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Sample records for acid binding motifs

  1. Carboxylic-Acid-passivated metal oxide nanocrystals: ligand exchange characteristics of a new binding motif.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Jonathan; Justo, Yolanda; De Keukeleere, Katrien; Van den Broeck, Freya; Martins, José C; Van Driessche, Isabel; Hens, Zeger

    2015-05-26

    Ligand exchange is central in the processing of inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) and requires understanding of surface chemistry. Studying sterically stabilized HfO2 and ZrO2 NCs using (1) H solution NMR and IR spectroscopy as well as elemental analysis, this paper demonstrates the reversible exchange of initial oleic acid ligands for octylamine and self-adsorption of oleic acid at NC surfaces. Both processes are incompatible with an X-type binding motif of carboxylic acids as reported for sulfide and selenide NCs. We argue that this behavior stems from the dissociative adsorption of carboxylic acids at the oxide surface. Both proton and carboxylate moieties must be regarded as X-type ligands yielding a combined X2 binding motif that allows for self-adsorption and exchange for L-type ligands. PMID:25866095

  2. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeremy G; Lincoln, James E; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  3. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeremy G.; Lincoln, James E.; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C.

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  4. Signature amino acids enable the archaeal L7Ae box C/D RNP core protein to recognize and bind the K-loop RNA motif

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Keith T.; Zhang, Xinxin; Qu, Guosheng; Biswas, Shyamasri; Suryadi, Jimmy; Brown, Bernard A.; Maxwell, E. Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD protein homologs are members of the L7Ae/15.5kD protein family that characteristically recognize K-turn motifs found in both archaeal and eukaryotic RNAs. In Archaea, the L7Ae protein uniquely binds the K-loop motif found in box C/D and H/ACA sRNAs, whereas the eukaryotic 15.5kD homolog is unable to recognize this variant K-turn RNA. Comparative sequence and structural analyses, coupled with amino acid replacement experiments, have demonstrated that five amino acids enable the archaeal L7Ae core protein to recognize and bind the K-loop motif. These signature residues are highly conserved in the archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD homologs, but differ between the two domains of life. Interestingly, loss of K-loop binding by archaeal L7Ae does not disrupt C′/D′ RNP formation or RNA-guided nucleotide modification. L7Ae is still incorporated into the C′/D′ RNP despite its inability to bind the K-loop, thus indicating the importance of protein–protein interactions for RNP assembly and function. Finally, these five signature amino acids are distinct for each of the L7Ae/L30 family members, suggesting an evolutionary continuum of these RNA-binding proteins for recognition of the various K-turn motifs contained in their cognate RNAs. PMID:19926724

  5. Structural and functional studies of a phosphatidic acid-binding antifungal plant defensin MtDef4: Identification of an RGFRRR motif governing fungal cell entry

    SciTech Connect

    Sagaram, Uma S.; El-Mounadi, Kaoutar; Buchko, Garry W.; Berg, Howard R.; Kaur, Jagdeep; Pandurangi, Raghoottama; Smith, Thomas J.; Shah, Dilip

    2013-12-04

    A highly conserved plant defensin MtDef4 potently inhibits the growth of a filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum. MtDef4 is internalized by cells of F. graminearum. To determine its mechanism of fungal cell entry and antifungal action, NMR solution structure of MtDef4 has been determined. The analysis of its structure has revealed a positively charged patch on the surface of the protein consisting of arginine residues in its γ-core signature, a major determinant of the antifungal activity of MtDef4. Here, we report functional analysis of the RGFRRR motif of the γ-core signature of MtDef4. The replacement of RGFRRR to AAAARR or to RGFRAA not only abolishes fungal cell entry but also results in loss of the antifungal activity of MtDef4. MtDef4 binds strongly to phosphatidic acid (PA), a precursor for the biosynthesis of membrane phospholipids and a signaling lipid known to recruit cytosolic proteins to membranes. Mutations of RGFRRR which abolish fungal cell entry of MtDef4 also impair its binding to PA. Our results suggest that RGFRRR motif is a translocation signal for entry of MtDef4 into fungal cells and that this positively charged motif likely mediates interaction of this defensin with PA as part of its antifungal action.

  6. Solution structure of gamma-bungarotoxin: the functional significance of amino acid residues flanking the RGD motif in integrin binding.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Jia-Hau; Chen, Chiu-Yueh; Chang, Long-Sen; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yen-Chin; Lo, Yu-Hui; Liu, Yu-Chen; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2004-12-01

    Gamma-bungarotoxin, a snake venom protein isolated from Bungarus multicinctus, contains 68 amino acids, including 10 cysteine residues and a TAVRGDGP sequence at positions 30-37. The solution structure of gamma-bungarotoxin has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The structure is similar to that of the short-chain neurotoxins that contain three loops extending from a disulfide-bridged core. The tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence is located at the apex of the flexible loop and is similar to that of other RGD-containing proteins. However, gamma-bungarotoxin only inhibits platelet aggregations with an IC50 of 34 microM. To understand its weak activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation, we mutated the RGD loop sequences of rhodostomin, a potent platelet aggregation inhibitor, from RIPRGDMP to TAVRGDGP, resulting in a 196-fold decrease in activity. In addition, the average Calpha-to-Calpha distance between R33 and G36 of gamma-bungarotoxin is 6.02 A, i.e., shorter than that of other RGD-containing proteins that range from 6.55 to 7.46 A. These results suggested that the amino acid residues flanking the RGD motif might control the width of the RGD loop. This structural difference may be responsible for its decrease in platelet aggregation inhibition compared with other RGD-containing proteins. PMID:15390258

  7. A Motif Unique to the Human Dead-Box Protein DDX3 Is Important for Nucleic Acid Binding, ATP Hydrolysis, RNA/DNA Unwinding and HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Di Cicco, Giulia; Dietrich, Ursula; Maga, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins are enzymes endowed with nucleic acid-dependent ATPase, RNA translocase and unwinding activities. The human DEAD-box protein DDX3 has been shown to play important roles in tumor proliferation and viral infections. In particular, DDX3 has been identified as an essential cofactor for HIV-1 replication. Here we characterized a set of DDX3 mutants biochemically with respect to nucleic acid binding, ATPase and helicase activity. In particular, we addressed the functional role of a unique insertion between motifs I and Ia of DDX3 and provide evidence for its implication in nucleic acid binding and HIV-1 replication. We show that human DDX3 lacking this domain binds HIV-1 RNA with lower affinity. Furthermore, a specific peptide ligand for this insertion selected by phage display interferes with HIV-1 replication after transduction into HelaP4 cells. Besides broadening our understanding of the structure-function relationships of this important protein, our results identify a specific domain of DDX3 which may be suited as target for antiviral drugs designed to inhibit cellular cofactors for HIV-1 replication. PMID:21589879

  8. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  9. Solid-phase synthesis of amidine-substituted phenylbenzimidazoles and incorporation of this DNA binding and recognition motif into amino acid and peptide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Garner, Matthew L; Georgiadis, Taxiarchis M; Li, Jessica Bo; Wang, Tianxiu; Long, Eric C

    2014-05-01

    Amidine-substituted phenylbenzimidazoles are well-established DNA-binding structural motifs that have contributed to the development of diverse classes of DNA-targeted agents; this ring system not only assists in increasing the overall DNA affinity of an agent, but can also influence its site selectivity. Seeking a means to conveniently exploit these attributes, a protocol for the on-resin synthesis of amino acid- and peptide-phenylbenzimidazole-amidine conjugates was developed to facilitate installation of phenylbenzimidazole-amidines into peptide chains during the course of standard solid-phase syntheses. Building from a resin-bound amino acid or peptide on Rink amide resin, 4-formyl benzoic acid was coupled to the resin-bound free amine followed by introduction of 3,4-diamino-N'-hydroxybenzimidamide (in the presence of 1,4-benzoquinone) to construct the benzimidazole heterocycle. Finally, the resin-bound N'-hydroxybenzimidamide functionality was reduced to an amidine via 1 M SnCl2·2H2O in DMF prior to resin cleavage to release final product. This procedure permits the straightforward synthesis of amino acids or peptides that are N-terminally capped by a phenylbenzimidazole-amidine ring system. Employing this protocol, a series of amino acid-phenylbenzimidazole-amidine (Xaa-R) conjugates was synthesized as well as dipeptide conjugates of the general form Xaa-Gly-R (where R is the phenylbenzimidazole-amidine and Xaa is any amino acid). PMID:24562478

  10. Structural and Functional Studies of a Phosphatidic Acid-Binding Antifungal Plant Defensin MtDef4: Identification of an RGFRRR Motif Governing Fungal Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Buchko, Garry W.; Berg, Howard R.; Kaur, Jagdeep; Pandurangi, Raghu S.; Smith, Thomas J.; Shah, Dilip M.

    2013-01-01

    MtDef4 is a 47-amino acid cysteine-rich evolutionary conserved defensin from a model legume Medicago truncatula. It is an apoplast-localized plant defense protein that inhibits the growth of the ascomycetous fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum in vitro at micromolar concentrations. Little is known about the mechanisms by which MtDef4 mediates its antifungal activity. In this study, we show that MtDef4 rapidly permeabilizes fungal plasma membrane and is internalized by the fungal cells where it accumulates in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, analysis of the structure of MtDef4 reveals the presence of a positively charged γ-core motif composed of β2 and β3 strands connected by a positively charged RGFRRR loop. Replacement of the RGFRRR sequence with AAAARR or RGFRAA abolishes the ability of MtDef4 to enter fungal cells, suggesting that the RGFRRR loop is a translocation signal required for the internalization of the protein. MtDef4 binds to phosphatidic acid (PA), a precursor for the biosynthesis of membrane phospholipids and a signaling lipid known to recruit cytosolic proteins to membranes. Amino acid substitutions in the RGFRRR sequence which abolish the ability of MtDef4 to enter fungal cells also impair its ability to bind PA. These findings suggest that MtDef4 is a novel antifungal plant defensin capable of entering into fungal cells and affecting intracellular targets and that these processes are mediated by the highly conserved cationic RGFRRR loop via its interaction with PA. PMID:24324798

  11. Structure and ubiquitin binding of the ubiquitin-interacting motif

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher,R.; Wang, B.; Alam, S.; Higginson, D.; Robinson, H.; Sundquist, C.; Hill, C.

    2003-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is used to target proteins into a large number of different biological processes including proteasomal degradation, endocytosis, virus budding, and vacuolar protein sorting (Vps). Ubiquitylated proteins are typically recognized using one of several different conserved ubiquitin binding modules. Here, we report the crystal structure and ubiquitin binding properties of one such module, the ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM). We found that UIM peptides from several proteins involved in endocytosis and vacuolar protein sorting including Hrs, Vps27p, Stam1, and Eps15 bound specifically, but with modest affinity (K{sub d} = 0.1-1 mM), to free ubiquitin. Full affinity ubiquitin binding required the presence of conserved acidic patches at the N and C terminus of the UIM, as well as highly conserved central alanine and serine residues. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping experiments demonstrated that all of these UIM peptides bind to the I44 surface of ubiquitin. The 1.45 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the second yeast Vps27p UIM (Vps27p-2) revealed that the ubiquitin-interacting motif forms an amphipathic helix. Although Vps27p-2 is monomeric in solution, the motif unexpectedly crystallized as an antiparallel four-helix bundle, and the potential biological implications of UIM oligomerization are therefore discussed.

  12. Identification of amino acid sequence motifs in desmocollin, a desmosomal glycoprotein, that are required for plakoglobin binding and plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Troyanovsky, S M; Troyanovsky, R B; Eshkind, L G; Leube, R E; Franke, W W

    1994-11-01

    By transfecting epithelial cells with gene constructs encoding chimeric proteins of the transmembrane part of the gap junction protein connexin 32 in combination with various segments of the cytoplasmic part of the desmosomal cadherin desmocollin 1a, we have determined that a relatively short sequence element is necessary for the formation of desmosome-like plaques and for the specific anchorage of bundles of intermediate-sized filaments (IFs). Deletion of as little as the carboxyl-terminal 37 aa resulted in a lack of IF anchorage and binding of the plaque protein plakoglobin, as shown by immunolocalization and immunoprecipitation experiments. In addition, we show that the sequence requirements for the recruitment of desmoplakin, another desmosomal plaque protein, differ and that a short (10 aa) segment of the desmocollin 1a tail, located close to the plasma membrane, is also required for the binding of plakoglobin, as well as of desmoplakin, and also for IF anchorage. The importance of the carboxyl-terminal domain, homologous in diverse types of cadherins, is emphasized, as it must harbor, in a mutually exclusive pattern, the information for assembly of the IF-anchoring desmosomal plaque in desmocollins and for formation of the alpha-/beta-catenin- and vinculin-containing, actin filament-anchoring plaque in E- and N-cadherin. PMID:7971964

  13. Space-related pharma-motifs for fast search of protein binding motifs and polypharmacological targets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To discover a compound inhibiting multiple proteins (i.e. polypharmacological targets) is a new paradigm for the complex diseases (e.g. cancers and diabetes). In general, the polypharmacological proteins often share similar local binding environments and motifs. As the exponential growth of the number of protein structures, to find the similar structural binding motifs (pharma-motifs) is an emergency task for drug discovery (e.g. side effects and new uses for old drugs) and protein functions. Results We have developed a Space-Related Pharmamotifs (called SRPmotif) method to recognize the binding motifs by searching against protein structure database. SRPmotif is able to recognize conserved binding environments containing spatially discontinuous pharma-motifs which are often short conserved peptides with specific physico-chemical properties for protein functions. Among 356 pharma-motifs, 56.5% interacting residues are highly conserved. Experimental results indicate that 81.1% and 92.7% polypharmacological targets of each protein-ligand complex are annotated with same biological process (BP) and molecular function (MF) terms, respectively, based on Gene Ontology (GO). Our experimental results show that the identified pharma-motifs often consist of key residues in functional (active) sites and play the key roles for protein functions. The SRPmotif is available at http://gemdock.life.nctu.edu.tw/SRP/. Conclusions SRPmotif is able to identify similar pharma-interfaces and pharma-motifs sharing similar binding environments for polypharmacological targets by rapidly searching against the protein structure database. Pharma-motifs describe the conservations of binding environments for drug discovery and protein functions. Additionally, these pharma-motifs provide the clues for discovering new sequence-based motifs to predict protein functions from protein sequence databases. We believe that SRPmotif is useful for elucidating protein functions and drug discovery

  14. A survey of motif finding Web tools for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2014-01-01

    ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) has provided the advantage for finding motifs as ChIP-Seq experiments narrow down the motif finding to binding site locations. Recent motif finding tools facilitate the motif detection by providing user-friendly Web interface. In this work, we reviewed nine motif finding Web tools that are capable for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data. We showed each motif finding Web tool has its own advantages for detecting motifs that other tools may not discover. We recommended the users to use multiple motif finding Web tools that implement different algorithms for obtaining significant motifs, overlapping resemble motifs, and non-overlapping motifs. Finally, we provided our suggestions for future development of motif finding Web tool that better assists researchers for finding motifs in ChIP-Seq data. PMID:24555784

  15. The LIMP-2/SCARB2 binding motif on acid β-glucosidase: basic and applied implications for Gaucher disease and associated neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Liou, Benjamin; Haffey, Wendy D; Greis, Kenneth D; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2014-10-24

    The acid β-glucosidase (glucocerbrosidase (GCase)) binding sequence to LIMP-2 (lysosomal integral membrane protein 2), the receptor for intracellular GCase trafficking to the lysosome, has been identified. Heterologous expression of deletion constructs, the available GCase crystal structures, and binding and co-localization of identified peptides or mutant GCases were used to identify and characterize a highly conserved 11-amino acid sequence, DSPIIVDITKD, within human GCase. The binding to LIMP-2 is not dependent upon a single amino acid, but the interactions of GCase with LIMP-2 are heavily influenced by Asp(399) and the di-isoleucines, Ile(402) and Ile(403). A single alanine substitution at any of these decreases GCase binding to LIMP-2 and alters its pH-dependent binding as well as diminishing the trafficking of GCase to the lysosome and significantly increasing GCase secretion. Enterovirus 71 also binds to LIMP-2 (also known as SCARB2) on the external surface of the plasma membrane. However, the LIMP-2/SCARB2 binding sequences for enterovirus 71 and GCase are not similar, indicating that LIMP-2/SCARB2 may have multiple or overlapping binding sites with differing specificities. These findings have therapeutic implications for the production of GCase and the distribution of this enzyme that is delivered to various organs. PMID:25202012

  16. Heparin-Binding Motifs and Biofilm Formation by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Green, Julianne V.; Orsborn, Kris I.; Zhang, Minlu; Tan, Queenie K. G.; Greis, Kenneth D.; Porollo, Alexey; Andes, David R.; Long Lu, Jason; Hostetter, Margaret K.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is a leading pathogen in infections of central venous catheters, which are frequently infused with heparin. Binding of C. albicans to medically relevant concentrations of soluble and plate-bound heparin was demonstrable by confocal microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A sequence-based search identified 34 C. albicans surface proteins containing ≥1 match to linear heparin-binding motifs. The virulence factor Int1 contained the most putative heparin-binding motifs (n = 5); peptides encompassing 2 of 5 motifs bound to heparin-Sepharose. Alanine substitution of lysine residues K805/K806 in 804QKKHQIHK811 (motif 1 of Int1) markedly attenuated biofilm formation in central venous catheters in rats, whereas alanine substitution of K1595/R1596 in 1593FKKRFFKL1600 (motif 4 of Int1) did not impair biofilm formation. Affinity-purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) recognizing motif 1 abolished biofilm formation in central venous catheters; preimmune IgG had no effect. After heparin treatment of C. albicans, soluble peptides from multiple C. albicans surface proteins were detected, such as Eno1, Pgk1, Tdh3, and Ssa1/2 but not Int1, suggesting that heparin changes candidal surface structures and may modify some antigens critical for immune recognition. These studies define a new mechanism of biofilm formation for C. albicans and a novel strategy for inhibiting catheter-associated biofilms. PMID:23904295

  17. Sequence-motif Detection of NAD(P)-binding Proteins: Discovery of a Unique Antibacterial Drug Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yun Hao; Wu, Chih Yuan; Sargsyan, Karen; Lim, Carmay

    2014-09-01

    Many enzymes use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)) as essential coenzymes. These enzymes often do not share significant sequence identity and cannot be easily detected by sequence homology. Previously, we determined all distinct locally conserved pyrophosphate-binding structures (3d motifs) from NAD(P)-bound protein structures, from which 1d sequence motifs were derived. Here, we aim to establish the precision of these 3d and 1d motifs to annotate NAD(P)-binding proteins. We show that the pyrophosphate-binding 3d motifs are characteristic of NAD(P)-binding proteins, as they are rarely found in nonNAD(P)-binding proteins. Furthermore, several 1d motifs could distinguish between proteins that bind only NAD and those that bind only NADP. They could also distinguish between NAD(P)-binding proteins from nonNAD(P)-binding ones. Interestingly, one of the pyrophosphate-binding 3d and corresponding 1d motifs was found only in enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases, which are enzymes essential for bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This unique 3d motif serves as an attractive novel drug target, as it is conserved across many bacterial species and is not found in human proteins.

  18. Sequence-motif Detection of NAD(P)-binding Proteins: Discovery of a Unique Antibacterial Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yun Hao; Wu, Chih Yuan; Sargsyan, Karen; Lim, Carmay

    2014-01-01

    Many enzymes use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)) as essential coenzymes. These enzymes often do not share significant sequence identity and cannot be easily detected by sequence homology. Previously, we determined all distinct locally conserved pyrophosphate-binding structures (3d motifs) from NAD(P)-bound protein structures, from which 1d sequence motifs were derived. Here, we aim to establish the precision of these 3d and 1d motifs to annotate NAD(P)-binding proteins. We show that the pyrophosphate-binding 3d motifs are characteristic of NAD(P)-binding proteins, as they are rarely found in nonNAD(P)-binding proteins. Furthermore, several 1d motifs could distinguish between proteins that bind only NAD and those that bind only NADP. They could also distinguish between NAD(P)-binding proteins from nonNAD(P)-binding ones. Interestingly, one of the pyrophosphate-binding 3d and corresponding 1d motifs was found only in enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases, which are enzymes essential for bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This unique 3d motif serves as an attractive novel drug target, as it is conserved across many bacterial species and is not found in human proteins. PMID:25253464

  19. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs). Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. Results We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. Conclusions We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does provide more interpretable

  20. A survey of motif finding Web tools for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) has provided the advantage for finding motifs as ChIP-Seq experiments narrow down the motif finding to binding site locations. Recent motif finding tools facilitate the motif detection by providing user-friendly Web interface. In this work, we reviewed nine motif finding Web tools that are capable for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data. We showed each motif finding Web tool has its own advantages for detecting motifs that other tools may not discover. We recommended the users to use multiple motif finding Web tools that implement different algorithms for obtaining significant motifs, overlapping resemble motifs, and non-overlapping motifs. Finally, we provided our suggestions for future development of motif finding Web tool that better assists researchers for finding motifs in ChIP-Seq data. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Prof. Sandor Pongor, Dr. Yuriy Gusev, and Dr. Shyam Prabhakar (nominated by Prof. Limsoon Wong). PMID:24555784

  1. The Q Motif Is Involved in DNA Binding but Not ATP Binding in ChlR1 Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hao; Guo, Manhong; Vidhyasagar, Venkatasubramanian; Talwar, Tanu; Wu, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Helicases are molecular motors that couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to the unwinding of structured DNA or RNA and chromatin remodeling. The conversion of energy derived from ATP hydrolysis into unwinding and remodeling is coordinated by seven sequence motifs (I, Ia, II, III, IV, V, and VI). The Q motif, consisting of nine amino acids (GFXXPXPIQ) with an invariant glutamine (Q) residue, has been identified in some, but not all helicases. Compared to the seven well-recognized conserved helicase motifs, the role of the Q motif is less acknowledged. Mutations in the human ChlR1 (DDX11) gene are associated with a unique genetic disorder known as Warsaw Breakage Syndrome, which is characterized by cellular defects in genome maintenance. To examine the roles of the Q motif in ChlR1 helicase, we performed site directed mutagenesis of glutamine to alanine at residue 23 in the Q motif of ChlR1. ChlR1 recombinant protein was overexpressed and purified from HEK293T cells. ChlR1-Q23A mutant abolished the helicase activity of ChlR1 and displayed reduced DNA binding ability. The mutant showed impaired ATPase activity but normal ATP binding. A thermal shift assay revealed that ChlR1-Q23A has a melting point value similar to ChlR1-WT. Partial proteolysis mapping demonstrated that ChlR1-WT and Q23A have a similar globular structure, although some subtle conformational differences in these two proteins are evident. Finally, we found ChlR1 exists and functions as a monomer in solution, which is different from FANCJ, in which the Q motif is involved in protein dimerization. Taken together, our results suggest that the Q motif is involved in DNA binding but not ATP binding in ChlR1 helicase. PMID:26474416

  2. The β-Lactamase Gene Regulator AmpR Is a Tetramer That Recognizes and Binds the d-Ala-d-Ala Motif of Its Repressor UDP-N-acetylmuramic Acid (MurNAc)-pentapeptide*

    PubMed Central

    Vadlamani, Grishma; Thomas, Misty D.; Patel, Trushar R.; Donald, Lynda J.; Reeve, Thomas M.; Stetefeld, Jörg; Standing, Kenneth G.; Vocadlo, David J.; Mark, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    Inducible expression of chromosomal AmpC β-lactamase is a major cause of β-lactam antibiotic resistance in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae. AmpC expression is induced by the LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) AmpR, which activates ampC expression in response to changes in peptidoglycan (PG) metabolite levels that occur during exposure to β-lactams. Under normal conditions, AmpR represses ampC transcription by binding the PG precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc)-pentapeptide. When exposed to β-lactams, however, PG catabolites (1,6-anhydroMurNAc-peptides) accumulate in the cytosol, which have been proposed to competitively displace UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide from AmpR and convert it into an activator of ampC transcription. Here we describe the molecular interactions between AmpR (from Citrobacter freundii), its DNA operator, and repressor UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. Non-denaturing mass spectrometry revealed AmpR to be a homotetramer that is stabilized by DNA containing the T-N11-A LTTR binding motif and revealed that it can bind four repressor molecules in an apparently stepwise manner. A crystal structure of the AmpR effector-binding domain bound to UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide revealed that the terminal d-Ala-d-Ala motif of the repressor forms the primary contacts with the protein. This observation suggests that 1,6-anhydroMurNAc-pentapeptide may convert AmpR into an activator of ampC transcription more effectively than 1,6-anhydroMurNAc-tripeptide (which lacks the d-Ala-d-Ala motif). Finally, small angle x-ray scattering demonstrates that the AmpR·DNA complex adopts a flat conformation similar to the LTTR protein AphB and undergoes only a slight conformational change when binding UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. Modeling the AmpR·DNA tetramer bound to UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide predicts that the UDP-MurNAc moiety of the repressor participates in modulating AmpR function. PMID:25480792

  3. The β-lactamase gene regulator AmpR is a tetramer that recognizes and binds the D-Ala-D-Ala motif of its repressor UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc)-pentapeptide.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, Grishma; Thomas, Misty D; Patel, Trushar R; Donald, Lynda J; Reeve, Thomas M; Stetefeld, Jörg; Standing, Kenneth G; Vocadlo, David J; Mark, Brian L

    2015-01-30

    Inducible expression of chromosomal AmpC β-lactamase is a major cause of β-lactam antibiotic resistance in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae. AmpC expression is induced by the LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) AmpR, which activates ampC expression in response to changes in peptidoglycan (PG) metabolite levels that occur during exposure to β-lactams. Under normal conditions, AmpR represses ampC transcription by binding the PG precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc)-pentapeptide. When exposed to β-lactams, however, PG catabolites (1,6-anhydroMurNAc-peptides) accumulate in the cytosol, which have been proposed to competitively displace UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide from AmpR and convert it into an activator of ampC transcription. Here we describe the molecular interactions between AmpR (from Citrobacter freundii), its DNA operator, and repressor UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. Non-denaturing mass spectrometry revealed AmpR to be a homotetramer that is stabilized by DNA containing the T-N11-A LTTR binding motif and revealed that it can bind four repressor molecules in an apparently stepwise manner. A crystal structure of the AmpR effector-binding domain bound to UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide revealed that the terminal D-Ala-D-Ala motif of the repressor forms the primary contacts with the protein. This observation suggests that 1,6-anhydroMurNAc-pentapeptide may convert AmpR into an activator of ampC transcription more effectively than 1,6-anhydroMurNAc-tripeptide (which lacks the D-Ala-D-Ala motif). Finally, small angle x-ray scattering demonstrates that the AmpR·DNA complex adopts a flat conformation similar to the LTTR protein AphB and undergoes only a slight conformational change when binding UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. Modeling the AmpR·DNA tetramer bound to UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide predicts that the UDP-MurNAc moiety of the repressor participates in modulating AmpR function. PMID:25480792

  4. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Abo, Hirohito; Soga, Keisuke; Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA), revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units. PMID:26714191

  5. Calmodulation meta-analysis: predicting calmodulin binding via canonical motif clustering.

    PubMed

    Mruk, Karen; Farley, Brian M; Ritacco, Alan W; Kobertz, William R

    2014-07-01

    The calcium-binding protein calmodulin (CaM) directly binds to membrane transport proteins to modulate their function in response to changes in intracellular calcium concentrations. Because CaM recognizes and binds to a wide variety of target sequences, identifying CaM-binding sites is difficult, requiring intensive sequence gazing and extensive biochemical analysis. Here, we describe a straightforward computational script that rapidly identifies canonical CaM-binding motifs within an amino acid sequence. Analysis of the target sequences from high resolution CaM-peptide structures using this script revealed that CaM often binds to sequences that have multiple overlapping canonical CaM-binding motifs. The addition of a positive charge discriminator to this meta-analysis resulted in a tool that identifies potential CaM-binding domains within a given sequence. To allow users to search for CaM-binding motifs within a protein of interest, perform the meta-analysis, and then compare the results to target peptide-CaM structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank, we created a website and online database. The availability of these tools and analyses will facilitate the design of CaM-related studies of ion channels and membrane transport proteins. PMID:24935744

  6. Identification and characterization of the actin-binding motif of phostensin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Fan; Lai, Ning-Sheng; Huang, Kuang-Yung; Huang, Hsien-Lu; Lu, Ming-Chi; Lin, Yu-Shan; Chen, Chun-Yu; Liu, Su-Qin; Lin, Ta-Hsien; Huang, Hsien-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Phostensin, a protein phosphatase 1 F-actin cytoskeleton-targeting subunit encoded by KIAA1949, consists of 165 amino acids and caps the pointed ends of actin filaments. Sequence alignment analyses suggest that the C-terminal region of phostensin, spanning residues 129 to 155, contains a consensus actin-binding motif. Here, we have verified the existence of an actin-binding motif in the C-terminal domain of phostensin using colocalization, F-actin co-sedimentation and single filament binding assays. Our data indicate that the N-terminal region of phostensin (1-129) cannot bind to actin filaments and cannot retard the pointed end elongation of gelsolin-actin seeds. Furthermore, the C-terminal region of phostensin (125-165) multiply bind to the sides of actin filaments and lacks the ability to block the pointed end elongation, suggesting that the actin-binding motif is located in the C-terminal region of the phostensin. Further analyses indicate that phostensin binding to the pointed end of actin filament requires N-terminal residues 35 to 51. These results suggest that phostensin might fold into a rigid structure, allowing the N-terminus to sterically hinder the binding of C-terminus to the sides of actin filament, thus rendering phostensin binding to the pointed ends of actin filaments. PMID:23443105

  7. Application of Synthetic Peptide Arrays To Uncover Cyclic Di-GMP Binding Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Düvel, Juliane; Bense, Sarina; Möller, Stefan; Bertinetti, Daniela; Schwede, Frank; Morr, Michael; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Jänsch, Lothar; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Frank, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High levels of the universal bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) promote the establishment of surface-attached growth in many bacteria. Not only can c-di-GMP bind to nucleic acids and directly control gene expression, but it also binds to a diverse array of proteins of specialized functions and orchestrates their activity. Since its development in the early 1990s, the synthetic peptide array technique has become a powerful tool for high-throughput approaches and was successfully applied to investigate the binding specificity of protein-ligand interactions. In this study, we used peptide arrays to uncover the c-di-GMP binding site of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa protein (PA3740) that was isolated in a chemical proteomics approach. PA3740 was shown to bind c-di-GMP with a high affinity, and peptide arrays uncovered LKKALKKQTNLR to be a putative c-di-GMP binding motif. Most interestingly, different from the previously identified c-di-GMP binding motif of the PilZ domain (RXXXR) or the I site of diguanylate cyclases (RXXD), two leucine residues and a glutamine residue and not the charged amino acids provided the key residues of the binding sequence. Those three amino acids are highly conserved across PA3740 homologs, and their singular exchange to alanine reduced c-di-GMP binding within the full-length protein. IMPORTANCE In many bacterial pathogens the universal bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP governs the switch from the planktonic, motile mode of growth to the sessile, biofilm mode of growth. Bacteria adapt their intracellular c-di-GMP levels to a variety of environmental challenges. Several classes of c-di-GMP binding proteins have been structurally characterized, and diverse c-di-GMP binding domains have been identified. Nevertheless, for several c-di-GMP receptors, the binding motif remains to be determined. Here we show that the use of a synthetic peptide array allowed the identification of a c-di-GMP binding motif of a putative c

  8. Stanniocalcin 1 binds hemin through a partially conserved heme regulatory motif

    SciTech Connect

    Westberg, Johan A.; Jiang, Ji; Andersson, Leif C.

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Stanniocalcin 1 (STC1) binds heme through novel heme binding motif. {yields} Central iron atom of heme and cysteine-114 of STC1 are essential for binding. {yields} STC1 binds Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} heme. {yields} STC1 peptide prevents oxidative decay of heme. -- Abstract: Hemin (iron protoporphyrin IX) is a necessary component of many proteins, functioning either as a cofactor or an intracellular messenger. Hemoproteins have diverse functions, such as transportation of gases, gas detection, chemical catalysis and electron transfer. Stanniocalcin 1 (STC1) is a protein involved in respiratory responses of the cell but whose mechanism of action is still undetermined. We examined the ability of STC1 to bind hemin in both its reduced and oxidized states and located Cys{sup 114} as the axial ligand of the central iron atom of hemin. The amino acid sequence differs from the established (Cys-Pro) heme regulatory motif (HRM) and therefore presents a novel heme binding motif (Cys-Ser). A STC1 peptide containing the heme binding sequence was able to inhibit both spontaneous and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induced decay of hemin. Binding of hemin does not affect the mitochondrial localization of STC1.

  9. A Conserved Motif Provides Binding Specificity to the PP2A-B56 Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Emil Peter Thrane; Kruse, Thomas; Davey, Norman E; López-Méndez, Blanca; Sigurðsson, Jón Otti; Montoya, Guillermo; Olsen, Jesper V; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-08-18

    Dynamic protein phosphorylation is a fundamental mechanism regulating biological processes in all organisms. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the main source of phosphatase activity in the cell, but the molecular details of substrate recognition are unknown. Here, we report that a conserved surface-exposed pocket on PP2A regulatory B56 subunits binds to a consensus sequence on interacting proteins, which we term the LxxIxE motif. The composition of the motif modulates the affinity for B56, which in turn determines the phosphorylation status of associated substrates. Phosphorylation of amino acid residues within the motif increases B56 binding, allowing integration of kinase and phosphatase activity. We identify conserved LxxIxE motifs in essential proteins throughout the eukaryotic domain of life and in human viruses, suggesting that the motifs are required for basic cellular function. Our study provides a molecular description of PP2A binding specificity with broad implications for understanding signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:27453045

  10. Novel Mycobacteria Antigen 85 Complex Binding Motif on Fibronectin*

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chih-Jung; Bell, Hannah; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Ptak, Christopher P.; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2012-01-01

    The members of the antigen 85 protein family (Ag85), consisting of members Ag85A, Ag85B, and Ag85C, are the predominantly secreted proteins of mycobacteria and possess the ability to specifically interact with fibronectin (Fn). Because Fn-binding proteins are likely to be important virulence factors of Mycobacterium spp., Ag85 may contribute to the adherence, invasion, and dissemination of organisms in host tissue. In this study, we reported the Fn binding affinity of Ag85A, Ag85B, and Ag85C from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) (KD values were determined from 33.6 to 68.4 nm) and mapped the Ag85-binding motifs of Fn. Fn14, a type III module located on the heparin-binding domain II (Hep-2) of Fn, was discovered to interact with Ag85 from MAP. The peptide inhibition assay subsequently demonstrated that a peptide consisting of residues 17–26 from Fn14 (17SLLVSWQPPR26, termed P17–26) could interfere with Ag85B binding to Fn (73.3% reduction). In addition, single alanine substitutions along the sequence of P17–26 revealed that the key residues involved in Ag85-Fn binding likely contribute through hydrophobic and charge interactions. Moreover, binding of Ag85 on Fn siRNA-transfected Caco2 cells was dramatically reduced (44.6%), implying the physiological significance of the Ag85-Fn interaction between mycobacteria and host cells during infection. Our results indicate that Ag85 binds to Fn at a novel motif and plays a critical role in mycobacteria adherence to host cells by initiating infection. Ag85 might serve as an important colonization factor potentially contributing to mycobacterial virulence. PMID:22128161

  11. Magnesium and manganese binding sites on proteins have the same predominant motif of secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, Vladislav Victorovich; Barkovsky, Eugene Victorovich; Khrustaleva, Tatyana Aleksandrovna

    2016-04-21

    Manganese ion (Mn(2+)) can substitute magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) in active sites of numerous enzymes. Binding sites for these two ions have been studied in two sets of protein 3D structures from the Protein Data Bank with the homology level lower than 25%. The structural motif "beta strand - binder - random coil" is predominant in both Mn(2+) and Mg(2+) coordination spheres, especially in functionally relevant ones. That predominant motif works as an active binder of those divalent cations which can then attract additional ligands, such as different phosphate-containing compounds. In contrast, such Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) binding motif as "GK(T/S)T" being the N-terminal part of alpha helices works as an active binder of phosphates which can then attract divalent cations. There are few differences between Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) coordination spheres responsible of the cation specificity. His residues are underrepresented in certain positions around Asp and Glu residues involved in Mg(2+) coordination, while they are overrepresented in certain positions around Asp and Glu residues coordinating Mn(2+). The random coil region in the "beta strand - random coil - alpha helix" motif for Mg(2+) binding is usually shorter than that in the same motif for Mn(2+) coordination. This feature is associated with the lower number of binding amino acids (and lower levels of usage of such "major" binders as Asp and Glu) for Mg(2+) (which is a hard Lewis acid) in comparison with those for Mn(2+) (an intermediate Lewis acid). PMID:26876751

  12. Evolutionary optimization of transcription factor binding motif detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Wang, Ze; Mai, Guoqin; Luo, Youxi; Zhao, Miaomiao; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2015-01-01

    All the cell types are under strict control of how their genes are transcribed into expressed transcripts by the temporally dynamic orchestration of the transcription factor binding activities. Given a set of known binding sites (BSs) of a given transcription factor (TF), computational TFBS screening technique represents a cost efficient and large scale strategy to complement the experimental ones. There are two major classes of computational TFBS prediction algorithms based on the tertiary and primary structures, respectively. A tertiary structure based algorithm tries to calculate the binding affinity between a query DNA fragment and the tertiary structure of the given TF. Due to the limited number of available TF tertiary structures, primary structure based TFBS prediction algorithm is a necessary complementary technique for large scale TFBS screening. This study proposes a novel evolutionary algorithm to randomly mutate the weights of different positions in the binding motif of a TF, so that the overall TFBS prediction accuracy is optimized. The comparison with the most widely used algorithm, Position Weight Matrix (PWM), suggests that our algorithm performs better or the same level in all the performance measurements, including sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and Matthews correlation coefficient. Our data also suggests that it is necessary to remove the widely used assumption of independence between motif positions. The supplementary material may be found at: http://www.healthinformaticslab.org/supp/ . PMID:25387969

  13. Novel septin 9 repeat motifs altered in neuralgic amyotrophy bind and bundle microtubules.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaobo; Bowen, Jonathan R; Knox, Tara K; Zhou, Kaifeng; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Sindelar, Charles V; Spiliotis, Elias T

    2013-12-23

    Septin 9 (SEPT9) interacts with microtubules (MTs) and is mutated in hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA), an autosomal-dominant neuropathy. The mechanism of SEPT9 interaction with MTs and the molecular basis of HNA are unknown. Here, we show that the N-terminal domain of SEPT9 contains the novel repeat motifs K/R-x-x-E/D and R/K-R-x-E, which bind and bundle MTs by interacting with the acidic C-terminal tails of β-tubulin. Alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed that the K/R-R/x-x-E/D motifs pair electrostatically with one another and the tails of β-tubulin, enabling septin–septin interactions that link MTs together. SEPT9 isoforms lacking repeat motifs or containing the HNA-linked mutation R88W, which maps to the R/K-R-x-E motif, diminished intracellular MT bundling and impaired asymmetric neurite growth in PC-12 cells. Thus, the SEPT9 repeat motifs bind and bundle MTs, and thereby promote asymmetric neurite growth. These results provide the first insight into the mechanism of septin interaction with MTs and the molecular and cellular basis of HNA. PMID:24344182

  14. Varying levels of complexity in transcription factor binding motifs

    PubMed Central

    Keilwagen, Jens; Grau, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Binding of transcription factors to DNA is one of the keystones of gene regulation. The existence of statistical dependencies between binding site positions is widely accepted, while their relevance for computational predictions has been debated. Building probabilistic models of binding sites that may capture dependencies is still challenging, since the most successful motif discovery approaches require numerical optimization techniques, which are not suited for selecting dependency structures. To overcome this issue, we propose sparse local inhomogeneous mixture (Slim) models that combine putative dependency structures in a weighted manner allowing for numerical optimization of dependency structure and model parameters simultaneously. We find that Slim models yield a substantially better prediction performance than previous models on genomic context protein binding microarray data sets and on ChIP-seq data sets. To elucidate the reasons for the improved performance, we develop dependency logos, which allow for visual inspection of dependency structures within binding sites. We find that the dependency structures discovered by Slim models are highly diverse and highly transcription factor-specific, which emphasizes the need for flexible dependency models. The observed dependency structures range from broad heterogeneities to sparse dependencies between neighboring and non-neighboring binding site positions. PMID:26116565

  15. Numb directs the subcellular localization of EAAT3 through binding the YxNxxF motif.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin-Feng; Wei, Jian; Li, Pei-Shan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Ma, Yong-Chao; Qu, Yu-Xiu; Xu, Jie; Qin, Jie; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang; Xu, Zheng-Ping; Luo, Jie

    2016-08-15

    Excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3, also known as SLC1A1) is a high-affinity, Na(+)-dependent glutamate carrier that localizes primarily within the cell and at the apical plasma membrane. Although previous studies have reported proteins and sequence regions involved in EAAT3 trafficking, the detailed molecular mechanism by which EAAT3 is distributed to the correct location still remains elusive. Here, we identify that the YVNGGF sequence in the C-terminus of EAAT3 is responsible for its intracellular localization and apical sorting in rat hepatoma cells CRL1601 and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, respectively. We further demonstrate that Numb, a clathrin adaptor protein, directly binds the YVNGGF motif and regulates the localization of EAAT3. Mutation of Y503, N505 and F508 within the YVNGGF motif to alanine residues or silencing Numb by use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) results in the aberrant localization of EAAT3. Moreover, both Numb and the YVNGGF motif mediate EAAT3 endocytosis in CRL1601 cells. In summary, our study suggests that Numb is a pivotal adaptor protein that mediates the subcellular localization of EAAT3 through binding the YxNxxF (where x stands for any amino acid) motif. PMID:27358480

  16. Identifying combinatorial regulation of transcription factors and binding motifs

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mamoru; Hata, Naoya; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Futcher, Bruce; Zhang, Michael Q

    2004-01-01

    Background Combinatorial interaction of transcription factors (TFs) is important for gene regulation. Although various genomic datasets are relevant to this issue, each dataset provides relatively weak evidence on its own. Developing methods that can integrate different sequence, expression and localization data have become important. Results Here we use a novel method that integrates chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data with microarray expression data and with combinatorial TF-motif analysis. We systematically identify combinations of transcription factors and of motifs. The various combinations of TFs involved multiple binding mechanisms. We reconstruct a new combinatorial regulatory map of the yeast cell cycle in which cell-cycle regulation can be drawn as a chain of extended TF modules. We find that the pairwise combination of a TF for an early cell-cycle phase and a TF for a later phase is often used to control gene expression at intermediate times. Thus the number of distinct times of gene expression is greater than the number of transcription factors. We also see that some TF modules control branch points (cell-cycle entry and exit), and in the presence of appropriate signals they can allow progress along alternative pathways. Conclusions Combining different data sources can increase statistical power as demonstrated by detecting TF interactions and composite TF-binding motifs. The original picture of a chain of simple cell-cycle regulators can be extended to a chain of composite regulatory modules: different modules may share a common TF component in the same pathway or a TF component cross-talking to other pathways. PMID:15287978

  17. Conserved Repeat Motifs and Glucan Binding by Glucansucrases of Oral Streptococci and Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Deepan S. H.; Joucla, Gilles; Remaud-Simeon, Magali; Russell, Roy R. B.

    2004-01-01

    Glucansucrases of oral streptococci and Leuconostoc mesenteroides have a common pattern of structural organization and characteristically contain a domain with a series of tandem amino acid repeats in which certain residues are highly conserved, particularly aromatic amino acids and glycine. In some glucosyltransferases (GTFs) the repeat region has been identified as a glucan binding domain (GBD). Such GBDs are also found in several glucan binding proteins (GBP) of oral streptococci that do not have glucansucrase activity. Alignment of the amino acid sequences of 20 glucansucrases and GBP showed the widespread conservation of the 33-residue A repeat first identified in GtfI of Streptococcus downei. Site-directed mutagenesis of individual highly conserved residues in recombinant GBD of GtfI demonstrated the importance of the first tryptophan and the tyrosine-phenylalanine pair in the binding of dextran, as well as the essential contribution of a basic residue (arginine or lysine). A microplate binding assay was developed to measure the binding affinity of recombinant GBDs. GBD of GtfI was shown to be capable of binding glucans with predominantly α-1,3 or α-1,6 links, as well as alternating α-1,3 and α-1,6 links (alternan). Western blot experiments using biotinylated dextran or alternan as probes demonstrated a difference between the binding of streptococcal GTF and GBP and that of Leuconostoc glucansucrases. Experimental data and bioinformatics analysis showed that the A repeat motif is distinct from the 20-residue CW motif, which also has conserved aromatic amino acids and glycine and which occurs in the choline-binding proteins of Streptococcus pneumoniae and other organisms. PMID:15576779

  18. Identification of sequence–structure RNA binding motifs for SELEX-derived aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Hoinka, Jan; Zotenko, Elena; Friedman, Adam; Sauna, Zuben E.; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential Enrichment (SELEX) represents a state-of-the-art technology to isolate single-stranded (ribo)nucleic acid fragments, named aptamers, which bind to a molecule (or molecules) of interest via specific structural regions induced by their sequence-dependent fold. This powerful method has applications in designing protein inhibitors, molecular detection systems, therapeutic drugs and antibody replacement among others. However, full understanding and consequently optimal utilization of the process has lagged behind its wide application due to the lack of dedicated computational approaches. At the same time, the combination of SELEX with novel sequencing technologies is beginning to provide the data that will allow the examination of a variety of properties of the selection process. Results: To close this gap we developed, Aptamotif, a computational method for the identification of sequence–structure motifs in SELEX-derived aptamers. To increase the chances of identifying functional motifs, Aptamotif uses an ensemble-based approach. We validated the method using two published aptamer datasets containing experimentally determined motifs of increasing complexity. We were able to recreate the author's findings to a high degree, thus proving the capability of our approach to identify binding motifs in SELEX data. Additionally, using our new experimental dataset, we illustrate the application of Aptamotif to elucidate several properties of the selection process. Contact: przytyck@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, Zuben.Sauna@fda.hhs.gov PMID:22689764

  19. Phosphorylation Modulates the Mechanical Stability of the Cardiac Myosin-Binding Protein C Motif

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, Arthur J.; Howarth, Jack W.; Gulick, James; Previs, Michael J.; Robbins, Jeffrey; Rosevear, Paul R.; Warshaw, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is a thick-filament-associated protein that modulates cardiac contractility through interactions of its N-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig)-like C0-C2 domains with actin and/or myosin. These interactions are modified by the phosphorylation of at least four serines located within the motif linker between domains C1 and C2. We investigated whether motif phosphorylation alters its mechanical properties by characterizing force-extension relations using atomic force spectroscopy of expressed mouse N-terminal cMyBP-C fragments (i.e., C0-C3). Protein kinase A phosphorylation or serine replacement with aspartic acids did not affect persistence length (0.43 ± 0.04 nm), individual Ig-like domain unfolding forces (118 ± 3 pN), or Ig extension due to unfolding (30 ± 0.38 nm). However, phosphorylation did significantly decrease the C0-C3 mean contour length by 24 ± 2 nm. These results suggest that upon phosphorylation, the motif, which is freely extensible in the nonphosphorylated state, adopts a more stable and/or different structure. Circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering data for shorter expressed C1-C2 fragments with all four serines replaced by aspartic acids confirmed that the motif did adopt a more stable structure that was not apparent in the nonphosphorylated motif. These biophysical data provide both a mechanical and structural basis for cMyBP-C regulation by motif phosphorylation. PMID:23442866

  20. An examination of binding motifs associated with inter-particle interactions between facetted nano-crystals of acetylsalicylic acid and ascorbic acid through the application of molecular grid-based search methods.

    PubMed

    Hammond, R B; Jeck, S; Ma, C Y; Pencheva, K; Roberts, K J; Auffret, T

    2009-12-01

    Grid-based intermolecular search methods using atom-atom force fields are used to assess the structural nature of potential crystal-crystal interfacial binding associated with the examination of representative pharmaceutical formulation components, viz acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C). Molecular models of nano-sized molecular clusters for these two compounds, shaped in accordance with an attachment energy model of the respective particle morphologies, are constructed and used together with a grid-based search method to model the likely inter-particle interactions. The most-stable, mutual alignments of the respective nano-clusters based on their interaction energies are identified in the expectation that these are indicative of the most likely inter-particle binding configurations. The stable inter-particle binding configurations identified reveal that the number of interfacial hydrogen bonds formed between the binding particles is, potentially, an important factor in terms of the stability of inter-particle cohesion. All preferred inter-particle alignments are found to involve either the (1 0 0) or the (1 1 0) face of aspirin crystals interacting with a number of the growth forms of ascorbic acid. Four main types of interfacial hydrogen bonds are found to be associated with inter-particle binding and involve acceptor-donor interactions between hydroxyl, carbonyl, ester and lactone acceptor groups and hydroxyl donor groups. This hydrogen bonding network is found to be consistent with the surface chemistry of the interacting habit faces with, in general, the number of hydrogen bonds increasing for the more stable alignments. The likely usefulness of this approach for predicting solid-state formulation properties is reviewed. PMID:19544525

  1. Coagulase and Efb of Staphylococcus aureus Have a Common Fibrinogen Binding Motif

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ya-Ping; Kang, Mingsong; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K.; Ravirajan, Dharmanand; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coagulase (Coa) and Efb, secreted Staphylococcus aureus proteins, are important virulence factors in staphylococcal infections. Coa interacts with fibrinogen (Fg) and induces the formation of fibrin(ogen) clots through activation of prothrombin. Efb attracts Fg to the bacterial surface and forms a shield to protect the bacteria from phagocytic clearance. This communication describes the use of an array of synthetic peptides to identify variants of a linear Fg binding motif present in Coa and Efb which are responsible for the Fg binding activities of these proteins. This motif represents the first Fg binding motif identified for any microbial protein. We initially located the Fg binding sites to Coa’s C-terminal disordered segment containing tandem repeats by using recombinant fragments of Coa in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-type binding experiments. Sequence analyses revealed that this Coa region contained shorter segments with sequences similar to the Fg binding segments in Efb. An alanine scanning approach allowed us to identify the residues in Coa and Efb that are critical for Fg binding and to define the Fg binding motifs in the two proteins. In these motifs, the residues required for Fg binding are largely conserved, and they therefore constitute variants of a common Fg binding motif which binds to Fg with high affinity. Defining a specific motif also allowed us to identify a functional Fg binding register for the Coa repeats that is different from the repeat unit previously proposed. PMID:26733070

  2. A sialoreceptor binding motif in the Mycoplasma synoviae adhesin VlhA.

    PubMed

    May, Meghan; Dunne, Dylan W; Brown, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae depends on its adhesin VlhA to mediate cytadherence to sialylated host cell receptors. Allelic variants of VlhA arise through recombination between an assemblage of promoterless vlhA pseudogenes and a single transcription promoter site, creating lineages of M. synoviae that each express a different vlhA allele. The predicted full-length VlhA sequences adjacent to the promoter of nine lineages of M. synoviae varying in avidity of cytadherence were aligned with that of the reference strain MS53 and with a 60-a.a. hemagglutinating VlhA C-terminal fragment from a Tunisian lineage of strain WVU1853(T). Seven different sequence variants of an imperfectly conserved, single-copy, 12-a.a. candidate cytadherence motif were evident amid the flanking variable residues of the 11 total sequences examined. The motif was predicted to adopt a short hairpin structure in a low-complexity region near the C-terminus of VlhA. Biotinylated synthetic oligopeptides representing four selected variants of the 12-a.a. motif, with the whole synthesized 60-a.a. fragment as a positive control, differed (P<0.01) in the extent they bound to chicken erythrocyte membranes. All bound to a greater extent (P<0.01) than scrambled or irrelevant VlhA domain negative control peptides did. Experimentally introduced branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) substitutions Val3Ile and Leu7Ile did not significantly alter binding, whereas fold-destabilizing substitutions Thr4Gly and Ala9Gly tended to reduce it (P<0.05). Binding was also reduced to background levels (P<0.01) when the peptides were exposed to desialylated membranes, or were pre-saturated with free sialic acid before exposure to untreated membranes. From this evidence we conclude that the motif P-X-(BCAA)-X-F-X-(BCAA)-X-A-K-X-G binds sialic acid and likely mediates VlhA-dependent M. synoviae attachment to host cells. This conserved mechanism retains the potential for fine-scale rheostasis in binding avidity, which could be a general

  3. A Sialoreceptor Binding Motif in the Mycoplasma synoviae Adhesin VlhA

    PubMed Central

    May, Meghan; Dunne, Dylan W.; Brown, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae depends on its adhesin VlhA to mediate cytadherence to sialylated host cell receptors. Allelic variants of VlhA arise through recombination between an assemblage of promoterless vlhA pseudogenes and a single transcription promoter site, creating lineages of M. synoviae that each express a different vlhA allele. The predicted full-length VlhA sequences adjacent to the promoter of nine lineages of M. synoviae varying in avidity of cytadherence were aligned with that of the reference strain MS53 and with a 60-a.a. hemagglutinating VlhA C-terminal fragment from a Tunisian lineage of strain WVU1853T. Seven different sequence variants of an imperfectly conserved, single-copy, 12-a.a. candidate cytadherence motif were evident amid the flanking variable residues of the 11 total sequences examined. The motif was predicted to adopt a short hairpin structure in a low-complexity region near the C-terminus of VlhA. Biotinylated synthetic oligopeptides representing four selected variants of the 12-a.a. motif, with the whole synthesized 60-a.a. fragment as a positive control, differed (P<0.01) in the extent they bound to chicken erythrocyte membranes. All bound to a greater extent (P<0.01) than scrambled or irrelevant VlhA domain negative control peptides did. Experimentally introduced branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) substitutions Val3Ile and Leu7Ile did not significantly alter binding, whereas fold-destabilizing substitutions Thr4Gly and Ala9Gly tended to reduce it (P<0.05). Binding was also reduced to background levels (P<0.01) when the peptides were exposed to desialylated membranes, or were pre-saturated with free sialic acid before exposure to untreated membranes. From this evidence we conclude that the motif P-X-(BCAA)-X-F-X-(BCAA)-X-A-K-X-G binds sialic acid and likely mediates VlhA-dependent M. synoviae attachment to host cells. This conserved mechanism retains the potential for fine-scale rheostasis in binding avidity, which could be a general

  4. A natural variant of the cysteine protease virulence factor of group A Streptococcus with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif preferentially binds human integrins alphavbeta3 and alphaIIbbeta3.

    PubMed

    Stockbauer, K E; Magoun, L; Liu, M; Burns, E H; Gubba, S; Renish, S; Pan, X; Bodary, S C; Baker, E; Coburn, J; Leong, J M; Musser, J M

    1999-01-01

    The human pathogenic bacterium group A Streptococcus produces an extracellular cysteine protease [streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB)] that is a critical virulence factor for invasive disease episodes. Sequence analysis of the speB gene from 200 group A Streptococcus isolates collected worldwide identified three main mature SpeB (mSpeB) variants. One of these variants (mSpeB2) contains an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence, a tripeptide motif that is commonly recognized by integrin receptors. mSpeB2 is made by all isolates of the unusually virulent serotype M1 and several other geographically widespread clones that frequently cause invasive infections. Only the mSpeB2 variant bound to transfected cells expressing integrin alphavbeta3 (also known as the vitronectin receptor) or alphaIIbbeta3 (platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa), and binding was blocked by a mAb that recognizes the streptococcal protease RGD motif region. In addition, mSpeB2 bound purified platelet integrin alphaIIbbeta3. Defined beta3 mutants that are altered for fibrinogen binding were defective for SpeB binding. Synthetic peptides with the mSpeB2 RGD motif, but not the RSD sequence present in other mSpeB variants, blocked binding of mSpeB2 to transfected cells expressing alphavbeta3 and caused detachment of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The results (i) identify a Gram-positive virulence factor that directly binds integrins, (ii) identify naturally occurring variants of a documented Gram-positive virulence factor with biomedically relevant differences in their interactions with host cells, and (iii) add to the theme that subtle natural variation in microbial virulence factor structure alters the character of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:9874803

  5. A natural variant of the cysteine protease virulence factor of group A Streptococcus with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif preferentially binds human integrins αvβ3 and αIIbβ3

    PubMed Central

    Stockbauer, Kathryn E.; Magoun, Loranne; Liu, Mengyao; Burns, Eugene H.; Gubba, Siddeswar; Renish, Sarah; Pan, Xi; Bodary, Sarah C.; Baker, Elizabeth; Coburn, Jenifer; Leong, John M.; Musser, James M.

    1999-01-01

    The human pathogenic bacterium group A Streptococcus produces an extracellular cysteine protease [streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB)] that is a critical virulence factor for invasive disease episodes. Sequence analysis of the speB gene from 200 group A Streptococcus isolates collected worldwide identified three main mature SpeB (mSpeB) variants. One of these variants (mSpeB2) contains an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence, a tripeptide motif that is commonly recognized by integrin receptors. mSpeB2 is made by all isolates of the unusually virulent serotype M1 and several other geographically widespread clones that frequently cause invasive infections. Only the mSpeB2 variant bound to transfected cells expressing integrin αvβ3 (also known as the vitronectin receptor) or αIIbβ3 (platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa), and binding was blocked by a mAb that recognizes the streptococcal protease RGD motif region. In addition, mSpeB2 bound purified platelet integrin αIIbβ3. Defined β3 mutants that are altered for fibrinogen binding were defective for SpeB binding. Synthetic peptides with the mSpeB2 RGD motif, but not the RSD sequence present in other mSpeB variants, blocked binding of mSpeB2 to transfected cells expressing αvβ3 and caused detachment of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The results (i) identify a Gram-positive virulence factor that directly binds integrins, (ii) identify naturally occurring variants of a documented Gram-positive virulence factor with biomedically relevant differences in their interactions with host cells, and (iii) add to the theme that subtle natural variation in microbial virulence factor structure alters the character of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:9874803

  6. Inclusion of an RGD Motif Alters Invasin Integrin-Binding Affinity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tarik A; Wang, Xianzhe; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2016-04-12

    Invasin is a key adhesin displayed on the outer membrane of Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis that mediates the initial stages of infection. Invasin specifically targets microfold (M) cells in the small intestine by binding β1 integrins and is sufficient to trigger eukaryotic uptake of invasin-coated particles, including Yersinia, Escherichia coli, and latex beads. As a result, invasin has generated interest to mediate oral delivery of vaccines and other biologics. Integrin binding affinity has been shown to correlate with particle uptake; thus we hypothesized that invasin variants with higher affinity would confer enhanced internalization. We first performed alanine scanning of surface-exposed tyrosine residues to identify those contributing to integrin binding. We identified two residues, which, when substituted with alanine, reduced binding to soluble α5β1 integrin. Next, we constructed four targeted mutagenesis libraries spanning these and other residues known to contribute to binding, followed by enrichment of variants able to mediate Caco-2 cellular invasion and to bind soluble α5β1 integrin. We identified three amino acid substitutions that increased α5β1 integrin binding affinity as measured by flow cytometry and ELISA assays, two of which created a novel RGD motif surrounding the D911 residue critical for binding. This variant confers enhanced internalization into CHO cells but not Caco-2 cells when expressed on the E. coli surface. Further analysis showed that inclusion of an RGD expands invasin-integrin specificity, thereby impacting cellular selectivity. This work provides a molecular explanation for the lack of an RGD motif in invasin that is present in many other adhesins. PMID:27015583

  7. SPIC: A novel similarity metric for comparing transcription factor binding site motifs based on information contents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Discovering transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) is one of primary challenges to decipher complex gene regulatory networks encrypted in a genome. A set of short DNA sequences identified by a transcription factor (TF) is known as a motif, which can be expressed accurately in matrix form such as a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) and a position frequency matrix. Very frequently, we need to query a motif in a database of motifs by seeking its similar motifs, merge similar TFBS motifs possibly identified by the same TF, separate irrelevant motifs, or filter out spurious motifs. Therefore, a novel metric is required to seize slight differences between irrelevant motifs and highlight the similarity between motifs of the same group in all these applications. While there are already several metrics for motif similarity proposed before, their performance is still far from satisfactory for these applications. Methods A novel metric has been proposed in this paper with name as SPIC (Similarity with Position Information Contents) for measuring the similarity between a column of a motif and a column of another motif. When defining this similarity score, we consider the likelihood that the column of the first motif's PFM can be produced by the column of the second motif's PSSM, and multiply the likelihood by the information content of the column of the second motif's PSSM, and vise versa. We evaluated the performance of SPIC combined with a local or a global alignment method having a function for affine gap penalty, for computing the similarity between two motifs. We also compared SPIC with seven existing state-of-the-arts metrics for their capability of clustering motifs from the same group and retrieving motifs from a database on three datasets. Results When used jointly with the Smith-Waterman local alignment method with an affine gap penalty function (gap open penalty is equal to1, gap extension penalty is equal to 0.5), SPIC outperforms the seven

  8. A Novel Alignment-Free Method for Comparing Transcription Factor Binding Site Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Minli; Su, Zhengchang

    2010-01-01

    Background Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs can be accurately represented by position frequency matrices (PFM) or other equivalent forms. We often need to compare TFBS motifs using their PFMs in order to search for similar motifs in a motif database, or cluster motifs according to their binding preference. The majority of current methods for motif comparison involve a similarity metric for column-to-column comparison and a method to find the optimal position alignment between the two compared motifs. In some applications, alignment-free methods might be preferred; however, few such methods with high accuracy have been described. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a novel alignment-free method for quantifying the similarity of motifs using their PFMs by converting PFMs into k-mer vectors. The motifs could then be compared by measuring the similarity among their corresponding k-mer vectors. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that our method in general achieves similar performance or outperforms the existing methods for clustering motifs according to their binding preference and identifying similar motifs of transcription factors of the same family. PMID:20098703

  9. Magnesium-binding architectures in RNA crystal structures: validation, binding preferences, classification and motif detection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Heping; Shabalin, Ivan G.; Handing, Katarzyna B.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Minor, Wladek

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of magnesium ions in RNA has long been recognized as a key factor governing RNA folding, and is crucial for many diverse functions of RNA molecules. In this work, Mg2+-binding architectures in RNA were systematically studied using a database of RNA crystal structures from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Due to the abundance of poorly modeled or incorrectly identified Mg2+ ions, the set of all sites was comprehensively validated and filtered to identify a benchmark dataset of 15 334 ‘reliable’ RNA-bound Mg2+ sites. The normalized frequencies by which specific RNA atoms coordinate Mg2+ were derived for both the inner and outer coordination spheres. A hierarchical classification system of Mg2+ sites in RNA structures was designed and applied to the benchmark dataset, yielding a set of 41 types of inner-sphere and 95 types of outer-sphere coordinating patterns. This classification system has also been applied to describe six previously reported Mg2+-binding motifs and detect them in new RNA structures. Investigation of the most populous site types resulted in the identification of seven novel Mg2+-binding motifs, and all RNA structures in the PDB were screened for the presence of these motifs. PMID:25800744

  10. A Nucleotide Binding Motif in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS4B Mediates HCV RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Einav, Shirit; Elazar, Menashe; Danieli, Tsafi; Glenn, Jeffrey S.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of viral hepatitis. There is no effective therapy for most patients. We have identified a nucleotide binding motif (NBM) in one of the virus's nonstructural proteins, NS4B. This structural motif binds and hydrolyzes GTP and is conserved across HCV isolates. Genetically disrupting the NBM impairs GTP binding and hydrolysis and dramatically inhibits HCV RNA replication. These results have exciting implications for the HCV life cycle and novel antiviral strategies. PMID:15452248

  11. Miz-1 Activates Gene Expression via a Novel Consensus DNA Binding Motif

    PubMed Central

    Barrilleaux, Bonnie L.; Burow, Dana; Lockwood, Sarah H.; Yu, Abigail; Segal, David J.; Knoepfler, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor Miz-1 can either activate or repress gene expression in concert with binding partners including the Myc oncoprotein. The genomic binding of Miz-1 includes both core promoters and more distal sites, but the preferred DNA binding motif of Miz-1 has been unclear. We used a high-throughput in vitro technique, Bind-n-Seq, to identify two Miz-1 consensus DNA binding motif sequences—ATCGGTAATC and ATCGAT (Mizm1 and Mizm2)—bound by full-length Miz-1 and its zinc finger domain, respectively. We validated these sequences directly as high affinity Miz-1 binding motifs. Competition assays using mutant probes indicated that the binding affinity of Miz-1 for Mizm1 and Mizm2 is highly sequence-specific. Miz-1 strongly activates gene expression through the motifs in a Myc-independent manner. MEME-ChIP analysis of Miz-1 ChIP-seq data in two different cell types reveals a long motif with a central core sequence highly similar to the Mizm1 motif identified by Bind-n-Seq, validating the in vivo relevance of the findings. Miz-1 ChIP-seq peaks containing the long motif are predominantly located outside of proximal promoter regions, in contrast to peaks without the motif, which are highly concentrated within 1.5 kb of the nearest transcription start site. Overall, our results indicate that Miz-1 may be directed in vivo to the novel motif sequences we have identified, where it can recruit its specific binding partners to control gene expression and ultimately regulate cell fate. PMID:24983942

  12. A Conserved Acidic Motif in the N-Terminal Domain of Nitrate Reductase Is Necessary for the Inactivation of the Enzyme in the Dark by Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 Binding1

    PubMed Central

    Pigaglio, Emmanuelle; Durand, Nathalie; Meyer, Christian

    1999-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the N-terminal domain of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) nitrate reductase (NR) is involved in the inactivation of the enzyme by phosphorylation, which occurs in the dark (L. Nussaume, M. Vincentz, C. Meyer, J.P. Boutin, and M. Caboche [1995] Plant Cell 7: 611–621). The activity of a mutant NR protein lacking this N-terminal domain was no longer regulated by light-dark transitions. In this study smaller deletions were performed in the N-terminal domain of tobacco NR that removed protein motifs conserved among higher plant NRs. The resulting truncated NR-coding sequences were then fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter and introduced in NR-deficient mutants of the closely related species Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. We found that the deletion of a conserved stretch of acidic residues led to an active NR protein that was more thermosensitive than the wild-type enzyme, but it was relatively insensitive to the inactivation by phosphorylation in the dark. Therefore, the removal of this acidic stretch seems to have the same effects on NR activation state as the deletion of the N-terminal domain. A hypothetical explanation for these observations is that a specific factor that impedes inactivation remains bound to the truncated enzyme. A synthetic peptide derived from this acidic protein motif was also found to be a good substrate for casein kinase II. PMID:9880364

  13. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Yu; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition.

  14. Analysis of Genomic Sequence Motifs for Deciphering Transcription Factor Binding and Transcriptional Regulation in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites, and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation. PMID:26941778

  15. Analysis of Genomic Sequence Motifs for Deciphering Transcription Factor Binding and Transcriptional Regulation in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites, and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation. PMID:26941778

  16. Systematic discovery and characterization of regulatory motifs in ENCODE TF binding experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kheradpour, Pouya; Kellis, Manolis

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in technology have led to a dramatic increase in the number of available transcription factor ChIP-seq and ChIP-chip data sets. Understanding the motif content of these data sets is an important step in understanding the underlying mechanisms of regulation. Here we provide a systematic motif analysis for 427 human ChIP-seq data sets using motifs curated from the literature and also discovered de novo using five established motif discovery tools. We use a systematic pipeline for calculating motif enrichment in each data set, providing a principled way for choosing between motif variants found in the literature and for flagging potentially problematic data sets. Our analysis confirms the known specificity of 41 of the 56 analyzed factor groups and reveals motifs of potential cofactors. We also use cell type-specific binding to find factors active in specific conditions. The resource we provide is accessible both for browsing a small number of factors and for performing large-scale systematic analyses. We provide motif matrices, instances and enrichments in each of the ENCODE data sets. The motifs discovered here have been used in parallel studies to validate the specificity of antibodies, understand cooperativity between data sets and measure the variation of motif binding across individuals and species. PMID:24335146

  17. The Verrucomicrobia LexA-Binding Motif: Insights into the Evolutionary Dynamics of the SOS Response

    PubMed Central

    Erill, Ivan; Campoy, Susana; Kılıç, Sefa; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The SOS response is the primary bacterial mechanism to address DNA damage, coordinating multiple cellular processes that include DNA repair, cell division, and translesion synthesis. In contrast to other regulatory systems, the composition of the SOS genetic network and the binding motif of its transcriptional repressor, LexA, have been shown to vary greatly across bacterial clades, making it an ideal system to study the co-evolution of transcription factors and their regulons. Leveraging comparative genomics approaches and prior knowledge on the core SOS regulon, here we define the binding motif of the Verrucomicrobia, a recently described phylum of emerging interest due to its association with eukaryotic hosts. Site directed mutagenesis of the Verrucomicrobium spinosum recA promoter confirms that LexA binds a 14 bp palindromic motif with consensus sequence TGTTC-N4-GAACA. Computational analyses suggest that recognition of this novel motif is determined primarily by changes in base-contacting residues of the third alpha helix of the LexA helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. In conjunction with comparative genomics analysis of the LexA regulon in the Verrucomicrobia phylum, electrophoretic shift assays reveal that LexA binds to operators in the promoter region of DNA repair genes and a mutagenesis cassette in this organism, and identify previously unreported components of the SOS response. The identification of tandem LexA-binding sites generating instances of other LexA-binding motifs in the lexA gene promoter of Verrucomicrobia species leads us to postulate a novel mechanism for LexA-binding motif evolution. This model, based on gene duplication, successfully addresses outstanding questions in the intricate co-evolution of the LexA protein, its binding motif and the regulatory network it controls. PMID:27489856

  18. The Verrucomicrobia LexA-Binding Motif: Insights into the Evolutionary Dynamics of the SOS Response.

    PubMed

    Erill, Ivan; Campoy, Susana; Kılıç, Sefa; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The SOS response is the primary bacterial mechanism to address DNA damage, coordinating multiple cellular processes that include DNA repair, cell division, and translesion synthesis. In contrast to other regulatory systems, the composition of the SOS genetic network and the binding motif of its transcriptional repressor, LexA, have been shown to vary greatly across bacterial clades, making it an ideal system to study the co-evolution of transcription factors and their regulons. Leveraging comparative genomics approaches and prior knowledge on the core SOS regulon, here we define the binding motif of the Verrucomicrobia, a recently described phylum of emerging interest due to its association with eukaryotic hosts. Site directed mutagenesis of the Verrucomicrobium spinosum recA promoter confirms that LexA binds a 14 bp palindromic motif with consensus sequence TGTTC-N4-GAACA. Computational analyses suggest that recognition of this novel motif is determined primarily by changes in base-contacting residues of the third alpha helix of the LexA helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. In conjunction with comparative genomics analysis of the LexA regulon in the Verrucomicrobia phylum, electrophoretic shift assays reveal that LexA binds to operators in the promoter region of DNA repair genes and a mutagenesis cassette in this organism, and identify previously unreported components of the SOS response. The identification of tandem LexA-binding sites generating instances of other LexA-binding motifs in the lexA gene promoter of Verrucomicrobia species leads us to postulate a novel mechanism for LexA-binding motif evolution. This model, based on gene duplication, successfully addresses outstanding questions in the intricate co-evolution of the LexA protein, its binding motif and the regulatory network it controls. PMID:27489856

  19. A novel zinc-binding motif found in two ubiquitous deaminase families.

    PubMed Central

    Reizer, J.; Buskirk, S.; Bairoch, A.; Reizer, A.; Saier, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Two families of deaminases, one specific for cytidine, the other for deoxycytidylate, are shown to possess a novel zinc-binding motif, here designated ZBS. We have (1) identified the protein members of these 2 families, (2) carried out sequence analyses that allow specification of this zinc-binding motif, and (3) determined signature sequences that will allow identification of additional members of these families as their sequences become available. PMID:8061614

  20. Structural basis for the binding of tryptophan-based motifs by δ-COP

    PubMed Central

    Suckling, Richard J.; Poon, Pak Phi; Travis, Sophie M.; Majoul, Irina V.; Hughson, Frederick M.; Evans, Philip R.; Duden, Rainer; Owen, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Coatomer consists of two subcomplexes: the membrane-targeting, ADP ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1):GTP-binding βγδζ-COP F-subcomplex, which is related to the adaptor protein (AP) clathrin adaptors, and the cargo-binding αβ’ε-COP B-subcomplex. We present the structure of the C-terminal μ-homology domain of the yeast δ-COP subunit in complex with the WxW motif from its binding partner, the endoplasmic reticulum-localized Dsl1 tether. The motif binds at a site distinct from that used by the homologous AP μ subunits to bind YxxΦ cargo motifs with its two tryptophan residues sitting in compatible pockets. We also show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) homolog Gcs1p uses a related WxxF motif at its extreme C terminus to bind to δ-COP at the same site in the same way. Mutations designed on the basis of the structure in conjunction with isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the mode of binding and show that mammalian δ-COP binds related tryptophan-based motifs such as that from ArfGAP1 in a similar manner. We conclude that δ-COP subunits bind Wxn(1–6)[WF] motifs within unstructured regions of proteins that influence the lifecycle of COPI-coated vesicles; this conclusion is supported by the observation that, in the context of a sensitizing domain deletion in Dsl1p, mutating the tryptophan-based motif-binding site in yeast causes defects in both growth and carboxypeptidase Y trafficking/processing. PMID:26578768

  1. Binding of a proline-independent hydrophobic motif by the Candida albicans Rvs167-3 SH3 domain.

    PubMed

    Gkourtsa, Areti; van den Burg, Janny; Avula, Teja; Hochstenbach, Frans; Distel, Ben

    2016-09-01

    Src-homology 3 (SH3) domains are small protein-protein interaction modules. While most SH3 domains bind to proline-x-x-proline (PxxP) containing motifs in their binding partners, some SH3 domains recognize motifs other than proline-based sequences. Recently, we showed that the SH3 domain of Candida albicans Rvs167-3 binds peptides enriched in hydrophobic residues and containing a single proline residue (RΦxΦxΦP, where x is any amino acid and Φ is a hydrophobic residue). Here, we demonstrate that the proline in this motif is not required for Rvs167-3 SH3 recognition. Through mutagenesis studies we show that binding of the peptide ligand involves the conserved tryptophan in the canonical PxxP binding pocket as well as residues in the extended n-Src loop of Rvs167-3 SH3. Our studies establish a novel, proline-independent, binding sequence for Rvs167-3 SH3 (RΦxΦxΦ) that is comprised of a positively charged residue (arginine) and three hydrophobic residues. PMID:27393996

  2. WordSpy: identifying transcription factor binding motifs by building a dictionary and learning a grammar

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guandong; Yu, Taotao; Zhang, Weixiong

    2005-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding sites or motifs (TFBMs) are functional cis-regulatory DNA sequences that play an essential role in gene transcriptional regulation. Although many experimental and computational methods have been developed, finding TFBMs remains a challenging problem. We propose and develop a novel dictionary based motif finding algorithm, which we call WordSpy. One significant feature of WordSpy is the combination of a word counting method and a statistical model which consists of a dictionary of motifs and a grammar specifying their usage. The algorithm is suitable for genome-wide motif finding; it is capable of discovering hundreds of motifs from a large set of promoters in a single run. We further enhance WordSpy by applying gene expression information to separate true TFBMs from spurious ones, and by incorporating negative sequences to identify discriminative motifs. In addition, we also use randomly selected promoters from the genome to evaluate the significance of the discovered motifs. The output from WordSpy consists of an ordered list of putative motifs and a set of regulatory sequences with motif binding sites highlighted. The web server of WordSpy is available at . PMID:15980501

  3. A calmodulin binding protein from Arabidopsis is induced by ethylene and contains a DNA-binding motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Reddy, V. S.; Golovkin, M.

    2000-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a key calcium sensor in all eukaryotes, regulates diverse cellular processes by interacting with other proteins. To isolate CaM binding proteins involved in ethylene signal transduction, we screened an expression library prepared from ethylene-treated Arabidopsis seedlings with 35S-labeled CaM. A cDNA clone, EICBP (Ethylene-Induced CaM Binding Protein), encoding a protein that interacts with activated CaM was isolated in this screening. The CaM binding domain in EICBP was mapped to the C-terminus of the protein. These results indicate that calcium, through CaM, could regulate the activity of EICBP. The EICBP is expressed in different tissues and its expression in seedlings is induced by ethylene. The EICBP contains, in addition to a CaM binding domain, several features that are typical of transcription factors. These include a DNA-binding domain at the N terminus, an acidic region at the C terminus, and nuclear localization signals. In database searches a partial cDNA (CG-1) encoding a DNA-binding motif from parsley and an ethylene up-regulated partial cDNA from tomato (ER66) showed significant similarity to EICBP. In addition, five hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome also showed a very high sequence similarity with EICBP, indicating that there are several EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis. The structural features of EICBP are conserved in all EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis, suggesting that they may constitute a new family of DNA binding proteins and are likely to be involved in modulating gene expression in the presence of ethylene.

  4. Coordinated Action of Two Double-Stranded RNA Binding Motifs and an RGG Motif Enables Nuclear Factor 90 To Flexibly Target Different RNA Substrates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Tobias; Knick, Paul; Lilie, Hauke; Friedrich, Susann; Golbik, Ralph Peter; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2016-02-16

    The mechanisms of how RNA binding proteins (RBP) bind to and distinguish different RNA molecules are yet uncertain. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the RNA binding properties of multidomain RBP nuclear factor 90 (NF90) by investigating specifically the functional activities of two double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsRBM) and an RGG motif in the protein's unstructured C-terminus. By comparison of the RNA binding affinities of several NF90 variants and their modes of binding to a set of defined RNA molecules, the activities of the motifs turned out to be very different. While dsRBM1 contributes little to RNA binding, dsRBM2 is essential for effective binding of double-stranded RNA. The protein's immediate C-terminus, including the RGG motif, is indispensable for interactions of the protein with single-stranded RNA, and the RGG motif decisively contributes to NF90's overall RNA binding properties. Conformational studies, which compared wild-type NF90 with a variant that contains a pseudophosphorylated residue in the RGG motif, suggest that the NF90 C-terminus is involved in conformational changes in the protein after RNA binding, with the RGG motif acting as a central regulatory element. In summary, our data propose a concerted action of all RNA binding motifs within the frame of the full-length protein, which may be controlled by regulation of the activity of the RGG motif, e.g., by phosphorylation. This multidomain interplay enables the RBP NF90 to discriminate RNA features by dynamic and adaptable interactions. PMID:26795062

  5. PDZ motifs in PTP-BL and RIL bind to internal protein segments in the LIM domain protein RIL.

    PubMed

    Cuppen, E; Gerrits, H; Pepers, B; Wieringa, B; Hendriks, W

    1998-03-01

    The specificity of protein-protein interactions in cellular signaling cascades is dependent on the sequence and intramolecular location of distinct amino acid motifs. We used the two-hybrid interaction trap to identify proteins that can associate with the PDZ motif-rich segment in the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-BL. A specific interaction was found with the Lin-11, Isl-1, Mec-3 (LIM) domain containing protein RIL. More detailed analysis demonstrated that the binding specificity resides in the second and fourth PDZ motif of PTP-BL and the LIM domain in RIL. Immunohistochemistry on various mouse tissues revealed a submembranous colocalization of PTP-BL and RIL in epithelial cells. Remarkably, there is also an N-terminal PDZ motif in RIL itself that can bind to the RIL-LIM domain. We demonstrate here that the RIL-LIM domain can be phosphorylated on tyrosine in vitro and in vivo and can be dephosphorylated in vitro by the PTPase domain of PTP-BL. Our data point to the presence of a double PDZ-binding interface on the RIL-LIM domain and suggest tyrosine phosphorylation as a regulatory mechanism for LIM-PDZ associations in the assembly of multiprotein complexes. These findings are in line with an important role of PDZ-mediated interactions in the shaping and organization of submembranous microenvironments of polarized cells. PMID:9487134

  6. PDZ Motifs in PTP-BL and RIL Bind to Internal Protein Segments in the LIM Domain Protein RIL

    PubMed Central

    Cuppen, Edwin; Gerrits, Herlinde; Pepers, Barry; Wieringa, Bé; Hendriks, Wiljan

    1998-01-01

    The specificity of protein–protein interactions in cellular signaling cascades is dependent on the sequence and intramolecular location of distinct amino acid motifs. We used the two-hybrid interaction trap to identify proteins that can associate with the PDZ motif-rich segment in the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-BL. A specific interaction was found with the Lin-11, Isl-1, Mec-3 (LIM) domain containing protein RIL. More detailed analysis demonstrated that the binding specificity resides in the second and fourth PDZ motif of PTP-BL and the LIM domain in RIL. Immunohistochemistry on various mouse tissues revealed a submembranous colocalization of PTP-BL and RIL in epithelial cells. Remarkably, there is also an N-terminal PDZ motif in RIL itself that can bind to the RIL-LIM domain. We demonstrate here that the RIL-LIM domain can be phosphorylated on tyrosine in vitro and in vivo and can be dephosphorylated in vitro by the PTPase domain of PTP-BL. Our data point to the presence of a double PDZ-binding interface on the RIL-LIM domain and suggest tyrosine phosphorylation as a regulatory mechanism for LIM-PDZ associations in the assembly of multiprotein complexes. These findings are in line with an important role of PDZ-mediated interactions in the shaping and organization of submembranous microenvironments of polarized cells. PMID:9487134

  7. Delineation of a T-cell activation motif required for binding of protein tyrosine kinases containing tandem SH2 domains.

    PubMed Central

    Koyasu, S; Tse, A G; Moingeon, P; Hussey, R E; Mildonian, A; Hannisian, J; Clayton, L K; Reinherz, E L

    1994-01-01

    To define the T-cell receptor signal transduction motif, we have transfected human and murine T-cell lines with a chimeric receptor consisting of the extracellular and transmembrane domains of human CD8 alpha and the membrane-proximal portion of CD3 zeta containing at its C terminus either an 18-amino acid segment (NQLYNELNLGRREEYDVL) or alanine-scanning point mutant derivatives. Crosslinking of the extracellular domain of the chimera is sufficient to initiate Ca2+ flux, interleukin 2 production, and tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins including the chimera. Subsequently, the chimera becomes associated with several tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, among them the 70-kDa protein tyrosine kinase ZAP70. Mutational data identify the T-cell activation motif as Y(X)2L(X)7Y(X)2L and show that each of the four designated residues is necessary for the above activation events. Recombinant protein containing the two tandem SH2 domains derived from ZAP70 binds to a synthetic peptide corresponding to the above 18-amino acid motif but only when both tyrosines are phosphorylated; in contrast, little or no binding is observed to monophosphorylated or nonphosphorylated analogues. These results imply that after receptor crosslinking in T cells, and by inference also in B cells and mast cells, the motif is phosphorylated on both tyrosine residues, thereafter serving as a docking site for protein tyrosine kinases containing tandem SH2 domains. Images PMID:7517560

  8. The mammalian heterochromatin protein 1 binds diverse nuclear proteins through a common motif that targets the chromoshadow domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Mark S. . E-mail: msl27@drexel.edu; Schultz, David C.; Negorev, Dmitri; Maul, Gerd G.; Rauscher, Frank J.

    2005-06-17

    The HP1 proteins regulate epigenetic gene silencing by promoting and maintaining chromatin condensation. The HP1 chromodomain binds to methylated histone H3. More enigmatic is the chromoshadow domain (CSD), which mediates dimerization, transcription repression, and interaction with multiple nuclear proteins. Here we show that KAP-1, CAF-1 p150, and NIPBL carry a canonical amino acid motif, PxVxL, which binds directly to the CSD with high affinity. We also define a new class of variant PxVxL CSD-binding motifs in Sp100A, LBR, and ATRX. Both canonical and variant motifs recognize a similar surface of the CSD dimer as demonstrated by a panel of CSD mutants. These in vitro binding results were confirmed by the analysis of polypeptides found associated with nuclear HP1 complexes and we provide the first evidence of the NIPBL/delangin protein in human cells, a protein recently implicated in the developmental disorder, Cornelia de Lange syndrome. NIPBL is related to Nipped-B, a factor participating in gene activation by remote enhancers in Drosophila melanogaster. Thus, this spectrum of direct binding partners suggests an expanded role for HP1 as factor participating in promoter-enhancer communication, chromatin remodeling/assembly, and sub-nuclear compartmentalization.

  9. Gbp1p, a Protein with RNA Recognition Motifs, Binds Single-Stranded Telomeric DNA and Changes Its Binding Specificity upon Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Stephen D.; Lew, Jodi E.; Berman, Judith

    1999-01-01

    Gbp1p is a putative telomere-binding protein from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that contains two RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) which are commonly found in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Previously we demonstrated that Gbp1p binds single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) containing the Chlamydomonas telomeric sequence but not the RNA containing the cognate sequence. Here we show that at lower protein concentrations Gbp1 can also bind an RNA containing the cognate sequence. We found that mutation of the two RRM motifs of Gbp1p to match the highly conserved region of hnRNP RRMs did not alter the affinity of Gbp1p for either RNA or DNA. The ability of Gbp1p to associate with either of these two nucleic acids is governed by the dimerization state of the protein. Monomeric Gbp1p associates with either ssDNA or RNA, showing a small binding preference for RNA. Dimeric Gbp1p has a strong preference for binding ssDNA and shows little affinity for RNA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a protein that qualitatively shifts its nucleic acid binding preference upon dimerization. The biological implications of a telomere-binding protein that is regulated by dimerization are discussed. PMID:9858616

  10. Juvenile hormone binding protein and transferrin from Galleria mellonella share a similar structural motif.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, D; Ozyhar, A; Lalik, A; Parkitna, J M; Szkudlarek, J; Waśniowska, K; Lisowska, E; Kochman, M

    2001-07-01

    It has been previously suggested that juvenile hormone binding protein(s) (JHBP) belongs to a new class of proteins. In the search for other protein(s) that may contain structural motifs similar to those found in JHBP, hemolymph from Galleria mellonella (Lepidoptera) was chromatographed over a Sephadex G-200 column and resulting fractions were subjected to SDS-PAGE, transferred onto nitrocellulose membrane and scanned with a monoclonal antibody, mAb 104, against hemolymph JHBP. Two proteins yielded a positive reaction with mAb 104, one corresponding to JHBP and the second corresponding to a transferrin, as judged from N-terminal amino acid sequencing staining. Transferrin was purified to about 80% homogeneity using a two-step procedure including Sephadex G-200 gel filtration and HPLC MonoQ column chromatography. Panning of a random peptide display library and analysis with immobilized synthetic peptides were applied for finding a common epitope present in JHBP and the transferrin molecule. The postulated epitope motif recognized by mAb 104 in the JHBP sequence is RDTKAVN, and is localized at position 82-88. PMID:11530933

  11. Aryl-triazole foldamers incorporating a pyridinium motif for halide anion binding in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jie; Zhao, Wei; Li, Xichen; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Hua

    2016-03-15

    Aryl-triazole oligomers incorporating a pyridinium motif have been synthesized from their pyridine precursors. Anion binding studies show that methylation of the pyridine units can significantly enhance the halide anion affinities of the folded oligomers so that the foldamers are capable of binding halide anions in aqueous solutions. PMID:26933696

  12. A tobacco bZip transcription activator (TAF-1) binds to a G-box-like motif conserved in plant genes.

    PubMed Central

    Oeda, K; Salinas, J; Chua, N H

    1991-01-01

    Tobacco nuclear extract contains a factor that binds specifically to the motif I sequence (5'-GTACGTGGCG-3') conserved among rice rab genes and cotton lea genes. We isolated from a tobacco cDNA expression library, a partial cDNA clone encoding a truncated derivative of a protein designated as TAF-1. The truncated TAF-1 (Mr = 26,000) contains an acidic region at its N-terminus and a bZip motif at its C-terminus. Using a panel of motif I mutants as probes, we showed that the truncated TAF-1 and the tobacco nuclear factor for motif I have similar, it not identical, binding specificities. In particular, both show high-affinity binding to the perfect palindrome 5'-GCCACGTGGC-3' which is also known as the G-box motif. TAF-1 mRNA is highly expressed in root, but the level is at least 10 times lower in stem and leaf. Consistent with this observation, we found that a motif I tetramer, when fused to the -90 derivative of the CaMV 35S promoter, is inactive in leaf of transgenic tobacco. The activity, however, can be elevated by transient expression of the truncated TAF-1. We conclude from these results that TAF-1 can bind to the G-box and related motifs and that it functions as a transcription activator. Images PMID:2050116

  13. Identification of Ubiquinol Binding Motifs at the Qo-Site of the Cytochrome bc1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes of the bc1 complex family power the biosphere through their central role in respiration and photosynthesis. These enzymes couple the oxidation of quinol molecules by cytochrome c to the transfer of protons across the membrane, to generate a proton-motive force that drives ATP synthesis. Key for the function of the bc1 complex is the initial redox process that involves a bifurcated electron transfer in which the two electrons from a quinol substrate are passed to different electron acceptors in the bc1 complex. The electron transfer is coupled to proton transfer. The overall mechanism of quinol oxidation by the bc1 complex is well enough characterized to allow exploration at the atomistic level, but details are still highly controversial. The controversy stems from the uncertain binding motifs of quinol at the so-called Qo active site of the bc1 complex. Here we employ a combination of classical all atom molecular dynamics and quantum chemical calculations to reveal the binding modes of quinol at the Qo-site of the bc1 complex from Rhodobacter capsulatus. The calculations suggest a novel configuration of amino acid residues responsible for quinol binding and support a mechanism for proton-coupled electron transfer from quinol to iron–sulfur cluster through a bridging hydrogen bond from histidine that stabilizes the reaction complex. PMID:25372183

  14. Characterization of a Synaptic Vesicle Binding Motif on the Distal CaV2.2 Channel C-terminal

    PubMed Central

    Gardezi, Sabiha R.; Nath, Arup R.; Li, Qi; Stanley, Elise F.

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles (SVs) that are gated to fuse with the presynaptic membrane by calcium ions that enter through voltage-gated calcium channels (CaVs). There is compelling evidence that SVs associate closely with the CaVs but the molecular linking mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using a cell-free, synaptic vesicle-pull-down assay method (SV-PD) we have recently demonstrated that SVs can bind both to the intact CaV2.2 channel and also to a fusion protein comprising the distal third, C3 segment, of its long C-terminal. This site was localized to a 49 amino acid region just proximal to the C-terminal tip. To further restrict the SV binding site we generated five, 10 amino acid mimetic blocking peptides spanning this region. Of these, HQARRVPNGY effectively inhibited SV-PD and also inhibited SV recycling when cryoloaded into chick brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes). Further, SV-PD was markedly reduced using a C3 fusion protein that lacked the HQARRVPNGY sequence, C3HQless. We zeroed in on the SV binding motif within HQARRVPNGY by means of a palette of mutant blocking peptides. To our surprise, peptides that lacked the highly conserved VPNGY sequence still blocked SV-PD. However, substitution of the HQ and RR amino acids markedly reduced block. Of these, the RR pair was essential but not sufficient as the full block was not observed without H suggesting a CaV2.2 SV binding motif of HxxRR. Interestingly, CaV2.1, the other primary presynaptic calcium channel, exhibits a similar motif, RHxRR, that likely serves the same function. Bioinformatic analysis showed that variations of this binding motif, +(+) xRR (where + is a positively charged aa H or R), are conserved from lung-fish to man. Further studies will be necessary to identify the C terminal motif binding partner on the SV itself and to determine the role of this molecular interaction in synaptic transmission. We hypothesize that the distal C-terminal participates in the capture

  15. A Cysteine-Rich Motif in Poliovirus Protein 2CATPase Is Involved in RNA Replication and Binds Zinc In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Thomas; Jones, Keith W.; Wimmer, Eckard

    2000-01-01

    Protein 2CATPase of picornaviruses is involved in the rearrangement of host cell organelles, viral RNA replication, and encapsidation. However, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms by which 2CATPase engages in these processes are not known. To characterize functional domains of 2CATPase, we have focused on a cysteine-rich motif near the carboxy terminus of poliovirus 2CATPase. This region, which is well conserved among enteroviruses and rhinoviruses displaying an amino acid arrangement resembling zinc finger motifs, was studied by genetic and biochemical analyses. A mutation that replaced the first cysteine residue of the motif with a serine was lethal. A mutant virus which lacked the second of four potential coordination sites for zinc was temperature sensitive. At the restrictive temperature, RNA replication was inhibited whereas translation and polyprotein processing, assayed in vitro and in vivo, appeared to be normal. An intragenomic second-site revertant which reinserted the missing coordination site for zinc and recovered RNA replication at the restrictive temperature was isolated. The cysteine-rich motif was sufficient to bind zinc in vitro, as assessed in the presence of 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol by a colorimetric assay. Zinc binding, however, was not required for hydrolysis of ATP. 2CATPase as well as its precursors 2BC and P2 were found to exist in a reduced form in poliovirus-infected cells. PMID:10590122

  16. A designed DNA binding motif that recognizes extended sites and spans two adjacent major grooves†

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Jéssica; Mosquera, Jesús; García-Fandiño, Rebeca; Vázquez, M. Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-01-01

    We report the rational design of a DNA-binding peptide construct composed of the DNA-contacting regions of two transcription factors (GCN4 and GAGA) linked through an AT-hook DNA anchor. The resulting chimera, which represents a new, non-natural DNA binding motif, binds with high affinity and selectivity to a long composite sequence of 13 base pairs (TCAT-AATT-GAGAG). PMID:27252825

  17. Redefining the structural motifs that determine RNA binding and RNA editing by pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in land plants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shifeng; Gutmann, Bernard; Zhong, Xiao; Ye, Yongtao; Fisher, Mark F; Bai, Fengqi; Castleden, Ian; Song, Yue; Song, Bo; Huang, Jiaying; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xun; Lim, Boon L; Bond, Charles S; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Small, Ian

    2016-02-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins form one of the largest protein families in land plants. They are characterised by tandem 30-40 amino acid motifs that form an extended binding surface capable of sequence-specific recognition of RNA strands. Almost all of them are post-translationally targeted to plastids and mitochondria, where they play important roles in post-transcriptional processes including splicing, RNA editing and the initiation of translation. A code describing how PPR proteins recognise their RNA targets promises to accelerate research on these proteins, but making use of this code requires accurate definition and annotation of all of the various nucleotide-binding motifs in each protein. We have used a structural modelling approach to define 10 different variants of the PPR motif found in plant proteins, in addition to the putative deaminase motif that is found at the C-terminus of many RNA-editing factors. We show that the super-helical RNA-binding surface of RNA-editing factors is potentially longer than previously recognised. We used the redefined motifs to develop accurate and consistent annotations of PPR sequences from 109 genomes. We report a high error rate in PPR gene models in many public plant proteomes, due to gene fusions and insertions of spurious introns. These consistently annotated datasets across a wide range of species are valuable resources for future comparative genomics studies, and an essential pre-requisite for accurate large-scale computational predictions of PPR targets. We have created a web portal (http://www.plantppr.com) that provides open access to these resources for the community. PMID:26764122

  18. Hydrogen Bound Complexes with Tropolone: Binding Motifs, Barrier Heights, and the Search for Bifurcating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemchick, Deacon; Chew, Kathryn; Vaccaro, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    The potentially frustrated transfer of a proton between the hydroxylic (proton-donating) and ketonic (proton-accepting) oxygen atom centers in tropolone (TrOH) long has served as a model system for the study of coherent (symmetrical) proton-transfer events. A litany of hydrogen-bound complexes [TrOH \\cdot Xn] can be formed in situ by docking amphoteric ligands onto the TrOH substrate under supersonic free-jet expansion conditions. Binary (n = 1) and higher order (n = 2, 3, ldots) complexes formed with formic acid, hydrogen fluoride, acetic acid and propiolic acid (X = FA, HF, AA, and PA) have been synthesized and interrogated using a variety of spectroscopic probes built upon the intense ˜{A1}B2-˜{X1}{A}1 (π *←π) near-ultraviolet absorption system of bare tropolone, thereby providing vibronically resolved information through combined use of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), dispersed fluorescence (DF), fluorescence hole-burning (FHB), and stimulated emission pumping (SEP) methods. Experimental results reveal the propensity for binary complexes to adopt a higher-energy external binding motif (ligand attached to the seven membered aromatic ring) over the energetically preferred internal form (ligand bound to the O-H\\cdotsO reaction center), where the latter cleft-bound species can undergo unique symmetric (coherent) double proton-transfer reactions. These findings will be discussed in light of supporting quantum-chemical calculations.

  19. The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN protein is able to specifically bind DNA through its single Cys2-His2 zinc finger motif.

    PubMed

    Dathan, Nina; Zaccaro, Laura; Esposito, Sabrina; Isernia, Carla; Omichinski, James G; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Carlo; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Fattorusso, Roberto; Pedone, Paolo V

    2002-11-15

    The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) gene has been shown to be important in maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels, and is presumed to act by regulating cell proliferation. In this work, we show that the SUP protein, which contains a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger domain including the QALGGH sequence, highly conserved in the plant zinc finger proteins, binds DNA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was determined that the minimal domain required for specific DNA binding (residues 15-78) includes the single zinc finger and two basic regions located on either side of this motif. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions in the zinc finger or in the basic regions, including a mutation that knocks out the function of the SUP protein in vivo (glycine 63 to aspartate), have been found to abolish the activity of the SUP DNA-binding domain. These results strongly suggest that the SUP protein functions in vivo by acting as a DNA-binding protein, likely involved in transcriptional regulation. The association of both an N-terminal and a C-terminal basic region with a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger represents a novel DNA-binding motif suggesting that the mechanism of DNA recognition adopted by the SUP protein is different from that described so far in other zinc finger proteins. PMID:12433998

  20. ConBind: motif-aware cross-species alignment for the identification of functional transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lelieveld, Stefan H; Schütte, Judith; Dijkstra, Maurits J J; Bawono, Punto; Kinston, Sarah J; Göttgens, Berthold; Heringa, Jaap; Bonzanni, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is regulated by transcription factors (TFs) binding to promoter as well as distal enhancers. TFs recognize short, but specific binding sites (TFBSs) that are located within the promoter and enhancer regions. Functionally relevant TFBSs are often highly conserved during evolution leaving a strong phylogenetic signal. While multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a potent tool to detect the phylogenetic signal, the current MSA implementations are optimized to align the maximum number of identical nucleotides. This approach might result in the omission of conserved motifs that contain interchangeable nucleotides such as the ETS motif (IUPAC code: GGAW). Here, we introduce ConBind, a novel method to enhance alignment of short motifs, even if their mutual sequence similarity is only partial. ConBind improves the identification of conserved TFBSs by improving the alignment accuracy of TFBS families within orthologous DNA sequences. Functional validation of the Gfi1b + 13 enhancer reveals that ConBind identifies additional functionally important ETS binding sites that were missed by all other tested alignment tools. In addition to the analysis of known regulatory regions, our web tool is useful for the analysis of TFBSs on so far unknown DNA regions identified through ChIP-sequencing. PMID:26721389

  1. ConBind: motif-aware cross-species alignment for the identification of functional transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Lelieveld, Stefan H.; Schütte, Judith; Dijkstra, Maurits J.J.; Bawono, Punto; Kinston, Sarah J.; Göttgens, Berthold; Heringa, Jaap; Bonzanni, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is regulated by transcription factors (TFs) binding to promoter as well as distal enhancers. TFs recognize short, but specific binding sites (TFBSs) that are located within the promoter and enhancer regions. Functionally relevant TFBSs are often highly conserved during evolution leaving a strong phylogenetic signal. While multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a potent tool to detect the phylogenetic signal, the current MSA implementations are optimized to align the maximum number of identical nucleotides. This approach might result in the omission of conserved motifs that contain interchangeable nucleotides such as the ETS motif (IUPAC code: GGAW). Here, we introduce ConBind, a novel method to enhance alignment of short motifs, even if their mutual sequence similarity is only partial. ConBind improves the identification of conserved TFBSs by improving the alignment accuracy of TFBS families within orthologous DNA sequences. Functional validation of the Gfi1b + 13 enhancer reveals that ConBind identifies additional functionally important ETS binding sites that were missed by all other tested alignment tools. In addition to the analysis of known regulatory regions, our web tool is useful for the analysis of TFBSs on so far unknown DNA regions identified through ChIP-sequencing. PMID:26721389

  2. From ligands to binding motifs and beyond; the enhanced versatility of nanocrystal surfaces.

    PubMed

    De Roo, J; De Keukeleere, K; Hens, Z; Van Driessche, I

    2016-09-14

    Surface chemistry bridges the gap between nanocrystal synthesis and their applications. In this respect, the discovery of complex ligand binding motifs on semiconductor quantum dots and metal oxide nanocrystals opens a gateway to new areas of research. The implications are far-reaching, from catalytic model systems to the performance of solar cells. PMID:27461488

  3. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120) and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM). Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infection of erythrocytes and DBP binding to the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC). A peptide including the HBM of PvDBP had similar affinity for heparin as RANTES and V3 loop peptides, and could be specifically inhibited from heparin binding by the same polyanions that inhibit DBP binding to DARC. However, some V3 peptides can competitively inhibit RANTES binding to heparin, but not the PvDBP HBM peptide. Three other members of the DBP family have an HBM sequence that is necessary for erythrocyte binding, however only the protein which binds to DARC, the P. knowlesi alpha protein, is inhibited by heparin from binding to erythrocytes. Heparitinase digestion does not affect the binding of DBP to erythrocytes. Conclusion The HBMs of DBPs that bind to DARC have similar heparin binding affinities as some V3 loop peptides and chemokines, are responsible for specific sulfated polysaccharide inhibition of parasite binding and invasion of red blood cells, and are more likely to bind to negative charges on the receptor than cell surface glycosaminoglycans. PMID:22122911

  4. Evidence for a conserved binding motif of the dinuclear metal site in mammalian and plant purple acid phosphatases: 1H NMR studies of the di-iron derivative of the Fe(III)Zn(II) enzyme from kidney bean.

    PubMed Central

    Battistuzzi, G; Dietrich, M; Löcke, R; Witzel, H

    1997-01-01

    The di-iron core of mammalian purple acid phosphatases has been reproduced in the plant enzyme from kidney bean (Mr 111000) upon insertion of an Fe(II) ion in place of the native zinc(II) in the dinuclear Fe(III)Zn(II) core. The shortening of the electronic relaxation time of the metal centre allows detection of hyperfine-shifted 1H NMR resonances, although severe broadening due to Curie relaxation prevents independent signal assignment. Nevertheless, comparison of the spectral features of the structurally characterized plant enzyme with those of the mammalian species, which were previously extensively assigned, is consistent with a close similarity of the metal-binding sites, also suggested by previous sequence-alignment studies. Some differences appear to be mainly localized at the M(II) site. Spectral comparison was also carried out on the Fe(III)Co(II) derivatives. PMID:9169589

  5. ATtRACT—a database of RNA-binding proteins and associated motifs

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Girolamo; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Torroja, Carlos; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a crucial role in key cellular processes, including RNA transport, splicing, polyadenylation and stability. Understanding the interaction between RBPs and RNA is key to improve our knowledge of RNA processing, localization and regulation in a global manner. Despite advances in recent years, a unified non-redundant resource that includes information on experimentally validated motifs, RBPs and integrated tools to exploit this information is lacking. Here, we developed a database named ATtRACT (available at http://attract.cnic.es) that compiles information on 370 RBPs and 1583 RBP consensus binding motifs, 192 of which are not present in any other database. To populate ATtRACT we (i) extracted and hand-curated experimentally validated data from CISBP-RNA, SpliceAid–F, RBPDB databases, (ii) integrated and updated the unavailable ASD database and (iii) extracted information from Protein-RNA complexes present in Protein Data Bank database through computational analyses. ATtRACT provides also efficient algorithms to search a specific motif and scan one or more RNA sequences at a time. It also allows discovering de novo motifs enriched in a set of related sequences and compare them with the motifs included in the database. Database URL: http:// attract. cnic. es PMID:27055826

  6. Hydrogen-bond motifs in the crystals of hydrophobic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Fábián, László; Chisholm, James A; Galek, Peter T A; Motherwell, W D Samuel; Feeder, Neil

    2008-08-01

    A computer program has been developed to survey a set of crystal structures for hydrogen-bond motifs. Possible ring and chain motifs are generated automatically from a user-defined list of interacting molecular fragments and intermolecular interactions. The new program was used to analyse the hydrogen-bond networks in the crystals of 52 zwitterionic alpha-amino acids. All the possible chain motifs (repeating 1-4 molecules) are frequent, while the frequency of ring motifs (2-6 molecules) ranges from 0 to 85% of the structures. The list of motifs displayed by each structure reveals structural similarities and it can be used to compare polymorphs. The motifs formed in cocrystals of alpha-amino acids and in crystals of beta- and gamma-amino acids are similar to those of alpha-amino acids. PMID:18641453

  7. An SOS Regulon under Control of a Noncanonical LexA-Binding Motif in the Betaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alberola, Neus; Campoy, Susana; Emerson, David; Barbé, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The SOS response is a transcriptional regulatory network governed by the LexA repressor that activates in response to DNA damage. In the Betaproteobacteria, LexA is known to target a palindromic sequence with the consensus sequence CTGT-N8-ACAG. We report the characterization of a LexA regulon in the iron-oxidizing betaproteobacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus. In silico and in vitro analyses show that LexA targets six genes by recognizing a binding motif with the consensus sequence GAACGaaCGTTC, which is strongly reminiscent of the Bacillus subtilis LexA-binding motif. We confirm that the closely related Gallionella capsiferriformans shares the same LexA-binding motif, and in silico analyses indicate that this motif is also conserved in the Nitrosomonadales and the Methylophilales. Phylogenetic analysis of LexA and the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase III (DnaE) reveal that the organisms harboring this noncanonical LexA form a compact taxonomic cluster within the Betaproteobacteria. However, their lexA gene is unrelated to the standard Betaproteobacteria lexA, and there is evidence of its spread through lateral gene transfer. In contrast to other reported cases of noncanonical LexA-binding motifs, the regulon of S. lithotrophicus is comparable in size and function to that of many other Betaproteobacteria, suggesting that a convergent SOS regulon has reevolved under the control of a new LexA protein. Analysis of the DNA-binding domain of S. lithotrophicus LexA reveals little sequence similarity with that of other LexA proteins targeting similar binding motifs, suggesting that network structure may limit site evolution or that structural constrains make the B. subtilis-type motif an optimal interface for multiple LexA sequences. IMPORTANCE Understanding the evolution of transcriptional systems enables us to address important questions in microbiology, such as the emergence and transfer potential of different regulatory systems to regulate virulence or

  8. Two RNA-binding motifs in eIF3 direct HCV IRES-dependent translation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chaomin; Querol-Audí, Jordi; Mortimer, Stefanie A.; Arias-Palomo, Ernesto; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Nogales, Eva; Cate, Jamie H. D.

    2013-01-01

    The initiation of protein synthesis plays an essential regulatory role in human biology. At the center of the initiation pathway, the 13-subunit eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3) controls access of other initiation factors and mRNA to the ribosome by unknown mechanisms. Using electron microscopy (EM), bioinformatics and biochemical experiments, we identify two highly conserved RNA-binding motifs in eIF3 that direct translation initiation from the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site (HCV IRES) RNA. Mutations in the RNA-binding motif of subunit eIF3a weaken eIF3 binding to the HCV IRES and the 40S ribosomal subunit, thereby suppressing eIF2-dependent recognition of the start codon. Mutations in the eIF3c RNA-binding motif also reduce 40S ribosomal subunit binding to eIF3, and inhibit eIF5B-dependent steps downstream of start codon recognition. These results provide the first connection between the structure of the central translation initiation factor eIF3 and recognition of the HCV genomic RNA start codon, molecular interactions that likely extend to the human transcriptome. PMID:23766293

  9. A Common Structural Motif in the Binding of Virulence Factors to Bacterial Secretion Chaperones

    SciTech Connect

    Lilic,M.; Vujanac, M.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella invasion protein A (SipA) is translocated into host cells by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and comprises two regions: one domain binds its cognate type III secretion chaperone, InvB, in the bacterium to facilitate translocation, while a second domain functions in the host cell, contributing to bacterial uptake by polymerizing actin. We present here the crystal structures of the SipA chaperone binding domain (CBD) alone and in complex with InvB. The SipA CBD is found to consist of a nonglobular polypeptide as well as a large globular domain, both of which are necessary for binding to InvB. We also identify a structural motif that may direct virulence factors to their cognate chaperones in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria. Disruption of this structural motif leads to a destabilization of several chaperone-substrate complexes from different species, as well as an impairment of secretion in Salmonella.

  10. Sequence-Specific Recognition of DNA by Proteins: Binding Motifs Discovered Using a Novel Statistical/Computational Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jakubec, David; Laskowski, Roman A; Vondrasek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Decades of intensive experimental studies of the recognition of DNA sequences by proteins have provided us with a view of a diverse and complicated world in which few to no features are shared between individual DNA-binding protein families. The originally conceived direct readout of DNA residue sequences by amino acid side chains offers very limited capacity for sequence recognition, while the effects of the dynamic properties of the interacting partners remain difficult to quantify and almost impossible to generalise. In this work we investigated the energetic characteristics of all DNA residue-amino acid side chain combinations in the conformations found at the interaction interface in a very large set of protein-DNA complexes by the means of empirical potential-based calculations. General specificity-defining criteria were derived and utilised to look beyond the binding motifs considered in previous studies. Linking energetic favourability to the observed geometrical preferences, our approach reveals several additional amino acid motifs which can distinguish between individual DNA bases. Our results remained valid in environments with various dielectric properties. PMID:27384774

  11. Sequence-Specific Recognition of DNA by Proteins: Binding Motifs Discovered Using a Novel Statistical/Computational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jakubec, David; Laskowski, Roman A.; Vondrasek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Decades of intensive experimental studies of the recognition of DNA sequences by proteins have provided us with a view of a diverse and complicated world in which few to no features are shared between individual DNA-binding protein families. The originally conceived direct readout of DNA residue sequences by amino acid side chains offers very limited capacity for sequence recognition, while the effects of the dynamic properties of the interacting partners remain difficult to quantify and almost impossible to generalise. In this work we investigated the energetic characteristics of all DNA residue—amino acid side chain combinations in the conformations found at the interaction interface in a very large set of protein—DNA complexes by the means of empirical potential-based calculations. General specificity-defining criteria were derived and utilised to look beyond the binding motifs considered in previous studies. Linking energetic favourability to the observed geometrical preferences, our approach reveals several additional amino acid motifs which can distinguish between individual DNA bases. Our results remained valid in environments with various dielectric properties. PMID:27384774

  12. Novel DNA Motif Binding Activity Observed In Vivo With an Estrogen Receptor α Mutant Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A.; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Hamilton, Katherine J.; Pockette, Brianna; Rubel, Cory A.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Fargo, David; Lanz, Rainer B.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Schütz, Günther; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) interacts with DNA directly or indirectly via other transcription factors, referred to as “tethering.” Evidence for tethering is based on in vitro studies and a widely used “KIKO” mouse model containing mutations that prevent direct estrogen response element DNA- binding. KIKO mice are infertile, due in part to the inability of estradiol (E2) to induce uterine epithelial proliferation. To elucidate the molecular events that prevent KIKO uterine growth, regulation of the pro-proliferative E2 target gene Klf4 and of Klf15, a progesterone (P4) target gene that opposes the pro-proliferative activity of KLF4, was evaluated. Klf4 induction was impaired in KIKO uteri; however, Klf15 was induced by E2 rather than by P4. Whole uterine chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing revealed enrichment of KIKO ERα binding to hormone response elements (HREs) motifs. KIKO binding to HRE motifs was verified using reporter gene and DNA-binding assays. Because the KIKO ERα has HRE DNA-binding activity, we evaluated the “EAAE” ERα, which has more severe DNA-binding domain mutations, and demonstrated a lack of estrogen response element or HRE reporter gene induction or DNA-binding. The EAAE mouse has an ERα null–like phenotype, with impaired uterine growth and transcriptional activity. Our findings demonstrate that the KIKO mouse model, which has been used by numerous investigators, cannot be used to establish biological functions for ERα tethering, because KIKO ERα effectively stimulates transcription using HRE motifs. The EAAE-ERα DNA-binding domain mutant mouse demonstrates that ERα DNA-binding is crucial for biological and transcriptional processes in reproductive tissues and that ERα tethering may not contribute to estrogen responsiveness in vivo. PMID:24713037

  13. Novel DNA motif binding activity observed in vivo with an estrogen receptor α mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sylvia C; Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Hamilton, Katherine J; Pockette, Brianna; Rubel, Cory A; Pedersen, Lars C; Fargo, David; Lanz, Rainer B; DeMayo, Francesco J; Schütz, Günther; Korach, Kenneth S

    2014-06-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) interacts with DNA directly or indirectly via other transcription factors, referred to as "tethering." Evidence for tethering is based on in vitro studies and a widely used "KIKO" mouse model containing mutations that prevent direct estrogen response element DNA- binding. KIKO mice are infertile, due in part to the inability of estradiol (E2) to induce uterine epithelial proliferation. To elucidate the molecular events that prevent KIKO uterine growth, regulation of the pro-proliferative E2 target gene Klf4 and of Klf15, a progesterone (P4) target gene that opposes the pro-proliferative activity of KLF4, was evaluated. Klf4 induction was impaired in KIKO uteri; however, Klf15 was induced by E2 rather than by P4. Whole uterine chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing revealed enrichment of KIKO ERα binding to hormone response elements (HREs) motifs. KIKO binding to HRE motifs was verified using reporter gene and DNA-binding assays. Because the KIKO ERα has HRE DNA-binding activity, we evaluated the "EAAE" ERα, which has more severe DNA-binding domain mutations, and demonstrated a lack of estrogen response element or HRE reporter gene induction or DNA-binding. The EAAE mouse has an ERα null-like phenotype, with impaired uterine growth and transcriptional activity. Our findings demonstrate that the KIKO mouse model, which has been used by numerous investigators, cannot be used to establish biological functions for ERα tethering, because KIKO ERα effectively stimulates transcription using HRE motifs. The EAAE-ERα DNA-binding domain mutant mouse demonstrates that ERα DNA-binding is crucial for biological and transcriptional processes in reproductive tissues and that ERα tethering may not contribute to estrogen responsiveness in vivo. PMID:24713037

  14. Systematic discovery of linear binding motifs targeting an ancient protein interaction surface on MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Zeke, András; Bastys, Tomas; Alexa, Anita; Garai, Ágnes; Mészáros, Bálint; Kirsch, Klára; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Kalinina, Olga V; Reményi, Attila

    2015-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are broadly used regulators of cellular signaling. However, how these enzymes can be involved in such a broad spectrum of physiological functions is not understood. Systematic discovery of MAPK networks both experimentally and in silico has been hindered because MAPKs bind to other proteins with low affinity and mostly in less-characterized disordered regions. We used a structurally consistent model on kinase-docking motif interactions to facilitate the discovery of short functional sites in the structurally flexible and functionally under-explored part of the human proteome and applied experimental tools specifically tailored to detect low-affinity protein-protein interactions for their validation in vitro and in cell-based assays. The combined computational and experimental approach enabled the identification of many novel MAPK-docking motifs that were elusive for other large-scale protein-protein interaction screens. The analysis produced an extensive list of independently evolved linear binding motifs from a functionally diverse set of proteins. These all target, with characteristic binding specificity, an ancient protein interaction surface on evolutionarily related but physiologically clearly distinct three MAPKs (JNK, ERK, and p38). This inventory of human protein kinase binding sites was compared with that of other organisms to examine how kinase-mediated partnerships evolved over time. The analysis suggests that most human MAPK-binding motifs are surprisingly new evolutionarily inventions and newly found links highlight (previously hidden) roles of MAPKs. We propose that short MAPK-binding stretches are created in disordered protein segments through a variety of ways and they represent a major resource for ancient signaling enzymes to acquire new regulatory roles. PMID:26538579

  15. ATtRACT-a database of RNA-binding proteins and associated motifs.

    PubMed

    Giudice, Girolamo; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Torroja, Carlos; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a crucial role in key cellular processes, including RNA transport, splicing, polyadenylation and stability. Understanding the interaction between RBPs and RNA is key to improve our knowledge of RNA processing, localization and regulation in a global manner. Despite advances in recent years, a unified non-redundant resource that includes information on experimentally validated motifs, RBPs and integrated tools to exploit this information is lacking. Here, we developed a database named ATtRACT (available athttp://attract.cnic.es) that compiles information on 370 RBPs and 1583 RBP consensus binding motifs, 192 of which are not present in any other database. To populate ATtRACT we (i) extracted and hand-curated experimentally validated data from CISBP-RNA, SpliceAid-F, RBPDB databases, (ii) integrated and updated the unavailable ASD database and (iii) extracted information from Protein-RNA complexes present in Protein Data Bank database through computational analyses. ATtRACT provides also efficient algorithms to search a specific motif and scan one or more RNA sequences at a time. It also allows discoveringde novomotifs enriched in a set of related sequences and compare them with the motifs included in the database.Database URL:http:// attract. cnic. es. PMID:27055826

  16. Inferring the evolutionary history of primate microRNA binding sites: overcoming motif counting biases.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Alfred T; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Gao, Fen-Biao; Jensen, Jeffrey D

    2014-07-01

    The first microRNAs (miRNAs) were identified as essential, conserved regulators of gene expression, targeting the same genes across nearly all bilaterians. However, there are also prominent examples of conserved miRNAs whose functions appear to have shifted dramatically, sometimes over very brief periods of evolutionary time. To determine whether the functions of conserved miRNAs are stable or dynamic over evolutionary time scales, we have here defined the neutral turnover rates of short sequence motifs in predicted primate 3'-UTRs. We find that commonly used approaches to quantify motif turnover rates, which use a presence/absence scoring in extant lineages to infer ancestral states, are inherently biased to infer the accumulation of new motifs, leading to the false inference of continually increasing regulatory complexity over time. Using a maximum likelihood approach to reconstruct individual ancestral nucleotides, we observe that binding sites of conserved miRNAs in fact have roughly equal numbers of gain and loss events relative to ancestral states and turnover extremely slowly relative to nearly identical permutations of the same motif. Contrary to case studies showing examples of functional turnover, our systematic study of miRNA binding sites suggests that in primates, the regulatory roles of conserved miRNAs are strongly conserved. Our revised methodology may be used to quantify the mechanism by which regulatory networks evolve. PMID:24723422

  17. Oxidation Protection in Metal-Binding Peptide Motif and Its Application to Antibody for Site-Selective Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hye-Shin; Lee, Sunbae; Park, Soon Jae

    2016-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that a metal ion binding motif could serve as an efficient and robust tool for site-specific conjugation strategy. Cysteine-containing metal binding motifs were constructed as single repeat or tandem repeat peptides and their metal binding characteristics were investigated. The tandem repeats of the Cysteine-Glycine-Histidine (CGH) metal ion binding motif exhibited concerted binding to Co(II) ions, suggesting that conformational transition of peptide was triggered by the sequential metal ion binding. Evaluation of the free thiol content after reduction by reducing reagent showed that metal-ion binding elicited strong retardation of cysteine oxidation in the order of Zn(II)>Ni(II)>Co(II). The CGH metal ion binding motif was then introduced to the C-terminus of antibody heavy chain and the metal ion-dependent characteristics of oxidation kinetics were investigated. As in the case of peptides, CGH-motif-introduced antibody exhibited strong dependence on metal ion binding to protect against oxidation. Zn(II)-saturated antibody with tandem repeat of CGH motif retains the cysteine reactivity as long as 22 hour even with saturating O2 condition. Metal-ion dependent fluorophore labeling clearly indicated that metal binding motifs could be employed as an efficient tool for site-specific conjugation. Whereas Trastuzumab without a metal ion binding site exhibited site-nonspecific dye conjugation, Zn(II) ion binding to antibody with a tandem repeat of CGH motif showed that fluorophores were site-specifically conjugated to the heavy chain of antibody. We believe that this strong metal ion dependence on oxidation protection and the resulting site-selective conjugation could be exploited further to develop a highly site-specific conjugation strategy for proteins that contain multiple intrinsic cysteine residues, including monoclonal antibodies. PMID:27420328

  18. An essential GT motif in the lamin A promoter mediates activation by CREB-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Janaki Ramaiah, M.; Parnaik, Veena K. . E-mail: veenap@ccmb.res.in

    2006-09-29

    Lamin A is an important component of nuclear architecture in mammalian cells. Mutations in the human lamin A gene lead to highly degenerative disorders that affect specific tissues. In studies directed towards understanding the mode of regulation of the lamin A promoter, we have identified an essential GT motif at -55 position by reporter gene assays and mutational analysis. Binding of this sequence to Sp transcription factors has been observed in electrophoretic mobility shift assays and by chromatin immunoprecipitation studies. Further functional analysis by co-expression of recombinant proteins and ChIP assays has shown an important regulatory role for CREB-binding protein in promoter activation, which is mediated by the GT motif.

  19. The rad50 signature motif: essential to ATP binding and biological function.

    PubMed

    Moncalian, Gabriel; Lengsfeld, Bettina; Bhaskara, Venugopal; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Karcher, Annette; Alden, Erinn; Tainer, John A; Paull, Tanya T

    2004-01-23

    The repair of double-strand breaks in DNA is an essential process in all organisms, and requires the coordinated activities of evolutionarily conserved protein assemblies. One of the most critical of these is the Mre11/Rad50 (M/R) complex, which is present in all three biological kingdoms, but is not well-understood at the biochemical level. Previous structural analysis of a Rad50 homolog from archaebacteria illuminated the catalytic core of the enzyme, an ATP-binding domain related to the ABC transporter family of ATPases. Here, we present the crystallographic structure of the Rad50 mutant S793R. This missense signature motif mutation changes the key serine residue in the signature motif that is conserved among Rad50 homologs and ABC ATPases. The S793R mutation is analogous to the mutation S549R in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) that results in cystic fibrosis. We show here that the serine to arginine change in the Rad50 protein prevents ATP binding and disrupts the communication among the other ATP-binding loops. This structural change, in turn, alters the communication between Rad50 monomers and thus prevents Rad50 dimerization. The equivalent mutation was made in the human Rad50 gene, and the resulting mutant protein did form a complex with Mre11 and Nbs1, but was specifically deficient in all ATP-dependent enzymatic activities. This signature motif structure-function homology extends to yeast, because the same mutation introduced into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD50 gene generated an allele that failed to complement a rad50 deletion strain in DNA repair assays in vivo. These structural and biochemical results extend our understanding of the Rad50 catalytic domain and validate the use of the signature motif mutant to test the role of Rad50 ATP binding in diverse organisms. PMID:14698290

  20. Prediction of peptides binding to MHC class I and II alleles by temporal motif mining

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) is a key player in the immune response of most vertebrates. The computational prediction of whether a given antigenic peptide will bind to a specific MHC allele is important in the development of vaccines for emerging pathogens, the creation of possibilities for controlling immune response, and for the applications of immunotherapy. One of the problems that make this computational prediction difficult is the detection of the binding core region in peptides, coupled with the presence of bulges and loops causing variations in the total sequence length. Most machine learning methods require the sequences to be of the same length to successfully discover the binding motifs, ignoring the length variance in both motif mining and prediction steps. In order to overcome this limitation, we propose the use of time-based motif mining methods that work position-independently. Results The prediction method was tested on a benchmark set of 28 different alleles for MHC class I and 27 different alleles for MHC class II. The obtained results are comparable to the state of the art methods for both MHC classes, surpassing the published results for some alleles. The average prediction AUC values are 0.897 for class I, and 0.858 for class II. Conclusions Temporal motif mining using partial periodic patterns can capture information about the sequences well enough to predict the binding of the peptides and is comparable to state of the art methods in the literature. Unlike neural networks or matrix based predictors, our proposed method does not depend on peptide length and can work with both short and long fragments. This advantage allows better use of the available training data and the prediction of peptides of uncommon lengths. PMID:23368521

  1. IQ-motif selectivity in human IQGAP2 and IQGAP3: binding of calmodulin and myosin essential light chain.

    PubMed

    Atcheson, Erwan; Hamilton, Elaine; Pathmanathan, Sevvel; Greer, Brett; Harriott, Pat; Timson, David J

    2011-10-01

    The IQGAP [IQ-motif-containing GAP (GTPase-activating protein)] family members are eukaryotic proteins that act at the interface between cellular signalling and the cytoskeleton. As such they collect numerous inputs from a variety of signalling pathways. A key binding partner is the calcium-sensing protein CaM (calmodulin). This protein binds mainly through a series of IQ-motifs which are located towards the middle of the primary sequence of the IQGAPs. In some IQGAPs, these motifs also provide binding sites for CaM-like proteins such as myosin essential light chain and S100B. Using synthetic peptides and native gel electrophoresis, the binding properties of the IQ-motifs from human IQGAP2 and IQGAP3 have been mapped. The second and third IQ-motifs in IQGAP2 and all four of the IQ-motifs of IQGAP3 interacted with CaM in the presence of calcium ions. However, there were differences in the type of interaction: while some IQ-motifs were able to form complexes with CaM which were stable under the conditions of the experiment, others formed more transient interactions. The first IQ-motifs from IQGAP2 and IQGAP3 formed transient interactions with CaM in the absence of calcium and the first motif from IQGAP3 formed a transient interaction with the myosin essential light chain Mlc1sa. None of these IQ-motifs interacted with S100B. Molecular modelling suggested that all of the IQ-motifs, except the first one from IQGAP2 formed α-helices in solution. These results extend our knowledge of the selectivity of IQ-motifs for CaM and related proteins. PMID:21299499

  2. IQ-motif selectivity in human IQGAP2 and IQGAP3: binding of calmodulin and myosin essential light chain

    PubMed Central

    Atcheson, Erwan; Hamilton, Elaine; Pathmanathan, Sevvel; Greer, Brett; Harriott, Pat; Timson, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The IQGAP [IQ-motif-containing GAP (GTPase-activating protein)] family members are eukaryotic proteins that act at the interface between cellular signalling and the cytoskeleton. As such they collect numerous inputs from a variety of signalling pathways. A key binding partner is the calcium-sensing protein CaM (calmodulin). This protein binds mainly through a series of IQ-motifs which are located towards the middle of the primary sequence of the IQGAPs. In some IQGAPs, these motifs also provide binding sites for CaM-like proteins such as myosin essential light chain and S100B. Using synthetic peptides and native gel electrophoresis, the binding properties of the IQ-motifs from human IQGAP2 and IQGAP3 have been mapped. The second and third IQ-motifs in IQGAP2 and all four of the IQ-motifs of IQGAP3 interacted with CaM in the presence of calcium ions. However, there were differences in the type of interaction: while some IQ-motifs were able to form complexes with CaM which were stable under the conditions of the experiment, others formed more transient interactions. The first IQ-motifs from IQGAP2 and IQGAP3 formed transient interactions with CaM in the absence of calcium and the first motif from IQGAP3 formed a transient interaction with the myosin essential light chain Mlc1sa. None of these IQ-motifs interacted with S100B. Molecular modelling suggested that all of the IQ-motifs, except the first one from IQGAP2 formed α-helices in solution. These results extend our knowledge of the selectivity of IQ-motifs for CaM and related proteins. PMID:21299499

  3. A PP1-binding motif present in BRCA1 plays a role in its DNA repair function

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Young-Mi; Pace, Serena M.; Allen, Susan R.; Deng, Chu-Xia; Hsu, Lih-Ching

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1α (PP1α) regulates phosphorylation of BRCA1, which contains a PP1-binding motif 898KVTF901. Mutation of this motif greatly reduces the interaction between BRCA1 and PP1α. Here we show that mutation of the PP1-binding motif abolishes the ability of BRCA1 to enhance survival of Brca1-deficient mouse mammary tumor cells after DNA damage. The Rad51 focus formation and comet assays revealed that the DNA repair function of BRCA1 was impaired when the PP1-binding motif was mutated. Analysis of subnuclear localization of GFP-tagged BRCA1 demonstrated that mutation of the PP1-binding motif affected BRCA1 redistribution in response to DNA damage. BRCA1 is required for the formation of Rad51 subnuclear foci after DNA damage. Mutation of the PP1-binding motif in BRCA1 also affected recruitment of Rad51 to sites of DNA damage. Consistent with these findings, knockdown of PP1α in BRCA1-proficient cells by small interfering RNA also significantly reduced Rad51 focus formation induced by DNA damage. Further analysis indicated that mutation of the PP1-binding motif compromised BRCA1 activities in homologous recombination. Altogether, our data implicate that interaction with PP1α is important for BRCA1 function in DNA repair. PMID:18953404

  4. Opposing Effects of a Tyrosine-Based Sorting Motif and a PDZ-Binding Motif Regulate Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Envelope Trafficking▿

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskaya, Anna; Heidecker, Gisela; Derse, David

    2010-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates binding of the virus to its receptor on the surface of target cells and subsequent fusion of virus and cell membranes. To better understand the mechanisms that control HTLV-1 Env trafficking and activity, we have examined two protein-protein interaction motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of Env. One is the sequence YSLI, which matches the consensus YXXΦ motifs that are known to interact with various adaptor protein complexes; the other is the sequence ESSL at the C terminus of Env, which matches the consensus PDZ-binding motif. We show here that mutations that destroy the YXXΦ motif increased Env expression on the cell surface and increased cell-cell fusion activity. In contrast, mutation of the PDZ-binding motif greatly diminished Env expression in cells, which could be restored to wild-type levels either by mutating the YXXΦ motif or by silencing AP2 and AP3, suggesting that interactions with PDZ proteins oppose an Env degradation pathway mediated by AP2 and AP3. Silencing of the PDZ protein hDlg1 did not affect Env expression, suggesting that hDlg1 is not a binding partner for Env. Substitution of the YSLI sequence in HTLV-1 Env with YXXΦ elements from other cell or virus membrane-spanning proteins resulted in alterations in Env accumulation in cells, incorporation into virions, and virion infectivity. Env variants containing YXXΦ motifs that are predicted to have high-affinity interaction with AP2 accumulated to lower steady-state levels. Interestingly, mutations that destroy the YXXΦ motif resulted in viruses that were not infectious by cell-free or cell-associated routes of infection. Unlike YXXΦ, the function of the PDZ-binding motif manifests itself only in the producer cells; AP2 silencing restored the incorporation of PDZ-deficient Env into virus-like particles (VLPs) and the infectivity of these VLPs to wild-type levels. PMID:20463077

  5. Transcription Factor Binding Site Positioning in Yeast: Proximal Promoter Motifs Characterize TATA-Less Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of ‘proximal promoter motifs’ (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters. PMID:21931670

  6. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  7. Automatic generation of 3D motifs for classification of protein binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Herzyk, Pawel; Gilbert, David R

    2007-01-01

    Background Since many of the new protein structures delivered by high-throughput processes do not have any known function, there is a need for structure-based prediction of protein function. Protein 3D structures can be clustered according to their fold or secondary structures to produce classes of some functional significance. A recent alternative has been to detect specific 3D motifs which are often associated to active sites. Unfortunately, there are very few known 3D motifs, which are usually the result of a manual process, compared to the number of sequential motifs already known. In this paper, we report a method to automatically generate 3D motifs of protein structure binding sites based on consensus atom positions and evaluate it on a set of adenine based ligands. Results Our new approach was validated by generating automatically 3D patterns for the main adenine based ligands, i.e. AMP, ADP and ATP. Out of the 18 detected patterns, only one, the ADP4 pattern, is not associated with well defined structural patterns. Moreover, most of the patterns could be classified as binding site 3D motifs. Literature research revealed that the ADP4 pattern actually corresponds to structural features which show complex evolutionary links between ligases and transferases. Therefore, all of the generated patterns prove to be meaningful. Each pattern was used to query all PDB proteins which bind either purine based or guanine based ligands, in order to evaluate the classification and annotation properties of the pattern. Overall, our 3D patterns matched 31% of proteins with adenine based ligands and 95.5% of them were classified correctly. Conclusion A new metric has been introduced allowing the classification of proteins according to the similarity of atomic environment of binding sites, and a methodology has been developed to automatically produce 3D patterns from that classification. A study of proteins binding adenine based ligands showed that these 3D patterns are not

  8. Development of a salicylic acid inducible minimal sub-genomic transcript promoter from Figwort mosaic virus with enhanced root- and leaf-activity using TGACG motif rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Patro, Sunita; Ghosh, Jayasish; Das, Abhimanyu; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2012-07-15

    In Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (F-Sgt), function of the TGACG-regulatory motif, was investigated in the background of artificially designed promoter sequences. The 131bp (FS, -100 to +31) long F-Sgt promoter sequence containing one TGACG motif [FS-(TGACG)] was engineered to generate a set of three modified promoter constructs: [FS-(TGACG)(2), containing one additional TGACG motif at 7 nucleotides upstream of the original one], [FS-(TGACG)(3), containing two additional TGACG motifs at 7 nucleotides upstream and two nucleotides downstream of the original one] and [FS-(TGCTG)(mu), having a mutated TGACG motif]. EMSA and foot-printing analysis confirmed binding of tobacco nuclear factors with modified TGACG motif/s. The transcription-activation of the GUS gene by the TGACG motif/s in above promoter constructs was examined in transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants and observed that the transcription activation was affected by the spacing/s and number/s of the TGACG motif/s. The FS-(TGACG)(2) promoter showed strongest root-activity compared to other modified and CaMV35S promoters. Also under salicylic acid (SA) stress, the leaf-activity of the said promoter was further enhanced. All above findings were confirmed by real-time and semi-qRT PCR analysis. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrated that the TGACG motif plays an important role in inducing the root-specific expression of the F-Sgt promoter. This study advocates the importance of genetic manipulation of functional cis-motif for amending the tissue specificity of a plant promoter. SA inducible FS-(TGACG)(2) promoter with enhanced activity could be a useful candidate promoter for developing plants with enhanced crop productivity. PMID:22561698

  9. Identification of an Orthogonal Peptide Binding Motif for Biarsenical Multiuse Affinity Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Cao, Haishi; Yan, Ping; Mayer, M. Uljana; Squier, Thomas C.

    2007-07-01

    Biarsenical multiuse affinity probes (MAPs) complexed with ethanedithiol (EDT) permit the selective cellular labeling of proteins engineered with tetracysteine motifs, but are limited by the availability of a single binding motif (i.e., CCPGCC or PG tag) that prevents the differential labeling of co-expressed proteins. To overcome this problem, we have used a high-throughput peptide screen to identify an alternate binding motif (i.e., CCKACC or KA tag), which has a similar brightness to the classical sequence upon MAP binding, but displays altered rates and affinities of association that permit the differential labeling of these peptide sequences by the red probe 4,5-bis(1,3,2-dithiarsolan-2-yl)-resorufin (ReAsH-EDT2) or its green cognate 4’,5’-bis(1,3,2-dithoarsolan-2-yl)fluorescein-(1,2-ethanedithiol)2 (FLAsH-EDT2). The utility of this labeling strategy was demonstrated following the expression of PG- and KA-tagged subunits of RNA polymerase expressed in E. coli. Specific labeling of two subunits of RNA polymerase in cellular lysates was achieved, whereby ReAsH-EDT2 is shown to selectively label the PG-tag on RNA polymerase alpha subunit prior to the labeling of the KA-tag sequence of the beta subunit of RNA polymerase with FlAsH-EDT2. These results demonstrate the ability to selectively label multiple individual proteins with orthogonal sequence tags in complex cellular lystates with spectroscopically distinct MAPs, and indicate the absolute specificity of ReAsH to target expressed proteins with essentially no nonspecific binding interactions.

  10. Improved detection of helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motifs in protein sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, I B; Egan, J B

    1990-01-01

    We present an update of our method for systematic detection and evaluation of potential helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motifs in protein sequences [Dodd, I. and Egan, J. B. (1987) J. Mol. Biol. 194, 557-564]. The new method is considerably more powerful, detecting approximately 50% more likely helix-turn-helix sequences without an increase in false predictions. This improvement is due almost entirely to the use of a much larger reference set of 91 presumed helix-turn-helix sequences. The scoring matrix derived from this reference set has been calibrated against a large protein sequence database so that the score obtained by a sequence can be used to give a practical estimation of the probability that the sequence is a helix-turn-helix motif. PMID:2402433

  11. A conserved disulfide motif in human tear lipocalins influences ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, B J; Abduragimov, A R; Yusifov, T N; Gasymov, O K; Horwitz, J; Hubbell, W L; Faull, K F

    1998-02-24

    Structural and functional characteristics of the disulfide motif have been determined for tear lipocalins, members of a novel group of proteins that carry lipids. Amino acid sequences for two of the six isolated isoforms were assigned by a comparison of molecular mass measurements with masses calculated from the cDNA-predicted protein sequence and available N-terminal protein sequence data. A third isoform was tentatively sequence assigned using the same criteria. The most abundant isoform has a measured mass of 17 446.3 Da, consistent with residues 19-176 of the putative precursor (calculated mass 17 445.8 Da). Chemical derivatization of native and reduced/denatured protein confirmed the presence of a single intramolecular disulfide bond in the native protein. Reactivity of native, reduced, and denatured protein with 4-pyridine disulfide and dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) indicated that access to the free cysteine is markedly restricted by the intact disulfide bridge. Mass measurements of tryptic fragments identified C119 as the free cysteine and showed that the single intramolecular disulfide bond joined residues C79 and C171. Circular dichroism indicated that tear lipocalins have a predominant beta-pleated sheet structure (44%) that is essentially retained after reduction of the disulfide bond. Circular dichroism in the far-UV showed reduced molecular asymmetry and enhanced urea-induced unfolding with disulfide reduction indicative of relaxation of protein structure. Circular dichroism in the near-UV shows that the disulfide bond contributes to the asymmetry of aromatic sites. The effect of disulfide reduction on ligand binding was monitored using the intrinsic optical activity of bound retinol. The intact disulfide bond diminishes the affinity of tear lipocalins for retinol and restricts the displacement of native lipids by retinol. Disulfide reduction is accompanied by a dramatic alteration in ligand-induced conformational changes that involves aromatic

  12. The C(2)B Ca(2+)-binding motif of synaptotagmin is required for synaptic transmission in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mackler, J M; Drummond, J A; Loewen, C A; Robinson, I M; Reist, N E

    2002-07-18

    Synaptotagmin is a synaptic vesicle protein that is postulated to be the Ca(2+) sensor for fast, evoked neurotransmitter release. Deleting the gene for synaptotagmin (syt(null)) strongly suppresses synaptic transmission in every species examined, showing that synaptotagmin is central in the synaptic vesicle cycle. The cytoplasmic region of synaptotagmin contains two C(2) domains, C(2)A and C(2)B. Five, highly conserved, acidic residues in both the C(2)A and C(2)B domains of synaptotagmin coordinate the binding of Ca(2+) ions, and biochemical studies have characterized several in vitro Ca(2+)-dependent interactions between synaptotagmin and other nerve terminal molecules. But there has been no direct evidence that any of the Ca(2+)-binding sites within synaptotagmin are required in vivo. Here we show that mutating two of the Ca(2+)-binding aspartate residues in the C(2)B domain (D(416,418)N in Drosophila) decreased evoked transmitter release by >95%, and decreased the apparent Ca(2+) affinity of evoked transmitter release. These studies show that the Ca(2+)-binding motif of the C(2)B domain of synaptotagmin is essential for synaptic transmission. PMID:12110842

  13. Application of the C3-Binding Motif of Streptococcal Pyrogenic Exotoxin B to Protect Mice from Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chih-Feng; Tsao, Nina; Cheng, Miao-Hui; Yang, Hsiu-Chen; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Chen, Ying-Pin; Lin, Kai-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen that produces several extracellular exotoxins to facilitate invasion and infection. Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B) has been demonstrated to be an important virulence factor of GAS. Our previous studies indicate that SPE B cleaves complement 3 (C3) and inhibits the activation of complement pathways. In this study, we constructed and expressed recombinant fragments of SPE B to examine the C3-binding site of SPE B. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and pull-down assays, we found that the C-terminal domain, containing amino-acid residues 345–398, of SPE B was the major binding site of human serum C3. We further identified a major, Ala376-Pro398, and a minor C3-binding motif, Gly346-Gly360, that both mediated the binding of C3 complement. Immunization with the C3-binding motifs protected mice against challenge with a lethal dose of non-invasive M49 strain GAS but not invasive M1 strains. To achieve higher efficiency against invasive M1 GAS infection, a combination of synthetic peptides derived from C-terminal epitope of streptolysin S (SLSpp) and from the major C3-binding motif of SPE B (PP6, Ala376-Pro398) was used to elicit specific immune response to those two important streptococcal exotoxins. Death rates and the severity of skin lesions decreased significantly in PP6/SLSpp-immunized mice that were infected with invasive M1 strains of GAS. These results indicate a combination of the C3-binding motif of SPE B and the protective epitope of SLS could be used as a subunit vaccine against invasive M1 strains group A streptococcal infection. PMID:25629609

  14. IQ motif selectivity in human IQGAP1: binding of myosin essential light chain and S100B.

    PubMed

    Pathmanathan, Sevvel; Elliott, Sarah F; McSwiggen, Sara; Greer, Brett; Harriott, Pat; Irvine, G Brent; Timson, David J

    2008-11-01

    IQGAPs are cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins which link signalling pathways to the reorganisation of actin and microtubules. Human IQGAP1 has four IQ motifs each of which binds to calmodulin. The same region has been implicated in binding to two calmodulin-like proteins, the myosin essential light chain Mlc1sa and the calcium and zinc ion binding protein S100B. Using synthetic peptides corresponding to the four IQ motifs of human IQGAP1, we showed by native gel electrophoresis that only the first IQ motif interacts with Mlc1sa. This IQ motif, and also the fourth, interacts with the budding yeast myosin essential light chain Mlc1p. The first and second IQ motifs interact with S100B in the presence of calcium ions. This clearly establishes that S100B can interact with its targets through IQ motifs in addition to interacting via previously reported sequences. These results are discussed in terms of the function of IQGAP1 and IQ motif recognition. PMID:18587628

  15. Multiple Binding Modes between HNF4[alpha] and the LXXLL Motifs of PGC-1[alpha] Lead to Full Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Rha, Geun Bae; Wu, Guangteng; Shoelson, Steven E.; Chi, Young-In

    2010-04-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) is a novel nuclear receptor that participates in a hierarchical network of transcription factors regulating the development and physiology of such vital organs as the liver, pancreas, and kidney. Among the various transcriptional coregulators with which HNF4{alpha} interacts, peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) represents a novel coactivator whose activation is unusually robust and whose binding mode appears to be distinct from that of canonical coactivators such as NCoA/SRC/p160 family members. To elucidate the potentially unique molecular mechanism of PGC-1{alpha} recruitment, we have determined the crystal structure of HNF4{alpha} in complex with a fragment of PGC-1{alpha} containing all three of its LXXLL motifs. Despite the presence of all three LXXLL motifs available for interactions, only one is bound at the canonical binding site, with no additional contacts observed between the two proteins. However, a close inspection of the electron density map indicates that the bound LXXLL motif is not a selected one but an averaged structure of more than one LXXLL motif. Further biochemical and functional studies show that the individual LXXLL motifs can bind but drive only minimal transactivation. Only when more than one LXXLL motif is involved can significant transcriptional activity be measured, and full activation requires all three LXXLL motifs. These findings led us to propose a model wherein each LXXLL motif has an additive effect, and the multiple binding modes by HNF4{alpha} toward the LXXLL motifs of PGC-1{alpha} could account for the apparent robust activation by providing a flexible mechanism for combinatorial recruitment of additional coactivators and mediators.

  16. Distance preferences in the arrangement of binding motifs and hierarchical levels in organization of transcription regulatory information

    PubMed Central

    Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Lifanov, Alexander P.; Nazina, Anna G.; Papatsenko, Dmitri A.

    2003-01-01

    We explored distance preferences in the arrangement of binding motifs for five transcription factors (Bicoid, Krüppel, Hunchback, Knirps and Caudal) in a large set of Drosophila cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). Analysis of non-overlapping binding motifs revealed the presence of periodic signals specific to particular combinations of binding motifs. The most striking periodic signals (10 bp for Bicoid and 11 bp for Hunchback) suggest preferential positioning of some binding site combinations on the same side of the DNA helix. We also analyzed distance preferences in arrangements of highly correlated overlapping binding motifs, such as Bicoid and Krüppel. Based on the distance analysis, we extracted preferential binding site arrangements and proposed models for potential composite elements (CEs) and antagonistic motif pairs involved in the function of developmental CRMs. Our results suggest that there are distinct hierarchical levels in the organization of transcription regulatory information. We discuss the role of the hierarchy in understanding transcriptional regulation and in detection of transcription regulatory regions in genomes. PMID:14530449

  17. The nature of actinomycin D binding to d(AACCAXYG) sequence motifs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fu-Ming; Sha, Feng; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2004-01-01

    Earlier studies by others had indicated that actinomycin D (ACTD) binds well to d(AACCATAG) and the end sequence TAG-3′ is essential for its strong binding. In an effort to verify these assertions and to uncover other possible strong ACTD binding sequences as well as to elucidate the nature of their binding, systematic studies have been carried out with oligomers of d(AACCAXYG) sequence motifs, where X and Y can be any DNA base. The results indicate that in addition to TAG-3′, oligomers ending with XAG-3′ and XCG-3′ all provide binding constants ≥1 × 107 M–1 and even sequences ending with XTG-3′ and XGG-3′ exhibit binding affinities in the range 1–8 × 106 M–1. The nature of the strong ACTD affinity of the sequences d(A1A2C3C4A5X6Y7G8) was delineated via comparative binding studies of d(AACCAAAG), d(AGCCAAAG) and their base substituted derivatives. Two binding modes are proposed to coexist, with the major component consisting of the 3′-terminus G base folding back to base pair with C4 and the ACTD inserting at A2C3C4 by looping out the C3 while both faces of the chromophore are stacked by A and G bases, respectively. The minor mode is for the G to base pair with C3 and to have the same A/chromophore/G stacking but without a looped out base. These assertions are supported by induced circular dichroic and fluorescence spectral measurements. PMID:14715925

  18. Discovery of a new ATP-binding motif involved in peptidic azoline biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Kyle L.; Chekan, Jonathan R.; Cox, Courtney L.; Burkhart, Brandon J.; Nair, Satish K.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite intensive research, the cyclodehydratase responsible for azoline biogenesis in thiazole/oxazole-modified microcin (TOMM) natural products remains enigmatic. The collaboration of two proteins, C and D, is required for cyclodehydration. The C protein is homologous to E1 ubiquitin-activating enzymes, while the D protein is within the YcaO superfamily. Recent studies have demonstrated that TOMM YcaOs phosphorylate amide carbonyl oxygens to facilitate azoline formation. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of an uncharacterized YcaO from Escherichia coli (Ec-YcaO). Ec-YcaO harbors an unprecedented fold and ATP-binding motif. This motif is conserved among TOMM YcaOs and is required for cyclodehydration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the C protein regulates substrate binding and catalysis and that the proline-rich C-terminus of the D protein is involved in C protein recognition and catalysis. This study identifies the YcaO active site and paves the way for the characterization of the numerous YcaO domains not associated with TOMM biosynthesis. PMID:25129028

  19. Functionally related transcripts have common RNA motifs for specific RNA-binding proteins in trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Noé, Griselda; De Gaudenzi, Javier G; Frasch, Alberto C

    2008-01-01

    Background Trypanosomes mostly control gene expression by post-transcriptional events such as modulation of mRNA stability and translational efficiency. These mechanisms involve RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), which associate with transcripts to form messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes. Results In this study, we report the identification of mRNA targets for Trypanosoma cruzi U-rich RBP 1 (TcUBP1) and T. cruzi RBP 3 (TcRBP3), two phylogenetically conserved proteins among Kinetoplastids. Co-immunoprecipitated RBP-associated RNAs were extracted from mRNP complexes and binding of RBPs to several targets was confirmed by independent experimental assays. Analysis of target transcript sequences allowed the identification of different signature RNA motifs for each protein. Cis-elements for RBP binding have a stem-loop structure of 30–35 bases and are more frequently represented in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of mRNAs. Insertion of the correctly folded RNA elements to a non-specific mRNA rendered it into a target transcript, whereas substitution of the RNA elements abolished RBP interaction. In addition, RBPs competed for RNA-binding sites in accordance with the distribution of different and overlapping motifs in the 3'-UTRs of common mRNAs. Conclusion Functionally related transcripts were preferentially associated with a given RBP; TcUBP1 targets were enriched in genes encoding proteins involved in metabolism, whereas ribosomal protein-encoding transcripts were the largest group within TcRBP3 targets. Together, these results suggest coordinated control of different mRNA subsets at the post-transcriptional level by specific RBPs. PMID:19063746

  20. Nucleic acid-binding properties of the RRM-containing protein RDM1

    SciTech Connect

    Hamimes, Samia; Bourgeon, Dominique; Stasiak, Alicja Z.; Stasiak, Andrzej; Van Dyck, Eric . E-mail: Vandyck@iarc.fr

    2006-05-26

    RDM1 (RAD52 Motif 1) is a vertebrate protein involved in the cellular response to the anti-cancer drug cisplatin. In addition to an RNA recognition motif, RDM1 contains a small amino acid motif, named RD motif, which it shares with the recombination and repair protein, RAD52. RDM1 binds to single- and double-stranded DNA, and recognizes DNA distortions induced by cisplatin adducts in vitro. Here, we have performed an in-depth analysis of the nucleic acid-binding properties of RDM1 using gel-shift assays and electron microscopy. We show that RDM1 possesses acidic pH-dependent DNA-binding activity and that it binds RNA as well as DNA, and we present evidence from competition gel-shift experiments that RDM1 may be capable of discrimination between the two nucleic acids. Based on reported studies of RAD52, we have generated an RDM1 variant mutated in its RD motif. We find that the L{sub 119}GF {sup {yields}} AAA mutation affects the mode of RDM1 binding to single-stranded DNA.

  1. Crystal structure of bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Yukie; Ochiai, Akihito; Mikami, Bunzo; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Bacterial alginate-binding Algp7 is similar to component EfeO of Fe{sup 2+} transporter. {yields} We determined the crystal structure of Algp7 with a metal-binding motif. {yields} Algp7 consists of two helical bundles formed through duplication of a single bundle. {yields} A deep cleft involved in alginate binding locates around the metal-binding site. {yields} Algp7 may function as a Fe{sup 2+}-chelated alginate-binding protein. -- Abstract: A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. A1 directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm via the cell-surface pit and ABC transporter. A cell-surface alginate-binding protein, Algp7, functions as a concentrator of the polysaccharide in the pit. Based on the primary structure and genetic organization in the bacterial genome, Algp7 was found to be homologous to an M75 peptidase motif-containing EfeO, a component of a ferrous ion transporter. Despite the presence of an M75 peptidase motif with high similarity, the Algp7 protein purified from recombinant Escherichia coli cells was inert on insulin B chain and N-benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-p-nitroanilide, both of which are substrates for a typical M75 peptidase, imelysin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The X-ray crystallographic structure of Algp7 was determined at 2.10 A resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. Although a metal-binding motif, HxxE, conserved in zinc ion-dependent M75 peptidases is also found in Algp7, the crystal structure of Algp7 contains no metal even at the motif. The protein consists of two structurally similar up-and-down helical bundles as the basic scaffold. A deep cleft between the bundles is sufficiently large to accommodate macromolecules such as alginate polysaccharide. This is the first structural report on a bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif.

  2. YB-1 binds to CAUC motifs and stimulates exon inclusion by enhancing the recruitment of U2AF to weak polypyrimidine tracts

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Juan; Mu, Shi-Rong; Heiner, Monika; Fu, Xing; Cao, Li-Juan; Gong, Xiu-Feng; Bindereif, Albrecht; Hui, Jingyi

    2012-01-01

    The human Y box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) is a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)/ribonucleic acid (RNA)-binding protein with pleiotropic functions. Besides its roles in the regulation of transcription and translation, several recent studies indicate that YB-1 is a spliceosome-associated protein and is involved in alternative splicing, but the underlying mechanism has remained elusive. Here, we define both CAUC and CACC as high-affinity binding motifs for YB-1 by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) and demonstrate that these newly defined motifs function as splicing enhancers. Interestingly, on the endogenous CD44 gene, YB-1 appears to mediate a network interaction to activate exon v5 inclusion via multiple CAUC motifs in both the alternative exon and its upstream polypyrimidine tract. We provide evidence that YB-1 activates splicing by facilitating the recruitment of U2AF65 to weak polypyrimidine tracts through direct protein–protein interactions. Together, these findings suggest a vital role of YB-1 in activating a subset of weak 3′ splice sites in mammalian cells. PMID:22730292

  3. A unique transactivation sequence motif is found in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the single-strand-binding protein FBP.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, R; Collins, I; Tomonaga, T; Zhang, T; Levens, D

    1996-01-01

    The far-upstream element-binding protein (FBP) is one of several recently described factors which bind to a single strand of DNA in the 5' region of the c-myc gene. Although cotransfection of FBP increases expression from a far-upstream element-bearing c-myc promoter reporter, the mechanism of this stimulation is heretofore unknown. Can a single-strand-binding protein function as a classical transactivator, or are these proteins restricted to stabilizing or altering the conformation of DNA in an architectural role? Using chimeric GAL4-FBP fusion proteins we have shown that the carboxyl-terminal region (residues 448 to 644) is a potent transcriptional activation domain. This region contains three copies of a unique amino acid sequence motif containing tyrosine diads. Analysis of deletion mutants demonstrated that a single tyrosine motif alone (residues 609 to 644) was capable of activating transcription. The activation property of the C-terminal domain is repressed by the N-terminal 107 amino acids of FBP. These results show that FBP contains a transactivation domain which can function alone, suggesting that FBP contributes directly to c-myc transcription while bound to a single-strand site. Furthermore, activation is mediated by a new motif which can be negatively regulated by a repression domain of FBP. PMID:8628294

  4. Use of synthetic peptides to locate novel integrin alpha2beta1-binding motifs in human collagen III.

    PubMed

    Raynal, Nicolas; Hamaia, Samir W; Siljander, Pia R-M; Maddox, Ben; Peachey, Anthony R; Fernandez, Rafael; Foley, Loraine J; Slatter, David A; Jarvis, Gavin E; Farndale, Richard W

    2006-02-17

    A set of 57 synthetic peptides encompassing the entire triplehelical domain of human collagen III was used to locate binding sites for the collagen-binding integrin alpha(2)beta(1). The capacity of the peptides to support Mg(2+)-dependent binding of several integrin preparations was examined. Wild-type integrins (recombinant alpha(2) I-domain, alpha(2)beta(1) purified from platelet membranes, and recombinant soluble alpha(2)beta(1) expressed as an alpha(2)-Fos/beta(1)-Jun heterodimer) bound well to only three peptides, two containing GXX'GER motifs (GROGER and GMOGER, where O is hydroxyproline) and one containing two adjacent GXX'GEN motifs (GLKGEN and GLOGEN). Two mutant alpha(2) I-domains were tested: the inactive T221A mutant, which recognized no peptides, and the constitutively active E318W mutant, which bound a larger subset of peptides. Adhesion of activated human platelets to GER-containing peptides was greater than that of resting platelets, and HT1080 cells bound well to more of the peptides compared with platelets. Binding of cells and recombinant proteins was abolished by anti-alpha(2) monoclonal antibody 6F1 and by chelation of Mg(2+). We describe two novel high affinity integrin-binding motifs in human collagen III (GROGER and GLOGEN) and a third motif (GLKGEN) that displays intermediate activity. Each motif was verified using shorter synthetic peptides. PMID:16326707

  5. Identification of five different Patr class I molecules that bind HLA supertype peptides and definition of their peptide binding motifs.

    PubMed

    McKinney, D M; Erickson, A L; Walker, C M; Thimme, R; Chisari, F V; Sidney, J; Sette, A

    2000-10-15

    We have sequenced the Pan troglodytes class I (Patr) molecules from three common chimpanzees and expressed them as single molecules in a class I-deficient cell line. These lines were utilized to obtain purified class I molecules to define the peptide binding motifs associated with five different Patr molecules. Based on these experiments, as well as analysis of the predicted structure of the B and F polymorphic MHC pockets, we classified five Patr molecules (Patr-A*0101, Patr-B*0901, Patr-B*0701, Patr-A*0602, and Patr-B*1301) within previously defined supertype specificities associated with HLA class I molecules (HLA-A3, -B7, -A1, and -A24 supertypes). The overlap in the binding repertoire between specific HLA and Patr class I molecules was in the range of 33 to 92%, depending on the particular Patr molecule as assessed by the binding of HIV-, hepatitis B virus-, and hepatitis C virus-derived epitopes. Finally, live cell binding assays of nine chimpanzee-derived B cell lines demonstrated that HLA supertype peptides bound to Patr class I molecules with frequencies in the 20-50% range. PMID:11035079

  6. Gentamicin Binds to the Megalin Receptor as a Competitive Inhibitor Using the Common Ligand Binding Motif of Complement Type Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Dagil, Robert; O'Shea, Charlotte; Nykjær, Anders; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2013-01-01

    Gentamicin is an aminoglycoside widely used in treatments of, in particular, enterococcal, mycobacterial, and severe Gram-negative bacterial infections. Large doses of gentamicin cause nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity, entering the cell via the receptor megalin. Until now, no structural information has been available to describe the interaction with gentamicin in atomic detail, and neither have any three-dimensional structures of domains from the human megalin receptor been solved. To address this gap in our knowledge, we have solved the NMR structure of the 10th complement type repeat of human megalin and investigated its interaction with gentamicin. Using NMR titration data in HADDOCK, we have generated a three-dimensional model describing the complex between megalin and gentamicin. Gentamicin binds to megalin with low affinity and exploits the common ligand binding motif previously described (Jensen, G. A., Andersen, O. M., Bonvin, A. M., Bjerrum-Bohr, I., Etzerodt, M., Thogersen, H. C., O'Shea, C., Poulsen, F. M., and Kragelund, B. B. (2006) J. Mol. Biol. 362, 700–716) utilizing the indole side chain of Trp-1126 and the negatively charged residues Asp-1129, Asp-1131, and Asp-1133. Binding to megalin is highly similar to gentamicin binding to calreticulin. We discuss the impact of this novel insight for the future structure-based design of gentamicin antagonists. PMID:23275343

  7. The structure of the translational initiation factor IF1 from E.coli contains an oligomer-binding motif.

    PubMed Central

    Sette, M; van Tilborg, P; Spurio, R; Kaptein, R; Paci, M; Gualerzi, C O; Boelens, R

    1997-01-01

    The structure of the translational initiation factor IF1 from Escherichia coli has been determined with multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Using 1041 distance and 78 dihedral constraints, 40 distance geometry structures were calculated, which were refined by restrained molecular dynamics. From this set, 19 structures were selected, having low constraint energy and few constraint violations. The ensemble of 19 structures displays a root-mean-square deviation versus the average of 0.49 A for the backbone atoms and 1.12 A for all atoms for residues 6-36 and 46-67. The structure of IF1 is characterized by a five-stranded beta-barrel. The loop connecting strands three and four contains a short 3(10) helix but this region shows considerably higher flexibility than the beta-barrel. The fold of IF1 is very similar to that found in the bacterial cold shock proteins CspA and CspB, the N-terminal domain of aspartyl-tRNA synthetase and the staphylococcal nuclease, and can be identified as the oligomer-binding motif. Several proteins of this family are nucleic acid-binding proteins. This suggests that IF1 plays its role in the initiation of protein synthesis by nucleic acid interactions. Specific changes of NMR signals of IF1 upon titration with 30S ribosomal subunit identifies several residues that are involved in the interaction with ribosomes. PMID:9135158

  8. Nucleic Acid i-Motif Structures in Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alba, Joan Josep; Sadurní, Anna; Gargallo, Raimundo

    2016-09-01

    Under the appropriate experimental conditions of pH and temperature, cytosine-rich segments in DNA or RNA sequences may produce a characteristic folded structure known as an i-motif. Besides its potential role in vivo, which is still under investigation, this structure has attracted increasing interest in other fields due to its sharp, fast and reversible pH-driven conformational changes. This "on/off" switch at molecular level is being used in nanotechnology and analytical chemistry to develop nanomachines and sensors, respectively. This paper presents a review of the latest applications of this structure in the field of chemical analysis. PMID:26939549

  9. Differential display detects host nucleic acid motifs altered in scrapie-infected brain.

    PubMed

    Lathe, Richard; Harris, Alyson

    2009-09-25

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) including scrapie have been attributed to an infectious protein or prion. Infectivity is allied to conversion of the endogenous nucleic-acid-binding protein PrP to an infectious modified form known as PrP(sc). The protein-only theory does not easily explain the enigmatic properties of the agent including strain variation. It was previously suggested that a short nucleic acid, perhaps host-encoded, might contribute to the pathoetiology of the TSEs. No candidate host molecules that might explain transmission of strain differences have yet been put forward. Differential display is a robust technique for detecting nucleic acid differences between two populations. We applied this technique to total nucleic acid preparations from scrapie-infected and control brain. Independent RNA preparations from eight normal and eight scrapie-infected (strain 263K) hamster brains were randomly amplified and visualized in parallel. Though the nucleic acid patterns were generally identical in scrapie-infected versus control brain, some rare bands were differentially displayed. Molecular species consistently overrepresented (or underrepresented) in all eight infected brain samples versus all eight controls were excised from the display, sequenced, and assembled into contigs. Only seven ros contigs (RNAs over- or underrepresented in scrapie) emerged, representing <4 kb from the transcriptome. All contained highly stable regions of secondary structure. The most abundant scrapie-only ros sequence was homologous to a repetitive transposable element (LINE; long interspersed nuclear element). Other ros sequences identified cellular RNA 7SL, clathrin heavy chain, visinin-like protein-1, and three highly specific subregions of ribosomal RNA (ros1-3). The ribosomal ros sequences accurately corresponded to LINE; retrotransposon insertion sites in ribosomal DNA (p<0.01). These differential motifs implicate specific host RNAs in the pathoetiology

  10. Export of malaria proteins requires co-translational processing of the PEXEL motif independent of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate binding

    PubMed Central

    Boddey, Justin A.; O'Neill, Matthew T.; Lopaticki, Sash; Carvalho, Teresa G.; Hodder, Anthony N.; Nebl, Thomas; Wawra, Stephan; van West, Pieter; Ebrahimzadeh, Zeinab; Richard, Dave; Flemming, Sven; Spielmann, Tobias; Przyborski, Jude; Babon, Jeff J.; Cowman, Alan F.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins into erythrocytes using the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL) motif, which is cleaved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by plasmepsin V (PMV). A recent study reported that phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) concentrated in the ER binds to PEXEL motifs and is required for export independent of PMV, and that PEXEL motifs are functionally interchangeable with RxLR motifs of oomycete effectors. Here we show that the PEXEL does not bind PI(3)P, and that this lipid is not concentrated in the ER. We find that RxLR motifs cannot mediate export in P. falciparum. Parasites expressing a mutated version of KAHRP, with the PEXEL motif repositioned near the signal sequence, prevented PMV cleavage. This mutant possessed the putative PI(3)P-binding residues but is not exported. Reinstatement of PEXEL to its original location restores processing by PMV and export. These results challenge the PI(3)P hypothesis and provide evidence that PEXEL position is conserved for co-translational processing and export. PMID:26832821

  11. Export of malaria proteins requires co-translational processing of the PEXEL motif independent of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Boddey, Justin A; O'Neill, Matthew T; Lopaticki, Sash; Carvalho, Teresa G; Hodder, Anthony N; Nebl, Thomas; Wawra, Stephan; van West, Pieter; Ebrahimzadeh, Zeinab; Richard, Dave; Flemming, Sven; Spielmann, Tobias; Przyborski, Jude; Babon, Jeff J; Cowman, Alan F

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins into erythrocytes using the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL) motif, which is cleaved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by plasmepsin V (PMV). A recent study reported that phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) concentrated in the ER binds to PEXEL motifs and is required for export independent of PMV, and that PEXEL motifs are functionally interchangeable with RxLR motifs of oomycete effectors. Here we show that the PEXEL does not bind PI(3)P, and that this lipid is not concentrated in the ER. We find that RxLR motifs cannot mediate export in P. falciparum. Parasites expressing a mutated version of KAHRP, with the PEXEL motif repositioned near the signal sequence, prevented PMV cleavage. This mutant possessed the putative PI(3)P-binding residues but is not exported. Reinstatement of PEXEL to its original location restores processing by PMV and export. These results challenge the PI(3)P hypothesis and provide evidence that PEXEL position is conserved for co-translational processing and export. PMID:26832821

  12. Interaction of the Spo20 Membrane-Sensor Motif with Phosphatidic Acid and Other Anionic Lipids, and Influence of the Membrane Environment

    PubMed Central

    Horchani, Habib; de Saint-Jean, Maud; Barelli, Hélène; Antonny, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The yeast protein Spo20 contains a regulatory amphipathic motif that has been suggested to recognize phosphatidic acid, a lipid involved in signal transduction, lipid metabolism and membrane fusion. We have investigated the interaction of the Spo20 amphipathic motif with lipid membranes using a bioprobe strategy that consists in appending this motif to the end of a long coiled-coil, which can be coupled to a GFP reporter for visualization in cells. The resulting construct is amenable to in vitro and in vivo experiments and allows unbiased comparison between amphipathic helices of different chemistry. In vitro, the Spo20 bioprobe responded to small variations in the amount of phosphatidic acid. However, this response was not specific. The membrane binding of the probe depended on the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine and also integrated the contribution of other anionic lipids, including phosphatidylserine and phosphatidyl-inositol-(4,5)bisphosphate. Inverting the sequence of the Spo20 motif neither affected the ability of the probe to interact with anionic liposomes nor did it modify its cellular localization, making a stereo-specific mode of phosphatidic acid recognition unlikely. Nevertheless, the lipid binding properties and the cellular localization of the Spo20 alpha-helix differed markedly from that of another amphipathic motif, Amphipathic Lipid Packing Sensor (ALPS), suggesting that even in the absence of stereo specific interactions, amphipathic helices can act as subcellular membrane targeting determinants in a cellular context. PMID:25426975

  13. Mutation of the Zinc-Binding Metalloprotease Motif Affects Bacteroides fragilis Toxin Activity but Does Not Affect Propeptide Processing

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Augusto A.; Buckwold, Simy L.; Shin, Jai W.; Ascon, Miguel; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the zinc-binding metalloprotease in Bacteroides fragilis toxin (BFT) processing and activity, the zinc-binding consensus sequences (H348, E349, H352, G355, H358, and M366) were mutated by site-directed-mutagenesis. Our results indicated that single point mutations in the zinc-binding metalloprotease motif do not affect BFT processing but do reduce or eliminate BFT biologic activity in vitro. PMID:16041055

  14. Rim1 and rabphilin-3 bind Rab3-GTP by composite determinants partially related through N-terminal alpha -helix motifs.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Hu, B; Zimmermann, B; Kilimann, M W

    2001-08-31

    Rim1 is a protein of the presynaptic active zone, the area of the plasma membrane specialized for neurotransmitter exocytosis, and interacts with Rab3, a small GTPase implicated in neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics. Here, we have studied the molecular determinants of Rim1 that are responsible for Rab3 binding, employing surface plasmon resonance and recombinant, bacterially expressed Rab3 and Rim1 proteins. A site that binds GTP- but not GDP-saturated Rab3 was localized to a short alpha-helical sequence near the Rim1 N terminus (amino acids 19-55). Rab3 isoforms A, C, and D were bound with similar affinities (K(d) = 1-2 microm). Low affinity binding of Rab6A-GTP was also observed (K(d) = 16 microm), whereas Rab1B, -5, -7, -8, or -11A did not bind. Adjacent sequences up to amino acid 387, encompassing differentially spliced sequences, the zinc finger module, and the SGAWFF motif of Rim1, did not significantly contribute to the strength or the specificity of Rab3 binding, whereas a point mutation within the helix (R33G) abolished binding. This Rab3 binding site of Rim1 is reminiscent of the N-terminal alpha-helix that is part of the Rab3-binding region of rabphilin-3, and indeed we observed low affinity, specific binding of Rab3A (K(d) on the order of magnitude of 10-100 microm) to this region of rabphilin-3 alone (amino acids 40-88), whereas additional sequences up to amino acid 178 are needed for high affinity Rab3A binding to rabphilin-3 (K(d) = 10-20 nm). In contrast, an N-terminal alpha-helix motif in aczonin, with sequence similarity to the Rab3-binding site of Rim1, did not bind Rab3A, -C, or -D or several other Rab proteins. These results were qualitatively confirmed in pull-down experiments with native, prenylated Rab3 from brain lysate in Triton X-100. Munc13 bound to the zinc finger domain of Rim1 but not to the rabphilin-3 or aczonin zinc fingers. Pull-down experiments from brain lysate in the presence of cholate as detergent detected binding to

  15. Hydrogen bonding motifs of protein side chains: descriptions of binding of arginine and amide groups.

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, L.; Glusker, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    The modes of hydrogen bonding of arginine, asparagine, and glutamine side chains and of urea have been examined in small-molecule crystal structures in the Cambridge Structural Database and in crystal structures of protein-nucleic acid and protein-protein complexes. Analysis of the hydrogen bonding patterns of each by graph-set theory shows three patterns of rings (R) with one or two hydrogen bond acceptors and two donors and with eight, nine, or six atoms in the ring, designated R2(2)(8), R2(2)(9), and R1(2)(6). These three patterns are found for arginine-like groups and for urea, whereas only the first two patterns R2(2)(8) and R2(2)(9) are found for asparagine- and glutamine-like groups. In each case, the entire system is planar within 0.7 A or less. On the other hand, in macromolecular crystal structures, the hydrogen bonding patterns in protein-nucleic acid complexes between the nucleic acid base and the protein are all R2(2)(9), whereas hydrogen bonding between Watson-Crick-like pairs of nucleic acid bases is R2(2)(8). These two hydrogen bonding arrangements [R2(2)(9)] and R2(2)(8)] are predetermined by the nature of the groups available for hydrogen bonding. The third motif identified, R1(2)(6), involves hydrogen bonds that are less linear than in the other two motifs and is found in proteins. PMID:7773178

  16. Identification of a Novel Inhibitory Actin-capping Protein Binding Motif in CD2-associated Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Bruck, Serawit; Huber, Tobias B.; Ingham, Robert J.; Kim, Kyoungtae; Niederstrasser, Hanspeter; Allen, Paul M.; Pawson, Tony; Cooper, John A.; Shaw, Andrey S.

    2008-01-01

    CD2-associated protein (CD2AP) is a scaffold molecule that plays a critical role in the maintenance of the kidney filtration barrier. Little, however, is understood about its mechanism of function. We used mass spectrometry to identify CD2AP-interacting proteins. Many of the proteins that we identified suggest a role for CD2AP in endocytosis and actin regulation. To address the role of CD2AP in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, we focused on characterizing the interaction of CD2AP with actin-capping protein CP. We identified a novel binding motif LXHXTXXRPK(X)6P present in CD2AP that is also found in its homolog Cin85 and other capping protein-associated proteins such as CARMIL and CKIP-1. CD2AP inhibits the function of capping protein in vitro. Therefore, our results support a role of CD2AP in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:16707503

  17. rab GTP-binding proteins with three different carboxyl-terminal cysteine motifs are modified in vivo by 20-carbon isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, B T; Maltese, W A

    1992-02-25

    p21ras and several other ras-related GTP-binding proteins are modified post-translationally by addition of 15-carbon farnesyl or 20-carbon geranylgeranyl isoprenoids to cysteines within a conserved carboxyl-terminal sequence motif, Caa(M/S/L), where a is an aliphatic amino acid. Proteins ending with M or S are substrates for farnesyltransferase, whereas those ending with L are modified preferentially by geranylgeranyltransferase. We recently reported that GTP-binding proteins encoded by rab1B (GGCC), rab2 (GGCC), and rab5 (CCSN) are modified by 20-carbon isoprenyl derivatives of [3H]mevalonate when translated in vitro, despite having carboxyl-terminal sequences distinct from the Caa(M/S/L) motif. We now show that these proteins function as specific acceptors for geranylgeranyl in vitro and are modified by 20-carbon isoprenyl groups in COS cells metabolically labeled with [3H]mevalonate. Proteins encoded by rab4 and rab6, with yet another distinct carboxyl-terminal motif (xCxC), are similarly modified by 20-carbon isoprenoids in vitro and in vivo. The geranylgeranyl modification of rab5 protein (CCSN) is catalyzed by an enzyme in brain cytosol but not by a purified geranylgeranyltransferase that modifies GTP-binding proteins with the CaaL motif. Unlike the prenylation of proteins with Caa(M/S/L) termini, the prenylation of rab5 protein is not inhibited by a synthetic peptide based on its carboxyl-terminal sequence (TRNQCCSN). When cellular isoprenoid synthesis is blocked by treatment of cells with lovastatin, rab proteins that are normally localized in membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and endosomes accumulate in the cytosol. This change in rab protein localization is reversed by providing cells with mevalonate. These findings suggest that geranylgeranyl modification underlies the ability of rab GTP-binding proteins to associate with intracellular membranes, where they are postulated to function as mediators of vesicular traffic. PMID:1740442

  18. The ABBA motif binds APC/C activators and is shared by APC/C substrates and regulators

    PubMed Central

    Hagting, Anja; Izawa, Daisuke; Mansfeld, Jörg; Gibson, Toby J.; Pines, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    The APC/C is the ubiquitin ligase that regulates mitosis by targeting specific proteins for degradation at specific times under the control of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC). How the APC/C recognises its different substrates is a key problem in the control of cell division. Here, we have identified the ABBA motif in Cyclin A, BUBR1, BUB1 and Acm1, and show that it binds to the APC/C co-activator CDC20. The ABBA motif in Cyclin A is required for its proper degradation in prometaphase through competing with BUBR1 for the same site on CDC20. Moreover, the ABBA motifs in BUBR1 and BUB1 are necessary for the SAC to work at full strength and to recruit CDC20 to kinetochores. Thus, we have identified a conserved motif integral to the proper control of mitosis that connects APC/C substrate recognition with the SAC. PMID:25669885

  19. The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN protein is able to specifically bind DNA through its single Cys2–His2 zinc finger motif

    PubMed Central

    Dathan, Nina; Zaccaro, Laura; Esposito, Sabrina; Isernia, Carla; Omichinski, James G.; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Carlo; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Fattorusso, Roberto; Pedone, Paolo V.

    2002-01-01

    The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) gene has been shown to be important in maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels, and is presumed to act by regulating cell proliferation. In this work, we show that the SUP protein, which contains a single Cys2–His2 zinc finger domain including the QALGGH sequence, highly conserved in the plant zinc finger proteins, binds DNA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was determined that the minimal domain required for specific DNA binding (residues 15–78) includes the single zinc finger and two basic regions located on either side of this motif. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions in the zinc finger or in the basic regions, including a mutation that knocks out the function of the SUP protein in vivo (glycine 63 to aspartate), have been found to abolish the activity of the SUP DNA-binding domain. These results strongly suggest that the SUP protein functions in vivo by acting as a DNA-binding protein, likely involved in transcriptional regulation. The association of both an N-terminal and a C-terminal basic region with a single Cys2–His2 zinc finger represents a novel DNA-binding motif suggesting that the mechanism of DNA recognition adopted by the SUP protein is different from that described so far in other zinc finger proteins. PMID:12433998

  20. Identification of the Raptor-binding motif on Arabidopsis S6 kinase and its use as a TOR signaling suppressor.

    PubMed

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Hur, Yoon-Sun; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2016-03-25

    TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase signaling plays central role as a regulator of growth and proliferation in all eukaryotic cells and its key signaling components and effectors are also conserved in plants. Unlike the mammalian and yeast counterparts, however, we found through yeast two-hybrid analysis that multiple regions of the Arabidopsis Raptor (regulatory associated protein of TOR) are required for binding to its substrate. We also identified that a 44-amino acid region at the N-terminal end of Arabidopsis ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) specifically interacted with AtRaptor1, indicating that this region may contain a functional equivalent of the TOS (TOR-Signaling) motif present in the mammalian TOR substrates. Transient over-expression of this 44-amino acid fragment in Arabidopsis protoplasts resulted in significant decrease in rDNA transcription, demonstrating a feasibility of developing a new plant-specific TOR signaling inhibitor based upon perturbation of the Raptor-substrate interaction. PMID:26920057

  1. Exploring water binding motifs to an excess electron via X2(-)(H2O) [X = O, F].

    PubMed

    Chiou, Mong-Feng; Sheu, Wen-Shyan

    2012-07-26

    X(2)(-)(H(2)O) [X = O, F] is utilized to explore water binding motifs to an excess electron via ab initio calculations at the MP4(SDQ)/aug-cc-pVDZ + diffs(2s2p,2s2p) level of theory. X(2)(-)(H(2)O) can be regarded as a water molecule that binds to an excess electron, the distribution of which is gauged by X(2). By varying the interatomic distance of X(2), r(X1-X2), the distribution of the excess electron is altered, and the water binding motifs to the excess electron is then examined. Depending on r(X1-X2), both binding motifs of C(s) and C(2v) forms are found with a critical distance of ∼1.37 Å and ∼1.71 Å for O(2)(-)(H(2)O) and F(2)(-)(H(2)O), respectively. The energetic and geometrical features of O(2)(-)(H(2)O) and F(2)(-)(H(2)O) are compared. In addition, various electronic properties of X(2)(-)(H(2)O) are examined. For both O(2)(-)(H(2)O) and F(2)(-)(H(2)O), the C(s) binding motif appears to prevail at a compact distribution of the excess electron. However, when the electron is diffuse, characterized by the radius of gyration in the direction of the X(2) bond axis with a threshold of ∼0.84 Å, the C(2v) binding motif is formed. PMID:22762788

  2. Identification of an Electrostatic Ruler Motif for Sequence-Specific Binding of Collagenase to Collagen.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sundar Raman; Singam, Ettayapuram Ramaprasad Azhagiya; Berinski, Michael; Subramanian, Venkatesan; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-08-25

    Sequence-specific cleavage of collagen by mammalian collagenase plays a pivotal role in cell function. Collagenases are matrix metalloproteinases that cleave the peptide bond at a specific position on fibrillar collagen. The collagenase Hemopexin-like (HPX) domain has been proposed to be responsible for substrate recognition, but the mechanism by which collagenases identify the cleavage site on fibrillar collagen is not clearly understood. In this study, Brownian dynamics simulations coupled with atomic-detail and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations were performed to dock matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) on a collagen IIIα1 triple helical peptide. We find that the HPX domain recognizes the collagen triple helix at a conserved R-X11-R motif C-terminal to the cleavage site to which the HPX domain of collagen is guided electrostatically. The binding of the HPX domain between the two arginine residues is energetically stabilized by hydrophobic contacts with collagen. From the simulations and analysis of the sequences and structural flexibility of collagen and collagenase, a mechanistic scheme by which MMP-1 can recognize and bind collagen for proteolysis is proposed. PMID:27245212

  3. Retroposition and evolution of the DNA-binding motifs of YY1, YY2 and REX1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Do; Faulk, Christopher; Kim, Joomyeong

    2007-01-01

    YY1 is a DNA-binding transcription factor found in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Database searches identified 62 YY1 related sequences from all the available genome sequences ranging from flying insects to human. These sequences are characterized by high levels of sequence conservation, ranging from 66% to 100% similarity, in the zinc finger DNA-binding domain of the predicted proteins. Phylogenetic analyses uncovered duplication events of YY1 in several different lineages, including flies, fish and mammals. Retroposition is responsible for generating one duplicate in flies, PHOL from PHO, and two duplicates in placental mammals, YY2 and Reduced Expression 1 (REX1) from YY1. DNA-binding motif studies have demonstrated that YY2 still binds to the same consensus sequence as YY1 but with much lower affinity. In contrast, REX1 binds to DNA motifs divergent from YY1, but the binding motifs of REX1 and YY1 share some similarity at their core regions (5'-CCAT-3'). This suggests that the two duplicates, YY2 and REX1, although generated through similar retroposition events have undergone different selection schemes to adapt to new roles in placental mammals. Overall, the conservation of YY2 and REX1 in all placental mammals predicts that each duplicate has co-evolved with some unique features of eutherian mammals. PMID:17478514

  4. GIT1 Paxillin-binding Domain Is a Four-helix Bundle, and It Binds to Both Paxillin LD2 and LD4 Motifs*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ziwei M.; Simmerman, Joseph A.; Guibao, Cristina D.; Zheng, Jie J.

    2008-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting protein 1 (GIT1) is a multidomain protein that plays an important role in cell adhesion, motility, cytoskeletal remodeling, and membrane trafficking. GIT1 mediates the localization of the p21-activated kinase (PAK) and PAK-interactive exchange factor to focal adhesions, and its activation is regulated by the interaction between its C-terminal paxillin-binding domain (PBD) and the LD motifs of paxillin. In this study, we determined the solution structure of rat GIT1 PBD by NMR spectroscopy. The PBD folds into a four-helix bundle, which is structurally similar to the focal adhesion targeting and vinculin tail domains. Previous studies showed that GIT1 interacts with paxillin through the LD4 motif. Here, we demonstrated that in addition to the LD4 motif, the GIT1 PBD can also bind to the paxillin LD2 motif, and both LD2 and LD4 motifs competitively target the same site on the PBD surface. We also revealed that paxillin Ser272 phosphorylation does not influence GIT1 PBD binding in vitro. These results are in agreement with the notion that phosphorylation of paxillin Ser272 plays an essential role in regulating focal adhesion turnover. PMID:18448431

  5. Novel amino acids: synthesis of furoxan and sydnonimine containing amino acids and peptides as potential nitric oxide releasing motifs.

    PubMed

    Nortcliffe, Andrew; Botting, Nigel P; O'Hagan, David

    2013-07-28

    The incorporation of furoxan and sydnonimine ring systems into amino acid side chains is demonstrated with the preparation of four novel amino acids which carry these nitric oxide-releasing motifs. N-((4-Nitrophenoxy)carbonyl)-3-phenylsydnonimine 9 and bis(phenylsulfonyl)furoxan 10 are the key intermediates for introducing the heterocycle side chains onto appropriate amine and alcohol functionalities respectively. Furoxan 5 and 7 both displayed NO release based on determination of nitrite production. Orthogonal amino acid protecting group strategies were deployed to demonstrate that the amino acids could be incorporated into peptide frameworks. By way of demonstration the amino acids were placed centrally into several tripeptide motifs. Griess test assays showed that these amino acids released NO in the presence of γ-glutathione (GST). PMID:23753002

  6. Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effect of global regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Leuze, Michael Rex; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Syed, Mustafa H; Beliaev, Alexander S; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TFs) that influence the expression of many genes. Global regulators, including CRP (cAMP Receptor Protein), ArcA, and FNR, can modulate the transcriptional activity of multiple operons. The similarity of a regulatory element s sequence to a TF s consensus binding site (BS) and the position of the regulatory element in an operon promoter are considered the most important determinants of this TF s regulatory influence. In this study we explore the hypothesis that the number of TFBS half-sites (where a half-site is one half of the palindromic BS consensus sequence, which we shall refer to as a binding motif or a BM) of a global regulator in an operon s promoter plays an important role in the operon s transcriptional regulation. We examine empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP regulon in Shewanella oneidenses MR 1 and Escherichia coli, and of the ArcA regulon in S. oneidenses MR 1. We compare the power of CRP BM counts and of full, symmetrical CRP TFBS characteristics, namely similarity to consensus and location, to predict CRP-induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full-length TFBS quality or location. Regression analysis indicates that IHF (Integration Host Factor) and ArcA have synergistic effects on CRP-induced gene transcription, positive and negative, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that the fine-tuning of bacterial transcriptional activity by CRP may involves not only the bending of the operon promoter, facilitated by CRP in cooperation with the histone-like protein IHF, but also the cumulative binding affinity of multiple weak BMs.

  7. Contribution of Transcription Factor Binding Site Motif Variants to Condition-Specific Gene Expression Patterns in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rest, Joshua S.; Bullaughey, Kevin; Morris, Geoffrey P.; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    It is now experimentally well known that variant sequences of a cis transcription factor binding site motif can contribute to differential regulation of genes. We characterize the relationship between motif variants and gene expression by analyzing expression microarray data and binding site predictions. To accomplish this, we statistically detect motif variants with effects that differ among environments. Such environmental specificity may be due to either affinity differences between variants or, more likely, differential interactions of TFs bound to these variants with cofactors, and with differential presence of cofactors across environments. We examine conservation of functional variants across four Saccharomyces species, and find that about a third of transcription factors have target genes that are differentially expressed in a condition-specific manner that is correlated with the nucleotide at variant motif positions. We find good correspondence between our results and some cases in the experimental literature (Reb1, Sum1, Mcm1, and Rap1). These results and growing consensus in the literature indicates that motif variants may often be functionally distinct, that this may be observed in genomic data, and that variants play an important role in condition-specific gene regulation. PMID:22384202

  8. Actin binding and proline rich motifs of CR16 play redundant role in growth of vrp1Delta cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lei; Rajmohan, Rajamuthiah; Yu, Shangjuan; Thanabalu, Thirumaran

    2007-05-25

    CR16, (Glucocorticoid-regulated) belongs to the verprolin family of proteins which are characterized by the presence of a V domain (verprolin) at the N-terminal. Expression of CR16 suppressed the growth and endocytosis defect of vrp1Delta strain without correcting the actin patch polarization defect. The V domain of CR16 is critical for suppression of the growth defect of vrp1Delta strain but not for localisation to cortical actin patches. Mutations in the actin binding motif alone did not abolish the activity of CR16 but the mutations in combination with deletion of N-terminal proline rich motif abolished the ability of CR16 to suppress the growth defect. This suggests that the V domain of CR16 has two functionally redundant motifs and either one of these motifs is sufficient for suppressing the growth defect of vrp1Delta strain. This is in contrast to the observation that both WIP and WIRE require the actin binding motif for their activity. PMID:17418095

  9. The evolution of substrate specificity-associated residues and Ca(2+) -binding motifs in EF-hand-containing type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Hao, Meng-Shu; Rasmusson, Allan G

    2016-07-01

    Most eukaryotic organisms, except some animal clades, have mitochondrial alternative electron transport enzymes that allow respiration to bypass the energy coupling in oxidative phosphorylation. The energy bypass enzymes in plants include the external type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases (DHs) of the NDB family, which are characterized by an EF-hand domain for Ca(2+) binding. Here we investigate these plant enzymes by combining molecular modeling with evolutionary analysis. Molecular modeling of the Arabidopsis thaliana AtNDB1 with the yeast ScNDI1 as template revealed distinct similarities in the core catalytic parts, and highlighted the interaction between the pyridine nucleotide and residues correlating with NAD(P)H substrate specificity. The EF-hand domain of AtNDB1 has no counterpart in ScNDI1, and was instead modeled with Ca(2+) -binding signal transducer proteins. Combined models displayed a proximity of the AtNDB1 EF-hand domain to the substrate entrance side of the catalytic part. Evolutionary analysis of the eukaryotic NDB-type proteins revealed ancient and recent reversions between the motif observed in proteins specific for NADH (acidic type) and NADPH (non-acidic type), and that the clade of enzymes with acidic motifs in angiosperms derives from non-acidic-motif NDB-type proteins present in basal plants, fungi and protists. The results suggest that Ca(2+) -dependent external NADPH oxidation is an ancient process, indicating that it has a fundamental importance for eukaryotic cellular redox metabolism. In contrast, the external NADH DHs in plants are products of a recent expansion, mirroring the expansion of the alternative oxidase family. PMID:27079180

  10. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits constitutively active YAP (5SA)-induced oncogenic cell transformation. •The PDZ-binding motif of YAP promotes its nuclear localization in cultured cells and mouse liver. •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF transcription in cultured cells and mouse liver. -- Abstract: YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP’s functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP’s co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription.

  11. The conserved helicase motifs of the herpes simplex virus type 1 origin-binding protein UL9 are important for function.

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, R; Shao, L; Weller, S K

    1992-01-01

    The UL9 gene of herpes simplex virus encodes a protein that specifically recognizes sequences within the viral origins of replication and exhibits helicase and DNA-dependent ATPase activities. The specific DNA binding domain of the UL9 protein was localized to the carboxy-terminal one-third of the molecule (H. M. Weir, J. M. Calder, and N. D. Stow, Nucleic Acids Res. 17:1409-1425, 1989). The N-terminal two-thirds of the UL9 gene contains six sequence motifs found in all members of a superfamily of DNA and RNA helicases, suggesting that this region may be important for helicase activity of UL9. In this report, we examined the functional significance of these six motifs for the UL9 protein through the introduction of site-specific mutations resulting in single amino acid substitutions of the most highly conserved residues within each motif. An in vivo complementation test was used to study the effect of each mutation on the function of the UL9 protein in viral DNA replication. In this assay, a mutant UL9 protein expressed from a transfected plasmid is used to complement a replication-deficient null mutant in the UL9 gene for the amplification of herpes simplex virus origin-containing plasmids. Mutations in five of the six conserved motifs inactivated the function of the UL9 protein in viral DNA replication, providing direct evidence for the importance of these conserved motifs. Insertion mutants resulting in the introduction of two alanines at 100-residue intervals in regions outside the conserved motifs were also constructed. Three of the insertion mutations were tolerated, whereas the other five abolished UL9 function. These data indicate that other regions of the protein, in addition to the helicase motifs, are important for function in vivo. Several mutations result in instability of the mutant products, presumably because of conformational changes in the protein. Taken together, these results suggest that UL9 is very sensitive to mutations with respect to both

  12. Novel porphyrin-daunomycin hybrids: Synthesis and preferential binding to G-quadruplexes over i-motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ping; Jin, Shu-fang; Lu, Jia-Zheng; Lv, Jun-liang; Wu, Gong-qing; Chen, Pan-Pan; Tan, Cai-Lian; Chen, Dian-Wen

    2015-02-01

    Encouraged by the enormous importance attributed to the structure and function of human telomeric DNA, herein we focused our attention on the interaction of a serious of newly prepared porphyrin-daunomycin (Por-DNR) hybrids with the guanine-rich single-strand oligomer (G4) and the complementary cytosine-rich strand (i-motif). Various spectral methods such as absorption and fluorescence titration, surface-enhanced Raman and circular dichroism spectrum were integrated in the experiment and it was found that these Por-DNR hybrids could serve as prominent molecules to recognize G4 and i-motif. What is more, interesting results were obtained that the hybrids with longer flexible links are more favorable in binding with both G4 and i-motif than the hybrid with shorter linkage. These Por-DNR hybrids may help to develop new ideas in the research of human telomeric DNA with small molecules.

  13. A non-canonical DNA structure is a binding motif for the transcription factor SP1 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Raiber, Eun-Ang; Kranaster, Ramon; Lam, Enid; Nikan, Mehran; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2012-01-01

    SP1 is a ubiquitous transcription factor that is involved in the regulation of various house-keeping genes. It is known that it acts by binding to a double-stranded consensus motif. Here, we have discovered that SP1 binds also to a non-canonical DNA structure, a G-quadruplex, with high affinity. In particular, we have studied the SP1 binding site within the promoter region of the c-KIT oncogene and found that this site can fold into an anti-parallel two-tetrad G-quadruplex. SP1 pull-down experiments from cellular extracts, together with biophysical binding assays revealed that SP1 has a comparable binding affinity for this G-quadruplex structure and the canonical SP1 duplex sequence. Using SP1 ChIP-on-chip data sets, we have also found that 87% of SP1 binding sites overlap with G-quadruplex forming sequences. Furthermore, while many of these immuoprecipitated sequences (36%) even lack the minimal SP1 consensus motif, 5′-GGGCGG-3′, we have shown that 77% of them are putative G-quadruplexes. Collectively, these data suggest that SP1 is able to bind both, canonical SP1 duplex DNA as well as G-quadruplex structures in vitro and we hypothesize that both types of interactions may occur in cells. PMID:22021377

  14. Frequency Patterns of T-Cell Exposed Amino Acid Motifs in Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Peptides Presented by MHCs.

    PubMed

    Bremel, Robert D; Homan, E Jane

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are highly diverse protein sequences that are processed and presented to T-cells by B-cells and other antigen presenting cells. We examined a large dataset of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable regions (IGHV) to assess the diversity of T-cell exposed motifs (TCEMs). TCEM comprise those amino acids in a MHC-bound peptide, which face outwards, surrounded by the MHC histotope, and which engage the T-cell receptor. Within IGHV there is a distinct pattern of predicted MHC class II binding and a very high frequency of re-use of the TCEMs. The re-use frequency indicates that only a limited number of different cognate T-cells are required to engage many different clonal B-cells. The amino acids in each outward-facing TCEM are intercalated with the amino acids of inward-facing MHC groove-exposed motifs (GEM). Different GEM may have differing, allele-specific, MHC binding affinities. The intercalation of TCEM and GEM in a peptide allows for a vast combinatorial repertoire of epitopes, each eliciting a different response. Outcome of T-cell receptor binding is determined by overall signal strength, which is a function of the number of responding T-cells and the duration of engagement. Hence, the frequency of TCEM re-use appears to be an important determinant of whether a T-cell response is stimulatory or suppressive. The frequency distribution of TCEMs implies that somatic hypermutation is followed by T-cell clonal expansion that develops along repeated pathways. The observations of TCEM and GEM derived from immunoglobulins suggest a relatively simple, yet powerful, mechanism to correlate T-cell polyspecificity, through re-use of TCEMs, with a very high degree of specificity achieved by combination with a diversity of GEMs. The frequency profile of TCEMs also points to an economical mechanism for maintaining T-cell memory, recall, and self-discrimination based on an endogenously generated profile of motifs. PMID:25389426

  15. Mutations in the nucleotide binding domain 1 signature motif region rescue processing and functional defects of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator delta f508.

    PubMed

    DeCarvalho, Ana C V; Gansheroff, Lisa J; Teem, John L

    2002-09-27

    The gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a phosphorylation- and nucleotide-regulated chloride channel, is mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Deletion of a phenylalanine at amino acid position 508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) is the most prevalent CF-causing mutation and results in defective protein processing and reduced CFTR function, leading to chloride impermeability in CF epithelia and heterologous systems. Using a STE6/CFTRDeltaF508 chimera system in yeast, we isolated two novel DeltaF508 revertant mutations, I539T and G550E, proximal to and within the conserved ABC signature motif of NBD1, respectively. Western blot and functional analysis in mammalian cells indicate that mutations I539T and G550E each partially rescue the CFTRDeltaF508 defect. Furthermore, a combination of both revertant mutations resulted in a 38-fold increase in CFTRDeltaF508-mediated chloride current, representing 29% of wild type channel activity. The G550E mutation increased the sensitivity of CFTRDeltaF508 and wild type CFTR to activation by cAMP agonists and blocked the enhancement of CFTRDeltaF508 channel activity by 2 mm 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. The data show that the DeltaF508 defect can be significantly rescued by second-site mutations in the nucleotide binding domain 1 region, that includes the LSGGQ consensus motif. PMID:12110684

  16. Sites for Phosphates and Iron-Sulfur Thiolates in the First Membranes: 3 to 6 Residue Anion-Binding Motifs (Nests)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner-White, E. James; Russell, Michael J.

    2005-02-01

    Nests are common three to six amino acid residue motifs in proteins where successive main chain NH groups bind anionic atoms or groups. On average 8% of residues in proteins belong to nests. Nests form a key part of a number of phosphate binding sites, notably the P-loop, which is the commonest of the binding sites for the phosphates of ATP and GTP. They also occur regularly in sites that bind [Fe2S2](RS)4 [Fe3S4](RS)3 and [Fe4S4](RS)4 iron-sulfur centers, which are also anionic groups. Both phosphates and iron-sulfur complexes would have occurred in the precipitates within hydrothermal vents of moderate temperature as key components of the earliest metabolism and it is likely existing organisms emerging in this milieu would have benefited from evolving molecules binding such anions. The nest conformation is favored by high proportions of glycine residues and there is evidence for glycine being the commonest amino acid during the stage of evolution when proteins were evolving so it is likely nests would have been common features in peptides occupying the membranes at the dawn of life.

  17. Genomic Analysis Identifies a Transcription Factor Binding Motif Regulating Expression of the Alpha C Protein in Group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Klinzing, David C.; Madoff, Lawrence C.; Puopolo, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    The virulence-associated alpha C protein (ACP) of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) facilitates the bacterial interaction with host epithelial cells. We previously demonstrated that phase-variable expression of ACP is controlled by variation in short-sequence repeat sequences present upstream of the promoter of bca, the gene encoding ACP. To determine if trans-acting transcriptional control also influences ACP expression, we developed an in silico prediction algorithm that identified a potential transcription-factor binding motif (TTT-N6-ATAT) in the bca upstream region. In vitro reporter gene expression studies confirmed that this motif is required for full ACP expression, and DNA-binding assays with a GBS protein extract demonstrated that the predicted site is bound by a protein. This approach demonstrates the utility of in silico genomic predictive methods in the study of GBS regulatory mechanisms. PMID:19328843

  18. Rate Motifs Tune Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid Degradation Dynamics1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Britney L.; Mao, Haibin; Guseman, Jessica M.; Hinds, Thomas R.; Hellmuth, Antje; Kovenock, Marlies; Noorassa, Anisa; Lanctot, Amy; Villalobos, Luz Irina A. Calderón; Zheng, Ning; Nemhauser, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is a common feature in diverse plant cell signaling pathways; however, the factors that control the dynamics of regulated protein turnover are largely unknown. One of the best-characterized families of E3 ubiquitin ligases facilitates ubiquitination of auxin (aux)/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) repressor proteins in the presence of auxin. Rates of auxin-induced degradation vary widely within the Aux/IAA family, and sequences outside of the characterized degron (the minimum region required for auxin-induced degradation) can accelerate or decelerate degradation. We have used synthetic auxin degradation assays in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in plants to characterize motifs flanking the degron that contribute to tuning the dynamics of Aux/IAA degradation. The presence of these rate motifs is conserved in phylogenetically distant members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Aux/IAA family, as well as in their putative Brassica rapa orthologs. We found that rate motifs can act by enhancing interaction between repressors and the E3, but that this is not the only mechanism of action. Phenotypes of transgenic plants expressing a deletion in a rate motif in IAA28 resembled plants expressing degron mutations, underscoring the functional relevance of Aux/IAA degradation dynamics in regulating auxin responses. PMID:26149575

  19. Rate Motifs Tune Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid Degradation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Moss, Britney L; Mao, Haibin; Guseman, Jessica M; Hinds, Thomas R; Hellmuth, Antje; Kovenock, Marlies; Noorassa, Anisa; Lanctot, Amy; Villalobos, Luz Irina A Calderón; Zheng, Ning; Nemhauser, Jennifer L

    2015-09-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is a common feature in diverse plant cell signaling pathways; however, the factors that control the dynamics of regulated protein turnover are largely unknown. One of the best-characterized families of E3 ubiquitin ligases facilitates ubiquitination of auxin (aux)/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) repressor proteins in the presence of auxin. Rates of auxin-induced degradation vary widely within the Aux/IAA family, and sequences outside of the characterized degron (the minimum region required for auxin-induced degradation) can accelerate or decelerate degradation. We have used synthetic auxin degradation assays in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in plants to characterize motifs flanking the degron that contribute to tuning the dynamics of Aux/IAA degradation. The presence of these rate motifs is conserved in phylogenetically distant members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Aux/IAA family, as well as in their putative Brassica rapa orthologs. We found that rate motifs can act by enhancing interaction between repressors and the E3, but that this is not the only mechanism of action. Phenotypes of transgenic plants expressing a deletion in a rate motif in IAA28 resembled plants expressing degron mutations, underscoring the functional relevance of Aux/IAA degradation dynamics in regulating auxin responses. PMID:26149575

  20. Efficient Cadmium Bioaccumulation by Displayed Hybrid CS3 Pili: Effect of Heavy Metal Binding Motif Insertion Site on Adsorption Capacity and Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Vajiheh; Yakhchali, Bagher; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Karkhane, Ali Asghar; Ahmadi-Danesh, Houra

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of insertion site of the metal binding motif on the bioaccumulation capacity of the hybrid CS3 pili displayed on the surface of Escherichia coli using both computational and experimental methods. Two metal binding motifs (cadmium binding motif (cbm) and cadmium binding beta motif (cbβm)), identified by searching against the PROSITE database, were inserted into five putative permissive sites of CstH protein (CS3 pili subunit) by using SOEing PCR technique. The expression and surface display of the hybrid pili were evaluated using dot and Western blotting methods and also immunofluorescence microscopy. The cadmium binding affinity and selectivity of the recombinant bacteria displaying various hybrid pili were evaluated using atomic absorption procedure. The results showed that the cadmium binding motifs enabled the cells to sequester cadmium 8- to 16-fold higher than the E.coli expressing native pili. The location of the metal binding motifs in the pili subunit had also a significant effect on the metal-binding properties of the hybrid pili. The insertion at positions 107-108 and 92-93 of the mature CstH showed the highest adsorption in comparison to other positions. PMID:26438314

  1. Mutation of the Conserved Calcium-Binding Motif in Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 Impacts Adhesion but Not Piliation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan; Johnson, Michael D. L.; Burillo-Kirch, Christine; Mocny, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, James E.; Garrett, Christopher K.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 is a member of the PilC family of type IV pilus-associated adhesins found in Neisseria species and other type IV pilus-producing genera. Previously, a calcium-binding domain was described in the C-terminal domains of PilY1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in PilC1 and PilC2 of Kingella kingae. Genetic analysis of N. gonorrhoeae revealed a similar calcium-binding motif in PilC1. To evaluate the potential significance of this calcium-binding region in N. gonorrhoeae, we produced recombinant full-length PilC1 and a PilC1 C-terminal domain fragment. We show that, while alterations of the calcium-binding motif disrupted the ability of PilC1 to bind calcium, they did not grossly affect the secondary structure of the protein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both full-length wild-type PilC1 and full-length calcium-binding-deficient PilC1 inhibited gonococcal adherence to cultured human cervical epithelial cells, unlike the truncated PilC1 C-terminal domain. Similar to PilC1 in K. kingae, but in contrast to the calcium-binding mutant of P. aeruginosa PilY1, an equivalent mutation in N. gonorrhoeae PilC1 produced normal amounts of pili. However, the N. gonorrhoeae PilC1 calcium-binding mutant still had partial defects in gonococcal adhesion to ME180 cells and genetic transformation, which are both essential virulence factors in this human pathogen. Thus, we conclude that calcium binding to PilC1 plays a critical role in pilus function in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:24002068

  2. Binding site discovery from nucleic acid sequences by discriminative learning of hidden Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Maaskola, Jonas; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    We present a discriminative learning method for pattern discovery of binding sites in nucleic acid sequences based on hidden Markov models. Sets of positive and negative example sequences are mined for sequence motifs whose occurrence frequency varies between the sets. The method offers several objective functions, but we concentrate on mutual information of condition and motif occurrence. We perform a systematic comparison of our method and numerous published motif-finding tools. Our method achieves the highest motif discovery performance, while being faster than most published methods. We present case studies of data from various technologies, including ChIP-Seq, RIP-Chip and PAR-CLIP, of embryonic stem cell transcription factors and of RNA-binding proteins, demonstrating practicality and utility of the method. For the alternative splicing factor RBM10, our analysis finds motifs known to be splicing-relevant. The motif discovery method is implemented in the free software package Discrover. It is applicable to genome- and transcriptome-scale data, makes use of available repeat experiments and aside from binary contrasts also more complex data configurations can be utilized. PMID:25389269

  3. Asp residues of βDELSEED-motif are required for peptide binding in the Escherichia coli ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Tayou, Junior; Laughlin, Thomas F

    2015-04-01

    This study demonstrates the requirement of Asp-380 and Asp-386 in the βDELSEED-motif of Escherichia coli ATP synthase for peptide binding and inhibition. We studied the inhibition profiles of wild-type and mutant E. coli ATP synthase in presence of c-terminal amide bound melittin and melittin related peptide. Melittin and melittin related peptide inhibited wild-type ATPase almost completely while only partial inhibition was observed in single mutations with replacement of Asp to Ala, Gln, or Arg. Additionally, very little or no inhibition occurred among double mutants βD380A/βD386A, βD380Q/βD386Q, or βD380R/βD386R signifying that removal of one Asp residue allows limited peptide binding. Partial or substantial loss of oxidative phosphorylation among double mutants demonstrates the functional requirement of βD380 and βD386 Asp residues. Moreover, abrogation of wild-type E. coli cell growth and normal growth of mutant cells in presence of peptides provides strong evidence for the requirement of βDELSEED-motif Asp residues for peptide binding. It is concluded that while presence of one Asp residue may allow partial peptide binding, both Asp residues, βD380 and βD386, are essential for proper peptide binding and inhibition of ATP synthase. PMID:25603139

  4. Clathrin Functions in the Absence of the Terminal Domain Binding Site for Adaptor-associated Clathrin-Box Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Collette, John R.; Chi, Richard J.; Boettner, Douglas R.; Fernandez-Golbano, Isabel M.; Plemel, Rachael; Merz, Alex J.; Geli, Maria Isabel; Traub, Linton M.

    2009-01-01

    Clathrin is involved in vesicle formation in the trans-Golgi network (TGN)/endosomal system and during endocytosis. Clathrin recruitment to membranes is mediated by the clathrin heavy chain (HC) N-terminal domain (TD), which forms a seven-bladed β-propeller. TD binds membrane-associated adaptors, which have short peptide motifs, either the clathrin-box (CBM) and/or the W-box; however, the importance of the TD binding sites for these motifs has not been tested in vivo. We investigated the importance of the TD in clathrin function by generating 1) mutations in the yeast HC gene (CHC1) to disrupt the binding sites for the CBM and W-box (chc1-box), and 2) four TD-specific temperature-sensitive alleles of CHC1. We found that TD is important for the retention of resident TGN enzymes and endocytosis of α-factor; however, the known adaptor binding sites are not necessary, because chc1-box caused little to no effect on trafficking pathways involving clathrin. The Chc1-box TD was able to interact with the endocytic adaptor Ent2 in a CBM-dependent manner, and HCs encoded by chc1-box formed clathrin-coated vesicles. These data suggest that additional or alternative binding sites exist on the TD propeller to help facilitate the recruitment of clathrin to sites of vesicle formation. PMID:19458198

  5. Separate Elements within a Single IQ-like Motif in Adenylyl Cyclase Type 8 Impart Ca2+/Calmodulin Binding and Autoinhibition*

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, David A.; Wachten, Sebastian; Ciruela, Antonio; Sinz, Andrea; Cooper, Dermot M. F.

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitous Ca2+-sensing protein calmodulin (CaM) fulfills its numerous signaling functions through a wide range of modular binding and activation mechanisms. By activating adenylyl cyclases (ACs) 1 and 8, Ca2+ acting via calmodulin impacts on the signaling of the other major cellular second messenger cAMP. In possessing two CaM-binding domains, a 1-5-8-14 motif at the N terminus and an IQ-like motif (IQlm) at the C terminus, AC8 offers particularly sophisticated regulatory possibilities. The IQlm has remained unexplored beyond the suggestion that it bound CaM, and the larger C2b region of which it is part was involved in the relief of autoinhibition of AC8. Here we attempt to distinguish the function of individual residues of the IQlm. From a complementary approach of in vitro and cell population AC activity assays, as well as CaM binding, we propose that the IQlm alone, and not the majority of the C2b, imparts CaM binding and autoinhibitory functions. Moreover, this duality of function is spatially separated and depends on amino acid side-chain character. Accordingly, residues critical for CaM binding are positively charged and clustered toward the C terminus, and those essential for the maintenance of autoinhibition are hydrophobic and more N-terminal. Secondary structure prediction of the IQlm supports this separation, with an ideally placed break in the α-helical nature of the sequence. We additionally find that the N and C termini of AC8 interact, which is an association specifically abrogated by fully Ca2+-bound, but not Ca2+-free, CaM. These data support a sophisticated activation mechanism of AC8 by CaM, in which the duality of the IQlm function is critical. PMID:19305019

  6. The ABBA motif binds APC/C activators and is shared by APC/C substrates and regulators.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, Barbara; Davey, Norman E; Hagting, Anja; Izawa, Daisuke; Mansfeld, Jörg; Gibson, Toby J; Pines, Jonathon

    2015-02-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C) is the ubiquitin ligase that regulates mitosis by targeting specific proteins for degradation at specific times under the control of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). How the APC/C recognizes its different substrates is a key problem in the control of cell division. Here, we have identified the ABBA motif in cyclin A, BUBR1, BUB1, and Acm1, and we show that it binds to the APC/C coactivator CDC20. The ABBA motif in cyclin A is required for its proper degradation in prometaphase through competing with BUBR1 for the same site on CDC20. Moreover, the ABBA motifs in BUBR1 and BUB1 are necessary for the SAC to work at full strength and to recruit CDC20 to kinetochores. Thus, we have identified a conserved motif integral to the proper control of mitosis that connects APC/C substrate recognition with the SAC. PMID:25669885

  7. Use of Cre/loxP recombination to swap cell binding motifs on the adenoviral capsid protein IX

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Kathy L.; Tong, Grace; Vorobyova, Olga; Pool, Madeline; Kothary, Rashmi; Parks, Robin J.

    2011-11-25

    We used Cre/loxP recombination to swap targeting ligands present on the adenoviral capsid protein IX (pIX). A loxP-flanked sequence encoding poly-lysine (pK-binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans) was engineered onto the 3'-terminus of pIX, and the resulting fusion protein allowed for routine virus propagation. Growth of this virus on Cre-expressing cells removed the pK coding sequence, generating virus that could only infect through alternative ligands, such as a tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA)-binding motif engineered into the capsid fibre protein for enhanced infection of neuronal cells. We used a similar approach to swap the pK motif on pIX for a sequence encoding a single-domain antibody directed towards CD66c for targeted infection of cancer cells; Cre-mediated removal of the pK-coding sequence simultaneously placed the single-domain antibody coding sequence in frame with pIX. Thus, we have developed a simple method to propagate virus lacking native viral tropism but containing cell-specific binding ligands. - Highlights: > We describe a method to grow virus lacking native tropism but containing novel cell-binding ligands. > Cre/loxP recombination was used to modify the adenovirus genome. > A targeting ligand present on capsid protein IX was removed or replaced using recombination. > Cre-loxP was also used to 'swap' the identity of the targeting ligand present on pIX.

  8. Optimization of a Novel Binding Motif to (E)-3-(3,5-Difluoro-4-((1R,3R)-2-(2-fluoro-2-methylpropyl)-3-methyl-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-pyrido[3,4-b]indol-1-yl)phenyl)acrylic Acid (AZD9496), a Potent and Orally Bioavailable Selective Estrogen Receptor Downregulator and Antagonist.

    PubMed

    De Savi, Chris; Bradbury, Robert H; Rabow, Alfred A; Norman, Richard A; de Almeida, Camila; Andrews, David M; Ballard, Peter; Buttar, David; Callis, Rowena J; Currie, Gordon S; Curwen, Jon O; Davies, Chris D; Donald, Craig S; Feron, Lyman J L; Gingell, Helen; Glossop, Steven C; Hayter, Barry R; Hussain, Syeed; Karoutchi, Galith; Lamont, Scott G; MacFaul, Philip; Moss, Thomas A; Pearson, Stuart E; Tonge, Michael; Walker, Graeme E; Weir, Hazel M; Wilson, Zena

    2015-10-22

    The discovery of an orally bioavailable selective estrogen receptor downregulator (SERD) with equivalent potency and preclinical pharmacology to the intramuscular SERD fulvestrant is described. A directed screen identified the 1-aryl-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole motif as a novel, druglike ER ligand. Aided by crystal structures of novel ligands bound to an ER construct, medicinal chemistry iterations led to (E)-3-(3,5-difluoro-4-((1R,3R)-2-(2-fluoro-2-methylpropyl)-3-methyl-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-pyrido[3,4-b]indol-1-yl)phenyl)acrylic acid (30b, AZD9496), a clinical candidate with high oral bioavailability across preclinical species that is currently being evaluated in phase I clinical trials for the treatment of advanced estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. PMID:26407012

  9. Short RNA Molecules with High Binding Affinity to the KH Motif of A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 1 (AKAP1): Implications for the Regulation of Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grozdanov, Petar N.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key regulators of acute steroid hormone biosynthesis in steroidogenic tissues is the steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein. Acute regulation of STAR production on the transcriptional level is mainly achieved through a cAMP-dependent mechanism, which is well understood. However, less is known about the posttranscriptional regulation of STAR synthesis, specifically the factors influencing the destiny of the Star mRNA after it leaves the nucleus. Here, we show that the 3′-untranslated region of Star mRNA interacts with the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K-homology (KH) motif of the mitochondrial scaffold A-kinase anchoring protein 1 (AKAP1) in vitro with a moderate affinity as measured by EMSAs. A mutation that mimics the phosphorylation state of the KH motif at a specific serine either did not alter, or had a negative impact on, protein-RNA binding under these conditions. The KH motif of AKAP1 binds short pyrimidine-rich RNA molecules with a stable hairpin structure as demonstrated by in vitro selection. AKAP1 also interacts with STAR mRNA in a dibutyryl-cAMP-stimulated human steroidogenic adrenocortical carcinoma cell line in vivo. Therefore, we propose a model in which AKAP1 anchors Star mRNA at the mitochondria, thus stabilizing the translational complex at this organelle, a situation that might affect STAR production and steroidogenesis. In addition, we suggest that the last 216 amino acid residues of AKAP1 might participate in the degradation of STAR and other nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs through interaction with a RNA-induced silencing complex, specifically with the argonaute 2 protein. PMID:23077346

  10. Novel recognition motifs and biological functions of the RNA-binding protein HuD revealed by genome-wide identification of its targets

    PubMed Central

    Bolognani, Federico; Contente-Cuomo, Tania; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.

    2010-01-01

    HuD is a neuronal ELAV-like RNA-binding protein (RBP) involved in nervous system development, regeneration, and learning and memory. This protein stabilizes mRNAs by binding to AU-rich instability elements (AREs) in their 3′ unstranslated regions (3′ UTR). To isolate its in vivo targets, messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes containing HuD were first immunoprecipitated from brain extracts and directly bound mRNAs identified by subsequent GST-HuD pull downs and microarray assays. Using the 3′ UTR sequences of the most enriched targets and the known sequence restrictions of the HuD ARE-binding site, we discovered three novel recognition motifs. Motifs 2 and 3 are U-rich whereas motif 1 is C-rich. In vitro binding assays indicated that HuD binds motif 3 with the highest affinity, followed by motifs 2 and 1, with less affinity. These motifs were found to be over-represented in brain mRNAs that are upregulated in HuD overexpressor mice, supporting the biological function of these sequences. Gene ontology analyses revealed that HuD targets are enriched in signaling pathways involved in neuronal differentiation and that many of these mRNAs encode other RBPs, translation factors and actin-binding proteins. These findings provide further insights into the post-transcriptional mechanisms by which HuD promotes neural development and synaptic plasticity. PMID:19846595

  11. Characterization of a unique motif in LIM mineralization protein-1 that interacts with jun activation-domain-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, Sreedhara; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Enyo, Yoshio; Liu, Yunshan; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    Development and repair of the skeletal system and other organs are highly dependent on precise regulation of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. The use of BMPs clinically to induce bone formation has been limited in part by the requirement of much higher doses of recombinant proteins in primates than were needed in cell culture or rodents. Therefore, increasing cellular responsiveness to BMPs has become our focus. We determined that an osteogenic LIM mineralization protein, LMP-1 interacts with Smurf1 (Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 1) and prevents ubiquitination of Smads resulting in potentiation of BMP activity. In the region of LMP-1 responsible for bone formation, there is a motif that directly interacts with the Smurf1 WW2 domain and thus effectively competes for binding with Smad1 and Smad5, key signaling proteins in the BMP pathway. Here we show that the same region also contains a motif that interacts with Jun activation-domain-binding protein 1 (Jab1) which targets a common Smad, Smad4, shared by both the BMP and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathways, for proteasomal degradation. Jab1 was first identified as a coactivator of the transcription factor c-Jun. Jab1 binds to Smad4, Smad5, and Smad7, key intracellular signaling molecules of the TGF-β superfamily, and causes ubiquitination and/or degradation of these Smads. We confirmed a direct interaction of Jab1 with LMP-1 using recombinantly expressed wild-type and mutant proteins in slot-blot-binding assays. We hypothesized that LMP-1 binding to Jab1 prevents the binding and subsequent degradation of these Smads causing increased accumulation of osteogenic Smads in cells. We identified a sequence motif in LMP-1 that was predicted to interact with Jab1 based on the MAME/MAST sequence analysis of several cellular signaling molecules that are known to interact with Jab-1. We further mutated the potential key interacting residues in LMP-1 and showed loss of binding to Jab1 in binding

  12. Characterization of a unique motif in LIM mineralization protein-1 that interacts with jun activation-domain-binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Sangadala, Sreedhara; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Enyo, Yoshio; Liu, Yunshan; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Development and repair of the skeletal system and other organs are highly dependent on precise regulation of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. The use of BMPs clinically to induce bone formation has been limited in part by the requirement of much higher doses of recombinant proteins in primates than were needed in cell culture or rodents. Therefore, increasing cellular responsiveness to BMPs has become our focus. We determined that an osteogenic LIM mineralization protein, LMP-1 interacts with Smurf1 (Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 1) and prevents ubiquitination of Smads resulting in potentiation of BMP activity. In the region of LMP-1 responsible for bone formation, there is a motif that directly interacts with the Smurf1 WW2 domain and thus effectively competes for binding with Smad1 and Smad5, key signaling proteins in the BMP pathway. Here we show that the same region also contains a motif that interacts with Jun activation-domain-binding protein 1 (Jab1) which targets a common Smad, Smad4, shared by both the BMP and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathways, for proteasomal degradation. Jab1 was first identified as a coactivator of the transcription factor c-Jun. Jab1 binds to Smad4, Smad5, and Smad7, key intracellular signaling molecules of the TGF-β superfamily, and causes ubiquiti-nation and/or degradation of these Smads. We confirmed a direct interaction of Jab1 with LMP-1 using recombinantly expressed wild-type and mutant proteins in slot-blot-binding assays. We hypothesized that LMP-1 binding to Jab1 prevents the binding and subsequent degradation of these Smads causing increased accumulation of osteogenic Smads in cells. We identified a sequence motif in LMP-1 that was predicted to interact with Jab1 based on the MAME/MAST sequence analysis of several cellular signaling molecules that are known to interact with Jab-1. We further mutated the potential key interacting residues in LMP-1 and showed loss of binding to Jab1 in binding

  13. Electrostatic interactions, but not the YGNGV consensus motif, govern the binding of pediocin PA-1 and its fragments to phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Ludescher, R D; Montville, T J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize in detail the binding of pediocin PA-1 and its fragments to target membranes by using tryptophan fluorescence as a probe. Based on a three-dimensional model (Y. Chen, R. Shapira, M. Eisenstein, and T. J. Montville, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:524-531, 1997), four synthetic N-terminal pediocin fragments were selected to study the mechanism of the initial step by which the bacteriocin associates with membranes. Binding of pediocin PA-1 to vesicles of phosphatidylglycerol, the major component of Listeria membranes, caused an increase in the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence intensity with a blue shift of the emission maximum. The Stern-Volmer constants for acrylamide quenching of the fluorescence of pediocin PA-1 in buffer and in the lipid vesicles were 8.83 +/- 0.42 and 3.53 +/- 0.67 M-1, respectively, suggesting that the tryptophan residues inserted into the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer. The synthetic pediocin fragments bound strongly to the lipid vesicles when a patch of positively charged amino acid residues (K-11 and H-12) was present but bound weakly when this patch was mutated out. Quantitative comparison of changes in tryptophan fluorescence parameters, as well as the dissociation constants for pediocin PA-1 and its fragments, revealed that the relative affinity to the lipid vesicles paralleled the net positive charge in the peptide. The relative affinity for the fragment containing the YGNGV consensus motif was 10-fold lower than that for the fragment containing the positive patch. Furthermore, changing the pH from 6.0 to 8.0 decreased binding of the fragments containing the positive patch, probably due to deprotonation of His residues. These results demonstrate that electrostatic interactions, but not the YGNGV motif, govern pediocin binding to the target membrane. PMID:9406395

  14. Salicylic Acid Suppresses Jasmonic Acid Signaling Downstream of SCFCOI1-JAZ by Targeting GCC Promoter Motifs via Transcription Factor ORA59[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Van der Does, Dieuwertje; Leon-Reyes, Antonio; Koornneef, Annemart; Van Verk, Marcel C.; Rodenburg, Nicole; Pauwels, Laurens; Goossens, Alain; Körbes, Ana P.; Memelink, Johan; Ritsema, Tita; Van Wees, Saskia C.M.; Pieterse, Corné M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Antagonism between the defense hormones salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) plays a central role in the modulation of the plant immune signaling network, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that suppression of the JA pathway by SA functions downstream of the E3 ubiquitin-ligase Skip-Cullin-F-box complex SCFCOI1, which targets JASMONATE ZIM-domain transcriptional repressor proteins (JAZs) for proteasome-mediated degradation. In addition, neither the stability nor the JA-induced degradation of JAZs was affected by SA. In silico promoter analysis of the SA/JA crosstalk transcriptome revealed that the 1-kb promoter regions of JA-responsive genes that are suppressed by SA are significantly enriched in the JA-responsive GCC-box motifs. Using GCC:GUS lines carrying four copies of the GCC-box fused to the β-glucuronidase reporter gene, we showed that the GCC-box motif is sufficient for SA-mediated suppression of JA-responsive gene expression. Using plants overexpressing the GCC-box binding APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (AP2/ERF) transcription factors ERF1 or ORA59, we found that SA strongly reduces the accumulation of ORA59 but not that of ERF1. Collectively, these data indicate that the SA pathway inhibits JA signaling downstream of the SCFCOI1-JAZ complex by targeting GCC-box motifs in JA-responsive promoters via a negative effect on the transcriptional activator ORA59. PMID:23435661

  15. A MOF platform for incorporation of complementary organic motifs for CO2 binding.

    PubMed

    Deria, Pravas; Li, Song; Zhang, Hongda; Snurr, Randall Q; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2015-08-11

    CO2 capture is essential for reducing the carbon footprint of coal-fired power plants. Here we show, both experimentally and computationally, a new design strategy for capturing CO2 in nanoporous adsorbents. The approach involves 'complementary organic motifs' (COMs), which have a precise alignment of charge densities that is complementary to the CO2 quadrupole. Two promising COMs were post-synthetically incorporated into a robust metal-organic framework (MOF) material using solvent-assisted ligand incorporation (SALI). We demonstrate that these COM-functionalized MOFs exhibit high capacity and selectivity for CO2 relative to other reported motifs. PMID:26145451

  16. Leukocyte Protease Binding to Nucleic Acids Promotes Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Marshall P.; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein (RBP) targets, while adding RNA to recombinant RBP substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Pre-incubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G (CATG). During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which bind NE and CATG. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and NETs in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation. PMID:24771851

  17. Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effects of global regulators CRP and ArcA

    SciTech Connect

    Leuze, Mike; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Syed, Mustafa H.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2012-05-30

    Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TF) that bind to DNA recognition sequences in operon promoters. These recognition sequences, many of which are palindromic, are known as regulatory elements or transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Some TFs are global regulators that can modulate the expression of hundreds of genes. In this study we examine global regulator half-sites, where a half-site, which we shall call a binding motif (BM), is one half of a palindromic TFBS. We explore the hypothesis that the number of BMs plays an important role in transcriptional regulation, examining empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP and ArcA regulons. We compare the power of BM counts and of full TFBS characteristics to predict induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full TFBS quality or location.

  18. Distal NF-kB binding motif functions as an enhancer for nontypeable H. influenzae-induced DEFB4 regulation in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jeong-Im; Kil, Sung-Hee; Pan, Huiqi; Lee, Yoo Jin; Lim, David J.; Moon, Sung K.

    2014-01-01

    Among the antimicrobial molecules produced by epithelial cells, DEFB4 is inducible in response to proinflammatory signals such as cytokines and bacterial molecules. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an important human pathogen that exacerbates chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adult and causes otitis media and sinusitis in children. Previously, we have demonstrated that DEFB4 effectively kills NTHi and is induced by NTHi via TLR2 signaling. The 5′-flanking region of DEFB4 contains several NF-κB binding motifs, but their NTHi-specific activity remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate molecular mechanism involved in DEFB4 regulation, focusing on the role of the distal NF-κB binding motif of DEFB4 responding to NTHi. Here, we show that the human middle ear epithelial cells up-regulate DEFB4 expression in response to NTHi via NF-κB activation mediated by IκKα/β–IκBα signaling. Deletion of the distal NF-κB binding motif led to a significant reduction in NTHi-induced DEFB4 up-regulation. A heterologous construct containing the distal NF-κB binding motif was found to increase the promoter activity in response to NTHi, indicating a NTHi-responding enhancer activity of the distal NF-κB binding motif. Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that the p65 domain of NF-κB binds to the distal NF-κB binding motif in response to NTHi. Taken together, our results suggest that NTHi-induced binding of p65 NF-κB to the distal NF-κB binding motif of DEFB4 enhances NTHi-induced DEFB4 regulation in epithelial cells. PMID:24368180

  19. Affinity of the heparin binding motif of Noggin1 to heparan sulfate and its visualization in the embryonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Nesterenko, Alexey M; Orlov, Eugeny E; Ermakova, Galina V; Ivanov, Igor A; Semenyuk, Pavel I; Orlov, Victor N; Martynova, Natalia Y; Zaraisky, Andrey G

    Heparin binding motifs were found in many secreted proteins and it was suggested that they are responsible for retardation of the protein diffusion within the intercellular space due to the binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycanes (HSPG). Here we used synthetic FITC labeled heparin binding motif (HBM peptide) of the Xenopus laevis secreted BMP inhibitor Noggin1 to study its diffusion along the surface of the heparin beads by FRAP method. As a result, we have found out that diffusivity of HBM-labeled FITC was indeed much lesser than those predicted by theoretical calculations even for whole protein of the Noggin size. We also compared by isothermal titration calorimetry the binding affinity of HBM and the control oligolysine peptide to several natural polyanions including heparan sulfate (HS), heparin, the bacterial dextran sulfate and salmon sperm DNA, and demonstrated that HBM significantly exceeds oligolysine peptide in the affinity to HS, heparin and DNA. By contrast, oligolysine peptide bound with higher affinity to dextran sulfate. We speculate that such a difference may ensure specificity of the morphogen binding to HSPG and could be explained by steric constrains imposed by different distribution of the negative charges along a given polymeric molecule. Finally, by using EGFP-HBM recombinant protein we have visualized the natural pattern of the Noggin1 binding sites within the X. laevis gastrula and demonstrated that these sites forms a dorsal-ventral concentration gradient, with a maximum in the dorsal blastopore lip. In sum, our data provide a quantitative basis for modeling the process of Noggin1 diffusion in embryonic tissues, considering its interaction with HSPG. PMID:26525852

  20. Alteration of the carbohydrate-binding specificity of a C-type lectin CEL-I mutant with an EPN carbohydrate-binding motif.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Ishimine, Tomohiro; Baba, Tomohiro; Kimura, Masanari; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro

    2013-07-01

    CEL-I is a Gal/GalNAc-specific C-type lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of two carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) with the carbohydrate-recognition motif QPD (Gln-Pro- Asp), which is generally known to exist in galactose-specific C-type CRDs. In the present study, a mutant CEL-I with EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif, which is thought to be responsible for the carbohydrate-recognition of mannose-specific Ctype CRDs, was produced in Escherichia coli, and its effects on the carbohydrate-binding specificity were examined using polyamidoamine dendrimer (PD) conjugated with carbohydrates. Although wild-type CEL-I effectively formed complexes with N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-PD but not with mannose-PD, the mutant CEL-I showed relatively weak but definite affinity for mannose-PD. These results indicated that the QPD and EPN motifs play a significant role in the carbohydrate-recognition mechanism of CEL-I, especially in the discrimination of galactose and mannose. Additional mutations in the recombinant CEL-I binding site may further increase its specificity for mannose, and should provide insights into designing novel carbohydrate-recognition proteins. PMID:23157284

  1. TGF-β Signaling Cooperates with AT Motif-Binding Factor-1 for Repression of the α-Fetoprotein Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Satoshi; Ikeno, Souichi; Miura, Yutaka; Nakabayashi, Hidekazu; Dong, Xue-Yuan; Dong, Jin-Tang; Tamaoki, Taiki; Nakano, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    α-Fetoprotein (AFP) is known to be highly produced in fetal liver despite its barely detectable level in normal adult liver. On the other hand, hepatocellular carcinoma often shows high expression of AFP. Thus, AFP seems to be an oncogenic marker. In our present study, we investigated how TGF-β signaling cooperates with AT motif-binding factor-1 (ATBF1) to inhibit AFP transcription. Indeed, the expression of AFP mRNA in HuH-7 cells was negatively regulated by TGF-β signaling. To further understand how TGF-β suppresses the transcription of the AFP gene, we analyzed the activity of the AFP promoter in the presence of TGF-β. We found that the TGF-β signaling and ATBF1 suppressed AFP transcription through two ATBF1 binding elements (AT-motifs). Using a heterologous reporter system, both AT-motifs were required for transcriptional repression upon TGF-β stimulation. Furthermore, Smads were found to interact with ATBF1 at both its N-terminal and C-terminal regions. Since the N-terminal (ATBF1N) and C-terminal regions of ATBF1 (ATBF1C) lack the ability of DNA binding, both truncated mutants rescued the cooperative inhibitory action by the TGF-β signaling and ATBF1 in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings indicate that TGF-β signaling can act in concert with ATBF1 to suppress the activity of the AFP promoter through direct interaction of ATBF1 with Smads. PMID:25105025

  2. S phase-specific DNA-binding proteins interacting with the Hex and Oct motifs in type I element of the wheat histone H3 promoter.

    PubMed

    Minami, M; Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    2000-01-11

    The type I element (CCACGTCANCGATCCGCG), consisting of the Hex motif (CCACGTCA) and the reverse-oriented Oct motif (GATCCGCG), is necessary and sufficient to confer the S phase-specific transcription of the wheat histone H3 (TH012) gene. The transcriptional regulation via the type I element is thought to occur through interactions between transcription factors which bind specifically to the Hex and Oct motifs. Here we report S phase-specific DNA-binding proteins interacting with the type I element in partially synchronized wheat cultured cells. Hex motif-binding proteins found here resembled HBP-1a, as reported previously in terms of DNA-binding specificity. DNA-binding activities of the HBP-1a-like proteins were modulated by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. In the electrophoretic mobility shift assay of the wheat nuclear extract, we also found three Oct motif-specific binding proteins, named OBRF (octamer-binding regulatory factor)-1, -2 and -3. One of the HBP-1a-like proteins and OBRF-1 appeared predominantly at the S phase. Thus, it was supposed that these two factors play a crucial role in the S phase-specific regulation of wheat histone gene expression. PMID:10675046

  3. Uncommon structural motifs dominate the antigen binding site in human autoantibodies reactive with basement membrane collagen.

    PubMed

    Foster, Mary H; Buckley, Elizabeth S; Chen, Benny J; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Clark, Amy G

    2016-08-01

    Autoantibodies mediate organ destruction in multiple autoimmune diseases, yet their origins in patients remain poorly understood. To probe the genetic origins and structure of disease-associated autoantibodies, we engrafted immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and immunized with the non-collagenous-1 (NC1) domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. This antigen is expressed in lungs and kidneys and is targeted by autoantibodies in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), prototypic human organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Using Epstein Barr virus transformation and cell fusion, six human anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen monoclonal autoantibodies (mAb) were recovered, including subsets reactive with human kidney and with epitopes recognized by patients' IgG. Sequence analysis reveals a long to exceptionally long heavy chain complementarity determining region3 (HCDR3), the major site of antigen binding, in all six mAb. Mean HCDR3 length is 25.5 amino acids (range 20-36), generated from inherently long DH and JH genes and extended regions of non-templated N-nucleotides. Long HCDR3 are suited to forming noncontiguous antigen contacts and to binding recessed, immunologically silent epitopes hidden from conventional antibodies, as seen with self-antigen crossreactive broadly neutralizing anti-HIV Ig (bnAb). The anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen mAb also show preferential use of unmutated variable region genes that are enriched among human chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies that share features with natural polyreactive Ig. Our findings suggest unexpected relationships between pathogenic anti-collagen Ig, bnAb, and autoreactive Ig associated with malignancy, all of which arise from B cells expressing unconventional structural elements that may require transient escape from tolerance for successful expansion. PMID:27450516

  4. Iodine binding to humic acid.

    PubMed

    Bowley, H E; Young, S D; Ander, E L; Crout, N M J; Watts, M J; Bailey, E H

    2016-08-01

    The rate of reactions between humic acid (HA) and iodide (I(-)) and iodate (IO3(-)) have been investigated in suspensions spiked with (129)I at concentrations of 22, 44 and 88 μg L(-1) and stored at 10 °C. Changes in the speciation of (129)I(-), (129)IO3(-) and mixed ((129)I(-) + (129)IO3(-)) spikes were monitored over 77 days using liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS). In suspensions spiked with (129)I(-) 25% of the added I(-) was transformed into organic iodine (Org-(129)I) within 77 days and there was no evidence of (129)IO3(-) formation. By contrast, rapid loss of (129)IO3(-) and increase in both (129)I(-) and Org-(129)I was observed in (129)IO3(-)-spiked suspensions. However, the rate of Org-(129)I production was greater in mixed systems compared to (129)IO3(-)-spiked suspensions with the same total (129)I concentration, possibly indicating IO3(-)I(-) redox coupling. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) demonstrated that Org-(129)I was present in both high and low molecular weight fractions of the HA although a slight preference to bond with the lower molecular weight fractions was observed indicating that, after 77 days, the spiked isotope had not fully mixed with the native (127)I pool. Iodine transformations were modelled using first order rate equations and fitted rate coefficients determined. However, extrapolation of the model to 250 days indicated that a pseudo-steady state would be attained after ∼200 days but that the proportion of (129)I incorporated into HA was less than that of (127)I indicating the presence of a recalcitrant pool of (127)I that was unavailable for isotopic mixing. PMID:27231879

  5. A survey of DNA motif finding algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Das, Modan K; Dai, Ho-Kwok

    2007-01-01

    Background Unraveling the mechanisms that regulate gene expression is a major challenge in biology. An important task in this challenge is to identify regulatory elements, especially the binding sites in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for transcription factors. These binding sites are short DNA segments that are called motifs. Recent advances in genome sequence availability and in high-throughput gene expression analysis technologies have allowed for the development of computational methods for motif finding. As a result, a large number of motif finding algorithms have been implemented and applied to various motif models over the past decade. This survey reviews the latest developments in DNA motif finding algorithms. Results Earlier algorithms use promoter sequences of coregulated genes from single genome and search for statistically overrepresented motifs. Recent algorithms are designed to use phylogenetic footprinting or orthologous sequences and also an integrated approach where promoter sequences of coregulated genes and phylogenetic footprinting are used. All the algorithms studied have been reported to correctly detect the motifs that have been previously detected by laboratory experimental approaches, and some algorithms were able to find novel motifs. However, most of these motif finding algorithms have been shown to work successfully in yeast and other lower organisms, but perform significantly worse in higher organisms. Conclusion Despite considerable efforts to date, DNA motif finding remains a complex challenge for biologists and computer scientists. Researchers have taken many different approaches in developing motif discovery tools and the progress made in this area of research is very encouraging. Performance comparison of different motif finding tools and identification of the best tools have proven to be a difficult task because tools are designed based on algorithms and motif models that are diverse and complex and our incomplete understanding of

  6. Crystal Structure of (+)-[delta]-Cadinene Synthase from Gossypium arboreum and Evolutionary Divergence of Metal Binding Motifs for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gennadios, Heather A.; Gonzalez, Veronica; Di Costanzo, Luigi; Li, Amang; Yu, Fanglei; Miller, David J.; Allemann, Rudolf K.; Christianson, David W.

    2009-09-11

    (+)-{delta}-Cadinene synthase (DCS) from Gossypium arboreum (tree cotton) is a sesquiterpene cyclase that catalyzes the cyclization of farnesyl diphosphate in the first committed step of the biosynthesis of gossypol, a phytoalexin that defends the plant from bacterial and fungal pathogens. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of unliganded DCS at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution and the structure of its complex with three putative Mg{sup 2+} ions and the substrate analogue inhibitor 2-fluorofarnesyl diphosphate (2F-FPP) at 2.75 {angstrom} resolution. These structures illuminate unusual features that accommodate the trinuclear metal cluster required for substrate binding and catalysis. Like other terpenoid cyclases, DCS contains a characteristic aspartate-rich D{sup 307}DTYD{sup 311} motif on helix D that interacts with Mg{sub A}{sup 2+} and Mg{sub C}{sup 2+}. However, DCS appears to be unique among terpenoid cyclases in that it does not contain the 'NSE/DTE' motif on helix H that specifically chelates Mg{sub B}{sup 2+}, which is usually found as the signature sequence (N,D)D(L,I,V)X(S,T)XXXE (boldface indicates Mg{sub B}{sup 2+} ligands). Instead, DCS contains a second aspartate-rich motif, D{sup 451}DVAE{sup 455}, that interacts with Mg{sub B}{sup 2+}. In this regard, DCS is more similar to the isoprenoid chain elongation enzyme farnesyl diphosphate synthase, which also contains two aspartate-rich motifs, rather than the greater family of terpenoid cyclases. Nevertheless, the structure of the DCS-2F-FPP complex shows that the structure of the trinuclear magnesium cluster is generally similar to that of other terpenoid cyclases despite the alternative Mg{sub B}{sup 2+} binding motif. Analyses of DCS mutants with alanine substitutions in the D{sup 307}DTYD{sup 311} and D{sup 451}DVAE{sup 455} segments reveal the contributions of these segments to catalysis.

  7. Reversibly bound chloride in the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor hormone-binding domain: Possible allosteric regulation and a conserved structural motif for the chloride-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Haruo; Qiu, Yue; Philo, John S; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Ogata, Craig M; Misono, Kunio S

    2010-01-01

    The binding of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to its receptor requires chloride, and it is chloride concentration dependent. The extracellular domain (ECD) of the ANP receptor (ANPR) contains a chloride near the ANP-binding site, suggesting a possible regulatory role. The bound chloride, however, is completely buried in the polypeptide fold, and its functional role has remained unclear. Here, we have confirmed that chloride is necessary for ANP binding to the recombinant ECD or the full-length ANPR expressed in CHO cells. ECD without chloride (ECD(−)) did not bind ANP. Its binding activity was fully restored by bromide or chloride addition. A new X-ray structure of the bromide-bound ECD is essentially identical to that of the chloride-bound ECD. Furthermore, bromide atoms are localized at the same positions as chloride atoms both in the apo and in the ANP-bound structures, indicating exchangeable and reversible halide binding. Far-UV CD and thermal unfolding data show that ECD(−) largely retains the native structure. Sedimentation equilibrium in the absence of chloride shows that ECD(−) forms a strongly associated dimer, possibly preventing the structural rearrangement of the two monomers that is necessary for ANP binding. The primary and tertiary structures of the chloride-binding site in ANPR are highly conserved among receptor-guanylate cyclases and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The chloride-dependent ANP binding, reversible chloride binding, and the highly conserved chloride-binding site motif suggest a regulatory role for the receptor bound chloride. Chloride-dependent regulation of ANPR may operate in the kidney, modulating ANP-induced natriuresis. PMID:20066666

  8. Reversibly Bound Chloride in the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Hormone Binding Domain: Possible Allosteric Regulation and a Conserved Structural Motif for the Chloride-binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.; Qiu, Y; Philo, J; Arakawa, T; Ogata, C; Misono, K

    2010-01-01

    The binding of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to its receptor requires chloride, and it is chloride concentration dependent. The extracellular domain (ECD) of the ANP receptor (ANPR) contains a chloride near the ANP-binding site, suggesting a possible regulatory role. The bound chloride, however, is completely buried in the polypeptide fold, and its functional role has remained unclear. Here, we have confirmed that chloride is necessary for ANP binding to the recombinant ECD or the full-length ANPR expressed in CHO cells. ECD without chloride (ECD(-)) did not bind ANP. Its binding activity was fully restored by bromide or chloride addition. A new X-ray structure of the bromide-bound ECD is essentially identical to that of the chloride-bound ECD. Furthermore, bromide atoms are localized at the same positions as chloride atoms both in the apo and in the ANP-bound structures, indicating exchangeable and reversible halide binding. Far-UV CD and thermal unfolding data show that ECD(-) largely retains the native structure. Sedimentation equilibrium in the absence of chloride shows that ECD(-) forms a strongly associated dimer, possibly preventing the structural rearrangement of the two monomers that is necessary for ANP binding. The primary and tertiary structures of the chloride-binding site in ANPR are highly conserved among receptor-guanylate cyclases and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The chloride-dependent ANP binding, reversible chloride binding, and the highly conserved chloride-binding site motif suggest a regulatory role for the receptor bound chloride. Chloride-dependent regulation of ANPR may operate in the kidney, modulating ANP-induced natriuresis.

  9. Generation of mice deficient in RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and characterization of its role in innate immune responses and cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Yanai, Hideyuki; Naka, Daiji; Goto, Ayana; Ao, Tomoka; Tanno, Yuji; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Honda, Kenya; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We identified RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) as CpG-B DNA-binding protein. {yields} RBM3 translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and co-localized with CpG-B DNA. {yields} We newly generated Rbm3-deficient (Rbm3{sup -/-}) mice. {yields} DNA-mediated cytokine gene induction was normally occured in Rbm3{sup -/-} cells. {yields}Rbm3{sup -/-} MEFs showed poorer proliferation rate and increased number of G2-phase cells. -- Abstract: The activation of innate immune responses is critical to host defense against microbial infections, wherein nucleic acid-sensing pattern recognition receptors recognize DNA or RNA from viruses or bacteria and activate downstream signaling pathways. In a search for new DNA-sensing molecules that regulate innate immune responses, we identified RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3), whose role has been implicated in the regulation of cell growth. In this study, we generated Rbm3-deficient (Rbm3{sup -/-}) mice to study the role of RBM3 in immune responses and cell growth. Despite evidence for its interaction with immunogenic DNA in a cell, no overt phenotypic abnormalities were found in cells from Rbm3{sup -/-} mice for the DNA-mediated induction of cytokine genes. Interestingly, however, Rbm3{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) showed poorer proliferation rates as compared to control MEFs. Further cell cycle analysis revealed that Rbm3{sup -/-} MEFs have markedly increased number of G2-phase cells, suggesting a hitherto unknown role of RBM3 in the G2-phase control. Thus, these mutant mice and cells may provide new tools with which to study the mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell cycle and oncogenesis.

  10. Arabidopsis AtbHLH112 regulates the expression of genes involved in abiotic stress tolerance by binding to their E-box and GCG-box motifs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yujia; Ji, Xiaoyu; Nie, Xianguang; Qu, Min; Zheng, Lei; Tan, Zilong; Zhao, Huimin; Huo, Lin; Liu, Shengnan; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Yucheng

    2015-08-01

    Plant basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play essential roles in abiotic stress tolerance. However, most bHLHs have not been functionally characterized. Here, we characterized the functional role of a bHLH transcription factor from Arabidopsis, AtbHLH112, in response to abiotic stress. AtbHLH112 is a nuclear-localized protein, and its nuclear localization is induced by salt, drought and abscisic acid (ABA). In addition, AtbHLH112 serves as a transcriptional activator, with the activation domain located at its N-terminus. In addition to binding to the E-box motifs of stress-responsive genes, AtbHLH112 binds to a novel motif with the sequence 'GG[GT]CC[GT][GA][TA]C' (GCG-box). Gain- and loss-of-function analyses showed that the transcript level of AtbHLH112 is positively correlated with salt and drought tolerance. AtbHLH112 mediates stress tolerance by increasing the expression of P5CS genes and reducing the expression of P5CDH and ProDH genes to increase proline levels. AtbHLH112 also increases the expression of POD and SOD genes to improve reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging ability. We present a model suggesting that AtbHLH112 is a transcriptional activator that regulates the expression of genes via binding to their GCG- or E-boxes to mediate physiological responses, including proline biosynthesis and ROS scavenging pathways, to enhance stress tolerance. PMID:25827016

  11. The impact of RNA binding motif protein 4-regulated splicing cascade on the progression and metabolism of colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Ju; Lin, Jung-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated splicing of pre-messenger (m)RNA is considered a molecular occasion of carcinogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism is complex and remains to be investigated. Herein, we report that the upregulated miR-92a reduced the RNA-binding motif 4 (RBM4) protein expression, leading to the imbalanced expression of the neuronal polypyrimidine tract-binding (nPTB) protein through alternative splicing-coupled nonsense mediated decay (NMD) mechanism. Increase in nPTB protein enhances the relative level of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 IIIc (FGFR2) and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) transcripts which contribute to the progression and metabolic signature of CRC cells. Expression profiles of RBM4 and downstream alternative splicing events are consistently observed in cancerous tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues. These results constitute a mechanistic understanding of RBM4 on repressing the carcinogenesis of colorectal cells. PMID:26506517

  12. Binding and Transcriptional Regulation by 14-3-3 (Bmh) Proteins Requires Residues Outside of the Canonical Motif

    PubMed Central

    Parua, Pabitra K.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionarily conserved 14-3-3 proteins have important functions as dimers in numerous cellular signaling processes, including regulation of transcription. Yeast 14-3-3 proteins, known as Bmh, inhibit a post-DNA binding step in transcription activation by Adr1, a glucose-regulated transcription factor, by binding to its regulatory domain, residues 226 to 240. The domain was originally defined by regulatory mutations, ADR1c alleles that alter activator-dependent gene expression. Here, we report that ADR1c alleles and other mutations in the regulatory domain impair Bmh binding and abolish Bmh-dependent regulation both directly and indirectly. The indirect effect is caused by mutations that inhibit phosphorylation of Ser230 and thus inhibit Bmh binding, which requires phosphorylated Ser230. However, several mutations inhibit Bmh binding without inhibiting phosphorylation and thus define residues that provide important interaction sites between Adr1 and Bmh. Our proposed model of the Adr1 regulatory domain bound to Bmh suggests that residues Ser238 and Tyr239 could provide cross-dimer contacts to stabilize the complex and that this might explain the failure of a dimerization-deficient Bmh mutant to bind Adr1 and to inhibit its activity. A bioinformatics analysis of Bmh-interacting proteins suggests that residues outside the canonical 14-3-3 motif might be a general property of Bmh target proteins and might help explain the ability of 14-3-3 to distinguish target and nontarget proteins. Bmh binding to the Adr1 regulatory domain, and its failure to bind when mutations are present, explains at a molecular level the transcriptional phenotype of ADR1c mutants. PMID:24142105

  13. Novel hinge-binding motifs for Janus kinase 3 inhibitors: a comprehensive structure-activity relationship study on tofacitinib bioisosteres.

    PubMed

    Gehringer, Matthias; Forster, Michael; Pfaffenrot, Ellen; Bauer, Silke M; Laufer, Stefan A

    2014-11-01

    The Janus kinases (JAKs) are a family of cytosolic tyrosine kinases crucially involved in cytokine signaling. JAKs have been demonstrated to be valid targets in the treatment of inflammatory and myeloproliferative disorders, and two inhibitors, tofacitinib and ruxolitinib, recently received their marketing authorization. Despite this success, selectivity within the JAK family remains a major issue. Both approved compounds share a common 7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine hinge binding motif, and little is known about modifications tolerated at this heterocyclic core. In the current study, a library of tofacitinib bioisosteres was prepared and tested against JAK3. The compounds possessed the tofacitinib piperidinyl side chain, whereas the hinge binding motif was replaced by a variety of heterocycles mimicking its pharmacophore. In view of the promising expectations obtained from molecular modeling, most of the compounds proved to be poorly active. However, strategies for restoring activity within this series of novel chemotypes were discovered and crucial structure-activity relationships were deduced. The compounds presented may serve as starting point for developing novel JAK inhibitors and as a valuable training set for in silico models. PMID:25139757

  14. Using the PfEMP1 Head Structure Binding Motif to Deal a Blow at Severe Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Alba, Martha Patricia; Curtidor, Hernando; Vanegas, Magnolia; Almonacid, Hannia; Patarroyo, Manuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria causes 200 million cases worldwide, 8 million being severe and complicated leading to ∼1 million deaths and ∼100,000 abortions annually. Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) has been implicated in cytoadherence and infected erythrocyte rosette formation, associated with cerebral malaria; chondroitin sulphate-A attachment and infected erythrocyte sequestration related to pregnancy-associated malaria and other severe forms of disease. An endothelial cell high activity binding peptide is described in several of this ∼300 kDa hypervariable protein’s domains displaying a conserved motif (GACxPxRRxxLC); it established H-bonds with other binding peptides to mediate red blood cell group A and chondroitin sulphate attachment. This motif (when properly modified) induced PfEMP1-specific strain-transcending, fully-protective immunity for the first time in experimental challenge in Aotus monkeys, opening the way forward for a long sought-after vaccine against severe malaria. PMID:24516657

  15. Binding of the Bacteriophage P22 N-Peptide to the boxB RNA Motif Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Bahadur, Ranjit P.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Zacharias, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Protein-RNA interactions are important for many cellular processes. The Nut-utilization site (N)-protein of bacteriophages contains an N-terminal arginine-rich motif that undergoes a folding transition upon binding to the boxB RNA hairpin loop target structure. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the dynamics of the P22 N-peptide-boxB complex and to elucidate the energetic contributions to binding. In addition, the free-energy changes of RNA and peptide conformational adaptation to the bound forms, as well as the role of strongly bound water molecules at the peptide-RNA interface, were studied. The influence of peptide amino acid substitutions and the salt dependence of interaction were investigated and showed good agreement with available experimental results. Several tightly bound water molecules were found at the RNA-binding interface in both the presence and absence of N-peptide. Explicit consideration of the waters resulted in shifts of calculated contributions during the energetic analysis, but overall similar binding energy contributions were found. Of interest, it was found that the electrostatic field of the RNA has a favorable influence on the coil-to-α-helix transition of the N-peptide already outside of the peptide-binding site. This result may have important implications for understanding peptide-RNA complex formation, which often involves coupled folding and association processes. It indicates that electrostatic interactions near RNA molecules can lead to a shift in the equilibrium toward the bound form of an interacting partner before it enters the binding pocket. PMID:20006951

  16. Adhesive and Migratory Effects of Phosphophoryn Are Modulated by Flanking Peptides of the Integrin Binding Motif

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shigeki; Kobuke, Seiji; Haruyama, Naoto; Hoshino, Hiroaki; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Nishimura, Fusanori

    2014-01-01

    Phosphophoryn (PP) is generated from the proteolytic cleavage of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP). Gene duplications in the ancestor dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1) genomic sequence created the DSPP gene in toothed animals. PP and DMP-1 are phosphorylated extracellular matrix proteins that belong to the family of small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs). Many SIBLING members have been shown to evoke various cell responses through the integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) domain; however, the RGD-dependent function of PP is not yet fully understood. We demonstrated that recombinant PP did not exhibit any obvious cell adhesion ability, whereas the simultaneously purified recombinant DMP-1 did. A cell adhesion inhibitory analysis was performed by pre-incubating human osteosarcoma MG63 cells with various PP peptides before seeding onto vitronectin. The results obtained revealed that the incorporation of more than one amino acid on both sides of the PP-RGD domain was unable to inhibit the adhesion of MG63 cells onto vitronectin. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of a peptide containing the PP-RGD domain with an open carboxyl-terminal side (H-463SDESDTNSESANESGSRGDA482-OH) was more potent than that of a peptide containing the RGD domain with an open amino-terminal side (H-478SRGDASYTSDESSDDDNDSDSH499-OH). This phenomenon was supported by the potent cell adhesion and migration abilities of the recombinant truncated PP, which terminated with Ala482. Furthermore, various point mutations in Ala482 and/or Ser483 converted recombinant PP into cell-adhesive proteins. Therefore, we concluded that the Ala482-Ser483 flanking sequence, which was detected in primates and mice, was the key peptide bond that allowed the PP-RGD domain to be sequestered. The differential abilities of PP and DMP-1 to act on integrin imply that DSPP was duplicated from DMP-1 to serve as a crucial extracellular protein for tooth development rather than as an integrin

  17. Comparison of the receptor FGFRL1 from sea urchins and humans illustrates evolution of a zinc binding motif in the intracellular domain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background FGFRL1, the gene for the fifth member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family, is found in all vertebrates from fish to man and in the cephalochordate amphioxus. Since it does not occur in more distantly related invertebrates such as insects and nematodes, we have speculated that FGFRL1 might have evolved just before branching of the vertebrate lineage from the other invertebrates (Beyeler and Trueb, 2006). Results We identified the gene for FGFRL1 also in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and cloned its mRNA. The deduced amino acid sequence shares 62% sequence similarity with the human protein and shows conservation of all disulfides and N-linked carbohydrate attachment sites. Similar to the human protein, the S. purpuratus protein contains a histidine-rich motif at the C-terminus, but this motif is much shorter than the human counterpart. To analyze the function of the novel motif, recombinant fusion proteins were prepared in a bacterial expression system. The human fusion protein bound to nickel and zinc affinity columns, whereas the sea urchin protein barely interacted with such columns. Direct determination of metal ions by atomic absorption revealed 2.6 mole zinc/mole protein for human FGFRL1 and 1.7 mole zinc/mole protein for sea urchin FGFRL1. Conclusion The FGFRL1 gene has evolved much earlier than previously assumed. A comparison of the intracellular domain between sea urchin and human FGFRL1 provides interesting insights into the shaping of a novel zinc binding domain. PMID:20021659

  18. Characterization of DNA Binding and Retinoic Acid Binding Properties of Retinoic Acid Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Na; Schule, Roland; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Evans, Ronald M.

    1991-05-01

    High-level expression of the full-length human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α and the DNA binding domain of the RAR in Escherichia coli was achieved by using a T7 RNA polymerase-directed expression system. After induction, full-length RAR protein was produced at an estimated level of 20% of the total bacterial proteins. Both intact RAR molecules and the DNA binding domain bind to the cognate DNA response element with high specificity in the absence of retinoic acid. However, this binding is enhanced to a great extent upon the addition of eukaryotic cell extracts. The factor responsible for this enhancement is heat-sensitive and forms a complex with RAR that binds to DNA and exhibits a distinct migration pattern in the gel-mobility-shift assay. The interaction site of the factor with RAR is localized in the 70-amino acid DNA binding region of RAR. The hormone binding ability of the RARα protein was assayed by a charcoal absorption assay and the RAR protein was found to bind to retinoic acid with a K_d of 2.1 x 10-10 M.

  19. A point mutation to Galphai selectively blocks GoLoco motif binding: direct evidence for Galpha.GoLoco complexes in mitotic spindle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Willard, Francis S; Zheng, Zhen; Guo, Juan; Digby, Gregory J; Kimple, Adam J; Conley, Jason M; Johnston, Christopher A; Bosch, Dustin; Willard, Melinda D; Watts, Val J; Lambert, Nevin A; Ikeda, Stephen R; Du, Quansheng; Siderovski, David P

    2008-12-26

    Heterotrimeric G-protein Galpha subunits and GoLoco motif proteins are key members of a conserved set of regulatory proteins that influence invertebrate asymmetric cell division and vertebrate neuroepithelium and epithelial progenitor differentiation. GoLoco motif proteins bind selectively to the inhibitory subclass (Galphai) of Galpha subunits, and thus it is assumed that a Galphai.GoLoco motif protein complex plays a direct functional role in microtubule dynamics underlying spindle orientation and metaphase chromosomal segregation during cell division. To address this hypothesis directly, we rationally identified a point mutation to Galphai subunits that renders a selective loss-of-function for GoLoco motif binding, namely an asparagine-to-isoleucine substitution in the alphaD-alphaE loop of the Galpha helical domain. This GoLoco-insensitivity ("GLi") mutation prevented Galphai1 association with all human GoLoco motif proteins and abrogated interaction between the Caenorhabditis elegans Galpha subunit GOA-1 and the GPR-1 GoLoco motif. In contrast, the GLi mutation did not perturb any other biochemical or signaling properties of Galphai subunits, including nucleotide binding, intrinsic and RGS protein-accelerated GTP hydrolysis, and interactions with Gbetagamma dimers, adenylyl cyclase, and seven transmembrane-domain receptors. GoLoco insensitivity rendered Galphai subunits unable to recruit GoLoco motif proteins such as GPSM2/LGN and GPSM3 to the plasma membrane, and abrogated the exaggerated mitotic spindle rocking normally seen upon ectopic expression of wild type Galphai subunits in kidney epithelial cells. This GLi mutation should prove valuable in establishing the physiological roles of Galphai.GoLoco motif protein complexes in microtubule dynamics and spindle function during cell division as well as to delineate potential roles for GoLoco motifs in receptor-mediated signal transduction. PMID:18984596

  20. Role of the Chemical Environment beyond the Coordination Site: Structural Insight into Fe(III) Protoporphyrin Binding to Cysteine-Based Heme-Regulatory Protein Motifs.

    PubMed

    Brewitz, Hans Henning; Kühl, Toni; Goradia, Nishit; Galler, Kerstin; Popp, Jürgen; Neugebauer, Ute; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Imhof, Diana

    2015-10-12

    The importance of heme as a transient regulatory molecule has become a major focus in biochemical research. However, detailed information about the molecular basis of transient heme-protein interactions is still missing. We report an in-depth structural analysis of Fe(III) heme-peptide complexes by a combination of UV/Vis, resonance Raman, and 2D-NMR spectroscopic methods. The experiments reveal insights both into the coordination to the central iron ion and into the spatial arrangement of the amino acid sequences interacting with protoporphyrin IX. Cysteine-based peptides display different heme-binding behavior as a result of the existence of ordered, partially ordered, and disordered conformations in the heme-unbound state. Thus, the heme-binding mode is clearly the consequence of the nature and flexibility of the residues surrounding the iron ion coordinating cysteine. Our analysis reveals scenarios for transient binding of heme to heme-regulatory motifs in proteins and demonstrates that a thorough structural analysis is required to unravel how heme alters the structure and function of a particular protein. PMID:26260099

  1. CodingMotif: exact determination of overrepresented nucleotide motifs in coding sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It has been increasingly appreciated that coding sequences harbor regulatory sequence motifs in addition to encoding for protein. These sequence motifs are expected to be overrepresented in nucleotide sequences bound by a common protein or small RNA. However, detecting overrepresented motifs has been difficult because of interference by constraints at the protein level. Sampling-based approaches to solve this problem based on codon-shuffling have been limited to exploring only an infinitesimal fraction of the sequence space and by their use of parametric approximations. Results We present a novel O(N(log N)2)-time algorithm, CodingMotif, to identify nucleotide-level motifs of unusual copy number in protein-coding regions. Using a new dynamic programming algorithm we are able to exhaustively calculate the distribution of the number of occurrences of a motif over all possible coding sequences that encode the same amino acid sequence, given a background model for codon usage and dinucleotide biases. Our method takes advantage of the sparseness of loci where a given motif can occur, greatly speeding up the required convolution calculations. Knowledge of the distribution allows one to assess the exact non-parametric p-value of whether a given motif is over- or under- represented. We demonstrate that our method identifies known functional motifs more accurately than sampling and parametric-based approaches in a variety of coding datasets of various size, including ChIP-seq data for the transcription factors NRSF and GABP. Conclusions CodingMotif provides a theoretically and empirically-demonstrated advance for the detection of motifs overrepresented in coding sequences. We expect CodingMotif to be useful for identifying motifs in functional genomic datasets such as DNA-protein binding, RNA-protein binding, or microRNA-RNA binding within coding regions. A software implementation is available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/chuanglab/codingmotif.tar PMID

  2. IQCJ-SCHIP1, a novel fusion transcript encoding a calmodulin-binding IQ motif protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kwasnicka-Crawford, Dorota A. . E-mail: dakc@yorku.ca; Carson, Andrew R.; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2006-12-01

    The existence of transcripts that span two adjacent, independent genes is considered rare in the human genome. This study characterizes a novel human fusion gene named IQCJ-SCHIP1. IQCJ-SCHIP1 is the longest isoform of a complex transcriptional unit that bridges two separate genes that encode distinct proteins, IQCJ, a novel IQ motif containing protein and SCHIP1, a schwannomin interacting protein that has been previously shown to interact with the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) protein. IQCJ-SCHIP1 is located on the chromosome 3q25 and comprises a 1692-bp transcript encompassing 11 exons spanning 828 kb of the genomic DNA. We show that IQCJ-SCHIP1 mRNA is highly expressed in the brain. Protein encoded by the IQCJ-SCHIP1 gene was localized to cytoplasm and actin-rich regions and in differentiated PC12 cells was also seen in neurite extensions.

  3. Selective recognition of protein tetraserine motifs with a cell-permeable, pro-fluorescent bis-boronic acid.

    PubMed

    Halo, Tiffany L; Appelbaum, Jacob; Hobert, Elissa M; Balkin, Daniel M; Schepartz, Alanna

    2009-01-21

    There is considerable interest in novel cell imaging tools that avoid the use of fluorescent proteins. One widely used class of such reagents are "pro-fluorescent" biarsenical dyes such as FlAsH, ReAsH, CrAsH, and Cy3As. Despite their utility, biarsenicals are plagued by high background labeling and cytotoxicity and are challenging to apply in oxidizing cellular locale. Here we demonstrate that [(3-oxospiro[isobenzofuran-1(3H),9'-[9H]xanthene]-3',6'-diyl)bis(iminomethylene-2,1-phenylene)]bis-(9CI), a rhodamine-derived bisboronic acid (RhoBo) described initially as a monosaccharide sensor, functions as a cell-permeable, turn-on fluorescent sensor for tetraserine motifs in recombinant proteins. RhoBo binds peptides or proteins containing Ser-Ser-Pro-Gly-Ser-Ser with affinities in the nanomolar concentration range and prefers this sequence to simple monosaccharides by >10,000-fold. RhoBo fails to form fluorescent complexes with constituents of the mammalian cell surface, as judged by epifluorescent, confocal, and TIRF microscopy, but fluoresces brightly within the Ser-Ser-Pro-Gly-Ser-Ser-rich cell interior. These results suggest that current efforts to identify optimal serine-rich sequences for RhoBo will allow it to function effectively as a selective small-molecule label for appropriately tagged proteins either upon or within living cells. PMID:19105691

  4. Design of polymer motifs for nucleic acid recognition and assembly stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhun

    This dissertation describes the synthesis and assembly of bio-functional polymers and the applications of these polymers to drug encapsulation, delivery, and multivalent biomimetic macromolecular recognition between synthetic polymer and nucleic acids. The main content is divided into three parts: (1) polyacidic domains as strongly stabilizing design elements for aqueous phase polyacrylate diblock assembly; (2) small molecule/polymer recognition triggered macromolecular assembly and drug encapsulation; (3) trizaine derivatized polymer as a novel class of "bifacial polymer nucleic acid" (bPoNA) and applications of bPoNA to nanoparticle loading of DNA/RNA, silencing delivery as well as control of aptamer function. Through the studies in part (1) and part (2), it was demonstrated that well-designed polymer motifs are not only able to enhance assemblies driven by non-specific hydrophobic effect, but are also able to direct assemblies based on specific recognitions. In part (3) of this dissertation, this concept was further extended by the design of polyacrylate polymers that are capable of discrete and robust hybridization with nucleic acids. This surprising finding demonstrated both fundamental and practical applications. Overall, these studies provided insights into the rational design elements for improving the bio-functions of synthetic polymers, and significantly expanded the scope of biological applications in which polymers synthesized via controlled radical polymerization may play a role.

  5. An Unexpected Gas-Phase Binding Motif for Metal Dication Complexation with Peptides: Irmpd Spectroscopic Structure Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Robert C.; Steill, Jeffrey; Polfer, Nicolas; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2011-06-01

    The favorable orientation of the amide linkage and the aromatic side chain of N-terminal Phe or Trp leads to several favorable motifs for metal ion binding to dipeptides, having distinct characteristics in the IR spectrum. Infrared multiple photon photodissociation spectroscopy using the FELIX free electron laser has enabled clear resolution of these isomeric forms. The spectral patterns of complexes of small dications (Mg2+, Ni2+ and Co2+) reveal an unexpected new isomeric form, in which the metal ion displaces the amide hydrogen, forming a metal-nitrogen bond with covalent character which is unprecedented in such gas-phase complexes. Spectra of the ions were acquired by irradiating the cell of the Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with infrared light from the FELIX laser at wavelengths in the approximate range 500 to 1900 Cm-1.

  6. Condensin II Regulates Interphase Chromatin Organization Through the Mrg-Binding Motif of Cap-H2

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Heather A.; Klebba, Joseph E.; Kusch, Thomas; Rogers, Gregory C.; Bosco, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The spatial organization of the genome within the eukaryotic nucleus is a dynamic process that plays a central role in cellular processes such as gene expression, DNA replication, and chromosome segregation. Condensins are conserved multi-subunit protein complexes that contribute to chromosome organization by regulating chromosome compaction and homolog pairing. Previous work in our laboratory has shown that the Cap-H2 subunit of condensin II physically and genetically interacts with the Drosophila homolog of human MORF4-related gene on chromosome 15 (MRG15). Like Cap-H2, Mrg15 is required for interphase chromosome compaction and homolog pairing. However, the mechanism by which Mrg15 and Cap-H2 cooperate to maintain interphase chromatin organization remains unclear. Here, we show that Cap-H2 localizes to interband regions on polytene chromosomes and co-localizes with Mrg15 at regions of active transcription across the genome. We show that co-localization of Cap-H2 on polytene chromosomes is partially dependent on Mrg15. We have identified a binding motif within Cap-H2 that is essential for its interaction with Mrg15, and have found that mutation of this motif results in loss of localization of Cap-H2 on polytene chromosomes and results in partial suppression of Cap-H2-mediated compaction and homolog unpairing. Our data are consistent with a model in which Mrg15 acts as a loading factor to facilitate Cap-H2 binding to chromatin and mediate changes in chromatin organization. PMID:25758823

  7. Mutations in the carboxyl-terminal SEC24 binding motif of the serotonin transporter impair folding of the transporter.

    PubMed

    El-Kasaby, Ali; Just, Herwig; Malle, Elisabeth; Stolt-Bergner, Peggy C; Sitte, Harald H; Freissmuth, Michael; Kudlacek, Oliver

    2010-12-10

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is a member of the SLC6 family of solute carriers. SERT plays a crucial role in synaptic neurotransmission by retrieving released serotonin. The intracellular carboxyl terminus of various neurotransmitter transporters has been shown to be important for the correct delivery of SLC6 family members to the cell surface. Here we studied the importance of the C terminus in trafficking and folding of human SERT. Serial truncations followed by mutagenesis identified sequence spots (PG(601,602), RII(607-609)) within the C terminus relevant for export of SERT from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). RI(607,608) is homologous to the RL-motif that in other SLC6 family members provides a docking site for the COPII component Sec24D. The primary defect resulting from mutation at PG(601,602) and RI(607,608) was impaired folding, because mutated transporters failed to bind the inhibitor [(3)H]imipramine. In contrast, when retained in the ER (e.g. by dominant negative Sar1) the wild type transporter bound [(3)H]imipramine with an affinity comparable to that of the surface-expressed transporter. SERT-RI(607,608)AA and SERT-RII(607-609)AAA were partially rescued by treatment of cells with the nonspecific chemical chaperone DMSO or the specific pharmacochaperone ibogaine (which binds to the inward facing conformation of SERT) but not by other classes of ligands (inhibitors, substrates, amphetamines). These observations (i) demonstrate an hitherto unappreciated role of the C terminus in the folding of SERT, (ii) indicates that the folding trajectory proceeds via an inward facing intermediate, and (iii) suggest a model where the RI-motif plays a crucial role in preventing premature Sec24-recruitment and export of incorrectly folded transporters. PMID:20889976

  8. Identification of the bioactive and consensus peptide motif from Momordica charantia insulin receptor-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hsin-Yi; Li, Chia-Cheng; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Many food bioactive peptides with diverse functions have been discovered by studying plant proteins. We have previously identified a 68-residue insulin receptor (IR)-binding protein (mcIRBP) from Momordica charantia that exhibits hypoglycemic effects in mice via interaction with IR. By in vitro digestion, we found that mcIRBP-19, spanning residues 50-68 of mcIRBP, enhanced the binding of insulin to IR, stimulated the phosphorylation of PDK1 and Akt, induced the expression of glucose transporter 4, and stimulated both the uptake of glucose in cells and the clearance of glucose in diabetic mice. Furthermore, mcIRBP-19 homologs were present in various plants and shared similar β-hairpin structures and IR kinase-activating abilities to mcIRBP-19. In conclusion, our findings suggested that mcIRBP-19 is a blood glucose-lowering bioactive peptide that exhibits IR-binding potentials. Moreover, we newly identified novel IR-binding bioactive peptides in various plants which belonged to different taxonomic families. PMID:26988505

  9. A “Coiled-Coil” Motif Is Important for Oligomerization and DNA Binding Properties of Human Cytomegalovirus Protein UL77

    PubMed Central

    Dittmer, Alexandra; Lapp, Sara; Bogner, Elke

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL77 gene encodes the essential protein UL77, its function is characterized in the present study. Immunoprecipitation identified monomeric and oligomeric pUL77 in HCMV infected cells. Immunostaining of purified virions and subviral fractions showed that pUL77 is a structural protein associated with capsids. In silico analysis revealed the presence of a coiled-coil motif (CCM) at the N-terminus of pUL77. Chemical cross-linking of either wild-type pUL77 or CCM deletion mutant (pUL77ΔCCM) implicated that CCM is critical for oligomerization of pUL77. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitations of infected and transfected cells demonstrated that pUL77 interacts with the capsid-associated DNA packaging motor components, pUL56 and pUL104, as well as the major capsid protein. The ability of pUL77 to bind dsDNA was shown by an in vitro assay. Binding to certain DNA was further confirmed by an assay using biotinylated 36-, 250-, 500-, 1000-meric dsDNA and 966-meric HCMV-specific dsDNA designed for this study. The binding efficiency (BE) was determined by image processing program defining values above 1.0 as positive. While the BE of the pUL56 binding to the 36-mer bio-pac1 containing a packaging signal was 10.0±0.63, the one for pUL77 was only 0.2±0.03. In contrast to this observation the BE of pUL77 binding to bio-500 bp or bio-1000 bp was 2.2±0.41 and 4.9±0.71, respectively. By using pUL77ΔCCM it was demonstrated that this protein could not bind to dsDNA. These data indicated that pUL77 (i) could form homodimers, (ii) CCM of pUL77 is crucial for oligomerization and (iii) could bind to dsDNA in a sequence independent manner. PMID:21998635

  10. A Plasmodium falciparum copper-binding membrane protein with copper transport motifs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Copper is an essential catalytic co-factor for metabolically important cellular enzymes, such as cytochrome-c oxidase. Eukaryotic cells acquire copper through a copper transport protein and distribute intracellular copper using molecular chaperones. The copper chelator, neocuproine, inhibits Plasmodium falciparum ring-to-trophozoite transition in vitro, indicating a copper requirement for malaria parasite development. How the malaria parasite acquires or secretes copper still remains to be fully elucidated. Methods PlasmoDB was searched for sequences corresponding to candidate P. falciparum copper-requiring proteins. The amino terminal domain of a putative P. falciparum copper transport protein was cloned and expressed as a maltose binding fusion protein. The copper binding ability of this protein was examined. Copper transport protein-specific anti-peptide antibodies were generated in chickens and used to establish native protein localization in P. falciparum parasites by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Six P. falciparum copper-requiring protein orthologs and a candidate P. falciparum copper transport protein (PF14_0369), containing characteristic copper transport protein features, were identified in PlasmoDB. The recombinant amino terminal domain of the transport protein bound reduced copper in vitro and within Escherichia coli cells during recombinant expression. Immunolocalization studies tracked the copper binding protein translocating from the erythrocyte plasma membrane in early ring stage to a parasite membrane as the parasites developed to schizonts. The protein appears to be a PEXEL-negative membrane protein. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum parasites express a native protein with copper transporter characteristics that binds copper in vitro. Localization of the protein to the erythrocyte and parasite plasma membranes could provide a mechanism for the delivery of novel anti-malarial compounds. PMID:23190769

  11. One exon of the human LSF gene includes conserved regions involved in novel DNA-binding and dimerization motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Shirra, M K; Zhu, Q; Huang, H C; Pallas, D; Hansen, U

    1994-01-01

    The transcription factor LSF, identified as a HeLa protein that binds the simian virus 40 late promoter, recognizes direct repeats with a center-to-center spacing of 10 bp. The characterization of two human cDNAs, representing alternatively spliced mRNAs, provides insight into the unusual DNA-binding and oligomerization properties of LSF. The sequence of the full-length LSF is identical to that of the transcription factors alpha CP2 and LBP-1c and has similarity to the Drosophila transcription factor Elf-1/NTF-1. Using an epitope-counting method, we show that LSF binds DNA as a homodimer. LSF-ID, which is identical to LBP-1d, contains an in-frame internal deletion of 51 amino acids resulting from alternative mRNA splicing. Unlike LSF, LSF-ID did not bind LSF DNA-binding sites. Furthermore, LSF-ID did not affect the binding of LSF to DNA, suggesting that the two proteins do not interact. Of three short regions with a high degree of homology between LSF and Elf-1/NTF-1, LSF-ID lacks two, which are predicted to form beta-strands. Double amino acid substitutions in each of these regions eliminated specific DNA-binding activity, similarly to the LSF-ID deletion. The dimerization potential of these mutants was measured both by the ability to inhibit the binding of LSF to DNA and by direct protein-protein interaction studies. Mutations in one homology region, but not the other, functionally eliminated dimerization. Images PMID:8035790

  12. The SH3 regulatory domain of the hematopoietic cell kinase Hck binds ELMO via its polyproline motif.

    PubMed

    Awad, Rida; Sévajol, Marion; Ayala, Isabel; Chouquet, Anne; Frachet, Philippe; Gans, Pierre; Reiser, Jean-Baptiste; Kleman, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic EnguLfment and cell MOtility (ELMO) proteins form an evolutionary conserved family of regulators involved in small GTPase dependent actin remodeling processes that regulates the guanine exchange factor activity of some of the Downstream Of CrK (DOCK) family members. Gathered data strongly suggest that DOCK activation by ELMO and the subsequent signaling result from a subtle balance in the binding of partners to ELMO. Among its putative upward modulators, the Hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), a member of the Src kinase superfamily, has been identified as a binding partner and a specific tyrosine kinase for ELMO1. Indeed, Hck is implicated in distinct molecular signaling pathways governing phagocytosis, cell adhesion, and migration of hematopoietic cells. Although ELMO1 has been shown to interact with the regulatory Src Homology 3 (SH3) domain of Hck, no direct evidence indicating the mode of interaction between Hck and ELMO1 have been provided in the literature. In the present study, we report convergent pieces of evidence that demonstrate the specific interaction between the SH3 domain of Hck and the polyproline motif of ELMO1. Our results also suggest that the tyrosine-phosphorylation state of ELMO1 tail might act as a putative modulator of Hck kinase activity towards ELMO1 that in turn participates in DOCK180 activation and further triggers subsequent signaling towards actin remodeling. PMID:25737835

  13. The SH3 regulatory domain of the hematopoietic cell kinase Hck binds ELMO via its polyproline motif

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Rida; Marion, Sévajol; Isabel, Ayala; Anne, Chouquet; Philippe, Frachet; Pierre, Gans; Jean-Baptiste, Reiser; Jean-Philippe, Kleman

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic EnguLfment and cell MOtility (ELMO) proteins form an evolutionary conserved family of regulators involved in small GTPase dependent actin remodeling processes that regulates the guanine exchange factor activity of some of the Downstream Of CrK (DOCK) family members. Gathered data strongly suggest that DOCK activation by ELMO and the subsequent signaling result from a subtle balance in the binding of partners to ELMO. Among its putative upward modulators, the Hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), a member of the Src kinase superfamily, has been identified as a binding partner and a specific tyrosine kinase for ELMO1. Indeed, Hck is implicated in distinct molecular signaling pathways governing phagocytosis, cell adhesion, and migration of hematopoietic cells. Although ELMO1 has been shown to interact with the regulatory Src Homology 3 (SH3) domain of Hck, no direct evidence indicating the mode of interaction between Hck and ELMO1 have been provided in the literature. In the present study, we report convergent pieces of evidence that demonstrate the specific interaction between the SH3 domain of Hck and the polyproline motif of ELMO1. Our results also suggest that the tyrosine-phosphorylation state of ELMO1 tail might act as a putative modulator of Hck kinase activity towards ELMO1 that in turn participates in DOCK180 activation and further triggers subsequent signaling towards actin remodeling. PMID:25737835

  14. Affinity regression predicts the recognition code of nucleic acid binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pelossof, Raphael; Singh, Irtisha; Yang, Julie L.; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Hughes, Timothy R.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the affinity profiles of nucleic acid-binding proteins directly from the protein sequence is a major unsolved problem. We present a statistical approach for learning the recognition code of a family of transcription factors (TFs) or RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) from high-throughput binding assays. Our method, called affinity regression, trains on protein binding microarray (PBM) or RNA compete experiments to learn an interaction model between proteins and nucleic acids, using only protein domain and probe sequences as inputs. By training on mouse homeodomain PBM profiles, our model correctly identifies residues that confer DNA-binding specificity and accurately predicts binding motifs for an independent set of divergent homeodomains. Similarly, learning from RNA compete profiles for diverse RBPs, our model can predict the binding affinities of held-out proteins and identify key RNA-binding residues. More broadly, we envision applying our method to model and predict biological interactions in any setting where there is a high-throughput ‘affinity’ readout. PMID:26571099

  15. HIGH CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE145 Binds to and Stabilizes the psaA 5' UTR via a Newly Defined Repeat Motif in Embryophyta.

    PubMed

    Manavski, Nikolay; Torabi, Salar; Lezhneva, Lina; Arif, Muhammad Asif; Frank, Wolfgang; Meurer, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    The seedling-lethal Arabidopsis thaliana high chlorophyll fluorescence145 (hcf145) mutation leads to reduced stability of the plastid tricistronic psaA-psaB-rps14 mRNA and photosystem I (PSI) deficiency. Here, we genetically mapped the HCF145 gene, which encodes a plant-specific, chloroplast-localized, modular protein containing two homologous domains related to the polyketide cyclase family comprising 37 annotated Arabidopsis proteins of unknown function. Two further highly conserved and previously uncharacterized tandem repeat motifs at the C terminus, herein designated the transcript binding motif repeat (TMR) domains, confer sequence-specific RNA binding capability to HCF145. Homologous TMR motifs are often found as multiple repeats in quite diverse proteins of green and red algae and in the cyanobacterium Microcoleus sp PCC 7113 with unknown function. HCF145 represents the only TMR protein found in vascular plants. Detailed analysis of hcf145 mutants in Arabidopsis and Physcomitrella patens as well as in vivo and in vitro RNA binding assays indicate that HCF145 has been recruited in embryophyta for the stabilization of the psaA-psaB-rps14 mRNA via specific binding to its 5' untranslated region. The polyketide cyclase-related motifs support association of the TMRs to the psaA RNA, presumably pointing to a regulatory role in adjusting PSI levels according to the requirements of the plant cell. PMID:26307378

  16. The Q motif of Fanconi anemia group J protein (FANCJ) DNA helicase regulates its dimerization, DNA binding, and DNA repair function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuliang; Sommers, Joshua A; Loiland, Jason A; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Kuper, Jochen; Kisker, Caroline; Brosh, Robert M

    2012-06-22

    The Q motif, conserved in a number of RNA and DNA helicases, is proposed to be important for ATP binding based on structural data, but its precise biochemical functions are less certain. FANCJ encodes a Q motif DEAH box DNA helicase implicated in Fanconi anemia and breast cancer. A Q25A mutation of the invariant glutamine in the Q motif abolished its ability to complement cisplatin or telomestatin sensitivity of a fancj null cell line and exerted a dominant negative effect. Biochemical characterization of the purified recombinant FANCJ-Q25A protein showed that the mutation disabled FANCJ helicase activity and the ability to disrupt protein-DNA interactions. FANCJ-Q25A showed impaired DNA binding and ATPase activity but displayed ATP binding and temperature-induced unfolding transition similar to FANCJ-WT. Size exclusion chromatography and sedimentation velocity analyses revealed that FANCJ-WT existed as molecular weight species corresponding to a monomer and a dimer, and the dimeric form displayed a higher specific activity for ATPase and helicase, as well as greater DNA binding. In contrast, FANCJ-Q25A existed only as a monomer, devoid of helicase activity. Thus, the Q motif is essential for FANCJ enzymatic activity in vitro and DNA repair function in vivo. PMID:22582397

  17. 4E-BPs require non-canonical 4E-binding motifs and a lateral surface of eIF4E to repress translation

    PubMed Central

    Igreja, Cátia; Peter, Daniel; Weiler, Catrin; Izaurralde, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    eIF4E-binding proteins (4E-BPs) are a widespread class of translational regulators that share a canonical (C) eIF4E-binding motif (4E-BM) with eIF4G. Consequently, 4E-BPs compete with eIF4G for binding to the dorsal surface on eIF4E to inhibit translation initiation. Some 4E-BPs contain non-canonical 4E-BMs (NC 4E-BMs), but the contribution of these motifs to the repressive mechanism—and whether these motifs are present in all 4E-BPs—remains unknown. Here, we show that the three annotated Drosophila melanogaster 4E-BPs contain NC 4E-BMs. These motifs bind to a lateral surface on eIF4E that is not used by eIF4G. This distinct molecular recognition mode is exploited by 4E-BPs to dock onto eIF4E–eIF4G complexes and effectively displace eIF4G from the dorsal surface of eIF4E. Our data reveal a hitherto unrecognized role for the NC4E-BMs and the lateral surface of eIF4E in 4E-BP-mediated translational repression, and suggest that bipartite 4E-BP mimics might represent efficient therapeutic tools to dampen translation during oncogenic transformation. PMID:25179781

  18. The phosphotyrosine interaction domains of X11 and FE65 bind to distinct sites on the YENPTY motif of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Borg, J P; Ooi, J; Levy, E; Margolis, B

    1996-01-01

    The phosphotyrosine interaction (PI) domains (also known as the PTB, or phosphotyrosine binding, domains) of Shc and IRS-1 are recently described domains that bind peptides phosphorylated on tyrosine residues. The PI/PTB domains differ from Src homology 2 (SH2) domains in that their binding specificity is determined by residues that lie amino terminal and not carboxy terminal to the phosphotyrosine. Recently, it has been appreciated that other cytoplasmic proteins also contain PI domains. We now show that the PI domain of X11 and one of the PI domains of FE65, two neuronal proteins, bind to the cytoplasmic domain of the amyloid precursor protein ((beta)APP). (beta)APP is an integral transmembrane glycoprotein whose cellular function is unknown. One of the processing pathways of (beta)APP leads to the secretion of A(beta), the major constituent of the amyloid deposited in the brain parenchyma and vessel walls of Alzheimer's disease patients. We have found that the X11 PI domain binds a YENPTY motif in the intracellular domain of (beta)APP that is strikingly similar to the NPXY motifs that bind the Shc and IRS-1 PI/PTB domains. However, unlike the case for binding of the Shc PI/PTB domain, tyrosine phosphorylation of the YENPTY motif is not required for the binding of (beta)APP to X11 or FE65. The binding site of the FE65 PI domain appears to be different from that of X11, as mutations within the YENPTY motif differentially affect the binding of X11 and FE65. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified a crucial residue within the PI domain involved in X11 and FE65 binding to (beta)APP. The binding of X11 or FE65 PI domains to residues of the YENPTY motif of (beta)APP identifies PI domains as general protein interaction domains and may have important implications for the processing of (beta)APP. PMID:8887653

  19. Acidic Residues in the Hfq Chaperone Increase the Selectivity of sRNA Binding and Annealing.

    PubMed

    Panja, Subrata; Santiago-Frangos, Andrew; Schu, Daniel J; Gottesman, Susan; Woodson, Sarah A

    2015-11-01

    Hfq facilitates gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), thereby affecting bacterial attributes such as biofilm formation and virulence. Escherichia coli Hfq recognizes specific U-rich and AAN motifs in sRNAs and target mRNAs, after which an arginine patch on the rim promotes base pairing between their complementary sequences. In the cell, Hfq must discriminate between many similar RNAs. Here, we report that acidic amino acids lining the sRNA binding channel between the inner pore and rim of the Hfq hexamer contribute to the selectivity of Hfq's chaperone activity. RNase footprinting, in vitro binding and stopped-flow fluorescence annealing assays showed that alanine substitution of D9, E18 or E37 strengthened RNA interactions with the rim of Hfq and increased annealing of non-specific or U-tailed RNA oligomers. Although the mutants were less able than wild-type Hfq to anneal sRNAs with wild-type rpoS mRNA, the D9A mutation bypassed recruitment of Hfq to an (AAN)4 motif in rpoS, both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that acidic residues normally modulate access of RNAs to the arginine patch. We propose that this selectivity limits indiscriminate target selection by E. coli Hfq and enforces binding modes that favor genuine sRNA and mRNA pairs. PMID:26196441

  20. Identification of a Novel Calcium Binding Motif Based on the Detection of Sequence Insertions in the Animal Peroxidase Domain of Bacterial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría-Hernando, Saray

    2012-01-01

    Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP) superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20), where it was found to be involved in Ca2+ coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33–79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca2+ binding with a KD of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821) is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of life. PMID

  1. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Santamaría-Hernando, Saray; Krell, Tino; Ramos-González, María-Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP) superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20), where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+) coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+) binding with a K(D) of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821) is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of life. PMID

  2. Expression and characterization of a Bifidobacterium adolescentis beta-mannanase carrying mannan-binding and cell association motifs.

    PubMed

    Kulcinskaja, Evelina; Rosengren, Anna; Ibrahim, Romany; Kolenová, Katarína; Stålbrand, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The gene encoding β-mannanase (EC 3.2.1.78) BaMan26A from the bacterium Bifidobacterium adolescentis (living in the human gut) was cloned and the gene product characterized. The enzyme was found to be modular and to contain a putative signal peptide. It possesses a catalytic module of the glycoside hydrolase family 26, a predicted immunoglobulin-like module, and two putative carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) of family 23. The enzyme is likely cell attached either by the sortase mechanism (LPXTG motif) or via a C-terminal transmembrane helix. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli without the native signal peptide or the cell anchor. Two variants were made: one containing all four modules, designated BaMan26A-101K, and one truncated before the CBMs, designated BaMan26A-53K. BaMan26A-101K, which contains the CBMs, showed an affinity to carob galactomannan having a dissociation constant of 0.34 μM (8.8 mg/liter), whereas BaMan26A-53K did not bind, showing that at least one of the putative CBMs of family 23 is mannan binding. For BaMan26A-53K, k(cat) was determined to be 444 s(-1) and K(m) 21.3 g/liter using carob galactomannan as the substrate at the optimal pH of 5.3. Both of the enzyme variants hydrolyzed konjac glucomannan, as well as carob and guar gum galactomannans to a mixture of oligosaccharides. The dominant product from ivory nut mannan was found to be mannotriose. Mannobiose and mannotetraose were produced to a lesser extent, as shown by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. Mannobiose was not hydrolyzed, and mannotriose was hydrolyzed at a significantly lower rate than the longer oligosaccharides. PMID:23064345

  3. Expression and Characterization of a Bifidobacterium adolescentis Beta-Mannanase Carrying Mannan-Binding and Cell Association Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Kulcinskaja, Evelina; Rosengren, Anna; Ibrahim, Romany; Kolenová, Katarína

    2013-01-01

    The gene encoding β-mannanase (EC 3.2.1.78) BaMan26A from the bacterium Bifidobacterium adolescentis (living in the human gut) was cloned and the gene product characterized. The enzyme was found to be modular and to contain a putative signal peptide. It possesses a catalytic module of the glycoside hydrolase family 26, a predicted immunoglobulin-like module, and two putative carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) of family 23. The enzyme is likely cell attached either by the sortase mechanism (LPXTG motif) or via a C-terminal transmembrane helix. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli without the native signal peptide or the cell anchor. Two variants were made: one containing all four modules, designated BaMan26A-101K, and one truncated before the CBMs, designated BaMan26A-53K. BaMan26A-101K, which contains the CBMs, showed an affinity to carob galactomannan having a dissociation constant of 0.34 μM (8.8 mg/liter), whereas BaMan26A-53K did not bind, showing that at least one of the putative CBMs of family 23 is mannan binding. For BaMan26A-53K, kcat was determined to be 444 s−1 and Km 21.3 g/liter using carob galactomannan as the substrate at the optimal pH of 5.3. Both of the enzyme variants hydrolyzed konjac glucomannan, as well as carob and guar gum galactomannans to a mixture of oligosaccharides. The dominant product from ivory nut mannan was found to be mannotriose. Mannobiose and mannotetraose were produced to a lesser extent, as shown by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. Mannobiose was not hydrolyzed, and mannotriose was hydrolyzed at a significantly lower rate than the longer oligosaccharides. PMID:23064345

  4. The Ku-binding motif is a conserved module for recruitment and stimulation of non-homologous end-joining proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grundy, Gabrielle J.; Rulten, Stuart L.; Arribas-Bosacoma, Raquel; Davidson, Kathryn; Kozik, Zuzanna; Oliver, Antony W.; Pearl, Laurence H.; Caldecott, Keith W.

    2016-01-01

    The Ku-binding motif (KBM) is a short peptide module first identified in APLF that we now show is also present in Werner syndrome protein (WRN) and in Modulator of retrovirus infection homologue (MRI). We also identify a related but functionally distinct motif in XLF, WRN, MRI and PAXX, which we denote the XLF-like motif. We show that WRN possesses two KBMs; one at the N terminus next to the exonuclease domain and one at the C terminus next to an XLF-like motif. We reveal that the WRN C-terminal KBM and XLF-like motif function cooperatively to bind Ku complexes and that the N-terminal KBM mediates Ku-dependent stimulation of WRN exonuclease activity. We also show that WRN accelerates DSB repair by a mechanism requiring both KBMs, demonstrating the importance of WRN interaction with Ku. These data define a conserved family of KBMs that function as molecular tethers to recruit and/or stimulate enzymes during NHEJ. PMID:27063109

  5. Probing why trypanosomes assemble atypical cytochrome c with an AxxCH haem-binding motif instead of CxxCH.

    PubMed

    Ginger, Michael L; Sam, Katharine A; Allen, James W A

    2012-12-01

    Mitochondrial cytochromes c and c1 are core components of the respiratory chain of all oxygen-respiring eukaryotes. These proteins contain haem, covalently bound to the polypeptide in a catalysed post-translational modification. In all eukaryotes, except members of the protist phylum Euglenozoa, haem attachment is to the cysteine residues of a CxxCH haem-binding motif. In the Euglenozoa, which include medically relevant trypanosomatid parasites, haem attachment is to a single cysteine residue in an AxxCH haem-binding motif. Moreover, genes encoding known c-type cytochrome biogenesis machineries are all absent from trypanosomatid genomes, indicating the presence of a novel biosynthetic apparatus. In the present study, we investigate expression and maturation of cytochrome c with a typical CxxCH haem-binding motif in the trypanosomatids Crithidia fasciculata and Trypanosoma brucei. Haem became attached to both cysteine residues of the haem-binding motif, indicating that, in contrast with previous hypotheses, nothing prevents formation of a CxxCH cytochrome c in euglenozoan mitochondria. The cytochrome variant was also able to replace the function of wild-type cytochrome c in T. brucei. However, the haem attachment to protein was not via the stereospecifically conserved linkage universally observed in natural c-type cytochromes, suggesting that the trypanosome cytochrome c biogenesis machinery recognized and processed only the wild-type single-cysteine haem-binding motif. Moreover, the presence of the CxxCH cytochrome c resulted in a fitness cost in respiration. The level of cytochrome c biogenesis in trypanosomatids was also found to be limited, with the cells operating at close to maximum capacity. PMID:22928879

  6. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Type 1 (CRHR1) Clustering with MAGUKs Is Mediated via Its C-Terminal PDZ Binding Motif

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Julia; Engeholm, Maik; Ederer, Marion S.; Breu, Johannes; Møller, Thor C.; Michalakis, Stylianos; Rasko, Tamas; Wanker, Erich E.; Biel, Martin; Martinez, Karen L.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Deussing, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRHR1) plays an important role in orchestrating neuroendocrine, behavioral, and autonomic responses to stress. To identify molecules capable of directly modulating CRHR1 signaling, we performed a yeast-two-hybrid screen using the C-terminal intracellular tail of the receptor as bait. We identified several members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family: postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP97), SAP102 and membrane associated guanylate kinase, WW and PDZ domain containing 2 (MAGI2). CRHR1 is co-expressed with the identified MAGUKs and with the additionally investigated PSD93 in neurons of the adult mouse brain and in primary hippocampal neurons, supporting the probability of a physiological interaction in vivo. The C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95, discs large, zona occludens 1) binding motif of CRHR1 is essential for its physical interaction with MAGUKs, as revealed by the CRHR1-STAVA mutant, which harbors a functionally impaired PDZ binding motif. The imitation of a phosphorylation at Thr413 within the PDZ binding motif also disrupted the interaction with MAGUKs. In contrast, distinct PDZ domains within the identified MAGUKs are involved in the interactions. Expression of CRHR1 in primary neurons demonstrated its localization throughout the neuronal plasma membrane, including the excitatory post synapse, where the receptor co-localized with PSD95 and SAP97. The co-expression of CRHR1 and respective interacting MAGUKs in HEK293 cells resulted in a clustered subcellular co-localization which required an intact PDZ binding motif. In conclusion, our study characterized the PDZ binding motif-mediated interaction of CRHR1 with multiple MAGUKs, which directly affects receptor function. PMID:26352593

  7. Guidelines for choosing molecular "alligator clip" binding motifs in electron transport devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Matthew G.; Seideman, Tamar; Ratner, Mark A.

    2011-04-01

    We employ a one-electron, tight-binding model of an electrode-molecule-electrode junction to explore the fundamental relationship between adsorption geometry and electron transport, producing exact results (within this model). By varying the chemisorption location (e.g., atop a surface atom or in a hollow site between surface atoms) and the molecule-electrode coupling, we find that the largest currents are realized when the molecule (i) is highly coordinated by the surface and (ii) has favorable overlap with electrode states near the Fermi level. We also show the importance of electrode-induced molecular level shifting for certain adsorption geometries, which can cause molecular levels far from the Fermi level to conduct better than those near the Fermi level. Since all of these factors are greatly influenced by the chemical moiety used to link the molecule to an electrode, these results present a set of guidelines to help choose "alligator clips" for molecular electronic devices.

  8. Identification of a Regulatory Acidic Motif as the Determinant of Membrane Localization of TICAM-2.

    PubMed

    Funami, Kenji; Matsumoto, Misako; Enokizono, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Noriko; Tatematsu, Megumi; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Seya, Tsukasa

    2015-11-01

    TLR4 triggers LPS signaling through the adaptors Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor molecule (TICAM)-2 (also called TRAM) and TICAM-1 (also called TRIF), together with Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) and MyD88. The MyD88 pathway mediates early phase responses to LPS on the plasma membrane, whereas the TICAM pathway mediates late-phase responses, which induce the production of type I IFN and activation of inflammasomes. TICAM-2 bridges TLR4 and TICAM-1 for LPS signaling in the endosome. Recently, we identified an acidic motif, E87/D88/D89 in TICAM-2, that provides the interaction surfaces between TICAM-2 and TICAM-1. In the present study, we found additional D91/E92 in TICAM-2, conserved across species, that is crucial for TICAM-1 activation. The D91A/E92A mutant protein was distributed largely to the cytosol, despite myristoylation, suggesting its importance for assistance of membrane localization of TICAM-2. An ectopically expressed D91A/E92A mutant per se failed to activate TICAM-1, unlike its wild-type counterpart that forms self-aggregation, but it still retained the ability to pass LPS-mediated IFN regulatory factor (IRF)3 activation. In a TICAM-2 knockout human cell line expressing TLR4/MD-2 with or without CD14, overexpression of the D91A/E92A mutant did not activate IRF3, but upon LPS stimulation, it induced sufficient TLR4-mediated IRF3 activation with high coefficient colocalization. Hence, the D91/E92 motif guides TICAM-2 membrane localization and self-activation for signaling. Our results suggest the presence of two distinct steps underlying endosomal LPS signaling on TICAM-2 for TICAM-1 activation: TICAM-2 assembling in TLR4 and/or TICAM-2 self-activation. D91A/E92A of TICAM-2 selectively associates the TLR4-dependent TICAM-2 assembling, but not cytosolic TICAM-2 self-aggregation, to activate TICAM-1. PMID:26408662

  9. Gene Delivery Mediated by Recombinant Silk Proteins Containing Cationic and Cell Binding Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Keiji; Hamasaki, Juliana; Subramanian, Balajikarthick; Kaplan, David L

    2010-01-01

    Silk proteins are biodegradable and biocompatible, and can also be tailored to contain additional features via genetic engineering, suggesting utility for gene delivery. In the present study, novel silk-based block copolymers were bioengineered both with poly(L-lysine) domains to interact with plasmid DNA (pDNA) and RGD, to enhance cell-binding and transfection efficiency. Ionic complexes of these silk-polylysine-RGD block copolymers with pDNA were prepared, characterized and utilized for gene delivery to HeLa cells and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. The material systems were characterized by agarose gel electrophoresis, zeta-potentialmeter, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Sizes and charges of the pDNA complexes were regulated by the polymer/nucleotide molar ratio. Samples with 30-lysine residues and 11 RGD sequences, prepared at the ratio of number of amines/phosphates from pDNA (N/P) of 2, had an average solution diameter of 186 nm and showed the highest transfection efficiency. The intracellular distribution of complexes of Cy5-labeled pDNA was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The Cy5-labeled pDNA was distributed near the cell membrane and around the nuclei, indicating that the pDNA was transferred near the nucleus. The results demonstrated the potential of bioengineered silk proteins with additional functional features as a new family of highly tailored gene delivery systems. PMID:20457191

  10. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Tamara A.; Nicol, Clare; Cesur, Özlem; Travé, Gilles; Blair, George Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4) which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future. PMID:25062098

  11. LRP130, a pentatricopeptide motif protein with a noncanonical RNA-binding domain, is bound in vivo to mitochondrial and nuclear RNAs.

    PubMed

    Mili, Stavroula; Piñol-Roma, Serafín

    2003-07-01

    LRP130 (also known as LRPPRC) is an RNA-binding protein that is a constituent of postsplicing nuclear RNP complexes associated with mature mRNA. It belongs to a growing family of pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motif-containing proteins, several of which have been implicated in organellar RNA metabolism. We show here that only a fraction of LRP130 proteins are in nuclei and are directly bound in vivo to at least some of the same RNA molecules as the nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein hnRNP A1. The majority of LRP130 proteins are located within mitochondria, where they are directly bound to polyadenylated RNAs in vivo. In vitro, LRP130 binds preferentially to polypyrimidines. This RNA-binding activity maps to a domain in its C-terminal region that does not contain any previously described RNA-binding motifs and that contains only 2 of the 11 predicted PPR motifs. Therefore, LRP130 is a novel type of RNA-binding protein that associates with both nuclear and mitochondrial mRNAs and as such is a potential candidate for coordinating nuclear and mitochondrial gene expression. These findings provide the first identification of a mammalian protein directly bound to mitochondrial RNA in vivo and provide a possible molecular explanation for the recently described association of mutations in LRP130 with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in humans. PMID:12832482

  12. Mining Conditional Phosphorylation Motifs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jun; Gong, Haipeng; Deng, Shengchun; He, Zengyou

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation motifs represent position-specific amino acid patterns around the phosphorylation sites in the set of phosphopeptides. Several algorithms have been proposed to uncover phosphorylation motifs, whereas the problem of efficiently discovering a set of significant motifs with sufficiently high coverage and non-redundancy still remains unsolved. Here we present a novel notion called conditional phosphorylation motifs. Through this new concept, the motifs whose over-expressiveness mainly benefits from its constituting parts can be filtered out effectively. To discover conditional phosphorylation motifs, we propose an algorithm called C-Motif for a non-redundant identification of significant phosphorylation motifs. C-Motif is implemented under the Apriori framework, and it tests the statistical significance together with the frequency of candidate motifs in a single stage. Experiments demonstrate that C-Motif outperforms some current algorithms such as MMFPh and Motif-All in terms of coverage and non-redundancy of the results and efficiency of the execution. The source code of C-Motif is available at: https://sourceforge. net/projects/cmotif/. PMID:26356863

  13. A Polybasic Plasma Membrane Binding Motif in the I-II Linker Stabilizes Voltage-gated CaV1.2 Calcium Channel Function.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurjot; Pinggera, Alexandra; Ortner, Nadine J; Lieb, Andreas; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Obermair, Gerald J; Flucher, Bernhard E; Striessnig, Jörg

    2015-08-21

    L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) regulate many physiological functions like muscle contraction, hormone secretion, gene expression, and neuronal excitability. Their activity is strictly controlled by various molecular mechanisms. The pore-forming α1-subunit comprises four repeated domains (I-IV), each connected via an intracellular linker. Here we identified a polybasic plasma membrane binding motif, consisting of four arginines, within the I-II linker of all LTCCs. The primary structure of this motif is similar to polybasic clusters known to interact with polyphosphoinositides identified in other ion channels. We used de novo molecular modeling to predict the conformation of this polybasic motif, immunofluorescence microscopy and live cell imaging to investigate the interaction with the plasma membrane, and electrophysiology to study its role for Cav1.2 channel function. According to our models, this polybasic motif of the I-II linker forms a straight α-helix, with the positive charges facing the lipid phosphates of the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Membrane binding of the I-II linker could be reversed after phospholipase C activation, causing polyphosphoinositide breakdown, and was accelerated by elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels. This indicates the involvement of negatively charged phospholipids in the plasma membrane targeting of the linker. Neutralization of four arginine residues eliminated plasma membrane binding. Patch clamp recordings revealed facilitated opening of Cav1.2 channels containing these mutations, weaker inhibition by phospholipase C activation, and reduced expression of channels (as quantified by ON-gating charge) at the plasma membrane. Our data provide new evidence for a membrane binding motif within the I-II linker of LTCC α1-subunits essential for stabilizing normal Ca(2+) channel function. PMID:26100638

  14. Presence of calcium-binding motifs in PilY1 homologs correlates with Ca-mediated twitching motility and evolutionary history across diverse bacteria.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jennifer K; Cruz, Luisa F; Evans, Michael R; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2015-02-01

    Twitching motility, involving type IV pili, is essential for host colonization and virulence of many pathogenic bacteria. Studies of PilY1, a tip-associated type IV pili protein, indicate that PilY1 functions as a switch between pilus extension and retraction, resulting in twitching motility. Recent work detected a calcium-binding motif in PilY1 of some animal bacterial pathogens and demonstrated that binding of calcium to PilY1 with this motif regulates twitching. Though studies of PilY1 in non-animal pathogens are limited, our group demonstrated that twitching motility in the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, which contains three PilY1 homologs, is increased by calcium supplementation. A study was conducted to investigate the phylogenetic relationship between multiple PilY1 homologs, the presence of calcium-binding motifs therein, and calcium-mediated twitching motility across diverse bacteria. Strains analyzed contained one to three PilY1 homologs, but phylogenetic analyses indicated that PilY1 homologs containing the calcium-binding motif Dx[DN]xDGxxD are phylogenetically divergent from other PilY1 homologs. Plant-associated bacteria included in these analyses were then examined for a calcium-mediated twitching response. Results indicate that bacteria must have at least one PilY1 homolog containing the Dx[DN]xDGxxD motif to display a calcium-mediated increase in twitching motility, which likely reflects an adaption to environmental calcium concentrations. PMID:25688068

  15. A Polybasic Plasma Membrane Binding Motif in the I-II Linker Stabilizes Voltage-gated CaV1.2 Calcium Channel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurjot; Pinggera, Alexandra; Ortner, Nadine J.; Lieb, Andreas; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Obermair, Gerald J.; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Striessnig, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (LTCCs) regulate many physiological functions like muscle contraction, hormone secretion, gene expression, and neuronal excitability. Their activity is strictly controlled by various molecular mechanisms. The pore-forming α1-subunit comprises four repeated domains (I–IV), each connected via an intracellular linker. Here we identified a polybasic plasma membrane binding motif, consisting of four arginines, within the I-II linker of all LTCCs. The primary structure of this motif is similar to polybasic clusters known to interact with polyphosphoinositides identified in other ion channels. We used de novo molecular modeling to predict the conformation of this polybasic motif, immunofluorescence microscopy and live cell imaging to investigate the interaction with the plasma membrane, and electrophysiology to study its role for Cav1.2 channel function. According to our models, this polybasic motif of the I-II linker forms a straight α-helix, with the positive charges facing the lipid phosphates of the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Membrane binding of the I-II linker could be reversed after phospholipase C activation, causing polyphosphoinositide breakdown, and was accelerated by elevated intracellular Ca2+ levels. This indicates the involvement of negatively charged phospholipids in the plasma membrane targeting of the linker. Neutralization of four arginine residues eliminated plasma membrane binding. Patch clamp recordings revealed facilitated opening of Cav1.2 channels containing these mutations, weaker inhibition by phospholipase C activation, and reduced expression of channels (as quantified by ON-gating charge) at the plasma membrane. Our data provide new evidence for a membrane binding motif within the I-II linker of LTCC α1-subunits essential for stabilizing normal Ca2+ channel function. PMID:26100638

  16. The dynein light chain 8 binding motif of rabies virus phosphoprotein promotes efficient viral transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Gene S.; Preuss, Mirjam A. R.; Williams, John C.; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the interaction between rabies virus (RV) phosphoprotein and the dynein light chain 8 (LC8) is essential for RV pathogenesis. Through its association with the dynein motor complex, LC8 has been suggested as a molecular factor that links the viral ribonucleoprotein to the host cell transport system. Recent structural investigations, however, dispute this model. To understand the role of LC8 in RV pathogenesis, we generated recombinant RVs with or without the LC8 binding domain (LC8-BD) deleted from the RV phosphoprotein. Peripheral infection of adult mice showed that removal of the LC8-BD did not inhibit entry into the CNS, although it prevented onset of RV-induced CNS disease. However, deletion of the LC8-BD significantly attenuated viral transcription and replication in the CNS. Studies in RAG2 knockout (KO) mice infected with the same recombinant RVs confirmed this finding and indicated that the adaptive immune system is not a factor in the attenuation of viral replication early in the infection. In cell culture, the deletion of the LC8-BD greatly attenuated growth on neuronal cells whereas the growth pattern on nonneuronal cells remained unchanged. However, deletion of the LC8-BD did not affect production of RV virions. We provide evidence that removal of the LC8-BD decreases primary transcription. In this study, we propose that LC8 does not play a role in the retrograde axonal transport of RV and that the deletion of the LC8-BD impairs the infectivity of the virions by reducing early transcription and replication in neurons. PMID:17438267

  17. Identification of the First Prokaryotic Collagen Sequence Motif That Mediates Binding to Human Collagen Receptors, Integrins α2β1 and α11β1*

    PubMed Central

    Caswell, Clayton C.; Barczyk, Malgorzata; Keene, Douglas R.; Lukomska, Ewa; Gullberg, Donald E.; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2008-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria interact with human integrins to enter host cells and to augment host colonization. Group A Streptococcus (GAS) employs molecular mimicry by direct interactions between the cell surface streptococcal collagen-like protein-1 (Scl1) and the human collagen receptor, integrin α2β1. The collagen-like (CL) region of the Scl1 protein mediates integrin-binding, although, the integrin binding motif was not defined. Here, we used molecular cloning and site-directed mutagenesis to identify the GLPGER sequence as the α2β1 and the α11β1 binding motif. Electron microscopy experiments mapped binding sites of the recombinant α2-integrin-inserted domain to the GLPGER motif of the recombinant Scl (rScl) protein. rScl proteins and a synthetic peptide harboring the GLPGER motif mediated the attachment of C2C12-α2 + myoblasts expressing the α2β1 integrin as the sole collagen receptor. The C2C12-α11 + myoblasts expressing the α11β1 integrin also attached to GLPGER-harboring rScl proteins. Furthermore, the C2C12-α11 + cells attached to rScl1 more efficiently than C2C12-α2 + cells, suggesting that the α11β1 integrin may have a higher binding affinity for the GLPGER sequence. Human endothelial cells and dermal fibroblasts adhered to rScl proteins, indicating that multiple cell types may recognize and bind the Scl proteins via their collagen receptors. This work is a stepping stone toward defining the utilization of collagen receptors by microbial collagen-like proteins that are expressed by pathogenic bacteria. PMID:18990704

  18. Cysteine S-Glutathionylation Promotes Stability and Activation of the Hippo Downstream Effector Transcriptional Co-activator with PDZ-binding Motif (TAZ).

    PubMed

    Gandhirajan, Rajesh Kumar; Jain, Manaswita; Walla, Benedikt; Johnsen, Marc; Bartram, Malte P; Huynh Anh, Minh; Rinschen, Markus M; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2016-05-27

    Transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) and Yes-associated protein (YAP) are critical transcriptional co-activators downstream of the Hippo pathway involved in the regulation of organ size, tissue regeneration, proliferation, and apoptosis. Recent studies suggested common and distinct functions of TAZ and YAP and their diverse impact under several pathological conditions. Here we report differential regulation of TAZ and YAP in response to oxidative stress. H2O2 exposure leads to increased stability and activation of TAZ but not of YAP. H2O2 induces reversible S-glutathionylation at conserved cysteine residues within TAZ. We further demonstrate that TAZ S-glutathionylation is critical for reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated, TAZ-dependent TEA domain transcription factor (TEAD) trans-activation. Lysophosphatidic acid, a physiological activator of YAP and TAZ, induces ROS elevation and, subsequently, TAZ S-glutathionylation, which promotes TAZ-mediated target gene expression. TAZ expression is essential for renal homeostasis in mice, and we identify basal TAZ S-glutathionylation in murine kidney lysates, which is elevated during ischemia/reperfusion injury in vivo This induced nuclear localization of TAZ and increased expression of connective tissue growth factor. These results describe a novel mechanism by which ROS sustains total cellular levels of TAZ. This preferential regulation suggests TAZ to be a redox sensor of the Hippo pathway. PMID:27048650

  19. In silico identification of enhancers on the basis of a combination of transcription factor binding motif occurrences

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yaping; Wang, Yunlong; Zhu, Qin; Wang, Jia; Li, Guoliang

    2016-01-01

    Enhancers interact with gene promoters and form chromatin looping structures that serve important functions in various biological processes, such as the regulation of gene transcription and cell differentiation. However, enhancers are difficult to identify because they generally do not have fixed positions or consensus sequence features, and biological experiments for enhancer identification are costly in terms of labor and expense. In this work, several models were built by using various sequence-based feature sets and their combinations for enhancer prediction. The selected features derived from a recursive feature elimination method showed that the model using a combination of 141 transcription factor binding motif occurrences from 1,422 transcription factor position weight matrices achieved a favorably high prediction accuracy superior to that of other reported methods. The models demonstrated good prediction accuracy for different enhancer datasets obtained from different cell lines/tissues. In addition, prediction accuracy was further improved by integration of chromatin state features. Our method is complementary to wet-lab experimental methods and provides an additional method to identify enhancers. PMID:27582178

  20. In silico identification of enhancers on the basis of a combination of transcription factor binding motif occurrences.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yaping; Wang, Yunlong; Zhu, Qin; Wang, Jia; Li, Guoliang

    2016-01-01

    Enhancers interact with gene promoters and form chromatin looping structures that serve important functions in various biological processes, such as the regulation of gene transcription and cell differentiation. However, enhancers are difficult to identify because they generally do not have fixed positions or consensus sequence features, and biological experiments for enhancer identification are costly in terms of labor and expense. In this work, several models were built by using various sequence-based feature sets and their combinations for enhancer prediction. The selected features derived from a recursive feature elimination method showed that the model using a combination of 141 transcription factor binding motif occurrences from 1,422 transcription factor position weight matrices achieved a favorably high prediction accuracy superior to that of other reported methods. The models demonstrated good prediction accuracy for different enhancer datasets obtained from different cell lines/tissues. In addition, prediction accuracy was further improved by integration of chromatin state features. Our method is complementary to wet-lab experimental methods and provides an additional method to identify enhancers. PMID:27582178

  1. Mutations in the coat protein-binding cis-acting RNA motifs debilitate RNA recombination of Brome mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Sztuba-Solińska, Joanna; Fanning, Sean W; Horn, James R; Bujarski, Jozef J

    2012-12-01

    We have previously described the efficient homologous recombination system between 5' subgenomic RNA3a (sgRNA3a) and genomic RNA3 of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) in barley protoplasts (Sztuba-Solińska et al., 2011a). Here, we demonstrated that sequence alterations in the coat protein (CP)-binding cis-acting RNA motifs, the Bbox region (in the intercistronic RNA3 sequence) and the RNA3 packaging element (PE, in the movement protein ORF), reduced crossover frequencies in protoplasts. Additionally, the modification of Bbox-like element in the 5' UTR region strongly debilitated crossovers. Along the lines of these observations, RNA3 mutants not expressing CP or expressing mutated CPs also reduced recombination. A series of reciprocal transfections demonstrated a functional crosstalk between the Bbox and PE elements. Altogether, our data imply the role of CP in sgRNA3a-directed recombination by either facilitating the interaction of the RNA substrates and/or by creating roadblocks for the viral replicase. PMID:23079110

  2. Human HDAC7 Harbors a Class IIa Histone Deacetylase-specific Zinc Binding Motif and Cryptic Deacetylase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz, Anja; Min, Jinrong; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Schapira, Matthieu; Shuen, Michael; Loppnau, Peter; Mazitschek, Ralph; Kwiatkowski, Nick P.; Lewis, Timothy A.; Maglathin, Rebecca L.; McLean, Thomas H.; Bochkarev, Alexey; Plotnikov, Alexander N.; Vedadi, Masoud; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2010-10-18

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are protein deacetylases that play a role in repression of gene transcription and are emerging targets in cancer therapy. Here, we characterize the structure and enzymatic activity of the catalytic domain of human HDAC7 (cdHDAC7). Although HDAC7 normally exists as part of a multiprotein complex, we show that cdHDAC7 has a low level of deacetylase activity which can be inhibited by known HDAC inhibitors. The crystal structures of human cdHDAC7 and its complexes with two hydroxamate inhibitors are the first structures of the catalytic domain of class IIa HDACs and demonstrate significant differences with previously reported class I and class IIb-like HDAC structures. We show that cdHDAC7 has an additional class IIa HDAC-specific zinc binding motif adjacent to the active site which is likely to participate in substrate recognition and protein-protein interaction and may provide a site for modulation of activity. Furthermore, a different active site topology results in modified catalytic properties and in an enlarged active site pocket. Our studies provide mechanistic insights into class IIa HDACs and facilitate the design of specific modulators.

  3. The PDZ-Binding Motif of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Envelope Protein Is a Determinant of Viral Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M.; Nieto-Torres, Jose L.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Regla-Nava, Jose A.; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-01-01

    A recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) lacking the envelope (E) protein is attenuated in vivo. Here we report that E protein PDZ-binding motif (PBM), a domain involved in protein-protein interactions, is a major determinant of virulence. Elimination of SARS-CoV E protein PBM by using reverse genetics caused a reduction in the deleterious exacerbation of the immune response triggered during infection with the parental virus and virus attenuation. Cellular protein syntenin was identified to bind the E protein PBM during SARS-CoV infection by using three complementary strategies, yeast two-hybrid, reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy assays. Syntenin redistributed from the nucleus to the cell cytoplasm during infection with viruses containing the E protein PBM, activating p38 MAPK and leading to the overexpression of inflammatory cytokines. Silencing of syntenin using siRNAs led to a decrease in p38 MAPK activation in SARS-CoV infected cells, further reinforcing their functional relationship. Active p38 MAPK was reduced in lungs of mice infected with SARS-CoVs lacking E protein PBM as compared with the parental virus, leading to a decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines and to virus attenuation. Interestingly, administration of a p38 MAPK inhibitor led to an increase in mice survival after infection with SARS-CoV, confirming the relevance of this pathway in SARS-CoV virulence. Therefore, the E protein PBM is a virulence domain that activates immunopathology most likely by using syntenin as a mediator of p38 MAPK induced inflammation. PMID:25122212

  4. Aminopeptidase B, a glucagon-processing enzyme: site directed mutagenesis of the Zn2+-binding motif and molecular modelling

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Viet-Laï; Cadel, Marie-Sandrine; Gouzy-Darmon, Cécile; Hanquez, Chantal; Beinfeld, Margery C; Nicolas, Pierre; Etchebest, Catherine; Foulon, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    Background Aminopeptidase B (Ap-B; EC 3.4.11.6) catalyzes the cleavage of basic residues at the N-terminus of peptides and processes glucagon into miniglucagon. The enzyme exhibits, in vitro, a residual ability to hydrolyze leukotriene A4 into the pro-inflammatory lipid mediator leukotriene B4. The potential bi-functional nature of Ap-B is supported by close structural relationships with LTA4 hydrolase (LTA4H ; EC 3.3.2.6). A structure-function analysis is necessary for the detailed understanding of the enzymatic mechanisms of Ap-B and to design inhibitors, which could be used to determine the complete in vivo functions of the enzyme. Results The rat Ap-B cDNA was expressed in E. coli and the purified recombinant enzyme was characterized. 18 mutants of the H325EXXHX18E348 Zn2+-binding motif were constructed and expressed. All mutations were found to abolish the aminopeptidase activity. A multiple alignment of 500 sequences of the M1 family of aminopeptidases was performed to identify 3 sub-families of exopeptidases and to build a structural model of Ap-B using the x-ray structure of LTA4H as a template. Although the 3D structures of the two enzymes resemble each other, they differ in certain details. The role that a loop, delimiting the active center of Ap-B, plays in discriminating basic substrates, as well as the function of consensus motifs, such as RNP1 and Armadillo domain are discussed. Examination of electrostatic potentials and hydrophobic patches revealed important differences between Ap-B and LTA4H and suggests that Ap-B is involved in protein-protein interactions. Conclusion Alignment of the primary structures of the M1 family members clearly demonstrates the existence of different sub-families and highlights crucial residues in the enzymatic activity of the whole family. E. coli recombinant enzyme and Ap-B structural model constitute powerful tools for investigating the importance and possible roles of these conserved residues in Ap-B, LTA4H and M1

  5. ATP-binding motifs play key roles in Krp1p, kinesin-related protein 1, function for bi-polar growth control in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Dong Keun; Cho, Bon A; Kim, Hyong Bai . E-mail: hbkim5212@hotmail.com

    2005-06-03

    Kinesin is a microtubule-based motor protein with various functions related to the cell growth and division. It has been reported that Krp1p, kinesin-related protein 1, which belongs to the kinesin heavy chain superfamily, localizes on microtubules and may play an important role in cytokinesis. However, the function of Krp1p has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we overexpressed an intact form and three different mutant forms of Krp1p in fission yeast constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in two ATP-binding motifs or by truncation of the leucine zipper-like motif (LZiP). We observed hyper-extended microtubules and the aberrant nuclear shape in Krp1p-overexpressed fission yeast. As a functional consequence, a point mutation of ATP-binding domain 1 (G89E) in Krp1p reversed the effect of Krp1p overexpression in fission yeast, whereas the specific mutation in ATP-binding domain 2 (G238E) resulted in the altered cell polarity. Additionally, truncation of the leucine zipper-like domain (LZiP) at the C-terminal of Krp1p showed a normal nuclear division. Taken together, we suggest that krp1p is involved in regulation of cell-polarized growth through ATP-binding motifs in fission yeast.

  6. The ESEV PDZ-Binding Motif of the Avian Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein Protects Infected Cells from Apoptosis by Directly Targeting Scribble▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongbing; Golebiewski, Lisa; Dow, Eugene C.; Krug, Robert M.; Javier, Ronald T.; Rice, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    The NS1 protein from influenza A viruses contains a four-amino-acid sequence at its carboxyl terminus that is termed the PDZ-binding motif (PBM). The NS1 PBM is predicted to bind to cellular PDZ proteins and functions as a virulence determinant in infected mice. ESEV is the consensus PBM sequence of avian influenza viruses, while RSKV is the consensus sequence of human viruses. Currently circulating highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses encode an NS1 protein with the ESEV PBM. We identified cellular targets of the avian ESEV PBM and identified molecular mechanisms involved in its function. Using glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays, we found that the ESEV PBM enables NS1 to associate with the PDZ proteins Scribble, Dlg1, MAGI-1, MAGI-2, and MAGI-3. Because Scribble possesses a proapoptotic activity, we investigated the interaction between NS1 and Scribble. The association between NS1 and Scribble is direct and requires the ESEV PBM and two Scribble PDZ domains. We constructed recombinant H3N2 viruses that encode an H6N6 avian virus NS1 protein with either an ESEV or mutant ESEA PBM, allowing an analysis of the ESEV PBM in infections in mammalian cells. The ESEV PBM enhanced viral replication up to 4-fold. In infected cells, NS1 with the ESEV PBM relocalized Scribble into cytoplasmic puncta concentrated in perinuclear regions and also protected cells from apoptosis. In addition, the latter effect was eliminated by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated Scribble depletion. This study shows that one function of the avian ESEV PBM is to reduce apoptosis during infection through disruption of Scribble's proapoptotic function. PMID:20702615

  7. Complementarity of Binding Motifs is a General Property of HLA-A and HLA-B Molecules and Does Not Seem to Effect HLA Haplotype Composition.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiangyu; De Boer, Rob J; van Baarle, Debbie; Maiers, Martin; Kesmir, Can

    2013-01-01

    Different human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes (i.e., the specific combinations of HLA-A, -B, -DR alleles inherited together from one parent) are observed in different frequencies in human populations. Some haplotypes, like HLA-A1-B8, are very frequent, reaching up to 10% in the Caucasian population, while others are very rare. Numerous studies have identified associations between HLA haplotypes and diseases, and differences in haplotype frequencies can in part be explained by these associations: the stronger the association with a severe (autoimmune) disease, the lower the expected HLA haplotype frequency. The peptide repertoires of the HLA molecules composing a haplotype can also influence the frequency of a haplotype. For example, it would seem advantageous to have HLA molecules with non-overlapping binding specificities within a haplotype, as individuals expressing such an haplotype would present a diverse set of peptides from viruses and pathogenic bacteria on the cell surface. To test this hypothesis, we collect the proteome data from a set of common viruses, and estimate the total ligand repertoire of HLA class I haplotypes (HLA-A-B) using in silico predictions. We compare the size of these repertoires to the HLA haplotype frequencies reported in the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). We find that in most HLA-A and HLA-B pairs have fairly distinct binding motifs, and that the observed haplotypes do not contain HLA-A and -B molecules with more distinct binding motifs than random HLA-A and HLA-B pairs. In addition, the population frequency of a haplotype is not correlated to the distinctness of its HLA-A and HLA-B peptide binding motifs. These results suggest that there is a not a strong selection pressure on the haplotype level favoring haplotypes having HLA molecules with distinct binding motifs, which would result the largest possible presented peptide repertoires in the context of infectious diseases. PMID:24294213

  8. Role of NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Asaka; Asahina, Kota; Okamoto, Takumi; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Kostsin, Dzmitry G.; Kashiwayama, Yoshinori; Takanashi, Kojiro; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Imanaka, Tsuneo; Morita, Masashi

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms.

  9. Developmentally Regulated RNA-binding Protein 1 (Drb1)/RNA-binding Motif Protein 45 (RBM45), a Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Trafficking Protein, Forms TAR DNA-binding Protein 43 (TDP-43)-mediated Cytoplasmic Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Takafumi; Sakashita, Eiji; Kasashima, Katsumi; Tominaga, Kaoru; Kuroiwa, Kenji; Nozaki, Yasuyuki; Matsuura, Tohru; Hamamoto, Toshiro; Endo, Hitoshi

    2016-07-15

    Cytoplasmic protein aggregates are one of the pathological hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Several RNA-binding proteins have been identified as components of inclusion bodies. Developmentally regulated RNA-binding protein 1 (Drb1)/RNA-binding motif protein 45 is an RNA-binding protein that was recently described as a component in ALS- and FTLD-related inclusion bodies. However, the molecular mechanism underlying cytoplasmic Drb1 aggregation remains unclear. Here, using an in vitro cellular model, we demonstrated that Drb1 co-localizes with cytoplasmic aggregates mediated by TAR DNA-binding protein 43, a major component of ALS and FTLD-related inclusion bodies. We also defined the domains involved in the subcellular localization of Drb1 to clarify the role of Drb1 in the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates in ALS and FTLD. Drb1 predominantly localized in the nucleus via a classical nuclear localization signal in its carboxyl terminus and is a shuttling protein between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Furthermore, we identify a double leucine motif serving as a nuclear export signal. The Drb1 mutant, presenting mutations in both nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal, is prone to aggregate in the cytoplasm. The mutant Drb1-induced cytoplasmic aggregates not only recruit TAR DNA-binding protein 43 but also decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, these results indicate that perturbation of Drb1 nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking induces toxic cytoplasmic aggregates, suggesting that mislocalization of Drb1 is involved in the cause of cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. PMID:27226551

  10. Validation of chemical compound library screening for transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif inhibitors using GFP-fused transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Shunta; Maruyama, Junichi; Kawano, Shodai; Iwasa, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Kentaro; Ishigami-Yuasa, Mari; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Nishina, Hiroshi; Hata, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) plays versatile roles in cell proliferation and differentiation. It is phosphorylated by large tumor suppressor kinases, the core kinases of the tumor-suppressive Hippo pathway. Phosphorylation induces the cytoplasmic accumulation of TAZ and its degradation. In human cancers, the deregulation of the Hippo pathway and gene amplification enhance TAZ activity. TAZ interacts with TEA domain family members (TEAD), and upregulates genes implicated in epithelial-mesenchymal transition. It also confers stemness to cancer cells. Thus, TAZ activation provides cancer cells with malignant properties and worsens the clinical prognosis. Therefore, TAZ attracts attention as a therapeutic target in cancer therapy. We applied 18 606 small chemical compounds to human osteosarcoma U2OS cells expressing GFP-fused TAZ (GFP-TAZ), monitored the subcellular localization of GFP-TAZ, and selected 33 compounds that shifted GFP-TAZ to the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, only a limited number of compounds suppressed TAZ-mediated enhancement of TEAD-responsive reporter activity. Moreover, the compounds that weakened TEAD reporter activity did not necessarily decrease the unphosphorylated TAZ. In this study, we focused on three compounds that decreased both TEAD reporter activity and unphosphorylated TAZ, and treated several human cancer cells with these compounds. One compound did not show a remarkable effect, whereas the other two compounds compromised the cell viability in certain cancer cells. In conclusion, the GFP-TAZ-based assay can be used as the first screening for compounds that inhibit TAZ and show anticancer properties. To develop anticancer drugs, we need additional assays to select the compounds. PMID:27009852

  11. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  12. Biophysical analysis of binding of WW domains of the YAP2 transcriptional regulator to PPXY motifs within WBP1 and WBP2 adaptors.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Caleb B; McIntosh, Samantha K N; Mikles, David C; Bhat, Vikas; Deegan, Brian J; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Saeed, Ali M; Buffa, Laura; Sudol, Marius; Nawaz, Zafar; Farooq, Amjad

    2011-11-01

    The YAP2 transcriptional regulator mediates a plethora of cellular functions, including the newly discovered Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, by virtue of its ability to recognize WBP1 and WBP2 signaling adaptors among a wide variety of other ligands. Herein, using isothermal titration calorimery and circular dichroism in combination with molecular modeling and molecular dynamics, we provide evidence that the WW1 and WW2 domains of YAP2 recognize various PPXY motifs within WBP1 and WBP2 in a highly promiscuous and subtle manner. Thus, although both WW domains strictly require the integrity of the consensus PPXY sequence, nonconsensus residues within and flanking this motif are not critical for high-affinity binding, implying that they most likely play a role in stabilizing the polyproline type II helical conformation of the PPXY ligands. Of particular interest is the observation that both WW domains bind to a PPXYXG motif with highest affinity, implicating a preference for a nonbulky and flexible glycine one residue to the C-terminal side of the consensus tyrosine. Importantly, a large set of residues within both WW domains and the PPXY motifs appear to undergo rapid fluctuations on a nanosecond time scale, suggesting that WW-ligand interactions are highly dynamic and that such conformational entropy may be an integral part of the reversible and temporal nature of cellular signaling cascades. Collectively, our study sheds light on the molecular determinants of a key WW-ligand interaction pertinent to cellular functions in health and disease. PMID:21981024

  13. The human 64-kDa polyadenylylation factor contains a ribonucleoprotein-type RNA binding domain and unusual auxiliary motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Takagaki, Y; MacDonald, C C; Shenk, T; Manley, J L

    1992-01-01

    Cleavage stimulation factor is one of the multiple factors required for 3'-end cleavage of mammalian pre-mRNAs. We have shown previously that this factor is composed of three subunits with estimated molecular masses of 77, 64, and 50 kDa and that the 64-kDa subunit can be UV-crosslinked to RNA in a polyadenylylation signal (AAUAAA)-dependent manner. We have now isolated cDNAs encoding the 64-kDa subunit of human cleavage stimulation factor. The 64-kDa subunit contains a ribonucleoprotein-type RNA binding domain in the N-terminal region and a repeat structure in the C-terminal region in which a pentapeptide sequence (consensus MEARA/G) is repeated 12 times and the formation of a long alpha-helix stabilized by salt bridges is predicted. An approximately 270-amino acid segment surrounding this repeat structure is highly enriched in proline and glycine residues (approximately 20% for each). When cloned 64-kDa subunit was expressed in Escherichia coli, an N-terminal fragment containing the RNA binding domain bound to RNAs in a polyadenylylation-signal-independent manner, suggesting that the RNA binding domain is directly involved in the binding of the 64-kDa subunit to pre-mRNAs. Images PMID:1741396

  14. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, Paulina M.; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits, two catalytic centers, common amino acid sequence, and specific contacts to provide a flip-flop, or alternate site, mechanism of action. Each catalytic center [PP:PYR] is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and aminopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core [PP:PYR]* within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GX@&(G)@XXGQ, and GDGX25-30 within the PP- domain, and the E&(G)@XXG@ within the PYR-domain, where Q, corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  15. The HIV-1 envelope transmembrane domain binds TLR2 through a distinct dimerization motif and inhibits TLR2-mediated responses.

    PubMed

    Reuven, Eliran Moshe; Ali, Mohammad; Rotem, Etai; Schwarzer, Roland; Schwarzter, Roland; Gramatica, Andrea; Futerman, Anthony H; Shai, Yechiel

    2014-08-01

    HIV-1 uses a number of means to manipulate the immune system, to avoid recognition and to highjack signaling pathways. HIV-1 infected cells show limited Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) responsiveness via as yet unknown mechanisms. Using biochemical and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the trans-membrane domain (TMD) of the HIV-1 envelope (ENV) directly interacts with TLR2 TMD within the membrane milieu. This interaction attenuates TNFα, IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion in macrophages, induced by natural ligands of TLR2 both in in vitro and in vivo models. This was associated with decreased levels of ERK phosphorylation. Furthermore, mutagenesis demonstrated the importance of a conserved GxxxG motif in driving this interaction within the membrane milieu. The administration of the ENV TMD in vivo to lipotechoic acid (LTA)/Galactosamine-mediated septic mice resulted in a significant decrease in mortality and in tissue damage, due to the weakening of systemic macrophage activation. Our findings suggest that the TMD of ENV is involved in modulation of the innate immune response during HIV infection. Furthermore, due to the high functional homology of viral ENV proteins this function may be a general character of viral-induced immune modulation. PMID:25121610

  16. The clathrin-binding motif and the J-domain of Drosophila Auxilin are essential for facilitating Notch ligand endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kandachar, Vasundhara; Bai, Ting; Chang, Henry C

    2008-01-01

    Background Ligand endocytosis plays a critical role in regulating the activity of the Notch pathway. The Drosophila homolog of auxilin (dAux), a J-domain-containing protein best known for its role in the disassembly of clathrin coats from clathrin-coated vesicles, has recently been implicated in Notch signaling, although its exact mechanism remains poorly understood. Results To understand the role of auxilin in Notch ligand endocytosis, we have analyzed several point mutations affecting specific domains of dAux. In agreement with previous work, analysis using these stronger dAux alleles shows that dAux is required for several Notch-dependent processes, and its function during Notch signaling is required in the signaling cells. In support of the genetic evidences, the level of Delta appears elevated in dAux deficient cells, suggesting that the endocytosis of Notch ligand is disrupted. Deletion analysis shows that the clathrin-binding motif and the J-domain, when over-expressed, are sufficient for rescuing dAux phenotypes, implying that the recruitment of Hsc70 to clathrin is a critical role for dAux. However, surface labeling experiment shows that, in dAux mutant cells, Delta accumulates at the cell surface. In dAux mutant cells, clathrin appears to form large aggregates, although Delta is not enriched in these aberrant clathrin-positive structures. Conclusion Our data suggest that dAux mutations inhibit Notch ligand internalization at an early step during clathrin-mediated endocytosis, before the disassembly of clathrin-coated vesicles. Further, the inhibition of ligand endocytosis in dAux mutant cells possibly occurs due to depletion of cytosolic pools of clathrin via the formation of clathrin aggregates. Together, our observations argue that ligand endocytosis is critical for Notch signaling and auxilin participates in Notch signaling by facilitating ligand internalization. PMID:18466624

  17. Decreased expression of RNA-binding motif protein 3 correlates with tumour progression and poor prognosis in urothelial bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low nuclear expression of the RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) has previously been found to be associated with poor prognosis in several cancer forms e.g. breast, ovarian, colorectal, prostate cancer and malignant melanoma. The aim of this study was to examine the prognostic impact of RBM3 expression in urinary bladder cancer. Methods Immunohistochemical RBM3 expression was examined in tumours from 343 patients with urothelial bladder cancer. Chi-square and Spearman’s correlation tests were applied to explore associations between RBM3 expression and clinicopathological characteristics. The impact of RBM3 expression on disease-specific survival (DSS), 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling. Results Reduced nuclear RBM3 expression was significantly associated with more advanced tumour (T) stage (p <0.001) and high grade tumours (p=0.004). Negative RBM3 expression was associated with a significantly shorter DSS (HR=2.55; 95% CI 1.68-3.86)) and 5-year OS (HR=2.10; 95% CI 1.56-2.82), also in multivariable analysis (HR=1.65; 95% CI 1.07-2.53 for DSS and HR=1.54; 95% CI 1.13-2.10 for 5-year OS). In patients with Ta and T1 tumours expressing reduced RBM3 levels, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a significantly shorter PFS (p=0.048) and 5-year OS (p=0.006). Conclusion Loss of RBM3 expression is associated with clinically more aggressive tumours and an independent factor of poor prognosis in patients with urothelial bladder cancer and a potentially useful biomarker for treatment stratification and surveillance of disease progression. PMID:23565664

  18. Echinococcus granulosus fatty acid binding proteins subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2016-05-01

    Two fatty acid binding proteins, EgFABP1 and EgFABP2, were isolated from the parasitic platyhelminth Echinococcus granulosus. These proteins bind fatty acids and have particular relevance in flatworms since de novo fatty acids synthesis is absent. Therefore platyhelminthes depend on the capture and intracellular distribution of host's lipids and fatty acid binding proteins could participate in lipid distribution. To elucidate EgFABP's roles, we investigated their intracellular distribution in the larval stage by a proteomic approach. Our results demonstrated the presence of EgFABP1 isoforms in cytosolic, nuclear, mitochondrial and microsomal fractions, suggesting that these molecules could be involved in several cellular processes. PMID:26873273

  19. PscanChIP: finding over-represented transcription factor-binding site motifs and their correlations in sequences from ChIP-Seq experiments

    PubMed Central

    Zambelli, Federico; Pesole, Graziano; Pavesi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing with next-generation technologies (ChIP-Seq) has become the de facto standard for building genome-wide maps of regions bound by a given transcription factor (TF). The regions identified, however, have to be further analyzed to determine the actual DNA-binding sites for the TF, as well as sites for other TFs belonging to the same TF complex or in general co-operating or interacting with it in transcription regulation. PscanChIP is a web server that, starting from a collection of genomic regions derived from a ChIP-Seq experiment, scans them using motif descriptors like JASPAR or TRANSFAC position-specific frequency matrices, or descriptors uploaded by users, and it evaluates both motif enrichment and positional bias within the regions according to different measures and criteria. PscanChIP can successfully identify not only the actual binding sites for the TF investigated by a ChIP-Seq experiment but also secondary motifs corresponding to other TFs that tend to bind the same regions, and, if present, precise positional correlations among their respective sites. The web interface is free for use, and there is no login requirement. It is available at http://www.beaconlab.it/pscan_chip_dev. PMID:23748563

  20. The histone chaperone sNASP binds a conserved peptide motif within the globular core of histone H3 through its TPR repeats

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Andrew; Lercher, Lukas; Singh, Hari R.; Zinne, Daria; Timinszky, Gyula; Carlomagno, Teresa; Ladurner, Andreas G.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is a complex yet dynamic structure, which is regulated in part by the assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes. Key to this process is a group of proteins termed histone chaperones that guide the thermodynamic assembly of nucleosomes by interacting with soluble histones. Here we investigate the interaction between the histone chaperone sNASP and its histone H3 substrate. We find that sNASP binds with nanomolar affinity to a conserved heptapeptide motif in the globular domain of H3, close to the C-terminus. Through functional analysis of sNASP homologues we identified point mutations in surface residues within the TPR domain of sNASP that disrupt H3 peptide interaction, but do not completely disrupt binding to full length H3 in cells, suggesting that sNASP interacts with H3 through additional contacts. Furthermore, chemical shift perturbations from 1H-15N HSQC experiments show that H3 peptide binding maps to the helical groove formed by the stacked TPR motifs of sNASP. Our findings reveal a new mode of interaction between a TPR repeat domain and an evolutionarily conserved peptide motif found in canonical H3 and in all histone H3 variants, including CenpA and have implications for the mechanism of histone chaperoning within the cell. PMID:26673727

  1. The MotA transcription factor from bacteriophage T4 contains a novel DNA-binding domain : the 'double wing' motif.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Sickmier, E. A.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; White, S. W.; Biosciences Division; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital; Univ. of Tennessee Health Science Center; Corixa Inc.

    2002-01-01

    MotA is a transcription factor from bacteriophage T4 that helps adapt the host Escherichia coli transcription apparatus to T4 middle promoters. We have determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of MotA (MotCF) to 1.6 A resolution using multiwavelength, anomalous diffraction methods. The structure reveals a novel DNA-binding alpha/beta motif that contains an exposed beta-sheet surface that mediates interactions with the DNA. Independent biochemical experiments have shown that MotCF binds to one surface of a single turn of DNA through interactions in adjacent major and minor grooves. We present a model of the interaction in which beta-ribbons at opposite corners of the six-stranded beta-sheet penetrate the DNA grooves, and call the motif a 'double wing' to emphasize similarities to the 'winged-helix' motif. The model is consistent with data on how MotA functions at middle promoters, and provides an explanation for why MotA can form non-specific multimers on DNA.

  2. A conserved motif N-terminal to the DNA-binding domains of myogenic bHLH transcription factors mediates cooperative DNA binding with pbx-Meis1/Prep1.

    PubMed

    Knoepfler, P S; Bergstrom, D A; Uetsuki, T; Dac-Korytko, I; Sun, Y H; Wright, W E; Tapscott, S J; Kamps, M P

    1999-09-15

    The t(1;19) chromosomal translocation of pediatric pre-B cell leukemia produces chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1, which contains the N-terminal transactivation domain of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, E2a, joined to the majority of the homeodomain protein, Pbx1. There are three Pbx family members, which bind DNA as heterodimers with both broadly expressed Meis/Prep1 homeo-domain proteins and specifically expressed Hox homeodomain proteins. These Pbx heterodimers can augment the function of transcriptional activators bound to adjacent elements. In heterodimers, a conserved tryptophan motif in Hox proteins binds a pocket on the surface of the Pbx homeodomain, while Meis/Prep1 proteins bind an N-terminal Pbx domain, raising the possibility that the tryptophan-interaction pocket of the Pbx component of a Pbx-Meis/Prep1 complex is still available to bind trypto-phan motifs of other transcription factors bound to flanking elements. Here, we report that Pbx-Meis1/Prep1 binds DNA cooperatively with heterodimers of E2a and MyoD, myogenin, Mrf-4 or Myf-5. As with Hox proteins, a highly conserved tryptophan motif N-terminal to the DNA-binding domains of each myogenic bHLH family protein is required for cooperative DNA binding with Pbx-Meis1/Prep1. In vivo, MyoD requires this tryptophan motif to evoke chromatin remodeling in the Myogenin promoter and to activate Myogenin transcription. Pbx-Meis/Prep1 complexes, therefore, have the potential to cooperate with the myogenic bHLH proteins in regulating gene transcription. PMID:10471746

  3. Natural ligand binding and transfer from liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) to membranes.

    PubMed

    De Gerónimo, Eduardo; Hagan, Robert M; Wilton, David C; Córsico, Betina

    2010-09-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is distinctive among fatty acid-binding proteins because it binds more than one molecule of long-chain fatty acid and a variety of diverse ligands. Also, the transfer of fluorescent fatty acid analogues to model membranes under physiological ionic strength follows a different mechanism compared to most of the members of this family of intracellular lipid binding proteins. Tryptophan insertion mutants sensitive to ligand binding have allowed us to directly measure the binding affinity, ligand partitioning and transfer to model membranes of natural ligands. Binding of fatty acids shows a cooperative mechanism, while acyl-CoAs binding presents a hyperbolic behavior. Saturated fatty acids seem to have a stronger partition to protein vs. membranes, compared to unsaturated fatty acids. Natural ligand transfer rates are more than 200-fold higher compared to fluorescently-labeled analogues. Interestingly, oleoyl-CoA presents a markedly different transfer behavior compared to the rest of the ligands tested, probably indicating the possibility of specific targeting of ligands to different metabolic fates. PMID:20541621

  4. RNA Binding of T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) C-terminal RNA Recognition Motif Is Modified by pH Conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Aroca, Ángeles; Persson, Cecilia; Karlsson, B. Göran; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2013-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates critical events in cell physiology by the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. TIA-1 is composed of three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a glutamine-rich domain and binds to uridine-rich RNA sequences through its C-terminal RRM2 and RRM3 domains. Here, we show that RNA binding mediated by either isolated RRM3 or the RRM23 construct is controlled by slight environmental pH changes due to the protonation/deprotonation of TIA-1 RRM3 histidine residues. The auxiliary role of the C-terminal RRM3 domain in TIA-1 RNA recognition is poorly understood, and this work provides insight into its binding mechanisms. PMID:23902765

  5. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, E.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits and two catalytic centers. Each catalytic center (PP:PYR) is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and amhopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core (PP:PYR)(sub 2) within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GXPhiX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGQ and GDGX(sub 25-30)NN in the PP-domain, and the EX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGPhi in the PYR-domain, where Phi corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  6. Accessory Interaction Motifs in the Atg19 Cargo Receptor Enable Strong Binding to the Clustered Ubiquitin-related Atg8 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Abert, Christine; Kontaxis, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Selective autophagy contributes to cellular homeostasis by delivering harmful material into the lysosomal system for degradation via vesicular intermediates referred to as autophagosomes. The cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting pathway is a variant of selective autophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during which hydrolases such as prApe1 are transported into the vacuole. In general, selectivity is achieved by autophagic cargo receptors that link the cargo to autophagosomal membranes because of their ability to simultaneously interact with the cargo and Atg8 proteins that coat the membrane. The Atg19 receptor contains multiple Atg8 interaction sites in its C terminus in addition to a canonical Atg8-interacting LC3-interacting region (LIR, with LC3 being a homolog of Atg8) motif, but their mode of interaction with Atg8 is unclear. Here we show, using a combination of NMR, microscopy-based interaction assays, and prApe1 processing experiments, that two additional sites interact with Atg8 in a LIR-like and thus mutually exclusive manner. We term these motifs accessory LIR motifs because their affinities are lower than that of the canonical LIR motif. Thus, one Atg19 molecule has the ability to interact with multiple Atg8 proteins simultaneously, resulting in a high-avidity interaction that may confer specific binding to the Atg8-coated autophagosomal membrane on which Atg8 is concentrated. PMID:27402840

  7. Spectrofluorimetric study of the binding of codeine to nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Huang, Wei; Su, Liang; Dong, Zijia; Zhang, Shuai

    2009-06-01

    The characteristics of the interaction between codeine (CD) and nucleic acids were studied by ultraviolet-visible spectra and fluorescent spectra. It shows that there is a powerful ability in nucleic acids to quench the fluorescence intensity of codeine. The fluorescence quenching data were analyzed according to Stern-Volmer equation and Förster's nonradiative energy transfer mechanism. Thus the binding constant and the thermodynamic parameters between codeine and nucleic acids were obtained. The results show that codeine interacts with nucleic acids in a mode of groove binding and -OCH 3 of the codeine molecular combines with the groove of nucleic acids through hydrogen bond or van der Waals force.

  8. Capture and release of acid-gasses with acid-gas binding organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Heldebrant, David J; Yonker, Clement R; Koech, Phillip K

    2015-03-17

    A system and method for acid-gas capture wherein organic acid-gas capture materials form hetero-atom analogs of alkyl-carbonate when contacted with an acid gas. These organic-acid gas capture materials include combinations of a weak acid and a base, or zwitterionic liquids. This invention allows for reversible acid-gas binding to these organic binding materials thus allowing for the capture and release of one or more acid gases. These acid-gas binding organic compounds can be regenerated to release the captured acid gasses and enable these organic acid-gas binding materials to be reused. This enables transport of the liquid capture compounds and the release of the acid gases from the organic liquid with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems.

  9. Expression and characterization of EF-hand I loop mutants of aequorin replaced with other loop sequences of Ca2+-binding proteins: an approach to studying the EF-hand motif of proteins.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara-Miura, Yuiko

    2016-07-01

    The binding properties of Ca(2+) to EF-hand I of aequorin (AQ) were characterized by replacing the loop sequence of EF-hand I (AQ[I]) with other known loop sequences of Ca(2+)-binding proteins, including photoproteins (aequorin, clytin-I, clytin-II and mitrocomin), Renilla luciferin-binding protein (RLBP) and calmodulin (CaM). For evaluation of the binding affinity of Ca(2+) to AQ[I] mutants, the half-decay time of the maximum intensity in the luminescence reaction triggered by Ca(2+) was used as an indicator and 22 kinds of AQ[I] mutants were expressed in Escherichia coli cells. AQ[I] mutants replaced with the EF-hand I and EF-hand III from photoproteins showed sufficient luminescence activity, but it was not shown by other EF-hands from RLBP and CaM. An AQ[I] mutant with a lysine or arginine residue at the second position of the non-conserved amino acid residue showed a slow-decay pattern of luminescence, indicating that the Ca(2+)-binding affinity to aequorin was reduced by a positive charge at the second position of the loop sequence. The specific loop sequence of the EF-hand I motif in aequorin caused the specific Ca(2+)-triggered luminescence pattern. PMID:26896488

  10. Native characterization of nucleic acid motif thermodynamics via non-covalent catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyan; Bae, Jin H.; Zhang, David Yu

    2016-01-01

    DNA hybridization thermodynamics is critical for accurate design of oligonucleotides for biotechnology and nanotechnology applications, but parameters currently in use are inaccurately extrapolated based on limited quantitative understanding of thermal behaviours. Here, we present a method to measure the ΔG° of DNA motifs at temperatures and buffer conditions of interest, with significantly better accuracy (6- to 14-fold lower s.e.) than prior methods. The equilibrium constant of a reaction with thermodynamics closely approximating that of a desired motif is numerically calculated from directly observed reactant and product equilibrium concentrations; a DNA catalyst is designed to accelerate equilibration. We measured the ΔG° of terminal fluorophores, single-nucleotide dangles and multinucleotide dangles, in temperatures ranging from 10 to 45 °C. PMID:26782977

  11. Native characterization of nucleic acid motif thermodynamics via non-covalent catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyan; Bae, Jin H.; Zhang, David Yu

    2016-01-01

    DNA hybridization thermodynamics is critical for accurate design of oligonucleotides for biotechnology and nanotechnology applications, but parameters currently in use are inaccurately extrapolated based on limited quantitative understanding of thermal behaviours. Here, we present a method to measure the ΔG° of DNA motifs at temperatures and buffer conditions of interest, with significantly better accuracy (6- to 14-fold lower s.e.) than prior methods. The equilibrium constant of a reaction with thermodynamics closely approximating that of a desired motif is numerically calculated from directly observed reactant and product equilibrium concentrations; a DNA catalyst is designed to accelerate equilibration. We measured the ΔG° of terminal fluorophores, single-nucleotide dangles and multinucleotide dangles, in temperatures ranging from 10 to 45 °C.

  12. Using Weeder, Pscan, and PscanChIP for the Discovery of Enriched Transcription Factor Binding Site Motifs in Nucleotide Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zambelli, Federico; Pesole, Graziano; Pavesi, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing modern molecular biology is understanding the complex mechanisms regulating gene expression. A fundamental step in this process requires the characterization of sequence motifs involved in the regulation of gene expression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In particular, transcription is modulated by the interaction of transcription factors (TFs) with their corresponding binding sites. Weeder, Pscan, and PscanChIP are software tools freely available for noncommercial users as a stand-alone or Web-based applications for the automatic discovery of conserved motifs in a set of DNA sequences likely to be bound by the same TFs. Input for the tools can be promoter sequences from co-expressed or co-regulated genes (for which Weeder and Pscan are suitable), or regions identified through genome wide ChIP-seq or similar experiments (Weeder and PscanChIP). The motifs are either found by a de novo approach (Weeder) or by using descriptors of the binding specificity of TFs (Pscan and PscanChIP). PMID:25199791

  13. A novel DNA binding motif for yeast zinc cluster proteins: the Leu3p and Pdr3p transcriptional activators recognize everted repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Hellauer, K; Rochon, M H; Turcotte, B

    1996-01-01

    The Gal4, Put3, and Ppr1 yeast zinc cluster proteins bind as homodimers to DNA sequences composed of palindromic CGG triplets. Spacing between the triplets specifies the target site for a given zinc cluster protein. In addition, Hap1p, another zinc cluster protein, also recognizes CGG triplets but only when oriented as a direct repeat. Unexpectedly, our results show that Leu3p, another member of this family, also recognizes CGG triplets but oriented in opposite directions and spaced by 4 nucleotides (an everted repeat or inverted palindrome: CCG-N4-CGG). This constitutes a novel DNA motif for zinc cluster proteins. Moreover, the presence of this motif was shown to be essential for in vivo activation by Leu3p of a minimal reporter containing one copy of a target site for this activator. We also provide evidence that another member of this family, Pdr3p, binds to an everted repeat spaced by 0 nucleotides (CCGCGG). Thus, our results show that three CGG motifs are used by members of the zinc cluster family: palindromes, direct repeats, and everted repeats. PMID:8887639

  14. Photoaffinity labeling of retinoic acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, P S; Choi, S Y; Ho, Y C; Rando, R R

    1995-01-01

    Retinoid-binding proteins are essential mediators of vitamin A function in vertebrate organisms. They solubilize and stabilize retinoids, and they direct the intercellular and intracellular trafficking, transport, and metabolic function of vitamin A compounds in vision and in growth and development. Although many soluble retinoid-binding proteins and receptors have been purified and extensively characterized, relatively few membrane-associated enzymes and other proteins that interact with retinoids have been isolated and studied, due primarily to their inherent instabilities during purification. In an effort to identify and purify previously uncharacterized retinoid-binding proteins, it is shown that radioactively labeled all-trans-retinoic acid can be used as a photoaffinity labeling reagent to specifically tag two known retinoic acid-binding proteins, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein and albumin, in complex mixtures of cytosolic proteins. Additionally, a number of other soluble and membrane-associated proteins that bind all-trans-[11,12-3H]retinoic acid with high specificity are labeled utilizing the same photoaffinity techniques. Most of these labeled proteins have molecular weights that do not correspond to any known retinoid-binding proteins. Thus, photoaffinity labeling with all-trans-retinoic acid and related photoactivatable retinoids is a method that should prove extremely useful in the identification and purification of novel soluble and membrane-associated retinoid-binding proteins from ocular and nonocular tissues. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7846032

  15. Enhanced stability of Cu(2+)-ATCUN complexes under physiologically relevant conditions by insertion of structurally bulky and hydrophobic amino acid residues into the ATCUN motif.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Takaaki; Fukino, Yuta; Kamino, Shinichiro; Ueda, Masashi; Enomoto, Shuichi

    2016-06-21

    Copper complexes formed by an amino terminal Cu(2+)- and Ni(2+)-binding (ATCUN) motif have attracted attention as metallodrug candidates that cleave DNA or RNA and inactivate enzymes. Although the stability of the Cu(2+)-ATCUN complex under physiologically relevant conditions is a key factor for medical applications, it has remained unclear. Here we prepared a series of ATCUN peptides by inserting various amino acid residues into positions 1 and 2, and investigated the stability of the Cu(2+)-ATCUN complexes in aqueous solution, blood plasma, and living animals. Systematic pH titration showed that the low basicity of the N-terminal amine of the peptide stabilized the Cu(2+)-ATCUN complex in aqueous solution. Interestingly, the stability of (64)Cu-labeled ATCUN complexes in blood plasma was significantly enhanced by the structural bulkiness and hydrophobicity of the amino acid residues at positions 1 and 2. To validate the in vivo stability, six ATCUN motifs (YYH, VVH, NNH, TTH, GGH, and DDH) were conjugated to a tumor-targeting peptide, octreotide (Oct). The stability of the (64)Cu-ATCUN-Oct complexes in blood plasma showed a similar trend to that of the (64)Cu-ATCUN complexes. The (64)Cu-YYH-Oct complex exhibited the highest stability in blood plasma. According to the positron emission tomography and competitive blocking studies of a tumor-bearing mouse model, (64)Cu-YYH-Oct specifically accumulated in tumors, suggesting that the complex was sufficiently stable to reach its target in vivo. The results show that the structural bulkiness and hydrophobicity of the residues at positions 1 and 2 are key parameters for designing metallodrugs on the basis of the Cu(2+)-ATCUN complex. PMID:27184978

  16. A Conserved alpha-helical motif mediates the binding of diverse nuclear proteins to the SRC1 interaction domain of CBP.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Sachiko; Harries, Janet C; Viskaduraki, Maria; Troke, Philip J F; Kindle, Karin B; Ryan, Colm; Heery, David M

    2004-04-01

    CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 contain modular domains that mediate protein-protein interactions with a wide variety of nuclear factors. A C-terminal domain of CBP (referred to as the SID) is responsible for interaction with the alpha-helical AD1 domain of p160 coactivators such as the steroid receptor coactivator (SRC1), and also other transcriptional regulators such as E1A, Ets-2, IRF3, and p53. Here we show that the pointed (PNT) domain of Ets-2 mediates its interaction with the CBP SID, and describe the effects of mutations in the SID on binding of Ets-2, E1A, and SRC1. In vitro binding studies indicate that SRC1, Ets-2 and E1A display mutually exclusive binding to the CBP SID. Consistent with this, we observed negative cross-talk between ERalpha/SRC1, Ets-2, and E1A proteins in reporter assays in transiently transfected cells. Transcriptional inhibition of Ets-2 or GAL4-AD1 activity by E1A was rescued by co-transfection with a CBP expression plasmid, consistent with the hypothesis that the observed inhibition was due to competition for CBP in vivo. Sequence comparisons revealed that SID-binding proteins contain a leucine-rich motif similar to the alpha-helix Aalpha1 of the SRC1 AD1 domain. Deletion mutants of E1A and Ets-2 lacking the conserved motif were unable to bind the CBP SID. Moreover, a peptide corresponding to this sequence competed the binding of full-length SRC1, Ets-2, and E1A proteins to the CBP SID. Thus, a leucine-rich amphipathic alpha-helix mediates mutually exclusive interactions of functionally diverse nuclear proteins with CBP. PMID:14722092

  17. Unusual conformation of the SxN motif in the crystal structure of penicillin-binding protein A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    SciTech Connect

    Fedarovich, Alena; Nicholas, Robert A.; Davies, Christopher

    2010-07-19

    PBPA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a class B-like penicillin-binding protein (PBP) that is not essential for cell growth in M. tuberculosis, but is important for proper cell division in Mycobacterium smegmatis. We have determined the crystal structure of PBPA at 2.05 {angstrom} resolution, the first published structure of a PBP from this important pathogen. Compared to other PBPs, PBPA has a relatively small N-terminal domain, and conservation of a cluster of charged residues within this domain suggests that PBPA is more related to class B PBPs than previously inferred from sequence analysis. The C-terminal domain is a typical transpeptidase fold and contains the three conserved active-site motifs characterisitic of penicillin-interacting enzymes. While the arrangement of the SxxK and KTG motifs is similar to that observed in other PBPs, the SxN motif is markedly displaced away from the active site, such that its serine (Ser281) is not involved in hydrogen bonding with residues of the other two motifs. A disulfide bridge between Cys282 (the 'x' of the SxN motif) and Cys266, which resides on an adjacent loop, may be responsible for this unusual conformation. Another interesting feature of the structure is a relatively long connection between {beta}5 and {alpha}11, which restricts the space available in the active site of PBPA and suggests that conformational changes would be required to accommodate peptide substrate or {beta}-lactam antibiotics during acylation. Finally, the structure shows that one of the two threonines postulated to be targets for phosphorylation is inaccessible (Thr362), whereas the other (Thr437) is well placed on a surface loop near the active site.

  18. Key importance of small RNA binding for the activity of a glycine-tryptophan (GW) motif-containing viral suppressor of RNA silencing.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cañamás, Miryam; Hernández, Carmen

    2015-01-30

    Viruses express viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing-based host defenses. Although virtually all stages of the antiviral silencing pathway can be inhibited by VSRs, small RNAs (sRNAs) and Argonaute (AGO) proteins seem to be the most frequent targets. Recently, GW/WG motifs of some VSRs have been proposed to dictate their suppressor function by mediating interaction with AGO(s). Here we have studied the VSR encoded by Pelargonium line pattern virus (family Tombusviridae). The results show that p37, the viral coat protein, blocks RNA silencing. Site-directed mutagenesis of some p37 sequence traits, including a conserved GW motif, allowed generation of suppressor-competent and -incompetent molecules and uncoupling of the VSR and particle assembly capacities. The engineered mutants were used to assess the importance of p37 functions for viral infection and the relative contribution of diverse molecular interactions to suppressor activity. Two main conclusions can be drawn: (i) the silencing suppression and encapsidation functions of p37 are both required for systemic Pelargonium line pattern virus infection, and (ii) the suppressor activity of p37 relies on the ability to bind sRNAs rather than on interaction with AGOs. The data also caution against potential misinterpretations of results due to overlap of sequence signals related to distinct protein properties. This is well illustrated by mutation of the GW motif in p37 that concurrently affects nucleolar localization, efficient interaction with AGO1, and sRNA binding capability. These concomitant effects could have been overlooked in other GW motif-containing suppressors, as we exemplify with the orthologous p38 of turnip crinkle virus. PMID:25505185

  19. Biophysical Analysis of the Binding of WW Domains of YAP2 Transcriptional Regulator to PPXY Motifs within WBP1 and WBP2 Adaptors

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Caleb B.; McIntosh, Samantha K. N.; Mikles, David C.; Bhat, Vikas; Deegan, Brian J.; Seldeen, Kenneth L.; Saeed, Ali M.; Buffa, Laura; Sudol, Marius; Nawaz, Zafar; Farooq, Amjad

    2011-01-01

    YAP2 transcriptional regulator mediates a plethora of cellular functions, including the newly discovered Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, by virtue of its ability to recognize WBP1 and WBP2 signaling adaptors among a wide variety of other ligands. Herein, using isothermal titration calorimery (ITC) and circular dichroism (CD) in combination with molecular modeling (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD), we provide evidence that the WW1 and WW2 domains of YAP2 recognize various PPXY motifs within WBP1 and WBP2 in a highly promiscuous and subtle manner. Thus, although both WW domains strictly require the integrity of the consensus PPXY sequence, non-consensus residues within and flanking this motif are not critical for high-affinity binding, implying that they most likely play a role in stabilizing the polyproline type II (PPII) helical conformation of the PPXY ligands. Of particular interest is the observation that both WW domains bind to a PPXYXG motif with highest affinity, implicating a preference for a non-bulky and flexible glycine one-residue C-terminal to the consensus tyrosine. Importantly, a large set of residues within both WW domains and the PPXY motifs appear to undergo rapid fluctuations on a nanosecond time scale, arguing that WW-ligand interactions are highly dynamic and that such conformational entropy may be an integral part of the reversible and temporal nature of cellular signaling cascades. Collectively, our study sheds light on the molecular determinants of a key WW-ligand interaction pertinent to cellular functions in health and disease. PMID:21981024

  20. Key Importance of Small RNA Binding for the Activity of a Glycine-Tryptophan (GW) Motif-containing Viral Suppressor of RNA Silencing*

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cañamás, Miryam; Hernández, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Viruses express viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing-based host defenses. Although virtually all stages of the antiviral silencing pathway can be inhibited by VSRs, small RNAs (sRNAs) and Argonaute (AGO) proteins seem to be the most frequent targets. Recently, GW/WG motifs of some VSRs have been proposed to dictate their suppressor function by mediating interaction with AGO(s). Here we have studied the VSR encoded by Pelargonium line pattern virus (family Tombusviridae). The results show that p37, the viral coat protein, blocks RNA silencing. Site-directed mutagenesis of some p37 sequence traits, including a conserved GW motif, allowed generation of suppressor-competent and -incompetent molecules and uncoupling of the VSR and particle assembly capacities. The engineered mutants were used to assess the importance of p37 functions for viral infection and the relative contribution of diverse molecular interactions to suppressor activity. Two main conclusions can be drawn: (i) the silencing suppression and encapsidation functions of p37 are both required for systemic Pelargonium line pattern virus infection, and (ii) the suppressor activity of p37 relies on the ability to bind sRNAs rather than on interaction with AGOs. The data also caution against potential misinterpretations of results due to overlap of sequence signals related to distinct protein properties. This is well illustrated by mutation of the GW motif in p37 that concurrently affects nucleolar localization, efficient interaction with AGO1, and sRNA binding capability. These concomitant effects could have been overlooked in other GW motif-containing suppressors, as we exemplify with the orthologous p38 of turnip crinkle virus. PMID:25505185

  1. Crystal structure of the N-terminal region of human Ash2L shows a winged-helix motif involved in DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yong; Wan, Bingbing; Wang, Kevin C.; Cao, Fang; Yang, Yuting; Protacio, Angeline; Dou, Yali; Chang, Howard Y.; Lei, Ming

    2011-09-06

    Ash2L is a core component of the MLL family histone methyltransferases and has an important role in regulating the methylation of histone H3 on lysine 4. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of Ash2L and reveal a new function of Ash2L. The structure shows that Ash2L contains an atypical PHD finger that does not have histone tail-binding activity. Unexpectedly, the structure shows a previously unrecognized winged-helix motif that directly binds to DNA. The DNA-binding-deficient mutants of Ash2L reduced Ash2L localization to the HOX locus. Strikingly, a single mutation in Ash2L{sub WH} (K131A) breaks the chromatin domain boundary, suggesting that Ash2L also has a role in chromosome demarcation.

  2. Loss of DNA-binding and new transcriptional trans-activation function in polyomavirus large T-antigen with mutation of zinc finger motif.

    PubMed Central

    Bergqvist, A; Nilsson, M; Bondeson, K; Magnusson, G

    1990-01-01

    A putative zinc finger in polyomavirus large T-antigen was investigated. We were unable to demonstrate unequivocally a requirement for zinc in specific DNA-binding using the chelating agent 1, 10-phenanthroline. An involvement of the putative zinc finger in specific DNA-binding was nevertheless suggested by the properties of a mutant protein with a cys----ser replacement in the finger motif. Probably as a result of the defective DNA-binding, the mutant protein had lost its activity in initiation of viral DNA-replication and in negative regulation of viral early transcription. However, the trans-activation of the viral late promoter was normal. The analysis also revealed a previously unrecognized activity of large T-antigen. The mutant protein trans-activated the viral early promoter. In the wild-type protein this activity is probably concealed by the separate, negative regulatory function. Images PMID:2160069

  3. Nicotine induced CpG methylation of Pax6 binding motif in StAR promoter reduces the gene expression and cortisol production

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tingting; Chen, Man; Liu, Lian; Cheng, Huaiyan; Yan, You-E; Feng, Ying-Hong; Wang, Hui

    2011-12-15

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) mediates the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of steroid hormones, essential to fetal development. We have reported that the StAR expression in fetal adrenal is inhibited in a rat model of nicotine-induced intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Here using primary human fetal adrenal cortex (pHFAC) cells and a human fetal adrenal cell line NCI-H295A, we show that nicotine inhibits StAR expression and cortisol production in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and prolongs the inhibitory effect on cells proliferating over 5 passages after termination of nicotine treatment. Methylation detection within the StAR promoter region uncovers a single site CpG methylation at nt -377 that is sensitive to nicotine treatment. Nicotine-induced alterations in frequency of this point methylation correlates well with the levels of StAR expression, suggesting an important role of the single site in regulating StAR expression. Further studies using bioinformatics analysis and siRNA approach reveal that the single CpG site is part of the Pax6 binding motif (CGCCTGA) in the StAR promoter. The luciferase activity assays validate that Pax6 increases StAR gene expression by binding to the glucagon G3-like motif (CGCCTGA) and methylation of this site blocks Pax6 binding and thus suppresses StAR expression. These data identify a nicotine-sensitive CpG site at the Pax6 binding motif in the StAR promoter that may play a central role in regulating StAR expression. The results suggest an epigenetic mechanism that may explain how nicotine contributes to onset of adult diseases or disorders such as metabolic syndrome via fetal programming. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine-induced StAR inhibition in two human adrenal cell models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine-induced single CpG site methylation in StAR promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Persistent StAR inhibition and single CpG methylation after nicotine termination

  4. Adaptive Evolution of Eel Fluorescent Proteins from Fatty Acid Binding Proteins Produces Bright Fluorescence in the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, David F.; Gaffney, Jean P.; Mehr, Shaadi; DeSalle, Rob; Sparks, John S.; Platisa, Jelena; Pieribone, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of two new members of a family of bilirubin-inducible fluorescent proteins (FPs) from marine chlopsid eels and demonstrate a key region of the sequence that serves as an evolutionary switch from non-fluorescent to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Using transcriptomic analysis of two species of brightly fluorescent Kaupichthys eels (Kaupichthys hyoproroides and Kaupichthys n. sp.), two new FPs were identified, cloned and characterized (Chlopsid FP I and Chlopsid FP II). We then performed phylogenetic analysis on 210 FABPs, spanning 16 vertebrate orders, and including 163 vertebrate taxa. We show that the fluorescent FPs diverged as a protein family and are the sister group to brain FABPs. Our results indicate that the evolution of this family involved at least three gene duplication events. We show that fluorescent FABPs possess a unique, conserved tripeptide Gly-Pro-Pro sequence motif, which is not found in non-fluorescent fatty acid binding proteins. This motif arose from a duplication event of the FABP brain isoforms and was under strong purifying selection, leading to the classification of this new FP family. Residues adjacent to the motif are under strong positive selection, suggesting a further refinement of the eel protein’s fluorescent properties. We present a phylogenetic reconstruction of this emerging FP family and describe additional fluorescent FABP members from groups of distantly related eels. The elucidation of this class of fish FPs with diverse properties provides new templates for the development of protein-based fluorescent tools. The evolutionary adaptation from fatty acid-binding proteins to fluorescent fatty acid-binding proteins raises intrigue as to the functional role of bright green fluorescence in this cryptic genus of reclusive eels that inhabit a blue, nearly monochromatic, marine environment. PMID:26561348

  5. Naturally occurring germline and tumor-associated mutations within the ATP-binding motifs of PTEN lead to oxidative damage of DNA associated with decreased nuclear p53

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Ni, Ying; Wang, Yu; Romigh, Todd; Eng, Charis

    2011-01-01

    Somatic and germline mutations in PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) are found in sporadic cancers and Cowden syndrome patients, respectively. Recent identification of naturally occurring cancer and germline mutations within the ATP-binding motifs of PTEN (heretofore referred to as PTEN ATP-binding mutations) has revealed that these mutations disrupted the subcellular localization and tumor-suppressor activity of PTEN. However, very little is known about the underlying mechanisms of PTEN ATP-binding mutations in tumorigenesis. Here we show that these mutations impair PTEN's function both qualitatively and quantitatively. On the one hand, PTEN ATP-binding mutants lose their phosphatase activity and the effect of downregulation of cyclin D1. On the other, the mislocalized mutant PTEN results in a significantly decreased nuclear p53 protein level and transcriptional activity, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species, induction of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase as well as dramatically increased DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). When compared with wild-type PTEN, the ATP-binding mutant PTEN has reduced half-life in vitro and decreased protein expression levels in vivo. Our data, thus, reveal a novel mechanism of tumorigenesis in patients with germline or somatic mutations affecting PTEN ATP-binding motifs, i.e. qualitative and quantitative impairment of PTEN due to the loss of its phosphatase activity, and nuclear mislocalization, resulting in rapid PTEN protein degradation, suppression of p53-mediated transcriptional activity, loss of protection against oxidative stress as well as accumulation of spontaneous DNA DSBs. PMID:20926450

  6. Directed evolution reveals the binding motif preference of the LC8/DYNLL hub protein and predicts large numbers of novel binders in the human proteome.

    PubMed

    Rapali, Péter; Radnai, László; Süveges, Dániel; Harmat, Veronika; Tölgyesi, Ferenc; Wahlgren, Weixiao Y; Katona, Gergely; Nyitray, László; Pál, Gábor

    2011-01-01

    LC8 dynein light chain (DYNLL) is a eukaryotic hub protein that is thought to function as a dimerization engine. Its interacting partners are involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In its dozens of hitherto identified binding partners DYNLL binds to a linear peptide segment. The known segments define a loosely characterized binding motif: [D/S](-4)K(-3)X(-2)[T/V/I](-1)Q(0)[T/V](1)[D/E](2). The motifs are localized in disordered segments of the DYNLL-binding proteins and are often flanked by coiled coil or other potential dimerization domains. Based on a directed evolution approach, here we provide the first quantitative characterization of the binding preference of the DYNLL binding site. We displayed on M13 phage a naïve peptide library with seven fully randomized positions around a fixed, naturally conserved glutamine. The peptides were presented in a bivalent manner fused to a leucine zipper mimicking the natural dimer to dimer binding stoichiometry of DYNLL-partner complexes. The phage-selected consensus sequence V(-5)S(-4)R(-3)G(-2)T(-1)Q(0)T(1)E(2) resembles the natural one, but is extended by an additional N-terminal valine, which increases the affinity of the monomeric peptide twentyfold. Leu-zipper dimerization increases the affinity into the subnanomolar range. By comparing crystal structures of an SRGTQTE-DYNLL and a dimeric VSRGTQTE-DYNLL complex we find that the affinity enhancing valine is accommodated in a binding pocket on DYNLL. Based on the in vitro evolved sequence pattern we predict a large number of novel DYNLL binding partners in the human proteome. Among these EML3, a microtubule-binding protein involved in mitosis contains an exact match of the phage-evolved consensus and binds to DYNLL with nanomolar affinity. These results significantly widen the scope of the human interactome around DYNLL and will certainly shed more light on the biological functions and organizing role of DYNLL in the human and other eukaryotic interactomes

  7. Directed Evolution Reveals the Binding Motif Preference of the LC8/DYNLL Hub Protein and Predicts Large Numbers of Novel Binders in the Human Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Rapali, Péter; Radnai, László; Süveges, Dániel; Harmat, Veronika; Tölgyesi, Ferenc; Wahlgren, Weixiao Y.; Katona, Gergely; Nyitray, László; Pál, Gábor

    2011-01-01

    LC8 dynein light chain (DYNLL) is a eukaryotic hub protein that is thought to function as a dimerization engine. Its interacting partners are involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In its dozens of hitherto identified binding partners DYNLL binds to a linear peptide segment. The known segments define a loosely characterized binding motif: [D/S]-4K-3X-2[T/V/I]-1Q0[T/V]1[D/E]2. The motifs are localized in disordered segments of the DYNLL-binding proteins and are often flanked by coiled coil or other potential dimerization domains. Based on a directed evolution approach, here we provide the first quantitative characterization of the binding preference of the DYNLL binding site. We displayed on M13 phage a naïve peptide library with seven fully randomized positions around a fixed, naturally conserved glutamine. The peptides were presented in a bivalent manner fused to a leucine zipper mimicking the natural dimer to dimer binding stoichiometry of DYNLL-partner complexes. The phage-selected consensus sequence V-5S-4R-3G-2T-1Q0T1E2 resembles the natural one, but is extended by an additional N-terminal valine, which increases the affinity of the monomeric peptide twentyfold. Leu-zipper dimerization increases the affinity into the subnanomolar range. By comparing crystal structures of an SRGTQTE-DYNLL and a dimeric VSRGTQTE-DYNLL complex we find that the affinity enhancing valine is accommodated in a binding pocket on DYNLL. Based on the in vitro evolved sequence pattern we predict a large number of novel DYNLL binding partners in the human proteome. Among these EML3, a microtubule-binding protein involved in mitosis contains an exact match of the phage-evolved consensus and binds to DYNLL with nanomolar affinity. These results significantly widen the scope of the human interactome around DYNLL and will certainly shed more light on the biological functions and organizing role of DYNLL in the human and other eukaryotic interactomes. PMID:21533121

  8. The Arabidopsis GAGA-Binding Factor BASIC PENTACYSTEINE6 Recruits the POLYCOMB-REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 Component LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 to GAGA DNA Motifs1

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Andreas; Brand, Luise H.; Peter, Sébastien; Simoncello, Nathalie; Kilian, Joachim; Gaudin, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb-repressive complexes (PRCs) play key roles in development by repressing a large number of genes involved in various functions. Much, however, remains to be discovered about PRC-silencing mechanisms as well as their targeting to specific genomic regions. Besides other mechanisms, GAGA-binding factors in animals can guide PRC members in a sequence-specific manner to Polycomb-responsive DNA elements. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GAGA-motif binding factor protein BASIC PENTACYSTEINE6 (BPC6) interacts with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1), a PRC1 component, and associates with VERNALIZATION2 (VRN2), a PRC2 component, in vivo. By using a modified DNA-protein interaction enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, we could show that BPC6 was required and sufficient to recruit LHP1 to GAGA motif-containing DNA probes in vitro. We also found that LHP1 interacts with VRN2 and, therefore, can function as a possible scaffold between BPC6 and VRN2. The lhp1-4 bpc4 bpc6 triple mutant displayed a pleiotropic phenotype, extreme dwarfism and early flowering, which disclosed synergistic functions of LHP1 and group II plant BPC members. Transcriptome analyses supported this synergy and suggested a possible function in the concerted repression of homeotic genes, probably through histone H3 lysine-27 trimethylation. Hence, our findings suggest striking similarities between animal and plant GAGA-binding factors in the recruitment of PRC1 and PRC2 components to Polycomb-responsive DNA element-like GAGA motifs, which must have evolved through convergent evolution. PMID:26025051

  9. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  10. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  11. Purification and characterization of a 59-kilodalton protein that specifically binds to NF-kappa B-binding motifs of the defense protein genes of Sarcophaga peregrina (the flesh fly).

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, A; Matsui, M; Kubo, T; Natori, S

    1993-01-01

    Various Sarcophaga peregrina (flesh fly) defense protein genes were shown to be activated when NIH-Sape-4 cells were cultured with bacterial lipopolysaccharides or beta-1,3-glucan. The 5' upstream regions of the defense protein genes were found to have common motifs showing similarity to the mammalian NF-kappa B-binding consensus sequence. A protein with affinity to the NF-kappa B-binding motif of the Sarcophaga lectin promoter was identified and purified to near homogeneity. This 59-kDa protein also bound to the NF-kappa B-binding motifs of other defense protein genes, e.g., sarcotoxin I and sarcotoxin II genes. This protein was found in both the cytoplasmic and the nuclear fractions of the cells, and it appeared to migrate from the cytoplasm to the nucleus on treatment of the cells with lipopolysaccharides. This 59-kDa protein is probably a transcriptional regulator of the genes for defense proteins of S. peregrina. Images PMID:8321212

  12. Iodination of salicylic acid improves its binding to transthyretin.

    PubMed

    Gales, Luís; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Arsequell, Gemma; Valencia, Gregorio; Saraiva, Maria João; Damas, Ana Margarida

    2008-03-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a plasma homotetrameric protein associated with senile systemic amyloidosis and familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy. In theses cases, TTR dissociation and misfolding induces the formation of amyloidogenic intermediates that assemble into toxic oligomeric species and lead to the formation of fibrils present in amyloid deposits. The four TTR monomers associate around a central hydrophobic channel where two thyroxine molecules can bind simultaneously. In each thyroxine binding site there are three pairs of symmetry related halogen binding pockets which can accommodate the four iodine substituents of thyroxine. A number of structurally diverse small molecules that bind to the TTR channel increasing the protein stability and thereafter inhibiting amyloid fibrillogenesis have been tested. In order to take advantage of the high propensity to interactions between iodine substituents and the TTR channel we have identified two iodinated derivatives of salicylic acid, 5-iodosalicylic acid and 3,5-diiodosalicylic acid, available commercially. We report in this paper the relative binding affinities of salicylic acid and the two iodinated derivatives and the crystal structure of TTR complexed with 3,5-diiodosalicylic acid, to elucidate the higher binding affinity of this compound towards TTR. PMID:18155178

  13. Binding of oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid to proteoglycans (Short Communication)

    PubMed Central

    Hardingham, Timothy E.; Muir, Helen

    1973-01-01

    Oligosaccharides derived from hyaluronic acid were shown to inhibit proteoglycan–hyaluronic acid interaction, as measured in a viscometer. The relative inhibition increased with the size of the oligosaccharide and the results suggested that decasaccharides were the smallest fragments able to bind strongly to the proteoglycan. PMID:4273187

  14. Folic acid binds DNA and RNA at different locations.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, P; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2015-03-01

    We located multiple binding sites for folic acid on DNA and tRNA at physiological conditions, using FTIR, CD, fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling. Structural analysis revealed that folic acid binds DNA and tRNA at multiple sites via hydrophilic, hydrophobic and H-bonding contacts with overall binding constants of Kfolic acid-DNA=1.1 (±0.3)×10(4) M(-1) and Kfolic acid-tRNA=6.4 (±0.5)×10(3) M(-1). Molecular modeling showed the participation of several nucleobases in folic acid complexes with DNA and tRNA, stabilized by H-bonding network. Two types of complexes were located for folic acid-tRNA adducts, one at the major groove and the other with TΨC loop, while acid binding occurs at major and minor grooves of DNA duplex. Folic acid complexation induced more alterations of DNA structure than tRNA. PMID:25555838

  15. Central Role of the Copper-Binding Motif in the Complex Mechanism of Action of Ixosin: Enhancing Oxidative Damage and Promoting Synergy with Ixosin B.

    PubMed

    Libardo, M Daben J; Gorbatyuk, Vitaliy Y; Angeles-Boza, Alfredo M

    2016-01-01

    Ticks transmit multiple pathogens to different hosts without compromising their health. Their ability to evade microbial infections is largely a result of their effective innate immune response including various antimicrobial peptides. Therefore, a deep understanding of how ticks (and other arthropod vectors) control microbial loads could lead to the design of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. In this paper we study the role of the amino-terminal copper and nickel (ATCUN)-binding sequence in the peptide ixosin, isolated from the salivary glands of the hard tick Ixodes sinensis. Our results indicate that the ATCUN motif is not essential to the potency of ixosin, but is indispensable to its oxidative mechanism of action. Specifically, the ATCUN motif promotes dioxygen- and copper-dependent lipid (per)oxidation of bacterial membranes in a temporal fashion coinciding with the onset of bacterial death. Microscopy and studies on model membranes indicate that the oxidized phospholipids are utilized as potential targets of ixosin B (another tick salivary gland peptide) involving its delocalization to the bacterial membrane, thus resulting in a synergistic effect. Our proposed mechanism of action highlights the centrality of the ATCUN motif to ixosin's mechanism of action and demonstrates a novel way in which (tick) antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) utilize metal ions in its activity. This study suggests that ticks employ a variety of effectors to generate an amplified immune response, possibly justifying its vector competence. PMID:27622949

  16. A polybasic motif in ErbB3-binding protein 1 (EBP1) has key functions in nucleolar localization and polyphosphoinositide interaction.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Thomas; Altankhuyag, Altanchimeg; Dobrovolska, Olena; Turcu, Diana C; Lewis, Aurélia E

    2016-07-15

    Polyphosphoinositides (PPIns) are present in the nucleus where they participate in crucial nuclear processes, such as chromatin remodelling, transcription and mRNA processing. In a previous interactomics study, aimed to gain further insight into nuclear PPIns functions, we identified ErbB3 binding protein 1 (EBP1) as a potential nuclear PPIn-binding protein in a lipid pull-down screen. EBP1 is a ubiquitous and conserved protein, located in both the cytoplasm and nucleolus, and associated with cell proliferation and survival. In the present study, we show that EBP1 binds directly to several PPIns via two distinct PPIn-binding sites consisting of clusters of lysine residues and positioned at the N- and C-termini of the protein. Using interaction mutants, we show that the C-terminal PPIn-binding motif contributes the most to the localization of EBP1 in the nucleolus. Importantly, a K372N point mutation, located within the C-terminal motif and found in endometrial tumours, is sufficient to alter the nucleolar targeting of EBP1. Our study reveals also the presence of the class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) catalytic subunit p110β and its product PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 together with EBP1 in the nucleolus. Using NMR, we further demonstrate an association between EBP1 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 via both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Taken together, these results show that EBP1 interacts directly with PPIns and associate with PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 in the nucleolus. The presence of p110β and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 in the nucleolus indicates their potential role in regulating nucleolar processes, at least via EBP1. PMID:27118868

  17. A polybasic motif in ErbB3-binding protein 1 (EBP1) has key functions in nucleolar localization and polyphosphoinositide interaction

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Thomas; Altankhuyag, Altanchimeg; Dobrovolska, Olena; Turcu, Diana C.; Lewis, Aurélia E.

    2016-01-01

    Polyphosphoinositides (PPIns) are present in the nucleus where they participate in crucial nuclear processes, such as chromatin remodelling, transcription and mRNA processing. In a previous interactomics study, aimed to gain further insight into nuclear PPIns functions, we identified ErbB3 binding protein 1 (EBP1) as a potential nuclear PPIn-binding protein in a lipid pull-down screen. EBP1 is a ubiquitous and conserved protein, located in both the cytoplasm and nucleolus, and associated with cell proliferation and survival. In the present study, we show that EBP1 binds directly to several PPIns via two distinct PPIn-binding sites consisting of clusters of lysine residues and positioned at the N- and C-termini of the protein. Using interaction mutants, we show that the C-terminal PPIn-binding motif contributes the most to the localization of EBP1 in the nucleolus. Importantly, a K372N point mutation, located within the C-terminal motif and found in endometrial tumours, is sufficient to alter the nucleolar targeting of EBP1. Our study reveals also the presence of the class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) catalytic subunit p110β and its product PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 together with EBP1 in the nucleolus. Using NMR, we further demonstrate an association between EBP1 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 via both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Taken together, these results show that EBP1 interacts directly with PPIns and associate with PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 in the nucleolus. The presence of p110β and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 in the nucleolus indicates their potential role in regulating nucleolar processes, at least via EBP1. PMID:27118868

  18. Dependence of RIG-I Nucleic Acid-Binding and ATP Hydrolysis on Activation of Type I Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Yu Mi; Yoon, Soojin; Hwang, Yeo Eun

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous nucleic acids induce an innate immune response in mammalian host cells through activation of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). We evaluated RIG-I protein for RNA binding and ATPase stimulation with RNA ligands to investigate the correlation with the extent of immune response through RIG-I activation in cells. RIG-I protein favored blunt-ended, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) ligands over sticky-ended dsRNA. Moreover, the presence of the 5'-triphosphate (5'-ppp) moiety in dsRNA further enhanced binding affinity to RIG-I. Two structural motifs in RNA, blunt ends in dsRNA and 5'-ppp, stimulated the ATP hydrolysis activity of RIG-I. These structural motifs also strongly induced IFN expression as an innate immune response in cells. Therefore, we suggest that IFN induction through RIG-I activation is mainly determined by structural motifs in dsRNA that increase its affinity for RIG-I protein and stimulate ATPase activity in RIG-I. PMID:27574504

  19. Dependence of RIG-I Nucleic Acid-Binding and ATP Hydrolysis on Activation of Type I Interferon Response.

    PubMed

    Baek, Yu Mi; Yoon, Soojin; Hwang, Yeo Eun; Kim, Dong-Eun

    2016-08-01

    Exogenous nucleic acids induce an innate immune response in mammalian host cells through activation of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). We evaluated RIG-I protein for RNA binding and ATPase stimulation with RNA ligands to investigate the correlation with the extent of immune response through RIG-I activation in cells. RIG-I protein favored blunt-ended, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) ligands over sticky-ended dsRNA. Moreover, the presence of the 5'-triphosphate (5'-ppp) moiety in dsRNA further enhanced binding affinity to RIG-I. Two structural motifs in RNA, blunt ends in dsRNA and 5'-ppp, stimulated the ATP hydrolysis activity of RIG-I. These structural motifs also strongly induced IFN expression as an innate immune response in cells. Therefore, we suggest that IFN induction through RIG-I activation is mainly determined by structural motifs in dsRNA that increase its affinity for RIG-I protein and stimulate ATPase activity in RIG-I. PMID:27574504

  20. Roles of the Putative Integrin-Binding Motif of the Human Metapneumovirus Fusion (F) Protein in Cell-Cell Fusion, Viral Infectivity, and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yongwei; Zhang, Yu; Cai, Hui; Mirza, Anne M.; Iorio, Ronald M.; Peeples, Mark E.; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a relatively recently identified paramyxovirus that causes acute upper and lower respiratory tract infection. Entry of hMPV is unusual among the paramyxoviruses, in that fusion is accomplished by the fusion (F) protein without the attachment glycoprotein (G protein). It has been suggested that hMPV F protein utilizes integrin αvβ1 as a cellular receptor. Consistent with this, the F proteins of all known hMPV strains possess an integrin-binding motif (329RGD331). The role of this motif in viral entry, infectivity, and pathogenesis is poorly understood. Here, we show that α5β1 and αv integrins are essential for cell-cell fusion and hMPV infection. Mutational analysis found that residues R329 and G330 in the 329RGD331 motif are essential for cell-cell fusion, whereas mutations at D331 did not significantly impact fusion activity. Furthermore, fusion-defective RGD mutations were either lethal to the virus or resulted in recombinant hMPVs that had defects in viral replication in cell culture. In cotton rats, recombinant hMPV with the R329K mutation in the F protein (rhMPV-R329K) and rhMPV-D331A exhibited significant defects in viral replication in nasal turbinates and lungs. Importantly, inoculation of cotton rats with these mutants triggered a high level of neutralizing antibodies and protected against hMPV challenge. Taken together, our data indicate that (i) α5β1 and αv integrins are essential for cell-cell fusion and viral replication, (ii) the first two residues in the RGD motif are essential for fusion activity, and (iii) inhibition of the interaction of the integrin-RGD motif may serve as a new target to rationally attenuate hMPV for the development of live attenuated vaccines. IMPORTANCE Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is one of the major causative agents of acute respiratory disease in humans. Currently, there is no vaccine or antiviral drug for hMPV. hMPV enters host cells via a unique mechanism, in that viral

  1. Recognition of Conserved Amino Acid Motifs of Common Viruses and Its Role in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The triggers of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) remain elusive. Epidemiological studies suggest that common pathogens can exacerbate and also induce MS, but it has been difficult to pinpoint individual organisms. Here we demonstrate that in vivo clonally expanded CD4+ T cells isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of a MS patient during disease exacerbation respond to a poly-arginine motif of the nonpathogenic and ubiquitous Torque Teno virus. These T cell clones also can be stimulated by arginine-enriched protein domains from other common viruses and recognize multiple autoantigens. Our data suggest that repeated infections with common pathogenic and even nonpathogenic viruses could expand T cells specific for conserved protein domains that are able to cross-react with tissue-derived and ubiquitous autoantigens. PMID:16362076

  2. Intrinsically disordered linker and plasma membrane-binding motif sort Ist2 and Ssy1 to junctions.

    PubMed

    Kralt, Annemarie; Carretta, Marco; Mari, Muriel; Reggiori, Fulvio; Steen, Anton; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2015-02-01

    Membrane junctions or contact sites are close associations of lipid bilayers of heterologous organelles. Ist2 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident transmembrane protein that mediates associations between the plasma membrane (PM) and the cortical ER (cER) in baker's yeast. We asked the question what structure in Ist2 bridges the up to 30 nm distance between the PM and the cER and we noted that the region spacing the transmembrane domain from the cortical sorting signal interacting with the PM is predicted to be intrinsically disordered (ID). In Ssy1, a protein that was not previously described to reside at membrane junctions, we recognized a domain organization similar to that in Ist2. We found that the localization of both Ist2 and Ssy1 at the cell periphery depends on the presence of a PM-binding domain, an ID linker region of sufficient length and a transmembrane domain that most probably resides in the ER. We show for the first time that an ID amino acid domain bridges adjacent heterologous membranes. The length and flexibility of ID domains make them uniquely eligible for spanning large distances, and we suggest that this domain structure occurs more frequently in proteins that mediate the formation of membrane contact sites. PMID:25409870

  3. Highly efficient delivery of functional cargoes by the synergistic effect of GAG binding motifs and cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Dixon, James E; Osman, Gizem; Morris, Gavin E; Markides, Hareklea; Rotherham, Michael; Bayoussef, Zahia; El Haj, Alicia J; Denning, Chris; Shakesheff, Kevin M

    2016-01-19

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs) are powerful nongenetic tools that allow intracellular delivery of conjugated cargoes to modify cell behavior. Their use in biomedicine has been hampered by inefficient delivery to nuclear and cytoplasmic targets. Here we overcame this deficiency by developing a series of novel fusion proteins that couple a membrane-docking peptide to heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) with a PTD. We showed that this GET (GAG-binding enhanced transduction) system could deliver enzymes (Cre, neomycin phosphotransferase), transcription factors (NANOG, MYOD), antibodies, native proteins (cytochrome C), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and nucleic acids [plasmid (p)DNA, modified (mod)RNA, and small inhibitory RNA] at efficiencies of up to two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in cell types considered hard to transduce, such as mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). This technology represents an efficient strategy for controlling cell labeling and directing cell fate or behavior that has broad applicability for basic research, disease modeling, and clinical application. PMID:26733682

  4. Highly efficient delivery of functional cargoes by the synergistic effect of GAG binding motifs and cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, James E.; Osman, Gizem; Morris, Gavin E.; Markides, Hareklea; Rotherham, Michael; Bayoussef, Zahia; El Haj, Alicia J.; Denning, Chris; Shakesheff, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs) are powerful nongenetic tools that allow intracellular delivery of conjugated cargoes to modify cell behavior. Their use in biomedicine has been hampered by inefficient delivery to nuclear and cytoplasmic targets. Here we overcame this deficiency by developing a series of novel fusion proteins that couple a membrane-docking peptide to heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) with a PTD. We showed that this GET (GAG-binding enhanced transduction) system could deliver enzymes (Cre, neomycin phosphotransferase), transcription factors (NANOG, MYOD), antibodies, native proteins (cytochrome C), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and nucleic acids [plasmid (p)DNA, modified (mod)RNA, and small inhibitory RNA] at efficiencies of up to two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in cell types considered hard to transduce, such as mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). This technology represents an efficient strategy for controlling cell labeling and directing cell fate or behavior that has broad applicability for basic research, disease modeling, and clinical application. PMID:26733682

  5. Structural analysis of cysteine S-nitrosylation: a modified acid-based motif and the emerging role of trans-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Stefano M.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2009-01-01

    S-nitrosylation, the selective and reversible addition of nitric oxide (NO) moiety to cysteine (Cys) sulfur in proteins, regulates numerous cellular processes. In recent years, proteomic approaches have been developed that are capable of identifying nitrosylated Cys residues. However, the features underlying specificity of Cys modification with NO remain poorly defined. Previous studies suggested that S-nitrosylated Cys may be flanked by an acid-base motif or hydrophobic areas, and show high reactivity, low pKa and high sulfur atom exposure. In the current study, we prepared an extensive, manually curated dataset of proteins with S-nitrosothiols, accounting for a variety of biochemical functions, organisms of origin and physiological responses to NO. Analysis of this generic NO-Cys dataset revealed that proximal acid-base motif, Cys pKa, sulfur atom exposure, Cys conservation or hydrophobicity in the vicinity of the modified Cys do not define the specificity of S-nitrosylation. Instead, this analysis revealed a revised acid-base motif, which is located more distantly to the Cys and has its charged groups exposed. We hypothesize that, rather than being strictly employed for direct activation of Cys, the modified acid-base motif is engaged in protein-protein interactions whereby contributing to trans-nitrosylation as an important and widespread mechanism for reversible modification of Cys with NO moiety. For proteins lacking the revised motif, we discuss alternative mechanisms including a potential role of nitrosoglutathione as a transacting agent. PMID:19854201

  6. Evidence that Chemical Chaperone 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Binds to Human Serum Albumin at Fatty Acid Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    James, Joel; Shihabudeen, Mohamed Sham; Kulshrestha, Shweta; Goel, Varun; Thirumurugan, Kavitha

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress elicits unfolded protein response to counteract the accumulating unfolded protein load inside a cell. The chemical chaperone, 4-Phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) is a FDA approved drug that alleviates endoplasmic reticulum stress by assisting protein folding. It is found efficacious to augment pathological conditions like type 2 diabetes, obesity and neurodegeneration. This study explores the binding nature of 4-PBA with human serum albumin (HSA) through spectroscopic and molecular dynamics approaches, and the results show that 4-PBA has high binding specificity to Sudlow Site II (Fatty acid binding site 3, subdomain IIIA). Ligand displacement studies, RMSD stabilization profiles and MM-PBSA binding free energy calculation confirm the same. The binding constant as calculated from fluorescence spectroscopic studies was found to be kPBA = 2.69 x 105 M-1. Like long chain fatty acids, 4-PBA induces conformational changes on HSA as shown by circular dichroism, and it elicits stable binding at Sudlow Site II (fatty acid binding site 3) by forming strong hydrogen bonding and a salt bridge between domain II and III of HSA. This minimizes the fluctuation of HSA backbone as shown by limited conformational space occupancy in the principal component analysis. The overall hydrophobicity of W214 pocket (located at subdomain IIA), increases upon occupancy of 4-PBA at any FA site. Descriptors of this pocket formed by residues from other subdomains largely play a role in compensating the dynamic movement of W214. PMID:26181488

  7. Characterization of DNA sequences that mediate nuclear protein binding to the regulatory region of the Pisum sativum (pea) chlorophyl a/b binding protein gene AB80: identification of a repeated heptamer motif.

    PubMed

    Argüello, G; García-Hernández, E; Sánchez, M; Gariglio, P; Herrera-Estrella, L; Simpson, J

    1992-05-01

    Two protein factors binding to the regulatory region of the pea chlorophyl a/b binding protein gene AB80 have been identified. One of these factors is found only in green tissue but not in etiolated or root tissue. The second factor (denominated ABF-2) binds to a DNA sequence element that contains a direct heptamer repeat TCTCAAA. It was found that presence of both of the repeats is essential for binding. ABF-2 is present in both green and etiolated tissue and in roots and factors analogous to ABF-2 are present in several plant species. Computer analysis showed that the TCTCAAA motif is present in the regulatory region of several plant genes. PMID:1303797

  8. Soluble Mimetics of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Viral Spikes Produced by Replacement of the Native Trimerization Domain with a Heterologous Trimerization Motif: Characterization and Ligand Binding Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pancera, Marie; Lebowitz, Jacob; Schön, Arne; Zhu, Ping; Freire, Ernesto; Kwong, Peter D.; Roux, Kenneth H.; Sodroski, Joseph; Wyatt, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, mediates binding to the viral receptors and, along with the transmembrane glycoprotein gp41, is a major target for neutralizing antibodies. We asked whether replacing the gp41 fusion/trimerization domain with a stable trimerization motif might lead to a more stable gp120 trimer that would be amenable to structural and immunologic analysis. To obtain stable gp120 trimers, a heterologous trimerization motif, GCN4, was appended to the C terminus of YU2gp120. Biochemical analysis indicated that the gp120-GCN4 trimers were superior to gp140 molecules in their initial homogeneity, and trilobed structures were observable by electron microscopy. Biophysical analysis of gp120-GCN4 trimers by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and ultracentrifugation analyses indicated that most likely two molecules of soluble CD4 could bind to one gp120-GCN4 trimer. To further examine restricted CD4 stoichiometric binding to the gp120-GCN4 trimers, we generated a low-affinity CD4 binding trimer by introducing a D457V change in the CD4 binding site of each gp120 monomeric subunit. The mutant trimers could definitively bind only one soluble CD4 molecule, as determined by ITC and sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation. These data indicate that there are weak interactions between the gp120 monomeric subunits of the GCN4-stabilized trimers that can be detected by low-affinity ligand sensing. By similar analysis, we also determined that removal of the variable loops V1, V2, and V3 in the context of the gp120-GCN4 proteins allowed the binding of three CD4 molecules per trimer. Interestingly, both the gp120-GCN4 variants displayed a restricted stoichiometry for the CD4-induced antibody 17b of one antibody molecule binding per trimer. This restriction was not evident upon removal of the variable loops V1 and V2 loops, consistent with conformational constraints in the wild-type gp120 trimers and similar to

  9. Fast approximate motif statistics.

    PubMed

    Nicodème, P

    2001-01-01

    We present in this article a fast approximate method for computing the statistics of a number of non-self-overlapping matches of motifs in a random text in the nonuniform Bernoulli model. This method is well suited for protein motifs where the probability of self-overlap of motifs is small. For 96% of the PROSITE motifs, the expectations of occurrences of the motifs in a 7-million-amino-acids random database are computed by the approximate method with less than 1% error when compared with the exact method. Processing of the whole PROSITE takes about 30 seconds with the approximate method. We apply this new method to a comparison of the C. elegans and S. cerevisiae proteomes. PMID:11535175

  10. Activation of ATP binding for the autophosphorylation of DosS, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis histidine kinase lacking an ATP lid motif.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ha Yeon; Lee, Young-Hoon; Bae, Young-Seuk; Kim, Eungbin; Kang, Beom Sik

    2013-05-01

    The sensor histidine kinases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, DosS and DosT, are responsible for sensing hypoxic conditions and consist of sensor and kinase cores responsible for accepting signals and phosphorylation activity, respectively. The kinase core contains a dimerization and histidine phosphate-accepting (DHp) domain and an ATP binding domain (ABD). The 13 histidine kinase genes of M. tuberculosis can be grouped based on the presence or absence of the ATP lid motif and F box (elements known to play roles in ATP binding) in their ABDs; DosS and DosT have ABDs lacking both these elements, and the crystal structures of their ABDs indicated that they were unsuitable for ATP binding, as a short loop covers the putative ATP binding site. Although the ABD alone cannot bind ATP, the kinase core is functional in autophosphorylation. Appropriate spatial arrangement of the ABD and DHp domain within the kinase core is required for both autophosphorylation and ATP binding. An ionic interaction between Arg(440) in the DHp domain and Glu(537) in the short loop of the ABD is available and may open the ATP binding site, by repositioning the short loop away from the site. Mutations at Arg(440) and Glu(537) reduce autophosphorylation activity. Unlike other histidine kinases containing an ATP lid, which protects bound ATP, DosS is unable to accept ATP until the ABD is properly positioned relative to the histidine; this may prevent unexpected ATP reactions. ATP binding can, therefore, function as a control mechanism for histidine kinase activity. PMID:23486471

  11. The PPFLMLLKGSTR motif in globular domain 3 of the human laminin-5 {alpha}3 chain is crucial for integrin {alpha}3{beta}1 binding and cell adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Man; Park, Won Ho; Min, Byung-Moo . E-mail: bmmin@snu.ac.kr

    2005-03-10

    Laminin-5 regulates various cellular functions, including cell adhesion, spreading, and motility. Here, we expressed the five human laminin {alpha}3 chain globular (LG) domains as monomeric, soluble fusion proteins, and examined their biological functions and signaling. Recombinant LG3 (rLG3) protein, unlike rLG1, rLG2, rLG4, and rLG5, played roles in cell adhesion, spreading, and integrin {alpha}3{beta}1 binding. More significantly, we identified a novel motif (PPFLMLLKGSTR) in the LG3 domain that is crucial for these responses. Studies with the synthetic peptides delineated the PPFLMLLKGSTR peptide within LG3 domain as a major site for both integrin {alpha}3{beta}1 binding and cell adhesion. Substitution mutation experiments suggest that the Arg residue is important for these activities. rLG3 protein- and PPFLMLLKGSTR peptide-induced keratinocyte adhesion triggered cell signaling through FAK phosphorylation at tyrosine-397 and -577. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the PPFLMLLKGSTR peptide within the LG3 domain is a novel motif that is capable of supporting integrin {alpha}3{beta}1-dependent cell adhesion and spreading.

  12. Sequence and peptide-binding motif for a variant of HLA-A*0214 (A*02142) in an HIV-1-resistant individual from the Nairobi Sex Worker cohort.

    PubMed

    Luscher, M A; MacDonald, K S; Bwayo, J J; Plummer, F A; Barber, B H

    2001-02-01

    As part of the ongoing study of natural HIV-1 resistance in the women of the Nairobi Sex Workers' study, we have examined a resistance-associated HLA class I allele at the molecular level. Typing by polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primers determined that this molecule is closely related to HLA-A*0214, one of a family of HLA-A2 supertype alleles which correlate with HIV-1 resistance in this population. Direct nucleotide sequencing shows that this molecule differs from A*0214, having a silent nucleotide substitution. We therefore propose to designate it HLA-A*02142. We have determined the peptide-binding motif of HLA-A*0214/02142 by peptide elution and bulk Edman degradative sequencing. The resulting motif, X-[Q,V]-X-X-X-K-X-X-[V,L], includes lysine as an anchor at position 6. The data complement available information on the peptide-binding characteristics of this molecule, and will be of use in identifying antigenic peptides from HIV-1 and other pathogens. PMID:11261925

  13. FTZ-F1 and FOXL2 up-regulate catfish brain aromatase gene transcription by specific binding to the promoter motifs.

    PubMed

    Sridevi, P; Chaitanya, R K; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna; Senthilkumaran, B

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 aromatase (cyp19) catalyzes the conversion of androgens into estrogens. Teleosts have distinct, ovarian specific (cyp19a1a) and brain specific (cyp19a1b) cyp19 genes. Previous studies in teleosts demonstrated regulation of cyp19a1a expression by the NR5A nuclear receptor subfamily as well as a fork head transcription factor, FOXL2. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of fushi tarazu factor 1, FTZ-F1, a NR5A subfamily member, and FOXL2 in the regulation of cyp19a1b expression in brain of the air-breathing catfish, Clarias gariepinus. Based on the synchronous expression pattern of cyp19a1b, FTZ-F1 and FOXL2 in the brain, we isolated the 5' upstream region of cyp19a1b to analyse regulatory motifs. Promoter motif analysis revealed FTZ-F1/NR5A1 and FOXL2 binding nucleotide sequences. Transient transfection studies showed that FTZ-F1 and FOXL2 together enhanced the transcriptional activity of cyp19a1b gene in mammalian cell lines. Mutation in either of their putative binding sites within the cyp19a1b promoter abolished this effect. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift experiments indicated that FTZ-F1 and FOXL2 proteins bind to the synthesized radio-labelled oligomers used as probes and mobility shifted upon addition of their respective antibodies. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed the binding of both these transcription factors to their corresponding cis-acting elements in the upstream region of cyp19a1b. To our knowledge, this study is the first report on the transcriptional regulation of cyp19a1b by FTZ-F1 and FOXL2 in a teleost fish. PMID:22019437

  14. The Human Glucocorticoid Receptor as an RNA-binding Protein: Global Analysis of Glucocorticoid Receptor-Associated Transcripts and Identification of a Target RNA Motif

    PubMed Central

    Ishmael, Faoud T.; Fang, Xi; Houser, Kenneth R.; Pearce, Kenneth; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Zhan, Ming; Gorospe, Myriam; Stellato, Cristiana

    2010-01-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation is emerging as a key factor in glucocorticoid (GC)-mediated gene regulation. We investigated the role of the human glucocorticoid receptor (GR) as an RNA-binding protein and its effect on mRNA turnover in human airway epithelial cells. Cell treatment with the potent GC budesonide accelerated the decay of CCL2 mRNA (t1/2=8±1 min vs. 62±17 min in DMSO-treated cells) and CCL7 mRNA (t1/2=15±4 min vs. 114±37 min), but not that of CCL5 mRNA (t1/2=231±8 min vs. 266±5 min) in the BEAS-2B cell line. This effect was inhibited by pre-incubation with an anti-GR antibody, indicating that GR itself plays a role in the turnover of these transcripts. Co-immunoprecipitation and biotin pulldown experiments showed that GR associates with CCL2 and CCL7 mRNAs, but not CCL5 mRNA. These methods confirmed CCL2 mRNA targeting by GR in human primary airway epithelial cells. Association of the GR was localized to the 5’UTR of CCL2 mRNA, and further mapped to nucleotides 44–60. The collection of transcripts associated with GR, identified by immunoprecipitation of GR-mRNA complexes followed by microarray analysis, revealed 479 transcripts that associated with GR. Computational analysis of the primary sequence and secondary structures of these transcripts yielded a GC-rich motif, which was shown to bind to GR in vitro. This motif was used to predict binding of GR to an additional 7889 transcripts. These results indicate that cytoplasmic GR interacts with a subset of mRNA through specific sequences and can regulate turnover rates, suggesting a novel posttranscriptional role for GR as an RNA-binding protein. PMID:21148795

  15. A motif of eleven amino acids is a structural adaptation that facilitates motor capability of eutherian prestin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaodong; Pecka, Jason L.; Tang, Jie; Lovas, Sándor; Beisel, Kirk W.; He, David Z. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) alter their length in response to transmembrane voltage changes. This so-called electromotility is the result of conformational changes of membrane-bound prestin. Prestin-based OHC motility is thought to be responsible for cochlear amplification, which contributes to the exquisite frequency selectivity and sensitivity of mammalian hearing. Prestin belongs to an anion transporter family, the solute carrier protein 26A (SLC26A). Prestin is unique in this family in that it functions as a voltage-dependent motor protein manifested by two hallmarks, nonlinear capacitance and motility. Evidence suggests that prestin orthologs from zebrafish and chicken are anion exchangers or transporters with no motor function. We identified a segment of 11 amino acid residues in eutherian prestin that is extremely conserved among eutherian species but highly variable among non-mammalian orthologs and SLC26A paralogs. To determine whether this sequence represents a motif that facilitates motor function in eutherian prestin, we utilized a chimeric approach by swapping corresponding residues from the zebrafish and chicken with those of gerbil. Motility and nonlinear capacitance were measured from chimeric prestin-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells using a voltage-clamp technique and photodiode-based displacement measurement system. We observed a gain of motor function with both of the hallmarks in the chimeric prestin without loss of transport function. Our results show, for the first time, that the substitution of a span of 11 amino acid residues confers the electrogenic anion transporters of zebrafish and chicken prestins with motor-like function. Thus, this motif represents the structural adaptation that assists gain of motor function in eutherian prestin. PMID:22399806

  16. A motif of eleven amino acids is a structural adaptation that facilitates motor capability of eutherian prestin.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaodong; Pecka, Jason L; Tang, Jie; Lovas, Sándor; Beisel, Kirk W; He, David Z Z

    2012-02-15

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) alter their length in response to transmembrane voltage changes. This so-called electromotility is the result of conformational changes of membrane-bound prestin. Prestin-based OHC motility is thought to be responsible for cochlear amplification, which contributes to the exquisite frequency selectivity and sensitivity of mammalian hearing. Prestin belongs to an anion transporter family, the solute carrier protein 26A (SLC26A). Prestin is unique in this family in that it functions as a voltage-dependent motor protein manifested by two hallmarks, nonlinear capacitance and motility. Evidence suggests that prestin orthologs from zebrafish and chicken are anion exchangers or transporters with no motor function. We identified a segment of 11 amino acid residues in eutherian prestin that is extremely conserved among eutherian species but highly variable among non-mammalian orthologs and SLC26A paralogs. To determine whether this sequence represents a motif that facilitates motor function in eutherian prestin, we utilized a chimeric approach by swapping corresponding residues from the zebrafish and chicken with those of gerbil. Motility and nonlinear capacitance were measured from chimeric prestin-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells using a voltage-clamp technique and photodiode-based displacement measurement system. We observed a gain of motor function with both of the hallmarks in the chimeric prestin without loss of transport function. Our results show, for the first time, that the substitution of a span of 11 amino acid residues confers the electrogenic anion transporters of zebrafish and chicken prestins with motor-like function. Thus, this motif represents the structural adaptation that assists gain of motor function in eutherian prestin. PMID:22399806

  17. In silico cloning and characterization of the TGA (TGACG MOTIF-BINDING FACTOR) transcription factors subfamily in Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Idrovo Espín, Fabio Marcelo; Peraza-Echeverria, Santy; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2012-05-01

    The TGA transcription factors belong to the subfamily of bZIP group D that play a major role in disease resistance and development. Most of the TGA identified in Arabidopsis interact with the master regulator of SAR, NPR1 that controls the expression of PR genes. As a first approach to determine the possible involvement of these transcription factors in papaya defense, we characterized Arabidopsis TGA orthologs from the genome of Carica papaya cv. SunUp. Six orthologs CpTGA1 to CpTGA6, were identified. The predicted CpTGA proteins were highly similar to AtTGA sequences and probably share the same DNA binding properties and transcriptional regulation features. The protein sequences alignment evidenced the presence of conserved domains, characteristic of this group of transcription factors. The phylogeny showed that CpTGA evolved into three different subclades associated with defense and floral development. This is the first report of basal expression patterns assessed by RT-PCR, from the whole subfamily of CpTGA members in different tissues from papaya cv. Maradol mature plants. Overall, CpTGA1, CpTGA3 CpTGA6 and CpTGA4 showed a basal expression in all tissues tested; CpTGA2 expressed strongly in all tissues except in petioles while CpTGA5 expressed only in petals and to a lower extent in petioles. Although more detailed studies in anthers and other floral structures are required, we suggest that CpTGA5 might be tissue-specific, and it might be involved in papaya floral development. On the other hand, we report here for the first time, the expression of the whole family of CpTGA in response to salicylic acid (SA). The expression of CpTGA3, CpTGA4 and CpTGA6 increased in response to SA, what would suggest its involvement in the SAR response in papaya. PMID:22410205

  18. A Proline-Rich Motif Downstream of the Receptor Binding Domain Modulates Conformation and Fusogenicity of Murine Retroviral Envelopes

    PubMed Central

    Lavillette, Dimitri; Maurice, Marielle; Roche, Catherine; Russell, Stephen J.; Sitbon, Marc; Cosset, François-Loïc

    1998-01-01

    The entry of retroviruses into cells depends on receptor recognition by the viral envelope surface subunit SU followed by membrane fusion, which is thought to be mediated by a fusion peptide located at the amino terminus of the envelope transmembrane subunit TM. Several fusion determinants have been previously identified in murine leukemia virus (MLV) envelopes, but their functional interrelationships as well as the processes involved in fusion activation upon retroviral receptor recognition remain unelucidated. Despite both structural and functional similarities of their envelope glycoproteins, ecotropic and amphotropic MLVs display two different postbinding properties: (i) while amphotropic MLVs fuse the cells at neutral pH, penetration of ecotropic MLVs is relatively acid pH dependent and (ii) ecotropic envelopes are more efficient than amphotropic envelopes in inducing cell-to-cell fusion and syncytium formation. By exploiting the latter characteristic in the analysis of chimeras of ecotropic and amphotropic MLV envelopes, we show here that substitution of the ecotropic MLV proline-rich region (PRR), located in the SU between the amino-terminal receptor binding domain and the TM-interacting SU carboxy-terminal domains, is sufficient to revert the amphotropic low-fusogenic phenotype into a high-fusogenic one. Furthermore, we have identified potential β-turns in the PRR that control the stability of SU-TM associations as well as the thresholds required to trigger either cell-to-cell or virus-to-cell fusion. These data, demonstrating that the PRR functions as a signal which induces envelope conformational changes leading to fusion, have enabled us to derive envelopes which can infect cells harboring low levels of available amphotropic receptors. PMID:9811733

  19. Binding of Actinomycin D to Single-Stranded DNA of Sequence Motifs d(TGTCTnG) and d(TGTnGTCT)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fu-Ming; Sha, Feng; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2003-01-01

    Our recent binding studies with oligomers derived from base replacements on d(CGTCGTCG) had led to the finding that actinomycin D (ACTD) binds strongly to d(TGTCATTG) of apparent single-stranded conformation without GpC sequence. A fold-back binding model was speculated in which the planar phenoxazone inserts at the GTC site with a loop-out T base whereas the G base at the 3′-terminus folds back to form a basepair with the internal C and stacks on the opposite face of the chromophore. To provide a more concrete support for such a model, ACTD equilibrium binding studies were carried out and the results are reported herein on oligomers of sequence motifs d(TGTCTnG) and d(TGTnGTC). These oligomers are not expected to form dimeric duplexes and contain no canonical GpC sequences. It was found that ACTD binds strongly to d(TGTCTTTTG), d(TGTTTTGTC), and d(TGTTTTTGTC), all exhibiting 1:1 drug/strand binding stoichiometry. The fold-back binding model with displaced T base is further supported by the finding that appending TC and TCA at the 3′-terminus of d(TGTCTTTTG) results in oligomers that exhibit enhanced ACTD affinities, consequence of the added basepairing to facilitate the hairpin formation of d(TGTCTTTTGTC) and d(TGTCTTTTGTCA) in stabilizing the GTC/GTC binding site for juxtaposing the two G bases for easy stacking on both faces of the phenoxazone chromophore. Further support comes from the observation of considerable reduction in ACTD affinity when GTC is replaced by GTTC in an oligomer, in line with the reasoning that displacing two T bases to form a bulge for ACTD binding is more difficult than displacing a single base. Based on the elucidated binding principle of phenoxazone ring requiring its opposite faces to be stacked by the 3′-sides of two G bases for tight ACTD binding, several oligonucleotide sequences have been designed and found to bind well. PMID:12524296

  20. Structural Basis of Fatty Acid Substrate Binding to Cyclooxygenase-2*

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Alex J.; Simmons, Danielle M.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    The cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) are membrane-associated heme-containing homodimers that generate prostaglandin H2 from arachidonic acid (AA). Although AA is the preferred substrate, other fatty acids are oxygenated by these enzymes with varying efficiencies. We determined the crystal structures of AA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) bound to Co3+-protoporphyrin IX-reconstituted murine COX-2 to 2.1, 2.4, and 2.65 Å, respectively. AA, EPA, and docosahexaenoic acid bind in different conformations in each monomer constituting the homodimer in their respective structures such that one monomer exhibits nonproductive binding and the other productive binding of the substrate in the cyclooxygenase channel. The interactions identified between protein and substrate when bound to COX-1 are conserved in our COX-2 structures, with the only notable difference being the lack of interaction of the carboxylate of AA and EPA with the side chain of Arg-120. Leu-531 exhibits a different side chain conformation when the nonproductive and productive binding modes of AA are compared. Unlike COX-1, mutating this residue to Ala, Phe, Pro, or Thr did not result in a significant loss of activity or substrate binding affinity. Determination of the L531F:AA crystal structure resulted in AA binding in the same global conformation in each monomer. We speculate that the mobility of the Leu-531 side chain increases the volume available at the opening of the cyclooxygenase channel and contributes to the observed ability of COX-2 to oxygenate a broad spectrum of fatty acid and fatty ester substrates. PMID:20463020

  1. Probing the Binding Site of Bile Acids in TGR5.

    PubMed

    Macchiarulo, Antonio; Gioiello, Antimo; Thomas, Charles; Pols, Thijs W H; Nuti, Roberto; Ferrari, Cristina; Giacchè, Nicola; De Franco, Francesca; Pruzanski, Mark; Auwerx, Johan; Schoonjans, Kristina; Pellicciari, Roberto

    2013-12-12

    TGR5 is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) mediating cellular responses to bile acids (BAs). Although some efforts have been devoted to generate homology models of TGR5 and draw structure-activity relationships of BAs, none of these studies has hitherto described how BAs bind to TGR5. Here, we present an integrated computational, chemical, and biological approach that has been instrumental to determine the binding mode of BAs to TGR5. As a result, key residues have been identified that are involved in mediating the binding of BAs to the receptor. Collectively, these results provide new hints to design potent and selective TGR5 agonists. PMID:24900622

  2. Using a color-coded ambigraphic nucleic acid notation to visualize conserved palindromic motifs within and across genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ambiscript is a graphically-designed nucleic acid notation that uses symbol symmetries to support sequence complementation, highlight biologically-relevant palindromes, and facilitate the analysis of consensus sequences. Although the original Ambiscript notation was designed to easily represent consensus sequences for multiple sequence alignments, the notation’s black-on-white ambiguity characters are unable to reflect the statistical distribution of nucleotides found at each position. We now propose a color-augmented ambigraphic notation to encode the frequency of positional polymorphisms in these consensus sequences. Results We have implemented this color-coding approach by creating an Adobe Flash® application ( http://www.ambiscript.org) that shades and colors modified Ambiscript characters according to the prevalence of the encoded nucleotide at each position in the alignment. The resulting graphic helps viewers perceive biologically-relevant patterns in multiple sequence alignments by uniquely combining color, shading, and character symmetries to highlight palindromes and inverted repeats in conserved DNA motifs. Conclusion Juxtaposing an intuitive color scheme over the deliberate character symmetries of an ambigraphic nucleic acid notation yields a highly-functional nucleic acid notation that maximizes information content and successfully embodies key principles of graphic excellence put forth by the statistician and graphic design theorist, Edward Tufte. PMID:24447494

  3. The highly conserved amino acid sequence motif Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser in alpha-like DNA polymerases is required by phage phi 29 DNA polymerase for protein-primed initiation and polymerization.

    PubMed Central

    Bernad, A; Lázaro, J M; Salas, M; Blanco, L

    1990-01-01

    The alpha-like DNA polymerases from bacteriophage phi 29 and other viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes contain an amino acid consensus sequence that has been proposed to form part of the dNTP binding site. We have used site-directed mutants to study five of the six highly conserved consecutive amino acids corresponding to the most conserved C-terminal segment (Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser). Our results indicate that in phi 29 DNA polymerase this consensus sequence, although irrelevant for the 3'----5' exonuclease activity, is essential for initiation and elongation. Based on these results and on its homology with known or putative metal-binding amino acid sequences, we propose that in phi 29 DNA polymerase the Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser consensus motif is part of the dNTP binding site, involved in the synthetic activities of the polymerase (i.e., initiation and polymerization), and that it is involved particularly in the metal binding associated with the dNTP site. Images PMID:2191296

  4. Characterization of the fibronectin-attachment protein of Mycobacterium avium reveals a fibronectin-binding motif conserved among mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Schorey, J S; Holsti, M A; Ratliff, T L; Allen, P M; Brown, E J

    1996-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an intracellular pathogen and a major opportunistic infectious agent observed in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Evidence suggests that the initial portal of infection by M. avium is often the gastrointestinal tract. However, the mechanism by which the M. avium crosses the epithelial barrier is unclear. A possible mechanism is suggested by the ability of M. avium to bind fibronectin, an extracellular matrix protein that is a virulence factor for several extracellular pathogenic bacteria which bind to mucosal surfaces. To further characterize fibronectin binding by M. avium, we have cloned the M. avium fibronectin-attachment protein (FAP). The M. avium FAP (FAP-A) has an unusually large number of Pro and Ala residues (40% overall) and is 50% identical to FAP of both Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using recombinant FAP-A and FAP-A peptides, we show that two non-continuous regions in FAP-A bind fibronectin. Peptides from these regions and homologous sequences from M. leprae FAP inhibit fibronectin binding by both M. avium and Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). These regions have no homology to eukaryotic fibronectin-binding proteins and are only distantly related to fibronectin-binding peptides of Gram-positive bacteria. Nevertheless, these fibronectin-binding regions are highly conserved among the mycobacterial FAPs, suggesting an essential function for this interaction in mycobacteria infection of their metazoan hosts. PMID:8858587

  5. Binding Mechanism of the N-Terminal SH3 Domain of CrkII and Proline-Rich Motifs in cAbl.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Veer S; Zeng, Danyun; Krieger, Inna; Sacchettini, James C; Cho, Jae-Hyun

    2016-06-21

    The N-terminal Src homology 3 (nSH3) domain of a signaling adaptor protein, CT-10 regulator of kinase II (CrkII), recognizes proline-rich motifs (PRMs) of binding partners, such as cAbl kinase. The interaction between CrkII and cAbl kinase is involved in the regulation of cell spreading, microbial pathogenesis, and cancer metastasis. Here, we report the detailed biophysical characterizations of the interactions between the nSH3 domain of CrkII and PRMs in cAbl. We identified that the nSH3 domain of CrkII binds to three PRMs in cAbl with virtually identical affinities. Structural studies, by using x-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, revealed that the binding modes of all three nSH3:PRM complexes are highly similar to each other. Van 't Hoff analysis revealed that nSH3:PRM interaction is associated with favorable enthalpy and unfavorable entropy change. The combination of experimentally determined thermodynamic parameters, structure-based calculations, and (15)N NMR relaxation analysis highlights the energetic contribution of conformational entropy change upon the complex formation, and water molecules structured in the binding interface of the nSH3:PRM complex. Understanding the molecular basis of nSH3:PRM interaction will provide, to our knowledge, new insights for the rational design of small molecules targeting the interaction between CrkII and cAbl. PMID:27332121

  6. Two ribosomal DNA-binding factors interact with a cluster of motifs on the 5' external transcribed spacer, upstream from the primary pre-rRNA processing site in a higher plant.

    PubMed

    Caparros-Ruiz, D; Lahmy, S; Piersanti, S; Echeverría, M

    1997-08-01

    In radish the primary processing site in pre-rRNA has been mapped to a TTTTCGCGC sequence (motif P) in the 5' external transcribed spacer (5' ETS) of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) [Delcasso-Tremousaygue, D., Grellet, F., Panabières, F., Ananiev, E. & Delseny, M. (1988) Eur. J. Biochem. 172, 767-776]. The processing site is just downstream of four similar motifs named A1, A2, A3 and B. The five motifs constitute cluster A123BP. We have described previously that in radish extracts a nuclear protein, nuclear factor B (NF B) specifically binds to motif B [Echeverría, M., Penon, P. & Delseny, M. (1994) Mol. Gen. Genet. 243, 442-452]. Here, by means of electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays, we describe an rDNA-binding activity, nuclear factor D (NF D), that interacts with the A123BP cluster. Using various rDNA probes and competitors we show that NF D binds specifically to the A123 clustered motifs but not to similar B or P motifs. We used sequence-specific DNA-affinity chromatography to separate NF D from NF B. DNase I footprinting was used to map the binding site of NF D on the A123BP cluster and we compared it with that of NF B on the same probe. The footprint of NF D extends from the A1 motif to the 5' end of the NF B-binding site and includes motifs A2 and A3 on each strand. The footprinting of NF B is restricted to motif B and adjacent nucleotides. Thus the NF D-binding and NF B-binding sites are distinct but overlap. These two factors bind with a high specificity to the A123BP cluster in the radish 5' ETS. The possibility that these factors regulate rDNA transcription elongation at the level of the primary pre-rRNA processing site in crucifers is discussed. PMID:9288923

  7. Structure and function of Plasmodium falciparum malate dehydrogenase: role of critical amino acids in co-substrate binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Anupam; Tripathi, Abhai K; Desai, Prashant V; Mukherjee, Prasenjit K; Avery, Mitchell A; Walker, Larry A; Tekwani, Babu L

    2009-01-01

    The malaria parasite thrives on anaerobic fermentation of glucose for energy. Earlier studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that a cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (PfMDH) with striking similarity to lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) might complement PfLDH function in Plasmodium falciparum. The N-terminal glycine motif, which forms a characteristic Rossman dinucleotide-binding fold in the co-substrate binding pocket, differentiates PfMDH (GlyXGlyXXGly) from other eukaryotic and prokaryotic malate dehydrogenases (GlyXXGlyXXGly). The amino acids lining the co-substrate binding pocket are completely conserved in MDHs from different species of human, primate and rodent malaria parasites. Based on this knowledge and conserved domains among prokaryotic and eukaryotic MDH, the role of critical amino acids lining the co-substrate binding pocket was analyzed in catalytic functions of PfMDH using site-directed mutagenesis. Insertion of Ala at the 9th or 10th position, which converts the N-terminal GlyXGlyXXGly motif (characteristic of malarial MDH and LDH) to GlyXXGlyXXGly (as in bacterial and eukaryotic MDH), uncoupled regulation of the enzyme through substrate inhibition. The dinucleotide fold GlyXGlyXXGly motif seems not to be responsible for the distinct affinity of PfMDH to 3-acetylpyridine-adenine dinucleotide (APAD, a synthetic analog of NAD), since Ala9 and Ala10 insertion mutants still utilized APADH. The Gln11Met mutation, which converts the signature glycine motif in PfMDH to that of PfLDH, did not change the enzyme function. However, the Gln11Gly mutant showed approximately a 5-fold increase in catalytic activity, and higher susceptibility to inhibition with gossypol. Asn119 and His174 participate in binding of both co-substrate and substrate. The Asn119Gly mutant exhibited approximately a 3-fold decrease in catalytic efficiency, while mutation of His174 to Asn or Ala resulted in an inactive enzyme. These studies provide critical insights into the co

  8. PDlim2 Selectively Interacts with the PDZ Binding Motif of Highly Pathogenic Avian H5N1 Influenza A Virus NS1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Li, Bo; Li, Hongyue; Li, Yapeng; Zhou, Weihong; Zhang, Cuizhu; Wang, Yingying; Rao, Zihe; Bartlam, Mark; Cao, Youjia

    2011-01-01

    The multi-functional NS1 protein of influenza A virus is a viral virulence determining factor. The last four residues at the C-terminus of NS1 constitute a type I PDZ domain binding motif (PBM). Avian influenza viruses currently in circulation carry an NS1 PBM with consensus sequence ESEV, whereas human influenza viruses bear an NS1 PBM with consensus sequence RSKV or RSEV. The PBM sequence of the influenza A virus NS1 is reported to contribute to high viral pathogenicity in animal studies. Here, we report the identification of PDlim2 as a novel binding target of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 strain with an NS1 PBM of ESEV (A/Chicken/Henan/12/2004/H5N1, HN12-NS1) by yeast two-hybrid screening. The interaction was confirmed by in vitro GST pull-down assays, as well as by in vivo mammalian two-hybrid assays and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. The binding was also confirmed to be mediated by the interaction of the PDlim2 PDZ domain with the NS1 PBM motif. Interestingly, our assays showed that PDlim2 bound specifically with HN12-NS1, but exhibited no binding to NS1 from a human influenza H1N1 virus bearing an RSEV PBM (A/Puerto Rico/8/34/H1N1, PR8-NS1). A crystal structure of the PDlim2 PDZ domain fused with the C-terminal hexapeptide from HN12-NS1, together with GST pull-down assays on PDlim2 mutants, reveals that residues Arg16 and Lys31 of PDlim2 are critical for the binding between PDlim2 and HN12-NS1. The identification of a selective binding target of HN12-NS1 (ESEV), but not PR8-NS1 (RSEV), enables us to propose a structural mechanism for the interaction between NS1 PBM and PDlim2 or other PDZ-containing proteins. PMID:21625420

  9. Rapid, Structure-Based Exploration of Pipecolic Acid Amides as Novel Selective Antagonists of the FK506-Binding Protein 51.

    PubMed

    Gaali, Steffen; Feng, Xixi; Hähle, Andreas; Sippel, Claudia; Bracher, Andreas; Hausch, Felix

    2016-03-24

    The FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51) is a key regulator of stress hormone receptors and an established risk factor for stress-related disorders. Drug development for FKBP51 has been impaired by the structurally similar but functionally opposing homologue FKBP52. High selectivity between FKBP51 and FKBP52 can be achieved by ligands that stabilize a recently discovered FKBP51-favoring conformation. However, drug-like parameters for these ligands remained unfavorable. In the present study, we replaced the potentially labile pipecolic ester group of previous FKBP51 ligands by various low molecular weight amides. This resulted in the first series of pipecolic acid amides, which had much lower molecular weights without affecting FKBP51 selectivity. We discovered a geminally substituted cyclopentyl amide as a preferred FKBP51-binding motif and elucidated its binding mode to provide a new lead structure for future drug optimization. PMID:26954324

  10. A phosphonic acid appended naphthalene diimide motif for self-assembly into tunable nanostructures through molecular recognition with arginine in water.

    PubMed

    Nandre, Kamalakar P; Bhosale, Sheshanath V; Rama Krishna, K V S; Gupta, Akhil; Bhosale, Sidhanath V

    2013-06-18

    A naphthalene diimide motif bearing phosphonic acid functionalities has been found to be self-assembled with L- and D-arginine through chirality induced molecular recognitions and leads to the formation of micrometre long nanobelts and spherical aggregates at pH 9 in water, respectively. PMID:23589823

  11. Cd2+ and the N-terminal metal-binding domain protect the putative membranous CPC motif of the Cd2+-ATPase of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Nathalie; Wu, Chen Chou; Catty, Patrice; Guillain, Florent; Mintz, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    CadA, the Cd(2+)-ATPase of Listeria monocytogenes, contains four cysteine residues: two in the CTNC (Cys-Thr-Asn-Cys) sequence in the cytoplasmic metal-binding domain (MBD), and two in the CPC (Cys-Pro-Cys) sequence in the membrane domain. Taking advantage of DeltaMBD, a truncated version of CadA that lacks the MBD but which still acts as a functional Cd(2+)-ATPase [Bal, Mintz, Guillain and Catty (2001) FEBS Lett. 506, 249-252], we analysed the role of the membrane cysteine residues (studied using DeltaMBD) separately from that of the cysteine residues of the MBD, which were studied using full-length CadA. The role of the cysteines was assessed by reacting DeltaMBD and CadA with N -ethylmaleimide (NEM), an SH-specific reagent, in the presence or absence of Cd(2+). We show here that (i) in both DeltaMBD and CadA, the cysteine residues in the CPC motif are essential for phosphorylation; (ii) in both proteins, Cd(2+) protects against alkylation by NEM; and (iii) in the absence of Cd(2+), the MBD of CadA also protects against alkylation by NEM. Our results suggest that the CPC motif is present in the membrane Cd(2+) transport site(s) and that the MBD protects these site(s). PMID:12383056

  12. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) confirms that MEPE binds to PHEX via the MEPE–ASARM motif: a model for impaired mineralization in X-linked rickets (HYP)

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Peter S.N.; Garrett, Ian R.; Schwarz, Patricia M.; Carnes, David L.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Mundy, Gregory R.; Gutierrez, Gloria E.

    2012-01-01

    Matrix Extracellular Phospho-glycoprotEin (MEPE) and proteases are elevated and PHEX is defective in HYP. PHEX prevents proteolysis of MEPE and release of a protease-resistant MEPE–ASARM peptide, an inhibitor of mineralization (minhibin). Thus, in HYP, mutated PHEX may contribute to increased ASARM peptide release. Moreover, binding of MEPE by PHEX may regulate this process in normal subjects. The nature of the PHEX–MEPE nonproteolytic interaction(s) (direct or indirect) is/are unknown. Our aims were to determine (1) whether PHEX binds specifically to MEPE, (2) whether the binding involves the ASARM motif region, and (3) whether free ASARM peptide affects mineralization in vivo in mice. Protein interactions between MEPE and recombinant soluble PHEX (secPHEX) were measured using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Briefly, secPHEX, MEPE, and control protein (IgG) were immobilized on a Biacore CM5 sensor chip, and SPR experiments were performed on a Biacore 3000 high-performance research system. Pure secPHEX was then injected at different concentrations, and interactions with immobilized proteins were measured. To determine MEPE sequences interacting with secPHEX, the inhibitory effects of MEPE–ASARM peptides (phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated), control peptides, and MEPE midregion RGD peptides on secPHEX binding to chip-immobilized MEPE were measured. ASARM peptide and etidronate-mediated mineralization inhibition in vivo and in vitro were determined by quenched calcein fluorescence in hind limbs and calvariae in mice and by histological Sanderson stain. A specific, dose-dependent and Zn-dependent protein interaction between secPHEX and immobilized MEPE occurs (EC50 of 553 nM). Synthetic MEPE PO4-ASARM peptide inhibits the PHEX–MEPE interaction (KDapp = 15 uM and Bmax/inhib = 68%). In contrast, control and MEPE–RGD peptides had no effect. Subcutaneous administration of ASARM peptide resulted in marked quenching of fluorescence in calvariae and hind limbs

  13. CD36 Binds Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) in a Mechanism Dependent upon Fatty Acid Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Anthony G.; Chen, Alexander N.; Paz, Miguel A.; Hung, Justin P.; Hamilton, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The association of unesterified fatty acid (FA) with the scavenger receptor CD36 has been actively researched, with focuses on FA and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. CD36 has been shown to bind FA, but this interaction has been poorly characterized to date. To gain new insights into the physiological relevance of binding of FA to CD36, we characterized FA binding to the ectodomain of CD36 by the biophysical method surface plasmon resonance. Five structurally distinct FAs (saturated, monounsaturated (cis and trans), polyunsaturated, and oxidized) were pulsed across surface plasmon resonance channels, generating association and dissociation binding curves. Except for the oxidized FA HODE, all FAs bound to CD36, with rapid association and dissociation kinetics similar to HSA. Next, to elucidate the role that each FA might play in CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake, we used a fluorescent oxLDL (Dii-oxLDL) live cell assay with confocal microscopy imaging. CD36-mediated uptake in serum-free medium was very low but greatly increased when serum was present. The addition of exogenous FA in serum-free medium increased oxLDL binding and uptake to levels found with serum and affected CD36 plasma membrane distribution. Binding/uptake of oxLDL was dependent upon the FA dose, except for docosahexaenoic acid, which exhibited binding to CD36 but did not activate the uptake of oxLDL. HODE also did not affect oxLDL uptake. High affinity FA binding to CD36 and the effects of each FA on oxLDL uptake have important implications for protein conformation, binding of other ligands, functional properties of CD36, and high plasma FA levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25555908

  14. Amino Acids of Conserved Kinase Motifs of Cytomegalovirus Protein UL97 Are Essential for Autophosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Detlef; Kramer, Silke; Höhn, Simone; Schaarschmidt, Peter; Wunderlich, Kirsten; Mertens, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Thirteen point mutations targeting predicted domains conserved in homologous protein kinases were introduced into the UL97 coding region of the human cytomegalovirus. All mutagenized proteins were expressed in cells infected with recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVV). Several mutations drastically reduced ganciclovir (GCV) phosphorylation. Mutations at amino acids G340, A442, L446, and F523 resulted in a complete loss of pUL97 phosphorylation, which was strictly associated with a loss of GCV phosphorylation. Our results confirm that in rVV-infected cells pUL97 phosphorylation is due to autophosphorylation and show that several amino acids conserved within domains of protein kinases are essential for this pUL97 phosphorylation. GCV phosphorylation is dependent on pUL97 phosphorylation. PMID:10482650

  15. Amino acid motifs in both the major and minor capsid proteins of HPV51 impact antigenicity and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Godi, Anna; Epifano, Ilaria; Bissett, Sara L; Dell'Anna, Tiziana; Piana, Andrea; Cocuzza, Clementina; Beddows, Simon

    2015-07-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is a prerequisite for cervical disease development, yet data regarding the host immune response to infection at the genotype level are quite limited. We created pseudoviruses bearing the major (L1) and minor (L2) capsid proteins and L1 virus-like particles representing the reference sequence and a consensus of 34 European sequences of HPV51. Despite the formation of similarly sized particles, motifs in the reference L1 and L2 genes had a profound impact on the immunogenicity, antigenicity and infectivity of these antigens. The antibody status of women exhibiting low-grade disease was similar between HPV16 and the consensus HPV51, but both demonstrated discrepancies between binding and neutralizing antibody responses. These data support the use of pseudoviruses as the preferred target antigen in studies of natural HPV infection and the need to consider variation in both the L1 and L2 proteins for the appropriate presentation of antibody epitopes. PMID:25770119

  16. Metallofullerenol Gd@C82(OH)22 distracts the proline-rich-motif from putative binding on the SH3 domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seung-Gu; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong

    2013-03-01

    Biocompatibility is often regarded as one important aspect of de novo designed nanomaterials for biosafety. However, the toxicological effect, appearing along with its latency, is much more difficult to address by linearly mapping physicochemical properties of related nanomaterials with biological effects such as immune or cellular regulatory responses due to the complicated protein-protein interactions. Here, we investigate a potential interference of a metallofullerenol, Gd@C82(OH)22, on the function of SH3 domain, a highly promiscuous protein-protein interaction mediator involved in signaling and regulatory pathways through its binding with the proline-rich motif (PRM) peptides, using the atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. Our study shows that when only Gd@C82(OH)22 and the SH3 domain are present (without the PRM ligand), Gd@C82(OH)22 can interact with the SH3 domain by either directly blocking the hydrophobic active site or binding with a hydrophilic off-site with almost equal probability, which can be understood from its intrinsic amphiphilic nature. In a binding competition with the PRM onto the SH3 domain, however, the on-site binding mode is depleted while Gd@C82(OH)22 effectively intercepts the PRM from the putative binding site of the SH3 domain, implying that Gd@C82(OH)22 can disturb protein-protein interactions mediated by the SH3 domain. Despite a successful surface modification in an aqueous biological medium and a more recent demonstration as potential de novo cancer therapeutics, our study indicates that greater attention is needed in assessing the potential cytotoxicity of these nanomaterials.Biocompatibility is often regarded as one important aspect of de novo designed nanomaterials for biosafety. However, the toxicological effect, appearing along with its latency, is much more difficult to address by linearly mapping physicochemical properties of related nanomaterials with biological effects such as immune or cellular regulatory responses

  17. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes. PMID:19754879

  18. Structural analysis of ibuprofen binding to human adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein (FABP4)

    PubMed Central

    González, Javier M.; Fisher, S. Zoë

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of human adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein (FABP4) has been proposed as a treatment for type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease and atherosclerosis. However, FABP4 displays a naturally low selectivity towards hydrophobic ligands, leading to the possibility of side effects arising from cross-inhibition of other FABP isoforms. In a search for structural determinants of ligand-binding selectivity, the binding of FABP4 towards a group of small molecules structurally related to the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen was analyzed through X-ray crystallography. Several specific hydrophobic interactions are shown to enhance the binding affinities of these compounds, whereas an aromatic edge-to-face interaction is proposed to determine the conformation of bound ligands, highlighting the importance of aromatic interactions in hydrophobic environments. PMID:25664790

  19. Heavy metal binding to heparin disaccharides. I. Iduronic acid is the main binding site.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, D M; Choay, J; Sarkar, B

    1992-06-01

    As model compounds for Ni(II)-binding heparin-like compounds isolated from human kidneys (Templeton, D.M. & Sarkar, B. (1985) Biochem. J. 230 35-42.), we investigated two disaccharides--4-O-(2-O-sulfo-alpha-L-idopyranosyluronic acid)-2,5-anhydro- D-mannitol, disodium salt (1a), and 4-O-(2-O-sulfo-alpha-L-idopyranosyluronic acid)-6-O- sulfo-2,5-anhydro-D-mannitol, trisodium salt (1b)--that were isolated from heparin after nitrous acid hydrolysis and reduction. The monosulfate (1a) was active whereas the disulfate (1b) was inactive in a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) binding assay with the tracer ions 63Ni(II) 54Mn(II), 65Zn(II), and 109Cd(II). This result is in accord with the isolation of two 67Cu(II) and 63Ni(II) binding fractions from a complete pool of nitrous-acid-derived heparin disaccharides using sulfate gradients and a MonoQ anion exchange column on an FPLC system. One was identified as compound (1a) and the other as a tetrasulfated trisaccharide by high resolution FAB-MS, NMR and HPLC-PAD. Similarly, two synthetic disaccharides-methyl, 2-O-sulfo-4-O-(alpha-L-idopyranosyluronic acid)-2-deoxy-2-sulfamide-alpha-D-glucosamine, trisodium salt [IdopA2S(alpha 1,4)GlcNS alpha Me, 2a], and 2-O-sulfo-4-O-(alpha-L-idopyranosyluronic acid)-2-deoxy-2-sulfamide-6-O-sulfo- alpha-D-glucosamine, tetrasodium salt [IdopA2S (alpha 1,4)GlcNS6S alpha Me, 2b]--were shown to bind tracer amounts of 63Ni and 67Cu using chromatographic assays. Subsequently, 1H NMR titrations of 1a, 1b, 2a, and 2b with Zn (OAc)2 were analyzed to yield 1:1 Zn(II)-binding constants of 472 +/- 59, 698 +/- 120, 8,758 +/- 2,237 and 20,100 +/- 5,598 M-1, respectively. The values for 2a and 2b suggest chelation. It is suggested that the idopyranosiduronic acid residue is the major metal binding site. NMR evidence for this hypothesis comes from marked 1H and 13C chemical shift changes to the iduronic acid resonances after addition of diamagnetic Zn(II) ions. PMID:1643264

  20. Pbx-1 Hox heterodimers bind DNA on inseparable half-sites that permit intrinsic DNA binding specificity of the Hox partner at nucleotides 3' to a TAAT motif.

    PubMed

    Knoepfler, P S; Lu, Q; Kamps, M P

    1996-06-15

    Heterodimers between the Pbx/Exd and Hox/HOM-C classes of homeodomain proteins bind regulatory elements in tissue-specific and developmentally regulated genes. In this work, we characterize the half-site bound by both Pbx1 and Hox proteins on a prototypic element (TGATTAAT) and determine how the orientation of the Hox protein contributes to the DNA binding specificity of Pbx-Hox heterodimers. We demonstrate that the Hox protein binds the 3' TAAT sequence as its recognition core and exhibits sequence-specific binding at positions 3' to the TAAT core. Unfavored sequences at this position, such as two cytosines, abrogate binding to the element. The upstream Pbx1 core sequence, TGAT, must immediately juxtapose the Hox core. This geometry maintains the preference of Hox/HOM-C proteins for a T base at position -1, as T represents the fourth position of the Pbx1 core, and suggests that this T base is bound by both Pbx1 and Hox proteins, Pbx1 binding in the major grove and the Hox protein binding in the minor grove. Pbx1 also exhibits base selectivity 5' to its TGAT recognition sequence. PMID:8710498

  1. Two-Dimensional Combinatorial Screening (2DCS) of a Bacterial rRNA A-site-like Motif Library: Defining Privileged Asymmetric Internal Loops that Bind Aminoglycosides

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tuan; Disney, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    RNAs have diverse structures that are important for biological function. These structures include bulges and internal loops that can form tertiary contacts or serve as ligand binding sites. The most commonly exploited RNA drug target for small molecule intervention is the bacterial ribosome, more specifically the ribosomal RNA aminoacyl-tRNA site (rRNA A-site) which is a major target for the aminoglycoside class of antibiotics. The bacterial A-site is composed of a 1×1 nucleotide all-U internal loop and a 2×1 nucleotide all-A internal loop separated by a single GC base pair. Therefore, we probed the molecular recognition of a small library of four aminoglycosides for binding a 16384-member bacterial rRNA A-site-like internal loop library using Two-Dimensional Combinatorial Screening (2DCS). 2DCS is a microarray-based method that probes RNA and chemical spaces simultaneously. These studies sought to determine if aminoglycosides select their therapeutic target if given a choice of binding all possible internal loops derived from an A-site-like library. Results show that the bacterial rRNA A-site was not selected by any aminoglycoside. Analyses of selected sequences using the RNA Privileged Space Predictor (RNA-PSP) program show that each aminoglycoside preferentially binds different types of internal loops. For three of the aminoglycosides, 6″-azido-kanamycin A, 5-O-(2-azidoethyl) neamine, and 6″-azido-tobramycin, the selected internal loops bind with ~10-fold higher affinity than the bacterial rRNA A-site. The internal loops selected to bind 5″-azido-neomycin B bind with similar affinity as the therapeutic target. Selected internal loops that are unique for each aminoglycoside have dissociation constants ranging from 25 to 270 nM and are specific for the aminoglycoside they were selected to bind compared to the other arrayed aminoglycosides. These studies further establish a database of RNA motifs that are recognized by small molecules that could be used to

  2. Structure of L-Xylulose-5-Phosphate 3-Epimerase (UlaE) from the Anaerobic L-Ascorbate Utilization Pathway of Escherichia coli: Identification of a Novel Phosphate Binding Motif within a TIM Barrel Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Rong; Pineda, Marco; Ajamian, Eunice; Cui, Qizhi; Matte, Allan; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2009-01-15

    Three catabolic enzymes, UlaD, UlaE, and UlaF, are involved in a pathway leading to fermentation of L-ascorbate under anaerobic conditions. UlaD catalyzes a {beta}-keto acid decarboxylation reaction to produce L-xylulose-5-phosphate, which undergoes successive epimerization reactions with UlaE (L-xylulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase) and UlaF (L-ribulose-5-phosphate 4-epimerase), yielding D-xylulose-5-phosphate, an intermediate in the pentose phosphate pathway. We describe here crystallographic studies of UlaE from Escherichia coli O157:H7 that complete the structural characterization of this pathway. UlaE has a triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold and forms dimers. The active site is located at the C-terminal ends of the parallel {beta}-strands. The enzyme binds Zn{sup 2+}, which is coordinated by Glu155, Asp185, His211, and Glu251. We identified a phosphate-binding site formed by residues from the {beta}1/{alpha}1 loop and {alpha}3' helix in the N-terminal region. This site differs from the well-characterized phosphate-binding motif found in several TIM barrel superfamilies that is located at strands {beta}7 and {beta}8. The intrinsic flexibility of the active site region is reflected by two different conformations of loops forming part of the substrate-binding site. Based on computational docking of the L-xylulose 5-phosphate substrate to UlaE and structural similarities of the active site of this enzyme to the active sites of other epimerases, a metal-dependent epimerization mechanism for UlaE is proposed, and Glu155 and Glu251 are implicated as catalytic residues. Mutation and activity measurements for structurally equivalent residues in related epimerases supported this mechanistic proposal.

  3. Structure of l-Xylulose-5-Phosphate 3-Epimerase (UlaE) from the Anaerobic l-Ascorbate Utilization Pathway of Escherichia coli: Identification of a Novel Phosphate Binding Motif within a TIM Barrel Fold▿

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Rong; Pineda, Marco; Ajamian, Eunice; Cui, Qizhi; Matte, Allan; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2008-01-01

    Three catabolic enzymes, UlaD, UlaE, and UlaF, are involved in a pathway leading to fermentation of l-ascorbate under anaerobic conditions. UlaD catalyzes a β-keto acid decarboxylation reaction to produce l-xylulose-5-phosphate, which undergoes successive epimerization reactions with UlaE (l-xylulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase) and UlaF (l-ribulose-5-phosphate 4-epimerase), yielding d-xylulose-5-phosphate, an intermediate in the pentose phosphate pathway. We describe here crystallographic studies of UlaE from Escherichia coli O157:H7 that complete the structural characterization of this pathway. UlaE has a triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold and forms dimers. The active site is located at the C-terminal ends of the parallel β-strands. The enzyme binds Zn2+, which is coordinated by Glu155, Asp185, His211, and Glu251. We identified a phosphate-binding site formed by residues from the β1/α1 loop and α3′ helix in the N-terminal region. This site differs from the well-characterized phosphate-binding motif found in several TIM barrel superfamilies that is located at strands β7 and β8. The intrinsic flexibility of the active site region is reflected by two different conformations of loops forming part of the substrate-binding site. Based on computational docking of the l-xylulose 5-phosphate substrate to UlaE and structural similarities of the active site of this enzyme to the active sites of other epimerases, a metal-dependent epimerization mechanism for UlaE is proposed, and Glu155 and Glu251 are implicated as catalytic residues. Mutation and activity measurements for structurally equivalent residues in related epimerases supported this mechanistic proposal. PMID:18849419

  4. An eIF2α-binding motif in protein phosphatase 1 subunit GADD34 and its viral orthologs is required to promote dephosphorylation of eIF2α

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Margarito; Vasconcelos, Gabriel; Dever, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Transient protein synthesis inhibition, mediated by phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α), is an important protective mechanism cells use during stress conditions. Following relief of the stress, the growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein GADD34 associates with the broadly acting serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) to dephosphorylate eIF2α. Whereas the PP1-binding motif on GADD34 has been defined, it remains to be determined how GADD34 directs PP1 to specifically dephosphorylate eIF2α. In this report, we map a novel eIF2α-binding motif to the C terminus of GADD34 in a region distinct from where PP1 binds to GADD34. This motif is characterized by the consensus sequence Rx[Gnl]x1–2Wxxx[Arlv]x[Dn][Rg]xRFxx[Rlvk][Ivc], where capital letters are preferred and x is any residue. Point mutations altering the eIF2α-binding motif impair the ability of GADD34 to interact with eIF2α, promote eIF2α dephosphorylation, and suppress PKR toxicity in yeast. Interestingly, this eIF2α-docking motif is conserved among viral orthologs of GADD34, and is necessary for the proteins produced by African swine fever virus, Canarypox virus, and Herpes simplex virus to promote eIF2α dephosphorylation. Taken together, these data indicate that GADD34 and its viral orthologs direct specific dephosphorylation of eIF2α by interacting with both PP1 and eIF2α through independent binding motifs. PMID:26100893

  5. Biased, non-equivalent gene-proximal and -distal binding motifs of orphan nuclear receptor TR4 in primary human erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lihong; Sierant, M C; Gurdziel, Katherine; Zhu, Fan; Cui, Shuaiying; Kolodziej, Katarzyna E; Strouboulis, John; Guan, Yuanfang; Tanabe, Osamu; Lim, Kim-Chew; Engel, James Douglas

    2014-05-01

    We previously reported that TR2 and TR4 orphan nuclear receptors bind to direct repeat (DR) elements in the ε- and γ-globin promoters, and act as molecular anchors for the recruitment of epigenetic corepressors of the multifaceted DRED complex, thereby leading to ε- and γ-globin transcriptional repression during definitive erythropoiesis. Other than the ε- and γ-globin and the GATA1 genes, TR4-regulated target genes in human erythroid cells remain unknown. Here, we identified TR4 binding sites genome-wide using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) as human primary CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors differentiated progressively to late erythroid precursors. We also performed whole transcriptome analyses by RNA-seq to identify TR4 downstream targets after lentiviral-mediated TR4 shRNA knockdown in erythroid cells. Analyses from combined ChIP-seq and RNA-seq datasets indicate that DR1 motifs are more prevalent in the proximal promoters of TR4 direct target genes, which are involved in basic biological functions (e.g., mRNA processing, ribosomal assembly, RNA splicing and primary metabolic processes). In contrast, other non-DR1 repeat motifs (DR4, ER6 and IR1) are more prevalent at gene-distal TR4 binding sites. Of these, approximately 50% are also marked with epigenetic chromatin signatures (such as P300, H3K27ac, H3K4me1 and H3K27me3) associated with enhancer function. Thus, we hypothesize that TR4 regulates gene transcription via gene-proximal DR1 sites as TR4/TR2 heterodimers, while it can associate with novel nuclear receptor partners (such as RXR) to bind to distant non-DR1 consensus sites. In summary, this study reveals that the TR4 regulatory network is far more complex than previously appreciated and that TR4 regulates basic, essential biological processes during the terminal differentiation of human erythroid cells. PMID:24811540

  6. A single amino acid in the SH3 domain of Hck determines its high affinity and specificity in binding to HIV-1 Nef protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C H; Leung, B; Lemmon, M A; Zheng, J; Cowburn, D; Kuriyan, J; Saksela, K

    1995-01-01

    We have examined the differential binding of Hck and Fyn to HIV-1 Nef to elucidate the structural basis of SH3 binding affinity and specificity. Full-length Nef bound to Hck SH3 with the highest affinity reported for an SH3-mediated interaction (KD 250 nM). In contrast to Hck, affinity of the highly homologous Fyn SH3 for Nef was too weak (KD > 20 microM) to be accurately determined. We show that this distinct specificity lies in a variable loop, the 'RT loop', positioned close to conserved SH3 residues implicated in the binding of proline-rich (PxxP) motifs. A mutant Fyn SH3 with a single amino acid substitution (R96I) in its RT loop had an affinity (KD 380 nM) for Nef comparable with that of Hck SH3. Based on additional mutagenesis studies we propose that the selective recognition of Nef by Hck SH3 is determined by hydrophobic interactions involving an isoleucine residue in its RT loop. Although Nef contains a PxxP motif which is necessary for the interaction with Hck SH3, high affinity binding was only observed for intact Nef protein. The binding of a peptide containing the Nef PxxP motif showed > 300-fold weaker affinity for Hck SH3 than full-length Nef. Images PMID:7588629

  7. The structure of Plasmodium vivax phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein suggests a functional motif containing a left-handed helix

    SciTech Connect

    Arakaki, Tracy; Neely, Helen; Boni, Erica; Mueller, Natasha; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2007-03-01

    The crystal structure of a phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein from P. vivax, a homolog of Raf-kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP), has been solved to a resolution of 1.3 Å. The inferred interaction surface near the anion-binding site is found to include a distinctive left-handed α-helix. The structure of a putative Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) homolog from the eukaryotic parasite Plasmodium vivax has been studied to a resolution of 1.3 Å using multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction at the Se K edge. This protozoan protein is topologically similar to previously studied members of the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) sequence family, but exhibits a distinctive left-handed α-helical region at one side of the canonical phospholipid-binding site. Re-examination of previously determined PEBP structures suggests that the P. vivax protein and yeast carboxypeptidase Y inhibitor may represent a structurally distinct subfamily of the diverse PEBP-sequence family.

  8. Relationship between binding affinities to cellular retinoic acid-binding protein and biological potency of a new series of retinoids.

    PubMed

    Sani, B P; Dawson, M I; Hobbs, P D; Chan, R L; Schiff, L J

    1984-01-01

    Binding affinities of a new and unusual series of retinoic acid analogues to cellular retinoic acid-binding protein, a possible mediator of their biological function in the control of differentiation and tumorigenesis, and to serum albumin, their plasma transport protein, were determined. Also, biological activity of these retinoids in the reversal of keratinization in hamster tracheal organ cultures was assessed and compared with their binding affinities. Analogues that possessed high biological activity showed high binding efficiency to cellular retinoic acid-binding protein. Those that were biologically less active were poor binders to the binding protein. Three retinoids, 4657-57, 3920-59, and 4445-75, which showed 90 to 100% binding efficiency of that of retinoic acid for cellular retinoic acid-binding protein expressed high biological activity detectable in the range of 10(-10) M as against 10(-11) M for retinoic acid. The correlation noticed in these two activities not only enhances the confidence in the two assay procedures but also paves the way for design and development of potential chemopreventive agents. No apparent differences were observed in the binding affinities of the retinoids to binding proteins of a normal tissue or a tumor tissue. No correlation existed between the binding affinities of these retinoids to serum albumin and their biological activity. Structure-activity relationships of the retinoids in relation to their binding affinities and biological activities have been discussed. PMID:6317169

  9. An SH3 binding motif within the nucleocapsid protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus interacts with the host cellular signaling proteins STAMI, TXK, Fyn, Hck, and cortactin.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Scott P; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes an economically important global swine disease, and has a complicated virus-host immunomodulation that often leads to a weak Th2 immune response and viral persistence. In this study, we identified a Src homology 3 (SH3) binding motif, PxxPxxP, that is conserved within the N protein of PRRSV strains. Subsequently, we identified five host cellular proteins [signal transducing adaptor molecule (STAM)I, TXK tyrosine kinase (TXK), protein tyrosine kinase fyn (Fyn), hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), and cortactin] that interact with this SH3 motif. We demonstrated that binding of SH3 proteins with PRRSV N protein depends on at least one intact PxxP motif as disruption of P53 within the motif significantly reduced interaction of each of the 5 proteins. The first PxxP motif appears to be more important for STAMI-N protein interactions whereas the second PxxP motif was more important for Hck interaction. Both STAMI and Hck interactions with PRRSV N protein required an unhindered C-terminal domain as the interaction was only observed with STAMI and Hck proteins with N-terminal but not C-terminal fluorescent tags. We showed that the P56 residue within the SH3 motif is critical for virus lifecycle as mutation resulted in a loss of virus infectivity, however the P50 and P53 mutations did not abolish virus infectivity suggesting that these highly conserved proline residues within the SH3 motif may provide a selective growth advantage through interactions with the host rather than a vital functional element. These results have important implications in understanding PRRSV-host interactions. PMID:25882913

  10. Cellular nucleic acid binding protein binds G-rich single-stranded nucleic acids and may function as a nucleic acid chaperone.

    PubMed

    Armas, Pablo; Nasif, Sofía; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2008-02-15

    Cellular nucleic acid binding protein (CNBP) is a small single-stranded nucleic acid binding protein made of seven Zn knuckles and an Arg-Gly rich box. CNBP is strikingly conserved among vertebrates and was reported to play broad-spectrum functions in eukaryotic cells biology. Neither its biological function nor its mechanisms of action were elucidated yet. The main goal of this work was to gain further insights into the CNBP biochemical and molecular features. We studied Bufo arenarum CNBP (bCNBP) binding to single-stranded nucleic acid probes representing the main reported CNBP putative targets. We report that, although bCNBP is able to bind RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes in vitro, it binds RNA as a preformed dimer whereas both monomer and dimer are able to bind to ssDNA. A systematic analysis of variant probes shows that the preferred bCNBP targets contain unpaired guanosine-rich stretches. These data expand the knowledge about CNBP binding stoichiometry and begins to dissect the main features of CNBP nucleic acid targets. Besides, we show that bCNBP presents a highly disordered predicted structure and promotes the annealing and melting of nucleic acids in vitro. These features are typical of proteins that function as nucleic acid chaperones. Based on these data, we propose that CNBP may function as a nucleic acid chaperone through binding, remodeling, and stabilizing nucleic acids secondary structures. This novel CNBP biochemical activity broadens the field of study about its biological function and may be the basis to understand the diverse ways in which CNBP controls gene expression. PMID:17661353

  11. Liver fatty acid-binding protein binds monoacylglycerol in vitro and in mouse liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Lagakos, William S; Guan, Xudong; Ho, Shiu-Ying; Sawicki, Luciana Rodriguez; Corsico, Betina; Kodukula, Sarala; Murota, Kaeko; Stark, Ruth E; Storch, Judith

    2013-07-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP; FABP1) is expressed both in liver and intestinal mucosa. Mice null for LFABP were recently shown to have altered metabolism of not only fatty acids but also monoacylglycerol, the two major products of dietary triacylglycerol hydrolysis (Lagakos, W. S., Gajda, A. M., Agellon, L., Binas, B., Choi, V., Mandap, B., Russnak, T., Zhou, Y. X., and Storch, J. (2011) Am. J. Physiol. Gastrointest. Liver Physiol. 300, G803-G814). Nevertheless, the binding and transport of monoacylglycerol (MG) by LFABP are uncertain, with conflicting reports in the literature as to whether this single chain amphiphile is in fact bound by LFABP. In the present studies, gel filtration chromatography of liver cytosol from LFABP(-/-) mice shows the absence of the low molecular weight peak of radiolabeled monoolein present in the fractions that contain LFABP in cytosol from wild type mice, indicating that LFABP binds sn-2 MG in vivo. Furthermore, solution-state NMR spectroscopy demonstrates two molecules of sn-2 monoolein bound in the LFABP binding pocket in positions similar to those found for oleate binding. Equilibrium binding affinities are ∼2-fold lower for MG compared with fatty acid. Finally, kinetic studies examining the transfer of a fluorescent MG analog show that the rate of transfer of MG is 7-fold faster from LFABP to phospholipid membranes than from membranes to membranes and occurs by an aqueous diffusion mechanism. These results provide strong support for monoacylglycerol as a physiological ligand for LFABP and further suggest that LFABP functions in the efficient intracellular transport of MG. PMID:23658011

  12. Liver Fatty Acid-binding Protein Binds Monoacylglycerol in Vitro and in Mouse Liver Cytosol*

    PubMed Central

    Lagakos, William S.; Guan, Xudong; Ho, Shiu-Ying; Sawicki, Luciana Rodriguez; Corsico, Betina; Kodukula, Sarala; Murota, Kaeko; Stark, Ruth E.; Storch, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP; FABP1) is expressed both in liver and intestinal mucosa. Mice null for LFABP were recently shown to have altered metabolism of not only fatty acids but also monoacylglycerol, the two major products of dietary triacylglycerol hydrolysis (Lagakos, W. S., Gajda, A. M., Agellon, L., Binas, B., Choi, V., Mandap, B., Russnak, T., Zhou, Y. X., and Storch, J. (2011) Am. J. Physiol. Gastrointest. Liver Physiol. 300, G803–G814). Nevertheless, the binding and transport of monoacylglycerol (MG) by LFABP are uncertain, with conflicting reports in the literature as to whether this single chain amphiphile is in fact bound by LFABP. In the present studies, gel filtration chromatography of liver cytosol from LFABP−/− mice shows the absence of the low molecular weight peak of radiolabeled monoolein present in the fractions that contain LFABP in cytosol from wild type mice, indicating that LFABP binds sn-2 MG in vivo. Furthermore, solution-state NMR spectroscopy demonstrates two molecules of sn-2 monoolein bound in the LFABP binding pocket in positions similar to those found for oleate binding. Equilibrium binding affinities are ∼2-fold lower for MG compared with fatty acid. Finally, kinetic studies examining the transfer of a fluorescent MG analog show that the rate of transfer of MG is 7-fold faster from LFABP to phospholipid membranes than from membranes to membranes and occurs by an aqueous diffusion mechanism. These results provide strong support for monoacylglycerol as a physiological ligand for LFABP and further suggest that LFABP functions in the efficient intracellular transport of MG. PMID:23658011

  13. OsCCD1, a novel small calcium-binding protein with one EF-hand motif, positively regulates osmotic and salt tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Jing, Pei; Zou, Juanzi; Kong, Lin; Hu, Shiqi; Wang, Biying; Yang, Jun; Xie, Guosheng

    2016-06-01

    Calcium-binding proteins play key roles in the signal transduction in the growth and stress response in eukaryotes. However, a subfamily of proteins with one EF-hand motif has not been fully studied in higher plants. Here, a novel small calcium-binding protein with a C-terminal centrin-like domain (CCD1) in rice, OsCCD1, was characterized to show high similarity with a TaCCD1 in wheat. As a result, OsCCD1 can bind Ca(2+) in the in vitro EMSA and the fluorescence staining calcium-binding assays. Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged OsCCD1 in rice protoplasts showed that OsCCD1 was localized in the nucleus and cytosol of rice cells. OsCCD1 transcript levels were transiently induced by osmotic stress and salt stress through the calcium-mediated ABA signal. The rice seedlings of T-DNA mutant lines showed significantly less tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.01). Conversely, its overexpressors can significantly enhance the tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.05). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that, OsDREB2B, OsAPX1 and OsP5CS genes are involved in the rice tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses. In sum, OsCCD1 gene probably affects the DREB2B and its downstream genes to positively regulate osmotic and salt tolerance in rice seedlings. PMID:27095404

  14. T-Cell Memory Responses Elicited by Yellow Fever Vaccine are Targeted to Overlapping Epitopes Containing Multiple HLA-I and -II Binding Motifs

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Andréa Barbosa; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Braga-Neto, Ulisses; Dhalia, Rafael; Silva, Ana Maria; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan P.; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Montenegro, Silvia M. L.; Marques, Ernesto T. A.

    2013-01-01

    The yellow fever vaccines (YF-17D-204 and 17DD) are considered to be among the safest vaccines and the presence of neutralizing antibodies is correlated with protection, although other immune effector mechanisms are known to be involved. T-cell responses are known to play an important role modulating antibody production and the killing of infected cells. However, little is known about the repertoire of T-cell responses elicited by the YF-17DD vaccine in humans. In this report, a library of 653 partially overlapping 15-mer peptides covering the envelope (Env) and nonstructural (NS) proteins 1 to 5 of the vaccine was utilized to perform a comprehensive analysis of the virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses. The T-cell responses were screened ex-vivo by IFN-γ ELISPOT assays using blood samples from 220 YF-17DD vaccinees collected two months to four years after immunization. Each peptide was tested in 75 to 208 separate individuals of the cohort. The screening identified sixteen immunodominant antigens that elicited activation of circulating memory T-cells in 10% to 33% of the individuals. Biochemical in-vitro binding assays and immunogenetic and immunogenicity studies indicated that each of the sixteen immunogenic 15-mer peptides contained two or more partially overlapping epitopes that could bind with high affinity to molecules of different HLAs. The prevalence of the immunogenicity of a peptide in the cohort was correlated with the diversity of HLA-II alleles that they could bind. These findings suggest that overlapping of HLA binding motifs within a peptide enhances its T-cell immunogenicity and the prevalence of the response in the population. In summary, the results suggests that in addition to factors of the innate immunity, “promiscuous” T-cell antigens might contribute to the high efficacy of the yellow fever vaccines. PMID:23383350

  15. Evolution of the hydrogen-bonding motif in the melamine-cyanuric acid co-crystal: a topological study.

    PubMed

    Petelski, Andre N; Peruchena, Nelida M; Sosa, Gladis L

    2016-09-01

    The melamine (M)/cyanuric acid (CA) supramolecular system is perhaps one of the most exploited in the field of self-assembly because of the high complementarity of the components. However, it is necessary to investigate further the factors involved in the assembly process. In this study, we analyzed a set of 13 M n /CA m clusters (with n , m = 1, 2, 3), taken from crystallographic data, to characterize the nature of the hydrogen bonds involved in the self-assembly of these components as well as to provide greater understanding of the phenomenon. The calculations were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and ω-B97XD (single point) levels of theory, and the interactions were analyzed within the framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules and by means of molecular electrostatic potential maps. Our results show that the stablest structure is the rosette-type motif and the aggregation mechanism is governed by a combination of cooperative and anticooperative effects. Our topological results explain the polymorphism in the self-assembly of coadsorbed monolayers of M and CA. Graphical abstract The aggregation steps of the melamine-cyanuric co-crystal is driven by a hydrogen-bonded network which is governed by a complex combination of cooperative and anticooperative effects. PMID:27491851

  16. Identification of amino acids important for binding of Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin to host cells and to HAVCR1

    PubMed Central

    Ivie, Susan E.; McClain, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin belongs to the aerolysin-like family of pore-forming toxins and is one of the most potent bacterial toxins known. The epsilon toxin causes fatal enterotoxemia in sheep, goats, and possibly humans. Evidence indicates that the toxin binds to protein receptors including hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), but the region of the toxin responsible for cell binding has not been identified. In the present study, we identify amino acids within the epsilon toxin important for this cell interaction. Site-specific mutagenesis was used to investigate the role of a surface-accessible cluster of aromatic amino acids, and purified mutant proteins were tested in a series of cell-culture assays to assess cytotoxic activity and cell binding. When added to cells, four mutant proteins (Etx-Y29E, Etx-Y30E, Etx-Y36E and Etx-Y196E) were severely impaired in their ability to not only kill host cells, but also in their ability to permeabilize the plasma membrane. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and thermal stability studies revealed that the wild-type and mutant proteins were similarly folded. Additional experiments revealed that these mutant proteins were defective in binding to host cells and to HAVCR1. These data indicate that an amino acid motif including Y29, Y30, Y36, and Y196 is important for the ability of epsilon toxin to interact with cells and HAVCR1. PMID:22938730

  17. Identification of amino acids important for binding of Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin to host cells and to HAVCR1.

    PubMed

    Ivie, Susan E; McClain, Mark S

    2012-09-25

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin belongs to the aerolysin-like family of pore-forming toxins and is one of the most potent bacterial toxins known. The epsilon toxin causes fatal enterotoxemia in sheep, goats, and possibly humans. Evidence indicates that the toxin binds to protein receptors including hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), but the region of the toxin responsible for cell binding has not been identified. In the present study, we identify amino acids within the epsilon toxin important for this cell interaction. Site-specific mutagenesis was used to investigate the role of a surface-accessible cluster of aromatic amino acids, and purified mutant proteins were tested in a series of cell-culture assays to assess cytotoxic activity and cell binding. When added to cells, four mutant proteins (Etx-Y29E, Etx-Y30E, Etx-Y36E and Etx-Y196E) were severely impaired in their ability to not only kill host cells, but also in their ability to permeabilize the plasma membrane. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and thermal stability studies revealed that the wild-type and mutant proteins were similarly folded. Additional experiments revealed that these mutant proteins were defective in binding to host cells and to HAVCR1. These data indicate that an amino acid motif including Y29, Y30, Y36, and Y196 is important for the ability of epsilon toxin to interact with cells and HAVCR1. PMID:22938730

  18. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl transferase binds acidic and basic amino acid substrates.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Aman; Clifton, Ian J; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Ivison, David; Domene, Carmen; Schofield, Christopher J

    2011-09-21

    Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl-transferases catalyse the reversible transfer of an acetyl-group from a basic (ornithine) to an acidic (glutamate) amino acid by employing a common mechanism involving an acetyl-enzyme intermediate but using different side chain binding modes. PMID:21796301

  19. Interaction of perfluoroalkyl acids with human liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Nan; Li, Juan; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Aiqian; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are highly persistent and bioaccumulative, resulting in their broad distribution in humans and the environment. The liver is an important target for PFAAs, but the mechanisms behind PFAAs interaction with hepatocyte proteins remain poorly understood. We characterized the binding of PFAAs to human liver fatty acid-binding protein (hL-FABP) and identified critical structural features in their interaction. The binding interaction of PFAAs with hL-FABP was determined by fluorescence displacement and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assay. Molecular simulation was conducted to define interactions at the binding sites. ITC measurement revealed that PFOA/PFNA displayed a moderate affinity for hL-FABP at a 1:1 molar ratio, a weak binding affinity for PFHxS and no binding for PFHxA. Moreover, the interaction was mainly mediated by electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bonding. Substitution of Asn111 with Asp caused loss of binding affinity to PFAA, indicating its crucial role for the initial PFAA binding to the outer binding site. Substitution of Arg122 with Gly caused only one molecule of PFAA to bind to hL-FABP. Molecular simulation showed that substitution of Arg122 increased the volume of the outer binding pocket, making it impossible to form intensive hydrophobic stacking and hydrogen bonds with PFOA, and highlighting its crucial role in the binding process. The binding affinity of PFAAs increased significantly with their carbon number. Arg122 and Asn111 played a pivotal role in these interactions. Our findings may help understand the distribution pattern, bioaccumulation, elimination, and toxicity of PFAAs in humans. PMID:25370009

  20. Direct Imaging of Hippocampal Epileptiform Calcium Motifs Following Kainic Acid Administration in Freely Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berdyyeva, Tamara K.; Frady, E. Paxon; Nassi, Jonathan J.; Aluisio, Leah; Cherkas, Yauheniya; Otte, Stephani; Wyatt, Ryan M.; Dugovic, Christine; Ghosh, Kunal K.; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Lovenberg, Timothy; Bonaventure, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to abnormally high calcium concentrations is thought to be a core mechanism underlying hippocampal damage in epileptic patients; however, no prior study has characterized calcium activity during seizures in the live, intact hippocampus. We have directly investigated this possibility by combining whole-brain electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements with microendoscopic calcium imaging of pyramidal cells in the CA1 hippocampal region of freely behaving mice treated with the pro-convulsant kainic acid (KA). We observed that KA administration led to systematic patterns of epileptiform calcium activity: a series of large-scale, intensifying flashes of increased calcium fluorescence concurrent with a cluster of low-amplitude EEG waveforms. This was accompanied by a steady increase in cellular calcium levels (>5 fold increase relative to the baseline), followed by an intense spreading calcium wave characterized by a 218% increase in global mean intensity of calcium fluorescence (n = 8, range [114–349%], p < 10−4; t-test). The wave had no consistent EEG phenotype and occurred before the onset of motor convulsions. Similar changes in calcium activity were also observed in animals treated with 2 different proconvulsant agents, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), suggesting the measured changes in calcium dynamics are a signature of seizure activity rather than a KA-specific pathology. Additionally, despite reducing the behavioral severity of KA-induced seizures, the anticonvulsant drug valproate (VA, 300 mg/kg) did not modify the observed abnormalities in calcium dynamics. These results confirm the presence of pathological calcium activity preceding convulsive motor seizures and support calcium as a candidate signaling molecule in a pathway connecting seizures to subsequent cellular damage. Integrating in vivo calcium imaging with traditional assessment of seizures could potentially increase translatability of pharmacological

  1. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder. PMID:25639618

  2. Optical property of iron binding to Suwannee River fulvic acid.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Li, Mingyang; Wang, Dongsheng; Xiao, Feng

    2013-05-01

    In this work, absorbance and fluorescence spectra were used to study iron binding to standard Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). The differential logarithm-transformed absorbance and fluorescence spectra of SRFA induced by iron binding were processed to examine the nature of the observed phenomena and to investigate the contributions of discrete binding sites present in SRFA. Both the Fe-differential log-transformed absorbance and fluorescence were well correlated to the bound iron concentrations predicted based on the Non-ideal Competitive Adsorption (NICA-Donnan) model at iron concentrations below 10.0μM (R(2)>0.99 for absorbance and R(2)>0.97 for fluorescence) and over a wide pH range of 3.5-8.0. At pH3.5, both the Fe-differential log-transformed absorbance and fluorescence vs. iron bound spectra exhibited significantly lower slopes than those at pH5.0, 7.0, and 8.0. These results suggest that a different set of complexation-active chromophores and fluorophores are responsible for iron binding at low pH values or that the NICA-Donnan model is limited at low pH. Because phenolic and carboxylic complex sites of different fluorophores respond to iron quenching, the fluorescence data indicate three stages of iron binding to phenolic, carboxylic, and Donnan gels (electrostatic interactions) in SRFA (with R(2)>0.99 at each stage). The agreement between observations from spectroscopic indices and established metal-binding models shows that the absorbance and fluorescence spectra provide important information about the involvement of metal complexation of specific functional groups typical for fulvic acids. PMID:23499223

  3. Rice MEL2, the RNA recognition motif (RRM) protein, binds in vitro to meiosis-expressed genes containing U-rich RNA consensus sequences in the 3'-UTR.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Saori; Sato, Yutaka; Asano, Tomoya; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Nonomura, Ken-Ichi

    2015-10-01

    Post-transcriptional gene regulation by RNA recognition motif (RRM) proteins through binding to cis-elements in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) is widely used in eukaryotes to complete various biological processes. Rice MEIOSIS ARRESTED AT LEPTOTENE2 (MEL2) is the RRM protein that functions in the transition to meiosis in proper timing. The MEL2 RRM preferentially associated with the U-rich RNA consensus, UUAGUU[U/A][U/G][A/U/G]U, dependently on sequences and proportionally to MEL2 protein amounts in vitro. The consensus sequences were located in the putative looped structures of the RNA ligand. A genome-wide survey revealed a tendency of MEL2-binding consensus appearing in 3'-UTR of rice genes. Of 249 genes that conserved the consensus in their 3'-UTR, 13 genes spatiotemporally co-expressed with MEL2 in meiotic flowers, and included several genes whose function was supposed in meiosis; such as Replication protein A and OsMADS3. The proteome analysis revealed that the amounts of small ubiquitin-related modifier-like protein and eukaryotic translation initiation factor3-like protein were dramatically altered in mel2 mutant anthers. Taken together with transcriptome and gene ontology results, we propose that the rice MEL2 is involved in the translational regulation of key meiotic genes on 3'-UTRs to achieve the faithful transition of germ cells to meiosis. PMID:26319516

  4. Zygotic Expression of the Double-Stranded RNA Binding Motif Protein Drb2p Is Required for DNA Elimination in the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila ▿

    PubMed Central

    Motl, Jason A.; Chalker, Douglas L.

    2011-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA binding motif (DSRM)-containing proteins play many roles in the regulation of gene transcription and translation, including some with tandem DSRMs that act in small RNA biogenesis. We report the characterization of the genes for double-stranded RNA binding proteins 1 and 2 (DRB1 and DRB2), two genes encoding nuclear proteins with tandem DSRMs in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. Both proteins are expressed throughout growth and development but exhibit distinct peaks of expression, suggesting different biological roles. In support of this, we show that expression of DRB2 is essential for vegetative growth while DRB1 expression is not. During conjugation, Drb1p and Drb2p localize to distinct nuclear foci. Cells lacking all DRB1 copies are able to produce viable progeny, although at a reduced rate relative to wild-type cells. In contrast, cells lacking germ line DRB2 copies, which thus cannot express Drb2p zygotically, fail to produce progeny, arresting late into conjugation. This arrest phenotype is accompanied by a failure to organize the essential DNA rearrangement protein Pdd1p into DNA elimination bodies and execute DNA elimination and chromosome breakage. These results implicate zygotically expressed Drb2p in the maturation of these nuclear structures, which are necessary for reorganization of the somatic genome. PMID:22021239

  5. Fatty acid-binding site environments of serum vitamin D-binding protein and albumin are different

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Narasimha; Ray, Rahul

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) and albumin (ALB) are abundant serum proteins and both possess high-affinity binding for saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. However, certain differences exist. We surmised that in cases where serum albumin level is low, DBP presumably can act as a transporter of fatty acids. To explore this possibility we synthesized several alkylating derivatives of 14C-palmitic acid to probe the fatty acid binding pockets of DBP and ALB. We observed that N-ethyl-5-phenylisooxazolium-3′-sulfonate-ester (WRK ester) of 14C-palmitic acid specifically labeled DBP; but p-nitrophenyl- and N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-esters failed to do so. However, p-nitrophenyl ester of 14C-palmitic acid specifically labeled bovine ALB, indicating that the micro-environment of the fatty acid-binding domains of DBP and ALB may be different; and DBP may not replace ALB as a transporter of fatty acids. PMID:18374965

  6. Fatty acid induced remodeling within the human liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashwani; Sharma, Amit

    2011-09-01

    We crystallized human liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) in apo, holo, and intermediate states of palmitic acid engagement. Structural snapshots of fatty acid recognition, entry, and docking within LFABP support a heads-in mechanism for ligand entry. Apo-LFABP undergoes structural remodeling, where the first palmitate ingress creates the atomic environment for placement of the second palmitate. These new mechanistic insights will facilitate development of pharmacological agents against LFABP. PMID:21757748

  7. Retinoic acid binding protein in normal and neopolastic rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Gesell, M S; Brandes, M J; Arnold, E A; Isaacs, J T; Ueda, H; Millan, J C; Brandes, D

    1982-01-01

    Sucrose density gradient analysis of cytosol from normal and neoplastic rat prostatic tissues exhibited a peak of (3H) retinoic acid binding in the 2S region, corresponding to the cytoplasmic retinoic acid binding protein (cRABP). In the Fisher-Copenhagen F1 rat, cRABP was present in the lateral lobe, but could not be detected in the ventral nor in the dorsal prostatic lobes. Four sublines of the R-3327 rat prostatic tumor contained similar levels of this binding protein. The absence of cRABP in the normal tissue of origin of the R-3327 tumor, the rat dorsal prostate, and reappearance in the neoplastic tissues follows a pattern described in other human and animal tumors. The occurrence of cRABP in the well-differentiated as well as in the anaplastic R-3327 tumors in which markers which reflect a state of differentiation and hormonal regulation, such as androgen receptor, 5 alpha reductase, and secretory acid phosphatase are either markedly reduced or absent, points to cRABP as a marker of malignant transformation. PMID:6283503

  8. Characterization of phosphonic acid binding to zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, Peter J.; Malicki, Michał; Giordano, Anthony J.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Marder, Seth R.

    2011-01-24

    Radio Frequency (RF) sputter-deposited zinc oxide (ZnO) films have been modified with alkylphosphonic acids in order to study both the binding of the phosphonic acid (PA) group to the ZnO surface and the packing of the alkyl chain. The characterization of these PA-modified ZnO substrates by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements is presented herein. The surface modification procedure is straightforward and was adapted from earlier work. XPS analysis shows that oxygen plasma (OP) treatment creates reactive oxygen species on the surface of ZnO, allowing for a more robust binding of PAs to the ZnO surface. IRRAS analysis indicates that octadecylphosphonic acid binds to the ZnO surface in a predominantly tridentate fashion, forming dense, well-packed monolayers with alkyl chains in a fully anti-conformation. AFM and contact angle measurements indicate good surface coverage of the PAs with little to no multilayer formation.

  9. Effects of microgravity on the binding of acetylsalicylic acid by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, James E.; Gerren, Richard; Zoelle, Jeffery

    1995-07-01

    Bacteroids can be induced in vitro by treating growing Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii with succinic acid or succinic acid structural analogs like acetylsalicylic acid. Quantitating bacteroid induction by measuring acetylsalicylic binding under normal (1 g) conditions showed two forms of binding to occur. In one form of binding cells immediately bound comparatively high levels of acetylsalicylic acid, but the binding was quickly reversed. The second form of binding increased with time by first-order kinetics, and reached saturation in 40 s. Similar experiments performed in the microgravity environment aboard the NASA 930 aircraft showed only one form of binding and total acetylsalicylic acid bound was 32% higher than at 1 g.

  10. Retromer binds the FANSHY sorting motif in SorLA to regulate amyloid precursor protein sorting and processing.

    PubMed

    Fjorback, Anja W; Seaman, Matthew; Gustafsen, Camilla; Mehmedbasic, Arnela; Gokool, Suzanne; Wu, Chengbiao; Militz, Daniel; Schmidt, Vanessa; Madsen, Peder; Nyengaard, Jens R; Willnow, Thomas E; Christensen, Erik Ilsø; Mobley, William B; Nykjær, Anders; Andersen, Olav M

    2012-01-25

    sorLA is a sorting receptor for amyloid precursor protein (APP) genetically linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Retromer, an adaptor complex in the endosome-to-Golgi retrieval pathway, has been implicated in APP transport because retromer deficiency leads to aberrant APP sorting and processing and levels of retromer proteins are altered in AD. Here we report that sorLA and retromer functionally interact in neurons to control trafficking and amyloidogenic processing of APP. We have identified a sequence (FANSHY) in the cytoplasmic domain of sorLA that is recognized by the VPS26 subunit of the retromer complex. Accordingly, we characterized the interaction between the retromer complex and sorLA and determined the role of retromer on sorLA-dependent sorting and processing of APP. Mutations in the VPS26 binding site resulted in receptor redistribution to the endosomal network, similar to the situation seen in cells with VPS26 knockdown. The sorLA mutant retained APP-binding activity but, as opposed to the wild-type receptor, misdirected APP into a distinct non-Golgi compartment, resulting in increased amyloid processing. In conclusion, our data provide a molecular link between reduced retromer expression and increased amyloidogenesis as seen in patients with sporadic AD. PMID:22279231

  11. Local Unfolding of Fatty Acid Binding Protein to Allow Ligand Entry for Binding.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Tianshu; Fan, Jing-Song; Zhou, Hu; Lin, Qingsong; Yang, Daiwen

    2016-06-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins are responsible for the transportation of fatty acids in biology. Despite intensive studies, the molecular mechanism of fatty acid entry to and exit from the protein cavity is still unclear. Here a cap-closed variant of human intestinal fatty acid binding protein was generated by mutagenesis, in which the helical cap is locked to the β-barrel by a disulfide linkage. Structure determination shows that this variant adopts a closed conformation, but still uptakes fatty acids. Stopped-flow experiments indicate that a rate-limiting step exists before the ligand association and this step corresponds to the conversion of the closed form to the open one. NMR relaxation dispersion and H-D exchange data demonstrate the presence of two excited states: one is native-like, but the other adopts a locally unfolded structure. Local unfolding of helix 2 generates an opening for ligands to enter the protein cavity, and thus controls the ligand association rate. PMID:27105780

  12. Newly identified motifs in Candida albicans Cdr1 protein nucleotide binding domains are pleiotropic drug resistance subfamily-specific and functionally asymmetric.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Banerjee, Atanu; Shah, Abdul Haseeb; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Sen, Sobhan; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Monk, Brian C; Cannon, Richard D; Bhatnagar, Rakesh; Mondal, Alok Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of Candida albicans ABC transporters identified conserved related α-helical sequence motifs immediately C-terminal of each Walker A sequence. Despite the occurrence of these motifs in ABC subfamilies of other yeasts and higher eukaryotes, their roles in protein function remained unexplored. In this study we have examined the functional significance of these motifs in the C. albicans PDR transporter Cdr1p. The motifs present in NBD1 and NBD2 were subjected to alanine scanning mutagenesis, deletion, or replacement of an entire motif. Systematic replacement of individual motif residues with alanine did not affect the function of Cdr1p but deletion of the M1-motif in NBD1 (M1-Del) resulted in Cdr1p being trapped within the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast, deletion of the M2-motif in NBD2 (M2-Del) yielded a non-functional protein with normal plasma membrane localization. Replacement of the motif in M1-Del with six alanines (M1-Ala) significantly improved localization of the protein and partially restored function. Conversely, replacement of the motif in M2-Del with six alanines (M2-Ala) did not reverse the phenotype and susceptibility to antifungal substrates of Cdr1p was unchanged. Together, the M1 and M2 motifs contribute to the functional asymmetry of NBDs and are important for maturation of Cdr1p and ATP catalysis, respectively. PMID:27251950

  13. Newly identified motifs in Candida albicans Cdr1 protein nucleotide binding domains are pleiotropic drug resistance subfamily-specific and functionally asymmetric

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Banerjee, Atanu; Shah, Abdul Haseeb; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Sen, Sobhan; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Monk, Brian C.; Cannon, Richard D.; Bhatnagar, Rakesh; Mondal, Alok Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of Candida albicans ABC transporters identified conserved related α-helical sequence motifs immediately C-terminal of each Walker A sequence. Despite the occurrence of these motifs in ABC subfamilies of other yeasts and higher eukaryotes, their roles in protein function remained unexplored. In this study we have examined the functional significance of these motifs in the C. albicans PDR transporter Cdr1p. The motifs present in NBD1 and NBD2 were subjected to alanine scanning mutagenesis, deletion, or replacement of an entire motif. Systematic replacement of individual motif residues with alanine did not affect the function of Cdr1p but deletion of the M1-motif in NBD1 (M1-Del) resulted in Cdr1p being trapped within the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast, deletion of the M2-motif in NBD2 (M2-Del) yielded a non-functional protein with normal plasma membrane localization. Replacement of the motif in M1-Del with six alanines (M1-Ala) significantly improved localization of the protein and partially restored function. Conversely, replacement of the motif in M2-Del with six alanines (M2-Ala) did not reverse the phenotype and susceptibility to antifungal substrates of Cdr1p was unchanged. Together, the M1 and M2 motifs contribute to the functional asymmetry of NBDs and are important for maturation of Cdr1p and ATP catalysis, respectively. PMID:27251950

  14. Studies on fatty acid-binding proteins. The diurnal variation shown by rat liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, T C; Wilton, D C

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of fatty acid-binding protein in rat liver was examined by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, by Western blotting and by quantifying the fluorescence enhancement achieved on the binding of the fluorescent probe 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid. A 2-3-fold increase in the concentration of this protein produced by treatment of rats with the peroxisome proliferator tiadenol was readily detected; however, only a small variation in the concentration of the protein due to a diurnal rhythm was observed. This result contradicts the 7-10-fold variation previously reported for this protein [Hargis, Olson, Clarke & Dempsey (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 1988-1991]. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:3593284

  15. Fox-2 Splicing Factor Binds to a Conserved Intron Motif to PromoteInclusion of Protein 4.1R Alternative Exon 16

    SciTech Connect

    Ponthier, Julie L.; Schluepen, Christina; Chen, Weiguo; Lersch,Robert A.; Gee, Sherry L.; Hou, Victor C.; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Chasis, Joel A.; Winkelmann, John C.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-03-01

    Activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 (E16) inclusion during erythropoiesis represents a physiologically important splicing switch that increases 4.1R affinity for spectrin and actin. Previous studies showed that negative regulation of E16 splicing is mediated by the binding of hnRNP A/B proteins to silencer elements in the exon and that downregulation of hnRNP A/B proteins in erythroblasts leads to activation of E16 inclusion. This paper demonstrates that positive regulation of E16 splicing can be mediated by Fox-2 or Fox-1, two closely related splicing factors that possess identical RNA recognition motifs. SELEX experiments with human Fox-1 revealed highly selective binding to the hexamer UGCAUG. Both Fox-1 and Fox-2 were able to bind the conserved UGCAUG elements in the proximal intron downstream of E16, and both could activate E16 splicing in HeLa cell co-transfection assays in a UGCAUG-dependent manner. Conversely, knockdown of Fox-2 expression, achieved with two different siRNA sequences resulted in decreased E16 splicing. Moreover, immunoblot experiments demonstrate mouse erythroblasts express Fox-2, but not Fox-1. These findings suggest that Fox-2 is a physiological activator of E16 splicing in differentiating erythroid cells in vivo. Recent experiments show that UGCAUG is present in the proximal intron sequence of many tissue-specific alternative exons, and we propose that the Fox family of splicing enhancers plays an important role in alternative splicing switches during differentiation in metazoan organisms.

  16. Specific high-affinity binding of fatty acids to epidermal cytosolic proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.; Chung, W.L.; Mukhtar, H. )

    1991-08-01

    Cytosol from rat, mouse, and human skin or rat epidermis was incubated with (3H)arachidonic acid, (14C)retinoic acid, (14C)oleic acid, (3H)leukotriene A4, (3H)prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or (3H) 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), and protein-bound ligands were separated using Lipidex-1000 at 4C to assess the binding specificity. The binding of oleic acid and arachidonic acid with rat epidermal cytosol was rapid, saturable, and reversible. Binding of oleic acid was competed out with the simultaneous addition of other ligands and found to be in the following order: arachidonic acid greater than oleic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than lauric acid greater than leukotriene A4 greater than 15-HETE = PGE1 greater than PGE2 = PGF2. Scatchard analysis of the binding with arachidonic acid, oleic acid, and retinoic acid revealed high-affinity binding sites with the dissociation constant in the nM range. SDS-PAGE analysis of the oleic acid-bound epidermal cytosolic protein(s) revealed maximum binding at the 14.5 kDa region. The presence of the fatty acid-binding protein in epidermal cytosol and its binding to fatty acids and retinoic acid may be of significance both in the trafficking and the metabolism of fatty acids and retinoids across the skin.

  17. Recent advances in the discovery of zinc-binding motifs for the development of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Winum, Jean-Yves; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-04-01

    In addition to the sulfonamides and their isosteres, recently novel carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors (CAIs) which act by binding to the metal ion from the active site were discovered. Based on the X-ray crystal structure of the CA II-trithiocarbonate adduct, dithiocarbamates, xanthates and thioxanthates were shown to potently inhibit α- and β-CAs. The hydroxamates constitute another class of recently studied CAIs both against mammalian and protozoan enzymes. Another chemotype for which CA inhibitory properties were recently reported is the salicylaldoxime scaffold. X-ray crystal structures were reported for CA II complexed with dithiocarbamates and hydroxamates, whereas the xanthates and salicylaldoximes were investigated by kinetic measurements and docking studies. The dithiocarbamates and the xanthates showed potent antiglaucoma activity in animal models of the disease whereas some hydroxamates inhibited the growth of Trypanosoma cruzii probably by inhibiting the protozoan CA. PMID:24939097

  18. ZNF10 inhibits HIV-1 LTR activity through interaction with NF-κB and Sp1 binding motifs.

    PubMed

    Nishitsuji, Hironori; Sawada, Leila; Sugiyama, Ryuichi; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Kruppel-associated box-containing zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF) genes constitute the single largest gene family of transcriptional repressors in the genomes of higher organisms. In this study, we isolated 52 cDNA clones of KRAB-ZFPs from U1 cell lines and screened them to identify which were capable of regulating HIV-1 gene expression. We identified 5 KRAB-ZFPs that suppressed ⩾50% of HIV-1 LTR. Of the 5 identified KRAB-ZFPs, the expression of ZNF10 significantly enhanced the transcriptional repression activity of the LTR compared with other ZNFs. In addition, the depletion of endogenous ZNF10 led to the activation of HIV-1 LTR. The repressor activity of ZNF10 was required for TRIM28, SETDB1 and HP1-gamma binding. These results indicate that ZNF10 could be involved in a potent intrinsic antiretroviral defense. PMID:26096782

  19. A C-terminal motif found in the β2-adrenergic receptor, P2Y1 receptor and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator determines binding to the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor family of PDZ proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Randy A.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Premont, Richard T.; Blitzer, Jeremy T.; Rahman, Nadeem; Welsh, Michael J.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    The Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF) binds to the tail of the β2-adrenergic receptor and plays a role in adrenergic regulation of Na+/H+ exchange. NHERF contains two PDZ domains, the first of which is required for its interaction with the β2 receptor. Mutagenesis studies of the β2 receptor tail revealed that the optimal C-terminal motif for binding to the first PDZ domain of NHERF is D-S/T-x-L, a motif distinct from those recognized by other PDZ domains. The first PDZ domain of NHERF-2, a protein that is 52% identical to NHERF and also known as E3KARP, SIP-1, and TKA-1, exhibits binding preferences very similar to those of the first PDZ domain of NHERF. The delineation of the preferred binding motif for the first PDZ domain of the NHERF family of proteins allows for predictions for other proteins that may interact with NHERF or NHERF-2. For example, as would be predicted from the β2 receptor tail mutagenesis studies, NHERF binds to the tail of the purinergic P2Y1 receptor, a seven-transmembrane receptor with an intracellular C-terminal tail ending in D-T-S-L. NHERF also binds to the tail of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, which ends in D-T-R-L. Because the preferred binding motif of the first PDZ domain of the NHERF family of proteins is found at the C termini of a variety of intracellular proteins, NHERF and NHERF-2 may be multifunctional adaptor proteins involved in many previously unsuspected aspects of intracellular signaling. PMID:9671706

  20. Identification of G and P genotype-specific motifs in the predicted VP7 and VP4 amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongping

    2015-12-01

    Equine rotavirus (ERV) strain L338 (G13P[18]) has a unique G and P genotype. However, the evolutionary relationship of L338 with other ERVs is still unknown. Here whole genome analysis of the L338 ERV strain was independently performed. Its genotype constellations were determined as G13-P[18]-I6-R9-C9-M6-A6-N9-T12-E14-H11, confirming previous genotype assignments. The L338 strain only shared the P[18] and I6 genotypes with other ERVs. The nucleotide sequences of the other 9 RNA segments were different from those of cogent genes of all other group A rotavirus (RVA) strains including ERVs and formed unique phylogenetic lineages. The L338 evolutionary footprints were tentatively identified in both VP7 and VP4 amino acid sequences: two regions were found in VP7 and twelve in VP4. The conserved regions shared between L338 and other group A rotavirus strains (RVAs) indicated that L338 was more closely related genomically to animal and human RVAs other than ERVs, suggesting that L338 may not be an endogenous equine RV but have emerged as an interspecies reassortant with other RVA strains. Furthermore, genotype-specific motifs of all 27 G and 37 P types were identified in regions 7-1a (aa 91-100) of VP7 and regions 8-1 (aa146-151) and 8-3 (aa113-118 and 125-135) of VP4 (VP8*). PMID:26321159

  1. Characteristics of the binding of tacrine to acidic phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Lehtonen, J Y; Rytömaa, M; Kinnunen, P K

    1996-01-01

    Tacrine (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-9-acridinamine monohydrate) is an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase currently used in the treatment of the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. The present study demonstrates preferential binding of this drug to acidic phospholipids, as revealed by fluorescence polarization, penetration into lipid monolayers, and effects on the thermal phase behavior of dimyristoyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA). A fivefold enhancement in the polarization of tacrine emission is evident above the main phase transition temperature (T(m)) of DMPA vesicles, whereas below T(m) only a 0.75-fold increase is observed. In contrast, the binding of tacrine to another acidic phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol, did not exhibit strong dependence on T(m). In accordance with the electrostatic nature of the membrane association of tacrine, the extent of binding was augmented with increasing contents of egg PG in phosphatidylcholine liposomes. Furthermore, [NaCl] > 50 mM dissociates tacrine (albeit incompletely) from the liposomes composed of acidic phospholipids. Inclusion of the cationic amphiphile sphingosine in egg PG vesicles decreased the membrane association of tacrine until at 1:1 sphingosine: egg PG stoichiometry binding was no longer evident. Tacrine also penetrated into egg PG but not into egg PC monolayers. Together with broadening of the main transition and causing a shoulder on its high temperature side, the binding of tacrine to DMPA liposomes results in a concentration-dependent reduction both in the combined enthalpy delta H of the above overlapping endotherms and the main transition temperature T(m). Interestingly, these changes in the thermal phase behavior of DMPA as a function of the content of the drug in vesicles were strongly nonlinear. More specifically, upon increasing [tacrine], T(m) exhibited stepwise decrements. Simultaneously, sharp minima in delta H were observed at drug:lipid stoichiometries of approximately 2:100 and 25:100, whereas a

  2. Plant seed peroxygenase is an original heme-oxygenase with an EF-hand calcium binding motif.

    PubMed

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Burcklen, Michel; Flenet, Martine; Ivancich, Anabella; Louwagie, Mathilde; Garin, Jérôme; Blée, Elizabeth

    2006-11-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that phytooxylipins play important roles in plant defense responses. However, many enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of these metabolites are still elusive. We have purified one of these enzymes, the peroxygenase (PXG), from oat microsomes and lipid droplets. It is an integral membrane protein requiring detergent for its solubilization. Proteinase K digestion showed that PXG is probably deeply buried in lipid droplets or microsomes with only about 2 kDa at the C-terminal region accessible to proteolytic digestion. Sequencing of the N terminus of the purified protein showed that PXG had no sequence similarity with either a peroxidase or a cytochrome P450 but, rather, with caleosins, i.e. calcium-binding proteins. In agreement with this finding, we demonstrated that recombinant thale cress and rice caleosins, expressed in yeast, catalyze hydroperoxide-dependent mono-oxygenation reactions that are characteristic of PXG. Calcium was also found to be crucial for peroxygenase activity, whereas phosphorylation of the protein had no impact on catalysis. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that PXG catalytic activity is dependent on two highly conserved histidines, the 9 GHz EPR spectrum being consistent with a high spin pentacoordinated ferric heme. PMID:16956885

  3. DNA binding proteins that alter nucleic acid flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Micah; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Maher, L. J., III; Williams, Mark C.

    2007-09-01

    Dual - beam optical tweezers experiments subject single molecules of DNA to high forces (~ 300 pN) with 0.1 pN accuracy, probing the energy and specificity of nucleic acid - ligand structures. Stretching phage λ-DNA reveals an increase in the applied force up to a critical force known as the overstretching transition. In this region, base pairing and stacking are disrupted as double stranded DNA (dsDNA) is melted. Proteins that bind to the double strand will tend to stabilize dsDNA, and melting will occur at higher forces. Proteins that bind to single stranded DNA (ssDNA) destabilize melting, provided that the rate of association is comparable to the pulling rate of the experiment. Many proteins, however, exhibit some affinity for both dsDNA and ssDNA. We describe experiments upon DNA + HMGB2 (box A), a nuclear protein that is believed to facilitate transcription. By characterizing changes in the structure of dsDNA with a polymer model of elasticity, we have determined the equilibrium association constant for HMGB2 to be K ds = 0.15 +/- 0.7 10 9 M -1 for dsDNA binding. Analysis of the melting transition reveals an equilibrium association constant for HMGB2 to ssDNA to be K ss = 0.039 +/- 0.019 10 9 M -1 for ssDNA binding.

  4. Amino acid substitutions in the FXYD motif enhance phospholemman-induced modulation of cardiac L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kai; Wang, Xianming; Gao, Guofeng; Huang, Congxin; Elmslie, Keith S; Peterson, Blaise Z

    2010-11-01

    We have found that phospholemman (PLM) associates with and modulates the gating of cardiac L-type calcium channels (Wang et al., Biophys J 98: 1149-1159, 2010). The short 17 amino acid extracellular NH(2)-terminal domain of PLM contains a highly conserved PFTYD sequence that defines it as a member of the FXYD family of ion transport regulators. Although we have learned a great deal about PLM-dependent changes in calcium channel gating, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the observed changes. Therefore, we investigated the role of the PFTYD segment in the modulation of cardiac calcium channels by individually replacing Pro-8, Phe-9, Thr-10, Tyr-11, and Asp-12 with alanine (P8A, F9A, T10A, Y11A, D12A). In addition, Asp-12 was changed to lysine (D12K) and cysteine (D12C). As expected, wild-type PLM significantly slows channel activation and deactivation and enhances voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). We were surprised to find that amino acid substitutions at Thr-10 and Asp-12 significantly enhanced the ability of PLM to modulate Ca(V)1.2 gating. T10A exhibited a twofold enhancement of PLM-induced slowing of activation, whereas D12K and D12C dramatically enhanced PLM-induced increase of VDI. The PLM-induced slowing of channel closing was abrogated by D12A and D12C, whereas D12K and T10A failed to impact this effect. These studies demonstrate that the PFXYD motif is not necessary for the association of PLM with Ca(V)1.2. Instead, since altering the chemical and/or physical properties of the PFXYD segment alters the relative magnitudes of opposing PLM-induced effects on Ca(V)1.2 channel gating, PLM appears to play an important role in fine tuning the gating kinetics of cardiac calcium channels and likely plays an important role in shaping the cardiac action potential and regulating Ca(2+) dynamics in the heart. PMID:20720179

  5. The cytosolic C-terminus of the glucose transporter GLUT4 contains an acidic cluster endosomal targeting motif distal to the dileucine signal.

    PubMed Central

    Shewan, A M; Marsh, B J; Melvin, D R; Martin, S; Gould, G W; James, D E

    2000-01-01

    The insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4 is targeted to a post-endocytic compartment in adipocytes, from where it moves to the cell surface in response to insulin. Previous studies have identified two cytosolic targeting motifs that regulate the intracellular sequestration of this protein: FQQI(5-8) in the N-terminus and LL(489,490) (one-letter amino acid notation) in the C-terminus. In the present study we show that a GLUT4 chimaera in which the C-terminal 12 amino acids in GLUT4 have been replaced with the same region from human GLUT3 is constitutively targeted to the plasma membrane when expressed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. To further dissect this domain it was divided into three regions, each of which was mutated en bloc to alanine residues. Analysis of these constructs revealed that the targeting information is contained within the residues TELEYLGP(498-505). Using the transferrin-horseradish peroxidase endosomal ablation technique in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, we show that mutants in which this C-terminal domain has been disrupted are more sensitive to chemical ablation than wild-type GLUT4. These data indicate that GLUT4 contains a targeting signal in its C-terminus, distal to the dileucine motif, that regulates its sorting into a post-endosomal compartment. Similar membrane-distal, acidic-cluster-based motifs are found in the cytosolic tails of the insulin-responsive aminopeptidase IRAP (insulin-regulated aminopeptidase) and the proprotein convertase PC6B, indicating that this type of motif may play an important role in the endosomal sequestration of a number of different proteins. PMID:10926832

  6. Distance-based identification of structure motifs in proteins using constrained frequent subgraph mining.

    PubMed

    Huan, Jun; Bandyopadhyay, Deepak; Prins, Jan; Snoeyink, Jack; Tropsha, Alexander; Wang, Wei

    2006-01-01

    Structure motifs are amino acid packing patterns that occur frequently within a set of protein structures. We define a labeled graph representation of protein structure in which vertices correspond to amino acid residues and edges connect pairs of residues and are labeled by (1) the Euclidian distance between the C(alpha) atoms of the two residues and (2) a boolean indicating whether the two residues are in physical/chemical contact. Using this representation, a structure motif corresponds to a labeled clique that occurs frequently among the graphs representing the protein structures. The pairwise distance constraints on each edge in a clique serve to limit the variation in geometry among different occurrences of a structure motif. We present an efficient constrained subgraph mining algorithm to discover structure motifs in this setting. Compared with contact graph representations, the number of spurious structure motifs is greatly reduced. Using this algorithm, structure motifs were located for several SCOP families including the Eukaryotic Serine Proteases, Nuclear Binding Domains, Papain-like Cysteine Proteases, and FAD/NAD-linked Reductases. For each family, we typically obtain a handful of motifs within seconds of processing time. The occurrences of these motifs throughout the PDB were strongly associated with the original SCOP family, as measured using a hyper-geometric distribution. The motifs were found to cover functionally important sites like the catalytic triad for Serine Proteases and co-factor binding sites for Nuclear Binding Domains. The fact that many motifs are highly family-specific can be used to classify new proteins or to provide functional annotation in Structural Genomics Projects. PMID:17369641

  7. Efficient ensemble system based on the copper binding motif for highly sensitive and selective detection of cyanide ions in 100% aqueous solutions by fluorescent and colorimetric changes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwan Ho; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2015-09-15

    A peptide-based ensemble for the detection of cyanide ions in 100% aqueous solutions was designed on the basis of the copper binding motif. 7-Nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole-labeled tripeptide (NBD-SSH, NBD-SerSerHis) formed the ensemble with Cu(2+), leading to a change in the color of the solution from yellow to orange and a complete decrease of fluorescence emission. The ensemble (NBD-SSH-Cu(2+)) sensitively and selectively detected a low concentration of cyanide ions in 100% aqueous solutions by a colorimetric change as well as a fluorescent change. The addition of cyanide ions instantly removed Cu(2+) from the ensemble (NBD-SSH-Cu(2+)) in 100% aqueous solutions, resulting in a color change of the solution from orange to yellow and a "turn-on" fluorescent response. The detection limits for cyanide ions were lower than the maximum allowable level of cyanide ions in drinking water set by the World Health Organization. The peptide-based ensemble system is expected to be a potential and practical way for the detection of submicromolar concentrations of cyanide ions in 100% aqueous solutions. PMID:26320594

  8. Novel Nucleotide Variations, Haplotypes Structure and Associations with Growth Related Traits of Goat AT Motif-Binding Factor (ATBF1) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xianfeng; Jia, Wenchao; Pan, Chuanying; Li, Xiangcheng; Lei, Chuzhao; Chen, Hong; Lan, Xianyong

    2015-01-01

    The AT motif-binding factor (ATBF1) not only interacts with protein inhibitor of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) (PIAS3) to suppress STAT3 signaling regulating embryo early development and cell differentiation, but is required for early activation of the pituitary specific transcription factor 1 (Pit1) gene (also known as POU1F1) critically affecting mammalian growth and development. The goal of this study was to detect novel nucleotide variations and haplotypes structure of the ATBF1 gene, as well as to test their associations with growth-related traits in goats. Herein, a total of seven novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (SNP 1-7) within this gene were found in two well-known Chinese native goat breeds. Haplotypes structure analysis demonstrated that there were four haplotypes in Hainan black goat while seventeen haplotypes in Xinong Saanen dairy goat, and both breeds only shared one haplotype (hap1). Association testing revealed that the SNP2, SNP5, SNP6, and SNP7 loci were also found to significantly associate with growth-related traits in goats, respectively. Moreover, one diplotype in Xinong Saanen dairy goats significantly linked to growth related traits. These preliminary findings not only would extend the spectrum of genetic variations of the goat ATBF1 gene, but also would contribute to implementing marker-assisted selection in genetics and breeding in goats. PMID:26323396

  9. Novel binding motif and new flexibility revealed by structural analyses of a pyruvate dehydrogenase-dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase subcomplex from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Wang, Junjie; Nemeria, Natalia S; Reynolds, Shelley; Brown, Ian; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Calero, Guillermo; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2014-10-24

    The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex contains multiple copies of three enzymatic components, E1p, E2p, and E3, that sequentially carry out distinct steps in the overall reaction converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. Efficient functioning requires the enzymatic components to assemble into a large complex, the integrity of which is maintained by tethering of the displaced, peripheral E1p and E3 components to the E2p core through non-covalent binding. We here report the crystal structure of a subcomplex between E1p and an E2p didomain containing a hybrid lipoyl domain along with the peripheral subunit-binding domain responsible for tethering to the core. In the structure, a region at the N terminus of each subunit in the E1p homodimer previously unseen due to crystallographic disorder was observed, revealing a new folding motif involved in E1p-E2p didomain interactions, and an additional, unexpected, flexibility was discovered in the E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex, both of which probably have consequences in the overall multienzyme complex assembly. This represents the first structure of an E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex involving a homodimeric E1p, and the results may be applicable to a large range of complexes with homodimeric E1 components. Results of HD exchange mass spectrometric experiments using the intact, wild type 3-lipoyl E2p and E1p are consistent with the crystallographic data obtained from the E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex as well as with other biochemical and NMR data reported from our groups, confirming that our findings are applicable to the entire E1p-E2p assembly. PMID:25210042

  10. Peptide binding motifs associated with MHC molecules common in Chinese rhesus macaques are analogous to those of human HLA supertypes, and include HLA-B27-like alleles

    PubMed Central

    Mothé, Bianca R.; Southwood, Scott; Sidney, John; English, A. Michelle; Wriston, Amanda; Hoof, Ilka; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Chinese rhesus macaques are of particular interest in SIV/HIV research as these animals have prolonged kinetics of disease progression to AIDS, compared to their Indian counterparts, suggesting that they may be a better model for HIV. Nevertheless, the specific mechanism(s) accounting for these kinetics remains unclear. The study of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) molecules, including their MHC:peptide binding motifs, provides valuable information for measuring cellular immune responses and deciphering outcomes of infection and vaccine efficacy. In this study, we have provided detailed characterization of six prevalent Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I alleles, yielding a combined phenotypic frequency of 29%. The peptide binding specificity of two of these alleles, Mamu-A2*01:02 and -B*010:01, as well as the previously characterized allele Mamu-B*003:01 (and Indian rhesus Mamu-B*003:01), was found to be analogous to that of alleles in the HLA-B27 supertype family. Specific alleles in the HLA-B27 supertype family, including HLA-B*27:05, have been associated with long-term non-progression to AIDS in humans. All six alleles characterized in the present study were found to have specificities analogous to HLA-supertype alleles. These data contribute to the concept that Chinese rhesus macaque MHC immunogenetics is more similar to HLA than their Indian rhesus macaque counterparts, and thereby warrant further studies to decipher the role of these alleles in the context of SIV infection. PMID:23417323

  11. Synthesis of Nanoporous Iminodiacetic Acid Sorbents for Binding Transition Metals

    PubMed Central

    Busche, Brad; Wiacek, Robert; Davidson, Joseph; Koonsiripaiboon, View; Yantasee, Wassana; Addleman, R. Shane; Fryxell, Glen E.

    2009-01-01

    Iminodiacetic acid (IDAA) forms strong complexes with a wide variety of metal ions. Using self-assembled monolayers in mesoporous supports (SAMMS) to present the IDAA ligand potentially allows for multiple metal-ligand interactions to enhance the metal binding affinity relative to that of randomly oriented polymer-based supports. This manuscript describes the synthesis of a novel nanostructured sorbent material built using self-assembly of a IDAA ligand inside a nanoporous silica, and demonstrates its use for capturing transition metal cations, and anionic metal complexes, such as PdCl4−2. PMID:22068901

  12. Characterization of the comparative drug binding to intra- (liver fatty acid binding protein) and extra- (human serum albumin) cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Andrew; Hallifax, David; Nussio, Matthew R; Shapter, Joseph G; Mackenzie, Peter I; Brian Houston, J; Knights, Kathleen M; Miners, John O

    2015-01-01

    1. This study compared the extent, affinity, and kinetics of drug binding to human serum albumin (HSA) and liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) using ultrafiltration and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). 2. Binding of basic and neutral drugs to both HSA and LFABP was typically negligible. Binding of acidic drugs ranged from minor (fu > 0.8) to extensive (fu < 0.1). Of the compounds screened, the highest binding to both HSA and LFABP was observed for the acidic drugs torsemide and sulfinpyrazone, and for β-estradiol (a polar, neutral compound). 3. The extent of binding of acidic drugs to HSA was up to 40% greater than binding to LFABP. SPR experiments demonstrated comparable kinetics and affinity for the binding of representative acidic drugs (naproxen, sulfinpyrazone, and torsemide) to HSA and LFABP. 4. Simulations based on in vitro kinetic constants derived from SPR experiments and a rapid equilibrium model were undertaken to examine the impact of binding characteristics on compartmental drug distribution. Simulations provided mechanistic confirmation that equilibration of intracellular unbound drug with the extracellular unbound drug is attained rapidly in the absence of active transport mechanisms for drugs bound moderately or extensively to HSA and LFABP. PMID:25801059

  13. Computational analysis of a novel mutation in ETFDH gene highlights its long-range effects on the FAD-binding motif

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by the defects in the mitochondrial electron transfer system and the metabolism of fatty acids. Recently, mutations in electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH) gene, encoding electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO) have been reported to be the major causes of riboflavin-responsive MADD. To date, no studies have been performed to explore the functional impact of these mutations or their mechanism of disrupting enzyme activity. Results High resolution melting (HRM) analysis and sequencing of the entire ETFDH gene revealed a novel mutation (p.Phe128Ser) and the hotspot mutation (p.Ala84Thr) from a patient with MADD. According to the predicted 3D structure of ETF:QO, the two mutations are located within the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding domain; however, the two residues do not have direct interactions with the FAD ligand. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and normal mode analysis (NMA), we found that the p.Ala84Thr and p.Phe128Ser mutations are most likely to alter the protein structure near the FAD binding site as well as disrupt the stability of the FAD binding required for the activation of ETF:QO. Intriguingly, NMA revealed that several reported disease-causing mutations in the ETF:QO protein show highly correlated motions with the FAD-binding site. Conclusions Based on the present findings, we conclude that the changes made to the amino acids in ETF:QO are likely to influence the FAD-binding stability. PMID:22013910

  14. Sequence-specific DNA binding by long hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamides containing an 8-amino-3,6-dioxaoctanoic acid unit.

    PubMed

    Sawatani, Yoshito; Kashiwazaki, Gengo; Chandran, Anandhakumar; Asamitsu, Sefan; Guo, Chuanxin; Sato, Shinsuke; Hashiya, Kaori; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-08-15

    With the aim of improving aqueous solubility, we designed and synthesized five N-methylpyrrole (Py)-N-methylimidazole (Im) polyamides capable of recognizing 9-bp sequences. Their DNA-binding affinities and sequence specificities were evaluated by SPR and Bind-n-Seq analyses. The design of polyamide 1 was based on a conventional model, with three consecutive Py or Im rings separated by a β-alanine to match the curvature and twist of long DNA helices. Polyamides 2 and 3 contained an 8-amino-3,6-dioxaoctanoic acid (AO) unit, which has previously only been used as a linker within linear Py-Im polyamides or between Py-Im hairpin motifs for tandem hairpin. It is demonstrated herein that AO also functions as a linker element that can extend to 2-bp in hairpin motifs. Notably, although the AO-containing unit can fail to bind the expected sequence, polyamide 4, which has two AO units facing each other in a hairpin form, successfully showed the expected motif and a KD value of 16nM was recorded. Polyamide 5, containing a β-alanine-β-alanine unit instead of the AO of polyamide 2, was synthesized for comparison. The aqueous solubilities and nuclear localization of three of the polyamides were also examined. The results suggest the possibility of applying the AO unit in the core of Py-Im polyamide compounds. PMID:27301681

  15. Characterization and amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart.

    PubMed

    Offner, G D; Brecher, P; Sawlivich, W B; Costello, C E; Troxler, R F

    1988-05-15

    The complete amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart was determined by automated Edman degradation of CNBr, BNPS-skatole [3'-bromo-3-methyl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulphenyl)indolenine], hydroxylamine, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, tryptic and chymotryptic peptides, and by digestion of the protein with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of the blocked N-terminal tryptic peptide from citraconylated protein was determined by collisionally induced decomposition mass spectrometry. The protein contains 132 amino acid residues, is enriched with respect to threonine and lysine, lacks cysteine, has an acetylated valine residue at the N-terminus, and has an Mr of 14768 and an isoelectric point of 5.25. This protein contains two short internal repeated sequences from residues 48-54 and from residues 114-119 located within regions of predicted beta-structure and decreasing hydrophobicity. These short repeats are contained within two longer repeated regions from residues 48-60 and residues 114-125, which display 62% sequence similarity. These regions could accommodate the charged and uncharged moieties of long-chain fatty acids and may represent fatty acid-binding domains consistent with the finding that human heart fatty acid-binding protein binds 2 mol of oleate or palmitate/mol of protein. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the peptides has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50143 (23 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3421901

  16. The Dynamic Character of the BCL2 Promoter i-Motif Provides a Mechanism for Modulation of Gene Expression by Compounds That Bind Selectively to the Alternative DNA Hairpin Structure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that DNA predominantly exists in duplex form in cells. However, under torsional stress imposed by active transcription, DNA can assume nonduplex structures. The BCL2 promoter region forms two different secondary DNA structures on opposite strands called the G-quadruplex and the i-motif. The i-motif is a highly dynamic structure that exists in equilibrium with a flexible hairpin species. Here we identify a pregnanol derivative and a class of piperidine derivatives that differentially modulate gene expression by stabilizing either the i-motif or the flexible hairpin species. Stabilization of the i-motif structure results in significant upregulation of the BCL2 gene and associated protein expression; in contrast, stabilization of the flexible hairpin species lowers BCL2 levels. The BCL2 levels reduced by the hairpin-binding compound led to chemosensitization to etoposide in both in vitro and in vivo models. Furthermore, we show antagonism between the two classes of compounds in solution and in cells. For the first time, our results demonstrate the principle of small molecule targeting of i-motif structures in vitro and in vivo to modulate gene expression. PMID:24559410

  17. Comprehensive discovery of DNA motifs in 349 human cells and tissues reveals new features of motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yiyu; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive motif discovery under experimental conditions is critical for the global understanding of gene regulation. To generate a nearly complete list of human DNA motifs under given conditions, we employed a novel approach to de novo discover significant co-occurring DNA motifs in 349 human DNase I hypersensitive site datasets. We predicted 845 to 1325 motifs in each dataset, for a total of 2684 non-redundant motifs. These 2684 motifs contained 54.02 to 75.95% of the known motifs in seven large collections including TRANSFAC. In each dataset, we also discovered 43 663 to 2 013 288 motif modules, groups of motifs with their binding sites co-occurring in a significant number of short DNA regions. Compared with known interacting transcription factors in eight resources, the predicted motif modules on average included 84.23% of known interacting motifs. We further showed new features of the predicted motifs, such as motifs enriched in proximal regions rarely overlapped with motifs enriched in distal regions, motifs enriched in 5′ distal regions were often enriched in 3′ distal regions, etc. Finally, we observed that the 2684 predicted motifs classified the cell or tissue types of the datasets with an accuracy of 81.29%. The resources generated in this study are available at http://server.cs.ucf.edu/predrem/. PMID:25505144

  18. The C-terminal RNA binding motif of HuR is a multi-functional domain leading to HuR oligomerization and binding to U-rich RNA targets.

    PubMed

    Scheiba, Rafael M; de Opakua, Alain Ibáñez; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Martínez-Cruz, Luis A; Martínez-Chantar, María L; Blanco, Francisco J; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Human antigen R (HuR) is a 32 kDa protein with 3 RNA Recognition Motifs (RRMs), which bind to Adenylate and uridylate Rich Elements (AREs) of mRNAs. Whereas the N-terminal and central domains (RRM1 and RRM2) are essential for AREs recognition, little is known on the C-terminal RRM3 beyond its implication in HuR oligomerization and apoptotic signaling. We have developed a detergent-based strategy to produce soluble RRM3 for structural studies. We have found that it adopts the typical RRM fold, does not interact with the RRM1 and RRM2 modules, and forms dimers in solution. Our NMR measurements, combined with Molecular Dynamics simulations and Analytical Ultracentrifugation experiments, show that the protein dimerizes through a helical region that contains the conserved W261 residue. We found that HuR RRM3 binds to 5'-mer U-rich RNA stretches through the solvent exposed side of its β-sheet, located opposite to the dimerization site. Upon mimicking phosphorylation by the S318D replacement, RRM3 mutant shows less ability to recognize RNA due to an electrostatic repulsion effect with the phosphate groups. Our study brings new insights of HuR RRM3 as a domain involved in protein oligomerization and RNA interaction, both functions regulated by 2 surfaces on opposite sides of the RRM domain. PMID:25584704

  19. The C-terminal RNA binding motif of HuR is a multi-functional domain leading to HuR oligomerization and binding to U-rich RNA targets

    PubMed Central

    Scheiba, Rafael M; de Opakua, Alain Ibáñez; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Martínez-Cruz, Luis A; Martínez-Chantar, María L; Blanco, Francisco J; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Human antigen R (HuR) is a 32 kDa protein with 3 RNA Recognition Motifs (RRMs), which bind to Adenylate and uridylate Rich Elements (AREs) of mRNAs. Whereas the N-terminal and central domains (RRM1 and RRM2) are essential for AREs recognition, little is known on the C-terminal RRM3 beyond its implication in HuR oligomerization and apoptotic signaling. We have developed a detergent-based strategy to produce soluble RRM3 for structural studies. We have found that it adopts the typical RRM fold, does not interact with the RRM1 and RRM2 modules, and forms dimers in solution. Our NMR measurements, combined with Molecular Dynamics simulations and Analytical Ultracentrifugation experiments, show that the protein dimerizes through a helical region that contains the conserved W261 residue. We found that HuR RRM3 binds to 5′-mer U-rich RNA stretches through the solvent exposed side of its β-sheet, located opposite to the dimerization site. Upon mimicking phosphorylation by the S318D replacement, RRM3 mutant shows less ability to recognize RNA due to an electrostatic repulsion effect with the phosphate groups. Our study brings new insights of HuR RRM3 as a domain involved in protein oligomerization and RNA interaction, both functions regulated by 2 surfaces on opposite sides of the RRM domain. PMID:25584704

  20. Proton-binding study of standard and reference fulvic acids, humic acids, and natural organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Jason D.; Perdue, E. Michael

    2003-01-01

    The acid-base properties of 14 standard and reference materials from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) were investigated by potentiometric titration. Titrations were conducted in 0.1 M NaCl under a nitrogen atmosphere, averaging 30 min from start to finish. Concentrations of carboxyl groups and phenolic groups were estimated directly from titration curves. Titration data were also fit to a modified Henderson-Hasselbalch model for two classes of proton-binding sites to obtain "best fit" parameters that describe proton-binding curves for the samples. The model was chosen for its simplicity, its ease of implementation in computer spreadsheets, and its excellent ability to describe the shapes of the titration curves. The carboxyl contents of the IHSS samples are in the general order: terrestrial fulvic acids > aquatic fulvic acids > Suwannee River natural organic matter (NOM) > aquatic humic acids > terrestrial humic acids. Overall, fulvic acids and humic acids have similar phenolic contents; however, all of the aquatically derived samples have higher phenolic contents than the terrestrially derived samples. The acid-base properties of reference Suwannee River NOM are surprisingly similar to those of standard Suwannee River humic acid. Results from titrations in this study were compared with other published results from both direct and indirect titrations. Typically, carboxyl contents for the IHSS samples were in agreement with the results from both methods of titration. Phenolic contents for the IHSS samples were comparable to those determined by direct titrations, but were significantly less than estimates of phenolic content that were based on indirect titrations with Ba(OH) 2 and Ca(OAc) 2. The average phenolic-to-carboxylic ratio of the IHSS samples is approximately 1:4. Models that assume a 1:2 ratio of phenolic-to-carboxylic groups may overestimate the relative contribution of phenolic groups to the acid-base chemistry of humic substances.

  1. Bioinformatics Approaches for Predicting Disordered Protein Motifs.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Pallab; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Short, linear motifs (SLiMs) in proteins are functional microdomains consisting of contiguous residue segments along the protein sequence, typically not more than 10 consecutive amino acids in length with less than 5 defined positions. Many positions are 'degenerate' thus offering flexibility in terms of the amino acid types allowed at those positions. Their short length and degenerate nature confers evolutionary plasticity meaning that SLiMs often evolve convergently. Further, SLiMs have a propensity to occur within intrinsically unstructured protein segments and this confers versatile functionality to unstructured regions of the proteome. SLiMs mediate multiple types of protein interactions based on domain-peptide recognition and guide functions including posttranslational modifications, subcellular localization of proteins, and ligand binding. SLiMs thus behave as modular interaction units that confer versatility to protein function and SLiM-mediated interactions are increasingly being recognized as therapeutic targets. In this chapter we start with a brief description about the properties of SLiMs and their interactions and then move on to discuss algorithms and tools including several web-based methods that enable the discovery of novel SLiMs (de novo motif discovery) as well as the prediction of novel occurrences of known SLiMs. Both individual amino acid sequences as well as sets of protein sequences can be scanned using these methods to obtain statistically overrepresented sequence patterns. Lists of putatively functional SLiMs are then assembled based on parameters such as evolutionary sequence conservation, disorder scores, structural data, gene ontology terms and other contextual information that helps to assess the functional credibility or significance of these motifs. These bioinformatics methods should certainly guide experiments aimed at motif discovery. PMID:26387106

  2. Mass Spectral Characterization of Organophosphate-Labeled, Tyrosine-Containing Peptides: Characteristic Mass Fragments and A New Binding Motif for Organophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Grigoryan, Hasmik; Li, Bin; Nachon, Florian; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2009-01-01

    We have identified organophosphorus agent (OP)-tyrosine adducts on 12 different proteins labeled with 6 different OP. Labeling was achieved by treating pure proteins with up to 40-fold molar excess of OP at pH 8–8.6. OP-treated proteins were digested with trypsin, and peptides were separated by HPLC. Fragmentation patterns for 100 OP-peptides labeled on tyrosine were determined in the mass spectrometer. The goals of the present work were 1) to determine the common features of the OP-reactive tyrosines, and 2) to describe non-sequence MSMS fragments characteristic of OP-tyrosine peptides. Characteristic ions at 272 amu and 244 amu for tyrosine-OP immonium ions were nearly always present in the MSMS spectrum of peptides labeled on tyrosine by chlorpyrifos oxon. Characteristic fragments also appeared from the parent ions that had been labeled with diisopropylfluorophosphate (216 amu), sarin (214 amu), soman (214 amu) or FP-biotin (227, 312, 329, 691 and 708 amu). In contrast to OP-reactive serines, which lie in the consensus sequence GXSXG, the OP-reactive tyrosines have no consensus sequence. Their common feature is the presence of nearby positively charged residues that activate the phenolic hydroxyl group. The significance of these findings is the recognition of a new binding motif for OP to proteins that have no active site serine. Modified peptides are difficult to find when the OP bears no radiolabel and no tag. The characteristic MSMS fragment ions are valuable because they are identifiers for OP-tyrosine, independent of the peptide. PMID:19762289

  3. RNA-binding motif protein 5 inhibits the proliferation of cigarette smoke-transformed BEAS-2B cells through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xue-Jiao; Du, Yan-Wei; Hao, Yu-Qiu; Su, Zhen-Zhong; Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Li-Jing; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Cigarette smoking has been shown to be the most significant risk factor for lung cancer. Recent studies have also indicated that RNA-binding motif protein 5 (RBM5) can modulate apoptosis and suppress tumor growth. The present study focused on the role of RBM5 in the regulation of cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced transformation of bronchial epithelial cells into the cancerous phenotype and its mechanism of action. Herein, we exposed normal BEAS-2B cells for 8 days to varying concentrations of CSE or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), followed by a recovery period of 2 weeks. Next, the RBM5 protein was overexpressed in these transformed BEAS-2B cells though lentiviral infection. Later, the morphological changes, cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, invasion and migration were assessed. In addition, we analyzed the role of RBM5 in xenograft growth. The expression of RBM5 along with the genes related to cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and invasion were also examined. Finally, our results revealed that BEAS-2B cells exposed to 100 µg/ml CSE acquired phenotypic changes and formed tumors in nude mice, indicative of their cancerous transformation and had reduced RBM5 expression. Subsequent overexpression of RBM5 in these cells significantly inhibited their proliferation, induced G1/S arrest, triggered apoptosis and inhibited their invasion and migration, including xenograft growth. Thus, we established an in vitro model of CSE-induced cancerous transformation and concluded that RBM5 overexpression inhibited the growth of these transformed cells through cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. Therefore, our study suggests the importance of RBM5 in the pathogenesis of smoking-related cancer. PMID:26782095

  4. Calcium-binding protein, spermatid-specific 1 is expressed in human salivary glands and contains an anti-inflammatory motif.

    PubMed

    St Laurent, Chris D; St Laurent, Katherine E; Mathison, Ron D; Befus, A Dean

    2015-04-01

    Salivary glands are involved in the production and exocrine and endocrine secretion of biologically active proteins, polypeptides, and hormones involved in growth and differentiation, homeostasis, and digestion. We have previously studied the prohormone submandibular rat 1 (SMR1), product of the Vcsa1 gene, which is highly expressed in the testes and salivary glands of rats, and can be cleaved to produce polypeptides with analgesic, erectile function, and anti-inflammatory activities. Humans lack the Vcsa1 gene, but homologous sequences and functions for analgesia and erectile function exist in the human genes Prol1, SMR3a, and SMR3b located on the human chromosomal region close to where Vcsa1 lies in the rat. Here we show the human protein calcium-binding protein spermatid-specific 1 (CABS1) contains a similar sequence to the anti-inflammatory sequence in rat SMR1, thus CABS1 may be another human gene with homologous function to Vcsa1. Using Western blot and PCR, we discovered that the human protein CABS1, previously thought to only be expressed in the testes, is also expressed in the salivary glands and lung, in a tissue-specific manner. Peptides derived from CABS1 were tested in an in vivo mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neutrophilia and an ex vivo rat model of antigen-induced intestinal anaphylaxis and significantly reduced both neutrophil accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and antigen-induced ileal contractions, respectively. Thus human CABS1 has a peptide motif homologous to the anti-inflammatory peptide sequence of rat SMR1. Whether this similarity of CABS1 extends to the neuroendocrine regulation of the anti-inflammatory activity seen for SMR1 remains to be determined. PMID:25632019

  5. Tracking a refined eIF4E-binding motif reveals Angel1 as a new partner of eIF4E.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Pauline; Martineau, Yvan; Morales, Julia; Czjzek, Mirjam; Glippa, Virginie; Gauffeny, Isabelle; Morin, Emmanuelle; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Pyronnet, Stephane; Cormier, Patrick; Cosson, Bertrand

    2013-09-01

    The initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) is implicated in most of the crucial steps of the mRNA life cycle and is recognized as a pivotal protein in gene regulation. Many of these roles are mediated by its interaction with specific proteins generally known as eIF4E-interacting partners (4E-IPs), such as eIF4G and 4E-BP. To screen for new 4E-IPs, we developed a novel approach based on structural, in silico and biochemical analyses. We identified the protein Angel1, a member of the CCR4 deadenylase family. Immunoprecipitation experiments provided evidence that Angel1 is able to interact in vitro and in vivo with eIF4E. Point mutation variants of Angel1 demonstrated that the interaction of Angel1 with eIF4E is mediated through a consensus eIF4E-binding motif. Immunofluorescence and cell fractionation experiments showed that Angel1 is confined to the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, where it partially co-localizes with eIF4E and eIF4G, but not with 4E-BP. Furthermore, manipulating Angel1 levels in living cells had no effect on global translation rates, suggesting that the protein has a more specific function. Taken together, our results illustrate that we developed a powerful method for identifying new eIF4E partners and open new perspectives for understanding eIF4E-specific regulation. PMID:23814182

  6. A single amino acid substitution (R441A) in the receptor-binding domain of SARS coronavirus spike protein disrupts the antigenic structure and binding activity

    SciTech Connect

    He Yuxian . E-mail: yhe@nybloodcenter.org; Li Jingjing; Jiang Shibo

    2006-05-26

    The spike (S) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has two major functions: interacting with the receptor to mediate virus entry and inducing protective immunity. Coincidently, the receptor-binding domain (RBD, residues 318-510) of SAR-CoV S protein is a major antigenic site to induce neutralizing antibodies. Here, we used RBD-Fc, a fusion protein containing the RBD and human IgG1 Fc, as a model in the studies and found that a single amino acid substitution in the RBD (R441A) could abolish the immunogenicity of RBD to induce neutralizing antibodies in immunized mice and rabbits. With a panel of anti-RBD mAbs as probes, we observed that R441A substitution was able to disrupt the majority of neutralizing epitopes in the RBD, suggesting that this residue is critical for the antigenic structure responsible for inducing protective immune responses. We also demonstrated that the RBD-Fc bearing R441A mutation could not bind to soluble and cell-associated angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the functional receptor for SARS-CoV and failed to block S protein-mediated pseudovirus entry, indicating that this point mutation also disrupted the receptor-binding motif (RBM) in the RBD. Taken together, these data provide direct evidence to show that a single amino acid residue at key position in the RBD can determine the major function of SARS-CoV S protein and imply for designing SARS vaccines and therapeutics.

  7. NMR studies reveal the role of biomembranes in modulating ligand binding and release by intracellular bile acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Pedò, Massimo; Löhr, Frank; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Assfalg, Michael; Dötsch, Volker; Molinari, Henriette

    2009-12-18

    Bile acid molecules are transferred vectorially between basolateral and apical membranes of hepatocytes and enterocytes in the context of the enterohepatic circulation, a process regulating whole body lipid homeostasis. This work addresses the role of the cytosolic lipid binding proteins in the intracellular transfer of bile acids between different membrane compartments. We present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data describing the ternary system composed of the bile acid binding protein, bile acids, and membrane mimetic systems, such as anionic liposomes. This work provides evidence that the investigated liver bile acid binding protein undergoes association with the anionic membrane and binding-induced partial unfolding. The addition of the physiological ligand to the protein-liposome mixture is capable of modulating this interaction, shifting the equilibrium towards the free folded holo protein. An ensemble of NMR titration experiments, based on nitrogen-15 protein and ligand observation, confirm that the membrane and the ligand establish competing binding equilibria, modulating the cytoplasmic permeability of bile acids. These results support a mechanism of ligand binding and release controlled by the onset of a bile salt concentration gradient within the polarized cell. The location of a specific protein region interacting with liposomes is highlighted. PMID:19836400

  8. A mutation in the Arabidopsis HYL1 gene encoding a dsRNA binding protein affects responses to abscisic acid, auxin, and cytokinin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C.; Fedoroff, N.

    2000-01-01

    Both physiological and genetic evidence indicate interconnections among plant responses to different hormones. We describe a pleiotropic recessive Arabidopsis transposon insertion mutation, designated hyponastic leaves (hyl1), that alters the plant's responses to several hormones. The mutant is characterized by shorter stature, delayed flowering, leaf hyponasty, reduced fertility, decreased rate of root growth, and an altered root gravitropic response. It also exhibits less sensitivity to auxin and cytokinin and hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA). The auxin transport inhibitor 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid normalizes the mutant phenotype somewhat, whereas another auxin transport inhibitor, N-(1-naph-thyl)phthalamic acid, exacerbates the phenotype. The gene, designated HYL1, encodes a 419-amino acid protein that contains two double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding motifs, a nuclear localization motif, and a C-terminal repeat structure suggestive of a protein-protein interaction domain. We present evidence that the HYL1 gene is ABA-regulated and encodes a nuclear dsRNA binding protein. We hypothesize that the HYL1 protein is a regulatory protein functioning at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level.

  9. Cation binding of antimicrobial sulfathiazole to leonardite humic acid.

    PubMed

    Richter, Merle K; Sander, Michael; Krauss, Martin; Christl, Iso; Dahinden, Manuel G; Schneider, Manuel K; Schwarzenbach, René P

    2009-09-01

    Sorption of sulfathiazole (STA) and three structural analogs to Leonardite humic acid (LHA) was investigated in single- and binary-solute systems to elucidate the sorption mechanism of sulfonamides to soil organic matter (SOM). Cation binding of STA+ to anionic sites A- in LHA governed sorption up to circumneutral pH, based on the following findings: (i) From pH 7.7 to 3.3, the increase in extent and nonlinearity (i.e., concentration dependence) of STA sorption paralleled the increase in STA+. (ii) From pH 3.3 to 1.7, sorption decreased and nonlinearity increased, consistent with strong competition of STA+ and H+ for A-. (iii) Replacement of the protonable aniline group in STA by an apolar methylbenzene group resulted in much weaker, linear, and pH-independent sorption. (iv) Only analogs with aniline moieties displaced STA from LHA in binary-solute systems. Displacement occurred up to pH 5.4, at which <1% of STA in solution was cationic. (v) STA sorption was well-described (R2 = 0.98) by the NICA-Donnan cation-binding model, yielding high median affinities for STA+ to carboxylic and phenolic A- (log K(STA+,1) = 3.25 +/- 0.08 log (L mol(-1)) and log K(STA+,2) = 8.76 +/- 0.11 log (L mol(-1)), respectively). High affinity cation binding explains sorption of polar sulfonamides in agricultural soils and the strong dependence of sorption on SOM content and pH. PMID:19764228

  10. The Eps1p Protein Disulfide Isomerase Conserves Classic Thioredoxin Superfamily Amino Acid Motifs but Not Their Functional Geometries

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Shai; Gat, Yair; Fass, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    The widespread thioredoxin superfamily enzymes typically share the following features: a characteristic α-β fold, the presence of a Cys-X-X-Cys (or Cys-X-X-Ser) redox-active motif, and a proline in the cis configuration abutting the redox-active site in the tertiary structure. The Cys-X-X-Cys motif is at the solvent-exposed amino terminus of an α-helix, allowing the first cysteine to engage in nucleophilic attack on substrates, or substrates to attack the Cys-X-X-Cys disulfide, depending on whether the enzyme functions to reduce, isomerize, or oxidize its targets. We report here the X-ray crystal structure of an enzyme that breaks many of our assumptions regarding the sequence-structure relationship of thioredoxin superfamily proteins. The yeast Protein Disulfide Isomerase family member Eps1p has Cys-X-X-Cys motifs and proline residues at the appropriate primary structural positions in its first two predicted thioredoxin-fold domains. However, crystal structures show that the Cys-X-X-Cys of the second domain is buried and that the adjacent proline is in the trans, rather than the cis isomer. In these configurations, neither the “active-site” disulfide nor the backbone carbonyl preceding the proline is available to interact with substrate. The Eps1p structures thus expand the documented diversity of the PDI oxidoreductase family and demonstrate that conserved sequence motifs in common folds do not guarantee structural or functional conservation. PMID:25437863

  11. A Sialic Acid Binding Site in a Human Picornavirus

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Martin; Hähnlein-Schick, Irmgard; Ekström, Jens-Ola; Arnberg, Niklas; Stehle, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    The picornaviruses coxsackievirus A24 variant (CVA24v) and enterovirus 70 (EV70) cause continued outbreaks and pandemics of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC), a highly contagious eye disease against which neither vaccines nor antiviral drugs are currently available. Moreover, these viruses can cause symptoms in the cornea, upper respiratory tract, and neurological impairments such as acute flaccid paralysis. EV70 and CVA24v are both known to use 5-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) for cell attachment, thus providing a putative link between the glycan receptor specificity and cell tropism and disease. We report the structures of an intact human picornavirus in complex with a range of glycans terminating in Neu5Ac. We determined the structure of the CVA24v to 1.40 Å resolution, screened different glycans bearing Neu5Ac for CVA24v binding, and structurally characterized interactions with candidate glycan receptors. Biochemical studies verified the relevance of the binding site and demonstrated a preference of CVA24v for α2,6-linked glycans. This preference can be rationalized by molecular dynamics simulations that show that α2,6-linked glycans can establish more contacts with the viral capsid. Our results form an excellent platform for the design of antiviral compounds to prevent AHC. PMID:25329320

  12. Cellular retinol-binding protein and retinoic acid-binding protein in rat testes: effect of retinol depletion.

    PubMed

    Ong, D E; Tsai, C H; Chytil, F

    1976-02-01

    Testes of rats contain two cellular binding proteins of interest in vitamin A metabolism. One protein binds retinoic acid with high specificity; the other binds retinol with high specificity. When the cellular retinol-binding protein was partially purified from rat testes, it exhibited fluorescence excitation and emission spectra similar to that of all-trans-retinol in hexane. Exposure of this preparation to UV light destroyed this fluorescence but spectra identical to the original were obtained after addition of retinol. Hexane extracts of the binding protein had fluorescence spectra identical to all-trans-retinol, suggesting that this compound is bound to the protein in vivo. Extracts of testes from retinol depleted rats were submitted to gel filtration but failed to show a retinol-like fluorescence at the elution position of retinol binding protein. This fluorescence was observed in the preparations from pair fed control animals. However, after addition of all-trans-retinol to the extracts from the depleted rats, fluorescence at that elution position was observed. This indicates that in testes of retinol depleted rats the cellular retinol binding protein is present but without bound retinol, in contrast to the non-depleted rats where 30-43% of the binding protein had bound retinol. The amounts of cellular retinol binding protein and retinoic acid binding protein in testes, as determined by sucrose gradient centrifugation, were found to be similar for retinol depleted and pair fed control rats. PMID:942996

  13. Structural and biochemical characterization of an RNA/DNA binding motif in the N-terminal domain of RecQ4 helicases

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Francesca; Mojumdar, Aditya; Zucchelli, Chiara; Bhardwaj, Amit; Buratti, Emanuele; Vindigni, Alessandro; Musco, Giovanna; Onesti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The RecQ4 helicase belongs to the ubiquitous RecQ family but its exact role in the cell is not completely understood. In addition to the helicase domain, RecQ4 has a unique N-terminal part that is essential for viability and is constituted by a region homologous to the yeast Sld2 replication initiation factor, followed by a cysteine-rich region, predicted to fold as a Zn knuckle. We carried out a structural and biochemical analysis of both the human and Xenopus laevis RecQ4 cysteine-rich regions, and showed by NMR spectroscopy that the Xenopus fragment indeed assumes the canonical Zn knuckle fold, whereas the human sequence remains unstructured, consistent with the mutation of one of the Zn ligands. Both the human and Xenopus Zn knuckles bind to a variety of nucleic acid substrates, with a mild preference for RNA. We also investigated the effect of a segment located upstream the Zn knuckle that is highly conserved and rich in positively charged and aromatic residues, partially overlapping with the C-terminus of the Sld2-like domain. In both the human and Xenopus proteins, the presence of this region strongly enhances binding to nucleic acids. These results reveal novel possible roles of RecQ4 in DNA replication and genome stability. PMID:26888063

  14. 2,6-Diiminopiperidin-1-ol: an overlooked motif relevant to uranyl and transition metal binding on poly(amidoxime) adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Zachary C; Cardenas, Allan Jay P; Corbey, Jordan F; Warner, Marvin G

    2016-07-01

    Glutardiamidoxime, a structural motif on sorbents used in uranium extraction from seawater, was discovered to cyclize in situ at room temperature to 2,6-diimino-piperidin-1-ol in the presence of uranyl nitrate. The new diimino motif was also generated when exposed to competing transition metals Cu(ii) and Ni(ii). Multinuclear μ-O bridged U(vi), Cu(ii), and Ni(ii) complexes featuring bound diimino ligands were isolated. PMID:27292161

  15. Solution-state molecular structure of apo and oleate-liganded liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Yang, Xiaomin; Wang, Hsin; Estephan, Rima; Francis, Fouad; Kodukula, Sarala; Storch, Judith; Stark, Ruth E

    2007-11-01

    Rat liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is distinctive among intracellular lipid-binding proteins (iLBPs): more than one molecule of long-chain fatty acid and a variety of diverse ligands can be bound within its large cavity, and in vitro lipid transfer to model membranes follows a mechanism that is diffusion-controlled rather than mediated by protein-membrane collisions. Because the apoprotein has proven resistant to crystallization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy offers a unique route to functionally informative comparisons of molecular structure and dynamics for LFABP in free (apo) and liganded (holo) forms. We report herein the solution-state structures determined for apo-LFABP at pH 6.0 and for holoprotein liganded to two oleates at pH 7.0, as well as the structure of the complex including locations of the ligands. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments revealed very similar types and locations of secondary structural elements for apo- and holo-LFABP as judged from chemical shift indices. The solution-state tertiary structures of the proteins were derived with the CNS/ARIA computational protocol, using distance and angular restraints based on 1H-1H nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs), hydrogen-bonding networks, 3J(HNHA) coupling constants, intermolecular NOEs, and residual dipolar (NH) couplings. The holo-LFABP solution-state conformation is in substantial agreement with a previously reported X-ray structure [Thompson, J., Winter, N., Terwey, D., Bratt, J., and Banaszak, L. (1997) The crystal structure of the liver fatty acid-binding protein. A complex with two bound oleates, J. Biol. Chem. 272, 7140-7150], including the typical beta-barrel capped by a helix-turn-helix portal. In the solution state, the internally bound oleate has the expected U-shaped conformation and is tethered electrostatically, but the extended portal ligand can adopt a range of conformations based on the computationally refined structures, in contrast to the single

  16. Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like protein 4 (SmVAL4) is a novel lipid-binding SCP/TAPS protein that lacks the prototypical CAP motifs

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Alan; Darwiche, Rabih; Rezende, Wanderson C.; Farias, Leonardo P.; Leite, Luciana C. C.; Schneiter, Roger; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease that affects over 200 million people. Vaccine candidates have been identified, including Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like proteins (SmVALs) from the SCP/TAPS (sperm-coating protein/Tpx/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1/Sc7) superfamily. The first SmVAL structure, SmVAL4, was refined to a resolution limit of 2.16 Å. SmVAL4 has a unique structure that could not be predicted from homologous structures, with longer loops and an unusual C-terminal extension. SmVAL4 has the characteristic α/β-sandwich and central SCP/TAPS cavity. Furthermore, SmVAL4 has only one of the signature CAP cavity tetrad amino-acid residues and is missing the histidines that coordinate divalent cations such as Zn2+ in other SCP/TAPS proteins. SmVAL4 has a cavity between α-helices 1 and 4 that was observed to bind lipids in tablysin-15, suggesting the ability to bind lipids. Subsequently, SmVAL4 was shown to bind cholesterol in vitro. Additionally, SmVAL4 was shown to complement the in vivo sterol-export phenotype of yeast mutants lacking their endogenous CAP proteins. Expression of SmVAL4 in yeast cells lacking endogenous CAP function restores the block in sterol export. These studies suggest an evolutionarily conserved lipid-binding function shared by CAP proteins such as SmVAL4 and yeast CAP proteins such as Pry1. PMID:25084337

  17. Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like protein 4 (SmVAL4) is a novel lipid-binding SCP/TAPS protein that lacks the prototypical CAP motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, Alan; Darwiche, Rabih; Rezende, Wanderson C.; Farias, Leonardo P.; Leite, Luciana C. C.; Schneiter, Roger; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2014-08-01

    The first structure of an S. mansoni venom allergen-like protein is presented. Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease that affects over 200 million people. Vaccine candidates have been identified, including Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like proteins (SmVALs) from the SCP/TAPS (sperm-coating protein/Tpx/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1/Sc7) superfamily. The first SmVAL structure, SmVAL4, was refined to a resolution limit of 2.16 Å. SmVAL4 has a unique structure that could not be predicted from homologous structures, with longer loops and an unusual C-terminal extension. SmVAL4 has the characteristic α/β-sandwich and central SCP/TAPS cavity. Furthermore, SmVAL4 has only one of the signature CAP cavity tetrad amino-acid residues and is missing the histidines that coordinate divalent cations such as Zn{sup 2+} in other SCP/TAPS proteins. SmVAL4 has a cavity between α-helices 1 and 4 that was observed to bind lipids in tablysin-15, suggesting the ability to bind lipids. Subsequently, SmVAL4 was shown to bind cholesterol in vitro. Additionally, SmVAL4 was shown to complement the in vivo sterol-export phenotype of yeast mutants lacking their endogenous CAP proteins. Expression of SmVAL4 in yeast cells lacking endogenous CAP function restores the block in sterol export. These studies suggest an evolutionarily conserved lipid-binding function shared by CAP proteins such as SmVAL4 and yeast CAP proteins such as Pry1.

  18. Fatty Acid- and Retinoid-binding Proteins Have Distinct Binding Pockets for the Two Types of Cargo*

    PubMed Central

    Jordanova, Rositsa; Groves, Matthew R.; Kostova, Elena; Woltersdorf, Christian; Liebau, Eva; Tucker, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes cause serious diseases in humans, animals, and plants. They have limited lipid metabolism and are reliant on lipid-binding proteins to acquire these metabolites from their hosts. Several structurally novel families of lipid-binding proteins in nematodes have been described, including the fatty acid- and retinoid-binding protein family (FAR). In Caenorhabditis elegans, used as a model for studying parasitic nematodes, eight C. elegans FAR proteins have been described. The crystal structure of C. elegans FAR-7 is the first structure of a FAR protein, and it exhibits a novel fold. It differs radically from the mammalian fatty acid-binding proteins and has two ligand binding pockets joined by a surface groove. The first can accommodate the aliphatic chain of fatty acids, whereas the second can accommodate the bulkier retinoids. In addition to demonstrating lipid binding by fluorescence spectroscopy, we present evidence that retinol binding is positively regulated by casein kinase II phosphorylation at a conserved site near the bottom of the second pocket. far-7::GFP (green fluorescent protein) expression shows that it is localized in the head hypodermal syncytia and the excretory cell but that this localization changes under starvation conditions. In conclusion, our study provides the basic structural and functional information for investigation of inhibitors of lipid binding by FAR proteins. PMID:19828452

  19. The liver fatty acid binding protein--comparison of cavity properties of intracellular lipid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J; Ory, J; Reese-Wagoner, A; Banaszak, L

    1999-02-01

    The crystal and solution structures of all of the intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs) reveal a common beta-barrel framework with only small local perturbations. All existing evidence points to the binding cavity and a poorly delimited 'portal' region as defining the function of each family member. The importance of local structure within the cavity appears to be its influence on binding affinity and specificity for the lipid. The portal region appears to be involved in the regulation of ligand exchange. Within the iLBP family, liver fatty acid binding protein or LFABP, has the unique property of binding two fatty acids within its internalized binding cavity rather than the commonly observed stoichiometry of one. Furthermore, LFABP will bind hydrophobic molecules larger than the ligands which will associate with other iLBPs. The crystal structure of LFABP contains two bound oleate molecules and provides the explanation for its unusual stoichiometry. One of the bound fatty acids is completely internalized and has its carboxylate interacting with an arginine and two serines. The second oleate represents an entirely new binding mode with the carboxylate on the surface of LFABP. The two oleates also interact with each other. Because of this interaction and its inner location, it appears the first oleate must be present before the second more external molecule is bound. PMID:10331654

  20. Identification of novel PTEN-binding partners: PTEN interaction with fatty acid binding protein FABP4.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, O; Panayotou, G; Zhyvoloup, A; Volkova, D; Gout, I; Filonenko, V

    2010-04-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor with dual protein and lipid-phosphatase activity, which is frequently deleted or mutated in many human advanced cancers. Recent studies have also demonstrated that PTEN is a promising target in type II diabetes and obesity treatment. Using C-terminal PTEN sequence in pEG202-NLS as bait, yeast two-hybrid screening on Mouse Embryo, Colon Cancer, and HeLa cDNA libraries was carried out. Isolated positive clones were validated by mating assay and identified through automated DNA sequencing and BLAST database searches. Sequence analysis revealed a number of PTEN-binding proteins linking this phosphatase to a number of different signaling cascades, suggesting that PTEN may perform other functions besides tumor-suppressing activity in different cell types. In particular, the interplay between PTEN function and adipocyte-specific fatty-acid-binding protein FABP4 is of notable interest. The demonstrable tautology of PTEN to FABP4 suggested a role for this phosphatase in the regulation of lipid metabolism and adipocyte differentiation. This interaction was further studied using coimmunoprecipitation and gel-filtration assays. Finally, based on Biacore assay, we have calculated the K(D) of PTEN-FABP4 complex, which is around 2.8 microM. PMID:19911253

  1. Bile acid salt binding with colesevelam HCl is not affected by suspension in common beverages.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Martin; Zhorov, Eugene

    2006-12-01

    It has been previously reported that anions in common beverages may bind to bile acid sequestrants (BAS), reducing their capacity for binding bile acid salts. This study examined the ability of the novel BAS colesevelam hydrochloride (HCl), in vitro, to bind bile acid sodium salts following suspension in common beverages. Equilibrium binding was evaluated under conditions of constant time and varying concentrations of bile acid salts in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). A stock solution of sodium salts of glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC), taurodeoxycholic acid (TDC), and glycocholic acid (GC), was added to each prepared sample of colesevelam HCl. Bile acid salt binding was calculated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Kinetics experiments were conducted using constant initial bile acid salt concentrations and varying binding times. The affinity, capacity, and kinetics of colesevelam HCl binding for GCDC, TDC, and GC were not significantly altered after suspension in water, carbonated water, Coca-Cola, Sprite, grape juice, orange juice, tomato juice, or Gatorade. The amount of bile acid sodium salt bound as a function of time was unchanged by pretreatment with any beverage tested. The in vitro binding characteristics of colesevelam HCl are unchanged by suspension in common beverages. PMID:16937334

  2. CD44 Binding to Hyaluronic Acid Is Redox Regulated by a Labile Disulfide Bond in the Hyaluronic Acid Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Kellett-Clarke, Helena; Stegmann, Monika; Barclay, A. Neil; Metcalfe, Clive

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is the primary leukocyte cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix. Enzymatic post translational cleavage of labile disulfide bonds is a mechanism by which proteins are structurally regulated by imparting an allosteric change and altering activity. We have identified one such disulfide bond in CD44 formed by Cys77 and Cys97 that stabilises the HA binding groove. This bond is labile on the surface of leukocytes treated with chemical and enzymatic reducing agents. Analysis of CD44 crystal structures reveal the disulfide bond to be solvent accessible and in the–LH hook configuration characteristic of labile disulfide bonds. Kinetic trapping and binding experiments on CD44-Fc chimeric proteins show the bond is preferentially reduced over the other disulfide bonds in CD44 and reduction inhibits the CD44-HA interaction. Furthermore cells transfected with CD44 no longer adhere to HA coated surfaces after pre-treatment with reducing agents. The implications of CD44 redox regulation are discussed in the context of immune function, disease and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26379032

  3. Ascorbic acid enables reversible dopamine receptor /sup 3/H-agonist binding

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, S.; Sibley, D.R.; Hamblin, M.; Creese, I.

    1981-11-16

    The effects of ascorbic acid on dopaminergic /sup 3/H-agonist receptor binding were studied in membrane homogenates of bovine anterior pituitary and caudate, and rat striatum. In all tissues virtually no stereospecific binding (defined using 1uM (+)butaclamol) of the /sup 3/H-agonists N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA), apomorphine, or dopamine could be demonstrated in the absence of ascorbic acid. Although levels of total /sup 3/H-agonist binding were three to five times greater in the absence than in the presence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, the increased binding was entirely non-stereospecific. Greater amounts of dopamine-inhibitable /sup 3/H-NPA binding could be demonstrated in the absence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, but this measure of ''specific binding'' was demonstrated not to represent dopamine receptor binding since several other catecholamines and catechol were equipotent with dopamine and more potent than the dopamine agonist (+/-)amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) in inhibiting this binding. High levels of dopamine-displaceable /sup 3/H-agonist binding were detected in fresh and boiled homogenates of cerebellum, an area of brain which receives no dopaminergic innervation, further demonstrating the non-specific nature of /sup 3/H-agonist binding in the absence of ascorbic acid. These studies emphasize that under typical assay conditions ascorbic acid is required in order to demonstrate reversible and specific /sup 3/H-agonist binding to dopamine receptors.

  4. MYB elongation is regulated by the nucleic acid binding of NFκB p50 to the intronic stem-loop region.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lloyd A; Hugo, Honor J; Malaterre, Jordane; Huiling, Xu; Sonza, Secondo; Cures, Alina; Purcell, Damian F J; Ramsland, Paul A; Gerondakis, Steven; Gonda, Thomas J; Ramsay, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    MYB transcriptional elongation is regulated by an attenuator sequence within intron 1 that has been proposed to encode a RNA stem loop (SLR) followed by a polyU tract. We report that NFκBp50 can bind the SLR polyU RNA and promote MYB transcriptional elongation together with NFκBp65. We identified a conserved lysine-rich motif within the Rel homology domain (RHD) of NFκBp50, mutation of which abrogated the interaction of NFκBp50 with the SLR polyU and impaired NFκBp50 mediated MYB elongation. We observed that the TAR RNA-binding region of Tat is homologous to the NFκBp50 RHD lysine-rich motif, a finding consistent with HIV Tat acting as an effector of MYB transcriptional elongation in an SLR dependent manner. Furthermore, we identify the DNA binding activity of NFκBp50 as a key component required for the SLR polyU mediated regulation of MYB. Collectively these results suggest that the MYB SLR polyU provides a platform for proteins to regulate MYB and reveals novel nucleic acid binding properties of NFκBp50 required for MYB regulation. PMID:25853889

  5. Modeling nucleic acid structure in the presence of single-stranded binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forties, Robert; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2009-03-01

    There are many important proteins which bind single-stranded nucleic acids, such as the nucleocapsid protein in HIV, the RecA DNA repair protein in bacteria, and all proteins involved in mRNA splicing and translation. We extend the Vienna Package for quantitatively modeling the secondary structure of nucleic acids to include proteins which bind to unpaired portions of the nucleic acid. All parameters needed to model nucleic acid secondary structures in the absence of proteins have been previously measured. This leaves the footprint and sequence dependent binding affinity of the protein as adjustable parameters of our model. Using this model we are able to predict the probability of the protein binding at any position in the nucleic acid sequence, the impact of the protein on nucleic acid base pairing, the end-to-end distance distribution for the nucleic acid, and FRET distributions for fluorophores attached to the nucleic acid.

  6. Incorporating substrate sequence motifs and spatial amino acid composition to identify kinase-specific phosphorylation sites on protein three-dimensional structures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by kinases plays crucial regulatory roles in cellular processes. Given the high-throughput mass spectrometry-based experiments, the desire to annotate the catalytic kinases for in vivo phosphorylation sites has motivated. Thus, a variety of computational methods have been developed for performing a large-scale prediction of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites. However, most of the proposed methods solely rely on the local amino acid sequences surrounding the phosphorylation sites. An increasing number of three-dimensional structures make it possible to physically investigate the structural environment of phosphorylation sites. Results In this work, all of the experimental phosphorylation sites are mapped to the protein entries of Protein Data Bank by sequence identity. It resulted in a total of 4508 phosphorylation sites containing the protein three-dimensional (3D) structures. To identify phosphorylation sites on protein 3D structures, this work incorporates support vector machines (SVMs) with the information of linear motifs and spatial amino acid composition, which is determined for each kinase group by calculating the relative frequencies of 20 amino acid types within a specific radial distance from central phosphorylated amino acid residue. After the cross-validation evaluation, most of the kinase-specific models trained with the consideration of structural information outperform the models considering only the sequence information. Furthermore, the independent testing set which is not included in training set has demonstrated that the proposed method could provide a comparable performance to other popular tools. Conclusion The proposed method is shown to be capable of predicting kinase-specific phosphorylation sites on 3D structures and has been implemented as a web server which is freely accessible at http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/PhosK3D/. Due to the difficulty of identifying the kinase-specific phosphorylation

  7. Retinoic acid-binding protein, rhombomeres and the neural crest.

    PubMed

    Maden, M; Hunt, P; Eriksson, U; Kuroiwa, A; Krumlauf, R; Summerbell, D

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated by immunocytochemistry the spatial and temporal distribution of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP) in the developing nervous system of the chick embryo in order to answer two specific questions: do neural crest cells contain CRABP and where and when do CRABP-positive neuroblasts first arise in the neural tube? With regard to the neural crest, we have compared CRABP staining with HNK-1 staining (a marker of migrating neural crest) and found that they do indeed co-localise, but cephalic and trunk crest behave slightly differently. In the cephalic region in tissues such as the frontonasal mass and branchial arches, HNK-1 immunoreactivity is intense at early stages, but it disappears as CRABP immunoreactivity appears. Thus the two staining patterns do not overlap, but are complementary. In the trunk, HNK-1 and CRABP stain the same cell populations at the same time, such as those migrating through the anterior halves of the somites. In the neural tube, CRABP-positive neuroblasts first appear in the rhombencephalon just after the neural folds close and then a particular pattern of immunoreactivity appears within the rhombomeres of the hindbrain. Labelled cells are present in the future spinal cord, the posterior rhombencephalon up to rhombomere 6 and in rhombomere 4 thus producing a single stripe pattern. This pattern is dynamic and gradually changes as anterior rhombomeres begin to label. The similarity of this initial pattern to the arrangement of certain homeobox genes in the mouse stimulated us to examine the expression of the chicken Hox-2.9 gene. We show that at stage 15 the pattern of expression of this gene is closely related to that of CRABP. The relationship between retinoic acid, CRABP and homeobox genes is discussed. PMID:1707786

  8. Identification and Characterization of Linoleic Acid as an Endogenous Modulator of in Vitro N-1-Naphthylphthalamic Acid Binding.

    PubMed Central

    Suttle, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    An endogenous inhibitor of the in vitro binding of the phytotropin N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid to microsomal membranes was detected in extracts prepared from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) epicotyls. Following extensive purification, the inhibitor was identified as linoleic acid. Authentic linoleic acid inhibited N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid binding noncompetitively in a dose-dependent manner, exhibiting a 50% inhibitory concentration of approximately 24 ([mu]M. Using a variety of fatty acids and their derivatives, this inhibition was found to exhibit strict structural requirements, with both linoleic and linolenic acids being the most inhibitory. A variety of membrane-solubilizing detergents elicited no such inhibitory activity when tested at equivalent concentrations. The possible physiological significance of this interaction is discussed and it is proposed that linoleic acid serves as an intracellular modulator of phytotropin binding and therefore polar auxin transport. PMID:12223622

  9. Prediction of nucleic acid binding probability in proteins: a neighboring residue network based score.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-06-23

    We describe a general binding score for predicting the nucleic acid binding probability in proteins. The score is directly derived from physicochemical and evolutionary features and integrates a residue neighboring network approach. Our process achieves stable and high accuracies on both DNA- and RNA-binding proteins and illustrates how the main driving forces for nucleic acid binding are common. Because of the effective integration of the synergetic effects of the network of neighboring residues and the fact that the prediction yields a hierarchical scoring on the protein surface, energy funnels for nucleic acid binding appear on protein surfaces, pointing to the dynamic process occurring in the binding of nucleic acids to proteins. PMID:25940624

  10. Prediction of nucleic acid binding probability in proteins: a neighboring residue network based score

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We describe a general binding score for predicting the nucleic acid binding probability in proteins. The score is directly derived from physicochemical and evolutionary features and integrates a residue neighboring network approach. Our process achieves stable and high accuracies on both DNA- and RNA-binding proteins and illustrates how the main driving forces for nucleic acid binding are common. Because of the effective integration of the synergetic effects of the network of neighboring residues and the fact that the prediction yields a hierarchical scoring on the protein surface, energy funnels for nucleic acid binding appear on protein surfaces, pointing to the dynamic process occurring in the binding of nucleic acids to proteins. PMID:25940624

  11. Modulatory effects of unsaturated fatty acids on the binding of glucocorticoids to rat liver glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Vallette, G; Vanet, A; Sumida, C; Nunez, E A

    1991-09-01

    Binding of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone to the rat liver cytosol glucocorticoid receptor was inhibited by physiological concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids as a function of increasing dose, degree of unsaturation, and chain length of the fatty acid. Polyunsaturated fatty acids were the most potent inhibitors. Scatchard analysis and Line-weaver-Burk plots of the binding data revealed that both the association constants and number of binding sites decreased and that polyunsaturated fatty acids inhibition was of a mixed non-competitive type. The dissociation rate constant of [3H]dexamethasone from glucocorticoid receptors was increased by up to 10 times in the presence of docosahexaenoic acid, whereas a competitive inhibitor like the glucocorticoid antagonist RU 38486 had no effect. Moreover, sucrose density gradient analysis showed that docosahexaenoic acid inhibited the binding of [3H] dexamethasone to both the 8.8S and 4S forms. The results strongly suggest that unsaturated fatty acids are interacting at a site on the receptor different from the hormone binding site and the heat shock protein and that by binding to a second site unsaturated fatty acids greatly change the conformation of the hormone binding site to reduce its affinity for the hormone, either partially or completely depending on the concentration and the class of the fatty acid. PMID:1874175

  12. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in 1918 Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Changes Receptor Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Laurel; Stevens, James; Zamarin, Dmitriy; Wilson, Ian A.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Basler, Christopher F.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Palese, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The receptor binding specificity of influenza viruses may be important for host restriction of human and avian viruses. Here, we show that the hemagglutinin (HA) of the virus that caused the 1918 influenza pandemic has strain-specific differences in its receptor binding specificity. The A/South Carolina/1/18 HA preferentially binds the α2,6 sialic acid (human) cellular receptor, whereas the A/New York/1/18 HA, which differs by only one amino acid, binds both the α2,6 and the α2,3 sialic acid (avian) cellular receptors. Compared to the conserved consensus sequence in the receptor binding site of avian HAs, only a single amino acid at position 190 was changed in the A/New York/1/18 HA. Mutation of this single amino acid back to the avian consensus resulted in a preference for the avian receptor. PMID:16103207

  13. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 activates NF-kappaB, induces cIAP-2 expression, and protects against apoptosis in a PDZ binding motif-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    James, Michael A; Lee, John H; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J

    2006-06-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of most cervical cancers and some aerodigestive cancers. The HPV E6 oncoprotein from high-risk HPV types contributes to the immortalization and transformation of cells by multiple mechanisms, including degradation of p53, transcriptional activation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and degradation of several proteins containing PDZ domains. The ability of E6 to bind PDZ domain-containing proteins is independent of p53 degradation or hTERT activation but does correlate with oncogenic potential (R. A. Watson, M. Thomas, L. Banks, and S. Roberts, J. Cell Sci. 116:4925-4934, 2003) and is essential for induction of epithelial hyperplasia in vivo (M. L. Nguyen, M. M. Nguyen, D. Lee, A. E. Griep, and P. F. Lambert, J. Virol. 77:6957-6964, 2003). In this study, we found that HPV type 16 E6 was able to activate NF-kappaB in airway epithelial cells through the induction of nuclear binding activity of p52-containing NF-kappaB complexes in a PDZ binding motif-dependent manner. Transcript accumulation for the NF-kappaB-responsive antiapoptotic gene encoding cIAP-2 and binding of nuclear factors to the proximal NF-kappaB binding site of the cIAP-2 gene promoter are induced by E6 expression. Furthermore, E6 is able to protect cells from TNF-induced apoptosis. All of these E6-dependent phenotypes are dependent on the presence of the PDZ binding motif of E6. Our results imply a role for targeting of PDZ proteins by E6 in NF-kappaB activation and protection from apoptosis in airway epithelial cells. PMID:16699010

  14. New structural motifs and properties of squaric acid anions in the presence of the L-lysinium counterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, Tsonko; Mayer-Figge, Heike; Seidel, Rüdiger W.; Sheldrick, William S.; Spiteller, Michael; Koleva, Bojidarka B.

    2009-02-01

    Two novel L-lysinium hydrogensquarate monohydrate ( 1) and the corresponding salt of the L-lysinium dication ( 2) are synthesized and their structure and properties elucidated in detail spectroscopically, thermally and structurally, using single crystal X-ray diffraction, linear-polarized solid-state IR-spectroscopy oriented colloid suspensions in nematic host, TGA, DSC, DTA methods, positive and negative HPLC tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS·MS). Quantum chemical methods are used to calculate the electronic structure, vibrational data and electronic spectra. Two novel structural motifs have been obtained, isolated [(HSq -)] and tetramolecular [(H 2Sq)(HSq) 2(Sq)] 4- anion, respectively. Preliminary second harmonic generation measurements are also performed.

  15. Lysine residues direct the chlorination of tyrosines in YXXK motifs of apolipoprotein A-I when hypochlorous acid oxidizes high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bergt, Constanze; Fu, Xiaoyun; Huq, Nabiha P; Kao, Jeff; Heinecke, Jay W

    2004-02-27

    Oxidized lipoproteins may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Elevated levels of 3-chlorotyrosine, a specific end product of the reaction between hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and tyrosine residues of proteins, have been detected in atherosclerotic tissue. Thus, HOCl generated by the phagocyte enzyme myeloperoxidase represents one pathway for protein oxidation in humans. One important target of the myeloperoxidase pathway may be high density lipoprotein (HDL), which mobilizes cholesterol from artery wall cells. To determine whether activated phagocytes preferentially chlorinate specific sites in HDL, we used tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to analyze apolipoprotein A-I that had been oxidized by HOCl. The major site of chlorination was a single tyrosine residue located in one of the protein's YXXK motifs (where X represents a nonreactive amino acid). To investigate the mechanism of chlorination, we exposed synthetic peptides to HOCl. The peptides encompassed the amino acid sequences YKXXY, YXXKY, or YXXXY. MS/MS analysis demonstrated that chlorination of tyrosine in the peptides that contained lysine was regioselective and occurred in high yield if the substrate was KXXY or YXXK. NMR and MS analyses revealed that the N(epsilon) amino group of lysine was initially chlorinated, which suggests that chloramine formation is the first step in tyrosine chlorination. Molecular modeling of the YXXK motif in apolipoprotein A-I demonstrated that these tyrosine and lysine residues are adjacent on the same face of an amphipathic alpha-helix. Our observations suggest that HOCl selectively targets tyrosine residues that are suitably juxtaposed to primary amino groups in proteins. This mechanism might enable phagocytes to efficiently damage proteins when they destroy microbial proteins during infection or damage host tissue during inflammation. PMID:14660678

  16. Models of metal binding structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Leenheer, J.A.; Brown, G.K.; Cabaniss, S.E.; MacCarthy, P.

    1998-08-15

    Fulvic acid, isolated from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was assessed for its ability to bind Ca{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} ions at pH 6 before and after extensive fractionation that was designed to reveal the nature of metal binding functional groups. The binding constant for Ca{sup 2+} ion had the greatest increase of all the ions in a metal binding fraction that was selected for intensive characterization for the purpose of building quantitative average model structures. The metal binding fraction was characterized by quantitative {sup 13}C NMR, {sup 1}H NMR, and FT-IR spectrometry and elemental, titrimetric, and molecular weight determinations. The characterization data revealed that carboxyl groups were clustered in short-chain aliphatic dibasic acid structures. The Ca{sup 2+} binding data suggested that ether-substituted oxysuccinic acid structures are good models for the metal binding sites at pH 6. Structural models were derived based upon oxidation and photolytic rearrangements of cutin, lignin, and tannin precursors. These structural models rich in substituted dibasic acid structures revealed polydentate binding sites with the potential for both inner-sphere and outer-sphere type binding. The majority of the fulvic acid molecule was involved with metal binding rather than a small substructural unit.

  17. An ATF/CREB binding motif is required for aberrant constitutive expression of the MHC class II DR alpha promoter and activation by SV40 T-antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, P M; Goding, C R

    1992-01-01

    Constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) antigens normally occurs in B-lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. However, many malignant tumours and transformed cells express these proteins aberrantly. We demonstrate here that the MHC II DR alpha promoter is constitutively active both in the SV40 large T antigen transformed cell line, COS, and in CV1 cells from which they are derived. As an approach to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant DR alpha expression we have examined the cis- and trans-acting requirements for DR alpha transcription in these cell types. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the region immediately 3' to the X-box was bound by a member of the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors. Using deletions and point mutations in the DR alpha promoter we demonstrate that, in contrast to B-cells, the octamer motif and conserved X- and Y-boxes make only a minor contribution to promoter function while single point mutations in the ATF/CREB motif reduced transcription up to 20-fold. In addition, we show that the DR alpha promoter is activated by SV40 large T-antigen and that activation requires an intact ATF/CREB motif. Similar data were obtained using B16 melanoma cells. These results suggest that the ATF/CREB motif may be a target for transcription deregulation in several transformed cell types. Images PMID:1329030

  18. The Calmodulin-Binding, Short Linear Motif, NSCaTE Is Conserved in L-Type Channel Ancestors of Vertebrate Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Taiakina, Valentina; Boone, Adrienne N.; Fux, Julia; Senatore, A