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Sample records for acid biosynthetic enzymes

  1. Evidence of Selection for Low Cognate Amino Acid Bias in Amino Acid Biosynthetic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Rui; Savageau, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Summary If the enzymes responsible for biosynthesis of a given amino acid are repressed and the cognate amino acid pool suddenly depleted, then derepression of these enzymes and replenishment of the pool would be problematic, if the enzymes were largely composed of the cognate amino acid. In the proverbial ‘Catch 22’, cells would lack the necessary enzymes to make the amino acid, and they would lack the necessary amino acid to make the needed enzymes. Based on this scenario, we hypothesize that evolution would lead to the selection of amino acid biosynthetic enzymes that have a relatively low content of their cognate amino acid. We call this the ‘cognate bias hypothesis’. Here we test several implications of this hypothesis directly using data from the proteome of Escherichia coli. Several lines of evidence show that low cognate bias is evident in 15 of the 20 amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Comparison with closely related Salmonella typhimurium shows similar results. Comparison with more distantly related Bacillus subtilis shows general similarities as well as significant differences in the detailed profiles of cognate bias. Thus, selection for low cognate bias plays a significant role in shaping the amino acid composition for a large class of cellular proteins. PMID:15853887

  2. Plastid-localized amino acid biosynthetic pathways of Plantae are predominantly composed of non-cyanobacterial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Moustafa, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Studies of photosynthetic eukaryotes have revealed that the evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria involved the recruitment of non-cyanobacterial proteins. Our phylogenetic survey of >100 Arabidopsis nuclear-encoded plastid enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis identified only 21 unambiguous cyanobacterial-derived proteins. Some of the several non-cyanobacterial plastid enzymes have a shared phylogenetic origin in the three Plantae lineages. We hypothesize that during the evolution of plastids some enzymes encoded in the host nuclear genome were mistargeted into the plastid. Then, the activity of those foreign enzymes was sustained by both the plastid metabolites and interactions with the native cyanobacterial enzymes. Some of the novel enzymatic activities were favored by selective compartmentation of additional complementary enzymes. The mosaic phylogenetic composition of the plastid amino acid biosynthetic pathways and the reduced number of plastid-encoded proteins of non-cyanobacterial origin suggest that enzyme recruitment underlies the recompartmentation of metabolic routes during the evolution of plastids. PMID:23233874

  3. Production of Delta(1)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid by the biosynthetic enzyme secreted from transgenic Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Taura, Futoshi; Dono, Emi; Sirikantaramas, Supaart; Yoshimura, Kohji; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2007-09-28

    Delta(1)-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase is the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative cyclization of cannabigerolic acid into THCA, the acidic precursor of Delta(1)-tetrahydrocannabinol. We developed a novel expression system for THCA synthase using a methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris as a host. Under optimized conditions, the transgenic P. pastoris secreted approximately 1.32nkat/l of THCA synthase activity, and the culture medium, from which the cells were removed, effectively synthesized THCA from cannabigerolic acid with a approximately 98% conversion rate. The secreted THCA synthase was readily purified to homogeneity. Interestingly, endoglycosidase treatment afforded a deglycosylated THCA synthase with more catalytic activity than that of the glycosylated form. The non-glycosylated THCA synthase should be suitable for structure-function studies because it displayed much more activity than the previously reported native enzyme from Cannabis sativa as well as the recombinant enzyme from insect cell cultures.

  4. Nuclear localization of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Elzaouk, Lina; Laufs, Stephanie; Heerklotz, Dirk; Leimbacher, Walter; Blau, Nenad; Résibois, Annette; Thöny, Beat

    2004-01-05

    Biosynthesis of the tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) cofactor, essential for catecholamines and serotonin production and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, requires the enzymes GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS), and sepiapterin reductase (SR). Upon studying the distribution of GTPCH and PTPS with polyclonal immune sera in cross sections of rat brain, prominent nuclear staining in many neurons was observed besides strong staining in peri-ventricular structures. Furthermore, localization studies in transgenic mice expressing a Pts-LacZ gene fusion containing the N-terminal 35 amino acids of PTPS revealed beta-galactosidase in the nucleus of neurons. In contrast, PTPS-beta-galactosidase was exclusively cytoplasmic in the convoluted kidney tubules but nuclear in other parts of the nephron, indicating again that nuclear targeting may occur only in specific cell categories. Furthermore, the N terminus of PTPS acts as a domain able to target the PTPS-beta-galactosidase fusion protein to the nucleus. In transiently transfected COS-1 cells, which do not express GTPCH and PTPS endogenously, we found cytoplasmic and nuclear staining for GTPCH and PTPS. To further investigate nuclear localization of all three BH(4)-biosynthetic enzymes, we expressed Flag-fusion proteins in transiently transfected COS-1 cells and analyzed the distribution by immunolocalization and sub-cellular fractionation using anti-Flag antibodies and enzymatic assays. Whereas 5-10% of total GTPCH and PTPS and approximately 1% of total SR were present in the nucleus, only GTPCH was confirmed to be an active enzyme in nuclear fractions. The in vitro studies together with the tissue staining corroborate specific nuclear localization of BH(4)-biosynthetic proteins with yet unknown biological function.

  5. A new locus (leuK) affecting the regulation of branched-chain amino acid, histidine, and tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Brown, C S; West, R; Hilderman, R H; Bayliss, F T; Klines, E L

    1978-08-01

    A locus (leuK) affecting regulation of the leucine operon was selected by isolating a spontaneous Ara+ derivative of an Escherichia coli B/r strain carrying an ara-leu fusion in which the arabinose operon is under leucine control. Genetic analyses by P1 transduction demonstrated that the lesion is located to the right of the galactose operon. Regulation of the biosynthetic enzymes for leucine, isoleucine-valine, histidine, and tryptophan was altered in a strain carrying leuK16. High-level gene expression in the heterozygous merodiploid strain F' leuK+/leuK16) demonstrated the dominance of the mutant allele to the wild-type allele. No apparent effect was observed in the mutant on N-acetylornithinase, a biosynthetic enzyme in the arginine pathway, nor on any of the 18 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases examined. However, compared with that of the parent strain, the extent of the charging of leucyl-, isoleucyl-, valyl-, histidyl-, and arginyl-tRNA was decreased in the mutant.

  6. Structure of the D-alanylgriseoluteic acid biosynthetic protein EhpF, an atypical member of the ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, A.K.; Robinson, H.; Atanasova, V.; Gamage, S.; Parsons, J. F.

    2010-06-01

    The structure of EhpF, a 41 kDa protein that functions in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound D-alanylgriseoluteic acid (AGA), is reported. A cluster of approximately 16 genes, including ehpF, located on a 200 kbp plasmid native to certain strains of Pantoea agglomerans encodes the proteins that are required for the conversion of chorismic acid to AGA. Phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate has been identified as an intermediate in AGA biosynthesis and deletion of ehpF results in accumulation of this compound in vivo. The crystallographic data presented here reveal that EhpF is an atypical member of the acyl-CoA synthase or ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes. These enzymes typically catalyze two-step reactions involving adenylation of a carboxylate substrate followed by transfer of the substrate from AMP to coenzyme A or another phosphopantetheine. EhpF is distinguished by the absence of the C-terminal domain that is characteristic of enzymes from this family and is involved in phosphopantetheine binding and in the second half of the canonical two-step reaction that is typically observed. Based on the structure of EhpF and a bioinformatic analysis, it is proposed that EhpF and EhpG convert phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate to 6-formylphenazine-1-carboxylate via an adenylyl intermediate.

  7. Elevation of the Yields of Very Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids via Minimal Codon Optimization of Two Key Biosynthetic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Desong; Sun, Quanxi; Liu, Jiang; Li, Yaxiao; Hua, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5Δ5,8,11,14,17) and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6Δ4,7,10,13,16,19) are nutritionally beneficial to human health. Transgenic production of EPA and DHA in oilseed crops by transferring genes originating from lower eukaryotes, such as microalgae and fungi, has been attempted in recent years. However, the low yield of EPA and DHA produced in these transgenic crops is a major hurdle for the commercialization of these transgenics. Many factors can negatively affect transgene expression, leading to a low level of converted fatty acid products. Among these the codon bias between the transgene donor and the host crop is one of the major contributing factors. Therefore, we carried out codon optimization of a fatty acid delta-6 desaturase gene PinD6 from the fungus Phytophthora infestans, and a delta-9 elongase gene, IgASE1 from the microalga Isochrysis galbana for expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis respectively. These are the two key genes encoding enzymes for driving the first catalytic steps in the Δ6 desaturation/Δ6 elongation and the Δ9 elongation/Δ8 desaturation pathways for EPA/DHA biosynthesis. Hence expression levels of these two genes are important in determining the final yield of EPA/DHA. Via PCR-based mutagenesis we optimized the least preferred codons within the first 16 codons at their N-termini, as well as the most biased CGC codons (coding for arginine) within the entire sequences of both genes. An expression study showed that transgenic Arabidopsis plants harbouring the codon-optimized IgASE1 contained 64% more elongated fatty acid products than plants expressing the native IgASE1 sequence, whilst Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the codon optimized PinD6 yielded 20 times more desaturated products than yeast expressing wild-type (WT) PinD6. Thus the codon optimization strategy we developed here offers a simple, effective and low-cost alternative to whole gene synthesis for high expression of

  8. Elevation of the Yields of Very Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids via Minimal Codon Optimization of Two Key Biosynthetic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Li, Xueying; Li, Xinzheng; Zheng, Desong; Sun, Quanxi; Liu, Jiang; Li, Yaxiao; Hua, Jinping; Qi, Baoxiu

    2016-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5Δ5,8,11,14,17) and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6Δ4,7,10,13,16,19) are nutritionally beneficial to human health. Transgenic production of EPA and DHA in oilseed crops by transferring genes originating from lower eukaryotes, such as microalgae and fungi, has been attempted in recent years. However, the low yield of EPA and DHA produced in these transgenic crops is a major hurdle for the commercialization of these transgenics. Many factors can negatively affect transgene expression, leading to a low level of converted fatty acid products. Among these the codon bias between the transgene donor and the host crop is one of the major contributing factors. Therefore, we carried out codon optimization of a fatty acid delta-6 desaturase gene PinD6 from the fungus Phytophthora infestans, and a delta-9 elongase gene, IgASE1 from the microalga Isochrysis galbana for expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis respectively. These are the two key genes encoding enzymes for driving the first catalytic steps in the Δ6 desaturation/Δ6 elongation and the Δ9 elongation/Δ8 desaturation pathways for EPA/DHA biosynthesis. Hence expression levels of these two genes are important in determining the final yield of EPA/DHA. Via PCR-based mutagenesis we optimized the least preferred codons within the first 16 codons at their N-termini, as well as the most biased CGC codons (coding for arginine) within the entire sequences of both genes. An expression study showed that transgenic Arabidopsis plants harbouring the codon-optimized IgASE1 contained 64% more elongated fatty acid products than plants expressing the native IgASE1 sequence, whilst Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the codon optimized PinD6 yielded 20 times more desaturated products than yeast expressing wild-type (WT) PinD6. Thus the codon optimization strategy we developed here offers a simple, effective and low-cost alternative to whole gene synthesis for high expression of

  9. Structure of the d-alanylgriseoluteic acid biosynthetic protein EhpF, an atypical member of the ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, Asim K.; Atanasova, Vesna; Gamage, Swarna; Robinson, Howard; Parsons, James F.

    2010-06-01

    The structure of EhpF from P. agglomerans has been solved alone and in complex with phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate. Apo EhpF was solved and refined in two different space groups at 1.95 and 2.3 Å resolution and the EhpF–phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate complex structure was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure of EhpF, a 41 kDa protein that functions in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound d-alanylgriseoluteic acid (AGA), is reported. A cluster of approximately 16 genes, including ehpF, located on a 200 kbp plasmid native to certain strains of Pantoea agglomerans encodes the proteins that are required for the conversion of chorismic acid to AGA. Phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate has been identified as an intermediate in AGA biosynthesis and deletion of ehpF results in accumulation of this compound in vivo. The crystallographic data presented here reveal that EhpF is an atypical member of the acyl-CoA synthase or ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes. These enzymes typically catalyze two-step reactions involving adenylation of a carboxylate substrate followed by transfer of the substrate from AMP to coenzyme A or another phosphopantetheine. EhpF is distinguished by the absence of the C-terminal domain that is characteristic of enzymes from this family and is involved in phosphopantetheine binding and in the second half of the canonical two-step reaction that is typically observed. Based on the structure of EhpF and a bioinformatic analysis, it is proposed that EhpF and EhpG convert phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate to 6-formylphenazine-1-carboxylate via an adenylyl intermediate.

  10. Identification of the Fluvirucin B2 (Sch 38518) Biosynthetic Gene Cluster from Actinomadura fulva subsp. indica ATCC 53714: substrate Specificity of the β-Amino Acid Selective Adenylating Enzyme FlvN.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Hayakawa, Yuki; Numakura, Mario; Hashimoto, Junko; Teruya, Kuniko; Hirano, Takashi; Shin-Ya, Kazuo; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2016-05-01

    Fluvirucins are 14-membered macrolactam polyketides that show antifungal and antivirus activities. Fluvirucins have the β-alanine starter unit at their polyketide skeletons. To understand the construction mechanism of the β-alanine moiety in fluvirucin biosyntheses, we have identified the biosynthetic cluster of fluvirucin B2 produced from Actinomadura fulva subsp. indica ATCC 53714. The identified gene cluster contains three polyketide synthases, four characteristic β-amino acid-carrying enzymes, one decarboxylase, and one amidohydrolase. We next investigated the activity of the adenylation enzyme FlvN, which is a key enzyme for the selective incorporation of a β-amino acid substrate. FlvN showed strong preference for l-aspartate over other amino acids such as β-alanine. Based on these results, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for fluvirucin B2.

  11. Arabidopsis thaliana VTC4 encodes L-galactose-1-P phosphatase, a plant ascorbic acid biosynthetic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Conklin, Patricia L; Gatzek, Stephan; Wheeler, Glen L; Dowdle, John; Raymond, Marjorie J; Rolinski, Susanne; Isupov, Mikhail; Littlechild, Jennifer A; Smirnoff, Nicholas

    2006-06-09

    In plants, a proposed ascorbate (vitamin C) biosynthesis pathway occurs via GDP-D-mannose (GDP-D-Man), GDP-L-galactose (GDP-L-Gal), and L-galactose. However, the steps involved in the synthesis of L-Gal from GDP-L-Gal in planta are not fully characterized. Here we present evidence for an in vivo role for L-Gal-1-P phosphatase in plant ascorbate biosynthesis. We have characterized a low ascorbate mutant (vtc4-1) of Arabidopsis thaliana, which exhibits decreased ascorbate biosynthesis. Genetic mapping and sequencing of the VTC4 locus identified a mutation (P92L) in a gene with predicted L-Gal-1-P phosphatase activity (At3g02870). Pro-92 is within a beta-bulge that is conserved in related myo-inositol monophosphatases. The mutation is predicted to disrupt the positioning of catalytic amino acid residues within the active site. Accordingly, L-Gal-1-P phosphatase activity in vtc4-1 was approximately 50% of wild-type plants. In addition, vtc4-1 plants incorporate significantly more radiolabel from [2-(3)H]Man into L-galactosyl residues suggesting that the mutation increases the availability of GDP-L-Gal for polysaccharide synthesis. Finally, a homozygous T-DNA insertion line, which lacks a functional At3g02870 gene product, is also ascorbate-deficient (50% of wild type) and deficient in L-Gal-1-P phosphatase activity. Genetic complementation tests revealed that the insertion mutant and VTC4-1 are alleles of the same genetic locus. The significantly lower ascorbate and perturbed L-Gal metabolism in vtc4-1 and the T-DNA insertion mutant indicate that L-Gal-1-P phosphatase plays a role in plant ascorbate biosynthesis. The presence of ascorbate in the T-DNA insertion mutant suggests there is a bypass to this enzyme or that other pathways also contribute to ascorbate biosynthesis.

  12. Structural Insights Into the Evolutionary Paths of Oxylipin Biosynthetic Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.-S.; Nioche, P.; Hamberg, M.; Raman, C.S.

    2009-05-20

    The oxylipin pathway generates not only prostaglandin-like jasmonates but also green leaf volatiles (GLVs), which confer characteristic aromas to fruits and vegetables. Although allene oxide synthase (AOS) and hydroperoxide lyase are atypical cytochrome P450 family members involved in the synthesis of jasmonates and GLVs, respectively, it is unknown how these enzymes rearrange their hydroperoxide substrates into different products. Here we present the crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana AOS, free and in complex with substrate or intermediate analogues. The structures reveal an unusual active site poised to control the reactivity of an epoxyallylic radical and its cation by means of interactions with an aromatic {pi}-system. Replacing the amino acid involved in these steps by a non-polar residue markedly reduces AOS activity and, unexpectedly, is both necessary and sufficient for converting AOS into a GLV biosynthetic enzyme. Furthermore, by combining our structural data with bioinformatic and biochemical analyses, we have discovered previously unknown hydroperoxide lyase in plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, AOS in coral, and epoxyalcohol synthase in amphioxus. These results indicate that oxylipin biosynthetic genes were present in the last common ancestor of plants and animals, but were subsequently lost in all metazoan lineages except Placozoa, Cnidaria and Cephalochordata.

  13. Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase, the ultimate enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of juvenile hormone III, exhibits substrate control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the cloning, sequencing, characterization, 3D modeling and docking of Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase (AeaJHAMT), the enzyme that converts juvenile hormone acid (JHA) into juvenile hormone (JH). Purified recombinant AeaJHAMT was extensively characterized for enzym...

  14. Phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes in human brain.

    PubMed

    Ross, B M; Moszczynska, A; Blusztajn, J K; Sherwin, A; Lozano, A; Kish, S J

    1997-04-01

    Growing evidence suggests an involvement of brain membrane phospholipid metabolism in a variety of neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions. This has prompted the use of drugs (e.g., CDPcholine) aimed at elevating the rate of neural membrane synthesis. However, no information is available regarding the human brain enzymes of phospholipid synthesis which these drugs affect. Thus, the objective of our study was to characterize the enzymes involved, in particular, whether differences existed in the relative affinity of substrates for the enzymes of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) compared to those of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis. The concentration of choline in rapidly frozen human brain biopsies ranged from 32-186 nmol/g tissue, a concentration similar to that determined previously for ethanolamine. Since human brain ethanolamine kinase possessed a much lower affinity for ethanolamine (Km = 460 microM) than choline kinase did for choline (Km = 17 microM), the activity of ethanolamine kinase in vivo may be more dependent on substrate availability than that of choline kinase. In addition, whereas ethanolamine kinase was inhibited by choline, and to a lesser extent by phosphocholine, choline kinase activity was unaffected by the presence of ethanolamine, or phosphoethanolamine, and only weakly inhibited by phosphocholine. Phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase (PECT) and phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (PCCT) also displayed dissimilar characteristics, with PECT and PCCT being located predominantly in the cytosolic and particulate fractions, respectively. Both PECT and PCCT exhibited a low affinity for CTP (Km approximately 1.2 mM), suggesting that the activities of these enzymes, and by implication, the rate of phospholipid synthesis, are highly dependent upon the cellular concentration of CTP. In conclusion our data indicate different regulatory properties of PE and PC synthesis in human brain, and suggest that the rate of PE synthesis may be more

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum localization and activity of maize auxin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Seo, Hyesu; Park, Woong June; Hawes, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is a major growth hormone in plants and the first plant hormone to be discovered and studied. Active research over >60 years has shed light on many of the molecular mechanisms of its action including transport, perception, signal transduction, and a variety of biosynthetic pathways in various species, tissues, and developmental stages. The complexity and redundancy of the auxin biosynthetic network and enzymes involved raises the question of how such a system, producing such a potent agent as auxin, can be appropriately controlled at all. Here it is shown that maize auxin biosynthesis takes place in microsomal as well as cytosolic cellular fractions from maize seedlings. Most interestingly, a set of enzymes shown to be involved in auxin biosynthesis via their activity and/or mutant phenotypes and catalysing adjacent steps in YUCCA-dependent biosynthesis are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Positioning of auxin biosynthetic enzymes at the ER could be necessary to bring auxin biosynthesis in closer proximity to ER-localized factors for transport, conjugation, and signalling, and allow for an additional level of regulation by subcellular compartmentation of auxin action. Furthermore, it might provide a link to ethylene action and be a factor in hormonal cross-talk as all five ethylene receptors are ER localized.

  16. Effect of photoperiod on gibberellin biosynthetic enzymes in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, S.J.; Bleecker, A.B.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1986-04-01

    The photoperiodic control of stem elongation in spinach, a long day (LD) rosette plant, is mediated by gibberellins (GAs). The early 13-hydroxylated GA biosynthetic pathway from GA/sub 12/ to GA/sub 20/ operates in spinach: GA/sub 12/ ..-->.. GA/sub 53/ ..-->.. GA/sub 44/ ..-->.. GA/sub 19/ ..-->.. GA/sub 20/. Two enzymes of this pathway, those converting GA/sub 53/ to GA/sub 44/ (GA/sub 53/ oxidase) and GA/sub 19/ to GA/sub 20/ (GA/sub 19/ oxidase), are regulated by light. The enzyme converting GA/sub 44/ to GA/sub 19/ (GA/sub 44/ oxidase) is not light-regulated. In the light GA/sub 53/ and GA/sub 18/ oxidase activities are increased, therefore causing the GA biosynthetic pathway to be turned on. This leads to the production of an active GA in LD, which causes an increase in stem elongation. Two the enzymes, GA/sub 44/ and GA/sub 53/ oxidases, can be separated from one another by anion exchange HPLC. Estimates of the molecular weights of these two enzymes based on gel filtration HPLC will be reported.

  17. The oxalic acid biosynthetic activity of Burkholderia mallei is encoded by a single locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although it is known that oxalic acid provides a selective advantage to the secreting microbe, our understanding of how this acid is biosynthesized remains incomplete. This study reports the identification, cloning, and partial characterization of the oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme from the animal ...

  18. A gene encoding an abscisic acid biosynthetic enzyme (LsNCED4) collocates with the high temperature germination locus Htg6.1 in lettuce (Lactuca sp.)

    PubMed Central

    Argyris, Jason; Truco, María José; Ochoa, Oswaldo; McHale, Leah; Dahal, Peetambar; Van Deynze, Allen; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    Thermoinhibition, or failure of seeds to germinate when imbibed at warm temperatures, can be a significant problem in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) production. The reliability of stand establishment would be improved by increasing the ability of lettuce seeds to germinate at high temperatures. Genes encoding germination- or dormancy-related proteins were mapped in a recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between L. sativa cv. Salinas and L. serriola accession UC96US23. This revealed several candidate genes that are located in the genomic regions containing quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with temperature and light requirements for germination. In particular, LsNCED4, a temperature-regulated gene in the biosynthetic pathway for abscisic acid (ABA), a germination inhibitor, mapped to the center of a previously detected QTL for high temperature germination (Htg6.1) from UC96US23. Three sets of sister BC3S2 near-isogenic lines (NILs) that were homozygous for the UC96US23 allele of LsNCED4 at Htg6.1 were developed by backcrossing to cv. Salinas and marker-assisted selection followed by selfing. The maximum temperature for germination of NIL seed lots with the UC96US23 allele at LsNCED4 was increased by 2–3°C when compared with sister NIL seed lots lacking the introgression. In addition, the expression of LsNCED4 was two- to threefold lower in the former NIL lines as compared to expression in the latter. Together, these data strongly implicate LsNCED4 as the candidate gene responsible for the Htg6.1 phenotype and indicate that decreased ABA biosynthesis at high imbibition temperatures is a major factor responsible for the increased germination thermotolerance of UC96US23 seeds. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-010-1425-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20703871

  19. The oxalic acid biosynthetic activity of Burkholderia mallei is encoded by a single locus.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2011-10-20

    Although it is known that oxalic acid provides a selective advantage to the secreting microbe our understanding of how this acid is biosynthesized remains incomplete. This study reports the identification, cloning, and partial characterization of the oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme from the animal bacterial pathogen, Burkholderia mallei. The discovered gene was named oxalate biosynthetic component (obc)1. Complementation of Burkholderia oxalate defective (Bod)1, a Burkholderia glumae mutant that lacks expression of a functional oxalic acid biosynthetic operon, revealed that the obc1 was able to rescue the no oxalate mutant phenotype. This single gene rescue is in contrast to the situation found in B. glumae which required the expression of two genes, obcA and obcB, to achieve complementation. Enzyme assays showed that even though the two Burkholderia species differed in the number of genes required to encode a functional enzyme, both catalyzed the same acyl-CoA dependent biosynthetic reaction. In addition, mutagenesis studies suggested a similar domain structure of the assembled oxalate biosynthetic enzymes whether encoded by one or two genes.

  20. Substrate specificity of the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Christina L.; Goon, Scarlett; Yarema, Kevin J.; Hinderlich, Stephan; Hang, Howard C.; Chai, Diana H.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2001-07-18

    Unnatural analogs of sialic acid can be delivered to mammalian cell surfaces through the metabolic transformation of unnatural N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) derivatives. In previous studies, mannosamine analogs bearing simple N-acyl groups up to five carbon atoms in length were recognized as substrates by the biosynthetic machinery and transformed into cell-surface sialoglycoconjugates [Keppler, O. T., et al. (2001) Glycobiology 11, 11R-18R]. Such structural alterations to cell surface glycans can be used to probe carbohydrate-dependent phenomena. This report describes our investigation into the extent of tolerance of the pathway toward additional structural alterations of the N-acyl substituent of ManNAc. A panel of analogs with ketone-containing N-acyl groups that varied in the lengthor steric bulk was chemically synthesized and tested for metabolic conversion to cell-surface glycans. We found that extension of the N-acyl chain to six, seven, or eight carbon atoms dramatically reduced utilization by the biosynthetic machinery. Likewise, branching from the linear chain reduced metabolic conversion. Quantitation of metabolic intermediates suggested that cellular metabolism is limited by the phosphorylation of the N-acylmannosamines by ManNAc 6-kinase in the first step of the pathway. This was confirmed by enzymatic assay of the partially purified enzyme with unnatural substrates. Identification of ManNAc 6-kinase as a bottleneck for unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis provides a target for expanding the metabolic promiscuity of mammalian cells.

  1. Nanolipoprotein particles comprising a natural rubber biosynthetic enzyme complex and related products, methods and systems

    DOEpatents

    Hoeprich, Paul D.; Whalen, Maureen

    2016-04-05

    Provided herein are nanolipoprotein particles that comprise a biosynthetic enzyme more particularly an enzyme capable of catalyzing rubber or other rubbers polymerization, and related assemblies, devices, methods and systems.

  2. Evolutionary systems biology of amino acid biosynthetic cost in yeast.

    PubMed

    Barton, Michael D; Delneri, Daniela; Oliver, Stephen G; Rattray, Magnus; Bergman, Casey M

    2010-08-17

    Every protein has a biosynthetic cost to the cell based on the synthesis of its constituent amino acids. In order to optimise growth and reproduction, natural selection is expected, where possible, to favour the use of proteins whose constituents are cheaper to produce, as reduced biosynthetic cost may confer a fitness advantage to the organism. Quantifying the cost of amino acid biosynthesis presents challenges, since energetic requirements may change across different cellular and environmental conditions. We developed a systems biology approach to estimate the cost of amino acid synthesis based on genome-scale metabolic models and investigated the effects of the cost of amino acid synthesis on Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression and protein evolution. First, we used our two new and six previously reported measures of amino acid cost in conjunction with codon usage bias, tRNA gene number and atomic composition to identify which of these factors best predict transcript and protein levels. Second, we compared amino acid cost with rates of amino acid substitution across four species in the genus Saccharomyces. Regardless of which cost measure is used, amino acid biosynthetic cost is weakly associated with transcript and protein levels. In contrast, we find that biosynthetic cost and amino acid substitution rates show a negative correlation, but for only a subset of cost measures. In the economy of the yeast cell, we find that the cost of amino acid synthesis plays a limited role in shaping transcript and protein expression levels compared to that of translational optimisation. Biosynthetic cost does, however, appear to affect rates of amino acid evolution in Saccharomyces, suggesting that expensive amino acids may only be used when they have specific structural or functional roles in protein sequences. However, as there appears to be no single currency to compute the cost of amino acid synthesis across all cellular and environmental conditions, we conclude that

  3. Characterization of the Genes Encoding d-Amino Acid Transaminase and Glutamate Racemase, Two d-Glutamate Biosynthetic Enzymes of Bacillus sphaericus ATCC 10208

    PubMed Central

    Fotheringham, Ian G.; Bledig, Stefan A.; Taylor, Paul P.

    1998-01-01

    In Bacillus sphaericus and other Bacillus spp., d-amino acid transaminase has been considered solely responsible for biosynthesis of d-glutamate, an essential component of cell wall peptidoglycan, in contrast to the glutamate racemase employed by many other bacteria. We report here the cloning of the dat gene encoding d-amino acid transaminase and the glr gene encoding a glutamate racemase from B. sphaericus ATCC 10208. The glr gene encodes a 28.8-kDa protein with 40 to 50% sequence identity to the glutamate racemases of Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, and Staphylococcus species. The dat gene encodes a 31.4-kDa peptide with 67% primary sequence homology to the d-amino acid transaminase of the thermophilic Bacillus sp. strain YM1. PMID:9696787

  4. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  5. A coordinated expression of biosynthetic enzymes controls the flux of juvenile hormone precursors in the corpora allata of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Nouzova, Marcela; Edwards, Marten J; Mayoral, Jaime G; Noriega, Fernando G

    2011-09-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of metamorphosis and ovarian development in mosquitoes. Adult female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes show developmental and dynamically regulated changes of JH synthesis. Newly emerged females have corpora allata (CA) with low biosynthetic activity, but they produce high amounts of JH a day later; blood feeding results in a striking decrease in JH synthesis, but the CA returns to a high level of JH synthesis three days later. To understand the molecular bases of these dynamic changes we combined transcriptional studies of 11 of the 13 enzymes of the JH pathway with a functional analysis of JH synthesis. We detected up to a 1000-fold difference in the levels of mRNA in the CA among the JH biosynthetic enzymes studied. There was a coordinated expression of the 11 JH biosynthetic enzymes in female pupae and adult mosquito. Increases or decreases in transcript levels for all the enzymes resulted in increases or decreases of JH synthesis; suggesting that transcript changes are at least partially responsible for the dynamic changes of JH biosynthesis observed. JH synthesis by the CA was progressively increased in vitro by addition of exogenous precursors such as geranyl-diphosphate, farnesyl-diphosphate, farnesol, farnesal and farnesoic acid. These results suggest that the supply of these precursors and not the activity of the last 6 pathway enzymes is rate limiting in these glands. Nutrient reserves play a key role in the regulation of JH synthesis. Nutritionally deficient females had reduced transcript levels for the genes encoding JH biosynthetic enzymes and reduced JH synthesis. Our studies suggest that JH synthesis is controlled by the rate of flux of isoprenoids, which is the outcome of a complex interplay of changes in precursor pools, enzyme levels and external regulators such as nutrients and brain factors. Enzyme levels might need to surpass a minimum threshold to achieve a net flux of precursors through the biosynthetic

  6. Structures and Mechanisms of the Mycothiol Biosynthetic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Vetting, Matthew W.; Frantom, Patrick A.; Blanchard, John S.

    2009-01-01

    In the last decade, the genes encoding all four enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of mycothiol in Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been identified. Orthologues of each of these have been stably expressed and structurally characterized. The chemical mechanisms of all four have also been studied. Due to the unique phylogenetic distribution of mycothiol, and the enzymes responsible for its biosynthesis, these enzymes represent interesting potential targets for anti mycobacterial agents. PMID:19699138

  7. An Unusual Role for a Mobile Flavin in StaC-like Indolocarbazole Biosynthetic Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, Peter J.; Ryan, Katherine S.; Hamill, Michael J.; Howard-Jones, Annaleise R.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Elliott, Sean J.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2012-10-09

    The indolocarbazole biosynthetic enzymes StaC, InkE, RebC, and AtmC mediate the degree of oxidation of chromopyrrolic acid on route to the natural products staurosporine, K252a, rebeccamycin, and AT2433-A1, respectively. Here, we show that StaC and InkE, which mediate a net 4-electron oxidation, bind FAD with a micromolar K{sub d}, whereas RebC and AtmC, which mediate a net 8-electron oxidation, bind FAD with a nanomolar K{sub d} while displaying the same FAD redox properties. We further create RebC-10x, a RebC protein with ten StaC-like amino acid substitutions outside of previously characterized FAD-binding motifs and the complementary StaC-10x. We find that these mutations mediate both FAD affinity and product specificity, with RebC-10x displaying higher StaC activity than StaC itself. X-ray structures of this StaC catalyst identify the substrate of StaC as 7-carboxy-K252c and suggest a unique mechanism for this FAD-dependent enzyme.

  8. Identification of a 12-gene fusaric acid biosynthetic gene cluster in Fusarium species through comparative and functional genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In fungi, genes involved in biosynthesis of a secondary metabolite (SM) are often located adjacent to one another in the genome and are coordinately regulated. These SM biosynthetic gene clusters typically encode enzymes, one or more transcription factors, and a transport protein. Fusaric acid is a ...

  9. Cellular Localization of Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Enzymes in Marchantia polymorpha. Uncovering a New Role of Oil Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Suire, Claude; Bouvier, Florence; Backhaus, Ralph A.; Bégu, Dominique; Bonneu, Marc; Camara, Bilal

    2000-01-01

    Like seed plants, liverworts synthesize and accumulate a myriad of isoprenoid compounds. Using antibodies raised against several isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes, we investigated their intracellular compartmentation by in situ immunolocalization from Marchantia polymorpha. The enzymes examined were deoxy-xylulose phosphate synthase, geranyl diphosphate synthase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, monoterpene synthase, geranylgeranyl diphosphate reductase, phytoene synthase, and phytoene desaturase. Our results show that liverwort oil bodies, which are organelles bound by a single unit membrane, possess isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in plastids and the cytosol. We postulate that oil bodies play a dynamic role in cell metabolism in addition to their role as sites of essential oil accumulation and sequestration. The occurrence of such enzymes in different cellular compartments might be due to multiple targeting of gene products to various organelles. PMID:11080275

  10. Characterization of the Promoter Region of Biosynthetic Enzyme Genes Involved in Berberine Biosynthesis in Coptis japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Yoshida, Sayumi T.; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The presence of alkaloids is rather specific to certain plant species. However, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, is relatively broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Thus, berberine biosynthesis has been intensively investigated, especially using Coptis japonica cell cultures. Almost all biosynthetic enzyme genes have already been characterized at the molecular level. Particularly, two transcription factors (TFs), a plant-specific WRKY-type TF, CjWRKY1, and a basic helix-loop-helix TF, CjbHLH1, were shown to comprehensively regulate berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica cells. In this study, we characterized the promoter region of some biosynthetic enzyme genes and associated cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation via two TFs. The promoter regions of three berberine biosynthetic enzyme genes (CYP80B2, 4′OMT and CYP719A1) were isolated, and their promoter activities were dissected by a transient assay involving the sequentially truncated promoter::luciferase (LUC) reporter constructs. Furthermore, transactivation activities of CjWRKY1 were determined using the truncated promoter::LUC reporter constructs or constructs with mutated cis-elements. These results suggest the involvement of a putative W-box in the regulation of biosynthetic enzyme genes. Direct binding of CjWRKY1 to the W-box DNA sequence was also confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay and by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. In addition, CjbHLH1 also activated transcription from truncated 4′OMT and CYP719A1 promoters independently of CjWRKY1, suggesting the involvement of a putative E-box. Unexpected transcriptional activation of biosynthetic enzyme genes via a non-W-box sequence and by CjWRKY1 as well as the possible involvement of a GCC-box in berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica are discussed. PMID:27642289

  11. Integrative genomic mining for enzyme function to enable engineering of a non-natural biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Wai Shun; Tran, Stephen; Marcheschi, Ryan; Bertolani, Steve; Thompson, James; Baker, David; Liao, James C.; Siegel, Justin B.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to biosynthetically produce chemicals beyond what is commonly found in Nature requires the discovery of novel enzyme function. Here we utilize two approaches to discover enzymes that enable specific production of longer-chain (C5–C8) alcohols from sugar. The first approach combines bioinformatics and molecular modelling to mine sequence databases, resulting in a diverse panel of enzymes capable of catalysing the targeted reaction. The median catalytic efficiency of the computationally selected enzymes is 75-fold greater than a panel of naively selected homologues. This integrative genomic mining approach establishes a unique avenue for enzyme function discovery in the rapidly expanding sequence databases. The second approach uses computational enzyme design to reprogramme specificity. Both approaches result in enzymes with >100-fold increase in specificity for the targeted reaction. When enzymes from either approach are integrated in vivo, longer-chain alcohol production increases over 10-fold and represents >95% of the total alcohol products. PMID:26598135

  12. The lysine biosynthetic enzyme Lys4 influences iron metabolism, mitochondrial function and virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Do, Eunsoo; Park, Minji; Hu, Guanggan; Caza, Mélissa; Kronstad, James W; Jung, Won Hee

    2016-09-02

    The lysine biosynthesis pathway via α-aminoadipate in fungi is considered an attractive target for antifungal drugs due to its absence in mammalian hosts. The iron-sulfur cluster-containing enzyme homoaconitase converts homocitrate to homoisocitrate in the lysine biosynthetic pathway, and is encoded by LYS4 in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we identified the ortholog of LYS4 in the human fungal pathogen, Cryptococcus neoformans, and found that LYS4 expression is regulated by iron levels and by the iron-related transcription factors Hap3 and HapX. Deletion of the LYS4 gene resulted in lysine auxotrophy suggesting that Lys4 is essential for lysine biosynthesis. Our study also revealed that lysine uptake was mediated by two amino acid permeases, Aap2 and Aap3, and influenced by nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). Furthermore, the lys4 mutant showed increased sensitivity to oxidative stress, agents that challenge cell wall/membrane integrity, and azole antifungal drugs. We showed that these phenotypes were due in part to impaired mitochondrial function as a result of LYS4 deletion, which we propose disrupts iron homeostasis in the organelle. The combination of defects are consistent with our observation that the lys4 mutant was attenuated virulence in a mouse inhalation model of cryptococcosis.

  13. Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes from Developing Maize Endosperm Associate in Multisubunit Complexes1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A.; Liu, Fushan; Marsh, Rebekah S.; Kim, Seungtaek; Gan, Qinglei; Tetlow, Ian J.; Emes, Michael J.; James, Martha G.; Myers, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations affecting specific starch biosynthetic enzymes commonly have pleiotropic effects on other enzymes in the same metabolic pathway. Such genetic evidence indicates functional relationships between components of the starch biosynthetic system, including starch synthases (SSs), starch branching enzymes (BEs), and starch debranching enzymes; however, the molecular explanation for these functional interactions is not known. One possibility is that specific SSs, BEs, and/or starch debranching enzymes associate physically with each other in multisubunit complexes. To test this hypothesis, this study sought to identify stable associations between three separate SS polypeptides (SSI, SSIIa, and SSIII) and three separate BE polypeptides (BEI, BEIIa, and BEIIb) from maize (Zea mays) amyloplasts. Detection methods included in vivo protein-protein interaction tests in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) nuclei, immunoprecipitation, and affinity purification using recombinant proteins as the solid phase ligand. Eight different instances were detected of specific pairs of proteins associating either directly or indirectly in the same multisubunit complex, and direct, pairwise interactions were indicated by the in vivo test in yeast. In addition, SSIIa, SSIII, BEIIa, and BEIIb all comigrated in gel permeation chromatography in a high molecular mass form of approximately 600 kD, and SSIIa, BEIIa, and BEIIb also migrated in a second high molecular form, lacking SSIII, of approximately 300 kD. Monomer forms of all four proteins were also detected by gel permeation chromatography. The 600- and 300-kD complexes were stable at high salt concentration, suggesting that hydrophobic effects are involved in the association between subunits. PMID:18281416

  14. Starch biosynthetic enzymes from developing maize endosperm associate in multisubunit complexes.

    PubMed

    Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A; Liu, Fushan; Marsh, Rebekah S; Kim, Seungtaek; Gan, Qinglei; Tetlow, Ian J; Emes, Michael J; James, Martha G; Myers, Alan M

    2008-04-01

    Mutations affecting specific starch biosynthetic enzymes commonly have pleiotropic effects on other enzymes in the same metabolic pathway. Such genetic evidence indicates functional relationships between components of the starch biosynthetic system, including starch synthases (SSs), starch branching enzymes (BEs), and starch debranching enzymes; however, the molecular explanation for these functional interactions is not known. One possibility is that specific SSs, BEs, and/or starch debranching enzymes associate physically with each other in multisubunit complexes. To test this hypothesis, this study sought to identify stable associations between three separate SS polypeptides (SSI, SSIIa, and SSIII) and three separate BE polypeptides (BEI, BEIIa, and BEIIb) from maize (Zea mays) amyloplasts. Detection methods included in vivo protein-protein interaction tests in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) nuclei, immunoprecipitation, and affinity purification using recombinant proteins as the solid phase ligand. Eight different instances were detected of specific pairs of proteins associating either directly or indirectly in the same multisubunit complex, and direct, pairwise interactions were indicated by the in vivo test in yeast. In addition, SSIIa, SSIII, BEIIa, and BEIIb all comigrated in gel permeation chromatography in a high molecular mass form of approximately 600 kD, and SSIIa, BEIIa, and BEIIb also migrated in a second high molecular form, lacking SSIII, of approximately 300 kD. Monomer forms of all four proteins were also detected by gel permeation chromatography. The 600- and 300-kD complexes were stable at high salt concentration, suggesting that hydrophobic effects are involved in the association between subunits.

  15. Producing the Ethylene Signal: Regulation and Diversification of Ethylene Biosynthetic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Booker, Matthew A; DeLong, Alison

    2015-09-01

    Strictly controlled production of ethylene gas lies upstream of the signaling activities of this crucial regulator throughout the plant life cycle. Although the biosynthetic pathway is enzymatically simple, the regulatory circuits that modulate signal production are fine tuned to allow integration of responses to environmental and intrinsic cues. Recently identified posttranslational mechanisms that control ethylene production converge on one family of biosynthetic enzymes and overlay several independent reversible phosphorylation events and distinct mediators of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. Although the core pathway is conserved throughout seed plants, these posttranslational regulatory mechanisms may represent evolutionarily recent innovations. The evolutionary origins of the pathway and its regulators are not yet clear; outside the seed plants, numerous biochemical and phylogenetic questions remain to be addressed.

  16. Producing the Ethylene Signal: Regulation and Diversification of Ethylene Biosynthetic Enzymes1

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Matthew A.; DeLong, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Strictly controlled production of ethylene gas lies upstream of the signaling activities of this crucial regulator throughout the plant life cycle. Although the biosynthetic pathway is enzymatically simple, the regulatory circuits that modulate signal production are fine tuned to allow integration of responses to environmental and intrinsic cues. Recently identified posttranslational mechanisms that control ethylene production converge on one family of biosynthetic enzymes and overlay several independent reversible phosphorylation events and distinct mediators of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. Although the core pathway is conserved throughout seed plants, these posttranslational regulatory mechanisms may represent evolutionarily recent innovations. The evolutionary origins of the pathway and its regulators are not yet clear; outside the seed plants, numerous biochemical and phylogenetic questions remain to be addressed. PMID:26134162

  17. Application of a Mass Spectrometric Approach to Detect the Presence of Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Lau, Benjamin Yii Chung; Clerens, Stefan; Morton, James D; Dyer, Jolon M; Deb-Choudhury, Santanu; Ramli, Umi Salamah

    2016-04-01

    The details of plant lipid metabolism are relatively well known but the regulation of fatty acid production at the protein level is still not understood. Hence this study explores the importance of phosphorylation as a mechanism to control the activity of fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes using low and high oleic acid mesocarps of oil palm fruit (Elaeis guineensis variety of Tenera). Adaptation of neutral loss-triggered tandem mass spectrometry and selected reaction monitoring to detect the neutral loss of phosphoric acid successfully found several phosphoamino acid-containing peptides. These peptides corresponded to the peptides from acetyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase as identified by their precursor ion masses. These findings suggest that these enzymes were phosphorylated at 20th week after anthesis. Phosphorylation could have reduce their activities towards the end of fatty acid biosynthesis at ripening stage. Implication of phosphorylation in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis at protein level has never been reported.

  18. Bacterial Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Their Biosynthetic Genes, Functions, and Practical Use

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kiyohito; Hashimoto, Mikako; Hori, Ryuji; Adachi, Takumi; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Nagamine, Tadashi; Shimizu, Satoru; Ueno, Akio; Morita, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The nutritional and pharmaceutical values of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) such as arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids have been well recognized. These LC-PUFAs are physiologically important compounds in bacteria and eukaryotes. Although little is known about the biosynthetic mechanisms and functions of LC-PUFAs in bacteria compared to those in higher organisms, a combination of genetic, bioinformatic, and molecular biological approaches to LC-PUFA-producing bacteria and some eukaryotes have revealed the notably diverse organization of the pfa genes encoding a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase complex (PUFA synthase), the LC-PUFA biosynthetic processes, and tertiary structures of the domains of this enzyme. In bacteria, LC-PUFAs appear to take part in specific functions facilitating individual membrane proteins rather than in the adjustment of the physical fluidity of the whole cell membrane. Very long chain polyunsaturated hydrocarbons (LC-HCs) such as hentriacontanonaene are considered to be closely related to LC-PUFAs in their biosynthesis and function. The possible role of LC-HCs in strictly anaerobic bacteria under aerobic and anaerobic environments and the evolutionary relationships of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria carrying pfa-like genes are also discussed. PMID:27187420

  19. Sporopollenin Biosynthetic Enzymes Interact and Constitute a Metabolon Localized to the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Tapetum Cells[W

    PubMed Central

    Lallemand, Benjamin; Erhardt, Mathieu; Heitz, Thierry; Legrand, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The sporopollenin polymer is the major constituent of exine, the outer pollen wall. Recently fatty acid derivatives have been shown to be the precursors of sporopollenin building units. ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE, POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A (PKSA) and PKSB, TETRAKETIDE α-PYRONE REDUCTASE1 (TKPR1) and TKPR2 have been demonstrated to be involved in sporopollenin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here all these sporopollenin biosynthetic enzymes but TKPR2 have been immunolocalized to endoplasmic reticulum of anther tapetal cells. Pull-down experiments demonstrated that tagged recombinant proteins interacted to form complexes whose constituents were characterized by immunoblotting. In vivo protein interactions were evidenced by yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid analysis and by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy/Förster resonance energy transfer studies in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana, which were used to test the possibility that the enzymes interact to form a biosynthetic metabolon. Various pairs of proteins fused to two distinct fluorochromes were coexpressed in N. benthamiana leaf tissues and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy/Förster resonance energy transfer measurements demonstrated that proteins interacted pairwise in planta. Taken together, these results suggest the existence of a sporopollenin metabolon. PMID:23632852

  20. exo-Brevicomin biosynthetic pathway enzymes from the Mountain Pine Beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae.

    PubMed

    Song, Minmin; Delaplain, Patrick; Nguyen, Trang T; Liu, Xibei; Wickenberg, Leah; Jeffrey, Christopher; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus

    2014-10-01

    exoBrevicomin (exo-7-ethyl-5-methyl-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane) is an important semiochemical for a number of beetle species, including the highly destructive Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae). It is also found in other insects and the African elephant. Despite its significance, very little is known about its biosynthesis. A recent microarray analysis implicated a small cluster of three D. ponderosae genes in exo-brevicomin biosynthesis, two of which had identifiable open reading frames (Aw et al., 2010; BMC Genomics 11:215). Here we report further expression profiling of two genes in that cluster and functional analysis of their recombinantly-produced enzymes. One encodes a short-chain dehydrogenase that used NAD(P)(+) as a co-factor to catalyze the oxidation of (Z)-6-nonen-2-ol to (Z)-6-nonen-2-one. We therefore named the enzyme (Z)-6-nonen-2-ol dehydrogenase (ZnoDH). The other encodes the cytochrome P450, CYP6CR1, which epoxidized (Z)-6-nonen-2-one to 6,7-epoxynonan-2-one with very high specificity and substrate selectivity. Both the substrates and products of the two enzymes are intermediates in the exo-brevicomin biosynthetic pathway. Thus, ZnoDH and CYP6CR1 are enzymes that apparently catalyze the antepenultimate and penultimate steps in the exo-brevicomin biosynthetic pathway, respectively.

  1. Reconstruction of cytosolic fumaric acid biosynthetic pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fumaric acid is a commercially important component of foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals and industrial materials, yet the current methods of production are unsustainable and ecologically destructive. Results In this study, the fumarate biosynthetic pathway involving reductive reactions of the tricarboxylic acid cycle was exogenously introduced in S. cerevisiae by a series of simple genetic modifications. First, the Rhizopus oryzae genes for malate dehydrogenase (RoMDH) and fumarase (RoFUM1) were heterologously expressed. Then, expression of the endogenous pyruvate carboxylase (PYC2) was up-regulated. The resultant yeast strain, FMME-001 ↑PYC2 + ↑RoMDH, was capable of producing significantly higher yields of fumarate in the glucose medium (3.18 ± 0.15 g liter-1) than the control strain FMME-001 empty vector. Conclusions The results presented here provide a novel strategy for fumarate biosynthesis, which represents an important advancement in producing high yields of fumarate in a sustainable and ecologically-friendly manner. PMID:22335940

  2. Aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a model system for the regulation of a eukaryotic biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Braus, G H

    1991-01-01

    This review focuses on the gene-enzyme relationships and the regulation of different levels of the aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway in a simple eukaryotic system, the unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most reactions of this branched pathway are common to all organisms which are able to synthesize tryptophan, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. The current knowledge about the two main control mechanisms of the yeast aromatic amino acid biosynthesis is reviewed. (i) At the transcriptional level, most structural genes are regulated by the transcriptional activator GCN4, the regulator of the general amino acid control network, which couples transcriptional derepression to amino acid starvation of numerous structural genes in multiple amino acid biosynthetic pathways. (ii) At the enzyme level, the carbon flow is controlled mainly by modulating the enzyme activities at the first step of the pathway and at the branch points by feedback action of the three aromatic amino acid end products. Implications of these findings for the relationship of S. cerevisiae to prokaryotic as well as to higher eukaryotic organisms and for general regulatory mechanisms occurring in a living cell such as initiation of transcription, enzyme regulation, and the regulation of a metabolic branch point are discussed. PMID:1943992

  3. The hidden universal distribution of amino acid biosynthetic networks: a genomic perspective on their origins and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Montes, Georgina; Díaz-Mejía, J Javier; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Segovia, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Background Twenty amino acids comprise the universal building blocks of proteins. However, their biosynthetic routes do not appear to be universal from an Escherichia coli-centric perspective. Nevertheless, it is necessary to understand their origin and evolution in a global context, that is, to include more 'model' species and alternative routes in order to do so. We use a comparative genomics approach to assess the origins and evolution of alternative amino acid biosynthetic network branches. Results By tracking the taxonomic distribution of amino acid biosynthetic enzymes, we predicted a core of widely distributed network branches biosynthesizing at least 16 out of the 20 standard amino acids, suggesting that this core occurred in ancient cells, before the separation of the three cellular domains of life. Additionally, we detail the distribution of two types of alternative branches to this core: analogs, enzymes that catalyze the same reaction (using the same metabolites) and belong to different superfamilies; and 'alternologs', herein defined as branches that, proceeding via different metabolites, converge to the same end product. We suggest that the origin of alternative branches is closely related to different environmental metabolite sources and life-styles among species. Conclusion The multi-organismal seed strategy employed in this work improves the precision of dating and determining evolutionary relationships among amino acid biosynthetic branches. This strategy could be extended to diverse metabolic routes and even other biological processes. Additionally, we introduce the concept of 'alternolog', which not only plays an important role in the relationships between structure and function in biological networks, but also, as shown here, has strong implications for their evolution, almost equal to paralogy and analogy. PMID:18541022

  4. Regulation of the Omega-3 Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Pathway in Atlantic Salmon Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ruyter, Bente; Berge, Gerd Marit; Sun, Yajing; Østbye, Tone-Kari Knutsdatter

    2016-01-01

    Limited availability of the n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA have led to an interest in better understanding of the n-3 biosynthetic pathway and its regulation. The biosynthesis of alpha-linolenic acid to EPA and DHA involves several complex reaction steps including desaturation-, elongation- and peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes. The aims of the present experiments were to gain more knowledge on how this biosynthesis is regulated over time by different doses and fatty acid combinations. Hepatocytes isolated from salmon were incubated with various levels and combinations of oleic acid, EPA and DHA. Oleic acid led to a higher expression of the Δ6 fatty acid desaturase (fad) genes Δ6fad_a, Δ6fad_b, Δ6fad_c and the elongase genes elovl2 compared with cells cultured in medium enriched with DHA. Further, the study showed rhythmic variations in expression over time. Levels were reached where a further increase in specific fatty acids given to the cells not stimulated the conversion further. The gene expression of Δ6fad_a_and Δ6fad_b responded similar to fatty acid treatment, suggesting a co-regulation of these genes, whereas Δ5fad and Δ6fad_c showed a different regulation pattern. EPA and DHA induced different gene expression patterns, especially of Δ6fad_a. Addition of radiolabelled alpha-linolenic acid to the hepatocytes confirmed a higher degree of elongation and desaturation in cells treated with oleic acid compared to cells treated with DHA. This study suggests a complex regulation of the conversion process of n-3 fatty acids. Several factors, such as that the various gene copies are differently regulated, the gene expression show rhythmic variations and gene expression only affected to a certain level, determines when you get the maximum conversion of the beneficial n-3 fatty acids. PMID:27973547

  5. Mice lacking Mrp1 have reduced testicular steroid hormone levels and alterations in steroid biosynthetic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    SIVILS, JEFFREY C.; GONZALEZ, IVEN; BAIN, LISA J.

    2010-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a member of the ABC active transporter family that can transport several steroid hormone conjugates, including 17β-estradiol glucuronide, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and estrone 3-sulfate. The present study investigated the role that MRP1 plays in maintaining proper hormone levels in the serum and testes. Serum and testicular steroid hormone levels were examined in both wild-type mice and Mrp1 null mice. Serum testosterone levels were reduced 5-fold in mice lacking Mrp1, while testicular androstenedione, testosterone, estradiol, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were significantly reduced by 1.7- to 4.5-fold in Mrp1 knockout mice. Investigating the mechanisms responsible for the reduction in steroid hormones in Mrp1-/- mice revealed no differences in the expression or activity of enzymes that inactivate steroids, the sulfotransferases or glucuronosyltransferases. However, steroid biosynthetic enzyme levels in the testes were altered. Cyp17 protein levels were increased by 1.6-fold, while Cyp17 activity using progesterone as a substrate was also increased by 1.4-2.0-fold in mice lacking Mrp1. Additionally, the ratio of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase to 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and steroidogenic factor 1 to 3βhydroxysteroid dehydrogenase were significantly increased in the testes of Mrp1-/- mice. These results indicate that Mrp1-/- mice have lowered steroid hormones levels, and suggests that upregulation of steroid biosynthetic enzymes may be an attempt to maintain proper steroid hormone homeostasis. PMID:20178799

  6. Functional Characterization of the Vitamin K2 Biosynthetic Enzyme UBIAD1

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Yoshihisa; Nakagawa, Kimie; Sawada, Natsumi; Okuda, Naoko; Suhara, Yoshitomo; Uchino, Yuri; Kimoto, Takashi; Funahashi, Nobuaki; Kamao, Maya; Tsugawa, Naoko; Okano, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    UbiA prenyltransferase domain-containing protein 1 (UBIAD1) plays a significant role in vitamin K2 (MK-4) synthesis. We investigated the enzymological properties of UBIAD1 using microsomal fractions from Sf9 cells expressing UBIAD1 by analysing MK-4 biosynthetic activity. With regard to UBIAD1 enzyme reaction conditions, highest MK-4 synthetic activity was demonstrated under basic conditions at a pH between 8.5 and 9.0, with a DTT ≥0.1 mM. In addition, we found that geranyl pyrophosphate and farnesyl pyrophosphate were also recognized as a side-chain source and served as a substrate for prenylation. Furthermore, lipophilic statins were found to directly inhibit the enzymatic activity of UBIAD1. We analysed the aminoacid sequences homologies across the menA and UbiA families to identify conserved structural features of UBIAD1 proteins and focused on four highly conserved domains. We prepared protein mutants deficient in the four conserved domains to evaluate enzyme activity. Because no enzyme activity was detected in the mutants deficient in the UBIAD1 conserved domains, these four domains were considered to play an essential role in enzymatic activity. We also measured enzyme activities using point mutants of the highly conserved aminoacids in these domains to elucidate their respective functions. We found that the conserved domain I is a substrate recognition site that undergoes a structural change after substrate binding. The conserved domain II is a redox domain site containing a CxxC motif. The conserved domain III is a hinge region important as a catalytic site for the UBIAD1 enzyme. The conserved domain IV is a binding site for Mg2+/isoprenyl side-chain. In this study, we provide a molecular mapping of the enzymological properties of UBIAD1. PMID:25874989

  7. Harnessing the synthetic capabilities of glycopeptide antibiotic tailoring enzymes: characterization of the UK-68,597 biosynthetic cluster.

    PubMed

    Yim, Grace; Kalan, Lindsay; Koteva, Kalinka; Thaker, Maulik N; Waglechner, Nicholas; Tang, Irene; Wright, Gerard D

    2014-11-24

    In this study, a draft genome sequence of Actinoplanes sp. ATCC 53533 was assembled, and an 81-kb biosynthetic cluster for the unusual sulfated glycopeptide UK-68,597 was identified. Glycopeptide antibiotics are important in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Glycopeptides contain heptapeptide backbones that are modified by many tailoring enzymes, including glycosyltransferases, sulfotransferases, methyltransferases, and halogenases, generating extensive chemical and functional diversity. Several tailoring enzymes in the cluster were examined in vitro for their ability to modify glycopeptides, resulting in the synthesis of novel molecules. Tailoring enzymes were also expressed in the producer of the glycopeptide aglycone A47934, generating additional chemical diversity. This work characterizes the biosynthetic program of UK-68,597 and demonstrates the capacity to expand glycopeptide chemical diversity by harnessing the unique chemistry of tailoring enzymes.

  8. Betacyanin Biosynthetic Genes and Enzymes Are Differentially Induced by (a)biotic Stress in Amaranthus hypochondriacus

    PubMed Central

    Casique-Arroyo, Gabriela; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma; González de la Vara, Luis; Délano-Frier, John P.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of key genes and enzymes of the betacyanin biosynthetic pathway in Amaranthus hypochondriacus (Ah) was performed. Complete cDNA sequence of Ah genes coding for cyclo-DOPA 5-O glucosyltransferase (AhcDOPA5-GT), two 4, 5-DOPA-extradiol-dioxygenase isoforms (AhDODA-1 and AhDODA-2, respectively), and a betanidin 5-O-glucosyltransferase (AhB5-GT), plus the partial sequence of an orthologue of the cytochrome P-450 R gene (CYP76AD1) were obtained. With the exception AhDODA-2, which had a closer phylogenetic relationship to DODA-like genes in anthocyanin-synthesizing plants, all genes analyzed closely resembled those reported in related Caryophyllales species. The measurement of basal gene expression levels, in addition to the DOPA oxidase tyrosinase (DOT) activity, in different tissues of three Ah genotypes having contrasting pigmentation levels (green to red-purple) was determined. Additional analyses were performed in Ah plants subjected to salt and drought stress and to two different insect herbivory regimes. Basal pigmentation accumulation in leaves, stems and roots of betacyanic plants correlated with higher expression levels of AhDODA-1 and AhB5-GT, whereas DOT activity levels coincided with pigment accumulation in stems and roots and with the acyanic nature of green plants, respectively, but not with pigmentation in leaves. Although the abiotic stress treatments tested produced changes in pigment levels in different tissues, pigment accumulation was the highest in leaves and stems of drought stressed betacyanic plants, respectively. However, tissue pigment accumulation in stressed Ah plants did not always correlate with betacyanin biosynthetic gene expression levels and/or DOT activity. This effect was tissue- and genotype-dependent, and further suggested that other unexamined factors were influencing pigment content in stressed Ah. The results obtained from the insect herbivory assays, particularly in acyanic plants, also support the proposal that

  9. Allosteric regulation of an essential trypanosome polyamine biosynthetic enzyme by a catalytically dead homolog

    PubMed Central

    Willert, Erin K.; Fitzpatrick, Richard; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2007-01-01

    African sleeping sickness is a fatal disease that is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Polyamine biosynthesis is an essential pathway in the parasite and is a validated drug target for treatment of the disease. S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) catalyzes a key step in polyamine biosynthesis. Here, we show that trypanosomatids uniquely contain both a functional AdoMetDC and a paralog designated prozyme that has lost catalytic activity. The T. brucei prozyme forms a high-affinity heterodimer with AdoMetDC that stimulates its activity by 1,200-fold. Both genes are expressed in T. brucei, and analysis of AdoMetDC activity in T. brucei extracts supports the finding that the heterodimer is the functional enzyme in vivo. Thus, prozyme has evolved to be a catalytically dead but allosterically active subunit of AdoMetDC, providing an example of how regulators of multimeric enzymes can evolve through gene duplication and mutational drift. These data identify a distinct mechanism for regulating AdoMetDC in the parasite that suggests new strategies for the development of parasite-specific inhibitors of the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. PMID:17485680

  10. Structure, function and regulation of the enzymes in the starch biosynthetic pathway.

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, Jim

    2013-11-30

    structure of ADP- Glucose pyrophosphorylase from potato in its inhibited conformation, and bound to both ATP and ADP-glucose. In addition, we have determined the first structure of glycogen synthase in its "closed", catalytically active conformation bound to ADP-glucose. We also determined the structure of glycogen synthase bound to malto-oligosaccharides, showing for the first time that an enzyme in the starch biosynthetic pathway recognizes glucans not just in its active site but on binding sites on the surface of the enzyme ten’s of Angstroms from the active site. In addition our structure of a glycogen branching enzyme bound to malto-oligosaccharides identified seven distinct binding sites distributed about the surface of the enzyme. We will now determine the function of these sites to get a molecular-level picture of exactly how these enzymes interact with their polymeric substrates and confer specificity leading to the complex structure of the starch granule. We will extend our studies to other isoforms of the enzymes, to understand how their structures give rise to their distinct function. Our goal is to understand what accounts for the various functional differences between SS and SBE isoforms at a molecular level.

  11. The Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthase Biosynthetic Enzyme Has Distinct Catalytic and Metabolic Roles

    PubMed Central

    Frej, Anna D.; Clark, Jonathan; Le Roy, Caroline I.; Lilla, Sergio; Thomason, Peter A.; Otto, Grant P.; Churchill, Grant; Insall, Robert H.; Claus, Sandrine P.; Hawkins, Phillip; Stephens, Len

    2016-01-01

    Inositol levels, maintained by the biosynthetic enzyme inositol-3-phosphate synthase (Ino1), are altered in a range of disorders, including bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease. To date, most inositol studies have focused on the molecular and cellular effects of inositol depletion without considering Ino1 levels. Here we employ a simple eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum, to demonstrate distinct effects of loss of Ino1 and inositol depletion. We show that loss of Ino1 results in an inositol auxotrophy that can be rescued only partially by exogenous inositol. Removal of inositol supplementation from the ino1− mutant resulted in a rapid 56% reduction in inositol levels, triggering the induction of autophagy, reduced cytokinesis, and substrate adhesion. Inositol depletion also caused a dramatic generalized decrease in phosphoinositide levels that was rescued by inositol supplementation. However, loss of Ino1 triggered broad metabolic changes consistent with the induction of a catabolic state that was not rescued by inositol supplementation. These data suggest a metabolic role for Ino1 that is independent of inositol biosynthesis. To characterize this role, an Ino1 binding partner containing SEL1L1 domains (Q54IX5) and having homology to mammalian macromolecular complex adaptor proteins was identified. Our findings therefore identify a new role for Ino1, independent of inositol biosynthesis, with broad effects on cell metabolism. PMID:26951199

  12. The flavonoid biosynthetic enzyme chalcone isomerase modulates terpenoid production in glandular trichomes of tomato.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin-Ho; McRoberts, John; Shi, Feng; Moreno, Javier E; Jones, A Daniel; Howe, Gregg A

    2014-03-01

    Flavonoids and terpenoids are derived from distinct metabolic pathways but nevertheless serve complementary roles in mediating plant interactions with the environment. Here, we show that glandular trichomes of the anthocyanin free (af) mutant of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fail to accumulate both flavonoids and terpenoids. This pleiotropic metabolic deficiency was associated with loss of resistance to native populations of coleopteran herbivores under field conditions. We demonstrate that Af encodes an isoform (SlCHI1) of the flavonoid biosynthetic enzyme chalcone isomerase (CHI), which catalyzes the conversion of naringenin chalcone to naringenin and is strictly required for flavonoid production in multiple tissues of tomato. Expression of the wild-type SlCHI1 gene from its native promoter complemented the anthocyanin deficiency in af. Unexpectedly, the SlCHI1 transgene also complemented the defect in terpenoid production in glandular trichomes. Our results establish a key role for SlCHI1 in flavonoid production in tomato and reveal a link between CHI1 and terpenoid production. Metabolic coordination of the flavonoid and terpenoid pathways may serve to optimize the function of trichome glands in dynamic environments.

  13. Nonconventional techniques for separation of biosynthetic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kloetzer, Lenuţa; Poştaru, Mădălina; Cheptea, Corina; Caşcaval, D; Galaction, Anca-Irina

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids can be obtained by biosynthesis, by protein hydrolysis or by extraction from natural sources. The most efficient methods are the first two, but the separation of amino acids from fermentation broths or protein hydrolysates is rather difficult. Amino acids dissociate in aqueous solutions, forming characteristic ionic species depending on the solution pH-value. These properties make amino acids to be hydrophilic at any pH-value. This paper presents a review of the separation studies of some amino acids by nonconventional methods, namely individual or selective reactive extraction. Separation of some amino acids from their mixture obtained either by fermentation or protein hydrolysis by reactive extraction with different extractants indicated the possibility of the amino acids selective separation as a function of the pH-value of aqueous solution correlated with the acidic or basic character of each amino acid.

  14. Complete Proteomic-Based Enzyme Reaction and Inhibition Kinetics Reveal How Monolignol Biosynthetic Enzyme Families Affect Metabolic Flux and Lignin in Populus trichocarpa[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jack P.; Naik, Punith P.; Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Shi, Rui; Lin, Chien-Yuan; Liu, Jie; Shuford, Christopher M.; Li, Quanzi; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Tunlaya-Anukit, Sermsawat; Williams, Cranos M.; Muddiman, David C.; Ducoste, Joel J.; Sederoff, Ronald R.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    2014-01-01

    We established a predictive kinetic metabolic-flux model for the 21 enzymes and 24 metabolites of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway using Populus trichocarpa secondary differentiating xylem. To establish this model, a comprehensive study was performed to obtain the reaction and inhibition kinetic parameters of all 21 enzymes based on functional recombinant proteins. A total of 104 Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters and 85 inhibition kinetic parameters were derived from these enzymes. Through mass spectrometry, we obtained the absolute quantities of all 21 pathway enzymes in the secondary differentiating xylem. This extensive experimental data set, generated from a single tissue specialized in wood formation, was used to construct the predictive kinetic metabolic-flux model to provide a comprehensive mathematical description of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway. The model was validated using experimental data from transgenic P. trichocarpa plants. The model predicts how pathway enzymes affect lignin content and composition, explains a long-standing paradox regarding the regulation of monolignol subunit ratios in lignin, and reveals novel mechanisms involved in the regulation of lignin biosynthesis. This model provides an explanation of the effects of genetic and transgenic perturbations of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway in flowering plants. PMID:24619611

  15. Higher transcription levels in ascorbic acid biosynthetic and recycling genes were associated with higher ascorbic acid accumulation in blueberry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenghong; Wang, Lei; Gu, Liang; Zhao, Wei; Su, Hongyan; Cheng, Xianhao

    2015-12-01

    In our preliminary study, the ripe fruits of two highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) cultivars, cv 'Berkeley' and cv 'Bluecrop', were found to contain different levels of ascorbic acid. However, factors responsible for these differences are still unknown. In the present study, ascorbic acid content in fruits was compared with expression profiles of ascorbic acid biosynthetic and recycling genes between 'Bluecrop' and 'Berkeley' cultivars. The results indicated that the l-galactose pathway was the predominant route of ascorbic acid biosynthesis in blueberry fruits. Moreover, higher expression levels of the ascorbic acid biosynthetic genes GME, GGP, and GLDH, as well as the recycling genes MDHAR and DHAR, were associated with higher ascorbic acid content in 'Bluecrop' compared with 'Berkeley', which indicated that a higher efficiency ascorbic acid biosynthesis and regeneration was likely to be responsible for the higher ascorbic acid accumulation in 'Bluecrop'.

  16. Vitamin K2 Biosynthetic Enzyme, UBIAD1 Is Essential for Embryonic Development of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Kimie; Sawada, Natsumi; Hirota, Yoshihisa; Uchino, Yuri; Suhara, Yoshitomo; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Amizuka, Norio; Okamoto, Tadashi; Tsugawa, Naoko; Kamao, Maya; Funahashi, Nobuaki; Okano, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    UbiA prenyltransferase domain containing 1 (UBIAD1) is a novel vitamin K2 biosynthetic enzyme screened and identified from the human genome database. UBIAD1 has recently been shown to catalyse the biosynthesis of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in zebrafish and human cells. To investigate the function of UBIAD1 in vivo, we attempted to generate mice lacking Ubiad1, a homolog of human UBIAD1, by gene targeting. Ubiad1-deficient (Ubiad1−/−) mouse embryos failed to survive beyond embryonic day 7.5, exhibiting small-sized body and gastrulation arrest. Ubiad1−/− embryonic stem (ES) cells failed to synthesize vitamin K2 but were able to synthesize CoQ9, similar to wild-type ES cells. Ubiad1+/− mice developed normally, exhibiting normal growth and fertility. Vitamin K2 tissue levels and synthesis activity were approximately half of those in the wild-type, whereas CoQ9 tissue levels and synthesis activity were similar to those in the wild-type. Similarly, UBIAD1 expression and vitamin K2 synthesis activity of mouse embryonic fibroblasts prepared from Ubiad1+/− E15.5 embryos were approximately half of those in the wild-type, whereas CoQ9 levels and synthesis activity were similar to those in the wild-type. Ubiad1−/− mouse embryos failed to be rescued, but their embryonic lifespans were extended to term by oral administration of MK-4 or CoQ10 to pregnant Ubiad1+/− mice. These results suggest that UBIAD1 is responsible for vitamin K2 synthesis but may not be responsible for CoQ9 synthesis in mice. We propose that UBIAD1 plays a pivotal role in embryonic development by synthesizing vitamin K2, but may have additional functions beyond the biosynthesis of vitamin K2. PMID:25127365

  17. Novel NAD+-Farnesal Dehydrogenase from Polygonum minus Leaves. Purification and Characterization of Enzyme in Juvenile Hormone III Biosynthetic Pathway in Plant

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed-Hussein, Zeti-Azura; Ng, Chyan Leong

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Hormone III is of great concern due to negative effects on major developmental and reproductive maturation in insect pests. Thus, the elucidation of enzymes involved JH III biosynthetic pathway has become increasing important in recent years. One of the enzymes in the JH III biosynthetic pathway that remains to be isolated and characterized is farnesal dehydrogenase, an enzyme responsible to catalyze the oxidation of farnesal into farnesoic acid. A novel NAD+-farnesal dehydrogenase of Polygonum minus was purified (315-fold) to apparent homogeneity in five chromatographic steps. The purification procedures included Gigacap S-Toyopearl 650M, Gigacap Q-Toyopearl 650M, and AF-Blue Toyopearl 650ML, followed by TSK Gel G3000SW chromatographies. The enzyme, with isoelectric point of 6.6 is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 70 kDa. The enzyme was relatively active at 40°C, but was rapidly inactivated above 45°C. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme were found to be 35°C and 9.5, respectively. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sulfhydryl agent, chelating agent, and metal ion. The enzyme was highly specific for farnesal and NAD+. Other terpene aldehydes such as trans- cinnamaldehyde, citral and α- methyl cinnamaldehyde were also oxidized but in lower activity. The Km values for farnesal, citral, trans- cinnamaldehyde, α- methyl cinnamaldehyde and NAD+ were 0.13, 0.69, 0.86, 1.28 and 0.31 mM, respectively. The putative P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase that’s highly specific towards farnesal but not to aliphatic aldehydes substrates suggested that the enzyme is significantly different from other aldehyde dehydrogenases that have been reported. The MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS spectrometry further identified two peptides that share similarity to those of previously reported aldehyde dehydrogenases. In conclusion, the P. minus farnesal dehydrogenase may represent a novel plant farnesal dehydrogenase that exhibits distinctive substrate specificity

  18. Structure-Based Design of Inhibitors of the Crucial Cysteine Biosynthetic Pathway Enzyme O-Acetyl Serine Sulfhydrylase.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Mohit; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-01-01

    The cysteine biosynthetic pathway is of fundamental importance for the growth, survival, and pathogenicity of the many pathogens. This pathway is present in many species but is absent in mammals. The ability of pathogens to counteract the oxidative defences of a host is critical for the survival of these pathogens during their long latent phases, especially in anaerobic pathogens such as Entamoeba histolytica, Leishmania donovani, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Salmonella typhimurium. All of these organisms rely on the de novo cysteine biosynthetic pathway to assimilate sulphur and maintain a ready supply of cysteine. The de novo cysteine biosynthetic pathway, on account of its being important for the survival of pathogens and at the same time being absent in mammals, is an important drug target for diseases such as amoebiasis, trichomoniasis & tuberculosis. Cysteine biosynthesis is catalysed by two enzymes: serine acetyl transferase (SAT) followed by O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). OASS is well studied, and with the availability of crystal structures of this enzyme in different conformations, it is a suitable template for structure-based inhibitor development. Moreover, OASS is highly conserved, both structurally and sequence-wise, among the above-mentioned organisms. There have been several reports of inhibitor screening and development against this enzyme from different organisms such as Salmonella typhimurium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Entamoeba histolytica. All of these inhibitors have been reported to display micromolar to nanomolar binding affinities for the open conformation of the enzyme. In this review, we highlight the structural similarities of this enzyme in different organisms and the attempts for inhibitor development so far. We also propose that the intermediate state of the enzyme may be the ideal target for the design of effective highaffinity inhibitors.

  19. Biosynthetic studies on clavulanic acid: its biopathway and stereochemical course

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    A degradative analysis allowed determination of the stereochemistry at C-9 of clavulanic acid produced by Streptomyces clavuigerus. An over-all inversion of configuration from the C/sub 5/-unit precursor ornithine was observed. The diastereomeric (1R,2R)- and (1S,2R)-(1-/sup 3/H)-glycerols were separately synthesized and administered. Complementary results demonstrated an overall retention of configuration paralleling cysteine incorporation in the biosynthesis of penicillin. 3-Hydroxyornithine, a potential precursor to clavulanic acid, was prepared by a 1,3-dipolar addition of a nitrone and vinylglycine. However, 3-hydroxyornithine was not taken up by the organism and this possible intermediate could not be shown to be a specific precursor to clavulanic acid. (2-/sup 3/H)-L-Ornithine displays a preferential incorporation relative to D-ornithine. An epimerization by a one-base mechanism is suggested by the retention of half the tritium activity. ..beta..-Alanine, a potential precursor of the ..beta..-lactam segment was examined and shown not to play a direct role in the biosynthesis. Further, 3-hydroxypropionyl-ornithine, a parallel amide to the tripeptide intermediate in penicillin biosynthesis, was not incorporated into clavulanic acid. The role of 3-hydroxypropionate and glycerol were examined in both starch and triglyceride fermentation media.

  20. Probing phosphorylation by non-mammalian isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes using (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Ananya; Shah, Meha H; Bitok, J Kipchirchir; Hassis-LeBeau, Maria E; Freel Meyers, Caren L

    2009-09-01

    The biogenesis of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) is accomplished by the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway in plants, bacteria and parasites, making it a potential target for the development of anti-infective agents and herbicides. The biosynthetic enzymes comprising this pathway catalyze intriguing chemical transformations on diphosphate scaffolds, offering an opportunity to generate novel analogs in this synthetically challenging compound class. Such a biosynthetic approach to generating new diphosphate analogs may involve transformation through discrete diphosphate species, presenting unique challenges in structure determination and characterization of unnatural enzyme-generated diphosphate products produced in tandem. We have developed (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation NMR spectroscopy techniques for the direct characterization of crude MEP pathway enzyme products at low concentrations (200 microM to 5 mM) on a room temperature (non-cryogenic) NMR probe. Coupling the 100% natural abundance of the (31)P nucleus with the high intrinsic sensitivity of proton NMR, (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation spectroscopy is particularly useful for characterization of unnatural diphosphate enzyme products in the MEP pathway. As proof of principle, we demonstrate the rapid characterization of natural enzyme products of the enzymes IspD, E and F in tandem enzyme incubations. In addition, we have characterized several unnatural enzyme products using this technique, including new products of cytidyltransferase IspD bearing erythritol, glycerol and ribose components. The results of this study indicate that IspD may be a useful biocatalyst and highlight (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation spectroscopy as a valuable tool for the characterization of other unnatural products in non-mammalian isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  1. Conserved biosynthetic pathways for phosalacine, bialaphos and newly discovered phosphonic acid natural products

    PubMed Central

    Blodgett, Joshua A. V; Zhang, Jun Kai; Yu, Xiaomin; Metcalf, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural products containing phosphonic or phosphinic acid functionalities often display potent biological activities with applications in medicine and agriculture. The herbicide phosphinothricin-tripeptide (PTT) was the first phosphinate natural product discovered, yet despite numerous studies, questions remain surrounding key transformations required for its biosynthesis. In particular, the enzymology required to convert phosphonoformate to carboxyphosphonoenolpyruvate and the mechanisms underlying phosphorus-methylation remain poorly understood. In addition, the model for NRPS assembly of the intact tripeptide product has undergone numerous revisions that have yet to be experimentally tested. To further investigate the biosynthesis of this unusual natural product, we completely sequenced the PTT biosynthetic locus from Streptomyces hygroscopicus and compared it to the orthologous cluster from Streptomyces viridochromogenes. We also sequenced and analysed the closely related phosalacine (PAL) biosynthetic locus from Kitasatospora phosalacinea. Using data drawn from the comparative analysis of the PTT and PAL pathways, we also evaluate three related recently discovered phosphonate biosynthetic loci from Streptomyces sviceus, Streptomyces sp. WM6386 and Frankia alni. Our observations address long-standing biosynthetic questions related to PTT and PAL production and suggest that additional members of this pharmacologically important class await discovery. PMID:26328935

  2. Conserved biosynthetic pathways for phosalacine, bialaphos and newly discovered phosphonic acid natural products.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, Joshua A V; Zhang, Jun Kai; Yu, Xiaomin; Metcalf, William W

    2016-01-01

    Natural products containing phosphonic or phosphinic acid functionalities often display potent biological activities with applications in medicine and agriculture. The herbicide phosphinothricin-tripeptide (PTT) was the first phosphinate natural product discovered, yet despite numerous studies, questions remain surrounding key transformations required for its biosynthesis. In particular, the enzymology required to convert phosphonoformate to carboxyphosphonoenolpyruvate and the mechanisms underlying phosphorus methylation remain poorly understood. In addition, the model for non-ribosomal peptide synthetase assembly of the intact tripeptide product has undergone numerous revisions that have yet to be experimentally tested. To further investigate the biosynthesis of this unusual natural product, we completely sequenced the PTT biosynthetic locus from Streptomyces hygroscopicus and compared it with the orthologous cluster from Streptomyces viridochromogenes. We also sequenced and analyzed the closely related phosalacine (PAL) biosynthetic locus from Kitasatospora phosalacinea. Using data drawn from the comparative analysis of the PTT and PAL pathways, we also evaluate three related recently discovered phosphonate biosynthetic loci from Streptomyces sviceus, Streptomyces sp. WM6386 and Frankia alni. Our observations address long-standing biosynthetic questions related to PTT and PAL production and suggest that additional members of this pharmacologically important class await discovery.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus mevalonate kinase: isolation and characterization of an enzyme of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Voynova, Natalya E; Rios, Sandra E; Miziorko, Henry M

    2004-01-01

    It has been proposed that isoprenoid biosynthesis in several gram-positive cocci depends on the mevalonate pathway for conversion of acetyl coenzyme A to isopentenyl diphosphate. Mevalonate kinase catalyzes a key reaction in this pathway. In this study the enzyme from Staphylococcus aureus was expressed in Escherichia coli, isolated in a highly purified form, and characterized. The overall amino acid sequence of this enzyme was very heterologous compared with the sequences of eukaryotic mevalonate kinases. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analytical gel filtration chromatography suggested that the native enzyme is a monomer with a molecular mass of approximately 33 kDa. The specific activity was 12 U/mg, and the pH optimum was 7.0 to 8.5. The apparent K(m) values for R,S-mevalonate and ATP were 41 and 339 micro M, respectively. There was substantial substrate inhibition at millimolar levels of mevalonate. The sensitivity to feedback inhibition by farnesyl diphosphate and its sulfur-containing analog, farnesyl thiodiphosphate, was characterized. These compounds were competitive inhibitors with respect to ATP; the K(i) values were 46 and 45 micro M for farnesyl diphosphate and its thio analog, respectively. Parallel measurements with heterologous eukaryotic mevalonate kinases indicated that S. aureus mevalonate kinase is much less sensitive to feedback inhibition (K(i) difference, 3 orders of magnitude) than the human enzyme. In contrast, both enzymes tightly bound trinitrophenyl-ATP, a fluorescent substrate analog, suggesting that there are similarities in structural features that are important for catalytic function.

  4. Accumulation of Rutin and Betulinic Acid and Expression of Phenylpropanoid and Triterpenoid Biosynthetic Genes in Mulberry (Morus alba L.).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shicheng; Park, Chang Ha; Li, Xiaohua; Kim, Yeon Bok; Yang, Jingli; Sung, Gyoo Byung; Park, Nam Il; Kim, Soonok; Park, Sang Un

    2015-09-30

    Mulberry (Morus alba L.) is used in traditional Chinese medicine and is the sole food source of the silkworm. Here, 21 cDNAs encoding phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and 21 cDNAs encoding triterpene biosynthetic genes were isolated from mulberry. The expression levels of genes involved in these biosynthetic pathways and the accumulation of rutin, betulin, and betulinic acid, important secondary metabolites, were investigated in different plant organs. Most phenylpropanoid and triterpene biosynthetic genes were highly expressed in leaves and/or fruit, and most genes were downregulated during fruit ripening. The accumulation of rutin was more than fivefold higher in leaves than in other organs, and higher levels of betulin and betulinic acid were found in roots and leaves than in fruit. By comparing the contents of these compounds with gene expression levels, we speculate that MaUGT78D1 and MaLUS play important regulatory roles in the rutin and betulin biosynthetic pathways.

  5. Molecular interaction of the first 3 enzymes of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Nara, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirawake, Hiroko; Liao, Chien-Wei; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Morales, Jorge; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Fan, Chia-Kwung; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Inoue, Masayuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi; and others

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An Escherichia coli strain co-expressing CPSII, ATC, and DHO of Trypanosoma cruzi was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of T. cruzi were demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CPSII bound with both ATC and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATC bound with both CPSII and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A functional tri-enzyme complex might precede the establishment of the fused enzyme. -- Abstract: The first 3 reaction steps of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway are catalyzed by carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII), aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC), and dihydroorotase (DHO), respectively. In eukaryotes, these enzymes are structurally classified into 2 types: (1) a CPSII-DHO-ATC fusion enzyme (CAD) found in animals, fungi, and amoebozoa, and (2) stand-alone enzymes found in plants and the protist groups. In the present study, we demonstrate direct intermolecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of the parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The 3 enzymes were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their interactions were examined. Immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for each enzyme coupled with Western blotting-based detection using antibodies for the counterpart enzymes showed co-precipitation of all 3 enzymes. From an evolutionary viewpoint, the formation of a functional tri-enzyme complex may have preceded-and led to-gene fusion to produce the CAD protein. This is the first report to demonstrate the structural basis of these 3 enzymes as a model of CAD. Moreover, in conjunction with the essentiality of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in the parasite, our findings provide a rationale for new strategies for developing drugs for Chagas disease, which target the intermolecular interactions of these 3 enzymes.

  6. Structure of Nampt/PBEF/visfatin, a mammalian NAD[superscript +]biosynthetic enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Xiangbin; Bheda, Poonam; Revollo, Javier R.; Imai, Shin-ichiro; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2010-07-22

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) synthesizes nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide in a mammalian NAD{sup +} biosynthetic pathway and is required for SirT1 activity in vivo. Nampt has also been presumed to be a cytokine (PBEF) or a hormone (visfatin). The crystal structure of Nampt in the presence and absence of NMN shows that Nampt is a dimeric type II phosphoribosyltransferase and provides insights into the enzymatic mechanism.

  7. Overexpression of halophilic serine hydroxymethyltransferase in fresh water cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 results in increased enzyme activities of serine biosynthetic pathways and enhanced salinity tolerance.

    PubMed

    Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Kageyama, Hakuto; Tanaka, Yoshito; Fukaya, Minoru; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2017-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) catalyzes the conversion of serine to glycine and provides activated one-carbon units required for synthesis of nucleic acids, proteins and numerous biological compounds. SHMT is involved in photorespiratory pathway of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. Accumulating evidence revealed that SHMT plays vital role for abiotic stresses such as low CO2 and high salinity in plants, but its role in cyanobacteria remains to be clarified. In this study, we examined to overexpress the SHMT from halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica in freshwater cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The transformed cells did not show an obvious phenotype under non-stress condition, but exhibited more tolerance to salinity than the control cells harboring vector only under high salinity. Elevated levels of enzymes in phosphorylated serine biosynthetic pathway and photorespiration pathway were observed in the transformed cells. Glycine level was also increased in the transformed cells. Physiological roles of SHMT for salt tolerance were discussed.

  8. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Pseudaminic Acid Biosynthetic Pathway: Targeting Motility as a Key Bacterial Virulence Factor

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Robert; Schoenhofen, Ian C.; Tao, Limei; Aubry, Annie; Bouchard, Patrice; Reid, Christopher W.; Lachance, Paule; Twine, Susan M.; Fulton, Kelly M.; Cui, Qizhi; Hogues, Hervé; Purisima, Enrico O.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is motile by means of polar flagella, and this motility has been shown to play a critical role in pathogenicity. The major structural flagellin proteins have been shown to be glycosylated with the nonulosonate sugar, pseudaminic acid (Pse). This glycan is unique to microorganisms, and the process of flagellin glycosylation is required for H. pylori flagellar assembly and consequent motility. As such, the Pse biosynthetic pathway offers considerable potential as an antivirulence drug target, especially since motility is required for H. pylori colonization and persistence in the host. This report describes screening the five Pse biosynthetic enzymes for small-molecule inhibitors using both high-throughput screening (HTS) and in silico (virtual screening [VS]) approaches. Using a 100,000-compound library, 1,773 hits that exhibited a 40% threshold inhibition at a 10 μM concentration were identified by HTS. In addition, VS efforts using a 1.6-million compound library directed at two pathway enzymes identified 80 hits, 4 of which exhibited reasonable inhibition at a 10 μM concentration in vitro. Further secondary screening which identified 320 unique molecular structures or validated hits was performed. Following kinetic studies and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of selected inhibitors from our refined list of 320 compounds, we demonstrated that three inhibitors with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of approximately 14 μM, which belonged to a distinct chemical cluster, were able to penetrate the Gram-negative cell membrane and prevent formation of flagella. PMID:25267679

  9. Structure of PqsD, a Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Biosynthetic Enzyme, in Complex with Anthranilate

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, A.; Atanasova, V; Robinson, H; Eisenstein, E; Coleman, J; Pesci, E; Parsons, J

    2009-01-01

    Here we present a structural and biophysical characterization of PqsD that includes several crystal structures of the enzyme, including that of the PqsD-anthranilate covalent intermediate and the inactive Cys112Ala active site mutant in complex with anthranilate. The structure reveals that PqsD is structurally similar to the FabH and chalcone synthase families of fatty acid and polyketide synthases. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contains a PqsD dimer. The PqsD monomer is composed of two nearly identical 170-residue ????? domains. The structures show anthranilate-liganded Cys112 is positioned deep in the protein interior at the bottom of an 15 A long channel while a second anthraniloyl-CoA molecule is waiting in the cleft leading to the protein surface. Cys112, His257, and Asn287 form the FabH-like catalytic triad of PqsD. The C112A mutant is inactive, although it still reversibly binds anthraniloyl-CoA. The covalent complex between anthranilate and Cys112 clearly illuminates the orientation of key elements of the PqsD catalytic machinery and represents a snapshot of a key point in the catalytic cycle.

  10. Structure of PqsD, a Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Biosynthetic Enzyme, in Complex with Anthranilate†

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Asim K.; Atanasova, Vesna; Robinson, Howard; Eisenstein, Edward; Coleman, James P.; Pesci, Everett C.; Parsons, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone, is an intercellular alkyl quinolone signaling molecule produced by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Alkyl quinolone signaling is an atypical system that, in P. aeruginosa, controls the expression of numerous virulence factors. PQS is synthesized from the tryptophan pathway intermediate, anthranilate, which is either derived from the kynurenine pathway or from an alkyl quinolone specific anthranilate synthase encoded by phnAB. Anthranilate is converted to PQS by the enzymes encoded by the pqsABCDE operon and pqsH. PqsA forms an activated anthraniloyl-CoA thioester that shuttles anthranilate to the PqsD active site where it is transferred to Cys112 of PqsD. In the only biochemically characterized reaction, a condensation then occurs between anthraniloyl-PqsD and malonyl-CoA or malonyl-ACP, a second PqsD substrate, forming 2,4-dihydroxyquinoline (DHQ). The role PqsD plays in the biosynthesis of other alkyl quinolones, such as PQS, is unclear though it has been reported to be required for their production. No evidence however, exists that DHQ is a PQS precursor. Here we present a structural and biophysical characterization of PqsD that includes several crystal structures of the enzyme including that of the PqsD-anthranilate covalent intermediate and the inactive Cys112Ala active site mutant in complex with anthranilate. The structure reveals that PqsD is structurally similar to the FabH and chalcone synthase families of fatty acid and polyketide synthases. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contains a PqsD dimer. The PqsD monomer is composed of two nearly identical ~170 residue αβαβα domains. The structures show anthranilate-liganded Cys112 is positioned deep in the protein interior at the bottom of a ~15 Å long channel while a second anthraniloyl-CoA molecule is waiting in the cleft leading to the protein surface. Cys112, His257, and Asn287 form the FabH-like catalytic triad

  11. Comparison of constitutive gene expression levels of hepatic cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes between Wistar-Kyoto and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Ikeda, Ayaka; Ito, Sei; Miyata, Misaki; Yoshida, Chiaki; Degawa, Masakuni

    2013-01-01

    Serum total cholesterol amounts in the stroke-prone hypertensive rat (SHRSP) strain are lower than in the normotensive control strain, Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat. To understand the strain difference, constitutive gene expression levels of hepatic cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes in male 8-week-old SHRSP and WKY rats were comparatively examined by DNA microarray and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses. Of 22 cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme genes, expression levels of 8 genes, Pmvk, Idi1, Fdps, Fdft1, Sqle, Lss, Sc4mol, and Hsd17b7, in SHRSP were less than 50% those of the WKY rats; especially, the expression level of Sqle gene, encoding squalene epoxidase, a rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, was about 20%. The gene expression level of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2), which functions as a transcription factor upregulating gene expression of cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes, in SHRSP was about 70% of that in WKY rats. These results demonstrate the possibility that the lower serum total cholesterol level in SHRSP is defined by lower gene expression of most hepatic cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes. In particular, decreased gene expression level of Sqle gene might be the most essential factor. Moreover, the broad range of lowered rates of these genes in SHRSP suggests that the abnormal function and/or expression not only of SREBP-2 but also of one or more other transcription factors for those gene expressions exist in SHRSP.

  12. Accumulation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid in hairy roots of Daucus carota 2: confirming biosynthetic steps through feeding of inhibitors and precursors.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Debabrata; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2009-09-01

    Biosynthesis of hydroxybenzoates even at enzymatic level is poorly understood. In this report, effect of feeding of putative biosynthetic precursors and pathway-specific enzyme inhibitors of early phenylpropanoid pathway on p-hydroxybenzoic acid accumulation in chitosan-elicited hairy roots of Daucus carota was studied. Three selective metabolic inhibitors of plant phenylpropanoid pathway, namely, aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), piperonylic acid (PIP) and 3,4-methylenedioxycinnamic acid (MDCA), which are known to inhibit phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL) respectively, the three early enzymes of phenylpropanoid metabolism, were chosen with the anticipation that selective inhibition of these enzymes in vivo may provide information on the metabolic route to p-hydroxybenzoic acid formation. Supplementation of AOAA (0.2-1.0 mM) and PIP (0.2-1.0 mM) resulted in the reduced accumulation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid in the wall-bound fraction. However, addition of MDCA (0.2-1.25 mM), did not suppress p-hydroxybenzoic acid accumulation but suppressed lignin and total flavonoid accumulation, suggesting that 4CL enzyme activity is not required for p-hydroxybenzoic acid formation. Feeding of elicited hairy roots with phenylalanine, coumaric acid and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde had a stimulatory effect on p-hydroxybenzoic acid accumulation; however, maximum stimulatory effect was shown by p-hydroxybenzaldehyde. This suggests that p-hydroxybenzaldehyde might be the immediate precursor in p-hydroxybenzoic acid biosynthesis. Finally, in vitro conversion of p-coumaric acid to p-hydroxybenzoic acid with p-hydroxybenzaldehyde as intermediate using cell-free extract provided an unequivocal support for CoA-independent and non-beta-oxidative route of p-hydroxybenzoic acid biosynthesis in Daucus carota.

  13. 1,2-Dehydroreticuline synthase, the branch point enzyme opening the morphinan biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Kazumasa; Poeaknapo, Chotima; Schmidt, Juergen; Zenk, Meinhart H

    2004-04-01

    A synthase which oxidizes (S)-reticuline to 1,2-dehydroreticuline has been found to occur in seedlings of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.). Due to its instability, this enzyme could only be partly purified (ca. 5-fold enrichment). Partial characterization at this stage of purification showed that it does not need a redox cofactor and accepts both (S)-reticuline and (S)-norreticuline as substrates. [1-(2)H, (13)C]-(R,S)-reticuline was enzymatically converted into [1-(13)C]-dehydroreticuline, which has been identified by mass spectrometry. Release of the hydrogen atom in position C-1 of the isoquinoline alkaloid during the oxidative conversion, was exploited as a sensitive assay system for this enzyme. The enzyme has a pH optimum of 8.75, a temperature optimum of 37 degrees C and the apparent K(M) value for the substrate reticuline was shown to be 117 microM. Moreover it could be demonstrated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation that the enzyme is located in vesicles of varying size. In combination with the previously discovered strictly stereoselective and NADPH dependent 1,2-dehydroreticuline reductase the detection of this enzyme, the 1,2-dehydroreticuline synthase, provides the necessary inversion of configuration and completes the pathway from two molecules of L-tyrosine via (S)-norcoclaurine to (R)-reticuline in opium poppy involving a total number of 11 enzymes.

  14. Cellular localization and kinetics of the rice melatonin biosynthetic enzymes SNAT and ASMT.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Lee, Kyungjin; Park, Sangkyu; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) and N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase (ASMT) are the final two enzymes in the melatonin synthesis pathway in plants. Although their corresponding genes have been cloned, their cellular localization and enzymatic characteristics are unknown. Using confocal microscopy, we showed that SNAT protein is localized in chloroplasts, whereas ASMT is expressed in the cytoplasm. In vitro measurement of ASMT enzyme activity revealed a peak of activity in roots, but SNAT enzyme activity was not detected in any plant tissues. This may be attributed in part to an effect of chlorophyll because SNAT enzyme activity was greatly inhibited by chlorophyll in a dose-dependent manner. Because the SNAT protein of cyanobacteria is thermophilic, we examined the effect of temperature on the activity of the rice SNAT and ASMT enzymes. Purified recombinant rice SNAT and ASMT enzymes had an optimum temperature for activity of 55°C. The Km and Vmax values for SNAT at 55°C were 270 μm and 3.3 nmol/min/mg protein, whereas the Km and Vmax for ASMT were 222 μm and 9 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (Vmax /Km ) values of SNAT and ASMT were 16-fold and 4054-fold higher at 55°C than at 30°C suggestive of increased melatonin production at high temperature in plants.

  15. Heterologous carotenoid-biosynthetic enzymes: functional complementation and effects on carotenoid profiles in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Song, Gyu Hyeon; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Choi, Bo Hyun; Han, Se Jong; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2013-01-01

    A limited number of carotenoid pathway genes from microbial sources have been studied for analyzing the pathway complementation in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. In order to systematically investigate the functionality of carotenoid pathway enzymes in E. coli, the pathway genes of carotenogenic microorganisms (Brevibacterium linens, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodobacter capsulatus, Rhodopirellula baltica, and Pantoea ananatis) were modified to form synthetic expression modules and then were complemented with Pantoea agglomerans pathway enzymes (CrtE, CrtB, CrtI, CrtY, and CrtZ). The carotenogenic pathway enzymes in the synthetic modules showed unusual activities when complemented with E. coli. For example, the expression of heterologous CrtEs of B. linens, C. glutamicum, and R. baltica influenced P. agglomerans CrtI to convert its substrate phytoene into a rare product-3,4,3',4'-tetradehydrolycopene-along with lycopene, which was an expected product, indicating that CrtE, the first enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, can influence carotenoid profiles. In addition, CrtIs of R. sphaeroides and R. capsulatus converted phytoene into an unusual lycopene as well as into neurosporene. Thus, this study shows that the functional complementation of pathway enzymes from different sources is a useful methodology for diversifying biosynthesis as nature does.

  16. Heterologous Carotenoid-Biosynthetic Enzymes: Functional Complementation and Effects on Carotenoid Profiles in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gyu Hyeon; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Choi, Bo Hyun; Han, Se Jong

    2013-01-01

    A limited number of carotenoid pathway genes from microbial sources have been studied for analyzing the pathway complementation in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. In order to systematically investigate the functionality of carotenoid pathway enzymes in E. coli, the pathway genes of carotenogenic microorganisms (Brevibacterium linens, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodobacter capsulatus, Rhodopirellula baltica, and Pantoea ananatis) were modified to form synthetic expression modules and then were complemented with Pantoea agglomerans pathway enzymes (CrtE, CrtB, CrtI, CrtY, and CrtZ). The carotenogenic pathway enzymes in the synthetic modules showed unusual activities when complemented with E. coli. For example, the expression of heterologous CrtEs of B. linens, C. glutamicum, and R. baltica influenced P. agglomerans CrtI to convert its substrate phytoene into a rare product—3,4,3′,4′-tetradehydrolycopene—along with lycopene, which was an expected product, indicating that CrtE, the first enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, can influence carotenoid profiles. In addition, CrtIs of R. sphaeroides and R. capsulatus converted phytoene into an unusual lycopene as well as into neurosporene. Thus, this study shows that the functional complementation of pathway enzymes from different sources is a useful methodology for diversifying biosynthesis as nature does. PMID:23144136

  17. Arginine and Ornithine Decarboxylases, the Polyamine Biosynthetic Enzymes of Mung Bean Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Arie; Friedman, Ra'Anan; Levin, Nitsa

    1982-01-01

    General properties and relative activities of l-arginine decarboxylase (ADC) (EC 4.1.1.19) and l-ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) (EC 4.1.1.17), two important enzymes in putrescine and polyamine biosynthesis, were investigated in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.) tissues. Both activities increase linearly with increasing concentrations of crude enzyme, but the increase in ADC activity is considerably greater. The decarboxylation reaction is linear for up to 30 to 60 minutes, and both enzymes have a pH optimum of 7.2. α-Difluoromethyl-ornithine inhibits ODC activity of excised roots, while increasing ADC activity. High specific activity of both enzymes is detected in terminal buds and leaves, while root and hypocotyl activity is low. Different ADC-to-ODC activity ratios are found in various tissues of mung bean plants. Substantial increase in the activity of both enzymes is detected in incubated sections as compared with intact plants. A comparison of several plant species indicates a wide range of ADC-to-ODC activity ratio. It is suggested that both ADC and ODC are active in plant tissues and that their relative contribution to putrescine biosynthesis is dependent upon the type of tissue and growth process. PMID:16662312

  18. Biosynthetic exchange of bromide for chloride and strontium for calcium in the photosystem II oxygen-evolving enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Naoko; Sugiura, Miwa; Rappaport, Fabrice; Lai, Thanh-Lan; Rutherford, A William; Boussac, Alain

    2008-05-09

    The active site for water oxidation in photosystem II goes through five sequential oxidation states (S(0) to S(4)) before O(2) is evolved. It consists of a Mn(4)Ca cluster close to a redox-active tyrosine residue (Tyr(Z)). Cl(-) is also required for enzyme activity. To study the role of Ca(2+) and Cl(-) in PSII, these ions were biosynthetically substituted by Sr(2+) and Br(-), respectively, in the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Irrespective of the combination of the non-native ions used (Ca/Br, Sr/Cl, Sr/Br), the enzyme could be isolated in a state that was fully intact but kinetically limited. The electron transfer steps affected by the exchanges were identified and then investigated by using time-resolved UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, time-resolved O(2) polarography, and thermoluminescence spectroscopy. The effect of the Ca(2+)/Sr(2+) and Cl(-)/Br(-) exchanges was additive, and the magnitude of the effect varied in the following order: Ca/Cl < Ca/Br < Sr/Cl < Sr/Br. In all cases, the rate of O(2) release was similar to that of the S(3)Tyr(Z)(.) to S(0)Tyr(Z) transition, with the slowest kinetics (i.e. the Sr/Br enzyme) being approximately 6-7 slower than in the native Ca/Cl enzyme. This slowdown in the kinetics was reflected in a decrease in the free energy level of the S(3) state as manifest by thermoluminescence. These observations indicate that Cl(-) is involved in the water oxidation mechanism. The possibility that Cl(-) is close to the active site is discussed in terms of recent structural models.

  19. A Genetic Analysis of the Pteridine Biosynthetic Enzyme, Guanosine Triphosphate Cyclohydrolase, in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, William J.; O'Donnell, Janis M.

    1983-01-01

    Strains with mutant eye color were surveyed for levels of GTP cyclohydrolase (GTP CH), the first enzyme acting in the biosynthesis of pteridines, the pigments causing red eye color in Drosophila. Six strains were found to have reduced GTP CH activity. In five of the six strains, the reduction of activity is apparent only in the adult head of homozygous mutants. We show that mutations in Punch (2-97, Pu) have severe effects on GTP CH activity. In most cases, the reduction of activity is apparent in all tissues and stages that express the enzyme. The activity of GTP CH is shown to be closely correlated with the number of Pu+ genes in the genome. One ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-induced Pu mutant has a GTP CH enzyme that is unstable when compared with the wild-type enzyme. Mutations in Pu fall into three general classes. The largest class has a recessive lethal and eye color phenotype, 50% or higher GTP CH activity in heterozygotes, and equivalent defects in all tissues. A second class is dominant in eye color phenotype and recessive lethal, with less than 50% GTP CH activity in heterozygotes. The third class is homozygous viable and has severe reduction of activity in the adult head, but no or less severe loss in other tissues. PMID:6413298

  20. The induction of two biosynthetic enzymes helps Escherichia coli sustain heme synthesis and activate catalase during hydrogen peroxide stress.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Stefano; Imlay, James A

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide pervades many natural environments, including the phagosomes that mediate cell-based immunity. Transcriptomic analysis showed that during protracted low-grade H(2)O(2) stress, Escherichia coli responds by activating both the OxyR defensive regulon and the Fur iron-starvation response. OxyR induced synthesis of two members of the nine-step heme biosynthetic pathway: ferrochelatase (HemH) and an isozyme of coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (HemF). Mutations that blocked either adaptation caused the accumulation of porphyrin intermediates, inadequate activation of heme enzymes, low catalase activity, defective clearance of H(2)O(2) and a failure to grow. Genetic analysis indicated that HemH induction is needed to compensate for iron sequestration by the mini-ferritin Dps. Dps activity protects DNA and proteins by limiting Fenton chemistry, but it interferes with the ability of HemH to acquire the iron that it needs to complete heme synthesis. HemF is a manganoprotein that displaces HemN, an iron-sulfur enzyme whose synthesis and/or stability is apparently problematic during H(2)O(2) stress. Thus, the primary responses to H(2)O(2), including the sequestration of iron, require compensatory adjustments in the mechanisms of iron-cofactor synthesis. The results support the growing evidence that oxidative stress is primarily an iron pathology.

  1. Mutation of a Rice Gene Encoding a Phenylalanine Biosynthetic Enzyme Results in Accumulation of Phenylalanine and Tryptophan[W

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Fumio; Kasai, Koji; Fukuoka, Shuichi; Kitamura, Keisuke; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Miyagawa, Hisashi; Wakasa, Kyo

    2008-01-01

    Two distinct biosynthetic pathways for Phe in plants have been proposed: conversion of prephenate to Phe via phenylpyruvate or arogenate. The reactions catalyzed by prephenate dehydratase (PDT) and arogenate dehydratase (ADT) contribute to these respective pathways. The Mtr1 mutant of rice (Oryza sativa) manifests accumulation of Phe, Trp, and several phenylpropanoids, suggesting a link between the synthesis of Phe and Trp. Here, we show that the Mtr1 mutant gene (mtr1-D) encodes a form of rice PDT with a point mutation in the putative allosteric regulatory region of the protein. Transformed callus lines expressing mtr1-D exhibited all the characteristics of Mtr1 callus tissue. Biochemical analysis revealed that rice PDT possesses both PDT and ADT activities, with a preference for arogenate as substrate, suggesting that it functions primarily as an ADT. The wild-type enzyme is feedback regulated by Phe, whereas the mutant enzyme showed a reduced feedback sensitivity, resulting in Phe accumulation. In addition, these observations indicate that rice PDT is critical for regulating the size of the Phe pool in plant cells. Feeding external Phe to wild-type callus tissue and seedlings resulted in Trp accumulation, demonstrating a connection between Phe accumulation and Trp pool size. PMID:18487352

  2. Engineering the central biosynthetic and secondary metabolic pathways of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201 to improve phenazine-1-carboxylic acid production.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kaiming; Zhou, Lian; Jiang, Haixia; Sun, Shuang; Fang, Yunling; Liu, Jianhua; Zhang, Xuehong; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-11-01

    The secondary metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is an important component of the newly registered biopesticide Shenqinmycin. We used a combined method involving gene, promoter, and protein engineering to modify the central biosynthetic and secondary metabolic pathways in the PCA-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201. The PCA yield of the resulting strain PA-IV was increased 54.6-fold via the following strategies: (1) blocking PCA conversion and enhancing PCA efflux pumping; (2) increasing metabolic flux towards the PCA biosynthetic pathway through the over-production of two DAHP synthases and blocking the synthesis of 21 secondary metabolites; (3) increasing the PCA precursor supply through the engineering of five chorismate-utilizing enzymes; (4) engineering the promoters of two PCA biosynthetic gene clusters. Strain PA-IV produced 9882 mg/L PCA in fed-batch fermentation, which is twice as much as that produced by the current industrial strain. Strain PA-IV was also genetically stable and comparable to Escherichia coli in cytotoxicity.

  3. Underpinning Starch Biology with in vitro Studies on Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes and Biosynthetic Glycomaterials

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Ellis C.; Field, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Starch makes up more than half of the calories in the human diet and is also a valuable bulk commodity that is used across the food, brewing and distilling, medicines and renewable materials sectors. Despite its importance, our understanding of how plants make starch, and what controls the deposition of this insoluble, polymeric, liquid crystalline material, remains rather limited. Advances are hampered by the challenges inherent in analyzing enzymes that operate across the solid–liquid interface. Glyconanotechnology, in the form of glucan-coated sensor chips and metal nanoparticles, present novel opportunities to address this problem. Herein, we review recent developments aimed at the bottom-up generation and self-assembly of starch-like materials, in order to better understand which enzymes are required for starch granule biogenesis and metabolism. PMID:26442250

  4. Responses of Aspergillus flavus to Oxidative Stress Are Related to Fungal Development Regulator, Antioxidant Enzyme, and Secondary Metabolite Biosynthetic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, Jake C.; Bajaj, Prasad; Nayak, Spurthi N.; Yang, Liming; Pandey, Manish K.; Kumar, Vinay; Jayale, Ashwin S.; Chitikineni, Anu; Lee, Robert D.; Kemerait, Robert C.; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Guo, Baozhu

    2016-01-01

    The infection of maize and peanut with Aspergillus flavus and subsequent contamination with aflatoxin pose a threat to global food safety and human health, and is exacerbated by drought stress. Drought stress-responding compounds such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with fungal stress responsive signaling and secondary metabolite production, and can stimulate the production of aflatoxin by A. flavus in vitro. These secondary metabolites have been shown to possess diverse functions in soil-borne fungi including antibiosis, competitive inhibition of other microbes, and abiotic stress alleviation. Previously, we observed that isolates of A. flavus showed differences in oxidative stress tolerance which correlated with their aflatoxin production capabilities. In order to better understand these isolate-specific oxidative stress responses, we examined the transcriptional responses of field isolates of A. flavus with varying levels of aflatoxin production (NRRL3357, AF13, and Tox4) to H2O2-induced oxidative stress using an RNA sequencing approach. These isolates were cultured in an aflatoxin-production conducive medium amended with various levels of H2O2. Whole transcriptomes were sequenced using an Illumina HiSeq platform with an average of 40.43 million filtered paired-end reads generated for each sample. The obtained transcriptomes were then used for differential expression, gene ontology, pathway, and co-expression analyses. Isolates which produced higher levels of aflatoxin tended to exhibit fewer differentially expressed genes than isolates with lower levels of production. Genes found to be differentially expressed in response to increasing oxidative stress included antioxidant enzymes, primary metabolism components, antibiosis-related genes, and secondary metabolite biosynthetic components specifically for aflatoxin, aflatrem, and kojic acid. The expression of fungal development-related genes including aminobenzoate degradation genes and conidiation

  5. Assessing directed evolution methods for the generation of biosynthetic enzymes with potential in drug biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nannemann, David P; Birmingham, William R; Scism, Robert A; Bachmann, Brian O

    2011-05-01

    To address the synthesis of increasingly structurally diverse small-molecule drugs, methods for the generation of efficient and selective biological catalysts are becoming increasingly important. 'Directed evolution' is an umbrella term referring to a variety of methods for improving or altering the function of enzymes using a nature-inspired twofold strategy of mutagenesis followed by selection. This article provides an objective assessment of the effectiveness of directed evolution campaigns in generating enzymes with improved catalytic parameters for new substrates from the last decade, excluding studies that aimed to select for only improved physical properties and those that lack kinetic characterization. An analysis of the trends of methodologies and their success rates from 81 qualifying examples in the literature reveals the average fold improvement for k (cat) (or V (max)), K (m) and k (cat)/K (m) to be 366-, 12- and 2548-fold, respectively, whereas the median fold improvements are 5.4, 3 and 15.6. Further analysis by enzyme class, library-generation methodology and screening methodology explores relationships between successful campaigns and the methodologies employed.

  6. Assessing directed evolution methods for the generation of biosynthetic enzymes with potential in drug biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nannemann, David P; Birmingham, William R; Scism, Robert A; Bachmann, Brian O

    2011-01-01

    To address the synthesis of increasingly structurally diverse small-molecule drugs, methods for the generation of efficient and selective biological catalysts are becoming increasingly important. ‘Directed evolution’ is an umbrella term referring to a variety of methods for improving or altering the function of enzymes using a nature-inspired twofold strategy of mutagenesis followed by selection. This article provides an objective assessment of the effectiveness of directed evolution campaigns in generating enzymes with improved catalytic parameters for new substrates from the last decade, excluding studies that aimed to select for only improved physical properties and those that lack kinetic characterization. An analysis of the trends of methodologies and their success rates from 81 qualifying examples in the literature reveals the average fold improvement for kcat (or Vmax), Km and kcat/Km to be 366-, 12- and 2548-fold, respectively, whereas the median fold improvements are 5.4, 3 and 15.6. Further analysis by enzyme class, library-generation methodology and screening methodology explores relationships between successful campaigns and the methodologies employed. PMID:21644826

  7. Expression of phosphatidylcholine biosynthetic enzymes during early embryogenesis in the amphibian Bufo arenarum.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Bussy, Rodrigo; Mouguelar, Valeria; Banchio, Claudia; Coux, Gabriela

    2015-04-01

    In the principal route of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis the regulatory steps are catalysed by CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT) and choline kinase (CK). Knock-out mice in Pcyt1a (CCT gene) and Chka1 (CK gene) resulted in preimplantation embryonic lethality, demonstrating the essential role of this pathway. However, there is still a lack of detailed CCT and CK expression analysis during development. The aim of the current work was to study the expression during early development of both enzymes in the external-fertilization vertebrate Bufo arenarum. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot confirmed their presence in unfertilized eggs. Analysis performed in total extracts from staged embryos showed constant protein levels of both enzymes until the 32-cell stage: then they decreased, reaching a minimum in the gastrula before starting to recover. CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase is an amphitropic enzyme that inter-converts between cytosolic inactive and membrane-bound active forms. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that the cytosolic:total CCT protein ratio does not change throughout embryogenesis, suggesting a progressive decline of CCT activity in early development. However, PC (and phosphatidylethanolamine) content per egg/embryo remained constant throughout the stages analysed. In conclusion, the current data for B. arenarum suggest that net synthesis of PC mediated by CCT and CK is not required in early development and that supplies for membrane biosynthesis are fulfilled by lipids already present in the egg/embryo reservoirs.

  8. Glutamic acid promotes monacolin K production and monacolin K biosynthetic gene cluster expression in Monascus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chan; Liang, Jian; Yang, Le; Chai, Shiyuan; Zhang, Chenxi; Sun, Baoguo; Wang, Chengtao

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of glutamic acid on production of monacolin K and expression of the monacolin K biosynthetic gene cluster. When Monascus M1 was grown in glutamic medium instead of in the original medium, monacolin K production increased from 48.4 to 215.4 mg l(-1), monacolin K production increased by 3.5 times. Glutamic acid enhanced monacolin K production by upregulating the expression of mokB-mokI; on day 8, the expression level of mokA tended to decrease by Reverse Transcription-polymerase Chain Reaction. Our findings demonstrated that mokA was not a key gene responsible for the quantity of monacolin K production in the presence of glutamic acid. Observation of Monascus mycelium morphology using Scanning Electron Microscope showed glutamic acid significantly increased the content of Monascus mycelium, altered the permeability of Monascus mycelium, enhanced secretion of monacolin K from the cell, and reduced the monacolin K content in Monascus mycelium, thereby enhancing monacolin K production.

  9. Atlas of nonribosomal peptide and polyketide biosynthetic pathways reveals common occurrence of nonmodular enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Fewer, David P; Holm, Liisa; Rouhiainen, Leo; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2014-06-24

    Nonribosomal peptides and polyketides are a diverse group of natural products with complex chemical structures and enormous pharmaceutical potential. They are synthesized on modular nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme complexes by a conserved thiotemplate mechanism. Here, we report the widespread occurrence of NRPS and PKS genetic machinery across the three domains of life with the discovery of 3,339 gene clusters from 991 organisms, by examining a total of 2,699 genomes. These gene clusters display extraordinarily diverse organizations, and a total of 1,147 hybrid NRPS/PKS clusters were found. Surprisingly, 10% of bacterial gene clusters lacked modular organization, and instead catalytic domains were mostly encoded as separate proteins. The finding of common occurrence of nonmodular NRPS differs substantially from the current classification. Sequence analysis indicates that the evolution of NRPS machineries was driven by a combination of common descent and horizontal gene transfer. We identified related siderophore NRPS gene clusters that encoded modular and nonmodular NRPS enzymes organized in a gradient. A higher frequency of the NRPS and PKS gene clusters was detected from bacteria compared with archaea or eukarya. They commonly occurred in the phyla of Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Cyanobacteria in bacteria and the phylum of Ascomycota in fungi. The majority of these NRPS and PKS gene clusters have unknown end products highlighting the power of genome mining in identifying novel genetic machinery for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.

  10. Divergent non-heme iron enzymes in the nogalamycin biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Siitonen, Vilja; Selvaraj, Brinda; Niiranen, Laila; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Nogalamycin, an aromatic polyketide displaying high cytotoxicity, has a unique structure, with one of the carbohydrate units covalently attached to the aglycone via an additional carbon–carbon bond. The underlying chemistry, which implies a particularly challenging reaction requiring activation of an aliphatic carbon atom, has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that the unusual C5′′–C2 carbocyclization is catalyzed by the non-heme iron α-ketoglutarate (α-KG)–dependent SnoK in the biosynthesis of the anthracycline nogalamycin. The data are consistent with a mechanistic proposal whereby the Fe(IV) = O center abstracts the H5′′ atom from the amino sugar of the substrate, with subsequent attack of the aromatic C2 carbon on the radical center. We further show that, in the same metabolic pathway, the homologous SnoN (38% sequence identity) catalyzes an epimerization step at the adjacent C4′′ carbon, most likely via a radical mechanism involving the Fe(IV) = O center. SnoK and SnoN have surprisingly similar active site architectures considering the markedly different chemistries catalyzed by the enzymes. Structural studies reveal that the differences are achieved by minor changes in the alignment of the substrates in front of the reactive ferryl-oxo species. Our findings significantly expand the repertoire of reactions reported for this important protein family and provide an illustrative example of enzyme evolution. PMID:27114534

  11. Biosynthetic Pathways of Ergot Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

  12. Tracing the biosynthetic source of essential amino acids in marine turtles using delta13C fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Karen E; Kelez, Shaleyla; Larsen, Thomas; Choy, C Anela; Popp, Brian N

    2014-05-01

    Plants, bacteria, and fungi produce essential amino acids (EAAs) with distinctive patterns of delta13C values that can be used as naturally occurring fingerprints of biosynthetic origin of EAAs in a food web. Because animals cannot synthesize EAAs and must obtain them from food, their tissues reflect delta13C(EAA) patterns found in diet, but it is not known how microbes responsible for hindgut fermentation in some herbivores influence the delta13C values of EAAs in their hosts' tissues. We examined whether distinctive delta13C fingerprints of hindgut flora are evident in the tissues of green turtles (Chelonia mydas), which are known to be facultative hindgut fermenters. We determined delta13C(EAA) values in tissues of green turtles foraging herbivorously in neritic habitats of Hawaii and compared them with those from green, olive ridley, and loggerhead turtles foraging carnivorously in oceanic environments of the central and southeast Pacific Ocean. Results of multivariate statistical analysis revealed two distinct groups that could be distinguished based on unique delta13C(EAA) patterns. A three-end-member predictive linear discriminant model indicated that delta13C(EAA) fingerprints existed in the tissues of carnivorous turtles that resembled patterns found in microalgae, which form the base of an oceanic food web, whereas herbivorous turtles derive EAAs from a bacterial or seagrass source. This study demonstrates the capacity for delta13C fingerprinting to establish the biosynthetic origin of EAAs in higher consumers, and that marine turtles foraging on macroalgal diets appear to receive nutritional supplementation from bacterial symbionts in their digestive system.

  13. Analysis of protein complexes in wheat amyloplasts reveals functional interactions among starch biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tetlow, Ian J; Beisel, Kim G; Cameron, Scott; Makhmoudova, Amina; Liu, Fushan; Bresolin, Nicole S; Wait, Robin; Morell, Matthew K; Emes, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions among enzymes of amylopectin biosynthesis were investigated in developing wheat (Triticum aestivum) endosperm. Physical interactions between starch branching enzymes (SBEs) and starch synthases (SSs) were identified from endosperm amyloplasts during the active phase of starch deposition in the developing grain using immunoprecipitation and cross-linking strategies. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments using peptide-specific antibodies indicate that at least two distinct complexes exist containing SSI, SSIIa, and either of SBEIIa or SBEIIb. Chemical cross linking was used to identify protein complexes containing SBEs and SSs from amyloplast extracts. Separation of extracts by gel filtration chromatography demonstrated the presence of SBE and SS forms in protein complexes of around 260 kD and that SBEII forms may also exist as homodimers. Analysis of cross-linked 260-kD aggregation products from amyloplast lysates by mass spectrometry confirmed SSI, SSIIa, and SBEII forms as components of one or more protein complexes in amyloplasts. In vitro phosphorylation experiments with gamma-(32)P-ATP indicated that SSII and both forms of SBEII are phosphorylated. Treatment of the partially purified 260-kD SS-SBE complexes with alkaline phosphatase caused dissociation of the assembly into the respective monomeric proteins, indicating that formation of SS-SBE complexes is phosphorylation dependent. The 260-kD SS-SBEII protein complexes are formed around 10 to 15 d after pollination and were shown to be catalytically active with respect to both SS and SBE activities. Prior to this developmental stage, SSI, SSII, and SBEII forms were detectable only in monomeric form. High molecular weight forms of SBEII demonstrated a higher affinity for in vitro glucan substrates than monomers. These results provide direct evidence for the existence of protein complexes involved in amylopectin biosynthesis.

  14. Effect of prolonged nicotine infusion on response of rat catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes to restraint and cold stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu-Yuan; Glazkova, Dina; Serova, Lidia; Sabban, Esther L

    2005-11-01

    There is a paradoxical relationship between nicotine and stress. To help elucidate their relationship on catecholamine biosynthesis, rats were infused with nicotine for 7-14 days before exposure to cold or restraint stress. Nicotine (5 mg/kg/day, 14 days) did not alter basal plasma corticosterone or its elevation with 24 h cold stress, but prevented corticosterone elevation following 2 h restraint stress. In adrenal medulla (AM), response of dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), but not tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA, to both stressors was attenuated in nicotine-infused rats. In locus coeruleus (LC), restraint stress elevated TH and DBH mRNA in saline-, but not in nicotine-infused rats. Cold stress triggered a similar response of TH and DBH mRNAs in LC with and without nicotine infusion. With shorter nicotine infusion (8 mg/kg/day, 7 days), TH mRNA in AM was not induced by restraint stress on one (1x) or two (2x) consecutive days nor was DBH mRNA in AM or LC by 2x. The findings demonstrate that constant release of nicotine can modulate, or even prevent, some stress responses at the level of the HPA axis and gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in LC and AM.

  15. GO-PROMTO illuminates protein membrane topologies of glycan biosynthetic enzymes in the Golgi apparatus of living tissues.

    PubMed

    Søgaard, Casper; Stenbæk, Anne; Bernard, Sophie; Hadi, Masood; Driouich, Azeddine; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2012-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is the main site of glycan biosynthesis in eukaryotes. Better understanding of the membrane topology of the proteins and enzymes involved can impart new mechanistic insights into these processes. Publically available bioinformatic tools provide highly variable predictions of membrane topologies for given proteins. Therefore we devised a non-invasive experimental method by which the membrane topologies of Golgi-resident proteins can be determined in the Golgi apparatus in living tissues. A Golgi marker was used to construct a series of reporters based on the principle of bimolecular fluorescence complementation. The reporters and proteins of interest were recombinantly fused to split halves of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and transiently co-expressed with the reporters in the Nicotiana benthamiana leaf tissue. Output signals were binary, showing either the presence or absence of fluorescence with signal morphologies characteristic of the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The method allows prompt and robust determinations of membrane topologies of Golgi-resident proteins and is termed GO-PROMTO (for GOlgi PROtein Membrane TOpology). We applied GO-PROMTO to examine the topologies of proteins involved in the biosynthesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides including xyloglucan and arabinan. The results suggest the existence of novel biosynthetic mechanisms involving transports of intermediates across Golgi membranes.

  16. The Flavonoid Biosynthetic Enzyme Chalcone Isomerase Modulates Terpenoid Production in Glandular Trichomes of Tomato1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jin-Ho; McRoberts, John; Shi, Feng; Moreno, Javier E.; Jones, A. Daniel; Howe, Gregg A.

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids and terpenoids are derived from distinct metabolic pathways but nevertheless serve complementary roles in mediating plant interactions with the environment. Here, we show that glandular trichomes of the anthocyanin free (af) mutant of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fail to accumulate both flavonoids and terpenoids. This pleiotropic metabolic deficiency was associated with loss of resistance to native populations of coleopteran herbivores under field conditions. We demonstrate that Af encodes an isoform (SlCHI1) of the flavonoid biosynthetic enzyme chalcone isomerase (CHI), which catalyzes the conversion of naringenin chalcone to naringenin and is strictly required for flavonoid production in multiple tissues of tomato. Expression of the wild-type SlCHI1 gene from its native promoter complemented the anthocyanin deficiency in af. Unexpectedly, the SlCHI1 transgene also complemented the defect in terpenoid production in glandular trichomes. Our results establish a key role for SlCHI1 in flavonoid production in tomato and reveal a link between CHI1 and terpenoid production. Metabolic coordination of the flavonoid and terpenoid pathways may serve to optimize the function of trichome glands in dynamic environments. PMID:24424324

  17. Effects of overexpressing individual lignin biosynthetic enzymes on feeding and growth of corn earworms and fall armyworms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignin is an important insect resistance component of plants. Enhancing or disrupting the lignin biosynthetic pathway for different bioenergy uses may alter pest resistance. The lignin biosynthetic pathway is complex, and a number of pathway compounds are also involved in the biosynthesis of simpler...

  18. Suppression of rat and human androgen biosynthetic enzymes by apigenin: Possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiudi; Wang, Guimin; Li, Xiaoheng; Liu, Jianpeng; Hong, Tingting; Zhu, Qiqi; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-06-01

    Apigenin is a natural flavone. It has recently been used as a chemopreventive agent. It may also have some beneficial effects to treat prostate cancer by inhibiting androgen production. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of apigenin on the steroidogenesis of rat immature Leydig cells and some human testosterone biosynthetic enzyme activities. Rat immature Leydig cells were incubated for 3h with 100μM apigenin without (basal) or with 1ng/ml luteinizing hormone (LH), 10mM 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8BR), and 20μM of the following steroid substrates: 22R-hydroxychloesterol (22R), pregnenolone (P5), progesterone (P4), and androstenedione (D4). The medium levels of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol (DIOL), the primary androgen produced by rat immature Leydig cells, were measured. Apigenin significantly inhibited basal, 8BR, 22R, PREG, P4, and D4 stimulated DIOL production in rat immature Leydig cells. Further study showed that apigenin inhibited rat 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase, and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 11.41±0.7, 8.98±0.10, and 9.37±0.07μM, respectively. Apigenin inhibited human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 2.17±0.04 and 1.31±0.09μM, respectively. Apigenin is a potent inhibitor of rat and human steroidogenic enzymes, being possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  19. Enhanced production of n-alkanes in Escherichia coli by spatial organization of biosynthetic pathway enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rahmana, Ziaur; Sung, Bong Hyun; Yi, Ji-Yeun; Bui, Le Minh; Lee, Jun Hyoung; Kim, Sun Chang

    2014-12-20

    Alkanes chemically mimic hydrocarbons found in petroleum, and their demand as biofuels is steadily increasing. Biologically, n-alkanes are produced from fatty acyl-ACPs by acyl-ACP reductases (AARs) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenases (ADOs). One of the major impediments in n-alkane biosynthesis is the low catalytic turnover rates of ADOs. Here, we studied n-alkane biosynthesis in Escherichia coli using a chimeric ADO-AAR fusion protein or zinc finger protein-guided ADO/AAR assembly on DNA scaffolds to control their stoichiometric ratios and spatial arrangements. Bacterial production of n-alkanes with the ADO-AAR fusion protein was increased 4.8-fold (24 mg/L) over a control strain expressing ADO and AAR separately. Optimal n-alkane biosynthesis was achieved when the ADO:AAR binding site ratio on a DNA scaffold was 3:1, yielding an 8.8-fold increase (44 mg/L) over the control strain. Our findings indicate that the spatial organization of alkane-producing enzymes is critical for efficient n-alkane biosynthesis in E. coli.

  20. An NAD+ biosynthetic pathway enzyme functions cell non-autonomously in C. elegans development

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Matt; McReynolds, Melanie R.; Wang, Wenqing; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Background Disruption of cellular metabolite levels can adversely impact development. Specifically, loss-of-function of the C. elegans NAD+ salvage biosynthesis gene PNC-1 results in an array of developmental phenotypes. Intriguingly, PNC-1 and its functional equivalent in vertebrates are secreted, but the contributions of the extracellular enzymes are poorly understood. We sought to study the tissue-specific requirements for PNC-1 expression and to examine the role of the secreted isoform. Results A thorough analysis of PNC-1 expression did not detect expression in tissues that require PNC-1 function. Limited expression of both the secreted and intracellular PNC-1 isoforms provided function at a distance from the tissues with phenotypes. We also find that the secreted isoform contributes to in vivo PNC-1 activity. Furthermore, uv1 cell survival has the most stringent requirements in terms of PNC-1 expression pattern or level. Conclusion Using careful promoter analysis and a restricted expression approach we have shown that both the secreted and the intracellular PNC-1 isoforms function cell non-autonomously, and that the PNC-1a isoform is functionally relevant in vivo. Our work suggests a model where PNC-1 function is provided cell non-autonomously by a mix of intra and extracellular activity, most likely requiring NAD+ salvage metabolite transport between tissues. PMID:24753121

  1. Identification of mRNA for endocannabinoid biosynthetic enzymes within hippocampal pyramidal cells and CA1 stratum radiatum interneuron subtypes using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Merrill, C B; McNeil, M; Williamson, R C; Poole, B R; Nelson, B; Sudweeks, S; Edwards, J G

    2012-08-30

    The hippocampus is required for short-term memory and contains both excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons. These cells exhibit various forms of synaptic plasticity, the mechanism underlying learning and memory. More recently, endocannabinoids were identified to be involved in synaptic plasticity. Our goal was to describe the distribution of endocannabinoid biosynthetic enzymes within CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons and CA3/CA1 pyramidal cells. We extracted mRNA from single interneurons and pyramidal cells and used real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect the presence of 12-lipoxygenase, N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D, diacylglycerol lipase α, and type I metabotropic glutamate receptors, all known to be involved in endocannabinoid production and plasticity. We observed that the expression of endocannabinoid biosynthetic enzyme mRNA does occur within interneurons and that it is coexpressed with type I metabotropic glutamate receptors, suggesting interneurons have the potential to produce endocannabinoids. We also identified that CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cells express endocannabinoid biosynthetic enzyme mRNA. Our data provide the first molecular biological evidence for putative endocannabinoid production in interneurons, suggesting their potential ability to regulate endocannabinoid-mediated processes, such as synaptic plasticity.

  2. A mutation in a ganglioside biosynthetic enzyme, ST3GAL5, results in salt & pepper syndrome, a neurocutaneous disorder with altered glycolipid and glycoprotein glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Boccuto, Luigi; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Chen, Chin-Fu; Fan, Xiang; Bartel, Frank; Petukh, Marharyta; Pittman, Ayla; Saul, Robert; Chaubey, Alka; Alexov, Emil; Tiemeyer, Michael; Steet, Richard; Schwartz, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    ‘Salt & Pepper’ syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, scoliosis, choreoathetosis, dysmorphic facial features and altered dermal pigmentation. High-density SNP array analysis performed on siblings first described with this syndrome detected four shared regions of loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Whole-exome sequencing narrowed the candidate region to chromosome 2p11.2. Sanger sequencing confirmed a homozygous c.994G>A transition (p.E332K) in the ST3GAL5 gene, which encodes for a sialyltransferase also known as GM3 synthase. A different homozygous mutation of this gene has been previously associated with infantile-onset epilepsy syndromes in two other cohorts. The ST3GAL5 enzyme synthesizes ganglioside GM3, a glycosophingolipid enriched in neural tissue, by adding sialic acid to lactosylceramide. Unlike disorders of glycosphingolipid (GSL) degradation, very little is known regarding the molecular and pathophysiologic consequences of altered GSL biosynthesis. Glycolipid analysis confirmed a complete lack of GM3 ganglioside in patient fibroblasts, while microarray analysis of glycosyltransferase mRNAs detected modestly increased expression of ST3GAL5 and greater changes in transcripts encoding enzymes that lie downstream of ST3GAL5 and in other GSL biosynthetic pathways. Comprehensive glycomic analysis of N-linked, O-linked and GSL glycans revealed collateral alterations in response to loss of complex gangliosides in patient fibroblasts and in zebrafish embryos injected with antisense morpholinos that targeted zebrafish st3gal5 expression. Morphant zebrafish embryos also exhibited increased apoptotic cell death in multiple brain regions, emphasizing the importance of GSL expression in normal neural development and function. PMID:24026681

  3. Molecular annotation of ketol-acid reductoisomerases from Streptomyces reveals a novel amino acid biosynthesis interlock mediated by enzyme promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Verdel-Aranda, Karina; López-Cortina, Susana T; Hodgson, David A; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase superfamily oxidize and reduce a wide range of substrates, making their functional annotation challenging. Ketol-acid reductoisomerase (KARI), encoded by the ilvC gene in branched-chain amino acids biosynthesis, is a promiscuous reductase enzyme within this superfamily. Here, we obtain steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters for 10 IlvC homologues from the genera Streptomyces and Corynebacterium, upon eight selected chemically diverse substrates, including some not normally recognized by enzymes of this superfamily. This biochemical data suggested a Streptomyces biosynthetic interlock between proline and the branched-chain amino acids, mediated by enzyme substrate promiscuity, which was confirmed via mutagenesis and complementation analyses of the proC, ilvC1 and ilvC2 genes in Streptomyces coelicolor. Moreover, both ilvC orthologues and paralogues were analysed, such that the relationship between gene duplication and functional diversification could be explored. The KARI paralogues present in S. coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans, despite their conserved high sequence identity (97%), were shown to be more promiscuous, suggesting a recent functional diversification. In contrast, the KARI paralogue from Streptomyces viridifaciens showed selectivity towards the synthesis of valine precursors, explaining its recruitment within the biosynthetic gene cluster of valanimycin. These results allowed us to assess substrate promiscuity indices as a tool to annotate new molecular functions with metabolic implications. PMID:25296650

  4. The sub-cellular localisation of the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes, CrtRb2 and PSY2.

    PubMed

    Pasare, Stefania; Wright, Kathryn; Campbell, Raymond; Morris, Wayne; Ducreux, Laurence; Chapman, Sean; Bramley, Peter; Fraser, Paul; Roberts, Alison; Taylor, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Carotenoids are isoprenoids with important biological roles both for plants and animals. The yellow flesh colour of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers is a quality trait dependent on the types and levels of carotenoids that accumulate. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is well characterised, facilitating the successful engineering of carotenoid content in numerous crops including potato. However, a clear understanding concerning the factors regulating carotenoid accumulation and localisation in plant storage organs, such as tubers, is lacking. In the present study, the localisation of key carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes was investigated, as one of the unexplored factors that could influence the accumulation of carotenoids in potato tubers. Stable transgenic potato plants were generated by over-expressing β-CAROTENE HYDROXYLASE 2 (CrtRb2) and PHYTOENE SYNTHASE 2 (PSY2) genes, fused to red fluorescent protein (RFP). Gene expression and carotenoid levels were both significantly increased, confirming functionality of the fluorescently tagged proteins. Confocal microscopy studies revealed different sub-organellar localisations of CrtRb2-RFP and PSY2-RFP within amyloplasts. CrtRb2 was detected in small vesicular structures, inside amyloplasts, whereas PSY2 was localised in the stroma of amyloplasts. We conclude that it is important to consider the location of biosynthetic enzymes when engineering the carotenoid metabolic pathway in storage organs such as tubers.

  5. The Biosynthetic Pathways for Shikimate and Aromatic Amino Acids in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tzin, Vered; Galili, Gad

    2010-01-01

    The aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan in plants are not only essential components of protein synthesis, but also serve as precursors for a wide range of secondary metabolites that are important for plant growth as well as for human nutrition and health. The aromatic amino acids are synthesized via the shikimate pathway followed by the branched aromatic amino acid metabolic pathway, with chorismate serving as a major branch point intermediate metabolite. Yet, the regulation of their synthesis is still far from being understood. So far, only three enzymes in this pathway, namely, chorismate mutase of phenylalanine and tyrosine synthesis, tryptophan synthase of tryptophan biosynthesis and arogenate dehydratase of phenylalanine biosynthesis, proved experimentally to be allosterically regulated. The major biosynthesis route of phenylalanine in plants occurs via arogenate. Yet, recent studies suggest that an alternative route of phynylalanine biosynthesis via phenylpyruvate may also exist in plants, similarly to many microorganisms. Several transcription factors regulating the expression of genes encoding enzymes of both the shikimate pathway and aromatic amino acid metabolism have also been recently identified in Arabidopsis and other plant species. PMID:22303258

  6. Role of oxidative stress and the activity of ethylene biosynthetic enzymes on the formation of spongy tissue in 'Alphonso' mango.

    PubMed

    Nagamani, J E; Shivashankara, K S; Roy, T K

    2010-06-01

    Spongy tissue formation in 'Alphonso' mangoes (Mangifera indica L) is a major national problem leading to loss for farmers and traders. Spongy tissue is whitish sponge like tissue formed near the seed with insipid taste and off odour. Lipid peroxidation of membranes as studied by malondialdehyde formation was significantly higher in spongy tissue. Activities of antioxidative enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase were lower in spongy tissue. Among the antioxidative enzymes, activities of catalase and peroxidases were severely reduced leading to membrane damage in spongy tissue. A significant reduction in 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase and accumulation of ACC was also observed in spongy tissue. However, ACC synthase activity in spongy tissue was more compared to healthy tissue. Results indicate that the membrane peroxidation leading to lower activity of ACC oxidase might lead to the formation of spongy tissue in 'Alphonso' mango.

  7. Effective use of heterologous hosts for characterization of biosynthetic enzymes allows production of natural products and promotes new natural product discovery.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, there has been impressive progress in elucidating the mechanism of biosynthesis of various natural products accomplished through the use of genetic, molecular biological and biochemical techniques. Here, we present a comprehensive overview of the current results from our studies on fungal natural product biosynthetic enzymes, including nonribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrid synthetase, as well as auxiliary enzymes, such as methyltransferases and oxygenases. Specifically, biosynthesis of the following compounds is described in detail: (i) Sch210972, potentially involving a Diels-Alder reaction that may be catalyzed by CghA, a functionally unknown protein identified by targeted gene disruption in the wild type fungus; (ii) chaetoglobosin A, formed via multi-step oxidations catalyzed by three redox enzymes, one flavin-containing monooxygenase and two cytochrome P450 oxygenases as characterized by in vivo biotransformation of relevant intermediates in our engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae; (iii) (-)-ditryptophenaline, formed by a cytochrome P450, revealing the dimerization mechanism for the biosynthesis of diketopiperazine alkaloids; (iv) pseurotins, whose variations in the C- and O-methylations and the degree of oxidation are introduced combinatorially by multiple redox enzymes; and (v) spirotryprostatins, whose spiro-carbon moiety is formed by a flavin-containing monooxygenase or a cytochrome P450 as determined by heterologous de novo production of the biosynthetic intermediates and final products in Aspergillus niger. We close our discussion by summarizing some of the key techniques that have facilitated the discovery of new natural products, production of their analogs and identification of biosynthetic mechanisms in our study.

  8. Interaction of aspartate and aspartate-derived antimetabolites with the enzymes of the threonine biosynthetic pathway of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shames, S L; Ash, D E; Wedler, F C; Villafranca, J J

    1984-12-25

    The five enzymes responsible for the conversion of L-aspartate to L-threonine in Escherichia coli were purified to homogeneity and subsequently reconstituted in vitro in ratios approximating those found in vivo. 31P NMR was used to conveniently monitor the rates of consumption of the substrates ATP and NADPH, the accumulation of the intermediates beta-aspartyl phosphate and homoserine phosphate, and the formation of the products ADP, NADP+, and Pi in a single experiment. By this method, the flux of aspartic acid through the enzymes of the pathway was monitored in the absence and in the presence of several alternative substrates and inhibitors. Several known antimetabolites were found to be alternative substrates that ultimately became inhibitors of pathway flux. L-threo-3-Hydroxyaspartic acid was converted to 3-hydroxyhomoserine phosphate by the first four enzymes of the pathway. The antimetabolite L-threo-3-hydroxyhomoserine was found to bind to and inhibit aspartokinase-homoserine dehydrogenase I in a cooperative fashion (I 0.5 = 3 mM, nH = 2.5), similar to the action of the allosteric end product inhibitor L-threonine (I 0.5 = 0.36 mM, nH = 2.4). In the presence of the remaining enzymes of the pathway, however, L-threo-3-hydroxyhomoserine was phosphorylated to the apparent ultimate antimetabolite L-threo-3-hydroxyhomoserine phosphate that was a potent inhibitor of threonine synthase and consequently of L-threonine biosynthesis. When aspartic acid alone was examined as a substrate of the enzymes of the pathway, no accumulation of the beta-aspartyl phosphate and homoserine phosphate intermediates was observed. However, in the presence of either 5 mM L-threo-3-hydroxyhomoserine or 5 mM L-threo-3-hydroxyhomoserine phosphate, homoserine phosphate was found to accumulate. In contrast to the homoserine phosphate and 3-hydroxyhomoserine phosphate intermediates, both of which were very stable, the acylphosphate intermediates beta-aspartyl phosphate and beta-3

  9. Molecular cloning and promoter analysis of the specific salicylic acid biosynthetic pathway gene phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (AaPAL1) from Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Fu, Xueqing; Hao, Xiaolong; Zhang, Lida; Wang, Luyao; Qian, Hongmei; Zhao, Jingya

    2016-07-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of salicylic acid (SA). In this study, a full-length cDNA of PAL gene (named as AaPAL1) was cloned from Artemisia annua. The gene contains an open reading frame of 2,151 bps encoding 716 amino acids. Comparative and bioinformatics analysis revealed that the polypeptide protein of AaPAL1 was highly homologous to PALs from other plant species. Southern blot analysis revealed that it belonged to a gene family with three members. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of various tissues of A. annua showed that AaPAL1 transcript levels were highest in the young leaves. A 1160-bp promoter region was also isolated resulting in identification of distinct cis-regulatory elements including W-box, TGACG-motif, and TC-rich repeats. Quantitative RT-PCR indicated that AaPAL1 was upregulated by salinity, drought, wounding, and SA stresses, which were corroborated positively with the identified cis-elements within the promoter region. AaPAL1 was successfully expressed in Escherichia. coli and the enzyme activity of the purified AaPAL1 was approximately 287.2 U/mg. These results substantiated the involvement of AaPAL1 in the phenylalanine pathway.

  10. EPA, DHA, and Lipoic Acid Differentially Modulate the n-3 Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Pathway in Atlantic Salmon Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bou, Marta; Østbye, Tone-Kari; Berge, Gerd M; Ruyter, Bente

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how EPA, DHA, and lipoic acid (LA) influence the different metabolic steps in the n-3 fatty acid (FA) biosynthetic pathway in hepatocytes from Atlantic salmon fed four dietary levels (0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0%) of EPA, DHA or a 1:1 mixture of these FA. The hepatocytes were incubated with [1-(14)C] 18:3n-3 in the presence or absence of LA (0.2 mM). Increased endogenous levels of EPA and/or DHA and LA exposure both led to similar responses in cells with reduced desaturation and elongation of [1-(14)C] 18:3n-3 to 18:4n-3, 20:4n-3, and EPA, in agreement with reduced expression of the Δ6 desaturase gene involved in the first step of conversion. DHA production, on the other hand, was maintained even in groups with high endogenous levels of DHA, possibly due to a more complex regulation of this last step in the n-3 metabolic pathway. Inhibition of the Δ6 desaturase pathway led to increased direct elongation to 20:3n-3 by both DHA and LA. Possibly the route by 20:3n-3 and then Δ8 desaturation to 20:4n-3, bypassing the first Δ6 desaturase step, can partly explain the maintained or even increased levels of DHA production. LA increased DHA production in the phospholipid fraction of hepatocytes isolated from fish fed 0 and 0.5% EPA and/or DHA, indicating that LA has the potential to further increase the production of this health-beneficial FA in fish fed diets with low levels of EPA and/or DHA.

  11. OsWOX3A is involved in negative feedback regulation of the gibberellic acid biosynthetic pathway in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Hwan; Kang, Kiyoon; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Lee, In-Jung; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2016-03-01

    The plant-specific WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) nuclear proteins have important roles in the transcriptional regulation of many developmental processes. Among the rice (Oryza sativa) WOX proteins, a loss of OsWOX3A function in narrow leaf2 (nal2) nal3 double mutants (termed nal2/3) causes pleiotropic effects, such as narrow and curly leaves, opened spikelets, narrow grains, more tillers, and fewer lateral roots, but almost normal plant height. To examine OsWOX3A function in more detail, transgenic rice overexpressing OsWOX3A (OsWOX3A-OX) were generated; unexpectedly, all of them consistently exhibited severe dwarfism with very short and wide leaves, a phenotype that resembles that of gibberellic acid (GA)-deficient or GA-insensitive mutants. Exogenous GA3 treatment fully rescued the developmental defects of OsWOX3A-OX plants, suggesting that constitutive overexpression of OsWOX3A downregulates GA biosynthesis. Quantitative analysis of GA intermediates revealed significantly reduced levels of GA20 and bioactive GA1 in OsWOX3A-OX, possibly due to downregulation of the expression of KAO, which encodes ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase, a GA biosynthetic enzyme. Yeast one-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that OsWOX3A directly interacts with the KAO promoter. OsWOX3A expression is drastically and temporarily upregulated by GA3 and downregulated by paclobutrazol, a blocker of GA biosynthesis. These data indicate that OsWOX3A is a GA-responsive gene and functions in the negative feedback regulation of the GA biosynthetic pathway for GA homeostasis to maintain the threshold levels of endogenous GA intermediates throughout development.

  12. OsWOX3A is involved in negative feedback regulation of the gibberellic acid biosynthetic pathway in rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Hwan; Kang, Kiyoon; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Lee, In-Jung; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2016-01-01

    The plant-specific WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) nuclear proteins have important roles in the transcriptional regulation of many developmental processes. Among the rice (Oryza sativa) WOX proteins, a loss of OsWOX3A function in narrow leaf2 (nal2) nal3 double mutants (termed nal2/3) causes pleiotropic effects, such as narrow and curly leaves, opened spikelets, narrow grains, more tillers, and fewer lateral roots, but almost normal plant height. To examine OsWOX3A function in more detail, transgenic rice overexpressing OsWOX3A (OsWOX3A-OX) were generated; unexpectedly, all of them consistently exhibited severe dwarfism with very short and wide leaves, a phenotype that resembles that of gibberellic acid (GA)-deficient or GA-insensitive mutants. Exogenous GA3 treatment fully rescued the developmental defects of OsWOX3A-OX plants, suggesting that constitutive overexpression of OsWOX3A downregulates GA biosynthesis. Quantitative analysis of GA intermediates revealed significantly reduced levels of GA20 and bioactive GA1 in OsWOX3A-OX, possibly due to downregulation of the expression of KAO, which encodes ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase, a GA biosynthetic enzyme. Yeast one-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that OsWOX3A directly interacts with the KAO promoter. OsWOX3A expression is drastically and temporarily upregulated by GA3 and downregulated by paclobutrazol, a blocker of GA biosynthesis. These data indicate that OsWOX3A is a GA-responsive gene and functions in the negative feedback regulation of the GA biosynthetic pathway for GA homeostasis to maintain the threshold levels of endogenous GA intermediates throughout development. PMID:26767749

  13. Methamphetamine-induced neuronal protein NAT8L is the NAA biosynthetic enzyme: implications for specialized acetyl coenzyme A metabolism in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Ariyannur, Prasanth S; Moffett, John R; Manickam, Pachiappan; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Arun, Peethambaran; Nitta, Atsumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Madhavarao, Chikkathur N; Namboodiri, Aryan M A

    2010-06-04

    N-acetylaspartate (NAA) is a concentrated, neuron-specific brain metabolite routinely used as a magnetic resonance spectroscopy marker for brain injury and disease. Despite decades of research, the functional roles of NAA remain unclear. Biochemical investigations over several decades have associated NAA with myelin lipid synthesis and energy metabolism. However, studies have been hampered by an inability to identify the gene for the NAA biosynthetic enzyme aspartate N-acetyltransferase (Asp-NAT). A very recent report has identified Nat8l as the gene encoding Asp-NAT and confirmed that the only child diagnosed with a lack of NAA on brain magnetic resonance spectrograms has a 19-bp deletion in this gene. Based on in vitro Nat8l expression studies the researchers concluded that many previous biochemical investigations have been technically flawed and that NAA may not be associated with brain energy or lipid metabolism. In studies done concurrently in our laboratory we have demonstrated via cloning, expression, specificity for acetylation of aspartate, responsiveness to methamphetamine treatment, molecular modeling and comparative immunolocalization that NAT8L is the NAA biosynthetic enzyme Asp-NAT. We conclude that NAA is a major storage and transport form of acetyl coenzyme A specific to the nervous system, thus linking it to both lipid synthesis and energy metabolism.

  14. Accumulation of a Threonine Biosynthetic Intermediate Attenuates General Amino Acid Control by Accelerating Degradation of Gcn4 via Pho85 and Cdk8

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Yashpal; Qiu, Hongfang; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    Gcn4 is a master transcriptional regulator of amino acid and vitamin biosynthetic enzymes subject to the general amino acid control (GAAC), whose expression is upregulated in response to amino acid starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that accumulation of the threonine pathway intermediate β-aspartate semialdehyde (ASA), substrate of homoserine dehydrogenase (Hom6), attenuates the GAAC transcriptional response by accelerating degradation of Gcn4, already an exceedingly unstable protein, in cells starved for isoleucine and valine. The reduction in Gcn4 abundance on ASA accumulation requires Cdk8/Srb10 and Pho85, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) known to mediate rapid turnover of Gcn4 by the proteasome via phosphorylation of the Gcn4 activation domain under nonstarvation conditions. Interestingly, rescue of Gcn4 abundance in hom6 cells by elimination of SRB10 is not accompanied by recovery of transcriptional activation, while equivalent rescue of UAS-bound Gcn4 in hom6 pho85 cells restores greater than wild-type activation of Gcn4 target genes. These and other findings suggest that the two CDKs target different populations of Gcn4 on ASA accumulation, with Srb10 clearing mostly inactive Gcn4 molecules at the promoter that are enriched for sumoylation of the activation domain, and Pho85 clearing molecules unbound to the UAS that include both fully functional and inactive Gcn4 species. PMID:25079372

  15. Potent inhibition of retinoic acid metabolism enzyme(s) by novel azolyl retinoids.

    PubMed

    Njar, V C; Nnane, I P; Brodie, A M

    2000-09-04

    Novel (+/-)-4-azolyl retinoic acid analogues 4, 5, 7 and 8 have been designed and synthesized and have been shown to be powerful inhibitors of hamster microsomal all-trans-retinoic acid 4-hydroxylase enzyme(s). (+/-)-4-(1H-Imidazol-1-yl)retinoic acid (4) is the most potent inhibitor of this enzyme reported to date.

  16. 78 kDa receptor for Man6P-independent lysosomal enzyme targeting: Biosynthetic transport from endoplasmic reticulum to 'high-density vesicles'

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso . E-mail: gonor@biomedicas.unam.mx; Ortega Cuellar, Daniel D.; Michalak, Colette

    2006-04-15

    Recent work has shown that the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate and the 78 kDa receptors for lysosomal enzyme targeting are located in different cell compartments. While the mannose 6-phosphate receptor is enriched in the Percoll fractions that contain Golgi apparatus, most of the 78 kDa receptor is localized in a heavy fraction at the bottom of the Percoll gradient. This report presents the biosynthetic transport of the 78 kDa receptor. Newly synthesized 78 kDa receptor was transported to Golgi from endoplasmic reticulum with a half life of 5 min. From the Golgi apparatus, the receptor takes two routes; about 15-25% is transported to the plasma membrane, and the rest migrates to late endosomes, subsequently to prelysosomes and finally to the dense vesicles. The 78 kDa receptor starts appearing at the dense vesicles 120 min after biosynthesis and reaches a maximum of 40-50% of the total receptor. Treatment of cells with NH{sub 4}Cl causes depletion of the receptor from the dense vesicles and prelysosomes and corresponding augmentation in endosomes and plasma membrane. These results suggest that the 78 kDa receptor cycles between compartments and that the dense vesicles seem to represent the most distal compartment in the biosynthetic pathway of this receptor.

  17. Evolutionary diversification and characterization of the eubacterial gene family encoding DXR type II, an alternative isoprenoid biosynthetic enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Isoprenoids constitute a vast family of natural compounds performing diverse and essential functions in all domains of life. In most eubacteria, isoprenoids are synthesized through the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The production of MEP is usually catalyzed by deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR-I) but a few organisms use an alternative DXR-like enzyme (DXR-II). Results Searches through 1498 bacterial complete proteomes detected 130 sequences with similarity to DXR-II. Phylogenetic analysis identified three well-resolved clades: the DXR-II family (clustering 53 sequences including eleven experimentally verified as functional enzymes able to produce MEP), and two previously uncharacterized NAD(P)-dependent oxidoreductase families (designated DLO1 and DLO2 for DXR-II-like oxidoreductases 1 and 2). Our analyses identified amino acid changes critical for the acquisition of DXR-II biochemical function through type-I functional divergence, two of them mapping onto key residues for DXR-II activity. DXR-II showed a markedly discontinuous distribution, which was verified at several levels: taxonomic (being predominantly found in Alphaproteobacteria and Firmicutes), metabolic (being mostly found in bacteria with complete functional MEP pathways with or without DXR-I), and phenotypic (as no biological/phenotypic property was found to be preferentially distributed among DXR-II-containing strains, apart from pathogenicity in animals). By performing a thorough comparative sequence analysis of GC content, 3:1 dinucleotide frequencies, codon usage and codon adaptation indexes (CAI) between DXR-II sequences and their corresponding genomes, we examined the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), as opposed to an scenario of massive gene loss, in the evolutionary origin and diversification of the DXR-II subfamily in bacteria. Conclusions Our analyses support a single origin of the DXR-II family through functional divergence, in which constitutes

  18. Temperature Features of Enzymes Affecting Crassulacean acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, P. C.

    1967-01-01

    Enzymes involved in malic acid production via a pathway with 2 carboxylation reactions and in malic acid conversion via total oxidation have been demonstrated in mitochondria of Bryophyllum tubiflorum Harv. Activation of the mitochondria by Tween 40 was necessary to reveal part of the enzyme activities. The temperature behavior of the enzymes has been investigated, revealing optimal activity of acid-producing enzymes at 35°. Even at 53° the optimum for acid-converting enzymes was not yet reached. From the simultaneous action of acid-producing and acid-converting enzyme systems the overall result at different temperatures was established. Up to 15° the net result was a malic acid production. Moderate temperatures brought about a decrease in this accumulation, which was partly accompanied by a shift to isocitrate production, while at higher temperatures total oxidation of the acids exceeded the production. PMID:16656606

  19. Biosynthetic production of universally (13)C-labelled polyunsaturated fatty acids as reference materials for natural health product research.

    PubMed

    Le, Phuong Mai; Fraser, Catherine; Gardner, Graeme; Liang, Wei-Wan; Kralovec, Jaroslav A; Cunnane, Stephen C; Windust, Anthony J

    2007-09-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) have become important natural health products with numerous proven benefits related to brain function and cardiovascular health. Not only are omega-3 fatty acids available in a plethora of dietary supplements, but they are also increasingly being incorporated as triglycerides into conventional foods, including bread, milk, yoghurt and confectionaries. Recently, transgenic oil seed crops and livestock have been developed that enhance omega-3 fatty acid content. This diverse array of matrices presents a difficult analytical challenge and is compounded further by samples generated through clinical research. Stable isotope (13)C-labelled LCPUFA standards offer many advantages as research tools because they may be distinguished from their naturally abundant counterparts by mass spectrometry and directly incorporated as internal standards into analytical procedures. Further, (13)C-labelled LCPUFAs are safe to use as metabolic tracers to study uptake and metabolism in humans. Currently, (13)C-labelled LCPUFAs are expensive, available in limited supply and not in triglyceride form. To resolve these issues, marine heterotrophic microorganisms are being isolated and screened for LCPUFA production with a view to the efficient biosynthetic production of U-(13)C-labelled fatty acids using U-(13)C glucose as a carbon source. Of 37 isolates obtained, most were thraustochytrids, and either DHA or omega-6 docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-6) were produced as the major LCPUFA. The marine protist Hyalochlorella marina was identified as a novel source of EPA and omega-3 docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-3). As proof of principle, gram-level production of (13)C-labelled DHA has been achieved with high chemical purity ( >99%) and high (13)C incorporation levels (>90%), as confirmed by NMR and MS analyses. Finally, U-(13)C-DHA was enzymatically re-esterified to

  20. Hypoxia decreases the expression of the two enzymes responsible for producing linear and cyclic tetrapyrroles in the heme biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Patrick D; Furuyama, Kazumichi; Sassa, Shigeru; Shibahara, Shigeki

    2008-12-01

    Heme is synthesized in all cell types in aerobic organisms. Hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS) and uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) catalyze two consecutive reactions in the heme biosynthetic pathway, generating the first linear and the first cyclic tetrapyrroles, respectively. Each of the HMBS and UROS genes contains the two separate promoters that generate ubiquitous and erythroid-specific mRNAs. Despite the functional significance of HMBS and UROS, regulation of their gene expression remains to be investigated. Here, we showed that hypoxia (1% O(2)) decreased the expression of ubiquitous mRNAs for HMBS and UROS by three- and twofold, respectively, in human hepatic cells (HepG2 and Hep3B), whereas the expression of ubiquitous and erythroid HMBS and UROS mRNAs remained unchanged in erythroid cells (YN-1 and K562). Unexpectedly, hypoxia did not decrease the half-life of HMBS mRNA (8.4 h under normoxia versus 9.1 h under hypoxia) or UROS mRNA (9.0 versus 10.4 h) in hepatic cells. It is therefore unlikely that a change in mRNA stability is responsible for the hypoxia-mediated decrease in the expression levels of these mRNAs. Furthermore, expression levels of HMBS and UROS mRNAs were decreased under normoxia by treatment with deferoxamine or cobalt chloride in hepatic cells, while hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha was accumulated. Thus, the decrease in the expression of ubiquitous HMBS and UROS mRNAs is associated with accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha protein. In conclusion, the expression of HMBS and UROS mRNAs may be coordinately regulated, which represents a newly identified mechanism that is important for heme homeostasis.

  1. Genetic analyses involving interactions between the ergosterol biosynthetic enzymes, lanosterol synthase (Erg7p) and 3-ketoreductase (Erg27p), in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Teske, B.; Taramino, S.; Bhuiyan, M. S. A.; Kumaraswami, N. S.; Randall, S. K.; Barbuch, R.; Eckstein, J.; Balliano, G.; Bard, M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Protein-protein interaction studies in the S. cerevisiae ergosterol biosynthetic pathway suggest that enzymes in this pathway may act as an integrated multienzyme complex. The yeast sterol 3-ketoreductase (Erg27p) required for C-4 demethylation of sterols has previously been shown to also be required for the function of the upstream oxidosqualene cyclase/lanosterol synthase (Erg7p); thus, erg27 mutants accumulate oxidosqualenes as precursors rather than 3-ketosterones. In the present study, we have created various mutations in the ERG27 gene. These mutations include 5 C-terminal truncations, 6 internal deletions, and 32 point mutants of which 14 were obtained by site directed mutagenesis and 18 by random mutagenesis. We have characterized these ERG27 mutations by determining the following: Erg27 and Erg7 enzyme activities, presence of Erg27p as determined by western immunoblots, ability to grow on various sterol substrates and GC sterol profiles. Mutations of the predicted catalytic residues, Y202F and K206A, resulted in the endogenous accumulation of 3-ketosterones rather than oxidosqualenes suggesting retention of Erg7 enzyme activity. This novel phenotype demonstrated that the catalytic function of Erg27p can be separated from its Erg7p chaperone ability. Other erg27 mutations resulted in proteins that were present, as determined by western immunoblotting, but unable to interact with the Erg7 protein. We also classify Erg27p as belonging to the SDR (short chain dehydrogenase/reductase) family of enzymes and demonstrate the possibility of homo -or hetero-dimerization of the protein. This study provides new insights into the role of Erg27p in sterol biosynthesis. PMID:18555807

  2. Bioconjugation of therapeutic proteins and enzymes using the expanded set of genetically encoded amino acids.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-10-01

    The last decade has witnessed striking progress in the development of bioorthogonal reactions that are strictly directed towards intended sites in biomolecules while avoiding interference by a number of physical and chemical factors in biological environment. Efforts to exploit bioorthogonal reactions in protein conjugation have led to the evolution of protein translational machineries and the expansion of genetic codes that systematically incorporate a range of non-natural amino acids containing bioorthogonal groups into recombinant proteins in a site-specific manner. Chemoselective conjugation of proteins has begun to find valuable applications to previously inaccessible problems. In this review, we describe bioorthogonal reactions useful for protein conjugation, and biosynthetic methods that produce proteins amenable to those reactions through an expanded genetic code. We then provide key examples in which novel protein conjugates, generated by the genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and the chemoselective reactions, address unmet needs in protein therapeutics and enzyme engineering.

  3. An apparent Bacillus subtilis folic acid biosynthetic operon containing pab, an amphibolic trpG gene, a third gene required for synthesis of para-aminobenzoic acid, and the dihydropteroate synthase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Slock, J; Stahly, D P; Han, C Y; Six, E W; Crawford, I P

    1990-01-01

    McDonald and Burke (J. Bacteriol. 149:391-394, 1982) previously cloned a sulfanilamide-resistance gene, sul, residing on a 4.9-kb segment of Bacillus subtilis chromosomal DNA, into plasmid pUB110. In this study we determined the nucleotide sequence of the entire 4.9-kb fragment. Genes identified on the fragment include pab, trpG, pabC, sul, one complete unidentified open reading frame, and one incomplete unidentified open reading frame. The first three of these genes, pab, trpG, and pabC, are required for synthesis of p-aminobenzoic acid. The trpG gene encodes an amphibolic glutamine amidotransferase required for synthesis of both p-aminobenzoate and anthranilate, the latter an intermediate in the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway. The pabC gene may encode a B. subtilis analog of enzyme X, an enzyme needed for p-aminobenzoate synthesis in Escherichia coli. The sul gene probably encodes dihydropteroate synthase, the enzyme responsible for formation of 7,8-dihydropteroate, the immediate precursor of folic acid. All six of the cloned genes are arranged in a single operon. Since all four of the identified genes are needed for folate biosynthesis, we refer to this operon as a folic acid operon. Expression of the trpG gene is known to be negatively controlled by tryptophan. We propose that this regulation is at the level of translation. This hypothesis is supported by the finding of an apparent Mtr-binding site which overlaps with the trpG ribosome-binding site. PMID:2123867

  4. Effect of exogenous hormones on transcription levels of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthetic enzymes in the silkworm (Bombyx mori).

    PubMed

    Huang, ShuoHao; Yang, HuanHuan; Yao, LiLi; Zhang, JianYun; Huang, LongQuan

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B6 includes 6 pyridine derivatives, among which pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is a coenzyme for over 140 enzymes. Animals acquire their vitamin B6 from food. Through a salvage pathway, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is synthesized from pyridoxal, pyridoxine or pyridoxamine, in a series of reactions catalyzed by pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase. The regulation of pyridoxal 5'-phospahte biosynthesis and pyridoxal 5'-phospahte homeostasis are at the center of study for vitamin B6 nutrition. How pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis is regulated by hormones has not been reported so far. Our previous studies have shown that pyridoxal 5'-phosphate level in silkworm larva displays cyclic developmental changes. In the current study, effects of exogenous juvenile hormone and molting hormone on the transcription level of genes coding for the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of pyridoxal 5'-phospahte were examined. Results show that pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase are regulated at the transcription level by development and are responsive to hormones. Molting hormone stimulates the expression of genes coding for pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase, and juvenile hormone appears to work against molting hormone. Whether pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis is regulated by hormones in general is an important issue for further studies.

  5. New N-Acetyltransferase Fold in the Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphonate Biosynthetic Enzyme FrbF

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Brian; Cobb, Ryan E.; DeSieno, Matthew A.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K.

    2015-10-15

    The enzyme FrbF from Streptomyces rubellomurinus has attracted significant attention due to its role in the biosynthesis of the antimalarial phosphonate FR-900098. The enzyme catalyzes acetyl transfer onto the hydroxamate of the FR-900098 precursors cytidine 5'-monophosphate-3-aminopropylphosphonate and cytidine 5'-monophosphate-N-hydroxy-3-aminopropylphosphonate. Despite the established function as a bona fide N-acetyltransferase, FrbF shows no sequence similarity to any member of the GCN5-like N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily. Here, we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of FrbF in complex with acetyl-CoA, which demonstrates a unique architecture that is distinct from those of canonical GNAT-like acetyltransferases. We also utilized the co-crystal structure to guide structure-function studies that identified the roles of putative active site residues in the acetyltransferase mechanism. The combined biochemical and structural analyses of FrbF provide insights into this previously uncharacterized family of N-acetyltransferases and also provide a molecular framework toward the production of novel N-acyl derivatives of FR-900098.

  6. Regulation of NAD biosynthetic enzymes modulates NAD-sensing processes to shape mammalian cell physiology under varying biological cues.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Silverio; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Sorci, Leonardo; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2015-09-01

    In addition to its role as a redox coenzyme, NAD is a substrate of various enzymes that split the molecule to either catalyze covalent modifications of target proteins or convert NAD into biologically active metabolites. The coenzyme bioavailability may be significantly affected by these reactions, with ensuing major impact on energy metabolism, cell survival, and aging. Moreover, through the activity of the NAD-dependent deacetylating sirtuins, NAD behaves as a beacon molecule that reports the cell metabolic state, and accordingly modulates transcriptional responses and metabolic adaptations. In this view, NAD biosynthesis emerges as a highly regulated process: it enables cells to preserve NAD homeostasis in response to significant NAD-consuming events and it can be modulated by various stimuli to induce, via NAD level changes, suitable NAD-mediated metabolic responses. Here we review the current knowledge on the regulation of mammalian NAD biosynthesis, with focus on the relevant rate-limiting enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications.

  7. Alteration in the cytosolic triacylglycerol biosynthetic machinery leads to decreased cell growth and triacylglycerol synthesis in oleaginous yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Gangar, Akanksha; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2002-01-01

    Altered nutrient content (levels of glucose) caused a drastic reduction in cell growth and triacylglycerol (TAG) production in the wild-type (WT) Rhodotorula glutinis. This was due to the decreased level of synthesis of TAG biosynthetic enzymes, reflected by a reduction in enzyme activity. A similar observation was made in the case of non-lethal mutants of TAG-deficient oleaginous yeast, namely TAG1 and TAG2, which were generated by ethyl methane sulphonate mutagenesis. Metabolic labelling of TAG-deficient cells with [(14)C]acetate, [(32)P]orthophosphate and [(14)C]mevalonate showed a negligible TAG formation with minimal alterations in phospholipid and sterol compositions. Assays on the activities of cytosolic TAG biosynthetic enzymes revealed that lysophosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol acyltransferases (ATs) were defective in TAG1 and TAG2 respectively. The activity of membrane-bound isoforms of TAG biosynthetic enzymes remains unaltered in the mutants. Analysis of cytosolic TAG biosynthetic enzymes by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation indicated that the defective ATs were a part of the TAG biosynthetic multienzyme complex. Quantitatively, the cytosolic lysophosphatidic acid-AT was comparable between TAG1 and the WT. However, diacylglycerol-AT was relatively less in TAG2 than the WT. These results demonstrated that either by decreasing the nutrient content or mutating the enzymes of the soluble TAG biosynthetic pathway, TAG production was decreased with concomitant reduction in the cell growth. PMID:11972450

  8. Inhibition of green tea and the catechins against 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase, the key enzyme of the MEP terpenoid biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hui, Xian; Liu, Hui; Tian, Fang-Lin; Li, Fei-Fei; Li, Heng; Gao, Wen-Yun

    2016-09-01

    1-Deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) is the first committed enzyme in the MEP terpenoid biosynthetic pathway and also a validated antimicrobial target. Green tea which is rich in polyphenolic components such as the catechins, possesses a plenty of pharmacological activities, in particular an antibacterial effect. To uncover the antibacterial mechanism of green tea and to seek new DXR inhibitors from natural sources, the DXR inhibitory activity of green tea and its main antimicrobial catechins were investigated in this study. The results show that the raw extract of green tea and its ethyl acetate fraction are able to suppress DXR activity explicitly. Further determination of the DXR inhibitory capacity of eight catechin compounds demonstrates that the most active compound is gallocatechin gallate that is able to inhibit around 50% activity of DXR at 25μM. Based on these data, the primary structure-activity relationship of the catechins against DXR is discussed. This study would be very helpful to elucidate the antimicrobial mechanism of green tea and the catechins and also would be very useful to direct the rational utilization of them as food additives.

  9. Enhancing a Pathway-Genome Database (PGDB) to Capture Subcellular Localization of Metabolites and Enzymes: The Nucleotide-Sugar Biosynthetic Pathways of Populus trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, A.; Karpinets, T. V.; Chang, C. H.; Bar-Peled, M.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how cellular metabolism works and is regulated requires that the underlying biochemical pathways be adequately represented and integrated with large metabolomic data sets to establish a robust network model. Genetically engineering energy crops to be less recalcitrant to saccharification requires detailed knowledge of plant polysaccharide structures and a thorough understanding of the metabolic pathways involved in forming and regulating cell-wall synthesis. Nucleotide-sugars are building blocks for synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides. The biosynthesis of nucleotide-sugars is catalyzed by a multitude of enzymes that reside in different subcellular organelles, and precise representation of these pathways requires accurate capture of this biological compartmentalization. The lack of simple localization cues in genomic sequence data and annotations however leads to missing compartmentalization information for eukaryotes in automatically generated databases, such as the Pathway-Genome Databases (PGDBs) of the SRI Pathway Tools software that drives much biochemical knowledge representation on the internet. In this report, we provide an informal mechanism using the existing Pathway Tools framework to integrate protein and metabolite sub-cellular localization data with the existing representation of the nucleotide-sugar metabolic pathways in a prototype PGDB for Populus trichocarpa. The enhanced pathway representations have been successfully used to map SNP abundance data to individual nucleotide-sugar biosynthetic genes in the PGDB. The manually curated pathway representations are more conducive to the construction of a computational platform that will allow the simulation of natural and engineered nucleotide-sugar precursor fluxes into specific recalcitrant polysaccharide(s).

  10. Antimicrobial mechanism of theaflavins: They target 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase, the key enzyme of the MEP terpenoid biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Xian; Yue, Qiao; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Li, Heng; Yang, Shao-Qing; Gao, Wen-Yun

    2016-01-01

    1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) is the first committed enzyme in the 2-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) terpenoid biosynthetic pathway and is also a validated antimicrobial target. Theaflavins, which are polyphenolic compounds isolated from fermented tea, possess a wide range of pharmacological activities, especially an antibacterial effect, but little has been reported on their modes of antimicrobial action. To uncover the antibacterial mechanism of theaflavins and to seek new DXR inhibitors from natural sources, the DXR inhibitory activity of theaflavins were investigated in this study. The results show that all four theaflavin compounds could specifically suppress the activity of DXR, with theaflavin displaying the lowest effect against DXR (IC50 162.1 μM) and theaflavin-3,3′-digallate exhibiting the highest (IC50 14.9 μM). Moreover, determination of inhibition kinetics of the theaflavins demonstrates that they are non-competitive inhibitors of DXR against 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) and un-competitive inhibitors with respect to NADPH. The possible interactions between DXR and the theaflavins were simulated via docking experiments. PMID:27941853

  11. Synthesis of 13(R)-Hydroxy-7Z,10Z,13R,14E,16Z,19Z Docosapentaenoic Acid (13R-HDPA) and Its Biosynthetic Conversion to the 13-Series Resolvins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators are biosynthesized during the resolution phase of acute inflammation from n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Recently, the isolation and identification of the four novel mediators denoted 13-series resolvins, namely, RvT1 (1), RvT2 (2), RvT3 (3) and RvT4 (4), were reported, which showed potent bioactions characteristic for specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators. Herein, based on results from LC/MS-MS metabololipidomics and the stereoselective synthesis of 13(R)-hydroxy-7Z,10Z,13R,14E,16Z,19Z docosapentaenoic acid (13R-HDPA, 5), we provide direct evidence that the four novel mediators 1–4 are all biosynthesized from the pivotal intermediate 5. The UV and LC/MS-MS results from synthetic 13R-HDPA (5) matched those from endogenously and biosynthetically produced material obtained from in vivo infectious exudates, endothelial cells, and human recombinant COX-2 enzyme. Stereochemically pure 5 was obtained with the use of a chiral pool starting material that installed the configuration at the C-13 atom as R. Two stereoselective Z-Wittig reactions and two Z-selective reductions of internal alkynes afforded the geometrically pure alkene moieties in 5. Incubation of 5 with isolated human neutrophils gave all four RvTs. The results presented herein provide new knowledge on the biosynthetic pathways and the enzymatic origin of RvTs 1–4. PMID:27704804

  12. The Glucosinolate Biosynthetic Gene AOP2 Mediates Feed-back Regulation of Jasmonic Acid Signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Burow, Meike; Atwell, Susanna; Francisco, Marta; Kerwin, Rachel E; Halkier, Barbara A; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2015-08-01

    Survival in changing and challenging environments requires an organism to efficiently obtain and use its resources. Due to their sessile nature, it is particularly critical for plants to dynamically optimize their metabolism. In plant primary metabolism, metabolic fine-tuning involves feed-back mechanisms whereby the output of a pathway controls its input to generate a precise and robust response to environmental changes. By contrast, few studies have addressed the potential for feed-back regulation of secondary metabolism. In Arabidopsis, accumulation of the defense compounds glucosinolates has previously been linked to genetic variation in the glucosinolate biosynthetic gene AOP2. AOP2 expression can increase the transcript levels of two known regulators (MYB28 and MYB29) of the pathway, suggesting that AOP2 plays a role in positive feed-back regulation controlling glucosinolate biosynthesis. We generated mutants affecting AOP2, MYB28/29, or both. Transcriptome analysis of these mutants identified a so far unrecognized link between AOP2 and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling independent of MYB28 and MYB29. Thus, AOP2 is part of a regulatory feed-back loop linking glucosinolate biosynthesis and JA signaling and thereby allows the glucosinolate pathway to influence JA sensitivity. The discovery of this regulatory feed-back loop provides insight into how plants optimize the use of resources for defensive metabolites.

  13. Identifying the emerging human pathogen Scedosporium prolificans by using a species-specific monoclonal antibody that binds to the melanin biosynthetic enzyme tetrahydroxynaphthalene reductase.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Christopher R; Ryder, Lauren S; Le Cocq, Kate; Soanes, Darren M

    2015-04-01

    The dematiaceous (melanized) fungus Scedosporium prolificans is an emerging and frequently fatal pathogen of immunocompromised humans and which, along with the closely related fungi Pseudallescheria boydii, Scedosporium apiospermum and S. aurantiacum in the Pseudallescheria-Scedosporium complex, is a contributing aetiology to tsunami lung and central nervous system infections in near-drowning victims who have aspirated water laden with spores. At present, the natural habitat of the fungus is largely unknown, and accurate detection methods are needed to identify environmental reservoirs of infectious propagules. In this study, we report the development of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (CA4) specific to S. prolificans, which does not cross-react with closely related fungi in the Pseudallescheria-Scedosporium complex or with a wide range of mould and yeast species pathogenic to humans. Using genome sequencing of a soil isolate and targeted gene disruption of the CA4 antigen-encoding gene, we show that mAb CA4 binds to the melanin-biosynthetic enzyme tetrahydroxynaphthalene reductase. Enzyme-deficient mutants produce orange-brown or green-brown spore suspensions compared with the black spore suspension of the wild-type strain. Using mAb CA4 and a mAb (HG12) specific to the related fungi P. boydii, P. apiosperma, S. apiospermum and S. aurantiacum, we demonstrate how the mAbs can be used in combination with a semiselective isolation procedure to track these opportunistic pathogens in environmental samples containing mixed populations of human pathogenic fungi. Specificity of mAb CA4 was confirmed by sequencing of the internally transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1)-5.8S-ITS2 rRNA-encoding regions of fungi isolated from estuarine muds.

  14. Plasma Catecholamines (CA) and Gene Expression of CA Biosynthetic Enzymes in Adrenal Medulla and Sympathetic Ganglia of Rats Exposed to Single or Repeated Hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrak, J.; Jurani, M.; Baranovska, M.; Hapala, I.; Frollo, I.; Kvetnansky, R.

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate plasma epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) levels in blood collected directly during a single or 8-times repeated centrifugation at hypergravity 4G, using remote controlled equipment. Plasma EPI levels showed a huge hypergravity-induced increase. After the last blood collection during hypergravity, the centrifuge was turned off and another blood sampling was performed immediately after the centrifuge decelerated and stopped (10 min). In these samples plasma EPI showed significantly lower levels compared to centrifugation intervals. Plasma NE levels showed none or small changes. Repeated exposure to hypergravity 4G (8 days for 60 min) eliminated the increase in plasma EPI levels at the 15 min interval but did not markedly affect plasma NE levels. To explain these findings we measured mRNA levels of CA biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in the adrenal medulla (AM) and stellate ganglia (SG) of rats exposed to continuous hypergravity (2G) up to 6 days. In AM, TH, DBH and PNMT mRNA levels were significantly increased in intervals up to 3 days, however, after 6 day hypergravity exposure, no significant elevation was found. In SG, no significant changes in gene expression of CA enzymes were seen both after a single or repeated hypergravity. Thus, our data show that hypergravity highly activates the adrenomedullary system, whereas the sympathoneural system is not significantly changed. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that during repeated or continuous exposure of the organism to hypergravity the adrenomedullary system is adapted, whereas sympathoneural system is not affected.

  15. The Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing autoinducer CAI-1: analysis of the biosynthetic enzyme CqsA

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.; Bolitho, M; Higgins, D; Lu, W; Ng, W; Jeffrey, P; Rabinowitz, J; Semmelhack, M; Hughson, F; Bassler, B

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes the disease cholera, controls virulence factor production and biofilm development in response to two extracellular quorum-sensing molecules, called autoinducers. The strongest autoinducer, called CAI-1 (for cholera autoinducer-1), was previously identified as (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one. Biosynthesis of CAI-1 requires the enzyme CqsA. Here, we determine the CqsA reaction mechanism, identify the CqsA substrates as (S)-2-aminobutyrate and decanoyl coenzyme A, and demonstrate that the product of the reaction is 3-aminotridecan-4-one, dubbed amino-CAI-1. CqsA produces amino-CAI-1 by a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent acyl-CoA transferase reaction. Amino-CAI-1 is converted to CAI-1 in a subsequent step via a CqsA-independent mechanism. Consistent with this, we find cells release {ge}100 times more CAI-1 than amino-CAI-1. Nonetheless, V. cholerae responds to amino-CAI-1 as well as CAI-1, whereas other CAI-1 variants do not elicit a quorum-sensing response. Thus, both CAI-1 and amino-CAI-1 have potential as lead molecules in the development of an anticholera treatment.

  16. Identification of Thiotetronic Acid Antibiotic Biosynthetic Pathways by Target-directed Genome Mining

    PubMed Central

    Millán-Aguiñaga, Natalie; Zhang, Jia Jia; O'Neill, Ellis C.; Ugalde, Juan A.; Jensen, Paul R.; Mantovani, Simone M.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent genome sequencing efforts have led to the rapid accumulation of uncharacterized or “orphaned” secondary metabolic biosynthesis gene clusters (BGCs) in public databases. This increase in DNA-sequenced big data has given rise to significant challenges in the applied field of natural product genome mining, including (i) how to prioritize the characterization of orphan BGCs, and (ii) how to rapidly connect genes to biosynthesized small molecules. Here we show that by correlating putative antibiotic resistance genes that encode target-modified proteins with orphan BGCs, we predict the biological function of pathway specific small molecules before they have been revealed in a process we call target-directed genome mining. By querying the pan-genome of 86 Salinispora bacterial genomes for duplicated house-keeping genes co-localized with natural product BGCs, we prioritized an orphan polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrid BGC (tlm) with a putative fatty acid synthase resistance gene. We employed a new synthetic double-stranded DNA-mediated cloning strategy based on transformation-associated recombination to efficiently capture tlm and the related ttm BGCs directly from genomic DNA and to heterologously express them in Streptomyces hosts. We show the production of a group of unusual thiotetronic acid natural products, including the well-known fatty acid synthase inhibitor thiolactomycin that was first described over 30 years ago, yet never at the genetic level in regards to biosynthesis and auto-resistance. This finding not only validates the target-directed genome mining strategy for the discovery of antibiotic producing gene clusters without a priori knowledge of the molecule synthesized, but also paves the way for the investigation of novel enzymology involved in thiotetronic acid natural product biosynthesis. PMID:26458099

  17. CYP82Y1 is N-methylcanadine 1-hydroxylase, a key noscapine biosynthetic enzyme in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thu-Thuy T; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-01-24

    Noscapine is a phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid investigated for its potent pharmacological properties. Although structurally elucidated more than a century ago, the biosynthesis of noscapine has not been established. Radiotracer studies have shown that noscapine is derived from the protoberberine alkaloid (S)-scoulerine and has been proposed to proceed through (S)-N-methylcanadine. However, pathway intermediates involved in the conversion of N-methylcanadine to noscapine have not been identified. We report the isolation and characterization of the cytochrome P-450 CYP82Y1, which catalyzes the 1-hydroxylation of N-methylcanadine to 1-hydroxy-N-methylcanadine. Comparison of transcript and metabolite profiles of eight opium poppy chemotypes revealed four cytochrome P-450s, three from the CYP82 and one from the CYP719 families, that were tightly correlated with noscapine accumulation. Recombinant CYP82Y1 was the only enzyme that accepted (R,S)-N-methylcanadine as a substrate with strict specificity and high affinity. As expected, CYP82Y1 was abundantly expressed in opium poppy stems where noscapine accumulation is highest among plant organs. Suppression of CYP82Y1 using virus-induced gene silencing caused a significant reduction in the levels of noscapine, narcotoline, and a putative downstream secoberbine intermediate and also resulted in increased accumulation of the upstream pathway intermediates scoulerine, tetrahydrocolum-bamine, canadine, and N-methylcanadine. The combined biochemical and physiological data support the 1-hydroxylation of (S)-N-methylcanadine catalyzed by CYP82Y1 as the first committed step in the formation of noscapine in opium poppy.

  18. Early lignin pathway enzymes and routes to chlorogenic acid in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.).

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Treviño, Luis L; Shen, Hui; Hernandez, Timothy; Yin, Yanbin; Xu, Ying; Dixon, Richard A

    2014-03-01

    Studying lignin biosynthesis in Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) has provided a basis for generating plants with reduced lignin content and increased saccharification efficiency. Chlorogenic acid (CGA, caffeoyl quinate) is the major soluble phenolic compound in switchgrass, and the lignin and CGA biosynthetic pathways potentially share intermediates and enzymes. The enzyme hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA: quinate hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HQT) is responsible for CGA biosynthesis in tobacco, tomato and globe artichoke, but there are no close orthologs of HQT in switchgrass or in other monocotyledonous plants with complete genome sequences. We examined available transcriptomic databases for genes encoding enzymes potentially involved in CGA biosynthesis in switchgrass. The protein products of two hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT) genes (PvHCT1a and PvHCT2a), closely related to lignin pathway HCTs from other species, were characterized biochemically and exhibited the expected HCT activity, preferring shikimic acid as acyl acceptor. We also characterized two switchgrass coumaroyl shikimate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H) enzymes (PvC3'H1 and PvC3'H2); both of these cytochrome P450s had the capacity to hydroxylate 4-coumaroyl shikimate or 4-coumaroyl quinate to generate caffeoyl shikimate or CGA. Another switchgrass hydroxycinnamoyl transferase, PvHCT-Like1, is phylogenetically distant from HCTs or HQTs, but exhibits HQT activity, preferring quinic acid as acyl acceptor, and could therefore function in CGA biosynthesis. The biochemical features of the recombinant enzymes, the presence of the corresponding activities in plant protein extracts, and the expression patterns of the corresponding genes, suggest preferred routes to CGA in switchgrass.

  19. Mutations in Biosynthetic Enzymes for the Protein Linker Region of Chondroitin/Dermatan/Heparan Sulfate Cause Skeletal and Skin Dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Yamada, Shuhei; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans, including chondroitin, dermatan, and heparan sulfate, have various roles in a wide range of biological events such as cell signaling, cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, and interactions with various growth factors. Their polysaccharides covalently attach to the serine residues on specific core proteins through the common linker region tetrasaccharide, -xylose-galactose-galactose-glucuronic acid, which is produced through the stepwise addition of respective monosaccharides by four distinct glycosyltransferases. Mutations in the human genes encoding the glycosyltransferases responsible for the biosynthesis of the linker region tetrasaccharide cause a number of genetic disorders, called glycosaminoglycan linkeropathies, including Desbuquois dysplasia type 2, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Larsen syndrome. This review focused on recent studies on genetic diseases caused by defects in the biosynthesis of the common linker region tetrasaccharide. PMID:26582078

  20. Identification and characterization of cDNAs encoding ethylene biosynthetic enzymes from Pelargonium x hortorum cv Snow Mass leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, T W; Arteca, R N

    1995-01-01

    Two Pelargonium 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase cDNAs (GAC-1 and GAC-2) were identified and characterized. GAC-1 is 1934 bp long with a 1446-bp open reading frame encoding a 54.1-kD polypeptide. GAC-2 is a 1170-bp-long ACC synthase polymerase chain reaction fragment encoding 390 amino acids. Expression of GAC-1 and GAC-2 together with a previously identified ACC oxidase (GEFE-1) was examined in different Pelargonium plant parts, and leaves were subjected to osmotic stress (sorbitol), metal ion stress (CuCl2), auxin (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid [2,4-D]), and ethylene. GAC-1 expression was not detectable in any of the plant parts tested, whereas high levels of GAC-2 were expressed in the leaf bud, young leaf, young floret, fully open floret, and senescing floret. GAC-2 was expressed to a lesser degree in fully expanded leaves or roots and was undetectable in old leaves and floret buds. GEFE-1 was detectable at all leaf ages tested, in young and fully open florets, and in the roots; however, the highest degree of expression was in the senescing florets. GAC-1 was induced by sorbitol. Both GAC-1 and GAC-2 were only slightly affected by CuCl2 and induced indirectly by 2,4-D. GEFE-1 was highly induced by sorbitol, CuCl2, and 2,4-D. GAC-1, GAC-2, and GEFE-1 were unaffected by ethylene treatment. These results suggest that GAC-1 is only induced by stress and that GAC-2 may be developmentally regulated, whereas GEFE-1 is influenced by both stress and development. PMID:7480351

  1. Extending enzyme molecular recognition with an expanded amino acid alphabet

    PubMed Central

    Windle, Claire L.; Simmons, Katie J.; Ault, James R.; Trinh, Chi H.; Nelson, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Natural enzymes are constructed from the 20 proteogenic amino acids, which may then require posttranslational modification or the recruitment of coenzymes or metal ions to achieve catalytic function. Here, we demonstrate that expansion of the alphabet of amino acids can also enable the properties of enzymes to be extended. A chemical mutagenesis strategy allowed a wide range of noncanonical amino acids to be systematically incorporated throughout an active site to alter enzymic substrate specificity. Specifically, 13 different noncanonical side chains were incorporated at 12 different positions within the active site of N-acetylneuraminic acid lyase (NAL), and the resulting chemically modified enzymes were screened for activity with a range of aldehyde substrates. A modified enzyme containing a 2,3-dihydroxypropyl cysteine at position 190 was identified that had significantly increased activity for the aldol reaction of erythrose with pyruvate compared with the wild-type enzyme. Kinetic investigation of a saturation library of the canonical amino acids at the same position showed that this increased activity was not achievable with any of the 20 proteogenic amino acids. Structural and modeling studies revealed that the unique shape and functionality of the noncanonical side chain enabled the active site to be remodeled to enable more efficient stabilization of the transition state of the reaction. The ability to exploit an expanded amino acid alphabet can thus heighten the ambitions of protein engineers wishing to develop enzymes with new catalytic properties. PMID:28196894

  2. Common biosynthetic origins for polycyclic tetramate macrolactams from phylogenetically diverse bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Blodgett, Joshua A. V.; Oh, Dong-Chan; Cao, Shugeng; Currie, Cameron R.; Kolter, Roberto; Clardy, Jon

    2010-01-01

    A combination of small molecule chemistry, biosynthetic analysis, and genome mining has revealed the unexpected conservation of polycyclic tetramate macrolactam biosynthetic loci in diverse bacteria. Initially our chemical analysis of a Streptomyces strain associated with the southern pine beetle led to the discovery of frontalamides A and B, two previously undescribed members of this antibiotic family. Genome analyses and genetic manipulation of the producing organism led to the identification of the frontalamide biosynthetic gene cluster and several biosynthetic intermediates. The biosynthetic locus for the frontalamides’ mixed polyketide/amino acid structure encodes a hybrid polyketide synthase nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS), which resembles iterative enzymes known in fungi. No such mixed iterative PKS-NRPS enzymes have been characterized in bacteria. Genome-mining efforts revealed strikingly conserved frontalamide-like biosynthetic clusters in the genomes of phylogenetically diverse bacteria ranging from proteobacteria to actinomycetes. Screens for environmental actinomycete isolates carrying frontalamide-like biosynthetic loci led to the isolation of a number of positive strains, the majority of which produced candidate frontalamide-like compounds under suitable growth conditions. These results establish the prevalence of frontalamide-like gene clusters in diverse bacterial types, with medicinally important Streptomyces species being particularly enriched. PMID:20547882

  3. The effect of haem biosynthesis inhibitors and inducers on intestinal iron absorption and liver haem biosynthetic enzyme activities

    SciTech Connect

    Laftah, A.H.; Simpson, R.J. Peters, T.J.; Raja, K.B.

    2008-06-15

    The relation between haem biosynthesis and intestinal iron absorption is not well understood, we therefore investigated the effect of compounds that alter haem metabolism on duodenal iron absorption. CD1 mice were treated with either an inhibitor (succinyl acetone (SA)) or stimulator (2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide (AIA)) of haem biosynthesis. 5-Aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) dehydratase and urinary ALA and porphobilinogen (PBG) levels, were determined. Intestinal iron absorption was assayed with in vivo and in vitro techniques. Liver hepcidin (Hamp1) and duodenal iron transporter mRNA levels were measured using RT-PCR. AIA caused increased hepatic ALA synthase (1.6-fold) and ALA dehydratase (1.4-fold, both p < 0.005) activities and increased urinary ALA and PBG excretion (2.1- and 1.4-fold, p < 0.005, p < 0.05, respectively). In vivo intestinal iron absorption was reduced to 49% of control (p < 0.005). Mice treated with SA showed decreased urinary ALA and PBG levels (75 and 55% control, both p < 0.005) and reductions in both ALA synthase and ALA dehydratase activities (77 and 56% control, p < 0.05, p < 0.005, respectively) in the liver. Liver and duodenal haem and cytochrome oxidase levels were not significantly decreased. Iron absorption was enhanced (1.26-fold, p < 0.05) and hepatic Hamp1 mRNA was reduced (53% of control, p < 0.05). In vitro duodenal iron uptake after mice were injected with SA also demonstrated an increase in Fe(III) reduction and uptake (1.27- and 1.41-fold, p < 0.01 respectively). Simultaneous injections of SA and ALA blocked the enhancing effect on iron absorption seen with SA alone. We conclude that alterations in haem biosynthesis can influence iron absorption and in particular, the intermediate ALA seems to be an inhibitor of iron absorption.

  4. UPLC-qTOF-MS/MS-based phenolic profile and their biosynthetic enzyme activity used to discriminate between cashew apple (Anacardium occidentale L.) maturation stages.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Aline G; Brito, Edy S; Moura, Carlos F H; Ribeiro, Paulo R V; Miranda, Maria Raquel A

    2017-04-15

    Cashew immature and ripe peduncles (Anacardium occidentale L.) from orange- and red-colored clones CCP 76 and BRS 189, respectively, were prepared as juice or fibrous fraction and submitted to UPLC-MS analyses, while the soluble fraction was also submitted to enzymatic evaluation. Cinnamoyl glucoside was present in ripe juice samples from both cashew clones, while monogalloyl diglucoside and digalloyl glucoside were present in immature juice samples from both cashew clones. Four compounds were found at immature fiber of both clones, anacardic acids (1, 2, 3) and GA19. The phenolic biosynthetic pathway was evaluated in juice samples and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity decreased significantly during the development, although it was much higher in ripe CCP 76. UDP-glycosyltransferases activity differed between clones, however its product cinnamoyl glucoside was a possible chemical marker of ripe juice samples from both clones. Flavonol synthase showed the highest specific activity in both cashew clones and its product, flavonols were identified in cashew apple at immature and ripe stages.

  5. Global Identification of the Full-Length Transcripts and Alternative Splicing Related to Phenolic Acid Biosynthetic Genes in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhichao; Luo, Hongmei; Ji, Aijia; Zhang, Xin; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolic acids are among the main bioactive components in Salvia miltiorrhiza, and their biosynthesis has attracted widespread interest. However, previous studies on the biosynthesis of phenolic acids using next-generation sequencing platforms are limited with regard to the assembly of full-length transcripts. Based on hybrid-seq (next-generation and single molecular real-time sequencing) of the S. miltiorrhiza root transcriptome, we experimentally identified 15 full-length transcripts and four alternative splicing events of enzyme-coding genes involved in the biosynthesis of rosmarinic acid. Moreover, we herein demonstrate that lithospermic acid B accumulates in the phloem and xylem of roots, in agreement with the expression patterns of the identified key genes related to rosmarinic acid biosynthesis. According to co-expression patterns, we predicted that six candidate cytochrome P450s and five candidate laccases participate in the salvianolic acid pathway. Our results provide a valuable resource for further investigation into the synthetic biology of phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26904067

  6. Improvement of shikimic acid production in Escherichia coli with growth phase-dependent regulation in the biosynthetic pathway from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Yi; Hung, Wen-Pin; Tsai, Shu-Hsien

    2017-02-01

    Shikimic acid is an important metabolic intermediate with various applications. This paper presents a novel control strategy for the construction of shikimic acid producing strains, without completely blocking the aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways. Growth phase-dependent expression and gene deletion was performed to regulate the aroK gene expression in the shikimic acid producing Escherichia coli strain, SK4/rpsM. In this strain, the aroL and aroK genes were deleted, and the aroB, aroG*, ppsA, and tktA genes were overexpressed. The relative amount of shikimic acid that accumulated in SK4/rpsM was 1.28-fold higher than that in SK4/pLac. Furthermore, a novel shikimic acid production pathway, combining the expression of the dehydroquinate dehydratase-shikimate dehydrogenase (DHQ-SDH) enzyme from woody plants, was constructed in E. coli strains. The results demonstrated that a growth phase-dependent control of the aroK gene leads to higher SA accumulation (5.33 g/L) in SK5/pSK6. This novel design can achieve higher shikimic acid production by using the same amount of medium used by the current methods and can also be widely used for modifying other metabolic pathways.

  7. Ketol-acid reductoisomerase enzymes and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Govindarajan, Sridhar; Li, Yougen; Liao, Der-Ing; O'Keefe, Daniel P.; Minshull, Jeremy Stephen; Rothman, Steven Cary; Tobias, Alexander Vincent

    2015-10-27

    Provided herein are polypeptides having ketol-aid reductoisomerase activity as well as microbial host cells comprising such polypeptides. Polypeptides provided herein may be used in biosynthetic pathways, including, but not limited to, isobutanol biosynthetic pathways.

  8. Affinity labelling enzymes with esters of aromatic sulfonic acids

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Show-Chu; Shaw, Elliott

    1977-01-01

    Novel esters of aromatic sulfonic acids are disclosed. The specific esters are nitrophenyl p- and m-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate. Also disclosed is a method for specific inactivation of the enzyme, thrombin, employing nitrophenyl p-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate.

  9. Structural Characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Biotin Biosynthesis Enzymes 7,8-Diaminopelargonic Acid Synthase and Dethiobiotin Synthetase†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Sanghamitra; Lane, James M.; Lee, Richard E.; Rubin, Eric J.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) depends on biotin synthesis for survival during infection. In the absence of biotin, disruption of the biotin biosynthesis pathway results in cell death rather than growth arrest, an unusual phenotype for an Mtb auxotroph. Humans lack the enzymes for biotin production, making the proteins of this essential Mtb pathway promising drug targets. To this end, we have determined the crystal structures of the second and third enzymes of the Mtb biotin biosynthetic pathway, 7,8-diaminopelargonic acid synthase (DAPAS) and dethiobiotin synthetase (DTBS), at respective resolutions of 2.2 Å and 1.85 Å. Superimposition of the DAPAS structures bound either to the SAM analog sinefungin or to 7-keto-8-aminopelargonic acid (KAPA) allowed us to map the putative binding site for the substrates and to propose a mechanism by which the enzyme accommodates their disparate structures. Comparison of the DTBS structures bound to the substrate 7,8-diaminopelargonic acid (DAPA) or to ADP and the product dethiobiotin (DTB) permitted derivation of an enzyme mechanism. There are significant differences between the Mtb enzymes and those of other organisms; the Bacillus subtilis DAPAS, presented here at a high resolution of 2.2 Å, has active site variations and the Escherichia coli and Helicobacter pylori DTBS have alterations in their overall folds. We have begun to exploit the unique characteristics of the Mtb structures to design specific inhibitors against the biotin biosynthesis pathway in Mtb. PMID:20565114

  10. The Roles of Acids and Bases in Enzyme Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2007-01-01

    Many organic reactions are catalyzed by strong acids or bases that protonate or deprotonate neutral reactants leading to reactive cations or anions that proceed to products. In enzyme reactions, only weak acids and bases are available to hydrogen bond to reactants and to transfer protons in response to developing charges. Understanding this…

  11. Lactic Acid Bacterial Starter Culture with Antioxidant and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Biosynthetic Activities Isolated from Flatfish-Sikhae Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Won, Yeong Geol; Yu, Hyun-Hee; Chang, Young-Hyo; Hwang, Han-Joon

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to select a lactic acid bacterial strain as a starter culture for flatfish-Sikhae fermentation and to evaluate its suitability for application in a food system. Four strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from commercial flatfish-Sikhae were identified and selected as starter culture candidates through investigation of growth rates, salt tolerance, food safety, and functional properties such as antioxidative and antimicrobial activities. The fermentation properties of the starter candidates were also examined in food systems prepared with these strains (candidate batch) in comparison with a spontaneous fermentation process without starter culture (control batch) at 15°C. The results showed that the candidate YG331 batch had better fermentation properties such as viable cell count, pH, and acidity than the other experimental batches, including the control batch. The results are expressed according to selection criteria based on a preliminary sensory evaluation and physiochemical investigation. Also, only a small amount of histamine was detected with the candidate YG331 batch. The radical scavenging activity of the candidate batches was better compared with the control batch, and especially candidate YG331 batch showed the best radical scavenging activity. Also, we isolated another starter candidate (identified as Lactobacillus brevis PM03) with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing activity from commercial flatfish-Sikhae products. The sensory scores of the candidate YG331 batch were better than those of the other experimental batches in terms of flavor, color, and overall acceptance. In this study, we established selection criteria for the lactic acid bacterial starter for the flatfish-Sikhae production and finally selected candidate YG331 as the most suitable starter.

  12. The Unusual Acid-Accumulating Behavior during Ripening of Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is Linked to Changes in Transcription and Enzyme Activity Related to Citric and Malic Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    González-Agüero, Mauricio; Tejerina Pardo, Luis; Zamudio, María Sofía; Contreras, Carolina; Undurraga, Pedro; Defilippi, Bruno G

    2016-04-25

    Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is a subtropical fruit characterized by a significant increase in organic acid levels during ripening, making it an interesting model for studying the relationship between acidity and fruit flavor. In this work, we focused on understanding the balance between the concentration of organic acids and the gene expression and activity of enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these metabolites during the development and ripening of cherimoya cv. "Concha Lisa". Our results showed an early accumulation of citric acid and other changes associated with the accumulation of transcripts encoding citrate catabolism enzymes. During ripening, a 2-fold increase in malic acid and a 6-fold increase in citric acid were detected. By comparing the contents of these compounds with gene expression and enzymatic activity levels, we determined that cytoplasmic NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (cyNAD-MDH) and mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS) play important regulatory roles in the malic and citric acid biosynthetic pathways.

  13. The effects of a low protein diet on amino acids and enzymes in the serine synthesis pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Antflick, Jordan E; Baker, Glen B; Hampson, David Richard

    2010-06-01

    L-serine is required for cellular and tissue growth and is particularly important in the immature brain where it acts as a crucial neurotrophic factor. In this study, the levels of amino acids and enzymes in the L-serine biosynthetic pathway were examined in the forebrain, cerebellum, liver, and kidney after the exposure of mice to protein-restricted diets. The levels of L-serine, D-serine, and L-serine-O-phosphate were quantified by HPLC and quantitative Western blotting was used to measure changes in protein levels of five enzymes in the pathway. The L-serine biosynthetic enzyme phosphoserine phosphatase was strongly upregulated, while the serine degradative enzymes serine racemase and serine dehydratase were downregulated in the livers and kidneys of mice fed low (6%) or very low (2%) protein diets for 2 weeks compared with mice fed a normal diet (18% protein). No changes in these enzymes were seen in the brain. The levels of L-serine increased in the livers of mice fed 2% protein; in contrast, D-serine levels were reduced below the limit of detection in the livers of mice given either the 6 or 2% diets. D-Serine is a co-agonist at the NMDA class of glutamate receptors; no alterations in NMDA-R1 subunit expression were observed in liver or brain after protein restriction. These findings demonstrate that the expression of L-serine synthetic and degradative enzymes display reciprocal changes in the liver and kidney to increase L-serine and decrease D-serine levels under conditions of protein restriction, and that the brain is insulated from such changes.

  14. Adhesion, phenotypic expression, and biosynthetic capacity of corneal keratocytes on surfaces coated with hyaluronic acid of different molecular weights.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jui-Yang; Tu, I-Hao

    2012-03-01

    In ophthalmology, hyaluronic acid (HA) is an important extracellular matrix (ECM) component and is appropriate for use in generating a microenvironment for cell cultivation. The aim of this work was to evaluate the rabbit corneal keratocyte (RCK) growth in response to HA coatings under serum-free conditions. After modification with HA of varying molecular weights (MWs: 35-1500kDa), the surfaces were characterized by atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements, and were used for cell culture studies. Our data indicated that the substrates coated with higher negatively charged HA become rougher and are more hydrophilic, resulting in the decrease of cell adhesion and cell-matrix interaction. This early cellular event was likely responsible for the determination of keratocyte configuration. Additionally, for the growth of RCKs on dry HA coatings with surface roughness of 1.1-1.7 nm, a strong cell-cell interaction was observed, which may facilitate the formation of multicellular spheroid aggregates and maintenance of mitotically quiescent state. At each culture time point from 1 to 5 days, a better biosynthetic capacity associated with a higher prevalence of elevated ECM production was found for the cells in a spherical configuration. Irrespective of polysaccharide MW of surface coatings, the RCKs presented good viability without hypoxia-induced death. As compared with a monolayer of adherent keratocytes on tissue culture polystyrene plates and low MW HA-modified samples, the cell spheroids (76-110 μm in diameter) showed significantly higher expressions of keratocan and lumican and lower expressions of biglycan, similar to those of keratocytes in vivo. Moreover, the expression levels of corneal crystallin aldehyde dehydrogenase (7-9-fold increase) and nestin (10-16-fold increase) were greater in larger-sized spheroids, indicating higher ability to maintain cellular transparency and self-renewal potential. It is concluded that the cultured RCKs on surfaces

  15. Tannerella forsythia strains display different cell-surface nonulosonic acids: biosynthetic pathway characterization and first insight into biological implications.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Valentin; Janesch, Bettina; Windwarder, Markus; Maresch, Daniel; Braun, Matthias L; Megson, Zoë A; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Goneau, Marie-France; Sharma, Ashu; Altmann, Friedrich; Messner, Paul; Schoenhofen, Ian C; Schäffer, Christina

    2016-12-16

    Tannerella forsythia is an anaerobic, Gram-negative periodontal pathogen. A unique O-linked oligosaccharide decorates the bacterium's cell surface proteins and was shown to modulate the host immune response. In our study, we investigated the biosynthesis of the nonulosonic acid (NulO) present at the terminal position of this glycan. A bioinformatic analysis of T. forsythia genomes revealed a gene locus for the synthesis of pseudaminic acid (Pse) in the type strain ATCC 43037 while strains FDC 92A2 and UB4 possess a locus for the synthesis of legionaminic acid (Leg) instead. In contrast to the NulO in ATCC 43037, which has been previously identified as a Pse derivative (5-N-acetimidoyl-7-N-glyceroyl-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-l-glycero-l-manno-NulO), glycan analysis of strain UB4 performed in this study indicated a 350-Da, possibly N-glycolyl Leg (3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-d-glycero-d-galacto-NulO) derivative with unknown C5,7 N-acyl moieties. We have expressed, purified and characterized enzymes of both NulO pathways to confirm these genes' functions. Using capillary electrophoresis (CE), CE-mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, our studies revealed that Pse biosynthesis in ATCC 43037 essentially follows the UDP-sugar route described in Helicobacter pylori, while the pathway in strain FDC 92A2 corresponds to Leg biosynthesis in Campylobacter jejuni involving GDP-sugar intermediates. To demonstrate that the NulO biosynthesis enzymes are functional in vivo, we created knockout mutants resulting in glycans lacking the respective NulO. Compared to the wild-type strains, the mutants exhibited significantly reduced biofilm formation on mucin-coated surfaces, suggestive of their involvement in host-pathogen interactions or host survival. This study contributes to understanding possible biological roles of bacterial NulOs.

  16. Tannerella forsythia strains display different cell-surface nonulosonic acids: biosynthetic pathway characterization and first insight into biological implications

    PubMed Central

    Windwarder, Markus; Maresch, Daniel; Braun, Matthias L.; Megson, Zoë A.; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Goneau, Marie-France; Sharma, Ashu; Altmann, Friedrich; Messner, Paul; Schoenhofen, Ian C.; Schäffer, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is an anaerobic, Gram-negative periodontal pathogen. A unique O-linked oligosaccharide decorates the bacterium’s cell surface proteins and was shown to modulate the host immune response. In our study, we investigated the biosynthesis of the nonulosonic acid (NulO) present at the terminal position of this glycan. A bioinformatic analysis of T. forsythia genomes revealed a gene locus for the synthesis of pseudaminic acid (Pse) in the type strain ATCC 43037 while strains FDC 92A2 and UB4 possess a locus for the synthesis of legionaminic acid (Leg) instead. In contrast to the NulO in ATCC 43037, which has been previously identified as a Pse derivative (5-N-acetimidoyl-7-N-glyceroyl-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-l-glycero-l-manno-NulO), glycan analysis of strain UB4 performed in this study indicated a 350-Da, possibly N-glycolyl Leg (3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-d-glycero-d-galacto-NulO) derivative with unknown C5,7 N-acyl moieties. We have expressed, purified and characterized enzymes of both NulO pathways to confirm these genes’ functions. Using capillary electrophoresis (CE), CE–mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, our studies revealed that Pse biosynthesis in ATCC 43037 essentially follows the UDP-sugar route described in Helicobacter pylori, while the pathway in strain FDC 92A2 corresponds to Leg biosynthesis in Campylobacter jejuni involving GDP-sugar intermediates. To demonstrate that the NulO biosynthesis enzymes are functional in vivo, we created knockout mutants resulting in glycans lacking the respective NulO. Compared to the wild-type strains, the mutants exhibited significantly reduced biofilm formation on mucin-coated surfaces, suggestive of their involvement in host-pathogen interactions or host survival. This study contributes to understanding possible biological roles of bacterial NulOs. PMID:27986835

  17. Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase, the enzyme controlling marijuana psychoactivity, is secreted into the storage cavity of the glandular trichomes.

    PubMed

    Sirikantaramas, Supaart; Taura, Futoshi; Tanaka, Yumi; Ishikawa, Yu; Morimoto, Satoshi; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2005-09-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase is the enzyme responsible for the production of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana (Cannabis sativa L.). We suggest herein that THCA is biosynthesized in the storage cavity of the glandular trichomes based on the following observations. (i) The exclusive expression of THCA synthase was confirmed in the secretory cells of glandular trichomes by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis. (ii) THCA synthase activity was detected in the storage cavity content. (iii) Transgenic tobacco expressing THCA synthase fused to green fluorescent protein showed fluorescence in the trichome head corresponding to the storage cavity. These results also showed that secretory cells of the glandular trichomes secrete not only metabolites but also biosynthetic enzyme.

  18. Hydroxycinnamic acids and UV-B depletion: Profiling and biosynthetic gene expression in flesh and peel of wild-type and hp-1.

    PubMed

    Calvenzani, Valentina; Castagna, Antonella; Ranieri, Annamaria; Tonelli, Chiara; Petroni, Katia

    2015-06-01

    Hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) are phenolic compounds widely found in most plant families. Aim of the present work was to investigate their accumulation and biosynthetic gene expression in presence or absence of UV-B radiation in tomato fruits of wild-type and hp-1, a mutant characterized by exaggerated photoresponsiveness and increased fruit pigmentation. Gene expression and HCAs content were higher in hp-1 than in wild type peel and UV-B depletion determined a decrease in HCAs accumulation in wild-type and an increase in hp-1 fruits, generally in accordance with biosynthetic gene expression. In flesh, despite a similar transcript level of most genes between the two genotypes, HCAs content was generally higher in wild type than in hp-1, although remaining at a lower level with respect to wild type peel. Under UV-B depletion, a general reduction of HCAs content was observed in wild-type flesh, whereas an increase in the content of p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid was observed in hp-1 flesh.

  19. A gene encoding lysine 6-aminotransferase, which forms the beta-lactam precursor alpha-aminoadipic acid, is located in the cluster of cephamycin biosynthetic genes in Nocardia lactamdurans.

    PubMed Central

    Coque, J J; Liras, P; Laiz, L; Martín, J F

    1991-01-01

    A gene (lat) encoding lysine 6-aminotransferase was found upstream of the pcbAB (encoding alpha-aminoadipylcysteinyl-valine synthetase) and pcbC (encoding isopenicillin N synthase) genes in the cluster of early cephamycin biosynthetic genes in Nocardia lactamdurans. The lat gene was separated by a small intergenic region of 64 bp from the 5' end of the pcbAB gene. The lat gene contained an open reading frame of 1,353 nucleotides (71.4% G + C) encoding a protein of 450 amino acids with a deduced molecular mass of 48,811 Da. Expression of DNA fragments carrying the lat gene in Streptomyces lividans led to a high lysine 6-aminotransferase activity which was absent from untransformed S. lividans. The enzyme was partially purified from S. lividans(pULBS8) and showed a molecular mass of 52,800 Da as calculated by Sephadex gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. DNA sequences which hybridized strongly with the lat gene of N. lactamdurans were found in four cephamycin-producing Streptomyces species but not in four other actinomycetes which are not known to produce beta-lactams, suggesting that the gene is specific for beta-lactam biosynthesis and is not involved in general lysine catabolism. The protein encoded by the lat gene showed similarity to ornithine-5-aminotransferases and N-acetylornithine-5-aminotransferases and contained a pyridoxal phosphate-binding consensus amino acid sequence around Lys-300 of the protein. The evolutionary implications of the lat gene as a true beta-lactam biosynthetic gene are discussed. Images PMID:1917857

  20. Analysis of the Transcriptome of Erigeron breviscapus Uncovers Putative Scutellarin and Chlorogenic Acids Biosynthetic Genes and Genetic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Jin; Shu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Wei; Long, Guang-Qiang; Liu, Tao; Meng, Zheng-Gui; Chen, Jun-Wen; Yang, Sheng-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Background Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand-Mazz. is a famous medicinal plant. Scutellarin and chlorogenic acids are the primary active components in this herb. However, the mechanisms of biosynthesis and regulation for scutellarin and chlorogenic acids in E. breviscapus are considerably unknown. In addition, genomic information of this herb is also unavailable. Principal Findings Using Illumina sequencing on GAIIx platform, a total of 64,605,972 raw sequencing reads were generated and assembled into 73,092 non-redundant unigenes. Among them, 44,855 unigenes (61.37%) were annotated in the public databases Nr, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, and COG. The transcripts encoding the known enzymes involved in flavonoids and in chlorogenic acids biosynthesis were discovered in the Illumina dataset. Three candidate cytochrome P450 genes were discovered which might encode flavone 6-hydroase converting apigenin to scutellarein. Furthermore, 4 unigenes encoding the homologues of maize P1 (R2R3-MYB transcription factors) were defined, which might regulate the biosynthesis of scutellarin. Additionally, a total of 11,077 simple sequence repeat (SSR) were identified from 9,255 unigenes. Of SSRs, tri-nucleotide motifs were the most abundant motif. Thirty-six primer pairs for SSRs were randomly selected for validation of the amplification and polymorphism. The result revealed that 34 (94.40%) primer pairs were successfully amplified and 19 (52.78%) primer pairs exhibited polymorphisms. Conclusion Using next generation sequencing (NGS) technology, this study firstly provides abundant genomic data for E. breviscapus. The candidate genes involved in the biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation of scutellarin and chlorogenic acids were obtained in this study. Additionally, a plenty of genetic makers were generated by identification of SSRs, which is a powerful tool for molecular breeding and genetics applications in this herb. PMID:24956277

  1. A common mechanism of inhibition of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis mycolic acid biosynthetic pathway by isoxyl and thiacetazone.

    PubMed

    Grzegorzewicz, Anna E; Korduláková, Jana; Jones, Victoria; Born, Sarah E M; Belardinelli, Juan M; Vaquié, Adrien; Gundi, Vijay A K B; Madacki, Jan; Slama, Nawel; Laval, Françoise; Vaubourgeix, Julien; Crew, Rebecca M; Gicquel, Brigitte; Daffé, Mamadou; Morbidoni, Hector R; Brennan, Patrick J; Quémard, Annaik; McNeil, Michael R; Jackson, Mary

    2012-11-09

    Isoxyl (ISO) and thiacetazone (TAC), two prodrugs once used in the clinical treatment of tuberculosis, have long been thought to abolish Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) growth through the inhibition of mycolic acid biosynthesis, but their respective targets in this pathway have remained elusive. Here we show that treating M. tuberculosis with ISO or TAC results in both cases in the accumulation of 3-hydroxy C(18), C(20), and C(22) fatty acids, suggestive of an inhibition of the dehydratase step of the fatty-acid synthase type II elongation cycle. Consistently, overexpression of the essential hadABC genes encoding the (3R)-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratases resulted in more than a 16- and 80-fold increase in the resistance of M. tuberculosis to ISO and TAC, respectively. A missense mutation in the hadA gene of spontaneous ISO- and TAC-resistant mutants was sufficient to confer upon M. tuberculosis high level resistance to both drugs. Other mutations found in hypersusceptible or resistant M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium kansasii isolates mapped to hadC. Mutations affecting the non-essential mycolic acid methyltransferases MmaA4 and MmaA2 were also found in M. tuberculosis spontaneous ISO- and TAC-resistant mutants. That MmaA4, at least, participates in the activation of the two prodrugs as proposed earlier is not supported by our biochemical evidence. Instead and in light of the known interactions of both MmaA4 and MmaA2 with HadAB and HadBC, we propose that mutations affecting these enzymes may impact the binding of ISO and TAC to the dehydratases.

  2. Structural and Functional Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni PseG: a Udp-sugarhydrolase from the Pseudaminic Acid Biosynthetic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    E Rangarajan; A Proteau; Q Cui; S Logan; Z Potetinova; D Whitfield; E Purisima; M Cygler; A Matte; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Flagella of the bacteria Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni are important virulence determinants, whose proper assembly and function are dependent upon glycosylation at multiple positions by sialic acid-like sugars, such as 5,7-diacetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-l-glycero-l-manno-nonulosonic acid (pseudaminic acid (Pse)). The fourth enzymatic step in the pseudaminic acid pathway, the hydrolysis of UDP-2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-{beta}-l-altropyranose to generate 2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-l-altropyranose, is performed by the nucleotide sugar hydrolase PseG. To better understand the molecular basis of the PseG catalytic reaction, we have determined the crystal structures of C. jejuni PseG in apo-form and as a complex with its UDP product at 1.8 and 1.85 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In addition, molecular modeling was utilized to provide insight into the structure of the PseG-substrate complex. This modeling identifies a His{sup 17}-coordinated water molecule as the putative nucleophile and suggests the UDP-sugar substrate adopts a twist-boat conformation upon binding to PseG, enhancing the exposure of the anomeric bond cleaved and favoring inversion at C-1. Furthermore, based on these structures a series of amino acid substitution derivatives were constructed, altering residues within the active site, and each was kinetically characterized to examine its contribution to PseG catalysis. In conjunction with structural comparisons, the almost complete inactivation of the PseG H17F and H17L derivatives suggests that His{sup 17} functions as an active site base, thereby activating the nucleophilic water molecule for attack of the anomeric C-O bond of the UDP-sugar. As the PseG structure reveals similarity to those of glycosyltransferase family-28 members, in particular that of Escherichia coli MurG, these findings may also be of relevance for the mechanistic understanding of this important enzyme family.

  3. Mining and engineering natural-product biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Barrie; Micklefield, Jason

    2007-07-01

    Natural products continue to fulfill an important role in the development of therapeutic agents. In addition, with the advent of chemical genetics and high-throughput screening platforms, these molecules have become increasingly valuable as tools for interrogating fundamental aspects of biological systems. To access the vast portion of natural-product structural diversity that remains unexploited for these and other applications, genome mining and microbial metagenomic approaches are proving particularly powerful. When these are coupled with recombineering and related genetic tools, large biosynthetic gene clusters that remain intractable or cryptic in the native host can be more efficiently cloned and expressed in a suitable heterologous system. For lead optimization and the further structural diversification of natural-product libraries, combinatorial biosynthetic engineering has also become indispensable. However, our ability to rationally redesign biosynthetic pathways is often limited by our lack of understanding of the structure, dynamics and interplay between the many enzymes involved in complex biosynthetic pathways. Despite this, recent structures of fatty acid synthases should allow a more accurate prediction of the likely architecture of related polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase multienzymes.

  4. Differential fatty acid selection during biosynthetic S-acylation of a transmembrane protein (HEF) and other proteins in insect cells (Sf9) and in mammalian cells (CV1).

    PubMed

    Reverey, H; Veit, M; Ponimaskin, E; Schmidt, M F

    1996-09-27

    The transmembrane glycoprotein HEF and its acylation deficient mutant M1 were expressed in Sf9 insect cells infected with recombinant baculovirus and in CV1 mammalian cells using the vaccinia T7 system. In insect cells (Sf9), both wild type HEF and HEF(M1) are synthesized in their precursor form HEF0, which appears as a double band in SDS gels. Digestion with glycopeptidase F and endoglycosidase H reveals that the larger 84-kDa form is modified by the attachment of unprocessed carbohydrates of the high mannose type whereas the smaller 76-kDa form is non-glycosylated. As revealed by in vitro labeling experiments with palmitic acid another modification of HEF is the attachment of a long chain fatty acid to cysteine residue Cys-652 which is located at the internal border of the cytoplasmic membrane. After labeling with [3H]palmitic acid in both systems only HEF(WT) is acylated, whereas HEF(M1) is not. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of the fatty acids bound to HEF(WT) expressed in Sf9 insect cells reveals nearly 80% of palmitic acid. In contrast to this finding, the acylation pattern of HEF expressed in CV1 cells shows nearly the same amounts of stearic and palmitic acid (40%). Since the interconversion of the input [3H]palmitic acid to stearic acid is even lower in CV1 cells than in insect cells, it follows that only HEF expressed in mammalian, but not in insect cells selects for stearic acid during its biosynthetic acylation. We extended our study to acylation of endogenous proteins in Sf9 cells. In finding only palmitate linked to protein we present evidence that, in contrast to mammalian cells, insect cells (Sf9) cannot transfer stearic acid to polypeptide. This finding favors the hypothesis of enzymatic acylation over non-enzymatic mechanisms of acyl transfer to protein.

  5. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson’s Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  6. Regulation of amino acid metabolic enzymes and transporters in plants.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Réjane; Pilot, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    Amino acids play several critical roles in plants, from providing the building blocks of proteins to being essential metabolites interacting with many branches of metabolism. They are also important molecules that shuttle organic nitrogen through the plant. Because of this central role in nitrogen metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, degradation, and transport are tightly regulated to meet demand in response to nitrogen and carbon availability. While much is known about the feedback regulation of the branched biosynthesis pathways by the amino acids themselves, the regulation mechanisms at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and protein levels remain to be identified. This review focuses mainly on the current state of our understanding of the regulation of the enzymes and transporters at the transcript level. Current results describing the effect of transcription factors and protein modifications lead to a fragmental picture that hints at multiple, complex levels of regulation that control and coordinate transport and enzyme activities. It also appears that amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport, and stress signal integration can influence each other in a so-far unpredictable fashion.

  7. The role of CYP26 enzymes in retinoic acid clearance

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Jayne E.; Isoherranen, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a critical signaling molecule that regulates gene transcription and the cell cycle. Understanding of RA signaling has increased dramatically over the past decades, but the connection between whole body RA homeostasis and gene regulation in individual cells is still unclear. It has been proposed that cytochrome P450 family 26 (CYP26) enzymes have a role in determining the cellular exposure to RA by inactivating RA in cells that do not need RA. The CYP26 enzymes have been shown to metabolize RA efficiently and they are also inducible by RA in selected systems. However, their expression patterns in different cell types and a mechanistic understanding of their function is still lacking. Based on preliminary kinetic data and protein expression levels, one may predict that if CYP26A1 is expressed in the liver at even very low levels, it will be the major RA hydroxylase in this tissue. As such, it is an attractive pharmacological target for drug development when one aims to increase circulating or cellular RA concentrations. To further the understanding of how CYP26 enzymes contribute to the regulation of RA homeostasis, structural information of the CYP26’s, commercially available recombinant enzymes and good specific and sensitive antibodies are needed. PMID:19519282

  8. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced changes in oil content, fatty acid profiles and expression of four fatty acid biosynthetic genes in Chlorella vulgaris at early stationary growth phase.

    PubMed

    Jusoh, Malinna; Loh, Saw Hong; Chuah, Tse Seng; Aziz, Ahmad; Cha, Thye San

    2015-03-01

    Microalgae lipids and oils are potential candidates for renewable biodiesel. Many microalgae species accumulate a substantial amount of lipids and oils under environmental stresses. However, low growth rate under these adverse conditions account for the decrease in overall biomass productivity which directly influence the oil yield. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of exogenously added auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA) on the oil content, fatty acid compositions, and the expression of fatty acid biosynthetic genes in Chlorella vulgaris (UMT-M1). Auxin has been shown to regulate growth and metabolite production of several microalgae. Results showed that oil accumulation was highest on days after treatment (DAT)-2 with enriched levels of palmitic (C16:0) and stearic (C18:0) acids, while the linoleic (C18:2) and α-linolenic (C18:3n3) acids levels were markedly reduced by IAA. The elevated levels of saturated fatty acids (C16:0 and C18:0) were consistent with high expression of the β-ketoacyl ACP synthase I (KAS I) gene, while low expression of omega-6 fatty acid desaturase (ω-6 FAD) gene was consistent with low production of C18:2. However, the increment of stearoyl-ACP desaturase (SAD) gene expression upon IAA induction did not coincide with oleic acid (C18:1) production. The expression of omega-3 fatty acid desaturase (ω-3 FAD) gene showed a positive correlation with the synthesis of PUFA and C18:3n3.

  9. Assembly of a novel biosynthetic pathway for production of the plant flavonoid fisetin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stahlhut, Steen G; Siedler, Solvej; Malla, Sailesh; Harrison, Scott J; Maury, Jérôme; Neves, Ana Rute; Forster, Jochen

    2015-09-01

    Plant secondary metabolites are an underutilized pool of bioactive molecules for applications in the food, pharma and nutritional industries. One such molecule is fisetin, which is present in many fruits and vegetables and has several potential health benefits, including anti-cancer, anti-viral and anti-aging activity. Moreover, fisetin has recently been shown to prevent Alzheimer's disease in mice and to prevent complications associated with diabetes type I. Thus far the biosynthetic pathway of fisetin in plants remains elusive. Here, we present the heterologous assembly of a novel fisetin pathway in Escherichia coli. We propose a novel biosynthetic pathway from the amino acid, tyrosine, utilizing nine heterologous enzymes. The pathway proceeds via the synthesis of two flavanones never produced in microorganisms before--garbanzol and resokaempferol. We show for the first time a functional biosynthetic pathway and establish E. coli as a microbial platform strain for the production of fisetin and related flavonols.

  10. Evolution of alternative biosynthetic pathways for vitamin C following plastid acquisition in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Glen; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Pornsaksit, Varissa; Smirnoff, Nicholas

    2015-03-13

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is an enzyme co-factor in eukaryotes that also plays a critical role in protecting photosynthetic eukaryotes against damaging reactive oxygen species derived from the chloroplast. Many animal lineages, including primates, have become ascorbate auxotrophs due to the loss of the terminal enzyme in their biosynthetic pathway, L-gulonolactone oxidase (GULO). The alternative pathways found in land plants and Euglena use a different terminal enzyme, L-galactonolactone dehydrogenase (GLDH). The evolutionary processes leading to these differing pathways and their contribution to the cellular roles of ascorbate remain unclear. Here we present molecular and biochemical evidence demonstrating that GULO was functionally replaced with GLDH in photosynthetic eukaryote lineages following plastid acquisition. GULO has therefore been lost repeatedly throughout eukaryote evolution. The formation of the alternative biosynthetic pathways in photosynthetic eukaryotes uncoupled ascorbate synthesis from hydrogen peroxide production and likely contributed to the rise of ascorbate as a major photoprotective antioxidant.

  11. Dual Enzyme-Responsive Capsules of Hyaluronic Acid-block-Poly(Lactic Acid) for Sensing Bacterial Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tücking, Katrin-Stephanie; Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Schönherr, Holger

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of novel amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HYA) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) block copolymers is reported as the key element of a strategy to detect the presence of pathogenic bacterial enzymes. In addition to the formation of defined HYA-block-PLA assemblies, the encapsulation of fluorescent reporter dyes and the selective enzymatic degradation of the capsules by hyaluronidase and proteinase K are studied. The synthesis of the dual enzyme-responsive HYA-b-PLA is carried out by copper-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The resulting copolymers are assembled in water to form vesicular structures, which are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). DLS measurements show that both enzymes cause a rapid decrease in the hydrodynamic diameter of the nanocapsules. Fluorescence spectroscopy data confirm the liberation of encapsulated dye, which indicates the disintegration of the capsules and validates the concept of enzymatically triggered payload release. Finally, cytotoxicity assays confirm that the HYA-b-PLA nanocapsules are biocompatible with primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

  12. Multiple turnovers of the nicotino-enzyme PdxB require α-keto acids as co-substrates

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Johannes; Kim, Juhan; Copley, Shelley D.

    2012-01-01

    PdxB catalyzes the second step in the biosynthesis of pyridoxal phosphate by oxidizing 4-phospho-D-erythronate (4PE) to 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-4-phospho-butanoate (OHPB) with concomitant reduction of NAD+ to NADH. PdxB is a nicotino-enzyme wherein the NAD(H) cofactor remains tightly bound to PdxB. It has been a mystery how PdxB performs multiple turnovers since addition of free NAD+ does not re-oxidize the enzyme-bound NADH following conversion of 4PE to OHPB. We have solved this mystery by demonstrating that a variety of physiologically available α-ketoacids serve as oxidants of PdxB to sustain multiple turnovers. In a coupled assay using the next two enzymes of the biosynthetic pathway for pyridoxal phosphate (SerC and PdxA), we have found that α-ketoglutarate, oxaloacetic acid, and pyruvate are equally good substrates for PdxB (kcat/Km values ~ 1 × 104 M-1s-1). The kinetic parameters for the substrate 4PE include a kcat of 1.4 s-1, a Km of 2.9 μM, and a kcat/Km of 6.7 × 106 M-1s-1. Additionally, we have characterized the stereochemistry of α-ketoglutarate reduction by showing that D-2-HGA, but not L-2-HGA, is a competitive inhibitor vs. 4PE and a noncompetitive inhibitor vs. α-ketoglutarate. PMID:20831184

  13. Recent advances in Cannabis sativa research: biosynthetic studies and its potential in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Sirikantaramas, Supaart; Taura, Futoshi; Morimoto, Satoshi; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2007-08-01

    Cannabinoids, consisting of alkylresorcinol and monoterpene groups, are the unique secondary metabolites that are found only in Cannabis sativa. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabichromene (CBC) are well known cannabinoids and their pharmacological properties have been extensively studied. Recently, biosynthetic pathways of these cannabinoids have been successfully established. Several biosynthetic enzymes including geranylpyrophosphate:olivetolate geranyltransferase, tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase, cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) synthase and cannabichromenic acid (CBCA) synthase have been purified from young rapidly expanding leaves of C. sativa. In addition, molecular cloning, characterization and localization of THCA synthase have been recently reported. THCA and cannabigerolic acid (CBGA), its substrate, were shown to be apoptosis-inducing agents that might play a role in plant defense. Transgenic tobacco hairy roots expressing THCA synthase can produce THCA upon feeding of CBGA. These results open the way for biotechnological production of cannabinoids in the future.

  14. Structural and Kinetic Characterization of the LPS Biosynthetic Enzyme D-alpha,beta-D-heptose-1,7-bisphosphate Phosphatase (GmhB) from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.; Sugiman-Marangos, S; Zhang, K; Valvano, M; Wright, G; Junop, M

    2010-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide is a major component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and provides a permeability barrier to many commonly used antibiotics. ADP-heptose residues are an integral part of the LPS inner core, and mutants deficient in heptose biosynthesis demonstrate increased membrane permeability. The heptose biosynthesis pathway involves phosphorylation and dephosphorylation steps not found in other pathways for the synthesis of nucleotide sugar precursors. Consequently, the heptose biosynthetic pathway has been marked as a novel target for antibiotic adjuvants, which are compounds that facilitate and potentiate antibiotic activity. D-{alpha},{beta}-D-Heptose-1,7-bisphosphate phosphatase (GmhB) catalyzes the third essential step of LPS heptose biosynthesis. This study describes the first crystal structure of GmhB and enzymatic analysis of the protein. Structure-guided mutations followed by steady state kinetic analysis, together with established precedent for HAD phosphatases, suggest that GmhB functions through a phosphoaspartate intermediate. This study provides insight into the structure-function relationship of GmhB, a new target for combatting Gram-negative bacterial infection.

  15. Structural and kinetic characterization of the LPS biosynthetic enzyme D-alpha,beta-D-heptose-1,7-bisphosphate phosphatase (GmhB) from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Patricia L; Sugiman-Marangos, Seiji; Zhang, Kun; Valvano, Miguel A; Wright, Gerard D; Junop, Murray S

    2010-02-09

    Lipopolysaccharide is a major component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria and provides a permeability barrier to many commonly used antibiotics. ADP-heptose residues are an integral part of the LPS inner core, and mutants deficient in heptose biosynthesis demonstrate increased membrane permeability. The heptose biosynthesis pathway involves phosphorylation and dephosphorylation steps not found in other pathways for the synthesis of nucleotide sugar precursors. Consequently, the heptose biosynthetic pathway has been marked as a novel target for antibiotic adjuvants, which are compounds that facilitate and potentiate antibiotic activity. D-alpha,beta-D-heptose-1,7-bisphosphate phosphatase (GmhB) catalyzes the third essential step of LPS heptose biosynthesis. This study describes the first crystal structure of GmhB and enzymatic analysis of the protein. Structure-guided mutations followed by steady state kinetic analysis, together with established precedent for HAD phosphatases, suggest that GmhB functions through a phosphoaspartate intermediate. This study provides insight into the structure-function relationship of GmhB, a new target for combatting gram-negative bacterial infection.

  16. Enzyme therapy for lysosomal acid lipase deficiency in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Du, H; Schiavi, S; Levine, M; Mishra, J; Heur, M; Grabowski, G A

    2001-08-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is the critical enzyme for the hydrolysis of the triglycerides (TG) and cholesteryl esters (CE) delivered to lysosomes. Its deficiency produces two human phenotypes, Wolman disease (WD) and cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD). A targeted disruption of the LAL locus produced a null (lal( -/-)) mouse model that mimics human WD/CESD. The potential for enzyme therapy was tested using mannose terminated human LAL expressed in Pichia pastoris (phLAL), purified, and administered by tail vein injections to lal( -/-) mice. Mannose receptor (MR)-dependent uptake and lysosomal targeting of phLAL were evidenced ex vivo using competitive assays with MR-positive J774E cells, a murine monocyte/macrophage line, immunofluorescence and western blots. Following (bolus) IV injection, phLAL was detected in Kupffer cells, lung macrophages and intestinal macrophages in lal( -/-) mice. Two-month-old lal( -/-) mice received phLAL (1.5 U/dose) or saline injections once every 3 days for 30 days (10 doses). The treated lal( -/-) mice showed nearly complete resolution of hepatic yellow coloration; hepatic weight decreased by approximately 36% compared to PBS-treated lal( -/-) mice. Histologic analyses of numerous tissues from phLAL-treated mice showed reductions in macrophage lipid storage. TG and cholesterol levels decreased by approximately 50% in liver, 69% in spleen and 50% in small intestine. These studies provide feasibility for LAL enzyme therapy in human WD and CESD.

  17. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  18. Reconstruction of the Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Pathway of Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7 Based on Genomic and Bibliomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Regiane; Carepo, Marta S. P.; Oliveira, Rui; Marques, Rodolfo; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Schneider, Maria P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7 is extremophile Gram-positive bacteria able to survive in cold environments. A key factor to understanding cold adaptation processes is related to the modification of fatty acids composing the cell membranes of psychrotrophic bacteria. In our study we show the in silico reconstruction of the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of E. antarcticum B7. To build the stoichiometric model, a semiautomatic procedure was applied, which integrates genome information using KEGG and RAST/SEED. Constraint-based methods, namely, Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and elementary modes (EM), were applied. FBA was implemented in the sense of hexadecenoic acid production maximization. To evaluate the influence of the gene expression in the fluxome analysis, FBA was also calculated using the log2⁡FC values obtained in the transcriptome analysis at 0°C and 37°C. The fatty acid biosynthesis pathway showed a total of 13 elementary flux modes, four of which showed routes for the production of hexadecenoic acid. The reconstructed pathway demonstrated the capacity of E. antarcticum B7 to de novo produce fatty acid molecules. Under the influence of the transcriptome, the fluxome was altered, promoting the production of short-chain fatty acids. The calculated models contribute to better understanding of the bacterial adaptation at cold environments. PMID:27595107

  19. WAX INDUCER1 (HvWIN1) transcription factor regulates free fatty acid biosynthetic genes to reinforce cuticle to resist Fusarium head blight in barley spikelets

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun; Yogendra, Kalenahalli N.; Karre, Shailesh; Kushalappa, Ajjamada C.; Dion, Yves; Choo, Thin M.

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum, is one of the most devastating diseases of wheat and barley. Resistance to FHB is highly complex and quantitative in nature, and is most often classified as resistance to spikelet infection and resistance to spread of pathogen through the rachis. In the present study, a resistant (CI9831) and a susceptible (H106-371) two-row barley genotypes, with contrasting levels of spikelet resistance to FHB, pathogen or mock-inoculated, were profiled for metabolites based on liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry. The key resistance-related (RR) metabolites belonging to fatty acids, phenylpropanoids, flavonoids and terpenoid biosynthetic pathways were identified. The free fatty acids (FFAs) linoleic and palmitic acids were among the highest fold change RR induced (RRI) metabolites. These FFAs are deposited as cutin monomers and oligomers to reinforce the cuticle, which acts as a barrier to pathogen entry. Quantitative real-time PCR studies revealed higher expressions of KAS2, CYP86A2, CYP89A2, LACS2 and WAX INDUCER1 (HvWIN1) transcription factor in the pathogen-inoculated resistant genotype than in the susceptible genotype. Knockdown of HvWIN1 by virus-induced genes silencing (VIGS) in resistant genotype upon pathogen inoculation increased the disease severity and fungal biomass, and decreased the abundance of FFAs like linoleic and palmitic acids. Notably, the expression of CYP86A2, CYP89A2 and LAC2 genes was also suppressed, proving the link of HvWIN1 in regulating these genes in cuticle biosynthesis as a defense response. PMID:27194736

  20. Combinatorial Effects of Fatty Acid Elongase Enzymes on Nervonic Acid Production in Camelina sativa

    PubMed Central

    Huai, Dongxin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Chunyu; Cahoon, Edgar B.; Zhou, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) with chain lengths of 20 carbons and longer provide feedstocks for various applications; therefore, improvement of VLCFA contents in seeds has become an important goal for oilseed enhancement. VLCFA biosynthesis is controlled by a multi-enzyme protein complex referred to as fatty acid elongase, which is composed of β-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), β-ketoacyl-CoA reductase (KCR), β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase (HCD) and enoyl reductase (ECR). KCS has been identified as the rate-limiting enzyme, but little is known about the involvement of other three enzymes in VLCFA production. Here, the combinatorial effects of fatty acid elongase enzymes on VLCFA production were assessed by evaluating the changes in nervonic acid content. A KCS gene from Lunaria annua (LaKCS) and the other three elongase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana were used for the assessment. Five seed-specific expressing constructs, including LaKCS alone, LaKCS with AtKCR, LaKCS with AtHCD, LaKCS with AtECR, and LaKCS with AtKCR and AtHCD, were transformed into Camelina sativa. The nervonic acid content in seed oil increased from null in wild type camelina to 6-12% in LaKCS-expressing lines. However, compared with that from the LaKCS-expressing lines, nervonic acid content in mature seeds from the co-expressing lines with one or two extra elongase genes did not show further increases. Nervonic acid content from LaKCS, AtKCR and AtHCD co-expressing line was significantly higher than that in LaKCS-expressing line during early seed development stage, while the ultimate nervonic acid content was not significantly altered. The results from this study thus provide useful information for future engineering of oilseed crops for higher VLCFA production. PMID:26121034

  1. Structural characterization of CalO1: a putative orsellinic acid methyltransferase in the calicheamicin-biosynthetic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Aram; Singh, Shanteri; Bingman, Craig A.; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr, George N.

    2011-11-07

    The X-ray structure determination at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution of the putative orsellinic acid C3 O-methyltransferase (CalO1) involved in calicheamicin biosynthesis is reported. Comparison of CalO1 with a homology model of the functionally related calicheamicin orsellinic acid C2 O-methyltransferase (CalO6) implicates several residues that are likely to contribute to the regiospecificity of alkylation. Consistent with the proposed requirement of an acyl-carrier-protein-bound substrate, this structural study also reveals structural determinants within CalO1 that are anticipated to accommodate an association with an acyl carrier protein.

  2. Diversifying Carotenoid Biosynthetic Pathways by Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Umeno, Daisuke; Tobias, Alexander V.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2005-01-01

    Microorganisms and plants synthesize a diverse array of natural products, many of which have proven indispensable to human health and well-being. Although many thousands of these have been characterized, the space of possible natural products—those that could be made biosynthetically—remains largely unexplored. For decades, this space has largely been the domain of chemists, who have synthesized scores of natural product analogs and have found many with improved or novel functions. New natural products have also been made in recombinant organisms, via engineered biosynthetic pathways. Recently, methods inspired by natural evolution have begun to be applied to the search for new natural products. These methods force pathways to evolve in convenient laboratory organisms, where the products of new pathways can be identified and characterized in high-throughput screening programs. Carotenoid biosynthetic pathways have served as a convenient experimental system with which to demonstrate these ideas. Researchers have mixed, matched, and mutated carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes and screened libraries of these “evolved” pathways for the emergence of new carotenoid products. This has led to dozens of new pathway products not previously known to be made by the assembled enzymes. These new products include whole families of carotenoids built from backbones not found in nature. This review details the strategies and specific methods that have been employed to generate new carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in the laboratory. The potential application of laboratory evolution to other biosynthetic pathways is also discussed. PMID:15755953

  3. Functional Expression and Extension of Staphylococcal Staphyloxanthin Biosynthetic Pathway in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2012-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway for staphyloxanthin, a C30 carotenoid biosynthesized by Staphylococcus aureus, has previously been proposed to consist of five enzymes (CrtO, CrtP, CrtQ, CrtM, and CrtN). Here, we report a missing sixth enzyme, 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-aldehyde dehydrogenase (AldH), in the staphyloxanthin biosynthetic pathway and describe the functional expression of the complete staphyloxanthin biosynthetic pathway in Escherichia coli. When we expressed the five known pathway enzymes through artificial synthetic operons and the wild-type operon (crtOPQMN) in E. coli, carotenoid aldehyde intermediates such as 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4-al accumulated without being converted into staphyloxanthin or other intermediates. We identified an aldH gene located 670 kilobase pairs from the known staphyloxanthin gene cluster in the S. aureus genome and an aldH gene in the non-staphyloxanthin-producing Staphylococcus carnosus genome. These two putative enzymes catalyzed the missing oxidation reaction to convert 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4-al into 4,4′-diaponeurosporenoic acid in E. coli. Deletion of the aldH gene in S. aureus abolished staphyloxanthin biosynthesis and caused accumulation of 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4-al, confirming the role of AldH in staphyloxanthin biosynthesis. When the complete staphyloxanthin biosynthetic pathway was expressed using an artificial synthetic operon in E. coli, staphyloxanthin-like compounds, which contained altered fatty acid acyl chains, and novel carotenoid compounds were produced, indicating functional expression and coordination of the six staphyloxanthin pathway enzymes. PMID:22535955

  4. Hydrogen isotope analysis of amino acids and whole cells reflects biosynthetic processing of nutrient- and water-derived hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, P.; Newsome, S.; Steele, A.; Fogel, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen (H) isotopes serve as sensitive tracers of biochemical processes that can be exploited to answer critical questions in biogeochemistry, ecology, and microbiology. Despite this apparent utility, relatively little is known about the specific mechanisms of H isotope fractionation involved in biosynthesis. In order to understand how organisms incorporate hydrogen from their chemical milieu into biomass, we have cultured the model bacterium E. coli MG1655 in a variety of media composed of deuterium-labeled nutrients and waters. Isotopic analysis of bulk cell mass reveals that the H fractionation between media water and cell material varies as a function of the nutrient source, with commonly used organic food sources (glucose and tryptone) leading to far smaller fractionation signals than non-standard ones (such as formamide, adenine, and urea). In addition, we have completed compound specific isotope analysis of amino acids using combined GC-IRMS. Amino acids harvested from E. coli cultured on glucose in water of varied D/H composition posses an extraordinary range of isotopic compositions (400-600 %). Furthermore, these amino acids follow a systematic distribution of D/H where proline is always heaviest and glycine is always lightest. However, when the short-chain peptide tryptone is used in place of glucose, only the non-essential amino acids reflect media water D/H values, suggesting the direct incorporation of some media-borne amino acids into cellular protein. These observations provide a foundation for understanding the cellular routing of hydrogen obtained from food and water sources and indicate that D/H analysis can serve as a powerful probe of biological function.

  5. Genome-enabled determination of amino acid biosynthesis in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris and identification of biosynthetic pathways for alanine, glycine, and isoleucine by 13C-isotopologue profiling.

    PubMed

    Schatschneider, Sarah; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg; Rückert, Christian; Becker, Anke; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Pühler, Alfred; Niehaus, Karsten

    2011-10-01

    To elucidate the biosynthetic pathways for all proteinogenic amino acids in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, this study combines results obtained by in silico genome analysis and by (13)C-NMR-based isotopologue profiling to provide a panoramic view on a substantial section of bacterial metabolism. Initially, biosynthesis pathways were reconstructed from an improved annotation of the complete genome of X. campestris pv. campestris B100. This metabolic reconstruction resulted in the unequivocal identification of biosynthesis routes for 17 amino acids in total: arginine, asparagine, aspartate, cysteine, glutamate, glutamine, histidine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and valine. Ambiguous pathways were reconstructed from the genome data for alanine, glycine, and isoleucine biosynthesis. (13)C-NMR analyses supported the identification of the metabolically active pathways. The biosynthetic routes for these amino acids were derived from the precursor molecules pyruvate, serine, and pyruvate, respectively. By combining genome analysis and isotopologue profiling, a comprehensive set of biosynthetic pathways covering all proteinogenic amino acids was unraveled for this plant pathogenic bacterium, which plays an important role in biotechnology as a producer of the exopolysaccharide xanthan. The data obtained lay ground for subsequent functional analyses in post-genomics and biotechnology, while the innovative combination of in silico and wet lab technology described here is promising as a general approach to elucidate metabolic pathways.

  6. Application of quantitative targeted absolute proteomics to profile protein expression changes of hepatic transporters and metabolizing enzymes during cholic acid-promoted liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takayuki; Tachikawa, Masanori; Ohtsuka, Hideo; Fukase, Koji; Nakayama, Shun; Sakata, Naoaki; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Naitoh, Takeshi; Katayose, Yu; Uchida, Yasuo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Unno, Michiaki

    2017-02-26

    Preoperative administration of cholic acid (CA) may be an option to increase the liver volume before elective liver resection surgery, so it is important to understand its effects on liver functionality for drug transport and metabolism. The purpose of this study was to clarify the absolute protein expression dynamics of transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the liver of mice fed CA-containing diet for 5 days (CA1) and mice fed CA-containing diet for 5 days followed by diet without CA for 7 days (CA2), in comparison with non CA-fed control mice. The CA1 group showed the increased liver weight, cell proliferation index, and oxidative stress, but no increase of apoptosis. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomics revealed (i) decreases in basolateral bile acid transporters ntcp, oatp1a1, oatp1b2, bile acid synthesis-related enzymes cyp7a1 and cyp8b1, and drug transporters bcrp, mrp6, ent1, oatp2b1, and (ii) increases in glutathione biosynthetic enzymes and drug-metabolizing enzyme cyp3a11. Liver concentrations of reduced and oxidized glutathione were both increased. In the CA2 group, the increased liver weight was maintained, while the biochemical features and protein profiles were restored to the non-CA-fed control levels. These findings suggest that CA administration alters liver functionality per body during liver regeneration and restoration.

  7. Distribution of a Fatty Acid Cyclase Enzyme System in Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Vick, Brady A.; Zimmermann, Don C.

    1979-01-01

    Extracts from tissues of 24 plant species were tested for the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of 13-l-hydroperoxy-cis-9,15-trans-11-octadecatrienoic acid to the cyclic fatty acid 12-oxo-cis-10,15-phytodienoic acid. The enzyme was detected in 15 of the 24 tissues examined, and was demonstrated in seedlings, leaves, and fruits. PMID:16660932

  8. Structural characterization of CalO2: A putative orsellinic acid P450 oxidase in the calicheamicin biosynthetic

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Jason G.; Johnson, Heather D.; Singh, Shanteri; Bingman, Craig A.; Lei, In-Kyoung; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2009-08-13

    Although bacterial iterative Type I polyketide synthases are now known to participate in the biosynthesis of a small set of diverse natural products, the subsequent downstream modification of the resulting polyketide products remains poorly understood. Toward this goal, we report the X-ray structure determination at 2.5 A resolution and preliminary characterization of the putative orsellenic acid P450 oxidase (CalO2) involved in calicheamicin biosynthesis. These studies represent the first crystal structure for a P450 involved in modifying a bacterial iterative Type I polyketide product and suggest the CalO2-catalyzed step may occur after CalO3-catalyzed iodination and may also require a coenzyme A- (CoA) or acyl carrier protein- (ACP) bound substrate. Docking studies also reveal a putative docking site within CalO2 for the CLM orsellinic acid synthase (CalO5) ACP domain which involves a well-ordered helix along the CalO2 active site cavity that is unique compared with other P450 structures.

  9. Harnessing biodiesel-producing microbes: from genetic engineering of lipase to metabolic engineering of fatty acid biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinyong; Yan, Yunjun; Madzak, Catherine; Han, Bingnan

    2017-02-01

    Microbial production routes, notably whole-cell lipase-mediated biotransformation and fatty-acids-derived biosynthesis, offer new opportunities for synthesizing biodiesel. They compare favorably to immobilized lipase and chemically catalyzed processes. Genetically modified whole-cell lipase-mediated in vitro route, together with in vivo and ex vivo microbial biosynthesis routes, constitutes emerging and rapidly developing research areas for effective production of biodiesel. This review presents recent advances in customizing microorganisms for producing biodiesel, via genetic engineering of lipases and metabolic engineering (including system regulation) of fatty-acids-derived pathways. Microbial hosts used include Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris and Aspergillus oryzae. These microbial cells can be genetically modified to produce lipases under different forms: intracellularly expressed, secreted or surface-displayed. They can be metabolically redesigned and systematically regulated to obtain balanced biodiesel-producing cells, as highlighted in this study. Such genetically or metabolically modified microbial cells can support not only in vitro biotransformation of various common oil feedstocks to biodiesel, but also de novo biosynthesis of biodiesel from glucose, glycerol or even cellulosic biomass. We believe that the genetically tractable oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica could be developed to an effective biodiesel-producing microbial cell factory. For this purpose, we propose several engineered pathways, based on lipase and wax ester synthase, in this promising oleaginous host.

  10. Enzyme-assisted target recycling (EATR) for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2014-09-07

    Fast, reliable and sensitive methods for nucleic acid detection are of growing practical interest with respect to molecular diagnostics of cancer, infectious and genetic diseases. Currently, PCR-based and other target amplification strategies are most extensively used in practice. At the same time, such assays have limitations that can be overcome by alternative approaches. There is a recent explosion in the design of methods that amplify the signal produced by a nucleic acid target, without changing its copy number. This review aims at systematization and critical analysis of the enzyme-assisted target recycling (EATR) signal amplification technique. The approach uses nucleases to recognize and cleave the probe-target complex. Cleavage reactions produce a detectable signal. The advantages of such techniques are potentially low sensitivity to contamination and lack of the requirement of a thermal cycler. Nucleases used for EATR include sequence-dependent restriction or nicking endonucleases or sequence independent exonuclease III, lambda exonuclease, RNase H, RNase HII, AP endonuclease, duplex-specific nuclease, DNase I, or T7 exonuclease. EATR-based assays are potentially useful for point-of-care diagnostics, single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyping and microRNA analysis. Specificity, limit of detection and the potential impact of EATR strategies on molecular diagnostics are discussed.

  11. Determination of pyruvic acid by using enzymic fluorescence capillary analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Gao, Xiu-Feng; Li, Yong-Sheng; Ju, Xiang; Zhang, Jia; Zheng, Jia

    2008-07-15

    A new method (P-LE-FCA) for the determination of pyruvic acid was proposed based on liquid enzyme method (LE) and fluorescence capillary analysis (FCA). The optimum experimental conditions were as follows: the excitation and emission wavelengths were 350 and 460 nm, respectively; the reaction time and temperature were 20 min and 38 degrees C, respectively; the pH of phosphate buffer solution was 7.5; the concentrations of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and lactate dehydrogenase were 1.0 mmol L(-1) and 5.0 k UL(-1), respectively. The linear range of this method was 0.2-1.2 mmol L(-1) (Delta F=327.13C-10.018, r=0.9942). Its detection limit was 0.012 mmol L(-1). And its relative standard deviation was 0.86%. Only 18 microL of total reaction solution is enough for the detection. P-LE-FCA has some merits such as lower cost, simple operation procedure and micro determination. It has been used for the determination of pyruvic acid content in human urine samples.

  12. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  13. The thiamine biosynthetic enzyme ThiC catalyzes multiple turnovers and is inhibited by S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) metabolites.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Lauren D; Downs, Diana M

    2013-10-18

    ThiC (4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine phosphate synthase; EC 4.1.99.17) is a radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) enzyme that uses a [4Fe-4S](+) cluster to reductively cleave AdoMet to methionine and a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical that initiates catalysis. In plants and bacteria, ThiC converts the purine intermediate 5-aminoimidazole ribotide to 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine phosphate, an intermediate of thiamine pyrophosphate (coenzyme B1) biosynthesis. In this study, assay conditions were implemented that consistently generated 5-fold molar excess of HMP, demonstrating that ThiC undergoes multiple turnovers. ThiC activity was improved by in situ removal of product 5'-deoxyadenosine. The activity was inhibited by AdoMet metabolites S-adenosylhomocysteine, adenosine, 5'-deoxyadenosine, S-methyl-5'-thioadenosine, methionine, and homocysteine. Neither adenosine nor S-methyl-5'-thioadenosine had been shown to inhibit radical AdoMet enzymes, suggesting that ThiC is distinct from other family members. The parameters for improved ThiC activity and turnover described here will facilitate kinetic and mechanistic analyses of ThiC.

  14. Evolution in biosynthetic pathways: two enzymes catalyzing consecutive steps in methionine biosynthesis originate from a common ancestor and possess a similar regulatory region.

    PubMed

    Belfaiza, J; Parsot, C; Martel, A; de la Tour, C B; Margarita, D; Cohen, G N; Saint-Girons, I

    1986-02-01

    The metC gene of Escherichia coli K-12 was cloned and the nucleotide sequence of the metC gene and its flanking regions was determined. The translation initiation codon was identified by sequencing the NH2-terminal part of beta-cystathionase, the MetC gene product. The metC gene (1185 nucleotides) encodes a protein having 395 amino acid residues. The 5' noncoding region was found to contain a "Met box" homologous to sequences suggestive of operator structures upstream from other methionine genes that are controlled by the product of the pleiotropic regulatory metJ gene. The deduced amino acid sequence of beta-cystathionase showed extensive homology with that of the MetB protein (cystathionine gamma-synthase) that catalyzes the preceding step in methionine biosynthesis. The homology strongly suggests that the structural genes for the MetB and MetC proteins evolved from a common ancestral gene.

  15. Diffusible gas transmitter signaling in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus: identification of the biosynthetic enzymes of nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using a de novo assembled transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Fontanilla, Tiana M; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C; Lenz, Petra H

    2014-06-01

    Neurochemical signaling is a major component of physiological/behavioral control throughout the animal kingdom. Gas transmitters are perhaps the most ancient class of molecules used by nervous systems for chemical communication. Three gases are generally recognized as being produced by neurons: nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As part of an ongoing effort to identify and characterize the neurochemical signaling systems of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton in much of the North Atlantic Ocean, we have mined a de novo assembled transcriptome for sequences encoding the neuronal biosynthetic enzymes of these gases, i.e. nitric oxide synthase (NOS), heme oxygenase (HO) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), respectively. Using Drosophila proteins as queries, two NOS-, one HO-, and one CBS-encoding transcripts were identified. Reverse BLAST and structural analyses of the deduced proteins suggest that each is a true member of its respective enzyme family. RNA-Seq data collected from embryos, early nauplii, late nauplii, early copepodites, late copepodites and adults revealed the expression of each transcript to be stage specific: one NOS restricted primarily to the embryo and the other was absent in the embryo but expressed in all other stages, no CBS expression in the embryo, but present in all other stages, and HO expressed across all developmental stages. Given the importance of gas transmitters in the regulatory control of a number of physiological processes, these data open opportunities for investigating the roles these proteins play under different life-stage and environmental conditions in this ecologically important species.

  16. Metabolic flux between unsaturated and saturated fatty acids is controlled by the FabA:FabB ratio in the fully reconstituted fatty acid biosynthetic pathway of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xirui; Yu, Xingye; Khosla, Chaitan

    2013-11-19

    The entire fatty acid biosynthetic pathway of Escherichia coli, starting from the acetyl-CoA carboxylase, has been reconstituted in vitro from 14 purified protein components. Radiotracer analysis verified stoichiometric conversion of acetyl-CoA and NAD(P)H to the free fatty acid product, allowing implementation of a facile spectrophotometric assay for kinetic analysis of this multienzyme system. At steady state, a maximal turnover rate of 0.5 s(-1) was achieved. Under optimal turnover conditions, the predominant products were C16 and C18 saturated as well as monounsaturated fatty acids. The reconstituted system allowed us to quantitatively interrogate the factors that influence metabolic flux toward unsaturated versus saturated fatty acids. In particular, the concentrations of the dehydratase FabA and the β-ketoacyl synthase FabB were found to be crucial for controlling this property. Via changes in these variables, the percentage of unsaturated fatty acid produced could be adjusted between 10 and 50% without significantly affecting the maximal turnover rate of the pathway. Our reconstituted system provides a powerful tool for understanding and engineering rate-limiting and regulatory steps in this complex and practically significant metabolic pathway.

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding the gibberellin biosynthetic enzyme ent-kaurene synthase B from pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima L.).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Saito, T; Abe, H; Yamane, H; Murofushi, N; Kamiya, Y

    1996-08-01

    The first committed step in the formation of diterpenoids leading to gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis is the conversion of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP) to ent-kaurene. ent-Kaurene synthase A (KSA) catalyzes the conversion of GGDP to copalyl diphosphate (CDP), which is subsequently converted to ent-kaurene by ent-kaurene synthase B (KSB). A full-length KSB cDNA was isolated from developing cotyledons in immature seeds of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima L.). Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed from the amino acid sequences obtained from the purified protein to amplify a cDNA fragment, which was used for library screening. The isolated full-length cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein, which demonstrated the KSB activity to cyclize [3H]CDP to [3H]ent-kaurene. The KSB transcript was most abundant in growing tissues, but was detected in every organ in pumpkin seedlings. The deduced amino acid sequence shares significant homology with other terpene cyclases, including the conserved DDXXD motif, a putative divalent metal ion-diphosphate complex binding site. A putative transit peptide sequence that may target the translated product into the plastids is present in the N-terminal region.

  18. Gallic acid and gallic acid derivatives: effects on drug metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ow, Yin-Yin; Stupans, Ieva

    2003-06-01

    Gallic acid and its structurally related compounds are found widely distributed in fruits and plants. Gallic acid, and its catechin derivatives are also present as one of the main phenolic components of both black and green tea. Esters of gallic acid have a diverse range of industrial uses, as antioxidants in food, in cosmetics and in the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, gallic acid is employed as a source material for inks, paints and colour developers. Studies utilising these compounds have found them to possess many potential therapeutic properties including anti-cancer and antimicrobial properties. In this review, studies of the effects of gallic acid, its esters, and gallic acid catechin derivatives on Phase I and Phase II enzymes are examined. Many published reports of the effects of the in vitro effects of gallic acid and its derivatives on drug metabolising enzymes concern effects directly on substrate (generally drug or mutagen) metabolism or indirectly through observed effects in Ames tests. In the case of the Ames test an antimutagenic effect may be observed through inhibition of CYP activation of indirectly acting mutagens and/or by scavenging of metabolically generated mutagenic electrophiles. There has been considerable interest in the in vivo effects of the gallate esters because of their incorporation into foodstuffs as antioxidants and in the catechin gallates with their potential role as chemoprotective agents. Principally an induction of Phase II enzymes has been observed however more recent studies using HepG2 cells and primary cultures of human hepatocytes provide evidence for the overall complexity of actions of individual components versus complex mixtures, such as those in food. Further systematic studies of mechanisms of induction and inhibition of drug metabolising enzymes by this group of compounds are warranted in the light of their distribution and consequent ingestion, current uses and suggested therapeutic potential. However, it

  19. In vitro assay of the chlorophyll biosynthetic enzyme Mg-chelatase: Resolution of the activity into soluble and membrane-bound fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1991-07-01

    The first committed step in chlorophyll synthesis is the Mg-chelatase-catalyzed insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin IX. Since iron insertion into protoporphyrin leads to heme formation, Mg-chelatase lies at the branch point of heme and chlorophyll synthesis in chloroplasts. Little is known about the enzymology or regulation of Mg-chelatase, as it has been assayed only in intact cucumber chloroplasts. In this report we describe an in vitro assay for Mg-chelatase. Mg-chelatase activity in intact pea chloroplasts was 3- to 4-fold higher than in cucumber chloroplasts. This activity survived chloroplast lysis and could be fractionated by centrifugation into supernatant and pellet components. Both of these fractions were required to reconstitute Mg-chelatase activity, and both were inactivated by boiling indicating that the enzyme is composed of soluble and membrane-bound protein(s). The product of the reaction was confirmed fluorometrically as the magnesium chelate of the porphyrin substrate. The specific activity of the reconstituted system was typically 1 nmol of Mg-deuteroporphyrin per h per mg of protein, and activity was linear for at least 60 min under our assay conditions. ATP and magnesium were required for Mg-chelatase activity and the enzymen was sensitive to the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide (I{sub 50}, 20 {mu}M). Broken and reconstituted cucumber chloroplasts were unable to maintain Mg-chelatase activity. However, the cucumber supernatant fraction was active when combined with the pellet fraction of peas; the converse was not true, which suggested that the cucumber pellet was the component that lost activity during lysis.

  20. Structural Biology of the Purine Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Morar, Mariya; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    Purine biosynthesis requires ten enzymatic transformations to generate inosine monophosphate. PurF, PurD, PurL, PurM, PurC, and PurB are common to all pathways, while PurN or PurT, PurK/PurE-I or PurE-II, PurH or PurP, and PurJ or PurO catalyze the same steps in different organisms. X-ray crystal structures are available for all 15 purine biosynthetic enzymes, including seven ATP-dependent enzymes, two amidotransferases and two tetrahydrofolate-dependent enzymes. Here we summarize the structures of the purine biosynthetic enzymes, discuss similarities and differences, and present arguments for pathway evolution. Four of the ATP-dependent enzymes belong to the ATP-grasp superfamily and two to the PurM superfamily. The amidotransferases are unrelated with one utilizing an NTN-glutaminase and the other utilizing a triad glutaminase. Likewise the tetrahydrofolate-dependent enzymes are unrelated. Ancestral proteins may have included a broad specificity enzyme instead of PurD, PurT, PurK, PurC, and PurP, and a separate enzyme instead of PurM and PurL. PMID:18712276

  1. Production of cellulolytic enzymes containing cinnamic acid esterase from Schizophyllum commune.

    PubMed

    Tsujiyama, Sho-ichi; Ueno, Hitomi

    2011-01-01

    To develop enzyme preparations capable of digesting plant biomass, we examined the production of cinnamic acid esterase as well as cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes in cultures of Schizophyllum commune. The cinnamic acid esterase was produced in the cultures containing solid cellulosic substrates, with production being enhanced by delignifying the wood powder. This indicates that these esterases are produced by cellulose, despite their substrates being phenolic compounds. Cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes, with the exception of α-arabinofuranosidase, were also produced in cultures containing cellulosic substances. These results show that enzyme preparation can have high activity of cinnamic acid esterase and cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes when S. commune is incubated in the presence of cellulose. These enzyme preparations will be useful for digesting plant biomass and for releasing cinnamic acid derivatives from plant cell walls.

  2. Metabolic profiling of alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Mori, Valerio; Amici, Adolfo; Mazzola, Francesca; Di Stefano, Michele; Conforti, Laura; Magni, Giulio; Ruggieri, Silverio; Raffaelli, Nadia; Orsomando, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    NAD plays essential redox and non-redox roles in cell biology. In mammals, its de novo and recycling biosynthetic pathways encompass two independent branches, the "amidated" and "deamidated" routes. Here we focused on the indispensable enzymes gating these two routes, i.e. nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT), which in mammals comprises three distinct isozymes, and NAD synthetase (NADS). First, we measured the in vitro activity of the enzymes, and the levels of all their substrates and products in a number of tissues from the C57BL/6 mouse. Second, from these data, we derived in vivo estimates of enzymes'rates and quantitative contributions to NAD homeostasis. The NMNAT activity, mainly represented by nuclear NMNAT1, appears to be high and nonrate-limiting in all examined tissues, except in blood. The NADS activity, however, appears rate-limiting in lung and skeletal muscle, where its undetectable levels parallel a relative accumulation of the enzyme's substrate NaAD (nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide). In all tissues, the amidated NAD route was predominant, displaying highest rates in liver and kidney, and lowest in blood. In contrast, the minor deamidated route showed higher relative proportions in blood and small intestine, and higher absolute values in liver and small intestine. Such results provide the first comprehensive picture of the balance of the two alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in different mammalian tissues under physiological conditions. This fills a gap in the current knowledge of NAD biosynthesis, and provides a crucial information for the study of NAD metabolism and its role in disease.

  3. Reducing AsA leads to leaf lesion and defence response in knock-down of the AsA biosynthetic enzyme GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase gene in tomato plant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chanjuan; Ouyang, Bo; Yang, Changxian; Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Yuyang; Zhang, Junhong; Li, Hanxia; Ye, Zhibiao

    2013-01-01

    As a vital antioxidant, L-ascorbic acid (AsA) affects diverse biological processes in higher plants. Lack of AsA in cell impairs plant development. In the present study, we manipulated a gene of GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase which catalyzes the conversion of D-mannose-1-P to GDP-D-mannose in AsA biosynthetic pathway and found out the phenotype alteration of tomato. In the tomato genome, there are four members of GMP gene family and they constitutively expressed in various tissues in distinct expression patterns. As expected, over-expression of SlGMP3 increased total AsA contents and enhanced the tolerance to oxidative stress in tomato. On the contrary, knock-down of SlGMP3 significantly decreased AsA contents below the threshold level and altered the phenotype of tomato plants with lesions and further senescence. Further analysis indicated the causes for this symptom could result from failing to instantly deplete the reactive oxygen species (ROS) as decline of free radical scavenging activity. More ROS accumulated in the leaves and then triggered expressions of defence-related genes and mimic symptom occurred on the leaves similar to hypersensitive responses against pathogens. Consequently, the photosynthesis of leaves was dramatically fallen. These results suggested the vital roles of AsA as an antioxidant in leaf function and defence response of tomato.

  4. Nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided signal amplification strategy for biochemical analysis: status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Qing, Taiping; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Wen, Li; Shangguan, Jingfang; Mao, Zhengui; Lei, Yanli

    2016-04-01

    Owing to their highly efficient catalytic effects and substrate specificity, the nucleic acid tool enzymes are applied as 'nano-tools' for manipulating different nucleic acid substrates both in the test-tube and in living organisms. In addition to the function as molecular scissors and molecular glue in genetic engineering, the application of nucleic acid tool enzymes in biochemical analysis has also been extensively developed in the past few decades. Used as amplifying labels for biorecognition events, the nucleic acid tool enzymes are mainly applied in nucleic acids amplification sensing, as well as the amplification sensing of biorelated variations of nucleic acids. With the introduction of aptamers, which can bind different target molecules, the nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided signal amplification strategies can also be used to sense non-nucleic targets (e.g., ions, small molecules, proteins, and cells). This review describes and discusses the amplification strategies of nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided biosensors for biochemical analysis applications. Various analytes, including nucleic acids, ions, small molecules, proteins, and cells, are reviewed briefly. This work also addresses the future trends and outlooks for signal amplification in nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided biosensors.

  5. Bioactive enzyme-metal composites: the entrapment of acid phosphatase within gold and silver.

    PubMed

    Ben-Knaz, Racheli; Avnir, David

    2009-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the entrapment of an enzyme within an aggregated metallic matrix and the development of a bioactive enzyme-metal composite. Whereas the use of organic polymers and metal oxides for the preparation of enzymatically active materials is well developed, the third principle enzyme-material combination, namely protein-metal bulk, has not yet been reported. A new methodology for the entrapment of organic molecules and polymers within metals has been employed for the preparation of bioactive acid phosphatase@gold and acid phosphatase@silver, according to which room temperature reduction of the metal cation is carried out in the presence of the enzyme to be entrapped. Protectability of the entrapped enzyme against harsh conditions is shown: the acidic enzyme is kept alive under basic conditions.

  6. Non-enzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doctor, V. M.; Oro, J.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the mechanism of nonenzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid in the presence of metal ions and pyridoxal. The results suggest that aspartic acid is first converted to oxalacetic acid by transamination with pyridoxal which in turn is converted to pyridoxamine. This is followed by decarboxylation of oxalacetic acid to form pyruvic acid which transaminates with pyridoxamine to form alanine. The possible significance of these results to prebiotic molecular evolution is briefly discussed.

  7. Enterobacter sp. I-3, a bio-herbicide inhibits gibberellins biosynthetic pathway and regulates abscisic acid and amino acids synthesis to control plant growth.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Park, Jae-Man; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-12-01

    Very few bacterial species were identified as bio-herbicides for weed control. The present research was focused to elucidate the plant growth retardant properties of Enterobacter sp. I-3 during their interaction by determining the changes in endogenous photosynthetic pigments, plant hormones and amino acids. The two bacterial isolates I-4-5 and I-3 were used to select the superior bacterium for controlling weed seeds (Echinochloa crus-galli L. and Portulaca oleracea L.) germination. The post-inoculation of I-3 (Enterobacter sp. I-3) significantly inhibited the weeds seed germination than their controls. The mechanism of bacterium induced plant growth reduction was identified in lettuce treated with I-3 bacterium and compared their effects with known chemical herbicide, trinexapac-ethyl (TE). The treatment of I-3 and TE showed a significant inhibitory effect on shoot length, leaf number, leaf length, leaf width, shoot weight, root weight and chlorophyll content in lettuce seedlings. The endogenous gibberellins (GAs) and abscisic acid (ABA) analysis showed that Enterobacter sp. I-3 treated plants had lower levels of GAs (GA12, GA19, GA20 and GA8) and GAs/ABA ratio and then, the higher level of ABA when compared to their controls. Indeed, the individual amino acids ie., aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, threonine, alanine, serine, leucine, isoleucine and tyrosine were declined in TE and I-3 exposed plants. Our results suggest that the utilization of Enterobacter sp. I-3 inhibits the GAs pathway and amino acids synthesis in weeds to control their growth can be an alternative to chemical herbicides.

  8. Biosynthetic inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi

    2006-08-25

    Inorganic chemistry and biology can benefit greatly from each other. Although synthetic and physical inorganic chemistry have been greatly successful in clarifying the role of metal ions in biological systems, the time may now be right to utilize biological systems to advance coordination chemistry. One such example is the use of small, stable, easy-to-make, and well-characterized proteins as ligands to synthesize novel inorganic compounds. This biosynthetic inorganic chemistry is possible thanks to a number of developments in biology. This review summarizes the progress in the synthesis of close models of complex metalloproteins, followed by a description of recent advances in using the approach for making novel compounds that are unprecedented in either inorganic chemistry or biology. The focus is mainly on synthetic "tricks" learned from biology, as well as novel structures and insights obtained. The advantages and disadvantages of this biosynthetic approach are discussed.

  9. Stimulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthetic pathways delays axonal degeneration after axotomy.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yo; Araki, Toshiyuki; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2006-08-16

    Axonal degeneration occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases and after traumatic injury and is a self-destructive program independent from programmed cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that overexpression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (Nmnat1) or exogenous application of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) can protect axons of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from degeneration caused by mechanical or neurotoxic injury. In mammalian cells, NAD can be synthesized from multiple precursors, including tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside (NmR), via multiple enzymatic steps. To determine whether other components of these NAD biosynthetic pathways are capable of delaying axonal degeneration, we overexpressed each of the enzymes involved in each pathway and/or exogenously administered their respective substrates in DRG cultures and assessed their capacity to protect axons after axotomy. Among the enzymes tested, Nmnat1 had the strongest protective effects, whereas nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase showed moderate protective activity in the presence of their substrates. Strong axonal protection was also provided by Nmnat3, which is predominantly located in mitochondria, and an Nmnat1 mutant localized to the cytoplasm, indicating that the subcellular location of NAD production is not crucial for protective activity. In addition, we showed that exogenous application of the NAD precursors that are the substrates of these enzymes, including nicotinic acid mononucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, and NmR, can also delay axonal degeneration. These results indicate that stimulation of NAD biosynthetic pathways via a variety of interventions may be useful in preventing or delaying axonal degeneration.

  10. Modification of bactericidal fatty acids by an enzyme of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, J E; Shryock, T R; Kapral, F A

    1992-04-01

    Certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus produce an enzyme capable of inactivating the bactericidal fatty acids produced in staphylococcal abscesses by esterification to various alcohols. The enzyme, called FAME (fatty acid modifying enzyme), has a pH optimum between 5.5 and 6.0 and a temperature optimum of about 40 degrees C. Enzyme activity is not affected by edetic acid or by the presence or absence of sodium and potassium ions. Although FAME can utilise methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol or cholesterol as substrates, cholesterol appears to be the preferred substrate. FAME esterifies without being an esterase operating in reverse. Strains capable of producing the enzyme can synthesise it in trypticase soy broth and in a chemically defined medium, but not necessarily in equal amounts. FAME production is correlated with the ability of a strain to grow and survive within the tissues.

  11. Kinetic characteristics of polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyzing galacturonic acid oligomers using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid chains found in pectin. Interest in polygalacturonase enzymes continues as they are useful in a number of industrial processes and conversely, detrimental, as they are involved in maceration of economically important crops. While a good...

  12. Structural and functional analysis of Campylobacter jejuni PseG: a udp-sugar hydrolase from the pseudaminic acid biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S; Proteau, Ariane; Cui, Qizhi; Logan, Susan M; Potetinova, Zhanna; Whitfield, Dennis; Purisima, Enrico O; Cygler, Miroslaw; Matte, Allan; Sulea, Traian; Schoenhofen, Ian C

    2009-07-31

    Flagella of the bacteria Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni are important virulence determinants, whose proper assembly and function are dependent upon glycosylation at multiple positions by sialic acid-like sugars, such as 5,7-diacetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-l-glycero-l-manno-nonulosonic acid (pseudaminic acid (Pse)). The fourth enzymatic step in the pseudaminic acid pathway, the hydrolysis of UDP-2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-beta-l-altropyranose to generate 2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-l-altropyranose, is performed by the nucleotide sugar hydrolase PseG. To better understand the molecular basis of the PseG catalytic reaction, we have determined the crystal structures of C. jejuni PseG in apo-form and as a complex with its UDP product at 1.8 and 1.85 A resolution, respectively. In addition, molecular modeling was utilized to provide insight into the structure of the PseG-substrate complex. This modeling identifies a His(17)-coordinated water molecule as the putative nucleophile and suggests the UDP-sugar substrate adopts a twist-boat conformation upon binding to PseG, enhancing the exposure of the anomeric bond cleaved and favoring inversion at C-1. Furthermore, based on these structures a series of amino acid substitution derivatives were constructed, altering residues within the active site, and each was kinetically characterized to examine its contribution to PseG catalysis. In conjunction with structural comparisons, the almost complete inactivation of the PseG H17F and H17L derivatives suggests that His(17) functions as an active site base, thereby activating the nucleophilic water molecule for attack of the anomeric C-O bond of the UDP-sugar. As the PseG structure reveals similarity to those of glycosyltransferase family-28 members, in particular that of Escherichia coli MurG, these findings may also be of relevance for the mechanistic understanding of this important enzyme family.

  13. Liquid chromatographic determination of hippuric acid for the evaluation of ethacrynic acid as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, A S; Dowling, M

    1999-05-01

    A rapid, simple and interference-free method is described to evaluate the inhibitory effects of organic compounds on the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme irrespective of their acid-base properties. The assay is based on the high performance liquid chromatographic separation of the synthetic substrate hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine, the hydrolysis product hippuric acid and the test compound. Using the new method, the diuretic drug ethacrynic acid was found to act as an inhibitor for the enzyme in a non competitive mode.

  14. Protective effect of p-methoxycinnamic acid, an active phenolic acid against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis: modulating biotransforming bacterial enzymes and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, Sivagami; Venkatachalam, Karthikkumar; Jeyavel, Kabalimoorthy; Namasivayam, Nalini

    2014-09-01

    Objective of the study is to evaluate the modifying potential of p-methoxycinnamic acid (p-MCA), an active rice bran phenolic acid on biotransforming bacterial enzymes and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. 48 male albino wistar rats were divided into six groups. Group1 (control) received modified pellet diet and 0.1 % carboxymethylcellulose; group2 received modified pellet diet along with p-MCA (80 mg/kg b.wt. p.o.) everyday for 16 weeks; groups 3-6 received 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) (20 mg/kg b.wt.) subcutaneous injection once a week for the first 4 weeks, while groups 4-6 received p-MCA at three different doses of 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg b.wt. p.o. everyday for 16 weeks. A significant increase in carcinogen-activating enzymes (cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, cytochrome P4502E1, NADH-cytochrome-b5-reductase and NADPH-cytochrome-P450 reductase) with concomitant decrease in phaseII enzymes, DT-Diaphorase, glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronyl-transferase and gamma glutamyltransferase were observed in group3 compared to control. DMH treatment significantly increased the activities of feacal and colonic bacterial enzymes (β-glucosidase, β-galactosidase, β-glucuronidase, nitroreductase, sulphatase and mucinase). p-MCA supplementation (40 mg/kg b.wt) to carcinogen exposed rats inhibited these enzymes, which were near those of control rats. The formation of dysplastic aberrant crypt foci in the colon and the histopathological observations of the liver also supports our biochemical findings. p-MCA (40 mg/kg b.wt.) offers remarkable modulating efficacy of biotransforming bacterial and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in colon carcinogenesis.

  15. Characterization of Enzymes Involved in Fatty Acid Elongation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-11

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene involved in synthesis of 1,3- beta - glucan in vitro. J Bacteriol, 1995. 177(11): p. 3227-34. 39. Ladeveze, V...which conferred resistance to echinocandins and had defects in "- glucan synthase activities [38]. ELO2 was also reported as FEN1, a mutant...required for heterologous fatty acid elongase activity encodes a microsomal beta -keto-reductase. J Biol Chem, 2002. 277(13): p. 11481-8. 4. Chang, S.I

  16. Biochemical Analysis of the Biosynthetic Pathway of an Anticancer Tetracycline SF2575

    PubMed Central

    Pickens, Lauren B.; Kim, Woncheol; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Hui; Watanabe, Kenji; Gomi, Shuichi; Tang, Yi

    2009-01-01

    SF2575 1 is a tetracycline polyketide produced by Streptomyces sp. SF2575 and displays exceptionally potent anticancer activity towards a broad range of cancer cell lines. The structure of SF2575 is characterized by a highly substituted tetracycline aglycon. The modifications include methylation of the C-6 and C-12a hydroxyl groups, acylation of the 4-(S)-hydroxyl with salicylic acid, C-glycosylation of the C-9 of the D-ring with d-olivose and further acylation of the C4′-hydroxyl of d-olivose with the unusual angelic acid. Understanding the biosynthesis of SF2575 can therefore expand the repertoire of enzymes that can modify tetracyclines, and facilitate engineered biosynthesis of SF2575 analogs. In this study, we identified, sequenced and functionally analyzed the ssf biosynthetic gene cluster which contains 40 putative open reading frames. Genes encoding enzymes that can assemble the tetracycline aglycon, as well as installing these unique structural features are found in the gene cluster. Biosynthetic intermediates were isolated from the SF2575 culture extract to suggest the order of pendant groups addition is C-9 glycosylation, C-4 salicylation and O-4′ angelycylation. Using in vitro assays, two enzymes that are responsible for C-4 acylation of salicylic acid were identified. These enzymes include an ATP-dependent salicylyl-CoA ligase SsfL1 and a putative GDSL family acyltransferase SsfX3, both of which were shown to have relaxed substrate specificity towards substituted benzoic acids. Since the salicylic acid moiety is critically important for the anticancer properties of SF2575, verification of the activities of SsfL1 and SsfX3 sets the stage for biosynthetic modification of the C-4 group towards structural-activity relationship studies of SF2575. Using heterologous biosynthesis in Streptomyces lividans, we also determined that biosynthesis of the SF2575 tetracycline aglycon 8 parallels that of oxytetracycline 4 and diverges after the assembly of 4-keto

  17. Functional characterization of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase, kaurene synthase and kaurene oxidase in the Salvia miltiorrhiza gibberellin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Ping; Tong, Yuru; Cheng, Qiqing; Hu, Yating; Zhang, Meng; Yang, Jian; Teng, Zhongqiu; Gao, Wei; Huang, Luqi

    2016-03-14

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge is highly valued in traditional Chinese medicine for its roots and rhizomes. Its bioactive diterpenoid tanshinones have been reported to have many pharmaceutical activities, including antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Previous studies found four different diterpenoid biosynthetic pathways from the universal diterpenoid precursor (E,E,E)-geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) in S. miltiorrhiza. Here, we describe the functional characterization of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (SmCPSent), kaurene synthase (SmKS) and kaurene oxidase (SmKO) in the gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway. SmCPSent catalyzes the cyclization of GGPP to ent-copalyl diphosphate (ent-CPP), which is converted to ent-kaurene by SmKS. Then, SmKO catalyzes the three-step oxidation of ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid. Our results show that the fused enzyme SmKS-SmCPSent increases ent-kaurene production by several fold compared with separate expression of SmCPSent and SmKS in yeast strains. In this study, we clarify the GA biosynthetic pathway from GGPP to ent-kaurenoic acid and provide a foundation for further characterization of the subsequent enzymes involved in this pathway. These insights may allow for better growth and the improved accumulation of bioactive tanshinones in S. miltiorrhiza through the regulation of the expression of these genes during developmental processes.

  18. Functional characterization of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase, kaurene synthase and kaurene oxidase in the Salvia miltiorrhiza gibberellin biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ping; Tong, Yuru; Cheng, Qiqing; Hu, Yating; Zhang, Meng; Yang, Jian; Teng, Zhongqiu; Gao, Wei; Huang, Luqi

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge is highly valued in traditional Chinese medicine for its roots and rhizomes. Its bioactive diterpenoid tanshinones have been reported to have many pharmaceutical activities, including antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Previous studies found four different diterpenoid biosynthetic pathways from the universal diterpenoid precursor (E,E,E)-geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) in S. miltiorrhiza. Here, we describe the functional characterization of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (SmCPSent), kaurene synthase (SmKS) and kaurene oxidase (SmKO) in the gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway. SmCPSent catalyzes the cyclization of GGPP to ent-copalyl diphosphate (ent-CPP), which is converted to ent-kaurene by SmKS. Then, SmKO catalyzes the three-step oxidation of ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid. Our results show that the fused enzyme SmKS-SmCPSent increases ent-kaurene production by several fold compared with separate expression of SmCPSent and SmKS in yeast strains. In this study, we clarify the GA biosynthetic pathway from GGPP to ent-kaurenoic acid and provide a foundation for further characterization of the subsequent enzymes involved in this pathway. These insights may allow for better growth and the improved accumulation of bioactive tanshinones in S. miltiorrhiza through the regulation of the expression of these genes during developmental processes. PMID:26971881

  19. The Catalytic Machinery of a Key Enzyme in Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, Ronald E.; Faehnle, Christopher R.; Blanco, Julio; Moore, Roger A.; Liu, Xuying; Arachea, Buenafe T.; Pavlovsky, Alexander G.

    2013-02-28

    The aspartate pathway of amino acid biosynthesis is essential for all microbial life but is absent in mammals. Characterizing the enzyme-catalyzed reactions in this pathway can identify new protein targets for the development of antibiotics with unique modes of action. The enzyme aspartate {beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH) catalyzes an early branch point reaction in the aspartate pathway. Kinetic, mutagenic, and structural studies of ASADH from various microbial species have been used to elucidate mechanistic details and to identify essential amino acids involved in substrate binding, catalysis, and enzyme regulation. Important structural and functional differences have been found between ASADHs isolated from these bacterial and fungal organisms, opening the possibility for developing species-specific antimicrobial agents that target this family of enzymes.

  20. Effect of organic/inorganic compounds on the enzymes in soil under acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang-shen; Xu, Dong-mei; Wang, Li-ming; Li, Ke-bin; Liu, Wei-ping

    2004-01-01

    The main effects of pollutions including acid rain, Cu2+, atrazine and their combined products on the activities of urease, invertin, acid phosphatase and catalase were studied by means of orthogonal test. The results showed that H+ and Cu2+ had significant influence on the activities of four enzymes and the ability of their inhibiting followed the order: H+ > Cu2+. Al3+ and atrazine only had litter effects on the activity of urease and phosphatase, respectively. Furthermore, interaction analysis revealed that Cu2+ -H+ affected on the activity of acid phosphatase significantly and antagonism on invertin and urease, Cu2+ -atrazine only exhibited the synergism on the activity of acid phosphatase. But atrazine-H+ had non-interaction within the investigated concentration range. Among four enzymes, acid phosphatase was the most sensitive one to the contaminations.

  1. Model of the haem biosynthetic pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves-Brown, Jeanette; Williams, Tim J.; Parish, J. H.

    1995-03-01

    (delta) -Aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) is a photodynamic therapy (PDT) agent that utilizes the haem biosynthetic pathway to create therapeutic levels of photoactive agents within tissues. Photosensitizer dosimetry and drug concentrations in target tissues are areas of uncertainty within PDT research. A program is described that uses numerical methods to model mathematically the haem biosynthetic pathway from ALA to haem as a set of partial differential rate equations. The data generated allow analysis and correlation with functions describing the kinetic behavior governing the reactions. This analysis provides insight into the production of protoporphyrin IX and other photoactive agents from exogenous ALA and provides a method for optimizing parameters, and for highlighting metabolic steps to which the product formation is most sensitive.

  2. Characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Gene Cluster: Purification of Acyl Carrier Protein (ACP) and Malonyl-Coenzyme A:ACP Transacylase (FabD)

    PubMed Central

    Kutchma, Alecksandr J.; Hoang, Tung T.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    1999-01-01

    A DNA fragment containing the Pseudomonas aeruginosa fabD (encoding malonyl-coenzyme A [CoA]:acyl carrier protein [ACP] transacylase), fabG (encoding β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase), acpP (encoding ACP), and fabF (encoding β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II) genes was cloned and sequenced. This fab gene cluster is delimited by the plsX (encoding a poorly understood enzyme of phospholipid metabolism) and pabC (encoding 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate lyase) genes; the fabF and pabC genes seem to be translationally coupled. The fabH gene (encoding β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III), which in most gram-negative bacteria is located between plsX and fabD, is absent from this gene cluster. A chromosomal temperature-sensitive fabD mutant was obtained by site-directed mutagenesis that resulted in a W258Q change. A chromosomal fabF insertion mutant was generated, and the resulting mutant strain contained substantially reduced levels of cis-vaccenic acid. Multiple attempts aimed at disruption of the chromosomal fabG gene were unsuccessful. We purified FabD as a hexahistidine fusion protein (H6-FabD) and ACP in its native form via an ACP-intein-chitin binding domain fusion protein, using a novel expression and purification scheme that should be applicable to ACP from other bacteria. Matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization spectroscopy, native polyacrylamide electrophoresis, and amino-terminal sequencing revealed that (i) most of the purified ACP was properly modified with its 4′-phosphopantetheine functional group, (ii) it was not acylated, and (iii) the amino-terminal methionine was removed. In an in vitro system, purified ACP functioned as acyl acceptor and H6-FabD exhibited malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase activity. PMID:10464226

  3. Salicylic acid and ascorbic acid retrieve activity of antioxidative enzymes and structure of Caralluma tuberculata calli on PEG stress.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Riaz U; Zia, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Muhammad F

    2017-02-02

    Biochemical adaptations and morphological changes are cellular aptitude originated on biotic and abiotic stresses. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) induces drought stress in the nutrient solution. In the present investigation, Caralluma tuberculata calli is exposed to PEG and antioxidative molecules. By increasing the level of antioxidative enzymes (SOD, POD, CAT, APX, and GR), the PEG-stressed calli falls off upon exposure to non-enzymatic antioxidants (ascorbic acid and salicylic acid). Under PEG-stress, several cellular and sub-cellular changes such as alteration in plasma membrane thickness, change in nucleus shape, increase in nucleoli, deformation of thylakoid membranes, and increase in plastoglobuli are observed through electron microscopic images. From our results we conclude that application of PEG (a drought causative agent) leads to an increase in the level of antioxidative enzymes and also deformation of cellular organelles. However, application of ascorbic acid and salicylic acid eradicate drought effect induced by PEG.

  4. Enzyme-entrapped mesoporous silica for treatment of uric acid disorders.

    PubMed

    Muthukoori, Shanthini; Narayanan, Naagarajan; Chandra, Manuguri Sesha Sarath; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2013-05-01

    Gout is an abnormality in the body resulting in the accumulation of uric acid mainly in joints. Dissolution of uric acid crystals into soluble allantoin by the enzyme uricase might provide a better alternative for the treatment of gout. This work aims to investigate the feasibility of a transdermal patch loaded with uricase for better patient compliance. Mesoporous silica (SBA-15) was chosen as the matrix for immobilisation of uricase. Highly oriented mesoporous SBA-15 was synthesized, characterized and uricase was physisorbed in the mesoporous material. The percentage adsorption and release of enzyme in borate buffer was monitored. The release followed linear kinetics and greater than 80% enzyme activity was retained indicating the potential of this system as an effective enzyme immobilization matrix. The enzyme permeability was studied with Wistar rat skin and human cadaver skin. It was found that in case of untreated rat skin 10% of enzyme permeated through skin in 100 h. The permeation increased by adding permeation enhancer (combination of oleic acid in propylene glycol (OA in PG)). The permeation enhancement was studied under two concentrations of OA in PG (1%, 5%) in both rat and human cadaver skin and it was found that 1% OA in PG showed better result in rat skin and 5% OA in PG showed good results in human cadaver skin.

  5. Ascorbate as a Biosynthetic Precursor in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Debolt, Seth; Melino, Vanessa; Ford, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims l-Ascorbate (vitamin C) has well-documented roles in many aspects of redox control and anti-oxidant activity in plant cells. This Botanical Briefing highlights recent developments in another aspect of l-ascorbate metabolism: its function as a precursor for specific processes in the biosynthesis of organic acids. Scope The Briefing provides a summary of recent advances in our understanding of l-ascorbate metabolism, covering biosynthesis, translocation and functional aspects. The role of l-ascorbate as a biosynthetic precursor in the formation of oxalic acid, l-threonic acid and l-tartaric acid is described, and progress in elaborating the mechanisms of the formation of these acids is reviewed. The potential conflict between the two roles of l-ascorbate in plant cells, functional and biosynthetic, is highlighted. Conclusions Recent advances in the understanding of l-ascorbate catabolism and the formation of oxalic and l-tartaric acids provide compelling evidence for a major role of l-ascorbate in plant metabolism. Combined experimental approaches, using classic biochemical and emerging ‘omics’ technologies, have provided recent insight to previously under-investigated areas. PMID:17098753

  6. Evolution of alternative biosynthetic pathways for vitamin C following plastid acquisition in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Glen; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Pornsaksit, Varissa; Smirnoff, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is an enzyme co-factor in eukaryotes that also plays a critical role in protecting photosynthetic eukaryotes against damaging reactive oxygen species derived from the chloroplast. Many animal lineages, including primates, have become ascorbate auxotrophs due to the loss of the terminal enzyme in their biosynthetic pathway, l-gulonolactone oxidase (GULO). The alternative pathways found in land plants and Euglena use a different terminal enzyme, l-galactonolactone dehydrogenase (GLDH). The evolutionary processes leading to these differing pathways and their contribution to the cellular roles of ascorbate remain unclear. Here we present molecular and biochemical evidence demonstrating that GULO was functionally replaced with GLDH in photosynthetic eukaryote lineages following plastid acquisition. GULO has therefore been lost repeatedly throughout eukaryote evolution. The formation of the alternative biosynthetic pathways in photosynthetic eukaryotes uncoupled ascorbate synthesis from hydrogen peroxide production and likely contributed to the rise of ascorbate as a major photoprotective antioxidant. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06369.001 PMID:25768426

  7. Novel Enzyme Family Found in Filamentous Fungi Catalyzing trans-4-Hydroxylation of l-Pipecolic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Hibi, Makoto; Mori, Ryosuke; Miyake, Ryoma; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Kozono, Shoko; Takahashi, Satomi

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxypipecolic acids are bioactive compounds widely distributed in nature and are valuable building blocks for the organic synthesis of pharmaceuticals. We have found a novel hydroxylating enzyme with activity toward l-pipecolic acid (l-Pip) in a filamentous fungus, Fusarium oxysporum c8D. The enzyme l-Pip trans-4-hydroxylase (Pip4H) of F. oxysporum (FoPip4H) belongs to the Fe(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily, catalyzes the regio- and stereoselective hydroxylation of l-Pip, and produces optically pure trans-4-hydroxy-l-pipecolic acid (trans-4-l-HyPip). Amino acid sequence analysis revealed several fungal enzymes homologous with FoPip4H, and five of these also had l-Pip trans-4-hydroxylation activity. In particular, the homologous Pip4H enzyme derived from Aspergillus nidulans FGSC A4 (AnPip4H) had a broader substrate specificity spectrum than other homologues and reacted with the l and d forms of various cyclic and aliphatic amino acids. Using FoPip4H as a biocatalyst, a system for the preparative-scale production of chiral trans-4-l-HyPip was successfully developed. Thus, we report a fungal family of l-Pip hydroxylases and the enzymatic preparation of trans-4-l-HyPip, a bioactive compound and a constituent of secondary metabolites with useful physiological activities. PMID:26801577

  8. Biosynthetic infochemical communication.

    PubMed

    Olsson, S B; Challiss, R A J; Cole, M; Gardeniers, J G E; Gardner, J W; Guerrero, A; Hansson, B S; Pearce, T C

    2015-07-09

    There is an ever-increasing demand for data to be embedded in our environment at ever-decreasing temporal and spatial scales. Whilst current communication and storage technologies generally exploit the electromagnetic properties of media, chemistry offers us a new alternative for nanoscale signaling using molecules as messengers with high information content. Biological systems effectively overcome the challenges of chemical communication using highly specific biosynthetic pathways for signal generation together with specialized protein receptors and nervous systems. Here we consider a new approach for information transmission based upon nature's quintessential example of infochemical communication, the moth pheromone system. To approach the sensitivity, specificity and versatility of infochemical communication seen in nature, we describe an array of biologically-inspired technologies for the production, transmission, detection, and processing of molecular signals. We show how it is possible to implement each step of the moth pheromone pathway for biosynthesis, transmission, receptor protein binding/transduction, and antennal lobe processing of monomolecular and multimolecular signals. For each implemented step, we discuss the value, current limitations, and challenges for the future development and integration of infochemical communication technologies. Together, these building blocks provide a starting point for future technologies that can utilize programmable emission and detection of multimolecular information for a new and robust means of communicating chemical information.

  9. Role of malic enzyme during fatty acid synthesis in the oleaginous fungus Mortierella alpina.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guangfei; Chen, Haiqin; Wang, Lei; Gu, Zhennan; Song, Yuanda; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei; Chen, Yong Q

    2014-05-01

    The generation of NADPH by malic enzyme (ME) was postulated to be a rate-limiting step during fatty acid synthesis in oleaginous fungi, based primarily on the results from research focusing on ME in Mucor circinelloides. This hypothesis is challenged by a recent study showing that leucine metabolism, rather than ME, is critical for fatty acid synthesis in M. circinelloides. To clarify this, the gene encoding ME isoform E from Mortierella alpina was homologously expressed. ME overexpression increased the fatty acid content by 30% compared to that for a control. Our results suggest that ME may not be the sole rate-limiting enzyme, but does play a role, during fatty acid synthesis in oleaginous fungi.

  10. Ketopremithramycins and ketomithramycins, four new aureolic acid-type compounds obtained upon inactivation of two genes involved in the biosynthesis of the deoxysugar moieties of the antitumor drug mithramycin by Streptomyces argillaceus, reveal novel insights into post-PKS tailoring steps of the mithramycin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Remsing, Lily L; Garcia-Bernardo, Jose; Gonzalez, Ana; Künzel, Eva; Rix, Uwe; Braña, Alfredo F; Bearden, Daniel W; Méndez, Carmen; Salas, Jose A; Rohr, Jürgen

    2002-02-27

    Mithramycin is an aureolic acid-type antimicrobial and antitumor agent produced by Streptomyces argillaceus. Modifying post-polyketide synthase (PKS) tailoring enzymes involved in the production of mithramycin is an effective way of gaining further information regarding the late steps of its biosynthetic pathway. In addition, new "unnatural" natural products of the aureolic acid-type class are likely to be produced. The role of two such post-PKS tailoring enzymes, encoded by mtmC and mtmTIII, was investigated, and four novel aureolic acid class drugs, two premithramycin-type molecules and two mithramycin derivatives, were isolated from mutant strains constructed by insertional gene inactivation of either of these two genes. From data bank comparisons, the corresponding proteins MtmC and MtmTIII were believed to act as a C-methyltransferase involved in the production of the D-mycarose (sugar E) of mithramycin and as a ketoreductase seemingly involved in the biosynthesis of the mithramycin aglycon, respectively. However, gene inactivation and analysis of the accumulated products revealed that both genes encode enzymes participating in the biosynthesis of the D-mycarose building block. Furthermore, the inactivation of MtmC seems to affect the ketoreductase responsible for 4-ketoreduction of sugar C, a D-olivose. Instead of obtaining premithramycin and mithramycin derivatives with a modified E-sugar upon inactivation of mtmC, compounds were obtained that completely lack the E-sugar moiety and that possess an unexpected 4-ketosugar moiety instead of the D-olivose at the beginning of the lower deoxysaccharide chain. The inactivation of mtmTIII led to the accumulation of 4E-ketomithramycin, showing that this ketoreductase is responsible for the 4-ketoreduction of the D-mycarose moiety. The new compounds of the mutant strains, 4A-ketopremithramycin A2, 4A-keto-9-demethylpremithramycin A2, 4C-keto-demycarosylmithramycin, and 4E-ketomithramycin, indicate surprising substrate

  11. Ketopremithramycins and Ketomithramycins, Four New Aureolic Acid-Type Compounds Obtained upon Inactivation of Two Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis of the Deoxysugar Moieties of the Antitumor Drug Mithramycin by Streptomyces Argillaceus, Reveal Novel Insights into Post-PKS Tailoring Steps of the Mithramycin Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Remsing, Lily L.; Garcia-Bernardo, Jose; Gonzalez, Ana; Künzel, Eva; Rix, Uwe; Braña, Alfredo F.; Bearden, Daniel W.; Méndez, Carmen; Salas, Jose A.; Rohr, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Mithramycin is an aureolic acid-type antimicrobial and antitumor agent produced by Streptomyces argillaceus. Modifying post-polyketide synthase (PKS) tailoring enzymes involved in the production of mithramycin is an effective way of gaining further information regarding the late steps of its biosynthetic pathway. In addition, new “unnatural” natural products of the aureolic acid-type class are likely to be produced. The role of two such post-PKS tailoring enzymes, encoded by mtmC and mtmTIII, was investigated, and four novel aureolic acid class drugs, two premithramycin-type molecules and two mithramycin derivatives, were isolated from mutant strains constructed by insertional gene inactivation of either of these two genes. From data bank comparisons, the corresponding proteins MtmC and MtmTIII were believed to act as a C-methyltransferase involved in the production of the D-mycarose (sugar E) of mithramycin and as a ketoreductase seemingly involved in the biosynthesis of the mithramycin aglycon, respectively. However, gene inactivation and analysis of the accumulated products revealed that both genes encode enzymes participating in the biosynthesis of the D-mycarose building block. Furthermore, the inactivation of MtmC seems to affect the ketoreductase responsible for 4-ketoreduction of sugar C, a D-olivose. Instead of obtaining premithramycin and mithramycin derivatives with a modified E-sugar upon inactivation of mtmC, compounds were obtained that completely lack the E-sugar moiety and that possess an unexpected 4-ketosugar moiety instead of the D-olivose at the beginning of the lower deoxysaccharide chain. The inactivation of mtmTIII led to the accumulation of 4E-ketomithramycin, showing that this ketoreductase is responsible for the 4-ketoreduction of the D-mycarose moiety. The new compounds of the mutant strains, 4A-ketopremithramycin A2, 4A-keto-9-demethylpremithramycin A2, 4C-keto-demycarosylmithramycin, and 4E-ketomithramycin, indicate surprising

  12. Synthesis of repressible acid phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions of enzyme instability.

    PubMed Central

    Bostian, K A; Lemire, J M; Halvorson, H O

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis of repressible acid phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was examined under conditions of blocked derepression as described by Toh-e et al. (Mol. Gen. Genet. 162:139-149, 1978). Based on a genetic and biochemical analysis of the phenomenon these authors proposed a new regulatory model for acid phosphatase expression involving a simultaneous interaction of regulatory factors in the control of structural gene transcription. We demonstrate here that under growth conditions that fail to produce acid phosphatase the enzyme is readily inactivated. Furthermore, we demonstrate under these conditions the production of acid phosphatase mRNA which is active both in vitro and in vivo in the synthesis of enzyme. This eliminates any step prior to translation of acid phosphatase polypeptide as an explanation for the phenomenon. We interpret our results for the block in appearance of acid phosphatase as a result of both deaccelerated growth and cellular biosynthesis during derepression, accompanied by an enhanced instability of the enzyme. Images PMID:7050664

  13. Structure-Function Relationships of Glucansucrase and Fructansucrase Enzymes from Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Kralj, Slavko; Ozimek, Lukasz K.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; van Geel-Schutten, Ineke G. H.

    2006-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) employ sucrase-type enzymes to convert sucrose into homopolysaccharides consisting of either glucosyl units (glucans) or fructosyl units (fructans). The enzymes involved are labeled glucansucrases (GS) and fructansucrases (FS), respectively. The available molecular, biochemical, and structural information on sucrase genes and enzymes from various LAB and their fructan and α-glucan products is reviewed. The GS and FS enzymes are both glycoside hydrolase enzymes that act on the same substrate (sucrose) and catalyze (retaining) transglycosylation reactions that result in polysaccharide formation, but they possess completely different protein structures. GS enzymes (family GH70) are large multidomain proteins that occur exclusively in LAB. Their catalytic domain displays clear secondary-structure similarity with α-amylase enzymes (family GH13), with a predicted permuted (β/α)8 barrel structure for which detailed structural and mechanistic information is available. Emphasis now is on identification of residues and regions important for GS enzyme activity and product specificity (synthesis of α-glucans differing in glycosidic linkage type, degree and type of branching, glucan molecular mass, and solubility). FS enzymes (family GH68) occur in both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria and synthesize β-fructan polymers with either β-(2→6) (inulin) or β-(2→1) (levan) glycosidic bonds. Recently, the first high-resolution three-dimensional structures have become available for FS (levansucrase) proteins, revealing a rare five-bladed β-propeller structure with a deep, negatively charged central pocket. Although these structures have provided detailed mechanistic insights, the structural features in FS enzymes dictating the synthesis of either β-(2→6) or β-(2→1) linkages, degree and type of branching, and fructan molecular mass remain to be identified. PMID:16524921

  14. Occurrence of Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes in Arginine Catabolism by Wine Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S.; Pritchard, G. G.; Hardman, M. J.; Pilone, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    l-Arginine, an amino acid found in significant quantities in grape juice and wine, is known to be catabolized by some wine lactic acid bacteria. The correlation between the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and the ability to catabolize arginine was examined in this study. The activities of the three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes, arginine deiminase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and carbamate kinase, were measured in cell extracts of 35 strains of wine lactic acid bacteria. These enzymes were present in all heterofermentative lactobacilli and most leuconostocs but were absent in all the homofermentative lactobacilli and pediococci examined. There was a good correlation among arginine degradation, formation of ammonia and citrulline, and the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes. Urea was not detected during arginine degradation, suggesting that the catabolism of arginine did not proceed via the arginase-catalyzed reaction, as has been suggested in some earlier studies. Detection of ammonia with Nessler's reagent was shown to be a simple, rapid test to assess the ability of wine lactic acid bacteria to degrade arginine, although in media containing relatively high concentrations (>0.5%) of fructose, ammonia formation is inhibited. PMID:16534912

  15. Biological Monitoring of 3-Phenoxybenzoic Acid in Urine by an Enzyme -Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method was employed for determination of the pyrethroid biomarker, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) in human urine samples. The optimized coating antigen concentration was 0.5 ng/mL with a dilution of 1:4000 for the 3-PBA antibody and 1:6...

  16. Zeolite molecular sieves have dramatic acid-base effects on enzymes in nonaqueous media.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Nuno; Partridge, Johann; Halling, Peter J; Barreiros, Susana

    2002-02-05

    Zeolite molecular sieves very commonly are used as in situ drying agents in reaction mixtures of enzymes in nonaqueous media. They often affect enzyme behavior, and this has been interpreted in terms of altered hydration. Here, we show that zeolites can also have dramatic acid-base effects on enzymes in low water media, resulting from their cation-exchange ability. Initial rates of transesterification catalyzed by cross-linked crystals of subtilisin were compared in supercritical ethane, hexane, and acetonitrile with water activity fixed by pre-equilibration. Addition of zeolite NaA (4 A powder) still caused remarkable rate enhancements (up to 20-fold), despite the separate control of hydration. In the presence of excess of an alternative solid-state acid-base buffer, however, zeolite addition had no effect. The more commonly used Merck molecular sieves (type 3 A beads) had similar but somewhat smaller effects. All zeolites have ion-exchange ability and can exchange H+ for cations such as Na+ and K+. These exchanges will tend to affect the protonation state of acidic groups in the protein and, hence, enzymatic activity. Zeolites pre-equilibrated in aqueous suspensions of varying pH-pNa gave very different enzyme activities. Their differing basicities were demonstrated directly by equilibration with an indicator dissolved in toluene. The potential of zeolites as acid-base buffers for low-water media is discussed, and their ability to overcome pH memory is demonstrated.

  17. Cell organelles from crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants : II. Compartmentation of enzymes of the crassulacean acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Schnarrenberger, C; Groß, D; Burkhard, C; Herbert, M

    1980-02-01

    The intracellular distribution of enzymes involved in the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) has been studied in Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Crassula lycopodioides Lam. After separation of cell organelles by isopycnic centrifugation, enzymes of the Crassulacean acid metabolism were found in the following cell fractions: Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the chloroplasts; NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase in the mitochondria and in the supernatant; NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the chloroplasts; NADP-dependent malic enzyme in the supernatant and to a minor extent in the chloroplasts; NAD-dependent malic enzyme in the supernatant and to some degree in the mitochondria; and pyruvate; orthophosphate dikinase in the chloroplasts. The activity of the NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase was due to three isoenzymes separated by (NH4)2SO4 gradient solubilization. These isoenzymes represented 17, 78, and 5% of the activity recovered, respectively, in the order of elution. The isoenzyme eluting first was associated with the mitochondria and the second isoenzyme was of cytosolic origin, while the intracellular location of the third isoenzyme was probably the peroxisome. Based on these findings, the metabolic path of Crassulacean acid metabolism within cells of CAM plants is discussed.

  18. Functional characterization of the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster of Penicillium chrysogenum Wisconsin54-1255.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Marco A; Westerlaken, Ilja; Leeflang, Chris; Kerkman, Richard; Bovenberg, Roel A L

    2007-09-01

    Industrial strain improvement via classical mutagenesis is a black box approach. In an attempt to learn from and understand the mutations introduced, we cloned and characterized the amplified region of industrial penicillin production strains. Upon amplification of this region Penicillium chrysogenum is capable of producing an increased amount of antibiotics, as was previously reported [Barredo, J.L., Diez, B., Alvarez, E., Martín, J.F., 1989a. Large amplification of a 35-kb DNA fragment carrying two penicillin biosynthetic genes in high yielding strains of Penicillium chrysogenum. Curr. Genet. 16, 453-459; Newbert, R.W., Barton, B., Greaves, P., Harper, J., Turner, G., 1997. Analysis of a commercially improved Penicillium chrysogenum strain series, involvement of recombinogenic regions in amplification and deletion of the penicillin gene cluster. J. Ind. Microbiol. 19, 18-27]. Bioinformatic analysis of the central 56.9kb, present as six direct repeats in the strains analyzed in this study, predicted 15 Open Reading Frames (ORFs). Besides the three penicillin biosynthetic genes (pcbAB, pcbC and penDE) only one ORF has an orthologue of known function in the database: the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene ERG25. Surprisingly, many genes known to encode direct or indirect steps beta-lactam biosynthesis like phenyl acetic acid CoA ligase and transporters are not present. Detailed analyses reveal a detectable transcript for most of the predicted ORFs under the conditions tested. We have studied the role of these in relation to penicillin production and amplification of the biosynthetic gene cluster. In contrast to what was expected, the genes encoding the three penicillin biosynthetic enzymes alone are sufficient to restore full beta-lactam synthesis in a mutant lacking the complete region. Therefore, the role of the other 12 ORFs in this region seems irrelevant for penicillin biosynthesis.

  19. Investigation of Proposed Ladderane Biosynthetic Genes from Anammox Bacteria by Heterologous Expression in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Javidpour, Pouya; Deutsch, Samuel; Mutalik, Vivek K.; Hillson, Nathan J.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Beller, Harry R.

    2016-01-01

    Ladderanes are hydrocarbon chains with three or five linearly concatenated cyclobutane rings that are uniquely produced as membrane lipid components by anammox (anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing) bacteria. By virtue of their angle and torsional strain, ladderanes are unusually energetic compounds, and if produced biochemically by engineered microbes, could serve as renewable, high-energy-density jet fuel components. The biochemistry and genetics underlying the ladderane biosynthetic pathway are unknown, however, previous studies have identified a pool of 34 candidate genes from the anammox bacterium, Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, some or all of which may be involved with ladderane fatty acid biosynthesis. The goal of the present study was to establish a systematic means of testing the candidate genes from K. stuttgartiensis for involvement in ladderane biosynthesis through heterologous expression in E. coli under anaerobic conditions. This study describes an efficient means of assembly of synthesized, codon-optimized candidate ladderane biosynthesis genes in synthetic operons that allows for changes to regulatory element sequences, as well as modular assembly of multiple operons for simultaneous heterologous expression in E. coli (or potentially other microbial hosts). We also describe in vivo functional tests of putative anammox homologs of the phytoene desaturase CrtI, which plays an important role in the hypothesized ladderane pathway, and a method for soluble purification of one of these enzymes. This study is, to our knowledge, the first experimental effort focusing on the role of specific anammox genes in the production of ladderanes, and lays the foundation for future efforts toward determination of the ladderane biosynthetic pathway. Our substantial, but far from comprehensive, efforts at elucidating the ladderane biosynthetic pathway were not successful. We invite the scientific community to take advantage of the considerable synthetic biology resources and

  20. Application of ionic liquids based enzyme-assisted extraction of chlorogenic acid from Eucommia ulmoides leaves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Sui, Xiaoyu; Li, Li; Zhang, Jie; Liang, Xin; Li, Wenjing; Zhang, Honglian; Fu, Shuang

    2016-01-15

    A new approach for ionic liquid based enzyme-assisted extraction (ILEAE) of chlorogenic acid (CGA) from Eucommia ulmoides is presented in which enzyme pretreatment was used in ionic liquids aqueous media to enhance extraction yield. For this purpose, the solubility of CGA and the activity of cellulase were investigated in eight 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids. Cellulase in 0.5 M [C6mim]Br aqueous solution was found to provide better performance in extraction. The factors of ILEAE procedures including extraction time, extraction phase pH, extraction temperatures and enzyme concentrations were investigated. Moreover, the novel developed approach offered advantages in term of yield and efficiency compared with other conventional extraction techniques. Scanning electronic microscopy of plant samples indicated that cellulase treated cell wall in ionic liquid solution was subjected to extract, which led to more efficient extraction by reducing mass transfer barrier. The proposed ILEAE method would develope a continuous process for enzyme-assisted extraction including enzyme incubation and solvent extraction process. In this research, we propose a novel view for enzyme-assisted extraction of plant active component, besides concentrating on enzyme facilitated cell wall degradation, focusing on improvement of bad permeability of ionic liquids solutions.

  1. Innovative use of a bacterial enzyme involved in sialic acid degradation to initiate sialic acid biosynthesis in glycoengineered insect cells

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    The baculovirus/insect cell system is widely used for recombinant protein production, but it is suboptimal for recombinant glycoprotein production because it does not provide sialylation, which is an essential feature of many glycoprotein biologics. This problem has been addressed by metabolic engineering, which has extended endogenous insect cell N-glycosylation pathways and enabled glycoprotein sialylation by baculovirus/insect cell systems. However, further improvement is needed because even the most extensively engineered baculovirus/insect cell systems require media supplementation with N-acetylmannosamine, an expensive sialic acid precursor, for efficient recombinant glycoprotein sialylation. Our solution to this problem focused on E. coli N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate 2′-epimerase (GNPE), which normally functions in bacterial sialic acid degradation. Considering that insect cells have the product, but not the substrate for this enzyme, we hypothesized that GNPE might drive the reverse reaction in these cells, thereby initiating sialic acid biosynthesis in the absence of media supplementation. We tested this hypothesis by isolating transgenic insect cells expressing E. coli GNPE together with a suite of mammalian genes needed for N-glycoprotein sialylation. Various assays showed that these cells efficiently produced sialic acid, CMP-sialic acid, and sialylated recombinant N-glycoproteins even in growth media without N-acetylmannosamine. Thus, this study demonstrated that a eukaryotic recombinant protein production platform can be glycoengineered with a bacterial gene, that a bacterial enzyme which normally functions in sialic acid degradation can be used to initiate sialic acid biosynthesis, and that insect cells expressing this enzyme can produce sialylated N-glycoproteins without N-acetylmannosamine supplementation, which will reduce production costs in glycoengineered baculovirus/insect cell systems. PMID:23022569

  2. Carboxylic acid reductase is a versatile enzyme for the conversion of fatty acids into fuels and chemical commodities.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, M Kalim; Turner, Nicholas J; Jones, Patrik R

    2013-01-02

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons such as fatty alcohols and petroleum-derived alkanes have numerous applications in the chemical industry. In recent years, the renewable synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons has been made possible by engineering microbes to overaccumulate fatty acids. However, to generate end products with the desired physicochemical properties (e.g., fatty aldehydes, alkanes, and alcohols), further conversion of the fatty acid is necessary. A carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) from Mycobacterium marinum was found to convert a wide range of aliphatic fatty acids (C(6)-C(18)) into corresponding aldehydes. Together with the broad-substrate specificity of an aldehyde reductase or an aldehyde decarbonylase, the catalytic conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols (C(8)-C(16)) or fatty alkanes (C(7)-C(15)) was reconstituted in vitro. This concept was applied in vivo, in combination with a chain-length-specific thioesterase, to engineer Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains that were capable of synthesizing fatty alcohols and alkanes. A fatty alcohol titer exceeding 350 mg·L(-1) was obtained in minimal media supplemented with glucose. Moreover, by combining the CAR-dependent pathway with an exogenous fatty acid-generating lipase, natural oils (coconut oil, palm oil, and algal oil bodies) were enzymatically converted into fatty alcohols across a broad chain-length range (C(8)-C(18)). Together with complementing enzymes, the broad substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of CAR opens the road for direct and tailored enzyme-catalyzed conversion of lipids into user-ready chemical commodities.

  3. Expanding the product profile of a microbial alkane biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Harger, Matthew; Zheng, Lei; Moon, Austin; Ager, Casey; An, Ju Hye; Choe, Chris; Lai, Yi-Ling; Mo, Benjamin; Zong, David; Smith, Matthew D; Egbert, Robert G; Mills, Jeremy H; Baker, David; Pultz, Ingrid Swanson; Siegel, Justin B

    2013-01-18

    Microbially produced alkanes are a new class of biofuels that closely match the chemical composition of petroleum-based fuels. Alkanes can be generated from the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway by the reduction of acyl-ACPs followed by decarbonylation of the resulting aldehydes. A current limitation of this pathway is the restricted product profile, which consists of n-alkanes of 13, 15, and 17 carbons in length. To expand the product profile, we incorporated a new part, FabH2 from Bacillus subtilis , an enzyme known to have a broader specificity profile for fatty acid initiation than the native FabH of Escherichia coli . When provided with the appropriate substrate, the addition of FabH2 resulted in an altered alkane product profile in which significant levels of n-alkanes of 14 and 16 carbons in length are produced. The production of even chain length alkanes represents initial steps toward the expansion of this recently discovered microbial alkane production pathway to synthesize complex fuels. This work was conceived and performed as part of the 2011 University of Washington international Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) project.

  4. Impacts of simulated acid rain on soil enzyme activities in a latosol.

    PubMed

    Ling, Da-Jiong; Huang, Qian-Chun; Ouyang, Ying

    2010-11-01

    Acid rain pollution is a serious environmental problem in the world. This study investigated impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon four types of soil enzymes, namely the catalase, acid phosphatase, urease, and amylase, in a latosol. Latosol is an acidic red soil and forms in the tropical rainforest biome. Laboratory experiments were performed by spraying the soil columns with the SAR at pH levels of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5., 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, and 7.0 (control) over a 20-day period. Mixed results were obtained in enzyme activities for different kinds of enzymes under the influences of the SAR. The catalase activities increased rapidly from day 0 to 5, then decreased slightly from day 5 to 15, and finally decreased sharply to the end of the experiments, whereas the acid phosphatase activities decreased rapidly from day 0 to 5, then increased slightly from day 5 to 15, and finally decreased dramatically to the end of the experiments. A decrease in urease activities was observed at all of the SAR pH levels for the entire experimental period, while an increase from day 0 to 5 and then a decrease from day 5 to 20 in amylase activities were observed at all of the SAR pH levels. In general, the catalase, acid phosphatase, and urease activities increased with the SAR pH levels. However, the maximum amylase activity was found at pH 4.0 and decreased as the SAR pH increased from 4.0 to 5.0 or decreased from 4.0 to 2.5. It is apparent that acid rain had adverse environmental impacts on soil enzyme activities in the latosol. Our study further revealed that impacts of the SAR upon soil enzyme activities were in the following order: amylase>catalase>acid phosphatase>urease. These findings provide useful information on better understanding and managing soil biological processes in the nature under the influence of acid rains.

  5. Influence of various concentrations of selenic acid (IV) on the activity of soil enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nowak, J; Kaklewski, K; Klódka, D

    2002-05-27

    The aim of this experiment was the assessment of the influence of various concentrations of H2SeO3 (0.05, 0.5 and 5 mM) on the activity of soil enzymes over 112 days. The lab experiment was performed using soil samples (dust-silt black soil of 1.92% organic C content, pH 7.7), 60% maximal water capacity. The soil samples were treated with a selenic acid water solution at the concentrations mentioned above. As a reference, natural soil was used (without the selenic acid). The activity of the following enzymes was tested: beta-glucosidase, nitrate reductase, urease, dehydrogenase, acid and alkaline phosphatases. The soil was sampled at days 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, 28, 56 and 112. The results of the study have shown that the selenic acid had no effect on the activity of the beta-glucosidase in soil. In the course of the whole experiment, the applied selenic acid inhibited activity of the nitrate reductase up to 70% at 5 mM, and the activity of dehydrogenase was also decreased--by up to 85% at 5 mM, similarly to urease (with the exception of days 14 and 28), and acid phosphatase (until day 56). The activity of alkaline phosphatase was increased by the lowest concentration of selenic acid and decreased by the highest, which was found in the course of the whole experiment. The 5-mM concentration of selenic acid inhibited the activity of all the enzymes tested in this experiment.

  6. Determining the Biochemical Properties of the Oxalate Biosynthetic Component (Obc)1 from Burkholderia mallei

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxalic acid is produced by a variety of organisms ranging from simple microbes to complex animals. This acid has been proposed to fulfill various physiological and pathological functions which vary between organisms. In bacteria from the Burkholderia genus, oxalate secretion has been shown to be quorum sensing dependent and to support pathogenicity and cell viability. In light of the critical roles of oxalate in Burkholderia as well as other organisms, it is surprising that our understanding of how this simple dicarboxylate is biosynthesized remains incomplete. Here we report the expression, purification, and partial characterization of the first intact bacterial oxalate biosynthetic enzyme, Obc1, from B. mallei. An N-terminal His-tagged Bmobc1 was cloned into pDUET, expressed in E. coli BLR (DE3), and the recombinant enzyme purified by affinity chromatography. Oxalate biosynthetic enzyme assays coupled with HPLC analysis revealed that BmObc1 catalyzed the biosynthesis of oxalate, acetoacetate, and free CoA from oxaloacetate and a short chain acyl-CoA following Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Optimal enzyme activity was measured at pH 8.0 and a temperature around 44°C. Kinetic analysis conducted under conditions of saturating acetyl-CoA and varying oxaloacetate concentrations resulted in a calculated Km value for oxaloacetate of 94.3± 9.2 μM (mean ± SE). Under conditions of saturating oxaloacetate concentration and varying acyl-CoA (acetyl- or propionyl-CoA) concentrations kinetic analysis generated a calculated Km value of 26.8 ± 2.3 μM (mean ± SE) for acetyl-CoA and 104.4 ± 12.7 μM for propionyl-CoA. The significantly lower Km for acetyl-CoA suggests that it is strongly favored as a substrate over propionyl-CoA. PMID:27643499

  7. In the aging housefly aconitase is the only citric acid cycle enzyme to decline significantly.

    PubMed

    Yarian, Connie S; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2005-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine if the activities of the mitochondrial citric acid cycle enzymes are altered during the normal aging process. Flight muscle mitochondria of houseflies of different ages were used as a model system because of their apparent age-related decline in bioenergetic efficiency, evident as a failure of flying ability. The maximal activities of each of the citric acid cycle enzymes were determined in preparations of mitochondria from flies of relatively young, middle, and old age. Aconitase was the only enzyme exhibiting altered activity during aging. The maximal activity of aconitase from old flies was decreased by 44% compared to that from young flies while the other citric acid cycle enzymes showed no change in activity with age. It is suggested that the selective age-related decrease in aconitase activity is likely to contribute to a decline in the efficiency of mitochondrial bioenergetics, as well as result in secondary effects associated with accumulation of citrate and redox-active iron.

  8. Complete characterization of the seventeen step moenomycin biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ostash, Bohdan; Doud, Emma; Lin, Cecilie; Ostash, Iryna; Perlstein, Deborah; Fuse, Shinichiro; Wolpert, Manuel; Kahne, Daniel; Walker, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    The moenomycins are phosphoglycolipid antibiotics produced by Streptomyces ghanaensis and related organisms. The phosphoglycolipids are the only known active site inhibitors of the peptidoglycan glycosyltransferases, an important family of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the bacterial cell wall. Although these natural products have exceptionally potent antibiotic activity, pharmacokinetic limitations have precluded their clinical use. We previously identified the moenomycin biosynthetic gene cluster in order to facilitate biosynthetic approaches to new derivatives. Here we report a comprehensive set of genetic and enzymatic experiments that establish functions for the seventeen moenomycin biosynthetic genes involved in the synthesis moenomycin and variants. These studies reveal the order of assembly of the full molecular scaffold and define a subset of seven genes involved in the synthesis of bioactive analogs. This work will enable both in vitro and fermentation-based reconstitution of phosphoglycolipid scaffolds so that chemoenzymatic approaches to novel analogs can be explored. PMID:19640006

  9. Purification and characterization of cannabidiolic-acid synthase from Cannabis sativa L.. Biochemical analysis of a novel enzyme that catalyzes the oxidocyclization of cannabigerolic acid to cannabidiolic acid.

    PubMed

    Taura, F; Morimoto, S; Shoyama, Y

    1996-07-19

    We identified a unique enzyme that catalyzes the oxidocyclization of cannabigerolic acid to cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) in Cannabis sativa L. (CBDA strain). The enzyme, named CBDA synthase, was purified to apparent homogeneity by a four-step procedure: ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, and hydroxylapatite. The active enzyme consists of a single polypeptide with a molecular mass of 74 kDa and a pI of 6.1. The NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of CBDA synthase is similar to that of Delta1-tetrahydrocannabinolic-acid synthase. CBDA synthase does not require coenzymes, molecular oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and metal ion cofactors for the oxidocyclization reaction. These results indicate that CBDA synthase is neither an oxygenase nor a peroxidase and that the enzymatic cyclization does not proceed via oxygenated intermediates. CBDA synthase catalyzes the formation of CBDA from cannabinerolic acid as well as cannabigerolic acid, although the kcat for the former (0.03 s-1) is lower than that for the latter (0.19 s-1). Therefore, we conclude that CBDA is predominantly biosynthesized from cannabigerolic acid rather than cannabinerolic acid.

  10. The Impact of Enzyme Characteristics on Corn Stover Fiber Degradation and Acid Production During Ensiled Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haiyu; Richard, Tom L.; Moore, Kenneth J.

    Ensilage can be used to store lignocellulosic biomass before industrial bioprocessing. This study investigated the impacts of seven commerical enzyme mixtures derived from Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma reesei, and T. longibrachiatum. Treatments included three size grades of corn stover, two enzyme levels (1.67 and 5 IU/g dry matter based on hemicellulase), and various ratios of cellulase to hemicellulase (C ∶ H). The highest C ∶ H ratio tested, 2.38, derived from T. reesei, resulted in the most effective fermentation, with lactic acid as the dominant product. Enzymatic activity during storage may complement industrial pretreatment; creating synergies that could reduce total bioconversion costs.

  11. The impact of enzyme characteristics on corn stover fiber degradation and acid production during ensiled storage.

    PubMed

    Ren, Haiyu; Richard, Tom L; Moore, Kenneth J

    2007-04-01

    Ensilage can be used to store lignocellulosic biomass before industrial bioprocessing. This study investigated the impacts of seven commercial enzyme mixtures derived from Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma reesei, and T. longibrachiatum. Treatments included three size grades of corn stover, two enzyme levels (1.67 and 5 IU/g dry matter based on hemicellulase), and various ratios of cellulase to hemicellulase (C:H). The highest C:H ratio tested, 2.38, derived from T. reesei, resulted in the most effective fermentation, with lactic acid as the dominant product. Enzymatic activity during storage may complement industrial pretreatment; creating synergies that could reduce total bioconversion costs.

  12. Organosoluble enzyme conjugates with poly(2-oxazoline)s via pyromellitic acid dianhydride.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Stefan; Fik, Christoph P; Averesch, Nils J H; Tiller, Joerg C

    2012-06-15

    The use of enzymes in organic solvents offers a great opportunity for the synthesis of complex organic compounds and is therefore in focus of current research. In this work we describe the synthesis of poly(2-methyl-1,3-oxazoline) (PMOx) and poly(2-ethyl-1,3-oxazoline) (PEtOx) enzyme conjugates with hen-egg white lysozyme, RNase A and α-chymotrypsin using a new coupling technique. The POXylation was carried out reacting pyromellitic acid dianhydride subsequently with ethylenediamine terminated POx and then with the NH₂-groups of the respective enzymes. Upon conjugation with the polymers, RNase A and lysozyme became fully soluble in DMF (1.4 mg/ml). These are the first examples of fully POXylated proteins, which become organosoluble. The synthesized enzyme conjugates were characterized by SDS-PAGE, isoelectric focusing, dynamic light scattering and size exclusion chromatography, which all indicated the full POXylation of the enzymes. The modified enzymes even partly retained their activity in water. With α-chymotrypsin as example we could demonstrate that the molecular weight of the attached polymer significantly influences the activity.

  13. Production of L-lactic Acid from Biomass Wastes Using Scallop Crude Enzymes and Novel Lactic Acid Bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Mitsunori; Nakamura, Kanami; Nakasaki, Kiyohiko

    In the present study, biomass waste raw materials including paper mill sludge, bamboo, sea lettuce, and shochu residue (from a distiller) and crude enzymes derived from inedible and discarded scallop parts were used to produce L-lactic acid for the raw material of biodegradable plastic poly-lactic acid. The activities of cellulase and amylase in the crude enzymes were 22 and 170units/L, respectively, and L-lactic acid was produced from every of the above mentioned biomass wastes, by the method of liquid-state simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) . The L-lactic acid concentrations produced from sea lettuce and shochu residue, which contain high concentration of starch were 3.6 and 9.3g/L, respectively, and corresponded to greater than 25% of the conversion of glucans contained in these biomass wastes. Furthermore, using the solid state SSF method, concentrations as high as 13g/L of L-lactic acid were obtained from sea lettuce and 26g/L were obtained from shochu residue.

  14. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gallage, Nethaji J.; Hansen, Esben H.; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco. PMID:24941968

  15. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Nethaji J; Hansen, Esben H; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-06-19

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco.

  16. Bioengineering natural product biosynthetic pathways for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Cheng; Law, Brian; Wilkinson, Barrie; Micklefield, Jason

    2012-12-01

    With the advent of next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, the number of microbial genome sequences has increased dramatically, revealing a vast array of new biosynthetic gene clusters. Genomics data provide a tremendous opportunity to discover new natural products, and also to guide the bioengineering of new and existing natural product scaffolds for therapeutic applications. Notably, it is apparent that the vast majority of biosynthetic gene clusters are either silent or produce very low quantities of the corresponding natural products. It is imperative therefore to devise methods for activating unproductive biosynthetic pathways to provide the quantities of natural products needed for further development. Moreover, on the basis of our expanding mechanistic and structural knowledge of biosynthetic assembly-line enzymes, new strategies for re-programming biosynthetic pathways have emerged, resulting in focused libraries of modified products with potentially improved biological properties. In this review we will focus on the latest bioengineering approaches that have been utilised to optimise yields and increase the structural diversity of natural product scaffolds for future clinical applications.

  17. Genome Sequence of Thermofilum pendens Reveals an Exceptional Loss of Biosynthetic Pathways without Genome Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Rodriquez, Jason; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, I.; Reich, Claudia; Ulrich, Luke; Elkins, James G; Mavromatis, K; Lykidis, A; Kim, Edwin; Thompson, Linda S; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam L; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Detter, J C; Zhulin, Igor B; Olsen, Gary; Whitman, W. B.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deep-branching member of class Thermoproteales of Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It was known to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome reveals substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first Crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have transporters of the phosphotransferase system. T. pendens is known to require an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than any other free-living organism. In addition to heterotrophy, T. pendens may gain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogenlyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time this enzyme has been found outside of Methanosarcinales, and a presenilin-related protein from a new subfamily. Predicted highly expressed proteins include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides, and CRISPR-associated proteins, suggesting that defense against viruses is a high priority.

  18. Genome sequence of Thermofilum pendens reveals an exceptional loss of biosynthetic pathways without genome reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Anderson, Iain; Rodriguez, Jason; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Reich, Claudia; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kim, Edwin; Thompson, Linda S.; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Detter, Chris; Zhulin, Igor B.; Olsen, Gary J.; Whitman, William; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deep-branching, hyperthermophilic member of the order Thermoproteales within the archaeal kingdom Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It is an extracellular commensal, requiring an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. In fact T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than obligate intracellular parasites, although it does not display other features common among obligate parasites and thus does not appear to be in the process of becoming a parasite. It appears that T. pendens has adapted to life in an environment rich in nutrients. T. pendens was known to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome reveals substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have a transporter of the phosphotransferase system. In addition to fermentation, T. pendens may gain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogenlyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time this enzyme has been found outside of Methanosarcinales, and a presenilin-related protein. Predicted highly expressed proteins do not include housekeeping genes, and instead include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides, and CRISPR-associated proteins.

  19. Identification of a novel sesquiterpene biosynthetic machinery involved in astellolide biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Yasutomo; Takahashi, Shunji; Osada, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Yasuji

    2016-01-01

    Esterified drimane-type sesquiterpene lactones such as astellolides display various biological activities and are widely produced by plants and fungi. Given their low homology to known sesquiterpene cyclases, the genes responsible for their biosynthesis have not been uncovered yet. Here, we identified the astellolide gene cluster from Aspergillus oryzae and discovered a novel sesquiterpene biosynthetic machinery consisting of AstC, AstI, and AstK. All these enzymes are annotated as haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolases, whereas AstC also contains a DxDTT motif conserved in class II diterpene cyclases. Based on enzyme reaction analyses, we found that AstC catalysed the protonation-initiated cyclisation of farnesyl pyrophosphate into drimanyl pyrophosphate. This was successively dephosphorylated by AstI and AstK to produce drim-8-ene-11-ol. Moreover, we also identified and characterised a unique non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, AstA, responsible for esterifying aryl acids to drimane-type sesquiterpene lactones. In this study, we highlight a new biosynthetic route for producing sesquiterpene and its esterified derivative. Our findings shed light on the identification of novel sesquiterpenes via genome mining. PMID:27628599

  20. DIFFERENTIAL EXPRESSION OF RETINOIC ACID BIOSYNTHETIC AND METABOLISM GENES IN LIVERS FROM MICE TREATED WITH HEPATOTUMORIGENIC AND NON-HEPATOTUMORIGENIC CONAZOLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used in crop protection and as pharmaceuticals. Triadimefon and propiconazole are hepatotumorigenic in mice, while myclobutanil is not. Previous toxicogenomic studies suggest that alteration of the retinoic acid metabolism pathway may play a key event in ...

  1. CYP4 enzymes as potential drug targets: focus on enzyme multiplicity, inducers and inhibitors, and therapeutic modulation of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) synthase and fatty acid ω-hydroxylase activities.

    PubMed

    Edson, Katheryne Z; Rettie, Allan E

    2013-01-01

    The Cytochrome P450 4 (CYP4) family of enzymes in humans is comprised of thirteen isozymes that typically catalyze the ω-oxidation of endogenous fatty acids and eicosanoids. Several CYP4 enzymes can biosynthesize 20- hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, or 20-HETE, an important signaling eicosanoid involved in regulation of vascular tone and kidney reabsorption. Additionally, accumulation of certain fatty acids is a hallmark of the rare genetic disorders, Refsum disease and X-ALD. Therefore, modulation of CYP4 enzyme activity, either by inhibition or induction, is a potential strategy for drug discovery. Here we review the substrate specificities, sites of expression, genetic regulation, and inhibition by exogenous chemicals of the human CYP4 enzymes, and discuss the targeting of CYP4 enzymes in the development of new treatments for hypertension, stroke, certain cancers and the fatty acid-linked orphan diseases.

  2. Effect of abscisic acid and hydrogen peroxide on antioxidant enzymes in Syzygium cumini plant.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Ramkishan; Saroha, Ajaya Eesha; Swarnkar, P L

    2012-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to study the effect of abscisic acid and hydrogen peroxide on the activities of antioxidant enzymes namely superoxide dismutase (SOD; E.C. 1.15.1.1), catalase (CAT; E.C. 1.11.1.6) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX; E.C. 1.11.1.11) in Syzygium cumini plant. The varying concentrations of ABA (2-8 mM/l) and H2O2 (2-8 mM/l) modulated enzyme activities differently. In general, some concentrations of the ABA and H2O2 stimulated the activities of all the three enzymes except that there was a dose dependent reduction in catalase activity in the plants treated with ABA.

  3. Efficient production of optically pure L-lactic acid from food waste at ambient temperature by regulating key enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Chen, Yinguang; Zhao, Shu; Chen, Hong; Zheng, Xiong; Luo, Jinyang; Liu, Yanan

    2015-03-01

    Bio-production of optically pure L-lactic acid from food waste has attracted much interest as it can treat organic wastes with simultaneous recovery of valuable by-products. However, the yield of L-lactic acid was very low and no optically pure L-lactic acid was produced in the literature due to (1) the lower activity of enzymes involved in hydrolysis and L-lactic acid generation, and (2) the participation of other enzymes related to D-lactic acid and acetic and propionic acids production. In this paper, a new strategy was reported for effective production of optically pure L-lactic acid from food waste at ambient temperature, i.e. via regulating key enzyme activity by sewage sludge supplement and intermittent alkaline fermentation. It was found that not only optically pure L-lactic acid was produced, but the yield was enhanced by 2.89-fold. The mechanism study showed that the activities of enzymes relevant to food waste hydrolysis and lactic acid production were enhanced, and the key enzymes related to volatile fatty acids and D-lactic acid generations were severally decreased or inhibited. Also, the microbes responsible for L-lactic acid production were selectively proliferated. Finally, the pilot-scale continuous experiment was conducted to testify the feasibility of this new technique.

  4. Dynamic expression of retinoic acid synthesizing and metabolizing enzymes in the developing mouse inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Romand, Raymond; Kondo, Takako; Fraulob, Valérie; Petkovich, Martin; Dollé, Pascal; Hashino, Eri

    2008-01-01

    Retinoic acid signaling plays essential roles in morphogenesis and neural development through transcriptional regulation of downstream target genes. It is believed that the balance between the activities of synthesizing and metabolizing enzymes determines the amount of active retinoic acid to which a developing tissue is exposed. In this study, we investigated spatio-temporal expression patterns of four synthesizing enzymes, the retinaldehyde dehydrogenases 1, 2, 3 and 4 (Raldh1, Raldh2, Raldh3 and Raldh4) and two metabolizing enzymes (Cyp26A1 and Cyp26B1) in the embryonic and postnatal mouse inner ear using quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and Western blot analysis. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis and Western blot data revealed that the expression of CYP26s was much higher than that of Raldhs at early embryonic ages, but that Cyp26 expression was down-regulated during embryonic development. Conversely, the expression levels of Raldh2 and -3 increased during development and were significantly higher than the Cyp26 levels at postnatal day 20. At this age, Raldh3 was expressed predominantly in the cochlea, while Raldh2 was present in the vestibular end organ. At early embryonic stages as observed by in situ hybridization, the synthesizing enzymes were expressed only in the dorsoventral epithelium of the otocyst, while the metabolizing enzymes were present mainly in mesenchymal cells surrounding the otic epithelium. At later stages, Raldh2, Raldh3 and Cyp26B1 were confined to the stria vascularis, spiral ganglion and supporting cells in the cochlear and vestibular epithelia, respectively. The downregulation of Cyp26s and the upregulation of Raldhs after birth during inner ear maturation suggests tissue changes in the sensitivity to retinoic acid concentrations. PMID:16615129

  5. Efficient production of free fatty acids from ionic liquid-based acid- or enzyme-catalyzed bamboo hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Mi, Le; Qin, Dandan; Cheng, Jie; Wang, Dan; Li, Sha; Wei, Xuetuan

    2017-03-01

    Two engineered Escherichia coli strains, DQ101 (MG1655 fadD (-))/pDQTES and DQ101 (MG1655 fadD (-))/pDQTESZ were constructed to investigate the free fatty acid production using ionic liquid-based acid- or enzyme-catalyzed bamboo hydrolysate as carbon source in this study. The plasmid, pDQTES, carrying an acyl-ACP thioesterase 'TesA of E. coli in pTrc99A was constructed firstly, and then (3R)-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase was ligated after the TesA to give the plasmid pDQTESZ. These two strains exhibited efficient fatty acid production when glucose was used as the sole carbon source, with a final concentration of 2.45 and 3.32 g/L, respectively. The free fatty acid production of the two strains on xylose is not as efficient as that on glucose, which was 2.32 and 2.96 g/L, respectively. For mixed sugars, DQ101 (MG1655 fadD (-))-based strains utilized glucose and pentose sequentially under the carbon catabolite repression (CCR) regulation. The highest total FFAs concentration from the mixed sugar culture reached 2.81 g/L by DQ101 (MG1655 fadD (-))/pDQTESZ. Furthermore, when ionic liquid-based enzyme-catalyzed bamboo hydrolysate was used as the carbon source, the strain DQ101 (MG1655 fadD (-))/pDQTESZ could produce 1.23 g/L FFAs with a yield of 0.13 g/g, and while it just produced 0.65 g/L free fatty acid with the ionic liquid-based acid-catalyzed bamboo hydrolysate as the feedstock. The results suggested that enzymatic catalyzed bamboo hydrolysate with ionic liquid pretreatment could serve as an efficient feedstock for free fatty acid production.

  6. Genipin Cross-Linked Glucose Oxidase and Catalase Multi-enzyme for Gluconic Acid Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Caixia; Chen, Haibin; Chen, Biqiang; Tan, Tianwei

    2017-02-01

    In this work, glucose oxidase (GOD) and catalase (CAT) were used simultaneously to produce gluconic acid from glucose. In order to reduce the distance between the two enzymes, and therefore improve efficiency, GOD and CAT were cross-linked together using genipin. Improvements in gluconic acid production were due to quick removal of harmful intermediate hydrogen peroxide by CAT. GOD activity was significantly affected by the proportion of CAT in the system, with GOD activity in the cross-linked multi-enzyme (CLME) being 10 times higher than that in an un-cross-linked GOD/CAT mixture. The glucose conversion rate after 15 h using 15 % glucose was also 10 % higher using the CLME than was measured using a GOD/CAT mixture.

  7. [Controlling arachidonic acid metabolic network: from single- to multi-target inhibitors of key enzymes].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Zheng; Shang, Er-chang; Yang, Kun; Wei, Deng-guo; Zhou, Lu; Jiang, Xiao-lu; He, Chong; Lai, Lu-hua

    2009-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases are common medical conditions seen in disorders of human immune system. There is a great demand for anti-inflammatory drugs. There are major inflammatory mediators in arachidonic acid metabolic network. Several enzymes in this network have been used as key targets for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs. However, specific single-target inhibitors can not sufficiently control the network balance and may cause side effects at the same time. Most inflammation induced diseases come from the complicated coupling of inflammatory cascades involving multiple targets. In order to treat these complicated diseases, drugs that can intervene multi-targets at the same time attracted much attention. The goal of this review is mainly focused on the key enzymes in arachidonic acid metabolic network, such as phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase, 5-lipoxygenase and eukotriene A4 hydrolase. Advance in single target and multi-targe inhibitors is summarized.

  8. Production of 5-aminolevulinic acid by cell free multi-enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinglong; Zhang, Yanfei; Ju, Xiaozhi; Ma, Chunling; Ma, Hongwu; Chen, Jiuzhou; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Jibin; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Yanhe; Zhao, Xueming; Chen, Tao

    2016-05-20

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is the precursor for the biosynthesis of tetrapyrroles and has broad agricultural and medical applications. Currently ALA is mainly produced by chemical synthesis and microbial fermentation. Cell free multi-enzyme catalysis is a promising method for producing high value chemicals. Here we reported our work on developing a cell free process for ALA production using thermostable enzymes. Cheap substrates (succinate and glycine) were used for ALA synthesis by two enzymes: 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS) from Laceyella sacchari (LS-ALAS) and succinyl-CoA synthase (Suc) from Escherichia coli. ATP was regenerated by polyphosphate kinase (Ppk) using polyphosphate as the substrate. Succinate was added into the reaction system in a fed-batch mode to avoid its inhibition effect on Suc. After reaction for 160min, ALA concentration was increased to 5.4mM. This is the first reported work on developing the cell free process for ALA production. Through further process and enzyme optimization the cell free process could be an effective and economic way for ALA production.

  9. Enhanced production of polyunsaturated fatty acids by enzyme engineering of tandem acyl carrier proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shohei; Satoh, Yasuharu; Ujihara, Tetsuro; Takata, Yusuke; Dairi, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    In some microorganisms, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are biosynthesized by PUFA synthases characterized by tandem acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) in subunit A. These ACPs were previously shown to be important for PUFA productivity. In this study, we examined their function in more detail. PUFA productivities increased depending on the number of ACPs without profile changes in each subunit A of eukaryotic and prokaryotic PUFA synthases. We also constructed derivative enzymes from subunit A with 5 × ACPs. Enzymes possessing one inactive ACP at any position produced ~30% PUFAs compared with the parental enzyme but unexpectedly had ~250% productivity compared with subunit A with 4 × ACPs. Enzymes constructed by replacing the 3rd ACP with an inactive ACP from another subunit A or ACP-unrelated sequences produced ~100% and ~3% PUFAs compared with the parental 3rd ACP-inactive enzyme, respectively. These results suggest that both the structure and number of ACP domains are important for PUFA productivity. PMID:27752094

  10. Salicylic-Acid-Induced Chilling- and Oxidative-Stress Tolerance in Relation to Gibberellin Homeostasis, C-Repeat/Dehydration-Responsive Element Binding Factor Pathway, and Antioxidant Enzyme Systems in Cold-Stored Tomato Fruit.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yang; Zhao, Jinhong; Nie, Ying; Fan, Bei; Wu, Shujuan; Zhang, Yu; Sheng, Jiping; Shen, Lin; Zhao, Ruirui; Tang, Xuanming

    2016-11-02

    Effects of salicylic acid (SA) on gibberellin (GA) homeostasis, C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding factor (CBF) pathway, and antioxidant enzyme systems linked to chilling- and oxidative-stress tolerance in tomato fruit were investigated. Mature green tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Moneymaker) were treated with 0, 0.5, and 1 mM SA solution for 15 min before storage at 4 °C for 28 days. In comparison to 0 or 0.5 mM SA, 1 mM SA significantly decreased the chilling injury (CI) index in tomato fruit. In the SA-treated fruit, the upregulation of GA biosynthetic gene (GA3ox1) expression was followed by gibberellic acid (GA3) surge and DELLA protein degradation. CBF1 participated in the SA-modulated tolerance and stimulated the expression of GA catabolic gene (GA2ox1). Furthermore, 1 mM SA enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes and, thus, reduced reactive oxygen species accumulation. Our findings suggest that SA might protect tomato fruit from CI and oxidative damage through regulating GA metabolism, CBF1 gene expression, and antioxidant enzyme activities.

  11. Another unusual type of citric acid cycle enzyme in Helicobacter pylori: the malate:quinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Kather, B; Stingl, K; van der Rest, M E; Altendorf, K; Molenaar, D

    2000-06-01

    The only enzyme of the citric acid cycle for which no open reading frame (ORF) was found in the Helicobacter pylori genome is the NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase. Here, it is shown that in this organism the oxidation of malate to oxaloacetate is catalyzed by a malate:quinone oxidoreductase (MQO). This flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent membrane-associated enzyme donates electrons to quinones of the electron transfer chain. Similar to succinate dehydrogenase, it is part of both the electron transfer chain and the citric acid cycle. MQO activity was demonstrated in isolated membranes of H. pylori. The enzyme is encoded by the ORF HP0086, which is shown by the fact that expression of the HP0086 sequence from a plasmid induces high MQO activity in mqo deletion mutants of Escherichia coli or Corynebacterium glutamicum. Furthermore, this plasmid was able to complement the phenotype of the C. glutamicum mqo deletion mutant. Interestingly, the protein predicted to be encoded by this ORF is only distantly related to known or postulated MQO sequences from other bacteria. The presence of an MQO shown here and the previously demonstrated presence of a 2-ketoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and a succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetoacetyl-CoA transferase indicate that H. pylori possesses a complete citric acid cycle, but one which deviates from the standard textbook example in three steps.

  12. Crystal structure of FadD32, an enzyme essential for mycolic acid biosynthesis in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Gu, Shoujin; Fleming, Joy; Bi, Lijun

    2015-12-02

    Fatty acid degradation protein D32 (FadD32), an enzyme required for mycolic acid biosynthesis and essential for mycobacterial growth, has recently been identified as a valid and promising target for anti-tuberculosis drug development. Here we report the crystal structures of Mycobacterium smegmatis FadD32 in the apo and ATP-bound states at 2.4 Å and 2.25 Å resolution, respectively. FadD32 consists of two globular domains connected by a flexible linker. ATP binds in a cleft at the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains and its binding induces significant local conformational changes in FadD32. The binding sites of meromycolic acid and phosphopantetheine are identified by structural comparison with other members of the adenylating enzyme superfamily. These results will improve our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of FadD32 and help in the design of inhibitors of this essential enzyme.

  13. New biosynthetic pathway for pink pigments from uncultured oceanic viruses.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Benjamin; Béjà, Oded; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2016-12-01

    The pink open-chain tetrapyrrole pigment phycoerythrobilin (PEB) is employed by marine cyanobacteria, red algae and cryptophytes as a light-harvesting chromophore in phycobiliproteins. Genes encoding biosynthesis proteins for PEB have also been discovered in cyanophages, viruses that infect cyanobacteria, and mimic host pigment biosynthesis with the exception of PebS which combines the enzymatic activities of two host enzymes. In this study, we have identified novel members of the PEB biosynthetic enzyme families, heme oxygenases and ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductases. Encoding genes were found in metagenomic datasets and could be traced back to bacteriophage but not cyanophage origin. While the heme oxygenase exhibited standard activity, a new bilin reductase with highest homology to the teal pigment producing enzyme PcyA revealed PEB biosynthetic activity. Although PcyX possesses PebS-like activity both enzymes share only 9% sequence identity and likely catalyze the reaction via two independent mechanisms. Our data point towards the presence of phycobilin biosynthetic genes in phages that probably infect alphaproteobacteria and, therefore, further support a role of phycobilins outside oxygenic phototrophs.

  14. Sequential Immunoprecipitation of Secretory Vesicle Proteins from Biosynthetically Labelled Cells.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse radiolabelling of cells with radioactive amino acids is a common method for studying the biosynthesis of proteins. The labelled proteins can then be immunoprecipitated and analysed by electrophoresis and imaging techniques. This chapter presents a protocol for the biosynthetic labelling and immunoprecipitation of pancreatic islet proteins which are known to be affected in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

  15. Ligand-dependent regulation of the activity of the orphan nuclear receptor, small heterodimer partner (SHP), in the repression of bile acid biosynthetic CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 genes.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ji; Choi, Sung-E; Seok, Sun Mi; Yang, Linda; Zuercher, William J; Xu, Yong; Willson, Timothy M; Xu, H Eric; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2011-07-01

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP) plays important roles in diverse biological processes by directly interacting with transcription factors and inhibiting their activities. SHP has been designated an orphan nuclear receptor, but whether its activity can be modulated by ligands has been a long-standing question. Recently, retinoid-related molecules, including 4-[3-(1-adamantyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]-3-chlorocinnamic acid (3Cl-AHPC), were shown to bind to SHP and enhance apoptosis. We have examined whether 3Cl-AHPC acts as an agonist and increases SHP activity in the repression of bile acid biosynthetic CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 genes and delineated the underlying mechanisms. Contrary to this expectation, micromolar concentrations of 3Cl-AHPC increased CYP7A1 expression but indirectly via p38 kinase signaling. Nanomolar concentrations, however, repressed CYP7A1 expression and decreased bile acid levels in HepG2 cells, and little repression was observed when SHP was down-regulated by small hairpin RNA. Mechanistic studies revealed that 3Cl-AHPC bound to SHP, increased the interaction of SHP with liver receptor homologue (LRH)-1, a hepatic activator for CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 genes, and with repressive cofactors, Brahma, mammalian Sin3a, and histone deacetylase-1, and, subsequently, increased the occupancy of SHP and these cofactors at the promoters. Mutation of Leu-100, predicted to contact 3Cl-AHPC within the SHP ligand binding pocket by molecular modeling, severely impaired the increased interaction with LRH-1, and repression of LRH-1 activity mediated by 3Cl-AHPC. 3Cl-AHPC repressed SHP metabolic target genes in a gene-specific manner in human primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. These data suggest that SHP may act as a ligand-regulated receptor in metabolic pathways. Modulation of SHP activity by synthetic ligands may be a useful therapeutic strategy.

  16. Peroxidase activity of bacterial cytochrome P450 enzymes: modulation by fatty acids and organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Kersten S; Erkelenz, Michael; Kiko, Kathrin; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2010-08-01

    The modulation of peroxidase activity by fatty acid additives and organic cosolvents was determined and compared for four bacterial cytochrome P450 enzymes, thermostable P450 CYP119A1, the P450 domain of CYP102A1 (BMP), CYP152A1 (P450(bsbeta)), and CYP101A1 (P450(cam)). Utilizing a high-throughput microplate assay, we were able to readily screen more than 100 combinations of enzymes, additives and cosolvents in a convenient and highly reproducible assay format. We found that, in general, CYP119A1 and BMP showed an increase in peroxidative activity in the presence of fatty acids, whereas CYP152A1 revealed a decrease in activity and CYP101A1 was only slightly affected. In particular, we observed that the conversion of the fluorogenic peroxidase substrate Amplex Red by CYP119A1 and BMP was increased by a factor of 38 or 11, respectively, when isopropanol and lauric acid were present in the reaction mixture. The activity of CYP119A1 could thus be modulated to reach more than 90% of the activity of CYP152A1 without effectors, which is the system with the highest peroxidative activity. For all P450s investigated we found distinctive reactivity patterns, which suggest similarities in the binding site of CYP119A1 and BMP in contrast with the other two proteins studied. Therefore, this study points towards a role of fatty acids as activators for CYP enzymes in addition to being mere substrates. In general, our detailed description of fatty acid- and organic solvent-effects is of practical interest because it illustrates that optimization of modulators and cosolvents can lead to significantly increased yields in biocatalysis.

  17. The Crystal Structure of the Adenylation Enzyme VinN Reveals a Unique β-Amino Acid Recognition Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp230 residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes. PMID:25246523

  18. The crystal structure of the adenylation enzyme VinN reveals a unique β-amino acid recognition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-11-07

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp(230) residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes.

  19. Flavoenzymes: Versatile Catalysts in Biosynthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Christopher T.; Wencewicz, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Riboflavin-based coenzymes, tightly bound to enzymes catalyzing substrate oxidations and reductions, enable an enormous range of chemical transformations in biosynthetic pathways. Flavoenzymes catalyze substrate oxidations involving amine and alcohol oxidations and desaturations to olefins, the latter setting up Diels-Alder cyclizations in lovastatin and solanapyrone biosyntheses. Both C4a and N5 of the flavin coenzymes are sites for covalent adduct formation. For example, the reactivity of dihydroflavins with molecular oxygen leads to flavin-4a-OOH adducts which then carry out a diverse range of oxygen transfers, including Baeyer-Villiger type ring expansions, olefin epoxidations, halogenations via transient HOCl generation, and an oxidative Favorskii rerrangement during enterocin assembly. PMID:23051833

  20. Study and comparison of two enzyme membrane reactors for fatty acids and glycerol production

    SciTech Connect

    Molinari, R.; Santoro, M.E.; Drioli, E. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Inst. on Membranes and Chemical Reactors-CNR, Arcavacata di Rende )

    1994-11-01

    Two enzyme membrane reactors (EMR), (1) with one substrate (olive oil) in an oil-in-water emulsion (E-EMR) and (2) with two separated liquid phases (oil and water) (TSLP-EMR), have been studied for the conversion of the triglycerides to fatty acids and glycerol. The enzyme was Candida cylindracea lipase confined on the pressurized face or entrapped in the sponge side of capillary ultrafiltration membranes. Two methods for immobilizing the enzyme in the TSLP-EMR were used: ultrafiltration on a virgin membrane and ultrafiltration on glutaraldehyde pretreated membranes. A multiple use of the reactor was obtained immobilizing the enzyme on the membrane preactivated with glutaraldehyde. The TSLP-EMR showed a specific activity of 0.529 mmol/(mg[center dot]h) versus a specific activity of 0.170 mmol/(mg[center dot]h) of the E-EMR. The rate of fatty acid production in the TSLP-EMR was linear with time showing no enzyme deactivation in an operating time of 80 h. The kinetics observed in the two reactors was different: an equilibrium reaction product-inhibited for the E-EMR and an apparent irreversible reaction of zero order for the TSLP-EMR. Taking into account that in the TSLP-EMR, compared to the E-EMR, (1) the specific activity was higher, (2) the specific rate was constant with the time, and (3) the two products were already separated after the reaction, the TSLP-EMR configuration seems the more convenient.

  1. Retinoic acid signalling centres in the avian embryo identified by sites of expression of synthesising and catabolising enzymes.

    PubMed

    Blentic, Aida; Gale, Emily; Maden, Malcolm

    2003-05-01

    Retinoic acid is an important signalling molecule in the developing embryo, but its precise distribution throughout development is very difficult to determine by available techniques. Examining the distribution of the enzymes by which it is synthesised by using in situ hybridisation is an alternative strategy. Here, we describe the distribution of three retinoic acid synthesising enzymes and one retinoic acid catabolic enzyme during the early stages of chick embryogenesis with the intention of identifying localized retinoic acid signalling regions. The enzymes involved are Raldh1, Raldh2, Raldh3, and Cyp26A1. Although some of these distributions have been described before, here we assemble them all in one species and several novel sites of enzyme expression are identified, including Hensen's node, the cardiac endoderm, the presumptive pancreatic endoderm, and the dorsal lens. This study emphasizes the dynamic pattern of expression of the enzymes that control the availability of retinoic acid as well as the role that retinoic acid plays in the development of many regions of the embryo throughout embryogenesis. This strategy provides a basis for understanding the phenotypes of retinoic acid teratology and retinoic acid-deficiency syndromes.

  2. Structural analysis of Bacillus pumilus phenolic acid decarboxylase, a lipocalin-fold enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Matte, Allan; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Abokitse, Kofi; Lau, Peter C.K.

    2012-04-30

    The decarboxylation of phenolic acids, including ferulic and p-coumaric acids, to their corresponding vinyl derivatives is of importance in the flavoring and polymer industries. Here, the crystal structure of phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) from Bacillus pumilus strain UI-670 is reported. The enzyme is a 161-residue polypeptide that forms dimers both in the crystal and in solution. The structure of PAD as determined by X-ray crystallography revealed a -barrel structure and two -helices, with a cleft formed at one edge of the barrel. The PAD structure resembles those of the lipocalin-fold proteins, which often bind hydrophobic ligands. Superposition of structurally related proteins bound to their cognate ligands shows that they and PAD bind their ligands in a conserved location within the -barrel. Analysis of the residue-conservation pattern for PAD-related sequences mapped onto the PAD structure reveals that the conservation mainly includes residues found within the hydrophobic core of the protein, defining a common lipocalin-like fold for this enzyme family. A narrow cleft containing several conserved amino acids was observed as a structural feature and a potential ligand-binding site.

  3. The c4h, tat, hppr and hppd Genes Prompted Engineering of Rosmarinic Acid Biosynthetic Pathway in Salvia miltiorrhiza Hairy Root Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shouhong; Saechao, Saengking; Di, Peng; Chen, Junfeng; Chen, Wansheng

    2011-01-01

    Rational engineering to produce biologically active plant compounds has been greatly impeded by our poor understanding of the regulatory and metabolic pathways underlying the biosynthesis of these compounds. Here we capitalized on our previously described gene-to-metabolite network in order to engineer rosmarinic acid (RA) biosynthesis pathway for the production of beneficial RA and lithospermic acid B (LAB) in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures. Results showed their production was greatly elevated by (1) overexpression of single gene, including cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (c4h), tyrosine aminotransferase (tat), and 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate reductase (hppr), (2) overexpression of both tat and hppr, and (3) suppression of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (hppd). Co-expression of tat/hppr produced the most abundant RA (906 mg/liter) and LAB (992 mg/liter), which were 4.3 and 3.2-fold more than in their wild-type (wt) counterparts respectively. And the value of RA concentration was also higher than that reported before, that produced by means of nutrient medium optimization or elicitor treatment. It is the first report of boosting RA and LAB biosynthesis through genetic manipulation, providing an effective approach for their large-scale commercial production by using hairy root culture systems as bioreactors. PMID:22242141

  4. Experiment K-7-21: Effect of Microgravity on 1: Metabolic Enzymes of Type 1 and Type 2 Muscle Fibers, and on 2: Metabolic Enzymes, Neurotransmitter Amino Acids, and Neurotransmitter Associated Enzymes in Selected Regions of the Central Nervous System. Part 2; The Distribution of Selected Enzymes and Amino Acids in the Hippocampal Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O. H.; Krasnov, I.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Nemeth, P. M.; McDougal, D. B., Jr.; Choksi, R.; Carter, J. G.; Chi, M. M. Y.; Manchester, J. K.; Pusateri, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Six key metabolic enzymes plus glutaminase and glutamate decarboxylase, as well as glutamate, aspartate and GABA, were measured in 11 regions of the hippocampal formation of synchronous, flight and tail suspension rats. Major differences were observed in the normal distribution patterns of each enzyme and amino acid, but no substantive effects of either microgravity or tail suspension on these patterns were clearly demonstrated.

  5. Threonine biosynthetic genes are essential in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Kingsbury, Joanne M.; McCusker, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We identified and attempted to disrupt the Cryptococcus neoformans homoserine and/or threonine biosynthetic genes encoding aspartate kinase (HOM3), homoserine kinase (THR1), and threonine synthase (THR4), however, each gene proved recalcitrant to disruption. By replacing the endogenous promoters of HOM3 and THR1 with the copper-repressible CTR4-1 promoter, we showed that HOM3 and THR1 were essential for the growth of C. neoformans in rich media, when ammonium was the nitrogen source, or when threonine was supplied as an amino acid instead of a dipeptide. Moreover, the severity of the growth defect associated with HOM3- or THR1-repression increased with increasing incubation temperature. This study comprises the first demonstration of threonine biosynthetic genes being essential in a fungus. The necessity of these genes for C. neoformans growth, particularly at physiologically relevant temperatures, makes threonine biosynthetic genes ideal anti-cryptococcal drug targets. PMID:18757810

  6. Lignification and related enzymes in Glycine max root growth-inhibition by ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes L; Finger, Aline; Teixeira, Aline C N; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2004-06-01

    Changes in soluble and cell wall bound peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7) activity, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5) activity, and lignin content in roots of ferulic acid-stressed soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) seedlings and their relationships with root growth were investigated. Three-day-old soybean seedlings were cultivated in half-strength Hoagland nutrient solution containing 1.0 mM ferulic acid for 24-72 hr. Length, fresh weight, and dry weight of roots decreased, while soluble and cell wall bound POD activity, PAL activity, and lignin content increased after ferulic acid treatment. These enzymes probably participate in root growth reduction in association with cell wall stiffening related to the formation of cross-linking among cell wall polymers and lignin production.

  7. Combined Effects of Lanthanum (III) and Acid Rain on Antioxidant Enzyme System in Soybean Roots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Du, Yuping; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua; Sun, Zhaoguo

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth element pollution (REEs) and acid rain (AR) pollution simultaneously occur in many regions, which resulted in a new environmental issue, the combined pollution of REEs and AR. The effects of the combined pollution on the antioxidant enzyme system of plant roots have not been reported. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum ion (La3+), one type of REE, and AR on the antioxidant enzyme system of soybean roots were investigated. In the combined treatment of La3+ (0.08 mM) and AR, the cell membrane permeability and the peroxidation of cell membrane lipid of soybean roots increased, and the superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and reduced ascorbic acid served as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. In other combined treatments of La3+ (0.40 mM, 1.20 mM) and AR, the membrane permeability, malonyldialdehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content increased, while the catalase activity decreased. The increased superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content were inadequate to scavenge the excess hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, leading to the damage of the cell membrane, which was aggravated with the increase in the concentration of La3+ and the level of AR. The deleterious effects of the combined treatment of La3+ and AR were stronger than those of the single treatment of La3+ or AR. Moreover, the activity of antioxidant enzyme system in the combined treatment group was affected directly and indirectly by mineral element content in soybean plants.

  8. Combined Effects of Lanthanum (III) and Acid Rain on Antioxidant Enzyme System in Soybean Roots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Du, Yuping; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua; Sun, Zhaoguo

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth element pollution (REEs) and acid rain (AR) pollution simultaneously occur in many regions, which resulted in a new environmental issue, the combined pollution of REEs and AR. The effects of the combined pollution on the antioxidant enzyme system of plant roots have not been reported. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum ion (La3+), one type of REE, and AR on the antioxidant enzyme system of soybean roots were investigated. In the combined treatment of La3+ (0.08 mM) and AR, the cell membrane permeability and the peroxidation of cell membrane lipid of soybean roots increased, and the superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and reduced ascorbic acid served as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. In other combined treatments of La3+ (0.40 mM, 1.20 mM) and AR, the membrane permeability, malonyldialdehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content increased, while the catalase activity decreased. The increased superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content were inadequate to scavenge the excess hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, leading to the damage of the cell membrane, which was aggravated with the increase in the concentration of La3+ and the level of AR. The deleterious effects of the combined treatment of La3+ and AR were stronger than those of the single treatment of La3+ or AR. Moreover, the activity of antioxidant enzyme system in the combined treatment group was affected directly and indirectly by mineral element content in soybean plants. PMID:26230263

  9. Stagewise dilute-acid pretreatment and enzyme hydrolysis of distillers' grains and corn fiber.

    PubMed

    Noureddini, Hossein; Byun, Jongwon; Yu, Ta-Jen

    2009-11-01

    Distillers' grains and corn fiber are the coproducts of the corn dry grind and wet milling industries, respectively. Availability of distillers' grains and corn fiber at the ethanol plant and their high levels of lignocellulosic material make these coproducts attractive feedstocks for conversion to ethanol. In this study, dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of these coproducts was investigated in a multistage scheme. After the completion of each pretreatment stage, the liquid substrate was separated and reused in the succeeding pretreatment stage with a fresh substrate. The substrate from each stage was also subjected to enzyme hydrolysis in a separate experiment. The sulfuric acid concentration and the substrate loading were maintained at 1.0 vol% and 15.0 wt.%, respectively, and the temperature was maintained at 120 degrees C in all the experiments. Experiments were also performed to study the effect of removing oil from the samples prior to the pretreatment. The highest concentration of monomeric sugars (MS) was observed when three stages of pretreatment were followed by the enzyme reaction. The enzyme hydrolysis of the three-stage pretreated dried distillers' grains and corn fiber yielded 122.6 +/- 5.8 and 184.5 +/- 4.1 mg/mL of MS, respectively. The formation of inhibitory products was also monitored.

  10. A novel enzyme-based acidizing system: Matrix acidizing and drilling fluid damage removal

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.E.; McKay, D.M.; Moses, V.

    1995-12-31

    A novel acidizing process is used to increase the permeability of carbonate rock cores in the laboratory and to remove drilling fluid damage from cores and wafers. Field results show the benefits of the technology as applied both to injector and producer wells.

  11. Importance of ALDH1A enzymes in determining human testicular retinoic acid concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Samuel L.; Kent, Travis; Hogarth, Cathryn A.; Schlatt, Stefan; Prasad, Bhagwat; Haenisch, Michael; Walsh, Thomas; Muller, Charles H.; Griswold, Michael D.; Amory, John K.; Isoherranen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, is required for spermatogenesis and many other biological processes. RA formation requires irreversible oxidation of retinal to RA by aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes of the 1A family (ALDH1A). While ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3 all form RA, the expression pattern and relative contribution of these enzymes to RA formation in the testis is unknown. In this study, novel methods to measure ALDH1A protein levels and intrinsic RA formation were used to accurately predict RA formation velocities in individual human testis samples and an association between RA formation and intratesticular RA concentrations was observed. The distinct localization of ALDH1A in the testis suggests a specific role for each enzyme in controlling RA formation. ALDH1A1 was found in Sertoli cells, while only ALDH1A2 was found in spermatogonia, spermatids, and spermatocytes. In the absence of cellular retinol binding protein (CRBP)1, ALDH1A1 was predicted to be the main contributor to intratesticular RA formation, but when CRBP1 was present, ALDH1A2 was predicted to be equally important in RA formation as ALDH1A1. This study provides a comprehensive novel methodology to evaluate RA homeostasis in human tissues and provides insight to how the individual ALDH1A enzymes mediate RA concentrations in specific cell types. PMID:25502770

  12. Nitrile-hydrolyzing enzyme from Meyerozyma guilliermondii and its potential in biosynthesis of 3-hydroxypropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Gong, Jin-Song; Dong, Ting-Ting; Liu, Ting-Ting; Li, Heng; Dou, Wen-Fang; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2017-03-11

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) is an important platform chemical in organic synthesis. Traditionally, 3-HP was produced by chemical methods and fermentation process. In this work, a novel enzymatic method was developed for green synthesis of 3-HP. A yeast strain harboring nitrile-hydrolyzing enzyme was newly isolated from environmental samples using 3-hydroxypropionitrile (3-HPN) as the sole nitrogen source. It was identified to be Meyerozyma guilliermondii CGMCC12935 by sequencing of the 18S ribosomal DNA and internal transcribed spacer, together with analysis of the morphology characteristics. The catalytic properties of M. guilliermondii CGMCC12935 resting cells were determined, and the optimum activity was achieved at 55 °C and pH 7.5. The enzyme showed broad substrate specificity towards nitriles, especially 3-HPN, aminoacetonitrile and 3-cyanopyridine. The presence of Ag(+), Pb(2+) and excess substrate inhibited the enzyme activity, whereas 5% (v/v) ethyl acetate had a positive effect on the enzyme activity. M. guilliermondii CGMCC12935 resting cells by addition of 3% glucose could thoroughly hydrolyze 500 mM 3-HPN into 3-HP within 100 h and the maximal accumulative production of 3-HP reached 216.33 mM, which was over twofolds than the control group with no additional glucose. And this work would lay the foundation for biological production of 3-HP in industry.

  13. Adenosine deaminase deficiency with normal immune function. An acidic enzyme mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Daddona, P E; Mitchell, B S; Meuwissen, H J; Davidson, B L; Wilson, J M; Koller, C A

    1983-01-01

    In most instances, marked deficiency of the purine catabolic enzyme adenosine deaminase results in lymphopenia and severe combined immunodeficiency disease. Over a 2-yr period, we studied a white male child with markedly deficient erythrocyte and lymphocyte adenosine deaminase activity and normal immune function. We have documented that (a) adenosine deaminase activity and immunoreactive protein are undetectable in erythrocytes, 0.9% of normal in lymphocytes, 4% in cultured lymphoblasts, and 14% in skin fibroblasts; (b) plasma adenosine and deoxyadenosine levels are undetectable and deoxy ATP levels are only slightly elevated in lymphocytes and in erythrocytes; (c) no defect in deoxyadenosine metabolism is present in the proband's cultured lymphoblasts; (d) lymphoblast adenosine deaminase has normal enzyme kinetics, absolute specific activity, S20,w, pH optimum, and heat stability; and (e) the proband's adenosine deaminase exhibits a normal apparent subunit molecular weight but an abnormal isoelectric pH. In contrast to the three other adenosine deaminase-deficient healthy subjects who have been described, the proband is unique in demonstrating an acidic, heat-stable protein mutation of the enzyme that is associated with less than 1% lymphocyte adenosine deaminase activity. Residual adenosine deaminase activity in tissues other than lymphocytes may suffice to metabolize the otherwise lymphotoxic enzyme substrate(s) and account for the preservation of normal immune function. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6603477

  14. Oligomeric structure of proclavaminic acid amidino hydrolase: evolution of a hydrolytic enzyme in clavulanic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Jonathan M; Clifton, Ian J; Hernández, Helena; Doan, Linh X; Robinson, Carol V; Schofield, Christopher J; Hewitson, Kirsty S

    2002-01-01

    During biosynthesis of the clinically used beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid, one of the three steps catalysed by clavaminic acid synthase is separated from the other two by a step catalysed by proclavaminic acid amidino hydrolase (PAH), in which the guanidino group of an intermediate is hydrolysed to give proclavaminic acid and urea. PAH shows considerable sequence homology with the primary metabolic arginases, which hydrolyse arginine to ornithine and urea, but does not accept arginine as a substrate. Like other members of the bacterial sub-family of arginases, PAH is hexameric in solution and requires Mn2+ ions for activity. Other metal ions, including Co2+, can substitute for Mn2+. Two new substrates for PAH were identified, N-acetyl-(L)-arginine and (3R)-hydroxy-N-acetyl-(L)-arginine. Crystal structures of PAH from Streptomyces clavuligerus (at 1.75 A and 2.45 A resolution, where 1 A=0.1 nm) imply how it binds beta-lactams rather than the amino acid substrate of the arginases from which it evolved. The structures also suggest how PAH selects for a particular alcohol intermediate in the clavam biosynthesis pathway. As observed for the arginases, each PAH monomer consists of a core of beta-strands surrounded by alpha-helices, and its active site contains a di-Mn2+ centre with a bridging water molecule responsible for hydrolytic attack on to the guanidino group of the substrate. Comparison of structures obtained under different conditions reveals different conformations of a flexible loop, which must move to allow substrate binding. PMID:12020346

  15. Homology modeling and docking studies of FabH (β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III) enzyme involved in type II fatty acid biosynthesis of Chlorella variabilis: a potential algal feedstock for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Misra, Namrata; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Sukla, Lala Bihari; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2013-03-01

    The concept of using microalgae as an alternative renewable source of biofuel has gained much importance in recent years. However, its commercial feasibility is still an area of concern for researchers. Unraveling the fatty acid metabolic pathway and understanding structural features of various key enzymes regulating the process will provide valuable insights to target microalgae for augmented oil content. FabH (β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase; KAS III) is a condensing enzyme catalyzing the initial elongation step of type II fatty acid biosynthetic process and acyl carrier protein (ACP) facilitates the shuttling of the fatty acyl intermediates to the active site of the respective enzymes in the pathway. In the present study, a reliable three-dimensional structure of FabH from Chlorella variabilis, an oleaginous green microalga was modeled and subsequently the key residues involved in substrate binding were determined by employing protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation protocols. The FabH-ACP complex having the lowest docking energy score showed the binding of ACP to the electropositive FabH surface with strong hydrogen bond interactions. The MD simulation results indicated that the substrate-complexed FabH adopted a more stable conformation than the free enzyme. Further, the FabH structure retained its stability throughout the simulation although noticeable displacements were observed in the loop regions. Molecular simulation studies suggested the importance of crucial hydrogen bonding of the conserved Arg(91) of FabH with Glu(53) and Asp(56) of ACP for exhibiting high affinity between the enzyme and substrate. The molecular modeling results are consistent with available experimental results on the flexibility of FabH and the present study provides first in silico insights into the structural and dynamical aspect of catalytic mechanism of FabH, which could be used for further site-specific mutagenic experiments to develop

  16. Allosteric ACTion: the varied ACT domains regulating enzymes of amino-acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lang, Eric J M; Cross, Penelope J; Mittelstädt, Gerd; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Parker, Emily J

    2014-12-01

    Allosteric regulation of enzyme activity plays important metabolic roles. Here we review the allostery of enzymes of amino-acid metabolism conferred by a discrete domain known as the ACT domain. This domain of 60-70 residues has a βαββαβ topology leading to a four-stranded β4β1β3β2 antiparallel sheet with two antiparallel helices on one face. Extensive sequence variation requires a combined sequence/structure/function analysis for identification of the ACT domain. Common features include highly varied modes of self-association of ACT domains, ligand binding at domain interfaces, and transmittal of allosteric signals through conformational changes and/or the manipulation of quaternary equilibria. A recent example illustrates the relatively facile adoption of this versatile module of allostery by gene fusion.

  17. Reverse reaction of malic enzyme for HCO3- fixation into pyruvic acid to synthesize L-malic acid with enzymatic coenzyme regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoko; Nakamori, Toshihiko; Zheng, Haitao; Suye, Shin-ichiro

    2008-05-01

    Malic enzyme [L-malate: NAD(P)(+) oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.39)] catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of L-malic acid to produce pyruvic acid using the oxidized form of NAD(P) (NAD(P)(+)). We used a reverse reaction of the malic enzyme of Pseudomonas diminuta IFO 13182 for HCO(3)(-) fixation into pyruvic acid to produce L-malic acid with coenzyme (NADH) generation. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC1.1.1.49) of Leuconostoc mesenteroides was suitable for coenzyme regeneration. Optimum conditions for the carboxylation of pyruvic acid were examined, including pyruvic acid, NAD(+), and both malic enzyme and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase concentrations. Under optimal conditions, the ratio of HCO(3)(-) and pyruvic acid to malic acid was about 38% after 24 h of incubation at 30 degrees C, and the concentration of the accumulated L-malic acid in the reaction mixture was 38 mM. The malic enzyme reverse reaction was also carried out by the conjugated redox enzyme reaction with water-soluble polymer-bound NAD(+).

  18. Fabrication of enzyme reactor utilizing magnetic porous polymer membrane for screening D-Amino acid oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun Fang; Qiao, Juan; Mu, Xiao Yu; Moon, Myeong Hee; Qi, Li

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a unique D-amino acid oxidase reactor for enhanced enzymolysis efficiency is presented. A kind of magnetic polymer matrices, composed of iron oxide nanoparticles and porous polymer membrane (poly styrene-co-maleic anhydride), was prepared. With covalent bonding D-Amino acid oxidase on the surface of the matrices and characterization of scanning electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometer, it demonstrated that the membrane enzyme reactor was successfully constructed. The enzymolysis efficiency of the enzyme reactor was evaluated and the apparent Michaelis-Menten constants of D-Amino acid oxidase were determined (Km was 1.10mM, Vmax was 23.8mMmin(-1)) by a chiral ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis protocol with methionine as the substrate. The results indicated that the enzyme reactor could exhibit good stability and excellent reusability. Importantly, because the enzyme and the substrate could be confined into the pores of the matrices, the enzyme reactor displayed the improved enzymolysis efficiency due to the confinement effect. Further, the prepared enzyme reactor was applied for D-Amino acid oxidase inhibitors screening. It has displayed that the proposed protocol could pave a new way for fabrication of novel porous polymer membrane based enzyme reactors to screen enzyme inhibitors.

  19. Relationship of lipogenic enzyme activities to the rate of rat liver fatty acid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, G.; Kelley, D.; Schmidt, P.; Virk, S.; Serrato, C.

    1986-05-01

    The mechanism by which diet regulates liver lipogenesis is unclear. Here the authors report how dietary alterations effect the activities of key enzymes of fatty acid (FA) synthesis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, 400-500 g, were fasted for 48h and then refed a fat-free, high carbohydrate (HC) diet (75% cal. from sucrose) for 0,3,9,24 and 48h, or refed a HC diet for 48h, then fed a high-fat (HF) diet (44% cal. from corn oil) for 3,9,24 and 48h. The FA synthesis rate and the activities of acetyl CoA carboxylase (AC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), ATP citrate lyase (CL), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) were determined in the livers. FA synthesis was assayed with /sup 3/H/sub 2/O, enzyme activities were measured spectrophotometrically except for AC which was assayed with /sup 14/C-bicarbonate. There was no change in the activity of AC during fasting or on the HC diet. Fasting decreased the rate of FA synthesis by 25% and the activities of FAS and CL by 50%; refeeding the HC diet induced parallel changes in FA synthesis and the activities of FAS, CL, and G6PDH. After 9h on the HF diet, FA synthesis had decreased sharply, AC activity increased significantly while no changes were detected in the other activities. Subsequently FA synthesis did not change while the activities of the enzymes decreased slowly. These enzymes did not appear to regulate FA synthesis during inhibition of lipogenesis, but FAS, CL or G6PDH may be rate limiting in the induction phase. Other key factors may regulate FA synthesis during dietary alterations.

  20. Recovery of Phenolic Acid and Enzyme Production from Corn Silage Biologically Treated by Trametes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Bucić-Kojić, Ana; Šelo, Gordana; Zelić, Bruno; Planinić, Mirela; Tišma, Marina

    2017-03-01

    Corn silage is used as high-energy forage for dairy cows and more recently for biogas production in a process of anaerobic co-digestion with cow manure. In this work, fresh corn silage after the harvest was used as a substrate in solid-state fermentations with T. versicolor with the aim of phenolic acid recovery and enzyme (laccase and manganese peroxidase) production. During 20 days of fermentation, 10.4-, 3.4-, 3.0-, and 1.8-fold increments in extraction yield of syringic acid, vanillic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and caffeic acid, respectively, were reached when compared to biologically untreated corn silage. Maximal laccase activity was gained on the 4th day of fermentation (V.A. = 180.2 U/dm(3)), and manganese peroxidase activity was obtained after the 3rd day of fermentation (V.A. = 30.1 U/dm(3)). The addition of copper(II) sulfate as inducer during solid state fermentation resulted in 8.5- and 7-fold enhancement of laccase and manganese peroxidase activities, respectively. Furthermore, the influence of pH and temperature on enzyme activities was investigated. Maximal activity of laccase was obtained at T = 50 °C and pH = 3.0, while manganese peroxidase is active at temperature range T = 45-70 °C with the maximal activity at pH = 4.5.

  1. Modulation of digestive enzyme activities during ontogeny of Labeo rohita larvae fed ascorbic acid enriched zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Gopa; Mukhopadhyay, P K; Ayyappan, S

    2008-04-01

    The effect of supplementation of ascorbic acid through enriched zooplankton [10%, 20% and 30% ascorbyl palmitate (AP) inclusion in diet of zooplankton] on different digestive enzyme activities during ontogeny of Labeo rohita larvae was studied from 4 day to 15 day post hatch. Ascorbic acid (AA) content in different groups of unenriched (8.6+/-0.71) and enriched zooplankton were, 750+/-29.3, 1409.1+/-45.5, 2009.21+/-199.2 mug/g respectively on dry matter basis with differences (P<0.05) between the treatments. A difference (P<0.05) was found in tissue AA level in different dietary groups. Low amylase, protease, lipase and alkaline phosphatase activities were present in rohu larvae from the mouth opening stage which showed increasing trend with the age of larvae and increasing dietary AA content. A clear dose-dependent modulation of digestive enzyme activities in response to 10%, 20% and 30% AP enriched zooplankton feeding was evidenced from positive correlations between dietary AA content with magnitude of elevation of enzyme activity in different groups. There were 57, 55, 29.2 and 2 fold increases in amylase activity; 7.35, 7.02, 4.43 and 2.73 fold increases in protease activity; 45.636, 41.50, 19.83 and 13.69 fold increases in lipase activity and 6, 5, 3, and 2 fold increases in alkaline phosphatase activity observed in the 15th day post hatch larvae fed 20%, 30%, 10%AP enriched and normal zooplankton respectively, than 4-day post hatch larvae of the respective groups. Enzyme activities were also positively correlated with specific growth rates of wet weight of rohu larvae at the 15th day post hatch. Increased AA might have played an important role in advancing morphological transformation of the digestive tract, protecting gastric mucosa and accelerating growth by the process of tissue formation, which necessitated the requirement of more nutrient thereby, increasing digestive enzyme activity. The regulatory role of AA in the modulation of different digestive

  2. Microbial modulation of bacoside A biosynthetic pathway and systemic defense mechanism in Bacopa monnieri under Meloidogyne incognita stress

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rupali; Singh, Akanksha; Srivastava, Madhumita; Singh, Vivek; Gupta, M. M.; Pandey, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Plant-associated beneficial microbes have been explored to fulfill the imperative function for plant health. However, their impact on the host secondary metabolite production and nematode disease management remains elusive. Our present work has shown that chitinolytic microbes viz., Chitiniphilus sp. MTN22 and Streptomyces sp. MTN14 singly as well as in combination modulated the biosynthetic pathway of bacoside A and systemic defense mechanism against Meloidogyne incognita in Bacopa monnieri. Interestingly, expression of bacoside biosynthetic pathway genes (3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase, and squalene synthase) were upregulated in plants treated with the microbial combination in the presence as well as in absence of M. incognita stress. These microbes not only augmented bacoside A production (1.5 fold) but also strengthened host resistance via enhancement in chlorophyll a, defense enzymes and phenolic compounds like gallic acid, syringic acid, ferulic acid and cinnamic acid. Furthermore, elevated lignification and callose deposition in the microbial combination treated plants corroborate well with the above findings. Overall, the results provide novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of priming by beneficial microbes and underscore their capacity to trigger bacoside A production in B. monnieri under biotic stress. PMID:28157221

  3. Elucidation of Enzymatic Mechanism of Phenazine Biosynthetic Protein PhzF Using QM/MM and MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Wang, Xiaolei; Hu, Hongbo; Peng, Huasong; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xuehong

    2015-01-01

    The phenazine biosynthetic pathway is of considerable importance for the pharmaceutical industry. The pathway produces two products: phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid. PhzF is an isomerase that catalyzes trans-2,3-dihydro-3-hydroxyanthranilic acid isomerization and plays an essential role in the phenazine biosynthetic pathway. Although the PhzF crystal structure has been determined recently, an understanding of the detailed catalytic mechanism and the roles of key catalytic residues are still lacking. In this study, a computational strategy using a combination of molecular modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations was used to elucidate these important issues. The Apo enzyme, enzyme–substrate complexes with negatively charged Glu45, enzyme–transition state analog inhibitor complexes with neutral Glu45, and enzyme–product complexes with negatively charged Glu45 structures were optimized and modeled using a 200 ns molecular dynamics simulation. Residues such as Gly73, His74, Asp208, Gly212, Ser213, and water, which play important roles in ligand binding and the isomerization reaction, were comprehensively investigated. Our results suggest that the Glu45 residue at the active site of PhzF acts as a general base/acid catalyst during proton transfer. This study provides new insights into the detailed catalytic mechanism of PhzF and the results have important implications for PhzF modification. PMID:26414009

  4. Microbial modulation of bacoside A biosynthetic pathway and systemic defense mechanism in Bacopa monnieri under Meloidogyne incognita stress.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupali; Singh, Akanksha; Srivastava, Madhumita; Singh, Vivek; Gupta, M M; Pandey, Rakesh

    2017-02-03

    Plant-associated beneficial microbes have been explored to fulfill the imperative function for plant health. However, their impact on the host secondary metabolite production and nematode disease management remains elusive. Our present work has shown that chitinolytic microbes viz., Chitiniphilus sp. MTN22 and Streptomyces sp. MTN14 singly as well as in combination modulated the biosynthetic pathway of bacoside A and systemic defense mechanism against Meloidogyne incognita in Bacopa monnieri. Interestingly, expression of bacoside biosynthetic pathway genes (3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase, and squalene synthase) were upregulated in plants treated with the microbial combination in the presence as well as in absence of M. incognita stress. These microbes not only augmented bacoside A production (1.5 fold) but also strengthened host resistance via enhancement in chlorophyll a, defense enzymes and phenolic compounds like gallic acid, syringic acid, ferulic acid and cinnamic acid. Furthermore, elevated lignification and callose deposition in the microbial combination treated plants corroborate well with the above findings. Overall, the results provide novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of priming by beneficial microbes and underscore their capacity to trigger bacoside A production in B. monnieri under biotic stress.

  5. Biosynthetic pathway of the phytohormone auxin in insects and screening of its inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Yokokura, Junpei; Ito, Tsukasa; Arai, Ryoma; Yokoyama, Chiaki; Toshima, Hiroaki; Nagata, Shinji; Asami, Tadao; Suzuki, Yoshihito

    2014-10-01

    Insect galls are abnormal plant tissues induced by galling insects. The galls are used for food and habitation, and the phytohormone auxin, produced by the insects, may be involved in their formation. We found that the silkworm, a non-galling insect, also produces an active form of auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), by de novo synthesis from tryptophan (Trp). A detailed metabolic analysis of IAA using IAA synthetic enzymes from silkworms indicated an IAA biosynthetic pathway composed of a three-step conversion: Trp → indole-3-acetaldoxime → indole-3-acetaldehyde (IAAld) → IAA, of which the first step is limiting IAA production. This pathway was shown to also operate in gall-inducing sawfly. Screening of a chemical library identified two compounds that showed strong inhibitory activities on the conversion step IAAld → IAA. The inhibitors can be efficiently used to demonstrate the importance of insect-synthesized auxin in gall formation in the future.

  6. The pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway modulates production of biofilm determinants in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Marco; Rossi, Elio; Landini, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria are often found in multicellular communities known as biofilms, which constitute a resistance form against environmental stresses. Extracellular adhesion and cell aggregation factors, responsible for bacterial biofilm formation and maintenance, are tightly regulated in response to physiological and environmental cues. We show that, in Escherichia coli, inactivation of genes belonging to the de novo uridine monophosphate (UMP) biosynthetic pathway impairs production of curli fibers and cellulose, important components of the bacterial biofilm matrix, by inhibiting transcription of the csgDEFG operon, thus preventing production of the biofilm master regulator CsgD protein. Supplementing growth media with exogenous uracil, which can be converted to UMP through the pyrimidine nucleotide salvage pathway, restores csgDEFG transcription and curli production. In addition, however, exogenous uracil triggers cellulose production, particularly in strains defective in either carB or pyrB genes, which encode enzymes catalyzing the first steps of de novo UMP biosynthesis. Our results indicate the existence of tight and complex links between pyrimidine metabolism and curli/cellulose production: transcription of the csgDEFG operon responds to pyrimidine nucleotide availability, while cellulose production is triggered by exogenous uracil in the absence of active de novo UMP biosynthesis. We speculate that perturbations in the UMP biosynthetic pathways allow the bacterial cell to sense signals such as starvation, nucleic acids degradation, and availability of exogenous pyrimidines, and to adapt the production of the extracellular matrix to the changing environmental conditions.

  7. Bacterial Biosynthetic Gene Clusters Encoding the Anti-cancer Haterumalide Class of Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Matilla, Miguel A.; Stöckmann, Henning; Leeper, Finian J.; Salmond, George P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Haterumalides are halogenated macrolides with strong antitumor properties, making them attractive targets for chemical synthesis. Unfortunately, current synthetic routes to these molecules are inefficient. The potent haterumalide, oocydin A, was previously identified from two plant-associated bacteria through its high bioactivity against plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. In this study, we describe oocydin A (ooc) biosynthetic gene clusters identified by genome sequencing, comparative genomics, and chemical analysis in four plant-associated enterobacteria of the Serratia and Dickeya genera. Disruption of the ooc gene cluster abolished oocydin A production and bioactivity against fungi and oomycetes. The ooc gene clusters span between 77 and 80 kb and encode five multimodular polyketide synthase (PKS) proteins, a hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase cassette and three flavin-dependent tailoring enzymes. The presence of two free-standing acyltransferase proteins classifies the oocydin A gene cluster within the growing family of trans-AT PKSs. The amino acid sequences and organization of the PKS domains are consistent with the chemical predictions and functional peculiarities associated with trans-acyltransferase PKS. Based on extensive in silico analysis of the gene cluster, we propose a biosynthetic model for the production of oocydin A and, by extension, for other members of the haterumalide family of halogenated macrolides exhibiting anti-cancer, anti-fungal, and other interesting biological properties. PMID:23012376

  8. Hyaluronic acid nanogels with enzyme-sensitive cross-linking group for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenchen; Wang, Xin; Yao, Xikuang; Zhang, Yajun; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2015-05-10

    A methacrylation strategy was employed to functionalize hyaluronic acid and prepare hyaluronic acid (HA) nanogels. Dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analyzer and electron microscopy were utilized to characterize the nanogels and their enzyme-degradability in vitro. It was found that these nanogels had a spherical morphology with the diameter of about 70nm, and negative surface potential. When doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded into the nanogels, the diameter decreased to approximately 50nm with a drug loading content of 16% and encapsulation efficiency of 62%. Cellular uptake examinations showed that HA nanogels could be preferentially internalized by two-dimensional (2D) cells and three-dimensional (3D) multicellular spheroids (MCs) which both overexpress CD44 receptor. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging, biodistribution and penetration examinations in tumor tissue indicated that the HA nanogels could efficiently accumulate and penetrate the tumor matrix. In vivo antitumor evaluation found that DOX-loaded HA nanogels exhibited a significantly superior antitumor effect.

  9. The citric acid-modified, enzyme-resistant dextrin from potato starch as a potential prebiotic.

    PubMed

    Sliżewska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, enzyme-resistant dextrin, prepared by heating of potato starch in the presence of hydrochloric (0.1% dsb) and citric (0.1% dsb) acid at 130ºC for 3 h (CA-dextrin), was tested as a source of carbon for probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria cultured with intestinal bacteria isolated from feces of three healthy 70-year old volunteers. The dynamics of growth of bacterial monocultures in broth containing citric acid (CA)-modified dextrin were estimated. It was also investigated whether lactobacilli and bifidobacteria cultured with intestinal bacteria in the presence of resistant dextrin would be able to dominate the intestinal isolates. Prebiotic fermentation of resistant dextrin was analyzed using prebiotic index (PI). In co-cultures of intestinal and probiotic bacteria, the environment was found to be dominated by the probiotic strains of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus, which is a beneficial effect.

  10. Characterization of inulin hydrolyzing enzyme(s) in commercial glucoamylases and its application in lactic acid production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Jat).

    PubMed

    Dao, Thai Ha; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2013-11-01

    A high inulinase activity was found in three commercially available glucoamylase enzymes. Its origin was investigated and two proteins in the commercial glucoamylases were identified as the potential enzymes showing inulinase activity. One of the commercial glucoamylases, GA-L New from Genencor, was used for Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Jat) hydrolysis and a high hydrolysis yield of fructose was obtained. The simultaneous saccharification and lactic acid fermentation (SSF) of Jat was carried out using GA-L New as the inulinase and Pediococcus acidilactici DQ2 as the fermenting strain. A high lactic acid titer, yield, and productivity of 111.5 g/L, 0.46 g/g DM, and 1.55 g/L/h, respectively, were obtained within 72 h. The enzyme cost using the commercial glucoamylase as inulinase was compared to that using the typical inulinase and a large profit margin was identified. The results provided a practical way of Jat application for lactic acid production using cheap commercial glucoamylase enzyme.

  11. Ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activities and the amino acid profile of starry flounder Platichthys stellatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhidong; Wang, Jiying; Qiao, Hongjin; Li, Peiyu; Zhang, Limin; Xia, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activities and the amino acid (AA) profile of starry flounder, Platichthys stellatus, were investigated and limiting amino acids were estimated compared with the essential AA profile between larvae and live food to clarify starry flounder larval nutritional requirements. Larvae were collected at the egg stage and 0, 2, 4, 7, 12, 17, 24 days after hatching (DAH) for analysis. Larvae grew from 1.91 mm at hatching to 12.13 mm at 24 DAH. Trypsin and chymotrypsin activities changed slightly by 4 DAH and then increased significantly 4 DAH. Pepsin activity increased sharply beginning 17 DAH. Lipase activity increased significantly 4 DAH and increased progressively with larval growth. Amylase activity was also detected in newly hatched larvae and increased 7 DAH followed by a gradual decrease. High free amino acid (FAA) content was detected in starry flounder eggs (110.72 mg/g dry weight). Total FAA content dropped to 43.29 mg/g in 4-DAH larvae and then decreased gradually to 13.74 mg/g in 24-DAH larvae. Most FAAs (except lysine and methionine) decreased >50% in 4-DAH larvae compared with those in eggs and then decreased to the lowest values in 24-DAH larvae. Changes in the protein amino acid (PAA) profile were much milder than those observed for FAAs. Most PAAs increased gradually during larval development, except lysine and phenylalanine. The percentages of free threonine, valine, isoleucine, and leucine decreased until the end of the trial, whereas the protein forms of these four AAs followed the opposite trend. A comparison of the essential AA composition of live food (rotifers, Artemia nauplii, and Artemia metanauplii) and larvae suggested that methionine was potentially the first limiting AA. These results may help develop starry flounder larviculture methods by solving the AA imbalance in live food. Moreover, the increased digestive enzyme activities indicate the possibility of introducing artificial compound feed.

  12. Inhibition of the RTEM beta-lactamase from Escherichia coli. Interaction of the enzyme with derivatives of olivanic acid.

    PubMed

    Easton, C J; Knowles, J R

    1982-06-08

    From chemical and kinetic studies of the interaction of the RTEM beta-lactamase from Escherichia coli with three derivatives of olivanic acid, MM22382 (1), MM13902 (2), and MM4550 (3), a mechanism for the inhibition of the enzyme by these compounds is proposed: the interaction proceeds by formation of an acyl-enzyme, the delta 2-pyrroline, which may either deacylate or undergo tautomerization to the more tightly bound delta 1-pyrroline. The ability of olivanic acids to inhibit the enzyme thus depends on the partitioning of the acyl-enzyme to the delta 1-pyrroline ( a process that competes with the normal hydrolytic pathway) and on the rate of regeneration of free enzyme from this complex.

  13. Structural and Mechanistic Insight into the Listeria monocytogenes Two-enzyme Lipoteichoic Acid Synthesis System*

    PubMed Central

    Campeotto, Ivan; Percy, Matthew G.; MacDonald, James T.; Förster, Andreas; Freemont, Paul S.; Gründling, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important cell wall component required for proper cell growth in many Gram-positive bacteria. In Listeria monocytogenes, two enzymes are required for the synthesis of this polyglycerolphosphate polymer. The LTA primase LtaPLm initiates LTA synthesis by transferring the first glycerolphosphate (GroP) subunit onto the glycolipid anchor and the LTA synthase LtaSLm extends the polymer by the repeated addition of GroP subunits to the tip of the growing chain. Here, we present the crystal structures of the enzymatic domains of LtaPLm and LtaSLm. Although the enzymes share the same fold, substantial differences in the cavity of the catalytic site and surface charge distribution contribute to enzyme specialization. The eLtaSLm structure was also determined in complex with GroP revealing a second GroP binding site. Mutational analysis confirmed an essential function for this binding site and allowed us to propose a model for the binding of the growing chain. PMID:25128528

  14. Polyamine biosynthetic diversity in plants and algae.

    PubMed

    Fuell, Christine; Elliott, Katherine A; Hanfrey, Colin C; Franceschetti, Marina; Michael, Anthony J

    2010-07-01

    Polyamine biosynthesis in plants differs from other eukaryotes because of the contribution of genes from the cyanobacterial ancestor of the chloroplast. Plants possess an additional biosynthetic route for putrescine formation from arginine, consisting of the enzymes arginine decarboxylase, agmatine iminohydrolase and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase, derived from the cyanobacterial ancestor. They also synthesize an unusual tetraamine, thermospermine, that has important developmental roles and which is evolutionarily more ancient than spermine in plants and algae. Single-celled green algae have lost the arginine route and are dependent, like other eukaryotes, on putrescine biosynthesis from the ornithine. Some plants like Arabidopsis thaliana and the moss Physcomitrella patens have lost ornithine decarboxylase and are thus dependent on the arginine route. With its dependence on the arginine route, and the pivotal role of thermospermine in growth and development, Arabidopsis represents the most specifically plant mode of polyamine biosynthesis amongst eukaryotes. A number of plants and algae are also able to synthesize unusual polyamines such as norspermidine, norspermine and longer polyamines, and biosynthesis of these amines likely depends on novel aminopropyltransferases similar to thermospermine synthase, with relaxed substrate specificity. Plants have a rich repertoire of polyamine-based secondary metabolites, including alkaloids and hydroxycinnamic amides, and a number of polyamine-acylating enzymes have been recently characterised. With the genetic tools available for Arabidopsis and other model plants and algae, and the increasing capabilities of comparative genomics, the biological roles of polyamines can now be addressed across the plant evolutionary lineage.

  15. Identification and biochemical characterization of plant acylamino acid-releasing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yasuo; Ejiri, Yukinori; Toyoda, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    2003-08-01

    Plant acylamino acid-releasing enzyme (AARE) catalyzing the N-terminal hydrolysis of N(alpha)-acylpeptides to release N(alpha)-acylated amino acids, was biochemically characterized using recombinant and native AAREs. A cDNA encoding a deduced Arabidopsis thaliana AARE (AtAARE) was cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence encoded a 764 amino acid protein of 83.9 kDa, which was 31.8% identical with that of rat AARE. In particular, the proposed catalytic residues (Ser, Asp, and His) of AARE, called the "catalytic triad residues, " were completely conserved. Recombinant AtAARE was expressed in Escherichia coli and confirmed to be a functional AARE. Native AAREs were prepared from A. thaliana and cucumber (Cucumis sativus, L.) plants. Both native AAREs were tetrameric proteins of 350 kDa comprising four subunits of 82 kDa, and showed typical enzymological properties of other AAREs, i.e. sensitivity to diisopropyl fluorophosphate, an optimum pH of around 7.0, and an optimum temperature of 37 degrees C. Both the native and recombinant AAREs were immunochemically homologous. Intracelluar fractionation analysis showed that the AARE was mainly present in the stroma of chloroplasts. Native AARE degraded the glycated ribulose-1,5-bisphoshate carboxylase/oxygenase protein but not the native protein. Thus, plant AARE might be involved in not only catalysis of the N-terminal hydrolysis of N(alpha)-acylpeptides but also the elimination of glycated proteins.

  16. Two-step immobilized enzyme conversion of cephalosporin C to 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.

    PubMed

    Conlon, H D; Baqai, J; Baker, K; Shen, Y Q; Wong, B L; Noiles, R; Rausch, C W

    1995-06-20

    The first large-scale production of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid (7ACA) from cephalosporin C (CPC) using a wholly enzymatic synthesis method is reported here. We produced 7ACA from CPC in as high a molar yield as 85% using the immobilized enzymes D-amino acid oxidase (D-AOD) and glutaryl-7-ACA acylase (GL-acylase). In the first reactor, CPC is converted to keto-adipyl-7-aminocephalosporanic acid (keto-7ACA) using an immobilized D-AOD isolated from a yeast, Trigonopsis variabilis. The keto-7ACA is then spontaneously converted to glutaryl-7-aminocephalosporanic acid (GL-7ACA) via a chemical reaction with hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide is also a product of the D-AOD reaction. Near quantitative conversion of the keto-7ACA to GL-7ACA was observed. The second reactor converts GL-7ACA to 7ACA using an immobilized GL-acylase, which was isolated from a recombinant Escherichia coli. The final 7ACA crystalline product is a high quality product. The reactions are conducted under very mild aqueous conditions: pH 8.0 and 20 degrees to 25 degrees C. The production of desacetyl side products is minimal. This process is currently being implemented on an industrial scale to produce 7ACA.

  17. Involvement of a lipoxygenase-like enzyme in abscisic Acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Creelman, R A; Bell, E; Mullet, J E

    1992-07-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that abscisic acid (ABA) is derived from 9'-cis-neoxanthin or 9'-cis-violaxanthin with xanthoxin as an intermediate. (18)O-labeling experiments show incorporation primarily into the side chain carboxyl group of ABA, suggesting that oxidative cleavage occurs at the 11, 12 (11', 12') double bond of xanthophylls. Carbon monoxide, a strong inhibitor of heme-containing P-450 monooxygenases, did not inhibit ABA accumulation, suggesting that the oxygenase catalyzing the carotenoid cleavage step did not contain heme. This observation, plus the ability of lipoxygenase to make xanthoxin from violaxanthin, suggested that a lipoxygenase-like enzyme is involved in ABA biosynthesis. To test this idea, the ability of several soybean (Glycine max L.) lipoxygenase inhibitors (5,8,11-eicosatriynoic acid, 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, and naproxen) to inhibit stress-induced ABA accumulation in soybean cell culture and soybean seedlings was determined. All lipoxygenase inhibitors significantly inhibited ABA accumulation in response to stress. These results suggest that the in vivo oxidative cleavage reaction involved in ABA biosynthesis requires activity of a nonheme oxygenase having lipoxygenase-like properties.

  18. Prediction of enzyme function based on 3D templates of evolutionarily important amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, David M; Ward, R Matthew; Lisewski, Andreas Martin; Erdin, Serkan; Chen, Brian Y; Fofanov, Viacheslav Y; Kimmel, Marek; Kavraki, Lydia E; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Background Structural genomics projects such as the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) yield many new structures, but often these have no known molecular functions. One approach to recover this information is to use 3D templates – structure-function motifs that consist of a few functionally critical amino acids and may suggest functional similarity when geometrically matched to other structures. Since experimentally determined functional sites are not common enough to define 3D templates on a large scale, this work tests a computational strategy to select relevant residues for 3D templates. Results Based on evolutionary information and heuristics, an Evolutionary Trace Annotation (ETA) pipeline built templates for 98 enzymes, half taken from the PSI, and sought matches in a non-redundant structure database. On average each template matched 2.7 distinct proteins, of which 2.0 share the first three Enzyme Commission digits as the template's enzyme of origin. In many cases (61%) a single most likely function could be predicted as the annotation with the most matches, and in these cases such a plurality vote identified the correct function with 87% accuracy. ETA was also found to be complementary to sequence homology-based annotations. When matches are required to both geometrically match the 3D template and to be sequence homologs found by BLAST or PSI-BLAST, the annotation accuracy is greater than either method alone, especially in the region of lower sequence identity where homology-based annotations are least reliable. Conclusion These data suggest that knowledge of evolutionarily important residues improves functional annotation among distant enzyme homologs. Since, unlike other 3D template approaches, the ETA method bypasses the need for experimental knowledge of the catalytic mechanism, it should prove a useful, large scale, and general adjunct to combine with other methods to decipher protein function in the structural proteome. PMID:18190718

  19. Clostridium thermocellum releases coumaric acid during degradation of untreated grasses by the action of an unknown enzyme.

    PubMed

    Herring, Christopher D; Thorne, Philip G; Lynd, Lee R

    2016-03-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is an anaerobic thermophile with the ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass that has not been pretreated with high temperatures. Thermophilic anaerobes have previously been shown to more readily degrade grasses than wood. Part of the explanation for this may be the presence of relatively large amounts of coumaric acid in grasses, with linkages to both hemicellulose and lignin. We found that C. thermocellum and cell-free cellulase preparations both release coumaric acid from bagasse and switchgrass. Cellulase preparations from a mutant strain lacking the scaffoldin cipA still showed activity, though diminished. Deletion of all three proteins in C. thermocellum with ferulic acid esterase domains, either singly or in combination, did not eliminate the activity. Further work will be needed to identify the novel enzyme(s) responsible for the release of coumaric acid from grasses and to determine whether these enzymes are important factors of microbial biomass degradation.

  20. Production and partial characterization of uric acid degrading enzyme from new source Saccharopolyspora sp. PNR11.

    PubMed

    Khucharoenphaisan, K; Sinma, K

    2011-02-01

    The strain PNR11 was isolated from gut of termite during the screening for uric acid degrading actinomyces. This strain was able to produce an intracellular uricase when cultured in fermentation medium containing uric acid as nitrogen source. Base on its morphological characters and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, this strain belong to the genus Saccharopolyspora. This is the first report ofuricase produced from the genus Saccharopolyspora. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different factors on uricase production by new source of Saccharopolyspora. Saccharopolyspora sp. PNR11 was cultured in production medium in order to determine the best cultivation period. The result showed that the time period required for maximum enzyme production was 24 h on a rotary shaker operating at 180 rpm. Optimized composition of the production medium consisted of 1% yeast extract, 1% maltose, 0.1% K2HPO4, 0.05% MgSO4 7H2O, 0.05% NaCl and 1% uric acid. The optimum pH and temperature for uricase production in the optimized medium were pH 7.0 and 30 degrees C, respectively. When the strain was cultured at optimized condition, the uricase activity reached to 216 mU mL(-1) in confidential level of 95%. The crude enzyme had an optimum temperature of uricase was 37 degrees C and it was stable up to 30 degrees C at pH 8.5. The optimum pH ofuricase was 8.5 and was stable in range of pH 7.0-10.0 at 4 degrees C. This strain might be considered as a candidate source for uricase production in the further studies. Present finding could be fulfill the information ofuricase produce from actinomycetes.

  1. Adapting capillary gel electrophoresis as a sensitive, high-throughput method to accelerate characterization of nucleic acid metabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Greenough, Lucia; Schermerhorn, Kelly M; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Slatko, Barton E; Gardner, Andrew F

    2016-01-29

    Detailed biochemical characterization of nucleic acid enzymes is fundamental to understanding nucleic acid metabolism, genome replication and repair. We report the development of a rapid, high-throughput fluorescence capillary gel electrophoresis method as an alternative to traditional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to characterize nucleic acid metabolic enzymes. The principles of assay design described here can be applied to nearly any enzyme system that acts on a fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide substrate. Herein, we describe several assays using this core capillary gel electrophoresis methodology to accelerate study of nucleic acid enzymes. First, assays were designed to examine DNA polymerase activities including nucleotide incorporation kinetics, strand displacement synthesis and 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Next, DNA repair activities of DNA ligase, flap endonuclease and RNase H2 were monitored. In addition, a multicolor assay that uses four different fluorescently labeled substrates in a single reaction was implemented to characterize GAN nuclease specificity. Finally, a dual-color fluorescence assay to monitor coupled enzyme reactions during Okazaki fragment maturation is described. These assays serve as a template to guide further technical development for enzyme characterization or nucleoside and non-nucleoside inhibitor screening in a high-throughput manner.

  2. Adapting capillary gel electrophoresis as a sensitive, high-throughput method to accelerate characterization of nucleic acid metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Greenough, Lucia; Schermerhorn, Kelly M.; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Slatko, Barton E.; Gardner, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    Detailed biochemical characterization of nucleic acid enzymes is fundamental to understanding nucleic acid metabolism, genome replication and repair. We report the development of a rapid, high-throughput fluorescence capillary gel electrophoresis method as an alternative to traditional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to characterize nucleic acid metabolic enzymes. The principles of assay design described here can be applied to nearly any enzyme system that acts on a fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide substrate. Herein, we describe several assays using this core capillary gel electrophoresis methodology to accelerate study of nucleic acid enzymes. First, assays were designed to examine DNA polymerase activities including nucleotide incorporation kinetics, strand displacement synthesis and 3′-5′ exonuclease activity. Next, DNA repair activities of DNA ligase, flap endonuclease and RNase H2 were monitored. In addition, a multicolor assay that uses four different fluorescently labeled substrates in a single reaction was implemented to characterize GAN nuclease specificity. Finally, a dual-color fluorescence assay to monitor coupled enzyme reactions during Okazaki fragment maturation is described. These assays serve as a template to guide further technical development for enzyme characterization or nucleoside and non-nucleoside inhibitor screening in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26365239

  3. Prediction of Thermostability from Amino Acid Attributes by Combination of Clustering with Attribute Weighting: A New Vista in Engineering Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Mansour; Lakizadeh, Amir; Agha-Golzadeh, Parisa; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Ebrahimi, Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    The engineering of thermostable enzymes is receiving increased attention. The paper, detergent, and biofuel industries, in particular, seek to use environmentally friendly enzymes instead of toxic chlorine chemicals. Enzymes typically function at temperatures below 60°C and denature if exposed to higher temperatures. In contrast, a small portion of enzymes can withstand higher temperatures as a result of various structural adaptations. Understanding the protein attributes that are involved in this adaptation is the first step toward engineering thermostable enzymes. We employed various supervised and unsupervised machine learning algorithms as well as attribute weighting approaches to find amino acid composition attributes that contribute to enzyme thermostability. Specifically, we compared two groups of enzymes: mesostable and thermostable enzymes. Furthermore, a combination of attribute weighting with supervised and unsupervised clustering algorithms was used for prediction and modelling of protein thermostability from amino acid composition properties. Mining a large number of protein sequences (2090) through a variety of machine learning algorithms, which were based on the analysis of more than 800 amino acid attributes, increased the accuracy of this study. Moreover, these models were successful in predicting thermostability from the primary structure of proteins. The results showed that expectation maximization clustering in combination with uncertainly and correlation attribute weighting algorithms can effectively (100%) classify thermostable and mesostable proteins. Seventy per cent of the weighting methods selected Gln content and frequency of hydrophilic residues as the most important protein attributes. On the dipeptide level, the frequency of Asn-Glu was the key factor in distinguishing mesostable from thermostable enzymes. This study demonstrates the feasibility of predicting thermostability irrespective of sequence similarity and will serve as a

  4. Biosynthetic Polymers as Functional Materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of functional polymers encoded with biomolecules has been an extensive area of research for decades. As such, a diverse toolbox of polymerization techniques and bioconjugation methods has been developed. The greatest impact of this work has been in biomedicine and biotechnology, where fully synthetic and naturally derived biomolecules are used cooperatively. Despite significant improvements in biocompatible and functionally diverse polymers, our success in the field is constrained by recognized limitations in polymer architecture control, structural dynamics, and biostabilization. This Perspective discusses the current status of functional biosynthetic polymers and highlights innovative strategies reported within the past five years that have made great strides in overcoming the aforementioned barriers. PMID:27375299

  5. Components of complex lipid biosynthetic pathways in developing castor (Ricinus communis) seeds identified by MudPIT analysis of enriched endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adrian P; Kroon, Johan T M; Topping, Jennifer F; Robson, Joanne L; Simon, William J; Slabas, Antoni R

    2011-08-05

    Ricinoleic acid is a feedstock for nylon-11 (N11) synthesis which is currently obtained from castor (Ricinus communis) oil. Production of this fatty acid in a temperate oilseed crop is of great commercial interest, but the highest reported level in transgenic plant oils is 30%, below the 90% observed in castor and insufficient for commercial exploitation. To identify castor oil-biosynthetic enzymes and inform strategies to improve ricinoleic acid yields, we performed MudPIT analysis on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) purified from developing castor bean endosperm. Candidate enzymes for all steps of triacylglycerol synthesis were identified among 72 proteins in the data set related to complex-lipid metabolism. Previous reported proteomic data from oilseeds had not included any membrane-bound enzyme that might incorporate ricinoleic acid into oil. Analysis of enriched ER enabled determination of which protein isoforms for these enzymes were in developing castor seed. To complement this data, quantitative RT-PCR experiments with castor seed and leaf RNA were performed for orthologues of Arabidopsis oil-synthetic enzymes, determining which were highly expressed in the seed. These data provide important information for further manipulation of ricinoleic acid content in oilseeds and peptide data for future quantification strategies.

  6. Vanadate and selenium inhibit the triiodothyronine induced enzyme activity and mRNA level for both fatty acid synthase and malic enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Mirmiran, R.; Goodridge, A.G.; Stapleton, S.R. Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo )

    1991-03-15

    In chick-embryo hepatocytes in culture, triiodothyronine stimulates enzyme activity, mRNA level and transcription rate for both fatty acid synthase (FAS) and malic enzyme (ME). Insulin alone has no effect but amplifies the induction by T3. Recent evidence has demonstrated the insulin-mimicking action of vanadate and selenium on various physiological processes. Little information, however, is available on the affects of vanadate and selenium on the expression of genes that are regulated by insulin. These studies were initiated to test the potential of vanadate and selenium to mimic the amplification affect of insulin on the T3 induction of FAS and ME. In chick-embryo hepatocytes incubated in a chemically defined medium, addition of T3 for 48h causes an increase in the enzyme activity and mRNA level for both FAS and ME. Addition of sodium vanadate or sodium selenate (20 {mu}M) coincident with the T3 almost completely inhibited the stimulation of FAS and ME activity and accumulation of their respective mRNA's. Fifty percent maximal inhibition occurred at about 3-40{mu}M vanadate or 5-10{mu}M selenium. Vanadate and selenium similarity inhibited FAS and ME enzyme activity and mRNA level when the cells were incubated in the presence of insulin and T3. The effect of these metals was selective; isocitrate dehydrogenase activity as well as the level of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate mRNA were not affected by any of the additions made to the cells in culture. This effect by vanadate and selenium also does not appear to be a generalized effect of metals on lipogenic enzymes as molydate under similar experimental conditions has no effect on either the enzyme activity or mRNA level of FAS or ME. Studies are continuing to determine the mechanism of action of these agents on the regulation of lipogenic enzymes.

  7. Enzymic dephosphorylation of bovine casein to improve acid clotting properties and digestibility for infant formula.

    PubMed

    Li-Chan, E; Nakai, S

    1989-01-01

    To improve acid clotting properties, enzymic dephosphorylation of caseins with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CAP) or potato acid phosphatase (PAP) was investigated. Greater dephosphorylation was achieved using alpha s1- or beta-casein as substrates, compared to whole casein or skim milk. Electrophoresis of PAP-modified caseins revealed bands with lower mobility and a multibanded pattern in the beta-casein region which was similar to that of human beta-casein. On the other hand, CAP modification produced electrophoretic bands having lower mobility of the beta-casein component, but with higher mobility in the alpha s1-casein component as well as increased net negative charge in the CAP-casein. PAP-casein formed a fine dispersion upon acidification to pH 4, with a microstructure similar to that of acidified human casein. Greater initial rates of hydrolysis by pepsin at pH 4 were observed for both CAP- and PAP-modified caseins, compared to bovine and human caseins. The rate and extent of hydrolysis remained high for CAP-casein but tended to level off with PAP-casein during sequential digestion with pepsin and pancreatin. There may be advantages in the use of partial dephosphorylation to improve acid clotting and digestibility properties of bovine casein for infant feeding.

  8. [1-butanol synthesis by Escherichia coli cells through butyryl-CoA formation by heterologous enzymes of clostridia and native enzymes of fatty acid beta-oxidation].

    PubMed

    Gulevich, A Iu; Skorokhodova, A Iu; Morzhakova, A A; Antonova, S V; Sukhozhenko, A V; Shakulov, R S; Debabov, V G

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic biosynthesis of 1-butanol from glucose is investigated in recombinant Escherichia coli strains which form butyryl-CoA using the heterologous enzyme complex of clostridia or as a result of a reversal in the action of native enzymes of the fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway. It was revealed that when the basic pathways of acetic and lactic acid formation are inactivated due to deletions in the ackA, pta, poxB, and ldhA genes, the efficiency of butyryl-CoA biosynthesis and its reduced product, i.e., 1-butanol, by two types of recombinant stains is comparable. The limiting factor for 1-butanol production by the obtained strains is the low substrate specificity of the basic CoA-dependent alcohol/aldehyde AdhE dehydrogenase from E. coli to butyryl-CoA. It was concluded that, in order to construct an efficient 1-butanol producer based on a model strain synthesizing butyryl-CoA as a result of a reversal in fatty acid beta-oxidation enzymes, it is necessary to provide intensive formation of acetyl-CoA and enhanced activity of alternative alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases in the cells of a strain.

  9. Pyrazinamide and Pyrazinoic Acid Derivatives Directed to Mycobacterial Enzymes Against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Michelle Fidelis; Fernandes, João Paulo-dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious diseases responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Due to the use of antimycobacterial drugs, TB prevalence seemed to be controlled, but with the appearance of resistant tuberculosis cases, the concern about the disease had become significant again, as well as the need for new alternatives to TB treatment. Since pyrazinamide (PZA) is part of the firstline agents in TB treatment, several derivatives of this drug were described, besides pyrazinoic acid (POA) derivatives, the active form of PZA. POA has been used mainly to design prodrugs to be activated by mycobacterial esterases, while PZA derivatives should be activated specifically by the nicotinamidase/ pyrazinamidase (PZAse), or other PZAse-independent pathways. The intention of this paper is to discuss the state of art of PZA and POA derivatives and their activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacteria, besides the therapeutic potential. Focus was given in prodrugs and derivatives directed to mycobacterial enzymes involved in its activation or mechanism of action.

  10. Aptamer- and nucleic acid enzyme-based systems for simultaneous detection of multiple analytes

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Yi [Champaign, IL; Liu, Juewen [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-11-15

    The present invention provides aptamer- and nucleic acid enzyme-based systems for simultaneously determining the presence and optionally the concentration of multiple analytes in a sample. Methods of utilizing the system and kits that include the sensor components are also provided. The system includes a first reactive polynucleotide that reacts to a first analyte; a second reactive polynucleotide that reacts to a second analyte; a third polynucleotide; a fourth polynucleotide; a first particle, coupled to the third polynucleotide; a second particle, coupled to the fourth polynucleotide; and at least one quencher, for quenching emissions of the first and second quantum dots, coupled to the first and second reactive polynucleotides. The first particle includes a quantum dot having a first emission wavelength. The second particle includes a second quantum dot having a second emission wavelength different from the first emission wavelength. The third polynucleotide and the fourth polynucleotide are different.

  11. [Effects of different tillage methods on phospholipid fatty acids and enzyme activities in calcareous cinnamon soil].

    PubMed

    Pei, Xue-Xia; Dang, Jian-You; Zhang, Ding-Yi; Wang, Jiao-Ai; Zhang, Jing

    2014-08-01

    In order to study changes of physical and chemical characteristics and microbial activities in soil under different tillage methods, effects of four tillage methods, rotary tillage (RT), subsoil tillage (ST), conventional tillage (CT) with corn straw returned to soil, and rotary tillage with no corn straw returned to soil (CK), on phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) characteristics and hydrolase enzymes activities in calcareous cinnamon soil were investigated. The results showed that soil hydrolase enzymes activities, nutrient contents, microbial diversity varied greatly with the different tillage methods. Returning corn straw to soil increased the kinds, amount of soil total PLFAs, bacteria PLFAs and actonomycetes PLFAs, while decreased the fungi PLFAs, indicating that fungi was more adaptable than bacteria to an infertile environment. ST and CT resulted in higher amounts of total PLFAs, which were 74.7% and 53.3% higher than that of CK, indicating they were more beneficial to the growth of plants. They could also improve soil physical and chemical properties, increase alk-phosphatase, protease and urease activities, which would provide a favorable soil condition for high and stable crop yields.

  12. Urinary D-glucaric acid and serum hepatic enzyme levels in chronic alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Tutor, J C; Alvarez-Prechous, A; Bernabeu, F; Pardiñas, M C; Paz, J M; Lareu, V

    1988-06-01

    Urinary D-glucaric acid (DGA) and the activities of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and other hepatic enzymes in serum were determined in 33 noncirrhotic male alcoholics who had continued to consume alcohol until at least 24 h prior to the taking of samples. DGA excretion was significantly greater in them than in a group of 30 healthy controls (p less than 0.001), exceeding the upper reference level in 38% of the alcoholic cases (as compared with 88% for GGT). In the alcoholic patients, there was highly significant correlation between urinary DGA and serum GGT (r = 0.613, p less than 0.001), suggesting that in both cases the increased levels are due to enzyme induction. None of the biochemical variables studied were significantly correlated with estimated daily alcohol consumption. Urinary DGA levels fell off rapidly with abstinence, and in 31 alcoholic patients who had consumed no alcohol for 5 days, there was no statistically significant correlation between DGA excretion and serum GGT (r = 0.158, p congruent to 0.4).

  13. Clinical and metabolic correction of pompe disease by enzyme therapy in acid maltase-deficient quail.

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, T; Yang, H W; Pennybacker, M; Ichihara, N; Mizutani, M; Van Hove, J L; Chen, Y T

    1998-01-01

    Pompe disease is a fatal genetic muscle disorder caused by a deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA), a glycogen degrading lysosomal enzyme. GAA-deficient (AMD) Japanese quails exhibit progressive myopathy and cannot lift their wings, fly, or right themselves from the supine position (flip test). Six 4-wk-old acid maltase-deficient quails, with the clinical symptoms listed, were intravenously injected with 14 or 4.2 mg/kg of precursor form of recombinant human GAA or buffer alone every 2-3 d for 18 d (seven injections). On day 18, both high dose-treated birds (14 mg/kg) scored positive flip tests and flapped their wings, and one bird flew up more than 100 cm. GAA activity increased in most of the tissues examined. In heart and liver, glycogen levels dropped to normal and histopathology was normal. In pectoralis muscle, morphology was essentially normal, except for increased glycogen granules. In sharp contrast, sham-treated quail muscle had markedly increased glycogen granules, multi-vesicular autophagosomes, and inter- and intrafascicular fatty infiltrations. Low dose-treated birds (4.2 mg/kg) improved less biochemically and histopathologically than high dose birds, indicating a dose-dependent response. Additional experiment with intermediate doses and extended treatment (four birds, 5.7-9 mg/kg for 45 d) halted the progression of the disease. Our data is the first to show that an exogenous protein can target to muscle and produce muscle improvement. These data also suggest enzyme replacement with recombinant human GAA is a promising therapy for human Pompe disease. PMID:9466978

  14. Clinical and metabolic correction of pompe disease by enzyme therapy in acid maltase-deficient quail.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, T; Yang, H W; Pennybacker, M; Ichihara, N; Mizutani, M; Van Hove, J L; Chen, Y T

    1998-02-15

    Pompe disease is a fatal genetic muscle disorder caused by a deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA), a glycogen degrading lysosomal enzyme. GAA-deficient (AMD) Japanese quails exhibit progressive myopathy and cannot lift their wings, fly, or right themselves from the supine position (flip test). Six 4-wk-old acid maltase-deficient quails, with the clinical symptoms listed, were intravenously injected with 14 or 4.2 mg/kg of precursor form of recombinant human GAA or buffer alone every 2-3 d for 18 d (seven injections). On day 18, both high dose-treated birds (14 mg/kg) scored positive flip tests and flapped their wings, and one bird flew up more than 100 cm. GAA activity increased in most of the tissues examined. In heart and liver, glycogen levels dropped to normal and histopathology was normal. In pectoralis muscle, morphology was essentially normal, except for increased glycogen granules. In sharp contrast, sham-treated quail muscle had markedly increased glycogen granules, multi-vesicular autophagosomes, and inter- and intrafascicular fatty infiltrations. Low dose-treated birds (4.2 mg/kg) improved less biochemically and histopathologically than high dose birds, indicating a dose-dependent response. Additional experiment with intermediate doses and extended treatment (four birds, 5.7-9 mg/kg for 45 d) halted the progression of the disease. Our data is the first to show that an exogenous protein can target to muscle and produce muscle improvement. These data also suggest enzyme replacement with recombinant human GAA is a promising therapy for human Pompe disease.

  15. Inhibition of the RTEM beta-lactamase from Escherichia coli. Interaction of enzyme with derivatives of olivanic acid.

    PubMed

    Charnas, R L; Knowles, J R

    1981-05-12

    The interaction of the RTEM beta-lactamase with two derivatives of olivanic acid has been studied. The compound MM22382 (1) behaves simply as a good substrate for the enzyme and is a relatively ineffective inhibitor. In contrast, the sulfate ester MM13902 (2) is a poor substrate and an excellent inhibitor of the enzyme. The inhibition derives from a branching of the normal hydrolytic pathway of the enzyme. At long times, all the catalytic activity of the enzyme returns. Free sulfate ion is not produced during the interaction with the enzyme, which rules out a mechanistic pathway involving beta elimination between C-6 and C-8. The validity of a number of alternative schemes is assessed.

  16. Production of succinic acid through overexpression of NAD{sup +}-dependent malic enzyme in an Escherichia coli mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Stols, L.; Donnelly, M.I.

    1997-07-01

    NAD{sup +}-dependent malic enzyme was cloned from the Escherichia coli genome by PCR based on the published partial sequence of the gene. The enzyme was overexpressed and purified to near homogeneity in two chromatographic steps and was analyzed kinetically in the forward and reverse directions. The K{sub m} values determined in the presence of saturating cofactor and manganese ion were 0.26 mM for malate (physiological direction) and 16 mM for pyruvate (reverse direction). When malic enzyme was induced under appropriate culture conditions in a strain of E. coli that was unable to ferment glucose and accumulated pyruvate, fermentative metabolism of glucose was restored. Succinic acid was the major fermentation product formed. When this fermentation was performed in the presence of hydrogen, the yield of succinic acid increased. The constructed pathway represents an alternative metabolic route for the fermentative production of dicarboxylic acids from renewable feedstocks. 27 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. The Expression and Prognostic Significance of Retinoic Acid Metabolising Enzymes in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gordon T.; Cash, Beatriz Gimenez; Blihoghe, Daniela; Johansson, Petronella; Alnabulsi, Ayham; Murray, Graeme I.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer with over fifty percent of patients presenting at an advanced stage. Retinoic acid is a metabolite of vitamin A and is essential for normal cell growth and aberrant retinoic acid metabolism is implicated in tumourigenesis. This study has profiled the expression of retinoic acid metabolising enzymes using a well characterised colorectal cancer tissue microarray containing 650 primary colorectal cancers, 285 lymph node metastasis and 50 normal colonic mucosal samples. Immunohistochemistry was performed on the tissue microarray using monoclonal antibodies which we have developed to the retinoic acid metabolising enzymes CYP26A1, CYP26B1, CYP26C1 and lecithin retinol acyl transferase (LRAT) using a semi-quantitative scoring scheme to assess expression. Moderate or strong expression of CYP26A1was observed in 32.5% of cancers compared to 10% of normal colonic epithelium samples (p<0.001). CYP26B1 was moderately or strongly expressed in 25.2% of tumours and was significantly less expressed in normal colonic epithelium (p<0.001). CYP26C1 was not expressed in any sample. LRAT also showed significantly increased expression in primary colorectal cancers compared with normal colonic epithelium (p<0.001). Strong CYP26B1 expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis (HR = 1.239, 95%CI = 1.104–1.390, χ2 = 15.063, p = 0.002). Strong LRAT was also associated with poorer outcome (HR = 1.321, 95%CI = 1.034–1.688, χ2 = 5.039, p = 0.025). In mismatch repair proficient tumours strong CYP26B1 (HR = 1.330, 95%CI = 1.173–1.509, χ2 = 21.493, p<0.001) and strong LRAT (HR = 1.464, 95%CI = 1.110–1.930, χ2 = 7.425, p = 0.006) were also associated with poorer prognosis. This study has shown that the retinoic acid metabolising enzymes CYP26A1, CYP26B1 and LRAT are significantly overexpressed in colorectal cancer and that CYP26B1 and LRAT are

  18. Nucleic acid sensing with enzyme-DNA binding protein conjugates cascade and simple DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Gülsen Betül; Skouridou, Vasso; Masip, Lluis

    2017-03-22

    A versatile and universal DNA sensing platform is presented based on enzyme-DNA binding protein tags conjugates and simple DNA nanostructures. Two enzyme conjugates were thus prepared, with horseradish peroxidase linked to the dimeric single-chain bacteriophage Cro repressor protein (HRP-scCro) and glucose oxidase linked to the dimeric headpiece domain of Escherichia coli LacI repressor protein (GOx-dHP), and used in conjunction with a hybrid ssDNA-dsDNA detection probe. This probe served as a simple DNA nanostructure allowing first for target recognition through its target-complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) part and then for signal generation after conjugate binding on the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) containing the specific binding sites for the dHP and scCro DNA binding proteins. The DNA binding proteins chosen in this work have different sequence specificity, high affinity, and lack of cross-reactivity. The proposed sensing system was validated for the detection of model target ssDNA from high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV16) and the limits of detection of 45, 26, and 21 pM were achieved using the probes with scCro/dHP DNA binding sites ratio of 1:1, 2:1, and 1:2, respectively. The performance of the platform in terms of limit of detection was comparable to direct HRP systems using target-specific oligonucleotide-HRP conjugates. The ratio of the two enzymes can be easily manipulated by changing the number of binding sites on the detection probe, offering further optimization possibilities of the signal generation step. Moreover, since the signal is obtained in the absence of externally added hydrogen peroxide, the described platform is compatible with paper-based assays for molecular diagnostics applications. Finally, just by changing the ssDNA part of the detection probe, this versatile nucleic acid platform can be used for the detection of different ssDNA target sequences or in a multiplex detection configuration without the need to change any of the

  19. Effect of process parameters on succinic acid production in Escherichia coli W3110 and enzymes involved in the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Isar, Jasmine; Agarwal, Lata; Saran, Saurabh; Gupta, Pritesh; Saxena, Rajendra Kumar

    2006-09-01

    The effect of process optimization on succinic acid production by Escherichia coli W3110 and on enzymes involved in the reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle was studied. Approximately, 7.02 g L-1 of succinic acid was produced in 60 h at pH 7.0 in 500 mL anaerobic bottles containing 300 mL of the medium, wherein the sucrose concentration was 2.5%, the ratio of tryptone to ammonium hydrogen phosphate was 1:1, and the concentration of magnesium carbon ate was 1.5%. When these optimized fermentation conditions were employed in a 10 L bioreactor, 11.2 g L-1 of succinic acid was produced in 48 h. This is a 10-fold increase in succinic acid production from the initial titer of 0.94 g L-1. This clearly indicates the importance of process optimization, where by manipulating the media composition and production conditions, a remarkable increase in the production of the desired biomolecule can be obtained. The production of succinic acid is a multi-step reaction through the reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle. A linear relationship was observed between succinic acid production and the enzyme activities. The enzyme activities were found to increase in the order phospho-enol-pyruvate carboxylaseenzyme was not a very active participant in the production of succinic acid, since it catalyzes the phosphorylation of oxaloacetic acid to yield phospho-enol-pyruvate.

  20. [Comparative effects of fluoride on three enzymes, hydrolyzing pyrophosphate - acid and alkaline phosphatases and inorganic pyrophosphatase].

    PubMed

    Kasho, V N; Baĭkov, A A; Avaeva, S M

    1982-08-01

    The effects of fluoride on the activities of acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) from potato and alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1) from E. coli during pyrophosphate and p-nitrophenylphosphate hydrolysis and on the activities of inorganic pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.1) from baker's yeast during pyrophosphate hydrolysis were compared. For both phosphatases the type of interaction was found to be independent on the nature of substrate. For acid phosphatase and inorganic pyrophosphatase the inhibition was of non-competitive and uncompetitive types, respectively. In the case of alkaline phosphatase fluoride increased the rate of p-nitrophenol release during p-nitrophenylphosphate hydrolysis at pH greater than or equal to 7.9 without affecting the rate of phosphate release, which is indicative of fluorophosphate formation in the course of the transphosphorylation reaction. The data obtained suggest the existence of essential differences in the mechanisms of fluoride effects on the three enzymes under study.

  1. Biosynthetic porphyrins and the origin of photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauzerall, D.; Ley, A.; Mercer-Smith, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Since the prebiotic atmosphere was anaerobic, if not reducing, a useful function of primordial photosynthesis would have been to photooxidize reduced substrates such as Fe(+2), S(-2) or reduced organic molecules and to emit hydrogen. Experiments have shown that the early biogenic pigments uroporphyrin and coproporphyrin do photooxidize organic compounds and emit hydrogen in the presence of a platinum catalyst. These experiments were carried out in dilute aqueous solution near neutral pH under anaerobic atmosphere, and quantum yields near 10-2 were obtained. Thus relevant prebiotic conditions were maintained. Rather then to further optimize conditions, attempts were made to replace the platinum catalyst by a more prebiotically suitable catalyst. Trials with an Fe4S4(SR)4 cluster, in analogy to the present hydrogenase and nitrogenase, were not successful. However, experiments using cobalt complexes to catalyze the formation of hydrogen are promising. In analogy with biological photosynthetic systems which group pigments, electron transfer molecules and enzymes in clusters for efficiency, it was found that binding the biogenic porphyrins to the polyvinyl alcohol used to support the platinum catalyst did increase the quantum yield of the reaction. It was also found that ultraviolet light can serve to photo-oxidize porphyrinogens to porphyrins under anaerobic conditions. Thus the formation of the colorless porphyriogens by the extraordinarily simple biosynthetic pathway would not be a problem because of the prevalence of UV light in the prebiotic, anoxic atmosphere.

  2. pH modulation of transient state kinetics of enzymes. II. Transient state kinetics of plant cell wall acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Crasnier, M; Ricard, J

    1984-03-01

    The pre-steady-state kinetics of plant cell wall acid phosphatase has been investigated at different pH values. The approach of the steady stale lasts about 1 or 2 s and may be fitted with two exponential terms. For certain pH values the approach to the steady state exhibits damped oscillations. Plotting the sum and the product of the two time constants of these exponentials as a function of substrate concentration yields two straight lines. From the slopes and intercepts of these lines one may determine the values of rate and ionization constants involved in the reaction scheme. The results obtained are consistent with the view that the binding of the substrate to the enzyme does not induce a 'slow' conformation change of the enzyme. The enzyme reacts with its substrate while being mostly in its ionized form. Release of p-nitrophenol is also favoured by this ionized form of the enzyme. However, the hydrolysis of the phosphoryl-enzyme complex mostly occurs from the protonated form of the enzyme. The ionization constants of the free enzyme and of the various enzyme-ligand complexes are very similar.

  3. [Metabolism of Yarrowia lipolytica grown on ethanol under conditions promoting the production of alpha-ketoglutaric and citric acids: a comparative study of the central metabolism enzymes].

    PubMed

    Il'chenko, A P; Cherniavskaia, O G; Shishkanova, N V; Finogenova, T V

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and glyoxylate cycles in the mutant Yarrowia lipolytica strain N1 capable of producing alpha-ketoglutaric acid (KGA) and citric acid showed that almost all enzymes of the TCA cycle are more active under conditions promoting the production of KGA. The only exception was citrate synthase, whose activity was higher in yeast cells producing citric acid. The production of both acids was accompanied by suppression of the glyoxylate cycle enzymes. The activities of malate dehydrogenase, aconitase, NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, and fumarase were higher in cells producing KGA than in cells producing citric acid.

  4. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Ward, Thomas E

    2013-07-23

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  5. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Ward, Thomas E

    2014-04-08

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  6. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David N.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2016-03-22

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  7. Evolution-guided optimization of biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Raman, Srivatsan; Rogers, Jameson K; Taylor, Noah D; Church, George M

    2014-12-16

    Engineering biosynthetic pathways for chemical production requires extensive optimization of the host cellular metabolic machinery. Because it is challenging to specify a priori an optimal design, metabolic engineers often need to construct and evaluate a large number of variants of the pathway. We report a general strategy that combines targeted genome-wide mutagenesis to generate pathway variants with evolution to enrich for rare high producers. We convert the intracellular presence of the target chemical into a fitness advantage for the cell by using a sensor domain responsive to the chemical to control a reporter gene necessary for survival under selective conditions. Because artificial selection tends to amplify unproductive cheaters, we devised a negative selection scheme to eliminate cheaters while preserving library diversity. This scheme allows us to perform multiple rounds of evolution (addressing ∼10(9) cells per round) with minimal carryover of cheaters after each round. Based on candidate genes identified by flux balance analysis, we used targeted genome-wide mutagenesis to vary the expression of pathway genes involved in the production of naringenin and glucaric acid. Through up to four rounds of evolution, we increased production of naringenin and glucaric acid by 36- and 22-fold, respectively. Naringenin production (61 mg/L) from glucose was more than double the previous highest titer reported. Whole-genome sequencing of evolved strains revealed additional untargeted mutations that likely benefit production, suggesting new routes for optimization.

  8. Antioxidant enzyme activities and mitochondrial fatty acids in pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS) in broilers.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M; Cawthon, D; Beers, K; Wideman, R F; Bottje, W G

    2002-02-01

    Major objectives of this study were to assess antioxidant protection and fatty acid profile in lung mitochondria and whole liver in broilers with pulmonary hypertension syndrome [(PHS; with and without high dietary vitamin E (VE)] (Experiment 1) and in broilers that did not develop PHS but were genetically selected (S) or not selected (NS) for resistance to PHS (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, lung mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was elevated in broilers with PHS compared to controls, broilers fed high VE, and broilers fed high VE with PHS (VE-PHS), but there were no differences in GSH reductase (GSH-Rd) among groups. In liver tissue, GSH-Px was also elevated by PHS but was lower in VE and VE-PHS groups than in controls. There were no differences in liver GSH-Rd, superoxide dismutase (SOD), or gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS) activities with the exception that gamma-GCS was higher in the VE-PHS group than in the other groups. In Experiment 2, S lung mitochondria exhibited lower GSH-Px and higher GSH-Rd compared to NS broilers. In the liver, there were no differences in GSH-Px, GSH-Rd, or gamma-GCS, but SOD was lower in S compared to the NS broilers. High VE increased the percentage of saturated fatty acids and decreased the percentage of unsaturated fatty acids in lung mitochondria in Experiment 1; there were no differences in fatty acid content between S and NS mitochondria in Experiment 2. Thus, it appears that GSH recycling enzyme activities are affected by PHS and high VE presumably in response to differences in oxidative stress and that genetic resistance to PHS is associated with an inherently better capability to metabolize oxidants in lung mitochondria. The increase in saturation of lung mitochondrial fatty acids with high dietary VE would presumably make them more resistant to oxidative stress and, thus, reduce the level of PHS-induced oxidative stress.

  9. Fatty acid breakdown in developing embryos of Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Chia, T; Rawsthorne, S

    2000-12-01

    Developing Brassica napus embryos are primarily concerned with the accumulation of storage products, namely oil, starch and protein. The presence of fatty acid catabolic pathways in the background of this biosynthetic activity was investigated. Enzymes involved in the process of lipid mobilization, such as malate synthase and isocitrate lyase, are detectable towards the late stages of embryo development. [(14)C]Acetate feeding experiments also reveal that fatty acid catabolism becomes increasingly functional as the embryo matures.

  10. Endophytic Fungi from Frankincense Tree Improves Host Growth and Produces Extracellular Enzymes and Indole Acetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Al-Farsi, Zainab; Al-Mamari, Aza; Waqas, Muhammad; Asaf, Sajjad; Elyassi, Ali; Mabood, Fazal; Shin, Jae-Ho; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Boswellia sacra, an economically important frankincense-producing tree found in the desert woodlands of Oman, is least known for its endophytic fungal diversity and the potential of these fungi to produce extracellular enzymes and auxins. We isolated various fungal endophytes belonging to Eurotiales (11.8%), Chaetomiaceae (17.6%), Incertae sadis (29.5%), Aureobasidiaceae (17.6%), Nectriaceae (5.9%) and Sporomiaceae (17.6%) from the phylloplane (leaf) and caulosphere (stem) of the tree. Endophytes were identified using genomic DNA extraction, PCR amplification and sequencing the internal transcribed spacer regions, whereas a detailed phylogenetic analysis of the same gene fragment was made with homologous sequences. The endophytic colonization rate was significantly higher in the leaf (5.33%) than the stem (0.262%). The Shannon-Weiner diversity index was H′ 0.8729, while Simpson index was higher in the leaf (0.583) than in the stem (0.416). Regarding the endophytic fungi’s potential for extracellular enzyme production, fluorogenic 4-methylumbelliferone standards and substrates were used to determine the presence of cellulases, phosphatases and glucosidases in the pure culture. Among fungal strains, Penicillum citrinum BSL17 showed significantly higher amounts of glucosidases (62.15±1.8 μM-1min-1mL) and cellulases (62.11±1.6 μM-1min-1mL), whereas Preussia sp. BSL10 showed significantly higher secretion of glucosidases (69.4±0.79 μM-1min-1mL) and phosphatases (3.46±0.31μM-1min-1mL) compared to other strains. Aureobasidium sp. BSS6 and Preussia sp. BSL10 showed significantly higher potential for indole acetic acid production (tryptophan-dependent and independent pathways). Preussia sp. BSL10 was applied to the host B. sacra tree saplings, which exhibited significant improvements in plant growth parameters and accumulation of photosynthetic pigments. The current study concluded that endophytic microbial resources producing extracellular enzymes and auxin

  11. Biosynthetic Modularity Rules in the Bisintercalator Family of Antitumor Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Javier; Marín, Laura; Álvarez-Alonso, Raquel; Redondo, Saúl; Carvajal, Juan; Villamizar, Germán; Villar, Claudio J.; Lombó, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Diverse actinomycetes produce a family of structurally and biosynthetically related non-ribosomal peptide compounds which belong to the chromodepsipeptide family. These compounds act as bisintercalators into the DNA helix. They give rise to antitumor, antiparasitic, antibacterial and antiviral bioactivities. These compounds show a high degree of conserved modularity (chromophores, number and type of amino acids). This modularity and their high sequence similarities at the genetic level imply a common biosynthetic origin for these pathways. Here, we describe insights about rules governing this modular biosynthesis, taking advantage of the fact that nowadays five of these gene clusters have been made public (thiocoraline, triostin, SW-163 and echinomycin/quinomycin). This modularity has potential application for designing and producing novel genetic engineered derivatives, as well as for developing new chemical synthesis strategies. These would facilitate their clinical development. PMID:24821625

  12. Changes in the Enzymes for Fatty Acid Synthesis and Desaturation during Acclimation of Developing Soybean Seeds to Altered Growth Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Cheesbrough, Thomas M.

    1989-01-01

    Temperature-induced changes in the enzymes for fatty acid synthesis and desaturation were studied in developing soybean seeds (Glycine max L. var Williams 82). Changes were induced by culture of the seed pods for 20 hours in liquid media at 20, 25, or 35°C. Linoleoyl and oleoyl desaturases were 94 and 10 times as active, respectively, in seeds cultured at 20°C as those cultured at 25°C. Both desaturases had negligible activity in seeds cultured at 35°C compared to seeds cultured at 20°C. Though less dramatic, other enzymes also showed differences in activity after 20 hours in culture at 20, 25, or 35°C. Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase and CDP-choline:diacylglycerol phosphorylcholine transferase were most active in preparations from 20°C cultures. Activities were twofold lower at 25°C and a further threefold lower in 35°C cultures. Cultures from 25 and 35°C had 60 and 40%, respectively, of the phosphorylcholine:CTP cytidylyl transferase activity present in cultures grown at 20°C. Fatty acid synthetase, malonyl-coenzyme A:ACP transacylase, palmitoyl-ACP elongation, and choline kinase were not significantly altered by culture temperature. These data suggest that the enzymes for fatty acid desaturation and phosphatidylcholine synthesis can be rapidly modulated in response to altered growth temperatures, while the enzymes for fatty acid synthesis and elongation are not. PMID:16666840

  13. Activation Energies for an Enzyme-Catalyzed and Acid-Catalyzed Hydrolysis: An Introductory Interdisciplinary Experiment for Chemists and Biochemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, K. R.; Meyers, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment in which students determine and compare the Arrhenius activation energies (Ea) for the hydrolysis of salicin. This reaction is subject to catalysis both by acid and by the enzyme emulsin (beta-d-glucoside glycohydrolase). (JN)

  14. Cutinase-like enzyme from the yeast Cryptococcus sp. strain S-2 hydrolyzes polylactic acid and other biodegradable plastics.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Kazuo; Kamini, Numbi Ramudu; Ikeda, Hiroko; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2005-11-01

    A purified lipase from the yeast Cryptococcus sp. strain S-2 exhibited remote homology to proteins belonging to the cutinase family rather than to lipases. This enzyme could effectively degrade the high-molecular-weight compound polylactic acid, as well as other biodegradable plastics, including polybutylene succinate, poly (epsilon-caprolactone), and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate).

  15. Survey of volatile oxylipins and their biosynthetic precursors in bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Croisier, Emmanuel; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2010-04-01

    Oxylipins are metabolites which are derived from the oxidative fragmentation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. These metabolites play central roles in plant hormonal regulation and defense. Here we survey the production of volatile oxylipins in bryophytes and report the production of a high structural variety of C5, C6, C8 and C9 volatiles of mosses. In liverworts and hornworts oxylipin production was not as pronounced as in the 23 screened mosses. A biosynthetic investigation revealed that both, C18 and C20 fatty acids serve as precursors for the volatile oxylipins that are mainly produced after mechanical wounding of the green tissue of mosses.

  16. Loss of glycogen debranching enzyme AGL drives bladder tumor growth via induction of hyaluronic acid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Guin, Sunny; Ru, Yuanbin; Agarwal, Neeraj; Lew, Carolyn R.; Owens, Charles; Comi, Giacomo P.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We demonstrated that Amylo-alpha-1-6-glucosidase-4-alpha-glucanotransferase (AGL) is a tumor growth suppressor and prognostic marker in human bladder cancer. Here we determine how AGL loss enhances tumor growth, hoping to find therapeutically tractable targets/pathways that could be used in patients with low AGL expressing tumors. Experimental Design We transcriptionally profiled bladder cell lines with different AGL expression. By focusing on transcripts overexpressed as a function of low AGL and associated with adverse clinicopathologic variables in human bladder tumors, we sought to increase the chances of discovering novel therapeutic opportunities. Results One such transcript was hyaluronic acid synthase 2 (HAS2), an enzyme responsible for hyaluronic acid (HA) synthesis. HAS2 expression was inversely proportional to that of AGL in bladder cancer cells and immortalized and normal urothelium. HAS2 driven HA synthesis was enhanced in bladder cancer cells with low AGL and this drove anchorage dependent and independent growth. siRNA mediated depletion of HAS2 or inhibition of HA synthesis by 4-Methylumbelliferone (4MU) abrogated in vitro and xenograft growth of bladder cancer cells with low AGL. AGL and HAS2 mRNA expression in human tumors was inversely correlated in patient datasets. Patients with high HAS2 and low AGL tumor mRNA expression had poor survival lending clinical support to xenograft findings that HAS2 drives growth of tumors with low AGL. Conclusion Our study establishes HAS2 mediated HA synthesis as a driver of growth of bladder cancer with low AGL and provides preclinical rationale for personalized targeting of HAS2/HA signaling in patients with low AGL expressing tumors. PMID:26490312

  17. Genomic clustering of cyanogenic glucoside biosynthetic genes aids their identification in Lotus japonicus and suggests the repeated evolution of this chemical defence pathway.

    PubMed

    Takos, Adam M; Knudsen, Camilla; Lai, Daniela; Kannangara, Rubini; Mikkelsen, Lisbeth; Motawia, Mohammed S; Olsen, Carl E; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Møller, Birger L; Rook, Fred

    2011-10-01

    Cyanogenic glucosides are amino acid-derived defence compounds found in a large number of vascular plants. Their hydrolysis by specific β-glucosidases following tissue damage results in the release of hydrogen cyanide. The cyanogenesis deficient1 (cyd1) mutant of Lotus japonicus carries a partial deletion of the CYP79D3 gene, which encodes a cytochrome P450 enzyme that is responsible for the first step in cyanogenic glucoside biosynthesis. The genomic region surrounding CYP79D3 contains genes encoding the CYP736A2 protein and the UDP-glycosyltransferase UGT85K3. In combination with CYP79D3, these genes encode the enzymes that constitute the entire pathway for cyanogenic glucoside biosynthesis. The biosynthetic genes for cyanogenic glucoside biosynthesis are also co-localized in cassava (Manihot esculenta) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), but the three gene clusters show no other similarities. Although the individual enzymes encoded by the biosynthetic genes in these three plant species are related, they are not necessarily orthologous. The independent evolution of cyanogenic glucoside biosynthesis in several higher plant lineages by the repeated recruitment of members from similar gene families, such as the CYP79s, is a likely scenario.

  18. Lysophosphatidylcholine Acyltransferase 3 Is the Key Enzyme for Incorporating Arachidonic Acid into Glycerophospholipids during Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Eto, Miki; Shindou, Hideo; Koeberle, Andreas; Harayama, Takeshi; Yanagida, Keisuke; Shimizu, Takao

    2012-01-01

    Cellular membranes contain glycerophospholipids, which have important structural and functional roles in cells. Glycerophospholipids are first formed in the de novo pathway (Kennedy pathway) and are matured in the remodeling pathway (Lands’ cycle). Recently, lysophospholipid acyltransferases functioning in Lands’ cycle were identified and characterized. Several enzymes involved in glycerophospholipid biosynthesis have been reported to have important roles in adipocytes. However, the role of Lands’ cycle in adipogenesis has not yet been reported. Using C3H10T1/2, a cell line capable of differentiating to adipocyte-like cells in vitro, changes of lysophospholipid acyltransferase activities were investigated. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT), lysophosphatidylethanolamine acyltransferase (LPEAT) and lysophosphatidylserine acyltransferase (LPSAT) activities were enhanced, especially with 18:2-CoA and 20:4-CoA as donors. Correspondingly, mRNA expression of LPCAT3, which possesses LPCAT, LPEAT and LPSAT activities with high specificity for 18:2- and 20:4-CoA, was upregulated during adipogenesis. Analysis of acyl-chain compositions of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) showed a change in their profiles between preadipocytes and adipocytes, including an increase in the percentage of arachidonic acid-containing phospholipids. These changes are consistent with the activities of LPCAT3. Therefore, it is possible that enhanced phospholipid remodeling by LPCAT3 may be associated with adipocyte differentiation. PMID:23208369

  19. Alteration of Fatty-Acid-Metabolizing Enzymes Affects Mitochondrial Form and Function in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Christelle; Nawara, Magdalena; Salih, Mustafa A.M.; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Zaki, Maha S.; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Schule, Rebecca; Mignot, Cyril; Obre, Emilie; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Durand, Christelle M.; Oteyza, Andrés Caballero; El-Hachimi, Khalid H.; Al Drees, Abdulmajeed; Bouslam, Naima; Lamari, Foudil; Elmalik, Salah A.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Esteves, Typhaine; Gaussen, Marion; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Gyapay, Gabor; Lechner, Doris; Gonzalez, Michael; Depienne, Christel; Mochel, Fanny; Lavie, Julie; Schols, Ludger; Lacombe, Didier; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Al Abdulkareem, Ibrahim; Zuchner, Stephan; Yamashita, Atsushi; Benomar, Ali; Goizet, Cyril; Durr, Alexandra; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Darios, Frederic; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is considered one of the most heterogeneous groups of neurological disorders, both clinically and genetically. The disease comprises pure and complex forms that clinically include slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity resulting from degeneration of the corticospinal tract. At least 48 loci accounting for these diseases have been mapped to date, and mutations have been identified in 22 genes, most of which play a role in intracellular trafficking. Here, we identified mutations in two functionally related genes (DDHD1 and CYP2U1) in individuals with autosomal-recessive forms of HSP by using either the classical positional cloning or a combination of whole-genome linkage mapping and next-generation sequencing. Interestingly, three subjects with CYP2U1 mutations presented with a thin corpus callosum, white-matter abnormalities, and/or calcification of the basal ganglia. These genes code for two enzymes involved in fatty-acid metabolism, and we have demonstrated in human cells that the HSP pathophysiology includes alteration of mitochondrial architecture and bioenergetics with increased oxidative stress. Our combined results focus attention on lipid metabolism as a critical HSP pathway with a deleterious impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic function. PMID:23176821

  20. Characterization of 12-Oxo-Phytodienoic Acid Reductase in Corn

    PubMed Central

    Vick, Brady A.; Zimmerman, Don C.

    1986-01-01

    12-Oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase, an enzyme of the biosynthetic pathway that converts linolenic acid to jasmonic acid, has been characterized from the kernel and seedlings of corn (Zea mays L.). The molecular weight of the enzyme, estimated by gel filtration, was 54,000. Optimum enzyme activity was observed over a broad pH range, from pH 6.8 to 9.0. The enzyme had a Km of 190 micromolar for its substrate, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid. The preferred reductant was NADPH, for which the enzyme exhibited a Km of 13 micromolar, compared with 4.2 millimolar for NADH. Reductase activity was low in the corn kernel but increased five-fold by the fifth day after germination and then gradually declined. PMID:16664582

  1. Cloning of the staurosporine biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. TP-A0274 and its heterologous expression in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Onaka, Hiroyasu; Taniguchi, Shin-ichi; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Furumai, Tamotsu

    2002-12-01

    Staurosporine is a representative member of indolocarbazole antibiotics. The entire staurosporine biosynthetic and regulatory gene cluster spanning 20-kb was cloned from Streptomyces sp. TP-A0274 and sequenced. The gene cluster consists of 14 ORFs and the amino acid sequence homology search revealed that it contains three genes, staO, staD, and staP, coding for the enzymes involved in the indolocarbazole aglycone biosynthesis, two genes, staG and staN, for the bond formation between the aglycone and deoxysugar, eight genes, staA, staB, staE, staJ, staI, staK, staMA, and staMB, for the deoxysugar biosynthesis and one gene, staR is a transcriptional regulator. Heterologous gene expression of a 38-kb fragment containing a complete set of the biosynthetic genes for staurosporine cloned into pTOYAMAcos confirmed its role in staurosporine biosynthesis. Moreover, the distribution of the gene for chromopyrrolic acid synthase, the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of indolocarbazole aglycone, in actinomycetes was investigated, and rebD homologs were shown to exist only in the strains producing indolocarbazole antibiotics.

  2. A biosynthetic pathway for anandamide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Lei; Harvey-White, Judith; Osei-Hyiaman, Douglas; Razdan, Raj; Gong, Qian; Chan, Andrew C.; Zhou, Zhifeng; Huang, Bill X.; Kim, Hee-Yong; Kunos, George

    2006-01-01

    The endocannabinoid arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide) is a lipid transmitter synthesized and released “on demand” by neurons in the brain. Anandamide is also generated by macrophages where its endotoxin (LPS)-induced synthesis has been implicated in the hypotension of septic shock and advanced liver cirrhosis. Anandamide can be generated from its membrane precursor, N-arachidonoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) through cleavage by a phospholipase D (NAPE–PLD). Here we document a biosynthetic pathway for anandamide in mouse brain and RAW264.7 macrophages that involves the phospholipase C (PLC)-catalyzed cleavage of NAPE to generate a lipid, phosphoanandamide, which is subsequently dephosphorylated by phosphatases, including PTPN22, previously described as a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Bacterial endotoxin (LPS)-induced synthesis of anandamide in macrophages is mediated exclusively by the PLC/phosphatase pathway, which is up-regulated by LPS, whereas NAPE–PLD is down-regulated by LPS and functions as a salvage pathway of anandamide synthesis when the PLC/phosphatase pathway is compromised. Both PTPN22 and endocannabinoids have been implicated in autoimmune diseases, suggesting that the PLC/phosphatase pathway of anandamide synthesis may be a pharmacotherapeutic target. PMID:16938887

  3. Increased fatty acid unsaturation and production of arachidonic acid by homologous over-expression of the mitochondrial malic enzyme in Mortierella alpina.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guangfei; Chen, Haiqin; Du, Kai; Huang, Xiaoyun; Song, Yuanda; Gu, Zhennan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei; Chen, Yong Q

    2014-09-01

    Malic enzyme (ME) catalyses the oxidative decarboxylation of L-malate to pyruvate and provides NADPH for intracellular metabolism, such as fatty acid synthesis. Here, the mitochondrial ME (mME) gene from Mortierella alpina was homologously over-expressed. Compared with controls, fungal arachidonic acid (ARA; 20:4 n-6) content increased by 60 % without affecting the total fatty acid content. Our results suggest that enhancing mME activity may be an effective mean to increase industrial production of ARA in M. alpina.

  4. Antioxidative Peptides Derived from Enzyme Hydrolysis of Bone Collagen after Microwave Assisted Acid Pre-Treatment and Nitrogen Protection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yun-Jian; Le, Guo-Wei; Wang, Jie-Yun; Li, Ya-Xin; Shi, Yong-Hui; Sun, Jin

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on the preparation method of antioxidant peptides by enzymatic hydrolysis of bone collagen after microwave assisted acid pre-treatment and nitrogen protection. Phosphoric acid showed the highest ability of hydrolysis among the four other acids tested (hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid and/or citric acid). The highest degree of hydrolysis (DH) was 9.5% using 4 mol/L phosphoric acid with a ratio of 1:6 under a microwave intensity of 510 W for 240 s. Neutral proteinase gave higher DH among the four protease tested (Acid protease, neutral protease, Alcalase and papain), with an optimum condition of: (1) ratio of enzyme and substrate, 4760 U/g; (2) concentration of substrate, 4%; (3) reaction temperature, 55 °C and (4) pH 7.0. At 4 h, DH increased significantly (P < 0.01) under nitrogen protection compared with normal microwave assisted acid pre-treatment hydrolysis conditions. The antioxidant ability of the hydrolysate increased and reached its maximum value at 3 h; however DH decreased dramatically after 3 h. Microwave assisted acid pre-treatment and nitrogen protection could be a quick preparatory method for hydrolyzing bone collagen. PMID:21151439

  5. Stability of Rosmarinic Acid in Aqueous Extracts from Different Lamiaceae Species after in vitro Digestion with Human Gastrointestinal Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Zorić, Zoran; Markić, Joško; Pedisić, Sandra; Bučević-Popović, Viljemka; Generalić-Mekinić, Ivana; Grebenar, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    Summary The present study compares the gastrointestinal stability of rosmarinic acid in aqueous extracts of thyme, winter savory and lemon balm with the stability of pure rosmarinic acid. The stability of rosmarinic acid was detected after two-phase in vitro digestion process (gastric and duodenal) with human gastrointestinal enzymes. The concentration of rosmarinic acid in undigested and digested samples was detected using HPLC-DAD. Results showed that gastrointestinal stability of pure rosmarinic acid was significantly higher than that of rosmarinic acid from plant extracts after both gastric and intestinal phases of digestion. Among plant extracts, rosmarinic acid was the most stable in lemon balm after gastric (14.10%) and intestinal digestion phases (6.5%). The temperature (37 °C) and slightly alkaline medium (pH=7.5) did not affect the stability of rosmarinic acid, while acid medium (pH=2.5) significantly decreased its stability (≥50%). In addition, the stability rate of rosmarinic acid is influenced by the concentration of human gastrointestinal juices. PMID:27904398

  6. Stability of Rosmarinic Acid in Aqueous Extracts from Different Lamiaceae Species after in vitro Digestion with Human Gastrointestinal Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zorić, Zoran; Markić, Joško; Pedisić, Sandra; Bučević-Popović, Viljemka; Generalić-Mekinić, Ivana; Grebenar, Katarina; Kulišić-Bilušić, Tea

    2016-03-01

    The present study compares the gastrointestinal stability of rosmarinic acid in aqueous extracts of thyme, winter savory and lemon balm with the stability of pure rosmarinic acid. The stability of rosmarinic acid was detected after two-phase in vitro digestion process (gastric and duodenal) with human gastrointestinal enzymes. The concentration of rosmarinic acid in undigested and digested samples was detected using HPLC-DAD. Results showed that gastrointestinal stability of pure rosmarinic acid was significantly higher than that of rosmarinic acid from plant extracts after both gastric and intestinal phases of digestion. Among plant extracts, rosmarinic acid was the most stable in lemon balm after gastric (14.10%) and intestinal digestion phases (6.5%). The temperature (37 °C) and slightly alkaline medium (pH=7.5) did not affect the stability of rosmarinic acid, while acid medium (pH=2.5) significantly decreased its stability (≥50%). In addition, the stability rate of rosmarinic acid is influenced by the concentration of human gastrointestinal juices.

  7. Evolution of galactoglycerolipid biosynthetic pathways--from cyanobacteria to primary plastids and from primary to secondary plastids.

    PubMed

    Petroutsos, Dimitris; Amiar, Souad; Abida, Heni; Dolch, Lina-Juana; Bastien, Olivier; Rébeillé, Fabrice; Jouhet, Juliette; Falconet, Denis; Block, Maryse A; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Bowler, Chris; Botté, Cyrille; Maréchal, Eric

    2014-04-01

    Photosynthetic membranes have a unique lipid composition that has been remarkably well conserved from cyanobacteria to chloroplasts. These membranes are characterized by a very high content in galactoglycerolipids, i.e., mono- and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG and DGDG, respectively). Galactoglycerolipids make up the bulk of the lipid matrix in which photosynthetic complexes are embedded. They are also known to fulfill specific functions, such as stabilizing photosystems, being a source of polyunsaturated fatty acids for various purposes and, in some eukaryotes, being exported to other subcellular compartments. The conservation of MGDG and DGDG suggests that selection pressures might have conserved the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis, but this does not appear to be the case. Important evolutionary transitions comprise primary endosymbiosis (from a symbiotic cyanobacterium to a primary chloroplast) and secondary endosymbiosis (from a symbiotic unicellular algal eukaryote to a secondary plastid). In this review, we compare biosynthetic pathways based on available molecular and biochemical data, highlighting enzymatic reactions that have been conserved and others that have diverged or been lost, as well as the emergence of parallel and alternative biosynthetic systems originating from other metabolic pathways. Questions for future research are highlighted.

  8. Isolation of a Microsomal Enzyme System Involved in Glucosinolate Biosynthesis from Seedlings of Tropaeolum majus L.

    PubMed Central

    Du, L.; Halkier, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    An in vitro system that converts phenylalanine to phenylacetaldoxime in the biosynthesis of the glucosinolate glucotropaeolin has been established in seedlings of Tropaeolum majus L. exposed to the combined treatment of jasmonic acid, ethanol, and light. The treatment resulted in a 9-fold induction, compared with untreated, dark-grown seedlings, of de novo biosynthesis measured as incorporation of radioactively labeled phenylalanine into glucotropaeolin. Formation of the inhibitory degradation product benzylisothiocyanate during tissue homogenization was prevented by inactivation of the thioglucosidase myrosinase by addition of 100 mM ascorbic acid to the isolation buffer. This allowed the isolation of a biosynthetically active microsomal preparation from the induced T. majus plant material. The enzyme, which catalyzes the conversion of phenylalanine to the corresponding oxime, was sensitive to cytochrome P450 inhibitors, indicating the involvement of a cytochrome P450 in the biosynthetic pathway. It has previously been shown that the oxime-producing enzyme in the biosynthesis of p-hydroxybenzylglucosinolate in Sinapis alba L. is dependent on cytochrome P450, whereas the oxime-producing enzymes in Brassica species have been suggested to be flavin monooxygenases or peroxidase-type enzymes. The result with T. majus provides additional experimental documentation for a similarity between the enzymes converting amino acids into the corresponding oximes in the biosynthesis of glucosinolates and cyanogenic glucosides. PMID:12226332

  9. Genetic and biosynthetic studies of the fungal prenylated xanthone shamixanthone and related metabolites in Aspergillus spp. revisited.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Thomas J

    2012-07-23

    Biosynthetic genes for the prenylated xanthone shamixanthone have been identified in the Aspergillus nidulans genome; based on assignment of putative functions from sequence analyses and selected gene deletions, a pathway was proposed leading from the anthraquinone emodin via the benzophenone carboxylic acid monodictyphenone and the xanthone emericellin to shamixanthone. Several aspects of this proposed pathway are inconsistent with previously identified biosynthetic intermediates: the anthraquinone chrysophanol and the benzophenone aldehyde derivatives arugosins F and A/B, isotopic labelling studies and chemical precedents. A new pathway is presented that provides a full rationale for the results of the gene deletion studies and reconciles them with previous biosynthetic results, and is in accord with established chemical and biosynthetic mechanisms. The importance of interpreting genetic information in terms of established biosynthetic events is discussed.

  10. Convergent biosynthetic pathways to β-lactam antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Five naturally-occurring β-lactams have inspired a class of drugs that constitute >60% of the antimicrobials used in human medicine. Their biosynthetic pathways reveal highly individualized synthetic strategies that yet converge on a common azetidinone ring assembled in structural contexts that confer selective binding and inhibition of D,D-transpeptidases that play essential roles in bacterial cell wall (peptidoglycan) biosynthesis. These enzymes belong to a single “clan” of evolutionarily distinct serine hydrolases whose active site geometry and mechanism of action is specifically matched by these antibiotics for inactivation that is kinetically competitive with their native function. Unusual enzyme-mediated reactions and catalytic multitasking in these pathways are discussed with particular attention to the diverse ways the β-lactam itself is generated, and more broadly how the intrinsic reactivity of this core structural element is modulated in natural systems through the introduction of ring strain and electronic effects. PMID:27693891

  11. Expression of Ascaris suum malic enzyme in a mutant Escherichia coli allows production of succinic acid from glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Stols, L.; Donnelly, M.I.; Kulkarni, G.; Harris, B.G.

    1997-12-31

    The malic enzyme gene of Ascaris suum was cloned into the vector pTRC99a in two forms encoding alternative amino-termini. The resulting plasmids, pMEA1 and pMEA2, were introduced into Escherichia coli NZN111, a strain that is unable to grow fermentatively because of inactivation of the genes encoding pyruvate dissimilation. Induction of pMEA1, which encodes the native animoterminus, gave better overexpression of malic enzyme, approx 12-fold compared to uninduced cells. Under the appropriate culture conditions, expression of malic enzyme allowed the fermentative dissimilation of glucose by NZN111. The major fermentation product formed in induced cultures was succinic acid.

  12. The Human UGT1A3 Enzyme Conjugates Norursodeoxycholic Acid into a C23-ester Glucuronide in the Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Trottier, Jocelyn; El Husseini, Diala; Perreault, Martin; Pâquet, Sophie; Caron, Patrick; Bourassa, Sylvie; Verreault, Mélanie; Inaba, Ted T.; Poirier, Guy G.; Bélanger, Alain; Guillemette, Chantal; Trauner, Michael; Barbier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) exhibits efficient anti-cholestatic properties in an animal model of sclerosing cholangitis. norUDCA is eliminated as a C23-ester glucuronide (norUDCA-23G) in humans. The present study aimed at identifying the human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzyme(s) involved in hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation and at evaluating the consequences of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding region of UGT genes on norUDCA-23G formation. The effects of norUDCA on the formation of the cholestatic lithocholic acid-glucuronide derivative and of rifampicin on hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation were also explored. In vitro glucuronidation assays were performed with microsomes from human tissues (liver and intestine) and HEK293 cells expressing human UGT enzymes and variant allozymes. UGT1A3 was identified as the major hepatic UGT enzyme catalyzing the formation of norUDCA-23G. Correlation studies using samples from a human liver bank (n = 16) indicated that the level of UGT1A3 protein is a strong determinant of in vitro norUDCA glucuronidation. Analyses of the norUDCA-conjugating activity by 11 UGT1A3 variant allozymes identified three phenotypes with high, low, and intermediate capacity. norUDCA is also identified as a competitive inhibitor for the hepatic formation of the pro-cholestatic lithocholic acid-glucuronide derivative, whereas norUDCA glucuronidation is weakly stimulated by rifampicin. This study identifies human UGT1A3 as the major enzyme for the hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation and supports that some coding polymorphisms affecting the conjugating activity of UGT1A3 in vitro may alter the pharmacokinetic properties of norUDCA in cholestasis treatment. PMID:19889628

  13. Role of protein, amino acids, and enzyme activity on odor production from anaerobically digested and dewatered biosolids.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Matthew J; Adams, Gregory; Chen, Yen-Chih; Erdal, Zeynep; Forbes, Robert H; Glindemann, Dietmar; Hargreaves, J Ronald; McEwen, David; Murthy, Sudhir N; Novak, John T; Witherspoon, Jay

    2008-02-01

    The main objective of this research was to test the hypothesis that bioavailable protein and, more specifically, the sulfur-containing amino acids within the protein, can be degraded by proteolytic enzymes to produce odor-causing compounds--mainly volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs)--during biosolids storage. To achieve these objectives, samples of digester effluent and cake solids were collected at 11 different wastewater treatment plants in North America, and the samples were analyzed for protein and amino acid content and general protein-degrading enzyme activity. At the same time, cake samples were stored using headspace bottles, the concentration of VSCs were measured using gas chromatography, and olfactometry measurements were made by a trained odor panel. The results showed that the bound cake protein content and methionine content was well-correlated with VSC production and the detection threshold measured by the odor panel.

  14. X-ray absorption studies of the purple acid phosphatase from red kidney beans (native enzyme, metal exchanged form)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, F.; Zippel, F.; Klabunde, T.; Krebs, B.; Löcke, R.; Witzel, H.; Nolting, H.-F.

    1995-02-01

    Purple acid phosphatase from red kidney beans (KBP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of activated phosphoric acid monoesters and contains a heterodinuclear Fe(III)Zn(II) core in its active site. Iron K-edge X-ray absorption data have been obtained for the native enzyme and for a metal exchanged derivative, where Zn(II) was substituted by Fe(III). The environment of the native enzyme consists of 2.5 O/N at 1.91 Å, 3 O/N at 2.09 Å, and 1 Zn at 4.05 Å. For the metal exchanged form we obtained 2.5 O/N at 1.94 Å, 2.5 O/N at 2.09 Å, and 1 Fe at 3.79 Å.

  15. Enzymes in Glycolysis and the Citric Acid Cycle in the Yeast and Mycelial Forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori; Carbonell, Luis M.

    1966-01-01

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas, Venezuela), and Luis M. Carbonell. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1315–1320. 1966.—Enzymatic activities in glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, and the citric acid cycle in cell-free extracts of the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were examined comparatively. Both forms have the enzymes of these pathways. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic dehydrogenase of the mycelial form were higher than those of the yeast form. Another 15 enzymatic activities of the mycelial form were lower than those of the yeast form. The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase showed the most marked difference between the two forms, its activity in the mycelial form being about 20% of that in the yeast form. PMID:5924267

  16. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT), a specific enzyme that modifies ghrelin with a medium-chain fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masayasu; Hamamoto, Akie; Sato, Takahiro

    2016-10-01

    In the gastric peptide hormone ghrelin, serine 3 (threonine 3 in frogs) is modified, primarily by n-octanoic acid; this modification is essential for ghrelin's activity. The enzyme that transfers n-octanoic acid to Ser3 of ghrelin is ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT). GOAT, the only enzyme known to catalyze acyl modification of ghrelin, specifically modifies serine (or threonine) at the third position and does not modify other serine residues in ghrelin peptides. GOAT prefers n-hexanoyl-CoA over n-octanoyl-CoA as the acyl donor, although in the stomach the n-octanoyl form is the predominant form of acyl-modified ghrelin. GOAT is a promising target for drug development to treat metabolic diseases and eating disorders.

  17. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Kanetsuna, F; Carbonell, L M

    1966-11-01

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas, Venezuela), and Luis M. Carbonell. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1315-1320. 1966.-Enzymatic activities in glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, and the citric acid cycle in cell-free extracts of the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were examined comparatively. Both forms have the enzymes of these pathways. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic dehydrogenase of the mycelial form were higher than those of the yeast form. Another 15 enzymatic activities of the mycelial form were lower than those of the yeast form. The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase showed the most marked difference between the two forms, its activity in the mycelial form being about 20% of that in the yeast form.

  18. Carnosic acid biosynthesis elucidated by a synthetic biology platform

    PubMed Central

    Ignea, Codruta; Athanasakoglou, Anastasia; Ioannou, Efstathia; Georgantea, Panagiota; Trikka, Fotini A.; Loupassaki, Sofia; Roussis, Vassilios; Makris, Antonios M.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology approaches achieving the reconstruction of specific plant natural product biosynthetic pathways in dedicated microbial “chassis” have provided access to important industrial compounds (e.g., artemisinin, resveratrol, vanillin). However, the potential of such production systems to facilitate elucidation of plant biosynthetic pathways has been underexplored. Here we report on the application of a modular terpene production platform in the characterization of the biosynthetic pathway leading to the potent antioxidant carnosic acid and related diterpenes in Salvia pomifera and Rosmarinus officinalis. Four cytochrome P450 enzymes are identified (CYP76AH24, CYP71BE52, CYP76AK6, and CYP76AK8), the combined activities of which account for all of the oxidation events leading to the biosynthesis of the major diterpenes produced in these plants. This approach develops yeast as an efficient tool to harness the biotechnological potential of the numerous sequencing datasets that are increasingly becoming available through transcriptomic or genomic studies. PMID:26976595

  19. The synthesis of glutamic acid in the absence of enzymes: Implications for biogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morowitz, Harold; Peterson, Eta; Chang, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the non-enzymatic aqueous phase synthesis of amino acids from keto acids, ammonia and reducing agents. The facile synthesis of key metabolic intermediates, particularly in the glycolytic pathway, the citric acid cycle, and the first step of amino acid synthesis, lead to new ways of looking at the problem of biogenesis.

  20. Determining soil enzyme activities for the assessment of fungi and citric acid-assisted phytoextraction under cadmium and lead contamination.

    PubMed

    Mao, Liang; Tang, Dong; Feng, Haiwei; Gao, Yang; Zhou, Pei; Xu, Lurong; Wang, Lumei

    2015-12-01

    Microorganism or chelate-assisted phytoextraction is an effective remediation tool for heavy metal polluted soil, but investigations into its impact on soil microbial activity are rarely reported. Consequently, cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-resistant fungi and citric acid (CA) were introduced to enhance phytoextraction by Solanum nigrum L. under varied Cd and Pb pollution levels in a greenhouse pot experiment. We then determined accumulation of Cd and Pb in S. nigrum and the soil enzyme activities of dehydrogenase, phosphatase, urease, catalase, sucrase, and amylase. Detrended canonical correspondence analysis (DCCA) was applied to assess the interactions between remediation strategies and soil enzyme activities. Results indicated that the addition of fungi, CA, or their combination enhanced the root biomass of S. nigrum, especially at the high-pollution level. The combined treatment of CA and fungi enhanced accumulation of Cd about 22-47 % and of Pb about 13-105 % in S. nigrum compared with the phytoextraction alone. However, S. nigrum was not shown to be a hyperaccumulator for Pb. Most enzyme activities were enhanced after remediation. The DCCA ordination graph showed increasing enzyme activity improvement by remediation in the order of phosphatase, amylase, catalase, dehydrogenase, and urease. Responses of soil enzyme activities were similar for both the addition of fungi and that of CA. In summary, results suggest that fungi and CA-assisted phytoextraction is a promising approach to restoring heavy metal polluted soil.

  1. Mechanism and inhibition of human UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase, the key enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng-Chia; Huang, Chi-Hung; Lai, Shu-Jung; Yang, Chia Shin; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Lin, Ching-Heng; Fu, Pin-Kuei; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Yeh

    2016-01-01

    The bifunctional enzyme UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase/ManNAc kinase (GNE) plays a key role in sialic acid production. It is different from the non-hydrolyzing enzymes for bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, and it is feed-back inhibited by the downstream product CMP-Neu5Ac. Here the complex crystal structure of the N-terminal epimerase part of human GNE shows a tetramer in which UDP binds to the active site and CMP-Neu5Ac binds to the dimer-dimer interface. The enzyme is locked in a tightly closed conformation. By comparing the UDP-binding modes of the non-hydrolyzing and hydrolyzing UDP-GlcNAc epimerases, we propose a possible explanation for the mechanistic difference. While the epimerization reactions of both enzymes are similar, Arg113 and Ser302 of GNE are likely involved in product hydrolysis. On the other hand, the CMP-Neu5Ac binding mode clearly elucidates why mutations in Arg263 and Arg266 can cause sialuria. Moreover, full-length modelling suggests a channel for ManNAc trafficking within the bifunctional enzyme. PMID:26980148

  2. A prediction of the amino acids and structures involved in DNA recognition by type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, S S; Dryden, D T

    1997-01-01

    The S subunits of type I DNA restriction/modification enzymes are responsible for recognising the DNA target sequence for the enzyme. They contain two domains of approximately 150 amino acids, each of which is responsible for recognising one half of the bipartite asymmetric target. In the absence of any known tertiary structure for type I enzymes or recognisable DNA recognition motifs in the highly variable amino acid sequences of the S subunits, it has previously not been possible to predict which amino acids are responsible for sequence recognition. Using a combination of sequence alignment and secondary structure prediction methods to analyse the sequences of S subunits, we predict that all of the 51 known target recognition domains (TRDs) have the same tertiary structure. Furthermore, this structure is similar to the structure of the TRD of the C5-cytosine methyltransferase, Hha I, which recognises its DNA target via interactions with two short polypeptide loops and a beta strand. Our results predict the location of these sequence recognition structures within the TRDs of all type I S subunits. PMID:9254696

  3. The trans-10,cis-12 isomer of conjugated linoleic acid reduces hepatic triacylglycerol content without affecting lipogenic enzymes in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Amaia; Churruca, Itziar; Macarulla, M Teresa; Rodríguez, Víctor M; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Martínez, J Alfredo; Portillo, María P

    2004-09-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) refers to the positional and geometric dienoic isomers of linoleic acid. The dietary intake of CLA has been associated with changes in lipid metabolism. The aim of the present work was to assess the effects of the two main isomers of CLA on sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1a and SREBP-1c mRNA levels, as well as on mRNA levels and the activities of several lipogenic enzymes in liver. For this purpose hamsters were fed an atherogenic diet supplemented with 5 g linoleic acid, cis-9,trans-11 or trans-10,cis-12 CLA/kg diet for 6 weeks. The trans-10,cis-12 isomer intake produced significantly greater liver weight, but also significantly decreased liver fat accumulation. No changes in mRNA levels of SREBP-1a, SREBP-1c and lipogenic enzymes, or in the activities of these enzymes, were observed. There was no effect of feeding cis-9,trans-11 CLA. These results suggest that increased fat accumulation in liver does not occur on the basis of liver enlargement produced by feeding the trans-10,cis-12 isomer of CLA in hamsters. The reduction in hepatic triacylglycerol content induced by this isomer was not attributable to changes in lipogenesis.

  4. The shikimate pathway: review of amino acid sequence, function and three-dimensional structures of the enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mir, Rafia; Jallu, Shais; Singh, T P

    2015-06-01

    The aromatic compounds such as aromatic amino acids, vitamin K and ubiquinone are important prerequisites for the metabolism of an organism. All organisms can synthesize these aromatic metabolites through shikimate pathway, except for mammals which are dependent on their diet for these compounds. The pathway converts phosphoenolpyruvate and erythrose 4-phosphate to chorismate through seven enzymatically catalyzed steps and chorismate serves as a precursor for the synthesis of variety of aromatic compounds. These enzymes have shown to play a vital role for the viability of microorganisms and thus are suggested to present attractive molecular targets for the design of novel antimicrobial drugs. This review focuses on the seven enzymes of the shikimate pathway, highlighting their primary sequences, functions and three-dimensional structures. The understanding of their active site amino acid maps, functions and three-dimensional structures will provide a framework on which the rational design of antimicrobial drugs would be based. Comparing the full length amino acid sequences and the X-ray crystal structures of these enzymes from bacteria, fungi and plant sources would contribute in designing a specific drug and/or in developing broad-spectrum compounds with efficacy against a variety of pathogens.

  5. Celluloytic enzymes, nucleic acids encoding them and methods for making and using them

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kevin A; Zhao, Lishan; Cayouette, Michelle H

    2015-11-04

    The invention is directed to polypeptides having any cellulolytic activity, e.g., a cellulase activity, e.g., endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, beta-glucosidase, xylanase, mannanse, .beta.-xylosidase, arabinofuranosidase, and/or oligomerase activity, including thermostable and thermotolerant activity, and polynucleotides encoding these enzymes, and making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. The polypeptides of the invention can be used in a variety of pharmaceutical, agricultural, food and feed processing and industrial contexts. The invention also provides compositions or products of manufacture comprising mixtures of enzymes comprising at least one enzyme of this invention.

  6. Celluloytic enzymes, nucleic acids encoding them and methods for making and using them

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kevin A.; Zhao, Lishan; Cayouette, Michelle H.

    2015-09-08

    The invention is directed to polypeptides having any cellulolytic activity, e.g., a cellulase activity, e.g., endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, beta-glucosidase, xylanase, mannanse, .beta.-xylosidase, arabinofuranosidase, and/or oligomerase activity, including thermostable and thermotolerant activity, and polynucleotides encoding these enzymes, and making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. The polypeptides of the invention can be used in a variety of pharmaceutical, agricultural, food and feed processing and industrial contexts. The invention also provides compositions or products of manufacture comprising mixtures of enzymes comprising at least one enzyme of this invention.

  7. Volatile terpenes from actinomycetes: a biosynthetic study correlating chemical analyses to genome data.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Patrick; Citron, Christian A; Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2013-11-25

    The volatile terpenes of 24 actinomycetes whose genomes have been sequenced (or are currently being sequenced) were collected by use of a closed-loop stripping apparatus and identified by GC/MS. The analytical data were compared against a phylogenetic analysis of all 192 currently available sequences of bacterial terpene cyclases (excluding geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases). In addition to the several groups of terpenes with known biosynthetic origin, selinadienes were identified as a large group of biosynthetically related sesquiterpenes that are produced by several streptomycetes. The detection of a large number of previously unrecognised side products of known terpene cyclases proved to be particularly important for an in depth understanding of biosynthetic pathways to known terpenes in actinomycetes. Interpretation of the chemical analytical data in the context of the phylogenetic tree of bacterial terpene cyclases pointed to the function of three new enzymes: (E)-β-caryophyllene synthase, selina-3,7(11)-diene synthase and aristolochene synthase.

  8. Regulation of ascorbic acid and of xylulose synthesis in rat-liver extracts. The effect of starvation on the enzymes of the glucuronic acid pathway

    PubMed Central

    Stirpe, F.; Comporti, M.

    1965-01-01

    1. The synthesis of ascorbic acid in rat-liver extracts is impaired during starvation, and more from glucuronolactone and glucuronate than from gulonate and gulonolactone. 2. The formation of xylulose from gulonate and from gulonolactone is greatly enhanced during starvation, whereas it is decreased from glucuronolactone and from glucuronate. 3. The activity of the enzymes of the glucuronic acid pathway during starvation has been determined in rat-liver preparations. Gulonolactone oxidase is decreased, NAD-linked gulonate dehydrogenase is enhanced, and uronolactonase, aldonolactonase and NADP-linked hexonate dehydrogenase are unchanged. 4. The impairment of ascorbic acid synthesis from gulonate observed during starvation can be accounted for by the depressed activity of gulonolactone oxidase. 5. The cause of the enhanced formation of xylulose has been located in the sedimentable fraction of liver homogenate. 6. The hypothesis is formulated of an increased utilization of the glucuronic acid pathway during starvation. PMID:14340084

  9. Salt hydrates for in situ water activity control have acid-base effects on enzymes in nonaqueous media.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Nuno; Harper, Neil; Halling, Peter J; Barreiros, Susana

    2003-06-30

    Salt hydrates very frequently are utilized as in situ water activity buffers in reaction mixtures of enzymes in nonaqueous media. In addition to buffering water activity, there is evidence that salt hydrates also often affect initial rates in other ways. This has been generally overlooked or thought to be related to water transfer effects. Here we show that salt hydrates can have important acid-base effects on enzymes in nonaqueous media. We performed transesterification reactions in n-hexane and in supercritical ethane catalyzed by cross-linked crystals of subtilisin, differing in the method used to set a(W), and confirmed that the presence of salt hydrate pairs significantly affected the catalytic performance of the enzyme. However, in the presence of a solid-state acid-base buffer, salt hydrates had no effect on enzymatic activity. Direct evidence for the acid-base effects of salt hydrates was obtained by testing their effect on the protonation state of an organo-soluble H(+)/Na(+) indicator. The four salt hydrate pairs tested affected the indicator to very different extents. By promoting the exchange of H(+) for Na(+), salt hydrates will tend to affect the ionization state of acidic residues in the protein and, hence, enzymatic activity. In fact, salt hydrates were able to affect the pH memory of subtilisin lyophilized from different aqueous pHs, bringing about up to 20-fold enhancements and up to 5-fold decreases in catalytic activity. The possibility of such acid-base effects need to be considered in all experiments using salt hydrates to control water activity.

  10. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males’ subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  11. [Biosynthetic study of actinomycetes-metabolites for creating novel analogs].

    PubMed

    Ito, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    The aminocyclitol family is a relatively new class of natural products such as gentamicin, kanamycin, and streptomycin, which have been used clinically for decades as potent antimicrobial agents. These secondary metabolites are chiefly produced by microorganisms, especially Actinomycetes. Their chemical structures most commonly contain a C7N unit, 2-epi-5-epi-valiolone or 3-amino-5-hydroxybenzoic acid (3,5-AHBA) which are known to be responsible for their biological activities. In the course of current study, the biosynthesis of the C7N-containing metabolites, validamycin and acarbose, pactamycin, have been evaluated. We studied N-formamide salicylic acid (FSA) moiety which is a C7N unit synthesized from tryptophan by microorganisms. A strong antifungal agent antimycin, isolated from several Streptomyces sp., contains an FSA moiety, and constitutes a unique nine-membered dilactone ring with L-threonine, short-chain fatty acid, and an amide linkage connecting it to an FSA moiety. Also, an antitumor antibiotic asukamycin, produced by Streptomyces nodosus subsp. asukaensis ATCC 29757, consists of both 3,4-AHBA and C5N, cyclohexane ring linked to trans-triens. To improve the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of these metabolites, further structural modification is needed. Total chemical synthesis of these complex compounds is difficult. Therefore, alternative approaches are required, e.g., biosynthetic or genetic modification methods. This review presents the biosynthetic study on these compounds for creating new analogs using mutasyntheis.

  12. Hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1 mediates alcohol-induced regulation of bile acid enzyme genes expression via CREBH.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Dipanjan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Li, Tiangang; Misra, Jagannath; Kim, Don-Kyu; Kim, Jung Ran; Kwon, Joseph; Jeong, Won-Il; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Park, Tae-Sik; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Chiang, John Y L; Lee, Chul-Ho; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids concentration in liver is tightly regulated to prevent cell damage. Previous studies have demonstrated that deregulation of bile acid homeostasis can lead to cholestatic liver disease. Recently, we have shown that ER-bound transcription factor Crebh is a downstream effector of hepatic Cb1r signaling pathway. In this study, we have investigated the effect of alcohol exposure on hepatic bile acid homeostasis and elucidated the mediatory roles of Cb1r and Crebh in this process. We found that alcohol exposure or Cb1r-agonist 2-AG treatment increases hepatic bile acid synthesis and serum ALT, AST levels in vivo alongwith significant increase in Crebh gene expression and activation. Alcohol exposure activated Cb1r, Crebh, and perturbed bile acid homeostasis. Overexpression of Crebh increased the expression of key bile acid synthesis enzyme genes via direct binding of Crebh to their promoters, whereas Cb1r knockout and Crebh-knockdown mice were protected against alcohol-induced perturbation of bile acid homeostasis. Interestingly, insulin treatment protected against Cb1r-mediated Crebh-induced disruption of bile acid homeostasis. Furthermore, Crebh expression and activation was found to be markedly increased in insulin resistance conditions and Crebh knockdown in diabetic mice model (db/db) significantly reversed alcohol-induced disruption of bile acid homeostasis. Overall, our study demonstrates a novel regulatory mechanism of hepatic bile acid metabolism by alcohol via Cb1r-mediated activation of Crebh, and suggests that targeting Crebh can be of therapeutic potential in ameliorating alcohol-induced perturbation of bile acid homeostasis.

  13. Influence of different forms of acidities on soil microbiological properties and enzyme activities at an acid mine drainage contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Prafulla Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Tripathy, Subhasish; Equeenuddin, Sk Md; Panigrahi, M K

    2010-07-15

    Assessment of microbial parameters, viz. microbial biomass, fluorescence diacetate, microbial respiration, acid phosphatase, beta-glucosidase and urease with respect to acidity helps in evaluating the quality of soils. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different forms of acidities on soil microbial parameters in an acid mine drainage contaminated site around coal deposits in Jainta Hills of India. Total potential and exchangeable acidity, extractable and exchangeable aluminium were significantly higher in contaminated soil compared to the baseline (p<0.01). Different forms of acidity were significantly and positively correlated with each other (p<0.05). Further, all microbial properties were positively and significantly correlated with organic carbon and clay (p<0.05). The ratios of microbial parameters with organic carbon were negatively correlated with different forms of acidity. Principal component analysis and cluster analyses showed that the microbial activities are not directly influenced by the total potential acidity and extractable aluminium. Though acid mine drainage affected soils had higher microbial biomass and activities due to higher organic matter content than those of the baseline soils, the ratios of microbial parameters/organic carbon indicated suppression of microbial growth and activities due to acidity stress.

  14. Modularity of Conifer Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis: P450 Enzymes of Different CYP720B Clades Use Alternative Substrates and Converge on the Same Products1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Macaire M.S.; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP720B subfamily play a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids (DRAs), which are a major component of the conifer oleoresin defense system. CYP720Bs exist in families of up to a dozen different members in conifer genomes and fall into four different clades (I–IV). Only two CYP720B members, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) PtCYP720B1 and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) PsCYP720B4, have been characterized previously. Both are multisubstrate and multifunctional clade III enzymes, which catalyze consecutive three-step oxidations in the conversion of diterpene olefins to DRAs. These reactions resemble the sequential diterpene oxidations affording ent-kaurenoic acid from ent-kaurene in gibberellin biosynthesis. Here, we functionally characterized the CYP720B clade I enzymes CYP720B2 and CYP720B12 in three different conifer species, Sitka spruce, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and jack pine (Pinus banksiana), and compared their activities with those of the clade III enzymes CYP720B1 and CYP720B4 of the same species. Unlike the clade III enzymes, clade I enzymes were ultimately found not to be active with diterpene olefins but converted the recently discovered, unstable diterpene synthase product 13-hydroxy-8(14)-abietene. Through alternative routes, CYP720B enzymes of both clades produce some of the same profiles of conifer oleoresin DRAs (abietic acid, neoabietic acid, levopimaric acid, and palustric acid), while clade III enzymes also function in the formation of pimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and sandaracopimaric acid. These results highlight the modularity of the specialized (i.e. secondary) diterpene metabolism, which produces conifer defense metabolites through variable combinations of different diterpene synthase and CYP720B enzymes. PMID:26936895

  15. Nonlinear biosynthetic gene cluster dose effect on penicillin production by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Jeroen G; Ebbendorf, Bjorg; Woszczynska, Marta; Boer, Rémon; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2010-11-01

    Industrial penicillin production levels by the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum increased dramatically by classical strain improvement. High-yielding strains contain multiple copies of the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster that encodes three key enzymes of the β-lactam biosynthetic pathway. We have analyzed the gene cluster dose effect on penicillin production using the high-yielding P. chrysogenum strain DS17690 that was cured from its native clusters. The amount of penicillin V produced increased with the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster number but was saturated at high copy numbers. Likewise, transcript levels of the biosynthetic genes pcbAB [δ-(l-α-aminoadipyl)-l-cysteinyl-d-valine synthetase], pcbC (isopenicillin N synthase), and penDE (acyltransferase) correlated with the cluster copy number. Remarkably, the protein level of acyltransferase, which localizes to peroxisomes, was saturated already at low cluster copy numbers. At higher copy numbers, intracellular levels of isopenicillin N increased, suggesting that the acyltransferase reaction presents a limiting step at a high gene dose. Since the number and appearance of the peroxisomes did not change significantly with the gene cluster copy number, we conclude that the acyltransferase activity is limiting for penicillin biosynthesis at high biosynthetic gene cluster copy numbers. These results suggest that at a high penicillin production level, productivity is limited by the peroxisomal acyltransferase import activity and/or the availability of coenzyme A (CoA)-activated side chains.

  16. Diversity and abundance of phosphonate biosynthetic genes in nature

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaomin; Doroghazi, James R.; Janga, Sarath C.; Zhang, Jun Kai; Circello, Benjamin; Griffin, Benjamin M.; Labeda, David P.; Metcalf, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphonates, molecules containing direct carbon–phosphorus bonds, compose a structurally diverse class of natural products with interesting and useful biological properties. Although their synthesis in protozoa was discovered more than 50 y ago, the extent and diversity of phosphonate production in nature remains poorly characterized. The rearrangement of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to phosphonopyruvate, catalyzed by the enzyme PEP mutase (PepM), is shared by the vast majority of known phosphonate biosynthetic pathways. Thus, the pepM gene can be used as a molecular marker to examine the occurrence and abundance of phosphonate-producing organisms. Based on the presence of this gene, phosphonate biosynthesis is common in microbes, with ∼5% of sequenced bacterial genomes and 7% of genome equivalents in metagenomic datasets carrying pepM homologs. Similarly, we detected the pepM gene in ∼5% of random actinomycete isolates. The pepM-containing gene neighborhoods from 25 of these isolates were cloned, sequenced, and compared with those found in sequenced genomes. PEP mutase sequence conservation is strongly correlated with conservation of other nearby genes, suggesting that the diversity of phosphonate biosynthetic pathways can be predicted by examining PEP mutase diversity. We used this approach to estimate the range of phosphonate biosynthetic pathways in nature, revealing dozens of discrete groups in pepM amplicons from local soils, whereas hundreds were observed in metagenomic datasets. Collectively, our analyses show that phosphonate biosynthesis is both diverse and relatively common in nature, suggesting that the role of phosphonate molecules in the biosphere may be more important than is often recognized. PMID:24297932

  17. Characterization of a C-5,13-Cleaving Enzyme of 13(S)-Hydroperoxide of Linolenic Acid by Soybean Seed.

    PubMed Central

    Salch, Y. P.; Grove, M. J.; Takamura, H.; Gardner, H. W.

    1995-01-01

    An activity was found in mature soybean seeds (Glycine max L. cv Century) that cleaved 13(S)-hydroperoxy-9(Z),11(E),15(Z)-octadecatrienoic acid (13S-HPOT) into 13-oxo-9(Z),11(E)-tridecadienoic acid and two isomeric pentenols, 2(Z)-penten-1-ol and 1-penten-3-ol. Isomeric pentene dimers were also produced and were presumably derived from the combination of two pentene radicals. 13(S)-Hydroperoxy-9(Z),11(E)-octadecadienoic acid (13S-HPOD) was, by contrast, a poor substrate. Activity with 13S-HPOT increased 24-fold under anaerobic conditions reminiscent of a similar anaerobic promoted reaction of 13S-HPOD catalyzed by lipoxygenase (LOX) in the presence of linoleic acid. However, prior to ion-exchange chromatography, cleavage activity did not require linoleic acid. After separation by gel filtration followed by ion-exchange chromatography, cleavage activity was lost but reappeared in the presence of either linoleic acid or dithiothreitol. Under these conditions cleavage activity was coincident with the activity of types 1 and 2 LOX. LOX inhibitors suppressed the cleavage reaction in a manner similar to inhibition of LOX activity. Heat-generated alkoxyl radicals derived from either 13S-HPOT or 13S-HPOD afforded similar products and yields of 13-oxo-9(Z),11(E)-tridecadienoic acid compared to the enzymic reaction. The product 1-penten-3-ol may be the precursor of the "raw-bean" volatile ethylvinylketone. PMID:12228538

  18. Heating of vegetable oils influences the activity of enzymes participating in arachidonic acid formation in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Stawarska, Agnieszka; Białek, Agnieszka; Tokarz, Andrzej

    2015-10-01

    Dietary intake of lipids and their fatty acids profile influence many aspects of health. Thermal processing changes the properties of edible oils and can also modify their metabolism, for example, eicosanoids formation. The aim of our study was to verify whether the activity of desaturases can be modified by lipids intake, especially by the fatty acids content. The experimental diets contained rapeseed oil, sunflower oil, and olive oil, both unheated and heated (for 10 minutes at 200 °C each time before administration), and influenced the fatty acids composition in serum and the activity of enzymes participating in arachidonic acid (AA) formation. The activity of desaturases was determined by measuring the amounts of AA formed in vitro derived from linoleic acid as determined in liver microsomes of Wistar rats. In addition, the indices of ∆(6)-desaturase (D6D) and ∆(5)-desaturase (D5D) have been determined. To realize this aim, the method of high-performance liquid chromatography has been used with ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry detection. Diet supplementation with the oils rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids affects the fatty acids profile in blood serum and the activity of D6D and ∆(5)-desaturase in rat liver microsomes, the above activities being dependent on the kind of oil applied. Diet supplementation with heated oils has been found to increase the amount of AA produced in hepatic microsomes; and in the case of rapeseed oil and sunflower oil, it has also increased D6D activity.

  19. 9-O-Acetylation of sialic acids is catalysed by CASD1 via a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Anna-Maria T.; Bakkers, Mark J. G.; Buettner, Falk F. R.; Hartmann, Maike; Grove, Melanie; Langereis, Martijn A.; de Groot, Raoul J.; Mühlenhoff, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acids, terminal sugars of glycoproteins and glycolipids, play important roles in development, cellular recognition processes and host–pathogen interactions. A common modification of sialic acids is 9-O-acetylation, which has been implicated in sialoglycan recognition, ganglioside biology, and the survival and drug resistance of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. Despite many functional implications, the molecular basis of 9-O-acetylation has remained elusive thus far. Following cellular approaches, including selective gene knockout by CRISPR/Cas genome editing, we here show that CASD1—a previously identified human candidate gene—is essential for sialic acid 9-O-acetylation. In vitro assays with the purified N-terminal luminal domain of CASD1 demonstrate transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl-coenzyme A to CMP-activated sialic acid and formation of a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate. Our study provides direct evidence that CASD1 is a sialate O-acetyltransferase and serves as key enzyme in the biosynthesis of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycans. PMID:26169044

  20. Spontaneous, Metal-Catalyzed, and Enzyme-Catalyzed Decarboxylation of Oxalosuccinic Acid.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    The Ohio State University, 1980 309 Pages Professor Daniel Leussing, Advisor Decarboxylation rates of oxalosuccinic acid , a tricarboxylic acid , thas...been studied in detail. It was shown that the keto forms of the acid spontaneously decarboxylate. The catalytic effect of three metals were examined. The...overall effectiveness of the metals were , This catalysis resulted from the formation of a 1:1 complex between the acid and the metal ions. The

  1. Elucidation of Pseurotin Biosynthetic Pathway Points to Trans-Acting C-Methyltransferase and Source of Chemical Diversity Generation**

    PubMed Central

    Tsunematsu, Yuta; Fukutomi, Manami; Saruwatari, Takayoshi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hotta, Kinya; Tang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Pseurotins comprise a family of structurally related Aspergillal natural products having interesting bioactivity. However, little is known about the biosynthetic steps involved in the formation of their complex chemical features. Here, we systematically deleted the pseurotin biosynthetic genes in A. fumigatus and performed in vivo and in vitro characterization of the tailoring enzymes to determine the biosynthetic intermediates and the gene products responsible for the formation of each intermediate. This allowed us to elucidate the main biosynthetic steps leading to the formation of pseurotin A from the predominant precursor, azaspirene. The study revealed the combinatorial nature of the biosynthesis of the pseurotin family of compounds and the intermediates. Most interestingly, we report the first identification of an epoxidase–C-methyltransferase bifunctional fusion protein PsoF that appears to methylate the nascent polyketide backbone carbon atom in trans. PMID:24939566

  2. Fundamental study of the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis by acids and enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, C. S.; Chang, M.

    1981-02-01

    There are three basic enzymes e.g., endoglucanase (C/sub x/), exoglucanase (C1) and cellobiase comprising the majority of extracellular cellulase enzymes produced by the cellulolytic mycelial fungi, Trichoderma reesei, and other cellulolytic microorganisms. The kinetics of cellobiase were developed on the basis of applying the pseudo-steady state assumption to hydrolyze cellobiose to glucose. The results indicated that cellobiase was bjected to end-product inhibition by glucose. The kinetic modeling of exoglucanase (C1) with respect to cellodextrins was studied. Both glucose and cellobiose were found to be inhibitors of this enzyme with cellobiose being a stronger inhibitor than glucose. Similarly, endoglucanase (C/sub x) is subject to end-product inhibition by glucose. Crystallinity of the cellulose affects the rate of hydrolysis by cellulases. Hence, the changes in crystallinity of cellulose in relation to chemical pretreatment and enzyme hydrolysis was compared. The study of cellulase biosynthesis resulted in the conclusion that exo-and endo-glucanases are coinduced while cellobiase is synthesized independent of the other two enzymes.

  3. RALDH2, the enzyme for retinoic acid synthesis, mediates meiosis initiation in germ cells of the female embryonic chickens.

    PubMed

    Yu, Minli; Yu, Ping; Leghari, Imdad H; Ge, Chutian; Mi, Yuling; Zhang, Caiqiao

    2013-02-01

    Meiosis is a process unique to the differentiation of germ cells and exhibits sex-specific in timing. Previous studies showed that retinoic acid (RA) as the vitamin A metabolite is crucial for controlling Stra8 (Stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8) expression in the gonad and to initiate meiosis; however, the mechanism by which retinoid-signaling acts has remained unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of the enzyme retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (RALDH2) which catalyzes RA synthesizes by initiating meiosis in chicken ovarian germ cells. Meiotic germ cells were first detected at day 15.5 in chicken embryo ovary when the expression of synaptonemal complex protein 3 (Scp3) and disrupted meiotic cDNA 1 homologue (Dmc1) became elevated, while Stra8 expression was specifically up-regulated at day 12.5 before meiosis onset. It was observed from the increase in Raldh2 mRNA expression levels and decreases in Cyp26b1 (the enzyme for RA catabolism) expression levels during meiosis that requirement for RA accumulation is essential to sustain meiosis. This was also revealed by RA stimulation of the cultured ovaries with the initiation of meiosis response, and the knocking down of the Raldh2 expression during meiosis, leading to abolishment of RA-dependent action. Altogether, these studies indicate that RA synthesis by the enzyme RALDH2 and signaling through its receptor is crucial for meiosis initiation in chicken embryonic ovary.

  4. Structure and function of ∆1-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase, the enzyme controlling the psychoactivity of Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Shoyama, Yoshinari; Tamada, Taro; Kurihara, Kazuo; Takeuchi, Ayako; Taura, Futoshi; Arai, Shigeki; Blaber, Michael; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Morimoto, Satoshi; Kuroki, Ryota

    2012-10-12

    ∆1-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase catalyzes the oxidative cyclization of cannabigerolic acid (CBGA) into THCA, the precursor of the primary psychoactive agent ∆1-tetrahydrocannabinol in Cannabis sativa. The enzyme was overproduced in insect cells, purified, and crystallized in order to investigate the structure-function relationship of THCA synthase, and the tertiary structure was determined to 2.75Å resolution by X-ray crystallography (R(cryst)=19.9%). The THCA synthase enzyme is a member of the p-cresol methyl-hydroxylase superfamily, and the tertiary structure is divided into two domains (domains I and II), with a flavin adenine dinucleotide coenzyme positioned between each domain and covalently bound to His114 and Cys176 (located in domain I). The catalysis of THCA synthesis involves a hydride transfer from C3 of CBGA to N5 of flavin adenine dinucleotide and the deprotonation of O6' of CBGA. The ionized residues in the active site of THCA synthase were investigated by mutational analysis and X-ray structure. Mutational analysis indicates that the reaction does not involve the carboxyl group of Glu442 that was identified as the catalytic base in the related berberine bridge enzyme but instead involves the hydroxyl group of Tyr484. Mutations at the active-site residues His292 and Tyr417 resulted in a decrease in, but not elimination of, the enzymatic activity of THCA synthase, suggesting a key role for these residues in substrate binding and not direct catalysis.

  5. Citric-acid cycle key enzyme activities during in vitro growth and metacyclogenesis of Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Louassini, M; Foulquié, M; Benítez, R; Adroher, J

    1999-08-01

    The activities of 5 key regulatory enzymes in most energetic systems, namely citrate synthase (EC 4.1.3.7, CS), NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.42, ICDH), succinate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.99.1, SDH), L-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37, MDH), and decarboxylating malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40, ME), were measured during the growth and metacyclogenesis of a cutaneous (CL) and a visceral (VL) strain of Leishmania infantum. As occurs with other Leishmania species, infective promastigotes were present along all phases of growth, but their percentages were higher at the early stationary phase for VL and the end of the same phase for CL. High CS and SDH activities were detected in both strains, as compared with other trypanosomatids, bringing more evidence for an actively functional citric-acid cycle in L. infantum. Both strains showed higher levels of CS, ICDH, and MDH and lower SDH and ME activities when more metacyclic promastigotes were present, but in VL these changes paralleled an increase in glucose consumption, whereas in CL these changes coincided with an NH3 hyperproduction. This suggests that the energy metabolism during L. infantum growth and metacyclogenesis is affected by regulated enzymes that probably respond to changes in the culture medium in the levels of glucose and amino acids.

  6. Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme activity in blood, brain, and liver of lead-dosed ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.; Finley, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    Mallard ducks were dosed with a single shotgun pellet (ca. 200 mg lead). After 1 month there was about 1 ppm lead in blood, 2.5 in liver, and 0.5 in brain. Lead-induced inhibition of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme in blood and cerebellum was much greater than in cerebral hemisphere or liver and was strongly correlated with the lead concentration in these tissues. The cerebellar portion of the brain was more sensitive to delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme inhibition by lead than were the other tissues examined. There was also a greater increase in the glial cell marker enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase, in cerebellum than in cerebral hemisphere, suggesting that nonregenerating neuronal cells were destroyed by lead and replaced by glial cells in that portion of the brain. Even partial loss of cerebellar tissue is severely debilitating in waterfowl, because functions critical to survival such as visual, auditory, motor, and reflex responses are integrated at this brain center.

  7. Impact of phosphate concentration on docosahexaenoic acid production and related enzyme activities in fermentation of Schizochytrium sp.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lu-Jing; Feng, Yun; Li, Juan; Qu, Liang; Huang, He

    2013-09-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an important and widely used infant food additive. In this study, the effects of phosphate concentration on lipid and especially DHA synthesis in the oleaginous fungi Schizochytrium sp. HX-308 have been investigated in batch cultures. The maximum DHA yield (8.9 g/L) and DHA productivity (148.3 mg/L h) in 0.1 g/L KH2PO4 concentration were higher than the DHA yield (6.2 g/L) and DHA productivity (86.1 mg/L h) in 4 g/L KH2PO4 concentration. Furthermore, differences in related enzyme activities (malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and NAD(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase) between phosphate-sufficient and phosphate-limitation conditions were assayed. The results showed that the phosphate-limitation condition could maintain higher activities of malic enzyme and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in addition to lower activity of NAD(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase. In addition, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase might be the main supplier of NADPH at the early stage of fermentation while malic enzyme might be the provider at the late stage. This information might explain the regulation mechanism of phosphate limitation for lipid production and be useful for further DHA production enhancement.

  8. Nucleic acids digestion by enzymes in the stomach of snakehead (Channa argus) and banded grouper (Epinephelus awoara).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yanfang; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Pan, Xiaoming; Wu, Wei; Cao, Minjie; Dong, Ping; Liang, Xingguo

    2017-02-01

    Dietary nucleic acids (NAs) were important nutrients. However, the digestion of NAs in stomach has not been studied. In this study, the digestion of NAs by enzymes from fish stomach was investigated. The snakehead pepsins (SP) which were the main enzymes in stomach were extracted and purified. The purity of SP was evaluated by SDS-PAGE and HPLC. The snakehead pepsin 2 (SP2) which was the main component in the extracts was used for investigating the protein and NAs digestion activity. SP2 could digest NAs, including λ DNA and salmon sperm DNA. Interestingly, the digestion could be inhibited by treatment of alkaline solution at pH 8.0 and pepstatin A, and the digestion could happen either in the presence or absence of hemoglobin (Hb) and BSA as the protein substrates. Similarly, the stomach enzymes of banded grouper also showed the NAs digestion activity. NAs could be digested by the stomach enzymes of snakehead and banded grouper. It may be helpful for understanding both animal nutrition and NAs metabolic pathway.

  9. Development of a Streptomyces venezuelae-based combinatorial biosynthetic system for the production of glycosylated derivatives of doxorubicin and its biosynthetic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Han, Ah Reum; Park, Je Won; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Ban, Yeon Hee; Yoo, Young Ji; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Byung-Gee; Sohng, Jae Kyung; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2011-07-01

    Doxorubicin, one of the most widely used anticancer drugs, is composed of a tetracyclic polyketide aglycone and l-daunosamine as a deoxysugar moiety, which acts as an important determinant of its biological activity. This is exemplified by the fewer side effects of semisynthetic epirubicin (4'-epi-doxorubicin). An efficient combinatorial biosynthetic system that can convert the exogenous aglycone ε-rhodomycinone into diverse glycosylated derivatives of doxorubicin or its biosynthetic intermediates, rhodomycin D and daunorubicin, was developed through the use of Streptomyces venezuelae mutants carrying plasmids that direct the biosynthesis of different nucleotide deoxysugars and their transfer onto aglycone, as well as the postglycosylation modifications. This system improved epirubicin production from ε-rhodomycinone by selecting a substrate flexible glycosyltransferase, AknS, which was able to transfer the unnatural sugar donors and a TDP-4-ketohexose reductase, AvrE, which efficiently supported the biosynthesis of TDP-4-epi-l-daunosamine. Furthermore, a range of doxorubicin analogs containing diverse deoxysugar moieties, seven of which are novel rhodomycin D derivatives, were generated. This provides new insights into the functions of deoxysugar biosynthetic enzymes and demonstrates the potential of the S. venezuelae-based combinatorial biosynthetic system as a simple biological tool for modifying structurally complex sugar moieties attached to anthracyclines as an alternative to chemical syntheses for improving anticancer agents.

  10. Chlorella viruses contain genes encoding a complete polyamine biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Sascha; Sander, Adrianne; Gurnon, James R.; Yanai-Balser, Giane; VanEtten, James L.; Piotrowski, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Two genes encoding the putative polyamine biosynthetic enzymes agmatine iminohydrolase (AIH) and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (CPA) were cloned from the chloroviruses PBCV-1, NY-2A and MT325. They were expressed in Escherichia coli to form C-terminal (His)6-tagged proteins and the recombinant proteins were purified by Ni2+- binding affinity chromatography. The biochemical properties of the two enzymes are similar to AIH and CPA enzymes from Arabidopsis thaliana and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Together with the previously known virus genes encoding ornithine/arginine decarboxlyase (ODC/ADC) and homospermidine synthase, the chloroviruses have genes that encode a complete set of functional enzymes that synthesize the rare polyamine homospermidine from arginine via agmatine, N-carbamoylputrescine and putrescine. The PBCV-1 aih and cpa genes are expressed early during virus infection together with the odc/adc gene, suggesting that biosynthesis of putrescine is important in early stages of viral replication. The aih and cpa genes are widespread in the chlorella viruses. PMID:17101165

  11. [Combined effects of copper and simulated acid rain on copper accumulation, growth, and antioxidant enzyme activities of Rumex acetosa].

    PubMed

    He, Shan-Ying; Gao, Yong-Jie; Shentu, Jia-Li; Chen, Kun-Bai

    2011-02-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the combined effects of Cu (0-1500 mg x kg(-1)) and simulated acid rain (pH 2.5-5.6) on the copper accumulation, growth, and antioxidant enzyme activities of Rumex acetosa. With the increasing concentration of soil Cu, the Cu accumulation in R. acetosa increased, being higher in root than in stem and leaf. The exposure to low pH acid rain promoted the Cu uptake by R. acetosa. With the increase of soil Cu concentration and/or of acid rain acidity, the biomass of R. acetosa decreased, leaf and root MDA contents increased and had good correlation with soil Cu concentration, and the SOD and POD activities in leaf and root displayed a decreasing trend after an initial increase. This study showed that R. acetosa had a strong adaptive ability to Cu and acid rain stress, exhibiting a high application potential in the remediation of Cu-contaminated soil in acid rain areas.

  12. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid W

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, S.; Gabelli, S; Echeverria, I; Vogel, J; Guan, J; Tan, B; Klee, H; McCarty, D; Amzela, M

    2010-01-01

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  13. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, Simon A.J.; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Echeverria, Ignacia; Vogel, Jonathan T.; Guan, Jiahn Chou; Tan, Bao Cai; Klee, Harry J.; McCarty, Donald R.; Amzel, L. Mario

    2011-09-06

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  14. Cellulolytic enzymes, nucleic acids encoding them and methods for making and using them

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kevin A [San Diego, CA; Zhao, Lishan [Emeryville, CA; Cayouette, Michelle H [San Diego, CA

    2012-01-24

    The invention provides polypeptides having any cellulolytic activity, e.g., a cellulase activity, a endoglucanase, a cellobiohydrolase, a beta-glucosidase, a xylanase, a mannanse, a .beta.-xylosidase, an arabinofuranosidase, and/or an oligomerase activity, polynucleotides encoding these polypeptides, and methods of making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. In one aspect, the invention is directed to polypeptides having any cellulolytic activity, e.g., a cellulase activity, e.g., endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, beta-glucosidase, xylanase, mannanse, .beta.-xylosidase, arabinofuranosidase, and/or oligomerase activity, including thermostable and thermotolerant activity, and polynucleotides encoding these enzymes, and making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. In one aspect, the invention provides polypeptides having an oligomerase activity, e.g., enzymes that convert recalcitrant soluble oligomers to fermentable sugars in the saccharification of biomass. The polypeptides of the invention can be used in a variety of pharmaceutical, agricultural, food and feed processing and industrial contexts. The invention also provides compositions or products of manufacture comprising mixtures of enzymes comprising at least one enzyme of this invention.

  15. Fatty acid composition of muscle fat and enzymes of storage lipid synthesis in whole muscle from beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Kazala, E Chris; Lozeman, Fred J; Mir, Priya S; Aalhus, Jennifer L; Schmutz, Sheila M; Weselake, Randall J

    2006-11-01

    Enhanced intramuscular fat content (i.e., marbling) in beef is a desirable trait, which can result in increased product value. This study was undertaken with the aim of revealing biochemical factors associated with the marbling trait in beef cattle. Samples of longissimus lumborum (LL) and pars costalis diaphragmatis (PCD) were taken from a group of intact crossbred males and females at slaughter, lipids extracted, and the resulting FAME examined for relationships with marbling fat deposition. For LL, significant associations were found between degree of marbling and myristic (14:0, r = 0.55, P < 0.01), palmitic (16:0, r = 0.80, P < 0.001), stearic (18:0, r = -0.58, P < 0.01), and oleic (18:1c-9, r = 0.79, P < 0.001) acids. For PCD, significant relationships were found between marbling and palmitic (r = 0.71, P < 0.001) and oleic (r = 0.74, P < 0.001) acids. Microsomal fractions prepared from PCD muscle were assayed for diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT), and phosphatidic acid phosphatase-1 (PAP-1) activity, and the results examined for relationships with degree of intramuscular fat deposition. None of the enzyme activities from PCD displayed an association with marbling fat content, but DGAT specific activity showed significant positive associations with LPAAT (r = 0.54, P < 0.01), total PAP (r = 0.66, P < 0.001), and PAP-1 (r = 0.63, P < 0.01) specific activities. The results on FA compositions of whole muscle tissues provide insight into possible enzyme action associated with the production of specific FA. The increased proportion of oleic acid associated with enhanced lipid content of whole muscle is noteworthy given the known health benefits of this FA.

  16. Polymerization of pentachlorophenol and ferulic acid by fungal extracellular lignin-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Rüttimann-Johnson, C; Lamar, R T

    1996-01-01

    High-molecular-weight polymers were produced by a crude concentrated supernatant from ligninolytic Phanerochaete chrysosporium cultures in a reaction mixture containing pentachlorophenol and a humic acid precursor (ferulic acid) in the presence of a detergent and H2O2. Pure manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and laccase were also shown to catalyze the reaction. PMID:8967777

  17. Harvesting the biosynthetic machineries that cultivate a variety of indispensable plant natural products

    PubMed Central

    Vickery, Christopher R; La Clair, James J; Burkart, Michael D; Noel, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    Plants are a sustainable resource for valuable natural chemicals best illustrated by large-scale farming centered on specific products. Here, we review recent discoveries of plant metabolic pathways producing natural products with unconventional biomolecular structures. Prenylation of polyketides by aromatic prenyltransferases (aPTases) ties together two of the major groups of plant specialized chemicals, terpenoids and polyketides, providing a core modification leading to new bioactivities and downstream metabolic processing. Moreover, PTases that biosynthesize Z-terpenoid precursors for small molecules such as lycosantalene have recently been found in the tomato family. Gaps in our understanding of how economically important compounds such as cannabinoids are produced are being identified using next-generation ‘omics’ to rapidly advance biochemical breakthroughs at an unprecedented rate. For instance, olivetolic acid cyclase, a polyketide synthase (PKS) co-factor from Cannabis sativa, directs the proper cyclization of a polyketide intermediate. Elucidations of spatial and temporal arrangements of biosynthetic enzymes into metabolons, such as those used to control the efficient production of natural polymers such as rubber and defensive small molecules such as linamarin and lotaustralin, provide blueprints for engineering streamlined production of plant products. PMID:26851514

  18. Hyperglycemia exacerbates colon cancer malignancy through hexosamine biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos-Dos-Santos, A; Loponte, H F B R; Mantuano, N R; Oliveira, I A; de Paula, I F; Teixeira, L K; de-Freitas-Junior, J C M; Gondim, K C; Heise, N; Mohana-Borges, R; Morgado-Díaz, J A; Dias, W B; Todeschini, A R

    2017-03-20

    Hyperglycemia is a common feature of diabetes mellitus, considered as a risk factor for cancer. However, its direct effects in cancer cell behavior are relatively unexplored. Herein we show that high glucose concentration induces aberrant glycosylation, increased cell proliferation, invasion and tumor progression of colon cancer. By modulating the activity of the rate-limiting enzyme, glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT), we demonstrate that hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) is involved in those processes. Biopsies from patients with colon carcinoma show increased levels of GFAT and consequently aberrant glycans' expression suggesting an increase of HBP flow in human colon cancer. All together, our results open the possibility that HBP links hyperglycemia, aberrant glycosylation and tumor malignancy, and suggest this pathway as a potential therapeutic target for colorectal cancer.

  19. Cloning and Heterologous Expression of the Grecocycline Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bilyk, Oksana; Sekurova, Olga N.; Zotchev, Sergey B.; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast is a rapid and inexpensive method for cloning and assembly of large DNA fragments, which relies on natural homologous recombination. Two vectors, based on p15a and F-factor replicons that can be maintained in yeast, E. coli and streptomycetes have been constructed. These vectors have been successfully employed for assembly of the grecocycline biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. Acta 1362. Fragments of the cluster were obtained by PCR and transformed together with the “capture” vector into the yeast cells, yielding a construct carrying the entire gene cluster. The obtained construct was heterologously expressed in S. albus J1074, yielding several grecocycline congeners. Grecocyclines have unique structural moieties such as a dissacharide side chain, an additional amino sugar at the C-5 position and a thiol group. Enzymes from this pathway may be used for the derivatization of known active angucyclines in order to improve their desired biological properties. PMID:27410036

  20. Pictet–Spengler reaction-based biosynthetic machinery in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wei; Ge, Hui Ming; Wang, Gang; Jiang, Nan; Mei, Ya Ning; Jiang, Rong; Li, Sui Jun; Chen, Chao Jun; Jiao, Rui Hua; Xu, Qiang; Ng, Seik Weng; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The Pictet–Spengler (PS) reaction constructs plant alkaloids such as morphine and camptothecin, but it has not yet been noticed in the fungal kingdom. Here, a silent fungal Pictet–Spenglerase (FPS) gene of Chaetomium globosum 1C51 residing in Epinephelus drummondhayi guts is described and ascertained to be activable by 1-methyl-l-tryptophan (1-MT). The activated FPS expression enables the PS reaction between 1-MT and flavipin (fungal aldehyde) to form “unnatural” natural products with unprecedented skeletons, of which chaetoglines B and F are potently antibacterial with the latter inhibiting acetylcholinesterase. A gene-implied enzyme inhibition (GIEI) strategy has been introduced to address the key steps for PS product diversifications. In aggregation, the work designs and validates an innovative approach that can activate the PS reaction-based fungal biosynthetic machinery to produce unpredictable compounds of unusual and novel structure valuable for new biology and biomedicine. PMID:25425666

  1. Discovery of a widely distributed toxin biosynthetic gene cluster

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shaun W.; Mitchell, Douglas A.; Markley, Andrew L.; Hensler, Mary E.; Gonzalez, David; Wohlrab, Aaron; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Nizet, Victor; Dixon, Jack E.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriocins represent a large family of ribosomally produced peptide antibiotics. Here we describe the discovery of a widely conserved biosynthetic gene cluster for the synthesis of thiazole and oxazole heterocycles on ribosomally produced peptides. These clusters encode a toxin precursor and all necessary proteins for toxin maturation and export. Using the toxin precursor peptide and heterocycle-forming synthetase proteins from the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes, we demonstrate the in vitro reconstitution of streptolysin S activity. We provide evidence that the synthetase enzymes, as predicted from our bioinformatics analysis, introduce heterocycles onto precursor peptides, thereby providing molecular insight into the chemical structure of streptolysin S. Furthermore, our studies reveal that the synthetase exhibits relaxed substrate specificity and modifies toxin precursors from both related and distant species. Given our findings, it is likely that the discovery of similar peptidic toxins will rapidly expand to existing and emerging genomes. PMID:18375757

  2. Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis of Insulin Secretory Granule Proteins from Biosynthetically-Labeled Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse-chase radiolabeling of cells with radioactive amino acids is a common method for tracking the biosynthesis of proteins. Radiolabeled newly synthesized proteins can be analyzed by a number of techniques such as two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). This chapter presents a protocol for the biosynthetic labeling of pancreatic islets with (35)S-methionine in the presence of basal and stimulatory concentrations of glucose, followed by subcellular fractionation to produce a secretory granule fraction and analysis of the granule protein contents by 2DE. This provides a means of determining whether or not the biosynthetic rates of the entire granule constituents are coordinately regulated.

  3. 2D Gel Electrophoresis of Insulin Secretory Granule Proteins from Biosynthetically Labelled Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse radiolabelling of cells with radioactive amino acids such is a common method for investigating the biosynthetic rates of proteins. In this way, the abundance of newly synthesized proteins can be determined by several proteomic techniques including 2D gel electrophoresis (2DE). This chapter describes a protocol for labelling pancreatic islets with (35)S-methionine in the presence of low and high concentrations of glucose, followed by subcellular fractionation enrichment of secretory granule proteins and analysis of the granule protein contents by 2DE. This demonstrated that the biosynthetic rates of most of the granule proteins are co-ordinately regulated in the presence of stimulatory glucose concentrations.

  4. Omega-3 fatty acid production from enzyme saccharified hemp hydrolysate using a novel marine thraustochytrid strain.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Adarsha; Abraham, Reinu E; Barrow, Colin J; Puri, Munish

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a newly isolated marine thraustochytrid strain, Schizochytrium sp. DT3, was used for omega-3 fatty acid production by growing on lignocellulose biomass obtained from local hemp hurd (Cannabis sativa) biomass. Prior to enzymatic hydrolysis, hemp was pretreated with sodium hydroxide to open the biomass structure for the production of sugar hydrolysate. The thraustochytrid strain was able to grow on the sugar hydrolysate and accumulated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). At the lowest carbon concentration of 2%, the PUFAs productivity was 71% in glucose and 59% in the sugars hydrolysate, as a percentage of total fatty acids. Saturated fatty acids (SFAs) levels were highest at about 49% of TFA using 6% glucose as the carbon source. SFAs of 41% were produced using 2% of SH. This study demonstrates that SH produced from lignocellulose biomass is a potentially useful carbon source for the production of omega-3 fatty acids in thraustochytrids, as demonstrated using the new strain, Schizochytrium sp. DT3.

  5. Microbial-processing of fruit and vegetable wastes for production of vital enzymes and organic acids: Biotechnology and scopes.

    PubMed

    Panda, Sandeep K; Mishra, Swati S; Kayitesi, Eugenie; Ray, Ramesh C

    2016-04-01

    Wastes generated from fruits and vegetables are organic in nature and contribute a major share in soil and water pollution. Also, green house gas emission caused by fruit and vegetable wastes (FVWs) is a matter of serious environmental concern. This review addresses the developments over the last one decade on microbial processing technologies for production of enzymes and organic acids from FVWs. The advances in genetic engineering for improvement of microbial strains in order to enhance the production of the value added bio-products as well as the concept of zero-waste economy have been briefly discussed.

  6. A catalytic triad is responsible for acid-base chemistry in the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Karsten, William E; Liu, Dali; Rao, G S Jagannatha; Harris, Ben G; Cook, Paul F

    2005-03-08

    The pH dependence of kinetic parameters of several active site mutants of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme was investigated to determine the role of amino acid residues likely involved in catalysis on the basis of three-dimensional structures of malic enzyme. Lysine 199 is positioned to act as the general base that accepts a proton from the 2-hydroxyl of malate during the hydride transfer step. The pH dependence of V/K(malate) for the K199R mutant enzyme reveals a pK of 5.3 for an enzymatic group required to be unprotonated for activity and a second pK of 6.3 that leads to a 10-fold loss in activity above the pK of 6.3 to a new constant value up to pH 10. The V profile for K199R is pH independent from pH 5.5 to pH 10 and decreases below a pK of 4.9. Tyrosine 126 is positioned to act as the general acid that donates a proton to the enolpyruvate intermediate to form pyruvate. The pH dependence of V/K(malate) for the Y126F mutant is qualitatively similar to K199R, with a requirement for a group to be unprotonated for activity with a pK of 5.6 and a partial activity loss of about 3-fold above a pK of 6.7 to a new constant value. The Y126F mutant enzyme is about 60000-fold less active than the wild-type enzyme. In contrast to K199R, the V rate profile for Y126F also shows a partial activity loss above pH 6.6. The wild-type pH profiles were reinvestigated in light of the discovery of the partial activity change for the mutant enzymes. The wild-type V/K(malate) pH-rate profile exhibits the requirement for a group to be unprotonated for catalysis with a pK of 5.6 and also shows the partial activity loss above a pK of 6.4. The wild-type V pH-rate profile decreases below a pK of 5.2 and is pH independent from pH 5.5 to pH 10. Aspartate 294 is within hydrogen-bonding distance to K199 in the open and closed forms of malic enzyme. D294A is about 13000-fold less active than the wild-type enzyme, and the pH-rate profile for V/K(malate) indicates the mutant is only active above p

  7. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors

    PubMed Central

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23–0.99 U mg−1 protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, < 0.03 U mg−1 protein) and butyryl-CoA:acetate-CoA transferase (But, 3.24–7.64 U mg−1 protein), were determined in cell free extracts of biogas reactor content from three different biogas reactors. Furthermore, the detection of Ack was successful via Western blot analysis. Quantification of corresponding functional genes encoding Buk (buk) and But (but) was not feasible, although an amplification was possible. Thus, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on respective gene fragments. Four new clades of possible butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH3 and NH4+-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH3 and NH4+-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities. PMID:26086956

  8. Regulation of adipose branched chain amino acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated blood branched chain amino acids (BCAA) are often associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. One possibility is that under these conditions there is a reduced cellular utilization and/or lower complete oxidation of BCAAs. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a...

  9. Recombinant Trichoderma harzianum endoglucanase I (Cel7B) is a highly acidic and promiscuous carbohydrate-active enzyme.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Vanessa O A; Serpa, Viviane Isabel; Godoy, Andre S; Camilo, Cesar M; Bernardes, Amanda; Rezende, Camila A; Junior, Nei Pereira; Franco Cairo, João Paulo L; Squina, Fabio M; Polikarpov, Igor

    2015-11-01

    Trichoderma filamentous fungi have been investigated due to their ability to secrete cellulases which find various biotechnological applications such as biomass hydrolysis and cellulosic ethanol production. Previous studies demonstrated that Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 has a high degree of cellulolytic activity and potential for biomass hydrolysis. However, enzymatic, biochemical, and structural studies of cellulases from T. harzianum are scarce. This work reports biochemical characterization of the recombinant endoglucanase I from T. harzianum, ThCel7B, and its catalytic core domain. The constructs display optimum activity at 55 °C and a surprisingly acidic pH optimum of 3.0. The full-length enzyme is able to hydrolyze a variety of substrates, with high specific activity: 75 U/mg for β-glucan, 46 U/mg toward xyloglucan, 39 U/mg for lichenan, 26 U/mg for carboxymethyl cellulose, 18 U/mg for 4-nitrophenyl β-D-cellobioside, 16 U/mg for rye arabinoxylan, and 12 U/mg toward xylan. The enzyme also hydrolyzed filter paper, phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, Sigmacell 20, Avicel PH-101, and cellulose, albeit with lower efficiency. The ThCel7B catalytic domain displays similar substrate diversity. Fluorescence-based thermal shift assays showed that thermal stability is highest at pH 5.0. We determined kinetic parameters and analyzed a pattern of oligosaccharide substrates hydrolysis, revealing cellobiose as a final product of C6 degradation. Finally, we visualized effects of ThCel7B on oat spelt using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrating the morphological changes of the substrate during the hydrolysis. The acidic behavior of ThCel7B and its considerable thermostability hold a promise of its industrial applications and other biotechnological uses under extremely acidic conditions.

  10. Enzyme toolbox: novel enantiocomplementary imine reductases.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Philipp N; Fademrecht, Silvia; Hofelzer, Sebastian; Pleiss, Jürgen; Leipold, Friedemann; Turner, Nicholas J; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard

    2014-10-13

    Reducing reactions are among the most useful transformations for the generation of chiral compounds in the fine-chemical industry. Because of their exquisite selectivities, enzymatic approaches have emerged as the method of choice for the reduction of C=O and activated C=C bonds. However, stereoselective enzymatic reduction of C=N bonds is still in its infancy-it was only recently described after the discovery of enzymes capable of imine reduction. In our work, we increased the spectrum of imine-reducing enzymes by database analysis. By combining the currently available knowledge about the function of imine reductases with the experimentally uncharacterized diversity stored in protein sequence databases, three novel imine reductases with complementary enantiopreference were identified along with amino acids important for catalysis. Furthermore, their reducing capability was demonstrated by the reduction of the pharmaceutically relevant prochiral imine 2-methylpyrroline. These novel enzymes exhibited comparable to higher catalytic efficiencies than previously described enzymes, and their biosynthetic potential is highlighted by the full conversion of 2-methylpyrroline in whole cells with excellent selectivities.

  11. Purification and characterization of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase, an enzyme in the inducible quinic acid catabolic pathway of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Strøman, P; Reinert, W R; Giles, N H

    1978-07-10

    3-Dehydroshikimate dehydratase catalyzes the third reaction in the inducible quinic acid catabolic pathway of Neurospora crassa and is encoded in the qa-4 gene of the qa gene cluster. As part of continuing genetic and biochemical studies concerning the organization and regulation of this gene cluster, 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase has been purified and characterized biochemically. The enzyme was purified 1650-fold using the following techniques: 1) (NH4)2SO4 fractionation; 2) ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose; 3) gel filtration on Sephadex G-100; 4) ion exchange chromatography on Cellex QAE (quaternary aminoethyl); and 5) hydroxylapatite chromatography. 3-Dehydroshikimate dehydratase is a monomer with a molecular weight of about 37,000 and a sedimentation coefficient of 3.27 S. It has a Km value of 5.9 X 10(-4) and an average isoelectric point of 4.92. The purified enzyme is extremely sensitive to thermal denaturation but can be significantly stabilized by Mg2+ ions. The purified enzyme also exhibits maximal catalytic activity only when assayed in the presence of certain divalent cations, e.g. magnesium. The NH2-terminal residue of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase is proline, and its alpha-amino group is unblocked.

  12. Biocatalyzed approach for the surface functionalization of poly(L-lactic acid) films using hydrolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pellis, Alessandro; Acero, Enrique Herrero; Weber, Hansjoerg; Obersriebnig, Michael; Breinbauer, Rolf; Srebotnik, Ewald; Guebitz, Georg M

    2015-09-01

    Poly(lactic acid) as a biodegradable thermoplastic polyester has received increasing attention. This renewable polyester has found applications in a wide range of products such as food packaging, textiles and biomedical devices. Its major drawbacks are poor toughness, slow degradation rate and lack of reactive side-chain groups. An enzymatic process for the grafting of carboxylic acids onto the surface of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) films was developed using Candida antarctica lipase B as a catalyst. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the PLLA film using Humicola insolens cutinase in order to increase the number of hydroxyl and carboxylic groups on the outer polymer chains for grafting was also assessed and showed a change of water contact angle from 74.6 to 33.1° while the roughness and waviness were an order of magnitude higher in comparison to the blank. Surface functionalization was demonstrated using two different techniques, (14) C-radiochemical analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using (14) C-butyric acid sodium salt and 4,4,4-trifluorobutyric acid as model molecules, respectively. XPS analysis showed that 4,4,4-trifluorobutyric acid was enzymatically coupled based on an increase of the fluor content from 0.19 to 0.40%. The presented (14) C-radiochemical analyses are consistent with the XPS data indicating the potential of enzymatic functionalization in different reaction conditions.

  13. Genes and enzymes of ectoine biosynthesis in halotolerant methanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Reshetnikov, Alexander S; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Mustakhimov, Ildar I; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2011-01-01

    Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidine carboxylic acid) is a widely distributed compatible solute accumulated by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms to prevent osmotic stress in highly saline environments. Ectoine as a highly water keeping compound stabilizing biomolecules and whole cells can be used in scientific work, cosmetics, and medicine. Detailed understanding of the organization/regulation of the ectoine biosynthetic pathway in various producers is an active area of research. Here we review current knowledge on some genetic and enzymatic aspects of ectoine biosynthesis in halophilic and halotolerant methanotrophs. By using PCR methodology, the genes coding for the specific enzymes of ectoine biosynthesis, diaminobutyric acid (DABA) aminotransferase (EctB), DABA acetyltransferase (EctA), and ectoine synthase (EctC), were identified in several methanotrophic species. Organization of these genes in either ectABC or ectABC-ask operons, the latter additionally encoding aspartate kinase isozyme (Ask), correlated well with methanotroph halotolerance and intracellular ectoine level. A new gene, ectR1 encoding the MarR-like transcriptional regulatory protein EctR1, negatively controlling transcription of ectoine biosynthetic genes was found upstream of ectABC-ask operon in Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z. The ectR-like genes were also found in halotolerant methanol utilizers Methylophaga alcalica and Methylophaga thalassica as well as in several genomes of nonmethylotrophic species. The His(6)-tagged DABA acetyltransferases from Mm. alcaliphilum, M. alcalica, and M. thalassica were purified and the enzyme properties were found to correlate with the ecophysiologies of these bacteria. All these discoveries should be very helpful for better understanding the biosynthetic mechanism of this important natural compound, and for the targeted metabolic engineering of its producers.

  14. Enzyme overexpression – an exercise toward understanding regulation of heparan sulfate biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jianping; Song, Tianyi; Lindahl, Ulf; Li, Jin-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Biosynthesis of heparan sulfate (HS) involves conversion of D-glucuronic acid (GlcA) to L-iduronic acid (IdoA) units catalyzed by glucuronyl C5-epimerase (Hsepi). IdoA units are the favored substrate for 2-O-sulfotransferase (2OST). We used HEK293 cells as a model to investigate the effects of overexpression of these enzymes on HS structure. Overexpression of Hsepi alone resulted in an unexpected increase in HS chain length. A Hsepi point-mutant (Y168A), devoid of catalytic activity, failed to affect chain length. Moreover, the effect of Hsepi overexpression on HS chain length was abolished by simultaneous overexpression of 2OST. These findings raise novel aspects on regulation of HS biosynthesis. We propose a hypothetical enzyme-binding protein (EBP) with distinct, specific and partly overlapping binding sites, the interactions of which will determine levels of enzymes available to the biosynthetic process. PMID:27511124

  15. Complete Biosynthetic Pathway of the C50 Carotenoid Bacterioruberin from Lycopene in the Extremely Halophilic Archaeon Haloarcula japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Ando, Ai; Miyoko, Nobuhiro; Fukui, Toshiaki; Takaichi, Shinichi; Nakamura, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Haloarcula japonica, an extremely halophilic archaeon that requires high concentrations of NaCl for growth, accumulates the C50 carotenoid bacterioruberin (BR). By homology analysis, a gene cluster, including c0507, c0506, and c0505, was found and predicted to be involved in the synthesis of bacterioruberin. To elucidate the function of the encoded enzymes, we constructed Ha. japonica mutants of these genes and analyzed carotenoids produced by the mutants. Our research showed that c0507, c0506, and c0505 encoded a carotenoid 3,4-desaturase (CrtD), a bifunctional lycopene elongase and 1,2-hydratase (LyeJ), and a C50 carotenoid 2″,3″-hydratase (CruF), respectively. The above three carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes catalyze the reactions that convert lycopene to bacterioruberin in Ha. japonica. This is the first identification of functional CrtD and CruF in archaea and elucidation of the complete biosynthetic pathway of bacterioruberin from lycopene. IMPORTANCE Haloarcula japonica, an extremely halophilic archaeon, accumulates the C50 carotenoid bacterioruberin (BR). In this study, we have identified three BR biosynthetic enzymes and have elucidated their functions. Among them, two enzymes were found in an archaeon for the first time. Our results revealed the biosynthetic pathway responsible for production of BR in Ha. japonica and provide a basis for investigating carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in other extremely halophilic archaea. Elucidation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in Ha. japonica may also prove useful for producing the C50 carotenoid BR efficiently by employing genetically modified haloarchaeal strains. PMID:25712483

  16. Mandelic acid chiral separation utilizing a two-phase partitioning bioreactor built by polysulfone microspheres and immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyu; Cui, Yanjun; Chen, Xia; Zhu, Hao; Zhu, Weiwei; Li, Yanfeng

    2015-03-01

    A novel two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) modified by polysulfone (PSF) microspheres and immobilized enzyme (novozym-435) was formed, and the resulting TPPB was applied into mandelic acid chiral separation. The PSF microspheres containing n-hexanol (named PSF/hexanol microspheres) was prepared by using the phase inversion method, which was used as the organic phase. Meanwhile, the immobilized enzyme novozym-435 was used as a biocatalyst. The water phase was composed of the phosphate buffer solution (PBS). (R, S)-Methyl mandelate was selected as the substrate to study enzymatic properties. Different reaction factors have been researched, such as pH, reaction time, temperature and the quantity of biocatalyst and PSF/hexanol microspheres added in. Finally, (S)-mandelic acid was obtained with an 80 % optical purity after 24 h in the two-phase partitioning bioreactor. The enantiomeric excess (eep) values were very low in the water phase, in which the highest eep value was only 46 %. The eep of the two-phase partitioning bioreactor had been enhanced more obviously than that catalyzed in the water phase.

  17. An Open and Shut Case: The Interaction of Magnesium with MST Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The shikimate pathway of bacteria, fungi, and plants generates chorismate, which is drawn into biosynthetic pathways that form aromatic amino acids and other important metabolites, including folates, menaquinone, and siderophores. Many of the pathways initiated at this branch point transform chorismate using an MST enzyme. The MST enzymes (menaquinone, siderophore, and tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes) are structurally homologous and magnesium-dependent, and all perform similar chemical permutations to chorismate by nucleophilic addition (hydroxyl or amine) at the 2-position of the ring, inducing displacement of the 4-hydroxyl. The isomerase enzymes release isochorismate or aminodeoxychorismate as the product, while the synthase enzymes also have lyase activity that displaces pyruvate to form either salicylate or anthranilate. This has led to the hypothesis that the isomerase and lyase activities performed by the MST enzymes are functionally conserved. Here we have developed tailored pre-steady-state approaches to establish the kinetic mechanisms of the isochorismate and salicylate synthase enzymes of siderophore biosynthesis. Our data are centered on the role of magnesium ions, which inhibit the isochorismate synthase enzymes but not the salicylate synthase enzymes. Prior structural data have suggested that binding of the metal ion occludes access or egress of substrates. Our kinetic data indicate that for the production of isochorismate, a high magnesium ion concentration suppresses the rate of release of product, accounting for the observed inhibition and establishing the basis of the ordered-addition kinetic mechanism. Moreover, we show that isochorismate is channeled through the synthase reaction as an intermediate that is retained in the active site by the magnesium ion. Indeed, the lyase-active enzyme has 3 orders of magnitude higher affinity for the isochorismate complex relative to the chorismate complex. Apparent negative-feedback inhibition by ferrous

  18. The Catalytic Scaffold fo the Haloalkanoic Acid Dehalogenase Enzyme Superfamily Acts as a Mold for the Trigonal Bipyramidal Transition State

    SciTech Connect

    Lu,Z.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Allen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of new catalytic activities and specificities within an enzyme superfamily requires the exploration of sequence space for adaptation to a new substrate with retention of those elements required to stabilize key intermediates/transition states. Here, we propose that core residues in the large enzyme family, the haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase enzyme superfamily (HADSF) form a 'mold' in which the trigonal bipyramidal transition states formed during phosphoryl transfer are stabilized by electrostatic forces. The vanadate complex of the hexose phosphate phosphatase BT4131 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 (HPP) determined at 1.00 Angstroms resolution via X-ray crystallography assumes a trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry with the nucleophilic Asp-8 and one oxygen ligand at the apical position. Remarkably, the tungstate in the complex determined to 1.03 Angstroms resolution assumes the same coordination geometry. The contribution of the general acid/base residue Asp-10 in the stabilization of the trigonal bipyramidal species via hydrogen-bond formation with the apical oxygen atom is evidenced by the 1.52 Angstroms structure of the D10A mutant bound to vanadate. This structure shows a collapse of the trigonal bipyramidal geometry with displacement of the water molecule formerly occupying the apical position. Furthermore, the 1.07 Angstroms resolution structure of the D10A mutant complexed with tungstate shows the tungstate to be in a typical 'phosphate-like' tetrahedral configuration. The analysis of 12 liganded HADSF structures deposited in the protein data bank (PDB) identified stringently conserved elements that stabilize the trigonal bipyramidal transition states by engaging in favorable electrostatic interactions with the axial and equatorial atoms of the transferring phosphoryl group.

  19. Evolution of the Sterol Biosynthetic Pathway of Pythium insidiosum and Related Oomycetes Contributes to Antifungal Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Sangcakul, Areeporn; Lohnoo, Tassanee; Yingyong, Wanta; Rujirawat, Thidarat; Krajaejun, Theerapong

    2017-04-01

    Pythiosis is a life-threatening infectious disease caused by the oomycete Pythium insidiosum Direct exposure to Py. insidiosum zoospores can initiate infections of the eye, limb, gastrointestinal tract, or skin/subcutaneous tissue. Treatments for pythiosis have mostly relied on surgery. Antifungal drugs are generally ineffective against Py. insidiosum However, one patient with an invasive Py. insidiosum infection recovered completely following treatment with terbinafine and itraconazole. Additionally, the drug target sterol biosynthetic enzymes have been identified in the oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches It remains an open question whether Py. insidiosum is susceptible to the antifungal drugs and harbors any of the known drug target enzymes. Here, we determined the in vitro susceptibilities of terbinafine and itraconazole against 30 isolates of Py. insidiosum We also analyzed endogenous sterols and searched for genes encoding the sterol biosynthetic enzymes in the genomes of Py. insidiosum and related oomycetes. The susceptibility assay showed that the growth of each of the Py. insidiosum isolates was inhibited by the antifungal agents, but only at difficult-to-achieve concentrations, which explains the clinical resistance of the drugs in the treatment of pythiosis patients. Genome searches of Py. insidiosum and related oomycetes demonstrated that these organisms contained an incomplete set of sterol biosynthetic enzymes. Gas chromatographic mass spectrometry did not detect any sterol end products in Py. insidiosum In conclusion, Py. insidiosum possesses an incomplete sterol biosynthetic pathway. Resistance to antifungal drugs targeting enzymes in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway in Py. insidiosum was due to modifications or losses of some of the genes encoding the drug target enzymes.

  20. Complete amino acid sequence of an acidic, cardiotoxic phospholipase A2 from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King Cobra): a novel cobra venom enzyme with "pancreatic loop".

    PubMed

    Huang, M Z; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Chung, M C; Kini, R M

    1997-02-15

    A phospholipase A2 (OHV A-PLA2) from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra) is an acidic protein exhibiting cardiotoxicity, myotoxicity, and antiplatelet activity. The complete amino acid sequence of OHV A-PLA2 has been determined using a combination of Edman degradation and mass spectrometric techniques. OHV A-PLA2 is composed of a single chain of 124 amino acid residues with 14 cysteines and a calculated molecular weight of 13719 Da. It contains the loop of residues (62-66) found in pancreatic PLA2s and hence belongs to class IB enzymes. This pancreatic loop is between two proline residues (Pro 59 and Pro 68) and contains several hydrophilic amino acids (Ser and Asp). This region has high degree of conformational flexibility and is on the surface of the molecule, and hence it may be a potential protein-protein interaction site. A relatively low sequence homology is found between OHV A-PLA2 and other known cardiotoxic PLA2s, and hence a contiguous segment could not be identified as a site responsible for the cardiotoxic activity.

  1. Characterization of arachidonic acid metabolism by rat cytochrome P450 enzymes: the involvement of CYP1As.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbeni, Ahmed A; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2014-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes mediate arachidonic acid (AA) oxidation to several biologically active metabolites. Our aims in this study were to characterize AA metabolism by different recombinant rat P450 enzymes and to identify new targets for modulating P450-AA metabolism in vivo. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the simultaneous measurements of AA and 15 of its P450 metabolites. CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B1, CYP2C6, and CYP2C11 were found to metabolize AA with high catalytic activity, and CYP2A1, CYP2C13, CYP2D1, CYP2E1, and CYP3A1 had lower activity. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 produced ω-1→4 hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) as 88.7 and 62.7%, respectively, of the total metabolites formed. CYP2C11 produced epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) as 61.3%, and CYP2C6 produced midchain HETEs and EETs as 48.3 and 29.4%, respectively, of the total metabolites formed. The formation of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2C6, and CYP2C11 major metabolites followed an atypical kinetic profile of substrate inhibition. CYP1As inhibition by α-naphthoflavone or anti-CYP1As antibodies significantly reduced ω-1→4 HETE formation in the lungs and liver, whereas CYP1As induction by 3-methylcholanthrene resulted in a significant increase in ω-1→4 HETEs formation in the heart, lungs, kidney, and livers by 370, 646, 532, and 848%, respectively. In conclusion, our results suggest that CYP1As and CYP2Cs are major players in the metabolism of AA. The significant contribution of CYP1As to AA metabolism and their strong inducibility suggest their possible use as targets for the prevention and treatment of several diseases.

  2. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolate from Markisa fruit (Passiflora sp.) as a producer of protease enzyme and probiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Habibi

    2017-03-01

    16S rRNA gene analysis of bacteria lactic acid (LAB) isolate from Markisa Kuning Fruit (Passiflora edulis var. flavicarpa) as a producer of protease enzyme and probiotics has been done. The aim of the study is to determine the protease enzyme activity and 16S rRNA gene amplification using PCR. The calculation procedure was done to M4 isolate bacteria lactic acid (LAB) Isolate which has been resistant to acids with pH 2.0 in the manner of screening protease enzyme activity test result 6.5 to clear zone is 13 mm againts colony diametre is 2 mm. The results of study enzyme activity used spectrophotometer UV-Vis obtainable the regression equation Y=0.02983+0.001312X, with levels of protein M4 isolate is 0.6594 mg/mL and enzyme activity of obtainable is 0.8626 unit/ml while the spesific enzyme activity produced is 1.308 unit/mg. Then, 16S rRNA gene amplificatiom and DNA sequencing has been done. The results of study showed that the bacteria species contained from M4 bacteria lactic acid (LAB) isolate is Weisella cibiria strain II-I-59. Weisella cibiria strain II-I-59 is one of bacteria could be utilized in the digestive tract.

  3. Asymmetric Total Syntheses of (+)- and (−)-Versicolamide B and Biosynthetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kenneth A.; Tsukamoto, Sachiko; Williams, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is one of the most well-studied, synthetically useful organic transformations. While a significant number of naturally occurring substances are postulated to arise by biosynthetic Diels-Alder reactions, rigorous confirmation of a mechanistically distinct natural Diels-Alderase enzyme remains elusive. Within this context, several related fungi within the Aspergillus genus produce a number of metabolites of opposite absolute configuration including (+)- or (−)-versicolamide B. These alkaloids are hypothesized to arise via biosynthetic Diels-Alder reactions implying that each Aspergillus species possesses enantiomerically distinct Diels-Alderases. Herein, experimental validation of these biosynthetic proposals via deployment of the IMDA reaction as a key step in the asymmetric total syntheses of (+)- and (−)-versicolamide B is described. Laboratory validation of the proposed biosynthetic Diels-Alder construction, coupled with the secondary metabolite profile of the producing fungi, reveals that each Aspergillus species has evolved enantiomerically distinct indole oxidases, as well as enantiomerically distinct Diels-Alderases. PMID:20300443

  4. Biosynthetic Genes for the Tetrodecamycin Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Gverzdys, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently described 13-deoxytetrodecamycin, a new member of the tetrodecamycin family of antibiotics. A defining feature of these molecules is the presence of a five-membered lactone called a tetronate ring. By sequencing the genome of a producer strain, Streptomyces sp. strain WAC04657, and searching for a gene previously implicated in tetronate ring formation, we identified the biosynthetic genes responsible for producing 13-deoxytetrodecamycin (the ted genes). Using the ted cluster in WAC04657 as a reference, we found related clusters in three other organisms: Streptomyces atroolivaceus ATCC 19725, Streptomyces globisporus NRRL B-2293, and Streptomyces sp. strain LaPpAH-202. Comparing the four clusters allowed us to identify the cluster boundaries. Genetic manipulation of the cluster confirmed the involvement of the ted genes in 13-deoxytetrodecamycin biosynthesis and revealed several additional molecules produced through the ted biosynthetic pathway, including tetrodecamycin, dihydrotetrodecamycin, and another, W5.9, a novel molecule. Comparison of the bioactivities of these four molecules suggests that they may act through the covalent modification of their target(s). IMPORTANCE The tetrodecamycins are a distinct subgroup of the tetronate family of secondary metabolites. Little is known about their biosynthesis or mechanisms of action, making them an attractive subject for investigation. In this paper we present the biosynthetic gene cluster for 13-deoxytetrodecamycin in Streptomyces sp. strain WAC04657. We identify related clusters in several other organisms and show that they produce related molecules. PMID:27137499

  5. Biosynthetic route towards saxitoxin and shunt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Shigeki; Cho, Yuko; Konoki, Keiichi; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Oshima, Yasukatsu; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Saxitoxin, the most potent voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, is one of the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) produced by cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates. Recently, putative biosynthetic genes of PSTs were reported in these microorganisms. We previously synthesized genetically predicted biosynthetic intermediates, Int-A’ and Int-C’2, and also Cyclic-C’ which was not predicted based on gene, and identified them all in the toxin-producing cyanobacterium Anabaena circinalis (TA04) and the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense (Axat-2). This study examined the incorporation of 15N-labeled intermediates into PSTs (C1 and C2) in A. circinalis (TA04). Conversions from Int-A’ to Int-C’2, from Int-C’2 to Cyclic-C’, and from Int-A’ and Int-C’2 to C1 and C2 were indicated using high resolution-LC/MS. However, Cyclic-C’ was not converted to C1 and C2 and was detected primarily in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that Int-A’ and Int-C’2 are genuine precursors of PSTs, but Int-C’2 converts partially to Cyclic-C’ which is a shunt product excreted to outside the cells. This paper provides the first direct demonstration of the biosynthetic route towards saxitoxin and a shunt pathway. PMID:26842222

  6. Cell organelles from crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) plants : I. Enzymes in isolated peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Herbert, M; Burkhard, C; Schnarrenberger, C

    1978-01-01

    Cell organelles were isolated from the CAM plants Crassula lycopodioides Lam., Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Sedum rubrotinctum R.T. Clausen by isopycnic centrifugation in sucrose gradients. The inclusion of 2.5% Ficoll in the grinding medium proved to be essential for a satisfactory separation of cell organelles during the subsequent centrifugation. Peroxisomes, mitochondria, and whole and broken chloroplasts were at least partially resolved as judged by marker-enzyme-activity profiles. The isolated peroxisomes contained activities of glycollate oxidase, catalase, hydroxypyruvate reductase, glycine aminotransferase, serine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase, comparable to activities found in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf peroxisomes. In contrast to spinach, however, only little, if any, particulate malate dehydrogenase activity could be attributed to isolated peroxisomes of the three CAM plants.

  7. Oligonucleotide-modified screen-printed gold electrodes for enzyme-amplified sensing of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Carpini, Guido; Lucarelli, Fausto; Marrazza, Giovanna; Mascini, Marco

    2004-09-15

    An electrochemical genosensor for the detection of specific sequences of DNA has been developed using disposable screen-printed gold electrodes. Screen-printed gold electrodes were firstly modified with a mixed monolayer of a 25-mer thiol-tethered DNA probe and a spacer thiol, 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH). The DNA probe sequence was internal to the sequence of the 35S promoter, which sequence is inserted in the genome of GMOs regulating the transgene expression. An enzyme-amplified detection scheme, based on the coupling of a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate and biotinylated target sequences was then applied. The enzyme catalysed the hydrolysis of the electroinactive alpha-naphthyl phosphate to alpha-naphthol; this product is electroactive and has been detected by means of differential pulse voltammetry. The assay was, firstly, characterised using synthetic oligonucleotides. Relevant parameters, such as the probe concentration and the immobilisation time, the use of the MCH and different enzymatic conjugates, were investigated and optimised. The genosensor response was found to be linearly related to the target concentration between 0 and 25 nmol/L; the detection limit was 0.25 nmol/L. The analytical procedure was then applied for the detection of the 35S promoter sequence, which was amplified from the pBI121 plasmid by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Hybridisation conditions (i.e., hybridisation buffer and hybridisation time) were further optimised. The selectivity of the assay was confirmed using biotinylated non-complementary amplicons and PCR blanks. The results showed that the genosensor enabled sensitive (detection limit: 1 nmol/L) and specific detection of GMO-related sequences, thus providing a useful tool for the screening analysis of bioengineered food samples.

  8. Annotating Enzymes of Uncertain Function: The Deacylation of d-Amino Acids by Members of the Amidohydrolase Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.; Fedorov, A; Xu, C; Brown, S; Fedorov, E; Babbitt, P; Almo, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic activities of three members of the amidohydrolase superfamily were discovered using amino acid substrate libraries. Bb3285 from Bordetella bronchiseptica, Gox1177 from Gluconobacter oxidans, and Sco4986 from Streptomyces coelicolor are currently annotated as d-aminoacylases or N-acetyl-d-glutamate deacetylases. These three enzymes are 22-34% identical to one another in amino acid sequence. Substrate libraries containing nearly all combinations of N-formyl-d-Xaa, N-acetyl-d-Xaa, N-succinyl-d-Xaa, and l-Xaa-d-Xaa were used to establish the substrate profiles for these enzymes. It was demonstrated that Bb3285 is restricted to the hydrolysis of N-acyl-substituted derivatives of d-glutamate. The best substrates for this enzyme are N-formyl-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 5.8 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}), N-acetyl-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 5.2 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}), and l-methionine-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 3.4 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). Gox1177 and Sco4986 preferentially hydrolyze N-acyl-substituted derivatives of hydrophobic d-amino acids. The best substrates for Gox1177 are N-acetyl-d-leucine (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 3.2 x 104 M{sup -1} s-1), N-acetyl-d-tryptophan (kcat/Km = 4.1 x 104 M-1 s-1), and l-tyrosine-d-leucine (kcat/Km = 1.5 x 104 M-1 s-1). A fourth protein, Bb2785 from B. bronchiseptica, did not have d-aminoacylase activity. The best substrates for Sco4986 are N-acetyl-d-phenylalanine and N-acetyl-d-tryptophan. The three-dimensional structures of Bb3285 in the presence of the product acetate or a potent mimic of the tetrahedral intermediate were determined by X-ray diffraction methods. The side chain of the d-glutamate moiety of the inhibitor is ion-paired to Arg-295, while the {alpha}-carboxylate is ion-paired with Lys-250 and Arg-376. These results have revealed the chemical and structural determinants for substrate specificity in this protein. Bioinformatic analyses of an additional {approx}250

  9. Synthesis of 2-monoacylglycerols and structured triacylglycerols rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids by enzyme catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alicia; Esteban, Luis; Martín, Lorena; Jiménez, María José; Hita, Estrella; Castillo, Beatriz; González, Pedro A; Robles, Alfonso

    2012-08-10

    This paper studies the synthesis of structured triacylglycerols (STAGs) by a four-step process: (i) obtaining 2-monoacylglycerols (2-MAGs) by alcoholysis of cod liver oil with several alcohols, catalyzed by lipases Novozym 435, from Candida antartica and DF, from Rhizopus oryzae, (ii) purification of 2-MAGs, (iii) formation of STAGs by esterification of 2-MAGs with caprylic acid catalyzed by lipase DF, from R. oryzae, and (iv) purification of these STAGs. For the alcoholysis of cod liver oil, absolute ethanol, ethanol 96% (v/v) and 1-butanol were compared; the conditions with ethanol 96% were then optimized and 2-MAG yields of around 54-57% were attained using Novozym 435. In these 2-MAGs, DHA accounted for 24-31% of total fatty acids. In the operational conditions this lipase maintained a stable level of activity over at least 11 uses. These results were compared with those obtained with lipase DF, which deactivated after only three uses. The alcoholysis of cod liver oil and ethanol 96% catalyzed by Novozym 435 was scaled up by multiplying the reactant amounts 100-fold and maintaining the intensity of treatment constant (IOT=3g lipase h/g oil). In these conditions, the 2-MAG yield attained was about 67%; these 2-MAGs contained 36.6% DHA. The synthesized 2-MAGs were separated and purified from the alcoholysis reaction products by solvent extraction using solvents of low toxicity (ethanol and hexane); 2-MAG recovery yield and purity of the target product were approximately 96.4% and 83.9%, respectively. These 2-MAGs were transformed to STAGs using the optimal conditions obtained in a previous work. After synthesis and purification, 93% pure STAGs were obtained, containing 38% DHA at sn-2 position and 60% caprylic acid (CA) at sn-1,3 positions (of total fatty acids at these positions), i.e. the major TAG is the STAG with the structure CA-DHA-CA.

  10. Impact of pretreatment with dilute sulfuric acid under moderate temperature on hydrolysis of corn stover with two enzyme systems.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chao; Keshwani, Deepak

    2014-03-01

    Pretreatment of corn stover with dilute sulfuric acid at moderate temperature was investigated, and glucan digestibility by Cellic CTec2 and Celluclast on the pretreated biomass was compared. Pretreatments were carried out from 60 to 180 min at the temperature from 105 to 135 °C, with acid concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 2% (w/v). Significant portion of xylan was removed during pretreatment, and the glucan digestibility by CTec2 was significantly better than that by Celluclast in all cases. Analysis showed that glucan digestibility by both two enzymes correlated directly with the extent of xylan removal in pretreatment. Confidence interval was built to give a more precise range of glucan conversion and to test the significant difference among pretreatment conditions. Response surface model was built to obtain the optimal pretreatment condition to achieve high glucan conversion after enzymatic hydrolysis. Considering the cost and energy savings, the optimal pretreatment condition of 1.75% acid for 160 min at 135 °C was determined, and glucan conversion can achieve the range from 72.86 to 76.69% at 95% confidence level after enzymatic hydrolysis, making total glucan recovery up to the range from 89.42 to 93.25%.

  11. Effect of Dietary ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid DHA on Glycolytic Enzymes and Warburg Phenotypes in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manzi, Laura; Costantini, Lara; Molinari, Romina; Merendino, Nicolò

    2015-01-01

    The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) are a class of lipids that has been shown to have beneficial effects on some chronic degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory disorders, diabetes, and cancer. Among ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has received particular attention for its antiproliferative, proapoptotic, antiangiogenetic, anti-invasion, and antimetastatic properties, even though the involved molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Recently, some in vitro studies showed that DHA promotes the inhibition of glycolytic enzymes and the Warburg phenotype. For example, it was shown that in breast cancer cell lines the modulation of bioenergetic functions is due to the capacity of DHA to activate the AMPK signalling and negatively regulate the HIF-1α functions. Taking into account these considerations, this review is focused on current knowledge concerning the role of DHA in interfering with cancer cell metabolism; this could be considered a further mechanism by which DHA inhibits cancer cell survival and progression. PMID:26339588

  12. Effect of Dietary ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid DHA on Glycolytic Enzymes and Warburg Phenotypes in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Laura; Costantini, Lara; Molinari, Romina; Merendino, Nicolò

    2015-01-01

    The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) are a class of lipids that has been shown to have beneficial effects on some chronic degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory disorders, diabetes, and cancer. Among ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has received particular attention for its antiproliferative, proapoptotic, antiangiogenetic, anti-invasion, and antimetastatic properties, even though the involved molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Recently, some in vitro studies showed that DHA promotes the inhibition of glycolytic enzymes and the Warburg phenotype. For example, it was shown that in breast cancer cell lines the modulation of bioenergetic functions is due to the capacity of DHA to activate the AMPK signalling and negatively regulate the HIF-1α functions. Taking into account these considerations, this review is focused on current knowledge concerning the role of DHA in interfering with cancer cell metabolism; this could be considered a further mechanism by which DHA inhibits cancer cell survival and progression.

  13. Codominant autosomal inheritance of polymorphic red cell acid phosphates of lemurs and some properties of the enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mason, G A; Buettner-Janusch, J

    1977-06-01

    Red cell acid phosphatase phenotypes of 207 captive animals of the genera Lemur, Hapalemur, and Prophithecus were determined by starch gel electrophoresis and phosphatase-specific staining. In Lemur fulvus, three phenotypes, designated A, B, and AB, were observed. In each of the species L. catta, L. macaco, L. mongoz, and L. variegatus, a single phenotype was observed, In Hapalemur griseus, three phenotypes were found: A,B, and AB. In Propithecus verreauxi, a single phenotype was found. Examination of breeding records in conjunction with the results of the electrophoretic analyses supports the conclusion that the erythrocytic acid phosphatases in this group of nonhuman primates are the products of at least two codominant autosomal alleles. There is a wide range of specific activities of the acid phosphatases as determined by colorimetric assays. The values range from 60.6 micronmoles of p-nitrophenol released per gram of hemoglobin per 30 min in Lemur catta to 429.1 micronmoles in Propithecus verreauxi. The enzymes of L. fulvus and P. vereauxi were purified approximately 400-fold, and Michaelis-Menten constants were determined on the purified preparations. For L. fulvus phenotype A, Km = 0.8 mM; for L. fulvus phenotype B, Km = 0.8 mM; and for P. verreauxi, Km = 0.6 mM; the substrate in each case was p-nitrophenylphosphate.

  14. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase: The application of a plant secondary metabolite enzyme in biocatalytic chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kerstin; Schmid, Andreas; Julsing, Mattijs K

    2016-09-10

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase (THCAS) from the secondary metabolism of Cannabis sativa L. catalyzes the oxidative formation of an intramolecular CC bond in cannabigerolic acid (CBGA) to synthesize Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), which is the direct precursor of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC). Aiming on a biotechnological production of cannabinoids, we investigated the potential of the heterologously produced plant oxidase in a cell-free system on preparative scale. THCAS was characterized in an aqueous/organic two-liquid phase setup in order to solubilize the hydrophobic substrate and to allow in situ product removal. Compared to the single phase aqueou