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Sample records for acid base interaction

  1. Theoretical calculations of base-base interactions in nucleic acids: II. Stacking interactions in polynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Sasisekharan, V

    1978-01-01

    Base-base interactions were computed for single- and double stranded poly,ucleotides, for all possible base sequences. In each case, both right and left stacking arrangements are energetically possible. The preference of one over the other depends upon the base-sequence and the orientation of the bases with respect to helix-axis. Inverted stacking arrangement is also energetically possible for both single- and double-stranded polynucleotides. Finally, interacting energies of a regular duplex and the alternative structures were compared. It was found that the type II model is energetically more favourable than the rest. PMID:662698

  2. The in Silico Insight into Carbon Nanotube and Nucleic Acid Bases Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Ali Asghar; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Tabatabaie, Seyed Saleh; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore practical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical fields the properties of their interaction with biomolecules must be revealed. Recent years, the interaction of CNTs with biomolecules is a subject of research interest for practical applications so that previous research explored that CNTs have complementary structure properties with single strand DNA (ssDNA). Objectives Hence, the quantum mechanics (QM) method based on ab initio was used for this purpose. Therefore values of binding energy, charge distribution, electronic energy and other physical properties of interaction were studied for interaction of nucleic acid bases and SCNT. Materials and Methods In this study, the interaction between nucleic acid bases and a (4, 4) single-walled carbon nanotube (SCNT) were investigated through calculations within quantum mechanics (QM) method at theoretical level of Hartree-Fock (HF) method using 6-31G basis set. Hence, the physical properties such as electronic energy, total dipole moment, charge distributions and binding energy of nucleic acid bases interaction with SCNT were investigated based on HF method. Results It has been found that the guanine base adsorption is bound stronger to the outer surface of nanotube in comparison to the other bases, consistent with the recent theoretical studies. In the other words, the results explored that guanine interaction with SCNT has optimum level of electronic energy so that their interaction is stable. Also, the calculations illustrated that SCNT interact to nucleic acid bases by noncovalent interaction because of charge distribution an electrostatic area is created in place of interaction. Conclusions Consequently, small diameter SCNT interaction with nucleic acid bases is noncovalent. Also, the results revealed that small diameter SCNT interaction especially SCNT (4, 4) with nucleic acid bases can be useful in practical application area of biomedical fields such detection and drug delivery

  3. Thioarsenides: A case for long-range Lewis acid-base-directed van der Waals interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Wallace, Adam F.; Downs, R. T.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-04-01

    Electron density distributions, bond paths, Laplacian and local energy density properties have been calculated for a number of As4Sn (n = 3,4,5) thioarsenide molecular crystals. On the basis of the distributions, the intramolecular As-S and As-As interactions classify as shared bonded interactions and the intermolecular As-S, As-As and S-S interactions classify as closed-shell van der Waals bonded interactions. The bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths link regions of locally concentrated electron density (Lewis base regions) with aligned regions of locally depleted electron density (Lewis acid regions) on adjacent molecules. The paths are comparable with intermolecular paths reported for several other molecular crystals that link aligned Lewis base and acid regions in a key-lock fashion, interactions that classified as long range Lewis acid-base directed van der Waals interactions. As the bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths (~70%) link Lewis acid-base regions on adjacent molecules, it appears that molecules adopt an arrangement that maximizes the number of As-S Lewis acid-base intermolecular bonded interactions. The maximization of the number of Lewis acid-base interactions appears to be connected with the close-packed array adopted by molecules: distorted cubic close-packed arrays are adopted for alacránite, pararealgar, uzonite, realgar and β-AsS and the distorted hexagonal close-packed arrays adopted by α- and β-dimorphite. A growth mechanism is proposed for thioarsenide molecular crystals from aqueous species that maximizes the number of long range Lewis acid-base vdW As-S bonded interactions with the resulting directed bond paths structuralizing the molecules as a molecular crystal.

  4. Molecular microenvironments: Solvent interactions with nucleic acid bases and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Pohorille, A.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of reconstructing plausible sequences of events in prebiotic molecular evolution is limited by the lack of fossil remains. However, with hindsight, one goal of molecular evolution was obvious: the development of molecular systems that became constituents of living systems. By understanding the interactions among molecules that are likely to have been present in the prebiotic environment, and that could have served as components in protobiotic molecular systems, plausible evolutionary sequences can be suggested. When stable aggregations of molecules form, a net decrease in free energy is observed in the system. Such changes occur when solvent molecules interact among themselves, as well as when they interact with organic species. A significant decrease in free energy, in systems of solvent and organic molecules, is due to entropy changes in the solvent. Entropy-driven interactioins played a major role in the organization of prebiotic systems, and understanding the energetics of them is essential to understanding molecular evolution.

  5. Thermochemical study of the reactions of acid-base interaction in an aqueous solution of α-aminobutyric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernikov, V. V.; Krutova, O. N.; Skvortsov, I. A.; Korchagina, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The heat effects of the interaction between a solution of α-aminobutyric acid and solutions of HNO3 and KOH are measured by means of calorimetry in different ranges of pH at 298.15 K and values of ionic strength of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 (KNO3). The heat effects of the stepwise dissociation of the amino acid are determined. Standard thermodynamic characteristics (Δr H 0, Δr G 0, and Δr S 0) of the reactions of acid-base interaction in aqueous solutions of α-aminobutyric acid are calculated. The connection between the thermodynamic characteristics of the dissociation of the amino acid and the structure of this compound is considered.

  6. Interactive Computer-Assisted Instruction in Acid-Base Physiology for Mobile Computer Platforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longmuir, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    In this project, the traditional lecture hall presentation of acid-base physiology in the first-year medical school curriculum was replaced by interactive, computer-assisted instruction designed primarily for the iPad and other mobile computer platforms. Three learning modules were developed, each with ~20 screens of information, on the subjects…

  7. Evaluation of cell interaction with polymeric biomaterials based on hyaluronic acid and chitosan.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Mônica Helena Monteiro; Ferreira, Mariselma; Malmonge, Sônia Maria; Lombello, Christiane Bertachini

    2017-05-01

    Tissue engineering involves the development of new materials or devices capable of specific interactions with biological tissues, searching the use of biocompatible materials as scaffolds for in vitro cell growth, and functional tissue development, that is subsequently implanted into patient. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the initial aspects of cell interaction with the polymeric biomaterials blends based on hyaluronic acid with chitosan. The hypothesis approach involves synthesis and analysis of swelling and thermal degradation (thermal gravimetric analysis) of the polymer blend; and Vero cell interaction with the biomaterial, through analysis of cytotoxicity, adhesion and cell morphology. The blend resulted in a biomaterial with a high swelling ratio that can allow nutrient distribution and absorption. The thermal gravimetric analysis results showed that the blend had two stages of degradation at temperatures very close to those observed for pure polymers, confirming that the physical mixing of hydrogels occurred, resulting in the presence of both hyaluronic acid and chitosan in the blend. The evaluation of indirect cytotoxicity showed that the blend was non cytotoxic for Vero cells, and the quantitative analysis performed with the MTT could verify a cell viability of 98%. The cells cultured on the blend showed adhesion, spreading and proliferation on this biomaterial, distinguished from the pattern of the control cells. These results showed that the blends produced from hyaluronic acid and chitosan hydrogels are promising for applications in tissue engineering, aiming at future cartilaginous tissue.

  8. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers

    SciTech Connect

    Nap, R. J.; Tagliazucchi, M.; Szleifer, I.

    2014-01-14

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads

  9. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers.

    PubMed

    Nap, R J; Tagliazucchi, M; Szleifer, I

    2014-01-14

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads

  10. Interactive computer-assisted instruction in acid-base physiology for mobile computer platforms.

    PubMed

    Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2014-03-01

    In this project, the traditional lecture hall presentation of acid-base physiology in the first-year medical school curriculum was replaced by interactive, computer-assisted instruction designed primarily for the iPad and other mobile computer platforms. Three learning modules were developed, each with ∼20 screens of information, on the subjects of the CO2-bicarbonate buffer system, other body buffer systems, and acid-base disorders. Five clinical case modules were also developed. For the learning modules, the interactive, active learning activities were primarily step-by-step learner control of explanations of complex physiological concepts, usually presented graphically. For the clinical cases, the active learning activities were primarily question-and-answer exercises that related clinical findings to the relevant basic science concepts. The student response was remarkably positive, with the interactive, active learning aspect of the instruction cited as the most important feature. Also, students cited the self-paced instruction, extensive use of interactive graphics, and side-by-side presentation of text and graphics as positive features. Most students reported that it took less time to study the subject matter with this online instruction compared with subject matter presented in the lecture hall. However, the approach to learning was highly examination driven, with most students delaying the study of the subject matter until a few days before the scheduled examination. Wider implementation of active learning computer-assisted instruction will require that instructors present subject matter interactively, that students fully embrace the responsibilities of independent learning, and that institutional administrations measure instructional effort by criteria other than scheduled hours of instruction.

  11. Physical nature of ethidium and proflavine interactions with nucleic acid bases in the intercalation plane.

    PubMed

    Langner, Karol M; Kedzierski, Pawel; Sokalski, W Andrzej; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2006-05-18

    On the basis of the crystallographic structures of three nucleic acid intercalation complexes involving ethidium and proflavine, we have analyzed the interaction energies between intercalator chromophores and their four nearest bases, using a hybrid variation-perturbation method at the second-order Møller-Plesset theory level (MP2) with a 6-31G(d,p) basis set. A total MP2 interaction energy minimum precisely reproduces the crystallographic position of the ethidium chromophore in the intercalation plane between UA/AU bases. The electrostatic component constitutes the same fraction of the total energy for all three studied structures. The multipole electrostatic interaction energy, calculated from cumulative atomic multipole moments (CAMMs), was found to converge only after including components above the fifth order. CAMM interaction surfaces, calculated on grids in the intercalation planes of these structures, reasonably reproduce the alignment of intercalators in crystal structures; they exhibit additional minima in the direction of the DNA grooves, however, which also need to be examined at higher theory levels if no crystallographic data are given.

  12. Mean-field interactions between nucleic-acid-base dipoles can drive the formation of the double helix

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi; Maciejczyk, Maciej; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2013-01-01

    A proposed coarse-grained model of nucleic acids demonstrates that average interactions between base dipoles, together with chain connectivity and excluded-volume interactions, are sufficient to form double-helical structures of DNA and RNA molecules. Additionally, local interactions determine helix handedness and direction of strand packing. This result, and earlier research on reduced protein models, suggest that mean-field multipole-multipole interactions are the principal factors responsible for the formation of regular structure of biomolecules. PMID:23496746

  13. Lewis acid-base interactions between polysulfides and metal organic framework in lithium sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianming; Tian, Jian; Wu, Dangxin; Gu, Meng; Xu, Wu; Wang, Chongmin; Gao, Fei; Engelhard, Mark H; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2014-05-14

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is one of the most promising energy storage systems because of its high specific capacity of 1675 mAh g(-1) based on sulfur. However, the rapid capacity degradation, mainly caused by polysulfide dissolution, remains a significant challenge prior to practical applications. This work demonstrates that a novel Ni-based metal organic framework (Ni-MOF), Ni6(BTB)4(BP)3 (BTB = benzene-1,3,5-tribenzoate and BP = 4,4'-bipyridyl), can remarkably immobilize polysulfides within the cathode structure through physical and chemical interactions at molecular level. The capacity retention achieves up to 89% after 100 cycles at 0.1 C. The excellent performance is attributed to the synergistic effects of the interwoven mesopores (∼2.8 nm) and micropores (∼1.4 nm) of Ni-MOF, which first provide an ideal matrix to confine polysulfides, and the strong interactions between Lewis acidic Ni(II) center and the polysulfide base, which significantly slow down the migration of soluble polysulfides out of the pores, leading to the excellent cycling performance of Ni-MOF/S composite.

  14. Deciphering the role of charge, hydration, and hydrophobicity for cytotoxic activities and membrane interactions of bile acid based facial amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manish; Singh, Ashima; Kundu, Somanath; Bansal, Sandhya; Bajaj, Avinash

    2013-08-01

    We synthesized four cationic bile acid based facial amphiphiles featuring trimethyl ammonium head groups. We evaluated the role of these amphiphiles for cytotoxic activities against colon cancer cells and their membrane interactions by varying charge, hydration and hydrophobicity. The singly charged cationic Lithocholic acid based amphiphile (LCA-TMA1) is most cytotoxic, whereas the triply charged cationic Cholic acid based amphiphile (CA-TMA3) is least cytotoxic. Light microscopy and Annexin-FITC assay revealed that these facial amphiphiles caused late apoptosis. In addition, we studied the interactions of these amphiphiles with model membrane systems by Prodan-based hydration, DPH-based anisotropy, and differential scanning calorimetry. LCA-TMA1 is most hydrophobic with a hard charge causing efficient dehydration and maximum perturbations of membranes thereby facilitating translocation and high cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In contrast, the highly hydrated and multiple charged CA-TMA3 caused least membrane perturbations leading to low translocation and less cytotoxicity. As expected, Chenodeoxycholic acid and Deoxycholic acid based amphiphiles (CDCA-TMA2, DCA-TMA2) featuring two charged head groups showed intermediate behavior. Thus, we deciphered that charge, hydration, and hydrophobicity of these amphiphiles govern membrane interactions, translocation, and resulting cytoxicity against colon cancer cells.

  15. The pH ruler: a Java applet for developing interactive exercises on acids and bases.

    PubMed

    Barrette-Ng, Isabelle H

    2011-07-01

    In introductory biochemistry courses, it is often a struggle to teach the basic concepts of acid-base chemistry in a manner that is relevant to biological systems. To help students gain a more intuitive and visual understanding of abstract acid-base concepts, a simple graphical construct called the pH ruler Java applet was developed. The applet allows students to visualize the abundance of different protonation states of diprotic and triprotic amino acids at different pH values. Using the applet, the student can drag a widget on a slider bar to change the pH and observe in real time changes in the abundance of different ionization states of this amino acid. This tool provides a means for developing more complex inquiry-based, active-learning exercises to teach more advanced topics of biochemistry, such as protein purification, protein structure and enzyme mechanism.

  16. DNA interaction with octahedral and square planar Ni(II) complexes of aspartic-acid Schiff-bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, S. A.; Orabi, A. S.; Abbas, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Ni(II) complexes of (S,E)-2-(2-OHbenzilydene)aspartic acid; (S,E)-2-(2,3-diOHbenzilydene)aspartic acid-; (S,E)-2-(2,4-diOH-benzilydene)aspartic acid; (S,E)-2-(2,5-diOHbenzilydene)aspartic acid and (S,E)-2-((2-OHnaphthalene-1-yl)methylene)aspartic acid Schiff-bases have been synthesized by template method in ethanol or ammonia media. They were characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity measurements, magnetic moment, UV, IR and 1H nmr spectra as well as thermal analysis (TG, DTG, DTA). The Schiff-bases are dibasic tridentate or tetradentate donors and the complexes have square planar and octahedral structures. The complexes decompose in two or three steps where kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the decomposition steps were computed. The interactions of the formed complexes with FM-DNA were monitored by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy.

  17. New Theoretical Insight into the Interactions and Properties of Formic Acid: Development of a Quantum-Based Pair Potential for Formic Acid.

    SciTech Connect

    Roszak, S; Gee, R; Balasubramanian, K; Fried, L

    2005-08-08

    We performed ab initio quantum chemical studies for the development of intra and intermolecular interaction potentials for formic acid for use in molecular dynamics simulations of formic acid molecular crystal. The formic acid structures considered in the ab initio studies include both the cis and trans monomers which are the conformers that have been postulated as part of chains constituting liquid and crystal phases under extreme conditions. Although the cis to trans transformation is not energetically favored, the trans isomer was found as a component of stable gas-phase species. Our decomposition scheme for the interaction energy indicates that the hydrogen bonded complexes are dominated by the Hartree-Fock forces while parallel clusters are stabilized by the electron correlation energy. The calculated three-body and higher interactions are found to be negligible, thus rationalizing the development of an atom-atom pair potential for formic acid based on high-level ab initio calculations of small formic acid clusters. Here we present an atom-atom pair potential that includes both intra- and inter-molecular degrees of freedom for formic acid. The newly developed pair potential is used to examine formic acid in the condensed phase via molecular dynamics simulations. The isothermal compression under hydrostatic pressure obtained from molecular dynamics simulations is in good agreement with experiment. Further, the calculated equilibrium melting temperature is found to be in good agreement with experiment.

  18. APPLICATION OF THE HARD AND SOFT, ACIDS AND BASES (HSAB) THEORY TO TOXICANT-TARGET INTERACTIONS

    PubMed Central

    LoPachin, Richard M.; Gavin, Terrence; DeCaprio, Anthony; Barber, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Many chemical toxicants and/or their active metabolites are electrophiles that cause cell injury by forming covalent bonds with nucleophilic targets on biological macromolecules. Covalent reactions between nucleophilic and electrophilic reagents are however discriminatory, since there is a significant degree of selectivity associated with these interactions. Over the course of the past few decades, the theory of Hard and Soft, Acid and Bases (HSAB) has proven to be a useful tool in predicting the outcome of such reactions. This concept utilizes the inherent electronic characteristic of polarizability to define, for example, reacting electrophiles and nucleophiles as either hard or soft. These HSAB definitions have been successfully applied to chemical-induced toxicity in biological systems. Thus, according to this principle, a toxic electrophile reacts preferentially with biological targets of similar hardness or softness. The soft/hard classification of a xenobiotic electrophile has obvious utility in discerning plausible biological targets and molecular mechanisms of toxicity. The purpose of this Perspective is to discuss the HSAB theory of electrophiles and nucleophiles within a toxicological framework. In principle, covalent bond formation can be described by using the properties of their outermost or frontier orbitals. Because these orbital energies for most chemicals can be calculated using quantum mechanical models, it is possible to quantify the relative softness (σ) or hardness (η) of electrophiles or nucleophiles and to subsequently convert this information into useful indices of reactivity. This atomic level information can provide insight into the design of corroborative laboratory research and thereby help investigators discern corresponding molecular sites and mechanisms of toxicant action. The use of HSAB parameters has also been instrumental in the development and identification of potential nucleophilic cytoprotectants that can scavenge toxic

  19. Application of the Hard and Soft, Acids and Bases (HSAB) theory to toxicant--target interactions.

    PubMed

    Lopachin, Richard M; Gavin, Terrence; Decaprio, Anthony; Barber, David S

    2012-02-20

    Many chemical toxicants and/or their active metabolites are electrophiles that cause cell injury by forming covalent bonds with nucleophilic targets on biological macromolecules. Covalent reactions between nucleophilic and electrophilic reagents are, however, discriminatory since there is a significant degree of selectivity associated with these interactions. Over the course of the past few decades, the theory of Hard and Soft, Acids and Bases (HSAB) has proven to be a useful tool in predicting the outcome of such reactions. This concept utilizes the inherent electronic characteristic of polarizability to define, for example, reacting electrophiles and nucleophiles as either hard or soft. These HSAB definitions have been successfully applied to chemical-induced toxicity in biological systems. Thus, according to this principle, a toxic electrophile reacts preferentially with biological targets of similar hardness or softness. The soft/hard classification of a xenobiotic electrophile has obvious utility in discerning plausible biological targets and molecular mechanisms of toxicity. The purpose of this perspective is to discuss the HSAB theory of electrophiles and nucleophiles within a toxicological framework. In principle, covalent bond formation can be described by using the properties of their outermost or frontier orbitals. Because these orbital energies for most chemicals can be calculated using quantum mechanical models, it is possible to quantify the relative softness (σ) or hardness (η) of electrophiles or nucleophiles and to subsequently convert this information into useful indices of reactivity. This atomic level information can provide insight into the design of corroborative laboratory research and thereby help investigators discern corresponding molecular sites and mechanisms of toxicant action. The use of HSAB parameters has also been instrumental in the development and identification of potential nucleophilic cytoprotectants that can scavenge toxic

  20. Lewis Acid-Base Interaction-Controlled ortho-Selective C-H Borylation of Aryl Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong Liang; Kuninobu, Yoichiro; Kanai, Motomu

    2017-02-01

    An iridium/bipyridine-catalyzed ortho-selective C-H borylation of aryl sulfides was developed. High ortho-selectivity was achieved by a Lewis acid-base interaction between a boryl group of the ligand and a sulfur atom of the substrate. This is the first example of a catalytic and regioselective C-H transformation controlled by a Lewis acid-base interaction between a ligand and a substrate. The C-H borylation reaction could be conducted on a gram scale, and with a bioactive molecule as a substrate, demonstrating its applicability to late-stage regioselective C-H borylation. A bioactive molecule was synthesized from an ortho-borylated product by converting the boryl and methylthio groups of the product.

  1. Polymer-Nucleic Acid Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhuang-Lin; Xia, Yi-Qi; Yang, Qiu-Song; Tian, Wen-de; Chen, Kang; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2017-04-01

    Gene therapy is an important therapeutic strategy in the treatment of a wide range of genetic disorders. Polymers forming stable complexes with nucleic acids (NAs) are non-viral gene carriers. The self-assembly of polymers and nucleic acids is typically a complex process that involves many types of interaction at different scales. Electrostatic interaction, hydrophobic interaction, and hydrogen bonds are three important and prevalent interactions in the polymer/nucleic acid system. Electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds are the main driving forces for the condensation of nucleic acids, while hydrophobic interactions play a significant role in the cellular uptake and endosomal escape of polymer-nucleic acid complexes. To design high-efficiency polymer candidates for the DNA and siRNA delivery, it is necessary to have a detailed understanding of the interactions between them in solution. In this chapter, we survey the roles of the three important interactions between polymers and nucleic acids during the formation of polyplexes and summarize recent understandings of the linear polyelectrolyte-NA interactions and dendrimer-NA interactions. We also review recent progress optimizing the gene delivery system by tuning these interactions.

  2. Acid-Base Interactions of Polystyrene Sulfonic Acid in Amorphous Solid Dispersions Using a Combined UV/FTIR/XPS/ssNMR Study.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Chen, Xin; Nie, Haichen; Su, Ziyang; Fang, Ke; Yang, Xinghao; Smith, Daniel; Byrn, Stephen; Lubach, Joseph W

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the potential drug-excipient interactions of polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSSA) and two weakly basic anticancer drugs, lapatinib (LB) and gefitinib (GB), in amorphous solid dispersions. Based on the strong acidity of the sulfonic acid functional group, PSSA was hypothesized to exhibit specific intermolecular acid-base interactions with both model basic drugs. Ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy identified red shifts, which correlated well with the color change observed in lapatinib-PSSA solutions. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra suggest the protonation of the quinazoline nitrogen atom in both model compounds, which agrees well with data from the crystalline ditosylate salt of lapatinib. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) detected increases in binding energy of the basic nitrogen atoms in both lapatinib and gefitinib, strongly indicating protonation of these nitrogen atoms. (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy provided direct spectroscopic evidence for protonation of the quinazoline nitrogen atoms in both LB and GB, as well as the secondary amine nitrogen atom in LB and the tertiary amine nitrogen atom in GB. The observed chemical shifts in the LB-PSSA (15)N spectrum also agree very well with the lapatinib ditosylate salt where proton transfer is known. Additionally, the dissolution and physical stability behaviors of both amorphous solid dispersions were examined. PSSA was found to significantly improve the dissolution of LB and GB and effectively inhibit the crystallization of LB and GB under accelerated storage conditions due to the beneficial strong intermolecular acid-base interaction between the sulfonic acid groups and basic nitrogen centers.

  3. Interaction and dynamics of ionic liquids based on choline and amino acid anions

    SciTech Connect

    Campetella, M.; Bodo, E. Caminiti, R. Martino, A.; Gontrani, L.; D’Apuzzo, F.; Lupi, S.

    2015-06-21

    The combination of amino acid anions with the choline cation gives origin to a new and potentially important class of organic ionic liquids that might represent a viable and bio-compatible alternative with respect to the traditional ones. We present here a detailed study of the bulk phase of the prototype system composed of the simplest amino acid (alanine) anion and the choline cation, based on ab initio and classical molecular dynamics. Theoretical findings have been validated by comparing with accurate experimental X-ray diffraction data and infrared spectra. We find that hydrogen bonding (HB) features in these systems are crucial in establishing their local geometric structure. We have also found that these HBs once formed are persistent and that the proton resides exclusively on the choline cation. In addition, we show that a classical force field description for this particular ionic liquid can be accurately performed by using a slightly modified version of the generalized AMBER force field.

  4. Urea destabilizes RNA by forming stacking interactions and multiple hydrogen bonds with nucleic acid bases.

    PubMed

    Priyakumar, U Deva; Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D; Mackerell, Alexander D

    2009-12-16

    Urea titration of RNA by urea is an effective approach to investigate the forces stabilizing this biologically important molecule. We used all atom molecular dynamics simulations using two urea force fields and two RNA constructs to elucidate in atomic detail the destabilization mechanism of folded RNA in aqueous urea solutions. Urea denatures RNA by forming multiple hydrogen bonds with the RNA bases and has little influence on the phosphodiester backbone. Most significantly we discovered that urea engages in stacking interactions with the bases. We also estimate, for the first time, the m-value for RNA, which is a measure of the strength of urea-RNA interactions. Our work provides a conceptual understanding of the mechanism by which urea enhances RNA folding rates.

  5. Histidine-Based Lipopeptides Enhance Cleavage of Nucleic Acids: Interactions with DNA and Hydrolytic Properties.

    PubMed

    Bélières, M; Déjugnat, C; Chouini-Lalanne, N

    2015-12-16

    Interaction studies and cleavage activity experiments were carried out between plasmid DNA and a series of histidine-based lipopeptides. Specific fluorescent probes (ethidium bromide, Hoechst 33342, and pyrene) were used to monitor intercalation, minor groove binding, and self-assembly of lipopeptides, respectively. Association between DNA and lipopeptides was thus evidenced, highlighting the importance of both histidine and hydrophobic tail in the interaction process. DNA cleavage in the presence of lipopeptides was then detected by gel electrophoresis and quantified, showing the importance of histidine and the involvement of its side-chain imidazole in the hydrolysis mechanism. These systems could then be developed as synthetic nucleases while raising concern of introducing histidine in the design of lipopeptide-based transfection vectors.

  6. Antiproliferative activity of aroylacrylic acids. Structure-activity study based on molecular interaction fields.

    PubMed

    Drakulić, Branko J; Stanojković, Tatjana P; Zižak, Zeljko S; Dabović, Milan M

    2011-08-01

    Antiproliferative activity of 27 phenyl-substituted 4-aryl-4-oxo-2-butenoic acids (aroylacrylic acids) toward Human cervix carcinoma (HeLa), Human chronic myelogenous leukemia (K562) and Human colon tumor (LS174) cell lines in vitro are reported. Compounds are active toward all examined cell lines. The most active compounds bear two or three branched alkyl or cycloalkyl substituents on phenyl moiety having potencies in low micromolar ranges. One of most potent derivatives arrests the cell cycle at S phase in HeLa cells. The 3D QSAR study, using molecular interaction fields (MIF) and derived alignment independent descriptors (GRIND-2), rationalize the structural characteristics correlated with potency of compounds. Covalent chemistry, most possibly involved in the mode of action of reported compounds, was quantitatively accounted using frontier molecular orbitals. Pharmacophoric pattern of most potent compounds are used as a template for virtual screening, to find similar ones in database of compounds screened against DTP-NCI 60 tumor cell lines. Potency of obtained hits is well predicted.

  7. Peptide nucleic acid probe for protein affinity purification based on biotin-streptavidin interaction and peptide nucleic acid strand hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tse, Jenny; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zengeya, Thomas; Rozners, Eriks; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2015-02-01

    We describe a new method for protein affinity purification that capitalizes on the high affinity of streptavidin for biotin but does not require dissociation of the biotin-streptavidin complex for protein retrieval. Conventional reagents place both the selectively reacting group (the "warhead") and the biotin on the same molecule. We place the warhead and the biotin on separate molecules, each linked to a short strand of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), synthetic polymers that use the same bases as DNA but attached to a backbone that is resistant to attack by proteases and nucleases. As in DNA, PNA strands with complementary base sequences hybridize. In conditions that favor PNA duplex formation, the warhead strand (carrying the tagged protein) and the biotin strand form a complex that is held onto immobilized streptavidin. As in DNA, the PNA duplex dissociates at moderately elevated temperature; therefore, retrieval of the tagged protein is accomplished by a brief exposure to heat. Using iodoacetate as the warhead, 8-base PNA strands, biotin, and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, we demonstrate retrieval of the cysteine protease papain. We were also able to use our iodoacetyl-PNA:PNA-biotin probe for retrieval and identification of a thiol reductase and a glutathione transferase from soybean seedling cotyledons.

  8. Mutual Lewis acid-base interactions of cations and anions in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Holzweber, Markus; Lungwitz, Ralf; Doerfler, Denise; Spange, Stefan; Koel, Mihkel; Hutter, Herbert; Linert, Wolfgang

    2013-01-02

    Solute properties are known to be strongly influenced by solvent molecules due to solvation. This is due to mutual interaction as both the properties of the solute and of the solvent strongly depend on each other. The present paper is based on the idea that ionic liquids are cations solvated by anions and anions solvated by cations. To show this (in this system strongly pronounced) interaction the long time established donor-acceptor concept for solvents and ions in solution by Viktor Gutmann is extended to ionic liquids. A number of solvent parameters, such as the Kamlet-Abboud-Taft and the Dimroth-Reichardt E(T) scale for ionic liquids neglect this mutual influence, which, however, seems to be in fact necessary to get a proper description of ionic liquid properties. It is shown how strong such parameters vary when the influence of the counter ion is taken into account. Furthermore, acceptor and donor numbers for ionic liquids are presented.

  9. Acid-Base Formalism Extended to Excited State for O-H···S Hydrogen Bonding Interaction.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Surjendu; Roy, Ved Prakash; Wategaonkar, Sanjay

    2016-09-08

    Hydrogen bond can be regarded as an interaction between a base and a proton covalently bound to another base. In this context the strength of hydrogen bond scales with the proton affinity of the acceptor base and the pKa of the donor, i.e., it follows the acid-base formalism. This has been amply demonstrated in conventional hydrogen bonds. Is this also true for the unconventional hydrogen bonds involving lesser electronegative elements such as sulfur atom? In our previous work, we had established that the strength of O-H···S hydrogen bonding (HB) interaction scales with the proton affinity (PA) of the acceptor. In this work, we have investigated the other counterpart, i.e., the H-bonding interaction between the photoacids with different pKa values with a common base such as the H2O and H2S. The 1:1 complexes of five para substituted phenols p-aminophenol, p-cresol, p-fluorophenol, p-chlorophenol, and p-cyanophenol with H2O and H2S were investigated experimentally and computationally. The investigations were also extended to the excited states. The experimental observations of the spectral shifts in the O-H stretching frequency and the S1-S0 band origins were correlated with the pKa of the donors. Ab initio calculations at the MP2 and various dispersion corrected density functional levels of theory were performed to compute the dissociation energy (D0) of the complexes. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), noncovalent interaction (NCI) method, natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis, and natural decomposition analysis (NEDA) were carried out for further characterization of HB interaction. The O-H stretching frequency red shifts and the dissociation energies were found to be lower for the O-H···S hydrogen bonded systems compared to those for the O-H···O H-bound systems. Despite being dominated by the dispersion interaction the O-H···S interaction in the H2S complexes also conformed to the acid-base formalism, i.e., the D0 and the O-H red shift

  10. Interactions between water soluble porphyrin-based star polymer and amino acids: Spectroscopic evidence of molecular binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, Nicola; Micali, Norberto; Villari, Valentina; Mineo, Placido; Vitalini, Daniele; Scamporrino, Emilio

    2005-02-01

    Molecular interactions giving rise to stable complexes between an uncharged water soluble cobalt-porphyrin and amino acids are investigated by time-resolved fluorescence, uv-vis, and circular dichroism measurements. This metalloporphyrin seems to act, by means of the coordination site of the cobalt of the core, as a recognition host, preferentially, with amino acids possessing aromatic groups. The binding with aliphatic amino acids requires longer time scales to be efficient and likely involves a slow kinetic process. The experimental findings suggest that, besides the metal(host)-N(guest) coordination bond, which is the common requisite for all amino acids, a preferential interaction with aromatic groups exists there. The solubility in water of the molecule, guaranteed by the polyethylene glycol arms as peripheral substituents, in the absence of electric charges, allows for a more selective discrimination of the binding process with respect to other water-soluble charged porphyrins. The interest devoted to the porphyrin-based star polymer and its recognition properties is, therefore, founded on the potential use either in polymeric matrices for material science or in aqueous solution for bioscience.

  11. Physically Cross-linked Polymer Binder Induced by Reversible Acid-Base Interaction for High-Performance Silicon Composite Anodes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sanghyun; Chu, Hodong; Lee, Kukjoo; Yim, Taeeun; Kim, Young-Jun; Mun, Junyoung; Kim, Tae-Hyun

    2015-10-28

    Silicon is greatly promising for high-capacity anode materials in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) due to their exceptionally high theoretical capacity. However, it has a big challenge of severe volume changes during charge and discharge, resulting in substantial deterioration of the electrode and restricting its practical application. This conflict requires a novel binder system enabling reliable cyclability to hold silicon particles without severe disintegration of the electrode. Here, a physically cross-linked polymer binder induced by reversible acid-base interaction is reported for high performance silicon-anodes. Chemical cross-linking of polymer binders, mainly based on acidic polymers including poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), have been suggested as effective ways to accommodate the volume expansion of Si-based electrodes. Unlike the common chemical cross-linking, which causes a gradual and nonreversible fracturing of the cross-linked network, a physically cross-linked binder based on PAA-PBI (poly(benzimidazole)) efficiently holds the Si particles even after the large volume changes due to its ability to reversibly reconstruct ionic bonds. The PBI-containing binder, PAA-PBI-2, exhibited large capacity (1376.7 mAh g(-1)), high Coulombic efficiency (99.1%) and excellent cyclability (751.0 mAh g(-1) after 100 cycles). This simple yet efficient method is promising to solve the failures relating with pulverization and isolation from the severe volume changes of the Si electrode, and advance the realization of high-capacity LIBs.

  12. The effect of intermolecular interactions on the electric dipole polarizabilities of nucleic acid base complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czyżnikowska, Żaneta; Góra, Robert W.; Zaleśny, Robert; Bartkowiak, Wojciech; Baranowska-Łączkowska, Angelika; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter, we report on the interaction-induced electric dipole polarizabilities of 70 Watson-Crick B-DNA pairs (27 adenine-thymine and 43 guanine-cytosine complexes) and 38 structures of cytosine dimer in stacked alignment. In the case of hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick base pairs the electrostatic as well as the induction and exchange-induction interactions, increase the average polarizability of the studied complexes, whereas the exchange-repulsion effects have the opposite effect and consistently diminish this property. On the other hand, in the case of the studied cytosine dimers in stacked alignment the dominant electrostatic contribution has generally much larger magnitude and the opposite sign, resulting in a significant reduction of the average polarizability of these complexes. As a part of this model study, we also assess the performance of recently developed LPol-ds reduced-size polarized basis set. Although being much smaller than the aug-cc-pVTZ set, the LPol-ds performs equally well as far as the excess polarizabilities of the studied hydrogen-bonded complexes are concerned.

  13. Ginseng pharmacology: a new paradigm based on gintonin-lysophosphatidic acid receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun-Hye; Jung, Seok-Won; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Ho-Kyoung; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng, is used as a traditional medicine. Despite the long history of the use of ginseng, there is no specific scientific or clinical rationale for ginseng pharmacology besides its application as a general tonic. The ambiguous description of ginseng pharmacology might be due to the absence of a predominant active ingredient that represents ginseng pharmacology. Recent studies show that ginseng abundantly contains lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs), which are phospholipid-derived growth factor with diverse biological functions including those claimed to be exhibited by ginseng. LPAs in ginseng form a complex with ginseng proteins, which can bind and deliver LPA to its cognate receptors with a high affinity. As a first messenger, gintonin produces second messenger Ca2+ via G protein-coupled LPA receptors. Ca2+ is an intracellular mediator of gintonin and initiates a cascade of amplifications for further intercellular communications by activation of Ca2+-dependent kinases, receptors, gliotransmitter, and neurotransmitter release. Ginsenosides, which have been regarded as primary ingredients of ginseng, cannot elicit intracellular [Ca2+]i transients, since they lack specific cell surface receptor. However, ginsenosides exhibit non-specific ion channel and receptor regulations. This is the key characteristic that distinguishes gintonin from ginsenosides. Although the current discourse on ginseng pharmacology is focused on ginsenosides, gintonin can definitely provide a mode of action for ginseng pharmacology that ginsenosides cannot. This review article introduces a novel concept of ginseng ligand-LPA receptor interaction and proposes to establish a paradigm that shifts the focus from ginsenosides to gintonin as a major ingredient representing ginseng pharmacology. PMID:26578955

  14. Influences of acid-base property of membrane on interfacial interactions related with membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor based on thermodynamic assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Leihong; Qu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Meijia; Lin, Hongjun; Zhou, Xiaoling; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Mei, Rongwu; Hong, Huachang

    2016-08-01

    Failure of membrane hydrophobicity in predicting membrane fouling requires a more reliable indicator. In this study, influences of membrane acid base (AB) property on interfacial interactions in two different interaction scenarios in a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) were studied according to thermodynamic approaches. It was found that both the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and foulant samples in the MBR had relatively high electron donor (γ(-)) component and low electron acceptor (γ(+)) component. For both of interaction scenarios, AB interaction was the major component of the total interaction. The results showed that, the total interaction monotonically decreased with membrane γ(-), while was marginally affected by membrane γ(+), suggesting that γ(-) could act as a reliable indicator for membrane fouling prediction. This study suggested that membrane modification for fouling mitigation should orient to improving membrane surface γ(-) component rather than hydrophilicity.

  15. Raman spectroscopy study and first-principles calculations of the interaction between nucleic acid bases and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Stepanian, Stepan G; Karachevtsev, Maksym V; Glamazda, Alexander Yu; Karachevtsev, Victor A; Adamowicz, L

    2009-04-16

    In this work, we have used Raman spectroscopy and quantum chemical methods (MP2 and DFT) to study the interactions between nucleic acid bases (NABs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). We found that the appearance of the interaction between the nanotubes and the NABs is accompanied by a spectral shift of the high-frequency component of the SWCNT G band in the Raman spectrum to a lower frequency region. The value of this shift varies from 0.7 to 1.3 cm(-1) for the metallic nanotubes and from 2.1 to 3.2 cm(-1) for the semiconducting nanotubes. Calculations of the interaction energies between the NABs and a fragment of the zigzag(10,0) carbon nanotube performed at the MP2/6-31++G(d,p)[NABs atoms]|6-31G(d)[nanotube atoms] level of theory while accounting for the basis set superposition error during geometry optimization allowed us to order the NABs according to the increasing interaction energy value. The order is: guanine (-67.1 kJ mol(-1)) > adenine (-59.0 kJ mol(-1)) > cytosine (-50.3 kJ mol(-1)) approximately = thymine (-50.2 kJ mol(-1)) > uracil (-44.2 kJ mol(-1)). The MP2 equilibrium structures and the interaction energies were used as reference points in the evaluation of the ability of various functionals in the DFT method to predict those structures and energies. We showed that the M05, MPWB1K, and MPW1B95 density functionals are capable of correctly predicting the SWCNT-NAB geometries but not the interaction energies, while the M05-2X functional is capable of correctly predicting both the geometries and the interaction energies.

  16. Synthesis, physicochemical studies, embryos toxicity and DNA interaction of some new Iron(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.

    2013-05-01

    New Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, and conductance measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. The investigated Schiff bases exhibited tridentate coordination mode with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O for all amino acids except L-histidine. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL = mono anion and L = dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their toxicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 μg/egg with full embryos formation. The interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometry and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA cleavage activity with the sequence: nhi > nari > nali > nasi > nphali. The thermodynamic Profile of the binding of nphali complex and CT-DNA was constructed by analyzing the experimental data of absorption titration and UV melting studies with the McGhee equation, van't Hoff's equation, and the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation.

  17. Multi-gas interaction modeling on decorated semiconductor interfaces: A novel Fermi distribution-based response isotherm and the inverse hard/soft acid/base concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laminack, William; Gole, James

    2015-12-01

    A unique MEMS/NEMS approach is presented for the modeling of a detection platform for mixed gas interactions. Mixed gas analytes interact with nanostructured decorating metal oxide island sites supported on a microporous silicon substrate. The Inverse Hard/Soft acid/base (IHSAB) concept is used to assess a diversity of conductometric responses for mixed gas interactions as a function of these nanostructured metal oxides. The analyte conductometric responses are well represented using a combination diffusion/absorption-based model for multi-gas interactions where a newly developed response absorption isotherm, based on the Fermi distribution function is applied. A further coupling of this model with the IHSAB concept describes the considerations in modeling of multi-gas mixed analyte-interface, and analyte-analyte interactions. Taking into account the molecular electronic interaction of both the analytes with each other and an extrinsic semiconductor interface we demonstrate how the presence of one gas can enhance or diminish the reversible interaction of a second gas with the extrinsic semiconductor interface. These concepts demonstrate important considerations in the array-based formats for multi-gas sensing and its applications.

  18. Nanostructure-directed chemical sensing: The IHSAB principle and the dynamics of acid/base-interface interaction.

    PubMed

    Gole, James L; Laminack, William

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructure-decorated n-type semiconductor interfaces are studied in order to develop chemical sensing with nanostructured materials. We couple the tenets of acid/base chemistry with the majority charge carriers of an extrinsic semiconductor. Nanostructured islands are deposited in a process that does not require self-assembly in order to direct a dominant electron-transduction process that forms the basis for reversible chemical sensing in the absence of chemical-bond formation. Gaseous analyte interactions on a metal-oxide-decorated n-type porous silicon interface show a dynamic electron transduction to and from the interface depending upon the relative strength of the gas and metal oxides. The dynamic interaction of NO with TiO(2), SnO(2), NiO, Cu(x)O, and Au(x)O (x > 1), in order of decreasing acidity, demonstrates this effect. Interactions with the metal-oxide-decorated interface can be modified by the in situ nitridation of the oxide nanoparticles, enhancing the basicity of the decorated interface. This process changes the interaction of the interface with the analyte. The observed change to the more basic oxinitrides does not represent a simple increase in surface basicity but appears to involve a change in molecular electronic structure, which is well explained by using the recently developed IHSAB model. The optical pumping of a TiO(2) and TiO(2-) (x)N(x) decorated interface demonstrates a significant enhancement in the ability to sense NH(3) and NO(2). Comparisons to traditional metal-oxide sensors are also discussed.

  19. Nanostructure-directed chemical sensing: The IHSAB principle and the dynamics of acid/base-interface interaction

    PubMed Central

    Laminack, William

    2013-01-01

    Summary Nanostructure-decorated n-type semiconductor interfaces are studied in order to develop chemical sensing with nanostructured materials. We couple the tenets of acid/base chemistry with the majority charge carriers of an extrinsic semiconductor. Nanostructured islands are deposited in a process that does not require self-assembly in order to direct a dominant electron-transduction process that forms the basis for reversible chemical sensing in the absence of chemical-bond formation. Gaseous analyte interactions on a metal-oxide-decorated n-type porous silicon interface show a dynamic electron transduction to and from the interface depending upon the relative strength of the gas and metal oxides. The dynamic interaction of NO with TiO2, SnO2, NiO, CuxO, and AuxO (x >> 1), in order of decreasing acidity, demonstrates this effect. Interactions with the metal-oxide-decorated interface can be modified by the in situ nitridation of the oxide nanoparticles, enhancing the basicity of the decorated interface. This process changes the interaction of the interface with the analyte. The observed change to the more basic oxinitrides does not represent a simple increase in surface basicity but appears to involve a change in molecular electronic structure, which is well explained by using the recently developed IHSAB model. The optical pumping of a TiO2 and TiO2− xNx decorated interface demonstrates a significant enhancement in the ability to sense NH3 and NO2. Comparisons to traditional metal-oxide sensors are also discussed. PMID:23400337

  20. Light-emitting self-assembled peptide nucleic acids exhibit both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing.

    PubMed

    Berger, Or; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Grunwald, Assaf; Liebes-Peer, Yael; Bachar, Mor; Buzhansky, Ludmila; Mossou, Estelle; Forsyth, V Trevor; Schwartz, Tal; Ebenstein, Yuval; Frolow, Felix; Shimon, Linda J W; Patolsky, Fernando; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-04-01

    The two main branches of bionanotechnology involve the self-assembly of either peptides or DNA. Peptide scaffolds offer chemical versatility, architectural flexibility and structural complexity, but they lack the precise base pairing and molecular recognition available with nucleic acid assemblies. Here, inspired by the ability of aromatic dipeptides to form ordered nanostructures with unique physical properties, we explore the assembly of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), which are short DNA mimics that have an amide backbone. All 16 combinations of the very short di-PNA building blocks were synthesized and assayed for their ability to self-associate. Only three guanine-containing di-PNAs-CG, GC and GG-could form ordered assemblies, as observed by electron microscopy, and these di-PNAs efficiently assembled into discrete architectures within a few minutes. The X-ray crystal structure of the GC di-PNA showed the occurrence of both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing. The assemblies were also found to exhibit optical properties including voltage-dependent electroluminescence and wide-range excitation-dependent fluorescence in the visible region.

  1. Light-emitting self-assembled peptide nucleic acids exhibit both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Or; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Grunwald, Assaf; Liebes-Peer, Yael; Bachar, Mor; Buzhansky, Ludmila; Mossou, Estelle; Forsyth, V. Trevor; Schwartz, Tal; Ebenstein, Yuval; Frolow, Felix; Shimon, Linda J. W.; Patolsky, Fernando; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-05-01

    The two main branches of bionanotechnology involve the self-assembly of either peptides or DNA. Peptide scaffolds offer chemical versatility, architectural flexibility and structural complexity, but they lack the precise base pairing and molecular recognition available with nucleic acid assemblies. Here, inspired by the ability of aromatic dipeptides to form ordered nanostructures with unique physical properties, we explore the assembly of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), which are short DNA mimics that have an amide backbone. All 16 combinations of the very short di-PNA building blocks were synthesized and assayed for their ability to self-associate. Only three guanine-containing di-PNAs—CG, GC and GG—could form ordered assemblies, as observed by electron microscopy, and these di-PNAs efficiently assembled into discrete architectures within a few minutes. The X-ray crystal structure of the GC di-PNA showed the occurrence of both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing. The assemblies were also found to exhibit optical properties including voltage-dependent electroluminescence and wide-range excitation-dependent fluorescence in the visible region.

  2. Acid-base interactions and complex formation while recovering copper(II) ions from aqueous solutions using cellulose adsorbent in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforova, T. E.; Kozlov, V. A.; Islyaikin, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    The sorption properties of nontreated cotton cellulose and cellulose modified with polyvinylpyrrolidone with respect to copper(II) ions are investigated. It is established that modified cellulose adsorbents have high sorption capability associated with the formation of new sorption centers during treatment with nitrogen-containing polymer. A mechanism is proposed for acid-base interactions in aqueous solutions of acids, bases, and salts during copper(II) cation recovery using cellulose adsorbent with the participation of polyvinylpyrrolidone.

  3. Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Singer, Brett C.; Gundel, Lara A.

    Molecular associations of pyridine with cellulose and gypsum, surrogates for common indoor surface materials, were studied using an attenuated total reflection (ATR)-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometric method. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the molecular interactions of amines with well-characterized materials that affect their partitioning between indoor air and surfaces. The experimental results suggest the presence of at least two sorptive states for volatile and semivolatile amines, attributed to the chemisorbed species and to a more labile surface state (i.e., physisorbed pyridine). Both exhibited spectroscopic signatures corresponding to aromatic C-H stretching modes (2950-3100 cm -1) in the studied spectral region. Chemisorbed pyridine could be identified by the presence of additional IR signals in the N-H and O-H stretching region of the spectrum (2900-3600 cm -1). During desorption under a stream of N 2, surface enrichment in the chemisorbed species was evidenced by a slower reduction of the absorbance of the broad band at 2900-3600 cm -1 in relation to the total pyridine absorbance change. This spectroscopic evidence for acid-base interactions between amines and surfaces is consistent with the desorption behavior observed in previous work for nicotine from model surfaces.

  4. Acid-base interactions in amorphous solid dispersions of lumefantrine prepared by spray-drying and hot-melt extrusion using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Chen, Xin; Su, Ziyang; Nie, Haichen; Lubach, Joseph W; Smith, Daniel; Byrn, Stephen; Pinal, Rodolfo

    2016-12-05

    This study investigates drug-excipient interactions in amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) of the model basic compound lumefantrine (LMN), with five acidic polymers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to measure the extent of the protonation of the tertiary amine in LMN by the five acidic polymers. The extent/efficiency of protonation of the ASDs was assessed a function of polymer type, manufacturing process (hot-melt extrusion vs. spray drying), and drug loading (DL). The most strongly acidic polymer, polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSSA) was found to be the most efficient polymer in protonating LMN, independently of manufacturing method and DL. The rank order for the protonation extent of LMN by each polymer is roughtly the same for both manufacturing processes. However, protonation efficiency of polymers of similar acidic strength ranged from ∼0% to 75% (HPMCAS and Eudragit L100-55, respectively), suggesting an important role of molecular/mixing effects. For some polymers, including Eudragit L100 55 and HPMCP, spray-drying resulted in higher protonation efficiency compared to hot-melt extrusion. This result is attributable to a more favorable encounter between acid and base groups, when exposed to each other in solution phase. Increasing DL led to decreased protonation efficiency in most cases, particularly for polyacrylic acid, despite having the highest content of acidic groups per unit mass. These results indicate that the combined effects of acid strength and mixing phenomena regulate the efficiency of acid-base interactions in the ASDs.

  5. Synthesis and comprehensive structural studies of a novel amide based carboxylic acid derivative: Non-covalent interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahkandi, Mohammad; Bhatti, Moazzam H.; Yunus, Uzma; Shaheen, Shahida; Nadeem, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz

    2017-04-01

    The presented work studies the geometric and electronic structures of the crystalline network of a novel amide based carboxylic acid derivative, N-[(4-chlorophenyl)]-4-oxo-4-[oxy] butane amide, C10H10NO3Cl (1), constructed via hydrogen bonds (HBs) and stacking non-covalent interactions. Compound 1 was synthesized and characterized by FTIR, 1H, and 13C NMR, and UV-Vis spectra, X-ray structural, DTA-TG, and EI-MS, analyses. DFT calculations about molecular and related network of 1 were performed at hybrid B3LYP/6-311+G (d, p) level of theory to support the experimental data. The neutral monomeric structures join together via inter-molecular conventional O/Nsbnd H⋯O and non-conventional Csbnd H⋯O HBs and Osbnd H···π and Csbnd O···π stacking interactions to create 2-D architecture of the network. The results of dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations within the binding energy of the constructive non-covalent interactions demonstrate that HBs, especially conventional Osbnd H⋯O and Nsbnd H⋯O, govern the network formation. The calculated electronic spectrum show six major bands in the range of 180-270 nm which confirm the experimental one within an intense band around 250 nm. These charge transfer bands result from shift of lone pair electron density of phenyl to chlorine or hydroxyl or phenyl functional groups that possess π → π* and π → n characters.

  6. The interaction of poly(ethylenimine) with nucleic acids and its use in determination of nucleic acids based on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying-lin; Li, Yuan-zong

    2004-01-01

    For the first time, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) was used to determine nucleic acids with a light scattering technique using a common spectrofluorometer. The interaction of PEI with DNA results in greatly enhanced intensity of light scattering at 300 nm, which is caused by the formation of the big particles between DNA and PEI. Based on this, a new quantitative method for nucleic acid determination in aqueous solutions has been developed. Under the optimum conditions, the enhanced intensity of light scattering is proportional to the concentration of nucleic acid in the range of 0.01-10.0 μg ml -1 for herring sperm DNA (hsDNA), 0.02-10.0 μg ml -1 for calf thymus DNA (ctDNA), 0.02-20.0 μg ml -1 for yeast RNA (yRNA). The detection limits are 5.3, 9.9, and 13.7 ng ml -1, respectively. Synthetic samples were determined satisfactorily. At the same time, the light scattering technique has been successfully used to obtain the information on the effects of pH and ionic strength on the formation and the stability of the DNA/PEI complex, which is important in some fields such as genetic engineering and gene transfer. Using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescent probe, the binding of PEI with hsDNA was studied. Both the binding constant of EB with DNA and the number of binding sites per nucleotide decrease with increasing concentration of PEI, indicating noncompetitive inhibition of EB binding to DNA in the presence of PEI. And the association constant of PEI to DNA obtained is 1.2×10 5 M -1. IR-spectra show that PEI interacts with DNA through both the phosphate groups and the bases of DNA and the formation of DNA/PEI complex may cause the change of the conformation of the DNA secondary structure, which is also proved by UV-spectra.

  7. Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions via a Novel Matrix-Based Sequence Representation Model with Amino Acid Contact Information.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yijie; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-09-24

    Identification of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is a difficult and important problem in biology. Since experimental methods for predicting PPIs are both expensive and time-consuming, many computational methods have been developed to predict PPIs and interaction networks, which can be used to complement experimental approaches. However, these methods have limitations to overcome. They need a large number of homology proteins or literature to be applied in their method. In this paper, we propose a novel matrix-based protein sequence representation approach to predict PPIs, using an ensemble learning method for classification. We construct the matrix of Amino Acid Contact (AAC), based on the statistical analysis of residue-pairing frequencies in a database of 6323 protein-protein complexes. We first represent the protein sequence as a Substitution Matrix Representation (SMR) matrix. Then, the feature vector is extracted by applying algorithms of Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) on the SMR matrix. Finally, we feed the feature vector into a Random Forest (RF) for judging interaction pairs and non-interaction pairs. Our method is applied to several PPI datasets to evaluate its performance. On the S . c e r e v i s i a e dataset, our method achieves 94 . 83 % accuracy and 92 . 40 % sensitivity. Compared with existing methods, and the accuracy of our method is increased by 0 . 11 percentage points. On the H . p y l o r i dataset, our method achieves 89 . 06 % accuracy and 88 . 15 % sensitivity, the accuracy of our method is increased by 0 . 76 % . On the H u m a n PPI dataset, our method achieves 97 . 60 % accuracy and 96 . 37 % sensitivity, and the accuracy of our method is increased by 1 . 30 % . In addition, we test our method on a very important PPI network, and it achieves 92 . 71 % accuracy. In the Wnt-related network, the accuracy of our method is increased by 16 . 67 % . The source code and all datasets are available

  8. Identification of Protein–Protein Interactions via a Novel Matrix-Based Sequence Representation Model with Amino Acid Contact Information

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yijie; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Identification of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) is a difficult and important problem in biology. Since experimental methods for predicting PPIs are both expensive and time-consuming, many computational methods have been developed to predict PPIs and interaction networks, which can be used to complement experimental approaches. However, these methods have limitations to overcome. They need a large number of homology proteins or literature to be applied in their method. In this paper, we propose a novel matrix-based protein sequence representation approach to predict PPIs, using an ensemble learning method for classification. We construct the matrix of Amino Acid Contact (AAC), based on the statistical analysis of residue-pairing frequencies in a database of 6323 protein–protein complexes. We first represent the protein sequence as a Substitution Matrix Representation (SMR) matrix. Then, the feature vector is extracted by applying algorithms of Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) on the SMR matrix. Finally, we feed the feature vector into a Random Forest (RF) for judging interaction pairs and non-interaction pairs. Our method is applied to several PPI datasets to evaluate its performance. On the S.cerevisiae dataset, our method achieves 94.83% accuracy and 92.40% sensitivity. Compared with existing methods, and the accuracy of our method is increased by 0.11 percentage points. On the H.pylori dataset, our method achieves 89.06% accuracy and 88.15% sensitivity, the accuracy of our method is increased by 0.76%. On the Human PPI dataset, our method achieves 97.60% accuracy and 96.37% sensitivity, and the accuracy of our method is increased by 1.30%. In addition, we test our method on a very important PPI network, and it achieves 92.71% accuracy. In the Wnt-related network, the accuracy of our method is increased by 16.67%. The source code and all datasets are available at https://figshare.com/s/580c11dce13e63cb9a53. PMID

  9. Study of physical interaction mefenamic acid - isonicotinamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuyun, Yonelian; Nugrahani, Ilma

    2015-09-01

    Solid-solid interaction in the form of physics and chemistry can occur in a combination of active ingredients with the active ingredient or active ingredients with excipients in a pharmaceutical preparation. Physical interactions can be classified into physical interaction system eutectic, peritectic, and molecular compounds based on the phase diagram of a mixture of two-component systems. The physical interaction between mefenamic acid and isonicotinamide not been reported previously. This study aims to examine the type of interaction of mefenamic acid (MA) with isonicotinamide (INA) and its interaction with the isolation methods by solvent drop grinding as the simplest method and easy to do. PXRD data showed the interaction of MA:INA mixture contained no new peaks, so the indicated MA:INA only form of eutectic interaction. There was founded new endothermic peak for DTA data at 149.5°C (SDG-Ethanol) and 148.4°C (SDG-EtAct). The results of infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated a shift in the NH stretch 3367 cm-1 to 3359 cm-1; and 3185 cm-1 to 3178 cm-1.

  10. [Interaction between NSAIDs and acetylsalicylic acid disregarded].

    PubMed

    Vollaard, E J; Kramers, C; Brouwers, J R B J

    2014-01-01

    In 2013 the European Medicines Agency declared that diclofenac is contraindicated in patients with arterial thrombotic complications, based on a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials on the adverse reactions of NSAIDs. The same decision was taken for coxibs some years earlier. The Dutch authorities (CBG/MEB) informed physicians and pharmacists about this decision without taking into account whether these patients were using prophylactic acetylsalicylic acid or not. It has been shown that NSAIDs with high COX-1 affinity like ibuprofen and naproxen cause a pharmacodynamic interaction with the inhibition of thromboxane synthesis by acetylsalicylic acid. This interaction does not occur with relatively COX-2-selective NSAIDs such as coxibs and diclofenac. Therefore, in patients who use acetylsalicylic acid for thromboprophylaxis, contraindicating coxibs or diclofenac is not justified, on the contrary: they are preferable.

  11. Interactions of the Watson-Crick nucleic acid base pairs with carbon nanotubes and graphene: DFT and MP2 study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanian, S. G.; Karachevtsev, M. V.; Karachevtsev, V. A.; Adamowicz, L.

    2014-08-01

    Structures and interaction energies of complexes formed by Watson-Crick base pairs and carbon surfaces (nanotubes and graphene) are investigated using the DFT M05-2X and MP2 quantum chemical computational methods. High structural flexibility of the complexes is demonstrated. Structures with approximately parallel and perpendicular orientations of the base pairs and the nanotube main axis are revealed. The complexes formed by the GC base pair and large-diameter zigzag nanotubes with the perpendicular orientation of the two systems are found to be the lowest energy configurations. Decomposition of the interaction energies into two-body contributions is applied to explain the nature of the interaction. The question of how the interaction between a base pair and a carbon surface affects the H-bonding between the nucleobases in the pair is elucidated.

  12. Abnormal synergistic effects between Lewis acid-base interaction and halogen bond in F3B···NCX···NCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qingjie; Li, Qingzhong

    2015-12-01

    An abnormal synergistic effect was found between the Lewis acid-base interaction and halogen bond in triads F3B···NCX···NCM (X and M are halogen atoms), where the strong Lewis acid-base interaction between F3B and NCX has a larger enhancement than the weak halogen bond between NCX and NCM. This is in contrast with the traditional cooperative effect. It is interesting that the alkali-metal substituent as well as the heavier halogen atom play a more remarkable role in the enhancement of the interaction F3B···NCX than that of NCX···NCM, particularly, the alkali-metal substituent makes the abnormal synergistic effect be the traditional cooperative one.

  13. Protophilicity index and protofelicity equalization principle: new measures of Brønsted-Lowry-Lewis acid-base interactions.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Francisco; Alonso, Julio A; Richaud, Arlette

    2013-09-01

    The simultaneous contributions of proton and electron transfer to the Brønsted-Lowry and Lewis acid-base properties of a set of p-substituted phenols are reported in this work. As a result of the analysis, a novel protophilicity index considered as the second-order energy change of a Brønsted-Lowry base as it is saturated with protons, a combined Brønsted-Lowry-Lewis acidity index (with a corresponding basicity index), and a protofelicity equalization principle (a parallel of the electronegativity equalization principle) are presented.

  14. Electrochemical genosensor based on peptide nucleic acid-mediated PCR and asymmetric PCR techniques: Electrostatic interactions with a metal cation.

    PubMed

    Kerman, Kagan; Vestergaard, Mun'delanji; Nagatani, Naoki; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2006-04-01

    The unique structure of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), linking the N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine units that create a neutral backbone, and prevent it from acting as a primer for DNA polymerase, has been utilized in an electrochemical biosensor scheme for simple and sensitive detection of hybridization. When the PNA is targeted against a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or wild-type site on the gene, PNA-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clamping method effectively blocks the formation of a PCR product. In our report, PNA probe for PCR clamping was targeted against the wild-type site of alcohol dehydrogenase. The electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged DNA and neutral PNA molecules with redox-active metal cation cobalt(III)hexamine ([Co(NH3)6]3+) were monitored using differential pulse voltammetry. The electrostatic binding of [Co(NH3)6]3+ to DNA provided the basis for the discrimination against PNA/PNA, PNA/DNA, and DNA/DNA hybrid molecules. We have optimized the experimental conditions, such as probe concentration, [Co(NH3)6]3+ concentration, accumulation time for [Co(NH3)6]3+, and target concentration. A new pretreatment method has also been employed to allow fast and simple detection of hybridization reaction between the PCR amplicon and the probe on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface. This method was based on the application of a high-temperature treatment (95 degrees C, 5 min), followed by a 1-min incubation in the presence of DNA primers. The excess concentration of DNA primers prevented the rehybridization of the denatured strands, while enabling the target gene sequence to bind with the immobilized probe. Additionally, asymmetric PCR was employed to detect the presence of genetically modified organism in standard Roundup Ready soybean samples. The amplicons of asymmetric PCR, which were predominantly single-stranded DNA as a result of unequal primer concentration, hybridized with the DNA probe on the sensor surface efficiently. The

  15. Interaction Energies in Complexes of Zn and Amino Acids: A Comparison of Ab Initio and Force Field Based Calculations.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrand, Emma; Hermansson, Kersti; Friedman, Ran

    2017-03-24

    Zinc plays important roles in structural stabilization of proteins, enzyme catalysis, and signal transduction. Many Zn binding sites are located at the interface between the protein and the cellular fluid. In aqueous solutions, Zn ions adopt an octahedral coordination, while in proteins zinc can have different coordinations, with a tetrahedral conformation found most frequently. The dynamics of Zn binding to proteins and the formation of complexes that involve Zn are dictated by interactions between Zn and its binding partners. We calculated the interaction energies between Zn and its ligands in complexes that mimic protein binding sites and in Zn complexes of water and one or two amino acid moieties, using quantum mechanics (QM) and molecular mechanics (MM). It was found that MM calculations that neglect or only approximate polarizability did not reproduce even the relative order of the QM interaction energies in these complexes. Interaction energies calculated with the CHARMM-Drude polarizable force field agreed better with the ab initio results, although the deviations between QM and MM were still rather large (40-96 kcal/mol). In order to gain further insight into Zn-ligand interactions, the free energies of interaction were estimated by QM calculations with continuum solvent representation, and we performed energy decomposition analysis calculations to examine the characteristics of the different complexes. The ligand-types were found to have high impact on the relative strength of polarization and electrostatic interactions. Interestingly, ligand-ligand interactions did not play a significant role in the binding of Zn. Finally, analysis of ligand exchange energies suggests that carboxylates could be exchanged with water molecules, which explains the flexibility in Zn binding dynamics. An exchange between carboxylate (Asp/Glu) and imidazole (His) is less likely.

  16. Gallic acid-based indanone derivative interacts synergistically with tetracycline by inhibiting efflux pump in multidrug resistant E. coli.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Gaurav Raj; Tiwari, Nimisha; Singh, Aastha; Kumar, Akhil; Roy, Sudeep; Negi, Arvind Singh; Pal, Anirban; Chanda, Debabrata; Sharma, Ashok; Darokar, Mahendra P

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to study the synergy potential of gallic acid-based derivatives in combination with conventional antibiotics using multidrug resistant cultures of Escherichia coli. Gallic acid-based derivatives significantly reduced the MIC of tetracycline against multidrug resistant clinical isolate of E. coli. The best representative, 3-(3',4,'5'-trimethoxyphenyl)-4,5,6-trimethoxyindanone-1, an indanone derivative of gallic acid, was observed to inhibit ethidium bromide efflux and ATPase which was also supported by in silico docking. This derivative extended the post-antibiotic effect and decreased the mutation prevention concentration of tetracycline. This derivative in combination with TET was able to reduce the concentration of TNFα up to 18-fold in Swiss albino mice. This derivative was nontoxic and well tolerated up to 300 mg/kg dose in subacute oral toxicity study in mice. This is the first report of gallic acid-based indanone derivative as drug resistance reversal agent acting through ATP-dependent efflux pump inhibition.

  17. Interaction of bovine serum albumin with N-acyl amino acid based anionic surfactants: Effect of head-group hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhajit; Dey, Joykrishna

    2015-11-15

    The function of a protein depends upon its structure and surfactant molecules are known to alter protein structure. For this reason protein-surfactant interaction is important in biological, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. In the present work, interactions of a series of anionic surfactants having the same hydrocarbon chain length, but different amino acid head group, such as l-alanine, l-valine, l-leucine, and l-phenylalanine with the transport protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), were studied at low surfactant concentrations using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The results of fluorescence measurements suggest that the surfactant molecules bind simultaneously to the drug binding site I and II of the protein subdomain IIA and IIIA, respectively. The fluorescence as well as CD spectra suggest that the conformation of BSA goes to a more structured state upon surfactant binding at low concentrations. The binding constants of the surfactants were determined by the use of fluorescence as well as ITC measurements and were compared with that of the corresponding glycine-derived surfactant. The binding constant values clearly indicate a significant head-group effect on the BSA-surfactant interaction and the interaction is mainly hydrophobic in nature.

  18. Interaction of osmoregulatory and acid-base compensation in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) during exposure to aquatic hypercarbia and elevated salinity.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Ciaran A; Baker, Dan W; Brauner, Colin J; Morgan, John D; Bystriansky, Jason S

    2015-07-10

    Migratory fishes encounter a variety of environmental conditions, including changes in salinity, temperature, and dissolved gases, and it is important to understand how these fishes are able to acclimate to multiple environmental stressors. The gill is the primary site of both acid-base balance and ion regulation in fishes. Many ion transport mechanisms involved with acid-base compensation are also required for the regulation of plasma Na(+) and Cl(+), the predominant extracellular ions, potentially resulting in a strong interaction between iono- and acid-base regulation. The present study examined the physiological interaction of elevated dissolved CO2 (an acid-base disturbance) on osmoregulation during seawater acclimation (an ionoregulatory disturbance) in juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Blood pH (pHe), plasma [HCO3(-)], [Na(+)], [Cl(-)], and osmolality, white muscle water content, and gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) abundance were examined over a 10-day seawater (SW) acclimation period under normocarbia (NCSW) or during prior and continued exposure to hypercarbia (HCSW), and compared to a normocarbic freshwater (NCFW) control. Hypercarbia induced a severe extracellular acidosis (from pH 7.65 to pH 7.2) in HCSW sturgeon, and these fish had a 2-fold greater rise in plasma osmolarity over NCSW by day 2 of SW exposure. Interestingly, pHe recovery in HCSW was associated more prominently with an elevation in plasma Na(+) prior to osmotic recovery and more prominently with a reduction in plasma Cl(-) following osmotic recovery, indicating a biphasic response as the requirements of osmoregulation transitioned from ion-uptake to ion-excretion throughout SW acclimation. These results imply a prioritization of osmoregulatory recovery over acid-base recovery in this period of combined exposure to acid-base and ionoregulatory disturbances.

  19. Interaction of osmoregulatory and acid-base compensation in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) during exposure to aquatic hypercarbia and elevated salinity.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Ciaran A; Baker, Dan W; Brauner, Colin J; Morgan, John D; Bystriansky, Jason S

    2015-09-01

    Migratory fishes encounter a variety of environmental conditions, including changes in salinity, temperature and dissolved gases, and it is important to understand how these fishes are able to acclimate to multiple environmental stressors. The gill is the primary site of both acid-base balance and ion regulation in fishes. Many ion transport mechanisms involved with acid-base compensation are also required for the regulation of plasma Na(+) and Cl(+), the predominant extracellular ions, potentially resulting in a strong interaction between ionoregulation and acid-base regulation. The present study examined the physiological interaction of elevated dissolved CO2 (an acid-base disturbance) on osmoregulation during seawater acclimation (an ionoregulatory disturbance) in juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Blood pH (pHe), plasma [HCO3 (-)], [Na(+)], [Cl(-)] and osmolality, white muscle water content, and gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC) abundance were examined over a 10 day seawater (SW) acclimation period under normocarbia (NCSW) or during prior and continued exposure to hypercarbia (HCSW), and compared with a normocarbic freshwater (NCFW) control. Hypercarbia induced a severe extracellular acidosis (from pH 7.65 to pH 7.2) in HCSW sturgeon, and these fish had a 2-fold greater rise in plasma osmolarity over NCSW by day 2 of SW exposure. Interestingly, pHe recovery in HCSW was associated more prominently with an elevation in plasma Na(+) prior to osmotic recovery and more prominently with a reduction in plasma Cl(-) following osmotic recovery, indicating a biphasic response as the requirements of osmoregulation transitioned from ion-uptake to ion-excretion throughout SW acclimation. These results imply a prioritization of osmoregulatory recovery over acid-base recovery in this period of combined exposure to acid-base and ionoregulatory disturbances.

  20. p-Hydroxyphenyl-pyranoanthocyanins: An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Their Acid-Base Properties and Molecular Interactions.

    PubMed

    Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Biler, Michal; Meudec, Emmanuelle; Guernevé, Christine Le; Vernhet, Aude; Mazauric, Jean-Paul; Legras, Jean-Luc; Loonis, Michèle; Trouillas, Patrick; Cheynier, Véronique; Dangles, Olivier

    2016-11-05

    The physicochemical properties of the wine pigments catechyl-pyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside (PA1) and guaiacyl-pyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside (PA2) are extensively revisited using ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and quantum chemistry density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In mildly acidic aqueous solution, each cationic pigment undergoes regioselective deprotonation to form a single neutral quinonoid base and water addition appears negligible. Above pH = 4, both PA1 and PA2 become prone to aggregation, which is manifested by the slow build-up of broad absorption bands at longer wavelengths (λ ≥ 600 nm), followed in the case of PA2 by precipitation. Some phenolic copigments are able to inhibit aggregation of pyranoanthocyanins (PAs), although at large copigment/PA molar ratios. Thus, chlorogenic acid can dissociate PA1 aggregates while catechin is inactive. With PA2, both chlorogenic acid and catechin are able to prevent precipitation but not self-association. Calculations confirmed that the noncovalent dimerization of PAs is stronger with the neutral base than with the cation and also stronger than π-π stacking of PAs to chlorogenic acid (copigmentation). For each type of complex, the most stable conformation could be obtained. Finally, PA1 can also bind hard metal ions such as Al(3+) and Fe(3+) and the corresponding chelates are less prone to self-association.

  1. The nature of peptide interactions with acid end-group PLGAs and facile aqueous-based microencapsulation of therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Andreas M.; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H.; Mazzara, J. Maxwell; Tong, Ling; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Olsen, Karl F.; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    An important poorly understood phenomenon in controlled-release depots involves the strong interaction between common cationic peptides and low Mw free acid end-group poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids) (PLGAs) used to achieve continuous peptide release kinetics. The kinetics of peptide sorption to PLGA was examined by incubating peptide solutions of 0.2-4 mM octreotide or leuprolide acetate salts in 0.1 M HEPES buffer, pH 7.4, with polymer particles or films at 4-37 °C for 24 h. The extent of absorption/loading of peptides in PLGA particles/films was assayed by two-phase extraction and amino acid analysis. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser scanning confocal imaging techniques were used to examine peptide penetration in the polymer phase. The release of sorbed peptide from leuprolide-PLGA particles was evaluated both in vitro (PBST + 0.02% sodium azide, 37 °C) and in vivo (male Sprague-Dawley rats). We found that when the PLGA-COOH chains are sufficiently mobilized, therapeutic peptides not only bind at the surface, a common belief to date, but can also internalized and distributed throughout the polymer phase at physiological temperature forming a salt with low-molecular weight PLGA-COOH. Importantly, absorption of leuprolide into low MW PLGA-COOH particles yielded ~17 wt% leuprolide loading in the polymer (i.e., ~70% of PLGA-COOH acids occupied), and the absorbed peptide was released from the polymer for > 2 weeks in a controlled fashion in vitro and as indicated by sustained testosterone suppression in male Sprague-Dawley rats. This new approach, which bypasses the traditional encapsulation method and associated production cost, opens up the potential for facile production of low-cost controlled-release injectable depots for leuprolide and related peptides. PMID:24021356

  2. Acid-base interactions and secondary structures of poly-L-lysine probed by 15N and 13C solid state NMR and Ab initio model calculations.

    PubMed

    Dos, Alexandra; Schimming, Volkmar; Tosoni, Sergio; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2008-12-11

    The interactions of the 15N-labeled amino groups of dry solid poly-L-lysine (PLL) with various halogen and oxygen acids HX and the relation to the secondary structure have been studied using solid-state 15N and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy (CP = cross polarization and MAS = magic angle spinning). For comparison, 15N NMR spectra of an aqueous solution of PLL were measured as a function of pH. In order to understand the effects of protonation and hydration on the 15N chemical shifts of the amino groups, DFT and chemical shielding calculations were performed on isolated methylamine-acid complexes and on periodic halide clusters of the type (CH3NH3(+)X(-))n. The combined experimental and computational results reveal low-field shifts of the amino nitrogens upon interaction with the oxygen acids HX = HF, H2SO4, CH3COOH, (CH3)2POOH, H3PO4, HNO3, and internal carbamic acid formed by reaction of the amino groups with gaseous CO2. Evidence is obtained that only hydrogen-bonded species of the type (Lys-NH2***H-X)n are formed in the absence of water. 15N chemical shifts are maximum when H is located in the hydrogen bond center and then decrease again upon full protonation, as found for aqueous solution at low pH. By contrast, halogen acids interact in a different way. They form internal salts of the type (Lys-NH3(+)X(-))n via the interaction of many acid-base pairs. This salt formation is possible only in the beta-sheet conformation. By contrast, the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes can occur both in beta-sheet domains as well as in alpha-helical domains. The 15N chemical shifts of the protonated ammonium groups increase when the size of the interacting halogen anions is increased from chloride to iodide and when the number of the interacting anions is increased. Thus, the observed high-field 15N shift of ammonium groups upon hydration is the consequence of replacing interacting halogen atoms by oxygen atoms.

  3. Modelling interactions of acid-base balance and respiratory status in the toxicity of metal mixtures in the American oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Macey, Brett M; Jenny, Matthew J; Williams, Heidi R; Thibodeaux, Lindy K; Beal, Marion; Almeida, Jonas S; Cunningham, Charles; Mancia, Annalaura; Warr, Gregory W; Burge, Erin J; Holland, A Fred; Gross, Paul S; Hikima, Sonomi; Burnett, Karen G; Burnett, Louis; Chapman, Robert W

    2010-03-01

    Heavy metals, such as copper, zinc and cadmium, represent some of the most common and serious pollutants in coastal estuaries. In the present study, we used a combination of linear and artificial neural network (ANN) modelling to detect and explore interactions among low-dose mixtures of these heavy metals and their impacts on fundamental physiological processes in tissues of the Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Animals were exposed to Cd (0.001-0.400 microM), Zn (0.001-3.059 microM) or Cu (0.002-0.787 microM), either alone or in combination for 1 to 27 days. We measured indicators of acid-base balance (hemolymph pH and total CO(2)), gas exchange (Po(2)), immunocompetence (total hemocyte counts, numbers of invasive bacteria), antioxidant status (glutathione, GSH), oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation; LPx), and metal accumulation in the gill and the hepatopancreas. Linear analysis showed that oxidative membrane damage from tissue accumulation of environmental metals was correlated with impaired acid-base balance in oysters. ANN analysis revealed interactions of metals with hemolymph acid-base chemistry in predicting oxidative damage that were not evident from linear analyses. These results highlight the usefulness of machine learning approaches, such as ANNs, for improving our ability to recognize and understand the effects of sub-acute exposure to contaminant mixtures.

  4. Interactions between groundwater and surface water in a Virginia coastal plain watershed. 2. Acid-base chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Brien, A. K.; Eshleman, K.N.; Pollard, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    At the Reedy Creek watershed sulphate concentrations were higher and alkalinity lower in the groundwater in the hillslope than in the stream. Sulphate concentrations and alkalinity observed in groundwater in the wetland were usually between those of the hillslope and stream. These data suggest that the wetland is a sink for sulphate and acidity; sulphate reduction may be an important mechanism for generating alkalinity in the wetland. The DOC concentrations were higher in the stream and wetland groundwater than in hillslope groundwater. No consistent spatial patterns in sulphate concentrations were observed in surface water chemistry under base flow conditions. Stream discharge was found to be positively correlated with base flow sulphate concentrations and inversely correlated with alkalinity. A sulphate mass balance indicated that approximately 30% of the estimated 24.9 kg SO42-/ha yr wet atmospheric input was exported from the watershed as sulphate in stream runoff in the water year 1990. -from Authors

  5. An experimental investigation of Lewis acid-base interactions of liquid carbon dioxide using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, J. T.; Bokis, C. P.; Donohue, M. D.

    1995-05-01

    Presented here is an investigation into the solvent properties of liquid carbon dioxide by means of FT-IR spectroscopy. A high-pressure, circulation-type apparatus was designed and built specifically for this study. The spectra for the combination bands for carbon dioxide show that there are interactions between methanol and carbon dioxide. However, the spectra of the fundamental O-D vibration of deuterated methanol in liquid carbon dioxide indicate that there is no hydrogen bonding. Therefore. we conclude that the interactions between carbon dioxide and methanol are Lewis acid-base interactions rather than hydrogen bonding. This conclusion is supported by experiments where acetone is introduced into the CO2/methanol- d binary system. FT-IR measurements show that acetone hydrogen bonds with deuterated methanol.

  6. Enhancement of a Lewis acid-base interaction via solvation: ammonia molecules and the benzene radical cation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chi-Tung; Freindorf, Marek; Furlani, Thomas; DeLeon, Robert L; Richard, John P; Garvey, James F

    2007-07-12

    The interaction between ammonia and the benzene radical cation has been investigated by gas-phase studies of mass selected ion clusters {C(6)H(6)-(NH(3))(n=0-8)}(+) via tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry and through calculations. Experiments show a special stability for the cluster ion that contains four ammonias: {C(6)H(6)(NH(3))(4)}(+). Calculations provide evidence that the first ammonia forms a weak dative bond to the cyclohexadienyl radical cation, {C(6)H(6)-NH(3)}(+), where there is a transfer of electrons from ammonia to benzene. Additional solvating ammonia molecules form stabilizing hydrogen bonds to the ring-bound ammonia {C(6)H(6)-NH(3)}(+).(NH(3))(n), which cause cooperative changes in the structure of the cluster complex. Free ammonia is a weak hydrogen bond donor, but electron transfer from NH(3) to the benzene ring that strengthens the dative bond will increase the hydrogen acidity and the strength of the cluster hydrogen bonds to the added ammonia. A progressive "tightening" of this dative bond is observed upon addition of the first, second, and third ammonia to give a cluster stabilized by three N-(+)H x N hydrogen bonds. This shows that the energetic cost of tightening the dative bond is recovered with dividends in the formation of stable cluster hydrogen bonds.

  7. bFGF interaction and in vivo angiogenesis inhibition by self-assembling sulfonic acid-based copolymers.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, L; Aguilar, M R; Ochoa-Callejero, L; Abradelo, C; Martínez, A; San Román, J

    2012-01-01

    The antiangiogenic activity of different families of biocompatible and non-toxic polymer drugs based on 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS) or polymethacrylic derivatives of 5-aminonaphthalen sulfonic acid (MANSA) is analyzed using directed in vivo angiogenesis assay and correlated with in vitro results. These active compounds were copolymerized with butylacrylate (BA) and N-vinylpyrrolidone in order to obtain two families of copolymers with different properties in aqueous media. The most hydrophobic copolymers poly(BA-co-MANSA) and poly(BA-co-AMPS) formed amphiphilic copolymers and presented micellar morphology in aqueous media. This supramolecular organization of the copolymers had a clear effect on bioactivity. Poly(BA-co-MANSA) copolymers showed the best antiangiogenic activity and very low toxicity at relatively low dose, with the possibility to be injected directly in the solid tumors alone or in combination with other therapeutic agents such as anti-VEGF drugs. The obtained results demonstrate that not only the chemical structure but also the supramolecular organization of the macromolecules plays a key role in the anti-angiogenic activity of these active polymers.

  8. Density functional theory study of interaction, bonding and affinity of group IIb transition metal cations with nucleic acid bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Sabyasachi; Mandal, Debasish; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Das, Abhijit K.

    2012-05-01

    The structure, bonding, and energetics of the complexes obtained from the interaction between the most stable tautomeric forms of free DNA and RNA bases and Zn2+, Cd2+ and Hg2+ cations have been studied using density functional B3LYP method. The 6-311+G (2df, 2p) basis set along with LANL2DZ pseudopotentials for the cations are used in the calculations. The tautomerization paths of the nucleobases are investigated and transition states between the tautomeric forms of the free bases are located. The relative stability of the complexes and the tautomers of the free nucleobases are discussed referring to MIA and relative energy values. For uracil, thymine and adenine, interaction of the metal cations with the most stable tautomers form the least stable molecular complexes. For cytosine and guanine, the stability of the metalated complexes differs significantly. The enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (TΔS) and free energy (ΔG) of the complexes at 298 K have also been calculated.

  9. The Comparative Studies of Binding Activity of Curcumin and Didemethylated Curcumin with Selenite: Hydrogen Bonding vs Acid-Base Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Chen, Ming-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lu, Shou-Yun; Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Shao-Pin; Hsu, Yen-Min; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Huang, Zih-You; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chang, Ching-Ming; Huang, Fu-Yung; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2015-12-01

    In this report, the in vitro relative capabilities of curcumin (CCM) and didemethylated curcumin (DCCM) in preventing the selenite-induced crystallin aggregation were investigated by turbidity tests and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DCCM showed better activity than CCM. The conformers of CCM/SeO32- and DCCM/SeO32- complexes were optimized by molecular orbital calculations. Results reveal that the selenite anion surrounded by CCM through the H-bonding between CCM and selenite, which is also observed via IR and NMR studied. For DCCM, the primary driving force is the formation of an acid-base adduct with selenite showing that the phenolic OH group of DCCM was responsible for forming major conformer of DCCM. The formation mechanisms of selenite complexes with CCM or DCCM explain why DCCM has greater activity than CCM in extenuating the toxicity of selenite as to prevent selenite-induced lens protein aggregation.

  10. The Comparative Studies of Binding Activity of Curcumin and Didemethylated Curcumin with Selenite: Hydrogen Bonding vs Acid-Base Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Chen, Ming-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lu, Shou-Yun; Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Shao-Pin; Hsu, Yen-Min; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Huang, Zih-You; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chang, Ching-Ming; Huang, Fu-Yung; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    In this report, the in vitro relative capabilities of curcumin (CCM) and didemethylated curcumin (DCCM) in preventing the selenite-induced crystallin aggregation were investigated by turbidity tests and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DCCM showed better activity than CCM. The conformers of CCM/SeO32− and DCCM/SeO32− complexes were optimized by molecular orbital calculations. Results reveal that the selenite anion surrounded by CCM through the H-bonding between CCM and selenite, which is also observed via IR and NMR studied. For DCCM, the primary driving force is the formation of an acid-base adduct with selenite showing that the phenolic OH group of DCCM was responsible for forming major conformer of DCCM. The formation mechanisms of selenite complexes with CCM or DCCM explain why DCCM has greater activity than CCM in extenuating the toxicity of selenite as to prevent selenite-induced lens protein aggregation. PMID:26635113

  11. The Comparative Studies of Binding Activity of Curcumin and Didemethylated Curcumin with Selenite: Hydrogen Bonding vs Acid-Base Interactions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Chen, Ming-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lu, Shou-Yun; Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Shao-Pin; Hsu, Yen-Min; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Huang, Zih-You; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chang, Ching-Ming; Huang, Fu-Yung; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2015-12-04

    In this report, the in vitro relative capabilities of curcumin (CCM) and didemethylated curcumin (DCCM) in preventing the selenite-induced crystallin aggregation were investigated by turbidity tests and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DCCM showed better activity than CCM. The conformers of CCM/SeO3(2-) and DCCM/SeO3(2-) complexes were optimized by molecular orbital calculations. Results reveal that the selenite anion surrounded by CCM through the H-bonding between CCM and selenite, which is also observed via IR and NMR studied. For DCCM, the primary driving force is the formation of an acid-base adduct with selenite showing that the phenolic OH group of DCCM was responsible for forming major conformer of DCCM. The formation mechanisms of selenite complexes with CCM or DCCM explain why DCCM has greater activity than CCM in extenuating the toxicity of selenite as to prevent selenite-induced lens protein aggregation.

  12. Interaction of Adjacent Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen

    2008-02-01

    Ramachandran plots display the dihedral angles of a single protein residue. We here propose a crossed torsion angle plot called SSY-plot between two neighboring amino acids and demonstrate that a special coherence motion can exist between some very special amino acid pairs leading to spontaneous unusual structures. We also suggest that the existence of two domains corresponds to a bifurcation between two different protein structures and that the special pair is the key to producing these two structures. These are two different structures and are produced spontaneously without an external agent.

  13. The pathophysiology of acid-base changes in chronically phosphate-depleted rats: bone-kidney interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Emmett, M; Goldfarb, S; Agus, Z S; Narins, R G

    1977-01-01

    Acid-base disturbances may develop secondary to the changes in renal tubular function and bone dynamics which attend phosphate depletion (PD). This work characterizes the acid-base status of rats fed a low phosphate diet. After 18 days, PD rats had marked calciuria (pair-fed controls: 0.3 +/- 0.2; PD 32.2 +/- 2.5 mueq/h; P less than 0.001), severe bicarbonaturia (controls: 0; PD 17.6 +/- 0.2 meq/h; P less than 0.001), and negative net acid excretion (controls: 44.5 +/- 2.9; PD: --6.6 +/- 2.5 meq/h; P less than 0.001), but plasma pH, HCO3, and PCO2 were equal in both groups. After 45 days, plasma HCO3 fell to 21.1 +/- 0.9 meq/liter in PD (controls: 23.6 +/- 0.5 meq/liter; P less than 0.05), while bicarbonaturia (controls: 0.4 +/- 0.2; PD: 3.8 +/- 1 mueq/h; P less than 0.02) and calciuria were present but diminished. These data suggested the coexistence of bone HCO3 mobilization and renal HCO3 wasting in PD. To test this thesis, bicarbonaturia was eliminated by nephrectomy. 24 h later plasma HCO3 was higher in PD rats (controls: 19.3 +/- 0.02; PD: 22.6 +/- 0.8 meq/liter; P less than 0.05), consistend with the presence of extrarenal HCO3 production. After inhibition of bone resorption with colchicine (1 mg/kg), plasma HCO3 decreased to 16.8 +/- 0.6 meq/liter in PD rats (controls): 26.4 +/- 1 meq/liter; P less than 0.001) while bicarbonaturia persisted. These data indicate that the plasma HCO3 in PD is the net result of renal HCO3 wasting and bone HCO3 mobilization. These combined effects maintain normal blood HCO3 initially (18 days) but with time (45 days), bone resorption diminishes and the acidifying renal tubular defect predominates. PMID:833276

  14. Density functional theory calculations on dipeptide gallic acid interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhan, B.; Parthasarathi, R.; Subramanian, V.; Raghava Rao, J.; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Ramasami, T.

    2003-02-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the interaction of dipeptides with gallic acid, using Becke3 parameter Lee Yang Parr (B3LYP) method employing 3-21G*, 6-31G* and 6-31+G* basis sets. The interaction energies of the dipeptide-gallic acid complexes are in the range of -5 to -18 kcal/mol depending on the mode of intermolecular complexation. Calculated molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) for the various intermolecular complexes revealed the electrostatic nature of the interaction. Qualitative estimations based on chemical hardness and chemical potential demonstrated fractional electron transfer from dipeptide to gallic acid.

  15. An examination of binding motifs associated with inter-particle interactions between facetted nano-crystals of acetylsalicylic acid and ascorbic acid through the application of molecular grid-based search methods.

    PubMed

    Hammond, R B; Jeck, S; Ma, C Y; Pencheva, K; Roberts, K J; Auffret, T

    2009-12-01

    Grid-based intermolecular search methods using atom-atom force fields are used to assess the structural nature of potential crystal-crystal interfacial binding associated with the examination of representative pharmaceutical formulation components, viz acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C). Molecular models of nano-sized molecular clusters for these two compounds, shaped in accordance with an attachment energy model of the respective particle morphologies, are constructed and used together with a grid-based search method to model the likely inter-particle interactions. The most-stable, mutual alignments of the respective nano-clusters based on their interaction energies are identified in the expectation that these are indicative of the most likely inter-particle binding configurations. The stable inter-particle binding configurations identified reveal that the number of interfacial hydrogen bonds formed between the binding particles is, potentially, an important factor in terms of the stability of inter-particle cohesion. All preferred inter-particle alignments are found to involve either the (1 0 0) or the (1 1 0) face of aspirin crystals interacting with a number of the growth forms of ascorbic acid. Four main types of interfacial hydrogen bonds are found to be associated with inter-particle binding and involve acceptor-donor interactions between hydroxyl, carbonyl, ester and lactone acceptor groups and hydroxyl donor groups. This hydrogen bonding network is found to be consistent with the surface chemistry of the interacting habit faces with, in general, the number of hydrogen bonds increasing for the more stable alignments. The likely usefulness of this approach for predicting solid-state formulation properties is reviewed.

  16. Bifunctional heterogeneous catalysis of silica-alumina-supported tertiary amines with controlled acid-base interactions for efficient 1,4-addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Tanaka, Satoka; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-10-19

    We report the first tunable bifunctional surface of silica-alumina-supported tertiary amines (SA-NEt(2)) active for catalytic 1,4-addition reactions of nitroalkanes and thiols to electron-deficient alkenes. The 1,4-addition reaction of nitroalkanes to electron-deficient alkenes is one of the most useful carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions and applicable toward a wide range of organic syntheses. The reaction between nitroethane and methyl vinyl ketone scarcely proceeded with either SA or homogeneous amines, and a mixture of SA and amines showed very low catalytic activity. In addition, undesirable side reactions occurred in the case of a strong base like sodium ethoxide employed as a catalytic reagent. Only the present SA-supported amine (SA-NEt(2)) catalyst enabled selective formation of a double-alkylated product without promotions of side reactions such as an intramolecular cyclization reaction. The heterogeneous SA-NEt(2) catalyst was easily recovered from the reaction mixture by simple filtration and reusable with retention of its catalytic activity and selectivity. Furthermore, the SA-NEt(2) catalyst system was applicable to the addition reaction of other nitroalkanes and thiols to various electron-deficient alkenes. The solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopic analyses, including variable-contact-time (13)C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR spectroscopy, revealed that acid-base interactions between surface acid sites and immobilized amines can be controlled by pretreatment of SA at different temperatures. The catalytic activities for these addition reactions were strongly affected by the surface acid-base interactions.

  17. Probing Lewis Acid-Base Interactions with Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics: The Electronic Absorption Spectrum of p-Nitroaniline in Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Benedito J Costa; Rivelino, Roberto; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2015-07-02

    The structure and dynamics of p-nitroaniline (PNA) in supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at T = 315 K and ρ = 0.81 g cm(-3) are investigated by carrying out Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, and the electronic absorption spectrum in scCO2 is determined by time dependent density functional theory. The structure of the PNA-scCO2 solution illustrates the role played by Lewis acid-base (LA-LB) interactions. In comparison with isolated PNA, the ν(N-O) symmetric and asymmetric stretching modes of PNA in scCO2 are red-shifted by -17 and -29 cm(-1), respectively. The maximum of the charge transfer (CT) absorption band of PNA in scSCO2 is at 3.9 eV, and the predicted red-shift of the π → π* electronic transition relative to the isolated gas-phase PNA molecule reproduces the experimental value of -0.35 eV. An analysis of the relationship between geometry distortions and excitation energies of PNA in scCO2 shows that the π → π* CT transition is very sensitive to changes of the N-O bond distance, strongly indicating a correlation between vibrational and electronic solvatochromism driven by LA-LB interactions. Despite the importance of LA-LB interactions to explain the solvation of PNA in scCO2, the red-shift of the CT band is mainly determined by electrostatic interactions.

  18. Characterization of the interaction between local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose and acid-base index in ischemic rat brain employing a double-isotope methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, K.E.H.

    1988-01-01

    The association between increases in cerebral glucose metabolism and the development of acidosis is largely inferential, based on reports linking hyperglycemia with poor neurological outcome, lactate accumulation, and the severity of acidosis. We measured local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (lCMRglc) and an index of brain pH-the acid-base index (ABI)-concurrently and characterized their interaction in a model of focal cerebral ischemia in rats in a double-label autoradiographic study, using ({sup 14}C)2-deoxyglucose and ({sup 14}C)dimethyloxazolidinedione. Computer-assisted digitization and analysis permitted the simultaneous quantification of the two variables on a pixel-by-pixel basis in the same brain slices.

  19. Carbohydrate-interactive pDNA and siRNA gene vectors based on boronic acid functionalized poly(amido amine)s.

    PubMed

    Piest, Martin; Ankoné, Marc; Engbersen, Johan F J

    2013-08-10

    In order to evaluate the influence of incorporation of boronic acid groups on the properties of poly(amido amine)s as gene vectors, a novel poly(amido amine) copolymer p(CBA-ABOL/2AMPBA) containing ortho-aminomethylphenylboronic acid (2AMPBA) moieties was prepared by Michael-type polyaddition of a mixture of 1,4-aminobutanol (ABOL) and 2-((4-aminobutylamino)methyl)phenyl boronic acid to N,N'-cystamine bisacrylamide (CBA). It appeared that the presence of the boronic acid moieties as side groups along the polymer chain strongly enhances the stability of the self-assembled nanoparticles and nanosized polyplexes formed from this polymer; no aggregation was observed after storage for 6days at 37°C. This strong stabilization can be attributed to intermolecular Lewis acid-base interactions between the 2AMPBA groups and the alcohol and amine groups present in the polymer, leading to dynamical (reversible) crosslinking in the nanoparticles. Moreover, since the boronic acids can reversibly form boronic esters with vicinal diol groups, the presence of the 2AMPBA groups add carbohydrate-interactive properties to these polymers that strongly influence their behavior as gene delivery vectors. DNA transfection with p(CBA-ABOL/2AMPBA) polyplexes gave transfection efficiencies that were approximately similar to commercial PEI in different cell lines (COS-7, HUH-6 and H1299-Fluc), but lower than those obtained with reference polyplexes from p(CBA-ABOL). It is hypothesized that the uptake of the boronated polyplexes is suppressed by binding to the glycocalyx of the cells. This is supported by the observation that addition of sorbitol or dextran to the transfection medium significantly enhances the transfection efficiency, which can be attributed to increased cellular uptake of the polyplexes due to boronic ester formation with these agents. AFM, SEM and confocal microscopy showed that polyplexes of p(CBA-ABOL/2AMPBA) become decorated with a dextran layer in the presence of 0.9% (w

  20. Effect of metal ions on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical with hydrogen atom donors. Fine control on hydrogen abstraction reactivity determined by Lewis acid-base interactions.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Mangiacapra, Livia; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2013-01-09

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the effect of metal ions (M(n+)) on hydrogen abstraction reactions from C-H donor substrates by the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) was carried out in acetonitrile. Metal salt addition was observed to increase the CumO(•) β-scission rate constant in the order Li(+) > Mg(2+) > Na(+). These effects were explained in terms of the stabilization of the β-scission transition state determined by Lewis acid-base interactions between M(n+) and the radical. When hydrogen abstraction from 1,4-cyclohexadiene was studied in the presence of LiClO(4) and Mg(ClO(4))(2), a slight increase in rate constant (k(H)) was observed indicating that interaction between M(n+) and CumO(•) can also influence, although to a limited extent, the hydrogen abstraction reactivity of alkoxyl radicals. With Lewis basic C-H donors such as THF and tertiary amines, a decrease in k(H) with increasing Lewis acidity of M(n+) was observed (k(H)(MeCN) > k(H)(Li(+)) > k(H)(Mg(2+))). This behavior was explained in terms of the stronger Lewis acid-base interaction of M(n+) with the substrate as compared to the radical. This interaction reduces the degree of overlap between the α-C-H σ* orbital and a heteroatom lone-pair, increasing the C-H BDE and destabilizing the carbon centered radical formed after abstraction. With tertiary amines, a >2-order of magnitude decrease in k(H) was measured after Mg(ClO(4))(2) addition up to a 1.5:1 amine/Mg(ClO(4))(2) ratio. At higher amine concentrations, very similar k(H) values were measured with and without Mg(ClO(4))(2). These results clearly show that with strong Lewis basic substrates variations in the nature and concentration of M(n+) can dramatically influence k(H), allowing for a fine control of the substrate hydrogen atom donor ability, thus providing a convenient method for C-H deactivation. The implications and generality of these findings are discussed.

  1. Highly efficient CO2 capture by carbonyl-containing ionic liquids through Lewis acid-base and cooperative C-H∙∙∙O hydrogen bonding interaction strengthened by the anion.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fang; He, Xi; Luo, Xiaoyan; Lin, Wenjun; Chen, Kaihong; Li, Haoran; Wang, Congmin

    2014-12-11

    A strategy to improve CO2 capture significantly through the non-covalent interaction strengthened by the anion was reported, which exhibits an extremely high capacity up to 1.24 mole CO2 per mole ionic liquid and excellent reversibility due to the presence of the enhanced Lewis acid-base and cooperative C-HO hydrogen bonding interactions.

  2. Design, characterization, teratogenicity testing, antibacterial, antifungal and DNA interaction of few high spin Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H; El-Khatib, Rafat M; Nassr, Lobna A E; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M; Lashin, Fakhr El-Din

    2013-07-01

    In this study, new Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid chelates derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized via elemental, thermogravimetric analysis, molar conductance, IR, electronic, mass spectra and magnetic moment measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. Correlation of all spectroscopic data suggested that Schiff bases ligands exhibited tridentate with ONO sites coordinating to the metal ions via protonated phenolic-OH, azomethine-N and carboxylate-O with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate via deprotonated phenolic-OH, azomethine-N, carboxylate-O and N-imidazole ring ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL=mono anion and L=dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their teratogenicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 μg/egg with full embryos formation. Moreover, the interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometric and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA activity with the sequence: nhi>nari>nali>nasi>nphali. Furthermore, the free ligands and their complexes are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus flavus and Trichotheium rosium in order to assess their antimicrobial potential. The results show that the metal complexes are more reactive with respect to their corresponding Schiff base amino acid ligands.

  3. Design, characterization, teratogenicity testing, antibacterial, antifungal and DNA interaction of few high spin Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.; Lashin, Fakhr El-Din

    2013-07-01

    In this study, new Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid chelates derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized via elemental, thermogravimetric analysis, molar conductance, IR, electronic, mass spectra and magnetic moment measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. Correlation of all spectroscopic data suggested that Schiff bases ligands exhibited tridentate with ONO sites coordinating to the metal ions via protonated phenolic-OH, azomethine-N and carboxylate-O with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate via deprotonated phenolic-OH, azomethine-N, carboxylate-O and N-imidazole ring ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL = mono anion and L = dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their teratogenicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 μg/egg with full embryos formation. Moreover, the interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometric and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA activity with the sequence: nhi > nari > nali > nasi > nphali. Furthermore, the free ligands and their complexes are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus flavus and Trichotheium rosium in order to assess their antimicrobial potential. The results show that the metal complexes are more reactive with respect to their corresponding Schiff base amino acid ligands.

  4. Facile "one-pot" synthesis of poly(methacrylic acid)-based hybrid monolith via thiol-ene click reaction for hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xumei; Tan, Wangming; Chen, Ye; Chen, Yingzhuang; Ma, Ming; Chen, Bo; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-07-08

    A novel sol-gel "one-pot" approach in tandem with a radical-mediated thiol-ene reaction for the synthesis of a methacrylic acid-based hybrid monolith was developed. The polymerization monomers, tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) and 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTS), were hydrolyzed in high-concentration methacrylic acid solution that also served as a hydrophilic functional monomer. The resulting solution was then mixed with initiator (2, 2'-azobis (2-methylpropionamide) dihydrochloride) and porogen (urea, polyethylene glycol 20,000) in a capillary column and polymerized in water bath. The column had a uniform porous structure and a good permeability. The evaluation of the monolith was performed by separation of small molecules including nucleosides, phenols, amides, bases and Triton X-100. The calibration curves for uridine, inosine, adenosine and cytidine were determined. All the calibration curves exhibited good linear regressions (R(2)≥0.995) within the test ranges of 0.5-40μg/mL for four nucleosides. Additionaliy, atypical hydrophilic mechanism was proved by elution order from low to high according to polarity retention time increased with increases in the content of the organic solvent in the mobile phase. Further studies indicated that hydrogen bond and electrostatic interactions existed between the polar analytes and the stationary phase. This was the mechanism of retention. The excellent separation of the BSA digest showed good hydrophility of the column and indicated the potential in separation of complex biological samples.

  5. Interaction of cetylpyridine bromide with nucleic acids and determination of nucleic acids at nanogram levels based on the enhancement of resonance Rayleigh light scattering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rutao; Yang, Jinghe; Wu, Xia

    2002-07-01

    Resonance Rayleigh light scattering (RRLS) spectra of cetylpyridine bromide (CPB)-nucleic acid system and their analytical application have been first studied. The effective factors and optimum conditions of the reaction have been investigated. After CPB and nucleic acid are mixed together, a new absorption peak located at 300 nm appeared, which is due to the formation of new ion associate of CPB-nucleic acid. The new associate can result in two apparent RRLS peaks at 310-400 and 460-480 nm. The RRLS peak of the corrected spectra located at 290-350 nm, which indicate that the RRLS is originated from the absorption of CPB-nucleic acid associate. The peak at 460-480 nm disappears in the corrected RRLS spectra, which indicated that this peak is originated from the strong line emission of the Xe lamp. Under the optimum conditions, the enhanced intensity of RRLS is proportional to the concentration of nucleic acid in the range of 5.0 x 10(-9)-5.0 x 10(-5) g ml(-1) for calf thymus DNA (ctDNA), 1.0 x 10(-8)-4.0 x 10(-5) g ml(-1) for fish sperm DNA (fsDNA) and 1.0 x 10(-8)-5.0 x 10(-5) g ml(-1) for yeast RNA (yRNA). The detection limits (S/N = 3) are 4.3, 8.7 and 7.4 ng ml(-1), respectively. Synthetic samples were determined satisfactorily.

  6. Facile synthesis of nano-sized agarose based amino acid-Its pH-dependent protein-like behavior and interactions with bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, Nishith A; Siddhanta, A K

    2015-11-19

    In a facile synthesis agarose was amphoterically functionalized to afford nano-sized agarose amino acids, aminoagarose succinate half-esters (AAE) containing one pendant carboxyl group. Nano-sized AAEs (<10 nm; DLS) were characterized and they had three various degrees of substitution [overall DSs 0.88, 0.89 and 0.96], both the amino and half-ester groups were placed on C-6 positions of the 1,3 beta-d-galactopyranose moieties of agarose backbone ((13)C NMR). AAEs performed like large protein molecules exhibiting pH-responsive structural variations (optical rotatory dispersion), presenting a mixed solubility pattern like random coil (soluble) and aggregate (precipitation) formations. Circular dichroism studies showed their pH-dependent associative interactions with bovine serum albumin, which indicated complexation at acidic and basic pHs, and decomplexation at pH 6.8 with AAE (DS 0.96). Thus, these nano-sized AAE based systems may be of potential utility in the domains demanding the merits of preferential protein bindings e.g. pH-responsive cationic/anionic drug carrier, separations or chiral sensing applications.

  7. [Stewart's acid-base approach].

    PubMed

    Funk, Georg-Christian

    2007-01-01

    In addition to paCO(2), Stewart's acid base model takes into account the influence of albumin, inorganic phosphate, electrolytes and lactate on acid-base equilibrium. It allows a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of acid-base disorders. Particularly simultaneous and mixed metabolic acid-base disorders, which are common in critically ill patients, can be assessed. Stewart's approach is therefore a valuable tool in addition to the customary acid-base approach based on bicarbonate or base excess. However, some chemical aspects of Stewart's approach remain controversial.

  8. Interaction of Humic Acids with Organic Toxicants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Yudina, N. V.; Maltseva, E. V.; Nechaev, L. V.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    Interaction of humic acids with polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (naphthalene and anthracene) and triazole series fungicides (cyproconazole (CC) and tebuconazole (TC)) is investigated by the method of fluorescence quenching depending on the concentration of substances in solutions and their structural features. Humic acids were modified by mechanochemical activation in a planetary mill. The complex character of intermolecular interactions between PAH and fungicides with humic acids, including donor-acceptor and hydrophobic binding, is established. Thermodynamically stable conformations of biocide molecules were estimated using ChemOffice CS Chem3D 8.0 by methods of molecular mechanics (MM2) and molecular dynamics. Biocide molecules with pH 7 are in energetically favorable position when the benzene and triazole rings are almost parallel to each other. After acidification of solutions to pH 4.5, the CC molecule retains the geometry for which donor-acceptor interactions are possible: the benzene ring in the molecule represents the electron donor, and triazole is the acceptor. In this case, the electron density in CC is redistributed easier, which is explained by a smaller number of carbon atoms between the triazole and benzene rings, unlike TC. As a result, the TC triazole ring is protonated to a greater degree, acquiring a positive charge, and enters into donoracceptor interactions with humic acid (HA) samples. The above-indicated bond types allow HA to participate actively in sorption processes and to provide their interaction with biocides and PAH and hence, to act as detoxifying agents for recultivation of the polluted environment.

  9. Interactions between homopolymeric amino acids (HPAAs).

    PubMed

    Oma, Yoko; Kino, Yoshihiro; Toriumi, Kazuya; Sasagawa, Noboru; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2007-10-01

    Many human proteins contain consecutive amino acid repeats, known as homopolymeric amino acid (HPAA) tracts. Some inherited diseases are caused by proteins in which HPAAs are expanded to an excessive length. To this day, nine polyglutamine-related diseases and nine polyalanine-related diseases have been reported, including Huntington's disease and oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy. In this study, potential HPAA-HPAA interactions were examined by yeast two-hybrid assays using HPAAs of approximately 30 residues in length. The results indicate that hydrophobic HPAAs interact with themselves and with other hydrophobic HPAAs. Previously, we reported that hydrophobic HPAAs formed large aggregates in COS-7 cells. Here, those HPAAs were shown to have significant interactions with each other, suggesting that hydrophobicity plays an important role in aggregation. Among the observed HPAA-HPAA interactions, the Ala28-Ala29 interaction was notable because polyalanine tracts of these lengths have been established to be pathogenic in several polyalanine-related diseases. By testing several constructs of different lengths, we clarified that polyalanine self-interacts at longer lengths (>23 residues) but not at shorter lengths (six to approximately 23 residues) in a yeast two-hybrid assay and a GST pulldown assay. This self-interaction was found to be SDS sensitive in SDS-PAGE and native-PAGE assays. Moreover, the intracellular localization of these long polyalanine tracts was also observed to be disturbed. Our results suggest that long tracts of polyalanine acquire SDS-sensitive self-association properties, which may be a prerequisite event for their abnormal folding. The misfolding of these tracts is thought to be a common molecular aspect underlying the pathogenesis of polyalanine-related diseases.

  10. Crystalline arrays of side chain modified bile acids derivatives. Two novel self-assemblies based on π-π and belly-to-belly interactions.

    PubMed

    Mayorquín-Torres, Martha C; Arcos-Ramos, Rafael; Flores-Álamo, Marcos; Iglesias-Arteaga, Martín A

    2016-11-01

    Crystalline derivatives of side chain modified bile acids were efficiently prepared from the naturally occurring steroids by palladium-catalyzed cross coupling reaction as a key step. The solvent-free crystalline bile acids derivatives 2b-e are readily accessed by slow evaporation from selected solvents. A variety of steroidal scaffolds were found and elucidated by SXRD studies. The crystal packing of the title compounds are dominated by hydrogen-bonding interactions established between differently positioned acetyl protecting groups, which in the case of 2b and 2e take advantage of the facial amphiphilicity producing two novel steroidal supramolecular self-assemblies combining π-π and strong facial interactions. Thus, these crystalline arrays of side chain modified bile acids represent promising scaffolds for research and implementation in biomolecular materials or inclusion phenomena.

  11. Identification of Novel MAGE-G1-Interacting Partners in Retinoic Acid-Induced P19 Neuronal Differentiation Using SILAC-Based Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Chen, Yujian; Lin, Shide; Yang, Shuguang; Liu, Shaojun

    2017-01-01

    MAGE-G1 is a protein plays role in the early process of neurogenesis. However, the fundamental roles MAGE-G1 played in neurogenesis have not yet been completely understood. Finding the partners MAGE-G1 interacting with will surely contribute to the function study of MAGE-G1. In this study, using Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture-immunoprecipitation quantitative proteomics, we screened the interacting proteins of MAGE-G1 during retinoic acid -induced neuronal differentiation of P19 cells and firstly found that FSCN1 and VIME were potential novel MAGE-G1-interacting proteins. Then, the interaction between overexpressed MAGE-G1 and FSCN1 or VIME was validated by GST-pull down assay in bacteria and by co-immunoprecipitation assay in COS7 cells. Endogenous co-immunoprecipitation assay further confirmed that MAGE-G1 interacted with FSCN1 or VIME in P19 cells after a 6-day retinoic acid-induced neuronal differentiation. Those results provide a functional linkage between MAGE-G1 and FSCN1 or VIME and may facilitate a better understanding of the fundamental aspects of MAGE-G1 during neurogenesis. PMID:28374796

  12. [Studies on interaction of acid-treated nanotube titanic acid and amino acids].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huqin; Chen, Xuemei; Jin, Zhensheng; Liao, Guangxi; Wu, Xiaoming; Du, Jianqiang; Cao, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Nanotube titanic acid (NTA) has distinct optical and electrical character, and has photocatalysis character. In accordance with these qualities, NTA was treated with acid so as to enhance its surface activity. Surface structures and surface groups of acid-treated NTA were characterized and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FT-IR). The interaction between acid-treated NTA and amino acids was investigated. Analysis results showed that the lengths of acid-treated NTA became obviously shorter. The diameters of nanotube bundles did not change obviously with acid-treating. Meanwhile, the surface of acid-treated NTA was cross-linked with carboxyl or esterfunction. In addition, acid-treated NTA can catch amino acid residues easily, and then form close combination.

  13. A new fluorogenic sensing platform for salicylic acid derivatives based on π-π and NH-π interactions between electron-deficient and electron-rich aromatics.

    PubMed

    Pandith, Anup; Hazra, Giridhari; Kim, Hong-Seok

    2017-02-03

    A novel simple fluorescent probe was designed for the recognition of electron-rich salicylic acid derivatives (SAs). The imidazole-appended aminomethyl perylene probe 1 selectively differentiated between electron-rich amino-SAs and electron-deficient nitro-SAs in EtOH, exhibiting the highest selectivity and sensitivity toward 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and showing strong 1:1 binding (Ka=1.37×10(7)M(-1)). This high selectivity and sensitivity resulted from the synergistic multiple hydrogen bonding interactions of secondary amine and imidazole units and π-π interactions between electron-rich and electron-deficient rings, along with the unusual NH-π interactions between 5-ASA and the perylene moiety of 1. The limit of detection (LOD) for 5-ASA in EtOH was 0.012ppb.

  14. Presumed interaction of fusidic acid with simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Burtenshaw, A J; Sellors, G; Downing, R

    2008-06-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted 6 weeks after an elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair following which methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) had been cultured from the aneurysmal sac. He had been commenced on a course of fusidic acid at discharge in addition to his ongoing statin prescription and presented 4 weeks later with symptoms consistent with rhabdomyolysis. Severe rhabdomyolysis was confirmed and despite prolonged and complicated critical care management, his treatment was unsuccessful. Extensive investigations ruled out other known causes of this clinical presentation and failed to identify any other precipitating cause of rhabdomyolysis. We believe the most likely cause was hepatic inhibition of the CYP3A4 hepatic isoenzyme by fusidic acid resulting in an acute severe rise in plasma simvastatin level and extensive myocellular damage. Increasing MRSA colonisation and infection rates together with increased statin usage have the potential to increase the incidence of this presumed drug interaction.

  15. Extended weak bonding interactions in DNA: pi-stacking (base-base), base-backbone, and backbone-backbone interactions.

    PubMed

    Matta, Chérif F; Castillo, Norberto; Boyd, Russell J

    2006-01-12

    We report on several weak interactions in nucleic acids, which, collectively, can make a nonnegligible contribution to the structure and stability of these molecules. Fragments of DNA were obtained from previously determined accurate experimental geometries and their electron density distributions calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The electron densities were analyzed topologically according to the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (AIM). A web of closed-shell bonding interactions is shown to connect neighboring base pairs in base-pair duplexes and in dinuleotide steps. This bonding underlies the well-known pi-stacking interaction between adjacent nucleic acid bases and is characterized topologically for the first time. Two less widely appreciated modes of weak closed-shell interactions in nucleic acids are also described: (i) interactions between atoms in the bases and atoms belonging to the backbone (base-backbone) and (ii) interactions among atoms within the backbone itself (backbone-backbone). These interactions include hydrogen bonding, dihydrogen bonding, hydrogen-hydrogen bonding, and several other weak closed-shell X-Y interactions (X, Y = O, N, C). While each individual interaction is very weak and typically accompanied by perhaps 0.5-3 kcal/mol, the sum total of these interactions is postulated to play a role in stabilizing the structure of nucleic acids. The Watson-and-Crick hydrogen bonding is also characterized in detail at the experimental geometries as a prelude to the discussion of the modes of interactions listed in the title.

  16. Acid-base characteristics of the Grass Pond watershed in the Adirondack Mountains of New York State, USA: interactions among soil, vegetation and surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEathron, K. M.; Mitchell, M. J.; Zhang, L.

    2013-07-01

    Grass Pond watershed is located within the southwestern Adirondack Mountain region of New York State, USA. This region receives some of the highest rates of acidic deposition in North America and is particularly sensitive to acidic inputs due to many of its soils having shallow depths and being generally base poor. Differences in soil chemistry and tree species between seven subwatersheds were examined in relation to acid-base characteristics of the seven major streams that drain into Grass Pond. Mineral soil pH, stream water BCS (base-cation surplus) and pH exhibited a positive correlation with sugar maple basal area (p = 0.055; 0.48 and 0.39, respectively). Black cherry basal area was inversely correlated with stream water BCS, ANC (acid neutralizing capacity)c and NO3- (p = 0.23; 0.24 and 0.20, respectively). Sugar maple basal areas were positively associated with watershed characteristics associated with the neutralization of atmospheric acidic inputs while in contrast, black cherry basal areas showed opposite relationships to these same watershed characteristics. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that black cherry had a distinctive relationship with forest floor chemistry apart from the other tree species, specifically a strong positive association with forest floor NH4, while sugar maple had a distinctive relationship with stream chemistry variables, specifically a strong positive association with stream water ANCc, BCS and pH. Our results provide evidence that sugar maple is acid-intolerant or calciphilic tree species and also demonstrate that black cherry is likely an acid-tolerant tree species.

  17. Synthesis, structure and DFT study of a chelidamic acid based Cu coordination polymer: On the importance of π-π interactions and hexameric water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, Masoud; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Karrabi, Zahra; Notash, Behrouz; Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional coordination polymer, i.e., {(Hampy)[Cu(chel)(H2O)]ṡ2H2O}n (1, ampy = 2-amino-6-methylpyridine, H3chel = chelidamic acid), has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, solution studies and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. In the monomeric unit of compound 1 the metal center exhibits a distorted square-pyramidal coordination sphere. The Cu(II) ion is coordinated to chelidamic acid and water. These monomers are interlinked generating a 1D polymer by means of the para hydroxyl group of the ligand. Protonated 2-amino-6-methylpyridine rings act as counter cations. The crystal lattice is aggregated through intermolecular interactions, such as electrostatic attraction, N-H⋯O, O-H⋯O and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonding and aromatic π stacking interactions. Hydrogen bond interactions between the water molecules led to formation of six-membered rings with chair conformation. These assemblies are described and analyzed by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations since they play an important role in the construction of three-dimensional supramolecular frameworks.

  18. Abscisic acid interacts antagonistically with salicylic acid signaling pathway in rice-Magnaporthe grisea interaction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chang-Jie; Shimono, Masaki; Sugano, Shoji; Kojima, Mikiko; Yazawa, Katsumi; Yoshida, Riichiro; Inoue, Haruhiko; Hayashi, Nagao; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    Plant hormones play pivotal signaling roles in plant-pathogen interactions. Here, we report characterization of an antagonistic interaction of abscisic acid (ABA) with salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathways in the rice-Magnaporthe grisea interaction. Exogenous application of ABA drastically compromised the rice resistance to both compatible and incompatible M. grisea strains, indicating that ABA negatively regulates both basal and resistance gene-mediated blast resistance. ABA markedly suppressed the transcriptional upregulation of WRKY45 and OsNPR1, the two key components of the SA signaling pathway in rice, induced by SA or benzothiadiazole or by blast infection. Overexpression of OsNPR1 or WRKY45 largely negated the enhancement of blast susceptibility by ABA, suggesting that ABA acts upstream of WRKY45 and OsNPR1 in the rice SA pathway. ABA-responsive genes were induced during blast infection in a pattern reciprocal to those of WRKY45 and OsPR1b in the compatible rice-blast interaction but only marginally in the incompatible one. These results suggest that the balance of SA and ABA signaling is an important determinant for the outcome of the rice-M. grisea interaction. ABA was detected in hyphae and conidia of M. grisea as well as in culture media, implying that blast-fungus-derived ABA could play a role in triggering ABA signaling at host infection sites.

  19. Homology-based modeling of the Erwinia amylovora type III secretion chaperone DspF used to identify amino acids required for virulence and interaction with the effector DspE.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Lindsay R; Wedemeyer, William J; Sundin, George W

    2010-09-01

    The structure of DspF, a type III secretion system (T3SS) chaperone required for virulence of the fruit tree pathogen Erwinia amylovora, was modeled based on predicted structural homology to characterized T3SS chaperones. This model guided the selection of 11 amino acid residues that were individually mutated to alanine via site-directed mutagenesis. Each mutant was assessed for its effect on virulence complementation, dimerization and interaction with the N-terminal chaperone-binding site of DspE. Four amino acid residues were identified that did not complement the virulence defect of a dspF knockout mutant, and three of these residues were required for interaction with the N-terminus of DspE. This study supports the significance of the predicted beta-sheet helix-binding groove in DspF chaperone function.

  20. Single-Molecule Studies of Nucleic Acid Interactions Using Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanunu, Meni; Soni, Gautam V.; Meller, Amit

    This chapter presents biophysical studies of single biopolymers using nanopores. Starting from the fundamental process of voltage-driven biopolymer translocation, the understanding of which is a prerequisite for virtually all nanopore applications, the chapter describes recent experiments that resolve nucleic acid structure and its interaction with enzymes, such as exonucleases and polymerases. It then outlines progress made with solid-state nanopores fabricated in ultrathin membranes and discusses experiments describing biopolymer dynamics in synthetic pores. The chapter concludes with a discussion on some of the main challenges facing nanopore technology, as well as on some of the future prospects associated with nanopore-based tools.

  1. SAXS studies of ion-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Lois

    2011-01-01

    Positively charged ions, atoms, or molecules compensate the high negative charge of the nucleic acid backbone. Their presence is critical to the biological function of DNA and RNA. This review focuses on experimental studies probing (a) interactions between small ions and nucleic acids and (b) ion-mediated interactions between nucleic acid duplexes. Experimental results on these simple model systems can be compared with specific theoretical models to validate their predictions. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) provides unique insight into these interactions. Anomalous SAXS reports the spatial correlations of condensed (e.g., locally concentrated) counterions to individual DNA or RNA duplexes. SAXS very effectively reports interactions between nucleic acid helices, which range from strongly repulsive to strongly attractive depending on the ionic species present. The sign and strength of interparticle interactions are easily deduced from dramatic changes in the scattering profiles of interacting duplexes.

  2. Dual Fatty Acid Elongase Complex Interactions in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Morineau, Céline; Gissot, Lionel; Bellec, Yannick; Hematy, Kian; Tellier, Frédérique; Renne, Charlotte; Haslam, Richard; Beaudoin, Frédéric; Napier, Johnathan; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2016-01-01

    Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) are involved in plant development and particularly in several cellular processes such as membrane trafficking, cell division and cell differentiation. However, the precise role of VLCFAs in these different cellular processes is still poorly understood in plants. In order to identify new factors associated with the biosynthesis or function of VLCFAs, a yeast multicopy suppressor screen was carried out in a yeast mutant strain defective for fatty acid elongation. Loss of function of the elongase 3 hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase PHS1 in yeast and PASTICCINO2 in plants prevents growth and induces cytokinesis defects. PROTEIN TYROSIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE (PTPLA) previously characterized as an inactive dehydratase was able to restore yeast phs1 growth and VLCFAs elongation but not the plant pas2-1 defects. PTPLA interacted with elongase subunits in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and its absence induced the accumulation of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA as expected from a dehydratase involved in fatty acid (FA) elongation. However, loss of PTPLA function increased VLCFA levels, an effect that was dependent on the presence of PAS2 indicating that PTPLA activity repressed FA elongation. The two dehydratases have specific expression profiles in the root with PAS2, mostly restricted to the endodermis, while PTPLA was confined in the vascular tissue and pericycle cells. Comparative ectopic expression of PTPLA and PAS2 in their respective domains confirmed the existence of two independent elongase complexes based on PAS2 or PTPLA dehydratase that are functionally interacting. PMID:27583779

  3. Dual Fatty Acid Elongase Complex Interactions in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Morineau, Céline; Gissot, Lionel; Bellec, Yannick; Hematy, Kian; Tellier, Frédérique; Renne, Charlotte; Haslam, Richard; Beaudoin, Frédéric; Napier, Johnathan; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2016-01-01

    Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) are involved in plant development and particularly in several cellular processes such as membrane trafficking, cell division and cell differentiation. However, the precise role of VLCFAs in these different cellular processes is still poorly understood in plants. In order to identify new factors associated with the biosynthesis or function of VLCFAs, a yeast multicopy suppressor screen was carried out in a yeast mutant strain defective for fatty acid elongation. Loss of function of the elongase 3 hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase PHS1 in yeast and PASTICCINO2 in plants prevents growth and induces cytokinesis defects. PROTEIN TYROSIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE (PTPLA) previously characterized as an inactive dehydratase was able to restore yeast phs1 growth and VLCFAs elongation but not the plant pas2-1 defects. PTPLA interacted with elongase subunits in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and its absence induced the accumulation of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA as expected from a dehydratase involved in fatty acid (FA) elongation. However, loss of PTPLA function increased VLCFA levels, an effect that was dependent on the presence of PAS2 indicating that PTPLA activity repressed FA elongation. The two dehydratases have specific expression profiles in the root with PAS2, mostly restricted to the endodermis, while PTPLA was confined in the vascular tissue and pericycle cells. Comparative ectopic expression of PTPLA and PAS2 in their respective domains confirmed the existence of two independent elongase complexes based on PAS2 or PTPLA dehydratase that are functionally interacting.

  4. Foamy Virus Protein—Nucleic Acid Interactions during Particle Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Martin V.; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Compared with orthoretroviruses, our understanding of the molecular and cellular replication mechanism of foamy viruses (FVs), a subfamily of retroviruses, is less advanced. The FV replication cycle differs in several key aspects from orthoretroviruses, which leaves established retroviral models debatable for FVs. Here, we review the general aspect of the FV protein-nucleic acid interactions during virus morphogenesis. We provide a summary of the current knowledge of the FV genome structure and essential sequence motifs required for RNA encapsidation as well as Gag and Pol binding in combination with details about the Gag and Pol biosynthesis. This leads us to address open questions in FV RNA engagement, binding and packaging. Based on recent findings, we propose to shift the point of view from individual glycine-arginine-rich motifs having functions in RNA interactions towards envisioning the FV Gag C-terminus as a general RNA binding protein module. We encourage further investigating a potential new retroviral RNA packaging mechanism, which seems more complex in terms of the components that need to be gathered to form an infectious particle. Additional molecular insights into retroviral protein-nucleic acid interactions help us to develop safer, more specific and more efficient vectors in an era of booming genome engineering and gene therapy approaches. PMID:27589786

  5. Dissociation of equimolar mixtures of aqueous carboxylic acids in ionic liquids: role of specific interactions.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shashi Kant; Kumar, Anil

    2015-04-30

    Hammett acidity function observes the effect of protonation/deprotonation on the optical density/absorbance of spectrophotometric indicator. In this work, the Hammett acidity, H0, of equimolar mixtures of aqueous HCOOH, CH3COOH, and CH3CH2COOH was measured in 1-methylimidazolium-, 1-methylpyrrolidinium-, and 1-methylpiperidinium-based protic ionic liquids (PILs) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-based aprotic ionic liquid (AIL) with formate (HCOO(-)) anion. Higher H0 values were observed for the equimolar mixtures of aqueous carboxylic acids in protic ionic liquids compared with those of the aprotic ionic liquid because of the involvement of the stronger specific interactions between the conjugate acid of ionic liquid and conjugate base of carboxylic acids as suggested by the hard-soft acid base (HSAB) theory. The different H0 values for the equimolar mixtures of aqueous carboxylic acids in protic and aprotic ionic liquids were noted to depend on the activation energy of proton transfer (Ea,H(+)). The higher activation energy of proton transfer was obtained in AIL, indicating lower ability to form specific interactions with solute than that of PILs. Thermodynamic parameters determined by the "indicator overlapping method" further confirmed the involvement of the secondary interactions in the dissociation of carboxylic acids. On the basis of the thermodynamic parameter values, the potential of different ionic liquids in the dissociation of carboxylic acids was observed to depend on the hydrogen bond donor acidity (α) and hydrogen bond acceptor basicity (β), characteristics of specific interactions.

  6. Interaction of milk whey protein with common phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Yu, Dandan; Sun, Jing; Guo, Huiyuan; Ding, Qingbo; Liu, Ruihai; Ren, Fazheng

    2014-01-01

    Phenolics-rich foods such as fruit juices and coffee are often consumed with milk. In this study, the interactions of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin with the phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and coumalic acid) were examined. Fluorescence, CD, and FTIR spectroscopies were used to analyze the binding modes, binding constants, and the effects of complexation on the conformation of whey protein. The results showed that binding constants of each whey protein-phenolic acid interaction ranged from 4 × 105 to 7 × 106 M-n and the number of binding sites n ranged from 1.28 ± 0.13 to 1.54 ± 0.34. Because of these interactions, the conformation of whey protein was altered, with a significant reduction in the amount of α-helix and an increase in the amounts of β-sheet and turn structures.

  7. Acid-base bifunctional catalytic surfaces for nucleophilic addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-09-01

    This article illustrates the modification of oxide surfaces with organic amine functional groups to create acid-base bifunctional catalysts, summarizing our previous reports and also presenting new data. Immobilization of organic amines as bases on inorganic solid-acid surfaces afforded highly active acid-base bifunctional catalysts, which enabled various organic transformations including C--C coupling reactions, though these reactions did not proceed with either the homogeneous amine precursors or the acidic supports alone. Spectroscopic characterization, such as by solid-state MAS NMR and FTIR, revealed not only the interactions between acidic and basic sites but also bifunctional catalytic reaction mechanisms.

  8. Nucleic acid-metal ion interactions in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Katsuyuki; Murayama, Kazutaka

    2012-01-01

    Metal ions play a key role in nucleic acid structure and activity. Elucidation of the rules that govern the binding of metal ions is therefore an essential step for better understanding of the nucleic acid functions. This review is as an update to a preceding one (Metal Ions Biol. Syst., 1996, 32, 91-134), in which we offered a general view of metal ion interactions with mono-, di-, tri-, and oligonucleotides in the solid state, based on their crystal structures reported before 1994. In this chapter, we survey all the crystal structures of metal ion complexes with nucleotides involving oligonucleotides reported after 1994 and we have tried to uncover new characteristic metal bonding patterns for mononucleotides and oligonucleotides with A-RNA and A/B/Z-DNA fragments that form duplexes. We do not cover quadruplexes, duplexes with metal-mediated base-pairs, tRNAs, rRNAs in ribosome, ribozymes, and nucleic acid-drug and -protein complexes. Factors that affect metal binding to mononucleotides and oligonucleotide duplexes are also dealt with.

  9. Thermochemical comparisons of homogeneous and heterogeneous acids and bases. 1. Sulfonic acid solutions and resins as prototype Broensted acids

    SciTech Connect

    Arnett, E.M.; Haaksma, R.A.; Chawla, B.; Healy, M.H.

    1986-08-06

    Heats of ionization by thermometric titration for a series of bases (or acids) can be used to compare solid acids (or bases) with liquid analogues bearing the same functionalities in homogeneous solutions. The method is demonstrated for Broensted acids by reacting a series of substituted nitrogen bases with solutions of p-toluenesulfonic acid (PTSA) in acetonitrile and with suspensions of the microporous polymeric arylsulfonic acid resin-Dowex 50W-X8 in the same solvent. Under well-controlled anhydrous conditions there is a good correlation (r = 0.992) between the heats of reaction of the bases with the homogeneous and heterogeneous acid systems, but the homogeneous system gives a more exothermic interaction by 3-4 kcal mol/sup -1/ for a series of 29 substituted pyrimidines, anilines, and some other amines. This difference may be attributed to homohydrogen bonding interactions between excess acid and sulfonate anion sites which are more restricted geometrically in the resin than in solution. Other factors which affect the enthalpy change for the acid-base interaction are the acid/base ratio, the water content of the sulfonic acid, the solvent, and the resin structure (e.g., microporous vs. macroporous). Steric hindrance in the base does not differentiate solid from homogeneous acid. In addition to the use of titration calorimetry, heats of immersion are reported for the Dowex-arylsulfonic acid resins and the Nafion-perfluorinated sulfonic acid resin in a series of basic liquids. The results are compared with each other and with those from a previous study of several varieties of coal.

  10. Sodium and Potassium Interactions with Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Auffinger, Pascal; D'Ascenzo, Luigi; Ennifar, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions are essential cofactors for the structure and functions of nucleic acids. Yet, the early discovery in the 70s of the crucial role of Mg(2+) in stabilizing tRNA structures has occulted for a long time the importance of monovalent cations. Renewed interest in these ions was brought in the late 90s by the discovery of specific potassium metal ions in the core of a group I intron. Their importance in nucleic acid folding and catalytic activity is now well established. However, detection of K(+) and Na(+) ions is notoriously problematic and the question about their specificity is recurrent. Here we review the different methods that can be used to detect K(+) and Na(+) ions in nucleic acid structures such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance or molecular dynamics simulations. We also discuss specific versus non-specific binding to different structures through various examples.

  11. Simple physics-based analytical formulas for the potentials of mean force for the interaction of amino acid side chains in water. 2. Tests with simple spherical systems.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Mariusz; Liwo, Adam; Maksimiak, Katarzyna; Makowska, Joanna; Scheraga, Harold A

    2007-03-22

    Simple analytical functions consisting of electrostatic, polarization, Lennard-Jones or modified Lennard-Jones, and cavity terms are proposed to express the potentials of mean force analytically for spherical particles interacting in water. The cavity term was expressed either through the molecular-surface area of the solute or by using the Gaussian-overlap model of hydrophobic hydration developed in paper 1 of this series. The analytical expressions were fitted to the potentials of mean force of a methane homodimer, heterodimers composed of a methane molecule, and an ammonium cation or a chloride anion, respectively, and dimers consisting of two chloride anions, two ammonium cations, or a chloride ion and an ammonium cation. The potentials of mean force for these dimers were determined by umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics simulations with the AMBER 7.0 force field with TIP3P water either in our earlier work or in this work. For all systems, the analytical formulas fitted the potentials of mean force very well. However, using the molecular-surface area to express the cavity term provided a good fit only when the nonbonded interactions were expressed by an all-repulsive modified Lennard-Jones potential but also resulted in non-physical values of some of the parameters. Conversely, the use of our new Gaussian-overlap-based expression for the cavity term provided a good fit to the potentials of mean force (PMFs) with Lennard-Jones nonbonded potential, and the values of all parameters were physically reasonable.

  12. Molecular interaction of pinic acid with sulfuric acid: exploring the thermodynamic landscape of cluster growth.

    PubMed

    Elm, Jonas; Kurtén, Theo; Bilde, Merete; Mikkelsen, Kurt V

    2014-09-11

    We investigate the molecular interactions between the semivolatile α-pinene oxidation product pinic acid and sulfuric acid using computational methods. The stepwise Gibbs free energies of formation have been calculated utilizing the M06-2X functional, and the stability of the clusters is evaluated from the corresponding ΔG values. The first two additions of sulfuric acid to pinic acid are found to be favorable with ΔG values of -9.06 and -10.41 kcal/mol. Addition of a third sulfuric acid molecule is less favorable and leads to a structural rearrangement forming a bridged sulfuric acid-pinic acid cluster. The involvement of more than one pinic acid molecule in a single cluster is observed to lead to the formation of favorable (pinic acid)2(H2SO4) and (pinic acid)2(H2SO4)2 clusters. The identified most favorable growth paths starting from a single pinic acid molecule lead to closed structures without the further possibility for attachment of either sulfuric acid or pinic acid. This suggests that pinic acid cannot be a key species in the first steps in nucleation, but the favorable interactions between sulfuric acid and pinic acid imply that pinic acid can contribute to the subsequent growth of an existing nucleus by condensation.

  13. Acid-base properties of adhesive dental polymers.

    PubMed

    Morra, M

    1993-11-01

    The surface energetics of three resins (polymethylmethacrylate, polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate, and Bis-GMA/triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate) commonly used in adhesive interactions with tooth hard tissues were evaluated according to the Fowkes acid-base theory of interfacial interactions. From the measurement of the contact angle of test acidic and basic liquids on the sample surfaces, the acid-base contribution to the work of adhesion was evaluated. Results show that polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate is a comparatively strong Lewis base, a finding that can explain the important role played by this material in the formulation of dentin adhesive.

  14. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  15. Heterogeneous Interactions of Acetaldehyde and Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Iraci, L. T.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of acetaldehyde [CH3CHO] by aqueous sulfuric acid has been studied via Knudsen cell experiments over ranges of temperature (210-250 K) and acid concentration (40-80 wt. %) representative of the upper troposphere. The Henry's law constants for acetaldehyde calculated from these data range from 6 x 10(exp 2) M/atm for 40 wt. % H2SO4 at 228 K to 2 x 10(exp 5) M/atm for 80 wt. % H2SO4 at 212 K. In some instances, acetaldehyde uptake exhibits apparent steady-state loss. The possible sources of this behavior, including polymerization, will be explored. Furthermore, the implications for heterogeneous reactions of aldehydes in sulfate aerosols in the upper troposphere will be discussed.

  16. Nucleic acid based logical systems.

    PubMed

    Han, Da; Kang, Huaizhi; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Cuichen; Zhou, Cuisong; You, Mingxu; Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2014-05-12

    Researchers increasingly visualize a significant role for artificial biochemical logical systems in biological engineering, much like digital logic circuits in electrical engineering. Those logical systems could be utilized as a type of servomechanism to control nanodevices in vitro, monitor chemical reactions in situ, or regulate gene expression in vivo. Nucleic acids (NA), as carriers of genetic information with well-regulated and predictable structures, are promising materials for the design and engineering of biochemical circuits. A number of logical devices based on nucleic acids (NA) have been designed to handle various processes for technological or biotechnological purposes. This article focuses on the most recent and important developments in NA-based logical devices and their evolution from in vitro, through cellular, even towards in vivo biological applications.

  17. Critical assessment of inverse gas chromatography as means of assessing surface free energy and acid-base interaction of pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Telko, Martin J; Hickey, Anthony J

    2007-10-01

    Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) has been employed as a research tool for decades. Despite this record of use and proven utility in a variety of applications, the technique is not routinely used in pharmaceutical research. In other fields the technique has flourished. IGC is experimentally relatively straightforward, but analysis requires that certain theoretical assumptions are satisfied. The assumptions made to acquire some of the recently reported data are somewhat modified compared to initial reports. Most publications in the pharmaceutical literature have made use of a simplified equation for the determination of acid/base surface properties resulting in parameter values that are inconsistent with prior methods. In comparing the surface properties of different batches of alpha-lactose monohydrate, new data has been generated and compared with literature to allow critical analysis of the theoretical assumptions and their importance to the interpretation of the data. The commonly used (simplified) approach was compared with the more rigorous approach originally outlined in the surface chemistry literature.

  18. Crystal and molecular structure of eight organic acid-base adducts from 2-methylquinoline and different acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Jin, Shouwen; Tao, Lin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Daqi

    2014-08-01

    Eight supramolecular complexes with 2-methylquinoline and acidic components as 4-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, malic acid, sebacic acid, and 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid were synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. All of the complexes are organic salts except compound 2. All supramolecular architectures of 1-8 involve extensive classical hydrogen bonds as well as other noncovalent interactions. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the classical hydrogen bonds (ionic or neutral) between acidic components and 2-methylquinoline are sufficient to bring about the formation of binary organic acid-base adducts. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These weak interactions combined, the complexes 1-8 displayed 2D-3D framework structure.

  19. Base pairing and base mis-pairing in nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H. J.; Rich, A.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years we have learned that DNA is conformationally active. It can exist in a number of different stable conformations including both right-handed and left-handed forms. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis we are able to discover not only additional conformations of the nucleic acids but also different types of hydrogen bonded base-base interactions. Although Watson-Crick base pairings are the predominant type of interaction in double helical DNA, they are not the only types. Recently, we have been able to examine mismatching of guanine-thymine base pairs in left-handed Z-DNA at atomic resolution (1A). A minimum amount of distortion of the sugar phosphate backbone is found in the G x T pairing in which the bases are held together by two hydrogen bonds in the wobble pairing interaction. Because of the high resolution of the analysis we can visualize water molecules which fill in to accommodate the other hydrogen bonding positions in the bases which are not used in the base-base interactions. Studies on other DNA oligomers have revealed that other types of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding interactions can occur. In the structure of a DNA octamer with the sequence d(GCGTACGC) complexed to an antibiotic triostin A, it was found that the two central AT base pairs are held together by Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick base pairs. Similarly, the G x C base pairs at the ends are also Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick pairing. Hoogsteen base pairs make a modified helix which is distinct from the Watson-Crick double helix.

  20. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  1. Quantitative thermodynamic predication of interactions between nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid species using Microsoft excel.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiaqi; Li, Na

    2013-09-01

    Proper design of nucleic acid sequences is crucial for many applications. We have previously established a thermodynamics-based quantitative model to help design aptamer-based nucleic acid probes by predicting equilibrium concentrations of all interacting species. To facilitate customization of this thermodynamic model for different applications, here we present a generic and easy-to-use platform to implement the algorithm of the model with Microsoft(®) Excel formulas and VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) macros. Two Excel spreadsheets have been developed: one for the applications involving only nucleic acid species, the other for the applications involving both nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid species. The spreadsheets take the nucleic acid sequences and the initial concentrations of all species as input, guide the user to retrieve the necessary thermodynamic constants, and finally calculate equilibrium concentrations for all species in various bound and unbound conformations. The validity of both spreadsheets has been verified by comparing the modeling results with the experimental results on nucleic acid sequences reported in the literature. This Excel-based platform described here will allow biomedical researchers to rationalize the sequence design of nucleic acid probes using the thermodynamics-based modeling even without relevant theoretical and computational skills.

  2. G4IPDB: A database for G-quadruplex structure forming nucleic acid interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Subodh Kumar; Tawani, Arpita; Mishra, Amit; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid G-quadruplex structure (G4) Interacting Proteins DataBase (G4IPDB) is an important database that contains detailed information about proteins interacting with nucleic acids that forms G-quadruplex structures. G4IPDB is the first database that provides comprehensive information about this interaction at a single platform. This database contains more than 200 entries with details of interaction such as interacting protein name and their synonyms, their UniProt-ID, source organism, target name and its sequences, ∆Tm, binding/dissociation constants, protein gene name, protein FASTA sequence, interacting residue in protein, related PDB entries, interaction ID, graphical view, PMID, author’s name and techniques that were used to detect their interactions. G4IPDB also provides an efficient web-based “G-quadruplex predictor tool” that searches putative G-quadruplex forming sequences simultaneously in both sense and anti-sense strands of the query nucleotide sequence and provides the predicted G score. Studying the interaction between proteins and nucleic acids forming G-quadruplex structures could be of therapeutic significance for various diseases including cancer and neurological disease, therefore, having detail information about their interactions on a single platform would be helpful for the discovery and development of novel therapeutics. G4IPDB can be routinely updated (twice in year) and freely available on http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/ipdb/index.php. PMID:27905517

  3. Interactions of salicylic acid derivatives with calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Ukrainczyk, Marko; Gredičak, Matija; Jerić, Ivanka; Kralj, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of basic interactions between the active pharmaceutical compounds and calcium carbonates is of great importance because of the possibility to use the carbonates as a mineral carrier in drug delivery systems. In this study the mode and extent of interactions of salicylic acid and its amino acid derivates, chosen as pharmaceutically relevant model compounds, with calcite crystals are described. Therefore, the crystal growth kinetics of well defined rhombohedral calcite seed crystals in the systems containing salicylic acid (SA), 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA), N-salicyloil-l-aspartic acid (N-Sal-Asp) or N-salicyloil-l-glutamic acid (N-Sal-Glu), were investigated. The precipitation systems were of relatively low initial supersaturation and of apparently neutral pH. The data on the crystal growth rate reductions in the presence of the applied salicylate molecules were analyzed by means of Cabrera & Vermileya's, and Kubota & Mullin's models of interactions of the dissolved additives and crystal surfaces. The crystal growth kinetic experiments were additionally supported with the appropriate electrokinetic, spectroscopic and adsorption measurements. The Langmuir adsorption constants were determined and they were found to be in a good correlation with values obtained from crystal growth kinetic analyses. The results indicated that salicylate molecules preferentially adsorb along the steps on the growing calcite surfaces. The values of average spacing between the adjacent salicylate adsorption active sites and the average distance between the neighboring adsorbed salicylate molecules were also estimated.

  4. Physicochemical interactions of maize starch with ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Karunaratne, Rusiru; Zhu, Fan

    2016-05-15

    Ferulic acid is widely present in diverse foods and has great health benefits. Starch is a major food component and can be flexibly employed to formulate various products. In this study, the effect of ferulic acid addition on various physicochemical properties of normal maize starch was explored. The properties including swelling, pasting, steady shear and dynamic oscillation rheology, gelatinization, retrogradation, and gel texture were affected by ferulic acid to various extents, depending on the addition level. Enzyme susceptibility of granular starch to α-amylase was not affected. These influences may be explained by the functions of solubilized as well as insoluble ferulic acid which was in the form of crystals in starch matrix. On the molecular level, V-type amylose-ferulic acid inclusion complex formation was not observed by both co-precipitation and acidification methods. The results of this study may inspire further studies on the interactions of phenolics with other food ingredients and their role in food quality.

  5. Boronic acid-tethered amphiphilic hyaluronic acid derivative-based nanoassemblies for tumor targeting and penetration.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae Young; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Song Yi; Lee, Jae-Young; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Ko, Seung-Hak; Shim, Jae-Seong; Choe, Sunghwa; Kim, Dae-Duk; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2017-02-16

    (3-Aminomethylphenyl)boronic acid (AMPB)-installed hyaluronic acid-ceramide (HACE)-based nanoparticles (NPs), including manassantin B (MB), were fabricated for tumor-targeted delivery. The amine group of AMPB was conjugated to the carboxylic acid group of hyaluronic acid (HA) via amide bond formation, and synthesis was confirmed by spectroscopic methods. HACE-AMPB/MB NPs with a 239-nm mean diameter, narrow size distribution, negative zeta potential, and >90% drug encapsulation efficiency were fabricated. Exposed AMPB in the outer surface of HACE-AMPB NPs (in the aqueous environment) may react with sialic acid of cancer cells. The improved cellular accumulation efficiency, in vitro antitumor efficacy, and tumor penetration efficiency of HACE-AMPB/MB NPs, compared with HACE/MB NPs, in MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44 receptor-positive human breast adenocarcinoma cells) may be based on the CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis and phenylboronic acid-sialic acid interaction. Enhanced in vivo tumor targetability, infiltration efficiency, and antitumor efficacies of HACE-AMPB NPs, compared with HACE NPs, were observed in a MDA-MB-231 tumor-xenografted mouse model. In addition to passive tumor targeting (based on an enhanced permeability and retention effect) and active tumor targeting (interaction between HA and CD44 receptor), the phenylboronic acid-sialic acid interaction can play important roles in augmented tumor targeting and penetration of HACE-AMPB NPs. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: (3-Aminomethylphenyl)boronic acid (AMPB)-tethered hyaluronic acid-ceramide (HACE)-based nanoparticles (NPs), including manassantin B (MB), were fabricated and their tumor targeting and penetration efficiencies were assessed in MDA-MB-231 (CD44 receptor-positive human adenocarcinoma) tumor models. MB, which exhibited antitumor efficacies via the inhibition of angiogenesis and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1, was entrapped in HACE-AMPB NPs in this study. Phenylboronic acid located in the outer surface

  6. Acid-base homeostasis in the human system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Acid-base regulation is a cooperative phenomena in vivo with body fluids, extracellular and intracellular buffers, lungs, and kidneys all playing important roles. The present account is much too brief to be considered a review of present knowledge of these regulatory systems, and should be viewed, instead, as a guide to the elements necessary to construct a simple model of the mutual interactions of the acid-base regulatory systems of the body.

  7. Roles of intrinsic disorder in protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Dyson, H Jane

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and nucleic acids typify the role of disordered segments, linkers, tails and other entities in the function of complexes that must form with high affinity and specificity but which must be capable of dissociating when no longer needed. While much of the emphasis in the literature has been on the interactions of disordered proteins with other proteins, disorder is also frequently observed in nucleic acids (particularly RNA) and in the proteins that interact with them. The interactions of disordered proteins with DNA most often manifest as molding of the protein onto the B-form DNA structure, although some well-known instances involve remodeling of the DNA structure that seems to require that the interacting proteins be disordered to various extents in the free state. By contrast, induced fit in RNA-protein interactions has been recognized for many years-the existence and prevalence of this phenomenon provides the clearest possible evidence that RNA and its interactions with proteins must be considered as highly dynamic, and the dynamic nature of RNA and its multiplicity of folded and unfolded states is an integral part of its nature and function.

  8. Thermodynamics of the interactions of m-AMSA and o-AMSA with nucleic acids: influence of ionic strength and DNA base composition.

    PubMed Central

    Wadkins, R M; Graves, D E

    1989-01-01

    The equilibrium binding of the antitumor agent m-AMSA and its biologically inactive analog o-AMSA to native and synthetic DNAs are compared over a wide range of ionic strengths and temperatures. Although o-AMSA binds DNA with a higher affinity than m-AMSA it is not effective as an antitumor agent. Both m-AMSA and o-AMSA bind DNA in an intercalative manner. Indepth investigations into the thermodynamic parameters of these interactions reveal the interaction of m-AMSA with DNA to be an enthalpy driven process. In contrast, the structurally similar but biologically inactive o-AMSA binds DNA through an entropy driven process. The differences in thermodynamic mechanisms of binding between the two isomers reveal that the electronic and/or steric factors resulting from the position of the methoxy substituent group on the anilino ring directs the DNA binding properties of these compounds and ultimately the biological effectiveness as an antitumor agent. PMID:2602146

  9. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of the dynamics of organofluorine interactions with a dissolved humic acid.

    PubMed

    Longstaffe, James G; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Simpson, Andre J

    2016-02-01

    A quantitative understanding of the dynamics of the interactions between organofluorine compounds and humic acids will contribute to an improved understanding of the role that Natural Organic Matter plays as a mediator in the fate, transport and distribution of these contaminants in the environment. Here, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based diffusion measurements are used to estimate the association dynamics between dissolved humic acid and selected organofluorine compounds: pentafluoroaniline, pentafluorophenol, potassium perfluorooctane sulfonate, and perfluorooctanoic acid. Under the conditions used here, the strength of the association with humic acid increases linearly as temperature decreases for all compounds except for perfluorooctanoic acid, which exhibits divergent behavior with a non-linear decrease in the extent of interaction as temperature decreases. A general interaction mechanism controlled largely by desolvation effects is suggested for all compounds examined here except for perfluorooctanoic acid, which exhibits a specific mode of interaction consistent with a proteinaceous binding site. Reverse Heteronuclear Saturation Transfer Difference NMR is used to confirm the identity and nature of the humic acid binding sites.

  10. Manipulating Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in Microalgae for Biofuel through Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Blatti, Jillian L.; Beld, Joris; Behnke, Craig A.; Mendez, Michael; Mayfield, Stephen P.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae are a promising feedstock for renewable fuels, and algal metabolic engineering can lead to crop improvement, thus accelerating the development of commercially viable biodiesel production from algae biomass. We demonstrate that protein-protein interactions between the fatty acid acyl carrier protein (ACP) and thioesterase (TE) govern fatty acid hydrolysis within the algal chloroplast. Using green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr) as a model, a structural simulation of docking CrACP to CrTE identifies a protein-protein recognition surface between the two domains. A virtual screen reveals plant TEs with similar in silico binding to CrACP. Employing an activity-based crosslinking probe designed to selectively trap transient protein-protein interactions between the TE and ACP, we demonstrate in vitro that CrTE must functionally interact with CrACP to release fatty acids, while TEs of vascular plants show no mechanistic crosslinking to CrACP. This is recapitulated in vivo, where overproduction of the endogenous CrTE increased levels of short-chain fatty acids and engineering plant TEs into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast did not alter the fatty acid profile. These findings highlight the critical role of protein-protein interactions in manipulating fatty acid biosynthesis for algae biofuel engineering as illuminated by activity-based probes. PMID:23028438

  11. Manipulating fatty acid biosynthesis in microalgae for biofuel through protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Blatti, Jillian L; Beld, Joris; Behnke, Craig A; Mendez, Michael; Mayfield, Stephen P; Burkart, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae are a promising feedstock for renewable fuels, and algal metabolic engineering can lead to crop improvement, thus accelerating the development of commercially viable biodiesel production from algae biomass. We demonstrate that protein-protein interactions between the fatty acid acyl carrier protein (ACP) and thioesterase (TE) govern fatty acid hydrolysis within the algal chloroplast. Using green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr) as a model, a structural simulation of docking CrACP to CrTE identifies a protein-protein recognition surface between the two domains. A virtual screen reveals plant TEs with similar in silico binding to CrACP. Employing an activity-based crosslinking probe designed to selectively trap transient protein-protein interactions between the TE and ACP, we demonstrate in vitro that CrTE must functionally interact with CrACP to release fatty acids, while TEs of vascular plants show no mechanistic crosslinking to CrACP. This is recapitulated in vivo, where overproduction of the endogenous CrTE increased levels of short-chain fatty acids and engineering plant TEs into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast did not alter the fatty acid profile. These findings highlight the critical role of protein-protein interactions in manipulating fatty acid biosynthesis for algae biofuel engineering as illuminated by activity-based probes.

  12. Probing the interactions between boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lü, Chenchen; Li, Hengye; Wang, Heye; Liu, Zhen

    2013-02-19

    The affinity of boronic acids to cis-diol-containing biomolecules has found wide applications in many fields, such as sensing, separation, drug delivery, and functional materials. A sound understanding of the binding interactions will greatly facilitate exquisite applications of this chemistry. Although a few analytical tools have been available for the characterization of the interactions, these techniques are associated with some apparent drawbacks, so they are only applicable to a limited range of boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules. Therefore, a widely applicable method is still greatly needed. In this work, an affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method was established and validated to probe the interactions between boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules. The method was proven to be applicable to almost all types of cis-diol-containing biomolecules and boronic acids. Based on this method, a quantitative, comparative study on the interactions between 14 boronic acids that have important potentials for application with 5 typical monosaccharides of biological importance was carried out. The findings provided new insights into boronate affinity interactions, particularly the relationship between the binding strength with the molecular structures of the binding species. Besides, effects of pH and temperature on the binding strength were also investigated. This method exhibited several significant advantages, including (1) possibility of simultaneous study of multiple interactions, (2) low requirement on the purity of the binding species, (3) wide applicability, and (4) high accuracy and precision.

  13. Expression-based GWAS identifies variants, gene interactions and key regulators affecting intramuscular fatty acid content and composition in porcine meat

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Oliveras, Anna; Revilla, Manuel; Castelló, Anna; Fernández, Ana I.; Folch, Josep M.; Ballester, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to better understand the genetic mechanisms determining two complex traits affecting porcine meat quality: intramuscular fat (IMF) content and its fatty acid (FA) composition. With this purpose, expression Genome-Wide Association Study (eGWAS) of 45 lipid-related genes associated with meat quality traits in swine muscle (Longissimus dorsi) of 114 Iberian × Landrace backcross animals was performed. The eGWAS identified 241 SNPs associated with 11 genes: ACSM5, CROT, FABP3, FOS, HIF1AN, IGF2, MGLL, NCOA1, PIK3R1, PLA2G12A and PPARA. Three expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTLs) for IGF2, ACSM5 and MGLL were identified, showing cis-acting effects, whereas 16 eQTLs had trans regulatory effects. A polymorphism in the ACSM5 promoter region associated with its expression was identified. In addition, strong candidate genes regulating ACSM5, FOS, PPARA, PIK3R1, PLA2G12A and HIF1AN gene expression were also seen. Notably, the analysis highlighted the NR3C1 transcription factor as a strong candidate gene involved in the regulation of the 45 genes analysed. Finally, the IGF2, MGLL, MC2R, ARHGAP6, and NR3C1 genes were identified as potential regulators co-localizing within QTLs for fatness and growth traits in the IBMAP population. The results obtained increase our knowledge in the functional regulatory mechanisms involved in these complex traits. PMID:27666082

  14. Effect of amino acids on the interaction between cobalamin(II) and dehydroascorbic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereven'kov, I. A.; Thi, Thu Thuy Bui; Salnikov, D. S.; Makarov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    The kinetics of the reaction between one-electron-reduced cobalamin (cobalamin(II), Cb(II)) and the two-electron-oxidized form of vitamin C (dehydroascorbic acid, DHA) with amino acids in an acidic medium is studied by conventional UV-Vis spectroscopy. It is shown that the oxidation of Cbl(II) by dehydroascorbic acid proceeds only in the presence of sulfur-containing amino acids (cysteine, acetylcysteine). A proposed reaction mechanism includes the step of amino acid coordination on the Co(II)-center through the sulfur atom, along with that of the interaction between this complex and DHA molecules, which results in the formation of ascorbyl radical and the corresponding Co(III) thiolate complex.

  15. Hydrogen atom transfer from 1,n-alkanediamines to the cumyloxyl radical. Modulating C-H deactivation through acid-base interactions and solvent effects.

    PubMed

    Milan, Michela; Salamone, Michela; Bietti, Massimo

    2014-06-20

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the effect of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) on the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions from 1,n-alkanediamines (R2N(CH2)nNR2, R = H, CH3; n = 1-4), piperazine, and 1,4-dimethylpiperazine to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)), has been carried out in MeCN and DMSO. Very strong deactivation of the α-C-H bonds has been observed following nitrogen protonation and the results obtained have been explained in terms of substrate basicity, of the distance between the two basic centers and of the solvent hydrogen bond acceptor ability. At [substrate] ≤ 1/2 [TFA] the substrates exist in the doubly protonated form HR2N(+)(CH2)nN(+)R2H, and no reaction with CumO(•) is observed. At 1/2 [TFA] < [substrate] ≤ [TFA], HAT occurs from the C-H bonds that are α to the nonprotonated nitrogen in R2N(CH2)nN(+)R2H. At [substrate] > [TFA], HAT occurs from the α-C-H bonds of R2N(CH2)nNR2, and the mesured kH values are very close to those obtained in the absence of TFA. Comparison between MeCN and DMSO clearly shows that in the monoprotonated diamines R2N(CH2)nN(+)R2H remote C-H deactivation can be modulated through solvent hydrogen bonding.

  16. Results-Based Interaction Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Meredith

    2008-01-01

    Interaction design is a user-centered approach to development in which users and their goals are the driving force behind a project's design. Interaction design principles are fundamental to the design and implementation of effective websites, but they are not sufficient. This article argues that, to reach its full potential, a website should also…

  17. Indole-3-acetic acid in plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Duca, Daiana; Lorv, Janet; Patten, Cheryl L; Rose, David; Glick, Bernard R

    2014-07-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is an important phytohormone with the capacity to control plant development in both beneficial and deleterious ways. The ability to synthesize IAA is an attribute that many bacteria including both plant growth-promoters and phytopathogens possess. There are three main pathways through which IAA is synthesized; the indole-3-pyruvic acid, indole-3-acetamide and indole-3-acetonitrile pathways. This chapter reviews the factors that effect the production of this phytohormone, the role of IAA in bacterial physiology and in plant-microbe interactions including phytostimulation and phytopathogenesis.

  18. Interaction of nucleic acids with carbon nanotubes and dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Bidisha; Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K

    2012-07-01

    Nucleic acid interaction with nanoscale objects like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and dendrimers is of fundamental interest because of their potential application in CNT separation, gene therapy and antisense therapy. Combining nucleic acids with CNTs and dendrimers also opens the door towards controllable self-assembly to generate various supra-molecular and nano-structures with desired morphologies. The interaction between these nanoscale objects also serve as a model system for studying DNA compaction, which is a fundamental process in chromatin organization. By using fully atomistic simulations, here we report various aspects of the interactions and binding modes of DNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) with CNTs, graphene and dendrimers. Our results give a microscopic picture and mechanism of the adsorption of single- and double-strand DNA (ssDNA and dsDNA) on CNT and graphene. The nucleic acid-CNT interaction is dominated by the dispersive van der Waals (vdW) interaction. In contrast, the complexation of DNA (both ssDNA and dsDNA) and siRNA with various generations of poly-amido-amine (PAMAM) dendrimers is governed by electrostatic interactions. Our results reveal that both the DNA and siRNA form stable complex with the PAMAM dendrimer at a physiological pH when the dendrimer is positively charged due to the protonation of the primary amines. The size and binding energy of the complex increase with increase in dendrimer generation. We also give a summary of the current status in these fields and discuss future prospects.

  19. Interaction between bisphenol A and tannic Acid: Spectroscopic titration approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omoike, Anselm; Brandt, Benjamin

    2011-06-01

    The interaction between tannic acid (TA) and bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, was studied by absorption and fluorescence titration techniques. The binding constants and corresponding thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures (294, 296, 298, 300 and 303 K) were determined. The intrinsic fluorescence of BPA was strongly quenched by TA and the quenching mechanism is attributed to static quenching. The thermodynamic data revealed that the formation of TA-BPA complex was exothermic, entropic-driven, and spontaneous. Furthermore, hydrogen and van der Waals interactions seem to be the major driving forces for the formation of the nonfluorescent TA-BPA complex.

  20. Interaction between bisphenol A and tannic acid: spectroscopic titration approach.

    PubMed

    Omoike, Anselm; Brandt, Benjamin

    2011-06-01

    The interaction between tannic acid (TA) and bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, was studied by absorption and fluorescence titration techniques. The binding constants and corresponding thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures (294, 296, 298, 300 and 303 K) were determined. The intrinsic fluorescence of BPA was strongly quenched by TA and the quenching mechanism is attributed to static quenching. The thermodynamic data revealed that the formation of TA-BPA complex was exothermic, entropic-driven, and spontaneous. Furthermore, hydrogen and van der Waals interactions seem to be the major driving forces for the formation of the nonfluorescent TA-BPA complex.

  1. Selenium speciation in acidic environmental samples: application to acid rain-soil interaction at Mount Etna volcano.

    PubMed

    Floor, Geerke H; Iglesías, Mònica; Román-Ross, Gabriela; Corvini, Philippe F X; Lenz, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Speciation plays a crucial role in elemental mobility. However, trace level selenium (Se) speciation analyses in aqueous samples from acidic environments are hampered due to adsorption of the analytes (i.e. selenate, selenite) on precipitates. Such solid phases can form during pH adaptation up till now necessary for chromatographic separation. Thermodynamic calculations in this study predicted that a pH<4 is needed to prevent precipitation of Al and Fe phases. Therefore, a speciation method with a low pH eluent that matches the natural sample pH of acid rain-soil interaction samples from Etna volcano was developed. With a mobile phase containing 20mM ammonium citrate at pH 3, selenate and selenite could be separated in different acidic media (spiked water, rain, soil leachates) in <10 min with a LOQ of 0.2 μg L(-1) using (78)Se for detection. Applying this speciation analysis to study acid rain-soil interaction using synthetic rain based on H(2)SO(4) and soil samples collected at the flanks of Etna volcano demonstrated the dominance of selenate over selenite in leachates from samples collected close to the volcanic craters. This suggests that competitive behavior with sulfate present in acid rain might be a key factor in Se mobilization. The developed speciation method can significantly contribute to understand Se cycling in acidic, Al/Fe rich environments.

  2. Main and interaction effects of acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on growth and ethanol productivity of yeasts.

    PubMed

    Palmqvist, E; Grage, H; Meinander, N Q; Hahn-Hägerdal, B

    1999-04-05

    The influence of the factors acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on the ethanol yield (YEtOH) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, bakers' yeast, S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581, and Candida shehatae NJ 23 was investigated using a 2(3)-full factorial design with 3 centrepoints. The results indicated that acetic acid inhibited the fermentation by C. shehatae NJ 23 markedly more than by bakers' yeast, whereas no significant difference in tolerance towards the compounds was detected between the S. cerevisiae strains. Furfural (2 g L-1) and the lignin derived compound p-hydroxybenzoic acid (2 g L-1) did not affect any of the yeasts at the cell mass concentration used. The results indicated that the linear model was not adequate to describe the experimental data (the p-values of curvatures were 0.048 for NJ 23 and 0.091 for bakers' yeast). Based on the results from the 2(3)-full factorial experiment, an extended experiment was designed based on a central composite design to investigate the influence of the factors on the specific growth rate (mu), biomass yield (Yx), volumetric ethanol productivity (QEtOH), and YEtOH. Bakers' yeast was chosen in the extended experiment due to its better tolerance towards acetic acid, which makes it a more interesting organism for use in industrial fermentations of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. The inoculum size was reduced in the extended experiment to reduce any increase in inhibitor tolerance that might be due to a large cell inoculum. By dividing the experiment in blocks containing fermentations performed with the same inoculum preparation on the same day, much of the anticipated systematic variation between the experiments was separated from the experimental error. The results of the fitted model can be summarised as follows: mu was decreased by furfural (0-3 g L-1). Furfural and acetic acid (0-10 g L-1) also interacted negatively on mu. Furfural concentrations up to 2 g L-1 stimulated Yx in the absence of acetic acid whereas higher

  3. Field evaluation of an acid rain-drought stress interaction.

    PubMed

    Banwart, W L

    1988-01-01

    Various methods have been proposed to simulate natural field conditions for growing agricultural crops while controlling conditions to study specific environmental effects. This report briefly describes the use of moveable rain exclusion shelters (10.4 x 40.9 m) to study the results of the interaction of acid rain and drought stress on corn and soybean yields. The rain exclusion shelters are constructed of galvanized pipe framing and covered with polyethylene film. Movement is automated by a rain switch to protect crops from ambient rainfall and to treat them with simulated acid rain The facility simulates a real environment with respect to variables such as solar exposure, wind movement, dew formation, and insect exposure, while allowing careful control of moisture regimes. Soybeans and corn were treated with average rainfall amounts, and with one-half and one-quarter of these rainfall amounts (drought stress) at two levels of rainfall acidity, pH 5.6 and 3.0. While drought stress resulted in considerable yield reduction for Amsoy and Williams soybeans, no additional reduction in yield was observed with rainfall of pH 3.0, as compared to rainfall of approximately pH 5.6. Similar results were observed for one corn cultivar, Pioneer 3377. For one year of the study however, yield of B73 x Mo17 (corn) was reduced 3139 kg ha(-1) by the most severe drought, and an additional 1883 kg ha(-1) by acid rain of pH 3.0, as compared to the control (pH 5.6). Yield reduction from acidic rain was considerably less at full water rates, resulting in a significant pH by drought stress interaction. However, during the second year of the experiment, no pH effect or drought by pH interaction was observed for this cultivar. The reason for the difference in the two years was not identified.

  4. Interactive Hangman teaches amino acid structures and abbreviations.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Britney O; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying structures, hints to the answers were written in "amino acid sentences" for the students to translate. Students were required to draw the structure of the corresponding letter they wished to guess on a whiteboard. Each student received a reference sheet of the structures and abbreviations, but was required to draw from memory when guessing a letter. Preassessments and postassessments revealed a drastic improvement in the students' ability to recognize and draw structures from memory. This activity provides a fun, educational game to play in biochemistry discussion sections or during long incubations in biochemistry laboratories.

  5. Probiotics--interactions with bile acids and impact on cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Nebojša; Stankov, Karmen; Mikov, Momir

    2012-12-01

    The use of probiotics, alone or in interaction with bile acids, is a modern strategy in the prevention and treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Numerous mechanisms for hypocholesterolemic effect of probiotics have been hypothesized, based mostly on in vitro evidence. Interaction with bile acids through reaction of deconjugation catalyzed by bile salt hydrolase enzymes (BSH) is considered as the main mechanism of cholesterol-lowering effects of probiotic bacteria, but it has been reported that microbial BSH activity could be potentially detrimental to the human host. There are several approaches for prevention of possible side effects associated with BSH activity, which at the same time increase the viability of probiotics in the intestines and also in food matrices. The aim of our study was to summarize present knowledge of probiotics-bile acids interactions, with special reference to cholesterol-lowering mechanisms of probiotics, and to report novel biotechnological approaches for increasing the pharmacological benefits of probiotics.

  6. Interaction of 2,6-dimethylpyridine with chloroacetic acid in some aprotic solvents: problem of stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Dulewicz, E.; Szafran, M.

    1988-07-01

    Infrared and 1H NMR spectra are reported for mixtures of chloroacetic acid and 2,6-dimethylpyridine with various acid-base ratios (2:1 and from 1:1 to 1:15) in benzene, dichloromethane, and acetonitrile. The pyridine ring stretching vibration bands demonstrate that two species, A sbnd H⋯B and A -⋯H sbnd B +, are present in the investigated solutions. In benzene and dichloromethane some uncomplexed acid is observed in 2:1 and 1:1 mixtures. In acetonitrile a complex between the acid and acetonitrile is formed even when there is a 1:10 mixture of acid and 2,6-dimethylpyridine. Both the chemical shift of hydrogen-bonded protons and the continuous absorption in IR spectra are affected when an excess of base is added to the equimolar mixture of 2,6-dimethylpyridine with chloroacetic acid. This is caused by the presence of the 2:1 complex [B +sbnd H(A -⋯HA)] in the equimolar mixture. The excess of base shifts complexation to the 1:1 acid-base complex. The continuous absorption due to strong hydrogen bonds was separated numerically from that of the skeletal ones due to the 2,6-dimethylpyridine and acid. The observed increase of the extent of proton transfer and the continuous absorption due to changes in solvent polarity is explained by the increasing interaction of the dipole of the hydrogen bond with the reaction field from the environment.

  7. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  8. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  9. Fluorometric estimation of amino acids interaction with colloidal suspension of FITC functionalized graphene oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Kashyap; Dhayal, Marshal

    2017-02-01

    A hydrosol approach developed to synthesize fluorescence quenched fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) functionalized colloidal suspension of graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONP). UV-vis spectroscopic measurements showed characteristic peak at 236 nm and 300 nm due to pi-pi* interaction in Cdbnd C and n-pi* transition in Cdbnd O bond of GONP, respectively. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra showed reduced intensity of 1429 cm-1 IR band of GONP due to the electrostatic and pi-pi interactions of FITC with GONP in FITC-GONP. ATR-FTIR spectra of different amino acid co-functionalised FITC-GONP showed an increase in the FTIR band intensity at 1429 cm-1 which was significantly reduced due to electrostatic/pi-pi interactions of FITC with GONP in the absence of the amino acids. A peak at 1084 cm-1 in ATR-FTIR spectra appears which confirms the interaction between amine group of amino acids and sbnd COO- groups at GONP surface. The FITC interaction with GONP lead to fluorescence resonance energy transfers (FRET) and resulted in a liner decrease in the FITC fluorescence with an increase of GONP concentration. An increase in the reappearance of FITC fluorescence observed while the amino acid concentration was increased in co-functionalised FITC-GONP. The quantified amount of reappeared fluorescence of FITC in amino acid co-functionalised FITC-GONP depends on the concentration, polar and non-polar nature of amino acids. The reappearance of FITC from the surface of FITC-GONP with the addition of amino acid was found to be consistent with the organic substitute, size of amino acids and their functionalities. Therefore, FRET based method using FITC-GONP colloidal suspension may have potential application in determining the binding nature of biomolecules with GONP for biomedical applications.

  10. The Conjugate Acid-Base Chart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treptow, Richard S.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the difficulties that beginning chemistry students have in understanding acid-base chemistry. Describes the use of conjugate acid-base charts in helping students visualize the conjugate relationship. Addresses chart construction, metal ions, buffers and pH titrations, and the organic functional groups and nonaqueous solvents. (TW)

  11. Students' Alternate Conceptions on Acids and Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Hanqing; Henriques, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Knowing what students bring to the classroom can and should influence how we teach them. This study is a review of the literature associated with secondary and postsecondary students' ideas about acids and bases. It was found that there are six types of alternate ideas about acids and bases that students hold. These are: macroscopic properties of…

  12. The Kidney and Acid-Base Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koeppen, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    Since the topic of the role of the kidneys in the regulation of acid base balance was last reviewed from a teaching perspective (Koeppen BM. Renal regulation of acid-base balance. Adv Physiol Educ 20: 132-141, 1998), our understanding of the specific membrane transporters involved in H+, HCO , and NH transport, and especially how these…

  13. Studies on molecular interactions between nalidixic acid and liposomes.

    PubMed

    Budai, M; Szabó, Zs; Zimmer, A; Szögyi, M; Gróf, P

    2004-07-26

    The interaction between nalidixic acid sodium salt (NANa) and liposomes prepared from alpha-L-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or from its binary mixture with dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) was studied with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. We evaluated the role of broadband ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation on the molecular interactions between the lipids and the NANa, and determined the decay-kinetics of the incorporated spin labeled fatty-acid free radicals. Multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles were prepared by sonication and extrusion. The entrapment efficiencies were determined spectrophotometrically. The size-distribution of the liposomes and its change in time was checked by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Our results indicate that NANa mainly interacts with lipid head groups. However, its effect and presumably the formation of the free radicals, induced by broadband ultraviolet-B, is not localized only to the head group region of the lipid molecules. Depending on DOPC content, interaction between the NANa and the lipids modifies the phase-transition parameters of the liposome dispersions.

  14. Interactions of aminomethylphosphonic acid and sarcosine with montmorillonite interlayer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennig, Amanda; Slutter, Annette; Tribe, Lorena

    The smectite clay, montmorillonite, can be found in many soils throughout the world. In addition to its importance in agriculture and soil remediation, montmorillonite has extensive applications in industry both in its natural form and as a component of composite materials. The adsorptive properties of montmorillonite have been explored in relation to its interactions with the common herbicide glyphosate. This herbicide, when exposed to microorganisms in the soil is degraded, forming two products: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and sarcosine. The atomic-level interactions of these compounds with the montmorillonite interlayer surfaces are studied here using molecular mechanics. The final outcomes of these calculations are analyzed in terms of the proximity of the montmorillonite surface to the moieties of the degradation products. The phosphonate moiety was found to be the most important source of interactions for AMPA, while for sarcosine there was an even distribution between the amino and carboxylic moieties, and Na+ ion mediated surface complexes.0

  15. Sequential injection redox or acid-base titration for determination of ascorbic acid or acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Lenghor, Narong; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Vilen, Michael; Sara, Rolf; Christian, Gary D; Grudpan, Kate

    2002-12-06

    Two sequential injection titration systems with spectrophotometric detection have been developed. The first system for determination of ascorbic acid was based on redox reaction between ascorbic acid and permanganate in an acidic medium and lead to a decrease in color intensity of permanganate, monitored at 525 nm. A linear dependence of peak area obtained with ascorbic acid concentration up to 1200 mg l(-1) was achieved. The relative standard deviation for 11 replicate determinations of 400 mg l(-1) ascorbic acid was 2.9%. The second system, for acetic acid determination, was based on acid-base titration of acetic acid with sodium hydroxide using phenolphthalein as an indicator. The decrease in color intensity of the indicator was proportional to the acid content. A linear calibration graph in the range of 2-8% w v(-1) of acetic acid with a relative standard deviation of 4.8% (5.0% w v(-1) acetic acid, n=11) was obtained. Sample throughputs of 60 h(-1) were achieved for both systems. The systems were successfully applied for the assays of ascorbic acid in vitamin C tablets and acetic acid content in vinegars, respectively.

  16. Nucleic acid-lipid membrane interactions studied by DSC.

    PubMed

    Giatrellis, Sarantis; Nounesis, George

    2011-01-01

    The interactions of nucleic acids with lipid membranes are of great importance for biological mechanisms as well as for biotechnological applications in gene delivery and drug carriers. The optimization of liposomal vectors for clinical use is absolutely dependent upon the formation mechanisms, the morphology, and the molecular organization of the lipoplexes, that is, the complexes of lipid membranes with DNA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has emerged as an efficient and relatively easy-to-operate experimental technique that can straightforwardly provide data related to the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the DNA-lipid complexation and especially to the lipid organization and phase transitions within the membrane. In this review, we summarize DSC studies considering nucleic acid-membrane systems, accentuating DSC capabilities, and data analysis. Published work involving cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic lipids as well as lipid mixtures interacting with RNA and DNA of different sizes and conformations are included. It is shown that despite limitations, issues such as DNA- or RNA-induced phase separation and microdomain lipid segregation, liposomal aggregation and fusion, alterations of the lipid long-range molecular order, as well as membrane-induced structural changes of the nucleic acids can be efficiently treated by systematic high-sensitivity DSC studies.

  17. Structural and medium effects on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical with intramolecular hydrogen bonded phenols. The interplay between hydrogen-bonding and acid-base interactions on the hydrogen atom transfer reactivity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Amorati, Riccardo; Menichetti, Stefano; Viglianisi, Caterina; Bietti, Massimo

    2014-07-03

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) with intramolecularly hydrogen bonded 2-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenol (1) and 4-methoxy-2-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenol (2) and with 4-methoxy-3-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenol (3) has been carried out. In acetonitrile, intramolecular hydrogen bonding protects the phenolic O-H of 1 and 2 from attack by CumO(•) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) exclusively occurs from the C-H bonds that are α to the piperidine nitrogen (α-C-H bonds). With 3 HAT from both the phenolic O-H and the α-C-H bonds is observed. In the presence of TFA or Mg(ClO4)2, protonation or Mg(2+) complexation of the piperidine nitrogen removes the intramolecular hydrogen bond in 1 and 2 and strongly deactivates the α-C-H bonds of the three substrates. Under these conditions, HAT to CumO(•) exclusively occurs from the phenolic O-H group of 1-3. These results clearly show that in these systems the interplay between intramolecular hydrogen bonding and Brønsted and Lewis acid-base interactions can drastically influence both the HAT reactivity and selectivity. The possible implications of these findings are discussed in the framework of the important role played by tyrosyl radicals in biological systems.

  18. Interaction of 70-kDa heat shock protein with glycosaminoglycans and acidic glycopolymers.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yoichiro; Garenáux, Estelle; Nagatsuka, Takehiro; Uzawa, Hirotaka; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken

    2014-10-17

    Interaction of Hsp70 with natural and artificial acidic glycans is demonstrated based on the native PAGE analysis. Hsp70 interacts with acidic glycopolymers that contain clustered sulfated and di-sialylated glycan moieties on a polyacrylamide backbone, but not with neutral or mono-sialylated glycopolymers. Hsp70 also interacts and forms a large complex with heparin, heparan sulfate, and dermatan sulfate that commonly contain 2-O-sulfated iduronic acid residues, but not with other types of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Hsp70 consists of the N-terminal ATPase domain and the C-terminal peptide-binding domain. The interaction analyses using the recombinant N- and C-terminal half domains show that the ATPase domain mediates the direct interaction with acidic glycans, while the peptide-binding domain stabilizes the large complexes with particular GAGs. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of direct binding of Hsp70 to the particular GAGs. This property may be involved in the physiological functions of Hsp70 at the plasma membrane and extracellular environments.

  19. Interactions of sodium montmorillonite with poly(acrylic acid).

    PubMed

    Tran, Nguyen H; Dennis, Gary R; Milev, Adriyan S; Kannangara, G S Kamali; Wilson, Michael A; Lamb, Robert N

    2005-10-15

    The chemical-structural modifications of the natural clay sodium montmorillonite during interaction with poly(acrylic acid) were studied mainly by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Samples of modified montmorillonite were prepared from the reaction of sodium montmorillonite ( approximately 0.5 g) and an aqueous solution of poly(acrylic acid) (pH approximately 1.8, 50 g) at varying temperatures. X-ray diffraction indicated that the montmorillonite interlayer space ( approximately 13 A), formed by regular stacking of the silicate layers (dimension approximately 1x1000 nm), expanded to approximately 16 A as the reaction was carried out at room temperature and at 30 degrees C. At 60 degrees C, the interlayer space further expanded to approximately 20 A. The results of X-ray photoemission spectroscopy indicated that poly(acrylic acid) molecules exchange sodium ions on the surface of the silicate layers. These combined results allowed development of a reaction model that explains the dependency of the interlayer expansion with temperature. Information concerning the surface chemical reactions and systematic increases in the interlayer distances is particularly useful if montmorillonite and poly(acrylic acid) are to be used for formation of nanocomposite materials.

  20. Metabolic interactions between vitamin A and conjugated linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Carta, Gianfranca; Murru, Elisabetta; Cordeddu, Lina; Ortiz, Berenice; Giordano, Elena; Belury, Martha A; Quadro, Loredana; Banni, Sebastiano

    2014-03-24

    Lipid-soluble molecules share several aspects of their physiology due to their common adaptations to a hydrophilic environment, and may interact to regulate their action in a tissue-specific manner. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a fatty acid with a conjugated diene structure that is found in low concentrations in ruminant products and available as a nutritional supplement. CLA has been shown to increase tissue levels of retinol (vitamin A alcohol) and its sole specific circulating carrier protein retinol-binding protein (RBP or RBP4). However, the precise mechanism of this action has not been elucidated yet. Here, we provide a summary of the current knowledge in this specific area of research and speculate that retinol and CLA may compete for catabolic pathways modulated by the activity of PPAR-α and RXR heterodimer. We also present preliminary data that may position PPAR-α at the crossroads between the metabolism of lipids and vitamin A.

  1. Interactions of gaseous-pollutant and acid-rain effects

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    This research addresses the significance of individual and combined effects of gaseous pollutants and acid rain on plant growth and development. It is specifically structured to determine the importance of pollutant interactions at concentrations, combinations and exposure frequencies typical of the eastern regional environment. Laboratory, greenhouse, and field studies are designed to establish pollutant-concentration thresholds for damage from SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, NO/sub x/, and acid rain. Research to date has determined visible-injury thresholds and growth-and-yield thresholds for a variety of cultivars of bean, wheat, radish, tomato, and loblolly pine. The thresholds vary within cultivars of a species and between species.

  2. Acid and base degraded products of ketorolac.

    PubMed

    Salaris, Margherita; Nieddu, Maria; Rubattu, Nicola; Testa, Cecilia; Luongo, Elvira; Rimoli, Maria Grazia; Boatto, Gianpiero

    2010-06-05

    The stability of ketorolac tromethamine was investigated in acid (0.5M HCl) and alkaline conditions (0.5M NaOH), using the same procedure reported by Devarajan et al. [2]. The acid and base degradation products were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS).

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations on the interactions of low molecular weight natural organic acids with C60.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Xie, Hong-Bin; Chen, Jingwen; Li, Xuehua; Wang, Zhuang; Sheng, Lianxi

    2013-07-01

    As an important part of dissolved organic matter (DOM), low molecular weight organic acids (LOAs) may play a key role in the process for DOM stabilizing carbon nanomaterials (e.g. C60) suspensions in aquatic environment. In addition, both LOAs and C60 have been detected in the troposphere and therefore have a chance to interact with each other in the gaseous phase. However, the mechanism for LOAs-C60 interactions and their environmental implications need further investigations. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was employed to investigate the interactions between both neutral and ionic LOAs with C60 in vacuum and water. The results showed that the adsorptions of all LOAs on C60 in energy are favorable, and the aromatic acids have stronger interactions with C60 than the aliphatic acids in vacuum and water. The interaction energies (Eint) of the LOA anions with C60 were weaker than those of their corresponding neutral LOA molecules. The models were also developed to predict and interpret Eint based on the results from MD simulations. Dispersion, induction and hydrophobic interactions were found to be the dominating factor in Eint. These findings indicate that cost-efficient MD simulation can be employed as an important tool to predict the adsorption behavior of LOAs on carbon nanomaterials.

  4. Differential Occurrence of Interactions and Interaction Domains in Proteins Containing Homopolymeric Amino Acid Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Pelassa, Ilaria; Fiumara, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Homopolymeric amino acids repeats (AARs), which are widespread in proteomes, have often been viewed simply as spacers between protein domains, or even as “junk” sequences with no obvious function but with a potential to cause harm upon expansion as in genetic diseases associated with polyglutamine or polyalanine expansions, including Huntington disease and cleidocranial dysplasia. A growing body of evidence indicates however that at least some AARs can form organized, functional protein structures, and can regulate protein function. In particular, certain AARs can mediate protein-protein interactions, either through homotypic AAR-AAR contacts or through heterotypic contacts with other protein domains. It is still unclear however, whether AARs may have a generalized, proteome-wide role in shaping protein-protein interaction networks. Therefore, we have undertaken here a bioinformatics screening of the human proteome and interactome in search of quantitative evidence of such a role. We first identified the sets of proteins that contain repeats of any one of the 20 amino acids, as well as control sets of proteins chosen at random in the proteome. We then analyzed the connectivity between the proteins of the AAR-containing protein sets and we compared it with that observed in the corresponding control networks. We find evidence for different degrees of connectivity in the different AAR-containing protein networks. Indeed, networks of proteins containing polyglutamine, polyglutamate, polyproline, and other AARs show significantly increased levels of connectivity, whereas networks containing polyleucine and other hydrophobic repeats show lower degrees of connectivity. Furthermore, we observed that numerous protein-protein, -nucleic acid, and -lipid interaction domains are significantly enriched in specific AAR protein groups. These findings support the notion of a generalized, combinatorial role of AARs, together with conventional protein interaction domains, in

  5. Solid Acid Based Fuel Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    superprotonic solid acids with elements such as P, As, Si and Ge, which have greater affinities to oxygen , we anticipate that the reduction reaction will be...bulk material consisted of an apatite phase (hexagonal symmetry) of variable composition, LixLa10-x(SiO4)6O3-x, with excess lithium residing in the...in Tables 1 and 2, indicate that this compound is a rather conventional apatite with fixed stoichiometry, LiLa9(SiO4)6O2 (x = 1). Such a result is

  6. Whole body acid-base modeling revisited.

    PubMed

    Ring, Troels; Nielsen, Søren

    2017-04-01

    The textbook account of whole body acid-base balance in terms of endogenous acid production, renal net acid excretion, and gastrointestinal alkali absorption, which is the only comprehensive model around, has never been applied in clinical practice or been formally validated. To improve understanding of acid-base modeling, we managed to write up this conventional model as an expression solely on urine chemistry. Renal net acid excretion and endogenous acid production were already formulated in terms of urine chemistry, and we could from the literature also see gastrointestinal alkali absorption in terms of urine excretions. With a few assumptions it was possible to see that this expression of net acid balance was arithmetically identical to minus urine charge, whereby under the development of acidosis, urine was predicted to acquire a net negative charge. The literature already mentions unexplained negative urine charges so we scrutinized a series of seminal papers and confirmed empirically the theoretical prediction that observed urine charge did acquire negative charge as acidosis developed. Hence, we can conclude that the conventional model is problematic since it predicts what is physiologically impossible. Therefore, we need a new model for whole body acid-base balance, which does not have impossible implications. Furthermore, new experimental studies are needed to account for charge imbalance in urine under development of acidosis.

  7. Synthesis of new kojic acid based unnatural α-amino acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, C; Payili, Nagaraju; Yennam, Satyanarayana; Devi, P Uma; Behera, Manoranjan

    2015-11-01

    An efficient method for the preparation of kojic acid based α-amino acid derivatives by alkylation of glycinate schiff base with bromokojic acids have been described. Using this method, mono as well as di alkylated kojic acid-amino acid conjugates have been prepared. This is the first synthesis of C-linked kojic acid-amino acid conjugate where kojic acid is directly linked to amino acid through a C-C bond.

  8. Covalent interaction of chloroacetic and acetic acids with cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Bhat, H K; Ansari, G A

    1989-01-01

    The covalent interaction of chloroacetic acid with rat liver lipids was studied in vivo. Rats were given a single oral dose (8.75 mg/kg, 50 microCi) of 1-[14C]chloroacetic acid and sacrificed after 24 hours. Lipids extracted from the livers were separated into neutral lipids and phospholipids by solid-phase extraction using sep-pak silica cartridges. The neutral lipid fraction was further fractionated by preparative thin-layer chromatography followed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The fraction corresponding to the retention time of standard cholesteryl chloroacetate gave a pseudomolecular ion peak at m/z 480/482 ratio: (3:1) on ammonia chemical ionization mass spectrometry, and the fragmentation pattern was found to be similar to that of the standard sample. Under similar conditions, acetic acid resulted in the formation of cholesteryl acetate. The effect of such conjugation reactions on the cell membrane and their contribution to toxicity is presently unknown.

  9. Acid-NSAID/aspirin interaction in peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Richard H; Yuan, Yuhong

    2011-01-01

    The presence of gastric acid plays a critical role in the mechanisms of NSAIDs/aspirin-associated gastric and duodenal mucosal injury and ulceration. The role of gastric acid and its relationship to NSAIDs/aspirin in mucosal damage, ulcer and ulcer complications continues to be an important concern because of the increasing worldwide use of NSAIDs and aspirin. Acid suppression continues to be an important prevention strategy for NSAID-associated gastric and duodenal ulcer and ulcer complications. While a coxib or an NSAID and PPI in combination are considered to have comparable safety profiles, the evidence from direct comparisons in high-risk patients is limited, and the cardiovascular safety of coxibs and NSAIDs remains a concern especially in patients with a high risk of cardiovascular disease. An evaluation of individual gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks and benefits, selection of the most appropriate NSAID and dose for each particular patient should always be emphasized. Twice daily PPI is more appropriate to protect a patient who is taking NSAIDs twice daily. PPI co-therapy is still recommended in patients receiving dual antiplatelet treatment, although conflicting results have been reported about adverse drug interactions between PPIs and clopidogrel.

  10. Simple physics-based analytical formulas for the potentials of mean force for the interaction of amino acid side chains in water. 1. Approximate expression for the free energy of hydrophobic association based on a Gaussian-overlap model.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Mariusz; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2007-03-22

    A physics-based model is proposed to derive approximate analytical expressions for the cavity component of the free energy of hydrophobic association of spherical and spheroidal solutes in water. The model is based on the difference between the number and context of the water molecules in the hydration sphere of a hydrophobic dimer and of two isolated hydrophobic solutes. It is assumed that the water molecules touching the convex part of the molecular surface of the dimer and those in the hydration spheres of the monomers contribute equally to the free energy of solvation, and those touching the saddle part of the molecular surface of the dimer result in a more pronounced increase in free energy because of their more restricted mobility (entropy loss) and fewer favorable electrostatic interactions with other water molecules. The density of water in the hydration sphere around a single solute particle is approximated by the derivative of a Gaussian centered on the solute molecule with respect to its standard deviation. On the basis of this approximation, the number of water molecules in different parts of the hydration sphere of the dimer is expressed in terms of the first and the second mixed derivatives of the two Gaussians centered on the first and second solute molecules, respectively, with respect to the standard deviations of these Gaussians, and plausible analytical expressions for the cavity component of the hydrophobic-association energy of spherical and spheroidal solutes are introduced. As opposed to earlier hydration-shell models, our expressions reproduce the desolvation maxima in the potentials of mean force of pairs of nonpolar solutes in water, and their advantage over the models based on molecular-surface area is that they have continuous gradients in the coordinates of solute centers.

  11. A rapid method for detecting protein-nucleic acid interactions by protein induced fluorescence enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Valuchova, Sona; Fulnecek, Jaroslav; Petrov, Alexander P.; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Riha, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Many fundamental biological processes depend on intricate networks of interactions between proteins and nucleic acids and a quantitative description of these interactions is important for understanding cellular mechanisms governing DNA replication, transcription, or translation. Here we present a versatile method for rapid and quantitative assessment of protein/nucleic acid (NA) interactions. This method is based on protein induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE), a phenomenon whereby protein binding increases the fluorescence of Cy3-like dyes. PIFE has mainly been used in single molecule studies to detect protein association with DNA or RNA. Here we applied PIFE for steady state quantification of protein/NA interactions by using microwell plate fluorescence readers (mwPIFE). We demonstrate the general applicability of mwPIFE for examining various aspects of protein/DNA interactions with examples from the restriction enzyme BamHI, and the DNA repair complexes Ku and XPF/ERCC1. These include determination of sequence and structure binding specificities, dissociation constants, detection of weak interactions, and the ability of a protein to translocate along DNA. mwPIFE represents an easy and high throughput method that does not require protein labeling and can be applied to a wide range of applications involving protein/NA interactions. PMID:28008962

  12. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  13. Nucleic acid-based nanoengineering: novel structures for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanying; LaBean, Thomas H.; Leong, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoengineering exploits the interactions of materials at the nanometre scale to create functional nanostructures. It relies on the precise organization of nanomaterials to achieve unique functionality. There are no interactions more elegant than those governing nucleic acids via Watson–Crick base-pairing rules. The infinite combinations of DNA/RNA base pairs and their remarkable molecular recognition capability can give rise to interesting nanostructures that are only limited by our imagination. Over the past years, creative assembly of nucleic acids has fashioned a plethora of two-dimensional and three-dimensional nanostructures with precisely controlled size, shape and spatial functionalization. These nanostructures have been precisely patterned with molecules, proteins and gold nanoparticles for the observation of chemical reactions at the single molecule level, activation of enzymatic cascade and novel modality of photonic detection, respectively. Recently, they have also been engineered to encapsulate and release bioactive agents in a stimulus-responsive manner for therapeutic applications. The future of nucleic acid-based nanoengineering is bright and exciting. In this review, we will discuss the strategies to control the assembly of nucleic acids and highlight the recent efforts to build functional nucleic acid nanodevices for nanomedicine. PMID:23050076

  14. Codes in the codons: construction of a codon/amino acid periodic table and a study of the nature of specific nucleic acid-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Benyo, B; Biro, J C; Benyo, Z

    2004-01-01

    The theory of "codon-amino acid coevolution" was first proposed by Woese in 1967. It suggests that there is a stereochemical matching - that is, affinity - between amino acids and certain of the base triplet sequences that code for those amino acids. We have constructed a common periodic table of codons and amino acids, where the nucleic acid table showed perfect axial symmetry for codons and the corresponding amino acid table also displayed periodicity regarding the biochemical properties (charge and hydrophobicity) of the 20 amino acids and the position of the stop signals. The table indicates that the middle (2/sup nd/) amino acid in the codon has a prominent role in determining some of the structural features of the amino acids. The possibility that physical contact between codons and amino acids might exist was tested on restriction enzymes. Many recognition site-like sequences were found in the coding sequences of these enzymes and as many as 73 examples of codon-amino acid co-location were observed in the 7 known 3D structures (December 2003) of endonuclease-nucleic acid complexes. These results indicate that the smallest possible units of specific nucleic acid-protein interaction are indeed the stereochemically compatible codons and amino acids.

  15. Influence of salt purity on Na+ and palmitic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zishuai; Hua, Wei; Verreault, Dominique; Allen, Heather C

    2013-12-19

    The influence of salt purity on the interactions between Na(+) ions and the carboxylate (COO(-)) head group of palmitic acid (PA) monolayers is studied in the COO(-) and OH stretching regions using broad-band vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. Ultrapure (UP) and ACS grade NaCl salts are used for aqueous solution preparation after proper pretreatment. The time evolution of VSFG spectra of PA monolayers on solutions made from these two grades of salts is different, which reveals that the salt purity has a significant impact on the interactions between Na(+) ions and the COO(-) group of PA. The trace metal impurities in ACS grade salt, which are more abundant than those in UP grade salt, are responsible for this difference due to their stronger affinity for the carboxylate group relative to Na(+) and further affects the interfacial water structure. These results suggest that the alkali salt grade even after pretreatment is critical in the studies of alkali cation-carboxylate interactions and comparison of relative binding affinities of different cations.

  16. The study of interaction of modified fatty acid with 99mTc in alcoholic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuridin, V. S.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Varlamova, N. V.; Nesterov, E. A.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Sadkin, V. L.; Rogov, A. S.; Ilina, E. A.; Larionova, L. A.; Sazonova, S. I.; Zelchan, R. V.; Villa, N. E.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the results of laboratory research aimed at the development of methods of synthesis of new radiodiagnostic agents based on modified fatty acid labelled with technetium-99m intended for scintigraphic evaluation of myocardial metabolism. In particular, the interaction of substance with 99mTc in alcoholic media and the use of ethanol as solvent in the synthesis of the radiopharmaceutical were studied.

  17. The origins of life -- the 'protein interaction world' hypothesis: protein interactions were the first form of self-reproducing life and nucleic acids evolved later as memory molecules.

    PubMed

    Andras, Peter; Andras, Csaba

    2005-01-01

    The 'protein interaction world' (PIW) hypothesis of the origins of life assumes that life emerged as a self-reproducing and expanding system of protein interactions. In mainstream molecular biology, 'replication' refers to the material copying of molecules such as nucleic acids. However, PIW is conceptualized as an abstract communication system constituted by the interactions between proteins, in which 'replication' happens at the level of self-reproduction of these interactions between proteins. Densely concentrated peptide interaction systems may have reproduced and expanded as 'protocell' vesicles surrounded by lipid bi-layer membranes. Protocells led to the emergence of proto-RNA molecules of greater chemical stability which served as chemically differentiated 'memories' of peptide interaction states, thereby facilitating the reproduction and expansion of protocells. Simplification-driven expansion led to the selection of biotic amino acids and the reduction of the typical RNA alphabet to the four usual bases (A, C, G and U). Dense interactions between RNA molecules led to the emergence of the RNA interaction subsystem of the cell, and to the emergence of 'memories' of RNA interactions in the form of DNA molecules with greater chemical stability. The expansion of DNA molecule interactions led to the dense clustering and encapsulation of DNA molecules within the cell nucleus. RNA molecules therefore serve as memories of protein interactions and DNA molecules are memories of RNA interactions. We believe that the PIW hypothesis is more evolutionarily plausible than the mainstream RNA world hypothesis, and has greater explanatory power.

  18. Adding Interactivity to Web Based Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cafolla, Ralph; Knee, Richard

    Web Based Distance Learning (WBDL) is a form of distance learning based on providing instruction mainly on the World Wide Web. This paradigm has limitations, especially the lack of interactivity inherent in the Web. The purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the technologies the authors have used in their courses at Florida Atlantic…

  19. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana; Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes’ properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate – for the first time – complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules.

  20. Hard and soft acids and bases: atoms and atomic ions.

    PubMed

    Reed, James L

    2008-07-07

    The structural origin of hard-soft behavior in atomic acids and bases has been explored using a simple orbital model. The Pearson principle of hard and soft acids and bases has been taken to be the defining statement about hard-soft behavior and as a definition of chemical hardness. There are a number of conditions that are imposed on any candidate structure and associated property by the Pearson principle, which have been exploited. The Pearson principle itself has been used to generate a thermodynamically based scale of relative hardness and softness for acids and bases (operational chemical hardness), and a modified Slater model has been used to discern the electronic origin of hard-soft behavior. Whereas chemical hardness is a chemical property of an acid or base and the operational chemical hardness is an experimental measure of it, the absolute hardness is a physical property of an atom or molecule. A critical examination of chemical hardness, which has been based on a more rigorous application of the Pearson principle and the availability of quantitative measures of chemical hardness, suggests that the origin of hard-soft behavior for both acids and bases resides in the relaxation of the electrons not undergoing transfer during the acid-base interaction. Furthermore, the results suggest that the absolute hardness should not be taken as synonymous with chemical hardness but that the relationship is somewhat more complex. Finally, this work provides additional groundwork for a better understanding of chemical hardness that will inform the understanding of hardness in molecules.

  1. Hard and soft acids and bases: small molecules.

    PubMed

    Reed, James L

    2009-08-03

    The operational chemical hardness has been determined for the hydride, chloride, and fluoride derivatives of the anionic atomic bases of the second period. Of interest is the identification of the structure and associated processes that give rise to hard-soft behavior in small molecules. The Pearson Principle of Hard and Soft Acids and Bases has been taken to be the defining statement about hard-soft behavior and as a definition of chemical hardness. Similar to the case for atoms, the molecule's responding electrons have been identified as the structure giving rise to hard-soft behavior, and a relaxation described by a modified Slater model has been identified as the associated process. The responding electrons are the molecule's valence electrons that are not undergoing electron transfer in an acid-base interaction. However, it has been demonstrated that chemical hardness is a local property, and only those responding electrons that are associated with the base's binding atom directly impact chemical hardness.

  2. Structure of six organic acid-base adducts from 6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine and acidic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Daqi; Tao, Lin; Zhou, Mengjian; Shen, Yinyan; Chen, Quan; Lin, Zhanghui; Gao, Xingjun

    2014-05-01

    Six anhydrous organic acid-base adducts of 6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine were prepared with organic acids as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, salicylic acid, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, malonic acid and sebacic acid. The compounds 1-6 were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, and elemental analysis. The melting points of all the adducts were given. Of the six adducts, 1, 3, 4, and 5 are organic salts, while 2, and 6 are cocrystals. The supramolecular arrangement in the crystals 2-6 is based on the R22(8) synthon. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-6 suggests that there are strong NH⋯O, OH⋯N, and OH⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between acid and base components in the supramolecular assemblies. When the hydroxyl group is present in the ortho position of the carboxy, the intramolecular S6 synthon is present, as expected. Besides the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, other noncovalent interactions also play important roles in structure extension. Due to the synergetic effect of these weak interactions, compounds 1-6 display 1D-3D framework structure.

  3. Mixed micelles of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid and selected hydrophobic bile acids: interaction parameter, partition coefficient of nitrazepam and mixed micelles haemolytic potential.

    PubMed

    Poša, Mihalj; Tepavčević, Vesna

    2011-09-01

    The formation of mixed micelles built of 7,12-dioxolithocholic and the following hydrophobic bile acids was examined by conductometric method: cholic (C), deoxycholic (D), chenodeoxycholic (CD), 12-oxolithocholic (12-oxoL), 7-oxolithocholic (7-oxoL), ursodeoxycholic (UD) and hiodeoxycholic (HD). Interaction parameter (β) in the studied binary mixed micelles had negative value, suggesting synergism between micelle building units. Based on β value, the hydrophobic bile acids formed two groups: group I (C, D and CD) and group II (12-oxoL, 7-oxoL, UD and HD). Bile acids from group II had more negative β values than bile acids from group I. Also, bile acids from group II formed intermolecular hydrogen bonds in aggregates with both smaller (2) and higher (4) aggregation numbers, according to the analysis of their stereochemical (conformational) structures and possible structures of mixed micelles built of these bile acids and 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid. Haemolytic potential and partition coefficient of nitrazepam were higher in mixed micelles built of the more hydrophobic bile acids (C, D, CD) and 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid than in micelles built only of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid. On the other hand, these mixed micelles still had lower values of haemolytic potential than micelles built of C, D or CD. The mixed micelles that included bile acids: 12-oxoL, 7-oxoL, UD or HD did not significantly differ from the micelles of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid, observing the values of their haemolytic potential.

  4. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Castillo-León, Jaime; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Svendsen, Winnie E.; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Boisen, Anja; Martínez, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    This Letter involved the preparation of a conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid that was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple 'one pot' synthesis method. Subsequently, the conjugate was investigated by a computational hybrid method: our own N-layered Integrated Molecular Orbital and Molecular Mechanics (B3LYP(6-31G(d):UFF)). The results confirmed that the interaction occurred via hydrogen bonding between protons of the glutamic moiety from folic acid and π electrons from the carbon nanotubes. The single-walled carbon nanotube-folic acid conjugate presented herein is believed to lead the way to new potential applications as carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems.

  5. Simple Physics-Based Analytical Formulas for the Potentials of Mean Force of the Interaction of Amino Acid Side Chains in Water. VII. Charged-Hydrophobic/Polar and Polar-Hydrophobic/Polar Side Chains.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Mariusz; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2017-01-19

    The physics-based potentials of side-chain-side-chain interactions corresponding to pairs composed of charged and polar, polar and polar, charged and hydrophobic, and hydrophobic and hydrophobic side chains have been determined. A total of 144 four-dimensional potentials of mean force (PMFs) of all possible pairs of molecules modeling these pairs were determined by umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water as functions of distance and orientation, and the analytical expressions were then fitted to the PMFs. Depending on the type of interacting sites, the analytical approximation to the PMF is a sum of terms corresponding to van der Waals interactions and cavity-creation involving the nonpolar sections of the side chains and van der Waals, cavity-creation, and electrostatic (charge-dipole or dipole-dipole) interaction energies and polarization energies involving the charged or polar sections of the side chains. The model used in this work reproduces all features of the interacting pairs. The UNited RESidue force field with the new side-chain-side-chain interaction potentials was preliminarily tested with the N-terminal part of the B-domain of staphylococcal protein A (PDBL 1BDD ; a three-α-helix bundle) and UPF0291 protein YnzC from Bacillus subtilis (PDB: 2HEP ; an α-helical hairpin).

  6. Jigsaw Cooperative Learning: Acid-Base Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarhan, Leman; Sesen, Burcin Acar

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on investigating the effectiveness of jigsaw cooperative learning instruction on first-year undergraduates' understanding of acid-base theories. Undergraduates' opinions about jigsaw cooperative learning instruction were also investigated. The participants of this study were 38 first-year undergraduates in chemistry education…

  7. Separation of Acids, Bases, and Neutral Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Megumi; Mah, Helen M.; Sgarbi, Paulo W. M.; Lall, Manjinder S.; Ly, Tai Wei; Browne, Lois M.

    2003-01-01

    Separation of Acids, Bases, and Neutral Compounds requires the following software, which is available for free download from the Internet: Netscape Navigator, version 4.75 or higher, or Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 5.0 or higher; Chime plug-in, version compatible with your OS and browser (available from MDL); and Flash player, version 5 or higher (available from Macromedia).

  8. Azadirachtin interacts with retinoic acid receptors and inhibits retinoic acid-mediated biological responses.

    PubMed

    Thoh, Maikho; Babajan, Banaganapalli; Raghavendra, Pongali B; Sureshkumar, Chitta; Manna, Sunil K

    2011-02-11

    Considering the role of retinoids in regulation of more than 500 genes involved in cell cycle and growth arrest, a detailed understanding of the mechanism and its regulation is useful for therapy. The extract of the medicinal plant Neem (Azadirachta indica) is used against several ailments especially for anti-inflammatory, anti-itching, spermicidal, anticancer, and insecticidal activities. In this report we prove the detailed mechanism on the regulation of retinoic acid-mediated cell signaling by azadirachtin, active components of neem extract. Azadirachtin repressed all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA)-mediated nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) activation, not the DNA binding but the NF-κB-dependent gene expression. It did not inhibit IκBα degradation, IκBα kinase activity, or p65 phosphorylation and its nuclear translocation but inhibited NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression. Azadirachtin inhibited TRAF6-mediated, but not TRAF2-mediated NF-κB activation. It inhibited ATRA-induced Sp1 and CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) DNA binding. Azadirachtin inhibited ATRA binding with retinoid receptors, which is supported by biochemical and in silico evidences. Azadirachtin showed strong interaction with retinoid receptors. It suppressed ATRA-mediated removal of retinoid receptors, bound with DNA by inhibiting ATRA binding to its receptors. Overall, our data suggest that azadirachtin interacts with retinoic acid receptors and suppresses ATRA binding, inhibits falling off the receptors, and activates transcription factors like CREB, Sp1, NF-κB, etc. Thus, azadirachtin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-metastatic responses by a novel pathway that would be beneficial for further anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer therapies.

  9. Ion-mediated nucleic acid helix-helix interactions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-07-15

    Salt ions are essential for the folding of nucleic acids. We use the tightly bound ion (TBI) model, which can account for the correlations and fluctuations for the ions bound to the nucleic acids, to investigate the electrostatic free-energy landscape for two parallel nucleic acid helices in the solution of added salt. The theory is based on realistic atomic structures of the helices. In monovalent salt, the helices are predicted to repel each other. For divalent salt, while the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann theory predicts only the repulsion, the TBI theory predicts an effective attraction between the helices. The helices are predicted to be stabilized at an interhelix distance approximately 26-36 A, and the strength of the attractive force can reach -0.37 k(B)T/bp for helix length in the range of 9-12 bp. Both the stable helix-helix distance and the strength of the attraction are strongly dependent on the salt concentration and ion size. With the increase of the salt concentration, the helix-helix attraction becomes stronger and the most stable helix-helix separation distance becomes smaller. For divalent ions, at very high ion concentration, further addition of ions leads to the weakening of the attraction. Smaller ion size causes stronger helix-helix attraction and stabilizes the helices at a shorter distance. In addition, the TBI model shows that a decrease in the solvent dielectric constant would enhance the ion-mediated attraction. The theoretical findings from the TBI theory agree with the experimental measurements on the osmotic pressure of DNA array as well as the results from the computer simulations.

  10. Interactive Pedagogy in a Literature Based Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Virginia

    1993-01-01

    Preserving a literary-based curriculum, creating a sensitivity to the literature, and encouraging communicative skills relative to the literature are significant goals in foreign language study. Therefore, a program involving strategic interaction and cooperative learning techniques applied to the study of literature fosters communication and…

  11. Hydrogen bonded binary molecular adducts derived from exobidentate N-donor ligand with dicarboxylic acids: Acid⋯imidazole hydrogen-bonding interactions in neutral and ionic heterosynthons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathalikkattil, Amal Cherian; Damodaran, Subin; Bisht, Kamal Kumar; Suresh, Eringathodi

    2011-01-01

    Four new binary molecular compounds between a flexible exobidentate N-heterocycle and a series of dicarboxylic acids have been synthesized. The N-donor 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzene (bix) was reacted with flexible and rigid dicarboxylic acids viz., cyclohexane-1,4-dicarboxylic acid (H 2chdc), naphthalene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid (H 2npdc) and 1H-pyrazole-3,5-dicarboxylic acid (H 2pzdc), generating four binary molecular complexes. X-ray crystallographic investigation of the molecular adducts revealed the primary intermolecular interactions carboxylic acid⋯amine (via O-H⋯N) as well as carboxylate⋯protonated amine (via N-H +⋯O -) within the binary compounds, generating layered and two-dimensional sheet type H-bonded networks involving secondary weak interactions (C-H⋯O) including the solvent of crystallization. Depending on the differences in p Ka values of the selected base/acid (Δp Ka), diverse H-bonded supramolecular assemblies could be premeditated. This study demonstrates the H-bonding interactions between imidazole/imidazolium cation and carboxylic acid/carboxylate anion in providing sufficient driving force for the directed assembly of binary molecular complexes. In the two-component solid form of hetero synthons involving bix and dicarboxylic acid, only H 2chdc exist as cocrystal with bix, while all the other three compounds crystallized exclusively as salt, in agreement with the Δp Ka values predicted for the formation of salts/cocrystals from the base and acid used in the synthesis of supramolecular solids.

  12. Linear Titration Curves of Acids and Bases.

    PubMed

    Joseph, N R

    1959-05-29

    The Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, by a simple transformation, becomes pH - pK = pA - pB, where pA and pB are the negative logarithms of acid and base concentrations. Sigmoid titration curves then reduce to straight lines; titration curves of polyelectrolytes, to families of straight lines. The method is applied to the titration of the dipeptide glycyl aminotricarballylic acid, with four titrable groups. Results are expressed as Cartesian and d'Ocagne nomograms. The latter is of a general form applicable to polyelectrolytes of any degree of complexity.

  13. Interaction of NAP-22 with brain glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD).

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Shohei; Kobayashi, Yuumi; Odagaki, Sin-Ichi; Makino, Midori; Kumanogoh, Haruko; Nakamura, Shun; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Hayashi, Fumio

    2013-03-14

    NAP-22 (also called BASP1 or CAP-23) is a neuron-enriched protein localized mainly in the synaptic vesicles and the synaptic plasma membrane. Biochemically, it is recovered in the lipid raft fraction. In order to understand the physiological function of the neuronal lipid raft, NAP-22 binding proteins were screened with a pull-down assay. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) was detected through LC-MS/MS, and Western blotting using a specific antibody confirmed the result. Two isoforms of GAD, GAD65 and GAD67, were expressed in bacteria as GST-fusion forms and the interaction with NAP-22 was confirmed in vitro. Partial co-localization of NAP-22 with GAD65 and GAD67 was also observed in cultured neurons. The binding showed no effect on the enzymatic activity of GAD65 and GAD67. These results hence suggest that NAP-22 could participate in the transport of GAD65 and GAD67 to the presynaptic termini and their retention on the synaptic vesicles as an anchoring protein.

  14. Simple physics-based analytical formulas for the potentials of mean force for the interaction of amino acid side chains in water. 3. Calculation and parameterization of the potentials of mean force of pairs of identical hydrophobic side chains.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Mariusz; Sobolewski, Emil; Czaplewski, Cezary; Liwo, Adam; Ołdziej, Stanisław; No, Joo Hwan; Scheraga, Harold A

    2007-03-22

    The potentials of mean force of homodimers of the molecules modeling hydrophobic amino acid side chains (ethane (for alanine), propane (for proline), isobutane (for valine), isopentane (for leucine and isoleucine), ethylbenzene (for phenylalanine), and methyl propyl sulfide (for methionine)) were determined by umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water as functions of distance and orientation. Analytical expressions consisting of the Gay-Berne term to represent effective van der Waals interactions and the cavity term derived in paper 1 of this series were fitted to the potentials of mean force. The positions and depths of the contact minima and the positions and heights of the desolvation maxima, including their dependence on the orientation of the molecules, were well represented by the analytical expressions for all systems, which justifies use of such potentials in coarse-grain protein-folding simulations.

  15. Amino Acid Specific Effects on RNA Tertiary Interactions: Single-Molecule Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Abhigyan; Sung, Hsuan-Lei; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-10-10

    In light of the current models for an early RNA-based universe, the potential influence of simple amino acids on tertiary folding of ribozymal RNA into biochemically competent structures is speculated to be of significant evolutionary importance. In the present work, the folding-unfolding kinetics of a ubiquitous tertiary interaction motif, the GAAA tetraloop-tetraloop receptor (TL-TLR), is investigated by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy in the presence of natural amino acids both with (e.g., lysine, arginine) and without (e.g., glycine) protonated side chain residues. By way of control, we also investigate the effects of a special amino acid (e.g., proline) and amino acid mimetic (e.g., betaine) that contain secondary or quaternary amine groups rather than a primary amine group. This combination permits systematic study of amino acid induced (or amino acid like) RNA folding dynamics as a function of side chain complexity, pKa, charge state, and amine group content. Most importantly, each of the naturally occurring amino acids is found to destabilize the TL-TLR tertiary folding equilibrium, the kinetic origin of which is dominated by a decrease in the folding rate constant (kdock), also affected by a strongly amino acid selective increase in the unfolding rate constant (kundock). To further elucidate the underlying thermodynamics, single-molecule equilibrium constants (Keq) for TL-TLR folding have been probed as a function of temperature, which reveal an amino acid dependent decrease in both overall exothermicity (ΔΔH° > 0) and entropic cost (-TΔΔS° < 0) for the overall folding process. Temperature-dependent studies on the folding/unfolding kinetic rate constants reveal analogous amino acid specific changes in both enthalpy (ΔΔH(⧧)) and entropy (ΔΔS(⧧)) for accessing the transition state barrier. The maximum destabilization of the TL-TLR tertiary interaction is observed for arginine, which is consistent with early

  16. Heterogeneous Interaction of Peroxyacetyl Nitrate on Liquid Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1996-01-01

    The uptake of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) on liquid sulfuric acid surfaces has been investigated using a fast-flow reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. PAN was observed to be reversibly adsorbed on sulfuric acid.

  17. Teaching Brønsted-Lowry Acid-Base Theory in a Direct Comprehensive Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcock, Jamie L.

    2001-11-01

    A figure is presented which shows in a comprehensive way the relationships between Brønsted-Lowry acids and their conjugate bases. It shows their interactions with water and quantifies the terms strong, weak, and very weak, showing precisely how these modifiers can be effectively used to indicate the nature of the reaction between any conjugate acid/base and water. It shows that ion hydrolysis is simple acid/base behavior, and it clearly suggests the leveling effect of water on strong acids and bases.

  18. Interaction effects of lactic acid and acetic acid at different temperatures on ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in corn mash.

    PubMed

    Graves, Tara; Narendranath, Neelakantam V; Dawson, Karl; Power, Ronan

    2007-01-01

    The combined effects of lactic acid and acetic acid on ethanol production by S. cerevisiae in corn mash, as influenced by temperature, were examined. Duplicate full factorial experiments (three lactic acid concentrations x three acetic acid concentrations) were performed to evaluate the interaction between lactic and acetic acids on the ethanol production of yeast at each of the three temperatures, 30, 34, and 37 degrees C. Corn mash at 30% dry solids adjusted to pH 4 after lactic and acetic acid addition was used as the substrate. Ethanol production rates and final ethanol concentrations decreased (P<0.001) progressively as the concentration of combined lactic and acetic acids in the corn mash increased and the temperature was raised from 30 to 37 degrees C. At 30 degrees C, essentially no ethanol was produced after 96 h when 0.5% w/v acetic acid was present in the mash (with 0.5, 2, and 4% w/v lactic acid). At 34 and 37 degrees C, the final concentrations of ethanol produced by the yeast were noticeably reduced by the presence of 0.3% w/v acetic acid and >or=2% w/v lactic acid. It can be concluded that, as in previous studies with defined media, lactic acid and acetic acid act synergistically to reduce ethanol production by yeast in corn mash. In addition, the inhibitory effects of combined lactic and acetic acid in corn mash were more apparent at elevated temperatures.

  19. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; Tan, Li Huey

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed. PMID:25205057

  20. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E; Tan, Li Huey; Lu, Yi

    2014-12-10

    In this review, we summarize recent progress in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed.

  1. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; Tan, Li Huey; Lu, Yi

    2014-09-10

    In this paper, we summarize recent progress in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed.

  2. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; ...

    2014-09-10

    In this paper, we summarize recent progress in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insightsmore » gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed.« less

  3. Interaction of ganoderic acid on HIV related target: molecular docking studies

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Rahmad; Yam, Wai Keat

    2011-01-01

    Finding the ultimate HIV cure remain a challenging tasks for decades. Various active compounds have been tested against various components of the virus in the effort to halt the virus development in infected host. The idea of finding cure from known pharmacologically active natural occurring compounds is intriguing and practical. Ganoderma lucidum (Ling-Zhi or Reishi) is one of the most productive and pharmacologically active compounds found in Asian countries. It has been used traditionally for many years throughout different cultures. More than a decade ago, el-Mekkawy and co-workers (1998) have tested several active compounds found in this plant. They have successfully identified several active compounds with reasonable inhibitory activity against HIV protease however; no further studies were done on these compounds. This study aimed to elucidate interactions for one of the active compounds of Ganoderma lucidum namely ganoderic acid with HIV-1 protease using molecular docking simulation. This study revealed four hydrogen bonds formed between model34 of ganoderic acid B and 1HVR. Hydrogen bonds in 1HVR-Model34 complex were formed through ILE50, ILE50', ASP29 and ASP30 residues. Interestingly similar interactions were also observed in the native ligand in 1HVR. Furthermore, interactions involving ILE50 and ILE50' residues have been previously identified to play central roles in HIV-1 protease-ligand interactions.These observed interactions not only suggested HIV-1 protease in general is a suitable target for ganoderic acid B, they also indicated a huge potential for HIV drug discovery based on this compound. PMID:22347784

  4. The first proton sponge-based amino acids: synthesis, acid-base properties and some reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ozeryanskii, Valery A; Gorbacheva, Anastasia Yu; Pozharskii, Alexander F; Vlasenko, Marina P; Tereznikov, Alexander Yu; Chernov'yants, Margarita S

    2015-08-21

    The first hybrid base constructed from 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (proton sponge or DMAN) and glycine, N-methyl-N-(8-dimethylamino-1-naphthyl)aminoacetic acid, was synthesised in high yield and its hydrobromide was structurally characterised and used to determine the acid-base properties via potentiometric titration. It was found that the basic strength of the DMAN-glycine base (pKa = 11.57, H2O) is on the level of amidine amino acids like arginine and creatine and its structure, zwitterionic vs. neutral, based on the spectroscopic (IR, NMR, mass) and theoretical (DFT) approaches has a strong preference to the zwitterionic form. Unlike glycine, the DMAN-glycine zwitterion is N-chiral and is hydrolytically cleaved with the loss of glycolic acid on heating in DMSO. This reaction together with the mild decarboxylative conversion of proton sponge-based amino acids into 2,3-dihydroperimidinium salts under air-oxygen was monitored with the help of the DMAN-alanine amino acid. The newly devised amino acids are unique as they combine fluorescence, strongly basic and redox-active properties.

  5. Prediction of retention times of proteins in hydrophobic interaction chromatography using only their amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Salgado, J Cristian; Rapaport, Ivan; Asenjo, Juan A

    2005-12-09

    This paper focuses on the prediction of the dimensionless retention time of proteins (DRT) in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) by means of mathematical models based, essentially, only on aminoacidic composition. The results show that such prediction is indeed possible. Our main contribution was the design of models that predict the DRT using the minimal information concerning a protein: its aminoacidic composition. The performance is similar to that observed in models that use much more sophisticated information such as the three-dimensional structure of proteins. Three models that, in addition to the amino acid composition, use different assumptions about the amino acids tendency to be exposed to the solvent, were evaluated in 12 proteins with known experimental DRT. In all the cases analyzed, the model that obtained the best results was the one based on a linear estimation of the aminoacidic surface composition. The models were adjusted using a collection of 74 vectors of aminoacidic properties plus a set of 6388 vectors derived from these using two mathematical tools: k-means and self-organizing maps (SOM) algorithms. The best vector was generated by the SOM algorithm and was interpreted as a hydrophobicity scale based partly on the tendency of the amino acids to be hidden in proteins. The prediction error (MSE(JK)) obtained by this model was almost 35% smaller than that obtained by the model that supposes that all the amino acids are completely exposed and 40% smaller than that obtained by the model that uses a simple correction factor considering the general tendency of each amino acid to be exposed to the solvent. In fact, the performance of the best model based on the aminoacidic composition was 5% better than that observed in the model based on the three-dimensional structure of proteins.

  6. Interactive analysis of geodata based intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Boris; Eck, Ralf; Unmüessig, Gabriel; Peinsipp-Byma, Elisabeth

    2016-05-01

    When a spatiotemporal events happens, multi-source intelligence data is gathered to understand the problem, and strategies for solving the problem are investigated. The difficulties arising from handling spatial and temporal intelligence data represent the main problem. The map might be the bridge to visualize the data and to get the most understand model for all stakeholders. For the analysis of geodata based intelligence data, a software was developed as a working environment that combines geodata with optimized ergonomics. The interaction with the common operational picture (COP) is so essentially facilitated. The composition of the COP is based on geodata services, which are normalized by international standards of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The basic geodata are combined with intelligence data from images (IMINT) and humans (HUMINT), stored in a NATO Coalition Shared Data Server (CSD). These intelligence data can be combined with further information sources, i.e., live sensors. As a result a COP is generated and an interaction suitable for the specific workspace is added. This allows the users to work interactively with the COP, i.e., searching with an on board CSD client for suitable intelligence data and integrate them into the COP. Furthermore, users can enrich the scenario with findings out of the data of interactive live sensors and add data from other sources. This allows intelligence services to contribute effectively to the process by what military and disaster management are organized.

  7. Study on the interaction between nucleic acid and Eu 3+-oxolinic acid and the determination of nucleic acid using the resonance light scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xia; Sun, Shuna; Yang, Jinghe; Wang, Minqin; Liu, Liyan; Guo, Changying

    2005-12-01

    At pH 9.75, the resonance light scattering (RLS) intensity of OA-Eu 3+ system is greatly enhanced by nucleic acid. Based on this phenomenon, a new quantitative method for nucleic acid in aqueous solution has been developed. Under the optimum condition, the enhanced RLS is proportional to the concentration of nucleic acid in the range of 1.0 × 10 -9 to 1.0 × 10 -6 g/ml for herring sperm DNA, 8.0 × 10 -10 to 1.0 × 10 -6 g/ml for calf thymus DNA and 1.0 × 10 -9 to 1.0 × 10 -6 g/ml for yeast RNA, and their detection limits are 0.020, 0.011 and 0.010 ng/ml, respectively. Synthetic samples and actual samples were satisfactorily determined. In addition, the interaction mechanism between nucleic acid and OA-Eu 3+ is also investigated.

  8. Interactions between Cooccurring Lactic Acid Bacteria in Honey Bee Hives.

    PubMed

    Rokop, Z P; Horton, M A; Newton, I L G

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to the honey bee gut, which is colonized by a few characteristic bacterial clades, the hive of the honey bee is home to a diverse array of microbes, including many lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this study, we used culture, combined with sequencing, to sample the LAB communities found across hive environments. Specifically, we sought to use network analysis to identify microbial hubs sharing nearly identical operational taxonomic units, evidence which may indicate cooccurrence of bacteria between environments. In the process, we identified interactions between noncore bacterial members (Fructobacillus and Lactobacillaceae) and honey bee-specific "core" members. Both Fructobacillus and Lactobacillaceae colonize brood cells, bee bread, and nectar and may serve the role of pioneering species, establishing an environment conducive to the inoculation by honey bee core bacteria. Coculture assays showed that these noncore bacterial members promote the growth of honey bee-specific bacterial species. Specifically, Fructobacillus by-products in spent medium supported the growth of the Firm-5 honey bee-specific clade in vitro. Metabolic characterization of Fructobacillus using carbohydrate utilization assays revealed that this strain is capable of utilizing the simple sugars fructose and glucose, as well as the complex plant carbohydrate lignin. We tested Fructobacillus for antibiotic sensitivity and found that this bacterium, which may be important for establishment of the microbiome, is sensitive to the commonly used antibiotic tetracycline. Our results point to the possible significance of "noncore" and environmental microbial community members in the modulation of honey bee microbiome dynamics and suggest that tetracycline use by beekeepers should be limited.

  9. Interaction of aminooxyacetic acid and ethacrynic acid with intense sound at the level of the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Kisiel, D L; Bobbin, R P

    1982-02-01

    Results of previous investigation of the interaction of intense sound and drugs have, in general, failed to show a protective effect mediated by pre-administration with a drug having transient ototoxic effects. The present investigation was designed to further evaluate a protective effect found previously at the anatomical level and explained with an electrochemical theory of noise damage. The alternating current (a.c) potential and compound eighth nerve action potential (CAP) amplitude were monitored in aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA)- or ethacrynic acid (EA)-treated guinea pigs exposed to either moderate or high levels of intense sound and compared to changes observed in the same potentials in animals exposed to the intense sounds alone. Results showed protective effects only in the moderate--intense sound-exposure groups, with changes in sensitivity and voltage on the linear part of the input--output curve of the a.c cochlear potential found to be the only conditions where differences occurred. These results were difficult to interpret in terms of a protective effect and point to the need for obtaining additional data before an electrochemical mechanism is shown to play a role in the effect of intense sound on the cochlea.

  10. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cinnamic acid and its hydroxyl derivatives with human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Jiang; Meng-Xia, Xie; Dong, Zheng; Yuan, Liu; Xiao-Yu, Li; Xing, Chen

    2004-04-01

    Cinnamic acid and its derivatives possess various biological effects in remedy of many diseases. Interaction of cinnamic acid and its hydroxyl derivatives, p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid, with human serum albumin (HSA), and concomitant changes in its conformation were studied using fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic methods. Fluorescence data revealed the presence of one binding site on HSA for cinnamic acid and its hydroxyl derivatives, and their binding constants ( KA) are caffeic acid> p-coumaric acid> cinnamic acid when Cdrug/ CHSA ranging from 1 to 10. The changes of the secondary structure of HSA after interacting with the three drugs are estimated, respectively by combining the curve-fitting results of amid I and amid III bands. The α-helix structure has a decrease of ≈9, 5 and 3% after HSA interacted with caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and cinnamic acid, respectively. It was found that the hydroxyls substituted on aromatic ring of the drugs play an important role in the changes of protein's secondary structure. Combining the result of fluorescence quenching and the changes of secondary structure of HSA after interaction with the three drugs, the drug-HSA interaction mode was discussed.

  11. Interaction Between Some Monosaccharides and Aspartic Acid in Dilute Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kulikova, Galina A.

    2008-01-01

    Interaction between aspartic acid and d-glucose, d-galactose, and d-fructose has been studied by isothermal titration calorimetry, calorimetry of dissolution, and densimetry. It has been found that d-glucose and d-fructose form thermodynamically stable associates with aspartic acid, in contrast to d-galactose. The selectivity in the interaction of aspartic acid with monosaccharides is affected by their stereochemical structures. PMID:19669542

  12. Environment and solute-solvent interaction effects on photo-physical behaviors of Folic acid and Folinic acid drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadem Sadigh, M.; Zakerhamidi, M. S.; Seyed Ahmadian, S. M.; Johari-Ahar, M.; Zare Haghighi, L.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, spectral properties of Folic acid and Folinic acid as widely used drugs in the treatment of some diseases have been studied in various environments with different polarity. Our results show that the absorption, emission and stokes shifts of solute molecules depend strongly on molecular surrounding characteristics, solute-solvent interactions and, different active groups in their chemical structures. In order to investigate the contribution of specific and nonspecific interactions on various properties of drug samples, the linear solvation energy relationships concept is used. Moreover, the calculated dipole moments by means of solvatochromic method show that the high values of dipole moments in excited state are due to local intramolecular charge transfer. Furthermore, the obtained results about molecular interactions can be extended to biological systems and can indicate completely the behaviors of Folic acid and Folinic acid in polar solvents such as water in body system.

  13. Quantifying Protein-Fatty Acid Interactions Using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lan; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2011-02-01

    The application of the direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) assay to quantify interactions between bovine β-lactoglobulin (Lg) and a series of fatty acids (FA), CH3(CH2)xCOOH, where x = 6 (caprylic acid, CpA), 8 (capric acid, CA), 10 (lauric acid, LA), 12 (myristic acid, MA), 14 (palmitic acid, PA) and 16 (stearic acid, SA), is described. Control ESI-MS binding measurements performed on the Lg-PA interaction revealed that both the protonated and deprotonated gas phase ions of the (Lg + PA) complex are prone to dissociate in the ion source, which leads to artificially small association constants ( K a ). The addition of imidazole, a stabilizing solution additive, at high concentration (10 mM) increased the relative abundance of (Lg + PA) complex measured by ESI-MS in both positive and negative ion modes. The K a value measured in negative ion mode and using sampling conditions that minimize in-source dissociation is in good agreement with a value determined using a competitive fluorescence assay. The K a values measured by ESI-MS for the Lg interactions with MA and SA are also consistent with values expected based on the fluorescence measurements. However, the K a values measured using optimal sampling conditions in positive ion mode are significantly lower than those measured in negative ion mode for all of the FAs investigated. It is concluded that the protonated gaseous ions of the (Lg + FA) complexes are kinetically less stable than the deprotonated ions. In-source dissociation was significant for the complexes of Lg with the shorter FAs (CpA, CA, and LA) in both modes and, in the case of CpA, no binding could be detected by ESI-MS. The affinities of Lg for CpA, CA, and LA determined using the reference ligand ESI-MS assay, a method for quantifying labile protein-ligand complexes that are prone to in-source dissociation, were found to be in good agreement with reported values.

  14. Interaction of sulfuric acid corrosion and mechanical wear of iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with elemental iron sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid at concentrations ranging from very dilute (0.00007 N; i.e., 4 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent acid). Load and reciprocating sliding speed were kept constant. With the most dilute acid concentration of 0.00007 to 0.0002 N, a complex corrosion product formed that was friable and often increased friction and wear. At slightly higher concentrations of 0.001 N, metal losses were essentially by wear alone. Because no buildup of corrosion products occurred, this acid concentration became the standard from which to separate metal loss from direct corrosion and mechanical wear losses. When the acid concentration was increased to 5 percent (1 N), the well-established high corrosion rate of iron in sulfuric acid strongly dominated the total wear loss. This strong corrosion increased to 30 percent acid and decreased somewhat to 50 percent acid in accordance with expectations. However, the low corrosion of iron expected at acid concentrations of 65 to 96 percent was not observed in the wear area. It was apparent that the normal passivating film was being worn away and a galvanic cell established that rapidly attacked the wear area. Under the conditions where direct corrosion losses were highest, the coefficient of friction was the lowest.

  15. Interaction of sulfuric acid corrosion and mechanical wear of iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Friction and wear experiment were conducted with elemental iron sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid at concentrations ranging from very dilute (0.00007 N; i.e., 4 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent acid). Load and reciprocating sliding speed were kept constant. With the most dilute acid concentration of 0.00007 to 0.0002 N, a complex corrosion product formed that was friable and often increased friction and wear. At slightly higher concentrations of 0.001 N, metal losses were essentially by wear alone. Because no buildup of corrosion products occurred, this acid concentration became the standard from which to separate metal loss from direct corrosion and mechanical wear losses. When the acid concentration was increased to 5 percent (1 N), the well-established high corrosion rate of iron in sulfuric acid strongly dominated the total wear loss. This strong corrosion increased to 30 percent acid and decreased somewhat to 50 percent acid in accordance with expectations. However, the low corrosion of iron expected at acid concentrations of 65 to 96 percent was not observed in the wear area. It was apparent that the normal passivating film was being worn away and a galvanic cell established that rapidly attacked the wear area. Under the conditions where direct corrosion losses were highest, the coefficient of friction was the lowest.

  16. Hard and soft acids and bases: structure and process.

    PubMed

    Reed, James L

    2012-07-05

    Under investigation is the structure and process that gives rise to hard-soft behavior in simple anionic atomic bases. That for simple atomic bases the chemical hardness is expected to be the only extrinsic component of acid-base strength, has been substantiated in the current study. A thermochemically based operational scale of chemical hardness was used to identify the structure within anionic atomic bases that is responsible for chemical hardness. The base's responding electrons have been identified as the structure, and the relaxation that occurs during charge transfer has been identified as the process giving rise to hard-soft behavior. This is in contrast the commonly accepted explanations that attribute hard-soft behavior to varying degrees of electrostatic and covalent contributions to the acid-base interaction. The ability of the atomic ion's responding electrons to cause hard-soft behavior has been assessed by examining the correlation of the estimated relaxation energies of the responding electrons with the operational chemical hardness. It has been demonstrated that the responding electrons are able to give rise to hard-soft behavior in simple anionic bases.

  17. Susceptibility based upon Chemical Interaction with Disease ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    One of the challenges facing toxicology and risk assessment is that numerous host and environmental factors may modulate vulnerability and risk. An area of increasing interest is the potential for chemicals to interact with background aging and disease processes, an interaction that may yield cumulative damage, altered chemical potency, and increased disease incidence. This review outlines the interactions possible between chemicals and background disease and identifies the type of information needed to evaluate such interactions. Key among these is the existence of a clinically relevant and easy to measure biomarker of disease risk which allows the identification of vulnerable individuals based upon the level of risk biomarker. The impact of toxic chemicals on this biomarker can then be used to predict how the chemical modifies disease risk as long as related mechanistic and toxicological data are consistent with toxicant effect on the disease process. Several case studies are briefly presented which describe the toxic chemical, the clinical biomarker and the impacted disease including: fine particulate matter/decreased heart rate variability/increased cardiopulmonary events; cadmium/decreased glomerular filtration rate/increased chronic kidney disease; methyl mercury/decreased paraoxonase-1/increased cardiovascular risk; trichloroethylene/increased anti-nuclear antibody/autoimmunity; dioxin/increased CYP1A1/hypertension. These case studies point o

  18. Preferential Treatment: Interaction Between Amino Acids and Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crapster-Pregont, E. J.; Cleaves, H. J.; Hazen, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and are important for some models of the origin of life. Polymerization of amino acids from dilute solution is unlikely without a scaffold or catalyst. The surfaces of early Earth minerals are the most likely candidates for this role. The surface adsorption behavior of 12 amino acids (L-alanine, L-serine, L-aspartic acid, L-proline, L- phenylalanine, L-valine, L-arginine, d-amino valeric acid, glycine, L-lysine, L-isoleucine, and B-alanine) on 21 minerals (quartz, calcite, enstatite, illite, olivine, pyrrhotite, pyrite, alkali basalt, albite, analcime, chlorite, barite, hydroxyl apatite, hematite, magnetite, aluminum hydroxide, kaolin, silica gel, corundum, rutile, and montmorillonite) was determined via batch adsorption experiments. Absorption was determined for concentrations between 10-4M and 10-6M in the presence of 0.1M NaCl, and between pH values of 3 and 9 at 25 degrees C. The equilibrated solutions were centrifuged, filtered, derivatized using a fluorescent amino group tag (dansyl-chloride) and analyzed by HPLC. Adsorption was standardized using BET surface area measurements for each mineral to give the number of mols of each amino acid adsorbed per square meter for each mineral. The results indicate an enormous difference in the adsorption of amino acids between minerals, along with major differences in the adsorption of individual amino acids on the same mineral surface. There is also a change in the absorbance of amino acids as the pH changes. Many previous studies of amino acid concentration and catalysis by minerals have used clay minerals because of their high surface areas, however, this data suggests that the surfaces of minerals such as calcite, quartz and pyrite have even higher affinities for amino acids. The results suggest mineral surfaces that could be optimal locations for the polymerization of molecules linked to the origin of life.

  19. Elucidating pH-dependent collagen triple helix formation through interstrand hydroxyproline-glutamic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liwei; Cai, Shuting; Lim, Jaehong; Lee, Su Seong; Lee, Song-Gil

    2015-02-09

    Here, we describe systematic explorations into the molecular basis underlying hydroxyproline-mediated interstrand interactions on the triple-helical stability of collagen-mimetic peptides containing glutamic acid residues. Our studies reveal that the triple-helical stability of these peptides relies on the existence of interstrand interactions between hydroxyprolines and glutamic acid residues that are pH dependent. These unique interactions have been used to engineer collagen peptides that form triple helices on demand through pH control.

  20. Investigating Students' Reasoning about Acid-Base Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Kouyoumdjian, Hovig; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Acid-base chemistry is central to a wide range of reactions. If students are able to understand how and why acid-base reactions occur, it should provide a basis for reasoning about a host of other reactions. Here, we report the development of a method to characterize student reasoning about acid-base reactions based on their description of…

  1. Molecular interactions of α-amino acids insight into aqueous β-cyclodextrin systems.

    PubMed

    Ekka, Deepak; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2013-10-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of molecular interaction prevailing in glycine, L-alanine, L-valine and aqueous solution of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) have been probed by thermophysical properties. Density (ρ), viscosity (η), and ultrasonic speed (u) measurements have been reported at different temperatures. The extent of interaction (solute-solvent interaction) is expressed in terms of the limiting apparent molar volume ([Formula: see text]), viscosity B-coefficient and limiting apparent molar adiabatic compressibility ([Formula: see text]). The changes on the enthalpy ([Formula: see text]) and entropy ([Formula: see text]) of the encapsulation analysis give information about the driving forces governing the inclusion. The temperature dependence behaviour of partial molar quantities and group contributions to partial molar volumes has been determined for the amino acids. The trends in transfer volumes, [Formula: see text], have been interpreted in terms of solute-cosolute interactions based on a cosphere overlap model. The role of the solvent (aqueous solution of β-CD) and the contribution of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions to the solution complexes have also been analyzed through the derived properties.

  2. Electrochemical monitoring of the interaction between Temozolamide and nucleic acids by using disposable pencil graphite electrodes.

    PubMed

    Altay, Cansu; Eksin, Ece; Congur, Gulsah; Erdem, Arzum

    2015-11-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is an anticancer drug used for the treatment of adult brain tumour and skin cancer. The biomolecular interaction between TMZ and DNA was investigated for the first time in this study using disposable pencil graphite electrodes (PGEs) in combination with electrochemical techniques. The surface confined interactions between TMZ and different type of nucleic acids were performed. Before/after surface confined interaction process, the oxidation signals of TMZ, guanine and adenine were measured using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and PGE and accordingly, the changes at the oxidation signals were evaluated. The detection limit (DL) was also estimated based on the oxidation signal of TMZ. The interaction of TMZ with single stranded poly [A], poly [G], or double stranded poly [A]-poly[T] and poly [G]-poly[C] was also explored. Moreover, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques were utilized for detection the interaction between TMZ and DNA. The features of this single-use electrochemical sensor was discussed in comparison to other reports that were developed for TMZ detection.

  3. The interaction of phenolic acids with Fe(III) in the presence of citrate as studied by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Senpei; Bai, Guangling; Chen, Lingli; Shen, Qun; Diao, Xianmin; Zhao, Guanghua

    2014-08-15

    Under physiological conditions, exogenous chelators such as polyphenols might interact with non-protein bound ferric complexes, such as Fe(III)-citrate. Additionally, Fe(III) and citrate are widely distributed in various fruits and vegetables which are also rich in phenolic acids. In this study, we focus on the interaction between phenolic acids (gallic acid, methyl gallate and protocatechuic acid) and Fe(III) in the presence of excessive citrate by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) for thermodynamic studies, and stopped-flow absorption spectrometry for fast kinetic studies. Results reveal that all of these three phenolic acids can bind to the Fe(III) with the same stoichiometry (3:1). Moreover, the binding constants of these three compounds with Fe(III) are greatly dependent on ligand structure, and are much higher than that of Fe(III)-citrate. Based on their stoichiometry and superhigh binding constants, it is most likely that these three phenolic acids can displace the citrate to bind with one iron(III) ion to form a stable octahedral geometric structure, albeit at different rates. These findings shed light on the interaction between phenolic acids and Fe(III) in the presence of citrate under either physiological conditions or in a food system.

  4. MINT: software to identify motifs and short-range interactions in trajectories of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Górska, Anna; Jasiński, Maciej; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Structural biology experiments and structure prediction tools have provided many high-resolution three-dimensional structures of nucleic acids. Also, molecular dynamics force field parameters have been adapted to simulating charged and flexible nucleic acid structures on microsecond time scales. Therefore, we can generate the dynamics of DNA or RNA molecules, but we still lack adequate tools for the analysis of the resulting huge amounts of data. We present MINT (Motif Identifier for Nucleic acids Trajectory) — an automatic tool for analyzing three-dimensional structures of RNA and DNA, and their full-atom molecular dynamics trajectories or other conformation sets (e.g. X-ray or nuclear magnetic resonance-derived structures). For each RNA or DNA conformation MINT determines the hydrogen bonding network resolving the base pairing patterns, identifies secondary structure motifs (helices, junctions, loops, etc.) and pseudoknots. MINT also estimates the energy of stacking and phosphate anion-base interactions. For many conformations, as in a molecular dynamics trajectory, MINT provides averages of the above structural and energetic features and their evolution. We show MINT functionality based on all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics trajectory of the 30S ribosomal subunit. PMID:26024667

  5. Interactions between greenhouse gas policies and acid rain control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, D.E.; Kane, R.L.; Mansueti, L.

    1997-12-31

    Conventional wisdom and much of the public policy debate have usually drawn a clean delineation between acid rain issues and global warming concerns. This traditional approach of evaluating one policy at a time is too simplistic to serve as a framework for electric utilities making major capital investment and fuel procurement decisions to comply with various environmental requirements. Potential Climate change regulation can affect acid rain compliance decisions, and acid rain compliance decisions will affect future GHG emissions. This paper explores two categories of linkages between these different environmental issues. First, the assumptions one makes regarding future climate change policies can have a profound impact on the economic attractiveness of various acid rain compliance strategies. Second, decisions regarding acid rain compliance strategy can have greenhouse gas implications that might prove more or less difficult to address in future climate change legislation.

  6. Catalysis based on reversible covalent interactions of organoboron compounds.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark S

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: An Account of the development of organoboron-catalyzed methods for chemo- or regioselective activation of pyruvic acids, diols, and carbohydrate derivatives is presented. These methods are based on reversible, covalent interactions that have been exploited extensively in host-guest chemistry, but were comparatively underutilized in catalysis. Important differences between the established properties of organboron compounds in molecular recognition and their behavior as catalysts emerged over the course of this work: for instance, borinic acids, which have largely been ignored in molecular recognition, proved to be a particularly useful class of catalysts. Nonetheless, the high selectivity that has enabled applications of organoboron compounds in molecular recognition (e.g., the selective binding of cis-1,2-diol groups in carbohydrates) also appears to play a key role in the outcomes of catalytic reactions. This research program began as a modest, narrowly defined project aimed at developing direct aldol reactions based on established interactions between pyruvic acids and boronic acids. While this goal was achieved, it was unexpected observations related to the nature of the nucleophile in this transformation (a putative tetracoordinate boron enolate) that attracted our attention and pointed toward broader applications in the catalyst-controlled, regioselective functionalization of polyols. This line of research proved to be fruitful: diarylborinic-acid-based precatalysts were found to promote efficient monoalkylations, sulfonylations, and alkylations of a range of diol substrates, as well as cis-1,2-diol motifs in pyranoside-derived triols. Extension of this chemistry to glycosyl donors as electrophiles enabled the regioselective, catalyst-controlled synthesis of disaccharides from readily accessible feedstocks, and was also employed to modify the oligosaccharide component of a complex, glycosylated natural product. Mechanistic studies have played an

  7. ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Andrea; Aedo, Ignacio; Díaz, Paloma

    2017-02-23

    Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit.

  8. ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bellucci, Andrea; Aedo, Ignacio; Díaz, Paloma

    2017-01-01

    Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit. PMID:28241502

  9. Interaction of anticancer drug methotrexate with nucleic acids analyzed by multi-spectroscopic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Changqun; Chen, Xiaoming; Gong, Hang

    2009-02-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) as an antifolate, which is widely used as chemotherapeutic drugs. A high-dose MTX therapy has a direct toxicity influence on the non-germinal cells, especially the liver cells. It is known that the inject dose for adults is 10-30 mg and is half for children for routine use, while our experiments showed that the optimum dosage of MTX which enhanced the RLS intensities to the maximum is 4.54 ng ml -1. The interaction of methotrexate (MTX) with nucleic acids in aqueous solution in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB), a kind of cationic surfactant similar to the Human cells, were investigated based on the measurements of resonance light scattering (RLS), UV-vis, fluorescence and NMR spectra, etc. The interaction has been proved to give a ternary complex of MTX-CTMAB-DNA in BR buffer (pH 9.30), which exhibits strong enhanced RLS signals at 339.5 nm.

  10. Intramolecular interactions in ortho-methoxyalkylphenylboronic acids and their catechol esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk-Woźniak, Agnieszka; Borys, Krzysztof M.; Czerwińska, Karolina; Gierczyk, Błażej; Jakubczyk, Michał; Madura, Izabela D.; Sporzyński, Andrzej; Tomecka, Ewelina

    2013-12-01

    Catechol esters of ortho-methoxyalkylphenylboronic acids have been synthesized and characterized by 17O NMR spectroscopy. The results were compared with the data for the parent acids. The influence of intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonds on the properties of the boronic acids has been discussed. The 17O NMR data for the boronic esters proved that there are no O → B interactions in the investigated compounds. This fact is connected with weak Lewis acidity of the parent acids and their low sugars' receptors activity. Crystal structure of ortho-methoxyphenylboronic acid catechol ester was determined.

  11. Analysis of the interactions of sulfur-containing amino acids in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Tamayo, José C; Cordomí, Arnau; Olivella, Mireia; Mayol, Eduardo; Fourmy, Daniel; Pardo, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    The interactions of Met and Cys with other amino acid side chains have received little attention, in contrast to aromatic-aromatic, aromatic-aliphatic or/and aliphatic-aliphatic interactions. Precisely, these are the only amino acids that contain a sulfur atom, which is highly polarizable and, thus, likely to participate in strong Van der Waals interactions. Analysis of the interactions present in membrane protein crystal structures, together with the characterization of their strength in small-molecule model systems at the ab-initio level, predicts that Met-Met interactions are stronger than Met-Cys ≈ Met-Phe ≈ Cys-Phe interactions, stronger than Phe-Phe ≈ Phe-Leu interactions, stronger than the Met-Leu interaction, and stronger than Leu-Leu ≈ Cys-Leu interactions. These results show that sulfur-containing amino acids form stronger interactions than aromatic or aliphatic amino acids. Thus, these amino acids may provide additional driving forces for maintaining the 3D structure of membrane proteins and may provide functional specificity.

  12. An Introductory Laboratory Exercise for Acids and Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Richard; Silberman, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Discusses an acid-base neutralization exercise requiring groups of students to determine: (1) combinations of solutions giving neutralization; (2) grouping solutions as acids or bases; and (3) ranking groups in order of concentration. (JM)

  13. The Bronsted-Lowery Acid-Base Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.

    1988-01-01

    Gives the background history of the simultaneous discovery of acid-base relationships by Johannes Bronsted and Thomas Lowry. Provides a brief biographical sketch of each. Discusses their concept of acids and bases in some detail. (CW)

  14. Coronavirus phylogeny based on triplets of nucleic acids bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bo; Liu, Yanshu; Li, Renfa; Zhu, Wen

    2006-04-01

    We considered the fully overlapping triplets of nucleotide bases and proposed a 2D graphical representation of protein sequences consisting of 20 amino acids and a stop code. Based on this 2D graphical representation, we outlined a new approach to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of coronaviruses by constructing a covariance matrix. The evolutionary distances are obtained through measuring the differences among the two-dimensional curves.

  15. Mathematical modeling of acid-base physiology

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F.

    2015-01-01

    pH is one of the most important parameters in life, influencing virtually every biological process at the cellular, tissue, and whole-body level. Thus, for cells, it is critical to regulate intracellular pH (pHi) and, for multicellular organisms, to regulate extracellular pH (pHo). pHi regulation depends on the opposing actions of plasma-membrane transporters that tend to increase pHi, and others that tend to decrease pHi. In addition, passive fluxes of uncharged species (e.g., CO2, NH3) and charged species (e.g., HCO3− , NH4+) perturb pHi. These movements not only influence one another, but also perturb the equilibria of a multitude of intracellular and extracellular buffers. Thus, even at the level of a single cell, perturbations in acid-base reactions, diffusion, and transport are so complex that it is impossible to understand them without a quantitative model. Here we summarize some mathematical models developed to shed light onto the complex interconnected events triggered by acids-base movements. We then describe a mathematical model of a spherical cell–which to our knowledge is the first one capable of handling a multitude of buffer reaction–that our team has recently developed to simulate changes in pHi and pHo caused by movements of acid-base equivalents across the plasma membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Finally, we extend our work to a consideration of the effects of simultaneous CO2 and HCO3− influx into a cell, and envision how future models might extend to other cell types (e.g., erythrocytes) or tissues (e.g., renal proximal-tubule epithelium) important for whole-body pH homeostasis. PMID:25617697

  16. Bipolar Membranes for Acid Base Flow Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthamatten, Mitchell; Roddecha, Supacharee; Jorne, Jacob; Coughlan, Anna

    2011-03-01

    Rechargeable batteries can provide grid-scale electricity storage to match power generation with consumption and promote renewable energy sources. Flow batteries offer modular and flexible design, low cost per kWh and high efficiencies. A novel flow battery concept will be presented based on acid-base neutralization where protons (H+) and hydroxyl (OH-) ions react electrochemically to produce water. The large free energy of this highly reversible reaction can be stored chemically, and, upon discharge, can be harvested as usable electricity. The acid-base flow battery concept avoids the use of a sluggish oxygen electrode and utilizes the highly reversible hydrogen electrode, thus eliminating the need for expensive noble metal catalysts. The proposed flow battery is a hybrid of a battery and a fuel cell---hydrogen gas storing chemical energy is produced at one electrode and is immediately consumed at the other electrode. The two electrodes are exposed to low and high pH solutions, and these solutions are separated by a hybrid membrane containing a hybrid cation and anion exchange membrane (CEM/AEM). Membrane design will be discussed, along with ion-transport data for synthesized membranes.

  17. Photocurable bioadhesive based on lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Marques, D S; Santos, J M C; Ferreira, P; Correia, T R; Correia, I J; Gil, M H; Baptista, C M S G

    2016-01-01

    Novel photocurable and low molecular weight oligomers based on l-lactic acid with proven interest to be used as bioadhesive were successfully manufactured. Preparation of lactic acid oligomers with methacrylic end functionalizations was carried out in the absence of catalyst or solvents by self-esterification in two reaction steps: telechelic lactic acid oligomerization with OH end groups and further functionalization with methacrylic anhydride. The final adhesive composition was achieved by the addition of a reported biocompatible photoinitiator (Irgacure® 2959). Preliminary in vitro biodegradability was investigated by hydrolytic degradation in PBS (pH=7.4) at 37 °C. The adhesion performance was evaluated using glued aminated substrates (gelatine pieces) subjected to pull-to-break test. Surface energy measured by contact angles is lower than the reported values of the skin and blood. The absence of cytoxicity was evaluated using human fibroblasts. A notable antimicrobial behaviour was observed using two bacterial models (Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli). The cured material exhibited a strong thrombogenic character when placed in contact with blood, which can be predicted as a haemostatic effect for bleeding control. This novel material was subjected to an extensive characterization showing great potential for bioadhesive or other biomedical applications where biodegradable and biocompatible photocurable materials are required.

  18. Teaching Acid/Base Physiology in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friis, Ulla G.; Plovsing, Ronni; Hansen, Klaus; Laursen, Bent G.; Wallstedt, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    Acid/base homeostasis is one of the most difficult subdisciplines of physiology for medical students to master. A different approach, where theory and practice are linked, might help students develop a deeper understanding of acid/base homeostasis. We therefore set out to develop a laboratory exercise in acid/base physiology that would provide…

  19. A clinical approach to acid-base conundrums.

    PubMed

    Garrubba, Carl; Truscott, Judy

    2016-04-01

    Acid-base disorders can provide essential clues to underlying patient conditions. This article provides a simple, practical approach to identifying simple acid-base disorders and their compensatory mechanisms. Using this stepwise approach, clinicians can quickly identify and appropriately treat acid-base disorders.

  20. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  1. Steering Siglec-Sialic Acid Interactions on Living Cells using Bioorthogonal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Büll, Christian; Heise, Torben; van Hilten, Niek; Pijnenborg, Johan F A; Bloemendal, Victor R L J; Gerrits, Lotte; Kers-Rebel, Esther D; Ritschel, Tina; den Brok, Martijn H; Adema, Gosse J; Boltje, Thomas J

    2017-03-13

    Sialic acid sugars that terminate cell-surface glycans form the ligands for the sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-like lectin (Siglec) family, which are immunomodulatory receptors expressed by immune cells. Interactions between sialic acid and Siglecs regulate the immune system, and aberrations contribute to pathologies like autoimmunity and cancer. Sialic acid/Siglec interactions between living cells are difficult to study owing to a lack of specific tools. Here, we report a glycoengineering approach to remodel the sialic acids of living cells and their binding to Siglecs. Using bioorthogonal chemistry, a library of cells with more than sixty different sialic acid modifications was generated that showed dramatically increased binding toward the different Siglec family members. Rational design reduced cross-reactivity and led to the discovery of three selective Siglec-5/14 ligands. Furthermore, glycoengineered cells carrying sialic acid ligands for Siglec-3 dampened the activation of Siglec-3(+) monocytic cells through the NF-κB and IRF pathways.

  2. Biomolecular interactions of emerging two-dimensional materials with aromatic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallineni, Sai Sunil Kumar; Karakaya, Mehmet; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao

    The present work experimentally investigates the interaction of aromatic amino acids, viz., tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine with novel two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO), and boron nitride (BN). Photoluminescence, micro-Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were employed to investigate the nature of interactions and possible charge transfer between 2D materials and amino acids. Consistent with previous theoretical studies, graphene and BN were observed to interact with amino acids through π- π interactions. Furthermore, we found that GO exhibits strong interactions with tryptophan and tyrosine as compared to graphene and BN, which we attribute to the formation of H-bonds between tryptophan and GO as shown theoretically in Ref. 2. On the other hand, phenylalanine did not exhibit much difference in interactions with G, GO, and BN. Clemson Nanomaterials Center, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA.

  3. Acid Base Equilibrium in a Lipid/Water Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streb, Kristina K.; Ilich, Predrag-Peter

    2003-12-01

    A new and original experiment in which partition of bromophenol blue dye between water and lipid/water gel causes a shift in the acid base equilibrium of the dye is described. The dye-absorbing material is a monoglyceride food additive of plant origin that mixes freely with water to form a stable cubic phase gel; the nascent gel absorbs the dye from aqueous solution and converts it to the acidic form. There are three concurrent processes taking place in the experiment: (a) formation of the lipid/water gel, (b) absorption of the dye by the gel, and (c) protonation of the dye in the lipid/water gel environment. As the aqueous solution of the dye is a deep purple-blue color at neutral pH and yellow at acidic pH the result of these processes is visually striking: the strongly green-yellow particles of lipid/water gel are suspended in purple-blue aqueous solution. The local acidity of the lipid/water gel is estimated by UV vis spectrophotometry. This experiment is an example of host-guest (lipid/water gel dye) interaction and is suitable for project-type biophysics, physical chemistry, or biochemistry labs. The experiment requires three, 3-hour lab sessions, two of which must not be separated by more than two days.

  4. Interaction of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit (MYPT1) with Myosin Phosphatase-RhoA Interacting Protein (MRIP): A Role of Glutamic Acids in the Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, III, Walter F.

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins bind to and functionally link protein members of signaling pathways. Interaction of the scaffold proteins, myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), causes co-localization of myosin phosphatase and RhoA to actomyosin. To examine biophysical properties of interaction of MYPT1 with MRIP, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation and surface plasmon resonance. In regard to MRIP, its residues 724–837 are sufficient for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Moreover, MRIP binds to MYPT1 as either a monomer or a dimer. With respect to MYPT1, its leucine repeat region, LR (residues 991–1030) is sufficient to account for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Furthermore, point mutations that replace glutamic acids 998–1000 within LR reduced the binding affinity toward MRIP. This suggests that the glutamic acids of MYPT1 play an important role in the interaction. PMID:26445108

  5. Interaction of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit (MYPT1) with Myosin Phosphatase-RhoA Interacting Protein (MRIP): A Role of Glutamic Acids in the Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins bind to and functionally link protein members of signaling pathways. Interaction of the scaffold proteins, myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), causes co-localization of myosin phosphatase and RhoA to actomyosin. To examine biophysical properties of interaction of MYPT1 with MRIP, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation and surface plasmon resonance. In regard to MRIP, its residues 724-837 are sufficient for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Moreover, MRIP binds to MYPT1 as either a monomer or a dimer. With respect to MYPT1, its leucine repeat region, LR (residues 991-1030) is sufficient to account for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Furthermore, point mutations that replace glutamic acids 998-1000 within LR reduced the binding affinity toward MRIP. This suggests that the glutamic acids of MYPT1 play an important role in the interaction.

  6. Oleic acid-based gemini surfactants with carboxylic acid headgroups.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Umemoto, Naoki; Matsuda, Wataru; Takamatsu, Yuichiro; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Anionic gemini surfactants with carboxylic acid headgroups have been synthesized from oleic acid. The hydrocarbon chain is covalently bound to the terminal carbonyl group of oleic acid via an ester bond, and the carboxylic acid headgroups are introduced to the cis double bond of oleic acid via disuccinyl units. The surfactants exhibit pH-dependent protonation-deprotonation behavior in aqueous solutions. In alkaline solutions (pH 9 in the presence of 10 mmol dm(-3) NaCl as the background electrolyte), the surfactants can lower the surface tension as well as form molecular assemblies, even in the region of low surfactant concentrations. Under acidic (pH 3) or neutral (pH 6-7) conditions, the surfactants are intrinsically insoluble in aqueous media and form a monolayer at the air/water interface. In this study, we have investigated physicochemical properties such as the function of the hydrocarbon chain length by means of static surface tension, pyrene fluorescence, dynamic light scattering, surface pressure-area isotherms, and infrared external reflection measurements.

  7. Interactions of nucleic acids with fluorescent dyes: spectral properties of condensed complexes.

    PubMed

    Kapuscinski, J

    1990-09-01

    Interaction of cations with nucleic acids (NA) often results in condensation of the product. The driving force of aromatic cation-induced condensation is the cooperative interaction between ligand and single-stranded (ss) NA. This type of reaction is highly specific with regard to the primary and secondary structure of NA, and results in destabilization of the latter. The spectral properties of fluorescent intercalating and non-intercalating ligands [acridine orange, pyronin Y(G), DAPI, Hoechst 33258, and Hoechst 33342]-NA complexes were studied in both the relaxed and condensed form. The changes in absorption, excitation, and fluorescence emission spectra and fluorescence yield that followed the condensation were examined. Although some of these effects can be explained by changes in solvation of the fluorophore and its interaction with NA bases and the solvent, the overall effect of condensation on spectral properties of the complex is unpredictable. In particular, no correlation was found between these effects and the ds DNA binding mode of these ligands. Nevertheless, the spectral data associated with polymer condensation can yield information about the composition and structure of NA and can explain some nonspecific interactions of these probes.

  8. Identifying a base in a nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2005-02-08

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  9. Non-covalent bonded 2D-3D supramolecular architectures based on 4-dimethylaminopyridine and organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huan; Jin, Shouwen; Wen, Xianhong; Liu, Bin; Fang, Yang; Zhang, Yani; Wang, Daqi

    2015-07-01

    Studies concentrating on non-covalent weak interactions between the organic base of 4-dimethylaminopyridine, and acidic derivatives have led to an increased understanding of the role 4-dimethylaminopyridine has in binding with the organic acid derivatives. Here anhydrous and hydrous multicomponent organic acid-base adducts of 4-dimethylaminopyridine have been prepared with organic acids such as 1,3-benzodioxole-5-carboxylic acid, p-aminobenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 5-bromosalicylic acid, 5-nitrosalicylic acid, and 5-sulfosalicylic acid. The 4-dimethylaminopyridine is only monoprotonated. All compounds are organic salts with the 1:1 ratio of the cation and the anion. For the 5-sulfosalicylic acid only one H is ionized to exhibit the valence number of -1. The eight crystalline complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. These structures adopted the hetero supramolecular synthons. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-8 suggests that there are Nsbnd H⋯O, Osbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯S hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between the organic acid and the 4-dimethylaminopyridine moieties in the studied compounds. Except the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, the secondary propagating interactions also play important roles in structure extension. For the synergistic effect of the various non-covalent interactions, the complexes displayed 2D-3D framework structures.

  10. INTERACTIVE ABANDONED MINE LANDS WORKSHOP SERIES - ACID MINE WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this interactive workshop is to present and discuss active and passive acid mine wastes cleanup technologies and to discuss the apparent disconnect between their development and their implementation. The workshop addressed five main barriers to implementing innovat...

  11. Laboratory simulations of the interaction between ozone and chloroacetic acids in the conditions close to stratospheric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strokova, N. E.; Savilov, S. V.; Morozov, I. I.; Yagodovskaya, T. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between ozone and mono-, di-, and trichloroacetic acids are studied using a flow vacuum gas discharge setup in a regime close to stratospheric conditions (in the temperature range of 77 to 250 K, at pressures of 10-3 to 0 Torr, and in the presence of ice). The interaction between ozone and trichloroacetic acid starts at 77 K, while interaction with monochloroacetic acid begins when the temperature is raised to 200 K. The reactions are assumed to proceed via different mechanisms: chlorine oxides of different composition are the reaction products, as is shown using low-temperature IR spectroscopy. Preliminary adsorption of the acids on a surface of ice raises the temperature of interaction to 190 K.

  12. An investigation into the interaction between taste masking fatty acid microspheres and alkaline buffer using thermal and spectroscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Sheng; Deutsch, David; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2006-05-01

    Fatty acid-based microspheres may be used for the controlled delivery and taste masking of therapeutic agents, although the mechanisms involved in the release process are poorly understood. In this investigation, microspheres composed of high purity stearic and palmitic acid were prepared using a spray-chilling protocol. In addition, samples of binary fatty acid systems, fatty acid salts and acid-soaps were prepared to allow comparison with the microspheres. The interaction with alkaline buffer, into which release is known to be rapid, was studied using DSC and powder XRD with a view to examining the physicochemical changes undergone by the microspheres as a result of exposure to this medium. New species were identified for the postimmersion microsphere systems; similarities between the thermal and spectroscopic properties of these materials and the acid-soap references indicated the formation of acid-soaps during the exposure to the medium. The data indicate that simple exposure to buffer may result in the formation of acid soaps. This in turn has implications for understanding not only the release of drugs from the microspheres but also the biological fate of fatty acids on ingestion.

  13. Surface interactions of cesium and boric acid with stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman-Canfield, N.

    1995-08-01

    In this report, the effects of cesium hydroxide and boric acid on oxidized stainless steel surfaces at high temperatures and near one atmosphere of pressure are investigated. This is the first experimental investigation of this chemical system. The experimental investigations were performed using a mass spectrometer and a mass electrobalance. Surfaces from the different experiments were examined using a scanning electron microscope to identify the presence of deposited species, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis to identify the species deposited on the surface. A better understanding of the equilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetics of the steam-accelerated volatilizations, and the release kinetics are gained by these experiments. The release rate is characterized by bulk vaporization/gas-phase mass transfer data. The analysis couples vaporization, deposition, and desorption of the compounds formed by cesium hydroxide and boric acid under conditions similar to what is expected during certain nuclear reactor accidents. This study shows that cesium deposits on an oxidized stainless steel surface at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 Kelvin. Cesium also deposits on stainless steel surfaces coated with boric oxide in the same temperature ranges. The mechanism for cesium deposition onto the oxide layer was found to involve the chemical reaction between cesium and chromate. Some revaporization in the cesium hydroxide-boric acid system was observed. It has been found that under the conditions given, boric acid will react with cesium hydroxide to form cesium metaborate. A model is proposed for this chemical reaction.

  14. Novel molecular interactions of acylcarnitines and fatty acids with myoglobin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research has indicated that long-chain fatty acids can bind myoglobin (Mb) in an oxygen dependent manner. This suggests that Oxy-Mb may play an important role in fuel delivery in Mb-rich muscle fibers (e.g., type I fibers and cardiomyocytes), and raises the possibility that Mb also serves ...

  15. Polarity based fractionation of fulvic acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Aimin; Hu, Jundong; Li, Wenhui; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xuejun

    2009-11-01

    Fulvic acids from the soil of Peking University (PF) and a Nordic river (NF) were separated into well defined sub-fractions using sequential elution techniques based on eluent polarity. The chemical properties of the fractions including: PF1 and NF1 (eluted by 0.01 M HCl), PF2 and NF2 (eluted by 0.01 M HCl+20% methanol), PF3 and NF3 (eluted by 0.01 M HCl+40% methanol), and PF4 and NF4 (eluted by 100% methanol), were characterized using UV-Visible spectroscopy, elemental analysis and (13)C NMR. The results showed that the UV absorptions of the elution peaks at 280 nm (A280) increased from PF2 to PF4 and NF2 to NF4. No elution peaks were observed for PF1 and NF1. The carbon contents increased from 43.34% to 51.90% and 43.06% to 53.26% while the oxygen contents decreased from 46.39% to 36.76% and 49.76% to 40.03% for PF1-PF4 and NF1-NF4, respectively. As a polarity indicator, the (O+N)/C ratio for PF1-PF4 and NF1-NF4 decreased from 0.88 to 0.62 and 0.89 to 0.58, respectively. The aromatic carbon content increased from PF1 to PF4 and NF1 to NF4, suggesting an increase of the hydrophobicity of these fractions. The polarity was positively related to the ratio of UV absorption at 250 nm and 365 nm (E2/E3), and negatively related to the aromaticity. A high positive relationship between the aromaticity and E2/E3 of fulvic acid fractions was also obtained. The use of an eluent with a decreasing polarity allowed to providing simpler fractions of soil and aquatic fulvic acids.

  16. Bifunctional acid base catalyzed reactions in zeolites from the HSAB viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemelsoet, K.; Lesthaeghe, D.; Speybroeck, V. Van; Waroquier, M.

    2006-02-01

    The applicability of the hard and soft acids and bases principle is investigated for the interaction of 5T zeolite clusters with probe molecules such as chloromethane, methanol and olefins. The reactions are intermediately hard-hard and, therefore, mainly charge-controlled. This is confirmed by the success of the atomic charges and the electrostatic interaction energy at the acid site as correct descriptors of regio-selectivity and reactivity sequences. Both acid and basic reactive sites can be clearly indicated using frontier orbitals. Moreover, an excellent correlation is found between the activation hardnesses and the energy barriers at the absolute zero.

  17. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  18. Monitoring potential molecular interactions of adenine with other amino acids using Raman spectroscopy and DFT modeling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Donfack, P; Srivastava, Sunil K; Singh, Dheeraj K; Materny, A; Asthana, B P; Mishra, P C

    2015-01-01

    We report on the modes of inter-molecular interaction between adenine (Ade) and the amino acids: glycine (Gly), lysine (Lys) and arginine (Arg) using Raman spectroscopy of binary mixtures of adenine and each of the three amino acids at varying molar ratios in the spectral region 1550-550 cm(-1). We focused our attention on certain specific changes in the Raman bands of adenine arising due to its interaction with the amino acids. While the changes are less apparent in the Ade/Gly system, in the Ade/Lys or Ade/Arg systems, significant changes are observed, particularly in the Ade Raman bands that involve the amino group moiety and the N7 and N1 atoms of the purine ring. The ν(N1-C6), ν(N1-C2), δ(C8-H) and δ(N7-C8-N9) vibrations at 1486, 1332, 1253 and 948 cm(-1) show spectral changes on varying the Ade to amino acid molar ratio, the extent of variation being different for the three amino acids. This observation suggests a specific interaction mode between Ade and Lys or Arg, which is due to the hydrogen bonding. The measured spectral changes provide a clear indication that the interaction of Ade depends strongly on the structures of the amino acids, especially their side chains. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to elucidate the most probable interaction modes of Ade with the different amino acids.

  19. Aluminium-phosphorus interactions in plants growing on acid soils: does phosphorus always alleviate aluminium toxicity?

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong Fu; Zhang, Fu Lin; Zhang, Qi Ming; Sun, Qing Bin; Dong, Xiao Ying; Shen, Ren Fang

    2012-03-30

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity and phosphorus (P) deficiency are considered to be the main constraints for crop production in acid soils, which are widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions. Conventionally, P addition is regarded as capable of alleviating Al toxicity in plants. However, this field is still rife with unsubstantiated theories, especially for different plant species growing on acid soils. In this review, the responses of plants to different methods of Al-P treatments are briefly summarized, and possible reasons are proposed by considering recent results from our laboratory. It is shown that: (1) long-term Al-P alternate treatment is advantageous for studying Al-P interactions in plants; (2) under the long-term Al-P alternate treatment, the roles of P in Al phytotoxicity might be associated with the Al resistance capability and P use efficiency of the plant, and a P/Al molar ratio exceeding 5 in roots may be the threshold of P alleviating Al toxicity based on the calculation of the tested plants; (3) in acid soils, P application may be effective only after Al stress is overcome for Al-sensitive species. Thus it is concluded that P application does not always alleviate Al toxicity under long-term Al-P alternate treatment.

  20. Interaction of DAPI with double-stranded ribonucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Manzini, G; Xodo, L; Barcellona, M L; Quadrifoglio, F

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of DAPI with natural and synthetic double-stranded polyribonucleotides was studied with different optical and calorimetric methods. The results were similar to those obtained previously with double-stranded polydeoxynucleotides, i.e. two interaction modes, the first of which shows high affinity for AU clusters and consequent strong fluorescence enhancement. The results suggest caution in the use of DAPI as selective fluorescent staining agent for DNA in the presence of RNA. A narrow groove binding model with hydrogen bonds between DAPI and AU pairs is proposed. An intercalation mechanism can be excluded because of the non planarity of DAPI molecule. PMID:4080554

  1. Reversible covalent interactions of β-aminoboronic acids with carbohydrate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Graham E; Diaz, Diego B; Yudin, Andrei K; Taylor, Mark S

    2017-02-07

    β-Aminoalkylboronic acids are capable of binding to carbohydrate derivatives through reversible covalent interactions. An anthracene-bearing β-aminoboronic acid has been synthesized, enabling determinations of association constants for binding of sugars by fluorescence spectroscopy. The diol-binding properties of β-aminoboronic acids are also useful in catalysis: one such compound displays remarkably high activity for regioselective O-acylation of a pyranoside derivative.

  2. Learning through Interaction: Improving Practice with Design-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voigt, Christian; Swatman, Paula M. C.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the first stage of a design-based research project to introduce case-based learning using existing interactive technologies in a major Australian university. The paper initially outlines the relationship between case-based learning, student interaction and the study of interactions--and includes a review of research into…

  3. Polymer gel dosimeter based on itaconic acid.

    PubMed

    Mattea, Facundo; Chacón, David; Vedelago, José; Valente, Mauro; Strumia, Miriam C

    2015-11-01

    A new polymeric dosimeter based on itaconic acid and N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide was studied. The preparation method, compositions of monomer and crosslinking agent and the presence of oxygen in the dosimetric system were analyzed. The resulting materials were irradiated with an X-ray tube at 158cGy/min, 226cGymin and 298cGy/min with doses up to 1000Gy. The dosimeters presented a linear response in the dose range 75-1000Gy, sensitivities of 0.037 1/Gyat 298cGy/min and an increase in the sensitivity with lower dose rates. One of the most relevant outcomes in this study was obtaining different monomer to crosslinker inclusion in the formed gel for the dosimeters where oxygen was purged during the preparation method. This effect has not been reported in other typical dosimeters and could be attributed to the large differences in the reactivity among these species.

  4. Interaction of Ethyl Alcohol Vapor with Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the uptake of ethyl alcohol (ethanol) vapor by sulfuric acid solutions over the range approx.40 to approx.80 wt % H2SO4 and temperatures of 193-273 K. Laboratory studies used a fast flow-tube reactor coupled to an electron-impact ionization mass spectrometer for detection of ethanol and reaction products. The uptake coefficients ((gamma)) were measured and found to vary from 0.019 to 0.072, depending upon the acid composition and temperature. At concentrations greater than approx.70 wt % and in dilute solutions colder than 220 K, the values approached approx.0.07. We also determined the effective solubility constant of ethanol in approx.40 wt % H2SO4 in the temperature range 203-223 K. The potential implications to the budget of ethanol in the global troposphere are briefly discussed.

  5. Interaction between oxalic acid and titania in aqueous ethanol dispersions.

    PubMed

    Dahlsten, Per; Rosenholm, Jarl B

    2013-02-15

    The charging effects resulting from adsorption of oxalic acid and oxalate anions on titania (anatase) surfaces in anhydrous or mixed water-ethanol suspensions is summarized. The suddenly enhanced electrical conductance with respect to titania free solutions has previously been explained in terms of surface-induced electrolytic dissociation (SIED) of weak acids. A recently published model has previously been found to successfully characterize the complex SIED effect. The model is evaluated experimentally by recording the conductance and pH of the dispersion and the zeta potential of the particles. The experimental results can be condensed to master curves, which reveal the major properties of the systems and facilitate further modeling of extensive experimental results. The equilibrium and transport properties of solutions and particles were related, but different mechanisms was found to be active in each case. The results suggest that at least three adsorption equilibria should be considered in order to improve the model.

  6. Interactive physically-based sound simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuvanshi, Nikunj

    The realization of interactive, immersive virtual worlds requires the ability to present a realistic audio experience that convincingly compliments their visual rendering. Physical simulation is a natural way to achieve such realism, enabling deeply immersive virtual worlds. However, physically-based sound simulation is very computationally expensive owing to the high-frequency, transient oscillations underlying audible sounds. The increasing computational power of desktop computers has served to reduce the gap between required and available computation, and it has become possible to bridge this gap further by using a combination of algorithmic improvements that exploit the physical, as well as perceptual properties of audible sounds. My thesis is a step in this direction. My dissertation concentrates on developing real-time techniques for both sub-problems of sound simulation: synthesis and propagation. Sound synthesis is concerned with generating the sounds produced by objects due to elastic surface vibrations upon interaction with the environment, such as collisions. I present novel techniques that exploit human auditory perception to simulate scenes with hundreds of sounding objects undergoing impact and rolling in real time. Sound propagation is the complementary problem of modeling the high-order scattering and diffraction of sound in an environment as it travels from source to listener. I discuss my work on a novel numerical acoustic simulator (ARD) that is hundred times faster and consumes ten times less memory than a high-accuracy finite-difference technique, allowing acoustic simulations on previously-intractable spaces, such as a cathedral, on a desktop computer. Lastly, I present my work on interactive sound propagation that leverages my ARD simulator to render the acoustics of arbitrary static scenes for multiple moving sources and listener in real time, while accounting for scene-dependent effects such as low-pass filtering and smooth attenuation

  7. Interaction of humic acids and humic-acid-like polymers with herpes simplex virus type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klöcking, Renate; Helbig, Björn

    The study was performed in order to compare the antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) of synthetic humic-acid-like polymers to that of their low-molecular-weight basic compounds and naturally occurring humic acids (HA) in vitro. HA from peat water showed a moderate antiviral activity at a minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 20 µg/ml. HA-like polymers, i.e. the oxidation products of caffeic acid (KOP), hydrocaffeic acid (HYKOP), chlorogenic acid (CHOP), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3,4-DHPOP), nordihydroguaretic acid (NOROP), gentisinic acid (GENOP), pyrogallol (PYROP) and gallic acid (GALOP), generally inhibit virus multiplication, although with different potency and selectivity. Of the substances tested, GENOP, KOP, 3,4-DHPOP and HYKOP with MEC values in the range of 2 to 10 µg/ml, proved to be the most potent HSV-1 inhibitors. Despite its lower antiviral potency (MEC 40 µg/ml), CHOP has a remarkable selectivity due to the high concentration of this polymer that is tolerated by the host cells (>640 µg/ml). As a rule, the antiviral activity of the synthetic compounds was restricted to the polymers and was not preformed in the low-molecular-weight basic compounds. This finding speaks in favour of the formation of antivirally active structures during the oxidative polymerization of phenolic compounds and, indirectly, of corresponding structural parts in different HA-type substances.

  8. Interaction of metal ions with acid sites of biosorbents peat moss and Vaucheria and model substances alginic and humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, R.H.; Martin, J.R.; Crist, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    The interaction between added metal ions and acid sites of two biosorbents, peat moss and the alga Vaucheria, was studied. Results were interpreted in terms of two model substances, alginic acid, a copolymer of guluronic and mannuronic acids present in marine algae, and humic acid in peat moss. For peat moss and Vaucheria at pH 4--6, two protons were displaced per Cd sorbed, after correction for sorbed metals also displaced by the heavy metal. The frequent neglect of exchange of heavy metals for metals either sorbed on the native material or added for pH adjustment leads to erroneous conclusions about proton displacement stoichiometry. Proton displacement constants K{sub ex}{sup H} decreased logarithmically with pH and had similar slopes for alginic acid and biosorbents. This pH effect was interpreted as an electrostatic effect of increasing anionic charge making proton removal less favorable. The maximum number of exchangeable acid sites (capacity C{sub H}) decreased with pH for alginic acid but increased with pH for biosorbents. Consistent with titration behavior, this difference was explained in terms of more weak acid sites in the biosorbents.

  9. DFT study of the energetic and noncovalent interactions between imidazolium ionic liquids and hydrofluoric acid.

    PubMed

    Velarde, Marco V; Gallo, Marco; Alonso, P A; Miranda, A D; Dominguez, J M

    2015-04-16

    In this work, we evaluated the energetic interactions between imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) and hydrofluoric acid, as well as the cation-anion interactions in ILs. We used DFT calculations that include dispersion corrections employing the PBE and M06 functionals. We tested 22 ILs, including [C4MIM][PF6], [C4MIM][NTf2], and [C4MIM][CH3COO], obtaining interaction energies in the range of -27 to -13 kcal/mol with the PBE functional. The NCI (noncovalent interaction) index developed by Yang and collaborators ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010 , 132 , 6498 - 6506 ; J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2011 , 7 , 625 - 632 ) also was used for mapping the key noncovalent interactions (hydrogen bonds, van der Waals, and steric repulsions) between the anions and cations of ILs and also for interactions of ILs with hydrofluoric acid (HF). The results obtained show that the anions have a stronger effect with respect to cations in their capacity for interacting with hydrofluoric acid, and the strongest interaction energies occur in systems where the key noncovalent interactions are mainly hydrogen bonds. The [C4MIM][PF6], [C4MIM][NTf2], and [C4MIM][BF4] ionic liquids displayed the weakest cation-anion interactions.

  10. Cross-species conservation of complementary amino acid-ribonucleobase interactions and their potential for ribosome-free encoding

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, John G. D.; Sherman, Rachel M.; Wang, Victoria M. Y.; Newman, Grace A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of amino acid-RNA nucleobase interactions in the evolution of RNA translation and protein-mRNA autoregulation remains an open area of research. We describe the inference of pairwise amino acid-RNA nucleobase interaction preferences using structural data from known RNA-protein complexes. We observed significant matching between an amino acid’s nucleobase affinity and corresponding codon content in both the standard genetic code and mitochondrial variants. Furthermore, we showed that knowledge of nucleobase preferences allows statistically significant prediction of protein primary sequence from mRNA using purely physiochemical information. Interestingly, ribosomal primary sequences were more accurately predicted than non-ribosomal sequences, suggesting a potential role for direct amino acid-nucleobase interactions in the genesis of amino acid-based ribosomal components. Finally, we observed matching between amino acid-nucleobase affinities and corresponding mRNA sequences in 35 evolutionarily diverse proteomes. We believe these results have important implications for the study of the evolutionary origins of the genetic code and protein-mRNA cross-regulation. PMID:26656258

  11. The interaction between humic acid and naphthalene after exposure to visible and UV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechaev, L. V.; Tchaikovskaya, O. N.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter plays an important role in pollution migration from human waste to aquatic environments. In this study, the effect of humic acid (HA) on the photo-chemical transformation of naphthalene by irradiation model solar and UV light was reported using fluorescence quenching titrations. It was calculated the interactions between naphthalene and humic acids. It is found that the molecular complex of humic acid and naphthalene is more stable to UV irradiation, compared with the model solar radiation. The application of molecular fluorescence spectrometry is a useful sensitive tool evaluate intermolecular HA and naphthalene interactions.

  12. Mucin/poly(acrylic acid) interactions: a spectroscopic investigation of mucoadhesion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minesh M; Smart, John D; Nevell, Thomas G; Ewen, Richard J; Eaton, Peter J; Tsibouklis, John

    2003-01-01

    Studies using infrared, (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies and differential scanning calorimetry support the hypothesis that hydrogen bonds, formed between the carboxylic acid functionality of the mucoadhesive material poly(acrylic acid) and the glycoprotein component of mucus, play a significant role in the process of mucoadhesion. There are fewer H-bonded interactions between the components than within the bulk of the pure mucoadhesive agent. The pH of the medium influences the structures of both the poly(acrylic acid) and the mucus, which, in turn, determine the nature and the extent of mucoadhesive interactions.

  13. CABINS: Case-based interactive scheduler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyashita, Kazuo; Sycara, Katia

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the need for interactive factory schedule repair and improvement, and we identify case-based reasoning (CBR) as an appropriate methodology. Case-based reasoning is the problem solving paradigm that relies on a memory for past problem solving experiences (cases) to guide current problem solving. Cases similar to the current case are retrieved from the case memory, and similarities and differences of the current case to past cases are identified. Then a best case is selected, and its repair plan is adapted to fit the current problem description. If a repair solution fails, an explanation for the failure is stored along with the case in memory, so that the user can avoid repeating similar failures in the future. So far we have identified a number of repair strategies and tactics for factory scheduling and have implemented a part of our approach in a prototype system, called CABINS. As a future work, we are going to scale up CABINS to evaluate its usefulness in a real manufacturing environment.

  14. Interaction of Benzimidazoles and Benzotriazole: Its Corrosion Protection Properties on Mild Steel in Hydrochloric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya, K.; Mohan, Revathi; Joseph, Abraham

    2014-11-01

    Synergistic hydrogen-bonded interaction of alkyl benzimidazoles and 1,2,3-benzotrizole and its corrosion protection properties on mild steel in hydrochloric acid at different temperatures have been studied using polarization, EIS, adsorption, surface studies, and computational methods. The extent of synergistic interaction increases with temperature. Quantum chemical approach is used to calculate some electronic properties of the molecules and to ascertain the synergistic interaction, inhibitive effect, and molecular structures. The corrosion inhibition efficiencies and the global chemical reactivity relate to some parameters, such as total energy, E HOMO, E LUMO, and gap energy (Δ E). 1,2,3-Benzotrizole interacts with benzimidazoles derivatives up to a bond length of approximately 1.99 Å. This interaction represents the formation of a hydrogen bond between the 1,2,3-benzotrizole and benzimidazoles. This synergistic interaction of 1,2,3-benzotrizole and benzimidazole derivatives offers extended inhibition efficiency toward mild steel in hydrochloric acid.

  15. On the Tannic Acid Interaction with Metallic Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, J.; García de Saldaña, E.; Jaén, J. A.

    2001-05-01

    The reaction between tannic acid and metallic iron was studied using infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Iron converts to sparingly soluble and amorphous ferric tannate complexes. The degree of conversion was followed from 1 day to 6 months. In the very early stages of reaction the product consists of a mono-type complex, while in the later stages a mixture of mono- and bis-type complexes were formed. The conversion reaction of metallic iron to tannate complexes follows a first-order reaction kinetics.

  16. An interactive visualization tool to explore the biophysical properties of amino acids and their contribution to substitution matrices

    PubMed Central

    Bulka, Blazej; desJardins, Marie; Freeland, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    Background Quantitative descriptions of amino acid similarity, expressed as probabilistic models of evolutionary interchangeability, are central to many mainstream bioinformatic procedures such as sequence alignment, homology searching, and protein structural prediction. Here we present a web-based, user-friendly analysis tool that allows any researcher to quickly and easily visualize relationships between these bioinformatic metrics and to explore their relationships to underlying indices of amino acid molecular descriptors. Results We demonstrate the three fundamental types of question that our software can address by taking as a specific example the connections between 49 measures of amino acid biophysical properties (e.g., size, charge and hydrophobicity), a generalized model of amino acid substitution (as represented by the PAM74-100 matrix), and the mutational distance that separates amino acids within the standard genetic code (i.e., the number of point mutations required for interconversion during protein evolution). We show that our software allows a user to recapture the insights from several key publications on these topics in just a few minutes. Conclusion Our software facilitates rapid, interactive exploration of three interconnected topics: (i) the multidimensional molecular descriptors of the twenty proteinaceous amino acids, (ii) the correlation of these biophysical measurements with observed patterns of amino acid substitution, and (iii) the causal basis for differences between any two observed patterns of amino acid substitution. This software acts as an intuitive bioinformatic exploration tool that can guide more comprehensive statistical analyses relating to a diverse array of specific research questions. PMID:16817972

  17. A statistical approach to study the interactive effects of process parameters on succinic acid production from Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Isar, Jasmine; Agarwal, Lata; Saran, Saurabh; Kaushik, Rekha; Saxena, Rajendra Kumar

    2007-04-01

    A statistical approach response surface methodology (RSM) was used to study the production of succinic acid from Bacteroides fragilis. The most influential parameters for succinic acid production obtained through one-at-a-time method were glucose, tryptone, sodium carbonate, inoculum size and incubation period. These resulted in the production of 5.4gL(-1) of succinic acid in 48h from B. fragilis under anaerobic conditions. Based on these results, a statistical method, face-centered central composite design (FCCCD) falling under RSM was employed for further enhancing the succinic acid production and to monitor the interactive effect of these parameters, which resulted in a more than 2-fold increase in yield (12.5gL(-1) in 24h). The analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed the adequacy of the model and the verification experiments confirmed its validity. On subsequent scale-up in a 10-L bioreactor using conditions optimized through RSM, 20.0gL(-1) of succinic acid was obtained in 24h. This clearly indicated that the model stood valid even on large scale. Thus, the statistical optimization strategy led to an approximately 4-fold increase in the yield of succinic acid. This is the first report on the use of FCCCD to improve succinic acid production from B. fragilis. The present study provides useful information about the regulation of succinic acid synthesis through manipulation of various physiochemical parameters.

  18. Recognition of 5'-YpG-3' sequences by coupled stacking/hydrogen bonding interactions with amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Jason S; Maynes, Jason T; Glover, J N Mark

    2004-01-09

    The combined biochemical and structural study of hundreds of protein-DNA complexes has indicated that sequence-specific interactions are mediated by two mechanisms termed direct and indirect readout. Direct readout involves direct interactions between the protein and base-specific atoms exposed in the major and minor grooves of DNA. For indirect readout, the protein recognizes DNA by sensing conformational variations in the structure dependent on nucleotide sequence, typically through interactions with the phosphodiester backbone. Based on our recent structure of Ndt80 bound to DNA in conjunction with a search of the existing PDB database, we propose a new method of sequence-specific recognition that utilizes both direct and indirect readout. In this mode, a single amino acid side-chain recognizes two consecutive base-pairs. The 3'-base is recognized by canonical direct readout, while the 5'-base is recognized through a variation of indirect readout, whereby the conformational flexibility of the particular dinucleotide step, namely a 5'-pyrimidine-purine-3' step, facilitates its recognition by the amino acid via cation-pi interactions. In most cases, this mode of DNA recognition helps explain the sequence specificity of the protein for its target DNA.

  19. The interaction of C.I. acid red 27 with human hemoglobin in solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2010-08-02

    The nature of the interaction between human hemoglobin and C.I. acid red 27 was investigated systematically by ultraviolet-vis absorbance, circular dichroism, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques at pH 7.40. The quenching mechanism, binding constants, and the number of binding sites were determined by the quenching of human hemoglobin fluorescence in presence of C.I. acid red 27. The results showed that the nature of the quenching was of static type and the process of binding acid red 27 on human hemoglobin was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure. The electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions played a major role in stabilizing the complex; The distance r between donor and acceptor was obtained to be 4.40 nm according to Förster's theory; The effect of acid red 27 on the conformation of human hemoglobin was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra.

  20. Abscisic acid-lipid interactions: a phospholipid monolayer study.

    PubMed

    Bürner, H; Benz, R; Gimmler, H; Hartung, W; Stillwell, W

    1993-08-15

    Lipid monolayer studies were performed on a Langmuir trough in the absence and in the presence of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA). The ABA-induced effects on the lipid monolayers can be summarized as follows: (i) ABA as the free acid (pH below 5.3) increased the molecular area and slightly decreased the surface pressure in the collapse points of monolayers made of saturated, unsaturated and of mixed lipids; ABA as the anion showed only minor effects. (ii) The ABA-induced area increase of the lipid monolayers decreased when the surface pressure increased, but some ABA remained in the monolayers made of unsaturated phospholipids even at collapse pressure. (iii) The incorporation of ABA into the monolayers could be inhibited by adding the plant sterol beta-sitosterol to the monolayer forming phospholipids. (iv) There was no substantial difference of ABA action on plant phospholipids as compared with other phospholipids. (v) ABA had a much stronger influence on unsaturated phospholipids than on saturated ones. (vi) ABA decreased the phase-transition temperature of saturated phospholipids. These results, which agree with those obtained from phospholipid vesicle studies, indicate that the physical state of the lipid is important for the ability of ABA penetrating into the lipid monolayer. Finally, a possible relevance of these results is discussed in terms of the action of ABA on guard cell membranes of plants.

  1. Interactions of hybrid gold-tannic acid nanoparticles with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Sekowski, Szymon; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Soliwoda, Katarzyna; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Grobelny, Jaroslaw

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles present a wide spectrum of chemical, biological, and physical properties which result in their usage in many branches of science. We present an investigation of the interaction between human serum albumin and hybrid gold-tannic acid nanoparticles synthesized via a chemical reduction method. The results obtained demonstrate that tannic acid can be a very effective reducing and stabilizing agent and allows monodisperse hybrid gold nanomaterial to be obtained. The synthesized hybrid gold-tannic acid nanoparticles strongly interact with human serum albumin by formation of protein-corona complexes. The strength of the interaction with albumin depends on the number of tannic acid molecules on the surface of the nanoparticles and the presence of citric acid. Nanoparticles of large size and rich in tannic acid react more strongly with the protein [K SV = (8.00 ± 0.2) × 10(5) M(-1)] compared with smaller ones [K SV = (6.83 ± 0.5) × 10(4) M(-1)] containing citric acid and low concentration of tannic acid.

  2. Molecular mechanics and dynamics studies on the interaction of gallic acid with collagen-like peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhan, B.; Thanikaivelan, P.; Subramanian, V.; Raghava Rao, J.; Unni Nair, Balachandran; Ramasami, T.

    2001-10-01

    Molecular modelling approaches have been used to understand the interaction of collagen-like peptides with gallic acid, which mimic vegetable tanning processes involved in protein stabilization. Several interaction sites have been identified and the binding energies of the complexes have been calculated. The calculated binding energies for various geometries are in the range 6-13 kcal/mol. It is found that some complexes exhibit hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic interaction plays a dominant role in the stabilization of the peptide by gallic acid. The π-OH type of interaction is also observed in the peptide stabilization. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for 600 ps revealed the possibility of hydrogen bonding between the collagen-like peptide and gallic acid.

  3. Interactive effects of cadmium and acid rain on photosynthetic light reaction in soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaoguo; Wang, Lihong; Chen, Minmin; Wang, Lei; Liang, Chanjuan; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2012-05-01

    Interactive effects of cadmium (Cd(2+)) and acid rain on photosynthetic light reaction in soybean seedlings were investigated under hydroponic conditions. Single treatment with Cd(2+) or acid rain and the combined treatment decreased the content of chlorophyll, Hill reaction rate, the activity of Mg(2+)-ATPase, maximal photochemical efficiency and maximal quantum yield, increased initial fluorescence and damaged the chloroplast structure in soybean seedlings. In the combined treatment, the change in the photosynthetic parameters and the damage of chloroplast structure were stronger than those of any single pollution. Meanwhile, Cd(2+) and acid rain had the interactive effects on the test indices in soybean seedlings. The results indicated that the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain aggravated the toxic effect of the single pollution of Cd(2+) or acid rain on the photosynthetic parameters due to the serious damage to the chloroplast structure.

  4. Spatially-interactive biomolecular networks organized by nucleic acid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jinglin; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2012-08-21

    Living systems have evolved a variety of nanostructures to control the molecular interactions that mediate many functions including the recognition of targets by receptors, the binding of enzymes to substrates, and the regulation of enzymatic activity. Mimicking these structures outside of the cell requires methods that offer nanoscale control over the organization of individual network components. Advances in DNA nanotechnology have enabled the design and fabrication of sophisticated one-, two- and three-dimensional (1D, 2D, and 3D) nanostructures that utilize spontaneous and sequence-specific DNA hybridization. Compared with other self-assembling biopolymers, DNA nanostructures offer predictable and programmable interactions and surface features to which other nanoparticles and biomolecules can be precisely positioned. The ability to control the spatial arrangement of the components while constructing highly organized networks will lead to various applications of these systems. For example, DNA nanoarrays with surface displays of molecular probes can sense noncovalent hybridization interactions with DNA, RNA, and proteins and covalent chemical reactions. DNA nanostructures can also align external molecules into well-defined arrays, which may improve the resolution of many structural determination methods, such as X-ray diffraction, cryo-EM, NMR, and super-resolution fluorescence. Moreover, by constraint of target entities to specific conformations, self-assembled DNA nanostructures can serve as molecular rulers to evaluate conformation-dependent activities. This Account describes the most recent advances in the DNA nanostructure directed assembly of biomolecular networks and explores the possibility of applying this technology to other fields of study. Recently, several reports have demonstrated the DNA nanostructure directed assembly of spatially interactive biomolecular networks. For example, researchers have constructed synthetic multienzyme cascades by

  5. Conserved charged amino acids are key determinants for fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs)-membrane interactions. A multi-methodological computational approach.

    PubMed

    Zamarreño, Fernando; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Amundarain, María Julia; Viso, Juan Francisco; Córsico, Betina; Costabel, Marcelo D

    2017-03-16

    Based on the analysis of the mechanism of ligand transfer to membranes employing in vitro methods, Fatty Acid Binding Protein (FABP) family has been divided in two subgroups: collisional and diffusional FABPs. Although the collisional mechanism has been well characterized employing in vitro methods, the structural features responsible for the difference between collisional and diffusional mechanisms remain uncertain. In this work, we have identified the amino acids putatively responsible for the interaction with membranes of both, collisional and diffusional, subgroups of FABPs. Moreover, we show how specific changes in FABPs' structure could change the mechanism of interaction with membranes. We have computed protein-membrane interaction energies for members of each subgroup of the family, and performed Molecular Dynamics simulations that have shown different configurations for the initial interaction between FABPs and membranes. In order to generalize our hypothesis, we extended the electrostatic and bioinformatics analysis over FABPs of different mammalian genus. Also, our methodological approach could be used for other systems involving protein-membrane interactions.

  6. Interfacial inhibitors of protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe

    2005-07-01

    This essay develops the paradigm of "Interfacial Inhibitors" (Pommier and Cherfils, TiPS, 2005, 28: 136) for inhibitory drugs beside orthosteric (competitive or non-competitive) and allosteric inhibitors. Interfacial inhibitors bind with high selectivity to a binding site involving two or more macromolecules within macromolecular complexes undergoing conformational changes. Interfacial binding traps (generally reversibly) a transition state of the complex, resulting in kinetic inactivation. The exemplary case of interfacial inhibitor of protein-DNA interface is camptothecin and its clinical derivatives. We will also provide examples generalizing the interfacial inhibitor concept to inhibitors of topoisomerase II (anthracyclines, ellipticines, epipodophyllotoxins), gyrase (quinolones, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin), RNA polymerases (alpha-amanitin and actinomycin D), and ribosomes (antibiotics such as streptomycin, hygromycin B, tetracycline, kirromycin, fusidic acid, thiostrepton, and possibly cycloheximide). We discuss the implications of the interfacial inhibitor concept for drug discovery.

  7. Anion-π interactions in complexes of proteins and halogen-containing amino acids.

    PubMed

    Borozan, Sunčica Z; Zlatović, Mario V; Stojanović, Srđan Đ

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the potential influence of anion-π interactions on the stability of complexes of proteins and halogen-containing non-natural amino acids. Anion-π interactions are distance and orientation dependent and our ab initio calculations showed that their energy can be lower than -8 kcal mol(-1), while most of their interaction energies lie in the range from -1 to -4 kcal mol(-1). About 20 % of these interactions were found to be repulsive. We have observed that Tyr has the highest occurrence among the aromatic residues involved in anion-π interactions, while His made the least contribution. Furthermore, our study showed that 67 % of total interactions in the dataset are multiple anion-π interactions. Most of the amino acid residues involved in anion-π interactions tend to be buried in the solvent-excluded environment. The majority of the anion-π interacting residues are located in regions with helical secondary structure. Analysis of stabilization centers for these complexes showed that all of the six residues capable of anion-π interactions are important in locating one or more of such centers. We found that anion-π interacting residues are sometimes involved in simultaneous interactions with halogens as well. With all that in mind, we can conclude that the anion-π interactions can show significant influence on molecular organization and on the structural stability of the complexes of proteins and halogen-containing non-natural amino acids. Their influence should not be neglected in supramolecular chemistry and crystal engineering fields as well.

  8. Interactions between space-based and feature-based attention

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Carly J.; Balestreri, Angela; Luck, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Although early research suggested that attention to nonspatial features (i.e., red) was confined to stimuli appearing at an attended spatial location, more recent research has emphasized the global nature of feature-based attention. For example, a distractor sharing a target feature may capture attention even if it occurs at a task-irrelevant location. Such findings have been used to argue that feature-based attention operates independently of spatial attention. However, feature-based attention may nonetheless interact with spatial attention, yielding larger feature-based effects at attended locations than at unattended locations. The present study tested this possibility. In two experiments, participants viewed a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream and identified a target letter defined by its color. Target-colored distractors were presented at various task-irrelevant locations during the RSVP stream. We found that feature-driven attentional capture effects were largest when the target-colored distractor was closer to the attended location. These results demonstrate that spatial attention modulates the strength of feature-based attention capture, calling into question the prior evidence that feature-based attention operates in a global manner that is independent of spatial attention. PMID:25285472

  9. Boronic Acid-Based Approach for Separation and Immobilization of Glycoproteins and Its Application in Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojin; Xia, Ning; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Glycoproteins influence a broad spectrum of biological processes including cell-cell interaction, host-pathogen interaction, or protection of proteins against proteolytic degradation. The analysis of their glyco-structures and concentration levels are increasingly important in diagnosis and proteomics. Boronic acids can covalently react with cis-diols in the oligosaccharide chains of glycoproteins to form five- or six-membered cyclic esters. Based on this interaction, boronic acid-based ligands and materials have attracted much attention in both chemistry and biology as the recognition motif for enrichment and chemo/biosensing of glycoproteins in recent years. In this work, we reviewed the progress in the separation, immobilization and detection of glycoproteins with boronic acid-functionalized materials and addressed its application in sensing. PMID:24141187

  10. Interactions of myelin basic protein with mixed dodecylphosphocholine/palmitoyllysophosphatidic acid micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Mendz, G.L. ); Brown, L.R. ); Martenson, R.E. )

    1990-03-06

    The interactions of myelin basic protein and peptides derived from it with detergent micelles of lysophosphatidylglycerol, lysophosphatidylserine, palmitoyllysophosphatidic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate, and with mixed micelles of the neutral detergent dodecylphosphocholine and the negatively charged detergent palmitoyllysophosphatidic acid, were investigated by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy and circular dichroic spectropolarimetry. The results with single detergents suggested that there are discrete interaction sites in the protein molecule for neutral and anionic detergent micelles and that at least some of these sites are different for each type of detergent. The data on the binding of the protein and peptides to mixed detergent micelles suggested that intramolecular interactions in the intact protein and in one of the longer peptides limited the formation of helices and also that a balance between hydrophobic and ionic forces is achieved in the interactions of the peptides with the detergents. At high detergent/protein molar ratios, hydrophobic interactions appeared to be favored.

  11. Prohibitin/annexin 2 interaction regulates fatty acid transport in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Ahmad; Daquinag, Alexes C.; Staquicini, Daniela I.; An, Zhiqiang; Pasqualini, Renata; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously identified prohibitin (PHB) and annexin A2 (ANX2) as proteins interacting on the surface of vascular endothelial cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) of humans and mice. Here, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB also interact in adipocytes. Mice lacking ANX2 have normal WAT vascularization, adipogenesis, and glucose metabolism but display WAT hypotrophy due to reduced fatty acid uptake by WAT endothelium and adipocytes. By using cell culture systems in which ANX2/PHB binding is disrupted either genetically or through treatment with a blocking peptide, we show that fatty acid transport efficiency relies on this protein complex. We also provide evidence that the interaction between ANX2 and PHB mediates fatty acid transport from the endothelium into adipocytes. Moreover, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB form a complex with the fatty acid transporter CD36. Finally, we show that the colocalization of PHB and CD36 on adipocyte surface is induced by extracellular fatty acids. Together, our results suggest that an unrecognized biochemical interaction between ANX2 and PHB regulates CD36-mediated fatty acid transport in WAT, thus revealing a new potential pathway for intervention in metabolic diseases. PMID:27468426

  12. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins.

  13. Fundamental Understanding of the Interaction of Acid Gases with CeO2 : From Surface Science to Practical Catalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Tumuluri, Uma; Rother, Gernot; Wu, Zili

    2016-03-21

    Acid gases including CO2, SO2, and NOx are ubiquitous in large-scale energy applications including heterogeneous catalysis. The adverse environmental and health effects of these acid gases have resulted in high interest in the research and development of technologies to remove or convert these acid gases. The main challenge for the development of these technologies is to develop catalysts that are highly efficient, stable, and cost-effective, and many catalysts have been reported in this regard. CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have gained prominence in the removal and conversion of CO2, SO2, and NOx because of their structural robustness and redox and acid–basemore » properties. In this article, we provide a brief overview of the application of CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts for the removal of CO2, SO2, and NOx gases with an emphasis on the fundamental understanding of the interactions of these acid gases with CeO2. The studies summarized in this review range from surface science using single crystals and thin films with precise crystallographic planes to practical catalysis applications of nanocrystalline and polycrystalline CeO2 materials with defects and dopants. After an introduction to the properties of CeO2 surfaces, their catalytic properties for conversions of different acid gases are reviewed and discussed. Lastly, we find that the surface atomic structure, oxygen vacancies, and surface acid–base properties of CeO2 play vital roles in the surface chemistry and structure evolution during the interactions of acid gases with CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts.« less

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular simulation on the interaction of caffeic acid with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuhong; Duan, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Lv, Zizheng; Ruohua, Zhu; Zhang, Zhuoyong

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular simulation were explored to study the interaction between caffeic acid and human serum albumin (HSA). The experimental results indicated that the fluorescence quenching mechanism between caffeic acid and HSA is a static quenching, which was proved again by the analysis of fluorescence lifetime by time-correlated single photon counting. The binding process is spontaneous and the hydrophobic force is the main force between caffeic acid and HSA. In addition, the binding of caffeic acid to HSA was modeled by molecular dynamics simulations. The root mean square deviations, root mean square fluctuations, radius of gyration and the number of hydrogen bonds of the molecular dynamic (MD) simulation process were analyzed. Both experimental and modeling results demonstrated strong binding between HSA and caffeic acid. HSA had a slight conformational change when it binds with caffeic acid. The obtained information is useful for HSA drug design. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Interaction of Peroxynitric Acid with Solid H2O Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhuangjie; Friedl, Randall R.; Moore, Steven B.; Sander, Stanley P.

    1996-01-01

    The uptake of peroxynitric acid (PNA), HO2NO2 or HNO4, on solid H2O ice at 193 K (-80 C) was studied using a fast flow-mass spectrometric technique. An uptake coefficient of 0.15 +/- 0.10 was measured, where the quoted uncertainty denotes 2 standard deviations. The uptake process did not result in the production of gas phase products. The composition of the condensed phase was investigated using programmed heating (3 K/min) of the substrate coupled with mass spectrometric detection of desorbed species. Significant quantities of HNO, and HNO3 desorbed from the substrates at temperatures above 225 K and 246 K, respectively. The desorbed HNO3, which was less than 9% of the desorbed HNO, and remained unchanged upon incubation of the substrate, was likely due to impurities in the HNO4 samples rather than reaction of HNO, on the substrate. The onset temperatures for HNO4 desorption increased with increasing H2O to HNO4 ratios, indicating that HNO4, like HNO3, tends to be hydrated in the presence of water. These observations suggest possible mechanisms for removal of HNO4 or repartitioning of total odd nitrogen species in the Earth's upper troposphere and stratosphere.

  16. Interactions between red light, abscisic acid, and calcium in gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leopold, A. C.; LaFavre, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of red light on orthogravitropism of Merit corn (Zea mays L.) roots has been attributed to its effects on the transduction phase of gravitropism (AC Leopold, SH Wettlaufer [1988] Plant Physiol 87:803-805). In an effort to characterize the orthogravitropic transduction system, comparative experiments have been carried out on the effects of red light, calcium, and abscisic acid (ABA). The red light effect can be completely satisfied with added ABA (100 micromolar) or with osmotic shock, which is presumed to increase endogenous ABA. The decay of the red light effect is closely paralleled by the decay of the ABA effect. ABA and exogenous calcium show strong additive effects when applied to either Merit or a line of corn which does not require red light for orthogravitropism. Measurements of the ABA content show marked increases in endogenous ABA in the growing region of the roots after red light. The interpretation is offered that red light or ABA may serve to increase the cytoplasmic concentrations of calcium, and that this may be an integral part of orthogravitropic transduction.

  17. Solvent–amino acid interaction energies in three-dimensional-lattice Monte Carlo simulations of a model 27-mer protein: Folding thermodynamics and kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Kai; Prausnitz, John M.; Radke, Clayton J.

    2004-01-01

    Amino acid residue–solvent interactions are required for lattice Monte Carlo simulations of model proteins in water. In this study, we propose an interaction-energy scale that is based on the interaction scale by Miyazawa and Jernigan. It permits systematic variation of the amino acid–solvent interactions by introducing a contrast parameter for the hydrophobicity, Cs, and a mean attraction parameter for the amino acids, ω. Changes in the interaction energies strongly affect many protein properties. We present an optimized energy parameter set for best representing realistic behavior typical for many proteins (fast folding and high cooperativity for single chains). Our optimal parameters feature a much weaker hydrophobicity contrast and mean attraction than does the original interaction scale. The proposed interaction scale is designed for calculating the behavior of proteins in bulk and at interfaces as a function of solvent characteristics, as well as protein size and sequence. PMID:14739322

  18. Metal cation dependence of interactions with amino acids: bond dissociation energies of Rb(+) and Cs(+) to the acidic amino acids and their amide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Armentrout, P B; Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-04-24

    Metal cation-amino acid interactions are key components controlling the secondary structure and biological function of proteins, enzymes, and macromolecular complexes comprising these species. Determination of pairwise interactions of alkali metal cations with amino acids provides a thermodynamic vocabulary that begins to quantify these fundamental processes. In the present work, we expand a systematic study of such interactions by examining rubidium and cesium cations binding with the acidic amino acids (AA), aspartic acid (Asp) and glutamic acid (Glu), and their amide derivatives, asparagine (Asn) and glutamine (Gln). These eight complexes are formed using electrospray ionization and their bond dissociation energies (BDEs) are determined experimentally using threshold collision-induced dissociation with xenon in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Analyses of the energy-dependent cross sections include consideration of unimolecular decay rates, internal energy of the reactant ions, and multiple ion-neutral collisions. Quantum chemical calculations are conducted at the B3LYP, MP2(full), and M06 levels of theory using def2-TZVPPD basis sets, with results showing reasonable agreement with experiment. At 0 and 298 K, most levels of theory predict that the ground-state conformers for M(+)(Asp) and M(+)(Asn) involve tridentate binding of the metal cation to the backbone carbonyl, amino, and side-chain carbonyl groups, although tridentate binding to the carboxylic acid group and side-chain carbonyl is competitive for M(+)(Asn). For the two longer side-chain amino acids, Glu and Gln, multiple structures are competitive. A comparison of these results to those for the smaller alkali cations, Na(+) and K(+), provides insight into the trends in binding energies associated with the molecular polarizability and dipole moment of the side chain. For all four metal cations, the BDEs are inversely correlated with the size of the metal cation and follow the order Asp < Glu

  19. Weak vs Strong Acids and Bases: The Football Analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstein, Todd P.

    2000-07-01

    An important topic in any introductory chemistry course is that of acids and bases. Students generally have no trouble learning the Brønsted-Lowry definition of an acid as a proton donor and a base as a proton acceptor. Problems often arise, however, when chemistry teachers attempt to explain the difference between weak and strong acids, and between weak and strong bases. For acids in aqueous solution, discussing complete in contrast to partial ionization works well for those with a strong grasp of the equilibrium concept, but for many students it does not seem to do the trick. Partial ionization may not evoke much in the mind of a "visual learner". Accordingly, I have developed a football analogy for acids and bases in which acids are compared to quarterbacks, whose job is to get rid of the ball (H+). A strong acid, like an excellent quarterback, delivers the ball effectively; a weak acid, like a poor quarterback, is often left holding the ball. Furthermore, bases may be likened to wide receivers, whose job is to catch and hold onto the ball (H+). A strong base, like an excellent wide receiver, holds onto the ball; a weak base, like a poor receiver, often drops the ball. The concept of throwing and catching a ball is easy to visualize and the analogy to acids and bases can help even students unfamiliar with the mores of the gridiron to comprehend the mores of aqueous protons.

  20. Fluorescent amino acid undergoing excited state intramolecular proton transfer for site-specific probing and imaging of peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Sholokh, Marianna; Zamotaiev, Oleksandr M; Das, Ranjan; Postupalenko, Viktoriia Y; Richert, Ludovic; Dujardin, Denis; Zaporozhets, Olga A; Pivovarenko, Vasyl G; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Mély, Yves

    2015-02-12

    Fluorescent amino acids bearing environment-sensitive fluorophores are highly valuable tools for site-selective probing of peptide/ligand interactions. Herein, we synthesized a fluorescent l-amino acid bearing the 4'-methoxy-3-hydroxyflavone fluorophore (M3HFaa) that shows dual emission, as a result of an excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The dual emission of M3HFaa was found to be substantially more sensitive to hydration as compared to previous analogues. By replacing the Ala30 and Trp37 residues of a HIV-1 nucleocapsid peptide, M3HFaa was observed to preserve the peptide structure and functions. Interaction of the labeled peptides with nucleic acids and lipid vesicles produced a strong switch in their dual emission, favoring the emission of the ESIPT product. This switch was associated with the appearance of long-lived fluorescence lifetimes for the ESIPT product, as a consequence of the rigid environment in the complexes that restricted the relative motions of the M3HFaa aromatic moieties. The strongest restriction and thus the longest fluorescence lifetimes were observed at position 37 in complexes with nucleic acids, where the probe likely stacks with the nucleobases. Based on the dependence of the lifetime values on the nature of the ligand and the labeled position, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging was used to identify the binding partners of the labeled peptides microinjected into living cells. Thus, M3HFaa appears as a sensitive tool for monitoring site selectively peptide interactions in solution and living cells.

  1. Spectroscopic analyses and studies on respective interaction of cyanuric acid and uric acid with bovine serum albumin and melamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dandan; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Wang, Qi; Qiao, Heng

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the fluorescence quenching was used to study the interaction of cyanuric acid (CYA) and uric acid (UA) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) at two different temperatures (283 K and 310 K). The bimolecular quenching constant (Kq), apparent quenching constant (Ksv), effective binding constant (KA) and corresponding dissociation constant (KD), binding site number (n) and binding distance (r) were calculated by adopting Stern-Volmer, Lineweaver-Burk, Double logarithm and overlap integral equations. The results show that CYA and UA are both able to obviously bind to BSA, but the binding strength order is BSA + CYA < BSA + UA. And then, the interactions of CYA and UA with melamine (MEL) under the same conditions were also studied by using similar methods. The results indicates that both CYA and UA can bind together closely with melamine (MEL). It is wished that these research results would facilitate the understanding the formation of kidney stones and gout in the body after ingesting excess MEL.

  2. Interaction of cinnamic acid derivatives with serum albumins: A fluorescence spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, T. Sanjoy; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2011-03-01

    Cinnamic acid (CA) derivatives are known to possess broad therapeutic applications including anti-tumor activity. The present study was designed to determine the underlying mechanism and thermodynamic parameters for the binding of two CA based intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) fluorescent probes, namely, 4-(dimethylamino) cinnamic acid (DMACA) and trans-ethyl p-(dimethylamino) cinnamate (EDAC), with albumins by fluorescence spectroscopy. Stern-Volmer analysis of the tryptophan fluorescence quenching data in presence of the added ligand reveals fluorescence quenching constant ( κq), Stern-Volmer constant ( KSV) and also the ligand-protein association constant ( Ka). The thermodynamic parameters like enthalpy (Δ H) and entropy (Δ S) change corresponding to the ligand binding process were also estimated. The results show that the ligands bind into the sub-domain IIA of the proteins in 1:1 stoichiometry with an apparent binding constant value in the range of 10 4 dm 3 mol -1. In both the cases, the spontaneous ligand binding to the proteins occur through entropy driven mechanism, although the interaction of DMACA is relatively stronger in comparison with EDAC. The temperature dependence of the binding constant indicates the induced change in protein secondary structure.

  3. Interactions Between Fatty Acid Transport Proteins, Genes That Encode for Them, and Exercise: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jayewardene, Avindra F; Mavros, Yorgi; Reeves, Anneliese; Hancock, Dale P; Gwinn, Tom; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-08-01

    Long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) movement into skeletal muscle involves a highly mediated process in which lipid rafts are utilized in the cellular membrane, involving numerous putative plasma membrane-associated LCFA transport proteins. The process of LCFA uptake and oxidation is of particular metabolic significance both at rest and during light to moderate exercise. A comprehensive systematic search of electronic databases was conducted to investigate whether exercise alters protein and/or gene expression of putative LCFA transport proteins. There were 31 studies meeting all eligibility criteria, of these 13 utilized an acute exercise protocol and 18 examined chronic exercise adaptations. Seventeen involved a study design incorporating an exercise stimulus, while the remaining 14 incorporated a combined exercise and diet stimulus. Divergent data relating to acute exercise, as well as prolonged exercise training (≥3 weeks), on protein content (PC) response was identified for proteins CD36, FABPpm and CAV1. Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) data did not always correspond to functional PC, supporting previous suggestions of a disconnect due to potentially limiting factors post gene expression. The large array of study designs, cohorts, and primary dependent variables within the studies included in the present review elucidate the complexity of the interaction between exercise and LCFA transport proteins. Summary of the results in the present review validate the need for further targeted investigation within this topic, and provide an important information base for such research. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1671-1687, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Humic acid metal cation interaction studied by spectromicroscopy techniques in combination with quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Plaschke, M; Rothe, J; Armbruster, M K; Denecke, M A; Naber, A; Geckeis, H

    2010-03-01

    Humic acids (HA) have a high binding capacity towards traces of toxic metal cations, thus affecting their transport in aquatic systems. Eu(III)-HA aggregates are studied by synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the carbon K-edge and laser scanning luminescence microscopy (LSLM) at the (5)D(0) --> (7)F(1,2) fluorescence emission lines. Both methods provide the necessary spatial resolution in the sub-micrometre range to resolve characteristic aggregate morphologies: optically dense zones embedded in a matrix of less dense material in STXM images correspond to areas with increased Eu(III) luminescence yield in the LSLM micrographs. In the C 1s-NEXAFS of metal-loaded polyacrylic acid (PAA), used as a HA model compound, a distinct complexation effect is identified. This effect is similar to trends observed in the dense fraction of HA/metal cation aggregates. The strongest complexation effect is observed for the Zr(IV)-HA/PAA system. This effect is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations performed at the ab initio level for model complexes with different metal centres and complex geometries. Without the high spatial resolution of STXM and LSLM and without the combination of molecular modelling with experimental results, the different zones indicating a ;pseudo'-phase separation into strong complexing domains and weaker complexing domains of HA would never have been identified. This type of strategy can be used to study metal interaction with other organic material.

  5. Acid-Base Pairs in Lewis Acidic Zeolites Promote Direct Aldol Reactions by Soft Enolization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer D; Van de Vyver, Stijn; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-08-17

    Hf-, Sn-, and Zr-Beta zeolites catalyze the cross-aldol condensation of aromatic aldehydes with acetone under mild reaction conditions with near quantitative yields. NMR studies with isotopically labeled molecules confirm that acid-base pairs in the Si-O-M framework ensemble promote soft enolization through α-proton abstraction. The Lewis acidic zeolites maintain activity in the presence of water and, unlike traditional base catalysts, in acidic solutions.

  6. Determination of acidity constants of acid-base indicators by second-derivative spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Derya; Alkan, Mahir

    2000-12-01

    A method for calculation of acid-base dissociation constants of monoprotic weak organic acids whose acid and base species have overlapping spectra from absorptiometric and pH measurements is described. It has been shown that the second-derivative spectrophotometry can effectively be used for determining the dissociation constants, when dissociation constants obtained for methyl orange and bromothymol blue were compared with the values given in the literature.

  7. Solid-state interaction of stearic acid with povidone and its effect on dissolution stability of capsules.

    PubMed

    Desai, D; Kothari, S; Huang, M

    2008-04-16

    Capsule formulations of two drugs under development showed slower dissolution upon storage; Drug A, after 2.5 weeks at 40 degrees C/23% RH and 4 weeks at 30 degrees C/60% RH, and Drug B, after 6 weeks at 50 degrees C and 40 degrees C/75% RH. The formulations of both drugs contained povidone as a binder and stearic acid as a lubricant. Replacement of stearic acid by magnesium stearate from the formulation of Drug B, which was selected for further studies, provided rapid dissolution profiles under similar storage conditions with no change occurring on storage. In order to investigate the role of stearic acid further, binary mixtures of stearic acid with the drugs and other excipients used in their respective formulations were prepared and stored at 40 degrees C/75% RH and 50 degrees C. After 1 week of storage, it was observed that povidone and stearic acid mixture formed a transparent, hard, glass-like insoluble substance. It is hypothesized that the substance formed by the interaction can reduce the porosity of the granules and thereby reduces the ingress of the dissolution medium leading to slower dissolution. The infrared (IR) spectra of the glass-like substance showed a slight broadening of the povidone carbonyl band at 1662 cm(-1). The powder X-ray diffraction of the stored mixture showed that the crystallinity of stearic acid was lost. Furthermore, repeated heating and cooling cycles of povidone and stearic acid mixtures in various proportions using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that recrystallization of stearic acid from its melt was strongly affected by the presence of increasing amounts of povidone. Based on the observed solid-state interaction, a combination of stearic and povidone should be avoided for immediate release formulations.

  8. Substrate Interaction in Intravenous Feeding. Comparative Effects of Carbohydrate and Fat on Amino Acid Utilization in Fasting Man

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Bruce M.; Culebras, J. M.; Sim, A. J. W.; Ball, M. R.; Moore, F. D.

    1977-01-01

    Data are presented on the metabolic and endocrine effects of intravenous infusions in normal fasting man observed under highly controlled conditions over a period of six to eight days duration. There are comparative data on a variety of intravenous feeding programs. The data on total starvation are based on studies from the literature, some of which were carried out in this laboratory. The data on low dose glucose, high dose glucose, glycerol, fat emulsion, and amino acids, each given separately, demonstrate changes seen with simple infusion of a single substrate in fasting. These data are now compared with the utilization of amino acid infusions when accompanied by low dose glucose, high dose glucose, glycerol, and fat emulsion. In all, nine experimental intravenous feeding programs are presented, based on data from 35 subjects observed over a total of 370 subject-days. The findings show a strong interaction between glucose or lipid and protein metabolism. In fasting, glucose had protein sparing effect, most evident when given at high dose. Glycerol, in an amount equal to that contained in 2000 ml of ten per cent fat emulsion, had a mild protein sparing effect. Fat emulsion was no more effective. When amino acids were given alone, normal fasting human subjects were always in negative nitrogen balance with the daily nitrogen loss half that seen in starvation alone. Although amino acids given alone have a protein sparing effect, this is accomplished only at the expense of a high nitrogen excretion including an amount equivalent to the entire infusion plus an additional loss from the body's native proteins. The provision of energy yielding non-protein substrates with the amino acids markedly improved nitrogen economy in the following order: glycerol, low dose glucose, fat emulsion and high dose glucose. When caloric provision with glucose approached the isocaloric level for normal diet, the utilization of amino acids was maximized. When given with amino acids, fat

  9. Poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid interaction with the transgenic flax fibers: FT-IR and Raman spectra of the composite extracted from a GM flax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Żuk, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan; Dymińska, Lucyna; Mączka, Mirosław; Hanuza, Jerzy

    2009-07-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman studies have been performed on commercial 3-hydroxy-butyric acid, commercial poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid as well as poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid (PHB) produced by bacteria. The data were compared to those obtained for poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid extracted from natural and genetically modified flax. Genetically modified flax was generated by expression of three bacterial genes coding for synthesis of poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid. Thus transgenic flaxes were enhanced with different amount of the PHB. The discussion of polymer structure and vibrational properties has been done in order to get insight into differences among these materials. The interaction between the cellulose of flax fibers and embedded poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid has been also discussed. The spectroscopic data provide evidences for structural changes in cellulose and in PHB when synthesized in fibers. Based on this data it is suggesting that cellulose and PHB interact by hydrogen and ester bonds.

  10. Genotypic variability and genotype by environment interactions in oil and fatty acids in high, intermediate, and low oleic acid peanut genotypes.

    PubMed

    Singkham, Nattawut; Jogloy, Sanun; Kesmala, Thawan; Swatsitang, Prasan; Jaisil, Prasit; Puppala, Naveen

    2010-05-26

    Variability of genotype and genotype x environment (G x E) interactions for fatty acids are important to develop high-oleic types in peanut varietal improvement programs. The objective of this study was to determine the variation in fatty acid composition among peanut genotypes and G x E interactions of fatty acids in three groups of genotypes with high, intermediate, and low-oleic acid. Twenty-one genotypes were tested in three environments consisting of two rainy seasons and one dry season. The results indicated that G x E interactions were significant for biomass, pod yield, and harvest index and also for oleic, linoleic acids, and O/L ratio. G x E interactions were less important than genotypic main effect. For oleic acid, significant interactions were found in the intermediate and low-oleic groups only. Therefore, selection for high-oleic trait in peanut breeding programs should be effective.

  11. Comparative studies on the interaction of caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid and ferulic acid with bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang; Huang, Kelong; Zhong, Ming; Guo, Jun; Wang, Wei-zheng; Zhu, Ronghua

    2010-10-01

    The substitution of the hydrogen on aromatic and esterification of carboxyl group of the phenol compounds plays an important role in their bio-activities. In this paper, caffeic acid (CaA), chlorogenic acid (ChA) and ferulic acid (FA) were selected to investigate the binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) using UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that the methoxyl group substituting for the 3-hydroxyl group of CaA decreased the affinity for BSA and the esterification of carboxyl group of CaA with quinic acid increased the affinities. The affinities of ChA and FA with BSA were more sensitive to the temperature than that of CaA with BSA. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence indicated that the Stern-Volmer plots largely deviated from linearity at high concentrations and were caused by complete quenching of the tyrosine fluorescence of BSA.

  12. Interaction forces and membrane charge tunability: Oleic acid containing membranes in different pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, James; Suga, Keishi; Kuhl, Tonya L

    2017-02-01

    Oleic acid is known to interact with saturated lipid molecules and increase the fluidity of gel phase lipid membranes. In this work, the thermodynamic properties of mixed monolayers of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and oleic acid at the air-water interface were determined using Langmuir isotherms. The isotherm study revealed an attractive interaction between oleic acid and DPPC. The incorporation of oleic acid also monotonically decreased the elastic modulus of the monolayer indicative of higher fluidity with increasing oleic acid content. Using the surface force apparatus, intermembrane force-distance profiles were obtained for substrate supported DPPC membranes containing 30mol% oleic acid at pH5.8 and 7.4. Three different preparation conditions resulted in distinct force profiles. Membranes prepared in pH5.8 subphase had a low number of nanoscopic defects ≤1% and an adhesion magnitude of ~0.6mN/m. A slightly higher defect density of 1-4% was found for membranes prepared in a physiological pH7.4 subphase. The presence of the exposed hydrophobic moieties resulted in a higher adhesion magnitude of 2.9mN/m. Importantly, at pH7.4, some oleic acid deprotonates resulting in a long-range electrostatic repulsion. Even though oleic acid increased the DPPC bilayer fluidity and the number of defects, no membrane restructuring was observed indicating that the system maintained a stable configuration.

  13. Interaction between Tea Polyphenols and Bile Acid Inhibits Micellar Cholesterol Solubility.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuki; Hirose, Sayumi; Nagaoka, Satoshi; Yanase, Emiko

    2016-01-13

    The molecular mechanism by which tea polyphenols decrease the micellar solubility of cholesterol is not completely clear. To clarify this mechanism, this study investigated the interaction between tea polyphenols (catechins and oolongtheanins) and cholesterol micelles. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study was performed on a micellar solution containing taurocholic acid and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis was carried out on the precipitate and the supernatant that formed when EGCg was added to a cholesterol-micelle solution. The data indicated a regiospecific interaction of EGCg with taurocholic acid. Therefore, the ability of EGCg to lower the solubility of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and cholesterol in micellar solutions can be attributed to their elimination from the micelles due to interaction between taurocholic acids and EGCg.

  14. Perfluorobutane sulfonic acid hydration and interactions with O2 adsorbed on Pt3.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liuming; Balbuena, Perla B; Seminario, Jorge M

    2006-04-06

    The side chain of NAFION, a proton conductive membrane used as electrolyte in low-temperature fuel cells, is modeled with perfluorobutane sulfonic acid. Density functional theory is used to characterize structures and energetics of hydration of the model system interacting with a proton solvated with up to 24 water molecules and analyze interactions of some of these hydrated complexes with O(2) adsorbed on Pt(3). It is found that at least three water molecules are needed to ionize the sulfonic acid, and higher degrees of hydration induce the formation of cages where the water molecules are held together via complex hydrogen-bond networks. The interaction between the complex formed by the ionized acid and the hydrated proton, in contact with a bridge-adsorbed O(2)-Pt(3), promotes the protonation of the adsorbed O(2). Upon protonation, the O(2)-Pt(3) system evolves from hydrophobic to hydrophilic behavior, which may facilitate further interfacial contact.

  15. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  16. Assessment of acid-base balance. Stewart's approach.

    PubMed

    Fores-Novales, B; Diez-Fores, P; Aguilera-Celorrio, L J

    2016-04-01

    The study of acid-base equilibrium, its regulation and its interpretation have been a source of debate since the beginning of 20th century. Most accepted and commonly used analyses are based on pH, a notion first introduced by Sorensen in 1909, and on the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation (1916). Since then new concepts have been development in order to complete and make easier the understanding of acid-base disorders. In the early 1980's Peter Stewart brought the traditional interpretation of acid-base disturbances into question and proposed a new method. This innovative approach seems more suitable for studying acid-base abnormalities in critically ill patients. The aim of this paper is to update acid-base concepts, methods, limitations and applications.

  17. Studies on the interaction of salvianolic acid B with human hemoglobin by multi-spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tingting; Zhu, Shajun; Cao, Hui; Shang, Yanfang; Wang, Miao; Jiang, Guoqing; Shi, Yujun; Lu, Tianhong

    2011-04-01

    The interaction between salvianolic acid B (Sal B) and human hemoglobin (HHb) under physiological conditions was investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques. The experimental results indicate that the quenching mechanism of fluorescence of HHb by Sal B is a static quenching procedure, the binding reaction is spontaneous, and the hydrophobic interactions play a major role in binding of Sal B to HHb. Based on Förster's theory of non-radiative energy transfer, the binding distance between Sal B and the inner tryptophan residues of HHb was determined to be 2.64 nm. The synchronous fluorescence experiment revealed that Sal B can not lead to the microenvironmental changes around the Tyr and Trp residues of HHb, and the binding site of Sal B on HHb is located at α 1β 2 interface of HHb. Furthermore, the CD spectroscopy indicated the secondary structure of HHb is not changed in the presence of Sal B.

  18. GAIA: a gram-based interaction analysis tool – an approach for identifying interacting domains in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kelvin X; Ouellette, BF Francis

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) play important roles in many biological functions. Protein domains, which are defined as independently folding structural blocks of proteins, physically interact with each other to perform these biological functions. Therefore, the identification of Domain-Domain Interactions (DDIs) is of great biological interests because it is generally accepted that PPIs are mediated by DDIs. As a result, much effort has been put on the prediction of domain pair interactions based on computational methods. Many DDI prediction tools using PPIs network and domain evolution information have been reported. However, tools that combine the primary sequences, domain annotations, and structural annotations of proteins have not been evaluated before. Results In this study, we report a novel approach called Gram-bAsed Interaction Analysis (GAIA). GAIA extracts peptide segments that are composed of fixed length of continuous amino acids, called n-grams (where n is the number of amino acids), from the annotated domain and DDI data set in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) and identifies a list of n-grams that may contribute to DDIs and PPIs based on the frequencies of their appearance. GAIA also reports the coordinate position of gram pairs on each interacting domain pair. We demonstrate that our approach improves on other DDI prediction approaches when tested against a gold-standard data set and achieves a true positive rate of 82% and a false positive rate of 21%. We also identify a list of 4-gram pairs that are significantly over-represented in the DDI data set and may mediate PPIs. Conclusion GAIA represents a novel and reliable way to predict DDIs that mediate PPIs. Our results, which show the localizations of interacting grams/hotspots, provide testable hypotheses for experimental validation. Complemented with other prediction methods, this study will allow us to elucidate the interactome of cells. PMID:19208164

  19. Interaction between glutathione and Cu(II) in the vicinity of nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Prütz, W A

    1994-01-01

    GSH interacts with Cu(II) in the vicinity of DNA (pH approximately 7) to form the DNA-Cu(I) complex, which can be quantified by characteristic absorption changes [e.g. delta epsilon 295 = 4516 cm-1.M-1 Cu(I)]. Under initial conditions of Cu(II)/GSH >> 1 and DNA(base)/Cu(II) >> 5, the stoichiometry is 1 DNA-Cu(I) per SH group (also for other thiols). Stopped-flow kinetics show that the complex is formed with half-lives of 1-30 s, depending on the environment, but independent of O2. DNA-Cu(I) generation is much slower, less efficient, and O2-dependent at Cu(II)/GSH < 1, or when GSH interacts with Cu(II) before the addition of DNA. Interaction of GSH with Cu(II) in the presence of DNA [at Cu(II)/GSH > 1] leads to DNA-associated transients, probably DNA-GS(-)-Cu(I); DNA-Cu(I) formation under these conditions is proposed to occur by ligand exchange: DNA-GS(-)-Cu(I)+Cu(II)<-->DNA-Cu(I)+GS(-)-Cu(II). There is no evidence for generation of free thiyl radicals (GS.) on reaction of Cu(II) with GSH. Formation of DNA-Cu(I) is, in our opinion, a primary step involved in DNA-strand cleavage by GSH in the presence of Cu(II) [Reed and Douglas (1991) Biochem. J. 275, 601-608]. In this context the question of the pro-oxidative and/or antioxidative activity of GSH, when combined with copper, is discussed. GSH also generates Cu(I) complexes with other nucleic acids. An updated order of affinities of various nucleic acids for Cu(I) is presented. Cu(I) exhibits a high preference for alternating dG-dC sequences and might even be a Z-DNA inducer. The poly(C)-Cu(I) complex seems to form a base-paired structure at pH approximately 7, as demonstrated by intercalation of ethidium bromide. PMID:8092988

  20. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  1. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  2. Calcium-based Lewis acid catalysts.

    PubMed

    Begouin, Jeanne-Marie; Niggemann, Meike

    2013-06-17

    Recently, Lewis acidic calcium salts bearing weakly coordinating anions such as Ca(NTf₂)₂, Ca(OTf)₂, CaF₂ and Ca[OCH(CF₃)₂]₂ have been discovered as catalysts for the transformation of alcohols, olefins and carbonyl compounds. High stability towards air and moisture, selectivity and high reactivity under mild reaction conditions render these catalysts a sustainable and mild alternative to transition metals, rare-earth metals or strong Brønsted acids.

  3. Interactions of zinc octacarboxyphthalocyanine with selected amino acids and with albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliber, Marta; Broda, Małgorzata A.; Nackiewicz, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Effect of selected amino acids (glycine, L-histidine, L-cysteine, L-serine, L-tryptophan) and albumin on the spectroscopic properties and photostability of zinc octacarboxyphthalocyanine (ZnPcOC) was explored in the phosphate buffer at a pH of 7.0. The photodegradation of ZnPcOC alone and in the presence of amino acids or albumin has been investigated in aqueous phase using UV-366 nm and daylight irradiation. Kinetic analysis showed that the interaction with amino acids or albumin enhances the photostability of ZnPcOC. To answer the question of how zinc phthalocyanine interacts with amino acids extensive DFT calculations were performed. Analysis of the optimized geometry features of ZnPcOC: amino acids complexes in the gas phase and in water environment as well as the BSSE corrected interaction energies indicates that the more likely is the formation of equatorial complexes in which H-bonds are formed between the COOH groups of the phthalocyanine and carboxyl or amino groups of amino acids. UV-Vis spectra calculated by employing time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) are also consistent with this conclusion.

  4. Interactions of zinc octacarboxyphthalocyanine with selected amino acids and with albumin.

    PubMed

    Kliber, Marta; Broda, Małgorzata A; Nackiewicz, Joanna

    2016-02-15

    Effect of selected amino acids (glycine, l-histidine, l-cysteine, l-serine, l-tryptophan) and albumin on the spectroscopic properties and photostability of zinc octacarboxyphthalocyanine (ZnPcOC) was explored in the phosphate buffer at a pH of 7.0. The photodegradation of ZnPcOC alone and in the presence of amino acids or albumin has been investigated in aqueous phase using UV-366nm and daylight irradiation. Kinetic analysis showed that the interaction with amino acids or albumin enhances the photostability of ZnPcOC. To answer the question of how zinc phthalocyanine interacts with amino acids extensive DFT calculations were performed. Analysis of the optimized geometry features of ZnPcOC: amino acids complexes in the gas phase and in water environment as well as the BSSE corrected interaction energies indicates that the more likely is the formation of equatorial complexes in which H-bonds are formed between the COOH groups of the phthalocyanine and carboxyl or amino groups of amino acids. UV-Vis spectra calculated by employing time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) are also consistent with this conclusion.

  5. Advances in nucleic acid-based detection methods.

    PubMed Central

    Wolcott, M J

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory techniques based on nucleic acid methods have increased in popularity over the last decade with clinical microbiologists and other laboratory scientists who are concerned with the diagnosis of infectious agents. This increase in popularity is a result primarily of advances made in nucleic acid amplification and detection techniques. Polymerase chain reaction, the original nucleic acid amplification technique, changed the way many people viewed and used nucleic acid techniques in clinical settings. After the potential of polymerase chain reaction became apparent, other methods of nucleic acid amplification and detection were developed. These alternative nucleic acid amplification methods may become serious contenders for application to routine laboratory analyses. This review presents some background information on nucleic acid analyses that might be used in clinical and anatomical laboratories and describes some recent advances in the amplification and detection of nucleic acids. PMID:1423216

  6. Development of a Quantitative BRET Affinity Assay for Nucleic Acid-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Timothy A.; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions play a crucial role in the regulation of diverse biological processes. Elucidating the roles that protein-nucleic acid complexes play in the regulation of transcription, translation, DNA replication, repair and recombination, and RNA processing continues to be a crucial aspect of understanding of cell biology and the mechanisms of disease. In addition, proteins have been demonstrated to interact with antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics in a sequence and chemistry dependent manner, influencing ASO potency and distribution in cells and in vivo. While many assays have been developed to measure protein-nucleic acid interactions, many suffer from lack of throughput and sensitivity, or challenges with protein purification and scalability. In this report we present a new BRET assay for the analysis of DNA-protein interactions which makes use of an extremely bright luciferase as a tag for the binding protein, along with a long-wavelength fluorophore conjugated to the nucleic acid. The resulting assay is high throughput, sensitive, does not require protein purification, and even allows for quantitative characterization of these interactions within the biologically relevant context of whole cells. PMID:27571227

  7. The Roles of Acids and Bases in Enzyme Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2007-01-01

    Many organic reactions are catalyzed by strong acids or bases that protonate or deprotonate neutral reactants leading to reactive cations or anions that proceed to products. In enzyme reactions, only weak acids and bases are available to hydrogen bond to reactants and to transfer protons in response to developing charges. Understanding this…

  8. What is the Ultimate Goal in Acid-Base Regulation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balakrishnan, Selvakumar; Gopalakrishnan, Maya; Alagesan, Murali; Prakash, E. Sankaranarayanan

    2007-01-01

    It is common to see chapters on acid-base physiology state that the goal of acid-base regulatory mechanisms is to maintain the pH of arterial plasma and not arterial PCO [subscript 2] (Pa[subscript CO[subscript 2

  9. Acid-base properties of titanium-antimony oxides catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zenkovets, G.A.; Paukshtis, E.A.; Tarasova, D.V.; Yurchenko, E.N.

    1982-06-01

    The acid-base properties of titanium-antimony oxide catalysts were studied by the methods of back titration and ir spectroscopy. The interrelationship between the acid-base and catalytic properties in the oxidative ammonolysis of propylene was discussed. 3 figures, 1 table.

  10. A Closer Look at Acid-Base Olfactory Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neppel, Kerry; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Queen, Connie; Reed, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Olfactory titrations using raw onions and eugenol as acid-base indicators are reported. An in-depth investigation on olfactory titrations is presented to include requirements for potential olfactory indicators and protocols for using garlic, onions, and vanillin as acid-base olfactory indicators are tested.

  11. Luminol as a fluorescent acid-base indicator.

    PubMed

    Erdey, L; Buzás, I; Vigh, K

    1966-03-01

    The acid and base dissociation constants of luminol are determined at various ionic strengths. The transition interval occurs at pH 7.7-9.0, therefore luminol is a fluorescent indicator for the titration of strong and weak acids and strong bases. Its value as an indicator is established by titrating milk, red wine and cherry juice.

  12. Proton defect solvation and dynamics in aqueous acid and base.

    PubMed

    Kale, Seyit; Herzfeld, Judith

    2012-10-29

    Easy come, easy go: LEWIS, a new model of reactive and polarizable water that enables the simulation of a statistically reliable number of proton hopping events in aqueous acid and base at concentrations of practical interest, is used to evaluate proton transfer intermediates in aqueous acid and base (picture, left and right, respectively).

  13. Practical strategies for the evaluation of high-affinity protein/nucleic acid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Altschuler, Sarah E.; Lewis, Karen A.; Wuttke, Deborah S.

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of binding interactions between proteins and nucleic acids is highly sensitive to a variety of experimental conditions. Optimization of these conditions is critical for obtaining high quality, reproducible data, particularly in the context of very high affinity interactions. Here, we discuss the practical considerations involved in optimizing the apparent binding constant of an interaction as measured by two common quantitative assays, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and double-filter binding when measuring extremely tight protein/nucleic acid interactions with sub-nanomolar binding affinities. We include specific examples from two telomere end-binding protein systems, Schizo -saccharomyces pombe Pot1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc13, to demonstrate potential experimental pitfalls and some useful strategies for optimization. PMID:25197549

  14. Connecting Acids and Bases with Encapsulation... and Chemistry with Nanotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criswell, Brett

    2007-01-01

    The features and the development of various new acids and bases activity sets that combines chemistry with nanotechnology are being described. These sets lead to the generation of many nanotechnology-based pharmaceuticals for the treatment of various diseases.

  15. No pharmacokinetic interaction between lacosamide and valproic acid in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Cawello, Willi; Bonn, Rainer

    2012-11-01

    Two open-label, randomized, multiple-dose clinical studies evaluated the potential for pharmacokinetic interaction between the antiepileptic drugs lacosamide and valproic acid. The influence of lacosamide on valproic acid pharmacokinetics (trial A) and valproic acid on lacosamide pharmacokinetics (trial B) was investigated in 32 healthy male volunteers, 16 in each trial. Volunteers in trial A received valproic acid (300 mg bid) with randomization to either early or late addition of lacosamide (200 mg bid). Those in trial B received lacosamide (200 mg bid) with randomization to either early or late addition of valproic acid (300 mg bid). Area under the concentration-time curve during a 12-hour dosing interval at steady state (AUC(τ,ss)) and maximum steady-state plasma drug concentration (C(max,ss)) were measured for each drug alone and together and tested for equivalence. The point estimates (90% confidence intervals) for AUC(τ,ss) and C(max,ss) were 104% (99%-109%) and 101% (97%-107%), respectively, for valproic acid and 100% (98%-103%) and 101% (96%-107%), respectively, for lacosamide, which were within the generally accepted equivalence range of 80% to 125%. No changes in the rate or extent of absorption, terminal half-life, or time to maximum concentration were observed. These results suggest that lacosamide and valproic acid have no relevant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction.

  16. A Computer-Based Simulation of an Acid-Base Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boblick, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews the advantages of computer simulated environments for experiments, referring in particular to acid-base titrations. Includes pre-lab instructions and a sample computer printout of a student's use of an acid-base simulation. Ten references. (PR)

  17. Nuclear reaction inputs based on effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilaire, S.; Goriely, S.; Péru, S.; Dubray, N.; Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E.

    2016-11-01

    Extensive nuclear structure studies have been performed for decades using effective interactions as sole input. They have shown a remarkable ability to describe rather accurately many types of nuclear properties. In the early 2000s, a major effort has been engaged to produce nuclear reaction input data out of the Gogny interaction, in order to challenge its quality also with respect to nuclear reaction observables. The status of this project, well advanced today thanks to the use of modern computers as well as modern nuclear reaction codes, is reviewed and future developments are discussed.

  18. Lactic acid bacteria in dairy food: surface characterization and interactions with food matrix components.

    PubMed

    Burgain, J; Scher, J; Francius, G; Borges, F; Corgneau, M; Revol-Junelles, A M; Cailliez-Grimal, C; Gaiani, C

    2014-11-01

    This review gives an overview of the importance of interactions occurring in dairy matrices between Lactic Acid Bacteria and milk components. Dairy products are important sources of biological active compounds of particular relevance to human health. These compounds include immunoglobulins, whey proteins and peptides, polar lipids, and lactic acid bacteria including probiotics. A better understanding of interactions between bioactive components and their delivery matrix may successfully improve their transport to their target site of action. Pioneering research on probiotic lactic acid bacteria has mainly focused on their host effects. However, very little is known about their interaction with dairy ingredients. Such knowledge could contribute to designing new and more efficient dairy food, and to better understand relationships between milk constituents. The purpose of this review is first to provide an overview of the current knowledge about the biomolecules produced on bacterial surface and the composition of the dairy matter. In order to understand how bacteria interact with dairy molecules, adhesion mechanisms are subsequently reviewed with a special focus on the environmental conditions affecting bacterial adhesion. Methods dedicated to investigate the bacterial surface and to decipher interactions between bacteria and abiotic dairy components are also detailed. Finally, relevant industrial implications of these interactions are presented and discussed.

  19. Interactions among lactic acid starter and probiotic bacteria used for fermented dairy products.

    PubMed

    Vinderola, C G; Mocchiutti, P; Reinheimer, J A

    2002-04-01

    Interactions among lactic acid starter and probiotic bacteria were investigated to establish adequate combinations of strains to manufacture probiotic dairy products. For this aim, a total of 48 strains of Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacterium spp. (eight of each) were used. The detection of bacterial interactions was carried out using the well-diffusion agar assay, and the interactions found were further characterized by growth kinetics. A variety of interactions was demonstrated. Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus was found to be able to inhibit S. thermophilus strains. Among probiotic cultures, Lb. acidophilus was the sole species that was inhibited by the others (Lb. casei and Bifidobacterium). In general, probiotic bacteria proved to be more inhibitory towards lactic acid bacteria than vice versa since the latter did not exert any effect on the growth of the former, with some exceptions. The study of interactions by growth kinetics allowed the setting of four different kinds of behaviors between species of lactic acid starter and probiotic bacteria (stimulation, delay, complete inhibition of growth, and no effects among them). The possible interactions among the strains selected to manufacture a probiotic fermented dairy product should be taken into account when choosing the best combination/s to optimize their performance in the process and their survival in the products during cold storage.

  20. Ammonia Transporters and Their Role in Acid-Base Balance.

    PubMed

    Weiner, I David; Verlander, Jill W

    2017-04-01

    Acid-base homeostasis is critical to maintenance of normal health. Renal ammonia excretion is the quantitatively predominant component of renal net acid excretion, both under basal conditions and in response to acid-base disturbances. Although titratable acid excretion also contributes to renal net acid excretion, the quantitative contribution of titratable acid excretion is less than that of ammonia under basal conditions and is only a minor component of the adaptive response to acid-base disturbances. In contrast to other urinary solutes, ammonia is produced in the kidney and then is selectively transported either into the urine or the renal vein. The proportion of ammonia that the kidney produces that is excreted in the urine varies dramatically in response to physiological stimuli, and only urinary ammonia excretion contributes to acid-base homeostasis. As a result, selective and regulated renal ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells is central to acid-base homeostasis. Both molecular forms of ammonia, NH3 and NH4(+), are transported by specific proteins, and regulation of these transport processes determines the eventual fate of the ammonia produced. In this review, we discuss these issues, and then discuss in detail the specific proteins involved in renal epithelial cell ammonia transport.

  1. [Microspeciation of amphoteric molecules of unusual acid-base properties].

    PubMed

    Kóczián, Kristóf

    2007-01-01

    The phisico-chemical properties of bio- and drug molecules greatly influence their interactions in the body and strongly effect the mechanism of drug action. Among these properties, macroscopic and site-specific protonation constants are of crucial importance. Latter one is the tool to calculate the relative concentration of the various microspecies in the compartments of the body at different pH values, and also, it is the versatile parameter to improve the pharmacokinetic properties of a new molecule in a particular family of drugs. In the present thesis work, the microspeciation of three molecules of great pharmaceutical importance and unusual acid-base properties, were carried out. The microconstants of tenoxicam, the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, were described, introducing a novel deductive method using Hammett constants. For this purpose, a total of 8 tenoxicam and piroxicam derivatives were synthesised. To the best of our knowledge, the log k(N)O microconstant of tenoxicam obtained thus is the lowest enolate basicity value, which, however, can be well explained by the effects of the intramolecular environment. The developed evaluation procedure is suitable for microconstant determination of compounds in other molecule families. Besides, prodrug-type compounds and analogues similar to the structures of selective COX-2 isoenzyme inhibitors were synthesised. The other two molecules studied, the 6-aminopenicillanic acid and 7-cephalosporanic acid, the core molecules of the two most important beta-lactam antibiotic-types were derivatised and investigated by 1D and 2D NMR techniques. The NMR-pH titration on the parent compounds and their ester derivatives, combined with in situ pH-measurements allowed the microspeciation of these easily decomposing molecules. One of the protonation constant of 7-ACA (log kN(O) = 4.12), to the best of our knowledge, is the least non-aromatic basic amino-site among the natural compounds.

  2. Nucleic acid duplexes incorporating a dissociable covalent base pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, K.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure.

  3. Nucleic Acid Duplexes Incorporating a Dissociable Covalent Base Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kui; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1999-12-01

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure.

  4. Interaction between calcofluor white and carbohydrates of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R; Plancke, Y D

    1999-05-31

    Interactions between the fluorescent probe, calcofluor white, and human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) are compared. The two proteins have comparable isoelectric points, but alpha 1-acid glycoprotein is highly glycosylated (40% of glycans by weight), while the serum albumin is not. Binding of calcofluor to the proteins induces an increase in both the fluorescence anisotropy and the fluorescence intensity of the fluorophore. Also, we found that the calcofluor exhibits a fluorescence emission with a maximum located at 432, 415 or 445 nm, respectively, in the absence of proteins, in the presence of HSA, and in the presence of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein. The stoichiometries of the calcofluor-serum albumin and calcofluor-alpha 1-acid glycoprotein complexes are 2:1 and 1:1, respectively. The association constants are 0.04 and 0.15 microM-1, respectively. The calcofluor does not interact with Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), although the protein has a hydrophobic site. Nevertheless, one cannot exclude that the binding of the fluorophore to the HSA is nonspecific. Our results, when compared with those obtained with calcofluor dissolved in the hydrophobic solvent isobutanol, and with the fluorescent probe, potassium 6-(p-toluidino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), bound to alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, indicate that the emission of calcofluor bound to HSA occurs from a hydrophobic state, while that of calcofluor bound to alpha 1-acid glycoprotein occurs from a hydrophilic state. The fluorescence intensity of calcofluor decreases in the presence of carbohydrates isolated from alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, while it increases in the presence of alpha 1-cellulose. Thus, calcofluor interacts mainly with the glycan moiety of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, and its fluorescence is sensitive to the secondary structure of the glycans.

  5. Acid-base properties of 2-phenethyldithiocarbamoylacetic acid, an antitumor agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novozhilova, N. E.; Kutina, N. N.; Petukhova, O. A.; Kharitonov, Yu. Ya.

    2013-07-01

    The acid-base properties of the 2-phenethyldithiocarbamoylacetic acid (PET) substance belonging to the class of isothiocyanates and capable of inhibiting the development of tumors on many experimental models were studied. The acidity and hydrolysis constants of the PET substance in ethanol, acetone, aqueous ethanol, and aqueous acetone solutions were determined from the data of potentiometric (pH-metric) titration of ethanol and acetone solutions of PET with aqueous solidum hydroxide at room temperature.

  6. The effect of pi-stacking, h-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-09-02

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies(IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions stronglyaffect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largestchanges in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) occur in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric pi- stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric h-bonded dimer the shiftin IEs is much smaller (0.1 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. Inthe former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by thedipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. The shifts in AAare much smaller due to a less effcient overlap and a smaller dipole moment. The ionization of the h-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) protontransfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

  7. Carbonyl-carbonyl interactions stabilize the partially allowed Ramachandran conformations of asparagine and aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Deane, C M; Allen, F H; Taylor, R; Blundell, T L

    1999-12-01

    Asparagine and aspartate are known to adopt conformations in the left-handed alpha-helical region and other partially allowed regions of the Ramachandran plot more readily than any other non-glycyl amino acids. The reason for this preference has not been established. An examination of the local environments of asparagine and aspartic acid in protein structures with a resolution better than 1.5 A revealed that their side-chain carbonyls are frequently within 4 A of their own backbone carbonyl or the backbone carbonyl of the previous residue. Calculations using protein structures with a resolution better than 1.8 A reveal that this close contact occurs in more than 80% of cases. This carbonyl-carbonyl interaction offers an energetic sabilization for the partially allowed conformations of asparagine and aspartic acid with respect to all other non-glycyl amino acids. The non-covalent attractive interactions between the dipoles of two carbonyls has recently been calculated to have an energy comparable to that of a hydrogen bond. The preponderance of asparagine in the left-handed alpha-helical region, and in general of aspartic acid and asparagine in the partially allowed regions of the Ramachandran plot, may be a consequence of this carbonyl-carbonyl stacking interaction.

  8. [Specific interaction study in collagen/hyaluronic acid blends by two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Tan, Qing-Tian; Tian, Zhen-Hua; Li, Guo-Ying

    2011-04-01

    Conformational changes and specific interactions in the collagen/hyaluronic acid blends were studied by two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy with the interruption of the component of hyaluronic acid in collagen/ hyaluronic acid blends. It was found that the synchronous cross-peaks, derived from stretching vibrations of C=O at 1 694 cm(-1), wagging of N-H at 1 524 cm(-1) and in-plane deformation of N-H at 1 241 cm(-1) of collagen, were indicative of local conformational changes of collagen. The synchronous negative cross-peak between stretching vibrations of C-OH of hyaluronic acid at 1 045 cm(-1) and streching vibrations of C=O of collagen at 1 694 cm(-1) suggested that the interaction of hydrogen bonding existing between O-H of HA and C=O of collagen with the content of HA varied from 0% to 50%. With the content of HA more than 50%, the cross-peak at 1 045 cm(-1) disappeared in synchronous correlation spectra while the intensity of cross-peak at (1 694, 1 524), (1 694, 1 241), (1 524, 1 241) increased, which indicated that no interaction was found between O-H of HA and collagen, however, the interactions of hydrogen bonding existed between C=O of HA and N-H of collagen, resulting in the conformational changes of collagen.

  9. Lipoprotein lipase variants interact with polyunsaturated fatty acids to modulate obesity traits in Puerto Ricans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a candidate gene for obesity based on its role in triglyceride hydrolysis and the partitioning of fatty acids towards storage or oxidation. Whether dietary fatty acids modify LPL associated obesity risk is unknown. We examined five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (...

  10. H7N9 influenza viruses interact preferentially with α2,3-linked sialic acids and bind weakly to α2,6-linked sialic acids.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Irene; Krammer, Florian; Hai, Rong; Aguilera, Domingo; Bernal-Rubio, Dabeiba; Steel, John; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2013-11-01

    The recent human outbreak of H7N9 avian influenza A virus has caused worldwide concerns. Receptor binding specificity is critical for viral pathogenicity, and still not thoroughly studied for this emerging virus. Here, we evaluated the receptor specificity of the haemagglutinin (HA) of two human H7N9 isolates (A/Shanghai/1/13 and A/Anhui/1/13) through a solid-phase binding assay and a flow cytometry-based assay. In addition, we compared it with those from several HAs from human and avian influenza viruses. We observed that the HAs from the novel H7 isolates strongly interacted with α2,3-linked sialic acids. Importantly, they also showed low levels of binding to α2,6-linked sialic acids, but significantly higher than other avian H7s.

  11. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhuang, Jinxing; Zong, Zichao; Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma.

  12. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhuang, Jinxing; Zong, Zichao; Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma. PMID:27183129

  13. Solubility and spectroscopic studies of the interaction of palladium with simple carboxylic acids and fulvic acid at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Scott A.; Tait, C. Drew; Vlassopoulos, Dimitri; Janecky, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of Pd with some O-donor organic acid anions has been investigated using solubility measurements and a variety of spectroscopic techniques (UV-visible, Raman, FTIR, 13C NMR). Some of the ligands investigated (acetate, oxalate and fulvic acid) occur naturally in relatively high concentrations, whereas others (phthalate and salicylate) serve as models of potential binding sites on humic and fulvic acids. Solubility measurements show that the presence of acetate, phthalate, salicylate and fulvic acid (oxalate was not studied via solubility methods) can increase the mobility of Pd over various pH ranges, depending on the organic ligand. In the case of acetate, UV-visible and Raman spectroscopy ( 13C NMR results were inconclusive) provide strong evidence for the formation of electrostatically bound, possibly outer-sphere palladium acetate complexes. Oxalate was confirmed by UV-visible and FTIR spectroscopy to compete favorably with chloride (0.56 M NaCl) for Pd even at oxalate concentrations as low as 1 mM at pH = 6-7. Available data from the literature suggest that oxalate may have an influence on Pd mobility at free oxalate concentrations as low as 10 -8-10 -9 M. UV-visible spectroscopy provides evidence of an initially rapid, followed by a slower, reaction between PdCl 42- and o-phthalate ion. Our findings lend support to the idea that similar binding sites on fulvic acid may be capable of complexing and solubilizing Pd in the natural environment. Although thermodynamic data are required to fully quantify the extent, it is concluded that simple carboxylic acid anions and/or fulvic and humic acids should be capable of significantly enhancing Pd transport in the surficial environment by forming truly dissolved complexes. On the other hand, flocculation of fulvic/humic acids, owing to changing ionic strengths or pH, or adsorption of these acids onto mineral surfaces, may also provide effective means of immobilizing Pd. These results have applications in

  14. Analysis of the binding interaction in uric acid - Human hemoglobin system by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2017-01-31

    The binding interaction between human hemoglobin and uric acid has been studied for the first time, by UV-vis absorption and steady-state, synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence techniques. Characteristic effects observed for human hemoglobin intrinsic fluorescence during interaction with uric acid at neutral pH point at the formation of stacking non-covalent and non-fluorescent complexes. All the calculated parameters, the binding, fluorescence quenching and bimolecular quenching rate constants, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer parameters confirm the existence of static quenching. The results of synchronous fluorescence measurements indicate that the fluorescence quenching of human hemoglobin originates both from Trp and Tyr residues and that the addition of uric acid could significantly hinder the physiological functions of human hemoglobin.

  15. Reactive Distillation for Esterification of Bio-based Organic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Nathan; Miller, Dennis J.; Asthana, Navinchandra S.; Kolah, Aspi K.; Vu, Dung; Lira, Carl T.

    2008-09-23

    The following is the final report of the three year research program to convert organic acids to their ethyl esters using reactive distillation. This report details the complete technical activities of research completed at Michigan State University for the period of October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2006, covering both reactive distillation research and development and the underlying thermodynamic and kinetic data required for successful and rigorous design of reactive distillation esterification processes. Specifically, this project has led to the development of economical, technically viable processes for ethyl lactate, triethyl citrate and diethyl succinate production, and on a larger scale has added to the overall body of knowledge on applying fermentation based organic acids as platform chemicals in the emerging biorefinery. Organic acid esters constitute an attractive class of biorenewable chemicals that are made from corn or other renewable biomass carbohydrate feedstocks and replace analogous petroleum-based compounds, thus lessening U.S. dependence on foreign petroleum and enhancing overall biorefinery viability through production of value-added chemicals in parallel with biofuels production. Further, many of these ester products are candidates for fuel (particularly biodiesel) components, and thus will serve dual roles as both industrial chemicals and fuel enhancers in the emerging bioeconomy. The technical report from MSU is organized around the ethyl esters of four important biorenewables-based acids: lactic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and propionic acid. Literature background on esterification and reactive distillation has been provided in Section One. Work on lactic acid is covered in Sections Two through Five, citric acid esterification in Sections Six and Seven, succinic acid in Section Eight, and propionic acid in Section Nine. Section Ten covers modeling of ester and organic acid vapor pressure properties using the SPEAD (Step Potential

  16. Essential Amino Acids of the Hantaan Virus N Protein in Its Interaction with RNA

    PubMed Central

    Severson, William; Xu, Xiaolin; Kuhn, Michaela; Senutovitch, Nina; Thokala, Mercy; Ferron, François; Longhi, Sonia; Canard, Bruno; Jonsson, Colleen B.

    2005-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of hantavirus encapsidates viral genomic and antigenomic RNAs. Previously, deletion mapping identified a central, conserved region (amino acids 175 to 217) within the Hantaan virus (HTNV) N protein that interacts with a high affinity with these viral RNAs (vRNAs). To further define the boundaries of the RNA binding domain (RBD), several peptides were synthesized and examined for the ability to bind full-length S-segment vRNA. Peptide 195-217 retained 94% of the vRNA bound by the HTNV N protein, while peptides 175-186 and 205-217 bound only 1% of the vRNA. To further explore which residues were essential for binding vRNA, we performed a comprehensive mutational analysis of the amino acids in the RBD. Single and double Ala substitutions were constructed for 18 amino acids from amino acids 175 to 217 in the full-length N protein. In addition, Ala substitutions were made for the three R residues in peptide 185-217. An analysis of protein-RNA interactions by electrophoretic mobility shift assays implicated E192, Y206, and S217 as important for binding. Chemical modification experiments showed that lysine residues, but not arginine or cysteine residues, contribute to RNA binding, which agreed with bioinformatic predictions. Overall, these data implicate lysine residues dispersed from amino acids 175 to 429 of the protein and three amino acids located in the RBD as essential for RNA binding. PMID:16014963

  17. Applications of hydrophilic interaction chromatography to amino acids, peptides, and proteins.

    PubMed

    Periat, Aurélie; Krull, Ira S; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-02-01

    This review summarizes the recent advances in the analysis of amino acids, peptides, and proteins using hydrophilic interaction chromatography. Various reports demonstrate the successful analysis of amino acids under such conditions. However, a baseline resolution of the 20 natural amino acids has not yet been published and for this reason, there is often a need to use mass spectrometry for detection to further improve selectivity. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography is also recognized as a powerful technique for peptide analysis, and there are a lot of papers showing its applicability for proteomic applications (peptide mapping). It is expected that its use for peptide mapping will continue to grow in the future, particularly because this analytical strategy can be combined with reversed-phase liquid chromatography, in a two-dimensional setup, to reach very high resolving power. Finally, the interest in hydrophilic interaction chromatography for intact proteins analysis is less evident due to possible solubility issues and a lack of suitable hydrophilic interaction chromatography stationary phases. To date, it has been successfully employed only for the characterization of membrane proteins, histones, and the separation of glycosylated isoforms of an intact glycoprotein. From our point of view, the number of hydrophilic interaction chromatography columns compatible with intact proteins (higher upper temperature limit, large pore size, etc.) is still too limited.

  18. Heterogeneous interactions of chlorine nitrate, hydrogen chloride, and nitric acid with sulfuric acid surfaces at stratospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Rossi, Michel J.; Golden, David M.

    1988-01-01

    The heterogeneous interactions of ClONO2, HCl, and HNO3 with sulfuric acid surfaces were studied using a Knudsen cell flow reactor. The surfaces studied, chosen to simulate global stratospheric particulate, were composed of 65-75 percent H2SO4 solutions at temperatures in the range -63 to -43 C. Heterogeneous loss, but not reaction, of HNO3 and HCl occurred on these surfaces; the measured sticking coefficients are reported. Chlorine nitrate reacted on the cold sulfuric acid surfaces, producing gas-phase HOCl and condensed HNO3. CLONO2 also reacted with HCl dissolved in the 65-percent H2SO4 solution at -63 C, forming gaseous Cl2. In all cases studied, the sticking and/or reaction coefficients were much larger for the 65-percent H2SO4 solution at -63 C than for the 75-percent solution at -43 C.

  19. Genetic interaction mapping with microfluidic-based single cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Haliburton, John R.; Shao, Wenjun; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Abate, Adam R.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic interaction mapping is useful for understanding the molecular basis of cellular decision making, but elucidating interactions genome-wide is challenging due to the massive number of gene combinations that must be tested. Here, we demonstrate a simple approach to thoroughly map genetic interactions in bacteria using microfluidic-based single cell sequencing. Using single cell PCR in droplets, we link distinct genetic information into single DNA sequences that can be decoded by next generation sequencing. Our approach is scalable and theoretically enables the pooling of entire interaction libraries to interrogate multiple pairwise genetic interactions in a single culture. The speed, ease, and low-cost of our approach makes genetic interaction mapping viable for routine characterization, allowing the interaction network to be used as a universal read out for a variety of biology experiments, and for the elucidation of interaction networks in non-model organisms. PMID:28170417

  20. Genetic interaction mapping with microfluidic-based single cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Haliburton, John R; Shao, Wenjun; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Abate, Adam R

    2017-01-01

    Genetic interaction mapping is useful for understanding the molecular basis of cellular decision making, but elucidating interactions genome-wide is challenging due to the massive number of gene combinations that must be tested. Here, we demonstrate a simple approach to thoroughly map genetic interactions in bacteria using microfluidic-based single cell sequencing. Using single cell PCR in droplets, we link distinct genetic information into single DNA sequences that can be decoded by next generation sequencing. Our approach is scalable and theoretically enables the pooling of entire interaction libraries to interrogate multiple pairwise genetic interactions in a single culture. The speed, ease, and low-cost of our approach makes genetic interaction mapping viable for routine characterization, allowing the interaction network to be used as a universal read out for a variety of biology experiments, and for the elucidation of interaction networks in non-model organisms.

  1. Thermodynamics of the interaction of globular proteins with powdered stearic acid in acid pH.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Atanu; Chattoraj, D K; Chakraborty, P

    2006-06-01

    Adsorption isotherms of different globular proteins and gelatin on strearic acid particles have been studied as a function of biopolymer concentration, ionic strength of the medium, and temperature. The effect of neutral salts including CaCl2, Na3PO4, and urea on the adsorption isotherms has been also investigated. It is observed that the extent of adsorption (Gamma2(1)) increases in two steps with the increase of biopolymer concentration (C2) in the bulk. Gamma2(1) increases with an increase of C2 until a steady maximum value Gamma2(m) is reached at a critical concentration C2(m). After initial saturation, Gamma2(1) again increases from Gamma2(m) without reaching any limiting value due to the surface aggregation of the protein. The values of the standard free energy change for adsorption have been calculated on the basis of the Gibbs equation. The standard entropy and enthalpy changes are also calculated.

  2. Polymerization of amino acids containing nucleotide bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben Cheikh, Azzouz; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleoamino acids 1-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)uracil (3) and 9-(3'-amino,3'-carboxypropyl)adenine (4) have been prepared as (L)-en-antiomers and as racemic mixtures. When 3 or 4 is suspended in water and treated with N,N'-carbon-yldiimidazole, peptides are formed in good yield. The products formed from the (L)-enantiomers are hydrolyzed to the monomeric amino acids by pronase. Attempts to improve the efficiency of these oligomerizations by including a polyuridylate template in the reaction mixture were not successful. Similarly, oligomers derived from the (L)-enantiomer of 3 did not act as templates to facilitate the oligomerization of 4.

  3. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-10-15

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100–500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO{sub 3}H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO{sub 3}H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst. - Highlights: • Carbon solid acid was successfully prepared by one-step hydrothermal carbonization. • The acrylic acid as monomer was effectively reduce the diameter size of particle. • The solid acid catalyst show good catalytic performance of starch hydrolysis. • The solid acid catalyst is not significantly deteriorated after repeated use.

  4. Differential titration of bases in glacial acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Castellano, T; Medwick, T; Shinkai, J H; Bailey, L

    1981-01-01

    A study of bases in acetic acid and their differential titration was carried out. The overall basicity constants for 20 bases were measured in acetic acid, and the differential titration of five binary mixtures of variable delta pKb values in acetic acid was followed using a glass electrode-modified calomel electrode system. Agreement with literature values was good. A leveling diagram was constructed that indicated that bases stronger than aqueous pKb 10 are leveled to an acetous pKb 5.69, whereas weaker bases are not leveled but instead exhibit their own intrinsic basicity, with the acetous pKb to aqueous pKb values being linearly related (slope 1.18, correlation coefficient 0.962). A minimum acetous delta pKb of four units is required for the satisfactory differential titration of two bases in acetic acid.

  5. Thermodynamic studies of ionic hydration and interactions for amino acid ionic liquids in aqueous solutions at 298.15 K.

    PubMed

    Dagade, Dilip H; Madkar, Kavita R; Shinde, Sandeep P; Barge, Seema S

    2013-01-31

    Amino acid ionic liquids are a special class of ionic liquids due to their unique acid-base behavior, biological significance, and applications in different fields such as templates in synthetic chemistry, stabilizers for biological macromolecules, etc. The physicochemical properties of these ionic liquids can easily be altered by making the different combinations of amino acids as anion along with possible cation modification which makes amino acid ionic liquids more suitable to understand the different kinds of molecular and ionic interactions with sufficient depth so that they can provide fruitful information for a molecular level understanding of more complicated biological processes. In this context, volumetric and osmotic coefficient measurements for aqueous solutions containing 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ([Emim]) based amino acid ionic liquids of glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, and isoleucine are reported at 298.15 K. From experimental osmotic coefficient data, mean molal activity coefficients of ionic liquids were estimated and analyzed using the Debye-Hückel and Pitzer models. The hydration numbers of ionic liquids in aqueous solutions were obtained using activity data. Pitzer ion interaction parameters are estimated and compared with other electrolytes reported in the literature. The nonelectrolyte contribution to the aqueous solutions containing ionic liquids was studied by calculating the osmotic second virial coefficient through an application of the McMillan-Mayer theory of solution. It has been found that the second osmotic virial coefficient which includes volume effects correlates linearly with the Pitzer ion interaction parameter estimated independently from osmotic data as well as the hydrophobicity of ionic liquids. The enthalpy-entropy compensation effect, explained using the Starikov-Nordén model of enthalpy-entropy compensation, and partial molar entropy analysis for aqueous [Emim][Gly] solutions are made by using experimental Gibb

  6. [Identification of rat and human hemoglobin acetilation sites after its interaction with acetylsalicylic acid].

    PubMed

    Shreĭner, E V; Murashko, E A; Dubrovskiĭ, Ia D; Krasnov, N V; Podol'skaia, E P; Babakov, V N

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of interaction of 0.1 mg/mL acetylsalicylic acid with purified human and rat globin in vitro during 24 h at 37 degrees C was investigated. The rat globin can be modified with acetylsalicylic acid on aminoacid residues K-17, K-57, K-91, K-140 in alpha subunit as well as on K-18, K-77 in beta subunit. The human globin can be modified with acetylsalicylic acid on aminoacid residues K-17, K-41, K-57 and K-91 in alpha subunit as well as on K-18, K-96 and K- 133 in beta subunit. We identified of acetetylated lysines K-17 and K-57 in alpha subunit of human hemoglobin after incubation whole blood with 0.1 mg/mL acetylsalicylic acid during 3 h.

  7. Solution influence on biomolecular equilibria - Nucleic acid base associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; Burt, S. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Various attempts to construct an understanding of the influence of solution environment on biomolecular equilibria at the molecular level using computer simulation are discussed. First, the application of the formal statistical thermodynamic program for investigating biomolecular equilibria in solution is presented, addressing modeling and conceptual simplications such as perturbative methods, long-range interaction approximations, surface thermodynamics, and hydration shell. Then, Monte Carlo calculations on the associations of nucleic acid bases in both polar and nonpolar solvents such as water and carbon tetrachloride are carried out. The solvent contribution to the enthalpy of base association is positive (destabilizing) in both polar and nonpolar solvents while negative enthalpies for stacked complexes are obtained only when the solute-solute in vacuo energy is added to the total energy. The release upon association of solvent molecules from the first hydration layer around a solute to the bulk is accompanied by an increase in solute-solvent energy and decrease in solvent-solvent energy. The techniques presented are expectd to displace less molecular and more heuristic modeling of biomolecular equilibria in solution.

  8. The acid-base titration of montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, I. C.; Sposito, G.; Bourg, A. C.

    2003-12-01

    Proton binding to clay minerals plays an important role in the chemical reactivity of soils (e.g., acidification, retention of nutrients or pollutants). If should also affect the performance of clay barriers for waste disposal. The surface acidity of clay minerals is commonly modelled empirically by assuming generic amphoteric surface sites (>SOH) on a flat surface, with fitted site densities and acidity constant. Current advances in experimental methods (notably spectroscopy) are rapidly improving our understanding of the structure and reactivity of the surface of clay minerals (arrangement of the particles, nature of the reactive surface sites, adsorption mechanisms). These developments are motivated by the difficulty of modelling the surface chemistry of mineral surfaces at the macro-scale (e.g., adsorption or titration) without a detailed (molecular-scale) picture of the mechanisms, and should be progressively incorporated into surface complexation models. In this view, we have combined recent estimates of montmorillonite surface properties (surface site density and structure, edge surface area, surface electrostatic potential) with surface site acidities obtained from the titration of alpha-Al2O3 and SiO2, and a novel method of accounting for the unknown initial net proton surface charge of the solid. The model predictions were compared to experimental titrations of SWy-1 montmorillonite and purified MX-80 bentonite in 0.1-0.5 mol/L NaClO4 and 0.005-0.5 mol/L NaNO3 background electrolytes, respectively. Most of the experimental data were appropriately described by the model after we adjusted a single parameter (silanol sites on the surface of montmorillonite were made to be slightly more acidic than those of silica). At low ionic strength and acidic pH the model underestimated the buffering capacity of the montmorillonite, perhaps due to clay swelling or to the interlayer adsorption of dissolved aluminum. The agreement between our model and the experimental

  9. Nucleic acid based fluorescent sensor for mercury detection

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen

    2013-02-05

    A nucleic acid enzyme comprises an oligonucleotide containing thymine bases. The nucleic acid enzyme is dependent on both Hg.sup.2+and a second ion as cofactors, to produce a product from a substrate. The substrate comprises a ribonucleotide, a deoxyribonucleotide, or both.

  10. An Interactive Computer-Based Revision Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, J. M.; Harris, F. T. C.

    1977-01-01

    A computer-based review system has been developed, based on the multiple-choice technique, at the University of London for medical students. The user can enter an answer or can have a list of questions to take away and enter later. Student response has been favorable. (LBH)

  11. Folic acid and safflower oil supplementation interacts and protects embryos from maternal diabetes-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Higa, R; Kurtz, M; Mazzucco, M B; Musikant, D; White, V; Jawerbaum, A

    2012-05-01

    Maternal diabetes increases the risk of embryo malformations. Folic acid and safflower oil supplementations have been shown to reduce embryo malformations in experimental models of diabetes. In this study we here tested whether folic acid and safflower oil supplementations interact to prevent embryo malformations in diabetic rats, and analyzed whether they act through the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), their endogenous inhibitors (TIMPs), and nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species production. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin administration prior to mating. From Day 0.5 of pregnancy, rats did or did not receive folic acid (15 mg/kg) and/or a 6% safflower oil-supplemented diet. Embryos and decidua were explanted on Day 10.5 of gestation for further analysis of embryo resorptions and malformations, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels, NO production and lipid peroxidation. Maternal diabetes induced resorptions and malformations that were prevented by folic acid and safflower oil supplementation. MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities were increased in embryos and decidua from diabetic rats and decreased with safflower oil and folic acid supplementations. In diabetic animals, the embryonic and decidual TIMPs were increased mainly with safflower oil supplementation in decidua and with folic acid in embryos. NO overproduction was decreased in decidua from diabetic rats treated with folic acid alone and in combination with safflower oil. These treatments also prevented increases in embryonic and decidual lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, folic acid and safflower oil supplementations interact and protect the embryos from diabetes-induced damage through several pathways related to a decrease in pro-inflammatory mediators.

  12. Physically-based interactive Schlieren flow visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Mccormick, Patrick S; Brownlee, Carson S; Pegoraro, Vincent; Shankar, Siddharth; Hansen, Charles D

    2009-01-01

    Understanding fluid flow is a difficult problem and of increasing importance as computational fluid dynamics produces an abundance of simulation data. Experimental flow analysis has employed techniques such as shadowgraph and schlieren imaging for centuries which allow empirical observation of inhomogeneous flows. Shadowgraphs provide an intuitive way of looking at small changes in flow dynamics through caustic effects while schlieren cutoffs introduce an intensity gradation for observing large scale directional changes in the flow. The combination of these shading effects provides an informative global analysis of overall fluid flow. Computational solutions for these methods have proven too complex until recently due to the fundamental physical interaction of light refracting through the flow field. In this paper, we introduce a novel method to simulate the refraction of light to generate synthetic shadowgraphs and schlieren images of time-varying scalar fields derived from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data. Our method computes physically accurate schlieren and shadowgraph images at interactive rates by utilizing a combination of GPGPU programming, acceleration methods, and data-dependent probabilistic schlieren cutoffs. Results comparing this method to previous schlieren approximations are presented.

  13. The Molecular Basis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Interactions with the Shaker Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Samira; Stein, Matthias; Elinder, Fredrik; Andersson, Magnus; Lindahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels are membrane proteins that respond to changes in membrane potential by enabling K+ ion flux across the membrane. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) induce channel opening by modulating the voltage-sensitivity, which can provide effective treatment against refractory epilepsy by means of a ketogenic diet. While PUFAs have been reported to influence the gating mechanism by electrostatic interactions to the voltage-sensor domain (VSD), the exact PUFA-protein interactions are still elusive. In this study, we report on the interactions between the Shaker KV channel in open and closed states and a PUFA-enriched lipid bilayer using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. We determined a putative PUFA binding site in the open state of the channel located at the protein-lipid interface in the vicinity of the extracellular halves of the S3 and S4 helices of the VSD. In particular, the lipophilic PUFA tail covered a wide range of non-specific hydrophobic interactions in the hydrophobic central core of the protein-lipid interface, while the carboxylic head group displayed more specific interactions to polar/charged residues at the extracellular regions of the S3 and S4 helices, encompassing the S3-S4 linker. Moreover, by studying the interactions between saturated fatty acids (SFA) and the Shaker KV channel, our study confirmed an increased conformational flexibility in the polyunsaturated carbon tails compared to saturated carbon chains, which may explain the specificity of PUFA action on channel proteins. PMID:26751683

  14. Strong Hydrogen Bonded Molecular Interactions between Atmospheric Diamines and Sulfuric Acid.

    PubMed

    Elm, Jonas; Jen, Coty N; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-05-26

    We investigate the molecular interaction between methyl-substituted N,N,N',N'-ethylenediamines, propane-1,3-diamine, butane-1,4-diamine, and sulfuric acid using computational methods. Molecular structure of the diamines and their dimer clusters with sulfuric acid is studied using three density functional theory methods (PW91, M06-2X, and ωB97X-D) with the 6-31++G(d,p) basis set. A high level explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12a/VDZ-F12 method is used to obtain accurate binding energies. The reaction Gibbs free energies are evaluated and compared with values for reactions involving ammonia and atmospherically relevant monoamines (methylamine, dimethylamine, and trimethylamine). We find that the complex formation between sulfuric acid and the studied diamines provides similar or more favorable reaction free energies than dimethylamine. Diamines that contain one or more secondary amino groups are found to stabilize sulfuric acid complexes more efficiently. Elongating the carbon backbone from ethylenediamine to propane-1,3-diamine or butane-1,4-diamine further stabilizes the complex formation with sulfuric acid by up to 4.3 kcal/mol. Dimethyl-substituted butane-1,4-diamine yields a staggering formation free energy of -19.1 kcal/mol for the clustering with sulfuric acid, indicating that such diamines could potentially be a key species in the initial step in the formation of new particles. For studying larger clusters consisting of a diamine molecule with up to four sulfuric acid molecules, we benchmark and utilize a domain local pair natural orbital coupled cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method. We find that a single diamine is capable of efficiently stabilizing sulfuric acid clusters with up to four acid molecules, whereas monoamines such as dimethylamine are capable of stabilizing at most 2-3 sulfuric acid molecules.

  15. Soybean Seed Development: Fatty Acid and Phytohormone Metabolism and Their Interactions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quoc Thien; Kisiala, Anna; Andreas, Peter; Neil Emery, R J; Narine, Suresh

    2016-06-01

    Vegetable oil utilization is determined by its fatty acid composition. In soybean and other grain crops, during the seed development oil accumulation is important trait for value in food or industrial applications. Seed development is relatively short and sensitive to unfavorable abiotic conditions. These stresses can lead to a numerous undesirable qualitative as well as quantitative changes in fatty acid production. Fatty acid manipulation which targets a higher content of a specific single fatty acid for food or industrial application has gained more attention. Despite several successes in modifying the ratio of endogenous fatty acids in most domesticated oilseed crops, numerous obstacles in FA manipulation of seed maturation are yet to be overcome. Remarkably, connections with plant hormones have not been well studied despite their critical roles in the regulation and promotion of a plethora of processes in plant growth and development. While activities of phytohormones during the reproductive phase have been partially clarified in seed physiology, the biological role of plant hormones in oil accumulation during seed development has not been investigated. In this review seed development and numerous effects of abiotic stresses are discussed. After describing fatty acid and phytohormone metabolism and their interactions, we postulate that the endogenous plant hormones play important roles in fatty acid production in soybean seeds.

  16. Soybean Seed Development: Fatty Acid and Phytohormone Metabolism and Their Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quoc Thien.; Kisiala, Anna; Andreas, Peter; Neil Emery, R.J.; Narine, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Vegetable oil utilization is determined by its fatty acid composition. In soybean and other grain crops, during the seed development oil accumulation is important trait for value in food or industrial applications. Seed development is relatively short and sensitive to unfavorable abiotic conditions. These stresses can lead to a numerous undesirable qualitative as well as quantitative changes in fatty acid production. Fatty acid manipulation which targets a higher content of a specific single fatty acid for food or industrial application has gained more attention. Despite several successes in modifying the ratio of endogenous fatty acids in most domesticated oilseed crops, numerous obstacles in FA manipulation of seed maturation are yet to be overcome. Remarkably, connections with plant hormones have not been well studied despite their critical roles in the regulation and promotion of a plethora of processes in plant growth and development. While activities of phytohormones during the reproductive phase have been partially clarified in seed physiology, the biological role of plant hormones in oil accumulation during seed development has not been investigated. In this review seed development and numerous effects of abiotic stresses are discussed. After describing fatty acid and phytohormone metabolism and their interactions, we postulate that the endogenous plant hormones play important roles in fatty acid production in soybean seeds. PMID:27252591

  17. Spherical Nucleic Acids as Intracellular Agents for Nucleic Acid Based Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liangliang

    Recent functional discoveries on the noncoding sequences of human genome and transcriptome could lead to revolutionary treatment modalities because the noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) can be applied as therapeutic agents to manipulate disease-causing genes. To date few nucleic acid-based therapeutics have been translated into the clinic due to challenges in the delivery of the oligonucleotide agents in an effective, cell specific, and non-toxic fashion. Unmodified oligonucleotide agents are destroyed rapidly in biological fluids by enzymatic degradation and have difficulty crossing the plasma membrane without the aid of transfection reagents, which often cause inflammatory, cytotoxic, or immunogenic side effects. Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), nanoparticles consisting of densely organized and highly oriented oligonucleotides, pose one possible solution to circumventing these problems in both the antisense and RNA interference (RNAi) pathways. The unique three dimensional architecture of SNAs protects the bioactive oligonucleotides from unspecific degradation during delivery and supports their targeting of class A scavenger receptors and endocytosis via a lipid-raft-dependent, caveolae-mediated pathway. Owing to their unique structure, SNAs are able to cross cell membranes and regulate target genes expression as a single entity, without triggering the cellular innate immune response. Herein, my thesis has focused on understanding the interactions between SNAs and cellular components and developing SNA-based nanostructures to improve therapeutic capabilities. Specifically, I developed a novel SNA-based, nanoscale agent for delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides to manipulate microRNAs (miRNAs), the endogenous post-transcriptional gene regulators. I investigated the role of SNAs involving miRNAs in anti-cancer or anti-inflammation responses in cells and in in vivo murine disease models via systemic injection. Furthermore, I explored using different strategies to construct

  18. Deuterium isotope effect on 13C chemical shifts of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rozwadowski, Z

    2006-09-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shift of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases, derivatives of amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine and L-methionine) and various ortho-hydroxyaldehydes in CDCl3 have been measured. The results have shown that the tetrabutylammonium salts of the Schiff bases amino acids, being derivatives of 2-hydroxynaphthaldehyde and 3,5-dibromosalicylaldehyde, exist in the NH-form, while in the derivatives of salicylaldehyde and 5-bromosalicylaldehyde a proton transfer takes place. The interactions between COO- and NH groups stabilize the proton-transferred form through a bifurcated intramolecular hydrogen bond.

  19. Acid-base titration curves for acids with very small ratios of successive dissociation constants.

    PubMed

    Campbell, B H; Meites, L

    1974-02-01

    The shapes of the potentiometric acid-base titration curves obtained in the neutralizations of polyfunctional acids or bases for which each successive dissociation constant is smaller than the following one are examined. In the region 0 < < 1 (where is the fraction of the equivalent volume of reagent that has been added) the slope of the titration curve decreases as the number j of acidic or basic sites increases. The difference between the pH-values at = 0.75 and = 0.25 has (1 j)log 9 as the lower limit of its maximum value.

  20. Renal acidification responses to respiratory acid-base disorders.

    PubMed

    Madias, Nicolaos E

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory acid-base disorders are those abnormalities in acid-base equilibrium that are expressed as primary changes in the arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2). An increase in PaCO2 (hypercapnia) acidifies body fluids and initiates the acid-base disturbance known as respiratory acidosis. By contrast, a decrease in PaCO2 (hypocapnia) alkalinizes body fluids and initiates the acid-base disturbance known as respiratory alkalosis. The impact on systemic acidity of these primary changes in PaCO2 is ameliorated by secondary, directional changes in plasma [HCO3¯] that occur in 2 stages. Acutely, hypercapnia or hypocapnia yields relatively small changes in plasma [HCO3¯] that originate virtually exclusively from titration of the body's nonbicarbonate buffers. During sustained hypercapnia or hypocapnia, much larger changes in plasma [HCO3¯] occur that reflect adjustments in renal acidification mechanisms. Consequently, the deviation of systemic acidity from normal is smaller in the chronic forms of these disorders. Here we provide an overview of the renal acidification responses to respiratory acid-base disorders. We also identify gaps in knowledge that require further research.

  1. Constraint-based interactive assembly planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.; Calton, T.L.

    1997-03-01

    The constraints on assembly plans vary depending on the product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. This paper describes the principles and implementation of a framework that supports a wide variety of user-specified constraints for interactive assembly planning. Constraints from many sources can be expressed on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. All constraints are implemented as filters that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner`s algorithms. Replanning is fast enough to enable a natural plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to several complex assemblies. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Isoniazid interaction with phosphatidylcholine-based membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Amanda Vicente; Marengo Trindade, Paulo; Marques, Sheylla; Brum, Tainá; Harte, Etienne; Rodrigues, Marieli Oliveira; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; da Silva, Pedro Almeida; Pohlmann, Adriana R.; Alves, Isabel Dantas; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues

    2013-11-01

    Interaction between the anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid (INH) and phosphatidylcholine membranes was investigated in terms of: (i) drug affinity to a lipid bilayer and (ii) drug-induced changes in the dynamic properties of liposomes, such as membrane hydration state, polar head and non-polar acyl chain order and lipid phase transition behavior. These parameters were studied by plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy (PWR), UV-visible, horizontal attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. PWR measurements showed an INH membrane dissociation constant value of 0.031 μM to phosphatidylcholine bilayers. INH induced higher membrane perturbation in the plane which is perpendicular to the membrane plane. The INH saturation concentration in phosphatidylcholine liposomes was 170 μM. At this concentration, HATR-FTIR and NMR findings showed that INH may interact with the lipid polar head, increasing the number of hydrogen bonds in the phosphate region and enhancing the choline motional freedom. DSC measurements showed that, at 115 μM, INH was responsible for a decrease in lipid phase transition temperature of approximately 2 °C and had no influence in the lipid enthalpy variation (ΔH). However, at 170 μM, INH induced the reduction of the ΔH by approximately 52%, suggesting that the drug may increase the distance among lipid molecules and enhance the freedom of the lipid acyl chains methylene groups. This paper provides information on the effects of INH on membrane dynamics which is important to understand liposome targeting of the drug and for the development of anti-TB pharmacologic systems that not only are less susceptible to resistance but also have low toxicity.

  3. Designed abscisic acid analogs as antagonists of PYL-PP2C receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Jun; Okamoto, Masanori; Akiyama, Tomonori; Muto, Takuya; Yajima, Shunsuke; Sue, Masayuki; Seo, Mitsunori; Kanno, Yuri; Kamo, Tsunashi; Endo, Akira; Nambara, Eiji; Hirai, Nobuhiro; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Cutler, Sean R; Todoroki, Yasushi

    2014-06-01

    The plant stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is critical for several abiotic stress responses. ABA signaling is normally repressed by group-A protein phosphatases 2C (PP2Cs), but stress-induced ABA binds Arabidopsis PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYL) receptors, which then bind and inhibit PP2Cs. X-ray structures of several receptor-ABA complexes revealed a tunnel above ABA's 3' ring CH that opens at the PP2C binding interface. Here, ABA analogs with sufficiently long 3' alkyl chains were predicted to traverse this tunnel and block PYL-PP2C interactions. To test this, a series of 3'-alkylsulfanyl ABAs were synthesized with different alkyl chain lengths. Physiological, biochemical and structural analyses revealed that a six-carbon alkyl substitution produced a potent ABA antagonist that was sufficiently active to block multiple stress-induced ABA responses in vivo. This study provides a new approach for the design of ABA analogs, and the results validated structure-based design for this target class.

  4. Study on the interaction of morphine chloride with deoxyribonucleic acid by fluorescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. F.; Dong, C.

    2009-01-01

    The mode and mechanism of the interaction of morphine chloride, an important alkaloid compound to calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct DNA) was investigated from absorption and fluorescence titration techniques. Hypochromic effect was founded in the absorption spectra of morphine when concentration of DNA increased. The decreased fluorescence study revealed non-cooperative binding of the morphine to DNA with an affinity of 3.94 × 10 3 M -1, and the stoichiometry of binding was characterized to be about one morphine molecule per nucleotide. Stern-Volmer plots at different temperatures proved that the quenching mechanism was static. Ferrocyanide quenching study showed that the magnitude of KSV of the bound morphine was lower than that of the free one. In addition, it was found that ionic strength could affect the binding of morphine and DNA. Fluorescence polarization and denatured DNA studies also applied strong evidences that morphine molecule was partially intercalated between every alternate base pairs of ct DNA. As observed from above experiments, intercalation was well supported as the binding mode of morphine and ct DNA.

  5. Identification of novel PTEN-binding partners: PTEN interaction with fatty acid binding protein FABP4.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, O; Panayotou, G; Zhyvoloup, A; Volkova, D; Gout, I; Filonenko, V

    2010-04-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor with dual protein and lipid-phosphatase activity, which is frequently deleted or mutated in many human advanced cancers. Recent studies have also demonstrated that PTEN is a promising target in type II diabetes and obesity treatment. Using C-terminal PTEN sequence in pEG202-NLS as bait, yeast two-hybrid screening on Mouse Embryo, Colon Cancer, and HeLa cDNA libraries was carried out. Isolated positive clones were validated by mating assay and identified through automated DNA sequencing and BLAST database searches. Sequence analysis revealed a number of PTEN-binding proteins linking this phosphatase to a number of different signaling cascades, suggesting that PTEN may perform other functions besides tumor-suppressing activity in different cell types. In particular, the interplay between PTEN function and adipocyte-specific fatty-acid-binding protein FABP4 is of notable interest. The demonstrable tautology of PTEN to FABP4 suggested a role for this phosphatase in the regulation of lipid metabolism and adipocyte differentiation. This interaction was further studied using coimmunoprecipitation and gel-filtration assays. Finally, based on Biacore assay, we have calculated the K(D) of PTEN-FABP4 complex, which is around 2.8 microM.

  6. Interaction between common organic acids and trace nucleation species in the Earth's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yisheng; Nadykto, Alexey B; Yu, Fangqun; Herb, J; Wang, Wei

    2010-01-14

    Atmospheric aerosols formed via nucleation in the Earth's atmosphere play an important role in the aerosol radiative forcing associated directly with global climate changes and public health. Although it is well-known that atmospheric aerosol particles contain organic species, the chemical nature of and physicochemical processes behind atmospheric nucleation involving organic species remain unclear. In the present work, the interaction of common organic acids with molecular weights of 122, 116, 134, 88, 136, and 150 (benzoic, maleic, malic, pyruvic, phenylacetic, and tartaric acids) with nucleation precursors and charged trace species has been investigated. We found a moderate strong effect of the organic species on the stability of neutral and charged ionic species. In most cases, the free energies of the mixed H(2)SO(4)-organic acid dimer formation are within 1-1.5 kcal mol(-1) of the (H(2)SO(4))(NH(3)) formation energy. The interaction of the organic acids with trace ionic species is quite strong, and the corresponding free energies far exceed those of the (H(3)O(+))(H(2)SO(4)) and (H(3)O(+))(H(2)SO(4))(2) formation. These considerations lead us to conclude that the aforementioned organic acids may possess a substantial capability of stabilizing both neutral and positively charged prenucleation clusters, and thus, they should be studied further with regard to their involvement in the gas-to-particle conversion in the Earth's atmosphere.

  7. Dynamics of Responses in Compatible Potato - Potato virus Y Interaction Are Modulated by Salicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Baebler, Špela; Stare, Katja; Kovač, Maja; Blejec, Andrej; Prezelj, Nina; Stare, Tjaša; Kogovšek, Polona; Pompe-Novak, Maruša; Rosahl, Sabine; Ravnikar, Maja; Gruden, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the dynamics of the potato – Potato virus Y (PVY) compatible interaction in relation to salicylic acid - controlled pathways we performed experiments using non-transgenic potato cv. Désirée, transgenic NahG-Désirée, cv. Igor and PVYNTN, the most aggressive strain of PVY. The importance of salicylic acid in viral multiplication and symptom development was confirmed by pronounced symptom development in NahG-Désirée, depleted in salicylic acid, and reversion of the effect after spraying with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (a salicylic acid - analogue). We have employed quantitative PCR for monitoring virus multiplication, as well as plant responses through expression of selected marker genes of photosynthetic activity, carbohydrate metabolism and the defence response. Viral multiplication was the slowest in inoculated potato of cv. Désirée, the only asymptomatic genotype in the study. The intensity of defence-related gene expression was much stronger in both sensitive genotypes (NahG-Désirée and cv. Igor) at the site of inoculation than in asymptomatic plants (cv. Désirée). Photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism gene expression differed between the symptomatic and asymptomatic phenotypes. The differential gene expression pattern of the two sensitive genotypes indicates that the outcome of the interaction does not rely simply on one regulatory component, but similar phenotypical features can result from distinct responses at the molecular level. PMID:22194976

  8. Dendrimer-protein interactions versus dendrimer-based nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Shcharbin, Dzmitry; Shcharbina, Natallia; Dzmitruk, Volha; Pedziwiatr-Werbicka, Elzbieta; Ionov, Maksim; Mignani, Serge; de la Mata, F Javier; Gómez, Rafael; Muñoz-Fernández, Maria Angeles; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Bryszewska, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Dendrimers are hyperbranched polymers belonging to the huge class of nanomedical devices. Their wide application in biology and medicine requires understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of their interactions with biological systems. Summarizing, electrostatic force plays the predominant role in dendrimer-protein interactions, especially with charged dendrimers. Other kinds of interactions have been proven, such as H-bonding, van der Waals forces, and even hydrophobic interactions. These interactions depend on the characteristics of both participants: flexibility and surface charge of a dendrimer, rigidity of protein structure and the localization of charged amino acids at its surface. pH and ionic strength of solutions can significantly modulate interactions. Ligands and cofactors attached to a protein can also change dendrimer-protein interactions. Binding of dendrimers to a protein can change its secondary structure, conformation, intramolecular mobility and functional activity. However, this strongly depends on rigidity versus flexibility of a protein's structure. In addition, the potential applications of dendrimers to nanomedicine are reviwed related to dendrimer-protein interactions.

  9. An Olfactory Indicator for Acid-Base Titrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flair, Mark N.; Setzer, William N.

    1990-01-01

    The use of an olfactory acid-base indicator in titrations for visually impaired students is discussed. Potential olfactory indicators include eugenol, thymol, vanillin, and thiophenol. Titrations performed with each indicator with eugenol proved to be successful. (KR)

  10. Distinctive interactions of oleic acid covered magnetic nanoparticles with saturated and unsaturated phospholipids in Langmuir monolayers.

    PubMed

    Matshaya, Thabo J; Lanterna, Anabel E; Granados, Alejandro M; Krause, Rui W M; Maggio, Bruno; Vico, Raquel V

    2014-05-27

    The growing number of innovations in nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology are posing new challenges in understanding the full spectrum of interactions between nanomateriales and biomolecules at nano-biointerfaces. Although considerable achievements have been accomplished by in vivo applications, many issues regarding the molecular nature of these interactions are far from being well-understood. In this work, we evaluate the interaction of hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) covered with a single layer of oleic acid with saturated and unsaturated phospholipids found in biomembranes through the use of Langmuir monolayers. We find distinctive interactions among the MNP with saturated and unsaturated phospholipids that are reflected by both, the compression isotherms and the surface topography of the films. The interaction between MNP and saturated lipids causes a noticeable reduction of the mean molecular area in the interfacial plane, while the interaction with unsaturated lipids promotes area expansion compared to the ideally mixed films. Moreover, when liquid expanded and liquid condensed phases of the phospholipid(s) coexist, the MNP preferably partition to the liquid-expanded phase, thus hindering the coalescence of the condensed domains with increasing surface pressure. In consequence organizational information on long-range order is attained. These results evidence the existence of a sensitive composition-dependent surface regulation given by phospholipid-nanoparticle interactions which enhance the biophysical relevance of understanding nanoparticle surface functionalization in relation to its interactions in biointerfaces constituted by defined types of biomolecules.

  11. Interactions of helquats with chiral acidic aromatic analytes investigated by partial-filling affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Růžička, Martin; Koval, Dušan; Vávra, Jan; Reyes-Gutiérrez, Paul E; Teplý, Filip; Kašička, Václav

    2016-10-07

    Noncovalent molecular interactions between helquats, a new class of dicationic helical extended diquats, and several chiral acidic aromatic drugs and catalysts have been investigated using partial-filling affinity capillary electrophoresis (PF-ACE). Helquats dissolved at 1mM concentration in the aqueous background electrolyte (40mM Tris, 20mM acetic acid, pH 8.1) were introduced as ligand zones of variable length (0-130mm) into the hydroxypropylcellulose coated fused silica capillary whereas 0.1mM solutions of negatively charged chiral drugs or catalysts (warfarin, ibuprofen, mandelic acid, etodolac, binaphthyl phosphate and 11 other acidic aromatic compounds) were applied as a short analyte zone at the injection capillary end. After application of electric field, analyte and ligand migrated against each other and in case of their interactions, migration time of the analyte was increasing with increasing length of the ligand zone. From the tested compounds, only isomers of those exhibiting helical chirality and/or possessing conjugated aromatic systems were enantioselectively separated through their differential interactions with helquats. Some compounds with conjugated aromatic groups interacted with helquats moderately strongly but non-enantiospecifically. Small compounds with single benzene ring exhibited no or very weak non-enantiospecific interactions. PF-ACE method allowed to determine binding constants of the analyte-helquat complexes from the changes of migration times of the analytes. Binding constants of the weakest complexes of the analytes with helquats were less than 50L/mol, whereas binding constants of the strongest complexes were in the range 1 000-1 400L/mol.

  12. Towards lactic acid bacteria-based biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Mazzoli, Roberto; Bosco, Francesca; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Bayer, Edward A; Pessione, Enrica

    2014-11-15

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have long been used in industrial applications mainly as starters for food fermentation or as biocontrol agents or as probiotics. However, LAB possess several characteristics that render them among the most promising candidates for use in future biorefineries in converting plant-derived biomass-either from dedicated crops or from municipal/industrial solid wastes-into biofuels and high value-added products. Lactic acid, their main fermentation product, is an attractive building block extensively used by the chemical industry, owing to the potential for production of polylactides as biodegradable and biocompatible plastic alternative to polymers derived from petrochemicals. LA is but one of many high-value compounds which can be produced by LAB fermentation, which also include biofuels such as ethanol and butanol, biodegradable plastic polymers, exopolysaccharides, antimicrobial agents, health-promoting substances and nutraceuticals. Furthermore, several LAB strains have ascertained probiotic properties, and their biomass can be considered a high-value product. The present contribution aims to provide an extensive overview of the main industrial applications of LAB and future perspectives concerning their utilization in biorefineries. Strategies will be described in detail for developing LAB strains with broader substrate metabolic capacity for fermentation of cheaper biomass.

  13. Spectroscopic analyses and studies on respective interaction of cyanuric acid and uric acid with bovine serum albumin and melamine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dandan; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Wang, Qi; Qiao, Heng

    2015-01-25

    In this work, the fluorescence quenching was used to study the interaction of cyanuric acid (CYA) and uric acid (UA) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) at two different temperatures (283 K and 310 K). The bimolecular quenching constant (Kq), apparent quenching constant (Ksv), effective binding constant (KA) and corresponding dissociation constant (KD), binding site number (n) and binding distance (r) were calculated by adopting Stern-Volmer, Lineweaver-Burk, Double logarithm and overlap integral equations. The results show that CYA and UA are both able to obviously bind to BSA, but the binding strength order is BSA+CYAinteractions of CYA and UA with melamine (MEL) under the same conditions were also studied by using similar methods. The results indicates that both CYA and UA can bind together closely with melamine (MEL). It is wished that these research results would facilitate the understanding the formation of kidney stones and gout in the body after ingesting excess MEL.

  14. Synthesis and antimicrobial activities of new higher amino acid Schiff base derivatives of 6-aminopenicillanic acid and 7-aminocephalosporanic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir (nee Güngör), Özlem; Gürkan, Perihan; Özçelik, Berrin; Oyardı, Özlem

    2016-02-01

    Novel β-lactam derivatives (1c-3c) (1d-3d) were produced by using 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), 7-aminocephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) and the higher amino acid Schiff bases. The synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H/13C NMR and UV-vis spectra. Antibacterial activities of all the higher amino acid Schiff bases (1a-3a) (1b-3b) and β-lactam derivatives were screened against three gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Acinetobacter baumannii RSKK 02026), three gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 07005, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633) and their drug-resistant isolates by using broth microdilution method. Two fungi (Candida albicans and Candida krusei) were used for antifungal activity.

  15. Kinetic energy releases of small amino acids upon interaction with keV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, S.; Alvarado, F.; Postma, J.; Sobocinski, P.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2009-01-01

    In chromatin, DNA is tightly packed into one complex together with histone and non-histone proteins. These proteins are known to protect the DNA against indirect and to some extent even direct radiation damage. Radiation action upon amino acids is thus one of the primary steps in biological radiation action. In this paper we investigate the ionization and fragmentation of the gas-phase amino acids glycine, alanine and valine upon interaction with keV α-particles. High resolution coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to determine the dominant fragmentation channels as well as fragment kinetic energies.

  16. [Studies on the interaction of the metal complex of hydrazide of podophyllic acid with DNA].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping-Hong; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Liu-Fang; Song, Yu-Min; Qu, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Ying-Qian

    2006-05-01

    The interaction between the metal complex of hydrazide of podophyllic acid and calf thymus (CT) DNA was studied by using absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and DNA heat denaturation. It was found that the intensity of the maximal absorption peaks from absorption spectra is weakened in the presence of the metal complex of hydrazide of podophyllic acid compared with that in the absence of the metal complex. All the experimental results show that the intercalation mode was proved to exist between HDPP-Ni complexes and CT DNA.

  17. An interactive technique for the display of nucleic acid secondary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, B A; Lipkin, L E; Maizel, J

    1982-01-01

    The ability to visualize nucleic acid secondary structure has become quite important since the advent of computer prediction and biochemical techniques that depict such structures. Manually drawing the conformations can be quite time consuming and tedious. Thus, the ability to draw with the aid of a computer the secondary structure of nucleic acid molecules is quite advantageous. This paper describes an interactive algorithm that permits one to generate such drawings which may then be used for further analysis and/or publications. PMID:7177857

  18. Interaction between methyl glyoxal and ascorbic acid: experimental and theoretical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.; Koll, A.; Filarowski, A.; Bhattacharyya, S. P.; Mukherjee, S.

    2004-06-01

    The absorption spectral change of methyl glyoxal (MG) due to the interaction with ascorbic acid (AA or Vitamin C) has been investigated using steady-state spectroscopic technique. A plausible explanation for the spectral change has been discussed on the basis of hydrogen bonding interaction between the two interacting species. The equilibrium constant for the complex formation due to hydrogen bonding interaction between MG and AA has been obtained from absorption spectral changes. Ab inito calculations with DFT B3LYP/6/31G (d,p) basis sets have been used to find out the molecular structure of the hydrogen bonded complex. The O⋯H distance found in the OH⋯O hydrogen bond turns out to be quite short (1.974 Å) which is in conformity with the large value of the equilibrium constant determined experimentally.

  19. A computational approach for the annotation of hydrogen-bonded base interactions in crystallographic structures of the ribozymes

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdani, Hazrina Yusof; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-25

    A fundamental understanding of the atomic level interactions in ribonucleic acid (RNA) and how they contribute towards RNA architecture is an important knowledge platform to develop through the discovery of motifs from simple arrangements base pairs, to more complex arrangements such as triples and larger patterns involving non-standard interactions. The network of hydrogen bond interactions is important in connecting bases to form potential tertiary motifs. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of automated methods for annotating RNA 3D structures based on hydrogen bond interactions. COnnection tables Graphs for Nucleic ACids (COGNAC) is automated annotation system using graph theoretical approaches that has been developed for the identification of RNA 3D motifs. This program searches for patterns in the unbroken networks of hydrogen bonds for RNA structures and capable of annotating base pairs and higher-order base interactions, which ranges from triples to sextuples. COGNAC was able to discover 22 out of 32 quadruples occurrences of the Haloarcula marismortui large ribosomal subunit (PDB ID: 1FFK) and two out of three occurrences of quintuple interaction reported by the non-canonical interactions in RNA (NCIR) database. These and several other interactions of interest will be discussed in this paper. These examples demonstrate that the COGNAC program can serve as an automated annotation system that can be used to annotate conserved base-base interactions and could be added as additional information to established RNA secondary structure prediction methods.

  20. Synthesis of polyacrylic-acid-based thermochromic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Jyoti; Alam, Sarfaraz; Mathur, G. N.

    2003-10-01

    Smart materials respond to environmental stimuli with particular changes in some variables (for example temperature, pressure and electric field etc), for that reason they are often called responsive materials. In the present work, we have synthesized thermochromic polymer based on poly acrylic acid cobalt chloride (CoCl2) and phosphoric acid (H3PO4) that visually and reversibly changes color in the temperature range (70 - 130°C). These thermochromic materials can be used as visual sensors of temperature. Thermochromic polymers are based on polyacrylic acid and CoCl2 complex.

  1. Acid Base Titrations in Nonaqueous Solvents and Solvent Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcza, Lajos; Buvári-Barcza, Ágnes

    2003-07-01

    The acid base determination of different substances by nonaqueous titrations is highly preferred in pharmaceutical analyses since the method is quantitative, exact, and reproducible. The modern interpretation of the reactions in nonaqueous solvents started in the last century, but several inconsistencies and unsolved problems can be found in the literature. The acid base theories of Brønsted Lowry and Lewis as well as the so-called solvent theory are outlined first, then the promoting (and leveling) and the differentiating effects are discussed on the basis of the hydrogen-bond concept. Emphasis is put on the properties of formic acid and acetic anhydride since their importance is increasing.

  2. The chemistry of lava-seawater interactions: The generation of acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Resing, J.A.; Sansone, F.J.

    1999-08-01

    High concentrations of acid were found to arise from the interaction between molten rock and seawater at the shoreline of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. A series of field samplings and experiments show that the acid was derived from two sources: the release of magmatic volatiles and water-rock reactions. Although the bulk of the magmatic volatiles (CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and SO{sub 2}) are vented at Puu Oo cinder cone before the lava`s transit downslope to the ocean, a portion of the sulfur (S) and fluoride (F) gases are retained by the lava and then are released partially when the lava is quenched by seawater. The primary water-rock reaction responsible for acid formation appears to be Na-metasomatism, which is much different from the predominant acid-forming reaction found in submarine hydrothermal systems, Mg-metasomatism. Analyses of surface seawater and of precipitation (rain) deposited at the shore show that {approximately}30% of the acid comes from magmatic gases with the balance from reactions between the rock and the salts found in seawater. Experimental results show that {approximately}4 {+-} 1.5 mEq of acid are formed per kilogram of lava entering the ocean, and of this 1 {+-} 0.5 mEq/kg of lava came from S and F, with the balance coming from water-rock reactions. On the basis of lava extrusion rates, {approximately}200--720 {times} 10{sup 6} Eq/yr of acid are being formed at this site. The deposition of the acid results in the alteration of subaerial lava flows along the coast, and the lowering of the pH of the adjacent surface ocean waters by more than 1 unit. The ejection of this acid into the atmosphere contributes to the formation of an extensive haze downwind of the lava entries.

  3. Nature of interactions of tryptophan with zinc oxide nanoparticles and L-aspartic acid: A spectroscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Gopa; Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Ganguly, Tapan

    2009-04-01

    The interaction between an essential amino acid L-tryptophan (TRP) with semiconductor zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and amino acid L-aspartic acid (ASP) is investigated by steady state and time resolved spectroscopic techniques. In both the cases static mode of fluorescence quenching occurs indicating the formation of ground-state complex. Binding constants and the number of binding sites were determined for both the complexes. The observed thermodynamic parameters suggest that the key interacting forces involved are van der Waals interaction and hydrogen bonding in case of TRP and ZnO nanoparticles whereas hydrophobic interaction is responsible in formations of TRP-ASP complex.

  4. Synthesis and description of intermolecular interactions in new sulfonamide derivatives of tranexamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashfaq, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad Nadeem; Danish, Muhammad; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Khatoon, Sadia; Mustafa, Ghulam; Zolotarev, Pavel N.; Butt, Rabia Ayub; Şahin, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Tranexamic acid (4-aminomethyl-cyclohexanecarboxylic acid) was reacted with sulfonyl chlorides to produce structurally related four sulfonamide derivatives using simple and environmental friendly method to check out their three-dimensional behavior and van der Walls interactions. The molecules were crystallized in different possibilities, as it is/after alkylation at its O and N atoms/along with a co-molecule. All molecules were crystallized in monoclinic crystal system with space group P21/n, P21/c and P21/a. X-ray studies reveal that the molecules stabilized themselves by different kinds of hydrogen bonding interactions. The molecules are getting connected through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form inversion dimers which are further connected through N-H⋯O interactions. The molecules in which N and O atoms were alkylated showed non-classical interaction and generated centro-symmetric R22(24) ring motif. The co-crystallized host and guest molecules are connected to each other via O-H⋯O interactions to generate different ring motifs. By means of the ToposPro software an analysis of the topologies of underlying nets that correspond to molecular packings and hydrogen-bonded networks in structures under consideration was carried out.

  5. A Usability Study of Interactive Web-Based Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girard, Tulay; Pinar, Musa

    2011-01-01

    This research advances the understanding of the usability of marketing case study modules in the area of interactive web-based technologies through the assignment of seven interactive case modules in a Principles of Marketing course. The case modules were provided for marketing students by the publisher, McGraw Hill Irwin, of the…

  6. Web-based Interactive Simulator for Rotating Machinery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirohi, Vijayalaxmi

    1999-01-01

    Baroma (Balance of Rotating Machinery), the Web-based educational engineering interactive software for teaching/learning combines didactical and software ergonomical approaches. The software in tutorial form simulates a problem using Visual Interactive Simulation in graphic display, and animation is brought about through graphical user interface…

  7. On Interactive Teaching Model of Translation Course Based on Wechat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Wang

    2017-01-01

    Constructivism is a theory related to knowledge and learning, focusing on learners' subjective initiative, based on which the interactive approach has been proved to play a crucial role in language learning. Accordingly, the interactive approach can also be applied to translation teaching since translation itself is a bilingual transformational…

  8. n→π* interactions in poly(lactic acid) suggest a role in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Robert W; Raines, Ronald T

    2013-09-11

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is a versatile synthetic polyester. We noted that this depsipeptide analog of polyalanine has a helical structure that resembles a polyproline II helix. Using natural bond orbital analysis, we find that n→π* interactions between sequential ester carbonyl groups contribute 0.44 kcal mol(-1) per monomer to the conformational stability of PLA helices. We conclude that analogous n→π* interactions could direct the folding of a polypeptide chain into a polyproline II helix prior to the formation of hydrogen bonds between backbone amides.

  9. Electrochemical evaluation of the interaction between ascorbic acid and the cardiotonic drug RS-82856.

    PubMed

    Visor, G C; Lin, L H; Kenley, R A; Venuti, M C; Alvarez, R

    1987-12-01

    The solution phase interaction between ascorbic acid and the cardiotonic drug N-cyclohexyl-N-methyl-4(7-oxy 1,2,3,5-tetrahydroimidazol[2,1-b] quinazolin-2-one butyramide (RS-82856) was evaluated using a differential pulse voltammetric technique. Shifts in the peak potential of ascorbic acid to higher energy as well as decreases in peak current values were monitored as a function of RS-82856 concentration. The electrochemical data were obtained under conditions where both the drug and the ascorbic acid concentrations exhibited linear relationships with peak current values. The methodology was extended to the study of two other structurally related phosphodiesterase inhibitors cilostamide and anagrelide. The complexation of these drugs with ascorbic acid were also characterized by decreases in the diffusion currents of ascorbic acid as well as by anodic shifts in the peak potential. The significance of these observations may be related to the inhibition of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity by both the drugs tested and the ascorbic acid.

  10. Interactions between hydrated cement paste and organic acids: Thermodynamic data and speciation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    De Windt, Laurent; Bertron, Alexandra; Larreur-Cayol, Steeves; Escadeillas, Gilles

    2015-03-15

    Interactions of short-chain organic acids with hydrated cement phases affect structure durability in the agro-food and nuclear waste industries but can also be used to modify cement properties. Most previous studies have been experimental, performed at fixed concentrations and pH, without quantitatively discriminating among polyacidity effects, or complexation and salt precipitation processes. This paper addresses such issues by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for acetic, citric, oxalic, succinic acids and a simplified hydrated CEM-I. The thermodynamic constants collected from the literature allow the speciation to be modeled over a wide range of pH and concentrations. Citric and oxalic had a stronger chelating effect than acetic acid, while succinic acid was intermediate. Similarly, Ca-citrate and Ca-oxalate salts were more insoluble than Ca-acetate and Ca-succinate salts. Regarding aluminium complexation, hydroxyls, sulfates, and acid competition was highlighted. The exploration of acid mixtures showed the preponderant effect of oxalate and citrate over acetate and succinate.

  11. An Acid-Base Chemistry Example: Conversion of Nicotine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerfield, John H.

    1999-10-01

    The current government interest in nicotine conversion by cigarette companies provides an example of acid-base chemistry that can be explained to students in the second semester of general chemistry. In particular, the conversion by ammonia of the +1 form of nicotine to the easier-to-assimilate free-base form illustrates the effect of pH on acid-base equilibrium. The part played by ammonia in tobacco smoke is analogous to what takes place when cocaine is "free-based".

  12. HF acid blends based on formation conditions eliminate precipitation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Gdanski, R.; Shuchart, C.

    1997-03-01

    Formulating HCl-HF acid blends based on the mineralogy and temperature of a formation can increase the success of hydrofluoric acid (HF) treatments. Sodium and potassium in the structures of formation minerals can cause precipitation and matrix plugging problems during acidizing. Slight modifications of the acid blend used in the treatment can help eliminate fluosilicate precipitation. Researchers recently conducted tests to determine how acid blends react in different formations under varying temperatures. The results of the tests indicate that the minimum HCl:HF ratio in an acid blend is 6-to-1, and the optimum ratio is 9-to-1. Regular mud acid (12% HCl-3% HF) has been used successfully for years to enhance production in sandstone formations. By the 1980s, operators began to vary the concentration of HF and HCl acids to solve excessive sanding problems in sandstone. The paper discusses treatment problems, formation characteristics, alumino-silicate scaling, research results, brine compatibility, optimum treatment, and acid volume guidelines.

  13. Interactions between the dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio and genetic factors determine susceptibility to pediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Costea, Irina; Mack, David R; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Israel, David; Marcil, Valerie; Ahmad, Ali; Amre, Devendra K

    2014-04-01

    Increased dietary ratios of ω6/ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD), but epidemiologic data are limited. We investigated whether variants of genes that control polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism (CYP4F3, FADS1, and FADS2), along with the dietary ratio of ω6/ω3, confers susceptibility to CD. Based on data from 182 children newly diagnosed with CD and 250 controls, we found that children who consumed a higher dietary ratio of ω6/ω3 were susceptible for CD if they were also carriers of specific variants of CYP4F3 and FADS2 genes. Our findings implicate diet-gene interactions in the pathogenesis of CD.

  14. Hydrochloric acid aerosol formation by the interaction of hydrogen chloride with humid air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhein, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions in which hydrochloric acid aerosol is predicted by the interaction of hydrogen chloride gas with the water vapor in humid air are analyzed. The liquid gas phase equilibrium for the HCL-H2O system is expressed in terms of relative humidity and hydrogen chloride concentration as parts per million, units commonly used in pollution studies. Presented are the concentration (wt %) of HC1 in the aerosol and the concentration of aerosol (ppm) predicted.

  15. Evolutionarily conserved amino acids in TCR V regions and MHC control their interaction

    PubMed Central

    Marrack, Philippa; Scott-Browne, James P.; Dai, Shaodong; Gapin, Laurent; Kappler, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Alpha/beta T cell receptors (TCRs) react with major histocompatibility complex proteins (MHC) plus peptides, a poorly understood phenomenon, probably because thymocytes bearing TCRs that manifest MHC-reactivity too well are lost by negative selection. Only TCRs with attenuated ability to react with MHC appear on mature T cells. Also, the interaction sites between TCRs and MHC may be inherently flexible and hence difficult to spot. Contacts between TCRs and MHC in the solved structures of their complexes were reevaluated with these points in mind. The results show that frequently used amino acids in TCR CDR1 and CDR2 regions are often used to bind MHC, in areas around small amino acids on the surfaces of MHC α helices that form a cup, allowing somewhat flexible binding of the TCRs. The TCR amino acids involved are specific to families of V regions and partially different rules govern recognition of MHC1 versus MHCII. PMID:18304006

  16. The μ3 model of acids and bases: extending the Lewis theory to intermetallics.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Timothy E; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2012-04-02

    A central challenge in the design of new metallic materials is the elucidation of the chemical factors underlying the structures of intermetallic compounds. Analogies to molecular bonding phenomena, such as the Zintl concept, have proven very productive in approaching this goal. In this Article, we extend a foundational concept of molecular chemistry to intermetallics: the Lewis theory of acids and bases. The connection is developed through the method of moments, as applied to DFT-calibrated Hückel calculations. We begin by illustrating that the third and fourth moments (μ(3) and μ(4)) of the electronic density of states (DOS) distribution tune the properties of a pseudogap. μ(3) controls the balance of states above and below the DOS minimum, with μ(4) then determining the minimum's depth. In this way, μ(3) predicts an ideal occupancy for the DOS distribution. The μ(3)-ideal electron count is used to forge a link between the reactivity of transition metals toward intermetallic phase formation, and that of Lewis acids and bases toward adduct formation. This is accomplished through a moments-based definition of acidity which classifies systems that are electron-poor relative to the μ(3)-ideal as μ(3)-acidic, and those that are electron-rich as μ(3)-basic. The reaction of μ(3) acids and bases, whether in the formation of a Lewis acid/base adduct or an intermetallic phase, tends to neutralize the μ(3) acidity or basicity of the reactants. This μ(3)-neutralization is traced to the influence of electronegativity differences at heteroatomic contacts on the projected DOS curves of the atoms involved. The role of μ(3)-acid/base interactions in intermetallic phases is demonstrated through the examination of 23 binary phases forming between 3d metals, the stability range of the CsCl type, and structural trends within the Ti-Ni system.

  17. CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase interacts with fragile X related protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yun; Tian, Shuai; Wang, Zongbao; Wang, Changbo; Chen, Xiaowei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yang; He, Shuya

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), fragile X related 1 protein (FXR1P) and FXR2P are the members of the FMR protein family. These proteins contain two KH domains and a RGG box, which are characteristic of RNA binding proteins. The absence of FMRP, causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of hereditary mental retardation. FXR1P is expressed throughout the body and important for normal muscle development, and its absence causes cardiac abnormality. To investigate the functions of FXR1P, a screen was performed to identify FXR1P-interacting proteins and determine the biological effect of the interaction. The current study identified CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase (CMAS) as an interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid system, and the interaction between FXR1P and CMAS was validated in yeast using a β-galactosidase assay and growth studies with selective media. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation was used to analyze the FXR1P/CMAS association and immunofluorescence microscopy was performed to detect expression and intracellular localization of the proteins. The results of the current study indicated that FXR1P and CMAS interact, and colocalize in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of HEK293T and HeLa cells. Accordingly, a fragile X related 1 (FXR1) gene overexpression vector was constructed to investigate the effect of FXR1 overexpression on the level of monosialotetrahexosylganglioside 1 (GM1). The results of the current study suggested that FXR1P is a tissue-specific regulator of GM1 levels in SH-SY5Y cells, but not in HEK293T cells. Taken together, the results initially indicate that FXR1P interacts with CMAS, and that FXR1P may enhance the activation of sialic acid via interaction with CMAS, and increase GM1 levels to affect the development of the nervous system, thus providing evidence for further research into the pathogenesis of FXS. PMID:27357083

  18. Interaction of Cytotoxic and Cytoprotective Bile Acids with Model Membranes: Influence of the Membrane Composition.

    PubMed

    Esteves, M; Ferreira, M J; Kozica, A; Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves da Silva, A; Saramago, B

    2015-08-18

    To understand the role of bile acids (BAs) in cell function, many authors have investigated their effect on biomembrane models which are less complex systems, but there are still many open questions. The present study aims to contribute for the deepening of the knowledge of the interaction between BAs and model membranes, in particular, focusing on the effect of BA mixtures. The cytotoxic deoxycholic acid (DCA), the cytoprotective ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and the equimolar mixture (DCA + UDCA) were investigated. Monolayers and liposomes were taken as model membranes with two lipid compositions: an equimolar mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (Chol)) traditionally associated with the formation of lipid rafts and an equimolar POPC/SM binary mixture. The obtained results showed that DCA causes the fluidization of monolayers and bilayers, leading to the eventual rupture of POPC/SM liposomes at high concentration. UDCA may provide a stabilization of POPC/SM membranes but has a negligible effect on the Chol-containing liposomes. In the case of equimolar mixture DCA/UDCA, the interactions depend not only on the lipid composition but also on the design of the experiment. The BA mixture has a greater impact on the monolayers than do pure BAs, suggesting a cooperative DCA-UDCA interaction that enhances the penetration of UDCA in both POPC/SM and POPC/SM/Chol monolayers. For the bilayers, the presence of UDCA in the mixture decreases the disturbing effect of DCA.

  19. Critical amino acid residues of maurocalcine involved in pharmacology, lipid interaction and cell penetration.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, Kamel; Ram, Narendra; Boisseau, Sylvie; Strappazzon, Flavie; Rehaim, Amel; Sadoul, Rémy; Darbon, Hervé; Ronjat, Michel; De Waard, Michel

    2007-10-01

    Maurocalcine (MCa) is a 33-amino acid residue peptide that was initially identified in the Tunisian scorpion Scorpio maurus palmatus. This peptide triggers interest for three main reasons. First, it helps unravelling the mechanistic basis of Ca(2+) mobilization from the sarcoplasmic reticulum because of its sequence homology with a calcium channel domain involved in excitation-contraction coupling. Second, it shows potent pharmacological properties because of its ability to activate the ryanodine receptor. Finally, it is of technological value because of its ability to carry cell-impermeable compounds across the plasma membrane. Herein, we characterized the molecular determinants that underlie the pharmacological and cell-penetrating properties of maurocalcine. We identify several key amino acid residues of the peptide that will help the design of cell-penetrating analogues devoid of pharmacological activity and cell toxicity. Close examination of the determinants underlying cell penetration of maurocalcine reveals that basic amino acid residues are required for an interaction with negatively charged lipids of the plasma membrane. Maurocalcine analogues that penetrate better have also stronger interaction with negatively charged lipids. Conversely, less effective analogues present a diminished ability to interact with these lipids. These findings will also help the design of still more potent cell penetrating analogues of maurocalcine.

  20. A web-based protein interaction network visualizer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interaction between proteins is one of the most important mechanisms in the execution of cellular functions. The study of these interactions has provided insight into the functioning of an organism’s processes. As of October 2013, Homo sapiens had over 170000 Protein-Protein interactions (PPI) registered in the Interologous Interaction Database, which is only one of the many public resources where protein interactions can be accessed. These numbers exemplify the volume of data that research on the topic has generated. Visualization of large data sets is a well known strategy to make sense of information, and protein interaction data is no exception. There are several tools that allow the exploration of this data, providing different methods to visualize protein network interactions. However, there is still no native web tool that allows this data to be explored interactively online. Results Given the advances that web technologies have made recently it is time to bring these interactive views to the web to provide an easily accessible forum to visualize PPI. We have created a Web-based Protein Interaction Network Visualizer: PINV, an open source, native web application that facilitates the visualization of protein interactions (http://biosual.cbio.uct.ac.za/pinv.html). We developed PINV as a set of components that follow the protocol defined in BioJS and use the D3 library to create the graphic layouts. We demonstrate the use of PINV with multi-organism interaction networks for a predicted target from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, its interacting partners and its orthologs. Conclusions The resultant tool provides an attractive view of complex, fully interactive networks with components that allow the querying, filtering and manipulation of the visible subset. Moreover, as a web resource, PINV simplifies sharing and publishing, activities which are vital in today’s research collaborative environments. The source code is freely available for download at

  1. Spectroscopic investigation of the interaction between human serum albumin and three organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Xie, Meng-Xia; Jiang, Min; Wang, Ying-Dian

    2005-07-01

    The interactions of human serum albumin (HSA) with sinapic acid (SA), gallic acid (GA) and shikimic acid (SI) were investigated by fluorescence and Fourier transformed infrared spectrometry. Fluorescence results showed that one molecule of protein combined with one molecule of GA at the molar ratio of drug to HSA ranging from 0.1 to 30, and their binding constant ( KA) is 1.1 × 10 4 M -1. While one HSA molecule combined with one or two molecule of SA at the molar ratio of drug to HSA ranging from 0.1 to 4.26 or 4.26 to 30, and their binding affinities ( KA) are 1.92 × 10 3 M -1 and 6.87 × 10 8 M -1, respectively. There is no specific interaction between HSA and SI. Combining the curve-fitting results of infrared amide I and amide III bands, the alterations of protein secondary structures induced by drugs were estimated. The drug-protein combination brought gradual reductions of the protein α-helix structure with increasing the concentrations of SA and GA, but SI did not change the protein secondary structure. From the fluorescence and FT-IR results, the binding mode was discussed in relation to the structures of the organic acids.

  2. Regulation by organic acids of polysaccharide-mediated microbe-plant interactions.

    PubMed

    Nakata, K; Kobayashi, T; Takiguchi, Y; Yamaguchi, T

    2000-10-01

    A polysaccharide flocculant of Klebsiella pneumoniae H12 has been suggested to mediate microbe-plant interactions with the aid of Ca2+ [K. Nakata et al., Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 64, 459-465, 2000]. Here, two-way regulation of polysaccharide-mediated interactions between K. pneumoniae and Raphanus sativus was studied using organic acids. Namely, 10 mM equivalents of organic acids promoted production of the polysaccharide by the bacterium, but inhibited flocculation of bacterial cells by the polysaccharide. These phenomena were counterbalanced by equi-molar equivalents of Ca2+, suggesting competition for Ca2+ between the carboxylic residues of the polysaccharide and those of the aliphatic acids. By electron microscopy observations, bacterial cell aggregates were sparsely distributed over the main roots and root hairs, had various sizes, and seemed to tightly adhere to root tissues. Their shapes seemed to be distorted and abundant in cavities. In brief, these microscopical observations may be explained by a two-way regulation system of bacterial adhesion to a plant by organic acids.

  3. Interaction of some metals between marine-origin humic acids and aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Huljev, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    The interaction of metal ions (carrier-free form) in aquatic medium with humic acids is a complicated process depending on the properties of humic acids (elementary, chemical, and trace element composition), metals studied (valence, charge, chemical form, concentration), and medium used (pH, ionic strength). The use of radionuclides was found to be very suitable for a rapid and precise determination of the distribution coefficient K/sub d/ (ratio of the concentration of a certain trace metal association with a gram of humic acid over the concentration of the same trace metal per milliliter of solution) of the investigated system. Isolated humic acids from offshore sediments from the North Adriatic (Lim channel, near Rovinj, Yugoslavia) were characterized according to their elementary composition, the amount of products of hydrolysis, and the trace elements bound. All experiments were carried out between pH 3 and 5. It was found that conditions usually present at the site where humic acid interacts with metal ions (anaerobic conditions, H/sub 2/S) in brackish (21% S) and standard seawater (38% S) are determined in the pH range 3 to 5. The results of the pick-up (uptake) and replacement (release) experiments are presented as a distribution coefficient (K/sub d/), as a function of contact time. Processes of pick-up and replacement of a number of metals under various physicochemical conditions were investigated and special attention was paid to the influence of salinity. With the increase in NaCl concentration and pH in the system, the fixation of ruthenium, zinc, cobalt, and mercury by humic acids decreased.

  4. Multiquadric Spline-Based Interactive Segmentation of Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sachin; Surya Prasath, V. B.; Kassim, Yasmin M.; Maude, Richard J.; Glinskii, Olga V.; Glinsky, Vladislav V.; Huxley, Virginia H.; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used drawing tools for interactive image segmentation and labeling include active contours or boundaries, scribbles, rectangles and other shapes. Thin vessel shapes in images of vascular networks are difficult to segment using automatic or interactive methods. This paper introduces the novel use of a sparse set of user-defined seed points (supervised labels) for precisely, quickly and robustly segmenting complex biomedical images. A multiquadric spline-based binary classifier is proposed as a unique approach for interactive segmentation using as features color values and the location of seed points. Epifluorescence imagery of the dura mater microvasculature are difficult to segment for quantitative applications due to challenging tissue preparation, imaging conditions, and thin, faint structures. Experimental results based on twenty epifluorescence images is used to illustrate the benefits of using a set of seed points to obtain fast and accurate interactive segmentation compared to four interactive and automatic segmentation approaches. PMID:28227856

  5. Multiquadric Spline-Based Interactive Segmentation of Vascular Networks.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sachin; Surya Prasath, V B; Kassim, Yasmin M; Maude, Richard J; Glinskii, Olga V; Glinsky, Vladislav V; Huxley, Virginia H; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2016-08-01

    Commonly used drawing tools for interactive image segmentation and labeling include active contours or boundaries, scribbles, rectangles and other shapes. Thin vessel shapes in images of vascular networks are difficult to segment using automatic or interactive methods. This paper introduces the novel use of a sparse set of user-defined seed points (supervised labels) for precisely, quickly and robustly segmenting complex biomedical images. A multiquadric spline-based binary classifier is proposed as a unique approach for interactive segmentation using as features color values and the location of seed points. Epifluorescence imagery of the dura mater microvasculature are difficult to segment for quantitative applications due to challenging tissue preparation, imaging conditions, and thin, faint structures. Experimental results based on twenty epifluorescence images is used to illustrate the benefits of using a set of seed points to obtain fast and accurate interactive segmentation compared to four interactive and automatic segmentation approaches.

  6. Cellular Interactions and Immune Response of Spherical Nucleic Acid (SNA) Nanoconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massich, Matthew David

    Spherical nucleic acid (SNA) nanoconjugates consist of a densely packed monolayer shell of highly-oriented oligonucleotides covalently bound to a gold nanoparticle core. The nanoconjugates exhibit several important qualities, which make them useful for various biological applications, such as antisense gene regulation strategies and the intracellular detection of biomolecules. The focus of this thesis was to characterize the nanoconjugates interaction with cultured cells and specifically the immune response to their intracellular presence. The immune response of macrophage cells to internalized nanoconjugates was studied, and due to the dense functionalization of oligonucleotides on the surface of the nanoparticle and the resulting high localized salt concentration the innate immune response to the nanoconjugates is ˜25-fold less when compared to a lipoplex carrying the same sequence. Additionally, genome-wide expression profiling was used to study the biological response of cultured cells to the nanoconjugates. The biological response of HeLa cells to gold nanoparticles stabilized by weakly bound ligands was significant, yet when these same nanoparticles were stably functionalized with covalently attached oligonucleotides the cells showed no measurable response. In human keratinocytes, the oligonucleotide sequences caused 427 genes to be differentially expressed when complexed with Dharmafect, but when the oligonucleotides were conjugated to nanoparticles only 7 genes were differentially expressed. Beyond characterizing the cellular interactions and immune response of the nanoconjugates, the optimal length of siRNA (from 19--34 base pairs) that induces the most gene knockdown while maintaining limited immune activation was determined to be 24 base pairs. Further, the SNAs were shown to be useful as a potential antiviral gene therapy by demonstrating approximately 50% knockdown of the Ebola VP35 gene. Lastly, a scanning probe-enabled method was used to rapidly

  7. Isobolographic analysis of the antinociceptive interaction between ursolic acid and diclofenac or tramadol in mice.

    PubMed

    Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Cortés, Alejandra; Pellicer, Francisco; Díaz-Reval, Irene; González-Trujano, María Eva

    2014-02-01

    It is considered that natural products used in folk medicine can potentiate the effect of drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological interaction between ursolic acid, a triterpene isolated from herbal medicines to treat pain, and the analgesics diclofenac or tramadol. Individual dose-response curves of the antinociceptive effect of these compounds were built to calculate the ED50, as well as the pharmacological interaction, by using isobolographic analysis. All treatments decreased significantly and in a dose-dependent manner the writhing behavior with ED50 values of 103.50 ± 19.66, 20.54 ± 6.05, and 9.60 ± 1.69 mg/kg, for ursolic acid, diclofenac, and tramadol, respectively. An isobolographic analysis allowed the characterization of the pharmacological interaction produced by a fixed ratio combination of 1 : 1 and 1 : 3 of equi-effective doses of these compounds. Theoretical antinociceptive ED50 values of ursolic acid-diclofenac were 62.12 ± 10.28 and 41.43 ± 6.69 mg/kg, respectively, not statistically different from those obtained experimentally (44.52 ± 5.25 and 44.89 ± 49.05 mg/kg, respectively), reporting an additive interaction. Theoretical antinociceptive ED50 values of ursolic acid-tramadol (56.56 ± 9.87 and 33.08 ± 5.07 mg/kg, respectively) were significantly lower than those observed experimentally (138.36 ± 49.05 and 67.34 ± 18.98 mg/kg, respectively) reporting antagonism in this interaction. Antinociceptive response obtained from isobolograms in the writhing test was corroborated by using formalin test in mice. Adverse effects such as gastric damage in the ursolic acid-diclofenac combination did not increase in an additive form similarly as with antinociception. Conversely, sedative response was significantly increased in the ursolic acid-tramadol combination. As observed in the formalin test, the antagonism on the antinociceptive response between ursolic acid

  8. Predicting the behaviour of proteins in hydrophobic interaction chromatography. 2. Using a statistical description of their surface amino acid distribution.

    PubMed

    Salgado, J Cristian; Rapaport, Ivan; Asenjo, Juan A

    2006-02-24

    This paper focuses on the prediction of the dimensionless retention time (DRT) of proteins in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) by means of mathematical models based on the statistical description of the amino acid surface distribution. Previous models characterises the protein surface as a whole. However, most of the time it is not the whole protein but some of its specific regions that interact with the environment. It seems much more natural to use local measurements of the characteristics of the surface. Therefore, the statistical characterisation of the distribution of an amino acid property on the protein surface was carried out from the systematic calculation of the local average of this property in a neighbourhood placed sequentially on each of the amino acids on the protein surface. This process allowed us to characterise the distribution of this property quantitatively using three main statistics: average, standard deviation and maximum. In particular, if the property considered is a hydrophobicity scale, these statistics allowed us to characterise the average hydrophobicity and the hydrophobic content of the most hydrophobic cluster or hotspot, as well as the heterogeneity of the hydrophobicity distribution on the protein surface. We tested the performance of the DRT predictive models based on these statistics on a set of 15 proteins. We obtained better predictive results with respect to the models previously reported. The best predictive model was a linear model based on the maximum. This statistic was calculated using an index of the mobilities of amino acids in chromatography. The predictive performance of this model (measured as the Jack Knife MSE) was 26.9% better than those obtained by the best model which does not consider the amino acid distribution and 19.5% better than the model based on the hydrophobic imbalance (HI). In addition, the best performance was obtained by a linear multivariable model based on the HI and the maximum. The

  9. Study of nucleic acid-gold nanorod interactions and detecting nucleic acid hybridization using gold nanorod solutions in the presence of sodium citrate.

    PubMed

    Kanjanawarut, Roejarek; Su, Xiaodi

    2010-09-01

    In this study, the authors report that sodium citrate can aggregate hexadecyl-trimethyl-ammonium ion(+)-coated gold nanorods (AuNRs), and nucleic acids of different charge and structure properties, i.e., single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), single-stranded peptide nucleic acid (PNA), and PNA-DNA complex, can bind to the AuNRs and therefore retard the sodium citrate-induced aggregation to different extents. The discovery that hybridized dsDNA (and the PNA-DNA complex) has a more pronounced protection effect than ssDNA (and PNA) allows the authors to develop a homogeneous phase AuNRs-based UV-visible (UV-vis) spectral assay for detecting specific sequences of oligonucleotides (20 mer) with a single-base-mismatch selectivity and a limit of detection of 5 nM. This assay involves no tedious bioconjugation and on-particle hybridization. The simple "set and test" format allows for a highly efficient hybridization in a homogeneous phase and a rapid display of the results in less than a minute. By measuring the degree of reduction in AuNR aggregation in the presence of different nucleic acid samples, one can assess how different nucleic acids interact with the AuNRs to complement the knowledge of spherical gold nanoparticles. Besides UV-vis characterization, transmission electron microscopy and zeta potential measurements were conduced to provide visual evidence of the particle aggregation and to support the discussion of the assay principle.

  10. Intermolecular interaction of nickel (ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt with bovine serum albumin: A multi-technique study.

    PubMed

    Dezhampanah, Hamid; Firouzi, Roghaye; Hasani, Leila

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of nickel (II) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been investigated by combination of fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and circular dichorism (CD) spectroscopies as well as through molecular docking. Fluorescence quenching and absorption spectra were investigated as a mean for estimating the binding parameters. Analysis of fluorescence quenching data at different temperatures was performed in order to specify the thermodynamics parameters for interactions of phthalocyanine complex with BSA. According to experimental data it was suggested that phthalocyanine had a significant binding affinity to BSA and the process was entropy driven. Based on the results of molecular docking it was indicated that the main active binding site for this phthalocyanine complex is site I in subdomain IIA of BSA. The results provide useful information for understanding the binding mechanism of anticancer drug-albumin and gives insight into the biological activity and metabolism of the drug in blood.

  11. Interactive Internet Based Pendulum for Learning Mechatronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethson, Magnus R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an Internet based remote experimental setup of a double lined pendulum mechanism for students experiments at the M. Sc. Level. Some of the first year experience using this web-based setup in classes is referred. In most of the courses given at the division of mechanical engineering systems at Linkoeping Institute of Technology we provide experimental setups to enhance the teaching Of M.Sc. students. Many of these experimental setups involve mechatronical systems. Disciplines like fluid power, electronics, and mechanics and also software technologies are used in each experiment. As our campus has recently been split into two different cities some new concepts for distance learning have been studied. The one described here tries to implement remotely controlled mechatronic setups for teaching basic programming of real-time operating systems and analysis of the dynamics of mechanical systems. The students control the regulators for the pendulum through a web interface and get measurement results and a movie back through their email. The present setup uses a double linked pendulum that is controlled by a DC-motor and monitored through both camera and angular position sensors. All software needed is hosted on a double-processor PC running the RedHat 7.1. distribution complemented with real-time scheduling using DIAPM-RTAI 1.7. The Internet site is presented to the students using PHP, Apache and MySQL. All of the used software originates from the open source domain. The experience from integrating these technologies and security issues is discussed together with the web-camera interface. One of the important experiences from this project so far is the need for a good visual feedback. This is both in terms of video speed but also in resolution. It has been noticed that when the students makes misstates and wants to search the failure they want clear, large images with high resolution to support their personal believes in the cause of the failure. Even

  12. Tracing amino acid exchange during host-pathogen interaction by combined stable-isotope time-resolved Raman spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Boitor, Radu A.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the temporal and spatial interchange of the aromatic amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) between human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) and tachyzoites of the apicomplexan protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is combined with Raman micro-spectroscopy to selectively monitor the incorporation of deuterium-labelled Phe into proteins in individual live tachyzoites. Our results show a very rapid uptake of L-Phe(D8) by the intracellular growing parasite. T. gondii tachyzoites are capable of extracting L-Phe(D8) from host cells as soon as it invades the cell. L-Phe(D8) from the host cell completely replaces the L-Phe within T. gondii tachyzoites 7–9 hours after infection. A quantitative model based on Raman spectra allowed an estimation of the exchange rate of Phe as 0.5–1.6 × 104 molecules/s. On the other hand, extracellular tachyzoites were not able to consume L-Phe(D8) after 24 hours of infection. These findings further our understanding of the amino acid trafficking between host cells and this strictly intracellular parasite. In particular, this study highlights new aspects of the metabolism of amino acid Phe operative during the interaction between T. gondii and its host cell.

  13. Individual versus Interactive Task-Based Performance through Voice-Based Computer-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granena, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Interaction is a necessary condition for second language (L2) learning (Long, 1980, 1996). Research in computer-mediated communication has shown that interaction opportunities make learners pay attention to form in a variety of ways that promote L2 learning. This research has mostly investigated text-based rather than voice-based interaction. The…

  14. Amino acid profile of milk-based infant formulas.

    PubMed

    Viadel, B; Alegriá, A; Farré, R; Abellán, P; Romero, F

    2000-09-01

    The protein content and amino acid profile of three milk-based infant formulas, two of which were powdered (adapted and follow-on) and the third liquid, were determined to check their compliance with the EU directive and to evaluate whether or not they fulfil an infant's nutritional needs. To obtain the amino acid profile proteins were subjected to acid hydrolysis, prior to which the sulfur-containing amino acids were oxidized with performic acid. The amino acids were derivatized with phenylisothiocyanate (PITC) and then determined by ion-pair reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) In the case of tryptophan a basic hydrolysis was applied and there was no need of derivatization. The protein contents of the analysed formulas were in the ranges established by the EU directive for these products and the amino acid contents were in the ranges reported by other authors for these types of formulas. In all cases the tryptophan content determined the value of the chemical score, which was always lower than 80% of the reference protein but in the ranges reported by other authors. The analysed adapted infant formula provides amino acids in amounts higher than the established nutritional requirements.

  15. Characterization of the Interaction between Gallic Acid and Lysozyme by Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Optical Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Minzhong; Guo, Ming; Jiang, Yanke; Wang, Xiaomeng

    2015-01-01

    The binding interaction between gallic acid (GA) and lysozyme (LYS) was investigated and compared by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and spectral techniques. The results from spectroscopy indicate that GA binds to LYS to generate a static complex. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. MD simulation revealed that the main driving forces for GA binding to LYS are hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. The root-mean-square deviation verified that GA and LYS bind to form a stable complex, while the root-mean-square fluctuation results showed that the stability of the GA-LYS complex at 298 K was higher than that at 310 K. The calculated free binding energies from the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method showed that van der Waals forces and electrostatic interactions are the predominant intermolecular forces. The MD simulation was consistent with the spectral experiments. This study provides a reference for future study of the pharmacological mechanism of GA. PMID:26140374

  16. Poly (ricinoleic acid) based novel thermosetting elastomer.

    PubMed

    Ebata, Hiroki; Yasuda, Mayumi; Toshima, Kazunobu; Matsumura, Shuichi

    2008-01-01

    A novel bio-based thermosetting elastomer was prepared by the lipase-catalyzed polymerization of methyl ricinoleate with subsequent vulcanization. Some mechanical properties of the cured carbon black-filled polyricinoleate compounds were evaluated as a thermosetting elastomer. It was found that the carbon black-filled polyricinoleate compounds were readily cured by sulfur curatives to produce a thermosetting elastomer that formed a rubber-like sheet with a smooth and non-sticky surface. The curing behaviors and mechanical properties were dependent on both the molecular weight of the polyricinoleate and the amount of the sulfur curatives. Cured compounds consisting of polyricinoleate with a molecular weight of 100,800 showed good mechanical properties, such as a hardness of 48 A based on the durometer A measurements, a tensile strength at break of 6.91 MPa and an elongation at break of 350%.

  17. Micellar acid-base potentiometric titrations of weak acidic and/or insoluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Gerakis, A M; Koupparis, M A; Efstathiou, C E

    1993-01-01

    The effect of various surfactants [the cationics cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC), the anionic sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), and the nonionic polysorbate 80 (Tween 80)] on the solubility and ionization constant of some sparingly soluble weak acids of pharmaceutical interest was studied. Benzoic acid (and its 3-methyl-, 3-nitro-, and 4-tert-butyl-derivatives), acetylsalicylic acid, naproxen and iopanoic acid were chosen as model examples. Precise and accurate acid-base titrations in micellar systems were made feasible using a microcomputer-controlled titrator. The response curve, response time and potential drift of the glass electrode in the micellar systems were examined. The cationics CTAB and CPC were found to increase considerably the ionization constant of the weak acids (delta pKa ranged from -0.21 to -3.57), while the anionic SDS showed negligible effect and the nonionic Tween 80 generally decreased the ionization constants. The solubility of the acids in aqueous micellar and acidified micellar solutions was studied spectrophotometrically and it was found increased in all cases. Acetylsalicylic acid, naproxen, benzoic acid and iopanoic acid could be easily determined in raw material and some of them in pharmaceutical preparations by direct titration in CTAB-micellar system instead of using the traditional non-aqueous or back titrimetry. Precisions of 0.3-4.3% RSD and good correlation with the official tedious methods were obtained. The interference study of some excipients showed that a preliminary test should be carried out before the assay of formulations.

  18. Soil Studies: Applying Acid-Base Chemistry to Environmental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Donna M.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory activities for chemistry students focus attention on the use of acid-base chemistry to examine environmental conditions. After using standard laboratory procedures to analyze soil and rainwater samples, students use web-based resources to interpret their findings. Uses CBL probes and graphing calculators to gather and analyze data and…

  19. High School Students' Concepts of Acids and Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Bertram H. B.

    An investigation of Ontario high school students' understanding of acids and bases with quantitative and qualitative methods revealed misconceptions. A concept map, based on the objectives of the Chemistry Curriculum Guideline, generated multiple-choice items and interview questions. The multiple-choice test was administered to 34 grade 12…

  20. Gallium based low-interaction anions

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne A.; Kubas, Gregory J.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides: a composition of the formula M.sup.+x (Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.-).sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; a composition of the formula (R).sub.x Q.sup.+ Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.- where Q is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus and oxygen, each R is a ligand selected from the group consisting of alkyl, aryl, and hydrogen, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 3 and 4 depending upon Q, and each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; an ionic polymerization catalyst composition including an active cationic portion and a gallium based weakly coordinating anion; and bridged anion species of the formula M.sup.+x.sub.y [X(Ga(Y.sub.3).sub.z ].sup.-y.sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, X is a bridging group between two gallium atoms, y is an integer selected from the group consisting 1 and 2, z is an integer of at least 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide.

  1. Interactive fluorophore and quencher pairs for labeling fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Marras, Salvatore A E

    2008-03-01

    The use of fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes that generate a fluorescence signal only when they bind to their target enables real-time monitoring of nucleic acid amplification assays. Real-time nucleic acid amplification assays markedly improves the ability to obtain qualitative and quantitative results. Furthermore, these assays can be carried out in sealed tubes, eliminating carryover contamination. Fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes are available in a wide range of different fluorophore and quencher pairs. Multiple hybridization probes, each designed for the detection of a different nucleic acid sequence and each labeled with a differently colored fluorophore, can be added to the same nucleic acid amplification reaction, enabling the development of high-throughput multiplex assays. In order to develop robust, highly sensitive and specific real-time nucleic acid amplification assays it is important to carefully select the fluorophore and quencher labels of hybridization probes. Selection criteria are based on the type of hybridization probe used in the assay, the number of targets to be detected, and the type of apparatus available to perform the assay. This article provides an overview of different aspects of choosing appropriate labels for the different types of fluorescent hybridization probes used with different types of spectrofluorometric thermal cyclers currently available.

  2. Interactions of low molecular weight aromatic acids and amino acids with goethite, kaolinite and bentonite with or without organic matter coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jiajia; Jansen, Boris; Cerli, Chiara; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2015-04-01

    Interaction of organic matter molecules with the soil's solid phase is a key factor influencing the stabilization of carbon in soils and thus forms a crucial aspect of the global carbon cycle. While subject of much research attention so far, we still have much to learn about such interactions at the molecular level; in particular in the light of competition between different classes of organic molecules and in the presence of previously adsorbed soil organic matter. We studied the interaction of a group of low molecular weight (LMW) aromatic acids (salicylic, syringic, vanillic and ferulic acid) and amino acids (lysine, glutamic, leucine and phenylalanine) on goethite, kaolinite and bentonite with and without previously adsorbed dissolved organic matter (DOM). For this we used batch experiments at pH = 6.0 where some of the organic compounds were positively charged (i.e. lysine) or negatively charged (i.e. glutamic and salicylic acid) while the minerals also displayed positively (i.e. goethite) or negatively charged surfaces (i.e. bentonite). We found much higher sorption of salicylic acid and lysine than other compounds. On the bare minerals we found a great variety of sorption strength, with salicylic acid strongly adsorbed, while syringic, vanillic and ferulic acid showed little or no adsorption. For the amino acids, protonated lysine showed a stronger affinity to negatively charged kaolinite and bentonite than other amino acids. While deprotonated glutamic acid showed the strongest adsorption on goethite. Leucine and phenylalanine showed hardly any adsorption on any of the minerals. When present concurrently, amino acids decreased the sorption of salicylic acid on the three types of mineral, while the presence of LMW aromatic acids increased the sorption of lysine on kaolinite and bentonite and the sorption of glutamic acid on goethite. The presence of previously adsorbed DOM reduced the sorption of salicylic acid and lysine. The results confirm that

  3. Interaction of chlorogenic acids and quinides from coffee with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Sinisi, Valentina; Forzato, Cristina; Cefarin, Nicola; Navarini, Luciano; Berti, Federico

    2015-02-01

    Chlorogenic acids and their derivatives are abundant in coffee and their composition changes between coffee species. Human serum albumin (HSA) interacts with this family of compounds with high affinity. We have studied by fluorescence spectroscopy the specific binding of HSA with eight compounds that belong to the coffee polyphenols family, four acids (caffeic acid, ferulic acid, 5-O-caffeoyl quinic acid, and 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid) and four lactones (3,4-O-dicaffeoyl-1,5-γ-quinide, 3-O-[3,4-(dimethoxy)cinnamoyl]-1,5-γ-quinide, 3,4-O-bis[3,4-(dimethoxy)cinnamoyl]-1,5-γ-quinide, and 1,3,4-O-tris[3,4-(dimethoxy)cinnamoyl]-1,5-γ-quinide), finding dissociation constants of the albumin-chlorogenic acids and albumin-quinides complexes in the micromolar range, between 2 and 30μM. Such values are comparable with those of the most powerful binders of albumin, and more favourable than the values obtained for the majority of drugs. Interestingly in the case of 3,4-O-dicaffeoyl-1,5-γ-quinide, we have observed the entrance of two ligand molecules in the same binding site, leading up to a first dissociation constant even in the hundred nanomolar range, which is to our knowledge the highest affinity ever observed for HSA and its ligands. The displacement of warfarin, a reference drug binding to HSA, by the quinide has also been demonstrated.

  4. Abscisic acid has a key role in modulating diverse plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jun; Hill, Lionel; Crooks, Casey; Doerner, Peter; Lamb, Chris

    2009-08-01

    We isolated an activation-tagged Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) line, constitutive disease susceptibility2-1D (cds2-1D), that showed enhanced bacterial growth when challenged with various Pseudomonas syringae strains. Systemic acquired resistance and systemic PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENE1 induction were also compromised in cds2-1D. The T-DNA insertion adjacent to NINE-CIS-EPOXYCAROTENOID DIOXYGENASE5 (NCED5), one of six genes encoding the abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthetic enzyme NCED, caused a massive increase in transcript level and enhanced ABA levels >2-fold. Overexpression of NCED genes recreated the enhanced disease susceptibility phenotype. NCED2, NCED3, and NCED5 were induced, and ABA accumulated strongly following compatible P. syringae infection. The ABA biosynthetic mutant aba3-1 showed reduced susceptibility to virulent P. syringae, and ABA, whether through exogenous application or endogenous accumulation in response to mild water stress, resulted in increased bacterial growth following challenge with virulent P. syringae, indicating that ABA suppresses resistance to P. syringae. Likewise ABA accumulation also compromised resistance to the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsis, whereas resistance to the fungus Alternaria brassicicola was enhanced in cds2-1D plants and compromised in aba3-1 plants, indicating that ABA promotes resistance to this necrotroph. Comparison of the accumulation of salicylic acid and jasmonic acid in the wild type, cds2-1D, and aba3-1 plants challenged with P. syringae showed that ABA promotes jasmonic acid accumulation and exhibits a complex antagonistic relationship with salicylic acid. Our findings provide genetic evidence that the abiotic stress signal ABA also has profound roles in modulating diverse plant-pathogen interactions mediated at least in part by cross talk with the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid biotic stress signal pathways.

  5. Drug-target interaction prediction from PSSM based evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Khakabimamaghani, Sahand; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The labor-intensive and expensive experimental process of drug-target interaction prediction has motivated many researchers to focus on in silico prediction, which leads to the helpful information in supporting the experimental interaction data. Therefore, they have proposed several computational approaches for discovering new drug-target interactions. Several learning-based methods have been increasingly developed which can be categorized into two main groups: similarity-based and feature-based. In this paper, we firstly use the bi-gram features extracted from the Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) of proteins in predicting drug-target interactions. Our results demonstrate the high-confidence prediction ability of the Bigram-PSSM model in terms of several performance indicators specifically for enzymes and ion channels. Moreover, we investigate the impact of negative selection strategy on the performance of the prediction, which is not widely taken into account in the other relevant studies. This is important, as the number of non-interacting drug-target pairs are usually extremely large in comparison with the number of interacting ones in existing drug-target interaction data. An interesting observation is that different levels of performance reduction have been attained for four datasets when we change the sampling method from the random sampling to the balanced sampling.

  6. Ionic liquid supported acid/base-catalyzed production of biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Lapis, Alexandre A M; de Oliveira, Luciane F; Neto, Brenno A D; Dupont, Jairton

    2008-01-01

    The transesterification (alcoholysis) reaction was successfully applied to synthesize biodiesel from vegetable oils using imidazolium-based ionic liquids under multiphase acidic and basic conditions. Under basic conditions, the combination of the ionic liquid 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMINTf2), alcohols, and K2CO3 (40 mol %) results in the production of biodiesel from soybean oil in high yields (>98%) and purity. H2SO4 immobilized in BMINTf2 efficiently promotes the transesterification reaction of soybean oil and various primary and secondary alcohols. In this multiphase process the acid is almost completely retained in the ionic liquid phase, while the biodiesel forms a separate phase. The recovered ionic liquid containing the acid could be reused at least six times without any significant loss in the biodiesel yield or selectivity. In both catalytic processes (acid and base), the reactions proceed as typical multiphasic systems in which the formed biodiesel accumulates as the upper phase and the glycerol by-product is selectively captured by the alcohol-ionic liquid-acid/base phase. Classical ionic liquids such as 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate and hexafluorophosphate are not stable under these acidic or basic conditions and decompose.

  7. Spectrofluorimetric study of the interaction of ciprofloxacin with amino acids in aqueous solution following solvatochromic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Kamal; Mobarrez, Mahsa; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz; Chaichi, Mohammad Javad

    Complexation of a fluoroquinolone derivative (ciprofloxacin), L, and some amino acids has been studied using spectrofluorimetric method. Results indicated that ciprofloxacin have a greater tendency to form a 1:1 complex with aspartic acid and arginine than the other tested molecules. The fluorescence of ciprofloxacin exhibits quenching process while it has been titrated with these amino acids. Formation constant values (Kf) for complex formed between ciprofloxacin and amino acids were also calculated. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° were studied too. Possible reasons for the observed stability sequence were discussed based on the structures proposed for the resulting complexes. Besides the solution studies, solvatochromic properties of the ciprofloxacin are discussed by studying its spectra in a selection of different solvents.

  8. Potentiometric Determination of Phytic Acid and Investigations of Phytate Interactions with Some Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Marolt, Gregor; Pihlar, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Determination of correct amount (concentration) of phytic acid is of vital importance when dealing with protonation and/or metal complexation equilibria. A novel approach for precise and reliable assay of phytic acid, based on the difference between end points by potentiometric titration, has been presented. Twelve phytic acid protons are classified into three groups of acidity, which enables detection of 2 to 3 distinct equivalent points (EPs) depending on experimental conditions, e.g. counter-ion concentration. Using the differences between individual EPs enables correct phytate determination as well as identification of potential contamination and/or determination of initial protonation degree. Impact of uncertainty of phytate amount on the calculation of protonation constants has been evaluated using computer simulation program (Hyperquad2013). With the analysis of titration curves different binding sites on phytate ligand have been proposed for complexation of Ca2+ and Fe3+ ions.

  9. Sequence-based discrimination of protein-RNA interacting residues using a probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Pai, Priyadarshini P; Dash, Tirtharaj; Mondal, Sukanta

    2017-04-07

    Protein interactions with ribonucleic acids (RNA) are well-known to be crucial for a wide range of cellular processes such as transcriptional regulation, protein synthesis or translation, and post-translational modifications. Identification of the RNA-interacting residues can provide insights into these processes and aid in relevant biotechnological manipulations. Owing to their eventual potential in combating diseases and industrial production, several computational attempts have been made over years using sequence- and structure-based information. Recent comparative studies suggest that despite these developments, many problems are faced with respect to the usability, prerequisites, and accessibility of various tools, thereby calling for an alternative approach and perspective supplementation in the prediction scenario. With this motivation, in this paper, we propose the use of a simple-yet-efficient conditional probabilistic approach based on the application of local occurrence of amino acids in the interacting region in a non-numeric sequence feature space, for discriminating between RNA interacting and non-interacting residues. The proposed method has been meticulously tested for robustness using a cross-estimation method showing MCC of 0.341 and F- measure of 66.84%. Upon exploring large scale applications using benchmark datasets available to date, this approach showed an encouraging performance comparable with the state-of-art. The software is available at https://github.com/ABCgrp/DORAEMON.

  10. A computational study of ultrafast acid dissociation and acid-base neutralization reactions. I. The model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Patrick; Thomas, Vibin; Rivard, Ugo; Iftimie, Radu

    2010-07-01

    Ultrafast, time-resolved investigations of acid-base neutralization reactions have recently been performed using systems containing the photoacid 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS) and various Brønsted bases. Two conflicting neutralization mechanisms have been formulated by Mohammed et al. [Science 310, 83 (2005)] and Siwick et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 13412 (2007)] for the same acid-base system. Herein an ab initio molecular dynamics based computational model is formulated, which is able to investigate the validity of the proposed mechanisms in the general context of ground-state acid-base neutralization reactions. Our approach consists of using 2,4,6-tricyanophenol (exp. pKa≅1) as a model for excited-state HPTS∗ (pKa≅1.4) and carboxylate ions for the accepting base. We employ our recently proposed dipole-field/quantum mechanics (QM) treatment [P. Maurer and R. Iftimie, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074112 (2010)] of the proton donor and acceptor molecules. This approach allows one to tune the free energy of neutralization to any desired value as well as model initial nonequilibrium hydration effects caused by a sudden increase in acidity, making it possible to achieve a more realistic comparison with experimental data than could be obtained via a full-QM treatment of the entire system. It is demonstrated that the dipole-field/QM model reproduces correctly key properties of the 2,4,6-tricyanophenol acid molecule including gas-phase proton dissociation energies and dipole moments, and condensed-phase hydration structure and pKa values.

  11. Acid-base properties of humic and fulvic acids formed during composting.

    PubMed

    Plaza, César; Senesi, Nicola; Polo, Alfredo; Brunetti, Gennaro

    2005-09-15

    The soil acid-base buffering capacity and the biological availability, mobilization, and transport of macro- and micronutrients, toxic metal ions, and xenobiotic organic cations in soil are strongly influenced by the acid-base properties of humic substances, of which humic and fulvic acids are the major fractions. For these reasons, the proton binding behavior of the humic acid-like (HA) and fulvic acid-like (FA) fractions contained in a compost are believed to be instrumental in its successful performance in soil. In this work, the acid-base properties of the HAs and FAs isolated from a mixture of the sludge residue obtained from olive oil mill wastewater (OMW) evaporated in an open-air pond and tree cuttings (TC) at different stages of composting were investigated by a current potentiometric titration method and the nonideal competitive adsorption (NICA)-Donnan model. The NICA-Donnan model provided an excellent description of the acid-base titration data, and pointed out substantial differences in site density and proton-binding affinity between the HAs and FAs examined. With respect to FAs, HAs were characterized by a smaller content of carboxylic- and phenolic-type groups and their larger affinities for proton binding. Further, HAs featured a greater heterogeneity in carboxylic-type groups than FAs. The composting process increased the content and decreased the proton affinity of carboxylic- and phenolic-type groups of HAs and FAs, and increased the heterogeneity of phenolic-type groups of HAs. As a whole, these effects indicated that the composting process could produce HA and FA fractions with greater cation binding capacities. These results suggest that composting of organic materials improves their agronomic and environmental value by increasing their potential to retain and exchange macro- and micronutrients, and to reduce the bioavailability of organic and inorganic pollutants.

  12. [New approach to the study of interaction of amino acid side groups with aryl azides].

    PubMed

    Knorre, D G; Bichenkova, E V; Koval', V V; Alekseev, P V; Knorre, V D; Nordhoff, E; Godovikova, T S

    1998-09-01

    A new approach to the study of the interaction of amino acid side chains with photoreactive aryl azides was proposed. This approach was based on the drawing together of the reacting groups by the attachment of the reacting compounds to complementary oligonucleotides. Cystamine, histamine, and 1,6-hexamethylenediamine mimicking the cystine, histidine, and lysine residues, respectively, were attached to the 3'-terminal phosphate of the oligonucleotide GGTATCp through a phosphamide bond and used as the targets for photomodification. Derivatives of the oligonucleotide pGATACCAA with the fragment N3C6H4NH- attached directly to its 5'-end by a phosphamide bond or through the spacer -(CH2)nNH- (where n is 2, 4, and 6) were used as photoreagents. Their derivatives containing the same spacer and the N3C6F4CO-NH(CH2)3NH- or 2-N3,5-NO2-C6H3CO-NH(CH2)3NH- residues were also used. The duplexes were photomodified by irradiation with 300-350 nm wavelength light. The maximal yields of the photo-cross-linking were from 22 to 68%. The reagents containing p-azidoaniline residue were found to be the most effective toward the targets. The maximum yields of the photomodification products modeling the side chains of cysteine and lysine were found to vary from 40 to 67% and to depend on the length and the structure of the spacers used. The duplex with the target bearing the imidazole residue (the histidine model) manifested a yield decreased to 25%. This fact was in a good agreement with the data of computer modeling that indicated an unfavorable mutual displacement of the imidazole residue and the photoreactive group.

  13. Chromatographic resolution of a salt into its parent acid and base constituents.

    PubMed

    Davankov, Vadim; Tsyurupa, Maria

    2006-12-08

    Based on the results of the earlier proposed process of separation of mixtures of mineral electrolytes by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), it has been suggested that a mineral salt must spontaneously resolve, at least partially, into its parent acid and base constituents, provided that the separating media discriminates the anion and cation of the salt according to their size. Indeed, migration of a zone of an aqueous salt solution through a bed of neutral nanoporous hypercrosslinked polystyrene-type packing was shown to result in the generation of acidic and alkaline effluent fractions. The principle of spontaneous salt resolution has been extended to other types of discriminating interactions between the stationary phase and the two ions of the salt. The idea was exemplified by the resolution of ammonium acetate, due to hydrophobic retention of the acetate, into fractions enriched in ammoniac and then acetic acid.

  14. Deoxyribonucleic acid base compositions of dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Davison, F D; Mackenzie, D W; Owen, R J

    1980-06-01

    DNA was extracted and purified from 55 dermatophyte isolates representing 34 species of Trichophyton, Microsporum and Epidermophyton. The base compositions of the chromosomal DNA were determined by CsCl density gradient centrifugation and were found to be in the narrow range of 48.7 to 50.3 mol % G + C. A satellite DNA component assumed to be of mitochondrial origin was present in most strains, with a G + C content ranging from 14.7 to 30.8 mol % G + C. Heterogeneity in microscopic and colonial characteristics was not reflected in differences in the mean G + C content of the chromosomal DNAs. Strains varied in the G + C contents of satelite DNA, but these did not correlate with traditional species concepts.

  15. Interacting with Visual Poems through AR-Based Digital Artwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Hao-Chiang Koong; Hsieh, Min-Chai; Liu, Eric Zhi-Feng; Chuang, Tsung-Yen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an AR-based digital artwork called "Mind Log" was designed and evaluated. The augmented reality technique was employed to create digital artwork that would present interactive poems. A digital poem was generated via the interplay between a video film and a text-based poem. This artwork was created following a rigorous design flow,…

  16. Surface modification of silica- and cellulose-based microfiltration membranes with functional polyamino acids for heavy metal sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, S.M.C.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Bachas, L.G.; Olin, T.; Sikdar, S.K.

    1999-09-14

    Functionalized membranes represent a field with multiple applications. Examination of specific metal-macromolecule interactions on these surfaces presents an excellent method for characterization of these materials. These interactions may also be exploited for heavy metal sorption from drinking and industrial water sources. Various low-capacity, silica-based ion-exchange and chelating sorbents (about 0.5 mmol of metal/g or resin) are available for treatment of such waters. Cellulosic membrane-based sorbents, functionalized with polyamino acids, present an excellent approach for high-capacity (3--14 mmol of metal/g or sorbent) metal sorption. Silica-based membrane sorbents posses metal sorption capacities approaching those of cellulosic-based membranes, with the added benefits of excellent acid and solvent resistance. Metal sorption capacities of silica-based membrane sorbents possess metal sorption capacities approaching those of cellulosic-based membranes, with the added benefits of excellent acid and solvent resistance. Metal sorption capacities of silica-based membrane sorbents with various polyamino acids range from 0.6 mmol to 1.4 mmol of metal/g of sorbent. Ion exchange, chelation, and electrostatic interactions form the basis of metal sorption. Electrostatic interactions are greatly magnified in membrane-based sorbents, and are partly responsible for their high capacities. Regeneration of these sorbents has also been shown, including the possibility for selective desorption of metals.

  17. Interactions of aqueous amino acids and proteins with the (110) surface of ZnS in molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocki, Grzegorz; Cieplak, Marek

    2014-03-07

    The growing usage of nanoparticles of zinc sulfide as quantum dots and biosensors calls for a theoretical assessment of interactions of ZnS with biomolecules. We employ the molecular-dynamics-based umbrella sampling method to determine potentials of mean force for 20 single amino acids near the ZnS (110) surface in aqueous solutions. We find that five amino acids do not bind at all and the binding energy of the remaining amino acids does not exceed 4.3 kJ/mol. Such energies are comparable to those found for ZnO (and to hydrogen bonds in proteins) but the nature of the specificity is different. Cysteine can bind with ZnS in a covalent way, e.g., by forming the disulfide bond with S in the solid. If this effect is included within a model incorporating the Morse potential, then the potential well becomes much deeper—the binding energy is close to 98 kJ/mol. We then consider tryptophan cage, a protein of 20 residues, and characterize its events of adsorption to ZnS. We demonstrate the relevance of interactions between the amino acids in the selection of optimal adsorbed conformations and recognize the key role of cysteine in generation of lasting adsorption. We show that ZnS is more hydrophobic than ZnO and that the density profile of water is quite different than that forming near ZnO—it has only a minor articulation into layers. Furthermore, the first layer of water is disordered and mobile.

  18. User Interaction Design for a Home-Based Telecare System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raptis, Spyros; Tsiakoulis, Pirros; Chalamandaris, Aimilios; Karabetsos, Sotiris

    This paper presents the design of the user-interaction component of a home-based telecare system for congestive heart failure patients. It provides a short overview of the overall system and offers details on the different interaction types supported by the system. Interacting with the user occurs either as part of a scheduled procedure or as a consequence of identifying or predicting a potentially hazardous deterioration of the patients' health state. The overall logic of the interaction is structured around event-scenario associations, where a scenario consists of concrete actions to be performed, some of which may involve the patient. A key objective in this type of interaction that it is very simple, intuitive and short, involving common everyday objects and familiar media such as speech.

  19. Folic acid-polydopamine nanofibers show enhanced ordered-stacking via π-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hailong; Yu, Xiang; Liu, Yang; Shi, Zujin; Liu, Huihui; Nie, Zongxiu; Wu, Decheng; Jin, Zhaoxia

    2015-06-21

    Recent research has indicated that polydopamine and synthetic eumelanins are optoelectronic biomaterials in which one-dimensional aggregates composed of ordered-stacking oligomers have been proposed as unique organic semiconductors. However, improving the ordered-stacking of oligomers in polydopamine nanostructures is a big challenge. Herein, we first demonstrate how folic acid molecules influence the morphology and nanostructure of polydopamine via tuning the π-π interactions of oligomers. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry reveals that porphyrin-like tetramers are characteristic of folic acid-polydopamine (FA-PDA) nanofibers. X-ray diffraction combined with simulation studies indicate that these oligomers favour aggregation into graphite-like ordered nanostructures via strong π-π interactions. High-resolution TEM characterization of carbonized FA-PDA hybrids show that in FA-PDA nanofibers the size of the graphite-like domains is over 100 nm. The addition of folic acid in polydopamine enhances the ordered stacking of oligomers in its nanostructure. Our study steps forward to discover the mystery of the structure-property relationship of FA-PDA hybrids. It paves a way to optimize the properties of PDA through the design and selection of oligomer structures.

  20. Dietary supply with polyunsaturated fatty acids and resulting maternal effects influence host – parasite interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interactions between hosts and parasites can be substantially modulated by host nutrition. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are essential dietary nutrients; they are indispensable as structural components of cell membranes and as precursors for eicosanoids, signalling molecules which act on reproduction and immunity. Here, we explored the potential of dietary PUFAs to affect the course of parasitic infections using a well-established invertebrate host – parasite system, the freshwater herbivore Daphnia magna and its bacterial parasite Pasteuria ramosa. Results Using natural food sources differing in their PUFA composition and by experimentally modifying the availability of dietary arachidonic acid (ARA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) we examined PUFA-mediated effects resulting from direct consumption as well as maternal effects on offspring of treated mothers. We found that both host and parasite were affected by food quality. Feeding on C20 PUFA-containing food sources resulted in higher offspring production of hosts and these effects were conveyed to a great extent to the next generation. While feeding on a diet containing high PUFA concentrations significantly reduced the likelihood of becoming infected, the infection success in the next generation increased whenever the maternal diet contained PUFAs. We suggest that this opposing effect was caused by a trade-off between reproduction and immunity in the second generation. Conclusions Considering the direct and maternal effects of dietary PUFAs on host and parasite we propose that host – parasite interactions and thus disease dynamics under natural conditions are subject to the availability of dietary PUFAs. PMID:24175981

  1. Predicting cellulose solvating capabilities of acid-base conjugate ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Arno; King, Alistair W T; Mutikainen, Ilpo; Hummel, Michael; Selg, Christoph; Hauru, Lauri K J; Sixta, Herbert; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka

    2013-11-01

    Different acid-base conjugates were made by combining a range of bases and superbases with acetic and propionic acid. Only the combinations that contained superbases were capable of dissolving cellulose. Proton affinities were calculated for the bases. A range, within which cellulose dissolution occurred, when combined with acetic or propionic acid, was defined for further use. This was above a proton affinity value of about 240 kcal mol(-1) at the MP2/6-311+G(d,p)//MP2/ 6-311+G(d,p) ab initio level. Understanding dissolution allowed us to determine that cation acidity contributed considerably to the ability of ionic liquids to dissolve cellulose and not just the basicity of the anion. By XRD analyses of suitable crystals, hydrogen bonding interactions between anion and cation were found to be the dominant interactions in the crystalline state. From determination of viscosities of these conjugates over a temperature range, certain structures were found to have as low a viscosity as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, which was reflected in their high rate of cellulose dissolution but not necessarily the quantitative solubility of cellulose in those ionic liquids. 1,5-Diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium propionate, which is one of the best structures for cellulose dissolution, was then distilled using laboratory equipment to demonstrate its recyclability.

  2. Sulfuric acid nucleation: An experimental study of the effect of seven bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasoe, W. A.; Volz, K.; Panta, B.; Freshour, N.; Bachman, R.; Hanson, D. R.; McMurry, P. H.; Jen, C.

    2015-03-01

    Nucleation of particles with sulfuric acid, water, and nitrogeneous bases was studied in a flow reactor. Sulfuric acid and water levels were set by flows over sulfuric acid and water reservoirs, respectively, and the base concentrations were determined from measured permeation rates and flow dilution ratios. Particle number distributions were measured with a nano-differential-mobility-analyzer system. Results indicate that the nucleation capability of NH3, methylamine, dimethylamine, and trimethylamine with sulfuric acid increases from NH3 as the weakest, methylamine next, and dimethylamine and trimethylamine the strongest. Three other bases were studied, and experiments with triethylamine showed that it is less effective than methylamine, and experiments with urea and acetamide showed that their capabilities are much lower than the amines with acetamide having basically no effect. When both NH3 and an amine were present, nucleation was more strongly enhanced than with just the amine present. Comparisons of nucleation rates to predictions and previous experimental work are discussed, and the sulfuric acid-base nucleation rates measured here are extrapolated to atmospheric conditions. The measurements suggest that atmospheric nucleation rates are significantly affected by synergistic interactions between ammonia and amines.

  3. Luminescent Aggregated Copper Nanoclusters Nanoswitch Controlled by Hydrophobic Interaction for Real-Time Monitoring of Acid Phosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Feng, Hui; Liu, Weidong; Zhou, Yingying; Tang, Cong; Ao, Hang; Zhao, Meizhi; Chen, Guilin; Chen, Jianrong; Qian, Zhaosheng

    2016-12-06

    A reversible luminescence nanoswitch through competitive hydrophobic interaction among copper nanoclusters, p-nitrophenol and α-cyclodextrin is established, and a reliable real-time luminescent assay for acid phosphatase (ACP) activity is developed on the basis of this luminescence nanoswitch. Stable and intensely luminescent copper nanoclusters (CuNCs) were synthesized via a green one-pot approach. The hydrophobic nature of CuNCs aggregate surface is identified, and further used to drive the adsorption of p-nitrophenol on the surface of CuNCs aggregate due to their hydrophobic interaction. This close contact switches off the luminescence of CuNCs aggregate through static quenching mechanism. However, the introduction of α-cyclodextrin switches on the luminescence since stronger host-guest interaction between α-cyclodextrin and p-nitrophenol causes the removal of p-nitrophenol from the surface of CuNCs. This nanoswitch in response to external stimulus p-nitrophenol or α-cyclodextrin can be run in a reversible way. Luminescence quenching by p-nitrophenol is further utilized to develop ACP assay using p-nitrophenyl phosphate ester as the substrate. Quantitative measurement of ACP level with a low detection limit of 1.3 U/L was achieved based on this specific detection strategy. This work reports a luminescence nanoswitch mediated by hydrophobic interaction, and provides a sensitive detection method for ACP level which is capable for practical detection in human serum and seminal plasma.

  4. Role of ion-pair interactions on asphaltene stabilization by alkylbenzenesulfonic acids.

    PubMed

    Goual, Lamia; Sedghi, Mohammad

    2015-02-15

    The dispersion of asphaltenes by dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) has been the subject of several studies in the past. However, it is unclear how these interactions affect the structure of asphaltenes and why asphaltene aggregates are larger in the presence of ionic DBSA. The main goal of this study was to address these points using a combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Another objective was to compare ionic DBSA (i.e., dodecylbenzenesulfonate or DBS(-)) to nonionic amphiphiles such as alkylphenols. A striking similarity between dodecylbenzenesulfonate and alkylphenols was that both favored the formation of filamentary rather than globular asphaltene flocculates. However the mechanism by which those filaments formed was very different. Two strong electrostatic interactions between DBSA and asphaltenes were found: (i) those between protonated asphaltenes (i.e., AH(+)) and DBS(-) molecules, which were fifteen times stronger than asphaltene-alkylphenol interactions, and (ii) those between two asphaltene-dispersant pairs (i.e., AH(+)-DBS(-) ion pairs), which did not exist with alkylphenols. These interactions promoted the formation of large and compact asphaltene flocculates, as compared to small and loose ones formed without DBSA. Flocculates with DBSA could further bind to each other through ion-pair interactions. The binding occurred in series (generating long filaments) or in parallel (generating lateral ramifications). However the series configuration was energetically favored due to less steric effects generated by the side aliphatic chains of asphaltenes and DBSA.

  5. Characterization of π-stacking interactions between aromatic amino acids and quercetagetin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akher, Farideh Badichi; Ebrahimi, Ali; Mostafavi, Najmeh

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the π-stacking interactions between quercetagetin (QUE), which is one of the most representative flavonol compounds with biological and chemical activities, and some aromatic amino acid (AA) residues has been investigated by the quantum mechanical calculations. The trend in the absolute value of stacking interaction energy |ΔE| with respect to AAs is HIS > PHE > TYR > TPR. The results show that the sum of donor-acceptor interaction energy between AAs and QUE (∑E2) and the sum of electron densities ρ calculated at BCPs and CCPs between the rings (∑ρBCPs and ∑ρCCP) can be useful descriptors for prediction of the ΔE values of the complexes. The Osbnd H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) slightly decreases by the π-stacking interaction, which confirms the positive effect of that interaction on the antioxidant activity of QUE. A reverse trend is observed for BDE when is compared with the |ΔE| values. A reliable relationship is also observed between the Muliken spin density (MSD) distributions of the radical species and the most convenient Osbnd H bond dissociations. In addition, reactivity is in good correlation with the antioxidant activity of the complexes.

  6. Solubility Challenges in High Concentration Monoclonal Antibody Formulations: Relationship with Amino Acid Sequence and Intermolecular Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pindrus, Mariya; Shire, Steven J; Kelley, Robert F; Demeule, Barthélemy; Wong, Rita; Xu, Yiren; Yadav, Sandeep

    2015-11-02

    The purpose of this work was to elucidate the molecular interactions leading to monoclonal antibody self-association and precipitation and utilize biophysical measurements to predict solubility behavior at high protein concentration. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAb-G and mAb-R) binding to overlapping epitopes were investigated. Precipitation of mAb-G solutions was most prominent at high ionic strength conditions and demonstrated strong dependence on ionic strength, as well as slight dependence on solution pH. At similar conditions no precipitation was observed for mAb-R solutions. Intermolecular interactions (interaction parameter, kD) related well with high concentration solubility behavior of both antibodies. Upon increasing buffer ionic strength, interactions of mAb-R tended to weaken, while those of mAb-G became more attractive. To investigate the role of amino acid sequence on precipitation behavior, mutants were designed by substituting the CDR of mAb-R into the mAb-G framework (GM-1) or deleting two hydrophobic residues in the CDR of mAb-G (GM-2). No precipitation was observed at high ionic strength for either mutant. The molecular interactions of mutants were similar in magnitude to those of mAb-R. The results suggest that presence of hydrophobic groups in the CDR of mAb-G may be responsible for compromising its solubility at high ionic strength conditions since deleting these residues mitigated the solubility issue.

  7. The interactions between humic acids and Pluronic F127 produce nanoparticles useful for pharmaceutical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, Bruna Alice Gomes; Motta, Fernanda Lopes; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade

    2015-10-01

    Humic acids (HAs) are macromolecules composed of a large variety of functional groups including phenols and carboxylic acids, which have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. HAs are completely soluble in aqueous medium in alkaline conditions only. At neutral pH, the protonation of the OH/OOH groups causes the formation of micelle-like structures containing a hydrophobic core. Pluronic F127 (PF127) is a nonionic and non-toxic block copolymer with surfactant properties, which are able to interact with HAs through hydrophobic interactions. In this work, these interactions were studied to determine the potential of HA-PF127 structures for pharmaceutical applications. The HAs used was composed of phenol (15.92 %), carboxylic (13.70 %), and other aromatic groups as characterized by 13C NMR, GC-MS, and FTIR. Initially, the HA-PF127 interactions were identified by a fivefold decrease in the CMC of PF127. The effects of the HA:PF127 molar ratio were studied by adding naturally occurring HAs to PF127 dispersions under mechanical stirring. The highest ratios, 1:8 and 1:80, favored the formation of submicellar aggregates of approximately 100 nm and zeta potentials of -28.37 and -30.23 mV, respectively. HA-PF127 structures were spherical, with a polydispersity of approximately 0.43. These results show that the interactions between HAs and PF127 produce stable nanoparticles. These nanoparticles may be used as a carrier for hydrophobic bioactives and as an antioxidant or anti-inflammatory agent. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt to develop HA-PF127 nanoparticles.

  8. Inhibition of tumor-stromal interaction through HGF/Met signaling by valproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yohsuke; Motoki, Takahiro; Kubota, Satoshi; Takigawa, Masaharu; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Gohda, Eiichi

    2008-02-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which is produced by surrounding stromal cells, including fibroblasts and endothelial cells, has been shown to be a significant factor responsible for cancer cell invasion mediated by tumor-stromal interactions. We found in this study that the anti-tumor agent valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, strongly inhibited tumor-stromal interaction. VPA inhibited HGF production in fibroblasts induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} without any appreciable cytotoxic effect. Other HDAC inhibitors, including butyric acid and trichostatin A (TSA), showed similar inhibitory effects on HGF production stimulated by various inducers. Up-regulations of HGF gene expression induced by PMA and EGF were also suppressed by VPA and TSA. Furthermore, VPA significantly inhibited HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. VPA, however, did not affect the increases in phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in HGF-treated HepG2 cells. These results demonstrated that VPA inhibited two critical processes of tumor-stromal interaction, induction of fibroblastic HGF production and HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 cells, and suggest that those activities serve for other anti-tumor mechanisms of VPA besides causing proliferation arrest, differentiation, and/or apoptosis of tumor cells.

  9. Interaction of diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) with natural and synthetic nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Manzini, G; Barcellona, M L; Avitabile, M; Quadrifoglio, F

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of DAPI with natural and synthetic polydeoxynucleotides of different base content and sequences was studied with circular dichroism, ultracentrifugation, viscosity and calorimetry. All the polymers show two types of binding. The strength of the interaction and its resistance to ionic strength are related to the content of AT clusters in the chain. On the other hand, sedimentation measurements rule out an intercalation mechanism. A model of DAPI interaction with DNA, similar to that displayed by distamycin and netropsin, is proposed. PMID:6672773

  10. Relativistic effects on acidities and basicities of Brønsted acids and bases containing gold.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Ilmar A; Burk, Peeter; Kasemets, Kalev; Koppel, Ivar

    2013-11-07

    It is usually believed that relativistic effects as described by the Dirac-Schrödinger equation (relative to the classical or time-independent Schrödinger equation) are of little importance in chemistry. A closer look, however, reveals that some important and widely known properties (e.g., gold is yellow, mercury is liquid at room temperature) stem from relativistic effects. So far the influence of relativistic effects on the acid-base properties has been mostly ignored. Here we show that at least for compounds of gold such omission is completely erroneous and would lead to too high basicity and too low acidity values with errors in the range of 25-55 kcal mol(-1) (or 20 to 44 powers of ten in pK(a) units) in the gas-phase. These findings have important implications for the design of new superstrong acids and bases, and for the understanding of gold-catalysed reactions.

  11. Acid-Base Titration of (S)-Aspartic Acid: A Circular Dichroism Spectrophotometry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.; Pedrosa de Jesus, Júlio D.

    2000-09-01

    The magnitude of the circular dichroism of (S)-aspartic acid in aqueous solutions at a fixed wavelength varies with the addition of strong base. This laboratory experiment consists of the circular dichroism spectrophotometric acid-base titration of (S)-aspartic acid in dilute aqueous solutions, and the use of the resulting data to determine the ionization constant of the protonated amino group. The work familiarizes students with circular dichroism and illustrates the possibility of performing titrations using a less usual instrumental method of following the course of a reaction. It shows the use of a chiroptical property in the determination of the concentration in solution of an optically active molecule, and exemplifies the use of a spectrophotometric titration in the determination of an ionization constant.

  12. Protein-silver nanoparticle interactions to colloidal stability in acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Tai, Jui-Ting; Lai, Chao-Shun; Ho, Hsin-Chia; Yeh, Yu-Shan; Wang, Hsiao-Fang; Ho, Rong-Ming; Tsai, De-Hao

    2014-11-04

    We report a kinetic study of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) under acidic environments (i.e., pH 2.3 to pH ≈7) and systematically investigate the impact of protein interactions [i.e., bovine serum albumin (BSA) as representative] to the colloidal stability of AgNPs. Electrospray-differential mobility analysis (ES-DMA) was used to characterize the particle size distributions and the number concentrations of AgNPs. Transmission electron microscopy was employed orthogonally to provide visualization of AgNPs. For unconjugated AgNPs, the extent of aggregation, or the average particle size, was shown to be increased significantly with an increase of acidity, where a partial coalescence was found between the primary particles of unconjugated AgNP clusters. Aggregation rate constant, kD, was also shown to be proportional to acidity, following a correlation of log(kD) = -1.627(pH)-9.3715. Using ES-DMA, we observe BSA had a strong binding affinity (equilibrium binding constant, ≈ 1.1 × 10(6) L/mol) to the surface of AgNPs, with an estimated maximum molecular surface density of ≈0.012 nm(-2). BSA-functionalized AgNPs exhibited highly-improved colloidal stability compared to the unconjugated AgNPs under acidic environments, where both the acid-induced interfacial dissolution and the particle aggregation became negligible. Results confirm a complex mechanism of colloidal stability of AgNPs: the aggregation process was shown to be dominant, and the formation of BSA corona on AgNPs suppressed both particle aggregation and interfacial dissolution of AgNP samples under acidic environments.

  13. Interaction of Glyphosate and Pelargonic acid in Ready-To-Use Weed Control Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyphosate-based, ready-to-use weed control products often contain pelargonic acid (PA) in addition to glyphosate. However it remains unclear what benefit (if any) this combination provides. Greenhouse experiments using longstalked phyllanthus, large crabgrass, prostrate spurge and yellow nutsedge...

  14. FOXP2 drives neuronal differentiation by interacting with retinoic acid signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Devanna, Paolo; Middelbeek, Jeroen; Vernes, Sonja C.

    2014-01-01

    FOXP2 was the first gene shown to cause a Mendelian form of speech and language disorder. Although developmentally expressed in many organs, loss of a single copy of FOXP2 leads to a phenotype that is largely restricted to orofacial impairment during articulation and linguistic processing deficits. Why perturbed FOXP2 function affects specific aspects of the developing brain remains elusive. We investigated the role of FOXP2 in neuronal differentiation and found that FOXP2 drives molecular changes consistent with neuronal differentiation in a human model system. We identified a network of FOXP2 regulated genes related to retinoic acid signaling and neuronal differentiation. FOXP2 also produced phenotypic changes associated with neuronal differentiation including increased neurite outgrowth and reduced migration. Crucially, cells expressing FOXP2 displayed increased sensitivity to retinoic acid exposure. This suggests a mechanism by which FOXP2 may be able to increase the cellular differentiation response to environmental retinoic acid cues for specific subsets of neurons in the brain. These data demonstrate that FOXP2 promotes neuronal differentiation by interacting with the retinoic acid signaling pathway and regulates key processes required for normal circuit formation such as neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth. In this way, FOXP2, which is found only in specific subpopulations of neurons in the brain, may drive precise neuronal differentiation patterns and/or control localization and connectivity of these FOXP2 positive cells. PMID:25309332

  15. Characterization of the metabolic interaction between trihalomethanes and chloroacetic acids using rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Annie; Krishnan, Kannan; Tardif, Robert

    2005-02-27

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro metabolism of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the presence of trichloroacetic acid (TCA), dichloracetic acid (DCA), monochloroacetic acid (MCA), and 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) using liver microsomes from male Sprague-Dawley rats. Using the vial equilibration technique, initial experiments were carried out with starting concentrations of approximately 40 ppm THMs and 12-22 mM chloroacetic acids. The results indicated a mutual metabolic inhibition between THMs present as binary or quaternary mixtures. Although DCA and MCA had no influence on THMs, TCA produced a marked inhibition of the metabolism of all THMs: chloroform (CHCl3) (55%), bromodichloromethane (BDCM) (34%), dibromochloromethane (DBCM) (30%), and bromoform (TBM) (23%). The presence of 4-MP also reduced THM metabolism, the importance of which decreased in the following order: CHCl3 > BDCM > DBCM = TBM. In further vial equilibration experiments, using 9-140 ppm as starting concentrations of THMs, enzyme kinetic parameters (i.e., Michaelis constant, K(m), and maximum velocity, V(max)) were determined both in the absence and in the presence of TCA (12.2 mM). Results are consistent with a competitive inhibition between TCA and CHCl3, whereas the metabolic inhibition of BDCM and TMB by TCA was non-competitive. As for DBCM, results suggest a more complex pattern of inhibition. These results suggest that CYP2E1 is involved in the metabolism of THMs as well as in the metabolic interaction between THMs and TCA.

  16. Spermidine-Deoxyribonucleic acid interaction in vitro and in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, R L

    1977-01-01

    The binding of spermidine to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was studied by equilibrium dialysis in a wide range of salt concentrations. The association constants ranged from 6 x 10(5) M-1 in 1 mM sodium cacodylate, pH 7.5, to 3 x 10(2) M-1 in 0.3 M NaCl. MgCl2 reduced spermidine-DNA interaction even more than NaCl so that in moderate-ionic-strength solutions (0.3 M NaCl, 0.002 M MgCl2) there was little detectable binding. Low-ionic-strength media were used to isolate DNA from Escherichia coli by a method shown to minimize loss of spermidine from the DNA. Considerable spermidine was associated with E. coli DNA, but control experiments indicated that complex formation had taken place during or after lysis of the cells. Exogenous DNA or ribonucleic acid added to spheroplasts at the time of their lysis caused most of the cellular spermidine to be scavenged by the extra nucleic acid. The data suggest that spermidine is relatively free in the cell and thereby capable of strong (high-affinity) associations with nucleic acids only after the ionic strength of the cell environment is lowered. PMID:320196

  17. Interactive enhancements of ascorbic acid and iron in hydroxyl radical generation in quinone redox cycling.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Tong; Zhao, Jincai; Xu, Bingye

    2012-09-18

    Quinones are toxicological substances in inhalable particulate matter (PM). The mechanisms by which quinones cause hazardous effects can be complex. Quinones are highly active redox molecules that can go through a redox cycle with their semiquinone radicals, leading to formation of reactive oxygen species. Electron spin resonance spectra have been reported for semiquinone radicals in PM, indicating the importance of ascorbic acid and iron in quinone redox cycling. However, these findings are insufficient for understanding the toxicity associated with quinone exposure. Herein, we investigated the interactions among anthraquinone (AQ), ascorbic acid, and iron in hydroxyl radical (·OH) generation through the AQ redox cycling process in a physiological buffer. We measured ·OH concentration and analyzed the free radical process. Our results showed that AQ, ascorbic acid, and iron have synergistic effects on ·OH generation in quinone redox cycling; i.e., ascorbyl radical oxidized AQ to semiquinone radical and started the redox cycling, iron accelerated this oxidation and enhanced ·OH generation through Fenton reactions, while ascorbic acid and AQ could help iron to release from quartz surface and enhance its bioavailability. Our findings provide direct evidence for the redox cycling hypothesis about airborne particle surface quinone in lung fluid.

  18. Evaluation of an Interactive Case-Based Online Network (ICON) in a Problem Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathoo, Arif N.; Goldhoff, Patricia; Quattrochi, James J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study sought to assess the introduction of a web-based innovation in medical education that complements traditional problem-based learning curricula. Utilizing the case method as its fundamental educational approach, the Interactive Case-based Online Network (ICON) allows students to interact with each other, faculty and a virtual…

  19. Interaction of pentobarbitone and gamma-aminobutyric acid on mammalian sympathetic ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, D A; Constanti, A

    1978-05-01

    1. Interactions of bath-applied pentobarbitone and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on neurones in isolated superior cervical ganglia of the rat have been examined with intracellular microelectrodes. 2. Pentobarbitone itself (30 micrometer-1 mM) showed no clear or consistent GABA-like effects: changes in resting input conductance and membrane potential were small and variable. 3. Pentobarbitone (100 micrometer) strikingly enhanced the conductance increases produced by GABA and 3-aminopropanesulphonic acid, and reversed the depression of GABA-evoked responses by bicuculline. 4. It is concluded that reversal of bicuculline action at the membrane conductance level might be explained by augmentation of GABA-action. This augmentation cannot be attributed to 'partial agonist' properties of pentobarbitone or to interference with glial transport processes.

  20. The toxicological interaction between ocean acidity and metals in coastal meiobenthic copepods.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Pierre-Yves; Fleeger, John W; Galvez, Fernando; Carman, Kevin R

    2010-12-01

    Increased atmospheric CO(2) concentrations are causing greater dissolution of CO(2) into seawater, and are ultimately responsible for today's ongoing ocean acidification. We manipulated seawater acidity by addition of HCl and by increasing CO(2) concentration and observed that two coastal harpacticoid copepods, Amphiascoides atopus and Schizopera knabeni were both more sensitive to increased acidity when generated by CO(2). The present study indicates that copepods living in environments more prone to hypercapnia, such as mudflats where S. knabeni lives, may be less sensitive to future acidification. Ocean acidification is also expected to alter the toxicity of waterborne metals by influencing their speciation in seawater. CO(2) enrichment did not affect the free-ion concentration of Cd but did increase the free-ion concentration of Cu. Antagonistic toxicities were observed between CO(2) with Cd, Cu and Cu free-ion in A. atopus. This interaction could be due to a competition for H(+) and metals for binding sites.

  1. Interaction of nucleic acids with Coomassie Blue G-250 in the Bradford assay.

    PubMed

    Wenrich, Broc R; Trumbo, Toni A

    2012-09-15

    The Bradford assay has been used reliably for decades to quantify protein in solution. The analyte is incubated in acidic solution of Coomassie Blue G-250 dye, during which reversible ionic and nonionic binding interactions form. Bradford assay color yields were determined for salmon, bovine, shrimp, and kiwi fruit genomic DNA; baker's yeast RNA; bovine serum albumin (BSA); and hen egg lysozyme. Pure DNA and RNA bound the dye, with color yields of 0.0017 mg⁻¹ cm⁻¹ and 0.0018 mg⁻¹ cm⁻¹, respectively. The nucleic acid-Coomassie Blue response was significant, at roughly 9% of that for BSA and 18% of that for lysozyme.

  2. Synergistic interaction between oxides of copper and iron for production of fatty alcohols from fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kandel, Kapil; Chaudhary, Umesh; Nelson, Nicholas C.; Slowing, Igor I.

    2015-10-08

    In this study, the selective hydrogenation of fatty acids to fatty alcohols can be achieved under moderate conditions (180 °C, 30 bar H2) by simultaneously supporting copper and iron oxides on mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The activity of the cosupported oxides is significantly higher than that of each supported metal oxide and of a physical mixture of both individually supported metal oxides. A strong interaction between both metal oxides is evident from dispersion, XRD, TPR, and acetic acid TPD measurements, which is likely responsible for the synergistic behavior of the catalyst. Copper oxide is reduced in situ to its metallic form and thereby activates hydrogen.

  3. Synergistic interaction between oxides of copper and iron for production of fatty alcohols from fatty acids

    DOE PAGES

    Kandel, Kapil; Chaudhary, Umesh; Nelson, Nicholas C.; ...

    2015-10-08

    In this study, the selective hydrogenation of fatty acids to fatty alcohols can be achieved under moderate conditions (180 °C, 30 bar H2) by simultaneously supporting copper and iron oxides on mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The activity of the cosupported oxides is significantly higher than that of each supported metal oxide and of a physical mixture of both individually supported metal oxides. A strong interaction between both metal oxides is evident from dispersion, XRD, TPR, and acetic acid TPD measurements, which is likely responsible for the synergistic behavior of the catalyst. Copper oxide is reduced in situ to its metallic formmore » and thereby activates hydrogen.« less

  4. Interaction between propranolol and amino acids in the single-pass isolated, perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Semple, H A; Xia, F

    1995-08-01

    Propranolol (PL) bioavailability has been shown to increase substantially when it is administered with a protein-rich meal. A change in metabolic capacity or tissue uptake, induced by amino acids (AAs) released as a result of digestion of dietary protein, is a possible contributing mechanism to the food effect. This hypothesis was tested in isolated, perfused rat livers in the single-pass mode. Rac-PL (20 micrograms/ml) was infused to steady-state at 3 ml/min/g liver for 150 min. A balanced mixture of I-AA was coinfused from 70 to 110 min. The AA reversibly increased the steady-state concentration of PL by 18% and reduced steady-state concentrations of 4-hydroxypropranolol, N-deisopropylpranolol, PL glycol, naphthoxylactic acid, and naphthoxyacetic acid by an average of 41% and propanolol conjugates by almost 100%, indicating metabolic inhibition. In a second experiment, PL was coinfused with AAs from the beginning of the experiment, and tissue binding was compared with control livers. There was no significant effect of AAs on PL tissue binding. In a third study, the effect of four different concentrations of AAs coinfused from 70 to 110 min was assessed. The percentage change in PL and phase I metabolite levels was linearly correlated to the influent AA concentration. The large magnitude, reversibility, lack of pathway specificity, and concentration dependence of the AA interaction in the perfused liver are also features of food interaction in humans. These similarities constitute evidence that metabolic inhibition by AAs originating from dietary protein could contribute to the PL-food interaction.

  5. Cation–Anion Interactions within the Nucleic Acid Ion Atmosphere Revealed by Ion Counting

    PubMed Central

    Gebala, Magdalena; Giambasu, George M.; Lipfert, Jan; Bisaria, Namita; Bonilla, Steve; Li, Guangchao; York, Darrin M.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The ion atmosphere is a critical structural, dynamic, and energetic component of nucleic acids that profoundly affects their interactions with proteins and ligands. Experimental methods that “count” the number of ions thermodynamically associated with the ion atmosphere allow dissection of energetic properties of the ion atmosphere, and thus provide direct comparison to theoretical results. Previous experiments have focused primarily on the cations that are attracted to nucleic acid polyanions, but have also showed that anions are excluded from the ion atmosphere. Herein, we have systematically explored the properties of anion exclusion, testing the zeroth-order model that anions of different identity are equally excluded due to electrostatic repulsion. Using a series of monovalent salts, we find, surprisingly, that the extent of anion exclusion and cation inclusion significantly depends on salt identity. The differences are prominent at higher concentrations and mirror trends in mean activity coefficients of the electrolyte solutions. Salts with lower activity coefficients exhibit greater accumulation of both cations and anions within the ion atmosphere, strongly suggesting that cation–anion correlation effects are present in the ion atmosphere and need to be accounted for to understand electrostatic interactions of nucleic acids. To test whether the effects of cation–anion correlations extend to nucleic acid kinetics and thermodynamics, we followed the folding of P4–P6, a domain of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme, via single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer in solutions with different salts. Solutions of identical concentration but lower activity gave slower and less favorable folding. Our results reveal hitherto unknown properties of the ion atmosphere and suggest possible roles of oriented ion pairs or anion-bridged cations in the ion atmosphere for electrolyte solutions of salts with reduced activity. Consideration of these new

  6. Development of polylactic acid-based materials through reactive modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowlks, Alison Camille

    2009-12-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA)-based systems have shown to be of great potential for the development of materials requiring biobased content, biodegradation, and sufficient properties. The efforts in this study are directed toward addressing the current research need to overcome some of the inherent drawbacks of PLA. To meet this need, reactive extrusion was employed to develop new materials based on PLA by grafting, compounding, and polymer blending. In the first part of this work, maleic anhydride (MA) was grafted onto PLA by reactive extrusion. Two structurally different peroxides were used to initiate grafting and results were reported on the basis of grafting, molecular weight, and thermal behavior. An inverse relationship between degree of grafting and molecular weight was established. It was also found that, regardless of peroxide type, there is an optimum peroxid-to-MA ratio of 0.5:2 that promotes maximum grafting, beyond which degradation reactions become predominant. Overall, it was found that the maleated copolymer (MAPLA) could be used as an interfacial modifier in PLA-based composites. Therefore, MAPLA was incorporated into PLA-talc composites in varying concentrations. The influence of the MAPLA addition on the mechanical and thermal behavior was investigated. When added in an optimum concentration, MAPLA improved the tensile strength and crystallization of the composite. Furthermore, microscopic observation confirmed the compatibilization effect of MAPLA in PLA-talc composites. Vinyltrimethoxysilane was free-radically grafted onto the backbone of PLA and subsequently moisture crosslinked. The effects of monomer, initiator, and catalyst concentration on the degree of crosslinking and the mechanical and thermal properties were investigated. The presence of a small amount of catalyst showed to be a major contributor to the crosslinking formation in the time frame investigated, shown by an increase in gel content and decrease in crystallinity. Furthermore

  7. Zoledronic acid inhibits aromatase activity and phosphorylation: potential mechanism for additive zoledronic acid and letrozole drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Schech, Amanda J; Nemieboka, Brandon E; Brodie, Angela H

    2012-11-01

    Zoledronic acid (ZA), a bisphosphonate originally indicated for use in osteoporosis, has been reported to exert a direct effect on breast cancer cells, although the mechanism of this effect is currently unknown. Data from the ABCSG-12 and ZO-FAST clinical trials suggest that treatment with the combination of ZA and aromatase inhibitors (AI) result in increased disease free survival in breast cancer patients over AI alone. To determine whether the mechanism of this combination involved inhibition of aromatase, AC-1 cells (MCF-7 human breast cancer cells transfected with an aromatase construct) were treated simultaneously with combinations of ZA and AI letrozole. This combination significantly increased inhibition of aromatase activity of AC-1 cells when compared to letrozole alone. Treatment of 1 nM letrozole in combination with 1 μM or 10 μM ZA resulted in an additive drug interaction on inhibition of cell viability, as measured by MTT assay. Treatment with ZA was found to inhibit phosphorylation of aromatase on serine residues. Zoledronic acid was also shown to be more effective in inhibiting cell viability in aromatase transfected AC-1 cells when compared to inhibition of cell viability observed in non-transfected MCF-7. Estradiol was able to partially rescue the effect of 1 μM and 10 μM ZA on cell viability following treatment for 72 h, as shown by a shift to the right in the estradiol dose-response curve. In conclusion, these results indicate that the combination of ZA and letrozole results in an additive inhibition of cell viability. Furthermore, ZA alone can inhibit aromatase activity through inhibition of serine phosphorylation events important for aromatase enzymatic activity and contributes to inhibition of cell viability.

  8. The Interaction of Positively-charged Ions with Nucleic Acid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Lois

    2003-01-01

    The successful development of extremely low background sample cells for x-ray scattering studies has enabled experiments designed to elucidate some of the fundamental physical interactions involved in macromolecular folding. Microfabrication techniques were used to fabricate low volume (50 micro-liter) sample cells with silicon nitride membranes (sub micron in thickness) as x-ray windows. Scientifically, these studies focus on the interaction of negatively charged nucleic acid systems, RNA and DNA, with their surrounding (positively charged) ion atmospheres. Understanding the structure of the ion atmosphere and its influence on the shape/conformation of the macromolecule will help reveal the underlying physical forces employed by nature in the self-assembly of these important molecules.

  9. Interaction of bovine serum albumin protein with self assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonia, Monika; Agarwal, Hitesh; Manjuladevi, V.; Gupta, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    Detection of proteins and other biomolecules in liquid phase is the essence for the design of a biosensor. The sensitivity of a sensor can be enhanced by the appropriate functionalization of the sensing area so as to establish the molecular specific interaction. In the present work, we have studied the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein with a chemically functionalized surface using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The gold-coated quartz crystals (AT-cut/5 MHz) were functionalized by forming self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 11-Mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA). The adsorption characteristics of BSA onto SAM of MUA on quartz crystal are reported. BSA showed the highest affinity for SAM of MUA as compared to pure gold surface. The SAM of MUA provides carboxylated surface which enhances not only the adsorption of the BSA protein but also a very stable BSA-MUA complex in the liquid phase.

  10. CMP‑N‑acetylneuraminic acid synthetase interacts with fragile X related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun; Tian, Shuai; Wang, Zongbao; Wang, Changbo; Chen, Xiaowei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yang; He, Shuya

    2016-08-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), fragile X related 1 protein (FXR1P) and FXR2P are the members of the FMR protein family. These proteins contain two KH domains and a RGG box, which are characteristic of RNA binding proteins. The absence of FMRP, causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of hereditary mental retardation. FXR1P is expressed throughout the body and important for normal muscle development, and its absence causes cardiac abnormality. To