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Sample records for acid beta oxidation

  1. Ghrelin reduces hepatic mitochondrial fatty acid beta oxidation.

    PubMed

    Rigault, C; Le Borgne, F; Georges, B; Demarquoy, J

    2007-04-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide secreted during starvation by gastric cells. Ghrelin physiologically induces food intake and seems to alter lipid and glucid metabolism in several tissues such as adipose tissue and liver. Liver has a key position in lipid metabolism as it allows the metabolic orientation of fatty acids between oxidation and esterification. We investigated the effects of peripheral ghrelin administration on 2 crucial parameters of fatty acid oxidation: the levocarnitine (L-carnitine)-dependent entry of the fatty acids in the mitochondria and the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Ghrelin was either given to rats prior to the hepatocyte preparation and culture or used to treat hepatocytes prepared from control animals. Direct incubation of ghrelin to raw hepatocytes did not induce any change in the studied parameters. In hepatocytes prepared from 3 nmol ghrelin-treated rats, a 44% reduction of the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation while no alteration of the L-carnitine-related parameters were observed. These results suggested (a) that ghrelin has no direct effect on liver, and (b) that when administrated to a whole organism, ghrelin may alter the lipid metabolism and the energy balance through a marked decrease in liver fatty acid oxidation. PMID:17556859

  2. Fatty Acid Beta-Oxidation Disorders: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanath, Vijay A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation disorders (FAODs) are a heterogeneous group of defects in fatty acid transport and mitochondrial β-oxidation. They are inherited as autosomal recessive disorders and have a wide range of clinical presentations. Summary The background information and case report provide important insight into mitochondrial FAODs. The article provides a wealth of information describing the scope of these disorders. Key Messages This article presents a typical case of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and summarizes the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of mitochondrial FAODs.

  3. Stereoselective and nonstereoselective effects of ibuprofen enantiomers on mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Freneaux, E.; Fromenty, B.; Berson, A.; Labbe, G.; Degott, C.; Letteron, P.; Larrey, D.; Pessayre, D. , Hopital Beaujon, Clichy )

    1990-11-01

    The effects of the R-(-) and S-(+)ibuprofen enantiomers were first studied in vitro with mouse liver mitochondria incubated in the presence of various concentrations of exogenous coenzyme A. In the presence of a low concentration of coenzyme A (2.5 microM), the R-(-)enantiomer (which forms an acylcoenzyme A) inhibited stereoselectively the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid but not that of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitoyl-L-carnitine (which can directly enter the mitochondria). In the presence, however, of a concentration of coenzyme A (50 microM) reproducing that present in liver cell cytosol, both enantiomers (2 mM) slightly inhibited the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid and markedly inhibited the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)octanoic acid and (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid. In vivo, both enantiomers (1 mmol.kg-1) similarly inhibited the formation of ({sup 14}C)CO{sub 2} from (1-{sup 14}C)fatty acids. Both enantiomers similarly decreased plasma ketone bodies. Both similarly increased hepatic triglycerides, and both produced mild microvesicular steatosis of the liver. We conclude that both ibuprofen enantiomers inhibit beta oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the R-(-)enantiomer may stereoselectively sequester coenzyme A; at low concentrations of coenzyme A in vitro, this may stereoselectively inhibit the mitochondrial uptake and beta oxidation of long chain fatty acids.

  4. BACE1 activity impairs neuronal glucose oxidation: rescue by beta-hydroxybutyrate and lipoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, John A.; Hamilton, David L.; Ashford, Michael L. J.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose hypometabolism and impaired mitochondrial function in neurons have been suggested to play early and perhaps causative roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Activity of the aspartic acid protease, beta-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), responsible for beta amyloid peptide generation, has recently been demonstrated to modify glucose metabolism. We therefore examined, using a human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell line, whether increased BACE1 activity is responsible for a reduction in cellular glucose metabolism. Overexpression of active BACE1, but not a protease-dead mutant BACE1, protein in SH-SY5Y cells reduced glucose oxidation and the basal oxygen consumption rate, which was associated with a compensatory increase in glycolysis. Increased BACE1 activity had no effect on the mitochondrial electron transfer process but was found to diminish substrate delivery to the mitochondria by inhibition of key mitochondrial decarboxylation reaction enzymes. This BACE1 activity-dependent deficit in glucose oxidation was alleviated by the presence of beta hydroxybutyrate or α-lipoic acid. Consequently our data indicate that raised cellular BACE1 activity drives reduced glucose oxidation in a human neuronal cell line through impairments in the activity of specific tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. Because this bioenergetic deficit is recoverable by neutraceutical compounds we suggest that such agents, perhaps in conjunction with BACE1 inhibitors, may be an effective therapeutic strategy in the early-stage management or treatment of AD. PMID:26483636

  5. Beta-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids and their coenzyme A derivatives by human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Singh, H; Derwas, N; Poulos, A

    1987-05-01

    The beta-oxidation of lignoceric acid (C24:0), hexacosanoic acid (C26:0), and their coenzyme A derivatives was investigated in human skin fibroblast homogenates. The cofactor requirements for oxidation of lignoceric acid and hexacosanoic acid were identical but were different from their coenzyme A derivatives. For example, lignoceric acid and hexacosanoic acid oxidation was strictly ATP dependent whereas the oxidation of the corresponding coenzyme A derivatives was ATP independent. Also the rate of oxidation of coenzyme A derivatives of lignoceric acid or hexacosanoic acid was much higher compared to the free fatty acids. In patients with Zellweger's syndrome, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and infantile Refsum's disease, the beta-oxidation of lignoceric and hexacosanoic acids was defective whereas the oxidation of their corresponding coenzyme A derivatives was nearly normal. The results presented in this communication suggest strongly that the beta-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids occurs exclusively in peroxisomes. However, the coenzyme A derivatives of very-long-chain fatty acids can be oxidized in mitochondria as well as in peroxisomes. The inability of the mitochondrial system to oxidize free fatty acids may be due to its inability to convert them to their corresponding coenzyme A derivatives. Our results suggest that a specific very-long-chain fatty acyl CoA synthetase may be required for the activation of the free fatty acids and that this synthetase may be deficient in patients with Zellweger's syndrome and possibly X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, as well. The results presented suggest that substrate specificity and the subcellular localization of the synthetase may regulate the beta-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids in the cell. PMID:2437859

  6. The role of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidation in bile acid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, H.; Miwa, A. )

    1989-11-01

    The physiological role of the peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidizing system (FAOS) is not yet established. We speculated that there might be a relationship between peroxisomal degradation of long-chain fatty acids in the liver and the biosynthesis of bile acids. This was investigated using (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid and (1-{sup 14}C)lignoceric acid as substrates of FAOS in mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively. The incorporation of ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid into primary bile acids was approximately four times higher than that of ({sup 14}C)butyric acid (in terms of C-2 units). The pools of these two fatty acids in the liver were exceedingly small. The incorporations of radioactivity into the primary bile acids were strongly inhibited by administration of aminotriazole, which is a specific inhibitor of peroxisomal FAOS in vivo. Aminotriazole inhibited preferentially the formation of cholate, the major primary bile acid, from both ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid and ({sup 14}C)butyric acid, rather than the formation of chenodeoxycholate. The former inhibition was about 70% and the latter was approximately 40-50%. In view of reports that cholate is biosynthesized from endogenous cholesterol, the above results indicate that peroxisomal FAOS may have an anabolic function, supplying acetyl CoA for bile acid biosynthesis.

  7. Medium-chain fatty acids undergo elongation before {beta}-oxidation in fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Patricia M. . E-mail: Patti.Jones@childrens.com; Butt, Yasmeen; Messmer, Bette; Boriak, Richard; Bennett, Michael J.

    2006-07-21

    Although mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation (FAO) is considered to be well understood, further elucidation of the pathway continues through evaluation of patients with FAO defects. The FAO pathway can be examined by measuring the 3-hydroxy-fatty acid (3-OHFA) intermediates. We present a unique finding in the study of this pathway: the addition of medium-chain fatty acids to the culture media of fibroblasts results in generation of 3-OHFAs which are two carbons longer than the precursor substrate. Cultured skin fibroblasts from normal and LCHAD-deficient individuals were grown in media supplemented with various chain-length fatty acids. The cell-free medium was analyzed for 3-OHFAs by stable-isotope dilution gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry. Our finding suggests that a novel carbon chain-length elongation process precedes the oxidation of medium-chain fatty acids. This previously undescribed metabolic step may have important implications for the metabolism of medium-chain triglycerides, components in the dietary treatment of a number of disorders.

  8. The fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway is important for decidualization of endometrial stromal cells in both humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jui-He; Chi, Maggie M-Y; Schulte, Maureen B; Moley, Kelle H

    2014-02-01

    Embryo implantation and development requires the endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) to undergo decidualization. This differentiation process requires glucose utilization, and blockade of the pentose phosphate pathway inhibits decidualization of ESCs both in vitro and in vivo. Glucose and fatty acids are energy substrates for many cell types, and fatty acid beta-oxidation is critical for embryo implantation. Here, we investigated whether beta-oxidation is required for decidualization of ESCs. As assessed by marker gene expression, decidualization of human primary ESCs was blocked by reducing activity of carnitine calmitoyltransferase I, the rate-limiting enzyme in beta-oxidation, either by short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing or by treatment with the inhibitor etomoxir. Ranolazine (RAN), a partial beta-oxidation inhibitor, blocked early decidualization of a human ESC line. However, decidualization resumed after several days, most likely due to a compensatory up-regulation of GLUT1 expression and an increase in glucose metabolism. Simultaneous inhibition of the beta-oxidation pathway with RAN and the pentose phosphate pathway with glucosamine (GlcN) impaired in vitro decidualization of human ESCs more strongly than inhibition of either pathway alone. These findings were confirmed in murine ESCs in vitro, and exposure to RAN plus GlcN inhibited decidualization in vivo in a deciduoma model. Finally, intrauterine implantation of time-release RAN and GlcN pellets reduced pup number. Importantly, pup number returned to normal after the end of the pellet-active period. This work indicates that both fatty acids and glucose metabolism pathways are important for ESC decidualization, and suggests novel pathways to target for the design of future nonhormonal contraceptives. PMID:24403548

  9. Quantification of syntrophic fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing bacteria in a mesophilic biogas reactor by oligonucleotide probe hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, K.H.; Ahring, B.K.; Raskin, L.

    1999-11-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYB, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S.wolfei LYB was closely related to S.wolfei subsp. solfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas. Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature-of-dissociation and specificity studies. To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated fatty acid-{beta}-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities and microbial numbers determined with most-probable-number estimates. Most of the methanogenic rRNA was comprised of Methanomicrobiales rRNA, suggesting that members of this order served as the main hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms. Between 0.2 and 1% of the rRNA was attributed to the Syntrophomonadaceae, or which the majority was accounted for by the genus Syntrophomonas.

  10. Amiodarone inhibits the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids and produces microvesicular steatosis of the liver in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fromenty, B.; Fisch, C.; Labbe, G.; Degott, C.; Deschamps, D.; Berson, A.; Letteron, P.; Pessayre, D. )

    1990-12-01

    Amiodarone has been shown to produce microvesicular steatosis of the liver in some recipients. We have determined the effects of amiodarone on the mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids in mice. In vitro, the formation of 14C-acid-soluble beta-oxidation products from (U-14C)palmitic acid by mouse liver mitochondria was decreased by 92% in the presence of 125 microM amiodarone and by 94% in the presence of 125 microM N-desethylamiodarone. Inhibition due to 100 or 150 microM amiodarone persisted in the presence of 5 mM acetoacetate, whereas acetoacetate totally relieved inhibition due to 15 microM rotenone. In vivo, exhalation of (14C)CO2 from (U-14C)palmitic acid was decreased by 31, 40, 58 and 78%, respectively, in mice receiving 19, 25, 50 and 100 mg.kg-1 of amiodarone hydrochloride 1 hr before the administration of (U-14C)palmitic acid. One hour after 100 mg.kg-1, the exhalation of (14C)CO2 from (1-14C)palmitic acid, (1-14C)octanoic acid or (1-14C)butyric acid was decreased by 78, 72 and 53%, respectively. Exhalation of (14C)CO2 from (1-14C)palmitic acid was normal between 6 and 9 hr after administration of 100 mg.kg-1 of amiodarone hydrochloride, but was still inhibited by 71 and 37%, 24 and 48 hr after 600 mg.kg-1. Twenty four hours after the latter dose of amiodarone, hepatic triglycerides were increased by 150%, and there was microvesicular steatosis of the liver. We conclude that amiodarone inhibits the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids and produces microvesicular steatosis of the liver in mice.

  11. Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid metabolism in cultured human skin fibroblasts. Evidence for peroxisomal beta-oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J A; Figard, P H; Spector, A A

    1990-01-01

    To determine whether the peroxisome is responsible for hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) oxidation, 12- and 15-HETE oxidation was measured in normal and peroxisomal deficient skin fibroblasts from patients with Zellweger's (cerebrohepatorenal) syndrome. When incubated for 1 h with normal fibroblasts, reverse phase HPLC indicated that 24% of the 12-HETE radioactivity was converted to one major polar metabolite. Chemical derivatization followed by reverse phase HPLC and TLC indicated that this metabolite is 8-hydroxyhexadecatrienoic acid [16:3(8-OH)]. Similarly, 33% of the added 15-HETE was also converted to a more polar metabolite. Neither 12- nor 15-HETE were converted to any metabolites by the peroxisomal deficient (Zellweger) cells. No defect in HETE oxidation was found in other human fibroblast cell lines with diverse metabolic abnormalities. Zellweger fibroblasts accumulated increased amounts of 12-HETE, compared with normal fibroblasts. As in the normal cells, most of the 12-HETE incorporated into Zellweger fibroblasts was present in the choline and ethanolamine phosphoglycerides. Protein synthesis, lysosomal acid lipase activity, and mitochondrial butyrate oxidation were not impaired in the Zellweger fibroblasts. Since the Zellweger cells do not convert 12- and 15-HETE to oxidative metabolites, peroxisomes appear to be the cellular organelle responsible for HETE oxidation. Images PMID:2318972

  12. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide stress derived from fatty acid beta-oxidation improves fatty acid utilization in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hidetaka; Hoshino, Yasushi; Nakase, Kentaro; Usuda, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are a promising raw material for substance production because of their highly reduced and anhydrous nature, which can provide higher fermentation yields than sugars. However, they are insoluble in water and are poorly utilized by microbes in industrial fermentation production. We used fatty acids as raw materials for L-lysine fermentation by emulsification and improved the limited fatty acid-utilization ability of Escherichia coli. We obtained a fatty acid-utilizing mutant strain by laboratory evolution and demonstrated that it expressed lower levels of an oxidative-stress marker than wild type. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) concentration of a fatty acid-utilizing wild-type E. coli strain was higher than that of a glucose-utilizing wild-type E. coli strain. The novel mutation rpsA(D210Y) identified in our fatty acid-utilizing mutant strain enabled us to promote cell growth, fatty-acid utilization, and L-lysine production from fatty acid. Introduction of this rpsA(D210Y) mutation into a wild-type strain resulted in lower H₂O₂ concentrations. The overexpression of superoxide dismutase (sodA) increased intracellular H₂O₂ concentrations and inhibited E. coli fatty-acid utilization, whereas overexpression of an oxidative-stress regulator (oxyS) decreased intracellular H₂O₂ concentrations and promoted E. coli fatty acid utilization and L-lysine production. Addition of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger thiourea promoted L-lysine production from fatty acids and decreased intracellular H₂O₂ concentrations. Among the ROS generated by fatty-acid β-oxidation, H₂O₂ critically affected E. coli growth and L-lysine production. This indicates that the regression of ROS stress promotes fatty acid utilization, which is beneficial for fatty acids used as raw materials in industrial production. PMID:24169950

  13. The enzymology of mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation and its application to follow-up analysis of positive neonatal screening results

    PubMed Central

    Ruiter, Jos P. N.; IJlst, Lodewijk; Waterham, Hans R.; Houten, Sander M.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria is a key physiological process in higher eukaryotes including humans. The importance of the mitochondrial beta-oxidation system in humans is exemplified by the existence of a group of genetic diseases in man caused by an impairment in the mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids. Identification of patients with a defect in mitochondrial beta-oxidation has long remained notoriously difficult, but the introduction of tandem-mass spectrometry in laboratories for genetic metabolic diseases has revolutionalized the field by allowing the rapid and sensitive analysis of acylcarnitines. Equally important is that much progress has been made with respect to the development of specific enzyme assays to identify the enzyme defect in patients subsequently followed by genetic analysis. In this review, we will describe the current state of knowledge in the field of fatty acid oxidation enzymology and its application to the follow-up analysis of positive neonatal screening results. PMID:20490924

  14. A role for 2,4-enoyl-CoA reductase in mitochondrial beta-oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Effects of treatment with clofibrate on oxidation of polyunsaturated acylcarnitines by isolated rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Osmundsen, H; Cervenka, J; Bremer, J

    1982-01-01

    1. beta-Oxidation of gamma-linolenoylcarnitine, arachidonoylcarnitine and docosahexaenoylcarnitine by isolated rat liver mitochondria is inhibited by uncoupling conditions. Partial re-activation is obtained with added ATP. With mitochondria from clofibrate-treated rats ATP-stimulated rates of beta-oxidation of docosahexaenoylcarnitine are higher than ADP-stimulated rates. This is not observed with the beta-oxidation of oleoylcarnitine. 2. beta-Oxidation of docosahexaenoylcarnitine, in the presence of rotenone, is inhibited by added oxaloacetate, analogous to previous findings with pent-4-enoylcarnitine [see Osmundsen (1978) FEBS Lett. 88, 219-222]. In the absence of rotenone added oxaloacetate stimulates the beta-oxidation of docosahexaenoylcarnitine, but has the opposite effect on the beta-oxidation of palmitoylcarnitine. 3. beta-Oxidation of polyunsaturated acylcarnitines by isolated rat liver mitochondria is selectively increased after treatment of the animals with a low dietary dose (0.2%, w/w) of clofibrate. Treatment with a higher dose of clofibrate (0.5%, w/w) resulted in a general stimulation of beta-oxidation. 4. The results presented suggest that long-chain fatty acids possessing a delta 4-double bond are not readily beta-oxidized unless the 2,4-enoyl-CoA reductase (EC 1.3.1.-) is operating. PMID:7165730

  15. Phylogenomic Evidence for a Myxococcal Contribution to the Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Beta-Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Agatha; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Pujol, Aurora

    2011-01-01

    Background The origin of eukaryotes remains a fundamental question in evolutionary biology. Although it is clear that eukaryotic genomes are a chimeric combination of genes of eubacterial and archaebacterial ancestry, the specific ancestry of most eubacterial genes is still unknown. The growing availability of microbial genomes offers the possibility of analyzing the ancestry of eukaryotic genomes and testing previous hypotheses on their origins. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we have applied a phylogenomic analysis to investigate a possible contribution of the Myxococcales to the first eukaryotes. We conducted a conservative pipeline with homologous sequence searches against a genomic sampling of 40 eukaryotic and 357 prokaryotic genomes. The phylogenetic reconstruction showed that several eukaryotic proteins traced to Myxococcales. Most of these proteins were associated with mitochondrial lipid intermediate pathways, particularly enzymes generating reducing equivalents with pivotal roles in fatty acid β-oxidation metabolism. Our data suggest that myxococcal species with the ability to oxidize fatty acids transferred several genes to eubacteria that eventually gave rise to the mitochondrial ancestor. Later, the eukaryotic nucleocytoplasmic lineage acquired those metabolic genes through endosymbiotic gene transfer. Conclusions/Significance Our results support a prokaryotic origin, different from α-proteobacteria, for several mitochondrial genes. Our data reinforce a fluid prokaryotic chromosome model in which the mitochondrion appears to be an important entry point for myxococcal genes to enter eukaryotes. PMID:21760940

  16. Mammalian mitochondrial beta-oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, S; Bartlett, K; Pourfarzam, M

    1996-01-01

    The enzymic stages of mammalian mitochondrial beta-oxidation were elucidated some 30-40 years ago. However, the discovery of a membrane-associated multifunctional enzyme of beta-oxidation, a membrane-associated acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and characterization of the carnitine palmitoyl transferase system at the protein and at the genetic level has demonstrated that the enzymes of the system itself are incompletely understood. Deficiencies of many of the enzymes have been recognized as important causes of disease. In addition, the study of these disorders has led to a greater understanding of the molecular mechanism of beta-oxidation and the import, processing and assembly of the beta-oxidation enzymes within the mitochondrion. The tissue-specific regulation, intramitochondrial control and supramolecular organization of the pathway is becoming better understood as sensitive analytical and molecular techniques are applied. This review aims to cover enzymological and organizational aspects of mitochondrial beta-oxidation together with the biochemical aspects of inherited disorders of beta-oxidation and the intrinsic control of beta-oxidation. PMID:8973539

  17. Modulation of fatty acid oxidation alters contact hypersensitivity to urushiols: role of aliphatic chain beta-oxidation in processing and activation of urushiols.

    PubMed

    Kalergis, A M; López, C B; Becker, M I; Díaz, M I; Sein, J; Garbarino, J A; De Ioannes, A E

    1997-01-01

    Lithraea caustica, or litre, a tree of the Anacardiaceae family that is endemic to the central region of Chile, induces a severe contact dermatitis in susceptible human beings. The allergen was previously isolated and characterized as a 3-(pentadecyl-10-enyl) catechol, a molecule belonging to the urushiol group of allergens isolated from poison ivy and poison oak plants. Because urushiols are pro-electrophilic haptens, it is believed that the reactive species are generated intracellularly by skin keratinocytes and Langerhans cells. The active species are presumed to modify self proteins which, after proteolytic processing, would generate immunogenic peptides carrying the hapten. The presence of a 15-carbon-length hydrophobic chain should impair antigen presentation of self-modified peptides by class I MHC molecules, either by steric hindrance or by limiting their sorting to the ER lumen. We have proposed that the shortening of the aliphatic chain by beta-oxidation within peroxisomes and/or mitochondria should be a requirement for the antigen presentation process. To test this hypothesis we investigated the effect of drugs that modify the fatty acid metabolism on urushiol-induced contact dermatitis in mice. Clofibrate, a peroxisomal proliferator in mice, increased the immune response to the urushiols from litre by 50%. Conversely, tetradecyl glycidic acid, an inhibitor of the uptake of fatty acids by mitochondria, decreased the hypersensitivity to the hapten. An increase in the level in glutathione by treatment of the animals with 2-oxotiazolidin-4-carboxilic acid lowered the response. Those findings strongly support a role for the fatty acid oxidative metabolism in the processing and activation of urushiols in vivo. PMID:8980288

  18. Cardioprotective cGMP favors exogenous fatty acid incorporation into tyiglycerides over direct beta-oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While cardiac hypertrophy has been associated with a shift in substrate selection for energy production from fatty acids (FA) to carbohydrates (CHO), it remains controversial whether this shift is adaptive or maladaptive. Since enhanced cGMP signalling can prevent hypertrophy, we hypothesized that t...

  19. Flux control exerted by mitochondrial outer membrane carnitine palmitoyltransferase over beta-oxidation, ketogenesis and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in hepatocytes isolated from rats in different metabolic states.

    PubMed Central

    Drynan, L; Quant, P A; Zammit, V A

    1996-01-01

    The Flux Control Coefficients of mitochondrial outer membrane carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT I) with respect to the overall rates of beta-oxidation, ketogenesis and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity were measured in hepatocytes isolated from rats in different metabolic states (fed, 24 h-starved, starved-refed and starved/insulin-treated). These conditions were chosen because there is controversy as to whether, when significant control ceases to be exerted by CPT I over the rate of fatty oxidation [Moir and Zammit (1994) Trends Biochem. Sci. 19, 313-317], this is transferred to one or more steps proximal to acylcarnitine synthesis (e.g. decreased delivery of fatty acids to the liver) or to the reaction catalysed by mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA synthase [Hegardt (1995) Biochem. Soc. Trans. 23, 486-490]. Therefore isolated hepatocytes were used in the present study to exclude the involvement of changes in the rate of delivery of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) to the liver, such as occur in vivo, and to ascertain whether, under conditions of constant supply of NEFA, CPT I retains control over the relevant fluxes of fatty acid oxidation to ketones and carbon dioxide, or whether control is transferred to another (intrahepatocytic) site. The results clearly show that the Flux Control Coefficients of CPT I with respect to overall beta-oxidation and ketogenesis are very high under all conditions investigated, indicating that control is not lost to another intrahepatic site during the metabolic transitions studied. The control of CPT I over tricarboxylic acid cycle activity was always very low. The significance of these findings for the integration of fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism in the liver is discussed. PMID:8760364

  20. Analysis of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Degradation in Agrobacterium fabrum Reveals a Coenzyme A-Dependent, Beta-Oxidative Deacetylation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Campillo, Tony; Renoud, Sébastien; Kerzaon, Isabelle; Vial, Ludovic; Baude, Jessica; Gaillard, Vincent; Bellvert, Floriant; Chamignon, Cécile; Comte, Gilles; Lavire, Céline; Hommais, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Agrobacterium fabrum (genomospecies G8 of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens species complex) is known to have species-specific genes involved in ferulic acid degradation. Here, we characterized, by genetic and analytical means, intermediates of degradation as feruloyl coenzyme A (feruloyl-CoA), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-hydroxypropionyl–CoA, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionyl–CoA, vanillic acid, and protocatechuic acid. The genes atu1416, atu1417, and atu1420 have been experimentally shown to be necessary for the degradation of ferulic acid. Moreover, the genes atu1415 and atu1421 have been experimentally demonstrated to be essential for this degradation and are proposed to encode a phenylhydroxypropionyl-CoA dehydrogenase and a 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionic acid (HMPKP)–CoA β-keto-thiolase, respectively. We thus demonstrated that the A. fabrum hydroxycinnamic degradation pathway is an original coenzyme A-dependent β-oxidative deacetylation that could also transform p-coumaric and caffeic acids. Finally, we showed that this pathway enables the metabolism of toxic compounds from plants and their use for growth, likely providing the species an ecological advantage in hydroxycinnamic-rich environments, such as plant roots or decaying plant materials. PMID:24657856

  1. Angiopoietin-Like 4 Mediates PPAR Delta Effect on Lipoprotein Lipase-Dependent Fatty Acid Uptake but Not on Beta-Oxidation in Myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Robciuc, Marius R.; Skrobuk, Paulina; Anisimov, Andrey; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Alitalo, Kari; Eckel, Robert H.; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Jauhiainen, Matti; Ehnholm, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) delta is an important regulator of fatty acid (FA) metabolism. Angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4), a multifunctional protein, is one of the major targets of PPAR delta in skeletal muscle cells. Here we investigated the regulation of Angptl4 and its role in mediating PPAR delta functions using human, rat and mouse myotubes. Expression of Angptl4 was upregulated during myotubes differentiation and by oleic acid, insulin and PPAR delta agonist GW501516. Treatment with GW501516 or Angptl4 overexpression inhibited both lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity and LPL-dependent uptake of FAs whereas uptake of BSA-bound FAs was not affected by either treatment. Activation of retinoic X receptor (RXR), PPAR delta functional partner, using bexarotene upregulated Angptl4 expression and inhibited LPL activity in a PPAR delta dependent fashion. Silencing of Angptl4 blocked the effect of GW501516 and bexarotene on LPL activity. Treatment with GW501516 but not Angptl4 overexpression significantly increased palmitate oxidation. Furthermore, Angptl4 overexpression did not affect the capacity of GW501516 to increase palmitate oxidation. Basal and insulin stimulated glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis and glucose oxidation were not significantly modulated by Angptl4 overexpression. Our findings suggest that FAs-PPARdelta/RXR-Angptl4 axis controls the LPL-dependent uptake of FAs in myotubes, whereas the effect of PPAR delta activation on beta-oxidation is independent of Angptl4. PMID:23056264

  2. Assignment of fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria to Syntrophomonadaceae fam. nov. on the basis of 16S rRNA sequence analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, H.; Yang, D.; Woese, C. R.; Bryant, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    After enrichment from Chinese rural anaerobic digestor sludge, anaerobic, sporing and nonsporing, saturated fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria were isolated as cocultures with H2- and formate-utilizing Methanospirillum hungatei or Desulfovibrio sp. strain G-11. The syntrophs degraded C4 to C8 saturated fatty acids, including isobutyrate and 2-methylbutyrate. They were adapted to grow on crotonate and were isolated as pure cultures. The crotonate-grown pure cultures alone did not grow on butyrate in either the presence or the absence of some common electron acceptors. However, when they were reconstituted with M. hungatei, growth on butyrate again occurred. In contrast, crotonate-grown Clostridium kluyveri and Clostridium sticklandii, as well as Clostridium sporogenes, failed to grow on butyrate when these organisms were cocultured with M. hungatei. The crotonate-grown pure subcultures of the syntrophs described above were subjected to 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Several previously documented fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophs grown in pure cultures with crotonate were also subjected to comparative sequence analyses. The sequence analyses revealed that the new sporing and nonsporing isolates and other syntrophs that we sequenced, which had either gram-negative or gram-positive cell wall ultrastructure, all belonged to the phylogenetically gram-positive phylum. They were not closely related to any of the previously known subdivisions in the gram-positive phylum with which they were compared, but were closely related to each other, forming a new subdivision in the phylum. We recommend that this group be designated Syntrophomonadaceae fam. nov.; a description is given.

  3. Preparation of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acids and esters

    DOEpatents

    Gogate, Makarand Ratnakar; Spivey, James Jerry; Zoeller, Joseph Robert

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for the preparation of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acids and esters thereof which comprises contacting formaldehyde or a source of formaldehyde with a carboxylic acid, ester or anhydride in the presence of a catalyst comprising an oxide of niobium.

  4. Preparation of {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acids and esters

    DOEpatents

    Gogate, M.R.; Spivey, J.J.; Zoeller, J.R.

    1998-09-15

    Disclosed is a process for the preparation of {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acids and esters thereof which comprises contacting formaldehyde or a source of formaldehyde with a carboxylic acid, ester or anhydride in the presence of a catalyst comprising an oxide of niobium.

  5. [The different notions about beta-oxidation of fatty acids in peroxisomes, peroxisomes and ketonic bodies. The diabetic, acidotic coma as an acute deficiency of acetyl-CoA and ATP].

    PubMed

    Kotkina, T I; Titov, V N; Parkhimovich, R M

    2014-03-01

    The mechanisms of beta-oxidation of fatty acids developed more than a century before have no compliance with actual physical chemical data. The oxidation of long-chain C 16:0 palmitic saturated fatty acid occurs not by sequential formation of eight molecules of acetyl-KoA but by force of formation of double bond and its hydrolysis on two short-chain C 8:0 fatty acids. Only short-chain fatty acids can become shorter under "chipping" of C 2-acetate with formation of C 4-butyric acid (butyrate) and its metabolites (beta-hidroxibutirate, acetoacetate, acetone). The critical moment of oxidation is a hydrolysis of acetoacetyl-KoA on two molecules of acetyl-KoA. The molecule of ATP is to be expended on hydrolysis. The foundation of nonspecific biological reaction of stress--ketoacidosis,--is a decrease in mitochondrions of acetyl-KoA pool formed both from glycogen and glucose and fatty acids. The oxalate acetate inputs into Krebs cycle inadequate amount of acetyl-KoA which limits synthesis of ATP. The insulin has no direct involvement into development of ketoacidosis but prepares conditions to facilitate nonspecific etiological factor to initiate diabetic ketoacidosis. These are the pooling of small amount of glycogen in cytozol and the predominance in cytozol of cells and adipocytes of palmitic triglycerides which are slowly hydrolyzed by hormone-dependent lipase to release non-esterified fatty acids into intercellular medium. The increase of their concentration in blood plasma precedes ketoacidosis which is developing in patients without diabetes mellitus too. When cells begin to oxidize unsaturated linoleic and linolenic acids with large number of double binds instead of medium-chain fatty acids, oleinic and palmitic fatty acids to support beta-oxidation in mitochondrions and synthesis of ATP the amount of butyric acid, beta-hidroxibutiryl-KoA and acetoacetyl-KoA increases and of acetyl-KoA decreases. The cause of fatal outcome is the development of metabolic acidosis

  6. Preparation of {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acids and anhydrides

    DOEpatents

    Spivey, J.J.; Gogate, M.R.; Zoeller, J.R.; Tustin, G.C.

    1998-01-20

    Disclosed is a process for the preparation of {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acids and anhydrides thereof which comprises contacting formaldehyde or a source of formaldehyde with a carboxylic anhydride in the presence of a catalyst comprising mixed oxides of vanadium, phosphorus and, optionally, a third component selected from titanium, aluminum or, preferably silicon.

  7. Preparation of .alpha., .beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acids and anhydrides

    DOEpatents

    Spivey, James Jerry; Gogate, Makarand Ratnakav; Zoeller, Joseph Robert; Tustin, Gerald Charles

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for the preparation of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acids and anhydrides thereof which comprises contacting formaldehyde or a source of formaldehyde with a carboxylic anhydride in the presence of a catalyst comprising mixed oxides of vanadium, phosphorus and, optionally, a third component selected from titanium, aluminum or, preferably silicon.

  8. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid and oxindole-3-acetic acid to 2,3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-1H indole-3-acetic acid-7'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside in Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Radiolabeled oxindole-3-acetic acid was metabolized by roots, shoots, and caryopses of dark grown Zea mays seedlings to 2,3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-1H indole-3-acetic acid-7'-O-beta-D-glycopyranoside with the simpler name of 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside. This compound was also formed from labeled indole-3-acetic acid supplied to intact seedlings and root segments. The glucoside of 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid was also isolated as an endogenous compound in the caryopses and shoots of 4-day-old seedlings. It accumulates to a level of 4.8 nanomoles per plant in the kernel, more than 10 times the amount of oxindole-3-acetic acid. In the shoot it is present at levels comparable to that of oxindole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetic acid (62 picomoles per shoot). We conclude that 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside is a natural metabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Z. mays seedlings. From the data presented in this paper and in previous work, we propose the following route as the principal catabolic pathway for indole-3-acetic acid in Zea seedlings: Indole-3-acetic acid --> Oxindole-3-acetic acid --> 7-Hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid --> 7-Hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside.

  9. Activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulates fatty acid oxidation and energy uncoupling genes of mitochondria and reduces palmitate-induced apoptosis in pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jun; Jiang, Li; Lue, Qingguo; Ke, Linqiu; Li, Xiaoyu; Tong, Nanwei

    2010-01-15

    Recent evidence indicates that decreased oxidative capacity, lipotoxicity, and mitochondrial aberrations contribute to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} (PPAR{delta}) activation on lipid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta}-cells. After HIT-T15 cells (a {beta}-cell line) were exposed to high concentrations of palmitate and GW501516 (GW; a selective agonist of PPAR{delta}), we found that administration of GW increased the expression of PPAR{delta} mRNA. GW-induced activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulated carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4), and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2); alleviated mitochondrial swelling; attenuated apoptosis; and reduced basal insulin secretion induced by increased palmitate in HIT cells. These results suggest that activation of PPAR{delta} plays an important role in protecting pancreatic {beta}-cells against aberrations caused by lipotoxicity in metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

  10. Fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Auestad, N.

    1988-01-01

    Astrocytes were derived from cortex of two-day-old rat brain and grown in primary culture to confluence. The metabolism of the fatty acids, octanoate and palmitate, to CO{sub 2} in oxidative respiration and to the formation of ketone bodies was examined by radiolabeled tracer methodology. The net production of acetoacetate was also determined by measurement of its mass. The enzymes in the ketogenic pathway were examined by measuring enzymic activity and/or by immunoblot analyses. Labeled CO{sub 2} and labeled ketone bodies were produced from the oxidation of fatty acids labeled at carboxy- and {omega}-terminal carbons, indicating that fatty acids were oxidized by {beta}-oxidation. The results from the radiolabeled tracer studies also indicated that a substantial proportion of the {omega}-terminal 4-carbon unit of the fatty acids bypassed the {beta}-ketothiolase step of the {beta}-oxidation pathway. The ({sup 14}C)acetoacetate formed from the (1-{sup 14}C)labeled fatty acids, obligated to pass through the acetyl-CoA pool, contained 50% of the label at carbon 3 and 50% at carbon 1. In contrast, the ({sup 14}C)acetoacetate formed from the ({omega}-1)labeled fatty acids contained 90% of the label at carbon 3 and 10% at carbon 1.

  11. D-saccharic acid-1,4-lactone ameliorates alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus and oxidative stress in rats through inhibiting pancreatic beta-cells from apoptosis via mitochondrial dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Semantee; Manna, Prasenjit; Sil, Parames C.

    2011-12-15

    Oxidative stress plays a vital role in diabetic complications. To suppress the oxidative stress mediated damage in diabetic pathophysiology, a special focus has been given on naturally occurring antioxidants present in normal diet. D-saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (DSL), a derivative of D-glucaric acid, is present in many dietary plants and is known for its detoxifying and antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the beneficial role of DSL against alloxan (ALX) induced diabetes in the pancreas tissue of Swiss albino rats. A dose-dependent study for DSL (20-120 mg/kg body weight) was carried out to find the effective dose of the compound in ALX-induced diabetic rats. ALX exposure elevated the blood glucose, glycosylated Hb, decreased the plasma insulin and disturbed the intra-cellular antioxidant machineries whereas oral administration of DSL at a dose of 80 mg/kg body weight restored these alterations close to normal. Investigating the mechanism of the protective activity of DSL we observed that it prevented the pancreatic {beta}-cell apoptosis via mitochondria-dependent pathway. Results showed decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced cytochrome c release in the cytosol and reciprocal regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins in the diabetic rats. These events were also found to be associated with increased level of Apaf-1, caspase 9, and caspase 3 that ultimately led to pancreatic {beta}-cell apoptosis. DSL treatment, however, counteracted these changes. In conclusion, DSL possesses the capability of ameliorating the oxidative stress in ALX-induced diabetes and thus could be a promising approach in lessening diabetic complications. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress is suggested as a key event in the pathogenesis of diabetes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D-saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (DSL) reduces the alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DSL normalizes cellular antioxidant machineries

  12. Polymerization of beta-amino acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have compared carbonyl diimidazole (CDI) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as activating agents for the oligomerization of negatively-charged alpha- and beta-amino acids in homogeneous aqueous solution. alpha-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using CDI, but not by EDAC. beta-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using EDAC, but not by CDI. Aspartic acid, an alpha- and beta-dicarboxylic acid is oligomerized efficiently by both reagents. These results are explained in terms of the mechanisms of the reactions, and their relevance to prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  13. Oxidations of cyclic {beta}-diketones catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Omar, M.M.; Espenson, J.H. |

    1996-08-06

    Methylrhenium trioxide (CH{sub 3}ReO{sub 3} or MTO) catalyzes the oxidation of {beta}-diketones by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of the initial oxidation step have been investigated in CH{sub 3}CN/H{sub 2}O (1:1 v/v) at 25{degree}C for a group of cyclic {beta}-diketones. The initial oxidation step features the enol form, the majority species, as the reactant. Its rate responds to substituents in the `normal` manner: electron-donating groups accelerate the reaction. We suggest that the double bond of the enol attacks a peroxo oxygen of a peroxorhenium complex A = CH{sub 3}Re(O){sub 2}(O{sub 2}) or B = CH{sub 3}Re(O)(O{sub 2}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O). This reaction affords a 2-hydroxy-1,3-dicarbonyl intermediate, which in some instances was detected by {sup 1}H NMR. This hydroxy intermediate is susceptible to cleavage via a Baeyer-Villiger oxidation to yield carboxylic acids as final products. In contrast to the first reaction, this step may feature the peroxorhenium complexes A and B as nucleophiles rather than their customary electrophilic behavior; perhaps the trend is reversed by substrate binding to rhenium. Time profiles for the different stages of the reaction were also determined. The mechanistic aspects of these multistep catalytic oxidations are discussed in terms of the electronic nature of the activated rhenium-bound peroxo ligands. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Metallo-beta-lactamase inhibitory activity of phthalic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Yukiko; Morinaka, Akihiro; Fukushima, Takayoshi; Kudo, Toshiaki

    2009-09-01

    4-Butyl-3-methylphthalic acid was recognized as a metallo-beta-lactamase inhibitor. The structure-activity relationship study of substituted phthalic acids afforded 3-phenylphthalic acid derivatives as potent IMP-1 inhibitors. On the other hand, 3-substituted with 4-hydroxyphenyl phthalic acid derivative displayed a potent combination effect with biapenem (BIPM) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa that produce IMP-1. PMID:19632114

  15. Segments of amino acid sequence similarity in beta-amylases.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, F; Rhodes, C

    1988-01-01

    In alpha-amylases from animals, plants and bacteria and in beta-amylases from plants and bacteria a number of segments exhibit amino acid sequence similarity specific to the alpha or to the beta type, respectively. In the case of the beta-amylases the similar sequence regions are extensive and they are disrupted only by short interspersed dissimilar regions. Close to the C terminus, however, no such sequence similarity exist. PMID:2464171

  16. Ferulic acid destabilizes preformed {beta}-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hirohata, Mie; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2005-10-21

    Inhibition of the formation of {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}), as well as the destabilization of preformed fA{beta} in the CNS, would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We reported previously that curcumin (Cur) inhibits fA{beta} formation from A{beta} and destabilizes preformed fA{beta} in vitro. Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of ferulic acid (FA) on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fA{beta} at pH 7.5 at 37 deg C in vitro. We next compared the anti-amyloidogenic activities of FA with Cur, rifampicin, and tetracycline. Ferulic acid dose-dependently inhibited fA{beta} formation from amyloid {beta}-peptide, as well as their extension. Moreover, it destabilized preformed fA{beta}s. The overall activity of the molecules examined was in the order of: Cur > FA > rifampicin = tetracycline. FA could be a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for AD.

  17. Nucleic acid encoding TGF-. beta. and its uses

    SciTech Connect

    Derynck, R.M.A.; Goeddel, D.V.

    1989-12-12

    This patent describes a method. It comprises: constructing a vector which includes nucleic acid encoding biologically active TGF-{beta}, transforming a host eukaryotic cell with the vector, culturing the transformed cell and recovering mature TGF-{beta} from the culture medium.

  18. Treatment of Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fatty acid oxidation disorders Treatment of fatty acid oxidation disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... page It's been added to your dashboard . Fatty acid oxidation disorders are rare health conditions that affect ...

  19. Non-enzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doctor, V. M.; Oro, J.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the mechanism of nonenzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid in the presence of metal ions and pyridoxal. The results suggest that aspartic acid is first converted to oxalacetic acid by transamination with pyridoxal which in turn is converted to pyridoxamine. This is followed by decarboxylation of oxalacetic acid to form pyruvic acid which transaminates with pyridoxamine to form alanine. The possible significance of these results to prebiotic molecular evolution is briefly discussed.

  20. Ellagic acid promotes A{beta}42 fibrillization and inhibits A{beta}42-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Ying; Yang, Shi-gao; Du, Xue-ting; Zhang, Xi; Sun, Xiao-xia; Zhao, Min; Sun, Gui-yuan; Liu, Rui-tian

    2009-12-25

    Smaller, soluble oligomers of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Selective inhibition of A{beta} oligomer formation provides an optimum target for AD therapy. Some polyphenols have potent anti-amyloidogenic activities and protect against A{beta} neurotoxicity. Here, we tested the effects of ellagic acid (EA), a polyphenolic compound, on A{beta}42 aggregation and neurotoxicity in vitro. EA promoted A{beta} fibril formation and significant oligomer loss, contrary to previous results that polyphenols inhibited A{beta} aggregation. The results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Western blot displayed more fibrils in A{beta}42 samples co-incubated with EA in earlier phases of aggregation. Consistent with the hypothesis that plaque formation may represent a protective mechanism in which the body sequesters toxic A{beta} aggregates to render them harmless, our MTT results showed that EA could significantly reduce A{beta}42-induced neurotoxicity toward SH-SY5Y cells. Taken together, our results suggest that EA, an active ingredient in many fruits and nuts, may have therapeutic potential in AD.

  1. BACTERIAL OXIDATION OF DIPICOLINIC ACID

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yasuo; Arima, Kei

    1962-01-01

    Kobayashi, Yasuo (University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan) and Kei Arima. Bacterial oxidation of dipicolinic acid. II. Identification of α-ketoglutaric acid and 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid and some properties of cell-free extracts. J. Bacteriol. 84:765–771. 1962—When a dipicolinic acid (DPA)-decomposing bacterium, Achromobacter strain 1–2, was incubated at 30 C with shaking in a DPA solution containing 10−3m arsenite, a keto acid was accumulated. The 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone of this acid was synthesized and identified as α-ketoglutaric acid by paper chromatography, visible absorption spectrum, infrared analysis, elemental analysis, and mixed melting point. During this incubation, oxalic acid equivalent to the consumed dipicolinic acid was produced. A fluorescent material was also isolated from culture fluid and identified as 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid by paper chromatography and the ultraviolet absorption spectrum. Further, cell-free extracts were prepared by sonic oscillation. Ferrous ion and a reduced di- or triphosphopyridine nucleotide-generating system were proven to be required for enzymic oxidation of DPA. And 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid was also oxidized by this preparation. From the results obtained, a possible metabolic pathway of dipicolinic acid was proposed. PMID:14033954

  2. Dealumination of zeolite {beta} via dicarboxylic acid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, M.R.; Fung, A.S.; Kennedy, G.J.; Degnan, T.F.

    1996-10-10

    It is demonstrated that zeolite {beta} and zeolite {beta} containing catalysts can be dealuminated to very low acidity levels using a novel oxalic acid treatment without reducing zeolite integrity. The effect of the oxalic acid treatment has been studied over a wide range of treatment conditions for both silica-bound and unbound zeolite {beta} catalysts. Greater than 90% dealumination is observed with a concomitant reduction in n-hexane-cracking activity as measured by the alpha ({alpha}) test. Removal of framework aluminum occurs via a two-step hyrolysis/chelation mechanism, with the oxalic acid acting both as an acid and as a chelating agent. Framework aluminum removal is accompanied by the formation of internal silanol groups. Water soluble aluminum oxalates are present in the extracted solutions. Silanol groups are annealed with extended oxalic acid treatment. Oxalic acid treatment results in a unique contraction of the zeolite {beta} lattice structure not observed for mineral acid treated or steamed zeolite {beta} catalysts. 15 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. 4-Pentafluoroethylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucoside as a new fluorogenic substrate for acid beta-D-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, I V; Karpova, E A; Dudukina, T V; Voznyi, Y V

    1996-04-30

    4-Pentafluoroethylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucoside is proposed as an efficient substrate for human leukocyte acid beta-glucosidase. Its synthesis is described. This substrate was compared directly with 4-trifluoromethylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucoside synthesized by us earlier and with 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucoside which is commonly used for acid beta-glucosidase activity assay. The specific activity of acid beta-glucosidase with 4-pentafluoroethylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucoside was 3- and 8-fold higher than it was with the substrates mentioned above. The kinetic parameters KM and VMAX for human leukocyte acid beta-glucosidase with the three substrates was determined. One possible application of the newly synthesized substrate is its use in the diagnosis of acid beta-glucosidase hereditary deficiency (Gaucher's disease). PMID:8740577

  4. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of limonene oxide,. cap alpha. -pinene oxide, and. beta. -pinene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Aikins, J.A.; Williams, F.

    1984-01-01

    After suitable drying, the subject monomers in the form of neat liquids undergo radiation-induced polymerization with no apparent side reactions and high conversions to precipitatable polymers of low molecular weight. A cationic mechanism is evidenced by the strongly retarding effect of tri-n-propylamine on the polymerization rate. At 25/sup 0/C, limonene oxide gives the highest polymerization rates, an average conversion of 36% per Mrad being obtained in comparison with values of 5.7 and 7.3% per Mrad for the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides, respectively. Similarly, the average anti DP/sub n/ decreases from 11.8 for the limonene oxide polymer to 5.6 and 4.0 for the ..cap alpha..-pinene oxide and ..beta..-pinene oxide polymers, respectively. A high frequency of chain transfer to monomer is indicated in each case by the fact that the kinetic chain lengths are estimated to be on the order of a hundred times larger than the anti DP/sub n/ values. Structural characterization of the limonene oxide polymer by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy provides conclusive evidence that the polymerization proceeds by the opening of the epoxide ring to yield a 1,2-trans polyether. Similar NMR studies on the polymers formed from the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides show that in the polymerization of these monomers, the opening of the epoxide ring is generally accompanied by the concomitant ring opening of the cyclobutane ring structure to yield a gem-dimethyl group in the main chain. The detection of isopropenyl end groups in the pinene oxide polymers is also consistent with this mode of propagation being followed by chain (proton) transfer to monomer.

  5. Peroxisomal. beta. -oxidation enzyme proteins in adrenoleukodystrophy: distinction between x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.W.; Watkins, P.A.; Osumi, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Moser, H.W.

    1987-03-01

    Very long chain fatty acids, which accumulate in plasma and tissues in x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), neonatal ALD, and the Zellweger cerebrohepatorenal syndrome, are degraded by the peroxisomal ..beta..-oxidation pathway, consisting of acyl-CoA oxidase, the bifunctional enoyl-CoA hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and ..beta..-ketothiolase. A marked deficiency of all three enzyme proteins was reported in livers from patients with the Zellweger syndrome, a disorder in which peroxisomes are decreased or absent. Peroxisomes are not as markedly decreased in neonatal ALD and appear normal in x-linked ALD. Immunoblot analysis of the peroxisomal ..beta..-oxidation enzymes revealed an almost complete lack of the bifunctional enzymes in neonatal ALD liver, similar to the finding in Zellweger tissues. In contrast, acyl-CoA oxidase and ..beta..-ketothiolase were present in neonatal ALD liver, although the thiolase appeared to be in precursor form (2-3 kDa larger than the mature enzyme) in neonatal ALD. Unlike either neonatal ALD or Zellweger syndrome, all three peroxisomal ..beta..-oxidation enzymes were present in x-linked ALD liver. Despite the absence in neonatal ALD liver of bifunctional enzyme protein, its mRNA was detected by RNA blot analysis in fibroblasts from these patients. These observations suggest that lack of bifunctional enzyme protein in neonatal ALD results from either abnormal translation of the mRNA or degradation of the enzyme prior to its entry into peroxisomes.

  6. The Protective Role of Carnosic Acid against Beta-Amyloid Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rasoolijazi, H.; Azad, N.; Joghataei, M. T.; Kerdari, M.; Nikbakht, F.; Soleimani, M.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the pathological mechanisms responsible for the beta- amyloid cascade associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies have demonstrated the role of carnosic acid (CA), an effective antioxidant, in combating oxidative stress. A progressive cognitive decline is one of the hallmarks of AD. Thus, we attempted to determine whether the administration of CA protects against memory deficit caused by beta-amyloid toxicity in rats. Beta-amyloid (1–40) was injected by stereotaxic surgery into the Ca1 region of the hippocampus of rats in the Amyloid beta (Aβ) groups. CA was delivered intraperitoneally, before and after surgery in animals in the CA groups. Passive avoidance learning and spontaneous alternation behavior were evaluated using the shuttle box and the Y-maze, respectively. The degenerating hippocampal neurons were detected by fluoro-jade b staining. We observed that beta-amyloid (1–40) can induce neurodegeneration in the Ca1 region of the hippocampus by using fluoro-jade b staining. Also, the behavioral tests revealed that CA may recover the passive avoidance learning and spontaneous alternation behavior scores in the Aβ + CA group, in comparison with the Aβ group. We found that CA may ameliorate the spatial and learning memory deficits induced by the toxicity of beta-amyloid in the rat hippocampus. PMID:24363627

  7. Polymerization on the rocks: beta-amino acids and arginine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the accumulation of long oligomers of beta-amino acids on the surface of minerals using the 'polymerization on the rocks' protocol. We find that long oligopeptides of beta-glutamic acid which cannot be formed in homogeneous aqueous solution are accumulated efficiently on the surface of hydroxylapatite using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as condensing agent. The EDAC-induced oligomerization of aspartic acid on hydroxylapatite proceeds even more efficiently. Hydroxylapatite can also facilitate the ligation of the tripeptide (glu)3. The 'polymerization on the rocks' scenario is not restricted to negatively-charged amino acids. Oligoarginines are accumulated on the surface of illite using carbonyldiimidizole (CDI) as condensing agent. We find that FeS2 catalyzes the CDI-induced oligomerization of arginine, although it does not adsorb oligoarginines. These results are relevant to the formation of polypeptides on the primitive earth.

  8. Peroxisomal beta-oxidation defect with detectable peroxisomes: a case with neonatal onset and progressive course.

    PubMed

    Barth, P G; Wanders, R J; Schutgens, R B; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E M; van Heemstra, D

    1990-07-01

    A progressive demyelinating cerebral disorder is described in a normally-appearing female infant with neonatal seizures, progressive psychomotor deterioration, deafness, retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy and loss of myelin observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning. MRI also showed the absence of macroscopic neocortical dysplasia which is usually found in Zellweger syndrome (ZS). Adrenal cortical function was normal. The patient died at the age of 37 months. Extensive biochemical investigations of peroxisomal functions in the patient revealed an impairment of peroxisomal beta-oxidation resulting in elevated levels of very long (greater than C22) chain fatty acids in plasma and fibroblasts. Moreover, elevated plasma levels of intermediates of bile acid biosynthesis such as tri- and dihydroxycholestanoic acid were found. Other peroxisomal functions were normal. Immunoblotting of the peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzyme proteins in liver from the patient revealed normal responses with antisera against acyl-CoA oxidase, bifunctional protein and thiolase respectively. From these data we conclude that the patient had a deficiency of a single peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzyme at the level of either the bifunctional protein or peroxisomal thiolase with retained immunoreactivity against these enzymes. PMID:2209666

  9. Method for preparing 6-.beta.-halopenicillanic acids

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Erik I.; Kran-Nielsen, Mogens P.; Von Daehne, Welf

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to a new and improved method for the preparation of a compound of the formula I ##STR1## in which R stands for halogen, giving rise to high yields of substantially pure 6.beta.-halopenicillanic acids, obtained in one step.

  10. HPLC Analysis of [Alpha]- and [Beta]-Acids in Hops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danenhower, Travis M.; Force, Leyna J.; Petersen, Kenneth J.; Betts, Thomas A.; Baker, Gary A.

    2008-01-01

    Hops have been used for centuries to impart aroma and bitterness to beer. The cones of the female hop plant contain both essential oils, which include many of the fragrant components of hops, and a collection of compounds known as [alpha]- and [beta]-acids that are the precursors to bittering agents. In order for brewers to predict the ultimate…

  11. Bioavailabilty of beta-amino acid and C-terminally derived PK/PBAN analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of linear beta amino-acid-substituted peptides (PK-betaA-1: Ac-YFT[beta3-P]RLa; PK-betaA-2: Ac-Y[beta2-homoF]TPRLa; PK-betaA-3: Ac-Y[beta3-F]TPRLa and PK-betaA-4: Ac-[beta3-F]FT[beta3-P]RLa) and unsubstituted analogs (Ac-YFTPRLa and YFTPRLa) of the pyrokinin(PK)/pheromone biosynthesis-ac...

  12. Lipid oxidation induced oxidative degradation of cereal beta-glucan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jie; Mäkelä, Noora; Maina, Ndegwa Henry; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Sontag-Strohm, Tuula

    2016-04-15

    In food systems, lipid oxidation can cause oxidation of other molecules. This research for the first time investigated oxidative degradation of β-glucan induced by lipid oxidation using an oil-in-water emulsion system which simulated a multi-phased aqueous food system containing oil and β-glucan. Lipid oxidation was monitored using peroxide value and hexanal production while β-glucan degradation was evaluated by viscosity and molecular weight measurements. The study showed that while lipid oxidation proceeded, β-glucan degradation occurred. Emulsions containing β-glucan, oil and ferrous ion showed significant viscosity and molecular weight decrease after 1 week of oxidation at room temperature. Elevated temperature (40°C) enhanced the oxidation reactions causing higher viscosity drop. In addition, the presence of β-glucan appeared to retard the hexanal production in lipid oxidation. The study revealed that lipid oxidation may induce the degradation of β-glucan in aqueous food systems where β-glucan and lipids co-exist. PMID:26675874

  13. Bioactivation of cysteine conjugates of 1-nitropyrene oxides by cysteine conjugate beta-lyase purified from Peptostreptococcus magnus.

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, K; Kinouchi, T; Akimoto, S; Ohnishi, Y

    1995-01-01

    To determine the role of cysteine conjugate beta-lyase (beta-lyase) in the metabolism of mutagenic nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, we determined the effect of beta-lyase on the mutagenicities and DNA binding of cysteine conjugates of 4,5-epoxy-4,5-dihydro-1-nitropyrene (1-NP 4,5-oxide) and 9,10-epoxy-9,10-dihydro-1-nitropyrene (1-NP 9,10-oxide), which are detoxified metabolites of the mutagenic compound 1-nitropyrene. We purified beta-lyase from Peptostreptococcus magnus GAI0663, since P. magnus is one of the constituents of the intestinal microflora and exhibits high levels of degrading activity with cysteine conjugates of 1-nitropyrene oxides (1-NP oxide-Cys). The activity of purified beta-lyase was optimal at pH 7.5 to 8.0, was completely inhibited by aminooxyacetic acid and hydroxylamine, and was eliminated by heating the enzyme at 55 degrees C for 5 min. The molecular weight of beta-lyase was 150,000, as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography. S-Arylcysteine conjugates were good substrates for this enzyme. As determined by the Salmonella mutagenicity test, 5 ng of beta-lyase protein increased the mutagenicity of the cysteine conjugate of 1-NP 9,10-oxide (10 nmol per plate) 4.5-fold in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and 4.1-fold in strain TA100. However, beta-lyase had little effect on the cysteine conjugate of 1-NP 4,5-oxide (10 nmol per plate). Both conjugates exhibited only low levels of mutagenicity with nitroreductase-deficient strain TA98NR. In vitro binding of 1-NP oxide-Cys to calf thymus DNA was increased by adding purified beta-lyase or xanthine oxidase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8526486

  14. Crystal structure of beta-cyclodextrin-benzoic acid inclusion complex.

    PubMed

    Aree, Thammarat; Chaichit, Narongsak

    2003-02-14

    The inclusion complex of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) with benzoic acid (BA) has been characterized crystallographically. Two beta-CDs cocrystallize with two BAs, 0.7 ethanol and 20.65 water molecules [2(C(6)H(10)O(5))(7).2(C(7)H(6)O(2)).0.7(C(2)H(6)O).20.65H(2)O] in the triclinic space group P1 with unit cell constants: a=15.210(1), b=15.678(1), c=15.687(1) A, alpha=89.13(1), beta=74.64(1), gamma=76.40(1) degrees. The anisotropic refinement of 1840 atomic parameters against 16,201 X-ray diffraction data converged at R=0.078. In the crystal lattice, beta-CD forms dimers stabilized by direct O-2(m)_1/O-3(m)_1...O-2(n)_2/O-3(n)_2 hydrogen bonds (intradimer) and by indirect O-6(m)_1...,O-6(n)_2 hydrogen bonds with one or two bridging water molecules joined in between (interdimer). These dimers are stacked like coins in a roll constructing endless channels where the guest molecules are included. The BA molecules protrude with their COOH groups at the beta-CD O-6-sides and are maintained in positions by hydrogen bonding to the surrounding O-6-H groups and water molecules. Water molecules (20.65) are distributed over 30 positions in the interstices between beta-CD molecules, except the water sites W-1, W-2 that are located in the channel of the beta-CD dimer. Water site W-2 is hydrogen bonded to the disordered ethanol molecule (occupancy 0.7). PMID:12559746

  15. C6-C10-dicarboxylic aciduria: biochemical considerations in relation to diagnosis of beta-oxidation defects.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, N; Kølvraa, S; Mortensen, P B; Rasmussen, K

    1982-01-01

    By means of gas chromatographic methods substantial amounts of the C6-C10-dicarboxylic acids, i.e. adipic, suberic and sebacic acids, have been found in the urine from children with unexplained attacks of lethargy and hypotonia, presumably related to episodes of fever and/or insufficient food intake. The course have once been fatal and is often characterized by severe hypoglycemia without ketonuria. Systematic gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric determinations of selected organic acid metabolites in the urine, together with enzymatic measurements in fibroblasts and clinical data from 4 patients of this category, have shown that the biochemical basis of this syndrome can be inborn errors of the beta-oxidation of fatty acids, localized to the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenation system. The biosynthesis of adipic, suberic and sebacic acids was studied using ketotic rats as the model, since ketosis in rats and humans is accompanied by excessive urinary excretion of adipic and suberic acids. A probable pathway for the production of the three dicarboxylic acids was found to be an initial omega-oxidation of the medium-chain C10-C14-monocarboxylic acids followed by beta-oxidation of the resulting medium-chain dicarboxylic acids. It is argued that the source of the omega-oxidizable monocarboxylic acids in ketosis most probably is the fat deposites, and it is speculated that the patients with beta-oxidation defects supplement this source with beta-oxidation intermediate medium-chain monocarboxylic acids, accumulated as a result of the defect. The ratio between the excreted amounts of adipic acid and sebacic acid in the urine from the patients with beta-oxidation defects is less than 50. This is in contrast to the ratio in urine from ketotic patients, where it is greater than 100. Adipic acid/sebacic acid ratio-measured by means of a gas chromatographic analysis-is therefore suggested as a tool in the diagnosis of dicarboxylic acidurias. Based on the clinical picture and

  16. Process for the generation of .alpha., .beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acids and esters using niobium catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gogate, Makarand Ratnakav; Spivey, James Jerome; Zoeller, Joseph Robert

    1999-01-01

    A process using a niobium catalyst includes the step of reacting an ester or carboxylic acid with oxygen and an alcohol in the presence a niobium catalyst to respectively produce an .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated ester or carboxylic acid. Methanol may be used as the alcohol, and the ester or carboxylic acid may be passed over the niobium catalyst in a vapor stream containing oxygen and methanol. Alternatively, the process using a niobium catalyst may involve the step of reacting an ester and oxygen in the presence the niobium catalyst to produce an .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acid. In this case the ester may be a methyl ester. In either case, niobium oxide may be used as the niobium catalyst with the niobium oxide being present on a support. The support may be an oxide selected from the group consisting of silicon oxide, aluminum oxide, titanium oxide and mixtures thereof. The catalyst may be formed by reacting niobium fluoride with the oxide serving as the support. The niobium catalyst may contain elemental niobium within the range of 1 wt % to 70 wt %, and more preferably within the range of 10 wt % to 30 wt %. The process may be operated at a temperature from 150 to 450.degree. C. and preferably from 250 to 350.degree. C. The process may be operated at a pressure from 0.1 to 15 atm. absolute and preferably from 0.5-5 atm. absolute. The flow rate of reactants may be from 10 to 10,000 L/kg.sub.(cat) /h, and preferably from 100 to 1,000 L/kg.sub.(cat) /h.

  17. Role of beta-carotene in ameliorating the cadmium-induced oxidative stress in rat brain and testis.

    PubMed

    El-Missiry, M A; Shalaby, F

    2000-01-01

    The role of oxidative stress in chronic cadmium (Cd) toxicity and its prevention by cotreatment with beta-carotene was investigated. Adult male rats were intragastrically administered 2 mg CdCl2/kg body weight three times a week intragastrically for 3 and 6 weeks. Brain and testicular thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) was elevated after 3 and 6 weeks of Cd administration, indicating increased lipid peroxidation (LPO) and oxidative stress. Cellular damage was indicated by inhibition of adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity and increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in brain and testicular tissues. Chronic Cd administration resulted in a decline in glutathione (GSH) content and a decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in both organs. Administration of beta-carotene (250 IU/kg i.g.) concurrent with Cd ameliorated Cd-induced LPO. The brain and testicular antioxidants, SOD, GST, and GSH, decreased by Cd alone, were restored by beta-carotene cotreatment. Concurrent treatment with beta-carotene also ameliorated the decrease in ATPase activity and the increase in LDH activity in brain and testis of Cd-treated rats, indicating a prophylactic action of beta-carotene on Cd toxicity. Therefore, the results indicate that the nutritional antioxidant beta-carotene ameliorated oxidative stress and the loss of cellular antioxidants and suggest that beta-carotene may control Cd-induced brain and testicular toxicity. PMID:10969995

  18. Peroxisomal and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in human hepatoma cells (HEP-G2)

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, P.A.; Blake, D.C. Jr.; Pedersen, J.I.

    1987-05-01

    Hep-G2 cells oxidize (1-/sup 14/C)palmitic acid (C16) and (1-/sup 14/C) lignoceric acid (C24) via beta-oxidation to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and water-soluble (WS) products. After perchloric acid precipitation and chloroform-methanol extraction, the WS fraction contained labelled oxidation products as well as fatty acyl CoA's, thus, measurement of WS radioactivity is an overestimate of Hep-G2 beta-oxidation. Alkaline hydrolysis of fatty acyl CoA's prior to measurement of WS radioactivity permits more accurate assessment of beta-oxidation. Using this method, the optimal pH for oxidation of each fatty acid to WS products by Hep-G2 cells was 9.0, while /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production was maximal at pH 7.0. To determine the subcellular location of beta-oxidation, mitochondria (M) were partially separated from peroxisomes (P) on linear Nycodenz gradients. In Hep-G2 cells, oxidation of both C16 and C24 was observed mainly in fractions enriched in succinate dehydrogenase, an M marker enzyme. In contrast, both P and M of rat liver oxidized these fatty acids. However, when Hep-G2 cells were fractionated on discontinuous sucrose gradients, C16 and C24 were oxidized by both P and M fractions. They conclude that beta-oxidation of both long (C16) and very long (C24) chain fatty acids occurs in P as well as in M of Hep-G2 cells, and the present method reflects a more accurate and sensitive measurement of oxidation rates.

  19. Cocoa Phenolic Extract Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Martín, María Ángeles; Ramos, Sonia; Cordero-Herrero, Isabel; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE) containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5–20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult. PMID:23912326

  20. l-Theanine, an amino acid in green tea, attenuates beta-amyloid-induced cognitive dysfunction and neurotoxicity: reduction in oxidative damage and inactivation of ERK/p38 kinase and NF-kappaB pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Il; Lee, Yong Kyung; Park, Sang Gi; Choi, Im Seop; Ban, Jung Ok; Park, Hyoung Kook; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Yun, Young Won; Han, Sang Bae; Oh, Ki Wan; Hong, Jin Tae

    2009-12-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta)-induced neurotoxicity is a major pathological mechanism of Alzheimer disease (AD). In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of l-theanine, a component of green tea (Camellia sinensis), on Abeta(1-42)-induced neuronal cell death and memory impairment. Oral treatment of l-theanine (2 and 4 mg/kg) for 5 weeks in the drinking water of mice, followed by injection of Abeta(1-42) (2 microg/mouse, icv), significantly attenuated Abeta(1-42)-induced memory impairment. Furthermore, l-theanine reduced Abeta(1-42) levels and the accompanying Abeta(1-42)-induced neuronal cell death in the cortex and hippocampus of the brain. Moreover, l-theanine inhibited Abeta(1-42)-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase as well as the activity of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). l-Theanine also significantly reduced oxidative protein and lipid damage and the elevation of glutathione levels in the brain. These data suggest that the positive effects of l-theanine on memory may be mediated by suppression of ERK/p38 and NF-kappaB as well as the reduction of macromolecular oxidative damage. Thus, l-theanine may be useful in the prevention and treatment of AD. PMID:19766184

  1. Distribution of acid phosphatase, beta-glucuronidase, n-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase and beta-galactosidase in cornea of albino rabbit.

    PubMed

    Cejková, J; Lojda, Z; Havránková, E

    1975-09-29

    Activities of acid phosphatase, beta-glucuronidase, N-acethyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase and acid beta-galactosidase were investigated histochemically in rabbit corneas. Frozen sections after block fixation in cold 4% formaldehyde with 1% CaCl2 followed by washing in cold physiological saline as well as cold microtome sections of corneas quenched in petroleter chilled with acetone-dry ice mixture, transferred to nonprecooled slides or semipermeable membranes were used. Standard aqueous media were employed in the case of free-floating frozen sections of fixed corneas as well as of cold mictrotome sections (postfixed in cold 4% formaldehyde). Agar media were used in connection with the technic of semipermeable membranes. Gomori method (in the case of acid phosphatase), simultaneous azocoupling methods (substrates derivated of naphthol-AS-BI with hexazonium-p-rosanilin) in the case of acid phosphatase, beta-glucuronidase and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase and the indigogenic method in the case of acid beta-galactosidase were applied. Enzyme activities in sections of fixed corneas were minimal in comparison with those in cold microtome sections of unfixed material revealed particularly with the technic of semipermeable membranes which is to be preferred. This technic is recommended in studies concerned with lysosomal enzymes in the cornea, particularly in keratocytes. All enzymes investigated were present in corneal epithelium, keratocytes and endothelium. Acid phosphatase displayed the highest activity followed by beta-glucuronidase and acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. The activity of beta-galactosidase was the lowest. For the demonstration of activities in keratocytes sections parallel to the surface are very suitable. In these sections enzyme activities were demonstrated in small granules (apparently lysosomes) present in the central part of their cytoplasm as well as in projections. Diffuse staining was also seen, being the highest in the case of acid phosphatase. PMID

  2. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of limonene oxide,. cap alpha. -pinene oxide, and. beta. -pinene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Aikins, J.A.; Williams, F.

    1985-01-01

    After suitable drying, the subject monomers in the form of neat liquids undergo radiation-induced polymerization with no apparent side reactions and high conversions to precipitatable polymers of low molecular weights. A high frequency of chain (proton) transfer to monomer is indicated by the fact that the kinetic chain lengths are estimated to be several hundred times larger than the range of DP/sub n/ values (12-4). Structural characterization of the limonene oxide polymer by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy provides conclusive evidence that the polymerization proceeds by the opening of the epoxide ring to yield a 1,2-trans polyether. Similar NMR studies on the polymers formed from the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides show that the opening of the epoxide ring for these monomers is generally accompanied by the concomitant ring opening of the cyclobutane ring structure to yield a gem-di-methyl group in the main chain.

  3. An Acidity Scale for Binary Oxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Derek W.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the classification of binary oxides as acidic, basic, or amphoteric. Demonstrates how a numerical scale for acidity/basicity of binary oxides can be constructed using thermochemical data for oxoacid salts. Presents the calculations derived from the data that provide the numeric scale values. (TW)

  4. Ascorbic acid recycling by cultured beta cells: effects of increased glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Steffner, Robert J; Wu, Lan; Powers, Alvin C; May, James M

    2004-11-15

    Ascorbic acid is necessary for optimal insulin secretion from pancreatic islets. We evaluated ascorbate recycling and whether it is impaired by increased glucose metabolism in the rat beta-cell line INS-1. INS-1 cells, engineered with the potential for overexpression of glucokinase under the control of a tetracycline-inducible gene expression system, took up and reduced dehydroascorbic acid to ascorbate in a concentration-dependent manner that was optimal in the presence of physiologic D-glucose concentrations. Ascorbate uptake did not affect intracellular GSH concentrations. Whereas depletion of GSH in culture to levels about 25% of normal also did not affect the ability of the cells to reduce dehydroascorbic acid, more severe acute GSH depletion to less than 10% of normal levels did impair dehydroascorbic acid reduction. Culture of inducible cells in 11.8 mM D-glucose and doxycycline for 48 h enhanced glucokinase activity, increased glucose utilization, abolished D-glucose-dependent insulin secretion, and increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The latter may have contributed to subsequent decreases in the ability of the cells both to maintain intracellular ascorbate and to recycle it from dehydroascorbic acid. Cultured beta cells have a high capacity to recycle ascorbate, but this is sensitive to oxidant stress generated by increased glucose metabolism due to culture in high glucose concentrations and increased glucokinase expression. Impaired ascorbate recycling as a result of increased glucose metabolism may have implications for the role of ascorbate in insulin secretion in diabetes mellitus and may partially explain glucose toxicity in beta cells. PMID:15477012

  5. Potential bile acid metabolites. XVIII. Synthesis of stereoisomeric 3,6,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholanoic acids.

    PubMed

    Iida, T; Tamaru, T; Chang, F C; Goto, J; Nambara, T

    1991-04-01

    Two new 6-hydroxylated bile acids, 3 beta, 6 alpha, 12 alpha- and 3 beta, 6 beta, 12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholanoic acids, were synthesized from deoxycholic acid. In addition, their C-3 epimers, 3 alpha, 6 alpha, 12 alpha- and 3 alpha, 6 beta, 12 alpha-trihydroxy acids, were prepared by a new route. The principal reactions used were 1) 6 beta-hydroxylation of 3-methoxy-3,5-dienes with m-chloroperbenzoic acid in aqueous dioxane; 2) catalytic hydrogenation of the resulting 6 beta-hydroxy-3-oxo-4-enes to the 6 beta-hydroxy-3-oxo-5 beta compounds with palladium on calcium carbonate catalyst in ethanol; and 3) stereoselective reduction of appropriate 3-oxo derivatives with potassium tri-sec-butylborohydride and tert-butylamine-borane complex. The thin-layer chromatographic, gas-liquid chromatographic, and high performance liquid chromatographic mobilities, and 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic data of the four stereoisomers are presented. With this work all the 6-hydroxylated derivatives of lithocholic, deoxycholic, chenodeoxycholic, ursodeoxycholic, and cholic acids in the 5 beta series are now known and have been synthesized. PMID:1856610

  6. Nickel Inhibits Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W.; Brant, Kelly A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation—the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy—in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with L-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 hr), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:26051273

  7. Pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant mechanism(s) of BHT and beta-carotene in photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Black, Homer S

    2002-04-01

    An hypothesis for the role of free radicals in cancer was elaborated by D. Harman in 1962 who suggested that it might be possible to reduce the extent of damage caused by free radicals through three dietary changes: (i) caloric reduction, i.e., lowering the level of free radical reactions arising in the course of normal metabolism; (ii) minimize dietary components that tend to increase the level of free radical reactions (e.g., polyunsaturated fats); and (iii) supplement the diet with one or more free radical reaction inhibitors (anti-oxidants). With respect to (ii) and (iii), lipid peroxidation exemplifies the type of chain reaction initiated by free radicals, with unsaturated fatty acids being the primary center of free radical attack. Anti-oxidants act as free radical scavengers and are able to terminate these reactions. Indeed, the phenolic anti-oxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), and the carotenoid beta-carotene, have both been shown to influence photocarcinogenesis, although the lack of correlation between physicochemical parameters and pathophysiological responses is apparent in both instances. The bimolecular rate constant for reaction of BHT with model peroxyl radicals is low while beta-carotene is highly reactive. However, both are able to efficiently inhibit lipid peroxidation reactions in biological membranes. Indeed, the influence of photocarcinogenesis by both BHT and beta-carotene is diminished as the level of dietary fat decreases, pointing to the involvement of lipid peroxidative reactions. Nevertheless, the mode of action of BHT in inhibiting photocarcinogenesis appears to be related to dose-diminution resulting from an increased spectral absorbance of the stratum corneum. On the other hand, beta-carotene has no such effect and may actually exacerbate photocarcinogenesis under certain dietary conditions. This paradox points to the complex relationship between chemical mechanisms and biological mode of action of anti-oxidants in

  8. Effect of graphene oxide on the conformational transitions of amyloid beta peptide: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Lokesh; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Subramanian, Venkatesan; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-09-01

    The interactions between nanomaterials (NMs) and amyloid proteins are central to the nanotechnology-based diagnostics and therapy in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Graphene oxide (GO) and its derivatives have shown to modulate the aggregation pattern of disease causing amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. However, the mechanism is still not well understood. Using molecular dynamics simulations, the effect of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) having carbon:oxygen ratio of 4:1 and 10:1, respectively, on the conformational transitions (alpha-helix to beta-sheet) and the dynamics of the peptide was investigated. GO and rGO decreased the beta-strand propensity of amino acid residues in Aβ. The peptide displayed different modes of adsorption on GO and rGO. The adsorption on GO was dominated by electrostatic interactions, whereas on rGO, both van der Waals and electrostatic interactions contributed in the adsorption of the peptide. Our study revealed that the slight increase in the hydrophobic patches on rGO made it more effective inhibitor of conformational transitions in the peptide. Alpha helix-beta sheet transition in Aβ peptide could be one of the plausible mechanism by which graphene oxide may inhibit amyloid fibrillation. PMID:26275931

  9. Reduction of 3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid to lithocholic and isolithocholic acids by human liver cytosol in vitro.

    PubMed

    Amuro, Y; Yamade, W; Maebo, A; Hada, T; Higashino, K

    1985-10-23

    The formation of lithocholic and isolithocholic acids from 3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid by human liver cytosol was examined in vitro. Liver cytosol was incubated at various pH levels with 3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid in a phosphate buffer containing NADPH or NADH; the products formed were analyzed by gas chromatography. Results showed that human liver cytosol reduced 3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid to lithocholic acid at a pH level of 7.0 or above and to isolithocholic acid at a pH level of 6.0 or below when NADPH was used as a coenzyme, and it was reduced to isolithocholic acid only when NADH was used. Furthermore, two peaks for the reducing enzymes could be clearly found by column chromatography of Affi-Gel Blue. These results indicate that human liver cytosol contains two enzymes acting on reduction of 3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid to lithocholic and isolithocholic acids, which are dependent on the pH level and the use of NADPH or NADH in vitro. Since the 3 beta-dehydrogenation was inhibited by the addition of pyrazole, an alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor or ethanol, and the major peak of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase coincided with the peak of alcohol dehydrogenase on Affi-Gel Blue chromatography, at least some of the cytosolic 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase seemed to be identical to or to have characteristics similar to alcohol dehydrogenase. PMID:2932163

  10. Diffusional transport during the cyclic oxidation of gamma + beta, Ni-Cr-Al(Y, Zr) alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.; Heckel, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    The cyclic oxidation behavior of several cast gamma + beta, Ni-Cr-Al(Y, Zr) alloys and one low-pressure plasma spraying gamma + beta, Ni-Co-Cr-Al(Y) alloy was studied. Cyclic oxidation was found to result in a decreasing Al concentration at the oxide-metal interface due to a high rate of Al consumption coupled with oxide scale cracking and spalling. Diffusion paths plotted on the ternary phase diagram showed higher Ni concentrations with increasing cyclic oxidation exposures. The alloy with the highest rate of Al consumption and the highest Al content underwent breakaway oxidation following 500 1-hr cycles at 1200 C.

  11. The role of the fatty acid beta-oxidation multienzyme complex from Pseudomonas oleovorans in polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis: molecular characterization of the fadBA operon from P. oleovorans and of the enoyl-CoA hydratase genes phaJ from P. oleovorans and Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Silke; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2002-08-01

    In order to investigate the role of the putative epimerase function of the beta-oxidation multienzyme complex (FadBA) in the provision of (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA thioesters for medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA(MCL)) biosynthesis, the fadBA(Po) operon of Pseudomonas oleovorans was cloned and characterized. The fadBA(Po) operon and a class-II PHA synthase gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were heterologously co-expressed in Escherichia coli to determine whether the putative epimerase function of FadBA(Po) has the ability to provide precursors for PHA accumulation in a non-PHA-accumulating bacterium. Cultivation studies with fatty acids as carbon source revealed that FadBA(Po) did not mediate PHA(MCL) biosynthesis in the E. coli wild-type strain harboring a PHA synthase gene. However, PHA accumulation was strongly impaired in a recombinant E. coli fadB mutant, which harbored a PHA synthase gene. These data indicate that in pseudomonads FadBA does not possess the inherent property, based on a putative epimerase function, to provide the ( R)-enantiomer of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA efficiently and that other linking enzymes are required to efficiently channel intermediates of beta-oxidation towards PHA(MCL) biosynthesis. However, the phaJ gene from P. oleovorans and from Pseudomonas putida, both of which encoded a 3- Re enoyl-CoA hydratase, was identified. The co-expression of phaJ(Po/Pp) with either a class-II PHA synthase gene or the PHA synthase gene from Aeromonas punctata in E. coli revealed that PhaJ(Po/Pp) mediated biosynthesis of either PHA(MCL), contributing to about 1% of cellular dry mass, or of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate- co-3-hydroxyhexanoate), contributing to 3.6% of cellular dry mass, when grown on decanoate. These data indicate that FadBA(Po)does not mediate the provision of (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA, which resembles FadBA of non-PHA-accumulating bacteria, and that 3- Re enoyl-CoA hydratases are required to divert intermediates of fatty acid beta-oxidation

  12. Development of magnetic resonance imaging based detection methods for beta amyloids via sialic acid-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouyoumdjian, Hovig

    The development of a non-invasive method for the detection of Alzheimer's disease is of high current interest, which can be critical in early diagnosis and in guiding preventive treatment of the disease. The aggregates of beta amyloids are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Carbohydrates such as sialic acid terminated gangliosides have been shown to play significant roles in initiation of amyloid aggregation. Herein, we report a biomimetic approach using sialic acid coated iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles for in vitro detection in addition to the assessment of the in vivo mouse-BBB (Blood brain barrier) crossing of the BSA (bovine serum albumin)-modified ones. The sialic acid functionalized dextran nanoparticles were shown to bind with beta amyloids through several techniques including ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), gel electrophoresis and tyrosine fluorescence assay. The superparamagnetic nature of the nanoparticles allowed easy detection of the beta amyloids in mouse brains in both in vitro and ex vivo model by magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, the sialic acid nanoparticles greatly reduced beta amyloid induced cytotoxicity to SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, highlighting the potential of the glyconanoparticles for detection and imaging of beta amyloids. Sialic acid functionalized BSA (bovine serum albumin) nanoparticles also showed significant binding to beta amyloids, through ELISA and ex vivo mouse brain MRI experiments. Alternatively, the BBB crossing was demonstrated by several techniques such as confocal microscopy, endocytosis, exocytosis assays and were affirmed by nanoparticles transcytosis assays through bEnd.3 endothelial cells. Finally, the BBB crossing was confirmed by analyzing the MRI signal of nanoparticle-injected CD-1 mice.

  13. Carboxylic acids in secondary aerosols from oxidation of cyclic monoterpenes by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Glasius, M.; Lahaniati, M.; Calogirou, A.; Di Bella, D.; Jensen, N.R.; Hjorth, J.; Kotzias, D.; Larsen, B.R.

    2000-03-15

    A series of smog chamber experiments have been conducted in which five cyclic monoterpenes were oxidized by ozone. The evolved secondary aerosol was analyzed by GC-MS and HPLC-MS for nonvolatile polar oxidation products with emphasis on the identification of carboxylic acids. Three classes of compounds were determined at concentration levels corresponding to low percentage molar yields: i.e., dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, and hydroxyketocarboxylic acids. Carboxylic acids are highly polar and have lower vapor pressures than their corresponding aldehydes and may thus play an important role in secondary organic aerosol formation processes. The most abundant carboxylic acids were the following: cis-pinic acid AB1(cis-3-carboxy-2,2-dimethylcyclobutylethanoic acid) from {alpha} and {beta}-pinene; cis-pinonic acid A3 (cis-3-acetyl-2,2-dimethylcyclobutylethanoic acid) and cis-10-hydroxypinonic acid Ab6 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxyacetylcyclobutyl-ethanoic acid) from {alpha}-pinene and {beta}-pinene; cis-3-caric acid C1 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-cyclopropyldiethanoic acid), cis-3-caronic acid C3 (2,2-dimethyl-3-(2-oxopropyl)cyclopropanylethanoic acid), and cis-10-hydroxy-3-caronic acid C6 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-3(hydroxy-2-oxopropyl)cyclopropanylethanoic acid) from 3-carene; cis-sabinic acid S1 (cis-2-carboxy-1-isopropylcyclopropylethanoic acid) from sabinene; limonic acid L1 (3-isopropenylhexanedioic acid), limononic acid L3 (3-isopropenyl-6-oxo-heptanoic acid), 7-hydroxy-limononic acid L6 (3-isopropenyl-7-hydroxy-6-oxoheptanoic acid), and 7-hydroxylimononic acid Lg{prime} (7-hydroxy-3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoic acid) from limonene.

  14. {alpha}-Lipoic acid exhibits anti-amyloidogenicity for {beta}-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hirohata, Mie; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2006-03-24

    Inhibition of the formation of {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}), as well as the destabilization of preformed fA{beta} in the CNS would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of {alpha}-lipoic acid (LA) and the metabolic product of LA, dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fA{beta} at pH 7.5 at 37 {sup o}C in vitro. LA and DHLA dose-dependently inhibited fA{beta} formation from amyloid {beta}-protein, as well as their extension. Moreover, they destabilized preformed fA{beta}s. LA and DHLA could be key molecules for the development of therapeutics for AD.

  15. Acid monolayer functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikenberry, Myles

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle functionalization is an area of intensely active research, with applications across disciplines such as biomedical science and heterogeneous catalysis. This work demonstrates the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with a quasi-monolayer of 11-sulfoundecanoic acid, 10-phosphono-1-decanesulfonic acid, and 11-aminoundecanoic acid. The carboxylic and phosphonic moieties form bonds to the iron oxide particle core, while the sulfonic acid groups face outward where they are available for catalysis. The particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), potentiometric titration, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The sulfonic acid functionalized particles were used to catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose at 80° and starch at 130°, showing a higher activity per acid site than the traditional solid acid catalyst Amberlyst-15, and comparing well against results reported in the literature for sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous silicas. In sucrose catalysis reactions, the phosphonic-sulfonic nanoparticles (PSNPs) were seen to be incompletely recovered by an external magnetic field, while the carboxylic-sulfonic nanoparticles (CSNPs) showed a trend of increasing activity over the first four recycle runs. Between the two sulfonic ligands, the phosphonates produced a more tightly packed monolayer, which corresponded to a higher sulfonic acid loading, lower agglomeration, lower recoverability through application of an external magnetic field, and higher activity per acid site for the hydrolysis of starch. Functionalizations with 11-aminoundecanoic acid resulted in some amine groups binding to the surfaces of iron oxide nanoparticles. This amine binding is commonly ignored in iron oxide

  16. A retinoic acid receptor-specific element controls the retinoic acid receptor-beta promoter.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, B; Lehmann, J M; Zhang, X K; Hermann, T; Husmann, M; Graupner, G; Pfahl, M

    1990-11-01

    The morphogen retinoic acid (RA) regulates gene transcription by interacting with specific nuclear receptors that recognize DNA sequences near responsive promoters. While much has recently been learned about the nuclear receptor proteins, little is known about the genes that are directly regulated by RA and their cis-acting response elements recognized by these receptors. Here we have analyzed the RA receptor-beta (RAR beta) gene promoter that is controlled by RA. We find that a RA-responsive element (RARE) is located adjacent to the TATA box. The RARE shows a direct repeat symmetry which is essential for its function. While thyroid hormone-responsive elements can also function as RAR response elements, we show here that this RARE is activated by endogenous RARs and RAR beta, but cannot be regulated by thyroid hormone receptors and other known nuclear receptors. In addition, we find that RAR gamma is a poor activator of this RARE. However, the response element is bound with high affinity by both RAR beta and RAR gamma as well as by thyroid hormone receptors. Thus, interaction between specific response elements and receptors is insufficient for gene activation. PMID:2177841

  17. Cyto- and genotoxic potential of beta-carotene and cleavage products under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Alija, A J; Bresgen, N; Sommerburg, O; Langhans, C D; Siems, W; Eckl, P M

    2005-01-01

    Free radical attack on beta-carotene results in the formation of high amounts of cleavage products with prooxidant activities towards subcellular organelles such as mitochondria, a finding which could provide an explanation for the contradictory results obtained with beta-carotene in clinical efficacy and cancer prevention trials. Since primary hepatocytes proved to be very sensitive indicators for the genotoxic action of suspect mutagens/carcinogens we therefore investigated a beta-carotene cleavage products mixture (CP), apo-8'-beta-carotenal (apo-8') and beta-carotene in the primary rat hepatocyte assay in the presence and absence of oxidative stress provided by hypoxia/reoxygenation (Hy/re). The endpoints tested were: the mitotic indices, the percentages of necrotic and apoptotic cells, micronucleated cells (MN), chromosomal aberrations (CA) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). The results obtained indicate a genotoxic potential of both CP and apo-8' already in the concentration range of 100 nM and 1 microM, i.e. at physiologically relevant levels of beta-carotene and beta-carotene breakdown products. In contrast, no significant cytotoxic effects of these substances were observed, nor did beta-carotene induce significant cytotoxic or genotoxic effects at concentrations ranging from 0.01 up to 10 microM. However, when beta-carotene is supplemented during oxidative stress induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation, a dose-dependent increase of CP is observed accompanied by increasing genotoxicity. Furthermore, when beta-carotene cleavage products were supplied during oxidative stress significant additional increases of genotoxic effects were observed, the additional increases indicating an additive effect of both exposures. Summarizing, these results provide strong evidence that beta-carotene breakdown products are responsible for the occurrence of carcinogenic effects found in the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-carotene-Cancer prevention (ATBC) study and the beta-CArotene and

  18. Hepatic alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid. A revised pathway.

    PubMed

    Van Veldhoven, P P; Mannaerts, G P; Casteels, M; Croes, K

    1999-01-01

    Synthetic 3-methyl-branched chain fatty acids were used to decipher the breakdown of phytanic acid. Based on results obtained in intact or permeabilized rat hepatocytes, rat liver homogenates or subcellular fractions, a revised alpha-oxidation pathway is proposed which appears to be functioning in man as well. In a first step, the 3-methyl-branched chain fatty acid is activated by an acyl-CoA synthetase. This reaction requires CoA, ATP and Mg2+. Subsequently, the acyl-CoA ester is hydroxylated at position 2 by a peroxisomal dioxygenase. This step is dependent on alpha-oxoglutarate, ascorbate (or glutathione), Fe2+ and O2. The 2-hydroxy-3-methylacyl-CoA intermediate is cleaved by a peroxisomal lyase to formyl-CoA and a 2-methyl-branched fatty aldehyde. Formyl-CoA is (partly enzymically) hydrolyzed to formate, which is then converted, most likely in the cytosol, to CO2. In the presence of NAD+, the aldehyde is dehydrogenated to a 2-methyl-branched fatty acid, presumably by a peroxisomal aldehyde dehydrogenase. This acid can--after activation--be degraded via a D-specific peroxisomal beta-oxidation system. PMID:10709654

  19. Oxidation reaction of high molecular weight carboxylic acids in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fangming; Moriya, Takehiko; Enomoto, Heiji

    2003-07-15

    Stearic acid, being a model compound of high molecular weight carboxylic acids, was oxidized in a batch reactor by changing the oxygen supply with an insufficient oxygen supply at a constant reaction time at 420 degrees C. On the basis of the intermediate products identified by GC/MS, NMR, and HPLC analyses and the free-radical reaction mechanism, the oxidation pathways of high molecular weight carboxylic acids in supercritical water are discussed. The reaction of carboxylic acids in supercritical water proceeds with the consecutive oxidation of higher molecular weight carboxylic acids to lower molecular weight carboxylic acids through several major pathways. The attack of the hydroxyl radical occurs not only at the carbons in alpha-, beta-, gamma-positions to a --COOH group but also at the carbons ((omega-1)-carbon and/or omega-carbon) far in the alkyl chain from a --COOH group, which may lead to the formation of dicarboxylic acids. PMID:12901673

  20. Inhibitory effect of beta-glucosyl-phenolic hydroxamic acids against urease in the presence of microfloral beta-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Park, J B; Imamura, L; Kobashi, K; Itoh, H; Miyazaki, T; Horisaki, T

    1995-02-01

    Three glucosyl-phenolic hydroxamates, 4-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl) benzohydroxamic acid, 4-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)hippuric hydroxamic acid, and 3-[4-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)phenyl]propionohydroxamic acid (Glc-PPHA), were hydrolyzed to their corresponding aglycones by beta-glucosidase of intestinal flora of rat without any major adverse hydrolysis in vitro. Inhibitory potency of these glucosyl-hydroxamates on urease was recovered to the same extent as that of the corresponding aglycone hydroxamates by preincubation for 2h with rat intestinal flora. p-Hydroxyphenylpropionohydroxamic acid inhibited noncompetitively jack-bean urease activity and its glucose-ligated form, Glc-PPHA inhibited it competitively. A single oral dose of Glc-PPHA tended to inhibit urease activity in proximal colon contents of rat at 6 h after administration (p = 0.06). After 14C-urea was orally administered to rat, 14CO2 was collected for to measure the ureolysis in vivo. Expired 14CO2 was limited to 40% by a single oral dose of Glc-PPHA during 6 h, and 75% of intestinal ureolysis was repressed during the first 1 h in the breath test. PMID:7742785

  1. The flux control coefficient of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I on palmitate beta-oxidation in rat hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Spurway, T D; Sherratt, H A; Pogson, C I; Agius, L

    1997-01-01

    Two important factors that determine the flux of hepatic beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids are the availability of fatty acid and the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I). Using Metabolic Control Analysis, the flux control coefficient of CPT I in rat hepatocyte monolayers was determined by titration with 2-[6-(4-chlorophenoxy)hexyl]oxirane-2-carboxylate (Etomoxir), which is converted to Etomoxir-CoA, an irreversible inhibitor of CPT I. We measured CPT I activity and flux through beta-oxidation at 0.2 mM and 1.0 mM palmitate to simulate substrate concentrations in fed and fasted states. Rates of beta-oxidation were 4.5-fold higher at 1. 0 mM palmitate compared with 0.2 mM palmitate. Flux control coefficients of CPT I, estimated by two independent methods, were similar: 0.67 and 0.79 for 0.2 mM palmitate, and 0.68 and 0.77 for 1 mM palmitate. It is concluded that the regulatory potential of CPT I is similar at low and high physiological concentrations of palmitate. PMID:9173869

  2. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. II - Five carbon acyclic primary beta-, gamma-, and delta-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Yuen, G. U.

    1985-01-01

    The five-carbon acyclic primary beta, gamma, and delta amino alkanoic acids of the Murchison meteorite are studied using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion exchange chromatography. The chromatograms reveal that alpha is the most abundant monoamino alkanoic acid followed by gamma and beta, and an exponential increase in the amount of amino acid is observed as the carbon number increases in the homologous series. The influence of frictional heating, spontaneous thermal decomposition, and radiation of the synthesis of amino acids is examined. The data obtained support an amino acid synthesis process involving random combination of single-carbon precursors.

  3. [Study of the circular dichroism for tribasic complex of amine derivative of beta-cyclodextrindien-Cu2+ -benzoic acid].

    PubMed

    Hu, J; Zhang, H; Shen, B

    1998-02-01

    The circular dichroism spectra of beta-cyclodextrindien, beta-cyclodextrindien-Cu2+ complex, beta-cyclodextrindien-benzoic acid complex, tribasic complex of beta-cyclodextrindien-Cu2+ -benzoic acid were determined by using JASCO J-20C automatic recording spectropolarimeter. The attribution of the bands obtained were made according to the order of orbit energy of Cu2+ complex and benzoic acid, and the coordination structure of tribasic complex of amine derivative of beta-cyclodextrindien-Cu2+ -benzoic acid were decided acording to the structure character of Cu2+ complex and KAJART sector rule of inclusion complex of beta-cyclodextrindien with aromatic compounds. PMID:15810322

  4. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, B. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  5. Lewis acid tuned facial stereodivergent HDA reactions using beta-substituted N-vinyloxazolidinones.

    PubMed

    Gohier, Frédéric; Bouhadjera, Keltoum; Faye, Djibril; Gaulon, Catherine; Maisonneuve, Vincent; Dujardin, Gilles; Dhal, Robert

    2007-01-18

    The [4 + 2] acido-catalyzed heterocycloaddition between new beta-substituted N-vinyl-1,3-oxazolidin-2-ones (with R' = Me, Ar, CH2 Ar) and beta,gamma-unsaturated alpha-ketoesters (R = Ar) afforded heteroadducts with high levels of endo and facial selectivities. A complete reversal of facial differentiation was achieved by varying the Lewis acid, leading to the stereoselective formation of either endo-alpha or endo-beta adducts. [reaction: see text]. PMID:17217267

  6. Acetate represents a major product of heptanoate and octanoate beta-oxidation in hepatocytes isolated from neonatal piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, X; Adams, S H; Odle, J

    1996-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to explore the nature of the radiolabel distribution in acid-soluble products (ASPs) resulting from the oxidation of [1-14C]C7:0 or C8:0 by isolated piglet hepatocytes. The differences between odd and even chain-length and the impacts of valproate and malonate upon the rate of beta-oxidation and ASP characteristics were tested. A minor amount of fatty acid carboxyl carbon (< or = 10% of organic acids identified by radio-HPLC) accumulated in ketone bodies regardless of chain-length or inhibitor used. In all cases, acetate represented the major reservoir of carboxyl carbon, accounting for 60-70% of radiolabel in identified organic acids. Cells given [1-14C]C7:0 accumulated 85% more carboxyl carbon in Krebs cycle intermediates when compared with C8:0, while accumulation in acetate was unaffected. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that anaplerosis from odd-carbon fatty acids affects the oxidative fate of fatty acid carbon. The piglet appears unique in that non-ketogenic routes of fatty acid carbon flow (i.e. acetogenesis) predominate in the liver of this species. PMID:8761477

  7. Acid-permanganate oxidation of potassium tetraphenylboron

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1993-02-01

    Scoping experiments have been performed which show that potassium tetraphenylboron (KTPB) is rapidly oxidized by permanganate in acidic solutions at room temperature. The main Products are CO{sub 2}, highly oxidized organic compounds related to tartaric and tartronic acids, boric acid, and potassium phosphate (when phosphoric acid is used as the source of acid). One liter of 0.6M NaMnO{sub 4}/2.5M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution will destroy up to 8 grams of KTPB. The residual benzene concentration has been measured to be less than the RCRA limit of 0.5 ppm. Approximately 30% of the organic material is released as CO{sub 2} (trace CO) and 0.16% as benzene vapor. The reaction is well behaved, no foaming or spattering. Tests were performed from .15M to near 1M permanganate. The phosphoric acid concentration was maintained at a concentration at least three times that of the permanganate since an excess of acid was desired and this is the ratio that these two reagents are consumed in the oxidation.

  8. Acid-permanganate oxidation of potassium tetraphenylboron

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1993-02-01

    Scoping experiments have been performed which show that potassium tetraphenylboron (KTPB) is rapidly oxidized by permanganate in acidic solutions at room temperature. The main Products are CO[sub 2], highly oxidized organic compounds related to tartaric and tartronic acids, boric acid, and potassium phosphate (when phosphoric acid is used as the source of acid). One liter of 0.6M NaMnO[sub 4]/2.5M H[sub 3]PO[sub 4] solution will destroy up to 8 grams of KTPB. The residual benzene concentration has been measured to be less than the RCRA limit of 0.5 ppm. Approximately 30% of the organic material is released as CO[sub 2] (trace CO) and 0.16% as benzene vapor. The reaction is well behaved, no foaming or spattering. Tests were performed from .15M to near 1M permanganate. The phosphoric acid concentration was maintained at a concentration at least three times that of the permanganate since an excess of acid was desired and this is the ratio that these two reagents are consumed in the oxidation.

  9. Reduced immunogenicity of beta-lactoglobulin by conjugation with acidic oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Makoto; Miyakawa, Shunpei; Ohama, Yukie; Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Tadashi; To-o, Kenji; Kuriki, Takashi; Takahashi, Koji

    2004-07-14

    Bovine beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) was conjugated with the acidic oligosaccharides, alginic acid oligosaccharide (ALGO) and phosphoryl oligosaccharides (POs) by the Maillard reaction to reduce the immunogenicity of beta-LG. The molar ratios of beta-LG to ALGO and POs in the conjugates were 1:6 and 1:8. The carbohydrate-binding sites in the beta-LG-ALGO conjugate were partially identified to be (60)Lys, (77)Lys, (100)Lys, (138)Lys, and (141)Lys. The isoelectric point of each conjugate was lower than that of beta-LG. CD spectra indicated that the secondary structure of beta-LG was almost maintained after conjugation. The results of fluorescence studies indicated that the conformation around Trp had not changed in each conjugate and that the surface of each conjugate was covered with a saccharide chain. Structural analyses with monoclonal antibodies indicated that the conformation around (8)Lys-(19)Trp (beta-sheet, random coil, short helix) in the conjugates had changed, whereas the native structure was maintained around (15)Val-(29)Ile (beta-sheet) and (125)Thr-(135)Lys (alpha-helix). The beta-LG-ALGO and beta-LG-POs conjugates maintained 77 and 70% of the retinol binding activity of beta-LG. Conjugation with ALGO and POs substantially enhanced the thermal stability of beta-LG. The anti-beta-LG antibody response was markedly reduced after immunization with both conjugates in BALB/c, C57BL/6, and C3H/He mice. B cell epitopes of beta-LG and the conjugate recognized in these mice were determined with 15-mer multipin peptides, and the linear epitope profiles of the conjugates were found to be similar to those of beta-LG, whereas the antibody response to each epitope was dramatically reduced. In particular, effective reduction of the antibody response was observed in the vicinity of the carbohydrate-binding sites. Conjugation of beta-LG with these acidic oligosaccharides was effective in reducing the immunogenicity of beta-LG. The conjugates obtained in this study are

  10. Involvement of DNA polymerase beta in repairing oxidative damages induced by antitumor drug adriamycin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Shukun; Wu Mei; Zhang Zunzhen

    2010-08-01

    Adriamycin (ADM) is a widely used antineoplastic drug. However, the increasing cellular resistance has become a serious limitation to ADM clinical application. The most important mechanism related to ADM-induced cell death is oxidative DNA damage mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway in the repair of DNA single strand break (SSB) and oxidized base. In this study, we firstly applied the murine embryo fibroblasts wild-type (pol {beta} +/+) and homozygous pol {beta} null cell (pol {beta} -/-) as a model to investigate ADM DNA-damaging effects and the molecular basis underlying these effects. Here, cellular sensitivity to ADM was examined using colorimetric assay and colony forming assay. ADM-induced cellular ROS level and the alteration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured by commercial kits. Further, DNA strand break, chromosomal damage and gene mutation were assessed by comet assay, micronucleus test and hprt gene mutation assay, respectively. The results showed that pol {beta} -/- cells were more sensitive to ADM compared with pol {beta} +/+ cells and more severe SSB and chromosomal damage as well as higher hprt gene mutation frequency were observed in pol {beta} -/- cells. ROS level in pol {beta} -/- cells increased along with decreased activity of SOD. These results demonstrated that pol {beta} deficiency could enable ROS accumulation with SOD activity decrease, further elevate oxidative DNA damage, and subsequently result in SSB, chromosome cleavage as well as gene mutation, which may be partly responsible for the cytotoxicity of ADM and the hypersensitivity of pol {beta} -/- cells to ADM. These findings suggested that pol {beta} is vital for repairing oxidative damage induced by ADM.

  11. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2015-04-14

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  12. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2015-08-11

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  13. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2014-03-25

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  14. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2014-03-04

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  15. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2013-01-29

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  16. BGL6 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2012-10-02

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  17. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2012-10-30

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  18. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2011-06-14

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  19. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2008-04-01

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  20. BGL5 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2008-03-18

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl5, and the corresponding BGL5 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL5, recombinant BGL5 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  1. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2009-09-01

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  2. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2008-08-05

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  3. BGL4 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2008-01-22

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  4. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2007-09-25

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  5. BGL4 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2011-12-06

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  6. Fatty acids and beta-carotene in australian purslane (Portulaca oleracea) varieties.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Howe, P; Zhou, Y F; Xu, Z Q; Hocart, C; Zhan, R

    2000-09-29

    The fatty acid profile and beta-carotene content of a number of Australian varieties of purslane (Portulaca oleracea) were determined by GC and HPLC. The total fatty acid content ranged from 1.5 to 2.5 mg/g of fresh mass in leaves, 0.6 to 0.9 mg/g in stems and 80 to 170 mg/g in seeds. alpha-Linolenic acid (C18:3omega3) accounted for around 60% and 40% of the total fatty acid content in leaves and seeds, respectively. Longer-chain omega-3 fatty acids were not detected. The beta-carotene content ranged from 22 to 30 mg/g fresh mass in leaves. These results indicate that Australian purslane varieties are a rich source of alpha-linolenic acid and beta-carotene. PMID:11043602

  7. Inhibition of mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium by Glycyrrhiza glabra extract, glycyrrhizinic acid, 18 alpha- and 18 beta-glycyrrhetinic acids.

    PubMed

    Zani, F; Cuzzoni, M T; Daglia, M; Benvenuti, S; Vampa, G; Mazza, P

    1993-12-01

    The effects of Glycyrrhiza glabra L. extract, glycyrrhizinic acid, 18 alpha- and 18 beta-glycyrrhetinic acids on the mutagenicity of the ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, and ribose-lysine Maillard model systems were investigated by using the Salmonella/microsome reversion assay. The protocol used allowed us to detect desmutagenic and antimutagenic activity and to avoid false positive results due to toxicity. For all the compounds tested, no desmutagenic activity was observed against ethyl methanesulfonate and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine; only Glycyrrhiza glabra extract showed antimutagenic activity against ethyl methanesulfonate. On using the ribose-lysine mutagenic browning mixture, the desmutagenic activities of the Glycyrrhiza glabra extract, glycyrrhizinic acid, 18 alpha- and 18 beta-glycyrrhetinic acids were observed. 18 beta-Glycyrrhetinic acid was the most active compound. Glycyrrhiza glabra extract also exhibited antimutagenic activity against ribose-lysine. PMID:8302947

  8. Expression and subcellular localization of thymosin beta15 following kainic acid treatment in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young Woong; Kim, Younghwa; Kim, Eun Hae; Koh, Doyle; Sun, Woong Kim, Hyun

    2008-07-11

    Thymosin {beta}15 (T{beta}15) is a pleiotropic factor which exerts multiple roles in the development of nervous system and brain diseases. In this study, we found that the expressions of T{beta}15 mRNA and protein were substantially increased in several brain regions including hippocampal formation and cerebral cortex, following kainic acid (KA)-evoked seizures in rat. Interestingly, a subset of cortex neurons exhibited nuclear T{beta}15 immunoreactivity upon KA treatment. Furthermore, translocation of T{beta}15 from cytosol to nuclei was observed in cultured neurons or HeLa cells during staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis, which was also verified by time-lapse imaging of YFP-tagged T{beta}15. It appeared that localization of T{beta}15 is restricted to the cytosol in normal condition by its G-actin-interacting domain, because site-directed mutagenesis of this region resulted in the nuclear localization of T{beta}15 in the absence of STS treatment. To explore the role of nuclear T{beta}15, we enforced T{beta}15 to localize in the nuclei by fusion of T{beta}15 with nuclear localization signal (NLS-T{beta}15). However, overexpression of NLS-T{beta}15 did not alter the viability of cells in response to STS treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that nuclear localization of T{beta}15 is a controlled process during KA or STS stimulation, although its functional significance is yet to be clarified.

  9. beta-Hydroxyaspartic acid or beta-hydroxyasparagine in bovine low density lipoprotein receptor and in bovine thrombomodulin.

    PubMed

    Stenflo, J; Ohlin, A K; Owen, W G; Schneider, W J

    1988-01-01

    All of the vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins with domains that are homologous to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) precursor have 1 hydroxylated aspartic acid residue in the NH2-terminal EGF-homology region. In addition, protein S has 1 hydroxylated asparagine residue in each of the three COOH-terminal EGF-homology regions. All of these proteins have been found to have the amino acid sequence, CX(D or N)XXXX(F or Y)XCXC (corresponding to residues 20 to 33 in EGF), where the Asp or Asn residue is hydroxylated. This sequence also appears in two of the three EGF-homology regions of the human low density lipoprotein receptor and in two of the six EGF-homology regions of bovine thrombomodulin so far identified, suggesting that they may have the modified amino acid. We have now identified beta-hydroxyaspartic acid in acid hydrolysates of both these proteins. PMID:2826439

  10. Reference electrode for strong oxidizing acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Rigdon, Lester P.; Harrar, Jackson E.; Bullock, Sr., Jack C.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    1990-01-01

    A reference electrode for the measurement of the oxidation-reduction potentials of solutions is especially suitable for oxidizing solutions such as highly concentrated and fuming nitric acids, the solutions of nitrogen oxides, N.sub.2 O.sub.4 and N.sub.2 O.sub.5, in nitric acids. The reference electrode is fabricated of entirely inert materials, has a half cell of Pt/Ce(IV)/Ce(III)/70 wt. % HNO.sub.3, and includes a double-junction design with an intermediate solution of 70 wt. % HNO.sub.3. The liquid junctions are made from Corning No. 7930 glass for low resistance and negligible solution leakage.

  11. Scoparic acid A, a beta-glucuronidase inhibitor from Scoparia dulcis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, T; Kawasaki, M; Okamura, K; Tamada, Y; Morita, N; Tezuka, Y; Kikuchi, T; Miwa, Y; Taga, T

    1992-12-01

    The 70% EtOH extract of Scoparia dulcis showed inhibitory activity against beta-glucuronidase from bovine liver. Bioassay-directed fractionation of the active extract led to the isolation of three labdane-type diterpene acids, scoparic acid A [1] [6-benzoyl-12-hydroxy-labda-8(17), 13-dien-18-oic acid], scoparic acid B [2] [6-benzoyl-14,15-dinor-13-oxo-8(17)-labden-18-oic acid], and scoparic acid C [3] [6-benzoyl-15-nor-14-oxo-8(17)-labden-18-oic acid], the structures of which were established by spectral means, including X-ray analysis. Scoparic acid A was found to be a potent beta-glucuronidase inhibitor. PMID:1294695

  12. Formation of ursodeoxycholic acid from chenodeoxycholic acid by a 7 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-elaborating Eubacterium aerofaciens strain cocultured with 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-elaborating organisms.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, I A; Rochon, Y P; Hutchison, D M; Holdeman, L V

    1982-01-01

    A gram-positive, anaerobic, chain-forming, rod-shaped anaerobe (isolate G20-7) was isolated from normal human feces. This organism was identified by cellular morphology as well as fermentative and biochemical data as Eubacterium aerofaciens. When isolate G20-7 was grown in the presence of Bacteroides fragilis or Escherichia coli (or another 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase producer) and chenodeoxycholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid produced. Time course curves revealed that 3 alpha-hydroxy-7-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid produced by B. fragilis or E. coli or introduced into the medium as a pure substance was reduced by G20-7 specifically to ursodeoxycholic acid. The addition of glycine- and taurine-conjugated primary bile acids (chenodeoxycholic and cholic acids) and other bile acids to binary cultures of B. fragilis and G20-7 revealed that (i) both conjugates were hydrolyzed to give free bile acids, (ii) ursocholic acid (3 alpha, 7 beta, 12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholanoic acid) was produced when conjugated (or free) cholic acid was the substrate, and (iii) the epimerization reaction was at least partially reversible. Corroborating these observations, an NADP-dependent 7 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (reacting specifically with 7 beta-OH-groups) was demonstrated in cell-free preparations of isolate G20-7; production of the enzyme was optimal at between 12 and 18 h of growth. This enzyme, when measured in the oxidative direction, was active with ursodeoxycholic acid, ursocholic acid, and the taurine conjugate of ursodeoxycholic acid (but not with chenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic, or cholic acids) and displayed an optimal pH range of 9.8 to 10.2 Images PMID:6758698

  13. New insights in dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency: a pivotal role for beta-aminoisobutyric acid?

    PubMed Central

    Van Kuilenburg, André B P; Stroomer, Alida E M; Van Lenthe, Henk; Abeling, Nico G G M; Van Gennip, Albert H

    2004-01-01

    DPD (dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase) constitutes the first step of the pyrimidine degradation pathway, in which the pyrimidine bases uracil and thymine are catabolized to beta-alanine and the R-enantiomer of beta-AIB (beta-aminoisobutyric acid) respectively. The S-enantiomer of beta-AIB is predominantly derived from the catabolism of valine. It has been suggested that an altered homoeostasis of beta-alanine underlies some of the clinical abnormalities encountered in patients with a DPD deficiency. In the present study, we demonstrated that only a slightly decreased concentration of beta-alanine was present in the urine and plasma, whereas normal levels of beta-alanine were present in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with a DPD deficiency. Therefore the metabolism of beta-alanine-containing peptides, such as carnosine, may be an important factor involved in the homoeostasis of beta-alanine in patients with DPD deficiency. The mean concentration of beta-AIB was approx. 2-3-fold lower in cerebrospinal fluid and urine of patients with a DPD deficiency, when compared with controls. In contrast, strongly decreased levels (10-fold) of beta-AIB were present in the plasma of DPD patients. Our results demonstrate that, under pathological conditions, the catabolism of valine can result in the production of significant amounts of beta-AIB. Furthermore, the observation that the R-enantiomer of beta-AIB is abundantly present in the urine of DPD patients suggests that significant cross-over exists between the thymine and valine catabolic pathways. PMID:14705962

  14. New insights in dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency: a pivotal role for beta-aminoisobutyric acid?

    PubMed

    Van Kuilenburg, André B P; Stroomer, Alida E M; Van Lenthe, Henk; Abeling, Nico G G M; Van Gennip, Albert H

    2004-04-01

    DPD (dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase) constitutes the first step of the pyrimidine degradation pathway, in which the pyrimidine bases uracil and thymine are catabolized to beta-alanine and the R-enantiomer of beta-AIB (beta-aminoisobutyric acid) respectively. The S-enantiomer of beta-AIB is predominantly derived from the catabolism of valine. It has been suggested that an altered homoeostasis of beta-alanine underlies some of the clinical abnormalities encountered in patients with a DPD deficiency. In the present study, we demonstrated that only a slightly decreased concentration of beta-alanine was present in the urine and plasma, whereas normal levels of beta-alanine were present in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with a DPD deficiency. Therefore the metabolism of beta-alanine-containing peptides, such as carnosine, may be an important factor involved in the homoeostasis of beta-alanine in patients with DPD deficiency. The mean concentration of beta-AIB was approx. 2-3-fold lower in cerebrospinal fluid and urine of patients with a DPD deficiency, when compared with controls. In contrast, strongly decreased levels (10-fold) of beta-AIB were present in the plasma of DPD patients. Our results demonstrate that, under pathological conditions, the catabolism of valine can result in the production of significant amounts of beta-AIB. Furthermore, the observation that the R-enantiomer of beta-AIB is abundantly present in the urine of DPD patients suggests that significant cross-over exists between the thymine and valine catabolic pathways. PMID:14705962

  15. ROS signaling, oxidative stress and Nrf2 in pancreatic beta-cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Pi Jingbo; Zhang Qiang; Fu Jingqi; Woods, Courtney G.; Hou Yongyong; Corkey, Barbara E.; Collins, Sheila; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2010-04-01

    This review focuses on the emerging evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from glucose metabolism, such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, act as metabolic signaling molecules for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic beta-cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential inhibitory role of endogenous antioxidants, which rise in response to oxidative stress, in glucose-triggered ROS and GSIS. We propose that cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress challenge, such as nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant induction, plays paradoxical roles in pancreatic beta-cell function. On the one hand, induction of antioxidant enzymes protects beta-cells from oxidative damage and possible cell death, thus minimizing oxidative damage-related impairment of insulin secretion. On the other hand, the induction of antioxidant enzymes by Nrf2 activation blunts glucose-triggered ROS signaling, thus resulting in reduced GSIS. These two premises are potentially relevant to impairment of beta-cells occurring in the late and early stage of Type 2 diabetes, respectively. In addition, we summarized our recent findings that persistent oxidative stress due to absence of uncoupling protein 2 activates cellular adaptive response which is associated with impaired pancreatic beta-cell function.

  16. Changes in brain interleukin-1beta following the coadministration of norfloxacin with biphenylacetic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-rong; Li, Xiao-tian; Tang, Wen-lu; Wang, Yong-ming; Cheng, Neng-neng; Chen, Bin-yan

    2006-08-14

    We sought to determine the changes in brain interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) following the coadministration of norfloxacin (25 mg/kg, i.p.) with biphenylacetic acid (100 mg/kg, p.o.) in rats. Norfloxacin provoked clonic convulsions in rats treated concomitantly with biphenylacetic acid, a major metabolite of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug fenbufen. Seizure activity was analyzed by EEG monitoring. Behavioral changes were also monitored. IL-1beta expressions in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus at different time intervals were studied by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The epileptiform discharges appeared in all the rats, accompanied with limb twitching and clonic-tonic seizures after administration of norfloxacin coadministered with biphenylacetic acid. Norfloxacin plus biphenylacetic acid-induced convulsions rapidly and transiently enhanced IL-1beta mRNA in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. IL-1beta mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus was detected as soon as 30 min after norfloxacin injection, and decayed to control levels by 6 h. ELISA analysis revealed significant increase of the IL-1beta protein in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus at 2 h and 6 h. Administration of either norfloxacin or biphenylacetic acid alone did not elicit convulsions and increase in IL-1beta mRNA and protein expressions. The results suggest that the increased IL-1beta expressions in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus induced by norfloxacin with biphenylacetic acid relate to seizure activities, and that these brain regions play pivotal roles in norfloxacin-induced convulsions. PMID:16824509

  17. Phenylpropenoic Acid Glucoside from Rooibos Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Cell Death Induced by Acute Injury

    PubMed Central

    Himpe, Eddy; Cunha, Daniel A.; Song, Imane; Bugliani, Marco; Marchetti, Piero; Cnop, Miriam; Bouwens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies demonstrated that a phenylpropenoic acid glucoside (PPAG) from rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) extract had anti-hyperglycemic activity and significant protective effects on the pancreatic beta cell mass in a chronic diet-induced diabetes model. The present study evaluated the cytoprotective effect of the phytochemical on beta cells exposed to acute cell stress. Methods Synthetically prepared PPAG was administered orally in mice treated with a single dose of streptozotocin to acutely induce beta cell death and hyperglycemia. Its effect was assessed on beta cell mass, proliferation and apoptotic cell death. Its cytoprotective effect was also studied in vitro on INS-1E beta cells and on human pancreatic islet cells. Results Treatment with the phytochemical PPAG protected beta cells during the first days after the insult against apoptotic cell death, as evidenced by TUNEL staining, and prevented loss of expression of anti-apoptotic protein BCL2 in vivo. In vitro, PPAG protected INS-1E beta cells from streptozotocin-induced apoptosis and necrosis in a BCL2-dependent and independent way, respectively, depending on glucose concentration. PPAG also protected human pancreatic islet cells against the cytotoxic action of the fatty acid palmitate. Conclusions These findings show the potential use of PPAG as phytomedicine which protects the beta cell mass exposed to acute diabetogenic stress. PMID:27299564

  18. Evidence for a complex of three beta-oxidation enzymes in Escherichia coli: induction and localization.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, W J; Frerman, F E

    1977-01-01

    The enzymes for beta-oxidation of fatty acids in inducible and constitutive strains of Escherichia coli were assayed in soluble and membrane fractions of disrupted cells by using fatty acid and acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) substrates containing either 4 or 16 carbon atoms in the acyl moieties. Cell fractionation was monitored, using succinic dehydrogenase as a membrane marker and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase as a soluble marker. Acyl-CoA synthetase activity was detected exclusively in the membrane fraction, whereas acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, enoyl-CoA hydratase, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase activities that utilized both C4 and C16 acyl-CoA substrates were isolated from the soluble fraction. 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, enoyl-CoA hydratase, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase activities assayed with both C4 and C16 acyl-CoA substrates co-chromatographed on gel filtration and ion-exchange columns and cosedimented in glycerol gradients. The data show that these three enzyme activities of the fad regulon can be isolated as a multienzyme complex. This complex dissociates in very dilute preparations; however, in those preparations where the three activities are separated, the fractionated species retain activity with both C4 and C16 acyl-CoA substrates. PMID:334745

  19. beta-Keratins in crocodiles reveal amino acid homology with avian keratins.

    PubMed

    Ye, Changjiang; Wu, Xiaobing; Yan, Peng; Amato, George

    2010-03-01

    The DNA sequences encoding beta-keratin have been obtained from Marsh Mugger (Crocodylus palustris) and Orinoco Crocodiles (Crocodylus intermedius). Through the deduced amino acid sequence, these proteins are rich in glycine, proline and serine. The central region of the proteins are composed of two beta-folded regions and show a high degree of identity with beta-keratins of aves and squamates. This central part is thought to be the site of polymerization to build the framework of beta-keratin filaments. It is believed that the beta-keratins in reptiles and birds share a common ancestry. Near the C-terminal, these beta-keratins contain a peptide rich in glycine-X and glycine-X-X, and the distinctive feature of the region is some 12-amino acid repeats, which are similar to the 13-amino acid repeats in chick scale keratin but absent from avian feather keratin. From our phylogenetic analysis, the beta-keratins in crocodile have a closer relationship with avian keratins than the other keratins in reptiles. PMID:19266314

  20. Effects of surface oxidation on vacancy defects in beta nickel-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathi, A.

    1980-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy and Auger Electron Spectroscopy have been used to make observations of the oxidation process in ..beta..-NiAl alloys annealed under controlled conditions of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Binary Ni-Al alloys, with nominally 47.5, 50.4 and 52.5 at. % Al, were examined. The Auger spectroscopy analysis showed that the predominant oxide formed on these alloys is Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, with a possible thin intermediate layer of spinel. Bulk oxidation experiments indicate that the oxide grows by outward diffusion of cations to the oxide/gas interface.

  1. Sodium Picosulfate, Magnesium Oxide, and Anhydrous Citric Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid combination powder is used to empty the colon (large intestine, ... oxide and anhydrous citric acid combine when the powder is mixed with water to form a medication ...

  2. A study of native oxides of beta-SiC using Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhry, M. Iqbal

    1989-01-01

    Thermal and anodic oxide films of beta-SiC are analyzed using Auger electron spectroscopy. Auger depth-composition profiles are obtained in order to determine the chemical composition of the oxide films. The position and shape of silicon spectral peaks are used to estimate the chemical bonding of the oxide constituents. It is found that the wet thermal oxide is almost stoichiometric but contains about 14 pct C. Dry oxide, on the other hand, has less than 3 pct C but is highly nonstoichiometric. The C content in the anodic oxide is 12 pct. Anodic oxide films, like dry-oxide films, are nonstoichiometric. A model of the SiC oxidation process is presented.

  3. Acid-Catalyzed Enolization of [beta]-Tetralone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo; Nesturi, Anthony; Urena, Joel

    2008-01-01

    This experiment allows students to use [to the first power]H NMR to directly compare the relative initial rates of substitution of the benzylic and non-benzylic [alpha] hydrogens of [beta]-tetralone and correlate their findings with the predictions made by resonance theory. The experiment demonstrates that the benzylic hydrogens undergo [alpha]…

  4. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V

    2014-11-18

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  5. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H.; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V.

    2011-10-04

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  6. beta-Hematin (hemozoin) mediated decompostion of polyunsaturated fatty acids to 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal.

    PubMed

    Miller, Crystal M; Carney, Clare Kenny; Schrimpe, Alexandra C; Wright, David W

    2005-04-01

    beta-Hematin is an important heme metabolite of malarial infection. Its role as an agent mediating the formation of the reactive electrophile 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) from polyunsaturated fatty acids was investigated. In vitro formation of HNE was found to be facilitated by the presence of hemozoin in a concentration-dependent fashion. The reactivity of HNE derived from reaction with beta-hematin was confirmed through its ability to form protein adducts on myoglobin. PMID:15792445

  7. Antimicrobial activity of basic cholane derivatives. X. Synthesis of 3 alpha- and 3 beta-amino-5 beta-cholan-24-oic acids.

    PubMed

    Bellini, A M; Mencini, E; Quaglio, M P; Guarneri, M; Fini, A

    1991-07-01

    A simple and convenient route to 3 alpha- and 3 beta-amino-5 beta-cholan-24-oic acids was developed via Leuckart-Wallach amination reduction and subsequent acid hydrolysis. Two epimeric formylamino derivatives were produced (alpha and beta), approximately in a 1:1 ratio, as determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The two isomers were separated by making use of their different solubilities in ethyl ether. The absolute configuration of the two amino acids was assigned by comparison with authentic reference samples. PMID:1780957

  8. Morphine-6beta-glucuronide modulates the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Lysle, D T; Carrigan, K A

    2001-08-01

    The immunomodulatory effects of morphine are well established; however, suprisingly little is known about the immunomodulatory properties of the major metabolites of morphine. The present study tests the hypothesis that expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is modulated by the administration of the morphine metabolite, morphine-6beta-glucuronide. The initial study using rats shows that morphine-6beta-glucuronide administration (0, 1.0, 3.163, 10 mg/kg s.c.) results in a pronounced reduction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of iNOS (inducible nitricoxide synthease) in spleen, lung, and liver tissue as measured by western blotting. Morphine-6beta-glucuronide also produces a reduction in the level of plasma nitrite/nitrate, the more stable end-product of nitric oxide degradation. In a subsequent study, administration of the opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone (0.1 mg/kg) prior to the injection of morphine-6beta-glucuronide (10 mg/kg) blocks the morphine-6beta-glucuronide induced reduction of iNOS expression and plasma nitrite/nitrite levels indicating that the effect is mediated via the opioid-receptor. This study provides the first evidence that morphine-6beta-glucuronide alters the expression of iNOS. PMID:11580103

  9. Ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection of aliphatic carboxylic acids on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin by elution with benzoic acid-beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Mori, Masanobu; Xu, Qun; Helaleh, Murad I H; Ikedo, Mikaru; Taoda, Hiroshi; Hu, Wenzhi; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Fritz, James S; Haddad, Paul R

    2003-05-16

    In this study, an aqueous solution consisting of benzoic acid with low background conductivity and beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) of hydrophilic nature and the inclusion effect to benzoic acid were used as eluent for the ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of aliphatic carboxylic acids with different pKa values and hydrophobicity on a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H+ form. With increasing concentration of beta-cyclodextrin in the eluent, the retention times of the carboxylic acids decreased due to the increased hydrophilicity of the polymethacrylate-based cation-exchange resin surface from the adsorption of OH groups of beta-cyclodextrin. Moreover, the eluent background conductivity decreased with increasing concentration of beta-cyclodextrin in 1 mM benzoic acid, which could result in higher sensitivity for conductimetric detection. The ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of carboxylic acids with high resolution and sensitivity was accomplished successfully by elution with a 1 mM benzoic acid-10 mM cyclodextrin solution without chemical suppression. PMID:12830884

  10. Fatty acid oxidation: systems analysis and applications.

    PubMed

    Cintolesi, Angela; Rodríguez-Moyá, María; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are essential components of cellular structure and energy-generating routes in living organisms. They exist in a variety of chemical configurations and functionalities and are catabolized by different oxidative routes, according to their structure. α- and ω-Oxidation are minor routes that occur only in eukaryotes, while β-oxidation is the major degradation route in eukaroytes and prokaryotes. These pathways have been characterized and engineered from different perspectives for industrial and biomedical applications. The severity of FA oxidation disorders in humans initially guided the study of FA metabolism at a molecular-level. On the other hand, recent advances in metabolic engineering and systems biology have powered the study of FA biosynthetic and catabolic routes in microorganisms at a systems-level. Several studies have proposed these pathways as platforms for the production of fuels and chemicals from biorenewable sources. The lower complexity of microbial systems has allowed a more comprehensive study of FA metabolism and has opened opportunities for a wider range of applications. Still, there is a need for techniques that facilitate the translation of high-throughput data from microorganisms to more complex eukaryotic systems in order to aid the development of diagnostic and treatment strategies for FA oxidation disorders. In addition, further systems biology analyses on human systems could also provide valuable insights on oxidation disorders. This article presents a comparison of the three main FA oxidative routes, systems biology analyses that have been used to study FA metabolism, and engineering efforts performed on microbial systems. PMID:23661533

  11. Synthesis of 3beta-(4-[18F]fluoromethylphenyl)- and 3beta-(2-[18F] fluoromethylphenyl)tropane-2beta-carboxylic acid methyl esters: new ligands for mapping brain dopamine transporter with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Petric, A; Barrio, J R; Namavari, M; Huang, S C; Satyamurthy, N

    1999-07-01

    The synthesis of two new dopamine transporter ligands, 3beta-(4-fluoromethylphenyl)tropane-2beta-carboxylic acid methyl ester and 3beta-(2-fluoromethylphenyl)tropane-2beta-carboxylic acid methyl ester, and their spectral characterization are described. The precursors for these ligands were prepared by TiCl4 catalyzed chloromethylation of 3beta-phenyltropane-2beta-carboxylic acid methyl ester followed by separation of the isomeric product mixture of 2- and 4-chloromethylphenyltropane derivatives. Reaction of the chloromethyl analogs with no-carrier-added [18F]fluoride ion followed by high performance liquid chromatography purification provided the corresponding [18F]fluoromethyltropanes, in good radiochemical yields, useful for imaging the brain dopamine transporter system in vivo with positron emission tomography. PMID:10473191

  12. Oxidation State of the XRCC1 N-terminal Domain Regulates DNA Polymerase Beta Binding Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, M.; London, R

    2010-01-01

    Formation of a complex between the XRCC1 N-terminal domain (NTD) and DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) is central to base excision repair of damaged DNA. Two crystal forms of XRCC1-NTD complexed with Pol {beta} have been solved, revealing that the XRCC1-NTD is able to adopt a redox-dependent alternate fold, characterized by a disulfide bond, and substantial variations of secondary structure, folding topology, and electrostatic surface. Although most of these structural changes occur distal to the interface, the oxidized XRCC1-NTD forms additional interactions with Pol {beta}, enhancing affinity by an order of magnitude. Transient disulfide bond formation is increasingly recognized as an important molecular regulatory mechanism. The results presented here suggest a paradigm in DNA repair in which the redox state of a scaffolding protein plays an active role in organizing the repair complex.

  13. Nebivolol: a novel beta-blocker with nitric oxide-induced vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Nebivolol is a novel beta1-blocker with a greater degree of selectivity for beta1-adrenergic receptors than other agents in this class and a nitric oxide (NO)-potentiating, vasodilatory effect that is unique among beta-blockers currently available to clinicians (nebivolol is approved in Europe and is currently under review in the US). A NO-potentiating agent such as nebivolol may have an important role in hypertensive populations with reduced endothelial function such as diabetics, African-Americans and those with vascular disease. Nebivolol is a racemic mixture with beta-blocker activity residing in the d-isomer; in contrast, l-nebivolol is far more potent in facilitating NO release. Nebivolol is unique among beta-blockers in that, at doses < 10 mg, it does not inhibit the increase in heart rate normally seen with exercise. The efficacy ofnebivolol has been tested successfully in clinical trials against other agents including other beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitors and calcium channel antagonists in patients with hypertension, angina, and congestive heart failure. The tolerability of nebivolol has been shown to be superior to that of atenolol and metoprolol. In controlled clinical trials, nebivolol has a side effect profile that is similar to placebo, in particular as it relates to fatigue and sexual dysfunction. This article will review published clinical data regarding this cardioselective beta-blocker. PMID:17326335

  14. Beta-carotene breakdown products enhance genotoxic effects of oxidative stress in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Alija, A J; Bresgen, N; Sommerburg, O; Langhans, C D; Siems, W; Eckl, P M

    2006-06-01

    Since it has to be expected that individuals exposed to oxidative stress who take supplements of beta-carotene are simultaneously exposed to both beta-carotene cleavage products (CPs) and oxidative stress, and both exposures have been demonstrated to cause genotoxic effects in primary rat hepatocytes, cyto- and genotoxic effects on primary rat hepatocytes after supplementation of the medium with increasing concentrations of a CP mixture during exposure to oxidative stress by treatment with either DMNQ (2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) or hypoxia/reoxygenation (Hy/Reox) was investigated. The cytological endpoints analysed were the mitotic indices, the percentages of apoptotic and necrotic cells, the percentages of micronucleated (MN) cells and the number of chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). The results obtained clearly demonstrate that the CP mixture enhances the genotoxic effects of oxidative stress exposure, whereas it had no effect at all on the endpoints of cytotoxicity studied. These results further support the hypothesis that CP might be responsible for the reported carcinogenic response in the beta-CArotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET) and Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-carotene Cancer prevention (ATBC) chemoprevention trials. PMID:16418177

  15. Long-chain fatty acid esters of 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol: composition and turnover in human mammary cancer cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Martyn, P; Adams, J B

    1989-08-01

    Long-chain fatty acid esters of the adrenal-derived estrogen 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol (ADIOL) were found to accumulate in four human mammary cancer cell lines (MCF-7, ZR-75-1, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-330) when explosed to 10-30 nM ADIOL for variable time periods. At each time point examined, the monoester fraction, which represented the major component of the total lipoidal fraction, contained fatty acids linked to either the 3 beta- or 17 beta-positions. However, there was considerable variation in the ratio of 3 beta- to 17 beta-monoesters in the four cell lines. By means of reverse phase HPLC and referral to authentic synthesized compounds, each monoester fraction was found to contain a number of long-chain fatty acid components whose composition resembled that previously determined for the fatty acid esters formed from 17 beta-estradiol. A specific and measurable turnover of a subfraction of ADIOL-17 beta-monoesters composed of essential fatty acids (22:6, 20:4, 18:3) occurred in MCF-7 cells, and to a lesser extent in ZR-75-1 cells. No changes were observed with time in any of the components of the 3 beta- or 17 beta-monoester fractions in MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-330 cells. These results, coupled with other studies, now suggest that a very rapid turnover of some components of these lipoidal derivatives may be occurring. If so, it is possible that the system of acylation-deacylation may be involved in a transport mechanism for estrogens and perhaps other steroid hormones. PMID:2588301

  16. Gaucher disease: Physical, kinetic and immunologic investigations of human and canine acid. beta. -glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbro, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Kinetic and immunologic techniques were developed to investigate the nature of the acid {beta}-glucosidase ({beta}-Glc) defects which results in human and canine Gaucher disease (GD). Two new affinity columns, using the potent inhibitors of {beta}-Glc (N-alkyl-deoxynojirimycins) as affinity ligands, were synthesized and methods were developed to obtain homogeneous {beta}-Glc from normal human placenta. Polyclonal and monoclonal (representing 14 different epitopes from 18 clones) antibodies were produced to the pure normal {beta}-Glc. Monospecific polyclonal IgG and tritiated-bromo-conduritol B epoxide (({sup 3}H)Br-CBE), a specific covalent active site directed inhibitor of {beta}-Glc, were used to quantitate the functional catalytic sites in normal and Type 1 Ashkenazi Jewish GD (AJGD) enzyme preparations: The k{sub cat} values for several new substrates with the mutant enzymes from spleen were about 1.5-fold less than the respective normal enzyme, indicating a nearly normal catalytic capacity of the mutant enzymes. Immunoblotting studies with polyclonal or several monoclonal antibodies indicated three molecular forms of {beta}-Glc (M{sub r} = 67,000, 62,000 to 65,000 and 58,000) in fibroblast extracts from normals and Type 1 AJGD patients. In comparison, only one form of cross-reacting immunologic material (CRIM) was detected in fibroblast extracts from Types 2 and 3 or several non-Jewish Type 1 GD patients.

  17. Retinoic acid modulates RAR alpha and RAR beta receptors in human glioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, A F; Leonard, N; Lacombe, J; Zassadowski, F; Padua, R A; Degos, L; Daumas-Duport, C; Chomienne, C

    1999-01-01

    To identify retinoic acid (RA) signalling pathways involved in growth and differentiation in cells of the glial lineage, two human glioma ceh lines were studied. The three RA receptors (RARs) mRNAs were constitutively expressed, and of the three RXRs, RXR beta appeared predominant. Western blotting analysis confirmed the constitutive expression of RAR alpha and RAR beta. Treatment with all-trans-RA induced morphological changes in the two cell lines, which progressed from their normal pattern of randomly oriented spindle-shaped cells to fibroblast-like glial cells. RA up-regulated RAR alpha and RAR beta mRNAs in both cell lines. Interestingly, RA treatment up-regulated RAR beta proteins but not RAR alpha proteins, suggesting post-transcriptional regulations of RAR transcripts in glioma cells. PMID:10652610

  18. Imaging of myocardial fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mather, Kieren J; DeGrado, Timothy R

    2016-10-01

    Myocardial fuel selection is a key feature of the health and function of the heart, with clear links between myocardial function and fuel selection and important impacts of fuel selection on ischemia tolerance. Radiopharmaceuticals provide uniquely valuable tools for in vivo, non-invasive assessment of these aspects of cardiac function and metabolism. Here we review the landscape of imaging probes developed to provide non-invasive assessment of myocardial fatty acid oxidation (MFAO). Also, we review the state of current knowledge that myocardial fatty acid imaging has helped establish of static and dynamic fuel selection that characterizes cardiac and cardiometabolic disease and the interplay between fuel selection and various aspects of cardiac function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:26923433

  19. Effect of nitric oxide on beta-glucan/indomethacin-induced septic shock.

    PubMed

    Nameda, Sachiko; Saito, Maki; Miura, Noriko N; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Naohito

    2005-07-01

    We have previously shown that repeated administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to mice treated with beta-glucan, a biological response modifier, induced severe lethality. The lethality would be strongly related to the translocation of enterobacterial flora to the peritoneal cavity and disruption of the cytokine network. Reports suggest that nitric oxide (NO) can have an effective or detrimental role in septic shock. In the present study, we examined the effect of NO, an inflammatory mediator, on beta-glucan/indomethacin (IND)- induced septic shock by inhibiting its synthesis with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nonselective NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor. Nitrite concentration was used as an indicator of NO generation. Mortality in beta-glucan/IND-treated mice was increased by administering L-NAME. Numbers of bacteria in various organs of mice treated with beta-glucan/IND rose significantly within a couple of days of the administration of L-NAME. Additionally, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 concentrations were enhanced in peritoneal exuded cells in culture. These results suggest a significant loss of the bactericidal activity of macrophages on the administration of a NOS inhibitor which enhanced the rate of enterobacterial invasion to the peritoneal cavity, resulting in systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The production of NO, therefore, provides a protective effect in beta-glucan/IND-induced sepsis. PMID:15997109

  20. Ligand-dependent occupancy of the retinoic acid receptor beta 2 promoter in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Dey, A; Minucci, S; Ozato, K

    1994-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) activates transcription of the RA receptor beta 2 (RAR beta 2) gene in embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells. This activation involves binding of the RAR/retinoid X receptor (RAR/RXR) heterodimer to the RA-responsive element (beta RARE). Dimethyl sulfate-based genomic footprinting was performed to examine occupancy of this promoter in P19 EC cells. No footprint was detected at the beta RARE prior to RA treatment, but a footprint was detected within the first hour of RA treatment. Concomitantly, other elements in the promoter, the cyclic AMP-responsive element and tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate-like-responsive element became footprinted. Footprints at these elements were induced by RA without requiring new protein synthesis and remained for the entire duration of RA treatment but rapidly reversed upon withdrawal of RA. A delayed protection observed at the initiator site was also reversed upon RA withdrawal. The RA-inducible footprint was not due to induction of factors that bind to these element, since in vitro assays showed that these factors are present in P19 cell extracts before RA treatment. Significantly, no RA-induced footprint was observed at any of these elements in P19 cells expressing a dominant negative RXR beta, in which RXR heterodimers are unable to bind to the beta RARE. Results indicate that binding of a liganded heterodimer receptor to the beta RARE is the initial event that allows other elements to gain access to the factors. In accordance, reporter analyses showed that a mutation in the beta RARE, but not those in other elements, abrogates RA activation of the promoter. It is likely that the RAR beta 2 promoter opens in a hierarchically ordered manner, signalled by the occupancy of liganded heterodimers. Images PMID:7969156

  1. The effects of beta acids from hops (Humulus lupulus L.)on mortality of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta acids from hop plants (Humulus lupulus L.) reduce feeding and oviposition behaviors and increase mortality in certain phytophagous mites. These compounds were tested for their effects on Varroa destructor (Anderson and Trueman) mortality. The effects of hops beta acids (HBA) on honey bee (Apis ...

  2. 75 FR 70236 - Hop Beta Acids; Receipt of Application for Emergency Exemption, Solicitation of Public Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... treat up to 181,000 honey bee colonies in the Pacific North West (PNW) to control varroa mites. The... exemption regional request for use of hop beta acids in honey bee hives to control varroa mites. Information... effect on honey bee populations. The parasitic mite is considered the primary pest of honeybees and...

  3. Proteomic analysis of drought resistance in crabapple seedlings primed by the xenobiotic Beta-aminobutyric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a variety of annual crops and model plants, the xenobiotic DL-Beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) has been shown to enhance disease resistance and increase salt, drought and thermotolerance. BABA does not activate stress genes directly, but sensitizes plants to respond more quickly and strongly to biot...

  4. Biostable beta-amino acid PK/PBAN analogs: Agonist and antagonist properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pyrokinin/pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PK/PBAN) family plays a significant role in a multifunctional array of important physiological processes in insects. PK/PBAN analogs incorporating beta-amino acids were synthesized and evaluated in a pheromonotropic assay in Heliothis pe...

  5. MODULATION OF HEALTH AND PRODUCTION BY ORAL BETA-GLUCAN AND ASCORBIC ACID AFTER TRANSPORT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeast cell-wall Beta-glucan works synergistically with ascorbic acid to enhance growth of neonatal calves in indoor, raised crates. Objectives of this study were to determine 1) if this combination of dietary supplements would improve neonatal calves' stress responses to transport, 2) production an...

  6. Poly(beta-L-malic acid) from agricultural substrates by Aureobasidium pullulans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report here for the first time the production of poly(beta-L-malic acid) (PMA) from agricultural substrates by the yeastlike fungus Aureobasidium pullulans. PMA is a natural biopolyester that has primarily been studied for biomedical uses as a drug carrier. However, PMA also has potential as a ...

  7. Metabolomic profiling of amino acids and beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity in youth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In longitudinal studies of adults, elevated amino acid (AA) concentrations predicted future type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of the present investigation was to examine whether increased plasma AA concentrations are associated with impaired beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity ...

  8. Poly (beta-L-malic acid) production by diverse phylogenetic clades of Aureobasidium pullulans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poly (beta-L-malic acid) (PMA) is a natural biopolyester that has pharmaceutical applications and other potential uses. Here we examine PMA production by genetically diverse phylogenetic clades of the fungus A. pullulans. Thirty-six strains of A. pullulans were isolated for this study from various...

  9. A Multicomponent UV Analysis of ["alpha"]- and ["beta"]-Acids in Hops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egts, Haley; Durben, Dan J.; Dixson, John A.; Zehfus, Micheal H.

    2012-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of ["alpha"]- and ["beta"]-acids (humulones and lupulones) in a hops sample using a multicomponent UV spectroscopic analysis of a methanolic hop extract. When compared with standard methods, this lab can be considered "greener" because it uses smaller volumes of safer solvents (methanol instead of…

  10. Production of poly(beta-L-malic acid) (PMA) from agricultural biomass substrates by Aureobasidium pullulans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report here for the first time the production of poly(beta-L-malic acid) (PMA) from agricultural biomass substrates by the yeastlike fungus Aureobasidium pullulans. Strains NRRL Y 2311-1, NRRL 50382, NRRL 50383, and NRRL 50384, representing diverse isolation sources and phylogenetic clades, prod...

  11. Structure-retention correlation of isomeric bile acids in inclusion high-performance liquid chromatography with methyl beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Momose, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Iida, T; Goto, J; Nambara, T

    1998-01-01

    The structure-retention correlation of various C24 bile acid isomers was studied by the addition of methyl beta-cyclodextrin (Me-beta-CD) to mobile phases in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The compounds examined include a series of monosubstituted bile acids related to cholanoic acids differing from one another in the position and configuration of an oxygen-containing function (hydroxyl or oxo group) at the position C-3, C-6, C-7, or C-12 and the stereochemistry of the A/B-ring fusion (trans 5 alpha-H and cis 5 beta-H) in the steroid nucleus. The inclusion HPLC with Me-beta-CD was also applied to biologically important 4 beta- and 6-hydroxylated bile acids substituted by three to four hydroxyl groups in the 5 beta-steroid nucleus. These bile acid samples were converted into their fluorescence prelabeled 24-pyrenacyl ester derivatives and chromatographed on a Capcell Pak C18 column eluted with methanol-water mixtures in the presence or absence of 5 mM Me-beta-CD. The effects of Me-beta-CD on the retentions of each compound were correlated quantitatively to the decreasing rate of capacity factors and the relative strength of host-guest interactions. On the basis of the retention data, specific and nonspecific hydrogen-bonding interactions between the bile acids and the Me-beta-CD were discussed. PMID:9470179

  12. Biosynthesis of gamma-linolenic acid and beta-carotene by Zygomycetes fungi.

    PubMed

    Klempova, Tatiana; Basil, Eva; Kubatova, Alena; Certik, Milan

    2013-07-01

    Due to increasing demand for natural sources of both polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and beta-carotene, 28 Zygomycetes fungal soil isolates were screened for their potential to synthesize these biologically active compounds. Although all fungi produced C18 PUFAs, only nine strains also formed beta-carotene. Although Actinomucor elegans CCF 3218 was the best producer of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) (251 mg/L), Umbelopsis isabellina CCF 2412 was found to be the most valuable fungus because of the dual production of GLA (217 mg/L) and beta-carotene (40.7 mg/L). The calculated ratio of formed PUFAs provided new insight into activities of individual fatty acid desaturases involved in biosynthetic pathways for various types of PUFAs. The maximal activity of delta-9 desaturase was accompanied by high accumulation of storage lipids in fungal cells. On the other hand, maximal activity of delta-15 desaturase was found in strains synthesizing low amounts of oleic acid due to diminished delta-9 desaturase. Activities of delta-6 desaturase showed competition for fatty acids engaged in n3, n6, and n9 biosynthetic pathways. Such knowledge about fatty acid desaturase activities provides new challenges for the regulation of biotechnological production of PUFAs by Zygomycetes fungi. PMID:23625863

  13. Delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 beta-reductase deficiency: failure of ursodeoxycholic acid treatment and response to chenodeoxycholic acid plus cholic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, P T; Mills, K A; Johnson, A W; Barabino, A; Marazzi, M G

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--In some infants with liver disease, 3-oxo-delta 4 bile acids are the major bile acids in urine, a phenomenon attributed to reduced activity of the delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 beta-reductase required for synthesis of chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid. These patients form a heterogeneous group. Many have a known cause of hepatic dysfunction and plasma concentrations of chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid that are actually greater than those of the 3-oxo-delta 4 bile acids. It is unlikely that these patients have a primary genetic deficiency of the 5 beta-reductase enzyme. AIMS--To document the bile acid profile, clinical phenotype, and response to treatment of an infant with cholestasis, increased plasma concentrations of 3-oxo-delta 4 bile acids, low plasma concentrations of chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid, and no other identifiable cause of liver disease. PATIENTS--This infant was compared with normal infants and infants with cholestasis of known cause. METHODS--Analysis of bile acids by liquid secondary ionisation mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS--The plasma bile acid profile of the patient was unique. She had chronic cholestatic liver disease associated with malabsorption of vitamins D and E and a normal gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase when the transaminases were increased. The liver disease failed to improve with ursodeoxycholic acid but responded to a combination of chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid. CONCLUSION--Treatment of primary 5 beta-reductase deficiency requires the use of bile acids that inhibit cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase. PMID:8707100

  14. The Iron-Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-17

    To assess the importance of iron to hydrazine stability, the study of hydrazine oxidation by nitric acid has been extended to investigate the iron-catalyzed oxidation. This report describes those results.

  15. Lipidomics of oxidized polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Karen A.; Nicolaou, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Lipid mediators are produced from the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids through enzymatic and free radical-mediated reactions. When subject to oxygenation via cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, and cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, polyunsaturated fatty acids give rise to an array of metabolites including eicosanoids, docosanoids, and octadecanoids. These potent bioactive lipids are involved in many biochemical and signaling pathways, with inflammation being of particular importance. Moreover, because they are produced by more than one pathway and substrate, and are present in a variety of biological milieus, their analysis is not always possible with conventional assays. Liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry offers a versatile and sensitive approach for the analysis of bioactive lipids, allowing specific and accurate quantitation of multiple species present in the same sample. Here we explain the principles of this approach to mediator lipidomics and present detailed protocols for the assay of enzymatically produced oxygenated metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids that can be tailored to answer biological questions or facilitate assessment of nutritional and pharmacological interventions. PMID:22940496

  16. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro evaluation of dimethyl-beta-cyclodextrin-4-biphenylylacetic acid conjugate.

    PubMed

    Ventura, C A; Paolino, D; Pedotti, S; Pistarà, V; Corsaro, A; Puglisi, G

    2003-05-01

    Biphenylylacetic acid (BPAA) was linked to the free hydroxyl group of 2,6-di-O-methyl-beta-Cyclodextrin (DM-beta-CyD) through an ester linkage to obtain the site specific release of the drug to the colon. The conjugate at 1:1 mole ratio was separated from the reaction mixture by semipreparative reverse-phase HPLC and characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, IR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and elemental analysis. Chemico-physical characteristics, such as water solubility and dissolution rate, were evaluated comparatively to the BPAA-DM-beta-CyD inclusion complex. Hydrolysis rates were investigated in media simulating gastro-intestinal fluids and at pH 7.4 in the presence of porcine liver esterase. A rapid release of the drug was observed at acid pH value. In all cases a first order kinetic was observed, characterized by t1/2 value of 1.19, 19 and 4 h for chemical hydrolysis at pH 1.1, at pH 7.4 and enzymatic hydrolysis, respectively. In vitro permeation studies through caco-2 cells confirmed the ability of DM-beta-CyD to increase the absorption of included BPAA. A slow permeation was observed for the drug conjugate to DM-beta-CyD due to the slow release of BPAA. PMID:14578110

  17. Stereoselective synthesis of (E)-trisubstituted alpha,beta-unsaturated amides and acids.

    PubMed

    Feuillet, Fred J P; Cheeseman, Matt; Mahon, Mary F; Bull, Steven D

    2005-08-21

    Potassium alkoxides of N-acyl-oxazolidin-2-one-syn-aldols undergo stereoselective elimination reactions to afford a range of trisubstituted (E)-alpha,beta-unsaturated amides in >95% de, that may be subsequently converted into their corresponding (E)-alpha,beta-unsaturated acids or (E)-alpha,beta-unsaturated oxazolines in good yield. syn-Aldols derived from alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes gave their corresponding trisubstituted (E)-alpha,beta-unsaturated-amides with poorer levels of diastereocontrol, whilst there was a similar loss in (E)-selectivity during elimination of syn-aldols derived from chiral aldehydes. These elimination reactions proceed via rearrangement of the potassium alkoxide of the syn-aldol to a 1,3-oxazinane-2,4-dione enolate intermediate that subsequently eliminates carbon dioxide to afford a trisubstituted (E)-alpha,beta-unsaturated amide. The (E)-selectivity observed during the E1cB-type elimination step has been rationalised using a simple conformational model that employs a chair-like transition state to explain the observed stereocontrol. PMID:16186928

  18. Physiology and molecular genetics of poly(beta-hydroxy-alkanoic acid) synthesis in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed

    Steinbüchel, A; Schlegel, H G

    1991-03-01

    The Alcaligenes eutrophus genes for beta-ketothiolase, NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl-CoA reductase and poly(beta-hydroxybutyric acid) synthase (PHB synthase) which comprise the three-step PHB-biosynthetic pathway, were cloned. Molecular studies revealed that these genes are organized in a single operon. The A. eutrophus PHB-biosynthetic genes are readily expressed in other bacteria, and DNA fragments harbouring the operon can be used as a cartridge to confer to other bacteria the ability to synthesize PHB from acetyl-CoA. The biochemical and physiological capabilities of A. eutrophus for the synthesis of a wide variety of polyhydroxyalkanoates are discussed. PMID:2046547

  19. Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Joshua J.; Davis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer in the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), is obtained by the oxidation of petroleum-derived p-xylene. There is significant interest in the synthesis of renewable, biomass-derived PTA. Here, routes to PTA starting from oxidized products of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) that can be produced from biomass are reported. These routes involve Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and avoid the hydrogenation of HMF to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Oxidized derivatives of HMF are reacted with ethylene over solid Lewis acid catalysts that do not contain strong Brønsted acids to synthesize intermediates of PTA and its equally important diester, dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic acid (HMFA), is reacted with high pressure ethylene over a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework tin (Sn-Beta) to produce the Diels-Alder dehydration product, 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoic acid (HMBA), with 31% selectivity at 61% HMFA conversion after 6 h at 190 °C. If HMFA is protected with methanol to form methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)furan-2-carboxylate (MMFC), MMFC can react with ethylene in the presence of Sn-Beta for 2 h to produce methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzenecarboxylate (MMBC) with 46% selectivity at 28% MMFC conversion or in the presence of a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework zirconium (Zr-Beta) for 6 h to produce MMBC with 81% selectivity at 26% MMFC conversion. HMBA and MMBC can then be oxidized to produce PTA and DMT, respectively. When Lewis acid containing mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and amorphous silica, or Brønsted acid containing zeolites (Al-Beta), are used as catalysts, a significant decrease in selectivity/yield of the Diels-Alder dehydration product is observed. PMID:24912153

  20. Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Joshua J; Davis, Mark E

    2014-06-10

    Terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer in the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), is obtained by the oxidation of petroleum-derived p-xylene. There is significant interest in the synthesis of renewable, biomass-derived PTA. Here, routes to PTA starting from oxidized products of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) that can be produced from biomass are reported. These routes involve Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and avoid the hydrogenation of HMF to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Oxidized derivatives of HMF are reacted with ethylene over solid Lewis acid catalysts that do not contain strong Brønsted acids to synthesize intermediates of PTA and its equally important diester, dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic acid (HMFA), is reacted with high pressure ethylene over a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework tin (Sn-Beta) to produce the Diels-Alder dehydration product, 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoic acid (HMBA), with 31% selectivity at 61% HMFA conversion after 6 h at 190 °C. If HMFA is protected with methanol to form methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)furan-2-carboxylate (MMFC), MMFC can react with ethylene in the presence of Sn-Beta for 2 h to produce methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzenecarboxylate (MMBC) with 46% selectivity at 28% MMFC conversion or in the presence of a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework zirconium (Zr-Beta) for 6 h to produce MMBC with 81% selectivity at 26% MMFC conversion. HMBA and MMBC can then be oxidized to produce PTA and DMT, respectively. When Lewis acid containing mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and amorphous silica, or Brønsted acid containing zeolites (Al-Beta), are used as catalysts, a significant decrease in selectivity/yield of the Diels-Alder dehydration product is observed. PMID:24912153

  1. A rapid response of beta-amylase to nitric oxide but not gibberellin in wheat seeds during the early stage of germination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Shen, Wen-Biao; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Lang-Lai

    2005-03-01

    The effects of nitric oxide (NO) and gibberellic acid (GA(3)) on the responses of amylases in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seeds (caryopses) were investigated during the first 12 h of germination. GA(3) had no effects on the activities of alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) or beta-amylase (EC 3.2.1.2), either in intact seeds or embryoless halves within 12 h. In contrast, addition of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor, was able to induce a rapid increase in beta-amylase activity without affecting alpha-amylase. Furthermore, the rapid response of beta-amylase to SNP in wheat seeds could be attributed to NO and was approximately dose-dependent. Some other aspects of SNP induction of amylase isozymes were also characterized. Further investigations showed that SNP might play an interesting role in the dissociation of free beta-amylase from small homopolymers or heteropolymers. Furthermore, SNP also directly induced the release of bound beta-amylase from glutenin and its crude enzyme preparation. However, the slight increase in protease also induced by SNP might not be responsible for this action. Interestingly, based on the fact that the rapid response of beta-amylase to NO also existed in seeds of other species, such as barley, soybean, rice and watermelon, it might be a universal event in early seed germination. PMID:15517355

  2. 18{beta}-Glycyrrhetinic acid inhibits adipogenic differentiation and stimulates lipolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Ahn, Dong-Choon; Kim, In-Shik; Park, Sang-Youel

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 18{beta}-GA inhibits adipogenic differentiation in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and stimulates lipolysis in differentiated adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-adipogenic effect of 18{beta}-GA is caused by down-regulation of PPAR{gamma} and inactivation of Akt signalling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipolytic effect of 18{beta}-GA is mediated by up-regulation of HSL, ATGL and perilipin and activation of HSL. -- Abstract: 18{beta}-Glycyrrhetinic acid (18{beta}-GA) obtained from the herb liquorice has various pharmacological properties including anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial activities. However, potential biological anti-obesity activities are unclear. In this study, novel biological activities of 18{beta}-GA in the adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and in lipolysis of differentiated adipocytes were identified. Mouse 3T3-L1 cells were used as an in vitro model of adipogenesis and lipolysis, using a mixture of insulin/dexamethasone/3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) to induce differentiation. The amount of lipid droplet accumulation was determined by an AdipoRed assay. The expression of several adipogenic transcription factors and enzymes was investigated using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. 18{beta}-GA dose-dependently (1-40 {mu}M) significantly decreased lipid accumulation in maturing preadipocytes. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, 10 {mu}M of 18{beta}-GA down-regulated the transcriptional levels of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein {alpha} and adiponectin, which are markers of adipogenic differentiation via Akt phosphorylation. Also, in differentiated adipocytes, 18{beta}-GA increased the level of glycerol release and up-regulated the mRNA of hormone-sensitive lipase, adipose TG lipase and perilipin, as well as the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase at Serine 563. The results indicate that 18{beta

  3. Reduction of n-3 PUFAs, specifically DHA and EPA, and enhancement of peroxisomal beta-oxidation in type 2 diabetic rat heart

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is overwhelming evidence that dietary supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), mainly EPA (C20:5n-3) and DHA (C22:6n-3), has cardiovascular protective effects on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) but not on healthy people. Because the T2DM heart increases fatty acid oxidation (FAO) to compensate for the diminished utilization of glucose, we hypothesize that T2DM hearts consume more n-3 PUFAs and, therefore, need more n-3 PUFAs. In the present study, we investigated the changes in cardiac n-3 PUFAs and peroxisomal beta-oxidation, which are responsible for the degradation of PUFAs in a high-fat diet (HFD) and low-dose streptozotocin- (STZ) induced type 2 diabetic rat model. Methods and results The capillary gas chromatography results showed that all the n-3 (or omega-3) PUFAs, especially DHA (~50%) and EPA (~100%), were significantly decreased, and the n-6/n-3 ratio (~115%) was significantly increased in the hearts of diabetic rats. The activity of peroxisomal beta-oxidation, which is crucial to very-long-chain and unsaturated FA metabolism (including DHA), was significantly elevated in DM hearts. Additionally, the real-time PCR results showed that the mRNA expression of most peroxisomal beta-oxidation key enzymes were up-regulated in T2DM rat hearts, which might contribute to the reduction of n-3 (or omega-3) PUFAs. Conclusion In conclusion, our results indicate that T2DM hearts consume more n-3 PUFAs, especially DHA and EPA, due to exaggerated peroxisomal beta-oxidation. PMID:23057715

  4. Possible enhancing mechanism of the cutaneous permeation of 4-biphenylylacetic acid by beta-cyclodextrin derivatives in hydrophilic ointment.

    PubMed

    Arima, H; Miyaji, T; Irie, T; Hirayama, F; Uekama, K

    1996-03-01

    The enhancing effects of heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin (DM-beta-CyD) and 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CyD) on the percutaneous absorption of 4-biphenylylacetic acid (BPAA), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, in hydrophilic ointment were studied and compared with the parent beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CyD). 13C-NMR measurements suggested that the biphenyl group of BPAA is preferably included within the cavity of three beta-CyDs. The three beta-CyDs remarkably enhanced the release of BPAA from the hydrophilic ointment base and the in vitro cutaneous permeation, depending on the increase in solubility of BPAA in the ointment base. Pretreatment of the ointment containing DM-beta-CyD or HP-beta-CyD onto the isolated skin of hairless mice, however, provided no effects on the skin permeation of BPAA. When propylene glycol was used as a vehicle, both the release rate and cutaneous permeation parameters showed no appreciable difference between BPAA alone and its HP-beta-CyD complex, because the solubilities of BPAA and its HP-beta-CyD complex were almost comparable in the vehicle. The present results suggested that the enhancing effect of beta-CyDs on the percutaneous absorption of BPAA can be mainly ascribed to an increase in the solubility of BPAA in the hydrophilic ointment. PMID:8882455

  5. Beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) Extract Ameliorates Gentamicin-Induced Nephrotoxicity Associated Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Apoptosis in Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    El Gamal, Ali A.; AlSaid, Mansour S.; Raish, Mohammad; Al-Sohaibani, Mohammed; Al-Massarani, Shaza M.; Ahmad, Ajaz; Hefnawy, Mohamed; Al-Yahya, Mohammed; Basoudan, Omer A.; Rafatullah, Syed

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was designed to investigate the protective effect of (Beta vulgaris L.) beat root ethanolic extract (BVEE) on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity and to elucidate the potential mechanism. Serum specific kidney function parameters (urea, uric acid, total protein, creatinine, and histopathology of kidney tissue) were evaluated to access gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. The oxidative/nitrosative stress (Lipid peroxidation, MDA, NP-SH, Catalase, and nitric oxide levels) was assessed. The inflammatory response (TNF-α, IL-6, MPO, NF-κB (p65), and NF-κB (p65) DNA binding) and apoptotic marker (Caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2) were also evaluated. BVEE (250 and 500 mg/kg) treatment along with gentamicin restored/increased the renal endogenous antioxidant status. Gentamicin-induced increased renal inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), nuclear protein expression of NF-κB (p65), NF-κB-DNA binding activity, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and nitric oxide level were significantly down regulated upon BVEE treatment. In addition, BVEE treatment significantly reduced the amount of cleaved caspase 3 and Bax, protein expression and increased the Bcl-2 protein expression. BVEE treatment also ameliorated the extent of histologic injury and reduced inflammatory infiltration in renal tubules. These findings suggest that BVEE treatment attenuates renal dysfunction and structural damage through the reduction of oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis in the kidney. PMID:25400335

  6. The effect of valinomycin in fibroblasts from patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Ndukwe Erlingsson, Uzochi Chimdinma; Iacobazzi, Francesco; Liu, Aiping; Ardon, Orly; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Valinomycin can cause mitochondrial stress and stimulate fatty acid oxidation. •Cells with VLCAD deficiency fail to increase fatty acid oxidation in response to valinomycin. •Response to valinomycin can help in the diagnosis of VLCAD deficiency. -- Abstract: Disorders of the carnitine cycle and of the beta oxidation spiral impair the ability to obtain energy from fats at time of fasting and stress. This can result in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, cardiac arrhythmia and other chronic medical problems. The in vitro study of fibroblasts from patients with these conditions is impaired by their limited oxidative capacity. Here we evaluate the capacity of valinomycin, a potassium ionophore that increases mitochondrial respiration, to increase the oxidation of fatty acids in cells from patients with inherited fatty acid oxidation defects. The addition of valinomycin to fibroblasts decreased the accumulation of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP{sup +}) at low concentrations due to the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. At higher doses, valinomycin increased TPP{sup +} accumulation due to the increased potassium permeability of the plasma membrane and subsequent cellular hyperpolarization. The incubation of normal fibroblasts with valinomycin increased [{sup 14}C]-palmitate oxidation (measured as [{sup 14}C]O{sub 2} release) in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, valinomycin failed to increase palmitate oxidation in fibroblasts from patients with very long chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. This was not observed in fibroblasts from patients heterozygous for this condition. These results indicate that valinomycin can increase fatty acid oxidation in normal fibroblasts and could be useful to differentiate heterozygotes from patients affected with VLCAD deficiency.

  7. The metabolism of primary, 7-oxo, and 7 beta-hydroxy bile acids by Clostridium absonum.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, J D; Macdonald, I A

    1982-07-01

    Clostridium absonum was shown to metabolize primary bile acids to give rise to both 7-oxo bile acids and 7 beta-hydroxy (urso) bile acids. At relatively low redox potential (Eh) values, high yields of urso bile acids were achieved (60-75%). If, however, the Eh value of the culture was allowed to rise above approximately -100 mv, the 7-oxo bile acid would tend to predominate (more than 75%) and the "death phase" was accelerated. Growth of C. absonum in sterile graduated cylinders instead of in conventional Erlenmeyer flasks was effective in delaying the rise in Eh value with time (which appears largely due to diffusion of atmospheric oxygen into the medium) and in preserving a higher viable count of organisms. It is proposed that the formation of excess amounts of 7-oxo bile acid is a manifestation of oxygen toxicity and that it could be mediated by an increasing intracellular NADP:NADPH ratio. Additionally, the reaction: primary bile acid in equilibrium oxo bile acid in equilibrium urso bile acid was shown to be partially reversible. When the organisms were grown with [24-(14)C]chenodeoxycholic, -cholic, or -7-keto-lithocholic acid, this reaction could be clearly demonstrated. The addition of an equimolar concentration of deoxycholic acid (which itself is not metabolized) effectively enhanced the rate of bioconversion of cholate and 7-keto-lithocholic, but not chenodeoxycholate (whose rate of bioconversion was the fastest of the three). When the organisms were grown with urso bile acids (ursocholic or ursodeoxycholic) or with 7-keto-deoxycholic acid, very little metabolism occurred unless deoxycholic acid was added which induced formation of primary and keto bile acids. In all cases, formation of oxo bile acid from primary or urso bile acid occurred as the Eh value of the medium rose with time and could thus be delayed by the use of a cylinder instead of a flask for growing the culture. These results were rationalized by demonstrating that induction of 7 alpha- and

  8. Controlled synthesis and inclusion ability of a hyaluronic acid derivative bearing beta-cyclodextrin molecules.

    PubMed

    Charlot, Aurélia; Heyraud, Alain; Guenot, Pierre; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Auzély-Velty, Rachel

    2006-03-01

    A new synthetic route to beta-cyclodextrin-linked hyaluronic acid (HA-CD) was developed. This was based on the preparation of a HA derivative selectively modified with adipic dihydrazide (HA-ADH) and a beta-cyclodextrin derivative possessing an aldehyde function on the primary face, followed by their coupling by a reductive amination-type reaction. The CD-polysaccharide was fully characterized in terms of chemical integrity and purity by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. The complexation ability of the grafted CD was further demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry using sodium adamantane acetate (ADAc) and Ibuprofen as model guest molecules. The thermodynamic parameters for the complexation of these negatively charged guest molecules by the beta-CD grafted on negatively charged HA were shown to be largely influenced by the ionic strength of the aqueous medium. PMID:16529430

  9. Comparison of the activity of imipenem and beta-lactams combined with sulbactam and clavulanic acid in beta-lactamase-producing strains of Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Martín, M A; Castillo, A M; Liébana, J; Marín, A; Alados, J C; Piédrola, G

    1991-01-01

    We compared the "in vitro" activity of imipenem with 14 beta-lactams, both alone and in combination with clavulanic acid, and sulbactam against 110 beta-lactamase-producing strains of Bacteroides fragilis. The following antibiotics were tested: amoxycillin, penicillin, mezlocillin, piperacillin, cephalothin, cephazolin, cefamandole, cefmetazole, cefonicid, cefoxitin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftizoxime, and ceftriaxone. In all cases, except those of cefoxitin and cefmetazole, these combinations showed a statistically significant increase in beta-lactam activity, which was, however, never higher than that of imipenem, the antibiotic which performed best against Bacteroides fragilis. PMID:1940333

  10. Reactive lattice oxygen sites for C sub 4 -hydrocarbon selective oxidation over. beta. -VOPO sub 4

    SciTech Connect

    Lashier, M.E.; Schrader, G.L. )

    1991-03-01

    The role of lattice oxygen species in the catalytic oxidation of n-butene to maleic anhydride has been investigated using {beta}-VOPO{sub 4} labeled with {sup 18}O. The catalyst was prepared by stoichiometric reaction of (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} with {sup 18}O{sub 2} using solid state preparation techniques. The {beta}-VOPO{sub 7/2} {sup 18}O{sub 1/2} was characterized using laser Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies: preferential incorporation at P-O-V sites was observed. A pulse reactor was used to react n-butane, 1-butene, 1,3-butadiene, furan, {gamma}-butyrolactone, and maleic anhydride with the catalyst in the absence of gas-phase O{sub 2}. Incorporation of {sup 18}O into the products was monitored by mass spectrometry. Specific lattice oxygen sites could be associated with the reaction pathways for selective or nonselective oxidation. The results of this study also indicate that the initial interaction of n-butane with {beta}-VOPO{sub 4} is fundamentally different from the initial interaction of olefins or oxygenated species. The approach used in this research-referred to as Isotopic Reactive-Site Mapping-is a potentially powerful method for probing the reactive lattice sites of other selective oxidation catalysts.

  11. OXIDATIVE DEGRADATION OF ORGANIC ACIDS CONJUGATED WITH SULFITE OXIDATION IN FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation under flue gas desulfurization (FGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k12, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate times th...

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of the binding of a hepatoprotectant drug, thioctic acid, by beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Junquera, E; Aicart, E

    1999-06-01

    Spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies of the binding of a hepatoprotectant drug, thioctic acid, by beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) have been carried out using UV-vis and pH potentiometric measurements. The UV-vis spectra and the pH of the aqueous solutions of the drug were measured (i) as a function of total drug concentration in the absence of cyclodextrin, and (ii) as a function of cyclodextrin concentration at constant drug concentration. The spectroscopic study was done at pH = 7 and 25 degrees C, while the potentiometric study was performed at several temperatures ranging from 15 to 40 degrees C. From the spectroscopic data, the molar absorption coefficient, epsilon, for the pure drug in aqueous media and the stoichiometry of the inclusion complex with beta-CD were determined. The dissociation constant, Ka, of the pure drug (which is a weak acid), and the association constants of the complexes formed by beta-cyclodextrin and both the nonionized (HTIO) and ionized (TIO-) forms of the drug, have been simultaneously determined at several temperatures from the pH data, without the necessity of working with buffered solutions. The nonionic forms are complexed by the beta-CD with higher affinity than their ionic counterparts. From the dependency of the association constants on temperature (van't Hoff analysis), the inclusion complexes formed by HTIO or TIO- and the beta-CD were found to be enthalpy driven, with a favorable enthalpic term dominant over an unfavorable entropic term. Both contributions were found to show a possible dependence with temperature (DeltaCpo not equal 0). This pattern may reveal the contribution of van der Waals interactions, hydrophobic effect, and solvent reorganization as the main driving forces promoting the complexation. PMID:10350499

  13. Structure of the complex of beta-cyclodextrin with beta-naphthyloxyacetic acid in the solid state and in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kokkinou, A; Yannakopoulou, K; Mavridis, I M; Mentzafo, D

    2001-05-01

    The structure of the complex of beta-cyclodextrin (cyclomaltoheptaose) with beta-naphthyloxyacetic acid was studied in solid state by X-ray diffraction and in aqueous solution by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The complex crystallizes in the channel mode, space group C2, with a stoichiometry of 2:1; two beta-cyclodextrin molecules related by a twofold crystal axis form dimers, in the cavity of which one guest molecule is found on average. The above stoichiometry indicates one guest per beta-CD dimer statistically oriented over two positions or two guest molecules in pi-pi interactions in half of the beta-CD dimers and the rest of the beta-CD dimers empty. In addition, occupancy of 0.5 for the guest per every beta-CD dimer is in accord with the occupancy of the two disordered primary hydroxyls. These two hydroxyl groups, to which the carboxylic oxygen atoms of the guest are hydrogen bonded, point towards the interior of the beta-CD cavity. In aqueous solution, the 1H NMR spectroscopic study indicated that there is a mixture of complexes with host-guest stoichiometries both 1:1 and 2:1. PMID:11403091

  14. Basal cell proliferation in female SKH-1 mice treated with alpha- and beta-hydroxy acids.

    PubMed

    Sams, R L; Couch, L H; Miller, B J; Okerberg, C V; Warbritton, A; Wamer, W G; Beer, J Z; Howard, P C

    2001-08-15

    Alpha- and beta-hydroxy acids are compounds that have been used extensively in cosmetic and dermatological formulations. Clinical and qualitative effects of alpha- and beta-hydroxy acids have been well characterized, but little is known about their mechanism of action or acute and chronic biochemical effects. In the present study, we examined the acute proliferative effects of glycolic and salicylic acids on cell proliferation in the epidermis of SKH-1 female mice, using BrdU incorporation as a marker of epidermal proliferation. In preliminary experiments, we observed an increase in the rate of proliferation after 3 days of treatment with 10% glycolic acid-containing cream and this was sustained throughout a 6.5-week (treatment 5 days/week) time course compared with untreated control animals. After each treatment with cream containing glycolic acid there was a wave of proliferation that was maximal 12 to 16 h (significant at p < 0.05) after treatment, followed by a subsequent increase in epidermal thickness at 18 to 20 h (significant at p < 0.05). The effects of the concentration and pH level of glycolic acid- and salicylic acid-containing creams on the rate of proliferation and increases in skin thickness in SKH-1 epidermis were also investigated. We observed a dose-dependent increase in epidermal proliferation of animals treated with either glycolic or salicylic acid. A similar time-dependent response was observed in the epidermal thickness in animals treated with salicylic acid, but not with glycolic acid. Differences in pH (3.5 or 4.0) had no significant effect on either epidermal proliferation or skin thickness. The data that we present here should be useful in characterizing not only the beneficial but also the adverse effects that occur following acute or chronic usage of alpha-hydroxy acids. PMID:11509029

  15. beta-Lactamase-catalyzed hydrolysis of acyclic depsipeptides and acyl transfer to specific amino acid acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, R F; Govardhan, C P

    1984-01-01

    beta-Lactamases from all three classes, A, B, and C, catalyze the hydrolysis of specific acyclic depsipeptide (PhCH2CONHCR1R2CO2CHR3CO2H) analogs of acyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine peptides. The depsipeptides investigated, which are chemically as reactive toward nucleophiles as penicillins, are in general poor substrates, although differences between the classes of beta-lactamases have been observed: the order of effectiveness seems to be C greater than B greater than A. Certain class A and C beta-lactamases also catalyze phenylacetylglycyl transfer between phenylacetylglycyl depsipeptides and specific amino acid acceptors, a type of reaction hitherto identified more closely with D-alanyl-D-alanine transpeptidases than with beta-lactamases. Preliminary indications of an acyl-enzyme intermediate in these reactions have been obtained. These results support the suggestion [Tipper, D.J. and Strominger, J.L. (1965) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 54, 1133-1141] that beta-lactamases are evolutionary descendants of bacterial cell wall D-alanyl-D-alanine transpeptidases. PMID:6424114

  16. Effect of acid predissolution on fibril size and fibril flexibility of synthetic beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, C L; Fitzgerald, M C; Murphy, R M

    1994-01-01

    beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) is the major protein component of senile plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's patients. Several researchers have demonstrated that A beta is neurotoxic in in vitro and in vivo systems. Peptide aggregation state and/or conformation might play a significant role in determining the toxicity of the peptide. The size and flexibility of fibrils formed from the synthetic peptide beta (1-39), corresponding to the first 39 residues of A beta, were determined. Samples were prepared either directly from lyophilized peptide or diluted from a 10 mg/ml stock solution in 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). All samples had a final peptide concentration of 0.5 mg/ml, a final pH of 7.4, and a final NaCl concentration of 0.14 M. The molecular weight and linear density of the fibrils increased with increasing pre-incubation time in TFA, based on static light scattering measurements. Analysis of the angular dependence of the intensity of scattered light indicated that the fibrils were semi-flexible chains and that the fibril flexibility decreased with increasing pre-incubation time in TFA. There was a concomitant change in phase behavior from precipitation to gelation with the decrease in fibril flexibility. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:7811938

  17. Acid-base properties of titanium-antimony oxides catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zenkovets, G.A.; Paukshtis, E.A.; Tarasova, D.V.; Yurchenko, E.N.

    1982-06-01

    The acid-base properties of titanium-antimony oxide catalysts were studied by the methods of back titration and ir spectroscopy. The interrelationship between the acid-base and catalytic properties in the oxidative ammonolysis of propylene was discussed. 3 figures, 1 table.

  18. Effect of 3-methylcholanthrene-induced increases in ascorbic acid levels on tissue. beta. -glucuronidase activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, E.J.; Barrett, T.J.; Leonard, D.A.; Horton, H.M.; Kenyon, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    The interrelationship between tissue ascorbic acid levels and tissue ..beta..-glucuronidase activity was examined in rats injected with 3-methylcholanthrene, an agent which induces ascorbic acid synthesis in rats. Six Fisher 344 rats were dosed intraperitoneally (IP) with 30 mg/kg of 3-methylcholanthrene. Ascorbic acid levels and ..beta..-glucuronidase (..beta..-G) activity were determined for lung, liver and kidney tissues. In a follow-up study, rats were dosed for three consecutive days with 3-methylcholanthrene. Controls in both groups were dosed IP with Emulphor (EL-620). Animals were sacrificed one week after the final dosage and lung, liver and kidney tissues were examined.

  19. The Lathyrus excitotoxin beta-N-oxalyl-L-alpha,beta-diaminopropionic acid is a substrate of the L-cystine/L-glutamate exchanger system xc-.

    PubMed

    Warren, Brady A; Patel, Sarjubhai A; Nunn, Peter B; Bridges, Richard J

    2004-10-15

    Beta-N-oxalyl-L-alpha-beta-diaminopropionic acid (beta-L-ODAP) is an unusual amino acid present in seeds of plants from the Lathyrus genus that is generally accepted as the causative agent underlying the motor neuron degeneration and spastic paraparesis in human neurolathyrism. Much of the neuropathology produced by beta-L-ODAP appears to be a direct consequence of its structural similarities to the excitatory neurotransmitter L-glutamate and its ability to induce excitotoxicity as an agonist of non-NMDA receptors. Its actions within the CNS are, however, not limited to non-NMDA receptors, raising the likely possibility that the anatomical and cellular specificity of the neuronal damage observed in neurolathyrism may result from the cumulative activity of beta-L-ODAP at multiple sites. Accumulating evidence suggests that system xc-, a transporter that mediates the exchange of L-cystine and L-glutamate, is one such site. In the present work, two distinct approaches were used to define the interactions of beta-L-ODAP with system xc-: Traditional radiolabel-uptake assays were employed to quantify inhibitory activity, while fluorometrically coupled assays that follow the exchange-induced efflux of L-glutamate were used to assess substrate activity. In addition to confirming that beta-L-ODAP is an effective competitive inhibitor of system xc-, we report that the compound exhibits a substrate activity comparable to that of the endogenous substrate L-cystine. The ability of system xc- to transport and accumulate beta-L-ODAP identifies additional variables that could influence its toxicity within the CNS, including the ability to limit its access to EAA receptors by clearing the excitotoxin from the extracellular synaptic environment, as well as serving as a point of entry through which beta-L-ODAP could have increased access to intracellular targets. PMID:15476861

  20. Alpha-lipoic acid exhibits anti-amyloidogenicity for beta-amyloid fibrils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hirohata, Mie; Yamada, Masahito

    2006-03-24

    Inhibition of the formation of beta-amyloid fibrils (fAbeta), as well as the destabilization of preformed fAbeta in the CNS would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (LA) and the metabolic product of LA, dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fAbeta at pH 7.5 at 37 degrees C in vitro. LA and DHLA dose-dependently inhibited fAbeta formation from amyloid beta-protein, as well as their extension. Moreover, they destabilized preformed fAbetas. LA and DHLA could be key molecules for the development of therapeutics for AD. PMID:16460684

  1. Incorporation of TGF-beta 3 within collagen-hyaluronic acid scaffolds improves their chondrogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Matsiko, Amos; Levingstone, Tanya J; Gleeson, John P; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-06-01

    Incorporation of therapeutics in the form of growth factors within biomaterials can enhance their biofunctionality. Two methods of incorporating transforming growth factor-beta 3 within collagen-hyaluronic acid scaffolds are described, markedly improving mesenchymal stem cell-mediated chondrogenic differentiation and matrix production. Such scaffolds offer control over the release of therapeutics, demonstrating their potential for repair of complex chondral defects requiring additional stimuli. PMID:25800862

  2. Carnitine transport and fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Longo, Nicola; Frigeni, Marta; Pasquali, Marzia

    2016-10-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for subsequent β-oxidation. It can be synthesized by the body or assumed with the diet from meat and dairy products. Defects in carnitine biosynthesis do not routinely result in low plasma carnitine levels. Carnitine is accumulated by the cells and retained by kidneys using OCTN2, a high affinity organic cation transporter specific for carnitine. Defects in the OCTN2 carnitine transporter results in autosomal recessive primary carnitine deficiency characterized by decreased intracellular carnitine accumulation, increased losses of carnitine in the urine, and low serum carnitine levels. Patients can present early in life with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and hepatic encephalopathy, or later in life with skeletal and cardiac myopathy or sudden death from cardiac arrhythmia, usually triggered by fasting or catabolic state. This disease responds to oral carnitine that, in pharmacological doses, enters cells using the amino acid transporter B(0,+). Primary carnitine deficiency can be suspected from the clinical presentation or identified by low levels of free carnitine (C0) in the newborn screening. Some adult patients have been diagnosed following the birth of an unaffected child with very low carnitine levels in the newborn screening. The diagnosis is confirmed by measuring low carnitine uptake in the patients' fibroblasts or by DNA sequencing of the SLC22A5 gene encoding the OCTN2 carnitine transporter. Some mutations are specific for certain ethnic backgrounds, but the majority are private and identified only in individual families. Although the genotype usually does not correlate with metabolic or cardiac involvement in primary carnitine deficiency, patients presenting as adults tend to have at least one missense mutation retaining residual activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler

  3. Ternary complexation of carvedilol, beta-cyclodextrin and citric acid for mouth-dissolving tablet formulation.

    PubMed

    Pokharkar, Varsha; Khanna, Abhishek; Venkatpurwar, Vinod; Dhar, Sheetal; Mandpe, Leenata

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the solubility and dissolution rate of carvedilol by forming a ternary complex with beta-cyclodextrin and citric acid and to formulate its mouth-dissolving tablets. The rationale for preparing mouth-dissolving tablet of carvedilol was to make the drug available in a soluble form in the mouth, which would facilitate its absorption from the buccal cavity. This would help to overcome its first-pass metabolism and thereby improve bioavailability. Phase solubility studies revealed the ability of beta-cyclodextrin and citric acid to complex with carvedilol and significantly increase its solubility. Ternary complexation of carvedilol was carried out with beta-cyclodextrin and citric acid by physical mixing, kneading and spray drying methods and the prepared complexes were characterized by Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy and complexation efficiency. The complex obtained by the spray drying method resulted in highest complexation efficiency and a 110-fold increase in the solubility of carvedilol. The mouth-dissolving tablets formulated using the spray dried complex with suitable excipients showed 100 % dissolution within five minutes. Accelerated stability studies of mouth-dissolving tablets carried out as per ICH guidelines revealed that the tablets were stable. PMID:19564138

  4. Translation attenuation through eIF2α phosphorylation prevents oxidative stress and maintains the differentiated state in beta cells

    PubMed Central

    Back, Sung Hoon; Scheuner, Donalyn; Han, JaeSeok; Song, Benbo; Ribick, Mark; Wang, Junying; Gildersleeve, Robert D.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Accumulation of unfolded protein within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen attenuates mRNA translation through activation of the protein kinase PERK and subsequent phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 on Ser51 of the alpha subunit (eIF2α). Genetic disruption of the PERK/eIF2α pathway in humans and mice produces severe pancreatic beta cell deficiency and post-natal lethality. To elucidate the role of eIF2α phosphorylation in beta cells, we have rescued the lethality of homozygous eIF2α Ser51Ala mice by expression of a loxP-flanked wild-type eIF2α transgene. Beta cell-specific transgene deletion to prevent eIF2α phosphorylation caused a severe diabetic phenotype due to heightened, unregulated proinsulin translation, defective intracellular trafficking of secretory and plasma membrane proteins, increased oxidative damage, reduced expression of stress response and beta cell-specific genes, and apoptosis. However, glucose intolerance and beta cell death in these mice were attenuated by antioxidant treatment. We conclude that phosphorylation of eIF2α coordinately attenuates mRNA translation, prevents oxidative stress, and optimizes ER protein folding to support insulin production in the beta cell. These findings that show increased proinsulin synthesis causes oxidative stress leading to beta cell failure may reflect events in the beta cell loss associated with insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. PMID:19583950

  5. Nitric oxide stimulates insulin gene transcription in pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.C. . E-mail: s.c.campbell@ncl.ac.uk; Richardson, H.; Ferris, W.F.; Butler, C.S.; Macfarlane, W.M.

    2007-02-23

    Recent studies have identified a positive role for nitric oxide (NO) in the regulation of pancreatic {beta}-cell function. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of short-term exposure to NO on {beta}-cell gene expression and the activity of the transcription factor PDX-1. NO stimulated the activity of the insulin gene promoter in Min6 {beta}-cells and endogenous insulin mRNA levels in both Min6 and isolated islets of Langerhans. Addition of wortmannin prior to NO stimulation blocked the observed increases in insulin gene promoter activity. Although NO addition stimulated the phosphorylation of p38, inhibition by SB203580 did not block the effect of NO on the insulin gene promoter. NO addition also stimulated both the nuclear accumulation and the DNA binding activity of PDX-1. This study has shown that over 24 h, NO stimulates insulin gene expression, PI-3-kinase activity and the activity of the critical {beta}-cell transcription factor PDX-1.

  6. Delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 beta-reductase deficiency described in identical twins with neonatal hepatitis. A new inborn error in bile acid synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Setchell, K D; Suchy, F J; Welsh, M B; Zimmer-Nechemias, L; Heubi, J; Balistreri, W F

    1988-01-01

    A new inborn error in bile acid synthesis, manifest in identical infant twins as severe intrahepatic cholestasis, is described involving the delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 beta-reductase catalyzed conversion of the key intermediates, 7 alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one and 7 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one for chenodeoxycholic and cholic acid synthesis, to the respective 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 beta (H) products. This defect was detected by fast atom bombardment ionization-mass spectrometry from an elevated excretion and predominance of taurine conjugated unsaturated hydroxy-oxo-bile acids. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed these to be 7 alpha-hydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholenoic and 7 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholenoic acids (75-92% of total). Fasting serum bile acid concentrations were greater than 37 mumol/liter; chenodeoxycholic acid was the major bile acid, but significant amounts of allo(5 alpha-H)-bile acids (approximately 30%) were present. Biliary bile acid concentration was less than 2 mumol/liter and consisted of chenodeoxycholic, allo-chenodeoxycholic, and allo-cholic acids. These biochemical findings, which were identical in both infants, indicate a defect in bile acid synthesis involving the conversion of the delta 4-3-oxo-C27 intermediates into the corresponding 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 beta(H)-structures, a reaction that is catalyzed by a delta 4-3-oxosteroid-5 beta reductase enzyme. This defect resulted in markedly reduced primary bile acid synthesis and concomitant accumulation of delta 4-3-oxo-and allo-bile acids. These findings indicate a pathway in bile acid synthesis whereby side chain oxidation can occur despite incomplete alterations to the steroid nucleus, and lend support for an active delta 4-3-oxosteroid 5 alpha-reductase catalyzing the conversion of the delta 4-3-oxosteroid intermediates to the respective 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 alpha(H)-structures. PMID:3198770

  7. A guide to 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Adamski, J; Jakob, F J

    2001-01-22

    17beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17beta-HSD) are pivotal in controlling the biological potency of steroid hormones by catalyzing oxidation or reduction at position 17. Several 17beta-HSDs may as well metabolize further substrates including alcohols, bile acids, fatty acids and retinols. This review summarizes recent progress in the field of 17beta-HSD research provides an update of nomenclature. PMID:11165003

  8. A beta-amino acid pyrokinin analog induces irregular pupariation behavior in larvae of the flesh fly Sarcophaga bullata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The developmental process of pupariation is accelerated by members of the pyrokinin class of neuropeptides in larvae of the flesh fly Sarcophaga bullata. A pyrokinin analog (Ac-Y[beta-3-Phe]TPRLamide), in which a Phe residue is replaced with a beta-amino acid, accelerates pupariation in this fly at...

  9. Beta2-adrenergic receptor stimulation inhibits nitric oxide generation by Mycobacterium avium infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Boomershine, C S; Lafuse, W P; Zwilling, B S

    1999-11-01

    Catecholamine regulation of nitric oxide (NO) production by IFNgamma-primed macrophages infected with Mycobacterium avium was investigated. Epinephrine treatment of IFNgamma-primed macrophages at the time of M. avium infection inhibited the anti-mycobacterial activity of the cells. The anti-mycobacterial activity of macrophages correlated with NO production. Using specific adrenergic receptor agonists, the abrogation of mycobacterial killing and decreased NO production by catecholamines was shown to be mediated via the beta2-adrenergic receptor. Elevation of intracellular cAMP levels mimicked the catecholamine-mediated inhibition of NO in both M. avium infected and LPS stimulated macrophages. Specific inhibitors of both adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A prevented the beta2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of nitric oxide production. Beta2-adrenoreceptor stimulation at the time of M. avium infection of IFNgamma-primed macrophages also inhibited expression of iNOS mRNA. These observations show that catecholamine hormones can affect the outcome of macrophage-pathogen interactions and suggest that one result of sympathetic nervous system activation is the suppression of the capacity of macrophages to produce anti-microbial effector molecules. PMID:10580815

  10. Retinoic acid modulates rat Ito cell proliferation, collagen, and transforming growth factor beta production.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B H; Kramer, R T; Davidson, N O

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that vitamin A plays an inhibitory role with respect to "activation" of the hepatic Ito cell, a likely effector of hepatic fibrogenesis. Ito cell "activation" during fibrogenesis is characterized by a decrease in intracellular vitamin A and an increase in cellular proliferation and collagen production. To explore the hypothesis that retinoids have the capacity to diminish Ito cell activation, cultured Ito cells were exposed to retinoic acid and its effects assessed on three key features: cell proliferation, collagen protein production and mRNA abundance, and transforming growth factor beta protein production. Retinoic acid was 100-1,000X more potent than retinol with respect to inhibition of Ito cell proliferation. Interstitial collagen and transforming growth factor beta production were also reduced by 10(-6) M retinoic acid. The relative abundance of type I collagen mRNA however, was not significantly altered. By contrast, retinoic acid administration to rats caused a marked reduction in the abundance of type I collagen mRNA in both total hepatic and purified Ito cell RNA. The relative abundance of rat hepatic fibronectin or apolipoprotein E mRNA was not significantly altered. These studies demonstrate that retinoic acid can differentially modulate several key features of hepatic fibrogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Images PMID:2254460

  11. Modulation of antimicrobial effects of beta-lactams by amino acids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, G; Schumacher, M; Breuer-Werle, M

    1991-06-01

    Glycine as well as 11 and 10, respectively, out of a total of 12 D-amino-acids tested increased the antimicrobial efficacy of imipenem (IMI) and of ampicillin (AMP) using the serosensitive strain E. coli ATCC 8739. D-proline was ineffective in assays with IMI as well as D-proline and D-leucine in assays with AMP. - In contrast, L-amino-acids behaved differently: In assays with IMI, 9 out of 13 isomers were ineffective whereas 3 were antagonistic (L-phenylalanine, L-serine, L-tryptophan). In combination with AMP, however, 10 L-amino acids had an antagonistic effect and 2 (L-leucine, L-methionine) were ineffective. L-alanine was an exception and showed a synergism with both antibiotics which was assumed to have been due to a racemase activity of cells. - Seroresistance of E. coli apparently reduced the synergistic effect of glycine and beta-lactams. - Glycine, alanine and tryptophan lost their typical synergistic or antagonistic effect with AMP when tested as di- or tri-amino-acid compounds. This was not the case with di-L-alanine - It is supposed that the synergistic effect of glycine or of D-amino-acids with beta-lactams can be explained mainly by an inhibition of carboxypeptidases. PMID:1930574

  12. In vitro bile-acid binding and fermentation of high, medium, and low molecular weight beta-glucan.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; White, Pamela J

    2010-01-13

    The impact of beta-glucan molecular weight (MW) on in vitro bile-acid binding and in vitro fermentation with human fecal flora was evaluated. beta-Glucan extracted from oat line 'N979-5-4' was treated with lichenase (1,3-1,4-beta-D-glucanase) to yield high (6.87x10(5) g/mol), medium (3.71x10(5) g/mol), and low (1.56x10(5) g/mol) MW fractions. The low MW beta-glucan bound more bile acid than did the high MW beta-glucan (p<0.05). If the positive control, cholestyramine, was considered to bind bile acid at 100%, the relative bile-acid binding of the original oat flour and the extracted beta-glucan with high, medium, and low MW was 15, 27, 24, and 21%, respectively. Significant effects of high, medium, and low MW beta-glucans on total SCFA were observed compared to the blank without substrate (p<0.05). There were no differences in pH changes and total gas production among high, medium, and low MW beta-glucans, and lactulose. The low MW beta-glucan produced greater amounts of SCFA than the high MW after 24 h of fermentation. Among the major SCFA, more propionate was produced from all MW fractions of extracted beta-glucans than from lactulose. In vitro fermentation of extracted beta-glucan fractions with different MW lowered pH and produced SCFA, providing potential biological function. PMID:20020684

  13. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  14. The orally active antihyperglycemic drug beta-guanidinopropionic acid is transported by the human proton-coupled amino acid transporter hPAT1.

    PubMed

    Metzner, Linda; Dorn, Madlen; Markwardt, Fritz; Brandsch, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The orally administered creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (beta-GPA) decreases plasma glucose levels by increasing the sensitivity to insulin. This effect is based on a beta-GPA induced expression of mRNA and total protein content of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4. Although the oral availability of beta-GPA is well established, the underlying uptake mechanism has not yet been studied. We investigated whether the H(+)-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1, which is expressed in the apical membrane of intestinal cells, accepts guanidine derivatives as substrates. Uptake of l-[(3)H]proline into Caco-2 cells expressing hPAT1 constitutively was strongly inhibited by beta-GPA and its derivatives guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) and 4-guanidinobutyric acid (4-GBA). Competition assays revealed apparent affinity constants of about 1.5 mM. Electrophysiological measurements at hPAT1-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes unequivocally demonstrated that beta-GPA, GAA and 4-GBA are effectively transported by this transport system in an electrogenic manner. We conclude that hPAT1 might be responsible for the intestinal absorption of beta-GPA thereby allowing its oral administration. Moreover, with beta-GPA we identified a new high affinity hPAT1 substrate that might be an interesting starting point for future drug design-drug delivery strategies. PMID:19358571

  15. Oxidative stability of milk influenced by fatty acids, antioxidants, and copper derived from feed.

    PubMed

    Havemose, M S; Weisbjerg, M R; Bredie, W L P; Poulsen, H D; Nielsen, J H

    2006-06-01

    Differences in the oxidative stability of milk from cows fed grass-clover silage or hay were examined in relation to fatty acid composition and contents of antioxidants and copper in the milk. The oxidation processes were induced by exposing the milk to fluorescent light. Protein oxidation was measured as an accumulation of dityrosine, whereas lipid oxidation was measured as an accumulation of lipid hydroperoxides as the primary oxidation product, and as the secondary oxidation products, pentanal, hexanal, and heptanal. No differences were found in the protein oxidation of the 2 types of milk measured as accumulation of dityrosine, but there was an increased accumulation of lipid hydroperoxides and hexanal in milk from cows fed grass-clover silage, compared with milk from cows fed hay. The higher degree of lipid oxidation in milk from cows fed grass-clover silage could not be explained from the concentration of alpha-tocopherol, carotenoids, uric acid, and copper in the milk. However, it was thought to be highly influenced by the significantly higher concentration of linolenic acid present in milk from cows fed grass-clover silage. A larger part of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene was transferred from the feed to the milk when cows were fed grass-clover silage than when cows were fed hay as roughage. The significantly higher concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk from cows fed grass-clover silage may be important for the better transfer of alpha-tocopherol from the feed to the milk. Other circumstances, as the different conditions in the rumen may also play a role, due to the different types of roughages and their digestibility, or be related to the mechanisms during milk production for the higher yielding cows fed grass-clover silage. PMID:16702260

  16. Antioxidant modulation of oxidant-stimulated uptake and release of arachidonic acid in eicosapentaenoic acid-supplemented human lymphoma U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Obajimi, Oluwakemi; Black, Kenneth D; Glen, Iain; Ross, Brian M

    2007-02-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are increasingly finding use as treatments for a variety of medical conditions. PUFA supplementation can, however, result in increased oxidative stress causing elevated turnover rate of membrane phospholipids, impairment of membrane integrity and increased formation of inflammatory mediators. The aim of this study was to determine which antioxidant compounds were most effective in ameliorating the stimulation of phospholipid turnover by oxidative stress. U937 cells were supplemented with eicosapentaenoic acid and either ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene or astaxanthin prior to being challenged with oxidant. Although all antioxidants were found to be effective in decreasing oxidant-stimulated peroxide formation, only alpha-tocopherol significantly decreased oxidant-stimulated release of 3H-labeled arachidonic acid (AA), while ascorbic acid markedly increased release. All antioxidants except alpha-tocopherol decreased oxidant-stimulated 3H-AA uptake. Our data suggest that antioxidants are not equally effective in combating the effects of oxidative stress upon membrane phospholipid turnover, and that optimal protection will require mixtures of antioxidants. PMID:17198751

  17. Poly-dopamine-beta-cyclodextrin: A novel nanobiopolymer towards sensing of some amino acids at physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Sadeghi, Sattar; Bageri, Leyla; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Karimzadeh, Ayub; Shadjou, Nasrin; Mahboob, Soltanali

    2016-12-01

    A novel nanobiopolymer film was electrodeposited on the surface of glassy carbon through cyclic voltammetry from dopamine, β-cyclodextrin, and phosphate buffer solution in physiological pH (7.40). The electrochemical behavior of polydopamine-Beta-cyclodextrin modified glassy carbon electrode was investigated for electro-oxidation and determination of some amino acids (l-Cysteine, l-Tyrosine, l-Glycine, and l-Phenylalanine). The modified electrode was applied for selected amino acid detection at physiological pH using cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry and chronoamperometry, chronocoulometery. The linear concentration range of the proposed sensor for the l-Glycine, l-Cysteine, l-Tyrosine, and l-Phenylalanine were 0.2-70, 0.06-0.2, 0.01-0.1, and 0.2-10μM, while low limit of quantifications were 0.2, 0.06, 0.01, and 0.2μM, respectively. The modified electrode shows many advantages as an amino acid sensor such as simple preparation method without using any specific electron transfer mediator or specific reagent, good sensitivity, short response time, and long term stability. PMID:27612722

  18. Defective (U-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.E.; Norris, B.J.; Brooke, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with normal skeletal muscle, muscle from patients with Duchenne dystrophy had decreased (U-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation. (1-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation was normal. These results may indicate a defect in intramitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

  19. Familial giant cell hepatitis associated with synthesis of 3 beta, 7 alpha-dihydroxy-and 3 beta,7 alpha, 12 alpha-trihydroxy-5-cholenoic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, P T; Leonard, J V; Lawson, A M; Setchell, K D; Andersson, S; Egestad, B; Sjövall, J

    1987-01-01

    Urinary bile acids from a 3-mo-old boy with cholestatic jaundice were analyzed by ion exchange chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This suggested the presence of labile sulfated cholenoic acids with an allylic hydroxyl group, a conclusion supported by analysis using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). The compounds detected by FAB-MS were separated by thin layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. The sulfated bile acids could be solvolyzed in acidified tetrahydrofuran, and glycine conjugates were partially hydrolyzed by cholylglycine hydrolase. Following solvolysis, deconjugation, and methylation with diazomethane, the bile acids were identified by GC-MS of trimethylsilyl derivatives. The major bile acids in the urine were 3 beta,7 alpha-dihydroxy-5-cholenoic acid 3-sulfate, 3 beta,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5-cholenoic acid monosulfate, and their glycine conjugates. Chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid were undetectable in urine and plasma. The family pedigree suggested that abnormal bile acid synthesis was an autosomal recessive condition leading to cirrhosis in early childhood. PMID:3470305

  20. L-Glutamine inhibits beta-aminobutyric acid-induced stress resistance and priming in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chen-Chi; Singh, Prashant; Chen, Mao-Chuain; Zimmerli, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) enhances Arabidopsis resistance to microbial pathogens and abiotic stresses through potentiation of the Arabidopsis defence responses. In this study, it is shown that BABA induces the stress-induced morphogenic response (SIMR). SIMR is observed in plants exposed to sub-lethal stress conditions. Anthocyanin, a known modulator of stress signalling, was also found to accumulate in BABA-treated Arabidopsis. These data and a previous microarray study indicate that BABA induces a stress response in Arabidopsis. High concentrations of amino acids, except for L-glutamine, cause a general amino acid stress inhibition. General amino acid inhibition is prevented by the addition of L-glutamine. L-Glutamine was found to inhibit the BABA-mediated SIMR and anthocyanin accumulation, suggesting that the non-protein amino acid BABA causes a general amino acid stress inhibition in Arabidopsis. L-Glutamine also blocked BABA-induced resistance to heat stress and to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. During bacterial infection, priming of the salicylic acid-dependent defence marker PR1 was abolished by L-glutamine treatment. These results indicate that L-glutamine removal of the BABA-mediated stress response is concomitant with L-glutamine inhibition of BABA priming and BABA-induced resistance. PMID:20007686

  1. Lycopene synergistically inhibits LDL oxidation in combination with vitamin E, glabridin, rosmarinic acid, carnosic acid, or garlic.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, B; Volkova, N; Rosenblat, M; Aviram, M

    2000-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is atherogenic, and that atherosclerosis can be attenuated by natural antioxidants, which inhibit LDL oxidation. This study was conducted to determine the effect of tomato lycopene alone, or in combination with other natural antioxidants, on LDL oxidation. LDL (100 microg of protein/ml) was incubated with increasing concentrations of lycopene or of tomato oleoresin (lipid extract of tomatoes containing 6% lycopene, 0.1% beta-carotene, 1% vitamin E, and polyphenols), after which it was oxidized by the addition of 5 micromol/liter of CuSO4. Tomato oleoresin exhibited superior capacity to inhibit LDL oxidation in comparison to pure lycopene, by up to five-fold [97% vs. 22% inhibition of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation, and 93% vs. 27% inhibition of lipid peroxides formation, respectively]. Because tomato oleoresin also contains, in addition to lycopene, vitamin E, flavonoids, and phenolics, a possible cooperative interaction between lycopene and such natural antioxidants was studied. A combination of lycopene (5 micromol/liter) with vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) in the concentration range of 1-10 micromol/liter resulted in an inhibition of copper ion-induced LDL oxidation that was significantly greater than the expected additive individual inhibitions. The synergistic antioxidative effect of lycopene with vitamin E was not shared by gamma-to-cotrienol. The polyphenols glabridin (derived from licorice), rosmarinic acid or carnosic acid (derived from rosemary), as well as garlic (which contains a mixture of natural antioxidants) inhibited LDL oxidation in a dose-dependent manner. When lycopene (5 micromol/liter) was added to LDL in combination with glabridin, rosmarinic acid, carnosic acid, or garlic, synergistic antioxidative effects were obtained against LDL oxidation induced either by copper ions or by the radical generator AAPH. Similar interactive

  2. Synthesis of beta-hydroxy-alpha-amino acids with a reengineered alanine racemase.

    PubMed

    Fesko, Kateryna; Giger, Lars; Hilvert, Donald

    2008-11-15

    The Y265A mutant of alanine racemase (alrY265A) was evaluated as a catalyst for the synthesis of beta-hydroxy-alpha-amino acids. It promotes the PLP-dependent aldol condensation of glycine with a range of aromatic aldehydes. The desired products were obtained with complete stereocontrol at C(alpha) (ee>99%, D) and moderate to high selectivity at C(beta) (up to 97% de). The designed enzyme is thus similar to natural d-threonine aldolases in its substrate specificity and stereoselectivity. Moreover, its ability to utilize alanine as an alternative donor suggests an expanded scope of potential utility for the production of biologically active compounds. PMID:18760921

  3. Synthesis of steroidal 17 beta-carboxamide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Formstecher, P; Lustenberger, P; Dautrevaux, M

    1980-03-01

    Several 17 beta-carboxamide derivatives of natural and fluorinated glucocorticoids have been synthesized. The 17 beta-carboxylic derivatives were obtained by periodic acid oxidation of their side chains. They were then activated by N-hydroxybenzotriazole (HOBT) and coupled to several primary amines. Using this method eleven 17 beta-carboxamide derivatives have been prepared in good yields. PMID:7376221

  4. Comparison of metabolic fluxes of cis-5-enoyl-CoA and saturated acyl-CoA through the beta-oxidation pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Tserng, K Y; Chen, L S; Jin, S J

    1995-01-01

    The metabolic fluxes of cis-5-enoyl-CoAs through the beta-oxidation cycle were studied in solubilized rat liver mitochondrial samples and compared with saturated acyl-CoAs of equal chain length. These studies were accomplished using either spectrophotometric assay of enzyme activities and/or the analysis of metabolites and precursors using a gas chromatographic method after conversion of CoA esters into their free acids. Cis-5-enoyl-CoAs were dehydrogenated by acyl-CoA oxidase or acyl-CoA dehydrogenases at significantly lower rates (10-44%) than saturated acyl-CoAs. However, enoyl-CoA hydratase hydrated trans-2-cis-5-enoyl-CoA at a faster rate (at least 1.5-fold) than trans-2-enoyl-CoA. The combined activities of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase for 3-hydroxy-cis-5-enoyl-CoAs derived from cis-5-enoyl-CoAs were less than 40% of the activity for the corresponding 3-hydroxyacyl-CoAs prepared from saturated acyl-CoAs. Rat liver mitochondrial beta-oxidation enzymes were capable of metabolizing cis-5-enoyl-CoA via one cycle of beta-oxidation to cis-3-enoyl-CoA with two less carbons. However, the overall rates of one cycle of beta-oxidation, as determined with stable-isotope-labelled tracer, was only 15-25%, for cis-5-enoyl-CoA, of that for saturated acyl-CoA. In the presence of NADPH, the metabolism of cis-5-enoyl-CoAs was switched to the reduction pathway.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7717980

  5. Reduced capacity for fatty acid oxidation in rats with inherited susceptibility to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Friedman, Mark I

    2007-08-01

    High-fat, energy-dense diets promote weight gain and obesity in humans and other animals, but the mechanisms underlying such diet-induced obesity remain elusive. To determine whether a reduced capacity to oxidize fat is involved in the etiology of diet-induced obesity, we examined different measures of fatty acid oxidation in rats selectively bred for susceptibility (DIO) or resistance (DR) to dietary obesity before and after they were fed a high-fat diet and became obese. DIO rats eating a low-fat diet oxidized less dietary fatty acid in vivo and had lower levels of plasma ketone bodies during fasting compared with DR rats. Lean DIO rats fed a low-fat diet showed reduced liver messenger RNA expression of CD36, which transports fatty acids across cell membranes, and long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (ACADL), which catalyzes the first step in the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids. The deficit in CD36 and ACADL messenger RNA expression was also seen in obese DIO rats that had been eating a high-fat diet and, in addition, was accompanied by reduced expression of liver carnitine palmitoyl transferase I, the enzyme that mediates transport of long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria. No differences were found in the expression of liver enzymes involved in fat synthesis; however, in muscle, DIO rats fed the low-fat, but not high-fat, diet showed greater expression of diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 and lipoprotein lipase than did DR rats. Expression of muscle enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation was similar in the 2 groups. These findings provide a metabolic mechanism for the development of diet-induced obesity and thus suggest potential targets for intervention strategies to treat or prevent it. PMID:17618960

  6. Quinic acids from Aster caucasicus and from transgenic callus expressing a beta-amyrin synthase.

    PubMed

    Pecchia, Paola; Cammareri, Maria; Malafronte, Nicola; Consiglio, M Federica; Gualtieri, Maria Josefina; Conicella, Clara

    2011-11-01

    Several different classes of secondary metabolites, including flavonoids, triterpenoid saponins and quinic acid derivatives, are found in Aster spp. (Fam. Asteraceae). Several Aster compounds revealed biological as well as pharmacological activities. In this work, a phytochemical investigation of A. caucasicus evidenced the presence of quinic acid derivatives, as well as the absence of triterpene saponins. To combine in one species the production of different phytochemicals, including triterpenes, an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of A. caucasicus was set up to introduce A. sedifolius beta-amyrin synthase (AsOXA1)-encoding gene under the control of the constitutive promoter CaMV35S. The quali-quantitative analysis of transgenic calli with ectopic expression of AsOXA1 showed, in one sample, a negligible amount of triterpene saponins combined with higher amount of quinic acid derivatives as compared with the wild type callus. PMID:22224284

  7. Synthesis of C-11-{beta}-aminoisobutyric acid (C-11-{beta}-AlB): A major in vivo catabolite of [methyl-C-11]thymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Alauddin, M.M.; Conti, P.S.; Fissekis, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    Carbon-11 labeled thymidine (TdR) is being used for brain tumor imaging in patients with PET. Following clearance of 5-methyl C-11 TdR from plasma in humans, there is a progressive increase of C-11 activity in normal brain and tumor presumably secondary to accumulation of C-11 beta-AIB, a major by-product of thymidine catabolism in vivo. Canine studies have demonstrated that the major radiolabeled species in acid soluble extracts of brain and tumor tissues during C-14 TdR studies is beta-AIB. The previously reported synthesis of beta-AIB is not suitable for incorporation of carbon-11. A convenient method of synthesis of C-11 beta-AIB was developed where commercially available beta-alanine ethyl ester was converted to the cold precursor reagent, benzaldimine-beta-alanine ethyl ester, in 87% yield. Treatment of the imine derivative with LDA (1.1 eq) in THF at -78{degrees} C, followed by addition of iodomethane (1.1 eq) produced the alpha-methylated benzaldimine-beta-alanine ethyl ester in 73% chemical yield. Deprotection of the amino group by acidic hydrolysis followed by basic hydrolysis of the ester group produced the desired product in 50% chemical yield. Chemical structures of unlabeled intermediates and product were confirmed by H-1 NMR and CI mass spectrometry. Labeling was accomplished using C-11-methyl iodide prepared from C-11-CO{sub 2} according to literature methods. After removal of protecting groups and neutralization, the enatiomeric mixture was purified by HPLC using a semipreparative reverse phase C-18 column and PBS as eluent. The desired compound was eluted at 8.26 minutes. In preliminary runs, the synthesis time was 39 minutes including HPLC purification, with radiochemical yields of 5-6% (EOB). Radiochemical purity was >99%

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of recombinant human acid beta-glucocerebrosidase, a treatment for Gaucher's disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeber, Dana; Achari, Aniruddha; Manavalan, Partha; Edmunds, Tim; Scott, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Acid beta-glucocerebrosidase (N-acylsphingosyl-1-O-beta-D-glucoside:glucohydrolase) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the glycolipid glucocerebroside to glucose and ceramide. Inadequate levels of this enzyme underly the pathophysiology of Gaucher's disease. Cerezyme (Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA, USA) is a partially deglycosylated form of recombinant human acid beta-glucocerebrosidase that is used in the treatment of Gaucher patients. Although acid beta-glucocerebrosidase belongs to a large family of glycosidases, relatively little is known regarding its structural biology. Here, the crystallization and the initial diffraction analysis of Cerezyme are reported. The crystals are C-centered orthorhombic, with unit-cell parameters a = 285.0, b = 110.2, c = 91.7 A. A 99.9% complete data set has been collected to 2.75 A with an R(sym) of 8.8%.

  9. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray analysis of Human Recombinant Acid beta-glucocerebrosidase, a treatment for Gaucher's Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeber, Dana F.; Achari, Aniruddha; Manavalan, Partha; Edmunds, Tim; Scott, David L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Acid beta-glucocerebrosidase (N-acylsphingosyl - O - beta-D - glucoside:glucohydrolase) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the glycolipid glucocerebroside to glucose and ceramide. Inadequate levels of this enzyme underly the pathophysiology of Gaucher's disease. Cerezyme(R) (Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) is a partially deglycosylated form of recombinant human acid beta-glucocerebrosidase that is commercially available for the treatment of Gaucher patients. Although acid beta-glucocerebrosidase belongs to a large family of glycosidases, relatively little is known regarding its structural biology. We report the crystallization and the initial diffraction analysis of Cerezyme(R). The crystals are C-centered orthorhombic, with unit-cell parameters of a = 285.0 A, b = 110.2 A, and c = 91.7 A. A 99.9 A complete data set has been collected to 2.75 A with an R(sub sym) of 8.8 %.

  10. Oxidative Stress Type Influences the Properties of Antioxidants Containing Polyphenols in RINm5F Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Auberval, Nathalie; Dal, Stéphanie; Bietiger, William; Seyfritz, Elodie; Peluso, Jean; Muller, Christian; Zhao, Minjie; Marchioni, Eric; Pinget, Michel; Jeandidier, Nathalie; Maillard, Elisa; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Sigrist, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro methods currently used to screen bioactive compounds focus on the use of a single model of oxidative stress. However, this simplistic view may lead to conflicting results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties of two natural extracts (a mix of red wine polyphenols (RWPs) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)) with three models of oxidative stress induced with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a mixture of hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase (HX/XO), or streptozotocin (STZ) in RINm5F beta cells. We employed multiple approaches to validate their potential as therapeutic treatment options, including cell viability, reactive oxygen species production, and antioxidant enzymes expression. All three oxidative stresses induced a decrease in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, whereas the level of ROS production was variable depending on the type of stress. The highest level of ROS was found for the HX/XO-induced stress, an increase that was reflected by higher expression antioxidant enzymes. Further, both antioxidant compounds presented beneficial effects during oxidative stress, but EGCG appeared to be a more efficient antioxidant. These data indicate that the efficiency of natural antioxidants is dependent on both the nature of the compound and the type of oxidative stress generated. PMID:26508986

  11. Sodium Picosulfate, Magnesium Oxide, and Anhydrous Citric Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid combination powder is used to empty the colon (large intestine, bowel) before a colonoscopy (examination of the inside of the colon to check ...

  12. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Onysko, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    Acid mine drainage is formed by the weathering or oxidation of pyritic material exposed during coal mining. The rate of pyritic material oxidation can be greatly accelerated by certain acidophilic bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans which catalyse the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage micro-organisms. Sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), an anionic surfactant has proved effective in this respect. Benzoic acid, sorbic acid and SLS at low concentrations, each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of T. ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low pH, sterile, batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations of any of the compounds.

  13. The anodic oxidation of p-benzoquinone and maleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, C.; MacDougall, B.

    1999-08-01

    The oxidation of organics, in particular of p-benzoquinone and maleic acid, at high anodic potentials has been studied using a range of anode materials such as noble-metal-based oxides and antimony-doped tin oxides. The influence of the current density was also investigated showing that the oxidation rate of p-benzoquinone increased only slightly with increasing current density. The efficiency of the p-benzoquinone oxidation was found to depend on several properties of the anode material, not just its chemical nature. Furthermore, efficiencies for the partial oxidation of p-benzoquinone using specially prepared noble-metal-oxide-based anodes were found to be only somewhat smaller or even as high as those observed for PbO{sub 2} or antimony-doped tin oxide anodes, respectively. The anodic electrolysis of maleic acid solutions was found to decrease the activity of IrO{sub 2} for the oxidation of organic compounds. This was not observed when PbO{sup 2} was employed for the oxidation of maleic acid.

  14. Identification of a novel bile acid in swans, tree ducks, and geese: 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid.

    PubMed

    Kakiyama, Genta; Iida, Takashi; Goto, Takaaki; Mano, Nariyasu; Goto, Junichi; Nambara, Toshio; Hagey, Lee R; Schteingart, Claudio D; Hofmann, Alan F

    2006-07-01

    By HPLC, a taurine-conjugated bile acid with a retention time different from that of taurocholate was found to be present in the bile of the black-necked swan, Cygnus melanocoryphus. The bile acid was isolated and its structure, established by (1)H and (13)C NMR and mass spectrometry, was that of the taurine N-acyl amidate of 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid. The compound was shown to have chromatographic and spectroscopic properties that were identical to those of the taurine conjugate of authentic 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid, previously synthesized by us from ursodeoxycholic acid. By HPLC, the taurine conjugate of 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid was found to be present in 6 of 6 species in the subfamily Dendrocygninae (tree ducks) and in 10 of 13 species in the subfamily Anserinae (swans and geese) but not in other subfamilies in the Anatidae family. It was also not present in species from the other two families of the order Anseriformes. 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-Trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid is a new primary bile acid that is present in the biliary bile acids of swans, tree ducks, and geese and may be termed 15alpha-hydroxy-chenodeoxycholic acid. PMID:16648547

  15. Detoxification of alpha- and beta-Thujones (the active ingredients of absinthe): site specificity and species differences in cytochrome P450 oxidation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Höld, K M; Sirisoma, N S; Casida, J E

    2001-05-01

    Alpha- and beta-Thujones are active ingredients in the liqueur absinthe and in herbal medicines and seasonings for food and drinks. Our earlier study established that they are convulsants and have insecticidal activity, acting as noncompetitive blockers of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channel, and identified 7-hydroxy-alpha-thujone as the major metabolite and 4-hydroxy-alpha- and -beta-thujones and 7,8-dehydro-alpha-thujone as minor metabolites in the mouse liver microsome-NADPH system. We report here unexpected site specificity and species differences in the metabolism of the thujone diastereomers in mouse, rat, and human liver microsomes and human recombinant P450 (P450 3A4), in orally treated mice and rats, and in Drosophila melanogaster. Major differences are apparent on comparing in vitro microsome-NADPH systems and in vivo urinary metabolites. Hydroxylation at the 2-position is observed only in mice where conjugated 2R-hydroxy-alpha-thujone is the major urinary metabolite of alpha-thujone. Hydroxylation at the 4-position gives one or both of 4-hydroxy-alpha- and -beta-thujones depending on the diastereomer and species studied with conjugated 4-hydroxy-alpha-thujone as the major urinary metabolite of alpha- and beta-thujones in rats. Hydroxylation at the 7-position of alpha- and beta-thujones is always a major pathway, but the conjugated urinary metabolite is minor except with beta-thujone in the mouse. Site specificity in glucuronidation favors excretion of 2R-hydroxy- and 4-hydroxy-alpha-thujone glucuronides rather than those of three other hydroxythujones. Two dehydro metabolites are observed from both alpha- and beta-thujones, the 7,8 in the P450 systems and the 4,10 in urine. Two types of evidence establish that P450-dependent oxidations of alpha- and beta-thujones are detoxification reactions: three P450 inhibitors block the metabolism of alpha- and beta-thujones and strongly synergize their toxicity in Drosophila; six metabolites

  16. Biochemical properties of porcine white adipose tissue mitochondria and relevance to fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Koekemoer, T C; Oelofsen, W

    2001-07-01

    The capacity of white adipose tissue mitochondria to support a high beta-oxidative flux was investigated by comparison to liver mitochondria. Based on marker enzyme activities and electron microscopy, the relative purity of the isolated mitochondria was similar thus allowing a direct comparison on a protein basis. The results confirm the comparable capacity of adipose tissue and liver mitochondria for palmitoyl-carnitine oxidation. Relative to liver, both citrate synthase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase were increased 7.87- and 10.38-fold, respectively. In contrast, adipose tissue NAD-isocitrate dehydrogenase was decreased (2.85-fold). Such modifications in the citric acid cycle are expected to severely restrict citrate oxidation in porcine adipose tissue. Except for cytochrome c oxidase, activities of the enzyme complexes comprising the electron transport chain were not significantly different. The decrease in adipose cytochrome c oxidase activity could partly be attributed to a decreased inner membrane as suggested by lipid and enzyme analysis. In addition, Western blotting indicated that adipose and liver mitochondria possess similar quantities of cytochrome c oxidase protein. Taken together these results indicate that not only is the white adipose tissue protoplasm relatively rich in mitochondria, but that these mitochondria contain comparable enzymatic machinery to support a relatively high beta-oxidative rate. PMID:11435134

  17. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Onysko, S.J.; Kleinmann, R.L.P.; Erickson, P.M.

    1984-07-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans promote indirect oxidation of pyrite through the catalysis of the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron, which is an effective oxidant of pyrite. These bacteria also may catalyze direct oxidation of pyrite by oxygen. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage microorganisms. In this study, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate at low concentrations (5 to 10 mg/liter) each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low-pH, sterile batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations (5 to 50 mg/liter) of any of the compounds.

  18. The Mechanism of MIO-Based Aminomutases in beta-Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson,C.; Montavon, T.; Festin, G.; Cooke, H.; Shen, B.; Bruner, S.

    2007-01-01

    {beta}-Amino acids are widely used building blocks in both natural and synthetic compounds. Aromatic {beta}-amino acids can be biosynthesized directly from proteinogenic a-amino acids by the action of MIO (4-methylideneimidazole-5-one)-based aminomutase enzymes. The uncommon cofactor MIO plays a role in both ammonia lyases and 2, 3-aminomutases; however, the precise mechanism of the cofactor has not been resolved. Here we provide evidence that the electrophilic cofactor uses covalent catalysis through the substrate amine to direct the elimination and subsequent readdition of ammonia. A mechanism-based inhibitor was synthesized and the X-ray cocomplex structure was determined to 2.0 Angstroms resolution. The inhibitor halts the chemistry of the reverse reaction, providing a stable complex that establishes the mode of substrate binding and the importance of tyrosine 63 in the chemistry. The proposed mechanism is consistent with the biochemistry of aminomutases and ammonia lyases and provides strong support for an amine-adduct mechanism of catalysis for this enzyme class.

  19. A method for measuring fatty acid oxidation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Elle, Ida Coordt; Rødkær, Steven Vestergaard; Fredens, Julius; Færgeman, Nils Joakim

    2012-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans has during the past decade proven to be a valuable model organism to identify and examine molecular mechanisms regulating lipid storage and metabolism. While the primary approach has been to identify genes and pathways conferring alterations in lipid accumulation, only a few recent studies have recognized the central role of fatty acid degradation in cellular lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we show how complete oxidation of fatty acids can be determined in live C. elegans by examining oxidation of tritium-labeled fatty acids to tritiated H2O that can be measured by scintillation counting. Treating animals with sodium azide, an inhibitor of the electron transport chain, reduced (3)H2O production to approximately 15%, while boiling of animals prior to assay completely blocked the production of labeled water. We demonstrate that worms fed different bacterial strains exhibit different fatty acid oxidation rates. We show that starvation results in increased fatty acid oxidation, which is independent of the transcription factor NHR-49. On the contrary, fatty acid oxidation is reduced to approximately 70% in animals lacking the worm homolog of the insulin receptor, DAF-2. Hence, the present methodology can be used to delineate the role of specific genes and pathways in the regulation of β-oxidation in C. elegans. PMID:24058820

  20. Beta-carotene reduces oxidative stress, improves glutathione metabolism and modifies antioxidant defense systems in lead-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kasperczyk, Sławomir; Dobrakowski, Michał; Kasperczyk, Janusz; Ostałowska, Alina; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Birkner, Ewa

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether beta-carotene administration reduces oxidative stress and influences antioxidant, mainly glutathione-related, defense systems in workers chronically exposed to lead. The population consisted of two randomly divided groups of healthy male volunteers exposed to lead. Workers in the first group (reference group) were not administered any antioxidants, while workers in the second group (CAR group) were treated orally with 10 mg of beta-carotene once a day for 12 weeks. Biochemical analysis included measuring markers of lead-exposure and oxidative stress in addition to the levels and activities of selected antioxidants. After treatment, levels of malondialdehyde, lipid hydroperoxides and lipofuscin significantly decreased compared with the reference group. However, the level of glutathione significantly increased compared with the baseline. Treatment with beta-carotene also resulted in significantly decreased glutathione peroxidase activity compared with the reference group, while the activities of other glutathione-related enzymes and of superoxide dismutase were not significantly changed. However, the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase, as well as the level of alpha-tocopherol, were significantly higher after treatment compared with the baseline. Despite controversy over the antioxidant properties of beta-carotene in vivo, our findings showed reduced oxidative stress after beta-carotene supplementation in chronic lead poisoning. - Highlights: • Beta-carotene reduces oxidative stress in lead-exposed workers. • Beta-carotene elevates glutathione level in lead-exposed workers. • Beta-carotene administration could be beneficial in lead poisoning.

  1. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers at air/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, L. F.; Bazerbashi, M. F.; Beekman, C. P.; Hadad, C. M.; Allen, H. C.

    2006-12-01

    Field studies of marine and continental aerosols find that fatty acid films form on aqueous tropospheric aerosols. Oxidation of the acyl chains is thought to be key to aerosol growth. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers by ozone was studied to understand the fate of fat-coated aerosols from both fresh and salt water sources. Using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, we present a molecular-level investigation of fatty acid monolayers at the air-water and air- sodium chloride solution interface and explore reactions with atmospheric oxidants by these model systems. Using sum frequency generation spectroscopy coupled with a Langmuir trough, concurrent spectroscopic and thermodynamic data were collected to obtain a molecular picture of the monolayers. No substantial difference was observed between oxidation of monolayers spread on water and on 0.6 molar sodium chloride solutions. Results indicate that depending on the size of the aerosol and the extent of oxidation, the subsequent oxidation products may not remain at the surface of these films, but instead be dissolved in the aqueous sub-phase of the aerosol particle. Results also indicate that oxidation of oleic acid could produce monolayers containing species that have no oxidized acyl chains.

  2. The Nitric Acid Oxidation of Selected Alcohols and Ketones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kurt W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Shows that nitric acid can be used as a rapid, versatile, and economical oxidant for selected organic substances. The experiments (with background information, procedures, and results provided) require one three-hour laboratory period but could serve as open-ended projects since substrates not described could be oxidized. (JN)

  3. Beta-galactosidase and selective neutrality. [amino acid composition of proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, R.

    1979-01-01

    Three hypotheses to explain the amino acid composition of proteins are inconsistent (about 10 to the minus 9th) with the experimental data for beta-galactosidase from Escherichia coli. The exceptional length of this protein, 1021 residues, permits rigorous tests of these hypotheses without complication from statistical artifacts. Either this protein is not at compositional equilibrium, which is unlikely from knowledge about other proteins, or the evolution of this protein and its coding gene have not been selectively neutral. However, the composition of approximately 60% of the molecule is consistent with either a selectively neutral or nonneutral evolutionary process.

  4. Acetic acid oxidation and hydrolysis in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.C.; Marrone, P.A.; Tester, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    Acetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOH) hydrolysis and oxidation in supercritical water were examined from 425--600 C and 246 bar at reactor residence times of 4.4 to 9.8 s. Over the range of conditions studied, acetic acid oxidation was globally 0.72 {+-} 0.15 order in acetic acid and 0.27 {+-} 0.15 order in oxygen to a 95% confidence level, with an activation energy of 168 {+-} 21 kJ/mol, a preexponential factor of 10{sup 9.9{+-}1.7}, and an induction time of about 1.5 s at 525 C. Isothermal kinetic measurements at 550 C over the range 160 to 263 bar indicated that pressure or density did not affect the rate of acetic acid oxidation as much as was previously observed in the oxidation of hydrogen or carbon monoxide in supercritical water. Major products of acetic acid oxidation in supercritical water are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen. Trace amounts of propenoic acid were occasionally detected. Hydrolysis or hydrothermolysis in the absence of oxygen resulted in approximately 35% conversion of acetic acid at 600 C, 246 bar, and 8-s reactor residence time. Regression of the limited hydrolysis runs assuming a reaction rate first-order in organic gave a global rate expression with a preexponential factor of 10{sup 4.4{+-}1.1} and an activation energy of 94 {+-} 17 kJ/mol.

  5. T Cell Determinants Incorporating [beta]-Amino Acid Residues Are Protease Resistant and Remain Immunogenic In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Andrew I.; Dunstone, Michelle A.; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Price, Jason D.; Kauwe, Andreade; Chen, Weisan; Oakley, Aaron; Perlmutter, Patrick; McCluskey, James; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Rossjohn, Jamie; Purcell, Anthony W.

    2010-07-20

    A major hurdle in designing successful epitope-based vaccines resides in the delivery, stability, and immunogenicity of the peptide immunogen. The short-lived nature of unmodified peptide-based vaccines in vivo limits their therapeutic application in the immunotherapy of cancers and chronic viral infections as well as their use in generating prophylactic immunity. The incorporation of {beta}-amino acids into peptides decreases proteolysis, yet its potential application in the rational design of T cell mimotopes is poorly understood. To address this, we have replaced each residue of the SIINFEKL epitope individually with the corresponding {beta}-amino acid and examined the resultant efficacy of these mimotopes. Some analogs displayed similar MHC binding and superior protease stability compared with the native epitope. Importantly, these analogs were able to generate cross-reactive CTLs in vivo that were capable of lysing tumor cells that expressed the unmodified epitope as a surrogate tumor Ag. Structural analysis of peptides in which anchor residues were substituted with {beta}-amino acids revealed the basis for enhanced MHC binding and retention of immunogenicity observed for these analogs and paves the way for future vaccine design using {beta}-amino acids. We conclude that the rational incorporation of {beta}-amino acids into T cell determinants is a powerful alternative to the traditional homologous substitution of randomly chosen naturally occurring {alpha}-amino acids, and these mimotopes may prove particularly useful for inclusion in epitope-based vaccines.

  6. Applications of ceramic electrolytes and electrodes in the beta battery and solid oxide fuel cell: Current assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.S.; Fischer, W.; Virkar, A.V.

    1996-12-31

    The use of ceramics as electrolytes, electrodes, cell interconnects and other structural components will be reviewed for two advanced electrochemical systems: (1) the beta battery for electric vehicle and utility load leveling applications and (2) the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) for power generation. Specific attention will be given to the processing and properties of the beta{double_prime}-alumina ceramic electrolyte, the heart of the beta battery, and stabilized zirconia, the key element in the SOFC. Thin film component fabrication, as an approach to lowering the operational temperature of the SOFC, will be discussed. The current state of development of these two electro-chemical systems will be assessed.

  7. The Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-02

    Hydrazine nitrate-nitric acid solutions are used in the ion exchange process for separating Pu-238 and Np-237 and have been found to dissolve plutonium metal in a manner advantageous to SRP metal recovery operations. Laboratory tests on the stability of hydrazine in nitric acid solutions were performed to obtain accurate data, and the results of these tests are reported here. These tests provide sufficient information to specify temperature control for hydrazine-nitric acid solutions in plant processes.

  8. Effect of propionic acid on fatty acid oxidation and ureagenesis.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, A M; Chase, H P

    1976-07-01

    Propionic acid significantly inhibited 14CO2 production from [1-14C] palmitate at a concentration of 10 muM in control fibroblasts and 100 muM in methylmalonic fibroblasts. This inhibition was similar to that produced by 4-pentenoic acid. Methylmalonic acid also inhibited 14CO2 production from [1-14C] palmitate, but only at a concentration of 1 mM in control cells and 5 mM in methylmalonic cells. Propionic acid (5 mM) also inhibited ureagenesis in rat liver slices when ammonia was the substrate but not with aspartate and citrulline as substrates. Propionic acid had no direct effect on either carbamyl phosphate synthetase or ornithine transcarbamylase. These findings may explain the fatty degeneration of the liver and the hyperammonemia in propionic and methylmalonic acidemia. PMID:934734

  9. Isoniazid cocrystals with anti-oxidant hydroxy benzoic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashhadi, Syed Muddassir Ali; Yunus, Uzma; Bhatti, Moazzam Hussain; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz

    2014-11-01

    Isoniazid is the primary constituent of “triple therapy” used to effectively treat tuberculosis. In tuberculosis and other diseases, tissue inflammation and free radical burst from macrophages results in oxidative stress. These free radicals cause pulmonary inflammation if not countered by anti-oxidants. Therefore, in the present study cocrystals of isoniazid with four anti-oxidant hydroxy benzoic acids have been reported. Gallic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid resulted in the formation of cocrystals when reacted with isoniazid. Cocrystal structure analysis confirmed the existence of pyridine-carboxylic acid synthon in the cocrystals of isoniazid with Gallic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid. While cocrystal of 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid formed the pyridine-hydroxy group synthon. Other synthons of different graph sets are formed between hydrazide group of isoniazid and coformers involving Nsbnd H⋯O and Osbnd H⋯N bonds. All the cocrystals were in 1:1 stoichiometric ratio.

  10. Photocatalytic Oxidation of Sulfurous Acid in an Aqueous Medium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Alicia; Hernandez, Willie; Suarez, Marco F.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of some parameters on sulfurous acid and sulfur oxidation kinetics such as initial concentration of sulfurous acid, oxygen, TiO[2] crystalline concentration, the power of black light, and quantity of TiO[2] is investigated. The experiments can be performed in an undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory with an inexpensive…

  11. Early stages in the high temperature cyclic oxidation of {beta}-NiAl: An x-ray reflectivity study

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, G.; You, Hoydoo; Paulikas, A.P.; Veal, B.W.

    1996-12-31

    Early stages in the cyclic oxidation of {beta}-NiAl at 500{degrees}C, 600{degrees}C, 700{degrees}C and 800{degrees}C were investigated using the technique of x-ray reflectivity. By fitting the data to a model function, oxide layer thickness, roughness of the oxide-vapor interface, and the roughness of the oxide-substrate interface were obtained as a function of oxidation time and temperature of oxidation. The time dependence of the oxide thickness was observed to be logarithmic at lower temperatures (500{degrees}C and 600{degrees}C) while a conventional t{sup 0.5} kinetics was observed at the higher temperatures. Comparison of the roughness of the oxide-substrate interface with that of the oxide-vapor interface shows that for comparable oxide thicknesses and identical substrate conditions, the oxide-vapor interface was rougher than the oxide-substrate interface at all temperatures. This is consistent with the previously postulated growth mechanism (outward diffusion of cations) for oxide growth during the early stages of oxidation at these temperatures. Thus, x-ray reflectivity offers a convenient way of determining the oxide growth rates, and the roughness of the interfaces when the oxide layer is thin; this regime cannot be easily studied with the techniques that are currently used for oxidation studies.

  12. Cyclic oxidation behavior of beta+gamma overlay coatings on gamma and gamma+gamma-prime alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.; Pilsner, B. H.; Carol, L. A.; Heckel, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed experimental studies of the cyclic oxidation behavior of low-pressure plasma sprayed beta+gamma coasting on gamma-phase Ni-Cr-Al alloys have shown the correlation of weight change, oxide type, and Cr and Al concentration-distance profiles as a function of oxidation time. Of special interest was the transition to breakway oxidation due to the loss of the Al flux to the oxide and the failure of the coated alloy to form an Al2O3-rich oxide scale. The experimental results on beta+gamma/gamma coating systems were used as the basis of a numerical model (ternary, semi-infinite, finite-difference analysis) which accurately predicted changes in Cr and Al concentration-distance profiles. The model was used to study parameters critical to enhancing the life of coatings which fail by a combination of Al loss in forming the oxide scale and Al loss via interdiffusion with the substrate alloy. Comparisons of beta+gamma/gamma coating behavior are made to the oxidation of coated gamma+gamma-prime substrates, both ternary Ni-Cr-Al alloys and Mar-M 247-type alloys.

  13. The synthesis and characterization of analogs of the antimicrobial compound squalamine: 6 beta-hydroxy-3-aminosterols synthesized from hyodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Jones, S R; Kinney, W A; Zhang, X; Jones, L M; Selinsky, B S

    1996-10-01

    Analogs of the aminosterol antimicrobial agent squalamine have been synthesized beginning from hyodeoxycholic acid. After carboxylic acid esterification and oxidation of both alcohol functions to ketones, the A/B ring junction was converted from cis to trans by acid-catalyzed isomerization. Different polyamines were added to the 3-keto group by reductive amination, yielding both the 3 alpha and 3 beta addition products. The synthetic products exhibited potent, broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity similar to that of the parent compound. Changing the identity of the polyamine or the stereochemistry of addition has little effect upon antimicrobial activity but appears to change the selectivity of the agents. The analogs are synthesized with high yield from inexpensive starting materials and are promising alternatives to squalamine as potential antibiotics. PMID:8910969

  14. Role of arachidonic acid metabolites in the action of a beta adrenergic agonist on human monocyte phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Borda, E S; Tenenbaum, A; Sales, M E; Rumi, L; Sterin-Borda, L

    1998-02-01

    The mechanisms by which beta adrenergic stimulation regulates phagocytosis of Candida albicans by human peripheral monocytes (HPM) are characterized. Isoproterenol (ISO) inhibits phagocytosis in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was blunted by propranolol, inhibitors of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenase and verapamil, pointing to a participation of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites and calcium in the phenomenon. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP) also exerted the same inhibitory effect on phagocytosis. ISO interacts with beta adrenergic receptors of HPM increasing PGE2 and cAMP. We conclude that the mechanisms by which beta adrenergic stimulation regulates phagocytosis of Candida albicans by HPM appear to be secondary to beta adrenoceptor-mediated hydrolysis of AA accompanied by an increase in PGE2 generation and cAMP production. Both PGE2 and cAMP could act as mediators of the inhibitory action of beta agonists on the HPM-phagocytosis process. PMID:9578144

  15. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers at air/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Laura

    2008-03-01

    Field studies of marine and continental aerosols find that fatty acid films form on aqueous tropospheric aerosols. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers by ozone was studied to understand the fate of fat-coated aerosols from both fresh and salt water sources. Using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, we present a molecular-level investigation of fatty acid monolayers at the air-water and air-sodium chloride solution interface and explore reactions with atmospheric oxidants by these model systems. Coupling sum frequency generation spectroscopy with a Langmuir trough, concurrent spectroscopic and thermodynamic data were collected to obtain a molecular picture of the monolayers. No substantial difference was observed between oxidation of monolayers spread on water and on 0.6 molar sodium chloride solutions. Results indicate that depending on the size of the aerosol and the extent of oxidation, the subsequent oxidation products may not remain at the surface of these films, but instead be dissolved in the aqueous sub-phase of the aerosol particle. Results also indicate that oxidation of oleic acid could produce monolayers containing species that have no oxidized acyl chains.

  16. Beta-aminobutyric acid priming of plant defense: the role of ABA and other hormones.

    PubMed

    Baccelli, Ivan; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte

    2016-08-01

    Plants are exposed to recurring biotic and abiotic stresses that can, in extreme situations, lead to substantial yield losses. With the changing environment, the stress pressure is likely to increase and sustainable measures to alleviate the effect on our crops are sought. Priming plants for better stress resistance is one of the sustainable possibilities to reach this goal. Here, we report on the effects of beta-aminobutyric acid, a priming agent with an exceptionally wide range of action and describe its way of preparing plants to defend themselves against various attacks, among others through the modulation of their hormonal defense signaling, and highlight the special role of abscisic acid in this process. PMID:26584561

  17. Induction of DNA polymerase beta-dependent base excision repair in response to oxidative stress in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cabelof, Diane C; Raffoul, Julian J; Yanamadala, Sunitha; Guo, ZhongMao; Heydari, Ahmad R

    2002-09-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is the DNA repair pathway primarily responsible for repairing small base modifications and abasic sites caused by normal cellular metabolism or environmental insult. Strong evidence supports the requirement of DNA polymerase beta (beta-pol) in the BER pathway involving single nucleotide gap filling DNA synthesis in mammalian systems. In this study, we examine the relationship between oxidative stress, cellular levels of beta-pol and BER to determine whether oxidizing agents can upregulate BER capacity in vivo. Intraperitoneal injection of 2-nitropropane (2-NP, 100 mg/kg), an oxidative stress-inducing agent, in C57BL/6 mice was found to generate 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in liver tissue (4-fold increase, P < 0.001). We also observed a 4-5-fold increase in levels of DNA single strand breaks in 2-NP treated animals. The protein level of the tumor suppressor gene, p53 was also induced in liver by 2-NP (2.1-fold, P < 0.01), indicating an induction of DNA damage. In addition, we observed a 2-3-fold increase in mutant frequency in the lacI gene after exposure to 2-NP. Interestingly, an increase in DNA damage upregulated the level of beta-pol as well as BER capacity (42%, P < 0.05). These results suggest that beta-pol and BER can be upregulated in response to oxidative stress in vivo. Furthermore, data show that heterozygous beta-pol knockout (beta-pol(+/-)) mice express higher levels of p53 in response to 2-NP as compared with wild-type littermates. While the knockout and wild-type mice display similar levels of 8-OHdG after 2-NP exposure, the beta-pol(+/-) mice exhibit a significant increase in DNA single strand breaks. These findings suggest that in mice, a reduction in beta-pol expression results in a higher accumulation of DNA damage by 2-NP, thus establishing the importance of the beta-pol-dependent BER pathway in repairing oxidative damage. PMID:12189182

  18. Differential effects of modified beta-cyclodextrins on pharmacological activity and bioavailability of 4-biphenylacetic acid in rats after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, G; Ventura, C A; Spadaro, A; Campana, G; Spampinato, S

    1995-02-01

    Gastric tolerability, absorption and pharmacological activity of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA), as an inclusion complex with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CyD) or chemically modified beta-CyDs: 2,6-di-O-methyl-beta-CyD (DM-beta-CyD), 2,3,6-tri-O-methyl-beta-CyD (TM-beta-CyD) and 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-CyD (HP-beta-CyD), were investigated in the rat after oral administration. BPAA absorption, determined from area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), was increased by complexation with all beta-CyDs in the following order: DM-beta-CyD > TM-beta-CyD > HP-beta-CyD > beta-CyD. The carrageenan paw oedema test demonstrated a significant increase in anti-inflammatory activity of BPAA and the ED50 values, compared with BPAA alone, were reduced to about a third for the BPAA-DM-beta-CyD complex and halved for the others. BPAA complexed with DM-beta-CyD, HP-beta-CyD or beta-CyD showed better gastric tolerability compared with uncomplexed drug, whereas the BPAA-TM-beta-CyD complex produced marked gastric lesions similar in extent to BPAA alone. TM-beta-CyD (500 mg kg-1) and DM-beta-CyD (1000 mg kg-1) caused gastric erosions 21 h after oral administration. The pharmacokinetic profiles of BPAA-beta-CyD complexes have shown that DM-beta-CyD is the most effective in enhancing the bioavailability of BPAA. PMID:7602465

  19. cDNA-derived amino-acid sequence of a land turtle (Geochelone carbonaria) beta-chain hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bordin, S; Meza, A N; Saad, S T; Ogo, S H; Costa, F F

    1997-06-01

    The cDNA sequence encoding the turtle Geochelone carbonaria beta-chain was determinated. The isolation of hemoglobin mRNA was based on degenerate primers' PCR in combination with 5'- and 3'-RACE protocol. The full length cDNA is 615 bp with the ATG start codon at position 53 and TGA stop codon at position 495; The AATAAA polyadenylation signal is found at position 599. The deduced polypeptyde contains 146 amino-acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence shares 83% identity with the beta-globin of a related specie, the aquatic turtle C. p. belli. Otherwise, identity is higher when compared with chicken beta-Hb (80%) than with other reptilian orders (Squamata, 69%, and Crocodilia, 61%). Compared with human HbA, there is 67% identity, and at least three amino acid substitutions could be of some functional significance (Glu43 beta-->Ser, His116 beta-->Thr and His143 beta-->Leu). To our knowledge this represents the first cDNA sequence of a reptile globin gene described. PMID:9238523

  20. Activation of transmembrane bile acid receptor TGR5 stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Divya P.; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Mahavadi, Sunila; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Grider, John R.; Murthy, Karnam S.; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G protein coupled receptor TGR5 is expressed in mouse and human islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 is coupled to activation of Gs and Ca{sup 2+} release via cAMP/Epac/PLC-{epsilon} pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of TGR5 by bile salts and selective ligands causes insulin secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 could be a potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. -- Abstract: Bile acids act as signaling molecules and stimulate the G protein coupled receptor, TGR5, in addition to nuclear farnesoid X receptor to regulate lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Bile acid induced activation of TGR5 in the enteroendocrine cells promotes glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, which has insulinotropic effect in the pancreatic {beta} cells. In the present study, we have identified the expression of TGR5 in pancreatic {beta} cell line MIN6 and also in mouse and human pancreatic islets. TGR5 selective ligands, oleanolic acid (OA) and INT-777 selectively activated G{alpha}{sub s} and caused an increase in intracellular cAMP and Ca{sup 2+}. OA and INT-777 also increased phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the increase was blocked by NF449 (a selective G{alpha}{sub s} inhibitor) or (U73122) (PI hydrolysis inhibitor). OA, INT-777 and lithocholic acid increased insulin release in MIN6 and human islets and the increase was inhibited by treatment with NF449, (U73122) or BAPTA-AM (chelator of calcium), but not with myristoylated PKI (PKA inhibitor), suggesting that the release is dependent on G{sub s}/cAMP/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, a cAMP analog, which activates Epac, but not PKA also stimulated PI hydrolysis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the TGR5 expressed in the pancreatic {beta} cells regulates insulin secretion and highlights the importance of ongoing therapeutic strategies targeting TGR5 in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  1. Oxidized amino acids: culprits in human atherosclerosis and indicators of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Heinecke, Jay W

    2002-06-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is implicated in atherogenesis, but the mechanisms that oxidize LDL in the human artery wall have proven difficult to identify. A powerful investigative approach is mass spectrometric quantification of the oxidized amino acids that are left in proteins by specific oxidation reactions. Comparison of these molecular fingerprints in biological samples with those produced in proteins by various in vitro oxidation systems can indicate which biochemical pathway has created damage in vivo. For example, the pattern of oxidized amino acids in proteins isolated from atherosclerotic lesions implicates reactive intermediates generated by myeloperoxidase, a major phagocyte enzyme. These intermediates include hypochlorous acid, tyrosyl radical, and reactive nitrogen species, each of which generates a different pattern of stable end products. Despite this strong evidence that myeloperoxidase promotes LDL oxidation in vivo, the antioxidant that has been tested most extensively in clinical trials, vitamin E, fails to inhibit myeloperoxidase pathways in vitro. Because the utility of an antioxidant depends critically on the nature of the pathway that inflicts tissue damage, interventions that specifically inhibit myeloperoxidase or other physiologically relevant pathways would be more logical candidates for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Moreover, levels of oxidized amino acids in urine and plasma might reflect those in tissues and therefore identify individuals with high levels of oxidative stress. Trials with such subjects would seem more likely to uncover effective antioxidant therapies than trials involving the general population. PMID:12031894

  2. Biodegradation and cometabolic modeling of selected beta blockers during ammonia oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sathyamoorthy, Sandeep; Chandran, Kartik; Ramsburg, C Andrew

    2013-11-19

    Accurate prediction of pharmaceutical concentrations in wastewater effluents requires that the specific biochemical processes responsible for pharmaceutical biodegradation be elucidated and integrated within any modeling framework. The fate of three selected beta blockers-atenolol, metoprolol, and sotalol-was examined during nitrification using batch experiments to develop and evaluate a new cometabolic process-based (CPB) model. CPB model parameters describe biotransformation during and after ammonia oxidation for specific biomass populations and are designed to be integrated within the Activated Sludge Models framework. Metoprolol and sotalol were not biodegraded by the nitrification enrichment culture employed herein. Biodegradation of atenolol was observed and linked to the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and heterotrophs but not nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. Results suggest that the role of AOB in atenolol degradation may be disproportionately more significant than is otherwise suggested by their lower relative abundance in typical biological treatment processes. Atenolol was observed to competitively inhibit AOB growth in our experiments, though model simulations suggest inhibition is most relevant at atenolol concentrations greater than approximately 200 ng·L(-1). CPB model parameters were found to be relatively insensitive to biokinetic parameter selection suggesting the model approach may hold utility for describing pharmaceutical biodegradation during biological wastewater treatment. PMID:24112027

  3. Studies on the oxidation of hexamethylbenzene 1: Oxidation of hexamethylbenzene with nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiba, K.; Tomura, S.; Mizuno, T.

    1986-01-01

    The oxidative reaction of hexamethylbenzene (HMB) with nitric acid was studied, and the hitherto unknown polymethylbenzenepolycarboxylic acids were isolated: tetramethylphthalic anhydride, tetramethylisophthalic acid, 1,3,5-, 1,2,4- and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzenetricarboxylic acids. When HMB was warmed with 50% nitric acid at about 80 C, tetramethylphthalic anhydride and tetramethylisophthalic acid were initially produced. The continued reaction led to the production of trimethylbenzenetricarboxylic acids, but only slight amounts of dimethylbenzenetetracarboxylic acids were detected in the reaction mixture. Whereas tetramethylphthalic anydride and tetramethylisophthalic acid were obtained, pentamethylbenzoic acid, a possible precursor of them, was scarcely produced. On the other hand, a yellow material extracted with ether from the initial reaction mixture contained bis-(nitromethyl)prehnitene (CH3)4C6(CH2NO2)2, which was easily converted into the phthalic anhydride.

  4. (Z)-3-hexenyl and trans-linalool 3,7-oxide beta-primeverosides isolated as aroma precursors from leaves of a green tea cultivar.

    PubMed

    Nishikitani, M; Wang, D; Kubota, K; Kobayashi, A; Sugawara, F

    1999-09-01

    6-O-beta-D-Xylopyranosyl-beta-D-glucopyranosides (beta-primeverosides) of (Z)-3-hexenol and trans-linalool 3,7-oxide were newly isolated from fresh leaves of a tea cultivar (Camellia sinensis var. sinensis cv. Yabukita). In addition, the already identified beta-primeverosides of benzyl alcohol, methyl salicylate, and trans-linalool 3,6-oxide from an oolong tea cultivar were isolated from the Yabukita cultivar. It was confirmed that all aglycones of the linalool oxide glycosides isolated here were of the optically active S-form by chiral GC after enzymatic hydrolysis with glycosidase. PMID:10540751

  5. Retinoic acid receptor beta2 and neurite outgrowth in the adult mouse spinal cord in vitro.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Jonathan; So, Po-Lin; Barber, Robert D; Vincent, Karen J; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Kingsman, Susan M; Maden, Malcolm

    2002-10-01

    Retinoic acid, acting through the nuclear retinoic acid receptor beta2 (RARbeta2), stimulates neurite outgrowth from peripheral nervous system tissue that has the capacity to regenerate neurites, namely, embryonic and adult dorsal root ganglia. Similarly, in central nervous system tissue that can regenerate, namely, embryonic mouse spinal cord, retinoic acid also stimulates neurite outgrowth and RARbeta2 is upregulated. By contrast, in the adult mouse spinal cord, which cannot regenerate, no such upregulation of RARbeta2 by retinoic acid is observed and no neurites are extended in vitro. To test our hypothesis that the upregulation of RARbeta2 is crucial to neurite regeneration, we have transduced adult mouse or rat spinal cord in vitro with a minimal equine infectious anaemia virus vector expressing RARbeta2. After transduction, prolific neurite outgrowth occurs. Outgrowth does not occur when the cord is transduced with a different isoform of RARbeta nor does it occur following treatment with nerve growth factor. These data demonstrate that RARbeta2 is involved in neurite outgrowth, at least in vitro, and that this gene may in the future be of some therapeutic use. PMID:12235288

  6. Nr2e1 Deficiency Augments Palmitate-Induced Oxidative Stress in Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoli; Deng, Haohua; Dai, Zhe; Xu, Yancheng; Xiong, Xiaokan; Ma, Pei; Cheng, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 2 group E member 1 (Nr2e1) has been regarded as an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its function elsewhere is unknown. In the present study, we generated Nr2e1 knockdown MIN6 cells and studied whether Nr2e1 knockdown affected basal beta cell functions such as proliferation, cell death, and insulin secretion. We showed that knockdown of Nr2e1 in MIN6 cells resulted in increased sensitivity to lipotoxicity, decreased proliferation, a partial G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest, and higher rates of apoptosis. Moreover, Nr2e1 deficiency exaggerates palmitate-induced impairment in insulin secretion. At the molecular level, Nr2e1 deficiency augments palmitate-induced oxidative stress. Nr2e1 deficiency also resulted in decreases in antioxidant enzymes and expression level of Nrf2. Together, this study indicated a potential protective effect of Nr2e1 on beta cells, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. PMID:26649147

  7. Oxidation of oleic acid at air/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Laura F.; Bazerbashi, Mohamad F.; Beekman, Christopher P.; Hadad, Christopher M.; Allen, Heather C.

    2007-03-01

    Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers by ozone was studied to understand the fate of fat-coated aerosols from both freshwater and saltwater sources. Oleic acid monolayers at the air/water interface and at the air/sodium chloride solution interface were investigated using surface-specific, broad-bandwidth, sum frequency generation spectroscopy. Complementary techniques of infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy and surface pressure measurements taken during monolayer oxidation confirmed the sum frequency results. Using this nonlinear optical technique coupled with a Langmuir trough, concurrent spectroscopic and thermodynamic data were collected to obtain a molecular picture of the monolayers. No substantial difference was observed between oxidation of monolayers spread on water and on 0.6 M sodium chloride solutions. Results indicate that depending on the size of the aerosol and the extent of oxidation, the subsequent oxidation products may not remain at the surface of these films, but instead be dissolved in the aqueous subphase of the aerosol particle. Results also indicate that oxidation of oleic acid could produce monolayers containing species that have no oxidized acyl chains.

  8. Group-IV Impurity Defect Levels in beta-Gallium Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badescu, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Beta-Gallium Oxide (β-Ga2O3) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor with a significant potential as a native substrate for electronic devices. One avenue for tuning its carrier concentration and electronic properties is doping with group-IV impurity atoms. This work presents a first-principles understanding of the effects of C, Si, Ge and Sn dopants at Ga sites. C is found to act like a bistable center whereas the other dopants preserve the symmetry of the Ga site. Hybrid functionals are used to describe accurately the effects that occur mainly in the conduction band. A Brillouin zone unfolding is used that enables a direct comparison to possible spectroscopy experiments. We delineate the effects on bandgap modulation induced by charge density on the one hand, and by conduction band resonances and effective masses on the other hand.

  9. Metabolism of prostaglandin F2 alpha in Zellweger syndrome. Peroxisomal beta-oxidation is a major importance for in vivo degradation of prostaglandins in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Diczfalusy, U; Kase, B F; Alexson, S E; Björkhem, I

    1991-01-01

    We have recently shown in vitro that the peroxisomal fraction of a rat liver homogenate has the highest capacity to beta-oxidize prostaglandins. In order to evaluate the relative importance of peroxisomes for this conversion also in vivo, we administered [3H]prostaglandin F2 alpha to an infant suffering from Zellweger syndrome, a congenital disorder characterized by the absence of intact peroxisomes. As a control, labeled compound was administered to two healthy volunteers. Urine was collected, fractionated on a SEP-PAK C18 cartridge, and subjected to reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The Zellweger patient was found to excrete prostaglandin metabolites considerably less polar than those of the control subjects. The major urinary metabolite in the control subjects was practically absent in the urine from the Zellweger patient. The major urinary prostaglandin F2 alpha metabolite from the Zellweger patient was identified as an omega-oxidized C20-prostaglandin, 9,11-dihydroxy-15-oxoprost-5-ene-1,20-dioic acid. The major urinary prostaglandin F2 alpha metabolite from the control subjects had chromatographic properties of a tetranor (C16) prostaglandin, in accordance with earlier published data. The present results, in combination with our previous in vitro data, indicate that peroxisomal beta-oxidation is of major importance for in vivo chain shortening of prostaglandins. PMID:1885782

  10. Products and intermediates of the beta-oxidation of [U-14C]hexadecanedionoyl-mono-CoA by rat liver peroxisomes and mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Pourfarzam, M; Bartlett, K

    1991-01-01

    1. The synthesis of [U-14C]hexadecanedionoyl-mono-CoA is described. 2. The beta-oxidation of [U-14C]hexadecanedionoyl-mono-CoA by purified rat liver peroxisomes and mitochondria is demonstrated. 3. The products of mitochondrial beta-oxidation of [U-14C]hexadecanedionoyl-mono-CoA include ketone bodies, citrate and acetylcarnitine. 4. Tetradecadionoyl-mono-CoA, hexadec-2-enedionyl-mono-CoA and hexadionoyl-mono-CoA were the only detectable intermediates formed by mitochondrial beta-oxidation, whereas acetyl-CoA and all saturated even-numbered intermediates of chain length C6-C16 were generated by peroxisomal beta-oxidation. 5. Hexadecanedionoyl-mono-CoA and hexadecanoyl-CoA were equally effective substrates for peroxisomal beta-oxidation, but hexadecanedionoyl-mono-CoA was a relatively poorer substrate for the mitochondrial pathway. PMID:1989582

  11. An improved procedure for the palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation of beta-amino alcohols to oxazolidin-2-ones.

    PubMed

    Gabriele, Bartolo; Mancuso, Raffaella; Salerno, Giuseppe; Costa, Mirco

    2003-01-24

    A highly efficient oxidative cyclocarbonylation of beta-amino alcohols and 2-aminophenol to oxazolidin-2-ones has been achieved by using PdI(2) in conjunction with KI as the catalytic system in DME under relatively mild conditions (100 degrees C and 20 atm of a 4:1 mixture of CO and air). PMID:12530891

  12. Reduction of omega-3 oil oxidation in stable emulsion of caseinate-omega-3 oil-oat beta-glucan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid oxidation, particularly oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids such as omega-3 fatty acids, has posed a serious challenge to the food industry trying to incorporate heart-healthy oil products into their lines of healthful foods and beverages. In this study, heart healthy plant and marine based o...

  13. [Investigation on mechanism of pyrite oxidation in acidic solutions].

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Yi, Xiao-Yun; Dang, Zhi; Liu, Yun

    2012-11-01

    The mechanism of pyrite oxidation in acidic solutions was investigated by electrochemical analysis methods, such as open-circuit potential, cyclic voltammetry, Tafel polarization curve and anodic polarization curve, using a pyrite-carbon paste electrode as working electrode. The results showed that the oxidation process of pyrite in acidic solutions was via a two-step reaction: the first step was the dissolution of iron moiety and formation of a passivation film composed of elemental sulphur, metal-deficient sulfide and polysulfide; the second step was the further oxidation of these intermediate products to SO4(2-). The final reaction products of pyrite oxidation were Fe3+ and SO4(2-) in acidic solutions. In addition, the open-circuit potential and corrosion potential were positively shifted, the peak current and the corrosion current were increased with the increase in concentration of H2SO4 solutions. This indicated that increased acidity of the system was advantageous to the oxidation of pyrite. PMID:23323425

  14. Structural alterations of adhesion mediating components in cells cultured on poly-beta-hydroxy butyric acid.

    PubMed

    Nebe, B; Forster, C; Pommerenke, H; Fulda, G; Behrend, D; Bernewski, U; Schmitz, K P; Rychly, J

    2001-09-01

    Polymers may serve as a biodegradable material in tissue engineering. To assess the biocompatibility of poly-beta-hydroxy butyric acid (PHB), we studied the structural organization of cellular molecules involved in adhesion using osteoblastic and epithelial cell lines. On PHB, both cell lines revealed a rounded cell shape due to reduced spreading. The filamentous organization of the actin cytoskeleton was impaired. In double immunofluorescence analyses we demostrated that the colocalization of the fibronectin fibrils with the actin filaments was lost in cultures on PHB. Similarly, collagen II distribution was altered, whereas the organization of collagen I was not obviously affected. Further evidence for impaired structural organization was obtained for the beta1-integrin receptor and vinculin which mediate the interaction of the cytoskeleton with the extracellular matrix. In confluent epithelial cells, the tight junction protein ZO-1 showed a larger lateral extension in the cell-cell contacts when cells were grown on PHB. Because structural organization of components which mediate cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion controls cell physiology these parameters could be a sensitive indicator for the biocompatibility of implant materials. PMID:11511040

  15. Synthesis of novel beta-lactone inhibitors of fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Robyn D; Ma, Gil; Oyola, Yatsandra; Zancanella, Manuel; Knowles, Lynn M; Cieplak, Piotr; Romo, Daniel; Smith, Jeffrey W

    2008-09-11

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is necessary for growth and survival of tumor cells and is a promising drug target for oncology. Here, we report on the syntheses and activity of novel inhibitors of the thioesterase domain of FAS. Using the structure of orlistat as a starting point, which contains a beta-lactone as the central pharmacophore, 28 novel congeners were synthesized and examined. Structural features such as the length of the alpha- and beta-alkyl chains, their chemical composition, and amino ester substitutions were altered and the resulting compounds explored for inhibitory activity toward the thioesterase domain of FAS. Nineteen congeners show improved potency for FAS in biochemical assays relative to orlistat. Three of that subset, including the natural product valilactone, also display an increased potency in inducing tumor cell death and improved solubility compared to orlistat. These findings support the idea that an orlistat congener can be optimized for use in a preclinical drug design and for clinical drug development. PMID:18710210

  16. Cysteine as a Monothiol Reducing Agent to Prevent Copper-Mediated Oxidation of Interferon Beta During PEGylation by CuAAC.

    PubMed

    Nairn, Natalie W; Bariola, Pauline A; Graddis, Thomas J; VanBrunt, Michael Pete; Wang, Aijun; Li, Gary; Grabstein, Kenneth

    2015-10-21

    Bioconjugation by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) provides a powerful means to produce site-specifically modified proteins. However, the use of a copper catalyst brings about the possible generation of reactive oxygen species that could cause degradation of vulnerable amino acid residues. We investigated whether PEGylation by CuAAC caused any modifications to the therapeutic protein interferon beta-1b, which was produced via global amino acid substitution with azidohomo-alanine at the N-terminus and contains no methionine residues. Using previously reported reaction conditions, LC-MS peptide mapping detected +32 Da and +48 Da oxidation modifications of tryptic peptides 28-33 (LEYCLK) and 137-147 (EYSHCAWTIVR) in the protein post-PEGylation. The oxidative degradation increased with reaction time, whereas reducing the copper concentration slowed the PEGylation rate as well as the oxidation rate. Replacing dithiothreitol (DTT) with any of five different monothiol reducing agents in anaerobic conditions allowed efficient PEGylation in 2-4 h and abrogated oxidative degradation. Free cysteine provided reproducible reaction results as a reducing agent in this system and has been successfully applied to other protein conjugations. Monothiol reducing agents, such as cysteine, may be useful tools as protective reducing agents for CuAAC in some bioconjugation systems. PMID:26439457

  17. Crucial role of interleukin-1beta and nitric oxide synthase in silica-induced inflammation and apoptosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Kamal D; Rom, William N; Jagirdar, Jaishree; Yie, Ting-An; Gordon, Terry; Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng

    2002-02-15

    Crystalline silica stimulates macrophages in vitro to release interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and nitric oxide (NO) and induces apoptosis of macrophages. Because the fibrogenic potential of a particulate paralleled its ability to induce apoptosis in macrophages, we investigated the underlying mechanisms by which IL-1beta and NO mediate apoptosis and inflammation in murine silicosis. First, we demonstrated that silica induced NO production and apoptosis in vitro using the IC-21 macrophage cell line. Both NO release and apoptosis could be inhibited by neutralizing anti-IL-1beta antibody or the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), demonstrating the requirement for IL-1beta-mediated NO release in silica-induced apoptosis. We exposed IL-1beta knockout (IL-1beta(-/-)) mice, inducible NOS knockout (iNOS(-/-)) mice, and wild-type mice to 250 mg/m(3) silica for 5 h/d for 10 d using an inhalation chamber. Exposure of wild-type mice to silica resulted in lung inflammation, apoptosis, and significantly larger and more numerous silicotic lesions than in IL-1beta(-/-) mice over a 12-wk course. We also exposed iNOS(-/-) mice via inhalation in the same protocol and compared with wild-type mice and demonstrated that iNOS(-/-) mice had significantly reduced apoptosis and inflammation. These results demonstrated an association between apoptosis and inflammation in murine silicosis and support a potential role for IL-1beta-dependent NO-mediated apoptosis in the evolution of silicosis. PMID:11850347

  18. Retinoic acid receptor beta2 promotes functional regeneration of sensory axons in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Wong, Liang-Fong; Yip, Ping K; Battaglia, Anna; Grist, John; Corcoran, Jonathan; Maden, Malcolm; Azzouz, Mimoun; Kingsman, Susan M; Kingsman, Alan J; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; McMahon, Stephen B

    2006-02-01

    The embryonic CNS readily undergoes regeneration, unlike the adult CNS, which has limited axonal repair after injury. Here we tested the hypothesis that retinoic acid receptor beta2 (RARbeta2), critical in development for neuronal growth, may enable adult neurons to grow in an inhibitory environment. Overexpression of RARbeta2 in adult rat dorsal root ganglion cultures increased intracellular levels of cyclic AMP and stimulated neurite outgrowth. Stable RARbeta2 expression in DRG neurons in vitro and in vivo enabled their axons to regenerate across the inhibitory dorsal root entry zone and project into the gray matter of the spinal cord. The regenerated neurons enhanced second-order neuronal activity in the spinal cord, and RARbeta2-treated rats showed highly significant improvement in sensorimotor tasks. These findings show that RARbeta2 induces axonal regeneration programs within injured neurons and may thus offer new therapeutic opportunities for CNS regeneration. PMID:16388307

  19. Selective oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions using gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2010-01-01

    H-mordenite-supported PtAu nanoparticles are highly active and selective in the oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions, which allows the direct preparation of free acids (see picture). The high selectivity for C{sub 3} compounds results from the negligible formation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, in contrast to PtAu nanoparticles supported on activated carbon.

  20. Oxidative cleavage of erucic acid for the synthesis of brassylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah; Pooja Thapliyal; Erica N. Pfarr; Nicholas S. Dusek; Kristofer L. Schiele; James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to synthesize Brassylic Acid (BA) using oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is an industrial oilseed grown in North Dakota. Crambe has potential as an industrial fatty acid feedstock as a source of Erucic acid (EA). It has approximately 50-60 % of EA, a C{sub 22} monounsaturated fatty acid. Oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids derived from oilseeds produces long chain (9, 11, and 13 carbon atoms) dibasic and monobasic acids. These acids are known commercial feedstocks for the preparation of nylons, polyesters, waxes, surfactants, and perfumes. Other sources of EA are Rapeseed seed oil which 50-60 % of EA. Rapeseed is grown outside USA. The oxidative cleavage of EA was done using a high throughput parallel pressure reactor system. Kinetics of the reaction shows that BA yields reach a saturation at 12 hours. H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} was found to be the best catalyst for the oxidative cleavage of EA. High yields of BA were obtained at 80 C with bubbling of O{sub 2} or 10 bar of O{sub 2} for 12 hours.

  1. Soluble beta amyloid evokes alteration in brain norepinephrine levels: role of nitric oxide and interleukin-1

    PubMed Central

    Morgese, Maria G.; Colaianna, Marilena; Mhillaj, Emanuela; Zotti, Margherita; Schiavone, Stefania; D'Antonio, Palma; Harkin, Andrew; Gigliucci, Valentina; Campolongo, Patrizia; Trezza, Viviana; De Stradis, Angelo; Tucci, Paolo; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Trabace, Luigia

    2015-01-01

    Strong evidence showed neurotoxic properties of beta amyloid (Aβ) and its pivotal role in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Beside, experimental data suggest that Aβ may have physiological roles considering that such soluble peptide is produced and secreted during normal cellular activity. There is now suggestive evidence that neurodegenerative conditions, like AD, involve nitric oxide (NO) in their pathogenesis. Nitric oxide also possess potent neuromodulatory actions in brain regions, such as prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HIPP), and nucleus accumbens (NAC). In the present study, we evaluated the effect of acute Aβ injection on norepinephrine (NE) content before and after pharmacological manipulations of nitrergic system in above mentioned areas. Moreover, effects of the peptide on NOS activity were evaluated. Our data showed that 2 h after i.c.v. soluble Aβ administration, NE concentrations were significantly increased in the considered areas along with increased iNOS activity. Pre-treatment with NOS inhibitors, 7-Nitroindazole (7-NI), and N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine-dihydrochloride (L-NIL), reversed Aβ-induced changes. Ultimately, pharmacological block of interleukin1 (IL-1) receptors prevented NE increase in all brain regions. Taken together our findings suggest that NO and IL-1 are critically involved in regional noradrenergic alterations induced by soluble Aβ injection. PMID:26594145

  2. Rare earth element partitioning between hydrous ferric oxides and acid mine water during iron oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kimball, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ferrous iron rapidly oxidizes to Fe (III) and precipitates as hydrous Fe (III) oxides in acid mine waters. This study examines the effect of Fe precipitation on the rare earth element (REE) geochemistry of acid mine waters to determine the pH range over which REEs behave conservatively and the range over which attenuation and fractionation occur. Two field studies were designed to investigate REE attenuation during Fe oxidation in acidic, alpine surface waters. To complement these field studies, a suite of six acid mine waters with a pH range from 1.6 to 6.1 were collected and allowed to oxidize in the laboratory at ambient conditions to determine the partitioning of REEs during Fe oxidation and precipitation. Results from field experiments document that even with substantial Fe oxidation, the REEs remain dissolved in acid, sulfate waters with pH below 5.1. Between pH 5.1 and 6.6 the REEs partitioned to the solid phases in the water column, and heavy REEs were preferentially removed compared to light REEs. Laboratory experiments corroborated field data with the most solid-phase partitioning occurring in the waters with the highest pH. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A new bacterial dehydrogenase oxidizing the lignin model compound guaiacylglycerol beta-O-4-guaiacyl ether.

    PubMed

    Pelmont, J; Barrelle, M; Hauteville, M; Gamba, D; Romdhane, M; Dardas, A; Beguin, C

    1985-09-01

    A lignin model compound, named in short guaiagylglycerol beta-guaiacyl ether (GGE), contains the beta-0-4 ether linkage that is common in the chemical structure of lignin. A Pseudomonas sp. (GU5) had been isolated as an organism able to grow with GGE as the sole source of carbon and energy. When grown on vanillate, the bacteria contained a NAD+ -dependent dehydrogenase converting GGE to a 355 nm absorbing product. The enzyme, named GGE-dehydrogenase, was purified about 160-fold using gel permeation, ion exchange on DEAE-Sephadex, and dye-ligand affinity chromatography. The new protein was about 52 kDa in apparent size with but one polypeptide chain after denaturation and reduction. According to several criteria, the product of GGE oxidation (Km = 12 microM) was identified as the corresponding conjugated ketone at the alpha-carbon of the C3 side-chain. The secondary alcohol function in GGE was apparently the sole target of the enzyme action. However the conversion of GGE into ketone catalyzed by the enzyme was only partial, and did not exceed 50%, probably because only one of the alpha-enantiomers was susceptible to enzyme attack. In contrast the ketone, either made by organic synthesis or by enzymic oxidation of GGE, could be totally reduced back to GGE (Km = 13 microM at pH 8.4, 8 microM at neutral pH), with NADH as the reductant, as confirmed by UV absorption and NMR spectra. Other model compounds with no primary alcoholic function, ether linkage or phenolic group were also substrates for the enzyme, confirming the specificity of GGE-dehydrogenase for the alpha-carbon position. Conjugation of the alpha-ketone with an adjacent phenolic nucleus interfered strongly with equilibrium constants and redox potentials of the system according to pH, and the enzyme displayed widely different optima with pH over 9 when oxidizing GGE, below 7 when reducing the ketone. Equilibrium studies showed that the ketone/GGE potential was -0.37 volt at pH 8.7, -0.23 volt at pH 7 (30

  4. Possible contribution of follicular interleukin-1beta to nitric oxide generation in human pre-ovulatory follicles.

    PubMed

    Tao, M; Kodama, H; Kagabu, S; Fukuda, J; Murata, M; Shimizu, Y; Hirano, H; Tanaka, T

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between follicular nitric oxide (NO) metabolite concentrations and several related variables, with special reference to follicular interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). The follicular fluid from the leading and secondary follicles was collected individually from 20 women undergoing in-vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment, and the concentrations of nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) were determined fluorometrically using 2,3-diaminonaphthalene. Both follicular nitrite (r = 0.42, P < 0.01) and nitrate (r = 0.49, P < 0.001) were found to be significantly correlated with follicular IL-1beta concentrations. There were also significant positive correlations between follicular nitrate and the number of oocytes retrieved (P < 0.01) and serum oestradiol concentration on the day of human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) administration (P < 0.05). When follicular cells were incubated in vitro with 10 ng/ml of IL-1beta for 24 h, nitrate generation was significantly (P < 0.01) elevated compared with the control. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that follicular IL-1beta and the number of developing follicles are significant variables that affect follicular NO concentrations, and points to the possible contribution of IL-1beta to NO generation in human preovulatory follicles. PMID:9402285

  5. Impact of herbicides on the abundance and structure of indigenous beta-subgroup ammonia-oxidizer communities in soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y J; Hussain, A K; Stephen, J R; Mullen, M D; White, D C; Peacock, A

    2001-11-01

    In this study, mixtures of five herbicide-formulated products (atrazine, dicamba, fluometuron, metolachlor, and sulfentrazone) were applied to soil microcosm columns in increasing concentrations. The toxic impact of herbicides on the indigenous beta-subclass Proteobacteria autotrophic ammonia-oxidizer (beta-AAO) community was assessed. The beta-AAO population abundances were estimated by competitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the gene amoA, encoding the alpha-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase. Community structure was examined by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis targeting 16S rDNA with band excision and sequence analysis, and by analysis of amoA gene fragment clone libraries. The 16S rDNA analyses showed that a single ribotype of Nitrosospira cluster 3 was the dominant beta-AAO in all treatments. At a finer scale, amoA clone library analysis suggested a shift in community structure corresponding to the 100-ppm application. Competitive PCR indicated significant differences between treatments. The control exhibited relatively stable population abundance over the time period examined. The 10-ppm treatment induced a population increase, but a significant decrease was induced by the 100-ppm application. At 1,000 ppm, the ammonia-oxidizer population dropped below the method detection limit by the first sampling point. An impact on ammonia oxidizers resulting from the application of herbicides was observed, both in abundance and community structure. PMID:11699770

  6. Dietary beta-carotene inhibits mammary carcinogenesis in rats depending on dietary alpha-linolenic acid content.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Virginie; Hoinard, Claude; Arab, Khelifa; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Bougnoux, Philippe; Chajès, Véronique

    2006-07-01

    To investigate whether dietary alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) content alters the effect of beta-carotene on mammary carcinogenesis, we conducted a chemically induced mammary tumorigenesis experiment in rats randomly assigned to four nutritional groups (15 rats per group) varying in beta-carotene supplementation and ALA content. Two oil formula-enriched diets (15 %) were used: one with 6 g ALA/kg diet in an essential fatty acids (EFA) ratio of linoleic acid:ALA of 5:1 w/w (EFA 5 diet), the other with 24 g ALA/kg diet in an EFA ratio of 1:1 w/w (EFA 1 diet), both designed with a similar linoleic acid content. beta-Carotene was either added (10 mg/kg diet per d) or not added to these diets. beta-Carotene supplementation led to decreased tumour incidence and tumour growth when added to the EFA 5 diet, whereas it had no effect when added to the EFA 1 diet. The decreased tumour growth did not result from an involvement of lipoperoxidation (tumour malondialdehyde content being similar between the groups) or from an inhibition of tumour cell proliferation (as there was an unchanged S phase fraction in the tumours). We concluded that an adequate content of ALA in the diet is required to allow a protective effect of beta-carotene in mammary carcinogenesis. Whether such an interaction between ALA and beta-carotene influences the risk of breast cancer in women needs to be investigated. PMID:16869986

  7. Excessive fatty acid oxidation induces muscle atrophy in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Fukawa, Tomoya; Yan-Jiang, Benjamin Chua; Min-Wen, Jason Chua; Jun-Hao, Elwin Tan; Huang, Dan; Qian, Chao-Nan; Ong, Pauline; Li, Zhimei; Chen, Shuwen; Mak, Shi Ya; Lim, Wan Jun; Kanayama, Hiro-Omi; Mohan, Rosmin Elsa; Wang, Ruiqi Rachel; Lai, Jiunn Herng; Chua, Clarinda; Ong, Hock Soo; Tan, Ker-Kan; Ho, Ying Swan; Tan, Iain Beehuat; Teh, Bin Tean; Shyh-Chang, Ng

    2016-06-01

    Cachexia is a devastating muscle-wasting syndrome that occurs in patients who have chronic diseases. It is most commonly observed in individuals with advanced cancer, presenting in 80% of these patients, and it is one of the primary causes of morbidity and mortality associated with cancer. Additionally, although many people with cachexia show hypermetabolism, the causative role of metabolism in muscle atrophy has been unclear. To understand the molecular basis of cachexia-associated muscle atrophy, it is necessary to develop accurate models of the condition. By using transcriptomics and cytokine profiling of human muscle stem cell-based models and human cancer-induced cachexia models in mice, we found that cachectic cancer cells secreted many inflammatory factors that rapidly led to high levels of fatty acid metabolism and to the activation of a p38 stress-response signature in skeletal muscles, before manifestation of cachectic muscle atrophy occurred. Metabolomics profiling revealed that factors secreted by cachectic cancer cells rapidly induce excessive fatty acid oxidation in human myotubes, which leads to oxidative stress, p38 activation and impaired muscle growth. Pharmacological blockade of fatty acid oxidation not only rescued human myotubes, but also improved muscle mass and body weight in cancer cachexia models in vivo. Therefore, fatty acid-induced oxidative stress could be targeted to prevent cancer-induced cachexia. PMID:27135739

  8. Plant uptake of cadmium from acid-extracted anaerobically digested sewage sludge. [Beta vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, T.J.; Feltz, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Approximately 80% of the Cd in an anaerobically digested sewage sludge was removed by acid extraction and dewatering. The acid extracted sludge was treated by (i) neutralization to pH 5.9 with Ca(OH)/sub 2/, (ii) addition of monocalcium phosphate (MCP) followed by Ca(OH)/sub 2/ neutralization to pH 5.9, and, (iii) addition of rock phosphate (RP) followed by Ca(OH)/sub 2/ neutralization to pH 5.9. The three treated sludges and the non acid-extracted sludge were applied to Spinks loamy sand at rates equivalent to 18.7 and 37.4 ..mu..mol Cd kg/sup -1/. Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris) was grown in the greenhouse for 56 d. Cadmium, Fe, Ca, and P were measured in saturation extracts of treated soil after sludge addition. These data indicated that hydroxyapatite was stable throughout the study in the soil receiving MCP treated sludge but not in other soil treatments. Cadmium concentration in saturation extracts of the soil with MCP sludge decreased while Cd concentration in saturation extracts of the other sludge treatments were much higher throughout the study. Chard yields were higher in the control than in any of the sludge treatments, and the difference was attributed to greater N availability in the control. Cadmium concentration in Swiss chard tissue at harvest was significantly lower from the MCP sludge than from the other sludges. Cadmium concentration in chard tissue was also higher from the aerated sludge (11.9 mmol Cd kg/sup -1/) than from the three acid-extracted sludges (2.58-3.29 mmol Cd kg/sup -1/). No significant difference in the Cd concentration of chard was obtained for the 18.7 and 37.4 ..mu..mol Cd kg/sup -1/ rates of the MCP sludge, while Cd concentrations in chard increased linearly with Cd applied by the other sludges.

  9. Hydroxyindole Carboxylic Acid-Based Inhibitors for Receptor-Type Protein Tyrosine Protein Phosphatase Beta

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Li-Fan; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Bai, Yunpeng; Wu, Li; Gunawan, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play an important role in regulating a wide range of cellular processes. Understanding the role of PTPs within these processes has been hampered by a lack of potent and selective PTP inhibitors. Generating potent and selective probes for PTPs remains a significant challenge because of the highly conserved and positively charged PTP active site that also harbors a redox-sensitive Cys residue. Results: We describe a facile method that uses an appropriate hydroxyindole carboxylic acid to anchor the inhibitor to the PTP active site and relies on the secondary binding elements introduced through an amide-focused library to enhance binding affinity for the target PTP and to impart selectivity against off-target phosphatases. Here, we disclose a novel series of hydroxyindole carboxylic acid-based inhibitors for receptor-type tyrosine protein phosphatase beta (RPTPβ), a potential target that is implicated in blood vessel development. The representative RPTPβ inhibitor 8b-1 (L87B44) has an IC50 of 0.38 μM and at least 14-fold selectivity for RPTPβ over a large panel of PTPs. Moreover, 8b-1 also exhibits excellent cellular activity and augments growth factor signaling in HEK293, MDA-MB-468, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Innovation: The bicyclic salicylic acid pharmacophore-based focused library approach may provide a potential solution to overcome the bioavailability issue that has plagued the PTP drug discovery field for many years. Conclusion: A novel method is described for the development of bioavailable PTP inhibitors that utilizes bicyclic salicylic acid to anchor the inhibitors to the active site and peripheral site interactions to enhance binding affinity and selectivity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2130–2140. PMID:24180557

  10. Naturally-occurring estradiol-17{beta}-fatty acid esters, but not estradiol-17{beta}, preferentially induce mammary tumorigenesis in female rats: Implications for an important role in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Laura H.; Yu Jina; Xu Xiaomeng; Lee, Anthony J.; Zhu Baoting

    2008-06-15

    Because mammary glands are surrounded by adipose tissues, we hypothesize that the ultra-lipophilic endogenous estrogen-17{beta}-fatty acid esters may have preferential hormonal and carcinogenic effects in mammary tissues compared to other target organs (such as the uterus and pituitary). This hypothesis is tested in the present study. We found that all 46 rats implanted with an estradiol-17{beta} pellet developed large pituitary tumors (average weight = 251 {+-}103 mg) and had to be terminated early, but only 48% of them developed mammary tumors. In addition, approximately one-fourth of them developed a huge uterus. In the 26 animals implanted with a mixture containing estradiol-17{beta}-stearate and estradiol-17{beta}-palmitate (two representative estradiol-17{beta}-fatty acid esters) or in the 29 animals implanted with estradiol-17{beta}-stearate alone (in the same molar dose as estradiol-17{beta}), 73% and 79%, respectively, of them developed mammary tumors, whereas only 3 or 2 animals, respectively, had to be terminated early due to the presence of a large pituitary tumor. Both tumorous and normal mammary tissues contained much higher levels of estrogen esterase than other tissues, which catalyzes the releases of bioactive estrogens from their fatty acid esters. In conclusion, while estradiol-17{beta} is much stronger in inducing pituitary tumor (100% incidence) than mammary tumor, estradiol-17{beta}-fatty acid esters have a higher efficacy than estradiol-17{beta} in inducing mammary tumor and yet it only has little ability to induce uterine out-growth and pituitary tumorigenesis. This study establishes the endogenous estrogen-17{beta}-fatty acid esters as preferential inducers of mammary tumorigenesis.

  11. Amino Acid Degradations Produced by Lipid Oxidation Products.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-06-10

    Differently to amino acid degradations produced by carbohydrate-derived reactive carbonyls, amino acid degradations produced by lipid oxidation products are lesser known in spite of being lipid oxidation a major source of reactive carbonyls in food. This article analyzes the conversion of amino acids into Strecker aldehydes, α-keto acids, and amines produced by lipid-derived free radicals and carbonyl compounds, as well as the role of lipid oxidation products on the reactions suffered by these compounds: the formation of Strecker aldehydes and other aldehydes from α-keto acids; the formation of Strecker aldehydes and olefins from amines; the formation of shorter aldehydes from Strecker aldehydes; and the addition reactions suffered by the olefins produced from the amines. The relationships among all these reactions and the effect of reaction conditions on them are discussed. This knowledge should contribute to better control food processing in order to favor the formation of desirable beneficial compounds and to inhibit the production of compounds with deleterious properties. PMID:25748518

  12. Production of rosmarinic acid and a new rosmarinic acid 3'-O-beta-D-glucoside in suspension cultures of the hornwort Anthoceros agrestis Paton.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, Katharina; Schneider, Bernd; Petersen, Maike

    2006-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures of the hornwort Anthoceros agrestis Paton (Anthocerotaceae) were cultivated and characterized in CB-media containing 2 and 4% sucrose. The suspension cells accumulated rosmarinic acid up to 5.1% of the cell dry weight as well as caffeoyl-4'-hydroxyphenyllactate. Moreover, a more hydrophilic compound was detected which was isolated and identified as rosmarinic acid 3'-O-beta-D-glucoside, a new rosmarinic acid derivative. This new rosmarinic acid derivative was found up to 1.0% of the cell dry weight in suspension cells of A. agrestis. PMID:16133208

  13. Acidic Ultrafine Tungsten Oxide Molecular Wires for Cellulosic Biomass Conversion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenxin; Sadakane, Masahiro; Hiyoshi, Norihito; Yoshida, Akihiro; Hara, Michikazu; Ueda, Wataru

    2016-08-22

    The application of nanocatalysis based on metal oxides for biomass conversion is of considerable interest in fundamental research and practical applications. New acidic transition-metal oxide molecular wires were synthesized for the conversion of cellulosic biomass. The ultrafine molecular wires were constructed by repeating (NH4 )2 [XW6 O21 ] (X=Te or Se) along the length, exhibiting diameters of only 1.2 nm. The nanowires dispersed in water and were observed using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Acid sites were created by calcination without collapse of the molecular wire structure. The acidic molecular wire exhibited high activity and stability and promoted the hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond. Various biomasses including cellulose were able to be converted to hexoses as main products. PMID:27482857

  14. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations of ..beta..-D-Glucose and ..beta..-D-Xylose Degradation Mechanisms in Acidic Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, X.; Nimlos, M. R.; Davis, M.; Johnson, D. K.; Himmel, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate, with explicit solvent water molecules, {beta}-d-glucose and {beta}-d-xylose degradation mechanisms in acidic media. The rate-limiting step in sugar degradation was found to be protonation of the hydroxyl groups on the sugar ring. We found that the structure of water molecules plays a significant role in the acidic sugar degradation pathways. Firstly, a water molecule competes with the hydroxyl group on the sugar ring for protons. Secondly, water forms hydrogen bonds with the hydroxyl groups on the sugar rings, thus weakening the C-C and C-O bonds (each to a different degree). Note that the reaction pathways could be altered due to the change of relative stability of the C-C and C-O bonds. Thirdly, water molecules that are hydrogen-bonded to sugar hydroxyls could easily extract a proton from the reaction intermediate, terminating the reaction. Indeed, the sugar degradation pathway is complex due to multiple protonation probabilities and the surrounding water structure. Our experimental data support multiple sugar acidic degradation pathways.

  15. Oxidative degradation of organic acids conjugated with sulfite oxidation in flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    Organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation has been studied under flue gas desulfurization (EGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k/sub 12/, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate after being normalized by the concentrations of organic acid and dissolved S(IV). K/sub 12/, not significantly affected by pH or dissolved oxygen, is around 10/sup -3/ in the absence of manganese or iron. However, k/sub 12/ is increased by certain transition metals such as Co, Ni, and Fe and is decreased by Mn and halides. Lower dissolved S(IV) magnified these effects. No k/sub 12/ greater than 4 x 10/sup -3/ or smaller than 0.1 x 10/sup -3/ has been observed. A free radical mechanism was proposed to describe the kinetics: (1) sulfate free radical is the major radical responsible to the degradation of organic acid; (2) ferrous generates sulfate radical by reacting with monoxypersulfate to enhance k/sub 12/; (3) manganous consumes sulfate radical to decrease k/sub 12/; (4) dissolved S(IV) competes with ferrous for monoxypersulfate and with manganous for sulfate radical to demonstrate the effects of dissolved S(IV) on k/sub 12/. Hydroxy and sulfonated carboxylic acids degrade approximately three times slower than saturated dicarboxylic acids; while maleic acid, an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid, degraded an order of magnitude faster. A wide spectrum of degradation products of adipic acid were found, including carbon dioxide - the major product, glutaric semialdehyde - the major retained product with low manganese, glutaric acid and valeric acids - the major retained product with high manganese, lower molecular weight mono- and dicarboxylic acids, other carbonyl compounds, and hydrocarbons.

  16. Streptomyces beta-alanine:alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase, a novel omega-amino acid transaminase. Purification, crystallization, and enzymologic properties.

    PubMed

    Yonaha, K; Suzuki, K; Toyama, S

    1985-03-25

    An enzyme which catalyzes the transamination of beta-alanine with alpha-ketoglutarate was purified to homogeneity from Streptomyces griseus IFO 3102 and crystallized. Molecular weight of the enzyme was found to be 185,000 +/- 10,000 by a gel-filtration method. The enzyme consists of four subunits identical in molecular weight (51,000 +/- 1,000). The transaminase is composed of 483 amino acids/subunit containing 7 and 8 residues of half-cystine and methionine, respectively. The enzyme exhibits absorption maxima at 278 and 415 nm. The pyridoxal 5'-phosphate content was determined to be 4 mol/mol of enzyme. The enzyme catalyzes transamination of omega-amino acids including taurine and hypotaurine. beta-Alanine and DL-beta-aminoisobutyrate served as a good amino donor; the Michaelis constants are 8.0 and 12.5 mM, respectively. alpha-Ketoglutarate is the only amino acceptor (Km = 4.0 mM); pyruvate and oxalacetate are inactive. Based on the substrate specificity, the terminology of beta-alanine:alpha-ketoglutarate transaminase is proposed for the enzyme. Carbonyl reagents, HgCl2,DL-gabaculine, and alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine strongly inhibited the enzyme. PMID:3972825

  17. Determination of the amino acid residue involved in [3H]beta-funaltrexamine covalent binding in the cloned rat mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Yin, J; Riel, J K; DesJarlais, R L; Raveglia, L F; Zhu, J; Liu-Chen, L Y

    1996-08-30

    We previously demonstrated that [3H]beta-funaltrexamine ([3H]beta-FNA) labeled the rat mu opioid receptor expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells with high specificity, and [3H]beta-FNA-labeled receptors migrated as one broad band with a mass of 80 kDa. In this study, we determined the region and then the amino acid residue of the mu receptor involved in the covalent binding of [3H]beta-FNA. [3H]beta-FNA-labeled receptors were solubilized and purified to approximately 10% purity by immunoaffinity chromatography with antibodies against a C-terminal domain peptide. The site of covalent bond formation was determined to be within Ala206-Met243 by CNBr cleavage of partially purified labeled mu receptors and determinations of sizes of labeled receptor fragments. The amino acid residue of beta-FNA covalent incorporation was then determined by site-directed mutagenesis studies within this region. Mutation of Lys233 to Ala, Arg, His, and Leu completely eliminated covalent binding of [3H]beta-FNA, although these mutants bound beta-FNA with high affinity. Mutations of other amino acid residues did not affect covalent binding of [3H]beta-FNA. These results indicate that [3H]beta-FNA binds covalently to Lys233. Since [3H]beta-FNA is a rigid molecule, the information will be very useful for molecular modeling of interaction between morphinans and the mu receptor. PMID:8702924

  18. Molecular diversity of soil and marine 16S rRNA gene sequences related to beta-subgroup ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, J R; McCaig, A E; Smith, Z; Prosser, J I; Embley, T M

    1996-01-01

    We have conducted a preliminary phylogenetic survey of ammonia-oxidizing beta-proteobacteria, using 16S rRNA gene libraries prepared by selective PCR and DNA from acid and neutral soils and polluted and nonpolluted marine sediments. Enrichment cultures were established from samples and analyzed by PCR. Analysis of 111 partial sequences of c. 300 bases revealed that the environmental sequences formed seven clusters, four of which are novel, within the phylogenetic radiation defined by cultured autotrophic ammonia oxidizers. Longer sequences from 13 cluster representatives support their phylogenetic positions relative to cultured taxa. These data suggest that known taxa may not be representative of the ammonia-oxidizing beta-proteobacteria in our samples. Our data provide further evidence that molecular and culture-based enrichment methods can select for different community members. Most enrichments contained novel Nitrosomonas-like sequences whereas novel Nitrosospira-like sequences were more common from gene libraries of soils and marine sediments. This is the first evidence for the occurrence of Nitrosospira-like strains in marine samples. Clear differences between the sequences of soil and marine sediment libraries were detected. Comparison of 16S rRNA sequences from polluted and nonpolluted sediments provided no strong evidence that the community composition was determined by the degree of pollution. Soil clone sequences fell into four clusters, each containing sequences from acid and neutral soils in varying proportions. Our data suggest that some related strains may be present in both samples, but further work is needed to resolve whether there is selection due to pH for particular sequence types. PMID:8900005

  19. Effect of Beta vulgaris Linn. Leaves Extract on Anxiety- and Depressive-like Behavior and Oxidative Stress in Mice after Acute Restraint Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sulakhiya, Kunjbihari; Patel, Vikas Kumar; Saxena, Rahul; Dashore, Jagrati; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Rathore, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    , that is, anxiety and depressionARS-induced oxidative stress was prevented by BVEE pretreatment in mice. Abbreviations Used: ANOVA: Analysis of variance, ARS: Acute restraint stress, BVEE: Beta vulgaris ethanolic extract, BV: Beta vulgaris, CMC: Carboxymethylcellulose, CNS: Central nervous system, CPCSEA: Committee for the purpose of control and supervision of experiments on animals, cms: Centimeter, DNA: Deoxyribose nucleic acid, EPM: Elevated plus maze, FST: Forced swim test, GSH: Reduced glutathione, g: Gram, h: Hour, IAEC: Institutional Animal Ethics Committee, mg: Milligram, μM: Microgram, MDA: Malondialdehyde, SEM: Standard error of mean, TST: Tail suspension test, UV: Ultraviolet, w/v: Weight by volume. PMID:26941529

  20. Determining the Effect of Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles on the Aggregation of Amyloid-Beta in Transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Suhag; Matticks, John; Howell, Carina

    2014-03-01

    The cause of Alzheimer's disease has been linked partially to genetic factors but the predicted environmental components have yet to be determined. In Alzheimer's, accumulation of amyloid-beta protein in the brain forms plaques resulting in neurodegeneration and loss of mental functions. It has been postulated that aluminum influences the aggregation of amyloid-beta. To test this hypothesis, transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans, CL2120, was used as a model organism to observe neurodegeneration in nematodes exposed to aluminum oxide nanoparticles. Behavioral testing, fluorescent staining, and fluorescence microscopy were used to test the effects of aggregation of amyloid-beta in the nervous systems of effected nematodes exposed to aluminum oxide nanoparticles. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy was used to quantify the total concentration of aluminum oxide that the worms were exposed to during the experiment. Exposure of transgenic and wild type worms to a concentration of 4 mg mL-1 aluminum oxide showed a decrease in the sinusoidal motion, as well as an infirmity of transgenic worms when compared to control worms. These results support the hypothesis that aluminum may play a role in neurodegeneration in C. elegans, and may influence and increase the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This work was supported by National Science Foundation grants DUE-1058829, DMR-0923047 DUE-0806660 and Lock Haven FPDC grants.

  1. Selective Chemical Conversion of Sugars in Aqueous Solutions without Alkali to Lactic Acid Over a Zn-Sn-Beta Lewis Acid-Base Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Zheng; Peng, Boyu; Gu, Minyan; Zhou, Xuefei; Xiang, Bo; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-05-01

    Lactic acid is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of a wide range of chemicals. However, in aqueous solutions without alkali, its efficient preparation via the direct catalysis of sugars is hindered by a side dehydration reaction to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural due to Brønsted acid, which originates from organic acids. Herein, we report that a previously unappreciated combination of common two metal mixed catalyst (Zn-Sn-Beta) prepared via solid-state ion exchange synergistically promoted this reaction. In water without a base, a conversion exceeding 99% for sucrose with a lactic acid yield of 54% was achieved within 2 hours at 190 °C under ambient air pressure. Studies of the acid and base properties of the Zn-Sn-Beta zeolite suggest that the introduction of Zn into the Sn-Beta zeolite sequentially enhanced both the Lewis acid and base sites, and the base sites inhibited a series of side reactions related to fructose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and its subsequent decomposition.

  2. Selective Chemical Conversion of Sugars in Aqueous Solutions without Alkali to Lactic Acid Over a Zn-Sn-Beta Lewis Acid-Base Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Zheng; Peng, Boyu; Gu, Minyan; Zhou, Xuefei; Xiang, Bo; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of a wide range of chemicals. However, in aqueous solutions without alkali, its efficient preparation via the direct catalysis of sugars is hindered by a side dehydration reaction to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural due to Brønsted acid, which originates from organic acids. Herein, we report that a previously unappreciated combination of common two metal mixed catalyst (Zn-Sn-Beta) prepared via solid-state ion exchange synergistically promoted this reaction. In water without a base, a conversion exceeding 99% for sucrose with a lactic acid yield of 54% was achieved within 2 hours at 190 °C under ambient air pressure. Studies of the acid and base properties of the Zn-Sn-Beta zeolite suggest that the introduction of Zn into the Sn-Beta zeolite sequentially enhanced both the Lewis acid and base sites, and the base sites inhibited a series of side reactions related to fructose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and its subsequent decomposition. PMID:27222322

  3. Selective Chemical Conversion of Sugars in Aqueous Solutions without Alkali to Lactic Acid Over a Zn-Sn-Beta Lewis Acid-Base Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Zheng; Peng, Boyu; Gu, Minyan; Zhou, Xuefei; Xiang, Bo; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of a wide range of chemicals. However, in aqueous solutions without alkali, its efficient preparation via the direct catalysis of sugars is hindered by a side dehydration reaction to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural due to Brønsted acid, which originates from organic acids. Herein, we report that a previously unappreciated combination of common two metal mixed catalyst (Zn-Sn-Beta) prepared via solid-state ion exchange synergistically promoted this reaction. In water without a base, a conversion exceeding 99% for sucrose with a lactic acid yield of 54% was achieved within 2 hours at 190 °C under ambient air pressure. Studies of the acid and base properties of the Zn-Sn-Beta zeolite suggest that the introduction of Zn into the Sn-Beta zeolite sequentially enhanced both the Lewis acid and base sites, and the base sites inhibited a series of side reactions related to fructose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and its subsequent decomposition. PMID:27222322

  4. Effect of 0.1 at. pct Zirconium on the cyclic oxidation resistance of beta-NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of 0.1 at. pct Zr on the cyclic oxidation of hipped beta-NiAl was studied. Oxidation testing was performed in static air at 1100-1200 C, using 1-hr exposure cycles for test times up to 3000 hr. The weight change versus time data were modeled with the COSP computer program to analyze and predict cyclic-oxidation behavior. Zr additions significantly change the nature of the scale-spalling process during cooling, so that the oxide spalls near the oxide-air interface at a relatively low depth within the scale. Without Zr, the predominantly alpha-Al2O3 scale tends to spall randomly to bare metal at relatively high effective-scale-loss rates, particularly at 1150 C and 1200 C. This leads to higher rates of Al consumption for the Zr-free aluminide and much earlier depletion of Al, leading to eventual breakaway (i.e., failure).

  5. Effect of sulfonylureas on hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, T.B.

    1986-08-01

    In isolated rat livers perfused with oleic acid (0.1 mM), infusion of tolbutamide or glyburide decreased the rate of ketogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was maximal at 2.0 mM and 10 M concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide, respectively. Neither tolbutamide nor glyburide inhibited ketogenesis in livers perfused with octanoate. The inhibition of hepatic ketogenesis by sulfonylureas was independent of perfusate oleic acid concentration. Additionally, in rat livers perfused with oleic acid in the presence of L-(-)-carnitine (10 mM), submaximal concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide did not inhibit hepatic ketogenesis. Finally, glyburide infusion into livers perfused with (U- $C)oleic acid (0.1 mM) increased the rate of UC label incorporation into hepatic triglycerides by 2.5-fold. These data suggest that both tolbutamide and glyburide inhibit long-chain fatty acid oxidation by inhibition the key regulatory enzyme, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, most probably by competing with L-(-)-carnitine.

  6. Surface oxide growth on platinum electrode in aqueous trifluoromethanesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yoshihisa; Mashio, Tetsuya; Ohma, Atsushi; Dale, Nilesh; Oshihara, Kenzo; Jerkiewicz, Gregory

    2014-10-28

    Platinum in the form of nanoparticles is the key and most expensive component of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, while trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (CF3SO3H) is the smallest fluorinated sulfonic acid. Nafion, which acts as both electrolyte and separator in fuel cells, contains -CF2SO3H groups. Consequently, research on the electrochemical behaviour of Pt in aqueous CF3SO3H solutions creates important background knowledge that can benefit fuel cell development. In this contribution, Pt electro-oxidation is studied in 0.1 M aqueous CF3SO3H as a function of the polarization potential (E(p), 1.10 ≤ E(p) ≤ 1.50 V), polarization time (t(p), 10(0) ≤ t(p) ≤ 10(4) s), and temperature (T, 278 ≤ T ≤ 333 K). The critical thicknesses (X1), which determines the applicability of oxide growth theories, is determined and related to the oxide thickness (d(ox)). Because X1 > d(ox) for the entire range of E(p), t(p), and T values, the formation of Pt surface oxide follows the interfacial place-exchange or the metal cation escape mechanism. The mechanism of Pt electro-oxidation is revised and expanded by taking into account possible interactions of cations, anions, and water molecules with Pt. A modified kinetic equation for the interfacial place exchange is proposed. The application of the interfacial place-exchange and metal cation escape mechanisms leads to an estimation of the Pt(δ+)-O(δ-) surface dipole (μ(PtO)), and the potential drop (V(ox)) and electric field (E(ox)) within the oxide. The Pt-anion interactions affect the oxidation kinetics by indirectly influencing the electric field within the double layer and the surface oxide. PMID:25362330

  7. Surface oxide growth on platinum electrode in aqueous trifluoromethanesulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Yoshihisa; Mashio, Tetsuya; Ohma, Atsushi; Dale, Nilesh; Oshihara, Kenzo; Jerkiewicz, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Platinum in the form of nanoparticles is the key and most expensive component of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, while trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (CF3SO3H) is the smallest fluorinated sulfonic acid. Nafion, which acts as both electrolyte and separator in fuel cells, contains -CF2SO3H groups. Consequently, research on the electrochemical behaviour of Pt in aqueous CF3SO3H solutions creates important background knowledge that can benefit fuel cell development. In this contribution, Pt electro-oxidation is studied in 0.1 M aqueous CF3SO3H as a function of the polarization potential (Ep, 1.10 ≤ Ep ≤ 1.50 V), polarization time (tp, 100 ≤ tp ≤ 104 s), and temperature (T, 278 ≤ T ≤ 333 K). The critical thicknesses (X1), which determines the applicability of oxide growth theories, is determined and related to the oxide thickness (dox). Because X1 > dox for the entire range of Ep, tp, and T values, the formation of Pt surface oxide follows the interfacial place-exchange or the metal cation escape mechanism. The mechanism of Pt electro-oxidation is revised and expanded by taking into account possible interactions of cations, anions, and water molecules with Pt. A modified kinetic equation for the interfacial place exchange is proposed. The application of the interfacial place-exchange and metal cation escape mechanisms leads to an estimation of the Ptδ+-Oδ- surface dipole (μPtO), and the potential drop (Vox) and electric field (Eox) within the oxide. The Pt-anion interactions affect the oxidation kinetics by indirectly influencing the electric field within the double layer and the surface oxide.

  8. Dissecting the beta-aminobutyric acid-induced priming phenomenon in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ton, Jurriaan; Jakab, Gabor; Toquin, Valérie; Flors, Victor; Iavicoli, Annalisa; Maeder, Muriel N; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte

    2005-03-01

    Plants treated with the nonprotein amino acid beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) develop an enhanced capacity to resist biotic and abiotic stresses. This BABA-induced resistance (BABA-IR) is associated with an augmented capacity to express basal defense responses, a phenomenon known as priming. Based on the observation that high amounts of BABA induce sterility in Arabidopsis thaliana, a mutagenesis screen was performed to select mutants impaired in BABA-induced sterility (ibs). Here, we report the isolation and subsequent characterization of three T-DNA-tagged ibs mutants. Mutant ibs1 is affected in a cyclin-dependent kinase-like protein, and ibs2 is defective in AtSAC1b encoding a polyphosphoinositide phosphatase. Mutant ibs3 is affected in the regulation of the ABA1 gene encoding the abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthetic enzyme zeaxanthin epoxidase. To elucidate the function of the three IBS genes in plant resistance, the mutants were tested for BABA-IR against the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato, the oomycete Hyaloperonospora parasitica, and BABA-induced tolerance to salt. All three ibs mutants were compromised in BABA-IR against H. parasitica, although to a different extent. Whereas ibs1 was reduced in priming for salicylate (SA)-dependent trailing necrosis, mutants ibs2 and ibs3 were affected in the priming for callose deposition. Only ibs1 failed to express BABA-IR against P. syringae, which coincided with a defect in priming for SA-inducible PR-1 gene expression. By contrast, ibs2 and ibs3 showed reduced BABA-induced tolerance to salt, which correlated with an affected priming for ABA-inducible gene expression. For all three ibs alleles, the defects in BABA-induced sterility and BABA-induced protection against P. syringae, H. parasitica, and salt could be confirmed in independent mutants. The data presented here introduce three novel regulatory genes involved in priming for different defense responses. PMID:15722464

  9. Lycopene and beta-carotene protect in vivo iron-induced oxidative stress damage in rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Matos, H R; Marques, S A; Gomes, O F; Silva, A A; Heimann, J C; Di Mascio, P; Medeiros, M H G

    2006-02-01

    It has been suggested that iron overload may be carcinogenic. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of plasma and prostate carotenoid concentration on oxidative DNA damage in 12-week-old Wistar rats treated with intraperitoneal (ip) ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) (10 mg Fe/kg). Plasma beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations were measured as a function of time after ip injection of carotenoids (10 mg kg(-1) day(-1) beta-carotene or lycopene) in rats. The highest total plasma concentration was reached 3 and 6 h after ip injection of lycopene or beta-carotene, respectively. After 5 days of carotenoid treatment, lycopene and beta-carotene were present in the 0.10-0.51 nmol/g wet tissue range in the prostate. Using a sensitive method to detected 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) by HPLC/EC, the level of 8-oxodGuo in rat prostate DNA was significantly higher (6.3 +/- 0.6 residues/10(6) dGuo) 3 h after Fe-NTA injection compared with control rats (1.7 +/- 0.3 residues/10(6) dGuo). Rats supplemented with lycopene or beta-carotene for 5 days prior to Fe-NTA treatment showed a reduction of about 70% in 8-oxodGuo levels to almost control levels. Compared with control rats, the prostate of Fe-NTA-treated animals showed a 78% increase in malondialdehyde accumulation. Lycopene or beta-carotene pre-treatment almost completely prevented lipid damage. Epidemiological studies have suggested a lower risk of prostate cancer in men reporting a higher consumption of tomato products. However, before associating this effect with tomato sauce constituents, more information is required. The results described here may contribute to the understanding of the protective effects of carotenoids against iron-induced oxidative stress. PMID:16470307

  10. Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation Restrains Systemic Catabolism during Starvation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Scafidi, Susanna; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2016-06-28

    The liver is critical for maintaining systemic energy balance during starvation. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation on this process, we generated mice with a liver-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (Cpt2(L-/-)), an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. Fasting induced hepatic steatosis and serum dyslipidemia with an absence of circulating ketones, while blood glucose remained normal. Systemic energy homeostasis was largely maintained in fasting Cpt2(L-/-) mice by adaptations in hepatic and systemic oxidative gene expression mediated in part by Pparα target genes including procatabolic hepatokines Fgf21, Gdf15, and Igfbp1. Feeding a ketogenic diet to Cpt2(L-/-) mice resulted in severe hepatomegaly, liver damage, and death with a complete absence of adipose triglyceride stores. These data show that hepatic fatty acid oxidation is not required for survival during acute food deprivation but essential for constraining adipocyte lipolysis and regulating systemic catabolism when glucose is limiting. PMID:27320917

  11. Transforming Growth Factor-Beta and Oxidative Stress Interplay: Implications in Tumorigenesis and Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Krstić, Jelena; Trivanović, Drenka; Mojsilović, Slavko; Santibanez, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and oxidative stress/Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) both have pivotal roles in health and disease. In this review we are analyzing the interplay between TGF-β and ROS in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. They have contradictory roles in cancer progression since both can have antitumor effects, through the induction of cell death, senescence and cell cycle arrest, and protumor effects by contributing to cancer cell spreading, proliferation, survival, and metastasis. TGF-β can control ROS production directly or by downregulating antioxidative systems. Meanwhile, ROS can influence TGF-β signaling and increase its expression as well as its activation from the latent complex. This way, both are building a strong interplay which can be taken as an advantage by cancer cells in order to increment their malignancy. In addition, both TGF-β and ROS are able to induce cell senescence, which in one way protects damaged cells from neoplastic transformation but also may collaborate in cancer progression. The mutual collaboration of TGF-β and ROS in tumorigenesis is highly complex, and, due to their differential roles in tumor progression, careful consideration should be taken when thinking of combinatorial targeting in cancer therapies. PMID:26078812

  12. Removal of beta-blockers from aqueous media by adsorption onto graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Kyzas, George Z; Koltsakidou, Anastasia; Nanaki, Stavroula G; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N; Lambropoulou, Dimitra A

    2015-12-15

    The aim of the present study is the evaluation of graphene oxide (GhO) as adsorbent material for the removal of beta-blockers (pharmaceutical compounds) in aqueous solutions. The composition and morphology of prepared materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Atenolol (ATL) and propranolol (PRO) were used as model drug molecules and their behavior were investigated in terms of GhO dosage, contact time, temperature and pH. Adsorption mechanisms were proposed and the pH-effect curves after adsorption were discussed. The kinetic behavior of GhO-drugs system was analyzed after fitting to pseudo-first and -second order equations. The adsorption equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich model calculating the maximum adsorption capacity (67 and 116 mg/g for PRO and ATL (25 °C), respectively). The temperature effect on adsorption was tested carrying out the equilibrium adsorption experiments at three different temperatures (25, 45, 65 °C). Then, the thermodynamic parameters of enthalpy, free energy and entropy were calculated. Finally, the desorption of drugs from GhO was evaluated by using both aqueous eluants (pH2-10) and organic solvents. PMID:26282775

  13. Nanoscale-alumina induces oxidative stress and accelerates amyloid beta (Aβ) production in ICR female mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Shahid Ali; Yoon, Gwang Ho; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ullah, Faheem; Amin, Faiz Ul; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-09-01

    The adverse effects of nanoscale-alumina (Al2O3-NPs) have been previously demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies, whereas little is known about their mechanism of neurotoxicity. It is the goal of this research to determine the toxic effects of nano-alumina on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and mouse hippocampal HT22 cells in vitro and on ICR female mice in vivo. Nano-alumina displayed toxic effects on SH-SY5Y cell lines in three different concentrations also increased aluminium abundance and induced oxidative stress in HT22 cells. Nano-alumina peripherally administered to ICR female mice for three weeks increased brain aluminium and ROS production, disturbing brain energy homeostasis, and led to the impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory. Most importantly, these nano-particles induced Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology by enhancing the amyloidogenic pathway of Amyloid Beta (Aβ) production, aggregation and implied the progression of neurodegeneration in the cortex and hippocampus of these mice. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that nano-alumina is toxic to both cells and female mice and that prolonged exposure may heighten the chances of developing a neurodegenerative disease, such as AD.

  14. Effect of PEGylated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) under magnetic field on amyloid beta fibrillation process.

    PubMed

    Mirsadeghi, Somayeh; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-02-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with specific surface coatings have been shown appropriate potential in the diagnosis and treatment of various brain diseases such as Alzheimer's. Comprehensive understanding of SPIONs interactions with amyloid beta (Aβ) and other amyloidogenic proteins is essential for their clinical application. SPIONs could be delivered to the target tissue under the magnetic field, while they might be influenced by the applied field. In this work, we exhibit the effect of different SPIONs (magnetized or non-magnetized with different surface charges) on the kinetics of Aβ fibrillation in aqueous solution by the aid of ThT assay. The results showed that applying of magnetic field to the SPIONs influences on the Aβ fibrillation because of its effect on the size due to surface charge. It was found that under magnetic field and high concentrations of nanoparticles (SPIONs-PEG-NH2), the Aβ fibrillation process accelerates, while at lower concentrations the fibrillation is inhibited. Furthermore, the coating charge has a considerable role in fibrillation process and the positively charged SPIONs/magnetized, at lower particle concentrations, accelerate the fibrillation compared with the negatively charged or uncharged SPIONs. This hints that SPIONs with a positive charge have dual effects on the Aβ fibrillation process. They influence on the concentration of monomeric protein in solution and thereby the nucleation time. Also, SPIONs have an effect on binding during the protein conformation. PMID:26652388

  15. Detection and characterization of oxidizing acids in the Atacama Desert using the Mars Oxidation Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, R. C.; Zent, A. P.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Taylor, C. L.; Garry, J. R. C.

    2005-11-01

    We have performed field experiments to further develop and validate the Mars Oxidation Instrument (MOI) as well as measurement strategies for the in situ characterization of oxidation mechanisms, kinetics, and carbon cycling on Mars. Using the Atacama Desert as a test site for the current dry conditions on Mars, we characterized the chemical reactivity of surface and near-surface atmosphere in the dry core of the Atacama. MOI is a chemiresistor-based sensor array that measures the reaction rates of chemical films that are sensitive to particular types of oxidants or that mimic chemical characteristics of pre-biotic and biotic materials. With these sensors, the chemical reactivity of a planetary environment is characterized by monitoring the resistance of the film as a function of time. Our instrumental approach correlates reaction rates with dust abundance, UV flux, humidity, and temperature, allowing discrimination between competing hypotheses of oxidant formation and organic decomposition. The sensor responses in the Atacama are consistent with an oxidative attack by strong acids triggered by dust accumulation, followed by transient wetting due to an increase in relative humidity during the night. We conclude that in the Atacama Desert, and perhaps on Mars, low pH resulting from acid accumulation, combined with limited water availability and high oxidation potential, can result in oxidizing acid reactions on dust and soil surfaces during low-moisture transient wetting events (i.e. thin films of water). These soil acids are expected to play a significant role in the oxidizing nature of the soils, the formation of mineral surface coatings, and the chemical modification of organics in the surface material.

  16. Oxidation of hypotaurine and cysteine sulphinic acid by peroxynitrite

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Peroxynitrite mediates the oxidation of the sulphinic group of both HTAU (hypotaurine) and CSA (cysteine sulphinic acid), producing the respective sulphonates, TAU (taurine) and CA (cysteic acid). The reaction is associated with extensive oxygen uptake, suggesting that HTAU and CSA are oxidized by the one-electron transfer mechanism to sulphonyl radicals, which may initiate an oxygen-dependent radical chain reaction with the sulphonates as final products. Besides the one-electron mechanism, HTAU and CSA can be oxidized by the two-electron pathway, leading directly to sulphonate formation without oxygen consumption. The apparent second-order rate constants for the direct reaction of peroxynitrite with HTAU and CSA at pH 7.4 and 25 °C are 77.4±5 and 76.4±9 M−1·s−1 respectively. For both sulphinates, the apparent second-order rate constants increase sharply with decrease in pH, and the sigmoidal curves obtained are consistent with peroxynitrous acid as the species responsible for sulphinate oxidation. The kinetic data, together with changes in oxygen uptake, sulphinate depletion, sulphonate production, and product distribution of nitrite and nitrate, suggest that oxidation of sulphinates by peroxynitrite may take place by the two reaction pathways whose relative importance depends on reagent concentrations and pH value. In the presence of bicarbonate, the direct reaction of sulphinates with peroxynitrite is inhibited and the oxidative reaction probably involves only the radicals •NO2 and CO3•−, generated by decomposition of the peroxynitrite-CO2 adduct. PMID:15740460

  17. Surface acidity of silica-titania mixed oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Odenbrand, C.U.I.; Brandin, J.G.M. ); Busca, G. )

    1992-06-01

    A study of the acidity of coprecipitated SiO[sub 2]-TiO[sub 2] oxides is presented. The amount of acidity has been determined by ammonia adsorption at 150 C. The acidity was also characterized by TPD of adsorbed ammonia and by infrared spectroscopy of various adsorbed probes, such as pivalonitrile, pyridine, ammonia, and n-butylamine. From the quantitative measurements of adsorption of ammonia and from TPD it was concluded that the SiO[sub 2]-TiO[sub 2] mixture can be regarded as a mechanical mixture of silica and titania. However, the IR investigation showed that Ti enters in small amounts into the silica framework. This results in formation of very strong Lewis acid sites, caused by incomplete tetrahedral coordination of Ti[sup 4[minus

  18. AMPK activation promotes lipid droplet dispersion on detyrosinated microtubules to increase mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Herms, Albert; Bosch, Marta; Reddy, Babu J.N.; Schieber, Nicole L.; Fajardo, Alba; Rupérez, Celia; Fernández-Vidal, Andrea; Ferguson, Charles; Rentero, Carles; Tebar, Francesc; Enrich, Carlos; Parton, Robert G.; Gross, Steven P.; Pol, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are intracellular organelles that provide fatty acids (FAs) to cellular processes including synthesis of membranes and production of metabolic energy. While known to move bidirectionally along microtubules (MTs), the role of LD motion and whether it facilitates interaction with other organelles are unclear. Here we show that during nutrient starvation, LDs and mitochondria relocate on detyrosinated MT from the cell centre to adopt a dispersed distribution. In the cell periphery, LD–mitochondria interactions increase and LDs efficiently supply FAs for mitochondrial beta-oxidation. This cellular adaptation requires the activation of the energy sensor AMPK, which in response to starvation simultaneously increases LD motion, reorganizes the network of detyrosinated MTs and activates mitochondria. In conclusion, we describe the existence of a specialized cellular network connecting the cellular energetic status and MT dynamics to coordinate the functioning of LDs and mitochondria during nutrient scarcity. PMID:26013497

  19. The role of nitric oxide in cardiac depression induced by interleukin-1 beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, R; Panas, D L; Catena, R; Moncada, S; Olley, P M; Lopaschuk, G D

    1995-01-01

    1. Myocardial dysfunction during septic shock is associated with enhanced production of cytokines such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). These cytokines depress cardiac mechanical function by a mechanism which is not well defined. 2. Bacterial endotoxin or cytokines cause the expression of Ca(2+)-independent nitric oxide (NO) synthase in cardiac myocytes, vascular endothelial cells and endocardial endothelial cells, causing enhanced production of NO. As NO has negative inotropic actions on cardiac muscle, we tested the sum effects of IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha in the intact heart to determine whether enhanced expression of NO synthase activity in the cells that comprise the heart is involved in cardiac depression associated with cytokine stimulation. 3. Rat isolated working hearts perfused with IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha showed a markedly greater depression in contractile function, measured as cardiac work, after 2 h of perfusion compared with time-matched control hearts. The depressant action of IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha was first apparent after 1 h of perfusion; no early (15 min) cardiac depressant actions were seen. 4. The competitive inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent NO synthases, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 3 microM) when given concurrently with IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha prevented the loss in contractile function such that these hearts after 2 h of perfusion had similar function to time-matched controls. L-NAME did not acutely reverse the loss of contractile function in hearts exposed for 2 h to IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7536096

  20. Nitroaromatic amino acids as inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Cowart, M; Kowaluk, E A; Daanen, J F; Kohlhaas, K L; Alexander, K M; Wagenaar, F L; Kerwin, J F

    1998-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO.) is an important biomodulator of many physiological processes. The inhibition of inappropriate production of NO. by the isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of stroke, inflammation, and other processes. In this study, certain 2-nitroaryl-substituted amino acid analogues were discovered to inhibit NOS. Analogues bearing a 5-methyl substituent on the aromatic ring demonstrated maximal inhibitory potency. For two selected inhibitors, investigation of the kinetics of the enzyme showed the inhibition to be competitive with l-arginine. Additionally, functional NOS inhibition in tissue preparations was demonstrated. PMID:9651169

  1. Synthesis of docosahexaenoic acid from eicosapentaenoic acid in retina neurons protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Simón, María Victoria; Agnolazza, Daniela L; German, Olga Lorena; Garelli, Andrés; Politi, Luis E; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E; Rotstein, Nora P

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in activating photoreceptor death in several retinal degenerations. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in the retina, protects cultured retina photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress and promotes photoreceptor differentiation. Here, we investigated whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a metabolic precursor to DHA, had similar effects and whether retinal neurons could metabolize EPA to DHA. Adding EPA to rat retina neuronal cultures increased opsin expression and protected photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by the oxidants paraquat and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). Palmitic, oleic, and arachidonic acids had no protective effect, showing the specificity for DHA. We found that EPA supplementation significantly increased DHA percentage in retinal neurons, but not EPA percentage. Photoreceptors and glial cells expressed Δ6 desaturase (FADS2), which introduces the last double bond in DHA biosynthetic pathway. Pre-treatment of neuronal cultures with CP-24879 hydrochloride, a Δ5/Δ6 desaturase inhibitor, prevented EPA-induced increase in DHA percentage and completely blocked EPA protection and its effect on photoreceptor differentiation. These results suggest that EPA promoted photoreceptor differentiation and rescued photoreceptors from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through its elongation and desaturation to DHA. Our data show, for the first time, that isolated retinal neurons can synthesize DHA in culture. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in retina photoreceptors, and its precursor, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have multiple beneficial effects. Here, we show that retina neurons in vitro express the desaturase FADS2 and can synthesize DHA from EPA. Moreover, addition of EPA to these cultures protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress and promotes their differentiation through its metabolization to DHA. PMID:26662863

  2. Interactions of humic acid with nanosized inorganic oxides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2009-04-01

    Adsorption of natural organic matter (NOM) on nanoparticles (NPs) is important for evaluating their transport, transfer, and fate in the environment, which will also affect sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) by NPs and thereby potentially alter the toxicity of NPs and the fate, transport, and bioavailability of HOCs in the environment. Therefore, the adsorption behavior of humic acids (HA) by four types of nano-oxides (i.e., TiO2, SiO2, Al2O3, and ZnO) was examined in this study to explore their interaction mechanisms using techniques including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and elemental, zeta potential, and surface area analyses. Adsorption of HA was observed on nanosized TiO2, Al2O3, and ZnO but not on nano-SiO2. Furthermore, HA adsorption was pH-dependent. HA adsorption by nano-oxides was mainly induced by electrostatic attraction and ligand exchange between HA and nano-oxide surfaces. Surface hydrophilicity and negative charges of nano-oxides affected their adsorption of HA. However, the maxima of HA adsorption on nano-oxides were limited by the surface area of nano-oxides. HA phenolic OH and COOH groups were responsible for its ligand exchange with nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO, respectively, while either HA COOH or HA phenolic/aliphatic OH was responsible for its ligand exchange with nano-Al2O3. HA adsorption decreased the micropore surface area of nano-oxides but not the external surface area because of the micropore blockage. HA adsorption also decreased the zeta potential of nano-oxides, indicating that HA-coated nano-oxides could be more easily dispersed and suspended and more stable in solution than uncoated ones because of their enhanced electrostatic repulsion. PMID:19708146

  3. Incomplete free fatty acid oxidation by ascites tumor cells under low oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Ookhtens, M; Baker, N

    1983-01-01

    We tried to understand why our earlier estimates of fatty acid (FA) oxidation rates under the nearly anaerobic state of the Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) in vivo were even greater than those found in vitro under aerobic conditions. Using tracers [1-14C]linoleate, [1-14C]-, and [9,10-3H]palmitate, and NaH14CO3, we estimated essential and nonessential FA oxidation rates to CO2 + H2O by EAT in living mice and in vitro under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Sequestration of intraperitoneally (ip)-injected 14C-FFA allowed a selective labeling of the tumor versus the host; thus, breath 14CO2 could be used to estimate the maximum rate of FA oxidation in vivo by the tumor. Initially, we measured breath 14CO2 following NaH14CO3 injections and developed a multicompartmental model to simulate the tumor-host HCO-3-CO2 system. This model was integrated with our earlier model for tumor FA turnover. The integrated model was fitted to breath 14CO2 data from mice injected ip with 14C-FFA to compute tumor FA oxidation rates. Both essential and nonessential FA were oxidized to CO2 at similar rates. The maximum rate of total FA oxidation to CO2 was 5-6 nmol FA X min-1 X 7-ml tumor-1, about 5-10 times lower than all previous estimates obtained in vitro and in vivo. To resolve this dilemma we used doubly labeled [1-14C; 9,10-3H]palmitate and found that under aerobic conditions, in vitro, EAT formed 3H2O and 14CO2 at nearly equal rates. These rates were suppressed markedly but unequally at low PO2. Anaerobic suppression of 14CO2 formation greatly exceeded that of 3H2O formation. As a result 3H2O/14CO2 reached a value of congruent to 10 at low PO2. Our data indicate that under the nearly anaerobic conditions of a growing EAT in vivo, the partial beta-oxidation of FA to 2C + H2O takes place at a 5 to 10 times faster rate than the complete oxidation of FA to CO2 + H2O. This finding can account for earlier apparent inconsistencies in the literature, since aerobic studies of 14C-FA oxidation

  4. Enhanced formic acid oxidation on Cu-Pd nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lin; Zou, Shouzhong

    Developing catalysts with high activity and high resistance to surface poisoning remains a challenge in direct formic acid fuel cell research. In this work, copper-palladium nanoparticles were formed through a galvanic replacement process. After electrochemically selective dissolution of surface Cu, Pd-enriched Cu-Pd nanoparticles were formed. These particles exhibit much higher formic acid oxidation activities than that on pure Pd nanoparticles, and they are much more resistant to the surface poisoning. Possible mechanisms of catalytic activity enhancement are briefly discussed.

  5. Roles of urea production, ammonium excretion, and amino acid oxidation in acid-base balance.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, W

    1986-02-01

    Atkinson and colleagues recently proposed several concepts that contrast with traditional views: first, that acid-base balance is regulated chiefly by the reactions leading to urea production in the liver; second, that ammonium excretion by the kidney plays no role in acid-base homeostasis; and third, that ammonium does not stimulate ureagenesis (except indirectly). To examine these concepts, plasma ions other than bicarbonate are categorized as 1) fixed cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, symbolized M+) and anions (Cl-), 2) buffer anions (A-), 3) other anions (X-), and 4) ammonium plus charged amino groups (N+). Since electroneutrality dictates that M+ + N+ = Cl- + HCO3- + A- + X-, it follows that delta HCO3- = delta(M+ - Cl-) - delta A- - delta X- + delta N+. Therefore acid-base disturbances (changes in HCO3-) can be categorized as to how they affect bodily content and hence plasma concentration of each of these four types of ions. The stoichiometry of ureagenesis, glutamine hydrolysis, ammonium and titratable acid excretion, oxidation of neutral, acidic, and basic amino acids, and oxidation of methionine, phosphoserine, and protein are examined to see how they alter these quantities. It is concluded that 1) although ureagenesis is pH dependent and also counteracts a tendency of amino acid oxidation to cause alkalosis, this tendency is inherently limited by the hyperammonemia (delta N+) that necessarily accompanies it, 2) ammonium excretion is equivalent to hydrogen excretion in its effects on acid-base balance if, and only if, it occurs in exchange for sodium or is accompanied by chloride excretion and only when the glutamate generated by glutamine hydrolysis is oxidized.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3511732

  6. Oxidative and reductive metabolism of 9-cis-retinoic acid in the rat. Identification of 13,14-dihydro-9-cis-retinoic acid and its taurine conjugate.

    PubMed

    Shirley, M A; Bennani, Y L; Boehm, M F; Breau, A P; Pathirana, C; Ulm, E H

    1996-03-01

    9-cis-Retinoic acid (9-cis-RA), a hormone that binds and activates all known retinoid receptor subtypes, is structurally similar to all-trans-retinoic acid and may share common metabolic fates. Both oral and intravenous doses of 9-cis-RA to rats led to hydroxylation and ketone formation at carbon-4. 9-Cis-RA also isomerized in vivo to 13-cis-retinoic acid, 9-cis, 13-cis-retinoic acid, and all-trans-retinoic acid. After administration of [11-3H]9-cis-RA, the proportion of plasma radioactivity that was volatile increased over time, which suggested that beta-oxidative chain-shortening of 9-cis-RA might occur. An equimolar mixture of [1-13C2H3]9-cis-RA and 9-cis-RA was administered to rats for stable-isotope-labeled metabolite production. A chromatographic peak that had a lambdamax = 290 nm vs. 348 nm for the parent compound, had a retention time similar to the parent, and yielded a 1:1 positive-ion isotope cluster at m/z 303/307 in its mass spectrum. NMR analysis revealed 9-cis and 13,14-dihydro configurations, indicating that 9-cis-RA can be metabolized in rat by reduction to 13,14-dihydro-9-cis-RA. An earlier-eluting HPLC peak that exhibited a lambdamax at 290 nm, and a negative-ion-MS isotope cluster at m/z 408/412 was observed during separations of rat liver extracts. LC/MS/MS analysis revealed product ions for this peak diagnostic for carboxylic acid taurine conjugates. In rats, reduction of 9-cis-RA to 13,14-dihydro-9-cis-RA may represent an initial step leading to beta-oxidation, although available data demonstrate it is conjugated with taurine to form a novel metabolite. PMID:8820419

  7. Clavulanic acid: a competitive inhibitor of beta-lactamases with novel anxiolytic-like activity and minimal side effects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deog J; King, Jean A; Zuccarelli, Lisa; Ferris, Craig F; Koppel, Gary A; Snowdon, Charles T; Ahn, Chang H

    2009-08-01

    Clavulanic acid is a member of the beta lactam family of antibiotics with little or no intrinsic antibacterial activity of its own; instead, it is used to enhance the activity of antibiotics by blocking bacterial beta-lactamases. Because clavulanic acid by itself is very safe, orally active and shows good brain penetrance, we sought to determine if it had any potential as a psychotherapeutic. Clavulanic acid was a tested across three mammalian species, hamsters, rats and cotton-top tamarin monkeys in a series of behavioral assays designed to screen for anxiolytic activity. In addition, several studies were done in rodents to compare the behavioral profile of clavulanic acid to the commonly prescribed benzodiazepines, particularly with respect to their unwanted side effects of motor depression, amnesia and neuroendocrine dysregulation. Our findings show that clavulanic acid is a highly potent anxiolytic in rodents without altering motor activity in the open field test, normal learning and memory in the Morris water maze, or normal stress hormone release. Orally administered clavulanic acid significantly reduces measures of anxiety in male/female pairs of cotton-top tamarins. In addition, male tamarins showed a highly significant increase in sexual arousal as measured by the number of penile erections. The fact clavulanic acid has anxiolytic activity in the tamarin holds the promise that this drug may be an effective therapeutic for the treatment of anxiety disorders in humans. PMID:19394358

  8. Purifications of calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders for neutrinoless double beta decay experiment, AMoRE

    SciTech Connect

    Park, HyangKyu

    2015-08-17

    The AMoRE (Advanced Mo based Rare process Experiment) collaboration is going to use calcium molybdate crystals to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 100}Mo isotope. In order to make the crystal, we use calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders as raw materials. Therefore it is highly necessary to reduce potential sources for radioactive backgrounds such as U and Th in the powders. In this talk, we will present our studies for purification of calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders.

  9. Biological reactivity and biomarkers of the neutrophil oxidant, hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, Christine C

    2002-12-27

    Free radicals or reactive oxygen species are thought to contribute to the pathology of many diseases. These include inflammatory conditions, where neutrophils accumulate in large numbers and are stimulated to produce superoxide and other reactive oxidants. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), produced by myeloperoxidase-catalysed oxidation of chloride by hydrogen peroxide, is the major strong oxidant generated by these cells. Neutrophil-mediated injury may also be important in toxicology when an initial insult is followed by an inflammatory response. It is important to characterize the inflammatory component of such injury and the extent to which it involves reactive oxidants. On the one hand, this requires an understanding of how neutrophil oxidants react with cells and tissue constituents. On the other, specific biomarkers are needed so that oxidative damage can be quantified in clinical material and related to disease severity. This presentation considers biologically relevant reactions of HOCl and the biomarker assays that can be applied to probing the pathological role of myeloperoxidase and its products. PMID:12505315

  10. Oxide for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, L. T.; Lim, O. V.; Haigh, N. P.; Rand, D. A. J.; Manders, J. E.; Rice, D. M.

    In order to meet the increasing demand for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries, a new soft lead has been produced by Pasminco Metals. In this material, bismuth is increased to a level that produces a significant improvement in battery cycle life. By contrast, other common impurities, such as arsenic, cobalt, chromium, nickel, antimony and tellurium, that are known to be harmful to VRLA batteries are controlled to very low levels. A bismuth (Bi)-bearing oxide has been manufactured (Barton-pot method) from this soft lead and is characterized in terms of phase composition, particle size distribution, BET surface area, and reactivity. An investigation is also made of the rates of oxygen and hydrogen evolution on pasted electrodes prepared from the Bi-bearing oxide. For comparison, the characteristics and performance of a Bi-free (Barton-pot) oxide, which is manufactured in the USA, are also examined. Increasing the level of bismuth and lowering those of the other impurities in soft lead produces no unusual changes in either the physical or the chemical properties of the resulting Bi-bearing oxide compared with Bi-free oxide. This is very important because there is no need for battery manufacturers to change their paste formulae and paste-mixing procedures on switching to the new Bi-bearing oxide. There is little difference in the rates of oxygen and hydrogen evolution on pasted electrodes prepared from Bi-bearing or Bi-free oxides. On the other hand, these rates increase on the former electrodes when the levels of all the other impurities are made to exceed (by deliberately adding the impurities as oxide powders) the corresponding, specified values for the Bi-bearing oxide. The latter behaviour is particularly noticeable for hydrogen evolution, which is enhanced even further when a negative electrode prepared from Bi-bearing oxide is contaminated through the deposition of impurities added to the sulfuric acid solution. The effects of impurities in the positive

  11. Design and synthesis of inhibitors incorporating beta -amino acids of metalloendopeptidase EC 3.4.24.15.

    PubMed

    Steer, D L; Lew, R A; Perlmutter, P; Smith, A I; Aguilar, M I

    2000-09-01

    Endopeptidase EC 3.4.24.15 (EP 24.15) is a thermolysin-like metalloendopeptidase which is expressed widely throughout the body, with the highest concentrations in the brain, pituitary and testis. While the precise role of EP 24.15 remains unknown, it is thought to participate in the regulated metabolism of a number of specific neuropeptides. Of the limited number of inhibitors described for EP 24.15, N-[1-(R,S)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-Ala-Ala-Tyr-p-amino benzoate (CFP) is the most widely studied. CFP is a potent and specific inhibitor, but is unstable in vivo due to its cleavage between the alanine and tyrosine residues by the enzyme neprilysin (EP 24.11). The cpp-Ala-Ala N-terminal product of this cleavage is a potent inhibitor of angiotensin converting enzyme, which further limits the use of CFP in vivo. To generate specific inhibitors of EP 24.15 that are resistant to in vivo proteolysis by EP 24.11, beta-amino acids have been incorporated into the structure of CFP. We have prepared racemic mixtures of beta-amino acids containing proteogenic side chains, which are 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc)-protected, and several analogues of CFP containing beta-amino acids have been synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis. The results of stability and inhibitory studies of these new analogues show that the incorporation of beta-amino acids adjacent to the scissile bond can indeed stabilize the peptides against cleavage by EP 24.11 and still inhibit EP 24.15. The results obtained in these studies demonstrate the potential of these amino acids in the synthesis of peptidomimetics and in the design of new stable and specific therapeutics. PMID:11016884

  12. [Separate evaluation of beta-methyl fatty acid uptake and perfusion in rat myocardium].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, M; Bunkou, H; Nakajima, K; Taki, J; Muramori, A; Matsunari, I; Nambu, I; Shiirei, Y; Tonami, N; Hisada, K

    1989-12-01

    The kinetics and distribution of I-125 beta-methyl iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) in rat's heart were studied for separate evaluation of perfusion and metabolism. Tl-201 and BMIPP were simultaneously injected. The experimental groups consisted of control (C), glucose (G) and sodium lactate loaded group (L). In C, myocardial uptake at 5 minutes after BMIPP injection was 3.60% ID/g and remained constant up to 60 minutes. The myocardium/lung ratio (2.44) and the myocardium/muscle ratio (4.55) of BMIPP were almost equal to those of Tl-201. But myocardium/liver ratio was low (1.31). In G, myocardial uptake of BMIPP (1.94 +/- 0.36% ID/g) and g-BMIPP/Tl (0.31 +/- 0.03) at 15 minutes after injection were significantly decreased (p less than 0.001) than those of C (3.16 +/- 0.18% ID/g and 0.48 +/- 0.05). In L. myocardial perfusion was decreased and g-BMIPP/Tl (0.73 +/- 0.14) was significantly higher (p less than 0.01) than those of C. Coefficient of variance of the density within a myocardium, and the ratio of inner to outer layer of myocardium (I/O ratio) were calculated from autoradiogram by videodensitometry. The myocardial distribution of BMIPP was more inhomogeneous, and the I/O ratio was lower than that of Tl-201, although these were not specific for metabolic interventions. In conclusion BMIPP is suitable for SPECT imaging and dual nuclide imaging by BMIPP and Tl-201 will provide informations about myocardial fatty acid metabolism and perfusion. PMID:2622083

  13. Composite nanoparticles based on hyaluronic acid chemically cross-linked with alpha,beta-polyaspartylhydrazide.

    PubMed

    Pitarresi, G; Craparo, E F; Palumbo, F S; Carlisi, B; Giammona, G

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, new composite nanoparticles based on hyaluronic acid (HA) chemically cross-linked with alpha,beta-polyaspartylhydrazide (PAHy) were prepared by the use of a reversed-phase microemulsion technique. HA-PAHy nanoparticles were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, confirming the occurrence of the chemical cross-linking, dimensional analysis, and transmission electron micrography, showing a sub-micrometer size and spherical shape. Zeta potential measurements demonstrated the presence of HA on the nanoparticle surface. A remarkable affinity of the obtained nanoparticles toward aqueous media that simulate some biological fluids was found. Stability studies showed the absence of chemical degradation in various media, while in the presence of hyaluronidase, a partial degradation occurred. Cell compatibility was evaluated by performing in vitro assays on human chronic myelogenous leukaemia cells (K-562) chosen as a model cell line and a haemolytic test. HA-PAHy nanoparticles were also able to entrap 5-fluorouracil, chosen as a model drug, and release it in a simulated physiological fluid and in human plasma with a mechanism essentially controlled by a Fickian diffusion. PMID:17521164

  14. Formation of phenol under conditions of the reaction of oxidative carbonylation of benzene to benzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinovsky, I.O.; Leshcheva, A.N.; Pogorelov, V.V.; Gelbshtein, A.I.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes conditions for the oxidation of benzene to phenol. It is shown that a reaction mixture of water, carbon monoxide, and oxygen are essential to the oxidation. The oxidation is a side reaction found to occur during the oxidative carbonylation of benzene to benzoic acid in a medium of trifluoroacetic acid.

  15. A mechanistic study explaining the synergistic viscosity increase obtained from polyethylene oxide (PEO) and {beta}-naphthalene sulfonate (BNS) in shotcrete

    SciTech Connect

    Pickelmann, J.; Plank, J.

    2012-11-15

    In shotcrete, a combination of polyethylene oxide (PEO) and {beta}-naphthalene sulfonate (BNS) is commonly applied to reduce rebound. Here, the mechanism for the synergistic viscosity increase resulting from this admixture combination was investigated via x-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. It was found that the electron-rich aromatic rings present in BNS donate electrons to the alkyl protons of PEO and thus increase the electron density there. This rare interaction is known as CH-{pi} interaction and leads to the formation of a supramolecular structure whereby PEO chains bind weakly to BNS molecules. Through this mechanism a polymer network exhibiting exceptionally high molecular weight and thus viscosity is formed. Among polycondensates, sulfanilic acid-phenol-formaldehyde (SPF) provides even higher synergy with PEO than BNS while melamine (PMS), acetone (AFS) or polycarboxylate (PCE) based superplasticizers do not work at all. Effectiveness of lignosulfonates is dependent on their degree of sulfonation.

  16. Different roles of protein kinase C-beta and -delta in arachidonic acid cascade, superoxide formation and phosphoinositide hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Duyster, J; Schwende, H; Fitzke, E; Hidaka, H; Dieter, P

    1993-01-01

    In contrast with protein kinase C (PKC)-beta, PKC-delta is exclusively detectable in the membrane fraction of liver macrophages. After long-term treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) PKC-beta is depleted faster (within 3 h) than PKC-delta (> 7h). Simultaneously, pretreatment with PMA for 3 h inhibits the PMA- and zymosan-induced generation of superoxide and the PMA-induced formation of prostaglandin (PG) E2, whereas a preincubation of more than 7 h is required to affect the zymosan-induced release of PGE2 and inositol phosphates. These results support an involvement of PKC-beta in the PMA-induced activation of the arachidonic acid cascade and in superoxide formation and imply an involvement of PKC-delta in zymosan-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis and PGE2 formation. Two phorbol ester derivates, sapintoxin A (SAPA) and 12-deoxyphorbol 13-phenylacetate 20-acetate (DOPPA), which have been previously reported to activate preferentially PLC-beta but not PKC-delta in vitro [Ryves, Evans, Olivier, Parker and Evans (1992) FEBS Lett. 288, 5-9], induce the formation of PGE2 and superoxide, down-regulate PKC-delta and potentiate inositol phosphate formation in parallel SAPA, but not DOPPA, down-regulates PKC-beta and inhibits the PMA-induced formation of eicosanoids and superoxide. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:8389125

  17. Sulfuric Acid Intercalated Graphite Oxide for Graphene Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yanzhong; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo

    2013-12-01

    Graphene has shown enormous potential for innovation in various research fields. The current chemical approaches based on exfoliation of graphite via graphite oxide (GO) are potential for large-scale synthesis of graphene but suffer from high cost, great operation difficulties, and serious waste discharge. We report a facile preparation of graphene by rapid reduction and expansion exfoliation of sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide (SIGO) at temperature just above 100°C in ambient atmosphere, noting that SIGO is easily available as the immediate oxidation descendent of graphite in sulfuric acid. The oxygenic and hydric groups in SIGO are mainly removed through dehydration as catalyzed by the intercalated sulfuric acid (ISA). The resultant consists of mostly single layer graphene sheets with a mean diameter of 1.07 μm after dispersion in DMF. This SIGO process is reductant free, easy operation, low-energy, environmental friendly and generates graphene with low oxygen content, less defect and high conductivity. The provided synthesis route from graphite to graphene via SIGO is compact and readily scalable.

  18. Sulfuric Acid Intercalated Graphite Oxide for Graphene Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yanzhong; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has shown enormous potential for innovation in various research fields. The current chemical approaches based on exfoliation of graphite via graphite oxide (GO) are potential for large-scale synthesis of graphene but suffer from high cost, great operation difficulties, and serious waste discharge. We report a facile preparation of graphene by rapid reduction and expansion exfoliation of sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide (SIGO) at temperature just above 100°C in ambient atmosphere, noting that SIGO is easily available as the immediate oxidation descendent of graphite in sulfuric acid. The oxygenic and hydric groups in SIGO are mainly removed through dehydration as catalyzed by the intercalated sulfuric acid (ISA). The resultant consists of mostly single layer graphene sheets with a mean diameter of 1.07 μm after dispersion in DMF. This SIGO process is reductant free, easy operation, low-energy, environmental friendly and generates graphene with low oxygen content, less defect and high conductivity. The provided synthesis route from graphite to graphene via SIGO is compact and readily scalable. PMID:24310650

  19. Rat epididymal luminal fluid acid beta-D-galactosidase optimally hydrolyses glycoprotein substrate at neutral pH.

    PubMed Central

    Skudlarek, M D; Tulsiani, D R; Orgebin-Crist, M C

    1992-01-01

    Several glycosidases, purified and characterized from mammalian tissues, have been shown to be optimally active under acidic conditions when p-nitrophenyl (PNP) or 4-methylumbelliferyl glycosides are used as substrates. Although high levels of the glycosidases are present in the epididymal lumen, their physiological role remains uncertain. To be functional, the glycosidases are expected to be enzymatically active at or near the physiological pH of luminal fluid. In this report, we demonstrate that the rat epididymal luminal fluid beta-D-galactosidase, optimally active toward PNP beta-D-galactoside at pH 3.5, shows maximum activity towards a glycoprotein substrate ([Gal-3H]fetuin) at neutral pH. Several lines of evidence, including immunoprecipitation studies using antibody to the acid beta-D-galactosidase, and substrate competition studies, indicate that PNP galactosidase and [3H]Gal galactosidase activities are caused by a single enzyme, and that the two substrates are probably cleaved by the same catalytic site(s). Competition studies with various disaccharides indicate that this enzyme is capable of cleaving a variety of galactose linkages found in both O- and N-linked oligosaccharides. Molecular-sieve column chromatography of the beta-D-galactosidase of luminal fluid under several conditions of buffer and pH show that, whereas the enzyme eluted as a tetramer (apparent M(r) 320,000) under acidic conditions (pH 3.5-4.3), only dimers and monomers (apparent M(r) 180,000 and 92,000 respectively) were observed in neutral conditions (pH 6.8). This aggregation/dissociation phenomenon is reversible. These studies indicate that beta-D-galactosidase is present in the luminal fluid in dissociated forms, and is therefore optimally active towards glycoprotein substrates at physiological pH. The potential role of the enzyme in modification of sperm surface glycoproteins is discussed. PMID:1417750

  20. Comparative abilities and optimal conditions for beta-glycosidase enzymes to hydrolyse the glucuronide, glucoside, and N-acetylglucosaminide conjugates of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Momose, T; Maruyama, J; Iida, T; Goto, J; Nambara, T

    1997-08-01

    Enzymatic hydrolyses were described for three variants of glycosidic conjugated bile acids with one beta-glucuronidase (Helix pomatia), three beta-glucosidase (almonds, sweet almonds, and Escherichia coli), and four beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase (jack beans, bovine kidney, human placenta, and Diplococcus pneumoniae) preparations. The substrates include the beta-glucuronide, beta-glucoside, and beta-N-acetylglucosaminide conjugates of bile acids related to hyodeoxycholic, murideoxycholic, chenodeoxycholic, and ursodeoxycholic acids possessing a sugar moiety at position C-3, C-6 or C-7. The comparative abilities and optimal conditions for the beta-glycosidases to catalyze the hydrolyses of the substrates were clarified by changing pHs and incubation times. Hydrolysis rates of the bile acid glycosides with beta-glycosidase treatments were influenced by both the source of the enzyme preparations and the conjugated position of a sugar moiety in the substrates, and the 3-glucoside and 3-N-acetylglucosaminide conjugates were usually hydrolyzed more efficiently than their corresponding 6- and 7-analogs. Escherichia coli and jack bean enzymes were chosen to hydrolyse the glucosidic and N-acetylglucosaminidic conjugated bile acids, respectively. PMID:9300125

  1. Influence of oxidation on fulvic acids composition and biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Kozyatnyk, Ivan; Świetlik, Joanna; Raczyk-Stanisławiak, Ursula; Dąbrowska, Agata; Klymenko, Nataliya; Nawrocki, Jacek

    2013-08-01

    Oxidation is well-known process of transforming natural organic matter during the treatment of drinking water. Chlorine, ozone, and chlorine dioxide are common oxidants used in water treatment technologies for this purpose. We studied the influence of different doses of these oxidants on by-products formation and changes in biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and molecular weight distribution (MWD) of fulvic acids (FA) with different BDOC content. Chlorination did not significantly change the MWD of FA and disinfection by-products formation. However, higher molecular weight compounds, than those in the initial FA, were formed. It could be a result of chlorine substitution into the FA structure. Chlorine dioxide oxidized FA stronger than chlorine. During ozonation of FA, we found the highest increase of BDOD due to the formation of a high amount of organic acids and aldehydes. FA molecules were transformed into a more biodegradable form. Ozonation is the most preferable process among those observed for pre-treatment of FA before biofiltration. PMID:23746389

  2. The action of o-dihydric phenols in the hydroxylation of p-coumaric acid by a phenolase from leaves of spinach beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Vaughan, P F; Butt, V S

    1970-08-01

    1. Under defined conditions, the hydroxylation of p-coumaric acid catalysed by a phenolase from leaves of spinach beet (Beta vulgaris L.) was observed to develop its maximum rate only after a lag period. 2. By decreasing the reaction rate with lower enzyme concentrations or by increasing it with higher concentrations of reductants, the length of the lag period was inversely related to the maximum rate subsequently developed. 3. Low concentrations of caffeic acid or other o-dihydric phenols abolished this lag period. With caffeic acid, the rate of hydroxylation was independent of the reductant employed. 4. Hydroxylation was inhibited by diethyldithiocarbamate, but with low inhibitor concentrations hydroxylation recovered after a lag period. This lag could again be abolished by the addition of high concentrations of caffeic acid or other o-dihydric phenols. 5. Catechol oxidase activity showed no lag period, and did not recover from diethyldithiocarbamate inhibition. 6. The purified enzyme contained 0.17-0.33% copper; preparations with the highest specific activity were found to have the highest copper content. 7. The results are interpreted to suggest that the oxidation of o-dihydric phenols converts the enzymic copper into a species catalytically active in hydroxylation. This may represent the primary function for the catechol oxidase activity of the phenolase complex. The electron donors are concerned mainly, but not entirely, in the reduction of o-quinones produced in this reaction. PMID:4991965

  3. {beta}-Secondary and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects and the mechanisms of base- and acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of penicillanic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Deraniyagala, S.A.; Adediran, S.A.; Pratt, R.F.

    1995-03-24

    {beta}-Secondary and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects have been determined at 25 {degrees}C for the alkaline and acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of penicillanic acid. In order to determine the former isotope effect, [6,6-{sup 2}H{sub 2}]dideuteriopenicillanic acid has been synthesized. In alkaline solution, the former isotope effect was found to be 0.95 {plus_minus} 0.01. These values support the B{sub AC}2 mechanism of hydrolysis with rate-determining formation of the tetrahedral intermediate that has been proposed for other {beta}-lactams. The measured {beta}-secondary kinetic isotope for the acid-catalyzed reaction was 1.00 {plus_minus} 0.01. The data indicates that a likely pathway of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis would be that of an A{sub AC}1 mechanism with an intermediate acylium ion. If this were so, the calculated {beta}-secondary isotope effect per hydrogen coplanar with the breaking C-N bond and corrected for the inductive effect of deuterium would be 1.06 {plus_minus} 0.01. This suggests an early A{sub AC}1 transition state, which would be reasonable in this case because of destabilization of the N-protonated amide with respect to the acylium ion because of ring strain. The absence of specific participation by solvent in the transition state, as would be expected of an A{sub AC}1 but not an associative mechanism, is supported by the strongly inverse solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effect of 0.25 {plus_minus} 0.00 in 1 M HCl and 0.22 {plus_minus} 0.01 in 33.3 wt % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Oligosaccharide structure and amino acid sequence of the major glycopeptides of mature human. beta. -hexosaminidase

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dowd, B.F.; Cumming, D.A.; Gravel, R.A.; Mahuran, D.

    1988-07-12

    Human ..beta..-hexosaminidase is a lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyzes terminal N-acetylhexosamines from GM/sub 2/ ganglioside, oligosaccharides, and other carbohydrate-containing macromolecules. There are two major forms of hexosaminidase: hexosaminidase A, with the structure ..cap alpha..(..beta../sub a/..beta../sub b/), and hexosaminidase B, 2(..beta../sub a/..beta../sub b/). Like other lysosomal proteins, hexosaminidase is targeted to its destination via glycosylation and processing in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Phosphorylation of specific mannose residues allows binding of the protein to the phosphomannosyl receptor and transfer to the lysosome. In order to define the structure and placement of the oligosaccharides in mature hexosaminidase and thus identify candidate mannose 6-phosphate recipient sites, the major tryptic/chymotryptic glycopeptides from each isozyme were purified by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Two major concanavalin A binding glycopeptides, localized to the ..beta../sub b/f chain, and one non concanavalin A binding glycopeptide, localized to the ..beta../sub a/ chain, were found associated with the ..beta..-subunit in both hexosaminidase A and hexosaminidase B. The oligosaccharide structures were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. The unique glycopeptide associated with the ..beta../sub a/ chain contained a single GlcNAc residue. Thus all three mature polypeptides comprising the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of hexosaminidase contain carbohydrate, the structures of which have the appearance of being partially degraded in the lysosome. In the ..cap alpha.. chain they found only one possible site for in vivo phosphorylation. In the ..beta.. it is unclear if only one or all three of the sites could have contained phosphate. However, mature placental hexosaminidase A and B can be rephosphorylated in vitro. This requires the presence of an oligosaccharide containing an ..cap

  5. Inactivation of lambda phage infectivity and lambda deoxyribonucleic acid transfection by N-methyl-isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone-copper complexes.

    PubMed

    Levinson, W; Helling, R

    1976-01-01

    The infectivity of intact lambda phage and transfection by lambda deoxyribonucleic acid were inactivated by exposure to the copper complexes of N-methyl-isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone, thiosemicarbazide, and semicarbazide, but not methyl-isatin. No inactivation was observed when these compounds were used in the absence of copper sulfate. This confirms our previous observation that the activity of N-methyl-isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone is mediated by its thiosemicarbazone moiety and that the presence of copper is required for action. This represents the first time, to our knowledge, that semicarbazide has been found to possess antiviral activity. It is clear that these compounds act directly on deoxyribonucleic acid; whether the compounds also act on proteins has not been determined. PMID:769669

  6. The world of beta- and gamma-peptides comprised of homologated proteinogenic amino acids and other components.

    PubMed

    Seebach, Dieter; Beck, Albert K; Bierbaum, Daniel J

    2004-08-01

    The origins of our nearly ten-year research program of chemical and biological investigations into peptides based on homologated proteinogenic amino acids are described. The road from the biopolymer poly[ethyl (R)-3-hydroxybutanoate] to the beta-peptides was primarily a step from organic synthesis methodology (the preparation of enantiomerically pure compounds (EPCs)) to supramolecular chemistry (higher-order structures maintained through non-covalent interactions). The performing of biochemical and biological tests on the beta- and gamma-peptides, which differ from natural peptides/proteins by a single or two additional CH(2) groups per amino acid, then led into bioorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry. The individual chapters of this review article begin with descriptions of work on beta-amino acids, beta-peptides, and polymers (Nylon-3) that dates back to the 1960s, even to the times of Emil Fischer, but did not yield insights into structures or biological properties. The numerous, often highly physiologically active, or even toxic, natural products containing beta- and gamma-amino acid moieties are then presented. Chapters on the preparation of homologated amino acids with proteinogenic side chains, their coupling to provide the corresponding peptides, both in solution (including thioligation) and on the solid phase, their isolation by preparative HPLC, and their characterization by mass spectrometry (HR-MS and MS sequencing) follow. After that, their structures, predominantly determined by NMR spectroscopy in methanolic solution, are described: helices, pleated sheets, and turns, together with stack-, crankshaft-, paddlewheel-, and staircase-like patterns. The presence of the additional C--C bonds in the backbones of the new peptides did not give rise to a chaotic increase in their secondary structures as many protein specialists might have expected: while there are indeed more structure types than are observed in the alpha-peptide realm - three different

  7. N-benzylideneaniline and N-benzylaniline are potent inhibitors of lignostilbene-alpha,beta-dioxygenase, a key enzyme in oxidative cleavage of the central double bond of lignostilbene.

    PubMed

    Han, Sun-Young; Inoue, Hiroki; Terada, Tamami; Kamoda, Shigehiro; Saburi, Yoshimasa; Sekimata, Katsuhiko; Saito, Tamio; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yoshida, Shigeo; Asami, Tadao

    2003-06-01

    Lignostilbene-alpha,beta-dioxygenase (LSD, EC 1.13.11.43) is involved in oxidative cleavage of the central double bond of lignostilbene to form the corresponding aldehydes by a mechanism similar to those of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase and beta-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase, key enzymes in abscisic acid biosynthesis and vitamin A biosynthesis, respectively. In this study, several N-benzylideneanilines and amine were synthesized and examined for their efficacy as inhibitors of LSD. N-(4-Hydroxybenzylidene)-3-methoxyaniline was found to be a potent inhibitor with IC50 = 0.3 microM and N-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-3-methoxyaniline was also active with IC50 = 10 microM. The information obtained from the structure-activity relationships study here can aid in discovering inhibitors of both abscisic acid and vitamin A biosynthesis. PMID:14506920

  8. Pro-oxidant actions of alpha-lipoic acid and dihydrolipoic acid.

    PubMed

    Cakatay, Ufuk

    2006-01-01

    There is strong accumulating evidence that a alpha-lipoic acid (LA) supplement is good insurance, and would markedly improve human health. LA is readily absorbed from the diet, transported to cells and reduced to dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA). Of the two compounds, DHLA evidently has greater antioxidant activity. Much research has focused on the antioxidant properties of these compounds. Aside from its antioxidant role, in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that LA and its reduced form DHLA also act as a pro-oxidant properties. Limited number of studies concerning the pro-oxidant potential of LA and DHLA were performed only in recent years. The ability of LA and/or DHLA to function as either anti- or pro-oxidants, at least in part, is determined by the type of oxidant stress and the physiological circumstances. These pro-oxidant actions suggest that LA and DHLA act by multiple mechanisms, many of which are only now being explored. LA has been reported to have a number of potentially beneficial effects in both prevention and treatment of oxygen-related diseases. Selection of appropriate pharmacological doses of LA for use in oxygen-related diseases is critical. On the other hand, much of the discussion in clinical studies has been devoted to the pro-oxidant role of LA. This aspect remains to be elucidated. In further studies, careful evaluation will be necessary for the decision in the biological system whether LA administration is beneficial or harmful. PMID:16165311

  9. Oxidation in Acidic Medium of Lignins from Agricultural Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labat, Gisele Aparecida Amaral; Gonçalves, Adilson Roberto

    Agricultural residues as sugarcane straw and bagasse are burned in boilers for generation of energy in sugar and alcohol industries. However, excess of those by-products could be used to obtain products with higher value. Pulping process generates cellulosic pulps and lignin. The lignin could be oxidized and applied in effluent treatments for heavy metal removal. Oxidized lignin presents very strong chelating properties. Lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse were obtained by ethanol-water pulping. Oxidation of lignins was carried out using acetic acid and Co/Mn/Br catalytical system at 50, 80, and 115 °C for 5 h. Kinetics of the reaction was accomplished by measuring the UV-visible region. Activation energy was calculated for lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse (34.2 and 23.4 kJ mol-1, respectively). The first value indicates higher cross-linked formation. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy data of samples collected during oxidation are very similar. Principal component analysis applied to spectra shows only slight structure modifications in lignins after oxidation reaction.

  10. Properties of nanocellulose isolated from corncob residue using sulfuric acid, formic acid, oxidative and mechanical methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Bin; Du, Haishun; Lv, Dong; Zhang, Yuedong; Yu, Guang; Mu, Xindong; Peng, Hui

    2016-10-20

    In this work, nanocellulose was extracted from bleached corncob residue (CCR), an underutilized lignocellulose waste from furfural industry, using four different methods (i.e. sulfuric acid hydrolysis, formic acid (FA) hydrolysis, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation, and pulp refining, respectively). The self-assembled structure, morphology, dimension, crystallinity, chemical structure and thermal stability of prepared nanocellulose were investigated. FA hydrolysis produced longer cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) than the one obtained by sulfuric acid hydrolysis, and resulted in high crystallinity and thermal stability due to its preferential degradation of amorphous cellulose and lignin. The cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) with fine and individualized structure could be isolated by TEMPO-mediated oxidation. In comparison with other nanocellulose products, the intensive pulp refining led to the CNFs with the longest length and the thickest diameter. This comparative study can help to provide an insight into the utilization of CCR as a potential source for nanocellulose production. PMID:27474618

  11. Chemical synthesis of the 3-sulfooxy-7-N-acetylglucosaminyl-24-amidated conjugates of 3beta,7beta-dihydroxy-5-cholen-24-oic acid, and related compounds: unusual, major metabolites of bile acid in a patient with Niemann-Pick disease type C1.

    PubMed

    Iida, Takashi; Kakiyama, Genta; Hibiya, Yohei; Miyata, Shohei; Inoue, Takehiko; Ohno, Kohsaku; Goto, Takaaki; Mano, Nariyasu; Goto, Junichi; Nambara, Toshio; Hofmann, Alan F

    2006-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of 3beta,7beta-dihydroxy-5-cholen-24-oic acid, triply conjugated by sulfuric acid at C-3, by N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) at C-7, and by glycine or taurine at C-24, is described. These are unusual, major metabolites of bile acid found to be excreted in the urine of a patient with Niemann-Pick disease type C1. Analogous double-conjugates of 3beta-hydroxy-7-oxo-5-cholen-24-oic acid were also prepared. The principal reactions involved were: (1) beta-d-N-acetylglucosaminidation at C-7 of methyl 3beta-tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy (TBDMSi)-7beta-hydroxy-5-cholen-24-oate with 2-acetamido-1alpha-chloro-1,2-dideoxy-3,4,6-tri-O-acetyl-d-glucopyranose in the presence of CdCO(3) in boiling toluene; (2) sulfation at C-3 of the resulting 3beta-TBDMSi-7beta-GlcNAc with sulfur trioxide-trimethylamine complex in pyridine; and (3) direct amidation at C-24 of the 3beta-sulfooxy-7beta-GlcNAc conjugate with glycine methyl ester hydrochloride (or taurine) using 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride as a coupling agent in DMF. The structures of the multi-conjugated bile acids were characterized by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with an electrospray ionization probe under the positive and negative ionization modes. PMID:16197972

  12. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides.

    PubMed

    Yngard, Ria A; Sharma, Virender K; Filip, Jan; Zboril, Radek

    2008-04-15

    Cyanide is commonly found in electroplating, mining, coal gasification, and petroleum refining effluents, which require treatment before being discharged. Cyanide in effluents exists either as free cyanide or as a metal complex. The kinetics of the oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides by an environmentally friendly oxidant, ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O4(2-), Fe(VI)), were studied as a function of pH (9.1-10.5) and temperature (15-45 degrees C) using a stopped-flow technique. The weak-acid dissociable cyanides were Cd(CN)4(2-) and Ni(CN)4(2-), and the rate-laws for the oxidation may be -d[Fe(VI)]/dt = k[Fe(VI)][M(CN)4(2-)]n where n = 0.5 and 1 for Cd(CN)4(2-) and Ni(CN)4(2-), respectively. The rates decreased with increasing pH and were mostly related to a decrease in concentration of the reactive protonated Fe(VI) species, HFeO4(-). The stoichiometries with Fe(VI) were determined to be: 4HFeO4(-) + M(CN)4(2-) + 6H2O --> 4Fe(OH)3 + M(2+) + 4NCO(-) + O2 + 4OH(-). Mechanisms are proposed that agree with the observed reaction rate-laws and stoichiometries of the oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides by Fe(VI). Results indicate that Fe(VI) is effective in removing cyanide in coke oven plant effluent, where organics are also present. PMID:18497158

  13. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides

    SciTech Connect

    Ria A. Yngard; Virender K. Sharma; Jan Filip; Radek Zboril

    2008-04-15

    Cyanide is commonly found in electroplating, mining, coal gasification, and petroleum refining effluents, which require treatment before being discharged. Cyanide in effluents exists either as free cyanide or as a metal complex. The kinetics of the oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides by an environmentally friendly oxidant, ferrate, were studied as a function of pH (9.1-10.5) and temperature (15-45{sup o}C) using a stopped-flow technique. The weak-acid dissociable cyanides were Cd(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-} and Ni(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}, and the rate-laws for the oxidation may be -d(Fe(VI))/dt = k (Fe(VI))(M(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}){sup n} where n = 0.5 and 1 for Cd(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-} and Ni(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}, respectively. The rates decreased with increasing pH and were mostly related to a decrease in concentration of the reactive protonated Fe(VI) species, HFeO{sub 4}{sup -}. The stoichiometries with Fe(VI) were determined to be: 4HFeO{sub 4}{sup -} + M(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-} + 6H{sub 2}O {yields} 4Fe(OH){sub 3} + M{sup 2+} + 4NCO{sup -} + O{sub 2} + 4OH{sup -}. Mechanisms are proposed that agree with the observed reaction rate-laws and stoichiometries of the oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides by Fe(VI). Results indicate that Fe(VI) is effective in removing cyanide in coke oven plant effluent, where organics are also present. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Travis Shane; Mincher, Bruce Jay; Schmitt, Nicholas C

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  15. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  16. Alpha- and beta-Proteobacteria control the consumption and release of amino acids on lake snow aggregates.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, B; Huber, I; Amann, R; Ludwig, W; Simon, M

    2001-02-01

    We analyzed the composition of aggregate (lake snow)-associated bacterial communities in Lake Constance from 1994 until 1996 between a depth of 25 m and the sediment surface at 110 m by fluorescent in situ hybridization with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes of various specificity. In addition, we experimentally examined the turnover of dissolved amino acids and carbohydrates together with the microbial colonization of aggregates formed in rolling tanks in the lab. Generally, between 40 and more than 80% of the microbes enumerated by DAPI staining (4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole) were detected as Bacteria by the probe EUB338. At a depth of 25 m, 10.5% +/- 7.9% and 14.2% +/- 10.2% of the DAPI cell counts were detected by probes specific for alpha- and beta-Proteobacteria. These proportions increased to 12.0% +/- 3.3% and 54.0% +/- 5.9% at a depth of 50 m but decreased again at the sediment surface at 110 m to 2.7% +/- 1.4% and 41.1% +/- 8.4%, indicating a clear dominance of beta-Proteobacteria at depths of 50 and 110 m, where aggregates have an age of 3 to 5 and 8 to 11 days, respectively. From 50 m to the sediment surface, cells detected by a Cytophaga/Flavobacteria-specific probe (CF319a) comprised increasing proportions up to 18% of the DAPI cell counts. gamma-Proteobacteria always comprised minor proportions of the aggregate-associated bacterial community. Using only two probes highly specific for clusters of bacteria closely related to Sphingomonas species and Brevundimonas diminuta, we identified between 16 and 60% of the alpha-Proteobacteria. In addition, with three probes highly specific for close relatives of the beta-Proteobacteria Duganella zoogloeoides (formerly Zoogloea ramigera), Acidovorax facilis, and Hydrogenophaga palleroni, bacteria common in activated sludge, 42 to 70% of the beta-Proteobacteria were identified. In the early phase (<20 h) of 11 of the 15 experimental incubations of aggregates, dissolved amino acids were consumed by the

  17. Mediation of beta-endorphin by isoferulic acid to lower plasma glucose in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, I-Min; Chen, Wang-Chuan; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2003-12-01

    We investigated the mechanism(s) by which isoferulic acid lowers plasma glucose levels in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-diabetic rats). In STZ-diabetic rats, isoferulic acid dose dependently lowered plasma glucose concentrations and increased plasma beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (BER). Both of these effects of isoferulic acid were abolished by pretreatment of rats with tamsulosin or 2-[2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl]aminomethyl-1,4-benzodioxane hydrochloride (WB 4101) at doses sufficient to block alpha1-adrenoceptors. Also, isoferulic acid enhanced BER release from isolated rat adrenal medulla in a concentration-dependent manner that could be abolished by treatment with alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists. Moreover, bilateral adrenalectomy in STZ-diabetic rats eliminated the activities of isoferulic acid, including the plasma glucose-lowering effect and the plasma BER-elevating effect. Naloxone and naloxonazine inhibited the plasma glucose-lowering activity of isoferulic acid at doses sufficient to block opioid mu-receptors. In contrast with the effect in wild-type diabetic mice, isoferulic acid failed to lower plasma glucose levels in opioid mu-receptor knockout diabetic mice. Treatment of STZ-diabetic rats with isoferulic acid three times in 1 day resulted in an increase in the expression of the glucose transporter subtype 4 form in soleus muscle. This effect was blocked by alpha1-adrenoceptor or opioid mu-receptor antagonists. The reduction of elevated mRNA or protein level of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was also impeded in the same groups of STZ-diabetic rats. In conclusion, our results suggest that isoferulic acid may activate alpha1-adrenoceptors to enhance the secretion of beta-endorphin, which can stimulate the opioid mu-receptors to increase glucose use or/and reduce hepatic gluconeogenesis, resulting in a decrease of plasma glucose in STZ-diabetic rats. PMID:12975496

  18. Biochemical and phylogenetic analyses of a cold-active {beta}-galactosidase from the lactic acid bacterium Carnobacterium piscicola BA

    SciTech Connect

    Coombs, J.M.; Brenchley, J.E.

    1999-12-01

    The authors are investigating glycosyl hydrolases from new psychrophilic isolates to examine the adaptations of enzymes to low temperatures. A {beta}-galactosidase from isolate BA, which they have classified as a strain of the lactic acid bacterium Carnobacterium piscicola, was capable of hydrolyzing the chromogen 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl {beta}-D-galactopyranoside (X-Gal) at 4 C and possessed higher activity in crude cell lysates at 25 than at 37 C. Sequence analysis of a cloned DNA fragment encoding this activity revealed a gene cluster containing three glycosyl hydrolases with homology to an {alpha}-galactosidase and two {beta}-galactosidases. The larger of the two {beta}-galactosidase genes, bgaB, encoded the 76.9-kDa cold-active enzyme. This gene was homologous to family 42 glycosyl hydrolases, a group which contains several thermophilic enzymes but none from lactic acid bacteria. The bgaB gene from isolate BA was subcloned in Escherichia coli, and its enzyme, BgaB, was purified. The purified enzyme was highly unstable and required 10% glycerol to maintain activity. Its optimal temperature for activity was 30 C, and it was inactivated at 40 C in 10 min. The K{sub m} of freshly purified enzyme at 30 C was 1.7 mM, and the V{sub max} was 450 {micro}mol {sm{underscore}bullet} min{sup {minus}1}{sm{underscore}bullet}mg{sup {minus}1} with o-nitrophenyl {beta}-D-galactopyranoside. This cold-active enzyme is interesting because it is homologous to a thermophilic enzyme from Bacillus stearothermophilus, and comparisons could provide information about structural features important for activity at low temperatures.

  19. Apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells caused by serum deprivation, oxidative stress and transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Hogg, N; Browning, J; Howard, T; Winterford, C; Fitzpatrick, D; Gobé, G

    1999-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell apoptosis has previously been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension-induced vessel deletion and damage. In the present in vitro study we analyse several possible relevant causative factors of vascular endothelial cell apoptosis, namely, serum deprivation and nutrient depletion, oxidative stress in the forms of hypoxia, hyperoxia or free radical damage, and altered levels of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) protein. An established cell line, bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), was maintained in complete growth medium (RPMI-1640 plus 15% fetal calf serum and antibiotics, abbreviated as RPMI) in 25cm2 flasks or in 12-well plates on glass coverslips. Confluent but actively-growing cultures were treated with either hypoxia (PO2 of RPMI = 50mmHg), serum-free media (SFM), SFM plus hypoxia, hyperoxia (PO2 of RPMI = 450mmHg), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1mM) in SFM, or TGF-beta1 protein (10ng/mL) in SFM. Appropriate control cultures were used. BAEC were collected 48h or 72h after all treatments except for TGF-beta1 and H2O2 treatments that were collected at 16-18h. Cell death was assessed using morphological characteristics or in situ end labeling (ISEL), cell proliferation assessed using proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and TGF-beta1 expression assessed using transcript levels or immunohistochemistry. All treatments significantly increased levels of apoptosis over control cultures (P<0.05), and decreased levels of cell proliferation. Treatment with TGF-beta1 protein or SFM plus hypoxia induced greatest levels of apoptosis. TGF-beta1 protein and transcript levels were decreased in treated cultures, results suggesting that a paracrine source of TGF-beta1 protein would be needed as a cause of endothelial cell apoptosis in viva. Future therapies against inappropriate vessel deletion in disease states may use the known gene-driven nature of apoptosis to modify this sort of cell death in endothelial cells. PMID

  20. Metabolism of parenterally administered fat emulsions in the rat: studies of fatty acid oxidation with 1-13C- and 8-13C-labelled triolein.

    PubMed

    Bäurle, W; Brösicke, H; Matthews, D E; Pogan, K; Fürst, P

    1998-04-01

    To reassess the hypothesis that fatty acid catabolism occurs to completion via beta-oxidation, male Sprague-Dawley rats receiving continuous total parenteral nutrition (TPN) including 43% energy as fat were infused with [1-(13)C]- or [8-(13)C]triolein. Expired CO2 was collected continuously for 4 h and its 13C:12C ratio determined by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Bicarbonate retention was also assessed over 4 h by infusion of NaH14CO3 and measurement of the expired 14CO2. A possible loss of label from [8-(13)C]oleic acid from the citric acid cycle via labelled acetyl-CoA without oxidation to CO2 was assessed by infusing further animals with acetate labelled with 14C either at C atoms 1 or 2 and determination of its conversion to expired 14CO2. At isotopic steady state, 63.2 (SE 1.6)% (n 8) of the infused [1-(14)C]acetate and 46.0 (SE 1.2)% (n 8) of [2-(14)C]acetate was recovered as expired 14CO2. After correction for bicarbonate retention and non-oxidative isotope loss, 37.3 (SE 1.2)% (n 20) of the [1-(13)C]triolein was found to have been oxidized, whereas 32.6 (SE 1.0)% (n 20) of the [8-(13)C]triolein was oxidized (P < or = 0.01). The lower oxidation of the C atom at position 8 of oleic acid than that at position 1 indicates incomplete oxidative breakdown of the fatty acid after entering beta-oxidation. PMID:9624230

  1. Seed treatment with beta-aminobutyric acid protects Pennisetum glaucum systemically from Sclerospora graminicola.

    PubMed

    Shailasree, S; Sarosh, B R; Vasanthi, N S; Shetty, H S

    2001-08-01

    beta-Aminobutyric acid (BABA) treatment of pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L) R Br] seeds influenced seedling vigour and protected the seedlings from downy mildew disease caused by the oomycetous biotropic fungus Sclerospora graminicola (Sacc) Schroet. Of the different concentrations of BABA tested, viz 25, 50, 75 and 100 mM, seeds treated with 50 mM for 6 h resulted in the maximum of 1428 seedling vigour and showed 23% disease incidence in comparison with the control which recorded a seedling vigour of 1260 and 98% disease incidence i.e. 75% protection from disease. Seeds treated with BABA when challenged for downy mildew disease using zoospores of S graminicola required 48 h after inducer treatment to develop maximum resistance. Durability of induced resistance was also tested in plants raised from seeds treated with the inducer and identified as resistant, by second challenge inoculation with the downy mildew pathogen at tillers and inflorescence axes. Reduced disease incidence of only 10 and 12% in these plants, compared with 71 and 76% disease in control plants inoculated at the tillers and inflorescence axes, respectively, suggested that resistance induced in seeds with BABA remained operative through vegetative and reproductive growth of pearl millet plants. Induction of resistance by seed treatment with BABA enhanced vegetative growth, viz height, fresh weight, leaf area and tillering, and reproductive growth, viz early flowering, number of productive ear heads and 1000 seed weight. Studies on induction of resistance in different cultivars of pearl millet with varying resistance reaction to downy mildew indicated that the protection offered by BABA is independent of the nature of cultivars used and not dependent on their constitutive resistance. PMID:11517726

  2. Maintained activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} despite of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in okadaic acid-induced neurodegenerative model

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong-Whan; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Choi, Jung-Eun; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Hui-Sun; Choe, Han; Lee, Seung-Chul; Kim, Dong-Hou

    2010-04-30

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK3{beta}) is recognized as one of major kinases to phosphorylate tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD), thus lots of AD drug discoveries target GSK3{beta}. However, the inactive form of GSK3{beta} which is phosphorylated at serine-9 is increased in AD brains. This is also inconsistent with phosphorylation status of other GSK3{beta} substrates, such as {beta}-catenin and collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) since their phosphorylation is all increased in AD brains. Thus, we addressed this paradoxical condition of AD in rat neurons treated with okadaic acid (OA) which inhibits protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) and induces tau hyperphosphorylation and cell death. Interestingly, OA also induces phosphorylation of GSK3{beta} at serine-9 and other substrates including tau, {beta}-catenin and CRMP2 like in AD brains. In this context, we observed that GSK3{beta} inhibitors such as lithium chloride and 6-bromoindirubin-3'-monoxime (6-BIO) reversed those phosphorylation events and protected neurons. These data suggest that GSK3{beta} may still have its kinase activity despite increase of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in AD brains at least in PP2A-compromised conditions and that GSK3{beta} inhibitors could be a valuable drug candidate in AD.

  3. Acute tissue-type plasminogen activator release in human microvascular endothelial cells: the roles of Galphaq, PLC-beta, IP3 and 5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid.

    PubMed

    Muldowney, James A S; Painter, Corrie A; Sanders-Bush, Elaine; Brown, Nancy J; Vaughan, Douglas E

    2007-02-01

    The acute physiologic release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) from the endothelium is critical for vascular homeostasis. This process is prostacyclin- and nitric oxide (NO)-independent in humans. It has been suggested that calcium signaling and endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHF) may play a role in t-PA release. G-protein-coupled receptor-dependent calcium signaling is typically Galphaq-dependent. EDHFs have been functionally defined and in various tissues are believed to be various regioisomers of the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). We tested the hypothesis in vitro that thrombin-stimulated t-PA release from human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) is both Galphaq- and EDHF-dependent. Conditioned media was harvested following thrombin stimulation, and t-PA antigen was measured by ELISA. Thrombin-induced t-PA release was limited by a membrane-permeable Galphaq inhibitory peptide, the PLC-beta antagonist U73122, and the IP3 receptor antagonist 2-aminoethoxyphenylborane, while the Galphaq agonist Pasteurella toxin modestly induced t-PA release. The cytochrome P450 (CYP450) inhibitor, miconazole, and the arachidonic acid epoxygenase inhibitor MS-PPOH inhibited thrombin-stimulated t-PA release, while 5,6-EET-methyl ester stimulated t-PA release. The 5,6- and 14,15-EET antagonist, 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid, inhibited t-PA release at the 100 microM concentration. However, thrombin-stimulated t-PA release was unaffected by the prostacyclin and NO inhibitors ASA and L-NAME, as well as the potassium channel inhibitors TEA, apamin and charybdotoxin. These studies suggest that thrombin-stimulated t-PA release is Galphaq-, PLC-beta-, IP3-, and 5,6-EET-dependent while being prostacyclin-, NO- and K+ channel-independent in HMECs. PMID:17264956

  4. Nitro-linolenic acid is a nitric oxide donor.

    PubMed

    Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Carreras, Alfonso; Padilla, María N; Melguizo, Manuel; Valderrama, Raquel; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2016-07-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs), which are the result of the interaction between reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and non-saturated fatty acids, constitute a new research area in plant systems, and their study has significantly increased. Very recently, the endogenous presence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln) has been reported in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In this regard, the signaling role of this molecule has been shown to be key in setting up a defense mechanism by inducing the chaperone network in plants. Here, we report on the ability of NO2-Ln to release nitric oxide (NO) in an aqueous medium with several approaches, such as by a spectrofluorometric probe with DAF-2, the oxyhemoglobin oxidation method, ozone chemiluminescence, and also by confocal laser scanning microscopy in Arabidopsis cell cultures. Jointly, this ability gives NO2-Ln the potential to act as a signaling molecule by the direct release of NO, due to its capacity to induce different changes mediated by NO or NO-related molecules such as nitration and S-nitrosylation or by the electrophilic capacity of these molecules through a nitroalkylation mechanism. PMID:27164295

  5. Oxidative stability of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids enriched eggs.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yuan; Perez, Tulia I; Zuidhof, Martin J; Renema, Robert A; Wu, Jianping

    2013-11-27

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) enriched eggs have a growing market share in the egg industry. This study examined the stability of n-3 PUFA enriched eggs fortified with antioxidants (vitamin E or organic Selenium [Sel-Plex] or both) following cooking and storage. The total fat content was not affected by cooking or simulated retail storage conditions, whereas, n-3 fatty acids were reduced. The content of n-3 fatty acids in boiled eggs was higher than in fried eggs. Lipid oxidation was significantly affected by the different cooking methods. Fried eggs contained higher levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, 2.02 μg/kg) and cholesterol oxidation products (COPs, 13.58 μg/g) compared to boiled (1.44 and 10.15 μg/kg) and raw eggs (0.95 and 9.03 μg/kg, respectively, for MDA and COPs). Supplementation of antioxidants reduced the formation of MDA by 40% and COPs by 12% in fried eggs. Although the content of MDA was significantly increased after 28 days of storage, COPs were not affected by storage. Our study indicated that the n-3 PUFA in enriched eggs was relatively stable during storage and home cooking in the presence of antioxidants. PMID:24164329

  6. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Titanium for Nitric Acid Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2014-07-01

    Tantalum and Niobium have good corrosion resistance in nitric acid as well as in molten chloride salt medium encountered in spent fuel nuclear reprocessing plants. Commercially, pure Ti (Cp-Ti) exhibits good corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium; however, in vapor condensates of nitric acid, significant corrosion was observed. In the present study, a thermochemical diffusion method was pursued to coat Ta2O5, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5 on Ti to improve the corrosion resistance and enhance the life of critical components in reprocessing plants. The coated samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, profilometry, micro-scratch test, and ASTM A262 Practice-C test in 65 pct boiling nitric acid. The SEM micrograph of the coated samples showed that uniform dense coating containing Ta2O5 and/or Nb2O5 was formed. XRD patterns indicated the formation of TiO2, Ta2O5/Nb2O5, and mixed oxide/solid solution phase on coated Ti samples. ASTM A262 Practice-C test revealed reproducible outstanding corrosion resistance of Ta2O5-coated sample in comparison to Nb2O5- and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5-coated sample. The hardness of the Ta2O5-coated Cp-Ti sample was found to be twice that of uncoated Cp-Ti. The SEM and XRD results confirmed the presence of protective oxide layer (Ta2O5, rutile TiO2, and mixed phase) on coated sample which improved the corrosion resistance remarkably in boiling liquid phase of nitric acid compared to uncoated Cp-Ti and Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb alloy. Three phase corrosion test conducted on Ta2O5-coated samples in boiling 11.5 M nitric acid showed poor corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid due to poor adhesion of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coated samples needs to be optimized in order to improve the corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid.

  7. Removal of arsenious acid from sulfuric acidic solution using ultrasound oxidation and goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Hosokawa, Ryota; Hangui, Shinji; Kawamura, Youhei; Sugawara, Katsuyasu

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the properties of synthetic goethite for the adsorption of As from strongly acidic solutions in ambient atmosphere under ultrasound irradiation. The goethite was successfully synthesized from iron-containing sulfuric acidic solution (1271 ppm) using an autoclave apparatus for 1 h at 0.12 MPa and 121 °C. The ratio of the iron eluted from the synthetic goethite to the acidic solution was only 0.58% at pH 2.1. Ultrasound irradiation (200 kHz, 200 W) was applied to oxidize 10 ppm of As(III) to As(V) at pH 2.2 for 60 min under various atmospheric conditions. Remarkably, the oxidation ratio of As(III) to As(V) is quite high (89.7%) at pH 2.2 in ambient atmosphere and is close to those obtained for Ar (95.3%) and O2 (95.9%) atmospheres. The As(III) removal ratio reached 94.5% after 60 min of irradiation. Therefore, goethite is a promising material for As adsorption using ultrasound oxidation in the acidic region in ambient atmosphere.

  8. DeltapH-Dependent Amino Acid Transport into Plasma Membrane Vesicles Isolated from Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Leaves: II. Evidence for Multiple Aliphatic, Neutral Amino Acid Symports.

    PubMed

    Li, Z C; Bush, D R

    1991-08-01

    Proton-coupled aliphatic, neutral amino acid transport was investigated in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L., cv Great Western) leaves. Two neutral amino acid symport systems were resolved based on inter-amino acid transport competition and on large variations in the specific activity of each porter in different species. Competitive inhibition was observed for transport competition between alanine, methionine, glutamine, and leucine (the alanine group) and between isoleucine, valine, and threonine (the isoleucine group). The apparent K(m) and K(i) values were similar for transport competition among amino acids within the alanine group. In contrast, the kinetics of transport competition between these two groups of amino acids did not fit a simple competitive model. Furthermore, members of the isoleucine group were weak transport antagonists of the alanine group. These results are consistent with two independent neutral amino acid porters. In support of that conclusion, the ratio of the specific activity of alanine transport versus isoleucine transport varied from two- to 13-fold in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from different plant species. This ratio would be expected to remain relatively stable if these amino acids were moving through a single transport system and, indeed, the ratio of alanine to glutamine transport varied less than twofold. Analysis of the predicted structure of the aliphatic, neutral amino acids in solution shows that isoleucine, valine, and threonine contain a branched methyl or hydroxyl group at the beta-carbon position that places a dense electron cloud close to the alpha-amino group. This does not occur for the unbranched amino acids or those that branch further away, e.g. leucine. We hypothesize that this structural feature of isoleucine, valine, and threonine results in unfavorable steric interactions with the alanine transport system that limits their flux through this porter. Hydrophobicity and

  9. Amyloid beta-peptide and oxidative cellular injury in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mark, R J; Blanc, E M; Mattson, M P

    1996-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects primarily learning and memory functions. There is significant neuronal loss and impairment of metabolic functioning in the temporal lobe, an area believed to be crucial for learning and memory tasks. Aggregated deposits of amyloid beta-peptide may have a causative role in the development and progression of AD. We review the cellular actions of A beta and how they can contribute to the cytotoxicity observed in AD. A beta causes plasma membrane lipid peroxidation, impairment of ion-motive ATPases, glutamate uptake, uncoupling of a G-protein linked receptor, and generation of reactive oxygen species. These effects contribute to the loss of intracellular calcium homeostasis reported in cultured neurons. Many cell types other than neurons show alterations in the Alzheimer's brain. The effects of A beta on these cell types is also reviewed. PMID:8884749

  10. Phosphonic Acids for Interfacial Engineering of Transparent Conductive Oxides.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Sergio A; Giordano, Anthony J; Smith, O'Neil L; Barlow, Stephen; Li, Hong; Armstrong, Neal R; Pemberton, Jeanne E; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Ginger, David; Marder, Seth R

    2016-06-22

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs), such as indium tin oxide and zinc oxide, play an important role as electrode materials in organic-semiconductor devices. The properties of the inorganic-organic interface-the offset between the TCO Fermi level and the relevant transport level, the extent to which the organic semiconductor can wet the oxide surface, and the influence of the surface on semiconductor morphology-significantly affect device performance. This review surveys the literature on TCO modification with phosphonic acids (PAs), which has increasingly been used to engineer these interfacial properties. The first part outlines the relevance of TCO surface modification to organic electronics, surveys methods for the synthesis of PAs, discusses the modes by which they can bind to TCO surfaces, and compares PAs to alternative organic surface modifiers. The next section discusses methods of PA monolayer deposition, the kinetics of monolayer formation, and structural evidence regarding molecular orientation on TCOs. The next sections discuss TCO work-function modification using PAs, tuning of TCO surface energy using PAs, and initiation of polymerizations from TCO-tethered PAs. Finally, studies that examine the use of PA-modified TCOs in organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaics are compared. PMID:27227316

  11. Aspartic acid at position 57 of the HLA-DQ beta chain protects against type I diabetes: a family study.

    PubMed Central

    Morel, P A; Dorman, J S; Todd, J A; McDevitt, H O; Trucco, M

    1988-01-01

    One hundred seventy-two members from 27 randomly selected multiple case Caucasian families of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) were studied at the DNA level to ascertain the reliability of codon 57 of the HLA-DQ beta-chain gene as a disease protection/susceptibility marker. The analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA encoding the first domain of the DQ beta chain and by dot blot analysis of the amplified material with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. One hundred twenty-three randomly selected healthy Caucasian donors were also tested. The results demonstrated that haplotypes carrying an aspartic acid in position 57 (Asp-57) of their DQ beta chain were significantly increased in frequency among nondiabetic haplotypes (23/38), while non-Asp-57 haplotypes were significantly increased in frequency among diabetic haplotypes (65/69). Ninety-six percent of the diabetic probands in our study were homozygous non-Asp/non-Asp as compared to 19.5% of healthy unrelated controls. This conferred a relative risk of 107 (chi 2 = 54.97; P = 0.00003) for non-Asp-57 homozygous individuals. Even though the inheritance and genetic features of IDDM are complex and are not necessarily fully explained by DQ beta chain polymorphism, this approach is much more sensitive than HLA serolog in assessing risk for IDDM. PMID:3186714

  12. The level of nitric oxide regulates lipocalin-2 expression under inflammatory condition in RINm5F beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seo-Yoon; Kim, Dong-Bin; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Jang, Hyun-Jong; Jo, Yang-Hyeok; Kim, Myung-Jun

    2016-07-15

    We previously reported that proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β and interferon-γ) induced the expression of lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) together with inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in RINm5F beta-cells. Therefore, we examined the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on LCN-2 expression in cytokines-treated RINm5F beta-cells. Additionally, we observed the effect of LCN-2 on cell viability. First, we found the existence of LCN-2 receptor and the internalization of exogenous recombinant LCN-2 peptide in RINm5F and INS-1 beta-cells. Next, the effects of NO on LCN-2 expression were evaluated. Aminoguanidine, an iNOS inhibitor and iNOS gene silencing significantly inhibited cytokines-induced LCN-2 expression while sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor potentiated it. Luciferase reporter assay showed that transcription factor NF-κB was not involved in LCN-2 expression. Both LCN-2 mRNA and protein stability assays were conducted. SNP did not affect LCN-2 mRNA stability, however, it significantly reduced LCN-2 protein degradation. The LCN-2 protein degradation was significantly attenuated by MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. Finally, the effect of LCN-2 on cell viability was evaluated. LCN-2 peptide treatment and LCN-2 overexpression significantly reduced cell viability. FACS analysis showed that LCN-2 induced the apoptosis of the cells. Collectively, NO level affects LCN-2 expression via regulation of LCN-2 protein stability under inflammatory condition and LCN-2 may reduce beta-cell viability by promoting apoptosis. PMID:27233602

  13. Reactivation of a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst by acid washing.

    PubMed

    Galisteo, Francisco Cabello; Mariscal, Rafael; Granados, Manuel López; Fierro, José Luis García; Brettes, Pilar; Salas, Oscar

    2005-05-15

    The catalytic activity of samples taken from an oxidation catalyst mounted on diesel-driven automobiles and aged under road conditions was recovered to a significant extent by washing with a dilute solution of citric acid. The characterization of samples arising from a fresh, a vehicle-aged, and a regenerated catalyst was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Relatively high levels of S and P, in the form of aluminum sulfate and phosphate, respectively, together with contaminant Si were detected in the used catalyst. Washing of the vehicle-aged catalytic oxidation converter revealed high efficiency in the extraction of the main contaminants detected (S and P) by this nondestructive methodology. The results of the experiments reported here should encourage the development of a technology based on this reactivation procedure for the rejuvenation of the catalytic device mounted on diesel exhaust pipes. PMID:15952394

  14. Gut microbiota regulates bile acid metabolism by reducing the levels of tauro-beta-muricholic acid, a naturally occurring FXR antagonist.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Sama I; Wahlström, Annika; Felin, Jenny; Jäntti, Sirkku; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Bamberg, Krister; Angelin, Bo; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Orešič, Matej; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2013-02-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and further metabolized by the gut microbiota into secondary bile acids. Bile acid synthesis is under negative feedback control through activation of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the ileum and liver. Here we profiled the bile acid composition throughout the enterohepatic system in germ-free (GF) and conventionally raised (CONV-R) mice. We confirmed a dramatic reduction in muricholic acid, but not cholic acid, levels in CONV-R mice. Rederivation of Fxr-deficient mice as GF demonstrated that the gut microbiota regulated expression of fibroblast growth factor 15 in the ileum and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) in the liver by FXR-dependent mechanisms. Importantly, we identified tauro-conjugated beta- and alpha-muricholic acids as FXR antagonists. These studies suggest that the gut microbiota not only regulates secondary bile acid metabolism but also inhibits bile acid synthesis in the liver by alleviating FXR inhibition in the ileum. PMID:23395169

  15. Pleiotropic effects of the beta-adrenoceptor blocker carvedilol on calcium regulation during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruijuan; Miura, Toshiro; Harada, Nozomu; Kametani, Ryosuke; Shibuya, Masaki; Fukagawa, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Shuji; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Hara, Masayuki; Matsuzaki, Masunori

    2006-07-01

    Carvedilol is a nonselective beta-adrenoceptor blocker with multiple pleiotropic actions. A recent clinical study suggested that carvedilol may be superior to other beta-adrenoceptor blockers in the treatment of heart failure. Despite numerous investigations, the underlying mechanisms of carvedilol on improving heart failure are yet to be fully established. The purpose of this study is to clarify the pleiotropic effect of carvedilol on cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium regulation during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Carvedilol (10 microM), but not metoprolol (10 microM), reduced H2O2 (100 microM)-induced apoptosis in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. During the process, changes in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and mitochondrial calcium concentration ([Ca2+]m) and mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim) were measured by fluorescent probes [Fluo-3/acetoxymethyl ester (AM), Rhod-2/AM, and tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester, respectively] and imaged by laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that H2O2 caused [Ca2]m overload first, followed by [Ca2+]i overload, leading to DeltaPsim dissipation and the induction of apoptosis. Carvedilol (10 microM) significantly delayed these processes and reduced apoptosis. These effects were not observed with other beta-adrenoceptor blockers (metoprolol, atenolol, and propranolol) or with a combination of the alpha (phentolamine)- and the beta-adrenoceptor blocker. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, 5 mM) and the combination of NAC and propranolol (10 microM) showed an effect similar to that of carvedilol. Therefore, the effect of carvedilol on H2O2-induced changes in [Ca2+]m, [Ca2+]i, and DeltaPsi(m) is independent of alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors but is probably dependent on the antioxidant effect. PMID:16611853

  16. A single disulfide bond differentiates aggregation pathways of beta2-microglobulin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiwen; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2005-11-25

    Deposition of wild-type beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) into amyloid fibrils is a complication in patients undergoing long-term hemodialysis. The native beta-sandwich fold of beta2m has a highly conserved disulfide bond linking Cys25 and Cys80. Oxidized beta2m forms needle-like amyloid fibrils at pH 2.5 in vitro, whereas reduced beta2m, at acid pH, in which the intra-chain disulfide bond is disrupted, cannot form typical fibrils. Instead, reduced beta2m forms thinner and more flexible filaments. To uncover the difference in molecular mechanisms underlying the aggregation of the oxidized and reduced beta2m, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of beta2m oligomerization under oxidized and reduced conditions. We show that, consistent with experimental observations, the oxidized beta2m forms domain-swapped dimer, in which the two proteins exchange their N-terminal segments complementing each other. In contrast, both dimers and trimers, formed by reduced beta2m, are comprised of parallel beta-sheets between monomers and stabilized by the hydrogen bond network along the backbone. The oligomerized monomers are in extended conformations, capable of further aggregation. We find that both reduced and oxidized dimers are thermodynamically less stable than their corresponding monomers, indicating that beta2m oligomerization is not accompanied by the formation of a thermodynamically stable dimer. Our studies suggest that the different aggregation pathways of oxidized and reduced beta2m are dictated by the formation of distinct precursor oligomeric species that are modulated by Cys25-Cys80 disulfide-bonds. We propose that the propagation of domain swapping is the aggregation mechanism for the oxidized beta2m, while "parallel stacking" of partially unfolded beta2m is the aggregation mechanism for the reduced beta2m. PMID:16242719

  17. Iron Photoreduction and Oxidation in an Acidic Mountain Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, D. M.; Kimball, B. A.; Bencala, K. E.

    1988-04-01

    In a small mountain stream in Colorado that receives acidic mine drainage, photoreduction of ferric iron results in a well-defined increase in dissolved ferrous iron during the day. To quantify this process, an instream injection of a conservative tracer was used to measure discharge at the time that each sample was collected. Daytime production of ferrous iron by photoreduction was almost four times as great as nighttime oxidation of ferrous iron. The photoreduction process probably involves dissolved or colloidal ferric iron species and limited interaction with organic species because concentrations of organic carbon are low in this stream.

  18. In situ electrocatalytic oxidation of acid violet 12 dye effluent.

    PubMed

    Mohan, N; Balasubramanian, N

    2006-08-21

    Electrochemical treatment of organic pollutants is a promising treatment technique for substances which are recalcitrant to biodegradation. Experiments were carried out to treat acid violet 12 dye house effluent using electrochemical technique for removal color and COD reduction covering wide range in operating conditions. Ruthenium/lead/tin oxide coated titanium and stainless steel were used as anode and cathode, respectively. The influence of effluent initial concentration, pH, supporting electrolyte and the electrode material on rate of degradation has been critically examined. The results indicate that the electrochemical method can be used to treat dye house effluents. PMID:16730894

  19. Low molecular weight carboxylic acids in oxidizing porphyry copper tailings.

    PubMed

    Dold, Bernhard; Blowes, David W; Dickhout, Ralph; Spangenberg, Jorge E; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf

    2005-04-15

    The distribution of low molecular weight carboxylic acids (LMWCA) was investigated in pore water profiles from two porphyry copper tailings impoundments in Chile (Piuquenes at La Andina and Cauquenes at El Teniente mine). The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the distribution of LMWCA, which are interpreted to be the metabolic byproducts of the autotroph microbial community in this low organic carbon system, and (2) to infer the potential role of these acids in cycling of Fe and other elements in the tailings impoundments. The speciation and mobility of iron, and potential for the release of H+ via hydrolysis of the ferric iron, are key factors in the formation of acid mine drainage in sulfidic mine wastes. In the low-pH oxidation zone of the Piuquenes tailings, Fe(III) is the dominant iron species and shows high mobility. LMWCA, which occur mainly between the oxidation front down to 300 cm below the tailings surface at both locations (e.g., max concentrations of 0.12 mmol/L formate, 0.17 mmol/L acetate, and 0.01 mmol/L pyruvate at Piuquenes and 0.14 mmol/L formate, 0.14 mmol/L acetate, and 0.006 mmol/L pyruvate at Cauquenes), are observed at the same location as high Fe concentrations (up to 71.2 mmol/L Fe(II) and 16.1 mmol/L Fe(III), respectively). In this zone, secondary Fe(III) hydroxides are depleted. Our data suggest that LMWCA may influence the mobility of iron in two ways. First, complexation of Fe(III), through formation of bidentate Fe(III)-LMWCA complexes (e.g., pyruvate, oxalate), may enhance the dissolution of Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides or may prevent precipitation of Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides. Soluble Fe(III) chelate complexes which may be mobilized downward and convert to Fe(II) by Fe(III) reducing bacteria. Second, monodentate LMWCA (e.g., acetate and formate) can be used by iron-reducing bacteria as electron donors (e.g., Acidophilum spp.), with ferric iron as the electron acceptor. These processes may, in part, explain the low abundances

  20. Co-oxidation of the sulfur-containing amino acids in an autoxidizing lipid system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, G.A.; Dollar, A.M.

    1963-01-01

    Oxidation of the sulfur amino acids by autoxidizing lipids was studied in a model system consisting of an amino acid dispersed in cold-pressed, molecularly distilled menhaden oil (20–80% w/w). Under all conditions investigated, cysteine was oxidized completely to cystine. Preliminary results suggest that at 110°C the oxidation follows first-order kinetics for at least the first 8 hr. A specific reaction rate constant of 0.25 per hour was calculated. When fatty acids were added to the system, cystine was oxidized to its thiosulfinate ester. When the fatty acid-cystine ratio was 1:2, oxidation of cystine was a maximum. No oxidation of cystine occurred unless either a fatty acid, volatile organic acid, or ethanol was added. Under the conditions investigated, methionine was not oxidized to either its sulfoxide or its sulfone.

  1. [Use of water-soluble beta-cyclodextrin derivatives as carriers of anti-inflammatory drug biphenylylacetic acid in rectal delivery].

    PubMed

    Arima, H; Kondo, T; Irie, T; Hirayama, F; Uekama, K; Miyaji, T; Inoue, Y

    1992-01-01

    To improve the rectal delivery of an anti-inflammatory drug, biphenylylacetic acid (BPAA), the use of 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CyD) and heptakis (2,6-di-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin (DM-beta-CyD) was investigated. Inclusion complex formations of BPAA with both beta-CyDs in a molar ratio of 1:1 in water were ascertained, and their stability constants were determined. The dissolution of BPAA in water and the release of BPAA from an oleaginous suppository (Witepsol H-5) were significantly increased by beta-CyDs, depending on the magnitude of the stability constants of the water-soluble complexes. However, the serum levels of BPAA after rectal administration of the suppositories containing BPAA or its beta-CyDs complexes in rats increased in the order of BPAA alone much less than DM-beta-CyD less than or equal to HP-beta-CyD complex. The in situ recirculation study revealed that the greater the stability constant of the complex, the lesser was the absorption of BPAA from the rectal lumen of rats under the solution state. Both in vivo and in situ studies demonstrated that rather high amount of HP-beta-CyD (about 20% of dose) was absorbable from the rat's rectum, compared with DM-beta-CyD (less than 5% of dose), suggesting the possibility of the permeation of BPAA through the rectal membrane in the form of HP-beta-CyD complex. Furthermore, DM-beta-CyD and HP-beta-CyD significantly reduced the irritation of the rectal mucosa caused by BPAA after the administration of the suppositories to rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1578346

  2. Artificial photosynthesis of. beta. -ketocarboxylic acids from carbon dioxide and ketones via enolate complexes of aluminum porphyrin

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Yasuhiro; Aida, Takuzo; Inoue, Shohei )

    1989-04-12

    Photochemical fixation of carbon dioxide is of much interest in connection with biological photosynthesis by green plants as well as from the viewpoint of carbon resource utilization. One of the important steps in the assimilation of carbon dioxide is the carboxylation of a carbonyl compound into ketocarboxylic acid, where the reaction proceeds via an enolate species as reactive intermediate. For example, in four carbon (C{sub 4}) pathway and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) processes, pyruvate is converted with the aid of ATP into phosphoenolpyruvate, which is subsequently carboxylated to give oxaloacetate by the action of pyruvate carboxylase. In relation to this interesting biological process, some artificial systems have been exploited for the synthesis of {beta}-ketocarboxylic acid derivatives from carbon dioxide and ketones using nucleophiles such as metal carbonates, thiazolates, phenolates, alkoxides, and strong organic as well as inorganic basis, which promote the enolization of ketones in the intermediate step. We wish to report here a novel, visible light-induced fixation of carbon dioxide with the enolate complex of aluminum porphyrin, giving {beta}-ketocarboxylic acid under mild conditions.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  5. Combined defects in oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid β-oxidation in mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Nsiah-Sefaa, Abena; McKenzie, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria provide the main source of energy to eukaryotic cells, oxidizing fats and sugars to generate ATP. Mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are two metabolic pathways which are central to this process. Defects in these pathways can result in diseases of the brain, skeletal muscle, heart and liver, affecting approximately 1 in 5000 live births. There are no effective therapies for these disorders, with quality of life severely reduced for most patients. The pathology underlying many aspects of these diseases is not well understood; for example, it is not clear why some patients with primary FAO deficiencies exhibit secondary OXPHOS defects. However, recent findings suggest that physical interactions exist between FAO and OXPHOS proteins, and that these interactions are critical for both FAO and OXPHOS function. Here, we review our current understanding of the interactions between FAO and OXPHOS proteins and how defects in these two metabolic pathways contribute to mitochondrial disease pathogenesis. PMID:26839416

  6. Effects of trimetazidine in ethanol- and acetic acid-induced colitis: oxidant/anti-oxidant status.

    PubMed

    Girgin; Karaoglu; Tüzün; Erkus; Ozütemiz; Dinçer; Batur; Tanyalçin

    1999-11-01

    There is overwhelming evidence in favour of a significant role of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in man and in experimental animal models. This study was undertaken to investigate the possible protective effects of pretreatment with trimetazidine (TMZ) on the oxidant-anti-oxidant balance in ethanol- and acetic acid-induced colonic damage in rats. TMZ was chosen because of its various cytoprotective features (preserving cellular ATP levels, limiting intracellular acidosis and limiting inorganic phosphate, Na(+) and Ca(2+) accumulation) and anti-oxy characteristics which were previously reported. A total of 80 rats were randomized into eight major groups each consisting of 10 animals. Animals in groups 1, 2 and 3 served as models of ethanol-induced colitis (0.25 ml of 30% (v/v) ethanol), while group 4 served as their control. Animals in groups 5, 6 and 7 served as models of acetic acid-induced colitis (1 ml of 4% (v/v) acetic acid), while group 8 served as their control. TMZ was administered 5 mg/kg by intrarectal (i.r.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes to groups 1, 2, 5 and 6. Intraperitoneal administration of TMZ was used in order to evaluate its systemic effect while i.r. administration was used to determine its local effect. After decapitation, colon mucosa samples were obtained and evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities as markers for inflammation, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as markers for oxidant stress and reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels as markers for anti-oxidant status were determined. Acute colitis was observed in macroscopic and microscopic evaluation in ethanol- and acetic acid-administered groups compared with controls (P = 0.000). The macroscopic and microscopic scores in colitis groups were correlated with MPO activities (r = 0.5365, P = 0.000 and r = 0.5499, P = 0.000, respectively). MDA

  7. Nitric oxide donor beta2-agonists: furoxan derivatives containing the fenoterol moiety and related furazans.

    PubMed

    Buonsanti, M Federica; Bertinaria, Massimo; Stilo, Antonella Di; Cena, Clara; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2007-10-01

    The structure of fenoterol, a beta2-adrenoceptor agonist used in therapy, has been joined with furoxan NO-donor moieties to give new NO-donor beta2-agonists. The furazan analogues, devoid of the property to release NO, were also synthesized for comparison. All the compounds retained beta2-agonistic activity at micromolar or submicromolar concentration when tested on guinea pig tracheal rings precontracted with carbachol. Among the furoxan derivatives, the NO contribution to trachea relaxation was evident with product 15b at micromolar concentrations. All the new NO-donor hybrids were able to dilate rat aortic strips precontracted with phenylephrine. Both furoxan and furazan derivatives displayed antioxidant activity greater than that of fenoterol. PMID:17845020

  8. Factors affecting the interactions between beta-lactoglobulin and fatty acids as revealed in molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yi, Changhong; Wambo, Thierry O

    2015-09-21

    Beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a bovine dairy protein, is a promiscuously interacting protein that can bind multiple hydrophobic ligands. Fatty acids (FAs), common hydrophobic molecules bound to BLG, are important sources of fuel for life because they yield large quantities of ATP when metabolized. The binding affinity increases with the length of the ligands, indicating the importance of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions between the hydrocarbon tail and the hydrophobic calyx of BLG. An exception to this rule is caprylic acid (OCA) which is two-carbon shorter but has a stronger binding affinity than capric acid. Theoretical calculations in the current literature are not accurate enough to shed light on the underlying physics of this exception. The computed affinity values are greater for longer fatty acids without respect for the caprylic exception and those values are generally several orders of magnitude away from the experimental data. In this work, we used hybrid steered molecular dynamics to accurately compute the binding free energies between BLG and the five saturated FAs of 8 to 16 carbon atoms. The computed binding free energies agree well with experimental data not only in rank but also in absolute values. We gained insights into the exceptional behavior of caprylic acid in the computed values of entropy and electrostatic interactions. We found that the electrostatic interaction between the carboxyl group of caprylic acid and the two amino groups of K60/69 in BLG is much stronger than the vdW force between the OCA's hydrophobic tail and the BLG calyx. This pulls OCA to the top of the beta barrel where it is easier to fluctuate, giving rise to greater entropy of OCA at the binding site. PMID:26272099

  9. Development of independent ingestive responding to blockade of fatty acid oxidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Swithers, S E

    1997-11-01

    The present studies examined the development of ingestive responsiveness to blockade of fatty acid oxidation in rat pups using 2-mercaptoacetate (MA), an inhibitor of mitochondrial acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenases, or methyl palmoxirate (MP), an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I). Rat pups aged 6, 9, 12, or 15 days of age received an intraperitoneal injection of 0, 100, 200, 400, or 800 mumol/kg MA, and intake of a commercial half-and-half or 15% glucose diet from the floor of test containers was assessed in a 30-min test beginning 1 h after administration of MA. The results demonstrate that, although no dose of MA affected intake of either diet in pups 9 days or younger, low doses of MA increased intake and the highest dose suppressed intake of both diets in pups 12 days of age or older. Physiological measurements indicated that levels of beta-hydroxybutyrate were significantly lower following doses of 400 or 800 mumol/kg MA in 9-, 12-, and 15-day-old pups and that gastric emptying was inhibited in 12 and 15 day olds by 800 mumol/kg MA. Intake of a commercial half-and-half diet from the floor of test containers was also assessed in 12- to 18-day-old rat pups 6.5 h after they received a gavage load of 0, 1.25, 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg MP. Unlike MA, MP did not increase intake of a commercial half-and-half diet in rat pups 12 or 15-18 days of age; instead, the highest dose of MP suppressed intake in 15- to 18-day-old pups. The failure of MP to enhance intake in pups at the ages tested is likely related to composition of dam's milk; rat milk is high in medium-chain fatty acids that do not require CPT-I for entry into mitochondria. Thus it is likely that MP does not significantly block fatty acid oxidation in pups at the ages tested. On the other hand, blockade of fatty acid oxidation produced by MA significantly affects intake by 12 days of age, suggesting it may be the first metabolic signal that influences intake in rat pups. PMID:9374805

  10. Impact of beta-cyclodextrin and resistant starch on bile acid metabolism and fecal steroid excretion in regard to their hypolipidemic action in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Trautwein, E A; Forgbert, K; Rieckhoff, D; Erbersdobler, H F

    1999-01-29

    To examine the impact on bile acid metabolism and fecal steroid excretion as a mechanism involved in the lipid-lowering action of beta-cyclodextrin and resistant starch in comparison to cholestyramine, male golden Syrian hamsters were fed 0% (control), 8% or 12% of beta-cyclodextrin or resistant starch or 1% cholestyramine. Resistant starch, beta-cyclodextrin and cholestyramine significantly lowered plasma total cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations compared to control. Distinct changes in the bile acid profile of gallbladder bile were caused by resistant starch, beta-cyclodextrin and cholestyramine. While cholestyramine significantly reduced chenodeoxycholate independently of its taurine-glycine conjugation, beta-cyclodextrin and resistant starch decreased especially the percentage of taurochenodeoxycholate by -75% and -44%, respectively. As a result, the cholate:chenodeoxycholate ratio was significantly increased by 100% with beta-cyclodextrin and by 550% with cholestyramine while resistant starch revealed no effect on this ratio. beta-Cyclodextrin and resistant starch, not cholestyramine, significantly increased the glycine:taurine conjugation ratio demonstrating the predominance of glycine conjugated bile acids. Daily fecal excretion of bile acids was 4-times higher with 8% beta-cyclodextrin and 19-times with 1% cholestyramine compared to control. beta-Cyclodextrin and cholestyramine also induced a 2-fold increase in fecal neutral sterol excretion, demonstrating the sterol binding capacity of these two compounds. Resistant starch had only a modest effect on fecal bile acid excretion (80% increase) and no effect on excretion of neutral sterols, suggesting a weak interaction with intestinal steroid absorption. These data demonstrate the lipid-lowering potential of beta-cyclodextrin and resistant starch. An impaired reabsorption of circulating bile acids and intestinal cholesterol absorption leading to an increase in fecal bile acid and neutral sterol

  11. Genetic Variation of Fatty Acid Oxidation and Obesity, A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Freitag Luglio, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of fat metabolism is an important component of the etiology of obesity as well as individual response to weight loss program. The influence of lipolysis process had receives many attentions in recent decades. Compared to that, fatty acid oxidation which occurred after lipolysis seems to be less exposed. There are limited publications on how fatty acid oxidation influences predisposition to obesity, especially the importance of genetic variations of fatty acid oxidation proteins on development of obesity. The aim of this review is to provide recent knowledge on how polymorphism of genes related fatty acid oxidation is obtained. Studies in human as well as animal model showed that disturbance of genes related fatty acid oxidation process gave impact on body weight and risks to obesity. Several polymorphisms on CD36, CPT, ACS and FABP had been shown to be related to obesity either by regulating enzymatic activity or directly influence fatty acid oxidation process. PMID:27127449

  12. Lewis acid catalysis and Green oxidations: sequential tandem oxidation processes induced by Mn-hyperaccumulating plants.

    PubMed

    Escande, Vincent; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Among the phytotechnologies used for the reclamation of degraded mining sites, phytoextraction aims to diminish the concentration of polluting elements in contaminated soils. However, the biomass resulting from the phytoextraction processes (highly enriched in polluting elements) is too often considered as a problematic waste. The manganese-enriched biomass derived from native Mn-hyperaccumulating plants of New Caledonia was presented here as a valuable source of metallic elements of high interest in chemical catalysis. The preparation of the catalyst Eco-Mn1 and reagent Eco-Mn2 derived from Grevillea exul exul and Grevillea exul rubiginosa was investigated. Their unusual polymetallic compositions allowed to explore new reactivity of low oxidative state of manganese-Mn(II) for Eco-Mn1 and Mn(IV) for Eco-Mn2. Eco-Mn1 was used as a Lewis acid to catalyze the acetalization/elimination of aldehydes into enol ethers with high yields; a new green and stereoselective synthesis of (-)-isopulegol via the carbonyl-ene cyclization of (+)-citronellal was also performed with Eco-Mn1. Eco-Mn2 was used as a mild oxidative reagent and controlled the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols into aldehydes with quantitative yields. Oxidative cleavage was interestingly noticed when Eco-Mn2 was used in the presence of a polyol. Eco-Mn2 allowed direct oxidative iodination of ketones without using iodine, which is strongly discouraged by new environmental legislations. Finally, the combination of the properties in the Eco-Mn catalysts and reagents gave them an unprecedented potential to perform sequential tandem oxidation processes through new green syntheses of p-cymene from (-)-isopulegol and (+)-citronellal; and a new green synthesis of functionalized pyridines by in situ oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines. PMID:25263417

  13. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. )

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  14. Effect of ascorbic acid deficiency on serum ferritin concentration in patients with beta-thalassaemia major and iron overload.

    PubMed

    Chapman, R W; Hussain, M A; Gorman, A; Laulicht, M; Politis, D; Flynn, D M; Sherlock, S; Hoffbrand, A V

    1982-05-01

    The incidence of ascorbic acid (AA) deficiency and its effect on serum ferritin concentration relative to body iron stores was studied in 61 unchelated patients with beta-thalassaemia major. Thirty-nine (64%) of patients had subnormal leucocyte ascorbate concentrations without clinical evidence of scurvy. The lowest leucocyte ascorbate concentrations tended to occur in the most transfused patients. No correlation was found between the units transfused and serum ferritin concentration in the AA-deficient patients but a close correlation (r = +0.82; p less than 0.005) existed for the AA-replete group. Similarly a close correlation (r = +0.77; p less than 0.005) was obtained between liver iron concentration and serum ferritin in AA-replete patients but only a weak correlation (r = +0.385; p less than 0.025) existed for the AA-deficient group. When AA-deficient patients were treated with ascorbic acid, serum iron and percentage saturation of iron binding capacity rose significantly; serum ferritin rose in 13 of 21 patients despite the simultaneous commencement of desferrioxamine therapy. In contrast all three measurements tended to fall in AA-replete patients with ascorbic acid and desferrioxamine therapy. Thus, AA deficiency is commonly present in beta-thalassaemia patients with iron overload and may give rise to inappropriate serum ferritin concentrations in relation to body iron stores. PMID:7085892

  15. Mycolic acid biosynthesis and enzymic characterization of the beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase A-condensing enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Laurent; Dover, Lynn G; Carrère, Séverine; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan; Lesjean, Sarah; Brown, Alistair K; Brennan, Patrick J; Minnikin, David E; Locht, Camille; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2002-06-01

    Mycolic acids consist of long-chain alpha-alkyl-beta-hydroxy fatty acids that are produced by successive rounds of elongation catalysed by a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS-II). A key feature in the elongation process is the condensation of a two-carbon unit from malonyl-acyl-carrier protein (ACP) to a growing acyl-ACP chain catalysed by a beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (Kas). In the present study, we provide evidence that kasA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes an enzyme that elongates in vivo the meromycolate chain, in both Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium chelonae. We demonstrate that KasA belongs to the FAS-II system, which utilizes primarily palmitoyl-ACP rather than short-chain acyl-ACP primers. Furthermore, in an in vitro condensing assay using purified recombinant KasA, palmitoyl-AcpM and malonyl-AcpM, KasA was found to express Kas activity. Also, mutated KasA proteins, with mutation of Cys(171), His(311), Lys(340) and His(345) to Ala abrogated the condensation activity of KasA in vitro completely. Finally, purified KasA was highly sensitive to cerulenin, a well-known inhibitor of Kas, which may lead to the development of novel anti-mycobacterial drugs targeting KasA. PMID:12023885

  16. Comparative Oxidative Stability of Fatty Acid Alkyl Esters by Accelerated Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several fatty acid alkyl esters were subjected to accelerated methods of oxidation, including EN 14112 (Rancimat method) and pressurized differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC). Structural trends elucidated from both methods that improved oxidative stability included decreasing the number of doubl...

  17. Respiratory and eye irritation from boron oxide and boric acid dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Garabrant, D.H.; Bernstein, L.; Peters, J.M.; Smith, T.J.

    1984-08-01

    Boron oxide has been shown in animals to irritate the respiratory mucosa and conjuctiva. The present study was undertaken to determine whether exposures to boron oxide and its hydration product, boric acid, cau

  18. Characterization of phosphonic acid binding to zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, Peter J.; Malicki, Michał; Giordano, Anthony J.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Marder, Seth R.

    2011-01-24

    Radio Frequency (RF) sputter-deposited zinc oxide (ZnO) films have been modified with alkylphosphonic acids in order to study both the binding of the phosphonic acid (PA) group to the ZnO surface and the packing of the alkyl chain. The characterization of these PA-modified ZnO substrates by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements is presented herein. The surface modification procedure is straightforward and was adapted from earlier work. XPS analysis shows that oxygen plasma (OP) treatment creates reactive oxygen species on the surface of ZnO, allowing for a more robust binding of PAs to the ZnO surface. IRRAS analysis indicates that octadecylphosphonic acid binds to the ZnO surface in a predominantly tridentate fashion, forming dense, well-packed monolayers with alkyl chains in a fully anti-conformation. AFM and contact angle measurements indicate good surface coverage of the PAs with little to no multilayer formation.

  19. Role of oxidative stress, inflammation, nitric oxide and transforming growth factor-beta in the protective effect of diosgenin in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Lamiaa A; Obaid, Al Arqam Z; Zaki, Hala F; Agha, Azza M

    2014-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a progressive disease of various origins that is associated with right ventricular dysfunction. In the present study, the protective effect of diosgenin was investigated in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. Pulmonary hypertension was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg). Diosgenin (100 mg/kg) was given by oral administration once daily for 3 weeks. At the end of the experiment, mean arterial blood pressure, electrocardiography and echocardiography were recorded. Rats were then sacrificed and serum was separated for determination of total nitrate/nitrite level. Right ventricles and lungs were isolated for estimation of oxidative stress markers, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, total nitrate/nitrite and transforming growth factor-beta contents. Myeloperoxidase and caspase-3 activities in addition to endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression were also determined. Moreover, histological analysis of pulmonary arteries and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was performed. Diosgenin treatment provided a significant improvement toward preserving hemodynamic changes and alleviating oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic markers induced by monocrotaline in rats. Furthermore, diosgenin therapy prevented monocrotaline-induced changes in nitric oxide production, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression as well as histological analysis. These findings support the beneficial effect of diosgenin in pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline in rats. PMID:25062790

  20. Catalytic air oxidation of biomass-derived carbohydrates to formic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Ding, Dao-Jun; Deng, Li; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2012-07-01

    An efficient catalytic system for biomass oxidation to form formic acid was developed. The conversion of glucose to formic acid can reach up to 52% yield within 3 h when catalyzed by 5 mol% of H(5)PV(2)Mo(10)O(40) at only 373 K using air as the oxidant. Furthermore, the heteropolyacid can be used as a bifunctional catalyst in the conversion of cellulose to formic acid (yield=35%) with air as the oxidant. PMID:22499553

  1. Beta-carotene encapsulated in food protein nanoparticles reduces peroxyl radical oxidation in Caco-2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-carotene (BC) was encapsulated by sodium caseinate (SC), whey protein isolate (WPI), and soybean protein isolate (SPI) by the homogenization-evaporation method forming nanoparticles of 78, 90 and 370 nm diameter. Indices of the chemical antioxidant assays, the reducing power, DPPH radical scave...

  2. Interaction of Beta-Hydroxy-Beta-Methylbutyrate Free Acid and Adenosine Triphosphate on Muscle Mass, Strength, and Power in Resistance Trained Individuals.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Rathmacher, John A; Baier, Shawn M; Fuller, John C; Shelley, Mack C; Jäger, Ralf; Purpura, Martin; Wilson, Stephanie M C; Wilson, Jacob M

    2016-07-01

    Lowery, RP, Joy, JM, Rathmacher, JA, Baier, SM, Fuller, JC Jr, Shelley, MC II, Jäger, R, Purpura, M, Wilson, SMC, and Wilson, JM. Interaction of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate free acid and adenosine triphosphate on muscle mass, strength, and power in resistance trained individuals. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1843-1854, 2016-Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) supplementation helps maintain performance under high fatiguing contractions and with greater fatigue recovery demands also increase. Current evidence suggests that the free acid form of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB-FA) acts by speeding regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle after high-intensity or prolonged exercise. Therefore, we investigated the effects of 12 weeks of HMB-FA (3 g) and ATP (400 mg) administration on lean body mass (LBM), strength, and power in trained individuals. A 3-phase double-blind, placebo-, and diet-controlled study was conducted. Phases consisted of an 8-week periodized resistance training program (phase 1), followed by a 2-week overreaching cycle (phase 2), and a 2-week taper (phase 3). Lean body mass was increased by a combination of HMB-FA/ATP by 12.7% (p < 0.001). In a similar fashion, strength gains after training were increased in HMB-FA/ATP-supplemented subjects by 23.5% (p < 0.001). Vertical jump and Wingate power were increased in the HMB-FA/ATP-supplemented group compared with the placebo-supplemented group, and the 12-week increases were 21.5 and 23.7%, respectively. During the overreaching cycle, strength and power declined in the placebo group (4.3-5.7%), whereas supplementation with HMB-FA/ATP resulted in continued strength gains (1.3%). In conclusion, HMB-FA and ATP in combination with resistance exercise training enhanced LBM, power, and strength. In addition, HMB-FA plus ATP blunted the typical response to overreaching, resulting in a further increase in strength during that period. It seems that the combination of HMB-FA/ATP could benefit those who

  3. Stimulation of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression by Beta Interferon Increases Necrotic Death of Macrophages upon Listeria monocytogenes Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Zwaferink, Heather; Stockinger, Silvia; Reipert, Siegfried; Decker, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Murine macrophage death upon infection with Listeria monocytogenes was previously shown to be increased by beta interferon, produced by the infected cells. We saw that interferon-upregulated caspase activation or other interferon-inducible, death-associated proteins, including TRAIL, protein kinase R, and p53, were not necessary for cell death. Macrophage death was reduced when inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was inhibited during infection, and iNOS-deficient macrophages were less susceptible to death upon infection than wild-type cells. The production of nitric oxide correlated with increased death, while no role was seen for iNOS in control of Listeria numbers during infection of resting macrophages. This indicates that the induction of iNOS by beta interferon in cells infected with L. monocytogenes contributes to cell death. Based on morphology, the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, and a lack of dependence on caspase 1, we characterize the type of cell death occurring and show that infected macrophages die by interferon-upregulated necrosis. PMID:18268032

  4. [Effect of cultivation conditions on the accumulation of poly-beta-hydroxy-butyric acid in Rhizobium lupini].

    PubMed

    Yushkova, L A; Fedulova, N G; Romanov, V I; Kretovich, W L

    1975-01-01

    The influence of the age of the culture and nitrogen source on the accumulation of poly-beta-hydroxybutyric acid by different strains of Rhizobium lupini was studied. The accumulation depended on the age of the culture and reached maximum at the end of the logarithmic and at the beginning of the stationary phase of the bacterial growth (about 50-60% dry weight). The accumulation varied in relation to the nitrogen source used: it was the highest in the glutamate medium and the lowest on nitrate nitrogen; the culture grown on ammonium phosphate was intermediate. PMID:1208373

  5. The cyclic oxidation resistance at 1200 C of beta-NiAl, FeAl, and CoAl alloys with selected third element additions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Titran, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The intermetallic compounds Beta-NiAl, FeAl, and CoAl were tested in cyclic oxidation with selected third element alloy additions. Tests in static air for 200 1-hr cycles at 1200 C indicated by specific weight change/time data and x-ray diffraction analysis that the 5 at percent alloy additions did not significantly improve the oxidation resistance over the alumina forming baseline alloys without the additions. Many of the alloy additions were actually deleterious. Ta and Nb were the only alloy additions that actually altered the nature of the oxide(s) formed and still maintained the oxidation resistance of the protective alumina scale.

  6. Beta-ketoadipic acid and muconolactone production from a lignin-related aromatic compound through the protocatechuate 3,4-metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Okamura-Abe, Yuriko; Abe, Tomokuni; Nishimura, Kei; Kawata, Yasutaka; Sato-Izawa, Kanna; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Kajita, Shinya; Masai, Eiji; Sonoki, Tomonori; Katayama, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the effects of PcaJ (beta-ketoadipate:succinyl-coenzyme A transferase)- and PcaD (beta-ketoadipate enol-lactone hydrolase)-inactivation on protocatechuic acid metabolism in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 were evaluated. Beta-ketoadipic acid was produced from protocatechuic acid by the inactivation of PcaJ as expected; however, a portion of the produced beta-ketoadipic acid was converted to levulinic acid through a purification step consisting of extraction from the culture and recrystallization. On the other hand, muconolactone was purified from the culture of the PcaD-inactivated mutant of KT2440, although beta-ketoadipate enol-lactone was supposed to be produced because it is the substrate of PcaD. Under aerobic conditions, it has been reported that lignin-related aromatics are metabolized through PCA 2,3- or 3,4- or 4,5-ring cleavage pathways, and muconolactone is an intermediate observed in the metabolism of catechol, not protocatechuic acid. Our results will provide a prospective route to produce muconolactone with a high yield through the protocatechuate-3,4-metabolic pathway. PMID:26723258

  7. Fatty Acid Composition as a Predictor for the Oxidation Stability of Korean Vegetable Oils with or without Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jung-Mi; Surh, Jeonghee

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the fatty acid composition could make a significant contribution to the oxidation stability of vegetable oils marketed in Korea. Ten kinds, 97 items of vegetable oils that were produced in either an industrialized or a traditional way were collected and analyzed for their fatty acid compositions and lipid oxidation products, in the absence or presence of oxidative stress. Peroxidability index (PI) calculations based on the fatty acid composition ranged from 7.10 to 111.87 with the lowest value found in olive oils and the highest in perilla oils. In the absence of induced oxidative stress, malondialdehyde (MDA), the secondary lipid oxidation product, was generated more in the oils with higher PI (r=0.890), while the tendency was not observed when the oils were subjected to an oxidation-accelerating system. In the presence of the oxidative stress, the perilla oils produced in an industrialized manner generated appreciably higher amounts of MDA than those produced in a traditional way, although both types of oils presented similar PIs. The results implicate that the fatty acid compositions could be a predictor for the oxidation stability of the vegetable oils at the early stage of oil oxidation, but not for those at a later stage of oxidation. PMID:24471078

  8. Iron sulfide oxidation and the chemistry of acid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Patrick J.; Yelton, Jennifer L.; Reddy, K. J.

    1988-06-01

    Acid mine drainage, produced from the oxidation of iron sulfides, often contains elevated levels of dissolved aluminum (AI), iron (Fe), and sulfate (SO4) and low pH. Understanding the interactions of these elements associated with acid mine drainage is necessary for proper solid waste management planning. Two eastern oil shales were leached using humidity cell methods. This study used a New Albany Shale (4.6 percent pyrite) and a Chattanooga Shale (1.5 percent pyrite). The leachates from the humidity cells were filtered, and the filtrates were analyzed for total concentrations of cations and anions. After correcting for significant solution species and complexes, ion activities were calculated from total concentrations. The results show that the activities of Fe3+, Fe2+, Al3+, and SO4 2- increased due to the oxidation of pyrite. Furthermore, the oxidation of pyrite resulted in a decreased pH and an increased pe+pH (redox-potential). The Fe3+ and Fe2+ activities appeared to be controlled by amorphous Fe(OH)3 solid phase above a pH of 6.0 and below pe+pH 11.0. The Fe3+, Fe2+, and SO4 2- activities reached saturation with respect to FeOHSO4 solid phase between pH 3.0 and 6.0 and below pe+pH 11.0 Below a pH of 3.0 and above a pe+pH of 11.0, Fe2+, Fe3+, and SO4 2- activities are supported by FeSO4·7H2O solid phase. Above a pH of 6.0, the Al3+ activity showed an equilibrium with amorphous Al(OH)3 solid phase. Below pH 6.0, Al3+ and SO4 2- activities are regulated by the AlOHSO4 solid phase, irrespective of pe+pH. The results of this study suggest that under oxidizing conditions with low to high leaching potential, activities of Al and Fe can be predicted on the basis of secondary mineral formation over a wide range of pH and redox. As a result, the long-term chemistry associated with disposal environments can be largely predicted (including trace elements).

  9. Exposure assessment of oxidant gases and acidic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    Clearly the presence of high ozone and acidic species in North America is primarily dependent upon photochemical air pollution. Evidence shows, however, that high acid exposures may occur in specific types of areas of high sulfur fuel use during the winter. At the present time, our concerns about exposure to local populations and regional populations should be directed primarily toward the outdoor activity patterns of individuals in the summer, and how those activity patterns relate to the location, duration, and concentrations of ozone and acid aerosol in photochemical air pollution episodes. Lioy Dyba and Mage et al have examined the activity patterns of children in summer camps. Because they spend more time outside than the normal population, these children form an important group of exercising individuals subject to photochemical pollution exposures. The dose of ozone inhaled by the children in the two camps was within 50% and 25% of the dose inhaled by adults in controlled clinical situations that produced clinically significant decrements in pulmonary function and increased the symptoms after 6.6 hr exposure in a given day. The chamber studies have used only ozone, whereas in the environment this effect may be enhanced by the presence of a complex mixture. The work of Lioy et al in Mendham, New Jersey found that hydrogen ion seemed to play a role in the inability of the children to return immediately to their normal peak expiratory flow rate after exposure. The camp health study conducted in Dunsville, Ontario suggested that children participating in a summer camp where moderate levels of ozone (100 ppb) but high levels of acid (46 micrograms/m3) occurred during an episode had a similar response. Thus, for children or exercising adults who are outdoors for at least one hour or more during a given day, the presence and persistence of oxidants in the environment are of particular concern. 63 references.

  10. [The influence of panthotenic acid mitochondrial oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation in liver of rats with alimentary obesity].

    PubMed

    Naruta, E E; Egorov, A I; Omel'ianchik, C N; Buko, V U

    2004-01-01

    Alimentary obesity induced by the long-term feeding of rats by high-fat diet results the reducing of rate and efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation in liver mitochondria when NAD-dependent substrates are used. The treatment of the obese rats with panthotenic acid derivatives (phosphopantotenate, panthetin, panthenol) enhanced oxidative phosphorylation of pyruvate and fatty acid carnitine esters. Among investigated compounds panthenol activated respiratory control and phosphorylation rate more effectively. Moreover, panthenol, but not phosphopanthotenate nor panthetine, increased the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 that confirms the preferable usage of fatty acids for mitochondrial oxidation under the influence of this compound. PMID:15460980

  11. Three-dimensional structural model analysis of the binding site of lithocholic acid, an inhibitor of DNA polymerase beta and DNA topoisomerase II.

    PubMed

    Mizushina, Y; Kasai, N; Sugawara, F; Iida, A; Yoshida, H; Sakaguchi, K

    2001-11-01

    The molecular action of lithocholic acid (LCA), a selective inhibitor of mammalian DNA polymerase beta (pol beta), was investigated. We found that LCA could also strongly inhibit the activity of human DNA topoisomerase II (topo II). No other DNA metabolic enzymes tested were affected by LCA. Therefore, LCA should be classified as an inhibitor of both pol beta and topo II. Here, we report the molecular interaction of LCA with pol beta and topo II. By three-dimensional structural model analysis and by comparison with the spatial positioning of specific amino acids binding to LCA on pol beta (Lys60, Leu77, and Thr79), we obtained supplementary information that allowed us to build a structural model of topo II. Modeling analysis revealed that the LCA-interaction interface in both enzymes has a pocket comprised of three amino acids in common, which binds to the LCA molecule. In topo II, the three amino acid residues were Lys720, Leu760, and Thr791. These results suggested that the LCA binding domains of pol beta and topo II are three-dimensionally very similar. PMID:11686928

  12. Factors contributing to decreased protein stability when aspartic acid residues are in {beta}-sheet regions.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Cai, X.; Raffen, R.; Gu, M.; Stevens, F. J.; Schiffer, M.

    2002-07-01

    Asp residues are significantly under represented in {beta}-sheet regions of proteins, especially in the middle of {beta}-strands, as found by a number of studies using statistical, modeling, or experimental methods. To further understand the reasons for this under representation of Asp, we prepared and analyzed mutants of a {beta}-domain. Two Gln residues of the immunoglobulin light-chain variable domain (V{sub L}) of protein Len were replaced with Asp, and then the effects of these changes on protein stability and protein structure were studied. The replacement of Q38D, located at the end of a {beta}-strand, and that of Q89D, located in the middle of a {beta}-strand, reduced the stability of the parent immunoglobulin VL domain by 2.0 kcal/mol and 5.3 kcal/mol, respectively. Because the Q89D mutant of the wild-type V{sub L}-Len domain was too unstable to be expressed as a soluble protein, we prepared the Q89D mutant in a triple mutant background, V{sub L}-Len M4L/Y27dD/T94H, which was 4.2 kcal/mol more stable than the wild-type V{sub L}-Len domain. The structures of mutants V{sub L}-Len Q38D and V{sub L}-Len Q89D/M4L/Y27dD/T94H were determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.6 A resolution. We found no major perturbances in the structures of these QD mutant proteins relative to structures of the parent proteins. The observed stability changes have to be accounted for by cumulative effects of the following several factors: (1) by changes in main-chain dihedral angles and in side-chain rotomers, (2) by close contacts between some atoms, and, most significantly, (3) by the unfavorable electrostatic interactions between the Asp side chain and the carbonyls of the main chain. We show that the Asn side chain, which is of similar size but neutral, is less destabilizing. The detrimental effect of Asp within a {beta}-sheet of an immunoglobulin-type domain can have very serious consequences. A somatic mutation of a {beta}-strand residue to Asp could prevent the expression of the

  13. The protective effects of omega-6 fatty acids in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in relation to transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1) up-regulation and increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production.

    PubMed

    Harbige, L S; Layward, L; Morris-Downes, M M; Dumonde, D C; Amor, S

    2000-12-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are known to affect the immune response and administration of the omega-6 fatty acid linoleic acid has been reported to be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS) and EAE. In this study we have investigated the effects of oral feeding of plant lipid rich in the omega-6 fatty acid gamma-linolenic acid from Borago officinalis on acute and relapse disease and the immune response in EAE using SJL mice. EAE was induced by an encephalitogenic peptide (92-106) of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), and mice were fed the plant lipid daily from 7 days after EAE induction to assess the effects on acute disease and from day 25 to assess the effects on disease relapse. The clinical incidence and histological manifestations of acute EAE, and the clinical relapse phase of chronic relapsing EAE (CREAE) were markedly inhibited by omega-6 fatty acid feeding. A significant increase in the production of TGF-beta1 in response to concanavalin A (Con A) at day 13 and a significant increase in TGF-beta1 and PGE2 to Con A, PPD and MOG peptide (92-106) at day 21 were detected in spleen mononuclear cells from fatty acid-fed mice. There was no difference in interferon-gamma, IL-4 and IL-2 production between the fatty acid-fed and control groups. Significantly higher TGF-beta mRNA expression was found in the spleens of omega-6 fatty acid-fed mice at day 21. There were no differences in spleen cell proliferative response to Con A, PPD and MOG peptide (92-106). Biochemical analysis of spleen cell membrane fatty acids revealed significant increases in the eicosanoid precursor fatty acids dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid in response to gamma-linolenic acid feeding, indicating rapid metabolism to longer chain omega-6 fatty acids. These results show that oral feeding of gamma-linolenic acid-rich plant lipid markedly affects the disease course of acute EAE and CREAE and is associated with an increase in cell membrane long chain omega-6 fatty acids

  14. Method for the separation of the unconjugates and conjugates of chenodeoxycholic acid and deoxycholic acid by two-dimensional reversed-phase thin layer chromatography with methyl beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Momose, T; Mure, M; Iida, T; Goto, J; Nambara, T

    1998-06-19

    A simple and efficient method for the separation of individual unconjugated bile acids and their glycine- and taurine-amidated, 3-sulfated, 3-glucosylated and 3-glucuronidated conjugates is described. The method involves the use of a two-dimensional (2D) reversed-phase (RP) high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) technique with methyl beta-cyclodextrin (Me-beta-CD). Five major unconjugated bile acids, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), ursodeoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid, and their conjugates were examined as the solutes. A high degree of separation of individual bile acids in each homologous series was achieved on a RP-HPTLC plate by developing with aqueous methanol in the first dimension and the same solvent system containing Me-beta-CD in the second dimension. In particular, all of the six 'difficult-to-separate' pairs, unconjugated CDCA and DCA and their conjugated forms with glycine, taurine, sulfuric acid, D-glucose and D-glucuronic acid, were effectively resolved by adding Me-beta-CD in the aqueous mobile phases with the formers having larger mobilities than the latter. The application of this 2D inclusion RP-HPLC method to the separation of glycine-conjugated bile acids in human bile is also described. The present method would be useful for separating and characterizing these bile acids present in biological materials. PMID:9691303

  15. An injectable oxidated hyaluronic acid/adipic acid dihydrazide hydrogel as a vitreous substitute.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Yu; Chen, Ko-Hua; Chen, Yu-Chun; Lee, Yen-Hsien; Tseng, Ching-Li; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2011-01-01

    Vitrectomy is a common procedure for treating ocular-related diseases. The surgery involves removing the vitreous humor from the center of the eye, and vitreous substitutes are needed to replace the vitreous humor after vitrectomy. In the present study, we developed a colorless, transparent and injectable hydrogel with appropriate refractive index as a vitreous substitute. The hydrogel is formed by oxidated hyaluronic acid (oxi-HA) cross-linked with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH). Hyaluronic acid (HA) was oxidized by sodium periodate to create aldehyde functional groups, which could be cross-linked by ADH. The refractive index of this hydrogel ranged between 1.3420 and 1.3442, which is quite similar to human vitreous humor (1.3345). The degradation tests demonstrated that the hydrogel could maintain the gel matrix over 35 days, depending on the ADH concentration. In addition, the cytotoxicity was evaluated on retina pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells cultivated following the ISO standard (tests for in vitro cytotoxicity), and the hydrogel was found to be non-toxic. In a preliminary animal study, the oxi-HA/ADH hydrogel was injected into the vitreous cavity of rabbit eyes. The evaluations of slit-lamp observation, intraocular pressure, cornea thickness and histological examination showed no significant abnormal biological reactions for 3 weeks. This study suggests that the injectable oxi-HA/ADH hydrogel should be a potential vitreous substitute. PMID:20843434

  16. Injectable oxidized hyaluronic acid/adipic acid dihydrazide hydrogel for nucleus pulposus regeneration.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chun; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2010-08-01

    Injectable hydrogel allows irregular surgical defects to be completely filled, lessens the risk of implant migration, and minimizes surgical defects due to the solution-gel state transformation. Here, we first propose a method for preparing oxidized hyaluronic acid/adipic acid dihydrazide (oxi-HA/ADH) injectable hydrogel by chemical cross-linking under physiological conditions. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and trinitrobenzene sulfonate assay were used to confirm the oxidation of hyaluronic acid. Rheological properties were measured to evaluate the working ability of the hydrogel for further clinical application. The oxi-HA/ADH in situ forming hydrogel can transform from liquid form into a gel-like matrix within 3-8 min, depending on the operational temperature. Furthermore, hydrogel degradation and cell assessment is also a concern for clinical application. Injectable oxi-HA/ADH8 hydrogel can maintain its gel-like state for at least 5 weeks with a degradation percentage of 40%. Importantly, oxi-HA/ADH8 hydrogel can assist in nucleus pulposus cell synthesis of type II collagen and aggrecan mRNA gene expression according to the results of real-time PCR analysis, and shows good biocompatibility based on cell viability and cytotoxicity assays. Based on the results of the current study, oxi-HA/ADH hydrogel may possess several advantages for future application in nucleus pulposus regeneration. PMID:20193782

  17. Flavins secreted by roots of iron-deficient Beta vulgaris enable mining of ferric oxide via reductive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sisó-Terraza, Patricia; Rios, Juan J; Abadía, Javier; Abadía, Anunciación; Álvarez-Fernández, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is abundant in soils but generally poorly soluble. Plants, with the exception of Graminaceae, take up Fe using an Fe(III)-chelate reductase coupled to an Fe(II) transporter. Whether or not nongraminaceous species can convert scarcely soluble Fe(III) forms into soluble Fe forms has deserved little attention so far. We have used Beta vulgaris, one among the many species whose roots secrete flavins upon Fe deficiency, to study whether or not flavins are involved in Fe acquisition. Flavins secreted by Fe-deficient plants were removed from the nutrient solution, and plants were compared with Fe-sufficient plants and Fe-deficient plants without flavin removal. Solubilization of a scarcely soluble Fe(III)-oxide was assessed in the presence or absence of flavins, NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form) or plant roots, and an Fe(II) trapping agent. The removal of flavins from the nutrient solution aggravated the Fe deficiency-induced leaf chlorosis. Flavins were able to dissolve an Fe(III)-oxide in the presence of NADH. The addition of extracellular flavins enabled roots of Fe-deficient plants to reductively dissolve an Fe(III)-oxide. We concluded that root-secretion of flavins improves Fe nutrition in B. vulgaris. Flavins allow B. vulgaris roots to mine Fe from Fe(III)-oxides via reductive mechanisms. PMID:26351005

  18. Evaluation of Dense Polylactic Acid/Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yanoso-Scholl, Laura; Jacobson, Justin A.; Bradica, Gino; Lerner, Amy L.; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Zuscik, Michael J.; Awad, Hani A.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in biomaterial fabrication have introduced numerous innovations in designing scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Often, the focus has been on fabricating scaffolds with high and interconnected porosity that would allow for cellular seeding and tissue ingrowth. However, such scaffolds typically lack the mechanical strength to sustain in vivo ambulatory stresses in models of load bearing cortical bone reconstruction. In this study, we investigated the microstructural and mechanical properties of dense PLA and PLA/beta-TCP (85:15) scaffolds fabricated using a rapid volume expansion phase separation technique, which embeds uncoated beta-TCP particles within the porous polymer. PLA scaffolds had a volumetric porosity in the range of 30 – 40%. With the embedding of beta-TCP mineral particles, the porosity of the scaffolds was reduced in half while the ultimate compressive and torsional strength were significantly increased. We also investigated the properties of the scaffolds as delivery vehicles for growth factors and gene delivery vectors in vitro and in vivo. The low surface porosity resulted in sub optimal retention efficiency of the growth factors, and burst release kinetics reflecting surface coating rather than volumetric entrapment, regardless of the scaffold used. When loaded with BMP2 and VEGF and implanted in the quadriceps muscle, PLA/beta-TCP scaffolds did not induce ectopic mineralization but induced a significant 1.8 fold increase in neo vessel formation. In conclusion, dense PLA/beta-TCP scaffolds can be engineered with enhanced mechanical properties and potentially be exploited for localized therapeutic factor delivery. PMID:20725979

  19. Hydrogen exchane at the beta-carbon of amino acids during transamination.

    PubMed

    Walter, U; Luthe, H; Söling, H D

    1975-11-15

    The hydrogen exchange at the Beta-carbon of L-alanine, L-glutamate and L-asparate with water has been examined during transamination catalyzed by glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and by glutamic-pyruvic transaminase. A significant hydrogen exchange at the Beta-carbon has been demonstrated during incubation of L-[3-3H]alanine + glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, L-[3-3H]alanine + alpha-oxo-glutarate + glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, L-[3-3H]glutamate + glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, L-[3-3H]glutamate + oxaloacetate +glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, and L-[3-3H]glutamate + pyruvate + glutamic-pyruvic transaminase as shown by the appearance of 3H2O. No hydrogen exchange at the Beta-carbon of L-glutamate occurred during incubation of L-[3-3H]-glutamate with glutamic-pyruvic transaminase alone. The hydrogen exchaned at the Beta-carbon of L-glutamate coincides with transamination as demonstrated by nuclear magnetic resonance studies of 2H2O-L-glutamate exchange during transamination by glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase. No hydrogen exchange at the Beta-carbon occurred during transamination of L-aspartate by glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance simulation studies. The results are discussed with special reference to the different equilibria between the pyridoxal form and the pyridoxamine form of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and of glutamic-pyruvic transaminase. PMID:1204622

  20. Dependence of gamma-aminobutyric acid modulation of cholinergic transmission on nitric oxide and purines in cat terminal ileum.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N

    1997-11-27

    The possible involvement of purines and/or nitric oxide (NO) in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-mediated effects on the spontaneous activity of isolated preparations from longitudinal and circular muscles of cat terminal ileum was investigated. GABA had biphasic effects, which were neurogenic and muscarinic. ATP and adenosine dose dependently inhibited the activity of the muscles. A contractile response evoked by the nucleotide only was also observed. The effects of the purines were equipotent and resistant to Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), tetrodotoxin and to desensitization by alpha,beta-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (alpha,beta-meATP), except for the contractile effect of ATP, which was abolished by alpha,beta-meATP. Pretreatment of the preparations with ATP or adenosine produced: (i) desensitization to the effects of the respective purinoceptor agonist only; and (ii) suppression of the GABA-induced responses of longitudinal and circular muscles. Hemoglobin and L-NNA greatly reduced or completely blocked the GABA(A)-induced relaxation and decreased the GABA(A)-induced contraction. Our results indicate that purines and NO, to a different extent, mediate the relaxant phase of the GABA effects in both layers. Interactions between muscarinic cholinoceptors and GABA-nitrergic pathway and a concomitant activation of postjunctional P1 and P2y purinoceptors are suggested to explain the prejunctional biphasic effects of GABA. PMID:9473135

  1. Triiodothyronine activates lactate oxidation without impairing fatty acid oxidation and improves weaning from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Kajimoto, Hidemi; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides a rescue for children with severe cardiac failure. We previously showed that triiodothyronine (T3) improves cardiac function by modulating pyruvate oxidation during weaning. This study was focused on fatty acid (FA) metabolism modulated by T3 for weaning from ECMO after cardiac injury. Methods: Nineteen immature piglets (9.1-15.3 kg) were separated into 3 groups with ECMO (6.5 hours) and wean: normal circulation (Group-C);transient coronary occlusion (10 minutes) followed by ECMO (Group-IR); and IR with T3 supplementation (Group-IR-T3). 13-Carbon labeled lactate, medium-chain and long-chain FAs were infused as oxidative substrates. Substrate fractional contribution to the citric acid cycle (FC) was analyzed by 13-Carbon nuclear magnetic resonance. Results: ECMO depressed circulating T3 levels to 40% baseline at 4 hours and were restored in Group-IR-T3. Group-IR decreased cardiac power, which was not fully restorable and 2 pigs were lost because of weaning failure. Group-IR also depressed FC-lactate, while the excellent contractile function and energy efficiency in Group-IR-T3 occurred along with a marked FC-lactate increase and [ATP]/[ADP] without either decreasing FC-FAs or elevating myocardial oxygen consumption over Group-C or -IR. Conclusions: T3 releases inhibition of lactate oxidation following ischemia-reperfusion injury without impairing FA oxidation. These findings indicate that T3 depression during ECMO is maladaptive, and that restoring levels improves metabolic flux and enhances contractile function during weaning.

  2. Campylobacter jejuni fatty acid synthase II: Structural and functional analysis of [beta]-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew S.; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Yeo, Hye-Jeong

    2009-08-14

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is crucial for all living cells. In contrast to higher organisms, bacteria use a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS II) composed of a series of individual proteins, making FAS II enzymes excellent targets for antibiotics discovery. The {beta}-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ) catalyzes an essential step in the FAS II pathway. Here, we report the structure of Campylobacter jejuni FabZ (CjFabZ), showing a hexamer both in crystals and solution, with each protomer adopting the characteristic hot dog fold. Together with biochemical analysis of CjFabZ, we define the first functional FAS II enzyme from this pathogen, and provide a framework for investigation on roles of FAS II in C. jejuni virulence

  3. Lewis Acid Catalysis in the Oxidative Cycloaddition of Thiophenes(1).

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanqiang; Thiemann, Thies; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Mataka, Shuntaro; Tashiro, Masashi

    1997-11-14

    Thiophenes 1 were treated with m-chloroperbenzoic acid (m-CPBA) under BF(3).Et(2)O catalysis to afford thiophene S-monoxides. These could be reacted in situ as intermediary species with a number of dienophiles to provide arenes (with alkynes as dienophiles) or 7-thiabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene 7-oxides (with alkenes as dienophiles). It was also possible to isolate thiophene S-monoxides in solution and to cycloadd them in a second step. In either way it could be shown that the use of BF(3).Et(2)O enhances the yields of the oxidative cycloaddition of thiophenes considerably. Moreover a greater variety of dienophiles (29a, 29b, 29c) could be reacted with thiophenes than in the case of the noncatalyzed reaction. All cycloadditions catalyzed by BF(3).Et(2)O give only a single diastereoisomer as cycloadduct. The reactions show a high pi-facial selectivity, a fact that can be explained by the Cieplak-effect. Without added dienophiles, 2-methylthiophene (1e) gave a single dimer (36) of 2-methylthiophene S-monoxide, whereas 2,5-dimethylthiophene (1a) gave three dimers (32a-c). In the case of tetrasubstituted thiophenes, thiophene S-monoxides (e.g., 31b and 31c) could be isolated in substance. PMID:11671894

  4. Regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: involvement of protein kinase G 1 beta, serine 116 phosphorylation and lipid structures.

    PubMed

    John, Theresa A; Ibe, Basil O; Raj, J Usha

    2008-02-01

    1. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) is important for vascular homeostasis. The role of protein kinase G (PKG) in regulation of NOS3 activity was studied in primary cultures of newborn lamb lung microvascular endothelial cells (LMVEC). 2. We determined the presence of PKG in fetal and neonatal LMVEC as well as subcellular localization of PKG isoforms in the neonatal cells by fluorescence immunohistochemistry. We used diaminofluorescein (DAF) fluorophore to measure nitric oxide (NO) production from neonatal LMVEC. We confirmed that NO measured was from constitutive NOS3 by inhibiting it with NOS inhibitors. 3. To identify a role for PKG in basal NO production, we measured NO release from LMVEC cells using 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein (DAF-FM; 0.5-0.8 micromol/L) with and without prior stimulation with the PKG activator 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP; 0.3 and 3 micromol/L) or prior PKG inhibition with beta-phenyl-1,N2-etheno-8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothionate (BPC; 0.3 and 3 micromol/L). With the same drugs, we determined the role of PKG on cellular expression of NOS3 and serine 116 phosphorylated NOS (pSer116-NOS) by qualitative and quantitative immunofluorescence assays, as well as western blotting. 4. Because PKG 1 beta was distributed throughout the cytosol in a punctate expression, we used 2 mmol/L cyclodextrin, a cholesterol extractor, to determine a role for lipid vesicles in PKG regulation of NO production. 5. Protein kinase G 1 beta gave a punctate appearance, indicating its presence in intracellular vesicles. Nitric oxide production decreased by approximately 20% with 300 nmol/L and 3 micromol/L 8-Br cGMP (P < 0.05) and increased by 20.8 +/- 3.7% with 3 micromol/L BPC (P < 0.001), indicating that both stimulated and basal PKG activity has inhibitory effects on basal NOS3 function. Nitric oxide synthase immunofluorescence and immunoblot expression were decreased and pSer116-NOS immunofluorescence was increased by 800 nmol

  5. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  6. Effect of chlorine as substituent on the photochemistry and acid-base properties of beta-carboline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Tarzi, Olga I; Erra-Balsells, Rosa

    2006-02-01

    The UV-absorption, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the 6-chloro-, 8-chloro-, 6,8-dichloro-derivatives of nor-harmane, harmane and harmine and the 8-chloro-derivative of harmol were studied. These studies were performed in EtOH and in EtOH+1% perchloric acid solutions (pa). Furthermore, fluorescence quantum yields (phi(f)) in both media and in acetonitrile and acetonitrile + 1% perchloric acid solutions at 298 K were measured. The HOMO and LUMO energy, the positions (lambda(max)) and oscillator strength (f) of the 1S1 <-- 1S0 band for all the neutral and protonated beta-carbolines studied were calculated and compared with the experimental data. The pK(a) values in aqueous solution for for 6-chloro-, 8-chloro- and 6,8-dichloro-nor-harmane, harmane and harmine and 8-chloro-harmol were spectrophotometrically measured (pK(a(H2O)). The change of the acid-base character of these compounds on going from the ground state (pK(a)) to the first electronic excited singlet state (pKa*) as DeltapKa = pKa*-pKa, in ethanol solution at 298 K were calculated (DeltapK(a(EtOH))). Ground-state proton affinity (PA) for all the compounds studied defined as minus the enthalpy change of the reaction M + H(+) --> MH+ (gas state) were calculated. Basicity relative to pyridine (DeltaH(rPy)) defined as the enthalpy change of the isodesmic reaction MH(+) + Py --> M + PyH+ in gas state and in water solution, were also calculated (ab initio calculations). The effect of chlorine as substituent on the photochemistry and acid-base properties of the beta-carboline alkaloids is discussed. PMID:16263305

  7. Retention of configuration in nucleophilic vinylic halide substitution - Proton magnetic resonance spectra of cis- and trans- beta-styryldiphenylphosphine oxides.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguiar, A. M.; Daigle, D.

    1965-01-01

    Cis- and trans-beta-bromostyrene reaction with lithium diphenylphosphide in tetrahydrofuran producing cis- and trans-beta- styryldiphenylphosphine, discussing proton magnetic resonance and configuration retention

  8. Basic FGF attenuates amyloid beta-peptide-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impairment of Na+/K+-ATPase activity in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Mark, R J; Keller, J N; Kruman, I; Mattson, M P

    1997-05-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) exhibits trophic activity for many populations of neurons in the brain, and can protect those neurons against excitotoxic, metabolic and oxidative insults. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) fibrils accumulate in plaques which are associated with degenerating neurons. A beta can be neurotoxic by a mechanism that appears to involve induction of oxidative stress and disruption of calcium homeostasis. Plaques in AD brain contain high levels of bFGF suggesting a possible modulatory role for bFGF in the neurodegenerative process. We now report that bFGF can protect cultured hippocampal neurons against A beta25-35 toxicity by a mechanism that involves suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and maintenance of Na+/K+-ATPase activity. A beta25-35 induced lipid peroxidation, accumulation of H2O2, mitochondrial ROS accumulation, and a decrease in mitochondrial transmembrane potential; each of these effects of A beta25-35 was abrogated in cultures pre-treated with bFGF. Na+/K+-ATPase activity was significantly reduced following exposure to A beta25-35 in control cultures, but not in cultures pre-treated with bFGF. bFGF did not protect neurons from death induced by ouabain (a specific inhibitor of the Na+/K+-ATPase) or 4-hydroxynonenal (an aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation) consistent with a site of action of bFGF prior to induction of oxidative stress and impairment of ion-motive ATPases. By suppressing accumulation of oxyradicals, bFGF may slow A beta-induced neurodegenerative cascades. PMID:9187334

  9. Peroxisomal oxidation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) by human hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, P.A.; Ferrell, E.V. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    Beta-oxidation of VLCFA was studied in a human hepatoma cell line (HEP-G2). These cells, disrupted by exposure to low concentrations of digitonin, oxidize (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate (C16:0) and (1-/sup 14/C)lignocerate (C24:0) to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and water-soluble products. It was recently reported that in rat liver the beta-oxidation of VLCFA takes place primarily in the peroxisome rather than the mitochondrion. The precise site of VLCFA oxidation in human tissues has not been clearly elucidated. The peroxisome has been implicated since there is impaired VLCFA oxidation in fibroblasts from Zellweger syndrome patients, in which this organelle is deficient. In order to define the subcellular localization of human VLCFA oxidation, homogenates of HEP-G2 cells were fractionated on a discontinuous sucrose gradient. Fractions enriched in the peroxisomal marker catalase oxidized C24:0 at significantly greater rates than fractions enriched in the mitochondrial marker succinate:cytochrome c reductase. C16:0 oxidation was catalyzed by both peroxisomal and mitochondrial fractions. These results suggest that the subcellular site of VLCFA oxidation in human hepatoma cells and rat liver is similar.

  10. Beta Lactams Antibiotic Ceftriaxone Modulates Seizures, Oxidative Stress and Connexin 43 Expression in Hippocampus of Pentylenetetrazole Kindled Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Abdelaziz M.; Ghalwash, Mohammed; Magdy, Khaled; Abulseoud, Osama A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the effect of ceftriaxone on oxidative stress and gap junction protein (connexin 43, Cx-43) expression in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced kindling model. Methods: Twenty four Sprague dawely rats were divided into 3 equal groups (a) normal group: normal rats. (b) PTZ kindled group: received PTZ at the dose of 50 mg/kg via intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) every other day for 2 weeks (c) ceftriaxone treated group: received ceftriaxone at the dose 200 mg\\kg/12 hrs via i.p. injection daily from the 6th dose of PTZ for 3 days. Racine score, latency before beginning the first myoclonic jerk and duration of the jerks used as parameters of behavioral assessment. Immunohistopathological study for Cx-43 expression in hippocampus and measurement of markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde [MDA], low reduced glutathione [GSH] and catalase [CAT]) in hippocampal neurons were done. Results: PTZ kindling was associated with behavioral changes (in the form high stage of Racine score, long seizure duration and short latency for the first jerk), enhanced oxidative stress state (as demonstrated by high MDA, low GSH and CAT) and up regulation of Cx43 in hippocampal regions. While, ceftriaxone treatment ameliorated, significantly, PTZ-induced convulsions and caused significant improvement in oxidative stress markers and Cx-43 expression in hippocamal regions (p < 0.05). Conclusions: These findings support the anticonvulsive effects of some beta-lactams antibiotics which could offer a possible contributor in the basic treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy. This effect might be due to reduction of oxidative stress and Cx43 expression. PMID:27390674

  11. Inorganic mercury causes pancreatic beta-cell death via the oxidative stress-induced apoptotic and necrotic pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yawen; Huang Chunfa; Yang Chingyao; Yen Chengchieh; Tsai Kehsung; Liu Shinghwa

    2010-03-15

    Mercury is a well-known highly toxic metal. In this study, we characterize and investigate the cytotoxicity and its possible mechanisms of inorganic mercury in pancreatic beta-cells. Mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) dose-dependently decreased the function of insulin secretion and cell viability in pancreatic beta-cell-derived HIT-T15 cells and isolated mouse pancreatic islets. HgCl{sub 2} significantly increased ROS formation in HIT-T15 cells. Antioxidant N-acetylcysteine effectively reversed HgCl{sub 2}-induced insulin secretion dysfunction in HIT-T15 cells and isolated mouse pancreatic islets. Moreover, HgCl{sub 2} increased sub-G1 hypodiploids and annexin-V binding in HIT-T15 cells, indicating that HgCl{sub 2} possessed ability in apoptosis induction. HgCl{sub 2} also displayed several features of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signals including disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, increase of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and activations of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase 3. Exposure of HIT-T15 cells to HgCl{sub 2} could significantly increase both apoptotic and necrotic cell populations by acridine orange/ethidium bromide dual staining. Meanwhile, HgCl{sub 2} could also trigger the depletion of intracellular ATP levels and increase the LDH release from HIT-T15 cells. These HgCl{sub 2}-induced cell death-related signals could be significantly reversed by N-acetylcysteine. The intracellular mercury levels were markedly elevated in HgCl{sub 2}-treated HIT-T15 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that HgCl{sub 2}-induced oxidative stress causes pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction and cytotoxicity involved the co-existence of apoptotic and necrotic cell death.

  12. Neuropsychological Outcomes in Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders: 85 Cases Detected by Newborn Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waisbren, Susan E.; Landau, Yuval; Wilson, Jenna; Vockley, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders include conditions in which the transport of activated acyl-Coenzyme A (CoA) into the mitochondria or utilization of these substrates is disrupted or blocked. This results in a deficit in the conversion of fat into energy. Most patients with fatty acid oxidation defects are now identified through…

  13. Oxidase-peroxidase enzymes of Datura innoxia. Oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester.

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, V S; Mahadevan, S; Kumar, S A

    1975-01-01

    An enzyme system from Datura innoxia roots oxidizing formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was purified 38-fold by conventional methods such as (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, negative adsorption on alumina Cy gel and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The purified enzyme was shown to catalyse the stoicheiometric oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester to benzoylformic acid ethyl ester and formic acid, utilizing molecular O2. Substrate analogues such as phenylacetaldehyde and phenylpyruvate were oxidized at a very low rate, and formylphenylacetonitrile was an inhilating agents, cyanide, thiol compounds and ascorbic acid. This enzyme was identical with an oxidase-peroxidase isoenzyme. Another oxidase-peroxidase isoenzyme which separated on DEAE-chromatography also showed formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester oxidase activity, albeit to a lesser extent. The properties of the two isoenzymes of the oxidase were compared and shown to differ in their oxidation and peroxidation properties. The oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was also catalysed by horseradish peroxidase. The Datura isoenzymes exhibited typical haemoprotein spectra. The oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was different from other peroxidase-catalysed reactions in not being activated by either Mn2+ or monophenols. The oxidation was inhibited by several mono- and poly-phenols and by catalase. A reaction mechanism for the oxidation is proposed. PMID:997

  14. The Baeyer-Villiger Oxidation with Trifluoroacetic Acid and Household Sodium Percarbonate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjonaas, Richard A.; Clemons, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    A method for carrying out the Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of cyclopentanone to [delta]-valerolactone in a large-section introductory organic chemistry laboratory course is reported. The oxidizing agent is trifluoroperoxyacetic acid generated in situ from trifluoroacetic acid and household sodium percarbonate such as OxiClean, Oxi Magic, or…

  15. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ester with pentaerythritol. 721.3680 Section 721.3680 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442)...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ester with pentaerythritol. 721.3680 Section 721.3680 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442)...

  17. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-20

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology. PMID:22012395

  18. The smoking-associated oxidant hypothiocyanous acid induces endothelial nitric oxide synthase dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Talib, Jihan; Kwan, Jair; Suryo Rahmanto, Aldwin; Witting, Paul K; Davies, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Smokers have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease but the origin(s) of this increased risk are incompletely defined. Considerable evidence supports an accumulation of the oxidant-generating enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase) in the inflamed artery wall, and smokers have high levels of SCN(-), a preferred MPO substrate, with this resulting in HOSCN (hypothiocyanous acid) formation. We hypothesized that this thiol-specific oxidant may target the Zn(2+)-thiol cluster of eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase), resulting in enzyme dysfunction and reduced formation of the critical signalling molecule NO•. Decreased NO• bioavailability is an early and critical event in atherogenesis, and HOSCN-mediated damage to eNOS may contribute to smoking-associated disease. In the present study it is shown that exposure of isolated eNOS to HOSCN or MPO/H2O2/SCN(-) decreased active dimeric eNOS levels, and increased inactive monomer and Zn(2+) release, compared with controls, HOCl (hypochlorous acid)- or MPO/H2O2/Cl(-)-treated samples. eNOS activity was increasingly compromised by MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) with increasing SCN(-) concentrations. Exposure of HCAEC (human coronary artery endothelial cell) lysates to pre-formed HOSCN, or MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) with increasing SCN(-), increased eNOS monomerization and Zn(2+) release, and decreased activity. Intact HCAECs exposed to HOCl and HOSCN had decreased eNOS activity and NO2(-)/NO3(-) formation (products of NO• decomposition), and increased free Zn(2+). Exposure of isolated rat aortic rings to HOSCN resulted in thiol loss, and decreased eNOS activity and cGMP levels. Overall these data indicate that high SCN(-) levels, as seen in smokers, can increase HOSCN formation and enhance eNOS dysfunction in human endothelial cells, with this potentially contributing to increased atherogenesis in smokers. PMID:24112082

  19. Omega-3 fatty acid ethyl-eicosapentaenoate, but not soybean oil, attenuates memory impairment induced by central IL-1beta administration.

    PubMed

    Song, Cai; Horrobin, David

    2004-06-01

    Proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1beta can cause cognitive impairment, activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and impair monoaminergic neurotransmission in the rat. IL-1beta has also been shown to increase the concentration of the inflammatory mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the blood. Omega (n)-3 fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), which are components of fish oil, have been shown to reduce both the proinflammatory cytokines and the synthesis of PGE2. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dietary supplements of EPA would attenuate the inflammation-induced impairment of spatial memory by centrally administered IL-1beta. Rats were fed with a diet of coconut oil (contained a negligible quantity of fatty acids), soybean oil (contained mainly n-6 fatty acids), or a diet of coconut oil enriched with ethyl-EPA (E-EPA). The rats were then injected intracerebroventricularly with IL-1beta or saline. The results of this study demonstrated that the IL-1-induced deficit in spatial memory was correlated with an impairment of central noradrenergic and serotonergic (but not dopaminergic) function and an increase in the serum corticosterone concentration. IL-1beta also caused an increase in the hippocampal PGE2 concentration. These effects of IL-1 were attenuated by the chronic administration of E-EPA. By contrast, rats fed with the soybean oil diet showed no effect on the changes induced by the IL-1 administration. PMID:15060086

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis of dicarboxylic acids near the active site of Bacillus cereus 5/B/6 beta-lactamase II.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, H M; Iyer, R K; Pène, J J

    1991-01-01

    An amino acid residue functioning as a general base has been proposed to assist in the hydrolysis of beta-lactam antibiotics by the zinc-containing Bacillus cereus beta-lactamase II [Bicknell & Waley (1985) Biochemistry 24, 6876-6887]. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis of cloned Bacillus cereus 5/B/6 beta-lactamase II was used in an 'in vivo' study to investigate the role of carboxy-group-containing amino acids near the active site of the enzyme. Substitution of asparagine for the wild-type aspartic acid residue at position 81 resulted in fully functional enzyme. An aspartic acid residue at position 90 is essential for beta-lactamase II to confer any detectable ampicillin and cephalosporin C resistance to Escherichia coli. Conversion of Asp90 into Asn90 or Glu90 lead to the synthesis of inactive enzyme, suggesting that the spatial position of the beta-carboxy group of Asp90 is critical for enzyme function. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1904717

  1. Effects of salvianolic acids on oxidative stress and hepatic fibrosis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, M.-K.; Lin, Y.-L.; Huang, Y.-T.

    2010-01-15

    Enhanced oxidative stress is associated with hepatic fibrosis. Salvianolic acids A (Sal A) and B (Sal B) have been reported to be strong polyphenolic antioxidants and free radical scavengers. The present study is to investigate if Sal A and B could attenuate oxidative stress and liver fibrosis in rats. A cell line of rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) was stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, 10 ng/ml). The inhibitory effects of Sal A and B on intracellular hydrogen peroxide levels were measured with dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF-DA) dye assay. alpha-Smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase subunits were measured by Western blotting. Liver fibrosis was induced by intraperitoneal injections of thioacetamide (TAA, 200 mg/kg) twice per week for 6 weeks. Sal A (10 mg/kg), Sal B (50 mg/kg) or S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe, 10 mg/kg), was given by gavage twice per day consecutively for 4 weeks starting 2 weeks after TAA injection. In vitro, PDGF increased the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in HSCs, which was attenuated by Sal A (10 muM) and Sal B (200 muM). Sal A and B attenuated the PDGF-stimulated expressions of alpha-SMA and NADPH oxidase subunits gp91{sup phox} and p47{sup phox} in membrane fractions. In vivo studies showed that the hepatic levels of collagen, malondialdehyde, TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-1beta, fibrosis scores and protein expressions of alpha-SMA, heme-oxygenase-1, iNOS, and gp91{sup phox}, and serum levels of ALT, AST, IL-6, and IL-1beta were increased in TAA-intoxicated rats, all of which were attenuated by 4-week treatment of Sal A or Sal B. Our results showed that Sal A and B attenuated PDGF-induced ROS formation in HSCs, possibly through inhibition of NADPH oxidase. Sal A and B treatments were also effective against hepatic fibrosis in TAA-intoxicated rats.

  2. Protective Effect of Folic Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Cui, Huan; Zhang, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaoju; Zhang, Zheng; Jia, Chaonan; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hui; Qiu, Wenting; Zhang, Chuanwu; Yang, Zuopeng; Chen, Zhu; Mao, Guangyun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although previous reports have linked DNA damage with both transmissions across generations as well as our own survival, it is unknown how to reverse the lesion. Based on the data from a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial, this study aimed to assess the efficacy of folic acid supplementation (FAS) on DNA oxidative damage reversal. In this randomized clinical trial (RCT), a total of 450 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups to receive folic acid (FA) 0.4 mg/day (low-FA), 0.8 mg/day (high-FA), or placebo (control) for 8 weeks. The urinary 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and creatinine (Cr) concentration at pre- and post-FAS were measured with modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. A multivariate general linear model was applied to assess the individual effects of FAS and the joint effects between FAS and hypercholesterolemia on oxidative DNA damage improvement. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02235948. Of the 438 subjects that received FA fortification or placebo, the median (first quartile, third quartile) of urinary 8-OHdG/Cr for placebo, low-FA, and high-FA groups were 58.19 (43.90, 82.26), 53.51 (38.97, 72.74), 54.73 (39.58, 76.63) ng/mg at baseline and 57.77 (44.35, 81.33), 51.73 (38.20, 71.30), and 50.65 (37.64, 76.17) ng/mg at the 56th day, respectively. A significant decrease of urinary 8-OHdG was observed after 56 days FA fortification (P < 0.001). Compared with the placebo, after adjusting for some potential confounding factors, including the baseline urinary 8-OHdG/Cr, the urinary 8-OHdG/Cr concentration significantly decreased after 56 days FAS [β (95% confidence interval) = −0.88 (−1.62, −0.14) and P = 0.020 for low-FA; and β (95% confidence interval) = −2.68 (−3.42, −1.94) and P < 0.001 for high-FA] in a dose-response fashion (Ptrend

  3. Proinsulin C-peptide antagonizes the profibrotic effects of TGF-beta1 via up-regulation of retinoic acid and HGF-related signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hills, Claire E; Willars, Gary B; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2010-04-01

    Novel signaling roles for C-peptide have recently been discovered with evidence that it can ameliorate complications of type 1 diabetes. Here we sought to identify new pathways regulated by C-peptide of relevance to the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. Microarray analysis was performed to identify genes regulated by either C-peptide and/or TGF-beta1 in a human proximal tubular cell line, HK-2. Expression of retinoic acid receptor beta (RARbeta), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II (CRABPII), vimentin, E-cadherin, Snail, and beta-catenin was assessed by immunoblotting. The cellular localization of vimentin and beta-catenin was determined by immunocytochemistry. Changes in cell morphology were assessed by phase contrast microscopy. Gene expression profiling demonstrated differential expression of 953 and 1458 genes after C-peptide exposure for 18 h or 48 h, respectively. From these, members of the antifibrotic retinoic acid (RA)- and HGF-signaling pathways were selected. Immunoblotting demonstrated that C-peptide increased RARbeta, CRABPII, and HGF. We confirmed a role for RA in reversal of TGF-beta1-induced changes associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, including expression changes in Snail, E-cadherin, vimetin, and redistribution of beta-catenin. Importantly, these TGF-beta1-induced changes were inhibited by C-peptide. Further, effects of TGF-beta1 on Snail and E-cadherin expression were blocked by HGF, and inhibitory effects of C-peptide were removed by blockade of HGF activity. This study identifies a novel role for HGF as an effector of C-peptide, possibly via an RA-signaling pathway, highlighting C-peptide as a potential therapy for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:20197308

  4. Interference by morpholine ethanesulfonic acid (MES) and related buffers in phenolic oxidation by peroxidase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While characterizing the kinetic parameters of apoplastic phenolic oxidation by peroxidase, we found anomalies caused by the 4-morpholine ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer being used. In the presence of MES, certain phenolics appeared not to be oxidized by peroxidase, yet the oxidant, H2O2, was uti...

  5. Humic acids as electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial oxidation of vinyl chloride and dichloroethene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride and [1,2- 14C]dichloroethene to 14CO2 under humic acid-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that waterborne contaminants can be oxidized by using humic acid compounds as electron acceptors and suggest that natural aquatic systems have a much larger capacity for contaminant oxidation than previously thought.

  6. Humic acids as electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial oxidation of vinyl chloride and dichloroethane

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-08-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-{sup 14}C]vinyl chloride and [1,2-{sup 14}C]dichloroethene to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} under humic acid-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that waterborne contaminants can be oxidized by using humic acid compounds as electron acceptors and suggest that natural aquatic systems have a much larger capacity for contaminant oxidation than previously thought.

  7. Iron Regulation of Pancreatic Beta-Cell Functions and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Backe, Marie Balslev; Moen, Ingrid Wahl; Ellervik, Christina; Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2016-07-17

    Dietary advice is the cornerstone in first-line treatment of metabolic diseases. Nutritional interventions directed at these clinical conditions mainly aim to (a) improve insulin resistance by reducing energy-dense macronutrient intake to obtain weight loss and (b) reduce fluctuations in insulin secretion through avoidance of rapidly absorbable carbohydrates. However, even in the majority of motivated patients selected for clinical trials, massive efforts using this approach have failed to achieve lasting efficacy. Less attention has been given to the role of micronutrients in metabolic diseases. Here, we review the evidence that highlights (a) the importance of iron in pancreatic beta-cell function and dysfunction in diabetes and (b) the integrative pathophysiological effects of tissue iron levels in the interactions among the beta cell, gut microbiome, hypothalamus, innate and adaptive immune systems, and insulin-sensitive tissues. We propose that clinical trials are warranted to clarify the impact of dietary or pharmacological iron reduction on the development of metabolic disorders. PMID:27146016

  8. Thermal and acid tolerant beta xylosidases, arabinofuranosidases, genes encoding, related organisms, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N; Thompson, Vicki S; Schaller, Kastli D; Apel, William A; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2013-04-30

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading xylotriose, xylobiose, and/or arabinofuranose-substituted xylan using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof.

  9. Thermal and acid tolerant beta-xylosidases, genes encoding, related organisms, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Schaller, Kastli D.; Apel, William A.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Reed, David W.

    2011-04-12

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading xylotriose and/or xylobiose using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof.

  10. Current issues regarding treatment of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders.

    PubMed

    Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Bastin, Jean; Gillingham, Melanie; Morris, Andrew; Wijburg, Frits; Wilcken, Bridget

    2010-10-01

    Treatment recommendations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) defects are diverse. With implementation of newborn screening and identification of asymptomatic patients, it is necessary to define whom to treat and how strictly. We here discuss critical questions that are currently under debate. For some asymptomatic long-chain defects, long-chain fat restriction plays a minor role, and a normal diet may be introduced. For patients presenting only with myopathic symptoms, e.g., during exercise, treatment may be adapted to energy demand. As a consequence, patients with exercise-induced myopathy may be able to return to normal activity when provided with medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) prior to exercise. There is no need to limit participation in sports. Progression of retinopathy in disorders of the mitochondrial trifunctional protein complex is closely associated with hydroxyacylcarnitine accumulation. A strict low-fat diet with MCT supplementation is recommended to slow or prevent progression of chorioretinopathy. Additional docosahexanoic acid does not prevent the decline in retinal function but does promote nonspecific improvement in visual acuity and is recommended. There is no evidence that L-carnitine supplementation is beneficial. Thus, supplementation with L-carnitine in a newborn identified by screening with either a medium-chain or long-chain defect is not supported. With respect to the use of the odd-chain medium-chain triglyceride triheptanoin in myopathic phenotypes, randomized trials are needed to establish whether triheptanoin is more effective than even-chain MCT. With increasing pathophysiological knowledge, new treatment options have been identified and are being clinically evaluated. These include the use of bezafibrates in myopathic long-chain defects. PMID:20830526

  11. All-trans retinoic acid modulates mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation in human scleral fibroblasts through retinoic acid receptor beta

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Lijun; Cui, Dongmei; Yang, Xiao; Gao, Zhenya; Trier, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Purpose All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is known to inhibit the proliferation of human scleral fibroblasts (HSFs) and to modulate the scleral intercellular matrix composition, and may therefore serve as a mediator for controlling eye growth. Cell proliferation is regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether changed activation of the MAPK pathway could be involved in the response of HSFs exposed to ATRA. Methods HSFs were cultured in Dulbecco Modified Eagle's Medium/F12 (DMEM/F12) and exposed to 1 μmol/l ATRA for 10 min, 30 min, 1 h, 8 h, or 24 h. The activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2), p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in HSFs was assessed with western blot analysis and immunocytofluorescence. Results After exposure to ATRA for 24 h, the HSFs appeared shrunken and thinner than the control cells. The intercellular spaces were wider, and the HSFs appeared less numerous than in the control culture. Western blot showed decreased activation of ERK 1/2 in the HSFs from 30 min (p=0.01) to 24 h (p<0.01) after the start of exposure to ATRA, and increased activation of the JNK protein from 10 to 30 min (p<0.01) after the start of exposure to ATRA. Indirect immunofluorescence confirmed changes in activation of ERK 1/2 and JNK in HSFs exposed to ATRA. No change in activation of p38 in HSFs was observed after exposure to ATRA. Pretreatment of the HSFs with LE135, an antagonist of retinoic acid receptor beta (RARβ), abolished the ATRA-induced changes inactivation of ERK 1/2 and JNK. Conclusions ATRA inhibits HSF proliferation by a mechanism associated with modulation of ERK 1/2 and JNK activation and depends on stimulation of retinoic acid receptor beta. PMID:23946634

  12. Photochemical intracomplex reaction between [beta]-cyclodextrin and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid disodium salt in water solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, S. S.; Kruppa, A. I.; Leshina, T. V.

    2005-05-01

    1D and 2D 1H NMR studies of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid disodium salt in the β-cyclodextrin solution have identified the inclusion complex formation. The association constant of AQDS-β-CD inclusion complex was determined as 800 ± 100 M -1. The selective intra-complex photo-oxidation of β-cyclodextrin at C6 position was detected by CIDNP method.

  13. Quantitative analysis of amino acid oxidation and related gluconeogenesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Jungas, R L; Halperin, M L; Brosnan, J T

    1992-04-01

    Significant gaps remain in our knowledge of the pathways of amino acid catabolism in humans. Further quantitative data describing amino acid metabolism in the kidney are especially needed as are further details concerning the pathways utilized for certain amino acids in liver. Sufficient data do exist to allow a broad picture of the overall process of amino acid oxidation to be developed along with approximate quantitative assessments of the role played by liver, muscle, kidney, and small intestine. Our analysis indicates that amino acids are the major fuel of liver, i.e., their oxidative conversion to glucose accounts for about one-half of the daily oxygen consumption of the liver, and no other fuel contributes nearly so importantly. The daily supply of amino acids provided in the diet cannot be totally oxidized to CO2 in the liver because such a process would provide far more ATP than the liver could utilize. Instead, most amino acids are oxidatively converted to glucose. This results in an overall ATP production during amino acid oxidation very nearly equal to the ATP required to convert amino acid carbon to glucose. Thus gluconeogenesis occurs without either a need for ATP from other fuels or an excessive ATP production that could limit the maximal rate of the process. The net effect of the oxidation of amino acids to glucose in the liver is to make nearly two-thirds of the total energy available from the oxidation of amino acids accessible to peripheral tissues, without necessitating that peripheral tissues synthesize the complex array of enzymes needed to support direct amino acid oxidation. As a balanced mixture of amino acids is oxidized in the liver, nearly all carbon from glucogenic amino acids flows into the mitochondrial aspartate pool and is actively transported out of the mitochondria via the aspartate-glutamate antiport linked to proton entry. In the cytoplasm the aspartate is converted to fumarate utilizing urea cycle enzymes; the fumarate flows via

  14. Amino acid sequence of the alpha subunit and computer modelling of the alpha and beta subunits of echicetin from the venom of Echis carinatus (saw-scaled viper).

    PubMed

    Polgár, J; Magnenat, E M; Peitsch, M C; Wells, T N; Saqi, M S; Clemetson, K J

    1997-04-15

    Echicetin, a heterodimeric protein from the venom of Echis carinatus, binds to platelet glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) and so inhibits platelet aggregation or agglutination induced by various platelet agonists acting via GPIb. The amino acid sequence of the beta subunit of echicetin has been reported and found to belong to the recently identified snake venom subclass of the C-type lectin protein family. Echicetin alpha and beta subunits were purified. N-terminal sequence analysis provided direct evidence that the protein purified was echicetin. The paper presents the complete amino acid sequence of the alpha subunit and computer models of the alpha and beta subunits. The sequence of alpha echicetin is highly similar to the alpha and beta chains of various heterodimeric and homodimeric C-type lectins. Neither of the fully reduced and alkylated alpha or beta subunits of echicetin inhibited the platelet agglutination induced by von Willebrand factor-ristocetin or alpha-thrombin. Earlier reports about the inhibitory activity of reduced and alkylated echicetin beta subunit might have been due to partial reduction of the protein. PMID:9163349

  15. Oxidative degradation of bis (2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid in nitric acid studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Groenewold; D. R. Peterman

    2012-10-01

    Samples of bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanex-301) were analyzed using direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Positive ion spectra of standard and stereo-pure acids displayed ions typical of the unmodified compound, cationized monomeric and dimeric cluster ion species. In addition, a significant ions 2 u less than the dimeric clusters were seen, that correspond to an oxidatively coupled species designated Cyx2 that is observed as H- or Na-cationized species in the electrospray analyses. Based on uncorrected ion intensities, Cyx2 is estimated to account for about 20% of the total in the standard materials. When samples that were contacted with 3 M HNO3 were analyzed, the positive ion spectrum consisted nearly entirely of ions derived from the oxidatively coupled product, indicating that the acid promotes coupling. The negative ion spectra of the standard acids consisted nearly entirely of the conjugate base that is formed by deprotonation of the acids, and cluster ions containing multiple acid molecules. The negative spectra of the HNO3-contacted samples also contained the conjugate base of the unmodified acid, but also two other species that correspond to the dioxo- and perthio- derivatives. It is concluded that HNO3 contact causes significant oxidation, forming at least three major products, Cyx2, the perthio-acid, and the dioxo-acid.

  16. Oxalic acid capped iron oxide nanorods as a sensing platform.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Bohidar, H B; Solanki, Pratima R

    2015-08-01

    A label free impedimetric immunosensor has been fabricated using protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) functionalized oxalic acid (OA) capped iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanorods for V. cholerae detection. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4, were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, OA-Fe3O4 nanorods were obtained as about 29±1 and 39±1nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of nanorods is found as 116nm (OA-Fe3O4) and 77nm (Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. Cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4 nanorods has been investigated in the presence of human epithelial kidney (HEK) cell line 293 using MTT assay. The cell viability and proliferation studies reveal that the OA-Fe3O4 nanorods facilitate cell growth. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/OA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits good linearity in the range of 12.5-500ng mL(-1) with low detection limit of 0.5ng mL(-1), sensitivity 0.1Ωng(-1)ml(-1)cm(-2) and reproducibility more than 11 times. PMID:26048074

  17. Reduction of a phosphorus oxide and acid reaction set

    SciTech Connect

    Twarowski, A.

    1995-07-01

    It has been predicted for some time that hypersonic aircraft will suffer from diminished fuel efficiency due to the slow speed of radical recombination in the nozzle of the aircraft and the consequent expulsion of high-energy fragments during high Mach number flight. The addition of small amounts of phosphine combustion products (phosphorus oxides and acids) to water vapor has been found to result in a faster relaxation rate of OH to its equilibrium density following H{sub 2}O photolysis. This article describes the systematic construction of a reaction model of 162 phosphorus reactions among 17 phosphorus-containing species. Those reactions that contribute to the reestablishment of equilibrium following the perturbation of the system by H{sub 2}O photolysis or by an increase in temperature are identified. A thermodynamic free energy function is used to quantify the rate of system relaxation back to equilibrium for a series of 36 reaction conditions covering a temperature range of 1,500 to 3,000 K, a gas density range of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} to 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} mol/cm{sup 3} and a fuel equivalence ratio of 0.8 to 1.2.

  18. Acidic properties of supported niobium oxide catalysts: An infrared spectroscopy investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Datka, J.; Turek, A.M.; Jehng, J.M.; Wachs, I.E. )

    1992-05-01

    Chemisorption of pyridine was applied as a method for studying the acidic properties of niobium pentoxide supported on silica, magnesia, alumina, titania, and zirconia. The infrared spectra of adsorbed pyridine were used to evaluate the concentration and the relative strength of Broensted and Lewis acid sites. Lewis acidity was found in all the supported niobium oxide systems, while Broensted acid sites were only detected for niobia supported on the alumina and silica supports. The origin and characteristics of the surface acid sites present in supported niobium oxide catalysts are discussed in the present study.

  19. Carnosic Acid Prevents Beta-Amyloid-Induced Injury in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells via the Induction of Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Su, Hua; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2016-09-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ), the hallmark protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD), induces neurotoxicity that involves oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to cell death. Carnosic acid (CA), a polyphenolic diterpene isolated from the herb rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis), was investigated in our study to assess its neuroprotective effect and underlying mechanism against Aβ-induced injury in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. We found that CA pretreatment alleviated the Aβ25-35-induced loss of cell viability, inhibited both Aβ1-42 accumulation and tau hyperphosphorylation, reduced reactive oxygen species generation, and maintained the mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover, CA increased the microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II/I ratio and decreased SQSTM1(p62), indicating that CA could induce autophagy. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) attenuated the neuroprotective effect of CA, suggesting that autophagy was involved in the neuroprotection of CA. It was also observed that CA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) but inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Furthermore, blocking AMPK with si-AMPKα successfully inhibited the upregulation of LC3-II/I, prevented the downregulation of phosphorylation of mTOR and SQSTM1(p62), indicating that CA induced autophagy in SH-SY5Y cells via the activation of AMPK. These results suggested that CA might be a potential agent for preventing AD. PMID:27168327

  20. Micelle-assisted signaling of peracetic acid by the oxidation of pyreneboronic acid via monomer-excimer switching.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiyoung; Lee, Hyo Jin; Cho, Min Jeoung; Chang, Suk-Kyu

    2015-08-15

    A simple fluorescent probe for the industrial oxidant peracetic acid (PAA) was investigated. PAA-assisted oxidative conversion of pyrene-1-boronic acid into 1-hydroxypyrene was used as the signaling tool. Pyreneboronic acid was found to display selective signaling behavior, being more responsive to PAA than to other commonly used practical oxidants such as H2O2 and HOCl. The changes in pyrene monomer fluorescence to excimer were used in the quantitative analysis of PAA. When using the surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide as a micellar additive, the signaling of PAA was markedly enhanced. Selective fluorescence signaling of PAA by pyrene-1-boronic acid with a detection limit of 1.5×10(-6)M in aqueous environment was successfully achieved. PMID:25966389

  1. Cationic poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) iron oxide microspheres for nucleic acid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Sharma, Aditya; Sumana, Gajjala; Tiwari, Ida; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2013-04-01

    Herein, we envisage the possibility of preparing stable cationic poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres encapsulating the iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs; 8-12 nm). The IONPs are incorporated into PLGA in organic phase followed by microsphere formation and chitosan coating in aqueous medium via nano-emulsion technique. The average size of the microspheres, as determined by dynamic light scattering are about 310 nm, while the zeta potential for the composite remains near 35 mV at pH 4.0. These microspheres are electrophoretically deposited onto indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate used as cathode and parallel platinum plate as the counter electrode. This platform is utilized to fabricate a DNA biosensor, by immobilizing a probe sequence specific to Escherichia coli. The bioelectrode shows a surface-controlled electrode reaction with the electron transfer coefficient (α) of 0.64 and charge transfer rate constant (ks) of 61.73 s-1. Under the optimal conditions, this biosensor shows a detection limit of 8.7 × 10-14 M and is found to retain about 81% of the initial activity after 9 cycles of use.Herein, we envisage the possibility of preparing stable cationic poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres encapsulating the iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs; 8-12 nm). The IONPs are incorporated into PLGA in organic phase followed by microsphere formation and chitosan coating in aqueous medium via nano-emulsion technique. The average size of the microspheres, as determined by dynamic light scattering are about 310 nm, while the zeta potential for the composite remains near 35 mV at pH 4.0. These microspheres are electrophoretically deposited onto indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate used as cathode and parallel platinum plate as the counter electrode. This platform is utilized to fabricate a DNA biosensor, by immobilizing a probe sequence specific to Escherichia coli. The bioelectrode shows a surface-controlled electrode reaction with the

  2. Effects of ammonia and beta-methylene-DL-aspartate on the oxidation of glucose and pyruvate by neurons and astrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, S M; Cooper, A J; Hertz, L

    1988-10-01

    Both ammonia and beta-methylene-DL-aspartate (beta-MA), an irreversible inhibitor of aspartate aminotransferase activity and thus of the malate-aspartate shuttle, were found previously to decrease oxidative metabolism in cerebral cortex slices. In the present work, the possibility that ammonia and beta-MA affect energy metabolism by a common mechanism (i.e., via inhibition of the malate-aspartate shuttle) was investigated using primary cultures of neurons and astrocytes. Incubation of astrocytes for 30 min with 5 mM beta-MA resulted in a decreased production of 14CO2 from [U-14C]glucose, but did not affect 14CO2 production from [2-14C]pyruvate. Conversely, incubation of astrocytes with 3 mM ammonium chloride resulted in decreased 14CO2 production from [2-14C]pyruvate, but 14CO2 production from [U-14C]glucose was not significantly affected. Ammonium chloride had no significant effect on 14CO2 production from either [U-14C]glucose or [2-14]pyruvate by neurons. However, incubation of neurons with beta-MA or beta-MA plus ammonium chloride resulted in a approximately 45% decrease of 14CO2 production from both [U-14C]glucose and [2-14C]pyruvate. A 2-h incubation of astrocytes with beta-MA resulted in no change in ATP levels, but a 35% decrease in phosphocreatine. Similar treatment of neurons resulted in greater than 50% decrease in ATP, but had little effect on phosphocreatine. beta-MA also caused a decrease in glutamate and aspartate content of neurons, but not of astrocytes. The different metabolic responses of neurons and astrocytes towards beta-MA were probably not due to a differential inhibition of aspartate aminotransferase which was inhibited by approximately 45% in astrocytes and by approximately 55% in neurons. PMID:3138386

  3. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y; Lonkar, Pallavi S; Krause, Diane S; Seidman, Michael M; Peterson, Kenneth R; Nielsen, Peter E; Kole, Ryszard; Glazer, Peter M

    2008-09-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the human beta-globin gene. We demonstrate here that these PNAs, when cotransfected with recombinatory donor DNA fragments, can promote single base-pair modification at the start of the second intron of the beta-globin gene, the site of a common thalassemia-associated mutation. This single base pair change was detected by the restoration of proper splicing of transcripts produced from a green fluorescent protein-beta-globin fusion gene. The ability of these PNAs to induce recombination was dependent on dose, sequence, cell-cycle stage, and the presence of a homologous donor DNA molecule. Enhanced recombination, with frequencies up to 0.4%, was observed with use of the lysomotropic agent chloroquine. Finally, we demonstrate that these PNAs were effective in stimulating the modification of the endogenous beta-globin locus in human cells, including primary hematopoietic progenitor cells. This work suggests that PNAs can be effective tools to induce heritable, site-specific modification of disease-related genes in human cells. PMID:18757759

  4. A novel system combining biocatalytic dephosphorylation of L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate and electrochemical oxidation of resulting ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Takashi; Homma, Toshimasa; Kondo, Mizuki; Shimomura, Masato

    2011-03-15

    An enzyme electrode was prepared with acid phosphatase (ACP) for development of a new electric power generation system using ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA2P) as a fuel. The properties of the electrode were investigated with respect to biocatalytic dephosphorylation of AA2P and electrochemical oxidation of resulting ascorbic acid (AA). The enzyme electrode was fabricated by immobilization of ACP through amide linkage onto a self-assembled monolayer of 3-mercaptopropionic acid on a gold electrode. AA2P was not oxidized on a bare gold electrode in the potential sweep range from -0.1 to +0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl. However, the enzyme electrode gave an oxidation current in citric buffer solution of pH 5 containing 10 mM of AA2P. The oxidation current began to increase at +0.2V, and reached to 5.0 μA cm(-2) at +0.5 V. The potential +0.2 V corresponded to the onset of oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA). These results suggest that the oxidation current observed with the enzyme electrode is due to AA resulting from dephosphorylation of AA2P. The oxidation current increased with increasing concentration of AA2P and almost leveled off at around the concentration of 5mM. Thus the enzyme electrode brought about biocatalytic conversion of AA2P to AA, followed by electrochemical oxidation of the AA. The oxidation current is likely to be controlled by the biocatalytic reaction. PMID:21247749

  5. Acetyl-keto-beta-boswellic acid inhibits cellular proliferation through a p21-dependent pathway in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Jun; Huang, Baohua; Hooi, Shing Chuan

    2006-08-01

    1. Although there is increasing evidence showing that boswellic acid might be a potential anticancer agent, the mechanisms involved in its action are unclear. 2. In the present study, we showed that acetyl-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA) inhibited cellular growth in several colon cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry showed that cells were arrested at the G1 phase after AKBA treatment. 3. Further analysis showed that cyclin D1 and E, CDK 2 and 4 and phosphorylated Rb were decreased in AKBA-treated cells while p21 expression was increased. 4. The growth inhibitory effect of AKBA was dependent on p21 but not p53. HCT-116 p53(-/-) cells were sensitized to the apoptotic effect of AKBA, suggesting that p21 may have protected cells against apoptosis by inducing a G1 arrest.5. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that AKBA inhibited cellular growth in colon cancer cells. These findings may have implications to the use of boswellic acids as potential anticancer agents in colon cancer. PMID:16783403

  6. Vitamin A increases nerve growth factor and retinoic acid receptor beta and improves diabetic neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pedro, Norma; Granados-Soto, Vinicio; Ordoñez, Graciela; Pineda, Benjamin; Rangel-López, Edgar; Salazar-Ramiro, Aleli; Arrieta, Oscar; Sotelo, Julio

    2014-09-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) promotes the endogenous expression of both nerve growth factor (NGF) and retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR-β). We have previously shown that the administration of ATRA partly reverts the damage induced by diabetic neuropathy (DN). In this investigation, we evaluated the effects of vitamin A, a commercial, inexpensive compound of retinoic acid, on the therapy of DN. A total of 70 rats were randomized into 4 groups. Group A was the control, and groups B, C, and D received a total dose of 60 mg/kg streptozotocin intraperitoneally. When signs of DN developed, groups C and D were treated either with vitamin A (20,000 IU) or with ATRA 25 mg/kg for 60 days. Plasma glucose, contents of NGF, thermal and nociceptive tests, and RAR-β expression were evaluated. All diabetic rats developed neuropathy. The treatment with vitamin A and ATRA reverted similarly the sensorial disturbances, which was associated with increased contents of NGF and RAR-β expression. Our results indicate that the administration of vitamin A has the same therapeutic effect as ATRA on peripheral neuropathy and suggest its potential therapeutic use in patients with diabetes. PMID:24768685

  7. Extracellular ATP stimulates exocytosis via localized Ca(2+) release from acidic stores in rat pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Zhang, Ming; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Zhengxing; Ding, Jiuping; Chen, Liangyi; Xu, Tao

    2006-04-01

    Three different methods, membrane capacitance (C(m)) measurement, amperometry and FM dye labeling were used to investigate the role of extracellular ATP in insulin secretion from rat pancreatic beta cells. We found that extracellular application of ATP mobilized intracellular Ca(2+) stores and synchronously triggered vigorous exocytosis. No influence of ATP on the readily releasable pool of vesicles was observed, which argues against a direct modulation of the secretory machinery at a level downstream of Ca(2+) elevation. The stimulatory effects of ATP were greatly reduced by intracellular perfusion of BAPTA but not EGTA, suggesting a close spatial association of fusion sites with intracellular Ca(2+) releasing sites. ATP-induced Ca(2+) transients and exocytosis were not blocked by thapsigargin (TG), by a ryanodine receptor antagonist or by dissipation of pH in acidic stores by monensin alone, but they were greatly attenuated by IP(3) receptor inhibition as well as ionomycin plus monensin, suggesting involvement of IP(3)-sensitive acidic Ca(2+) stores. Taken together, our data suggest that extracellular ATP triggers exocytosis by mobilizing spatially limited acidic Ca(2+) stores through IP(3) receptors. This mechanism may explain how insulin secretion from the pancreas is coordinated through diffusible ATP that is co-released with insulin. PMID:16536741

  8. Design and biological properties of iodine-123 labeled. beta. -methyl-branched fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    The synthetic strategy, synthesis, preclinical evaluation and potential clinical applications of 3-methyl-branched radioiodinated iodophenyl- and iodovinyl-substituted fatty acids are reviewed for use as myocardial imaging agents. 50 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  9. Syntheses of hydroxamic acid-containing bicyclic β-lactams via palladium-catalyzed oxidative amidation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Jobbins, Maria O; Miller, Marvin J

    2014-02-21

    Palladium-catalyzed oxidative amidation has been used to synthesize hydroxamic acid-containing bicyclic β-lactam cores. Oxidative cleavage of the pendant alkene provides access to the carboxylic acid in one step. PMID:24483144

  10. Enhancement of 4-biphenylacetic acid bioavailability in rats by its beta-cyclodextrin complex after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, G; Santagati, N A; Ventura, C A; Pignatello, R; Panico, A M; Spampinato, S

    1991-06-01

    4-Biphenylacetic acid, a potent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent forms a solid inclusion complex with beta-cyclodextrin in a 1:1 molar ratio, which exhibits better solubility and dissolution characteristics than the uncomplexed drug. Following oral administration of the complex to rats, quicker and higher drug plasma concentrations can be achieved than with the drug alone. Parallel studies, using the carrageenan paw oedema test, demonstrate a greater anti-inflammatory activity of the complex (ED50 of 2.9 mg kg-1 for the complex and of 6.2 mg kg-1 for the free drug). The complex displayed a better gastric tolerability in the rat than drug alone. PMID:1681057

  11. Reaction of /alpha/,/beta/-unsaturated acyl isothiocyanates with salts of dithiocarbamic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Krus, K.; Masias, A.; Beletskaya, I.P.

    1989-01-10

    The reaction of unsaturated isothiocyanates with the sodium and calcium salts of N-alkyl- and N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamic acids was studied. Depending on the structure of the dithiocarbamate, the reaction products are thiazines or acyl dithiocarbamates. For the salts of methyldithiocarbamic acid the effect of the concentration and the nature of the metal on the relative yields of 6-phenyl-3-methylpropiorhodanine and 6-phenylpropiorhodanine was studied. A method is proposed for the synthesis of 3-substituted propiorhodanines.

  12. The Use of Ascorbate as an Oxidation Inhibitor in Prebiotic Amino Acid Synthesis: A Cautionary Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Hideharu; Eto, Midori; Kawamoto, Yukinori; Kurihara, Hironari; Kaneko, Takeo; Obayashi, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Kensei

    2012-12-01

    It is generally thought that the terrestrial atmosphere at the time of the origin of life was CO2-rich and that organic compounds such as amino acids would not have been efficiently formed abiotically under such conditions. It has been pointed out, however, that the previously reported low yields of amino acids may have been partially due to oxidation by nitrite/nitrate during acid hydrolysis. Specifically, the yield of amino acids was found to have increased significantly (by a factor of several hundred) after acid hydrolysis with ascorbic acid as an oxidation inhibitor. However, it has not been shown that CO2 was the carbon source for the formation of the amino acids detected after acid hydrolysis with ascorbic acid. We therefore reinvestigated the prebiotic synthesis of amino acids in a CO2-rich atmosphere using an isotope labeling experiment. Herein, we report that ascorbic acid does not behave as an appropriate oxidation inhibitor, because it contributes amino acid contaminants as a consequence of its reactions with the nitrogen containing species and formic acid produced during the spark discharge experiment. Thus, amino acids are not efficiently formed from a CO2-rich atmosphere under the conditions studied.

  13. Effect of D-amino acids at Asp{sup 23} and Ser{sup 26} residues on the conformational preference of A{beta}{sub 20-29} peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, Ganesh; Polavarapu, Prasad L. . E-mail: Prasad.L.Polavarapu@Vanderbilt.edu; Hallgas, Balazs; Majer, Zsuzsa

    2005-09-30

    The effects of D-amino acids at Asp{sup 23} and Ser{sup 26} residues on the conformational preference of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) peptide fragment (A{beta}{sub 20-29}) have been studied using different spectroscopic techniques, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), vibrational absorption, and electronic circular dichroism. To study the structure of the A{beta}{sub 20-29}, [D-Asp{sup 23}]A{beta}{sub 20-29}, and [D-Ser{sup 26}]A{beta}{sub 20-29} peptides under different conditions, the spectra were measured in 10 mM acetate buffer (pH 3) and in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE). The spectroscopic results indicated that at pH 3, A{beta}{sub 20-29} peptide takes random coil with {beta}-turn structure, while [D-Ser{sup 26}]A{beta}{sub 20-29} peptide adopts significant amount of polyproline II (PPII) type structure along with {beta}-turn contribution and D-Asp-substituted peptide ([D-Asp{sup 23}]A{beta}{sub 20-29}) adopts predominantly PPII type structure. The increased propensity for PPII conformation upon D-amino acid substitution, in acidic medium, has important biological implications. In TFE, A{beta}{sub 20-29}, [D-Asp{sup 23}]A{beta}{sub 20-29}, and [D-Ser{sup 26}]A{beta}{sub 20-29} peptides adopt 3{sub 10}-helix, {alpha}-helix, and random coil with some {beta}-turn structures, respectively. The VCD data obtained for the A{beta} peptide films suggested that the secondary structures for the peptide films are not the same as those for corresponding solution and are also different among the A{beta} peptides studied here. This observation suggests that dehydration can have a significant influence on the structural preferences of these peptides.

  14. Generation of organic acids and monosaccharides by hydrolytic and oxidative transformation of food processing residues.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Klaus; Bipp, Hans-Peter

    2005-05-01

    Carbohydrate-rich biomass residues, i.e. sugar beet molasses, whey powder, wine yeast, potato peel sludge, spent hops, malt dust and apple marc, were tested as starting materials for the generation of marketable chemicals, e.g. aliphatic acids, sugar acids and mono-/disaccharides. Residues were oxidized or hydrolyzed under acidic or alkaline conditions applying conventional laboratory digestion methods and microwave assisted techniques. Yields and compositions of the oxidation products differed according to the oxidizing agent used. Main products of oxidation by 30% HNO(3) were acetic, glucaric, oxalic and glycolic acids. Applying H(2)O(2)/CuO in alkaline solution, the organic acid yields were remarkably lower with formic, acetic and threonic acids as main products. Gluconic acid was formed instead of glucaric acid throughout. Reaction of a 10% H(2)O(2) solution with sugar beet molasses generated formic and lactic acids mainly. Na(2)S(2)O(8) solutions were very inefficient at oxidizing the residues. Glucose, arabinose and galactose were formed during acidic hydrolysis of malt dust and apple marc. The glucose content reached 0.35 g per gram of residue. Important advantages of the microwave application were lower reaction times and reduced reagent demands. PMID:15607197

  15. NxrB encoding the beta subunit of nitrite oxidoreductase as functional and phylogenetic marker for nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospira.

    PubMed

    Pester, Michael; Maixner, Frank; Berry, David; Rattei, Thomas; Koch, Hanna; Lücker, Sebastian; Nowka, Boris; Richter, Andreas; Spieck, Eva; Lebedeva, Elena; Loy, Alexander; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2014-10-01

    Nitrospira are the most widespread and diverse known nitrite-oxidizing bacteria and key nitrifiers in natural and engineered ecosystems. Nevertheless, their ecophysiology and environmental distribution are understudied because of the recalcitrance of Nitrospira to cultivation and the lack of a molecular functional marker, which would allow the detection of Nitrospira in the environment. Here we introduce nxrB, the gene encoding subunit beta of nitrite oxidoreductase, as a functional and phylogenetic marker for Nitrospira. Phylogenetic trees based on nxrB of Nitrospira were largely congruent to 16S ribosomal RNA-based phylogenies. By using new nxrB-selective polymerase chain reaction primers, we obtained almost full-length nxrB sequences from Nitrospira cultures, two activated sludge samples, and several geographically and climatically distinct soils. Amplicon pyrosequencing of nxrB fragments from 16 soils revealed a previously unrecognized diversity of terrestrial Nitrospira with 1801 detected species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (using an inferred species threshold of 95% nxrB identity). Richness estimates ranged from 10 to 946 coexisting Nitrospira species per soil. Comparison with an archaeal amoA dataset obtained from the same soils [Environ. Microbiol. 14: 525-539 (2012)] uncovered that ammonia-oxidizing archaea and Nitrospira communities were highly correlated across the soil samples, possibly indicating shared habitat preferences or specific biological interactions among members of these nitrifier groups. PMID:24118804

  16. Impact of acid and oxidative modifications, single or dual, of sorghum starch on biodegradable films.

    PubMed

    Biduski, Bárbara; Silva, Francine Tavares da; Silva, Wyller Max da; Halal, Shanise Lisie de Mello El; Pinto, Vania Zanella; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of acid and oxidation modifications on sorghum starch, as well as the effect of dual modification of starch on the physical, morphological, mechanical, and barrier properties of biodegradable films. The acid modification was performed with 3% lactic acid and the oxidation was performed with 1.5% active chlorine. For dual modification, the acid modification was performed first, followed by oxidation under the same conditions as above. Both films of the oxidized starches, single and dual, had increased stiffness, providing a higher tensile strength and lower elongation when compared to films based on native and single acid modified starches. However, the dual modification increased the water vapor permeability of the films without changing their solubility. The increase in sorghum starch concentration in the filmogenic solution increased the thickness, water vapor permeability, and elongation of the films. PMID:27507447

  17. Redox-mediated activation of latent transforming growth factor-beta 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Dix, T. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta) is a multifunctional cytokine that orchestrates response to injury via ubiquitous cell surface receptors. The biological activity of TGF beta is restrained by its secretion as a latent complex (LTGF beta) such that activation determines the extent of TGF beta activity during physiological and pathological events. TGF beta action has been implicated in a variety of reactive oxygen-mediated tissue processes, particularly inflammation, and in pathologies such as reperfusion injury, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. It was recently shown to be rapidly activated after in vivo radiation exposure, which also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present studies, the potential for redox-mediated LTGF beta activation was investigated using a cell-free system in which ROS were generated in solution by ionizing radiation or metal ion-catalyzed ascorbate reaction. Irradiation (100 Gray) of recombinant human LTGF beta in solution induced 26% activation compared with that elicited by standard thermal activation. Metal-catalyzed ascorbate oxidation elicited extremely efficient recombinant LTGF beta activation that matched or exceeded thermal activation. The efficiency of ascorbate activation depended on ascorbate concentrations and the presence of transition metal ions. We postulate that oxidation of specific amino acids in the latency-conferring peptide leads to a conformation change in the latent complex that allows release of TGF beta. Oxidative activation offers a novel route for the involvement of TGF beta in tissue processes in which ROS are implicated and endows LTGF beta with the ability to act as a sensor of oxidative stress and, by releasing TGF beta, to function as a signal for orchestrating the response of multiple cell types. LTGF beta redox sensitivity is presumably directed toward recovery of homeostasis; however, oxidation may also be a mechanism of LTGF beta activation that can be deleterious during

  18. Redox-mediated activation of latent transforming growth factor-beta 1.

    PubMed

    Barcellos-Hoff, M H; Dix, T A

    1996-09-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta) is a multifunctional cytokine that orchestrates response to injury via ubiquitous cell surface receptors. The biological activity of TGF beta is restrained by its secretion as a latent complex (LTGF beta) such that activation determines the extent of TGF beta activity during physiological and pathological events. TGF beta action has been implicated in a variety of reactive oxygen-mediated tissue processes, particularly inflammation, and in pathologies such as reperfusion injury, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. It was recently shown to be rapidly activated after in vivo radiation exposure, which also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present studies, the potential for redox-mediated LTGF beta activation was investigated using a cell-free system in which ROS were generated in solution by ionizing radiation or metal ion-catalyzed ascorbate reaction. Irradiation (100 Gray) of recombinant human LTGF beta in solution induced 26% activation compared with that elicited by standard thermal activation. Metal-catalyzed ascorbate oxidation elicited extremely efficient recombinant LTGF beta activation that matched or exceeded thermal activation. The efficiency of ascorbate activation depended on ascorbate concentrations and the presence of transition metal ions. We postulate that oxidation of specific amino acids in the latency-conferring peptide leads to a conformation change in the latent complex that allows release of TGF beta. Oxidative activation offers a novel route for the involvement of TGF beta in tissue processes in which ROS are implicated and endows LTGF beta with the ability to act as a sensor of oxidative stress and, by releasing TGF beta, to function as a signal for orchestrating the response of multiple cell types. LTGF beta redox sensitivity is presumably directed toward recovery of homeostasis; however, oxidation may also be a mechanism of LTGF beta activation that can be deleterious during

  19. Metal ion adsorption to complexes of humic acid and metal oxides: Deviations from the additivity rule

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeer, A.W.P.; McCulloch, J.K.; Van Riemsdijk, W.H.; Koopal, L.K.

    1999-11-01

    The adsorption of cadmium ions to a mixture of Aldrich humic acid and hematite is investigated. The actual adsorption to the humic acid-hematite complex is compared with the sum of the cadmium ion adsorptivities to each of the isolated components. It is shown that the sum of the cadmium ion adsorptivities is not equal to the adsorption to the complex. In general, the adsorption of a specific metal ion to the complex can be understood and qualitatively predicted using the adsorptivities to each of the pure components and taking into account the effect of the pH on the interaction between humic acid and iron oxide on the metal ion adsorption. Due to the interaction between the negatively charged humic acid and the positively charged iron oxide, the adsorption of metal ions on the mineral oxide in the complex will increase as compared to that on the isolated oxide, whereas the adsorption to the humic acid will decrease as compared to that on the isolated humic acid. As a result, the overall adsorption of a specific metal ion to the complex will be smaller than predicted by the additivity rule when this metal ion has a more pronounced affinity for the humic acid than for the mineral oxide, whereas it will be larger than predicted by the additivity rule when the metal ion has a higher affinity for the oxide than for the humic acid.

  20. Barley beta-glucan promotes MnSOD expression and enhances angiogenesis under oxidative microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Silvia; Chiavacci, Elena; Matteucci, Marco; Torelli, Michele; Pitto, Letizia; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), a foremost antioxidant enzyme, plays a key role in angiogenesis. Barley-derived (1.3) β-d-glucan (β-d-glucan) is a natural water-soluble polysaccharide with antioxidant properties. To explore the effects of β-d-glucan on MnSOD-related angiogenesis under oxidative stress, we tested epigenetic mechanisms underlying modulation of MnSOD level in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Long-term treatment of HUVECs with 3% w/v β-d-glucan significantly increased the level of MnSOD by 200% ± 2% compared to control and by 50% ± 4% compared to untreated H2O2-stressed cells. β-d-glucan-treated HUVECs displayed greater angiogenic ability. In vivo, 24 hrs-treatment with 3% w/v β-d-glucan rescued vasculogenesis in Tg (kdrl: EGFP) s843Tg zebrafish embryos exposed to oxidative microenvironment. HUVECs overexpressing MnSOD demonstrated an increased activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), reduced load of superoxide anion (O2−) and an increased survival under oxidative stress. In addition, β-d-glucan prevented the rise of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)1-α under oxidative stress. The level of histone H4 acetylation was significantly increased by β-d-glucan. Increasing histone acetylation by sodium butyrate, an inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases (HDACs I), did not activate MnSOD-related angiogenesis and did not impair β-d-glucan effects. In conclusion, 3% w/v β-d-glucan activates endothelial expression of MnSOD independent of histone acetylation level, thereby leading to adequate removal of O2−, cell survival and angiogenic response to oxidative stress. The identification of dietary β-d-glucan as activator of MnSOD-related angiogenesis might lead to the development of nutritional approaches for the prevention of ischemic remodelling and heart failure. PMID:25388628

  1. Oxidation-Resistant Coating For Bipolar Lead/Acid Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolstad, James J.

    1993-01-01

    Cathode side of bipolar substrate coated with nonoxidizable conductive layer. Coating prepared as water slurry of aqueous dispersion of polyethylene copolymer plus such conductive fillers as tin oxide, titanium, tantalum, or tungsten oxide. Applied easily to substrate of polyethylene carbon plastic. As slurry dries, conductive, oxidation-resistant coating forms on positive side of substrate.

  2. Kinetics and Products of Heterogeneous Oxidation of Oleic acid, Linoleic acid and Linolenic acid in Aerosol Particles by Hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nah, T.; Leone, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    A significant mass fraction of atmospheric aerosols is composed of a variety of oxidized organic compounds with varying functional groups that may affect the rate at which they chemically age. Here we study the heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with different sub-micron, alkenoic acid particles: Oleic acid (OA), Linoleic acid (LA), and Linolenic acid (LNA), in the presence of H2O2 and O2. This research explores how OH addition reactions initiate chain reactions that rapidly transform the chemical composition of an organic particle. Particles are chemically aged in a photochemical flow tube reactor where they are exposed to OH radicals (~ 1011 molecule cm-3 s) that are produced by the photolysis of H2O2 at 254 nm. The aerosols are then sized and their composition analyzed via Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization (APCI). Detailed kinetic measurements show that the reactive uptake coefficient is larger than 1, indicating the presence of secondary chemistry occurring in the condensed phase. Reactive uptake coefficient is found to scale linearly with the number of double bonds present in the molecule. In addition, the reactive uptake coefficient is found to depend sensitively upon the concentrations of O2 in the photochemical flow tube reactor, indicating that O2 plays a role in secondary chemistry. In the absence of O2 the reactive uptake coefficient increases to ~ 8, 5 and 3 for LNA, LA, and OA, respectively. The reactive uptake coefficient approaches values of 6, 4 and 2 for LNA, LA, and OA respectively when 18% of the total nitrogen flow is replaced with O2. Mechanistic pathways and products will also be presented herein.

  3. The rationale for preventing cancer cachexia: targeting excessive fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chao-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Cachexia commonly occurs at the terminal stage of cancer and has largely unclear molecular mechanisms. A recent study published in Nature Medicine, entitled "Excessive fatty acid oxidation induces muscle atrophy in cancer cachexia," reveals that cachectic cancer cells can secrete multiple cytokines that induce excessive fatty acid oxidation, which is responsible for muscle loss in cancer cachexia. Inhibition of fatty acid oxidation using etomoxir can increase muscle mass and body weight in cancer cachexia animal models. The usage of stable cachexia animal models is also discussed in this research highlight. PMID:27443316

  4. Evaluation of Humic Acid and Tannic Acid Fouling in Graphene Oxide-Coated Ultrafiltration Membranes.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Huang, Yi; Yu, Miao; Her, Namguk; Flora, Joseph R V; Park, Chang Min; Kim, Suhan; Cho, Jaeweon; Yoon, Yeomin

    2016-08-31

    Three commercially available ultrafiltration (UF) membranes (poly(ether sulfone), PES) that have nominal molecular weight cut-offs (5, 10, and 30 kDa) were coated with graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, water contact angle measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to determine the changed physicochemical properties of the membranes after GO coating. The water permeability and single-solute rejection of GO-coated (GOC) membranes for humic acid (HA) molecules were significantly higher by approximately 15% and 55%, respectively, compared to those of pristine UF membranes. However, the GOc membranes for single-solute tannic acid (TA) rejection showed similar trends of higher flux decline versus pristine PES membranes, because the relatively smaller TA molecules were readily adsorbed onto the membrane pores. When the mixed-solute of HA and TA rejection tests were performed, in particular, the adsorbed small TA molecules resulted in irreversible membrane fouling due to cake formation and membrane pore blocking on the membrane surface for the HA molecules. Although both membranes showed significantly higher flux declines for small molecules rejection, the GOc membranes showed better performance than the pristine UF membranes in terms of the rejection of various mixed-solute molecules, due to higher membrane recovery and antifouling capabilities. PMID:27517308

  5. Vitronectin expression in differentiating neuroblastic tumors: integrin alpha v beta 5 mediates vitronectin-dependent adhesion of retinoic-acid-differentiated neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gladson, C. L.; Dennis, C.; Rotolo, T. C.; Kelly, D. R.; Grammer, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    The metastatic potential of undifferentiated neuroblastomas is typically lost when differentiation into ganglioneuroblastomas occurs spontaneously or is induced. Cell adhesion may play a role in metastasis, and we have shown recently that expression of integrin alpha v beta 5 protein and mRNA is up-regulated in ganglioneuroblastomas in vivo. To investigate whether interactions of alpha v beta 5 with matrix components play a role in the loss of metastatic potential, we used immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization to analyze neuroblastic tumors at various stages of differentiation for expression of the alpha v beta 5 ligands, vitronectin and osteopontin, and determined the ability of vitronectin to promote attachment and neurite outgrowth in vitro in a retinoic-acid-differentiated neuroblastoma cell model. We found that vitronectin, but not osteopontin, was expressed in 5 of 5 ganglioneuroblastomas but was absent or weakly expressed in 6 of 6 undifferentiated neuroblastomas. Neuronal cell vitronectin was detected in 7 of 9 ganglioneuromas, 5 of 8 peripheral ganglia, and 14 of 21 adrenal gland medullae, confirming expression of vitronectin in mature peripheral neurons. In vitro, vitronectin promoted attachment of both undifferentiated and retinoic-acid-differentiated neuroblastoma cells, which was inhibited 20 and 60%, respectively, by monoclonal antibody anti-integrin alpha v beta 5. Vitronectin-promoted neurite outgrowth of retinoic-acid-differentiated neuroblastoma cells was not inhibited by monoclonal antibody anti-alpha v beta 5. These data suggest that the synthesis of vitronectin and the ability of integrin alpha v beta 5 to mediate vitronectin adhesion on retinoic-acid-differentiated neuroblastoma cells may promote differentiation of neuroblastoma cells in vivo. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 8 PMID:9137089

  6. Oxidation of L-ascorbic acid to dehydroascorbic acid on the surface of the red blood cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.; Jennings, M.; Bennett, K.

    1986-05-01

    L-ascorbic acid-1-/sup 14/C when incubated with human blood did not bind irreversibly to any of the protein components of plasma but did migrate irreversibly into erythrocytes. Isolation and characterization via IR of the moiety trapped within the cell established its identity as apparently, unchanged L-ascorbic acid. When dehydroascorbic acid-1-/sup 14/C was incubated with human blood, the results were identical including the identity of the entrapped moiety, L-ascorbic acid. It was found that L-ascorbic acid was enzymatically oxidized on the surface of the red blood cell to dehydroascorbic acid which diffused through the lipid soluble portion of the cell membrane and was enzymatically reduced back to ascorbic acid within the cell.

  7. Humulus lupus Beta-acids Administered Through Water Reduce Clostridium perfringens Challenge Strains in the Chicken Intestinal Tract Midgut and Ceca.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antimicrobial activity activity of extracts of the hop plant Humulus lupus was studied in chickens fed diets without antibiotic growth promotants. Beta-acid resins of the hop plant were administered by water to 13 day old chickens subsequently challenged per so with necrotic enteritis-associate...

  8. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Penghua; Hu, Zhihao; Song, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C-50 °C), persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO₄(-)• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO₄(-)•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF₂-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn-1F2n-1COOH). The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs. PMID:27322298

  9. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Penghua; Hu, Zhihao; Song, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C–50 °C), persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO4−• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO4−•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF2-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn−1F2n−1COOH). The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs. PMID:27322298

  10. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-11-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  11. Nitric oxide and salicylic acid signaling in plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Klessig, Daniel F.; Durner, Jörg; Noad, Robert; Navarre, Duroy A.; Wendehenne, David; Kumar, Dhirendra; Zhou, Jun Ma; Shah, Jyoti; Zhang, Shuqun; Kachroo, Pradeep; Trifa, Youssef; Pontier, Dominique; Lam, Eric; Silva, Herman

    2000-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a critical signaling role in the activation of plant defense responses after pathogen attack. We have identified several potential components of the SA signaling pathway, including (i) the H2O2-scavenging enzymes catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, (ii) a high affinity SA-binding protein (SABP2), (iii) a SA-inducible protein kinase (SIPK), (iv) NPR1, an ankyrin repeat-containing protein that exhibits limited homology to IκBα and is required for SA signaling, and (v) members of the TGA/OBF family of bZIP transcription factors. These bZIP factors physically interact with NPR1 and bind the SA-responsive element in promoters of several defense genes, such as the pathogenesis-related 1 gene (PR-1). Recent studies have demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) is another signal that activates defense responses after pathogen attack. NO has been shown to play a critical role in the activation of innate immune and inflammatory responses in animals. Increases in NO synthase (NOS)-like activity occurred in resistant but not susceptible tobacco after infection with tobacco mosaic virus. Here we demonstrate that this increase in activity participates in PR-1 gene induction. Two signaling molecules, cGMP and cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR), which function downstream of NO in animals, also appear to mediate plant defense gene activation (e.g., PR-1). Additionally, NO may activate PR-1 expression via an NO-dependent, cADPR-independent pathway. Several targets of NO in animals, including guanylate cyclase, aconitase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (e.g., SIPK), are also modulated by NO in plants. Thus, at least portions of NO signaling pathways appear to be shared between plants and animals. PMID:10922045

  12. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J; Stahl, Shannon S

    2014-11-13

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered. PMID:25363781

  13. Rapid and Stereoselective Conversion of a "trans"-Cinnamic Acid to a beta-Bromostyrene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    The stereoselective synthesis of an aryl vinyl bromide is accomplished in a rapid microscale reaction of "trans"-4-methoxycinnamic acid with N-bromosuccinimide in dichloromethane. The product is purified by dry column vacuum chromatography and its stereochemistry is determined by [superscript 1]H NMR. TLC, GC and GC-MSD can also be used. This…

  14. OXIDATION OF NITROPYRIN TO 6-CHOLORPICOLINIC ACID BY THE AMMONIA-OXIDIZING BACTERIUM NOSTROSOMAS EUROPAEA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Suspensions of Nitrosomonas europaea catalyzed the oxidation of the commercial nitrification inhibitor nitrapyrin [2-chloro-6-(trichloromethyl)-pyridine]. apid oxidation of nitrapyrin (at a concentration of 10 uM) required the concomitant oxidation of ammonia, hydroxylamine, or h...

  15. (-)-3,6-Dioxo-5beta-cholanic acid: hydrogen bonding in the hemihydrate of a steroidal diketo acid.

    PubMed

    Thompson, H W; Lalancette, R A; Brunskill, A P

    2001-05-01

    The hemihydrate of the title diketo acid, C(24)H(36)O(4).0.5H(2)O, forms hydrogen-bonded carboxyl dimers related by a C(2) axis at crystallographic sites on the a and b edges of the chosen cell [O.O = 2.643 (7) and 2.716 (7) A]. The ketone ends of the molecules approach each other at sites near ((1/2),(1/2),(1/2)), ((1/2),0,(1/2)), (0,0,(1/2)) and (0,(1/2),(1/2)) in an interleaved arrangement incorporating partial-occupancy water hydrogen bonded to the B-ring ketone. PMID:11353275

  16. Fluorine-Doped and Partially Oxidized Tantalum Carbides as Nonprecious Metal Electrocatalysts for Methanol Oxidation Reaction in Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xin; He, Chunyong; Zhong, Chengyong; Chen, Yuanping; Jiang, San Ping; Shen, Pei Kang

    2016-03-16

    A nonprecious metal electrocatalyst based on fluorine-doped tantalum carbide with an oxidative surface on graphitized carbon (TaCx FyOz/(g)C) is developed by using a simple one-pot in situ ion exchange and adsorption method, and the TaCxFyOz/(g)C shows superior performance and durability for methanol oxidation reaction and extreme tolerance to CO poisoning in acidic media. PMID:26779940

  17. Changes in lipid composition, fatty acid profile and lipid oxidative stability during Cantonese sausage processing.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chaoying; Zhao, Mouming; Sun, Weizheng; Zhou, Feibai; Cui, Chun

    2013-03-01

    Lipid composition, fatty acid profile and lipid oxidative stability were evaluated during Cantonese sausage processing. Free fatty acids increased with concomitant decrease of phospholipids. Total content of free fatty acids at 72 h in muscle and adipose tissue was 7.341 mg/g and 3.067 mg/g, respectively. Total amount of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (SFA, MUFA, and PUFA) in neutral lipid exhibited a little change during processing, while the proportion of PUFA significantly decreased in the PL fraction. The main triacylglycerols were POO+SLO+OOO, PSO (P = palmitic acid, O = oleic acid, L = linoleic acid, S = stearic acid), and a preferential hydrolysis of palmitic, oleic and linoleic acid was observed. Phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) were the main components of phospholipids and PE exhibited the most significant degradation during processing. Thiobarbituric acid values (TBARS) increased while peroxide values and hexanal contents varied during processing. PMID:23273460

  18. Expression of an endo-(1,3;1,4)-beta-glucanase in response to wounding, methyl jasmonate, abscisic acid and ethephon in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Takashi; Jin, Shigeki; Yoshida, Midori; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Opassiri, Rodjana; Ketudat Cairns, James R

    2009-11-01

    We isolated two rice endo-(1,3;1,4)-beta-glucanase genes, denoted OsEGL1 and OsEGL2, which encoded proteins that shared 64% amino acid sequence identity. Both the OsEGL1 and OsEGL2 genes were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli to produce functional proteins. Purified OsEGL1 and OsEGL2 proteins hydrolyzed (1,3;1,4)-beta-glucans, but not (1,3;1,6)-beta-linked or (1,3)-beta-linked glucopolysaccharides nor carboxymethyl cellulose, similar to previously characterized grass endo-(1,3;1,4)-beta-glucanases. RNA blot analysis revealed that the OsEGL1 gene is expressed constitutively not only in young roots of rice seedlings, but also in mature roots of adult rice plants. Little or no expression of the OsEGL2 gene was observed in all tissues or treatments tested, but database and RT-PCR analysis indicated it is expressed in ripening panicle. In rice seedling leaves, OsEGL1 gene expression significantly increased in response to methyl jasmonate, abscisic acid, ethephon and mechanical wounding. Mechanical wounding also increased the leaf elongation rate in rice seedlings by 16% relative to that of control seedlings at day 4 after treatment. The increase in the leaf elongation rate of rice seedlings treated under mechanical wounding was concomitant with an increase in OsEGL1 expression levels in seedling leaves. PMID:19570592

  19. Expression of lauroyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase in brassica napus seeds induces pathways for both fatty acid oxidation and biosynthesis and implies a set point for triacylglycerol accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Eccleston, VS; Ohlrogge, JB

    1998-01-01

    Expression of a California bay lauroyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase (MCTE) in developing seeds of transgenic oilseed rape alters the fatty acid composition of the mature seed, resulting in up to 60 mol% of laurate in triacylglycerols. In this study, we examined the metabolism of lauric acid and 14C-acetate in developing seeds of oilseed rape that express high levels of MCTE. Lauroyl-CoA oxidase activity but not palmitoyl-CoA oxidase activity was increased several-fold in developing seeds expressing MCTE. In addition, isocitrate lyase and malate synthase activities were six- and 30-fold higher, respectively, in high-laurate developing seeds. Control seeds incorporated 14C-acetate almost entirely into fatty acids, whereas in seeds expressing MCTE, only 50% of the label was recovered in lipids and the remainder was in a range of water-soluble components, including sucrose and malate. Together, these results indicate that the pathways for beta-oxidation and the glyoxylate cycle have been induced in seeds expressing high levels of MCTE. Although a substantial portion of the fatty acid produced in these seeds is recycled to acetyl-CoA and sucrose through the beta-oxidation and glyoxylate cycle pathways, total seed oil is not reduced. How is oil content maintained if lauric acid is inefficiently converted to triacylglycerol? The levels of acyl carrier protein and several enzymes of fatty acid synthesis were increased two- to threefold at midstage development in high-laurate seeds. These results indicate that a coordinate induction of the fatty acid synthesis pathway occurs, presumably to compensate for the lauric acid lost through beta-oxidation or for a shortage of long-chain fatty acids. PMID:9548986

  20. Ozonization of humic acids in brown coal oxidized in situ

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Semenova; Yu.F. Patrakov; M.V. Batina

    2008-10-15

    The effect of the ozonization of humic acids in chloroform and glacial acetic acid media on the yield and component composition of the resulting products was studied. The high efficiency of ozonization in acetic acid was found. Water-soluble low-molecular-weight substances were predominant among the ozonization products.

  1. Lycopene Prevents Amyloid [Beta]-Induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress and Dysfunctions in Cultured Rat Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Qu, Mingyue; Jiang, Zheng; Liao, Yuanxiang; Song, Zhenyao; Nan, Xinzhong

    2016-06-01

    Brains affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) show a large spectrum of mitochondrial alterations at both morphological and genetic level. The causal link between β-amyloid (Aβ) and mitochondrial dysfunction has been established in cellular models of AD. We observed previously that lycopene, a member of the carotenoid family of phytochemicals, could counteract neuronal apoptosis and cell damage induced by Aβ and other neurotoxic substances, and that this neuroprotective action somehow involved the mitochondria. The present study aims to investigate the effects of lycopene on mitochondria in cultured rat cortical neurons exposed to Aβ. It was found that lycopene attenuated Aβ-induced oxidative stress, as evidenced by the decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondria-derived superoxide production. Additionally, lycopene ameliorated Aβ-induced mitochondrial morphological alteration, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pores and the consequent cytochrome c release. Lycopene also improved mitochondrial complex activities and restored ATP levels in Aβ-treated neuron. Furthermore, lycopene prevented mitochondrial DNA damages and improved the protein level of mitochondrial transcription factor A in mitochondria. Those results indicate that lycopene protects mitochondria against Aβ-induced damages, at least in part by inhibiting mitochondrial oxidative stress and improving mitochondrial function. These beneficial effects of lycopene may account for its protection against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26816095

  2. Investigating the inclusion properties of aromatic amino acids complexing beta-cyclodextrins in model peptides.

    PubMed

    Caso, Jolanda Valentina; Russo, Luigi; Palmieri, Maddalena; Malgieri, Gaetano; Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Isernia, Carla; Iacovino, Rosa

    2015-10-01

    Cyclodextrins are commonly used as complexing agents in biological, pharmaceutical, and industrial applications since they have an effect on protein thermal and proteolytic stability, refolding yields, solubility, and taste masking. β-cyclodextrins (β-CD), because of their cavity size are a perfectly suited complexing agent for many common guest moieties. In the case of peptide-cyclodextrin and protein-cyclodextrin host-guest complexes the aromatic amino acids are reported to be the principal responsible of the interaction. For these reasons, we have investigated the inclusion properties of nine designed tripeptides, obtained permuting the position of two L-alanines (Ala, A) with that of one L-tryptophan (Trp, W), L-phenylalanine (Phe, F), or L-tyrosine (Tyr, Y), respectively. Interestingly, the position of the aromatic side-chain in the sequence appears to modulate the β-CD:peptide binding constants, determined via UV-Vis and NMR spectroscopy, which in turn assumes values higher than those reported for the single amino acid. The tripeptides containing a tyrosine showed the highest binding constants, with the central position in the Ac-AYA-NH2 peptide becoming the most favorite for the interaction. A combined NMR and Molecular Docking approach permitted to build detailed complex models, highlighting the stabilizing interactions of the neighboring amino acids backbone atoms with the upper rim of the β-CD. PMID:25985927

  3. Loss of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 leads to impaired islet mass and beta cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Stephanie R.; Priyadarshini, Medha; Fuller, Miles H.; Bhardwaj, Tanya; Brodsky, Michael R.; Angueira, Anthony R.; Mosser, Rockann E.; Carboneau, Bethany A.; Tersey, Sarah A.; Mancebo, Helena; Gilchrist, Annette; Mirmira, Raghavendra G.; Gannon, Maureen; Layden, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of pancreatic β cell mass is a critical factor to help maintain normoglycemia during insulin resistance. Nutrient-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) contribute to aspects of β cell function, including regulation of β cell mass. Nutrients such as free fatty acids (FFAs) contribute to precise regulation of β cell mass by signaling through cognate GPCRs, and considerable evidence suggests that circulating FFAs promote β cell expansion by direct and indirect mechanisms. Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (FFA2) is a β cell-expressed GPCR that is activated by short chain fatty acids, particularly acetate. Recent studies of FFA2 suggest that it may act as a regulator of β cell function. Here, we set out to explore what role FFA2 may play in regulation of β cell mass. Interestingly, Ffar2−/− mice exhibit diminished β cell mass at birth and throughout adulthood, and increased β cell death at adolescent time points, suggesting a role for FFA2 in establishment and maintenance of β cell mass. Additionally, activation of FFA2 with Gαq/11-biased agonists substantially increased β cell proliferation in in vitro and ex vivo proliferation assays. Collectively, these data suggest that FFA2 may be a novel therapeutic target to stimulate β cell growth and proliferation. PMID:27324831

  4. Loss of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 leads to impaired islet mass and beta cell survival.

    PubMed

    Villa, Stephanie R; Priyadarshini, Medha; Fuller, Miles H; Bhardwaj, Tanya; Brodsky, Michael R; Angueira, Anthony R; Mosser, Rockann E; Carboneau, Bethany A; Tersey, Sarah A; Mancebo, Helena; Gilchrist, Annette; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Gannon, Maureen; Layden, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of pancreatic β cell mass is a critical factor to help maintain normoglycemia during insulin resistance. Nutrient-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) contribute to aspects of β cell function, including regulation of β cell mass. Nutrients such as free fatty acids (FFAs) contribute to precise regulation of β cell mass by signaling through cognate GPCRs, and considerable evidence suggests that circulating FFAs promote β cell expansion by direct and indirect mechanisms. Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (FFA2) is a β cell-expressed GPCR that is activated by short chain fatty acids, particularly acetate. Recent studies of FFA2 suggest that it may act as a regulator of β cell function. Here, we set out to explore what role FFA2 may play in regulation of β cell mass. Interestingly, Ffar2(-/-) mice exhibit diminished β cell mass at birth and throughout adulthood, and increased β cell death at adolescent time points, suggesting a role for FFA2 in establishment and maintenance of β cell mass. Additionally, activation of FFA2 with Gαq/11-biased agonists substantially increased β cell proliferation in in vitro and ex vivo proliferation assays. Collectively, these data suggest that FFA2 may be a novel therapeutic target to stimulate β cell growth and proliferation. PMID:27324831

  5. Iron Catalysis for Room-Temperature Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols to Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingguo; Zhang, Jiasheng; Ma, Shengming

    2016-07-13

    Oxidation from alcohols to carboxylic acids, a class of essential chemicals in daily life, academic laboratories, and industry, is a fundamental reaction, usually using at least a stoichiometric amount of an expensive and toxic oxidant. Here, an efficient and practical sustainable oxidation technology of alcohols to carboxylic acids using pure O2 or even O2 in air as the oxidant has been developed: utilizing a catalytic amount each of Fe(NO3)3·9H2O/TEMPO/MCl, a series of carboxylic acids were obtained from alcohols (also aldehydes) in high yields at room temperature. A 55 g-scale reaction was demonstrated using air. As a synthetic application, the first total synthesis of a naturally occurring allene, i.e., phlomic acid, was accomplished. PMID:27304226

  6. Fatty acids and oxidative stability of meat from lambs fed carob-containing diets.

    PubMed

    Gravador, Rufielyn S; Luciano, Giuseppe; Jongberg, Sisse; Bognanno, Matteo; Scerra, Manuel; Andersen, Mogens L; Lund, Marianne N; Priolo, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Male Comisana lambs were individually stalled and, for 56 days, were fed concentrates with 60% barley (n = 8 lambs), or concentrates in which barley was partially replaced by 24% or 35% carob pulp (n = 9 lambs in each group). The intramuscular fatty acids were analyzed and the color stability, lipid and protein oxidation were measured in fresh meat overwrapped with polyvinyl chloride film at 0, 3 or 6 days of storage at 4 °C in the dark. Carob pulp increased the concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in muscle, including the rumenic acid (P < 0.01), and reduced the saturated fatty acids (P < 0.01) and the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio (P = 0.01). The meat did not undergo extensive oxidative deterioration and the diet did not affect the oxidative stability parameters. Therefore, carob in lamb diet could increase PUFA in muscle without compromising meat oxidative stability. PMID:25842304

  7. Isotope composition of sulphate in acid mine drainage as measure of bacterial oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, B.E.; Wheeler, M.C.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    The formation of acid waters by oxidation of pyrite-bearing ore deposits, mine tailing piles, and coal measures is a complex biogeochemical process and is a serious environmental problem. We have studied the oxygen and sulphur isotope geochemistry of sulphides, sulphur, sulphate and water in the field and in experiments to identify sources of oxygen and reaction mechanisms of sulphate formation. Here we report that the oxygen isotope composition of sulphate in acid mine drainage shows a large variation due to differing proportions of atmospheric- and water-derived oxygen from both chemical and bacterially-mediated oxidation. 18O-enrichment of sulphate results from pyrite oxidation facilitated by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in aerated environments. Oxygen isotope analysis may therefore be useful in monitoring the effectiveness of abatement programmes designed to inhibit bacterial oxidation. Sulphur isotopes show no significant fractionation between pyrite and sulphate, indicating the quantitative insignificance of intermediate oxidation states of sulphur under acid conditions. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  8. Stoichiometric inhibition of amyloid beta-protein aggregation with peptides containing alternating alpha,alpha-disubstituted amino acids.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Marcus A; Aucoin, Jed P; Fu, Yanwen; McCarley, Robin L; Hammer, Robert P

    2006-03-22

    We have prepared two peptides based on the hydrophobic core (Lys-Leu-Val-Phe-Phe) of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) that contain alpha,alpha-disubstituted amino acids at alternating positions, but differ in the positioning of the oligolysine chain (AMY-1, C-terminus; AMY-2, N-terminus). We have studied the effects of AMY-1 and AMY-2 on the aggregation of Abeta and find that, at stoichiometric concentrations, both peptides completely stop Abeta fibril growth. Equimolar mixtures of AMY-1 and Abeta form only globular aggregates as imaged by scanning force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These samples show no signs of protofibrillar or fibrillar material even after prolonged periods of time (4.5 months). Also, 10 mol % of AMY-1 prevents Abeta self-assembly for long periods of time; aged samples (4.5 months) show only a few protofibrillar or fibrillar aggregates. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of equimolar mixtures of AMY-1 and Abeta show that the secondary structure of the mixture changes over time and progresses to a predominantly beta-sheet structure, which is consistent with the design of these inhibitors preferring a sheet-like conformation. Changing the position of the charged tail on the peptide, AMY-2 interacts with Abeta differently in that equimolar mixtures form large ( approximately 1 mum) globular aggregates which do not progress to fibrils, but precipitate out of solution. The differences in the aggregation mediated by the two peptides is discussed in terms of a model where the inhibitors act as cosurfactants that interfere with the native ability of Abeta to self-assemble by disrupting hydrophobic interactions either at the C-terminus or N-terminus of Abeta. PMID:16536517

  9. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by etiolated and green corn tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Reinecke, D. )

    1989-04-01

    Etiolated corn tissues oxidase indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to oxindole-3-acetic acid (OxIAA). This oxidation results in loss of auxin activity and may plant a role in regulating IAA-stimulated growth. The enzyme has been partially purified and characterized and shown to require O{sub 2}, and a heat-stable lipid-soluble corn factor which can be replaced by linolenic or linoleic acids in the oxidation of IAA. Corn oil was tested as a cofactor in the IAA oxidation reaction. Corn oil stimulated enzyme activity by 30% while trilinolein was inactive. The capacity of green tissue to oxidize IAA was examined by incubating leaf sections from 2 week old light-grown corn seedlings with {sup 14}C-IAA. OxIAA and IAA were separated from other IAA metabolites on a 3 ml anion exchange column. Of the IAA taken up by the sections, 13% was oxidized to OxIAA. This is the first evidence that green tissue of corn may also regulate IAA levels by oxidizing IAA to OxIAA.

  10. Electrochemical oxidation of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid by metal-oxide-coated Ti electrodes.

    PubMed

    Maharana, Dusmant; Xu, Zesheng; Niu, Junfeng; Rao, Neti Nageswara

    2015-10-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) over metal-oxide-coated Ti anodes, i.e., Ti/SnO2-Sb/Ce-PbO2, Ti/SnO2-Sb and Ti/RuO2, was examined. The degradation efficiency of over 90% was attained at 20 min at different initial concentrations (0.5-20 mg L(-1)) and initial pH values (3.1-11.2). The degradation efficiencies of 2,4,5-T on Ti/SnO2-Sb/Ce-PbO2, Ti/SnO2-Sb and Ti/RuO2 anodes were higher than 99.9%, 97.2% and 91.5% at 30 min, respectively, and the respective total organic carbon removal ratios were 65.7%, 54.6% and 37.2%. The electrochemical degradation of 2,4,5-T in aqueous solution followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The compounds, i.e., 2,5-dichlorohydroquinone and 2,5-dihydroxy-p-benzoquinone, have been identified as the main aromatic intermediates by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results showed that the energy efficiencies of 2,4,5-T (20 mg L(-1)) degradation with Ti/SnO2-Sb/Ce-PbO2 anode at the optimal current densities from 2 to 16 mA cm(-2) ranged from 8.21 to 18.73 kWh m(-3). PMID:25981800

  11. Evidence for Physical Association of Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation and Oxidative Phosphorylation Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yudong; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Mihalik, Stephanie J.; Goetzman, Eric S.; Vockley, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are key pathways involved in cellular energetics. Reducing equivalents from FAO enter OXPHOS at the level of complexes I and III. Genetic disorders of FAO and OXPHOS are among the most frequent inborn errors of metabolism. Patients with deficiencies of either FAO or OXPHOS often show clinical and/or biochemical findings indicative of a disorder of the other pathway. In this study, the physical and functional interactions between these pathways were examined. Extracts of isolated rat liver mitochondria were subjected to blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BNGE) to separate OXPHOS complexes and supercomplexes followed by Western blotting using antisera to various FAO enzymes. Extracts were also subjected to sucrose density centrifugation and fractions analyzed by BNGE or enzymatic assays. Several FAO enzymes co-migrated with OXPHOS supercomplexes in different patterns in the gels. When palmitoyl-CoA was added to the sucrose gradient fractions containing OXPHOS supercomplexes in the presence of potassium cyanide, cytochrome c was reduced. Cytochrome c reduction was completely blocked by myxothiazol (a complex III inhibitor) and 3-mercaptopropionate (an inhibitor of the first step of FAO), but was only partially inhibited by rotenone (a complex I inhibitor). Although palmitoyl-CoA and octanoyl-CoA provided reducing equivalents to OXPHOS-containing supercomplex fractions, no accumulation of their intermediates was detected. In contrast, short branched acyl-CoA substrates were not metabolized by OXPHOS-containing supercomplex fractions. These data provide evidence of a multifunctional FAO complex within mitochondria that is physically associated with OXPHOS supercomplexes and promotes metabolic channeling. PMID:20663895

  12. Moderate carnitine depletion and long-chain fatty acid oxidation, exercise capacity, and nitrogen balance in the rat.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, O J; Takala, J

    1994-09-01

    Carnitine plays a central role in lipid metabolism by transporting long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria for beta-oxidation. Reduction of carnitine concentration does not automatically imply that functional carnitine deficiency exists with direct consequences on energy metabolism. In our experimental model, we reduced tissue concentrations of carnitine to levels that are comparable to those in patients with various metabolic disorders with secondary carnitine deficiency and did a study on the in vivo effects of moderate carnitine depletion on palmitate oxidation, exercise capacity, and nitrogen balance. Thirty rats were divided into a carnitine-depleted group (group I) and pair-fed controls (group II). Carnitine depletion resulting in a 48% reduction of tissue carnitine concentrations was induced by feeding ad libitum a carnitine-free oral diet consisting of parenteral nutrition solutions. Palmitate oxidation was measured by collecting expired 14CO2 after an intraperitoneal injection of [1-14C]palmitate, and exercise capacity was determined by having the rats swim to exhaustion. Despite the 48% depletion of carnitine in serum, muscle, and liver, there were no differences in cumulative palmitate oxidation in 3 h (group I, 40 +/- 7%; group II, 37 +/- 9% of injected activity), swimming time to exhaustion (group I, 8.1 +/- 2.8 h; group II, 7.7 +/- 3.6 h), or nitrogen balance (group I, 1.1 +/- 0.5 g of nitrogen/kg/d; group II, 1.2 +/- 0.5 g of nitrogen/kg/d). We conclude that carnitine depletion of 48% has no effect on palmitate oxidation, exercise capacity, or nitrogen balance in the rats studied. PMID:7808823

  13. Phagocytosis of hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions containing oxidized dextrans conjugated with isonicotinic acid hydrazide by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shkurupy, V A; Arkhipov, S A; Troitsky, A V; Luzgina, N G; Zaikovskaja, M V; Ufimceva, E G; Iljine, D A; Akhramenko, E S; Gulyaeva, E P; Bistrova, T N

    2009-12-01

    We studied phagocytic activity of macrophages towards hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions consisting of 150-800-nm nanoliposomes containing oxidized dextrans with a molecular weight of 35 and 60 kDa obtained by chemical ("permanganate") and radiochemical oxidation of dextran conjugated with isonicotinic acid hydrazide (dextrazides, intracellular prolonged antituberculous drugs). Phagocytic activity of macrophages towards hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions containing dextrazides obtained by chemical oxidation of dextrans is higher than activity towards hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions containing dextrazides prepared by radiochemical oxidation and depends on the size of hybrid molecular nanosomal compositions and molecular weight of oxidized dextrans. PMID:21116494

  14. Novel amino acids: synthesis of furoxan and sydnonimine containing amino acids and peptides as potential nitric oxide releasing motifs.

    PubMed

    Nortcliffe, Andrew; Botting, Nigel P; O'Hagan, David

    2013-07-28

    The incorporation of furoxan and sydnonimine ring systems into amino acid side chains is demonstrated with the preparation of four novel amino acids which carry these nitric oxide-releasing motifs. N-((4-Nitrophenoxy)carbonyl)-3-phenylsydnonimine 9 and bis(phenylsulfonyl)furoxan 10 are the key intermediates for introducing the heterocycle side chains onto appropriate amine and alcohol functionalities respectively. Furoxan 5 and 7 both displayed NO release based on determination of nitrite production. Orthogonal amino acid protecting group strategies were deployed to demonstrate that the amino acids could be incorporated into peptide frameworks. By way of demonstration the amino acids were placed centrally into several tripeptide motifs. Griess test assays showed that these amino acids released NO in the presence of γ-glutathione (GST). PMID:23753002

  15. Omega-3 fatty acids differentially modulate enzymatic anti-oxidant systems in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    da Silva, E P; Nachbar, R T; Levada-Pires, A C; Hirabara, S M; Lambertucci, R H

    2016-01-01

    During physical activity, increased reactive oxygen species production occurs, which can lead to cell damage and in a decline of individual's performance and health. The use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as a supplement to protect the immune system has been increasing; however, their possible benefit to the anti-oxidant system is not well described. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether the omega-3 fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid) can be beneficial to the anti-oxidant system in cultured skeletal muscle cells. C2C12 myocytes were differentiated and treated with either eicosapentaenoic acid or docosahexaenoic acid for 24 h. Superoxide content was quantified using the dihydroethidine oxidation method and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activity, and expression was quantified. We observed that the docosahexaenoic fatty acids caused an increase in superoxide production. Eicosapentaenoic acid induced catalase activity, while docosahexaenoic acid suppressed superoxide dismutase activity. In addition, we found an increased protein expression of the total manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes when cells were treated with eicosapentaenoic acid. Taken together, these data indicate that the use of eicosapentaenoic acid may present both acute and chronic benefits; however, the treatment with DHA may not be beneficial to muscle cells. PMID:26386577

  16. Measurement of Fatty Acid Oxidation Rates in Animal Tissues and Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Frank K.; Green, Michelle F.; Koves, Timothy R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    While much oncological research has focused on metabolic shifts in glucose and amino acid oxidation, recent evidence suggests that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) may also play an important role in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells. Here, we present a simple method for measuring FAO rates using radiolabeled palmitate, common laboratory reagents, and standard supplies. This protocol is broadly applicable for measuring FAO rates in cultured cancer cells as well as in both malignant and nontransformed animal tissues. PMID:24862277

  17. Disposition and metabolism of 2-fluoro-beta-alanine conjug