mechanisms through the synthesis of heat stress proteins (HSPs) encoded by the hsp genes, notably a unique small HSP named Lo18. Despite the availability of the genome sequence, characterization of O. oeni genes is limited, and little is known about the in vivo role of Lo18. Due to the lack of genetic tools for O. oeni, an efficient expression vector in O. oeni is still lacking, and deletion or inactivation of the hsp18 gene is not presently practicable. As an alternative approach, with the goal of understanding the biological function of the O. oeni hsp18 gene in vivo, we have developed an expression vector to produce antisense RNA targeting of hsp18 mRNA. Recombinant strains were exposed to multiple stresses inducing hsp18 gene expression: heat shock and acid shock. We showed that antisense attenuation of hsp18 affects O. oeni survival under stress conditions. These results confirm the involvement of Lo18 in heat and acid tolerance of O. oeni. Results of anisotropy experiments also confirm a membrane-protective role for Lo18, as previous observations had already suggested. This study describes a new, efficient tool to demonstrate the use of antisense technology for modulating gene expression in O. oeni. PMID:26452552

  14. The Antisense RNA Approach: a New Application for In Vivo Investigation of the Stress Response of Oenococcus oeni, a Wine-Associated Lactic Acid Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Darsonval, Maud; Msadek, Tarek; Alexandre, Hervé; Grandvalet, Cosette

    2015-10-09

    Oenococcus oeni is a wine-associated lactic acid bacterium mostly responsible for malolactic fermentation in wine. In wine, O. oeni grows in an environment hostile to bacterial growth (low pH, low temperature, and ethanol) that induces stress response mechanisms. To survive, O. oeni is known to set up transitional stress response mechanisms through the synthesis of heat stress proteins (HSPs) encoded by the hsp genes, notably a unique small HSP named Lo18. Despite the availability of the genome sequence, characterization of O. oeni genes is limited, and little is known about the in vivo role of Lo18. Due to the lack of genetic tools for O. oeni, an efficient expression vector in O. oeni is still lacking, and deletion or inactivation of the hsp18 gene is not presently practicable. As an alternative approach, with the goal of understanding the biological function of the O. oeni hsp18 gene in vivo, we have developed an expression vector to produce antisense RNA targeting of hsp18 mRNA. Recombinant strains were exposed to multiple stresses inducing hsp18 gene expression: heat shock and acid shock. We showed that antisense attenuation of hsp18 affects O. oeni survival under stress conditions. These results confirm the involvement of Lo18 in heat and acid tolerance of O. oeni. Results of anisotropy experiments also confirm a membrane-protective role for Lo18, as previous observations had already suggested. This study describes a new, efficient tool to demonstrate the use of antisense technology for modulating gene expression in O. oeni.

  15. Aminiphilus circumscriptus gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic amino-acid-degrading bacterium from an upflow anaerobic sludge reactor.

    PubMed

    Díaz, C; Baena, S; Fardeau, M-L; Patel, B K C

    2007-08-01

    Strain ILE-2(T) was isolated from an upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor treating brewery wastewater. The motile, non-sporulating, slightly curved cells (2-4 x 0.1 microm) stained Gram-negative and grew optimally at 42 degrees C and pH 7.1 with 0.5 % NaCl. The strain required yeast extract for growth and fermented Casamino acids, peptone, isoleucine, arginine, lysine, alanine, valine, glutamate, histidine, glutamine, methionine, malate, fumarate, glycerol and pyruvate to acetate, propionate and minor amounts of branched-chain fatty acids. Carbohydrates, formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isovalerate, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, butanol, lactate, succinate, starch, casein, gelatin, xylan and a number of other amino acids were not utilized. The DNA G+C content of strain ILE-2(T) was 52.7 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that ILE-2(T) was distantly related to members of the genera Aminobacterium (83 % similarity) and Aminomonas (85 % similarity) in the family Syntrophomonadaceae, order Clostridiales, phylum Firmicutes. On the basis of the results of our polyphasic analysis, strain ILE-2(T) represents a novel species and genus within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, for which the name Aminiphilus circumscriptus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Aminiphilus circumscriptus is ILE-2(T) (=DSM 16581(T) =JCM 14039(T)). PMID:17684281

  16. Aminiphilus circumscriptus gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic amino-acid-degrading bacterium from an upflow anaerobic sludge reactor.

    PubMed

    Díaz, C; Baena, S; Fardeau, M-L; Patel, B K C

    2007-08-01

    Strain ILE-2(T) was isolated from an upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor treating brewery wastewater. The motile, non-sporulating, slightly curved cells (2-4 x 0.1 microm) stained Gram-negative and grew optimally at 42 degrees C and pH 7.1 with 0.5 % NaCl. The strain required yeast extract for growth and fermented Casamino acids, peptone, isoleucine, arginine, lysine, alanine, valine, glutamate, histidine, glutamine, methionine, malate, fumarate, glycerol and pyruvate to acetate, propionate and minor amounts of branched-chain fatty acids. Carbohydrates, formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isovalerate, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, butanol, lactate, succinate, starch, casein, gelatin, xylan and a number of other amino acids were not utilized. The DNA G+C content of strain ILE-2(T) was 52.7 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that ILE-2(T) was distantly related to members of the genera Aminobacterium (83 % similarity) and Aminomonas (85 % similarity) in the family Syntrophomonadaceae, order Clostridiales, phylum Firmicutes. On the basis of the results of our polyphasic analysis, strain ILE-2(T) represents a novel species and genus within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, for which the name Aminiphilus circumscriptus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Aminiphilus circumscriptus is ILE-2(T) (=DSM 16581(T) =JCM 14039(T)).

  17. High genetic diversity among strains of the unindustrialized lactic acid bacterium Carnobacterium maltaromaticum in dairy products as revealed by multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Abdur; Cailliez-Grimal, Catherine; Bontemps, Cyril; Payot, Sophie; Chaillou, Stéphane; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie; Borges, Frédéric

    2014-07-01

    Dairy products are colonized with three main classes of lactic acid bacteria (LAB): opportunistic bacteria, traditional starters, and industrial starters. Most of the population structure studies were previously performed with LAB species belonging to these three classes and give interesting knowledge about the population structure of LAB at the stage where they are already industrialized. However, these studies give little information about the population structure of LAB prior their use as an industrial starter. Carnobacterium maltaromaticum is a LAB colonizing diverse environments, including dairy products. Since this bacterium was discovered relatively recently, it is not yet commercialized as an industrial starter, which makes C. maltaromaticum an interesting model for the study of unindustrialized LAB population structure in dairy products. A multilocus sequence typing scheme based on an analysis of fragments of the genes dapE, ddlA, glpQ, ilvE, pyc, pyrE, and leuS was applied to a collection of 47 strains, including 28 strains isolated from dairy products. The scheme allowed detecting 36 sequence types with a discriminatory index of 0.98. The whole population was clustered in four deeply branched lineages, in which the dairy strains were spread. Moreover, the dairy strains could exhibit a high diversity within these lineages, leading to an overall dairy population with a diversity level as high as that of the nondairy population. These results are in agreement with the hypothesis according to which the industrialization of LAB leads to a diversity reduction in dairy products.

  18. WaaA of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is a monofunctional 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid transferase involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mamat, Uwe; Schmidt, Helgo; Munoz, Eva; Lindner, Buko; Fukase, Koichi; Hanuszkiewicz, Anna; Wu, Jing; Meredith, Timothy C; Woodard, Ronald W; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Mesters, Jeroen R; Holst, Otto

    2009-08-14

    The hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus belongs to the deepest branch in the bacterial genealogy. Although it has long been recognized that this unique Gram-negative bacterium carries genes for different steps of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) formation, data on the LPS itself or detailed knowledge of the LPS pathway beyond the first committed steps of lipid A and 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) synthesis are still lacking. We now report the functional characterization of the thermostable Kdo transferase WaaA from A. aeolicus and provide evidence that the enzyme is monofunctional. Compositional analysis and mass spectrometry of purified A. aeolicus LPS, showing the incorporation of a single Kdo residue as an integral component of the LPS, implicated a monofunctional Kdo transferase in LPS biosynthesis of A. aeolicus. Further, heterologous expression of the A. aeolicus waaA gene in a newly constructed Escherichia coli DeltawaaA suppressor strain resulted in synthesis of lipid IVA precursors substituted with one Kdo sugar. When highly purified WaaA of A. aeolicus was subjected to in vitro assays using mass spectrometry for detection of the reaction products, the enzyme was found to catalyze the transfer of only a single Kdo residue from CMP-Kdo to differently modified lipid A acceptors. The Kdo transferase was capable of utilizing a broad spectrum of acceptor substrates, whereas surface plasmon resonance studies indicated a high selectivity for the donor substrate. PMID:19546212

  19. Construction and application of chromosomally integrated lac-lux gene markers to monitor the fate of a 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-degrading bacterium in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Masson, L; Comeau, Y; Brousseau, R; Samson, R; Greer, C

    1993-03-01

    A reporter gene system, containing luxAB and lacZY, was constructed and integrated, using Tn7 transposition, into the chromosome of a 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading soil bacterium, Pseudomonas cepacia (BRI6001), to monitor its fate when introduced into soil microcosms. The genes were stably maintained in the modified strain of BRI6001, BRI6001L, for more than 300 generations in the absence of selection pressure, and had no apparent effects on biochemical or physiological properties. BRI6001L was easily and rapidly identified as light-emitting blue colonies on 2,4-D medium containing XGal (5-bromo-4-chloro-indolyl-beta-D-galacto-pyranoside) in the presence of n-decanal. Survival rates of BRI6001L introduced into non-sterile soil microcosms were substrate- and contaminant-dependent. The decrease in population density was lowest in a 2,4-D-amended agricultural soil, and highest in a wood-treatment facility soil contaminated with pentachlorophenol, creosote and heavy metals. A viable cell density as low as 10 cfu g-1 was detected in soil microcosms. The biochemical and growth properties of BRI6001 and BRI6001L, and their behaviour when introduced into soil microcosms indicates that BRI6001L can be used as a reliable model to predict the fate of BRI6001 when used to bioaugment contaminated soil. PMID:7506623

  20. WaaA of the Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Aquifex aeolicus Is a Monofunctional 3-Deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic Acid Transferase Involved in Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Mamat, Uwe; Schmidt, Helgo; Munoz, Eva; Lindner, Buko; Fukase, Koichi; Hanuszkiewicz, Anna; Wu, Jing; Meredith, Timothy C.; Woodard, Ronald W.; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Mesters, Jeroen R.; Holst, Otto

    2009-01-01

    The hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus belongs to the deepest branch in the bacterial genealogy. Although it has long been recognized that this unique Gram-negative bacterium carries genes for different steps of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) formation, data on the LPS itself or detailed knowledge of the LPS pathway beyond the first committed steps of lipid A and 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) synthesis are still lacking. We now report the functional characterization of the thermostable Kdo transferase WaaA from A. aeolicus and provide evidence that the enzyme is monofunctional. Compositional analysis and mass spectrometry of purified A. aeolicus LPS, showing the incorporation of a single Kdo residue as an integral component of the LPS, implicated a monofunctional Kdo transferase in LPS biosynthesis of A. aeolicus. Further, heterologous expression of the A. aeolicus waaA gene in a newly constructed Escherichia coli ΔwaaA suppressor strain resulted in synthesis of lipid IVA precursors substituted with one Kdo sugar. When highly purified WaaA of A. aeolicus was subjected to in vitro assays using mass spectrometry for detection of the reaction products, the enzyme was found to catalyze the transfer of only a single Kdo residue from CMP-Kdo to differently modified lipid A acceptors. The Kdo transferase was capable of utilizing a broad spectrum of acceptor substrates, whereas surface plasmon resonance studies indicated a high selectivity for the donor substrate. PMID:19546212

  1. Quantitative analysis of the lactic acid and acetaldehyde produced by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus strains isolated from traditional Turkish yogurts using HPLC.

    PubMed

    Gezginc, Y; Topcal, F; Comertpay, S; Akyol, I

    2015-03-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the lactic acid- and acetaldehyde-producing abilities of lactic acid bacterial species isolated from traditionally manufactured Turkish yogurts using HPLC. The lactic acid bacterial species purified from the yogurts were the 2 most widely used species in industrial yogurt production: Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus. These bacteria have the ability to ferment hexose sugars homofermentatively to generate lactic acid and some carbonyl compounds, such as acetaldehyde through pyruvate metabolism. The levels of the compounds produced during fermentation influence the texture and the flavor of the yogurt and are themselves influenced by the chemical composition of the milk, processing conditions, and the metabolic activity of the starter culture. In the study, morphological, biochemical, and molecular characteristics were employed to identify the bacteria obtained from homemade yogurts produced in different regions of Turkey. A collection of 91 Strep. thermophilus and 35 L. bulgaricus strains were investigated for their lactic acid- and acetaldehyde-formation capabilities in various media such as cow milk, LM17 agar, and aerobic-anaerobic SM17 agar or de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe agar. The amounts of the metabolites generated by each strain in all conditions were quantified by HPLC. The levels were found to vary depending on the species, the strain, and the growth conditions used. Whereas lactic acid production ranged between 0 and 77.9 mg/kg for Strep. thermophilus strains, it ranged from 0 to 103.5 mg/kg for L. bulgaricus. Correspondingly, the ability to generate acetaldehyde ranged from 0 to 105.9 mg/kg in Strep. thermophilus and from 0 to 126.9 mg/kg in L. bulgaricus. Our study constitutes the first attempt to determine characteristics of the wild strains isolated from traditional Turkish yogurts, and the approach presented here, which reveals the differences in metabolite production abilities of the

  2. Aureispira marina gen. nov., sp. nov., a gliding, arachidonic acid-containing bacterium isolated from the southern coastline of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Shoichi; Arunpairojana, Vullapa; Suwannachart, Chatrudee; Kanjana-Opas, Akkharawit; Yokota, Akira

    2006-12-01

    Three strains of gliding bacteria, 24(T), 62 and 71, isolated from a marine sponge and algae from the southern coastline of Thailand, were studied using a polyphasic approach to clarify their taxonomic positions. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the three isolates formed a distinct lineage within the family 'Saprospiraceae' of the phylum Bacteroidetes and were related to members of the genus Saprospira. The G+C contents of the isolates were in the range 38-39 mol%. The major respiratory quinone was MK-7. The predominant cellular fatty acids were 20 : 4omega6c (arachidonic acid), 16 : 0 and iso-17 : 0. On the basis of morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, together with DNA-DNA hybridization data and 16S rRNA gene sequences, the isolates represent a novel species of a novel genus, for which the name Aureispira marina gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Aureispira marina is 24(T) (=IAM 15389(T)=TISTR 1719(T)).

  3. Lysinibacillus endophyticus sp. nov., an indole-3-acetic acid producing endophytic bacterium isolated from corn root (Zea mays cv. Xinken-5).

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiang; Guan, Xuejiao; Liu, Chongxi; Xiang, Wensheng; Yu, Zhenhua; Liu, Xiaobing; Wang, Guanghua

    2016-10-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain C9(T), was isolated from surface sterilised corn roots (Zea mays cv. Xinken-5) and found to be able to produce indole-3-acetic acid. A polyphasic taxonomic study was carried out to determine the status of strain C9(T). The major cellular fatty acids were found to contain iso-C15:0, anteiso-C15:0 and anteiso-C17:0, and the only menaquinone was identified as MK-7. The polar lipid profile was found to contain diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified phospholipids and an unidentified lipid. The cell wall peptidoglycan was found to be of the A4α L-Lys-D-Asp type and the whole cell sugar was found to be glucose. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain C9(T) belongs to the genus Lysinibacillus and is closely related to Lysinibacillus chungkukjangi NBRC 108948(T) (98.1 % similarity) and Lysinibacillus sinduriensis DSM 27595(T) (98.0 %). However, the low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness and some differential phenotypic characteristics allowed the strain to be distinguished from its close relatives. Therefore, it is concluded that strain C9(T) represents a novel species of the genus Lysinibacillus, for which the name Lysinibacillus endophyticus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is C9(T) (=DSM 100506(T) = CGMCC 1.15291(T)). PMID:27401830

  4. Sphingomonas oligophenolica sp. nov., a halo- and organo-sensitive oligotrophic bacterium from paddy soil that degrades phenolic acids at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Reiko; Ushiba, Yuuji; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Ito, Masao; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Tonosaki, Akira; Hattori, Tsutomu

    2004-11-01

    The taxonomic position of a halo- and organo-sensitive, oligotrophic soil bacterium, strain S213(T), was investigated. Cells were Gram-negative, non-motile, strictly aerobic, yellow-pigmented rods of short to medium length on diluted nutrient broth. When 0.1-0.4 % (w/v) NaCl was added to diluted media composed of peptone and meat extract, growth was inhibited with increasing NaCl concentration and the cells became long aberrant forms. When 6 mM CaCl(2) was added, the cells grew quite normally and aberrant cells were no longer found at 0.1-0.5 % (w/v) NaCl. Chemotaxonomically, strain S213(T) contains chemical markers that indicate its assignment to the Sphingomonadaceae: the presence of ubiquinone Q-10 as the predominant respiratory quinone, C(18 : 1) and C(16 : 0) as major fatty acids, C(14 : 0) 2-OH as the major 2-hydroxy fatty acid and sphingoglycolipids. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain S213(T) belongs to the genus Sphingomonas, exhibiting high sequence similarity to the 16S rRNA gene sequences of Sphingomonas mali IFO 15500(T) (98.3 %), Sphingomonas pruni IFO 15498(T) (98.0 %), Sphingomonas asaccharolytica IFO 15499(T) (97.9 %) and Sphingomonas echinoides DSM 1805(T) (97.8 %). The results of DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and its phenotypic characteristics clearly distinguished the strain from its nearest neighbours and demonstrate that strain S213(T) represents a novel Sphingomonas species, for which the name Sphingomonas oligophenolica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S213(T) (=JCM 12082(T)=CIP 107926(T)).

  5. Aminobacterium thunnarium sp. nov., a mesophilic, amino acid-degrading bacterium isolated from an anaerobic sludge digester, pertaining to the phylum Synergistetes.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Olfa; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Postec, Anne; Bouallagui, Hassib; Hamdi, Moktar; Bonin, Patricia; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2015-02-01

    A new Gram-staining-positive, non-sporulating, mesophilic, amino acid-degrading anaerobic bacterium, designated strain OTA 102(T), was isolated from an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor treating wastewater from cooking tuna. The cells were curved rods (0.6-2.5×0.5 µm) and occurred singly or in pairs. The strain was motile by means of one lateral flagellum. Strain OTA 102(T) grew at temperatures between 30 and 45 °C (optimum 40 °C), between pH 6.0 and 8.4 (optimum pH 7.2) and NaCl concentrations between 1 and 5 % (optimum 2 %, w/v). Strain OTA 102(T) required yeast extract for growth. Serine, threonine, glycine, cysteine, citrate, fumarate, α-ketoglutarate and pyruvate were fermented. When co-cultured with Methanobacterium formicicum as the hydrogen scavenger, strain OTA 102(T) oxidized alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartate, tyrosine, methionine, histidine and asparagine. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain OTA 102(T) was 41.7 mol%. The main fatty acid was iso-C15 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain OTA 102(T) was related to Aminobacterium colombiense and Aminobacterium mobile (95.5 and 95.2 % similarity, respectively), of the phylum Synergistetes. On the basis of phylogenetic, genetic and physiological characteristics, strain OTA 102(T) is proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Aminobacterium, Aminobacterium thunnarium sp. nov. The type strain is OTA 102(T) ( = DSM 27500(T) = JCM 19320(T)).

  6. Influence of nitrogen substrates and substrate C:N ratios on the nitrogen isotopic composition of amino acids from the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, K.; Ohkouchi, N.; Chikaraishi, Y.; Fukuda, H.; Miyajima, T.; Nagata, T.

    2014-09-01

    Nitrogen (N) isotopic compositions of individual hydrolysable amino acids (δ15NAAs) in N pools have been increasingly used for trophic position assessment and evaluation of sources and transformation processes of organic matter in marine environments. However, there are limited data about variability in δ15NAAs patterns and how this variability influences marine bacteria, an important mediator of trophic transfer and organic matter transformation. We explored whether marine bacterial δ15NAAs profiles change depending on the type and C:N ratio of the substrate. The δ15NAAs profile of a marine bacterium, Vibrio harveyi, was examined using medium containing either glutamate, alanine or ammonium as the N source [substrate C:N ratios (range, 3 to 20) were adjusted with glucose]. The data were interpreted as a reflection of isotope fractionations associated with de novo synthesis of amino acids by bacteria. Principal component analysis (PCA) using the δ15N offset values normalized to glutamate + glutamine δ15N revealed that δ15NAAs profiles differed depending on the N source and C:N ratio of the substrate. High variability in the δ15N offset of alanine and valine largely explained this bacterial δ15NAAs profile variability. PCA was also conducted using bacterial and phytoplankton (cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae) δ15NAAs profile data reported previously. The results revealed that bacterial δ15NAAs patterns were distinct from those of phytoplankton. Therefore, the δ15NAAs profile is a useful indicator of biochemical responses of bacteria to changes in substrate conditions, serving as a potentially useful method for identifying organic matter sources in marine environments.

  7. Genome Sequence of a Food Spoilage Lactic Acid Bacterium, Leuconostoc gasicomitatum LMG 18811T, in Association with Specific Spoilage Reactions ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Per; Paulin, Lars; Säde, Elina; Salovuori, Noora; Alatalo, Edward R.; Björkroth, K. Johanna; Auvinen, Petri

    2011-01-01

    Leuconostoc gasicomitatum is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium causing spoilage of cold-stored, modified-atmosphere-packaged (MAP), nutrient-rich foods. Its role has been verified by challenge tests in gas and slime formation, development of pungent acidic and buttery off odors, and greening of beef. MAP meats have especially been prone to L. gasicomitatum spoilage. In addition, spoilage of vacuum-packaged vegetable sausages and marinated herring has been reported. The genomic sequencing project of L. gasicomitatum LMG 18811T was prompted by a need to understand the growth and spoilage potentials of L. gasicomitatum, to study its phylogeny, and to be able to knock out and overexpress the genes. Comparative genomic analysis was done within L. gasicomitatum LMG 18811T and the three fully assembled Leuconostoc genomes (those of Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Leuconostoc citreum, and Leuconostoc kimchii) available. The genome of L. gasicomitatum LMG 18811T is plasmid-free and contains a 1,954,080-bp circular chromosome with an average GC content of 36.7%. It includes genes for the phosphoketolase pathway and alternative pathways for pyruvate utilization. As interesting features associated with the growth and spoilage potential, LMG 18811T possesses utilization strategies for ribose, external nucleotides, nucleosides, and nucleobases and it has a functional electron transport chain requiring only externally supplied heme for respiration. In respect of the documented specific spoilage reactions, the pathways/genes associated with a buttery off odor, meat greening, and slime formation were recognized. Unexpectedly, genes associated with platelet binding and collagen adhesion were detected, but their functionality and role in food spoilage and processing environment contamination need further study. PMID:21571876

  8. Screening of Streptococcus pneumoniae ABC transporter mutants demonstrates that LivJHMGF, a branched-chain amino acid ABC transporter, is necessary for disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Basavanna, Shilpa; Khandavilli, Suneeta; Yuste, Jose; Cohen, Jonathan M; Hosie, Arthur H F; Webb, Alexander J; Thomas, Gavin H; Brown, Jeremy S

    2009-08-01

    Bacterial ABC transporters are an important class of transmembrane transporters that have a wide variety of substrates and are important for the virulence of several bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, many S. pneumoniae ABC transporters have yet to be investigated for their role in virulence. Using insertional duplication mutagenesis mutants, we investigated the effects on virulence and in vitro growth of disruption of 9 S. pneumoniae ABC transporters. Several were partially attenuated in virulence compared to the wild-type parental strain in mouse models of infection. For one ABC transporter, required for full virulence and termed LivJHMGF due to its similarity to branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) transporters, a deletion mutant (DeltalivHMGF) was constructed to investigate its phenotype in more detail. When tested by competitive infection, the DeltalivHMGF strain had reduced virulence in models of both pneumonia and septicemia but was fully virulent when tested using noncompetitive experiments. The DeltalivHMGF strain had no detectable growth defect in defined or complete laboratory media. Recombinant LivJ, the substrate binding component of the LivJHMGF, was shown by both radioactive binding experiments and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy to specifically bind to leucine, isoleucine, and valine, confirming that the LivJHMGF substrates are BCAAs. These data demonstrate a previously unsuspected role for BCAA transport during infection for S. pneumoniae and provide more evidence that functioning ABC transporters are required for the full virulence of bacterial pathogens. PMID:19470745

  9. Lactivibrio alcoholicus gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, mesophilic, lactate-, alcohol-, carbohydrate- and amino-acid-degrading bacterium in the phylum Synergistetes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yan-Ling; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Guo, Rong-Bo; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2014-06-01

    A mesophilic, obligately anaerobic, lactate-, alcohol-, carbohydrate- and amino-acid- degrading bacterium, designated strain 7WAY-8-7(T), was isolated from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating high-strength organic wastewater from isomerized sugar production processes. Cells of strain 7WAY-8-7(T) were motile, curved rods (0.7-1.0×5.0-8.0 µm). Spore formation was not observed. The strain grew optimally at 37 °C (range for growth was 25-40 °C) and pH 7.0 (pH 6.0-7.5), and could grow fermentatively on yeast extract, glucose, ribose, xylose, malate, tryptone, pyruvate, fumarate, Casamino acids, serine and cysteine. The main end-products of glucose fermentation were acetate and hydrogen. In co-culture with the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanospirillum hungatei DSM 864(T), strain 7WAY-8-7(T) could utilize lactate, glycerol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, L-glutamate, alanine, leucine, isoleucine, valine, histidine, asparagine, glutamine, arginine, lysine, threonine, 2-oxoglutarate, aspartate and methionine. A Stickland reaction was not observed with some pairs of amino acids. Yeast extract was required for growth. Nitrate, sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite and Fe (III) were not used as terminal electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 61.4 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate belongs to the uncultured environmental clone clade (called 'PD-UASB-13' in the Greengenes database) in the bacterial phylum Synergistetes, showing less than 90% sequence similarity with closely related described species such as Aminivibrio pyruvatiphilus and Aminobacterium colombiense (89.7% and 88.7%, respectively). The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(13 : 0), iso-C(15 : 0), anteiso-C(15 : 0), C(18 : 1), C(19 : 1), C(20 : 1) and C(21 : 1). A novel genus and species, Lactivibrio alcoholicus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate strain 7WAY-8-7(T) ( = JCM 17151(T

  10. Sugar Utilization and Acid Production by Free and Entrapped Cells of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis in a Whey Permeate Medium

    PubMed Central

    Audet, Pascal; Paquin, Celine; Lacroix, Christophe

    1989-01-01

    Cells of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis entrapped in k-carrageenan-locust bean gum gel performed similarly to free cells in the conversion of lactose to lactic acid. Bead diameter influenced the fermentation rate. Cells entrapped in smaller beads (0.5 to 1.0 mm) showed higher release rates, higher lactose, glucose, and formic acid utilization, higher galactose accumulation, and higher lactic acid production than did cells entrapped in larger beads (1.0 to 2.0 mm). Values for smaller beads were comparable with those for free cells. Immobilization affected the fermentation rate of lactic acid bacteria, especially Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. Entrapped cells of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus demonstrated a lower lactic acid production than did free cells in batch fermentation. The kinetics of the production of formic and pyruvic acids by L. lactis subsp. lactis and S. salivarius subsp. thermophilus are presented. PMID:16347822

  11. Genes involved in protein metabolism of the probiotic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20.

    PubMed

    Do Carmo, A P; da Silva, D F; De Oliveira, M N V; Borges, A C; De Carvalho, A F; De Moraes, C A

    2011-09-01

    A basic requirement for the prediction of the potential use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the dairy industry is the identification of specific genes involved in flavour-forming pathways. The probiotic Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20 was submitted to a genetic characterisation and phylogenetic analysis of genes involved in protein catabolism. Eight genes belonging to this system were identified, which possess a closely phylogenetic relationship to NCFM strains representative, as it was demonstrated for oppC and oppBII, encoding oligopeptide transport system components. PepC, PepN, and PepX might be essential for growth of LAB, probiotic or not, since the correspondent genes are always present, including in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 genome. For pepX gene, a probable link between carbohydrate catabolism and PepX expression may exists, where it is regulated by PepR1/CcpA-like, a common feature between Lactobacillus strains and also in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20. The well conserved evolutionary history of the ilvE gene is evidence that the pathways leading to branched-chain amino acid degradation, such as isoleucine and valine, are similar among L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains and L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20. Thus, the involvement of succinate in flavour formation can be attributed to IlvE activity. The presence of aminopeptidase G in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 genome, which is absent in several strains, might improve the proteolytic activity and effectiveness. The nucleotide sequence encoding PepG revealed that it is a cysteine endopeptidase, belonging to Peptidase C1 superfamily; sequence analysis showed 99% identity with L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ATCC 11842 pepG, whereas protein sequence analysis revealed 100% similarity with PepG from the same organism. The present study proposes a schematic model to explain how the proteolytic system of the probiotic L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 works, based on the components identified so far.

  12. Salivaricin D, a novel intrinsically trypsin-resistant lantibiotic from Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c isolated from a healthy infant.

    PubMed

    Birri, Dagim Jirata; Brede, Dag Anders; Nes, Ingolf F

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we purified and characterized a newly identified lantibiotic (salivaricin D) from Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c. Salivaricin D is a 34-amino-acid-residue peptide (3,467.55 Da); the locus of the gene encoding this peptide is a 16.5-kb DNA segment which contains genes encoding the precursor of two lantibiotics, two modification enzymes (dehydratase and cyclase), an ABC transporter, a serine-like protease, immunity proteins (lipoprotein and ABC transporters), a response regulator, and a sensor histidine kinase. The immunity gene (salI) was heterologously expressed in a sensitive indicator and provided significant protection against salivaricin D, confirming its immunity function. Salivaricin D is a naturally trypsin-resistant lantibiotic that is similar to nisin-like lantibiotics. It is a relatively broad-spectrum bacteriocin that inhibits members of many genera of Gram-positive bacteria, including the important human pathogens Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Thus, Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c may be a potential biological agent for the control of oronasopharynx-colonizing streptococcal pathogens or may be used as a probiotic bacterium. PMID:22101034

  13. Salivaricin D, a Novel Intrinsically Trypsin-Resistant Lantibiotic from Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c Isolated from a Healthy Infant

    PubMed Central

    Birri, Dagim Jirata; Brede, Dag Anders

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we purified and characterized a newly identified lantibiotic (salivaricin D) from Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c. Salivaricin D is a 34-amino-acid-residue peptide (3,467.55 Da); the locus of the gene encoding this peptide is a 16.5-kb DNA segment which contains genes encoding the precursor of two lantibiotics, two modification enzymes (dehydratase and cyclase), an ABC transporter, a serine-like protease, immunity proteins (lipoprotein and ABC transporters), a response regulator, and a sensor histidine kinase. The immunity gene (salI) was heterologously expressed in a sensitive indicator and provided significant protection against salivaricin D, confirming its immunity function. Salivaricin D is a naturally trypsin-resistant lantibiotic that is similar to nisin-like lantibiotics. It is a relatively broad-spectrum bacteriocin that inhibits members of many genera of Gram-positive bacteria, including the important human pathogens Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Thus, Streptococcus salivarius 5M6c may be a potential biological agent for the control of oronasopharynx-colonizing streptococcal pathogens or may be used as a probiotic bacterium. PMID:22101034

  14. Comparative chemical evaluation of two commercially available derivatives of hyaluronic acid (hylaform from rooster combs and restylane from streptococcus) used for soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Manna, F; Dentini, M; Desideri, P; De Pità, O; Mortilla, E; Maras, B

    1999-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives have been developed to try to enhance rheological properties of this molecule to make it suitable for various medical applications. The main dermatological application of HA derivatives is the augmentation of soft tissues, via injection into the dermis. HA derivatives are indicated for the correction of cutaneous contour deficiencies of the skin, particularly in cases of ageing or degenerative lesions or to increase lips. Two HA derivatives have been evaluated: Hylaform Viscoelastic Gel (Hylan B), derived from rooster combs and subjected to cross-linking, and Restylane, produced through bacterial fermentation (streptococci) and stabilized, as declared by the producer. In both cases the purpose is to improve HA theological characteristics and slow down its degradation once it is in contact with biological structures. Distribution of particle dimensions, pH, protein concentration and rheological properties have been investigated in order to evaluate their reliability as fillers for soft tissue augmentation. The results of the analyses showed that there are differences between Restylane and Hylaform. Especially as far as rheological characteristics are concerned, the results outline different structures of the products: Hylaform behaves as a strong hydrogel, Restylane as a weak hydrogel; rheologically Hylaform is clearly superior to Restylane. Hylaform contains a definitely minor quantity (about a quarter) of cross-linked hyaluronic acid than Restylane. Furthermore, although not declared by the manufacturer, Restylane contains protein, resulting from bacterial fermentation or added to enable cross-linking reaction; the quantity of proteins contained by Restylane can be as much as four times the quantity contained by Hylaform, for the same volume (1 ml). It is evident that Hylaform offers higher safety margin than Restylane. Furthermore, wide literature and 20 years of clinical experience on hyaluronan derived from rooster combs confirm

  15. Genomic features of Lactococcus lactis IO-1, a lactic acid bacterium that utilizes xylose and produces high levels of L-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Kato, Hiroaki; Shiwa, Yuh; Oshima, Kenshiro; Machii, Miki; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Zendo, Takeshi; Hattori, Masahira; Sonomoto, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis IO-1 (JCM7638) produces L-lactic acid predominantly when grown at high xylose concentrations, and its utilization is highly desired in the green plastics industry. Therefore it is worthwhile studying its genomic traits. In this study, we focused on (i) genes of possible horizontal transfer derivation (prophages, the nisin-sucrose transposon, and several restriction-modification systems), and (ii) genes for the synthetic pathways of amino acids and vitamins in the IO-1 genome. In view of the results of this analysis, we consider their meanings in strain IO-1.

  16. Olsenella umbonata sp. nov., a microaerotolerant anaerobic lactic acid bacterium from the sheep rumen and pig jejunum, and emended descriptions of Olsenella, Olsenella uli and Olsenella profusa.

    PubMed

    Kraatz, Mareike; Wallace, R John; Svensson, Liselott

    2011-04-01

    Strain A2 is an anaerobic, variably Gram-stain-positive, non-spore-forming, small and irregularly rod-shaped bacterium from the ruminal fluid of a sheep that has been described informally as a representative of 'Olsenella (basonym Atopobium) oviles'. Three phenotypically similar bacterial strains (lac15, lac16 and lac31(T)) were isolated in concert with Veillonella magna lac18(T) from the mucosal jejunum of a pig. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strains A2, lac15, lac16 and lac31(T) formed a genetically coherent group (100 % interstrain sequence similarity) within the bigeneric Olsenella-Atopobium branch of the family Coriobacteriaceae, class Actinobacteria. This group was most closely related to the type strains of the two recognized Olsenella species, namely Olsenella uli (sequence similarity of 96.85 %) and Olsenella profusa (sequence similarity of 97.20 %). The sequence similarity to the type strain of Atopobium minutum, the type species of the genus Atopobium, was 92.33 %. Unlike those of O. uli and O. profusa, outgrown colonies of strains A2, lac15, lac16 and lac31(T) were opaque and greyish-white with an umbonate elevation on solid culture media. The four novel strains were characterized as being well-adapted and presumably indigenous to the gastrointestinal tract of homoeothermic vertebrates: they were mesophilic, microaerotolerant, neutrophilic and acidotolerant, bile-resistant, mucin-utilizing and markedly peptidolytic lactic acid bacteria. The results of DNA-DNA hybridizations, cellular fatty acid analysis and other differential phenotypic (physiological and biochemical) tests confirmed that strains A2, lac15, lac16 and lac31(T) represent a novel species of the genus Olsenella. On the basis of the genotypic and phenotypic results, we therefore describe Olsenella umbonata sp. nov., with lac31(T) ( = CCUG 58604(T)  = DSM 22620(T)  = JCM 16156(T)) as the type strain and A2 ( = CCUG 58212

  17. Effects of acid pH and urea on the spectral properties of the LHII antenna complex from the photosynthetic bacterium Ectothiorhodospira sp.

    PubMed

    Buche, A; Ramirez, J M; Picorel, R

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the spectral modifications of the LHII antenna complex from the purple bacterium Ectothiorhodospira sp. upon acid pH titration both in the presence and absence of urea. A blue shift specifically and reversibly affected the B850 band around pH 5.5-6.0 suggesting that a histidine residue most probably participated in the in vivo absorption red shifting mechanism. This transition was observed in the presence and absence of urea. Under strong chaotropic conditions, a second transition occurred around pH 2.0, affecting the B800 band irreversibly and the B850 reversibly. Under these conditions a blue shift from 856 to 842 nm occurred and a new and strong circular dichroism signal from the new 842 nm band was observed. Reverting to the original experimental conditions induced a red shift of the B850 band up to 856 nm but the circular dichroism signal remained mostly unaffected. Under the same experimental conditions, i.e. pH 2.1 in the presence of urea, part of the B800 band was irreversibly destroyed with concomitant appearance of a band around 770 nm due to monomeric bacteriochlorophyll from the disrupted B800. Furthermore, Gaussian deconvolution and second derivative of the reverted spectra at pH 8.0 after strong-acid treatment indicated that the new B850 band was actually composed of two bands centered at 843 and 858 nm. We ascribed the 858 nm band to bacteriochlorophylls that underwent reversible spectral shift and the 843 nm band to oligomeric bacteriopheophytin formed from a part of the B850 bacteriochlorophyll. This new oligomer would be responsible for the observed strong and mostly conservative circular dichroism signal. The presence of bacteriopheophytin in the reverted samples was definitively demonstrated by HPLC pigment analysis. The pheophytinization process progressed as the pH decreased below 2.1, and at a certain point (i.e. pH 1.5) all bacteriochlorophylls, including those from the B800 band, became converted to

  18. ArgR is an essential local transcriptional regulator of the arcABC operon in Streptococcus suis and is crucial for biological fitness in an acidic environment.

    PubMed

    Fulde, Marcus; Willenborg, Joerg; de Greeff, Astrid; Benga, Laurentiu; Smith, Hilde E; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2011-02-01

    Streptococcus suis is one of the most important pathogens in pigs and can also cause severe infections in humans. Despite its clinical relevance, very little is known about the factors that contribute to its virulence. Recently, we identified a new putative virulence factor in S. suis, the arginine deiminase system (ADS), an arginine catabolic enzyme system encoded by the arcABC operon, which enables S. suis to survive in an acidic environment. In this study, we focused on ArgR, an ADS-associated regulator belonging to the ArgR/AhrC arginine repressor family. Using an argR knockout strain we were able to show that ArgR is essential for arcABC operon expression and necessary for the biological fitness of S. suis. By cDNA expression microarray analyses and quantitative real-time RT-PCR we found that the arcABC operon is the only gene cluster regulated by ArgR, which is in contrast to the situation in many other bacteria. Reporter gene analysis with gfp under the control of the arcABC promoter demonstrated that ArgR is able to activate the arcABC promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with fragments of the arcABC promoter and recombinant ArgR, and chromatin immunoprecipitation with antibodies directed against ArgR, revealed that ArgR interacts with the arcABC promoter in vitro and in vivo by binding to a region from -147 to -72 bp upstream of the transcriptional start point. Overall, our results show that in S. suis, ArgR is an essential, system-specific transcriptional regulator of the ADS that interacts directly with the arcABC promoter in vivo.

  19. Insertional inactivation of genes responsible for the D-alanylation of lipoteichoic acid in Streptococcus gordonii DL1 (Challis) affects intrageneric coaggregations.

    PubMed

    Clemans, D L; Kolenbrander, P E; Debabov, D V; Zhang, Q; Lunsford, R D; Sakone, H; Whittaker, C J; Heaton, M P; Neuhaus, F C

    1999-05-01

    Most human oral viridans streptococci participate in intrageneric coaggregations, the cell-to-cell adherence among genetically distinct streptococci. Two genes relevant to these intrageneric coaggregations were identified by transposon Tn916 mutagenesis of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 (Challis). A 626-bp sequence flanking the left end of the transposon was homologous to dltA and dltB of Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 (formerly called Lactobacillus casei). A 60-kb probe based on this flanking sequence was used to identify the homologous DNA in a fosmid library of S. gordonii DL1. This DNA encoded D-alanine-D-alanyl carrier protein ligase that was expressed in Escherichia coli from the fosmid clone. The cloned streptococcal dltA was disrupted by inserting an ermAM cassette, and then it was linearized and transformed into S. gordonii DL1 for allelic replacement. Erythromycin-resistant transformants containing a single insertion in dltA exhibited a loss of D-alanyl esters in lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and a loss of intrageneric coaggregation. This phenotype was correlated with the loss of a 100-kDa surface protein reported previously to be involved in mediating intrageneric coaggregation (C. J. Whittaker, D. L. Clemans, and P. E. Kolenbrander, Infect. Immun. 64:4137-4142, 1996). The mutants retained the parental ability to participate in intergeneric coaggregation with human oral actinomyces, indicating the specificity of the mutation in altering intrageneric coaggregations. The mutants were altered morphologically and exhibited aberrant cell septa in a variety of pleomorphs. The natural DNA transformation frequency was reduced 10-fold in these mutants. Southern analysis of chromosomal DNAs from various streptococcal species with the dltA probe revealed the presence of this gene in most viridans streptococci. Thus, it is hypothesized that D-alanyl LTA may provide binding sites for the putative 100-kDa adhesin and scaffolding for the proper presentation of this adhesin to

  20. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of jackfruit seed powder (JFSP) to l-lactic acid and to polylactide polymer.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nimisha Rajendran; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan; Banarjee, Rintu; Reddy, Gopal

    2016-08-01

    A newly isolated amylolytic lactic acid bacterium, Streptococcus equinus, was used for the production of l-lactic acid from jackfruit seed powder (JFSP) by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). After optimization of shake flask fermentation by a response surface box-behnken design, the maximum lactate titer was 109g/L from 200g/L jackfruit seed powder. Amberlite IRA67, a weak base resin, was used to recover pure lactic acid from fermented broth and subsequently used for the synthesis of polylactic acid by direct condensation polymerization method with a yield of 62%.

  1. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of jackfruit seed powder (JFSP) to l-lactic acid and to polylactide polymer.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nimisha Rajendran; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan; Banarjee, Rintu; Reddy, Gopal

    2016-08-01

    A newly isolated amylolytic lactic acid bacterium, Streptococcus equinus, was used for the production of l-lactic acid from jackfruit seed powder (JFSP) by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). After optimization of shake flask fermentation by a response surface box-behnken design, the maximum lactate titer was 109g/L from 200g/L jackfruit seed powder. Amberlite IRA67, a weak base resin, was used to recover pure lactic acid from fermented broth and subsequently used for the synthesis of polylactic acid by direct condensation polymerization method with a yield of 62%. PMID:27005791

  2. Effects of the organic acids produced by a lactic acid bacterium in Apis mellifera colony development, Nosema ceranae control and fumagillin efficiency.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Matías; Negri, Pedro; Plischuk, Santiago; Szawarski, Nicolás; De Piano, Fiorella; De Feudis, Leonardo; Eguaras, Martín; Audisio, Carina

    2013-12-27

    The European honey bee Apis mellifera is known to be affected by many parasites and pathogens that have great impact over the insect development. Among parasites affecting bee health, Nosema ceranae is one of the main biotic factors affecting colony populations. As honey bee populations decline, interest in pathogenic and mutualistic relationships between bees and microorganisms has increased. The main goal of the current study was to assess the effect of the oral administration of the metabolites produced by Lactobacillus johnsonii CRL1647 (mainly organic acids) supplemented in syrup, on: (I) N. ceranae sporulation dynamics before and after fumagillin application, and (II) performance of A. mellifera colonies. Different experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of these bacterial metabolites on bees: in vitro administration revealed no toxic effects against bees. Colonies fed with the lactic acids incremented their beehive population and also the amount of fat bodies per bee. Finally, the organic acids reduced the intensity of the pathogen after the second application of treatment as well as enhanced the fumagillin efficiency. This study provides important information for the development of new control substances against nosemosis.

  3. Effects of the organic acids produced by a lactic acid bacterium in Apis mellifera colony development, Nosema ceranae control and fumagillin efficiency.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Matías; Negri, Pedro; Plischuk, Santiago; Szawarski, Nicolás; De Piano, Fiorella; De Feudis, Leonardo; Eguaras, Martín; Audisio, Carina

    2013-12-27

    The European honey bee Apis mellifera is known to be affected by many parasites and pathogens that have great impact over the insect development. Among parasites affecting bee health, Nosema ceranae is one of the main biotic factors affecting colony populations. As honey bee populations decline, interest in pathogenic and mutualistic relationships between bees and microorganisms has increased. The main goal of the current study was to assess the effect of the oral administration of the metabolites produced by Lactobacillus johnsonii CRL1647 (mainly organic acids) supplemented in syrup, on: (I) N. ceranae sporulation dynamics before and after fumagillin application, and (II) performance of A. mellifera colonies. Different experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of these bacterial metabolites on bees: in vitro administration revealed no toxic effects against bees. Colonies fed with the lactic acids incremented their beehive population and also the amount of fat bodies per bee. Finally, the organic acids reduced the intensity of the pathogen after the second application of treatment as well as enhanced the fumagillin efficiency. This study provides important information for the development of new control substances against nosemosis. PMID:23978352

  4. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)- and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T)-degrading gene cluster in the soybean root-nodulating bacterium Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA94.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shohei; Sano, Tomoki; Suyama, Kousuke; Itoh, Kazuhito

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)- and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T)-degrading Bradyrhizobium strains possess tfdAα and/or cadABC as degrading genes. It has been reported that root-nodulating bacteria belonging to Bradyrhizobium elkanii also have tfdAα and cadA like genes but lack the ability to degrade these herbicides and that the cadA genes in 2,4-D-degrading and non-degrading Bradyrhizobium are phylogenetically different. In this study, we identified cadRABCK in the genome of a type strain of soybean root-nodulating B. elkanii USDA94 and demonstrated that the strain could degrade the herbicides when cadABCK was forcibly expressed. cadABCK-cloned Escherichia coli also showed the degrading ability. Because co-spiked phenoxyacetic acid (PAA) could induce the degradation of 2,4-D in B. elkanii USDA94, the lack of degrading ability in this strain was supposed to be due to the low inducing potential of the herbicides for the degrading gene cluster. On the other hand, tfdAα from B. elkanii USDA94 showed little potential to degrade the herbicides, but it did for 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and PAA. The 2,4-D-degrading ability of the cad cluster and the inducing ability of PAA were confirmed by preparing cadA deletion mutant. This is the first study to demonstrate that the cad cluster in the typical root-nodulating bacterium indeed have the potential to degrade the herbicides, suggesting that degrading genes for anthropogenic compounds could be found in ordinary non-degrading bacteria. PMID:27296963

  5. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)- and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T)-degrading gene cluster in the soybean root-nodulating bacterium Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA94.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shohei; Sano, Tomoki; Suyama, Kousuke; Itoh, Kazuhito

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)- and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T)-degrading Bradyrhizobium strains possess tfdAα and/or cadABC as degrading genes. It has been reported that root-nodulating bacteria belonging to Bradyrhizobium elkanii also have tfdAα and cadA like genes but lack the ability to degrade these herbicides and that the cadA genes in 2,4-D-degrading and non-degrading Bradyrhizobium are phylogenetically different. In this study, we identified cadRABCK in the genome of a type strain of soybean root-nodulating B. elkanii USDA94 and demonstrated that the strain could degrade the herbicides when cadABCK was forcibly expressed. cadABCK-cloned Escherichia coli also showed the degrading ability. Because co-spiked phenoxyacetic acid (PAA) could induce the degradation of 2,4-D in B. elkanii USDA94, the lack of degrading ability in this strain was supposed to be due to the low inducing potential of the herbicides for the degrading gene cluster. On the other hand, tfdAα from B. elkanii USDA94 showed little potential to degrade the herbicides, but it did for 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and PAA. The 2,4-D-degrading ability of the cad cluster and the inducing ability of PAA were confirmed by preparing cadA deletion mutant. This is the first study to demonstrate that the cad cluster in the typical root-nodulating bacterium indeed have the potential to degrade the herbicides, suggesting that degrading genes for anthropogenic compounds could be found in ordinary non-degrading bacteria.

  6. Streptococcus salivarius Fimbriae Are Composed of a Glycoprotein Containing a Repeated Motif Assembled into a Filamentous Nondissociable Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Céline; Vadeboncoeur, Christian; Chandad, Fatiha; Frenette, Michel

    2001-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius, a gram-positive bacterium found in the human oral cavity, expresses flexible peritrichous fimbriae. In this paper, we report purification and partial characterization of S. salivarius fimbriae. Fimbriae were extracted by shearing the cell surface of hyperfimbriated mutant A37 (a spontaneous mutant of S. salivarius ATCC 25975) with glass beads. Preliminary experiments showed that S. salivarius fimbriae did not dissociate when they were incubated at 100°C in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. This characteristic was used to separate them from other cell surface components by successive gel filtration chromatography procedures. Fimbriae with molecular masses ranging from 20 × 106 to 40 × 106 Da were purified. Examination of purified fimbriae by electron microscopy revealed the presence of filamentous structures up to 1 μm long and 3 to 4 nm in diameter. Biochemical studies of purified fimbriae and an amino acid sequence analysis of a fimbrial internal peptide revealed that S. salivarius fimbriae were composed of a glycoprotein assembled into a filamentous structure resistant to dissociation. The internal amino acid sequence was composed of a repeated motif of two amino acids alternating with two modified residues: A/X/T-E-Q-M/φ, where X represents a modified amino acid residue and φ represents a blank cycle. Immunolocalization experiments also revealed that the fimbriae were associated with a wheat germ agglutinin-reactive carbohydrate. Immunolabeling experiments with antifimbria polyclonal antibodies showed that antigenically related fimbria-like structures were expressed in two other human oral streptococcal species, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus constellatus. PMID:11292790

  7. Effects of simulated microgravity on Streptococcus mutans physiology and biofilm structure.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingqun; Xu, Xin; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Xuedong; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Wang, Renke; Jia, Wenxiang; Li, Yu-Qing

    2014-10-01

    Long-term spaceflights will eventually become an inevitable occurrence. Previous studies have indicated that oral infectious diseases, including dental caries, were more prevalent in astronauts due to the effect of microgravity. However, the impact of the space environment, especially the microgravity environment, on the virulence factors of Streptococcus mutans, a major caries-associated bacterium, is yet to be explored. In the present study, we investigated the impact of simulated microgravity on the physiology and biofilm structure of S. mutans. We also explored the dual-species interaction between S. mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis under a simulated microgravity condition. Results indicated that the simulated microgravity condition can enhance the acid tolerance ability, modify the biofilm architecture and extracellular polysaccharide distribution of S. mutans, and increase the proportion of S. mutans within a dual-species biofilm, probably through the regulation of various gene expressions. We hypothesize that the enhanced competitiveness of S. mutans under simulated microgravity may cause a multispecies micro-ecological imbalance, which would result in the initiation of dental caries. Our current findings are consistent with previous studies, which revealed a higher astronaut-associated incidence of caries. Further research is required to explore the detailed mechanisms. PMID:25109245

  8. Effects of simulated microgravity on Streptococcus mutans physiology and biofilm structure.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingqun; Xu, Xin; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Xuedong; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Wang, Renke; Jia, Wenxiang; Li, Yu-Qing

    2014-10-01

    Long-term spaceflights will eventually become an inevitable occurrence. Previous studies have indicated that oral infectious diseases, including dental caries, were more prevalent in astronauts due to the effect of microgravity. However, the impact of the space environment, especially the microgravity environment, on the virulence factors of Streptococcus mutans, a major caries-associated bacterium, is yet to be explored. In the present study, we investigated the impact of simulated microgravity on the physiology and biofilm structure of S. mutans. We also explored the dual-species interaction between S. mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis under a simulated microgravity condition. Results indicated that the simulated microgravity condition can enhance the acid tolerance ability, modify the biofilm architecture and extracellular polysaccharide distribution of S. mutans, and increase the proportion of S. mutans within a dual-species biofilm, probably through the regulation of various gene expressions. We hypothesize that the enhanced competitiveness of S. mutans under simulated microgravity may cause a multispecies micro-ecological imbalance, which would result in the initiation of dental caries. Our current findings are consistent with previous studies, which revealed a higher astronaut-associated incidence of caries. Further research is required to explore the detailed mechanisms.

  9. Streptococcus anginosus ("Streptococcus milleri"): the unrecognized pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L

    1988-01-01

    "Streptococcus milleri" is an unofficial name that has been applied to a group of streptococci which, although basically similar, show various hemolytic, serological, and physiological characteristics. The species name Streptococcus anginosus has recently been recognized as the approved name for these organisms. Streptococci known as "S. milleri" have been implicated as etiologic agents in a variety of serious purulent infections, but because of their heterogeneous characteristics, these organisms may be unrecognized or misidentified by clinical laboratorians. This review describes the bacteriological aspects of organisms known as "S. milleri," their clinical significance, and the problems encountered with their identification in the clinical laboratory. PMID:3060239

  10. Streptococcus milleri in the appendix.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, P M; Wilson, G

    1977-01-01

    The appendix was investigated as a possible habitat of Streptococcus milleri. Both normal and inflamed appendices were examined and the isolation rates compared. S. milleri was present in a quarter of the normal appendices and more than half of those associated with apendicitis--a difference that was statistically highly significant. The isolation rates throughout were indepencent of age. There was a pronounced connection between the presence of S. milleri in the appendix and the purulent manifestations of appendicitis. S. milleri was isolated from other abdominal sites associated with appendicitis. The frequency of isolation was increased by culture in an enrichment broth containing nalidixic acid and sulphadimidine. PMID:591633

  11. Streptococcus milleri in the appendix.

    PubMed

    Poole, P M; Wilson, G

    1977-10-01

    The appendix was investigated as a possible habitat of Streptococcus milleri. Both normal and inflamed appendices were examined and the isolation rates compared. S. milleri was present in a quarter of the normal appendices and more than half of those associated with apendicitis--a difference that was statistically highly significant. The isolation rates throughout were indepencent of age. There was a pronounced connection between the presence of S. milleri in the appendix and the purulent manifestations of appendicitis. S. milleri was isolated from other abdominal sites associated with appendicitis. The frequency of isolation was increased by culture in an enrichment broth containing nalidixic acid and sulphadimidine.

  12. The well-coordinated linkage between acidogenicity and aciduricity via insoluble glucans on the surface of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lihong; McLean, Jeffrey S; Lux, Renate; He, Xuesong; Shi, Wenyuan

    2015-12-10

    Streptococcus mutans is considered the principal cariogenic bacterium for dental caries. Despite the recognition of their importance for cariogenesis, the possible coordination among S. mutans' main virulence factors, including glucan production, acidogenicity and aciduricity, has been less well studied. In the present study, using S. mutans strains with surface-displayed pH-sensitive pHluorin, we revealed sucrose availability- and Gtf functionality-dependent proton accumulation on S. mutans surface. Consistent with this, using a pH-sensitive dye, we demonstrated that both in vivo cell-produced and in vitro enzymatically synthesized insoluble glucans displayed proton-concentrating ability. Global transcriptomics revealed proton accumulation triggers the up-regulation of genes encoding functions involved in acid tolerance response in a glucan-dependent manner. Our data suggested that this proton enrichment around S. mutans could pre-condition the bacterium for acid-stress. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found S. mutans strains defective in glucan production were more acid sensitive. Our study revealed for the first time that insoluble glucans is likely an essential factor linking acidogenicity with aciduricity. The coordination of these key virulence factors could provide new insights on how S. mutans may have become a major cariogenic pathogen.

  13. The well-coordinated linkage between acidogenicity and aciduricity via insoluble glucans on the surface of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lihong; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Lux, Renate; He, Xuesong; Shi, Wenyuan

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is considered the principal cariogenic bacterium for dental caries. Despite the recognition of their importance for cariogenesis, the possible coordination among S. mutans’ main virulence factors, including glucan production, acidogenicity and aciduricity, has been less well studied. In the present study, using S. mutans strains with surface-displayed pH-sensitive pHluorin, we revealed sucrose availability- and Gtf functionality-dependent proton accumulation on S. mutans surface. Consistent with this, using a pH-sensitive dye, we demonstrated that both in vivo cell-produced and in vitro enzymatically synthesized insoluble glucans displayed proton-concentrating ability. Global transcriptomics revealed proton accumulation triggers the up-regulation of genes encoding functions involved in acid tolerance response in a glucan-dependent manner. Our data suggested that this proton enrichment around S. mutans could pre-condition the bacterium for acid-stress. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found S. mutans strains defective in glucan production were more acid sensitive. Our study revealed for the first time that insoluble glucans is likely an essential factor linking acidogenicity with aciduricity. The coordination of these key virulence factors could provide new insights on how S. mutans may have become a major cariogenic pathogen. PMID:26657939

  14. Recombination-deficient mutant of Streptococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Y.; Clewell, D.B.

    1980-08-01

    An ultraviolet radiation-sensitive derivative of Streptococcus faecalis strain JH2-2 was isolated and found to be deficient in recombination, using a plasmid-plasmid recombination system. The strain was sensitive to chemical agents which interact with deoxyribonucleic acid and also underwent deoxyribonucleic acid degradation after ultraviolet irradiation. Thus, the mutant has properties similar to those of recA strains of Escherichia coli.

  15. The Effect of Carbon Source and Fluoride Concentrations in the "Streptococcus Mutans" Biofilm Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulino, Tony P.; Andrade, Ricardo O.; Bruschi-Thedei, Giuliana C. M.; Thedei, Geraldo, Jr.; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this class experiment is to show the influence of carbon source and of different fluoride concentrations on the biofilm formation by the bacterium "Streptococcus mutans." The observation of different biofilm morphology as a function of carbon source and fluoride concentration allows an interesting discussion regarding the…

  16. Misidentification of Streptococcus uberis as a human pathogen: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Toma, Luigi; Prignano, Grazia; Pelagalli, Lorella; Police, Andrea; Cavallotti, Claudia; Torelli, Riccardo; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Ensoli, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus uberis is an environmental bacterium responsible for bovine mastitis. It is occasionally described as a human pathogen, though in most cases the identification was based on biochemical phenotyping techniques. This report shows that the biochemical phenotyping may incorrectly identify Enterococcus faecium as S. uberis. PMID:25578263

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of the Streptococcus pneumoniae Avery Strain A66.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Christoph; Harrison, Ewan M; Parkhill, Julian; Holmes, Mark A; Paterson, Gavin K

    2015-01-01

    We have used HiSeq 2000 technology to generate a draft genome sequence of Streptococcus pneumoniae strain A66. This is a common study strain used in investigations of pneumococcal bacterium-host interactions and was used in the seminal genetic studies of Avery et al.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Streptococcus pneumoniae Avery Strain A66

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Christoph; Harrison, Ewan M.; Holmes, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used HiSeq 2000 technology to generate a draft genome sequence of Streptococcus pneumoniae strain A66. This is a common study strain used in investigations of pneumococcal bacterium-host interactions and was used in the seminal genetic studies of Avery et al. PMID:26112793

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Strain JIM8777 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Guédon, Eric; Delorme, Christine; Pons, Nicolas; Cruaud, Corinne; Loux, Valentin; Couloux, Arnaud; Gautier, Céline; Sanchez, Nicolas; Layec, Séverine; Galleron, Nathalie; Almeida, Mathieu; van de Guchte, Maarten; Kennedy, Sean P.; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Wincker, Patrick; Renault, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is a prevalent species of the human oropharyngeal tract with an important role in oral ecology. Here, we report the complete 2.2-Mb genome sequence and annotation of strain JIM8777, which was recently isolated from the oral cavity of a healthy, dentate infant. PMID:21742871

  20. Complete genome sequence of the commensal Streptococcus salivarius strain JIM8777.

    PubMed

    Guédon, Eric; Delorme, Christine; Pons, Nicolas; Cruaud, Corinne; Loux, Valentin; Couloux, Arnaud; Gautier, Céline; Sanchez, Nicolas; Layec, Séverine; Galleron, Nathalie; Almeida, Mathieu; van de Guchte, Maarten; Kennedy, Sean P; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Wincker, Patrick; Renault, Pierre

    2011-09-01

    The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is a prevalent species of the human oropharyngeal tract with an important role in oral ecology. Here, we report the complete 2.2-Mb genome sequence and annotation of strain JIM8777, which was recently isolated from the oral cavity of a healthy, dentate infant. PMID:21742871

  1. Misidentification of Streptococcus uberis as a human pathogen: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Toma, Luigi; Prignano, Grazia; Pelagalli, Lorella; Police, Andrea; Cavallotti, Claudia; Torelli, Riccardo; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Ensoli, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus uberis is an environmental bacterium responsible for bovine mastitis. It is occasionally described as a human pathogen, though in most cases the identification was based on biochemical phenotyping techniques. This report shows that the biochemical phenotyping may incorrectly identify Enterococcus faecium as S. uberis.

  2. Comparative genomics of the dairy isolate Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 against related members of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the genus Streptococcus, only Streptococcus thermophilus is used as a starter culture in food fermentations. Streptococcus macedonicus though, which belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC), is also frequently isolated from fermented foods mainly of dairy origin. Members of the SBSEC have been implicated in human endocarditis and colon cancer. Here we compare the genome sequence of the dairy isolate S. macedonicus ACA-DC 198 to the other SBSEC genomes in order to assess in silico its potential adaptation to milk and its pathogenicity status. Results Despite the fact that the SBSEC species were found tightly related based on whole genome phylogeny of streptococci, two distinct patterns of evolution were identified among them. Streptococcus macedonicus, Streptococcus infantarius CJ18 and Streptococcus pasteurianus ATCC 43144 seem to have undergone reductive evolution resulting in significantly diminished genome sizes and increased percentages of potential pseudogenes when compared to Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus. In addition, the three species seem to have lost genes for catabolizing complex plant carbohydrates and for detoxifying toxic substances previously linked to the ability of S. gallolyticus to survive in the rumen. Analysis of the S. macedonicus genome revealed features that could support adaptation to milk, including an extra gene cluster for lactose and galactose metabolism, a proteolytic system for casein hydrolysis, auxotrophy for several vitamins, an increased ability to resist bacteriophages and horizontal gene transfer events with the dairy Lactococcus lactis and S. thermophilus as potential donors. In addition, S. macedonicus lacks several pathogenicity-related genes found in S. gallolyticus. For example, S. macedonicus has retained only one (i.e. the pil3) of the three pilus gene clusters which may mediate the binding of S. gallolyticus to the extracellular matrix. Unexpectedly

  3. Streptococcus bovis meningitis and hemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam Hewitt; Sra, Harminder K; Bawa, Sandeep; Stevens, Richard

    2010-07-01

    We report a case of Streptococcus bovis (Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus) meningitis, a rare cause of central nervous system (CNS) infection in an adult, and comment on the importance of investigation of the lower gastrointestinal tract to identify a portal of entry in cases of systemic Streptococcus bovis infection. PMID:20421434

  4. Current Taxonomical Situation of Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Okura, Masatoshi; Osaki, Makoto; Nomoto, Ryohei; Arai, Sakura; Osawa, Ro; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Takamatsu, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis, a major porcine pathogen and an important zoonotic agent, is considered to be composed of phenotypically and genetically diverse strains. However, recent studies reported several "S. suis-like strains" that were identified as S. suis by commonly used methods for the identification of this bacterium, but were regarded as distinct species from S. suis according to the standards of several taxonomic analyses. Furthermore, it has been suggested that some S. suis-like strains can be assigned to several novel species. In this review, we discuss the current taxonomical situation of S. suis with a focus on (1) the classification history of the taxon of S. suis; (2) S. suis-like strains revealed by taxonomic analyses; (3) methods for detecting and identifying this species, including a novel method that can distinguish S. suis isolates from S. suis-like strains; and (4) current topics on the reclassification of S. suis-like strains. PMID:27348006

  5. Current Taxonomical Situation of Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Okura, Masatoshi; Osaki, Makoto; Nomoto, Ryohei; Arai, Sakura; Osawa, Ro; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Takamatsu, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis, a major porcine pathogen and an important zoonotic agent, is considered to be composed of phenotypically and genetically diverse strains. However, recent studies reported several “S. suis-like strains” that were identified as S. suis by commonly used methods for the identification of this bacterium, but were regarded as distinct species from S. suis according to the standards of several taxonomic analyses. Furthermore, it has been suggested that some S. suis-like strains can be assigned to several novel species. In this review, we discuss the current taxonomical situation of S. suis with a focus on (1) the classification history of the taxon of S. suis; (2) S. suis-like strains revealed by taxonomic analyses; (3) methods for detecting and identifying this species, including a novel method that can distinguish S. suis isolates from S. suis-like strains; and (4) current topics on the reclassification of S. suis-like strains. PMID:27348006

  6. Highly Variable Streptococcus oralis Strains Are Common among Viridans Streptococci Isolated from Primates.

    PubMed

    Denapaite, Dalia; Rieger, Martin; Köndgen, Sophie; Brückner, Reinhold; Ochigava, Irma; Kappeler, Peter; Mätz-Rensing, Kerstin; Leendertz, Fabian; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Viridans streptococci were obtained from primates (great apes, rhesus monkeys, and ring-tailed lemurs) held in captivity, as well as from free-living animals (chimpanzees and lemurs) for whom contact with humans is highly restricted. Isolates represented a variety of viridans streptococci, including unknown species. Streptococcus oralis was frequently isolated from samples from great apes. Genotypic methods revealed that most of the strains clustered on separate lineages outside the main cluster of human S. oralis strains. This suggests that S. oralis is part of the commensal flora in higher primates and evolved prior to humans. Many genes described as virulence factors in Streptococcus pneumoniae were present also in other viridans streptococcal genomes. Unlike in S. pneumoniae, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) gene clusters were common among viridans streptococci, and many S. oralis strains were type PI-2 (pilus islet 2) variants. S. oralis displayed a remarkable diversity of genes involved in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan (penicillin-binding proteins and MurMN) and choline-containing teichoic acid. The small noncoding cia-dependent small RNAs (csRNAs) controlled by the response regulator CiaR might contribute to the genomic diversity, since we observed novel genomic islands between duplicated csRNAs, variably present in some isolates. All S. oralis genomes contained a β-N-acetyl-hexosaminidase gene absent in S. pneumoniae, which in contrast frequently harbors the neuraminidases NanB/C, which are absent in S. oralis. The identification of S. oralis-specific genes will help us to understand their adaptation to diverse habitats. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus pneumoniae is a rare example of a human-pathogenic bacterium among viridans streptococci, which consist of commensal symbionts, such as the close relatives Streptococcus mitis and S. oralis. We have shown that S. oralis can frequently

  7. Highly Variable Streptococcus oralis Strains Are Common among Viridans Streptococci Isolated from Primates

    PubMed Central

    Denapaite, Dalia; Rieger, Martin; Köndgen, Sophie; Brückner, Reinhold; Ochigava, Irma; Kappeler, Peter; Mätz-Rensing, Kerstin; Leendertz, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viridans streptococci were obtained from primates (great apes, rhesus monkeys, and ring-tailed lemurs) held in captivity, as well as from free-living animals (chimpanzees and lemurs) for whom contact with humans is highly restricted. Isolates represented a variety of viridans streptococci, including unknown species. Streptococcus oralis was frequently isolated from samples from great apes. Genotypic methods revealed that most of the strains clustered on separate lineages outside the main cluster of human S. oralis strains. This suggests that S. oralis is part of the commensal flora in higher primates and evolved prior to humans. Many genes described as virulence factors in Streptococcus pneumoniae were present also in other viridans streptococcal genomes. Unlike in S. pneumoniae, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)–CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) gene clusters were common among viridans streptococci, and many S. oralis strains were type PI-2 (pilus islet 2) variants. S. oralis displayed a remarkable diversity of genes involved in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan (penicillin-binding proteins and MurMN) and choline-containing teichoic acid. The small noncoding cia-dependent small RNAs (csRNAs) controlled by the response regulator CiaR might contribute to the genomic diversity, since we observed novel genomic islands between duplicated csRNAs, variably present in some isolates. All S. oralis genomes contained a β-N-acetyl-hexosaminidase gene absent in S. pneumoniae, which in contrast frequently harbors the neuraminidases NanB/C, which are absent in S. oralis. The identification of S. oralis-specific genes will help us to understand their adaptation to diverse habitats. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus pneumoniae is a rare example of a human-pathogenic bacterium among viridans streptococci, which consist of commensal symbionts, such as the close relatives Streptococcus mitis and S. oralis. We have shown that S. oralis can

  8. Dual Functions of Streptococcus salivarius Urease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Weaver, Cheryl A.; Burne, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    A urease-deficient derivative of Streptococcus salivarius 57.I was constructed by allelic exchange at the ureC locus. The wild-type strain was protected against acid killing through hydrolysis of physiologically relevant concentrations of urea, whereas the mutant was not. Also, S. salivarius could use urea as a source of nitrogen for growth exclusively through a urease-dependent pathway. PMID:10913107

  9. Recombinant production of Streptococcus equisimilis streptokinase by Streptomyces lividans

    PubMed Central

    Pimienta, Elsa; Ayala, Julio C; Rodríguez, Caridad; Ramos, Astrid; Van Mellaert, Lieve; Vallín, Carlos; Anné, Jozef

    2007-01-01

    Background Streptokinase (SK) is a potent plasminogen activator with widespread clinical use as a thrombolytic agent. It is naturally secreted by several strains of beta-haemolytic streptococci. The low yields obtained in SK production, lack of developed gene transfer methodology and the pathogenesis of its natural host have been the principal reasons to search for a recombinant source for this important therapeutic protein. We report here the expression and secretion of SK by the Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces lividans. The structural gene encoding SK was fused to the Streptomyces venezuelae CBS762.70 subtilisin inhibitor (vsi) signal sequence or to the Streptomyces lividans xylanase C (xlnC) signal sequence. The native Vsi protein is translocated via the Sec pathway while the native XlnC protein uses the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway. Results SK yield in the spent culture medium of S. lividans was higher when the Sec-dependent signal peptide mediates the SK translocation. Using a 1.5 L fermentor, the secretory production of the Vsi-SK fusion protein reached up to 15 mg SK/l. SK was partially purified from the culture supernatant by DEAE-Sephacel chromatography. A 44-kDa degradation product co-eluted with the 47-kDa mature SK. The first amino acid residues of the S. lividans-produced SK were identical with those of the expected N-terminal sequence. The Vsi signal peptide was thus correctly cleaved off and the N-terminus of mature Vsi-SK fusion protein released by S. lividans remained intact. This result also implicates that the processing of the recombinant SK secreted by Streptomyces probably occurred at its C-terminal end, as in its native host Streptococcus equisimilis. The specific activity of the partially purified Streptomyces-derived SK was determined at 2661 IU/mg protein. Conclusion Heterologous expression of Streptococcus equisimilis ATCC9542 skc-2 in Streptomyces lividans was successfully achieved. SK can be translocated via both the

  10. Streptococcus caprae sp. nov., isolated from Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica).

    PubMed

    Vela, A I; Mentaberre, G; Lavín, S; Domínguez, L; Fernández-Garayzábal, J F

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical and molecular genetic studies were performed on a novel Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative, coccus-shaped organism isolated from tonsil samples of two Iberian ibexes. The micro-organism was identified as a streptococcal species based on its cellular, morphological and biochemical characteristics. 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison studies confirmed its identification as a member of the genus Streptococcus, but the organism did not correspond to any species of this genus. The nearest phylogenetic relative of the unknown coccus from ibex was Streptococcus porci 2923-03T (96.6 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Analysis based on rpoB and sodA gene sequences revealed sequence similarity values lower than 86.0 and 83.8 %, respectively, from the type strains of recognized Streptococcus species. The novel bacterial isolate was distinguished from Streptococcus porci and other Streptococcus species using biochemical tests. Based on both phenotypic and phylogenetic findings, it is proposed that the unknown bacterium be classified as representing a novel species of the genus Streptococcus, for which the name Streptococcus caprae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DICM07-02790-1CT ( = CECT 8872T = CCUG 67170T).

  11. Streptococcus caprae sp. nov., isolated from Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica).

    PubMed

    Vela, A I; Mentaberre, G; Lavín, S; Domínguez, L; Fernández-Garayzábal, J F

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical and molecular genetic studies were performed on a novel Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative, coccus-shaped organism isolated from tonsil samples of two Iberian ibexes. The micro-organism was identified as a streptococcal species based on its cellular, morphological and biochemical characteristics. 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison studies confirmed its identification as a member of the genus Streptococcus, but the organism did not correspond to any species of this genus. The nearest phylogenetic relative of the unknown coccus from ibex was Streptococcus porci 2923-03T (96.6 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Analysis based on rpoB and sodA gene sequences revealed sequence similarity values lower than 86.0 and 83.8 %, respectively, from the type strains of recognized Streptococcus species. The novel bacterial isolate was distinguished from Streptococcus porci and other Streptococcus species using biochemical tests. Based on both phenotypic and phylogenetic findings, it is proposed that the unknown bacterium be classified as representing a novel species of the genus Streptococcus, for which the name Streptococcus caprae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DICM07-02790-1CT ( = CECT 8872T = CCUG 67170T). PMID:26486442

  12. A plasmid in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M D; Guild, W R

    1979-01-01

    Plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid has been detected in three related laboratory strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Strains D39S, R36, and R36NC each contain a minimum of two copies per cell of a 2.0-megadalton plasmid (pDP1). A plasmid twice as large as this smaller one is also present in much lower quantity in these strains, but neither plasmid is present in four strains related to these or in a drug-resistant clinical isolate from Paris. The plasmid yield was not amplified in the presence of chloramphenicol. No phenotype has been correlated with the presence of pDP1, which has existed in strains carried for many years in laboratory collections. Images PMID:33961

  13. Phenotypic differentiation of Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus anginosus strains within the "Streptococcus milleri group".

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, R A; Fraser, H; Hardie, J M; Beighton, D

    1990-01-01

    A biochemical scheme was developed by which strains of Streptococcus constellatus, Streptococcus intermedius, and Streptococcus anginosus can reliably be distinguished from within the "Streptococcus milleri group." Strains identified as S. intermedius were differentiated by the ability to produce detectable levels of alpha-glucosidase, beta-galactosidase, beta-D-fucosidase, beta-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, and sialidase with 4-methylumbelliferyl-linked fluorogenic substrates in microdilution trays after 3 h of incubation at 37 degrees C, together with the production of hyaluronidase. Strains of S. constellatus and S. anginosus were differentiated by the production of alpha-glucosidase and hyaluronidase by the former and the production of beta-glucosidase by the latter. The majority of strains of the S. milleri group obtained from dental plaque were identified as S. intermedius, as were most strains isolated from abscesses of the brain and liver. Strains of S. constellatus and S. anginosus were from a wider variety of infections, both oral and nonoral, than were strains of S. intermedius, with the majority of strains from urogenital infections being identified as S. anginosus. PMID:2380375

  14. Serologic studies of Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus morbillorum by crossed immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Coleman, R M; Lambe, D W

    1979-07-01

    A reference antigen-antibody system for Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus morbillorum was established with crossed immunoelectrophoresis. A comparison of S. intermedius, S. constellatus, and S. morbillorum with crossed immunoelectrophoresis and crossed immunoelectrophoresis with intermediate gel indicated that S. intermedius and S. constellatus are closely related antigenically with as many as six common cytoplasmic antigens. S. morbillorum was antigenically more distinct; antiserum of one strain of S. morbillorum was monospecific, indicating that specific serogroups of S. morbillorum exist. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis and tandem crossed immunoelectrophoresis revealed that S. intermedius, S. constellatus, and S. morbillorum also share some common antigens with Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mitis, but S. intermedius, S. constellatus, and S. morbillorum are antigenically distinct from Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus bovis.

  15. Natural Genetic Transformation of Streptococcus mutans Growing in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yung-Hua; Lau, Peter C. Y.; Lee, Janet H.; Ellen, Richard P.; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G.

    2001-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a bacterium that has evolved to be dependent upon a biofilm “lifestyle” for survival and persistence in its natural ecosystem, dental plaque. We initiated this study to identify the genes involved in the development of genetic competence in S. mutans and to assay the natural genetic transformability of biofilm-grown cells. Using genomic analyses, we identified a quorum-sensing peptide pheromone signaling system similar to those previously found in other streptococci. The genetic locus of this system comprises three genes, comC, comD, and comE, that encode a precursor to the peptide competence factor, a histidine kinase, and a response regulator, respectively. We deduced the sequence of comC and its active pheromone product and chemically synthesized the corresponding 21-amino-acid competence-stimulating peptide (CSP). Addition of CSP to noncompetent cells facilitated increased transformation frequencies, with typically 1% of the total cell population transformed. To further confirm the roles of these genes in genetic competence, we inactivated them by insertion-duplication mutagenesis or allelic replacement followed by assays of transformation efficiency. We also demonstrated that biofilm-grown S. mutans cells were transformed at a rate 10- to 600-fold higher than planktonic S. mutans cells. Donor DNA included a suicide plasmid, S. mutans chromosomal DNA harboring a heterologous erythromycin resistance gene, and a replicative plasmid. The cells were optimally transformed during the formation of 8- to 16-h-old biofilms primarily consisting of microcolonies on solid surfaces. We also found that dead cells in the biofilms could act as donors of a chromosomally encoded antibiotic resistance determinant. This work demonstrated that a peptide pheromone system controls genetic competence in S. mutans and that the system functions optimally when the cells are living in actively growing biofilms. PMID:11208787

  16. Production of Indole-3-Acetic Acid via the Indole-3-Acetamide Pathway in the Plant-Beneficial Bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 Is Inhibited by ZnO Nanoparticles but Enhanced by CuO Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jia; McLean, Joan E.; Britt, David W.; Zhan, Jixun; Anderson, Anne J.

    2012-01-01

    The beneficial bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 produces indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), a plant growth regulator. However, the pathway involved in IAA production in this bacterium has not been reported. In this paper we describe the involvement of the indole-3-acetamide (IAM) pathway in IAA production in P. chlororaphis O6 and the effects of CuO and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs). Sublethal levels of CuO and ZnO NPs differentially affected the levels of IAA secreted in medium containing tryptophan as the precursor. After 15 h of growth, CuO NP-exposed cells had metabolized more tryptophan than the control and ZnO NP-challenged cells. The CuO NP-treated cells produced higher IAA levels than control cultures lacking NPs. In contrast, ZnO NPs inhibited IAA production. Mixing of CuO and ZnO NPs resulted in an intermediate level of IAA production relative to the levels in the separate CuO and ZnO NP treatments. The effect of CuO NPs on IAA levels could be duplicated by ions at the concentrations released from the NPs. However, ion release did not account for the inhibition caused by the ZnO NPs. The mechanism underlying changes in IAA levels cannot be accounted for by effects on transcript accumulation from genes encoding a tryptophan permease or the IAM hydrolase in 15-h cultures. These findings raise the issue of whether sublethal doses of NPs would modify the beneficial effects of association between plants and bacteria. PMID:22210218

  17. Streptococcus pyogenes arginine and citrulline catabolism promotes infection and modulates innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Cusumano, Zachary T; Watson, Michael E; Caparon, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    A bacterium's ability to acquire nutrients from its host during infection is an essential component of pathogenesis. For the Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes, catabolism of the amino acid arginine via the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway supplements energy production and provides protection against acid stress in vitro. Its expression is enhanced in murine models of infection, suggesting an important role in vivo. To gain insight into the function of the ADI pathway in pathogenesis, the virulence of mutants defective in each of its enzymes was examined. Mutants unable to use arginine (ΔArcA) or citrulline (ΔArcB) were attenuated for carriage in a murine model of asymptomatic mucosal colonization. However, in a murine model of inflammatory infection of cutaneous tissue, the ΔArcA mutant was attenuated but the ΔArcB mutant was hyperattenuated, revealing an unexpected tissue-specific role for citrulline metabolism in pathogenesis. When mice defective for the arginine-dependent production of nitric oxide (iNOS(-/-)) were infected with the ΔArcA mutant, cutaneous virulence was rescued, demonstrating that the ability of S. pyogenes to utilize arginine was dispensable in the absence of nitric oxide-mediated innate immunity. This work demonstrates the importance of arginine and citrulline catabolism and suggests a novel mechanism of virulence by which S. pyogenes uses its metabolism to modulate innate immunity through depletion of an essential host nutrient.

  18. Functional incorporation of beef-heart cytochrome c oxidase into membranes of Streptococcus cremoris.

    PubMed

    Driessen, A J; de Vrij, W; Konings, W N

    1986-02-01

    Beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase has been incorporated into membrane vesicles derived from the homofermentative lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus cremoris. Proteoliposomes containing cytochrome c oxidase were fused with the bacterial membrane vesicles by means of a freeze/thaw sonication technique. Evidence that membrane fusion has taken place is presented by the demonstration that nonexchangeable fluorescent phospholipid probes, originally present only in the bacterial membrane or only in the liposomal membrane, are diluted in the membrane after fusion and, by sucrose gradient centrifugation, indicating a buoyant density of the membranes after fusion in between those of the starting membrane preparations. The fused membranes are endowed with a relatively low ion permeability which makes it possible to generate a high proton motive force (100 mV, inside negative and alkaline) by cytochrome-c-oxidase-mediated oxidation of the electron donor system ascorbate/N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine/cytochrome c. In the fused membranes this proton motive force can drive the uptake of several amino acids via secondary transport systems. The incorporation procedure described for primary proton pumps in biological membranes opens attractive possibilities for studies of proton-motive-force-dependent processes in isolated membrane vesicles from bacterial or eukaryotic origin which lack a suitable proton-motive-force-generating system.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the d-Amino Acid Catabolism Bacterium Phaeobacter sp. Strain JL2886, Isolated from Deep Seawater of the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yingnan; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zilian; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Phaeobacter sp. strain JL2886, isolated from deep seawater of the South China Sea, can catabolize d-amino acids. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Phaeobacter sp. JL2886. It comprises ~4.06 Mbp, with a G+C content of 61.52%. A total of 3,913 protein-coding genes and 10 genes related to d-amino acid catabolism were obtained. PMID:27587825

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the d-Amino Acid Catabolism Bacterium Phaeobacter sp. Strain JL2886, Isolated from Deep Seawater of the South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yingnan; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Phaeobacter sp. strain JL2886, isolated from deep seawater of the South China Sea, can catabolize d-amino acids. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Phaeobacter sp. JL2886. It comprises ~4.06 Mbp, with a G+C content of 61.52%. A total of 3,913 protein-coding genes and 10 genes related to d-amino acid catabolism were obtained. PMID:27587825

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of the d-Amino Acid Catabolism Bacterium Phaeobacter sp. Strain JL2886, Isolated from Deep Seawater of the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yingnan; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zilian; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Phaeobacter sp. strain JL2886, isolated from deep seawater of the South China Sea, can catabolize d-amino acids. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Phaeobacter sp. JL2886. It comprises ~4.06 Mbp, with a G+C content of 61.52%. A total of 3,913 protein-coding genes and 10 genes related to d-amino acid catabolism were obtained.

  2. A severe case of Lemierre Syndrome with Streptococcus constellatus Infection.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Midori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Kitazaki, Takeshi; Fukuda, Minoru; Hashiguchi, Kohji; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old Japanese male presenting with high fever, headache, and disturbance of consciousness was hospitalized. Contrast computed tomography revealed thrombophlebitis in the internal jugular vein and abscesses in the posterior neck region, pharynx, and pterygoid muscle. Streptococcus constellatus infection was confirmed by culture of blood samples, and the patient was diagnosed with Lemierre syndrome. In addition to the administration of antibiotics and anticoagulants, abscess drainage was performed. S. constellatus should be considered as a causative bacterium in elderly patients with Lemierre syndrome. PMID:25410567

  3. Sialylation of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is essential for capsule expression but is not responsible for the main capsular epitope.

    PubMed

    Lecours, Marie-Pier; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Okura, Masatoshi; Segura, Mariela; Goyette-Desjardins, Guillaume; Van Calsteren, Marie-Rose; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2012-09-01

    The capsular polysaccharide is a critical virulence factor of the swine and zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis serotype 2. The capsule of this bacterium is composed of five different sugars, including terminal sialic acid. To evaluate the role of sialic acid in the pathogenesis of the infection, the neuC gene, encoding for an enzyme essential for sialic acid biosynthesis, was inactivated in a highly virulent S. suis serotype 2 strain. Using transmission electron microscopy, it was shown that inactivation of neuC resulted in loss of expression of the whole capsule. Compared to the parent strain, the ΔneuC mutant strain was more phagocytosed by macrophages and was also severely impaired in virulence in a mouse infection model. Both native and desialylated S. suis serotype 2 purified capsular polysaccharides were recognized by a polyclonal anti-whole cell S. suis serotype 2 serum and a monospecific polyclonal anti-capsule serotype 2 serum. In contrast, only the native capsular polysaccharide was recognized by a monoclonal antibody specific for the sialic acid moiety of the serotype 2 capsule. Together, our results infer that sialylation of S. suis serotype 2 may be essential for capsule expression, but that this sugar is not the main epitope of this serotype.

  4. Streptococcus rubneri sp. nov., isolated from the human throat.

    PubMed

    Huch, Melanie; De Bruyne, Katrien; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Bub, Achim; Cho, Gyu-Sung; Watzl, Bernhard; Snauwaert, Isabel; Franz, Charles M A P; Vandamme, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The novel, Gram-stain-positive, ovoid, lactic acid bacterial isolates LMG 27205, LMG 27206, LMG 27207(T) and MRI-F 18 were obtained from throat samples of healthy humans. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses indicated that these isolates belong to the genus Streptococcus, specifically the Streptococcus mitis group, with Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus mitis as the nearest neighbours (99.45 and 98.56 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the respective type strains). Genotypic fingerprinting by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), DNA-DNA hybridizations, comparative sequence analysis of pheS, rpoA and atpA and physiological and biochemical tests revealed that these bacteria formed a taxon well separated from its nearest neighbours and other species of the genus Streptococcus with validly published names and, therefore, represent a novel species, for which the name Streptococcus rubneri sp. nov. is proposed, with LMG 27207(T) ( = DSM 26920(T)) as the type strain.

  5. Endosymbiosis in trypanosomatids: the genomic cooperation between bacterium and host in the synthesis of essential amino acids is heavily influenced by multiple horizontal gene transfers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Trypanosomatids of the genera Angomonas and Strigomonas live in a mutualistic association characterized by extensive metabolic cooperation with obligate endosymbiotic Betaproteobacteria. However, the role played by the symbiont has been more guessed by indirect means than evidenced. Symbiont-harboring trypanosomatids, in contrast to their counterparts lacking symbionts, exhibit lower nutritional requirements and are autotrophic for essential amino acids. To evidence the symbiont’s contributions to this autotrophy, entire genomes of symbionts and trypanosomatids with and without symbionts were sequenced here. Results Analyses of the essential amino acid pathways revealed that most biosynthetic routes are in the symbiont genome. By contrast, the host trypanosomatid genome contains fewer genes, about half of which originated from different bacterial groups, perhaps only one of which (ornithine cyclodeaminase, EC:4.3.1.12) derived from the symbiont. Nutritional, enzymatic, and genomic data were jointly analyzed to construct an integrated view of essential amino acid metabolism in symbiont-harboring trypanosomatids. This comprehensive analysis showed perfect concordance among all these data, and revealed that the symbiont contains genes for enzymes that complete essential biosynthetic routes for the host amino acid production, thus explaining the low requirement for these elements in symbiont-harboring trypanosomatids. Phylogenetic analyses show that the cooperation between symbionts and their hosts is complemented by multiple horizontal gene transfers, from bacterial lineages to trypanosomatids, that occurred several times in the course of their evolution. Transfers occur preferentially in parts of the pathways that are missing from other eukaryotes. Conclusion We have herein uncovered the genetic and evolutionary bases of essential amino acid biosynthesis in several trypanosomatids with and without endosymbionts, explaining and complementing decades of

  6. Draft genome sequence of Sporolactobacillus inulinus strain CASD, an efficient D-lactic acid-producing bacterium with high-concentration lactate tolerance capability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bo; Su, Fei; Wang, Limin; Xu, Ke; Zhao, Bo; Xu, Ping

    2011-10-01

    Sporolactobacillus inulinus CASD is an efficient D-lactic acid producer with high optical purity. Here we report for the first time the draft genome sequence of S. inulinus (2,930,096 bp). The large number of annotated two-component system genes makes it possible to explore the mechanism of extraordinary lactate tolerance of S. inulinus CASD.

  7. Streptococcus pneumoniae NanC

    PubMed Central

    Owen, C. David; Lukacik, Petra; Potter, Jane A.; Sleator, Olivia; Taylor, Garry L.; Walsh, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human pathogen that causes a range of disease states. Sialidases are important bacterial virulence factors. There are three pneumococcal sialidases: NanA, NanB, and NanC. NanC is an unusual sialidase in that its primary reaction product is 2-deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac2en, also known as DANA), a nonspecific hydrolytic sialidase inhibitor. The production of Neu5Ac2en from α2–3-linked sialosides by the catalytic domain is confirmed within a crystal structure. A covalent complex with 3-fluoro-β-N-acetylneuraminic acid is also presented, suggesting a common mechanism with other sialidases up to the final step of product formation. A conformation change in an active site hydrophobic loop on ligand binding constricts the entrance to the active site. In addition, the distance between the catalytic acid/base (Asp-315) and the ligand anomeric carbon is unusually short. These features facilitate a novel sialidase reaction in which the final step of product formation is direct abstraction of the C3 proton by the active site aspartic acid, forming Neu5Ac2en. NanC also possesses a carbohydrate-binding module, which is shown to bind α2–3- and α2–6-linked sialosides, as well as N-acetylneuraminic acid, which is captured in the crystal structure following hydration of Neu5Ac2en by NanC. Overall, the pneumococcal sialidases show remarkable mechanistic diversity while maintaining a common structural scaffold. PMID:26370075

  8. Role of two amino acid residues' insertion on thermal stability of thermophilic α-amylase AMY121 from a deep sea bacterium Bacillus sp. SCSIO 15121.

    PubMed

    Li, Lizhen; Yang, Jian; Li, Jie; Long, Lijuan; Xiao, Yunzhu; Tian, Xinpeng; Wang, Fazuo; Zhang, Si

    2015-05-01

    α-Amylases from Bacillus licheniformis (BLA) and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BAA) are both important industrial enzymes with high similarity in structure but significant differences in thermostability. The mechanisms underlying this discrepancy are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the role of two amino acids' insertion on the thermostability of these two group amylases. A newly obtained thermophilic amylase AMY121 was found much closer to BLA in both primary structure and enzymological properties. Two amino acids' insertion widespread among BAA group α-amylases was identified as one of the key factors leading to the thermostability differences, since thermostability of insertion mutants (AMY121-EG and AMY121-AA) from AMY121 significantly decreased, while that of deletion mutant from BAA increased. Moreover, we proposed that conformational disturbance caused by insertion mutation might weaken the calcium-binding affinity and consequently decrease the enzyme thermostability.

  9. Streptococcus hongkongensis sp. nov., isolated from a patient with an infected puncture wound and from a marine flatfish.

    PubMed

    Lau, Susanna K P; Curreem, Shirly O T; Lin, Cherry C N; Fung, Ami M Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2013-07-01

    A bacterium, HKU30(T), was isolated from the infected tissue of a patient with wound infection after puncture by a fish fin. Cells are facultative anaerobic, non-spore-forming, non-motile, Gram-positive cocci arranged in chains. Colonies were non-haemolytic. The strain was catalase, oxidase, urease and Voges-Proskauer test negative. It reacted with Lancefield's group G antisera and was resistant to optochin. It grew on bile aesculin agar and in 5 % NaCl. It was unidentified by three commercial identification systems. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the bacterium shared 98.2, 97.7, 97.4 and 97.1 % nucleotide identities with Streptococcus iniae, Streptococcus pseudoporcinus, Streptococcus parauberis and Streptococcus uberis, respectively. The DNA G+C content was 35.6 ± 0.9 mol% (mean ± sd). In view of the occupational exposure of the patient, an epidemiological study was performed to isolate the bacterium from marine fish. Two strains, with similar phenotypic and genotypic characteristics to those of HKU30(T), were isolated from a three-lined tongue sole (Cynoglossus abbreviatus) and an olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of four additional housekeeping genes, groEL, gyrB, sodA and rpoB, showed that the three isolates formed a distinct branch among known species of the genus Streptococcus, being most closely related to S. parauberis (CCUG 39954(T)). DNA-DNA hybridization demonstrated ≤ 53.8 % DNA relatedness between the three isolates and related species of the genus Streptococcus. A novel species, Streptococcus hongkongensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is HKU30(T) ( = DSM 26014(T) = CECT 8154(T)).

  10. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C.; Phelps, T.

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  11. Identification and quantification of the caproic acid-producing bacterium Clostridium kluyveri in the fermentation of pit mud used for Chinese strong-aroma type liquor production.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-long; Du, Hai; Xu, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Chinese strong-aroma type liquor (CSAL) is a popular distilled alcoholic beverage in China. It is produced by a complex fermentation process that is conducted in pits in the ground. Ethyl caproate is a key flavor compound in CSAL and is thought to originate from caproic acid produced by Clostridia inhabiting the fermentation pit mud. However, the particular species of Clostridium associated with this production are poorly understood and problematic to quantify by culturing. In this study, a total of 28 closest relatives including 15 Clostridia and 8 Bacilli species in pit muds from three CSAL distilleries, were detected by culture-dependent and -independent methods. Among them, Clostridium kluyveri was identified as the main producer of caproic acid. One representative strain C. kluyveri N6 could produce caproic, butyric and octanoic acids and their corresponding ethyl esters, contributing significantly to CSAL flavor. A real time quantitative PCR assay of C. kluyveri in pit muds developed showed that a concentration of 1.79×10(7) 16S rRNA gene copies/g pit mud in LZ-old pit was approximately six times higher than that in HLM and YH pits and sixty times higher than that in LZ-new pit respectively. This method can be used to improve the management of pit mud microbiology and its impact on CSAL quality. PMID:26267890

  12. In Vitro Effect of Zingiber officinale Extract on Growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Arash; Aghayan, Shabnam; Zaker, Saeed; Shakeri, Mahdieh; Entezari, Navid; Lawaf, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Tooth decay is an infectious disease of microbial origin. Considering the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance due to their overuse and also their side effects, medicinal plants are now considered for use against bacterial infections. This study aimed to assess the effects of different concentrations of Zingiber officinale extract on proliferation of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in vitro. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in two sets of 10 test tubes for each bacterium (total of 20). Standard amounts of bacterial suspension were added; 100ƛ of each tube was cultured on prepared solid agar plates and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in another 20 tubes and 100ƛ of each tube was added to blood agar culture medium while being prepared. The mixture was transferred to the plates. The bacteria were inoculated on plates and incubated as described. Results. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 0.02 mg/mL for S. mutans and 0.3 mg/mL for S. sanguinis. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was 0.04 mg for S. mutans and 0.6 mg for S. sanguinis. Conclusion. Zingiber officinale extract has significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans and S. sanguinis cariogenic microorganisms.

  13. In Vitro Effect of Zingiber officinale Extract on Growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Arash; Aghayan, Shabnam; Zaker, Saeed; Shakeri, Mahdieh; Entezari, Navid; Lawaf, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Tooth decay is an infectious disease of microbial origin. Considering the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance due to their overuse and also their side effects, medicinal plants are now considered for use against bacterial infections. This study aimed to assess the effects of different concentrations of Zingiber officinale extract on proliferation of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in vitro. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in two sets of 10 test tubes for each bacterium (total of 20). Standard amounts of bacterial suspension were added; 100ƛ of each tube was cultured on prepared solid agar plates and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in another 20 tubes and 100ƛ of each tube was added to blood agar culture medium while being prepared. The mixture was transferred to the plates. The bacteria were inoculated on plates and incubated as described. Results. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 0.02 mg/mL for S. mutans and 0.3 mg/mL for S. sanguinis. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was 0.04 mg for S. mutans and 0.6 mg for S. sanguinis. Conclusion. Zingiber officinale extract has significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans and S. sanguinis cariogenic microorganisms. PMID:26347778

  14. Dethiosulfatibacter aminovorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel thiosulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from coastal marine sediment via sulfate-reducing enrichment with Casamino acids.

    PubMed

    Takii, Susumu; Hanada, Satoshi; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Ueno, Yutaka; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Ibe, Akihiro; Matsuura, Katsumi

    2007-10-01

    A sulfate-reducing enrichment culture originating from coastal marine sediment of the eutrophic Tokyo Bay, Japan, was successfully established with Casamino acids as a substrate. A thiosulfate reducer, strain C/G2(T), was isolated from the enrichment culture after further enrichment with glutamate. Cells of strain C/G2(T) were non-motile rods (0.6-0.8 microm x 2.2-4.8 microm) and were found singly or in pairs and sometimes in short chains. Spores were not formed. Cells of strain C/G2(T) stained Gram-negatively, despite possessing Gram-positive cell walls. The optimum temperature for growth was 28-30 degrees C, the optimum pH was around 7.8 and the optimum salt concentration was 20-30 g l(-1). Lactate, pyruvate, serine, cysteine, threonine, glutamate, histidine, lysine, arginine, Casamino acids, peptone and yeast extract were fermented as single substrates and no sugar was used as a fermentative substrate. A Stickland reaction was observed with some pairs of amino acids. Fumarate, alanine, proline, phenylalanine, tryptophan, glutamine and aspartate were utilized only in the presence of thiosulfate. Strain C/G2(T) fermented glutamate to H2, CO2, acetate and propionate. Thiosulfate and elemental sulfur were reduced to sulfide. Sulfate, sulfite and nitrate were not utilized as electron acceptors. The growth of strain C/G2(T) on Casamino acids or glutamate was enhanced by co-culturing with Desulfovibrio sp. isolated from the original mixed culture enriched with Casamino acids. The DNA G+C content of strain C/G2(T) was 41.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain C/G2(T) formed a distinct cluster with species of the genus Sedimentibacter. The closest relative was Sedimentibacter hydroxybenzoicus (with a gene sequence similarity of 91 %). On the basis of its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, strain C/G2(T) (=JCM 13356(T)=NBRC 101112(T)=DSM 17477(T)) is proposed as representing a new genus and novel species, Dethiosulfatibacter

  15. Lactic Acid Bacterium and Yeast Microbiotas of 19 Sourdoughs Used for Traditional/Typical Italian Breads: Interactions between Ingredients and Microbial Species Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Minervini, Fabio; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Lattanzi, Anna; Antonielli, Livio; Cardinali, Gianluigi; Cappelle, Stefan; Gobbetti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The study of the microbiotas of 19 Italian sourdoughs used for the manufacture of traditional/typical breads allowed the identification, through a culture-dependent approach, of 20 and 4 species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts, respectively. Numerically, the most frequent LAB isolates were Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis (ca. 28% of the total LAB isolates), Lactobacillus plantarum (ca. 16%), and Lactobacillus paralimentarius (ca. 14%). Saccharomyces cerevisiae was identified in 16 sourdoughs. Candida humilis, Kazachstania barnettii, and Kazachstania exigua were also identified. As shown by principal component analysis (PCA), a correlation was found between the ingredients, especially the type of flour, the microbial community, and the biochemical features of sourdoughs. Triticum durum flours were characterized by the high level of maltose, glucose, fructose, and free amino acids (FAA) correlated with the sole or main presence of obligately heterofermentative LAB, the lowest number of facultatively heterofermentative strains, and the low cell density of yeasts in the mature sourdoughs. This study highlighted, through a comprehensive and comparative approach, the dominant microbiotas of 19 Italian sourdoughs, which determined some of the peculiarities of the resulting traditional/typical Italian breads. PMID:22156414

  16. Genome-scale reconstruction of the Streptococcus pyogenes M49 metabolic network reveals growth requirements and indicates potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Levering, Jennifer; Fiedler, Tomas; Sieg, Antje; van Grinsven, Koen W A; Hering, Silvio; Veith, Nadine; Olivier, Brett G; Klett, Lara; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Teusink, Bas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Kummer, Ursula

    2016-08-20

    Genome-scale metabolic models comprise stoichiometric relations between metabolites, as well as associations between genes and metabolic reactions and facilitate the analysis of metabolism. We computationally reconstructed the metabolic network of the lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes M49. Initially, we based the reconstruction on genome annotations and already existing and curated metabolic networks of Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis. This initial draft was manually curated with the final reconstruction accounting for 480 genes associated with 576 reactions and 558 metabolites. In order to constrain the model further, we performed growth experiments of wild type and arcA deletion strains of S. pyogenes M49 in a chemically defined medium and calculated nutrient uptake and production fluxes. We additionally performed amino acid auxotrophy experiments to test the consistency of the model. The established genome-scale model can be used to understand the growth requirements of the human pathogen S. pyogenes and define optimal and suboptimal conditions, but also to describe differences and similarities between S. pyogenes and related lactic acid bacteria such as L. lactis in order to find strategies to reduce the growth of the pathogen and propose drug targets. PMID:26970054

  17. Modeling the acid-base properties of bacterial surfaces: A combined spectroscopic and potentiometric study of the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Leone, Laura; Ferri, Diego; Manfredi, Carla; Persson, Per; Shchukarev, Andrei; Sjöberg, Staffan; Loring, John

    2007-09-15

    In this study, macroscopic and spectroscopic data were combined to develop a surface complexation model that describes the acid-base properties of Bacillus subtilis. The bacteria were freeze-dried and then resuspended in 0.1 M NaCl ionic medium. Macroscopic measurements included potentiometric acid-base titrations and electrophoretic mobility measurements. In addition, ATR-FTIR spectra of wet pastes from suspensions of Bacillus subtilis at different pH values were collected. The least-squares program MAGPIE was used to generate a surface complexation model that takes into account the presence of three acid-base sites on the surface: tripple bond COOH, tripple bond NH+, and tripple bond PO-, which were identified previously by XPS measurements. Both potentiometric titration data and ATR-FTIR spectra were used quantitatively, and electrostatic effects at the charged bacterial surface were accounted for using the constant capacitance model. The model was calculated using two different approaches: in the first one XPS data were used to constrain the ratio of the total concentrations of all three surface sites. The capacitance of the double layer, the total buffer capacity, and the deprotonation constants of the tripple bond NH+, tripple bond POH, and tripple bond COOH species were determined in the fit. A second approach is presented in which the ratio determined by XPS of the total concentrations of tripple bond NH+ to tripple bond PO- sites is relaxed. The total concentration of tripple bond PO- sites was determined in the fit, while the deprotonation constant for tripple bond POH was manually varied until the minimization led to a model which predicted an isoelectric point that resulted in consistency with electrophoretic mobility data. The model explains well the buffering capacity of Bacillus subtilis suspensions in a wide pH range (between pH=3 and pH=9) which is of considerable environmental interest. In particular, a similar quantitative use of the IR data

  18. Methylocystis bryophila sp. nov., a facultatively methanotrophic bacterium from acidic Sphagnum peat, and emended description of the genus Methylocystis (ex Whittenbury et al. 1970) Bowman et al. 1993.

    PubMed

    Belova, Svetlana E; Kulichevskaya, Irina S; Bodelier, Paul L E; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2013-03-01

    A novel species is proposed for two facultatively methanotrophic representatives of the genus Methylocystis, strains H2s(T) and S284, which were isolated from an acidic (pH 4.3) Sphagnum peat-bog lake (Teufelssee, Germany) and an acidic (pH 3.8) peat bog (European North Russia), respectively. Cells of strains H2s(T) and S284 are aerobic, Gram-negative, non-motile, curved coccoids or short rods that contain an intracytoplasmic membrane system typical of type-II methanotrophs. They possess both a soluble and a particulate methane monooxygenase (MMO); the latter is represented by two isozymes, pMMO1 and pMMO2. The preferred growth substrates are methane and methanol. In the absence of C1 substrates, however, these methanotrophs are capable of slow growth on acetate. Atmospheric nitrogen is fixed by means of an aerotolerant nitrogenase. Strains H2s(T) and S284 grow between pH 4.2 and 7.6 (optimum pH 6.0-6.5) and at 8-37 °C (optimum 25-30 °C). The major fatty acids are C18 : 1ω8c, C18 : 1ω7c and C16 : 1ω7c; the major quinone is Q-8. The DNA G+C content is 62.0-62.3 mol%. Strains H2s(T) and S284 share identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, which displayed 96.6-97.3 % similarity to sequences of other taxonomically characterized members of the genus Methylocystis. Therefore, strains H2s(T) and S284 are classified as members of a novel species, for which the name Methylocystis bryophila sp. nov. is proposed; strain H2s(T) ( = DSM 21852(T)  = VKM B-2545(T)) is the type strain. PMID:22707532

  19. Pyruvate oxidase influences the sugar utilization pattern and capsule production in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Sandra M; Farshchi Andisi, Vahid; Gradstedt, Henrik; Neef, Jolanda; Kuipers, Oscar P; Neves, Ana R; Bijlsma, Jetta J E

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate oxidase is a key function in the metabolism and lifestyle of many lactic acid bacteria and its activity depends on the presence of environmental oxygen. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the protein has been suggested to play a major role in metabolism and has been implicated in virulence, oxidative stress survival and death in stationary phase. Under semi-aerobic conditions, transcriptomic and metabolite profiling analysis of a spxB mutant grown on glucose showed minor changes compared to the wild type, apart from the significant induction of two operons involved in carbohydrate uptake and processing. This induction leads to a change in the sugar utilization capabilities of the bacterium, as indicated by the analysis of the growth profiles of the D39 parent and spxB mutant on alternative carbohydrates. Metabolic analysis and growth experiments showed that inactivation of SpxB has no effect on the glucose fermentation pattern, except under aerobic conditions. More importantly, we show that mutation of spxB results in the production of increased amounts of capsule, the major virulence factor of S. pneumoniae. Part of this increase can be attributed to induction of capsule operon (cps) transcription. Therefore, we propose that S. pneumoniae utilizes pyruvate oxidase as an indirect sensor of the oxygenation of the environment, resulting in the adaption of its nutritional capability and the amount of capsule to survive in the host.

  20. Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus canis, and Arcanobacterium phocae of healthy Canadian farmed mink and mink with pododermatitis.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Gabhan; McLean, John; Hunter, D Bruce; Brash, Marina; Slavic, Durda; Pearl, David L; Boerlin, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Pododermatitis is a disease of concern for mink breeders in Canada and worldwide, as it causes discomfort and lowers the breeding rates on farms affected by the disease. Unfortunately, the etiology and pathogenesis of pododermatitis are still unknown. In this study, we compared Staphylococcus spp. and Streptococcus canis isolates from healthy mink with isolates from animals with pododermatitis on 2 farms in Ontario. Almost all hemolytic Staphylococcus spp. isolated were shown to be Staphylococcus delphini Group A by 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence analysis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) did not reveal any S. delphini or S. canis clonal lineages specifically associated with pododermatitis, which suggests that these bacteria do not act as primary pathogens, but does not dismiss their potential roles as opportunistic pathogens. While S. delphini and S. canis were the most prevalent bacterial pathogens in mink pododermatitis, they were also present in samples from healthy mink. Arcanobacterium phocae is occasionally isolated from pododermatitis cases, but is difficult to recover with conventional culture methods due to its slow growth. A quantitative real-time PCR was developed for the detection of A. phocae and was tested on 138 samples of footpad tissues from 14 farms. The bacterium was detected only in pododermatitis-endemic farms in Canada and was at higher concentrations in tissues from infected footpads than in healthy tissues. This finding suggests that A. phocae is involved in the pathogenesis of pododermatitis.

  1. Targeted Killing of Streptococcus mutans by a Pheromone-Guided “Smart” Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Randal ; He, Jian; Yarbrough, Daniel K.; Qi, Fengxia; Anderson, Maxwell H.; Shi, Wenyuan

    2006-01-01

    Within the repertoire of antibiotics available to a prescribing clinician, the majority affect a broad range of microorganisms, including the normal flora. The ecological disruption resulting from antibiotic treatment frequently results in secondary infections or other negative clinical consequences. To address this problem, our laboratory has recently developed a new class of pathogen-selective molecules, called specifically (or selectively) targeted antimicrobial peptides (STAMPs), based on the fusion of a species-specific targeting peptide domain with a wide-spectrum antimicrobial peptide domain. In the current study, we focused on achieving targeted killing of Streptococcus mutans, a cavity-causing bacterium that resides in a multispecies microbial community (dental plaque). In particular, we explored the possibility of utilizing a pheromone produced by S. mutans, namely, the competence stimulating peptide (CSP), as a STAMP targeting domain to mediate S. mutans-specific delivery of an antimicrobial peptide domain. We discovered that STAMPs constructed with peptides derived from CSP were potent against S. mutans grown in liquid or biofilm states but did not affect other oral streptococci tested. Further studies showed that an 8-amino-acid region within the CSP sequence is sufficient for targeted delivery of the antimicrobial peptide domain to S. mutans. The STAMPs presented here are capable of eliminating S. mutans from multispecies biofilms without affecting closely related noncariogenic oral streptococci, indicating the potential of these molecules to be developed into “probiotic” antibiotics which could selectively eliminate pathogens while preserving the protective benefits of a healthy normal flora. PMID:17060534

  2. Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus canis, and Arcanobacterium phocae of healthy Canadian farmed mink and mink with pododermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Gabhan; McLean, John; Hunter, D. Bruce; Brash, Marina; Slavic, Durda; Pearl, David L.; Boerlin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pododermatitis is a disease of concern for mink breeders in Canada and worldwide, as it causes discomfort and lowers the breeding rates on farms affected by the disease. Unfortunately, the etiology and pathogenesis of pododermatitis are still unknown. In this study, we compared Staphylococcus spp. and Streptococcus canis isolates from healthy mink with isolates from animals with pododermatitis on 2 farms in Ontario. Almost all hemolytic Staphylococcus spp. isolated were shown to be Staphylococcus delphini Group A by 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence analysis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) did not reveal any S. delphini or S. canis clonal lineages specifically associated with pododermatitis, which suggests that these bacteria do not act as primary pathogens, but does not dismiss their potential roles as opportunistic pathogens. While S. delphini and S. canis were the most prevalent bacterial pathogens in mink pododermatitis, they were also present in samples from healthy mink. Arcanobacterium phocae is occasionally isolated from pododermatitis cases, but is difficult to recover with conventional culture methods due to its slow growth. A quantitative real-time PCR was developed for the detection of A. phocae and was tested on 138 samples of footpad tissues from 14 farms. The bacterium was detected only in pododermatitis-endemic farms in Canada and was at higher concentrations in tissues from infected footpads than in healthy tissues. This finding suggests that A. phocae is involved in the pathogenesis of pododermatitis. PMID:25852228

  3. Acid-base titrations of functional groups on the surface of the thermophilic bacterium Anoxybacillus flavithermus: comparing a chemical equilibrium model with ATR-IR spectroscopic data.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Hannah T M; Bremer, Phil J; Daughney, Christopher J; McQuillan, A James

    2007-02-27

    Acid-base functional groups at the surface of Anoxybacillus flavithermus (AF) were assigned from the modeling of batch titration data of bacterial suspensions and compared with those determined from in situ infrared spectroscopic titration analysis. The computer program FITMOD was used to generate a two-site Donnan model (site 1: pKa = 3.26, wet concn = 2.46 x 10(-4) mol g(-1); site 2: pKa = 6.12, wet concn = 6.55 x 10(-5) mol g(-1)), which was able to describe data for whole exponential phase cells from both batch acid-base titrations at 0.01 M ionic strength and electrophoretic mobility measurements over a range of different pH values and ionic strengths. In agreement with information on the composition of bacterial cell walls and a considerable body of modeling literature, site 1 of the model was assigned to carboxyl groups, and site 2 was assigned to amino groups. pH difference IR spectra acquired by in situ attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the presence of carboxyl groups. The spectra appear to show a carboxyl pKa in the 3.3-4.0 range. Further peaks were assigned to phosphodiester groups, which deprotonated at slightly lower pH. The presence of amino groups could not be confirmed or discounted by IR spectroscopy, but a positively charged group corresponding to site 2 was implicated by electrophoretic mobility data. Carboxyl group speciation over a pH range of 2.3-10.3 at two different ionic strengths was further compared to modeling predictions. While model predictions were strongly influenced by the ionic strength change, pH difference IR data showed no significant change. This meant that modeling predictions agreed reasonably well with the IR data for 0.5 M ionic strength but not for 0.01 M ionic strength.

  4. Purification and Some Properties of Diplococcin from Streptococcus cremoris 346

    PubMed Central

    Davey, G. P.; Richardson, B. C.

    1981-01-01

    Eleven of 150 Streptococcus cremoris strains examined produced the bacteriocin diplococcin. The diplococcin activity spectrum was restricted to S. cremoris and Streptococcus lactis strains, and none of a wide range of other gram-positive or gram-negative strains were inhibited. The diplococcin produced by S. cremoris 346 was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and column chromatography. Purified diplococcin was very unstable at room temperature and lost 75% of its activity after heating at 100°C for 1 min. The proteolytic enzymes trypsin, pronase, and α-chymotrypsin completely inactivated diplococcin. The amino acid composition showed a high content of acidic and neutral acids and a correspondingly low content of basic amino acids, including one residue of ornithine per mole. From the amino acid analysis a molecular weight of 5,300 was estimated. Diplococcin was readily distinguished from the S. lactis bacteriocin nisin by its restricted activity spectrum, its biological properties, and by cross-reaction experiments. PMID:16345704

  5. Pigment Production by Streptococcus agalactiae in Quasi-Defined Media

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Fraile, Manuel; Sampedro, Antonio; Rodríguez-Granger, Javier; García-Peña, Maria Luisa; Ruiz-Bravo, Alfonso; Haïdour, Ali

    2001-01-01

    A quasi-defined medium that supports the growth of Streptococcus agalactiae as pigmented colonies has been developed. The medium contains starch, a peptic digest of albumin, amino acids, nucleosides, vitamins, and salts. The presence of free cysteine, which could be replaced with other sulphur-containing compounds and to a lesser degree by reducing agents, was required for pigment formation. PMID:11133484

  6. Fe(III)-enhanced anaerobic transformation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by an iron-reducing bacterium Comamonas koreensis CY01.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Yuan; Zhuang, Li; Zhou, Shun-Gui; Li, Fang-Bai; Li, Xiao-Min

    2010-01-01

    This work studied the ability of Comamonas koreensis CY01 to reduce Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by coupling the oxidation of electron donors and the enhanced biodegradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) by the presence of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides. The experimental results suggested that strain CY01 can utilize ferrihydrite, goethite, lepidocrocite or hematite as the terminal electron acceptor and citrate, glycerol, glucose or sucrose as the electron donor. Strain CY01 could transform 2,4-D to 4-chlorophenol through reductive side-chain removal and dechlorination. Under the anaerobic conditions, Fe(III) reduction and 2,4-D biodegradation by strain CY01 occurred simultaneously. The presence of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides would significantly enhance 2,4-D biodegradation, probably due to the fact that the reactive mineral-bound Fe(II) species generated from Fe(III) reduction can abiotically reduce 2,4-D. This is the first report of a strain of C. koreensis capable of reducing Fe(III) (hydr)oxides and 2,4-D, which extends the diversity of iron-reducing bacteria associated with dechlorination.

  7. A tightly bound quinone functions in the ubiquinone reaction sites of quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase of an acetic acid bacterium, Gluconobacter suboxydans.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kazunobu; Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Mizuguchi, Mitsuhiro; Toyama, Hirohide; Adachi, Osao; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2008-10-01

    Quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) of acetic acid bacteria is a membrane-bound enzyme that functions as the primary dehydrogenase in the ethanol oxidase respiratory chain. It consists of three subunits and has a pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in the active site and four heme c moieties as electron transfer mediators. Of these, three heme c sites and a further site have been found to be involved in ubiquinone (Q) reduction and ubiquinol (QH2) oxidation respectively (Matsushita et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 1409, 154-164 (1999)). In this study, it was found that ADH solubilized and purified with dodecyl maltoside, but not with Triton X-100, had a tightly bound Q, and thus two different ADHs, one having the tightly bound Q (Q-bound ADH) and Q-free ADH, could be obtained. The Q-binding sites of both the ADHs were characterized using specific inhibitors, a substituted phenol PC16 (a Q analog inhibitor) and antimycin A. Based on the inhibition kinetics of Q2 reductase and ubiquinol-2 (Q2H2) oxidase activities, it was suggested that there are one and two PC16-binding sites in Q-bound ADH and Q-free ADH respectively. On the other hand, with antimycin A, only one binding site was found for Q2 reductase and Q2H2 oxidase activities, irrespective of the presence of bound Q. These results suggest that ADH has a high-affinity Q binding site (QH) besides low-affinity Q reduction and QH2 oxidation sites, and that the bound Q in the QH site is involved in the electron transfer between heme c moieties and bulk Q or QH2 in the low-affinity sites.

  8. A Novel α-Hemolytic Streptococcus Species (Streptococcus azizii sp. nov.) Associated with Meningoencephalitis in Naïve Weanling C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Braden, Gillian C; Arbona, Rodolfo Ricart; Lepherd, Michelle; Monette, Sébastien; Toma, Aziz; Fox, James G; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Lipman, Neil S

    2015-06-01

    During 1 year, experimentally naïve C57BL/6NCrl weanlings born to timed-pregnant dams from a single vendor demonstrated markedly increased mortality associated with runting, abnormal gait, and decreased activity. Gram-positive, aerobic, α-hemolytic, coccoid bacteria were isolated from the meninges (n = 16), blood (n = 1), and kidneys (n = 1) of clinically affected weanlings (n = 15); from the uterus (n = 1), meninges (n = 1), and oral cavity (n = 2) of 3 dams; and from the meninges and oral cavity of a clinically affected 86-d-old mouse in the same colony. Multifocal, necrosuppurative meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis with intralesional gram-positive coccoid bacteria were present in all but 2 affected animals. The bacterium also was isolated from the oral cavity of an asymptomatic timed-pregnant dam (1 of 23) from the same vendor and from 8 mice at the vendor's facility. All isolates (n = 25) were identified by using 2 semiautomated rapid-identification systems, one of which consistently identified the causative bacterium as Aerococcus viridans 2 (n = 12) or 3 (n = 13), with probabilities of 55.7% to 98.3%. The bacterium did not grow in 6.5% NaCl at 10 °C, thus suggesting a Streptococcus species. Partial 16S rRNA sequencing of 4 isolates suggested S. hyointestinalis (probability, 93.4%) and S. gallinaceus (99.5%). Full 16S rRNA sequences for 3 isolates identified the bacterium as a novel Streptococcus species most closely related to S. acidominimus strain LGM (96.5%) and Streptococcus species strain Smarlab 3301444 (96.3%) and for which we propose the name S. azizii.

  9. A Novel α-Hemolytic Streptococcus Species (Streptococcus azizii sp. nov.) Associated with Meningoencephalitis in Naïve Weanling C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Braden, Gillian C; Arbona, Rodolfo Ricart; Lepherd, Michelle; Monette, Sébastien; Toma, Aziz; Fox, James G; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Lipman, Neil S

    2015-06-01

    During 1 year, experimentally naïve C57BL/6NCrl weanlings born to timed-pregnant dams from a single vendor demonstrated markedly increased mortality associated with runting, abnormal gait, and decreased activity. Gram-positive, aerobic, α-hemolytic, coccoid bacteria were isolated from the meninges (n = 16), blood (n = 1), and kidneys (n = 1) of clinically affected weanlings (n = 15); from the uterus (n = 1), meninges (n = 1), and oral cavity (n = 2) of 3 dams; and from the meninges and oral cavity of a clinically affected 86-d-old mouse in the same colony. Multifocal, necrosuppurative meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis with intralesional gram-positive coccoid bacteria were present in all but 2 affected animals. The bacterium also was isolated from the oral cavity of an asymptomatic timed-pregnant dam (1 of 23) from the same vendor and from 8 mice at the vendor's facility. All isolates (n = 25) were identified by using 2 semiautomated rapid-identification systems, one of which consistently identified the causative bacterium as Aerococcus viridans 2 (n = 12) or 3 (n = 13), with probabilities of 55.7% to 98.3%. The bacterium did not grow in 6.5% NaCl at 10 °C, thus suggesting a Streptococcus species. Partial 16S rRNA sequencing of 4 isolates suggested S. hyointestinalis (probability, 93.4%) and S. gallinaceus (99.5%). Full 16S rRNA sequences for 3 isolates identified the bacterium as a novel Streptococcus species most closely related to S. acidominimus strain LGM (96.5%) and Streptococcus species strain Smarlab 3301444 (96.3%) and for which we propose the name S. azizii. PMID:26141443

  10. A Novel α-Hemolytic Streptococcus Species (Streptococcus azizii sp. nov.) Associated with Meningoencephalitis in Naïve Weanling C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Gillian C; Arbona, Rodolfo Ricart; Lepherd, Michelle; Monette, Sébastien; Toma, Aziz; Fox, James G; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Lipman, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    During 1 year, experimentally naïve C57BL/6NCrl weanlings born to timed-pregnant dams from a single vendor demonstrated markedly increased mortality associated with runting, abnormal gait, and decreased activity. Gram-positive, aerobic, α-hemolytic, coccoid bacteria were isolated from the meninges (n = 16), blood (n = 1), and kidneys (n = 1) of clinically affected weanlings (n = 15); from the uterus (n = 1), meninges (n = 1), and oral cavity (n = 2) of 3 dams; and from the meninges and oral cavity of a clinically affected 86-d-old mouse in the same colony. Multifocal, necrosuppurative meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis with intralesional gram-positive coccoid bacteria were present in all but 2 affected animals. The bacterium also was isolated from the oral cavity of an asymptomatic timed-pregnant dam (1 of 23) from the same vendor and from 8 mice at the vendor's facility. All isolates (n = 25) were identified by using 2 semiautomated rapid-identification systems, one of which consistently identified the causative bacterium as Aerococcus viridans 2 (n = 12) or 3 (n = 13), with probabilities of 55.7% to 98.3%. The bacterium did not grow in 6.5% NaCl at 10 °C, thus suggesting a Streptococcus species. Partial 16S rRNA sequencing of 4 isolates suggested S. hyointestinalis (probability, 93.4%) and S. gallinaceus (99.5%). Full 16S rRNA sequences for 3 isolates identified the bacterium as a novel Streptococcus species most closely related to S. acidominimus strain LGM (96.5%) and Streptococcus species strain Smarlab 3301444 (96.3%) and for which we propose the name S. azizii. PMID:26141443

  11. Compositions and characteristics of strains of Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Russell, J B; Robinson, P H

    1984-07-01

    Streptococcus bovis strains JB1, 26, 581AXY2, 21096C, and 45S1 grew on glucose, maltose, starch, sucrose, cellobiose, and lactose. None of these strains grew on xylose or ribose, but arabinose was a suitable energy source for strains 2109C and K27FF4. All strains grew at 45 degrees C, but incubation at 50 degrees C prevented growth. Growth was permitted in 2% sodium chloride, but 6.5% sodium chloride was inhibitory. Doubling times ranged from 24 to 27 min, and final pH on glucose was approximately 4.6. None of the strains had a requirement for amino acids, and growth was rapid in media containing glucose salts and B vitamins. There was no ammonia production from arginine. All strains showed aminoendopeptidase activity, but there was considerable strain variation. Strain 7H4, reported as Streptococcus bovis, was noticeably different from the other six strains. It had a doubling time that was more than four times as long, and it grew poorly on starch or in the absence of an amino acid source. Six-and-a-half percent sodium chloride was not inhibitory, and it produced ammonia from arginine. Cell morphology was coccoid rather than ovoid. Based on these criteria, classification of strain 7H4 as Streptococcus bovis seemed doubtful. Other experiments with strain 7H4 indicated that Streptococcus bovis was devoid of diaminopimelic acid. In these experiments strain 7H4 contained significant diaminopimelic acid. The six Streptococcus bovis strains all contained diaminopimelic acid as well, but concentration varied.

  12. Leuconostoc gasicomitatum is the dominating lactic acid bacterium in retail modified-atmosphere-packaged marinated broiler meat strips on sell-by-day.

    PubMed

    Susiluoto, Tuija; Korkeala, Hannu; Björkroth, K Johanna

    2003-01-15

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in retail, modified-atmosphere-packaged (MAP), marinated broiler meat strips on sell-by-day were mainly identified as Leuconostoc gasicomitatum. A total of 32 packages, three to five packages of seven differently marinated broiler meat products, were studied at the end of the producer-defined shelf life (at 6 degrees C, 7-9 days depending on the manufacturer). Prior to the microbiological analyses, appearance and smell of the product was checked and pH measured. Bacteria were cultured on MRS and Tomato Juice Agar (TJA), Rogosa SL agar (SLA), Plate Count Agar (PCA) and Streptomycin Thallium Acetate Agar (STAA) for the enumeration of LAB, lactobacilli, total bacterial count and Brochothrix thermosphacta, respectively. The average CFU/g of the 32 packages was 2.3 x 10(8) on PCA. The highest bacterial average, 3.1 x 10(8), was recovered on TJA, the corresponding CFU/g averages on MRS and SLA being 2.3 x 10(8) and 1.3 x 10(8), respectively. Despite the high LAB numbers detected, radical spoilage changes such as unpleasant odor, slime production and formation of gas were not seen. B. thermosphacta did not form a significant part of the bacterial population since none of the levels exceeded the spoilage threshold level of 10(5) CFU/g reported in previous studies for this organism. In order to characterize the dominating LAB population, as many as 85, 85 and 88 colonies from MRS, TJA and SLA, respectively, were randomly picked and cultured pure. LAB were identified to species level using a 16 and 23S rDNA HindIiI RFLP (ribotyping) database. Fifty-six of the 170 isolates picked from the non-selective LAB media (MRS and TJA) were identified as L. gasicomitatum, followed by Carnobacterium divergens (41 isolates), Lactobacillus sakei and Lactobacillus curvatus subsp. melibiosus (31 isolates) and L. curvatus subsp. curvatus (20 isolates) species. SLA proved not to be completely selective for lactobacilli because the growth of Leuconostoc spp. was not

  13. Streptococcus mutans Protein Synthesis during Mixed-Species Biofilm Development by High-Throughput Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marlise I.; Xiao, Jin; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M.; Yates, John R.; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms formed on tooth surfaces are comprised of mixed microbiota enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. Oral biofilms are constantly exposed to environmental changes, which influence the microbial composition, matrix formation and expression of virulence. Streptococcus mutans and sucrose are key modulators associated with the evolution of virulent-cariogenic biofilms. In this study, we used a high-throughput quantitative proteomics approach to examine how S. mutans produces relevant proteins that facilitate its establishment and optimal survival during mixed-species biofilms development induced by sucrose. Biofilms of S. mutans, alone or mixed with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis, were initially formed onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite surface under carbohydrate-limiting condition. Sucrose (1%, w/v) was then introduced to cause environmental changes, and to induce biofilm accumulation. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) approach detected up to 60% of proteins encoded by S. mutans within biofilms. Specific proteins associated with exopolysaccharide matrix assembly, metabolic and stress adaptation processes were highly abundant as the biofilm transit from earlier to later developmental stages following sucrose introduction. Our results indicate that S. mutans within a mixed-species biofilm community increases the expression of specific genes associated with glucan synthesis and remodeling (gtfBC, dexA) and glucan-binding (gbpB) during this transition (P<0.05). Furthermore, S. mutans up-regulates specific adaptation mechanisms to cope with acidic environments (F1F0-ATPase system, fatty acid biosynthesis, branched chain amino acids metabolism), and molecular chaperones (GroEL). Interestingly, the protein levels and gene expression are in general augmented when S. mutans form mixed-species biofilms (vs. single-species biofilms) demonstrating fundamental differences in the matrix assembly, survival and biofilm maintenance in the

  14. Aii20J, a wide-spectrum thermostable N-acylhomoserine lactonase from the marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. 20J, can quench AHL-mediated acid resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mayer, C; Romero, M; Muras, A; Otero, A

    2015-11-01

    Acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are produced by many Gram-negative bacteria to coordinate gene expression in cellular density dependent mechanisms known as quorum sensing (QS). Since the disruption of the communication systems significantly reduces virulence, the inhibition of quorumsensing processes or quorum quenching (QQ) represents an interesting anti-pathogenic strategy to control bacterial infections. Escherichia coli does not produce AHLs but possesses an orphan AHL receptor, SdiA, which is thought to be able to sense the QS signals produced by other bacteria and controls important traits as the expression of glutamate-dependent acid resistance mechanism, therefore constituting a putative target for QQ. A novel AHL-lactonase, named Aii20J, has been identified, cloned and over expressed from the marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. strain 20 J presenting a wide-spectrum QQ activity. The enzyme, belonging to the metallo-β-lactamase family, shares less than 31 % identity with the lactonase AiiA from Bacillus spp. Aii20J presents a much higher specific activity than the Bacillus enzyme, maintains its activity after incubation at 100 ºC for 10 minutes, is resistant to protease K and α-chymotrypsin, and is unaffected by wide ranges of pH. The addition of Aii20J (20 μg/mL) to cultures of E. coli K-12 to which OC6-HSL was added resulted in a significant reduction in cell viability in comparison with the acidresistant cultures derived from the presence of the signal. Results confirm the interaction between AHLs and SdiA in E. coli for the expression of virulence-related genes and reveal the potential use of Aii20J as anti-virulence strategy against important bacterial pathogens and in other biotechnological applications.

  15. Use of rRNA gene restriction patterns to evaluate lactic acid bacterium contamination of vacuum-packaged sliced cooked whole-meat product in a meat processing plant.

    PubMed Central

    Björkroth, K J; Korkeala, H J

    1997-01-01

    Molecular typing was applied to an in-plant lactic acid bacterium (LAB) contamination analysis of a vacuum-packaged sliced cooked whole-meat product. A total of 982 LAB isolates from the raw mass, product, and the environment at different production stages were screened by restriction endonuclease (EcoRI and HindIII) analysis. rRNA gene restriction patterns were further determined for different strains obtained from each source. These patterns were used for recognizing the spoilage-causing LAB strains from the product on the sell-by day and tracing the sources and sites of spoilage LAB contamination during the manufacture. LAB typing resulted in 71 different ribotypes, of which 27 were associated with contamination routes. Raw material was distinguished as the source of the major spoilage strains. Contamination of the product surfaces after cooking was shown to be airborne. The removal of the product from the cooking forms was localized as a major site of airborne LAB contamination. Food handlers and some surfaces in contact with the product during the manufacture were also contaminated with the spoilage strains. Some LAB strains were also able to resist cooking in the core of the product bar. These strains may have an effect on the product shelf life by contaminating the slicing machine. The air in the slicing department and adjacent cold room contained very few LAB. Surface-mediated contamination was detected during the slicing and packaging stages. Food handlers also carried strains later found in the packaged product. Molecular typing provided useful information revealing the LAB contamination sources and sites of this product. The production line will be reorganized in accordance with these results to reduce spoilage LAB contamination. PMID:9023922

  16. Use of rRNA gene restriction patterns to evaluate lactic acid bacterium contamination of vacuum-packaged sliced cooked whole-meat product in a meat processing plant.

    PubMed

    Björkroth, K J; Korkeala, H J

    1997-02-01

    Molecular typing was applied to an in-plant lactic acid bacterium (LAB) contamination analysis of a vacuum-packaged sliced cooked whole-meat product. A total of 982 LAB isolates from the raw mass, product, and the environment at different production stages were screened by restriction endonuclease (EcoRI and HindIII) analysis. rRNA gene restriction patterns were further determined for different strains obtained from each source. These patterns were used for recognizing the spoilage-causing LAB strains from the product on the sell-by day and tracing the sources and sites of spoilage LAB contamination during the manufacture. LAB typing resulted in 71 different ribotypes, of which 27 were associated with contamination routes. Raw material was distinguished as the source of the major spoilage strains. Contamination of the product surfaces after cooking was shown to be airborne. The removal of the product from the cooking forms was localized as a major site of airborne LAB contamination. Food handlers and some surfaces in contact with the product during the manufacture were also contaminated with the spoilage strains. Some LAB strains were also able to resist cooking in the core of the product bar. These strains may have an effect on the product shelf life by contaminating the slicing machine. The air in the slicing department and adjacent cold room contained very few LAB. Surface-mediated contamination was detected during the slicing and packaging stages. Food handlers also carried strains later found in the packaged product. Molecular typing provided useful information revealing the LAB contamination sources and sites of this product. The production line will be reorganized in accordance with these results to reduce spoilage LAB contamination.

  17. Isolation, Characterization, and U(VI)-Reducing Potential of a Facultatively Anaerobic, Acid-Resistant Bacterium from Low-pH, Nitrate- and U(VI)-Contaminated Subsurface Sediment and Description of Salmonella subterranea sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Sullivan, Sara A.; O'Neill, Kathleen R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2004-01-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, acid-resistant bacterium, designated strain FRCl, was isolated from a low-pH, nitrate- and U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediment at site FW-024 at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Strain FRCl was enriched at pH 4.5 in minimal medium with nitrate as the electron acceptor, hydrogen as the electron donor, and acetate as the carbon source. Clones with 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences identical to the sequence of strain FRCl were also detected in a U(VI)-reducing enrichment culture derived from the same sediment. Cells of strain FRCl were gram-negative motile regular rods 2.0 to 3.4 μm long and 0.7 to 0.9 μm in diameter. Strain FRCl was positive for indole production, by the methyl red test, and for ornithine decarboxylase; it was negative by the Voges-Proskauer test (for acetylmethylcarbinol production), for urea hydrolysis, for arginine dihydrolase, for lysine decarboxylase, for phenylalanine deaminase, for H2S production, and for gelatin hydrolysis. Strain FRCl was capable of using O2, NO3−, S2O32−, fumarate, and malate as terminal electron acceptors and of reducing U(VI) in the cell suspension. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of the isolate indicated that this strain was 96.4% similar to Salmonella bongori and 96.3% similar to Enterobacter cloacae. Physiological and phylogenetic analyses suggested that strain FRCl belongs to the genus Salmonella and represents a new species, Salmonella subterranea sp. nov. PMID:15128557

  18. Aii20J, a wide-spectrum thermostable N-acylhomoserine lactonase from the marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. 20J, can quench AHL-mediated acid resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mayer, C; Romero, M; Muras, A; Otero, A

    2015-11-01

    Acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are produced by many Gram-negative bacteria to coordinate gene expression in cellular density dependent mechanisms known as quorum sensing (QS). Since the disruption of the communication systems significantly reduces virulence, the inhibition of quorumsensing processes or quorum quenching (QQ) represents an interesting anti-pathogenic strategy to control bacterial infections. Escherichia coli does not produce AHLs but possesses an orphan AHL receptor, SdiA, which is thought to be able to sense the QS signals produced by other bacteria and controls important traits as the expression of glutamate-dependent acid resistance mechanism, therefore constituting a putative target for QQ. A novel AHL-lactonase, named Aii20J, has been identified, cloned and over expressed from the marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. strain 20 J presenting a wide-spectrum QQ activity. The enzyme, belonging to the metallo-β-lactamase family, shares less than 31 % identity with the lactonase AiiA from Bacillus spp. Aii20J presents a much higher specific activity than the Bacillus enzyme, maintains its activity after incubation at 100 ºC for 10 minutes, is resistant to protease K and α-chymotrypsin, and is unaffected by wide ranges of pH. The addition of Aii20J (20 μg/mL) to cultures of E. coli K-12 to which OC6-HSL was added resulted in a significant reduction in cell viability in comparison with the acidresistant cultures derived from the presence of the signal. Results confirm the interaction between AHLs and SdiA in E. coli for the expression of virulence-related genes and reveal the potential use of Aii20J as anti-virulence strategy against important bacterial pathogens and in other biotechnological applications. PMID:26092757

  19. Streptococcus troglodytidis sp. nov., isolated from a foot abscess of a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Michael; Yan, Lifang; Zhu, Guan; Holifield, Michael; Todd, Donna; Zhang, Shuping

    2013-02-01

    A facultative anaerobic, non-motile, non-spore-forming, Gram-positive-staining, coccus-shaped bacterium was isolated from an abscess on the right foot of a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes). The colonies were β-haemolytic. Catalase and oxidase activities were negative. The Lancefield group B antigen was expressed. On the basis of morphological and biochemical characteristics, the bacterium was tentatively identified as a streptococcal species. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the bacterium shared 96.7 %, 96.4 %, 96.1 %, 95.8 % and 95.7 % sequence similarities with Streptococcus gordonii, S. cristatus, S. intermedius, S. anginosus and S. constellatus, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses based on the sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and housekeeping genes encoding D-alanine : D-alanine ligase (ddl), the β-subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (sodA) revealed that the bacterium represented a novel species closely related to, albeit different from, S. gordonii, S. cristatus and the anginosus streptococci. The name Streptococcus troglodytidis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is M09-11185(T) ( = ATCC BAA-2337(T) = KCTC 33006(T)).

  20. CORNEAL REACTIONS TO BACTERIUM GRANULOSIS AND OTHER MICROORGANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Olitsky, Peter K.; Knutti, Ralph E.; Tyler, Joseph R.

    1932-01-01

    The conclusions which may be drawn from the results of the experiments here presented are: 1. The cornea of the rabbit is highly sensitive to the action of various injected bacteria. The lesions vary from insignificant, transient changes to severe, destructive panophthalmitis, with fine gradations from the mildest to the violent form of inflammation. Moreover, animals that receive the same organisms show like changes. 2. The varying degree of inflammatory reaction is related to the pathogenicity of the special culture employed; as, for example, is shown by the reactions to Type I pneumococci and to Bacterium granulosis. It is evident that when a microorganism having a certain degree of virulence is used, a lesion of localized vasculonebulous keratitis resembling pannus tenuis or vasculosus of human trachoma can be induced. Thus Bacterium granulosis, Bacillus xerosis, Hemophilus influenzae, Pneumococcus Type II, Streptococcus viridans, and gonococcus can cause the pannus-like corneal changes in the rabbit. Of these organisms, however, only Bacterium granulosis induces early, uncomplicated and enduring keratitic lesions; the others cause first, diffuse keratitis with suppurative lesions; then, as a residual effect, transient, localized, vasculonebulous changes in the cornea. These changes, in contradistinction to the granulosis lesions, are, therefore delayed, complicated, and transient. When, on the other hand, the invasiveness and infecting power of the organisms are low, as is the case with the filtrable, Gram-negative bacillus and the small, Gram-negative bacilli ultimately derived from cases of folliculosis, no marked effect is produced by their intracorneal inoculation. If the pathogenicity of bacteria is high (as shown by Pneumococcus Type I, hemolytic streptococcus, and the remaining bacteria), intracorneal inoculation of the microorganisms leads to serious suppurative or destructive changes. 3. The results of experiments with monkeys indicate that while

  1. [Streptococcus pyogenes pathogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenicity of ß-hemolytic group A streptococcus (GAS) is particularly diverse, ranging from mild infections, such as pharyngitis or impetigo, to potentially debilitating poststreptococcal diseases, and up to severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis or the dreaded streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This variety of clinical expressions, often radically different in individuals infected with the same strain, results from a complex interaction between the bacterial virulence factors, the mode of infection and the immune system of the host. Advances in comparative genomics have led to a better understanding of how, following this confrontation, GAS adapts to the immune system's pressure, either peacefully by reducing the expression of certain virulence factors to achieve an asymptomatic carriage, or on the contrary, by overexpressing them disproportionately, resulting in the most severe forms of invasive infection. PMID:25456681

  2. Streptococcus suis infection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Zuowei; Wang, Shihua; Cao, Min; Hu, Dan; Wang, Changjun

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a family of pathogenic gram-positive bacterial strains that represents a primary health problem in the swine industry worldwide. S. suis is also an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes severe human infections clinically featuring with varied diseases/syndromes (such as meningitis, septicemia, and arthritis). Over the past few decades, continued efforts have made significant progress toward better understanding this zoonotic infectious entity, contributing in part to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism underlying its high pathogenicity. This review is aimed at presenting an updated overview of this pathogen from the perspective of molecular epidemiology, clinical diagnosis and typing, virulence mechanism, and protective antigens contributing to its zoonosis. PMID:24667807

  3. Streptococcus pharyngis sp. nov., a novel streptococcal species isolated from the respiratory tract of wild rabbits.

    PubMed

    Vela, Ana I; Casas-Díaz, Encarna; Lavín, Santiago; Domínguez, Lucas; Fernández-Garayzábal, Jose F

    2015-09-01

    Four isolates of an unknown Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative coccus-shaped organism, isolated from the pharynx of four wild rabbits, were characterized by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. The micro-organisms were tentatively assigned to the genus Streptococcus based on cellular morphological and biochemical criteria, although the organisms did not appear to correspond to any species with a validly published name. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing confirmed their identification as members of the genus Streptococcus, being most closely related phylogenetically to Streptococcus porcorum 682-03(T) (96.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Analysis of rpoB and sodA gene sequences showed divergence values between the novel species and S. porcorum 682-03(T) (the closest phylogenetic relative determined from 16S rRNA gene sequences) of 18.1 and 23.9%, respectively. The novel bacterial isolate could be distinguished from the type strain of S. porcorum by several biochemical characteristics, such as the production of glycyl-tryptophan arylamidase and α-chymotrypsin, and the non-acidification of different sugars. Based on both phenotypic and phylogenetic findings, it is proposed that the unknown bacterium be assigned to a novel species of the genus Streptococcus, and named Streptococcus pharyngis sp. nov. The type strain is DICM10-00796B(T) ( = CECT 8754(T) = CCUG 66496(T)).

  4. Acid tolerance, proton permeabilities, and membrane ATPases of oral streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, G R; Sutton, S V; Marquis, R E

    1986-01-01

    Differences in acid tolerance among representative oral streptococci were found to be related more closely to the dynamic permeabilities of the bacteria to protons than to differences in the sensitivities of cell membranes to gross damage caused by environmental acidification. For Streptococcus mutans GS-5, Streptococcus sanguis NCTC 10904, and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419, gross membrane damage, indicated by the release of magnesium from whole cells, occurred at pH values below about 4 and was rapid and extensive at pH values of about 3 or less. A more aciduric, lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus casei ATCC 4646, was more resistant to environmental acidification, and gross membrane damage was evident only at pH values below 3. Assessments of the movements of protons into S. mutans cells after an acid pulse at various pH values indicated that permeability to protons was minimal at a pH value of about 5, at which the average half time for pH equilibration across the cell membrane was about 12 min. The corresponding values for the less aciduric organism S. sanguis were pH 7 and 8.2 min, and the values for the intermediate organism S. salivarius were pH 6 and 6.6 min. The ATPase inhibitor dicyclohexylcarbodiimide acted to increase markedly the permeability of each organism to protons, and this action indicated that permeability involved not only the passive inflow of protons but also active outflow through the proton-translocating membrane ATPase. Membranes were isolated from each of the bacteria, and pH profiles for ATPase activities indicated pH optima of about 7.5, 7.0, 6.0, and 5.0 for S. sanguis, S. salivarius, S. mutans, and L. casei, respectively. Thus, the pH profiles for the enzymes reflected the acid tolerances of the bacteria and the permeabilities of whole cells to protons. PMID:3015800

  5. Influences of trans-trans farnesol, a membrane-targeting sesquiterpenoid, on Streptococcus mutans physiology and survival within mixed-species oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae-Gyu; Pandit, Santosh; Xiao, Jin; Gregoire, Stacy; Falsetta, Megan L; Klein, Marlise I; Koo, Hyun

    2011-04-01

    Trans-trans farnesol (tt-farnesol) is a bioactive sesquiterpene alcohol commonly found in propolis (a beehive product) and citrus fruits, which disrupts the ability of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to form virulent biofilms. In this study, we investigated whether tt-farnesol affects cell-membrane function, acid production and/or acid tolerance by planktonic cells and biofilms of S. mutans UA159. Furthermore, the influence of the agent on S. mutans gene expression and ability to form biofilms in the presence of other oral bacteria (Streptococcus oralis (S. oralis) 35037 and Actinomyces naeslundii (A. naeslundii) 12104) was also examined. In general, tt-farnesol (1 mmol x L(-1)) significantly increased the membrane proton permeability and reduced glycolytic activity of S. mutans in the planktonic state and in biofilms (P < 0.05). Moreover, topical applications of 1 mmol x L(-1) tt-farnesol twice daily (1 min exposure/treatment) reduced biomass accumulation and prevented ecological shifts towards S. mutans dominance within mixed-species biofilms after introduction of 1% sucrose. S. oralis (a non-cariogenic organism) became the major species after treatments with tt-farnesol, whereas vehicle-treated biofilms contained mostly S. mutans (>90% of total bacterial population). However, the agent did not affect significantly the expression of S. mutans genes involved in acidogenicity, acid tolerance or polysaccharide synthesis in the treated biofilms. Our data indicate that tt-farnesol may affect the competitiveness of S. mutans in a mixed-species environment by primarily disrupting the membrane function and physiology of this bacterium. This naturally occurring terpenoid could be a potentially useful adjunctive agent to the current anti-biofilm/anti-caries chemotherapeutic strategies.

  6. A Functional dlt Operon, Encoding Proteins Required for Incorporation of d-Alanine in Teichoic Acids in Gram-Positive Bacteria, Confers Resistance to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Márta; Halfmann, Alexander; Fedtke, Iris; Heintz, Manuel; Peschel, Andreas; Vollmer, Waldemar; Hakenbeck, Regine; Brückner, Reinhold

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the few species within the group of low-G +C gram-positive bacteria reported to contain no d-alanine in teichoic acids, although the dltABCD operon encoding proteins responsible for d-alanylation is present in the genomes of two S. pneumoniae strains, the laboratory strain R6 and the clinical isolate TIGR4. The annotation of dltA in R6 predicts a protein, d-alanine-d-alanyl carrier protein ligase (Dcl), that is shorter at the amino terminus than all other Dcl proteins. Translation of dltA could also start upstream of the annotated TTG start codon at a GTG, resulting in the premature termination of dltA translation at a stop codon. Applying a novel integrative translation probe plasmid with Escherichia coli ′lacZ as a reporter, we could demonstrate that dltA translation starts at the upstream GTG. Consequently, S. pneumoniae R6 is a dltA mutant, whereas S. pneumoniae D39, the parental strain of R6, and Rx, another derivative of D39, contained intact dltA genes. Repair of the stop codon in dltA of R6 and insertional inactivation of dltA in D39 and Rx yielded pairs of dltA-deficient and dltA-proficient strains. Subsequent phenotypic analysis showed that dltA inactivation resulted in enhanced sensitivity to the cationic antimicrobial peptides nisin and gallidermin, a phenotype fully consistent with those of dltA mutants of other gram-positive bacteria. In addition, mild alkaline hydrolysis of heat-inactivated whole cells released d-alanine from dltA-proficient strains, but not from dltA mutants. The results of our study suggest that, as in many other low-G+C gram-positive bacteria, teichoic acids of S. pneumoniae contain d-alanine residues in order to protect this human pathogen against the actions of cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:16885447

  7. Point-Counterpoint: A Nucleic Acid Amplification Test for Streptococcus pyogenes Should Replace Antigen Detection and Culture for Detection of Bacterial Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Pritt, Bobbi S; Patel, Robin; Kirn, Thomas J; Thomson, Richard B

    2016-10-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have frequently been the standard diagnostic approach when specific infectious agents are sought in a clinic specimen. They can be applied for specific agents such as S. pyogenes, or commercial multiplex NAATs for detection of a variety of pathogens in gastrointestinal, bloodstream, and respiratory infections may be used. NAATs are both rapid and sensitive. For many years, S. pyogenes testing algorithms used a rapid and specific group A streptococcal antigen test to screen throat specimens, followed, in some clinical settings, by a throat culture for S. pyogenes to increase the sensitivity of its detection. Now S. pyogenes NAATs are being used with increasing frequency. Given their accuracy, rapidity, and ease of use, should they replace antigen detection and culture for the detection of bacterial pharyngitis? Bobbi Pritt and Robin Patel of the Mayo Clinic, where S. pyogenes NAATs have been used for well over a decade with great success, will explain the advantages of this approach, while Richard (Tom) Thomson and Tom Kirn of the NorthShore University HealthSystem will discuss their concerns about this approach to diagnosing bacterial pharyngitis.

  8. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  9. Genetically Engineered Immunomodulatory Streptococcus thermophilus Strains Producing Antioxidant Enzymes Exhibit Enhanced Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen, Silvina; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) having both immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties and to evaluate their anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro, in different cellular models, and in vivo, in a mouse model of colitis. Different Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains were cocultured with primary cultures of mononuclear cells. Analysis of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines secreted by these cells after coincubation with candidate bacteria revealed that L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 and S. thermophilus CRL 807 display the highest anti-inflammatory profiles in vitro. Moreover, these results were confirmed in vivo by the determination of the cytokine profiles in large intestine samples of mice fed with these strains. S. thermophilus CRL 807 was then transformed with two different plasmids harboring the genes encoding catalase (CAT) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) antioxidant enzymes, and the anti-inflammatory effects of recombinant streptococci were evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Our results showed a decrease in weight loss, lower liver microbial translocation, lower macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, and modulation of the cytokine production in the large intestines of mice treated with either CAT- or SOD-producing streptococci compared to those in mice treated with the wild-type strain or control mice without any treatment. Furthermore, the greatest anti-inflammatory activity was observed in mice receiving a mixture of both CAT- and SOD-producing streptococci. The addition of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 to this mixture did not improve their beneficial effects. These findings show that genetically engineering a candidate bacterium (e.g., S. thermophilus CRL 807) with intrinsic immunomodulatory properties by introducing a gene expressing an antioxidant enzyme enhances its anti

  10. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine. PMID:24386196

  11. Comparative genomics analysis of Streptococcus isolates from the human small intestine reveals their adaptation to a highly dynamic ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine.

  12. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R.; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P.; Williams, Matthew L.; Nascimento, Marcelle M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)–ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens. PMID:26826230

  13. Ornithine transport and exchange in Streptococcus lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.

    1987-09-01

    Resting cells of Streptococcus lactis 133 appeared to accumulate (/sup 14/C)ornithine to a high concentration in the absence of an exogenous energy source. However, analysis of intracellular amino acid pool constituents and results of transport experiments revealed that the accumulation of ornithine represented a homoexchange between extracellular (/sup 14/C)ornithine and unlabeled ornithine in the cell. The energy-independent exchange of ornithine was not inhibited by proton-conducting uncouplers or by metabolic inhibitors. Intracellular (/sup 14/C)ornithine was retained by resting cells after suspension in a buffered medium. However, addition of unlabeled ornithine to the suspension elicited rapid exit of labeled amino acid. The initial rate of exist of (/sup 14/C)ornithine was dependent on the concentration of unlabeled ornithine in the medium, but this accelerative exchange diffusion process caused no net loss of amino acid. By contrast, the presence of a fermentable energy source caused a rapid expulsion of and new decrease in the concentration of intracellular ornithine. Kinetic analyses of amino acid transport demonstrated competitive inhibition between lysine and ornithine, and data obtained by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography established the heteroexchange of these basic amino acids. The effects of amino acids and of ornithine analogs on both entry and exit of (/sup 14/C)ornithine have been examined. The data suggest that common carrier mediates the entry and exchange of lysine, arginine, and ornithine in cells of S. lactis.

  14. Occurrence of Streptococcus macedonicus in Italian cheeses.

    PubMed

    Pacini, Federico; Cariolato, Diego; Andrighetto, Christian; Lombardi, Angiolella

    2006-08-01

    A new approach for the detection and enumeration of Streptococcus macedonicus in cheese was developed. The method which is based on a first screening of cheeses by a PCR assay specific for S. macedonicus followed by plating positive samples on a differential medium (SM medium) was applied to 51 samples derived from PDO and traditional Italian cheeses. Streptococcus macedonicus was found in 16 of the 51 samples examined in the present work. With the exclusion of an Asiago cheese sample in which very high numbers of S. macedonicus (7.13 log CFU g(-1)) were found, the counts of S. macedonicus in SM medium ranged from 2.48 to 4.70 log CFU g(-1). In the same cheeses, total streptococci enumerated onto M17 agar were found at higher concentrations with values up to 7.88 log CFU g(-1). The system developed was particularly useful for the differential count of S. macedonicus in cheese and allowed to evaluate the occurrence of this species within the complex microbial lactic acid bacteria (LAB) population, which is typical of traditional cheeses. Results showed that in the examined cheeses S. macedonicus cannot be considered as a dominant LAB species.

  15. Streptococcus canis arthritis in a cat breeding colony.

    PubMed

    Iglauer, F; Kunstýr, I; Mörstedt, R; Farouq, H; Wullenweber, M; Damsch, S

    1991-01-01

    This is the first description of a pathologic condition--arthritis in cats affecting mainly one joint, i.e. monarthritis--caused by Streptococcus canis (S. canis), of the Lancefield serologic group G. Six cases were recorded in a closed cat breeding colony during a 6 month period in 1988, and one additional case in 1990. Therapy with penicillin and streptomycin led to full recovery in four of six cases. The bacterium had been detected from different purulent processes sporadically--including one case of purulent arthritis in 1982--as a nosocomial infection since 1980, the year the breeding colony was established. A possible genetic predisposition (high inbreeding) may have contributed to the accumulation of the six cases in 1988. Although S. canis was isolated in mouse, rat, rabbit and dog, cat and man seem to be more frequently affected. There are some similarities between S. canis-arthritis in cat and man.

  16. Megaplasmids encode differing combinations of lantibiotics in Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Wescombe, Philip A; Burton, Jeremy P; Cadieux, Peter A; Klesse, Nikolai A; Hyink, Otto; Heng, Nicholas C K; Chilcott, Chris N; Reid, Gregor; Tagg, John R

    2006-10-01

    Streptococcus salivarius strains commonly produce bacteriocins as putative anti-competitor or signalling molecules. Here we report that bacteriocin production by the oral probiotic strain S. salivarius K12 is encoded by a large (ca. 190 kb) plasmid. Oral cavity transmission of the plasmid from strain K12 to a plasmid-negative variant of this bacterium was demonstrated in two subjects. Tests of additional S. salivarius strains showed large (up to ca. 220 kb) plasmids present in bacteriocin-producing isolates. Various combinations (up to 3 per plasmid) of loci encoding the known streptococcal lantibiotics salivaricin A, salivaricin B, streptin and SA-FF22 were localised to these plasmids. Since all bacteriocin-producing strains of S. salivarius tested to date appear to harbour plasmids, it appears that they may function as mobile repositories for bacteriocin loci, especially those of the lantibiotic class. PMID:16871420

  17. Structural and Functional Analysis of Cell Wall-anchored Polypeptide Adhesin BspA in Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Rego, Sara; Heal, Timothy J; Pidwill, Grace R; Till, Marisa; Robson, Alice; Lamont, Richard J; Sessions, Richard B; Jenkinson, Howard F; Race, Paul R; Nobbs, Angela H

    2016-07-29

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) is the predominant cause of early-onset infectious disease in neonates and is responsible for life-threatening infections in elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Clinical manifestations of GBS infection include sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis. Here, we describe BspA, a deviant antigen I/II family polypeptide that confers adhesive properties linked to pathogenesis in GBS. Heterologous expression of BspA on the surface of the non-adherent bacterium Lactococcus lactis confers adherence to scavenger receptor gp340, human vaginal epithelium, and to the fungus Candida albicans Complementary crystallographic and biophysical characterization of BspA reveal a novel β-sandwich adhesion domain and unique asparagine-dependent super-helical stalk. Collectively, these findings establish a new bacterial adhesin structure that has in effect been hijacked by a pathogenic Streptococcus species to provide competitive advantage in human mucosal infections. PMID:27311712

  18. Comparative growth, cross stress resistance, transcriptomics of Streptococcus pyogenes cultured under low shear modeled microgravity and normal gravity

    PubMed Central

    Kalpana, Duraisamy; Im, Chanki; Lee, Yang Soo

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is commonly found on pharynx, mouth and rarely on skin, lower gastrointestinal tract. It is a potential pathogen causing tonsillitis, pneumonia, endocarditis. The present study was undertaken to study the effects of low shear modeled microgravity on growth, morphology, antibiotic resistance, cross-stress resistance to various stresses and alteration in gene expression of S. pyogenes. The growth analysis performed using UV–Visible spectroscopy indicated decrease in growth of S. pyogenes under low shear modeled microgravity. Morphological analysis by Bio-transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Bio-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) did not reveal much difference between normal and low shear modeled microgravity grown S. pyogenes. The sensitivity of S. pyogenes to antibiotics ampicillin, penicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, hygromycin, rifampicin indicates that the bacterium is resistant to hygromycin. Further S. pyogenes cultured under low shear modeled microgravity was found to be more sensitive to ampicillin and rifampicin as compared with normal gravity grown S. pyogenes. The bacteria were tested for the acid, osmotic, temperature and oxidative cross stress resistances. The gene expression of S. pyogenes under low shear modeled microgravity analyzed by microarray revealed upregulation of 26 genes and down regulation of 22 genes by a fold change of 1.5. PMID:26858535

  19. Streptococcus Adherence and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Nobbs, Angela H.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Streptococci readily colonize mucosal tissues in the nasopharynx; the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts; and the skin. Each ecological niche presents a series of challenges to successful colonization with which streptococci have to contend. Some species exist in equilibrium with their host, neither stimulating nor submitting to immune defenses mounted against them. Most are either opportunistic or true pathogens responsible for diseases such as pharyngitis, tooth decay, necrotizing fasciitis, infective endocarditis, and meningitis. Part of the success of streptococci as colonizers is attributable to the spectrum of proteins expressed on their surfaces. Adhesins enable interactions with salivary, serum, and extracellular matrix components; host cells; and other microbes. This is the essential first step to colonization, the development of complex communities, and possible invasion of host tissues. The majority of streptococcal adhesins are anchored to the cell wall via a C-terminal LPxTz motif. Other proteins may be surface anchored through N-terminal lipid modifications, while the mechanism of cell wall associations for others remains unclear. Collectively, these surface-bound proteins provide Streptococcus species with a “coat of many colors,” enabling multiple intimate contacts and interplays between the bacterial cell and the host. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated direct roles for many streptococcal adhesins as colonization or virulence factors, making them attractive targets for therapeutic and preventive strategies against streptococcal infections. There is, therefore, much focus on applying increasingly advanced molecular techniques to determine the precise structures and functions of these proteins, and their regulatory pathways, so that more targeted approaches can be developed. PMID:19721085

  20. One More Disguise in the Stealth Behavior of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Fischetti, Vincent A; Dale, James B

    2016-05-17

    The ability to hide in the animal kingdom is essential for survival; the same is true for bacteria. Streptococcus pyogenes is considered one of the more successful stealth bacteria in its production of a hyaluronic acid capsule that is chemically identical to the hyaluronic acid lining human joints. It has also acquired the capacity to enter eukaryotic cells to avoid the onslaught of the host's immune defenses, as well as drugs. From this intracellular vantage point, it may remain dormant from days to weeks, only to cause disease again at a later time, perhaps causing a relapse in a drug-treated patient. We now learn that it is able to enter macrophages as well, enabling the Streptococcus to use this "Trojan horse" approach to be transported to distant sites in the body.

  1. One More Disguise in the Stealth Behavior of Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Dale, James B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to hide in the animal kingdom is essential for survival; the same is true for bacteria. Streptococcus pyogenes is considered one of the more successful stealth bacteria in its production of a hyaluronic acid capsule that is chemically identical to the hyaluronic acid lining human joints. It has also acquired the capacity to enter eukaryotic cells to avoid the onslaught of the host’s immune defenses, as well as drugs. From this intracellular vantage point, it may remain dormant from days to weeks, only to cause disease again at a later time, perhaps causing a relapse in a drug-treated patient. We now learn that it is able to enter macrophages as well, enabling the Streptococcus to use this “Trojan horse” approach to be transported to distant sites in the body. PMID:27190219

  2. Development of primer sets for loop-mediated isothermal amplification that enables rapid and specific detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae are the three main pathogens causing bovine mastitis, with great losses to the dairy industry. Rapid and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification methods (LAMP) for identification and differentiation of these three ...

  3. [Streptococcus pyogenes and the brain: living with the enemy].

    PubMed

    Dale, R C

    Streptococcus pyogenes (or group A beta hemolytic streptococcus) is a pathogenic bacterium that can give rise to a range of invasive and autoimmune diseases, although it is more widely known as the cause of tonsillitis. It is particularly interesting to note that this germ only causes disease in humans. For many years it has been acknowledged that it can cause an autoimmune brain disease (Sydenham s chorea). Yet, the spectrum of post streptococcal brain disorders has recently been extended to include other movement disorders such as tics or dystonia. A number of systematic psychiatric studies have shown that certain emotional disorders generally accompany the movement disorder (particularly, obsessive compulsive disorder). The proposed pathogenetic mechanism is that of a neuronal dysfunction in which antibodies play a mediating role. The antibodies that are produced after the streptococcal infection cross react with neuronal proteins, and more especially so in individuals with a propensity. This represents a possible model of immunological mimicry and its potential importance with respect to certain idiopathic disorders such as Tourette syndrome and obsessive compulsive disorder.

  4. A molecular trigger for intercontinental epidemics of group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Luchang; Olsen, Randall J.; Nasser, Waleed; Beres, Stephen B.; Vuopio, Jaana; Kristinsson, Karl G.; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Porter, Adeline R.; DeLeo, Frank R.; Musser, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular events responsible for strain emergence, enhanced virulence, and epidemicity has been a long-pursued goal in infectious diseases research. A recent analysis of 3,615 genomes of serotype M1 group A Streptococcus strains (the so-called “flesh-eating” bacterium) identified a recombination event that coincides with the global M1 pandemic beginning in the early 1980s. Here, we have shown that the allelic variation that results from this recombination event, which replaces the chromosomal region encoding secreted NADase and streptolysin O, is the key driver of increased toxin production and enhanced infection severity of the M1 pandemic strains. Using isoallelic mutant strains, we found that 3 polymorphisms in this toxin gene region increase resistance to killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, increase bacterial proliferation, and increase virulence in animal models of pharyngitis and necrotizing fasciitis. Genome sequencing of an additional 1,125 streptococcal strains and virulence studies revealed that a highly similar recombinational replacement event underlies an ongoing intercontinental epidemic of serotype M89 group A Streptococcus infections. By identifying the molecular changes that enhance upper respiratory tract fitness, increased resistance to innate immunity, and increased tissue destruction, we describe a mechanism that underpins epidemic streptococcal infections, which have affected many millions of people. PMID:26258415

  5. Genomics of Streptococcus salivarius, a major human commensal.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Christine; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Renault, Pierre; Guédon, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The salivarius group of streptococci is of particular importance for humans. This group consists of three genetically similar species, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus vestibularis and Streptococcus thermophilus. S. salivarius and S. vestibularis are commensal organisms that may occasionally cause opportunistic infections in humans, whereas S. thermophilus is a food bacterium widely used in dairy production. We developed Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and comparative genomic analysis to confirm the clear separation of these three species. These analyses also identified a subgroup of four strains, with a core genome diverging by about 10%, in terms of its nucleotide sequence, from that of S. salivarius sensu stricto. S. thermophilus species displays a low level of nucleotide variability, due to its recent emergence with the development of agriculture. By contrast, nucleotide variability is high in the other two species of the salivarius group, reflecting their long-standing association with humans. The species of the salivarius group have genome sizes ranging from the smallest (∼ 1.7 Mb for S. thermophilus) to the largest (∼ 2.3 Mb for S. salivarius) among streptococci, reflecting genome reduction linked to a narrow, nutritionally rich environment for S. thermophilus, and natural, more competitive niches for the other two species. Analyses of genomic content have indicated that the core genes of S. salivarius account for about two thirds of the genome, indicating considerable variability of gene content and differences in potential adaptive features. Furthermore, we showed that the genome of this species is exceptionally rich in genes encoding surface factors, glycosyltransferases and response regulators. Evidence of widespread genetic exchanges was obtained, probably involving a natural competence system and the presence of diverse mobile elements. However, although the S. salivarius strains studied were isolated from several human body-related sites

  6. Genomics of Streptococcus salivarius, a major human commensal.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Christine; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Renault, Pierre; Guédon, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The salivarius group of streptococci is of particular importance for humans. This group consists of three genetically similar species, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus vestibularis and Streptococcus thermophilus. S. salivarius and S. vestibularis are commensal organisms that may occasionally cause opportunistic infections in humans, whereas S. thermophilus is a food bacterium widely used in dairy production. We developed Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and comparative genomic analysis to confirm the clear separation of these three species. These analyses also identified a subgroup of four strains, with a core genome diverging by about 10%, in terms of its nucleotide sequence, from that of S. salivarius sensu stricto. S. thermophilus species displays a low level of nucleotide variability, due to its recent emergence with the development of agriculture. By contrast, nucleotide variability is high in the other two species of the salivarius group, reflecting their long-standing association with humans. The species of the salivarius group have genome sizes ranging from the smallest (∼ 1.7 Mb for S. thermophilus) to the largest (∼ 2.3 Mb for S. salivarius) among streptococci, reflecting genome reduction linked to a narrow, nutritionally rich environment for S. thermophilus, and natural, more competitive niches for the other two species. Analyses of genomic content have indicated that the core genes of S. salivarius account for about two thirds of the genome, indicating considerable variability of gene content and differences in potential adaptive features. Furthermore, we showed that the genome of this species is exceptionally rich in genes encoding surface factors, glycosyltransferases and response regulators. Evidence of widespread genetic exchanges was obtained, probably involving a natural competence system and the presence of diverse mobile elements. However, although the S. salivarius strains studied were isolated from several human body-related sites

  7. Recombination-deficient Streptococcus sanguis

    SciTech Connect

    Daneo-Moore, L.; Volpe, A.

    1985-05-01

    A UV-sensitive derivative was obtained from Streptococcus sanguis Challis. The organism could be transformed with a number of small streptococcal plasmids at frequencies equal to, or 1 logarithm below, the transformation frequencies for the parent organism. However, transformation with chromosomal DNA was greatly impaired in the UV-sensitive derivative.

  8. Immunization with a Streptococcus bovis vaccine administered by different routes against lactic acidosis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Shu, Q; Gill, H S; Leng, R A; Rowe, J B

    2000-05-01

    Streptococcus bovis is an important lactic acid bacterium in the rumen, which contributes to the development of lactic acidosis. This study was designed to test the efficacy of immunization with S. bovis primed either intramuscularly (i.m.) or intraperitoneally (i.p. ) against lactic acidosis. Forty-five wethers were allocated to three treatment groups. Two groups were injected with a S. bovis vaccine by either the i.m. or i.p. route for primary immunization; both groups were further immunized by the same route(s) (oral and/or i.m.) for boosters. The third group was not immunized (control). Antibody concentrations were measured in saliva prior to and following animals being fed a grain diet, and also in the rumen fluid, before the animals were suddenly introduced to a grain diet. The average antibody concentration in the animals of the i.m. group was higher than the i.p. group (P< 0.05). The antibody concentration in the rumen fluid of immunized sheep was higher than the control animals (P< 0.01). The difference in the rumen fluid antibody concentration between the i.m. and i.p. groups was not statistically significant (P> 0.05). In the i.m. group, there was a significantly greater feed intake, higher rumen pH, lower diarrhoea scores, and less increase in blood packed cell volume following grain feeding than in the animals of the control group. The severity of diarrhoea and the increase of blood packed cell volume in the animals of the i. p. group were also less than in the animals of the control group. The results suggest that the risk of lactic acidosis can be reduced by immunization against S. bovis, and that the immunization primed i. m. is more effective than the immunization primed i.p.

  9. Growth, body fatty acid composition, immune response and resistance to Streptococcus iniae of hybrid tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus X O. aureus, fed diets containing various levels of linoleic and linolenic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of dietary linoleic (LA) and linolenic acids (LN) on growth and immunity of all-male hybrid tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus × O. aureus, were evaluated for 10 weeks. Fish fed 0.12% LA + 0% LN had the lowest weight gain (WG) but was not significantly different from diets containing 0.5% LA...

  10. Lactobionic and cellobionic acid production profiles of the resting cells of acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kiryu, Takaaki; Kiso, Taro; Nakano, Hirofumi; Murakami, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Lactobionic acid was produced by acetic acid bacteria to oxidize lactose. Gluconobacter spp. and Gluconacetobacter spp. showed higher lactose-oxidizing activities than Acetobacter spp. Gluconobacter frateurii NBRC3285 produced the highest amount of lactobionic acid per cell, among the strains tested. This bacterium assimilated neither lactose nor lactobionic acid. At high lactose concentration (30%), resting cells of the bacterium showed sufficient oxidizing activity for efficient production of lactobionic acid. These properties may contribute to industrial production of lactobionic acid by the bacterium. The bacterium showed higher oxidizing activity on cellobiose than that on lactose and produced cellobionic acid. PMID:25965080

  11. Antibacterial effects of several current orthodontic materials against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Catalbaş, B; Kamak, H; Demir, A; Nur, M; Hadimli, H H

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the antibacterial effect of several current orthodontic materials against a certain oral bacterium. The antibacterial activities of six orthodontic composite resins (Transbond LR, Light Cure Retainer (LCR), Light Bond, System 1+, Kurasper F, Transbond XT adhesive), two orthodontic bonding materials (Transbond XT primer and System 1+ activator) and two glass ionomer cements (GIC) [Multicure Glass Ionomer and Ketac Cem GIC] were evaluated against Streptococcus mutans. The hard materials were put into the Teflon mould. The liquid materials were put on a paper disc. All materials were handled under aseptic conditions and placed on agar culture plates. All plates were incubated at 5% CO2 and 37 degrees C for 48 hours. The bacterial growth inhibition zones including the diameter of the sample were measured in millimetres. As a result of this study, the multicure GIC showed the highest antibacterial effectiveness, but no inhibition zones were noted for ketac cem GIC. The light bond adhesive of the Reliance orthodontic bonding system produced high antibacterial effect against S mutans, while the Reliance composite (LCR) did not show any antibacterial effect (p < 0.05). Both composite and primer of the transbond XT system demonstrated significant antibacterial effect against the test bacterium when compared to transbond LR (p < 0.05). Among the materials tested, kurasper F, Ormco system 1+ and system 1+ activator showed slight or no inhibitory effect against the test bacterium in this study In patients who have relatively high salivary levels of Streptococci mutans before treatment, the multicure GIC, the Reliance light bond adhesive, and transbond XT system which had high level antibacterial properties could be applied. PMID:23757904

  12. Gene repertoire evolution of Streptococcus pyogenes inferred from phylogenomic analysis with Streptococcus canis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Lefébure, Tristan; Richards, Vince P; Lang, Ping; Pavinski-Bitar, Paulina; Stanhope, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, is an important human pathogen classified within the pyogenic group of streptococci, exclusively adapted to the human host. Our goal was to employ a comparative evolutionary approach to better understand the genomic events concomitant with S. pyogenes human adaptation. As part of ascertaining these events, we sequenced the genome of one of the potential sister species, the agricultural pathogen S. canis, and combined it in a comparative genomics reconciliation analysis with two other closely related species, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus equi, to determine the genes that were gained and lost during S. pyogenes evolution. Genome wide phylogenetic analyses involving 15 Streptococcus species provided convincing support for a clade of S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. dysgalactiae, and S. canis and suggested that the most likely S. pyogenes sister species was S. dysgalactiae. The reconciliation analysis identified 113 genes that were gained on the lineage leading to S. pyogenes. Almost half (46%) of these gained genes were phage associated and 14 showed significant matches to experimentally verified bacteria virulence factors. Subsequent to the origin of S. pyogenes, over half of the phage associated genes were involved in 90 different LGT events, mostly involving different strains of S. pyogenes, but with a high proportion involving the horse specific pathogen S. equi subsp. equi, with the directionality almost exclusively (86%) in the S. pyogenes to S. equi direction. Streptococcus agalactiae appears to have played an important role in the evolution of S. pyogenes with a high proportion of LGTs originating from this species. Overall the analysis suggests that S. pyogenes adaptation to the human host was achieved in part by (i) the integration of new virulence factors (e.g. speB, and the sal locus) and (ii) the construction of new regulation networks (e.g. rgg, and to some extent speB).

  13. Gene Repertoire Evolution of Streptococcus pyogenes Inferred from Phylogenomic Analysis with Streptococcus canis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Lefébure, Tristan; Richards, Vince P.; Lang, Ping; Pavinski-Bitar, Paulina; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, is an important human pathogen classified within the pyogenic group of streptococci, exclusively adapted to the human host. Our goal was to employ a comparative evolutionary approach to better understand the genomic events concomitant with S. pyogenes human adaptation. As part of ascertaining these events, we sequenced the genome of one of the potential sister species, the agricultural pathogen S. canis, and combined it in a comparative genomics reconciliation analysis with two other closely related species, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus equi, to determine the genes that were gained and lost during S. pyogenes evolution. Genome wide phylogenetic analyses involving 15 Streptococcus species provided convincing support for a clade of S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. dysgalactiae, and S. canis and suggested that the most likely S. pyogenes sister species was S. dysgalactiae. The reconciliation analysis identified 113 genes that were gained on the lineage leading to S. pyogenes. Almost half (46%) of these gained genes were phage associated and 14 showed significant matches to experimentally verified bacteria virulence factors. Subsequent to the origin of S. pyogenes, over half of the phage associated genes were involved in 90 different LGT events, mostly involving different strains of S. pyogenes, but with a high proportion involving the horse specific pathogen S. equi subsp. equi, with the directionality almost exclusively (86%) in the S. pyogenes to S. equi direction. Streptococcus agalactiae appears to have played an important role in the evolution of S. pyogenes with a high proportion of LGTs originating from this species. Overall the analysis suggests that S. pyogenes adaptation to the human host was achieved in part by (i) the integration of new virulence factors (e.g. speB, and the sal locus) and (ii) the construction of new regulation networks (e.g. rgg, and to some extent speB). PMID:22666370

  14. Inhibition of group A streptococcus infection by carboxyfullerene.

    PubMed

    Tsao, N; Luh, T Y; Chou, C K; Wu, J J; Lin, Y S; Lei, H Y

    2001-06-01

    The effect of a water-soluble trimalonic acid derivative of fullerene, carboxyfullerene, against Streptococcus pyogenes infection was tested. Pretreatment with carboxyfullerene was able to protect mice from S. pyogenes infection in an air pouch model. S. pyogenes-induced death and skin injury were inhibited dose dependently by carboxyfullerene. Administration of carboxyfullerene via the peritoneum and air pouch at 3 h post-S. pyogenes infection was able to protect 33% of mice from death. Surveys of exudates of the air pouch of carboxyfullerene-treated mice revealed that survival of infiltrating neutrophils was prolonged and that the bacteria were eliminated as a result of enhanced bactericidal activity of the neutrophils. Furthermore, carboxyfullerene was able to directly inhibit in vitro growth of S. pyogenes. These data suggest that carboxyfullerene can be considered an antimicrobial agent for group A streptococcus infection. PMID:11353626

  15. Rapid antigen testing for group A Streptococcus by DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Heelan, J S; Wilbur, S; Depetris, G; Letourneau, C

    1996-02-01

    The Gen-probe group A Streptococcus direct test (GASD), a nucleic acid probe assay for detecting GAS from throat swabs, has recently been developed. The test uses an acridium ester-labeled DNA probe which is complementary to the rRNA of Streptococcus pyogenes. In this study, 318 single culturette throat swabs were tested by this method using culture as a "gold standard." After plating onto trypticase soy agar plates with 5% sheep blood, swabs were stored at 4 degrees C for no more than 72 h before the probe assay was performed. Our patient population consisted of symptomatic outpatients seen in the Memorial Hospital Emergency Department and in the Family Care Center. After discrepancy testing, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 91.4%, 97%, 91.4%, and 97%. The GASD is a rapid, easy-to-perform method for batch screening for streptococcal pharyngitis.

  16. First Isolation of Streptococcus halichoeri and Streptococcus phocae from a Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kichan; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Jung, Suk Chan; Lee, Hee-Soo; Her, Moon; Chae, Chanhee

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus species are emerging potential pathogens in marine mammals. We report the isolation and identification of Streptococcus halichoeri and Streptococcus phocae in a Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) in South Korea.

  17. First Isolation of Streptococcus halichoeri and Streptococcus phocae from a Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kichan; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Jung, Suk Chan; Lee, Hee-Soo; Her, Moon; Chae, Chanhee

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus species are emerging potential pathogens in marine mammals. We report the isolation and identification of Streptococcus halichoeri and Streptococcus phocae in a Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) in South Korea. PMID:26555114

  18. GLYOXYLATE FERMENTATION BY STREPTOCOCCUS ALLANTOICUS

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, R. C.; Drucker, H.; Wolfe, R. S.

    1964-01-01

    Valentine, R. C. (University of Illinois, Urbana), H. Drucker, and R. S. Wolfe. Glyoxylate fermentation by Streptococcus allantoicus. J. Bacteriol. 87:241–246. 1964.—Extracts of Streptococcus allantoicus were found to degrade glyoxylate, yielding tartronic semialdehyde and CO2. Tartronic semialdehyde was prepared chemically, and its properties were compared with the enzymatic product: reduction by sodium borohydride yielded glycerate; heating at 100 C yielded glycolaldehyde and CO2; autoxidation yielded mesoxalic semialdehyde; periodate oxidation yielded glyoxylate and a compound presumed to be formate. Tartronic semialdehyde reductase was present in extracts of S. allantoicus and in a species of Pseudomonas grown on allantoin. A scheme for the synthesis of acetate from glyoxylate by S. allantoicus is discussed. PMID:14151040

  19. Streptococcus tangierensis sp. nov. and Streptococcus cameli sp. nov., two novel Streptococcus species isolated from raw camel milk in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Zaina; Vandamme, Peter; Ouadghiri, Mouna; Cnockaert, Margo; Aerts, Maarten; Elfahime, El Mostafa; Farricha, Omar El; Swings, Jean; Amar, Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    Biochemical and molecular genetic studies were performed on two unidentified Gram-stain positive, catalase and oxidase negative, non-hemolytic Streptococcus-like organisms recovered from raw camel milk in Morocco. Phenotypic characterization and comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing demonstrated that the two strains were highly different from each other and that they did not correspond to any recognized species of the genus Streptococcus. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the unidentified organisms each formed a hitherto unknown sub-line within the genus Streptococcus, displaying a close affinity with Streptococcus moroccensis, Streptococcus minor and Streptococcus ovis. DNA G+C content determination, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and biochemical tests demonstrated the bacterial isolates represent two novel species. Based on the phenotypic distinctiveness of the new bacteria and molecular genetic evidence, it is proposed to classify the two strains as Streptococcus tangierensis sp. nov., with CCMM B832(T) (=LMG 27683(T)) as the type strain, and Streptococcus cameli sp. nov., with CCMM B834(T) (=LMG 27685(T)) as the type strain.

  20. Trichloroethylene Biodegradation by a Methane-Oxidizing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Little, C. Deane; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Herbes, Stephen E.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Tyndall, Richard L.; Gilmer, Penny J.

    1988-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, is a suspected carcinogen that is highly resistant to aerobic biodegradation. An aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacterium was isolated that degrades TCE in pure culture at concentrations commonly observed in contaminated groundwater. Strain 46-1, a type I methanotrophic bacterium, degraded TCE if grown on methane or methanol, producing CO2 and water-soluble products. Gas chromatography and 14C radiotracer techniques were used to determine the rate, methane dependence, and mechanism of TCE biodegradation. TCE biodegradation by strain 46-1 appears to be a cometabolic process that occurs when the organism is actively metabolizing a suitable growth substrate such as methane or methanol. It is proposed that TCE biodegradation by methanotrophs occurs by formation of TCE epoxide, which breaks down spontaneously in water to form dichloroacetic and glyoxylic acids and one-carbon products. Images PMID:16347616

  1. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy.

  2. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Patras, Kathryn A.; Wescombe, Philip A.; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D.; Tagg, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. PMID:26077762

  3. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. PMID:26077762

  4. Group A Streptococcus endometritis following medical abortion.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Nicolas; Joubrel, Caroline; Nedellec, Sophie; Campagna, Jennifer; Agostini, Aubert; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Casetta, Anne; Raymond, Josette; Poyart, Claire; Kernéis, Solen

    2014-07-01

    Medical abortion is not recognized as a high-risk factor for invasive pelvic infection. Here, we report two cases of group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) endometritis following medical abortions with a protocol of oral mifepristone and misoprostol. PMID:24829245

  5. Group A Streptococcus Endometritis following Medical Abortion

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, Nicolas; Joubrel, Caroline; Nedellec, Sophie; Campagna, Jennifer; Agostini, Aubert; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Casetta, Anne; Raymond, Josette; Kernéis, Solen

    2014-01-01

    Medical abortion is not recognized as a high-risk factor for invasive pelvic infection. Here, we report two cases of group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) endometritis following medical abortions with a protocol of oral mifepristone and misoprostol. PMID:24829245

  6. Lactic Acid Bacteria in Durum Wheat Flour Are Endophytic Components of the Plant during Its Entire Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Minervini, Fabio; Celano, Giuseppe; Lattanzi, Anna; Tedone, Luigi; De Mastro, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the dynamics of lactic acid bacteria and other Firmicutes associated with durum wheat organs and processed products. 16S rRNA gene-based high-throughput sequencing showed that Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Enterococcus, and Lactococcus were the main epiphytic and endophytic genera among lactic acid bacteria. Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, Paenibacillus, and Staphylococcus completed the picture of the core genus microbiome. The relative abundance of each lactic acid bacterium genus was affected by cultivars, phenological stages, other Firmicutes genera, environmental temperature, and water activity (aw) of plant organs. Lactobacilli, showing the highest sensitivity to aw, markedly decreased during milk development (Odisseo) and physiological maturity (Saragolla). At these stages, Lactobacillus was mainly replaced by Streptococcus, Lactococcus, and Enterococcus. However, a key sourdough species, Lactobacillus plantarum, was associated with plant organs during the life cycle of Odisseo and Saragolla wheat. The composition of the sourdough microbiota and the overall quality of leavened baked goods are also determined throughout the phenological stages of wheat cultivation, with variations depending on environmental and agronomic factors. PMID:26187970

  7. Membrane cofactor protein (CD46) is a keratinocyte receptor for the M protein of the group A streptococcus.

    PubMed Central

    Okada, N; Liszewski, M K; Atkinson, J P; Caparon, M

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) is the causative agent of numerous suppurative diseases of human skin. The M protein of S. pyogenes mediates the adherence of the bacterium to keratinocytes, the most numerous cell type in the epidermis. In this study, we have constructed and analyzed a series of mutant M proteins and have shown that the C repeat domain of the M molecule is responsible for cell recognition. The binding of factor H, a serum regulator of complement activation, to the C repeat region of M protein blocked bacterial adherence. Factor H is a member of a large family of complement regulatory proteins that share a homologous structural motif termed the short consensus repeat. Membrane cofactor protein (MCP), or CD46, is a short consensus repeat-containing protein found on the surface of keratinocytes, and purified MCP could competitively inhibit the adherence of S. pyogenes to these cells. Furthermore, the M protein was found to bind directly to MCP, whereas mutant M proteins that lacked the C repeat domain did not bind MCP, suggesting that recognition of MCP plays an important role in the ability of the streptococcus to adhere to keratinocytes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7708671

  8. Development of approaches to a third-generation carbohydrate-conjugate vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae: the search for optimal oligosaccharide ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gening, M. L.; Kurbatova, E. A.; Tsvetkov, Yu E.; Nifantiev, N. E.

    2015-11-01

    The review addresses the application of synthetic oligosaccharides related to fragments of capsular polysaccharides from different serotypes of the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae for the design of third-generation pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Special focus is given to characteristic features of the chemical structures of oligosaccharides required for the induction of the protective immune response when using synthetic glycoconjugate vaccines based on oligosaccharide ligands and carrier proteins. The bibliography includes 101 references.

  9. Severe Streptococcus infection in spotted hyenas in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Höner, Oliver P; Wachter, Bettina; Speck, Stephanie; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Ludwig, Arne; Fyumagwa, Robert D; Wohlsein, Peter; Lieckfeldt, Dietmar; Hofer, Heribert; East, Marion L

    2006-06-15

    In a population of spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) monitored between 1996 and 2005 in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, 16 individuals from five of eight social groups displayed clinical signs of an infection, including severe unilateral swelling of the head followed by abscess formation at the mandibular angle, respiratory distress, mild ataxia, and lethargy. Two (12.5%) of these 16 individuals died within days of developing signs. Clinical signs in hyenas were first noted in 2001, and most cases occurred between September 2002 and February 2003, suggesting an outbreak of infection during this period. Histopathological examination of internal organs from one hyena that died with signs revealed morphological changes consistent with severe bacterial infection. Phenotypic examination and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of the causative agent of infection revealed a Lancefield group C Streptococcus with a high level of homology to S. equi subsp. ruminatorum, a subspecies of S. equi recently described in domestic sheep (Ovis aries) and goats (Capra hircus) with mastitis in Spain. Strains similar to this bacterium were also isolated from two hyenas without obvious clinical signs, suggesting that hyenas may be 'carriers' of this bacterium, and from a sympatric Burchell's zebra (Equus burchelli), a herbivore species often consumed by hyenas. To our knowledge this is the first report of a Streptococcus infection in these two wildlife species. The high genetic similarity between the hyena and zebra isolates indicates that inter-specific transmission may occur, possibly when hyenas consume infected zebra carcasses.

  10. Molecular characterization of virulence genes of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in equines

    PubMed Central

    Javed, R.; Taku, A. K.; Gangil, Rakhi; Sharma, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the occurrence of streptococci in equines in Jammu (R. S. Pura, Katra), characterization of Streptococci equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus with respect to their virulence traits and to determine antibiotic sensitivity pattern of virulent Streptococcus isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 96 samples were collected from both clinically affected animals (exhibiting signs of respiratory tract disease) and apparently healthy animals and were sent to laboratory. The organisms were isolated on Columbia nalidixic acid agar containing 5% sheep blood as well as on sheep blood agar and confirmed by cultural characteristics and biochemical tests. Molecular detection of Streptococcus was done directly from cultures using sodA and seM gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Antibiogram was performed against five antibiotics such as amoxicillin, penicillin G, streptomycin, rifampicin, and methicillin. Results: During this study, a total 40 streptococcal isolates were obtained out of which 2 isolates were of S. equi subsp. equi, 12 isolates were from S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. In the PCR-based detection, we revealed amplicons of 235 bp and 679 bp for confirmation of sodA and seM gene, respectively. In antibiogram, two isolates of S. equi subsp. equi were found resistant to penicillin G, and all other isolates were found sensitive to amoxicillin and streptomycin. Conclusion: The majority of streptococcal infections was due to S. equi subsp. Zooepidemicus, and thus was recognized as a potential pathogen of diseases of equines besides S. equi subsp. equi.

  11. The cell-bound fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus salivarius: the carboxyl terminus specifies attachment in a Streptococcus gordonii model system.

    PubMed Central

    Rathsam, C; Giffard, P M; Jacques, N A

    1993-01-01

    The ftf gene, coding for the cell-bound beta-D-fructosyltransferase (FTF) of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, has been analyzed, and its deduced amino acid sequence has been compared with that of the secreted FTF of Streptococcus mutans and the levansucrases (SacBs) of Bacillus species. A unique proline-rich region detected at the C terminus of the FTF of S. salivarius preceded a hydrophobic terminal domain. This proline-rich region was shown to possess strong homology to the product of the prgC gene from pCF10 in Enterococcus faecalis, which encodes a pheromone-responsive protein of unknown function, as well as homology to the human proline-rich salivary protein PRP-4. A series of 3'-OH deletions of the S. salivarius ftf gene expressed in Streptococcus gordonii Challis LGR2 showed that the C terminus was required for cell surface attachment in this heterologous organism, as only the complete gene product was cell bound. This cell-bound activity was released in the presence of sucrose, suggesting that the mode of attachment and release of the S. salivarius FTF in S. gordonii was similar to that in its native host. PMID:8331080

  12. Involvement of NADH Oxidase in Biofilm Formation in Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiuchun; Shi, Xiaoli; Shi, Limei; Liu, Jinlin; Stone, Victoria; Kong, Fanxiang; Kitten, Todd; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms play important roles in microbial communities and are related to infectious diseases. Here, we report direct evidence that a bacterial nox gene encoding NADH oxidase is involved in biofilm formation. A dramatic reduction in biofilm formation was observed in a Streptococcus sanguinis nox mutant under anaerobic conditions without any decrease in growth. The membrane fluidity of the mutant bacterial cells was found to be decreased and the fatty acid composition altered, with increased palmitic acid and decreased stearic acid and vaccenic acid. Extracellular DNA of the mutant was reduced in abundance and bacterial competence was suppressed. Gene expression analysis in the mutant identified two genes with altered expression, gtfP and Idh, which were found to be related to biofilm formation through examination of their deletion mutants. NADH oxidase-related metabolic pathways were analyzed, further clarifying the function of this enzyme in biofilm formation. PMID:26950587

  13. Capsule of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus hampers the adherence and invasion of epithelial and endothelial cells and is attenuated during internalization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Pei, Xiaomeng; Su, Yiqi; Ma, Zhe; Fan, Hongjie

    2016-08-01

    Direct interaction between pathogens and host cells often is a prerequisite for colonization, infection and dissemination. Regulated production of capsular polysaccharide (CPS), which is made of hyaluronic acid, is essential for the pathogenicity of Streptococcus equi subsp. Zooepidemicus (SEZ). Here, we constructed a CPS-deleted mutant and analyzed it along with the parental wild-type strain in attachment and invasion of mammalian epithelial and endothelial cell lines. The CPS-deleted mutant exhibited significant increase in adherence and invasion by several orders of magnitude compared with the wild-type strain through quantitative analysis and electron microscopy observation. After the wild-type strain was recovered from invaded cells, its morphology was analyzed by visual methods and scanning electron microscopy, which revealed that its capsule was almost completely absent. Capsule measurements showed a similar result in which CPS production was nearly attenuated to the same extent as in the CPS-deleted mutant. qPCR assays revealed a marked reduction in the transcriptional levels of the CPS biosynthesis genes, has operon. Moreover, the repression in capsular production was stable inheritance. Our findings indicate that SEZ is a facultative intracellular bacterium, capsule attenuation in SEZ contributes to attachment and invasion in interactions with host cells, and the active regulation of capsule breakdown is controlled by SEZ during internalization. PMID:27388015

  14. Endocarditis caused by unusual Streptococcus species (Streptococcus pluranimalium)

    PubMed Central

    Fotoglidis, A; Pagourelias, E; Kyriakou, P; Vassilikos, V

    2015-01-01

    Background Infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers is caused mainly by Staphylococcus species and usually affects the right heart valves. Case Description We report the case of a 37-years-old intravenous drug abuser, who was diagnosed with infective endocarditis of the mitral and aortic valve. An unusual Streptococcus species (Streptococcus pluranimalium) was isolated from surgical specimens (peripheral arterial emboli, valves’ vegetations) which, according to the literature, is related to animals’ diseases such as infective endocarditis in adult broiler parents, with no references existing regarding causing such disease in humans. This unusual coccus infection caused specific clinical features (sizable vegetation on mitral valve >2cm, smaller vegetations on aortic valve, systemic emboli), resistance to antimicrobial therapy, rapid progression of the disease (despite of medical therapy and surgical replacement of both valves), and finally the death of the patient two months after the initial presentation of infective endocarditis. Conclusion Unusual cases of infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers are emerging and are characterized by changing microbiological profile and varying clinical characteristics. Clinical doctors must be aware of these cases, especially when their patients present an atypical clinical course, and reappraise their medical management. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2):182-185. PMID:27418771

  15. Evaluation of a chromogenic agar for detection of group B streptococcus in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Craven, Robin R; Weber, Carol J; Jennemann, Rebecca A; Dunne, W Michael

    2010-09-01

    We compared ChromID Strepto B agar (STRB; bioMérieux, Inc.), a selective and differential medium for group B streptococcus, with culture using neomycin-nalidixic acid agar (NNA) and LIM broth. STRB alone was more sensitive (87.7%) than NNA alone (79.0%), while each had a sensitivity of 100% when used in conjunction with LIM broth.

  16. Effects of inulin chain length on fermentation by equine fecal bacteria and Streptococcus bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fructans from pasture can be fermented by Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Streptococcus bovis) in the equine hindgut, increasing production of lactic acid and decreasing pH. The degree of polymerization (DP) of fructans has been suggested to influence fermentation rates. The objective of the current ...

  17. Occurrence and cultural features of Streptococcus milleri in various body sites.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, P M; Wilson, G

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was made into the habitat of commensal strains of Streptococcus milleri. These showed distinctive patterns of cultural features, dependent on their sites of origin, which were compared with those prevalent in strains grown from the appendix, 'anal' lesions, and Bartholin's abscesses. A biotype, which showed a marked affinity for the vagina and produced acid from raffinose and melibiose, was identified. PMID:512036

  18. Vector-mediated chromosomal integration of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The integrative vector pINTRS was used to transfer glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity to Streptococcus thermophilus ST128, thus allowing for the production of '-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In pINTRS, the gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was flanked by DNA fragments homologous to a S. ...

  19. [Streptococcus pyogenes--much more than the aetiological agent of scarlet fever].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2009-11-01

    The grampositive bacterium S. pyogenes (beta-haemolytic group A Streptococcus) is a natural colonizer of the human oropharynx mucous membrane and one of the most common agents of infectious diseases in humans. S. pyogenes causes the widest range of disease in humans among all bacterial pathogens. It is responsible for various skin infections such as impetigo contagiosa and erysipelas, and localized mucous membrane infections of the oropharynx (e. g. tonsillitis and pharyngitis). Betahaemolytic group A Streptococcus causes also invasive diseases such as sepses including puerperal sepsis. Additionally, S. pyogenes induces toxin-mediated syndromes, i. e. scarlet fever, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) and necrotizing fasciitis (NF). STSS and NF are severe, frequently fatal diseases that have emerged in Europe and Northern America during the last two decades. Finally, some immunpathological diseases such as acute rheumatic fever and glomerulonephritis also result from S. pyogenes infections. Most scientists recommend penicillins (benzylpenicillin, phenoxymethylpenicllin) as drugs of first choice for treatment of Streptococcus tonsillopharyngitis and scarlet fever. Erysipelas and some other skin infections should be treated with benzylpenicillin. Intensive care measurements are needed for treatment of severe toxin-mediated S. pyogenes diseases. These measurements include the elimination of internal bacterial foci, concomitant application of clindamycin and benzylpenicillin and suitable treatment of shock symptoms. Management of immunpathological diseases requires antiphlogistical therapy. Because of the wide distribution of S. pyogenes in the general population and the lack of an effective vaccine, possibilities for prevention allowing a suitable protection for diseases due to S. pyogenes are very limited.

  20. Classification of the Legionnaires' disease bacterium: Legionella pneumophila, genus novum, species nova, of the family Legionellaceae, familia nova.

    PubMed

    Brenner, D J; Steigerwalt, A G; McDade, J E

    1979-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) relatedness was used to classify strains of the Legionnaires' disease (LD) bacterium. These DNA comparisons showed that all strains of the LD bacterium were members of the same species. Included were strains isolated from the environment and strains with three different O-antigens. The DNA from the LD bacterium was not significantly related to DNA from any other group of bacteria that was tested. Biochemical data, growth characteristics, and guanine-plus-cytosine ratios were used to rule out the possibility that the LD bacterium was significantly related to members of genera whose DNA was not tested. In view of these data we propose that the LD bacterium be named Legionella pneumophila species nova, the type species of Legionella, genus novum. The type strain of L. pneumophila is Philadelphia 1.

  1. Streptococcus agalactiae mastitis: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, G P

    1997-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae continues to be a major cause of subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle and a source of economic loss for the industry. Veterinarians are often asked to provide information on herd level control and eradication of S. agalactiae mastitis. This review collects and collates relevant publications on the subject. The literature search was conducted in 1993 on the Agricola database. Articles related to S. agalactiae epidemiology, pathogen identification techniques, milk quality consequences, and control, prevention, and therapy were included. Streptococcus agalactiae is an oblique parasite of the bovine mammary gland and is susceptible to treatment with a variety of antibiotics. Despite this fact, where state or provincial census data are available, herd prevalence levels range from 11% (Alberta, 1991) to 47% (Vermont, 1985). Infection with S. agalactiae is associated with elevated somatic cell count and total bacteria count and a decrease in the quantity and quality of milk products produced. Bulk tank milk culture has, using traditional milk culture techniques, had a low sensitivity for identifying S. agalactiae at the herd level. New culture methods, using selective media and large inocula, have substantially improved the sensitivity of bulk tank culture. Efficacy of therapy on individual cows remains high. Protocols for therapy of all infected animals in a herd are generally successful in eradicating the pathogen from the herd, especially if they are followed up with good udder hygiene techniques. PMID:9220132

  2. Characterization of an extracellular dipeptidase from Streptococcus gordonii FSS2.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, J M; Kordula, T; Moon, J L; Mayo, J A; Travis, J

    2005-02-01

    PepV, a dipeptidase found in culture fluids of Streptococcus gordonii FSS2, was purified and characterized, and its gene was cloned. PepV is a monomeric metalloenzyme of approximately 55 kDa that preferentially degrades hydrophobic dipeptides. The gene encodes a polypeptide of 467 amino acids, with a theoretical molecular mass of 51,114 Da and a calculated pI of 4.8. The S. gordonii PepV gene is homologous to the PepV gene family from Lactobacillus and Lactococcus spp.

  3. Development of Streptococcus pneumoniae Vaccines Using Live Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shifeng; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae still causes severe morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in young children and the elderly. Much effort has been dedicated to developing protein-based universal vaccines to conquer the current shortcomings of capsular vaccines and capsular conjugate vaccines, such as serotype replacement, limited coverage and high costs. A recombinant live vector vaccine delivering protective antigens is a promising way to achieve this goal. In this review, we discuss the researches using live recombinant vaccines, mainly live attenuated Salmonella and lactic acid bacteria, to deliver pneumococcal antigens. We also discuss both the limitations and the future of these vaccines. PMID:25309747

  4. Organic Turkey Flocks: A Reservoir of Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Jochen; Dumke, Jessika; Hinse, Dennis; Dreier, Jens; Habig, Christin; Kemper, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus (S. gallolyticus) can colonise the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals and is known to cause similar infections in both humans and animals. Data about the spread or prevalence in farm animals are missing. In this study, Trypton Soya Agar was modified to a selective medium enabling the isolation and quantification of S. gallolyticus from faecal samples. The bacterium was observed in 82 out of 91 faecal samples obtained from 18 different organic turkey flocks. The prevalence of shedding birds was estimated by the number of positive fresh droppings and reached up to 100% on most farms. Furthermore, for the first time S. gallolyticus was quantified in faeces from poultry flocks. The median of colony forming units (CFU) per gramme faeces was 3.6 x 10(5) CFU/g. Typing of one isolate from each positive faecal sample by multilocus sequence typing delivered 24 sequence types (STs). Most of the isolates belonged to the clonal complex CC58. The same STs of this complex were detected in up to six different flocks. Partly, these flocks were located in various regions and stocked with varying breeding lines. Regarding the biochemical profiles of the same STs from different farms, the results did not contradict a spread of specific STs in the organic turkey production. Moreover, checking the pubMLST database revealed that STs found in this study were also found in other animal species and in humans. The high detection rate and the number of S. gallolyticus in turkey faeces indicate that this bacterium probably belongs to the common microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract of turkeys from organic flocks. Furthermore, the findings of this study support the suggestion of a possible interspecies transmission.

  5. Organic Turkey Flocks: A Reservoir of Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Jochen; Dumke, Jessika; Hinse, Dennis; Dreier, Jens; Habig, Christin; Kemper, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus (S. gallolyticus) can colonise the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals and is known to cause similar infections in both humans and animals. Data about the spread or prevalence in farm animals are missing. In this study, Trypton Soya Agar was modified to a selective medium enabling the isolation and quantification of S. gallolyticus from faecal samples. The bacterium was observed in 82 out of 91 faecal samples obtained from 18 different organic turkey flocks. The prevalence of shedding birds was estimated by the number of positive fresh droppings and reached up to 100% on most farms. Furthermore, for the first time S. gallolyticus was quantified in faeces from poultry flocks. The median of colony forming units (CFU) per gramme faeces was 3.6 x 105CFU/g. Typing of one isolate from each positive faecal sample by multilocus sequence typing delivered 24 sequence types (STs). Most of the isolates belonged to the clonal complex CC58. The same STs of this complex were detected in up to six different flocks. Partly, these flocks were located in various regions and stocked with varying breeding lines. Regarding the biochemical profiles of the same STs from different farms, the results did not contradict a spread of specific STs in the organic turkey production. Moreover, checking the pubMLST database revealed that STs found in this study were also found in other animal species and in humans. The high detection rate and the number of S. gallolyticus in turkey faeces indicate that this bacterium probably belongs to the common microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract of turkeys from organic flocks. Furthermore, the findings of this study support the suggestion of a possible interspecies transmission. PMID:26657757

  6. Identification and analysis of potential targets in Streptococcus sanguinis using computer aided protein data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Md Rabiul Hossain; Bhuiyan, Md IqbalKaiser; Saha, Ayan; Mosleh, Ivan MHAI; Mondol, Sobuj; Ahmed, C M Sabbir

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Streptococcus sanguinis is a Gram-positive, facultative aerobic bacterium that is a member of the viridans streptococcus group. It is found in human mouths in dental plaque, which accounts for both dental cavities and bacterial endocarditis, and which entails a mortality rate of 25%. Although a range of remedial mediators have been found to control this organism, the effectiveness of agents such as penicillin, amoxicillin, trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole, and erythromycin, was observed. The emphasis of this investigation was on finding substitute and efficient remedial approaches for the total destruction of this bacterium. Materials and methods In this computational study, various databases and online software were used to ascertain some specific targets of S. sanguinis. Particularly, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases were applied to determine human nonhomologous proteins, as well as the metabolic pathways involved with those proteins. Different software such as Phyre2, CastP, DoGSiteScorer, the Protein Function Predictor server, and STRING were utilized to evaluate the probable active drug binding site with its known function and protein–protein interaction. Results In this study, among 218 essential proteins of this pathogenic bacterium, 81 nonhomologous proteins were accrued, and 15 proteins that are unique in several metabolic pathways of S. sanguinis were isolated through metabolic pathway analysis. Furthermore, four essentially membrane-bound unique proteins that are involved in distinct metabolic pathways were revealed by this research. Active sites and druggable pockets of these selected proteins were investigated with bioinformatic techniques. In addition, this study also mentions the activity of those proteins, as well as their interactions with the other proteins. Conclusion Our findings helped to identify the type of protein to be considered as an efficient drug target. This study will pave the way for researchers to

  7. Involvement of NADH Oxidase in Competition and Endocarditis Virulence in Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiuchun; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Min; Chen, Lei; Chen, Weihua; Elrami, Fadi; Kong, Fanxiang; Kitten, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report for the first time that the Streptococcus sanguinis nox gene encoding NADH oxidase is involved in both competition with Streptococcus mutans and virulence for infective endocarditis. An S. sanguinis nox mutant was found to fail to inhibit the growth of Streptococcus mutans under microaerobic conditions. In the presence of oxygen, the recombinant Nox protein of S. sanguinis could reduce oxygen to water and oxidize NADH to NAD+. The oxidation of NADH to NAD+ was diminished in the nox mutant. The nox mutant exhibited decreased levels of extracellular H2O2; however, the intracellular level of H2O2 in the mutant was increased. Furthermore, the virulence of the nox mutant was attenuated in a rabbit endocarditis model. The nox mutant also was shown to be more sensitive to blood killing, oxidative and acid stresses, and reduced growth in serum. Thus, NADH oxidase contributes to multiple phenotypes related to competitiveness in the oral cavity and systemic virulence. PMID:26930704

  8. GENETIC LINKAGE OF MUTATIONAL SITES AFFECTING SIMILAR CHARACTERS IN PNEUMOCOCCUS AND STREPTOCOCCUS.

    PubMed

    RAVIN, A W; DESA, J H

    1964-01-01

    Ravin, Arnold W. (University of Rochester, Rochester, N.Y.), and Joscelyn D. H. De Sa. Genetic linkage of mutational sites affecting similar characters in pneumococcus and streptococcus. J. Bacteriol. 87:86-96. 1964.-By interspecific transformation, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) determinants conferring resistance to high levels of streptomycin in pneumococcus were found to be allelic with DNA determinants conferring low levels of streptomycin resistance in the Challis and NBSI strains of streptococcus. The reciprocal transformation (low resistance pneumococcus x high resistance streptococcus) led to the same conclusion. In addition, determinants controlling resistance to erythromycin in pneumococcus and the Challis strain of streptococcus were found to become closely linked after interspecific transformation. Modifier genes influencing the phenotype conferred by mutations at the streptomycin-resistance locus differentiate species to a certain extent. The results demonstrate that transformations between pneumococcus and streptococcus are not due to episomes, but involve recombinational events in which genetic material of the host species is replaced by homologous material that performed a similar function in the donor species.

  9. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation by Streptococcus salivarius FruA.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Ayako; Furukawa, Soichi; Fujita, Shuhei; Mitobe, Jiro; Kawarai, Taketo; Narisawa, Naoki; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Kosono, Saori; Yoneda, Saori; Watanabe, Haruo; Morinaga, Yasushi; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2011-03-01

    The oral microbial flora consists of many beneficial species of bacteria that are associated with a healthy condition and control the progression of oral disease. Cooperative interactions between oral streptococci and the pathogens play important roles in the development of dental biofilms in the oral cavity. To determine the roles of oral streptococci in multispecies biofilm development and the effects of the streptococci in biofilm formation, the active substances inhibiting Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation were purified from Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 9759 and HT9R culture supernatants using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis was performed, and the results were compared to databases. The S. salivarius HT9R genome sequence was determined and used to indentify candidate proteins for inhibition. The candidates inhibiting biofilms were identified as S. salivarius fructosyltransferase (FTF) and exo-beta-d-fructosidase (FruA). The activity of the inhibitors was elevated in the presence of sucrose, and the inhibitory effects were dependent on the sucrose concentration in the biofilm formation assay medium. Purified and commercial FruA from Aspergillus niger (31.6% identity and 59.6% similarity to the amino acid sequence of FruA from S. salivarius HT9R) completely inhibited S. mutans GS-5 biofilm formation on saliva-coated polystyrene and hydroxyapatite surfaces. Inhibition was induced by decreasing polysaccharide production, which is dependent on sucrose digestion rather than fructan digestion. The data indicate that S. salivarius produces large quantities of FruA and that FruA alone may play an important role in multispecies microbial interactions for sucrose-dependent biofilm formation in the oral cavity. PMID:21239559

  10. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus salivarius FruA▿

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Ayako; Furukawa, Soichi; Fujita, Shuhei; Mitobe, Jiro; Kawarai, Taketo; Narisawa, Naoki; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Kosono, Saori; Yoneda, Saori; Watanabe, Haruo; Morinaga, Yasushi; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2011-01-01

    The oral microbial flora consists of many beneficial species of bacteria that are associated with a healthy condition and control the progression of oral disease. Cooperative interactions between oral streptococci and the pathogens play important roles in the development of dental biofilms in the oral cavity. To determine the roles of oral streptococci in multispecies biofilm development and the effects of the streptococci in biofilm formation, the active substances inhibiting Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation were purified from Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 9759 and HT9R culture supernatants using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis was performed, and the results were compared to databases. The S. salivarius HT9R genome sequence was determined and used to indentify candidate proteins for inhibition. The candidates inhibiting biofilms were identified as S. salivarius fructosyltransferase (FTF) and exo-beta-d-fructosidase (FruA). The activity of the inhibitors was elevated in the presence of sucrose, and the inhibitory effects were dependent on the sucrose concentration in the biofilm formation assay medium. Purified and commercial FruA from Aspergillus niger (31.6% identity and 59.6% similarity to the amino acid sequence of FruA from S. salivarius HT9R) completely inhibited S. mutans GS-5 biofilm formation on saliva-coated polystyrene and hydroxyapatite surfaces. Inhibition was induced by decreasing polysaccharide production, which is dependent on sucrose digestion rather than fructan digestion. The data indicate that S. salivarius produces large quantities of FruA and that FruA alone may play an important role in multispecies microbial interactions for sucrose-dependent biofilm formation in the oral cavity. PMID:21239559

  11. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xudong; de Soet, Johannes Jacob; Tong, Huichun; Gao, Xuejun; He, Libang; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP). Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0) for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period) produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries. PMID:26114758

  12. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xudong; de Soet, Johannes Jacob; Tong, Huichun; Gao, Xuejun; He, Libang; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP). Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0) for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period) produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries. PMID:26114758

  13. Antibody binding to Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis cell fractions

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Katherine A.; Bowden, George H.; Richmond, Dorothy A.; Sheridan, Michael J.; Cole, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objective To determine which cell fraction(s) of Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 serve as the best source of antigens recognized by salivary SIgA antibodies in infants. Design Whole cells of 38 reference and wild-type isolates of Streptococcus mitis, S. oralis, S. gordonii, Enterococcus casseliflavus, and E. faecalis were fractionated into cell walls CW), protease-treated cell walls (PTCW), cell membranes (CM) and cell protein (CP). Whole cells and these fractions were tested for binding by rabbit anti-S. mitis SK145 and anti-S. oralis SK100 sera, and also by salivary SIgA antibodies from infants and adults. Results Anti-SK145 and anti-SK100 sera bound whole cells and fractions of all strains of S. mitis and S. oralis variably. Cluster analysis of antibody binding data placed the strains into S. mitis, S. oralis and ‘Non-S. mitis/non-S. oralis’ clusters. Antigens from CW and CM best discriminated S. mitis from S. oralis. CM bound the most infant salivary SIgA antibody and PTCW bound the least. In contrast, adult salivary SIgA antibody bound all of the cell fractions and at higher levels. Conclusions Presumably the relatively short period of immune stimulation and immunological immaturity in infants, in contrast to adults, result in low levels of salivary SIgA antibody that preferentially bind CM of S. mitis but not PTCW. By utilizing isolated cell walls and membranes as sources of antigens for proteomics it may be possible to identify antigens common to oral streptococci and dissect the fine specificity of salivary SIgA antibodies induced by oral colonization by S. mitis. PMID:17904095

  14. Unique Genomic Arrangements in an Invasive Serotype M23 Strain of Streptococcus pyogenes Identify Genes That Induce Hypervirulence

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yunjuan; Liang, Zhong; Booyjzsen, Claire; Mayfield, Jeffrey A.; Li, Yang; Lee, Shaun W.; Ploplis, Victoria A.; Song, Hui

    2014-01-01

    The first genome sequence of a group A Streptococcus pyogenes serotype M23 (emm23) strain (M23ND), isolated from an invasive human infection, has been completed. The genome of this opacity factor-negative (SOF−) strain is composed of a circular chromosome of 1,846,477 bp. Gene profiling showed that this strain contained six phage-encoded and 24 chromosomally inherited well-known virulence factors, as well as 11 pseudogenes. The bacterium has acquired four large prophage elements, ΦM23ND.1 to ΦM23ND.4, harboring genes encoding streptococcal superantigen (ssa), streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxins (speC, speH, and speI), and DNases (spd1 and spd3), with phage integrase genes being present at one flank of each phage insertion, suggesting that the phages were integrated by horizontal gene transfer. Comparative analyses revealed unique large-scale genomic rearrangements that result in genomic rearrangements that differ from those of previously sequenced GAS strains. These rearrangements resulted in an imbalanced genomic architecture and translocations of chromosomal virulence genes. The covS sensor in M23ND was identified as a pseudogene, resulting in the attenuation of speB function and increased expression of the genes for the chromosomal virulence factors multiple-gene activator (mga), M protein (emm23), C5a peptidase (scpA), fibronectin-binding proteins (sfbI and fbp54), streptolysin O (slo), hyaluronic acid capsule (hasA), streptokinase (ska), and DNases (spd and spd3), which were verified by PCR. These genes are responsible for facilitating host epithelial cell binding and and/or immune evasion, thus further contributing to the virulence of M23ND. In conclusion, strain M23ND has become highly pathogenic as the result of a combination of multiple genetic factors, particularly gene composition and mutations, prophage integrations, unique genomic rearrangements, and regulated expression of critical virulence factors. PMID:25225265

  15. The Surface Protein Srr-1 of Streptococcus agalactiae Binds Human Keratin 4 and Promotes Adherence to Epithelial HEp-2 Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Samen, Ulrike; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.; Reinscheid, Dieter J.; Borges, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is frequently the cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in neonates. In addition, it is a commensal bacterium that colonizes the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. During its commensal and pathogenic lifestyles, S. agalactiae colonizes and invades a number of host compartments, thereby interacting with different host proteins. In the present study, the serine-rich repeat protein Srr-1 from S. agalactiae was functionally investigated. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that Srr-1 was localized on the surface of streptococcal cells. The Srr-1 protein was shown to interact with a 62-kDa protein in human saliva, which was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight analysis as human keratin 4 (K4). Immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay experiments allowed us to narrow down the K4 binding domain in Srr-1 to a region of 157 amino acids (aa). Furthermore, the Srr-1 binding domain of K4 was identified in the C-terminal 255 aa of human K4. Deletion of the srr-1 gene in the genome of S. agalactiae revealed that this gene plays a role in bacterial binding to human K4 and that it is involved in adherence to epithelial HEp-2 cells. Binding to immobilized K4 and adherence to HEp-2 cells were restored by introducing the srr-1 gene on a shuttle plasmid into the srr-1 mutant. Furthermore, incubation of HEp-2 cells with the K4 binding domain of Srr-1 blocked S. agalactiae adherence to epithelial cells in a dose-dependent fashion. This is the first report describing the interaction of a bacterial protein with human K4. PMID:17709412

  16. Human plasma fibronectin inhibits adherence of Streptococcus pyogenes to hexadecane.

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, H S; Ofek, I; Simpson, W A; Whitnack, E; Beachey, E H

    1985-01-01

    The effect of human plasma fibronectin on the adherence of Streptococcus pyogenes to hexadecane droplets was investigated. Fibronectin blocked the adherence of streptococci to hexadecane in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect resulted from the binding of fibronectin to the streptococcal cells; radiolabeled fibronectin failed to bind to the hexadecane but bound readily to untreated streptococci. Chemical treatments of streptococci that decreased streptococcal binding of fibronectin also decreased their binding to hexadecane. Pretreatment of fibronectin with lipoteichoic acid blocked the binding of fibronectin to streptococci and abolished its ability to inhibit streptococcal adherence to hexadecane in a dose-related manner. In contrast, wheat germ agglutinin, which binds to N-acetylglucosamine on the surface of S. pyogenes cells, failed to alter hexadecane adherence. The data suggest that fibronectin binds to lipoteichoic acid on the surface of the streptococci, thereby preventing lipoteichoic acid from interacting with the hexadecane phase. PMID:3880729

  17. Streptococcus mutans in a wild, sucrose-eating rat population.

    PubMed

    Coykendall, A L; Specht, P A; Samol, H H

    1974-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans, an organism implicated in dental caries and not previously found outside of man and certain laboratory animals, was isolated from the mouths of wild rats which ate sugar cane. The strains isolated fermented mannitol and sorbitol, and failed to grow in 6.5% NaCl or at 45 C. They formed in vitro plaques on nichrome wires when grown in sucrose broth. They also stored intracellular polysaccharide which could be catabolized by washed, resting cells. Deoxyribonucleic acid-deoxyribonucleic acid reassociations revealed two genetic types. One type shared extensive deoxyribonucleic acid base sequences with S. mutans strains HS6 and OMZ61, two members of a genetic type found in man and laboratory hamsters. The other type seemed unrelated to any S. mutans genetic type previously encountered. It is concluded that the ecological triad of tooth-sucrose-S. mutans is not a phenomenon unique to man and experimental animals. PMID:4601769

  18. Antigenic determinant of the Lancefield group H antigen of Streptococcus sanguis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosan, B; Argenbright, L

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the teichoic acid isolated from strains of Streptococcus sanguis was group specific and defined the Lancefield group H streptococci. To determine the specific antigenic determinants, the antigen was extracted from a group H streptococcus (ATCC 903) by the phenol-water method and purified by column chromatography. The isolated antigen had a glycerol/phosphate/glucose molar ratio of 1:0.9:0.3; the lipid concentration was 7.6% of its dry weight. No nucleic acids were detected, and amino acids constituted approximately 2% of the dry weight. The minimum concentration of antigen required to sensitize erythrocytes for hemagglutination with a 1:1,000 dilution of either group H antiserum or antiteichoic acid serum was 0.02 microgram/ml. Hemagglutination inhibition studies suggested that the major antigenic determinant consisted of an alpha-glucose linked to the glycerol phosphate backbone. Images PMID:6185428

  19. Cloacibacillus porcorum sp. nov., a mucin-degrading bacterium from the swine intestinal tract and emended description of the genus Cloacibacillus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel anaerobic, mesophilic, amino-acid-fermenting bacterium, designated strain CL-84T, was isolated from the swine intestinal tract on mucin-based media. The bacterium had curved-rod cells (0.8-1.2 µm x 3.5-5.0 µm), stained Gram negative, and was non-motile with no evidence of spores. CL-84T pro...

  20. Comparative functional analysis of the lac operons in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Loughman, Jennifer A; Caparon, Michael G

    2007-04-01

    Having no known environmental reservoir, Streptococcus pyogenes, a bacterium responsible for a wider variety of human diseases than any other bacterial species, must rely on its host for metabolic substrates. Although a streptococcal aldolase, LacD.1, has been adapted to virulence gene regulation, both LacD.1 and a paralogous protein, LacD.2, are predicted to function in the tagatose 6-phosphate pathway for lactose and galactose utilization. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of the LacD.1 regulatory pathway and the role of genome context in the emergence of LacD.1's novel regulatory functions, we compared the function and regulation of the Lac.1 and Lac.2 loci. The Lac.1 operon is not inducible, and regulation by LacD.1 is independent of a functional tagatose 6-phosphate pathway and enhanced by the conserved truncation of upstream Lac.1 genes. In contrast, Lac.2 expression is sensitive to environmental carbohydrates, and LacD.2, not LacD.1, contributes to growth on galactose. Thus, we conclude that the Lac.1 locus has been specialized to participate in regulation, leaving efficient utilization of carbohydrate sources to the Lac.2 locus. The adaptation of LacD for transcription regulation may be an underappreciated strategy among prokaryotes, as homologues of this multifaceted enzyme are present in a broad range of species. PMID:17371500

  1. Selection and application of Streptococcus bovis as a silage inoculant.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B A; Muck, R E; Ricke, S C

    1991-01-01

    Three strains of Streptococcus bovis, a homolactic bacterium capable of utilizing starch, were evaluated for growth kinetics and ability to decrease the pH of alfalfa silage. A selected strain was evaluated for its competitiveness as an inoculant with Enterococcus faecium, an organism used in inoculants, and for its ability to enhance the effect of a commercial inoculant. Testing was completed over three studies using wilted alfalfa (28 to 34% dry matter) ensiled into laboratory silos. Treatments were control, E. faecium, E. faecium and commercial inoculant, S. bovis, and S. bovis and commercial inoculant. Replicate silos were emptied and analyzed at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 40 days for pH, fermentation products, and nitrogen fractions. S. bovis alone lowered the pH quicker and improved silage parameters early in the fermentation compared with E. faecium, the commercial inoculant, and control treatments. When combined with a commercial inoculant, S. bovis lowered pH more quickly than the commercial inoculant alone and E. faecium plus commercial inoculant. At 40 days, S. bovis combination had lower pH and ammonia nitrogen and acetate contents than the E. faecium combination. Starch in the silage was not utilized by S. bovis as had been anticipated. Results indicate that S. bovis was more effective than E. faecium as a silage inoculant and could enhance a commercial inoculant on low-dry-matter alfalfa. PMID:1746960

  2. Protein degradation in bovine milk caused by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Åkerstedt, Maria; Wredle, Ewa; Lam, Vo; Johansson, Monika

    2012-08-01

    Streptococcus (Str.) agalactiae is a contagious mastitis bacterium, often associated with cases of subclinical mastitis. Different mastitis bacteria have been evaluated previously from a diagnostic point of view, but there is a lack of knowledge concerning their effect on milk composition. Protein composition is important in achieving optimal yield and texture when milk is processed to fermented products, such as cheese and yoghurt, and is thus of great economic value. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate protein degradation mainly caused by exogenous proteases originating from naturally occurring Str. agalactiae. The samples were incubated at 37°C to imitate degradation caused by the bacteria in the udder. Protein degradation caused by different strains of Str. agalactiae was also investigated. Protein degradation was observed to occur when Str. agalactiae was added to milk, but there were variations between strains of the bacteria. Caseins, the most economically important proteins in milk, were degraded up to 75% in milk inoculated with Str. agalactiae in relation to sterile ultra-high temperature (UHT) milk, used as control milk. The major whey proteins, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin, were degraded up to 21% in relation to the sterile control milk. These results suggest that different mastitis bacteria but also different strains of mastitis bacteria should be evaluated from a milk quality perspective to gain knowledge about their ability to degrade the economically important proteins in milk. PMID:22850579

  3. Safety assessment of dairy microorganisms: Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Christine

    2008-09-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is a major dairy starter used in yogurt and cheese production. In Streptococcus genus, S. thermophilus is the only one food species among commensal and opportunistic pathogen species. Comparative genomics suggest that this species recently emerged and evolved by combination of loss-of-function and horizontal gene transfer events. These gene transfer events detected in S. thermophilus have originated from other dairy species and might contribute to its adaptation to the milk environment.

  4. Infections Associated with Streptococcus intermedius in Children.

    PubMed

    Faden, Howard S

    2016-09-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a viridans Streptococcus belonging to the Anginosus group. In the past 7 years, it has been associated with abscesses in 48 children, 40% of whom had complicated and/or life-threatening illness. It was the sole pathogen in 35 cases. Seventy-five percent of the infections occurred in winter and spring. None occurred in infants younger than 1 year.

  5. Humoral Immunity to Commensal Oral Bacteria in Human Infants: Salivary Secretory Immunoglobulin A Antibodies Reactive with Streptococcus mitis biovar 1, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus mutans, and Enterococcus faecalis during the First Two Years of Life

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Michael F.; Bryan, Stacey; Evans, Mishell K.; Pearce, Cheryl L.; Sheridan, Michael J.; Sura, Patricia A.; Wientzen, Raoul L.; Bowden, George H. W.

    1999-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) antibodies reactive with the pioneer oral streptococci Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 and Streptococcus oralis, the late oral colonizer Streptococcus mutans, and the pioneer enteric bacterium Enterococcus faecalis in saliva samples from 10 human infants from birth to age 2 years were analyzed. Low levels of salivary SIgA1 and SIgA2 antibodies reactive with whole cells of all four species were detected within the first month after birth, even though S. mutans and E. faecalis were not recovered from the mouths of the infants during the study period. Although there was a fivefold increase in the concentration of SIgA between birth and age 2 years, there were no differences between the concentrations of SIgA1 and SIgA2 antibodies reactive with the four species over this time period. When the concentrations of SIgA1 and SIgA2 antibodies reactive with all four species were normalized to the concentrations of SIgA1 and SIgA2 in saliva, SIgA1 and SIgA2 antibodies reactive with these bacteria showed a significant decrease from birth to 2 years of age. Adsorption of each infant’s saliva with cells of one species produced a dramatic reduction of antibodies recognizing the other three species. Sequential adsorption of saliva samples removed all SIgA antibody to the bacteria, indicating that the SIgA antibodies were directed to antigens shared by all four species. The induction by the host of a limited immune response to common antigens that are likely not involved in adherence may be among the mechanisms that commensal streptococci employ to persist in the oral cavity. PMID:10085031

  6. Fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus.

    PubMed Central

    Lindmark, H; Jacobsson, K; Frykberg, L; Guss, B

    1996-01-01

    By screening a genomic lambda library of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, we have cloned and sequenced a gene, termed fnz, encoding a fibronectin (Fn)-binding protein called FNZ. On the basis of the deduced amino acid sequence of FNZ, the mature protein has a molecular mass of approximately 61 kDa. Analysis of FNZ reveals a structural organization similar to that of other cell surface proteins from streptococci and staphylococci. The Fn-binding activity is localized to two domains in the C-terminal part of FNZ. One domain is composed of five repeats, which contain a motif similar to what has earlier been found in other Fn-binding proteins in streptococci and staphylococci. The first and second repeats are separated by a short stretch of amino acids, including the motif LAGESGET, which is an important part of the second Fn-binding domain. This motif is also present in an Fn-binding domain (UR) in protein F of Streptococcus pyogenes. A fusion protein covering the Fn-binding domain of FNZ inhibits the binding of the 29-kDa N-terminal fragment of Fn to cells of various streptococcal species as well as to Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:8926060

  7. Isolation of Streptococcus tigurinus - a novel member of Streptococcus mitis group from a case of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Dhotre, Shree V; Mehetre, Gajanan T; Dharne, Mahesh S; Suryawanshi, Namdev M; Nagoba, Basavraj S

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus tigurinus is a new member of the Streptococcus viridians group and is closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus infantis. The type strain AZ_3a(T) of S. tigurinus was originally isolated from a patient with infective endocarditis. Accurate identification of S. tigurinus is facilitated only by newer molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene analysis. During the course of study on bacteraemia and infective endocarditis with reference to periodontitis and viridians group of streptococci, a strain of S. tigurinus isolated from subgingival plaque of a patient with periodontitis identified by 16S rRNA gene analysis, which was originally identified as Streptococcus pluranimalium by Vitek 2. Confirmation by 16S rRNA gene analysis showed 99.39% similarity (1476/1485 bp) with S. tigurinus AZ_3a(T) (AORU01000002). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation of S. tigurinus from the oral cavity of a periodontitis patient.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments. PMID:26853478

  9. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments.

  10. Effects of Streptococcus bovis Isolated from Bovine Rumen on the Fermentation Characteristics and Nutritive Value of Tanzania Grass Silage

    PubMed Central

    Zanine, Anderson de Moura; Bonelli, Emerson Alencar; de Souza, Alexandre Lima; Ferreira, Daniele de Jesus; Santos, Edson Mauro; Ribeiro, Marinaldo Divino; Geron, Luiz Juliano Valério; Pinho, Ricardo Martins Araujo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Streptococcus bovis on the fermentation characteristics and nutritive value of Tanzania grass silage. Tanzania grass was chopped and left untreated (U) or treated with Streptococcus bovis JB1 at 1 × 106 colony-forming units per gram (cfu/g) of fresh forage or Streptococcus bovis HC5 at 1 × 106 cfu/g of fresh forage and packed into sixtuplicate laboratory silos. The largest number of enterobacteria, molds and yeast (M&Y) occurred in untreated silages and the smallest populations of enterobacteria and M&Y and the largest numbers of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), at 9.81 and 9.87 log cfu/g, were observed in Streptococcus bovis JB1 and HC5, respectively (P < 0.05). Silages treated with JB1 and HC5 had lower (P < 0.05) silage pHs and concentrations of ammoniacal nitrogen (NH3-N) than untreated silages. The application of Streptococcus bovis JB1 and HC5 resulted in fewer losses through gases and effluents (P < 0.05), which resulted in greater dry matter recovery (DMR) and crude protein recovery (CPR) (P < 0.05). Streptococcus bovis JB1 and HC5 improved the fermentative profile and increased the concentration of crude protein and DMR and CPR in Tanzania grass silage. PMID:27073806

  11. Effects of Streptococcus bovis Isolated from Bovine Rumen on the Fermentation Characteristics and Nutritive Value of Tanzania Grass Silage.

    PubMed

    Zanine, Anderson de Moura; Bonelli, Emerson Alencar; de Souza, Alexandre Lima; Ferreira, Daniele de Jesus; Santos, Edson Mauro; Ribeiro, Marinaldo Divino; Geron, Luiz Juliano Valério; Pinho, Ricardo Martins Araujo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Streptococcus bovis on the fermentation characteristics and nutritive value of Tanzania grass silage. Tanzania grass was chopped and left untreated (U) or treated with Streptococcus bovis JB1 at 1 × 10(6) colony-forming units per gram (cfu/g) of fresh forage or Streptococcus bovis HC5 at 1 × 10(6) cfu/g of fresh forage and packed into sixtuplicate laboratory silos. The largest number of enterobacteria, molds and yeast (M&Y) occurred in untreated silages and the smallest populations of enterobacteria and M&Y and the largest numbers of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), at 9.81 and 9.87 log cfu/g, were observed in Streptococcus bovis JB1 and HC5, respectively (P < 0.05). Silages treated with JB1 and HC5 had lower (P < 0.05) silage pHs and concentrations of ammoniacal nitrogen (NH3-N) than untreated silages. The application of Streptococcus bovis JB1 and HC5 resulted in fewer losses through gases and effluents (P < 0.05), which resulted in greater dry matter recovery (DMR) and crude protein recovery (CPR) (P < 0.05). Streptococcus bovis JB1 and HC5 improved the fermentative profile and increased the concentration of crude protein and DMR and CPR in Tanzania grass silage.

  12. Penetration of Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus sanguinis into dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Kneist, Susanne; Nietzsche, Sandor; Küpper, Harald; Raser, Gerhard; Willershausen, Brita; Callaway, Angelika

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the difference in virulence of acidogenic and aciduric oral streptococci in an in vitro caries model using their penetration depths into dental enamel. 30 caries-free extracted molars from 11- to 16-year-olds were cleaned ultrasonically for 1 min with de-ionized water and, after air-drying, embedded in epoxy resin. After 8-h of setting at room temperature, the specimens were ground on the buccal side with SiC-paper 1200 (particle size 13-16 μm). Enamel was removed in circular areas sized 3 mm in diameter; the mean depth of removed enamel was 230 ± 60 μm. 15 specimens each were incubated anaerobically under standardized conditions with 24 h-cultures of Streptococcus sanguinis 9S or Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ 176 in Balmelli broth at 37 ± 2 °C; the pH-values of the broths were measured at the beginning and end of each incubation cycle. After 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks 3 teeth each were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffer for 24 h, washed 3× and dehydrated 30-60min by sequential washes through a series of 30-100% graded ethanol. The teeth were cut in half longitudinally; afterward, two slits were made to obtain fracture surfaces in the infected area. After critical-point-drying the fragments were gold-sputtered and viewed in a scanning electron microscope at magnifications of ×20-20,000. After 10 weeks of incubation, penetration of S. sanguinis of 11.13 ± 24.04 μm below the break edges into the enamel was observed. The invasion of S. sobrinus reached depths of 87.53 ± 76.34 μm. The difference was statistically significant (paired t test: p = 0.033). The experimental penetration depths emphasize the importance of S. sanguinis versus S. sobrinus in the context of the extended ecological plaque hypothesis.

  13. Penetration of Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus sanguinis into dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Kneist, Susanne; Nietzsche, Sandor; Küpper, Harald; Raser, Gerhard; Willershausen, Brita; Callaway, Angelika

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the difference in virulence of acidogenic and aciduric oral streptococci in an in vitro caries model using their penetration depths into dental enamel. 30 caries-free extracted molars from 11- to 16-year-olds were cleaned ultrasonically for 1 min with de-ionized water and, after air-drying, embedded in epoxy resin. After 8-h of setting at room temperature, the specimens were ground on the buccal side with SiC-paper 1200 (particle size 13-16 μm). Enamel was removed in circular areas sized 3 mm in diameter; the mean depth of removed enamel was 230 ± 60 μm. 15 specimens each were incubated anaerobically under standardized conditions with 24 h-cultures of Streptococcus sanguinis 9S or Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ 176 in Balmelli broth at 37 ± 2 °C; the pH-values of the broths were measured at the beginning and end of each incubation cycle. After 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks 3 teeth each were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffer for 24 h, washed 3× and dehydrated 30-60min by sequential washes through a series of 30-100% graded ethanol. The teeth were cut in half longitudinally; afterward, two slits were made to obtain fracture surfaces in the infected area. After critical-point-drying the fragments were gold-sputtered and viewed in a scanning electron microscope at magnifications of ×20-20,000. After 10 weeks of incubation, penetration of S. sanguinis of 11.13 ± 24.04 μm below the break edges into the enamel was observed. The invasion of S. sobrinus reached depths of 87.53 ± 76.34 μm. The difference was statistically significant (paired t test: p = 0.033). The experimental penetration depths emphasize the importance of S. sanguinis versus S. sobrinus in the context of the extended ecological plaque hypothesis. PMID:25805186

  14. Macedovicin, the second food-grade lantibiotic produced by Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198.

    PubMed

    Georgalaki, Marina; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Anastasiou, Rania; Pot, Bruno; Van Driessche, Gonzalez; Devreese, Bart; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2013-02-01

    Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 was found to produce a second lantibiotic named macedovicin in addition to macedocin. Macedovicin was purified to homogeneity and mass spectrometric analysis identified a peptide of approximately 3.4 kDa. Partial N-terminal sequence analysis and tandem mass spectrometry revealed that macedovicin was identical to bovicin HJ50 and thermophilin 1277 produced by Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus thermophilus, respectively. Macedovicin inhibits a broad spectrum of lactic acid bacteria, several food spoilage species (e.g. Clostridium spp.) and oral streptococci. We determined the complete biosynthetic gene cluster of macedovicin. Even though the gene clusters of macedovicin, thermophilin 1277 and bovicin HJ50 were almost identical at the nucleotide level, there were important differences in their predicted genes and proteins. Bovicin HJ50-like lantibiotics were also found to be encoded by Streptococcus suis strains SC84 and D12, Enterococcus columbae PLCH2, Clostridium perfringens JGS1721 and several Bacillus strains. All these lantibiotics contained a number of conserved amino acids that may be important for their biosynthesis and activity, while phylogenetic analysis supported their dispersion by horizontal gene transfer. In conclusion, the production of multiple bacteriocins may enhance the bio-protective potential of S. macedonicus during food fermentation.

  15. Tween 80 effect on glucosyltransferase synthesis by Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberger, C L; Beaman, A J; Lee, L N

    1978-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius (ATCC 25975) produced very low or nondetectable amounts of the extracellular enzyme glucosyltransferase (GTase) when grown in a chemically defined medium. The addition of Tween 80 to this medium resulted in the production of markedly enhanced levels of the enzyme. Oleic acid, the methyl ester of oleic acid, and sucrose each could not substitute for Tween 80 in this regard. The surfactant had no direct activating effect on performed enzyme activity. Tween 80 also stimulated the production of GTase by concentrated cells suspended in defined medium during a time when no measurable growth occurred. Under these conditions, the stimulatory effect of Tween 80 was blocked by chloramphenicol. It was further found that the surfactant dramatically stimulated the differential rate of GTase synthesis. These and other data strongly suggest that Tween 80 stimulates the production of extracellular GTase by acting either directly or indirectly at the level of enzyme synthesis. PMID:618839

  16. The Streptococcus pneumoniae Beta-Galactosidase Is a Surface Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zähner, Dorothea; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2000-01-01

    The β-galactosidase gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae, bgaA, encodes a putative 2,235-amino-acid protein with the two amino acid motifs characteristic of the glycosyl hydrolase family of proteins. In addition, an N-terminal signal sequence and a C-terminal LPXTG motif typical of surface-associated proteins of gram-positive bacteria are present. Trypsin treatment of cells resulted in solubilization of the enzyme, documenting that it is associated with the cell envelope. In order to obtain defined mutants suitable for lacZ reporter experiments, the bgaA gene was disrupted, resulting in a complete absence of endogenous β-galactosidase activity. The results are consistent with β-galactosidase being a surface protein that seems not to be involved in lactose metabolism but that may play a role during pathogenesis. PMID:11004197

  17. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. serological reagents are devices... streptococci are associated with infections, such as sore throat, impetigo (an infection characterized by...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. serological reagents are devices... streptococci are associated with infections, such as sore throat, impetigo (an infection characterized by...

  19. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus FW-101-2B, an Organic Acid-Oxidizing Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Uranium(VI)-Contaminated Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, Bradley D.; Hwang, Chiachi; Woo, Hannah L.; Carroll, Sue L.; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Samuel; Peters, Lin; Chertkov, Olga; Held, Brittany; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff S.; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren J.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pagani, Loanna; Woyke, Tanja; Arkin, Adam P.; Dehal, Paramvir; Chivian, Dylan; Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin; Chakraborty, Romy; Hazen, Terry C.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2015-03-12

    Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus subsp. oakridgensis FW-101-2B is an anaerobic, organic acid/alcohol-oxidizing, sulfate-reducing δ-proteobacterium. FW-101-2B was isolated from contaminated groundwater at The Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Lab after in situ stimulation for heavy metal-reducing conditions. The genome will help elucidate the metabolic potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium reduction.

  20. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus FW-101-2B, an Organic Acid-Oxidizing Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Uranium(VI)-Contaminated Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Bradley D.; Hwang, Chiachi; Carroll, Sue L.; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Samuel; Peters, Lin; Chertkov, Olga; Held, Brittany; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff S.; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren J.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Woyke, Tanja; Arkin, Adam P.; Dehal, Paramvir; Chivian, Dylan; Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin; Chakraborty, Romy

    2015-01-01

    Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus subsp. oakridgensis FW-101-2B is an anaerobic, organic acid/alcohol-oxidizing, sulfate-reducing δ-proteobacterium. FW-101-2B was isolated from contaminated groundwater at The Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Lab after in situ stimulation for heavy metal-reducing conditions. The genome will help elucidate the metabolic potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium reduction. PMID:25767232

  1. A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takehana, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yamaji, Hironao; Maeda, Yasuhito; Toyohara, Kiyotsuna; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Oda, Kohei

    2016-03-11

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is used extensively worldwide in plastic products, and its accumulation in the environment has become a global concern. Because the ability to enzymatically degrade PET has been thought to be limited to a few fungal species, biodegradation is not yet a viable remediation or recycling strategy. By screening natural microbial communities exposed to PET in the environment, we isolated a novel bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, that is able to use PET as its major energy and carbon source. When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol. PMID:26965627

  2. A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takehana, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yamaji, Hironao; Maeda, Yasuhito; Toyohara, Kiyotsuna; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Oda, Kohei

    2016-03-11

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is used extensively worldwide in plastic products, and its accumulation in the environment has become a global concern. Because the ability to enzymatically degrade PET has been thought to be limited to a few fungal species, biodegradation is not yet a viable remediation or recycling strategy. By screening natural microbial communities exposed to PET in the environment, we isolated a novel bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, that is able to use PET as its major energy and carbon source. When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol.

  3. Molecular characterization of virulence genes of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in equines

    PubMed Central

    Javed, R.; Taku, A. K.; Gangil, Rakhi; Sharma, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the occurrence of streptococci in equines in Jammu (R. S. Pura, Katra), characterization of Streptococci equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus with respect to their virulence traits and to determine antibiotic sensitivity pattern of virulent Streptococcus isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 96 samples were collected from both clinically affected animals (exhibiting signs of respiratory tract disease) and apparently healthy animals and were sent to laboratory. The organisms were isolated on Columbia nalidixic acid agar containing 5% sheep blood as well as on sheep blood agar and confirmed by cultural characteristics and biochemical tests. Molecular detection of Streptococcus was done directly from cultures using sodA and seM gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Antibiogram was performed against five antibiotics such as amoxicillin, penicillin G, streptomycin, rifampicin, and methicillin. Results: During this study, a total 40 streptococcal isolates were obtained out of which 2 isolates were of S. equi subsp. equi, 12 isolates were from S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. In the PCR-based detection, we revealed amplicons of 235 bp and 679 bp for confirmation of sodA and seM gene, respectively. In antibiogram, two isolates of S. equi subsp. equi were found resistant to penicillin G, and all other isolates were found sensitive to amoxicillin and streptomycin. Conclusion: The majority of streptococcal infections was due to S. equi subsp. Zooepidemicus, and thus was recognized as a potential pathogen of diseases of equines besides S. equi subsp. equi. PMID:27651677

  4. A novel pheromone quorum-sensing system controls the development of natural competence in Streptococcus thermophilus and Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Laetitia; Boutry, Céline; de Frahan, Marie Henry; Delplace, Brigitte; Fremaux, Christophe; Horvath, Philippe; Boyaval, Patrick; Hols, Pascal

    2010-03-01

    In streptococcal species, the key step of competence development is the transcriptional induction of comX, which encodes the alternative sigma factor sigma(X), which positively regulates genes necessary for DNA transformation. In Streptococcus species belonging to the mitis and mutans groups, induction of comX relies on the activation of a three-component system consisting of a secreted pheromone, a histidine kinase, and a response regulator. In Streptococcus thermophilus, a species belonging to the salivarius group, the oligopeptide transporter Ami is essential for comX expression under competence-inducing conditions. This suggests a different regulation pathway of competence based on the production and reimportation of a signal peptide. The objective of our work was to identify the main actors involved in the early steps of comX induction in S. thermophilus LMD-9. Using a transcriptomic approach, four highly induced early competence operons were identified. Among them, we found a Rgg-like regulator (Ster_0316) associated with a nonannotated gene encoding a 24-amino-acid hydrophobic peptide (Shp0316). Through genetic deletions, we showed that these two genes are essential for comX induction. Moreover, addition to the medium of synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal part of Shp0316 restored comX induction and transformation of a Shp0316-deficient strain. These peptides also induced competence in S. thermophilus and Streptococcus salivarius strains that are poorly transformable or not transformable. Altogether, our results show that Ster_0316 and Shp0316, renamed ComRS, are the two members of a novel quorum-sensing system responsible for comX induction in species from the salivarius group, which differs from the classical phosphorelay three-component system identified previously in streptococci. PMID:20023010

  5. A Novel Pheromone Quorum-Sensing System Controls the Development of Natural Competence in Streptococcus thermophilus and Streptococcus salivarius▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Laetitia; Boutry, Céline; de Frahan, Marie Henry; Delplace, Brigitte; Fremaux, Christophe; Horvath, Philippe; Boyaval, Patrick; Hols, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    In streptococcal species, the key step of competence development is the transcriptional induction of comX, which encodes the alternative sigma factor σX, which positively regulates genes necessary for DNA transformation. In Streptococcus species belonging to the mitis and mutans groups, induction of comX relies on the activation of a three-component system consisting of a secreted pheromone, a histidine kinase, and a response regulator. In Streptococcus thermophilus, a species belonging to the salivarius group, the oligopeptide transporter Ami is essential for comX expression under competence-inducing conditions. This suggests a different regulation pathway of competence based on the production and reimportation of a signal peptide. The objective of our work was to identify the main actors involved in the early steps of comX induction in S. thermophilus LMD-9. Using a transcriptomic approach, four highly induced early competence operons were identified. Among them, we found a Rgg-like regulator (Ster_0316) associated with a nonannotated gene encoding a 24-amino-acid hydrophobic peptide (Shp0316). Through genetic deletions, we showed that these two genes are essential for comX induction. Moreover, addition to the medium of synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal part of Shp0316 restored comX induction and transformation of a Shp0316-deficient strain. These peptides also induced competence in S. thermophilus and Streptococcus salivarius strains that are poorly transformable or not transformable. Altogether, our results show that Ster_0316 and Shp0316, renamed ComRS, are the two members of a novel quorum-sensing system responsible for comX induction in species from the salivarius group, which differs from the classical phosphorelay three-component system identified previously in streptococci. PMID:20023010

  6. Galactokinase activity in Streptococcus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Hutkins, R.; Morris, H.A.; McKay, L.L.

    1985-10-01

    ATP-dependent phosphorylation of (/sup 14/C)galactose by 11 strains of streptococcus thermophilus indicated that these organisms possessed the Leloir enzyme, galactokinase (galK). Activities were 10 times higher in fully induced, galactose-fermenting (Gal/sup +/) strains than in galactose-nonfermenting (Gal/sup -/) strains. Lactose-grown, Gal/sup -/ cells released free galactose into the medium and were unable to utilize residual galactose or to induce galK above basal levels. Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus 19258 also released galactose into the medium, but when lactose was depleted, growth on galactose commenced, and galK increased from 0.025 to 0.22 ..mu..mol of galactose phosphorylated per min per mg of protein. When lactose was added to galactose-grown cells of S. thermophilus 19258, galK activity rapidly decreased. These results suggest that galK in Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus is subject to an induction-repression mechanism, but that galK cannot be induced in Gal/sup -/ strains.

  7. Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Max R.; Stephens, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common commensal and an opportunistic pathogen. Suspected pneumococcal upper respiratory infections and pneumonia are often treated with macrolide antibiotics. Macrolides are bacteriostatic antibiotics and inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit. The widespread use of macrolides is associated with increased macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae, and the treatment of pneumococcal infections with macrolides may be associated with clinical failures. In S. pneumoniae, macrolide resistance is due to ribosomal dimethylation by an enzyme encoded by erm(B), efflux by a two-component efflux pump encoded by mef (E)/mel(msr(D)) and, less commonly, mutations of the ribosomal target site of macrolides. A wide array of genetic elements have emerged that facilitate macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae; for example erm(B) is found on Tn917, while the mef (E)/mel operon is carried on the 5.4- or 5.5-kb Mega element. The macrolide resistance determinants, erm(B) and mef (E)/mel, are also found on large composite Tn916-like elements most notably Tn6002, Tn2009, and Tn2010. Introductions of 7-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV-7 and PCV-13) have decreased the incidence of macrolide-resistant invasive pneumococcal disease, but serotype replacement and emergence of macrolide resistance remain an important concern. PMID:27709102

  8. Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae YZUSK-4, a Bacterium Proposed as a Starter Culture for Fermented Meat Products.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai; Yin, Yongqi; Xu, Lin; Yan, Ming; Fang, Weiming; Ge, Qingfeng

    2015-07-23

    Klebsiella pneumoniae strain YZUSK-4, isolated from Chinese RuGao ham, is an efficient branched-chain aminotransferase-producing bacterium that can be used widely in fermented meat products to enhance flavor. The draft genome sequence of strain YZUSK-4 may provide useful genetic information on branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase production and branched-chain amino acid metabolism.

  9. Streptococcus orisasini sp. nov. and Streptococcus dentasini sp. nov., isolated from the oral cavity of donkeys.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kazuko; Saito, Masanori; Tsudukibashi, Osamu; Hiroi, Takachika; Hirasawa, Masatomo

    2013-08-01

    Four Gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid isolates that were obtained from donkey oral cavities formed two distinct clonal groups when characterized by phenotypic and phylogenetic studies. From the results of biochemical tests, the organisms were tentatively identified as a streptococcal species. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies confirmed the organisms to be members of the genus Streptococcus. Two of the isolates were related most closely to Streptococcus ursoris with 95.6 % similarity based on the 16S rRNA gene and to Streptococcus ratti with 92.0 % similarity based on the 60 kDa heat-shock protein gene (groEL). The other two isolates, however, were related to Streptococcus criceti with 95.0 and 89.0 % similarities based on the 16S rRNA and groEL genes, respectively. From both phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, the four isolates formed two distinct clonal groups and are suggested to represent novel species of the genus Streptococcus. The names proposed for these organisms are Streptococcus orisasini sp. nov. (type strain NUM 1801(T) = JCM 17942(T) = DSM 25193(T)) and Streptococcus dentasini sp. nov. (type strain NUM 1808(T) = JCM 17943(T) = DSM 25137(T)).

  10. Distribution of Streptococcus troglodytae and Streptococcus dentirousetti in chimpanzee oral cavities.

    PubMed

    Miyanohara, Mayu; Imai, Susumu; Okamoto, Masaaki; Saito, Wataru; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Momoi, Yasuko; Tomonaga, Masaki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution and phenotypic properties of the indigenous streptococci in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) oral cavities. Eleven chimpanzees (aged from 9 to 44 years, mean ± SD, 26.9 ± 12.6 years) in the Primate Research Institute of Kyoto University were enrolled in this research and brushing bacterial samples collected from them. Streptococci were isolated from the oral cavities of all chimpanzees. The isolates (n = 46) were identified as thirteen species by 16S rRNA genes analysis. The predominant species was Streptococcus sanguinis of mitis streptococci from five chimpanzees (45%). Mutans streptococci were isolated from six chimpanzees (55%). The predominant species in the mutans streptococci were Streptococcus troglodytae from four chimpanzees (36%), this species having been proposed as a novel species by us, and Streptococcus dentirousetti from three chimpanzees (27%). Streptococcus mutans was isolated from one chimpanzee (9%). However, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus macacae and Streptococcus downei, which are indigenous to human and monkey (Macaca fasciclaris) oral habitats, were not isolated. Of the mutans streptococci, S. troglodytae, S. dentirousetti, and S. mutans possessed strong adherence activity to glass surface.

  11. A plant growth-promoting bacterium that decreases nickel toxicity in seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Burd, G.I.; Dixon, D.G.; Glick, B.R.

    1998-10-01

    A plant growth-promoting bacterium, Kluyvera ascorbata SUD165, that contained high levels of heavy metals was isolated from soil collected near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The bacterium was resistant to the toxic effects of Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and CrO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, produced a siderophore(s), and displayed 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity. Canola seeds inoculated with this bacterium and then grown under gnotobiotic conditions in the presence of high concentrations of nickel chloride were partially protected against nickel toxicity. In addition, protection by the bacterium against nickel toxicity was evident in pot experiments with canola and tomato seeds. The presence of K. ascorbata SUD165 had no measurable influence on the amount of nickel accumulated per milligram (dry weight) of either roots or shoots of canola plants. Therefore, the bacterial plant growth-promoting effect in the presence of nickel was probably not attributable to the reduction of nickel uptake by seedlings. Rather, it may reflect the ability of the bacterium to lower the level of stress ethylene induced by the nickel.

  12. A Commensal Bacterium Promotes Virulence of an Opportunistic Pathogen via Cross-Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Apollo; Fleming, Derek; Lamont, Richard J.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria rarely inhabit infection sites alone, instead residing in diverse, multispecies communities. Despite this fact, bacterial pathogenesis studies primarily focus on monoculture infections, overlooking how community interactions influence the course of disease. In this study, we used global mutant fitness profiling (transposon sequencing [Tn-seq]) to determine the genetic requirements for the pathogenic bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans to cause disease when coinfecting with the commensal bacterium Streptococcus gordonii. Our results show that S. gordonii extensively alters A. actinomycetemcomitans requirements for virulence factors and biosynthetic pathways during infection. In addition, we discovered that the presence of S. gordonii enhances the bioavailability of oxygen during infection, allowing A. actinomycetemcomitans to shift from a primarily fermentative to a respiratory metabolism that enhances its growth yields and persistence. Mechanistically, respiratory metabolism enhances the fitness of A. actinomycetemcomitans in vivo by increasing ATP yields via central metabolism and creating a proton motive force. Our results reveal that, similar to cross-feeding, where one species provides another species with a nutrient, commensal bacteria can also provide electron acceptors that promote the respiratory growth and fitness of pathogens in vivo, an interaction that we term cross-respiration. PMID:27353758

  13. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  14. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress.

  15. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the ‘top 10’ causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•−), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  16. Genomic signatures of human and animal disease in the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Lucy A; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Wang, Jinhong; Peters, Sarah E; Corander, Jukka; Jombart, Thibaut; Baig, Abiyad; Howell, Kate J; Vehkala, Minna; Välimäki, Niko; Harris, David; Chieu, Tran Thi Bich; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Campbell, James; Schultsz, Constance; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D; Langford, Paul R; Rycroft, Andrew N; Wren, Brendan W; Farrar, Jeremy; Baker, Stephen; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Holden, Matthew T G; Tucker, Alexander W; Maskell, Duncan J

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis causes disease in pigs worldwide and is increasingly implicated in zoonotic disease in East and South-East Asia. To understand the genetic basis of disease in S. suis, we study the genomes of 375 isolates with detailed clinical phenotypes from pigs and humans from the United Kingdom and Vietnam. Here, we show that isolates associated with disease contain substantially fewer genes than non-clinical isolates, but are more likely to encode virulence factors. Human disease isolates are limited to a single-virulent population, originating in the 1920, s when pig production was intensified, but no consistent genomic differences between pig and human isolates are observed. There is little geographical clustering of different S. suis subpopulations, and the bacterium undergoes high rates of recombination, implying that an increase in virulence anywhere in the world could have a global impact over a short timescale. PMID:25824154

  17. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence and description of Streptococcus varani sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Bakour, S; Rathored, J; Lo, C I; Mediannikov, O; Beye, M; Ehounoud, C B; Biagini, P; Raoult, D; Fournier, P-E; Fenollar, F

    2016-05-01

    Strain FF10(T) (= CSUR P1489 = DSM 100884) was isolated from the oral cavity of a lizard (Varanus niloticus) in Dakar, Senegal. Here we used a polyphasic study including phenotypic and genomic analyses to describe the strain FF10(T). Results support strain FF10(T) being a Gram-positive coccus, facultative anaerobic bacterium, catalase-negative, non-motile and non-spore forming. The sequenced genome counts 2.46 Mb with one chromosome but no plasmid. It exhibits a G+C content of 40.4% and contains 2471 protein-coding and 45 RNA genes. On the basis of these data, we propose the creation of Streptococcus varani sp. nov. PMID:27158513

  18. Mechanisms and impact of genetic recombination in the evolution of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Chaguza, Chrispin; Cornick, Jennifer E.; Everett, Dean B.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a highly recombinogenic bacterium responsible for a high burden of human disease globally. Genetic recombination, a process in which exogenous DNA is acquired and incorporated into its genome, is a key evolutionary mechanism employed by the pneumococcus to rapidly adapt to selective pressures. The rate at which the pneumococcus acquires genetic variation through recombination is much higher than the rate at which the organism acquires variation through spontaneous mutations. This higher rate of variation allows the pneumococcus to circumvent the host innate and adaptive immune responses, escape clinical interventions, including antibiotic therapy and vaccine introduction. The rapid influx of whole genome sequence (WGS) data and the advent of novel analysis methods and powerful computational tools for population genetics and evolution studies has transformed our understanding of how genetic recombination drives pneumococcal adaptation and evolution. Here we discuss how genetic recombination has impacted upon the evolution of the pneumococcus. PMID:25904996

  19. Genomic signatures of human and animal disease in the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Weinert, Lucy A.; Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Wang, Jinhong; Peters, Sarah E.; Corander, Jukka; Jombart, Thibaut; Baig, Abiyad; Howell, Kate J.; Vehkala, Minna; Välimäki, Niko; Harris, David; Chieu, Tran Thi Bich; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Campbell, James; Schultsz, Constance; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D.; Langford, Paul R.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Wren, Brendan W.; Farrar, Jeremy; Baker, Stephen; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Holden, Matthew T.G.; Tucker, Alexander W.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Bossé, Janine T.; Li, Yanwen; Maglennon, Gareth A.; Matthews, Dominic; Cuccui, Jon; Terra, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus suis causes disease in pigs worldwide and is increasingly implicated in zoonotic disease in East and South-East Asia. To understand the genetic basis of disease in S. suis, we study the genomes of 375 isolates with detailed clinical phenotypes from pigs and humans from the United Kingdom and Vietnam. Here, we show that isolates associated with disease contain substantially fewer genes than non-clinical isolates, but are more likely to encode virulence factors. Human disease isolates are limited to a single-virulent population, originating in the 1920, s when pig production was intensified, but no consistent genomic differences between pig and human isolates are observed. There is little geographical clustering of different S. suis subpopulations, and the bacterium undergoes high rates of recombination, implying that an increase in virulence anywhere in the world could have a global impact over a short timescale. PMID:25824154

  20. Isolation and phylogenetic characterization of Streptococcus halichoeri from a European badger (Meles meles) with pyogranulomatous pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed

    Moreno, B; Bolea, R; Morales, M; Martín-Burriel, I; González, Ch; Badiola, J J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and pathological studies in European badgers (Meles meles) are limited. Badgers play a significant role in the epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in some countries and an accurate diagnosis is needed for this infection. However, the lesions of bovine TB are similar to those associated with other pathogens, making pathological diagnosis difficult. In the present study, Streptococcus halichoeri was isolated from a European badger with pyogranulomatous pleuropneumonia and suspected of having tuberculosis. TB and other pathogens able to induce similar lesions were ruled out. Comparative 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequencing studies showed an identity of 99.51% and 98.28%, respectively, with S. halichoeri. This report represents the third description of this bacterium and the first in an animal species other than the grey seal (Halichoerus grypus). It also shows that S. halichoeri can be associated with a pathological process characterized by granulomatous inflammation and resembling tuberculosis.

  1. [A case of multiple liver abscesses associated with Streptococcus salivarius in a patient with chronic periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Kamachi, Saori; Otsuka, Taiga; Tsuji, Chika; Nakashita, Shunya; Ide, Yasushi; Mizuta, Toshihiko

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is an oral commensal bacterium that rarely causes disease in humans. Here, we report a case of liver abscess associated with S. salivarius in a 41-year-old woman who presented with continuous abdominal discomfort, fatigue, and fever. She was diagnosed with multiple liver abscesses; she underwent percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage. Thereafter, S. salivarius was isolated in all bacterial cultures of the drained abscesses, and it was sensitive to penicillins. She made a good recovery after treatment. In the absence of an infective source other than chronic periodontitis, the cause of liver abscesses was attributed to oral S. salivarius. S. salivarius is a normal oral commensal, and oral commensals must be considered if the infective origin of liver abscess cannot be determined. PMID:25100350

  2. Screening of Taiwanese crude drugs for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Chen, C P; Lin, C C; Namba, T

    1989-12-01

    Preliminary antibacterial screening of local crude drugs was carried out using the cariogenic bacterium, Streptococcus mutans. Of 79 aqueous extracts tested, 6 crude drugs were shown to have significant antibacterial activity with minimal inhibitory concentration equal to or lower than 7.8 mg/ml (expressed in terms of dry starting material). Of these effective crude drugs, Morus australis, Ludwigia octovalvis and Thuja orientalis were very effective in inhibiting the growth of serotypes c and d of S. mutans (MIC less than or equal to 2.0-7.8 mg/ml). Elephantopus scaber, Artemisia vulgaris, Mosla chinensis and Orthosiphon aristatus also exhibited considerable antibacterial activity (MIC = 7.8-23.4 mg/ml) against both serotypes. In the presence of 5% sucrose, the antibacterial potency of the majority of the extracts did not change for type c, while the potency decreased about one-half for type d.

  3. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence and description of Streptococcus varani sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Bakour, S.; Rathored, J.; Lo, C.I.; Mediannikov, O.; Beye, M.; Ehounoud, C.B.; Biagini, P.; Raoult, D.; Fournier, P.-E.; Fenollar, F.

    2016-01-01

    Strain FF10T (= CSUR P1489 = DSM 100884) was isolated from the oral cavity of a lizard (Varanus niloticus) in Dakar, Senegal. Here we used a polyphasic study including phenotypic and genomic analyses to describe the strain FF10T. Results support strain FF10T being a Gram-positive coccus, facultative anaerobic bacterium, catalase-negative, non-motile and non-spore forming. The sequenced genome counts 2.46 Mb with one chromosome but no plasmid. It exhibits a G+C content of 40.4% and contains 2471 protein-coding and 45 RNA genes. On the basis of these data, we propose the creation of Streptococcus varani sp. nov. PMID:27158513

  4. Mechanisms and impact of genetic recombination in the evolution of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Chaguza, Chrispin; Cornick, Jennifer E; Everett, Dean B

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a highly recombinogenic bacterium responsible for a high burden of human disease globally. Genetic recombination, a process in which exogenous DNA is acquired and incorporated into its genome, is a key evolutionary mechanism employed by the pneumococcus to rapidly adapt to selective pressures. The rate at which the pneumococcus acquires genetic variation through recombination is much higher than the rate at which the organism acquires variation through spontaneous mutations. This higher rate of variation allows the pneumococcus to circumvent the host innate and adaptive immune responses, escape clinical interventions, including antibiotic therapy and vaccine introduction. The rapid influx of whole genome sequence (WGS) data and the advent of novel analysis methods and powerful computational tools for population genetics and evolution studies has transformed our understanding of how genetic recombination drives pneumococcal adaptation and evolution. Here we discuss how genetic recombination has impacted upon the evolution of the pneumococcus.

  5. Unveiling molecular mechanisms of bacterial surface proteins: Streptococcus pneumoniae as a model organism for structural studies.

    PubMed

    Jedrzejas, M J

    2007-11-01

    Bacteria present a variety of molecules either on their surface or in a cell-free form. These molecules take part in numerous processes in the interactions with their host, with its tissues and other molecules. These molecules are essential to bacterial pathogenesis either during colonization or the spread/invasion stages, and most are virulence factors. This review is focused on such molecules using Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Gram-positive bacterium, as an example. Selected surface proteins are introduced, their structure described, and, whenever available, their mechanisms of function on an atomic level are explained. Such mechanisms for hyaluronate lyase, pneumococcal surface protein A, pneumolysin, histidine-triad and fibronectin-binding proteins are discussed. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms of virulence factors is essential for the understanding of bacteria and their functional properties. Structural biology appears pivotal for these studies, as structural and mechanistic insights facilitate rational approach to the development of new treatments.

  6. Characterization and genome sequencing of a novel bacteriophage infecting Streptococcus agalactiae with high similarity to a phage from Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Bai, Qinqin; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Yongchun; Tang, Fang; Nguyen, Xuanhoa; Liu, Guangjin; Lu, Chengping

    2013-08-01

    A novel bacteriophage, JX01, specifically infecting bovine Streptococcus agalactiae was isolated from milk of mastitis-affected cattle. The phage morphology showed that JX01 belongs to the family Siphoviridae, and this phage demonstrated a broad host range. Microbiological characterization demonstrated that nearly 90 % of JX01 phage particles were adsorbed after 2.5 min of incubation, that the burst size was 20 virions released per infected host cell, and that there was a latent period of 30 min. JX01 was thermal sensitive and showed acid and alkaline resistance (pH 3-11). The genome of JX01 was found to consist of a linear, double-stranded 43,028-bp DNA molecule with a GC content of 36.81 % and 70 putative open reading frames (ORFs) plus one tRNA. Comparative genome analysis revealed high similarity between JX01 and the prophage 315.2 of Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:23515875

  7. Galactose metabolism by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Abranches, Jacqueline; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Burne, Robert A

    2004-10-01

    The galK gene, encoding galactokinase of the Leloir pathway, was insertionally inactivated in Streptococcus mutans UA159. The galK knockout strain displayed only marginal growth on galactose, but growth on glucose or lactose was not affected. In strain UA159, the sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) for lactose and the PTS for galactose were induced by growth in lactose and galactose, although galactose PTS activity was very low, suggesting that S. mutans does not have a galactose-specific PTS and that the lactose PTS may transport galactose, albeit poorly. To determine if the galactose growth defect of the galK mutant could be overcome by enhancing lactose PTS activity, the gene encoding a putative repressor of the operon for lactose PTS and phospho-beta-galactosidase, lacR, was insertionally inactivated. A galK and lacR mutant still could not grow on galactose, although the strain had constitutively elevated lactose PTS activity. The glucose PTS activity of lacR mutants grown in glucose was lower than in the wild-type strain, revealing an influence of LacR or the lactose PTS on the regulation of the glucose PTS. Mutation of the lacA gene of the tagatose pathway caused impaired growth in lactose and galactose, suggesting that galactose can only be efficiently utilized when both the Leloir and tagatose pathways are functional. A mutation of the permease in the multiple sugar metabolism operon did not affect growth on galactose. Thus, the galactose permease of S. mutans is not present in the gal, lac, or msm operons. PMID:15466549

  8. Streptococcus oligofermentans sp. nov., a novel oral isolate from caries-free humans.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huichun; Gao, Xuejun; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2003-07-01

    Five streptococcal strains were isolated from dental plaque and saliva of caries-free humans. The cells were gram-positive, non-spore-forming, non-motile cocci that were arranged in short chains. The strains were catalase-negative, facultatively anaerobic and produced lactic acid exclusively from glucose fermentation. Biochemical analysis that used both conventional methods and the commercial API 20 Strep system showed that the five strains fermented only a few kinds of sugar. The mean DNA G + C content of the five novel strains was 39.5 +/- 0.8 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence homology indicated that the new isolates represented a novel member of the mitis group of the genus Streptococcus, related most closely to the recently described species Streptococcus sinensis. DNA-DNA relatedness between novel strain LMG 21535T and type strains of phylogenetically related species of oral streptococci was 7.1-16.4%. Therefore a novel Streptococcus species, Streptococcus oligofermentans sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is LMG 21535T=AS 1.3089T.

  9. Iron acquisition and regulation systems in Streptococcus species.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ruiguang; Sun, Xuesong

    2014-05-01

    Gram-positive Streptococcus species are responsible for millions of cases of meningitis, bacterial pneumonia, endocarditis, erysipelas and necrotizing fasciitis. Iron is essential for the growth and survival of Streptococcus in the host environment. Streptococcus species have developed various mechanisms to uptake iron from an environment with limited available iron. Streptococcus can directly extract iron from host iron-containing proteins such as ferritin, transferrin, lactoferrin and hemoproteins, or indirectly by relying on the employment of specialized secreted hemophores (heme chelators) and small siderophore molecules (high affinity ferric chelators). This review presents the most recent discoveries in the iron acquisition system of Streptococcus species - the transporters as well as the regulators.

  10. Effects of surface reaction-type pre-reacted glass ionomer on oral biofilm formation of Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Kisaki; Oguchi, Riyo; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Konishi, Kiyoshi; Karibe, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, a bacterium involved in the initial colonization of tooth surfaces, contributes to dental biofilm formation and is an important cause of infective endocarditis. This study aimed to investigate the influence of surface reaction-type pre-reacted glass ionomer (S-PRG) filler on oral bacterial growth and aggregation of S. gordonii. The effect of various concentrations of S-PRG eluate on the growth and the biofilm formation of S. gordonii and other oral microorganisms (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus oralis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Candida albicans) was assessed. In addition, the effect of S-PRG eluate on coaggregation of S. gordonii with both S. oralis and Fusobacterium nucleatum was assessed. The effect of S-PRG eluate treatment on autoaggregation of S. gordonii was also evaluated. Our results indicate that S-PRG eluate treatment reduced both for the growth and for biofilm of all organisms in a dose-dependent manner. Coaggregation of S. gordonii with both S. oralis and F. nucleatum was inhibited by S-PRG eluate, whereas autoaggregation of S. gordonii increased at certain concentrations of S-PRG eluate. These results indicate that the S-PRG filler possesses antimicrobial activity that is mediated by inhibiting growth and biofilm of oral microorganisms, and by suppressing coaggregation of S. gordonii. In addition, these findings indicate that coaggregation of S. gordonii with other bacteria is inhibited by increased autoaggregation of S. gordonii. PMID:26319990

  11. Chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis and biological activity on cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Leticia; Herrera, Christian L.; Montenegro, Gloria; Ortega, Ximena; Veloz, Jorge; Alvear, Marysol; Cuevas, Alejandro; Saavedra, Nicolás; Salazar, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a non-toxic natural substance with multiple pharmacological properties including anti-cancer, antioxidant, fungicidal, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory among others. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis samples and to evaluate their biological activity against the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. Twenty propolis samples were obtained from beekeeping producers from the central and southern regions of Chile. The botanical profile was determined by palynological analysis. Total phenolic contents were determined using colorimetric assays. Reverse phase HPLC and HPLC-MS were used to determine the chemical composition. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined on S. mutans and S. sobrinus. All propolis samples were dominated by structures from native plant species. The characterization by HPLC/MS, evidenced the presence of quercetin, myricetin, kaempferol, rutine, pinocembrin, coumaric acid, caffeic acid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester, that have already been described in these propolis with conventional HPLC. Although all propolis samples inhibited the mutans streptococci growth, it was observed a wide spectrum of action (MIC 0.90 to 8.22 μg mL−1). Given that results it becomes increasingly evident the need of standardization procedures, where we combine both the determination of botanical and the chemical characterization of the extracts. Research conducted to date, describes a promising effectiveness of propolis in the prevention of caries and other diseases of the oral cavity, making it necessary to develop studies to identify and understand the therapeutic targets or mechanisms of molecular action of the various compounds present on them. PMID:24294257

  12. Chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis and biological activity on cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Leticia; Herrera, Christian L; Montenegro, Gloria; Ortega, Ximena; Veloz, Jorge; Alvear, Marysol; Cuevas, Alejandro; Saavedra, Nicolás; Salazar, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a non-toxic natural substance with multiple pharmacological properties including anti-cancer, antioxidant, fungicidal, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory among others. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis samples and to evaluate their biological activity against the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. Twenty propolis samples were obtained from beekeeping producers from the central and southern regions of Chile. The botanical profile was determined by palynological analysis. Total phenolic contents were determined using colorimetric assays. Reverse phase HPLC and HPLC-MS were used to determine the chemical composition. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined on S. mutans and S. sobrinus. All propolis samples were dominated by structures from native plant species. The characterization by HPLC/MS, evidenced the presence of quercetin, myricetin, kaempferol, rutine, pinocembrin, coumaric acid, caffeic acid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester, that have already been described in these propolis with conventional HPLC. Although all propolis samples inhibited the mutans streptococci growth, it was observed a wide spectrum of action (MIC 0.90 to 8.22 μg mL(-1)). Given that results it becomes increasingly evident the need of standardization procedures, where we combine both the determination of botanical and the chemical characterization of the extracts. Research conducted to date, describes a promising effectiveness of propolis in the prevention of caries and other diseases of the oral cavity, making it necessary to develop studies to identify and understand the therapeutic targets or mechanisms of molecular action of the various compounds present on them.

  13. Conjugative Transfer of the Integrative Conjugative Elements ICESt1 and ICESt3 from Streptococcus thermophilus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bellanger, Xavier; Roberts, Adam P.; Morel, Catherine; Choulet, Frédéric; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Mullany, Peter; Decaris, Bernard; Guédon, Gérard

    2009-01-01

    Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), also called conjugative transposons, are genomic islands that excise, self-transfer by conjugation, and integrate in the genome of the recipient bacterium. The current investigation shows the intraspecies conjugative transfer of the first described ICEs in Streptococcus thermophilus, ICESt1 and ICESt3. Mitomycin C, a DNA-damaging agent, derepresses ICESt3 conjugative transfer almost 25-fold. The ICESt3 host range was determined using various members of the Firmicutes as recipients. Whereas numerous ICESt3 transconjugants of Streptococcus pyogenes and Enterococcus faecalis were recovered, only one transconjugant of Lactococcus lactis was obtained. The newly incoming ICEs, except the one from L. lactis, are site-specifically integrated into the 3′ end of the fda gene and are still able to excise in these transconjugants. Furthermore, ICESt3 was retransferred from E. faecalis to S. thermophilus. Recombinant plasmids carrying different parts of the ICESt1 recombination module were used to show that the integrase gene is required for the site-specific integration and excision of the ICEs, whereas the excisionase gene is required for the site-specific excision only. PMID:19181800

  14. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and outcomes of Streptococcus suis infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Huong, Vu Thi Lan; Ha, Ngo; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Horby, Peter; Nghia, Ho Dang Trung; Thiem, Vu Dinh; Zhu, Xiaotong; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Hien, Tran Tinh; Zamora, Javier; Schultsz, Constance; Wertheim, Heiman Frank Louis; Hirayama, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    Streptococcus suis, a bacterium that affects pigs, is a neglected pathogen that causes systemic disease in humans. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize global estimates of the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of this zoonosis. We searched main literature databases for all studies through December 2012 using the search term "streptococcus suis." The prevalence of S. suis infection is highest in Asia; the primary risk factors are occupational exposure and eating of contaminated food. The pooled proportions of case-patients with pig-related occupations and history of eating high-risk food were 38.1% and 37.3%, respectively. The main clinical syndrome was meningitis (pooled rate 68.0%), followed by sepsis, arthritis, endocarditis, and endophthalmitis. The pooled case-fatality rate was 12.8%. Sequelae included hearing loss (39.1%) and vestibular dysfunction (22.7%). Our analysis identified gaps in the literature, particularly in assessing risk factors and sequelae of this infection.

  15. Selective Antibody Response to Streptococcus gallolyticus Pilus Proteins in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boleij, Annemarie; Roelofs, Rian; Danne, Camille; Bellais, Samuel; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Kato, Ikuko; Tjalsma, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (previously called Streptococcus bovis biotype I) infections have long been associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). This work aimed to investigate the CRC-associated humoral immune response to four pilus proteins of this bacterium by newly developed ELISAs. Pilus proteins are interesting diagnostic targets as they are the building blocks of pilin-like structures that mediate bacterial virulence and are readily exposed to the host immune system upon infection. The presence of serum antibodies against these pilus proteins was evaluated in Dutch and American populations. These analyses showed that an immune response to these antigens was specific for clinical S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus infections, but that increased serum antibody titers to multiple pilus proteins in single individuals were rarely observed. However, a multiplex approach based on antibody titers against any of these four antigens resulted in assay sensitivities between 16% and 43% for the detection of early-stage CRC. Together these findings underscore the potential of a multi-antigen approach to complement diagnosis of S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus–associated CRC. PMID:22012878

  16. Induction of a putative laminin-binding protein of Streptococcus gordonii in human infective endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, P; Gleyzal, C; Guerret, S; Etienne, J; Grimaud, J A

    1992-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the virulence of Streptococcus strains in infective endocarditis might be due to the expression of binding sites for the extracellular matrix proteins of damaged valves. In this communication, we draw attention to one laminin-binding protein from a strain of Streptococcus gordonii isolated from a patient with human endocarditis. This 145-kDa protein was found on the cell wall of the bacterium. The level of expression of this binding protein might be regulated by the presence of extracellular matrix proteins: the protein was lacking after in vitro selection of laminin, collagen I, and fibronectin nonbinding variants, and it was recovered after growth of the variants when laminin or collagen I was added to the growth medium. It was also missing after 10 subcultures in minimal medium, indicating some positive control. Furthermore, the 145-kDa protein was recognized as a major antigen by sera from patients treated for streptococcal infective endocarditis, while sera from patients with valvulopathies gave only slight recognition, suggesting an increase of the expression of this protein during infective endocarditis. It was also shown that the 145-kDa protein carried a collagen I-like determinant detected with anti-human collagen I antibodies. Images PMID:1530927

  17. Streptococcal bacteriocins and the case for Streptococcus salivarius as model oral probiotics.

    PubMed

    Wescombe, Philip A; Heng, Nicholas C K; Burton, Jeremy P; Chilcott, Chris N; Tagg, John R

    2009-09-01

    Members of the Gram-positive bacterial genus Streptococcus are a diverse collection of species inhabiting many body sites and range from benign, nonpathogenic species to those causing life-threatening infections. The streptococci are also prolific producers of bacteriocins, which are ribosomally synthesized proteinaceous antibiotics that kill or inhibit species closely related to the producer bacterium. With the emergence of bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics, there is an impetus to discover, and implement, new and preferably 'natural' antibiotics to treat or prevent bacterial infections, a niche that bacterial interference therapy mediated by bacteriocins could easily fill. This review focuses on describing the diversity of bacteriocins produced by streptococci and also puts forth a case for Streptococcus salivarius, a nonpathogenic and numerically predominant oral species, as an ideal candidate for development as the model probiotic for the oral cavity. S. salivarius is a safe species that not only produces broad-spectrum bacteriocins but harbors bacteriocin-encoding (and bacteriocin-inducing) transmissible DNA entities (megaplasmids). PMID:19722837

  18. Remodeling of the Streptococcus agalactiae Transcriptome in Response to Growth Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Mereghetti, Laurent; Sitkiewicz, Izabela; Green, Nicole M.; Musser, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Background To act as a commensal bacterium and a pathogen in humans and animals, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus, GBS) must be able to monitor and adapt to different environmental conditions. Temperature variation is a one of the most commonly encountered variables. Methodology/Principal Findings To understand the extent to which GBS modify gene expression in response to temperatures encountered in the various hosts, we conducted a whole genome transcriptome analysis of organisms grown at 30°C and 40°C. We identified extensive transcriptome remodeling at various stages of growth, especially in the stationary phase (significant transcript changes occurred for 25% of the genes). A large proportion of genes involved in metabolism was up-regulated at 30°C in stationary phase. Conversely, genes up-regulated at 40°C relative to 30°C include those encoding virulence factors such as hemolysins and extracellular secreted proteins with LPXTG motifs. Over-expression of hemolysins was linked to larger zones of hemolysis and enhanced hemolytic activity at 40°C. A key theme identified by our study was that genes involved in purine metabolism and iron acquisition were significantly up-regulated at 40°C. Conclusion/Significance Growth of GBS in vitro at different temperatures resulted in extensive remodeling of the transcriptome, including genes encoding proven and putative virulence genes. The data provide extensive new leads for molecular pathogenesis research. PMID:18665215

  19. Identification of a fourth gene involved in dTDP-rhamnose synthesis in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukioka, Y; Yamashita, Y; Nakano, Y; Oho, T; Koga, T

    1997-01-01

    We had isolated three genes (rmlA, rmlB, and rmlC) involved in dTDP-rhamnose synthesis in Streptococcus mutans and found that three genes were insufficient for dTDP-rhamnose synthesis (Y. Tsukioka, Y. Yamashita, T. Oho, Y. Nakano, and T. Koga, J. Bacteriol. 179:1126-1134, 1997). The rmlD gene of S. mutans, encoding the enzyme which catalyzes the last step of dTDP-rhamnose synthesis, has been cloned and sequenced. The cell extract of Escherichia coli expressing the rmlD gene of S. mutans exhibited enzymatic activity corresponding to its counterpart in Shigella flexneri, a gram-negative bacterium. Rhamnose was not detected in the cell wall preparation purified from the mutant in which the cloned gene was insertionally inactivated. Rabbit antiserum against S. mutans serotype c-specific antigen did not react with autoclaved extracts from the mutant. The rmlD gene product of S. mutans compensated for the incompleteness of dTDP-rhamnose synthesis by the three previously isolated genes. These results indicate that the rmlD gene product is indispensable for the dTDP-rhamnose pathway and subsequently for the synthesis of serotype-specific antigen in S. mutans. Furthermore, conservation of the rmlD gene in Streptococcus species was demonstrated by Southern blot analysis. PMID:9209063

  20. Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation potential of a new acid tolerant, diazotrophic P-solubilizing and heavy metal resistant bacterium Cupriavidus sp. MTS-7 isolated from long-term mixed contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Saranya; Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Lee, Yong Bok; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    An isolate of Cupriavidus (strain MTS-7) was identified from a long-term PAHs and heavy metals mixed contaminated soil with the potential to biodegrade both LMW and HMW PAHs with added unique traits of acid and alkali tolerance, heavy metal tolerance, self-nutrient assimilation by N fixation and P solubilization. This strain completely degraded the model 3 (150 mg L(-1) Phe), 4 (150 mg L(-1) Pyr) and 5 (50 mg L(-1) BaP) ring PAHs in 4, 20 and 30 days, respectively. It could mineralize 90-100% of PAHs (200 mg L(-1) of Phe and Pyr) within 15 days across pH ranging from 5 to 8 and even in the presence of toxic metal contaminations. During biodegradation, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were 5 (Cu(2+)) and 3 (Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+)) mg L(-1) of the potentially bioavailable metal ions and over 17 mg L(-1) metal levels was lethal for the microbe. Further, it could fix 217-274 μg mL(-1) of N and solubilize 79-135 μg mL(-1) of P while PAHs degradation. MTS-7 as a superior candidate could be thus used in the enhanced bioaugmentation and/or phytoremediation of long-term mixed contaminated sites. PMID:27475295

  1. Streptococcus tigurinus, a novel member of the Streptococcus mitis group, causes invasive infections.

    PubMed

    Zbinden, Andrea; Mueller, Nicolas J; Tarr, Philip E; Eich, Gerhard; Schulthess, Bettina; Bahlmann, Anna S; Keller, Peter M; Bloemberg, Guido V

    2012-09-01

    We recently described the novel species Streptococcus tigurinus sp. nov. belonging to the Streptococcus mitis group. The type strain AZ_3a(T) of S. tigurinus was originally isolated from a patient with infective endocarditis. According to its phenotypic and molecular characteristics, S. tigurinus is most closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus infantis. Accurate identification of S. tigurinus is facilitated by 16S rRNA gene analysis. We retrospectively analyzed our 16S rRNA gene molecular database, which contains sequences of all clinical samples obtained in our institute since 2003. We detected 17 16S rRNA gene sequences which were assigned to S. tigurinus, including sequences from the 3 S. tigurinus strains described previously. S. tigurinus originated from normally sterile body sites, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or heart valves, of 14 patients and was initially detected by culture or broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR, followed by sequencing. The 14 patients had serious invasive infections, i.e., infective endocarditis (n = 6), spondylodiscitis (n = 3), bacteremia (n = 2), meningitis (n = 1), prosthetic joint infection (n = 1), and thoracic empyema (n = 1). To evaluate the presence of Streptococcus tigurinus in the endogenous oral microbial flora, we screened saliva specimens of 31 volunteers. After selective growth, alpha-hemolytic growing colonies were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and subsequent molecular methods. S. tigurinus was not identified among 608 strains analyzed. These data indicate that S. tigurinus is not widely distributed in the oral cavity. In conclusion, S. tigurinus is a novel agent of invasive infections, particularly infective endocarditis.

  2. Antagonistic action of Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus faecalis to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Darling, C L; Hart, G D

    1976-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus faecalis were found to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Löwenstein-Jensen and Middlebrook 7H11 agars, but not on the latter medium when antibacterial drugs were added. S. faecalis was found to be more inhibitory than S. salivarius to 15 strains of M. tuberculosis. S. salivarius produced little or no inhibition of growth of Runyon group III organisms but was very antagonistic to Runyon group I mycobacteria. Images PMID:824304

  3. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  4. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar

    2015-12-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc.

  5. Streptococcus loxodontisalivarius sp. nov. and Streptococcus saliviloxodontae sp. nov., isolated from oral cavities of elephants.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masanori; Shinozaki-Kuwahara, Noriko; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2014-09-01

    Four Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid-shaped organisms were isolated from elephant oral cavities. The isolates were tentatively identified as streptococcal species based on the results of biochemical tests. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies confirmed the organisms to be members of the genus Streptococcus. Two isolates (NUM 6304(T) and NUM 6312) were related most closely to Streptococcus salivarius with 96.8 % and 93.1 % similarity based on the 16S rRNA gene and the RNA polymerase β subunit encoding gene (rpoB), respectively, and to Streptococcus vestibularis with 83.7 % similarity based on the 60 kDa heat-shock protein gene (groEL). The other two isolates (NUM 6306(T) and NUM 6318) were related most closely to S. vestibularis with 97.0 % and 82.9 % similarity based on the 16S rRNA and groEL genes, respectively, and to S. salivarius with 93.5 % similarity based on the rpoB gene. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, these isolates are suggested to represent novel species of the genus Streptococcus, for which the names Streptococcus loxodontisalivarius sp. nov. (type strain NUM 6304(T) = JCM 19287(T) = DSM 27382(T)) and Streptococcus saliviloxodontae sp. nov. (type strain NUM 6306(T) = JCM 19288(T) = DSM 27513(T)) are proposed.

  6. Streptococcus moroccensis sp. nov. and Streptococcus rifensis sp. nov., isolated from raw camel milk.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Zaina; Amar, Mohamed; Ouadghiri, Mouna; Cnockaert, Margo; Aerts, Maarten; El Farricha, Omar; Vandamme, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Two catalase- and oxidase-negative Streptococcus-like strains, LMG 27682(T) and LMG 27684(T), were isolated from raw camel milk in Morocco. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing assigned these bacteria to the genus Streptococcus with Streptococcus rupicaprae 2777-2-07(T) as their closest phylogenetic neighbour (95.9% and 95.7% similarity, respectively). 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between the two strains was 96.7%. Although strains LMG 27682(T) and LMG 27684(T) shared a DNA-DNA hybridization value that corresponded to the threshold level for species delineation (68%), the two strains could be distinguished by multiple biochemical tests, sequence analysis of the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase (pheS), RNA polymerase (rpoA) and ATP synthase (atpA) genes and by their MALDI-TOF MS profiles. On the basis of these considerable phenotypic and genotypic differences, we propose to classify both strains as novel species of the genus Streptococcus, for which the names Streptococcus moroccensis sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 27682(T)  = CCMM B831(T)) and Streptococcus rifensis sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 27684(T)  = CCMM B833(T)) are proposed.

  7. Binding Forces of Streptococcus mutans P1 Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Li, James K.; Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a Gram-positive oral bacterium that is a primary etiological agent associated with human dental caries. In the oral cavity, S. mutans adheres to immobilized salivary agglutinin (SAG) contained within the salivary pellicle on the tooth surface. Binding to SAG is mediated by cell surface P1, a multifunctional adhesin that is also capable of interacting with extracellular matrix proteins. This may be of particular importance outside of the oral cavity as S. mutans has been associated with infective endocarditis and detected in atherosclerotic plaque. Despite the biomedical importance of P1, its binding mechanisms are not completely understood. In this work, we use atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule and single-cell force spectroscopy to quantify the nanoscale forces driving P1-mediated adhesion. Single-molecule experiments show that full-length P1, as well as fragments containing only the P1 globular head or C-terminal region, binds to SAG with relatively weak forces (~50 pN). In contrast, single-cell analyses reveal that adhesion of a single S. mutans cell to SAG is mediated by strong (~500 pN) and long-range (up to 6000 nm) forces. This is likely due to the binding of multiple P1 adhesins to self-associated gp340 glycoproteins. Such a cooperative, long-range character of the S. mutans–SAG interaction would therefore dramatically increase the strength and duration of cell adhesion. We also demonstrate, at single-molecule and single-cell levels, the interaction of P1 with fibronectin and collagen, as well as with hydrophobic, but not hydrophilic, substrates. The binding mechanism (strong forces, cooperativity, broad specificity) of P1 provides a molecular basis for its multifunctional adhesion properties. Our methodology represents a valuable approach to probe the binding forces of bacterial adhesins and offers a tractable methodology to assess anti-adhesion therapy. PMID:25671413

  8. The influence of Brazilian plant extracts on Streptococcus mutans biofilm

    PubMed Central

    BARNABÉ, Michele; SARACENI, Cíntia Helena Coury; DUTRA-CORREA, Maristela; SUFFREDINI, Ivana Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Nineteen plant extracts obtained from plants from the Brazilian Amazon showed activity against planktonic Streptococcus mutans, an important bacterium involved in the first steps of biofilm formation and the subsequent initiation of several oral diseases. Objective Our goal was to verify whether plant extracts that showed activity against planktonic S. mutans could prevent the organization of or even disrupt a single-species biofilm made by the same bacteria. Material and Methods Plant extracts were tested on a single-bacteria biofilm prepared using the Zürich method. Each plant extract was tested at a concentration 5 times higher than its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Discs of hydroxyapatite were submersed overnight in brain-heart infusion broth enriched with saccharose 5%, which provided sufficient time for biofilm formation. The discs were then submersed in extract solutions for one minute, three times per day, for two subsequent days. The discs were then washed with saline three times, at ten seconds each, after each treatment. Supports were allowed to remain in the enriched medium for one additional night. At the end of the process, the bacteria were removed from the discs by vortexing and were counted. Results Only two of 19 plant extracts showed activity in the present assay: EB1779, obtained from Dioscorea altissima, and EB1673, obtained from Annona hypoglauca. Although the antibacterial activity of the plant extracts was first observed against planktonic S. mutans, influence over biofilm formation was not necessarily observed in the biofilm model. The present results motivate us to find new natural products to be used in dentistry. PMID:25466471

  9. Regulation and function of lactate oxidation in Streptococcus faecium.

    PubMed

    London, J

    1968-04-01

    Regulation of the synthesis and function of an l(+)-specific lactate-oxidizing enzyme system found in a homofermentative Streptococcus was investigated. With the exception of fructose, aerobic growth at the expense of a variety of substrates resulted in the formation of a lactate oxidation system; anaerobic growth resulted in a marked reduction or complete loss of lactate-oxidizing activity. Growth on fructose, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, invariably produced a decrease in the activity of the lactate oxidation system. A negative control, activated by an early intermediate product of glycolysis, appeared to be responsible for repression of the lactate-oxidizing enzyme(s). The enzyme system confers upon the organism the ability to grow aerobically at the expense of l(+)-lactic acid.

  10. 9230 FECAL ENTEROCOCCUS/STREPTOCOCCUS GROUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1903 the genus name Enterococcus was proposed for gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid-shaped bacterial of intestinal origin. Several years later, it was suggested that the genus name be changed to Streptococcus because of the organisms' ability to form chains of coccoid...

  11. Nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae as an Otopathogen

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingfu; Kaur, Ravinder; Casey, Janet R.; Sabharwal, Vishakha; Pelton, Stephen; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Among 34 Spn sequential isolates from middle ear fluid we found a case of a nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae (NT-Spn) in a child with AOM. The strain was pneumolysin PCR positive and capsule gene PCR negative. Virulence of the NT-Spn was confirmed in a chinchilla model of AOM. PMID:21251566

  12. Streptococcus-Zebrafish Model of Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Melody N.; Pfeifer, John D.; Caparon, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Due to its small size, rapid generation time, powerful genetic systems, and genomic resources, the zebrafish has emerged as an important model of vertebrate development and human disease. Its well-developed adaptive and innate cellular immune systems make the zebrafish an ideal model for the study of infectious diseases. With a natural and important pathogen of fish, Streptococcus iniae, we have established a streptococcus- zebrafish model of bacterial pathogenesis. Following injection into the dorsal muscle, zebrafish developed a lethal infection, with a 50% lethal dose of 103 CFU, and died within 2 to 3 days. The pathogenesis of infection resembled that of S. iniae in farmed fish populations and that of several important human streptococcal diseases and was characterized by an initial focal necrotic lesion that rapidly progressed to invasion of the pathogen into all major organ systems, including the brain. Zebrafish were also susceptible to infection by the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. However, disease was characterized by a marked absence of inflammation, large numbers of extracellular streptococci in the dorsal muscle, and extensive myonecrosis that occurred far in advance of any systemic invasion. The genetic systems available for streptococci, including a novel method of mutagenesis which targets genes whose products are exported, were used to identify several mutants attenuated for virulence in zebrafish. This combination of a genetically amenable pathogen with a well-defined vertebrate host makes the streptococcus-zebrafish model of bacterial pathogenesis a powerful model for analysis of infectious disease. PMID:12065534

  13. Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders after streptococcus infection.

    PubMed

    Maini, Baljeet; Bathla, Manish; Dhanjal, Gurdeep S; Sharma, Prem D

    2012-10-01

    Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infection (PANDAS) is a group of disorders recently recognized as a clinical entity. A case of PANDAS is described here, which remitted after 1 month of treatment. Recent Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus infection should be considered in a child who presents with a sudden explosive onset of tics or obsessive compulsive symptoms. PMID:23372243

  14. Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Capsule In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Auger, Jean-Philippe; Meekhanon, Nattakan; Okura, Masatoshi; Osaki, Makoto; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Takamatsu, Daisuke

    2016-10-01

    Many Streptococcus suis isolates from porcine endocarditis in slaughterhouses have lost their capsule and are considered avirulent. However, we retrieved capsule- and virulence-recovered S. suis after in vivo passages of a nonencapsulated strain in mice, suggesting that nonencapsulated S. suis are still potentially hazardous for persons in the swine industry. PMID:27648583

  15. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis in Peru.

    PubMed

    Mori, Nicanor; Guevara, Jose M; Tilley, Drake H; Briceno, Jesus A; Zunt, Joseph R; Montano, Silvia M

    2013-02-01

    A 59-year-old man with a history of fever, unsteadiness, hemiparesis, motor aphasia and consciousness disturbance was hospitalized for Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis. He denied contact with farm animals, but had a practice of consuming unpasteurized goats' cheese from an uncertain source.

  16. Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Capsule In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Jean-Philippe; Meekhanon, Nattakan; Okura, Masatoshi; Osaki, Makoto; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Sekizaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Many Streptococcus suis isolates from porcine endocarditis in slaughterhouses have lost their capsule and are considered avirulent. However, we retrieved capsule- and virulence-recovered S. suis after in vivo passages of a nonencapsulated strain in mice, suggesting that nonencapsulated S. suis are still potentially hazardous for persons in the swine industry. PMID:27648583

  17. Revisitingmolecular serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Ninety-two Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes have been described so far, but the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduced in the Brazilian basic vaccination schedule in 2010 covers only the ten most prevalent in the country. Pneumococcal serotype-shifting after massive immunization is a major concern and monitoring this phenomenon requires efficient and accessible serotyping methods. Pneumococcal serotyping based on antisera produced in animals is laborious and restricted to a few reference laboratories. Alternatively, molecular serotyping methods assess polymorphisms in the cps gene cluster, which encodes key enzymes for capsular polysaccharides synthesis in pneumococci. In one such approach, cps-RFLP, the PCR amplified cps loci are digested with an endonuclease, generating serotype-specific fingerprints on agarose gel electrophoresis. Methods In this work, in silico and in vitro approaches were combined to demonstrate that XhoII is the most discriminating endonuclease for cps-RFLP, and to build a database of serotype-specific fingerprints that accommodates the genetic diversity within the cps locus of 92 known pneumococci serotypes. Results The expected specificity of cps-RFLP using XhoII was 76% for serotyping and 100% for serogrouping. The database of cps-RFLP fingerprints was integrated to Molecular Serotyping Tool (MST), a previously published web-based software for molecular serotyping. In addition, 43 isolates representing 29 serotypes prevalent in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from 2007 to 2013, were examined in vitro; 11 serotypes (nine serogroups) matched the respective in silico patterns calculated for reference strains. The remaining experimental patterns, despite their resemblance to their expected in silico patterns, did not reach the threshold of similarity score to be considered a match and were then added to the database. Conclusion The cps-RFLP method with XhoII outperformed the antisera-based and other molecular serotyping

  18. Effects of Withania somnifera on the growth and virulence properties of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus at sub-MIC levels.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Santosh; Chang, Kee-Wan; Jeon, Jae-Gyu

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the methanol extract of Withania somnifera (MEW) on the growth and virulence properties of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus at sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels and to identify the main components of MEW. First, antibacterial activity of MEW against oral bacteria was determined using a micro-dilution method. Then, the effect of MEW on the growth of S. mutans and S. sobrinus was investigated at sub-MIC levels. To test the effect of MEW on the virulence properties of S. mutans and S. sobrinus, assays for acid production, acid tolerance, and biofilm formation were performed at sub-MIC levels. A GC-MS analysis for the main components of MEW was also carried out. MEW showed a broad antibacterial range against oral bacteria (MIC: 0.125-2 mg/mL). At sub-MIC levels, MEW dose-dependently increased doubling times of S. mutans and S. sobrinus up to 258% and 400%, respectively. Furthermore, MEW inhibited acid production, acid tolerance, and biofilm formation of S. mutans and S. sobrinus at sub-MIC levels. The GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of mono- and disaccharides, sugar alcohols, and organic acids as main components. These data suggest that MEW might be useful for restraining physiological activities of cariogenic bacteria.

  19. Characterization of the Streptococcus adjacens group antigen structure.

    PubMed Central

    Sieling, P A; Thomas, M J; van de Rijn, I

    1992-01-01

    Serological classification of bacteria requires the presence of an antigen unique to the organism of interest. Streptococci are serologically differentiated by group antigens, many of which are carbohydrates, although some are amphiphiles. This report describes the chemical characterization of the Streptococcus adjacens group antigen structure. Previous studies demonstrated that the amphiphile contained phosphorus, ribitol, galactose, galactosamine, alanine, and fatty acids. Phosphodiester bonds present in the purified group antigen were identified as part of a poly(ribitol phosphate), since ribitol phosphate was the only organic phosphate detected after acid hydrolysis. Hydrofluoric acid cleavage of the phosphodiester bonds generated oligosaccharide repeating units. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the methylated, acetylated oligosaccharide suggested that the repeating unit is a trisaccharide of Galp beta 1-3Galp beta 1-4GalNac with N-acetylgalactosamine attached in beta-linkage to either the number two or the number four carbon of ribitol. The lipid- and carbohydrate-substituted poly(ribitol phosphate) of the S. adjacens group antigen therefore is a unique amphiphile structure, differing in its repeating-unit structure from the polyglycerophosphate structure of the more common gram-positive amphiphile lipoteichoic acid. PMID:1309524

  20. Streptococcus thermophilus, an emerging and promising tool for heterologous expression: Advantages and future trends.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, Xavier; Gagnaire, Valérie; Lortal, Sylvie; Dary, Annie; Genay, Magali

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is the second most used bacterium in dairy industry. It is daily consumed by millions of people through the worldwide consumption of yogurts, cheeses and fermented milks. S. thermophilus presents many features that make it a good candidate for the production of heterologous proteins. First, its ability to be naturally transformable allows obtaining swiftly and easily recombinant strains using various genetic tools available. Second, its Generally Recognised As Safe status and its ability to produce beneficial molecules or to liberate bioactive peptides from milk proteins open up the way for the development of new functional foods to maintain health and well-being of consumers. Finally, its ability to survive the intestinal passage and to be metabolically active in gastrointestinal tract allows considering S. thermophilus as a potential tool for delivering various biological molecules to the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this review is therefore to take stock of various genetic tools which can be employed in S. thermophilus to produce heterologous proteins and to highlight the advantages and future trends of use of this bacterium as a heterologous expression host.